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Sample records for gene mutation analysis

  1. Mutation analysis of the gene involved in adrenoleukodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Oost, B.A. van; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Kemp, S.; Bolhuis, P.A.

    1994-09-01

    A gene responsible for the X-linked genetic disorder adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) that is characterized by demyelination of the nervous system and adrenocortical insufficiency has been identified by positional cloning. The gene encodes an ATP-binding transporter which is located in the peroxisomal membrane. Deficiency of the gene leads to accumulation of unsaturated very long chain fatty acids due to impaired peroxisomal {beta}-oxidation. A systematic analysis of the open reading frame of the ALD gene unraveled the mutations in 28 different families using reverse transcriptase-PCR followed by direct sequencing. No entire gene deletions or drastic promoter mutations have been detected. Only in one family did the mutation involved multiple exons. The remaining mutations were subtle alterations leading to missense (about 50%) or nonsense mutations, frameshifts or splice acceptor site defects. In one patient a single codon was missing. Mutations affecting a single amino acid were concentrated in the region between the third and fourth putative membrane spanning fragments and in the ATP-binding domain. This overview of mutations aids in the determination of structural and functional important regions and facilitates the screening for mutations in other ALD patients. The detection of mutations in virtually all ALD families tested indicates that the isolated gene is the only gene responsible for ALD located in Xq28.

  2. Molecular analysis of mutations in the human HPRT gene.

    PubMed

    Keohavong, Phouthone; Xi, Liqiang; Grant, Stephen G

    2014-01-01

    The HPRT assay uses incorporation of toxic nucleotide analogues to select for cells lacking the purine scavenger enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase. A major advantage of this assay is the ability to isolate mutant cells and determine the molecular basis for their functional deficiency. Many types of analyses have been performed at this locus: the current protocol involves generation of a cDNA and multiplex PCR of each exon, including the intron/exon junctions, followed by direct sequencing of the products. This analysis detects point mutations, small deletions and insertions within the gene, mutations affecting RNA splicing, and products of illegitimate V(D)J recombination within the gene. Establishment of and comparisons with mutational spectra hold the promise of identifying exposures to mutation-inducing genotoxicants from their distinctive pattern of gene-specific DNA damage at this easily analyzed reporter gene. PMID:24623237

  3. Mutational analysis of adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) gene in Japanese ALD patients

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, R.; Onodera, O.; Tabe, H.

    1994-09-01

    Recently a putative ALD gene containing a striking homology with peroxisomal membrane protein (PMP70) has been identified. Besides childhood ALD, various clinical phenotypes have been identified with the onset in adolescence or adulthood (adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN), adult cerebral ALD or cerebello-brainstem dominant type). The different clinical phenotypes occasionally coexist even in the same family. To investigate if there is a correlation between the clinical phenotypes and genotypes of the mutations in the ALD gene, we have analyzed 43 Japanese ALD patients. By Southern blot analysis, we identified non-overlapping deletions of 0.5 kb to 10.4 kb involving the ALD gene in 3 patients with adult onset cerebello-brainstem dominant type. By detailed direct sequence analysis, we found 4 patients who had point mutations in the coding region. An AMN patient had a point mutation leading to {sup 266}Gly{r_arrow}Arg change, and another patient with adult cerebral ALD had a 3 bp deletion resulting in the loss of glutamic acid at codon 291, which is a conserved amino acid both in ALD protein and PMP70. Two patients with childhood ALD had point mutations leading to {sup 507}Gly{r_arrow}Val, and {sup 518}Arg{r_arrow}Gln, respectively. Since amino acids from 507 to 520 are highly conserved as ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins, mutations in this region are expected to result in dramatic changes of the function of this protein. Although there is a tendancy for mutation in childhood ALD to be present within the ATP-binding site motif, we found two adult patients who had large deletions involving the region. Taken together, strong correlation between genotypes and clinical phenotypes is unlikely to exist, and some other modifying factors might well play an important role for the clinical manifestations of ALD.

  4. Mutational analysis of STK11 gene in ovarian carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Y; Kobayashi, K; Sagae, S; Sugimura, M; Ishioka, S; Nagata, M; Terasawa, K; Tokino, T; Kudo, R

    1999-06-01

    Recently STK11, the causative gene of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) was identified on chromosome 19p13.3. PJS is often accompanied by several malignancies, including breast tumor, adenoma malignum of the uterine cervix, and ovarian tumor. To investigate the involvement of STK11 gene in the development of ovarian carcinomas, we analyzed 30 ovarian carcinomas for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and STK11 gene mutations. We found one missense mutation (codon 281, Pro to Leu) with heterozygous and somatic status. This mutation occurred at codon 281, which lies within the mutational hot spot (codon 279-281) of STK11 gene previously reported in PJS. We also detected LOH in 2 (11%) of 19 informative ovarian carcinomas. Our results suggest that mutations of the STK11 gene may play a limited role in the development of ovarian carcinomas. PMID:10429654

  5. Mutation analysis of the Fanconi Anemia Gene FACC

    SciTech Connect

    Verlander, P.C.; Lin, J.D.; Udono, M.U.; Zhang, Q.; Auerbach, A.D. ); Gibson, R.A.; Mathew, C.G. )

    1994-04-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a unique hypersensitivity of cells to DNA cross-linking agents; a gene for complementation group C (FACC) has recently been cloned. The authors have amplified FACC exons with their flanking intron sequences from genomic DNA from 174 racially and ethnically diverse families in the International Fanconi Anemia Registry and have screened for mutations by using SSCP analysis. They have identified eight different variants in 32 families; three were detected in exon 1, one in exon 4, one in intron 4, two in exon 6, and one in exon 14. Two of the eight variants, in seven families, did not segregate with the disease allele in multiplex families, suggesting that these variants represented benign polymorphisms. Disease-associated mutations in FACC were detected in a total of 25 (14.4%) of 174 families screened. The most frequent mutations were IVS4 + 4 A [yields] T (intron 4; 12 families) and 322delG (exon 1; 9 families). Other, less common mutations include Q13X in exon 1, R185X and D195V in exon 6, and L554P in exon 14. The polymorphisms were S26F in exon 1 and G139E in exon 4. All patients in the study with 322delG, Q13X, R185X, and D195V are of northern or eastern European or southern Italian ancestry, and 18 of 19 have a mild form of the disease, while the 2 patients with L554P, both from the same family, have a severe phenotype. All 19 patients with IVS4 + 4 A [yields] T have Jewish ancestry and have a severe phenotype. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  6. Systematic analysis of somatic mutations impacting gene expression in 12 tumour types

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jiarui; McConechy, Melissa K.; Horlings, Hugo M.; Ha, Gavin; Chun Chan, Fong; Funnell, Tyler; Mullaly, Sarah C.; Reimand, Jüri; Bashashati, Ali; Bader, Gary D.; Huntsman, David; Aparicio, Samuel; Condon, Anne; Shah, Sohrab P.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel hierarchical Bayes statistical model, xseq, to systematically quantify the impact of somatic mutations on expression profiles. We establish the theoretical framework and robust inference characteristics of the method using computational benchmarking. We then use xseq to analyse thousands of tumour data sets available through The Cancer Genome Atlas, to systematically quantify somatic mutations impacting expression profiles. We identify 30 novel cis-effect tumour suppressor gene candidates, enriched in loss-of-function mutations and biallelic inactivation. Analysis of trans-effects of mutations and copy number alterations with xseq identifies mutations in 150 genes impacting expression networks, with 89 novel predictions. We reveal two important novel characteristics of mutation impact on expression: (1) patients harbouring known driver mutations exhibit different downstream gene expression consequences; (2) expression patterns for some mutations are stable across tumour types. These results have critical implications for identification and interpretation of mutations with consequent impact on transcription in cancer. PMID:26436532

  7. The DCC gene: Structural analysis and mutations in colorectal carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, K.R.; Oliner, J.D.; Simons, J.W.; Hedrick, L.; Preisinger, A.C.; Vogelstein, B. ); Fearon, E.R. ); Hedge, P. ); Silverman, G.A. )

    1994-02-01

    DCC is a candidate tumor-suppressor gene encoding a protein with sequence similarity to cell adhesion molecules such as N-CAM. A set of overlapping YAC clones that contains the entire DCC coding region was isolated. Studies of this YAC contig showed that the DCC gene spans approximately 1.4 Mb. For elucidation of exon-intron structure, lambda phage clones containing all known coding sequences were isolated from a genomic library. These clones were used to demonstrate the existence of 29 DCC exons, and the sequences of the exon-intron boundaries were determined for each. Twenty-three polymorphic markers from chromosome 18 were then studied in a panel of primary colorectal tumors that had lost some, but not all, of chromosome 18. In most of these tumors, the region that was lost included DCC. Finally, Southern blot and PCR-based approaches were used to search for subtle mutations in several DCC exons. One tumor that had a point mutation in exon 28 was found, resulting in a proline to histidine substitution. A second tumor with a point mutation in intron 13 was also found. The regional map and genomic structure of DCC should provide the means to more extensively study DCC gene alterations and protein function in normal and neoplastic cells. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Mutational analysis of genes coding for cell surface proteins in colorectal cancer cell lines reveal novel altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Bruna R.; Bettoni, Fabiana; Koyama, Fernanda C.; Navarro, Fabio C.P.; Perez, Rodrigo O.; Mariadason, John; Sieber, Oliver M.; Strausberg, Robert L.; Simpson, Andrew J.G.; Jardim, Denis L.F.; Reis, Luiz Fernando L.; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2014-01-01

    We carried out a mutational analysis of 3,594 genes coding for cell surface proteins (Surfaceome) in 23 colorectal cancer cell lines, searching for new altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy in colorectal cancer. A total of 3,944 somatic non-synonymous substitutions and 595 InDels, occurring in 2,061 (57%) Surfaceome genes were catalogued. We identified 48 genes not previously described as mutated in colorectal tumors in the TCGA database, including genes that are mutated and expressed in >10% of the cell lines (SEMA4C, FGFRL1, PKD1, FAM38A, WDR81, TMEM136, SLC36A1, SLC26A6, IGFLR1). Analysis of these genes uncovered important roles for FGF and SEMA4 signaling in colorectal cancer with possible therapeutic implications. We also found that cell lines express on average 11 druggable mutations, including frequent mutations (>20%) in the receptor tyrosine kinases AXL and EPHA2, which have not been previously considered as potential targets for colorectal cancer. Finally, we identified 82 cell surface mutated epitopes, however expression of only 30% of these epitopes was detected in our cell lines. Notwithstanding, 92% of these epitopes were expressed in cell lines with the mutator phenotype, opening new venues for the use of “general” immune checkpoint drugs in this subset of patients. PMID:25193853

  9. Systematic analysis of mutation distribution in three dimensional protein structures identifies cancer driver genes

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Akihiro; Okada, Yukinori; Boroevich, Keith A.; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2016-01-01

    Protein tertiary structure determines molecular function, interaction, and stability of the protein, therefore distribution of mutation in the tertiary structure can facilitate the identification of new driver genes in cancer. To analyze mutation distribution in protein tertiary structures, we applied a novel three dimensional permutation test to the mutation positions. We analyzed somatic mutation datasets of 21 types of cancers obtained from exome sequencing conducted by the TCGA project. Of the 3,622 genes that had ≥3 mutations in the regions with tertiary structure data, 106 genes showed significant skew in mutation distribution. Known tumor suppressors and oncogenes were significantly enriched in these identified cancer gene sets. Physical distances between mutations in known oncogenes were significantly smaller than those of tumor suppressors. Twenty-three genes were detected in multiple cancers. Candidate genes with significant skew of the 3D mutation distribution included kinases (MAPK1, EPHA5, ERBB3, and ERBB4), an apoptosis related gene (APP), an RNA splicing factor (SF1), a miRNA processing factor (DICER1), an E3 ubiquitin ligase (CUL1) and transcription factors (KLF5 and EEF1B2). Our study suggests that systematic analysis of mutation distribution in the tertiary protein structure can help identify cancer driver genes. PMID:27225414

  10. Systematic analysis of mutation distribution in three dimensional protein structures identifies cancer driver genes.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Akihiro; Okada, Yukinori; Boroevich, Keith A; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2016-01-01

    Protein tertiary structure determines molecular function, interaction, and stability of the protein, therefore distribution of mutation in the tertiary structure can facilitate the identification of new driver genes in cancer. To analyze mutation distribution in protein tertiary structures, we applied a novel three dimensional permutation test to the mutation positions. We analyzed somatic mutation datasets of 21 types of cancers obtained from exome sequencing conducted by the TCGA project. Of the 3,622 genes that had ≥3 mutations in the regions with tertiary structure data, 106 genes showed significant skew in mutation distribution. Known tumor suppressors and oncogenes were significantly enriched in these identified cancer gene sets. Physical distances between mutations in known oncogenes were significantly smaller than those of tumor suppressors. Twenty-three genes were detected in multiple cancers. Candidate genes with significant skew of the 3D mutation distribution included kinases (MAPK1, EPHA5, ERBB3, and ERBB4), an apoptosis related gene (APP), an RNA splicing factor (SF1), a miRNA processing factor (DICER1), an E3 ubiquitin ligase (CUL1) and transcription factors (KLF5 and EEF1B2). Our study suggests that systematic analysis of mutation distribution in the tertiary protein structure can help identify cancer driver genes. PMID:27225414

  11. SERPINA1 Full-Gene Sequencing Identifies Rare Mutations Not Detected in Targeted Mutation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Graham, Rondell P; Dina, Michelle A; Howe, Sarah C; Butz, Malinda L; Willkomm, Kurt S; Murray, David L; Snyder, Melissa R; Rumilla, Kandelaria M; Halling, Kevin C; Highsmith, W Edward

    2015-11-01

    Genetic α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is characterized by low serum AAT levels and the identification of causal mutations or an abnormal protein. It needs to be distinguished from deficiency because of nongenetic causes, and diagnostic delay may contribute to worse patient outcome. Current routine clinical testing assesses for only the most common mutations. We wanted to determine the proportion of unexplained cases of AAT deficiency that harbor causal mutations not identified through current standard allele-specific genotyping and isoelectric focusing (IEF). All prospective cases from December 1, 2013, to October 1, 2014, with a low serum AAT level not explained by allele-specific genotyping and IEF were assessed through full-gene sequencing with a direct sequencing method for pathogenic mutations. We reviewed the results using American Council of Medical Genetics criteria. Of 3523 cases, 42 (1.2%) met study inclusion criteria. Pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutations not identified through clinical testing were detected through full-gene sequencing in 16 (38%) of the 42 cases. Rare mutations not detected with current allele-specific testing and IEF underlie a substantial proportion of genetic AAT deficiency. Full-gene sequencing, therefore, has the ability to improve accuracy in the diagnosis of AAT deficiency. PMID:26321041

  12. A Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis patient confirmed by mutation analysis of SHOX gene.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Bok; Seo, Seung Hyeon; Yoo, Woo Hyun; Kim, Su Young; Kwak, Min Jung

    2015-09-01

    Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis is characterized by SHOX deficiency, Madelung deformity, and mesomelic short stature. In addition, SHOX deficiency is associated with idiopathic short stature, Turner syndrome, and Langer mesomelic dysplasia. We report the first case of a Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis patient confirmed by SHOX gene mutation analysis in Korea. The patient, who was a 7-year-old female, showed short stature. Her height and weight were 108.9 cm (<3rd percentile) and 19.7 kg (5th-10th percentile), respectively. Her arm span, height of trunk, leg length, and sitting length were 100.5 cm, 58 cm, 50.9 cm, and 62.5 cm, respectively. Her body proportion was 1.13:1. Extremities to trunk ratio was 2.61. Her hand radiograph showed Madelung deformity. And the growth hormone stimulation test showed a normal response. Furthermore, because of Madelung deformity with idiopathic short stature, she was suspected of SHOX deficiency. We performed SHOX gene mutation analysis and found a c.491G>A (p.W164X) mutation of the SHOX gene. Accordingly, this patient was diagnosed with Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis. Recently, many mutations have been reported in the SHOX gene. However, to date, mutation analysis of the SHOX gene for Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis has not been reported in Korea as yet. We report the first case of a Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis patient confirmed by mutation analysis of the SHOX gene. PMID:26512353

  13. A Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis patient confirmed by mutation analysis of SHOX gene

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won Bok; Seo, Seung Hyeon; Yoo, Woo Hyun; Kim, Su Young

    2015-01-01

    Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis is characterized by SHOX deficiency, Madelung deformity, and mesomelic short stature. In addition, SHOX deficiency is associated with idiopathic short stature, Turner syndrome, and Langer mesomelic dysplasia. We report the first case of a Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis patient confirmed by SHOX gene mutation analysis in Korea. The patient, who was a 7-year-old female, showed short stature. Her height and weight were 108.9 cm (<3rd percentile) and 19.7 kg (5th-10th percentile), respectively. Her arm span, height of trunk, leg length, and sitting length were 100.5 cm, 58 cm, 50.9 cm, and 62.5 cm, respectively. Her body proportion was 1.13:1. Extremities to trunk ratio was 2.61. Her hand radiograph showed Madelung deformity. And the growth hormone stimulation test showed a normal response. Furthermore, because of Madelung deformity with idiopathic short stature, she was suspected of SHOX deficiency. We performed SHOX gene mutation analysis and found a c.491G>A (p.W164X) mutation of the SHOX gene. Accordingly, this patient was diagnosed with Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis. Recently, many mutations have been reported in the SHOX gene. However, to date, mutation analysis of the SHOX gene for Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis has not been reported in Korea as yet. We report the first case of a Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis patient confirmed by mutation analysis of the SHOX gene. PMID:26512353

  14. Analysis of mutation of the c-Kit gene and PDGFRA in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    XU, CHUN-WEI; LIN, SHAN; WANG, WU-LONG; GAO, WEN-BIN; LV, JIN-YAN; GAO, JING-SHAN; ZHANG, LI-YING; LI, YANG; WANG, LIN; ZHANG, YU-PING; TIAN, YU-WANG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate mutation status of the c-Kit gene (KIT) and PDGFRA in patients with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). In total, 93 patients with a GIST were included in the study, in which polymerase chain reaction amplification and gene sequencing were used to detect the sequences of exons 9, 11, 13 and 17 in KIT and exons 12 and 18 in PDGFRA. KIT mutations were detected in 64 cases (68.82%), of which exon 11 mutations were detected in 56 cases (60.22%), exon 13 mutations were detected in three cases (3.23%) and one case (1.08%) was shown to have a mutation in exon 17. The most common mutation in exon 11 was a deletion, which accounted for 55.36% (31/56) of the cases, followed by a point mutation observed in 26.79% (15/56) of the cases, while an insertion (tandem repeats) was identified in 14.29% (8/56) of the cases, and 3.57% (2/56) of the exon 11 mutations were deletions associated with a point mutation. The majority of the mutations were heterozygous, with only a few homozygous mutations. Mutational analysis revealed the mutations to be more concentrated in the classic hot zone at the 5′-end, followed by the tandem repeat frame at the 3′-end. In four cases, a mutation was detected in exon 18 of PDGFRA, of which one was associated with a mutation in KIT. The remaining three cases (10.34%, 3/29) were not associated with mutations in KIT and accounted for 37.5% (3/8) of the CD117-negative GIST cases. Therefore, the majority of the GIST cases were characterized by mutations in KIT or PDGFRA, which were directly associated with the disease. Pairs of different mutations in the same exon of KIT, or KIT mutations coupled with pairs of mutations in PDGFRA, were detected in a small number of patients. Imatinib is a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor and is the first line targeted treatment for GIST, resulting in markedly improved survival rates. Thus, gene mutation genotyping may provide inspiration and guidance for

  15. Sequence analysis of tyrosinase gene in ocular and oculocutaneous albinism patients: introducing three novel mutations

    PubMed Central

    Khordadpoor-Deilamani, Faravareh; Karimipoor, Morteza; Javadi, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Albinism is a heterogeneous genetic disorder of melanin synthesis that results in hypopigmented eyes (in patients with ocular albinism) or hair, skin, and eyes (in individuals with oculocutaneous albinism). It is associated with decreased visual acuity, nystagmus, strabismus, and photophobia. The tyrosinase gene is known to be involved in both oculocutaneous albinism and autosomal recessive ocular albinism. In this study, we aimed to screen the mutations in the TYR gene in the nonsyndromic OCA and autosomal recessive ocular albinism patients from Iran. Methods The tyrosinase gene was examined in 23 unrelated patients with autosomal recessive ocular albinism or nonsyndromic OCA using DNA sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. Results TYR gene mutations were identified in 14 (app. 60%) albinism patients. Conclusions We found 10 mutations, 3 of which were novel. No mutation was found in our ocular albinism patients, but one of them was heterozygous for the p.R402Q polymorphism. PMID:26167114

  16. Heteroduplex analysis of the dystrophin gene: Application to point mutation and carrier detection

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, T.W.; Papp, A.C.; Snyder, P.J.; Sedra, M.S.; Western, L.M.; Bartolo, C.; Mendell, J.R.; Moxley, R.T.

    1994-03-01

    Approximately one-third of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have undefined mutations in the dystrophin gene. For carrier and prenatal studies in families without detectable mutations, the indirect restriction fragment length polymorphism linkage approach is used. Using a multiplex amplification and heteroduplex analysis of dystrophin exons, the authors identified nonsense mutations in two DMD patients. Although the nonsense mutations are predicted to severely truncate the dystrophin protein, both patients presented with mild clinical courses of the disease. As a result of identifying the mutation in the affected boys, direct carrier studies by heteroduplex analysis were extended to other relatives. The authors conclude that the technique is not only ideal for mutation detection but is also useful for diagnostic testing. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene in two Chinese families with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SONG; XU, HAIKUN; AN, WEI; ZHU, DECHUN; LI, DEJUN

    2016-01-01

    Androgens are essential for normal male sex differentiation and are responsible for the normal development of male secondary sexual characteristics at puberty. The physiological effects of androgens are mediated by the androgen receptor (AR). Mutations in the AR gene are the most common cause of androgen insensitivity syndrome. The present study undertook a genetic analysis of the AR gene in two unrelated families affected by complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) in China. In family 1, a previously reported nonsense mutation (G-to-A; p.W751X) was identified in exon 5 of the AR gene. In addition, a novel missense mutation was detected in exon 6 of the AR gene from family 2; this mutation resulted in a predicted amino acid change from phenylalanine to serine at codon 804 (T-to-C; p.F804S) in the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of AR. Computer simulation of the structural changes generated by the p.F804S substitution revealed marked conformational alterations in the hydrophobic core responsible for the stability and function of the AR-LBD. In conclusion, the present study identified two mutations from two unrelated Chinese families affected by CAIS. The novel mutation (p.F804S) may provide insights into the molecular mechanism underlying CAIS. Furthermore, it expands on the number of mutational hot spots in the international AR mutation database, which may be useful in the future for prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling. PMID:27284311

  18. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS INDUCED BY MUTAGENS IN THE TK GENE OF MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS INDUCED BY BROMATE AND N- ETHYL-N-NITROSOUREA IN THE TK GENE OF MOUSE L YMPHOMA CELLS

    The mouse lymphoma assay is widely used to identify chemical mutagens The Tk +1- gene located on an autosome in mouse lymphoma cells may recover a wide ra...

  19. Molecular analysis of the APC gene in 71 Israeli families: 17 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Gavert, Nancy; Yaron, Yuval; Naiman, Tova; Bercovich, Dani; Rozen, Paul; Shomrat, Ruth; Legum, Cyril; Orr-Urtreger, Avi

    2002-06-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is caused by germline mutations in the APC gene. This study included 71 Israeli families referred for molecular analysis of the APC gene. Analysis was performed by the protein truncation test (PTT) of exon 15, and if negative, by direct sequencing of exon 1 to 14. Mutations were found in 36 (50.7%) probands. Mutation detection rates depended on the pattern of referral, such that among the 40 probands referred from the Service for Hereditary Cancer the mutation detection rate was 70%, whereas among the 31 probands referred by other gastroenterologists detection rate was significantly lower (25.8%). Of the 36 mutations detected, 21 were within exon 15, 13 within exons 1 to 14 and 2 were newly-described splicing mutations in introns 9 and 14. A relatively high proportion of the mutations was detected in exon 9 (6/36), five of them newly described. Altogether, we describe here 17 new mutations. Within the two major ethnic groups in Israel, patients of Ashkenazi and non-Ashkenazi origin, there was no significant differences in the mutation detection rate or the distribution of mutations within the APC gene. No founder mutation was detected in any of these populations. Our data confirm that higher detection rates may be expected in patients referred by clinical services specializing in hereditary colon cancer. These results further underscore the importance of complete analysis of all exons and exon/intron boundaries, in order to achieve maximal detection rate in patients suspected of FAP. PMID:12007223

  20. Mutation Analysis of the CYP21A2 Gene in the Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Rabbani, Bahareh; Mahdieh, Nejat; Ashtiani, Mohammad Tahgi Haghi; Larijani, Bagher; Akbari, Mohammad Taghi; New, Maria; Parsa, Alan; Schouten, Jan P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Defects in the CYP21A2 gene cause steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency, which is the most frequent cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Forty four affected families were investigated to identify the mutation spectrum of the CYP21A2 gene. Methods: Families were subjected to clinical, biochemical, and molecular analyses. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction amplification was used for eight common mutations followed by dosage analysis to exclude CYP21A2 deletions. Results: The most frequent mutations detected were gene deletions and chimera (31.8%). Other mutation frequencies were as follows: Q318X, 15.9%; I2G, 14.8%; I172N, 5.8%; gene duplication, 5.7%; R356W, 8%; and E6 cluster mutations, 2.3%. Direct sequencing of the CYP21A2 gene revealed R316X, P453S, c.484insT, and a change at the start codon. Different modules carried by patients were classified into five different haplotypes. The genotype phenotype correlation (positive predictive value) for group null, A, B, and C were 92.3%, 85.7%, 100%, and 0, respectively. Conclusions: Methods used will be helpful for carrier detection and antenatal diagnosis, especially with inclusion of the multiplex ligation probe dependent amplification technique, which is easier for routine tests in comparison with other methods. Mutation frequencies indicate that Iranians are possible descendants of Asians and Europeans. PMID:22017335

  1. Comprehensive analysis of cancer-associated somatic mutations in class I HLA genes

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Sachet A.; Rooney, Michael S.; Rajasagi, Mohini; Tiao, Grace; Dixon, Philip M.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Stevens, Jonathan; Lane, William J.; Dellagatta, Jamie L.; Steelman, Scott; Sougnez, Carrie; Cibulskis, Kristian; Kiezun, Adam; Brusic, Vladimir; Wu, Catherine J.; Getz, Gad

    2015-01-01

    Detection of somatic mutations in HLA genes using whole-exome sequencing (WES) is hampered by the high polymorphism of the HLA loci, which prevents alignment of sequencing reads to the human reference genome. We describe a computational pipeline that enables accurate inference of germline alleles of class I HLA-A, -B and -C genes and subsequent detection of mutations in these genes using the inferred alleles as a reference. Analysis of WES data from 7,930 pairs of tumor and healthy tissue from the same patient revealed 298 non-silent HLA mutations in tumors from 266 patients. These 298 mutations are enriched for likely functional mutations, including putative loss-of-function events. Recurrence of mutations suggested that these ‘hotspot’ sites were positively selected. Cancers with recurrent somatic HLA mutations were associated with upregulation of signatures of cytolytic activity characteristic of tumor infiltration by effector lymphocytes, supporting immune evasion by altered HLA function as a contributory mechanism in cancer. PMID:26372948

  2. Mutation analysis of the CYP21A2 gene in congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Forouzanfar, K; Seifi, M; Hashemi-Gorji, F; Karimi, N; Estiar, M A; Karimoei, M; Sakhinia, E; Karimipour, M; Ghergherehchi, R

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is an inherited autosomal recessive enzymatic disorder involving the synthesis of adrenal corticosteroids. 21-Hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) is the most common form of the disease which is observed in more than 90% of patients with CAH. Early identification of mutations in the genes involved in this disease is critical. A marker of the disease, errors in the CYP21A2 gene, is thought to be part of the pathophysiology of CAH. Therefore, the identification of gene mutations would be very beneficial in the early detection of CAH. This research was a descriptive epidemiological study conducted on individuals elected by the inclusion criteria whom were referred to the Genetic Diagnosis Center of Tabriz during 2012 to 2013. After sampling and DNA extraction, PCR for the detection of mutations in the CYP21A2 gene was performed followed by sequencing. For data analysis, the results of sequencing were compared with the reference gene by blast, Gene Runner and MEGA-5 software. Obtained changes were compared with NCBI databases. The analysis of the sequencing determined the mutations located in Exons 6, 7, 8 and 10. The most frequent findings were Q318X (53%) and R356W (28%). Exon 6 cluster (7%), E431k (4%), V237E (2%), V281L (2%), E351K (2%), R426C (2%) were also frequent in our patients. The most frequent genotype was compound heterozygote, Q318X/R356W. Three rare mutations in our study were E431K, E351K and R426C. Observed mutation frequencies in this study were much higher than those reported in previous studies in Iranian populations. Thus, it seems that it is necessary to follow-up screening programs and use sequencing methods to better identify mutations in the development of the disease. PMID:26278268

  3. Mutation analysis of pre-mRNA splicing genes in Chinese families with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xinyuan; Chen, Xue; Liu, Xiaoxing; Gao, Xiang; Kang, Xiaoli; Xu, Qihua; Chen, Xuejuan; Zhao, Kanxing; Zhang, Xiumei; Chu, Qiaomei; Wang, Xiuying

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Seven genes involved in precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) splicing have been implicated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). We sought to detect mutations in all seven genes in Chinese families with RP, to characterize the relevant phenotypes, and to evaluate the prevalence of mutations in splicing genes in patients with adRP. Methods Six unrelated families from our adRP cohort (42 families) and two additional families with RP with uncertain inheritance mode were clinically characterized in the present study. Targeted sequence capture with next-generation massively parallel sequencing (NGS) was performed to screen mutations in 189 genes including all seven pre-mRNA splicing genes associated with adRP. Variants detected with NGS were filtered with bioinformatics analyses, validated with Sanger sequencing, and prioritized with pathogenicity analysis. Results Mutations in pre-mRNA splicing genes were identified in three individual families including one novel frameshift mutation in PRPF31 (p.Leu366fs*1) and two known mutations in SNRNP200 (p.Arg681His and p.Ser1087Leu). The patients carrying SNRNP200 p.R681H showed rapid disease progression, and the family carrying p.S1087L presented earlier onset ages and more severe phenotypes compared to another previously reported family with p.S1087L. In five other families, we identified mutations in other RP-related genes, including RP1 p. Ser781* (novel), RP2 p.Gln65* (novel) and p.Ile137del (novel), IMPDH1 p.Asp311Asn (recurrent), and RHO p.Pro347Leu (recurrent). Conclusions Mutations in splicing genes identified in the present and our previous study account for 9.5% in our adRP cohort, indicating the important role of pre-mRNA splicing deficiency in the etiology of adRP. Mutations in the same splicing gene, or even the same mutation, could correlate with different phenotypic severities, complicating the genotype–phenotype correlation and clinical prognosis. PMID:24940031

  4. Mutation analysis of the polycystic kidney disease 1 (PKD1) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Peral, B.; Ward, C.J.; Thomas, S.

    1994-09-01

    The gene which is mutated in most cases of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), PKD1, has recently been identified on chromosome 16. Three quarters of this gene lies in a region of genomic DNA that is duplicated elsewhere on chromosome 16. Consequently, the search for mutations has proved difficult and our efforts so far have concentrated on screening the single copy 3{prime} region of the gene. We have employed the methods of field inversion gel electrophoresis, conventional Southern blotting, RT-PCR and heteroduplex analysis. From the examination of DNA of approximately 300 PKD1 patients, two deletions have been identified. One is a 5.5 kb genomic deletion, which is transmitted with the disease and results in a 3 kb deletion of the PKD1 transcript. The other is a de novo genomic deletion of 2 kb which removes {approximately}500 bp of the transcript. In addition, analysis of lymphoblast RNA by RT-PCR from 50 patients has revealed one splicing mutation resulting in the removal of a 135 bp exon. Further analysis of the single copy region of this gene is underway and strategies to screen the duplicated area of the gene for mutations are being explored.

  5. Screening two mutations in the dysferlin gene by exon capture and sequence analysis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, XUEYAN; YANG, YUN; ZHOU, RONG

    2016-01-01

    A patient with progressive muscular atrophy was assessed for the disease-associated genes by next-generation sequencing technology and exon trap and sequence analysis. The results of the investigation identified 399 genes, covering all exons in addition to 10 bp on either side, which are specific to 659 types of neuromuscular disorders, including hypotypes. Exon capture and sequence analysis revealed that the patient possessed two splice site mutations in the dysferlin (DYSF) gene, c.144+1G>A and c.342+1G>T, and the presence of the mutations was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The patient's mother and sister were also assessed and confirmed to have mutations within the DYSF gene, the mother with c.342+1G>T and the sister with c.144+1G>A. The two splice site mutations in the DYSF gene, c.144+1G>A and c.342+1G>T, have not previously been reported. Therefore, exon capture and sequence analysis is able to rapidly and efficiently screen for genetic alterations in neuromuscular disorders.

  6. PCR-sequencing is a complementary method to amplification refractory mutation system for EGFR gene mutation analysis in FFPE samples.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junchang; Wang, Chunhua; Yu, Xiaoli; Sheng, Danli; Zuo, Chen; Ren, Minpu; Wu, Yaqin; Shen, Jie; Jin, Mei; Xu, Songxiao

    2015-12-01

    Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS) is the most popular technology for EGFR gene mutation analysis in China. Cutoff Ct or ΔCt values were used to differentiate low mutation abundance cases from no mutation cases. In this study, all of 359 NSCLC samples were tested by ARMS. Seventeen samples with larger Ct or ΔCt than cutoff values were retested by PCR-sequencing. TKI treatment responses were monitored on the cases with ARMS negative and PCR-sequencing positive results. One exon 18 G719X case, 67 exon 19 deletion cases, 2 exon 20 insertion cases, 1 exon 20 T790M case, 60 exon 21 L858R cases, 5 exon 21 L861Q cases and 201 wild type cases were identified by ARMS. Another 22 cases were evaluated as wild type but had later amplification fluorescent curves. Seventeen out of these 22 cases were retested by PCR-sequencing. It turns out that 3 out of 3 cases with exon 19 deletion later amplifications, 2 out of 2 cases with L858R later amplifications and 4 out of 12 cases with T790M later amplifications were identified as mutation positive. Two cases with exon 19 deletion and L858R respectively were treated by TKI and got responses. Our study indicated that PCR-sequencing might be a complementary way to confirm ARMS results with later amplifications. PMID:26477713

  7. Analysis of mutations in the entire coding sequence of the factor VIII gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bidichadani, S.I.; Lanyon, W.G.; Connor, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    Hemophilia A is a common X-linked recessive disorder of bleeding caused by deleterious mutations in the gene for clotting factor VIII. The large size of the factor VIII gene, the high frequency of de novo mutations and its tissue-specific expression complicate the detection of mutations. We have used a combination of RT-PCR of ectopic factor VIII transcripts and genomic DNA-PCRs to amplify the entire essential sequence of the factor VIII gene. This is followed by chemical mismatch cleavage analysis and direct sequencing in order to facilitate a comprehensive search for mutations. We describe the characterization of nine potentially pathogenic mutations, six of which are novel. In each case, a correlation of the genotype with the observed phenotype is presented. In order to evaluate the pathogenicity of the five missense mutations detected, we have analyzed them for evolutionary sequence conservation and for their involvement of sequence motifs catalogued in the PROSITE database of protein sites and patterns.

  8. Mutation analysis of the PALB2 gene in unselected pancreatic cancer patients in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Borecka, M; Zemankova, P; Vocka, M; Soucek, P; Soukupova, J; Kleiblova, P; Sevcik, J; Kleibl, Z; Janatova, M

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has the worst prognosis among common solid cancer diagnoses. It has been shown that up to 10% of PDAC cases have a familial component. Characterization of PDAC-susceptibility genes could reveal high-risk individuals and patients that may benefit from tailored therapy. Hereditary mutations in PALB2 (Partner and Localizer of BRCA2) gene has been shown to predispose, namely to PDAC and breast cancers; however, frequencies of mutations vary among distinct geographical populations. Using the combination of sequencing, high-resolution melting and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analyses, we screened the entire PALB2 gene in 152 unselected Czech PDAC patients. Truncating mutations were identified in three (2.0%) patients. Genotyping of found PALB2 variants in 1226 control samples revealed one carrier of PALB2 truncating variant (0.08%; P = 0.005). The mean age at PDAC diagnosis was significantly lower among PALB2 mutation carriers (51 years) than in non-carriers (63 years; P = 0.016). Only one patient carrying germline PALB2 mutation had a positive family breast cancer history. Our results indicate that hereditary PALB2 mutation represents clinically considerable genetic factor increasing PDAC susceptibility in our population and that analysis of PALB2 should be considered not only in PDAC patients with familial history of breast or pancreatic cancers but also in younger PDAC patients without family cancer history. PMID:27106063

  9. Analysis of factor VIII gene inversion mutations in 166 unrelated haemophilia A families: frequency and utility in genetic counselling.

    PubMed

    Vnencak-Jones, C L; Iii, J A; Janco, R L; Cohen, M P; Dupont, W D; Kazazian, H H; Rossiter, J P

    1996-01-01

    Haemophilia A is an X-linked recessive bleeding disorder of variable severity that is caused by a deficiency of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). The disease results from mutations in the FVIII gene which are heterogenous both in type and position within the gene. Recently, however, inversion mutations were found to be common to patients with severe disease (Lakich et al., 1993). These mutations result from intrachromosomal recombinations between DNA sequences in the A gene (located in intron 22 of the FVIII gene) and one of two A genes upstream to the FVIII gene. To determine the frequency of these inversions we performed Southern blot analysis on banked DNA from 166 consecutive, unrelated haemophilia A families previously referred for carrier or prenatal testing. In 57/166 (34%) families an inversion or other unique mutation was detected. The distal and proximal A genes lying upstream to the FVIII gene were involved in 79% and 18% of the mutations, respectively, but in 3% of the families the sequences involved in the mutation have not been identified. In 20/38 (53%) families with severe disease a mutation was detected. Interestingly, the relative risk of developing inhibitors in patients with FVIII gene inversions or other 3° mutations detected by this assay, as compared to patients with no detectable mutation by this assay, was 3.8. In families for which a mutation is detected, direct DNA testing is an accurate and inexpensive alternative to linkage analysis for prenatal or haemophilia A carrier testing. PMID:27213900

  10. Mutational analysis of Btk, the defective gene in X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, M.E.; Fitch-Hilgenberg, M.E.; Rohrer, J.

    1994-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA), a disorder of B cell development, is due to mutations in an scr-like cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase, Btk. Thus far, mutations in this gene have been identified by sequencing of cDNA. To permit the detection of mutations in genomic DNA, we determined the structure of Btk and identified 19 exons in 37 kb of DNA. PCR primers were designed to amplify each exon with its splice sites. Two overlapping PCR products were employed for exons longer than 230 base pairs. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was used to screen genomic DNA from 30 unrelated families presumed to carry a mutation in Btk. It was possible to amplify DNA in every reaction from every patient. None of the DNA samples demonstrated more than one aberrant SSCP pattern. Twenty three mutations were detected in 25 families. Seven point mutations resulting in amino acid substitutions were seen. An additional 7 base pair substitutions gave rise to premature stop codons. Two splice defects were noted. Small insertions or deletions, all resulting in frameshifts and premature stop codons were seen in eight patients. One patient had an A to G transition in the ATG start codon. Two mutations, both at CpG dinucleotides, were seen in more than one family. Haplotype analysis, using CA repeats closely linked to Btk, demonstrated that the mutations in these families arose independently. We conclude from these studies that the mutations in Btk in patients with XLA are highly variable. Large deletions are uncommon, although small 1 to 4 bp insertions or deletions constitute as many as one third of the mutations. Further analysis of patients with amino acid substitutions will permit structure/function correlations.

  11. MUFFINN: cancer gene discovery via network analysis of somatic mutation data.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ara; Shim, Jung Eun; Kim, Eiru; Supek, Fran; Lehner, Ben; Lee, Insuk

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge for distinguishing cancer-causing driver mutations from inconsequential passenger mutations is the long-tail of infrequently mutated genes in cancer genomes. Here, we present and evaluate a method for prioritizing cancer genes accounting not only for mutations in individual genes but also in their neighbors in functional networks, MUFFINN (MUtations For Functional Impact on Network Neighbors). This pathway-centric method shows high sensitivity compared with gene-centric analyses of mutation data. Notably, only a marginal decrease in performance is observed when using 10 % of TCGA patient samples, suggesting the method may potentiate cancer genome projects with small patient populations. PMID:27333808

  12. ABCG2 in peptic ulcer: gene expression and mutation analysis.

    PubMed

    Salagacka-Kubiak, Aleksandra; Żebrowska, Marta; Wosiak, Agnieszka; Balcerczak, Mariusz; Mirowski, Marek; Balcerczak, Ewa

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the participation of polymorphism at position C421A and mRNA expression of the ABCG2 gene in the development of peptic ulcers, which is a very common and severe disease. ABCG2, encoded by the ABCG2 gene, has been found inter alia in the gastrointestinal tract, where it plays a protective role eliminating xenobiotics from cells into the extracellular environment. The materials for the study were biopsies of gastric mucosa taken during a routine endoscopy. For genotyping by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) at position C421A, DNA was isolated from 201 samples, while for the mRNA expression level by real-time PCR, RNA was isolated from 60 patients. The control group of healthy individuals consisted of 97 blood donors. The dominant genotype in the group of peptic ulcer patients and healthy individuals was homozygous CC. No statistically significant differences between healthy individuals and the whole group of peptic ulcer patients and, likewise, between the subgroups of peptic ulcer patients (infected and uninfected with Helicobacter pylori) were found. ABCG2 expression relative to GAPDH expression was found in 38 of the 60 gastric mucosa samples. The expression level of the gene varies greatly among cases. The statistically significant differences between the intensity (p = 0.0375) of H. pylori infection and ABCG2 gene expression have been shown. It was observed that the more intense the infection, the higher the level of ABCG2 expression. PMID:26578453

  13. Molecular signature of disease onset in granulin mutation carriers: a gene expression analysis study.

    PubMed

    Milanesi, Elena; Bonvicini, Cristian; Alberici, Antonella; Pilotto, Andrea; Cattane, Nadia; Premi, Enrico; Gazzina, Stefano; Archetti, Silvana; Gasparotti, Roberto; Cancelli, Vanessa; Gennarelli, Massimo; Padovani, Alessandro; Borroni, Barbara

    2013-07-01

    Mutations within Granulin (GRN) gene are causative of autosomal dominant frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Though GRN mutations are inherited at birth, the disease onset usually occurs in the sixth decade of life. The objective of this study was to identify new genetic pathways linked to inherited GRN disease and involved in the shift from asymptomatic to symptomatic stages. Microarray gene expression analysis on leukocytes was carried out on 15 patients carrying GRN T272SfsX10 mutation, and their asymptomatic siblings with (n = 14) or without (n = 11) GRN mutation. The results were then validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and compared with those obtained in a cohort of FTLD without GRN mutation (n = 16). The association between candidate genes and damage of specific brain areas was investigated by voxel-based morphometry on magnetic resonance imaging scans (family-wise error-corrected). Leukocytes mRNA levels of TMEM40 and LY6G6F and other genes mainly involved in inflammation were significantly higher in patients carrying GRN mutations compared with asymptomatic carriers and other FTLD. The higher the levels of TMEM40 the greater is the damage of parietal lobule; the higher the LY6G6F gene expression the greater is the atrophy in superior frontal gyrus. Enhanced inflammation associated with the onset of GRN disease might be either related to disease pathogenetic mechanism leading to neurodegeneration or to a compensatory pathway that counteracts disease progression. The identification of specific molecular targets of GRN-FTLD disease is essential when considering future disease-modifying therapies. PMID:23419701

  14. Mutation analysis of PALB2 gene in French breast cancer families.

    PubMed

    Damiola, Francesca; Schultz, Inès; Barjhoux, Laure; Sornin, Valérie; Dondon, Marie-Gabrielle; Eon-Marchais, Séverine; Marcou, Morgane; Caron, Olivier; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; de Pauw, Antoine; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Bonadona, Valérie; Maugard, Christine; Pujol, Pascal; Lasset, Christine; Longy, Michel; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Andrieu, Nadine; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Muller, Danièle

    2015-12-01

    Several population-based and family-based studies have demonstrated that germline mutations of the PALB2 gene (Partner and Localizer of BRCA2) are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Distinct mutation frequencies and spectrums have been described depending on the population studied. Here we describe the first complete PALB2 coding sequence screening in the French population. We screened the complete coding sequence and intron-exon boundaries of PALB2, using the EMMA technique, to assess the contribution of pathogenic mutations in a set of 835 familial breast cancer cases and 662 unrelated controls from the French national study GENESIS and the Paul Strauss Cancer Centre, all previously tested negative for BRCA1 and BRCA2 pathogenic mutations. Our analysis revealed the presence of four novel deleterious mutations: c.1186insT, c.1857delT and c.2850delC in three cases, c.3418dupT in one control. In addition, we identified two in-frame insertion/deletion, 19 missense substitutions (two of them predicted as pathogenic), 9 synonymous variants, 28 variants located in introns and 2 in UTRs, as well as frequent variants. Truncating PALB2 mutations were found in 0.36% of familial breast cancer cases, a frequency lower than the one detected in comparable studies in other populations (0.73-3.40%). This suggests a small but significant contribution of PALB2 mutations to the breast cancer susceptibility in the French population. PMID:26564480

  15. Mutation analysis of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene in native American populations of the southwest

    SciTech Connect

    Grebe, T.A. Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ ); Doane, W.W.; Norman, R.A.; Rhodes, S.N. ); Richter, S.F. ); Clericuzio, C. ); Seltzer, W.K. ); Goldberg, B.E. ); Hernried, L.S. ); McClure, M.; Kaplan, G.

    1992-10-01

    The authors report DNA and clinical analysis of cystic fibrosis (CF) in two previously unstudied, genetically isolated populations: Pueblo and Navajo Native Americans. Direct mutation analysis of six mutations of the CFTR gene - namely, [Delta]F508, G542X, G551D, R553X, N1303K, and W1282X - was performed on PCR-amplified genomic DNA extracted from blood samples. Haplotype analyses with marker/enzyme pairs XV2c/TaqI and KM29/PstI were performed as well. Of the 12 affected individuals studied, no [Delta]F508 mutation was detected; only one G542X mutation was found. None of the other mutations was detected. All affected individuals have either an AA, AC, or CC haplotype, except for the one carrying the G542X mutation, who has the haplotye AB. Clinically, six of the affected individuals examined exhibit growth deficiency, and five (all from the Zuni Pueblo) have a severe CF phenotype. Four of the six Zunis with CF are also microcephalic, a finding not previously noted in CF patients. The DNA data have serious implications for risk assessment of CF carrier status for these people. 14 refs., 3 tabs.

  16. DNA analysis of renal electrolyte transporter genes among patients suffering from Bartter and Gitelman syndromes: summary of mutation screening.

    PubMed

    Urbanová, M; Reiterová, J; Stěkrová, J; Lněnička, P; Ryšavá, R

    2011-01-01

    Patients with renal diseases associated with salt-losing tubulopathies categorized as Gitelman and classic form of Bartter syndrome have undergone genetic screening for possible mutation capture in two different genes: SLC12A3 and CLCNKB. Clinical symptoms of these two diseases may overlap. Patients with clinical symptoms of antenatal form of Bartter syndrome were screened for mutations in two different genes: KCNJ1 and SLC12A1. The aim was to establish genetic mutation screening of Bartter/Gitelman syndrome and to confirm the proposed diagnosis. We have identified seven different causative mutations in the SLC12A3 gene, four in the CLCNKB gene, two in the SLC12A1 gene, and none in the KCNJ1 gene. Nine of these mutations are novel. In one case, genetic analysis led to re-evaluation of diagnosis between the Gitelman and classic form of Bartter syndrome. PMID:21631963

  17. Mutations analysis of C1 inhibitor coding sequence gene among Portuguese patients with hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Martinho, A; Mendes, J; Simões, O; Nunes, R; Gomes, J; Dias Castro, E; Leiria-Pinto, P; Ferreira, M B; Pereira, C; Castel-Branco, M G; Pais, L

    2013-04-01

    Mutations that modify the amino acid sequence of C1-INH (except Val458Met) are associated with HAE. More than 200 different mutations scattering the entire C1-INH gene have been reported. The main objective of this study was to report the mutational findings in a HAE cohort of 138 Portuguese patients followed in specialized consultation all over the country. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood with QiaSymphony BioRobot (QIAGEN Portugal). The sequence reactions were performed by using a DNA sequencing kit (Big Dye terminator cycle sequencing v1.1/v3.1 from Applied Biosystems) and sequencing products were immediately submitted to direct sequencing on an Applied Biosystem 3130 DNA Analyser. DNA sequences were analyzed at four different stages. Raw data and sequence alignments of all 8 exons and intron-exon boundaries were performed for each patient individually with SeqScape software and using SERPING1 gene NG_009625 of 24,300 bp (12-March-2011) as reference sequence. Sequence comparisons among patients and controls were performed with software CodonCode Aligner v.3.7 from CodonCode Corp and with Geneious 4.5 from Biomatters Lda. A total of 94 point mutations were observed among patients, and 67% of them were located on exon 8. In addition, we noticed one not described stop codon at position c.1459 C>T in three different patients. Translation termination was also found on exon 3 and 7, as a result of mutations at positions c.481A>7, c.1174C>T. In this population, the prevalence of the missense mutation p.Arg444Cys was 39 out of 42. Mutational analysis revealed 22 different pathogenic mutations, of which 64% were not described on HAE database. Although identification of disease causing mutations is not necessary to establish HAE diagnosis, studies on gene expression and characterization of rearrangements in SERPING1 gene are suggested in order to get new insights on function and genetic tests of C1 inhibitor. PMID:23123409

  18. Analysis of gene mutation in plant cell wall by dielectric relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, Frédéric; Dantras, Eric; Grima-Pettenatti, Jacqueline; Lacabanne, Colette

    2012-07-01

    Arabidopsis Thaliana is a plant composed mainly of cellulose and lignin. Geneticists need techniques able to make differences at the molecular level between modified plants (DML6, CAD C/D) and non-modified ones. Thermo-stimulated current (TSC) analysis is a promising route to identify gene mutations. For the non-modified plant, at low temperatures, TSC thermograms highlight three dielectric relaxation modes. From -150 to -110 °C, γCellulose is attributed to CH2OH and-OH groups of cellulose. Between -110 and -80 °C, βLignin is detected. From -80 to -40 °C, βCellulose is characteristic of the molecular mobility of glycosidic linkages. For the CAD C/D modified plants, only γCellulose and βLignin are observed; due to analogous enthalpy values, those modes have the same molecular origin as in the non-modified plant. So, the βLignin mode is associated with the molecular mobility of the lignin-OH groups. The CAD C/D gene mutation changes the chemical structure of lignin, which promotes hydrogen bonds in the network and inhibits molecular mobility of glucosidic rings. It is also interesting to note that the DML6 gene mutation induces a higher cooperativity of this βCellulose relaxation than in wild vegetal composites. In fact, this mutation promotes molecular mobility of glycosidic rings thanks to β1-4 glycosidic linkages.

  19. A transposon-based analysis of gene mutations related to skin cancer development.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Rita M; Dupuy, Adam J; Bravo, Ana; Casanova, M Llanos; Alameda, Josefa P; Page, Angustias; Sánchez-Viera, Miguel; Ramírez, Angel; Navarro, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is by far the most frequent type of cancer in humans. NMSC includes several types of malignancies with different clinical outcomes, the most frequent being basal and squamous cell carcinomas. We have used the Sleeping Beauty transposon/transposase system to identify somatic mutations associated with NMSC. Transgenic mice bearing multiple copies of a mutagenic Sleeping Beauty transposon T2Onc2 and expressing the SB11 transposase under the transcriptional control of regulatory elements from the keratin K5 promoter were treated with TPA, either in wild-type or Ha-ras mutated backgrounds. After several weeks of treatment, mice with transposition developed more malignant tumors with decreased latency compared with control mice. Transposon/transposase animals also developed basal cell carcinomas. Genetic analysis of the transposon integration sites in the tumors identified several genes recurrently mutated in different tumor samples, which may represent novel candidate cancer genes. We observed alterations in the expression levels of some of these genes in human tumors. Our results show that inactivating mutations in Notch1 and Nsd1, among others, may have an important role in skin carcinogenesis. PMID:22832494

  20. Transcriptome Analysis of Targeted Mouse Mutations Reveals the Topography of Local Changes in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Adkisson, Michael; Nava, A. J.; Kirov, Julia V.; Cipollone, Andreanna; Willis, Brandon; Rapp, Jared; de Jong, Pieter J.; Lloyd, Kent C.

    2016-01-01

    The unintended consequences of gene targeting in mouse models have not been thoroughly studied and a more systematic analysis is needed to understand the frequency and characteristics of off-target effects. Using RNA-seq, we evaluated targeted and neighboring gene expression in tissues from 44 homozygous mutants compared with C57BL/6N control mice. Two allele types were evaluated: 15 targeted trap mutations (TRAP); and 29 deletion alleles (DEL), usually a deletion between the translational start and the 3’ UTR. Both targeting strategies insert a bacterial beta-galactosidase reporter (LacZ) and a neomycin resistance selection cassette. Evaluating transcription of genes in +/- 500 kb of flanking DNA around the targeted gene, we found up-regulated genes more frequently around DEL compared with TRAP alleles, however the frequency of alleles with local down-regulated genes flanking DEL and TRAP targets was similar. Down-regulated genes around both DEL and TRAP targets were found at a higher frequency than expected from a genome-wide survey. However, only around DEL targets were up-regulated genes found with a significantly higher frequency compared with genome-wide sampling. Transcriptome analysis confirms targeting in 97% of DEL alleles, but in only 47% of TRAP alleles probably due to non-functional splice variants, and some splicing around the gene trap. Local effects on gene expression are likely due to a number of factors including compensatory regulation, loss or disruption of intragenic regulatory elements, the exogenous promoter in the neo selection cassette, removal of insulating DNA in the DEL mutants, and local silencing due to disruption of normal chromatin organization or presence of exogenous DNA. An understanding of local position effects is important for understanding and interpreting any phenotype attributed to targeted gene mutations, or to spontaneous indels. PMID:26839965

  1. Mutation Analysis of the LH Receptor Gene in Leydig Cell Adenoma and Hyperplasia and Functional and Biochemical Studies of Activating Mutations of the LH Receptor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Lumbroso, Serge; Verhoef-Post, Miriam; Richter-Unruh, Annette; Looijenga, Leendert H. J.; Funaro, Ada; Beishuizen, Auke; van Marle, André; Drop, Stenvert L. S.; Themmen, Axel P. N.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Germline and somatic activating mutations in the LH receptor (LHR) gene have been reported. Objective: Our objective was to perform mutation analysis of the LHR gene of patients with Leydig cell adenoma or hyperplasia. Functional studies were conducted to compare the D578H-LHR mutant with the wild-type (WT)-LHR and the D578G-LHR mutant, a classic cause of testotoxicosis. The three main signal transduction pathways in which LHR is involved were studied. Patients: We describe eight male patients with gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty due to Leydig cell adenoma or hyperplasia. Results: The D578H-LHR mutation was found in the adenoma or nodule with hyperplasia in all but two patients. D578H-LHR displayed a constitutively increased but noninducible production of cAMP, led to a very high production of inositol phosphates, and induced a slight phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK in the absence of human chorionic gonadotropin. The D578G-LHR showed a response intermediate between WT-LHR and the D578H-LHR. Subcellular localization studies showed that the WT-LHR was almost exclusively located at the cell membrane, whereas the D578H-LHR showed signs of internalization. D578H-LHR was the only receptor to colocalize with early endosomes in the absence of human chorionic gonadotropin. Conclusions: Although several LHR mutations have been reported in testotoxicosis, the D578H-LHR mutation, which has been found only as a somatic mutation, appears up until now to be specifically responsible for Leydig cell adenomas. This is reflected by the different activation of the signal transduction pathways, when compared with the WT-LHR or D578G-LHR, which may explain the tumorigenesis in the D578H mutant. PMID:21490077

  2. Mutational analysis of PKD1 gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyan; Li, Lanrong; Liu, Qingmin

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a hereditary disease and common renal disease. Mutations of PKD genes are responsible for this disease. We analyzed a large Chinese family with ADPKD using Sanger sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for this disease. The family comprised 27 individuals including 10 ADPKD patients. These ADPKD patients had severe renal disease and most of them died very young. We analyzed 6 survival patients gene and found they all had C10529T mutation in exon 35 of PKD1 gene. We did not found gene mutation in any unaffected relatives or 300 unrelated controls. These findings suggested that the C10529T mutation in PKD1 gene might be the pathogenic mutation responsible for the disease in this family. PMID:26722532

  3. Mutational analysis of PKD1 gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyan; Li, Lanrong; Liu, Qingmin

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a hereditary disease and common renal disease. Mutations of PKD genes are responsible for this disease. We analyzed a large Chinese family with ADPKD using Sanger sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for this disease. The family comprised 27 individuals including 10 ADPKD patients. These ADPKD patients had severe renal disease and most of them died very young. We analyzed 6 survival patients gene and found they all had C10529T mutation in exon 35 of PKD1 gene. We did not found gene mutation in any unaffected relatives or 300 unrelated controls. These findings suggested that the C10529T mutation in PKD1 gene might be the pathogenic mutation responsible for the disease in this family. PMID:26722532

  4. Linkage and mutational analysis of familial Alzheimer disease kindreds for the APP gene region

    SciTech Connect

    Kamino, K.; Anderson, L.; O'dahl, S.; Nemens, E.; Bird, T.D.; Schellenberg, G.D.; Wijsman, E.M.; Kukall, W.; Larson, E. ); Heston, L.L.

    1992-11-01

    A large number of familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) kindreds were examined to determine whether mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene could be responsible for the disease. Previous studies have identified three mutations at APP codon 717 which are pathogenic for Alzheimer disease (AD). Samples from affected subjects were examined for mutations in exons 16 and 17 of the APP gene. A combination of direct sequencing and single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis was used. Sporadic AD and normal controls were also examined by the same methods. Five sequence variants were identified. One variant at APP codon 693 resulted in a Glu[yields]Gly change. This is the same codon as the hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type Glu[yields]Gln mutation. Another single-base change at APP codon 708 did not alter the amino acid encoded at this site. Two point mutations and a 6-bp deletion were identified in the intronic sequences surrounding exon 17. None of the variants could be unambigously determined to be responsible for FAD. The larger families were also analyzed by testing for linkage of FAD to a highly polymorphic short tandem repeat marker (D21S210) that is tightly linked to APP. Highly negative LOD scores were obtained for the family groups tested, and linkage was formally excluded beyond [theta] = .10 for the Volga German kindreds, [theta] = .20 for early-onset non-Volga Germans, and [theta] = .10 for late-onset families. LOD scores for linkage of FAD to markers centromeric to APP (D21S1/S11, D21S13, and D21S215) were also negative in the three family groups. These studies show that APP mutations account for AD in only a small fraction of FAD kindreds. 49 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Mutation analysis of the entire PKD1 gene: genetic and diagnostic implications.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, S; Strmecki, L; Gamble, V; Burton, S; Sneddon, V; Peral, B; Roy, S; Bakkaloglu, A; Komel, R; Winearls, C G; Harris, P C

    2001-01-01

    Mutation screening of the major autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) locus, PKD1, has proved difficult because of the large transcript and complex reiterated gene region. We have developed methods, employing long polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and specific reverse transcription-PCR, to amplify all of the PKD1 coding area. The gene was screened for mutations in 131 unrelated patients with ADPKD, using the protein-truncation test and direct sequencing. Mutations were identified in 57 families, and, including 24 previously characterized changes from this cohort, a detection rate of 52.3% was achieved in 155 families. Mutations were found in all areas of the gene, from exons 1 to 46, with no clear hotspot identified. There was no significant difference in mutation frequency between the single-copy and duplicated areas, but mutations were more than twice as frequent in the 3' half of the gene, compared with the 5' half. The majority of changes were predicted to truncate the protein through nonsense mutations (32%), insertions or deletions (29.6%), or splicing changes (6.2%), although the figures were biased by the methods employed, and, in sequenced areas, approximately 50% of all mutations were missense or in-frame. Studies elsewhere have suggested that gene conversion may be a significant cause of mutation at PKD1, but only 3 of 69 different mutations matched PKD1-like HG sequence. A relatively high rate of new PKD1 mutation was calculated, 1.8x10-5 mutations per generation, consistent with the many different mutations identified (69 in 81 pedigrees) and suggesting significant selection against mutant alleles. The mutation detection rate, in this study, of >50% is comparable to that achieved for other large multiexon genes and shows the feasibility of genetic diagnosis in this disorder. PMID:11115377

  6. Functional Analysis of A Novel Splicing Mutation in The Mutase Gene of Two Unrelated Pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Miryounesi, Mohammad; Pasalar, Parvin; Keramatipour, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective Methylmalonic acidura (MMA) is a rare autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism. In this study we present a novel nucleotide change in the mutase (MUT) gene of two unrelated Iranian pedigrees and introduce the methods used for its functional analysis. Materials and Methods Two probands with definite diagnosis of MMA and a common novel variant in the MUT were included in a descriptive study. Bioinformatic prediction of the splicing variant was done with different prediction servers. Reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was done for splicing analysis and the products were analyzed by sequencing. Results The included index patients showed elevated levels of propionylcarnitine (C3). Urine organic acid analysis confirmed the diagnosis of MMA, and screening for mutations in the MUT revealed a novel C to G variation at the 3´ splice acceptor site in intron 12. In silico analysis suggested the change as a mutation in a conserved sequence. The splicing analysis showed that the C to G nucleotide change at position -3 in the acceptor splice site can lead to retention of the intron 12 sequence. Conclusion This is the first report of a mutation at the position -3 in the MUT intron 12 (c.2125-3C>G). The results suggest that the identified variation can be associated with the typical clinical manifestations of MMA. PMID:27602322

  7. Molecular and functional analysis of two new MTTP gene mutations in an atypical case of abetalipoproteinemia.

    PubMed

    Di Filippo, Mathilde; Créhalet, Hervé; Samson-Bouma, Marie Elisabeth; Bonnet, Véronique; Aggerbeck, Lawrence P; Rabès, Jean-Pierre; Gottrand, Frederic; Luc, Gérald; Bozon, Dominique; Sassolas, Agnès

    2012-03-01

    Abetalipoproteinemia (ABL) is an inherited disease characterized by the defective assembly and secretion of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins caused by mutations in the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein large subunit (MTP) gene (MTTP). We report here a female patient with an unusual clinical and biochemical ABL phenotype. She presented with severe liver injury, low levels of LDL-cholesterol, and subnormal levels of vitamin E, but only mild fat malabsorption and no retinitis pigmentosa or acanthocytosis. Our objective was to search for MTTP mutations and to determine the relationship between the genotype and this particular phenotype. The subject exhibited compound heterozygosity for two novel MTTP mutations: one missense mutation (p.Leu435His) and an intronic deletion (c.619-5_619-2del). COS-1 cells expressing the missense mutant protein exhibited negligible levels of MTP activity. In contrast, the minigene splicing reporter assay showed an incomplete splicing defect of the intronic deletion, with 26% of the normal splicing being maintained in the transfected HeLa cells. The small amount of MTP activity resulting from the residual normal splicing in the patient explains the atypical phenotype observed. Our investigation provides an example of a functional analysis of unclassified variations, which is an absolute necessity for the molecular diagnosis of atypical ABL cases. PMID:22236406

  8. Gene Mutation Analysis in 253 Chinese Children with Unexplained Epilepsy and Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Gao, Kai; Xie, Han; Wu, Ye; Zhang, Yuehua; Wang, Jingmin; Gao, Feng; Wu, Xiru; Jiang, Yuwu

    2015-01-01

    Objective Epilepsy and intellectual/developmental disabilities (ID/DD) have a high rate of co-occurrence. Here, we investigated gene mutations in Chinese children with unexplained epilepsy and ID/DD. Methods We used targeted next-generation sequencing to detect mutations within 300 genes related to epilepsy and ID/DD in 253 Chinese children with unexplained epilepsy and ID/DD. A series of filtering criteria was used to find the possible pathogenic variations. Validation and parental origin analyses were performed by Sanger sequencing. We reviewed the phenotypes of patients with each mutated gene. Results We identified 32 novel and 16 reported mutations within 24 genes in 46 patients. The detection rate was 18% (46/253) in the whole group and 26% (17/65) in the early-onset (before three months after birth) epilepsy group. To our knowledge, we are the first to report KCNAB1 is a disease-causing gene of epilepsy by identifying a novel de novo mutation (c.1062dupCA p.Leu355HisfsTer5) within this gene in one patient with early infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EIEE). Patients with an SCN1A mutation accounted for the largest proportion, 17% (8/46). A total of 38% (9/24) of the mutated genes re-occurred at least 2 times and 63% (15/24) occurred only one time. Ion channel genes are the most common (8/24) and genes related to synapse are the next most common to occur (5/24). Significance We have established genetic diagnosis for 46 patients of our cohort. Early-onset epilepsy had the highest detection rate. KCNAB1 mutation was first identified in EIEE patient. We expanded the phenotype and mutation spectrum of the genes we identified. The mutated genes in this cohort are mostly isolated. This suggests that epilepsy and ID/DD phenotypes occur as a consequence of brain dysfunction caused by a highly diverse population of mutated genes. Ion channel genes and genes related to synapse were more common mutated in this patient cohort. PMID:26544041

  9. Screening of point mutations by multiple SSCP analysis in the dystrophin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Lasa, A.; Baiget, M.; Gallano, P.

    1994-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, X-linked neuromuscular disorder. The population frequency of DMD is one in approximately 3500 boys, of which one third is thought to be a new mutant. The DMD gene is the largest known to date, spanning over 2,3 Mb in band Xp21.2; 79 exons are transcribed into a 14 Kb mRNA coding for a protein of 427 kD which has been named dystrophin. It has been shown that about 65% of affected boys have a gene deletion with a wide variation in localization and size. The remaining affected individuals who have no detectable deletions or duplications would probably carry more subtle mutations that are difficult to detect. These mutations occur in several different exons and seem to be unique to single patients. Their identification represents a formidable goal because of the large size and complexity of the dystrophin gene. SSCP is a very efficient method for the detection of point mutations if the parameters that affect the separation of the strands are optimized for a particular DNA fragment. The multiple SSCP allows the simultaneous study of several exons, and implies the use of different conditions because no single set of conditions will be optimal for all fragments. Seventy-eight DMD patients with no deletion or duplication in the dystrophin gene were selected for the multiple SSCP analysis. Genomic DNA from these patients was amplified using the primers described for the diagnosis procedure (muscle promoter and exons 3, 8, 12, 16, 17, 19, 32, 45, 48 and 51). We have observed different mobility shifts in bands corresponding to exons 8, 12, 43 and 51. In exons 17 and 45, altered electrophoretic patterns were found in different samples identifying polymorphisms already described.

  10. Analysis of in vivo mutation in the Hprt and Tk genes of mouse lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Shaddock, Joseph G; Heflich, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Assays measuring mutant frequencies in endogenous reporter genes are used for identifying potentially genotoxic environmental agents and discovering phenotypes prone to genomic instability and diseases, such as cancer. Here, we describe methods for identifying mouse spleen lymphocytes with mutations in the endogenous X-linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (Hprt) gene and the endogenous autosomal thymidine kinase (Tk) gene. The selective clonal expansion of mutant lymphocytes is based upon the phenotypic properties of HPRT- and TK-deficient cells. The same procedure can be utilized for quantifying Hprt mutations in most strains of mice (and, with minor changes, in other mammalian species), while mutations in the Tk gene can be determined only in transgenic mice that are heterozygous for inactivation of this gene. Expanded mutant clones can be further analyzed to classify the types of mutations in the Tk gene (small intragenic mutations vs. large chromosomal mutations) and to determine the nature of intragenic mutation in both the Hprt and Tk genes. PMID:24623234

  11. A microsphere-based assay for mutation analysis of the biotinidase gene using dried blood spots

    PubMed Central

    Lindau-Shepard, Barbara; Janik, David K.; Pass, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessive syndrome caused by defects in the biotinidase gene, the product of which affects biotin metabolism. Newborn screening (NBS) for biotinidase deficiency can identify affected infants prior to onset of symptoms; biotin supplementation can resolve or prevent the clinical features. In NBS, dry blood spots (DBS) are usually tested for biotinidase enzyme activity by colorimetric analysis. By taking advantage of the multiplexing capabilities of the Luminex platform, we have developed a microsphere-based array genotyping method for the simultaneous detection of six disease causing mutations in the biotinidase gene, thereby permitting a second tier of molecular analysis. Genomic DNA was extracted from 3.2 mm DBS. Biotinidase gene sequences, containing the mutations of interest, were amplified by multiplexed polymerase chain reaction, followed by multiplexed allele-specific primer extension using universally tagged genotyping primers. The products were then hybridized to anti-tag carrying xTAG microspheres and detected on the Luminex platform. Genotypes were verified by sequencing. Genotyping results of 22 known biotinidase deficient samples by our xTAG biotinidase assay was in concordance with the results obtained from DNA sequencing, for all 6 mutations used in our panel. These results indicate that genotyping by an xTAG microsphere-based array is accurate, flexible, and can be adapted for high-throughput. Since NBS for biotinidase deficiency is by enzymatic assay, less than optimal quality of the DBS itself can compromise enzyme activity, while the DNA from these samples mostly remains unaffected. This assay warrants evaluation as a viable complement to the biotinidase semi-quantitative colorimetric assay.

  12. DGGE analysis of the coproporphyrinogen oxidase gene: two new mutations in DNA from Danish patients with hereditary coproporphyria.

    PubMed

    Petersen, N E; Käehne, M; Christiansen, L; Brock, A; Hother-Nielsen, O; Rasmussen, K

    2000-11-01

    The knowledge of at least 21 different mutations and several polymorphisms in the coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPO) gene demonstrates that the molecular basis of hereditary coproporphyria is heterogeneous. We developed a DGGE-based assay for the analysis of exons 2 to 7, including 14-96 nucleotides of the flanking intronic sequences of the CPO gene. To render it suitable for the clinical diagnostic laboratory, we designed the assay to allow use of identical PCR conditions and the same DGGE gel for analyses of all the regions. Using this assay, and subsequent sequencing of gene regions containing interallelic variations, two novel mutations in the CPO gene were identified: a missense mutation (607G-->A), leading to the substitution of an alanine with a threonine, and a nonsense mutation (1281G-->A), giving rise to a stop codon 28 codons upstream to the wild-type stop codon. PMID:11202054

  13. Analysis of regulatory mechanism after ErbB4 gene mutation based on local modeling methodology.

    PubMed

    Chen, C L; Zhao, J W

    2016-01-01

    ErbB4 is an oncogene belonging to the epidermal growth factor receptor family and contributes to the occurrence and development of multiple cancers, such as gastric, breast, and colorectal cancers. Therefore, studies of the regulation of ErbB4 in cancerigenic pathway will advance molecular targeted therapy. Advanced bioinformatic analysis softwares, such as ExPASy, Predictprotei, QUARK, and I-TASSER, were used to analyze the regulatory mechanism after ErbB4 gene mutation in terms of amino acid sequence, primary, secondary, and tertiary structure of the protein and upstream-downstream receptor/ligands. Mutation of the 19th and 113th amino acids at the carboxyl terminus of ErbB4 protein did not affect its biological nature, but its secondary structure changed and protein binding sites were near 2 mutational sites; moreover, after mutation introduction, additional binding sites were observed. Tertiary structure modeling indicated that local structure of ErbB4 was changed from an α helical conformation into a β chain folding structure; the α helical conformation is the functional site of protein, while active sites are typically near junctions between helical regions, thus the helical structures are easily destroyed and change into folding structures or other structures after stretching. Mutable sites of ErbB4 is exact binding sites where dimer formed with other epidermal growth factor family proteins; mutation enabled the ErbB4 receptor to bind to neuregulin 1 ligand without dimer formation, disrupting the signal transduction pathway and affecting ErbB4 function. PMID:27323039

  14. Mutation analysis of large tumor suppressor genes LATS1 and LATS2 supports a tumor suppressor role in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tian; Bachman, John; Lai, Zhi-Chun

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, human cancer genome projects provide unprecedented opportunities for the discovery of cancer genes and signaling pathways that contribute to tumor development. While numerous gene mutations can be identified from each cancer genome, what these mutations mean for cancer is a challenging question to address, especially for those from less understood putative new cancer genes. As a powerful approach, in silico bioinformatics analysis could efficiently sort out mutations that are predicted to damage gene function. Such an analysis of human large tumor suppressor genes, LATS1 and LATS2, has been carried out and the results support a role of hLATS1//2 as negative growth regulators and tumor suppressors. PMID:25482410

  15. Mutation analysis of TMC1 identifies four new mutations and suggests an additional deafness gene at locus DFNA36-DFNB7/11

    PubMed Central

    Hilgert, Nele; Alasti, Fatemeh; Dieltjens, Nele; Pawlik, Barbara; Wollnik, Bernd; Uyguner, Oya; Delmaghani, Sedigheh; Weil, Dominique; Petit, Christine; Danis, Evi; Yang, Tao; Pandelia, Efthimia; Petersen, Michael B.; Goossens, Dirk; Favero, Jurgen Del; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein; Smith, Richard JH; Van Camp, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is the most frequent sensorineural disorder, affecting 1 in 1000 newborns. In more than half of these babies, the hearing loss is inherited. Hereditary hearing loss is a very heterogeneous trait, with about 100 gene localizations and 44 gene identifications for nonsyndromic hearing loss. TMC1 has been identified as the disease-causing gene for autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss at the DFNA36 and DFNB7/11 loci, respectively. To date, two dominant and 18 recessive TMC1 mutations have been reported as the cause of hearing loss in 34 families. In this report, we describe linkage to DFNA36 and DFNB7/11 in one family with dominant and 10 families with recessive nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss. In addition, mutation analysis of TMC1 was performed in 51 familial Turkish patients with autosomal recessive hearing loss. TMC1 mutations were identified in seven of the families segregating recessive hearing loss. The pathogenic variants we found included two known mutations, c.100C>T and c.1165C>T, and four new mutations, c.2350C>T, c.776+1G>A, c.767_768del and c.1166G>A. The absence of TMC1 mutations in the remaining six linked families implies the presence of mutations outside the coding region of this gene, or alternatively, at least one additional deafness-causing gene in this region. The analysis of copy number variations in TMC1 as well as DNA sequencing of 15 additional candidate genes did not reveal any proven pathogenic changes, leaving both hypotheses open. PMID:18616530

  16. Mutational analysis of the luteinizing hormone receptor gene in two individuals with Leydig cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Canto, Patricia; Söderlund, Daniela; Ramón, Guillermo; Nishimura, Elisa; Méndez, Juan Pablo

    2002-03-01

    Inactivating mutations of the luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) gene in males induce Leydig cell agenesis or hypoplasia, while activating mutations cause testotoxicosis. Recently, it was demonstrated that a somatic heterozygous activating mutation of the LHR gene (Asp578His), limited to the tumor, was the cause of Leydig cell adenomas in three unrelated patients. We describe the molecular study of two unrelated boys with gonadotropin-independent hypersecretion of testosterone due to Leydig cell adenomas. Genomic DNA was extracted from the tumor, the adjacent normal testis tissue, and blood leukocytes. Both individuals exhibited an heterozygous missense mutation, limited only to the tumor, consisting of a guanine (G) to cytosine (C) substitution at codon 578 (GAT to CAT), turning aspartic acid into histidine. The presence of the same mutation in different ethnic groups demonstrates the existence of a mutational hot spot in the LHR gene. Indeed, this mutation occurs at the conserved aspartic acid residue at amino acid 578, where a substitution by glycine is the most common mutation observed in testotoxicosis and where a substitution by tyrosine has been linked to a more severe clinical phenotype where diffuse Leydig cell hyperplasia is found. Our results confirm the fact that somatic activating mutations of gonadotropin receptors are involved in gonadal tumorigenesis. PMID:11857565

  17. Mutation analysis of the phospholamban gene in 315 South Africans with dilated, hypertrophic, peripartum and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Fish, Maryam; Shaboodien, Gasnat; Kraus, Sarah; Sliwa, Karen; Seidman, Christine E; Burke, Michael A; Crotti, Lia; Schwartz, Peter J; Mayosi, Bongani M

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is an important cause of heart failure in Sub-Saharan Africa, accounting for up to 30% of adult heart failure hospitalisations. This high prevalence poses a challenge in societies without access to resources and interventions essential for disease management. Over 80 genes have been implicated as a cause of cardiomyopathy. Mutations in the phospholamban (PLN) gene are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and severe heart failure. In Africa, the prevalence of PLN mutations in cardiomyopathy patients is unknown. Our aim was to screen 315 patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (n = 111), DCM (n = 95), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n = 40) and peripartum cardiomyopathy (n = 69) for disease-causing PLN mutations by high resolution melt analysis and DNA sequencing. We detected the previously reported PLN c.25C > T (p.R9C) mutation in a South African family with severe autosomal dominant DCM. Haplotype analysis revealed that this mutation occurred against a different haplotype background to that of the original North American family and was therefore unlikely to have been inherited from a common ancestor. No other mutations in PLN were detected (mutation prevalence = 0.2%). We conclude that PLN is a rare cause of cardiomyopathy in African patients. The PLN p.R9C mutation is not well-tolerated, emphasising the importance of this gene in cardiac function. PMID:26917049

  18. Mutation analysis of the phospholamban gene in 315 South Africans with dilated, hypertrophic, peripartum and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Fish, Maryam; Shaboodien, Gasnat; Kraus, Sarah; Sliwa, Karen; Seidman, Christine E.; Burke, Michael A.; Crotti, Lia; Schwartz, Peter J.; Mayosi, Bongani M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is an important cause of heart failure in Sub-Saharan Africa, accounting for up to 30% of adult heart failure hospitalisations. This high prevalence poses a challenge in societies without access to resources and interventions essential for disease management. Over 80 genes have been implicated as a cause of cardiomyopathy. Mutations in the phospholamban (PLN) gene are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and severe heart failure. In Africa, the prevalence of PLN mutations in cardiomyopathy patients is unknown. Our aim was to screen 315 patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (n = 111), DCM (n = 95), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n = 40) and peripartum cardiomyopathy (n = 69) for disease-causing PLN mutations by high resolution melt analysis and DNA sequencing. We detected the previously reported PLN c.25C > T (p.R9C) mutation in a South African family with severe autosomal dominant DCM. Haplotype analysis revealed that this mutation occurred against a different haplotype background to that of the original North American family and was therefore unlikely to have been inherited from a common ancestor. No other mutations in PLN were detected (mutation prevalence = 0.2%). We conclude that PLN is a rare cause of cardiomyopathy in African patients. The PLN p.R9C mutation is not well-tolerated, emphasising the importance of this gene in cardiac function. PMID:26917049

  19. High Resolution Melting Analysis for Rapid Mutation Screening in Gyrase and Topoisomerase IV Genes in Quinolone-Resistant Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Thong, Kwai Lin

    2014-01-01

    The increased Salmonella resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones is a public health concern in the Southeast Asian region. The objective of this study is to develop a high resolution melt curve (HRM) assay to rapidly screen for mutations in quinolone-resistant determining region (QRDR) of gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes. DNA sequencing was performed on 62 Salmonella strains to identify mutations in the QRDR of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes. Mutations were detected in QRDR of gyrA (n = 52; S83F, S83Y, S83I, D87G, D87Y, and D87N) and parE (n = 1; M438I). Salmonella strains with mutations within QRDR of gyrA are generally more resistant to nalidixic acid (MIC 16 > 256 μg/mL). Mutations were uncommon within the QRDR of gyrB, parC, and parE genes. In the HRM assay, mutants can be distinguished from the wild-type strains based on the transition of melt curves, which is more prominent when the profiles are displayed in difference plot. In conclusion, HRM analysis allows for rapid screening for mutations at the QRDRs of gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes in Salmonella. This assay markedly reduced the sequencing effort involved in mutational studies of quinolone-resistance genes. PMID:25371903

  20. High resolution melting analysis for rapid mutation screening in gyrase and Topoisomerase IV genes in quinolone-resistant Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Ngoi, Soo Tein; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2014-01-01

    The increased Salmonella resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones is a public health concern in the Southeast Asian region. The objective of this study is to develop a high resolution melt curve (HRM) assay to rapidly screen for mutations in quinolone-resistant determining region (QRDR) of gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes. DNA sequencing was performed on 62 Salmonella strains to identify mutations in the QRDR of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes. Mutations were detected in QRDR of gyrA (n = 52; S83F, S83Y, S83I, D87G, D87Y, and D87N) and parE (n = 1; M438I). Salmonella strains with mutations within QRDR of gyrA are generally more resistant to nalidixic acid (MIC 16 > 256 μg/mL). Mutations were uncommon within the QRDR of gyrB, parC, and parE genes. In the HRM assay, mutants can be distinguished from the wild-type strains based on the transition of melt curves, which is more prominent when the profiles are displayed in difference plot. In conclusion, HRM analysis allows for rapid screening for mutations at the QRDRs of gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes in Salmonella. This assay markedly reduced the sequencing effort involved in mutational studies of quinolone-resistance genes. PMID:25371903

  1. Mutation and expression analysis of the putative prostate tumour-suppressor gene PTEN.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, I. C.; Stewart, L. M.; Phillips, S. M.; Hamilton, J. A.; Gray, N. E.; Watson, G. J.; Spurr, N. K.; Snary, D.

    1998-01-01

    The chromosomal region 10q23-24 is frequently deleted in a number of tumour types, including prostate adenocarcinoma and glioma. A candidate tumour-suppressor gene at 10q23.3, designated PTENor MMAC1, with putative actin-binding and tyrosine phosphatase domains has recently been described. Mutations in PTEN have been identified in cell lines derived from gliomas, melanomas and prostate tumours and from a number of tumour specimens derived from glial, breast, endometrial and kidney tissue. Germline mutations in PTEN appear to be responsible for Cowden disease. We identified five PTEN mutations in 37 primary prostatic tumours analysed and found that 70% of tumours showed loss or alteration of at least one PTEN allele, supporting the evidence for PTEN involvement in prostate tumour progression. We raised antisera to a peptide from PTEN and showed that reactivity occurs in numerous small cytoplasmic organelles and that the protein is commonly expressed in a variety of cell types. Northern blot analysis revealed multiple RNA species; some arise as a result of alternative polyadenylation sites, but others may be due to alternative splicing. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9823969

  2. Mutational Analysis of the TYR and OCA2 Genes in Four Chinese Families with Oculocutaneous Albinism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mengping; Fan, Ning; Yang, Jie; Liu, Lu; Wang, Ying; Liu, Xuyang

    2015-01-01

    Background Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is an autosomal recessive disorder. The most common type OCA1 and OCA2 are caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the tyrosinase gene (TYR) and OCA2 gene, respectively. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the molecular basis of oculocutaneous albinism in four Chinese families. Patients and Methods Four non-consanguineous OCA families were included in the study. The TYR and OCA2 genes of all individuals were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequenced and compared with a reference database. Results Four patients with a diagnosis of oculocutaneous albinism, presented with milky skin, white or light brown hair and nystagmus. Genetic analyses demonstrated that patient A was compound heterozygous for c.1037-7T.A, c.1037-10_11delTT and c.1114delG mutations in the TYR gene; patient B was heterozygous for c.593C>T and c.1426A>G mutations in the OCA2 gene, patients C and D were compound heterozygous mutations in the TYR gene (c.549_550delGT and c.896G>A, c.832C>T and c.985T>C, respectively). The heterozygous c.549_550delGT and c.1114delG alleles in the TYR gene were two novel mutations. Interestingly, heterozygous members in these pedigrees who carried c.1114delG mutations in the TYR gene or c.1426A>G mutations in the OCA2 gene presented with blond or brown hair and pale skin, but no ocular disorders when they were born; the skin of these patients accumulated pigment over time and with sun exposure. Conclusion This study expands the mutation spectrum of oculocutaneous albinism. It is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, to report that c.549_550delGT and c.1114delG mutations in the TYR gene were associated with OCA. The two mutations (c.1114delG in the TYR gene and c.1426A>G in the OCA2 gene) may be responsible for partial clinical manifestations of OCA. PMID:25919014

  3. Network Analysis of Genome-Wide Selective Constraint Reveals a Gene Network Active in Early Fetal Brain Intolerant of Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinmyung; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Daly, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Using robust, integrated analysis of multiple genomic datasets, we show that genes depleted for non-synonymous de novo mutations form a subnetwork of 72 members under strong selective constraint. We further show this subnetwork is preferentially expressed in the early development of the human hippocampus and is enriched for genes mutated in neurological Mendelian disorders. We thus conclude that carefully orchestrated developmental processes are under strong constraint in early brain development, and perturbations caused by mutation have adverse outcomes subject to strong purifying selection. Our findings demonstrate that selective forces can act on groups of genes involved in the same process, supporting the notion that purifying selection can act coordinately on multiple genes. Our approach provides a statistically robust, interpretable way to identify the tissues and developmental times where groups of disease genes are active. PMID:27305007

  4. Analysis of catechol-O-methyltransferase gene mutation and identification of new pathogenic gene for paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chengzhi; Li, Jia; Zhu, Lianhai; Lu, Zhenhui; Huang, Huaiyu

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to analyze the mutation site and frequency of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene, to explore the relationship between COMT genotype and phenotype, and to find new pathogenic genes for paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD). PKD patients who were treated from December 2011 to January 2014 were selected and subjected to genetic testing in the exon region of COMT. Two patients and one intrafamilial healthy control were subjected to exome sequencing using whole exome capture in combination with high-throughput sequencing to find candidate pathogenic gene sites. The results were verified by Sanger sequencing. A total of 11 familial PKD patients from 4 families and 9 sporadic patients without family history were included. Pathogenic c.634dupC(p.P220fsX7) mutation of COMT gene was found in 7 familial PKD patients and3 sporadic patients. Mutated COMT gene carriers suffered from PKD earlier (average age of onset: 11.61 ± 2.33 vs 16.21 ± 2.58, P = 0.001) with symmetric symptoms in most cases, while the mutation-negative group only showed unilateral symptoms (P = 0.001). The mutation-positive group also had more daily attacks (P = 0.038). Carbamazepine worked for all mutation-positive patients (10/10, 100%), but only for a part of mutation-negative patients (3/10, 30.0%). About 90000 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 2000 insertion-deletion polymorphisms were detected in each of the three samples. c.737C → T(p.T246 M) mutation of POC1B gene was a new pathogenic site for a selected family. COMT gene mutation, which was the pathogenesis of most familial PKD patients and a part of sporadic patients, predicted the response to carbamazepine. POC1B may be a novel pathogenic gene for PKD. PMID:26650803

  5. Comprehensive genomic analysis of malignant pleural mesothelioma identifies recurrent mutations, gene fusions and splicing alterations.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Raphael; Stawiski, Eric W; Goldstein, Leonard D; Durinck, Steffen; De Rienzo, Assunta; Modrusan, Zora; Gnad, Florian; Nguyen, Thong T; Jaiswal, Bijay S; Chirieac, Lucian R; Sciaranghella, Daniele; Dao, Nhien; Gustafson, Corinne E; Munir, Kiara J; Hackney, Jason A; Chaudhuri, Amitabha; Gupta, Ravi; Guillory, Joseph; Toy, Karen; Ha, Connie; Chen, Ying-Jiun; Stinson, Jeremy; Chaudhuri, Subhra; Zhang, Na; Wu, Thomas D; Sugarbaker, David J; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Richards, William G; Seshagiri, Somasekar

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed transcriptomes (n = 211), whole exomes (n = 99) and targeted exomes (n = 103) from 216 malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) tumors. Using RNA-seq data, we identified four distinct molecular subtypes: sarcomatoid, epithelioid, biphasic-epithelioid (biphasic-E) and biphasic-sarcomatoid (biphasic-S). Through exome analysis, we found BAP1, NF2, TP53, SETD2, DDX3X, ULK2, RYR2, CFAP45, SETDB1 and DDX51 to be significantly mutated (q-score ≥ 0.8) in MPMs. We identified recurrent mutations in several genes, including SF3B1 (∼2%; 4/216) and TRAF7 (∼2%; 5/216). SF3B1-mutant samples showed a splicing profile distinct from that of wild-type tumors. TRAF7 alterations occurred primarily in the WD40 domain and were, except in one case, mutually exclusive with NF2 alterations. We found recurrent gene fusions and splice alterations to be frequent mechanisms for inactivation of NF2, BAP1 and SETD2. Through integrated analyses, we identified alterations in Hippo, mTOR, histone methylation, RNA helicase and p53 signaling pathways in MPMs. PMID:26928227

  6. Mutation analysis of the ERCC4/FANCQ gene in hereditary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kohlhase, Sandra; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Schürmann, Peter; Bermisheva, Marina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Antonenkova, Natalia; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Meyer, Andreas; Christiansen, Hans; Schindler, Detlev; Dörk, Thilo

    2014-01-01

    The ERCC4 protein forms a structure-specific endonuclease involved in the DNA damage response. Different cancer syndromes such as a subtype of Xeroderma pigmentosum, XPF, and recently a subtype of Fanconi Anemia, FA-Q, have been attributed to biallelic ERCC4 gene mutations. To investigate whether monoallelic ERCC4 gene defects play some role in the inherited component of breast cancer susceptibility, we sequenced the whole ERCC4 coding region and flanking untranslated portions in a series of 101 Byelorussian and German breast cancer patients selected for familial disease (set 1, n = 63) or for the presence of the rs1800067 risk haplotype (set 2, n = 38). This study confirmed six known and one novel exonic variants, including four missense substitutions but no truncating mutation. Missense substitution p.R415Q (rs1800067), a previously postulated breast cancer susceptibility allele, was subsequently screened for in a total of 3,698 breast cancer cases and 2,868 controls from Germany, Belarus or Russia. The Gln415 allele appeared protective against breast cancer in the German series, with the strongest effect for ductal histology (OR 0.67; 95%CI 0.49; 0.92; p = 0.003), but this association was not confirmed in the other two series, with the combined analysis yielding an overall Mantel-Haenszel OR of 0.94 (95% CI 0.81; 1.08). There was no significant effect of p.R415Q on breast cancer survival in the German patient series. The other three detected ERCC4 missense mutations included two known rare variants as well as a novel substitution, p.E17V, that we identified on a p.R415Q haplotype background. The p.E17V mutation is predicted to be probably damaging but was present in just one heterozygous patient. We conclude that the contribution of ERCC4/FANCQ coding mutations to hereditary breast cancer in Central and Eastern Europe is likely to be small. PMID:24465539

  7. Exome Analysis Reveals Differentially Mutated Gene Signatures of Stage, Grade and Subtype in Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Li, You; Wang, Xiaosheng; Vural, Suleyman; Mishra, Nitish K.; Cowan, Kenneth H.; Guda, Chittibabu

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancers exhibit highly heterogeneous molecular profiles. Although gene expression profiles have been used to predict the risks and prognostic outcomes of breast cancers, the high variability of gene expression limits its clinical application. In contrast, genetic mutation profiles would be more advantageous than gene expression profiles because genetic mutations can be stably detected and the mutational heterogeneity widely exists in breast cancer genomes. We analyzed 98 breast cancer whole exome samples that were sorted into three subtypes, two grades and two stages. The sum deleterious effect of all mutations in each gene was scored to identify differentially mutated genes (DMGs) for this case-control study. DMGs were corroborated using extensive published knowledge. Functional consequences of deleterious SNVs on protein structure and function were also investigated. Genes such as ERBB2, ESP8, PPP2R4, KIAA0922, SP4, CENPJ, PRCP and SELP that have been experimentally or clinically verified to be tightly associated with breast cancer prognosis are among the DMGs identified in this study. We also identified some genes such as ARL6IP5, RAET1E, and ANO7 that could be crucial for breast cancer development and prognosis. Further, SNVs such as rs1058808, rs2480452, rs61751507, rs79167802, rs11540666, and rs2229437 that potentially influence protein functions are observed at significantly different frequencies in different comparison groups. Protein structure modeling revealed that many non-synonymous SNVs have a deleterious effect on protein stability, structure and function. Mutational profiling at gene- and SNV-level revealed differential patterns within each breast cancer comparison group, and the gene signatures correlate with expected prognostic characteristics of breast cancer classes. Some of the genes and SNVs identified in this study show high promise and are worthy of further investigation by experimental studies. PMID:25803781

  8. Novel MEK1 Mutation Identified by Mutational Analysis of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Pathway Genes in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Jenifer L.; Gong, Yixuan; Chitale, Dhananjay; Golas, Ben; McLellan, Michael D.; Kasai, Yumi; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Solit, David; Levine, Ross; Michel, Kathrin; Thomas, Roman K.; Rusch, Valerie W.; Ladanyi, Marc; Pao, William

    2008-01-01

    Genetic lesions affecting a number of kinases and other elements within the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We performed mutational profiling of a large cohort of lung adenocarcinomas to uncover other potential somatic mutations in genes of this pathway that could contribute to lung tumorigenesis. We have identified in 2 of 207 primary lung tumors a somatic activating mutation in exon 2 of MEK1 (i.e., mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 or MAP2K1) that substitutes asparagine for lysine at amino acid 57 (K57N) in the nonkinase portion of the kinase. Neither of these two tumors harbored known mutations in other genes encoding components of the EGFR signaling pathway (i.e., EGFR, HER2, KRAS, PIK3CA, and BRAF). Expression of mutant, but not wild-type, MEK1 leads to constitutive activity of extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 in human 293T cells and to growth factor–independent proliferation of murine Ba/F3 cells. A selective MEK inhibitor, AZD6244, inhibits mutant-induced ERK activity in 293T cells and growth of mutant-bearing Ba/F3 cells. We also screened 85 NSCLC cell lines for MEK1 exon 2 mutations; one line (NCI-H1437) harbors a Q56P substitution, a known transformation-competent allele of MEK1 originally identified in rat fibroblasts, and is sensitive to treatment with AZD6244. MEK1 mutants have not previously been reported in lung cancer and may provide a target for effective therapy in a small subset of patients with lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:18632602

  9. Mutational analysis of the candidate tumor suppressor genes TEL and KIP1 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stegmaier, K; Takeuchi, S; Golub, T R; Bohlander, S K; Bartram, C R; Koeffler, H P

    1996-03-15

    We have shown previously that loss of heterozygosity at chromosome band 12p13 is among the most frequent genetic abnormalities identified in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) of childhood. Two known genes map within the critically deleted region of 12p: TEL, the gene encoding a new member of the ETS family of transcription factors, which is rearranged in a variety of hematological malignancies; and KIP1, the gene encoding the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27. Both genes are, therefore, excellent candidate tumor suppressor genes. In this report, we determined the exon organization of the TEL gene and performed mutational analysis of TEL and KIP1 in 33 childhood ALL patients known to have loss of heterozygosity at this locus. No mutations in either TEL or KIP1 were found; this suggest that neither TEL nor KIP1 is the critical 12p tumor suppressor gene in childhood ALL. PMID:8640833

  10. Immunohistochemical Determination of p53 Protein Overexpression for Predicting p53 Gene Mutations in Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Miao; Liu, Dechun; Ma, Qingyong; Feng, Xiaoshan

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether increased expression of the tumor suppressor protein p53 indicates a p53 gene mutation in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis to determine whether p53 protein overexpression detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) offers a diagnostic prediction for p53 gene mutations in HCC patients. Methods Systematic literature searches were conducted with an end date of December 2015. A meta-analysis was performed to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of IHC-determined p53 protein overexpression in the prediction of p53 gene mutations in HCC. Sensitivity, subgroup, and publication bias analyses were also conducted. Results Thirty-six studies were included in the meta-analysis. The results showed that the overall sensitivity and specificity for IHC-determined p53 overexpression in the diagnostic prediction of p53 mutations in HCC were 0.83 (95% CI: 0.80–0.86) and 0.74 (95% CI: 0.71–0.76), respectively. The summary positive likelihood ratio (PLR) and negative likelihood ratio (NLR) were 2.65 (95% CI: 2.21–3.18) and 0.36 (95% CI: 0.26–0.50), respectively. The diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of IHC-determined p53 overexpression in predicting p53 mutations ranged from 0.56 to 105.00 (pooled, 9.77; 95% CI: 6.35–15.02), with significant heterogeneity between the included studies (I2 = 40.7%, P = 0.0067). Moreover, subgroup and sensitivity analyses did not alter the results of the meta-analysis. However, potential publication bias was present in the current meta-analysis. Conclusion The upregulation of the tumor suppressor protein p53 was indeed linked to p53 gene mutations. IHC determination of p53 overexpression can predict p53 gene mutations in HCC patients. PMID:27428001

  11. Mutation analysis of mycobacterial rpoB genes and rifampin resistance using recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Noboru; Kai, Masanori; Makino, Masahiko

    2012-04-01

    Rifampin is a major drug used to treat leprosy and tuberculosis. The rifampin resistance of Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from a mutation in the rpoB gene, encoding the β subunit of RNA polymerase. A method for the molecular determination of rifampin resistance in these two mycobacteria would be clinically valuable, but the relationship between the mutations and susceptibility to rifampin must be clarified before its use. Analyses of mutations responsible for rifampin resistance using clinical isolates present some limitations. Each clinical isolate has its own genetic variations in some loci other than rpoB, which might affect rifampin susceptibility. For this study, we constructed recombinant strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis carrying the M. leprae or M. tuberculosis rpoB gene with or without mutation and disrupted their own rpoB genes on the chromosome. The rifampin and rifabutin susceptibilities of the recombinant bacteria were measured to examine the influence of the mutations. The results confirmed that several mutations detected in clinical isolates of these two pathogenic mycobacteria can confer rifampin resistance, but they also suggested that some mutations detected in M. leprae isolates or rifampin-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates are not involved in rifampin resistance. PMID:22252831

  12. Mutational analysis of the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1B

    SciTech Connect

    Roa, B.B.; Warner, L.E.; Lupski, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    The MPZ gene that maps to chromosome 1q22q23 encodes myelin protein zero, which is the most abundant peripheral nerve myelin protein that functions as a homophilic adhesion molecule in myelin compaction. Association of the MPZ gene with the dysmyelinating peripheral neuropathies Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B (CMT1B) and the more severe Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS) was previously demonstrated by MPZ mutations identified in CMT1B and in rare DSS patients. In this study, the coding region of the MPZ gene was screened for mutations in a cohort of 74 unrelated patients with either CMT type 1 or DSS who do not carry the most common CMT1-associated molecular lesion of a 1.5 Mb DNA duplication on 17p11.2-p12. Heteroduplex analysis detected base mismatches in ten patients that were distributed over three exons of MPZ. Direct sequencing of PCR-amplified genomic DNA identified a de novo MPZ mutation associated with CMT1B that predicts an Ile(135)Thr substitution. This finding further confirms the role of MPZ in the CMT1B disease process. In addition, two polymorphisms were identified within the Gly(200) and Ser(228) codons that do not alter the respective amino acid residues. A fourth base mismatch in MPZ exon 3 detected by heteroduplex analysis is currently being characterized by direct sequence determination. Previously, four unrelated patients in this same cohort were found to have unique point mutations in the coding region of the PMP22 gene. The collective findings on CMT1 point mutations could suggest that regulatory region mutations, and possibly mutations in CMT gene(s) apart from the MPZ, PMP22 and Cx32 genes identified thus far, may prove to be significant for a number of CMT1 cases that do not involve DNA duplication.

  13. Does your gene need a background check? How genetic background impacts the analysis of mutations, genes, and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Christopher H.; Chari, Sudarshan; Dworkin, Ian

    2013-01-01

    The premise of genetic analysis is that a causal link exists between phenotypic and allelic variation. Yet it has long been documented that mutant phenotypes are not a simple result of a single DNA lesion, but rather are due to interactions of the focal allele with other genes and the environment. Although an experimentally rigorous approach focused on individual mutations and isogenic control strains has facilitated amazing progress within genetics and related fields, a glimpse back suggests that a vast complexity has been omitted from our current understanding of allelic effects. Armed with traditional genetic analyses and the foundational knowledge they have provided, we argue that the time and tools are ripe to return to the under-explored aspects of gene function and embrace the context-dependent nature of genetic effects. We assert that a broad understanding of genetic effects and the evolutionary dynamics of alleles requires identifying how mutational outcomes depend upon the “wild-type” genetic background. Furthermore, we discuss how best to exploit genetic background effects to broaden genetic research programs. PMID:23453263

  14. Mutation Analysis of IDH1/2 Genes in Unselected De novo Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Patients in India - Identification of A Novel IDH2 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Sureshkumar; Sarojam, Santhi; Vijay, Sangeetha; Geetha, Aswathy Chandran; Sreedharan, Jayadevan; Narayanan, Geetha; Sreedharan, Hariharan

    2015-01-01

    IDH1/2 mutations which result in alternation in DNA methylation pattern are one of the most common methylation associated mutations in Acute myeloid leukaemia. IDH1/2 mutations frequently associated with higher platelet level, normal cytogentics and NPM1 mutations. Here we analyzed IDH1/2 mutations in 200 newly diagnosed unselected Indian adult AML patients and investigated their correlation with clinical, cytogenetic parameters along with cooperating NPM1 mutation. We detected 5.5% and 4% mutations in IDH1/2 genes, respectively. Except IDH2 c.515_516GG>AA mutation, all the other identified mutations were reported mutations. Similar to reported c.515G>A mutation, the novel c.515_516GG>AA mutation replaces 172nd arginine to lysine in the active site of the enzyme. Even though there was a preponderance of IDH1/2 mutations in NK-AML, cytogenetically abnormal patients also harboured IDH1/2 mutations. IDH1 mutations showed significant higher platelet count and NPM1 mutations. IDH2 mutated patients displayed infrequent NPM1 mutations and lower WBC count. All the NPM1 mutations in the IDH1/2 mutated cases showed type A mutation. The present data suggest that IDH1/2 mutations are associated with normal cytogenetics and type A NPM1 mutations in adult Indian AML patients. PMID:25987093

  15. Screening analysis of candidate gene mutations in a kindred with polycystic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Song; Cui, Kai; Sun, Zi-Qiang; Shen, Yang-Yang; Li, Pang; Wang, Zhen-Dan; Li, Fei-Fei; Gong, Ke-Nan; Li, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To find potential mutable sites by detecting mutations of the candidate gene in a kindred with polycystic liver disease (PCLD). METHODS: First, we chose a kindred with PCLD and obtained five venous blood samples of this kindred after the family members signed the informed consent form. In the kindred two cases were diagnosed with PCLD, and the left three cases were normal individuals. All the blood samples were preserved at -85 °C. Second, we extracted the genomic DNA from the venous blood samples of the kindred using a QIAamp DNA Mini Kit and then performed long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with different primers. The exons of PKD1 were all sequenced with the forward and reverse primers to ensure the accuracy of the results. Next, we purified the PCR products and directly sequenced them using Big Dye Terminator Chemistry version 3.1. The sequencing reaction was conducted with BiomekFX (Beckman). Finally, we analyzed the results. RESULTS: A total of 42 normal exons were identified in detecting mutations of the PKD1 gene. A synonymous mutation occurred in exon 5. The mutation was a homozygous T in the proband and was C in the reference sequence. This mutation was located in the third codon and did not change the amino acid encoded by the codon. Missense mutations occurred in exons 11 and 35. These mutations were located in the second codon; they changed the amino acid sequence and existed in the dbSNP library. A nonsense mutation occurred in exon 15. The mutation was a heterozygous CT in the proband and was C in the reference sequence. This mutation was located in the first codon and resulted in a termination codon. This mutation had an obvious influence on the encoded protein and changed the length of the protein from 4303 to 2246 amino acids. This was a new mutation that was not present in the dbSNP library. CONCLUSION: The nonsense mutation of exon 15 existed in the proband and in the third individual. Additionally, the proband was heterozygous

  16. Analysis of the Ten-Eleven Translocation 2 (TET2) gene mutation in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jung-Sook; Jeon, Dong-Seok; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Ryoo, Nam-Hee; Suh, Jang-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the putative tumor suppressor gene, Ten-Eleven Ttranslocation 2(TET2), have been identified recently in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). The present study analyzed the TET2 gene in 99 MPNs patients. The overall TET2 mutational frequency was 12.1% (22.2% in polycythemia vera (PV), 9.7% in essential thrombocythemia (ET), 18.2% in primary myelofibrosis (PMF,) and 0% in unclassified MPNs), and 11 mutations (p.Lys95Asnfs*18, p.Gln967Asnfs*40, p.Lys1022Glufs*4, p.Asp1314Metfs*49, p.Gln1534Alafs*43, p.Tyr1618Leufs*4, p.Leu1609Glufs*45, p.Gly1735*, Q599R, c.3409+1G>T, c.4044+2insT) were identified. All the patients with TET2 mutation were accompanied by the JAK2 V617F mutation. The existence of the TET2 mutation was not related to the patient's age, hematologic indices, JAK2 V617F allele burden, frequencies of organomegaly, marrow fibrosis, or thrombotic/hemorrhagic complications in entire MPN patients. However, tendencies toward higher JAK2 V617F allele burdens (88.0±4.3% vs. 19.1±28.7%, P=0.034) and higher Hct (47.4±5.4% vs. 25.5±6.2%, P=0.037) were detected in PMF patients harboring TET2 mutations. Moreover, a significantly higher frequency of organomegaly was identified in ET patients harboring the TET2 mutation (50% vs. 19.6%, P=0.018). The TET2 mutation most likely contributes to clinical phenotypes and shows a high accompanying rate with JAK2 V617F; larger scale studies involving more MPN patients are needed. PMID:24795056

  17. Analysis of the role of Mycobacterium tuberculosis kasA gene mutations in isoniazid resistance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y-J; Lee, A S G; Wong, S-Y; Paton, N I

    2007-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that Mycobacterium tuberculosis kasA G312S and G269S gene mutations may represent sequence polymorphisms of the M. tuberculosis East-African-Indian (EAI) and T families, respectively, rather than relating to isoniazid resistance. The present study examined polymorphisms of these two codons in 98 drug-susceptible M. tuberculosis isolates (68 EAI and 30 T isolates). Twenty-eight isolates belonging to a sub-lineage of the EAI family had the kasA G312S mutation, but none of the 30 T isolates had the G269S mutation. The data suggest that the kasA G312S mutation is not related to isoniazid resistance, but represents a sequence polymorphism in a sub-lineage of the EAI family. PMID:17501974

  18. Mutational analysis of the DTDST gene in a fetus with achondrogenesis type 1B.

    PubMed

    Cai, G; Nakayama, M; Hiraki, Y; Ozono, K

    1998-06-16

    We describe a diastrophic dysplasia (DTDST) gene mutation in a Japanese male fetus with achondrogenesis type 1B and his relatives. Diagnosis in the fetus was based on roentgenographic data and pathological findings of bones and cartilage. Nucleotide sequencing of the DTDST gene demonstrated that the fetus was homozygous for both delVal340 and Thr689Ser and his parents and a healthy brother were heterozygous for the mutations. The former mutation was reported previously in patients with achondrogenesis type 1B, and the latter was detected in 5 alleles of 26 healthy Japanese individuals. These data suggest that delVal340 is associated with achondrogenesis type 1B in the Japanese, whereas a serine to threonine substitution is most likely polymorphic. PMID:9637425

  19. Identification of Novel Mutations in ABCA4 Gene: Clinical and Genetic Analysis of Indian Patients with Stargardt Disease.

    PubMed

    Battu, Rajani; Verma, Anshuman; Hariharan, Ramesh; Krishna, Shuba; Kiran, Ravi; Jacob, Jemima; Ganapathy, Aparna; Ramprasad, Vedam L; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy; Jeyabalan, Nallathambi; Ghosh, Arkasubhra

    2015-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD) is the leading cause of juvenile macular degeneration associated with progressive central vision loss, photophobia, and colour vision abnormalities. In this study, we have described the clinical and genetic features of Stargardt patients from an Indian cohort. The next generation sequencing was carried out in five clinically confirmed unrelated patients and their family members using a gene panel comprising 184 retinal specific genes. Sequencing results were analyzed by read mapping and variant calling in genes of interest, followed by their verification and interpretation. Genetic analysis revealed ABCA4 mutations in all of the five unrelated patients. Among these, four patients were found with compound heterozygous mutations and another one had homozygous mutation. All the affected individuals showed signs and symptoms consistent with the disease phenotype. We report two novel ABCA4 mutations in Indian patients with STGD disease, which expands the existing spectrum of disease-causing variants and the understanding of phenotypic and genotypic correlations. Screening for causative mutations in patients with STGD using panel of targeted gene sequencing by NGS would be a cost effective tool, might be helpful in confirming the precise diagnosis, and contributes towards the genetic counselling of asymptomatic carriers and isolated patients. PMID:25922843

  20. Identification of Novel Mutations in ABCA4 Gene: Clinical and Genetic Analysis of Indian Patients with Stargardt Disease

    PubMed Central

    Battu, Rajani; Verma, Anshuman; Hariharan, Ramesh; Krishna, Shuba; Kiran, Ravi; Jacob, Jemima; Ganapathy, Aparna; Ramprasad, Vedam L.; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy; Jeyabalan, Nallathambi; Ghosh, Arkasubhra

    2015-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD) is the leading cause of juvenile macular degeneration associated with progressive central vision loss, photophobia, and colour vision abnormalities. In this study, we have described the clinical and genetic features of Stargardt patients from an Indian cohort. The next generation sequencing was carried out in five clinically confirmed unrelated patients and their family members using a gene panel comprising 184 retinal specific genes. Sequencing results were analyzed by read mapping and variant calling in genes of interest, followed by their verification and interpretation. Genetic analysis revealed ABCA4 mutations in all of the five unrelated patients. Among these, four patients were found with compound heterozygous mutations and another one had homozygous mutation. All the affected individuals showed signs and symptoms consistent with the disease phenotype. We report two novel ABCA4 mutations in Indian patients with STGD disease, which expands the existing spectrum of disease-causing variants and the understanding of phenotypic and genotypic correlations. Screening for causative mutations in patients with STGD using panel of targeted gene sequencing by NGS would be a cost effective tool, might be helpful in confirming the precise diagnosis, and contributes towards the genetic counselling of asymptomatic carriers and isolated patients. PMID:25922843

  1. Analysis of POFUT1 Gene Mutation in a Chinese Family with Dowling-Degos Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingfei; Li, Yi; Liu, Hong; Fu, Xi'an; Yu, Yiongxiang; Yu, Gongqi; Wang, Chuan; Bao, Fangfang; Liany, Herty; Wang, Zhenzhen; Shi, Zhongxiang; Zhang, Dizhan; Zhou, Guizhi; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Furen

    2014-01-01

    Dowling-Degos disease (DDD) is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by reticular pigmented anomaly mainly affecting flexures. Though KRT5 has been identified to be the causal gene of DDD, the heterogeneity of this disease was displayed: for example, POFUT1 and POGLUT1 were recently identified and confirmed to be additional pathogenic genes of DDD. To identify other DDD causative genes, we performed genome-wide linkage and exome sequencing analyses in a multiplex Chinese DDD family, in which the KRT5 mutation was absent. Only a novel 1-bp deletion (c.246+5delG) in POFUT1 was found. No other novel mutation or this deletion was detected in POFUT1 in a second DDD family and a sporadic DDD case by Sanger Sequencing. The result shows the genetic-heterogeneity and complexity of DDD and will contribute to the further understanding of DDD genotype/phenotype correlations and to the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:25157627

  2. Mutational analysis of SYNJ1 gene (PARK20) in Parkinson's disease in a Taiwanese population.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai-Hsiang; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Lin, Hang-I; Tai, Chun-Hwei; Lin, Chin-Hsien

    2015-10-01

    Whole-exome sequencing recently identified a homozygous truncating mutation in Synaptojanin 1 (SYNJ1, PARK20), p.Arg258Gln, in 2 independent families with autosomal recessive young-onset parkinsonism with seizures and cognitive decline. This mutation's role in typical Parkinson's disease (PD) is unclear. We sequenced all coding exons and exon-intron boundaries of SYNJ1 gene in a total of 700 participants: 250 early-onset PD patients, 100 familial PD patients with family history, and 350 age/sex-matched controls from Taiwan. No patients harbored homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations of SYNJ1 gene in our study population. We observed 1 novel missense substitution, p.Ala551Val, in a single heterozygous state in 1 early-onset PD patient. This variant was not observed in controls with total 700 normal alleles. The clinical phenotype of this genetic variant carrier is similar to that seen in idiopathic PD, with motor fluctuation after 11 years of PD diagnosis and comorbidity with dementia after 13 years of motor symptoms. Our results suggest that mutations in SYNJ1 gene do not play a major role in early-onset or familial PD in our population. PMID:26149920

  3. Gene-scrambling mutagenesis: generation and analysis of insertional mutations in the alginate regulatory region of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Mohr, C D; Deretic, V

    1990-11-01

    A novel method for random mutagenesis of targeted chromosomal regions in Pseudomona aeruginosa was developed. This method can be used with a cloned DNA fragment of indefinite size that contains a putative gene of interest. Cloned DNA is digested to produce small fragments that are then randomly reassembled into long DNA inserts by using cosmid vectors and lambda packaging reaction. This DNA is then transferred into P. aeruginosa and forced into the chromosome via homologous recombination, producing in a single step a random set of insertional mutants along a desired region of the chromosome. Application of this method to extend the analysis of the alginate regulatory region, using a cloned 6.2-kb fragment with the algR gene and the previously uncharacterized flanking regions, produced several insertional mutations. One mutation was obtained in algR, a known transcriptional regulatory of mucoidy in P. aeruginosa. The null mutation of algR was generated in a mucoid derivative of the standard genetic strain PAO responsive to different environmental factors. This mutation was used to demonstrate that the algR gene product was not essential for the regulation of its promoters. Additional insertions were obtained in regions downstream and upstream of algR. A mutation that did not affect mucoidy was generated in a gene located 1 kb upstream of algR. This gene was transcribed in the direction opposite that of algR transcription and encoded a polypeptide of 47 kDa. Partial nucleotide sequence analysis revealed strong homology of its predicted gene product with the human and yeast argininosuccinate lyases. An insertion downstream of algR produced a strain showing reduced induction of mucoidy in response to growth on nitrate as the nitrogen source. PMID:2121708

  4. Gene-scrambling mutagenesis: generation and analysis of insertional mutations in the alginate regulatory region of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, C D; Deretic, V

    1990-01-01

    A novel method for random mutagenesis of targeted chromosomal regions in Pseudomona aeruginosa was developed. This method can be used with a cloned DNA fragment of indefinite size that contains a putative gene of interest. Cloned DNA is digested to produce small fragments that are then randomly reassembled into long DNA inserts by using cosmid vectors and lambda packaging reaction. This DNA is then transferred into P. aeruginosa and forced into the chromosome via homologous recombination, producing in a single step a random set of insertional mutants along a desired region of the chromosome. Application of this method to extend the analysis of the alginate regulatory region, using a cloned 6.2-kb fragment with the algR gene and the previously uncharacterized flanking regions, produced several insertional mutations. One mutation was obtained in algR, a known transcriptional regulatory of mucoidy in P. aeruginosa. The null mutation of algR was generated in a mucoid derivative of the standard genetic strain PAO responsive to different environmental factors. This mutation was used to demonstrate that the algR gene product was not essential for the regulation of its promoters. Additional insertions were obtained in regions downstream and upstream of algR. A mutation that did not affect mucoidy was generated in a gene located 1 kb upstream of algR. This gene was transcribed in the direction opposite that of algR transcription and encoded a polypeptide of 47 kDa. Partial nucleotide sequence analysis revealed strong homology of its predicted gene product with the human and yeast argininosuccinate lyases. An insertion downstream of algR produced a strain showing reduced induction of mucoidy in response to growth on nitrate as the nitrogen source. Images PMID:2121708

  5. Mutational analysis of the nor gene cluster which encodes nitric-oxide reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    de Boer, A P; van der Oost, J; Reijnders, W N; Westerhoff, H V; Stouthamer, A H; van Spanning, R J

    1996-12-15

    The genes that encode the hc-type nitric-oxide reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans have been identified. They are part of a cluster of six genes (norCBQDEF) and are found near the gene cluster that encodes the cd1-type nitrite reductase, which was identified earlier [de Boer, A. P. N., Reijnders, W. N. M., Kuenen, J. G., Stouthamer, A. H. & van Spanning, R. J. M. (1994) Isolation, sequencing and mutational analysis of a gene cluster involved in nitrite reduction in Paracoccus denitrificans, Antonie Leeu wenhoek 66, 111-127]. norC and norB encode the cytochrome-c-containing subunit II and cytochrome b-containing subunit I of nitric-oxide reductase (NO reductase), respectively. norQ encodes a protein with an ATP-binding motif and has high similarity to NirQ from Pseudomonas stutzeri and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and CbbQ from Pseudomonas hydrogenothermophila. norE encodes a protein with five putative transmembrane alpha-helices and has similarity to CoxIII, the third subunit of the aa3-type cytochrome-c oxidases. norF encodes a small protein with two putative transmembrane alpha-helices. Mutagenesis of norC, norB, norQ and norD resulted in cells unable to grow anaerobically. Nitrite reductase and NO reductase (with succinate or ascorbate as substrates) and nitrous oxide reductase (with succinate as substrate) activities were not detected in these mutant strains. Nitrite extrusion was detected in the medium, indicating that nitrate reductase was active. The norQ and norD mutant strains retained about 16% and 23% of the wild-type level of NorC, respectively. The norE and norF mutant strains had specific growth rates and NorC contents similar to those of the wild-type strain, but had reduced NOR and NIR activities, indicating that their gene products are involved in regulation of enzyme activity. Mutant strains containing the norCBQDEF region on the broad-host-range vector pEG400 were able to grow anaerobically, although at a lower specific growth rate and with lower

  6. Mutational analysis of the thyrotropin receptor gene in sporadic and familial feline thyrotoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Pearce, S H; Foster, D J; Imrie, H; Myerscough, N; Beckett, G J; Thoday, K L; Kendall-Taylor, P

    1997-12-01

    The characterization of a spontaneous animal model equivalent to a human form of thyrotoxicosis would provide a useful resource for the investigation of the human disorder. Feline thyrotoxicosis is the only common form of hyperthyroidism found in domestic or laboratory animals, but its etiopathogenesis remains poorly defined. We have used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify codons 480-640 of the previously uncharacterized feline thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) gene, and have determined the DNA sequence in this transmembrane domain region. We have analyzed single stranded conformational polymorphisms in thyroid DNA from 11 sporadic cases of feline thyrotoxicosis and leukocyte DNA from two cases of familial feline thyrotoxicosis. We have also determined the DNA sequence of this region of the TSHR in five of the cases of sporadic feline thyrotoxicosis and the two familial thyrotoxic cats. The normal feline TSHR sequence between codons 480-640 is highly homologous to that of other mammalian TSHRs, with 95%, 92%, and 90% amino acid identity between the feline receptor and canine, human, and bovine TSHRs, respectively. Thyroid gland DNA from 11 cats with sporadic thyrotoxicosis did not have mutations in this region of the TSHR gene. Leukocyte DNA from two littermates with familial feline thyrotoxicosis did not harbor mutations of this region of the TSHR gene. These studies suggest that TSHR gene mutations are not a common cause of feline thyrotoxicosis. PMID:9459639

  7. Mutational analysis of the promoter and the coding region of the 5-HT1A gene

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmann, J.; Noethen, M.M.; Shimron-Abarbanell, D.

    1994-09-01

    Disturbances of serotonergic pathways have been implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Serotonin (5HT) receptors can be subdivided into at least three major families (5HT1, 5HT2, and 5HT3). Five human 5HT1 receptor subtypes have been cloned, namely 1A, 1D{alpha}, 1D{beta}, 1E, and 1F. Of these, the 5HT1A receptor is the best characterized subtype. In the present study we sought to identify genetic variation in the 5HT1A receptor gene which through alteration of protein function or level of expression might contribute to the genetics of neuropsychiatric diseases. The coding region and the 5{prime} promoter region of the 5HT1A gene from 159 unrelated subjects (45 schizophrenic, 46 bipolar affective, and 43 patients with Tourette`s syndrome, as well as 25 controls) were analyzed using SSCA. SSCA revealed the presence of two mutations both located in the coding region of the 5HT1A receptor gene. The first mutation is a rare silent C{r_arrow}T substitution at nucleotide position 549. The second mutation is characterized by a base pair substitution (A{r_arrow}G) at the first position of codon 28 and results in an amino acid exchange (Ile{r_arrow}Val). Since Val28 was found only in a single schizophrenic patient and in none of the other patients or controls, we decided to extend our samples and to use a restriction assay for screening a further 74 schizophrenic, 95 bipolar affective, and 49 patients with Tourette`s syndrome, as well as 185 controls, for the presence of the mutation. In total, the mutation was found in 2 schizophrenic patients, in 3 bipolars, in 1 Tourette patient, and in 5 controls. To our knowledge the Ile-28-Val substitution reported here is the first natural occuring molecular variant which has been identified for a serotonin receptor so far.

  8. Analysis of mutations in the pbp genes of penicillin-non-susceptible pneumococci from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Biçmen, M; Gülay, Z; Ramaswamy, S V; Musher, D M; Gür, D

    2006-02-01

    Sequence analysis of the pbp genes from 20 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from Turkey (eight with high-level penicillin-resistance, nine with low-level penicillin-resistance, and three that were penicillin-susceptible) was performed and phylogenetic trees were constructed. Most isolates clustered together within a single branch that was distinct from sequences deposited previously in GenBank, which suggests that these isolates have probably evolved following new recombination events. The most prominent active-site mutations, which have also been associated previously with resistance, were T371A in PBP1a, E481G followed by T451A in PBP2b, and T338A in PBP2x. All isolates also possessed a (570)SVES/TK(574) block in the PBP2b sequence, instead of the QLQPT sequence of R6, which is fairly uncommon in GenBank sequences. This is the first study to analyse alterations in the pbp sequences of pneumococci isolated in Turkey. PMID:16441453

  9. Mutational analysis of the HLA-DQ3. 2 insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus susceptibility gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, W.W.; Lotshaw, C.; Milner, E.C.B.; Knitter-Jack, N.; Nepom, G.T. )

    1989-02-01

    The human major histocompatibility complex includes approximately 14 class II HLA genes within the HLA-D region, most of which exist in multiple allelic forms. One of these genes, the DQ3.2{beta} gene, accounts for the well-documented association of HLA-DR4 with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and is the single allele most highly correlated with this disease. The authors analyzed the amino acid substitutions that lead to the structural differences distinguishing DQ3.2{beta} from its nondiabetogenic, but closely related allele, DQ3.1{beta}. Site-directed mutagenesis of the DQ3.2{beta} gene was used to convert key nucleotides into DQ3.2{beta} codons. Subsequent expression studies of these mutated DQ3.2{beta} clones using retroviral vectors defined amino acid 45 as critical for generating serologic epitopes characterizing the DQw3.1{beta} and DQw3.2{beta} molecules.

  10. Mutational analysis of the hepatitis B virus P gene product: domain structure and RNase H activity.

    PubMed Central

    Radziwill, G; Tucker, W; Schaller, H

    1990-01-01

    To correlate the hepatitis B virus P gene with the enzymatic activities predicted to participate in hepadnavirus reverse transcription, a series of P gene mutants containing missense mutations, in-phase insertions, and in-phase deletions was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. These mutants were tested in the context of otherwise intact hepatitis B virus genomes for the ability to produce core particles containing the virus-associated polymerase activity. The results obtained suggest that the P protein consists of three functional domains and a nonessential spacer arranged in the following order: terminal protein, spacer, reverse transcriptase/DNA polymerase, and RNase H. The first two domains are separated by a spacer region which could be deleted to a large extent without significant loss of endogenous polymerase activity. In cotransfection experiments, all P gene mutants could be complemented in trans by constructs expressing the wild-type gene product but not by a second P gene mutant. This indicates that the multifunctional P gene is expressed as a single translational unit and independent of the core gene and furthermore that the gene product is freely diffusible and not processed before core assembly. Images PMID:2153228

  11. [Gene mutation analysis of coagulation factor VIII from a female patient with hemophilia A].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Yan, Nai-hong; Jia, Yong-qian; Lu, Yi-lu; Yu, Jiang; Cao, Gui-qun; Chen, Qing-ying; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Fa-qiang; Xia, Oing-jie

    2006-05-01

    Hemophilia A affects male, whereas females are carriers and generally spared from this disease. However, we here reported a 65-year-old female with Hemophilia A while screening the gene mutation of coagulation factor VIII. The female went to hospital because of tripping to lead her right chest to be injured with subcutaneous hematoma. She had historically a hemorrhagic diathesis. The physical examination discovered her hip limited to bend and move, but no discrepancy length between her two legs. The initial laboratory tests showed that the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) was 61. 3 seconds (20-40 seconds), and the APTT corrected by mixing with normal plasma was 41.3 s, but the levels of PT, FIB and TT were normal. The plain radiographs revealed the hip joints to suffer from the acetabular dysplasia and osteoarthritis. The level of FVIII:C was 2%, F IX:C 200%, vWF:Ag 120%, vWF:Rcof 100%, vWF:CBA 128%, and the F VIII binding assay to vWF was normal. The primers for exon 14 of F VIII gene were designed according to the NM - 000132 gene sequence. DNA was abstracted from the patient blood. PCR were carried out and the DNA sequence was followed. A new mutation of 4111A-->C was discovered, which caused the amino acid sequence changed (T 1314 P). The mutation of T 1314 P may be the cause of this female patient to get the hemophilia A. This mutation was a novel one which has never been reported before. PMID:16761442

  12. Oculocutaneous albinism type 3 (OCA3): analysis of two novel mutations in TYRP1 gene in two Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai-hui; Li, Zhuo; Lei, Jie; Pang, Ting; Xu, Bei; Jiang, Wei-ying; Li, Hong-yi

    2011-12-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a genetic disease characterized by the reduction or deficiency of melanin in eyes, skin, and hair. OCA exhibits genetic heterogeneity. Presently, there are four types of OCA named as OCA1, OCA2, OCA3, and OCA4. OCA3 is more common in African born blacks but rarely found in other ethnic populations. Our recent genotyping of patients with OCA of Chinese descent has identified two patients who were not OCA1, OCA2, or OCA4. Examination and analysis of the TYRP1 gene identified them to be having OCA3. PCR and DNA sequencing analysis found that the mutant TYPR1 alleles were present in each of the two patients, c.780-791del/c.1067G>A (p.R356Q) and c.625G>TT (p.G209LfsX1)/c.643C>T (p.H215Y). The c.780-791del and c.1067G>A mutations have been already reported. However, the c.625G>TT and c.643C>T mutations have not been previously reported and were found to be maternal and paternal mutations, respectively. Moreover, population screening and bioinformatic analysis were carried out to determine the effects of these two mutations which revealed that both the mutation were pathogenic. Based on the similar mild phenotype of these two patients, we suggest that OCA3 might be prevalent within the Chinese population. PMID:21739261

  13. PTEN gene mutations correlate to poor prognosis in glioma patients: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Feng; Hu, Rong; Yang, Hua; Liu, Jian; Sui, Jianmei; Xiang, Xin; Wang, Fan; Chu, Liangzhao; Song, Shibin

    2016-01-01

    Background We conducted this meta-analysis based on eligible trials to investigate the relationship between phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) genetic mutation and glioma patients’ survival. Methods PubMed, Web of Science, and EMBASE were searched for eligible studies regarding the relationship between PTEN genetic mutation and glioma patients’ survival. The primary outcome was the overall survival of glioma patient with or without PTEN genetic mutation, and second outcome was prognostic factors for the survival of glioma patient. A fixed-effects or random-effects model was used to pool the estimates according to the heterogeneity among the included studies. Results Nine cohort studies, involving 1,173 patients, were included in this meta-analysis. Pooled results suggested that glioma patients with PTEN genetic mutation had a significant shorter overall survival than those without PTEN genetic mutation (hazard ratio [HR] =2.23, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.35, 3.67; P=0.002). Furthermore, subgroup analysis indicated that this association was only observed in American patients (HR =2.19, 95% CI: 1.23, 3.89; P=0.008), but not in Chinese patients (HR =1.44, 95% CI: 0.29, 7.26; P=0.657). Histopathological grade (HR =1.42, 95% CI: 0.07, 28.41; P=0.818), age (HR =0.94, 95% CI: 0.43, 2.04; P=0.877), and sex (HR =1.28, 95% CI: 0.55, 2.98; P=0.564) were not significant prognostic factors for the survival of patients with glioma. Conclusion Current evidence indicates that PTEN genetic mutation is associated with poor prognosis in glioma patients. However, this finding is derived from data in observational studies, potentially subject to selection bias, and hence well conducted, high-quality randomized controlled trials are warranted. PMID:27366085

  14. Mutational Analysis of Stubble-stubbloid Gene Structure and Function in Drosophila Leg and Bristle Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hammonds, Ann S.; Fristrom, James W.

    2006-01-01

    The Stubble-stubbloid (Sb-sbd) gene is required for ecdysone-regulated epithelial morphogenesis of imaginal tissues during Drosophila metamorphosis. Mutations in Sb-sbd are associated with defects in apical cell shape changes critical for the evagination of the leg imaginal disc and with defects in assembly and extension of parallel actin bundles in growing mechanosensory bristles. The Sb-sbd gene encodes a type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP). Here we use a Sb-sbd transgenic construct to rescue both bristle and leg morphogenesis defects in Sb-sbd mutations. Molecular characterization of Sb-sbd mutations and rescue experiments with wild-type and modified Sb-sbd transgenic constructs show that the protease domain is required for both leg and bristle functions. Truncated proteins that express the noncatalytic domains without the protease have dominant effects in bristles but not in legs. Leg morphogenesis, but not bristle growth, is sensitive to Sb-sbd overexpression. Antibody localization of the Sb-sbd protein shows apical expression in elongating legs. Sb-sbd protein is found in the base and shaft in budding bristles and then concentrates at the growing tip when bristles are elongating rapidly. We propose a model whereby Sb-sbd helps coordinate proteolytic modification of extracellular matrix attachments with cytoskeletal changes in both legs and bristles. PMID:16322506

  15. ANO5 gene analysis in a large cohort of patients with anoctaminopathy: confirmation of male prevalence and high occurrence of the common exon 5 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Sarkozy, Anna; Hicks, Debbie; Hudson, Judith; Laval, Steve H; Barresi, Rita; Hilton-Jones, David; Deschauer, Marcus; Harris, Elizabeth; Rufibach, Laura; Hwang, Esther; Bashir, Rumaisa; Walter, Maggie C; Krause, Sabine; van den Bergh, Peter; Illa, Isabel; Pénisson-Besnier, Isabelle; De Waele, Liesbeth; Turnbull, Doug; Guglieri, Michela; Schrank, Bertold; Schoser, Benedikt; Seeger, Jürgen; Schreiber, Herbert; Gläser, Dieter; Eagle, Michelle; Bailey, Geraldine; Walters, Richard; Longman, Cheryl; Norwood, Fiona; Winer, John; Muntoni, Francesco; Hanna, Michael; Roberts, Mark; Bindoff, Laurence A; Brierley, Charlotte; Cooper, Robert G; Cottrell, David A; Davies, Nick P; Gibson, Andrew; Gorman, Gráinne S; Hammans, Simon; Jackson, Andrew P; Khan, Aijaz; Lane, Russell; McConville, John; McEntagart, Meriel; Al-Memar, Ali; Nixon, John; Panicker, Jay; Parton, Matt; Petty, Richard; Price, Christopher J; Rakowicz, Wojtek; Ray, Partha; Schapira, Anthony H; Swingler, Robert; Turner, Chris; Wagner, Kathryn R; Maddison, Paul; Shaw, Pamela J; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2013-08-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2L or anoctaminopathy is a condition mainly characterized by adult onset proximal lower limb muscular weakness and raised CK values, due to recessive ANO5 gene mutations. An exon 5 founder mutation (c.191dupA) has been identified in most of the British and German LGMD2L patients so far reported. We aimed to further investigate the prevalence and spectrum of ANO5 gene mutations and related clinical phenotypes, by screening 205 undiagnosed patients referred to our molecular service with a clinical suspicion of anoctaminopathy. A total of 42 unrelated patients had two ANO5 mutations (21%), whereas 14 carried a single change. We identified 34 pathogenic changes, 15 of which are novel. The c.191dupA mutation represents 61% of mutated alleles and appears to be less prevalent in non-Northern European populations. Retrospective clinical analysis corroborates the prevalently proximal lower limb phenotype, the male predominance and absence of major cardiac or respiratory involvement. Identification of cases with isolated hyperCKaemia and very late symptomatic male and female subjects confirms the extension of the phenotypic spectrum of the disease. Anoctaminopathy appears to be one of the most common adult muscular dystrophies in Northern Europe, with a prevalence of about 20%-25% in unselected undiagnosed cases. PMID:23606453

  16. Sensitive cytometry based system for enumeration, capture and analysis of gene mutations of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Takeshi; Watanabe, Masaru; Fujimura, Yuu; Yagishita, Shigehiro; Shimoyama, Tatsu; Maeda, Yoshiharu; Kanda, Shintaro; Yunokawa, Mayu; Tamura, Kenji; Tamura, Tomohide; Minami, Hironobu; Koh, Yasuhiro; Koizumi, Fumiaki

    2016-03-01

    Methods for the enumeration and molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTC) have been actively investigated. However, such methods are still technically challenging. We have developed a novel epithelial cell adhesion molecule independent CTC enumeration system integrated with a sorting system using a microfluidics chip. We compared the number of CTC detected using our system with those detected using the CellSearch system in 46 patients with various cancers. We also evaluated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and PIK3CA mutations of captured CTC in a study of 4 lung cancer and 4 breast cancer patients. The percentage of samples with detected CTC was significantly higher with our system (65.2%) than with CellSearch (28.3%). The number of detected CTC per patient using our system was statistically higher than that using CellSearch (median 5, 0; P = 0.000172, Wilcoxon test). In the mutation analysis study, the number of detected CTC per patient was low (median for lung, 4.5; median for breast, 5.5); however, it was easy to detect EGFR and PIK3CA mutations in the CTC of 2 lung and 1 breast cancer patient, respectively, using a commercially available kit. Our system is more sensitive than CellSearch in CTC enumeration of various cancers and is also capable of detecting EGFR and PIK3CA mutations in the CTC of lung and breast cancer patients, respectively. PMID:26708016

  17. A meta-analysis of somatic mutations from next generation sequencing of 241 melanomas: a road map for the study of genes with potential clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Junfeng; Jia, Peilin; Hutchinson, Katherine E.; Dahlman, Kimberly B.; Johnson, Douglas; Sosman, Jeffrey; Pao, William; Zhao, Zhongming

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) has been used to characterize the overall genomic landscape of melanomas. Here, we systematically examined mutations from recently published melanoma NGS data involving 241 paired tumor-normal samples to identify potentially clinically relevant mutations. Melanomas were characterized according to an in-house clinical assay that identifies well-known specific recurrent mutations in five driver genes: BRAF (affecting V600), NRAS (G12, G13, and Q61), KIT (W557, V559, L576, K642, and D816), GNAQ (Q209), and GNA11 (Q209). Tumors with none of these mutations are termed “pan-negative”. We then mined the driver mutation-positive and pan-negative melanoma NGS data for mutations in 632 cancer genes that could influence existing or emerging targeted therapies. First, we uncovered several genes whose mutations were more likely associated with BRAF- or NRAS-driven melanomas, including TP53 and COL1A1 with BRAF, and PPP6C, KALRN, PIK3R4, TRPM6, GUCY2C, and PRKAA2 with NRAS. Second, we found that the 69 “pan-negative” melanoma genomes harbored alternate infrequent mutations in the 5 known driver genes along with many mutations in genes encoding guanine nucleotide binding protein α-subunits. Third, we identified 12 significantly mutated genes in “pan-negative” samples (ALK, STK31, DGKI, RAC1, EPHA4, ADAMTS18, EPHA7, ERBB4, TAF1L, NF1, SYK, and KDR), including 5 genes (RAC1, ADAMTS18, EPHA7, TAF1L, and NF1) with a recurrent mutation in at least 2 “pan-negative” tumor samples. This meta-analysis provides a road map for the study of additional potentially actionable genes in both driver mutation-positive and pan-negative melanomas. PMID:24755198

  18. Comparative mutational analysis of wild-type and stretched tRNA3(Leu) gene promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Fabrizio, P; Coppo, A; Fruscoloni, P; Benedetti, P; Di Segni, G; Tocchini-Valentini, G P

    1987-01-01

    We demonstrate that, when the yeast tRNA(3Leu) gene is stretched so that the distance between the two portions of the intragenic promoter is increased to 365 base pairs, the A and B blocks remain functional. Mutations in the A block, which show a weak phenotype when inserted in the wild type, exert a dramatic effect when inserted into the stretched gene. Experiments with extensively purified transcription factor tau indicate that the tau B-B block interaction is not influenced by A-B distance; only the ability of tau A to interact with A block sequences is affected, possibly because of the additional free-energy cost of forming a large loop of the intervening DNA. Images PMID:3321052

  19. Cloning of Two Acetylcholinesterase Genes and Analysis of Point Mutations Putatively Associated with Triazophos Resistance in Chilo auricilius (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    PubMed

    Luo, Guang-Hua; Li, Xiao-Huan; Zhang, Zhi-Chun; Liu, Bao-Sheng; Huang, Shui-Jin; Fang, Ji-Chao

    2015-06-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the target of organophosphate (OP) and carbamate insecticides. Mutations in the AChE gene (ace) leading to decreased insecticide susceptibility is the main resistance mechanism in insects. In this study, two Chilo auricilius acetylcholinesterase genes, designated as Caace1 and Caace2, were cloned using RT-PCR and RACE. Caace1 cDNA is 2534 bp, with ORF of 2082 bp, and it encodes an acetylcholinesterase 1 (CaAChE1) protein comprising a calculated 693 amino acid (aa) residues. Caace2 cDNA contains 2280 bp, with a full-length ORF of 1917 bp, encoding acetylcholinesterase 2 (CaAChE2) comprising a calculated 638 aa residues. At the aa level, CaAChE1 displays the highest similarity (97%) with the Chilo suppressalis AChE1, and CaAChE2 shows the highest similarity with the C. suppressalis AChE2 (99%). From the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) PCR (RFLP-PCR) analysis, one mutation in Caace1, similar to the ace1 mutation associated with triazophos resistance in C. suppressalis, was detected. Detailed examination of field populations of C. auricilius indicated this resistance mutation in C. auricilius is still quite infrequent. Based on the assay of AChE activity and RFLP-PCR testing, an individual that contains resistance mutation has lower AChE activities, while the individual that does not contain the resistance mutation has higher AChE activities. This study provides a basis for future investigations into the mechanism of OP resistance in C. auricilius, as well as a guidance for C. auricilius control with reasonable choice of pesticides. PMID:26470257

  20. Mutational analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans cell-death gene ced-3.

    PubMed Central

    Shaham, S; Reddien, P W; Davies, B; Horvitz, H R

    1999-01-01

    Mutations in the gene ced-3, which encodes a protease similar to interleukin-1beta converting enzyme and related proteins termed caspases, prevent programmed cell death in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We used site-directed mutagenesis to demonstrate that both the presumptive active-site cysteine of the CED-3 protease and the aspartate residues at sites of processing of the CED-3 proprotein are required for programmed cell death in vivo. We characterized the phenotypes caused by and the molecular lesions of 52 ced-3 alleles. These alleles can be ordered in a graded phenotypic series. Of the 30 amino acid sites altered by ced-3 missense mutations, 29 are conserved with at least one other caspase, suggesting that these residues define sites important for the functions of all caspases. Animals homozygous for the ced-3(n2452) allele, which is deleted for the region of the ced-3 gene that encodes the protease domain, seemed to be incompletely blocked in programmed cell death, suggesting that some programmed cell death can occur independently of CED-3 protease activity. PMID:10581274

  1. Penetrance of ATM Gene Mutations in Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Different Measures of Risk.

    PubMed

    Marabelli, Monica; Cheng, Su-Chun; Parmigiani, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    The gene responsible for ataxia-telangiectasia syndrome, ATM, is also an intermediate-risk breast cancer (BC) susceptibility gene. Numerous studies have been carried out to determine the contribution of ATM gene mutations to BC risk. Epidemiological cohorts, segregation analyses, and case-control studies reported BC risk in different forms, including penetrance, relative risk, standardized incidence ratio, and odds ratio. Because the reported estimates vary both qualitatively and quantitatively, we developed a general model allowing the integration of the different types of cancer risk available in the literature. We performed a comprehensive meta-analysis identifying 19 studies, and used our model to obtain a consensus estimate of BC penetrance. We estimated the cumulative risk of BC in heterozygous ATM mutation carriers to be 6.02% by 50 years of age (95% credible interval: 4.58-7.42%) and 32.83% by 80 years of age (95% credible interval: 24.55-40.43%). An accurate assessment of cancer penetrance is crucial to help mutation carriers make medical and lifestyle decisions that can reduce their chances of developing the disease. PMID:27112364

  2. Analysis of p53, K-ras gene mutation & Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with gastric cancer & peptic ulcer disease at a tertiary care hospital in north India

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Ashish; Shukla, Sanket Kumar; Prasad, Kashi Nath; Ghoshal, Uday Chand

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Mutations in the oncogene and tumour suppressor genes play an important role in carcinogenesis. We investigated the association of p53 and K-ras gene mutation and Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with gastric cancer (GC) and peptic ulcer disease (PUD) attending a tertiary care hospital in north India. Methods: In total, 348 adult patients [62 GC, 45 PUD and 241 non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD)] who underwent an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were enrolled. H. pylori infection was diagnosed by rapid urease test, culture, histopathology and PCR. Mutation in the exon 5-8 of p53 gene was analyzed by PCR-single stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and confirmed by sequence analysis. K-ras gene codon 12 mutation was analyzed by PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results: Overall p53 gene mutation was found in 4.6 per cent of the study population, and its distribution in GC, PUD and NUD was 21, 4.4 and 0.4 per cent, respectively. p53 gene mutation was significantly higher in patients with GC than PUD (P<0.05) and NUD (P<0.001). No difference in p53 gene mutation was observed between H. pylori infected and non-infected individuals. K-ras gene mutation was absent in all the patients. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results show that p53 gene mutation may be associated with gastric carcinogenesis independent to H. pylori infection and absence of K-ras gene mutation questions its role in the pathogenesis of GC and PUD in Indian patients. PMID:23168708

  3. Gene mutations in Cushing's disease

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qi; Ge, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's disease (CD) is a severe (and potentially fatal) disease caused by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting adenomas of the pituitary gland (often termed pituitary adenomas). The majority of ACTH-secreting corticotroph tumors are sporadic and CD rarely appears as a familial disorder, thus, the genetic mechanisms underlying CD are poorly understood. Studies have reported that various mutated genes are associated with CD, such as those in menin 1, aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein and the nuclear receptor subfamily 3 group C member 1. Recently it was identified that ubiquitin-specific protease 8 mutations contribute to CD, which was significant towards elucidating the genetic mechanisms of CD. The present study reviews the associated gene mutations in CD patients. PMID:27588171

  4. Mutation analysis of genes within the dynactin complex in a cohort of hereditary peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Tey, S; Ahmad-Annuar, A; Drew, A P; Shahrizaila, N; Nicholson, G A; Kennerson, M L

    2016-08-01

    The cytoplasmic dynein-dynactin genes are attractive candidates for neurodegenerative disorders given their functional role in retrograde transport along neurons. The cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain (DYNC1H1) gene has been implicated in various neurodegenerative disorders, and dynactin 1 (DCTN1) genes have been implicated in a wide spectrum of disorders including motor neuron disease, Parkinson's disease, spinobulbar muscular atrophy and hereditary spastic paraplegia. However, the involvement of other dynactin genes with inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN) namely, hereditary sensory neuropathy, hereditary motor neuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is under reported. We screened eight genes; DCTN1-6 and ACTR1A and ACTR1B in 136 IPN patients using whole-exome sequencing and high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis. Eight non-synonymous variants (including one novel variant) and three synonymous variants were identified. Four variants have been reported previously in other studies, however segregation analysis within family members excluded them from causing IPN in these families. No variants of disease significance were identified in this study suggesting the dynactin genes are unlikely to be a common cause of IPNs. However, with the ease of querying gene variants from exome data, these genes remain worthwhile candidates to assess unsolved IPN families for variants that may affect the function of the proteins. PMID:26662454

  5. Comprehensive analysis of cooperative gene mutations between class I and class II in de novo acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Yuichi; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Tsujimura, Akane; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Kuriyama, Kazutaka; Tomonaga, Masao; Naoe, Tomoki

    2009-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been thought to be the consequence of two broad complementation classes of mutations: class I and class II. However, overlap-mutations between them or within the same class and the position of TP53 mutation are not fully analyzed. We comprehensively analyzed the FLT3, cKIT, N-RAS, C/EBPA, AML1, MLL, NPM1, and TP53 mutations in 144 newly diagnosed de novo AML. We found 103 of 165 identified mutations were overlapped with other mutations, and most overlap-mutations consisted of class I and class II mutations. Although overlap-mutations within the same class were found in seven patients, five of them additionally had the other class mutation. These results suggest that most overlap-mutations within the same class might be the consequence of acquiring an additional mutation after the completion both of class I and class II mutations. However, mutated genes overlapped with the same class were limited in N-RAS, TP53, MLL-PTD, and NPM1, suggesting the possibility that these irregular overlap-mutations might cooperatively participate in the development of AML. Notably, TP53 mutation was overlapped with both class I and class II mutations, and associated with morphologic multilineage dysplasia and complex karyotype. The genotype consisting of complex karyotype and TP53 mutation was an unfavorable prognostic factor in entire AML patients, indicating this genotype generates a disease entity in de novo AML. These results collectively suggest that TP53 mutation might be a functionally distinguishable class of mutation. PMID:19309322

  6. Mutational Robustness of Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Aalt D. J.; van Mourik, Simon; van Ham, Roeland C. H. J.

    2012-01-01

    Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks refers to their ability to generate constant biological output upon mutations that change network structure. Such networks contain regulatory interactions (transcription factor – target gene interactions) but often also protein-protein interactions between transcription factors. Using computational modeling, we study factors that influence robustness and we infer several network properties governing it. These include the type of mutation, i.e. whether a regulatory interaction or a protein-protein interaction is mutated, and in the case of mutation of a regulatory interaction, the sign of the interaction (activating vs. repressive). In addition, we analyze the effect of combinations of mutations and we compare networks containing monomeric with those containing dimeric transcription factors. Our results are consistent with available data on biological networks, for example based on evolutionary conservation of network features. As a novel and remarkable property, we predict that networks are more robust against mutations in monomer than in dimer transcription factors, a prediction for which analysis of conservation of DNA binding residues in monomeric vs. dimeric transcription factors provides indirect evidence. PMID:22295094

  7. Transcriptional Profile Analysis of RPGRORF15 Frameshift Mutation Identifies Novel Genes Associated with Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Genini, Sem; Zangerl, Barbara; Slavik, Julianna; Acland, Gregory M.; Beltran, William A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To identify genes and molecular mechanisms associated with photoreceptor degeneration in a canine model of XLRP caused by an RPGR exon ORF15 microdeletion. Methods. Expression profiles of mutant and normal retinas were compared by using canine retinal custom cDNA microarrays. qRT-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were applied to selected genes, to confirm and expand the microarray results. Results. At 7 and 16 weeks, respectively, 56 and 18 transcripts were downregulated in the mutant retinas, but none were differentially expressed (DE) at both ages, suggesting the involvement of temporally distinct pathways. Downregulated genes included the known retina-relevant genes PAX6, CHML, and RDH11 at 7 weeks and CRX and SAG at 16 weeks. Genes directly or indirectly active in apoptotic processes were altered at 7 weeks (CAMK2G, NTRK2, PRKCB, RALA, RBBP6, RNF41, SMYD3, SPP1, and TUBB2C) and 16 weeks (SLC25A5 and NKAP). Furthermore, the DE genes at 7 weeks (ELOVL6, GLOD4, NDUFS4, and REEP1) and 16 weeks (SLC25A5 and TARS2) are related to mitochondrial functions. qRT-PCR of 18 genes confirmed the microarray results and showed DE of additional genes not on the array. Only GFAP was DE at 3 weeks of age. Western blot and IHC analyses also confirmed the high reliability of the transcriptomic data. Conclusions. Several DE genes were identified in mutant retinas. At 7 weeks, a combination of nonclassic anti- and proapoptosis genes appear to be involved in photoreceptor degeneration, whereas at both 7 and 16 weeks, the expression of mitochondria-related genes indicates that they may play a relevant role in the disease process. PMID:20574030

  8. Mutational Analysis of the Arabidopsis Nucleotide Binding Site–Leucine-Rich Repeat Resistance Gene RPS2

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yi; Yuan, Fenghua; Leister, R. Todd; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Katagiri, Fumiaki

    2000-01-01

    Disease resistance proteins containing a nucleotide binding site (NBS) and a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) region compose the largest class of disease resistance proteins. These so-called NBS-LRR proteins confer resistance against a wide variety of phytopathogens. To help elucidate the mechanism by which NBS-LRR proteins recognize and transmit pathogen-derived signals, we analyzed mutant versions of the Arabidopsis NBS-LRR protein RPS2. The RPS2 gene confers resistance against Pseudomonas syringae strains carrying the avirulence gene avrRpt2. The activity of RPS2 derivatives in response to AvrRpt2 was measured by using a functional transient expression assay or by expressing the mutant proteins in transgenic plants. Directed mutagenesis revealed that the NBS and an N-terminal leucine zipper (LZ) motif were critical for RPS2 function. Mutations near the N terminus, including an LZ mutation, resulted in proteins that exhibited a dominant negative effect on wild-type RPS2. Scanning the RPS2 molecule with a small in-frame internal deletion demonstrated that RPS2 does not have a large dispensable region. Overexpression of RPS2 in the transient assay in the absence of avrRpt2 also led to an apparent resistant response, presumably a consequence of a low basal activity of RPS2. The NBS and LZ were essential for this overdose effect, whereas the entire LRR was dispensable. RPS2 interaction with a 75-kD protein (p75) required an N-terminal portion of RPS2 that is smaller than the region required for the overdose effect. These findings illuminate the pathogen recognition mechanisms common among NBS-LRR proteins. PMID:11148296

  9. Molecular and functional analysis of two new MTTP gene mutations in an atypical case of abetalipoproteinemia[S

    PubMed Central

    Di Filippo, Mathilde; Créhalet, Hervé; Samson-Bouma, Marie Elisabeth; Bonnet, Véronique; Aggerbeck, Lawrence P.; Rabès, Jean-Pierre; Gottrand, Frederic; Luc, Gérald; Bozon, Dominique; Sassolas, Agnès

    2012-01-01

    Abetalipoproteinemia (ABL) is an inherited disease characterized by the defective assembly and secretion of apolipoprotein B–containing lipoproteins caused by mutations in the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein large subunit (MTP) gene (MTTP). We report here a female patient with an unusual clinical and biochemical ABL phenotype. She presented with severe liver injury, low levels of LDL-cholesterol, and subnormal levels of vitamin E, but only mild fat malabsorption and no retinitis pigmentosa or acanthocytosis. Our objective was to search for MTTP mutations and to determine the relationship between the genotype and this particular phenotype. The subject exhibited compound heterozygosity for two novel MTTP mutations: one missense mutation (p.Leu435His) and an intronic deletion (c.619-5_619-2del). COS-1 cells expressing the missense mutant protein exhibited negligible levels of MTP activity. In contrast, the minigene splicing reporter assay showed an incomplete splicing defect of the intronic deletion, with 26% of the normal splicing being maintained in the transfected HeLa cells. The small amount of MTP activity resulting from the residual normal splicing in the patient explains the atypical phenotype observed. Our investigation provides an example of a functional analysis of unclassified variations, which is an absolute necessity for the molecular diagnosis of atypical ABL cases. PMID:22236406

  10. Identification and Genetic Analysis of a Factor IX Gene Intron 3 Mutation in a Hemophilia B Pedigree in China

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dong-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Li; Mu, Kai; Ma, Xiang-Wei; Sun, Jing-Li; Bai, Xiao-Zhong; Lin, Chang-Kun; Jin, Chun-Lian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Hemophilia B is caused by coagulation defects in the factor IX gene located in Xq27.1 on the X chromosome. A wide range of mutations, showing extensive molecular heterogeneity, have been described in hemophilia B patients. Our study was aimed at genetic analysis and prenatal diagnosis of hemophilia B in order to further elucidate the pathogenesis of the hemophilia B pedigree in China. Materials and Methods: Polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing of all the coding regions was conducted in hemophilia B patients and carriers. Prenatal diagnosis of the proband was conducted at 20 weeks. Results: We identified the novel point mutation 10.389 A>G, located upstream of the intron 3 acceptor site in hemophilia B patients. The fetus of the proband’s cousin was identified as a carrier. Conclusion: Our identification of a novel mutation in the F9 gene associated with hemophilia B provides novel insight into the pathogenesis of this genetically inherited disorder and also represents the basis of prenatal diagnosis. PMID:25330515

  11. Analysis of mutations in the p16/CDKN2A gene in sporadic and familial melanoma in the Polish population.

    PubMed

    Lamperska, Katarzyna; Karezewska, Aldona; Kwiatkowska, Eliza; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in CDKN2A have been found in sporadic cutaneous malignant (CMM), in familial CMM and in other syndromes associated with melanoma. In this study DNA was obtained from 207 individuals and five cell lines. There were 157 CMM patients and 50 healthy members of melanoma patients families. The CMM group included patients with one or two melanoma cases in the family, families with dysplastic nevus syndrom (DNS) and patients with a spectrum of other types of cancers in the family. PCR-SSCP analysis and sequencing identified: six substitutions in codon 58 CGA/TGA (Arg/Stop), 16 substitutions GAC/GAT in codon 84 (Asp/Asp), six substitutions CGA/TGA in codon 148 (Arg/Thr), 14 substitutions G/C in 3'UTR and 4 double changes (two in codon 84 and 3'UTR; two in codon 148 and 3'UTR). The mutation identified in codon 58 was found in tissue only. Other substitutions were polymorphisms found in DNA from tissue and blood samples. Most of them were identified in sporadic CMM (six in codon 148 Ala/Thr, 12 in codon 84 Asp/Asp and six in 3'UTR). The frequency of the polymorphisms was also high in DNS and CMM/DNS families (four in codon 84 Asp/Asp and six in 3'UTR). No mutations or polymorphisms were found in CMM patients with one or two melanoma cases and CMM patients, with other cancers in family history. The analysis of the CDKN2A gene mutations in the Polish population demonstrated: (i) no germline mutations; (ii) a relatively high number of genetic changes in sporadic melanoma; (iii) a high number of polymorphisms in DNS and CMM/DNS families. PMID:12362978

  12. Systematic Phenomics Analysis Deconvolutes Genes Mutated in Intellectual Disability into Biologically Coherent Modules

    PubMed Central

    Kochinke, Korinna; Zweier, Christiane; Nijhof, Bonnie; Fenckova, Michaela; Cizek, Pavel; Honti, Frank; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Oortveld, Merel A.W.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Kramer, Jamie M.; Webber, Caleb; Huynen, Martijn A.; Schenck, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) disorders are genetically and phenotypically extremely heterogeneous. Can this complexity be depicted in a comprehensive way as a means of facilitating the understanding of ID disorders and their underlying biology? We provide a curated database of 746 currently known genes, mutations in which cause ID (ID-associated genes [ID-AGs]), classified according to ID manifestation and associated clinical features. Using this integrated resource, we show that ID-AGs are substantially enriched with co-expression, protein-protein interactions, and specific biological functions. Systematic identification of highly enriched functional themes and phenotypes revealed typical phenotype combinations characterizing process-defined groups of ID disorders, such as chromatin-related disorders and deficiencies in DNA repair. Strikingly, phenotype classification efficiently breaks down ID-AGs into subsets with significantly elevated biological coherence and predictive power. Custom-made functional Drosophila datasets revealed further characteristic phenotypes among ID-AGs and specific clinical classes. Our study and resource provide systematic insights into the molecular and clinical landscape of ID disorders, represent a significant step toward overcoming current limitations in ID research, and prove the utility of systematic human and cross-species phenomics analyses in highly heterogeneous genetic disorders. PMID:26748517

  13. Mutation analysis in 129 genes associated with other forms of retinal dystrophy in 157 families with retinitis pigmentosa based on exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Guan, Liping; Xiao, Xueshan; Zhang, Jianguo; Li, Shiqiang; Jiang, Hui; Jia, Xiaoyun; Yang, Jianhua; Guo, Xiangming; Yin, Ye; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in 60 known genes were previously identified by exome sequencing in 79 of 157 families with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). This study analyzed variants in 129 genes associated with other forms of hereditary retinal dystrophy in the same cohort. Methods Apart from the 73 genes previously analyzed, a further 129 genes responsible for other forms of hereditary retinal dystrophy were selected based on RetNet. Variants in the 129 genes determined by whole exome sequencing were selected and filtered by bioinformatics analysis. Candidate variants were confirmed by Sanger sequencing and validated by analysis of available family members and controls. Results A total of 90 candidate variants were present in the 129 genes. Sanger sequencing confirmed 83 of the 90 variants. Analysis of family members and controls excluded 76 of these 83 variants. The remaining seven variants were considered to be potential pathogenic mutations; these were c.899A>G, c.1814C>G, and c.2107C>T in BBS2; c.1073C>T and c.1669C>T in INPP5E; and c.3582C>G and c.5704–5C>G in CACNA1F. Six of these seven mutations were novel. The mutations were detected in five unrelated patients without a family history, including three patients with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in BBS2 and INPP5E, and two patients with hemizygous mutations in CACNA1F. None of the patients had mutations in the genes associated with autosome dominant retinal dystrophy. Conclusions Only a small portion of patients with RP, about 3% (5/157), had causative mutations in the 129 genes associated with other forms of hereditary retinal dystrophy. PMID:25999675

  14. Single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of androgen receptor gene mutations in patients with androgen insensitivity syndromes: Application for diagnosis, genetic counseling, and therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hiort, O. Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, MA ); Huang, Q. ); Sinnecker, G.H.G.; Kruse, K. ); Sadeghi-Nejad, A.; Wolfe, H.J. ); Yandell, D.W. ) Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA )

    1993-07-01

    Recent studies indicate that mutations in the androgen receptor gene are associated with androgen insensitivity syndromes, a heterogeneous group of related disorders involving defective sexual differentiation in karyotypic males. In this report, the authors address the possibility of rapid mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene for initial diagnosis, genetic counseling, and molecular subclassification of affected patients and their families. DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes of six patients from five families with various degrees of androgen insensitivity was studied. Exons 2 to 8 of the androgen receptor gene were analyzed using a combination of single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct DNA sequencing. Female family members were also studied to identify heterozygote carriers. Point mutations in the AR gene were identified in all six patients, and all mutations caused amino acid substitutions. One patient with incomplete androgen insensitivity was a mosaic for the mutation. Four of the five mothers, as well as a young sister of one patient, were carriers of the mutation present in the affected child. The data show that new mutations may occur in the androgen receptor gene leading to sporadic androgen insensitivity syndrome. Molecular genetic characterization of the variant allele can serve as a primary tool for diagnosis and subsequent therapy, and can provide a basis for distinguishing heterozygous carriers in familial androgen resistance. The identification of carriers is of substantial clinical importance for genetic counseling. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Mutation Analysis of the Common Deafness Genes in Patients with Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss in Linyi by SNPscan Assay

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fengguo; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Guodong; Li, Jianfeng; Lv, Huaiqing; Bai, Xiaohui; Wang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is a common sensory disorder, and at least 50% of cases are due to a genetic etiology. Although hundreds of genes have been reported to be associated with nonsyndromic hearing loss, GJB2, SLC26A4, and mtDNA12SrRNA are the major contributors. However, the mutation spectrum of these common deafness genes varies among different ethnic groups. The present work summarized mutations in these three genes and their prevalence in 339 patients with nonsyndromic hearing loss at three different special education schools and one children's hospital in Linyi, China. A new multiplex genetic screening system “SNPscan assay” was employed to detect a total of 115 mutations of the above three genes. Finally, 48.67% of the patients were identified with hereditary hearing loss caused by mutations in GJB2, SLC26A4, and mtDNA12SrRNA. The carrying rate of mutations in the three genes was 37.76%, 19.75%, and 4.72%, respectively. This mutation profile in our study is distinct from other parts of China, with high mutation rate of GJB2 suggesting a unique mutation spectrum in this area. PMID:27247933

  16. High-throughput analysis of promoter occupancy reveals new targets for Arx, a gene mutated in mental retardation and interneuronopathies.

    PubMed

    Quillé, Marie-Lise; Carat, Solenne; Quéméner-Redon, Sylvia; Hirchaud, Edouard; Baron, Daniel; Benech, Caroline; Guihot, Jeanne; Placet, Morgane; Mignen, Olivier; Férec, Claude; Houlgatte, Rémi; Friocourt, Gaëlle

    2011-01-01

    Genetic investigations of X-linked intellectual disabilities have implicated the ARX (Aristaless-related homeobox) gene in a wide spectrum of disorders extending from phenotypes characterised by severe neuronal migration defects such as lissencephaly, to mild or moderate forms of mental retardation without apparent brain abnormalities but with associated features of dystonia and epilepsy. Analysis of Arx spatio-temporal localisation profile in mouse revealed expression in telencephalic structures, mainly restricted to populations of GABAergic neurons at all stages of development. Furthermore, studies of the effects of ARX loss of function in humans and animal models revealed varying defects, suggesting multiple roles of this gene during brain development. However, to date, little is known about how ARX functions as a transcription factor and the nature of its targets. To better understand its role, we combined chromatin immunoprecipitation and mRNA expression with microarray analysis and identified a total of 1006 gene promoters bound by Arx in transfected neuroblastoma (N2a) cells and in mouse embryonic brain. Approximately 24% of Arx-bound genes were found to show expression changes following Arx overexpression or knock-down. Several of the Arx target genes we identified are known to be important for a variety of functions in brain development and some of them suggest new functions for Arx. Overall, these results identified multiple new candidate targets for Arx and should help to better understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of intellectual disability and epilepsy associated with ARX mutations. PMID:21966449

  17. Mutation analysis of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene in Azerbaijani population, a report from West Azerbaijan province of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Morteza; Rad, Isa Abdi; Jazani, Nima Hosseini; Zarrin, Rasoul; Ghazavi, Ahad

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a genetic inborn error of phenylalanine (Phe) metabolism resulting from insufficiency in the hepatic enzyme, phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH), which leads to elevated levels of Phe in the blood. The present study was carried out for mutation analysis of the PAH gene in West Azerbaijan province of Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 218 alleles from 40 PKU families were studied using restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR) method. Results: The frequencies of IVS10-11, S67P, R261Q, R252W, IVS11nt-1 g>c, R408Q, and Q232Q mutations were 28(35), 17(21.25), 15(18.75), 3(3.75), 3(3.75), 2(2.5), and 1(1.25), in cases group, and 51(23.4), 31(14.2), 27(12.4), 6(2.75), 6(2.75), 4(1.83), and 2(0.92) in total group, respectively. The mutations of R243Q, 364delG, L333F, 261X, I65T, and R408W were not detected in our samples. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the IVS10-11 mutation has the highest frequency in the tested population. To our knowledge, this report is the first in its own kind and provides better understanding of the genetic heterogeneity, the origin and distributions of PAH mutations in West Azerbaijan province of Iran. PMID:26351554

  18. Duplication of the mmoX gene in Methylosinus sporium: cloning, sequencing and mutational analysis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hanif; Scanlan, Julie; Dumont, Marc G; Murrell, J Colin

    2006-10-01

    The soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) is a key enzyme for methane oxidation, and is found in only some methanotrophs, including Methylosinus sporium 5. sMMO expression is regulated at the level of transcription from a sigma(54) promoter by a copper-switch, and is only expressed when the copper-to-biomass ratio during growth is low. Extensive phylogenetic and genetic analyses of sMMOs and other soluble di-iron monooxygenases reveal that these enzymes have only been acquired relatively recently through horizontal gene transfer. In this study, further evidence of horizontal gene transfer was obtained, through cloning and sequencing of the genes encoding the sMMO enzyme complex plus the regulatory genes mmoG and mmoR, and identification of a duplicate copy of the mmoX gene in Ms. sporium. mmoX encodes the alpha subunit of the hydroxylase of the sMMO enzyme, which constitutes the active site (Prior & Dalton, 1985). The mmoX genes were characterized at the molecular and biochemical levels. Although both copies were transcribed, only mmoX copy 1 was essential for sMMO activity. Construction of an sMMO(-) mutant by marker-exchange mutagenesis gave some possible insights into the role of the water-soluble pigment in siderophore-mediated iron acquisition. Finally, the amenability of Ms. sporium to genetic manipulation was demonstrated by complementing the sMMO(-) mutant by heterologous expression of sMMO genes from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b and Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), and it was shown that Ms. sporium could be used as an alternative model organism for molecular analysis of MMO regulation. PMID:17005974

  19. Rapid deoxyribonucleic acid analysis by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction for detection of mutations in the steroid 21-hydroxylase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.C.; Wei, J.Q.; Cheng, K.C.

    1995-05-01

    Rapid DNA analysis based on allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mutation site-specific primers was developed to detect mutations in the CYP21 gene known to cause steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency. In contrast to the previous method, in which PCR of genomic DNA was followed by dot blot analysis with radio active probes and multiple rounds of stripping and reprobing for each of the 8 most common mutation sites, the results using this new method were immediately visualized after the PCR run by ethidium bromide-stained agarose gel electrophoresis. Using allele-specific PCR, mutation(s) were identified on 148 affected chromosomes out of 160 tested. Although mutation(s) were identified on only one chromosome of 11 of these patients, their parents showed a consistent pattern on DNA analysis. The only exception was that in one family, in which the parents each had a detectable mutation, a mutation was detected on only one allele of the patient. Most likely there is a mutation in the patient`s other allele that could have arisen de novo or was inherited from the parent and was not evident in the transmitting parent`s phenotype. When compared with the dot blot procedure, allele-specific PCR is more rapid, less labor-intensive, and avoids the use of radioactivity. 26 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Mutation analysis in exons 22 and 24 of SCN4A gene in Iranian patients with non-dystrophic myotonia

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Mohammad Mehdi; Khatami, Mehri; Nafissi, Shahriar; Hesami-Zokai, Faezeh; Khorrami, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Non-dystrophic myotonias are a heterogeneous set of skeletal, muscular channelopathies, which have been associated with point mutations within sodium channel α-subunit (SCN4A) gene. Because exons 22 and 24 of SCN4A gene are recognized as hot spots for this disease, the purpose of the study is to identify mutation in exons 22 and 24 of SCN4A gene in Iranian non-dystrophic myotonias patients. Methods: In this study, 28 Iranian patients with non-dystrophic myotonia analyzed for the mutation scanning in exons 22 and 24 of SCN4A gene by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and sequencing. Results: We found 29073G>C substitution in SCN4A gene in one case and 31506A>G substitution in seven cases. The 29073G>C substitution causes a missense mutation G1306A, located in the conserved cytoplasmic loop connecting repeat III and IV of the SCN4A channel but, 31506A>G substitution do not alter amino acid in SCN4A protein. Conclusion: G1306A residue is located in functionally important protein region. In “hinged-lid model” for Na+ channel inactivation in which glycines1306 act as the hinge of the lid occluding the channel pore. Mutation in this region slowed fast inactivation. Therefore, it might be a pathogenic mutation. The causal relationship of this mutation with the disease is an object for further discussion. PMID:26885337

  1. Gene Mutation Analysis in EGFR Wild Type NSCLC Responsive to Erlotinib: Are There Features to Guide Patient Selection?

    PubMed Central

    Ulivi, Paola; Delmonte, Angelo; Chiadini, Elisa; Calistri, Daniele; Papi, Maximilian; Mariotti, Marita; Verlicchi, Alberto; Ragazzini, Angela; Capelli, Laura; Gamboni, Alessandro; Puccetti, Maurizio; Dubini, Alessandra; Burgio, Marco Angelo; Casanova, Claudia; Crinò, Lucio; Amadori, Dino; Dazzi, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are very efficacious in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring activating Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) mutations. However, about 10% of EGFR wild type (wt) patients respond to TKI, with unknown molecular mechanisms of sensitivity. We considered a case series of 34 EGFR wt NSCLC patients responsive to erlotinib after at least one line of therapy. Responsive patients were matched with an equal number of non-responsive EGFR wt patients. A panel of 26 genes, for a total of 214 somatic mutations, was analyzed by MassARRAY® System (Sequenom, San Diego, CA, USA). A 15% KRAS mutation was observed in both groups, with a prevalence of G12C in non-responders (80% vs. 40% in responders). NOTCH1, p53 and EGFR-resistance-related mutations were found more frequently in non-responders, whereas EGFR-sensitizing mutations and alterations in genes involved in proliferation pathways were more frequent in responders. In conclusion, our findings indicate that p53, NOTCH1 and exon 20 EGFR mutations seem to be related to TKI resistance. KRAS mutations do not appear to influence the TKI response, although G12C mutation is more frequent in non-responders. Finally, the use of highly sensitive methodologies could lead to the identification of under-represented EGFR mutations potentially associated with TKI sensitivity. PMID:25561229

  2. Functional analysis of a proline to serine mutation in codon 453 of the thyroid hormone receptor {beta}1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ozata, M.; Suzuki, Satoru; Takeda, Teiji

    1995-10-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding human thyroid hormone receptor {beta}(hTR{beta}) have been associated with generalized resistance to thyroid hormone (GRTH). This disorder is associated with significant behavoral abnormalities. We examined the hTR{beta} gene in a family with members who manifest inappropriately normal TSH, elevated free T{sub 4}, and free and total T{sub 3}. Sequence analysis showed a cytosine to thymine transition at nucleotide 1642 in one allele of the index patient`s genomic DNA. This altered proline to serine at codon 453. The resulting mutant receptor when expressed in vitro bound DNA with high affinity, but the T{sub 3} affinity of the receptor was impaired. The mutant TR demonstrated a dominant negative effect when cotransfected with two isoforms of wild-type receptor and also in the presence of TR variant {alpha}2 in COS-1 cells. Mutations of codon 453 occur more frequently than at other sites, and four different amino acid substitutions have been reported. Significant differences in phenotype occur among affected individuals, varying from normality to moderately severe GRTH. There is no clear correlation between K{sub a} or in vitro function of the mutant receptor, and phenotype. This study extends the association between GRTH and illness, and indicates that early diagnosis and counseling are needed in families with TR{beta}1 abnormalities. 34 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Mutation analysis of PAH gene in patients with PKU in western Iran and its association with polymorphisms: identification of four novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Alibakhshi, Reza; Moradi, Keyvan; Mohebbi, Zahra; Ghadiri, Keyghobad

    2014-03-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a mutation in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Untreated PKU can lead to mental retardation, seizures, and other serious medical problems. This study was designed to investigate the status of molecular defects in the PAH gene and their association with polymorphisms in Kurdish patients with PKU in the Kermanshah province, western Iran. The study was conducted on 27 unrelated patients with PKU over a 2-year period (from 2010 to 2012). All 13 exons plus exon-intron boundaries of the PAH gene were analyzed and we identified 15 different mutations, including two novel mutations, in 51 of the 54 mutant alleles (diagnostic efficiency of 94.4 %). IVS4 + 1G > C (c.441 + 1G > C) and IVS7 - 5 T > C (c.843 - 5 T > C) are novel mutations that have not been reported in the academic literature or the PAH locus database ( http://www.pahdb.mcgill.ca ); therefore, they may be specific to the Kurdish population. IVS2 + 5G > C and IVS9 + 5G > A were the two most prevalent mutations in our sample, with frequencies of 26 % and 17 %, respectively. The second most common mutations were p.R261X, IVS10 - 11G > A, p.K363 > Nfs and IVS7 - 5 T > C, with each showing a relative frequency of 7.4 %. All other detected mutations, including p.F55 > Lfs, p.R176X, p.R243Q, p.V230I, p.R243X, p.R261Q, IVS8 - 7A > G and p.E390G had frequencies of less than 4 %. The present study showed that there is a distinct difference in the characteristics of PAH mutations between the Kermanshah province and other parts of Iran, suggesting that Kermanshah may have a unique population distribution of PAH gene mutations. Iran lies on the route of major ancient movements of the Caucasian people toward the Mediterranean basin, and Kermanshah has previously been called the gateway to Asia. Most of the mutations identified in this study are common in the Mediterranean region. Therefore, our findings are consistent with the historical and

  4. Nucleotide sequence and mutational analysis of the structural genes (anfHDGK) for the second alternative nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed Central

    Joerger, R D; Jacobson, M R; Premakumar, R; Wolfinger, E D; Bishop, P E

    1989-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a region of the Azotobacter vinelandii genome exhibiting sequence similarity to nifH has been determined. The order of open reading frames within this 6.1-kilobase-pair region was found to be anfH (alternative nitrogen fixation, nifH-like gene), anfD (nifD-like gene), anfG (potentially encoding a protein similar to the product of vnfG from Azotobacter chroococcum), anfK (nifK-like gene), followed by two additional open reading frames. The 5'-flanking region of anfH contains a nif promoter similar to that found in the A. vinelandii nifHDK gene cluster. The presumed products of anfH, anfD, and anfK are similar in predicted Mr and pI to the previously described subunits of nitrogenase 3. Deletion plus insertion mutations introduced into the anfHDGK region of wild-type strain A. vinelandii CA resulted in mutant strains that were unable to grow in Mo-deficient, N-free medium but grew in the presence of 1 microM Na2MoO4 or V2O5. Introduction of the same mutations into the nifHDK deletion strain CA11 resulted in strains that grew under diazotrophic conditions only in the presence of vanadium. The lack of nitrogenase 3 subunits in these mutant strains was demonstrated through two-dimensional gel analysis of protein extracts from cells derepressed for nitrogenase under Mo and V deficiency. These results indicate that anfH, anfD, and anfK encode structural proteins for nitrogenase 3. Images PMID:2644222

  5. Nucleotide sequence and mutational analysis of the structural genes (anfHDGK) for the second alternative nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Joerger, R D; Jacobson, M R; Premakumar, R; Wolfinger, E D; Bishop, P E

    1989-02-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a region of the Azotobacter vinelandii genome exhibiting sequence similarity to nifH has been determined. The order of open reading frames within this 6.1-kilobase-pair region was found to be anfH (alternative nitrogen fixation, nifH-like gene), anfD (nifD-like gene), anfG (potentially encoding a protein similar to the product of vnfG from Azotobacter chroococcum), anfK (nifK-like gene), followed by two additional open reading frames. The 5'-flanking region of anfH contains a nif promoter similar to that found in the A. vinelandii nifHDK gene cluster. The presumed products of anfH, anfD, and anfK are similar in predicted Mr and pI to the previously described subunits of nitrogenase 3. Deletion plus insertion mutations introduced into the anfHDGK region of wild-type strain A. vinelandii CA resulted in mutant strains that were unable to grow in Mo-deficient, N-free medium but grew in the presence of 1 microM Na2MoO4 or V2O5. Introduction of the same mutations into the nifHDK deletion strain CA11 resulted in strains that grew under diazotrophic conditions only in the presence of vanadium. The lack of nitrogenase 3 subunits in these mutant strains was demonstrated through two-dimensional gel analysis of protein extracts from cells derepressed for nitrogenase under Mo and V deficiency. These results indicate that anfH, anfD, and anfK encode structural proteins for nitrogenase 3. PMID:2644222

  6. The Wilson disease gene: Haplotypes and mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.R.; Roberts, E.A.; Cox, D.W.; Walshe, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    Wilson disease (WND) is an autosomal recessive defect of copper transport. The gene involved in WND, located on chromosome 13, has recently been shown to be a putative copper transporting P-type ATPase, designated ATP7B. The gene is highly similar to ATP7A, located on the X chromosome, which is defective in Menkes disease, another disorder of copper transport. We have available for study WND families from Canada (34 families), the United Kingdom (32 families), Japan (4 families), Iceland (3 families) and Hong Kong (2 families). We have utilized four highly polymorphic CA repeat markers (D13S296, D13S301, D13S314 and D13S316) surrounding the ATP7B locus to construct haplotypes in these families. Analysis indicates that there are many unique WND haplotypes not present on normal chromosomes and that there may be a large number of different WND mutations. We have screened the WND patients for mutations in the ATP7B gene. Fifty six patients, representing all of the identified haplotypes, have been screened using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP), followed by selective sequencing. To date, 19 mutations and 12 polymorphisms have been identified. All of the changes are nucleotide substitutions or small insertions/deletions and there is no evidence for larger deletions as seen in the similar gene on the X chromosome, ATP7A. Haplotypes of close markers and the ability to detect some of the mutations present in the gene allow for more reliable molecular diagnosis of presymptomatic sibs of WND patients. A reassessment of individuals previously diagnosed in the presymptomatic phase is now required, as we have have identified some heterozygotes who are biochemically indistinguishable from affected homozygotes. The identification of specific mutations will soon allow direct diagnosis of WND patients with a high level of certainty.

  7. Mutation analysis of metastatic melanomas in the central nervous system: results of a panel of 5 genes in 48 cases.

    PubMed

    Gamsizkan, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Ismail; Simsek, Hasan Aktug; Onguru, Onder; Griffin, Ann; Tihan, Tarik

    2016-01-01

    Melanocytic lesions in the central nervous system (CNS) may be primary to the site but are more commonly metastases from cutaneous primaries. In fact, melanomas are one of the most common malignancies that can metastasize to the brain, and some patients may not have a diagnosis of melanoma prior to the discovery of the CNS lesion. In such cases, identifying the primary site may be challenging. We reviewed the archives of a large referral center for melanocytic tumors involving the CNS and selected 48 patients for this study based on our inclusion criteria. We used sequencing to identify mutation status of these tumors and compared these with clinicopathological features. Mutations in exon 9, 11, 13, 17, and 18 of KIT gene, exon 15 of BRAF gene, exon 2 and 3 of NRAS gene, exon 4 and 5 of GNAQ and GNA11 genes were analyzed. Mutations in BRAF-exon 15 were the most common among tumors (58.3%). NRAS-exon 2 and NRAS-exon 3 mutations were detected in 3 and 7 cases, respectively. GNAQ-exon 4, GNAQ-exon 5 and GNA11-exon 5 mutation were present in 1 tumor each. Eight tumors were wild type for all 5 genes, and 6 of these were not known primary despite a work-up and clinical follow-up. Only 1 of these tumors showed a mutation in exon 11 of KIT gene. When compared to primary melanocytic lesions of the CNS, metastatic melanomas were characterized by BRAF gene mutations and wild-type GNAQ and GNA11 genes. PMID:27117140

  8. Evaluating the performance of clinical criteria for predicting mismatch repair gene mutations in Lynch syndrome: a comprehensive analysis of 3,671 families.

    PubMed

    Steinke, Verena; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Loeffler, Markus; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Morak, Monika; Schackert, Hans K; Görgens, Heike; Pox, Christian; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; von Knebel-Doeberitz, Magnus; Büttner, Reinhard; Propping, Peter; Engel, Christoph

    2014-07-01

    Carriers of mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations have a high lifetime risk for colorectal and endometrial cancers, as well as other malignancies. As mutation analysis to detect these patients is expensive and time-consuming, clinical criteria and tumor-tissue analysis are widely used as pre-screening methods. The aim of our study was to evaluate the performance of commonly applied clinical criteria (the Amsterdam I and II Criteria, and the original and revised Bethesda Guidelines) and the results of tumor-tissue analysis in predicting MMR gene mutations. We analyzed 3,671 families from the German HNPCC Registry and divided them into nine mutually exclusive groups with different clinical criteria. A total of 680 families (18.5%) were found to have a pathogenic MMR gene mutation. Among all 1,284 families with microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) colorectal cancer, the overall mutation detection rate was 53.0%. Mutation frequencies and their distribution between the four MMR genes differed significantly between clinical groups (p < 0.001). The highest frequencies were found in families fulfilling the Amsterdam Criteria (46.4%). Families with loss of MSH2 expression had higher mutation detection rates (69.5%) than families with loss of MLH1 expression (43.1%). MMR mutations were found significantly more often in families with at least one MSI-H small-bowel cancer (p < 0.001). No MMR mutations were found among patients under 40-years-old with only colorectal adenoma. Familial clustering of Lynch syndrome-related tumors, early age of onset, and familial occurrence of small-bowel cancer were clinically relevant predictors for Lynch syndrome. PMID:24493211

  9. Functional analysis reveals splicing mutations of the CASQ2 gene in patients with CPVT: implication for genetic counselling and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Roux-Buisson, Nathalie; Rendu, John; Denjoy, Isabelle; Guicheney, Pascale; Goldenberg, Alice; David, Nadine; Faivre, Laurence; Barthez, Olivier; Danieli, Gian Antonio; Marty, Isabelle; Lunardi, Joel; Fauré, Julien

    2011-09-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a rare and severe arrhythmogenic disorder. Although usually transmitted in a recessive form, few cases of dominant mutations have been reported. Thirteen mutations in the CASQ2 gene have been reported so far in association with CPVT. We performed molecular analysis of the CASQ2 gene in 43 probands with CPVT and identified eight mutations in five patients. Six mutations were novel: one was a single nucleotide deletion, three affected consensus splice sites, and two had unknown consequences: the c.939 + 5G>C and the synonymous c.381C>T variations. We demonstrated that these two variations affected CASQ2 splicing using a splicing minigene assay. These data increased significantly the number of CASQ2 mutations described in association with CPVT, revealed the high prevalence of splicing and truncating mutations in this gene and brought new insight regarding the dominant inheritance of the disease. Moreover, our report of the first splicing abnormalities in CASQ2 caused by intronic mutation or synonymous change underlines the absolute necessity to perform extensive molecular analysis for genetic diagnosis and counseling of CPVT. PMID:21618644

  10. Mutational analysis of JAK2, CBL, RUNX1, and NPM1 genes in familial aggregation of hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Hamadou, Walid S; Bourdon, Violaine; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Besbes, Sawsen; Fabre, Aurélie; Youssef, Yosra B; Regaieg, Haifa; Laatiri, Mohamed A; Eisinger, François; Mari, Véronique; Gesta, Paul; Dreyfus, Hélène; Bonadona, Valérie; Dugast, Catherine; Zattara, Hélène; Faivre, Laurence; Jemni, Saloua Yacoub; Noguchi, Testsuro; Khélif, Abderrahim; Sobol, Hagay; Soua, Zohra

    2016-06-01

    Familial aggregation of hematological malignancies has been reported highlighting inherited genetic predisposition. In this study, we targeted four candidate genes: JAK2 and RUNX1 genes assuring a prominent function in hematological process and CBL and NPM1 as proto-oncogenes. Their disruption was described in several sporadic hematological malignancies. The aim of this study is to determine whether JAK2, CBL, RUNX1, and NPM1 germline genes mutations are involved in familial hematological malignancies. Using direct sequencing, we analyzed JAK2 (exons 12 and 14); CBL (exons 7, 8 and 9); NPM1 (exon 12) and the entire RUNX1 in 88 independent families belonging to Tunisian and French populations. Twenty-one sporadic acute leukemias were included in this study. We reported a heterozygous intronic c.1641 + 6 T > C JAK2 variant (rs182123615) found in two independent familial cases diagnosed with gastric lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma. The in silico analysis suggested a potential impact on splicing, but the functional splicing minigene reporter assay on rs182123615 variant showed no aberrant transcripts. In one sporadic acute myeloblastic leukemia, we reported an insertion 846 in. TGTT in exon 12 of NPM1 gene that may impact the normal reading frame. The rs182123615 JAK2 variant was described in several contexts including myeloproliferative neoplasms and congenital erythrocytosis and was supposed to be pathogenic. Through this current study, we established the assessment of pathogenicity of rs182123615 and we classified it rather as rare polymorphism. PMID:27106701

  11. Molecular genetic analysis of some mutations in the cystic fibrosis gene in Moldova: Characterization of molecular markers and their linkage to various mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Gimbovskaya, S.D.; Kalinin, V.N.; Ivashchenko, T.E.; Baranov, V.S.

    1994-12-01

    Sixty-one patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) from Moldova were tested for mutations {Delta}F508, G551D, and R553X. Frequencies of various alleles of the repeated GATT sequence in intron 6B of the GFTR gene, their linkage to other polymorphic markers, and various mutations were determined. The frequency of occurrence of mutation {Delta}F508 was only 25%. An absolute majority of CF patients (80%) had pancreatic insufficiency. Mutations G551D and R553X were not found in our sample. Each of 31 chromosomes with mutation {Delta}F508 carry the 6-GATT allele. Most {open_quotes}non {Delta}F508{close_quotes} (78%) and normal (80%) chromosomes were marked by the 7-GATT allele. Twenty-seven {Delta}F508 chromosomes (96.4%) belong to haplotype B6, and only one to D6. Most chromosomes with {open_quotes}non {Delta}F508{close_quotes} mutations are associated with haplotypes D7 (26.3%) and C7 (21%). In addition, a significant portion of chromosomes from this subgroup were associated with haplotypes A7 (23.7%), A6 (10.5%), and C6 (2.7%), which are not yet described for mutant chromosomes. The results obtained demonstrate that CF in Moldova is mainly associated with mutations other than {Delta}F508, G551D, and R553X. Severe forms of the disease, with pancreatic insufficiency, are more frequently caused by these mutations; moreover, our data provides strong evidence for the presence of at least seven additional CF mutations in Moldova, apart from {Delta}F508, G551D, and R553X. Some of these are probably not described.

  12. Parkinson disease (PARK) genes are somatically mutated in cutaneous melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Yardena; Azizi, Esther; Qutob, Nouar; Inzelberg, Lilah; Domany, Eytan; Schechtman, Edna; Friedman, Eitan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether Parkinson disease (PD) genes are somatically mutated in cutaneous melanoma (CM) tissue, because CM occurs in patients with PD at higher rates than in the general population and PD is more common than expected in CM cohorts. Methods: We cross-referenced somatic mutations in metastatic CM detected by whole-exome sequencing with the 15 known PD (PARK) genes. We computed the empirical distribution of the sum of mutations in each gene (Smut) and of the number of tissue samples in which a given gene was mutated at least once (SSampl) for each of the analyzable genes, determined the 90th and 95th percentiles of the empirical distributions of these sums, and verified the location of PARK genes in these distributions. Identical analyses were applied to adenocarcinoma of lung (ADENOCA-LUNG) and squamous cell carcinoma of lung (SQUAMCA-LUNG). We also analyzed the distribution of the number of mutated PARK genes in CM samples vs the 2 lung cancers. Results: Somatic CM mutation analysis (n = 246) detected 315,914 mutations in 18,758 genes. Somatic CM mutations were found in 14 of 15 PARK genes. Forty-eight percent of CM samples carried ≥1 PARK mutation and 25% carried multiple PARK mutations. PARK8 mutations occurred above the 95th percentile of the empirical distribution for SMut and SSampl. Significantly more CM samples harbored multiple PARK gene mutations compared with SQUAMCA-LUNG (p = 0.0026) and with ADENOCA-LUNG (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The overrepresentation of somatic PARK mutations in CM suggests shared dysregulated pathways for CM and PD. PMID:27123489

  13. Whole mitochondrial genome analysis in two families with dilated mitochondrial cardiomyopathy: detection of mutations in MT-ND2 and MT-TL1 genes.

    PubMed

    Alila, Olfa Fersi; Rebai, Emna Mkaouar; Tabebi, Mouna; Tej, Amel; Chamkha, Imen; Tlili, Abdelaziz; Bouguila, Jihene; Tilouche, Samia; Soyah, Nejla; Boughamoura, Lamia; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2016-07-01

    Pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations leading to mitochondrial dysfunction can cause cardiomyopathy and heart failure. These mutations were described in the mt-tRNA genes and in the mitochondrial protein-coding genes. The aim of this study was to identify the genetic defect in two patients belonging to two families with cardiac dysfunction associated to a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. The sequencing analysis of the whole mitochondrial DNA in the two patients and their parents revealed the presence of known polymorphisms associated to cardiomyopathy and two pathogenic mutations in DNA extracted from blood leucocytes: the heteroplasmic m.3243A > G mutation in the MT-TL1 gene in patient A; and the homoplasmic m.5182C > T mutation in the ND2 gene in patient B. Secondary structure analysis of the ND2 protein further supported the deleterious role of the m.5182C > T mutation, as it was found to be involved an extended imbalance in its hydrophobicity and affect its function. In addition, the mitochondrial variants identified in patients A and B classify both of them in the same haplogroup H2a2a1. PMID:26258512

  14. Analysis of KRAS and BRAF genes mutation in the central nervous system metastases of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Nicoś, Marcin; Krawczyk, Paweł; Jarosz, Bożena; Sawicki, Marek; Szumiłło, Justyna; Trojanowski, Tomasz; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-05-01

    KRAS mutations are associated with tumor resistance to EGFR TKIs (erlotinib, gefitinib) and to monoclonal antibody against EGFR (cetuximab). Targeted treatment of mutated RAS patients is still considered as a challenge. Inhibitors of c-Met (onartuzumab or tiwantinib) and MEK (selumetinib-a dual inhibitor of MEK1 and MEK2) signaling pathways showed activity in patients with mutations in KRAS that can became an effective approach in carriers of such disorders. BRAF mutation is very rare in patients with NSCLC, and its presence is associated with sensitivity of tumor cells to BRAF inhibitors (vemurafenib, dabrafenib). In the present study, the frequency and type of KRAS and BRAF mutation were assessed in 145 FFPE tissue samples from CNS metastases of NSCLC. In 30 patients, material from the primary tumor was simultaneously available. Real-time PCR technique with allele-specific molecular probe (KRAS/BRAF Mutation Analysis Kit, Entrogen, USA) was used for molecular tests. KRAS mutations were detected in 21.4 % of CNS metastatic lesions and in 23.3 % of corresponding primary tumors. Five mutations were identified both in primary and in metastatic lesions, while one mutation only in primary tumor and one mutation only in the metastatic tumor. Most of mutations were observed in codon 12 of KRAS; however, an individual patient had diagnosed a rare G13D and Q61R substitutions. KRAS mutations were significantly more frequent in adenocarcinoma patients and smokers. Additional analysis indicated one patient with rare coexistence of KRAS and DDR2 mutations. BRAF mutation was not detected in the examined materials. KRAS frequency appears to be similar in primary and CNS. PMID:25902737

  15. Identification of 31 novel mutations in the F8 gene in Spanish hemophilia A patients: structural analysis of 20 missense mutations suggests new intermolecular binding sites.

    PubMed

    Venceslá, Adoración; Corral-Rodríguez, María Angeles; Baena, Manel; Cornet, Mónica; Domènech, Montserrat; Baiget, Montserrat; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Tizzano, Eduardo F

    2008-04-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by a wide variety of mutations in the factor 8 (F8) gene, leading to absent or deficient factor VIII (FVIII). We analyzed the F8 gene of 267 unrelated Spanish patients with HA. After excluding patients with the common intron-1 and intron-22 inversions and large deletions, we detected 137 individuals with small mutations, 31 of which had not been reported previously. Eleven of these were nonsense, frameshift, and splicing mutations, whereas 20 were missense changes. We assessed the impact of the 20 substitutions based on currently available information about FV and FVIII structure and function relationship, including previously reported results of replacements at these and topologically equivalent positions. Although most changes are likely to cause gross structural perturbations and concomitant cofactor instability, p.Ala375Ser is predicted to affect cofactor activation. Finally, 3 further mutations (p.Pro64Arg, p.Gly494Val, and p.Asp2267Gly) appear to affect cofactor interactions with its carrier protein, von Willebrand factor, with the scavenger receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), and/or with the substrate of the FVIIIapi*FIXa (Xase) complex, factor X. Characterization of these novel mutations is important for adequate genetic counseling in HA families, but also contributes to a better understanding of FVIII structure-function relationship. PMID:18184865

  16. Identification of 31 novel mutations in the F8 gene in Spanish hemophilia A patients: structural analysis of 20 missense mutations suggests new intermolecular binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Venceslá, Adoración; Corral-Rodríguez, María Ángeles; Baena, Manel; Cornet, Mónica; Domènech, Montserrat; Baiget, Montserrat; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo

    2008-01-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by a wide variety of mutations in the factor 8 (F8) gene, leading to absent or deficient factor VIII (FVIII). We analyzed the F8 gene of 267 unrelated Spanish patients with HA. After excluding patients with the common intron-1 and intron-22 inversions and large deletions, we detected 137 individuals with small mutations, 31 of which had not been reported previously. Eleven of these were nonsense, frameshift, and splicing mutations, whereas 20 were missense changes. We assessed the impact of the 20 substitutions based on currently available information about FV and FVIII structure and function relationship, including previously reported results of replacements at these and topologically equivalent positions. Although most changes are likely to cause gross structural perturbations and concomitant cofactor instability, p.Ala375Ser is predicted to affect cofactor activation. Finally, 3 further mutations (p.Pro64Arg, p.Gly494Val, and p.Asp2267Gly) appear to affect cofactor interactions with its carrier protein, von Willebrand factor, with the scavenger receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein (LRP), and/or with the substrate of the FVIIIapi•FIXa (Xase) complex, factor X. Characterization of these novel mutations is important for adequate genetic counseling in HA families, but also contributes to a better understanding of FVIII structure-function relationship. PMID:18184865

  17. Refining the locus for Best vitelliform macular dystrophy and mutation analysis of the candidate gene ROM1

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, B.E.; Stone, E.M.; Sheffield, V.C. ); McInnes, R.; Bascom, R. ); Litt, M. )

    1994-01-01

    Vitelliform macular dystrophy (Best disease) is an autosomal dominant macular dystrophy which shares important clinical features with age-related macular degeneration, the most common cause of legal blindness in the elderly. Unfortunately, understanding and treatment for this common age-related disorder is limited. Discovery of the gene which causes Best disease has the potential to increase the understanding of the pathogenesis of all types of macular degeneration, including the common age-related form. Best disease has recently been mapped to chromosome 11q13. The photoreceptor-specific protein ROM1 has also been recently mapped to this location, and the ROM1 gene is a candidate gene for Best disease. Using highly polymorphic markers, the authors have narrowed the genetic region which contains the Best disease gene to the 10-cM region between markers D11S871 and PYGM. Marker D11S956 demonstrated no recombinants with Best disease in three large families and resulted in a lod score of 18.2. In addition, a polymorphism within the ROM1 gene also demonstrated no recombinants and resulted in a lod score of 10.0 in these same three families. The authors used a combination of SSCP analysis, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and DNA sequencing to screen the entire coding region of the ROM1 gene in 11 different unrelated patients affected with Best disease. No nucleotide changes were found in the coding sequence of any affected patient, indicating that mutations within the coding sequence are unlikely to cause Best disease. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Refining the locus for Best vitelliform macular dystrophy and mutation analysis of the candidate gene ROM1.

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, B. E.; Bascom, R.; Litt, M.; McInnes, R.; Sheffield, V. C.; Stone, E. M.

    1994-01-01

    Vitelliform macular dystrophy (Best disease) is an autosomal dominant macular dystrophy which shares important clinical features with age-related macular degeneration, the most common cause of legal blindness in the elderly. Unfortunately, our understanding and treatment for this common age-related disorder is limited. Discovery of the gene which causes Best disease has the potential to increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of all types of macular degeneration, including the common age-related form. Best disease has recently been mapped to chromosome 11q13. The photoreceptor-specific protein ROM1 has also been recently mapped to this location, and the ROM1 gene is a candidate gene for Best disease. Using highly polymorphic markers, we have narrowed the genetic region which contains the Best disease gene to the 10-cM region between markers D11S871 and PYGM. Marker D11S956 demonstrated no recombinants with Best disease in three large families and resulted in a lod score of 18.2. In addition, a polymorphism within the ROM1 gene also demonstrated no recombinants and resulted in a lod score of 10.0 in these same three families. We used a combination of SSCP analysis, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and DNA sequencing to screen the entire coding region of the ROM1 gene in 11 different unrelated patients affected with Best disease. No nucleotide changes were found in the coding sequence of any affected patient, indicating that mutations within the coding sequence are unlikely to cause Best disease. Images Figure 2 PMID:8279475

  19. Refining the locus for Best vitelliform macular dystrophy and mutation analysis of the candidate gene ROM1.

    PubMed

    Nichols, B E; Bascom, R; Litt, M; McInnes, R; Sheffield, V C; Stone, E M

    1994-01-01

    Vitelliform macular dystrophy (Best disease) is an autosomal dominant macular dystrophy which shares important clinical features with age-related macular degeneration, the most common cause of legal blindness in the elderly. Unfortunately, our understanding and treatment for this common age-related disorder is limited. Discovery of the gene which causes Best disease has the potential to increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of all types of macular degeneration, including the common age-related form. Best disease has recently been mapped to chromosome 11q13. The photoreceptor-specific protein ROM1 has also been recently mapped to this location, and the ROM1 gene is a candidate gene for Best disease. Using highly polymorphic markers, we have narrowed the genetic region which contains the Best disease gene to the 10-cM region between markers D11S871 and PYGM. Marker D11S956 demonstrated no recombinants with Best disease in three large families and resulted in a lod score of 18.2. In addition, a polymorphism within the ROM1 gene also demonstrated no recombinants and resulted in a lod score of 10.0 in these same three families. We used a combination of SSCP analysis, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and DNA sequencing to screen the entire coding region of the ROM1 gene in 11 different unrelated patients affected with Best disease. No nucleotide changes were found in the coding sequence of any affected patient, indicating that mutations within the coding sequence are unlikely to cause Best disease. PMID:8279475

  20. Anti-EGFR Therapy for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer in the Era of Extended RAS Gene Mutational Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kassouf, Elie; Tabchi, Samer; Tehfe, Mustapha

    2016-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality worldwide. In the past 2 decades, advances in cancer therapeutics allowed for a remarkable improvement in terms of survival for patients with metastatic CRC. The advent of targeted therapy, coupled with more efficient chemotherapy regimens, was the pillar achievement that contributed to the success of CRC therapy. Cetuximab and panitumumab, monoclonal antibodies targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway, are the focus of this review since their mechanism of action and efficiency are closely related to the mutational status of a predictive biomarker, the Kristen rat Sarcoma viral oncogene (KRAS). More recently, another biomarker, the neuroblastoma rat sarcoma viral oncogene (NRAS), was found to be as valuable for the refinement of this targeted therapy. The arguments for the use of extended analysis of the RAS gene are thoroughly reviewed because they directly affect the choice of targeted agents and potentially the choice of backbone chemotherapy. PMID:26927802

  1. Functional analysis of MITF gene mutations associated with Waardenburg syndrome type 2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Luo, Hunjin; Chen, Hongsheng; Mei, Lingyun; He, Chufeng; Jiang, Lu; Li, Jia-Da; Feng, Yong

    2012-11-30

    MITF mutations results in an abnormal melanocyte development and lead to Waardenburg syndrome type 2 (WS2). Here, we analyzed the in vitro activities of two recently identified WS2-associated MITF mutations (p.R217I and p.T192fsX18). The R217I MITF retained partial activity, normal DNA-binding ability and nuclear distribution, whereas the T192fsX18 MITF failed to activate TYR promoter and showed aberrant subcellular localization which may be caused by deletion of nuclear localization signal (NLS) at aa 213-218 (ERRRRF). These results suggest that haploinsufficiency may be the underlying mechanism for the mild phenotypes of WS2 caused by these two mutations. PMID:23098757

  2. Mutational analysis of the Drosophila DNA repair and recombination gene mei-9.

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Ozlem; Kearney, Hutton; Kramer, Benjamin C; Sekelsky, Jeff J

    2004-01-01

    Drosophila mei-9 is essential for several DNA repair and recombination pathways, including nucleotide excision repair (NER), interstrand crosslink repair, and meiotic recombination. To better understand the role of MEI-9 in these processes, we characterized 10 unique mutant alleles of mei-9. These include a P-element insertion that disrupts repair functions but not the meiotic function; three nonsense mutations, one of which has nearly wild-type levels of protein; three missense mutations, one of which disrupts the meiotic function but not repair functions; two small in-frame deletions; and one frameshift. PMID:15166153

  3. Analysis of P gene mutations in patients with type II (tyrosinase-positive) oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.T.; Nicholls, R.D.; Schnur, R. ||

    1994-09-01

    OCA2 is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin pigment is greatly reduced in the skin, hair, and eyes. Recently, we showed that OCA2 results from mutations of the P gene, in chromosome segment 15q11-q13. In addition to OCA2, mutations of P account for OCA associated with the Prader-Willi syndrome and some cases of {open_quotes}autosomal recessive ocular albinism{close_quotes} (AROA). We have now studied 38 unrelated patients with various forms of OCA2 or AROA from a variety of different ethnic groups. None of these patients had detectable abnormalities of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene. Among 8 African-American patients with OCA2 we observed apparent locus homogeneity. We detected abnormalities of the P gene in all 8 patients, including 12 different mutations and deletions, most of which are unique to this group and none of which is predominant. In contrast, OCA2 in other populations appears to be genetically heterogeneous. Among 21 Caucasian patients we detected abnormalities of the P gene in only 8, comprising 9 different point mutations and deletions, some of which also occurred among the African-American patients. Among 3 Middle-Eastern, 3 Indo-Pakistani, and 3 Asian patients we detected mutations of the P gene in only one from each group. In a large Indo-Pakistani kindred with OCA2 we have excluded both the TYR and P genes on the basis of genetic linkage. The prevalence of mutations of the P gene thus appears to be much higher among African-Americans with OCA2 than among patients from other ethnic groups. The incidence of OCA2 in some parts of equatorial Africa is extremely high, as frequent as 1 per 1100, and the disease has been linked to P in South African Bantu. The eventual characterization of P gene mutations in Africans will be informative with regard to the origins of P gene mutations in African-American patients.

  4. Deafness gene mutations in newborns in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Han, Shujing; Yang, Xiaojian; Zhou, Yi; Hao, Jinsheng; Shen, Adong; Xu, Fang; Chu, Ping; Jin, Yaqiong; Lu, Jie; Guo, Yongli; Shi, Jin; Liu, Haihong; Ni, Xin

    2016-05-01

    Objective To determine the incidence of congenital hearing loss (HL) in newborns by the rate of deafness-related genetic mutations. Design Clinical study of consecutive newborns in Beijing using allele-specific polymerase chain reaction-based universal array. Study sample This study tested 37 573 newborns within 3 days after birth, including nine sites in four genes: GJB2 (35 del G, 176 del 16, 235 del C, 299 del AT), SLC26A4 (IVS7-2 A > G, 2168 A > G), MTRNR1 (1555 A > G, 1494 C > T), and GJB3 (538 C > T). The birth condition of infants was also recorded. Results Of 37 573 newborns, 1810 carried pathogenic mutations, or 4.817%. The carrier rates of GJB2 (35 del G, 176 del 16, 235 del C, 299 del AT), GJB3 (538 C > T), SLC26A4 (IVS7-2 A > G, 2168 A > G), and MTRNR1 (1555 A > G, 1494 C > T) mutations were 0.005%, 0.104%, 1.924%, 0.551%, 0.295%, 0.253%, 1.387%, 0.024%, and 0.274%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis indicated no statistically significant relationship between mutations and infant sex, premature delivery, twin status, or birth weight. Conclusions The 235delC GJB2 mutation was the most frequent deafness-related mutation in the Chinese population. Genetic screening for the deafness gene will help detect more cases of newborn congenital HL than current screening practices. PMID:26766211

  5. Molecular Analysis of Mutations Induced in the Vermilion Gene of Drosophila Melanogaster by Methyl Methanesulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Nivard, MJM.; Pastink, A.; Vogel, E. W.

    1992-01-01

    The nature of DNA sequence changes induced by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) at the vermilion locus of Drosophila melanogaster was determined after exposure of postmeiotic male germ cell stages. MMS is a carcinogen with strong preference for base nitrogen alkylation (s = 0.86). The spectrum of 40 intralocus mutations was dominated by AT -> GC transitions (23%), AT -> TA transversions (54%) and deletions (14%). The small deletions were preferentially found among mutants isolated in the F(1) (8/18), whereas the AT -> GC transitions exclusively occurred in the F(2) (6/22). The MMS-induced transversions and deletions are presumably caused by N-methyl DNA adducts, which may release apurinic intermediates, known to be a time-related process. Furthermore, MMS produces multilocus deletions, i.e., at least 30% of the F(1) mutants analyzed were of this type. A comparison of the mutational spectra of MMS with that produced by ethylnitrosourea (ENU), also in the vermilion locus of Drosophila, reveals major differences: predominantly transition mutations (61% GC -> AT and 18% AT -> GC) were found in both the F(1) and F(2) spectrum induced by ENU. It is concluded that the mutational spectrum of MMS is dominated by nitrogen DNA adducts, whereas with ENU DNA sequence changes mainly arose from modified oxygen in DNA. PMID:1628810

  6. Analysis of Mutations in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Gene in Korean Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: Summary of a Nationwide Survey

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hwa; Kim, Wan Seop; Choi, Yoo Duk; Seo, Jeong Wook; Han, Joung Ho; Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Lucia; Lee, Geon Kook; Lee, Chang Hun; Oh, Mee Hye; Kim, Gou Young; Sung, Sun Hee; Lee, Kyo Young; Chang, Sun Hee; Rho, Mee Sook; Kim, Han Kyeom; Jung, Soon Hee; Jang, Se Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Analysis of mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR) is important for predicting response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The overall rate of EGFR mutations in Korean patients is variable. To obtain comprehensive data on the status of EGFR mutations in Korean patients with lung cancer, the Cardiopulmonary Pathology Study Group of the Korean Society of Pathologists initiated a nationwide survey. Methods: We obtained 1,753 reports on EGFR mutations in patients with lung cancer from 15 hospitals between January and December 2009. We compared EGFR mutations with patient age, sex, history of smoking, histologic diagnosis, specimen type, procurement site, tumor cell dissection, and laboratory status. Results: The overall EGFR mutation rate was 34.3% in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 43.3% in patients with adenocarcinoma. EGFR mutation rate was significantly higher in women, never smokers, patients with adenocarcinoma, and patients who had undergone excisional biopsy. EGFR mutation rates did not differ with respect to patient age or procurement site among patients with NSCLC. Conclusions EGFR mutation rates and statuses were similar to those in published data from other East Asian countries. PMID:26459407

  7. Identification and functional analysis of a novel mutation in the SOX10 gene associated with Waardenburg syndrome type IV.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Han; Chen, Hong-Sheng; Li, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Hua; Mei, Ling-Yun; He, Chu-Feng; Wang, Xing-Wei; Men, Mei-Chao; Jiang, Lu; Liao, Xin-Bin; Wu, Hong; Feng, Yong

    2014-03-15

    Waardenburg syndrome type IV (WS4) is a rare genetic disorder, characterized by auditory-pigmentary abnormalities and Hirschsprung disease. Mutations of the EDNRB gene, EDN3 gene, or SOX10 gene are responsible for WS4. In the present study, we reported a case of a Chinese patient with clinical features of WS4. In addition, the three genes mentioned above were sequenced in order to identify whether mutations are responsible for the case. We revealed a novel nonsense mutation, c.1063C>T (p.Q355*), in the last coding exon of SOX10. The same mutation was not found in three unaffected family members or 100 unrelated controls. Then, the function and mechanism of the mutation were investigated in vitro. We found both wild-type (WT) and mutant SOX10 p.Q355* were detected at the expected size and their expression levels are equivalent. The mutant protein also localized in the nucleus and retained the DNA-binding activity as WT counterpart; however, it lost its transactivation capability on the MITF promoter and acted as a dominant-negative repressor impairing function of the WT SOX10. PMID:24440785

  8. A new approach for identifying non-pathogenic mutations. An analysis of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene in normal individuals.

    PubMed

    Bombieri, C; Giorgi, S; Carles, S; de Cid, R; Belpinati, F; Tandoi, C; Pallares-Ruiz, N; Lazaro, C; Ciminelli, B M; Romey, M C; Casals, T; Pompei, F; Gandini, G; Claustres, M; Estivill, X; Pignatti, P F; Modiano, G

    2000-02-01

    Given q as the global frequency of the alleles causing a disease, any allele with a frequency higher than q minus the cumulative frequency of the previously known disease-causing mutations (threshold) cannot be the cause of that disease. This principle was applied to the analysis of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations in order to decide whether they are the cause of cystic fibrosis. A total of 191 DNA samples from random individuals from Italy, France, and Spain were investigated by DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) analysis of all the coding and proximal non-coding regions of the gene. The mutations detected by DGGE were identified by sequencing. The sample size was sufficient to select essentially all mutations with a frequency of at least 0.01. A total of 46 mutations was detected, 20 of which were missense mutations. Four new mutations were identified: 1341+28 C/T, 2082 C/T, L1096R, and I11131V. Thirteen mutations (125 G/C, 875+40 A/G, TTGAn, IVS8-6 5T, IVS8-6 9T, 1525-61 A/G, M470V, 2694 T/G, 3061-65 C/A, 4002 A/G, 4521 G/A, IVS8 TG10, IVS8 TG12) were classified as non-CF-causing alleles on the basis of their frequency. The remaining mutations have a cumulative frequency far exceeding q; therefore, most of them cannot be CF-causing mutations. This is the first random survey capable of detecting all the polymorphisms of the coding sequence of a gene. PMID:10746558

  9. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences. (ERB)

  10. Mutation survey and genotype-phenotype analysis of COL2A1 and COL11A1 genes in 16 Chinese patients with Stickler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xun; Jia, Xiaoyun; Xiao, Xueshan; Li, Shiqiang; Li, Jie; Li, Yadi; Wei, Yantao; Liang, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify mutations in COL2A1 and COL11A1 genes and to examine the genotype-phenotype correlation in a cohort of Chinese patients with Stickler syndrome. Methods A total of 16 Chinese probands with Stickler syndrome were recruited, including nine with a family history of an autosomal dominant pattern and seven sporadic cases. All patients underwent full ocular and systemic examinations. Sanger sequencing was used to analyze all coding and adjacent regions of the COL2A1 and COL11A1 genes. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed to detect the gross indels of COL2A1 and COL11A1. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to evaluate the pathogenicity of the variants. Results Five mutations in COL2A1 were identified in six of 16 probands, including three novel (c.85C>T, c.3356delG, c.3401delG) mutations and two known mutations (c.1693C>T, c.2710C>T). Of the five mutations, three were truncated mutations, and the other two were missense mutations. Putative pathogenic mutations of the COL11A1 gene were absent in this cohort of patients. Gross indels were not found in COL2A1 or COL11A1 in any of the probands. High myopia was the most frequent initial ocular phenotype of Stickler syndrome. In this study, 12 Chinese probands lacked obvious systemic phenotypes. Conclusions In this study, three novel and two known mutations in the COL2A1 gene were identified in six of 16 Chinese patients with Stickler syndrome. This is the first study in a cohort of Chinese patients with Stickler syndrome, and the results expand the mutation spectrum of the COL2A1 gene. Analysis of the genotype-phenotype correlation showed that the early onset of high myopia with vitreous abnormalities may serve as a key indicator of Stickler syndrome, while the existence of mandibular protrusion in pediatric patients may be an efficient indicator for the absence of mutations in COL2A1 and COL11A1. PMID:27390512

  11. Use of mutation spectra analysis software.

    PubMed

    Rogozin, I; Kondrashov, F; Glazko, G

    2001-02-01

    The study and comparison of mutation(al) spectra is an important problem in molecular biology, because these spectra often reflect on important features of mutations and their fixation. Such features include the interaction of DNA with various mutagens, the function of repair/replication enzymes, and properties of target proteins. It is known that mutability varies significantly along nucleotide sequences, such that mutations often concentrate at certain positions, called "hotspots," in a sequence. In this paper, we discuss in detail two approaches for mutation spectra analysis: the comparison of mutation spectra with a HG-PUBL program, (FTP: sunsite.unc.edu/pub/academic/biology/dna-mutations/hyperg) and hotspot prediction with the CLUSTERM program (www.itba.mi.cnr.it/webmutation; ftp.bionet.nsc.ru/pub/biology/dbms/clusterm.zip). Several other approaches for mutational spectra analysis, such as the analysis of a target protein structure, hotspot context revealing, multiple spectra comparisons, as well as a number of mutation databases are briefly described. Mutation spectra in the lacI gene of E. coli and the human p53 gene are used for illustration of various difficulties of such analysis. PMID:11180592

  12. Genotyping of the C742T mutation of the FGFR3 gene causing type 1 thanatophoric dysplasia by high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying-Na; Li, Ru; Li, Dong-Zhi

    2011-01-01

    Type 1 thanatophoric dysplasia (TD) is typically a lethal dwarfism. It is not always possible to distinguish fetuses with TD from other skeletal dysplasia in utero by ultrasonography. A definite diagnosis should be established by molecular genetic analysis to find out the abnormal mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR 3) gene. Among the known mutations of this gene, the C742T (R248C) mutation is the most common one associated with type 1 TD. Exon 7 of the FGFR3 gene was analyzed in 10 prenatal samples with type 1 TD, as well as in 30 control individuals for the presence of the c.742 C > T variant using melting curve analysis with a high-resolution melting instrument. The high-resolution melting curve analysis successfully genotyped this mutation in all 10 samples with type 1 TD without the need of further assays. The technique had a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. This study suggest that high-resolution melting analysis is a simple, rapid, and sensitive one tube assay for genotyping the FGFR3 gene. PMID:20569165

  13. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation and Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Gene Fusion: Detection in Malignant Pleural Effusion by RNA or PNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Lin; Lee, Chung-Ta; Lu, Cheng-Chan; Yang, Shu-Ching; Chen, Wan-Li; Lee, Yang-Cheng; Yang, Chung-Hsien; Peng, Shu-Ling; Su, Wu-Chou; Chow, Nan-Haw; Ho, Chung-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing EGFR mutations and detecting ALK gene fusion are indispensable when planning to treat pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is a devastating complication of lung cancer and sometimes the only source for mutation analysis. The percentage of tumor cells in the pleural effusion may be low; therefore, mutant enrichment is required for a successful analysis. The EGFR mutation status in MPE was determined using three methods: (1) PCR sequencing of genomic DNA (direct sequencing), (2) mutant-enriched PCR sequencing of genomic DNA using peptide nucleic acid (PNA-sequencing), and (3) PCR sequencing of cDNA after reverse transcription for cellular RNA (RNA-sequencing). RT-PCR was also used to test cases for ALK gene fusion. PNA-sequencing and RNA-sequencing had similar analytical sensitivities (< 1%), which indicates similar enrichment capabilities. The clinical sensitivity in 133 cases when detecting the common EGFR exon 19 and exon 21 mutations was 56.4% (75/133) for direct sequencing, 63.2% (84/133) for PNA-sequencing, and 65.4% (87/133) for RNA-sequencing. RT-PCR and sequencing showed 5 cases (3.8%) with ALK gene fusion. All had wild-type EGFR. For EGFR analysis of MPE, RNA-sequencing is at least as sensitive as PNA-sequencing but not limited to specific mutations. Detecting ALK fusion can be incorporated in the same RNA workflow. Therefore, RNA is a better source for comprehensive molecular diagnoses in MPE. PMID:27352172

  14. SLC25A13 Gene Analysis in Citrin Deficiency: Sixteen Novel Mutations in East Asian Patients, and the Mutation Distribution in a Large Pediatric Cohort in China

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yuan-Zong; Zhang, Zhan-Hui; Lin, Wei-Xia; Zhao, Xin-Jing; Deng, Mei; Ma, Yan-Li; Guo, Li; Chen, Feng-Ping; Long, Xiao-Ling; He, Xiang-Ling; Sunada, Yoshihide; Soneda, Shun; Nakatomi, Akiko; Dateki, Sumito; Ngu, Lock-Hock; Kobayashi, Keiko; Saheki, Takeyori

    2013-01-01

    Background The human SLC25A13 gene encodes citrin, the liver-type mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier isoform 2 (AGC2), and SLC25A13 mutations cause citrin deficiency (CD), a disease entity that encompasses different age-dependant clinical phenotypes such as Adult-onset Citrullinemia Type II (CTLN2) and Neonatal Intrahepatic Cholestasis caused by Citrin Deficiency (NICCD). The analyses of SLC25A13 gene and its protein/mRNA products remain reliable tools for the definitive diagnoses of CD patients, and so far, the SLC25A13 mutation spectrum in Chinese CD patients has not been well-characterized yet. Methods and Results By means of direct DNA sequencing, cDNA cloning and SNP analyses, 16 novel pathogenic mutations, including 9 missense, 4 nonsense, 1 splice-site, 1 deletion and 1 large transposal insertion IVS4ins6kb (GenBank accession number KF425758), were identified in CTLN2 or NICCD patients from China, Japan and Malaysia, respectively, making the SLC25A13 variations worldwide reach the total number of 81. A large NICCD cohort of 116 Chinese cases was also established, and the 4 high-frequency mutations contributed a much larger proportion of the mutated alleles in the patients from south China than in those from the north (χ2 = 14.93, P<0.01), with the latitude of 30°N as the geographic dividing line in mainland China. Conclusions This paper further enriched the SLC25A13 variation spectrum worldwide, and formed a substantial contribution to the in-depth understanding of the genotypic feature of Chinese CD patients. PMID:24069319

  15. BRCA1 Gene Mutation Screening for the Hereditary Breast and/or Ovarian Cancer Syndrome in Breast Cancer Cases: a First High Resolution DNA Melting Analysis in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Mundhofir, Farmaditya Ep; Wulandari, Catharina Endah; Prajoko, Yan Wisnu; Winarni, Tri Indah

    2016-01-01

    Specific patterns of the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome are related to mutations in the BRCA1 gene. One hundred unrelated breast cancer patients were interviewed to obtain clinical symptoms and signs, pedigree and familial history of HBOC syndrome related cancer. Subsequently, data were calculated using the Breast and Ovarian Analysis of Disease Incidence and Carrier Estimation Algorithm (BOADICEA) risk prediction model. Patients with high score of BOADICEA were offered genetic testing. Eleven patients with high score of BOADICEA, 2 patients with low score of BOADICEA, 2 patient's family members and 15 controls underwent BRCA1 genetic testing. Mutation screening using PCR-HRM was carried out in 22 exons (41 amplicons) of BRCA1 gene. Sanger sequencing was subjected in all samples with aberrant graph. This study identified 10 variants in the BRCA1 gene, consisting of 6 missense mutations (c.1480C>A, c.2612C>T, c.2566T>C, c.3113A>G, c.3548 A>G, c.4837 A>G), 3 synonymous mutations (c.2082 C> T, c.2311 T> C and c.4308T>C) and one intronic mutation (c.134+35 G>T). All variants tend to be polymorphisms and unclassified variants. However, no known pathogenic mutations were found. PMID:27039803

  16. Molecular analysis of HEXA gene in Argentinean patients affected with Tay-Sachs disease: possible common origin of the prevalent c.459+5A>G mutation.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Stefania; Montalvo, Annalisa; Blanco, Mariana; Zanin, Irene; Amartino, Hernan; Vlahovicek, Kristian; Szlago, Marina; Schenone, Andrea; Pittis, Gabriela; Bembi, Bruno; Dardis, Andrea

    2012-05-15

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited disorder caused by the deficient activity of hexosaminidase A due to mutations in the HEXA gene. Up to date there is no information regarding the molecular genetics of TSD in Argentinean patients. In the present study we have studied 17 Argentinean families affected by TSD, including 20 patients with the acute infantile form and 3 with the sub-acute form. Overall, we identified 14 different mutations accounting for 100% of the studied alleles. Eight mutations were novel: 5 were single base changes leading to drastic residue changes or truncated proteins, 2 were small deletions and one was an intronic mutation that may cause a splicing defect. Although the spectrum of mutations was highly heterogeneous, a high frequency of the c.459+5G>A mutation, previously described in different populations was found among the studied cohort. Haplotype analysis suggested that in these families the c.459+5G>A mutation might have arisen by a single mutational event. PMID:22441121

  17. Clinical, cytogenetic and molecular analysis of androgen insensitivity syndromes from south Indian cohort and detection and in-silico characterization of androgen receptor gene mutations.

    PubMed

    V G, Abilash; S, Radha; K M, Marimuthu; K, Thangaraj; S, Arun; S, Nishu; A, Mohana Priya; J, Meena; D, Anuradha

    2016-01-30

    Rare cases of 9 complete androgen insensitivity syndromes, 9 cases of partial androgen insensitivity syndromes and equal number of male control samples were selected for this study. Few strong variations in clinical features were noticed; Giemsa banded metaphase revealed a 46,XY karyotype and the frequency of chromosome aberrations were significantly higher when compared with control samples. DNA sequence analysis of the androgen receptor gene of androgen insensitivity syndromes revealed three missense mutations - c.C1713>G resulting in the replacement of a highly conserved histidine residue with glutamine p.(His571Glu) in DNA-binding domain, c.A1715>G resulting in the replacement of a highly conserved tyrosine residue with cysteine p.(Tyr572Cys) in DNA-binding domain and c.G2599>A resulting in the replacement of a highly conserved valine residue with methionine p.(Val867Met) in ligand-binding domain of androgen receptor gene respectively. The heterozygous type of mutations c.C1713>G and c.G2599>A observed in mothers of the patients for familial cases concluding that the mutation was inherited from the mother. The novel mutation c.C1713>G is reported first time in androgen insensitivity syndrome. In-silico analysis of mutations observed in androgen receptor gene of androgen insensitivity syndrome predicted that the substitution at Y572C and V867M could probably disrupt the protein structure and function. PMID:26688387

  18. A molecular genetic analysis of carotenoid biosynthesis and the effects of carotenoid mutations on other photosynthetic genes in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.

    1989-04-01

    The nine known R. capsulatus carotenoid genes are contained within the 46 kilobase (kb) photosynthesis gene cluster. An 11 kb subcluster containing eight of these genes has been cloned and its nucleotide sequence determined. A new gene, crtK, has been located in the middle of the subcluster. The carotenoid gene cluster contains sequences homologous to Escherichia coli ..omega../sup 70/ promoters, rho-independent transcription terminators, and prokaryotic transcriptional factor binding sites. The phenotypes and genotypes of ten transposon Tn5.7 insertion mutations within the carotenoid gene cluster have been analyzed, by characterization of the carotenoids accumulated and high resolution mapping of the Tn5.7 insertions. The enzymatic blockages in previously uncharacterized early carotenoid mutants have been determined using a new in vitro synthesis system, suggesting specific roles for the CrtB and CrtE gene products. The expression of six of the eight carotenoid genes in the cluster is induced upon the shift from dark chemoheterotrophic to anaerobic photosynthetic growth. The magnitude of the induction is equivalent to that of genes encoding structural photosynthesis polypeptides, although the carotenoid genes are induced earlier after the growth shift. Different means of regulating photosynthesis genes in R. capsulatus are discussed, and a rationale for the temporal pattern of expression of the carotenoid genes during photosynthetic adaptation is presented. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of the two dehydrogenases of the R. capsulatus carotenoid biosynthesis pathway reveals two regions of strong similarity. The effect of carotenoid mutations on the photosynthetic phenotype has been studied by examining growth rates, pigments, pigment-protein complexes and gene expression for a complete set of carotenoid mutants. 161 refs.

  19. Prion protein gene analysis in three kindreds with fatal familial insomnia (FFI): Codon 178 mutation and codon 129 polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Medori, R.; Tritschler, H.J. )

    1993-10-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is a disease linked to a GAC(Asp) [yields] AAC(Asn) mutation in codon 178 of the prion protein (PrP) gene. FFI is characterized clinically by untreatable progressive insomnia, dysautonomia, and motor dysfunctions and is characterized pathologically by selective thalamic atrophy. The authors confirmed the 178[sup Asn] mutation in the PrP gene of a third FFI family of French ancestry. Three family members who are under 40 years of age and who inherited the mutation showed only reduced perfusion in the basal ganglia on single photon emission computerized tomography. Some FFI features differ from the clinical and neuropathologic findings associated with 178[sup Asn] reported elsewhere. However, additional intragenic mutations accounting for the phenotypic differences were not observed in two affected individuals. In other sporadic and familial forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Gerstmann-Straeussler syndrome, Met or Val homozygosity at polymorphic codon 129 is associated with a more severe phenotype, younger age at onset, and faster progression. In FFI, young and old individuals at disease onset had 129[sup Met/Val]. Moreover, of five 178[sup Asn] individuals who are above age-at-onset range and who are well, two have 129[sup Met] and three have 129[sup Met/Val], suggesting that polymorphic site 129 does not modulate FFI phenotypic expression. Genetic heterogeneity and environment may play an important role in inter- and intrafamilial variability of the 178[sup Asn] mutation. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Prion protein gene analysis in three kindreds with fatal familial insomnia (FFI): codon 178 mutation and codon 129 polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Medori, R; Tritschler, H J

    1993-01-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is a disease linked to a GAC(Asp)-->AAC(Asn) mutation in codon 178 of the prion protein (PrP) gene. FFI is characterized clinically by untreatable progressive insomnia, dysautonomia, and motor dysfunctions and is characterized pathologically by selective thalamic atrophy. We confirmed the 178Asn mutation in the PrP gene of a third FFI family of French ancestry. Three family members who are under 40 years of age and who inherited the mutation showed only reduced perfusion in the basal ganglia on single photon emission computerized tomography. Some FFI features differ from the clinical and neuropathologic findings associated with 178Asn reported elsewhere. However, additional intragenic mutations accounting for the phenotypic differences were not observed in two affected individuals. In other sporadic and familial forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Gerstmann-Sträussler syndrome, Met or Val homozygosity at polymorphic codon 129 is associated with a more severe phenotype, younger age at onset, and faster progression. In FFI, young and old individuals at disease onset had 129Met/Val. Moreover, of five 178Asn individuals who are above age-at-onset range and who are well, two have 129Met and three have 129Met/Val, suggesting that polymorphic site 129 does not modulate FFI phenotypic expression. Genetic heterogeneity and environment may play an important role in inter- and intrafamilial variability of the 178Asn mutation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8105681

  1. Generation and analysis of knock-in mice carrying pseudohypoaldosteronism type II-causing mutations in the cullin 3 gene.

    PubMed

    Araki, Yuya; Rai, Tatemitsu; Sohara, Eisei; Mori, Takayasu; Inoue, Yuichi; Isobe, Kiyoshi; Kikuchi, Eriko; Ohta, Akihito; Sasaki, Sei; Uchida, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) is a hereditary hypertensive disease caused by mutations in four different genes: with-no-lysine kinases (WNK) 1 and 4, Kelch-like family member 3 (KLHL3), and cullin 3 (Cul3). Cul3 and KLHL3 form an E3 ligase complex that ubiquitinates and reduces the expression level of WNK4. PHAII-causing mutations in WNK4 and KLHL3 impair WNK4 ubiquitination. However, the molecular pathogenesis of PHAII caused by Cul3 mutations is unclear. In cultured cells and human leukocytes, PHAII-causing Cul3 mutations result in the skipping of exon 9, producing mutant Cul3 protein lacking 57 amino acids. However, whether this phenomenon occurs in the kidneys and is responsible for the pathogenesis of PHAII in vivo is unknown. We generated knock-in mice carrying a mutation in the C-terminus of intron 8 of Cul3, c.1207-1G>A, which corresponds to a PHAII-causing mutation in the human Cul3 gene. Heterozygous Cul3(G(-1)A/+) knock-in mice did not exhibit PHAII phenotypes, and the skipping of exon 9 was not evident in their kidneys. However, the level of Cul3 mRNA expression in the kidneys of heterozygous knock-in mice was approximately half that of wild-type mice. Furthermore, homozygous knock-in mice were nonviable. It suggested that the mutant allele behaved like a knockout allele and did not produce Cul3 mRNA lacking exon 9. A reduction in Cul3 expression alone was not sufficient to develop PHAII in the knock-in mice. Our findings highlighted the pathogenic role of mutant Cul3 protein and provided insight to explain why PHAII-causing mutations in Cul3 cause kidney-predominant PHAII phenotypes. PMID:26490675

  2. Mutation Analysis of the RAD51C and RAD51D Genes in High-Risk Ovarian Cancer Patients and Families from the Czech Republic

    PubMed Central

    Janatova, Marketa; Soukupova, Jana; Stribrna, Jana; Kleiblova, Petra; Vocka, Michal; Boudova, Petra; Kleibl, Zdenek

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have conferred that the RAD51C and RAD51D genes, which code for the essential proteins involved in homologous recombination, are ovarian cancer (OC) susceptibility genes that may explain genetic risks in high-risk patients. We performed a mutation analysis in 171 high-risk BRCA1 and BRCA2 negative OC patients, to evaluate the frequency of hereditary RAD51C and RAD51D variants in Czech population. The analysis involved direct sequencing, high resolution melting and multiple ligation-dependent probe analysis. We identified two (1.2%) and three (1.8%) inactivating germline mutations in both respective genes, two of which (c.379_380insG, p.P127Rfs*28 in RAD51C and c.879delG, p.C294Vfs*16 in RAD51D) were novel. Interestingly, an indicative family cancer history was not present in four carriers. Moreover, the ages at the OC diagnoses in identified mutation carriers were substantially lower than those reported in previous studies (four carriers were younger than 45 years). Further, we also described rare missense variants, two in RAD51C and one in RAD51D whose clinical significance needs to be verified. Truncating mutations and rare missense variants ascertained in OC patients were not detected in 1226 control samples. Although the cumulative frequency of RAD51C and RAD51D truncating mutations in our patients was lower than that of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, it may explain OC susceptibility in approximately 3% of high-risk OC patients. Therefore, an RAD51C and RAD51D analysis should be implemented into the comprehensive multi-gene testing for high-risk OC patients, including early-onset OC patients without a family cancer history. PMID:26057125

  3. Novel mutations in the emerin gene in Israeli families.

    PubMed

    Nevo, Y; Ahituv, S; Yaron, Y; Kedmi, M; Shomrat, R; Legum, C; Orr-Urtreger, A

    2001-06-01

    Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy (EMD or EDMD) is a rare X-linked recessive disorder, characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness, contractures, and cardiomyopathy, manifesting as heart block. Mutation analysis at the EMD gene locus was performed in 4 unrelated Israeli families with X-linked EMD and in one sporadic case. In the 4 families 4 different mutations were found, 3 of which were novel. These included two frame shift mutations in exon 2 (333delT and 412insA) and one base pair substitution at the consensus +1 donor splice in intron 5 (1429G-->A). The fourth mutation in exon 6 (1675-1678delTCCG) has been previously described. No mutations were identified in the one sporadic case. Two of the three novel mutations were found in exon 2. A summary of the previously published mutations described in the EMD Mutation Database (http://www.path.cam.ac.uk/emd/) as well as the mutations described in our study suggest that the distribution of mutations in EMD gene is not entirely random and that exon 2 is prone to mutations. Hum Mutat 17:522, 2001. PMID:11385714

  4. Molecular analysis of mutations and polymorphisms of the Lewis secretor type alpha(1,2)-fucosyltransferase gene reveals that Taiwan aborigines are of Austronesian derivation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jan-Gowth; Ko, Ying-Chin; Lee, James Chun-I; Chang, Shun-Jen; Liu, Ta-Chih; Shih, Mu-Chin; Peng, Ching-Tien

    2002-01-01

    The origins of the Taiwan aborigines have not been fully resolved. Anthropological and linguistic studies have indicated that their ancestry is mainly Austronesian or Malayopolynesian. Some polymorphisms and mutations in the secretor type alpha(1,2)-fucosyltransferase (FUT2) gene are found in Taiwan aborigines. In this study, we analyzed the frequency of eight mutations and one polymorphism of the FUT2 gene in Taiwan aborigines and other ethnic groups in order to explore the origins of these groups. The results showed that the C302T, G428A, and fusion gene mutations were specific for Thai, Caucasians, and Japanese, respectively. The A385T mutation was specific for Asians including Taiwan aborigines. The genetic frequencies of C571T were much higher in Taiwan aborigines (1.96% to 20.4%), Filipinos (13.2%), and Indonesians (3.30%) as compared with Thai (0.57%), Chinese (0.65% to 1.12%), Japanese (0%), and Caucasians (0%). The frequencies of the G849A mutation were also higher in Taiwan aborigines (0.38% to 21.57%), Filipinos (6.80%), and Indonesians (1.48%) than in Thai (0.94%), Chinese (0-0.37%), Japanese (0%), or Caucasians (0%). Deletion of a 3-bp region (nt 688 to nt 690) was found only in Filipinos (0.85%), Indonesians (0.74%), and three tribes (0.42% to 2.70%) of Taiwan aborigines, but not in other populations. The C628T mutation was found only in Taiwanese Han, Thai, and two tribes of Taiwan aborigines. The genetic frequency of the C357T polymorphism was much higher in Asians than in Caucasians. The genetic analysis confirms that the origins of Taiwan aborigines are Austronesian and that they are closely related to the Filipino and Indonesian populations. We suggest that mutations or polymorphisms of the FUT2 gene are very good markers for investigating population genetics. PMID:11916003

  5. Identification of eight novel mutations in a collaborative analysis of a part of the second transmembrane domain of the CFTR gene

    SciTech Connect

    Mercier, B.; Audrezet, M.P.; Guillermit, H.; Quere, I.; Verlingue, C.; Ferec, C. ); Lissens, W.; Bonduelle, M.; Liebaers, I. ); Novelli, G.; Sangiuolo, F.; Dallapiccola, B. ); Kalaydjieva, L. ); Arce, M. De; Cashman, S. ); Kapranov, N. ); Canki Klain, N. ); Lenoir, G. ); Chauveau, P. ); Lanaerts, C. ); Rault, G. )

    1993-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the gene responsible, when mutated, for cystic fibrosis (CF), spans over 230 kb on the long arm of chromosome 7 and is composed of 27 exons. The most common mutation responsible for CF worldwide is the deletion of a phenylalanine amino acid at codon 508 in the first nucleotide-binding fold and accounts for approximately 70% of CF chromosomes studied. More than 250 other mutations have been reported through the CF Genetic Analysis Consortium. The majority of the mutations previously described lie in the two nucleotide-binding folds. To explore exhaustively other regions of the gene, particularly exons coding for transmembrane domains, the authors have initiated a collaborative study between different laboratories to screen 369 non-[Delta]F508 CF chromosomes of seven ethnic European populations (Belgian, French, Breton, Irish, Italian, Yugoslavian, Russian). Among these chromosomes carrying an unidentified mutation, 63 were from Brittany, 50 of various French origin, 45 of Irish origin, 56 of Italian origin, 41 of Belgian origin, 2 of Turkish origin, 38 of Yugoslavian origin, 22 of Russian origin, and 52 of Bulgarian origin. Diagnostic criteria for CF included at least one positive sweat test and pulmonary disease with or without pancreatic disease. Using a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) assay, they have identified eight novel mutations in exon 17b coding for part of the second transmembrane domain of the CFTR and they describe them in this report. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. In silico analysis of a disease-causing mutation in PCDH15 gene in a consanguineous Pakistani family with Usher phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Saleha, Shamim; Ajmal, Muhammad; Jamil, Muhammad; Nasir, Muhammad; Hameed, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    AIM To map Usher phenotype in a consanguineous Pakistani family and identify disease-associated mutation in a causative gene to establish phenotype-genotype correlation. METHODS A consanguineous Pakistani family in which Usher phenotype was segregating as an autosomal recessive trait was ascertained. On the basis of results of clinical investigations of affected members of this family disease was diagnosed as Usher syndrome (USH). To identify the locus responsible for the Usher phenotype in this family, genomic DNA from blood sample of each individual was genotyped using microsatellite Short Tandem Repeat (STR) markers for the known Usher syndrome loci. Then direct sequencing was performed to find out disease associated mutations in the candidate gene. RESULTS By genetic linkage analysis, the USH phenotype of this family was mapped to PCDH15 locus on chromosome 10q21.1. Three different point mutations in exon 11 of PCDH15 were identified and one of them, c.1304A>C was found to be segregating with the disease phenotype in Pakistani family with Usher phenotype. This, c.1304A>C transversion mutation predicts an amino-acid substitution of aspartic acid with an alanine at residue number 435 (p.D435A) of its protein product. Moreover, in silico analysis revealed conservation of aspartic acid at position 435 and predicated this change as pathogenic. CONCLUSION The identification of c.1304A>C pathogenic mutation in PCDH15 gene and its association with Usher syndrome in a consanguineous Pakistani family is the first example of a missense mutation of PCDH15 causing USH1 phenotype. In previous reports, it was hypothesized that severe mutations such as truncated protein of PCDH15 led to the Usher I phenotype and that missense variants are mainly responsible for non-syndromic hearing impairment. PMID:27275418

  7. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy due to a novel EGR2 gene mutation with mild phenotype--usefulness of human mapping chip linkage analysis in a Czech family.

    PubMed

    Safka Brožková, Dana; Nevšímalová, Soňa; Mazanec, Radim; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Seeman, Pavel

    2012-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies (CMT) are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders of the peripheral nervous system. Selection of candidate disease genes for mutation analysis is sometimes difficult since more than 40 genes and loci are known to be associated with CMT neuropathies. Hence a Czech family Cz-CMT with demyelinating type of autosomal dominant CMT disease was investigated by genome-wide linkage analysis by means of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. Among 35 regions with linkage, five carried known CMT genes. In the final result a novel early growth response 2 - missense mutation c.1235 A>G, p.Glu412Gly was found. Surprisingly, the more severely affected proband carried an additional heterozygous myelin protein zero variant p.Asp246Asn detected previously, which may modify the phenotype. However, this MPZ variant is benign in heterozygous state alone, because it is also carried by the patient's healthy father. PMID:22546699

  8. Mutational analysis of the transcription start site of the yeast tRNA(Leu3) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Fruscoloni, P; Zamboni, M; Panetta, G; De Paolis, A; Tocchini-Valentini, G P

    1995-01-01

    In addition to the well-known internal promoter elements of tRNA genes, 5' flanking sequences can also influence the efficiency of transcription by Saccharomyces cerevisiae extracts in vitro. A consensus sequence of yeast tRNA genes in the vicinity of the transcriptional start site can be derived. To determine whether the activity of this region can be attributed to particular sequence features we studied in vitro mutants of the start site region. We found that the start site can be shifted, but only to a limited extent, by moving the conserved sequence element. We found that both a pyrimidine-purine motif (with transcription initiating at the purine) and a small T:A base pair block upstream are important for efficient transcription in vitro. Thus the sequence surrounding the start site of transcription of the yeast tRNA(Leu3) gene does play a role in determining transcription efficiency and fixing the precise site of initiation by RNA polymerase III. Images PMID:7659514

  9. Analysis of the CYP21A1P pseudogene: indication of mutational diversity and CYP21A2-like and duplicated CYP21A2 genes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Ping; Cheng, Ching-Feng; Chuang, Shu-Hua; Lee, Hsien-Hsiung

    2011-06-15

    The CYP21A1P gene downstream of the XA gene, carrying 15 deteriorated mutations, is a nonfunctional pseudogene that shares 98% nucleotide sequence homology with CYP21A2 located on chromosome 6p21.3. However, these mutations in the CYP21A1P gene are not totally involved in each individual. From our analysis of 100 healthy ethnic Chinese (i.e., Taiwanese) (n=200 chromosomes) using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products combined with an amplification-created restriction site (ACRS) method and DNA sequencing, we found that approximately 10% of CYP21A1P alleles (n=195 chromosomes) presented the CYP21A2 sequence; frequencies of P30, V281, Q318, and R356 in that locus were approximately 24%, 21%, 11%, and 34%, respectively, and approximately 90% of the CYP21A1P alleles had 15 mutated loci. In addition, approximately 2.5% (n=5 chromosomes) showed four haplotypes of the 3.7-kb TaqI-produced fragment of the CYP21A2-like gene and one duplicated CYP21A2 gene. We conclude that the pseudogene of the CYP21A1P mutation presents diverse variants. Moreover, the existence of the CYP21A2-like gene is more abundant than that of the duplicated CYP21A2 gene downstream of the XA gene and could not be distinguished from the CYP21A2-TNXB gene; thus, it may be misdiagnosed by previously established methods for congenital adrenal hyperplasia caused by a 21-hydroxylase deficiency. PMID:21324303

  10. Immunoglobulin VH Gene Mutational Analysis Suggests that Primary Effusion Lymphomas Derive from Different Stages of B Cell Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Matolcsy, András; Nádor, Roland G.; Cesarman, Ethel; Knowles, Daniel M.

    1998-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a recently described distinct subtype of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma associated with infection by the Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, also called human herpesvirus-8. Most cases of PEL are also associated with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In order to better characterize the cellular origin of PEL, we investigated the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain variable region (VH) genes expressed by tumor cells of the BC-1 and BC-3 cell lines derived from PELs and five original PEL specimens. In the six EBV-positive PELs examined, including the BC-1 cell line, the expressed VH gene sequences showed numerous point mutations relative to the putative germline VH gene sequences. In addition, the VH segment of one of these cases showed intraclonal sequence heterogeneity, indicating ongoing somatic mutation. In five cases, the distribution and type of mutations indicated that tumor cells had been selected by antigen. Because somatically mutated Ig genes are expressed by B cells that have reached a germinal center/post-germinal center stage of development, these findings suggest that the PEL cell of origin is a germinal center or post-germinal center B cell in most cases. In contrast, the VH gene segment expressed by tumor cells of the BC-3 cell line, which was originated from an EBV-negative PEL obtained from an HIV-negative patient, was unmutated, suggesting a pre-germinal center B cell origin for tumor cells of this particular PEL cell line. Taken together, these findings suggest that development of PELs may not be restricted to one stage of B cell differentiation and may represent transformation of B cells at different stages of ontogeny. PMID:9811353

  11. CFTR gene mutations in isolated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatti, P.F.; Bombien, C.; Marigo, C.

    1994-09-01

    In order to identify a possible hereditary predisposition to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we have looked for the presence of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene DNA sequence modifications in 28 unrelated patients with no signs of cystic fibrosis. The known mutations in Italian CF patients, as well as the most frequent worldwide CF mutations, were investigated. In addition, a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of about half of the coding sequence of the gene in 56 chromosomes from the patients and in 102 chromosomes from control individuals affected by other pulmonary diseases and from normal controls was performed. Nine different CFTR gene mutations and polymorphisms were found in seven patients, a highly significant increase over controls. Two of the patients were compound heterozygotes. Two frequent CF mutations were detected: deletion F508 and R117H; two rare CF mutations: R1066C and 3667ins4; and five CF sequence variants: R75Q (which was also described as a disease-causing mutation in male sterility cases due to the absence of the vasa deferentia), G576A, 2736 A{r_arrow}G, L997F, and 3271+18C{r_arrow}T. Seven (78%) of the mutations are localized in transmembrane domains. Six (86%) of the patients with defined mutations and polymorphisms had bronchiectasis. These results indicate that CFTR gene mutations and sequence alterations may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of some cases of COPD.

  12. High-throughput discovery of mutations in tef semi-dwarfing genes by next-generation sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qihui; Smith, Shavannor M; Ayele, Mulu; Yang, Lixing; Jogi, Ansuya; Chaluvadi, Srinivasa R; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L

    2012-11-01

    Tef (Eragrostis tef) is a major cereal crop in Ethiopia. Lodging is the primary constraint to increasing productivity in this allotetraploid species, accounting for losses of ∼15-45% in yield each year. As a first step toward identifying semi-dwarf varieties that might have improved lodging resistance, an ∼6× fosmid library was constructed and used to identify both homeologues of the dw3 semi-dwarfing gene of Sorghum bicolor. An EMS mutagenized population, consisting of ∼21,210 tef plants, was planted and leaf materials were collected into 23 superpools. Two dwarfing candidate genes, homeologues of dw3 of sorghum and rht1 of wheat, were sequenced directly from each superpool with 454 technology, and 120 candidate mutations were identified. Out of 10 candidates tested, six independent mutations were validated by Sanger sequencing, including two predicted detrimental mutations in both dw3 homeologues with a potential to improve lodging resistance in tef through further breeding. This study demonstrates that high-throughput sequencing can identify potentially valuable mutations in under-studied plant species like tef and has provided mutant lines that can now be combined and tested in breeding programs for improved lodging resistance. PMID:22904035

  13. A Mutational Analysis of Killer Toxin Resistance in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Identifies New Genes Involved in Cell Wall (1 -> 6)-β-Glucan Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. L.; Kossaczka, Z.; Jiang, B.; Bussey, H.

    1993-01-01

    Recessive mutations leading to killer resistance identify the KRE9, KRE10 and KRE11 genes. Mutations in both the KRE9 and KRE11 genes lead to reduced levels of (1 -> 6)-β-glucan in the yeast cell wall. The KRE11 gene encodes a putative 63-kD cytoplasmic protein, and disruption of the KRE11 locus leads to a 50% reduced level of cell wall (1 -> 6)-glucan. Structural analysis of the (1 -> 6)-β-glucan remaining in a kre11 mutant indicates a polymer smaller in size than wild type, but containing a similar proportion of (1 -> 6)- and (1 -> 3)-linkages. Genetic interactions among cells harboring mutations at the KRE11, KRE6 and KRE1 loci indicate lethality of kre11 kre6 double mutants and that kre11 is epistatic to kre1, with both gene products required to produce the mature glucan polymer at wild-type levels. Analysis of these KRE genes should extend knowledge of the β-glucan biosynthetic pathway, and of cell wall synthesis in yeast. PMID:8462845

  14. DNA Sequence and Mutational Analysis of Rhizobitoxine Biosynthesis Genes in Bradyrhizobium elkanii

    PubMed Central

    Yasuta, Tsuyoshi; Okazaki, Shin; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Yuhashi, Ken-Ichi; Ezura, Hiroshi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2001-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced a cluster of genes involved in the biosynthesis of rhizobitoxine, a nodulation enhancer produced by Bradyrhizobium elkanii. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned 28.4-kb DNA region encompassing rtxA showed that several open reading frames (ORFs) were located downstream of rtxA. A large-deletion mutant of B. elkanii, USDA94Δrtx::Ω1, which lacks rtxA, ORF1 (rtxC), ORF2, and ORF3, did not produce rhizobitoxine, dihydrorhizobitoxine, or serinol. The broad-host-range cosmid pLAFR1, which contains rtxA and these ORFs, complemented rhizobitoxine production in USDA94Δrtx::Ω1. Further complementation experiments involving cosmid derivatives obtained by random mutagenesis with a kanamycin cassette revealed that at least rtxA and rtxC are necessary for rhizobitoxine production. Insertional mutagenesis of the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of rtxA indicated that rtxA is responsible for two crucial steps, serinol formation and dihydrorhizobitoxine biosynthesis. An insertional mutant of rtxC produced serinol and dihydrorhizobitoxine but no rhizobitoxine. Moreover, the rtxC product was highly homologous to the fatty acid desaturase of Pseudomonas syringae and included the copper-binding signature and eight histidine residues conserved in membrane-bound desaturase. This result suggested that rtxC encodes dihydrorhizobitoxine desaturase for the final step of rhizobitoxine production. In light of results from DNA sequence comparison, gene disruption experiments, and dihydrorhizobitoxine production from various substrates, we discuss the biosynthetic pathway of rhizobitoxine and its evolutionary significance in bradyrhizobia. PMID:11679318

  15. Mutational analysis of the HLA-DQ3.2 insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus susceptibility gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, W W; Lotshaw, C; Milner, E C; Knitter-Jack, N; Nepom, G T

    1989-01-01

    The human major histocompatibility complex includes approximately 14 class II HLA genes within the HLA-D region, most of which exist in multiple allelic forms. One of these genes, the DQ3.2 beta gene, accounts for the well-documented association of HLA-DR4 with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and is the single allele most highly correlated with this disease. We analyzed the amino acid substitutions that lead to the structural differences distinguishing DQ3.2 beta from its nondiabetogenic, but closely related allele, DQ3.1 beta. Site-directed mutagenesis of the DQ3.2 beta gene was used to convert key nucleotides into DQ3.1 beta codons. Subsequent expression studies of these mutated DQ3.2 beta clones using retroviral vectors defined amino acid 45 as critical for generating serologic epitopes characterizing the DQw3.1 beta and DQw3.2 beta molecules. Images PMID:2783780

  16. Computational analysis of a novel mutation in ETFDH gene highlights its long-range effects on the FAD-binding motif

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by the defects in the mitochondrial electron transfer system and the metabolism of fatty acids. Recently, mutations in electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase (ETFDH) gene, encoding electron transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO) have been reported to be the major causes of riboflavin-responsive MADD. To date, no studies have been performed to explore the functional impact of these mutations or their mechanism of disrupting enzyme activity. Results High resolution melting (HRM) analysis and sequencing of the entire ETFDH gene revealed a novel mutation (p.Phe128Ser) and the hotspot mutation (p.Ala84Thr) from a patient with MADD. According to the predicted 3D structure of ETF:QO, the two mutations are located within the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) binding domain; however, the two residues do not have direct interactions with the FAD ligand. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and normal mode analysis (NMA), we found that the p.Ala84Thr and p.Phe128Ser mutations are most likely to alter the protein structure near the FAD binding site as well as disrupt the stability of the FAD binding required for the activation of ETF:QO. Intriguingly, NMA revealed that several reported disease-causing mutations in the ETF:QO protein show highly correlated motions with the FAD-binding site. Conclusions Based on the present findings, we conclude that the changes made to the amino acids in ETF:QO are likely to influence the FAD-binding stability. PMID:22013910

  17. Replication and Meta-Analysis of Common Gene Mutations in TTF1 and TTF2 with Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Chen, Fei; Niu, Shuli; Lin, Shiyu; Li, Suping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), one of the most common malignant thyroid tumors, exits widely in the thyroid of adolescents. Thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF1) and 2 (TTF2) were thyroid-specific transcription factors, and regulated expression of the thyroid-specific genes. Hence, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlation between gene variants of TTF1 and TTF2 and the risk of PTC in Chinese population. Two tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) on TTF1 and TTF2 were selected and genotyped by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDITOF) mass spectrometry in a hospital-based case-control study of 297 PTC patients and 594 healthy controls. Furthermore, a meta-analysis of the association between TTF1 and TTF2 and PTC risk was also performed. We found that the rs944289 on the TTF1 was significantly associated with increased PTC risk (TT vs CC, OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.05–2.24; CT + TT vs TT, OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.00–1.79; T vs C, OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.04–1.55). Similarly, the rs965513 on the TTF2 can also elevate the risk of PTC significantly (GA vs GG, OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.07–2.59; AA+GA vs AA, OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.09–1.82; A vs G, OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.05–1.59). Furthermore, results of stratified analysis revealed that the risk effects of rs944289 and rs965513 were more overpowering in the subgroups of patients with MNG, as well as subjects without metastasis. Results of meta-analysis from the previous study and our new data indicated that variants of rs944289 and rs965513 might be the genetic susceptible factors both in Asians and Caucasians. We get the conclusion that mutations of TTF1 and TTF2 are significantly associated with an increasing risk of PTC in Chinese. However, more detailed investigations and further large-scale studies on genetic functions to provide more conclusive and accurate evidence are required in the future. PMID

  18. Diverse growth hormone receptor gene mutations in Laron syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, M.A.; Francke, U. ); Gracia, R.; Rosenbloom, A.; Toledo, S.P.A. ); Chernausek, S. ); Guevara-Aguirre, J. ); Hopp, M. ); Rosenbloom, A.; Argente, J. ); Toledo, S.P.A. )

    1993-05-01

    To better understand the molecular genetic basis and genetic epidemiology of Laron syndrome (growth-hormone insensitivity syndrome), the authors analysed the growth-hormone receptor (GHR) genes of seven unrelated affected individuals from the United States, South America, Europe, and Africa. They amplified all nine GHR gene exons and splice junctions from these individuals by PCR and screened the products for mutations by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). They identified a single GHR gene fragment with abnormal DGGE results for each affected individual, sequenced this fragment, and, in each case, identified a mutation likely to cause Laron syndrome, including two nonsense mutations (R43X and R217X), two splice-junction mutations, (189-1 G to T and 71+1 G to A), and two frameshift mutations (46 del TT and 230 del TA or AT). Only one of these mutations, R43X, has been previously reported. Using haplotype analysis, they determined that this mutation, which involves a CpG dinucleotide hot spot, likely arose as a separate event in this case, relative to the two prior reports of R43X. Aside from R43X, the mutations identified are unique to patients from particular geographic regions. Ten GHR gene mutations have now been described in this disorder. The authors conclude that Laron syndrome is caused by diverse GHR gene mutations, including deletions, RNA processing defects, translational stop codons, and missense codons. All the identified mutations involve the extracellular domain of the receptor, and most are unique to particular families or geographic areas. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Succinate dehydrogenase gene mutations in cardiac paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Victoria L; Emaminia, Abbas; del Rivero, Jaydira; Lechan, Ronald M; Magoon, Bindiya T; Galia, Analyza; Fojo, Tito; Leung, Steve; Lorusso, Roberto; Jimenez, Camilo; Shulkin, Barry L; Audibert, Jennifer L; Adams, Karen T; Rosing, Douglas R; Vaidya, Anand; Dluhy, Robert G; Horvath, Keith A; Pacak, Karel

    2015-06-15

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are chromaffin cell tumors arising from neuroendocrine cells. At least 1/3 of paragangliomas are related to germline mutations in 1 of 17 genes. Although these tumors can occur throughout the body, cardiac paragangliomas are very rare, accounting for <0.3% of mediastinal tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of patients with cardiac paragangliomas, particularly focusing on their genetic backgrounds. A retrospective chart analysis of 15 patients with cardiac paragangliomas was performed to determine clinical presentation, genetic background, diagnostic workup, and outcomes. The average age at diagnosis was 41.9 years. Typical symptoms of paraganglioma (e.g., hypertension, sweating, palpitations, headache) were reported at initial presentation in 13 patients (86.7%); the remaining 2, as well as 4 symptomatic patients, initially presented with cardiac-specific symptoms (e.g., chest pain, dyspnea). Genetic testing was done in 13 patients (86.7%); 10 (76.9%) were positive for mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) subunits B, C, or D. Thirteen patients (86.7%) underwent surgery to remove the paraganglioma with no intraoperative morbidity or mortality; 1 additional patient underwent surgical resection but experienced intraoperative complications after removal of the tumor due to co-morbidities and did not survive. SDHx mutations are known to be associated with mediastinal locations and malignant behavior of paragangliomas. In this report, the investigators extend the locations of predominantly SDHx-related paragangliomas to cardiac tumors. In conclusion, cardiac paragangliomas are frequently associated with underlying SDHx germline mutations, suggesting a need for genetic testing of all patients with this rare tumor. PMID:25896150

  20. Mutation analysis of the SLC26A4, FOXI1 and KCNJ10 genes in individuals with congenital hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Pique, Lynn M.; Brennan, Marie-Luise; Davidson, Colin J.; Schaefer, Frederick; Greinwald Jr, John

    2014-01-01

    Pendred syndrome (PDS) and DFNB4 comprise a phenotypic spectrum of sensorineural hearing loss disorders that typically result from biallelic mutations of the SLC26A4 gene. Although PDS and DFNB4 are recessively inherited, sequencing of the coding regions and splice sites of SLC26A4 in individuals suspected to be affected with these conditions often fails to identify two mutations. We investigated the potential contribution of large SLC26A4 deletions and duplications to sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) by screening 107 probands with one known SLC26A4 mutation by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA). A heterozygous deletion, spanning exons 4–6, was detected in only one individual, accounting for approximately 1% of the missing mutations in our cohort. This low frequency is consistent with previously published MLPA results. We also examined the potential involvement of digenic inheritance in PDS/DFNB4 by sequencing the coding regions of FOXI1 and KCNJ10. Of the 29 probands who were sequenced, three carried nonsynonymous variants including one novel sequence change in FOXI1 and two polymorphisms in KCNJ10. We performed a review of prior studies and, in conjunction with our current data, conclude that the frequency of FOXI1 (1.4%) and KCNJ10 (3.6%) variants in PDS/DFNB4 individuals is low. Our results, in combination with previously published reports, indicate that large SLC26A4 deletions and duplications as well as mutations of FOXI1 and KCNJ10 play limited roles in the pathogenesis of SNHL and suggest that other genetic factors likely contribute to the phenotype. PMID:24860705

  1. Mutation analysis of methylmalonyl CoA mutase gene exon 2 in Egyptian families: Identification of 25 novel allelic variants

    PubMed Central

    Ghoraba, Dina A.; Mohammed, Magdy M.; Zaki, Osama K.

    2015-01-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder of methylmalonate and cobalamin (cbl; vitamin B12) metabolism. It is an inborn error of organic acid metabolism which commonly results from a defect in the gene encoding the methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM) apoenzyme. Here we report the results of mutation study of exon 2 of the methylmalonyl CoA mutase (MUT) gene, coding MCM residues from 1 to 128, in ten unrelated Egyptian families affected with methylmalonic aciduria. Patients were presented with a wide-anion gap metabolic acidosis. The diagnosis has established by the measurement of C3 (propionylcarnitine) and C3:C2 (propionylcarnitine/acetylcarnitine) in blood by using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS–MS) and was confirmed by the detection of an abnormally elevated level of methylmalonic acid in urine by using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and isocratic cation exchange high-performance liquid-chromatography (HPLC). Direct sequencing of gDNA of the MUT gene exon 2 has revealed a total of 26 allelic variants: ten of which were intronic, eight were located upstream to the exon 2 coding region, four were novel modifications predicted to affect the splicing region, three were novel mutations within the coding region: c.15G > A (p.K5K), c.165C > A (p.N55K) and c.7del (p.R3EfsX14), as well as the previously reported mutation c.323G > A (p.R108H). PMID:25750861

  2. Mutation detection analysis of a region of 16S-like ribosomal RNA gene of Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar and Entamoeba moshkovskii

    PubMed Central

    Parija, Subhash Chandra; Khairnar, Krishna

    2008-01-01

    Background The level of intra-species genetic variation in Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar and Entamoeba moshkovskii populations in a localized geographic area, like Puducherry, India, remains unknown. Methods In the present study the existence of genetic variation in the nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (NM-PCR) amplified region of the 16S-like ribosomal RNA genes of E. histolytica, E. dispar and E. moshkovskii was investigated by riboprinting and single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. Results We found that 70 stool specimens were positive for E. histolytica, 171 stool specimens were positive for E. dispar, and 37 stool specimens were positive for E. moshkovskii by NM-PCR. Ninety liver abscess pus specimens, 21 urine specimens, and 8 saliva specimens were positive for E. histolytica by NM-PCR. Riboprinting analysis detected a mutation in the PCR product of only one E. histolytica isolate from a stool specimen. However, SSCP analysis detected mutations in the PCR products of five E. histolytica isolates and three E. moshkovskii isolates from stool specimens, and one E. histolytica isolate from a saliva specimen. The mutations detected by riboprinting and SSCP analysis were confirmed by sequencing. All the nucleotide sequences showing mutations in this study have already been deposited into the NCBI GenBank database under accession numbers [GenBank: EF682200 to GenBank: EF682208]. Conclusion The present study has revealed the subsistence of mutations in the ribosomal RNA genes of E. histolytica and E. moshkovskii, which points towards the existence of intra-species genetic variation in E. histolytica and E. moshkovskii isolates infecting humans. PMID:18822136

  3. Mutational Analysis of EYA1, SIX1 and SIX5 Genes and Strategies for Management of Hearing Loss in Patients with BOR/BO Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ju Hyun; Baek, Jeong-In; Lee, Won-Sang; Kim, Un-Kyung; Choi, Jae Young

    2013-01-01

    Background Branchio-oto-renal (BOR) or branchio-otic (BO) syndrome is one of the most common forms of autosomal dominant syndromic hearing loss. Mutations in EYA1, SIX1 and SIX5 genes have been associated with BOR syndrome. In this study, clinical and genetic analyses were performed in patients with BOR/BO syndrome focusing on auditory manifestations and rehabilitation. Methods The audiologic manifestations were reviewed in 10 patients with BOR/BO syndrome. The operative findings and hearing outcome were analyzed in patients who underwent middle ear surgeries. The modality and outcome of auditory rehabilitation were evaluated. Genetic analysis was performed for EYA1, SIX1, and SIX5 genes. Results All patients presented with mixed hearing loss. Five patients underwent middle ear surgeries without successful hearing gain. Cochlear implantation performed in two patients resulted in significant hearing improvement. Genetic analysis revealed four novel EYA1 mutations and a large deletion encompassing the EYA1 gene. Conclusions Auditory rehabilitation in BOR/BO syndrome should be individually tailored keeping in mind the high failure rate after middle ear surgeries. Successful outcome can be expected with cochlear implantations in patients with BOR/BO syndrome who cannot benefit from hearing aids. The novel EYA1 mutations may add to the genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of BOR syndrome in the East Asian population. PMID:23840632

  4. Role of Duplicate Genes in Robustness against Deleterious Human Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Tzu-Lin; Vitkup, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    It is now widely recognized that robustness is an inherent property of biological systems [1],[2],[3]. The contribution of close sequence homologs to genetic robustness against null mutations has been previously demonstrated in simple organisms [4],[5]. In this paper we investigate in detail the contribution of gene duplicates to back-up against deleterious human mutations. Our analysis demonstrates that the functional compensation by close homologs may play an important role in human genetic disease. Genes with a 90% sequence identity homolog are about 3 times less likely to harbor known disease mutations compared to genes with remote homologs. Moreover, close duplicates affect the phenotypic consequences of deleterious mutations by making a decrease in life expectancy significantly less likely. We also demonstrate that similarity of expression profiles across tissues significantly increases the likelihood of functional compensation by homologs. PMID:18369440

  5. Candidate gene analysis of tooth agenesis identifies novel mutations in six genes and suggests significant role for WNT and EDA signaling and allele combinations.

    PubMed

    Arte, Sirpa; Parmanen, Satu; Pirinen, Sinikka; Alaluusua, Satu; Nieminen, Pekka

    2013-01-01

    Failure to develop complete dentition, tooth agenesis, is a common developmental anomaly manifested most often as isolated but also as associated with many developmental syndromes. It typically affects third molars or one or few other permanent teeth but severe agenesis is also relatively prevalent. Here we report mutational analyses of seven candidate genes in a cohort of 127 probands with non-syndromic tooth agenesis. 82 lacked more than five permanent teeth excluding third molars, called as oligodontia. We identified 28 mutations, 17 of which were novel. Together with our previous reports, we have identified two mutations in MSX1, AXIN2 and EDARADD, five in PAX9, four in EDA and EDAR, and nine in WNT10A. They were observed in 58 probands (44%), with a mean number of missing teeth of 11.7 (range 4 to 34). Almost all of these probands had severe agenesis. Only few of the probands but several relatives with heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A or EDAR conformed to the common type of non-syndromic tooth agenesis, incisor-premolar hypodontia. Mutations in MSX1 and PAX9 affected predominantly posterior teeth, whereas both deciduous and permanent incisors were especially sensitive to mutations in EDA and EDAR. Many mutations in EDAR, EDARADD and WNT10A were present in several families. Biallelic or heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A were observed in 32 and hemizygous or heterozygous genotypes of EDA, EDAR or EDARADD in 22 probands. An EDARADD variant were in seven probands present together with variants in EDAR or WNT10A, suggesting combined phenotypic effects of alleles in distinct genes. PMID:23991204

  6. Candidate Gene Analysis of Tooth Agenesis Identifies Novel Mutations in Six Genes and Suggests Significant Role for WNT and EDA Signaling and Allele Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Arte, Sirpa; Parmanen, Satu; Pirinen, Sinikka; Alaluusua, Satu; Nieminen, Pekka

    2013-01-01

    Failure to develop complete dentition, tooth agenesis, is a common developmental anomaly manifested most often as isolated but also as associated with many developmental syndromes. It typically affects third molars or one or few other permanent teeth but severe agenesis is also relatively prevalent. Here we report mutational analyses of seven candidate genes in a cohort of 127 probands with non-syndromic tooth agenesis. 82 lacked more than five permanent teeth excluding third molars, called as oligodontia. We identified 28 mutations, 17 of which were novel. Together with our previous reports, we have identified two mutations in MSX1, AXIN2 and EDARADD, five in PAX9, four in EDA and EDAR, and nine in WNT10A. They were observed in 58 probands (44%), with a mean number of missing teeth of 11.7 (range 4 to 34). Almost all of these probands had severe agenesis. Only few of the probands but several relatives with heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A or EDAR conformed to the common type of non-syndromic tooth agenesis, incisor-premolar hypodontia. Mutations in MSX1 and PAX9 affected predominantly posterior teeth, whereas both deciduous and permanent incisors were especially sensitive to mutations in EDA and EDAR. Many mutations in EDAR, EDARADD and WNT10A were present in several families. Biallelic or heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A were observed in 32 and hemizygous or heterozygous genotypes of EDA, EDAR or EDARADD in 22 probands. An EDARADD variant were in seven probands present together with variants in EDAR or WNT10A, suggesting combined phenotypic effects of alleles in distinct genes. PMID:23991204

  7. Mutational analysis of the gephyrin-related molybdenum cofactor biosynthetic gene cnxE from the lower eukaryote Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Immanuel S; Schrag, Joseph D; Sloan, Joan; Millar, Lindsey J; Kanan, Ghassan; Kinghorn, James R; Unkles, Shiela E

    2002-01-01

    We report the identification of a number of mutations that result in amino acid replacements (and their phenotypic characterization) in either the MogA-like domain or domains 2 and 3 of the MoeA-like region of the Aspergillus nidulans cnxE gene. These domains are functionally required since mutations that result in amino acid substitutions in any one domain lead to the loss or to a substantial reduction in all three identified molybdoenzyme activities (i.e., nitrate reductase, xanthine dehydrogenase, and nicotinate hydroxylase). Certain cnxE mutants that show partial growth with nitrate as the nitrogen source in contrast do not grow on hypoxanthine or nicotinate. Complementation between mutants carrying lesions in the MogA-like domain or the MoeA-like region, respectively, most likely occurs at the protein level. A homology model of CnxE based on the dimeric structure of E. coli MoeA is presented and the position of inactivating mutations (due to amino acid replacements) in the MoeA-like functional region of the CnxE protein is mapped to this model. Finally, the activity of nicotinate hydroxylase, unlike that of nitrate reductase and xanthine dehydrogenase, is not restored in cnxE mutants grown in the presence of excess molybdate. PMID:12072459

  8. Gene expression analysis of the murine model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: studies of the Leu126delTT mutation in SOD1.

    PubMed

    Fukada, Yasuyo; Yasui, Kenichi; Kitayama, Michio; Doi, Koji; Nakano, Toshiya; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Nakashima, Kenji

    2007-07-30

    The pathogenic events that lead to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have not been elucidated. We previously described familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) caused by a Leu126delTT mutation in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase gene (SOD1) and have produced transgenic mice (TgM) carrying the same mutation (SOD1(L126delTT) TgM), which exhibited distinct ALS-like motor symptoms and pathological findings. In this study, we analyzed gene expression in the spinal cord of SOD1(L126delTT) TgM by cDNA microarray. Eleven genes were upregulated and two genes downregulated in pre-symptomatic TgM. In post-symptomatic TgM, 54 genes were upregulated and four genes downregulated. We performed real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of 10 of the 54 upregulated genes in the post-symptomatic TgM. The results of real-time PCR were consistent with those obtained by microarray for micro-crystallin (Crym), heat shock protein 1 (Hspb1/HSP27), serine proteinase inhibitor clade A member 3N (Serpina3n), complement component 1q subcomponent beta polypeptide (C1qb), cathepsin H (Ctsh) and polyadenylate binding protein-interacting protein 1 (Paip1). In immunohistochemical analysis, Hsbp1/HSP27 and Ctsh expression levels were increased in reactive astrocytes at the ventral horn of the spinal cord in post-symptomatic TgM, as were Crym, some of Ctsh and Paip1 in microglial cells. Increased expression of those genes was not observed in the control mice. These four genes may be related to the pathogenesis of FALS, especially with regard to the progression of reactive astrocytes and the inflammatory response of microglial cells. PMID:17583678

  9. Identification of HPV integration and gene mutation in HeLa cell line by integrated analysis of RNA-Seq and MS/MS data.

    PubMed

    Sun, Han; Chen, Chen; Lian, Baofeng; Zhang, Menghuan; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhang, Bing; Li, Yixue; Yang, Pengyuan; Xie, Lu

    2015-04-01

    HeLa cell line, which was derived from cervical carcinoma, provides an idea platform to study both the integration of human papillomavirus and the massive mutations occurring on the cancer cell genome. Proteogenomics is a field with the intersection of proteomics and genomics to perform gene annotation and identify gene mutation. In this work, we first identified the SNV/INDEL, structural variation (SV), and virus infection/integration events from RNA-Seq data of HeLa cell line; then, by applying proteogenomics strategy, we were able to detect some of the genomic events with the tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) data from the same sample. Furthermore, some of the mutated peptides were experimentally validated using multiple reaction monitoring technology. The integrated analysis of the RNA-Seq and MS/MS data not only renders the discovery of HeLa cell genome variations more credible but also illustrates a practical workflow for protein-coding mutation discovery in cancer-related studies. PMID:25698088

  10. Genetic and Molecular Analysis of the Soe1 Gene: A Trna(3)(glu) Missense Suppressor of Yeast Cdc8 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Su, J. Y.; Belmont, L.; Sclafani, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    The CDC8 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes deoxythymidylate (dTMP) kinase and is required for nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication in both the mitotic and meiotic cell cycles. All cdc8 temperature-sensitive mutants are partially defective in meiotic and mitochondrial functions at the permissive temperature. In a study of revertants of temperature-sensitive cdc8 mutants, the SOE201 and SOE1 mutants were isolated. The SOE201 mutant is a disome of chromosome X to which the cdc8 gene maps. Using the chromosome X aneuploids to vary cdc8 gene dosage, we demonstrate that different levels of dTMP kinase activity are required for mitotic, meiotic or mitochondrial DNA replication. The SOE1 mutant contains a dominant suppressor that suppresses five different cdc8 alleles but does not suppress a complete cdc8 deletion. The SOE1 gene is located <1.5 cM from the CYH2 gene on chromosome VII and is adjacent to the TSM437-CYH2 region, with the gene order being SOE1-TSM437-CYH2. SOE1 is an inefficient suppressor that can neither suppress the cdc8 hypomorphic phenotype nor restore dTMP kinase activity in vitro. SOE1 is a single C to T mutation in the anticodon of a tRNA(3)(Glu) gene and thereby, produces a missense suppressor tRNA capable of recognizing AAA lysine codons. We propose that the resultant lysine to glutamate change stabilizes thermo-labile dTMP kinase molecules in the cell. PMID:2155851

  11. [Correlation of adult AML Npm1 mutations with prognosis and its relationship with gene mutation of FLT3 and CEBPA].

    PubMed

    Bao, Li-Yan; Wang, Ji-Shi

    2010-02-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the correlation of 12th exon mutations in the npm1 gene with prognosis of adult AML patients and to explore the relationship of 12th exon mutation with other gene mutations. The specimen of bone marrow and peripheral blood from AML patients, the informations of medical history, symptoms, related image examinations, blood routine examination, NAP, oxygen saturation level in artery blood and EPO level in serum were collected; the bcr/abl fusion gene was detected by routine examination of bone marrow + biopsy + chromosome mapping + FISH. The patients were typed according to WHO classification. The DNA in cells was extracted, the npm1 gene mutation was detected by allele specific PCR combined were the sequencing. The results indicated that the npm1 heterozygote gene mutation was found in 72 out of 150 AML patients with normal cytogenetics (48%, 72/150). 48% patients showed a frameshift mutation in the C-terminal region of the NPM1 protein. The AML patients with npm1 gene mutation had specific clinical, phenotypic and genetic characteristics. The statistical analysis demonstrated the relationship between npm1 and flt3 ITDs. The patients with npm1 mutation showed a better response to induction therapy, furthermore, the overall survival (OS) rate of patients without flt3 ITD mutation was enhanced. The multivariate analysis demonstrated that the npm1 gene mutation and cebpa mutation positively correlated to the OS rate, and the correlation of flt3 mutation to OS rate showed negative. It is concluded that npm1 mutation is a favorable independent prognostic factor for adult AML patients with normal cytogenetics under conditions without FIT3 gene mutation. PMID:20137111

  12. Preservation of duplicate genes by complementary, degenerative mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Force, A; Lynch, M; Pickett, F B; Amores, A; Yan, Y L; Postlethwait, J

    1999-01-01

    The origin of organismal complexity is generally thought to be tightly coupled to the evolution of new gene functions arising subsequent to gene duplication. Under the classical model for the evolution of duplicate genes, one member of the duplicated pair usually degenerates within a few million years by accumulating deleterious mutations, while the other duplicate retains the original function. This model further predicts that on rare occasions, one duplicate may acquire a new adaptive function, resulting in the preservation of both members of the pair, one with the new function and the other retaining the old. However, empirical data suggest that a much greater proportion of gene duplicates is preserved than predicted by the classical model. Here we present a new conceptual framework for understanding the evolution of duplicate genes that may help explain this conundrum. Focusing on the regulatory complexity of eukaryotic genes, we show how complementary degenerative mutations in different regulatory elements of duplicated genes can facilitate the preservation of both duplicates, thereby increasing long-term opportunities for the evolution of new gene functions. The duplication-degeneration-complementation (DDC) model predicts that (1) degenerative mutations in regulatory elements can increase rather than reduce the probability of duplicate gene preservation and (2) the usual mechanism of duplicate gene preservation is the partitioning of ancestral functions rather than the evolution of new functions. We present several examples (including analysis of a new engrailed gene in zebrafish) that appear to be consistent with the DDC model, and we suggest several analytical and experimental approaches for determining whether the complementary loss of gene subfunctions or the acquisition of novel functions are likely to be the primary mechanisms for the preservation of gene duplicates. For a newly duplicated paralog, survival depends on the outcome of the race between

  13. Molecular evaluation of a novel missense mutation & an insertional truncating mutation in SUMF1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Kotecha, Udhaya H.; Movva, Sireesha; Sharma, Deepak; Verma, Jyotsna; Puri, Ratna Dua; Verma, Ishwar Chander

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Multiple suphphatase deficiency (MSD) is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting the post translational activation of all enzymes of the sulphatase family. To date, approximately 30 different mutations have been identified in the causative gene, sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1). We describe here the mutation analysis of a case of MSD. Methods: The proband was a four year old boy with developmental delay followed by neuroregression. He had coarse facies, appendicular hypertonia, truncal ataxia and ichthyosis limited to both lower limbs. Radiographs showed dysostosis multiplex. Clinical suspicion of MSD was confirmed by enzyme analysis of four enzymes of the sulphatase group. Results: The patient was compound heterozygote for a c.451A>G (p.K151E) substitution in exon 3 and a single base insertion mutation (c.690_691 InsT) in exon 5 in the SUMF1 gene. The bioinformatic analysis of the missense mutation revealed no apparent effect on the overall structure. However, the mutated 151-amino acid residue was found to be adjacent to the substrate binding and the active site residues, thereby affecting the substrate binding and/or catalytic activity, resulting in almost complete loss of enzyme function. Conclusions: The two mutations identified in the present case were novel. This is perhaps the first report of an insertion mutation in SUMF1 causing premature truncation of the protein. PMID:25222778

  14. DNA Microarray and Gene Ontology Enrichment Analysis Reveals That a Mutation in opsX Affects Virulence and Chemotaxis in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong-Il; Park, Young-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial leaf blight (BLB) in rice (Oryza sativa L.). In this study, we investigated the effect of a mutation in opsX (XOO1056), which encodes a saccharide biosynthesis regulatory protein, on the virulence and bacterial chemotaxis of Xoo. We performed DNA microarray analysis, which showed that 63 of 2,678 genes, including genes related to bacterial motility (flagellar and chemotaxis proteins) were significantly downregulated (<−2 log2 fold changes) by the mutation in opsX. Indeed, motility assays showed that the mutant strain was nonmotile on semisolid agar swarm plates. In addition, a mutant strain (opsX::Tn5) showed decreased virulence against the susceptible rice cultivar, IR24. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR reaction was performed to confirm the expression levels of these genes, including those related to flagella and chemotaxis, in the opsX mutant. Our findings revealed that mutation of opsX affects both virulence and bacterial motility. These results will help to improve our understanding of Xoo and provide insight into Xoo-rice interactions. PMID:27298594

  15. Genome-Wide Association Analysis Identifies a Mutation in the Thiamine Transporter 2 (SLC19A3) Gene Associated with Alaskan Husky Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vernau, Karen M.; Runstadler, Jonathan A.; Brown, Emily A.; Cameron, Jessie M.; Huson, Heather J.; Higgins, Robert J.; Ackerley, Cameron; Sturges, Beverly K.; Dickinson, Peter J.; Puschner, Birgit; Giulivi, Cecilia; Shelton, G. Diane; Robinson, Brian H.; DiMauro, Salvatore; Bollen, Andrew W.; Bannasch, Danika L.

    2013-01-01

    Alaskan Husky Encephalopathy (AHE) has been previously proposed as a mitochondrial encephalopathy based on neuropathological similarities with human Leigh Syndrome (LS). We studied 11 Alaskan Husky dogs with AHE, but found no abnormalities in respiratory chain enzyme activities in muscle and liver, or mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear genes that cause LS in people. A genome wide association study was performed using eight of the affected dogs and 20 related but unaffected control AHs using the Illumina canine HD array. SLC19A3 was identified as a positional candidate gene. This gene controls the uptake of thiamine in the CNS via expression of the thiamine transporter protein THTR2. Dogs have two copies of this gene located within the candidate interval (SLC19A3.2 – 43.36–43.38 Mb and SLC19A3.1 – 43.411–43.419 Mb) on chromosome 25. Expression analysis in a normal dog revealed that one of the paralogs, SLC19A3.1, was expressed in the brain and spinal cord while the other was not. Subsequent exon sequencing of SLC19A3.1 revealed a 4bp insertion and SNP in the second exon that is predicted to result in a functional protein truncation of 279 amino acids (c.624 insTTGC, c.625 C>A). All dogs with AHE were homozygous for this mutation, 15/41 healthy AH control dogs were heterozygous carriers while 26/41 normal healthy AH dogs were wild type. Furthermore, this mutation was not detected in another 187 dogs of different breeds. These results suggest that this mutation in SLC19A3.1, encoding a thiamine transporter protein, plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of AHE. PMID:23469184

  16. Analysis of C43G mutation in the promoter region of the XIST gene in patients with idiopathic primary ovarian insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objective The XIST gene is considered to be an attractive candidate gene for skewed X-chromosome inactivation and a possible cause of primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the XIST gene promoter mutation is associated with idiopathic POI in a sample of the Korean population. Methods Subjects consisted of 102 idiopathic POI patients and 113 healthy controls with normal menstrual cycles. Patients with the following known causes of POI were excluded in advance: cytogenetic abnormalities, prior chemo- or radiotherapy, or prior bilateral oophorectomy. Genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Results The mean age of onset of ovarian insufficiency was 28.7±8.5 years and the mean values of serum luteinizing and follicle-stimulating hormones and estradiol in the POI group were 31.4±18.2 mIU/mL, 74.5±41.1 mIU/mL, and 30.5±36.7 pg/mL, respectively. We found no cytosine to guanine (C43G) variation in the XIST gene in both POI patients and controls. Conclusion The C43G mutation in the promoter region of the XIST gene was not present in the Korean patients with idiopathic POI in our study, in contrast to our expectation, suggesting that the role of XIST in the pathogenesis of POI is not yet clear. PMID:26161334

  17. AB125. Neonatal diabetes mellitus due to insulin gene mutation

    PubMed Central

    Can, Ngoc Thi Bich; Vu, Dung Chi; Bui, Thao Phuong; Nguyen, Khanh Ngoc; Nguyen, Dat Phu; Craig, Maria; Ellard, Sian; Nguyen, Hoan Thi

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Insulin (INS) gene mutations that cause permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus change single protein building blocks (amino acids) in the protein sequence. These mutations are believed to disrupt the cleavage of the proinsulin chain or the binding of the A and B chains to form insulin, leading to impaired blood sugar control. At least ten mutations in the INS gene have been identified in people with permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus. To describe clinical features and laboratory manifestations of patients with INS gene mutation and to evaluate outcome of management. Methods Clinical features, biochemical finding, mutation analysis and management outcome of six cases from six unrelated families were study. All exons of INS gene were amplified from genomic DNA and directly sequenced. Results Six cases (three girls and three boys) onset at 129.2±128.8 days of age (median 101.5 days) with gestation age of 37.3±3.0 weeks, birth weight of 2,816.6±767.8 g. Five out of six patients admitted with the feature of diabetic ketoacidosis with pH of 7.04±0.22; plasma glucose levels were 34.3±12.7 mmoL/L, HbA1C of 9.75%±3.5%. Mutation analysis of the INS gene showed: heterozygous for a novel missense mutation (c.127T > A; C43S) in exon 2 in one case; heterozygous for a splicing mutation c.188-31G > A in intron 2 in two cases; heterozygous for a missense mutation c.286T > C in exon 3 in one case; heterozygous for a missense mutation c.265C > T [p.Arg89Cys (p.R89C)] in exon 3 in two cases. After 19.2±13.4 months of insulin treatment, 4/5 patients have normal development with DQ 80-100%, HbA1C of 6.85%±0.49%, quite normal blood glucose levels. The case with c.127T > A mutation treated with insulin for 14 years has physical development delay, poor blood glucose control with HbA1C of 11.4%. Conclusions It is important to perform screening gene mutation for patients with diabetes diagnosed before 6 months of age to control blood glucose and follow up the

  18. Pyridoxine responsiveness in novel mutations of the PNPO gene

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Karl; Mills, Philippa; Clayton, Peter; Paschke, Eduard; Maier, Oliver; Hasselmann, Oswald; Schmiedel, Gudrun; Kanz, Simone; Connolly, Mary; Wolf, Nicole; Struys, Eduard; Stockler, Sylvia; Abela, Lucia; Hofer, Doris

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether patients with pyridoxine-responsive seizures but normal biomarkers for antiquitin deficiency and normal sequencing of the ALDH7A1 gene may have PNPO mutations. Methods: We sequenced the PNPO gene in 31 patients who fulfilled the above-mentioned criteria. Results: We were able to identify 11 patients carrying 3 novel mutations of the PNPO gene. In 6 families, a homozygous missense mutation p.Arg225His in exon 7 was identified, while 1 family was compound heterozygous for a novel missense mutation p.Arg141Cys in exon 5 and a deletion c.279_290del in exon 3. Pathogenicity of the respective mutations was proven by absence in 100 control alleles and expression studies in CHO-K1 cell lines. The response to pyridoxine was prompt in 4, delayed in 2, on EEG only in 2, and initially absent in another 2 patients. Two unrelated patients homozygous for the p.Arg225His mutation experienced status epilepticus when switched to pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP). Conclusions: This study challenges the paradigm of exclusive PLP responsiveness in patients with pyridoxal 5′-phosphate oxidase deficiency and underlines the importance of consecutive testing of pyridoxine and PLP in neonates with antiepileptic drug–resistant seizures. Patients with pyridoxine response but normal biomarkers for antiquitin deficiency should undergo PNPO mutation analysis. PMID:24658933

  19. Mapping of the human cone transducin {alpha} subunit (GNAT2) gene to 1p13 and mutation analysis in patients with Stargardt`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Magovcevic, I.; Weremowicz, S.; Morton, C.C.

    1994-09-01

    Transducin {alpha} subunits are members of a large family of G-proteins and play an important role in phototransduction in rod and cone photoreceptors. We report the localization of the human cone {alpha} transducin (GNAT2) gene using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on chromosome 1 in band p13. The recent assignment of a gene for Stargardt`s disease to the same chromosomal region by linkage analysis prompted us to investigate the possible role of GNAT2 in the pathogenesis of this disease. Stargardt`s disease is characterized by degeneration in late childhood or early adulthood of the macula of the retina, a region rich in cones. We screened patients with Stargardt`s disease, with or without peripheral cone involvement as monitored by the full-field ERG, for mutations in this gene. We investigated 66 unrelated patients including 22 with peripheral cone dysfunction for mutations in the coding region of the GNAT2 gene using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism analysis (SSCP) and direct sequencing. One patient (034-16) was heterozygous for a silent change in exon VI, Asp238Asp (GAT to GAC). Two patients, one (035-005) with peripheral cone involvement and one (071-001) without peripheral cone involvement, were heterozygous for the missense change Val124Met (GTG to ATG) in exon IV. A subsequent screen of 96 unrelated, unaffected controls revealed one individual (N10) who was also heterozygous for the Val124Met alteration. We concluded that Asp238Asp and Val124Met are rare variants not causing Stargardt`s disease. Hence, no disease-specific mutations were found indicating that GNAT2 is probably not involved in the pathogenesis of most cases of Stargardt`s disease.

  20. From Gene Mutation to Protein Characterization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffet, David A.

    2009-01-01

    A seven-week "gene to protein" laboratory sequence is described for an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. Student pairs were given the task of introducing a point mutation of their choosing into the well studied protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). After conducting literature searches, each student group chose the…

  1. Pan-Cancer Analysis of Mutation Hotspots in Protein Domains.

    PubMed

    Miller, Martin L; Reznik, Ed; Gauthier, Nicholas P; Aksoy, Bülent Arman; Korkut, Anil; Gao, Jianjiong; Ciriello, Giovanni; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris

    2015-09-23

    In cancer genomics, recurrence of mutations in independent tumor samples is a strong indicator of functional impact. However, rare functional mutations can escape detection by recurrence analysis owing to lack of statistical power. We enhance statistical power by extending the notion of recurrence of mutations from single genes to gene families that share homologous protein domains. Domain mutation analysis also sharpens the functional interpretation of the impact of mutations, as domains more succinctly embody function than entire genes. By mapping mutations in 22 different tumor types to equivalent positions in multiple sequence alignments of domains, we confirm well-known functional mutation hotspots, identify uncharacterized rare variants in one gene that are equivalent to well-characterized mutations in another gene, detect previously unknown mutation hotspots, and provide hypotheses about molecular mechanisms and downstream effects of domain mutations. With the rapid expansion of cancer genomics projects, protein domain hotspot analysis will likely provide many more leads linking mutations in proteins to the cancer phenotype. PMID:27135912

  2. Transcriptome analysis of an apple (Malus × domestica) yellow fruit somatic mutation identifies a gene network module highly associated with anthocyanin and epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    El-Sharkawy, Islam; Liang, Dong; Xu, Kenong

    2015-01-01

    Using RNA-seq, this study analysed an apple (Malus×domestica) anthocyanin-deficient yellow-skin somatic mutant ‘Blondee’ (BLO) and its red-skin parent ‘Kidd’s D-8’ (KID), the original name of ‘Gala’, to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the mutation. A total of 3299 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between BLO and KID at four developmental stages and/or between two adjacent stages within BLO and/or KID. A weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) of the DEGs uncovered a network module of 34 genes highly correlated (r=0.95, P=9.0×10–13) with anthocyanin contents. Although 12 of the 34 genes in the WGCNA module were characterized and known of roles in anthocyanin, the remainder 22 appear to be novel. Examining the expression of ten representative genes in the module in 14 diverse apples revealed that at least eight were significantly correlated with anthocyanin variation. MdMYB10 (MDP0000259614) and MdGST (MDP0000252292) were among the most suppressed module member genes in BLO despite being undistinguishable in their corresponding sequences between BLO and KID. Methylation assay of MdMYB10 and MdGST in fruit skin revealed that two regions (MR3 and MR7) in the MdMYB10 promoter exhibited remarkable differences between BLO and KID. In particular, methylation was high and progressively increased alongside fruit development in BLO while was correspondingly low and constant in KID. The methylation levels in both MR3 and MR7 were negatively correlated with anthocyanin content as well as the expression of MdMYB10 and MdGST. Clearly, the collective repression of the 34 genes explains the loss-of-colour in BLO while the methylation in MdMYB10 promoter is likely causal for the mutation. PMID:26417021

  3. Transcriptome analysis of an apple (Malus × domestica) yellow fruit somatic mutation identifies a gene network module highly associated with anthocyanin and epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    El-Sharkawy, Islam; Liang, Dong; Xu, Kenong

    2015-12-01

    Using RNA-seq, this study analysed an apple (Malus×domestica) anthocyanin-deficient yellow-skin somatic mutant 'Blondee' (BLO) and its red-skin parent 'Kidd's D-8' (KID), the original name of 'Gala', to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the mutation. A total of 3299 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between BLO and KID at four developmental stages and/or between two adjacent stages within BLO and/or KID. A weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) of the DEGs uncovered a network module of 34 genes highly correlated (r=0.95, P=9.0×10(-13)) with anthocyanin contents. Although 12 of the 34 genes in the WGCNA module were characterized and known of roles in anthocyanin, the remainder 22 appear to be novel. Examining the expression of ten representative genes in the module in 14 diverse apples revealed that at least eight were significantly correlated with anthocyanin variation. MdMYB10 (MDP0000259614) and MdGST (MDP0000252292) were among the most suppressed module member genes in BLO despite being undistinguishable in their corresponding sequences between BLO and KID. Methylation assay of MdMYB10 and MdGST in fruit skin revealed that two regions (MR3 and MR7) in the MdMYB10 promoter exhibited remarkable differences between BLO and KID. In particular, methylation was high and progressively increased alongside fruit development in BLO while was correspondingly low and constant in KID. The methylation levels in both MR3 and MR7 were negatively correlated with anthocyanin content as well as the expression of MdMYB10 and MdGST. Clearly, the collective repression of the 34 genes explains the loss-of-colour in BLO while the methylation in MdMYB10 promoter is likely causal for the mutation. PMID:26417021

  4. Whole-exome Sequencing Analysis Identifies Mutations in the EYS Gene in Retinitis Pigmentosa in the Indian Population.

    PubMed

    Di, Yanan; Huang, Lulin; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Li, Shujin; Kim, Ramasamy; Ballav Saikia, Bibhuti; Qu, Chao; Zhu, Xiong; Zhou, Yu; Jiang, Zhilin; Zhang, Lin; Lin, Ying; Zhang, Dingding; Li, Yuanfen; Zhang, Houbin; Yin, Yibing; Lu, Fang; Zhu, Xianjun; Yang, Zhenglin

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a rare heterogeneous genetic retinal dystrophy disease, and despite years of research, known genetic mutations can explain only approximately 60% of RP cases. We sought to identify the underlying genetic mutations in a cohort of fourteen Indian autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) families and 100 Indian sporadic RP cases. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on the probands of the arRP families and sporadic RP patients, and direct Sanger sequencing was used to confirm the causal mutations identified by WES. We found that the mutations of EYS are likely pathogenic mutations in two arRP families and eight sporadic patients. Specifically, we found a novel pair of compound heterozygous mutations and a novel homozygous mutation in two separate arRP families, and found two novel heterozygous mutations in two sporadic RP patients, whereas we found six novel homozygous mutations in six sporadic RP patients. Of these, one was a frameshift mutation, two were stop-gain mutations, one was a splicing mutation, and the others were missense mutations. In conclusion, our findings expand the spectrum of EYS mutations in RP in the Indian population and provide further support for the role of EYS in the pathogenesis and clinical diagnosis of RP. PMID:26787102

  5. Whole-exome Sequencing Analysis Identifies Mutations in the EYS Gene in Retinitis Pigmentosa in the Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Di, Yanan; Huang, Lulin; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Li, Shujin; Kim, Ramasamy; Ballav Saikia, Bibhuti; Qu, Chao; Zhu, Xiong; Zhou, Yu; Jiang, Zhilin; Zhang, Lin; Lin, Ying; Zhang, Dingding; Li, Yuanfen; Zhang, Houbin; Yin, Yibing; Lu, Fang; Zhu, Xianjun; Yang, Zhenglin

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a rare heterogeneous genetic retinal dystrophy disease, and despite years of research, known genetic mutations can explain only approximately 60% of RP cases. We sought to identify the underlying genetic mutations in a cohort of fourteen Indian autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) families and 100 Indian sporadic RP cases. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on the probands of the arRP families and sporadic RP patients, and direct Sanger sequencing was used to confirm the causal mutations identified by WES. We found that the mutations of EYS are likely pathogenic mutations in two arRP families and eight sporadic patients. Specifically, we found a novel pair of compound heterozygous mutations and a novel homozygous mutation in two separate arRP families, and found two novel heterozygous mutations in two sporadic RP patients, whereas we found six novel homozygous mutations in six sporadic RP patients. Of these, one was a frameshift mutation, two were stop-gain mutations, one was a splicing mutation, and the others were missense mutations. In conclusion, our findings expand the spectrum of EYS mutations in RP in the Indian population and provide further support for the role of EYS in the pathogenesis and clinical diagnosis of RP. PMID:26787102

  6. Frequent mutations in chromatin-remodeling genes in pulmonary carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin; Sun, Ruping; Ozretić, Luka; Seidal, Danila; Zander, Thomas; Leenders, Frauke; George, Julie; Müller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Pinther, Berit; Bosco, Graziella; Konrad, Kathryn; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Schneider, Peter M; Bogus, Magdalena; Soltermann, Alex; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Åslaug; Solberg, Steinar; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Ansén, Sascha; Stoelben, Erich; Wright, Gavin M.; Russell, Prudence; Wainer, Zoe; Solomon, Benjamin; Field, John K; Hyde, Russell; Davies, Michael PA.; Heukamp, Lukas C; Petersen, Iver; Perner, Sven; Lovly, Christine; Cappuzzo, Federico; Travis, William D; Wolf, Jürgen; Vingron, Martin; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Haas, Stefan A.; Buettner, Reinhard; Thomas, Roman K

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary carcinoids are rare neuroendocrine tumors of the lung. The molecular alterations underlying the pathogenesis of these tumors have not been systematically studied so far. Here we perform gene copy number analysis (n=54), genome/exome (n=44) and transcriptome (n=69) sequencing of pulmonary carcinoids and observe frequent mutations in chromatin-remodeling genes. Covalent histone modifiers and subunits of the SWI/SNF complex are mutated in 40% and 22.2% of the cases respectively, with MEN1, PSIP1 and ARID1A being recurrently affected. In contrast to small-cell lung cancer and large-cell neuroendocrine tumors, TP53 and RB1 mutations are rare events, suggesting that pulmonary carcinoids are not early progenitor lesions of the highly aggressive lung neuroendocrine tumors but arise through independent cellular mechanisms. These data also suggest that inactivation of chromatin remodeling genes is sufficient to drive transformation in pulmonary carcinoids. PMID:24670920

  7. Molecular analysis of the Septoria nodorum beta-tubulin gene and characterization of a benomyl-resistance mutation.

    PubMed

    Cooley, R N; Caten, C E

    1993-02-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a benomyl-resistant allele of the Septoria nodorum beta-tubulin gene (tubAR) has been determined including 745 and 1024 nucleotides 5' and 3' to the tubAR coding region, respectively. tubAR encodes a 447 amino acid polypeptide which shows a high degree of homology with other fungal beta-tubulins. The gene contains three introns at codons 4, 12 and 53, uses 48 of the possible 61 sense codons and has a GC content of 59.1% in its coding region. S1 nuclease mapping has identified two transcriptional start sites 80 bp and 83 bp upstream of the translation start, and a transcriptional termination site 192 bp downstream of the stop codon. The two transcriptional start sites lie just 8 bp and 5 bp downstream of a CT motif consisting of 18 pyrimidine nucleotides interrupted by a single adenine. The wild-type allele tubA+ has been cloned using the polymerase chain reaction and the mutation producing the benomyl-resistant phenotype of tubAR mapped to a C to T transition at the first position of codon 6, resulting in a histidine to tyrosine amino acid substitution. PMID:8455567

  8. LEOPARD Syndrome: Clinical Features and Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Quintana, E.; Rodríguez-González, F.

    2012-01-01

    The RAS/MAPK pathway proteins with germline mutations in their respective genes are associated with some disorders such as Noonan, LEOPARD (LS), neurofibromatosis type 1, Costello and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndromes. LEOPARD is an acronym, mnemonic for the major manifestations of this disorder, characterized by multiple lentigines, electrocardiographic abnormalities, ocular hypertelorism, pulmonic stenosis, abnormal genitalia, retardation of growth, and sensorineural deafness. Though it is not included in the acronym, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most frequent cardiac anomaly observed, representing a potentially life-threatening problem in these patients. PTPN11, RAF1 and BRAF are the genes known to be associated with LS, identifying molecular genetic testing of the 3 gene mutations in about 95% of affected individuals. PTPN11 mutations are the most frequently found. Eleven different missense PTPN11 mutations (Tyr279Cys/Ser, Ala461Thr, Gly464Ala, Thr468Met/Pro, Arg498Trp/Leu, Gln506Pro, and Gln510Glu/Pro) have been reported so far in LS, 2 of which (Tyr279Cys and Thr468Met) occur in about 65% of the cases. Here, we provide an overview of clinical aspects of this disorder, the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogenesis and major genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:23239957

  9. Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013 Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks Schizophrenia networks in the prefrontal cortex area of the brain. ... of spontaneous mutations in genes that form a network in the front region of the brain. The ...

  10. Collodion Baby with TGM1 gene mutation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepak; Gupta, Basudev; Shastri, Sweta; Pandita, Aakash; Pawar, Smita

    2015-01-01

    Collodion baby (CB) is normally diagnosed at the time of birth and refers to a newborn infant that is delivered with a lambskin-like membrane encompassing the total body surface. CB is not a specific disease entity, but is a common phenotype in conditions like harlequin ichthyosis, lamellar ichthyosis, nonbullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, and trichothiodystrophy. We report a CB that was brought to our department and later diagnosed to have TGM1 gene c.984+1G>A mutation. However, it could not be ascertained whether the infant had lamellar ichthyosis or congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (both having the same mutation). The infant was lost to follow-up. PMID:26451124

  11. Collodion Baby with TGM1 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak; Gupta, Basudev; Shastri, Sweta; Pandita, Aakash; Pawar, Smita

    2015-01-01

    Collodion baby (CB) is normally diagnosed at the time of birth and refers to a newborn infant that is delivered with a lambskin-like membrane encompassing the total body surface. CB is not a specific disease entity, but is a common phenotype in conditions like harlequin ichthyosis, lamellar ichthyosis, nonbullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, and trichothiodystrophy. We report a CB that was brought to our department and later diagnosed to have TGM1 gene c.984+1G>A mutation. However, it could not be ascertained whether the infant had lamellar ichthyosis or congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (both having the same mutation). The infant was lost to follow-up. PMID:26451124

  12. Molecular analysis of Hurler syndrome in Druze and Muslim Arab patients in Israel: Multiple allelic mutations of the IDUA gene in a small geographic area

    SciTech Connect

    Bach, G. ); Moskowitz, S.M.; Tieu, P.T.; Matynia, A.; Neufeld, E.F. )

    1993-08-01

    The mutations underlying Hurler syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis IH) in Druze and Muslim Israeli Arab patients have been characterized. Four alleles were identified, using a combination of (a) PCR amplification of reverse-transcribed RNA or genomic DNA segments, (b) cycle sequencing of PCR products, and (c) restriction-enzyme analysis. One allele has two amino acid substitutions, Gly[sub 409][yields]Arg in exon 9 and Ter[yields]Cys in exon 14. The other three alleles have mutations in exon 2 (Tyr[sub 64][yields]Ter), exon 7 (Gln[sub 310][yields]Ter), or exon 8 (Thr[sub 366][yields]Pro). Transfection of mutagenized cDNAs into Cos-1 cells showed that two missense mutations, Thr[sub 366][yields]Pro and Ter[yields]Cys, permitted the expression of only trace amounts of [alpha]-L-iduronidase activity, whereas Gly[sub 409][yields]Arg permitted the expression of 60% as much enzyme as did the normal cDNA. The nonsense mutations were associated with abnormalities of RNA processing: (1) both a very low level of mRNA and skipping of exon 2 for Tyr[sub 64][yields]Ter and (2) utilization of a cryptic splice site for Gln[sub 310][yields]Ter. In all instances, the probands were found homozygous, and the parents heterozygous, for the mutant alleles, as anticipated from the consanguinity in each family. The two-mutation allele was identified in a family from Gaza; the other three alleles were found in seven families, five of them Druze, residing in a very small area of northern Israel. Since such clustering suggests a classic founder effect, the presence of three mutant alleles of the IDUA gene was unexpected. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Molecular analysis of Hurler syndrome in Druze and Muslim Arab patients in Israel: multiple allelic mutations of the IDUA gene in a small geographic area.

    PubMed Central

    Bach, G; Moskowitz, S M; Tieu, P T; Matynia, A; Neufeld, E F

    1993-01-01

    The mutations underlying Hurler syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis IH) in Druze and Muslim Israeli Arab patients have been characterized. Four alleles were identified, using a combination of (a) PCR amplification of reverse-transcribed RNA or genomic DNA segments, (b) cycle sequencing of PCR products, and (c) restriction-enzyme analysis. One allele has two amino acid substitutions, Gly409-->Arg in exon 9 and Ter-->Cys in exon 14. The other three alleles have mutations in exon 2 (Tyr64-->Ter), exon 7 (Gln310-->Ter), or exon 8 (Thr366-->Pro). Transfection of mutagenized cDNAs into Cos-1 cells showed that two missense mutations, Thr366-->Pro and Ter-->Cys, permitted the expression of only trace amounts of alpha-L-iduronidase activity, whereas Gly409-->Arg permitted the expression of 60% as much enzyme as did the normal cDNA. The nonsense mutations were associated with abnormalities of RNA processing: (1) both a very low level of mRNA and skipping of exon 2 for Tyr64-->Ter and (2) utilization of a cryptic splice site for Gln310-->Ter. In all instances, the probands were found homozygous, and the parents heterozygous, for the mutant alleles, as anticipated from the consanguinity in each family. The two-mutation allele was identified in a family from Gaza; the other three alleles were found in seven families, five of them Druze, residing in a very small area of northern Israel. Since such clustering suggests a classic founder effect, the presence of three mutant alleles of the IDUA gene was unexpected. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8328452

  14. SEQUENCE ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS INDUCED BY N-ETHYL-N-NITROSOUREA IN THE TK AND HPRT GENES OF MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mouse lymphoma assay is widely used to identify chemicals that are capable of inducing mutational damages. The Tk+/- gene located on an autosome in mouse lymphoma cells may recover a wider range of mutational events than the X-linked Hprt locus. However, chemical-induced muta...

  15. Mutational analysis of the neuronal cadherin gene CELSR1 and exclusion as a candidate for catatonic schizophrenia in a large family.

    PubMed

    Gross, J; Grimm, O; Ortega, G; Teuber, I; Lesch, K P; Meyer, J

    2001-12-01

    The cadherin gene CELSR1 is specifically expressed in the brain and located on chromosome 22q13.33, a region that has recently been shown to be involved in the etiopathogenesis of familial catatonic schizophrenia. The gene is a strong positional candidate and was considered for mutational analysis. A total of 17 allelic variants of CELSR1 was found by sequencing all 35 exons, intron-exon junctions, and the putative promoter region by screening two patients from a large family mainly supporting this locus, and three control subjects in a first step. No variant exclusively co-segregates with the disease in the large pedigree, providing evidence that CELSR1 is not causative for the pathogenesis of catatonic schizophrenia in this family. PMID:11807409

  16. Exclusion of growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone gene mutations in familial isolated GH deficiency by linkage and single strand conformation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Jurado, L.A.; Francke, U.; Phillips, J.A. III

    1994-03-01

    The molecular basis and the locus responsible for most familial cases of isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) are still unknown. The GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) gene has been evaluated as a possible candidate in 23 unrelated families with IGHD, 14 of whom were classified as having autosomal recessive IGHD type IB and 9 of whom had autosomal dominant IGHD type II. Three highly polymorphic microsatellites (dinucleotide repeats), mapped close to GHRH on chromosome 20 by previous linkage studies, were analyzed as markers for the GHRH locus. All available family members were genotyped for D20S44 [no recombination with GHRH at a LOD (logarithm of the odds) score of 3.6]. Noninformative families were also genotyped for D20S45 and/or D20S54 (located at {approximately} 1 and 3 centiMorgan of genetic distance from GHRH, respectively). Twenty families were informative for linkage analysis with 1 or more of these markers. They found at least 1 obligate recombinant with discordance between phenotype and genotype in 19 of the 23 families (83%). There is only a very small chance (1-3% or less) that the discordances observed are due to recombination between the GHRH locus and the marker tested. Concordant segregation was seen in only 1 type IB family (4%). When probands from this and the 3 noninformative families were screened for sequence variants in the 5 exons of the GHRH gene by single strand conformation analysis, no abnormal patterns were observed. They conclude that mutations responsible for IGHD are not within or near the structural gene for GHRH on chromosome 20 in the 23 families studied. As linkage to the GH-1 gene has also been previously excluded in 65% of these families, mutations in a locus or loci unlinked to GH-1 and GHRH must be responsible for the majority of these IGHD families. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Mutational analysis of CHRNB2, CHRNA2 and CHRNA4 genes in Chinese population with autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhihong; Wang, Lingan; Wang, Chun; Chen, Qian; Zhai, Qiongxiang; Guo, Yuxiong; Zhang, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study aims to investigate the gene mutations of CHRNB2, CHRNA2 and CHRNA4 in Chinese population with autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE). Methods: 257 ADNFLE patients (74 sporadic and 32 familial) were collected, including 42 pedigree patients and 215 sporadic cases. Exon mutational screening of CHRNB2, CHRNA2 and CHRNA4 was performed by direct PCR sequencing. Results: No published mutations of CHRNB2, CHRNA4 and CHRNA2 genes were detected in this study. Three kinds of c.SNP (c.66C> T, c.249C> T, c.375A> G) were detected on the 2nd and 5th exons of CHRNA2; six kinds of c.SNP (c.639T> C, c.678T> C, c.1209G> T, c.1227T> C, c.1659G> A, c.1629C> T) were detected on the 5th exon of CHRNA4. Three novel mutations were discovered, respectively locating on the exon 5 of CHRNA4 gene (c.570C> T), 5th and 6th exons of CHRNB2 gene (c.483C> T and c.1407C> G). The three mutations were absent in 200 healthy controls, indicating that the mutations were very rare. Conclusion: CHRNA4, CHRNB2 and CHRNA2 may be not the causative genes of Chinese ADNFLE population. Whether the three novel synonymous mutations were genetic factors of ADNFLE pathogenesis in Chinese Han population needs to be further studied. PMID:26309560

  18. SPINK1 gene mutations and pancreatitis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimosegawa, Tooru; Kume, Kiyoshi; Masamune, Atsushi

    2006-10-01

    SPINK1 can inhibit up to 20% of trypsin activity, and may constitute one major mechanism to protect the pancreas from autodigestion. In 2000, Witt et al. first recognized the association between mutations in the SPINK1 gene and chronic pancreatitis (CP), but the significance of SPINK1 gene mutation in pancreatitis and its relation to alcohol consumption remains unclear in Japan. The aim of the present paper was to clarify the incidence of SPINK1 mutations in CP patients with various etiologies in Japan and, in addition, to examine the relationship between alcohol metabolism and the polymorphisms in the key enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2). A total of 156 patients with CP, and 165 healthy volunteers, all Japanese, were examined for the SPINK1 mutations by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and direct sequencing. In Japan, the prevalence of [N34S; IVS1-37T > C] and [-215G > A; IVS3 + 2T > C] was significantly higher in patients with idiopathic CP (10.6% and 12.8%, respectively) than normal subjects (0.6% and 0%). The frequency of the [-215G > A; IVS3 + 2T > C] mutation in Japan was significantly higher than that reported in other populations. Concerning alcoholic CP, the [-215G > A; IVS3 + 2T > C] mutation was found in only a small number of patients (3.9%). On analysis of ADH2 and ALDH2 gene polymorphisms an association was found between ADH2*2 allele and alcoholic CP, and the ADH2*2/2*2 genotype had a tendency to increase the risk of developing pancreatic pseudocyst. In conclusion, in Japan the [-215G > A; IVS3 + 2T > C] mutation in the SPINK1 gene may form a unique genetic background for pancreatitis. PMID:16958672

  19. Analysis of a splice-site mutation in the sap-precursor gene of a patient with metachromatic leukodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Henseler, M.; Klein, A.; Reber, M.

    1996-01-01

    Sphingolipid activator proteins (SAPs) are small, nonenzymatic glycoproteins required for the lysosomal degradation of various sphingolipids with a short oligosaccharide chain by their exohydrolases. Four of the five known activator proteins (sap-A-sap-D), also called {open_quotes}saposins,{close_quotes} are derived from a common precursor by proteolytic processing. sap-B stimulates hydrolysis of sulfatides by arylsulfatase A in vivo. Its recessively inherited deficiency results in a metabolic disorder similar to classical metachromatic leukodystrophy, which is caused by a defect of arylsulfatase A. Here we report on a patient with sap-B deficiency. Reverse-transcription-PCR studies on the patient`s mRNA revealed the occurrence of two distinct mutant species: one with an in-frame deletion of the first 21 bases of exon 6, the other with a complete in-frame deletion of this exon. The patient was homozygous for the underlying mutation, which was found to be a G-{yields}T transversion within the acceptor splice site between intron e and exon 6, abolishing normal RNA splicing. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization revealed that the parents and both grandfathers of the patient were carriers of this mutation. In order to analyze the fate of the mutant precursor proteins, both abnormal cDNAs were stably expressed in baby hamster kidney cells. Pulse-chase experiments showed that the deletion of 21 bp had no effect on the transport and the maturation of the encoded precursor. All sap forms except sap-B were detectable by immunochemical methods. The cDNA bearing a complete deletion of exon 6 encoded a shortened precursor of only 60 kD, and no mature SAPs were detectable. The carbohydrate chains of this polypeptide were of the high-mannose and hybrid type, indicating no transport of the mutant precursor beyond early Golgi apparatus. An endoplasmic-reticulum localization of this polypeptide was supported by indirect immunofluorescence analysis. 31 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Mutational analysis of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes in Tunisian patients with nonsyndromic hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna . E-mail: emna_mkaouar@mail2world.com; Tlili, Abdelaziz; Masmoudi, Saber; Louhichi, Nacim; Charfeddine, Ilhem; Amor, Mohamed Ben; Lahmar, Imed; Driss, Nabil; Drira, Mohamed; Ayadi, Hammadi; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2006-02-24

    We explored the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and the tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes in 100 Tunisian families affected with NSHL and in 100 control individuals. We identified the mitochondrial A1555G mutation in one out of these 100 families and not in the 100 control individuals. Members of this family harbouring the A1555G mutation showed phenotypic heterogeneity which could be explained by an eventual nuclear-mitochondrial interaction. So, we have screened three nuclear genes: GJB2, GJB3, and GJB6 but we have not found correlation between the phenotypic heterogeneity and variants detected in these genes. We explored also the entire mitochondrial 12S rRNA and the tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes. We detected five novel polymorphisms: T742C, T794A, A813G, C868T, and C954T, and 12 known polymorphisms in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene. None of the 100 families or the 100 controls were found to carry mutations in the tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} gene. We report here First mutational screening of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and the tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes in the Tunisian population which describes the second family harbouring the A1555G mutation in Africa and reveals novel polymorphisms in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene.

  1. Towards linked open gene mutations data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background With the advent of high-throughput technologies, a great wealth of variation data is being produced. Such information may constitute the basis for correlation analyses between genotypes and phenotypes and, in the future, for personalized medicine. Several databases on gene variation exist, but this kind of information is still scarce in the Semantic Web framework. In this paper, we discuss issues related to the integration of mutation data in the Linked Open Data infrastructure, part of the Semantic Web framework. We present the development of a mapping from the IARC TP53 Mutation database to RDF and the implementation of servers publishing this data. Methods A version of the IARC TP53 Mutation database implemented in a relational database was used as first test set. Automatic mappings to RDF were first created by using D2RQ and later manually refined by introducing concepts and properties from domain vocabularies and ontologies, as well as links to Linked Open Data implementations of various systems of biomedical interest. Since D2RQ query performances are lower than those that can be achieved by using an RDF archive, generated data was also loaded into a dedicated system based on tools from the Jena software suite. Results We have implemented a D2RQ Server for TP53 mutation data, providing data on a subset of the IARC database, including gene variations, somatic mutations, and bibliographic references. The server allows to browse the RDF graph by using links both between classes and to external systems. An alternative interface offers improved performances for SPARQL queries. The resulting data can be explored by using any Semantic Web browser or application. Conclusions This has been the first case of a mutation database exposed as Linked Data. A revised version of our prototype, including further concepts and IARC TP53 Mutation database data sets, is under development. The publication of variation information as Linked Data opens new perspectives

  2. SCN1A, SCN1B, and GABRG2 gene mutation analysis in Chinese families with generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huihui; Zhang, Yuehua; Liang, Jianmin; Liu, Xiaoyan; Ma, Xiuwei; Wu, Husheng; Xu, Keming; Qin, Jiong; Qi, Yu; Wu, Xiru

    2008-01-01

    Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+; MIM#604233) is a familial epilepsy syndrome characterized by phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. It was associated with mutations in the neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel subunit gene (SCN1A, SCN2A, SCN1B) and ligand-gated gamma aminobutyric acid receptors genes (GABRG2, GABRD). We investigated the roles of SCN1A, SCN1B, and GABRG2 mutations in the etiology of Chinese GEFS+ families. Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes of 23 probands and their family members. The sequences of SCN1A, SCN1B, and GABRG2 genes were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing. The major phenotypes of affected members in the 23 GEFS+ families exhibited FS and FS+, whereas rare phenotypes afebrile generalized tonic-clonic seizures (AGTCS), myoclonic-astatic epilepsy (MAE), and partial seizures were also observed. A novel SCN1A mutation, p.N935H, was identified in one family and another novel mutation in GABRG2, p.W390X, in another family. However, no SCN1B mutation was identified. The combined frequency of SCN1A, SCN1B, and GABRG2 mutations was 8.7% (2/23), extending the distribution of SCN1A and GABRG2 mutations to Chinese GEFS+ families. There were still unidentified genes contributing to the pathogenesis of GEFS+. PMID:18566737

  3. Computational analysis of the mutations in BAP1, PBRM1 and SETD2 genes reveals the impaired molecular processes in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Occhipinti, Giulia; Santoni, Matteo; Massari, Francesco; Sotte, Valeria; Iacovelli, Roberto; Burattini, Luciano; Santini, Daniele; Montironi, Rodolfo; Cascinu, Stefano; Principato, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (ccRCC) is due to loss of von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) gene and at least one out of three chromatin regulating genes BRCA1-associated protein-1 (BAP1), Polybromo-1 (PBRM1) and Set domain-containing 2 (SETD2). More than 350, 700 and 500 mutations are known respectively for BAP1, PBRM1 and SETD2 genes. Each variation damages these genes with different severity levels. Unfortunately for most of these mutations the molecular effect is unknown, so precluding a severity classification. Moreover, the huge number of these gene mutations does not allow to perform experimental assays for each of them. By bioinformatic tools, we performed predictions of the molecular effects of all mutations lying in BAP1, PBRM1 and SETD2 genes. Our results allow to distinguish whether a mutation alters protein function directly or by splicing pattern destruction and how much severely. This classification could be useful to reveal correlation with patients’ outcome, to guide experiments, to select the variations that are worth to be included in translational/association studies, and to direct gene therapies. PMID:26452128

  4. Immunohistochemical analysis of the skin in junctional epidermolysis bullosa using laminin 5 chain specific antibodies is of limited value in predicting the underlying gene mutation.

    PubMed

    McMillan, J R; McGrath, J A; Pulkkinen, L; Kon, A; Burgeson, R E; Ortonne, J P; Meneguzzi, G; Uitto, J; Eady, R A

    1997-06-01

    The anchoring filament protein laminin 5 is composed of three polypeptide chains (alpha 3, beta 3 and gamma 2) each encoded by separate genes (LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2, respectively). Mutations in any of these three genes may give rise to the autosomal recessive blistering skin disease, junctional epidermolysis bullosa. At present, there is no easy way of predicting which of these three genes might harbour the pathogenetic laminin 5 mutations in a case of junctional epidermolysis bullosa. In this study, we assessed whether immunohistochemistry might be helpful in this regard. We performed immunohistochemical labelling of the dermal-epidermal junction using alpha 3, beta 3 and gamma 2 chain-specific antibodies in 11 patients with junctional epidermolysis bullosa, in whom the laminin 5 mutations had been previously delineated. Although, labelling for the laminin 5 chain bearing the mutations was attenuated or undetectable in all cases, a complete absence of labelling or a reduction in the staining intensity for the other two chains was also seen in all cases. The results showed that immunohistochemical labelling of the dermal-epidermal junction using alpha 3, beta 3 and gamma 2 chain-specific antibodies is not a specific indicator for which of the laminin 5 chain genes contains the pathogenetic mutations, and is therefore unreliable in screening for individual laminin 5 gene mutations in cases of junctional epidermolysis bullosa. PMID:9217810

  5. Cat3vl and Cat3vao cataract mutations on mouse chromosome 10: phenotypic characterization, linkage studies and analysis of candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Löster, J; Immervoll, T; Schmitt-John, T; Graw, J

    1997-12-01

    Cat3vl and Cat3vao are two allelic, dominant cataract mutations that arose independently in the F1 generation after gamma-irradiation of male mice. The cataracts are already present at birth. Examination of the eyes with a slit lamp revealed completely vacuolated lenses in Cat3vl mutants and anteriorly located opacity in Cat3vao mutants. The appearance of the opacities does not differ between the individuals or between heterozygotes and homozygotes. Penetrance of the mutations is complete. Viability and fertility of the mutants are normal except in the case of the Cat3vl homozygotes. Cat3vao was assigned to the distal part of mouse chromosome 10, 3.2 +/- 0.9 cM away from the visible marker Steel (SlgbH). Using polymorphic markers the following locus order was found: D10Mit230-(0.2 +/- 0.1 cM)-Cat3vao-(2.5 +/- 0.6 cM)-D10Mit70. No recombinants were found between Cat3vao and the markers D10Mit4l and D10Mit95 among 921 offspring. The results exclude allelism of Cat3vao with CatLop or To2, which also map to chromosome 10. Candidate genes were tested by examination of their expression in the eye of newborn mice and by analysis of cDNA sequences. So far, negative results have been obtained for the genes encoding the proteoglycans lumican and decorin, the nuclear orphan receptor Tr2-11 and the transcription factor Elk3. Based on syntenic homology of the Cat3 region to the human chromosome 12q, the Cat3 mutants are discussed as mouse models for cornea plana congenita in man. The recovery of the Cat3 mutations demonstrates the importance of the corresponding locus for proper eye development. PMID:9439574

  6. Functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II.

    PubMed

    Matos, Liliana; Gonçalves, Vânia; Pinto, Eugénia; Laranjeira, Francisco; Prata, Maria João; Jordan, Peter; Desviat, Lourdes R; Pérez, Belén; Alves, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis II is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the IDS gene, including exonic alterations associated with aberrant splicing. In the present work, cell-based splicing assays were performed to study the effects of two splicing mutations in exon 3 of IDS, i.e., c.241C>T and c.257C>T, whose presence activates a cryptic splice site in exon 3 and one in exon 8, i.e., c.1122C>T that despite being a synonymous mutation is responsible for the creation of a new splice site in exon 8 leading to a transcript shorter than usual. Mutant minigene analysis and overexpression assays revealed that SRSF2 and hnRNP E1 might be involved in the use and repression of the constitutive 3' splice site of exon 3 respectively. For the c.1122C>T the use of antisense therapy to correct the splicing defect was explored, but transfection of patient fibroblasts with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (n=3) and a locked nucleic acid failed to abolish the abnormal transcript; indeed, it resulted in the appearance of yet another aberrant splicing product. Interestingly, the oligonucleotides transfection in control fibroblasts led to the appearance of the aberrant transcript observed in patients' cells after treatment, which shows that the oligonucleotides are masking an important cis-acting element for 5' splice site regulation of exon 8. These results highlight the importance of functional studies for understanding the pathogenic consequences of mis-splicing and highlight the difficulty in developing antisense therapies involving gene regions under complex splicing regulation. PMID:26407519

  7. Screening of sarcomere gene mutations in young athletes with abnormal findings in electrocardiography: identification of a MYH7 mutation and MYBPC3 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Chika; Arimura, Takuro; Hayashi, Takeharu; Naruse, Taeko K; Kawai, Sachio; Kimura, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    There is an overlap between the physiological cardiac remodeling associated with training in athletes, the so-called athlete's heart, and mild forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common hereditary cardiac disease. HCM is often accompanied by unfavorable outcomes including a sudden cardiac death in the adolescents. Because one of the initial signs of HCM is abnormality in electrocardiogram (ECG), athletes may need to monitor for ECG findings to prevent any unfavorable outcomes. HCM is caused by mutations in genes for sarcomere proteins, but there is no report on the systematic screening of gene mutations in athletes. One hundred and two genetically unrelated young Japanese athletes with abnormal ECG findings were the subjects for the analysis of four sarcomere genes, MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2 and TNNI3. We found that 5 out of 102 (4.9%) athletes carried mutations: a heterozygous MYH7 Glu935Lys mutation, a heterozygous MYBPC3 Arg160Trp mutation and another heterozygous MYBPC3 Thr1046Met mutation, all of which had been reported as HCM-associated mutations, in 1, 2 and 2 subjects, respectively. This is the first study of systematic screening of sarcomere gene mutations in a cohort of athletes with abnormal ECG, demonstrating the presence of sarcomere gene mutations in the athlete's heart. PMID:26178432

  8. Mutational specificities of environmental carcinogens in the lacl gene of Escherichia coli H. V: DNA sequence analysis of mutations in bacteria recovered from the liver of Swiss mice exposed to 1,2-dimethylhydrazine, azoxymethane, and methylazoxymethanolacetate

    SciTech Connect

    Zeilmaker, M.J.; Horsfall, M.J.; van Helten, J.B.; Glickman, B.W.; Mohn, G.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The host-mediated assay (HMA) was used to determine the spectra of mutations induced in the lacl gene of Escherichia coli cells recovered from the livers of Swiss mice exposed to the carcinogens 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (SDMH), azoxymethane (AOM), and methylazoxymethanolacetate (MAMA). These spectra were further compared with changes induced by dimethylnitrosamine (DMNA) in the HMA methodology. A total of 177 independent lacl mutations arising in the HMA following exposure to SDMH, AOM, and MAMA were analyzed. Single-base substitutions accounted for 97% of all mutations analyzed. The vast majority of the single-base substitutions consisted of G:C----A:T transitions (94% of all mutations). The remaining mutations consisted of A:T----G:C transitions (3% of all mutations) while non-base substitutions accounted for only 3% of the total mutagenesis. The latter mutations consisted of one frameshift mutation and four lacO deletions. The distribution of G:C----A:T transitions induced by the three chemicals in the first 200 bp of the lacl gene was not random, but rather clustered at sites where a target guanine was flanked at the 5{prime} site by a purine residue.

  9. De Novo Mutations in Ataxin-2 Gene and ALS Risk

    PubMed Central

    Laffita-Mesa, José Miguel; Rodríguez Pupo, Jorge Michel; Moreno Sera, Raciel; Vázquez Mojena, Yaimee; Kourí, Vivian; Laguna-Salvia, Leonides; Martínez-Godales, Michael; Valdevila Figueira, José A.; Bauer, Peter O.; Rodríguez-Labrada, Roberto; Zaldívar, Yanetza González; Paucar, Martin; Svenningsson, Per; Pérez, Luís Velázquez

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic CAG repeat expansion in the ataxin-2 gene (ATXN2) is the genetic cause of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2). Recently, it has been associated with Parkinsonism and increased genetic risk for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here we report the association of de novo mutations in ATXN2 with autosomal dominant ALS. These findings support our previous conjectures based on population studies on the role of large normal ATXN2 alleles as the source for new mutations being involved in neurodegenerative pathologies associated with CAG expansions. The de novo mutations expanded from ALS/SCA2 non-risk alleles as proven by meta-analysis method. The ALS risk was associated with SCA2 alleles as well as with intermediate CAG lengths in the ATXN2. Higher risk for ALS was associated with pathogenic CAG repeat as revealed by meta-analysis. PMID:23936447

  10. Molecular genetic analysis in mild hyperhomocysteinemia: A common mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene is a genetic risk factor for cardiovascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Stevens, E.M.B.

    1996-01-01

    Mild hyperhomocysteinemia is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Genetic aberrations in the cystathionine P-synthase (CBS) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genes may account for reduced enzyme activities and elevated plasma homocysteine levels. In 15 unrelated Dutch patients with homozygous CBS deficiency, we observed the 833T{yields}C (1278T) mutation in 50% of the alleles. Very recently, we identified a common mutation (677C{yields}T; A{yields}V) in the MTHFR gene, which, in homozygous state, is responsible for the thermolabile phenotype and which is associated with decreased specific MTHFR activity and elevated homocysteine levels. We screened 60 cardiovascular patients and 111 controls for these two mutations, to determine whether these mutations are risk factors for premature cardiovascular disease. Heterozygosity for the 833T{yields}C mutation in the CBS gene was observed in one individual of the control group but was absent in patients with premature cardiovascular disease. Homozygosity for the 677C-{yields}T mutation in the MTHFR gene was found in 9 (15%) of 60 cardiovascular patients and in only 6 ({approximately}5%) of 111 control individuals (odds ratio 3.1 [95% confidence interval 1.0-9.21]). Because of both the high prevalence of the 833T-{yields}C mutation among homozygotes for CBS deficiency and its absence in 60 cardiovascular patients, we may conclude that heterozygosity for CBS deficiency does not appear to be involved in premature cardiovascular disease. However, a frequent homozygous mutation in the MTHFR gene is associated with a threefold increase in risk for premature cardiovascular disease. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. PDCD10 Gene Mutations in Multiple Cerebral Cavernous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Cigoli, Maria Sole; Avemaria, Francesca; De Benedetti, Stefano; Gesu, Giovanni P.; Accorsi, Lucio Giordano; Parmigiani, Stefano; Corona, Maria Franca; Capra, Valeria; Mosca, Andrea; Giovannini, Simona; Notturno, Francesca; Ciccocioppo, Fausta; Volpi, Lilia; Estienne, Margherita; De Michele, Giuseppe; Antenora, Antonella; Bilo, Leda; Tavoni, Antonietta; Zamponi, Nelia; Alfei, Enrico; Baranello, Giovanni; Riva, Daria; Penco, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular abnormalities that may cause seizures, intracerebral haemorrhages, and focal neurological deficits. Familial form shows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with incomplete penetrance and variable clinical expression. Three genes have been identified causing familial CCM: KRIT1/CCM1, MGC4607/CCM2, and PDCD10/CCM3. Aim of this study is to report additional PDCD10/CCM3 families poorly described so far which account for 10-15% of hereditary cerebral cavernous malformations. Our group investigated 87 consecutive Italian affected individuals (i.e. positive Magnetic Resonance Imaging) with multiple/familial CCM through direct sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) analysis. We identified mutations in over 97.7% of cases, and PDCD10/CCM3 accounts for 13.1%. PDCD10/CCM3 molecular screening revealed four already known mutations and four novel ones. The mutated patients show an earlier onset of clinical manifestations as compared to CCM1/CCM2 mutated patients. The study of further families carrying mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 may help define a possible correlation between genotype and phenotype; an accurate clinical follow up of the subjects would help define more precisely whether mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 lead to a characteristic phenotype. PMID:25354366

  12. Analysis of gene mutations involved in chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum parasites isolated from patients in the southwest of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Bin Dajem, Saad M.; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Chloroquine has been the drug of choice for the treatment of malaria for many decades. We aimed to examine the molecular basis of chloroquine resistance among Plasmodium falciparum isolates from the southwestern region of Saudi Arabia by analyzing the K76T and N86Y mutations in the PfCRT and PfMDR1 genes, respectively. PATIENTS AND METHODS: P falciparum-infected blood spot samples (n=121) were collected on filter papers. DNA was extracted and fragments from the above genes were amplified using nested PCR. The amplicons were digested by ApoI enzyme and sequenced. RESULTS: Of the 121 samples, 95 and 112 samples could be amplified for PfCRT K76T and PfMDR1 N86Y mutations, respectively. All of the samples amplified for the PfCRT K76T mutation were undigestible by ApoI, suggesting the presence of the K76T mutation. For the PfMDR1 N86Y mutation, 65/109 samples (59.6%) were digestible when treated with ApoI in a pattern, suggestive of the presence of the investigated wild allele (N86). However, 44/109 samples (40.4%) were digestible by ApoI, suggesting the presence of the mutated allele (Y) at position 86. DNA sequencing confirmed these results. CONCLUSION: Surprisingly, all isolates exhibited the mutated allele at codon 76 (K76T) of PfCRT. However, the mutated mutant allele at codon 86 (N86Y) of PfMDR1 was found in 40.4% of the samples studied. To our knowledge, this is the first study that has investigated the existence of the mutation in the PfMDR1 gene in the country. This study will contribute to the development of new strategies for therapeutic intervention against malaria in Saudi Arabia. PMID:20427933

  13. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene produce autosomal recessive ocular albinism

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.A.; Summers, C.G.; Oetting, W.S.

    1994-09-01

    Albinism has historically been divided into ocular (OA) and oculocutaneous (OCA) types based on the presence or absence of clinically apparent skin and hair involvement in an individual with the ocular features of albinism. The major genes for OCA include the tyrosinase gene in OCA1 and the P gene in OCA2. X-linked and autosomal recessive OA have been described and the responsible genes have not been identified. We now present six Caucasian individuals who have the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA but who have OCA1 as shown by the presence of mutations of the tyrosinase. They had white or very light hair and white skin at birth, and cutaneous pigment developed in the first decade of life. At ages ranging from 1.5-23 years, hair color was dark blond to light brown. The skin had generalized pigment and well developed tan was present on the exposed arm and face skin of four. Iris pigment was present and iris translucency varied. Molecular analysis of the tyrosinase gene, using PCR amplification and direct di-deoxy sequencing showed the following mutations: E398Z/E398Q, P406S/g346a, R402E/T373K, ?/D383N, and H211N/T373K. The homozygous individual was not from a known consanguineous mating. T373K is the most common tyrosinase gene mutation in our laboratory. Three of these mutations are associated with a total loss of tyrosinase activity (g346a splice-site, T373K, and D383N), while four are associated with residual enzyme activity (H211N, R402E, E398Q, and P406S). These studies show that mutations of the tyrosinase gene can produce the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA in an individual who has normal amounts of cutaneous pigment and the ability to tan after birth. This extends the phenotypic range of OCA1 to normal cutaneous pigment after early childhood, and suggest that mutations of the tyrosinase gene account for a significant number of individuals with autosomal recessive OA.

  14. Integrated Microfluidic Card with TaqMan Probes and High-Resolution Melt Analysis To Detect Tuberculosis Drug Resistance Mutations across 10 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pholwat, Suporn; Liu, Jie; Stroup, Suzanne; Gratz, Jean; Banu, Sayera; Rahman, S. M. Mazidur; Ferdous, Sara Sabrina; Foongladda, Suporn; Boonlert, Duangjai; Ogarkov, Oleg; Zhdanova, Svetlana; Kibiki, Gibson; Heysell, Scott

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genotypic methods for drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are desirable to speed the diagnosis and proper therapy of tuberculosis (TB). However, the numbers of genes and polymorphisms implicated in resistance have proliferated, challenging diagnostic design. We developed a microfluidic TaqMan array card (TAC) that utilizes both sequence-specific probes and high-resolution melt analysis (HRM), providing two layers of detection of mutations. Twenty-seven primer pairs and 40 probes were designed to interrogate 3,200 base pairs of critical regions of the inhA, katG, rpoB, embB, rpsL, rrs, eis, gyrA, gyrB, and pncA genes. The method was evaluated on 230 clinical M. tuberculosis isolates from around the world, and it yielded 96.1% accuracy (2,431/2,530) in comparison to that of Sanger sequencing and 87% accuracy in comparison to that of the slow culture-based susceptibility testing. This TAC-HRM method integrates assays for 10 genes to yield fast, comprehensive, and accurate drug susceptibility results for the 9 major antibiotics used to treat TB and could be deployed to improve treatment outcomes. PMID:25714709

  15. [Clinical analysis and autoimmune regulator gene mutation of autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type I in a family: a report of one case].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong-Xiang; He, Ya-Fei; Li, Xia-Lian

    2016-02-01

    The clinical data of one patient with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type I were collected. PCR-DNA direct bidirectional sequencing was applied for mutation screening of 14 exons in autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene in the patient and her parents. A total of 50 unrelated healthy controls were selected and tested. The bioinformatic methods were used to predict the possible impact of the mutations on the structure and function of the AIRE protein. The results of sequencing showed that heterozygous mutation c.622G>T (p.G208W) in exon 5 of the AIRE gene was detected in the patient and was a novel mutation, which had not been reported in the HGMD database and latest articles. This mutation was not detected in the 50 unrelated normal controls. The novel mutation of c.622G>T (p.G208W) in AIRE gene might play an important role in the pathogenesis of this case of autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type I. PMID:26903062

  16. Analysis of SDHD promoter mutations in various types of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Simone L.; Horn, Susanne; Murali, Rajmohan; Möller, Inga; Sucker, Antje; Sondermann, Wiebke; Stiller, Mathias; Schilling, Bastian; Livingstone, Elisabeth; Zimmer, Lisa; Reis, Henning; Metz, Claudia H.; Zeschnigk, Michael; Paschen, Annette; Steuhl, Klaus-Peter; Schadendorf, Dirk; Westekemper, Henrike; Griewank, Klaus G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Recently, recurrent mutations in regulatory DNA regions, such as promoter mutations in the TERT gene were identified in melanoma. Subsequently, Weinhold et al. reported SDHD promoter mutations occurring in 10% of melanomas and being associated with a lower overall survival rate. Our study analyzes the mutation rate and clinico-pathologic associations of SDHD promoter mutations in a large cohort of different melanoma subtypes. Methods 451 melanoma samples (incl. 223 non-acral cutaneous, 38 acral, 33 mucosal, 43 occult, 43 conjunctival and 51 uveal melanoma) were analyzed for the presence of SDHD promoter mutations by Sanger-sequencing. Statistical analysis was performed to screen for potential correlations of SDHD promoter mutation status with various clinico-pathologic criteria. Results The SDHD promoter was successfully sequenced in 451 tumor samples. ETS binding site changing SDHD promoter mutations were identified in 16 (4%) samples, of which 5 mutations had not been described previously. Additionally, 5 point mutations not located in ETS binding elements were identified. Mutations in UV-exposed tumors were frequently C>T. One germline C>A SDHD promoter mutation was identified. No statistically significant associations between SDHD promoter mutation status and various clinico-pathologic variables or overall patient survival were observed. Conclusions Melanomas harbor recurrent SDHD promoter mutations, which occur primarily as C>T alterations in UV-exposed melanomas. In contrast to the initial report and promoter mutations in the TERT gene, our analysis suggests that SDHD promoter mutations are a relatively rare event in melanoma (4% of tumors) of unclear clinical and prognostic relevance. PMID:26327518

  17. Mutation analysis of the MS4A and TREM gene clusters in a case-control Alzheimer's disease data set.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Mahdi; Sato, Christine; Kakhki, Erfan Ghani; Gibbs, J Raphael; Traynor, Bryan; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Rogaeva, Ekaterina

    2016-06-01

    Genome wide association studies have identified an association between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and common polymorphisms in the MS4A and TREM loci (each containing a cluster of homologous genes) and should be thoroughly investigated for the presence of potentially functional variations. We conducted a mutation analysis by next generation sequencing of 15 genes within the MS4A and TREM gene clusters; and catalogued rare coding variants detected in a North American data set of 210 cases and 233 controls. Investigation of the 5 homologues genes in the TREM locus revealed potentially damaging rare variants in TREM2, TREML1, TREML2, and TREML4. In agreement with a previous report, we observed a significant enrichment of TREM2-damaging missense substitutions in cases (N = 9; 4.2%) compared with controls (N=2; 0.9%; p = 0.010; after Yates' correction p = 0.022). Among known AD-associated TREM2 substitutions, we detected p.R47H, p.D87N, and p.H157Y affecting both TREM2 isoforms (NM_018965 and NM_001271821). In addition, we identified 2 cases with novel TREM2 variants (p.L205P and p.G219C), which mapped only to the isoform NM_001271821 at the C-terminus. Investigation of the MS4A gene cluster revealed that potentially damaging missense substitutions and loss-of-function variants were twice as frequent in controls (N = 19; 8.2%) than cases (N = 9; 4.3%), generating a nominally significant result (p = 0.047; after Yates' correction p = 0.07). Validation of our observation in large data sets might address the question whether such variants could contribute to the protective effect of the minor alleles of Genome wide association study-significant single nucleotide polymorphisms at the MS4A locus. PMID:27084067

  18. Analysis of the T354P mutation of the sodium/iodide cotransporter gene in children with congenital hypothyroidism due to dyshormonogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Miranzadeh-Mahabadi, Hajar; Emadi-Baygi, Modjtaba; Nikpour, Parvaneh; Mostofizade, Neda; Hovsepian, Silva; Hashemipour, Mahin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) due to the thyroid dyshormonogenesis is more prevalent in Iran in comparison to other countries. Sodium iodide symporter (NIS) is one of the plasma membrane glycoproteins that is located on the basolateral side of thyroid follicular cells and mediates active I− trapping into these cells. Playing a prominent role in thyroid hormone synthesis, NIS gene mutations can be a cause of permanent CH with the etiology of dyshormonogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of T354P mutation of the NIS gene, in a group of children affected with permanent CH in Isfahan. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients with the etiology of dyshormonogenesis, and 35 healthy children, collected between 2002 and 2011 in Isfahan Endocrine and Metabolism Research Center, were examined for T354P mutation of the NIS gene by direct polymerase chain reaction-sequencing method. Results: No T354P mutation was detected in any of the studied children. Conclusions: More subjects with confirmed iodide transport defects should be screened for detecting the frequency of different reported NIS gene mutations in our population. PMID:27169104

  19. Mutation Analysis in Chinese Patients with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Qiulian; Liang, Desheng; Liu, Jing; Xue, Jinjie

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a dominant multisystem developmental disorder and related to mutations of the NIPBL, SMC1A, and SMC3 genes. So far, there has been no report of a mutation analysis in Chinese patients with CdLS, while 12 cases have been clinically described. In the present study, we tried to search for pathogenic mutations of the NIPBL, SMC1A, and SMC3 genes in four patients with CdLS from four unrelated Chinese families. Results: The mutational analysis of the NIPBL, SMC1A, and SMC3 genes by direct sequencing revealed a heterozygous splice-site mutation c.4321G>T(p.V1441L) at exon 20 of NIPBL in proband 2 and a novel heterozygous splice-site mutation c.6589+5G>C at intron 38 of NIPBL in proband 3, which was showed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to generate both the full-length and an alternatively spliced transcript with an exon 38 deletion. Conclusions: This is the first report of the mutation analysis of NIPBL in China and our findings both expand the mutation spectrum of NIPBL and provide data for further understanding of the diverse and variable effects of NIPBL mutations. PMID:22857006

  20. Important role of indels in somatic mutations of human cancer genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer is clonal proliferation that arises owing to mutations in a subset of genes that confer growth advantage. More and more cancer related genes are found to have accumulated somatic mutations. However, little has been reported about mutational patterns of insertions/deletions (indels) in these genes. Results We analyzed indels' abundance and distribution, the relative ratio between indels and somatic base substitutions and the association between those two forms of mutations in a large number of somatic mutations in the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer database. We found a strong correlation between indels and base substitutions in cancer-related genes and showed that they tend to concentrate at the same locus in the coding sequences within the same samples. More importantly, a much higher proportion of indels were observed in somatic mutations, as compared to meiotic ones. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrated a great diversity of indels at some loci of cancer-related genes. Particularly in the genes with abundant mutations, the proportion of 3n indels in oncogenes is 7.9 times higher than that in tumor suppressor genes. Conclusions There are three distinct patterns of indel distribution in somatic mutations: high proportion, great abundance and non-random distribution. Because of the great influence of indels on gene function (e.g., the effect of frameshift mutation), these patterns indicate that indels are frequently under positive selection and can often be the 'driver mutations' in oncogenesis. Such driver forces can better explain why much less frameshift mutations are in oncogenes while much more in tumor suppressor genes, because of their different function in oncogenesis. These findings contribute to our understanding of mutational patterns and the relationship between indels and cancer. PMID:20807447

  1. Shared and unique mutational gene co-occurrences in cancers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junqi; Zhao, Di; Fan, Ruitai

    2015-10-01

    Cancers are often associated with mutations in multiple genes; thus, studying the distributions of genes that harbor cancer-promoting mutations in cancer samples and their co-occurrences could provide insights into cancer diagnostics and treatment. Using data from the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC), we found that mutated genes in cancer samples followed a power-law distribution. For instance, a few genes were mutated in a large number of samples (designated as high-frequent genes), while a large number of genes were only mutated in a few samples. This power-law distribution can be found in samples of all cancer types as well as individual cancers. In samples where two or more mutated genes are found, the high-frequent genes, i.e., those that were frequently mutated, often did not co-occur with other genes, while the other genes often tended to co-occur. Co-occurrences of mutated genes were often unique to a certain cancer; however, some co-occurrences were shared by multiple cancer types. Our results revealed distinct patterns of high-frequent genes and those that were less-frequently mutated in the cancer samples in co-occurring and anti-co-occurring networks. Our results indicated that distinct treatment strategies should be adopted for cancer patients with known high-frequent gene mutations and those without. The latter might be better treated with a combination of drugs targeting multiple genes. Our results also suggested that possible cross-cancer treatments, i.e., the use of the same drug combinations, may treat cancers of different histological origins. PMID:26315265

  2. The role of objective facial analysis using FDNA in making diagnoses following whole exome analysis. Report of two patients with mutations in the BAF complex genes.

    PubMed

    Gripp, Karen W; Baker, Laura; Telegrafi, Aida; Monaghan, Kristin G

    2016-07-01

    The genetic basis of numerous intellectual disability (ID) syndromes has recently been identified by applying exome analysis on a research or clinical basis. There is significant clinical overlap of biologically related syndromes, as exemplified by Nicolaides-Baraitser (NCBRS) and Coffin-Siris (CSS) syndrome. Both result from mutations affecting the BAF (mSWI/SNF) complex and belong to the growing category of BAFopathies. In addition to the notable clinical overlap between these BAFopathies, heterogeneity exists for patients clinically diagnosed with one of these conditions. We report two teenagers with ID whose molecular diagnosis of a SMARC2A or ARID1B mutation, respectively, was established through clinical exome analysis. Interestingly, using only the information provided in a single clinically obtained facial photograph from each patient, the facial dysmorphology analysis detected similarities to facial patterns associated with NCBRS as the first suggestion for both individuals, followed by CSS as the second highest ranked in the individual with the ARID1B mutation. Had this information been available to the laboratory performing the exome analysis, it could have been utilized during the variant analysis and reporting process, in conjunction with the written summary provided with each test requisition. While the available massive parallel sequencing technology, variant calling and variant interpretation are constantly evolving, clinical information remains critical for this diagnostic process. When trio analysis is not feasible, additional diagnostic tools may become particularly valuable. Facial dysmorphology analysis data may supplement the clinical phenotype summary and provide data independent of the clinician's personal experience and bias. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27112773

  3. Rapid and Reliable Detection of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) Gene Mutations in Han Chinese Using High-Resolution Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jing-bin; Xu, Hong-ping; Xiong, Can; Ren, Zhao-rui; Tian, Guo-li; Zeng, Fanyi; Huang, Shu-zhen

    2010-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, an X-linked inherited disease, is one of the most common enzymopathies and affects over 400 million people worldwide. In China at least 21 distinct point mutations have been identified so far. In this study high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis was used to screen for G6PD mutations in 260 unrelated Han Chinese individuals, and the rapidity and reliability of this method was investigated. The mutants were readily differentiated by using HRM analysis, which produced distinct melting curves for each tested mutation. Interestingly, G1388A and G1376T, the two most common variants accounting for 50% to 60% of G6PD deficiency mutations in the Chinese population, could be differentiated in a single reaction. Further, two G6PD mutations not previously reported in the Chinese population were identified in this study. One of these mutations, designated “G6PD Jiangxi G1340T,” involved a G1340T substitution in exon 11, predicting a Gly447Val change in the protein. The other mutation involved a C406T substitution in exon 5. The frequencies of the common polymorphism site C1311T/IVS (intervening sequence) XI t93c between patients with G6PD and healthy volunteers were not significantly different. Thus, HRM analysis will be a useful alternative for screening G6PD mutations. PMID:20203002

  4. Rapid and reliable detection of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) gene mutations in Han Chinese using high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing-bin; Xu, Hong-ping; Xiong, Can; Ren, Zhao-rui; Tian, Guo-li; Zeng, Fanyi; Huang, Shu-zhen

    2010-05-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, an X-linked inherited disease, is one of the most common enzymopathies and affects over 400 million people worldwide. In China at least 21 distinct point mutations have been identified so far. In this study high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis was used to screen for G6PD mutations in 260 unrelated Han Chinese individuals, and the rapidity and reliability of this method was investigated. The mutants were readily differentiated by using HRM analysis, which produced distinct melting curves for each tested mutation. Interestingly, G1388A and G1376T, the two most common variants accounting for 50% to 60% of G6PD deficiency mutations in the Chinese population, could be differentiated in a single reaction. Further, two G6PD mutations not previously reported in the Chinese population were identified in this study. One of these mutations, designated "G6PD Jiangxi G1340T," involved a G1340T substitution in exon 11, predicting a Gly447Val change in the protein. The other mutation involved a C406T substitution in exon 5. The frequencies of the common polymorphism site C1311T/IVS (intervening sequence) XI t93c between patients with G6PD and healthy volunteers were not significantly different. Thus, HRM analysis will be a useful alternative for screening G6PD mutations. PMID:20203002

  5. Organizational and mutational analysis of a complete FR-008/candicidin gene cluster encoding a structurally related polyene complex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi; Huang, Xi; Zhou, Xiufen; Bai, Linquan; He, Jing; Jeong, Ki Jun; Lee, Sang Yup; Deng, Zixin

    2003-11-01

    The complete gene cluster for biosynthesis of a polyene complex, FR-008, spans 137.2 kb of the genome of Streptomyces sp. FR-008 consisting of six genes for a modular PKS and 15 additional genes. The extensive similarity to the partially characterized candicidin gene cluster in Streptomyces griseus IMRU3570, especially for genes involved in mycosamine biosynthesis, prompted us to compare the compounds produced by Streptomyces sp. FR-008 and Streptomyces griseus IMRU3570, and we found that FR-008 and candicidin complex are identical. A model for biosynthesis of a set of four structurally related FR-008/candicidin compounds was proposed. Deletion of the putative regulatory genes abolished antibiotic production, while disruption of putative glycosyltransferase and GDP-ketosugar aminotransferase functionalities led to the productions of a set of nonmycosaminated aglycones and a novel polyene complex with attachment of altered sugar moiety, respectively. PMID:14652074

  6. Mutations in the pericentrin (PCNT) gene cause primordial dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Anita; Thiel, Christian T; Schindler, Detlev; Wick, Ursula; Crow, Yanick J; Ekici, Arif B; van Essen, Anthonie J; Goecke, Timm O; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Chrzanowska, Krystyna H; Zweier, Christiane; Brunner, Han G; Becker, Kristin; Curry, Cynthia J; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Devriendt, Koenraad; Dörfler, Arnd; Kinning, Esther; Megarbane, André; Meinecke, Peter; Semple, Robert K; Spranger, Stephanie; Toutain, Annick; Trembath, Richard C; Voss, Egbert; Wilson, Louise; Hennekam, Raoul; de Zegher, Francis; Dörr, Helmuth-Günther; Reis, André

    2008-02-01

    Fundamental processes influencing human growth can be revealed by studying extreme short stature. Using genetic linkage analysis, we find that biallelic loss-of-function mutations in the centrosomal pericentrin (PCNT) gene on chromosome 21q22.3 cause microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) in 25 patients. Adults with this rare inherited condition have an average height of 100 centimeters and a brain size comparable to that of a 3-month-old baby, but are of near-normal intelligence. Absence of PCNT results in disorganized mitotic spindles and missegregation of chromosomes. Mutations in related genes are known to cause primary microcephaly (MCPH1, CDK5RAP2, ASPM, and CENPJ). PMID:18174396

  7. Analysis of DNA gyrA Gene Mutation in Clinical and Environmental Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Isolates of Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria Using Molecular Methods

    PubMed Central

    Nasr Esfahani, Bahram; Zarkesh Esfahani, Fatemeh Sadat; Bahador, Nima; Moghim, Sharareh; Radaei, Tooba; Rezaei Yazdi, Hadi; Ghasemian Safaei, Hajiyeh; Fazeli, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background During the past several years, nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been reported as some of the most important agents of infection in immunocompromised patients. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the ciprofloxacin susceptibility of clinical and environmental NTM species isolated from Isfahan province, Iran, using the agar dilution method, and to perform an analysis of gyrA gene-related ciprofloxacin resistance. Materials and Methods A total of 41 clinical and environmental isolates of NTM were identified by conventional and multiplex PCR techniques. The isolates were separated out of water, blood, abscess, and bronchial samples. The susceptibility of the isolates to 1 µg/mL, 2 µg/mL and 4 µg/mL of ciprofloxacin concentrations was determined by the agar dilution method according to CLSI guidelines. A 120-bp area of the gyrA gene was amplified, and PCR-SSCP templates were defined using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The 120-bp of gyrA amplicons with different PCR-SSCP patterns were sequenced. Results The frequency of the identified isolates was as follows: Mycobacterium fortuitum, 27 cases; M. gordonae, 10 cases; M. smegmatis, one case; M. conceptionense, one case; and M. abscessus, two cases. All isolates except for M. abscessus were sensitive to all three concentrations of ciprofloxacin. The PCR-SSCP pattern of the gyrA gene of resistant M. abscessus isolates showed four different bands. The gyrA sequencing of resistant M. abscessus isolates showed 12 alterations in nucleotides compared to the M. abscessus ATCC 19977 resistant strain; however, the amino acid sequences were similar. Conclusions This study demonstrated the specificity and sensitivity of the PCR-SSCP method for finding mutations in the gyrA gene. Due to the sensitivity of most isolates to ciprofloxacin, this antibiotic should be considered an appropriate drug for the treatment of related diseases. PMID:27217921

  8. Analysis of cystic fibrosis gene mutations in children with cystic fibrosis and in 964 infertile couples within the region of Basilicata, Italy: a research study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive genetic disease in the Caucasian population. Extending knowledge about the molecular pathology on the one hand allows better delineation of the mutations in the CFTR gene and the other to dramatically increase the predictive power of molecular testing. Methods This study reports the results of a molecular screening of cystic fibrosis using DNA samples of patients enrolled from January 2009 to December 2013. Patients were referred to our laboratory for cystic fibrosis screening for infertile couples. In addition, we identified the gene mutations present in 76 patients affected by cystic fibrosis in the pediatric population of Basilicata. Results In the 964 infertile couples examined, 132 subjects (69 women and 63 men) resulted heterozygous for one of the CFTR mutations, with a recurrence of carriers of 6.85%. The recurrence of carriers in infertile couples is significantly higher from the hypothetical value of the general population (4%). Conclusions This study shows that in the Basilicata region of Italy the CFTR phenotype is caused by a small number of mutations. Our aim is to develop a kit able to detect not less than 96% of CTFR gene mutations so that the relative risk for screened couples is superimposable with respect to the general population. PMID:25304080

  9. Analysis of p.V37I compound heterozygous mutations in the GJB2 gene in Chinese infants and young children.

    PubMed

    Du, Yating; Huang, Lihui; Cheng, Xiaohua; Zhao, Liping; Ruan, Yu; Ni, Tingting

    2016-07-19

    The p.V37I (c.109G>A) mutation in the GJB2 gene is the common frequent cause of congenital deafness; however, its pathogenicity is debated. The present study investigated the prevalence of p.V37I in Chinese infants and young children and associated clinical characteristics. The subjects of the present study were screened for mutations in GJB2 (235delC, 299delAT, 176dell6, 35delG), SLC26A4 (IVS7-2A>G, 2168A>G), GJB3 (538C>T), and in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene (1555A>G, 1494C>T). Subjects with p.V37I underwent an audiological evaluation. GJB2 exon sequencing revealed that 20 subjects had p.V37I compound heterozygous mutations, one of whom had a family history; the mutations included c.235delC/p.V37I (n = 12), c.299AT/p.V37I (n = 7), and c.176del16/p.V37I (n = 1). Of the 20 subjects, 12 were referred for Universal Newborn Hearing Screening (UNHS). Nine of the 20 subjects had mild hearing loss in the better ear and 5 had moderate hearing loss in the better ear while 4 had normal hearing. Among subjects with the c.235delC/p.V37I mutation, 5 had mild hearing loss and 2 had moderate hearing loss while 3 had normal hearing. Among subjects with the c.299AT/p.V37I mutation, 3 had mld hearing loss and 3 had moderate hearing loss while 1 had normal hearing. One subject with the c.176del16/p.V37I mutation had mild hearing loss. Few studies have reported on the clinical characteristics of Chinese infants with p.V37I compound heterozygous mutations identified via screening for deafness genes and GJB2 sequencing. The c.235delC/p.V37I mutation was the most prevalent mutation found in subjects. The degree of hearing loss associated with p.V37I compound heterozygous mutations was mainly mild to moderate. PMID:27350192

  10. Malignant pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas harbor mutations in transport and cell adhesion genes.

    PubMed

    Wilzén, Annica; Rehammar, Anna; Muth, Andreas; Nilsson, Ola; Tešan Tomić, Tajana; Wängberg, Bo; Kristiansson, Erik; Abel, Frida

    2016-05-01

    One out of ten patients with pheochromocytoma (PCC) and paraganglioma (PGL) develop malignant disease. Today there are no reliable pathological methods to predict malignancy at the time of diagnosis. Tumors harboring mutations in the succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB) gene often metastasize but the sequential genetic events resulting in malignant progression are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to identify somatic mutations that contribute to the malignant transformation of PCC/PGL. We performed pair-wise (tumor-normal) whole-exome sequencing to analyze the somatic mutational landscape in five malignant and four benign primary PCC/sympathetic PGL (sPGL), including two biological replicates from each specimen. In total, 225 unique somatic mutations were identified in 215 genes, with an average mutation rate of 0.54 mutations/megabase. Malignant tumors had a significantly higher number of mutations compared to benign tumors (p < 0.001). Three novel genes were identified as recurrently mutated; MYCN, MYO5B and VCL, and mutations in these genes were exclusively found in malignant sPGL tumors. Mutations in the MYO5B gene could be verified in two publicly available data sets. A gene ontology analysis of mutated genes showed enrichment of cellular functions related to cytoskeletal protein binding, myosin complex and motor activity, many of which had functions in Rab and Rac/Rho GTPase pathways. In conclusion, we have identified recurrent mutations in genes related to intracellular transport and cell adhesion, and we have confirmed MYO5B to be recurrently mutated in PCC/PGL cases with malignant potential. Our study suggests that deregulated Rab and Rac/Rho pathways may be important in PCC/PGL tumorigenesis. PMID:26650627

  11. Heterogeneous AVPR2 gene mutations in congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    SciTech Connect

    Wildin, R.S.; Antush, M.J.; Bennett, R.L.; Schoof, J.M.; Scott, C.R. )

    1994-08-01

    Mutations in the AVPR2 gene encoding the receptor for arginine vasopressin in the kidney (V2 ADHR) have been reported in patients with congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, a predominantly X-linked disorder of water homeostasis. The authors have used restriction-enzyme analysis and direct DNA sequencing of genomic PCR product to evaluate the AVPR2 gene in 11 unrelated affected males. Each patient has a different DNA sequence variation, and only one matches a previously reported mutation. Cosegregation of the variations with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was demonstrated for two families, and a de novo mutation was accomplished in one family. All the variations predict frameshifts, truncations, or nonconservative amino acid substitutions in evolutionarily conserved positions in the V2 ADHR and related receptors. Of interest, a 28-bp deletion is found in one patient, while another, unrelated patient has a tandem duplication of the same 28-bp segment, suggesting that both resulted from the same unusual unequal crossing-over mechanism facilitated by 9-mer direct sequence repeats. Since the V2 ADHR is a member of the seven-transmembrane-domain, G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily, the loss-of-function mutations from this study and others provide important clues to the structure-function relationship of this and related receptors. 55 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Mutations in COL1A1 Gene Change Dentin Nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaohong; Liu, Zhenxia; Gan, Yunna; Xia, Dan; Li, Qiang; Li, Yanling; Yang, Jiaji; Gao, Shan; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-04-01

    Although many studies have attempted to associate specific gene mutations with dentin phenotypic severity, it remains unknown how the mutations in COL1A1 gene influence the mechanical behavior of dentin collagen and matrix. Here, we reported one osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) pedigree caused by two new inserting mutations in exon 5 of COL1A1 (NM_000088.3:c.440_441insT;c.441_442insA), which resulted in the unstable expression of COL1A1 mRNA and half quantity of procollagen production. We investigated the morphological and mechanical features of proband's dentin using atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope. Increased D-periodic spacing, variably enlarged collagen fibrils coating with fewer minerals were found in the mutated collagen. AFM analysis demonstrated rougher dentin surface and sparsely decreased Young's modulus in proband's dentin. We believe that our findings provide new insights into the genetic-/nano- mechanisms of dentin diseases, and may well explain OI dentin features with reduced mechanical strength and a lower crosslinked density. Anat Rec, 299:511-519, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26694865

  13. Mutations in the rpoB gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that interfere with PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for rifampin susceptibility testing.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, B J; Kim, S Y; Park, B H; Lyu, M A; Park, I K; Bai, G H; Kim, S J; Cha, C Y; Kook, Y H

    1997-01-01

    Rifampin susceptibility of 32 rifampin-resistant and 26 rifampin-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains was analyzed by PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and DNA sequencing within the 157-bp region of the rpoB gene (Ala500 to Val550). Two false-positive PCR-SSCP results were observed among the susceptible strains due to the silent mutation Gln513 (CAA-->CAG) and the deletion mutation Thr508 and Ser509. Another silent mutation [Leu511 (CTG-->CTA)], combined with the mutation Ser531-->Leu, was observed in a resistant strain. These results suggest that to rule out false-positive PCR-SSCP results, sequencing of the target DNA is required. PMID:9003625

  14. Identification of BRCA1/2 Founder Mutations in Southern Chinese Breast Cancer Patients Using Gene Sequencing and High Resolution DNA Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Ava; Ng, Enders Kai On; Wong, Chris Lei Po; Law, Fian Bic Fai; Au, Tommy; Wong, Hong Nei; Kurian, Allison W.; West, Dee W.; Ford, James M.; Ma, Edmond Siu Kwan

    2012-01-01

    Background Ethnic variations in breast cancer epidemiology and genetics have necessitated investigation of the spectra of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in different populations. Knowledge of BRCA mutations in Chinese populations is still largely unknown. We conducted a multi-center study to characterize the spectra of BRCA mutations in Chinese breast and ovarian cancer patients from Southern China. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 651 clinically high-risk breast and/or ovarian cancer patients were recruited from the Hong Kong Hereditary Breast Cancer Family Registry from 2007 to 2011. Comprehensive BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation screening was performed using bi-directional sequencing of all coding exons of BRCA1 and BRCA2. Sequencing results were confirmed by in-house developed full high resolution DNA melting (HRM) analysis. Among the 451 probands analyzed, 69 (15.3%) deleterious BRCA mutations were identified, comprising 29 in BRCA1 and 40 in BRCA2. The four recurrent BRCA1 mutations (c.470_471delCT, c.3342_3345delAGAA, c.5406+1_5406+3delGTA and c.981_982delAT) accounted for 34.5% (10/29) of all BRCA1 mutations in this cohort. The four recurrent BRCA2 mutations (c.2808_2811delACAA, c.3109C>T, c.7436_7805del370 and c.9097_9098insA) accounted for 40% (16/40) of all BRCA2 mutations. Haplotype analysis was performed to confirm 1 BRCA1 and 3 BRCA2 mutations are putative founder mutations. Rapid HRM mutation screening for a panel of the founder mutations were developed and validated. Conclusion In this study, our findings suggest that BRCA mutations account for a substantial proportion of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer in Southern Chinese population. Knowing the spectrum and frequency of the founder mutations in this population will assist in the development of a cost-effective rapid screening assay, which in turn facilitates genetic counseling and testing for the purpose of cancer risk assessment. PMID:22970155

  15. Germ-line mutations of the APC gene in 53 familial adenomatous polyposis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Y; Ando, H; Nagase, H; Nishisho, I; Horii, A; Miki, Y; Mori, T; Utsunomiya, J; Baba, S; Petersen, G

    1992-01-01

    We searched for germ-line mutations of the APC gene in 79 unrelated patients with familial adenomatous polyposis using a ribonuclease protection analysis coupled with polymerase chain reaction amplifications of genomic DNA. Mutations were found in 53 patients (67%); 28 of the mutations were small deletions and 2 were 1- to 2-base-pair insertions; 19 were point mutations resulting in stop codons and only 4 were missense point mutations. Thus, 92% of the mutations were predicted to result in truncations of the APC protein. More than two-thirds (68%) of the mutations were clustered in the 5' half of the last exon, and nearly two-fifths of the total mutations occurred at one of five positions. This information has significant implications for understanding the role of APC mutation in inherited forms of colorectal neoplasia and for designing effective methods for genetic counseling and presymptomatic diagnosis. Images PMID:1316610

  16. Analysis of differential β variable region of T cell receptor expression and NAV3/TNFRSF1B gene mutation in mycosis fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Ren, Jingyu; Guo, Shuping; Bai, Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to analyze the predominant expression of the variable region of T cell receptor (TRBV) and determine whether NAV3 or TNFRSF1B gene mutation involved in the pathogenesis of MF. Results TRBV5-7 expression increased from the normal, early-stage to advanced-stage lesion in MF patient. By contrast, TRBV2 decreased with the lesion developed. We found no mutations of NAV3 or TNFRSF1B in the lesions from this study. Materials and Methods Real-time PCR were used to screen differential expression of TRBV in different lesions. Mutational analyses were used to validate genetic alterations in the skin lesions. Conclusions The identification of TRBV gene expression differences between normal and different stages of MF lesions provide insight into promising new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. None of the reported genetic abnormalities suggests complexity of progress from a primary cytogenetic event to an advanced stage with poor prognosis in MF. PMID:26918607

  17. PCR-SSCP analysis of the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1): Detection of a point mutation in five patients

    SciTech Connect

    Dunnil, M.G.S.; Richards, A.J.; Pope, F.M.

    1994-09-01

    Type VII collagen is the major component of anchoring fibrils, structures which extend below the lamina densa of the epidermal basement membrane in stratified squamous epithelia. Genetic linkage studies and two mutation reports have implicated the type VII collagen gene, COL7A1, in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB), an inherited disorder characterized by blistering and scarring of the skin and mucous membranes after minor trauma. We have used PCR-SSCP of genomic DNA to screen exons of COL7A1 for mutations in recessive DEB patients. Band mobility shifts were detected in exon FN4-B in five patients. Sequencing revealed a C to T transition changing a codon for arginine into a stop codon, homozygous in two related patients and heterozygous in the others. We are currently searching for a second mutation in these three heterozygous patients who are presumably genetic compounds. Screening for an informative Xho I restriction site altered by the mutation showed parental heterozygosity but no evidence for the mutation in 50 normal chromosomes. Segregation of COL7A1 markers in these patients suggests that the mutation has arisen independently in at least two of our families. The premature stop mutation in the 5{prime} end of the gene predicts a severely shortened collagen VII molecule. The homozygote formation of anchoring fibrils would be impaired providing an explanation at the molecular level for the ultrastructural findings of reduced numbers or absence of anchoring fibrils in this disease. In conclusion, these data strongly suggest that this novel premature stop mutation is the cause of DEB in the homozygotes and contributes to the disease in the other patients. The important role of anchoring fibrils in dermal-epidermal adhesion is also underlined.

  18. Analysis of Mutations in the Gene Encoding Cytomegalovirus DNA Polymerase in a Phase 2 Clinical Trial of Brincidofovir Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, E. Randall; Foster, Scott; Brundage, Tom; Chou, Sunwen; Prichard, Mark N.; Kleiboeker, Steven; Wilson, Chad; Colville, Donella; Mommeja-Marin, Herve

    2016-01-01

    Brincidofovir is an oral antiviral in development for prevention of cytomegalovirus disease. Cytomegalovirus genotyping results from a phase 2 trial comparing brincidofovir to placebo for prophylaxis against cytomegalovirus infection in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients provided initial data on the clinical resistance profile for brincidofovir. In this study, no known resistance-associated mutations were detected in brincidofovir-treated subjects; identified genotypic substitutions did not confer resistance to cytomegalovirus antivirals in vitro, suggesting that these changes represent polymorphisms unrelated to brincidofovir resistance. Lack of evidence for genotypic resistance during prophylaxis suggests that first-line use of brincidofovir for prevention of cytomegalovirus infection may preserve downstream options for patients. PMID:26941282

  19. Analysis of Mutations in the Gene Encoding Cytomegalovirus DNA Polymerase in a Phase 2 Clinical Trial of Brincidofovir Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Lanier, E Randall; Foster, Scott; Brundage, Tom; Chou, Sunwen; Prichard, Mark N; Kleiboeker, Steven; Wilson, Chad; Colville, Donella; Mommeja-Marin, Herve

    2016-07-01

    Brincidofovir is an oral antiviral in development for prevention of cytomegalovirus disease. Cytomegalovirus genotyping results from a phase 2 trial comparing brincidofovir to placebo for prophylaxis against cytomegalovirus infection in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients provided initial data on the clinical resistance profile for brincidofovir. In this study, no known resistance-associated mutations were detected in brincidofovir-treated subjects; identified genotypic substitutions did not confer resistance to cytomegalovirus antivirals in vitro, suggesting that these changes represent polymorphisms unrelated to brincidofovir resistance. Lack of evidence for genotypic resistance during prophylaxis suggests that first-line use of brincidofovir for prevention of cytomegalovirus infection may preserve downstream options for patients. PMID:26941282

  20. Molecular analysis of methylmalonic acidemia: Identification of novel mutations in the methylmalonyl-CoA mutase gene with decreased level of mutant mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Ogasawara, M.; Matsubara, Y.; Mikami, H.; Narisawa, K.

    1994-09-01

    Deficiency of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM) results in methylmalonic acidemia, which is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and clinically characterized by metabolic ketoacidosis. Previous studies of Caucasian and African American patients identified seven MCM mutations, and we also detected four missense substitutions (Ala197Thr, Val368Asp, Arg369His and Val669Glu). However, mutations with decreased level of MCM mRNA, which accounts for at least 25% of mutations among Caucasian patients, have not been reported. Our study on eight Japanese patients indicated that 13 of 16 mutant alleles (81%) showed decreased level of MCM mRNA, suggesting that these {open_quotes}low message{close_quotes} alleles are likely to be common contributors to MCM deficiency. Reverse transcription/polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of MCM mRNA followed by analysis on a fluorescent fragment analyzer indicated that the level of these mutant mRNAs was less than 1% controls. We were able to amplify such mutant mRNAs by nested PCR and directly determine the primary structure. Sequence analysis revealed three novel mutations: a G-to-T substitution at nucleotide position 425, a 2 bp deletion at nt 769 and 770, and a G-to-T substitution at nt 326. The first mutation (G425T) resulted in the substitution of a termination codon for glutamic acid at amino acid position 117. The analysis of 17 Japanese patients revealed the presence of G425T in 7 alleles (21%), suggesting a relatively high incidence of the mutation among Japanese patients. This observation is in sharp contrast to previous reports describing diverse heterogeneity of MCM mutations among Caucasians. Our report is the first to identify MCM mutations that decrease the stability of MCM mRNA. Amplification of trace amount of mRNA followed by sequencing analysis may provide useful tool for identifying such mutations.

  1. Muscle imaging in muscle dystrophies produced by mutations in the EMD and LMNA genes.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Manera, Jordi; Alejaldre, Aida; González, Laura; Olivé, Montse; Gómez-Andrés, David; Muelas, Nuria; Vílchez, Juan José; Llauger, Jaume; Carbonell, Pilar; Márquez-Infante, Celedonio; Fernández-Torrón, Roberto; Poza, Juan José; López de Munáin, Adolfo; González-Quereda, Lidia; Mirabet, Sonia; Clarimon, Jordi; Gallano, Pía; Rojas-García, Ricard; Gallardo, Eduard; Illa, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the mutated gene that produces a particular muscle dystrophy is difficult because different genotypes may share a phenotype and vice versa. Muscle MRI is a useful tool to recognize patterns of muscle involvement in patients with muscle dystrophies and to guide the diagnosis process. The radiologic pattern of muscle involvement in patients with mutations in the EMD and LMNA genes has not been completely established. Our objective is to describe the pattern of muscle fatty infiltration in patients with mutations in the EMD and in the LMNA genes and to search for differences between the two genotypes that could be helpful to guide the genetic tests. We conducted a national multicenter study in 42 patients, 10 with mutations in the EMD gene and 32 with mutations in the LMNA gene. MRI or CT was used to study the muscles from trunk to legs. Patients had a similar pattern of fatty infiltration regardless of whether they had the mutation in the EMD or LMNA gene. The main muscles involved were the paravertebral, glutei, quadriceps, biceps, semitendinosus, semimembranosus, adductor major, soleus, and gastrocnemius. Involvement of peroneus muscle, which was more frequently affected in patients with mutations in the EMD gene, was useful to differentiate between the two genotypes. Muscle MRI/CT identifies a similar pattern of muscle fatty infiltration in patients with mutations in the EMD or the LMNA genes. The involvement of peroneus muscles could be useful to conduct genetic analysis in patients with an EDMD phenotype. PMID:26573435

  2. Myostatin gene mutated mice induced with tale nucleases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fangfang; Sun, Ruilin; Chen, Hongyan; Fei, Jian; Lu, Daru

    2015-01-01

    Myostain gene (MSTN) is expressed primarily in skeletal muscle, and negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass; it has been suggested that mice with MSTN inhibition have reduced adiposity and improved insulin sensitivity. Therefore, it is important to establish a fast and effective gene editing method. In this report, we established the myostatin mutated-mouse model by microinjection of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) mRNA within the mouse fertilized oocytes and achieved high rates of mutagenesis of the mouse MSTN in C57BL/6J. Six of 45 born mice carried target mutations and we appointed one as the parental mating with wild mouse to produce the F1 and backcross to produce the F2 generation. All the mutations of the mice were examined quickly and efficiently by high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRMA) and then verified by direct sequencing. We obtained the homozygous of the F2 generation which transmitted the mutant alleles to the progeny with 100% efficiency. Mutant mice exhibited increases in muscle mass comparable to those observed in wild-type mice. Therefore, combining TALEN-mediated gene targeting with HRMA technology is a superior method of constructing genetically modified mice through microinjection in the mouse fertilized oocytes with high efficiency and short time of selection. PMID:25695746

  3. Molecular screening of pituitary adenomas for gene mutations and rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, V.; Drazin, N.Z.; Gonskey, R.; Melmed, S. )

    1993-07-01

    Although pituitary tumors arise as benign monoclonal neoplasms, genetic alterations have not readily been identified in these adenomas. The authors studied restriction fragment abnormalities involving the GH gene locus, and mutations in the p53 and H-, K-, and N-ras genes in 22 human GH cell adenomas. Twenty two nonsecretory adenomas were also examined for p53 and ras gene mutations. Seven prolactinoma DNA samples were tested for deletions in the multiple endocrine neoplasia-1 (MEN-1) locus, as well as for rearrangements in the hst gene, a member of the fibroblast growth factor family. In DNA from GH-cell adenomas, identical GH restriction patterns were detected in both pituitary and lymphocyte DNA in all patients and in one patient with a mixed GH-TSH cell adenoma. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single stranded conformation polymorphism analysis, no mutations were detected in exons 5, 6, 7 and 8 of the p53 gene in GH cell adenomas nor in 22 nonsecretory adenomas. Codons 12/13 and 61 of H-ras, K-ras, and N-ras genes were also intact on GH cell adenomas and in nonsecretory adenomas. Site-specific probes for chromosome 11q13 including, PYGM, D11S146, and INT2 were used in 7 sporadic PRL-secreting adenomas to detect deletions of the MEN-1 locus on chromosome 11. One patient was identified with a loss of 11p, and the remaining 6 patients did not demonstrate loss of heterozygosity in the pituitary 11q13 locus, compared to lymphocyte DNA. None of these patients demonstrated hst gene rearrangements which also maps to this locus. These results show that p53 and ras gene mutations are not common events in the pathogenesis of acromegaly and nonsecretory tumors. Although hst gene rearrangements and deletions of 11q13 are not associated with sporadic PRl-cell adenoma formation, a single patient was detected with a partial loss of chromosome 11, including the putative MEN-1 site. 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. mutation3D: Cancer Gene Prediction Through Atomic Clustering of Coding Variants in the Structural Proteome.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Michael J; Lapcevic, Ryan; Romero, Alfonso E; Yoon, Mark; Das, Jishnu; Beltrán, Juan Felipe; Mort, Matthew; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Paccanaro, Alberto; Yu, Haiyuan

    2016-05-01

    A new algorithm and Web server, mutation3D (http://mutation3d.org), proposes driver genes in cancer by identifying clusters of amino acid substitutions within tertiary protein structures. We demonstrate the feasibility of using a 3D clustering approach to implicate proteins in cancer based on explorations of single proteins using the mutation3D Web interface. On a large scale, we show that clustering with mutation3D is able to separate functional from nonfunctional mutations by analyzing a combination of 8,869 known inherited disease mutations and 2,004 SNPs overlaid together upon the same sets of crystal structures and homology models. Further, we present a systematic analysis of whole-genome and whole-exome cancer datasets to demonstrate that mutation3D identifies many known cancer genes as well as previously underexplored target genes. The mutation3D Web interface allows users to analyze their own mutation data in a variety of popular formats and provides seamless access to explore mutation clusters derived from over 975,000 somatic mutations reported by 6,811 cancer sequencing studies. The mutation3D Web interface is freely available with all major browsers supported. PMID:26841357

  5. Pseudoachondroplasia and Multiple Epiphyseal Dysplasia: A 7-Year Comprehensive Analysis of the Known Disease Genes Identify Novel and Recurrent Mutations and Provides an Accurate Assessment of Their Relative Contribution

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Gail C; Mittaz-Crettol, Laureane; Taylor, Jacqueline A; Mortier, Geert R; Spranger, Juergen; Zabel, Bernhard; Le Merrer, Martine; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Hall, Christine M; Offiah, Amaka; Wright, Michael J; Savarirayan, Ravi; Nishimura, Gen; Ramsden, Simon C; Elles, Rob; Bonafe, Luisa; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Unger, Sheila; Zankl, Andreas; Briggs, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) are relatively common skeletal dysplasias resulting in short-limbed dwarfism, joint pain, and stiffness. PSACH and the largest proportion of autosomal dominant MED (AD-MED) results from mutations in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP); however, AD-MED is genetically heterogenous and can also result from mutations in matrilin-3 (MATN3) and type IX collagen (COL9A1, COL9A2, and COL9A3). In contrast, autosomal recessive MED (rMED) appears to result exclusively from mutations in sulphate transporter solute carrier family 26 (SLC26A2). The diagnosis of PSACH and MED can be difficult for the nonexpert due to various complications and similarities with other related diseases and often mutation analysis is requested to either confirm or exclude the diagnosis. Since 2003, the European Skeletal Dysplasia Network (ESDN) has used an on-line review system to efficiently diagnose cases referred to the network prior to mutation analysis. In this study, we present the molecular findings in 130 patients referred to ESDN, which includes the identification of novel and recurrent mutations in over 100 patients. Furthermore, this study provides the first indication of the relative contribution of each gene and confirms that they account for the majority of PSACH and MED. Hum Mutat 33:144–157, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21922596

  6. Bestrophin gene mutations in patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, G M; Kakuk, L E; Griesinger, I B; Simpson, S A; Nowak, N J; Small, K W; Maumenee, I H; Rosenfeld, P J; Sieving, P A; Shows, T B; Ayyagari, R

    1999-05-15

    Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2) is an autosomal dominant dystrophy with a juvenile age of onset. Mutations in the Bestrophin gene were shown in patients affected with VMD2. In a mutation study, we made three new and interesting observations. First, we identified possible mutation hotspots within the gene, suggesting that particular regions of the protein have greater functional significance than others. Second, we described a 2-bp deletion in a part of the gene where mutations have not previously been reported; this mutation causes a frameshift and subsequent premature termination of the protein. Finally, we have evidence that some mutations are associated with variable expression of the disease, suggesting the involvement of other factors or genes in the disease phenotype. PMID:10331951

  7. Clonal diversity of recurrently mutated genes in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Walter, MJ; Shen, D; Shao, J; Ding, L; White, BS; Kandoth, C; Miller, CA; Niu, B; McLellan, MD; Dees, ND; Fulton, R; Elliot, K; Heath, S; Grillot, M; Westervelt, P; Link, DC; DiPersio, JF; Mardis, E; Ley, TJ; Wilson, RK; Graubert, TA

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that most cases of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are clonally heterogeneous, with a founding clone and multiple subclones. It is not known whether specific gene mutations typically occur in founding clones or subclones. We screened a panel of 94 candidate genes in a cohort of 157 patients with MDS or secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML). This included 150 cases with samples obtained at MDS diagnosis and 15 cases with samples obtained at sAML transformation (8 were also analyzed at the MDS stage). We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to define the clonal architecture in eight sAML genomes and identified the range of variant allele frequencies (VAFs) for founding clone mutations. At least one mutation or cytogenetic abnormality was detected in 83% of the 150 MDS patients and 17 genes were significantly mutated (false discovery rate ≤0.05). Individual genes and patient samples displayed a wide range of VAFs for recurrently mutated genes, indicating that no single gene is exclusively mutated in the founding clone. The VAFs of recurrently mutated genes did not fully recapitulate the clonal architecture defined by WGS, suggesting that comprehensive sequencing may be required to accurately assess the clonal status of recurrently mutated genes in MDS. PMID:23443460

  8. Laminin 5 genes and Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa: novel mutations and polymorphisms in the LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes. Mutations in brief no. 190. Online.

    PubMed

    Kon, A; Pulkkinen, L; Hara, M; Tamai, K; Tagami, H; Hashimoto, I; Uitto, J

    1998-01-01

    Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa (H-JEB; OMIM #226700) is a lethal, autosomal recessive blistering disorder characterized by fragility of the skin and other specialized epithelia. Previously, mutations in the laminin 5 genes (LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2) have been disclosed, most of them in LAMB3. In this study, we have examined the genetic basis of H-JEB in three families utilizing heteroduplex analysis and automated nucleotide sequencing. In one family, the proband was compound heterozygote for previously unpublished LAMB3 mutations, 1482delC and W95X. In two other families, the probands were found to be homozygous for novel nonsense mutations C553X and K822X in the LAMC2 gene. These mutations result in premature termination codons and predict truncation of the corresponding polypeptides. Also, during the search of laminin 5 mutations, 18 LAMB3 and LAMC2 polymorphisms were discovered, 9 of them being previously undescribed. Delineation of novel homozygous nonsense mutations in the LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes, with previous demonstrations of LAMA3 mutations, re-emphasizes the concept that stop codon mutations in both alleles of any of the three laminin 5 genes result in the severe H-JEB phenotype. PMID:10660342

  9. Molecular analysis of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA: Common mutations and racial difference

    SciTech Connect

    Tomatsu, S.; Hori, T.; Nakashima, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in N-acetylgalactosamine -6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Studies on the molecular basis of MPS IVA have been facilitated following cloning of the full-length cDNA and genomic DNA. In this study we detected mutations from 20 Caucasian and 19 Japanese MPS IVA patients using SSCP system and compared mutations of Caucasian origin with those of Japanese origin. The results showed the presence of 16 various mutations (3 small, deletions, 2 nonsense and 11 missense mutations) for Caucasian patients and 15 (1 deletion, 1 large alteration and 13 missense mutations) for Japanese. Moreover, two common mutations existed; one is double gene deletion characteristic for Japanese (6 alleles; 15%) and the other is a point mutation (1113F A{yields}T transition) characteristic for Caucasian (9 alleles; 22.5%). And the clear genotype/phenotype relationship among 1342delCA, IVS1(-2), P151S, Q148X, R386C, I113F, Q473X, W220G, P151L, A291T, R90W, and P77R, for a severe type, G96B N204K and V138A for a milder type, was observed. Only R386 mutation was seen in both of the populations. Further, the precise DNA analysis for double gene deletion of a common double gene deletion has been performed by defining the breakpoints and the results showed that one deletion was caused by homologous recombination due to Alu repetitive sequences and the other was due to nonhomologous recombination of short direct repeat. Haplotype analysis for six alleles with double deletion were different, indicating the different origin of this mutation or the frequent recombination events before a mutational event. Thus the mutations in GALNS gene are very heterogeneous and the racial difference is characteristic.

  10. MULTIPLEX PCR ANALYSIS OF IN VIVO-ARISING DELETION MUTATIONS IN THE HPRT GENE OF HUMAN T-LYMPHOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedure was adapted for the rapid and efficient evaluation of the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene in human T-lymphocytes for deletions. he hprt clonal assay was used to isolate in-vivo-arising hprt-deficient...

  11. K-ras gene mutation in gall bladder carcinomas and dysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Ajiki, T; Fujimori, T; Onoyama, H; Yamamoto, M; Kitazawa, S; Maeda, S; Saitoh, Y

    1996-01-01

    Epithelial dysplasia of gall bladder is an important precancerous lesion of gall bladder carcinogenesis. To investigate the frequency of K-ras gene mutation in gall bladder carcinoma and dysplasia, K-ras codon 12 mutations were investigated by the polymerase chain reaction/restriction enzyme based method following direct sequencing. Mutation was detected in 59% (30 of 51) of gall bladder carcinomas, in 73% (8 of 11) of gall bladder dysplasia in gall stone cases, and in 0% of the normal gall bladder epithelium. There was, however, no correlation between K-ras mutation and clinicopathological factors of gall bladder carcinoma. K-ras gene mutation occurs even in gall bladder dysplasia at an incidence similar to that in carcinomas, suggesting that testing for K-ras gene mutation may prove useful as an adjunct to bile cytological or biopsy analysis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8675098

  12. Association of PAX2 and Other Gene Mutations with the Clinical Manifestations of Renal Coloboma Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Higashide, Tomomi; Sakurai, Mayumi; Hashimoto, Shin-ichi; Shinozaki, Yasuyuki; Hara, Akinori; Iwata, Yasunori; Sakai, Norihiko; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa; Kaneko, Shuichi; Wada, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Background Renal coloboma syndrome (RCS) is characterized by renal anomalies and optic nerve colobomas. PAX2 mutations contribute to RCS. However, approximately half of the patients with RCS have no mutation in PAX2 gene. Methods To investigate the incidence and effects of mutations of PAX2 and 25 candidate genes, patient genes were screened using next-generation sequence analysis, and candidate mutations were confirmed using Sanger sequencing. The correlation between mutations and clinical manifestation was evaluated. Result Thirty patients, including 26 patients (two families of five and two, 19 sporadic cases) with RCS, and 4 optic nerve coloboma only control cases were evaluated in the present study. Six PAX2 mutations in 21 probands [28%; two in family cohorts (n = 5 and n = 2) and in 4 out of 19 patients with sporadic disease] including four novel mutations were confirmed using Sanger sequencing. Moreover, four other sequence variants (CHD7, SALL4, KIF26B, and SIX4) were also confirmed, including a potentially pathogenic novel KIF26B mutation. Kidney function and proteinuria were more severe in patients with PAX2 mutations than in those without the mutation. Moreover, the coloboma score was significantly higher in patients with PAX2 gene mutations. Three out of five patients with PAX2 mutations had focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) diagnosed from kidney biopsies. Conclusion The results of this study identify several new mutations of PAX2, and sequence variants in four additional genes, including a novel potentially pathogenic mutation in KIF26B, which may play a role in the pathogenesis of RCS. PMID:26571382

  13. Identification of a novel mutation in the presenilin 1 gene in a Chinese Alzheimer's disease family.

    PubMed

    Deng, Bo; Lian, Yan; Wang, Xin; Zeng, Fan; Jiao, Bin; Wang, Ye-Ran; Liang, Chun-Rong; Liu, Yu-Hui; Bu, Xian-Le; Yao, Xiu-Qing; Zhu, Chi; Shen, Lu; Zhou, Hua-Dong; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Yan-Jiang

    2014-10-01

    This study has identified a gene mutation in a Chinese family with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Family members were screened by a set of medical examinations and neuropsychological tests. Their DNA was extracted from blood cells and sequenced for gene mutation in the amyloid precursor protein (APP), the presenilin 1 (PS1) and the presenilin 2 (PS2) genes. Genetic analysis showed that the AD patients in the family harbored a T to G missense mutation at the position 314 in exon 4 of the PS1 gene, resulting in a change of F105C in amino acid sequence. Clinical manifestation of these patients included memory loss, counting difficulty, personality change, disorientation, dyscalculia, agnosia, aphasia, and apraxia, which was similar to that of the familial AD (FAD) patients harboring other PS1 mutations. We intend to add a novel mutation F105C of the PS1 gene to the pool of FAD mutations. With the current available genetic data, mutations of the PS1 gene account for the majority of gene mutations in Chinese FAD. PMID:24737487

  14. Comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Madan, V; Shyamsunder, P; Han, L; Mayakonda, A; Nagata, Y; Sundaresan, J; Kanojia, D; Yoshida, K; Ganesan, S; Hattori, N; Fulton, N; Tan, K-T; Alpermann, T; Kuo, M-C; Rostami, S; Matthews, J; Sanada, M; Liu, L-Z; Shiraishi, Y; Miyano, S; Chendamarai, E; Hou, H-A; Malnassy, G; Ma, T; Garg, M; Ding, L-W; Sun, Q-Y; Chien, W; Ikezoe, T; Lill, M; Biondi, A; Larson, R A; Powell, B L; Lübbert, M; Chng, W J; Tien, H-F; Heuser, M; Ganser, A; Koren-Michowitz, M; Kornblau, S M; Kantarjian, H M; Nowak, D; Hofmann, W-K; Yang, H; Stock, W; Ghavamzadeh, A; Alimoghaddam, K; Haferlach, T; Ogawa, S; Shih, L-Y; Mathews, V; Koeffler, H P

    2016-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of myeloid leukemia characterized by differentiation block at the promyelocyte stage. Besides the presence of chromosomal rearrangement t(15;17), leading to the formation of PML-RARA (promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor alpha) fusion, other genetic alterations have also been implicated in APL. Here, we performed comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse APL to identify somatic alterations, which cooperate with PML-RARA in the pathogenesis of APL. We explored the mutational landscape using whole-exome (n=12) and subsequent targeted sequencing of 398 genes in 153 primary and 69 relapse APL. Both primary and relapse APL harbored an average of eight non-silent somatic mutations per exome. We observed recurrent alterations of FLT3, WT1, NRAS and KRAS in the newly diagnosed APL, whereas mutations in other genes commonly mutated in myeloid leukemia were rarely detected. The molecular signature of APL relapse was characterized by emergence of frequent mutations in PML and RARA genes. Our sequencing data also demonstrates incidence of loss-of-function mutations in previously unidentified genes, ARID1B and ARID1A, both of which encode for key components of the SWI/SNF complex. We show that knockdown of ARID1B in APL cell line, NB4, results in large-scale activation of gene expression and reduced in vitro differentiation potential. PMID:27063598

  15. Comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Madan, V; Shyamsunder, P; Han, L; Mayakonda, A; Nagata, Y; Sundaresan, J; Kanojia, D; Yoshida, K; Ganesan, S; Hattori, N; Fulton, N; Tan, K-T; Alpermann, T; Kuo, M-C; Rostami, S; Matthews, J; Sanada, M; Liu, L-Z; Shiraishi, Y; Miyano, S; Chendamarai, E; Hou, H-A; Malnassy, G; Ma, T; Garg, M; Ding, L-W; Sun, Q-Y; Chien, W; Ikezoe, T; Lill, M; Biondi, A; Larson, R A; Powell, B L; Lübbert, M; Chng, W J; Tien, H-F; Heuser, M; Ganser, A; Koren-Michowitz, M; Kornblau, S M; Kantarjian, H M; Nowak, D; Hofmann, W-K; Yang, H; Stock, W; Ghavamzadeh, A; Alimoghaddam, K; Haferlach, T; Ogawa, S; Shih, L-Y; Mathews, V; Koeffler, H P

    2016-08-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of myeloid leukemia characterized by differentiation block at the promyelocyte stage. Besides the presence of chromosomal rearrangement t(15;17), leading to the formation of PML-RARA (promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor alpha) fusion, other genetic alterations have also been implicated in APL. Here, we performed comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse APL to identify somatic alterations, which cooperate with PML-RARA in the pathogenesis of APL. We explored the mutational landscape using whole-exome (n=12) and subsequent targeted sequencing of 398 genes in 153 primary and 69 relapse APL. Both primary and relapse APL harbored an average of eight non-silent somatic mutations per exome. We observed recurrent alterations of FLT3, WT1, NRAS and KRAS in the newly diagnosed APL, whereas mutations in other genes commonly mutated in myeloid leukemia were rarely detected. The molecular signature of APL relapse was characterized by emergence of frequent mutations in PML and RARA genes. Our sequencing data also demonstrates incidence of loss-of-function mutations in previously unidentified genes, ARID1B and ARID1A, both of which encode for key components of the SWI/SNF complex. We show that knockdown of ARID1B in APL cell line, NB4, results in large-scale activation of gene expression and reduced in vitro differentiation potential. PMID:27063598

  16. Molecular Analysis of Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer in the United States: High Mutation Detection Rate among Clinically Selected Families and Characterization of an American Founder Genomic Deletion of the MSH2 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Anja; Barrows, Alicia; Wijnen, Juul Th.; van der Klift, Heleen; Franken, Patrick F.; Verkuijlen, Paul; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Geugien, Marjan; Jaghmohan-Changur, Shantie; Breukel, Cor; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Morreau, Hans; van Puijenbroek, Marjo; Burn, John; Coronel, Stephany; Kinarski, Yulia; Okimoto, Ross; Watson, Patrice; Lynch, Jane F.; de la Chapelle, Albert; Lynch, Henry T.; Fodde, Riccardo

    2003-01-01

    The identification of germline mutations in families with HNPCC is hampered by genetic heterogeneity and clinical variability. In previous studies, MSH2 and MLH1 mutations were found in approximately two-thirds of the Amsterdam-criteria–positive families and in much lower percentages of the Amsterdam-criteria–negative families. Therefore, a considerable proportion of HNPCC seems not to be accounted for by the major mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Does the latter result from a lack of sensitivity of mutation detection techniques, or do additional genes underlie the remaining cases? In this study we address these questions by thoroughly investigating a cohort of clinically selected North American families with HNPCC. We analyzed 59 clinically well-defined U.S. families with HNPCC for MSH2, MLH1, and MSH6 mutations. To maximize mutation detection, different techniques were employed, including denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, Southern analysis, microsatellite instability, immunohistochemistry, and monoallelic expression analysis. In 45 (92%) of the 49 Amsterdam-criteria–positive families and in 7 (70%) of the 10 Amsterdam-criteria–negative families, a mutation was detected in one of the three analyzed MMR genes. Forty-nine mutations were in MSH2 or MLH1, and only three were in MSH6. A considerable proportion (27%) of the mutations were genomic rearrangements (12 in MSH2 and 2 in MLH1). Notably, a deletion encompassing exons 1–6 of MSH2 was detected in seven apparently unrelated families (12% of the total cohort) and was subsequently proven to be a founder. Screening of a second U.S. cohort with HNPCC from Ohio allowed the identification of two additional kindreds with the identical founder deletion. In the present study, we show that optimal mutation detection in HNPCC is achieved by combining accurate and expert clinical selection with an extensive mutation detection strategy. Notably, we identified a common North American deletion in MSH2, accounting

  17. Ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers: analysis of prognostic factors and survival

    PubMed Central

    Biglia, Nicoletta; Sgandurra, Paola; Bounous, Valentina Elisabetta; Maggiorotto, Furio; Piva, Eleonora; Pivetta, Emanuele; Ponzone, Riccardo; Pasini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare clinical–pathological characteristics and outcome between sporadic ovarian cancer and ovarian cancer in patents with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC). Methods Twenty-four patients with ovarian cancer treated between 2000 and 2009 who tested positive for BRCA1/2 mutation (BRCA+) and a control group of 64 age-matched patients with no family history of breast/ovarian cancer (controls) were enrolled. Clinical–pathological characteristics, surgical outcome, overall (OS), and progression-free survival (PFS) were compared between the two groups. Results The high-grade serous histotype was more represented in BRCA+ than in controls (70.8% versus 53.1%) (p > 0.05). BRCA+ cancers were more frequently diagnosed at stage II than controls (20.83% versus 4.69%) (p = 0.024). Radical primary surgery was performed in 70% of women in both groups, with no difference in debulking results. In patients undergoing surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, in all BRCA+ patients, optimal cytoreduction was achieved (versus 70% of the controls). PFS was significantly longer for BRCA+ patients compared to controls (60 months versus 22 months; p = 0.039). No significant difference was observed in OS between BRCA+ patients and controls. Conclusions At a median follow-up time of 46 months, BRCA+ patients have a better prognosis than controls in terms of PFS. Higher chemosensitivity of BRCA+ tumours was observed. PMID:27350785

  18. Spectrum of mutations and genotype-phenotype analysis in Noonan syndrome patients with RIT1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Yaoita, Masako; Niihori, Tetsuya; Mizuno, Seiji; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Hayashi, Shion; Watanabe, Atsushi; Yokozawa, Masato; Suzumura, Hiroshi; Nakahara, Akihiko; Nakano, Yusuke; Hokosaki, Tatsunori; Ohmori, Ayumi; Sawada, Hirofumi; Migita, Ohsuke; Mima, Aya; Lapunzina, Pablo; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; Ogata, Tsutomu; Kawame, Hiroshi; Kurosawa, Kenji; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Inoue, Shin-Ichi; Matsubara, Yoichi; Kure, Shigeo; Aoki, Yoko

    2016-02-01

    RASopathies are autosomal dominant disorders caused by mutations in more than 10 known genes that regulate the RAS/MAPK pathway. Noonan syndrome (NS) is a RASopathy characterized by a distinctive facial appearance, musculoskeletal abnormalities, and congenital heart defects. We have recently identified mutations in RIT1 in patients with NS. To delineate the clinical manifestations in RIT1 mutation-positive patients, we further performed a RIT1 analysis in RASopathy patients and identified 7 RIT1 mutations, including two novel mutations, p.A77S and p.A77T, in 14 of 186 patients. Perinatal abnormalities, including nuchal translucency, fetal hydrops, pleural effusion, or chylothorax and congenital heart defects, are observed in all RIT1 mutation-positive patients. Luciferase assays in NIH 3T3 cells demonstrated that the newly identified RIT1 mutants, including p.A77S and p.A77T, and the previously identified p.F82V, p.T83P, p.Y89H, and p.M90I, enhanced Elk1 transactivation. Genotype-phenotype correlation analyses of previously reported NS patients harboring RIT1, PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, and KRAS revealed that hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (56 %) was more frequent in patients harboring a RIT1 mutation than in patients harboring PTPN11 (9 %) and SOS1 mutations (10 %). The rates of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were similar between patients harboring RIT1 mutations and patients harboring RAF1 mutations (75 %). Short stature (52 %) was less prevalent in patients harboring RIT1 mutations than in patients harboring PTPN11 (71 %) and RAF1 (83 %) mutations. These results delineate the clinical manifestations of RIT1 mutation-positive NS patients: high frequencies of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, atrial septal defects, and pulmonary stenosis; and lower frequencies of ptosis and short stature. PMID:26714497

  19. Gene Expression in the Star Mutation of Petunia x Hybrida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in structural gene expression are responsible for a wide range of responses from human cancer to patterned flowers. Gene silencing is one of the ways in which gene expression is controlled. We have developed a model system to study anthocyanin gene silencing using a mutation in Petunia ...

  20. A Common Founder Mutation in the EDA-A1 Gene in X-Linked Hypodontia

    PubMed Central

    Kurban, Mazen; Michailidis, Eleni; Wajid, Muhammad; Shimomura, Yutaka; Christiano, Angela M.

    2010-01-01

    Background X-linked recessive hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED; OMIM 305100) is a rare genodermatosis characterized clinically by developmental abnormalities affecting the teeth, hair and sweat glands. Mutations in the EDA-A1 gene have been associated with XLHED. Recently, mutations in the EDA-A1 gene have also been implicated in isolated X-linked recessive hypodontia (XLRH; OMIM 313500). Methods We analyzed the DNA from members of 3 unrelated Pakistani families with XLRH for mutations in the EDA-A1 gene through direct sequencing and performed haplotype analysis. Results We identified a common missense mutation in both families designated c.1091T→C (p.M364T). Haplotype analysis revealed that this is a founder mutation in the 3 families. Conclusion XLHED is a syndrome with variable clinical presentations that contain a spectrum of findings, including hypodontia. We suggest that XLRH should be grouped under XLHED as both share several phenotypic and genotypic similarities. PMID:20628232

  1. Na channel gene mutations in epilepsy--the functional consequences.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Kazuhiro

    2006-08-01

    Mutations of voltage-gated sodium channel genes SCN1A, SCN2A, and SCN1B have been identified in several types of epilepsies including generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) and severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (SMEI). In both SCN1A and SCN2A, missense mutations tend to result in benign idiopathic epilepsy, whereas truncation mutations lead to severe and intractable epilepsy. However, the results obtained by the biophysical analyses using cultured cell systems still remain elusive. Now studies in animal models harboring sodium channel gene mutations should be eagerly pursued. PMID:16806834

  2. Genes involved in the copper-dependent regulation of soluble methane monooxygenase of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath): cloning, sequencing and mutational analysis.

    PubMed

    Csáki, Róbert; Bodrossy, Levente; Klem, József; Murrell, J Colin; Kovács, Kornél L

    2003-07-01

    The key enzyme in methane metabolism is methane monooxygenase (MMO), which catalyses the oxidation of methane to methanol. Some methanotrophs, including Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), possess two distinct MMOs. The level of copper in the environment regulates the biosynthesis of the MMO enzymes in these methanotrophs. Under low-copper conditions, soluble MMO (sMMO) is expressed and regulation takes place at the level of transcription. The structural genes of sMMO were previously identified as mmoXYBZ, mmoD and mmoC. Putative transcriptional start sites, containing a sigma(70)- and a sigma(N)-dependent motif, were identified in the 5' region of mmoX. The promoter region of mmoX was mapped using truncated 5' end regions fused to a promoterless green fluorescent protein gene. A 9.5 kb region, adjacent to the sMMO structural gene cluster, was analysed. Downstream (3') from the last gene of the operon, mmoC, four ORFs were found, mmoG, mmoQ, mmoS and mmoR. mmoG shows significant identity to the large subunit of the bacterial chaperonin gene, groEL. In the opposite orientation, two genes, mmoQ and mmoS, showed significant identity to two-component sensor-regulator system genes. Next to mmoS, a gene encoding a putative sigma(N)-dependent transcriptional activator, mmoR was identified. The mmoG and mmoR genes were mutated by marker-exchange mutagenesis and the effects of these mutations on the expression of sMMO was investigated. sMMO transcription was impaired in both mutants. These results indicate that mmoG and mmoR are essential for the expression of sMMO in Mc. capsulatus (Bath). PMID:12855730

  3. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene in Indo-Pakistani patients with type I (tyrosinase-deficient) oculocutaneous albinsm (OCA)

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, R.K.; Droetto, S.; Strunk, K.M.; Holmes, S.A.; Spritz, R.A. ); Bundey, S.; Musarella, M.A.

    1993-12-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a group of autosomal recessive disorders characterized by deficient synthesis of melanin pigment. Type I (tyrosinase-deficient) OCA results from mutations of the tyrosinase gene (TYR gene) encoding tyrosinase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first two steps of melanin biosynthesis. Mutations of the TYR gene have been identified in a large number of patients, most of Caucasian ethnic origin, with various forms of type I OCA. The authors present an analysis of the TYR gene in eight Indo-Pakistani patients with type I OCA. The authors describe four novel TYR gene mutations and a fifth mutation previously observed in a Caucasian patient. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  4. High-Throughput Analysis of Human Cytomegalovirus Genome Diversity Highlights the Widespread Occurrence of Gene-Disrupting Mutations and Pervasive Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Thys, Kim; Mbong Ngwese, Mirabeau; Van Damme, Ellen; Dvorak, Jan; Van Loock, Marnix; Li, Guangdi; Tachezy, Ruth; Busson, Laurent; Aerssens, Jeroen; Van Ranst, Marc

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus is a widespread pathogen of major medical importance. It causes significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised individuals, and congenital infections can result in severe disabilities or stillbirth. Development of a vaccine is prioritized, but no candidate is close to release. Although correlations of viral genetic variability with pathogenicity are suspected, knowledge about the strain diversity of the 235-kb genome is still limited. In this study, 96 full-length human cytomegalovirus genomes from clinical isolates were characterized, quadrupling the amount of information available for full-genome analysis. These data provide the first high-resolution map of human cytomegalovirus interhost diversity and evolution. We show that cytomegalovirus is significantly more divergent than all other human herpesviruses and highlight hot spots of diversity in the genome. Importantly, 75% of strains are not genetically intact but contain disruptive mutations in a diverse set of 26 genes, including the immunomodulatory genes UL40 and UL111A. These mutants are independent of culture passage artifacts and circulate in natural populations. Pervasive recombination, which is linked to the widespread occurrence of multiple infections, was found throughout the genome. The recombination density was significantly higher than those of other human herpesviruses and correlated with strain diversity. While the overall effects of strong purifying selection on virus evolution are apparent, evidence of diversifying selection was found in several genes encoding proteins that interact with the host immune system, including UL18, UL40, UL142, and UL147. These residues may present phylogenetic signatures of past and ongoing virus-host interactions. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus has the largest genome of all viruses that infect humans. Currently, there is a great interest in establishing associations between genetic variants and strain pathogenicity of

  5. Mutation analysis of the gene encoding Bruton`s tyrosine kinase in a family with a sporadic case of X-linked agammaglobulinemia reveals three female carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Hagemann, T.L.; Kwan, Sau-Ping; Assa`ad, A.H.

    1995-11-06

    Bruton`s tyrosine kinase (Btk) has been identified as the protein responsible for the primary immunodeficiency X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). We and others have cloned the gene for Btk and recently reported the genomic organization. Nineteen exons were positioned within the 37 kb gene. With the sequence data derived from our genomic map, we have designed a PCR based assay to directly identify mutations of the Btk gene in germline DNA of patients with XLA. In this report, the assay was used to analyze a family with a sporadic case of XLA to determine if other female relatives carry the disease. A four base-pair deletion was found in the DNA of the affected boy and was further traced through three generations. With the direct identification of the mutations responsible for XLA, we can now diagnose conclusively the disease and identify the immunologically normal female carriers. This same technique can easily be applied to prenatal diagnosis in families where the mutation can be identified. 34 refs., 3 figs.

  6. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html. PMID:21913285

  7. Multi-institutional oncogenic driver mutation analysis in lung adenocarcinoma: The Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium experience

    PubMed Central

    Dias-Santagata, Dora; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Chen, Heidi; Fujimoto, Junya; Kugler, Kelly; Franklin, Wilbur A.; Iafrate, A. John; Ladanyi, Marc; Kris, Mark G.; Johnson, Bruce E.; Bunn, Paul A.; Minna, John D.; Kwiatkowski, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Molecular genetic analyses of lung adenocarcinoma have recently become standard of care for treatment selection. The Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium was formed to enable collaborative multi-institutional analyses of 10 potential oncogenic driver mutations. Technical aspects of testing, and clinicopathologic correlations are presented. Methods Mutation testing in at least one of 8 genes (EGFR, KRAS, ERBB2, AKT1, BRAF, MEK1, NRAS, PIK3CA) using SNaPshot, mass spectrometry, Sanger sequencing +/− PNA and/or sizing assays, along with ALK and/or MET FISH were performed in 6 labs on 1007 patients from 14 institutions. Results 1007 specimens had mutation analysis performed, and 733 specimens had all 10 genes analyzed. Mutation identification rates did not vary by analytic method. Biopsy and cytology specimens were inadequate for testing in 26% and 35% of cases compared to 5% of surgical specimens. Among the 1007 cases with mutation analysis performed, EGFR, KRAS, ALK, and ERBB2 alterations were detected in 22, 25, 8.5, and 2.4% of cases, respectively. EGFR mutations were highly associated with female sex, Asian race, and never smoking status; and less strongly associated with stage IV disease, presence of bone metastases, and absence of adrenal metastases. ALK rearrangements were strongly associated with never smoking status, and more weakly associated with presence of liver metastases. ERBB2 mutations were strongly associated with Asian race and never smoking status. Two mutations were seen in 2.7% of samples, all but one of which involved one or more of PIK3CA, ALK or MET. Conclusion Multi-institutional molecular analysis across multiple platforms, sample types, and institutions can yield consistent results and novel clinicopathological observations. PMID:25738220

  8. Ataxia Telangiectasia–Mutated Gene Polymorphisms and Acute Normal Tissue Injuries in Cancer Patients After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Lihua; Cui, Jingkun; Tang, Fengjiao; Cong, Xiaofeng; Han, Fujun

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Studies of the association between ataxia telangiectasia–mutated (ATM) gene polymorphisms and acute radiation injuries are often small in sample size, and the results are inconsistent. We conducted the first meta-analysis to provide a systematic review of published findings. Methods and Materials: Publications were identified by searching PubMed up to April 25, 2014. Primary meta-analysis was performed for all acute radiation injuries, and subgroup meta-analyses were based on clinical endpoint. The influence of sample size and radiation injury incidence on genetic effects was estimated in sensitivity analyses. Power calculations were also conducted. Results: The meta-analysis was conducted on the ATM polymorphism rs1801516, including 5 studies with 1588 participants. For all studies, the cut-off for differentiating cases from controls was grade 2 acute radiation injuries. The primary meta-analysis showed a significant association with overall acute radiation injuries (allelic model: odds ratio = 1.33, 95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.71). Subgroup analyses detected an association between the rs1801516 polymorphism and a significant increase in urinary and lower gastrointestinal injuries and an increase in skin injury that was not statistically significant. There was no between-study heterogeneity in any meta-analyses. In the sensitivity analyses, small studies did not show larger effects than large studies. In addition, studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries showed larger effects than studies with low incidence. Power calculations revealed that the statistical power of the primary meta-analysis was borderline, whereas there was adequate power for the subgroup analysis of studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries. Conclusions: Our meta-analysis showed a consistency of the results from the overall and subgroup analyses. We also showed that the genetic effect of the rs1801516 polymorphism on acute radiation injuries was

  9. Mutational analysis of patients with neurofibromatosis 2

    SciTech Connect

    MacCollin, M.; Ramesh, V.; Pulaski, K.; Trofatter, J.A.; Short, M.P.; Bove, C.; Jacoby, L.B.; Louis, D.N.; Rubio, M.P.; Eldridge, R.

    1994-08-01

    Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) is a genetic disorder characterized by the development of multiple nervous-system tumors in young adulthood. The NF2 gene has recently been isolated and found to encode a new member, merlin, of the protein 4.1 family of cytoskeleton-associated proteins. To define the molecular basis of NF2 in affected individuals, the authors have used SSCP analysis to scan the exons of the NF2 gene from 33 unrelated patients with NF2. Twenty unique SSCP variants were seen in 21 patients; 10 of these individuals were known to be the only affected person in their kindred, while 7 had at least one other known affected relative. In all cases in which family members were available, the SSCP variant segregated with the disease; comparison of sporadic cases with their parents confirmed the de novo variants. DNA sequence analysis revealed that 19 of the 20 variants observed are predicted to lead to a truncated protein due to frameshift, creation of a stop codon, or interference with normal RNA splicing. A single patient carried a 3-bp deletion removing a phenylalanine residue. The authors conclude that the majority of NF2 patients carry an inactivating mutation of the NF2 gene and that neutral polymorphism in the gene is rare. 18 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Ferredoxin Gene Mutation in Iranian Trichomonas vaginalis Isolates

    PubMed Central

    HEIDARI, Soudabeh; BANDEHPOUR, Mojgan; SEYYED-TABAEI, Seyyed-Javad; VALADKHANI, Zarintaj; HAGHIGHI, Ali; ABADI, AliReza; KAZEMI, Bahram

    2013-01-01

    Background Trichomonas vaginalis causes trichomoniasis and metronidazole is its chosen drug for treatment. Ferredoxin has role in electron transport and carbohydrate metabolism and the conversion of an inactive form of metronidazole (CO) to its active form (CPR). Ferredoxin gene mutations reduce gene expression and increase its resistance to metronidazole. In this study, the frequency of ferredoxin gene mutations in clinical isolates of T.vaginalis in Tehran has been studied. Methods Forty six clinical T. vaginalis isolates of vaginal secretions and urine sediment were collected from Tehran Province since 2011 till 2012. DNA was extracted and ferredoxin gene was amplified by PCR technique. The ferredoxin gene PCR products were sequenced to determine gene mutations. Results In four isolates (8.69%) point mutation at nucleotide position -239 (the translation start codon) of the ferredoxin gene were detected in which adenosine were converted to thymine. Conclusion Mutation at nucleotide -239 ferredoxin gene reduces translational regulatory protein's binding affinity which concludes reduction of ferredoxin expression. For this reduction, decrease in activity and decrease in metronidazole drug delivery into the cells occur. Mutations in these four isolates may lead to resistance of them to metronidazole. PMID:24454433

  11. New mutations in MAPT gene causing frontotemporal lobar degeneration: biochemical and structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Giacomina; Bastone, Antonio; Piccoli, Elena; Mazzoleni, Giulia; Morbin, Michela; Uggetti, Andrea; Giaccone, Giorgio; Sperber, Sarah; Beeg, Marten; Salmona, Mario; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2012-04-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) can be sporadic or familial. The genes encoding the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) and progranulin (GRN) are the most relevant genes so far known causing the hereditary forms. Following genetic screening of patients affected by FTLD, we identified 2 new MAPT mutations, P364S and G366R, the former in a sporadic case. In the study we report the clinical and genetic features of the patients carrying these mutations, and the functional effects of the mutations, analyzed in vitro in order to investigate their pathogenic character. Both mutations resulted in reduced ability of tau to promote microtubule polymerization; the P364S protein variant also showed a high propensity to aggregate into filaments. These results suggest a high probability that these mutations are pathogenic. Our findings highlight the importance of genetic analysis also in sporadic forms of FTLD, and the role of in vitro studies to evaluate the pathologic features of new mutations. PMID:21943955

  12. Mutation hot spots in the canine herpesvirus thymidine kinase gene.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shinya; Matsumoto, Yasunobu; Takashima, Yasuhiro; Otsuka, Haruki

    2005-08-01

    The guanine and cytosine content (GC-content) of alpha-herpesvirus genes are highly variable despite similar genome structures. It is known that drug resistant HSV, which has the genome with a high GC-content (approximately 70%), commonly includes frameshift mutations in homopolymer stretches of guanine (G) and cytosine (C) within the thymidine kinase (TK) gene. However, whether such mutation hotspots exist in the TK gene of canine herpesvirus (CHV) which has a low GC-content was unknown. In this study, we investigated mutations in the TK gene of CHV. CHV was passaged in the presence of iodo-deoxyuridine (IDU), and IDU-resistant clones were isolated. In all IDU-resistant virus clones, mutations in the TK gene were observed. The majority of these mutations were frameshift mutations of an adenine (A) insertion or deletion within either of 2 stretches of eight A's in the TK gene. It was demonstrated that CHV TK mutations frequently occur at a limited number of hot spots within long homopolymer nucleotide stretches. PMID:15965615

  13. Mutational screening of the USH2A gene in Spanish USH patients reveals 23 novel pathogenic mutations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Usher Syndrome type II (USH2) is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by moderate to severe hearing impairment and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Among the three genes implicated, mutations in the USH2A gene account for 74-90% of the USH2 cases. Methods To identify the genetic cause of the disease and determine the frequency of USH2A mutations in a cohort of 88 unrelated USH Spanish patients, we carried out a mutation screening of the 72 coding exons of this gene by direct sequencing. Moreover, we performed functional minigene studies for those changes that were predicted to affect splicing. Results As a result, a total of 144 DNA sequence variants were identified. Based upon previous studies, allele frequencies, segregation analysis, bioinformatics' predictions and in vitro experiments, 37 variants (23 of them novel) were classified as pathogenic mutations. Conclusions This report provide a wide spectrum of USH2A mutations and clinical features, including atypical Usher syndrome phenotypes resembling Usher syndrome type I. Considering only the patients clearly diagnosed with Usher syndrome type II, and results obtained in this and previous studies, we can state that mutations in USH2A are responsible for 76.1% of USH2 disease in patients of Spanish origin. PMID:22004887

  14. Four novel mutations of the coproporphyrinogen III oxidase gene.

    PubMed

    Aurizi, C; Lupia Palmieri, G; Barbieri, L; Macrì, A; Sorge, F; Usai, G; Biolcati, G

    2009-01-01

    Here we report the characterization of four novel mutations and a previously described one of the coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (CPO) gene in five Italian patients affected by Hereditary Coproporphyria (HCP). Three of the novel genetic variants are missense mutations (p.Gly242Cys; p.Leu398Pro; p.Ser245Phe) and one is a frameshift mutation (p.Gly188TrpfsX45). PMID:19267996

  15. Mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) gene (SLC26A2): 22 novel mutations, mutation review, associated skeletal phenotypes, and diagnostic relevance.

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; Superti-Furga, A

    2001-03-01

    Mutations in the DTDST gene can result in a family of skeletal dysplasia conditions which comprise two lethal disorders, achondrogenesis type 1B (ACG1B) and atelosteogenesis type 2 (AO2); and two non-lethal disorders, diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) and recessive multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (rMED). The gene product is a sulfate-chloride exchanger of the cell membrane. Inactivation of the sulfate exchanger leads to intracellular sulfate depletion and to the synthesis of undersulfated proteoglycans in susceptible cells such as chondrocytes and fibroblasts. Genotype-phenotype correlations are recognizable, with mutations predicting a truncated protein or a non-conservative amino acid substitution in a transmembrane domain giving the severe phenotypes, and non-transmembrane amino acid substitutions and splice site mutations giving the milder phenotypes. The clinical phenotype is modulated strictly by the degree of residual activity. Over 30 mutations have been observed, including 22 novel mutations reported here. The most frequent mutation, 862C>T (R279W), is a mild mutation giving the rMED phenotype when homozygous and mostly DTD when compounded; occurrence at a CpG dinucleotide and its panethnic distribution suggest independent recurrence. Mutation IVS1+2T>C is the second most common mutation, but is very frequent in Finland. It produces low levels of correctly spliced mRNA, and results in DTD when homozygous. Two other mutations, 1045-1047delGTT (V340del) and 558C>T (R178X), are associated with severe phenotypes and have been observed in multiple patients. Most other mutations are rare. Heterozygotes are clinically unaffected. When clinical samples are screened for radiologic and histologic features compatible with the ACG1B/AO2/DTD/rMED spectrum prior to analysis, the mutation detection rate is high (over 90% of alleles), and appropriate genetic counseling can be given. The sulfate uptake or sulfate incorporation assays in cultured fibroblasts have largely been

  16. Identification of a novel mutation of the EDA gene in X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Xue, J J; Tan, B; Gao, Q P; Zhu, G S; Liang, D S; Wu, L Q

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the disease-causing mutation in the ectodysplasin A (EDA) gene in a Chinese family affected by X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED). A family clinically diagnosed with XLHED was investigated. For mutation analysis, the coding region of EDA of 2 patients and 7 unaffected members of the family was sequenced. The detected mutation in EDA was investigated in 120 normal controls. A missense mutation (c.878T>G) in EDA was detected in 2 patients and 3 female carriers, but not in 4 unaffected members of the family. The mutation was not found in the 120 healthy controls and has not been reported previously. Our findings indicate that a novel mutation (c.878T>G) of EDA is associated with XLHED and adds to the repertoire of EDA mutations. PMID:26634545

  17. Simulation of gene evolution under directional mutational pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkiewicz, Małgorzata; Mackiewicz, Paweł; Kowalczuk, Maria; Mackiewicz, Dorota; Nowicka, Aleksandra; Polak, Natalia; Smolarczyk, Kamila; Banaszak, Joanna; R. Dudek, Mirosław; Cebrat, Stanisław

    2004-05-01

    The two main mechanisms generating the genetic diversity, mutation and recombination, have random character but they are biased which has an effect on the generation of asymmetry in the bacterial chromosome structure and in the protein coding sequences. Thus, like in a case of two chiral molecules-the two possible orientations of a gene in relation to the topology of a chromosome are not equivalent. Assuming that the sequence of a gene may oscillate only between certain limits of its structural composition means that the gene could be forced out of these limits by the directional mutation pressure, in the course of evolution. The probability of the event depends on the time the gene stays under the same mutation pressure. Inversion of the gene changes the directional mutational pressure to the reciprocal one and hence it changes the distance of the gene to its lower and upper bound of the structural tolerance. Using Monte Carlo methods we were able to simulate the evolution of genes under experimentally found mutational pressure, assuming simple mechanisms of selection. We found that the mutation and recombination should work in accordance to lower their negative effects on the function of the products of coding sequences.

  18. MAMMALIAN CELL GENE MUTATION ASSAYS WORKING GROUP REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammalian cell gene mutation assays have been used for many years and the diversity of the available systems attests to the varied methods found to grow mammalian dells and detect mutations. s part of the International Workshop on Standardization of Genotoxicity Test Procedures, ...

  19. Phenotypic Involvement in Females with the FMR1 Gene Mutation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, J. E.; Cheema, A.; Sobesky, W. E.; Gardner, S. C.; Taylor, A. K.; Pennington, B. F.; Hagerman, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    A study investigated phenotypic effects seen in 114 females with premutation and 41 females (ages 18-58) with full Fragile X mental retardation gene mutation. Those with the full mutation had a greater incidence of hand-flapping, eye contact problems, special education help for reading and math, and grade retention. (Author/CR)

  20. Variable expressivity and mutation databases: The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Trifiro, M A

    2001-05-01

    For over 50 years genetics has presumed that variations in phenotypic expression have, for the most part, been the result of alterations in genotype. The importance and value of mutation databases has been based on the premise that the same gene or allelic variation in a specific gene that has been proven to determine a specific phenotype, will always produce the same phenotype. However, recent evidence has shown that so called "simple" Mendelian disorders or monogenic traits are often far from simple, exhibiting phenotypic variation (variable expressivity) that cannot be explained solely by a gene or allelic alteration. The AR gene mutations database now lists 25 cases where different degrees of androgen insensitivity are caused by identical mutations in the androgen receptor gene. In five of these cases the phenotypic variability is due to somatic mosaicism, that is, somatic mutations that occur in only certain cells of androgen-sensitive tissue. Recently, a number of other cases of variable expressivity have also been linked to somatic mosaicism. The impact of variable expressivity due to somatic mutations and mosaicism on mutation databases is discussed. In particular, the effect of an organism exhibiting genetic heterogeneity within its tissues, and the possibility of an organism's genotype changing over its lifetime, are considered to have important implications for mutation databases in the future. PMID:11317353

  1. Clinical Significance of a Point Mutation in DNA Polymerase Beta (POLB) Gene in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaohui; Wang, Hongyi; Luo, Guangbin; Ren, Shuyang; Li, Wenmei; Cui, Jiantao; Gill, Harindarpal S.; Fu, Sidney W.; Lu, Youyong

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a major cause of global cancer mortality. Genetic variations in DNA repair genes can modulate DNA repair capability and, consequently, have been associated with risk of developing cancer. We have previously identified a T to C point mutation at nucleotide 889 (T889C) in DNA polymerase beta (POLB) gene, a key enzyme involved in base excision repair in primary GCs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mutation and expression of POLB in a larger cohort and to identify possible prognostic roles of the POLB alterations in GC. Primary GC specimens and their matched normal adjacent tissues were collected at the time of surgery. DNA, RNA and protein samples were isolated from GC specimens and cell lines. Mutations were detected by PCR-RFLP/DHPLC and sequencing analysis. POLB gene expression was examined by RT-PCR, tissue microarray, Western blotting and immunofluorescence assays. The function of the mutation was evaluated by chemosensitivity, MTT, Transwell matrigel invasion and host cell reactivation assays. The T889C mutation was detected in 18 (10.17%) of 177 GC patients. And the T889C mutation was associated with POLB overexpression, lymph nodes metastases and poor tumor differentiation. In addition, patients with- the mutation had significantly shorter survival time than those without-, following postoperative chemotherapy. Furthermore, cell lines with T889C mutation in POLB gene were more resistant to the treatment of 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin and epirubicin than those with wild type POLB. Forced expression of POLB gene with T889C mutation resulted in enhanced cell proliferation, invasion and resistance to anticancer drugs, along with increased DNA repair capability. These results suggest that POLB gene with T889C mutation in surgically resected primary gastric tissues may be clinically useful for predicting responsiveness to chemotherapy in patients with GC. The POLB gene alteration may serve as a prognostic biomarker for GC. PMID

  2. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia syndrome associated with mutations in the human insulin receptor gene: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yohei; Iwahashi, Hiromi; Mineo, Ikuo; Fukui, Kenji; Fukuhara, Atsunori; Iwamoto, Ryuya; Imagawa, Akihisa; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2015-01-01

    Insulinoma and insulin or insulin receptor (IR) autoantibodies are the main causes of hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia in adults, but the exact cause in other cases remains obscure. This study is to determine the genetic basis of hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia in two cases without the above abnormalities. Sequence analysis of IR gene in two patients with adult-onset hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia and their relatives were performed, and the mutant gene observed in one case was analyzed. Both cases had normal levels of fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting hyperinsulinemia, low insulin sensitivity, and hypoglycemia with excessive insulin secretion during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Both reported adult-onset postprandial hypoglycemic symptoms. In one patient, a missense mutation (Arg256Cys) was detected in both alleles of the IR gene, and his parents had the same mutation in only one allele but no hypoglycemia. The other had a novel nonsense mutation (Trp1273X) followed by a mutation (Gln1274Lys) in one allele, and his 9-year old son had the same mutation in one allele, together with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia during OGTT. Overexpression experiments of the mutant gene found in Case 1 in mammalian cells showed abnormal processing of the IR protein and demonstrated reduced function of Akt/Erk phosphorylation by insulin in the cells. In two cases of hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia in adults, we found novel mutations in IR gene considered to be linked to hypoglycemia. We propose a disease entity of adult-onset hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia syndrome associated with mutations in IR gene. PMID:25753915

  3. Identification of somatic gene mutations in penile squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ferrándiz-Pulido, Carla; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Masferrer, Emili; Vivancos, Ana; Somoza, Rosa; Marés, Roso; Valverde, Claudia; Salvador, Carlos; Placer, Jose; Morote, Juan; Pujol, Ramon M; Ramon y Cajal, Santiago; de Torres, Ines; Toll, Agusti; García-Patos, Vicente

    2015-10-01

    There is a lack of studies on somatic gene mutations and cell signaling driving penile carcinogenesis. Our objective was to analyze somatic mutations in genes downstream of EGFR in penile squamous cell carcinomas, especially the mTOR and RAS/MAPK pathways. We retrospectively analyzed somatic mutations in 10 in situ and 65 invasive penile squamous cell carcinomas by using Sequenom's Mass Spectrometry iPlex Technology and Oncocarta v1.0 Panel. The DNA was extracted from FFPE blocks and we identified somatic missense mutations in three in situ tumors and in 19 invasive tumors, mostly in PIK3CA, KRAS, HRAS, NRAS, and PDGFA genes. Somatic mutations in the PIK3CA gene or RAS family genes were neither associated with tumor grade, stage or outcome, and were equally often identified in hrHPV positive and in hrHPV negative tumors that showed no p53 expression. Mutations in PIK3CA, KRAS, and HRAS are frequent in penile squamous cell carcinoma and likely play a role in the development of p53-negative tumors. Although the presence of these mutations does not seem to correlate with tumoral behavior or outcome, they could be biomarkers of treatment failure with anti-EGFR mAb in patients with penile squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26216163

  4. Mutational analysis of the coat protein gene of tobacco mosaic virus in relation to hypersensitive response in tobacco plants with the N' gene.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Yamanaka, K; Watanabe, Y; Takamatsu, N; Meshi, T; Okada, Y

    1989-11-01

    Tomato strain L of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV-L) induces a hypersensitive response (necrotic local lesions) on tobacco plants with the N' gene. A factor responsible for induction of the hypersensitive response has been mapped to the coat protein gene. We have constructed several mutants which have insertions or deletions in the coat protein gene. Frame-shift mutants which cause premature termination of translation of the coat protein caused no necrotic local lesions on N' plants. Mutants which result in the expression of coat protein derivatives with one amino acid inserted after residue 56, 101, or 152 caused necrotic local lesions on N' plants. Deletion mutants lacking the coding region for fewer than the C-terminal 13 amino acid residues caused necrotic local lesions, whereas mutants lacking the coding region for the C-terminal 38 residues caused no necrotic local lesions. These results show that modifications of the coat protein gene affect its ability to induce the hypersensitive response in N' plants. PMID:2815580

  5. Splicing defects in the ataxia-telangiectasia gene, ATM: underlying mutations and consequences.

    PubMed Central

    Teraoka, S N; Telatar, M; Becker-Catania, S; Liang, T; Onengüt, S; Tolun, A; Chessa, L; Sanal, O; Bernatowska, E; Gatti, R A; Concannon, P

    1999-01-01

    Mutations resulting in defective splicing constitute a significant proportion (30/62 [48%]) of a new series of mutations in the ATM gene in patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) that were detected by the protein-truncation assay followed by sequence analysis of genomic DNA. Fewer than half of the splicing mutations involved the canonical AG splice-acceptor site or GT splice-donor site. A higher percentage of mutations occurred at less stringently conserved sites, including silent mutations of the last nucleotide of exons, mutations in nucleotides other than the conserved AG and GT in the consensus splice sites, and creation of splice-acceptor or splice-donor sites in either introns or exons. These splicing mutations led to a variety of consequences, including exon skipping and, to a lesser degree, intron retention, activation of cryptic splice sites, or creation of new splice sites. In addition, 5 of 12 nonsense mutations and 1 missense mutation were associated with deletion in the cDNA of the exons in which the mutations occurred. No ATM protein was detected by western blotting in any AT cell line in which splicing mutations were identified. Several cases of exon skipping in both normal controls and patients for whom no underlying defect could be found in genomic DNA were also observed, suggesting caution in the interpretation of exon deletions observed in ATM cDNA when there is no accompanying identification of genomic mutations. PMID:10330348

  6. Novel mutations in the COL2A1 gene in Japanese patients with Stickler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Itsuka; Nagata, Tatsuo; Hayashi, Takaaki; Kakinoki, Masashi; Uchio, Eiichi; Kondo, Mineo; Ohji, Masahito; Kusaka, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an inherited connective tissue disorder that affects the eyes, cartilage and articular tissues. The phenotypes of Stickler syndrome include congenital high myopia, retinal detachment, premature joint degeneration, hearing impairment and craniofacial anomalies, such as cleft palate and midline facial hypoplasia. The disease is genetically heterogeneous, and the majority of the cases are caused by mutations in the COL2A1 gene. We examined 40 Japanese patients with Stickler syndrome from 23 families to determine whether they had mutations in the COL2A1 gene. This analysis was conducted by examining each patient's genomic DNA by Sanger sequencing. Five nonsense, 4 splicing and 8 deletion mutations in the COL2A1 gene were identified, accounting for 21 of the 23 families. Different mutations of the COL2A1 gene were associated with similar phenotypes but with different degrees of expressivity. PMID:27408751

  7. Novel mutations in the COL2A1 gene in Japanese patients with Stickler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Itsuka; Nagata, Tatsuo; Hayashi, Takaaki; Kakinoki, Masashi; Uchio, Eiichi; Kondo, Mineo; Ohji, Masahito; Kusaka, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an inherited connective tissue disorder that affects the eyes, cartilage and articular tissues. The phenotypes of Stickler syndrome include congenital high myopia, retinal detachment, premature joint degeneration, hearing impairment and craniofacial anomalies, such as cleft palate and midline facial hypoplasia. The disease is genetically heterogeneous, and the majority of the cases are caused by mutations in the COL2A1 gene. We examined 40 Japanese patients with Stickler syndrome from 23 families to determine whether they had mutations in the COL2A1 gene. This analysis was conducted by examining each patient’s genomic DNA by Sanger sequencing. Five nonsense, 4 splicing and 8 deletion mutations in the COL2A1 gene were identified, accounting for 21 of the 23 families. Different mutations of the COL2A1 gene were associated with similar phenotypes but with different degrees of expressivity. PMID:27408751

  8. Identification of 28 novel mutations in the Bardet-Biedl syndrome genes: the burden of private mutations in an extensively heterogeneous disease.

    PubMed

    Muller, Jean; Stoetzel, C; Vincent, M C; Leitch, C C; Laurier, V; Danse, J M; Hellé, S; Marion, V; Bennouna-Greene, V; Vicaire, S; Megarbane, A; Kaplan, J; Drouin-Garraud, V; Hamdani, M; Sigaudy, S; Francannet, C; Roume, J; Bitoun, P; Goldenberg, A; Philip, N; Odent, S; Green, J; Cossée, M; Davis, E E; Katsanis, N; Bonneau, D; Verloes, A; Poch, O; Mandel, J L; Dollfus, H

    2010-03-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), an emblematic disease in the rapidly evolving field of ciliopathies, is characterized by pleiotropic clinical features and extensive genetic heterogeneity. To date, 14 BBS genes have been identified, 3 of which have been found mutated only in a single BBS family each (BBS11/TRIM32, BBS13/MKS1 and BBS14/MKS4/NPHP6). Previous reports of systematic mutation detection in large cohorts of BBS families (n > 90) have dealt only with a single gene, or at most small subsets of the known BBS genes. Here we report extensive analysis of a cohort of 174 BBS families for 12/14 genes, leading to the identification of 28 novel mutations. Two pathogenic mutations in a single gene have been found in 117 families, and a single heterozygous mutation in 17 families (of which 8 involve the BBS1 recurrent mutation, M390R). We confirm that BBS1 and BBS10 are the most frequently mutated genes, followed by BBS12. No mutations have been found in BBS11/TRIM32, the identification of which as a BBS gene only relies on a single missense mutation in a single consanguineous family. While a third variant allele has been observed in a few families, they are in most cases missenses of uncertain pathogenicity, contrasting with the type of mutations observed as two alleles in a single gene. We discuss the various strategies for diagnostic mutation detection, including homozygosity mapping and targeted arrays for the detection of previously reported mutations. PMID:20177705

  9. Identification of 28 novel mutations in the Bardet–Biedl syndrome genes: the burden of private mutations in an extensively heterogeneous disease

    PubMed Central

    Stoetzel, C.; Vincent, M. C.; Leitch, C. C.; Laurier, V.; Danse, J. M.; Hellé, S.; Marion, V.; Bennouna-Greene, V.; Vicaire, S.; Megarbane, A.; Kaplan, J.; Drouin-Garraud, V.; Hamdani, M.; Sigaudy, S.; Francannet, C.; Roume, J.; Bitoun, P.; Goldenberg, A.; Philip, N.; Odent, S.; Green, J.; Cossée, M.; Davis, E. E.; Katsanis, N.; Bonneau, D.; Verloes, A.; Poch, O.; Mandel, J. L.; Dollfus, H.

    2013-01-01

    Bardet–Biedl syndrome (BBS), an emblematic disease in the rapidly evolving field of ciliopathies, is characterized by pleiotropic clinical features and extensive genetic heterogeneity. To date, 14 BBS genes have been identified, 3 of which have been found mutated only in a single BBS family each (BBS11/TRIM32, BBS13/MKS1 and BBS14/MKS4/NPHP6). Previous reports of systematic mutation detection in large cohorts of BBS families (n > 90) have dealt only with a single gene, or at most small subsets of the known BBS genes. Here we report extensive analysis of a cohort of 174 BBS families for 12/14 genes, leading to the identification of 28 novel mutations. Two pathogenic mutations in a single gene have been found in 117 families, and a single heterozygous mutation in 17 families (of which 8 involve the BBS1 recurrent mutation, M390R). We confirm that BBS1 and BBS10 are the most frequently mutated genes, followed by BBS12. No mutations have been found in BBS11/TRIM32, the identification of which as a BBS gene only relies on a single missense mutation in a single consanguineous family. While a third variant allele has been observed in a few families, they are in most cases missenses of uncertain pathogenicity, contrasting with the type of mutations observed as two alleles in a single gene. We discuss the various strategies for diagnostic mutation detection, including homozygosity mapping and targeted arrays for the detection of previously reported mutations. PMID:20177705

  10. Point Mutations Effects on Charge Transport Properties of the Tumor-Suppressor Gene p53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roemer, Rudolf A.; Shih, Chi-Tin; Roche, Stephan

    2008-03-01

    We report on a theoretical study of point mutations effects on charge transfer properties in the DNA sequence of the tumor-suppressor p53 gene. On the basis of effective tight-binding models which simulate hole propagation along the DNA, a statistical analysis of mutation-induced charge transfer modifications is performed. In contrast to non-cancerous mutations, mutation hotspots tend to result in significantly weaker changes of transmission properties. This suggests that charge transport could play a significant role for DNA-repairing deficiency yielding carcinogenesis.

  11. Mutated human androgen receptor gene detected in a prostatic cancer patient is also activated by estradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Elo, J.P.; Kvist, L.; Leinonen, K.; Isomaa, V.

    1995-12-01

    Androgens are necessary for the development of prostatic cancer. The mechanisms by which the originally androgen-dependent prostatic cancer cells are relieved of the requirement to use androgen for their growth are largely unknown. The human prostatic cancer cell line LNCaP has been shown to contain a point mutation in the human androgen receptor gene (hAR), suggesting that changes in the hAR may contribute to the abnormal hormone response of prostatic cells. To search for point mutations in the hAR, we used single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and a polymerase chain reaction direct sequencing method to screen 23 prostatic cancer specimens from untreated patients, 6 prostatic cancer specimens from treated patients, and 11 benign prostatic hyperplasia specimens. One mutation was identified in DNA isolated from prostatic cancer tissue, and the mutation was also detected in the leukocyte DNA of the patient and his offspring. The mutation changed codon 726 in exon E from arginine to leucine and was a germ line mutation. The mutation we found in exon E of the hAR gene does not alter the ligand binding specificity of the AR, but the mutated receptor was activated by estradiol to a significantly greater extent than the wild-type receptor. The AR gene mutation described in this study might be one explanation for the altered biological activity of prostatic cancer. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Identification and functional analysis of novel THAP1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Katja; Uflacker, Nils; Erogullari, Alev; Lohnau, Thora; Winkler, Susen; Dendorfer, Andreas; Schneider, Susanne A; Osmanovic, Alma; Svetel, Marina; Ferbert, Andreas; Zittel, Simone; Kühn, Andrea A; Schmidt, Alexander; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münchau, Alexander; Kamm, Christoph; Wittstock, Matthias; Kupsch, Andreas; Moro, Elena; Volkmann, Jens; Kostic, Vladimir; Kaiser, Frank J; Klein, Christine; Brüggemann, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Mutations in THAP1 have been associated with dystonia 6 (DYT6). THAP1 encodes a transcription factor that represses the expression of DYT1. To further evaluate the mutational spectrum of THAP1 and its associated phenotype, we sequenced THAP1 in 567 patients with focal (n = 461), segmental (n = 68), or generalized dystonia (n = 38). We identified 10 novel variants, including six missense substitutions within the DNA-binding Thanatos-associated protein domain (Arg13His, Lys16Glu, His23Pro, Lys24Glu, Pro26Leu, Ile80Val), a 1bp-deletion downstream of the nuclear localization signal (Asp191Thrfs*9), and three alterations in the untranslated regions. The effect of the missense variants was assessed using prediction tools and luciferase reporter gene assays. This indicated the Ile80Val substitution as a benign variant. The subcellular localization of Asp191Thrfs*9 suggests a disturbed nuclear import for this mutation. Thus, we consider six of the 10 novel variants as pathogenic mutations accounting for a mutation frequency of 1.1%. Mutation carriers presented mainly with early onset dystonia (<12 years in five of six patients). Symptoms started in an arm or neck and spread to become generalized in three patients or segmental in two patients. Speech was affected in four mutation carriers. In conclusion, THAP1 mutations are rare in unselected dystonia patients and functional analysis is necessary to distinguish between benign variants and pathogenic mutations. PMID:21847143

  13. Identification and functional analysis of novel THAP1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lohmann, Katja; Uflacker, Nils; Erogullari, Alev; Lohnau, Thora; Winkler, Susen; Dendorfer, Andreas; Schneider, Susanne A; Osmanovic, Alma; Svetel, Marina; Ferbert, Andreas; Zittel, Simone; Kühn, Andrea A; Schmidt, Alexander; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münchau, Alexander; Kamm, Christoph; Wittstock, Matthias; Kupsch, Andreas; Moro, Elena; Volkmann, Jens; Kostic, Vladimir; Kaiser, Frank J; Klein, Christine; Brüggemann, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in THAP1 have been associated with dystonia 6 (DYT6). THAP1 encodes a transcription factor that represses the expression of DYT1. To further evaluate the mutational spectrum of THAP1 and its associated phenotype, we sequenced THAP1 in 567 patients with focal (n=461), segmental (n=68), or generalized dystonia (n=38). We identified 10 novel variants, including six missense substitutions within the DNA-binding Thanatos-associated protein domain (Arg13His, Lys16Glu, His23Pro, Lys24Glu, Pro26Leu, Ile80Val), a 1bp-deletion downstream of the nuclear localization signal (Asp191Thrfs*9), and three alterations in the untranslated regions. The effect of the missense variants was assessed using prediction tools and luciferase reporter gene assays. This indicated the Ile80Val substitution as a benign variant. The subcellular localization of Asp191Thrfs*9 suggests a disturbed nuclear import for this mutation. Thus, we consider six of the 10 novel variants as pathogenic mutations accounting for a mutation frequency of 1.1%. Mutation carriers presented mainly with early onset dystonia (<12 years in five of six patients). Symptoms started in an arm or neck and spread to become generalized in three patients or segmental in two patients. Speech was affected in four mutation carriers. In conclusion, THAP1 mutations are rare in unselected dystonia patients and functional analysis is necessary to distinguish between benign variants and pathogenic mutations. PMID:21847143

  14. Phenotypic heterogeneity in British patients with a founder mutation in the FHL1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Sarkozy, Anna; Windpassinger, Christian; Hudson, Judith; Dougan, Charlotte F; Lecky, Bryan; Hilton-Jones, David; Eagle, Michelle; Charlton, Richard; Barresi, Rita; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the four-and-a-half LIM domain 1 (FHL1) gene, which encodes a 280-amino-acid protein containing four LIM domains and a single zinc-finger domain in the N-terminal region, have been associated with a broad clinical spectrum of X-linked muscle diseases encompassing a variety of different phenotypes. Patients might present with a scapuloperoneal myopathy, a myopathy with postural muscle atrophy and generalized hypertrophy, an Emery–Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, or an early onset myopathy with reducing bodies. It has been proposed that the phenotypic variability is related to the position of the mutation within the FHL1 gene. Here, we report on three British families with a heterogeneous clinical presentation segregating a single FHL1 gene mutation and haplotype, suggesting that this represents a founder mutation. The underlying FHL1 gene mutation was detected by direct sequencing and the founder effect was verified by haplotype analysis of the FHL1 gene locus. A 3-bp insertion mutation (p.Phe127_Thr128insIle) within the second LIM domain of the FHL1 gene was identified in all available affected family members of the three families. Haplotype analysis of the FHL1 region on Xq26 revealed that the families shared a common haplotype. The p.Phe127_Thr128insIle mutation in the FHL1 gene therefore appears to be a British founder mutation and FHL1 gene screening, in particular of exon 6, should therefore be indicated in British patients with a broad phenotypic spectrum of X-linked muscle diseases. PMID:21629301

  15. Pancreatic adenocarcinomas frequently show p53 gene mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Scarpa, A.; Capelli, P.; Mukai, K.; Zamboni, G.; Oda, T.; Iacono, C.; Hirohashi, S.

    1993-01-01

    Thirty-four pancreatic adenocarcinomas were studied for the presence of p53 gene mutations by the single-strand conformation polymorphism method and by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified fragments. p53 protein expression was immunohistochemically evaluated using monoclonal PAb1801 and polyclonal CM1 antibodies. Mutations were detected in 14 cases. The transitions were six G to A and two A to G; the transversions were one C to G and two A to C; the remaining three were frameshift mutations. Immunostaining results were identical with both antibodies. Nuclear immunohistochemical p53-positive cells were found in nine p53 mutated cases and in 12 cases in which no mutation was detected. In most of these latter cases only a minority of cancer cells showed immunohistochemical positivity. Twenty-nine cases, including all p53 mutated cancers, were known to contain codon 12 Ki-ras gene mutations. Also in the light of the demonstrated cooperation of ras and p53 gene alterations in the transformation of cultured cells, our data suggest that p53 mutation is one of the genetic defects that may have a role in the pathogenesis of a proportion of pancreatic cancers. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8494051

  16. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 gene mutation status as a prognostic biomarker in classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bubolz, Anna-Maria; Lessel, Davor; Welke, Claudia; Rüther, Nele; Viardot, Andreas; Möller, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) mutations are among the most frequent somatic mutations in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), yet their prognostic relevance in cHL is unexplored. Here, we performed laser-capture microdissection of Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells from tumor samples in a cohort of 105 cHL patients. Full-length SOCS1 gene sequencing showed mutations in 61% of all cases (n = 64/105). Affected DNA-motifs and mutation pattern suggest that many of these SOCS1 mutations are the result of aberrant somatic hypermutation and we confirmed expression of mutant alleles at the RNA level. Contingency analysis showed no significant differences of patient-characteristics with HRS-cells containing mutant vs. wild-type SOCS1. By predicted mutational consequence, mutations can be separated into those with non-truncating point mutations (‘minor’ n = 49/64 = 77%) and those with length alteration (‘major’; n = 15/64 = 23%). Subgroups did not differ in clinicopathological characteristics; however, patients with HRS-cells that contained SOCS1 major mutations suffered from early relapse and significantly shorter overall survival (P = 0.03). The SOCS1 major status retained prognostic significance in uni-(P = 0.016) and multivariate analyses (P = 0.005). Together, our data indicate that the SOCS1 mutation type qualifies as a single-gene prognostic biomarker in cHL. PMID:26336985

  17. Oculocutaneous albinism with TYRP1 gene mutations in a Caucasian patient.

    PubMed

    Rooryck, Caroline; Roudaut, Christel; Robine, Eulalie; Müsebeck, Jörg; Arveiler, Benoît

    2006-06-01

    Non-syndromic oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder with mutations identified in several genes: OCA1 (tyrosinase, TYR), OCA2 (OCA2), OCA3 (tyrosinase-related protein 1, TYRP1), and OCA4 (membrane-associated transporter protein, MATP). OCA3 was thought to be restricted to black populations, where it was clinically described as rufous or brown albinism, until the recent report of a homozygous TYRP1 mutation in Caucasian patients from a consanguineous Pakistani family. Here, we describe a German patient of Caucasian origin, with a light-yellow skin, yellow-gold hair with orange highlights, fair eyelashes, several pigmented naevi, and no tendency to tan, only to burn. Eye-colour is blue-green with substance defects of the iris. Molecular analysis did not reveal any mutation in the TYR and OCA2 genes. Two mutations were found in the TYRP1 gene: a missense mutation (c.1066G>A/p.Arg356Glu) that was inherited from the mother, and a de novo single-base deletion (c.106delT/p.Leu36X). This finding suggests that mutation screening should be extended to the TYRP1 gene in patients from all ethnic origins, at least in cases where no mutations have been identified in the other OCA genes. PMID:16704458

  18. Gigaxonin mutation analysis in patients with NIFID.

    PubMed

    Dequen, Florence; Cairns, Nigel J; Bigio, Eileen H; Julien, Jean-Pierre

    2011-08-01

    Neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease (NIFID) is a frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) characterized by frontotemporal dementia (FTD), pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs. The disease is histologically characterized by the presence of abnormal neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs) which contain α-internexin and other neuronal intermediate filament (IF) proteins. Gigaxonin (GAN) is a cytoskeletal regulating protein and the genetic cause of giant axonal neuropathy. Since the immunoreactive profile of NCIs in NIFID is similar to that observed in brain sections from Gan(Δex1/Δex1) mice, we speculated that GAN could be a candidate gene causing NIFID. Therefore, we performed a mutation analysis of GAN in NIFID patients. Although the NCIs of NIFID and Gan(Δex1/Δex1) mice were immunohistochemically similar, no GAN variant was identified in DNA obtained from well-characterized cases of NIFID. PMID:19782434

  19. Amelogenin signal peptide mutation: Correlation between mutations in the amelogenin gene (AMGX) and manifestations of X-linked amelogenesis imperfecta

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerstroem-Fermer, M.; Nilsson, M.; Pettersson, U.

    1995-03-01

    Formation of tooth enamel is a poorly understood biological process. In this study the authors describe a 9-bp deletion in exon 2 of the amelogenin gene (AMGX) causing X-linked hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta, a disease characterized by defective enamel. The mutation results in the loss of 3 amino acids and exchange of 1 in the signal peptide of the amelogenin protein. This deletion in the signal peptide probably interferes with translocation of the amelogenin protein during synthesis, resulting in the thin enamel observed in affected members of the family. The authors compare this mutation to a previously reported mutation in the amelogenin gene that causes a different disease phenotype. The study illustrates that molecular analysis can help explain the various manifestations of a tooth disorder and thereby provide insights into the mechanisms of tooth enamel formation. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Two novel CAV3 gene mutations in Japanese families.

    PubMed

    Sugie, Kazuma; Murayama, Kumiko; Noguchi, Satoru; Murakami, Nobuyuki; Mochizuki, Mika; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nonaka, Ikuya; Nishino, Ichizo

    2004-12-01

    Caveolin-3 deficiency is a rare, autosomal dominant, muscle disorder caused by caveolin-3 gene (CAV3) mutations and consists of four clinical phenotypes: limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1C (LGMD-1C), rippling muscle disease, distal myopathy, and familial hyperCKemia. So far, only 13 mutations have been reported. We here report two novel heterozygous mutations, 96C>G (N32K) and 128T>A (V43E), in the CAV3 gene in two unrelated Japanese families with LGMD-1C. Both probands presented with elevated serum CK level with calf muscle hypertrophy in their childhood but without apparent muscle weakness. However, their mothers showed mild limb-girdle weakness in addition to high CK level. Caveolin-3 was deficient and caveolae were lacking in muscles from both patients. Our data confirm that caveolin-3 deficiency causes LGMD-1C and expand the variability in CAV3 gene mutations. PMID:15564037

  1. Investigation of mutations in Erg11 gene of fluconazole resistant Candida albicans isolates from Turkish hospitals.

    PubMed

    Manastır, Lerzan; Ergon, M Cem; Yücesoy, Mine

    2011-03-01

    Widespread use of fluconazole has resulted in resistance in strains of Candida. The aim of our study was to investigate Y132H and other mutations in the ERG11 gene in conferring fluconazole resistance to C. albicans isolates. Seven fluconazole-resistant (R)/susceptible dose-dependent (SDD)/trailing and 10 fluconazole-susceptible (S) isolates were included. Restriction enzyme analysis was performed on all isolates for Y132H mutation and sequence analysis was performed for other mutations in the ERG11 gene. None of our strains had Y132H mutation. One single mutation (D153E, E266D, D116E, V437I) was detected in isolates 348, 533, 644, 1453, 2157, while the others had more than one nucleotide change. D116E and E266D, which were two mutations found in fluconazole R/SDD/trailing isolates with the highest frequency, were also detected in azole S strains. K143R, G464S, G465S and V488I mutations were determined in three of the R/SDD isolates. S412T and R469K mutations were detected only in this group of strains by sequence analysis. Mutations such as K143R, G464S, G465S, V488I, S412T and R469K in the ERG11 gene were determined to be effective mechanisms in our fluconazole R/SDD C. albicans isolates. Other mechanisms of resistance, such as overexpression of ERG11 and efflux pumps and mutations in the ERG3 gene should also be investigated. PMID:19732347

  2. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  7. Gene Coexpression Analyses Differentiate Networks Associated with Diverse Cancers Harboring TP53 Missense or Null Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Oros Klein, Kathleen; Oualkacha, Karim; Lafond, Marie-Hélène; Bhatnagar, Sahir; Tonin, Patricia N.; Greenwood, Celia M. T.

    2016-01-01

    In a variety of solid cancers, missense mutations in the well-established TP53 tumor suppressor gene may lead to the presence of a partially-functioning protein molecule, whereas mutations affecting the protein encoding reading frame, often referred to as null mutations, result in the absence of p53 protein. Both types of mutations have been observed in the same cancer type. As the resulting tumor biology may be quite different between these two groups, we used RNA-sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) from four different cancers with poor prognosis, namely ovarian, breast, lung and skin cancers, to compare the patterns of coexpression of genes in tumors grouped according to their TP53 missense or null mutation status. We used Weighted Gene Coexpression Network analysis (WGCNA) and a new test statistic built on differences between groups in the measures of gene connectivity. For each cancer, our analysis identified a set of genes showing differential coexpression patterns between the TP53 missense- and null mutation-carrying groups that was robust to the choice of the tuning parameter in WGCNA. After comparing these sets of genes across the four cancers, one gene (KIR3DL2) consistently showed differential coexpression patterns between the null and missense groups. KIR3DL2 is known to play an important role in regulating the immune response, which is consistent with our observation that this gene's strongly-correlated partners implicated many immune-related pathways. Examining mutation-type-related changes in correlations between sets of genes may provide new insight into tumor biology. PMID:27536319

  8. Mutational Analysis of TARDBP in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ticozzi, Nicola; LeClerc, Ashley Lyn; Van-Blitterswijk, Marka; Keagle, Pamela; McKenna-Yasek, Diane M.; Sapp, Peter C.; Silani, Vincenzo; Wills, Anne-Marie; Brown, Robert H.; Landers, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are often characterized by the presence of aggregates of misfolded proteins. TDP-43 is a major component of these aggregates in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), but has also been observed in Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's Diseases (PD). In addition, mutations in the TARDBP gene, encoding TDP-43, have been found to be a significant cause of familial ALS (FALS). All mutations, except for one, have been found in exon 6. To confirm this observation in ALS and to investigate whether TARDBP may play a role in the pathogenesis of AD and PD, we screened for mutations in exon 6 of the TARDBP gene in three cohorts composed of 376 AD, 463 PD (18% familial PD) and 376 ALS patients (50% FALS). We found mutations in ∼7% of FALS and ∼0.5% of sporadic ALS (SALS) patients, including two novel mutations, p.N352T and p.G384R. In contrast, we did not find TARDBP mutations in our cohort of AD and PD patients. These results suggest that mutations in TARDBP are not a significant cause of AD and PD. PMID:20031275

  9. Detection of a novel mutation in exon 20 of the BRCA1 gene.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Katarkar, Atul; Chaudhuri, Keya; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis; Basak, Jayasri

    2013-12-01

    Hereditary breast cancer constitutes 5-10% of all breast cancer cases. Inherited mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumor-suppressor genes account for the majority of hereditary breast cancer cases. The BRCA1 C-terminal region (BRCT) has a functional duplicated globular domain, which helps with DNA damage repair and cell cycle checkpoint protein control. More than 100 distinct BRCA1 missense variants with structural and functional effects have been documented within the BRCT domain. Interpreting the results of mutation screening of tumor-suppressor genes that can have high-risk susceptibility mutations is increasingly important in clinical practice. This study includes a novel mutation, p.His1746 Pro (c.5237A>C), which was found in BRCA1 exon 20 of a breast cancer patient. In silico analysis suggests that this mutation could alter the stability and orientation of the BRCT domain and the differential binding of the BACH1 substrate. PMID:24297685

  10. Mutational characteristics of ANK1 and SPTB genes in hereditary spherocytosis.

    PubMed

    Park, J; Jeong, D-C; Yoo, J; Jang, W; Chae, H; Kim, J; Kwon, A; Choi, H; Lee, J W; Chung, N-G; Kim, M; Kim, Y

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the mutational characteristics in Korean hereditary spherocytosis (HS) patients. Relevant literatures including genetically confirmed cases with well-documented clinical summaries and relevant information were also reviewed to investigate the mutational gene- or domain-specific laboratory and clinical association. Twenty-five HS patients carried one heterozygous mutation of ANK1 (n = 13) or SPTB (n = 12) but not in SPTA1, SLC4A1, or EPB42. Deleterious mutations including frameshift, nonsense, and splice site mutations were identified in 91% (21/23), and non-hotspot mutations were dispersed across multiple exons. Genotype-phenotype correlation was clarified after combined analysis of the cases and the literature review; anemia was most severe in HS patients with mutations on the ANK1 spectrin-binding domain (p < 0.05), and SPTB mutations in HS patients spared the tetramerization domain in which mutations of hereditary elliptocytosis and pyropoikilocytosis are located. Splenectomy (17/75) was more frequent in ANK1 mutant HS (32%) than in HS with SPTB mutation (10%) (p = 0.028). Aplastic crisis occurred in 32.0% of the patients (8/25; 3 ANK1 and 5 SPTB), and parvovirus B19 was detected in 88%. The study clarifies ANK1 or SPTB mutational characteristics in HS Korean patients. The genetic association of laboratory and clinical aspects suggests comprehensive considerations for genetic-based management of HS. PMID:26830532

  11. Genetic Analysis of thr Mutations in Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Stuttard, Colin

    1973-01-01

    Previous workers divided threonine-requiring (Thr−) strains of Salmonella into three phenotypes with mutations in four complementation groups. The mutations were deemed to define four genes in the order thrD-C-A-B at minute zero on the Salmonella linkage map. In the present study 12 of these mutants were reexamined together with eight new Thr− strains. The three phenotypes were: homoserine-requiring (Hom−); Thr−, feeders of Hom− strains; Thr−, nonfeeders. Exact correlation between these phenotypic groups and three complementation groups was confirmed by abortive transduction. No evidence was found for intergenic complementation between mutations in Hom− strains. It is proposed that thr mutations define three genes rather than four and that these be renamed thrA (Hom−), thrB (Thr− feeders), and thrC (Thr− nonfeeders) to correspond with the sequence of reactions in threonine biosynthesis. Double mutant trpRthr strains were used in reciprocal three-point transduction tests to establish the order of thr mutation sites. Although revisions were made in the classification or location of several mutations, there was an overall correlation of complementation group, phenotype, and map position. The present data provide a basis for further correlation of threonine genes and biosynthetic enzymes, and analysis of cross regulation in aspartate amino acid biosynthesis in Salmonella. PMID:4583208

  12. Identification of 45 novel mutations in the nebulin gene associated with autosomal recessive nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Pelin, Katarina; Sandbacka, Maria; Ranta, Salla; Donner, Kati; Muntoni, Francesco; Sewry, Caroline; Angelini, Corrado; Bushby, Kate; Van den Bergh, Peter; Iannaccone, Susan; Laing, Nigel G; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2006-09-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder of skeletal muscle caused by mutations in at least five different genes encoding thin filament proteins of the striated muscle sarcomere. We have previously described 18 different mutations in the last 42 exons of the nebulin gene (NEB) in 18 families with NM. Here we report 45 novel NEB mutations detected by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) and sequence analysis of all 183 NEB exons in NM patients from 44 families. Altogether we have identified, including the deletion of exon 55 identified in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, 64 different mutations in NEB segregating with autosomal recessive NM in 55 families. The majority (55%) of the mutations in NEB are frameshift or nonsense mutations predicted to cause premature truncation of nebulin. Point mutations (25%) or deletions (3%) affecting conserved splice signals are predicted in the majority of cases to cause in-frame exon skipping, possibly leading to impaired nebulin-tropomyosin interaction along the thin filament. Patients in 18 families had one of nine missense mutations (14%) affecting conserved amino acids at or in the vicinity of actin or tropomyosin binding sites. In addition, we found the exon 55 deletion in four families. The majority of the patients (in 49/55 families) were shown to be compound heterozygous for two different mutations. The mutations were found in both constitutively and alternatively expressed exons throughout the NEB gene, and there were no obvious mutational hotspots. Patients with more severe clinical pictures tended to have mutations predicted to be more disruptive than patients with milder forms. PMID:16917880

  13. The Association of Pre-S/S Gene Mutations and Hepatitis B Virus Vertical Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yuzhu; Zhang, Peizhen; Tan, Zhangmin; Zhou, Jin; Wu, Lingling; Hou, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    Background HBV Pre-S/S gene mutations can occur before or after implementation of combined vaccination program. HBV Prs-S/S gene mutation is a risk factor of vaccination failure and frequently causes HBV vertical transfection. Objectives To assess the association of hepatitis B virus (HBV) S gene mutations with vertical transmission. Patients and Methods In this prospective nested case-control study, a total of 60 pregnant women with positive serum HBsAg and HBV DNA ≥ 107 IU/mL were divided into a case group (15 cases with vaccination failure) and a control group (45 cases with vaccination success) according to whether their infants tested positive for HBV infection. Mothers and their children in the case group were further sub-divided into groups including mothers, newborns and infant (the same newborns at age of seven months). The pre-S/S gene mutations were detected by PCR and sequenced and its association with vertical transmission of HBV was analyzed. Results HBV genotype B was the dominant genotype in the both groups’ mothers. Each mother-child pair in case group had the same HBV genotype. There were no significant differences in mutation frequencies of HBV Pre-S/S gene between case and control groups’ mothers (Fragment 1 (M): 2 vs. 4, P > 0.05; Fragment 2 (M): 10 vs. 10, P > 0.05), or among the mothers, newborns and infants in the case group (Fragment 1 (M): 2, 2, and 3, respectively, P > 0.05; Fragment 2 (M): 10, 10 and 10 respectively, P > 0.05). Mutation site analysis of the both groups’ mothers demonstrated 108 different mutation sites in the HBV pre-S/S gene, with 105 silent mutations and 5 missense mutations including ntA826G, ntC531T, ntT667C, ntC512T and ntC546A. Among 15 mother-newborn-infant pairs with successful PCR and sequence in case group, 7 (41.17%) mother-newborn pairs, 9 (60.00%) mother-infant pairs and 3 (20.00%) infant-newborn pairs had different mutation sites. Conclusions HBV in children due to vaccination failure was resulted

  14. Progressive myoclonus epilepsy associated with SACS gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Fábio A; Canafoglia, Laura; Aljaafari, Danah; Muona, Mikko; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Berkovic, Samuel F; Franceschetti, Silvana; Andrade, Danielle M

    2016-08-01

    Pathogenic variants in the SACS gene (OMIM #604490) cause autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS). ARSACS is a neurodegenerative early-onset progressive disorder, originally described in French Canadians, but later observed elsewhere.(1) Whole-exome sequencing of a large group of patients with unclassified progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PMEs) identified 2 patients bearing SACS gene mutations.(2) We detail the PME clinical features associated with SACS mutations and suggest the inclusion of the SACS gene in diagnostic screening of PMEs. PMID:27433545

  15. Phenotypic expression in von Hippel-Lindau disease: correlations with germline VHL gene mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Maher, E R; Webster, A R; Richards, F M; Green, J S; Crossey, P A; Payne, S J; Moore, A T

    1996-01-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau disease is an autosomal dominantly inherited familial cancer syndrome predisposing to retinal and central nervous system haemangioblastomas, renal cell carcinoma, and phaeochromocytoma. VHL disease shows variable expression and interfamilial differences in predisposition to phaeochromocytoma. In a previous study of 65 VHL kindreds with defined VHL mutations we detected significant differences between VHL families with and without phaeochromocytoma such that missense mutations were more common and large deletions or protein truncating mutations less frequent in phaeochromocytoma positive families. To investigate the significance and cause of this association further, we studied 138 VHL kindreds for germline mutations and calculated the age related tumour risks for different classes of VHL gene mutations. Using SSCP, heteroduplex and Southern analysis we identified a germline VHL gene mutation in 101 families (73%). Direct sequencing of the VHL coding region further increased the mutation detection rate to 81%. In addition to precise presymptomatic diagnosis, identification of a VHL gene mutation can provide an indication of the likely phenotype. We found that large deletions and mutations predicted to cause a truncated protein were associated with a lower risk of phaeochromocytoma (6% and 9% at 30 and 50 years, respectively) than missense mutations (40% and 59%, respectively) and that missense mutations at codon 167 were associated with a high risk of phaeochromocytoma (53% and 82% at ages 30 and 50 years). Cumulative probabilities of renal cell carcinoma did not differ between the two groups (deletion/ truncation mutations: 8% and 60%, and missense mutations: 10% and 64% at ages 30 and 50 years, respectively). Age related risks for haemangioblastoma were similar in the two mutation groups, with the age related risks of cerebellar haemangioblastoma slightly less (35% and 64% v 38% and 75% at ages 30 and 50 years) and retinal haemangioblastoma

  16. Neurocognitive Profiles in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Gene Mutation Site

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Maria Grazia; Lorusso, Maria Luisa; Civati, Federica; Comi, Giacomo Pietro; Magri, Francesca; Del Bo, Roberto; Guglieri, Michela; Molteni, Massimo; Turconi, Anna Carla; Bresolin, Nereo

    2011-01-01

    The presence of nonprogressive cognitive impairment is recognized as a common feature in a substantial proportion of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To investigate the possible role of mutations along the dystrophin gene affecting different brain dystrophin isoforms and specific cognitive profiles, 42 school-age children affected with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, subdivided according to sites of mutations along the dystrophin gene, underwent a battery of tests tapping a wide range of intellectual, linguistic, and neuropsychologic functions. Full-scale intelligence quotient was approximately 1 S.D. below the population average in the whole group of dystrophic children. Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the distal portion of the dystrophin gene (involving the 140-kDa brain protein isoform, called Dp140) were generally more severely affected and expressed different patterns of strengths and impairments, compared with patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the proximal portion of the dystrophin gene (not involving Dp140). Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and distal mutations demonstrated specific impairments in visuospatial functions and visual memory (which seemed intact in proximally mutated patients) and greater impairment in syntactic processing. PMID:22000308

  17. Exome sequencing identifies recurrent mutations in NF1 and RASopathy genes in sun-exposed melanomas.

    PubMed

    Krauthammer, Michael; Kong, Yong; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; Evans, Perry; Pornputtapong, Natapol; Wu, Cen; McCusker, James P; Ma, Shuangge; Cheng, Elaine; Straub, Robert; Serin, Merdan; Bosenberg, Marcus; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak; Sznol, Mario; Kluger, Harriet M; Mane, Shrikant; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lifton, Richard P; Halaban, Ruth

    2015-09-01

    We report on whole-exome sequencing (WES) of 213 melanomas. Our analysis established NF1, encoding a negative regulator of RAS, as the third most frequently mutated gene in melanoma, after BRAF and NRAS. Inactivating NF1 mutations were present in 46% of melanomas expressing wild-type BRAF and RAS, occurred in older patients and showed a distinct pattern of co-mutation with other RASopathy genes, particularly RASA2. Functional studies showed that NF1 suppression led to increased RAS activation in most, but not all, melanoma cases. In addition, loss of NF1 did not predict sensitivity to MEK or ERK inhibitors. The rebound pathway, as seen by the induction of phosphorylated MEK, occurred in cells both sensitive and resistant to the studied drugs. We conclude that NF1 is a key tumor suppressor lost in melanomas, and that concurrent RASopathy gene mutations may enhance its role in melanomagenesis. PMID:26214590

  18. A common FGFR3 gene mutation is present in achondroplasia but not in hypochondroplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Stoilov, I.; Kilpatrick, M.W.; Tsipouras, P.

    1995-01-02

    Achondroplasia is the most common type of genetic dwarfism. It is characterized by disproportionate short stature and other skeletal anomalies resulting from a defect in the maturation of the chondrocytes in the growth plate of the cartilage. Recent studies mapped the achondroplasia gene on chromosome region 4p16.3 and identified a common mutation in the gene encoding the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3). In an analysis of 19 achondroplasia families from a variety of ethnic backgrounds we confirmed the presence of the G380R mutation in 21 of 23 achondroplasia chromosomes studied. In contrast, the G380R mutation was not found in any of the 8 hypochondroplasia chromosomes studied. Futhermore, linkage studies in a 3-generation family with hypochondroplasia show discordant segregation with markers in the 4p16.3 region suggesting that at least some cases of hypochondroplasia are caused by mutations in a gene other than FGFR3. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Exome sequencing identifies recurrent mutations in NF1 and RASopathy genes in sun-exposed melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Krauthammer, Michael; Kong, Yong; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; Evans, Perry; Pornputtapong, Natapol; Wu, Cen; McCusker, James P; Ma, Shuangge; Cheng, Elaine; Straub, Robert; Serin, Merdan; Bosenberg, Marcus; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak; Sznol, Mario; Kluger, Harriet M; Mane, Shrikant; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lifton, Richard P; Halaban, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    We report on whole-exome sequencing (WES) of 213 melanomas. Our analysis established NF1, encoding a negative regulator of RAS, as the third most frequently mutated gene in melanoma, after BRAF and NRAS. Inactivating NF1 mutations were present in 46% of melanomas expressing wild-type BRAF and RAS, occurred in older patients and showed a distinct pattern of co-mutation with other RASopathy genes, particularly RASA2. Functional studies showed that NF1 suppression led to increased RAS activation in most, but not all, melanoma cases. In addition, loss of NF1 did not predict sensitivity to MEK or ERK inhibitors. The rebound pathway, as seen by the induction of phosphorylated MEK, occurred in cells both sensitive and resistant to the studied drugs. We conclude that NF1 is a key tumor suppressor lost in melanomas, and that concurrent RASopathy gene mutations may enhance its role in melanomagenesis. PMID:26214590

  20. Human gene mutation database-a biomedical information and research resource.

    PubMed

    Krawczak, M; Ball, E V; Fenton, I; Stenson, P D; Abeysinghe, S; Thomas, N; Cooper, D N

    2000-01-01

    Although 20 years have elapsed since the first single basepair substitution underlying an inherited disease in humans was characterised at the DNA level, the initiative has only recently been taken to establish central database resources for pathological genetic variants. Disease-associated gene lesions are currently collected and publicised by the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD) in Cardiff, locus-specific mutation databases, and to some extent also by the Genome Database (GDB) and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). To date, HGMD represents the only comprehensive and publicly available database of gene lesions underlying human inherited disease. By July 1999, HGMD contained over 18,000 different mutations from some 900 human genes, the majority being single basepair substitutions. In addition to its potential as an information resource for clinicians and genetic counsellors, HGMD has allowed molecular geneticists to address a variety of biological questions through meta-analysis of the collated data. HGMD also promises to assist research workers in optimising mutation search strategies for a given gene. A questionnaire sent out to, and answered by, the editors of 20 key journals revealed that human genetics journals are increasingly reluctant to publish mutation reports. Electronic data submission and publication facilities are therefore urgently required. The World Wide Web (WWW) provides an excellent medium within which to combine the centralised management of basic mutation data, including rigorous quality control, with the possibility of publishing additional mutation-related information. In response to these needs, HGMD has both instituted a collaboration with Springer-Verlag GmbH, Heidelberg, to potentiate free online submission and electronic publication of human gene mutation data and developed links with the curators of locus-specific mutation databases. PMID:10612821

  1. RADIA: RNA and DNA Integrated Analysis for Somatic Mutation Detection

    PubMed Central

    Radenbaugh, Amie J.; Ma, Singer; Ewing, Adam; Stuart, Joshua M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Zhu, Jingchun; Haussler, David

    2014-01-01

    The detection of somatic single nucleotide variants is a crucial component to the characterization of the cancer genome. Mutation calling algorithms thus far have focused on comparing the normal and tumor genomes from the same individual. In recent years, it has become routine for projects like The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to also sequence the tumor RNA. Here we present RADIA (RNA and DNA Integrated Analysis), a novel computational method combining the patient-matched normal and tumor DNA with the tumor RNA to detect somatic mutations. The inclusion of the RNA increases the power to detect somatic mutations, especially at low DNA allelic frequencies. By integrating an individual’s DNA and RNA, we are able to detect mutations that would otherwise be missed by traditional algorithms that examine only the DNA. We demonstrate high sensitivity (84%) and very high precision (98% and 99%) for RADIA in patient data from endometrial carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma from TCGA. Mutations with both high DNA and RNA read support have the highest validation rate of over 99%. We also introduce a simulation package that spikes in artificial mutations to patient data, rather than simulating sequencing data from a reference genome. We evaluate sensitivity on the simulation data and demonstrate our ability to rescue back mutations at low DNA allelic frequencies by including the RNA. Finally, we highlight mutations in important cancer genes that were rescued due to the incorporation of the RNA. PMID:25405470

  2. RADIA: RNA and DNA integrated analysis for somatic mutation detection.

    PubMed

    Radenbaugh, Amie J; Ma, Singer; Ewing, Adam; Stuart, Joshua M; Collisson, Eric A; Zhu, Jingchun; Haussler, David

    2014-01-01

    The detection of somatic single nucleotide variants is a crucial component to the characterization of the cancer genome. Mutation calling algorithms thus far have focused on comparing the normal and tumor genomes from the same individual. In recent years, it has become routine for projects like The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to also sequence the tumor RNA. Here we present RADIA (RNA and DNA Integrated Analysis), a novel computational method combining the patient-matched normal and tumor DNA with the tumor RNA to detect somatic mutations. The inclusion of the RNA increases the power to detect somatic mutations, especially at low DNA allelic frequencies. By integrating an individual's DNA and RNA, we are able to detect mutations that would otherwise be missed by traditional algorithms that examine only the DNA. We demonstrate high sensitivity (84%) and very high precision (98% and 99%) for RADIA in patient data from endometrial carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma from TCGA. Mutations with both high DNA and RNA read support have the highest validation rate of over 99%. We also introduce a simulation package that spikes in artificial mutations to patient data, rather than simulating sequencing data from a reference genome. We evaluate sensitivity on the simulation data and demonstrate our ability to rescue back mutations at low DNA allelic frequencies by including the RNA. Finally, we highlight mutations in important cancer genes that were rescued due to the incorporation of the RNA. PMID:25405470

  3. Analysis of APC mutation in human ameloblastoma and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Liu, Bing; Sui, Chengguang; Jiang, Youhong

    2016-01-01

    As a highly conserved signaling pathway, Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction pathway plays an important role in many processes. Either in the occurrence or development of tumor, activation of this pathway takes an important place. APC inhibits Wnt/β-catenin pathway to regulate cell proliferation and differentiation. This study aimed to investigate the function of cancer suppressor gene. PCR amplification and sequencing method was used to analyze APC mutations of human clinical specimens. The pathological specimens were collected for PCR and clear electrophoretic bands were obtained after electrophoresis. The gene sequence obtained after purification and sequencing analysis was compared with the known APC gene sequence (NM_000038.5). Base mutations at APC 1543 (T → C), APC-4564 (G → A), APC-5353 (T → G), APC-5550 (T → A) and APC-5969 (G → A) locus existed in 22 (27.5 %), 12 (15 %), 5 (6.25 %), 13 (16.25 %) and 12 patients (15 %), respectively. Gene mutations existed in ameloblastoma, and the mutation loci were 1543 locus (T → C), 4564 locus (G → A), 5353 locus (T → G), 5550 locus (T → A) and 5969 locus (G → A) 15 %, respectively. APC mutation plays a certain role in monitoring the tumor malignant degree as it may indicate the transition process of ameloblastoma malignant phenotype. PMID:27065015

  4. Tyrosinase gene mutations in the Chinese Han population with OCA1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Kong, Xiang Dong; Shi, Hui Rong; Wu, Qing Hua; Jiang, Miao

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a heterogeneous autosomal recessive genetic disorder that affects melanin synthesis. OCA results in reduced or absent pigmentation in the hair, skin and eyes. Type 1 OCA (OCA1) is the result of tyrosinase (TYR) gene mutations and is a severe disease type. This study investigated TYR mutations in a Chinese cohort with OCA1. This study included two parts: patient genetic study and prenatal genetic diagnosis. A total of 30 OCA1 patients were subjected to TYR gene mutation analysis. Ten pedigrees were included for prenatal genetic diagnosis. A total of 100 unrelated healthy Chinese individuals were genotyped for controls. The coding sequence and the intron/exon junctions of TYR were analysed by bidirectional DNA sequencing. In this study, 20 mutations were identified, four of which were novel. Of these 30 OCA1 patients, 25 patients were TYR compound heterozygous; two patients carried homozygous TYR mutations; and three were heterozygous. Among the ten prenatally genotyped fetuses, three fetuses carried compound heterozygous mutations and seven carried no mutation or only one mutant allele of TYR and appeared normal at birth. In conclusion, we identified four novel TYR mutations and showed that molecular-based prenatal screening to detect TYR mutations in a fetus at risk for OCA1 provided essential information for genetic counselling of couples at risk. PMID:25577957

  5. Recurrent Deep Intronic Mutations in the SLC12A3 Gene Responsible for Gitelman's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yi-Fen; Nozu, Kandai; Iijima, Kazumoto; Morishita, Takahiro; Huang, Che-Chung; Yang, Sung-Sen; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Fang, Yu-Wei; Tseng, Min-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Gitelman's syndrome (GS) is an autosomal recessive renal tubular disorder caused by mutations in the SLC12A3 gene encoding the thiazide-sensitive Na+-Cl− cotransporter (NCC). Despite meticulous sequencing of genomic DNA, approximately one-third of GS patients are negative or heterozygotes for the known mutations. Design, Setting, Participants, & Measurements Because blood leukocytes express NCC mRNA, we evaluate whether deep intronic mutations contribute to GS patients with uniallelic or undetectable SLC12A3 mutations. Twenty-nine patients with GS (men/women = 16/13), including eight negative and 21 uniallelic SLC12A3 mutations from 19 unrelated families, and normal controls were enrolled in an academic medical center. Analysis of cDNA from blood leukocytes, sequencing of the corresponding introns of genomic DNA for abnormal transcript, and analysis of NCC protein expression from renal biopsy were performed. Results We identified nine Taiwan aboriginal patients carrying c.1670–191C→T mutations in intron 13 and 10 nonaboriginal patients carrying c.2548+253C→T mutations in intron 21 from 14 families (14/19). These two mutations undetected in 100 healthy subjects created pseudoexons containing new premature termination codons. Haplotype analysis with markers flanking SLC12A3 revealed that both mutations did not have founder effects. Apical NCC expression in the DCT of renal tissue was markedly diminished in two patients carrying deep intronic mutations. Conclusions Deep intronic mutations in SLC12A3 causing defective NCC expression can be identified with the RNA-based approach in patients with GS. c.1670–191C→T and c.2548+253C→T are hot spot mutations that can be screened in GS patients with uniallelic or negative SLC12A3 mutations. PMID:21051746

  6. De novo mutations in histone modifying genes in congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Samir; Choi, Murim; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Ma, Lijiang; Jiang, Jianming; Overton, John D.; Romano-Adesman, Angela; Bjornson, Robert D.; Breitbart, Roger E.; Brown, Kerry K.; Carriero, Nicholas J.; Cheung, Yee Him; Deanfield, John; DePalma, Steve; Fakhro, Khalid A.; Glessner, Joseph; Hakonarson, Hakon; Italia, Michael; Kaltman, Jonathan R.; Kaski, Juan; Kim, Richard; Kline, Jennie K.; Lee, Teresa; Leipzig, Jeremy; Lopez, Alexander; Mane, Shrikant M.; Mitchell, Laura E.; Newburger, Jane W.; Parfenov, Michael; Pe'er, Itsik; Porter, George; Roberts, Amy; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Sanders, Stephan J.; Seiden, Howard S.; State, Mathew W.; Subramanian, Sailakshmi; Tikhonova, Irina R.; Wang, Wei; Warburton, Dorothy; White, Peter S.; Williams, Ismee A.; Zhao, Hongyu; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Brueckner, Martina; Chung, Wendy K.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Seidman, Christine E.; Lifton, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most frequent birth defect, affecting 0.8% of live births1. Many cases occur sporadically and impair reproductive fitness, suggesting a role for de novo mutations. By analysis of exome sequencing of parent-offspring trios, we compared the incidence of de novo mutations in 362 severe CHD cases and 264 controls. CHD cases showed a significant excess of protein-altering de novo mutations in genes expressed in the developing heart, with an odds ratio of 7.5 for damaging mutations. Similar odds ratios were seen across major classes of severe CHD. We found a marked excess of de novo mutations in genes involved in production, removal or reading of H3K4 methylation (H3K4me), or ubiquitination of H2BK120, which is required for H3K4 methylation2–4. There were also two de novo mutations in SMAD2; SMAD2 signaling in the embryonic left-right organizer induces demethylation of H3K27me5. H3K4me and H3K27me mark `poised' promoters and enhancers that regulate expression of key developmental genes6. These findings implicate de novo point mutations in several hundred genes that collectively contribute to ~10% of severe CHD. PMID:23665959

  7. Prioritization of neurodevelopmental disease genes by discovery of new mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hoischen, Alexander; Krumm, Niklas; Eichler, Evan E.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in genome sequencing technologies have begun to revolutionize neurogenetics allowing the full spectrum of genetic variation to be better understood in relationship to disease. Exome sequencing of hundreds to thousands of samples from patients with autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, epilepsy, and schizophrenia provide strong evidence of the importance of de novo and gene-disruptive events. There are now several hundred new candidate genes and targeted resequencing technologies that allow screening of dozens of genes in tens of thousands of individuals with high specificity and sensitivity. The decision of which genes to pursue depends on numerous factors including recurrence, prior evidence of overlap with pathogenic copy number variants, the position of the mutation within the protein, the mutational burden among healthy individuals, and membership of the candidate gene within disease-implicated protein networks. We discuss these emerging criteria for gene prioritization and the potential impact on the field of neuroscience. PMID:24866042

  8. Gene mutation-based and specific therapies in precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangdong

    2016-04-01

    Precision medicine has been initiated and gains more and more attention from preclinical and clinical scientists. A number of key elements or critical parts in precision medicine have been described and emphasized to establish a systems understanding of precision medicine. The principle of precision medicine is to treat patients on the basis of genetic alterations after gene mutations are identified, although questions and challenges still remain before clinical application. Therapeutic strategies of precision medicine should be considered according to gene mutation, after biological and functional mechanisms of mutated gene expression or epigenetics, or the correspondent protein, are clearly validated. It is time to explore and develop a strategy to target and correct mutated genes by direct elimination, restoration, correction or repair of mutated sequences/genes. Nevertheless, there are still numerous challenges to integrating widespread genomic testing into individual cancer therapies and into decision making for one or another treatment. There are wide-ranging and complex issues to be solved before precision medicine becomes clinical reality. Thus, the precision medicine can be considered as an extension and part of clinical and translational medicine, a new alternative of clinical therapies and strategies, and have an important impact on disease cures and patient prognoses. PMID:26994883

  9. Identification of mutator genes and mutational pathways in Escherichia coli using a multicopy cloning approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hanjing; Wolff, Erika; Kim, Mandy; Diep, Amy; Miller, Jeffrey H

    2004-07-01

    We searched for genes that create mutator phenotypes when put on to a multicopy plasmid in Escherichia coli. In many cases, this will result in overexpression of the gene in question. We constructed a random shotgun library with E. coli genomic fragments between 3 and 5 kbp in length on a multicopy plasmid vector that was transformed into E. coli to screen for frameshift mutators. We identified a total of 115 independent genomic fragments that covered 17 regions on the E. coli chromosome. Further studies identified 12 genes not previously known as causing mutator phenotypes when overproduced. A striking finding is that overproduction of the multidrug resistance transcription regulator, EmrR, results in a large increase in frameshift and base substitution mutagenesis. This suggests a link between multidrug resistance and mutagenesis. Other identified genes include those encoding DNA helicases (UvrD, RecG, RecQ), truncated forms of the DNA mismatch repair protein (MutS) and a primosomal component (DnaT), a negative modulator of initiation of replication/GATC-binding protein (SeqA), a stationary phase regulator AppY, a transcriptional regulator PaaX and three putative open reading frames, ycgW, yfjY and yjiD, encoding hypothetical proteins. In addition, we found three genes encoding proteins that were previously known to cause mutator effects under overexpression conditions: error-prone polymerase IV (DinB), DNA methylase (Dam) and sigma S factor (RpoS). This genomic strategy offers an approach to identify novel mutator effects resulting from the multicopy cloning (MCC) of specific genes and therefore complementing the conventional gene inactivation approach to finding mutators. PMID:15225322

  10. Comprehensive analysis of targetable oncogenic mutations in chinese cervical cancers

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Libing; Li, Jiajia; Jiang, Wei; Shen, Xuxia; Yang, Wentao; Wu, Xiaohua; Yang, Huijuan

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in 16 targetable oncogenic genes were examined using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and direct sequencing in 285 Chinese cervical cancers. Their clinicopathological relevance and prognostic significance was assessed. Ninety-two nonsynonymous somatic mutations were identified in 29.8% of the cancers. The mutation rates were as follows: PIK3CA (12.3%), KRAS (5.3%), HER2 (4.2%), FGFR3-TACC3 fusions (3.9%), PTEN (2.8%), FGFR2 (1.8%), FGFR3 (0.7%), NRAS (0.7%), HRAS (0.4%) and EGFR (0.4%). No mutations were detected in AKT1 or BRAF, and the fusions FGFR1-TACC1, EML4-ALK, CCDC6-RET and KIF5B-RET were not found in any of the cancers. RTK and RAS mutations were more common in non-squamous carcinomas than in squamous carcinomas (P=0.043 and P=0.042, respectively). RAS mutations were more common in young patients (<45 years) (13.7% vs. 7.7%, P=0.027). RTK mutations tended to be more common in young patients, whereas PIK3CA/PTEN/AKT mutations tended to be more common in old patients. RAS mutations were significantly associated with disease relapse. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of major targetable oncogenic mutations in a large cohort of cervical cancer cases. Our data reveal that a considerable proportion of patients with cervical cancers harbor known druggable mutations and might benefit from targeted therapy. PMID:25669975

  11. EpilepsyGene: a genetic resource for genes and mutations related to epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ran, Xia; Li, Jinchen; Shao, Qianzhi; Chen, Huiqian; Lin, Zhongdong; Sun, Zhong Sheng; Wu, Jinyu

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most prevalent chronic neurological disorders, afflicting about 3.5-6.5 per 1000 children and 10.8 per 1000 elderly people. With intensive effort made during the last two decades, numerous genes and mutations have been published to be associated with the disease. An organized resource integrating and annotating the ever-increasing genetic data will be imperative to acquire a global view of the cutting-edge in epilepsy research. Herein, we developed EpilepsyGene (http://61.152.91.49/EpilepsyGene). It contains cumulative to date 499 genes and 3931 variants associated with 331 clinical phenotypes collected from 818 publications. Furthermore, in-depth data mining was performed to gain insights into the understanding of the data, including functional annotation, gene prioritization, functional analysis of prioritized genes and overlap analysis focusing on the comorbidity. An intuitive web interface to search and browse the diversified genetic data was also developed to facilitate access to the data of interest. In general, EpilepsyGene is designed to be a central genetic database to provide the research community substantial convenience to uncover the genetic basis of epilepsy. PMID:25324312

  12. EpilepsyGene: a genetic resource for genes and mutations related to epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Xia; Li, Jinchen; Shao, Qianzhi; Chen, Huiqian; Lin, Zhongdong; Sun, Zhong Sheng; Wu, Jinyu

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most prevalent chronic neurological disorders, afflicting about 3.5–6.5 per 1000 children and 10.8 per 1000 elderly people. With intensive effort made during the last two decades, numerous genes and mutations have been published to be associated with the disease. An organized resource integrating and annotating the ever-increasing genetic data will be imperative to acquire a global view of the cutting-edge in epilepsy research. Herein, we developed EpilepsyGene (http://61.152.91.49/EpilepsyGene). It contains cumulative to date 499 genes and 3931 variants associated with 331 clinical phenotypes collected from 818 publications. Furthermore, in-depth data mining was performed to gain insights into the understanding of the data, including functional annotation, gene prioritization, functional analysis of prioritized genes and overlap analysis focusing on the comorbidity. An intuitive web interface to search and browse the diversified genetic data was also developed to facilitate access to the data of interest. In general, EpilepsyGene is designed to be a central genetic database to provide the research community substantial convenience to uncover the genetic basis of epilepsy. PMID:25324312

  13. Mutations in the filaggrin gene and food allergy

    PubMed Central

    Markiewicz, Lidia; Wróblewska, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The results of long-term epidemiological studies show that the number of people suffering from allergic diseases, especially from food allergies and atopic dermatitis (AD), is still increasing. Although the research thus far has been conducted mainly in Europe, North America, and Asia, there are also data appearing from the first studies in that field among the African population. This may indicate the importance of the problem of allergic diseases. The discovery that loss-of-function mutations in the gene coding filaggrin (FLG) are the cause of ichthyosis vulgaris marked a significant breakthrough in understanding the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. The presence of mutations in the filaggrin gene is also an important factor that predisposes to such allergic diseases as: allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, atopic asthma, and food allergy. So far, over 40 loss-of-function mutations and numerous silent mutations in filaggrin have been discovered. PMID:25276250

  14. Novel PRKAR1A gene mutations in Carney Complex.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lorraine; Peng, Lan; Jean-Gilles, J; Zhang, Ximin; Wieczorek, Rosemary; Jain, Shilpa; Levine, Vicki; Osman, Iman; Prieto, Victor G; Lee, Peng

    2010-01-01

    Carney complex is a syndrome that may include cardiac and mucocutaneous myxomas, spotting skin pigmentation, and endocrine lesions. Many patients with Carney complex have been shown to have a stop codon mutation in the PRKAR1A gene in the 17q22-24 region. Here we present the case of a 57 year-old man with multiple skin lesions and cardiac myxomas. Histology of the skin lesions showed lentigenous melanocytic hyperplasia and cutaneous myxomas, confirming the diagnosis of Carney complex. Lesional and control normal tissue from the patient were identified and sequenced for the PRKAR1A gene. A germline missense mutation was identified at exon 1A. This is the first report of this mutation, and one of the few reported missense mutation associated with Carney complex. This finding strengthens the argument that there are alternative ways in which the protein kinase A 1-alpha subunit plays a role in tumorigenesis. PMID:20606737

  15. Mutations in STK11 gene in Czech Peutz-Jeghers patients

    PubMed Central

    Vasovčák, Peter; Puchmajerová, Alena; Roubalík, Jan; Křepelová, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Background Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is an autosomal dominant hereditary disease characterized by mucocutaneous pigmentation and gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyposis. The germline mutations in the serine/threonine kinase 11 (STK11) gene have been shown to be associated with the disease. Individuals with PJS are at increased risk for development of various neoplasms. The aim of the present study was to characterize the genotype and phenotype of Czech patients with PJS. Methods We examined genomic DNA of 8 individuals from five Czech families by sequencing analysis of STK11 gene, covering its promotor region, the entire coding region and the splice-site boundaries, and by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay designed for the identification of large exonic deletions or duplications of STK11 gene. Results We found pathogenic mutations in STK11 gene in two families fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of PJS and in one of three sporadic cases not complying with the criteria. The patient with the frameshift mutation in STK11 gene developed aggressive gastric cancer. No other studied proband has developed a carcinoma so far. Conclusion Our results showed that a germline mutation of STK11 gene can be found not only in probands fulfilling the PJS diagnostic criteria, but also in some sporadic cases not complying with the criteria. Moreover, we observed a new case of aggressive gastric cancer in a young patient with a frameshift mutation of STK11 gene. PMID:19615099

  16. Legius Syndrome: two novel mutations in the SPRED1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Marika; Saletti, Veronica; Micheli, Roberto; Esposito, Silvia; Molinaro, Anna; Gagliardi, Stella; Orcesi, Simona; Cereda, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The SPRED1 gene encodes a protein involved in the Ras/MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signaling pathway. Mutations in SPRED1 have been reported to cause Legius Syndrome, a rare developmental disorder that shares some clinical features with Neurofibromatosis-1. Direct sequencing was used to define SPRED1 mutations. We present two previously undescribed mutations: a frameshift mutation causing a stop codon, which was identified in an Italian family (p.Ile60Tyrfs*18) and a missense variation, which was identified in one sporadic Italian case (p.Pro422Arg). Our results led us to hypothesize that these modifications may contribute to the Legius Syndrome phenotype. Further studies will be needed to determine the roles of these mutations in the mechanisms of Legius Syndrome. PMID:27081556

  17. Novel mutations of the PRKAR1A gene in patients with acrodysostosis.

    PubMed

    Muhn, F; Klopocki, E; Graul-Neumann, L; Uhrig, S; Colley, A; Castori, M; Lankes, E; Henn, W; Gruber-Sedlmayr, U; Seifert, W; Horn, D

    2013-12-01

    Acrodysostosis is characterized by a peripheral dysostosis that is accompanied by short stature, midface hypoplasia, and developmental delay. Recently, it was shown that heterozygous point mutations in the PRKAR1A gene cause acrodysostosis with hormone resistance. By mutational analysis of the PRKAR1A gene we detected four different mutations (p.Arg368Stop, p.Ala213Thr, p.Tyr373Cys, and p.Arg335Cys) in four of seven affected patients with acrodysostosis. The combination of clinical results, endocrinological parameters and in silico mutation analysis gives evidence to suppose a pathogenic effect of each mutation. This assumption is supported by the de novo origin of these mutations. Apart from typical radiological abnormalities of the hand bones, elevated thyroid stimulating hormone and parathyroid hormone values as well as short stature are the most common findings. Less frequent features are characteristic facial dysmorphisms, sensorineural hearing loss and mild intellectual disability. These results lead to the conclusion that mutations of PKRAR1A are the major molecular cause for acrodysostosis with endocrinological abnormalities. In addition, in our cohort of 44 patients affected with brachydactyly type E (BDE) we detected only one sequence variant of PRKAR1A (p.Asp227Asn) with an unclear effect on protein function. Thus, we conclude that PRKAR1A mutations may play no major role in the pathogenesis of BDE. PMID:23425300

  18. An Ashkenazi founder mutation in the PKHD1 gene.

    PubMed

    Quint, Adina; Sagi, Michal; Carmi, Shai; Daum, Hagit; Macarov, Michal; Ben Neriah, Ziva; Meiner, Vardiela; Elpeleg, Orly; Lerer, Israela

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is usually detected late in pregnancies in embryos with large echogenic kidneys accompanied by oligohydramnios. Hundreds of private pathogenic variants have been identified in the large PKHD1 gene in various populations. Yet, because of the large size of the gene, segregation analysis of microsatellite polymorphic markers residing in the PKDH1 locus has commonly been utilized for prenatal diagnosis. Keeping in mind the limitations of this strategy, we utilized it for testing 7 families with affected fetuses or newborns, of which in 5 at least one parent was Ashkenazi, and identified that the same haplotype was shared by the majority of the Ashkenazi parents (7/9). This led us to suspect that they carry the same founder mutation. Whole Exome analysis of DNA from a fetus of one of the families detected an already known pathogenic variant c.3761_3762delCCinsG, an indel variant resulting in frameshift (p.Ala1254GlyfsX49). This variant was detected in 9 parents (5 families), of them 7 individuals were Ashkenazi and one Moroccan Jew who shared the same haplotype, and one Ashkenazi, who carried the same variant on a recombinant haplotype. Screening for this variant in 364 Ashkenazi individuals detected 2 carriers. These findings suggest that although c.3761_3762delCCinsG is considered one of the frequent variants detected in unrelated individuals, and was thought to have occurred independently on various haplotypes, it is in fact a founder mutation in the Ashkenazi population. PMID:26721323

  19. Role of p53 gene mutations in human esophageal carcinogenesis: results from immunohistochemical and mutation analyses of carcinomas and nearby non-cancerous lesions.

    PubMed

    Shi, S T; Yang, G Y; Wang, L D; Xue, Z; Feng, B; Ding, W; Xing, E P; Yang, C S

    1999-04-01

    In order to characterize p53 alterations in esophageal cancer and to study their roles in carcinogenesis, we performed gene mutation and immunohistochemical analysis on 43 surgically resected human esophageal specimens, which contain squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adjacent non-cancerous lesions, from a high-incidence area of Linzhou in Henan, China. A newly developed immunohisto-selective sequencing (IHSS) method was used to enrich the p53 immunostain-positive cells for mutation analysis. p53 gene mutations were detected in 30 out of 43 (70%) SCC cases. Among 29 SCC cases that were stained positive for p53 protein, 25 (86%) were found to contain p53 mutations. In five cases of SCC with homogeneous p53 staining, the same mutation was observed in samples taken from four different positions of each tumor. In a well differentiated cancer nest, p53 mutation was detected in only the peripheral p53-positive cells. In tumor areas with heterogeneous p53 staining, either the area stained positive for p53 had an additional mutation to the negatively stained area or both areas lacked any detectable p53 mutation. In the p53-positive non-cancerous lesions adjacent to cancer, p53 mutations were detected in seven out of 16 (47%) samples with basal cell hyperplasia (BCH), eight out of 12 (67%) samples with dysplasia (DYS), and six out of seven (86%) samples with carcinoma in situ (CIS). All mutations found in lesions with DYS and CIS were the same as those in the nearby SCC. In seven cases of BCH containing mutations, only three had the same mutations as the nearby SCC. The results suggest that p53 mutation is an early event in esophageal carcinogenesis occurring in most of the DYS and CIS lesions, and cells with such mutations will progress to carcinoma, whereas the role of p53 mutations in BCH is less clear. PMID:10223186

  20. Analysis of opa1 isoforms expression and apoptosis regulation in autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) patients with mutations in the opa1 gene.

    PubMed

    Formichi, Patrizia; Radi, Elena; Giorgi, Eleonora; Gallus, Gian Nicola; Brunetti, Jlenia; Battisti, Carla; Rufa, Alessandra; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Franceschini, Rossella; Bracci, Luisa; Federico, Antonio

    2015-04-15

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) is a hereditary optic neuropathy characterized by bilateral symmetrical visual loss, decrease in retinal ganglion cells and a loss of myelin within the optic nerve. ADOA is associated to mutations in Optic atrophy 1 gene (OPA1), which encodes a mitochondrial protein involved in cristae remodeling, maintenance of mitochondrial membrane integrity, mitochondrial fusion and apoptosis regulation. We thus evaluated the rate of apoptosis and the expression levels of OPA1 isoforms in ADOA and control cells. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from eight patients with OPA1 mutation and age matched controls were cultivated both in basal conditions or with 2-deoxy-D-ribose, a reducing sugar that induces apoptosis through oxidative stress. Apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry, phosphatidylserine translocation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization and caspase 3 activation. We also analyzed the expression levels of OPA1 isoforms in ADOA and control cells cultured with and without 2-deoxy-D-ribose. We showed an increased percentage of apoptotic cells in ADOA patients compared to controls, both in basal culture conditions and after 2-deoxy-D-ribose treatment. This suggested a great susceptibility of ADOA cells to oxidative stress and a strong correlation between OPA1 protein dysfunctions and morphological-functional alterations to mitochondria. Moreover OPA1 protein expression was significantly decreased in lymphocytes from the ADOA patients after 2-deoxy-D-ribose treatment, implying a great sensitivity of the mutated protein to free radical damage. Concluding, we could confirm that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis may play a key role in the pathophysiological process bringing to retinal ganglion cells degeneration in ADOA. PMID:25796301

  1. Hemophilia B: Molecular Pathogenesis and Mutation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goodeve, Anne C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hemophilia B is an X-chromosome-linked inherited bleeding disorder primarily affecting males, while those carrier females having reduced factor IX:C levels may also experience some bleeding issues. Genetic analysis has been undertaken for hemophilia B since the mid-1980s, both through linkage analysis to track inheritance of an affected allele and to enable determination of the familial mutation. Mutation analysis using PCR and Sanger sequencing along with dosage analysis for detection of large deletions/duplications enables mutation detection in more than 97% of hemophila B patients. Risk of inhibitory antibodies, reported in ~2% of hemophilia B patients can be predicted, especially in patients with large deletions and these individuals are also at risk of anaphylaxis, and nephrotic syndrome if they receive immune tolerance induction. Inhibitors also occur in patients with nonsense mutations, occasionally with small insertions/deletions, splice mutations and rarely with missense mutations (p.Gln237Lys and p.Gln241His). Hemophilia B results from several different mechanisms and those associated with hemophilia B Leyden, ribosome readthrough of nonsense mutations and apparently "silent" changes that do not alter amino acid coding are explored. Large databases of genetic variants in healthy individuals and patients with a range of disorders including hemophilia B are yielding useful information on sequence variant frequency to help establish possible variant pathogenicity whilst a growing range of algorithms is available to help predict pathogenicity for previously unreported variants. PMID:25851415

  2. MMACHC gene mutation in familial hypogonadism with neurological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Shi, Changhe; Shang, Dandan; Sun, Shilei; Mao, Chengyuan; Qin, Jie; Luo, Haiyang; Shao, Mingwei; Chen, Zhengguang; Liu, Yutao; Liu, Xinjing; Song, Bo; Xu, Yuming

    2015-12-15

    Recent studies have convincingly documented that hypogonadism is a component of various hereditary disorders and is often recognized as an important clinical feature in combination with various neurological symptoms, yet, the causative genes in a few related families are still unknown. High-throughput sequencing has become an efficient method to identify causative genes in related complex hereditary disorders. In this study, we performed exome sequencing in a family presenting hypergonadotropic hypogonadism with neurological presentations of mental retardation, epilepsy, ataxia, and leukodystrophy. After bioinformatic analysis and Sanger sequencing validation, we identified compound heterozygous mutations: c.482G>A (p.R161Q) and c.609G>A (p.W203X) in MMACHC gene in this pedigree. MMACHC was previously confirmed to be responsible for methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) combined with homocystinuria, cblC type (cblC disease), a hereditary vitamin B12 metabolic disorder. Biochemical and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) examinations in this pedigree further supported the cblC disease diagnosis. These results indicated that hypergonadotropic hypogonadism may be a novel clinical manifestation of cblC disease, but more reports on additional patients are needed to support this hypothesis. PMID:26283149

  3. Gene mutations and molecularly targeted therapies in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hatzimichael, Eleftheria; Georgiou, Georgios; Benetatos, Leonidas; Briasoulis, Evangelos

    2013-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) can progress quickly and without treatment can become fatal in a short period of time. However, over the last 30 years fine-tuning of therapeutics have increased the rates of remission and cure. Cytogenetics and mutational gene profiling, combined with the option of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation offered in selected patients have further optimized AML treatment on a risk stratification basis in younger adults. However there is still an unmet medical need for effective therapies in AML since disease relapses in almost half of adult patients becoming refractory to salvage therapy. Improvements in the understanding of molecular biology of cancer and identification of recurrent mutations in AML provide opportunities to develop targeted therapies and improve the clinical outcome. In the spectrum of identified gene mutations, primarily targetable lesions are gain of function mutations of tyrosine kinases FLT3, JAK2 and cKIT for which specific, dual and multi-targeted small molecule inhibitors have been developed. A number of targeted compounds such as sorafenib, quizartinib, lestaurtinib, midostaurin, pacritinib, PLX3397 and CCT137690 are in clinical development. For loss-of-function gene mutations, which are mostly biomarkers of favorable prognosis, combined therapeutic approaches can maximize the therapeutic efficacy of conventional therapy. Apart from mutated gene products, proteins aberrantly overexpressed in AML appear to be clinically significant therapeutic targets. Such a molecule for which targeted inhibitors are currently in clinical development is PLK1. We review characteristic gene mutations, discuss their biological functions and clinical significance and present small molecule compounds in clinical development, which are expected to have a role in treating AML subtypes with characteristic molecular alterations. PMID:23358589

  4. Mutation/SNP analysis in EF-hand calcium binding domain of mitochondrial Ca[Formula: see text] uptake 1 gene in bipolar disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Safari, Roghaiyeh; Salimi, Reza; Tunca, Zeliha; Ozerdem, Aysegul; Ceylan, Deniz; Sakizli, Meral

    2016-06-01

    Calcium signaling is important for synaptic plasticity, generation of brain rhythms, regulating neuronal excitability, data processing and cognition. Impairment in calcium homeostasis contributed to the development of psychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorder (BP). MCU is the most important calcium transporter in mitochondria inner membrane responsible for influx of Ca[Formula: see text]. MICU1 is linked with MCU and has two canonical EF hands that are vital for its activity and regulates MCU-mediated Ca[Formula: see text] influx. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the role of genetic alteration of EF hand calcium binding motifs of MICU1 on the development of BP. We examined patients with BP, first degree relatives of these patients and healthy volunteers for mutations and polymorphisms in EF hand calcium binding motifs of MICU1. The result showed no SNP/mutation in BP patients, in healthy subjects and in first degree relatives. Additionally, alignment of the EF hand calcium binding regions among species (Gallus-gallus, Canis-lupus-familiaris, Bos-taurus, Mus-musculus, Rattus-norvegicus, Pan-troglodytes, Homosapiens and Danio-rerio) showed exactly the same amino acids (DLNGDGEVDMEE and DCDGNGELSNKE) except in one of the calcium binding domain of Danio-rerio that there was only one difference; leucine instead of Methionine. Our results showed that the SNP on EF-hand Ca[Formula: see text] binding domains of MICU1 gene had no effect in phenotypic characters of BP patients. PMID:27297032

  5. Genetic Analysis of 63 Mutations Affecting Maize Kernel Development Isolated from Mutator Stocks

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, M. J.; Stinard, P. S.; James, M. G.; Myers, A. M.; Robertson, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Sixty-three mutations affecting development of the maize kernel were isolated from active Robertson's Mutator (Mu) stocks. At least 14 previously undescribed maize gene loci were defined by mutations in this collection. Genetic mapping located 53 of these defective kernel (dek) mutations to particular chromosome arms, and more precise map determinations were made for 21 of the mutations. Genetic analyses identified 20 instances of allelism between one of the novel mutations and a previously described dek mutation, or between new dek mutations identified in this study; phenotypic variability was observed in three of the allelic series. Viability testing of homozygous mutant kernels identified numerous dek mutations with various pleiotropic effects on seedling and plant development. The mutations described here presumably arose by insertion of a Mu transposon within a dek gene; thus, many of the affected loci are expected to be accessible to molecular cloning via transposon-tagging. PMID:8138165

  6. Glutaric acidemia type II: gene structure and mutations of the electron transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO) gene.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Stephen I; Binard, Robert J; Woontner, Michael R; Frerman, Frank E

    2002-01-01

    Glutaric acidemia type II is a human inborn error of metabolism which can be due to defects in either subunit of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or in ETF:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO), but few disease-causing mutations have been described. The ETF:QO gene is located on 4q33, and contains 13 exons. Primers to amplify these exons are presented, together with mutations identified by molecular analysis of 20 ETF:QO-deficient patients. Twenty-one different disease-causing mutations were identified on 36 of the 40 chromosomes. PMID:12359134

  7. Exome Analyses of Long QT Syndrome Reveal Candidate Pathogenic Mutations in Calmodulin-Interacting Genes.

    PubMed

    Shigemizu, Daichi; Aiba, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Ozaki, Kouichi; Miya, Fuyuki; Satake, Wataru; Toda, Tatsushi; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Fujimoto, Akihiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kubo, Michiaki; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Shimizu, Wataru; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an arrhythmogenic disorder that can lead to sudden death. To date, mutations in 15 LQTS-susceptibility genes have been implicated. However, the genetic cause for approximately 20% of LQTS patients remains elusive. Here, we performed whole-exome sequencing analyses on 59 LQTS and 61 unaffected individuals in 35 families and 138 unrelated LQTS cases, after genetic screening of known LQTS genes. Our systematic analysis of familial cases and subsequent verification by Sanger sequencing identified 92 candidate mutations in 88 genes for 23 of the 35 families (65.7%): these included eleven de novo, five recessive (two homozygous and three compound heterozygous) and seventy-three dominant mutations. Although no novel commonly mutated gene was identified other than known LQTS genes, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analyses revealed ten new pathogenic candidates that directly or indirectly interact with proteins encoded by known LQTS genes. Furthermore, candidate gene based association studies using an independent set of 138 unrelated LQTS cases and 587 controls identified an additional novel candidate. Together, mutations in these new candidates and known genes explained 37.1% of the LQTS families (13 in 35). Moreover, half of the newly identified candidates directly interact with calmodulin (5 in 11; comparison with all genes; p=0.042). Subsequent variant analysis in the independent set of 138 cases identified 16 variants in the 11 genes, of which 14 were in calmodulin-interacting genes (87.5%). These results suggest an important role of calmodulin and its interacting proteins in the pathogenesis of LQTS. PMID:26132555

  8. Identification of two poorly prognosed ovarian carcinoma subtypes associated with CHEK2 germ-line mutation and non-CHEK2 somatic mutation gene signatures.

    PubMed

    Ow, Ghim Siong; Ivshina, Anna V; Fuentes, Gloria; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A

    2014-01-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HG-SOC), a major histologic type of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), is a poorly-characterized, heterogeneous and lethal disease where somatic mutations of TP53 are common and inherited loss-of-function mutations in BRCA1/2 predispose to cancer in 9.5-13% of EOC patients. However, the overall burden of disease due to either inherited or sporadic mutations is not known. We performed bioinformatics analyses of mutational and clinical data of 334 HG-SOC tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas to identify novel tumor-driving mutations, survival-significant patient subgroups and tumor subtypes potentially driven by either hereditary or sporadic factors. We identified a sub-cluster of high-frequency mutations in 22 patients and 58 genes associated with DNA damage repair, apoptosis and cell cycle. Mutations of CHEK2, observed with the highest intensity, were associated with poor therapy response and overall survival (OS) of these patients (P = 8.00e-05), possibly due to detrimental effect of mutations at the nuclear localization signal. A 21-gene mutational prognostic signature significantly stratifies patients into relatively low or high-risk subgroups with 5-y OS of 37% or 6%, respectively (P = 7.31e-08). Further analysis of these genes and high-risk subgroup revealed 2 distinct classes of tumors characterized by either germline mutations of genes such as CHEK2, RPS6KA2 and MLL4, or somatic mutations of other genes in the signature. Our results could provide improvement in prediction and clinical management of HG-SOC, facilitate our understanding of this complex disease, guide the design of targeted therapeutics and improve screening efforts to identify women at high-risk of hereditary ovarian cancers distinct from those associated with BRCA1/2 mutations. PMID:24879340

  9. Frequency of mutations and polymorphisms in borderline ovarian tumors of known cancer genes.

    PubMed

    Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Shipman, Kristy; Kitsou-Mylona, Isidora; de Castro, David G; Hird, Vicky; Brown, Robert; Flanagan, James; Gabra, Hani; Mills, Gordon B; Agarwal, Roshan; El-Bahrawy, Mona

    2013-04-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors represent an understudied subset of ovarian tumors. Most studies investigating aberrations in borderline tumors have focused on KRAS/BRAF mutations. In this study, we conducted an extensive analysis of mutations and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in borderline ovarian tumors. Using the Sequenom MassArray platform, we investigated 160 mutations/polymorphisms in 33 genes involved in cell signaling, apoptosis, angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation and cellular senescence. Of 52 tumors analyzed, 33 were serous, 18 mucinous and 1 endometrioid. KRAS c.35G>A p.Gly12Asp mutations were detected in eight tumors (six serous and two mucinous), BRAF V600E mutations in two serous tumors, and PIK3CA H1047Y and PIK3CA E542K mutations in a serous and an endometrioid BOT, respectively. CTNNB1 mutation was detected in a serous tumor. Potentially functional polymorphisms were found in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), ABCB1, FGFR2 and PHLPP2. VEGF polymorphisms were the most common and detected at four loci. PHLPP2 polymorphisms were more frequent in mucinous as compared with serous tumors (P=0.04), with allelic imbalance in one case. This study represents the largest and most comprehensive analysis of mutations and functional SNPs in borderline ovarian tumors to date. At least 25% of borderline ovarian tumors harbor somatic mutations associated with potential response to targeted therapeutics. PMID:23174937

  10. Frequency of mutations and polymorphisms in borderline ovarian tumors of known cancer genes

    PubMed Central

    Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Shipman, Kristy; Kitsou-Mylona, Isidora; de Castro, David Gonzalez; Hird, Vicky; Brown, Robert; Flanagan, James; Hani Gabra, H; Mills, Gordon B.; Agarwal, R; El-Bahrawy, Mona

    2013-01-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors represent an understudied subset of ovarian tumors. Most studies investigating aberrations in borderline tumors have focused on KRAS/BRAF mutations. In this study we conducted an extensive analysis of mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms in borderline ovarian tumors. Using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform we investigated 160 mutations/polymorphisms in 33 genes involved in cell signalling, apoptosis, angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation, and cellular senescence. Of 52 tumors analysed, 33 were serous, 18 mucinous and 1 endometrioid. KRAS c.35G>A p.Gly12Asp mutations were detected in 8 tumors (6 serous and 2 mucinous), BRAF V600E mutations in 2 serous tumors, and PIK3CA H1047Y and PIK3CA E542K mutations in a serous and an endometrioid BOT respectively. CTNNB1 mutation was detected in a serous tumor. Potentially functional polymorphisms were found in VEGF, ABCB1, FGFR2 and PHLPP2. VEGF polymorphisms were the most common and detected at 4 loci. PHLPP2 polymorphisms were more frequent in mucinous as compared to serous tumors (p=0.04), with allelic imbalance in one case. This study represents the largest and most comprehensive analysis of mutations and functional single nucleotide polymorphisms in borderline ovarian tumors to date. At least 25% of borderline ovarian tumors harbour somatic mutations associated with potential response to targeted therapeutics. PMID:23174937

  11. Monoallelic thyroid peroxidase gene mutation in a patient with congenital hypothyroidism with total iodide organification defect.

    PubMed

    Neves, Solange Caires; Mezalira, Paola Rossi; Dias, Vera M A; Chagas, Antonio J; Viana, Maria; Targovnik, Hector; Knobel, Meyer; Medeiros-Neto, Geraldo; Rubio, Ileana G S

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the genetic defect of a patient with dyshormonogenetic congenital hypothyroidisms (CH) with total iodide organification defect (TIOD). A male child diagnosed with CH during neonatal screening. Laboratory tests confirmed the permanent and severe CH with TIOD (99% perchlorate release). The coding sequence of TPO, DUOX2, and DUOXA2 genes and 2957 base pairs (bp) of the TPO promoter were sequenced. Molecular analysis of patient's DNA identified the heterozygous duplication GGCC (c.1186_1187insGGCC) in exon 8 of the TPO gene. No additional mutation was detected either in the TPO gene, TPO promoter, DUOX2 or DUOXA2 genes. We have described a patient with a clear TIOD causing severe goitrous CH due to a monoallelic TPO mutation. A plausible explanation for the association between an autosomal recessive disorder with a single TPO-mutated allele is the presence of monoallelic TPO expression. PMID:21340161

  12. Novel LMNA Gene Mutation in a Patient With Atypical Werner's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Doh, Yun Jeong; Kim, Hee Kyoung; Jung, Eui Dal; Choi, Seung Hee; Kim, Jung Guk; Kim, Bo Wan

    2009-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) and Werner's syndrome are representative types of progeroid syndrome. LMNA (Lamin A/C) gene mutation with atypical Werner's syndrome have recently been reported. Atypical Werner's syndrome with the severe metabolic complications, the extent of the lipodystrophy is associated with A133L mutation in the LMNA gene and these patients present with phenotypically heterogeneous disorders. We experienced a 15-yr-old Korean female with progeroid features, generalized lipodystrophy, hypertriglyceridemia, fatty liver, steatohepatitis, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Skin fibroblasts from the patient showed marked abnormal nuclear morphology, compared with that from normal persons. Gene analysis revealed that this patient had T506del of exon 2 in the LMNA gene. We report here the first case of atypical Werner's syndrome with frameshift mutation that was caused by T506del. PMID:19270485

  13. TINF2 Gene Mutation in a Patient with Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, T. W.; van der Vis, J. J.; van Oosterhout, M. F. M.; van Es, H. W.; van Kessel, D. A.; Grutters, J. C.; van Moorsel, C. H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a frequent manifestation of telomere syndromes. Telomere gene mutations are found in up to 25% and 3% of patients with familial disease and sporadic disease, respectively. The telomere gene TINF2 encodes an eponymous protein that is part of the shelterin complex, a complex involved in telomere protection and maintenance. A TINF2 gene mutation was recently reported in a family with pulmonary fibrosis. We identified a heterozygous Ser245Tyr mutation in the TINF2 gene of previously healthy female patient that presented with progressive cough due to pulmonary fibrosis as well as panhypogammaglobulinemia at age 52. Retrospective multidisciplinary evaluation classified her as a case of possible idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Telomere length-measurement indicated normal telomere length in the peripheral blood compartment. This is the first report of a TINF2 mutation in a patient with sporadic pulmonary fibrosis, which represents another association between TINF2 mutations and this disease. Furthermore, this case underlines the importance of telomere dysfunction and not telomere length alone in telomere syndromes and draws attention to hypogammaglobulinemia as a manifestation of telomere syndromes. PMID:27088026

  14. Mutation analysis in patients with Wilson disease: identification of 4 novel mutations. Mutation in brief no. 250. Online.

    PubMed

    Haas, R; Gutierrez-Rivero, B; Knoche, J; Böker, K; Manns, M P; Schmidt, H H

    1999-01-01

    In order to obtain novel mutations in the recently discovered Wilson disease gene, we screened 5 unrelated German individuals for mutations in the 21 exons and their flanking intronic sequences. We detected 9 mutations affecting the Wilson disease gene. Four of those, designated 802-808delTGTAAGT, 2008-2013delTATATG, Cys985Thr, and Ile1148Thr have not yet been reported. One patient had a homozygous mutation whereas the remaining four subjects were compound heterozygous. Therefore these data confirm, that mutations causing Wilson disease are frequently found in affected subjects and they are very heterogenous. PMID:10447265

  15. Mutation of the PIK3CA gene as a prognostic factor in patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    STEC, RAFAŁ; SEMENIUK-WOJTAŚ, ALEKSANDRA; CHARKIEWICZ, RADOSŁAW; BODNAR, LUBOMIR; KORNILUK, JAN; SMOTER, MARTA; CHYCZEWSKI, LECH; NIKLIŃSKI, JACEK; SZCZYLIK, CEZARY

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with ~700,000 mortalities occurring due to CRC in 2012. The treatment options are effective in a small percentage of patients, and it is important to identify specific biomarkers in order to determine patients for whom the available therapies will be beneficial. It has been hypothesised that the PIK3CA gene mutation may affect the response to therapy of patients with metastatic CRC. In the present study, primary tumour specimens were collected from 156 patients with CRC who were treated in the Military Institute of Medicine in Warsaw (Warsaw, Poland). Codons 12 and 13 of exon 1 of KRAS, exons 11 and 15 of BRAF and exons 9 and 20 of PIK3CA were analysed for mutation using direct sequencing. The prognostic value of each mutation and the clinical and pathological variables of these tumours were estimated. The results revealed that PIK3CA mutations were present in 15 patients (9.6%), of whom seven (46.7%) possessed mutations in codon 9 and eight (53.3%) possessed mutations in codon 20. Mutation in the PIK3CA gene was detected in six patients with KRAS gene mutations, which accounted for 40% of PIK3CA-mutated tumours, and in one patient with BRAF mutations, which accounted for 6.6% of PIK3CA-mutated tumours. No significant differences were identified between the overall survival (OS) rates of patients with PIK3CA mutations (median OS, 56.7 months) and those with wild-type PIK3CA genes (median OS, 47.6 months) (P=0.1270). Univariate analysis identified that the following prognostic factors affected the OS rate in the current patient cohort: Gender, female patients survived for 57.5 months compared with 39.3 months for male patients (P=0.0111); and lymph node involvement grade, as survival of patients without lymph node metastases was 61.4 months compared with 45.4 months in patients presenting with metastases (P=0.0122). The findings of the present analysis indicate that PIK3CA mutation status is not a

  16. Gene-Specific Function Prediction for Non-Synonymous Mutations in Monogenic Diabetes Genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quan; Liu, Xiaoming; Gibbs, Richard A.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Polychronakos, Constantin; Qu, Hui-Qi

    2014-01-01

    The rapid progress of genomic technologies has been providing new opportunities to address the need of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) molecular diagnosis. However, whether a new mutation causes MODY can be questionable. A number of in silico methods have been developed to predict functional effects of rare human mutations. The purpose of this study is to compare the performance of different bioinformatics methods in the functional prediction of nonsynonymous mutations in each MODY gene, and provides reference matrices to assist the molecular diagnosis of MODY. Our study showed that the prediction scores by different methods of the diabetes mutations were highly correlated, but were more complimentary than replacement to each other. The available in silico methods for the prediction of diabetes mutations had varied performances across different genes. Applying gene-specific thresholds defined by this study may be able to increase the performance of in silico prediction of disease-causing mutations. PMID:25136813

  17. [A patient with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with a new valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene mutation].

    PubMed

    Segawa, Mari; Hoshi, Akihiko; Naruse, Hiroya; Kuroda, Masayuki; Bujo, Hideaki; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    In this communication, we report a patient with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) associated with a familial dyslipidemia. Genetic analysis revealed a novel heterozygous valosin-containing protein (VCP) mutation (c.466G>T (p.G156C)). The other gene analysis also disclosed a known homozygous LCAT mutation (c.101C>T (p.P10L)). VCP gene mutation shown should be responsible for familial ALS because of following reasons. The patient's father also was also affected by ALS. The VCP gene mutation (p.G156C) in the patient was located in the vicinity of a site frequently associated with pathogenic VCP variants. The same amino acid transformation as that of this patient has been reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of inclusion body myopathy with Paget's disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia. This is the first case report of rare association of ALS with VCP mutation and dyslipidemia with LCAT mutation. PMID:26511028

  18. Novel Mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 Genes in Mexican Patients with Lynch Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Ortiz, Jose Miguel; Ayala-Madrigal, María de la Luz; Corona-Rivera, Jorge Román; Maciel-Gutiérrez, Víctor; Franco-Topete, Ramón Antonio; Armendáriz-Borunda, Juan; Pérez-Carbonell, Lucia; Rhees, Jennifer; Gutiérrez-Angulo, Melva

    2016-01-01

    Background. Lynch Syndrome (LS) is characterized by germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. This syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and is characterized by early onset colorectal cancer (CRC) and extracolonic tumors. The aim of this study was to identify mutations in MMR genes in three Mexican patients with LS. Methods. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed as a prescreening method to identify absent protein expression. PCR, Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography (dHPLC), and Sanger sequencing complemented the analysis. Results. Two samples showed the absence of nuclear staining for MLH1 and one sample showed loss of nuclear staining for MSH2. The mutations found in MLH1 gene were c.2103+1G>C in intron 18 and compound heterozygous mutants c.1852_1854delAAG (p.K618del) and c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A) in exon 16. In the MSH2 gene, we identified mutation c.638dupT (p.L213fs) in exon 3. Conclusions. This is the first report of mutations in MMR genes in Mexican patients with LS and these appear to be novel. PMID:27247567

  19. GeneChip{sup {trademark}} screening assay for cystic fibrosis mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Cronn, M.T.; Miyada, C.G.; Fucini, R.V.

    1994-09-01

    GeneChip{sup {trademark}} assays are based on high density, carefully designed arrays of short oligonucleotide probes (13-16 bases) built directly on derivatized silica substrates. DNA target sequence analysis is achieved by hybridizing fluorescently labeled amplification products to these arrays. Fluorescent hybridization signals located within the probe array are translated into target sequence information using the known probe sequence at each array feature. The mutation screening assay for cystic fibrosis includes sets of oligonucleotide probes designed to detect numerous different mutations that have been described in 14 exons and one intron of the CFTR gene. Each mutation site is addressed by a sub-array of at least 40 probe sequences, half designed to detect the wild type gene sequence and half designed to detect the reported mutant sequence. Hybridization with homozygous mutant, homozygous wild type or heterozygous targets results in distinctive hybridization patterns within a sub-array, permitting specific discrimination of each mutation. The GeneChip probe arrays are very small (approximately 1 cm{sup 2}). There miniature size coupled with their high information content make GeneChip probe arrays a useful and practical means for providing CF mutation analysis in a clinical setting.

  20. Mutation of the PAX6 gene in patients with autosomal dominant keratitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mirzayans, F; Pearce, W G; MacDonald, I M; Walter, M A

    1995-01-01

    Autosomal dominant keratitis (ADK) is an eye disorder chiefly characterized by corneal opacification and vascularization and by foveal hypoplasia. Aniridia (shown recently to result from mutations in the PAX6 gene) has overlapping clinical findings and a similar pattern of inheritance with ADK. On the basis of these similarities, we used a candidate-gene approach to investigate whether mutations in the PAX6 gene also result in ADK. Significant linkage was found between two polymorphic loci in the PAX6 region and ADK in a family with 15 affected members in four generations (peak LOD score = 4.45; theta = .00 with D11S914), consistent with PAX6 mutations being responsible for ADK. SSCP analysis and direct sequencing revealed a mutation in the PAX6 exon 11 splice-acceptor site. The predicted consequent incorrect splicing results in truncation of the PAX6 proline-serine-threonine activation domain. The SeyNeu mouse results from a mutation in the Pax-6 exon 10 splice-donor site that produces a PAX6 protein truncated from the same point as occurs in our family with ADK. Therefore, the SeyNeu mouse is an excellent animal model of ADK. The finding that mutations in PAX6 underlie ADK, along with a recent report that mutations in PAX6 also underlie Peters anomaly, implicates PAX6 broadly in human anterior segment malformations. Images Figure 2 Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:7668281

  1. Fumarate hydratase gene mutation in two young patients with sporadic uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Kubinova, Kristyna; Tesarova, Marketa; Hansikova, Hana; Vesela, Kamila; Kuzel, David; Mara, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Fumarate hydratase (FH) is a key enzyme of the Krebs cycle. Germline mutations in the FH gene encoding fumarate hydratase cause autosomal dominant syndromes multiple cutaneous and uterine leiomyomata and hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). Few data have been published on the role of FH gene mutation in development of uterine fibroids outside the context of multiple cutaneous and uterine leiomyomata /HLRCC. We report two FH gene mutations, one novel and one previously described, in two young patients with sporadic uterine fibroids and decreased fumarate hydratase activity in lymphocytes. In patient 1, a novel heterozygous mutation c.892G>C was found. In patient 2 we detected heterozygous mutation c.584T>C. Both the patients had a negative family history for renal cancer and cutaneous leiomyomatosis. None of the relatives, however, underwent renal imaging at the time of writing. FH mutation carriers may be easily identified by analysis of fumarate hydratase activity in blood lymphocytes. We suggest performing fumarate hydratase activity or FH mutation screening in women with onset of uterine fibroids in their 20s and family history of uterine fibroids or other HLRCC-associated malignancies. PMID:22764886

  2. Novel VANGL1 Gene Mutations in 144 Slovakian, Romanian and German Patients with Neural Tube Defects

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, O.; Kirmes, I.; Thiede, A.; Lechno, S.; Gocan, H.; Florian, I.S.; Haaf, T.; Zechner, U.; Sabova, L.; Horn, F.

    2012-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are a group of congenital malformations of the central nervous system occurring at an average rate of 1 per 1,000 human pregnancies worldwide. Numerous genetic and environmental factors are discussed to be relevant in their etiology. In mice, mutants in >200 genes including the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway are known to cause NTDs, and recently, heterozygous mutations in the human VANGL1 gene have been described in a small subset of patients with NTDs. We performed a VANGL1 mutation analysis in 144 unrelated individuals with NTDs from Slovakia, Romania and Germany and identified 3 heterozygous missense mutations: c.613G>A (p.Gly205Arg) with an open spina bifida (lumbosacral meningomyelocele), c.557G>A (p.Arg186His) with a closed spina bifida (tethered cord and spinal lipoma) and c.518G>A (p.Arg173His) with an unknown NTD. The c.613G>A mutation was also found in a healthy sibling. None of the mutations were described previously. Findings support that heterozygous VANGL1 mutations represent hypomorphs or conditional mutants predisposing to NTDs and occur at a frequency of approximately 2.1% of open and closed spinal NTDs. The mutations (p.Arg173His, p.Arg186His, p.Gly205Arg) modified conserved regions of the VANGL1 protein and shared similarities with previously described mutants, providing further evidence for the presence of mutational hot spots in these patients. PMID:23326252

  3. Novel plasminogen gene mutations in Turkish patients with type I plasminogen deficiency.

    PubMed

    Dönmez-Demir, Buket; Celkan, Tiraje; Sarper, Nazan; Deda, Gülhis; İnce, Elif; Çalişkan, Ümran; Öztürk, Gülyüz; Karagün, Barbaros; Küpesiz, Alphan; Tokgöz, Hüseyin; Akar, Nejat; Özdağ, Hilal

    2016-09-01

    The plasminogen (Plg) protein is the inactive proenzyme form of plasmin that dissolves fibrin thrombi by a process called fibrinolysis. It has been shown that homozygous or compound-heterozygous deficiency of this protein is a major cause of a rare inflammatory disease affecting mainly mucous membranes found in different body sites. In this study, five individual Turkish patients and nine Turkish families with type 1 Plg deficiency were investigated for PLG gene mutations. All of the coding regions of the PLG gene mutations were screened for mutations using denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography (DHPLC). Samples showing a different DHPLC profile were subjected to DNA sequencing analysis. Here, we described five novel mutations namely, Cys49Ter, +1 IVS6 G>A, Gly218Val, Tyr283Cys, and Gly703Asp. Previously identified five nonsynonymous (Lys38Glu, Glu180Lys, Gly420Asp, Asp453Asn, Pro763Ser), five synonymous (330 C>T, 582 C>T, 771 T>C, 1083 A>G, 2286 T>G), and a 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) mutation (c.*45 A>G) were also reported in this present study. In this study, we have identified a total of eight mutations, five of which are novel. The mutations/polymorphisms identified in eight of the patients do not explain the disease phenotype. These cases probably carry other pathological mutations (homozygous or compound heterozygous) that cannot be detected by DHPLC. PMID:26340456

  4. Frequent NF2 gene transcript mutations in sporadic meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Deprez, R.H.L.; Groen, N.A.; Zwarthoff, E.C.; Hagemeijer, A.; Van Drunen, E.; Bootsma, D.; Koper, J.W.; Avezaat, C.J.J. ); Bianchi, A.B.; Seizinger, B.R. )

    1994-06-01

    The gene for the hereditary disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), which predisposes for benign CNS tumors such as vestibular schwannomas and meningiomas, has been assigned to chromosome 22 and recently has been isolated. Mutations in the NF2 gene were found in both sporadic meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas. However, so far only 6 of the 16 exons of the gene have been analyzed. In order to extend the analysis of an involvement of the NF2 gene in the sporadic counterparts of these NF2-related tumors, the authors have used reverse transcriptase-PCR amplification followed by SSCP and DNA sequence analysis to screen for mutations in the coding region of the NF2 gene. Analysis of the NF2 gene transcript in 53 unrelated patients with meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas revealed mutations in 32% of the sporadic meningiomas (n = 44), in 50% of the sporadic vestibular schwannomas (n = 4), in 100% of the tumors found in NF2 patients (n = 2), and in one of three tumors from multiple-meningioma patients. Of the 18 tumors in which a mutation in the NF2 gene transcript was observed and the copy number of chromosome 22 could be established, 14 also showed loss of (parts of) chromosome 22. This suggests that in sporadic meningiomas and NF2-associated tumors the NF2 gene functions as a recessive tumor-suppressor gene. The mutations detected resulted mostly in frameshifts, predicting truncations starting within the N-terminal half of the putative protein. 23 refs., 2 figs. 3 tabs.

  5. A novel start codon mutation of the MERTK gene in a patient with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Jinda, Worapoj; Poungvarin, Naravat; Taylor, Todd D.; Suzuki, Yutaka; Thongnoppakhun, Wanna; Limwongse, Chanin; Lertrit, Patcharee; Suriyaphol, Prapat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited retinal degenerations characterized by progressive loss of photoreceptor cells and RPE functions. More than 70 causative genes are known to be responsible for RP. This study aimed to identify the causative gene in a patient from a consanguineous family with childhood-onset severe retinal dystrophy. Methods To identify the defective gene, whole exome sequencing was performed. Candidate causative variants were selected and validated using Sanger sequencing. Segregation analysis of the causative gene was performed in additional family members. To verify that the mutation has an effect on protein synthesis, an expression vector containing the first ten amino acids of the mutant protein fused with the DsRed2 fluorescent protein was constructed and transfected into HEK293T cells. Expression of the fusion protein in the transfected cells was measured using fluorescence microscopy. Results By filtering against public variant databases, a novel homozygous missense mutation (c.3G>A) localized in the start codon of the MERTK gene was detected as a potentially pathogenic mutation for autosomal recessive RP. The c.3G>A mutation cosegregated with the disease phenotype in the family. No expression of the first ten amino acids of the MerTK mutant fused with the DsRed2 fluorescent protein was detected in HEK293T cells, indicating that the mutation affects the translation initiation site of the gene that may lead to loss of function of the MerTK signaling pathway. Conclusions We report a novel missense mutation (c.3G>A, p.0?) in the MERTK gene that causes severe vision impairment in a patient. Taken together with previous reports, our results expand the spectrum of MERTK mutations and extend our understanding of the role of the MerTK protein in the pathogenesis of retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:27122965

  6. Rapid detection of the Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 tcdC gene frame shift mutation at position 117 by real-time PCR and melt curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Wolff, D; Brüning, T; Gerritzen, A

    2009-08-01

    The emergence of the hypervirulent strain Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 027 has increased the necessity for rapid C. difficile typing tests for clinical and epidemiological purposes. We developed a rapid real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for the detection of C. difficile. As the target, we chose the tcdC gene, which encodes for a negative regulator in toxin production. A deletion at position 117 of the tcdC gene, which is associated with severe tcdC truncation, is well conserved in all PCR ribotype 027 isolates. Probe sequences of the real-time PCR test were designed to result in distinct melt profiles for sequence variations at positions 117 to 120 of the tcdC gene. The tcdC gene deletion at position 117 was easily detected with real-time PCR and melt curve analysis in all C. difficile ribotype 027 isolates. In five non-027 strains and 46 hospitalised patient samples, melt curve analysis detected no deletion. PCR results were confirmed by DNA sequencing. The combination of real-time PCR and melt curve analysis is a rapid and accurate method for the detection of C. difficile DNA and simultaneous screening for the tcdC gene deletion at position 117, which is closely related to the C. difficile PCR ribotype 027 strain. PMID:19333630

  7. Identification and analysis of mutations in bob, Doa and eight new genes required for oocyte specification and development in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jason Z; Navarro, Caryn; Lehmann, Ruth

    2003-08-01

    The Drosophila oocyte develops from a cluster of 16 interconnected cells that derive from a common progenitor. One of these cells, the oocyte, arrests in meiosis. The other cells endoreplicate their DNA and produce mRNAs and proteins that they traffic to the oocyte along a polarized microtubule cytoskeleton shared by the entire cyst. Therefore, Drosophila oogenesis is an attractive system for the study of cell cycle control and cell polarity. We carried out a clonal screen on the right arm of chromosome 3 for female sterile mutations using the FLP-FRT-ovo(D) system to identify new genes required for early oogenesis. We identified alleles of oo18 RNA binding protein (orb) and Darkener of apricot (Doa), which had previously been shown to exhibit oogenesis defects. We also identified several lethal alleles of the male sterile mutant, bobble (bob). In addition, we identified eight new lethal complementation groups that exhibit early oogenesis phenotypes. We analyzed mutant clones to determine the aspects of oogenesis disrupted by each complementation group. We assayed for the production and development of egg chambers, localization of ORB to and within the oocyte, and proper execution of the nurse cell cycle (endoreplication of DNA) and the oocyte cell cycle (karyosome formation). Here we discuss the identification, mapping, and phenotypic characterization of these new genes: omelet, soft boiled, hard boiled, poached, fried, over easy, sunny side up, and benedict. PMID:12930750

  8. A case of Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome with a CREB-binding protein gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Hee; Lim, Byung Chan; Chae, Jong Hee; Kim, Ki Joong; Hwang, Yong Seung

    2010-06-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a congenital disorder characterized by typical facial features, broad thumbs and toes, with mental retardation. Additionally, tumors, keloids and various congenital anomalies including congenital heart defects have been reported in RTS patients. In about 50% of the patients, mutations in the CREB binding protein (CREBBP) have been found, which are understood to be associated with cell growth and proliferation. Here, we describe a typical RTS patient with Arnold-Chiari malformation. A mutation in the CREBBP gene, c.4944_4945insC, was identified by mutational analysis. PMID:21189944

  9. Targeted next-generation sequencing in steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome: mutations in multiple glomerular genes may influence disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Bullich, Gemma; Trujillano, Daniel; Santín, Sheila; Ossowski, Stephan; Mendizábal, Santiago; Fraga, Gloria; Madrid, Álvaro; Ariceta, Gema; Ballarín, José; Torra, Roser; Estivill, Xavier; Ars, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diagnosis of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) using Sanger sequencing is complicated by the high genetic heterogeneity and phenotypic variability of this disease. We aimed to improve the genetic diagnosis of SRNS by simultaneously sequencing 26 glomerular genes using massive parallel sequencing and to study whether mutations in multiple genes increase disease severity. High-throughput mutation analysis was performed in 50 SRNS and/or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) patients, a validation cohort of 25 patients with known pathogenic mutations, and a discovery cohort of 25 uncharacterized patients with probable genetic etiology. In the validation cohort, we identified the 42 previously known pathogenic mutations across NPHS1, NPHS2, WT1, TRPC6, and INF2 genes. In the discovery cohort, disease-causing mutations in SRNS/FSGS genes were found in nine patients. We detected three patients with mutations in an SRNS/FSGS gene and COL4A3. Two of them were familial cases and presented a more severe phenotype than family members with mutation in only one gene. In conclusion, our results show that massive parallel sequencing is feasible and robust for genetic diagnosis of SRNS/FSGS. Our results indicate that patients carrying mutations in an SRNS/FSGS gene and also in COL4A3 gene have increased disease severity. PMID:25407002

  10. Point mutations throughout the GLI3 gene cause Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kalff-Suske, M; Wild, A; Topp, J; Wessling, M; Jacobsen, E M; Bornholdt, D; Engel, H; Heuer, H; Aalfs, C M; Ausems, M G; Barone, R; Herzog, A; Heutink, P; Homfray, T; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G; König, R; Kunze, J; Meinecke, P; Müller, D; Rizzo, R; Strenge, S; Superti-Furga, A; Grzeschik, K H

    1999-09-01

    Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome, characterized by craniofacial and limb anomalies (GCPS; MIM 175700), previously has been demonstrated to be associated with translocations as well as point mutations affecting one allele of the zinc finger gene GLI3. In addition to GCPS, Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS; MIM 146510) and post-axial polydactyly type A (PAP-A; MIM 174200), two other disorders of human development, are caused by GLI3 mutations. In order to gain more insight into the mutational spectrum associated with a single phenotype, we report here the extension of the GLI3 mutation analysis to 24 new GCPS cases. We report the identification of 15 novel mutations present in one of the patient's GLI3 alleles. The mutations map throughout the coding gene regions. The majority are truncating mutations (nine of 15) that engender prematurely terminated protein products mostly but not exclusively N-terminally to or within the central region encoding the DNA-binding domain. Two missense and two splicing mutations mapping within the zinc finger motifs presumably also interfere with DNA binding. The five mutations identified within the protein regions C-terminal to the zinc fingers putatively affect additional functional properties of GLI3. In cell transfection experiments using fusions of the DNA-binding domain of yeast GAL4 to different segments of GLI3, transactivating capacity was assigned to two adjacent independent domains (TA(1)and TA(2)) in the C-terminal third of GLI3. Since these are the only functional domains affected by three C-terminally truncating mutations, we postulate that GCPS may be due either to haploinsufficiency resulting from the complete loss of one gene copy or to functional haploinsufficiency related to compromised properties of this transcription factor such as DNA binding and transactivation. PMID:10441342

  11. Mutation distributions and clinical correlations of PIK3CA gene mutations in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dirican, Ebubekir; Akkiprik, Mustafa; Özer, Ayşe

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) is the most common cancer and the second cause of death among women. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway has a crucial role in the cellular processes such as cell survival, growth, division, and motility. Moreover, oncogenic mutations in the PI3K pathway generally involve the activation phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase-catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) mutation which has been identified in numerous BCa subtypes. In this review, correlations between PIK3CA mutations and their clinicopathological parameters on BCa will be described. It is reported that PIK3CA mutations which have been localized mostly on exon 9 and 20 hot spots are detected 25-40 % in BCa. This relatively high frequency can offer an advantage for choosing the best treatment options for BCa. PIK3CA mutations may be used as biomarkers and have been major focus of drug development in cancer with the first clinical trials of PI3K pathway inhibitors currently in progress. Screening of PIK3CA gene mutations might be useful genetic tests for targeted therapeutics or diagnosis. Increasing data about PIK3CA mutations and its clinical correlations with BCa will help to introduce new clinical applications in the near future. PMID:26921096

  12. Targeted next-generation sequencing of candidate genes reveals novel mutations in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, YUE; FENG, YUE; ZHANG, YUN-MEI; DING, XIAO-XUE; SONG, YU-ZHU; ZHANG, A-MEI; LIU, LI; ZHANG, HONG; DING, JIA-HUAN; XIA, XUE-SHAN

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a major cause of sudden cardiac death and heart failure, and it is characterized by genetic and clinical heterogeneity, even for some patients with a very poor clinical prognosis; in the majority of cases, DCM necessitates a heart transplant. Genetic mutations have long been considered to be associated with this disease. At present, mutations in over 50 genes related to DCM have been documented. This study was carried out to elucidate the characteristics of gene mutations in patients with DCM. The candidate genes that may cause DCM include MYBPC3, MYH6, MYH7, LMNA, TNNT2, TNNI3, MYPN, MYL3, TPM1, SCN5A, DES, ACTC1 and RBM20. Using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and subsequent mutation confirmation with traditional capillary Sanger sequencing analysis, possible causative non-synonymous mutations were identified in ~57% (12/21) of patients with DCM. As a result, 7 novel mutations (MYPN, p.E630K; TNNT2, p.G180A; MYH6, p.R1047C; TNNC1, p.D3V; DES, p.R386H; MYBPC3, p.C1124F; and MYL3, p.D126G), 3 variants of uncertain significance (RBM20, p.R1182H; MYH6, p.T1253M; and VCL, p.M209L), and 2 known mutations (MYH7, p.A26V and MYBPC3, p.R160W) were revealed to be associated with DCM. The mutations were most frequently found in the sarcomere (MYH6, MYBPC3, MYH7, TNNC1, TNNT2 and MYL3) and cytoskeletal (MYPN, DES and VCL) genes. As genetic testing is a useful tool in the clinical management of disease, testing for pathogenic mutations is beneficial to the treatment of patients with DCM and may assist in predicting disease risk for their family members before the onset of symptoms. PMID:26458567

  13. A novel CHSY1 gene mutation underlies Temtamy preaxial brachydactyly syndrome in a Pakistani family.

    PubMed

    Sher, Gulab; Naeem, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Temtamy preaxial brachydactyly syndrome (TPBS) is an autosomal recessive rare disorder characterized by hyperphalangism of digits, facial dysmorphism, dental anomalies, sensorineural hearing loss, delayed motor and mental development, and growth retardation. Loss of function mutations have been recently reported in the CHSY1 gene to cause the TPBS. Here, we report a novel missense mutation (c.1897 G > A) in the CHSY1 gene in two TPBS patients from a consanguineous Pakistani family. The mutation predicted substitution of a highly conserved aspartate amino acid residue to asparagine at position 633 in the protein (D633N). Polyphen analysis supported the pathogenicity of D36N mutation. Our finding extends the body of recent evidence that supports the role of CHSY1 as a potential mediator of BMP signaling. PMID:24269551

  14. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    DOEpatents

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  15. Suppressor analysis of temperature-sensitive mutations of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase I in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a suppressor gene encodes the second-largest subunit of RNA polymerase I.

    PubMed Central

    Yano, R; Nomura, M

    1991-01-01

    The SRP3-1 mutation is an allele-specific suppressor of temperature-sensitive mutations in the largest subunit (A190) of RNA polymerase I from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two mutations known to be suppressed by SRP3-1 are in the putative zinc-binding domain of A190. We have cloned the SRP3 gene by using its suppressor activity and determined its complete nucleotide sequence. We conclude from the following evidence that the SRP3 gene encodes the second-largest subunit (A135) of RNA polymerase I. First, the deduced amino acid sequence of the gene product contains several regions with high homology to the corresponding regions of the second-largest subunits of RNA polymerases of various origins, including those of RNA polymerase II and III from S. cerevisiae. Second, the deduced amino acid sequence contains known amino acid sequences of two tryptic peptides from the A135 subunit of RNA polymerase I purified from S. cerevisiae. Finally, a strain was constructed in which transcription of the SRP3 gene was controlled by the inducible GAL7 promoter. When this strain, which can grow on galactose but not on glucose, was shifted from galactose medium to glucose medium, a large decrease in the cellular concentration of A135 was observed by Western blot analysis. We have also identified the specific amino acid alteration responsible for suppression by SRP3-1 and found that it is located within the putative zinc-binding domain conserved among the second-largest subunits of eucaryotic RNA polymerases. From these results, it is suggested that this putative zinc-binding domain is in physical proximity to and interacts with the putative zinc-binding domain of the A190 subunit. Images PMID:1990281

  16. CHCHD2 gene mutations in familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chang-He; Mao, Cheng-Yuan; Zhang, Shu-Yu; Yang, Jing; Song, Bo; Wu, Ping; Zuo, Chuan-Tao; Liu, Yu-Tao; Ji, Yan; Yang, Zhi-Hua; Wu, Jun; Zhuang, Zheng-Ping; Xu, Yu-Ming

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in CHCHD2 gene have been reported in autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (ADPD). However, there is still lack of evidence supported CHCHD2 mutations lead to ADPD in other populations. We performed whole exome sequencing, positron emission tomography (PET), and haplotype analyses in an ADPD pedigree and then comprehensively screened for CHCHD2 gene mutations in additional 18 familial parkinsonism pedigrees, 364 sporadic PD patients, and 384 healthy controls to assess the frequencies of known and novel rare nonsynonymous CHCHD2 mutations. We identified a heterozygous variant (c.182C>T; p.Thr61Ile) in the CHCHD2 gene in the ADPD pedigree. PET revealed a significant reduction in dopamine transporter binding in the putamen and caudate nucleus of the proband, similar to idiopathic PD. The single nucleotide variant 5C>T (Pro2Leu) in CHCHD2 was confirmed to have a significantly higher frequency among sporadic PD patients than controls. Our results confirm that ADPD can be caused by CHCHD2 mutations and show that the Pro2Leu variant in CHCHD2 may be a risk factor for sporadic PD in Chinese populations. PMID:26705026

  17. Identification of 5 novel mutations in the AGXT gene.

    PubMed

    Basmaison, O; Rolland, M O; Cochat, P; Bozon, D

    2000-06-01

    In order to identify additional genotypes in primary hyperoxaluria type 1, we sequenced the AGXT genes of 9 patients. We report 5 new mutations. Three are splice-site mutations situated at the end of intron 4 and 8 (647-1G>A, 969-1G>C, 969-3C>G), one is a missense mutation in exon 5 (D183N), and one is a short duplication in exon 2 (349ins7). Their consequence is always a lack of enzymatic activity of the Alanine-Glyoxylate Aminotransferase (AGT); for 4 of them, we were able to deduce that they were associated to the absence of AGT protein. These mutations are rare, as they have been found on one allele in our study (except 969-3C>G present in 2 unrelated families), and have not been previously reported. PMID:10862087

  18. Impact of thrombophilic genes mutations on thrombosis risk in Egyptian nonmetastatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Mona Ahmed; Ismail, Mona Ahmed; Saad, Abeer Attia; Habashy, Deena Mohamed; Hafeez, Zeinab Mohamed Abdel; Boshnak, Noha Hussein

    2015-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common complication in cancer patients. Several genetic risk factors related to thrombophilia are known; however, their contributions to thrombotic tendency in cancer patients have conflicting results. We aimed to determine the prevalence of factor V Leiden (FVL), prothrombin (PTH) G20210A and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T gene polymorphisms in Egyptian nonmetastatic cancer patients and their influence on thrombosis risk in those patients. Factor V Leiden, PTH G20210A and MTHFR C677T polymorphisms were detected in 40 cancer patients with VTE (group 1) and 40 cancer patients with no evidence of VTE (group 2) by PCR-based DNA analysis. Factor V and MTHFR mutations were higher in group 1 than in group 2 (factor V heterozygous mutation: 20 vs. 7.5%, homozygous mutation: 10 vs. 2.5%; MTHFR heterozygous mutation: 40 vs. 25%, homozygous mutation 5 vs. 0%, respectively) (P = 0.03). Mortality rate was higher in group 1 (75%) than in group 2 (25%; P < 0.001). No difference was found between those groups regarding PTH mutation (P = 1). Mortality rate was higher in the presence of homozygous and heterozygous factor V mutation (100 and 82%, respectively) compared to the wild type (41%) (P = 0.0006). Having any of the three studied gene mutations worsened the overall survival (P = 0.0003). Cox regression proved that both thrombosis and presence of factor V mutation are independent factors affecting survival in cancer patients (P < 0.001 and P = 0.01, respectively). In conclusion, there is an association between factor V and MTHFR mutations and risk of VTE in Egyptian cancer patients. Thrombosis and presence of factor V mutation are independent factors that influence survival in those patients. PMID:25565385

  19. Germline mutation analysis of MLH1 and MSH2 in Malaysian Lynch syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Zahary, Mohd Nizam; Kaur, Gurjeet; Abu Hassan, Muhammad Radzi; Singh, Harjinder; Naik, Venkatesh R; Ankathil, Ravindran

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the protein expression profile of mismatch repair (MMR) genes in suspected cases of Lynch syndrome and to characterize the associated germline mutations. METHODS: Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor samples was performed to determine the protein expression profile of MMR protein. Germline mutation screening was carried out on peripheral blood samples. The entire exon regions of MLH1 and MSH2 genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, screened by denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) and analyzed by DNA sequencing to characterize the germline mutations. RESULTS: Three out of 34 tissue samples (8.8%) and four out of 34 tissue samples (11.8%) showed loss of nuclear staining by immunohistochemistry, indicating the absence of MLH1 and MSH2 protein expression in carcinoma cells, respectively. dHPLC analysis followed by DNA sequencing showed these samples to have germline mutations of MSH2 gene. However, no deleterious mutations were identified in any of the 19 exons or coding regions of MLH1 gene, but we were able to identify MLH1 promoter polymorphism, -93G > A (rs1800734), in 21 out of 34 patients (61.8%). We identified one novel mutation, transversion mutation c.2005G > C, which resulted in a missense mutation (Gly669Arg), a transversion mutation in exon 1, c.142G > T, which resulted in a nonsense mutation (Glu48Stop) and splice-site mutation, c.2006-6T > C, which was adjacent to exon 13 of MSH2 gene. CONCLUSION: Germline mutations were identified in four Malaysian Lynch syndrome patients. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissue proved to be a good pre-screening test before proceeding to germline mutation analysis of DNA MMR genes. PMID:22371642

  20. Systematic Mutational Analysis of Histidine Kinase Genes in the Nosocomial Pathogen Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Identifies BfmAK System Control of Biofilm Development.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Liu; Wang, Fang-Fang; Ren, Bao-Zhen; Liu, Wei; Liu, Zhong; Qian, Wei

    2016-04-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Stenotrophomonas maltophilialives in diverse ecological niches. As a result of its formidable capabilities of forming biofilm and its resistance to multiple antibiotic agents, the bacterium is also a nosocomial pathogen of serious threat to the health of patients whose immune systems are suppressed or compromised. Besides the histidine kinase RpfC, the two-component signal transduction system (TCS), which is the canonical regulatory machinery used by most bacterial pathogens, has never been experimentally investigated inS. maltophilia Here, we annotated 62 putative histidine kinase genes in the S. maltophilia genome and successfully obtained 51 mutants by systematical insertional inactivation. Phenotypic characterization identified a series of mutants with deficiencies in bacterial growth, swimming motility, and biofilm development. A TCS, named here BfmA-BfmK (Smlt4209-Smlt4208), was genetically confirmed to regulate biofilm formation inS. maltophilia Together with interacting partner prediction and chromatin immunoprecipitation screens, six candidate promoter regions bound by BfmA in vivo were identified. We demonstrated that, among them, BfmA acts as a transcription factor that binds directly to the promoter regions of bfmA-bfmK and Smlt0800(acoT), a gene encoding an acyl coenzyme A thioesterase that is associated with biofilm development, and positively controls their transcription. Genome-scale mutational analyses of histidine kinase genes and functional dissection of BfmK-BfmA regulation in biofilm provide genetic information to support more in-depth studies on cellular signaling inS. maltophilia, in the context of developing novel approaches to fight this important bacterial pathogen. PMID:26873318

  1. Activating HER2 mutations in HER2 gene amplification negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Ron; Kavuri, Shyam M.; Searleman, Adam C.; Shen, Wei; Shen, Dong; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Monsey, John; Goel, Nicholas; Aronson, Adam B.; Li, Shunqiang; Ma, Cynthia X.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Ellis, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    Data from eight breast cancer genome sequencing projects identified 25 patients with HER2 somatic mutations in cancers lacking HER2 gene amplification. To determine the phenotype of these mutations, we functionally characterized thirteen HER2 mutations using in vitro kinase assays, protein structure analysis, cell culture and xenograft experiments. Seven of these mutations are activating mutations, including G309A, D769H, D769Y, V777L, P780ins, V842I, and R896C. HER2 in-frame deletion 755-759, which is homologous to EGFR exon 19 in-frame deletions, had a neomorphic phenotype with increased phosphorylation of EGFR or HER3. L755S produced lapatinib resistance, but was not an activating mutation in our experimental systems. All of these mutations were sensitive to the irreversible kinase inhibitor, neratinib. These findings demonstrate that HER2 somatic mutation is an alternative mechanism to activate HER2 in breast cancer and they validate HER2 somatic mutations as drug targets for breast cancer treatment. PMID:23220880

  2. Compound heterozygous DUOX2 gene mutations (c.2335-1G>C/c.3264_3267delCAGC) associated with congenital hypothyroidism. Characterization of complex cryptic splice sites by minigene analysis.

    PubMed

    Belforte, Fiorella S; Citterio, Cintia E; Testa, Graciela; Olcese, María Cecilia; Sobrero, Gabriela; Miras, Mirta B; Targovnik, Héctor M; Rivolta, Carina M

    2016-01-01

    Iodide Organification defects (IOD) represent 10% of cases of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) being the main genes affected that of TPO (thyroid peroxidase) and DUOX2 (dual oxidasa 2). From a patient with clinical and biochemical criteria suggestive with CH associated with IOD, TPO and DUOX2 genes were analyzed by means of PCR-Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism analysis and sequencing. A novel heterozygous compound to the mutations c.2335-1G>C (paternal mutation, intron 17) and c.3264_3267delCAGC (maternal mutation, exon 24) was identified in the DUOX2 gene. Ex-vivo splicing assays and subsequent RT-PCR and sequencing analyses were performed on mRNA isolated from the HeLa cells transfected with wild-type and mutant pSPL3 expression vectors. The wild-type and c.2335-1G>C mutant alleles result in the complete inclusion or exclusion of exon 18, or in the activation of an exonic cryptic 5' ss with the consequent deletion of 169 bp at the end of this exon. However, we observed only a band of the expected size in normal thyroid tissue by RT-PCR. Additionally, the c.2335-1G>C mutation activates an unusual cryptic donor splice site in intron 17, located at position -14 of the authentic intron 17/exon 18 junction site, with an insertion of the last 14 nucleotides of the intron 17 in mutant transcripts with complete and partial inclusion of exon 18. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutation, predicted with the bioinformatics NNSplice, Fsplice, SPL, SPLM and MaxEntScan programs were investigated and evaluated in relation with the experimental evidence. These analyses confirm that c.2335-1G>C mutant allele would result in the abolition of the authentic splice acceptor site. The results suggest the coexistence in our patient of four putative truncated proteins of 786, 805, 806 and 1105 amino acids, with conservation of peroxidase-like domain and loss of gp91(phox)/NOX2-like domain. In conclusion a novel heterozygous compound was identified being responsible of

  3. Mutational analysis of essential IncP alpha plasmid transfer genes traF and traG and involvement of traF in phage sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Waters, V L; Strack, B; Pansegrau, W; Lanka, E; Guiney, D G

    1992-01-01

    Although the broad-host-range IncP plasmids can vegetatively replicate in diverse gram-negative bacteria, the development of shuttle vector systems has established that the host range for IncP plasmid conjugative transfer is greater than the range of bacteria that sustain IncP replicons. Towards understanding IncP plasmid conjugation and the connection between IncP conjugation and Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-DNA transfer to plants, two sets of mutants were generated in the larger transfer region (Tra1) of the IncP alpha plasmid RK2. Mutagenesis strategies were chosen to minimize transcriptional polar effects. Mutant Tra1 clones were mapped, sequenced, and processed to reconstruct 49.5-kb Tra2-containing plasmid derivatives in order to assay for transfer activity and IncP plasmid-specific phage sensitivity. Focusing on the activities of the gene products of traF and traG in Escherichia coli, we found that mutations in traF abolished transfer activity and rendered the host cells phage resistant and mutations in traG abolished transfer activity but had no effect on phage sensitivity. Complementation of these mutant derivatives with corresponding trans-acting clones carrying traF or traG restored transfer activity and, in the case of the traF mutant, the phage sensitivity of the host cell. We conclude that in E. coli, both TraF and TraG are essential for IncP plasmid transfer and that TraF is necessary (but not sufficient) for donor-specific phage sensitivity, and sequencing data suggest that both TraF and TraG are membrane spanning. Images PMID:1400217

  4. Feature genes predicting the FLT3/ITD mutation in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    LI, CHENGLONG; ZHU, BIAO; CHEN, JIAO; HUANG, XIAOBING

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, gene expression profiles of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples were analyzed to identify feature genes with the capacity to predict the mutation status of FLT3/ITD. Two machine learning models, namely the support vector machine (SVM) and random forest (RF) methods, were used for classification. Four datasets were downloaded from the European Bioinformatics Institute, two of which (containing 371 samples, including 281 FLT3/ITD mutation-negative and 90 mutation-positive samples) were randomly defined as the training group, while the other two datasets (containing 488 samples, including 350 FLT3/ITD mutation-negative and 138 mutation-positive samples) were defined as the test group. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by significance analysis of the micro-array data by using the training samples. The classification efficiency of the SCM and RF methods was evaluated using the following parameters: Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Functional enrichment analysis was performed for the feature genes with DAVID. A total of 585 DEGs were identified in the training group, of which 580 were upregulated and five were downregulated. The classification accuracy rates of the two methods for the training group, the test group and the combined group using the 585 feature genes were >90%. For the SVM and RF methods, the rates of correct determination, specificity and PPV were >90%, while the sensitivity and NPV were >80%. The SVM method produced a slightly better classification effect than the RF method. A total of 13 biological pathways were overrepresented by the feature genes, mainly involving energy metabolism, chromatin organization and translation. The feature genes identified in the present study may be used to predict the mutation status of FLT3/ITD in patients with AML. PMID:27177049

  5. Detection of rarely identified multiple mutations in MECP2 gene do not contribute to enhanced severity in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chapleau, Christopher A; Lane, Jane; Kirwin, Susan M; Schanen, Carolyn; Vinette, Kathy M B; Stubbolo, Danielle; MacLeod, Patrick; Glaze, Daniel G; Motil, Kathleen J; Neul, Jeffrey L; Skinner, Steven A; Kaufmann, Walter E; Percy, Alan K

    2013-07-01

    The objective of our study was to characterize the influence of multiple mutations in the MECP2 gene in a cohort of individuals with Rett syndrome. Further analysis demonstrated that nearly all resulted from de novo in cis mutations, where the disease severity was indistinguishable from single mutations. Our methods involved enrolling participants in the RTT Natural History Study (NHS). After providing informed consent through their parents or principal caretakers, additional molecular assessments were performed in the participants and their parents to assess the presence and location of more than one mutation in each. Clinical severity was assessed at each visit in those participants in the NHS. Non-contiguous MECP2 gene variations were detected in 12 participants and contiguous mutations involving a deletion and insertion in three participants. Thirteen of 15 participants had mutations that were in cis; four (of 13) had three MECP2 mutations; two (of 15) had mutations that were both in cis and in trans (i.e., on different alleles). Clinical severity did not appear different from NHS participants with a single similar mutation. Mutations in cis were identified in most participants; two individuals had mutations both in cis and in trans. The presence of multiple mutations was not associated with greater severity. Nevertheless, multiple mutations will require greater thought in the future, if genetic assignment to drug treatment protocols is considered. PMID:23696494

  6. Atypical distal renal tubular acidosis confirmed by mutation analysis.

    PubMed

    Weber, S; Soergel, M; Jeck, N; Konrad, M

    2000-12-01

    In autosomal dominant distal renal tubular acidosis type I (dRTA) impaired hydrogen ion secretion is associated with metabolic acidosis, hyperchloremic hypokalemia, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, and/or nephrolithiasis. A retardation of growth is commonly observed. In this report we present a family with autosomal dominant dRTA with an atypical and discordant clinical picture. The father presented with severe nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, and isosthenuria but metabolic acidosis was absent. His 6-year-old daughter, however, suffered from metabolic acidosis, hypokalemia, and hypercalciuria. In addition, sonography revealed multiple bilateral renal cysts but no nephrocalcinosis. Mutation analysis of the AE1 gene coding for the renal Cl-/HCO3(-)-exchanger AE1 displayed a heterozygous Arg589Cys exchange in both patients but not in the healthy family members. This point mutation is frequently associated with autosomal dominant dRTA. Diagnosis of autosomal dominant dRTA is supported in this family by results of AE1 mutation analysis. PMID:11149111

  7. Detection of driver pathways using mutated gene network in cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Gao, Lin; Ma, Xiaoke; Yang, Xiaofei

    2016-06-21

    Distinguishing driver pathways has been extensively studied because they are critical for understanding the development and molecular mechanisms of cancers. Most existing methods for driver pathways are based on high coverage as well as high mutual exclusivity, with the underlying assumption that mutations are exclusive. However, in many cases, mutated driver genes in the same pathways are not strictly mutually exclusive. Based on this observation, we propose an index for quantifying mutual exclusivity between gene pairs. Then, we construct a mutated gene network for detecting driver pathways by integrating the proposed index and coverage. The detection of driver pathways on the mutated gene network consists of two steps: raw pathways are obtained using a CPM method, and the final driver pathways are selected using a strict testing strategy. We apply this method to glioblastoma and breast cancers and find that our method is more accurate than state-of-the-art methods in terms of enrichment of KEGG pathways. Furthermore, the detected driver pathways intersect with well-known pathways with moderate exclusivity, which cannot be discovered using the existing algorithms. In conclusion, the proposed method provides an effective way to investigate driver pathways in cancers. PMID:27118146

  8. Mutation Burden of Rare Variants in Schizophrenia Candidate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Simon L.; Dion, Patrick A.; Bourassa, Cynthia V.; Geoffroy, Steve; Lachance-Touchette, Pamela; Barhdadi, Amina; Langlois, Mathieu; Joober, Ridha; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Dubé, Marie-Pierre; Rouleau, Guy A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a very heterogeneous disease that affects approximately 1% of the general population. Recently, the genetic complexity thought to underlie this condition was further supported by three independent studies that identified an increased number of damaging de novo mutations DNM in different SCZ probands. While these three reports support the implication of DNM in the pathogenesis of SCZ, the absence of overlap in the genes identified suggests that the number of genes involved in SCZ is likely to be very large; a notion that has been supported by the moderate success of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). Methods To further examine the genetic heterogeneity of this disease, we resequenced 62 genes that were found to have a DNM in SCZ patients, and 40 genes that encode for proteins known to interact with the products of the genes with DNM, in a cohort of 235 SCZ cases and 233 controls. Results We found an enrichment of private nonsense mutations amongst schizophrenia patients. Using a kernel association method, we were able to assess for association for different sets. Although our power of detection was limited, we observed an increased mutation burden in the genes that have DNM. PMID:26039597

  9. New novel mutation of the ATP7B gene in a family with Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Young; Kim, Young-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Woo; Oh, Sun-Young; Kim, Dal-Sik; Shin, Byoung-Soo

    2012-02-15

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism. The WD gene codes for a copper transporting P-type ATPase (ATP7B) are located on chromosome 13q14.3. Mutation of this gene disrupts copper homeostasis, resulting in the accumulation of copper in the liver, brain, kidneys and corneas and copper toxication at these sites. Since the detection of the WD gene in 1993, approximately 300 disease-specific muations have been identified. We recently evaluated a Korean family with WD. The proband, a 17-year-old boy, visited our hospital due to abnormal behaviors including generalized slow movement, dysphagia, drooling and ataxia. Laboratory results revealed decreases in serum copper and ceruloplasmin and an increase in urinary excretion of copper. He had liver cirrhosis, brain lesions and Kayser-Fleischer corenal rings. Molecular genetic analysis of the ATP7B gene demonstrated that he was heterozygous for deletion mutation c.2697_2723del27 in exon 11. Further study of family members revealed that his father and younger brother had the same mutation. The c.2697_2723del27 deletion mutation in exon 11 has not yet been reported as a causative muation of WD and is an in-frame deletion not expected to lead to a frame shift. Therefore, we report a novel mutation of the ATP7B gene in a family with WD. PMID:22075048

  10. Mutation Spectrum of Six Genes in Chinese Phenylketonuria Patients Obtained through Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Zhong; Yu, Li; Lin, Lin; Hao, Jing; Yang, Zhigang; Peng, Jiabao; Cui, Shujian; Huang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Background The identification of gene variants plays an important role in the diagnosis of genetic diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings To develop a rapid method for the diagnosis of phenylketonuria (PKU) and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) deficiency, we designed a multiplex, PCR-based primer panel to amplify all the exons and flanking regions (50 bp average) of six PKU-associated genes (PAH, PTS, GCH1, QDPR, PCBD1 and GFRP). The Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) System was used to detect mutations in all the exons of these six genes. We tested 93 DNA samples from blood specimens from 35 patients and their parents (32 families) and 26 healthy adults. Using strict bioinformatic criteria, this sequencing data provided, on average, 99.14% coverage of the 39 exons at more than 70-fold mean depth of coverage. We found 23 previously documented variants in the PAH gene and six novel mutations in the PAH and PTS genes. A detailed analysis of the mutation spectrum of these patients is described in this study. Conclusions/Significance These results were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. In conclusion, benchtop next-generation sequencing technology can be used to detect mutations in monogenic diseases and can detect both point mutations and indels with high sensitivity, fidelity and throughput at a lower cost than conventional methods in clinical applications. PMID:24705691

  11. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy in the Agarwals: Utility of founder mutations in CAPN3 gene

    PubMed Central

    Khadilkar, Satish V.; Chaudhari, Chetan R.; Dastur, Rashna S.; Gaitonde, Pradnya S.; Yadav, Jayendra G.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Diagnostic evaluation of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) involves specialized studies on muscle biopsy and mutation analysis. Mutation screening is the gold standard for diagnosis but is difficult as the gene is large and multiple mutations are known. This study evaluates the utility of two known founder mutations as a first-line diagnostic test for LGMD2A in the Agarwals. Materials and Methods: The Agarwals with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) phenotype were analyzed for two founder alleles (intron 18/exon 19 c.2051-1G>T and exon 22 c.2338G>C). Asymptomatic first-degree relatives of patients with genetically confirmed mutations and desirous of counseling were screened for founder mutations. Results: Founder alleles were detected in 26 out of 29 subjects with LGMD phenotype (89%). The most common genotype observed was homozygous for exon 22 c.2338 G>C mutation followed by compound heterozygosity. Single founder allele was identified in two. Single allele was detected in two of the five asymptomatic relatives. Conclusion: Eighty-nine percent of the Agarwals having LGMD phenotype have LGMD2A resulting from founder mutations. Founder allele analysis can be utilized as the initial noninvasive diagnostic step for index cases, carrier detection, and counseling. PMID:27011640

  12. Structural analysis of the 5 prime flanking region of the. beta. -globin gene in African sickle cell anemia patients: Further evidence for three origins of the sickle cell mutation in Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Chebloune, Y.; Pagnier, J.; Trabuchet, G.; Faure, C.; Verdier, G.; Labie, D.; Nigon, V. )

    1988-06-01

    Haplotype analysis of the {beta}-globin gene cluster shows two regions of DNA characterized by nonrandom association of restriction site polymorphisms. These regions are separated by a variable segment containing the repeated sequences (ATTTT){sub n} and (AT){sub x}T{sub y}, which might be involved in recombinational events. Studies of haplotypes linked to the sickle cell gene in Africa provide strong argument for three origins of the mutation: Benin, Senegal, and the Central African Republic. The structure of the variable segment in the three African populations was studied by S1 nuclease mapping of genomic DNA, which allows a comparison of several samples. A 1080-base-pair DNA segment was sequenced for one sample from each population. S1 nuclease mapping confirmed the homogeneity of each population with regard to both (ATTTT){sub n} and (AT){sub x}T{sub y} repeats. The authors found three additional structures for (AT){sub x}T{sub y} correlating with the geographic origin of the patients. Ten other nucleotide positions, 5{prime} and 3{prime} to the (AT){sub x}T{sub y} copies, were found to be variable when compared to homologous sequences from human and monkey DNAs. These results allow us to propose an evolutionary scheme for the polymorphisms in the 5{prime} flanking region of the {beta}-globin gene. The results strongly support the hypothesis of three origins for the sickle mutation in Africa.

  13. Mutations in ras genes in experimental tumours of rodents.

    PubMed

    Sills, R C; Boorman, G A; Neal, J E; Hong, H L; Devereux, T R

    1999-01-01

    Studies of carcinogenesis in rodents are valuable for examining mutagenesis in vivo. An advantage of evaluating the frequency and spectra of ras mutations in chemically induced neoplasms is that the additional data at the molecular level indicate whether the carcinogenic effect is due to the chemical and is not a spontaneous event, as illustrated by the numerous examples in Appendices 1 and 2. In addition, data on the frequency and spectra of ras mutations in spontaneous and chemically induced neoplasms clearly expand the toxicological database by providing information helpful for understanding the pathogenesis of carcinogenesis. For example: (1) ozone-induced lung neoplasms had two unique mutations, one (codon 61 K-ras CTA mutation) consistent with a direct genotoxic event and a second (codon 12 K-ras G --> T transversion) consistent with an indirect genotoxic effect; (2) isoprene-induced Harderian gland neoplasms had a unique K-ras A --> T transversion at codon 61 which provided evidence that formation of an epoxide intermediate was involved; (3) 1,3-butadiene-induced neoplasms had a characteristic K-ras G --> C transversion mutation at codon 13 which was also consistent with a chemical-specific effect; (4) methylene chloride-induced liver neoplasms had an H-ras mutation profile at codon 61 similar to that of spontaneous tumours, suggesting that methylene chloride promotes cells with 'spontaneously initiated' ras mutations and (5) oxazepam-induced liver neoplasms had a low frequency of ras mutations, suggesting a nonmutagenic pathway of carcinogenesis. By extending the evaluation of rodent tumours to include molecular studies on ras mutation spectra and abnormalities in other cancer genes with human homologues, a number of hypotheses can be tested, allowing the most complete understanding of carcinogenesis in rodents and in potential extrapolation to the human risk situation. PMID:10353384

  14. Germline Mutations in Predisposition Genes in Pediatric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Edmonson, Michael N.; Gruber, Tanja A.; Easton, John; Hedges, Dale; Ma, Xiaotu; Zhou, Xin; Yergeau, Donald A.; Wilkinson, Mark R.; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Chen, Xiang; McGee, Rose B.; Hines-Dowell, Stacy; Nuccio, Regina; Quinn, Emily; Shurtleff, Sheila A.; Rusch, Michael; Patel, Aman; Becksfort, Jared B.; Wang, Shuoguo; Weaver, Meaghann S.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Gajjar, Amar; Ellison, David W.; Pappo, Alberto S.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Downing, James R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prevalence and spectrum of predisposing mutations among children and adolescents with cancer are largely unknown. Knowledge of such mutations may improve the understanding of tumorigenesis, direct patient care, and enable genetic counseling of patients and families. METHODS In 1120 patients younger than 20 years of age, we sequenced the whole genomes (in 595 patients), whole exomes (in 456), or both (in 69). We analyzed the DNA sequences of 565 genes, including 60 that have been associated with autosomal dominant cancer-predisposition syndromes, for the presence of germline mutations. The pathogenicity of the mutations was determined by a panel of medical experts with the use of cancer-specific and locus-specific genetic databases, the medical literature, computational predictions, and second hits identified in the tumor genome. The same approach was used to analyze data from 966 persons who did not have known cancer in the 1000 Genomes Project, and a similar approach was used to analyze data from an autism study (from 515 persons with autism and 208 persons without autism). RESULTS Mutations that were deemed to be pathogenic or probably pathogenic were identified in 95 patients with cancer (8.5%), as compared with 1.1% of the persons in the 1000 Genomes Project and 0.6% of the participants in the autism study. The most commonly mutated genes in the affected patients were TP53 (in 50 patients), APC (in 6), BRCA2 (in 6), NF1 (in 4), PMS2 (in 4), RB1 (in 3), and RUNX1 (in 3). A total of 18 additional patients had protein-truncating mutations in tumor-suppressor genes. Of the 58 patients with a predisposing mutation and available information on family history, 23 (40%) had a family history of cancer. CONCLUSIONS Germline mutations in cancer-predisposing genes were identified in 8.5% of the children and adolescents with cancer. Family history did not predict the presence of an underlying predisposition syndrome in most patients. (Funded by the American

  15. Thyroid hormone resistance: a novel mutation in thyroid hormone receptor beta (THRB) gene - case report.

    PubMed

    Işık, Emregül; Beck Peccoz, Paolo; Campi, Irene; Özön, Alev; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer; Gönç, Nazlı; Kandemir, Nurgün

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormone resistance (THR) is a dominantly inherited syndrome characterized by reduced sensitivity to thyroid hormones. It is usually caused by mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor beta (THRB) gene. In the present report, we describe the clinical and laboratory characteristics and genetic analysis of patients with a novel THRB gene mutation. The index patient had been misdiagnosed as hyperthyroidism and treated with antithyroid drugs since eight days of age. Thyroid hormone results showed that thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH) was never suppressed despite elevated thyroid hormone levels, and there was no symptom suggesting hyperthyroidism. A heterozygous mutation at codon 350 located in exon 9 of the THRB gene was detected in all the affected members of the family. It is important to consider thyroid hormone levels in association with TSH levels to prevent inappropriate treatment and the potential complications, such as clinical hypothyroidism or an increase in goiter size. PMID:24217081

  16. Role of genetic mutations in folate-related enzyme genes on Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kang; Zhao, Ruizhe; Shen, Min; Ye, Jiaxin; Li, Xiao; Huang, Yuan; Hua, Lixin; Wang, Zengjun; Li, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Several studies showed that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes might be associated with male infertility; however, the results were still inconsistent. We performed a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis to investigate the associations between the MTHFR C677T, MTHFR A1298C, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G mutations and the MTHFR haplotype with the risk of male infertility. Overall, a total of 37 studies were selected. Our meta-analysis showed that the MTHFR C677T mutation was a risk factor for male infertility in both azoospermia and oligoasthenoteratozoospermia patients, especially in Asian population. Men carrying the MTHFR TC haplotype were most liable to suffer infertility while those with CC haplotype had lowest risk. On the other hand, the MTHFR A1298C mutation was not related to male infertility. MTR A2756G and MTRR A66G were potential candidates in the pathogenesis of male infertility, but more case-control studies were required to avoid false-positive outcomes. All of these results were confirmed by the trial sequential analysis. Finally, our meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis proved that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes played a significant role in male infertility. PMID:26549413

  17. Role of genetic mutations in folate-related enzyme genes on Male Infertility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kang; Zhao, Ruizhe; Shen, Min; Ye, Jiaxin; Li, Xiao; Huang, Yuan; Hua, Lixin; Wang, Zengjun; Li, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Several studies showed that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes might be associated with male infertility; however, the results were still inconsistent. We performed a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis to investigate the associations between the MTHFR C677T, MTHFR A1298C, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G mutations and the MTHFR haplotype with the risk of male infertility. Overall, a total of 37 studies were selected. Our meta-analysis showed that the MTHFR C677T mutation was a risk factor for male infertility in both azoospermia and oligoasthenoteratozoospermia patients, especially in Asian population. Men carrying the MTHFR TC haplotype were most liable to suffer infertility while those with CC haplotype had lowest risk. On the other hand, the MTHFR A1298C mutation was not related to male infertility. MTR A2756G and MTRR A66G were potential candidates in the pathogenesis of male infertility, but more case-control studies were required to avoid false-positive outcomes. All of these results were confirmed by the trial sequential analysis. Finally, our meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis proved that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes played a significant role in male infertility. PMID:26549413

  18. Linkage and mutation analysis of Thomsen and Becker myotonia families

    SciTech Connect

    Koty, P.P.; Pegoraro, E.; Hoffman, E.P.

    1994-09-01

    Thomsen (autosomal dominant) and Becker (autosomal recessive) myotonias are characterized by the inability for muscle relaxation after voluntary, mechanical, or electrical stimulation. Families with both diseases have been linked to the skeletal muscle chloride channel (CLC1) on chromosome 7q35; however, only 2 gene mutations have been identified, and the reasons underlying the alternative dominant or recessive inheritance are not clear. We used linkage analysis and SSCP of 23 exons to screen 8 families (56 individuals) and 7 isolated cases with the diagnosis of Thomsen/Becker myotonia. A novel mutation (1290M) in exon 8 was detected in a family with Thomsen disease. Three additional families showed the previously described G230E change. Thus, chloride channel mutations could be identified in 4/5 families showing dominant inheritance. We were able to exclude linkage to the CLC1 gene in the fifth family. In patients with recessive Becker disease, an isolated case had two unique conformers, one causing a novel A437T change in exon 12. We also identified the previously reported F413C change in a second family. We found significant differences in the clinical picture between families with different mutations but also in families with the same mutation. Our data indicates that DNA studies are critical for correct diagnosis of the myotonias.

  19. Lack of Association of ACE2 G8790A Gene Mutation with Essential Hypertension in the Chinese Population: A Meta-Analysis Involving 5260 Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-yan

    2012-01-01

    Background: The angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) G8790A gene polymorphism has been associated with the susceptibility to essential hypertension (EH), but the results are disputable. Objective and Methods: To investigate the relationship between the ACE2 G8790A gene polymorphism and EH, eight separate studies with 5260 subjects were meta-analyzed. The pooled odds ratio (OR) and its corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated by a random effect model. Results: In the ACE2 G8790A gene polymorphism and EH meta-analysis in a Chinese population, no significant association was found between the ACE2 G8790A gene polymorphism and EH (OR: 1.03, 95% CI: 0.87–1.21, P = 0.76). In the stratified analysis by gender, no significant risk was found among males (OR: 1.06, 95% CI: 0.82–1.36, P = 0.66) or females (OR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.77–1.24, P = 0.85). Under a dominant model of inheritance in the female subgroup, the pooled OR for the GG/GA + AA value was 1.01 (95% CI: 0.82–1.25, P = 0.92). Under a recessive model of inheritance in the female subgroup, the pooled OR for the AA/AG + GG value was 0.93 (95% CI: 0.50–1.73, P = 0.83). Conclusion: The current meta-analysis suggested that the ACE2 G8790A gene polymorphism might not be related to the increased EH risk in the Chinese population. PMID:22988445

  20. Four novel mutations in the lactase gene (LCT) underlying congenital lactase deficiency (CLD)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Congenital lactase deficiency (CLD) is a severe gastrointestinal disorder of newborns. The diagnosis is challenging and based on clinical symptoms and low lactase activity in intestinal biopsy specimens. The disease is enriched in Finland but is also present in other parts of the world. Mutations encoding the lactase (LCT) gene have recently been shown to underlie CLD. The purpose of this study was to identify new mutations underlying CLD in patients with different ethnic origins, and to increase awareness of this disease so that the patients could be sought out and treated correctly. Methods Disaccharidase activities in intestinal biopsy specimens were assayed and the coding region of LCT was sequenced from five patients from Europe with clinical features compatible with CLD. In the analysis and prediction of mutations the following programs: ClustalW, Blosum62, PolyPhen, SIFT and Panther PSEC were used. Results Four novel mutations in the LCT gene were identified. A single nucleotide substitution leading to an amino acid change S688P in exon 7 and E1612X in exon 12 were present in a patient of Italian origin. Five base deletion V565fsX567 leading to a stop codon in exon 6 was found in one and a substitution R1587H in exon 12 from another Finnish patient. Both Finnish patients were heterozygous for the Finnish founder mutation Y1390X. The previously reported mutation G1363S was found in a homozygous state in two siblings of Turkish origin. Conclusion This is the first report of CLD mutations in patients living outside Finland. It seems that disease is more common than previously thought. All mutations in the LCT gene lead to a similar phenotype despite the location and/or type of mutation. PMID:19161632

  1. Two novel NIPBL gene mutations in Chinese patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mei, Libin; Liang, Desheng; Huang, Yanru; Pan, Qian; Wu, Lingqian

    2015-01-25

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a dominantly inherited developmental disorder characterized by distinctive facial features, mental retardation, and upper limb defects, with the involvement of multiple organs and systems. To date, mutations have been identified in five genes responsible for CdLS: NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21, and HDAC8. Here, we present a clinical and molecular characterization of five unrelated Chinese patients whose clinical presentation is consistent with that of CdLS. There were no chromosomal abnormalities in the five children. In three patients, DNA sequencing revealed a previously reported frameshift mutation c.2479delA (p.Arg827GlyfsX20), and two novel mutations including a heterozygous mutation c.6272 G>T (p.Cys2091Phe) and a frameshift mutation c.1672delA (p.Thr558LeufsX7) in NIPBL. For the remaining patients, large deletions and/or duplications within the NIPBL gene were excluded as playing a role in the pathogenesis, by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) analysis. These findings broaden the mutation spectrum of NIPBL and further our understanding of the diverse and variable effects of NIPBL mutations on CdLS. PMID:25447906

  2. Identification of a Variety of Mutations in Cancer Predisposition Genes in Patients with Suspected Lynch Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yurgelun, Matthew B.; Allen, Brian; Kaldate, Rajesh R.; Bowles, Karla R.; Judkins, Thaddeus; Kaushik, Praveen; Roa, Benjamin B.; Wenstrup, Richard J.; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Syngal, Sapna

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Multigene panels are commercially available tools for hereditary cancer risk assessment that allow for next-generation sequencing of numerous genes in parallel. However, it is not clear if these panels offer advantages over traditional genetic testing. We investigated the number of cancer predisposition gene mutations identified by parallel sequencing in individuals with suspected Lynch syndrome. Methods We performed germline analysis with a 25-gene next-generation sequencing panel using DNA from 1260 individuals who underwent clinical genetic testing for Lynch syndrome from 2012 through 2013. All subjects had a history of Lynch syndrome-associated cancer and/or polyps. We classified all identified germline alterations for pathogenicity and calculated the frequencies of pathogenic mutations and variants of uncertain significance (VUS). We also analyzed data on patients’ personal and family history of cancer, including fulfillment of clinical guidelines for genetic testing. Results Of the 1260 subjects, 1112 met National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) criteria for Lynch syndrome testing (88%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 86%–90%). Multigene panel testing identified 114 probands with Lynch syndrome mutations (9.0%; 95% CI, 7.6%−10.8%) and 71 with mutations in other cancer predisposition genes (5.6%; 95% CI, 4.4%−7.1%). Fifteen individuals had mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2; 93% of these met the NCCN criteria for Lynch syndrome testing and 33% met NCCN criteria for BRCA1 and BRCA2 analysis (P=.0017). An additional 9 individuals carried mutations in other genes linked to high lifetime risks of cancer (5 had mutations in APC, 3 had bi-allelic mutations in MUTYH, and 1 had a mutation in STK11); all of these patients met NCCN criteria for Lynch syndrome testing. Four hundred seventy-nine individuals had ≥1 VUS (38%; 95% CI, 35%–41%). Conclusions In individuals with suspected Lynch syndrome, multigene panel testing identified high

  3. Lysosomal Dysfunctions Associated with Mutations at Mouse Pigment Genes

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Edward K.; Swank, Richard T.

    1979-01-01

    Melanosomes and lysosomes share several structural and biosynthetic properties. Therefore, a large number of mouse pigment mutants were tested to determine whether genes affecting melanosome structure or function might also affect the lysosome. Among 31 mouse pigment mutants, six had 1.5- to 2.5- fold increased concentrations of kidney β-glucuronidase. Three mutants, pale ear, pearl and pallid, had a generalized effect on lysosomal enzymes since there were coordinate increases in kidney β-galactosidase and α-mannosidase. The effects of these three mutations are lysosome specific since rates of kidney protein synthesis and activities of three nonlysosomal kidney enzymes were normal. Also, the mutants are relatively tissue specific in that all had normal liver lysomal enzyme concentrations.—A common dysfunction in all three mutants was a lowered rate of lysosomal enzyme secretion from kidney into urine. While normal C57BL/6J mice daily secreted 27 to 30% of total kidney β-glucuronidase and β-galactosidase, secretion of these two enzymes was coordinately depressed to 1 to 2%, 8 to 9% and 4 to 5% of total kidney enzyme in the pale-ear, pearl and pallid mutants, respectively. Although depressed lysosomal enzyme secretion is the major pigment mutant alteration, the higher lysomal enzyme concentrations in pearl and pallid may be partly due to an increase in lysosomal enzyme synthesis. In these mutants kidney glucuronidase synthetic rate was increased 1.4- to 1.5-fold.—These results suggest that there are several critical genes in mammals that control the biogenesis, processing and/or function of related classes of subcellular organelles. The mechanism of action of these genes is amenable to further analysis since they have been incorporated into congenic inbred strains of mice. PMID:115747

  4. [Driver gene mutation and targeted therapy of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2013-03-01

    Although cancers may have many genetic alterations, there are only a few mutations actually associated with essential traits of cancer cells such as cell proliferation or evasion from apoptosis. Because cancer cells are "addicted" to these "drive genes" , pharmacologic inhibition of these gene function is highly effective. Epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor(TKI)(such as gefitinib or erlotinib)treatment of lung cancer harboring EGFR gene mutation is one of the prototypes of such therapies. Several clinical trials clearly demonstrated that progression-free survival of patients treated with EGFR-TKI is significantly longer than that of those treated by conventional platinum doublet chemotherapy. EGFR-TKI therapy dramatically changed the paradigm of lung cancer treatment. Furthermore, in 2012, crizotinib was approved for lung cancer treatment with anaplastic lymphoma kinase(ALK)gene translocation. Targeted therapies for lung cancers "addicted" to other driver gene mutations including ROS1, RET or HER2 are also under development. Through these personalized approaches, lung cancer is changing from an acute fatal disease to a more chronic disease, and eventually we might be able to cure it. PMID:23507588

  5. Analysis of Dominant Mutations Affecting Muscle Excitation in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, D. J.; Weinshenker, D.; Thomas, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    We examined mutations that disrupt muscle activation in Caenorhabditis elegans. Fifteen of 17 of these genes were identified previously and we describe new mutations in three of them. We also describe mutations in two new genes, exp-3 and exp-4. We assessed the degree of defect in pharyngeal, body-wall, egg-laying, and enteric muscle activation in animals mutant for each gene. Mutations in all 17 genes are semidominant and, in cases that could be tested, appear to be gain-of-function. Based on their phenotypes, the genes fall into three broad categories: mutations in 11 genes cause defective muscle activation, mutations in four genes cause hyperactivated muscle, and mutations in two genes cause defective activation in some muscle types and hyperactivation in others. In all testable cases, the mutations blocked response to pharmacological activators of egg laying, but did not block muscle activation by irradiation with a laser microbeam. The data suggest that these mutations affect muscle excitation, but not the capacity of the muscle fibers to contract. For most of the genes, apparent loss-of-function mutants have a grossly wild-type phenotype. These observations suggest that there is a large group of genes that function in muscle excitation that can be identified primarily by dominant mutations. PMID:8582640

  6. Thalassaemia mutations within the 5'UTR of the human beta-globin gene disrupt transcription.

    PubMed

    Sgourou, Argyro; Routledge, Samantha; Antoniou, Michael; Papachatzopoulou, Adamantia; Psiouri, Lambrini; Athanassiadou, Aglaia

    2004-03-01

    The mechanisms by which mutations within the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the human beta-globin gene (HBB) cause thalassaemia are currently not well understood. We present here the first comprehensive comparative functional analysis of four 'silent' mutations in the human beta-globin 5'UTR, namely: +10(-T), +22(G --> A), +33(C --> G) and +(40-43)(-AAAC), which are present in patients with beta-thalassaemia intermedia. Expression of these genes under the control of the beta-globin locus control region in stable transfected murine erythroleukaemia cells showed that all four mutations decreased steady state levels of mRNA to 61.6%, 68%, 85.2% and 70.6%, respectively, compared with the wildtype gene. These mutations did not interfere with either mRNA transport from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, 3' end processing or mRNA stability. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated that mutations +10(-T) and +33(C --> G) reduced the rate of transcription to a degree that fully accounted for the observed lower level of mRNA accumulation, suggesting a disruption of downstream promoter sequences. Interestingly, mutation +22(G --> A) decreased the rate of transcription to a low degree, indicating the existence of a mechanism that acts post-transcriptionally. Generally, our data demonstrated the significance of functionally analysing mutants of this type in the presence of a full complement of transcriptional regulatory elements within a stably integrated chromatin context in an erythroid cell environment. PMID:15009072

  7. Mutation of the PAX6 gene in patients with autosomal dominant keratitis

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzayans, F.; Pearce, W.G.; MacDonald, I.M.; Walter, M.A.

    1995-09-01

    Autosomal dominant keratitis (ADK) is an eye disorder chiefly characterized by corneal opacification and vascularization and by foveal hypoplasia. Aniridia (shown recen