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Sample records for gene nt4-ant-shepherdin induce

  1. Induced pluripotency with endogenous and inducible genes

    SciTech Connect

    Duinsbergen, Dirk; Eriksson, Malin; Hoen, Peter A.C. 't; Frisen, Jonas; Mikkers, Harald

    2008-10-15

    The recent discovery that two partly overlapping sets of four genes induce nuclear reprogramming of mouse and even human cells has opened up new possibilities for cell replacement therapies. Although the combination of genes that induce pluripotency differs to some extent, Oct4 and Sox2 appear to be a prerequisite. The introduction of four genes, several of which been linked with cancer, using retroviral approaches is however unlikely to be suitable for future clinical applications. Towards developing a safer reprogramming protocol, we investigated whether cell types that express one of the most critical reprogramming genes endogenously are predisposed to reprogramming. We show here that three of the original four pluripotency transcription factors (Oct4, Klf4 and c-Myc or MYCER{sup TAM}) induced reprogramming of mouse neural stem (NS) cells exploiting endogenous SoxB1 protein levels in these cells. The reprogrammed neural stem cells differentiated into cells of each germ layer in vitro and in vivo, and contributed to mouse development in vivo. Thus a combinatorial approach taking advantage of endogenously expressed genes and inducible transgenes may contribute to the development of improved reprogramming protocols.

  2. Radiation-induced gene responses

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

    1996-12-31

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5` region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression.

  3. Virus-induced gene complementation in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jinhua; Chen, Weiwei; Shen, Jiajia; Qin, Cheng; Lai, Tongfei; Zhang, Pengcheng; Wang, Ying; Wu, Chaoqun; Yang, Xin; Hong, Yiguo

    2013-01-01

    Virus-induced gene complementation (VIGC), a plant virus technology based on Potato virus X for transient overexpression of endogenous genes complemented tomato mutants, resulting in non-ripening fruits to ripen. This efficient “gain-of-function” approach involves no stable transformation, and reveals a fruit-specific transcriptional network that may exist among key transcription factors in modulating tomato ripening. Thus, VIGC represents a novel and feasible strategy for gene functional analysis in plants. PMID:24305652

  4. Virus induced gene silencing of Arabidopsis gene homologues in wheat identify genes conferring improved drought tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a non-model staple crop like wheat, functional validation of potential drought stress responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis could provide gene targets for wheat breeding. Virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) of genes of interest can overcome the inherent problems of polyploidy and limited tra...

  5. Heat induces gene amplification in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Bin; Ouyang, Ruoyun; Huang, Chenghui; Liu, Franklin; Neill, Daniel; Li, Chuanyuan; Dewhirst, Mark

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study discovered that heat exposure (hyperthermia) results in gene amplification in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyperthermia induces DNA double strand breaks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA double strand breaks are considered to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The underlying mechanism of heat-induced gene amplification is generation of DNA double strand breaks. -- Abstract: Background: Hyperthermia plays an important role in cancer therapy. However, as with radiation, it can cause DNA damage and therefore genetic instability. We studied whether hyperthermia can induce gene amplification in cancer cells and explored potential underlying molecular mechanisms. Materials and methods: (1) Hyperthermia: HCT116 colon cancer cells received water-submerged heating treatment at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min; (2) gene amplification assay using N-(phosphoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) selection of cabamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbarmylase, dihydro-orotase (cad) gene amplified cells; (3) southern blotting for confirmation of increased cad gene copies in PALA-resistant cells; (4) {gamma}H2AX immunostaining to detect {gamma}H2AX foci as an indication for DNA double strand breaks. Results: (1) Heat exposure at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces gene amplification. The frequency of cad gene amplification increased by 2.8 and 6.5 folds respectively; (2) heat exposure at both 42 and 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces DNA double strand breaks in HCT116 cells as shown by {gamma}H2AX immunostaining. Conclusion: This study shows that heat exposure can induce gene amplification in cancer cells, likely through the generation of DNA double strand breaks, which are believed to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. This process may be promoted by heat when cellular proteins that are responsible for checkpoints, DNA replication, DNA repair and

  6. Tetracycline inducible gene manipulation in serotonergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Weber, Tillmann; Renzland, Insa; Baur, Max; Mönks, Simon; Herrmann, Elke; Huppert, Verena; Nürnberg, Frank; Schönig, Kai; Bartsch, Dusan

    2012-01-01

    The serotonergic (5-HT) neuronal system has important and diverse physiological functions throughout development and adulthood. Its dysregulation during development or later in adulthood has been implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Transgenic animal models designed to study the contribution of serotonergic susceptibility genes to a pathological phenotype should ideally allow to study candidate gene overexpression or gene knockout selectively in serotonergic neurons at any desired time during life. For this purpose, conditional expression systems such as the tet-system are preferable. Here, we generated a transactivator (tTA) mouse line (TPH2-tTA) that allows temporal and spatial control of tetracycline (Ptet) controlled transgene expression as well as gene deletion in 5-HT neurons. The tTA cDNA was inserted into a 196 kb PAC containing a genomic mouse Tph2 fragment (177 kb) by homologous recombination in E. coli. For functional analysis of Ptet-controlled transgene expression, TPH2-tTA mice were crossed to a Ptet-regulated lacZ reporter line (Ptet-nLacZ). In adult double-transgenic TPH2-tTA/Ptet-nLacZ mice, TPH2-tTA founder line L62-20 showed strong serotonergic β-galactosidase expression which could be completely suppressed with doxycycline (Dox). Furthermore, Ptet-regulated gene expression could be reversibly activated or inactivated when Dox was either withdrawn or added to the system. For functional analysis of Ptet-controlled, Cre-mediated gene deletion, TPH2-tTA mice (L62-20) were crossed to double transgenic Ptet-Cre/R26R reporter mice to generate TPH2-tTA/Ptet-Cre/R26R mice. Without Dox, 5-HT specific recombination started at E12.5. With permanent Dox administration, Ptet-controlled Cre-mediated recombination was absent. Dox withdrawal either postnatally or during adulthood induced efficient recombination in serotonergic neurons of all raphe nuclei, respectively. In the enteric nervous system, recombination could not be detected. We generated a

  7. HIFU-induced gene activation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunbo; Zhong, Pei; Kon, Takashi; Li, Chuanyuan

    2001-05-01

    This work investigated the inducible gene activation in cancer cells that were sublethally injured during HIFU treatment. HeLa cells were transfected by an adenovirus vector that encodes GFP under the control of hsp70B promoter, leading to about 65% transfection efficiency. A volume of 10 μL transfected HeLa cells in suspension (5×107 cells/ml) were placed at the bottom of a PCR tube so that the cell suspension could be heated to a peak temperature of 50°C, 60°C, and 70°C for 120, 10, and 1 s, respectively, by a focused 1.1-MHz HIFU transducer operated at a peak negative pressure of -2.7 MPa at different duty cycles. One day after HIFU treatment, cell viability was determined to be 63%, 35%, and 18%, respectively, based on Trypan Blue exclusion test. Importantly, in all test groups, inducible GFP expression was detected in about 40%-50% of the surviving cells with GFP intensity increased by 25-fold based on flow cytometry analysis. These results demonstrate that even under the short exposure duration of HIFU treatment, inducible gene expression could be produced in sublethally injured cell population in vitro. Further studies are underway to explore the optimal HIFU condition for gene activation in vivo.

  8. Salt induced gene expression in Prosopis farcta

    SciTech Connect

    Heimer, I.M.; Golan, A.; Lips, H.

    1987-04-01

    The authors hypothesize that in facultative halophytes, the genes which impart salt tolerance are expressed when the plants are exposed to salt. As a first step towards possible identification of these genes, they examined salt induced changes of gene expression in the facultative halophyte Prosopis farcta at the protein level, by SDS-PAGE. Exposure to salt of aseptically grown, two-week old seedlings, was carried out in one of two ways: (1) a one step transfer of seedlings from medium without salt to that with the indicated concentrations followed by 5 hr or 24 hr incubation periods. During the last 2 hrs of each incubation period the seedlings were pulse-labelled with /sup 35/S Sulfate or L-Methionine; (2) a gradual increase of the salt concentration at 50 mM increments at 2-4 day intervals. Two days after reaching the desired salt concentration, the seedlings were pulse-labelled for 2 hrs with /sup 35/S sulfate or L-methionine. Protein from roots were extracted and analyzed. Polypeptides were visualized by staining with coomassie blue or by fluorography. Qualitative as well as quantitative changes of gene expression as induced by salt could be observed. Their significance regarding salt tolerance will be discussed.

  9. Gravity-Induced Gene Expression in Plants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sederoff, Heike; Heber, Steffen; Howard, Brian; Myburg-Nichols, Henrietta; Hammond, Rebecca; Salinas-Mondragon, Raul; Brown, Christopher S.

    Plants sense changes in their orientation towards the vector of gravity and respond with directional growth. Several metabolites in the signal transduction cascade have been identified. However, very little is known about the interaction between these sensing and signal transduction events and even less is known about their role in the differential growth response. Gravity induced changes in transcript abundance have been identified in Arabidopsis whole seedlings and root apices (Moseyko et al. 2002; Kimbrough et al. 2004). Gravity induced transcript abundance changes can be observed within less than 1 min after stimulation (Salinas-Mondragon et al. 2005). Gene expression however requires not only transcription but also translation of the mRNA. Translation can only occur when mRNA is associated with ribosomes, even though not all mRNA associated with ribosomes is actively translated. To approximate translational capacity we quantified whole genome transcript abundances in corn stem pulvini during the first hour after gravity stimulation in total and poly-ribosomal fractions. As in Arabidopsis root apices, transcript abundances of several clusters of genes responded to gravity stimulation. The vast majority of these transcripts were also found to associate with polyribosomes in the same temporal and quantitative pattern. These genes are transcriptionally regulated by gravity stimulation, but do not exhibit translational regulation. However, a small group of genes showed increased transcriptional regulation after gravity stimulation, but no association with polysomes. These transcripts likely are translationally repressed. The mechanism of translational repression for these transcripts is unknown. Based on the hypothesis that the genes essential for gravitropic responses should be expressed in most or all species, we compared the temporal gravity induced expression pattern of all orthologs identified between maize and Arabidopsis. A small group of genes showed high

  10. Targeted gene silencing to induce permanent sterility.

    PubMed

    Dissen, G A; Lomniczi, A; Boudreau, R L; Chen, Y H; Davidson, B L; Ojeda, S R

    2012-08-01

    A non-surgical method to induce sterility would be a useful tool to control feral populations of animals. Our laboratories have experience with approaches aimed at targeting brain cells in vivo with vehicles that deliver a payload of either inhibitory RNAs or genes intended to correct cellular dysfunction. A combination/modification of these methods may provide a useful framework for the design of approaches that can be used to sterilize cats and dogs. For this approach to succeed, it has to meet several conditions: it needs to target a gene essential for fertility. It must involve a method that can selectively silence the gene of interest. It also needs to deliver the silencing agent via a minimally invasive method. Finally, the silencing effect needs to be sustained for many years, so that expansion of the targeted population can be effectively prevented. In this article, we discuss this subject and provide a succinct account of our previous experience with: (i) molecular reagents able to disrupt reproductive cyclicity when delivered to regions of the brain involved in the control of reproduction and (ii) molecular reagents able to ameliorate neuronal disease when delivered systemically using a novel approach of gene therapy. PMID:22827375

  11. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Ornametal Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) provides an attractive tool for high throughput analysis of the functional effects of gene knock-down. Virus genomes are engineered to include fragments of target host genes, and the infected plant recognizes and silences the target genes as part of its viral defe...

  12. Virus-Induced gene silencing in ornamental plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) provides an attractive tool for high throughput analysis of the functional effects of gene knock-down. Virus genomes are engineered to include fragments of target host genes, and the infected plant recognizes and silences the target genes as part of its viral defe...

  13. GENE METHYLATION CHANGES IN TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENES INDUCED BY ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The choice of a dose-response model used for extrapolation can be influenced by knowledge of mechanism of action. We have already showed that arsenic affects methylation of the human p53 gene promoter. Evidence that genes other than the p53 tumor suppressor gene are affected woul...

  14. Insect and wound induced GUS gene expression from a Beta vulgaris proteinase inhibitor gene promoter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inducible gene promoters that are specifically activated by pathogen invasion or insect pest attack are needed for effective expression of resistance genes to control plant diseases. In the present study, a promoter from a serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) shown to be up-regulated in resist...

  15. Strong Magnetic Field Induced Changes of Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.; Klingenberg, B.; Brooks, J. S.; Morgan, A. N.; Yowtak, J.; Meisel, M. W.

    2005-07-01

    We review our studies of the biological impact of magnetic field strengths of up to 30 T on transgenic arabidopsis plants engineered with a stress response gene consisting of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene reporter. Field strengths in excess of 15 T induce expression of the Adh/GUS transgene in the roots and leaves. Microarray analyses indicate that such field strengths have a far reaching effect on the genome. Wide spread induction of stress-related genes and transcription factors, and a depression of genes associated with cell wall metabolism are prominent examples.

  16. Inducible and combinatorial gene manipulation in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Dogbevia, Godwin K.; Marticorena-Alvarez, Ricardo; Bausen, Melanie; Sprengel, Rolf; Hasan, Mazahir T.

    2015-01-01

    We have deployed recombinant adeno-associated viruses equipped with tetracycline-controlled genetic switches to manipulate gene expression in mouse brain. Here, we show a combinatorial genetic approach for inducible, cell type-specific gene expression and Cre/loxP mediated gene recombination in different brain regions. Our chemical-genetic approach will help to investigate ‘when’, ‘where’, and ‘how’ gene(s) control neuronal circuit dynamics, and organize, for example, sensory signal processing, learning and memory, and behavior. PMID:25954155

  17. EVIDENCE FOR THE MACROPHAGE INDUCING GENE IN MYCOBACTERIUM INTRACELLULARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and possibly others. Organisms belonging to the MAC are phylogenetically closely related, opportunistic pathogens. The macrophage inducing gene (mig) is the only well-des...

  18. IL-10 induces gene expression in macrophages: partial overlap with IL-5 but not with IL-4 induced genes.

    PubMed

    Stumpo, Rita; Kauer, Manfred; Martin, Stephan; Kolb, Hubert

    2003-10-01

    The hypothesis that IL-10, in addition to down-regulating pro-inflammatory activities of macrophages, induces an alternative state of macrophage reactivity was tested. We therefore conducted a systematic search for genes induced by IL-10 using the method of suppression subtractive hybridisation. Of an initial 1,300 candidate clones obtained, several screening rounds led to the identification of 51 clones which were reproducibly at least twofold up-regulated in mouse J774 macrophages in response to treatment with IL-10. Of these, 41 genes were homologous to known genes involved in cell metabolism or immunoregulation, five contained novel sequences and another five were homologous to ESTs without known function. One major finding was that about 25% of the IL-10 genes were also found expressed in response to IFNgamma, and several of these also reappeared in IL-4 or IL-5 induced mRNA species. Hence, Th1 and Th2 type cytokines may elicit a common basal activation response in macrophages. The second major finding was that 57% of IL-10 induced genes reappeared in IL-5 induced mRNA but no more than 18% were also found in IL-4 induced mRNA of J774 cells. We conclude that the gene expression response to IL-10 in macrophages is partially different from the response to IL-5 and is substantially different from the response to IL-4, which suggests an unexpected diversity of biological phenotypes induced by different Th2 type cytokines. PMID:14561490

  19. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in barley seedling leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is one of the most potent reverse genetics technologies for gene functional characterization. This method exploits a dsRNA-mediated antiviral defense mechanism in plants. Using this method allows researchers to generate rapid phenotypic data in a relatively rapid ...

  20. Synthetic riboswitches that induce gene expression in diverse bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Topp, Shana; Reynoso, Colleen M K; Seeliger, Jessica C; Goldlust, Ian S; Desai, Shawn K; Murat, Dorothée; Shen, Aimee; Puri, Aaron W; Komeili, Arash; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Scott, June R; Gallivan, Justin P

    2010-12-01

    We developed a series of ligand-inducible riboswitches that control gene expression in diverse species of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, including human pathogens that have few or no previously reported inducible expression systems. We anticipate that these riboswitches will be useful tools for genetic studies in a wide range of bacteria. PMID:20935124

  1. Mechanisms of radiation-induced gene responses

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.

    1996-10-01

    In the process of identifying genes differentially expressed in cells exposed ultraviolet radiation, we have identified a transcript having a 26-bp region that is highly conserved in a variety of species including Bacillus circulans, yeast, pumpkin, Drosophila, mouse, and man. When the 5` region (flanking region or UTR) of a gene, the sequence is predominantly in +/+ orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand; while in the coding region and the 3` region (UTR), the sequence is most frequently in the +/-orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand. In two genes, the element is split into two parts; however, in most cases, it is found only once but with a minimum of 11 consecutive nucleotides precisely depicting the original sequence. The element is found in a large number of different genes with diverse functions (from human ras p21 to B. circulans chitonase). Gel shift assays demonstrated the presence of a protein in HeLa cell extracts that binds to the sense and antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers, as well as to the double- stranded oligonucleotide. When double-stranded oligomer was used, the size shift demonstrated as additional protein-oligomer complex larger than the one bound to either sense or antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers alone. It is speculated either that this element binds to protein(s) important in maintaining DNA is a single-stranded orientation for transcription or, alternatively that this element is important in the transcription-coupled DNA repair process.

  2. Antipsychotic Induced Gene Regulation in Multiple Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Girgenti, Matthew James; Nisenbaum, Laura K.; Bymaster, Franklin; Terwilliger, Rosemarie; Duman, Ronald S; Newton, Samuel Sathyanesan

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs is not well understood. Their complex receptor affinity profiles indicate that their action could extend beyond dopamine receptor blockade. Single gene expression studies and high-throughput gene profiling have shown the induction of genes from several molecular classes and functional categories. Using a focused microarray approach we investigated gene regulation in rat striatum, frontal cortex and hippocampus after chronic administration of haloperidol or olanzapine. Regulated genes were validated by in-situ hybridization, realtime PCR and immunohistochemistry. Only limited overlap was observed in genes regulated by haloperidol and olanzapine. Both drugs elicited maximal gene regulation in the striatum and least in the hippocampus. Striatal gene induction by haloperidol was predominantly in neurotransmitter signaling, G-protein coupled receptors and transcription factors. Olanzapine prominently induced retinoic acid and trophic factor signaling genes in the frontal cortex. The data also revealed the induction of several genes that could be targeted in future drug development efforts. The study uncovered the induction of several novel genes, including somatostatin receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The results demonstrating the regulation of multiple receptors and transcription factors suggests that both typical and atypical antipsychotics could possess a complex molecular mechanism of action. PMID:20070867

  3. Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M. ); Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R. )

    1993-01-01

    Studies were designed to identify genes induced following low-dose neutron but not following [gamma]-ray exposure in fibroblasts. Our past work had shown differences in the expression of [beta]-protein kinase C and c-fos genes, both being induced following [gamma]-ray but not neutron exposure. We have identified two genes that are induced following neutron, but not [gamma]-ray, exposure: Rp-8 (a gene induced by apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency (HIV). Rp-8 mRNA induction was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) and at high dose rate (12 cGy/min). The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measures of CAT activity and CAT transcripts following irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to [gamma] rays over a broad range of doses. Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected following neutron exposure (48 cGy) administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) but not high (12 cGy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction was inhibited by low-dose-rate neutron exposure.

  4. Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M.; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    Studies were designed to identify genes induced following low-dose neutron but not following {gamma}-ray exposure in fibroblasts. Our past work had shown differences in the expression of {beta}-protein kinase C and c-fos genes, both being induced following {gamma}-ray but not neutron exposure. We have identified two genes that are induced following neutron, but not {gamma}-ray, exposure: Rp-8 (a gene induced by apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency (HIV). Rp-8 mRNA induction was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) and at high dose rate (12 cGy/min). The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measures of CAT activity and CAT transcripts following irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to {gamma} rays over a broad range of doses. Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected following neutron exposure (48 cGy) administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) but not high (12 cGy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction was inhibited by low-dose-rate neutron exposure.

  5. Three light-inducible heat shock genes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    von Gromoff, E D; Treier, U; Beck, C F

    1989-01-01

    Genomic clones representing three Chlamydomonas reinhardtii genes homologous to the Drosophila hsp70 heat shock gene were isolated. The mRNAs of genes hsp68, hsp70, and hsp80 could be translated in vitro into proteins of Mr 68,000, 70,000, and 80,000, respectively. Transcription of these genes increased dramatically upon heat shock, and the corresponding mRNAs rapidly accumulated, reaching a peak at around 30 min after a shift to the elevated temperature. Light also induced the accumulation of the mRNAs encoded by these heat shock genes. A shift of dark-grown cells to light resulted in a drastic increase in mRNA levels, which reached a maximum at around 1 h after the shift. Thus, in Chlamydomonas, expression of hsp70-homologous heat shock genes appears to be regulated by thermal stress and light. Images PMID:2779571

  6. Salmonella induces prominent gene expression in the rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Rodenburg, Wendy; Keijer, Jaap; Kramer, Evelien; Roosing, Susanne; Vink, Carolien; Katan, Martijn B; van der Meer, Roelof; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg MJ

    2007-01-01

    Background Salmonella enteritidis is suggested to translocate in the small intestine. In vivo it induces gene expression changes in the ileal mucosa and Peyer's patches. Stimulation of Salmonella translocation by dietary prebiotics fermented in colon suggests involvement of the colon as well. However, effects of Salmonella on colonic gene expression in vivo are largely unknown. We aimed to characterize time dependent Salmonella-induced changes of colonic mucosal gene expression in rats using whole genome microarrays. For this, rats were orally infected with Salmonella enteritidis to mimic a foodborne infection and colonic gene expression was determined at days 1, 3 and 6 post-infection (n = 8 rats per time-point). As fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) affect colonic physiology, we analyzed colonic mucosal gene expression of FOS-fed versus cellulose-fed rats infected with Salmonella in a separate experiment. Colonic mucosal samples were isolated at day 2 post-infection. Results Salmonella affected transport (e.g. Chloride channel calcium activated 6, H+/K+ transporting Atp-ase), antimicrobial defense (e.g. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein, Defensin 5 and phospholipase A2), inflammation (e.g. calprotectin), oxidative stress related genes (e.g. Dual oxidase 2 and Glutathione peroxidase 2) and Proteolysis (e.g. Ubiquitin D and Proteosome subunit beta type 9). Furthermore, Salmonella translocation increased serum IFNγ and many interferon-related genes in colonic mucosa. The gene most strongly induced by Salmonella infection was Pancreatitis Associated Protein (Pap), showing >100-fold induction at day 6 after oral infection. Results were confirmed by Q-PCR in individual rats. Stimulation of Salmonella translocation by dietary FOS was accompanied by enhancement of the Salmonella-induced mucosal processes, not by induction of other processes. Conclusion We conclude that the colon is a target tissue for Salmonella, considering the abundant changes in mucosal gene expression

  7. Light-Inducible Gene Regulation with Engineered Zinc Finger Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Polstein, Lauren R.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    The coupling of light-inducible protein-protein interactions with gene regulation systems has enabled the control of gene expression with light. In particular, heterodimer protein pairs from plants can be used to engineer a gene regulation system in mammalian cells that is reversible, repeatable, tunable, controllable in a spatiotemporal manner, and targetable to any DNA sequence. This system, Light-Inducible Transcription using Engineered Zinc finger proteins (LITEZ), is based on the blue light-induced interaction of GIGANTEA and the LOV domain of FKF1 that drives the localization of a transcriptional activator to the DNA-binding site of a highly customizable engineered zinc finger protein. This chapter provides methods for modifying LITEZ to target new DNA sequences, engineering a programmable LED array to illuminate cell cultures, and using the modified LITEZ system to achieve spatiotemporal control of transgene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:24718797

  8. Down-Regulation of Gene Expression by RNA-Induced Gene Silencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travella, Silvia; Keller, Beat

    Down-regulation of endogenous genes via post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) is a key to the characterization of gene function in plants. Many RNA-based silencing mechanisms such as post-transcriptional gene silencing, co-suppression, quelling, and RNA interference (RNAi) have been discovered among species of different kingdoms (plants, fungi, and animals). One of the most interesting discoveries was RNAi, a sequence-specific gene-silencing mechanism initiated by the introduction of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), homologous in sequence to the silenced gene, which triggers degradation of mRNA. Infection of plants with modified viruses can also induce RNA silencing and is referred to as virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). In contrast to insertional mutagenesis, these emerging new reverse genetic approaches represent a powerful tool for exploring gene function and for manipulating gene expression experimentally in cereal species such as barley and wheat. We examined how RNAi and VIGS have been used to assess gene function in barley and wheat, including molecular mechanisms involved in the process and available methodological elements, such as vectors, inoculation procedures, and analysis of silenced phenotypes.

  9. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound induced Gene Activation in Solid Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunbo; Kon, Takashi; Li, Chuanyuan; Zhong, Pei

    2006-05-01

    In this work, the feasibility of using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) to activate trans-gene expression in a mouse tumor model was investigated. 4T1 cancer cells were implanted subcutaneously in the hind limbs of Balb/C mice and adenovirus luciferase gene vectors under the control of heat shock protein 70B promoter (Adeno-hsp70B-Luc) were injected intratumoraly for gene transfection. One day following the virus injection, the transfected tumors were heated to a peak temperature of 55, 65, 75, and 85°C, respectively, in 10s at multiple sites around the center of the tumor using a HIFU transducer operated at either 1.1-MHz (fundamental) or 3.3-MHz (3rd harmonic) frequency. Inducible luciferase gene expression was found to vary from 15-fold to 120-fold of the control group following 1.1-MHz HIFU exposure. The maximum gene activation was produced at a peak temperature of 65˜75°C one day following HIFU exposure and decayed gradually to baseline level within 7 days. The inducible gene activation produced by 3.3-MHz HIFU exposure (75°C-10s) was found to be comparable to that produced by hyperthermia (42°C-30min). Altogether, these results demonstrate the feasibility of using HIFU as a simple and versatile physical means to regulate trans-gene expression in vivo. This unique feature may be explored in the future for a synergistic combination of HIFU-induced thermal ablation with heat-induced gene therapy for improved cancer therapy.

  10. Synapsins are late activity-induced genes regulated by birdsong

    PubMed Central

    Velho, Tarciso A. F.; Mello, Claudio V.

    2008-01-01

    The consolidation of long-lasting sensory memories requires the activation of gene expression programs in the brain. In spite of considerable knowledge about the early components of this response, little is known about late components (i.e. genes regulated 2-6 hr after stimulation) and the relationship between early and late genes. Birdsong represents one of the best natural behaviors to study sensory-induced gene expression in awake, freely behaving animals. Here we show that the expression of several isoforms of synapsins, a group of phosphoproteins thought to regulate the dynamics of synaptic vesicle storage and release, is induced by auditory stimulation with birdsong in the caudomedial nidopallium (NCM) of the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) brain. This induction occurs mainly in excitatory (non-GABAergic) neurons and is modulated (suppressed) by early song-inducible proteins. We also show that ZENK, an early song-inducible transcription factor, interacts with the syn3 promoter in vivo, consistent with a direct regulatory effect and an emerging novel view of ZENK action. These results demonstrate that synapsins are a late component of the genomic response to neuronal activation and that their expression depends on a complex set of regulatory interactions between early and late regulated genes. PMID:19005052

  11. INDUCIBLE RNAi-MEDIATED GENE SILENCING USING NANOSTRUCTURED GENE DELIVERY ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, David George James; McKnight, Timothy E; Mcpherson, Jackson; Hoyt, Peter R; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Simpson, Michael L; Sayler, Gary Steven

    2008-01-01

    RNA interference has become a powerful biological tool over the last decade. In this study, a tetracycline-inducible shRNA vector system was designed for silencing CFP expression and introduced alongside the yfp marker gene into Chinese hamster ovary cells using spatially indexed vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays (VACNFs) in a gene delivery process termed impalefection. The VACNF architecture provided simultaneous delivery of multiple genes, subsequent adherence and proliferation of interfaced cells, and repeated monitoring of single cells over time. 24 hours after nanofiber-mediated delivery, 53.1% 10.4% of the cells that expressed the yfp marker gene were also fully silenced by the inducible CFP-silencing shRNA vector. Additionally, efficient CFP-silencing was observed in single cells among a population of cells that remained CFP-expressing. This effective transient expression system enables rapid analysis of gene silencing effects using RNAi in single cells and cell populations.

  12. High magnetic field induced changes of gene expression in arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Ferl, Robert J; Meisel, Mark W

    2006-01-01

    Background High magnetic fields are becoming increasingly prevalent components of non-invasive, biomedical imaging tools (such as MRI), thus, an understanding of the molecular impacts associated with these field strengths in biological systems is of central importance. The biological impact of magnetic field strengths up to 30 Tesla were investigated in this study through the use of transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a stress response gene consisting of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene reporter. Methods Magnetic field induced Adh/GUS activity was evaluated with histochemical staining to assess tissue specific expression and distribution, and with quantitative, spectrofluometric assays to measure degree of activation. The evaluation of global changes in the Arabidopsis genome in response to exposure to high magnetic fields was facilitated with Affymetrix Gene Chip microarrays. Quantitative analyses of gene expression were performed with quantitative real-time polymerase-chain-reaction (qRT-PCR). Results Field strengths in excess of about 15 Tesla induce expression of the Adh/GUS transgene in the roots and leaves. From the microarray analyses that surveyed 8000 genes, 114 genes were differentially expressed to a degree greater than 2.5 fold over the control. These results were quantitatively corroborated by qRT-PCR examination of 4 of the 114 genes. Conclusion The data suggest that magnetic fields in excess of 15 Tesla have far-reaching effect on the genome. The wide-spread induction of stress-related genes and transcription factors, and a depression of genes associated with cell wall metabolism, are prominent examples. The roles of magnetic field orientation of macromolecules and magnetophoretic effects are discussed as possible factors that contribute to the mounting of this response. PMID:17187667

  13. Roles of factorial noise in inducing bimodal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peijiang; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Huang, Lifang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2015-06-01

    Some gene regulatory systems can exhibit bimodal distributions of mRNA or protein although the deterministic counterparts are monostable. This noise-induced bimodality is an interesting phenomenon and has important biological implications, but it is unclear how different sources of expression noise (each source creates so-called factorial noise that is defined as a component of the total noise) contribute separately to this stochastic bimodality. Here we consider a minimal model of gene regulation, which is monostable in the deterministic case. Although simple, this system contains factorial noise of two main kinds: promoter noise due to switching between gene states and transcriptional (or translational) noise due to synthesis and degradation of mRNA (or protein). To better trace the roles of factorial noise in inducing bimodality, we also analyze two limit models, continuous and adiabatic approximations, apart from the exact model. We show that in the case of slow gene switching, the continuous model where only promoter noise is considered can exhibit bimodality; in the case of fast switching, the adiabatic model where only transcriptional or translational noise is considered can also exhibit bimodality but the exact model cannot; and in other cases, both promoter noise and transcriptional or translational noise can cooperatively induce bimodality. Since slow gene switching and large protein copy numbers are characteristics of eukaryotic cells, whereas fast gene switching and small protein copy numbers are characteristics of prokaryotic cells, we infer that eukaryotic stochastic bimodality is induced mainly by promoter noise, whereas prokaryotic stochastic bimodality is induced primarily by transcriptional or translational noise. PMID:26172735

  14. Roles of factorial noise in inducing bimodal gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peijiang; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Huang, Lifang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2015-06-01

    Some gene regulatory systems can exhibit bimodal distributions of mRNA or protein although the deterministic counterparts are monostable. This noise-induced bimodality is an interesting phenomenon and has important biological implications, but it is unclear how different sources of expression noise (each source creates so-called factorial noise that is defined as a component of the total noise) contribute separately to this stochastic bimodality. Here we consider a minimal model of gene regulation, which is monostable in the deterministic case. Although simple, this system contains factorial noise of two main kinds: promoter noise due to switching between gene states and transcriptional (or translational) noise due to synthesis and degradation of mRNA (or protein). To better trace the roles of factorial noise in inducing bimodality, we also analyze two limit models, continuous and adiabatic approximations, apart from the exact model. We show that in the case of slow gene switching, the continuous model where only promoter noise is considered can exhibit bimodality; in the case of fast switching, the adiabatic model where only transcriptional or translational noise is considered can also exhibit bimodality but the exact model cannot; and in other cases, both promoter noise and transcriptional or translational noise can cooperatively induce bimodality. Since slow gene switching and large protein copy numbers are characteristics of eukaryotic cells, whereas fast gene switching and small protein copy numbers are characteristics of prokaryotic cells, we infer that eukaryotic stochastic bimodality is induced mainly by promoter noise, whereas prokaryotic stochastic bimodality is induced primarily by transcriptional or translational noise.

  15. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Hexaploid Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional genomics analysis in hexaploid wheat is greatly impeded by the genetic redundancy of polyploidy and the difficulties in generating large numbers of transgenic plants required in insertional mutagenesis strategies. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), however, is a strategy for creating g...

  16. A geminivirus-induced gene silencing system for gene function validation in cassava.

    PubMed

    Fofana, Ismael B F; Sangaré, Abdourahamane; Collier, Ray; Taylor, Christopher; Fauquet, Claude M

    2004-11-01

    We have constructed an African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) based gene-silencing vector as a reverse genetics tool for gene function analysis in cassava. The vector carrying a fragment from the Nicotiana tabacum sulfur gene (su), encoding one unit of the chloroplast enzyme magnesium chelatase, was used to induce the silencing of the cassava orthologous gene resulting in yellow-white spots characteristic of the inhibition of su expression. This result suggests that well developed sequence databases from model plants like Arabidopsis thaliana, Nicotiana benthamiana, N. tabacum, Lycopersicon esculentum and others could be used as a major source of information and sequences for functional genomics in cassava. Furthermore, a fragment of the cassava CYP79D2 endogenous gene, sharing 89% homology with CYP79D1 endogenous gene was inserted into the ACMV vector. The resultant vector was inducing the down regulation of the expression of these two genes which catalyze the first-dedicated step in the synthesis of linamarin, the major cyanogenic glycoside in cassava. At 21 days post-inoculation (dpi), a 76% reduction of linamarin content was observed in silenced leaves. Using transgenic plants expressing antisense RNA of CYP79D1 and CYP79D2, Siritunga and Sayre (2003) obtained several lines with a reduction level varying from 60% to 94%. This result provides the first example of direct comparison of the efficiency of a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) system and the transgenic approach for suppression of a biosynthetic pathway. The ACMV VIGS system will certainly be a complement and in some cases an alternative to the transgenic approach, for gene discovery and gene function analysis in cassava. PMID:15630624

  17. Hypergravity-induced changes in gene expression in Arabidopsis hypocotyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, R.; Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.; Takeba, G.; Hoson, T.

    2003-05-01

    Under hypergravity conditions, the cell wall of stem organs becomes mechanically rigid and elongation growth is suppressed, which can be recognized as the mechanism for plants to resist gravitational force. The changes in gene expression by hypergravity treatment were analyzed in Arabidopsis hypocotyls by the differential display method, for identifying genes involved in hypergravity-induced growth suppression. Sixty-two cDNA clones were expressed differentially between the control and 300 g conditions: the expression levels of 39 clones increased, whereas those of 23 clones decreased under hypergravity conditions. Sequence analysis and database searching revealed that 12 clones, 9 up-regulated and 3 down-regulated, have homology to known proteins. The expression of these genes was further analyzed using RT-PCR. Finally, six genes were confirmed to be up-regulated by hypergravity. One of such genes encoded 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), which catalyzes a reaction producing mevalonic acid, a key precursor ofterpenoids such as membrane sterols and several types of hormones. The expression of HMGR gene increased within several hours after hypergravity treatment. Also, compactin, an inhibitor of HMGR, prevented hypergravity-induced growth suppression, suggesting that HMGR is involved in suppression of Arabidopsis hypocotyl growth by hypergravity. In addition, hypergravity increased the expression levels of genes encoding CCR1 and ERD15, which were shown to take part in the signaling pathway of environmental stimuli such as temperature and water, and those of the α-tubulin gene. These genes may be involved in a series of cellular events leading to growth suppression of stem organs under hypergravity conditions.

  18. Benzoic Acid-Inducible Gene Expression in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dragset, Marte S.; Barczak, Amy K.; Kannan, Nisha; Mærk, Mali; Flo, Trude H.; Valla, Svein; Rubin, Eric J.; Steigedal, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Conditional expression is a powerful tool to investigate the role of bacterial genes. Here, we adapt the Pseudomonas putida-derived positively regulated XylS/Pm expression system to control inducible gene expression in Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis. By making simple changes to a Gram-negative broad-host-range XylS/Pm-regulated gene expression vector, we prove that it is possible to adapt this well-studied expression system to non-Gram-negative species. With the benzoic acid-derived inducer m-toluate, we achieve a robust, time- and dose-dependent reversible induction of Pm-mediated expression in mycobacteria, with low background expression levels. XylS/Pm is thus an important addition to existing mycobacterial expression tools, especially when low basal expression is of particular importance. PMID:26348349

  19. Foxtail Mosaic Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Monocot Plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Xie, Ke; Jia, Qi; Zhao, Jinping; Chen, Tianyuan; Li, Huangai; Wei, Xiang; Diao, Xianmin; Hong, Yiguo; Liu, Yule

    2016-07-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful technique to study gene function in plants. However, very few VIGS vectors are available for monocot plants. Here we report that Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV) can be engineered as an effective VIGS system to induce efficient silencing of endogenous genes in monocot plants including barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum) and foxtail millet (Setaria italica). This is evidenced by FoMV-based silencing of phytoene desaturase (PDS) and magnesium chelatase in barley, of PDS and Cloroplastos alterados1 in foxtail millet and wheat, and of an additional gene IspH in foxtail millet. Silencing of these genes resulted in photobleached or chlorosis phenotypes in barley, wheat, and foxtail millet. Furthermore, our FoMV-based gene silencing is the first VIGS system reported for foxtail millet, an important C4 model plant. It may provide an efficient toolbox for high-throughput functional genomics in economically important monocot crops. PMID:27225900

  20. Non-targeted effects of virus-induced gene silencing vectors on host endogenous gene expression.

    PubMed

    Oláh, Enikő; Pesti, Réka; Taller, Dénes; Havelda, Zoltán; Várallyay, Éva

    2016-09-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) uses recombinant viruses to study gene function; however, the effect of the virus vector itself on the gene expression of the host is not always considered. In our work, we investigated non-targeted gene expression changes of the host in order to see how often these changes appear. Effects of various VIGS vector infections were analysed by monitoring gene expression levels of housekeeping genes by Northern blot analysis in four different hosts. We found that non-targeted changes happens very often. More importantly, these non-targeted effects can cause drastic changes in the gene-expression pattern of host genes that are usually used as references in these studies. We have also found that in a tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based VIGS, the presence of foreign sequences in the cloning site of the vector can also have a non-targeted effect, and even the use of an internal control can lead to unpredicted changes. Our results show that although VIGS is a very powerful technique, the VIGS vector, as a pathogen of the host, can cause unwanted changes in its gene-expression pattern, highlighting the importance of careful selection of both the genes to be tested and those to be used as references in the planned experiments. PMID:27283101

  1. Microarray studies of psychostimulant-induced changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yuferov, Vadim; Nielsen, David; Butelman, Eduardo; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2005-03-01

    Alterations in the expression of multiple genes in many brain regions are likely to contribute to psychostimulant-induced behaviours. Microarray technology provides a powerful tool for the simultaneous interrogation of gene expression levels of a large number of genes. Several recent experimental studies, reviewed here, demonstrate the power, limitations and progress of microarray technology in the field of psychostimulant addiction. These studies vary in the paradigms of cocaine or amphetamine administration, drug doses, route and also mode of administration, duration of treatment, animal species, brain regions studied and time of tissue collection after final drug administration. The studies also utilize different microarray platforms and statistical techniques for analysis of differentially expressed genes. These variables influence substantially the results of these studies. It is clear that current microarray techniques cannot detect small changes reliably in gene expression of genes with low expression levels, including functionally significant changes in components of major neurotransmission systems such as glutamate, dopamine, opioid and GABA receptors, especially those that may occur after chronic drug administration or drug withdrawal. However, the microarray studies reviewed here showed cocaine- or amphetamine-induced alterations in the expression of numerous genes involved in the modulation of neuronal growth, cytoskeletal structures, synaptogenesis, signal transduction, apoptosis and cell metabolism. Application of laser capture microdissection and single-cell cDNA amplification may greatly enhance microarray studies of gene expression profiling. The combination of rapidly evolving microarray technology with established methods of neuroscience, molecular biology and genetics, as well as appropriate behavioural models of drug reinforcement, may provide a productive approach for delineating the neurobiological underpinnings of drug responses that lead to

  2. Identification of genes induced by neuregulin in cultured myotubes.

    PubMed

    Fu, A K; Cheung, W M; Ip, F C; Ip, N Y

    1999-09-01

    The formation of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) involves a series of inductive interactions between motor neurons and muscle fibers. The neural signals proposed to induce the mRNA expression of acetylcholine receptors in muscle include neuregulin (NRG). In the present study, we have employed RNA fingerprinting by arbitrarily primed PCR analysis to identify the differentially expressed transcripts following NRG treatment in cultured myotubes. Nine partial cDNA fragments were isolated; the mRNA expression of eight of these genes was found to be up-regulated by NRG. The spatial and temporal expression profiles of these NRG-regulated genes in rat tissues during development suggest potential functional roles during the formation of NMJ in vivo. Our findings not only allowed the identification of novel genes, but also suggested possible functions for some known genes that are consistent with their potential roles at the NMJ. Furthermore, the identification of G-protein beta1 subunit and G-protein-coupled receptor as NRG-regulated genes has provided the first demonstration that activation of the NRG signaling pathway can induce the expression of components in the G-protein signaling cascade. PMID:10576892

  3. Evaluating the ability of the barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing system to simultaneously silence two wheat genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an important tool for rapid assessment of gene function in plants. The ability of the Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus (BSMV) VIGS system to simultaneously silence two genes was assessed by comparing the extent of down-regulation of the wheat PDS and SGT1 genes afte...

  4. Evaluating the Ability of the Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus-Induced Gene Silencing System to Simultaneously Silence Two Wheat Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an important tool for rapid assessment of gene function in plants. The ability of the Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) VIGS system to simultaneously silence two genes was assessed by comparing the extent of down-regulation of the wheat PDS and SGT1 genes afte...

  5. Gene expression profiling of replicative and induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Maggie; Kruger, Adele; Tainsky, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a cell cycle arrest accompanied by high expression of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors which counteract overactive growth signals, which serves as a tumor suppressive mechanism. Senescence can be a result of telomere shortening (natural or replicative senescence) or DNA damage resulting from exogenous stressors (induced senescence). Here, we performed gene expression profiling through RNA-seq of replicative senescence, adriamycin-induced senescence, H2O2-induced senescence, and 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine-induced senescence in order to profile the pathways controlling various types of senescence. Overall, the pathways common to all 4 types of senescence were related to inflammation and the innate immune system. It was also evident that 5-aza-induced senescence mirrors natural replicative senescence due to telomere shortening. We also examined the prevalence of senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) factors in the RNA-seq data, showing that it is a common characteristic of all 4 types of senescence. In addition, we could discriminate changes in gene expression due to quiescence during cellular senescence from those that were specific to senescence. PMID:25483067

  6. Applications and advantages of virus-induced gene silencing for gene function studies in plants.

    PubMed

    Burch-Smith, Tessa M; Anderson, Jeffrey C; Martin, Gregory B; Dinesh-Kumar, S P

    2004-09-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a recently developed gene transcript suppression technique for characterizing the function of plant genes. The approach involves cloning a short sequence of a targeted plant gene into a viral delivery vector. The vector is used to infect a young plant, and in a few weeks natural defense mechanisms of the plant directed at suppressing virus replication also result in specific degradation of mRNAs from the endogenous plant gene that is targeted for silencing. VIGS is rapid (3-4 weeks from infection to silencing), does not require development of stable transformants, allows characterization of phenotypes that might be lethal in stable lines, and offers the potential to silence either individual or multiple members of a gene family. Here we briefly review the discoveries that led to the development of VIGS and what is known about the experimental requirements for effective silencing. We describe the methodology of VIGS and how it can be optimized and used for both forward and reverse genetics studies. Advantages and disadvantages of VIGS compared with other loss-of-function approaches available for plants are discussed, along with how the limitations of VIGS might be overcome. Examples are reviewed where VIGS has been used to provide important new insights into the roles of specific genes in plant development and plant defense responses. Finally, we examine the future prospects for VIGS as a powerful tool for assessing and characterizing the function of plant genes. PMID:15315635

  7. INDUCIBLE RNAi-MEDIATED GENE SILENCING USING NANOSTRUCTURED GENE DELIVERY ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, David George James; McKnight, Timothy E; Mcpherson, Jackson; Hoyt, Peter R; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Simpson, Michael L; Sayler, Gary Steven

    2008-01-01

    RNA interference has become a powerful biological tool over the last decade. In this study, a tetracycline-inducible shRNA vector system was designed for silencing CFP expression and delivered alongside the yfp marker gene into Chinese hamster ovary cells using impalefection on spatially indexed vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays (VACNFs). The VACNF architecture provided simultaneous delivery of multiple genes, subsequent adherence and proliferation of interfaced cells, and repeated monitoring of single cells over time. Following impalefection and tetracycline induction, 53.1% 10.4% of impalefected cells were fully silenced by the inducible CFP-silencing shRNA vector. Additionally, efficient CFP-silencing was observed in single cells among a population of cells that remained CFP-expressing. This effective transient expression system enables rapid analysis of gene silencing effects using RNAi in single cells and cell populations.

  8. Screening Helicobacter pylori genes induced during infection of mouse stomachs

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Aparna; Hodgson, Nathaniel; Yan, Ming; Joo, Jungsoo; Gu, Lei; Sang, Hong; Gregory-Bryson, Emmalena; Wood, William G; Ni, Yisheng; Smith, Kimberly; Jackson, Sharon H; Coleman, William G

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of in vivo environment on gene expression in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) as it relates to its survival in the host. METHODS: In vivo expression technology (IVET) systems are used to identify microbial virulence genes. We modified the IVET-transcriptional fusion vector, pIVET8, which uses antibiotic resistance as the basis for selection of candidate genes in host tissues to develop two unique IVET-promoter-screening vectors, pIVET11 and pIVET12. Our novel IVET systems were developed by the fusion of random Sau3A DNA fragments of H. pylori and a tandem-reporter system of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase and beta-galactosidase. Additionally, each vector contains a kanamycin resistance gene. We used a mouse macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7 and mice, as selective media to identify specific genes that H. pylori expresses in vivo. Gene expression studies were conducted by infecting RAW 264.7 cells with H. pylori. This was followed by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis to determine the relative expression levels of in vivo induced genes. RESULTS: In this study, we have identified 31 in vivo induced (ivi) genes in the initial screens. These 31 genes belong to several functional gene families, including several well-known virulence factors that are expressed by the bacterium in infected mouse stomachs. Virulence factors, vacA and cagA, were found in this screen and are known to play important roles in H. pylori infection, colonization and pathogenesis. Their detection validates the efficacy of these screening systems. Some of the identified ivi genes have already been implicated to play an important role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori and other bacterial pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae. Transcription profiles of all ivi genes were confirmed by real time PCR analysis of H. pylori RNA isolated from H. pylori infected RAW 264.7 macrophages. We compared the expression profile of H. pylori and RAW 264

  9. Early antiviral response and virus-induced genes in fish.

    PubMed

    Verrier, Eloi R; Langevin, Christelle; Benmansour, Abdenour; Boudinot, Pierre

    2011-12-01

    In fish as in mammals, virus infections induce changes in the expression of many host genes. Studies conducted during the last fifteen years revealed a major contribution of the interferon system in fish antiviral response. This review describes the screening methods applied to compare the impact of virus infections on the transcriptome in different fish species. These approaches identified a "core" set of genes that are strongly induced in most viral infections. The "core" interferon-induced genes (ISGs) are generally conserved in vertebrates, some of them inhibiting a wide range of viruses in mammals. A selection of ISGs -PKR, vig-1/viperin, Mx, ISG15 and finTRIMs - is further analyzed here to illustrate the diversity and complexity of the mechanisms involved in establishing an antiviral state. Most of the ISG-based pathways remain to be directly determined in fish. Fish ISGs are often duplicated and the functional specialization of multigenic families will be of particular interest for future studies. PMID:21414349

  10. CXCR4 gene transfer prevents pressure overload induced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    LaRocca, Thomas J.; Jeong, Dongtak; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Lee, Ahyoung; Chen, JiQiu; Hajjar, Roger J.; Tarzami, Sima T.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell and gene therapies are being pursued as strategies for repairing damaged cardiac tissue following myocardial infarction in an attempt to prevent heart failure. The chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) and its ligand, CXCL12, play a critical role in stem cell recruitment post-acute myocardial infarction. Whereas progenitor cell migration via the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis is well characterized, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of CXCR4 mediated modulation of cardiac hypertrophy and failure. We used gene therapy to test the effects of CXCR4 gene delivery on adverse ventricular remodeling due to pressure overload. We assessed the effect of cardiac overexpression of CXCR4 during trans-aortic constriction (TAC) using a cardiotropic adeno-associated viral vector (AAV9) carrying the CXCR4 gene. Cardiac overexpression of CXCR4 in mice with pressure overload prevented ventricular remodeling, preserved capillary density and maintained function as determined by echocardiography and in vivo hemodynamics. In isolated adult rat cardiac myocytes, CXCL12 treatment prevented isoproterenol induced hypertrophy and interrupted the calcineurin/NFAT pathway. Finally, a complex involving the L-type calcium channel, β2-adenoreceptor, and CXCR4 (Cav1.2/β2AR/CXCR4) was identified in healthy cardiac myocytes and was shown to dissociate as a consequence of heart failure. CXCR4 administered to the heart via gene transfer prevents pressure overload induced heart failure. The identification of CXCR4 participation in a Cav1.2-β2AR regulatory complex provides further insight into the mechanism by which CXCR4 modulates calcium homeostasis and chronic pressure overload responses in the cardiac myocyte. Together these results suggest AAV9.CXCR4 gene therapy is a potential therapeutic approach for congestive heart failure. PMID:22668785

  11. Two host-inducible genes of Rhizobium fredii and characterization of the inducing compound.

    PubMed Central

    Sadowsky, M J; Olson, E R; Foster, V E; Kosslak, R M; Verma, D P

    1988-01-01

    Random transcription fusions with Mu d1(Kan lac) generated three mutants in Rhizobium fredii (strain USDA 201) which showed induction of beta-galactosidase when grown in root exudate of the host plants Glycine max, Phaseolus vulgaris, and Vigna ungliculata. Two genes were isolated from a library of total plasmid DNA of one of the mutants, 3F1. These genes, present in tandem on a 4.2-kilobase HindIII fragment, appear in one copy each on the symbiotic plasmid and do not hybridize to the Rhizobium meliloti common nodulation region. They comprise two separate transcriptional units coding for about 450 and 950 nucleotides, both of which are transcribed in the same direction. The two open reading frames are separated by 586 base pairs, and the 5H regions of the two genes show a common sequence. No similarity was found with the promoter areas of Rhizobium trifolii, R. meliloti, or Bradyrhizobium japonicum nif genes and with any known nodulation genes. Regions homologous to both sequences were detected in EcoRI digests of genomic DNAs from B. japonicum USDA 110, USDA 122, and 61A76, but not in genomic DNA from R. trifolii, Rhizobium leguminosarum, or Rhizobium phaseoli. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated that the inducing compound has properties of 4',7-dihydroxyisoflavone, daidzein. These results suggest that, in addition to common nodulation genes, several other genes appear to be specifically induced by compounds in the root exudate of the host plants. Images PMID:2447061

  12. Bitumen fume-induced gene expression profile in rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Gate, Laurent . E-mail: laurent.gate@inrs.fr; Langlais, Cristina; Micillino, Jean-Claude; Nunge, Herve; Bottin, Marie-Claire; Wrobel, Richard; Binet, Stephane

    2006-08-15

    Exposure to bitumen fumes during paving and roofing activities may represent an occupational health risk. To date, most of the studies performed on the biological effect of asphalt fumes have been done with regard to their content in carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In order to gain an additional insight into the mechanisms of action of bitumen fumes, we studied their pulmonary effects in rodents following inhalation using the microarray technology. Fisher 344 rats were exposed for 5 days, 6 h/day to bitumen fumes generated at road paving temperature (170 {sup o}C) using a nose-only exposition device. With the intention of studying the early transcriptional events induced by asphalt fumes, lung tissues were collected immediately following exposure and gene expression profiles in control and exposed rats were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays. Data analysis revealed that genes involved in lung inflammatory response as well as genes associated with PAH metabolization and detoxification were highly expressed in bitumen-exposed animals. In addition, the expression of genes related to elastase activity and its inhibition which are associated with emphysema was also modulated. More interestingly genes coding for monoamine oxidases A and B involved in the metabolism of neurotransmitters and xenobiotics were downregulated in exposed rats. Altogether, these data give additional information concerning the bitumen fumes biological effects and would allow to better review the health effects of occupational asphalt fumes exposure.

  13. Efficient Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Solanum rostratum

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lan-Huan; Wang, Rui-Heng; Zhu, Ben-Zhong; Zhu, Hong-Liang; Luo, Yun-Bo; Fu, Da-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Solanum rostratum is a “super weed” that grows fast, is widespread, and produces the toxin solanine, which is harmful to both humans and other animals. To our knowledge, no study has focused on its molecular biology owing to the lack of available transgenic methods and sequence information for S. rostratum. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful tool for the study of gene function in plants; therefore, in the present study, we aimed to establish tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-derived VIGS in S. rostratum. The genes for phytoene desaturase (PDS) and Chlorophyll H subunit (ChlH) of magnesium protoporphyrin chelatase were cloned from S. rostratum and used as reporters of gene silencing. It was shown that high-efficiency VIGS can be achieved in the leaves, flowers, and fruit of S. rostratum. Moreover, based on our comparison of three different types of infection methods, true leaf infection was found to be more efficient than cotyledon and sprout infiltration in long-term VIGS in multiple plant organs. In conclusion, the VIGS technology and tomato genomic sequences can be used in the future to study gene function in S. rostratum. PMID:27258320

  14. Octylphenol induced gene expression in testes of Frog, Rana chensinensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinyi; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Yuhui

    2016-06-01

    Octylphenol (OP) is an endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC), which can disrupt the reproductive system. To understand the effect of OP, a subtractive cDNA library was constructed using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to identify alterations of gene transcription in the testes of the frog Rana chensinensis after OP exposure. Two hundred positive clones were selected and 134 sequences of gene fragments were produced from the subtractive library randomly. These genes were identified to be involved in metabolic process, cellular process, biological regulation, stimulus, immune system and female pregnancy process. In order to verify the efficiency of the subtractive cDNA library, PSG9 and PAPP-A were analyzed further as two representatives of differentially expressed transcription genes using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Our result was the first successful construction of the subtractive cDNA library in frog testes after OP treatment. Based on this cDNA library, OP was shown to affect multiple physiological processes including inducing immune response, disrupting the steroid hormone synthesis and influencing spermatogenesis in the testis by up-regulation of specific genes. PMID:26896894

  15. Efficient Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Solanum rostratum.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lan-Huan; Wang, Rui-Heng; Zhu, Ben-Zhong; Zhu, Hong-Liang; Luo, Yun-Bo; Fu, Da-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Solanum rostratum is a "super weed" that grows fast, is widespread, and produces the toxin solanine, which is harmful to both humans and other animals. To our knowledge, no study has focused on its molecular biology owing to the lack of available transgenic methods and sequence information for S. rostratum. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful tool for the study of gene function in plants; therefore, in the present study, we aimed to establish tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-derived VIGS in S. rostratum. The genes for phytoene desaturase (PDS) and Chlorophyll H subunit (ChlH) of magnesium protoporphyrin chelatase were cloned from S. rostratum and used as reporters of gene silencing. It was shown that high-efficiency VIGS can be achieved in the leaves, flowers, and fruit of S. rostratum. Moreover, based on our comparison of three different types of infection methods, true leaf infection was found to be more efficient than cotyledon and sprout infiltration in long-term VIGS in multiple plant organs. In conclusion, the VIGS technology and tomato genomic sequences can be used in the future to study gene function in S. rostratum. PMID:27258320

  16. Virus-induced gene silencing in eggplant (Solanum melongena).

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiping; Fu, Daqi; Zhu, Benzhong; Yan, Huaxue; Shen, Xiaoying; Zuo, Jinhua; Zhu, Yi; Luo, Yunbo

    2012-06-01

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena) is an economically important vegetable requiring investigation into its various genomic functions. The current limitation in the investigation of genomic function in eggplant is the lack of effective tools available for conducting functional assays. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has played a critical role in the functional genetic analyses. In this paper, TRV-mediated VIGS was successfully elicited in eggplant. We first cloned the CDS sequence of PDS (PHYTOENE DESATURASE) in eggplant and then silenced the PDS gene. Photo-bleaching was shown on the newly-developed leaves four weeks after agroinoculation, indicating that VIGS can be used to silence genes in eggplant. To further illustrate the reliability of VIGS in eggplant, we selected Chl H, Su and CLA1 as reporters to elicit VIGS using the high-pressure spray method. Suppression of Chl H and Su led to yellow leaves, while the depletion of CLA1 resulted in albino. In conclusion, four genes, PDS, Chl H, Su (Sulfur), CLA1, were down-regulated significantly by VIGS, indicating that the VIGS system can be successfully applied in eggplant and is a reliable tool for the study of gene function. PMID:22268843

  17. Gas-inducible product gene expression in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Weber, Wilfried; Rimann, Markus; de Glutz, François-Nicolas; Weber, Eric; Memmert, Klaus; Fussenegger, Martin

    2005-05-01

    Inducible transgene expression technologies are of unmatched potential for biopharmaceutical manufacturing of unstable, growth-impairing and cytotoxic proteins as well as conditional metabolic engineering to improve desired cell phenotypes. Currently available transgene dosing modalities which rely on physical parameters or small-molecule drugs for transgene fine-tuning compromise downstream processing and/or are difficult to implement technologically. The recently designed gas-inducible acetaldehyde-inducible regulation (AIR) technology takes advantage of gaseous acetaldehyde to modulate product gene expression levels. At regulation effective concentrations gaseous acetaldehyde is physiologically inert and approved as food additive by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA). During standard bioreactor operation, gaseous acetaldehyde could simply be administered using standard/existing gas supply tubing and eventually eliminated by stripping with inducer-free air. We have determined key parameters controlling acetaldehyde transfer in three types of bioreactors and designed a mass balance-based model for optimal product gene expression fine-tuning using gaseous acetaldehyde. Operating a standard stirred-tank bioreactor set-up at 10 L scale we have validated AIR technology using CHO-K1-derived serum-free suspension cultures transgenic for gas-inducible production of human interferon-beta (IFN-beta). Gaseous acetaldehyde-inducible IFN-beta production management was fully reversible while maintaining cell viability at over 95% during the entire process. Compatible with standard bioreactor design and downstream processing procedures AIR-based technology will foster novel opportunities for pilot and large-scale manufacturing of difficult-to-produce protein pharmaceuticals. PMID:15885616

  18. Inducible Gene Manipulations in Brain Serotonergic Neurons of Transgenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tews, Björn; Bartsch, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    The serotonergic (5-HT) system has been implicated in various physiological processes and neuropsychiatric disorders, but in many aspects its role in normal and pathologic brain function is still unclear. One reason for this might be the lack of appropriate animal models which can address the complexity of physiological and pathophysiological 5-HT functioning. In this respect, rats offer many advantages over mice as they have been the animal of choice for sophisticated neurophysiological and behavioral studies. However, only recently technologies for the targeted and tissue specific modification of rat genes - a prerequisite for a detailed study of the 5-HT system - have been successfully developed. Here, we describe a rat transgenic system for inducible gene manipulations in 5-HT neurons. We generated a Cre driver line consisting of a tamoxifen-inducible CreERT2 recombinase under the control of mouse Tph2 regulatory sequences. Tissue-specific serotonergic Cre recombinase expression was detected in four transgenic TPH2-CreERT2 rat founder lines. For functional analysis of Cre-mediated recombination, we used a rat Cre reporter line (CAG-loxP.EGFP), in which EGFP is expressed after Cre-mediated removal of a loxP-flanked lacZ STOP cassette. We show an in-depth characterisation of this rat Cre reporter line and demonstrate its applicability for monitoring Cre-mediated recombination in all major neuronal subpopulations of the rat brain. Upon tamoxifen induction, double transgenic TPH2-CreERT2/CAG-loxP.EGFP rats show selective and efficient EGFP expression in 5-HT neurons. Without tamoxifen administration, EGFP is only expressed in few 5-HT neurons which confirms minimal background recombination. This 5-HT neuron specific CreERT2 line allows Cre-mediated, inducible gene deletion or gene overexpression in transgenic rats which provides new opportunities to decipher the complex functions of the mammalian serotonergic system. PMID:22140568

  19. Virus-induced gene silencing of Arabidopsis thaliana gene homologues in wheat identifies genes conferring improved drought tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Lapitan, Nora

    2013-01-01

    In a non-model staple crop like wheat (Triticum aestivumI L.), functional validation of potential drought stress responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis could provide gene targets for breeding. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of genes of interest can overcome the inherent problems of polyploidy and limited transformation potential that hamper functional validation studies in wheat. In this study, three potential candidate genes shown to be involved in abiotic stress response pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana were selected for VIGS experiments in wheat. These include Era1 (enhanced response to abscisic acid), Cyp707a (ABA 8’-hydroxylase), and Sal1 (inositol polyphosphate 1-phosphatase). Gene homologues for these three genes were identified in wheat and cloned in the viral vector barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) in the antisense direction, followed by rub inoculation of BSMV viral RNA transcripts onto wheat plants. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that VIGS-treated wheat plants had significant reductions in target gene transcripts. When VIGS-treated plants generated for Era1 and Sal1 were subjected to limiting water conditions, they showed increased relative water content, improved water use efficiency, reduced gas exchange, and better vigour compared to water-stressed control plants inoculated with RNA from the empty viral vector (BSMV0). In comparison, the Cyp707a-silenced plants showed no improvement over BSMV0-inoculated plants under limited water condition. These results indicate that Era1 and Sal1 play important roles in conferring drought tolerance in wheat. Other traits affected by Era1 silencing were also studied. Delayed seed germination in Era1-silenced plants suggests this gene may be a useful target for developing resistance to pre-harvest sprouting. PMID:23364940

  20. Virus-induced gene silencing of fiber-related genes in cotton.

    PubMed

    Tuttle, John R; Haigler, Candace H; Robertson, Dominique Niki

    2015-01-01

    Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) is a useful method for transient downregulation of gene expression in crop plants. The geminivirus Cotton leaf crumple virus (CLCrV) has been modified to serve as a VIGS vector for persistent gene silencing in cotton. Here the use of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) is described as a marker for identifying silenced tissues in reproductive tissues, a procedure that requires the use of transgenic plants. Suggestions are given for isolating and cloning combinations of target and marker sequences so that the total length of inserted foreign DNA is between 500 and 750 bp. Using this strategy, extensive silencing is achieved with only 200-400 bp of sequence homologous to an endogenous gene, reducing the possibility of off-target silencing. Cotyledons can be inoculated using either the gene gun or Agrobacterium and will continue to show silencing throughout fruit and fiber development. CLCrV is not transmitted through seed, and VIGS is limited to genes expressed in the maternally derived seed coat and fiber in the developing seed. This complicates the use of GFP as a marker for VIGS because cotton fibers must be separated from unsilenced tissue in the seed to determine if they are silenced. Nevertheless, fibers from a large number of seeds can be rapidly screened following placement into 96-well plates. Methods for quantifying the extent of silencing using semiquantitative RT-PCR are given. PMID:25740368

  1. Functional analyses of cellulose synthase genes in flax (Linum usitatissimum) by virus-induced gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Chantreau, Maxime; Chabbert, Brigitte; Billiard, Sylvain; Hawkins, Simon; Neutelings, Godfrey

    2015-12-01

    Flax (Linum usitatissimum) bast fibres are located in the stem cortex where they play an important role in mechanical support. They contain high amounts of cellulose and so are used for linen textiles and in the composite industry. In this study, we screened the annotated flax genome and identified 14 distinct cellulose synthase (CESA) genes using orthologous sequences previously identified. Transcriptomics of 'primary cell wall' and 'secondary cell wall' flax CESA genes showed that some were preferentially expressed in different organs and stem tissues providing clues as to their biological role(s) in planta. The development for the first time in flax of a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) approach was used to functionally evaluate the biological role of different CESA genes in stem tissues. Quantification of transcript accumulation showed that in many cases, silencing not only affected targeted CESA clades, but also had an impact on other CESA genes. Whatever the targeted clade, inactivation by VIGS affected plant growth. In contrast, only clade 1- and clade 6-targeted plants showed modifications in outer-stem tissue organization and secondary cell wall formation. In these plants, bast fibre number and structure were severely impacted, suggesting that the targeted genes may play an important role in the establishment of the fibre cell wall. Our results provide new fundamental information about cellulose biosynthesis in flax that should facilitate future plant improvement/engineering. PMID:25688574

  2. Cigarette smoke induces methylation of the tumor suppressor gene NISCH

    PubMed Central

    Ostrow, Kimberly Laskie; Michalidi, Christina; Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Hoque, Mohammad O.; Greenberg, Alissa; Rom, William; Sidransky, David

    2013-01-01

    We have previously identified a putative tumor suppressor gene, NISCH, whose promoter is methylated in lung tumor tissue as well as in plasma obtained from lung cancer patients. NISCH was observed to be more frequently methylated in smoker lung cancer patients than in non-smoker lung cancer patients. Here, we investigated the effect of tobacco smoke exposure on methylation of the NISCH gene. We tested methylation of NISCH after oral keratinocytes were exposed to mainstream and side stream cigarette smoke extract in culture. Methylation of the promoter region of the NISCH gene was also evaluated in plasma obtained from lifetime non-smokers and light smokers (< 20 pack/year), with and without lung tumors, and heavy smokers (20+ pack/year) without disease. Promoter methylation of NISCH was tested by quantitative fluorogenic real-time PCR in all samples. Promoter methylation of NISCH occurred after exposure to mainstream tobacco smoke as well as to side stream tobacco smoke in normal oral keratinocyte cell lines. NISCH methylation was also detected in 68% of high-risk, heavy smokers without detectable tumors. Interestingly, in light smokers, NISCH methylation was present in 69% of patients with lung cancer and absent in those without disease. Our pilot study indicates that tobacco smoke induces methylation changes in the NISCH gene promoter before any detectable cancer. Methylation of the NISCH gene was also found in lung cancer patients’ plasma samples. After confirming these findings in longitudinally collected plasma samples from high-risk populations (such as heavy smokers), examining patients for hypermethylation of the NISCH gene may aid in identifying those who should undergo additional screening for lung cancer. PMID:23503203

  3. JC virus induces altered patterns of cellular gene expression: Interferon-inducible genes as major transcriptional targets

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Saguna; Ziegler, Katja; Ananthula, Praveen; Co, Juliene K.G.; Frisque, Richard J.; Yanagihara, Richard; Nerurkar, Vivek R. . E-mail: nerurkar@pbrc.hawaii.edu

    2006-02-20

    Human polyomavirus JC (JCV) infects 80% of the population worldwide. Primary infection, typically occurring during childhood, is asymptomatic in immunocompetent individuals and results in lifelong latency and persistent infection. However, among the severely immunocompromised, JCV may cause a fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Virus-host interactions influencing persistence and pathogenicity are not well understood, although significant regulation of JCV activity is thought to occur at the level of transcription. Regulation of the JCV early and late promoters during the lytic cycle is a complex event that requires participation of both viral and cellular factors. We have used cDNA microarray technology to analyze global alterations in gene expression in JCV-permissive primary human fetal glial cells (PHFG). Expression of more than 400 cellular genes was altered, including many that influence cell proliferation, cell communication and interferon (IFN)-mediated host defense responses. Genes in the latter category included signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), interferon stimulating gene 56 (ISG56), myxovirus resistance 1 (MxA), 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), and cig5. The expression of these genes was further confirmed in JCV-infected PHFG cells and the human glioblastoma cell line U87MG to ensure the specificity of JCV in inducing this strong antiviral response. Results obtained by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses supported the microarray data and provide temporal information related to virus-induced changes in the IFN response pathway. Our data indicate that the induction of an antiviral response may be one of the cellular factors regulating/controlling JCV replication in immunocompetent hosts and therefore constraining the development of PML.

  4. Virus-induced gene silencing and transient gene expression in soybean using Bean pod mottle virus infectious clones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful and rapid approach for determining the functions of plant genes. The basis of VIGS is that a viral genome is engineered so that it can carry fragments of plant genes, typically in the 200-300 base pair size range. The recombinant viruses are used to ...

  5. Targeted genes and interacting proteins of hypoxia inducible factor-1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Shen, Shao-Ming; Zhao, Xu-Yun; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Heterodimeric transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) functions as a master regulator of oxygen homeostasis in almost all nucleated mammalian cells. The fundamental process adapted to cellular oxygen alteration largely depends on the refined regulation on its alpha subunit, HIF-1α. Recent studies have unraveled expanding and critical roles of HIF-1α, involving in a multitude of developmental, physiological, and pathophysiological processes. This review will focus on the current knowledge of HIF-1α-targeting genes and its interacting proteins, as well as the concomitant functional relationships between them. PMID:22773957

  6. Pneumococcal Hydrogen Peroxide–Induced Stress Signaling Regulates Inflammatory Genes

    PubMed Central

    Loose, Maria; Hudel, Martina; Zimmer, Klaus-Peter; Garcia, Ernesto; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Lucas, Rudolf; Chakraborty, Trinad; Pillich, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Microbial infections can induce aberrant responses in cellular stress pathways, leading to translational attenuation, metabolic restriction, and activation of oxidative stress, with detrimental effects on cell survival. Here we show that infection of human airway epithelial cells with Streptococcus pneumoniae leads to induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress, activation of mitogen-associated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, and regulation of their respective target genes. We identify pneumococcal H2O2 as the causative agent for these responses, as both catalase-treated and pyruvate oxidase-deficient bacteria lacked these activities. Pneumococcal H2O2 induced nuclear NF-κB translocation and transcription of proinflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of translational arrest and ER stress by salubrinal or of MAPK signaling pathways attenuate cytokine transcription. These results provide strong evidence for the notion that inhibition of translation is an important host pathway in monitoring harmful pathogen-associated activities, thereby enabling differentiation between pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria. PMID:25183769

  7. Putting the diet back into diet-induced obesity: diet-induced hypothalamic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Julian G; Archer, Zoë A

    2008-05-01

    A wealth of detailed mechanistic information relating to obesity and body weight regulation has emerged from study of single gene mutation models, and continues to be generated by engineered rodent models targeting specific genes. However, as an early step in translational research, many researchers are turning to models of diet-induced obesity. Interpretation of data generated from such models is not aided by the variety of diets and rodent strains employed in these studies and a strong case could be made for rationalisation. Differences in experimental protocol, which may deploy a single obligatory solid diet, a choice of solid diets, or liquid/solid combinations, and which may or may not allow a preferred macronutrient composition to be selected, mean that different models of diet-induced obesity achieve that obesity by different routes. The priority should be to mimic the palatability- and choice-driven over-consumption that probably underlies the majority of human obesity. Some of the hypothalamic energy balance genes apparently 'recognise' developing diet-induced obesity as indicated by counter-regulatory changes in expression levels. However, substantial changes in gene expression on long-term exposure to obesogenic diets are not able to prevent weight gain. Forebrain reward systems are widely assumed to be overriding hypothalamic homeostatic energy balance systems under these circumstances. More mechanism-based research at the homeostatic/reward/diet interface may enable diets to be manipulated with therapeutic benefit, or define the contribution of these interactions to susceptibility to diet-induced obesity. PMID:18342851

  8. Gene Dosage Imbalance Contributes to Chromosomal Instability-Induced Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Clemente-Ruiz, Marta; Murillo-Maldonado, Juan M; Benhra, Najate; Barrio, Lara; Pérez, Lidia; Quiroga, Gonzalo; Nebreda, Angel R; Milán, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) is thought to be a source of mutability in cancer. However, CIN often results in aneuploidy, which compromises cell fitness. Here, we used the dosage compensation mechanism (DCM) of Drosophila to demonstrate that chromosome-wide gene dosage imbalance contributes to the deleterious effects of CIN-induced aneuploidy and its pro-tumorigenic action. We present evidence that resetting of the DCM counterbalances the damaging effects caused by CIN-induced changes in X chromosome number. Importantly, interfering with the DCM suffices to mimic the cellular effects of aneuploidy in terms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, JNK-dependent cell death, and tumorigenesis upon apoptosis inhibition. We unveil a role of ROS in JNK activation and a variety of cellular and tissue-wide mechanisms that buffer the deleterious effects of CIN, including DNA-damage repair, activation of the p38 pathway, and cytokine induction to promote compensatory proliferation. Our data reveal the existence of robust compensatory mechanisms that counteract CIN-induced cell death and tumorigenesis. PMID:26859353

  9. Functionalized nanoparticles for AMF-induced gene and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Souvik

    The properties and broad applications of nano-magnetic colloids have generated much interest in recent years. Specially, Fe3O4 nanoparticles have attracted a great deal of attention since their magnetic properties can be used for hyperthermia treatment or drug targeting. For example, enhanced levels of intracellular gene delivery can be achieved using Fe3O4 nano-vectors in the presence of an external magnetic field, a process known as 'magnetofection'. The low cytotoxicity, tunable particle size, ease of surface functionalization, and ability to generate thermal energy using an external alternating magnetic field (AMF) are properties have propelled Fe3O4 research to the forefront of nanoparticle research. The strategy of nanoparticle-mediated, AMF-induced heat generation has been used to effect intracellular hyperthermia. One application of this 'magnetic hyperthermia' is heat activated local delivery of a therapeutic effector (e.g.; drug or polynucleotide). This thesis describes the development of a magnetic nano-vector for AMF-induced, heat-activated pDNA and small molecule delivery. The use of heat-inducible vectors, such as heat shock protein ( hsp) genes, is a promising mode of gene therapy that would restrict gene expression to a local region by focusing a heat stimulus only at a target region. We thus aimed to design an Fe3O4 nanoparticle-mediated gene transfer vehicle for AMF-induced localized gene expression. We opted to use 'click' oximation techniques to assemble the magnetic gene transfer vector. Chapter 2 describes the synthesis, characterization, and transfection studies of the oxime ether lipid-based nano-magnetic vectors MLP and dMLP. The synthesis and characterization of a novel series of quaternary ammonium aminooxy reagents (2.1--2.4) is described. These cationic aminooxy compounds were loaded onto nanoparticles for ligation with carbonyl groups and also to impart a net positive charge on the nanoparticle surface. Our studies indicated that the

  10. Genomic Analysis Reveals Contrasting PIFq Contribution to Diurnal Rhythmic Gene Expression in PIF-Induced and -Repressed Genes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Guiomar; Soy, Judit; Monte, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Members of the PIF quartet (PIFq; PIF1, PIF3, PIF4, and PIF5) collectively contribute to induce growth in Arabidopsis seedlings under short day (SD) conditions, specifically promoting elongation at dawn. Their action involves the direct regulation of growth-related and hormone-associated genes. However, a comprehensive definition of the PIFq-regulated transcriptome under SD is still lacking. We have recently shown that SD and free-running (LL) conditions correspond to "growth" and "no growth" conditions, respectively, correlating with greater abundance of PIF protein in SD. Here, we present a genomic analysis whereby we first define SD-regulated genes at dawn compared to LL in the wild type, followed by identification of those SD-regulated genes whose expression depends on the presence of PIFq. By using this sequential strategy, we have identified 349 PIF/SD-regulated genes, approximately 55% induced and 42% repressed by both SD and PIFq. Comparison with available databases indicates that PIF/SD-induced and PIF/SD-repressed sets are differently phased at dawn and mid-morning, respectively. In addition, we found that whereas rhythmicity of the PIF/SD-induced gene set is lost in LL, most PIF/SD-repressed genes keep their rhythmicity in LL, suggesting differential regulation of both gene sets by the circadian clock. Moreover, we also uncovered distinct overrepresented functions in the induced and repressed gene sets, in accord with previous studies in other examined PIF-regulated processes. Interestingly, promoter analyses showed that, whereas PIF/SD-induced genes are enriched in direct PIF targets, PIF/SD-repressed genes are mostly indirectly regulated by the PIFs and might be more enriched in ABA-regulated genes. PMID:27458465

  11. Genomic Analysis Reveals Contrasting PIFq Contribution to Diurnal Rhythmic Gene Expression in PIF-Induced and -Repressed Genes

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Guiomar; Soy, Judit; Monte, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Members of the PIF quartet (PIFq; PIF1, PIF3, PIF4, and PIF5) collectively contribute to induce growth in Arabidopsis seedlings under short day (SD) conditions, specifically promoting elongation at dawn. Their action involves the direct regulation of growth-related and hormone-associated genes. However, a comprehensive definition of the PIFq-regulated transcriptome under SD is still lacking. We have recently shown that SD and free-running (LL) conditions correspond to “growth” and “no growth” conditions, respectively, correlating with greater abundance of PIF protein in SD. Here, we present a genomic analysis whereby we first define SD-regulated genes at dawn compared to LL in the wild type, followed by identification of those SD-regulated genes whose expression depends on the presence of PIFq. By using this sequential strategy, we have identified 349 PIF/SD-regulated genes, approximately 55% induced and 42% repressed by both SD and PIFq. Comparison with available databases indicates that PIF/SD-induced and PIF/SD-repressed sets are differently phased at dawn and mid-morning, respectively. In addition, we found that whereas rhythmicity of the PIF/SD-induced gene set is lost in LL, most PIF/SD-repressed genes keep their rhythmicity in LL, suggesting differential regulation of both gene sets by the circadian clock. Moreover, we also uncovered distinct overrepresented functions in the induced and repressed gene sets, in accord with previous studies in other examined PIF-regulated processes. Interestingly, promoter analyses showed that, whereas PIF/SD-induced genes are enriched in direct PIF targets, PIF/SD-repressed genes are mostly indirectly regulated by the PIFs and might be more enriched in ABA-regulated genes. PMID:27458465

  12. Moderate malnutrition in rats induces somatic gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Martínez, M Monserrat; Cortés-Barberena, Edith; Cervantes-Ríos, Elsa; Del Carmen García-Rodríguez, María; Rodríguez-Cruz, Leonor; Ortiz-Muñiz, Rocío

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between malnutrition and genetic damage has been widely studied in human and animal models, leading to the observation that interactions between genotoxic exposure and micronutrient status appear to affect genomic stability. A new assay has been developed that uses the phosphatidylinositol glycan class A gene (Pig-a) as a reporter for measuring in vivo gene mutation. The Pig-a assay can be employed to evaluate mutant frequencies (MFs) in peripheral blood reticulocytes (RETs) and erythrocytes (RBCs) using flow cytometry. In the present study, we assessed the effects of malnutrition on mutagenic susceptibility by exposing undernourished (UN) and well-nourished (WN) rats to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) and measuring Pig-a MFs. Two week-old UN and WN male Han-Wistar rats were treated daily with 0, 20, or 40mg/kg ENU for 3 consecutive days. Blood was collected from the tail vein one day before ENU treatment (Day-1) and after ENU administration on Days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56 and 63. Pig-a MFs were measured in RETs and RBCs as the RET(CD59-) and RBC(CD59-) frequencies. In the vehicle control groups, the frequencies of mutant RETs and RBCs were significantly higher in UN rats compared with WN rats at all sampling times. The ENU treatments increased RET and RBC MFs starting at Day 7. Although ENU-induced Pig-a MFs were consistently lower in UN rats than in WN rats, these differences were not significant. To understand these responses, further studies should use other mutagens and nucleated surrogate cells and examine the types of mutations induced in UN and WN rats. PMID:26994962

  13. Rapamycin induces pluripotent genes associated with avoidance of replicative senescence

    PubMed Central

    Pospelova, Tatiana V; Bykova, Tatiana V; Zubova, Svetlana G; Katolikova, Natalia V; Yartzeva, Natalia M; Pospelov, Valery A

    2013-01-01

    Primary rodent cells undergo replicative senescence, independent from telomere shortening. We have recently shown that treatment with rapamycin during passages 3–7 suppressed replicative senescence in rat embryonic fibroblasts (REFs), which otherwise occurred by 10–14 passages. Here, we further investigated rapamycin-primed cells for an extended number of passages. Rapamycin-primed cells continued to proliferate without accumulation of senescent markers. Importantly, these cells retained the ability to undergo serum starvation- and etoposide-induced cell cycle arrest. The p53/p21 pathway was functional. This indicates that rapamycin did not cause either transformation or loss of cell cycle checkpoints. We found that rapamycin activated transcription of pluripotent genes, oct-4, sox-2, nanog, as well as further upregulated telomerase (tert) gene. The rapamycin-derived cells have mostly non-rearranged, near-normal karyotype. Still, when cultivated for a higher number of passages, these cells acquired a chromosomal marker within the chromosome 3. We conclude that suppression mTORC1 activity may prevent replicative senescence without transformation of rodent cells. PMID:24296616

  14. Fetal Globin Gene Inducers: Novel Agents & New Potential

    PubMed Central

    Perrine, Susan P.; Castaneda, Serguei A.; Chui, David H.; Faller, Douglas V.; Berenson, Ronald J.; Fucharoen, Suthat

    2013-01-01

    Inducing expression of endogenous fetal globin (γ-globin) gene expression to 60-70% of alpha globin synthesis produces β-thalassemia trait globin synthetic ratios and can reduce anemia to a mild level. Several classes of therapeutics have induced γ-globin expression in beta thalassemia patients and subsequently raised total hemoglobin levels, demonstrating proof-of-concept of the approach. Butyrate treatment eliminated transfusion requirements in formerly transfusion-dependent patients with treatment for as long as 7 years. However, prior generations were not readily applicable for widespread use. Currently, a novel oral dual-action therapeutic sodium 2,2-dimethylbutyrate is in clinical trials, an oral decitabine formulation is under development, and agents with complementary mechanisms of action can be applied in combined regimens. Identification of 3 major genetic trait loci which modulate clinical severity provides avenues for developing tailored regimens. These refinements offer renewed potential to apply fetal globin induction as a treatment approach in patient-friendly regimens that can be used world-wide. PMID:20712788

  15. Replication-induced transcription of an autorepressed gene: The replication initiator gene of plasmid P1

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Suman; Chattoraj, Dhruba K.

    2000-01-01

    The replication origin of plasmid P1 contains an array of five repeats (iterons) that bind the plasmid-encoded initiator RepA. Within the array lies the repA promoter, which becomes largely repressed on RepA binding (autorepression). One might expect that extra iterons produced on plasmid replication would titrate RepA and release the repression. The promoter, however, is induced poorly by extra iterons. The P1 copy number is reduced by extra iterons in the presence of the autorepressed repA gene but not when additional RepA is provided from constitutive sources. It has been proposed that the iteron-bound RepA couples with the promoter-bound RepA and thereby maintains repression. Although not the product of replication, we find that the act of replication itself can renew RepA synthesis. Replication apparently cleans the promoter of bound RepA and provides a window of opportunity for repA transcription. We propose that replication-induced transcription is required to ensure initiator availability in a system that is induced poorly when challenged with additional initiator binding sites. PMID:10840063

  16. An improved chemically inducible gene switch that functions in the monocotyledonous plant sugar cane.

    PubMed

    Kinkema, Mark; Geijskes, R Jason; Shand, Kylie; Coleman, Heather D; De Lucca, Paulo C; Palupe, Anthony; Harrison, Mark D; Jepson, Ian; Dale, James L; Sainz, Manuel B

    2014-03-01

    Chemically inducible gene switches can provide precise control over gene expression, enabling more specific analyses of gene function and expanding the plant biotechnology toolkit beyond traditional constitutive expression systems. The alc gene expression system is one of the most promising chemically inducible gene switches in plants because of its potential in both fundamental research and commercial biotechnology applications. However, there are no published reports demonstrating that this versatile gene switch is functional in transgenic monocotyledonous plants, which include some of the most important agricultural crops. We found that the original alc gene switch was ineffective in the monocotyledonous plant sugar cane, and describe a modified alc system that is functional in this globally significant crop. A promoter consisting of tandem copies of the ethanol receptor inverted repeat binding site, in combination with a minimal promoter sequence, was sufficient to give enhanced sensitivity and significantly higher levels of ethanol inducible gene expression. A longer CaMV 35S minimal promoter than was used in the original alc gene switch also substantially improved ethanol inducibility. Treating the roots with ethanol effectively induced the modified alc system in sugar cane leaves and stem, while an aerial spray was relatively ineffective. The extension of this chemically inducible gene expression system to sugar cane opens the door to new opportunities for basic research and crop biotechnology. PMID:24142380

  17. Identification of promising host-induced silencing targets among genes preferentially transcribed in haustoria of Puccinia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Expression of dsRNA fragments of rust pathogen genes in wheat seedlings through the barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) based host-induced gene silencing (HIGS) system can reduce the expression of the corresponding genes in the rust fungus. The highest levels of suppression have generally been observe...

  18. Methods for Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Hexaploid Wheat using barley stripe mosaic virus vectors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a useful functional genomics tool for rapidly creating gene knockout phenotypes that can be used to infer gene function. Until recently, VIGS has only been possible in dicotyledonous plants. However, the development of vectors based on barley stripe mosaic vi...

  19. A gold nanoparticle pentapeptide: gene fusion to induce therapeutic gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Muroski, Megan E; Morgan, Thomas J; Levenson, Cathy W; Strouse, Geoffrey F

    2014-10-22

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been identified as having great potential as autologous cell therapeutics to treat traumatic brain injury and spinal injury as well as neuronal and cardiac ischemic events. All future clinical applications of MSC cell therapies must allow the MSC to be harvested, transfected, and induced to express a desired protein or selection of proteins to have medical benefit. For the full potential of MSC cell therapy to be realized, it is desirable to systematically alter the protein expression of therapeutically beneficial biomolecules in harvested MSC cells with high fidelity in a single transfection event. We have developed a delivery platform on the basis of the use of a solid gold nanoparticle that has been surface modified to produce a fusion containing a zwitterionic, pentapeptide designed from Bax inhibiting peptide (Ku70) to enhance cellular uptake and a linearized expression vector to induce enhanced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rat-derived MSCs. Ku70 is observed to effect >80% transfection following a single treatment of femur bone marrow isolated rat MSCs with efficiencies for the delivery of a 6.6 kbp gene on either a Au nanoparticle (NP) or CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD). Gene expression is observed within 4 d by optical measurements, and secretion is observed within 10 d by Western Blot analysis. The combination of being able to selectively engineer the NP, to colocalize biological agents, and to enhance the stability of those agents has provided the strong impetus to utilize this novel class of materials to engineer primary MSCs. PMID:25198921

  20. Regulation of gene expression during the vegetative incompatibility reaction in Podospora anserina. Characterization of three induced genes.

    PubMed Central

    Bourges, N; Groppi, A; Barreau, C; Clavé, C; Bégueret, J

    1998-01-01

    Vegetative incompatibility in fungi limits the formation of viable heterokaryons. It results from the coexpression of incompatible genes in the heterokaryotic cells and leads to a cell death reaction. In Podospora anserina, a modification of gene expression takes place during this reaction, including a strong decrease of total RNA synthesis and the appearance of a new set of proteins. Using in vitro translation of mRNA and separation of protein products by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we have shown that the mRNA content of cells is qualitatively modified during the progress of the incompatibility reaction. Thus, gene expression during vegetative incompatibility is regulated, at least in part, by variation of the mRNA content of specific genes. A subtractive cDNA library enriched in sequences preferentially expressed during incompatibility was constructed. This library was used to identify genomic loci corresponding to genes whose mRNA is induced during incompatibility. Three such genes were characterized and named idi genes for genes induced during incompatibility. Their expression profiles suggest that they may be involved in different steps of the incompatibility reaction. The putative IDI proteins encoded by these genes are small proteins with signal peptides. IDI-2 protein is a cysteine-rich protein. IDI-2 and IDI-3 proteins display some similarity in a tryptophan-rich region. PMID:9755195

  1. The bat gene of Halobacterium halobium encodes a trans-acting oxygen inducibility factor.

    PubMed Central

    Gropp, F; Betlach, M C

    1994-01-01

    Oxygen and light affect the expression of the bacterioopsin gene (bop), which encodes a light-driven proton pump in the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium. This response is thought to be mediated by a set of genes located adjacent to the bop gene. DNA fragments containing either the bop gene or the entire bop gene cluster reversed the phenotype of purple membrane-deficient strains with mutations in the bop gene. Purple membrane synthesis was constitutive in one of these strains transformed with the bop gene alone. The same strain transformed with the bop gene cluster was inducible by low oxygen tension. Moreover, another strain that constitutively expresses purple membrane remained constitutive when transformed with the bop gene alone but the phenotype of the strain changed to inducible when transformed with the bop gene cluster. Additional experiments have confirmed that one of the genes of the bop gene cluster, the bat gene, encodes a trans-acting factor that is necessary and sufficient to confer inducibility of purple membrane synthesis by low oxygen tension. Images PMID:8202511

  2. The HIN-200 family: More than interferon-inducible genes?

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlow, Louise E.A.; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Clarke, Christopher J.P. . E-mail: chris.clarke@petermac.org

    2005-08-01

    The HIN-200 family was initially grouped together based on their hemopoietic expression, interferon-inducibility, nuclear localization, and characteristic 200 amino-acid domains. In this review, we performed a comprehensive search of genome databases and determined the location of previously characterized and predicted genes within the human, mouse, and rat HIN-200 loci. Several novel proteins were predicted in the mouse and rat. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of this family of proteins and highlight the most important findings. In addition to a role in interferon biology, there is now good evidence supporting a role for these proteins as regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation. The activity of HIN-200 proteins is not restricted to the hemopoietic system as they are expressed and can function in a variety of other cells and tissues. The importance of HIN-200 proteins in disease now is beginning to be understood as they appear to be involved in autoimmunity and may act as tumor suppressor proteins.

  3. Tetranectin gene deletion induces Parkinson's disease by enhancing neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhifeng; Wang, Ersong; Hu, Rong; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Jue; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Hong

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). We previously identified tetranectin (TET) as a potential biomarker for PD whose expression is downregulated in the cerebrospinal fluid of PD patients. In the present study, we investigate the role of TET in neurodegeneration in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that siRNA knockdown of TET decreased cell viability and the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive cells, whereas it increased caspase-3 activity and the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in cultured primary dopaminergic neurons. Overexpression of TET protected dopaminergic neurons against neuronal apoptosis in 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium cell culture model in vitro. In TET knockdown mouse model of PD, TET gene deletion decreased the number of TH positive cells in the SNpc, induced apoptosis via the p53/Bax pathway, and significantly impaired the motor behavior of transgenic mice. The findings suggest that TET plays a neuroprotective role via reducing neuron apoptosis and could be a valuable biomarker or potential therapeutic target for the treatment of patients with PD. PMID:26597345

  4. p53-induced Gene 3 Mediates Cell Death Induced by Glutathione Peroxidase 3*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Luo, Katherine; Tan, Lang-Zhu; Ren, Bao-Guo; Gu, Li-Qun; Michalopoulos, George; Luo, Jian-Hua; Yu, Yan P.

    2012-01-01

    Expression of glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) is down-regulated in a variety of human malignancies. Both methylation and deletion of GPx3 gene underlie the alterations of GPx3 expression in prostate cancer. A strong correlation between the down-regulation of GPx3 expression and progression of prostate cancer and the suppression of prostate cancer xenografts in SCID mice by forced expression of GPx3 suggests a tumor suppression role of GPx3 in prostate cancer. However, the mechanism of GPx3-mediated tumor suppression remains unclear. In this report, GPx3 was found to interact directly with p53-induced gene 3 (PIG3). Forced overexpression of GPx3 in prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3 as well as immortalized prostate epithelial cells RWPE-1 increased apoptotic cell death. Expression of GPx3x73c, a peroxidase-negative OPAL codon mutant, in DU145 and PC3 cells also increased cell death. The induced expression of GPx3 in DU145 and PC3 cells resulted in an increase in reactive oxygen species and caspase-3 activity. These activities were abrogated by either knocking down PIG3 or mutating the PIG3 binding motif in GPx3 or binding interference from a peptide corresponding to PIG3 binding motif in GPx3. In addition, UV-treated RWPE-1 cells underwent apoptotic death, which was partially prevented by knocking down GPx3 or PIG3, suggesting that GPx3-PIG3 signaling is critical for UV-induced apoptosis. Taken together, these results reveal a novel signaling pathway of GPx3-PIG3 in the regulation of cell death in prostate cancer. PMID:22461624

  5. Gene Therapy Induces Antigen-Specific Tolerance in Experimental Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jirholt, Pernilla; Turesson, Olof; Wing, Kajsa; Holmdahl, Rikard; Kihlberg, Jan; Stern, Anna; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill; Henningsson, Louise; Gustafsson, Kenth; Gjertsson, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigate induction of immunological tolerance by lentiviral based gene therapy in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, collagen II-induced arthritis (CIA). Targeting the expression of the collagen type II (CII) to antigen presenting cells (APCs) induced antigen-specific tolerance, where only 5% of the mice developed arthritis as compared with 95% of the control mice. In the CII-tolerized mice, the proportion of Tregs as well as mRNA expression of SOCS1 (suppressors of cytokine signaling 1) increased at day 3 after CII immunization. Transfer of B cells or non-B cell APC, as well as T cells, from tolerized to naïve mice all mediated a certain degree of tolerance. Thus, sustainable tolerance is established very early during the course of arthritis and is mediated by both B and non-B cells as APCs. This novel approach for inducing tolerance to disease specific antigens can be used for studying tolerance mechanisms, not only in CIA but also in other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27159398

  6. Infrared laser-induced gene expression in targeted single cells of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Motoshi; Toyoda, Naoya; Shimojou, Masaki; Takagi, Shin

    2013-05-01

    Since the dawn of transgenic technology some 40 years ago, biologists have sought ways to manipulate, at their discretion, the expression of particular genes of interest in living organisms. The infrared laser-evoked gene operator (IR-LEGO) is a recently developed system for inducing gene expression in living organisms in a targeted fashion. It exploits the highly efficient capacity of an infrared laser for heating cells, to provide a high level of gene expression driven by heat-inducible promoters. By irradiating living specimens with a laser under a microscope, heat shock responses can be induced in individual cells, thereby inducing a particular gene, under the control of a heat shock promoter, in specifically targeted cells. In this review we first summarize previous attempts to drive transgene expression in organisms by using heat shock promoters, and then introduce the basic principle of the IR-LEGO system, and its applications. PMID:23614811

  7. Functional Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene Variants Associate With Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nikkari, Seppo T.; Määttä, Kirsi M.; Kunnas, Tarja A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity and expression has been associated with hypertension, but less is known whether the 2 known functional polymorphic sites in the iNOS gene (g.–1026 C/A (rs2779249), g.2087 G/A (rs2297518)) affect susceptibility to hypertension. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between the genetic variants of iNOS and diagnosed hypertension in a Finnish cohort. This study included 320 hypertensive cases and 439 healthy controls. All participants were 50-year-old men and women and the data were collected from the Tampere adult population cardiovascular risk study (TAMRISK). DNA was extracted from buccal swabs and iNOS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were analyzed using KASP genotyping PCR. Data analysis was done by logistic regression. At the age of 50 years, the SNP rs2779249 (C/A) associated significantly with hypertension (P = 0.009); specifically, subjects carrying the A-allele had higher risk of hypertension compared to those carrying the CC genotype (OR = 1.47; CI = 1.08–2.01; P = 0.015). In addition, a 15-year follow-up period (35, 40, and 45 years) of the same individuals showed that carriers of the A-allele had more often hypertension in all of the studied age-groups. The highest risk for developing hypertension was obtained among 35-year-old subjects (odds ratio [OR] 3.83; confidence interval [CI] = 1.20–12.27; P = 0.024). Those carrying variant A had also significantly higher readings of both systolic (P = 0.047) and diastolic (P = 0.048) blood pressure during the follow-up. No significant associations between rs2297518 (G/A) variants alone and hypertension were found. However, haplotype analysis of rs2779249 and rs2297518 revealed that individuals having haplotype H3 which combines both A alleles (CA–GA, 19.7% of individuals) was more commonly found in the hypertensive group than in the normotensive group (OR = 2.01; CI = 1

  8. Isoliquiritigenin, a strong nod gene- and glyceollin resistance-inducing flavonoid from soybean root exudate.

    PubMed Central

    Kape, R; Parniske, M; Brandt, S; Werner, D

    1992-01-01

    Isoflavonoid signal molecules from soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) seed and root exudate induce the transcription of nodulation (nod) genes in Bradyrhizobium japonicum. In this study, a new compound with symbiotic activity was isolated from soybean root exudate. The isolated 2',4',4-trihydroxychalcone (isoliquiritigenin) is characterized by its strong inducing activity for the nod genes of B. japonicum. These genes are already induced at concentrations 1 order of magnitude below those required of the previously described isoflavonoid inducers genistein and daidzein. Isoliquiritigenin is also a potent inducer of glyceollin resistance in B. japonicum, which renders this bacterium insensitive to potentially bactericidal concentrations of glyceollin, the phytoalexin of G. max. No chemotactic effect of isoliquiritigenin was observed. The highly efficient induction of nod genes and glyceollin resistance by isoliquiritigenin suggests the ecological significance of this compound, although it is not a major flavonoid constituent of the soybean root exudate in quantitative terms. PMID:1622242

  9. Bifidobacterium bifidum actively changes the gene expression profile induced by Lactobacillus acidophilus in murine dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Gudrun; Rasmussen, Simon; Nielsen Fink, Lisbeth; Jarmer, Hanne; Nøhr Nielsen, Birgit; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal regulatory role in activation of both the innate as well as the adaptive immune system by responding to environmental microorganisms. We have previously shown that Lactobacillus acidophilus induces a strong production of the pro-inflammatory and Th1 polarizing cytokine IL-12 in DC, whereas bifidobacteria do not induce IL-12 but inhibit the IL-12 production induced by lactobacilli. In the present study, genome-wide microarrays were used to investigate the gene expression pattern of murine DC stimulated with Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium bifidum Z9. L. acidophilus NCFM strongly induced expression of interferon (IFN)-beta, other virus defence genes, and cytokine and chemokine genes related to the innate and the adaptive immune response. By contrast, B. bifidum Z9 up-regulated genes encoding cytokines and chemokines related to the innate immune response. Moreover, B. bifidum Z9 inhibited the expression of the Th1-promoting genes induced by L. acidophilus NCFM and had an additive effect on genes of the innate immune response and Th2 skewing genes. The gene encoding Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a transcription factor regulating the activation of JNK, was one of the few genes only induced by B. bifidum Z9. Neutralization of IFN-beta abrogated L. acidophilus NCFM-induced expression of Th1-skewing genes, and blocking of the JNK pathway completely inhibited the expression of IFN-beta. Our results indicate that B. bifidum Z9 actively inhibits the expression of genes related to the adaptive immune system in murine dendritic cells and that JPD2 via blocking of IFN-beta plays a central role in this regulatory mechanism. PMID:20548777

  10. Identification of Chromosomal Shigella flexneri Genes Induced by the Eukaryotic Intracellular Environment

    PubMed Central

    Runyen-Janecky, L. J.; Payne, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    Upon entry into the eukaryotic cytosol, the facultative intracellular bacterium Shigella flexneri is exposed to an environment that may necessitate the expression of particular genes for it to survive and grow intracellularly. To identify genes that are induced in response to the intracellular environment, we screened a library containing fragments of the S. flexneri chromosome fused to a promoterless green fluorescent protein gene (gfp). Bacteria containing promoter fusions that had a higher level of gfp expression when S. flexneri was intracellular (in Henle cells) than when S. flexneri was extracellular (in Luria-Bertani broth) were isolated by using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Nine different genes with increased expression in Henle cells were identified. Several genes (uhpT, bioA, and lysA) were involved in metabolic processes. The uhpT gene, which encoded a sugar phosphate transporter, was the most frequently isolated gene and was induced by glucose-6-phosphate in vitro. Two of the intracellularly induced genes (pstS and phoA) encode proteins involved in phosphate acquisition and were induced by phosphate limitation in vitro. Additionally, three iron-regulated genes (sufA, sitA, and fhuA) were identified. The sufA promoter was derepressed in iron-limiting media and was also induced by oxidative stress. To determine whether intracellularly induced genes are required for survival or growth in the intracellular environment, we constructed mutations in the S. flexneri uhpT and pstS genes by allelic exchange. The uhpT mutant could not use glucose-6-phosphate as a sole carbon source in vitro but exhibited normal plaque formation on Henle cell monolayers. The pstS mutant had no apparent growth defect in low-phosphate media in vitro but formed smaller plaques on Henle cell monolayers than the parent strain. Both mutants were as effective as the parent strain in inducing apoptosis in a macrophage cell line. PMID:12117948

  11. Mapping the genes for haloperidol-induced catalepsy.

    PubMed

    Kanes, S; Dains, K; Cipp, L; Gatley, J; Hitzemann, B; Rasmussen, E; Sanderson, S; Silverman, M; Hitzemann, R

    1996-05-01

    The strain means for haloperidol-induced catalepsy were determined in the 26 strain BXD recombinant inbred series. The ED50 values ranged from 0.55 mg/kg (strain 30) to 7.9 mg/kg (strain 2). Heritability for the catalepsy response was 0.78 and the number of effective loci was estimated to be four. The strain means were correlated with the strain distribution patterns for 1300 marker loci of known chromosomal location and polymorphic between the C57Bl/6J and DBA/2J strains. Six quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were identified at P < .01. Two of the six QTLs were confirmed in a sample of B6XD2 F2 animals (n = 144), phenotyped for haloperidol response and genotyped for microsatellites closely linked to the QTLs. The confirmed QTL on chromosome 4 is near the b locus. The confirmed QTL on chromosome 9 is closely linked to Drd2, the D2 dopamine receptor gene. One hundred of the F2 individuals were phenotyped for D2 dopamine receptor binding using the ligand [125I] epidepride as the ligand. Consistent with previous results, the nonresponsive F2 individuals showed modestly higher receptor binding in all brain regions examined: the nucleus accumbens core, the nucleus accumbens shell, the lateral caudate putamen, the dorsomedial caudate putamen, the substantia nigra zona compacta and the ventral tegmental area. The DBA/2J allele of the chromosome 9 QTL was associated with higher receptor binding in all brain areas except the ventral tegmental area. Overall, the data illustrate that either near or part of Drd2 is a QTL which has significant effects on both haloperidol response and D2 dopamine receptor binding. However, the data also illustrate that most of the genetic variance in either haloperidol response or D2 dopamine receptor binding is not associated with Drd2. PMID:8627512

  12. Glomerulonephritis-induced changes in kidney gene expression in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pavkovic, Mira; Riefke, Björn; Frisk, Anna-Lena; Gröticke, Ina; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated a glomerulonephritis (GN) model in rats induced by nephrotoxic serum (NTS) which contains antibodies against the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). The anti-GBM GN model in rats is widely used since its biochemical and histopathological characteristics are similar to crescentic nephritis and Goodpasture's disease in humans (Pusey, 2003[2]). Male Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were dosed once with 1, 2.5 and 5 ml/kg nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or 1.5 and 5 ml/kg NTS, respectively. GN and tubular damage were observed histopathologically in all treated rats after 14 days. To obtain insight into molecular processes during GN pathogenesis, mRNA expression was investigated in WKY and SD kidneys using Affymetrix's GeneChip Rat genome 230_2.0 arrays (GSE64265). The immunopathological processes during GN are still not fully understood and likely involve both innate and adaptive immunity. In the present study, several hundred mRNAs were found deregulated, which functionally were mostly associated with inflammation and regeneration. The β-chain of the major histocompatibility complex class II RT1.B (Rt1-Bb) and complement component 6 (C6) were identified as two mRNAs differentially expressed between WKY and SD rat strains which could be related to known different susceptibilities to NTS of different rat strains; both were increased in WKY and decreased in SD rats (Pavkovic et al., 2015 [1]). Increased Rt1-Bb expression in WKY rats could indicate a stronger and more persistent cellular reaction of the adaptive immune system in this strain, in line with findings indicating adaptive immune reactions during GN. The complement cascade is also known to be essential for GN development, especially terminal cascade products like C6. PMID:26697341

  13. Relationship between gene responses and symptoms induced by Rice grassy stunt virus

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Kouji; Yoneyama, Kaori; Kondoh, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Takumi; Sasaya, Takahide; Choi, Il-Ryong; Yoneyama, Koichi; Omura, Toshihiro; Kikuchi, Shoshi

    2013-01-01

    Rice grassy stunt virus (RGSV) is a serious threat to rice production in Southeast Asia. RGSV is a member of the genus Tenuivirus, and it induces leaf yellowing, stunting, and excess tillering on rice plants. Here we examined gene responses of rice to RGSV infection to gain insight into the gene responses which might be associated with the disease symptoms. The results indicated that (1) many genes related to cell wall synthesis and chlorophyll synthesis were predominantly suppressed by RGSV infection; (2) RGSV infection induced genes associated with tillering process; (3) RGSV activated genes involved in inactivation of gibberellic acid and indole-3-acetic acid; and (4) the genes for strigolactone signaling were suppressed by RGSV. These results suggest that these gene responses to RGSV infection account for the excess tillering specific to RGSV infection as well as other symptoms by RGSV, such as stunting and leaf chlorosis. PMID:24151491

  14. A viral satellite DNA vector-induced transcriptional gene silencing via DNA methylation of gene promoter in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ju, Zheng; Wang, Lei; Cao, Dongyan; Zuo, Jinhua; Zhu, Hongliang; Fu, Daqi; Luo, Yunbo; Zhu, Benzhong

    2016-09-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has been widely used for plant functional genomics study at the post-transcriptional level using various DNA or RNA viral vectors. However, while virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing (VITGS) via DNA methylation of gene promoter was achieved using several plant RNA viral vectors, it has not yet been done using a satellite DNA viral vector. In this study, a viral satellite DNA associated with tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV), which has been modified as a VIGS vector in previous research, was developed as a VITGS vector. Firstly, the viral satellite DNA VIGS vector was further optimized to a more convenient p1.7A+2mβ vector with high silencing efficiency of the phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Secondly, the constructed VITGS vector (TYLCCNV:35S), which carried a portion of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, could successfully induce heritable transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene in the 35S-GFP transgenic N. benthamiana line 16c plants. Moreover, bisulfite sequencing results revealed higher methylated cytosine residues at CG, CHG and CHH sites of the 35S promoter sequence in TYLCCNV:35S-inoculated plants than in TYLCCNV-inoculated line 16c plants (control). Overall, these results demonstrated that the viral satellite DNA vector could be used as an effective VITGS vector to study DNA methylation in plant genomes. PMID:27422476

  15. Light-dependent expression of flg22-induced defense genes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Satoshi; Aoyama, Mayu; Nakai, Kana; Shimotani, Koji; Yamasaki, Kanako; Sato, Masa H.; Tojo, Daisuke; Suwastika, I. Nengah; Nomura, Hironari; Shiina, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplasts have been reported to generate retrograde immune signals that activate defense gene expression in the nucleus. However, the roles of light and photosynthesis in plant immunity remain largely elusive. In this study, we evaluated the effects of light on the expression of defense genes induced by flg22, a peptide derived from bacterial flagellins which acts as a potent elicitor in plants. Whole-transcriptome analysis of flg22-treated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings under light and dark conditions for 30 min revealed that a number of (30%) genes strongly induced by flg22 (>4.0) require light for their rapid expression, whereas flg22-repressed genes include a significant number of genes that are down-regulated by light. Furthermore, light is responsible for the flg22-induced accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), indicating that light is indispensable for basal defense responses in plants. To elucidate the role of photosynthesis in defense, we further examined flg22-induced defense gene expression in the presence of specific inhibitors of photosynthetic electron transport: 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) and 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-benzoquinone (DBMIB). Light-dependent expression of defense genes was largely suppressed by DBMIB, but only partially suppressed by DCMU. These findings suggest that photosynthetic electron flow plays a role in controlling the light-dependent expression of flg22-inducible defense genes. PMID:25346742

  16. Preferential effects of the chemotherapeutic DNA crosslinking agent mitomycin C on inducible gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Caron, R M; Hamilton, J W

    1995-01-01

    The immediate effects of a single dose of the chemotherapeutic DNA crosslinking agent, mitomycin C (MMC), on the expression of several constitutive and drug-inducible genes were examined in a simple in vivo system, the 14 day chick embryo. We observed no effect of MMC on the steady-state mRNA expression of the constitutively expressed beta-actin, transferrin, or albumin genes. In contrast, MMC treatment significantly altered both the basal and drug-inducible mRNA expression of two glutethimide-inducible genes, 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthase and cytochrome P450 CYP2H1. The basal expression of these genes was transiently but significantly increased over a 24 hr period following a single dose of MMC. Conversely, MMC significantly suppressed the glutethimide-inducible expression of these genes when administered 1 to 24 hr prior to the inducing drug. The effects of MMC on both basal and drug-inducible ALA synthase and CYP2H1 mRNA expression were principally a result of changes in the transcription rates of these genes. In contrast, MMC treatment had little or no effect on glutethimide-induced expression of ALA synthase or CYP2H1 when administered 1 hr after the inducing drug, suggesting that a very early event in the induction process represents the target for these MMC effects. Covalent binding studies demonstrated that the effects of MMC on gene expression were closely correlated temporally with formation of [3H]-porfiromycin-DNA adducts. These results support the hypothesis that genotoxic chemicals specifically target their effects to inducible genes in vivo. PMID:7875125

  17. Shigella dysenteriae Modulates BMP Pathway to Induce Mucin Gene Expression In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Ashidha; Iyer, Soumya Chidambaram; Gopal, Udhayakumar; Devaraj, Niranjali; Halagowder, Devaraj

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal epithelial cells in the intestine act as the first line of host defense against pathogens by increasing mucin production for clearance. Despite this fact, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which Shigella dysenteriae transduce mucin gene expression remain poorly defined. The goal of this study was to determine the role of Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway in mucin gene expression during S. dysenteriae infection. In this study we demonstrate that S. dysenteriae activates BMP signaling to induce MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expression in rat ileal loop model and in vitro. We also observed that BMP pathway regulates CDX2 expression which plays a critical role in induction of MUC2 gene during S. dysenteriae infection. In SMAD4 silenced cells S. dysenteriae infection did not abrogate MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expression whereas in CDX2 silenced cells it induces differential expression of MUC5AC gene. These results suggest that SMAD4-CDX2 induces MUC2 gene expression whereas SMAD4 directly influences differential expression of MUC5AC gene. Altogether, our results show that during S. dysenteriae infection the BMP pathway modulates inflammatory transcription factors CDX2 and SMAD4 to induce MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expression which plays a key role in the regulation of host mucosal defense thereby paving a cue for therapeutic application. PMID:25365201

  18. Spatial Control of Gene Expression within a Scaffold by Localized Inducer Release

    PubMed Central

    Baraniak, Priya R.; Nelson, Devin M.; Leeson, Cory E.; Katakam, Anand K.; Friz, Jennifer L.; Cress, Dean E.; Hong, Yi; Guan, Jianjun; Wagner, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression can be controlled in genetically modified cells by employing an inducer/promoter system where presence of the inducer molecule regulates the timing and level of gene expression. By applying the principles of controlled release, it should be possible to control gene expression on a biomaterial surface by the presence or absence of inducer release from the underlying material matrix, thus avoiding alternative techniques that rely upon uptake of relatively labile DNA from material surfaces. To evaluate this concept, a modified ecdysone-responsive gene expression system was transfected into B16 murine cells and the ability of an inducer ligand, which was released from elastomeric poly(ester urethane) urea (PEUU), to initiate gene expression was studied. The synthetic inducer ligand was first loaded into PEUU to demonstrate extended release of the bioactive molecule at various loading densities over a one year period in vitro. Patterning films of PEUU variably-loaded with inducer resulted in spatially controlled cell expression of the gene product (green fluorescent protein, GFP). In porous scaffolds made from PEUU by salt leaching, where the central region was exclusively loaded with inducer, cells expressed GFP predominately in the loaded central regions whereas expression was minimal in outer regions where ligand was omitted. This scaffold system may ultimately provide a means to precisely control progenitor cell commitment in a spatially-defined manner in vivo for soft tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:21269687

  19. Estradiol-induced gene expression in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowman, C.J.; Kroll, K.J.; Gross, T.G.; Denslow, N.D.

    2002-01-01

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) and estrogen receptor (ER) gene expression levels were measured in largemouth bass to evaluate the activation of the ER-mediated pathway by estradiol (E2). Single injections of E2 ranging from 0.0005 to 5 mg/kg up-regulated plasma Vtg in a dose-dependent manner. Vtg and ER mRNAs were measured using partial cDNA sequences corresponding to the C-terminal domain for Vtg and the ligand-binding domain of ER?? sequences. After acute E2-exposures (2 mg/kg), Vtg and ER mRNAs and plasma Vtg levels peaked after 2 days. The rate of ER mRNA accumulation peaked 36-42 h earlier than Vtg mRNA. The expression window for ER defines the primary response to E2 in largemouth bass and that for Vtg a delayed primary response. The specific effect of E2 on other estrogen-regulated genes was tested during these same time windows using differential display RT-PCR. Specific up-regulated genes that are expressed in the same time window as Vtg were ERp72 (a membrane-bound disulfide isomerase) and a gene with homology to an expressed gene identified in zebrafish. Genes that were expressed in a pattern that mimics the ER include the gene for zona radiata protein ZP2, and a gene with homology to an expressed gene found in winter flounder. One gene for fibrinogen ?? was down-regulated and an unidentified gene was transiently up-regulated after 12 h of exposure and returned to basal levels by 48 h. Taken together these studies indicate that the acute molecular response to E2 involves a complex network of responses over time. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The gene coding for the mustard trypsin inhibitor-2 is discontinuous and wound-inducible.

    PubMed

    Ceci, L R; Spoto, N; de Virgilio, M; Gallerani, R

    1995-05-01

    The gene coding for the mustard trypsin inhibitor-2 has been isolated from a genomic library and characterized. Comparison of genomic and cDNA sequences indicates that the gene is interrupted by an intron of 193 bp. The eukaryotic peculiar regulatory sequences have been detected in the 5' flanking region of the gene. In addition, a decanucleotide has been detected that is highly similar to the proposed G-box and to the ABRE motifs required for the gene expression induced by methyl jasmonate and abscissic acid. Northern blot analysis demonstrates that the gene is expressed in immature seeds as well as in wounded leaves. PMID:7750566

  1. METHYL METHANESULFONATE-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN HUMAN SKIN FIBROBLASTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    METHYL METHANESULFONATE-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN HUMAN SKIN FIBROBLASTS. Geremy W. Knapp, Alan Tennant, and Russell D. Owen. Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, Re...

  2. AGE-RELATED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN HUMAN SKIN FIBROBLASTS INDUCED BY MMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Age-Related Gene Expression Changes In Human Skin Fibroblasts Induced By methyl methanesulfonate. Geremy W. Knapp, Alan H. Tennant, and Russell D. Owen. Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U. S. Environmental Prote...

  3. Identification of novel light-induced genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Porterfield, Veronica M; Piontkivska, Helen; Mintz, Eric M

    2007-01-01

    Background The transmission of information about the photic environment to the circadian clock involves a complex array of neurotransmitters, receptors, and second messenger systems. Exposure of an animal to light during the subjective night initiates rapid transcription of a number of immediate-early genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Some of these genes have known roles in entraining the circadian clock, while others have unknown functions. Using laser capture microscopy, microarray analysis, and quantitative real-time PCR, we performed a comprehensive screen for changes in gene expression immediately following a 30 minute light pulse in suprachiasmatic nucleus of mice. Results The results of the microarray screen successfully identified previously known light-induced genes as well as several novel genes that may be important in the circadian clock. Newly identified light-induced genes include early growth response 2, proviral integration site 3, growth-arrest and DNA-damage-inducible 45 beta, and TCDD-inducible poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Comparative analysis of promoter sequences revealed the presence of evolutionarily conserved CRE and associated TATA box elements in most of the light-induced genes, while other core clock genes generally lack this combination of promoter elements. Conclusion The photic signalling cascade in the suprachiasmatic nucleus activates an array of immediate-early genes, most of which have unknown functions in the circadian clock. Detected evolutionary conservation of CRE and TATA box elements in promoters of light-induced genes suggest that the functional role of these elements has likely remained the same over evolutionary time across mammalian orders. PMID:18021443

  4. Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, A.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

  5. Inducible and Reversible Lentiviral and Recombination Mediated Cassette Exchange (RMCE) Systems for Controlling Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bersten, David C.; Sullivan, Adrienne E.; Li, Dian; Bhakti, Veronica; Bent, Stephen J.; Whitelaw, Murray L.

    2015-01-01

    Manipulation of gene expression to invoke loss of function (LoF) or gain of function (GoF) phenotypes is important for interrogating complex biological questions both in vitro and in vivo. Doxycycline (Dox)-inducible gene expression systems are commonly used although success is often limited by high background and insufficient sensitivity to Dox. Here we develop broadly applicable platforms for reliable, tightly controlled and reversible Dox-inducible systems for lentiviral mediated generation of cell lines or FLP Recombination-Mediated Cassette Exchange (RMCE) into the Collagen 1a1 (Col1a1) locus (FLP-In Col1a1) in mouse embryonic stem cells. We significantly improve the flexibility, usefulness and robustness of the Dox-inducible system by using Tetracycline (Tet) activator (Tet-On) variants which are more sensitive to Dox, have no background activity and are expressed from single Gateway-compatible constructs. We demonstrate the usefulness of these platforms in ectopic gene expression or gene knockdown in multiple cell lines, primary neurons and in FLP-In Col1a1 mouse embryonic stem cells. We also improve the flexibility of RMCE Dox-inducible systems by generating constructs that allow for tissue or cell type-specific Dox-inducible expression and generate a shRNA selection algorithm that can effectively predict potent shRNA sequences able to knockdown gene expression from single integrant constructs. These platforms provide flexible, reliable and broadly applicable inducible expression systems for studying gene function. PMID:25768837

  6. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS INDUCED BY MUTAGENS IN THE TK GENE OF MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS INDUCED BY BROMATE AND N- ETHYL-N-NITROSOUREA IN THE TK GENE OF MOUSE L YMPHOMA CELLS

    The mouse lymphoma assay is widely used to identify chemical mutagens The Tk +1- gene located on an autosome in mouse lymphoma cells may recover a wide ra...

  7. Wounding induces expression of genes involved in tuber closing layer and wound-periderm development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the coordinate induction of genes that may be involved in important wound-healing events. In this study, wound-healing events were determined together with wound-induced expression profiles of selected cell cycle, cell wall protein, and pectin methyl esterase genes using tuber...

  8. Probiotic bacteria change Escherichia coli-induced gene expression in cultured colonocytes: Implications in intestinal pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Pinaki; Braileanu, Gheorghe T; Chen, Hegang; Stine, O Colin

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the change in eukaryotic gene expression profile in Caco-2 cells after infection with strains of Escherichia coli and commensal probiotic bacteria. METHODS: A 19200 gene/expressed sequence tag gene chip was used to examine expression of genes after infection of Caco-2 cells with strains of normal flora E. coli, Lactobacillus plantarum, and a combination of the two. RESULTS: The cDNA microarray revealed up-regulation of 155 and down-regulation of 177 genes by E. coli. L. plantarum up-regulated 45 and down-regulated 36 genes. During mixed infection, 27 genes were up-regulated and 59 were down-regulated, with nullification of stimulatory/inhibitory effects on most of the genes. Expression of several new genes was noted in this group. CONCLUSION: The commensal bacterial strains used in this study induced the expression of a large number of genes in colonocyte-like cultured cells and changed the expression of several genes involved in important cellular processes such as regulation of transcription, protein biosynthesis, metabolism, cell adhesion, ubiquitination, and apoptosis. Such changes induced by the presence of probiotic bacteria may shape the physiologic and pathologic responses they trigger in the host. PMID:18081226

  9. Virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) for functional analysis of wheat genes involved in Zymoseptoria tritici susceptibility and resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wing-Sham; Rudd, Jason J.; Kanyuka, Kostya

    2015-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has emerged as a powerful reverse genetic technology in plants supplementary to stable transgenic RNAi and, in certain species, as a viable alternative approach for gene functional analysis. The RNA virus Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) was developed as a VIGS vector in the early 2000s and since then it has been used to study the function of wheat genes. Several variants of BSMV vectors are available, with some requiring in vitro transcription of infectious viral RNA, while others rely on in planta production of viral RNA from DNA-based vectors delivered to plant cells either by particle bombardment or Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We adapted the latest generation of binary BSMV VIGS vectors for the identification and study of wheat genes of interest involved in interactions with Zymoseptoria tritici and here present detailed and the most up-to-date protocols. PMID:26092793

  10. Bioinforrnatics of Gene Expression Profiling Data Provide Mechanistic Understanding of Acute Ozone-Induced Lung injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation are well characterized. A few studies have used gene expression profiling to determine the types of changes induced by ozone; however the mechanisms or the pathways involved are less well understood. We presumed that robust bi...

  11. FORMALDEHYDE-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION IN F344 RAT NASAL RESPIRATORY EPITHELIUM.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formaldehyde-induced gene expression in F344 rat nasal respiratory epithelium

    ABSTRACT

    Formaldehyde, an occupational and environmental toxicant used extensively in the manufacturing of many household and personal use products, is known to induce squamous cell carci...

  12. Protective effects of L-selenomethionine on space radiation induced changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J; Ko, Y-H; Kennedy, A R

    2007-06-01

    Ionizing radiation can produce adverse biological effects in astronauts during space travel. Of particular concern are the types of radiation from highly energetic, heavy, charged particles known as HZE particles. The aims of our studies are to characterize HZE particle radiation induced biological effects and evaluate the effects of L-selenomethionine (SeM) on these adverse biological effects. In this study, microarray technology was used to measure HZE radiation induced changes in gene expression, as well as to evaluate modulation of these changes by SeM. Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were irradiated (1 GeV/n iron ions) in the presence or in the absence of 5 microM SeM. At 6 h post-irradiation, all cells were harvested for RNA isolation. Gene Chip U133Av2 from Affymetrix was used for the analysis of gene expression, and ANOVA and EASE were used for a determination of the genes and biological processes whose differential expression is statistically significant. Results of this microarray study indicate that exposure to small doses of radiation from HZE particles, 10 and 20 cGy from iron ions, induces statistically significant differential expression of 196 and 610 genes, respectively. In the presence of SeM, differential expression of 77 out of 196 genes (exposure to 10 cGy) and 336 out of 610 genes (exposure to 20 cGy) is abolished. In the presence or in the absence of SeM, radiation from HZE particles induces differential expression of genes whose products have roles in the induction of G1/S arrest during the mitotic cell cycle, as well as heat shock proteins. Some of the genes, whose expressions were affected by radiation from HZE particles and were unchanged in irradiated cells treated with SeM, have been shown to have altered expression levels in cancer cells. The conclusions of this report are that radiation from HZE particles can induce differential expression of many genes, some of which are known to play roles in the same processes that have

  13. A specific library of randomly integrated reporter genes for the isolation of inducible functions by cell sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Lapeyre, J.N.; Marini, F.; Gratzner, H.G. AMC ImmunoDiagnostics, Houston, TX )

    1993-01-01

    A library of cells containing randomly integrated reporter genes has been constructed. The purpose of this library is to enable the isolation of genes of interest which are inducible by radiation, biological response modifiers, cytokines, or other agents. These genes are located near reporter genes which can be induced by the upstream promoter of the gene of interest. The reporter gene, Lac Z, was randomly inserted into the genome by retroviral transduction and subsequent selection of the neo[sup r] gene with gentamycin. Studies of radiation inducible genes were undertaken, whereby cells with the radiation sensitive function were isolated by sorting the cells fluorescent after staining with the beta gal substrate, fluorescein digalactoside (FDG). This gene-tagging approach is an improvement over the cDNA library subtraction protocol in that a single library of cells with random marker gene integration can be repeatedly and sequentially probed by sorting under different, selective conditions, dependent upon the genes to be characterized.

  14. Preventing High Fat Diet-induced Obesity and Improving Insulin Sensitivity through Neuregulin 4 Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yongjie; Gao, Mingming; Liu, Dexi

    2016-01-01

    Neuregulin 4 (NRG4), an epidermal growth factor-like signaling molecule, plays an important role in cell-to-cell communication during tissue development. Its function to regulate energy metabolism has recently been reported. This current study was designed to assess the preventive and therapeutic effects of NRG4 overexpression on high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Using the hydrodynamic gene transfer method, we demonstrate that Nrg4 gene transfer in mice suppressed the development of diet-induced obesity, but did not affect pre-existing adiposity and body weight in obese mice. Nrg4 gene transfer curbed HFD-induced hepatic steatosis by inhibiting lipogenesis and PPARγ-mediated lipid storage. Concurrently, overexpression of NRG4 reduced chronic inflammation in both preventive and treatment studies, evidenced by lower mRNA levels of macrophage marker genes including F4/80, Cd68, Cd11b, Cd11c, and macrophage chemokine Mcp1, resulting in improved insulin sensitivity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that overexpression of the Nrg4 gene by hydrodynamic gene delivery prevents HFD-induced weight gain and fatty liver, alleviates obesity-induced chronic inflammation and insulin resistance, and supports the health benefits of NRG4 in managing obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders. PMID:27184920

  15. Preventing High Fat Diet-induced Obesity and Improving Insulin Sensitivity through Neuregulin 4 Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongjie; Gao, Mingming; Liu, Dexi

    2016-01-01

    Neuregulin 4 (NRG4), an epidermal growth factor-like signaling molecule, plays an important role in cell-to-cell communication during tissue development. Its function to regulate energy metabolism has recently been reported. This current study was designed to assess the preventive and therapeutic effects of NRG4 overexpression on high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Using the hydrodynamic gene transfer method, we demonstrate that Nrg4 gene transfer in mice suppressed the development of diet-induced obesity, but did not affect pre-existing adiposity and body weight in obese mice. Nrg4 gene transfer curbed HFD-induced hepatic steatosis by inhibiting lipogenesis and PPARγ-mediated lipid storage. Concurrently, overexpression of NRG4 reduced chronic inflammation in both preventive and treatment studies, evidenced by lower mRNA levels of macrophage marker genes including F4/80, Cd68, Cd11b, Cd11c, and macrophage chemokine Mcp1, resulting in improved insulin sensitivity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that overexpression of the Nrg4 gene by hydrodynamic gene delivery prevents HFD-induced weight gain and fatty liver, alleviates obesity-induced chronic inflammation and insulin resistance, and supports the health benefits of NRG4 in managing obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders. PMID:27184920

  16. Hydroxycamptothecin-induced apoptotic gene expression profiling by PCR array in human Tenon's capsule fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Zhang, Yinong; Zhang, Qing; Wang, Qinghua; Wu, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Studies have indicated that hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) induces apoptosis of fibroblasts. In this study, we investigated the apoptotic gene expression profiling in HCPT-treated -human Tenon's capsule fibroblasts (HTCFs) and identify the most implicated gene in apoptotic signaling of HTCFs by HCPT. Method HTCFs were incubated with HCPT at 0, 0.25 and 4 mg/L for 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. Anti-proliferative effects were measured by MTT assay. Apoptosis was determined using the Annexin V-FITC/PI apoptosis detection kit and apoptotic cells were identified by flow cytometry. A PCR array was employed to analyze the most implicated apoptotic genes during HCPT-induced apoptosis in HTCFs. Results from our studies showed that HCPT induced apoptosis in HTCFs in a concentration-and time-dependent manner. The apoptotic HTCFs was increased by 9.38% with a multiplicity at 4 mg/L HCPT. PCR array demonstrated remarkable changes in 88 apoptotic genes, including 9 up-regulated genes and 36 down-regulated genes. HCPT treatment induced the upregulation of CHOP and downregulation of XIAP in HTCFs. To conclude, our results support HCPT induced the apoptosis of HTCFs, involving the activation of mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum stresses as well as the downregulation expression of XIAP. PMID:26045770

  17. Sugar-inducible expression of a gene for beta-amylase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Mita, S; Suzuki-Fujii, K; Nakamura, K

    1995-01-01

    The levels of beta-amylase activity and of the mRNA for beta-amylase in rosette leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. increased significantly, with the concomitant accumulation of starch, when whole plants or excised mature leaves were supplied with sucrose. A supply of glucose or fructose, but not of mannitol or sorbitol, to plants also induced the expression of the gene for beta-amylase, and the induction occurred not only in rosette leaves but also in roots, stems, and bracts. These results suggest that the gene for beta-amylase of Arabidopsis is subject to regulation by a carbohydrate metabolic signal, and expression of the gene in various tissues may be regulated by the carbon partitioning and sink-source interactions in the whole plant. The sugar-inducible expression of the gene in Arabidopsis was severely repressed in the absence of light. The sugar-inducible expression in the light was not inhibited by 3(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea or by chloramphenicol, but it was inhibited by cycloheximide. These results suggest that a light-induced signal and de novo synthesis of proteins in the cytoplasm are involved in the regulation. A fusion gene composed of the 5' upstream region of the gene for beta-amylase from Arabidopsis and the coding sequence of beta-glucuronidase showed the sugar-inducible expression in a light-dependent manner in rosette leaves of transgenic Arabidopsis. PMID:7716246

  18. Drug-loaded nanoparticles induce gene expression in human pluripotent stem cell derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Gajbhiye, Virendra; Escalante, Leah; Chen, Guojun; Laperle, Alex; Zheng, Qifeng; Steyer, Benjamin; Gong, Shaoqin; Saha, Krishanu

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and advanced manufacturing of human stem cells requires a suite of tools to control gene expression spatiotemporally in culture. Inducible gene expression systems offer cell-extrinsic control, typically through addition of small molecules, but small molecule inducers typically contain few functional groups for further chemical modification. Doxycycline (DXC), a potent small molecule inducer of tetracycline (Tet) transgene systems, was conjugated to a hyperbranched dendritic polymer (Boltorn H40) and subsequently reacted with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The resulting PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle exhibited pH-sensitive drug release behavior and successfully controlled gene expression in stem-cell-derived fibroblasts with a Tet-On system. While free DXC inhibited fibroblast proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticles maintained higher fibroblast proliferation levels and MMP activity. The results demonstrate that the PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle system provides an effective tool to controlling gene expression in human stem cell derivatives. PMID:24232694

  19. Methanol inducible genes obtained from pichia and methods of use

    SciTech Connect

    Stroman, D.W.; Brust, P.F.; Ellis, S.B.; Gingeras, T.R.; Harpold, M.M.; Tschopp, J.F.

    1989-02-28

    A method is described for isolating the p76 gene from a methanol assimilating yeast, the method comprising: (a) digesting total DNA with at least one restriction enzyme to give digested DNA; (b) size fractionating the digested DNA by agarose electrophoresis; (c) denaturating and binding the size fractionated DNA from step (b) to nitrocellulose filter to give bound DNA; (d) hybridizing the bound DNA with labeled p76 gene from Pichia pastoris; (e) identifying the unique size fragment of bound DNA which cross-hybridizes with the labeled p76 gene from P. pastoris; (f) size fractionating additional DNA which has been digested in accordance with step (a) to recover for cloning the unique size fragment of DNA identified in step (e).

  20. Radiation-induced gene expression in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Jones, Tamako A.; Chesnut, Aaron; Smith, Anna L.

    2002-01-01

    We used the nematode C. elegans to characterize the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation in a simple animal model emphasizing the unique effects of charged particle radiation. Here we demonstrate by RT-PCR differential display and whole genome microarray hybridization experiments that gamma rays, accelerated protons and iron ions at the same physical dose lead to unique transcription profiles. 599 of 17871 genes analyzed (3.4%) showed differential expression 3 hrs after exposure to 3 Gy of radiation. 193 were up-regulated, 406 were down-regulated and 90% were affected only by a single species of radiation. A novel statistical clustering technique identified the regulatory relationships between the radiation-modulated genes and showed that genes affected by each radiation species were associated with unique regulatory clusters. This suggests that independent homeostatic mechanisms are activated in response to radiation exposure as a function of track structure or ionization density.

  1. Fluoroquinolone-induced gene transfer in multidrug-resistant Salmonella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fluoroquinolones are broad spectrum antibiotics that inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase activity. Bacterial exposure to fluoroquinolones can cause DNA damage and induce a bacterial SOS response to stimulate repair of damaged DNA. Certain prophages (integrated in bacterial chromosomes) ...

  2. ISOLATION OF THE ALKANE INDUCIBLE CYTOCHROME P450 (P450ALK) GENE FROM THE YEAST CANDIDA TROPICALIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gene for the alkane-inducible cytochrome P450, P450alk, has been isolated from the yeast Candida tropicalis by immunoscreening a gtll library. solation of the gene has been identified on the basis of its inducibility and partial DNA sequence. ranscripts of this gene were indu...

  3. Isolation of the alkane inducible cytochrome P450 (P450alk) gene from the yeast Candida tropicalis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gene for the alkane-inducible cytochrome P450, P450alk, has been isolated from the yeast Candida tropicalis by immunoscreening a λgt11 library. Isolation of the gene has been identified on the basis of its inducibility and partial DNA sequence. Transcripts of this gene were i...

  4. Virus-induced gene silencing of soybean rust resistance genes in Glycine tomentella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean rust, incited by the fungal pathogen Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is a serious foliar soybean disease capable of causing major economic yield loss. Specific resistance to P. pachyrhizi is known and single dominant genes have been identified in soybean (Rpp1-4), but these genes have been deemed ine...

  5. Rapid Determination of Gene Function by Virus-induced Gene Silencing in Wheat and Barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cereal crops are essential components to the human and animal food supply. Solutions to many of the problems challenging cereal production will require identification of genes responsible for particular traits. Unfortunately, the process of identifying gene function is very slow and complex in...

  6. Establishment of a system for conditional gene expression using an inducible tRNA suppressor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Dingermann, T; Werner, H; Schütz, A; Zündorf, I; Nerke, K; Knecht, D; Marschalek, R

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the use of the prokaryotic tetracycline operator-repressor system as a regulatory device to control the expression of Dictyostelium discoideum tRNA genes. The tetO1 operator fragment was inserted at three different positions in front of a tRNA(Glu) (Am) suppressor gene from D. discoideum, and the tetracycline repressor gene was expressed under the control of a constitutive actin 6 promoter. The effectiveness of this approach was determined by monitoring the expression of a beta-galactosidase gene engineered to contain a stop codon that could be suppressed by the tRNA. When these constructs were introduced into Dictyostelium cells, the repressor bound to the operator in front of the tRNA gene and prevented expression of the suppressor tRNA. Addition of tetracycline (30 micrograms/ml) to the growth medium prevented repressor binding, allowed expression of the suppressor tRNA, and resulted in beta-galactosidase synthesis. The operator-repressor complex interfered with tRNA gene transcription when the operator was inserted immediately upstream (position +1 or -7) of the mature tRNA coding region. Expression of a tRNA gene carrying the operator at position -46 did not respond to repressor binding. This system could be used to control the synthesis of any protein, provided the gene contained a translational stop signal. Images PMID:1508201

  7. Rapid Determination of Gene Function by Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Wheat and Barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cereal crops are essential components to the human and animal food supply. Solutions to many of the problems challenging cereal production will require identification of genes responsible for particular traits. Unfortunately, the process of identifying gene function is very slow and complex in ...

  8. Permethrin induces overexpression of multiple genes in Aedes aegypti.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using the PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 18 different genes were isolated from a permethrin-treated vs acetone-treated Aedes aegypti subtractive library. QPCR results revealed that eight of the 18 gene’s transcriptional levels in permethrin-treated Ae. aegypti were at least 2- ...

  9. Gene expression profile analysis in astaxanthin-induced Haematococcus pluvialis using a cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Eom, Hyunsuk; Lee, Choul-Gyun; Jin, EonSeon

    2006-05-01

    The unicellular green alga Haematococcus pluvialis (Volvocales) is known for the ketocarotenoid astaxanthin (3, 3'-dihydroxy-beta, beta-carotene-4, 4'-dione) accumulation, which is induced under unfavorable culture conditions. In this work, we used cDNA microarray analysis to screen differentially expressed genes in H. pluvialis under astaxanthin-inductive culture conditions, such as combination of cell exposure to high irradiance and nutrient deprivation. Among the 965 genes in the cDNA array, there are 144 genes exhibiting differential expression (twofold changes) under these conditions. A significant decrease in the expression of photosynthesis-related genes was shown in astaxanthin-accumulating cells (red cells). Defense- or stress-related genes and signal transduction genes were also induced in the red cells. A comparison of microarray and real-time PCR analysis showed good correlation between the differentially expressed genes by the two methods. Our results indicate that the cDNA microarray approach, as employed in this work, can be relied upon and used to monitor gene expression profiles in H. pluvialis. In addition, the genes that were differentially expressed during astaxanthin induction are suitable candidates for further study and can be used as tools for dissecting the molecular mechanism of this unique pigment accumulation process in the green alga H. pluvialis. PMID:16320067

  10. Identification of genes in Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria induced during its interaction with tomato.

    PubMed

    Tamir-Ariel, Dafna; Navon, Naama; Burdman, Saul

    2007-09-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria is the causal agent of bacterial spot disease of tomato and pepper. The disease process is interactive and very intricate and involves a plethora of genes in the pathogen and in the host. In the pathogen, different genes are activated in response to the changing environment to enable it to survive, adapt, evade host defenses, propagate, and damage the host. To understand the disease process, it is imperative to broaden our understanding of the gene machinery that participates in it, and the most reliable way is to identify these genes in vivo. Here, we have adapted a recombinase-based in vivo expression technology (RIVET) to study the genes activated in X. campestris pv. vesicatoria during its interaction with one of its hosts, tomato. This is the first study that demonstrates the feasibility of this approach for identifying in vivo induced genes in a plant pathogen. RIVET revealed 61 unique X. campestris pv. vesicatoria genes or operons that delineate a picture of the different processes involved in the pathogen-host interaction. To further explore the role of some of these genes, we generated knockout mutants for 13 genes and characterized their ability to grow in planta and to cause disease symptoms. This analysis revealed several genes that may be important for the interaction of the pathogen with its host, including a citH homologue gene, encoding a citrate transporter, which was shown to be required for wild-type levels of virulence. PMID:17573477

  11. Inducible Knockdown of Plasmodium Gene Expression Using the glmS Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Prommana, Parichat; Uthaipibull, Chairat; Wongsombat, Chayaphat; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Knuepfer, Ellen; Holder, Anthony A.; Shaw, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional reverse genetic approaches for study of Plasmodium malaria parasite gene function are limited, or not applicable. Hence, new inducible systems are needed. Here we describe a method to control P. falciparum gene expression in which target genes bearing a glmS ribozyme in the 3′ untranslated region are efficiently knocked down in transgenic P. falciparum parasites in response to glucosamine inducer. Using reporter genes, we show that the glmS ribozyme cleaves reporter mRNA in vivo leading to reduction in mRNA expression following glucosamine treatment. Glucosamine-induced ribozyme activation led to efficient reduction of reporter protein, which could be rapidly reversed by removing the inducer. The glmS ribozyme was validated as a reverse-genetic tool by integration into the essential gene and antifolate drug target dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (PfDHFR-TS). Glucosamine treatment of transgenic parasites led to rapid and efficient knockdown of PfDHFR-TS mRNA and protein. PfDHFR-TS knockdown led to a growth/arrest mutant phenotype and hypersensitivity to pyrimethamine. The glmS ribozyme may thus be a tool for study of essential genes in P. falciparum and other parasite species amenable to transfection. PMID:24023691

  12. Cloning and characterization of a new multi-stress inducible metallothionein gene in Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chengjie; Miao, Wei

    2006-06-01

    A new multi-stress-inducible metallothionein (MT) gene isoform has been cloned and characterized from the ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis. Both the 5'- and 3'-UT regions of the Tp-MT2 gene are very different from the previously reported Tp-MT1 isoform in this organism and from other described MT genes in Tetrahymena pigmentosa and Tetrahymena thermophila. The putative protein sequence of Tp-MT2 contains cysteine clusters with characteristics of the typical Tetrahymena Cd-inducible MT genes. However, the sequence has a special feature of four intragenic tandem repeats within its first half, with a conserved structural pattern x(5/8)CCCx(6)CCx(6)CxCxNCxCCK. To investigate the transcriptional activities of both Tp-MT2 and Tp-MT1 genes toward heavy metals (Cd, Hg, Cu, Zn) and H(2)O(2), the mRNA levels of these two isoforms were evaluated by means of real-time quantitative PCR. Results showed that Tp-MT2 had a higher basal expression level than Tp-MT1 and both genes were induced by Cd, Hg, Cu, and Zn ions after short exposure (1h), although to different extents. Cd was the most effective metal inducer of both two isoforms, but the relative expression level of Tp-MT2 was much lower than that of Tp-MT1. Different expression patterns were also shown between the two genes when treated with Cd over a period of 24h. We suggest that TpMT-1 plays the role of a multi-inducible stress gene, while TpMT-2 may have a more specific function in basal metal homeostasis although it may have undergone a functional differentiation process. The putative functional significance and evolutionary mode of the TpMT-2 isoform are discussed. PMID:16621695

  13. Thermally induced osteocyte damage initiates pro-osteoclastogenic gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Eimear B; Tallon, David; Cheung, Wing-Yee; Schaffler, Mitchell B; Kennedy, Oran D; McNamara, Laoise M

    2016-06-01

    Bone is often subject to harsh temperatures during orthopaedic procedures resulting in thermally induced bone damage, which may affect the healing response. Postsurgical healing of bone is essential to the success of surgery, therefore, an understanding of the thermally induced responses of bone cells to clinically relevant temperatures in vivo is required. Osteocytes have been shown to be integrally involved in the bone remodelling cascade, via apoptosis, in micro-damage systems. However, it is unknown whether this relationship is similar following thermal damage. Sprague-Dawley rat tibia were exposed to clinically relevant temperatures (47°C or 60°C) to investigate the role of osteocytes in modulating remodelling related factors. Immunohistochemistry was used to quantify osteocyte thermal damage (activated caspase-3). Thermally induced pro-osteoclastogenic genes (Rankl, Opg and M-csf), in addition to genes known to mediate osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation via prostaglandin production (Cox2), vascularization (Vegf) and inflammatory (Il1a) responses, were investigated using gene expression analysis. The results demonstrate that heat-treatment induced significant bone tissue and cellular damage. Pro-osteoclastogenic genes were upregulated depending on the amount of temperature elevation compared with the control. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrate the in vivo effect of thermally induced osteocyte damage on the gene expression profile. PMID:27335224

  14. Regulation of endogenous human gene expression by ligand-inducible TALE transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Andrew C; Gaj, Thomas; Sirk, Shannon J; Lamb, Brian M; Barbas, Carlos F

    2014-10-17

    The construction of increasingly sophisticated synthetic biological circuits is dependent on the development of extensible tools capable of providing specific control of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Here, we describe a new class of synthetic transcription factors that activate gene expression in response to extracellular chemical stimuli. These inducible activators consist of customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins combined with steroid hormone receptor ligand-binding domains. We demonstrate that these ligand-responsive TALE transcription factors allow for tunable and conditional control of gene activation and can be used to regulate the expression of endogenous genes in human cells. Since TALEs can be designed to recognize any contiguous DNA sequence, the conditional gene regulatory system described herein will enable the design of advanced synthetic gene networks. PMID:24251925

  15. DNase I hypersensitive sites within the inducible qa gene cluster of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Baum, J A; Giles, N H

    1986-01-01

    DNase I hypersensitive regions were mapped within the 17.3-kilobase qa (quinic acid) gene cluster of Neurospora crassa. The 5'-flanking regions of the five qa structural genes and the two qa regulatory genes each contain DNase I hypersensitive sites under noninducing conditions and generally exhibit increases in DNase I cleavage upon induction of transcription with quinic acid. The two large intergenic regions of the qa gene cluster appear to be similarly organized with respect to the positions of constitutive and inducible DNase I hypersensitive sites. Inducible hypersensitive sites on the 5' side of one qa gene, qa-x, appear to be differentially regulated. Employing these and previously published data, we have identified a conserved sequence element that may mediate the activator function of the qa-1F regulatory gene. Variants of the 16-base-pair consensus sequence are consistently found within DNase I-protected regions adjacent to inducible DNase I hypersensitive sites within the gene cluster. Images PMID:2944110

  16. Virus-induced gene complementation reveals a transcription factor network in modulation of tomato fruit ripening

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Hang; Lai, Tongfei; Qin, Cheng; Shi, Nongnong; Wang, Huizhong; Jin, Mingfei; Zhong, Silin; Fan, Zaifeng; Liu, Yule; Wu, Zirong; Jackson, Stephen; Giovannoni, James J.; Rolin, Dominique; Gallusci, Philippe; Hong, Yiguo

    2012-01-01

    Plant virus technology, in particular virus-induced gene silencing, is a widely used reverse- and forward-genetics tool in plant functional genomics. However the potential of virus technology to express genes to induce phenotypes or to complement mutants in order to understand the function of plant genes is not well documented. Here we exploit Potato virus X as a tool for virus-induced gene complementation (VIGC). Using VIGC in tomato, we demonstrated that ectopic viral expression of LeMADS-RIN, which encodes a MADS-box transcription factor (TF), resulted in functional complementation of the non-ripening rin mutant phenotype and caused fruits to ripen. Comparative gene expression analysis indicated that LeMADS-RIN up-regulated expression of the SBP-box (SQUAMOSA promoter binding protein-like) gene LeSPL-CNR, but down-regulated the expression of LeHB-1, an HD-Zip homeobox TF gene. Our data support the hypothesis that a transcriptional network may exist among key TFs in the modulation of fruit ripening in tomato. PMID:23150786

  17. Gene profiling of the erythro- and megakaryoblastic leukaemias induced by the Graffi murine retrovirus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute erythro- and megakaryoblastic leukaemias are associated with very poor prognoses and the mechanism of blastic transformation is insufficiently elucidated. The murine Graffi leukaemia retrovirus induces erythro- and megakaryoblastic leukaemias when inoculated into NFS mice and represents a good model to study these leukaemias. Methods To expand our understanding of genes specific to these leukaemias, we compared gene expression profiles, measured by microarray and RT-PCR, of all leukaemia types induced by this virus. Results The transcriptome level changes, present between the different leukaemias, led to the identification of specific cancerous signatures. We reported numerous genes that may be potential oncogenes, may have a function related to erythropoiesis or megakaryopoiesis or have a poorly elucidated physiological role. The expression pattern of these genes has been further tested by RT-PCR in different samples, in a Friend erythroleukaemic model and in human leukaemic cell lines. We also screened the megakaryoblastic leukaemias for viral integrations and identified genes targeted by these integrations and potentially implicated in the onset of the disease. Conclusions Taken as a whole, the data obtained from this global gene profiling experiment have provided a detailed characterization of Graffi virus induced erythro- and megakaryoblastic leukaemias with many genes reported specific to the transcriptome of these leukaemias for the first time. PMID:20102610

  18. Requirement for metabolic activation of acetylaminofluorene to induce multidrug gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gant, T W; Schrenk, D; Silverman, J A; Thorgeirsson, S S

    1994-01-01

    Previously we have demonstrated that several xenobiotics can induce multidrug (mdr) gene expression in cultures of primary isolated hepatocytes. One of the best of these xenobiotic inducers in rat hepatocytes is 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), which induces mdr expression by an enhancement of mdr gene transcription. In all species studied to date, AAF is extensively and variously metabolized. In this study we have sought to determine if AAF per se or a metabolite is responsible for mediating the increase in mdr gene transcription and expression. This study demonstrates that AAF per se is not active, but that the effect of AAF we have observed on mdr gene transcription and expression in the rat is due to the formation of a reactive metabolite(s). Our data indicate that this reactive metabolite is probably N-acetoxy-2-aminofluorene or the sulfate ester of N-hydroxy-AAF. The requirement for the formation of one of these metabolites may explain the differences in species response to AAF, in terms of mdr gene expression, that we have observed. We hypothesize that the mechanism by which mdr gene transcription is increased in response to AAF involves a covalent interaction between a reactive metabolite and an mdr gene regulatory protein. Our current work is concerned with the exploration of this hypothesis. PMID:7889850

  19. Cigarette Smoke Modulates Expression of Human Rhinovirus-Induced Airway Epithelial Host Defense Genes

    PubMed Central

    Proud, David; Hudy, Magdalena H.; Wiehler, Shahina; Zaheer, Raza S.; Amin, Minaa A.; Pelikan, Jonathan B.; Tacon, Claire E.; Tonsaker, Tabitha O.; Walker, Brandie L.; Kooi, Cora; Traves, Suzanne L.; Leigh, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections trigger acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. The human airway epithelial cell is the primary site of HRV infection and responds to infection with altered expression of multiple genes, the products of which could regulate the outcome to infection. Cigarette smoking aggravates asthma symptoms, and is also the predominant risk factor for the development and progression of COPD. We, therefore, examined whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE) modulates viral responses by altering HRV-induced epithelial gene expression. Primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to medium alone, CSE alone, purified HRV-16 alone or to HRV-16+ CSE. After 24 h, supernatants were collected and total cellular RNA was isolated. Gene array analysis was performed to examine mRNA expression. Additional experiments, using real-time RT-PCR, ELISA and/or western blotting, validated altered expression of selected gene products. CSE and HRV-16 each induced groups of genes that were largely independent of each other. When compared to gene expression in response to CSE alone, cells treated with HRV+CSE showed no obvious differences in CSE-induced gene expression. By contrast, compared to gene induction in response to HRV-16 alone, cells exposed to HRV+CSE showed marked suppression of expression of a number of HRV-induced genes associated with various functions, including antiviral defenses, inflammation, viral signaling and airway remodeling. These changes were not associated with altered expression of type I or type III interferons. Thus, CSE alters epithelial responses to HRV infection in a manner that may negatively impact antiviral and host defense outcomes. PMID:22808255

  20. Technical advances in trigger-induced RNA interference gene silencing in the parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mohamed I; Foda, Bardees M; Suresh, Susmitha; Singh, Upinder

    2016-03-01

    Entamoeba histolytica has a robust endogenous RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. There are abundant 27 nucleotide (nt) anti-sense small RNAs (AS sRNAs) that target genes for silencing and the genome encodes many genes involved in the RNAi pathway such as Argonaute proteins. Importantly, an E. histolytica gene with numerous AS sRNAs can function as a "trigger" to induce silencing of a gene that is fused to the trigger. Thus, the amebic RNAi pathway regulates gene expression relevant to amebic biology and has additionally been harnessed as a tool for genetic manipulation. In this study we have further improved the trigger-induced gene silencing method. We demonstrate that rather than using the full-length gene, a short portion of the coding region fused to a trigger is sufficient to induce silencing; the first 537 bp of the E. histolytica rhomboid gene (EhROM1) fused in-frame to the trigger was sufficient to silence EhROM1. We also demonstrated that the trigger method could silence two amebic genes concomitantly; fusion of the coding regions of EhROM1 and transcription factor, EhMyb, in-frame to a trigger gene resulted in both genes being silenced. Alternatively, two genes can be silenced sequentially: EhROM1-silenced parasites with no drug selection plasmid were transfected with trigger-EhMyb, resulting in parasites with both EhROM1 and EhMyb silenced. With all approaches tested, the trigger-mediated silencing was substantive and silencing was maintained despite loss of the G418 selectable marker. All gene silencing was associated with generation of AS sRNAs to the silenced gene. We tested the reversibility of the trigger system using inhibitors of histone modifications but found that the silencing was highly stable. This work represents a technical advance in the trigger gene silencing method in E. histolytica. Approaches that readily silence multiple genes add significantly to the genetic toolkit available to the ameba research community. PMID:26747561

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ALKANE-INDUCIBLE CYTOCHROME P450 (P450ALK) GENE FROM THE YEAST CANDIDA TROPICALIS: IDENTIFICATION OF A NEW P450 GENE FAMILY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The P450ALK gene, which is inducible by the assimilation of alkane in Candida tropicalis, was sequenced and characterized. tructural features described in promoter and terminator regions of Saccharomyces yeast genes are present in the P450alk gene and some particular structures a...

  2. Myostatin gene mutated mice induced with tale nucleases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fangfang; Sun, Ruilin; Chen, Hongyan; Fei, Jian; Lu, Daru

    2015-01-01

    Myostain gene (MSTN) is expressed primarily in skeletal muscle, and negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass; it has been suggested that mice with MSTN inhibition have reduced adiposity and improved insulin sensitivity. Therefore, it is important to establish a fast and effective gene editing method. In this report, we established the myostatin mutated-mouse model by microinjection of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) mRNA within the mouse fertilized oocytes and achieved high rates of mutagenesis of the mouse MSTN in C57BL/6J. Six of 45 born mice carried target mutations and we appointed one as the parental mating with wild mouse to produce the F1 and backcross to produce the F2 generation. All the mutations of the mice were examined quickly and efficiently by high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRMA) and then verified by direct sequencing. We obtained the homozygous of the F2 generation which transmitted the mutant alleles to the progeny with 100% efficiency. Mutant mice exhibited increases in muscle mass comparable to those observed in wild-type mice. Therefore, combining TALEN-mediated gene targeting with HRMA technology is a superior method of constructing genetically modified mice through microinjection in the mouse fertilized oocytes with high efficiency and short time of selection. PMID:25695746

  3. Human CYP1A1 gene: cosegregation of the enzyme inducibility phenotype and an RFLP.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, D D; McKinney, C E; Ikeya, K; Smith, H H; Bale, A E; McBride, O W; Nebert, D W

    1991-01-01

    The human CYP1A1 (cytochrome P1450) gene encodes an enzyme involved in the activation of procarcinogens, such as benzo[a]pyrene, to the ultimate reactive intermediate. Approximately 10% of the human population exhibit high CYP1A1 inducibility, and Kouri et al. reported that the high-inducibility phenotype might be at greater risk than low-inducibility individuals for cigarette smoke-induced bronchogenic carcinoma. In one 3-generation family of 15 individuals, we show here that the high-CYP1A1-inducibility phenotype segregates concordantly with an infrequent polymorphic site located 450 bases downstream from the CYP1A1 gene. Our findings are consistent with the study of Kawajiri et al., who demonstrated an association between this polymorphism and an increased incidence of squamous-cell lung cancer. Our data suggest that the CYP1A1 structural gene, or a region near this gene, might be correlated with the inducibility phenotype. Images Figure 3 PMID:1707592

  4. Inducible long-term gene expression in brain with adeno-associated virus gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Haberman, R P; McCown, T J; Samulski, R J

    1998-12-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors hold promise for treating a number of neurological disorders due to the ability to deliver long-term gene expression without toxicity or immune response. Critical to these endeavors will be controlled expression of the therapeutic gene in target cells. We have constructed and tested a dual cassette rAAV vector carrying a reporter gene under the control of the tetracycline-responsive system and the tetracycline transactivator. Transduction in vitro resulted in stable expression from the vector that can be suppressed 20-fold by tetracycline treatment. In vivo experiments, carried out to 6 weeks, demonstrated that vector-transduced expression is sustained until doxycycline administration upon which reporter gene expression is reduced. Moreover, the suppression of vector-driven expression can be reversed by removal of the drug. These studies demonstrate long-term regulated gene expression from rAAV vectors. This system will provide a valuable approach for controlling vector gene expression both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:10023439

  5. Interferon induced IFIT family genes in host antiviral defense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Secretion of interferons (IFNs) from virus-infected cells is a hallmark of host antiviral immunity and in fact, IFNs exert their antiviral activities through the induction of antiviral proteins. The IFN-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) family is among hundreds of IF stimulated ...

  6. Tert-butylhydroquinone ameliorates doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity by activating Nrf2 and inducing the expression of its target genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin-Feng; Su, Su-Wen; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Rong; Niu, Yu-Jie; Guo, Yan-Su; Li, Chun-Yan; Jiang, Wen-Bo; Liu, Yi; Guo, Hui-Cai

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiotoxicity. Nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that orchestrates the antioxidant and cytoprotective responses to oxidative stress. In the present study, we tested whether tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) could protect against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity in vivo and, if so, whether the protection was associated with the up-regulation of the Nrf2 pathway. The results showed that treatment with tBHQ significantly decreased the DOX-induced cardiac injury in wild-type mice. Moreover, tBHQ ameliorated the DOX-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Further studies suggested that tBHQ increased the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and the Nrf2-regulated gene expression, including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxido-reductase-1 (NQO-1) expression. Knocking out Nrf2 in mice abolished the protective effect of tBHQ on the DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. These results indicate that tBHQ has a beneficial effect on DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, and this effect was associated with the enhanced expression of Nrf2 and its downstream antioxidant genes, HO-1 and NQO-1. PMID:26692920

  7. Tamoxifen Induces Expression of Immune Response-Related Genes in Cultured Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schild-Hay, Laura J.; Leil, Tarek A.; Divi, Rao L.; Olivero, Ofelia, A.; Weston, Ainsley; Poirier, Miriam C.

    2008-01-01

    Use of tamoxifen (TAM) is associated with a 50% reduction in breast cancer incidence and an increase in endometrial cancer incidence. Here, we documented TAM-induced gene expression changes in cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells (NHMEC strains numbered 5, 16 and 40), established from tissue taken at reduction mammoplasty from 3 individuals. Cells exposed to 0, 10 or 50 μM TAM for 48 hours were evaluated for (E)-α-(deoxyguanosin-N2-yl)-tamoxifen (dG-N2-TAM) adduct formation by TAM-DNA (DNA modified with dG-N2-TAM) chemiluminescence immunoassay (CIA), gene expression changes using NCI DNA-oligonucleotide microarray, and real time (RT)-PCR. At 48 hr, cells exposed to 10 μM and 50 μM TAM were 85.6% and 48.4% viable, respectively, and there were no measurable dG-N2-TAM adducts. For microarray, cells were exposed to 10 μM TAM and genes with expression changes of ≥ 3-fold were as follows: thirteen genes up-regulated and one down-related for strain 16; seventeen genes up-regulated for strain 5; and eleven genes up-regulated for strain 40. Interferon-inducible genes (IFITM1, IFIT1, IFNA1, MXI and GIP3), and a potassium ion channel (KCNJ1) were up-regulated in all 3 strains. No significant expression changes were found for genes related to estrogen or xenobiotic metabolism. RT-PCR revealed up-regulation of interferon α (IFNA1) and confirmed the TAM-induced up-regulation of the genes identified by microarray, with the exception of GIP3 and MX1, which were not up-regulated in strain 40. Induction of interferon-related genes in the three NHMEC strains suggests that, in addition to hormonal effects, TAM exposure may enhance immune response in normal breast tissue. PMID:19155303

  8. An Inducible Caspase-9 Suicide Gene to Improve the Safety of Therapy Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yagyu, Shigeki; Hoyos, Valentina; Del Bufalo, Francesca; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2015-09-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) hold promise for regenerative therapies, though there are several safety concerns including the risk of oncogenic transformation or unwanted adverse effects associated with hiPSC or their differentiated progeny. Introduction of the inducible caspase-9 (iC9) suicide gene, which is activated by a specific chemical inducer of dimerization (CID), is one of the most appealing safety strategies for cell therapies and is currently being tested in multicenter clinical trials. Here, we show that the iC9 suicide gene with a human EF1α promoter can be introduced into hiPSC by lentiviral transduction. The transduced hiPSC maintain their pluripotency, including their capacity for unlimited self-renewal and the potential to differentiate into three germ layer tissues. Transduced hiPSC are eliminated within 24 hours of exposure to pharmacological levels of CID in vitro, with induction of apoptosis in 94-99% of the cells. Importantly, the iC9 suicide gene can eradicate tumors derived from hiPSC in vivo. In conclusion, we have developed a direct and efficient hiPSC killing system that provides a necessary safety mechanism for therapies using hiPSC. We believe that our iC9 suicide gene will be of value in clinical applications of hiPSC-based therapy. PMID:26022733

  9. Interlaboratory evaluation of rat hepatic gene expression changes induced by methapyrilene.

    PubMed Central

    Waring, Jeffrey F; Ulrich, Roger G; Flint, Nick; Morfitt, David; Kalkuhl, Arno; Staedtler, Frank; Lawton, Michael; Beekman, Johanna M; Suter, Laura

    2004-01-01

    Several studies using microarrays have shown that changes in gene expression provide information about the mechanism of toxicity induced by xenobiotic agents. Nevertheless, the issue of whether gene expression profiles are reproducible across different laboratories remains to be determined. To address this question, several members of the Hepatotoxicity Working Group of the International Life Sciences Institute Health and Environmental Sciences Institute evaluated the liver gene expression profiles of rats treated with methapyrilene (MP). Animals were treated at one facility, and RNA was distributed to five different sites for gene expression analysis. A preliminary evaluation of the number of modulated genes uncovered striking differences between the five different sites. However, additional data analysis demonstrated that these differences had an effect on the absolute gene expression results but not on the outcome of the study. For all users, unsupervised algorithms showed that gene expression allows the distinction of the high dose of MP from controls and low dose. In addition, the use of a supervised analysis method (support vector machines) made it possible to correctly classify samples. In conclusion, the results show that, despite some variability, robust gene expression changes were consistent between sites. In addition, key expression changes related to the mechanism of MP-induced hepatotoxicity were identified. These results provide critical information regarding the consistency of microarray results across different laboratories and shed light on the strengths and limitations of expression profiling in drug safety analysis. PMID:15033593

  10. The Mycoplasma hyorhinis p37 Protein Rapidly Induces Genes in Fibroblasts Associated with Inflammation and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gomersall, Amber Cathie; Li, Song Feng; Parish, Roger W.

    2015-01-01

    The p37 protein at the surface of Mycoplasma hyorhinis cells forms part of a high-affinity transport system and has been found associated with animal and human cancers. Here we show in NIH3T3 fibroblasts, p37 rapidly induces the expression of genes implicated in inflammation and cancer progression. This gene activation was principally via the Tlr4 receptor. Activity was lost from p37 when the C-terminal 20 amino acids were removed or the four amino acids specific for the hydrogen bonding of thiamine pyrophosphate had been replaced by valine. Blocking the IL6 receptor or inhibiting STAT3 signalling resulted in increased p37-induced gene expression. Since cancer associated fibroblasts support growth, invasion and metastasis via their ability to regulate tumour-related inflammation, the rapid induction in fibroblasts of pro-inflammatory genes by p37 might be expected to influence cancer development. PMID:26512722

  11. Wnt signaling induces transcription, spatial proximity, and translocation of fusion gene partners in human hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Ugarte, Giorgia D; Vargas, Macarena F; Medina, Matías A; León, Pablo; Necuñir, David; Elorza, Alvaro A; Gutiérrez, Soraya E; Moon, Randall T; Loyola, Alejandra; De Ferrari, Giancarlo V

    2015-10-01

    Chromosomal translocations are frequently associated with a wide variety of cancers, particularly hematologic malignancies. A recurrent chromosomal abnormality in acute myeloid leukemia is the reciprocal translocation t(8;21) that fuses RUNX1 and ETO genes. We report here that Wnt/β-catenin signaling increases the expression of ETO and RUNX1 genes in human hematopoietic progenitors. We found that β-catenin is rapidly recruited into RNA polymerase II transcription factories (RNAPII-Ser5) and that ETO and RUNX1 genes are brought into close spatial proximity upon Wnt3a induction. Notably, long-term treatment of cells with Wnt3a induces the generation a frequent RUNX1-ETO translocation event. Thus, Wnt/β-catenin signaling induces transcription and translocation of RUNX1 and ETO fusion gene partners, opening a novel window to understand the onset/development of leukemia. PMID:26333776

  12. In vivo footprinting of the estrogen-inducible vitellogenin II gene from chicken.

    PubMed Central

    Philipsen, J N; Hennis, B C; Ab, G

    1988-01-01

    Protein-DNA interactions in the promoter region of the chicken vitellogenin II gene were analyzed by in vivo dimethylsulphate footprinting with expressing and non-expressing tissues. The reactivity of G-residues is essentially the same in erythrocytes, oviduct and control liver, not expressing the gene. In the expressing estrogen-induced liver we find a number of G-residues with altered reactivities. These G's are located within distinct sequences: the estrogen responsive elements, a sequence resembling the NF-1 recognition motive, and several elements which are conserved between yolk protein genes. The expression-dependent binding of proteins to these sites was confirmed by DNaseI footprinting applied to nuclei isolated from estrogen-induced and control liver. Estradiol appears to establish a transcription complex comprising a number of distinct proteins bound to different sites in the 5' flanking region of the vitellogenin II gene. Images PMID:3186442

  13. Absence of missense mutations in activated c-myc genes in avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Hayward, W.S.

    1988-06-01

    The authors determined the nucleotide sequences of two independent DNA clones which contained the activated c-myc genes from avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas. Neither of these c-myce genes contained missense mutations. This strongly supports the notion that the c-myc photo-oncogene in avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas can be oncogenically activated by altered expression of the gene without a change in the primary structure of the gene product.

  14. The agricultural antibiotic carbadox induces phage-mediated gene transfer in Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Bearson, Bradley L.; Allen, Heather K.; Brunelle, Brian W.; Lee, In Soo; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Stanton, Thaddeus B.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics are used for disease therapeutic or preventative effects in humans and animals, as well as for enhanced feed conversion efficiency in livestock. Antibiotics can also cause undesirable effects in microbial populations, including selection for antibiotic resistance, enhanced pathogen invasion, and stimulation of horizontal gene transfer. Carbadox is a veterinary antibiotic used in the US during the starter phase of swine production for improved feed efficiency and control of swine dysentery and bacterial swine enteritis. Carbadox has been shown in vitro to induce phage-encoded Shiga toxin in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and a phage-like element transferring antibiotic resistance genes in Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, but the effect of carbadox on prophages in other bacteria is unknown. This study examined carbadox exposure on prophage induction and genetic transfer in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a human foodborne pathogen that frequently colonizes swine without causing disease. S. Typhimurium LT2 exposed to carbadox induced prophage production, resulting in bacterial cell lysis and release of virions that were visible by electron microscopy. Carbadox induction of phage-mediated gene transfer was confirmed by monitoring the transduction of a sodCIII::neo cassette in the Fels-1 prophage from LT2 to a recipient Salmonella strain. Furthermore, carbadox frequently induced generalized transducing phages in multidrug-resistant phage type DT104 and DT120 isolates, resulting in the transfer of chromosomal and plasmid DNA that included antibiotic resistance genes. Our research indicates that exposure of Salmonella to carbadox induces prophages that can transfer virulence and antibiotic resistance genes to susceptible bacterial hosts. Carbadox-induced, phage-mediated gene transfer could serve as a contributing factor in bacterial evolution during animal production, with prophages being a reservoir for bacterial fitness genes in the

  15. Attenuation of serum inducibility of immediate early genes by oncoproteins in tyrosine kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, C L; Prochownik, E V; Imperiale, M J; Jove, R

    1993-01-01

    Immediate early genes involved in controlling cell proliferation are rapidly and transiently induced following stimulation of susceptible cells with serum. To study how oncoproteins regulate immediate early genes, we examined serum inducibility of these genes in cells transformed by various oncoproteins. We found that induction of the immediate early gene, c-fos, by serum stimulation was markedly attenuated in four independent cell lines stably transformed by the v-Src tyrosine kinase. Cells chronically transformed by other oncoproteins implicated in tyrosine kinase signaling pathways, including v-Sis, v-Ras, and v-Raf, showed the same pattern of attenuation. In contrast, serum inducibility of c-fos was not attenuated in cells transformed by simian virus 40, which is thought to transform cells through a different pathway. Cell cycle analyses showed that proliferation of these transformed cell lines could be arrested effectively in 0.1% serum, demonstrating that the attenuation was not simply due to continuous cycling of transformed cells after serum deprivation. Moreover, serum inducibility of other immediate early genes, including c-jun, junB, egr-1, and NGFI-B, also was strikingly attenuated by these same oncoproteins. Nuclear run-on transcription assays established that this attenuation of serum inducibility occurred at the transcriptional level. Finally, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that serum-starved v-Src-transformed cells were viable and able to progress into S phase of the cell cycle after serum stimulation, even though the induction of immediate early genes was greatly attenuated in these cells. Our results suggest that activation of immediate early genes is repressed by chronic stimulation of tyrosine kinase signaling pathways in transformed cells. Images PMID:8384301

  16. Rhizobium meliloti Genes Encoding Catabolism of Trigonelline Are Induced under Symbiotic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Boivin, C.; Camut, S.; Malpica, C. A.; Truchet, G.; Rosenberg, C.

    1990-12-01

    Rhizobium meliloti trc genes controlling the catabolism of trigonelline, a plant secondary metabolite often abundant in legumes, are closely linked to nif-nod genes on the symbiotic megaplasmid pSym [Boivin, C., Malpica, C., Rosenberg, C., Denarie, J., Goldman, A., Fleury, V., Maille, M., Message, B., and Tepfer, D. (1989). In Molecular Signals in the Microbe-Plant Symbiotic and Pathogenic Systems. (Berlin: Springer-Verlag), pp. 401-407]. To investigate the role of trigonelline catabolism in the Rhizobium-legume interaction, we studied the regulation of trc gene expression in free-living and in endosymbiotic bacteria using Escherichia coli lacZ as a reporter gene. Experiments performed with free-living bacteria indicated that trc genes were organized in at least four transcription units and that the substrate trigonelline was a specific inducer for three of them. Noninducing trigonelline-related compounds such as betaines appeared to antagonize the inducing effect of trigonelline. None of the general or symbiotic regulatory genes ntrA, dctB/D, or nodD seemed to be involved in trigonelline catabolism. trc fusions exhibiting a low basal and a high induced [beta]-galactosidase activity when present on pSym were used to monitor trc gene expression in alfalfa tissue under symbiotic conditions. Results showed that trc genes are induced during all the symbiotic steps, i.e., in the rhizosphere, infection threads, and bacteroids of alfalfa, suggesting that trigonelline is a nutrient source throughout the Rhizobium-legume association. PMID:12354952

  17. Differential gene expression and lipid metabolism in fatty liver induced by acute ethanol treatment in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Huquan; Kim, Mingoo; Kim, Ju-Han; Kong, Gu; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Yoon, Byung-IL; Lee, Mi-Ock; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2007-09-15

    Ethanol induces cumulative liver damage including steatosis, steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. The aim of this study is to investigate the global intrahepatic gene expression profile in the mouse liver treated with ethanol. A single oral dose of 0.5 or 5 g/kg ethanol was administered to male ICR mice, and liver samples were obtained after 6, 24 and 72 h. Histopathological evaluation showed typical fatty livers in the high-dose group at 24 h. Microarray analysis identified 28 genes as being ethanol responsive (two-way ANOVA; p < 0.05), after adjustment by the Benjamini-Hochberg multiple testing correction; these genes displayed {>=} 2-fold induction or repression. The expression of genes that are known to be involved in fatty acid synthesis was examined. The transcript for lipogenic transcription factor, sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding factor 1 (Srebf1), was upregulated by acute ethanol exposure. Of the genes known to contain SRE or SRE-like sequences and to be regulated by SRE-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), those encoding malic enzyme (Mod1), ATP-citrate lyase (Acly), fatty acid synthase (Fasn) and stearyl-CoA desaturase (Scd1) were induced by ethanol. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed the changes in the expression levels of the selected genes. The change in the Srebf1 mRNA level correlates well with that of the SREBP1 protein expression as well as its binding to the promoters of the target genes. The present study identifies differentially expressed genes that can be applied to the biomarkers for alcohol-binge-induced fatty liver. These results support the hypothesis by which ethanol-induced steatosis in mice is mediated by the fatty acid synthetic pathway regulated by SREBP1.

  18. Virus-induced gene silencing in the rapid cycling columbine Aquilegia coerulea "Origami".

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bharti; Kramer, Elena M

    2013-01-01

    Aquilegia Origami is an emerging model system for ecology and evolution, which has numerous genetic and genomic tools. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has been established as an effective approach to study gene function in Aquilegia. In the current protocol, we demonstrate VIGS using Agrobacterium strain GV3101 carrying tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based constructs to infect Aquilegia coerulea "Origami" plants via vacuum infiltration. PMID:23386296

  19. IRF1 marks activated genes in SLE and can induce target gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Shi, Lihua; Song, Li; Ephrem, Elshaddai; Petri, Michelle; Sullivan, Kathleen E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective IRF1 both mediates responses to type I interferons and the induction of interferons. It has been implicated in murine lupus models as a critical mediator of inflammation. A previous study of chromatin modifications in SLE patient monocytes implicated IRF1 as associated with increased histone acetylation in SLE patients. This study directly investigated IRF1 binding sites on chromatin using ChIP-seq. Methods Nine female SLE patients and seven female controls were examined. Monocytes were purified from peripheral blood and subjected to library preparation using a validated antibody to IRF1. The effect of IRF1 on target gene expression was confirmed using an overexpression system in cell lines and co-immunoprecipitation was used to define protein interactions. Results IRF1 binding around transcribed regions was increased in SLE patient monocytes but histone modifications at potential IRF1 binding sites without detectable IRF1 binding were also increased. IRF1 overexpression was sufficient to drive transcription of target genes. IRF1 overexpression was also able to alter histone modifications at a focus set of target genes and the use of an IRF1 inhibitor decreased both expression and histone modifications at target genes. IRF1 was found to interact with a select set of histone modifying enzymes and other transcription factors. Conclusions IRF1 is an important signaling protein in the interferon pathway. IRF1 not only activates gene expression as a transcription factor but may perpetuate disease by leading to a dysregulated epigenome. PMID:25418955

  20. Sense Transgene-Induced Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing in Tobacco Compromises the Splicing of Endogenous Counterpart Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mi-Rae; Natsuume, Masaya; Matsumoto, Takashi; Hanaoka, Mitsumasa; Imai, Misaki; Iijima, Ken; Oka, Shin-ichiro; Adachi, Eri; Kodama, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Sense transgene-induced post-transcriptional gene silencing (S-PTGS) is thought to be a type of RNA silencing in which ARGONAUTE1 directs the small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated cleavage of a target mRNA in the cytoplasm. Here, we report that the altered splicing of endogenous counterpart genes is a main cause for the reduction of their mature mRNA levels. After the S-PTGS of a tobacco endoplasmic reticulum ω-3 fatty acid desaturase (NtFAD3) gene, 3′-truncated, polyadenylated endo-NtFAD3 transcripts and 5′-truncated, intron-containing endo-NtFAD3 transcripts were detected in the total RNA fraction. Although transcription proceeded until the last exon of the endogenous NtFAD3 gene, intron-containing NtFAD3 transcripts accumulated in the nucleus of the S-PTGS plants. Several intron-containing NtFAD3 transcripts harboring most of the exon sequences were generated when an endogenous silencing suppressor gene, rgs-CaM, was overexpressed in the S-PTGS plants. These intron-containing NtFAD3 splice variants were generated in the presence of NtFAD3 siRNAs that are homologous to the nucleotide sequences of these splice variants. The results of this study indicate that the inhibition of endo-NtFAD3 gene expression is primarily directed via the alteration of splicing and not by cytoplasmic slicer activity. Our results suggest that the transgene and intron-containing endogenous counterpart genes are differentially suppressed in S-PTGS plants. PMID:24586294

  1. Regulation of sesquiterpene cyclase gene expression. Characterization of an elicitor- and pathogen-inducible promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Yin, S; Mei, L; Newman, J; Back, K; Chappell, J

    1997-01-01

    The promoter for a tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) sesquiterpene cyclase gene, a key regulatory step in sesquiterpene phytoalexin biosynthesis, has been analyzed. The EAS4 promoter was fused to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene, and the temporal and spatial expression patterns of GUS activity were examined in stably transformed plants and in transient expression assays using electroporated protoplasts of tobacco. No GUS activity was observed in any tissues under normal growth conditions. A low level of GUS activity was detected in wounded leaf, root, and stem tissues, whereas a much higher level was observed when these tissues were challenged with elicitors or microbial pathogens. The GUS expression pattern directed by the EAS4 promoter was identical to the induction patterns observed for the endogenous sesquiterpene cyclase genes. Neither exogenous salicylic acid nor methyl jasmonate induced GUS expression; and H2O2 induced GUS expression to only a limited extent. Although the EAS4 promoter contains cis-sequences resembling previously identified transcriptional control motifs, other cis-sequences important for quantitative and qualitative gene expression were identified by deletion and gain-of-function analyses. The EAS4 promoter differs from previously described pathogen-/elicitor-inducible promoters because it only supports inducible gene expression and directs unique spatial expression patterns. PMID:9342864

  2. Activity analysis and preliminary inducer screening of the chicken DAZL gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Rui; Zuo, Qisheng; Li, Dong; Lian, Chao; Tang, Beibei; Xiao, Tianrong; Zhang, Yani; Li, Bichun

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed at identifying the active control area of chicken DAZL gene core promoter, to screen optimum inducers of the DAZL gene, thus to enhance the differentiation of embryonic stem cells into spermatogonial stem cells. Fragments of chicken DAZL gene promoter were cloned into fluorescent reporter plasmids and transfected into DF-1 cells. Then Dual-Luciferase® Reporter Assay System was used to identify the activity of the DAZL gene under different inducers. Our studies showed that the DAZL core promoter region for the Suqin yellow chicken was -383 to -39 bp. The dual-luciferase® reporter showed that all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), a retinoic acid receptor alpha agonist (tamibarotene/Am80), or estradiol (E2) could significantly enhance DAZL transcription. The in vitro inductive culture of chicken ESCs demonstrated that, with ATRA treatment, DAZL transcription peaked at 6 days and then decreased slowly; whereas, DAZL transcription was continuous and peaked at 10 days with Am80 treatment. E2 treatment significantly increased DAZL expression after 8 days. All three treatments were associated with the appearance of male germ cell (MGC)-like cells on day 10. These results provide the optimum inducer screening of the DAZL gene and lay the foundation for further screening of compounds that can induce the differentiation of ESCs into MGCs in vitro. PMID:25807265

  3. Activity Analysis and Preliminary Inducer Screening of the Chicken DAZL Gene Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Rui; Zuo, Qisheng; Li, Dong; Lian, Chao; Tang, Beibei; Xiao, Tianrong; Zhang, Yani; Li, Bichun

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed at identifying the active control area of chicken DAZL gene core promoter, to screen optimum inducers of the DAZL gene, thus to enhance the differentiation of embryonic stem cells into spermatogonial stem cells. Fragments of chicken DAZL gene promoter were cloned into fluorescent reporter plasmids and transfected into DF-1 cells. Then Dual-Luciferase® Reporter Assay System was used to identify the activity of the DAZL gene under different inducers. Our studies showed that the DAZL core promoter region for the Suqin yellow chicken was −383 to −39 bp. The dual-luciferase® reporter showed that all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), a retinoic acid receptor alpha agonist (tamibarotene/Am80), or estradiol (E2) could significantly enhance DAZL transcription. The in vitro inductive culture of chicken ESCs demonstrated that, with ATRA treatment, DAZL transcription peaked at 6 days and then decreased slowly; whereas, DAZL transcription was continuous and peaked at 10 days with Am80 treatment. E2 treatment significantly increased DAZL expression after 8 days. All three treatments were associated with the appearance of male germ cell (MGC)-like cells on day 10. These results provide the optimum inducer screening of the DAZL gene and lay the foundation for further screening of compounds that can induce the differentiation of ESCs into MGCs in vitro. PMID:25807265

  4. UV-induced changes in cell cycle and gene expression within rabbit lens epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sidjanin, D.; Grdina, D.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-11-01

    Damage to lens epithelial cells is a probable initiation process in cataract formation induced by ultraviolet radiation. These experiments investigated the ability of 254 nm radiation on cell cycle progression and gene expression in rabbit lens epithelial cell line N/N1003A. No changes in expression of c-fos, c-jun, alpha- tubulin, or vimentin was observed following UV exposure. Using flow cytometry, an accumulation of cells in G1/S phase of the cell cycle 1 hr following exposure. The observed changes in gene expression, especially the decreased histone transcripts reported here may play a role in UV induced inhibition of cell cycle progression.

  5. A light-inducible CRISPR/Cas9 system for control of endogenous gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Polstein, Lauren R.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetic systems enable precise spatial and temporal control of cell behavior. We engineered a light-activated CRISPR/Cas9 effector (LACE) system that induces transcription of endogenous genes in the presence of blue light. This was accomplished by fusing the light-inducible heterodimerizing proteins CRY2 and CIB1 to a transactivation domain and the catalytically inactive dCas9, respectively. The versatile LACE system can be easily directed to new DNA sequences for the dynamic regulation of endogenous genes. PMID:25664691

  6. Use of differential fluorescence induction and optical trapping to isolate environmentally induced genes.

    PubMed

    Allaway, D; Schofield, N A; Leonard, M E; Gilardoni, L; Finan, T M; Poole, P S

    2001-06-01

    The techniques of differential fluorescence induction (DFI) and optical trapping (OT) have been combined to allow the identification of environmentally induced genes in single bacterial cells. Designated DFI-OT, this technique allows the in situ isolation of genes driving the expression of green fluorescent protein (Gfp) using temporal and spatial criteria. A series of plasmid-based promoter probe vectors (pOT) was developed for the construction of random genomic libraries that are linked to gfpUV or egfp. Bacteria that do not express Gfp on laboratory medium (i.e. non-fluorescent) were inoculated into the environment, and induced genes were detected with a combined fluorescence/optical trapping microscope. Using this selection strategy, rhizosphere-induced genes with homology to thiamine pyrophosphorylase (thiE) and cyclic glucan synthase (ndvB) were isolated. Other genes were expressed late in the stationary phase or as a consequence of surface-dependent growth, including fixND and metX, and a putative ABC transporter of putrescine. This strategy provides a unique ability to combine spatial, temporal and physical information to identify environmental regulation of bacterial gene expression. PMID:11472504

  7. Analysis of Stress Responsive Genes Induced by Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in BJ Foreskin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Shubhashish; Sharma, Chidananda; Yog, Rajeshwari; Periakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Jejelowo, Olufisayo; Thomas, Renard; Barrera, Enrique V.; Rice-Ficht, Allison C.; Wilson, Bobby L.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T.

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology is finding its use as a potential technology in consumer products, defense, electronics, and medical applications by exploiting the properties of nanomaterials. Single-walled carbon nanotubes are novel forms of these nanomaterials with potential for large applications. However, the toxicity studies on this material are not explored in detail and therefore limiting its use. It has been earlier reported that single-walled carbon nanotubes induces oxidative stress and also dictates activation of specific signaling pathway in keratinocytes. The present study explores the effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes on stress genes in human BJ Foreskin cells. The results show induction of oxidative stress in BJ Foreskin cells by single-walled carbon nanotubes and increase in stress responsive genes. The genes included inducible genes like HMOX1, HMOX2, and Cyp1B1. In addition we validated increase for four genes by SWCNT, namely ATM, CCNC, DNAJB4, and GADD45A by RT-PCR. Moreover results of the altered stress related genes have been discussed and that partially explains some of the toxic responses induced by single-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:17450800

  8. Cord blood administration induces oligodendrocyte survival through alterations in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, D.D.; Leonardo, C.C.; Hall, A.A.; Shahaduzzaman, M.D.; Collier, L.A.; Willing, A.E.; Pennypacker, K.R.

    2010-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes (OLs), the predominant cell type found in cerebral white matter, are essential for structural integrity and proper neural signaling. Very little is known concerning stroke-induced OL dysfunction. Our laboratory has shown that infusion of human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) cells protects striatal white matter tracts in vivo and directly protects mature primary OL cultures from oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD). Microarray studies of RNA prepared from OL cultures subjected to OGD and treated with HUCB cells showed an increase in the expression of 33 genes associated with OL proliferation, survival, and repair functions, such as myelination. The microarray results were verified using quantitative RT-PCR for the following eight genes: U2AF homology motif kinase 1 (Uhmk1), insulin induce gene 1 (Insig1), metallothionein ( Mt3), tetraspanin 2 (Tspan2), peroxiredoxin 4 (Prdx4), stathmin-like 2 (Stmn2), myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), and versican (Vcan). Immunohistochemistry showed that MOG, Prdx4, Uhmk1, Insig1 and Mt3 protein expression were upregluated in the ipsilateral white matter tracts of rats infused with HUCB cells 48 hrs after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Furthermore, promoter region analysis of these genes revealed common transcription factor binding sites, providing insight into the shared signal transduction pathways activated by HUCB cells to enhance transcription of these genes. These results show expression of genes induced by HUCB cell therapy that could confer oligoprotection from ischemia. PMID:20883670

  9. A CRISPR-based screen identifies genes essential for West Nile virus-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongming; Dang, Ying; Wu, Yonggan; Jia, Gengxiang; Anaya, Edgar; Zhang, Junli; Abraham, Sojan; Choi, Jang-Gi; Shi, Guojun; Qi, Ling; Manjunath, N.; Wu, Haoquan

    2015-01-01

    Summary West Nile virus (WNV) causes an acute neurological infection attended by massive neuronal cell death. However, the mechanism(s) behind the virus-induced cell death is poorly understood. Using a library containing 77,406 sgRNAs targeting 20,121 genes, we performed a genome-wide screen followed by a second screen with a sub-library. Among the genes identified, seven genes, EMC2, EMC3, SEL1L, DERL2, UBE2G2, UBE2J1, and HRD1, stood out as having the strongest phenotype, whose knockout conferred strong protection against WNV-induced cell death with two different WNV strains and in three cell lines. Interestingly, knockout of these genes did not block WNV replication. Thus, these appear to be essential genes that link WNV replication to downstream cell death pathway(s). In addition, the fact that all of these genes belong to the endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway suggests that this might be the primary driver of WNV-induced cell death. PMID:26190106

  10. Potential of GRID2 receptor gene for preventing TNF-induced neurodegeneration in autism.

    PubMed

    Kalkan, Zeynep; Durasi, İlknur Melis; Sezerman, Ugur; Atasever-Arslan, Belkis

    2016-05-01

    Autism is one of the most common subtypes of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Recent studies suggested a relationship between immune-dependent coding genes and ASD, indicating that long term neuroimmunological anomalies affect brain development and synaptic transmission among neural networks. Furthermore, various studies focused on biomarker potential of TNF-α in autism. Ionotropic receptors are also studied as potential marker for autism since altered gene expression levels are observed in autistic patients. GRID2 is a candidate ionotropic receptor which is involved glutamate transfer. In this study, to propose TNF-α dependent cellular processes involved in autism aetiology in relation to GRID2 we performed a bioinformatic network analysis and identified potential pathways and genes that are involved in TNF-α induced changes at GRID2 receptor levels. As a result, we ascertained the GRID2 receptor gene as a candidate gene and further studied the association between GRID2 expression levels and TNF-induced neurodegeneration. Our bioinformatic analyses and experimental results revealed that TNF-α regulates GRID2 gene expression by activating Cdc42 and GOPC genes. Moreover, increased TNF-α levels leads to increase of caspase-3 protein levels triggering neuronal apoptosis leading to neuronal deficiency, which is one of the major symptoms of autism. The study is the first to show the role of TNF-α in regulation of GRID2 gene expression and its signalling pathway. As a result, GRID2 gene can be a suppressor in TNF-induced neurodegeneration which may help to understand the main factors leading to autism. PMID:27019035

  11. MR VIGS: microRNA-based virus-induced gene silencing in plants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiwei; Zhang, Qi; Kong, Junhua; Hu, Feng; Li, Bin; Wu, Chaoqun; Qin, Cheng; Zhang, Pengcheng; Shi, Nongnong; Hong, Yiguo

    2015-01-01

    In plants, microRNA (miRNA)-based virus-induced gene silencing, dubbed MR VIGS, is a powerful technique to delineate the biological functions of genes. By targeting to a specific sequence, miRNAs can knock down expression of genes with fewer off-target effects. Here, using a modified Cabbage leaf curling virus (CaLCuV) and Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) as vectors, we describe two virus-based miRNA expression systems to perform MR VIGS for plant functional genomics assays. PMID:25740363

  12. Transcriptomic Sequencing Reveals a Set of Unique Genes Activated by Butyrate-Induced Histone Modification.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Robert W; Baldwin, Ransom L; Blomberg, Le Ann; Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes in the bovine epithelial cells using RNA sequencing technology, a set of unique genes that are activated only after butyrate treatment were revealed. A complementary bioinformatics analysis of the functional category, pathway, and integrated network, using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, indicated that these genes activated by butyrate treatment are related to major cellular functions, including cell morphological changes, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Our results offered insight into the butyrate-induced transcriptomic changes and will accelerate our discerning of the molecular fundamentals of epigenomic regulation. PMID:26819550

  13. Transcriptomic Sequencing Reveals a Set of Unique Genes Activated by Butyrate-Induced Histone Modification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Robert W.; Baldwin, Ransom L.; Blomberg, Le Ann; Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes in the bovine epithelial cells using RNA sequencing technology, a set of unique genes that are activated only after butyrate treatment were revealed. A complementary bioinformatics analysis of the functional category, pathway, and integrated network, using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, indicated that these genes activated by butyrate treatment are related to major cellular functions, including cell morphological changes, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Our results offered insight into the butyrate-induced transcriptomic changes and will accelerate our discerning of the molecular fundamentals of epigenomic regulation. PMID:26819550

  14. Identification of genes regulated during mechanical load-induced cardiac hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnatty, S. E.; Dyck, J. R.; Michael, L. H.; Olson, E. N.; Abdellatif, M.; Schneider, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is associated with both adaptive and adverse changes in gene expression. To identify genes regulated by pressure overload, we performed suppressive subtractive hybridization between cDNA from the hearts of aortic-banded (7-day) and sham-operated mice. In parallel, we performed a subtraction between an adult and a neonatal heart, for the purpose of comparing different forms of cardiac hypertrophy. Sequencing more than 100 clones led to the identification of an array of functionally known (70%) and unknown genes (30%) that are upregulated during cardiac growth. At least nine of those genes were preferentially expressed in both the neonatal and pressure over-load hearts alike. Using Northern blot analysis to investigate whether some of the identified genes were upregulated in the load-independent calcineurin-induced cardiac hypertrophy mouse model, revealed its incomplete similarity with the former models of cardiac growth. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  15. A Study on Effect of Electroacupuncture on Gene Expression in Hypothalamus of Rats with Stress-Induced Prehypertension Based on Gene Chip Technology

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiaojia; Guo, Yan; Liu, Qingguo; Wang, Zhaoyang; Guo, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To explore the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on gene expression in the hypothalamus of rats with stress-induced prehypertension and try to reveal its biological mechanism with gene chip technology. Methods. The stress-induced hypertensive rat model was prepared by combining electric foot-shocks with generated noise. Molding cycle lasted for 14 days and EA intervention was applied on model + EA group during model preparation. Rat Gene 2.0 Array technology was used for the determination of gene expression profiles and the screened key genes were verified by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR method. Results. Compared with the blank group, 234 genes were upregulated and 73 were downregulated in the model group. Compared with the model group, 110 genes were upregulated and 273 genes were downregulated in model + EA group. The PCR results of the key genes including HSPB1, P2RX4, PPP1R14A, and TH are consistent with that of gene chip test. Conclusion. EA could significantly lower blood pressure of stress-induced prehypertension rats and affect its gene expression profile in hypothalamus. Genes and their signal transduction pathway that related to the contraction of vascular smooth muscle, concentration of Ca2+, and excitability of sympathetic nerve may be involved in EA's antihypertensive mechanism. PMID:26229544

  16. 20-hydroxyecdysone upregulates Atg genes to induce autophagy in the Bombyx fat body

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ling; Ma, Li; Guo, Enen; Deng, Xiaojuan; Ma, Sanyuan; Xia, Qingyou; Cao, Yang; Li, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is finely regulated at multiple levels and plays crucial roles in development and disease. In the fat body of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, autophagy occurs and Atg gene expression peaks during the nonfeeding molting and pupation stages when the steroid hormone (20-hydroxyecdysone; 20E) is high. Injection of 20E into the feeding larvae upregulated Atg genes and reduced TORC1 activity resulting in autophagy induction in the fat body. Conversely, RNAi knockdown of the 20E receptor partner (USP) or targeted overexpression of a dominant negative mutant of the 20E receptor (EcRDN) in the larval fat body reduced autophagy and downregulated the Atg genes, confirming the importance of 20E-induction of Atg gene expression during pupation. Moreover, in vitro treatments of the larval fat body with 20E upregulated the Atg genes. Five Atg genes were potentially 20E primary-responsive, and a 20E response element was identified in the Atg1 (ortholog of human ULK1) promoter region. Furthermore, RNAi knockdown of 4 key genes (namely Br-C, E74, HR3 and βftz-F1) in the 20E-triggered transcriptional cascade reduced autophagy and downregulated Atg genes to different levels. Taken together, we conclude that in addition to blocking TORC1 activity for autophagosome initiation, 20E upregulates Atg genes to induce autophagy in the Bombyx fat body. PMID:23674061

  17. Gene expression during imidacloprid-induced hormesis in green peach aphid.

    PubMed

    Ayyanath, Murali-Mohan; Cutler, G Christopher; Scott-Dupree, Cynthia D; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan; Kandasamy, Saveetha; Prithiviraj, Kalyani

    2014-07-01

    Imidacloprid-induced hormesis in the form of stimulated reproduction has previously been reported in green peach aphid, Myzus persicae. Changes in gene expression accompanying this hormetic response have not been previously investigated. In this study, expression of stress response (Hsp60), dispersal (OSD, TOL and ANT), and developmental (FPPS I) genes were examined for two generations during imidacloprid-induced reproductive stimulation in M. persicae. Global DNA methylation was also measured to test the hypothesis that changes in gene expression are heritable. At hormetic concentrations, down-regulation of Hsp60 was followed by up-regulation of this gene in the subsequent generation. Likewise, expression of dispersal-related genes and FPPS I varied with concentration, life stage, and generation. These results indicate that reproductive hormesis in M. persicae is accompanied by a complex transgenerational pattern of up- and down-regulation of genes that likely reflects trade-offs in gene expression and related physiological processes during the phenotypic dose-response. Moreover, DNA methylation in second generation M. persicae occurred at higher doses than in first-generation aphids, suggesting that heritable adaptability to low doses of the stressor might have occurred. PMID:25249837

  18. Gene expression profiling of breast cells induced by X-rays and heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Roy, D; Guida, P; Zhou, G; Echiburu-Chau, C; Calaf, G M

    2008-05-01

    Several genetic aberrations and gene expression changes have been shown to occur when cells are exposed to various types of radiation. The integrity of DNA depends upon several processes that include DNA damage recognition and repair, replication, transcription and cell cycle regulation. Ionizing radiation has many sources, including radon decay from the soil and X-rays from medical practice. Epidemiological evidence indicates a risk for cancer by inducing genetic alterations through DNA damage, and molecular alterations have been reported in epidemiological studies of the A-bomb survivors. A spontaneously immortalized human breast epithelial cell model, MCF-10F, was used to examine the gene expression profiling of breast cells induced by X-ray and heavy ion exposure, by a cDNA expression array of DNA damage and repair genes. This cell line was exposed to 10, 50, 100 and 200 cGy of either X-rays or heavy ions and gene expression profiles were studied. Results indicated that out of a total of 161 genes, 38 were differentially expressed by X-ray treatment and 24 by heavy ion (Fe(+2)) treatment. Eight genes were common to both treatments and were confirmed by Northern blot analysis: BRCA1, BIRC2/CIAP1, CENP-E, DDB1, MRE11A, RAD54/ATRX, Wip1 and XPF/ERCC4. A number of candidate genes reported here may be useful molecular biomarkers of radiation exposure in breast cells. PMID:18425356

  19. Targeted gene conversion induced by triplex-directed psoralen interstrand crosslinks in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaobin; Nairn, Rodney S; Vasquez, Karen M

    2009-10-01

    Correction of a defective gene is a promising approach for both basic research and clinical gene therapy. However, the absence of site-specific targeting and the low efficiency of homologous recombination in human cells present barriers to successful gene targeting. In an effort to overcome these barriers, we utilized triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) conjugated to a DNA interstrand crosslinking (ICL) agent, psoralen (pTFO-ICLs), to improve the gene targeting efficiency at a specific site in DNA. Gene targeting events were monitored by the correction of a deletion on a recipient plasmid with the homologous sequence from a donor plasmid in human cells. The mechanism underlying this event is stimulation of homologous recombination by the pTFO-ICL. We found that pTFO-ICLs are efficient in inducing targeted gene conversion (GC) events in human cells. The deletion size in the recipient plasmid influenced both the recombination frequency and spectrum of recombinants; i.e. plasmids with smaller deletions had a higher frequency and proportion of GC events. The polarity of the pTFO-ICL also had a prominent effect on recombination. Our results suggest that pTFO-ICL induced intermolecular recombination provides an efficient method for targeted gene correction in mammalian cells. PMID:19726585

  20. Among-lake reciprocal transplants induce convergent expression of immune genes in threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Stutz, William E; Schmerer, Matthew; Coates, Jessica L; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2015-09-01

    Geographic variation in parasite communities can drive evolutionary divergence in host immune genes. However, biotic and abiotic environmental variation can also induce plastic differences in immune function among populations. At present, there is little information concerning the relative magnitudes of heritable vs. induced immune divergence in natural populations. We examined immune gene expression profiles of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from six lakes on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Parasite community composition differs between lake types (large or small, containing limnetic- or benthic-like stickleback) and between watersheds. We observed corresponding differences in immune gene expression profiles among wild-caught stickleback, using a set of seven immune genes representing distinct branches of the immune system. To evaluate the role of environmental effects on this differentiation, we experimentally transplanted wild-caught fish into cages in their native lake, or into a nearby foreign lake. Transplanted individuals' immune gene expression converged on patterns typical of their destination lake, deviating from their native expression profile. Transplant individuals' source population had a much smaller effect, suggesting relatively weak genetic underpinning of population differences in immunity, as viewed through gene expression. This strong environmental regulation of immune gene expression provides a counterpoint to the large emerging literature documenting microevolution and genetic diversification of immune function. Our findings illustrate the value of studying immunity in natural environmental settings where the immune system has evolved and actively functions. PMID:26118468

  1. Virus induced gene silencing of a gene repressing flowering in sugar beet.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposure to a prolonged cold period during winter is necessary for flowering in the next spring in many biennial plants - a process termed vernalization. We have described BvFL1, a vernalization gene in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris), which is a repressor of flowering that is downregulated in response ...

  2. Gene expression profiling in undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma induced by high-dose radiation.

    PubMed

    Bang, Hyun Soon; Choi, Moo Hyun; Kim, Cha Soon; Choi, Seung Jin

    2016-06-01

    Published gene expression studies for radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis have used various methodologies. In this study, we identified differential gene expression in a human thyroid epithelial cell line after exposure to high-dose γ-radiation. HTori-3 cells were exposed to 5 or 10 Gy of ionizing radiation using two dose rates (high-dose rate: 4.68 Gy/min, and low-dose rate: 40 mGy/h) and then implanted into the backs of BALB/c nude mice after 4 (10 Gy) or 5 weeks (5 Gy). Decreases in cell viability, increases in giant cell frequency, anchorage-independent growth in vitro, and tumorigenicity in vivo were observed. Particularly, the cells irradiated with 5 Gy at the high-dose rate or 10 Gy at the low-dose rate demonstrated more prominent tumorigenicity. Gene expression profiling was analyzed via microarray. Numerous genes that were significantly altered by a fold-change of >50% following irradiation were identified in each group. Gene expression analysis identified six commonly misregulated genes, including CRYAB, IL-18, ZNF845, CYP24A1, OR4N4 and VN1R4, at all doses. These genes involve apoptosis, the immune response, regulation of transcription, and receptor signaling pathways. Overall, the altered genes in high-dose rate (HDR) 5 Gy and low-dose rate (LDR) 10 Gy were more than those of LDR 5 Gy and HDR 10 Gy. Thus, we investigated genes associated with aggressive tumor development using the two dosage treatments. In this study, the identified gene expression profiles reflect the molecular response following high doses of external radiation exposure and may provide helpful information about radiation-induced thyroid tumors in the high-dose range. PMID:27006382

  3. Gene expression profiling in undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma induced by high-dose radiation

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun Soon; Choi, Moo Hyun; Kim, Cha Soon; Choi, Seung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Published gene expression studies for radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis have used various methodologies. In this study, we identified differential gene expression in a human thyroid epithelial cell line after exposure to high-dose γ-radiation. HTori-3 cells were exposed to 5 or 10 Gy of ionizing radiation using two dose rates (high-dose rate: 4.68 Gy/min, and low-dose rate: 40 mGy/h) and then implanted into the backs of BALB/c nude mice after 4 (10 Gy) or 5 weeks (5 Gy). Decreases in cell viability, increases in giant cell frequency, anchorage-independent growth in vitro, and tumorigenicity in vivo were observed. Particularly, the cells irradiated with 5 Gy at the high-dose rate or 10 Gy at the low-dose rate demonstrated more prominent tumorigenicity. Gene expression profiling was analyzed via microarray. Numerous genes that were significantly altered by a fold-change of >50% following irradiation were identified in each group. Gene expression analysis identified six commonly misregulated genes, including CRYAB, IL-18, ZNF845, CYP24A1, OR4N4 and VN1R4, at all doses. These genes involve apoptosis, the immune response, regulation of transcription, and receptor signaling pathways. Overall, the altered genes in high-dose rate (HDR) 5 Gy and low-dose rate (LDR) 10 Gy were more than those of LDR 5 Gy and HDR 10 Gy. Thus, we investigated genes associated with aggressive tumor development using the two dosage treatments. In this study, the identified gene expression profiles reflect the molecular response following high doses of external radiation exposure and may provide helpful information about radiation-induced thyroid tumors in the high-dose range. PMID:27006382

  4. IKK{epsilon} modulates RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Bao Xiaoyong; Indukuri, Hemalatha; Liu Tianshuang; Liao Suiling; Tian, Bing; Brasier, Allan R.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Casola, Antonella

    2010-12-20

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a negative-strand RNA virus, is the most common cause of epidemic respiratory disease in infants and young children. RSV infection of airway epithelial cells induces the expression of immune/inflammatory genes through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Nuclear Factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study we have investigated the role of the non canonical I{kappa}B kinase (IKK){epsilon} in modulating RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. Our results show that inhibition of IKK{epsilon} activation results in significant impairment of viral-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression, through a reduction in NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity, without changes in nuclear translocation or DNA-binding activity. Absence of IKK{epsilon} results in a significant decrease of RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B phosphorylation on serine 536, a post-translational modification important for RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression, known to regulate NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity without affecting nuclear translocation. This study identifies a novel mechanism by which IKK{epsilon} regulates viral-induced cellular signaling.

  5. Identification of genes regulating TRAIL-induced apoptosis in rheumatoid arthritis fibroblasts-like synoviocytes.

    PubMed

    Audo, R; Hegglin, A; Severac, D; Dantec, C; Combe, B; Hahne, M; Morel, J

    2015-10-01

    We previously described that sensitivity to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis varied in rheumatoid arthritis fibroblasts-like synoviocytes (RAFLS) from one patient to another and was correlated with disease severity. Therefore, we screened for genes differentially expressed in RAFLS sensitive and resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. The sensitivity of RAFLS was defined based on the percentage of TRAIL-induced apoptosis: 0-10% for resistant cells and >25% for sensitive RAFLS. We performed transcriptomic comparison between RAFLS-S (n=6) and RAFLS-R (n=6) and then examined the implication of identified candidates in the regulation of apoptosis using small interference RNA (siRNA). Microarray analysis revealed 10 functional genes differentially expressed according to TRAIL sensitivity. These factors are implicated in different functions, such as the respiratory chain (ND3), the transport of lipids (OSBP2, PLTP), the regulation of signaling linked to extracellular factors (SULF2, GALNT1, SIAE) or the regulation of gene expression (TET2 and LARP6). We confirmed differential expression for GALNT1 and LARP6 by quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR. Using siRNA extinction, we demonstrated the implication of GALNT1, SULF2 and LARP6 in the control of TRAIL-induced responses. These results are of particular interest as GALNT1 and LARP6 have been implicated in the regulation of cell death and may represent interesting targets to induce apoptosis of RAFLS. PMID:26247836

  6. IKKε MODULATES RSV-INDUCED NF-κB-DEPENDENT GENE TRANSCRIPTION

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiaoyong; Indukuri, Hemalatha; Liu, Tianshuang; Liao, Sui-Ling; Tian, Bing; Brasier, Allan R.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Casola, Antonella

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a negative-strand RNA virus, is the most common cause of epidemic respiratory disease in infants and young children. RSV infection of airway epithelial cells induces the expression of immune/inflammatory genes through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB). In this study we have investigated the role of the non canonical IκB kinase (IKK)ε in modulating RSV-induced NF-κB activation. Our results show that inhibition of IKKε activation results in significant impairment of viral-induced NF-κB-dependent gene expression, through a reduction in NF-κB transcriptional activity, without changes in nuclear translocation or DNA-binding activity. Absence of IKKε results in a significant decrease of RSV-induced NF-κB phosphorylation on serine 536, a post-translational modification important for RSV-induced NF-κB-dependent gene expression, known to regulate NF-κB transcriptional activity without affecting nuclear translocation. This study identifies a novel mechanism by which IKKε regulates viral-induced cellular signaling. PMID:20961594

  7. Multiple copies of a bile acid-inducible gene in Eubacterium sp. strain VPI 12708.

    PubMed Central

    Gopal-Srivastava, R; Mallonee, D H; White, W B; Hylemon, P B

    1990-01-01

    Eubacterium sp. strain VPI 12708 is an anaerobic intestinal bacterium which possesses inducible bile acid 7-dehydroxylation activity. Several new polypeptides are produced in this strain following induction with cholic acid. Genes coding for two copies of a bile acid-inducible 27,000-dalton polypeptide (baiA1 and baiA2) have been previously cloned and sequenced. We now report on a gene coding for a third copy of this 27,000-dalton polypeptide (baiA3). The baiA3 gene has been cloned in lambda DASH on an 11.2-kilobase DNA fragment from a partial Sau3A digest of the Eubacterium DNA. DNA sequence analysis of the baiA3 gene revealed 100% homology with the baiA1 gene within the coding region of the 27,000-dalton polypeptides. The baiA2 gene shares 81% sequence identity with the other two genes at the nucleotide level. The flanking nucleotide sequences associated with the baiA1 and baiA3 genes are identical for 930 bases in the 5' direction from the initiation codon and for at least 325 bases in the 3' direction from the stop codon, including the putative promoter regions for the genes. An additional open reading frame (occupying from 621 to 648 bases, depending on the correct start codon) was found in the identical 5' regions associated with the baiA1 and baiA3 clones. The 5' sequence 930 bases upstream from the baiA1 and baiA3 genes was totally divergent. The baiA2 gene, which is part of a large bile acid-inducible operon, showed no homology with the other two genes either in the 5' or 3' direction from the polypeptide coding region, except for a 15-base-pair presumed ribosome-binding site in the 5' region. These studies strongly suggest that a gene duplication (baiA1 and baiA3) has occurred and is stably maintained in this bacterium. Images PMID:2376563

  8. Influence factors and gene expression patterns during MeJa-induced gummosis in peach.

    PubMed

    Li, Minji; Liu, Meiyan; Peng, Futian; Fang, Long

    2015-06-15

    Jasmonates (JAs) play important roles in gummosis in peach. Mechanical damage, methyl jasmonate (MeJa), and ethylene can induce gummosis on peach shoots in the field. In this study, we used MeJa (2%, w/w) to induce gummosis on current-year shoots in peach on high temperature (35°C). Based on the experimental model, we studied the influence of factors on the development of peach gummosis. Our experimental results showed that high temperature could promote gummosis development induced by MeJa. Exogenous CaCl2 treatment reduced the degree of gummosis by increasing the calcium content in shoots, which is conducive to the synthesis and maintenance of the cell wall. Using digital gene expression (DGE), 3831 differentially expressed genes were identified in the MeJa treatment versus the control. By analyzing changes in gene expression associated with cell wall degradation, genes encoding pectin methylesterase (PME) and endo-polygalacturonase (PG) were found to be significantly induced, suggesting that they are key enzymes in cell wall degradation that occurs during MeJa-induced gummosis. Genes for glycosyltransferase (GT) and cellulose synthase (CS) were also significantly upregulated by MeJa. This result suggests that MeJa treatment not only promotes the degradation of polysaccharides to destroy the cell wall, but also promotes the synthesis of new polysaccharides. We also analyzed changes in gene expression associated with sugar metabolism, senescence, and defense. MeJa treatment affected the expression of genes related to sugar metabolism and promoted plant senescence. Among the defense genes, the expression pattern of phenylalanine ammonium lyase (PAL) suggested that PAL may play an important role in protecting against the effects of MeJa treatment. Our experimental results showed that MeJa treatment can promote the biosynthesis and signal transduction of ethylene in peach shoots; they can induce gummosis on peach shoots respectively, and there are overlaps between

  9. Inducible Gene Expression in Tumors Colonized by Modified Oncolytic Vaccinia Virus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Huppertz, Sascha; Zhang, Qian; Geissinger, Ulrike; Härtl, Barbara; Gentschev, Ivaylo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Exogenous gene induction of therapeutic, diagnostic, and safety mechanisms could be a considerable improvement in oncolytic virotherapy. Here, we introduced a doxycycline-inducible promoter system (comprised of a tetracycline repressor, several promoter constructs, and a tet operator sequence) into oncolytic recombinant vaccinia viruses (rVACV), which were further characterized in detail. Experiments in cell cultures as well as in tumor-bearing mice were analyzed to determine the role of the inducible-system components. To accomplish this, we took advantage of the optical reporter construct, which resulted in the production of click-beetle luciferase as well as a red fluorescent protein. The results indicated that each of the system components could be used to optimize the induction rates and had an influence on the background expression levels. Depending on the given gene to be induced in rVACV-colonized tumors of patients, we discuss the doxycycline-inducible promoter system adjustment and further optimization. IMPORTANCE Oncolytic virotherapy of cancer can greatly benefit from the expression of heterologous genes. It is reasonable that some of those heterologous gene products could have detrimental effects either on the cancer patient or on the oncolytic virus itself if they are expressed at the wrong time or if the expression levels are too high. Therefore, exogenous control of gene expression levels by administration of a nontoxic inducer will have positive effects on the safety as well as the therapeutic outcome of oncolytic virotherapy. In addition, it paves the way for the introduction of new therapeutic genes into the genome of oncolytic viruses that could not have been tested otherwise. PMID:25056902

  10. Fine Ambient Particles Induce Oxidative Stress and Metal Binding Genes in Human Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuh-Chin T.; Li, Zhuowei; Carter, Jacqueline D.; Soukup, Joleen M.; Schwartz, David A.; Yang, Ivana V.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to pollutant particles increased respiratory morbidity and mortality. The alveolar macrophages (AMs) are one cell type in the lung directly exposed to particles. Upon contact with particles, AMs are activated and produce reactive oxygen species, but the scope of this oxidative stress response remains poorly defined. In this study, we determined the gene expression profile in human AMs exposed to particles, and sought to characterize the global response of pro- and antioxidant genes. We exposed AMs obtained by bronchoscopy from normal individuals to Chapel Hill particulate matter of 2.5-μm diameter or smaller (PM2.5; 1 μg/ml) or vehicle for 4 hours (n = 6 independent samples). mRNAs were extracted, amplified, and hybridized to Agilent human 1A microarray. Significant genes were identified by significance analysis of microarrays (false discovery rate, 10%; P ≤ 0.05) and mapped with Gene Ontology in the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery. We found 34 and 41 up- and down-regulated genes, respectively; 22 genes (∼30%) were involved in metal binding, and 11 were linked to oxidative stress, including up-regulation of five metallothionein (MT)-1 isoforms. Exogenous MT1 attenuated PM2.5-induced H2O2 release. PM2.5 premixed with MT1 stimulated less H2O2 release. Knockdown of MT1F gene increased PM2.5-induced H2O2 release. PM2.5 at 1 μg/ml did not increase H2O2 release. Mount St. Helens PM2.5 and acid-extracted Chapel Hill PM2.5, both poor in metals, did not induce MT1F or H2O2 release. Our results show that PM2.5 induced a gene expression profile prevalent with genes related to metal binding and oxidative stress in human AMs, independent of oxidative stress. Metals associated with PM may play an important role in particle-induced gene changes. PMID:19251948

  11. Fine ambient particles induce oxidative stress and metal binding genes in human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuh-Chin T; Li, Zhuowei; Carter, Jacqueline D; Soukup, Joleen M; Schwartz, David A; Yang, Ivana V

    2009-11-01

    Exposure to pollutant particles increased respiratory morbidity and mortality. The alveolar macrophages (AMs) are one cell type in the lung directly exposed to particles. Upon contact with particles, AMs are activated and produce reactive oxygen species, but the scope of this oxidative stress response remains poorly defined. In this study, we determined the gene expression profile in human AMs exposed to particles, and sought to characterize the global response of pro- and antioxidant genes. We exposed AMs obtained by bronchoscopy from normal individuals to Chapel Hill particulate matter of 2.5-microm diameter or smaller (PM(2.5); 1 microg/ml) or vehicle for 4 hours (n = 6 independent samples). mRNAs were extracted, amplified, and hybridized to Agilent human 1A microarray. Significant genes were identified by significance analysis of microarrays (false discovery rate, 10%; P < or = 0.05) and mapped with Gene Ontology in the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery. We found 34 and 41 up- and down-regulated genes, respectively; 22 genes (approximately 30%) were involved in metal binding, and 11 were linked to oxidative stress, including up-regulation of five metallothionein (MT)-1 isoforms. Exogenous MT1 attenuated PM(2.5)-induced H2O2 release. PM(2.5) premixed with MT1 stimulated less H2O2 release. Knockdown of MT1F gene increased PM(2.5)-induced H2O2 release. PM(2.5) at 1 microg/ml did not increase H2O2 release. Mount St. Helens PM(2.5) and acid-extracted Chapel Hill PM(2.5), both poor in metals, did not induce MT1F or H2O2 release. Our results show that PM(2.5) induced a gene expression profile prevalent with genes related to metal binding and oxidative stress in human AMs, independent of oxidative stress. Metals associated with PM may play an important role in particle-induced gene changes. PMID:19251948

  12. Metal-dependent SV40 viruses containing inducible enhancers from the upstream region of metallothionein genes.

    PubMed Central

    Serfling, E; Lübbe, A; Dorsch-Häsler, K; Schaffner, W

    1985-01-01

    We have isolated SV40 recombinant viruses which are dependent on heavy metal ions for efficient propagation. They were obtained after-co-transfection of enhancerless SV40 DNA (the so-called enhancer trap) with sonicated DNA from the mouse metallothionein-I (mMT-I) or human metallothionein-IIA (hMT-IIA) upstream regions. To substitute for the SV40 enhancer, these viruses have incorporated a segment of the immediate upstream region of the metallothionein genes. Two recombinant viruses of the SVMT-I type carry segments of the mMT-I gene from positions -73 to -187 and -39 to -194 inverted with respect to their natural configuration. The overlapping segment contains two of the four metal-responsive elements involved in the induction of the mMT-I gene by heavy metal ions. The SVMT-II recombinant virus contains a segment of the hMT-IIA gene from position -39 to -366 which harbors the metal- and hormone-responsive elements of the hMT-IIA gene. Insertion of the mMT-I segment downstream of a rabbit beta-globin test gene enhances beta-globin transcription upon metal ion stimulation. This shows that the immediate upstream region of the mouse metalliothionein-I gene, when detached from its TATA box, can act as an inducible enhancer. It may be generally true that the enhancer/promoters of inducible genes are composed of several regulatory sequence elements which are interspersed with constitutive elements. The number and spatial arrangement of these elements probably determines the basal versus induced level of expression. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2419129

  13. Delay-Induced Transient Increase and Heterogeneity in Gene Expression in Negatively Auto-Regulated Gene Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Maithreye, R.; Sarkar, Ram Rup; Parnaik, Veena K.; Sinha, Somdatta

    2008-01-01

    A generic feature in all intracellular biochemical processes is the time required to complete the whole sequence of reactions to yield any observable quantity-from gene expression to circadian rhythms. This widespread phenomenon points towards the importance of time delay in biological functions. Theoretically time delay is known to be the source of instability, and has been attributed to lead to oscillations or transient dynamics in several biological functions. Negative feedback loops, common in biochemical pathways, have been shown to provide stability and withstand considerable variations and random perturbations of biochemical parameters. The interaction of these two opposing factors-of instability and homeostasis-are features that are widespread in intracellular processes. To test the effect of these divergent forces in the dynamics of gene expression, we have designed and constructed simple negatively auto-regulated gene circuits consisting of a basic regulator and transcriptional repressor module, and compared it with one, which has delayed repression. We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that delayed repression induces transient increase and heterogeneity in gene expression before the gain of stability effected by the negative feedback. This design, therefore, seems to be suitable for conferring both stability and variability in cells required for adaptive response to a noisy environment. PMID:18698420

  14. CaMK4 Gene Deletion Induces Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Santulli, Gaetano; Cipolletta, Ersilia; Sorriento, Daniela; Del Giudice, Carmine; Anastasio, Antonio; Monaco, Sara; Maione, Angela Serena; Condorelli, Gianluigi; Puca, Annibale; Trimarco, Bruno; Illario, Maddalena; Iaccarino, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Background The expression of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase IV (CaMKIV) was hitherto thought to be confined to the nervous system. However, a recent genome-wide analysis indicated an association between hypertension and a single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs10491334) of the human CaMKIV gene (CaMK4), which suggests a role for this kinase in the regulation of vascular tone. Methods and Results To directly assess the role of CaMKIV in hypertension, we characterized the cardiovascular phenotype of CaMK4−/− mice. They displayed a typical hypertensive phenotype, including high blood pressure levels, cardiac hypertrophy, vascular and kidney damage, and reduced tolerance to chronic ischemia and myocardial infarction compared with wild-type littermates. Interestingly, in vitro experiments showed the ability of this kinase to activate endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Eventually, in a population study, we found that the rs10491334 variant associates with a reduction in the expression levels of CaMKIV in lymphocytes from hypertensive patients. Conclusions Taken together, our results provide evidence that CaMKIV plays a pivotal role in blood pressure regulation through the control of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity. (J Am Heart Assoc. 2012;1:e001081 doi: 10.1161/JAHA.112.001081.) PMID:23130158

  15. Rescue Effects and Underlying Mechanisms of Intragland Shh Gene Delivery on Irradiation-Induced Hyposalivation.

    PubMed

    Hai, Bo; Zhao, Qingguo; Qin, Lizheng; Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Gutti, Veera R; Liu, Fei

    2016-05-01

    Irreversible hypofunction of salivary glands is common in head and neck cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy and can only be temporarily relieved with current treatments. We found in an inducible sonic hedgehog (Shh) transgenic mouse model that transient activation of the Hedgehog pathway after irradiation rescued salivary gland function in males by preserving salivary stem/progenitor cells and parasympathetic innervation. To translate these findings into feasible clinical application, we evaluated the effects of Shh gene transfer to salivary glands of wild-type mice on irradiation-induced hyposalivation. Shh or control GFP gene was delivered by noninvasive retrograde ductal instillation of corresponding adenoviral vectors. In both male and female mice, Shh gene delivery efficiently activated Hedgehog/Gli signaling, and significantly improved stimulated saliva secretion and preserved saliva-producing acinar cells after irradiation. In addition to preserving parasympathetic innervation through induction of neurotrophic factors, Shh gene delivery also alleviated the irradiation damage of the microvasculature, likely via inducing angiogenic factors, but did not expand the progeny of cells responsive to Hedgehog/Gli signaling. These data indicate that transient activation of the Hedgehog pathway by gene delivery is promising to rescue salivary function after irradiation in both sexes, and the Hedgehog/Gli pathway may function mainly in cell nonautonomous manners to achieve the rescue effect. PMID:27021743

  16. Sugar-Dependent Gibberellin-Induced Chalcone Synthase Gene Expression in Petunia Corollas.

    PubMed Central

    Moalem-Beno, D.; Tamari, G.; Leitner-Dagan, Y.; Borochov, A.; Weiss, D.

    1997-01-01

    The induction of anthocyanin synthesis and anthocyanin biosynthetic gene expression in detached petunia (Petunia hybrida) corollas by gibberellic acid (GA3) requires sucrose. Neither sucrose nor GA3 alone can induce these processes. We found that GA3 enhances sucrose uptake by 20 to 30%, and we tested whether this is the mechanism by which the hormone induces gene expression. Changing the intracellular level of sucrose with the inhibitors p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid and vanadate did not inhibit the induction of chalcone synthase gene (chs) expression by GA3. Growing detached corollas in various sucrose concentrations did not affect the induction of the gene but did affect its level of expression and the level of anthocyanin accumulated. Only metabolic sugars promoted GA3-induced anthocyanin accumulation. Mannitol and sorbitol had no effect and 3-O-methylglucose only slightly promoted chs expression and anthocyanin accumulation. Our results do not support the suggestion that sugars act as specific signals in the activation of anthocyanin biosynthetic gene expression during petunia corolla development. We suggest that sugars are essential as general sources of carbohydrates for carbon metabolism, upon which the induction of pigmentation is dependent. PMID:12223616

  17. Liver lipid molecules induce PEPCK-C gene transcription and attenuate insulin action

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Guoxun

    2007-09-28

    Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) plays key roles in gluconeogenesis, glyceroneogenesis, and cataplerosis. Experiments were designed to examine the effects of endogenous lipid molecules from rat livers on the expression of PEPCK-C gene in primary rat hepatocytes. The lipid extracts prepared from livers of Zucker fatty, lean, and Wistar rats induced the expression levels of PEPCK-C transcripts. Insulin-mediated reduction of PEPCK-C gene expression was attenuated by the same treatment. The lipid extracts induced the relative luciferase activity of reporter gene constructs that contain a 2.2-kb 5' promoter fragment of PEPCK-C gene, but not the construct that contains only the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of its mRNA. The estimated half life of PEPCK-C transcripts in the presence of the lipid extract is the same as that in the absence of it. My results demonstrate for the first time that endogenous lipid molecules induce PEPCK-C gene transcription and attenuate insulin action in liver.

  18. Isolation of nine gene sequences induced by silica in murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Segade, F.; Claudio, E.; Wrobel, K.; Ramos, S.; Lazo, P.S.

    1995-03-01

    Macrophage activation by silica is the initial step in the development of silicosis. To identify genes that might be involved in silica-mediated activation, RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages were treated with silica for 48 h, and a subtracted cDNA library enriched for silica-induced genes (SIG) was constructed and differently screened. Nine cDNA clones (designated SIG-12, -14, -20, -41, -61, -81, -91, and -111) were partially sequenced and compared with sequences in GenBank/EMBL databases. SIG-12, -14, and -20 corresponded to the genes for ribosomal proteins L13A, L32, and L26, respectively. SIG-61 is the mouse homologue of p21 RhoC. SIG-91 is identical to the 67-kDa high-affinity laminin receptor. Four genes were not identified and are novel. All of the mRNAs corresponding to the nine cloned cDNAs were inducible by silica. Steady-state levels of mRNAs in RAW 264.7 cells treated with various macrophage activators and inducers of signal transduction pathways were determined. A complex pattern of induction and repression was found, indicating that upon phagocytosis of silica particles, many regulatory mechanisms of genes expression are simultaneously triggered. 55 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. The necrosis-inducing Phytophthora protein gene family of Phytophthora capsici is involved in pathogenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora capsici is one of the most important pathogens limiting vegetable production worldwide. Necrosis-inducing Phytophthora protein (NPP), ocurring in phylogenetically distant organisms, is phytotoxic for dicotyledonous plants, but the mechanism of action has not been established. A gene fam...

  20. MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory


    MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of water disinfection by chlorination. Several studies have demonstrated the hepatocarcinogenicity of DCA in rodents when administered in dri...

  1. Dual-responsive aggregation-induced emission-active supramolecular nanoparticles for gene delivery and bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ruijiao; Ravinathan, Screenath P; Xue, Lizhe; Li, Nan; Zhang, Yingjian; Zhou, Linzhu; Cao, Chengxi; Zhu, Xinyuan

    2016-06-28

    Dual-responsive aggregation-induced emission-active supramolecular fluorescent nanoparticles are reported, which have the ability to undergo a unique morphological transition combining with a cooperative optical variation in response to pH and light stimuli. The dynamic supramolecular nanoparticles show excellent biocompatibility and effective plasmid DNA condensation capability, further achieving efficient in vitro gene delivery and bioimaging. PMID:27251637

  2. Hyperglycemia induces iNOS gene expression and consequent nitrosative stress via JNK activation

    PubMed Central

    YANG, Peixin; CAO, Yuanning; LI, Hua

    2010-01-01

    Objective Maternal diabetes adversely impacts embryonic development. We test the hypothesis that hyperglycemia-induced JNK1/2 activation mediates iNOS induction. Study Design Levels of iNOS mRNA and nitrosylated protein were determined in cultured C57BL/6J conceptuses exposed to hyperglycemia (300 mg/dl glucose) and C57BL/6J embryos exposed to streptozotocin-induced diabetes. iNOS-luciferase activity and endogenous reactive nitrogen species were determined in transfected PYS-2 (mouse teratocarcinoma) cells exposed to hyperglycemia (450 mg/dl glucose). Results Hyperglycemia increased iNOS mRNA and SP600125, a potent JNK1/2 inhibitor, abolished this effect. Hyperglycemia increased iNOS-luciferase activities and SP600125 blocked this effect. Diabetes increased iNOS mRNA and jnk2 gene deletion abrogated this effect. Correlated with iNOS gene induction, both hyperglycemia in vitro and diabetes in vivo enhanced the production of reactive nitrogen species and increased protein nitrosylation. jnk2 gene deletion blocked diabetes-induced protein nitrosylation. Conclusion JNK1/2 activation mediates hyperglycemia-induced iNOS gene expression and consequent nitrosative stress in diabetic embryopathy. PMID:20541731

  3. Age and vitamin E-induced changes in Gene Expression Profiles of T cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    T cell is vulnerable to age associated changes and vitamin E has been shown to improve T cell functions in the old. We studied the gene expression profile of T cells to better understand the underlying mechanisms of age and vitamin E-induced changes in T cell function. Young and old C57BL mice were ...

  4. Co-silencing the mirabilis antiviral protein permits virus-induced gene silencing in Mirabilis jalapa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an attractive and rapid technique for loss of function assay that can reveal the phenotype of embryo-lethal sequences and avoids the need for time consuming transformation and regeneration processes. Among various VIGS vectors that have been explored, the tobac...

  5. EFFECTS OF DIETARY FOLATE ON ARSENIC-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Dietary Folate on Arsenic-induced Gene Expression in Mice

    Arsenic, a drinking water contaminant, is a known carcinogen. Human exposure to inorganic arsenic has been linked to tumors of skin, bladder, lung, and to a lesser extent, kidney and liver. Dietary fola...

  6. Microarray analysis of acaricide inducible gene expression in the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acaricide-inducible differential gene expression was studied in larvae of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus using a microarray-based approach. The acaricides used were: coumaphos, permethrin, ivermectin, and amitraz. The microarrays contained over 13,000 probes, having been derived from a previous...

  7. Transcriptomic sequencing reveals a set of unique genes activated by butyrate-induced histone modification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes induced by butyrate in the bovine epithelial cell using deep RNA-sequencing technology (RNA-seq), a set of unique gen...

  8. Drug-loaded nanoparticles induce gene expression in human pluripotent stem cell derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajbhiye, Virendra; Escalante, Leah; Chen, Guojun; Laperle, Alex; Zheng, Qifeng; Steyer, Benjamin; Gong, Shaoqin; Saha, Krishanu

    2013-12-01

    Tissue engineering and advanced manufacturing of human stem cells requires a suite of tools to control gene expression spatiotemporally in culture. Inducible gene expression systems offer cell-extrinsic control, typically through addition of small molecules, but small molecule inducers typically contain few functional groups for further chemical modification. Doxycycline (DXC), a potent small molecule inducer of tetracycline (Tet) transgene systems, was conjugated to a hyperbranched dendritic polymer (Boltorn H40) and subsequently reacted with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The resulting PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle exhibited pH-sensitive drug release behavior and successfully controlled gene expression in stem-cell-derived fibroblasts with a Tet-On system. While free DXC inhibited fibroblast proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticles maintained higher fibroblast proliferation levels and MMP activity. The results demonstrate that the PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle system provides an effective tool to controlling gene expression in human stem cell derivatives.Tissue engineering and advanced manufacturing of human stem cells requires a suite of tools to control gene expression spatiotemporally in culture. Inducible gene expression systems offer cell-extrinsic control, typically through addition of small molecules, but small molecule inducers typically contain few functional groups for further chemical modification. Doxycycline (DXC), a potent small molecule inducer of tetracycline (Tet) transgene systems, was conjugated to a hyperbranched dendritic polymer (Boltorn H40) and subsequently reacted with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The resulting PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle exhibited pH-sensitive drug release behavior and successfully controlled gene expression in stem-cell-derived fibroblasts with a Tet-On system. While free DXC inhibited fibroblast proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticles maintained

  9. A virus-induced gene silencing approach to understanding alkaloid metabolism in Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Liscombe, David K.; O’Connor, Sarah E.

    2011-01-01

    The anticancer agents vinblastine and vincristine are bisindole alkaloids derived from coupling vindoline and catharanthine, monoterpenoid indole alkaloids produced exclusively by Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) plants. Industrial production of vinblastine and vincristine currently relies on isolation from C. roseus leaves, a process that affords these compounds in 0.0003–0.01% yields. Metabolic engineering efforts to improve alkaloid content or provide alternative sources of the bisindole alkaloids ultimately rely on the isolation and characterization of the genes involved. Several vindoline biosynthetic genes have been isolated, and the cellular and subcellular organization of the corresponding enzymes has been well studied. However, due to the leaf-specific localization of vindoline biosynthesis, and the lack of production of this precursor in cell suspension and hairy root cultures of C. roseus, further elucidation of this pathway demands the development of reverse genetics approaches to assay gene function in planta. The bipartite pTRV vector system is a Tobacco Rattle Virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) platform that has provided efficient and effective means to assay gene function in diverse plant systems. We have developed a VIGS method to investigate gene function in C. roseus plants using the pTRV vector system. The utility of this approach in understanding gene function in C. roseus leaves is demonstrated by silencing known vindoline biosynthetic genes previously characterized in vitro. PMID:21802100

  10. Differential cellular gene expression induced by hepatitis B and C viruses.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Motoyuki; Aizaki, Hideki; Kato, Naoya; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Omata, Masao; Seki, Naohiko

    2003-01-10

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a hepatotropic virus that causes acute and chronic hepatocellular injury and hepatocellular carcinoma. To clarify how HBV proteins regulate host cellular gene expression, we used our in-house cDNA microarray and HepG2.2.15 cells, which are derived from HepG2 cells and produce all HBV proteins. Of 2304 genes investigated, several genes were differentially expressed in HepG2.2.15 cells compared with HepG2 cells. These genes included insulin-like growth factor II and alpha-fetoprotein, consistent with previous reports. Furthermore, we previously performed similar microarray analyses to clarify the effects of hepatitis C virus (HCV) proteins on host cells, using a HepG2-derivative cell line, which produces all HCV proteins. Using these two microarray results, we compared the differences in cellular gene expression induced by HBV and HCV proteins. The expression of the majority of genes investigated differed only slightly between HBV and HCV protein-producing cells. However, HBV and HCV proteins clearly regulated several genes in a reciprocal manner. Combined, these microarray results shed new light on the effects of HBV proteins on cellular gene expression and on the differences in the pathogenic activities of these two hepatitis viruses. PMID:12504104

  11. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-induced gene expression in vitro: concordance with in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Snyder-Talkington, Brandi N.; Dong, Chunlin; Zhao, Xiangyi; Dymacek, Julian; Porter, Dale W.; Wolfarth, Michael G.; Castranova, Vincent; Qian, Yong; Guo, Nancy L.

    2014-01-01

    There is a current interest in reducing the in vivo toxicity testing of nanomaterials in animals by increasing toxicity testing using in vitro cellular assays; however, toxicological results are seldom concordant between in vivo and in vitro models. This study compared global multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-induced gene expression from human lung epithelial and microvascular endothelial cells in monoculture and coculture with gene expression from mouse lungs exposed to MWCNT. Using a cutoff of 10% false discovery rate and 1.5 fold change, we determined that there were more concordant genes (gene expression both up- or downregulated in vivo and in vitro) expressed in both cell types in coculture than in monoculture. When reduced to only those genes involved in inflammation and fibrosis, known outcomes of in vivo MWCNT exposure, there were more disease-related concordant genes expressed in coculture than monoculture. Additionally, different cellular signaling pathways are activated in response to MWCNT dependent upon culturing conditions. As coculture gene expression better correlated with in vivo gene expression, we suggest that cellular cocultures may offer enhanced in vitro models for nanoparticle risk assessment and the reduction of in vivo toxicological testing. PMID:25511174

  12. Gene expression profiles of murine fatty liver induced by the administration of valproic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Ho; Hong, Il; Kim, Mingoo; Lee, Byung Hoon; Kim, Ju-Han; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Yoon, Byung-Il; Chung, Heekyoung; Kong, Gu; Lee, Mi-Ock . E-mail: molee@snu.ac.kr

    2007-04-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) has been used as anticonvulsants, however, it induces hepatotoxicity such as microvesicular steatosis and necrosis in the liver. To explore the mechanisms of VPA-induced steatosis, we profiled the gene expression patterns of the mouse liver that were altered by treatment with VPA using microarray analysis. VPA was orally administered as a single dose of 100 mg/kg (low-dose) or 1000 mg/kg (high-dose) to ICR mice and the animals were killed at 6, 24, or 72 h after treatment. Serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels were not significantly altered in the experimental animals. However, symptoms of steatosis were observed at 72 h with low-dose and at 24 h and 72 h with high-dose. After microarray data analysis, 1910 genes were selected by two-way ANOVA (P < 0.05) as VPA-responsive genes. Hierarchical clustering revealed that gene expression changes depended on the time rather than the dose of VPA treatment. Gene profiling data showed striking changes in the expression of genes associated with lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism, oncogenesis, signal transduction, and development. Functional categorization of 1156 characteristically up- and down-regulated genes (cutoff > 1.5-fold) revealed that 60 genes were involved in lipid metabolism that was interconnected with biological pathways for biosynthesis of triglyceride and cholesterol, catabolism of fatty acid, and lipid transport. This gene expression profile may be associated with the known steatogenic hepatotoxicity of VPA and it may provide useful information for prediction of hepatotoxicity of unknown chemicals or new drug candidates through pattern recognition.

  13. Functional analysis of an auxin-inducible DNA-binding protein gene.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Any; Mangeon, Amanda; Almeida-Engler, Janice; Engler, Gilbert; Van Montagu, Marc; Sachetto-Martins, Gilberto; de Oliveira, Dulce Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, several studies indicate a correlation between the phytohormone auxin and cell division. The molecular players of this signaling pathway are now being uncovered. DNA Binding Protein1 from Arabidopsis (AtDBP1) is an auxin-inducible gene able to bind DNA non-specifically. In this work the tissue-expression pattern of this gene was investigated. Promoter-GUS analysis demonstrated that the AtDBP1 promoter is active in regions exhibiting intense cell division such as meristems and nematode feeding sites. Also, the promoter expression was modulated upon incubation with cell cycle blockers, indicating a potential role in cell division for this gene. Lastly, AtDBP1 antisense plants presented a higher insensitivity to auxin, and interfered negatively with auxin-induced callus formation and reduced apical dominance. PMID:25482757

  14. Functional analysis of an auxin-inducible DNA-binding protein gene

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Any; Mangeon, Amanda; Almeida-Engler, Janice; Engler, Gilbert; Montagu, Marc Van; Sachetto-Martins, Gilberto; de Oliveira, Dulce Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, several studies indicate a correlation between the phytohormone auxin and cell division. The molecular players of this signaling pathway are now being uncovered. DNA Binding Protein1 from Arabidopsis (AtDBP1) is an auxin-inducible gene able to bind DNA non-specifically. In this work the tissue-expression pattern of this gene was investigated. Promoter-GUS analysis demonstrated that the AtDBP1 promoter is active in regions exhibiting intense cell division such as meristems and nematode feeding sites. Also, the promoter expression was modulated upon incubation with cell cycle blockers, indicating a potential role in cell division for this gene. Lastly, AtDBP1 antisense plants presented a higher insensitivity to auxin, and interfered negatively with auxin–induced callus formation and reduced apical dominance. PMID:25482757

  15. Molecular characterization of a GA-inducible gene, Cvsus1, in developing watermelon seeds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joonyul; Jun, Sung-Hoon; Kang, Hong-Gyu; Lee, Jinwon; An, Gynheung

    2002-10-31

    To understand the molecular mechanisms that control seed development, we isolated a seed-preferential gene from ESTs of developing watermelon seeds. The gene Cvsus1 encodes a protein that is 86% identical to the Vicia faba sucrose synthase expressed in developing seeds. RNA blot analysis showed that Cvsus1 was preferentially expressed in watermelon seeds. We also investigated gene expression levels both in pollinated seeds and in parthenocarpic seeds, which lack zygotic tissues. Whereas the transcript level of Cvsus1 was rapidly increased during normal seed development, the expression was not significantly increased in the parthenocarpic seeds. However, treating the parthenocarpic fruits with GA3 strongly induced Cvsus1 expression, up to the level accumulated in pollinated seeds. These results suggest that Cvsus1 is induced in maternal tissues via signals from the zygotic tissues, and that GA may be one of those signals. PMID:12442898

  16. Fast and sensitive detection of indels induced by precise gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhang; Steentoft, Catharina; Hauge, Camilla; Hansen, Lars; Thomsen, Allan Lind; Niola, Francesco; Vester-Christensen, Malene B; Frödin, Morten; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H; Bennett, Eric P

    2015-05-19

    The nuclease-based gene editing tools are rapidly transforming capabilities for altering the genome of cells and organisms with great precision and in high throughput studies. A major limitation in application of precise gene editing lies in lack of sensitive and fast methods to detect and characterize the induced DNA changes. Precise gene editing induces double-stranded DNA breaks that are repaired by error-prone non-homologous end joining leading to introduction of insertions and deletions (indels) at the target site. These indels are often small and difficult and laborious to detect by traditional methods. Here we present a method for fast, sensitive and simple indel detection that accurately defines indel sizes down to ±1 bp. The method coined IDAA for Indel Detection by Amplicon Analysis is based on tri-primer amplicon labelling and DNA capillary electrophoresis detection, and IDAA is amenable for high throughput analysis. PMID:25753669

  17. Compressive forces induce osteogenic gene expression in calvarial osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Rath, Bjoern; Nam, Jin; Knobloch, Thomas J; Lannutti, John J; Agarwal, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Bone cells and their precursors are sensitive to changes in their biomechanical environment. The importance of mechanical stimuli has been observed in bone homeostasis and osteogenesis, but the mechanisms responsible for osteogenic induction in response to mechanical signals are poorly understood. We hypothesized that compressive forces could exert an osteogenic effect on osteoblasts and act in a dose-dependent manner. To test our hypothesis, electrospun poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds were used as a 3-D microenvironment for osteoblast culture. The scaffolds provided a substrate allowing cell exposure to levels of externally applied compressive force. Pre-osteoblasts adhered, proliferated and differentiated in the scaffolds and showed extensive matrix synthesis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and increased Young's modulus (136.45+/-9.15 kPa) compared with acellular scaffolds (24.55+/-8.5 kPa). Exposure of cells to 10% compressive strain (11.81+/-0.42 kPa) resulted in a rapid induction of bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2), runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), and MAD homolog 5 (Smad5). These effects further enhanced the expression of genes and proteins required for extracellular matrix (ECM) production, such as alkaline phosphatase (Akp2), collagen type I (Col1a1), osteocalcin/bone gamma carboxyglutamate protein (OC/Bglap), osteonectin/secreted acidic cysteine-rich glycoprotein (ON/Sparc) and osteopontin/secreted phosphoprotein 1 (OPN/Spp1). Exposure of cell-scaffold constructs to 20% compressive strain (30.96+/-2.82 kPa) demonstrated that these signals are not osteogenic. These findings provide the molecular basis for the experimental and clinical observations that appropriate physical activities or microscale compressive loading can enhance fracture healing due in part to the anabolic osteogenic effects. PMID:18191137

  18. Light-induced expression of fatty acid desaturase genes

    PubMed Central

    Kis, Mihály; Zsiros, Otto; Farkas, Tibor; Wada, Hajime; Nagy, Ferenc; Gombos, Zoltán

    1998-01-01

    In cyanobacterial cells, fatty acid desaturation is one of the crucial steps in the acclimation processes to low-temperature conditions. The expression of all the four acyl lipid desaturase genes of Synechocystis PCC 6803 was studied as a function of temperature and separately as a function of light. We used cells grown at 25°C in light-activated heterotrophic growth conditions. In these cells, the production of α-linolenic acid and 18:4 fatty acids was negligible and the synthesis of γ-linolenic acid was remarkably suppressed compared with those of the cells grown photoautotrophically. The cells grown in the light in the presence of glucose showed no difference in fatty acid composition compared with cells grown photoautotrophically. The level of desC mRNA for Δ9 desaturase was not affected by either the temperature or the light. It was constitutively expressed at 25°C with and without illumination. The level of desB transcripts was negligible in the dark-grown cells and was enhanced about 10-fold by exposure of the cells to light. The maximum level of expression occurred within 15 min. The level of desA and desD mRNAs was higher in dark-grown cells than that of desB mRNA for ω3 desaturase. However, the induction of both desA and desD mRNAs for Δ12 and Δ6 desaturases, respectively, was enhanced by light about 10-fold. Rifampicin, chloramphenicol, and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea completely blocked the induction of the expression of desA, desB, and desD. Consequently, we suggest the regulatory role of light via photosynthetic processes in the induction of the expression of acyl lipid desaturases. PMID:9539715

  19. Inhibitory PAS domain protein is a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Yuichi; Cao, Renhai; Svensson, Kristian; Bertilsson, Göran; Asman, Mikael; Tanaka, Hirotoshi; Cao, Yihai; Berkenstam, Anders; Poellinger, Lorenz

    2001-11-01

    Alteration of gene expression is a crucial component of adaptive responses to hypoxia. These responses are mediated by hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs). Here we describe an inhibitory PAS (Per/Arnt/Sim) domain protein, IPAS, which is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)/PAS protein structurally related to HIFs. IPAS contains no endogenous transactivation function but demonstrates dominant negative regulation of HIF-mediated control of gene expression. Ectopic expression of IPAS in hepatoma cells selectively impairs induction of genes involved in adaptation to a hypoxic environment, notably the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene, and results in retarded tumour growth and tumour vascular density in vivo. In mice, IPAS was predominantly expressed in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and in corneal epithelium of the eye. Expression of IPAS in the cornea correlates with low levels of expression of the VEGF gene under hypoxic conditions. Application of an IPAS antisense oligonucleotide to the mouse cornea induced angiogenesis under normal oxygen conditions, and demonstrated hypoxia-dependent induction of VEGF gene expression in hypoxic corneal cells. These results indicate a previously unknown mechanism for negative regulation of angiogenesis and maintenance of an avascular phenotype.

  20. Naked gene therapy of hepatocyte growth factor for dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kanbe, Takamasa |; Murai, Rie; Mukoyama, Tomoyuki; Murawaki, Yoshiyuki |; Hashiguchi, Ko-ichi; Yoshida, Yoko; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Harada, Ken-ichi; Yashima, Kazuo; Nishimuki, Eiji; Shabana, Noriko; Kishimoto, Yukihiro; Kojyo, Haruhiko; Miura, Kunihiko; Kawasaki, Hironaka; Murawaki, Yoshikazu; Shiota, Goshi . E-mail: gshiota@grape.med.tottori-u.ac.jp

    2006-07-14

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is progressive and relapsing disease. To explore the therapeutic effects of naked gene therapy of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on UC, the SR{alpha} promoter driving HGF gene was intrarectally administered to the mice in which colitis was induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Expression of the transgene was seen in surface epithelium, lamina propria, and muscularis mucosae. The HGF-treated mice showed reduced colonic mucosal damage and increased body weights, compared with control mice (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). The HGF-treated mice displayed increased number of PCNA-positive cells and decreased number of apoptotic cells than in control mice (P < 0.01, each). Phosphorylated AKT was dramatically increased after HGF gene administration, however, phosphorylated ERK1/2 was not altered. Microarray analysis revealed that HGF induced expression of proliferation- and apoptosis-associated genes. These data suggest that naked HGF gene delivery causes therapeutic effects through regulation of many downstream genes.

  1. A Foxtail mosaic virus Vector for Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Maize1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Yu; Kernodle, Bliss M.; Hill, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Plant viruses have been widely used as vectors for foreign gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). A limited number of viruses have been developed into viral vectors for the purposes of gene expression or VIGS in monocotyledonous plants, and among these, the tripartite viruses Brome mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus have been shown to induce VIGS in maize (Zea mays). We describe here a new DNA-based VIGS system derived from Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV), a monopartite virus that is able to establish systemic infection and silencing of endogenous maize genes homologous to gene fragments inserted into the FoMV genome. To demonstrate VIGS applications of this FoMV vector system, four genes, phytoene desaturase (functions in carotenoid biosynthesis), lesion mimic22 (encodes a key enzyme of the porphyrin pathway), iojap (functions in plastid development), and brown midrib3 (caffeic acid O-methyltransferase), were silenced and characterized in the sweet corn line Golden × Bantam. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the FoMV infectious clone establishes systemic infection in maize inbred lines, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and green foxtail (Setaria viridis), indicating the potential wide applications of this viral vector system for functional genomics studies in maize and other monocots. PMID:27208311

  2. Functional study of a salt-inducible TaSR gene in Triticum aestivum.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Li; Cui, Wei-Na; Zhao, Qian; Zhao, Jing; Hou, Xiao-Na; Li, Dong-Yan; Chen, Zhao-Liang; Shen, Yin-Zhu; Huang, Zhan-Jing

    2016-01-01

    The gene expression chip of a salt-tolerant wheat mutant under salt stress was used to clone a salt-induced gene with unknown functions. This gene was designated as TaSR (Triticum aestivum salt-response gene) and submitted to GenBank under accession number EF580107. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis showed that gene expression was induced by salt stress. Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa) plants expressing TaSR presented higher salt tolerance than the controls, whereas AtSR mutant and RNA interference rice plants were more sensitive to salt. Under salt stress, TaSR reduced Na(+) concentration and improved cellular K(+) and Ca(2+) concentrations; this gene was also localized on the cell membrane. β-Glucuronidase (GUS) staining and GUS fluorescence quantitative determination were conducted through fragmentation cloning of the TaSR promoter. Salt stress-responsive elements were detected at 588-1074 bp upstream of the start codon. GUS quantitative tests of the full-length promoter in different tissues indicated that promoter activity was highest in the leaf under salt stress. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and yeast two-hybrid screening further showed the correlation of TaSR with TaPRK and TaKPP. In vitro phosphorylation of TaSR and TaPRK2697 showed that TaPRK2697 did not phosphorylate TaSR. This study revealed that the novel TaSR may be used to improve plant tolerance to salt stress. PMID:25855206

  3. Heterogeneity of epigenetic changes at ischemia/reperfusion- and endotoxin-induced acute kidney injury genes

    PubMed Central

    Mar, Daniel; Gharib, Sina A.; Zager, Richard A.; Johnson, Ali; Denisenko, Oleg; Bomsztyk, Karol

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant gene expression is a molecular hallmark of acute kidney injury (AKI). Since epigenetic processes control gene expression in a cell- and environment-defined manner, understanding the epigenetic pathways that regulate genes altered by AKI may open vital new insights into the complexities of disease pathogenesis and identify possible therapeutic targets. Here we used matrix chromatin immunoprecipitation and integrative analysis to study twenty key permissive and repressive epigenetic histone marks at transcriptionally induced Tnf, Ngal, Kim-1 and Icam-1 genes in mouse models of AKI; unilateral renal ischemia/reperfusion, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and their synergistically injurious combination. Results revealed unexpected heterogeneity of transcriptional and epigenetic responses. Tnf and Ngal were transcriptionally upregulated in response to both treatments individually, and to combination treatment. Kim-1 was induced by ischemia/reperfusion and Icam-1 by LPS only. Epigenetic alterations at these genes exhibited distinct time-dependent changes that shared some similarities, such as reduction in repressive histone modifications, but also had major ischemia/reperfusion vs. endotoxin differences. Thus, diversity of changes at AKI genes in response to different insults indicates involvement of several epigenetic pathways. This could be exploited pharmacologically through rational-drug design to alter the course and improve clinical outcomes of this syndrome. PMID:26061546

  4. Heterogeneity of epigenetic changes at ischemia/reperfusion- and endotoxin-induced acute kidney injury genes.

    PubMed

    Mar, Daniel; Gharib, Sina A; Zager, Richard A; Johnson, Ali; Denisenko, Oleg; Bomsztyk, Karol

    2015-10-01

    Aberrant gene expression is a molecular hallmark of acute kidney injury (AKI). As epigenetic processes control gene expression in a cell- and environment-defined manner, understanding the epigenetic pathways that regulate genes altered by AKI may open vital new insights into the complexities of disease pathogenesis and identify possible therapeutic targets. Here we used matrix chromatin immunoprecipitation and integrative analysis to study 20 key permissive and repressive epigenetic histone marks at transcriptionally induced Tnf, Ngal, Kim-1, and Icam-1 genes in mouse models of AKI; unilateral renal ischemia/reperfusion, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and their synergistically injurious combination. Results revealed unexpected heterogeneity of transcriptional and epigenetic responses. Tnf and Ngal were transcriptionally upregulated in response to both treatments individually, and to combination treatment. Kim-1 was induced by ischemia/reperfusion and Icam-1 by LPS only. Epigenetic alterations at these genes exhibited distinct time-dependent changes that shared some similarities, such as reduction in repressive histone modifications, and also had major ischemia/reperfusion versus endotoxin differences. Thus, diversity of changes at AKI genes in response to different insults indicates involvement of several epigenetic pathways. This could be exploited pharmacologically through rational-drug design to alter the course and improve clinical outcomes of this syndrome. PMID:26061546

  5. UVB-induced gene expression in the skin of Xiphophorus maculatus Jp 163 B☆

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kuan; Boswell, Mikki; Walter, Dylan J.; Downs, Kevin P.; Gaston-Pravia, Kimberly; Garcia, Tzintzuni; Shen, Yingjia; Mitchell, David L.; Walter, Ronald B.

    2014-01-01

    Xiphophorus fish and interspecies hybrids represent long-standing models to study the genetics underlying spontaneous and induced tumorigenesis. The recent release of the Xiphophorus maculatus genome sequence will allow global genetic regulation studies of genes involved in the inherited susceptibility to UVB-induced melanoma within select backcross hybrids. As a first step toward this goal, we report results of an RNA-Seq approach to identify genes and pathways showing modulated transcription within the skin of X. maculatus Jp 163 B upon UVB exposure. X. maculatus Jp 163 B were exposed to various doses of UVB followed by RNA-Seq analysis at each dose to investigate overall gene expression in each sample. A total of 357 genes with a minimum expression change of 4-fold (p-adj < 0.05) were identified as responsive to UVB. The molecular genetic response of Xiphophorus skin to UVB exposure permitted assessment of; (1) the basal expression level of each transcript for each skin sample, (2) the changes in expression levels for each gene in the transcriptome upon exposure to increasing doses of UVB, and (3) clusters of genes that exhibit similar patterns of change in expression upon UVB exposure. These data provide a foundation for understanding the molecular genetic response of fish skin to UVB exposure. PMID:24556253

  6. Foxtail Mosaic Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Monocot Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Xie, Ke; Jia, Qi; Zhao, Jinping; Chen, Tianyuan; Li, Huangai; Wei, Xiang; Diao, Xianmin; Hong, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful technique to study gene function in plants. However, very few VIGS vectors are available for monocot plants. Here we report that Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV) can be engineered as an effective VIGS system to induce efficient silencing of endogenous genes in monocot plants including barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum) and foxtail millet (Setaria italica). This is evidenced by FoMV-based silencing of phytoene desaturase (PDS) and magnesium chelatase in barley, of PDS and Cloroplastos alterados1 in foxtail millet and wheat, and of an additional gene IspH in foxtail millet. Silencing of these genes resulted in photobleached or chlorosis phenotypes in barley, wheat, and foxtail millet. Furthermore, our FoMV-based gene silencing is the first VIGS system reported for foxtail millet, an important C4 model plant. It may provide an efficient toolbox for high-throughput functional genomics in economically important monocot crops. PMID:27225900

  7. A Foxtail mosaic virus Vector for Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Maize.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yu; Zhang, Chunquan; Kernodle, Bliss M; Hill, John H; Whitham, Steven A

    2016-06-01

    Plant viruses have been widely used as vectors for foreign gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). A limited number of viruses have been developed into viral vectors for the purposes of gene expression or VIGS in monocotyledonous plants, and among these, the tripartite viruses Brome mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus have been shown to induce VIGS in maize (Zea mays). We describe here a new DNA-based VIGS system derived from Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV), a monopartite virus that is able to establish systemic infection and silencing of endogenous maize genes homologous to gene fragments inserted into the FoMV genome. To demonstrate VIGS applications of this FoMV vector system, four genes, phytoene desaturase (functions in carotenoid biosynthesis), lesion mimic22 (encodes a key enzyme of the porphyrin pathway), iojap (functions in plastid development), and brown midrib3 (caffeic acid O-methyltransferase), were silenced and characterized in the sweet corn line Golden × Bantam. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the FoMV infectious clone establishes systemic infection in maize inbred lines, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and green foxtail (Setaria viridis), indicating the potential wide applications of this viral vector system for functional genomics studies in maize and other monocots. PMID:27208311

  8. Characterization of Chemically Induced Liver Injuries Using Gene Co-Expression Modules

    PubMed Central

    Tawa, Gregory J.; AbdulHameed, Mohamed Diwan M.; Yu, Xueping; Kumar, Kamal; Ippolito, Danielle L.; Lewis, John A.; Stallings, Jonathan D.; Wallqvist, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Liver injuries due to ingestion or exposure to chemicals and industrial toxicants pose a serious health risk that may be hard to assess due to a lack of non-invasive diagnostic tests. Mapping chemical injuries to organ-specific damage and clinical outcomes via biomarkers or biomarker panels will provide the foundation for highly specific and robust diagnostic tests. Here, we have used DrugMatrix, a toxicogenomics database containing organ-specific gene expression data matched to dose-dependent chemical exposures and adverse clinical pathology assessments in Sprague Dawley rats, to identify groups of co-expressed genes (modules) specific to injury endpoints in the liver. We identified 78 such gene co-expression modules associated with 25 diverse injury endpoints categorized from clinical pathology, organ weight changes, and histopathology. Using gene expression data associated with an injury condition, we showed that these modules exhibited different patterns of activation characteristic of each injury. We further showed that specific module genes mapped to 1) known biochemical pathways associated with liver injuries and 2) clinically used diagnostic tests for liver fibrosis. As such, the gene modules have characteristics of both generalized and specific toxic response pathways. Using these results, we proposed three gene signature sets characteristic of liver fibrosis, steatosis, and general liver injury based on genes from the co-expression modules. Out of all 92 identified genes, 18 (20%) genes have well-documented relationships with liver disease, whereas the rest are novel and have not previously been associated with liver disease. In conclusion, identifying gene co-expression modules associated with chemically induced liver injuries aids in generating testable hypotheses and has the potential to identify putative biomarkers of adverse health effects. PMID:25226513

  9. Novel drought-inducible genes in the highly drought-tolerant cowpea: cloning of cDNAs and analysis of the expression of the corresponding genes.

    PubMed

    Iuchi, S; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, K; Urao, T; Terao, T; Shinozaki, K

    1996-12-01

    Ten cDNAs of genes that were induced by dehydration stress were cloned by differential screening from the highly drought-tolerant legume, cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), a major crop in West Africa. The clones were collectively named CPRD (cowpea clones responsive to dehydration). Northern blot analysis revealed that nine of the CPRD genes were induced by dehydration stress, but the timing of induction of mRNA synthesis varied among the CPRD genes. We analyzed the effects of other environmental stresses on the expression of the CPRD8, CPRD14 and CPRD22 genes, and we found that these genes were strongly induced by high-salinity stress but not by cold or heat stress. Drought-stressed cowpea plants accumulated abscisic acid (ABA) to a level that was 160 times higher than that in unstressed plants. The CPRD8 and CPRD22 genes were induced to a significant extent by the application of exogenous ABA but the CPRD14 gene was not. These results indicate the existence of at least two signal-transduction pathways between the detection of water stress and the expression of CPRD genes in cowpea. Sequence analysis of CPRD8 and CPRD22 cDNAs revealed that they encoded putative proteins that were related to old yellow enzyme and group 2 LEA proteins, respectively. The protein encoded by CPRD14 exhibited sequence homology to dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR) and vestitone reductase (VR). Old yellow enzyme, DFR and VR have not been identified as drought-inducible proteins in other plants, whereas LEA genes have been well characterized as drought-inducible genes. The various gene products might function to protect cells from environmental stress. PMID:9032963

  10. β-Cryptoxanthin Alleviates Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis by Suppressing Inflammatory Gene Expression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kobori, Masuko; Ni, Yinhua; Takahashi, Yumiko; Watanabe, Natsumi; Sugiura, Minoru; Ogawa, Kazunori; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Kaneko, Shuichi; Naito, Shigehiro; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2014-01-01

    Recent nutritional epidemiological surveys showed that serum β-cryptoxanthin inversely associates with the risks for insulin resistance and liver dysfunction. Consumption of β-cryptoxanthin possibly prevents nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which is suggested to be caused by insulin resistance and oxidative stress from nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. To evaluate the effect of β-cryptoxanthin on diet-induced NASH, we fed a high-cholesterol and high-fat diet (CL diet) with or without 0.003% β-cryptoxanthin to C56BL/6J mice for 12 weeks. After feeding, β-cryptoxanthin attenuated fat accumulation, increases in Kupffer and activated stellate cells, and fibrosis in CL diet-induced NASH in the mice. Comprehensive gene expression analysis showed that although β-cryptoxanthin histochemically reduced steatosis, it was more effective in inhibiting inflammatory gene expression change in NASH. β-Cryptoxanthin reduced the alteration of expression of genes associated with cell death, inflammatory responses, infiltration and activation of macrophages and other leukocytes, quantity of T cells, and free radical scavenging. However, it showed little effect on the expression of genes related to cholesterol and other lipid metabolism. The expression of markers of M1 and M2 macrophages, T helper cells, and cytotoxic T cells was significantly induced in NASH and reduced by β-cryptoxanthin. β-Cryptoxanthin suppressed the expression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inducible and/or TNFα-inducible genes in NASH. Increased levels of the oxidative stress marker thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were reduced by β-cryptoxanthin in NASH. Thus, β-cryptoxanthin suppresses inflammation and the resulting fibrosis probably by primarily suppressing the increase and activation of macrophages and other immune cells. Reducing oxidative stress is likely to be a major mechanism of inflammation and injury suppression in the livers of mice with NASH. PMID:24858832

  11. Radiation-Inducible Caspase-8 Gene Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurushima, Hideo Yuan Xuan; Dillehay, Larry E.; Leong, Kam W.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: Patients with malignant gliomas have a poor prognosis. To explore a novel and more effective approach for the treatment of patients with malignant gliomas, we designed a strategy that combines caspase-8 (CSP8) gene therapy and radiation treatment (RT). In addition, the specificity of the combined therapy was investigated to decrease the unpleasant effects experienced by the surrounding normal tissue. Methods and Materials: We constructed the plasmid pEGR-green fluorescence protein that included the radiation-inducible early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1) promoter and evaluated its characteristics. The pEGR-CSP8 was constructed and included the Egr-1 promoter and CSP8 complementary DNA. Assays that evaluated the apoptosis inducibility and cytotoxicity caused by CSP8 gene therapy combined with RT were performed using U251 and U87 glioma cells. The pEGR-CSP8 was transfected into the subcutaneous U251 glioma cells of nude mice by means of in vivo electroporation. The in vivo effects of CSP8 gene therapy combined with RT were evaluated. Results: The Egr-1 promoter yielded a better response with fractionated RT than with single-dose RT. In the assay of apoptosis inducibility and cytotoxicity, pEGR-CSP8 showed response for RT. The pEGR-CSP8 combined with RT is capable of inducing cell death effectively. In mice treated with pEGR-CSP8 and RT, apoptotic cells were detected in pathologic sections, and a significant difference was observed in tumor volumes. Conclusions: Our results indicate that radiation-inducible gene therapy may have great potential because this can be spatially or temporally controlled by exogenous RT and is safe and specific.

  12. GATA2 Mediates Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone-Induced Transcriptional Activation of the Thyrotropin β Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohba, Kenji; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Matsushita, Akio; Iwaki, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Shingo; Ishizuka, Keiko; Misawa, Hiroko; Oki, Yutaka; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2011-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) activates not only the secretion of thyrotropin (TSH) but also the transcription of TSHβ and α-glycoprotein (αGSU) subunit genes. TSHβ expression is maintained by two transcription factors, Pit1 and GATA2, and is negatively regulated by thyroid hormone (T3). Our prior studies suggest that the main activator of the TSHβ gene is GATA2, not Pit1 or unliganded T3 receptor (TR). In previous studies on the mechanism of TRH-induced activation of the TSHβ gene, the involvements of Pit1 and TR have been investigated, but the role of GATA2 has not been clarified. Using kidney-derived CV1 cells and pituitary-derived GH3 and TαT1 cells, we demonstrate here that TRH signaling enhances GATA2-dependent activation of the TSHβ promoter and that TRH-induced activity is abolished by amino acid substitution in the GATA2-Zn finger domain or mutation of GATA-responsive element in the TSHβ gene. In CV1 cells transfected with TRH receptor expression plasmid, GATA2-dependent transactivation of αGSU and endothelin-1 promoters was enhanced by TRH. In the gel shift assay, TRH signal potentiated the DNA-binding capacity of GATA2. While inhibition by T3 is dominant over TRH-induced activation, unliganded TR or the putative negative T3-responsive element are not required for TRH-induced stimulation. Studies using GH3 cells showed that TRH-induced activity of the TSHβ promoter depends on protein kinase C but not the mitogen-activated protein kinase, suggesting that the signaling pathway is different from that in the prolactin gene. These results indicate that GATA2 is the principal mediator of the TRH signaling pathway in TSHβ expression. PMID:21533184

  13. Coordinated induction of Nrf2 target genes protects against iron nitrilotriacetate (FeNTA)-induced nephrotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Yuji; Aleksunes, Lauren M. |; Goedken, Michael J.; Chen, Chuan; Reisman, Scott A.; Manautou, Jose E.; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2008-09-15

    The iron chelate, ferric nitrilotriacetate (FeNTA), induces acute proximal tubular necrosis as a consequence of lipid peroxidation and oxidative tissue damage. Chronic exposure of FeNTA leads to a high incidence of renal adenocarcinomas in rodents. NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that is activated by oxidative stress and electrophiles, and regulates the basal and inducible expression of numerous detoxifying and antioxidant genes. To determine the roles of Nrf2 in regulating renal gene expression and protecting against oxidative stress-induced kidney damage, wild-type and Nrf2-null mice were administered FeNTA. Renal Nrf2 protein translocated to the nucleus at 6h after FeNTA treatment. FeNTA increased mRNA levels of Nrf2 target genes, including NQO1, GCLC, GSTpi1/2, Mrp1, 2, and 4 in kidneys from wild-type mice, but not Nrf2-null mice. Protein expression of NQO1, a prototypical Nrf2 target gene, was increased in wild-type mice, with no change in Nrf2-null mice. FeNTA produced more nephrotoxicity in Nrf2-null mice than wild-type mice as indicated by higher serum urea nitrogen and creatinine levels, as more urinary NAG, stronger 4-hydroxynonenal protein adduct staining, and more extensive proximal tubule damage. Furthermore, pretreatment with CDDO-Im, a potent small molecule Nrf2 activator, protected mice against FeNTA-induced renal toxicity. Collectively, these results suggest that activation of Nrf2 protects mouse kidneys from FeNTA-induced oxidative stress damage by coordinately up-regulating the expression of cytoprotective genes.

  14. Functional analysis of the TMPRSS2:ERG fusion gene in cisplatin‑induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junqi; Chi, Linfeng; Chen, Zhanghui; Lu, Xianghong; Xiao, Suping; Zhang, Guanglin; Luo, Jindan; Chen, Ge-Ming; Yang, Jun

    2016-04-01

    The TMPRSS2:E‑twenty‑six (ETS) gene fusion occurs frequently in a high proportion of patients with prostate cancer (PCa) in Western countries, and the aberrant expression of TMPRSS2: v‑ETS avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog (ERG), the most common form of the corresponding protein, can regulate cell migration and contribute to tumor invasion and metastasis. However, its association with other cellular events, and in particular, cell death, remain unknown. To examine the function of such fusion genes, an expression plasmid containing the TMPRSS2:ERG (T1/E5) sequence (ΔERG) from a patient sample was constructed and transiently transfected into DU145 cells, which do not express the fusion gene. It was found that the overexpression of ΔERG significantly inhibited the ability of cisplatin to induce apoptosis in DU145 cells. By contrast, VCaP cells, which do contain TMPRSS2:ERG, were sensitized to cisplatin‑induced apoptosis through siRNA inhibition of the fusion gene. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, a stable cell line expressing the ΔERG gene was constructed. Expression of ΔERG did not affect cell migration, but did protect cells from DNA damage and apoptosis induced by cisplatin. Furthermore, knockdown of ΔERG by short interfering RNA resulted in cells regaining their sensitivity to cisplatin. Finally, the gene coding for activating transcription factor 5, which is important for cell survival, may be upregulated by ΔERG. Taken together, these data point to a new function of the TMPRSS2:ERG fusion gene in regulating the apoptotic pathway. PMID:26935606

  15. Barcode Sequencing Screen Identifies SUB1 as a Regulator of Yeast Pheromone Inducible Genes.

    PubMed

    Sliva, Anna; Kuang, Zheng; Meluh, Pamela B; Boeke, Jef D

    2016-01-01

    The yeast pheromone response pathway serves as a valuable model of eukaryotic mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and transcription of their downstream targets. Here, we describe application of a screening method combining two technologies: fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and barcode analysis by sequencing (Bar-Seq). Using this screening method, and pFUS1-GFP as a reporter for MAPK pathway activation, we readily identified mutants in known mating pathway components. In this study, we also include a comprehensive analysis of the FUS1 induction properties of known mating pathway mutants by flow cytometry, featuring single cell analysis of each mutant population. We also characterized a new source of false positives resulting from the design of this screen. Additionally, we identified a deletion mutant, sub1Δ, with increased basal expression of pFUS1-GFP. Here, in the first ChIP-Seq of Sub1, our data shows that Sub1 binds to the promoters of about half the genes in the genome (tripling the 991 loci previously reported), including the promoters of several pheromone-inducible genes, some of which show an increase upon pheromone induction. Here, we also present the first RNA-Seq of a sub1Δ mutant; the majority of genes have no change in RNA, but, of the small subset that do, most show decreased expression, consistent with biochemical studies implicating Sub1 as a positive transcriptional regulator. The RNA-Seq data also show that certain pheromone-inducible genes are induced less in the sub1Δ mutant relative to the wild type, supporting a role for Sub1 in regulation of mating pathway genes. The sub1Δ mutant has increased basal levels of a small subset of other genes besides FUS1, including IMD2 and FIG1, a gene encoding an integral membrane protein necessary for efficient mating. PMID:26837954

  16. Barcode Sequencing Screen Identifies SUB1 as a Regulator of Yeast Pheromone Inducible Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sliva, Anna; Kuang, Zheng; Meluh, Pamela B.; Boeke, Jef D.

    2016-01-01

    The yeast pheromone response pathway serves as a valuable model of eukaryotic mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and transcription of their downstream targets. Here, we describe application of a screening method combining two technologies: fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and barcode analysis by sequencing (Bar-Seq). Using this screening method, and pFUS1-GFP as a reporter for MAPK pathway activation, we readily identified mutants in known mating pathway components. In this study, we also include a comprehensive analysis of the FUS1 induction properties of known mating pathway mutants by flow cytometry, featuring single cell analysis of each mutant population. We also characterized a new source of false positives resulting from the design of this screen. Additionally, we identified a deletion mutant, sub1Δ, with increased basal expression of pFUS1-GFP. Here, in the first ChIP-Seq of Sub1, our data shows that Sub1 binds to the promoters of about half the genes in the genome (tripling the 991 loci previously reported), including the promoters of several pheromone-inducible genes, some of which show an increase upon pheromone induction. Here, we also present the first RNA-Seq of a sub1Δ mutant; the majority of genes have no change in RNA, but, of the small subset that do, most show decreased expression, consistent with biochemical studies implicating Sub1 as a positive transcriptional regulator. The RNA-Seq data also show that certain pheromone-inducible genes are induced less in the sub1Δ mutant relative to the wild type, supporting a role for Sub1 in regulation of mating pathway genes. The sub1Δ mutant has increased basal levels of a small subset of other genes besides FUS1, including IMD2 and FIG1, a gene encoding an integral membrane protein necessary for efficient mating. PMID:26837954

  17. Gene trapping identifies a putative tumor suppressor and a new inducer of cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Haendeler, Judith; Lukosz, Margarete; Sturm, Karsten; Melchner, Harald von; Altschmied, Joachim

    2008-11-28

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF{alpha}) is a pleiotropic cytokine involved in apoptotic cell death, cellular proliferation, differentiation, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. In tumors it is secreted by tumor associated macrophages and can have both pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects. To identify genes regulated by TNF{alpha}, we performed a gene trap screen in the mammary carcinoma cell line MCF-7 and recovered 64 unique, TNF{alpha}-induced gene trap integration sites. Among these were the genes coding for the zinc finger protein ZC3H10 and for the transcription factor grainyhead-like 3 (GRHL3). In line with the dual effects of TNF{alpha} on tumorigenesis, we found that ZC3H10 inhibits anchorage independent growth in soft agar suggesting a tumor suppressor function, whereas GRHL3 strongly stimulated the migration of endothelial cells which is consistent with an angiogenic, pro-tumorigenic function.

  18. Inducible gene expression from the plastid genome by a synthetic riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Verhounig, Andreas; Karcher, Daniel; Bock, Ralph

    2010-04-01

    Riboswitches are natural RNA sensors that regulate gene expression in response to ligand binding. Riboswitches have been identified in prokaryotes and eukaryotes but are unknown in organelles (mitochondria and plastids). Here we have tested the possibility to engineer riboswitches for plastids (chloroplasts), a genetic system that largely relies on translational control of gene expression. To this end, we have used bacterial riboswitches and modified them in silico to meet the requirements of translational regulation in plastids. These engineered switches were then tested for functionality in vivo by stable transformation of the tobacco chloroplast genome. We report the identification of a synthetic riboswitch that functions as an efficient translational regulator of gene expression in plastids in response to its exogenously applied ligand theophylline. This riboswitch provides a novel tool for plastid genome engineering that facilitates the tightly regulated inducible expression of chloroplast genes and transgenes and thus has wide applications in functional genomics and biotechnology. PMID:20308585

  19. NGF deprivation-induced gene expression: after ten years, where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Freeman, Robert S; Burch, Robert L; Crowder, Robert J; Lomb, David J; Schoell, Matthew C; Straub, Jennifer A; Xie, Liang

    2004-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is required for the survival of developing sympathetic and sensory neurons. In the absence of NGF, these neurons undergo protein synthesis-dependent apoptosis. Ten years have gone by since the first reports of specific genes being upregulated during NGF deprivation-induced cell death. Over the last decade, a few additional genes (DP5, Bim, SM-20) have been added to a list that began with cyclin D1 and c-jun. In this chapter, we discuss the evidence that these genes act as regulators of neuronal cell death. We also suggest a hypothesis for how one gene, SM-20, may function to suppress a self-protection mechanism in NGF-deprived neurons. PMID:14699960

  20. Immunogenic response induced by wzm and wzt gene deletion mutants from Brucella abortus S19.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Ran; Yan, Guang-Mou; Zhang, Rui; Lang, Xu-Long; Yang, Yan-Ling; Li, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Si; Qian, Jing; Wang, Xing-Long

    2014-02-01

    Brucellosis is an infectious disease affecting humans and animals worldwide. Effective methods of control include inducing immunity in animals by vaccination and elimination. Brucella abortus S19 is one of the popular vaccines for control of cattle brucellosis, as it has low virulence. In this paper, allelic exchange plasmids of wzm and wzt genes were constructed and partially knocked out to evaluate the effects on the induction of immunity to Brucella abortus S19 mutants. Cytokine secretion in vitro, INF-γ induction in vivo and antibody dynamics were evaluated. These data suggested that the immunity-eliciting ability of the wzm and wzt gene deletion mutants was similar, although reduced compared with the S19 strain. The results demonstrated that the wzt gene may be more important in the regulation of the induction of immunity than the wzm gene. PMID:24247358

  1. Inducible gene expression from the plastid genome by a synthetic riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Verhounig, Andreas; Karcher, Daniel; Bock, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Riboswitches are natural RNA sensors that regulate gene expression in response to ligand binding. Riboswitches have been identified in prokaryotes and eukaryotes but are unknown in organelles (mitochondria and plastids). Here we have tested the possibility to engineer riboswitches for plastids (chloroplasts), a genetic system that largely relies on translational control of gene expression. To this end, we have used bacterial riboswitches and modified them in silico to meet the requirements of translational regulation in plastids. These engineered switches were then tested for functionality in vivo by stable transformation of the tobacco chloroplast genome. We report the identification of a synthetic riboswitch that functions as an efficient translational regulator of gene expression in plastids in response to its exogenously applied ligand theophylline. This riboswitch provides a novel tool for plastid genome engineering that facilitates the tightly regulated inducible expression of chloroplast genes and transgenes and thus has wide applications in functional genomics and biotechnology. PMID:20308585

  2. The Xenopus Emx genes identify presumptive dorsal telencephalon and are induced by head organizer signals.

    PubMed

    Pannese, M; Lupo, G; Kablar, B; Boncinelli, E; Barsacchi, G; Vignali, R

    1998-04-01

    We have isolated and studied the expression pattern of Xemx1 and Xemx2 genes in Xenopus laevis. Xemx genes are the homologues of mouse Emx genes, related to Drosophila empty spiracles. They are expressed in selected regions of the developing brain, particularly in the telencephalon, and, outside the brain, in the otic vesicles, olfactory placodes, visceral arches and the developing excretory system. We also report on experiments concerning the tissue and molecular signals responsible for their activation in competent ectoderm. Xemx genes are activated in ectoderm conjugated with head organizer tissue, but not with tail organizer tissue. Furthermore, they are not activated in animal cap either by noggin or by Xnr3, thus suggesting that a different inducer or the integration of several signals may be responsible for their activation. PMID:9545539

  3. Noise-induced multistability in the regulation of cancer by genes and pseudogenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, K. G.; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2016-07-01

    We extend a previously introduced model of stochastic gene regulation of cancer to a nonlinear case having both gene and pseudogene messenger RNAs (mRNAs) self-regulated. The model consists of stochastic Boolean genetic elements and possesses noise-induced multistability (multimodality). We obtain analytical expressions for probabilities for the case of constant but finite number of microRNA molecules which act as a noise source for the competing gene and pseudogene mRNAs. The probability distribution functions display both the global bistability regime as well as even-odd number oscillations for a certain range of model parameters. Statistical characteristics of the mRNA's level fluctuations are evaluated. The obtained results of the extended model advance our understanding of the process of stochastic gene and pseudogene expressions that is crucial in regulation of cancer.

  4. Marek's disease virus challenge induced immune-related gene expression and chicken repeat 1 (CR1) methylation alterations in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) challenge induces lymphoma in susceptible chickens. Host genes, especially immune related genes, are activated by the virus. DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that governs gene transcription. In the present study, we found that expression of signal transducer and...

  5. Inducibility of the avidin gene by progesterone is suppressed during estrogen-induced cytodifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Joensuu, T; Niemelä, A; Kunnas, T; Salomaa, S; Alho, H; Vilja, P; Ylikomi, T; Kulomaa, M; Tuohimaa, P

    1992-12-01

    We have studied epithelial differentiation of the chick oviduct as induced by diethylstilbestrol (DES) and 17 beta-estradiol (E2). The proportion of goblet cells in the oviduct was slightly higher after E2 than after DES treatment. Also avidin induction by progesterone was stronger following DES than E2 priming. In the estrogen pretreated oviduct epithelium, avidin expression was induced by progesterone in the surface epithelial cells, protodifferentiated gland cells and tubular gland cells, but not in goblet cells. During prolonged estrogen treatment, however, the inducibility of avidin by progesterone ceased in tubular gland cells but not in surface epithelial cells. The estrogen action on the expression of avidin could be explained by estrogen-induced terminal differentiation of the epithelial gland cells or by a direct effect of estrogen on the progesterone action, for instance interaction of estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor in the regulation of transcription. PMID:1472452

  6. Atypical antipsychotics induce both proinflammatory and adipogenic gene expression in human adipocytes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Sárvári, Anitta K.; Veréb, Zoltán; Uray, Iván P.; Fésüs, László; Balajthy, Zoltán

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Antipsychotics modulate the expression of adipogenic genes in human adipocytes. • Secretion of proinflammatory cytokine IL8 and MCP-1 is induced by antipsychotics. • Adipocyte-dependent inflammatory abnormality could develop during chronic treatment. • Infiltrated macrophages would further enhance proinflammatory cytokine production. - Abstract: Schizophrenia requires lifelong treatment, potentially causing systemic changes in metabolic homeostasis. In the clinical setting, antipsychotic treatment may differentially lead to weight gain among individual patients, although the molecular determinants of such adverse effects are currently unknown. In this study, we investigated changes in the expression levels of critical regulatory genes of adipogenesis, lipid metabolism and proinflammatory genes during the differentiation of primary human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). These cells were isolated from patients with body mass indices <25 and treated with the second-generation antipsychotics olanzapine, ziprasidone, clozapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole and risperidone and the first-generation antipsychotic haloperidol. We found that antipsychotics exhibited a marked effect on key genes involved in the regulation of cell cycle, signal transduction, transcription factors, nuclear receptors, differentiation markers and metabolic enzymes. In particular, we observed an induction of the transcription factor NF-KB1 and NF-KB1 target genes in adipocytes in response to these drugs, including the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8 and MCP-1. In addition, enhanced secretion of both IL8 and MCP-1 was observed in the supernatant of these cell cultures. In addition to their remarkable stimulatory effects on proinflammatory gene transcription, three of the most frequently prescribed antipsychotic drugs, clozapine, quetiapine and aripiprazole, also induced the expression of essential adipocyte differentiation genes and the adipocyte hormones leptin

  7. Sonoporation Increases Therapeutic Efficacy of Inducible and Constitutive BMP2/7 In Vivo Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Anna T.; Slezak, Paul; Schuetzenberger, Sebastian; Kaipel, Martin; Schwartz, Ernst; Neef, Anne; Nomikou, Nikolitsa; Nau, Thomas; van Griensven, Martijn; McHale, Anthony P.; Redl, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Abstract An ideal novel treatment for bone defects should provide regeneration without autologous or allogenous grafting, exogenous cells, growth factors, or biomaterials while ensuring spatial and temporal control as well as safety. Therefore, a novel osteoinductive nonviral in vivo gene therapy approach using sonoporation was investigated in ectopic and orthotopic models. Constitutive or regulated, doxycycline-inducible, bone morphogenetic protein 2 and 7 coexpression plasmids were repeatedly applied for 5 days. Ectopic and orthotopic gene transfer efficacy was monitored by coapplication of a luciferase plasmid and bioluminescence imaging. Orthotopic plasmid DNA distribution was investigated using a novel plasmid-labeling method. Luciferase imaging demonstrated an increased trend (61% vs. 100%) of gene transfer efficacy, and micro-computed tomography evaluation showed significantly enhanced frequency of ectopic bone formation for sonoporation compared with passive gene delivery (46% vs. 100%) dependent on applied ultrasound power. Bone formation by the inducible system (83%) was stringently controlled by doxycycline in vivo, and no ectopic bone formation was observed without induction or with passive gene transfer without sonoporation. Orthotopic evaluation in a rat femur segmental defect model demonstrated an increased trend of gene transfer efficacy using sonoporation. Investigation of DNA distribution demonstrated extensive binding of plasmid DNA to bone tissue. Sonoporated animals displayed a potentially increased union rate (33%) without extensive callus formation or heterotopic ossification. We conclude that sonoporation of BMP2/7 coexpression plasmids is a feasible, minimally invasive method for osteoinduction and that improvement of bone regeneration by sonoporative gene delivery is superior to passive gene delivery. PMID:24164605

  8. Developing tTA transgenic rats for inducible and reversible gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongxia; Huang, Cao; Yang, Min; Landel, Carlisle P; Xia, Pedro Yuxing; Liu, Yong-Jian; Xia, Xu Gang

    2009-01-01

    To develop transgenic lines for conditional expression of desired genes in rats, we generated several lines of the transgenic rats carrying the tetracycline-controlled transactivator (tTA) gene. Using a vigorous, ubiquitous promoter to drive the tTA transgene, we obtained widespread expression of tTA in various tissues. Expression of tTA was sufficient to strongly activate its reporter gene, but was below the toxicity threshold. We examined the dynamics of Doxycycline (Dox)-regulated gene expression in transgenic rats. In the two transmittable lines, tTA-mediated activation of the reporter gene was fully subject to regulation by Dox. Dox dose-dependently suppressed tTA-activated gene expression. The washout time for the effects of Dox was dose-dependent. We tested a complex regime of Dox administration to determine the optimal effectiveness and washout duration. Dox was administered at a high dose (500 microg/ml in drinking water) for two days to reach the effective concentration, and then was given at a low dose (20 microg/ml) to maintain effectiveness. This regimen of Dox administration can achieve a quick switch between ON and OFF statuses of tTA-activated gene expression. In addition, administration of Dox to pregnant rats fully suppressed postnatal tTA-activated gene expression in their offspring. Sufficient levels of Dox are present in mother's milk to produce maximal efficacy in nursing neonates. Administration of Dox to pregnant or nursing rats can provide a continual suppression of tTA-dependent gene expression during embryonic and postnatal development. The tTA transgenic rat allows for inducible and reversible gene expression in the rat; this important tool will be valuable in the development of genetic rat models of human diseases. PMID:19214245

  9. RNA Interference (RNAi) Induced Gene Silencing: A Promising Approach of Hi-Tech Plant Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Younis, Adnan; Siddique, Muhammad Irfan; Kim, Chang-Kil; Lim, Ki-Byung

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising gene regulatory approach in functional genomics that has significant impact on crop improvement which permits down-regulation in gene expression with greater precise manner without affecting the expression of other genes. RNAi mechanism is expedited by small molecules of interfering RNA to suppress a gene of interest effectively. RNAi has also been exploited in plants for resistance against pathogens, insect/pest, nematodes, and virus that cause significant economic losses. Keeping beside the significance in the genome integrity maintenance as well as growth and development, RNAi induced gene syntheses are vital in plant stress management. Modifying the genes by the interference of small RNAs is one of the ways through which plants react to the environmental stresses. Hence, investigating the role of small RNAs in regulating gene expression assists the researchers to explore the potentiality of small RNAs in abiotic and biotic stress management. This novel approach opens new avenues for crop improvement by developing disease resistant, abiotic or biotic stress tolerant, and high yielding elite varieties. PMID:25332689

  10. Cilia-Associated Genes Play Differing Roles in Aminoglycoside-Induced Hair Cell Death in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Stawicki, Tamara M.; Hernandez, Liana; Esterberg, Robert; Linbo, Tor; Owens, Kelly N.; Shah, Arish N.; Thapa, Nihal; Roberts, Brock; Moens, Cecilia B.; Rubel, Edwin W.; Raible, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells possess a single primary cilium, called the kinocilium, early in development. While the kinocilium is lost in auditory hair cells of most species it is maintained in vestibular hair cells. It has generally been believed that the primary role of the kinocilium and cilia-associated genes in hair cells is in the establishment of the polarity of actin-based stereocilia, the hair cell mechanotransduction apparatus. Through genetic screening and testing of candidate genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio) we have found that mutations in multiple cilia genes implicated in intraflagellar transport (dync2h1, wdr35, ift88, and traf3ip), and the ciliary transition zone (cc2d2a, mks1, and cep290) lead to resistance to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These genes appear to have differing roles in hair cells, as mutations in intraflagellar transport genes, but not transition zone genes, lead to defects in kinocilia formation and processes dependent upon hair cell mechanotransduction activity. These mutants highlight a novel role of cilia-associated genes in hair cells, and provide powerful tools for further study. PMID:27207957

  11. Expression of Defense Genes in Strawberry Fruits Treated with Different Resistance Inducers.

    PubMed

    Landi, Lucia; Feliziani, Erica; Romanazzi, Gianfranco

    2014-03-26

    The expression of 18 defense genes in strawberry fruit treated with elicitors: chitosan, BTH, and COA, at 0.5, 6, 24, and 48 h post-treatment was analyzed. The genes were up-regulated differentially, according to the elicitor. Chitosan and COA treatments promoted the expression of key phenylpropanoid pathway genes, for synthesis of lignin and flavonoids; only those associated with flavonoid metabolism were up-regulated by BTH. The calcium-dependent protein kinase, endo-β 1,4-glucanase, ascorbate peroxidase, and glutathione-S-transferase genes were up-regulated by BTH. The K(+) channel, polygalacturonase, polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein, and β-1,3-glucanase, increased in response to all tested elicitors. The enzyme activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase, β-1,3-glucanase, Chitinase, and guaiacol peroxidase supported the gene expression results. Similarity of gene expression was >72% between chitosan and COA treatments, while BTH showed lower similarity (38%) with the other elicitors. This study suggests the relationship between the composition of the elicitors and a specific pattern of induced defense genes. PMID:24627944

  12. Cilia-Associated Genes Play Differing Roles in Aminoglycoside-Induced Hair Cell Death in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Stawicki, Tamara M; Hernandez, Liana; Esterberg, Robert; Linbo, Tor; Owens, Kelly N; Shah, Arish N; Thapa, Nihal; Roberts, Brock; Moens, Cecilia B; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells possess a single primary cilium, called the kinocilium, early in development. While the kinocilium is lost in auditory hair cells of most species it is maintained in vestibular hair cells. It has generally been believed that the primary role of the kinocilium and cilia-associated genes in hair cells is in the establishment of the polarity of actin-based stereocilia, the hair cell mechanotransduction apparatus. Through genetic screening and testing of candidate genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio) we have found that mutations in multiple cilia genes implicated in intraflagellar transport (dync2h1, wdr35, ift88, and traf3ip), and the ciliary transition zone (cc2d2a, mks1, and cep290) lead to resistance to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These genes appear to have differing roles in hair cells, as mutations in intraflagellar transport genes, but not transition zone genes, lead to defects in kinocilia formation and processes dependent upon hair cell mechanotransduction activity. These mutants highlight a novel role of cilia-associated genes in hair cells, and provide powerful tools for further study. PMID:27207957

  13. Use of the HPRT gene to study nuclease-induced DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Gravells, Polly; Ahrabi, Sara; Vangala, Rajani K.; Tomita, Kazunori; Brash, James T.; Brustle, Lena A.; Chung, Christopher; Hong, Julia M.; Kaloudi, Aikaterini; Humphrey, Timothy C.; Porter, Andrew C.G.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of chromosomal double-strand break repair (DSBR) provides insight into genome instability, oncogenesis and genome engineering, including disease gene correction. Research into DSBR exploits rare-cutting endonucleases to cleave exogenous reporter constructs integrated into the genome. Multiple reporter constructs have been developed to detect various DSBR pathways. Here, using a single endogenous reporter gene, the X-chromosomal disease gene encoding hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), we monitor the relative utilization of three DSBR pathways following cleavage by I-SceI or CRISPR/Cas9 nucleases. For I-SceI, our estimated frequencies of accurate or mutagenic non-homologous end-joining and gene correction by homologous recombination are 4.1, 1.5 and 0.16%, respectively. Unexpectedly, I-SceI and Cas9 induced markedly different DSBR profiles. Also, using an I-SceI-sensitive HPRT minigene, we show that gene correction is more efficient when using long double-stranded DNA than single- or double-stranded oligonucleotides. Finally, using both endogenous HPRT and exogenous reporters, we validate novel cell cycle phase-specific I-SceI derivatives for investigating cell cycle variations in DSBR. The results obtained using these novel approaches provide new insights into template design for gene correction and the relationships between multiple DSBR pathways at a single endogenous disease gene. PMID:26423459

  14. Effects of laser parameters on propagation characteristics of laser-induced stress wave for gene transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2010-02-01

    Laser-based gene delivery is attractive as a new method for topical gene therapy because of the high spatial controllability of laser energy. Previously, we demonstrated that an exogenous gene can be transferred to cells both in vitro and in vivo by applying nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) or photomechanical waves (PMWs). In this study, we investigated effects of laser parameters on the propagation characteristics of LISWs in soft tissue phantoms and depth-dependent properties of gene transfection. Temporal pressure profiles of LISWs were measured with a hydrophone, showing that with a larger laser spot diameter, LISWs can be propagated more efficiently in phantoms with keeping flat wavefront. Phantoms with various thicknesses were placed on the rat dorsal skin that had been injected with plasmid DNA coding for reporter gene, and LISWs were applied from the top of the phantom. Efficient gene expression was observed in the rat skin that had interacted with LISWs propagating through a 15-mm-thick phantom. These results would be useful to determine appropriate laser parameters for gene delivery to deep-located tissue by transcutaneous application of LISWs.

  15. Effects of L-theanine on posttraumatic stress disorder induced changes in rat brain gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ceremuga, Tomás Eduardo; Martinson, Stephanie; Washington, Jason; Revels, Robert; Wojcicki, Jessica; Crawford, Damali; Edwards, Robert; Kemper, Joshua Luke; Townsend, William Luke; Herron, Geno M; Ceremuga, George Allen; Padron, Gina; Bentley, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is characterized by the occurrence of a traumatic event that is beyond the normal range of human experience. The future of PTSD treatment may specifically target the molecular mechanisms of PTSD. In the US, approximately 20% of adults report taking herbal products to treat medical illnesses. L-theanine is the amino acid in green tea primarily responsible for relaxation effects. No studies have evaluated the potential therapeutic properties of herbal medications on gene expression in PTSD. We evaluated gene expression in PTSD-induced changes in the amygdala and hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were assigned to PTSD-stressed and nonstressed groups that received either saline, midazolam, L-theanine, or L-theanine + midazolam. Amygdala and hippocampus tissue samples were analyzed for changes in gene expression. One-way ANOVA was used to detect significant difference between groups in the amygdala and hippocampus. Of 88 genes examined, 17 had a large effect size greater than 0.138. Of these, 3 genes in the hippocampus and 5 genes in the amygdala were considered significant (P < 0.05) between the groups. RT-PCR analysis revealed significant changes between groups in several genes implicated in a variety of disorders ranging from PTSD, anxiety, mood disorders, and substance dependence. PMID:25165739

  16. MicroRNA-322 protects hypoxia-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes via BDNF gene

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liguo; Song, Shigang; Lv, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiomyocytes apoptosis under hypoxia condition contributes significantly to various cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we investigated the role of microRNA-322 (miR-322) in regulating hypoxia-induced apoptosis in neonatal murine cardiomyocytes in vitro. Method: Cardiomyocytes of C57BL/6J mice were treated with hypoxia condition in vitro. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was measured by TUNEL assay. Gene expression pattern of miR-322 was measured by qRT-PCR. Stable downregulation of miR-322 in cardiomyocytes were achieved by lentiviral transduction, and the effect of miR-322 downregulation on hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis was investigated. Possible regulation of miR-322 on its downstream target gene, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was investigated in cardiomyocytes. BDNF was then genetically silenced by siRNA to evaluate its role in miR-137 mediated cardiomyocyte apoptosis protection under hypoxia condition. Results: Under hypoxia condition, significant apoptosis was induced and miR-322 was significantly upregulated in cardiomyocytes in vitro. Through lentiviral transduction, miR-322 was efficiently knocked down in cardiomyocytes. Downregulation of miR-322 protected hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Luciferase assay showed BDNF was the target gene of miR-322. QRT-PCR showed BDNF expression was associated with miR-322 regulation on hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Silencing BDNF in cardiomyocyte through siRNA transfection reversed the protective effect of miR-322 downregulation on hypoxia-induced apoptosis. Conclusion: Our study revealed that miR-322, in association with BDNF, played important role in regulating hypoxia-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocyte. PMID:27398164

  17. The benzophenanthridine alkaloid fagaronine induces erythroleukemic cell differentiation by gene activation.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Claude; Couillerot, Eric; Gillet, Reynald; Caron, Catherine; Zeches-Hanrot, Monique; Riou, Jean-François; Trentesaux, Chantal

    2005-06-01

    Fagaronine, a benzophenanthridine alkaloid from Fagara zanthoxyloides Lam. (Rutaceae), has been tested on the erythroleukemic cell line K562 in order to explain some previous results on cell differentiation. In this study we showed that fagaronine induces a significant hemoglobinization of the human erythroleukemic cell line K562. This hemoglobin synthesis was accompanied by a strong increase of erythroid mRNA expression such as gamma- and alpha-globin, and PBGD, an enzyme of heme synthesis. In addition, the Epo-R transcripts were also stimulated indicating that cells are engaged in a maturation process. Both transcription factors GATA-1 and NF-E2, which play an important role in the regulation of genes involved in the erythroid differentiation, were also transcriptionally up-regulated. To elucidate the possible role of GATA-1 in the FAG-induced differentiation of K562 cells, we transfected reporter constructs containing regulatory regions of erythroid genes encompassing GATA-1 binding sites. After 48 hours of treatment, FAG stimulated the EPO-R and gamma-globin promoters by 2- to 3-fold and the promoter/enhancer region of GATA-1 gene by 3.2-fold. A mutation within the GATA-1 binding sites strongly decreased the promoter activation induced by FAG. Taken together, our results represent a demonstration that FAG exerts its differentiating activity by a specific activation of the regulating GATA-1 regions of genes involved in the erythroid phenotype expression. PMID:15971117

  18. The adeno-associated virus rep gene suppresses herpes simplex virus-induced DNA amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Heilbronn, R; Bürkle, A; Stephan, S; zur Hausen, H

    1990-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) induces within the host cell genome DNA amplification which can be suppressed by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV). To characterize the AAV functions mediating this effect, cloned AAV type 2 wild-type or mutant genomes were transfected into simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed hamster cells together with the six HSV replication genes (encoding UL5, UL8, major DNA-binding protein, DNA polymerase, UL42, and UL52) which together are necessary and sufficient for the induction of SV40 DNA amplification (R. Heilbronn and H. zur Hausen, J. Virol. 63:3683-3692, 1989). The AAV rep gene was identified as being responsible for the complete inhibition of HSV-induced SV40 DNA amplification. Likewise, rep inhibited origin-dependent HSV replication. rep neither killed the transfected host cells nor interfered with gene expression from the cotransfected amplification genes. This points to a specific interference with HSV-induced DNA amplification. Images PMID:2159559

  19. Thrombin selectively induces transcription of genes in human monocytes involved in inflammation and wound healing.

    PubMed

    López, Mercedes L; Bruges, Gustavo; Crespo, Gustavo; Salazar, Victor; Deglesne, Pierre-Antoine; Schneider, Heike; Cabrera-Fuentes, Hector; Schmitz, M Lienhard; Preissner, Klaus T

    2014-11-01

    Thrombin is essential for blood coagulation but functions also as a mediator of cellular signalling. Gene expression microarray experiments in human monocytes revealed thrombin-induced upregulation of a limited subset of genes, which are almost exclusively involved in inflammation and wound healing. Among these, the expression of F3 gene encoding for tissue factor (TF) was enhanced indicating that this physiological initiator of coagulation cascade may create a feed-forward loop to enhance blood coagulation. Activation of protease-activated receptor type 1 (PAR1) was shown to play a main role in promoting TF expression. Moreover, thrombin induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, an event that is required for expression of thrombin-regulated genes. Thrombin also increased the expression of TF at the protein level in monocytes as evidenced by Western blot and immunostaining. Furthermore, FXa generation induced by thrombin-stimulated monocytes was abolished by a TF blocking antibody and therefore it is entirely attributable to the expression of tissue factor. This cellular activity of thrombin provides a new molecular link between coagulation, inflammation and wound healing. PMID:25057055

  20. Multi-wavelength photoacoustic imaging of inducible tyrosinase reporter gene expression in xenograft tumors.

    PubMed

    Paproski, Robert J; Heinmiller, Andrew; Wachowicz, Keith; Zemp, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging hybrid imaging technology capable of breaking through resolution limits of pure optical imaging technologies imposed by optical-scattering to provide fine-resolution optical contrast information in deep tissues. We demonstrate the ability of multi-wavelength photoacoustic imaging to estimate relative gene expression distributions using an inducible expression system and co-register images with hemoglobin oxygen saturation estimates and micro-ultrasound data. Tyrosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme in melanin production, is used as a reporter gene owing to its strong optical absorption and enzymatic amplification mechanism. Tetracycline-inducible melanin expression is turned on via doxycycline treatment in vivo. Serial multi-wavelength imaging reveals very low estimated melanin expression in tumors prior to doxycycline treatment or in tumors with no tyrosinase gene present, but strong signals after melanin induction in tumors tagged with the tyrosinase reporter. The combination of new inducible reporters and high-resolution photoacoustic and micro-ultrasound technology is poised to bring a new dimension to the study of gene expression in vivo. PMID:24936769

  1. The homeobox gene Distal-less induces ventral appendage development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Gorfinkiel, Nicole; Morata, Ginés; Guerrero, Isabel

    1997-01-01

    This study investigates the role of the homeobox gene Distal-less (Dll) in the development of the legs, antennae, and wings of Drosophila. Lack of Dll function causes a change in the identity of ventral appendage cells (legs and antennae) that often results in the loss of the appendage. Ectopic Dll expression in the proximal region of ventral appendages induces nonautonomous duplication of legs and antennae by the activation of wingless and decapentaplegic. Ectopic Dll expression in dorsal appendages produces transformation into corresponding ventral appendages; wings and halteres develop ectopic legs and the head–eye region develops ectopic antennae. In the wing, the exogenous Dll product induces this transformation by activating the endogenous Dll gene and repressing the wing determinant gene vestigial. It is proposed that Dll induces the development of ventral appendages and also participates in a genetic address that specifies the identity of ventral appendages and discriminates the dorsal versus the ventral appendages in the adult. However, unlike other homeotic genes, Dll expression and function is not defined by a cell lineage border. Dll also performs a secondary and late function required for the normal patterning of the wing. PMID:9303541

  2. Systematic analysis of dopamine receptor genes (DRD1-DRD5) in antipsychotic-induced weight gain.

    PubMed

    Müller, D J; Zai, C C; Sicard, M; Remington, E; Souza, R P; Tiwari, A K; Hwang, R; Likhodi, O; Shaikh, S; Freeman, N; Arenovich, T; Heinz, A; Meltzer, H Y; Lieberman, J A; Kennedy, J L

    2012-04-01

    Antipsychotic-induced weight gain has emerged as a serious complication in the treatment of patients with most antipsychotics. We have conducted the first in-depth examination of dopamine receptor genes in antipsychotic-induced weight gain. A total of 206 patients (139 of European descent and 56 African Americans) who underwent treatment for chronic schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were evaluated after on average over 6 weeks of treatment. Thirty-six tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and one variable-number tandem repeat, spanning the five dopamine receptor genes (DRD1-DRD5) were analyzed. In the total sample, we found a nominally significant association between the DRD2 rs1079598 marker and weight change using a cutoff of 7% gain (P=0.03). When stratifying the sample according to ethnicity and antipsychotics with highest risk for weight gain, we found significant associations in three DRD2 SNPs: rs6277 (C957T), rs1079598 and rs1800497 (TaqIA). The other genes were primarily negative. We provide evidence that dopamine receptor DRD2 gene variants might be associated with antipsychotic-induced weight gain in chronic schizophrenia patients. PMID:20714340

  3. Virus-induced gene silencing-based functional verification of six genes associated with vernalization in wheat.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ya-Lan; Wang, Ke-Tao; Ma, Chao; Zhao, Yong-Ying; Yin, Jun

    2015-03-20

    Vernalization requirement is an important characteristic in crop breeding. Wheat is a widely grown crop in the world that possesses enormous economic significance. To better understand the gene networks in vernalization process, we performed a high-throughput RNA sequencing analysis comparing the transcriptomes of spring and winter wheat cultivars, with and without vernalization (unpublished data). In this study, we selected six unigenes (CL14010, CL12788, CL176, Unigene 16777, CL8746 and Unigene10196) from our transcriptome analysis based on their expression differences to further characterize their function. Transient silencing of the six unigenes individually were achieved through virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) using BSMV vector. The period from germination to spike differentiation were recorded and compared between plants underwent VIGS silencing and the control. Our result showed that VIGS of the six unigenes significantly shortened the period from seedling to double ridge (DR) stage. Resulting in SD period ranging from 59.8 ± 0.60 to 65.8 ± 0.48 days, compared to 85.0 ± 0.73 days in the control. The results indicated that these six unigenes function as suppressors in vernalization process and silence or down-regulation of these genes promoted flower development in wheat. Further characterization of these six unigenes and their function in vernalization and flowering control is needed. PMID:25707852

  4. Erythropoietin-induced changes in brain gene expression reveal induction of synaptic plasticity genes in experimental stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mengozzi, Manuela; Cervellini, Ilaria; Villa, Pia; Erbayraktar, Zübeyde; Gökmen, Necati; Yilmaz, Osman; Erbayraktar, Serhat; Manohasandra, Mathini; Van Hummelen, Paul; Vandenabeele, Peter; Chernajovsky, Yuti; Annenkov, Alexander; Ghezzi, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a neuroprotective cytokine in models of ischemic and nervous system injury, where it reduces neuronal apoptosis and inflammatory cytokines and increases neurogenesis and angiogenesis. EPO also improves cognition in healthy volunteers and schizophrenic patients. We studied the effect of EPO administration on the gene-expression profile in the ischemic cortex of rats after cerebral ischemia at early time points (2 and 6 h). EPO treatment up-regulated genes already increased by ischemia. Hierarchical clustering and analysis of overrepresented functional categories identified genes implicated in synaptic plasticity—Arc, BDNF, Egr1, and Egr2, of which Egr2 was the most significantly regulated. Up-regulation of Arc, BDNF, Dusp5, Egr1, Egr2, Egr4, and Nr4a3 was confirmed by quantitative PCR. We investigated the up-regulation of Egr2/Krox20 further because of its role in neuronal plasticity. Its elevation by EPO was confirmed in an independent in vivo experiment of cerebral ischemia in rats. Using the rat neuroblastoma B104, we found that wild-type cells that do not express EPO receptor (EPOR) do not respond to EPO by inducing Egr2. However, EPOR-expressing B104 cells induce Egr2 early upon incubation with EPO, indicating that Egr2 induction is a direct effect of EPO and that EPOR mediates this effect. Because these changes occur in vivo before decreased inflammatory cytokines or neuronal apoptosis is evident, these findings provide a molecular mechanism for the neuroreparative effects of cytokines and suggest a mechanism of neuroprotection by which promotion of a plastic phenotype results in decreased inflammation and neuronal death. PMID:22645329

  5. Exposure to ionizing radiation induced persistent gene expression changes in mouse mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast tissue is among the most sensitive tissues to the carcinogenic actions of ionizing radiation and epidemiological studies have linked radiation exposure to breast cancer. Currently, molecular understanding of radiation carcinogenesis in mammary gland is hindered due to the scarcity of in vivo long-term follow up data. We undertook this study to delineate radiation-induced persistent alterations in gene expression in mouse mammary glands 2-month after radiation exposure. Methods Six to eight week old female C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 2 Gy of whole body γ radiation and mammary glands were surgically removed 2-month after radiation. RNA was isolated and microarray hybridization performed for gene expression analysis. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was used for biological interpretation of microarray data. Real time quantitative PCR was performed on selected genes to confirm the microarray data. Results Compared to untreated controls, the mRNA levels of a total of 737 genes were significantly (p<0.05) perturbed above 2-fold of control. More genes (493 genes; 67%) were upregulated than the number of downregulated genes (244 genes; 33%). Functional analysis of the upregulated genes mapped to cell proliferation and cancer related canonical pathways such as ‘ERK/MAPK signaling’, ‘CDK5 signaling’, and ‘14-3-3-mediated signaling’. We also observed upregulation of breast cancer related canonical pathways such as ‘breast cancer regulation by Stathmin1’, and ‘HER-2 signaling in breast cancer’ in IPA. Interestingly, the downregulated genes mapped to fewer canonical pathways involved in cell proliferation. We also observed that a number of genes with tumor suppressor function (GPRC5A, ELF1, NAB2, Sema4D, ACPP, MAP2, RUNX1) persistently remained downregulated in response to radiation exposure. Results from qRT-PCR on five selected differentially expressed genes confirmed microarray data. The PCR data on PPP4c, ELF1, MAPK12, PLCG1, and E2F

  6. Characterization and expression of a murine gene homologous to human EPA/TIMP: a virus-induced gene in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Gewert, D R; Coulombe, B; Castelino, M; Skup, D; Williams, B R

    1987-01-01

    A genomic clone encompassing the entire coding region of a murine gene homologous to human erythroid potentiating activity/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (EPA/TIMP) was isolated and sequenced. Based on alignment with human EPA/TIMP cDNAs we deduce a structure comprising five exons and four introns extending over 4.3 kb of DNA. In mouse and hamster cell lines transcription from this gene and interferon genes is induced by Newcastle Disease virus (NDV). Examination of the 5'-flanking sequences of the gene reveals a set of repeated elements with structural similarity to those previously described as inducer-responsive elements in the human IFN-beta 1 gene. The 4.3-kb DNA fragment encompassing the homologous murine EPA/TIMP gene was transfected into human T98G cells and transfectants tested for NDV inducibility. In contrast to the endogenous human gene, the integrated murine EPA/TIMP gene was NDV-inducible and TIMP activity was detectable in the cell culture fluid. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:3034603

  7. DNA vaccination using expression vectors carrying FIV structural genes induces immune response against feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Cuisinier, A M; Mallet, V; Meyer, A; Caldora, C; Aubert, A

    1997-07-01

    Following inactivated virus vaccination trials, the surface glycoprotein gp120 of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) was considered as one of the determinants for protection. However, several vaccination trials using recombinant Env protein or some peptides failed to induce protection. To understand the role of the gp120 protein in vivo, we vaccinated cats with naked DNA coding for FIV structural proteins gp120 and p10. We analyzed the ability of these vaccinations to induce immune protection and to influence the onset of infection. Injection in cat muscles of expression vectors coding for the FIV gp120 protein induced a humoral response. Cats immunized twice with the gp120 gene showed different patterns after challenge. Two cats were, like the control cats, infected from the second week after infection onwards. The two others maintained a low proviral load with no modification of their antibody pattern. The immune response induced by gp120 DNA injection could control the level of viral replication. This protective-like immune response was not correlated to the humoral response. All the cats immunized with the gp120 gene followed by the p10 gene were infected, like the control cats, from the second week but they developed a complete humoral response against viral proteins after challenge. Furthermore, they showed a sudden but transient drop of the proviral load at 4 weeks after infection. Under these conditions, one injection of the p10 gene after one injection of the gp120 gene was not sufficient to stimulate protection. On the contrary, after a period, it seems to facilitate virus replication. PMID:9269051

  8. Chronic ultraviolet exposure-induced p53 gene alterations in sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Ying; Smith, M.A.; Tucker, S.B.

    1997-06-27

    Alterations of the tumor suppressor gene p53 have been found in ultraviolet radiation (UVR) related human skin cancers and in UVR-induced murine skin tumors. However, links between p53 gene alterations and the stages of carcinogenesis induced by UVR have not been clearly defined. We established a chronic UVR exposure-induced Sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model to determine the frequency of p53 gene alterations in different stages of carcinogenesis, including UV-exposed skin, papillomas, squamous-cell carcinomas (SCCs), and malignant spindle-cell tumors (SCTs). A high incidence of SCCs and SCTs were found in this model. Positive p53 nuclear staining was found in 10137 (27%) of SCCs and 12124 (50%) of SCTs, but was not detected in normal skin or papillomas. DNA was isolated from 40 paraffin-embedded normal skin, UV-exposed skin, and tumor sections. The p53 gene (exons 5 and 6) was amplified from the sections by using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequent single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay and sequencing analysis revealed one point mutation in exon 6 (coden 193, C {r_arrow} A transition) from a UV-exposed skin sample, and seven point mutations in exon 5 (codens 146, 158, 150, 165, and 161, three C {r_arrow} T, two C {r_arrow} A, one C {r_arrow} G, and one A {r_arrow} T transition, respectively) from four SCTs, two SCCs and one UV-exposed skin sample. These experimental results demonstrate that alterations in the p53 gene are frequent events in chronic UV exposure-induced SCCs and later stage SCTs in Sencar mouse skin. 40 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Circadian-disruption-induced gene expression changes in rodent mammary tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kochan, David Z.; Ilnytskyy, Yaroslav; Golubov, Andrey; Deibel, Scott H.; McDonald, Robert J.; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is mounting that circadian disruption (CD) is a potential carcinogen in breast cancer development. However, despite the growing concern, to our knowledge, no studies have attempted a genome-wide analysis of CD-induced gene expression changes in mammary tissues. Using a rodent model system, a proven photoperiod-shifting paradigm, varying degrees of CD, and Illumina sequencing, we performed an exploratory genome-wide mRNA analysis in mammary tissues. Even though our analysis did not identify any significant patterns in mRNA levels based on the degree of CD, and the majority of groups did not show changes in gene expression on a large-scale, one group (two-week chronic ZT19) displayed 196 differentially expressed genes, 51 of which have been linked to breast cancer. Through gene-specific pathway analysis, the data illustrate that CD may promote breast cancer development through downregulation of DNA repair and p53 signaling pathways, thus promoting genomic instability and cancer development. Although these results have to be interpreted with caution because only a single group illustrated drastic changes in transcript levels, they indicate that chronic CD may directly induce changes in gene expression on a large-scale with potentially malignant consequences. PMID:27014724

  10. Prospective Study of Metal Fume-Induced Responses of Global Gene Expression Profiling in Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaoxi; Neuberg, Donna; Su, Li; Kim, Jee Young; Chen, Jiu-Chiuan; Christiani, David C.

    2008-01-01

    Metal particulate inhalation causes pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases. Our previous results showed that systemic responses to short-term occupational welding-fume exposure could be assessed by microarray analyses in whole-blood total RNA sampled before and after exposure. To expand our understanding of the duration of particulate-induced gene expression changes, we conducted a study using a similar population 1 yr after the original study and extended our observations in the postexposure period. We recruited 15 individuals with welding fume exposure and 7 nonexposed individuals. Thirteen of the 22 individuals (9 in exposed group and 4 in nonexposed group) had been monitored in the previous study. Whole-blood total RNA was analyzed at 3 time points, including baseline, immediately following exposure (approximately 5 h after baseline), and 24 h after baseline, using cDNA microarray technology. We replicated the patterns of Gene Ontology (GO) terms associated with response to stimulus, cell death, phosphorus metabolism, localization, and regulation of biological processes significantly enriched with altered genes in the nonsmoking exposed group. Most of the identified genes had opposite expression changes between the exposure and postexposure periods in nonsmoking welders. In addition, we found dose-dependent patterns that were affected by smoking status. In conclusion, short-term occupational exposure to metal particulates causes systemic responses in the peripheral blood. Furthermore, the acute particulate-induced effects on gene expression profiling were transient in nonsmoking welders, with most effects diminishing within 19 h following exposure. PMID:18951227

  11. Gene expression profile and synovial microcirculation at early stages of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gierer, Philip; Ibrahim, Saleh; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Koczan, Dirk; Moeller, Steffen; Landes, Jürgen; Gradl, Georg; Vollmar, Brigitte

    2005-01-01

    A better understanding of the initial mechanisms that lead to arthritic disease could facilitate development of improved therapeutic strategies. We characterized the synovial microcirculation of knee joints in susceptible mouse strains undergoing intradermal immunization with bovine collagen II in complete Freund's adjuvant to induce arthritis (i.e. collagen-induced arthritis [CIA]). Susceptible DBA1/J and collagen II T-cell receptor transgenic mice were compared with CIA-resistant FVB/NJ mice. Before onset of clinical symptoms of arthritis, in vivo fluorescence microscopy of knee joints revealed marked leucocyte activation and interaction with the endothelial lining of synovial microvessels. This initial inflammatory cell response correlated with the gene expression profile at this disease stage. The majority of the 655 differentially expressed genes belonged to classes of genes that are involved in cell movement and structure, cell cycle and signal transduction, as well as transcription, protein synthesis and metabolism. However, 24 adhesion molecules and chemokine/cytokine genes were identified, some of which are known to contribute to arthritis (e.g. CD44 and neutrophil cytosolic factor 1) and some of which are novel in this respect (e.g. CC chemokine ligand-27 and IL-13 receptor α1). Online in vivo data on synovial tissue microcirculation, together with gene expression profiling, emphasize the potential role played by early inflammatory events in the development of arthritis. PMID:15987489

  12. Association between Paraoxonases Gene Expression and Oxidative Stress in Hepatotoxicity Induced by CCl4

    PubMed Central

    Hafez, Mohamed M.; Al-Shabanah, Othman A.; Al-Harbi, Naif O.; Al-Harbi, Mohamed M.; Al-Rejaie, Salim S.; Alsurayea, Saad M.; Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of rutin in carbon tetrachloride- (CCl4-) induced liver injuries in rat model. Methods. Forty male Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups. Group I was the control group and received dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) and olive oil. Group II received rutin. Groups III was treated with CCl4. Group IV was administered rutin after 48 h of CCl4 treatment. Liver enzymes level, lipid profile, lipid peroxidation, and hydrogen peroxide were measured. The genes expression levels were monitored by real time RT-PCR and western blot techniques. Results. CCl4 group showed significant increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBAR), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and lipid profile and a significant decrease in glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S transferase (GST), catalase (CAT), paraoxonase-1 (PON-1), paraoxonase-3 (PON-3), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta (PPAR-δ), and ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABAC1) genes expression levels. Interestingly, rutin supplementation completely reversed the biochemical and gene expression levels induced by CCl4 to control values. Conclusion. CCl4 administration causes aberration of genes expression levels in oxidative stress pathway resulting in DNA damage and hepatotoxicity. Rutin causes hepatoprotective effect through enhancing the antioxidant genes. PMID:25478064

  13. A systems biology approach to suppress TNF-induced proinflammatory gene expressions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a widely studied cytokine (ligand) that induces proinflammatory signaling and regulates myriad cellular processes. In major illnesses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and certain cancers, the expression of TNF is elevated. Despite much progress in the field, the targeted regulation of TNF response for therapeutic benefits remains suboptimal. Here, to effectively regulate the proinflammatory response induced by TNF, a systems biology approach was adopted. Results We developed a computational model to investigate the temporal activations of MAP kinase (p38), nuclear factor (NF)-κB, and the kinetics of 3 groups of genes, defined by early, intermediate and late phases, in murine embryonic fibroblast (MEF) and 3T3 cells. To identify a crucial target that suppresses, and not abolishes, proinflammatory genes, the model was tested in several in silico knock out (KO) conditions. Among the candidate molecules tested, in silico RIP1 KO effectively regulated all groups of proinflammatory genes (early, middle and late). To validate this result, we experimentally inhibited TNF signaling in MEF and 3T3 cells with RIP1 inhibitor, Necrostatin-1 (Nec-1), and investigated 10 genes (Il6, Nfkbia, Jun, Tnfaip3, Ccl7, Vcam1, Cxcl10, Mmp3, Mmp13, Enpp2) belonging to the 3 major groups of upregulated genes. As predicted by the model, all measured genes were significantly impaired. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that Nec-1 modulates TNF-induced proinflammatory response, and may potentially be used as a therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. PMID:24199619

  14. Glucose Oxidase Induces Cellular Senescence in Immortal Renal Cells through ILK by Downregulating Klotho Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Troyano-Suárez, Nuria; del Nogal-Avila, María; Mora, Inés; Sosa, Patricia; López-Ongil, Susana; Rodriguez-Puyol, Diego; Olmos, Gemma; Ruíz-Torres, María Piedad

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence can be prematurely induced by oxidative stress involved in aging. In this work, we were searching for novel intermediaries in oxidative stress-induced senescence, focusing our interest on integrin-linked kinase (ILK), a scaffold protein at cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion sites, and on the Klotho gene. Cultured renal cells were treated with glucose oxidase (GOx) for long time periods. GOx induced senescence, increasing senescence associated β-galactosidase activity and the expression of p16. In parallel, GOx increased ILK protein expression and activity. Ectopic overexpression of ILK in cells increased p16 expression, even in the absence of GOx, whereas downregulation of ILK inhibited the increase in p16 due to oxidative stress. Additionally, GOx reduced Klotho gene expression and cells overexpressing Klotho protein did not undergo senescence after GOx addition. We demonstrated a direct link between ILK and Klotho since silencing ILK expression in cells and mice increases Klotho expression and reduces p53 and p16 expression in renal cortex. In conclusion, oxidative stress induces cellular senescence in kidney cells by increasing ILK protein expression and activity, which in turn reduces Klotho expression. We hereby present ILK as a novel downregulator of Klotho gene expression. PMID:26583057

  15. Glucose Oxidase Induces Cellular Senescence in Immortal Renal Cells through ILK by Downregulating Klotho Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Troyano-Suárez, Nuria; del Nogal-Avila, María; Mora, Inés; Sosa, Patricia; López-Ongil, Susana; Rodriguez-Puyol, Diego; Olmos, Gemma; Ruíz-Torres, María Piedad

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence can be prematurely induced by oxidative stress involved in aging. In this work, we were searching for novel intermediaries in oxidative stress-induced senescence, focusing our interest on integrin-linked kinase (ILK), a scaffold protein at cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion sites, and on the Klotho gene. Cultured renal cells were treated with glucose oxidase (GOx) for long time periods. GOx induced senescence, increasing senescence associated β-galactosidase activity and the expression of p16. In parallel, GOx increased ILK protein expression and activity. Ectopic overexpression of ILK in cells increased p16 expression, even in the absence of GOx, whereas downregulation of ILK inhibited the increase in p16 due to oxidative stress. Additionally, GOx reduced Klotho gene expression and cells overexpressing Klotho protein did not undergo senescence after GOx addition. We demonstrated a direct link between ILK and Klotho since silencing ILK expression in cells and mice increases Klotho expression and reduces p53 and p16 expression in renal cortex. In conclusion, oxidative stress induces cellular senescence in kidney cells by increasing ILK protein expression and activity, which in turn reduces Klotho expression. We hereby present ILK as a novel downregulator of Klotho gene expression. PMID:26583057

  16. Cadmium induces retinoic acid signaling by regulating retinoic acid metabolic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuxia; Freedman, Jonathan H

    2009-09-11

    The transition metal cadmium is an environmental teratogen. In addition, cadmium and retinoic acid can act synergistically to induce forelimb malformations. The molecular mechanism underlying the teratogenicity of cadmium and the synergistic effect with retinoic acid has not been addressed. An evolutionarily conserved gene, beta,beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase (BCMO), which is involved in retinoic acid biosynthesis, was studied in both Caenorhabditis elegans and murine Hepa 1-6 cells. In C. elegans, bcmo-1 was expressed in the intestine and was cadmium inducible. Similarly, in Hepa 1-6 cells, Bcmo1 was induced by cadmium. Retinoic acid-mediated signaling increased after 24-h exposures to 5 and 10 microm cadmium in Hepa 1-6 cells. Examination of gene expression demonstrated that the induction of retinoic acid signaling by cadmium may be mediated by overexpression of Bcmo1. Furthermore, cadmium inhibited the expression of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1, which are involved in retinoic acid degradation. These results indicate that cadmium-induced teratogenicity may be due to the ability of the metal to increase the levels of retinoic acid by disrupting the expression of retinoic acid-metabolizing genes. PMID:19556237

  17. Cadmium Induces Retinoic Acid Signaling by Regulating Retinoic Acid Metabolic Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuxia; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal cadmium is an environmental teratogen. In addition, cadmium and retinoic acid can act synergistically to induce forelimb malformations. The molecular mechanism underlying the teratogenicity of cadmium and the synergistic effect with retinoic acid has not been addressed. An evolutionarily conserved gene, β,β-carotene 15,15′-monooxygenase (BCMO), which is involved in retinoic acid biosynthesis, was studied in both Caenorhabditis elegans and murine Hepa 1–6 cells. In C. elegans, bcmo-1 was expressed in the intestine and was cadmium inducible. Similarly, in Hepa 1–6 cells, Bcmo1 was induced by cadmium. Retinoic acid-mediated signaling increased after 24-h exposures to 5 and 10 μm cadmium in Hepa 1–6 cells. Examination of gene expression demonstrated that the induction of retinoic acid signaling by cadmium may be mediated by overexpression of Bcmo1. Furthermore, cadmium inhibited the expression of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1, which are involved in retinoic acid degradation. These results indicate that cadmium-induced teratogenicity may be due to the ability of the metal to increase the levels of retinoic acid by disrupting the expression of retinoic acid-metabolizing genes. PMID:19556237

  18. The glucocorticoid-induced gene tdag8 encodes a pro-apoptotic G protein-coupled receptor whose activation promotes glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Malone, Michael H; Wang, Zhengqi; Distelhorst, Clark W

    2004-12-17

    The apoptotic action of glucocorticoids on lymphocytes makes them effective therapeutics for many lymphoid malignancies. Although it is clear that glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis requires transcription, the gene products that induce apoptosis remain unknown. Using gene expression profiles of lymphoma cell lines and primary thymocytes treated with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone, we discovered that induction of tdag8 (T-cell death-associated gene 8) was a common event in each model system investigated. Activation of TDAG8 by its agonist psychosine markedly enhanced dexamethasone-induced apoptosis in a TDAG8-dependent manner. Expression of a TDAG8-GFP fusion protein was sufficient to induce apoptosis, and repression of endogenous TDAG8 using RNA interference partially inhibited dexamethasone-induced apoptosis. Together, these data suggest that TDAG8 is a regulator of glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis and that agonists of TDAG8 may be promising agents to improve the efficacy of glucocorticoids for the treatment of leukemia and lymphoma. PMID:15485889

  19. High-level expression of the bacterial opd gene in Drosophila melanogaster: improved inducible insecticide resistance.

    PubMed

    Benedict, M Q; Scott, J A; Cockburn, A F

    1994-11-01

    The bacterial parathion hydrolase gene (opd) was expressed in transformed D. melanogaster under the control of an hsp70 promoter. Transformed lines carrying chimaeric genes designed for either cytoplasmic or secretory expression exhibited high- or low-level heat-shock-inducible transient resistance to paraoxon respectively. Greatest levels of resistance occurred approximately 12-16 h after heat shock and well after periods of maximal transcription. Insecticide resistance conferred by the cytoplasmic form of opd is expressed as a semidominant trait. PMID:7704308

  20. Reference gene validation for quantification of gene expression during final oocyte maturation induced by diethylstilbestrol and di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate in common carp.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yanyan; Lu, Jie; Wang, Yilei; Wang, Shuhong

    2016-08-01

    Final oocyte maturation is the key step to successful spawning and fertilization. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is the technique of election to quantify the abundance of functional genes in such study. Reference gene is essential for correct interpretation of qPCR data. However, an ideal universal reference gene that is stable under all experimental circumstances has not been described. Researchers should validate their reference genes while performing qPCR analysis. The expression of 6 candidate reference genes: 18s rRNA, 28s rRNA, Cathepsin Z, Elongation factor 1-α, Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and β-actin were investigated during final oocyte maturation induced by different compounds (DES and DEHP) in common carp (Cyprinus carpio). Four softwares (Bestkeeper, geNorm, NormFinder and RefFinder) were used to screen the most stable gene in order to evaluate their expression stability. The results revealed that EF1α was highly stable expressed when final oocyte maturation was induced by DES, while gapdh was the most stable gene when final oocyte maturation was induced by DEHP. Stable expressed reference gene selection is critical for all qPCR analysis to get accurate target gene mRNA expression information. PMID:27521935

  1. Identification of human metapneumovirus-induced gene networks in airway epithelial cells by microarray analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, X.; Sinha, M. |; Liu, T.; Hong, C.; Luxon, B.A. |; Garofalo, R.P. ||; Casola, A. ||

    2008-04-25

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants, elderly and immunocompromised patients. Little is known about the response to hMPV infection of airway epithelial cells, which play a pivotal role in initiating and shaping innate and adaptive immune responses. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptional profiles of airway epithelial cells infected with hMPV using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays. Of the 47,400 transcripts and variants represented on the Affimetrix GeneChip Human Genome HG-U133 plus 2 array, 1601 genes were significantly altered following hMPV infection. Altered genes were then assigned to functional categories and mapped to signaling pathways. Many up-regulated genes are involved in the initiation of pro-inflammatory and antiviral immune responses, including chemokines, cytokines, type I interferon and interferon-inducible proteins. Other important functional classes up-regulated by hMPV infection include cellular signaling, gene transcription and apoptosis. Notably, genes associated with antioxidant and membrane transport activity, several metabolic pathways and cell proliferation were down-regulated in response to hMPV infection. Real-time PCR and Western blot assays were used to confirm the expression of genes related to several of these functional groups. The overall result of this study provides novel information on host gene expression upon infection with hMPV and also serves as a foundation for future investigations of genes and pathways involved in the pathogenesis of this important viral infection. Furthermore, it can facilitate a comparative analysis of other paramyxoviral infections to determine the transcriptional changes that are conserved versus the one that are specific to individual pathogens.

  2. Gene expression changes induced by the tumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloid riddelliine in liver of Big Blue rats

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Nan; Guo, Lei; Liu, Ruqing; Fuscoe, James C; Chen, Tao

    2007-01-01

    Background Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are probably the most common plant constituents that poison livestock, wildlife, and humans worldwide. Riddelliine is isolated from plants grown in the western United States and is a prototype of genotoxic PAs. Riddelliine was used to investigate the genotoxic effects of PAs via analysis of gene expression in the target tissue of rats in this study. Previously we observed that the mutant frequency in the liver of rats gavaged with riddelliine was 3-fold higher than that in the control group. Molecular analysis of the mutants indicated that there was a statistically significant difference between the mutational spectra from riddelliine-treated and control rats. Results Riddelliine-induced gene expression profiles in livers of Big Blue transgenic rats were determined. The female rats were gavaged with riddelliine at a dose of 1 mg/kg body weight 5 days a week for 12 weeks. Rat whole genome microarray was used to perform genome-wide gene expression studies. When a cutoff value of a two-fold change and a P-value less than 0.01 were used as gene selection criteria, 919 genes were identified as differentially expressed in riddelliine-treated rats compared to the control animals. By analysis with the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Network, we found that these significantly changed genes were mainly involved in cancer, cell death, tissue development, cellular movement, tissue morphology, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, and cellular growth and proliferation. We further analyzed the genes involved in metabolism, injury of endothelial cells, liver abnormalities, and cancer development in detail. Conclusion The alterations in gene expression were directly related to the pathological outcomes reported previously. These results provided further insight into the mechanisms involved in toxicity and carcinogenesis after exposure to riddelliine, and permitted us to investigate the interaction of gene products inside the signaling networks

  3. Exercise-induced differential changes in gene expression among arterioles of skeletal muscles of obese rats.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, M Harold; Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T; Thorne, Pamela K; Martin, Jeffrey S; Rector, R Scott; Akter, Sadia; Davis, J Wade

    2015-09-15

    Using next-generation, transcriptome-wide RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology we assessed the effects of exercise training on transcriptional profiles in skeletal muscle arterioles isolated from the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats that underwent an endurance exercise training program (EX; n = 13), interval sprint training program (SPRINT; n = 14), or remained sedentary (Sed; n = 12). We hypothesized that the greatest effects of exercise would be in the gastrocnemius arterioles. Results show that EX caused the largest number of changes in gene expression in the soleus and white gastrocnemius 2a arterioles with little to no changes in the feed arteries. In contrast, SPRINT caused substantial changes in gene expression in the feed arteries. IPA canonical pathway analysis revealed 18 pathways with significant changes in gene expression when analyzed across vessels and revealed that EX induces increased expression of the following genes in all arterioles examined: Shc1, desert hedgehog protein (Dhh), adenylate cyclase 4 (Adcy4), G protein binding protein, alpha (Gnat1), and Bcl2l1 and decreased expression of ubiquitin D (Ubd) and cAMP response element modulator (Crem). EX increased expression of endothelin converting enzyme (Ece1), Hsp90b, Fkbp5, and Cdcl4b in four of five arterioles. SPRINT had effects on expression of Crem, Dhh, Bcl2l1, and Ubd that were similar to EX. SPRINT also increased expression of Nfkbia, Hspa5, Tubb 2a and Tubb 2b, and Fkbp5 in all five arterioles and increased expression of Gnat1 in all but the soleus second-order arterioles. Many contractile and/or structural protein genes were increased by SPRINT in the gastrocnemius feed artery, but the same genes exhibited decreased expression in red gastrocnemius arterioles. We conclude that training-induced changes in arteriolar gene expression patterns differ by muscle fiber type composition and along the arteriolar tree. PMID:26183477

  4. Dengue Virus Induces Novel Changes in Gene Expression of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Warke, Rajas V.; Xhaja, Kris; Martin, Katherine J.; Fournier, Marcia F.; Shaw, Sunil K.; Brizuela, Nathaly; de Bosch, Norma; Lapointe, David; Ennis, Francis A.; Rothman, Alan L.; Bosch, Irene

    2003-01-01

    Endothelial cells are permissive to dengue virus (DV) infection in vitro, although their importance as targets of DV infection in vivo remains a subject of debate. To analyze the virus-host interaction, we studied the effect of DV infection on gene expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by using differential display reverse transcription-PCR (DD-RTPCR), quantitative RT-PCR, and Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays. DD identified eight differentially expressed cDNAs, including inhibitor of apoptosis-1, 2′-5′ oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), a 2′-5′ OAS-like (OASL) gene, galectin-9, myxovirus protein A (MxA), regulator of G-protein signaling, endothelial and smooth muscle cell-derived neuropilin-like protein, and phospholipid scramblase 1. Microarray analysis of 22,000 human genes confirmed these findings and identified an additional 269 genes that were induced and 126 that were repressed more than fourfold after DV infection. Broad functional responses that were activated included the stress, defense, immune, cell adhesion, wounding, inflammatory, and antiviral pathways. These changes in gene expression were seen after infection of HUVECs with either laboratory-adapted virus or with virus isolated directly from plasma of DV-infected patients. Tumor necrosis factor alpha, OASL, and MxA and h-IAP1 genes were induced within the first 8 to 12 h after infection, suggesting a direct effect of DV infection. These global analyses of DV effects on cellular gene expression identify potentially novel mechanisms involved in dengue disease manifestations such as hemostatic disturbance. PMID:14557666

  5. Resveratrol and fenofibrate ameliorate fructose-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis by modulation of genes expression

    PubMed Central

    Abd El-Haleim, Enas A; Bahgat, Ashraf K; Saleh, Samira

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of resveratrol, alone and in combination with fenofibrate, on fructose-induced metabolic genes abnormalities in rats. METHODS: Giving a fructose-enriched diet (FED) to rats for 12 wk was used as a model for inducing hepatic dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. Adult male albino rats (150-200 g) were divided into a control group and a FED group which was subdivided into 4 groups, a control FED, fenofibrate (FENO) (100 mg/kg), resveratrol (RES) (70 mg/kg) and combined treatment (FENO + RES) (half the doses). All treatments were given orally from the 9th week till the end of experimental period. Body weight, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), liver index, glucose, insulin, insulin resistance (HOMA), serum and liver triglycerides (TGs), oxidative stress (liver MDA, GSH and SOD), serum AST, ALT, AST/ALT ratio and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured. Additionally, hepatic gene expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS-3), sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), fatty acid synthase (FAS), malonyl CoA decarboxylase (MCD), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and adipose tissue genes expression of leptin and adiponectin were investigated. Liver sections were taken for histopathological examination and steatosis area were determined. RESULTS: Rats fed FED showed damaged liver, impairment of glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, oxidative stress and dyslipidemia. As for gene expression, there was a change in favor of dyslipidemia and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) development. All treatment regimens showed some benefit in reversing the described deviations. Fructose caused deterioration in hepatic gene expression of SOCS-3, SREBP-1c, FAS, MDA and TGF-β1 and in adipose tissue gene expression of leptin and adiponectin. Fructose showed also an increase in body weight, insulin resistance (OGTT, HOMA), serum and liver TGs, hepatic MDA, serum AST, AST/ALT ratio and TNF-α compared to control. All

  6. Gene expression profile comparison in the penile tissue of diabetes and cavernous nerve injury-induced erectile dysfunction rat model

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Sung Chul; Lee, Sang Hoon; Jeon, Ju Hong; So, Insuk; Chae, Mee Ree; Park, Jong Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of cavernous nerve injury (CNI) on gene expression profiles in the cavernosal tissue of a CNI-induced erectile dysfunction (ED) model and to provide a basis for future investigations to discover potential target genes for ED treatment. Materials and Methods Young adult rats were divided randomly into 2 groups: sham operation and bilateral CN resection. At 12 weeks after CNI we measured erectile responses and performed microarray experiments and gene set enrichment analysis to reveal gene signatures that were enriched in the CNI-induced ED model. Alterations in gene signatures were compared with those in the diabetes-induced ED model. The diabetic-induced ED data is taken from GSE2457. Results The mean ratio of intracavernosal pressure/blood pressure for the CNI group (0.54±0.4 cmH2O) was significantly lower than that in the sham operation group (0.73±0.8 cmH2O, p<0.05). Supervised and unsupervised clustering analysis showed that the diabetes- and CNI-induced ED cavernous tissues had different gene expression profiles from normal cavernous tissues. We identified 46 genes that were upregulated and 77 genes that were downregulated in both the CNI- and diabetes-induced ED models. Conclusions Our genome-wide and computational studies provide the groundwork for understanding complex mechanisms and molecular signature changes in ED. PMID:27437539

  7. Disruption of Rpp1-mediated soybean rust immunity by virus-induced gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Bret; Campbell, Kimberly B; McMahon, Michael B; Luster, Douglas G

    2013-01-01

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi, a fungus that causes rust disease on soybean, has potential to impart significant yield loss and disrupt food security and animal feed production. Rpp1 is a soybean gene that confers immunity to soybean rust, and it is important to understand how it regulates the soybean defense system and to use this knowledge to protect commercial crops. It was previously discovered that some soybean proteins resembling transcription factors accumulate in the nucleus of Rpp1 soybeans. To determine if they contribute to immunity, Bean pod mottle virus was used to attenuate or silence the expression of their genes. Rpp1 plants subjected to virus-induced gene silencing exhibited reduced amounts of RNA for 5 of the tested genes, and the plants developed rust-like symptoms after subsequent inoculation with fungal spores. Symptoms were associated with the accumulation of rust fungal RNA and protein. Silenced plants also had reduced amounts of RNA for the soybean Myb84 transcription factor and soybean isoflavone O-methyltransferase, both of which are important to phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and lignin formation, crucial components of rust resistance. These results help resolve some of the genes that contribute to Rpp1-mediated immunity and improve upon the knowledge of the soybean defense system. It is possible that these genes could be manipulated to enhance rust resistance in otherwise susceptible soybean cultivars. PMID:24401541

  8. Method: low-cost delivery of the cotton leaf crumple virus-induced gene silencing system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously developed a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vector for cotton from the bipartite geminivirusCotton leaf crumple virus (CLCrV). The original CLCrV VIGS vector was designed for biolistic delivery by a gene gun. This prerequisite limited the use of the system to labs with access to biolistic equipment. Here we describe the adaptation of this system for delivery by Agrobacterium (Agrobacterium tumefaciens). We also describe the construction of two low-cost particle inflow guns. Results The biolistic CLCrV vector was transferred into two Agrobacterium binary plasmids. Agroinoculation of the binary plasmids into cotton resulted in silencing and GFP expression comparable to the biolistic vector. Two homemade low-cost gene guns were used to successfully inoculate cotton (G. hirsutum) and N. benthamiana with either the CLCrV VIGS vector or the Tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV) VIGS vector respectively. Conclusions These innovations extend the versatility of CLCrV-based VIGS for analyzing gene function in cotton. The two low-cost gene guns make VIGS experiments affordable for both research and teaching labs by providing a working alternative to expensive commercial gene guns. PMID:22853641

  9. Virus-induced gene silencing in Catharanthus roseus by biolistic inoculation of tobacco rattle virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Carqueijeiro, I; Masini, E; Foureau, E; Sepúlveda, L J; Marais, E; Lanoue, A; Besseau, S; Papon, N; Clastre, M; Dugé de Bernonville, T; Glévarec, G; Atehortùa, L; Oudin, A; Courdavault, V

    2015-11-01

    Catharanthus roseus constitutes the unique source of several valuable monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, including the antineoplastics vinblastine and vincristine. These alkaloids result from a complex biosynthetic pathway encompassing between 30 and 50 enzymatic steps whose characterisation is still underway. The most recent identifications of genes from this pathway relied on a tobacco rattle virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) approach, involving an Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation of plasmids encoding the two genomic components of the virus. As an alternative, we developed a biolistic-mediated approach of inoculation of virus-encoding plasmids that can be easily performed by a simple bombardment of young C. roseus plants. After optimisation of the transformation conditions, we showed that this approach efficiently silenced the phytoene desaturase gene, leading to strong and reproducible photobleaching of leaves. This biolistic transformation was also used to silence a previously characterised gene from the alkaloid biosynthetic pathway, encoding iridoid oxidase. Plant bombardment caused down-regulation of the targeted gene (70%), accompanied by a correlated decreased in MIA biosynthesis (45-90%), similar to results obtained via agro-transformation. Thus, the biolistic-based VIGS approach developed for C. roseus appears suitable for gene function elucidation and can readily be used instead of the Agrobacterium-based approach, e.g. when difficulties arise with agro-inoculations or when Agrobacterium-free procedures are required to avoid plant defence responses. PMID:26284695

  10. Virus-induced gene silencing for comparative functional studies in Gladiolus hybridus.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xionghui; Yuan, Xue; Wu, Ze; Khan, Muhammad Ali; Chen, Jin; Li, Xiaoxin; Gong, Benhe; Zhao, Yang; Wu, Jian; Wu, Chenyu; Yi, Mingfang

    2014-02-01

    Functional analysis of genes in gladiolus has previously been impractical due to the lack of an efficient stable genetic transformation method. However, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is effective in some plants which are difficult to transform through other methods. Although the Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based VIGS system has been developed and used for verifying gene functions in diverse plants, an appropriate TRV-VIGS approach for gladiolus has not been established yet. In this report we describe the first use of the TRV-VIGS system for gene silencing in gladiolus. Vacuum infiltration of cormels and young plants with the GhPDS-VIGS vector effectively down-regulated the PHYTOENE DESATURASE ortholog GhPDS gene and also resulted in various degrees of photobleaching in Gladiolus hybridus. The reduction in GhPDS expression was tested after TRV-based vector infection using real-time RT-PCR. In addition, the progress of TRV infection was detected by fluorescence visualization using a pTRV2: CP-GFP vector. In conclusion, the TRV-mediated VIGS described here will be an effective gene function analysis mechanism in gladiolus. PMID:24170343

  11. Multi-kilobase homozygous targeted gene replacement in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Susan M; Ortiz, Luis; Mali, Prashant; Aach, John; Church, George M

    2015-02-18

    Sequence-specific nucleases such as TALEN and the CRISPR/Cas9 system have so far been used to disrupt, correct or insert transgenes at precise locations in mammalian genomes. We demonstrate efficient 'knock-in' targeted replacement of multi-kilobase genes in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). Using a model system replacing endogenous human genes with their mouse counterpart, we performed a comprehensive study of targeting vector design parameters for homologous recombination. A 2.7 kilobase (kb) homozygous gene replacement was achieved in up to 11% of iPSC without selection. The optimal homology arm length was around 2 kb, with homology length being especially critical on the arm not adjacent to the cut site. Homologous sequence inside the cut sites was detrimental to targeting efficiency, consistent with a synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) mechanism. Using two nuclease sites, we observed a high degree of gene excisions and inversions, which sometimes occurred more frequently than indel mutations. While homozygous deletions of 86 kb were achieved with up to 8% frequency, deletion frequencies were not solely a function of nuclease activity and deletion size. Our results analyzing the optimal parameters for targeting vector design will inform future gene targeting efforts involving multi-kilobase gene segments, particularly in human iPSC. PMID:25414332

  12. Host-induced silencing of Fusarium culmorum genes protects wheat from infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wanxin; Kastner, Christine; Nowara, Daniela; Oliveira-Garcia, Ely; Rutten, Twan; Zhao, Yusheng; Deising, Holger B; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schweizer, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    Plants producing antisense or double-stranded RNA molecules that target specific genes of eukaryotic pests or pathogens can become protected from their attack. This beneficial effect was also reported for plant-fungus interactions and is believed to reflect uptake of the RNAs by the fungus via an as yet unknown mechanism, followed by target gene silencing. Here we report that wheat plants pre-infected with Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) strains containing antisense sequences against target genes of the Fusarium head blight (FHB) fungus F. culmorum caused a reduction of corresponding transcript levels in the pathogen and reduced disease symptoms. Stable transgenic wheat plants carrying an RNAi hairpin construct against the β-1, 3-glucan synthase gene FcGls1 of F. culmorum or a triple combination of FcGls1 with two additional, pre-tested target genes also showed enhanced FHB resistance in leaf and spike inoculation assays under greenhouse and near-field conditions, respectively. Microscopic evaluation of F. culmorum development in plants transiently or stably expressing FcGls1 silencing constructs revealed aberrant, swollen fungal hyphae, indicating severe hyphal cell wall defects. The results lead us to propose host-induced gene silencing (HIGS) as a plant protection approach that may also be applicable to highly FHB-susceptible wheat genotypes. PMID:27540093

  13. Host-induced silencing of Fusarium culmorum genes protects wheat from infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanxin; Kastner, Christine; Nowara, Daniela; Oliveira-Garcia, Ely; Rutten, Twan; Zhao, Yusheng; Deising, Holger B.; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schweizer, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Plants producing antisense or double-stranded RNA molecules that target specific genes of eukaryotic pests or pathogens can become protected from their attack. This beneficial effect was also reported for plant–fungus interactions and is believed to reflect uptake of the RNAs by the fungus via an as yet unknown mechanism, followed by target gene silencing. Here we report that wheat plants pre-infected with Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) strains containing antisense sequences against target genes of the Fusarium head blight (FHB) fungus F. culmorum caused a reduction of corresponding transcript levels in the pathogen and reduced disease symptoms. Stable transgenic wheat plants carrying an RNAi hairpin construct against the β-1, 3-glucan synthase gene FcGls1 of F. culmorum or a triple combination of FcGls1 with two additional, pre-tested target genes also showed enhanced FHB resistance in leaf and spike inoculation assays under greenhouse and near-field conditions, respectively. Microscopic evaluation of F. culmorum development in plants transiently or stably expressing FcGls1 silencing constructs revealed aberrant, swollen fungal hyphae, indicating severe hyphal cell wall defects. The results lead us to propose host-induced gene silencing (HIGS) as a plant protection approach that may also be applicable to highly FHB-susceptible wheat genotypes. PMID:27540093

  14. Targeted gene transfer into rat facial muscles by nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Akihiro; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Obara, Minoru; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) for gene transfer into rat facial muscles. LISWs are generated by irradiating a black natural rubber disk placed on the target tissue with nanosecond pulsed laser light from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, which is widely used in head and neck surgery and proven to be safe. After injection of plasmid deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) coding for Lac Z into rat facial muscles, pulsed laser is used to irradiate the laser target on the skin surface without incision or exposure of muscles. Lac Z expression is detected by X-gal staining of excised rat facial skin and muscles. Strong Lac Z expression is observed seven days after gene transfer, and sustained for up to 14 days. Gene transfer is achieved in facial muscles several millimeters deep from the surface. Gene expression is localized to the tissue exposed to LISWs. No tissue damage from LISWs is observed. LISW is a promising nonviral target gene transfer method because of its high spatial controllability, easy applicability, and minimal invasiveness. Gene transfer using LISW to produce therapeutic proteins such as growth factors could be used to treat nerve injury and paralysis. PMID:21950944

  15. Targeted gene transfer into rat facial muscles by nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Akihiro; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Obara, Minoru; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) for gene transfer into rat facial muscles. LISWs are generated by irradiating a black natural rubber disk placed on the target tissue with nanosecond pulsed laser light from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, which is widely used in head and neck surgery and proven to be safe. After injection of plasmid deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) coding for Lac Z into rat facial muscles, pulsed laser is used to irradiate the laser target on the skin surface without incision or exposure of muscles. Lac Z expression is detected by X-gal staining of excised rat facial skin and muscles. Strong Lac Z expression is observed seven days after gene transfer, and sustained for up to 14 days. Gene transfer is achieved in facial muscles several millimeters deep from the surface. Gene expression is localized to the tissue exposed to LISWs. No tissue damage from LISWs is observed. LISW is a promising nonviral target gene transfer method because of its high spatial controllability, easy applicability, and minimal invasiveness. Gene transfer using LISW to produce therapeutic proteins such as growth factors could be used to treat nerve injury and paralysis.

  16. Reduced Tyk2 gene expression in β-cells due to natural mutation determines susceptibility to virus-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Kenichi; Mine, Keiichiro; Inoue, Yoshitaka; Teshima, Miho; Ogawa, Shuichiro; Kai, Yuji; Kurafuji, Toshinobu; Hirakawa, Kanako; Miyakawa, Daiki; Ikeda, Haruka; Inada, Akari; Hara, Manami; Yamada, Hisakata; Akashi, Koichi; Niho, Yoshiyuki; Ina, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Takashi; Yoshikai, Yasunobu; Anzai, Keizo; Yamashita, Teruo; Minagawa, Hiroko; Fujimoto, Shuji; Kurisaki, Hironori; Shimoda, Kazuya; Katsuta, Hitoshi; Nagafuchi, Seiho

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that viruses play an important role in the development of diabetes. Although the diabetogenic encephalomyocarditis strain D virus induces diabetes in restricted lines of inbred mice, the susceptibility genes to virus-induced diabetes have not been identified. We report here that novel Tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2) gene mutations are present in virus-induced diabetes-sensitive SJL and SWR mice. Mice carrying the mutant Tyk2 gene on the virus-resistant C57BL/6 background are highly sensitive to virus-induced diabetes. Tyk2 gene expression is strongly reduced in Tyk2-mutant mice, associated with low Tyk2 promoter activity, and leads to decreased expression of interferon-inducible genes, resulting in significantly compromised antiviral response. Tyk2-mutant pancreatic β-cells are unresponsive even to high dose of Type I interferon. Reversal of virus-induced diabetes could be achieved by β-cell-specific Tyk2 gene expression. Thus, reduced Tyk2 gene expression in pancreatic β-cells due to natural mutation is responsible for susceptibility to virus-induced diabetes. PMID:25849081

  17. Reduced Tyk2 gene expression in β-cells due to natural mutation determines susceptibility to virus-induced diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Kenichi; Mine, Keiichiro; Inoue, Yoshitaka; Teshima, Miho; Ogawa, Shuichiro; Kai, Yuji; Kurafuji, Toshinobu; Hirakawa, Kanako; Miyakawa, Daiki; Ikeda, Haruka; Inada, Akari; Hara, Manami; Yamada, Hisakata; Akashi, Koichi; Niho, Yoshiyuki; Ina, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Takashi; Yoshikai, Yasunobu; Anzai, Keizo; Yamashita, Teruo; Minagawa, Hiroko; Fujimoto, Shuji; Kurisaki, Hironori; Shimoda, Kazuya; Katsuta, Hitoshi; Nagafuchi, Seiho

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that viruses play an important role in the development of diabetes. Although the diabetogenic encephalomyocarditis strain D virus induces diabetes in restricted lines of inbred mice, the susceptibility genes to virus-induced diabetes have not been identified. We report here that novel Tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2) gene mutations are present in virus-induced diabetes-sensitive SJL and SWR mice. Mice carrying the mutant Tyk2 gene on the virus-resistant C57BL/6 background are highly sensitive to virus-induced diabetes. Tyk2 gene expression is strongly reduced in Tyk2-mutant mice, associated with low Tyk2 promoter activity, and leads to decreased expression of interferon-inducible genes, resulting in significantly compromised antiviral response. Tyk2-mutant pancreatic β-cells are unresponsive even to high dose of Type I interferon. Reversal of virus-induced diabetes could be achieved by β-cell-specific Tyk2 gene expression. Thus, reduced Tyk2 gene expression in pancreatic β-cells due to natural mutation is responsible for susceptibility to virus-induced diabetes. PMID:25849081

  18. Twist1 Is a TNF-Inducible Inhibitor of Clock Mediated Activation of Period Genes

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Daniel; Lopez, Martin; Franken, Paul; Fontana, Adriano

    2015-01-01

    Background Activation of the immune system affects the circadian clock. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and Interleukin (IL)-1β inhibit the expression of clock genes including Period (Per) genes and the PAR-bZip clock-controlled gene D-site albumin promoter-binding protein (Dbp). These effects are due to cytokine-induced interference of E-box mediated transcription of clock genes. In the present study we have assessed the two E-box binding transcriptional regulators Twist1 and Twist2 for their role in cytokine induced inhibition of clock genes. Methods The expression of the clock genes Per1, Per2, Per3 and of Dbp was assessed in NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblasts and the mouse hippocampal neuronal cell line HT22. Cells were treated for 4h with TNF and IL-1β. The functional role of Twist1 and Twist2 was assessed by siRNAs against the Twist genes and by overexpression of TWIST proteins. In luciferase (luc) assays NIH-3T3 cells were transfected with reporter gene constructs, which contain a 3xPer1 E-box or a Dbp E-box. Quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) was performed using antibodies to TWIST1 and CLOCK, and the E-box consensus sequences of Dbp (CATGTG) and Per1 E-box (CACGTG). Results We report here that siRNA against Twist1 protects NIH-3T3 cells and HT22 cells from down-regulation of Period and Dbp by TNF and IL-1β. Overexpression of Twist1, but not of Twist2, mimics the effect of the cytokines. TNF down-regulates the activation of Per1-3xE-box-luc, the effect being prevented by siRNA against Twist1. Overexpression of Twist1, but not of Twist2, inhibits Per1-3xE-box-luc or Dbp-E-Box-luc activity. ChIP experiments show TWIST1 induction by TNF to compete with CLOCK binding to the E-box of Period genes and Dbp. Conclusion Twist1 plays a pivotal role in the TNF mediated suppression of E-box dependent transactivation of Period genes and Dbp. Thereby Twist1 may provide a link between the immune system and the circadian timing system. PMID:26361389

  19. Functional characterization of a Penicillium chrysogenum mutanase gene induced upon co-cultivation with Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microbial gene expression is strongly influenced by environmental growth conditions. Comparison of gene expression under different conditions is frequently used for functional analysis and to unravel regulatory networks, however, gene expression responses to co-cultivation with other microorganisms, a common occurrence in nature, is rarely studied under laboratory conditions. To explore cellular responses of the antibiotic-producing fungus Penicillium chrysogenum to prokaryotes, the present study investigates its transcriptional responses during co-cultivation with Bacillus subtilis. Results Steady-state glucose-limited chemostats of P. chrysogenum grown under penillicin-non-producing conditions were inoculated with B. subtilis. Physiological and transcriptional responses of P. chrysogenum in the resulting mixed culture were monitored over 72 h. Under these conditions, B. subtilis outcompeted P. chrysogenum, as reflected by a three-fold increase of the B. subtilis population size and a two-fold reduction of the P. chrysogenum biomass concentration. Genes involved in the penicillin pathway and in synthesis of the penicillin precursors and side-chain were unresponsive to the presence of B. subtilis. Moreover, Penicillium polyketide synthase and nonribosomal peptide synthase genes were either not expressed or down-regulated. Among the highly responsive genes, two putative α-1,3 endoglucanase (mutanase) genes viz Pc12g07500 and Pc12g13330 were upregulated by more than 15-fold and 8-fold, respectively. Measurement of enzyme activity in the supernatant of mixed culture confirmed that the co-cultivation with B. subtilis induced mutanase production. Mutanase activity was neither observed in pure cultures of P. chrysogenum or B. subtilis, nor during exposure of P. chrysogenum to B. subtilis culture supernatants or heat-inactivated B. subtilis cells. However, mutanase production was observed in cultures of P. chrysogenum exposed to filter-sterilized supernatants

  20. ssiRNA Induced Gene Silencing is Transmitted Between Cells From the Mammalian Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tian-Yong; Zou, Shi-Ping; Alimova, Yelena V.; Wang, Guoying; Hauser, Kurt F.; Ghandour, M. Said; Knapp, Pamela E.

    2014-01-01

    Although siRNA induced gene silencing can be transmitted between cells in plants and in C. elegans, this phenomenon has been barely studied in mammalian cells. Both immortalized oligodendrocytes and SNB-19 glioblastoma cells were transfected with siRNA constructs for PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) or Akt (Akt/protein kinase B). Co-cultures were established between silenced cells and non-silenced cells which were hygromycin resistant and/or expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP). After fluorescence sorting or hygromycin selection to remove the silenced cells, the expression of PTEN or Akt genes in the originally unsilenced cells was in all cases significantly decreased. Importantly, silencing did not occur in transwell culture studies, suggesting that transmission of the silencing signal requires a close association between cells. These results provide the first direct demonstration that an siRNA induced silencing signal can be transmitted between mammalian central nervous system (CNS) cells. PMID:16923165

  1. [Viral transfer of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Wędrowska, Ewelina; Wandtke, Tomasz; Dyczek, Andrzej; Woźniak, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively induces carcinoma cell death through the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Preclinical trials of gene therapy have been conducted using viral transfer of the TRAIL transgene into prostate, bladder, breast, kidney, liver, non-small cell lung cancer and also glioblastoma cells. Experiments in vitro demonstrated the extensive apoptosis of target cells as well as frequent disease regression or remission. TRAIL transfer did not show any side effects, opposite to chemotherapy. Encouraging results of TRAIL-related gene therapy were observed in rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes. Adenoviral vectors (AdV) encoding TRAIL are the most promising tool in anti-tumor therapy. They have undergone numerous modifications by increasing transfection efficiency and transgene expression in target cells. However, only one clinical phase I trial has been performed. AdV encoding the TRAIL transgene caused local inflammation and apoptosis in patients with prostate cancer. PMID:27259213

  2. Targeted Correction and Restored Function of the CFTR Gene in Cystic Fibrosis Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Ana M.; Kramer, Philipp; Bui, Jacquelin H.; Chung, Wook Joon; Li, Xuan Shirley; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Hawkins, Finn; Liao, Wei; Mora, Daniela; Choi, Sangbum; Wang, Jianbin; Sun, Helena C.; Paschon, David E.; Guschin, Dmitry Y.; Gregory, Philip D.; Kotton, Darrell N.; Holmes, Michael C.; Sorscher, Eric J.; Davis, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recently developed reprogramming and genome editing technologies make possible the derivation of corrected patient-specific pluripotent stem cell sources—potentially useful for the development of new therapeutic approaches. Starting with skin fibroblasts from patients diagnosed with cystic fibrosis, we derived and characterized induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines. We then utilized zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), designed to target the endogenous CFTR gene, to mediate correction of the inherited genetic mutation in these patient-derived lines via homology-directed repair (HDR). We observed an exquisitely sensitive, homology-dependent preference for targeting one CFTR allele versus the other. The corrected cystic fibrosis iPSCs, when induced to differentiate in vitro, expressed the corrected CFTR gene; importantly, CFTR correction resulted in restored expression of the mature CFTR glycoprotein and restoration of CFTR chloride channel function in iPSC-derived epithelial cells. PMID:25772471

  3. Targeted correction and restored function of the CFTR gene in cystic fibrosis induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Crane, Ana M; Kramer, Philipp; Bui, Jacquelin H; Chung, Wook Joon; Li, Xuan Shirley; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Hawkins, Finn; Liao, Wei; Mora, Daniela; Choi, Sangbum; Wang, Jianbin; Sun, Helena C; Paschon, David E; Guschin, Dmitry Y; Gregory, Philip D; Kotton, Darrell N; Holmes, Michael C; Sorscher, Eric J; Davis, Brian R

    2015-04-14

    Recently developed reprogramming and genome editing technologies make possible the derivation of corrected patient-specific pluripotent stem cell sources-potentially useful for the development of new therapeutic approaches. Starting with skin fibroblasts from patients diagnosed with cystic fibrosis, we derived and characterized induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines. We then utilized zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), designed to target the endogenous CFTR gene, to mediate correction of the inherited genetic mutation in these patient-derived lines via homology-directed repair (HDR). We observed an exquisitely sensitive, homology-dependent preference for targeting one CFTR allele versus the other. The corrected cystic fibrosis iPSCs, when induced to differentiate in vitro, expressed the corrected CFTR gene; importantly, CFTR correction resulted in restored expression of the mature CFTR glycoprotein and restoration of CFTR chloride channel function in iPSC-derived epithelial cells. PMID:25772471

  4. Gene expression profile of zeitlupe/lov kelch protein1 T-DNA insertion mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana: Downregulation of auxin-inducible genes in hypocotyls

    PubMed Central

    Saitoh, Aya; Takase, Tomoyuki; Kitaki, Hiroyuki; Miyazaki, Yuji; Kiyosue, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Elongation of hypocotyl cells has been studied as a model for elucidating the contribution of cellular expansion to plant organ growth. ZEITLUPE (ZTL) or LOV KELCH PROTEIN1 (LKP1) is a positive regulator of warmth-induced hypocotyl elongation under white light in Arabidopsis, although the molecular mechanisms by which it promotes hypocotyl cell elongation remain unknown. Microarray analysis showed that 134 genes were upregulated and 204 genes including 15 auxin-inducible genes were downregulated in the seedlings of 2 ztl T-DNA insertion mutants grown under warm conditions with continuous white light. Application of a polar auxin transport inhibitor, an auxin antagonist or an auxin biosynthesis inhibitor inhibited hypocotyl elongation of control seedlings to the level observed with the ztl mutant. Our data suggest the involvement of auxin and auxin-inducible genes in ZTL-mediated hypocotyl elongation. PMID:26237185

  5. Psychological Stress, Cocaine and Natural Reward Each Induce Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Genes in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovsky, Ashly A.; Boehning, Darren; Li, Dingge; Zhang, Yafang; Fan, Xiuzhen; Green, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Our prior research has shown that the transcription of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress transcription factors Activating Transcription Factor 3 (ATF3) and ATF4 are induced by amphetamine and restraint stress in rat striatum. However, presently it is unknown the full extent of ER stress responses to psychological stress or cocaine, and which of the three ER stress pathways is activated. The current study examines transcriptional responses of key ER stress target genes subsequent to psychological stress or cocaine. Rats were subjected to acute or repeated restraint stress or cocaine treatment and mRNA was isolated from dorsal striatum, medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens brain tissue. ER stress gene mRNA expression was measured using quantitative PCR and RNA sequencing. Restraint stress and cocaine induced transcription of the classic ER stress-induced genes (BIP, CHOP, ATF3 and GADD34) and of two other ER stress components XBP1 and ATF6. In addition, rats living in an enriched environment (large group cage with novel toys changed daily) exhibited rapid induction of GADD34 and ATF3 after 30 min of exploring novel toys, suggesting these genes are also involved in normal non-pathological signaling. However, environmental enrichment, a paradigm that produces protective addiction and depression phenotypes in rats, attenuated the rapid induction of ATF3 and GADD34 after restraint stress. These experiments provide a sensitive measure of ER stress and, more importantly, these results offer good evidence of the activation of ER stress mechanisms from psychological stress, cocaine and natural reward. Thus, ER stress genes may be targets for novel therapeutic targets for depression and addiction. PMID:23644055

  6. Psychological stress, cocaine and natural reward each induce endoplasmic reticulum stress genes in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Pavlovsky, A A; Boehning, D; Li, D; Zhang, Y; Fan, X; Green, T A

    2013-08-29

    Our prior research has shown that the transcription of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress transcription factors activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) and ATF4 are induced by amphetamine and restraint stress in rat striatum. However, presently the full extent of ER stress responses to psychological stress or cocaine, and which of the three ER stress pathways is activated is unknown. The current study examines transcriptional responses of key ER stress target genes subsequent to psychological stress or cocaine. Rats were subjected to acute or repeated restraint stress or cocaine treatment and mRNA was isolated from dorsal striatum, medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens brain tissue. ER stress gene mRNA expression was measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and RNA sequencing. Restraint stress and cocaine-induced transcription of the classic ER stress-induced genes (BIP, CHOP, ATF3 and GADD34) and of two other ER stress components x-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) and ATF6. In addition, rats living in an enriched environment (large group cage with novel toys changed daily) exhibited rapid induction of GADD34 and ATF3 after 30 min of exploring novel toys, suggesting these genes are also involved in normal non-pathological signaling. However, environmental enrichment, a paradigm that produces protective addiction and depression phenotypes in rats, attenuated the rapid induction of ATF3 and GADD34 after restraint stress. These experiments provide a sensitive measure of ER stress and, more importantly, these results offer good evidence of the activation of ER stress mechanisms from psychological stress, cocaine and natural reward. Thus, ER stress genes may be targets for novel therapeutic targets for depression and addiction. PMID:23644055

  7. Chlorhexidine Induces VanA-Type Vancomycin Resistance Genes in Enterococci.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Pooja; Ziegler, Elizabeth; Palmer, Kelli L

    2016-04-01

    Chlorhexidine is a bisbiguanide antiseptic used for infection control. Vancomycin-resistantE. faecium(VREfm) is among the leading causes of hospital-acquired infections. VREfm may be exposed to chlorhexidine at supra- and subinhibitory concentrations as a result of chlorhexidine bathing and chlorhexidine-impregnated central venous catheter use. We used RNA sequencing to investigate how VREfm responds to chlorhexidine gluconate exposure. Among the 35 genes upregulated ≥10-fold after 15 min of exposure to the MIC of chlorhexidine gluconate were those encoding VanA-type vancomycin resistance (vanHAX) and those associated with reduced daptomycin susceptibility (liaXYZ). We confirmed thatvanAupregulation was not strain or species specific by querying other VanA-type VRE. VanB-type genes were not induced. ThevanHpromoter was found to be responsive to subinhibitory chlorhexidine gluconate in VREfm, as was production of the VanX protein. UsingvanHreporter experiments withBacillus subtilisand deletion analysis in VREfm, we found that this phenomenon is VanR dependent. Deletion ofvanRdid not result in increased chlorhexidine susceptibility, demonstrating thatvanHAXinduction is not protective against chlorhexidine. As expected, VanA-type VRE is more susceptible to ceftriaxone in the presence of sub-MIC chlorhexidine. Unexpectedly, VREfm is also more susceptible to vancomycin in the presence of subinhibitory chlorhexidine, suggesting that chlorhexidine-induced gene expression changes lead to additional alterations in cell wall synthesis. We conclude that chlorhexidine induces expression of VanA-type vancomycin resistance genes and genes associated with daptomycin nonsusceptibility. Overall, our results indicate that the impacts of subinhibitory chlorhexidine exposure on hospital-associated pathogens should be further investigated in laboratory studies. PMID:26810654

  8. Ethylene-induced differential gene expression during abscission of citrus leaves

    PubMed Central

    Merelo, Paz; Cercós, Manuel; Tadeo, Francisco R.; Talón, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to identify and classify genes involved in the process of leaf abscission in Clementina de Nules (Citrus clementina Hort. Ex Tan.). A 7 K unigene citrus cDNA microarray containing 12 K spots was used to characterize the transcriptome of the ethylene-induced abscission process in laminar abscission zone-enriched tissues and the petiole of debladed leaf explants. In these conditions, ethylene induced 100% leaf explant abscission in 72 h while, in air-treated samples, the abscission period started later and took 240 h. Gene expression monitored during the first 36 h of ethylene treatment showed that out of the 12 672 cDNA microarray probes, ethylene differentially induced 725 probes distributed as follows: 216 (29.8%) probes in the laminar abscission zone and 509 (70.2%) in the petiole. Functional MIPS classification and manual annotation of differentially expressed genes highlighted key processes regulating the activation and progress of the cell separation that brings about abscission. These included cell-wall modification, lipid transport, protein biosynthesis and degradation, and differential activation of signal transduction and transcription control pathways. Expression data associated with the petiole indicated the occurrence of a double defensive strategy mediated by the activation of a biochemical programme including scavenging ROS, defence and PR genes, and a physical response mostly based on lignin biosynthesis and deposition. This work identifies new genes probably involved in the onset and development of the leaf abscission process and suggests a different but co-ordinated and complementary role for the laminar abscission zone and the petiole during the process of abscission. PMID:18515267

  9. Activation of vascular endothelial growth factor gene transcription by hypoxia-inducible factor 1.

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, J A; Jiang, B H; Iyer, N V; Agani, F; Leung, S W; Koos, R D; Semenza, G L

    1996-01-01

    Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is induced in cells exposed to hypoxia or ischemia. Neovascularization stimulated by VEGF occurs in several important clinical contexts, including myocardial ischemia, retinal disease, and tumor growth. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a heterodimeric basic helix-loop-helix protein that activates transcription of the human erythropoietin gene in hypoxic cells. Here we demonstrate the involvement of HIF-1 in the activation of VEGF transcription. VEGF 5'-flanking sequences mediated transcriptional activation of reporter gene expression in hypoxic Hep3B cells. A 47-bp sequence located 985 to 939 bp 5' to the VEGF transcription initiation site mediated hypoxia-inducible reporter gene expression directed by a simian virus 40 promoter element that was otherwise minimally responsive to hypoxia. When reporters containing VEGF sequences, in the context of the native VEGF or heterologous simian virus 40 promoter, were cotransfected with expression vectors encoding HIF-1alpha and HIF-1beta (ARNT [aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator]), reporter gene transcription was much greater in both hypoxic and nonhypoxic cells than in cells transfected with the reporter alone. A HIF-1 binding site was demonstrated in the 47-bp hypoxia response element, and a 3-bp substitution eliminated the ability of the element to bind HIF-1 and to activate transcription in response to hypoxia and/or recombinant HIF-1. Cotransfection of cells with an expression vector encoding a dominant negative form of HIF-1alpha inhibited the activation of reporter transcription in hypoxic cells in a dose-dependent manner. VEGF mRNA was not induced by hypoxia in mutant cells that do not express the HIF-1beta (ARNT) subunit. These findings implicate HIF-1 in the activation of VEGF transcription in hypoxic cells. PMID:8756616

  10. Molecular mapping of a new induced gene for nuclear male sterility in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new NMS line, NMS HA89-872, induced by mitomycin C and streptomycin carries a single recessive male-sterile gene ms6. An F2 population of 88 plants was obtained from a cross between nuclear male-sterile mutant NMS HA89-872 (msms) and male-fertile line RHA271 (MsMs). 225 SSR primers and 9 RFLP-deri...

  11. Identification and gene expression of anaerobically induced enolase in Echinochloa phyllopogon and Echinochloa crus-pavonis.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, T C; Mujer, C V; Andrews, D L; Williams, A S; Cobb, B G; Kennedy, R A; Rumpho, M E

    1995-01-01

    Enolase (2-phospho-D-glycerate hydrolase, EC 4.2.1.11) has been identified as an anaerobic stress protein in Echinochloa oryzoides based on the homology of its internal amino acid sequence with those of enolases from other organisms, by immunological reactivity, and induction of catalytic activity during anaerobic stress. Enolase activity was induced 5-fold in anoxically treated seedlings of three flood-tolerant species (E. oryzoides, Echinochloa phyllopogon, and rice [Oryza sativa L.]) but not in the flood-intolerant species (Echinochloa crus-pavonis). A 540-bp fragment of the enolase gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction from cDNAs of E. phyllopogon and maize (Zea mays L.) and used to estimate the number of enolase genes and to study the expression of enolase transcripts in E. phyllopogon, E. crus-pavonis, and maize. Southern blot analysis indicated that only one enolase gene is present in either E. phyllopogon or E. crus-pavonis. Three patterns of enolase gene expression were observed in the three species studied. In E. phyllopogon, enolase induction at both the mRNA and enzyme activity levels was sustained at all times with a further induction after 48 h of anoxia. In contrast, enolase was induced in hypoxically treated maize root tips only at the mRNA level. In E. crus-pavonis, enolase mRNA and enzyme activity were induced during hypoxia, but activity was only transiently elevated. These results suggest that enolase expression in maize and E. crus-pavonis during anoxia are similarly regulated at the transcriptional level but differ in posttranslational regulation, whereas enolase is fully induced in E. phyllopogon during anaerobiosis. PMID:7480340

  12. Altered circadian rhythm of the clock genes in fibrotic livers induced by carbon tetrachloride.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Kakan, Xiamusiya; Zhang, Jianfa

    2010-04-16

    Disruption in circadian rhythms either by mutation in mice or by shiftwork in people, is associated with an increased risk for the development of multiple organ diseases. In turn, organ disease may influence the function of clock genes and peripheral circadian systems. Here we showed that hepatic fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride in mice leads to alterations in the circadian rhythms of hepatic clock genes. Especially, we found an impaired daily Cry2 rhythm in the fibrotic livers, with markedly decreased levels during the day time while compared with control livers. Associatively, the expressions of two important clock-regulated genes peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase lost circadian rhythm with significantly decreased levels during the light-dark (12/12h) cycle in fibrotic livers. PMID:20233594

  13. Expression of an exogenous eukaryotic DNA methyltransferase gene induces transformation of NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J; Issa, J P; Herman, J; Bassett, D E; Nelkin, B D; Baylin, S B

    1993-01-01

    Abnormal regional increases in DNA methylation, which have potential for causing gene inactivation and chromosomal instability, are consistently found in immortalized and tumorigenic cells. Increased DNA methyltransferase activity, which is also a characteristic of such cells, is a candidate to mediate these abnormal DNA methylation patterns. We now show that, in NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts, constitutive overexpression of an exogenous mouse DNA methyltransferase gene results in a marked increase in overall DNA methylation which is accompanied by tumorigenic transformation. These transformation changes can also be elicited by dexamethasone-inducible expression of an exogenous DNA methyltransferase gene. Our findings provide strong evidence that the increase in DNA methyltransferase activity associated with tumor progression could be a key step in carcinogenesis and provide a model system that can be used to further study this possibility. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8415627

  14. Persistent virus-induced gene silencing in asymptomatic accessions of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Flores, Miguel A; Reyes, Maria I; Robertson, Dominique Niki; Kjemtrup, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Coupled with the advantages afforded by the model plant Arabidopsis, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) offers a rapid means to assess gene function. The geminivirus vector based on Cabbage leaf curl virus described here has the benefits of small insert size and persistent silencing of the target gene through the life cycle of the plant. Here, we show that genetic variation in the vast collection of Arabidopsis accessions can be leveraged to ameliorate viral symptomology that accompanies the VIGS procedure. The plasticity of phenotypes under different day lengths or temperature conditions can be exploited to achieve maximum silencing efficacy in either vegetative or inflorescence tissue, according to the question being asked. Protocols and vectors for Agro-infiltration of primary leaves, subapical pricking in older plants, and microprojectile bombardment are described. PMID:25757779

  15. Low temperature induced changes in gene expression in low temperature-sensitive and -tolerant tomatoes

    SciTech Connect

    Vallejos, C.E.; Camp, S.F. )

    1989-04-01

    The objective of this project is to identify genes that control low temperature (LT) tolerance/acclimation in a high altitude ecotype of the wild tomato L. hirsutum. LT induced changes in gene expression were monitored via 2-D gel electrophoresis and fluorography of radiolabeled in vitro translation products. Two types of changes were detected when both LT-sensitive (L. esculentum, L. hirsutum 100m) and LT-tolerant (L. hirsutum 3100m) genotypes were exposed to 6{degrees}C for 12 h in the dark: (a) specific LT induction or up-regulation or up-regulation of some genes; and (b) changes in the turnover rate of day specific mRNA's. Increased exposure lead to the disappearance of some mRNA's. These comparisons will lead to the identification of mRNA's involved in acclimation, and those involved in stress response.

  16. IL-17 Induces an Expanded Range of Downstream Genes in Reconstituted Human Epidermis Model

    PubMed Central

    Chiricozzi, Andrea; Nograles, Kristine E.; Johnson-Huang, Leanne M.; Fuentes-Duculan, Judilyn; Cardinale, Irma; Bonifacio, Kathleen M.; Gulati, Nicholas; Mitsui, Hiroshi; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Background IL-17 is the defining cytokine of the Th17, Tc17, and γδ T cell populations that plays a critical role in mediating inflammation and autoimmunity. Psoriasis vulgaris is an inflammatory skin disease mediated by Th1 and Th17 cytokines with relevant contributions of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17. Despite the pivotal role IL-17 plays in psoriasis, and in contrast to the other key mediators involved in the psoriasis cytokine cascade that are capable of inducing broad effects on keratinocytes, IL-17 was demonstrated to regulate the expression of a limited number of genes in monolayer keratinocytes cultured in vitro. Methodology/Principal Findings Given the clinical efficacy of anti-IL-17 agents is associated with an impressive reduction in a large set of inflammatory genes, we sought a full-thickness skin model that more closely resemble in vivo epidermal architecture. Using a reconstructed human epidermis (RHE), IL-17 was able to upregulate 419 gene probes and downregulate 216 gene probes. As possible explanation for the increased gene induction in the RHE model is that C/CAAT-enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBP) -β, the transcription factor regulating IL-17-responsive genes, is expressed preferentially in differentiated keratinocytes. Conclusions/Significance The genes identified in IL-17-treated RHE are likely relevant to the IL-17 effects in psoriasis, since ixekizumab (anti-IL-17A agent) strongly suppressed the “RHE” genes in psoriasis patients treated in vivo with this IL-17 antagonist. PMID:24587313

  17. Expression profiling of genes regulated by Fra-1/AP-1 transcription factor during bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Fra-1/AP-1 transcription factor regulates the expression of genes controlling various processes including migration, invasion, and survival as well as extracellular remodeling. We recently demonstrated that loss of Fra-1 leads to exacerbated bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, accompanied by enhanced expression of various inflammatory and fibrotic genes. To better understand the molecular mechanisms by which Fra-1 confers protection during bleomycin-induced lung injury, genome-wide mRNA expression profiling was performed. Results We found that Fra-1 regulates gene expression programs that include: 1) several cytokines and chemokines involved in inflammation, 2) several genes involved in the extracellular remodeling and cell adhesion, and 3) several genes involved in programmed cell death. Conclusion Loss of Fra-1 leads to the enhanced expression of genes regulating inflammation and immune responses and decreased the expression of genes involved in apoptosis, suggesting that this transcription factor distinctly modulates early pro-fibrotic cellular responses. PMID:23758685

  18. Stress induced gene expression drives transient DNA methylation changes at adjacent repetitive elements

    PubMed Central

    Secco, David; Wang, Chuang; Shou, Huixia; Schultz, Matthew D; Chiarenza, Serge; Nussaume, Laurent; Ecker, Joseph R; Whelan, James; Lister, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation (mC) is a genome modification that can regulate the expression of coding and non-coding genetic elements. However, little is known about the involvement of mC in response to environmental cues. Using whole genome bisulfite sequencing to assess the spatio-temporal dynamics of mC in rice grown under phosphate starvation and recovery conditions, we identified widespread phosphate starvation-induced changes in mC, preferentially localized in transposable elements (TEs) close to highly induced genes. These changes in mC occurred after changes in nearby gene transcription, were mostly DCL3a-independent, and could partially be propagated through mitosis, however no evidence of meiotic transmission was observed. Similar analyses performed in Arabidopsis revealed a very limited effect of phosphate starvation on mC, suggesting a species-specific mechanism. Overall, this suggests that TEs in proximity to environmentally induced genes are silenced via hypermethylation, and establishes the temporal hierarchy of transcriptional and epigenomic changes in response to stress. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09343.001 PMID:26196146

  19. Exchange factors directly activated by cAMP mediate melanocortin 4 receptor-induced gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Glas, Evi; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Gs protein-coupled receptors regulate many vital body functions by activation of cAMP response elements (CRE) via cAMP-dependent kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of the CRE binding protein (CREB). Melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4R) are prototypical Gs-coupled receptors that orchestrate the hypothalamic control of food-intake and metabolism. Remarkably, the significance of PKA for MC4R-induced CRE-dependent transcription in hypothalamic cells has not been rigorously interrogated yet. In two hypothalamic cell lines, we observed that blocking PKA activity had only weak or no effects on reporter gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of exchange factors directly activated by cAMP-1/2 (EPAC-1/2) mitigated MC4R-induced CRE reporter activation and mRNA induction of the CREB-dependent genes c-fos and thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Furthermore, we provide first evidence that extracellular-regulated kinases-1/2 (ERK-1/2) activated by EPACs and not PKA are the elusive CREB kinases responsible for MC4R-induced CREB/CRE activation in hypothalamic cells. Overall, these data emphasize the pivotal role of EPACs rather than PKA in hypothalamic gene expression elicited by a prototypical Gs-coupled receptor. PMID:27612207

  20. Erythropoietin gene expression: developmental-stage specificity, cell-type specificity, and hypoxia inducibility.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Erythrocytes play an essential role in the delivery of oxygen from the lung to every organ; a decrease in erythrocytes (anemia) causes hypoxic stress and tissue damage. To maintain oxygen homeostasis in adult mammals, when the kidney senses hypoxia, it secretes an erythroid growth factor, erythropoietin (Epo), which stimulates erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. Recently, studies using genetically modified mice have shown that the in vivo expression profile of the Epo gene changes dramatically during development. The first Epo-producing cells emerge in the neural crest and neuroepithelium of mid-stage embryos and support primitive erythropoiesis in the yolk sac. Subsequently, Epo from the hepatocytes stimulates erythropoiesis in the fetal liver of later stage embryos in a paracrine manner. In fact, erythroid lineage cells comprise the largest cell population in the fetal liver, and hepatocytes are distributed among the erythroid cell clusters. Adult erythropoiesis in the bone marrow requires Epo that is secreted by renal Epo-producing cells (REP cells). REP cells are widely distributed in the renal cortex and outer medulla. Hypoxia-inducible Epo production both in hepatocytes and REP cells is controlled at the gene transcription level that is mainly mediated by the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF) pathway. These mouse studies further provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of the cell-type specific, hypoxia-inducible expression of the Epo gene, which involves multiple sets of cis- and trans-regulatory elements. PMID:25786542

  1. Regulatory elements responsible for inducible expression of the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor gene in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, M; Nagata, S

    1990-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) plays an essential role in granulopoiesis during bacterial infection. Macrophages produce G-CSF in response to bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To elucidate the mechanism of the induction of G-CSF gene in macrophages or macrophage-monocytes, we have examined regulatory cis elements in the promoter of mouse G-CSF gene. Analyses of linker-scanning and internal deletion mutants of the G-CSF promoter by the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay have indicated that at least three regulatory elements are indispensable for the LPS-induced expression of the G-CSF gene in macrophages. When one of the three elements was reiterated and placed upstream of the TATA box of the G-CSF promoter, it mediated inducibility as a tissue-specific and orientation-independent enhancer. Although this element contains a conserved NF-kappa B-like binding site, the gel retardation assay and DNA footprint analysis with nuclear extracts from macrophage cell lines demonstrated that nuclear proteins bind to the DNA sequence downstream of the NF-kappa B-like element, but not to the conserved element itself. The DNA sequence of the binding site was found to have some similarities to the LPS-responsive element which was recently identified in the promoter of the mouse class II major histocompatibility gene. Images PMID:1691438

  2. DELLA proteins regulate expression of a subset of AM symbiosis-induced genes in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Floss, Daniela S; Lévesque-Tremblay, Véronique; Park, Hee-Jin; Harrison, Maria J

    2016-04-01

    The majority of the vascular flowering plants form symbiotic associations with fungi from the phylum Glomeromycota through which both partners gain access to nutrients, either mineral nutrients in the case of the plant, or carbon, in the case of the fungus. (1) The association develops in the roots and requires substantial remodeling of the root cortical cells where branched fungal hyphae, called arbuscules, are housed in a new membrane-bound apoplastic compartment. (2) Nutrient exchange between the symbionts occurs over this interface and its development and maintenance is critical for symbiosis. Previously, we showed that DELLA proteins, which are well known as repressors of gibberellic acid signaling, also regulate development of AM symbiosis and are necessary to enable arbuscule development. (3) Furthermore, constitutive overexpression of a dominant DELLA protein (della1-Δ18) is sufficient to induce transcripts of several AM symbiosis-induced genes, even in the absence of the fungal symbiont. (4) Here we further extend this approach and identify AM symbiosis genes that respond transcriptionally to constitutive expression of a dominant DELLA protein and also genes that do respond to this treatment. Additionally, we demonstrate that DELLAs interact with REQUIRED FOR ARBUSCULE DEVELOPMENT 1 (RAD1) which further extends our knowledge of GRAS factor complexes that have the potential to regulate gene expression during AM symbiosis. PMID:26984507

  3. Distinct structural transitions of chromatin topological domains correlate with coordinated hormone-induced gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Le Dily, François; Baù, Davide; Pohl, Andy; Vicent, Guillermo P.; Serra, François; Soronellas, Daniel; Castellano, Giancarlo; Wright, Roni H.G.; Ballare, Cecilia; Filion, Guillaume; Marti-Renom, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    The human genome is segmented into topologically associating domains (TADs), but the role of this conserved organization during transient changes in gene expression is not known. Here we describe the distribution of progestin-induced chromatin modifications and changes in transcriptional activity over TADs in T47D breast cancer cells. Using ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with high-throughput sequencing), Hi-C (chromosome capture followed by high-throughput sequencing), and three-dimensional (3D) modeling techniques, we found that the borders of the ∼2000 TADs in these cells are largely maintained after hormone treatment and that up to 20% of the TADs could be considered as discrete regulatory units where the majority of the genes are either transcriptionally activated or repressed in a coordinated fashion. The epigenetic signatures of the TADs are homogeneously modified by hormones in correlation with the transcriptional changes. Hormone-induced changes in gene activity and chromatin remodeling are accompanied by differential structural changes for activated and repressed TADs, as reflected by specific and opposite changes in the strength of intra-TAD interactions within responsive TADs. Indeed, 3D modeling of the Hi-C data suggested that the structure of TADs was modified upon treatment. The differential responses of TADs to progestins and estrogens suggest that TADs could function as “regulons” to enable spatially proximal genes to be coordinately transcribed in response to hormones. PMID:25274727

  4. Autophagy Genes Enhance Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Reactivation from Latency by Preventing Virus-Induced Systemic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunmin; Buck, Michael D; Desai, Chandni; Zhang, Xin; Loginicheva, Ekaterina; Martinez, Jennifer; Freeman, Michael L; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Akira, Shizuo; Guan, Jun-Lin; He, You-Wen; Blackman, Marcia A; Handley, Scott A; Levine, Beth; Green, Douglas R; Reese, Tiffany A; Artyomov, Maxim N; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-01-13

    Host genes that regulate systemic inflammation upon chronic viral infection are incompletely understood. Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) infection is characterized by latency in macrophages, and reactivation is inhibited by interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Using a lysozyme-M-cre (LysMcre) expression system, we show that deletion of autophagy-related (Atg) genes Fip200, beclin 1, Atg14, Atg16l1, Atg7, Atg3, and Atg5, in the myeloid compartment, inhibited MHV68 reactivation in macrophages. Atg5 deficiency did not alter reactivation from B cells, and effects on reactivation from macrophages were not explained by alterations in productive viral replication or the establishment of latency. Rather, chronic MHV68 infection triggered increased systemic inflammation, increased T cell production of IFN-γ, and an IFN-γ-induced transcriptional signature in macrophages from Atg gene-deficient mice. The Atg5-related reactivation defect was partially reversed by neutralization of IFN-γ. Thus Atg genes in myeloid cells dampen virus-induced systemic inflammation, creating an environment that fosters efficient MHV68 reactivation from latency. PMID:26764599

  5. Stress-induced alternative gene splicing in mind-body medicine.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Ernest Lawrence

    2004-01-01

    Recent research documents how psychosocial stress can alter the expression of the acetylcholinesterase gene to generate at least 3 alternative proteins that are implicated in a wide variety of normal mind-body functions, as well as pathologies. These range from early embryological development, plasticity of the brain in adulthood, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and stress-associated dysfunctions of the central nervous, endocrine, and immune systems, to age-related neuropathologies. Such stress-induced alternative gene splicing is proposed here as a major mind-body pathway of psychosocial genomics-the modulation of gene expression by creative psychological, social, and cultural processes. We explore the types of research that are now needed to investigate how stress-induced alternative splicing of the acetylcholinesterase gene may play a pivotal role in the deep psychobiology of psychotherapy, meditation, spiritual rituals, and the experiencing of positive humanistic values that have been associated with mind-body medicine, such as compassion, beneficence, serenity, forgiveness, and gratitude. PMID:15356952

  6. Involvement of a banana MADS-box transcription factor gene in ethylene-induced fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juhua; Xu, Biyu; Hu, Lifang; Li, Meiying; Su, Wei; Wu, Jing; Yang, Jinghao; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the regulation of MADS-box genes in banana (Musa acuminata L. AAA group cv. Brazilian) fruit development and postharvest ripening, we isolated from banana fruit a MADS-box gene designated MuMADS1. Amino acid alignment indicated MuMADS1 belongs to the AGAMOUS subfamily, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that this gene is most similar to class D MADS-box genes. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that MuMADS1 is expressed in the stamen and pistil of male and female flowers and in the rhizome, the vegetative reproductive organ of the banana plant. In preharvest banana fruit, MuMADS1 is likely expressed throughout banana fruit development. In postharvest banana ripening, MuMADS1 is associated with ethylene biosynthesis. Expression patterns of MuMADS1 during postharvest ripening as determined by real-time RT-PCR suggest that differential expression of MuMADS1 may not only be induced by ethylene biosynthesis associated with postharvest banana ripening, but also may be induced by exogenous ethylene. PMID:18820933

  7. Activation of a Mitochondrial ATPase Gene Induces Abnormal Seed Development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kon; Seo, Pil Joon; Park, Chung-Mo

    2011-01-01

    The ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA) proteins are widespread in living organisms. Some of the AAA-type ATPases possess metalloprotease activities. Other members constitute the 26S proteasome complexes. In recent years, a few AAA members have been implicated in vesicle-mediated secretion, membrane fusion, cellular organelle biogenesis, and hypersensitive responses (HR) in plants. However, the physiological roles and biochemical activities of plant AAA proteins have not yet been defined at the molecular level, and regulatory mechanisms underlying their functions are largely unknown. In this study, we showed that overexpression of an Arabidopsis gene encoding a mitochondrial AAA protein, ATPase-in-Seed-Development (ASD), induces morphological and anatomical defects in seed maturation. The ASD gene is expressed at a high level during the seed maturation process and in mature seeds but is repressed rapidly in germinating seeds. Transgenic plants overexpressing the ASD gene are morphologically normal. However, seed formation is severely disrupted in the transgenic plants. The ASD gene is induced by abiotic stresses, such as low temperatures and high salinity, in an abscisic acid (ABA)- dependent manner. The ASD protein possesses ATPase activity and is localized into the mitochondria. Our observations suggest that ASD may play a role in seed maturation by influencing mitochondrial function under abiotic stress. PMID:21359673

  8. Biological Characterization of Gene Response to Insulin-Induced Hypoglycemia in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Martine; Nanchen, Natacha; Preitner, Frédéric; Ibberson, Mark; Roduit, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    Glucose is the most important metabolic substrate of the retina and maintenance of normoglycemia is an essential challenge for diabetic patients. Chronic, exaggerated, glycemic excursions could lead to cardiovascular diseases, nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy. We recently showed that hypoglycemia induced retinal cell death in mouse via caspase 3 activation and glutathione (GSH) decrease. Ex vivo experiments in 661W photoreceptor cells confirmed the low-glucose induction of death via superoxide production and activation of caspase 3, which was concomitant with a decrease of GSH content. We evaluate herein retinal gene expression 4 h and 48 h after insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Microarray analysis demonstrated clusters of genes whose expression was modified by hypoglycemia and we discuss the potential implication of those genes in retinal cell death. In addition, we identify by gene set enrichment analysis, three important pathways, including lysosomal function, GSH metabolism and apoptotic pathways. Then we tested the effect of recurrent hypoglycemia (three successive 4h periods of hypoglycemia spaced by 48 h recovery) on retinal cell death. Interestingly, exposure to multiple hypoglycemic events prevented GSH decrease and retinal cell death, or adapted the retina to external stress by restoring GSH level comparable to control situation. We hypothesize that scavenger GSH is a key compound in this apoptotic process, and maintaining “normal” GSH level, as well as a strict glycemic control, represents a therapeutic challenge in order to avoid side effects of diabetes, especially diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26918849

  9. Systems genetics reveals key genetic elements of drought induced gene regulation in diploid potato.

    PubMed

    van Muijen, Dennis; Anithakumari, A M; Maliepaard, Chris; Visser, Richard G F; van der Linden, C Gerard

    2016-09-01

    In plants, tolerance to drought stress is a result of numerous minor effect loci in which transcriptional regulation contributes significantly to the observed phenotypes. Under severe drought conditions, a major expression quantitative trait loci hotspot was identified on chromosome five in potato. A putative Nuclear factor y subunit C4 was identified as key candidate in the regulatory cascade in response to drought. Further investigation of the eQTL hotspots suggests a role for a putative Homeobox leucine zipper protein 12 in relation to drought in potato. Genes strongly co-expressed with Homeobox leucine zipper protein 12 were plant growth regulators responsive to water deficit stress in Arabidopsis thaliana, implying a possible conserved mechanism. Integrative analysis of genetic, genomic, phenotypic and transcriptomic data provided insights in the downstream functional components of the drought response. The abscisic acid- and environmental stress-inducible protein TAS14 was highly induced by severe drought in potato and acts as a reliable biomarker for the level of stress perceived by the plant. The systems genetics approach supported a role for multiple genes responsive to severe drought stress of Solanum tuberosum. The combination of gene regulatory networks, expression quantitative trait loci mapping and phenotypic analysis proved useful for candidate gene selection. PMID:27353051

  10. Targeted Gene Correction in Osteopetrotic-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for the Generation of Functional Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Tui; Muggeo, Sharon; Paulis, Marianna; Caldana, Maria Elena; Crisafulli, Laura; Strina, Dario; Focarelli, Maria Luisa; Faggioli, Francesca; Recordati, Camilla; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Scanziani, Eugenio; Mantero, Stefano; Buracchi, Chiara; Sobacchi, Cristina; Lombardo, Angelo; Naldini, Luigi; Vezzoni, Paolo; Villa, Anna; Ficara, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis is a human bone disease mainly caused by TCIRG1 gene mutations that prevent osteoclasts resorbing activity, recapitulated by the oc/oc mouse model. Bone marrow transplantation is the only available treatment, limited by the need for a matched donor. The use of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as an unlimited source of autologous cells to generate gene corrected osteoclasts might represent a powerful alternative. We generated iPSCs from oc/oc mice, corrected the mutation using a BAC carrying the entire Tcirg1 gene locus as a template for homologous recombination, and induced hematopoietic differentiation. Similarly to physiologic fetal hematopoiesis, iPSC-derived CD41+ cells gradually gave rise to CD45+ cells, which comprised both mature myeloid cells and high proliferative potential colony-forming cells. Finally, we differentiated the gene corrected iPSC-derived myeloid cells into osteoclasts with rescued bone resorbing activity. These results are promising for a future translation into the human clinical setting. PMID:26344905

  11. Investigation of plasma induced electrical and chemical factors and their contribution processes to plasma gene transfection.

    PubMed

    Jinno, Masafumi; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Motomura, Hideki; Kido, Yugo; Satoh, Susumu

    2016-09-01

    This study has been done to know what kind of factors in plasmas and processes on cells induce plasma gene transfection. We evaluated the contribution weight of three groups of the effects and processes, i.e. electrical, chemical and biochemical ones, inducing gene transfection. First, the laser produced plasma (LPP) was employed to estimate the contribution of the chemical factors. Second, liposomes were fabricated and employed to evaluate the effects of plasma irradiation on membrane under the condition without biochemical reaction. Third, the clathrin-dependent endocytosis, one of the biochemical processes was suppressed. It becomes clear that chemical factors (radicals and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species) do not work by itself alone and electrical factors (electrical current, charge and field) are essential to plasma gene transfection. It turned out the clathrin-dependent endocytosis is the process of the transfection against the 60% in all the transfected cells. The endocytosis and electrical poration are dominant in plasma gene transfection, and neither permeation through ion channels nor chemical poration is dominant processes. The simultaneous achievement of high transfection efficiency and high cell survivability is attributed to the optimization of the contribution weight among three groups of processes by controlling the weight of electrical and chemical factors. PMID:27136710

  12. Anesthesia-induced hypothermia mediates decreased ARC gene and protein expression through ERK/MAPK inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Whittington, Robert A.; Bretteville, Alexis; Virág, László; Emala, Charles W.; Maurin, Thomas O.; Marcouiller, François; Julien, Carl; Petry, Franck R.; El-Khoury, Noura B.; Morin, Françoise; Charron, Jean; Planel, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Several anesthetics have been reported to suppress the transcription of a number of genes, including Arc, also known as Arg3.1, an immediate early gene that plays a significant role in memory consolidation. The purpose of this study was to explore the mechanism of anesthesia-mediated depression in Arc gene and protein expression. Here, we demonstrate that isoflurane or propofol anesthesia decreases hippocampal Arc protein expression in rats and mice. Surprisingly, this change was secondary to anesthesia-induced hypothermia. Furthermore, we confirm in vivo and in vitro that hypothermia per se is directly responsible for decreased Arc protein levels. This effect was the result of the decline of Arc mRNA basal levels following inhibition of ERK/MAPK by hypothermia. Overall, our results suggest that anesthesia-induced hypothermia leads to ERK inhibition, which in turns decreases Arc levels. These data give new mechanistic insights on the regulation of immediate early genes by anesthesia and hypothermia. PMID:24045785

  13. Characterization of a cyanobacterial iron stress-induced gene similar to psbC.

    PubMed Central

    Laudenbach, D E; Straus, N A

    1988-01-01

    Recently we have reported that the flavodoxin gene from the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans R2 is transcribed as part of an iron stress-induced operon containing multiple mRNA species (D. E. Laudenbach, M. E. Reith, and N. A. Straus, J. Bacteriol. 170: 258-265, 1988). Here we report that nucleotide sequence analyses of DNA located immediately upstream of the flavodoxin gene revealed an open reading frame of 1,026 bases (designated isiA; iron stress inducible) with a deduced amino acid sequence showing similarity to that of the psbC polypeptide of higher plants and cyanobacteria. Assuming proteolytic cleavage of the initial methionine residue, the open reading frame encodes a 341-amino-acid polypeptide with a molecular mass of 36,824 daltons. Amino acid sequence comparisons with known psbC polypeptides from spinach and A. nidulans R2 showed extensive similarity, especially in the proposed membrane-spanning regions. Mung bean nuclease mapping and primer extension experiments have localized a transcriptional start site to a position 19 bases upstream from the first methionine codon of the isiA gene product. The upstream region contains an Escherichia coli-like -10 sequence but lacks the typical -35 consensus sequence. Approximately 15, 25, and 150 bases upstream from the isiA transcription start site are 17 base sequences which resemble the operator sequences of iron-regulated genes of E. coli. Images PMID:3141374

  14. FoxO1 Deacetylation Regulates Thyroid Hormone-induced Transcription of Key Hepatic Gluconeogenic Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Zhou, Jin; Xie, Sherwin Ying; You, Seo-Hee; Gauthier, Karine; Yen, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is a concerted process that integrates transcriptional regulation with hormonal signals. A major regulator is thyroid hormone (TH), which acts through its nuclear receptor (TR) to induce the expression of the hepatic gluconeogenic genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC). Forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 also is an important regulator of these genes; however, its functional interactions with TR are not known. Here, we report that TR-mediated transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in human hepatic cells and mouse liver was FoxO1-dependent and furthermore required FoxO1 deacetylation by the NAD+-dependent deacetylase, SirT1. siRNA knockdown of FoxO1 decreased, whereas overexpression of FoxO1 increased, TH-dependent transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in cultured hepatic cells. FoxO1 siRNA knockdown also decreased TH-mediated transcription in vivo. Additionally, TH was unable to induce FoxO1 deacetylation or hepatic PCK1 gene expression in TH receptor β-null (TRβ−/−) mice. Moreover, TH stimulated FoxO1 recruitment to the PCK1 and G6PC gene promoters in a SirT1-dependent manner. In summary, our results show that TH-dependent deacetylation of a second metabolically regulated transcription factor represents a novel mechanism for transcriptional integration of nuclear hormone action with cellular energy status. PMID:23995837

  15. Neonatal Systemic AAV Induces Tolerance to CNS Gene Therapy in MPS I Dogs and Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, Christian; Bell, Peter; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Zhu, Yanqing; Yu, Hongwei; Lin, Gloria; Choa, Ruth; Gurda, Brittney L; Bagel, Jessica; O'Donnell, Patricia; Sikora, Tracey; Ruane, Therese; Wang, Ping; Tarantal, Alice F; Casal, Margret L; Haskins, Mark E; Wilson, James M

    2015-08-01

    The potential host immune response to a nonself protein poses a fundamental challenge for gene therapies targeting recessive diseases. We demonstrate in both dogs and nonhuman primates that liver-directed gene transfer using an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector in neonates induces a persistent state of immunological tolerance to the transgene product, substantially improving the efficacy of subsequent vector administration targeting the central nervous system (CNS). We applied this approach to a canine model of mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I), a progressive neuropathic lysosomal storage disease caused by deficient activity of the enzyme α-l-iduronidase (IDUA). MPS I dogs treated systemically in the first week of life with a vector expressing canine IDUA did not develop antibodies against the enzyme and exhibited robust expression in the CNS upon intrathecal AAV delivery at 1 month of age, resulting in complete correction of brain storage lesions. Newborn rhesus monkeys treated systemically with AAV vector expressing human IDUA developed tolerance to the transgene, resulting in high cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) IDUA expression and no antibody induction after subsequent CNS gene therapy. These findings suggest that inducing tolerance to the transgene product during a critical period in immunological development can improve the efficacy and safety of gene therapy. PMID:26022732

  16. Hypoxia-inducible nuclear factors bind to an enhancer element located 3' to the human erythropoietin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Semenza, G L; Nejfelt, M K; Chi, S M; Antonarakis, S E

    1991-01-01

    Human erythropoietin gene expression in liver and kidney is inducible by anemia or hypoxia. DNase I-hypersensitive sites were identified 3' to the human erythropoietin gene in liver nuclei. A 256-base-pair region of 3' flanking sequence was shown by DNase I protection and electrophoretic mobility-shift assays to bind four or more different nuclear factors, at least two of which are induced by anemia in both liver and kidney, and the region functioned as a hypoxia-inducible enhancer in transient expression assays. These results provide insight into the molecular basis for the regulation of gene expression by a fundamental physiologic stimulus, hypoxia. Images PMID:2062846

  17. An efficient virus-induced gene silencing vector for maize functional genomics research.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Yang, Xinxin; Wang, Nian; Liu, Xuedong; Nelson, Richard S; Li, Weimin; Fan, Zaifeng; Zhou, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Maize is a major crop whose rich genetic diversity provides an advanced resource for genetic research. However, a tool for rapid transient gene function analysis in maize that may be utilized in most maize cultivars has been lacking, resulting in reliance on time-consuming stable transformation and mutation studies to obtain answers. We developed an efficient virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vector for maize based on a naturally maize-infecting cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) strain, ZMBJ-CMV. An infectious clone of ZMBJ-CMV was constructed, and a vascular puncture inoculation method utilizing Agrobacterium was optimized to improve its utility for CMV infection of maize. ZMBJ-CMV was then modified to function as a VIGS vector. The ZMBJ-CMV vector induced mild to moderate symptoms in many maize lines, making it useful for gene function studies in critically important maize cultivars, such as the sequenced reference inbred line B73. Using this CMV VIGS system, expression of two endogenous genes, ZmPDS and ZmIspH, was found to be decreased by 75% and 78%, respectively, compared with non-silenced tissue. Inserts with lengths of 100-300 bp produced the most complete transcriptional and visual silencing phenotypes. Moreover, genes related to autophagy, ZmATG3 and ZmATG8a, were also silenced, and it was found that they function in leaf starch degradation. These results indicate that our ZMBJ-CMV VIGS vector provides a tool for rapid and efficient gene function studies in maize. PMID:26921244

  18. A subset of herpes simplex virus replication genes induces DNA amplification within the host cell genome.

    PubMed Central

    Heilbronn, R; zur Hausen, H

    1989-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) induces DNA amplification of target genes within the host cell chromosome. To characterize the HSV genes that mediate the amplification effect, combinations of cloned DNA fragments covering the entire HSV genome were transiently transfected into simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed hamster cells. This led to amplification of the integrated SV40 DNA sequences to a degree comparable to that observed after transfection of intact virion DNA. Transfection of combinations of subclones and of human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter-driven expression constructs for individual open reading frames led to the identification of six HSV genes which together were necessary and sufficient for the induction of DNA amplification: UL30 (DNA polymerase), UL29 (major DNA-binding protein), UL5, UL8, UL42, and UL52. All of these genes encode proteins necessary for HSV DNA replication. However, an additional gene coding for an HSV origin-binding protein (UL9) was required for origin-dependent HSV DNA replication but was dispensible for SV40 DNA amplification. Our results show that a subset of HSV replication genes is sufficient for the induction of DNA amplification. This opens the possibility that HSV expresses functions sufficient for DNA amplification but separate from those responsible for lytic viral growth. HSV infection may thereby induce DNA amplification within the host cell genome without killing the host by lytic viral growth. This may lead to persistence of a cell with a new genetic phenotype, which would have implications for the pathogenicity of the virus in vivo. Images PMID:2547992

  19. Gene expression patterns underlying parasite-induced alterations in host behaviour and life history.

    PubMed

    Feldmeyer, Barbara; Mazur, Johanna; Beros, Sara; Lerp, Hannes; Binder, Harald; Foitzik, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Many parasites manipulate their hosts' phenotype. In particular, parasites with complex life cycles take control of their intermediate hosts' behaviour and life history to increase transmission to their definitive host. The proximate mechanisms underlying these parasite-induced alterations are poorly understood. The cestode Anomotaenia brevis affects the behaviour, life history and morphology of parasitized Temnothorax nylanderi ants and indirectly of their unparasitized nestmates. To gain insights on how parasites alter host phenotypes, we contrast brain gene expression patterns of T. nylanderi workers parasitized with the cestode, their unparasitized nestmates and unparasitized workers from unparasitized colonies. Over 400 differentially expressed genes between the three groups were identified, with most uniquely expressed genes detected in parasitized workers. Among these are genes that can be linked to the increased lifespan of parasitized workers. Furthermore, many muscle (functionality) genes are downregulated in these workers, potentially causing the observed muscular deformations and their inactive behaviour. Alterations in lifespan and activity could be adaptive for the parasite by increasing the likelihood that infected workers residing in acorns are eaten by their definitive host, a woodpecker. Our transcriptome analysis reveals numerous gene expression changes in parasitized workers and their uninfected nestmates and indicates possible routes of parasite manipulation. Although causality still needs to be established, parasite-induced alterations in lifespan and host behaviour appear to be partly explained by morphological muscle atrophy instead of central nervous system interference, which is often the core of behavioural regulation. Results of this study will shed light upon the molecular basis of antagonistic species interactions. PMID:26615010

  20. [Role of DNA repair genes in radiation-induced changes of lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Shilova, L A; Pliusnina, E N; Zemskaia, N V; Moskalev, A A

    2014-01-01

    One of the main effects of various stress factors, including ionizing radiation, is DNA damage. Accumulation of DNA damage and somatic mutations in the somatic tissues is regarded as one of the basic mechanisms of aging. We have developed an approach to the study of molecular and genetic mechanisms of radioadaptation, which is based on the analysis of changes in the lifespan of Drosophila with a transformed genotype. In this study we investigated the radioadaptive response and hormesis by radiation-induced changed of the lifespan of different strains of Drosophila melanogaster, such as a wild type strain Canton-Sand strains with mutations in DNA damage response gene (homologue of GADD45), excision repair genes (homologues of XPF, XPC, PCNA) and double-strand breaks repair genes (homologues of RAD54, XRCC3, BLM). The exposure to irradiation at the dose rate of 40 cGy was performed chronically through the stages of fly development; an acute exposure at the dose rate of 30 Gy was applied to the adult stages of flies. Also, we investigated the resistance to acute gamma-radiation of Drosophila with conditional ubiquitous overexpression of genes that are involved in DNA damage recognition (homologues of GADD45, HUS1, CHK2), excision repair (homologues of XPF, XPC, AP-endonuclease-1) and double-strand break repair (homologues of BRCA2, XRCC3, KU80, WRNexo). In the wild type strain Canton-S, manifestation of the radioadaptive response and radiation hormesis were observed. In individuals with DNA repair gene mutations, no radioadaptive response was observed, or observed to a lesser extent than in wild type flies. Mifepristone--inducible transgene activation does not lead to an increase in resistance to acute irradiation by the parameters of lifespan of Drosophila. Overexpression of DNA repair genes led to a sharp decline in lifespan also in the absence of irradiation. PMID:25775840

  1. A subset of herpes simplex virus replication genes induces DNA amplification within the host cell genome

    SciTech Connect

    Heilbronn, R.; zur Hausen, H. )

    1989-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) induces DNA amplification of target genes within the host cell chromosome. To characterize the HSV genes that mediate the amplification effect, combinations of cloned DNA fragments covering the entire HSV genome were transiently transfected into simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed hamster cells. This led to amplification of the integrated SV40 DNA sequences to a degree comparable to that observed after transfection of intact virion DNA. Transfection of combinations of subclones and of human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter-driven expression constructs for individual open reading frames led to the identification of sic HSV genes which together were necessary and sufficient for the induction of DNA amplification: UL30 (DNA polymerase), UL29 (major DNA-binding protein), UL5, UL8, UL42, and UL52. All of these genes encode proteins necessary for HSV DNA replication. However, an additional gene coding for an HSV origin-binding protein (UL9) was required for origin-dependent HSV DNA replication but was dispensable for SV40 DNA amplification. The results show that a subset of HSV replication genes is sufficient for the induction of DNA amplification. This opens the possibility that HSV expresses functions sufficient for DNA amplification but separate from those responsible for lytic viral growth. HSV infection may thereby induce DNA amplification within the host cell genome without killing the host by lytic viral growth. This may lead to persistence of a cell with a new genetic phenotype, which would have implications for the pathogenicity of the virus in vivo.

  2. Pimecrolimus increases the expression of interferon-inducible genes that modulate human coronary artery cells proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hussner, Janine; Sünwoldt, Juliane; Seibert, Isabell; Gliesche, Daniel G; Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette E Meyer

    2016-08-01

    The pharmacodynamics of the loaded compounds defines clinical failure or success of a drug-eluting device. Various limus derivatives have entered clinics due to the observed positive outcome after stent implantation, which is explained by their antiproliferative activity resulting from inhibition of the cytosolic immunophilin FK506-binding protein 12. Although pimecrolimus also binds to this protein, pimecrolimus-eluting stents failed in clinics. However, despite its impact on T lymphocytes little is known about the pharmacodynamics of pimecrolimus in cultured human coronary artery cells. We were able to show that pimecrolimus exerts antiproliferative activity in human smooth muscle and endothelial cells. Furthermore in those cells pimecrolimus induced transcription of interferon-inducible genes which in part are known to modulate cell proliferation. Modulation of gene expression may be part of an interaction between calcineurin, the downstream target of the pimecrolimus/FK506-binding protein 12-complex, and the toll-like receptor 4. In accordance are our findings showing that silencing of toll-like receptor 4 by siRNA in A549 a lung carcinoma cell line reduced the activation of interferon-inducible genes upon pimecrolimus treatment in those cells. Based on our findings we hypothesize that calcineurin inhibition may induce the toll-like receptor 4 mediated activation of type I interferon signaling finally inducing the observed effect in endothelial and smooth muscle cells. The crosstalk of interferon and toll-like receptor signaling may be a molecular mechanism that contributed to the failure of pimecrolimus-eluting stents in humans. PMID:27212382

  3. Development of an inducible gene expression system for primary murine keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Priyadharsini

    2008-01-01

    Background The tetracycline (Tet) responsive system is a valuable tool that is routinely used in a wide variety of mammalian cells for regulatable expression of gene products. However, technical difficulties such as harsh selection conditions and extensive screening processes to identify suitably responsive clones limit the generation of stable cell lines. Hence, application of this system in mammalian cells with relatively slow growth rates and / or the capacity to undergo terminal differentiation such as primary mouse keratinocytes is particularly challenging. Objective To our knowledge, no Tet-responsive stable cell lines have been generated from mouse keratinocytes, presumably due to their sensitivity to selection conditions. Our goal was to utilize a modified and robust Tet-expression system to generate a stable primary mouse keratinocyte cell line. These cells could be then utilized for conditional expression of potentially toxic proteins in an inducible fashion. Methods We utilized a eukaryotic promoter instead of a viral promoter to express a modified reverse tetracycline transactivator in mouse keratinocytes and optimized the selection process for generating stable cell lines. Results Here, we report the generation of a stable mouse keratinocyte cell line for Tet-regulated gene expression with minimal leakiness and high degree of Tet responsivity. This mouse keratinocyte cell line was further engineered for generation of a double stable cell line, which expresses the transcription factor AP-2α in an inducible manner. Importantly, the selected cells retain their inherent keratinocyte morphology, respond to differentiation signals and exhibit a persistent and highly tunable Tet inducibility upon continuous culturing. Conclusion We have generated a tetracycline inducible gene expression model system in mouse epidermal keratinocytes. Such inducible cell lines will serve as valuable in vitro models for future gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies. PMID

  4. Introducing the “TCDD-Inducible AhR-Nrf2 Gene Battery”

    PubMed Central

    Yeager, Ronnie L.; Reisman, Scott A.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2009-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces genes via the transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), including Cyp1a1, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1a6 (Ugt1a6), and glutathione S-transferase a1 (Gsta1). These genes are referred to as the “AhR gene battery.” However, Nqo1 is also considered a prototypical target gene of the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor 2 (Nrf2). In mice, TCDD induction of Nrf2 and Nrf2 target, Nqo1, is dependent on AhR, and thus TCDD induction of drug-processing genes may be routed through an AhR-Nrf2 sequence. There has been speculation that Nrf2 may be involved in the TCDD induction of drug-processing genes; however, the data are not definitive. Therefore, to address whether TCDD induction of Nqo1, Ugts, and Gsts is dependent on Nrf2, we conducted the definitive experiment by administering TCDD (50 μg/kg, ip) to Nrf2-null and wild-type (WT) mice and collecting livers 24 h later to quantify the mRNA of drug-processing genes. TCDD induction of Cyp1a1 and Ugt1a1 was similar in WT and Nrf2-null mice, whereas TCDD induction of Ugt1a5 and 1a9 was blunted in Nrf2-null mice. TCDD induced Nqo1, Ugt1a6, 2b34, 2b35, 2b36, UDP-glucuronic acid–synthesizing gene UDP-glucose dehydrogenase, and Gsta1, m1, m2, m3, m6, p2, t2, and microsomal Gst1 in WT mice but not in Nrf2-null mice. Therefore, the present study demonstrates the novel finding that Nrf2 is required for TCDD induction of classical AhR battery genes Nqo1, Ugt1a6, and Gsta1, as well as most Ugt and Gst isoforms in livers of mice. PMID:19474220

  5. Increased glutamate receptor gene expression in the cerebral cortex of insulin induced hypoglycemic and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Joseph, A; Antony, S; Paulose, C S

    2008-10-01

    Hypoglycemia causes brain fuel deprivation, resulting in functional brain failure and brain death. It is a serious complication of insulin therapy in diabetic patients. A single intrafemoral dose of streptozotocin was administered to induce diabetes. Hypoglycemia was induced by appropriate doses of insulin s.c. in control and diabetic rats. Glutamate content and glutamate receptor kinetics were studied using [3H]glutamate. [3H]MK 801 was used to study the NMDA receptor kinetics. NMDA2B and metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) 5 subunits receptor gene expressions were done using real time PCR. There was a significant (P<0.001) increase in the glutamate content in the cerebral cortex of hypoglycemic and diabetic rats when compared with control with more glutamate content in the hypoglycemic group. Scatchard analysis using [3H]glutamate and [3H]MK 801 in the cerebral cortex showed a significant (P<0.001) increase in the maximal binding (Bmax) in both hypoglycemic and diabetic rats when compared with control with no significant change in equilibrium dissociation constant. The glutamate and NMDA receptor binding parameters were significantly (P<0.001) enhanced in the hypoglycemic rats compared with hyperglycemic rats. Real time PCR analysis also showed a significant increase (P<0.001) in the gene expression of NMDA2B and mGluR5 subunits of glutamate receptor. This increased gene expression of NMDA2B and mGluR5 glutamate receptor subunits confirmed the enhanced mRNA of receptor subunits and subsequently at the protein level from the receptor kinetic studies. The enhanced glutamate receptors were more prominent in hypoglycemic group which is of significance in this study. Up-regulation of glutamate leads to Ca2+ overload in cells, potentially leading to cell damage and death. This functional damage during hypoglycemia is suggested to contribute to cognitive and memory deficits which has immense clinical relevance in the therapeutic management of diabetes. PMID:18761060

  6. Avian hemangioma retrovirus induces cell proliferation via the envelope (env) gene.

    PubMed

    Alian, A; Sela-Donenfeld, D; Panet, A; Eldor, A

    2000-10-10

    Several years ago, a field strain retrovirus, avian hemangioma virus (AHV), was isolated from hemangioma tumors in layer hens. Sequence analysis indicated that the AHV genome contains the three prototypic retroviral genes, gag, pol, and env, and is devoid of an oncogene. In cultured endothelial cells, however, AHV induced a significant cytopathic effect through a typical apoptotic cascade. We now demonstrate that AHV also induces cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of BSC-1 epithelial cells and NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. This was shown by measurements of (1) cell viability, (2) DNA synthesis, (3) flow cytometry analysis of the cell DNA content, and (4) clonogenic efficiency of the infected cells. Anchorage-independent cell growth was demonstrated by colony formation in soft agar. Moreover, the AHV env gene was cloned into a MuLV-based retroviral vector, and infection of NIH-3T3 cells with this vector induced cell proliferation as well as clonogenic growth. These results suggest that AHV, which is devoid of an oncogene, is a pleiotropic activator capable of inducing either apoptosis or cellular proliferation, depending on the infected cell type. PMID:11022004

  7. DNA interference: DNA-induced gene silencing in the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica

    PubMed Central

    Omotezako, Tatsuya; Onuma, Takeshi A.; Nishida, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference is widely employed as a gene-silencing system in eukaryotes for host defence against invading nucleic acids. In response to invading double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), mRNA is degraded in sequence-specific manner. So far, however, DNA interference (DNAi) has been reported only in plants, ciliates and archaea, and has not been explored in Metazoa. Here, we demonstrate that linear double-stranded DNA promotes both sequence-specific transcription blocking and mRNA degradation in developing embryos of the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica. Introduced polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products or linearized plasmids encoding Brachyury induced tail malformation and mRNA degradation. This malformation was also promoted by DNA fragments of the putative 5′-flanking region and intron without the coding region. PCR products encoding Zic-like1 and acetylcholine esterase also induced loss of sensory organ and muscle acetylcholinesterase activity, respectively. Co-injection of mRNA encoding EGFP and mCherry, and PCR products encoding these fluorescent proteins, induced sequence-specific decrease in the green or red fluorescence, respectively. These results suggest that O. dioica possesses a defence system against exogenous DNA and RNA, and that DNA fragment-induced gene silencing would be mediated through transcription blocking as well as mRNA degradation. This is the first report of DNAi in Metazoa. PMID:25904672

  8. DNA interference: DNA-induced gene silencing in the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica.

    PubMed

    Omotezako, Tatsuya; Onuma, Takeshi A; Nishida, Hiroki

    2015-05-22

    RNA interference is widely employed as a gene-silencing system in eukaryotes for host defence against invading nucleic acids. In response to invading double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), mRNA is degraded in sequence-specific manner. So far, however, DNA interference (DNAi) has been reported only in plants, ciliates and archaea, and has not been explored in Metazoa. Here, we demonstrate that linear double-stranded DNA promotes both sequence-specific transcription blocking and mRNA degradation in developing embryos of the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica. Introduced polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products or linearized plasmids encoding Brachyury induced tail malformation and mRNA degradation. This malformation was also promoted by DNA fragments of the putative 5'-flanking region and intron without the coding region. PCR products encoding Zic-like1 and acetylcholine esterase also induced loss of sensory organ and muscle acetylcholinesterase activity, respectively. Co-injection of mRNA encoding EGFP and mCherry, and PCR products encoding these fluorescent proteins, induced sequence-specific decrease in the green or red fluorescence, respectively. These results suggest that O. dioica possesses a defence system against exogenous DNA and RNA, and that DNA fragment-induced gene silencing would be mediated through transcription blocking as well as mRNA degradation. This is the first report of DNAi in Metazoa. PMID:25904672

  9. Nucleotide Pool Depletion Induces G-Quadruplex-Dependent Perturbation of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, Charikleia; Guilbaud, Guillaume; Schiavone, Davide; Sale, Julian E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nucleotide pool imbalance has been proposed to drive genetic instability in cancer. Here, we show that slowing replication forks by depleting nucleotide pools with hydroxyurea (HU) can also give rise to both transient and permanent epigenetic instability of a reporter locus, BU-1, in DT40 cells. HU induces stochastic formation of Bu-1low variants in dividing cells, which have lost the H3K4me3 present in untreated cells. This instability is potentiated by an intragenic G quadruplex, which also promotes local H2Ax phosphorylation and transient heterochromatinization. Genome-wide, gene expression changes induced by HU significantly overlap with those resulting from loss of the G4-helicases FANCJ, WRN, and BLM. Thus, the effects of global replication stress induced by nucleotide pool depletion can be focused by local replication impediments caused by G quadruplex formation to induce epigenetic instability and changes in gene expression, a mechanism that may contribute to selectable transcriptional changes in cancer. PMID:26686635

  10. Amplification of TGFβ Induced ITGB6 Gene Transcription May Promote Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tatler, Amanda L.; Goodwin, Amanda T.; Gbolahan, Olumide; Saini, Gauri; Porte, Joanne; John, Alison E.; Clifford, Rachel L.; Violette, Shelia M.; Weinreb, Paul H.; Parfrey, Helen; Wolters, Paul J.; Gauldie, Jack; Kolb, Martin; Jenkins, Gisli

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating, progressive disease with poor survival rates and limited treatment options. Upregulation of αvβ6 integrins within the alveolar epithelial cells is a characteristic feature of IPF and correlates with poor patient survival. The pro-fibrotic cytokine TGFβ1 can upregulate αvβ6 integrin expression but the molecular mechanisms driving this effect have not previously been elucidated. We confirm that stimulation with exogenous TGFβ1 increases expression of the integrin β6 subunit gene (ITGB6) and αvβ6 integrin cell surface expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 expression occurs via transcriptional activation of the ITGB6 gene, but does not result from effects on ITGB6 mRNA stability. Basal expression of ITGB6 in, and αvβ6 integrins on, lung epithelial cells occurs via homeostatic αvβ6-mediated TGFβ1 activation in the absence of exogenous stimulation, and can be amplified by TGFβ1 activation. Fundamentally, we show for the first time that TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 expression occurs via canonical Smad signalling since dominant negative constructs directed against Smad3 and 4 inhibit ITGB6 transcriptional activity. Furthermore, disruption of a Smad binding site at -798 in the ITGB6 promoter abolishes TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 transcriptional activity. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrate that TGFβ1 stimulation of lung epithelial cells results in direct binding of Smad3, and Smad4, to the ITGB6 gene promoter within this region. Finally, using an adenoviral TGFβ1 over-expression model of pulmonary fibrosis we demonstrate that Smad3 is crucial for TGFβ1-induced αvβ6 integrin expression within the alveolar epithelium in vivo. Together, these data confirm that a homeostatic, autocrine loop of αvβ6 integrin activated TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 gene expression regulates epithelial basal αvβ6 integrin expression, and demonstrates that this occurs via Smad

  11. An elm EST database for identifying leaf beetle egg-induced defense genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plants can defend themselves against herbivorous insects prior to the onset of larval feeding by responding to the eggs laid on their leaves. In the European field elm (Ulmus minor), egg laying by the elm leaf beetle ( Xanthogaleruca luteola) activates the emission of volatiles that attract specialised egg parasitoids, which in turn kill the eggs. Little is known about the transcriptional changes that insect eggs trigger in plants and how such indirect defense mechanisms are orchestrated in the context of other biological processes. Results Here we present the first large scale study of egg-induced changes in the transcriptional profile of a tree. Five cDNA libraries were generated from leaves of (i) untreated control elms, and elms treated with (ii) egg laying and feeding by elm leaf beetles, (iii) feeding, (iv) artificial transfer of egg clutches, and (v) methyl jasmonate. A total of 361,196 ESTs expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified which clustered into 52,823 unique transcripts (Unitrans) and were stored in a database with a public web interface. Among the analyzed Unitrans, 73% could be annotated by homology to known genes in the UniProt (Plant) database, particularly to those from Vitis, Ricinus, Populus and Arabidopsis. Comparative in silico analysis among the different treatments revealed differences in Gene Ontology term abundances. Defense- and stress-related gene transcripts were present in high abundance in leaves after herbivore egg laying, but transcripts involved in photosynthesis showed decreased abundance. Many pathogen-related genes and genes involved in phytohormone signaling were expressed, indicative of jasmonic acid biosynthesis and activation of jasmonic acid responsive genes. Cross-comparisons between different libraries based on expression profiles allowed the identification of genes with a potential relevance in egg-induced defenses, as well as other biological processes, including signal transduction, transport and

  12. An ex vivo gene therapy approach to treat muscular dystrophy using inducible pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Filareto, Antonio; Parker, Sarah; Darabi, Radbod; Borges, Luciene; Iacovino, Michelina; Schaaf, Tory; Mayerhofer, Timothy; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Ervasti, James M; McIvor, R Scott; Kyba, Michael; Perlingeiro, Rita C R

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive and incurable neuromuscular disease caused by genetic and biochemical defects of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Here we show the regenerative potential of myogenic progenitors derived from corrected dystrophic induced pluripotent stem cells generated from fibroblasts of mice lacking both dystrophin and utrophin. We correct the phenotype of dystrophic induced pluripotent stem cells using a Sleeping Beauty transposon system carrying the micro-utrophin gene, differentiate these cells into skeletal muscle progenitors and transplant them back into dystrophic mice. Engrafted muscles displayed large numbers of micro-utrophin-positive myofibers, with biochemically restored dystrophin-glycoprotein complex and improved contractile strength. The transplanted cells seed the satellite cell compartment, responded properly to injury and exhibit neuromuscular synapses. We also detect muscle engraftment after systemic delivery of these corrected progenitors. These results represent an important advance towards the future treatment of muscular dystrophies using genetically corrected autologous induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:23462992

  13. Expression of cyr61, a growth factor-inducible immediate-early gene.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, T P; Yang, G P; Sanders, L; Lau, L F

    1990-01-01

    A set of immediate-early genes that are rapidly activated by serum or purified platelet-derived growth factor in mouse 3T3 fibroblasts has been previously identified. Among these genes, several are related to known or putative transcription factors and growth factors, supporting the notion that some of these genes encode regulatory molecules important to cell growth. We show here that a member of this set of genes, cyr61 (originally identified by its cDNA 3CH61), encodes a 379-amino-acid polypeptide rich in cysteine residues. cyr61 can be induced through protein kinase C-dependent and -independent pathways. Unlike many immediate-early genes that are transiently expressed, the cyr61 mRNA is accumulated from the G0/G1 transition through mid-G1. This expression pattern is due to persistent transcription, while the mRNA is rapidly turned over during the G0/G1 transition and in mid-G1 at the same rate. In logarithmically growing cells, the cyr61 mRNA level is constant throughout the cell cycle. Cyr61 contains an N-terminal secretory signal sequence; however, it is not detected in the culture medium by immunoprecipitation. Cyr61 is synthesized maximally at 1 to 2 h after serum stimulation and has a short half-life within the cell. Images PMID:2355916

  14. Morphological Profiles of RNAi-Induced Gene Knockdown Are Highly Reproducible but Dominated by Seed Effects

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shantanu; Wu, Xiaoyun; Ljosa, Vebjorn; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Piccioni, Federica; Root, David E.; Doench, John G.; Boehm, Jesse S.; Carpenter, Anne E.

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference and morphological profiling—the measurement of thousands of phenotypes from individual cells by microscopy and image analysis—are a potentially powerful combination. We show that morphological profiles of RNAi-induced knockdown using the Cell Painting assay are in fact highly sensitive and reproducible. However, we find that the magnitude and prevalence of off-target effects via the RNAi seed-based mechanism make morphological profiles of RNAi reagents targeting the same gene look no more similar than reagents targeting different genes. Pairs of RNAi reagents that share the same seed sequence produce image-based profiles that are much more similar to each other than profiles from pairs designed to target the same gene, a phenomenon previously observed in small-scale gene-expression profiling experiments. Various strategies have been used to enrich on-target versus off-target effects in the context of RNAi screening where a narrow set of phenotypes are measured, mostly based on comparing multiple sequences targeting the same gene; however, new approaches will be needed to make RNAi morphological profiling (that is, comparing multi-dimensional phenotypes) viable. We have shared our raw data and computational pipelines to facilitate research. PMID:26197079

  15. Hypoxia induces PDK4 gene expression through induction of the orphan nuclear receptor ERRγ.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ja Hee; Kim, Eun-Jin; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Ji-Min; Park, Seung Bum; Lee, In-Kyu; Harris, Robert A; Lee, Mi-Ock; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Multiple cellular signaling pathways that control metabolism and survival are activated when cell are incubated under hypoxic conditions. Activation of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1 promotes expression of genes that increase the capacity to cope with the stress imposed by a reduced oxygen environment. Here we show that the orphan nuclear receptor estrogen related receptor γ (ERRγ) plays a critical role in hypoxia-mediated activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) gene expression. ERRγ mRNA and protein levels were increased by hypoxia or desferrioxamine (DFO) treatment in hepatoma cell lines. Co-expression of HIF-1α and β increased ERRγ promoter activity as well as mRNA expression, while knockdown of endogenous HIF-1α reduced the hypoxia-mediated induction of ERRγ. In addition, hypoxia also increased the promoter activity and mRNA level of PDK4 in HepG2 cells. Adenovirus mediated-overexpression of ERRγ specifically increased PDK4 gene expression, while ablation of endogenous ERRγ significantly decreased hypoxia-mediated induction of PDK4 gene expression. Finally, GSK5182, an inverse agonist of ERRγ, strongly inhibited the hypoxia-mediated induction of PDK4 protein and promoter activity. Regulation of the transcriptional activity of ERRγ may provide a therapeutic approach for the regulation of PDK4 gene expression under hypoxia. PMID:23050013

  16. Hypoxia Induces PDK4 Gene Expression through Induction of the Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRγ

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Min; Park, Seung Bum; Lee, In-Kyu; Harris, Robert A.; Lee, Mi-Ock; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Multiple cellular signaling pathways that control metabolism and survival are activated when cell are incubated under hypoxic conditions. Activation of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1 promotes expression of genes that increase the capacity to cope with the stress imposed by a reduced oxygen environment. Here we show that the orphan nuclear receptor estrogen related receptor γ (ERRγ) plays a critical role in hypoxia–mediated activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) gene expression. ERRγ mRNA and protein levels were increased by hypoxia or desferrioxamine (DFO) treatment in hepatoma cell lines. Co-expression of HIF-1α and β increased ERRγ promoter activity as well as mRNA expression, while knockdown of endogenous HIF-1α reduced the hypoxia-mediated induction of ERRγ. In addition, hypoxia also increased the promoter activity and mRNA level of PDK4 in HepG2 cells. Adenovirus mediated-overexpression of ERRγ specifically increased PDK4 gene expression, while ablation of endogenous ERRγ significantly decreased hypoxia-mediated induction of PDK4 gene expression. Finally, GSK5182, an inverse agonist of ERRγ, strongly inhibited the hypoxia-mediated induction of PDK4 protein and promoter activity. Regulation of the transcriptional activity of ERRγ may provide a therapeutic approach for the regulation of PDK4 gene expression under hypoxia. PMID:23050013

  17. Development of Virus-Induced Gene Expression and Silencing Vector Derived from Grapevine Algerian Latent Virus.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Ho; Choi, Hoseong; Kim, Semin; Cho, Won Kyong; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-08-01

    Grapevine Algerian latent virus (GALV) is a member of the genus Tombusvirus in the Tombusviridae and infects not only woody perennial grapevine plant but also herbaceous Nicotiana benthamiana plant. In this study, we developed GALV-based gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vectors in N. benthamiana. The GALV coat protein deletion vector, pGMG, was applied to express the reporter gene, green fluorescence protein (GFP), but the expression of GFP was not detected due to the necrotic cell death on the infiltrated leaves. The p19 silencing suppressor of GALV was engineered to inactivate its expression and GFP was successfully expressed with unrelated silencing suppressor, HC-Pro, from soybean mosaic virus. The pGMG vector was used to knock down magnesium chelatase (ChlH) gene in N. benthamaina and the silencing phenotype was clearly observed on systemic leaves. Altogether, the GALV-derived vector is expected to be an attractive tool for useful gene expression and VIGS vectors in grapevine as well as N. benthamiana. PMID:27493613

  18. Development of Virus-Induced Gene Expression and Silencing Vector Derived from Grapevine Algerian Latent Virus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Ho; Choi, Hoseong; Kim, Semin; Cho, Won Kyong; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Grapevine Algerian latent virus (GALV) is a member of the genus Tombusvirus in the Tombusviridae and infects not only woody perennial grapevine plant but also herbaceous Nicotiana benthamiana plant. In this study, we developed GALV-based gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vectors in N. benthamiana. The GALV coat protein deletion vector, pGMG, was applied to express the reporter gene, green fluorescence protein (GFP), but the expression of GFP was not detected due to the necrotic cell death on the infiltrated leaves. The p19 silencing suppressor of GALV was engineered to inactivate its expression and GFP was successfully expressed with unrelated silencing suppressor, HC-Pro, from soybean mosaic virus. The pGMG vector was used to knock down magnesium chelatase (ChlH) gene in N. benthamaina and the silencing phenotype was clearly observed on systemic leaves. Altogether, the GALV-derived vector is expected to be an attractive tool for useful gene expression and VIGS vectors in grapevine as well as N. benthamiana. PMID:27493613

  19. Analysis of gene regulation in rabbit corneal epithelial cells induced by ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jacqueline J; Rogers, Christian; Howard, Carolyn B; Moore, Caronda; Chan, Lai-Man

    2005-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-induced cataracts are becoming a major environmental health concern because of the possible decrease in the stratospheric ozone layer. Experiments were designed to isolate gene(s) affected by UV irradiation in rabbit cornea tissues using fluorescent differential display-reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (FDDRT-PCR). The epithelial cells were grown in standard medium for 2 or 4 hours post treatment. Cornea epithelial cells were irradiated with UVB for 20 minutes. RNA was extracted and amplified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction using poly A+ specific anchoring primers and random arbitrary primers. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed several differentially expressed genes in untreated versus UV irradiated cells. Complimentary DNA (cDNA) fragments resulting from fluorescent differentially expressed mRNAs were eluted from the gel and re-amplified. The re-amplified PCR products were cloned directly into the PCR-TRAP cloning system. These data showed that FDDRT-PCR is a useful technique to elucidate UV-regulated gene expressions. Future experiments will involve sequence analysis of cloned inserts. The identification of these genes through sequence analysis could lead to a better understanding of cataract formation via DNA damage and mechanisms of prevention. PMID:16705801

  20. Identification of Genes Required for Normal Pheromone-Induced Cell Polarization in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chenevert, J.; Valtz, N.; Herskowitz, I.

    1994-01-01

    In response to mating pheromones, cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae adopt a polarized ``shmoo'' morphology, in which the cytoskeleton and proteins involved in mating are localized to a cell-surface projection. This polarization is presumed to reflect the oriented morphogenesis that occurs between mating partners to facilitate cell and nuclear fusion. To identify genes involved in pheromone-induced cell polarization, we have isolated mutants defective in mating to an enfeebled partner and studied a subset of these mutants. The 34 mutants of interest are proficient for pheromone production, arrest in response to pheromone, mate to wild-type strains, and exhibit normal cell polarity during vegetative growth. The mutants were divided into classes based on their morphological responses to mating pheromone. One class is unable to localize cell-surface growth in response to mating factor and instead enlarges in a uniform manner. These mutants harbor special alleles of genes required for cell polarization during vegetative growth, BEM1 and CDC24. Another class of mutants forms bilobed, peanut-like shapes when treated with pheromone and defines two genes, PEA1 and PEA2. PEA1 is identical to SPA2. A third class forms normally shaped but tiny shmoos and defines the gene TNY1. A final group of mutants exhibits apparently normal shmoo morphology. The nature of their mating defect is yet to be determined. We discuss the possible roles of these gene products in establishing cell polarity during mating. PMID:8013906

  1. Dietary bioflavonoids induce cleavage in the MLL gene and may contribute to infant leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Strick, Reiner; Strissel, Pamela L.; Borgers, Susanne; Smith, Steve L.; Rowley, Janet D.

    2000-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the MLL gene occur in about 80% of infant leukemia. In the search for possible agents inducing infant leukemia, we identified bioflavonoids, natural substances in food as well as in dietary supplements, that cause site-specific DNA cleavage in the MLL breakpoint cluster region (BCR) in vivo. The MLL BCR DNA cleavage was shown in primary progenitor hematopoietic cells from healthy newborns and adults as well as in cell lines; it colocalized with the MLL BCR cleavage site induced by chemotherapeutic agents, such as etoposide (VP16) and doxorubicin (Dox). Both in vivo and additional in vitro experiments demonstrated topoisomerase II (topo II) as the target of bioflavonoids similar to VP16 and Dox. Based on 20 bioflavonoids tested, we identified a common structure essential for topo II-induced DNA cleavage. Reversibility experiments demonstrated a religation of the bioflavonoid as well as the VP16-induced MLL cleavage site. Our observations support a two-stage model of cellular processing of topo II inhibitors: The first and reversible stage of topo II-induced DNA cleavage results in DNA repair, but also rarely in chromosome translocations; whereas the second, nonreversible stage leads to cell death because of an accumulation of DNA damage. These results suggest that maternal ingestion of bioflavonoids may induce MLL breaks and potentially translocations in utero leading to infant and early childhood leukemia. PMID:10758153

  2. Irradiated esophageal cells are protected from radiation-induced recombination by MnSOD gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yunyun; Wang, Hong; Wiktor-Brown, Dominika; Rugo, Rebecca; Shen, Hongmei; Huq, M Saiful; Engelward, Bevin; Epperly, Michael; Greenberger, Joel S

    2010-04-01

    Radiation-induced DNA damage is a precursor to mutagenesis and cytotoxicity. During radiotherapy, exposure of healthy tissues can lead to severe side effects. We explored the potential of mitochondrial SOD (MnSOD) gene therapy to protect esophageal, pancreatic and bone marrow cells from radiation-induced genomic instability. Specifically, we measured the frequency of homologous recombination (HR) at an integrated transgene in the Fluorescent Yellow Direct Repeat (FYDR) mice, in which an HR event can give rise to a fluorescent signal. Mitochondrial SOD plasmid/liposome complex (MnSOD-PL) was administered to esophageal cells 24 h prior to 29 Gy upper-body irradiation. Single cell suspensions from FYDR, positive control FYDR-REC, and negative control C57BL/6NHsd (wild-type) mouse esophagus, pancreas and bone marrow were evaluated by flow cytometry. Radiation induced a statistically significant increase in HR 7 days after irradiation compared to unirradiated FYDR mice. MnSOD-PL significantly reduced the induction of HR by radiation at day 7 and also reduced the level of HR in the pancreas. Irradiation of the femur and tibial marrow with 8 Gy also induced a significant increase in HR at 7 days. Radioprotection by intraesophageal administration of MnSOD-PL was correlated with a reduced level of radiation-induced HR in esophageal cells. These results demonstrate the efficacy of MnSOD-PL for suppressing radiation-induced HR in vivo. PMID:20334517

  3. Chalcone synthase as a reporter in virus-induced gene silencing studies of flower senescence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Chih; Jiang, Cai-Zhong; Gookin, Timothy E; Hunter, Donald A; Clark, David G; Reid, Michael S

    2004-07-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated infection of petunia (Petunia hybrida) plants with tobacco rattle virus (TRV) bearing fragments of Petunia genes resulted in systemic infection and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of the homologous host genes. Infection with TRV containing a phytoene desaturase (PDS) fragment resulted in reduced abundance of PDS transcripts and typical photobleaching of photosynthetic tissues. Infection with TRV containing a chalcone synthase (CHS) fragment resulted in silencing of anthocyanin production in infected flowers. The silencing phenotype ranged from scattered white spots on the normal purple background to entirely white flowers. Symptoms in the V26 cultivar were a diffuse mosaic, but infection of some purple-flowered commercial cultivars resulted in large white sectors and even entirely white flowers. Abundance of CHS transcripts in the white flowers was less than 4% of that in purple flowers on the same plant. Infection with TRV containing a tandem construct of PDS and CHS resulted in leaf photobleaching and white patterns on the flowers. Transcripts of CHS and PDS were reduced both in leaves and in flowers confirming simultaneous silencing of both genes by the tandem construct. We tested the effects of infection with TRV containing CHS and a fragment of a petunia gene encoding for 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO4) Abundance of transcripts encoding ACO4 and ACO1 were reduced (by 5% and 20%, respectively) in infected flowers. Whether the flowers were treated with ACC or pollinated, the white (silenced) flowers or flower sectors produced less ethylene and senesced later than purple (non-silenced) tissues. These results indicate the value of VIGS with tandem constructs containing CHS as reporter and a target gene as a tool for examining the function of floral-associated genes. PMID:15604697

  4. Maternal Diet during Pregnancy Induces Gene Expression and DNA Methylation Changes in Fetal Tissues in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Xianyong; Cretney, Evan C.; Kropp, Jenna; Khateeb, Karam; Berg, Mary A.; Peñagaricano, Francisco; Magness, Ronald; Radunz, Amy E.; Khatib, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Studies in rats and mice have established that maternal nutrition induces epigenetic modifications, sometimes permanently, that alter gene expression in the fetus, which in turn leads to phenotypic changes. However, limited data is available on the influence of maternal diet on epigenetic modifications and gene expression in sheep. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to investigate the impact of different maternal dietary energy sources on the expression of imprinted genes in fetuses in sheep. Ewes were naturally bred to a single sire and from days 67 ± 3 of gestation until necropsy (days 130 ± 1), they were fed one of three diets of alfalfa haylage (HY; fiber), corn (CN; starch), or dried corn distiller’s grains (DG; fiber plus protein plus fat). A total of 26 fetuses were removed from the dams and longissimus dorsi, semitendinosus, perirenal adipose depot, and subcutaneous adipose depot tissues were collected for expression and DNA methylation analyses. Expression analysis of nine imprinted genes and three DNA methyltransferase (DNMTs) genes showed significant effects of the different maternal diets on the expression of these genes. The methylation levels of CpG islands of both IGF2R and H19 were higher in HY and DG than CN fetuses in both males and females. This result is consistent with the low amino acid content of the CN diet, a source of methyl group donors, compared to HY and DG diets. Thus, results of this study provide evidence of association between maternal nutrition during pregnancy and transcriptomic and epigenomic alterations of imprinted genes and DNMTs in the fetal tissues. PMID:23577020

  5. Atypical antipsychotics induce both proinflammatory and adipogenic gene expression in human adipocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sárvári, Anitta K; Veréb, Zoltán; Uray, Iván P; Fésüs, László; Balajthy, Zoltán

    2014-08-01

    Schizophrenia requires lifelong treatment, potentially causing systemic changes in metabolic homeostasis. In the clinical setting, antipsychotic treatment may differentially lead to weight gain among individual patients, although the molecular determinants of such adverse effects are currently unknown. In this study, we investigated changes in the expression levels of critical regulatory genes of adipogenesis, lipid metabolism and proinflammatory genes during the differentiation of primary human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). These cells were isolated from patients with body mass indices <25 and treated with the second-generation antipsychotics olanzapine, ziprasidone, clozapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole and risperidone and the first-generation antipsychotic haloperidol. We found that antipsychotics exhibited a marked effect on key genes involved in the regulation of cell cycle, signal transduction, transcription factors, nuclear receptors, differentiation markers and metabolic enzymes. In particular, we observed an induction of the transcription factor NF-KB1 and NF-KB1 target genes in adipocytes in response to these drugs, including the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8 and MCP-1. In addition, enhanced secretion of both IL8 and MCP-1 was observed in the supernatant of these cell cultures. In addition to their remarkable stimulatory effects on proinflammatory gene transcription, three of the most frequently prescribed antipsychotic drugs, clozapine, quetiapine and aripiprazole, also induced the expression of essential adipocyte differentiation genes and the adipocyte hormones leptin and adiponectin, suggesting that both glucose and fat metabolism may be affected by these drugs. These data further suggest that antipsychotic treatments in patients alter the gene expression patterns in adipocytes in a coordinated fashion and priming them for a low-level inflammatory state. PMID:25019983

  6. A molecular characterization of the choroid plexus and stress-induced gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sathyanesan, M; Girgenti, M J; Banasr, M; Stone, K; Bruce, C; Guilchicek, E; Wilczak-Havill, K; Nairn, A; Williams, K; Sass, S; Duman, J G; Newton, S S

    2012-01-01

    The role of the choroid plexus (CP) in brain homeostasis is being increasingly recognized and recent studies suggest that the CP has a more important role in physiological and pathological brain functions than currently appreciated. To obtain additional insight on the CP function, we performed a proteomics and transcriptomics characterization employing a combination of high resolution tandem mass spectrometry and gene expression analyses in normal rodent brain. Using multiple protein fractionation approaches, we identified 1400 CP proteins in adult CP. Microarray-based comparison of CP gene expression with the kidney, cortex and hippocampus showed significant overlap between the CP and the kidney. CP gene profiles were validated by in situ hybridization analysis of several target genes including klotho, CLIC 6, OATP 14 and Ezrin. Immunohistochemical analyses were performed for CP and enpendyma detection of several target proteins including cytokeratin, Rab7, klotho, tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease 1 (TIMP1), MMP9 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The molecular functions associated with various proteins of the CP proteome indicate that it is a blood–cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier that exhibits high levels of metabolic activity. We also analyzed the gene expression changes induced by stress, an exacerbating factor for many illnesses, particularly mood disorders. Chronic stress altered the expression of several genes, downregulating 5HT2C, glucocorticoid receptor and the cilia genes IFT88 and smoothened while upregulating 5HT2A, BDNF, TNFα and IL-1b. The data presented here attach additional significance to the emerging importance of CP function in brain health and CNS disease states. PMID:22781172

  7. Anchoring Ethinylestradiol Induced Gene Expression Changes with Testicular Morphology and Reproductive Function in the Medaka

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Hilary D.; Clark, Bryan W.; Hinton, David E.; Whitehead, Andrew; Martin, Stan; Kwok, Kevin W.; Kullman, Seth W.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental estrogens are ubiquitous in the environment and can cause detrimental effects on male reproduction. In fish, a multitude of effects from environmental estrogens have been observed including altered courting behavior and fertility, sex reversal, and gonadal histopathology. However, few studies in fish assess the impacts of estrogenic exposure on a physiological endpoint, such as reproduction, as well as the associated morphologic response and underlying global gene expression changes. This study assessed the implications of a 14 day sub-chronic exposure of ethinylestradiol (EE2; 1.0 or 10.0 µg/L EE2) on male medaka fertility, testicular histology and testicular gene expression. The findings demonstrate that a 14 day exposure to EE2 induced impaired male reproductive capacity and time- and dose-dependent alterations in testicular morphology and gene expression. The average fertilization rate/day following the exposure for control, 1.0 and 10.0 µg/L EE2 was 91.3% (±4.4), 62.8% (±8.3) and 28.8% (±5.8), respectively. The testicular morphologic alterations included increased germ cell apoptosis, decreased germinal epithelium and thickening of the interstitium. These changes were highly associated with testicular gene expression changes using a medaka-specific microarray. A pathway analysis of the differentially expressed genes emphasized genes and pathways associated with apoptosis, cell cycle and proliferation, collagen production/extracellular matrix organization, hormone signaling, male reproduction and protein ubiquitination among others. These findings highlight the importance of anchoring global gonadal gene expression changes with morphology and ultimately with tissue/organ function. PMID:23300682

  8. Changes in Gene Expression Foreshadow Diet-Induced Obesity in Genetically Identical Mice

    PubMed Central

    Koza, Robert A; Nikonova, Larissa; Hogan, Jessica; Rim, Jong-Seop; Mendoza, Tamra; Faulk, Christopher; Skaf, Jihad; Kozak, Leslie P

    2006-01-01

    High phenotypic variation in diet-induced obesity in male C57BL/6J inbred mice suggests a molecular model to investigate non-genetic mechanisms of obesity. Feeding mice a high-fat diet beginning at 8 wk of age resulted in a 4-fold difference in adiposity. The phenotypes of mice characteristic of high or low gainers were evident by 6 wk of age, when mice were still on a low-fat diet; they were amplified after being switched to the high-fat diet and persisted even after the obesogenic protocol was interrupted with a calorically restricted, low-fat chow diet. Accordingly, susceptibility to diet-induced obesity in genetically identical mice is a stable phenotype that can be detected in mice shortly after weaning. Chronologically, differences in adiposity preceded those of feeding efficiency and food intake, suggesting that observed difference in leptin secretion is a factor in determining phenotypes related to food intake. Gene expression analyses of adipose tissue and hypothalamus from mice with low and high weight gain, by microarray and qRT-PCR, showed major changes in the expression of genes of Wnt signaling and tissue re-modeling in adipose tissue. In particular, elevated expression of SFRP5, an inhibitor of Wnt signaling, the imprinted gene MEST and BMP3 may be causally linked to fat mass expansion, since differences in gene expression observed in biopsies of epididymal fat at 7 wk of age (before the high-fat diet) correlated with adiposity after 8 wk on a high-fat diet. We propose that C57BL/6J mice have the phenotypic characteristics suitable for a model to investigate epigenetic mechanisms within adipose tissue that underlie diet-induced obesity. PMID:16733553

  9. Bicarbonate Induces Vibrio cholerae Virulence Gene Expression by Enhancing ToxT Activity▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Abuaita, Basel H.; Withey, Jeffrey H.

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a gram-negative bacterium that is the causative agent of cholera, a severe diarrheal illness. The two biotypes of V. cholerae O1 capable of causing cholera, classical and El Tor, require different in vitro growth conditions for induction of virulence gene expression. Growth under the inducing conditions or infection of a host initiates a complex regulatory cascade that results in production of ToxT, a regulatory protein that directly activates transcription of the genes encoding cholera toxin (CT), toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), and other virulence genes. Previous studies have shown that sodium bicarbonate induces CT expression in the V. cholerae El Tor biotype. However, the mechanism for bicarbonate-mediated CT induction has not been defined. In this study, we demonstrate that bicarbonate stimulates virulence gene expression by enhancing ToxT activity. Both the classical and El Tor biotypes produce inactive ToxT protein when they are cultured statically in the absence of bicarbonate. Addition of bicarbonate to the culture medium does not affect ToxT production but causes a significant increase in CT and TCP expression in both biotypes. Ethoxyzolamide, a potent carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, inhibits bicarbonate-mediated virulence induction, suggesting that conversion of CO2 into bicarbonate by carbonic anhydrase plays a role in virulence induction. Thus, bicarbonate is the first positive effector for ToxT activity to be identified. Given that bicarbonate is present at high concentration in the upper small intestine where V. cholerae colonizes, bicarbonate is likely an important chemical stimulus that V. cholerae senses and that induces virulence during the natural course of infection. PMID:19564378

  10. Nitrate-Induced Genes in Tomato Roots. Array Analysis Reveals Novel Genes That May Play a Role in Nitrogen Nutrition1[w

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Hong; Garvin, David F.; Kochian, Leon V.

    2001-01-01

    A subtractive tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) root cDNA library enriched in genes up-regulated by changes in plant mineral status was screened with labeled mRNA from roots of both nitrate-induced and mineral nutrient-deficient (−nitrogen [N], −phosphorus, −potassium [K], −sulfur, −magnesium, −calcium, −iron, −zinc, and −copper) tomato plants. A subset of cDNAs was selected from this library based on mineral nutrient-related changes in expression. Additional cDNAs were selected from a second mineral-deficient tomato root library based on sequence homology to known genes. These selection processes yielded a set of 1,280 mineral nutrition-related cDNAs that were arrayed on nylon membranes for further analysis. These high-density arrays were hybridized with mRNA from tomato plants exposed to nitrate at different time points after N was withheld for 48 h, for plants that were grown on nitrate/ammonium for 5 weeks prior to the withholding of N. One hundred-fifteen genes were found to be up-regulated by nitrate resupply. Among these genes were several previously identified as nitrate responsive, including nitrate transporters, nitrate and nitrite reductase, and metabolic enzymes such as transaldolase, transketolase, malate dehydrogenase, asparagine synthetase, and histidine decarboxylase. We also identified 14 novel nitrate-inducible genes, including: (a) water channels, (b) root phosphate and K+ transporters, (c) genes potentially involved in transcriptional regulation, (d) stress response genes, and (e) ribosomal protein genes. In addition, both families of nitrate transporters were also found to be inducible by phosphate, K, and iron deficiencies. The identification of these novel nitrate-inducible genes is providing avenues of research that will yield new insights into the molecular basis of plant N nutrition, as well as possible networking between the regulation of N, phosphorus, and K nutrition. PMID:11553762

  11. Control and target gene selection for studies on UV-induced genotoxicity in whales

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    on the capacity of wildlife to resolve or limit UV-induced damage. The proposed target genes are HSP70, P53 and KIN, known to be involved in genotoxic stress pathways, and whose expression patterns can be accurately assessed by using two stable control genes, RPL4 and RPS18. PMID:23837727

  12. Differential expression analysis of genes involved in high-temperature induced sex differentiation in Nile tilapia.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun Ge; Wang, Hui; Chen, Hong Ju; Zhao, Yan; Fu, Pei Sheng; Ji, Xiang Shan

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, high temperature effects on the molecular pathways during sex differentiation in teleosts need to be deciphered. In this study, a systematic differential expression analysis of genes involved in high temperature-induced sex differentiation was done in the Nile tilapia gonad and brain. Our results showed that high temperature caused significant down-regulation of CYP19A1A in the gonad of both sexes in induction group, and FOXL2 in the ovary of the induction group. The expressions of GTHα, LHβ and ERα were also significantly down-regulated in the brain of both sexes in the induction and recovery groups. On the contrary, the expression of CYP11B2 was significantly up-regulated in the ovary, but not in the testis in both groups. Spearman rank correlation analysis showed that there are significant correlations between the expressions of CYP19A1A, FOXL2, or DMRT1 in the gonads and the expression of some genes in the brain. Another result in this study showed that high temperature up-regulated the expression level of DNMT1 in the testis of the induction group, and DNMT1 and DNMT3A in the female brain of both groups. The expression and correlation analysis of HSPs showed that high temperature action on tilapia HSPs might indirectly induce the expression changes of sex differentiation genes in the gonads. These findings provide new insights on TSD and suggest that sex differentiation related genes, heat shock proteins, and DNA methylation genes are new candidates for studying TSD in fish species. PMID:25199961

  13. Structure and functional analysis of wheat ICE (inducer of CBF expression) genes.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Mohamed; Reddy, Yedulla Venkat; Agharbaoui, Zahra; Tominaga, Yoko; Danyluk, Jean; Sarhan, Fathey; Houde, Mario

    2008-08-01

    Two different inducers of CBF expression (ICE1-like genes), TaICE41 and TaICE87, were isolated from a cDNA library prepared from cold-treated wheat aerial tissues. TaICE41 encodes a protein of 381 aa with a predicted MW of 39.5 kDa while TaICE87 encodes a protein of 443 aa with a predicted MW of 46.5 kDa. TaICE41 and TaICE87 share 46% identity while they share 50 and 47% identity with Arabidopsis AtICE1 respectively. Expression analysis revealed that mRNA accumulation was not altered by cold treatment suggesting that both genes are expressed constitutively. Gel mobility shift analysis showed that TaICE41 and TaICE87 bind to different MYC elements in the wheat TaCBFIVd-B9 promoter. Transient expression assays in Nicotiana benthamiana, showed that both TaICE proteins can activate TaCBFIVd-B9 transcription. The different affinities of TaICE41 and TaICE87 for MYC variants suggest that ICE binding specificity may be involved in the differential expression of wheat CBF genes. Furthermore, analysis of MYC elements demonstrates that a specific variant is present in the wheat CBF group IV that is associated with freezing tolerance. Overexpression of either TaICE41 or TaICE87 genes in Arabidopsis enhanced freezing tolerance only upon cold acclimation suggesting that other factors induced by low temperature are required for their activity. The increased freezing tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis is associated with a higher expression of the cold responsive activators AtCBF2, AtCBF3, and of several cold-regulated genes. PMID:18635580

  14. 20-hydroxyecdysone upregulates apoptotic genes and induces apoptosis in the Bombyx fat body.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ling; Liu, Shumin; Liu, Hanhan; Li, Sheng

    2012-04-01

    During insect metamorphosis, obsolete larval tissues are removed by programed cell death (PCD), mainly apoptosis and autophagy, which is directed by the molting hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and the 20E-triggered transcriptional cascade. Here, we investigated how 20E regulates apoptosis at the transcriptional level in the fat body of the silkworm, Bombyx mori. As detected by TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL), apoptosis weakly occurred during the fourth larval molting, decreased to undetected levels during the early fifth instar, and gradually increased from day 4 of fifth instar to the wandering stage to the prepupal stage. Meanwhile, as determined by quantitative real-time PCR, eight genes involved in apoptosis, including Apaf-1, Nedd2 like1, Nedd2 like2, ICE1, ICE3, ICE5, Arp, and IAP, were highly expressed during molting and pupation, when the 20E titer is high. Injection of 20E into day 2 of fifth instar larvae significantly induced apoptosis and upregulated apoptotic genes after 6 h of treatment, and in vitro treatment of larval fat body tissues with 20E upregulated all the eight apoptotic genes. Moreover, RNAi knockdown of USP, a component of the 20E receptor complex EcR-USP, at the early-wandering stage reduced apoptosis and downregulated apoptotic genes after 24 h of treatment. Taken together, we infer that 20E upregulates apoptotic genes and thus induces apoptosis in the Bombyx fat body during larval molting and the larval-pupal transition. PMID:22517444

  15. Cytokine-induced patterns of gene expression in skeletal muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Alon, Tamar; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Socci, Nicholas D

    2003-08-22

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and other cytokines induce a state of negative energy balance leading to the breakdown of skeletal muscle. Leptin, another member of the cytokine superfamily, also induces a state of negative energy balance but does not alter lean body mass. The transcription profile of skeletal muscle was compared in animals treated with TNF-alpha or leptin or in animals pair-fed over a 7-day time course using 11,000-gene microarrays (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA). Ten clusters of skeletal muscle genes were identified, each of which showed significantly different expression between TNF-alpha treatment and pair feeding. Studies comparing leptin treatment and pair feeding revealed that both activate nearly identical programs of gene expression in skeletal muscle. These data indicate that the effects of leptin on skeletal muscle are markedly different from those of TNF-alpha and that the effects of leptin on skeletal muscle can be largely ascribed to its anorectic effects. Subtle differences between leptin and pair feeding were evident only after 7 days of treatment. In general, pair feeding altered gene expression after the 7-day treatment, whereas leptin did not. The effects of TNF-alpha on skeletal muscle are distinct from those of pair feeding, a result consistent with its known catabolic effects on this tissue. Analyses of the data from food-restricted animals also identified a set of transcriptional changes associated with this state. Further studies of many newly identified leptin-, TNF-alpha-, and starvation-regulated genes and the apparent coordinate regulation of these clusters may reveal important insights into the different effects of cytokines on skeletal muscle. PMID:12750389

  16. Minor changes in gene expression in the mouse preoptic hypothalamic region by inflammation-induced prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    Vasilache, A M; Kugelberg, U; Blomqvist, A; Nilsberth, C

    2013-07-01

    We investigated to what extent inflammation-induced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) regulates gene expression in the central nervous system. Wild-type mice and mice with deletion of the gene encoding microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1), which cannot produce inflammation-induced PGE2 , were subjected to peripheral injection of bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and killed after 5 h. The median and medial preoptic nuclei, which are rich in prostaglandin E receptors, were isolated by laser capture microdissection (LCM), and subjected to whole genome microarray analysis. Although the immune stimulus induced robust transcriptional changes in the brain, as seen by a quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) on selected genes, only small PGE2 -dependent gene expression changes were observed in the gene array analysis and, for only two genes, a pronounced differential expression between LPS-treated wild-type and mPGES-1 knockout mice could be verified by qRT-PCR. These were Hspa1a and Hspa1b, encoding heat shock proteins, which showed a two- to three-fold higher expression in wild-type mice than in knockout mice after immune challenge. However, the induced expression of these genes was found to be secondary to increased body temperature because they were induced also by cage exchange stress, which did not elicit PGE2 synthesis, and thus were not induced per se by PGE2 -elicited transcriptional events. Our findings suggest that inflammation-induced PGE2 has little effect on gene expression in the preoptic region, and that centrally elicited disease symptoms, although PGE2 -dependent, occur as a result of regulation of neuronal excitability that is a consequence of intracellular, transcriptional-independent signalling cascades. Our findings also imply that the profound changes in gene expression in the brain that are elicited by peripheral inflammation occur independently of PGE2 via a yet unidentified mechanism. PMID:23631667

  17. Flavonoids inhibit cytokine-induced endothelial cell adhesion protein gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gerritsen, M. E.; Carley, W. W.; Ranges, G. E.; Shen, C. P.; Phan, S. A.; Ligon, G. F.; Perry, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    Treatment of human endothelial cells with cytokines such as interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or interferon-gamma induces the expression of specific leukocyte adhesion molecules on the endothelial cell surface. Interfering with either leukocyte adhesion or adhesion protein upregulation is an important therapeutic target as evidenced by the potent anti-inflammatory actions of neutralizing antibodies to these ligands in various animal models and in patients. In the present study we report that cotreatment of human endothelial cells with certain hydroxyflavones and flavanols blocks cytokine-induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin expression on human endothelial cells. One of the most potent flavones, apigenin, exhibited a dose- and time-dependent, reversible effect on adhesion protein expression as well as inhibiting adhesion protein upregulation at the transcriptional level. Apigenin also inhibited IL-1 alpha-induced prostaglandin synthesis and TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 and IL-8 production, suggesting that the hydroxyflavones may act as general inhibitors of cytokine-induced gene expression. Although apigenin did not inhibit TNF-alpha-induced nuclear translocation of NF-kappa B(p50(NFKB1)/p65(RelA)) we found this flavonoid did inhibit TNF-alpha induced beta-galactosidase activity in SW480 cells stably transfected with a beta-galactosidase reporter construct driven by four NF-kappa B elements, suggesting an action on NF-kappa B transcriptional activation. Adhesion of leukocytes to cytokine-treated endothelial cells was blocked in endothelial cells cotreated with apigenin. Finally, apigenin demonstrated potent anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced rat paw edema and delayed type hypersensitivity in the mouse. We conclude that flavonoids offer important therapeutic potential for the treatment of a variety of inflammatory diseases involving an increase in leukocyte adhesion and trafficking. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 11 PMID:7543732

  18. RIG-I Signaling Is Essential for Influenza B Virus-Induced Rapid Interferon Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Österlund, Pamela; Westenius, Veera; Latvala, Sinikka; Diamond, Michael S.; Gale, Michael; Julkunen, Ilkka

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza B virus causes annual epidemics and, along with influenza A virus, accounts for substantial disease and economic burden throughout the world. Influenza B virus infects only humans and some marine mammals and is not responsible for pandemics, possibly due to a very low frequency of reassortment and a lower evolutionary rate than that of influenza A virus. Influenza B virus has been less studied than influenza A virus, and thus, a comparison of influenza A and B virus infection mechanisms may provide new insight into virus-host interactions. Here we analyzed the early events in influenza B virus infection and interferon (IFN) gene expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells. We show that influenza B virus induces IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) activation and IFN-λ1 gene expression with faster kinetics than does influenza A virus, without a requirement for viral protein synthesis or replication. Influenza B virus-induced activation of IRF3 required the fusion of viral and endosomal membranes, and nuclear accumulation of IRF3 and viral NP occurred concurrently. In comparison, immediate early IRF3 activation was not observed in influenza A virus-infected macrophages. Experiments with RIG-I-, MDA5-, and RIG-I/MDA5-deficient mouse fibroblasts showed that RIG-I is the critical pattern recognition receptor needed for the influenza B virus-induced activation of IRF3. Our results show that innate immune mechanisms are activated immediately after influenza B virus entry through the endocytic pathway, whereas influenza A virus avoids early IRF3 activation and IFN gene induction. IMPORTANCE Recently, a great deal of interest has been paid to identifying the ligands for RIG-I under conditions of natural infection, as many previous studies have been based on transfection of cells with different types of viral or synthetic RNA structures. We shed light on this question by analyzing the earliest step in innate immune recognition of

  19. Identification of activity-dependent gene expression profiles reveals specific subsets of genes induced by different routes of Ca(2+) entry in cultured rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Guangxin; Pan, Liangbin; Xing, Wanli; Zhang, Liang; Huang, Lihua; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Rui; Wu, Jianping; Cheng, Jing; Zhou, Yuxiang

    2007-07-01

    Neuronal activity-dependent gene transcription is a key feature of long-lasting synaptic strengthening associated with learning and memory, as well as activity-dependent neuroprotection. To comprehensively determine the molecular alterations, we carried out genome-wide microarray analysis in cultured rat cortical neurons treated with specific pharmacological agents, a model with alterations in neuronal activity, which were monitored by multi-site electrophysiological recordings. Of the approximately 27,000 genes, the expression of 248 genes was strongly changed in response to enhanced activity. These genes encompass a large number of members of distinct families, including synaptic vesicle proteins, ion channels, signal transduction molecules, synaptic growth regulators, and others. Two subsets of these genes were further confirmed to be specifically induced by Ca(2+) influx through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs). In addition, those genes dynamically regulated by the enhanced activity were also elucidated, as well as those candidate genes associated with synaptic plasticity and neuroprotection. Our findings therefore would help define the molecular mechanisms that occur in response to neuronal activity and identify specific clusters of genes that contribute to activity-dependent and Ca(2+)-inducible modulation of brain development and function. PMID:17443680

  20. Identification of crucial microRNAs and genes in hypoxia-induced human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ying; Deng, Lili; Su, Dongju; Xiao, Jinling; Ge, Dongjie; Bao, Yongxia; Jing, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Variations of microRNA (miRNA) expression profile in hypoxic lung cancer cells have not been studied so far. Therefore, using miRNA microarray technology, this study aimed to study the miRNA expression profile and investigate the potential crucial miRNAs and their target genes in hypoxia-induced human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Materials and methods Based on miRNA microarray, miRNA expression profiling of hypoxia-induced lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells was obtained. After identification of differentially expressed miRNAs (DE-miRNAs) in hypoxic cells, target genes of DE-miRNAs were predicted, and functional enrichment analysis of targets was conducted. Furthermore, the expression levels of DE-miRNAs and their target genes were validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition, using miRNA mimics, the effect of overexpressed DE-miRNAs on A549 cell behaviors (cell proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis) was evaluated. Results In total, 14 DE-miRNAs (nine upregulated miRNAs and five downregulated miRNAs) were identified in hypoxic cells, compared with normoxic cells. Target genes of both upregulated and downregulated miRNAs were enriched in the functions such as chromatin modification, and pathways such as Wnt signaling pathway and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling pathway. The expression levels of several miRNAs and their target genes were confirmed, including hsa-miR-301b/FOXF2, hsa-miR-148b-3p/WNT10B, hsa-miR-769-5p/(SMAD2, ARID1A), and hsa-miR-622. Among them, hsa-miR-301b was verified to regulate FOXF2, and hsa-miR-769-5p was verified to modulate ARID1A. In addition, the overexpression of hsa-miR-301b and hsa-miR-769-5p significantly affected the cell cycle of A549 cells, but not cell proliferation and apoptosis. Conclusion miRNA expression profile was changed in hypoxia-induced lung cancer cells. Those validated miRNAs and genes may play crucial roles in the response of lung cancer cells to hypoxia. PMID:27524914

  1. DNA sequence and spatial expression pattern of a drought- and ABA-induced gene in tomato

    SciTech Connect

    Plant, A.L.; Cohen, A.; Moses, M.S.; Bray, E.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The genomic and cDNA sequence for the previously characterized drought- and ABA-induced gene pLE16 are presented. The single open reading frame contained within the gene has the capacity to encode a polypeptide of 12.7 kD with a predicted pI of 8.73. The amino-terminus is highly hydrophobic and is characteristic of signal sequences which target polypeptides for export from the cytoplasm. There is considerable homology (51.3% identity) between the amino-terminus of pLE16 and the amino-terminal domains of a group of proteins that comprise the phospholipid transfer proteins. Although this homology breaks down at the carboxy-terminal half of pLE16, the homology that exists suggests that pLE16 may be associated with membranes and may therefore play a role in maintaining membrane integrity during drought-stress. pLE16 is expressed in drought-stressed leaf, petiole and stem tissue and to a much lower extent in the seeds and pericarp of mature green tomato fruit. No expression was detected in the seeds or pericarp of red fruit or drought-stressed roots. Expression of pLE16 is induced in leaf tissue by a variety of other environmental stresses including PEG-mediated water deficit, salt, cold stress and heat stress. These stresses did not however induce expression of pLE16 in the roots. Examination of the 5{prime} flanking DNA sequences for this gene did not reveal the presence of the consensus ABA responsive element (ABRE), implicated in ABA induction of gene expression and so far common to the 5{prime} flanking DNA sequences of many genes that are ABA responsive. The expression of pLE16 in response to drought-stress and other environmental stresses in vegetative tissue, together with the lack of a consensus ABRE, suggests that the regulation of this gene by ABA may differ from those that are seed-specific.

  2. Forced expression of Hnf4a induces hepatic gene activation through directed differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yahoo, Neda; Pournasr, Behshad; Rostamzadeh, Jalal; Fathi, Fardin

    2016-08-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of unlimited self-renewal and have a diverse differentiation potential. These unique features make ES cells as an attractive source for developmental biology studies. Having the mature hepatocyte in the lab with functional activities is valuable in drug discovery studies. Overexpression of hepatocyte lineage-specific transcription factors (TFs) becomes a promising approach in pluripotent cell differentiation toward liver cells. Many studies generate transgenic ES cell lines to examine the effects of specific TFs overexpression in cell differentiation. In the present report, we have addressed whether a suspension or adherent model of differentiation is an appropriate way to study the role of Hnf4a overexpression. We generated ES cells that carried a doxycycline (Dox)-inducible Hnf4a using lentiviral vectors. The transduced cells were subjected to induced Hnf4a overexpression through both spontaneous and directed differentiation methods. Gene expression analysis showed substantially increased expression of hepatic gene markers, particularly Ttr and endogenous Hnf4a, in transduced cells differentiated by the directed approach. These results demonstrated that forced expression of TFs during directed differentiation would be an appropriate way to study relevant gene activation and the effects of overexpression in the context of hepatic differentiation. PMID:27233607

  3. Co-expression analysis of differentially expressed genes in hepatitis C virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Song, Qingfeng; Zhao, Chang; Ou, Shengqiu; Meng, Zhibin; Kang, Ping; Fan, Liwei; Qi, Feng; Ma, Yilong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using the expression profiles of HCV-infected Huh7 cells at different time points. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified with the Samr package in R software once the data were normalized. Functional and pathway enrichment analysis of the identified DEGs was also performed. Subsequently, MCODE in Cytoscape software was applied to conduct module analysis of the constructed co-expression networks. A total of 1,100 DEGs were identified between the HCV-infected and control samples at 12, 18, 24 and 48 h post-infection. DEGs at 24 and 48 h were involved in the same signaling pathways and biological processes, including sterol biosynthetic processes and tRNA amino-acylation. There were 22 time series genes which were clustered into 3 expression patterns, and the demarcation point of the 2 expression patterns that 401 overlapping DEGs at 24 and 48 h clustered into was 24 h post-infection. tRNA synthesis-related biological processes emerged at 24 and 48 h. Replication and assembly of HCV in HCV-infected Huh7 cells occurred mainly at 24 h post-infection. In view of this, the screened time series genes have the potential to become candidate target molecules for monitoring, diagnosing and treating HCV-induced HCC. PMID:25339452

  4. An Arabidopsis ATPase gene involved in nematode-induced syncytium development and abiotic stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muhammad Amjad; Plattner, Stephan; Radakovic, Zoran; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Elashry, Abdelnaser; Grundler, Florian MW; Ammelburg, Moritz; Siddique, Shahid; Bohlmann, Holger

    2013-01-01

    The beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii induces syncytia in the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana, which are its only nutrient source. One gene, At1g64110, that is strongly up-regulated in syncytia as shown by RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR, in situ RT-PCR and promoter::GUS lines, encodes an AAA+-type ATPase. Expression of two related genes in syncytia, At4g28000 and At5g52882, was not detected or not different from control root segments. Using amiRNA lines and T-DNA mutants, we show that At1g64110 is important for syncytium and nematode development. At1g64110 was also inducible by wounding, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, heat and cold, as well as drought, sodium chloride, abscisic acid and mannitol, indicating involvement of this gene in abiotic stress responses. We confirmed this using two T-DNA mutants that were more sensitive to abscisic acid and sodium chloride during seed germination and root growth. These mutants also developed significantly smaller roots in response to abscisic acid and sodium chloride. An in silico analysis showed that ATPase At1g64110 (and also At4g28000 and At5g52882) belong to the ‘meiotic clade’ of AAA proteins that includes proteins such as Vps4, katanin, spastin and MSP1. PMID:23480402

  5. Glial cell derived neurotrophic factor induces spermatogonial stem cell marker genes in chicken mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Boozarpour, Sohrab; Matin, Maryam M; Momeni-Moghaddam, Madjid; Dehghani, Hesam; Mahdavi-Shahri, Naser; Sisakhtnezhad, Sajjad; Heirani-Tabasi, Asieh; Irfan-Maqsood, Muhammad; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known with the potential of multi-lineage differentiation. Advances in differentiation technology have also resulted in the conversion of MSCs to other kinds of stem cells. MSCs are considered as a suitable source of cells for biotechnology purposes because they are abundant, easily accessible and well characterized cells. Nowadays small molecules are introduced as novel and efficient factors to differentiate stem cells. In this work, we examined the potential of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for differentiating chicken MSCs toward spermatogonial stem cells. MSCs were isolated and characterized from chicken and cultured under treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (RA) or glial cell derived neurotrophic factor. Expression analysis of specific genes after 7days of RA treatment, as examined by RT-PCR, proved positive for some germ cell markers such as CVH, STRA8, PLZF and some genes involved in spermatogonial stem cell maintenance like BCL6b and c-KIT. On the other hand, GDNF could additionally induce expression of POU5F1, and NANOG as well as other genes which were induced after RA treatment. These data illustrated that GDNF is relatively more effective in diverting chicken MSCs towards Spermatogonial stem cell -like cells in chickens and suggests GDNF as a new agent to obtain transgenic poultry, nevertheless, exploitability of these cells should be verified by more experiments. PMID:27026484

  6. Mutations in cancer genes of UV-induced skin tumors of hairless mice.

    PubMed

    van Kranen, H J; de Gruijl, F R

    1999-12-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a very common carcinogen in our environment. Epidemiological data on the relationship between skin cancers and ambient solar UV radiation are very limited. Hairless mice provide the possibility to study the process of UV carcinogenesis in more detail. Experiments with this animal model have yielded quantitative data on how tumor development depends on dose, time and wavelength of the UV radiation. In addition, at the molecular level the interactions between UV, specific cancer genes-like the Ras oncogene family and the p53 tumor suppressor gene, together with the role of DNA repair in this process have been addressed recently. In wildtype hairless mice mutations in the p53 gene are clearly linked to UVB but not to UVA radiation. Furthermore, the p53 alterations seem to be essential early in tumor development. However, in Xpa-deficient mice this dependency on p53 alterations appeared to be different as is the tumor type induced by UVB. Research using genetically modified hairless mice should enable us to further unravel the mechanisms of UV-induced skin cancer. PMID:10709351

  7. Co-expression analysis of differentially expressed genes in hepatitis C virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    SONG, QINGFENG; ZHAO, CHANG; OU, SHENGQIU; MENG, ZHIBIN; KANG, PING; FAN, LIWEI; QI, FENG; MA, YILONG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using the expression profiles of HCV-infected Huh7 cells at different time points. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified with the Samr package in R software once the data were normalized. Functional and pathway enrichment analysis of the identified DEGs was also performed. Subsequently, MCODE in Cytoscape software was applied to conduct module analysis of the constructed co-expression networks. A total of 1,100 DEGs were identified between the HCV-infected and control samples at 12, 18, 24 and 48 h post-infection. DEGs at 24 and 48 h were involved in the same signaling pathways and biological processes, including sterol biosynthetic processes and tRNA amino-acylation. There were 22 time series genes which were clustered into 3 expression patterns, and the demarcation point of the 2 expression patterns that 401 overlapping DEGs at 24 and 48 h clustered into was 24 h post-infection. tRNA synthesis-related biological processes emerged at 24 and 48 h. Replication and assembly of HCV in HCV-infected Huh7 cells occurred mainly at 24 h post-infection. In view of this, the screened time series genes have the potential to become candidate target molecules for monitoring, diagnosing and treating HCV-induced HCC. PMID:25339452

  8. High-Throughput and Combinatorial Gene Expression on a Chip for Metabolism-Induced Toxicology Screening

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Seok Joon; Lee, Dong Woo; Shah, Dhiral A.; Ku, Bosung; Jeon, Sang Youl; Solanki, Kusum; Ryan, Jessica D.; Clark, Douglas S.; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Lee, Moo-Yeal

    2014-01-01

    Differential expression of various drug-metabolizing enzymes in the human liver may cause deviations of pharmacokinetic profiles, resulting in inter-individual variability of drug toxicity and/or efficacy. Here we present the “Transfected Enzyme and Metabolism Chip” (TeamChip), which predicts potential metabolism-induced drug or drug-candidate toxicity. The TeamChip is prepared by delivering genes into miniaturized three-dimensional cellular microarrays on a micropillar chip using recombinant adenoviruses in a complementary microwell chip. The device enables users to manipulate the expression of individual and multiple human metabolizing-enzyme genes (such as CYP3A4, CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP1A2, CYP2E1, and UGT1A4) in THLE-2 cell microarrays. To identify specific enzymes involved in drug detoxification, we created 84 combinations of metabolic-gene expressions in a combinatorial fashion on a single microarray. Thus, the TeamChip platform can provide critical information necessary for evaluating metabolism-induced toxicity in a high-throughput manner. PMID:24799042

  9. Patient-specific naturally gene-reverted induced pluripotent stem cells in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Tolar, Jakub; McGrath, John A; Xia, Lily; Riddle, Megan J; Lees, Chris J; Eide, Cindy; Keene, Douglas R; Liu, Lu; Osborn, Mark J; Lund, Troy C; Blazar, Bruce R; Wagner, John E

    2014-05-01

    Spontaneous reversion of disease-causing mutations has been observed in some genetic disorders. In our clinical observations of severe generalized recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB), a currently incurable blistering genodermatosis caused by loss-of-function mutations in COL7A1 that results in a deficit of type VII collagen (C7), we have observed patches of healthy-appearing skin on some individuals. When biopsied, this skin revealed somatic mosaicism resulting in the self-correction of C7 deficiency. We believe this source of cells could represent an opportunity for translational 'natural' gene therapy. We show that revertant RDEB keratinocytes expressing functional C7 can be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and that self-corrected RDEB iPSCs can be induced to differentiate into either epidermal or hematopoietic cell populations. Our results give proof-of-principle that an inexhaustible supply of functional patient-specific revertant cells can be obtained--potentially relevant to local wound therapy and systemic hematopoietic cell transplantation. This technology may also avoid some of the major limitations of other cell therapy strategies, e.g., immune rejection and insertional mutagenesis, which are associated with viral- and nonviral-mediated gene therapy. We believe this approach should be the starting point for autologous cellular therapies using 'natural' gene therapy in RDEB and other diseases. PMID:24317394

  10. The tobacco smoke component acrolein induces glucocorticoid resistant gene expression via inhibition of histone deacetylase.

    PubMed

    Randall, Matthew J; Haenen, Guido R M M; Bouwman, Freek G; van der Vliet, Albert; Bast, Aalt

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the leading cause of cigarette smoke-related death worldwide. Acrolein, a crucial reactive electrophile found in cigarette smoke mimics many of the toxic effects of cigarette smoke-exposure in the lung. In macrophages, cigarette smoke is known to hinder histone deacetylases (HDACs), glucocorticoid-regulated enzymes that play an important role in the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid resistant inflammation, a common feature of COPD. Thus, we hypothesize that acrolein plays a role in COPD-associated glucocorticoid resistance. To examine the role of acrolein on glucocorticoid resistance, U937 monocytes, differentiated with PMA to macrophage-like cells were treated with acrolein for 0.5h followed by stimulation with hydrocortisone for 8h, or treated simultaneously with LPS and hydrocortisone for 8h without acrolein. GSH and nuclear HDAC activity were measured, or gene expression was analyzed by qPCR. Acrolein-mediated TNFα gene expression was not suppressed by hydrocortisone whereas LPS-induced TNFα expression was suppressed. Acrolein also significantly inhibited nuclear HDAC activity in macrophage-like cells. Incubation of recombinant HDAC2 with acrolein led to the formation of an HDAC2-acrolein adduct identified by mass spectrometry. Therefore, these results suggest that acrolein-induced inflammatory gene expression is resistant to suppression by the endogenous glucocorticoid, hydrocortisone. PMID:26481333

  11. Cumate-Inducible Gene Expression System for Sphingomonads and Other Alphaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarczyk, Andreas; Vorholt, Julia A.

    2013-01-01

    Tunable promoters represent a pivotal genetic tool for a wide range of applications. Here we present such a system for sphingomonads, a phylogenetically diverse group of bacteria that have gained much interest for their potential in bioremediation and their use in industry and for which no dedicated inducible gene expression system has been described so far. A strong, constitutive synthetic promoter was first identified through a genetic screen and subsequently combined with the repressor and the operator sites of the Pseudomonas putida F1 cym/cmt system. The resulting promoter, termed PQ5, responds rapidly to the inducer cumate and shows a maximal induction ratio of 2 to 3 orders of magnitude in the different sphingomonads tested. Moreover, it was also functional in other Alphaproteobacteria, such as the model organisms Caulobacter crescentus, Paracoccus denitrificans, and Methylobacterium extorquens. In the noninduced state, expression from PQ5 is low enough to allow gene depletion analysis, as demonstrated with the essential gene phyP of Sphingomonas sp. strain Fr1. A set of PQ5-based plasmids has been constructed allowing fusions to affinity tags or fluorescent proteins. PMID:23995928

  12. A novel PRD I and TG binding activity involved in virus-induced transcription of IFN-A genes.

    PubMed Central

    Génin, P; Bragança, J; Darracq, N; Doly, J; Civas, A

    1995-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the inducible elements of the mouse interferon A4 and A11 gene promoters (IE-A4 and IE-A11) by transient transfection experiments, DNase 1 footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays resulted in identification of a virus-induced binding activity suggested to be involved in NDV-induced activation of transcription of these genes. The virus-induced factor, termed VIF, is activated early by contact of virions with cells. It specifically recognizes the PRD I-like domain shared by both inducible elements, as well as the TG-like domain of IE-A4. This factor, distinct from the IRF-1, IRF-2 and the alpha F1 binding proteins and presenting a different affinity pattern from that of the TG protein, is proposed as a candidate for IFN-type I gene regulation. Images PMID:8559665

  13. B-CAROTENE ACCUMULATION INDUCED BY THE CAULIFLOWER OR GENE IS NOT DUE TO AN INCREASED CAPACITY OF BIOSYNTHESIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis) Or gene is a rare carotenoid gene mutation that confers a high level of B-carotene accumulation in various tissues of the plant, turning them orange. To investigate the biochemical basis of the Or-induced carotenogenesis, we examined the caroteno...

  14. Molecular cloning and characterization of two hypersensitive induced reaction genes from wheat infected by stripe rust pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel gene induced during hypersensitive reaction (HIR) in wheat was identified using in silico cloning and designated as TaHIR2. The TaHIR2 gene was deduced to encode a 284-amino acid protein, whose molecular mass and isoelectric point (pI) were 31.05 kD and 5.18, respectively. Amino acid sequenc...

  15. Virus-induced gene silencing of RPC5-like subunit of RNA polymerase III caused pleiotropic effects in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In eukaryotic cells, RNA polymerase III is highly conserved, contains 17 subunits and transcribes housekeeping genes such as ribosomal 50S rRNA, tRNA and other small RNAs. Functional roles of the RPC5 are poorly characterized in the literature. In this work, we report that virus-induced gene silenci...

  16. Modulations of gene expression induced by daily ultraviolet light can be prevented by a broad spectrum sunscreen.

    PubMed

    Marionnet, Claire; Pierrard, Cécile; Lejeune, François; Bernerd, Françoise

    2012-11-01

    Realistic non-zenithal solar ultraviolet (UV) exposure, obtained using standard ultraviolet daylight spectrum (DUVR), has deleterious impact on epidermal and dermal compartments of human skin. The present study was designed to assess gene expression in human reconstructed skin following exposure to DUVR and the protective effect of a broad spectrum sunscreen. Reconstructed skins were exposed to a realistic daily UV dose of 12 J/cm(2) DUVR in the presence of a sunscreen product (Sun(burn) Protection Factor (SPF)=13 and UVA protection factor UVAPF (PPD) 10.5) or its vehicle. Six hours post exposure, gene expression was investigated in fibroblasts (225 genes) and keratinocytes (244 genes) separately using quantitative PCR arrays. DUVR exposure led to significant modulation of 35 and 66 genes in fibroblasts and keratinocytes, respectively. These genes were involved in extracellular matrix homeostasis, oxidative stress response, cell growth, inflammation and epidermal differentiation. Sunscreen use significantly reduced DUVR-induced gene modulation. Hierarchical clustering showed that gene expression profiles in protected and DUVR-exposed samples were very close to those of unexposed samples. The number of DUVR-modulated genes was significantly decreased by tested sunscreen (zero and four modulated genes in fibroblasts and keratinocytes, respectively). Our results demonstrate that a broad-spectrum sunscreen product is highly effective in protecting reconstructed human skin against DUVR-induced changes in gene expression. PMID:22960577

  17. Pregnancy-Induced Changes in Systemic Gene Expression among Healthy Women and Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Anuradha; Pachter, Lior; Nelson, J. Lee; Smed, Mette Kiel; Gildengorin, Virginia L.; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Hetland, Merete Lund; Jewell, Nicholas P.; Olsen, Jørn; Jawaheer, Damini

    2015-01-01

    Background Pregnancy induces drastic biological changes systemically, and has a beneficial effect on some autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, specific systemic changes that occur as a result of pregnancy have not been thoroughly examined in healthy women or women with RA. The goal of this study was to identify genes with expression patterns associated with pregnancy, compared to pre-pregnancy as baseline and determine whether those associations are modified by presence of RA. Results In our RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) dataset from 5 healthy women and 20 women with RA, normalized expression levels of 4,710 genes were significantly associated with pregnancy status (pre-pregnancy, first, second and third trimesters) over time, irrespective of presence of RA (False Discovery Rate (FDR)-adjusted p value<0.05). These genes were enriched in pathways spanning multiple systems, as would be expected during pregnancy. A subset of these genes (n = 256) showed greater than two-fold change in expression during pregnancy compared to baseline levels, with distinct temporal trends through pregnancy. Another 98 genes involved in various biological processes including immune regulation exhibited expression patterns that were differentially associated with pregnancy in the presence or absence of RA. Conclusions Our findings support the hypothesis that the maternal immune system plays an active role during pregnancy, and also provide insight into other systemic changes that occur in the maternal transcriptome during pregnancy compared to the pre-pregnancy state. Only a small proportion of genes modulated by pregnancy were influenced by presence of RA in our data. PMID:26683605

  18. Heterologous virus-induced gene silencing as a promising approach in plant functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Hosseini Tafreshi, Seied Ali; Shariati, Mansour; Mofid, Mohammad Reza; Khayam Nekui, Mojtaba; Esmaeili, Abolghasem

    2012-03-01

    VIGS (virus induced gene silencing) is considered as a powerful genomics tool for characterizing the function of genes in a few closely related plant species. The investigations have been carried out mainly in order to test if a pre-existing VIGS vector can serve as an efficient tool for gene silencing in a diverse array of plant species. Another route of investigation has been the constructing of new viral vectors to act in their hosts. Our approach was the creation of a heterologous system in which silencing of endogenous genes was achieved by sequences isolated from evolutionary remote species. In this study, we showed that a TRV-based vector cloned with sequences from a gymnosperm, Taxus baccata L. silenced the endogenous phytoene desaturase in an angiosperm, N. benthamiana. Our results showed that inserts of between 390 and 724 bp isolated from a conserved fragment of the Taxus PDS led to silencing of its homolog in tobacco. The real time analysis indicated that the expression of PDS was reduced 2.1- to 4.0-fold in pTRV-TbPDS infected plants compared with buffer treated plants. Once the best insert is identified and the conditions are optimized for heterologous silencing by pTRV-TbPDS in tobacco, then we can test if TRV can serve as an efficient silencing vector in Taxus. This strategy could also be used to silence a diverse array of genes from a wide range of species which have no VIGS protocol. The results also showed that plants silenced heterologously by the VIGS system a minimally affected with respect to plant growth which may be ideal for studying the genes that their complete loss of function may lead to decrease of plant growth or plant death. PMID:21655951

  19. Transcriptome-wide gene regulation by gentle treadmill walking during the progression of monoiodoacetate induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Jin; Perera, Priyangi; Liu, Jie; Wu, Lai-Chu; Rath, Björn; Butterfield, Timothy A.; Agarwal, Sudha

    2011-01-01

    Objective Physiotherapies are the most widely recommended conservative treatment options for arthritic diseases. Here we examined the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of gentle treadmill walking (GTW) on various stages of monoiodoacetate-induced arthritis (MIA) to unravel the basis for the success or failure of such therapies on the damaged joints. Methods Rat knees were harvested from untreated control, MIA afflicted but not subjected to GTW, GTW regimens started one day post-MIA induction, or after cartilage damage had progressed to Grade 1 or Grade 2. The cartilage was examined by macroscopic, microscopic, μCT imaging and transcriptome-wide gene expression analysis. Microarray data was analyzed by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis to construct molecular functional networks regulated by GTW. Results GTW intervention started on day 1 post-MIA induction significantly prevented the MIA progression, but its efficacy was reduced when implemented on the knees exhibiting close to Grade 1 cartilage damage. However, GTW accelerated damage in the knees with close to Grade 2 cartilage pathologies. Transcriptome-wide gene expression analysis revealed that GTW intervention started one day post-MIA inception significantly suppressed inflammation-associated genes and upregulated matrix associated gene networks. However, delayed GTW intervention following Grade 1 damage was less effective in suppressing proinflammatory genes or upregulating matrix synthesis. Conclusion The findings suggest that GTW suppresses proinflammatory gene networks and upregulates matrix synthesis to prevent progression of cartilage damage in MIA afflicted knees. However, the extent of cartilage damage at the initiation of GTW may be an important determinant for the success or failure of such therapies. PMID:21400474

  20. Identification of autophagy genes participating in zinc-induced necrotic cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Dziedzic, Slawomir A

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotes use a common set of genes to perform two mechanistically similar autophagic processes. Bulk autophagy harvests proteins nonselectively and reuses their constitutents when nutrients are scarce. In contrast, different forms of selective autophagy target protein aggregates or damaged organelles that threaten to interfere with growth. Yeast uses one form of selective autophagy, called cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt), to engulf two vacuolar enzymes in Cvt vesicles (“CVT-somes”) within which they are transported to vacuoles for maturation. While both are dispensable normally, bulk and selective autophagy help sustain life under stressful conditions. Consistent with this view, knocking out several genes participating in Cvt and specialized autophagic pathways heightened the sensitivity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to inhibitory levels of Zn2+. The loss of other autophagic genes, and genes responsible for apoptotic cell death, had no such effect. Unexpectedly, the loss of members of a third set of autophagy genes heightened cellular resistance to zinc as if they encoded proteins that actively contributed to zinc-induced cell death. Further studies showed that both sensitive and resistant strains accumulated similar amounts of H2O2 during zinc treatments, but that more sensitive strains showed signs of necrosis sooner. Although zinc lethality depended on autophagic proteins, studies with several reporter genes failed to reveal increased autophagic activity. In fact, microscopy analysis indicated that Zn2+ partially inhibited fusion of Cvt vesicles with vacuoles. Further studies into how the loss of autophagic processes suppressed necrosis in yeast might reveal whether a similar process could occur in plants and animals. PMID:21317551

  1. Chromosomal organization of the inducible and constitutive prostaglandin synthase/cyclooxygenase genes in mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Ping Zi Wen; Warden C.; Fletcher, B.S.; Kujubu, D.A.; Herschman, H.R.; Lusis, A.J. )

    1993-02-01

    Two distinct prostaglandin synthase/cyclooxygenase (PGS/COS) enzymes have recently been recognized. One (EC 1.14.00.1) is largely constitutive and has been characterized in a variety of species, whereas the other (also known as TIS10) is inducible by mitogens and inhibitable by glucocorticoids. Along with activation of phospholipase A2, the latter PGS/COS is likely to mediate ligand-induced prostaglandin production in a variety of cell types. The two enzymes have similar gene structures and activities. There is accumulating evidence that PGS/COX activity may play a role in inflammatory diseases. For example, PGS/COX expression is upregulated in inflammatory joint diseases and is genetically controlled. As part of an effort to examine genetic factors regulating PGS/COX expression and the possible involvement of the enzymes in mouse models of inflammatory disorders, we report here the chromosomal mapping of the genes for the constitutive and regulated PGS/COX enzymes. We will refer to the constitutive enzyme as Pgs-1 and the inducible enzyme as Pgs-2. 14 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Selenoprotein X Gene Knockdown Aggravated H2O2-Induced Apoptosis in Liver LO2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiayong; Cao, Lei; Li, Qiang; Wang, Longqiong; Jia, Gang; Liu, Guangmang; Chen, Xiaoling; Cai, Jingyi; Shang, Haiying; Zhao, Hua

    2016-09-01

    To determine the roles of selenoprotein X gene (Selx) in protecting liver cells against oxidative damage, the influences of Selx knockdown on H2O2-induced apoptosis in human normal hepatocyte (LO2) cells were studied. pSilencer 3.1 was used to develop knockdown vector targeting the 3'-UTR of human Selx. The Selx knockdown and control cells were further exposed to H2O2, and cell viability, cell apoptosis rate, and the expression levels of mRNA and protein of apoptosis-related genes were detected. The results showed that vector targeting the 3'-UTR of Selx successfully silenced mRNA or protein expression of SelX in LO2 cells. Selx knockdown resulted in decreased cell viability, increased percentage of early apoptotic cells, decreased Bcl2A1 and Bcl-2 expression, and increased phosphorylation of P38 in LO2 cells. When Selx knockdown LO2 cells were exposed to H2O2, characteristics of H2O2-induced cell dysfunctions were further exacerbated. Taken together, our findings suggested that SelX played important roles in protecting LO2 cells against oxidative damage and reducing H2O2-induced apoptosis in liver cells. PMID:26899321

  3. Methylation-Associated Gene Silencing of RARB in Areca Carcinogens Induced Mouse Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Yung-An; Fan, Shin-Ru; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Chang, Nai-Wen; Cheng, Ju-Chien

    2014-01-01

    Regarding oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) development, chewing areca is known to be a strong risk factor in many Asian cultures. Therefore, we established an OSCC induced mouse model by 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO), or arecoline, or both treatments, respectively. These are the main two components of the areca nut that could increase the occurrence of OSCC. We examined the effects with the noncommercial MCGI (mouse CpG islands) microarray for genome-wide screening the DNA methylation aberrant in induced OSCC mice. The microarray results showed 34 hypermethylated genes in 4-NQO plus arecoline induced OSCC mice tongue tissues. The examinations also used methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR) and bisulfite sequencing to realize the methylation pattern in collected mouse tongue tissues and human OSCC cell lines of different grades, respectively. These results showed that retinoic acid receptor β (RARB) was indicated in hypermethylation at the promoter region and the loss of expression during cancer development. According to the results of real-time PCR, it was shown that de novo DNA methyltransferases were involved in gene epigenetic alternations of OSCC. Collectively, our results showed that RARB hypermethylation was involved in the areca-associated oral carcinogenesis. PMID:25197641

  4. Ethanol induced astaxanthin accumulation and transcriptional expression of carotenogenic genes in Haematococcus pluvialis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zewen; Liu, Zhiyong; Hou, Yuyong; Liu, Chenfeng; Gao, Feng; Zheng, Yubin; Chen, Fangjian

    2015-10-01

    Haematococcus pluvialis is one of the most promising natural sources of astaxanthin. However, inducing the accumulation process has become one of the primary obstacles in astaxanthin production. In this study, the effect of ethanol on astaxanthin accumulation was investigated. The results demonstrated that astaxanthin accumulation occurred with ethanol addition even under low-light conditions. The astaxanthin productivity could reach 11.26 mg L(-1) d(-1) at 3% (v/v) ethanol, which was 2.03 times of that of the control. The transcriptional expression patterns of eight carotenogenic genes were evaluated using real-time PCR. The results showed that ethanol greatly enhanced transcription of the isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) isomerase genes (ipi-1 and ipi-2), which were responsible for isomerization reaction of IPP and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). This finding suggests that ethanol induced astaxanthin biosynthesis was up-regulated mainly by ipi-1 and ipi-2 at transcriptional level, promoting isoprenoid synthesis and substrate supply to carotenoid formation. Thus ethanol has the potential to be used as an effective reagent to induce astaxanthin accumulation in H. pluvialis. PMID:26215339

  5. Cholestasis induced antinociception and decreased gene expression of MOR1 in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, S; Karami, Z; Mohammadian, A; Khosrobakhsh, F; Rostamzadeh, J

    2015-01-22

    We examined antinociception and gene expression of mu-opioid receptor 1 (MOR1) in some brain areas of cholestatic rats, 21 days after common bile duct ligation (BDL). Cholestasis was induced in male Wistar rats during laparotomy and common BDL. Pain behavior was assessed on days 7, 14 or 21 of BDL using a hotplate test in control, sham and cholestatic groups. On day 21 of BDL, other groups of rats were sacrificed, whole brains were extracted, and the hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus and striatum in control, sham and cholestatic rats were dissected. We used a semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method for evaluating MOR1 gene expression. The results revealed that cholestatic rats showed significant antinociception on days 14 and 21 of ligation with the most significant effect on day 21, which was prevented by naloxone (1 mg/kg). On the other hand, the expression of MOR1 gene compared to the sham group was decreased by 42% in the hypothalamus, 41% in the PFC, and 67% in the hippocampus after 21 days of BDL, while no significant change in its expression in the striatum was observed. It can be concluded that a change in endogenous opioid levels and its subsequent influence on the gene expression of MOR in some areas of the rat brain may underlie the altered nociception and other possible pathological changes such as pruritus after induction of cholestasis. PMID:25290008

  6. Induced Pluripotency and Gene Editing in Disease Modelling: Perspectives and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Seah, Yu Fen Samantha; EL Farran, Chadi A.; Warrier, Tushar; Xu, Jian; Loh, Yuin-Han

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are chiefly characterized by their ability to self-renew and to differentiate into any cell type derived from the three main germ layers. It was demonstrated that somatic cells could be reprogrammed to form induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) via various strategies. Gene editing is a technique that can be used to make targeted changes in the genome, and the efficiency of this process has been significantly enhanced by recent advancements. The use of engineered endonucleases, such as homing endonucleases, zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and Cas9 of the CRISPR system, has significantly enhanced the efficiency of gene editing. The combination of somatic cell reprogramming with gene editing enables us to model human diseases in vitro, in a manner considered superior to animal disease models. In this review, we discuss the various strategies of reprogramming and gene targeting with an emphasis on the current advancements and challenges of using these techniques to model human diseases. PMID:26633382

  7. Genetic Background Modulates Gene Expression Profile Induced by Skin Irradiation in Ptch1 Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Galvan, Antonella; Noci, Sara; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Saran, Anna; Dragani, Tommaso A.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: Ptch1 germ-line mutations in mice predispose to radiation-induced basal cell carcinoma of the skin, with tumor incidence modulated by the genetic background. Here, we examined the possible mechanisms underlying skin response to radiation in F1 progeny of Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice crossed with either skin tumor-susceptible (Car-S) or -resistant (Car-R) mice and X-irradiated (3 Gy) at 2 days of age or left untreated. Methods and Materials: We conducted a gene expression profile analysis in mRNA samples extracted from the skin of irradiated or control mice, using Affymetrix whole mouse genome expression array. Confirmation of the results was done using real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results: Analysis of the gene expression profile of normal skin of F1 mice at 4 weeks of age revealed a similar basal profile in the nonirradiated mice, but alterations in levels of 71 transcripts in irradiated Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice of the Car-R cross and modulation of only eight genes in irradiated Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice of the Car-S cross. Conclusions: These results indicate that neonatal irradiation causes a persistent change in the gene expression profile of the skin. The tendency of mice genetically resistant to skin tumorigenesis to show a more complex pattern of transcriptional response to radiation than do genetically susceptible mice suggests a role for this response in genetic resistance to basal cell tumorigenesis.

  8. Inducibility of a gene product required for UV and chemical mutagenesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Bagg, A; Kenyon, C J; Walker, G C

    1981-01-01

    The product of the umuC gene is required for UV and chemical mutagenesis in Escherichia coli. By the use of the Mud(Ap, lac) bacteriophage, we have obtained an operon fusion of the lac structural genes to the promoter/regulatory region of the umuC gene. The strain containing the umuC::Mud(Ap, lac) fusion was identified on the basis of its UV nonmutability. Strains containing this putative null allele of umuC were (i) nonmutable by UV and other agents, (ii) slightly UV sensitive, and (iii) deficient in their ability to carry out Weigle reactivation of UV-irradiation bacteriophage lambda. The UV nonmutability of the strain could be suppressed by a derivative of the mutagenesis-enhancing plasmid pKM101. beta-Galactosidase synthesis in umuC::Mud(Ap, lac) fusion strains was inducible by UV and other DNA-damaging agents. Genetic analysis of the regulation of beta-galactosidase in umuC::Mud(Ap, lac) strains suggests that the lexA protein is the direct repressor of the umuC gene and that a function of the recA protein, probably its protease activity, is required for the removal of the lexA repressor at the time of umuC induction. PMID:7029544

  9. Thalidomide induced early gene expression perturbations indicative of human embryopathy in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiugong; Sprando, Robert L; Yourick, Jeffrey J

    2015-08-15

    Developmental toxicity testing has traditionally relied on animal models which are costly, time consuming, and require the sacrifice of large numbers of animals. In addition, there are significant disparities between human beings and animals in their responses to chemicals. Thalidomide is a species-specific developmental toxicant that causes severe limb malformations in humans but not in mice. Here, we used microarrays to study transcriptomic changes induced by thalidomide in an in vitro model based on differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). C57BL/6 mESCs were allowed to differentiate spontaneously and RNA was collected at 24, 48, and 72h after exposure to 0.25mM thalidomide. Global gene expression analysis using microarrays revealed hundreds of differentially expressed genes upon thalidomide exposure that were enriched in gene ontology (GO) terms and canonical pathways associated with embryonic development and differentiation. In addition, many genes were found to be involved in small GTPases-mediated signal transduction, heart development, and inflammatory responses, which coincide with clinical evidences and may represent critical embryotoxicities of thalidomide. These results demonstrate that transcriptomics in combination with mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation is a promising alternative model for developmental toxicity assessment. PMID:26006729

  10. Propagation characteristics of laser-induced stress wave in deep tissue for gene transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Takano, Shinta; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2009-09-01

    Propagation characteristics of laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) in tissue and their correlation with properties of gene transfection were investigated for targeted deep-tissue gene therapy. LISWs were generated by irradiating a laser-absorbing material with 532-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser pulses; a transparent plastic sheet was attached on the absorbing material for plasma confinement. Temporal pressure profiles of LISWs that were propagated through different thickness tissues were measured with a needle-type hydrophone and propagation of LISWs in water was visualized by shadowgraph technique. The measurements showed that at a laser fluence of 1.2 J/cm 2 with a laser spot diameter of 3 mm, flat wavefront was maintained for up to 5 mm in depth and peak pressure P decreased with increasing tissue thickness d; P was proportional to d-0.54. Rat dorsal skin was injected with plasmid DNA coding for reporter gene, on which different numbers of excised skin(s) was/were placed, and LISWs were applied from the top of the skins. Efficient gene expression was observed in the skin under the 3 mm thick stacked skins, suggesting that deep-located tissue such as muscle can be transfected by transcutaneous application of LISWs.

  11. Hypoxia-inducible genes encoding small EF-hand proteins in rice and tomato.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Chie; Minami, Ikuko; Oda, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Rice has evolved metabolic and morphological adaptations to low-oxygen stress to grow in submerged paddy fields. To characterize the molecular components that mediate the response to hypoxia in rice, we identified low-oxygen stress early response genes by microarray analysis. Among the highly responsive genes, five genes, OsHREF1 to OsHREF5, shared strong homology. They encoded small proteins harboring two EF-hands, typical Ca(2+)-binding motifs. Homologous genes were found in many land plants, including SlHREF in tomato, which is also strongly induced by hypoxia. SlHREF induction was detected in both roots and shoots of tomato plants under hypoxia. With the exception of OsHREF5, OsHREF expression was unaffected by drought, salinity, cold, or osmotic stress. Fluorescent signals of green fluorescent protein-fused OsHREFs were detected in the cytosol and nucleus. Ruthenium red, an inhibitor of intracellular Ca(2+) release, repressed induction of OsHREF1-4 under hypoxia. The HREFs may be related to the Ca(2+) response to hypoxia. PMID:21150100

  12. Salicylate-induced changes in immediate-early genes in the hippocampal CA1 area.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Xu, Feng-Lei; Yin, Yong; Da, Peng; You, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Hui-Min; Tang, Yan

    2015-08-01

    Studies have suggested that salicylate affects neuronal function via interactions with specific membrane channels/receptors. However, the effect of salicylate on activity and synaptic morphology of the hippocampal Cornu Ammonis (CA) 1 area remains to be elucidated. The activation of immediate-early genes (IEGs) was reported to correlate with neuronal activity, in particular activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein and early growth response gene 1. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of these IEGs, as well that of N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit 2B in rats following acute and chronic salicylate treatment. Protein and messenger RNA levels of all three genes were increased in rats following chronic administration of salicylate (300 mg/kg for 10 days), returning to baseline levels 14 days post-cessation of treatment. The transient upregulation of gene expression following treatment was accompanied by ultrastructural alterations in hippocampal CA1 area synapses. An increase in synaptic interface curvature was observed as well as an increased number of presynaptic vesicles; in addition, postsynaptic densities thickened and lengthened. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that chronic exposure to salicylate may lead to structural alteration of hippocampal CA1 neurons, and it was suggested that this process occurs through induced expression of IEGs via NMDA receptor activation. PMID:25873216

  13. Cadmium induces cadmium-tolerant gene expression in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma harzianum.

    PubMed

    Cacciola, Santa O; Puglisi, Ivana; Faedda, Roberto; Sanzaro, Vincenzo; Pane, Antonella; Lo Piero, Angela R; Evoli, Maria; Petrone, Goffredo

    2015-11-01

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma harzianum, strain IMI 393899, was able to grow in the presence of the heavy metals cadmium and mercury. The main objective of this research was to study the molecular mechanisms underlying the tolerance of the fungus T. harzianum to cadmium. The suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method was used for the characterization of the genes of T. harzianum implicated in cadmium tolerance compared with those expressed in the response to the stress induced by mercury. Finally, the effects of cadmium exposure were also validated by measuring the expression levels of the putative genes coding for a glucose transporter, a plasma membrane ATPase, a Cd(2+)/Zn(2+) transporter protein and a two-component system sensor histidine kinase YcbA, by real-time-PCR. By using the aforementioned SSH strategy, it was possible to identify 108 differentially expressed genes of the strain IMI 393899 of T. harzianum grown in a mineral substrate with the addition of cadmium. The expressed sequence tags identified by SSH technique were encoding different genes that may be involved in different biological processes, including those associated to primary and secondary metabolism, intracellular transport, transcription factors, cell defence, signal transduction, DNA metabolism, cell growth and protein synthesis. Finally, the results show that in the mechanism of tolerance to cadmium a possible signal transduction pathway could activate a Cd(2+)/Zn(2+) transporter protein and/or a plasma membrane ATPase that could be involved in the compartmentalization of cadmium inside the cell. PMID:26349455

  14. Searching for Interferon-Induced Genes That Inhibit Hepatitis B Virus Replication in Transgenic Mouse Hepatocytes†

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, Stefan F.; Vega, Raquel G.; Müller, Rolf; Evans, Claire F.; Hilbush, Brian; Guidotti, Luca G.; Sutcliffe, J. Gregor; Schultz, Peter G.; Chisari, Francis V.

    2003-01-01

    We have previously shown that alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) and IFN-γ inhibit hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication noncytopathically in the livers of HBV transgenic mice and in hepatocyte cell lines derived from these mice. The present study was designed to identify transcriptionally controlled hepatocellular genes that are tightly associated with the inhibition of HBV replication and that might, therefore, mediate the antiviral effect of these cytokines. Twenty-nine genes were identified, many of which have known or potential antiviral activity. Notably, multiple components of the immunoproteasome and ubiquitin-like proteins were strongly induced by both IFN-α/β and IFN-γ, as were a number of GTP-binding proteins, including GTPases with known antiviral activity, chemokines, signaling molecules, and miscellaneous genes associated with antigen processing, DNA-binding, or cochaperone activity and several expressed sequence tags. The results suggest that one or more members of this relatively small subset of genes may mediate the antiviral effect of IFN-α/β and IFN-γ against HBV. We have already exploited this information by demonstrating that the antiviral activity of IFN-α/β and IFN-γ is proteasome dependent. PMID:12502840

  15. Fitness Effects of Network Non-Linearity Induced by Gene Expression Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Christian; Cooper, Tim; Balazsi, Gabor

    2012-02-01

    In the non-equilibrium dynamics of growing microbial cells, metabolic enzymes can create non-linearities in metabolite concentration because of non-linear degradation (utilization): an enzyme can saturate in the process of metabolite utilization. Increasing metabolite production past the saturation point then results in an ultrasensitive metabolite response. If the production rate of a metabolite depends on a second enzyme or other protein-mediated process, uncorrelated gene expression noise can thus cause transient metabolite concentration bursts. Such bursts are physiologically unnecessary and may represent a source of selection against the ultrasensitive switch, especially if the fluctuating metabolic intermediate is toxic. Selection may therefore favor correlated gene expression fluctuations for enzymes in the same pathway, such as by same-operon membership in bacteria. Using a modified experimental lac operon system, we are undertaking a combined theoretical-experimental approach to demonstrate that (i) the lac operon has an implicit ultrasensitive switch that we predict is avoided by gene expression correlations induced by same-operon membership; (ii) bacterial growth rates are sensitive to crossing the ultrasensitive threshold. Our results suggest that correlations in intrinsic gene expression noise are exploited by evolution to ameliorate the detrimental effects of nonlinearities in metabolite concentrations.

  16. Targeting Calcium Signaling Induces Epigenetic Reactivation of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Raynal, Noël J-M; Lee, Justin T; Wang, Youjun; Beaudry, Annie; Madireddi, Priyanka; Garriga, Judith; Malouf, Gabriel G; Dumont, Sarah; Dettman, Elisha J; Gharibyan, Vazganush; Ahmed, Saira; Chung, Woonbok; Childers, Wayne E; Abou-Gharbia, Magid; Henry, Ryan A; Andrews, Andrew J; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Cui, Ying; Baylin, Stephen B; Gill, Donald L; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2016-03-15

    Targeting epigenetic pathways is a promising approach for cancer therapy. Here, we report on the unexpected finding that targeting calcium signaling can reverse epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes (TSG). In a screen for drugs that reactivate silenced gene expression in colon cancer cells, we found three classical epigenetic targeted drugs (DNA methylation and histone deacetylase inhibitors) and 11 other drugs that induced methylated and silenced CpG island promoters driving a reporter gene (GFP) as well as endogenous TSGs in multiple cancer cell lines. These newly identified drugs, most prominently cardiac glycosides, did not change DNA methylation locally or histone modifications globally. Instead, all 11 drugs altered calcium signaling and triggered calcium-calmodulin kinase (CamK) activity, leading to MeCP2 nuclear exclusion. Blocking CamK activity abolished gene reactivation and cancer cell killing by these drugs, showing that triggering calcium fluxes is an essential component of their epigenetic mechanism of action. Our data identify calcium signaling as a new pathway that can be targeted to reactivate TSGs in cancer. Cancer Res; 76(6); 1494-505. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26719529

  17. Salicylate-induced changes in immediate-early genes in the hippocampal CA1 area

    PubMed Central

    WU, HAO; XU, FENG-LEI; YIN, YONG; DA, PENG; YOU, XIAO-DONG; XU, HUI-MIN; TANG, YAN

    2015-01-01

    Studies have suggested that salicylate affects neuronal function via interactions with specific membrane channels/receptors. However, the effect of salicylate on activity and synaptic morphology of the hippocampal Cornu Ammonis (CA) 1 area remains to be elucidated. The activation of immediate-early genes (IEGs) was reported to correlate with neuronal activity, in particular activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein and early growth response gene 1. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of these IEGs, as well that of N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit 2B in rats following acute and chronic salicylate treatment. Protein and messenger RNA levels of all three genes were increased in rats following chronic administration of salicylate (300 mg/kg for 10 days), returning to baseline levels 14 days post-cessation of treatment. The transient upregulation of gene expression following treatment was accompanied by ultrastructural alterations in hippocampal CA1 area synapses. An increase in synaptic interface curvature was observed as well as an increased number of presynaptic vesicles; in addition, postsynaptic densities thickened and lengthened. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that chronic exposure to salicylate may lead to structural alteration of hippocampal CA1 neurons, and it was suggested that this process occurs through induced expression of IEGs via NMDA receptor activation. PMID:25873216

  18. Recombinase-mediated reprogramming and dystrophin gene addition in mdx mouse induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunli; Farruggio, Alfonso P; Bjornson, Christopher R R; Chavez, Christopher L; Geisinger, Jonathan M; Neal, Tawny L; Karow, Marisa; Calos, Michele P

    2014-01-01

    A cell therapy strategy utilizing genetically-corrected induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) may be an attractive approach for genetic disorders such as muscular dystrophies. Methods for genetic engineering of iPSC that emphasize precision and minimize random integration would be beneficial. We demonstrate here an approach in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy that focuses on the use of site-specific recombinases to achieve genetic engineering. We employed non-viral, plasmid-mediated methods to reprogram mdx fibroblasts, using phiC31 integrase to insert a single copy of the reprogramming genes at a safe location in the genome. We next used Bxb1 integrase to add the therapeutic full-length dystrophin cDNA to the iPSC in a site-specific manner. Unwanted DNA sequences, including the reprogramming genes, were then precisely deleted with Cre resolvase. Pluripotency of the iPSC was analyzed before and after gene addition, and ability of the genetically corrected iPSC to differentiate into myogenic precursors was evaluated by morphology, immunohistochemistry, qRT-PCR, FACS analysis, and intramuscular engraftment. These data demonstrate a non-viral, reprogramming-plus-gene addition genetic engineering strategy utilizing site-specific recombinases that can be applied easily to mouse cells. This work introduces a significant level of precision in the genetic engineering of iPSC that can be built upon in future studies. PMID:24781921

  19. Alcohol consumption induces global gene expression changes in VTA dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Marballi, K; Genabai, N K; Blednov, Y A; Harris, R A; Ponomarev, I

    2016-03-01

    Alcoholism is associated with dysregulation in the neural circuitry that mediates motivated and goal-directed behaviors. The dopaminergic (DA) connection between the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the nucleus accumbens is viewed as a critical component of the neurocircuitry mediating alcohol's rewarding and behavioral effects. We sought to determine the effects of binge alcohol drinking on global gene expression in VTA DA neurons. Alcohol-preferring C57BL/6J × FVB/NJ F1 hybrid female mice were exposed to a modified drinking in the dark (DID) procedure for 3 weeks, while control animals had access to water only. Global gene expression of laser-captured tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive VTA DA neurons was measured using microarrays. A total of 644 transcripts were differentially expressed between the drinking and nondrinking mice, and 930 transcripts correlated with alcohol intake during the last 2 days of drinking in the alcohol group. Bioinformatics analysis of alcohol-responsive genes identified molecular pathways and networks perturbed in DA neurons by alcohol consumption, which included neuroimmune and epigenetic functions, alcohol metabolism and brain disorders. The majority of genes with high and specific expression in DA neurons were downregulated by or negatively correlated with alcohol consumption, suggesting a decreased activity of DA neurons in high drinking animals. These changes in the DA transcriptome provide a foundation for alcohol-induced neuroadaptations that may play a crucial role in the transition to addiction. PMID:26482798

  20. Herbivory-induced glucose transporter gene expression in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens.

    PubMed

    Kikuta, Shingo; Nakamura, Yuki; Hattori, Makoto; Sato, Ryoichi; Kikawada, Takahiro; Noda, Hiroaki

    2015-09-01

    Nilaparvata lugens, the brown planthopper (BPH) feeds on rice phloem sap, containing high amounts of sucrose as a carbon source. Nutrients such as sugars in the digestive tract are incorporated into the body cavity via transporters with substrate selectivity. Eighteen sugar transporter genes of BPH (Nlst) were reported and three transporters have been functionally characterized. However, individual characteristics of NlST members associated with sugar transport remain poorly understood. Comparative gene expression analyses using oligo-microarray and quantitative RT-PCR revealed that the sugar transporter gene Nlst16 was markedly up-regulated during BPH feeding. Expression of Nlst16 was induced 2 h after BPH feeding on rice plants. Nlst16, mainly expressed in the midgut, appears to be involved in carbohydrate incorporation from the gut cavity into the hemolymph. Nlst1 (NlHT1), the most highly expressed sugar transporter gene in the midgut was not up-regulated during BPH feeding. The biochemical function of NlST16 was shown as facilitative glucose transport along gradients. Glucose uptake activity by NlST16 was higher than that of NlST1 in the Xenopus oocyte expression system. At least two NlST members are responsible for glucose uptake in the BPH midgut, suggesting that the midgut of BPH is equipped with various types of transporters having diversified manner for sugar uptake. PMID:26226652

  1. Induced Pluripotency and Gene Editing in Disease Modelling: Perspectives and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Seah, Yu Fen Samantha; El Farran, Chadi A; Warrier, Tushar; Xu, Jian; Loh, Yuin-Han

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are chiefly characterized by their ability to self-renew and to differentiate into any cell type derived from the three main germ layers. It was demonstrated that somatic cells could be reprogrammed to form induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) via various strategies. Gene editing is a technique that can be used to make targeted changes in the genome, and the efficiency of this process has been significantly enhanced by recent advancements. The use of engineered endonucleases, such as homing endonucleases, zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and Cas9 of the CRISPR system, has significantly enhanced the efficiency of gene editing. The combination of somatic cell reprogramming with gene editing enables us to model human diseases in vitro, in a manner considered superior to animal disease models. In this review, we discuss the various strategies of reprogramming and gene targeting with an emphasis on the current advancements and challenges of using these techniques to model human diseases. PMID:26633382

  2. Expression patterns and action analysis of genes associated with drug-induced liver diseases during rat liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Qian-Ji; Qin, Shao-Wei; Xu, Cun-Shuan

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the action of the genes associated with drug-induced liver diseases at the gene transcriptional level during liver regeneration (LR) in rats. METHODS: The genes associated with drug-induced liver diseases were obtained by collecting the data from databases and literature, and the gene expression changes in the regenerating liver were checked by the Rat Genome 230 2.0 array. RESULTS: The initial and total expression numbers of genes occurring in phases of 0.5-4 h after partial hepatectomy (PH), 4-6 h after PH (G0/G1 transition), 6-66 h after PH (cell proliferation), 66-168 h after PH (cell differentiation and structure-function reconstruction) were 21, 3, 9, 2 and 21, 9, 19, 18, respectively. It is illustrated that the associated genes were mainly triggered at the initial stage of LR and worked at different phases. According to their expression similarity, these genes were classified into 5 types: only up-regulated (12 genes), predominantly up-regulated (4 genes), only down-regulated (11 genes), predominantly down-regulated (3 genes), and approximately up-/down-regulated (2 genes). The total times of their up- and down-expression were 130 and 79, respectively, demonstrating that expression of most of the genes was increased during LR, while a few decreased. The cell physiological and biochemical activities during LR were staggered according to the time relevance and were diverse and complicated in gene expression patterns. CONCLUSION: Drug metabolic capacity in regenerating liver was enhanced. Thirty-two genes play important roles during liver regeneration in rats. PMID:17109518

  3. BET Inhibition Attenuates Helicobacter pylori-Induced Inflammatory Response by Suppressing Inflammatory Gene Transcription and Enhancer Activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinjing; Wang, Zhen; Hu, Xiangming; Chen, Ruichuan; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Peek, Richard M; Chen, Lin-Feng

    2016-05-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection causes chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. H. pylori-initiated chronic gastritis is characterized by enhanced expression of many NF-κB-regulated inflammatory cytokines. Brd4 has emerged as an important NF-κB regulator and regulates the expression of many NF-κB-dependent inflammatory genes. In this study, we demonstrated that Brd4 was not only actively involved in H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene mRNA transcription but also H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene enhancer RNA (eRNA) synthesis. Suppression of H. pylori-induced eRNA synthesis impaired H. pylori-induced mRNA synthesis. Furthermore, H. pylori stimulated NF-κB-dependent recruitment of Brd4 to the promoters and enhancers of inflammatory genes to facilitate the RNA polymerase II-mediated eRNA and mRNA synthesis. Inhibition of Brd4 by JQ1 attenuated H. pylori-induced eRNA and mRNA synthesis for a subset of NF-κB-dependent inflammatory genes. JQ1 also inhibited H. pylori-induced interaction between Brd4 and RelA and the recruitment of Brd4 and RNA polymerase II to the promoters and enhancers of inflammatory genes. Finally, we demonstrated that JQ1 suppressed inflammatory gene expression, inflammation, and cell proliferation in H. pylori-infected mice. These studies highlight the importance of Brd4 in H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene expression and suggest that Brd4 could be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of H. pylori-triggered inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:27084101

  4. Phosphoribulokinase mediates nitrogenase-induced carbon dioxide fixation gene repression in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Ryan M; Tabita, F Robert

    2015-11-01

    In many organisms there is a balance between carbon and nitrogen metabolism. These observations extend to the nitrogen-fixing, nonsulfur purple bacteria, which have the classic family of P(II) regulators that coordinate signals of carbon and nitrogen status to regulate nitrogen metabolism. Curiously, these organisms also possess a reverse mechanism to regulate carbon metabolism based on cellular nitrogen status. In this work, studies in Rhodobacter sphaeroides firmly established that the activity of the enzyme that catalyses nitrogen fixation, nitrogenase, induces a signal that leads to repression of genes encoding enzymes of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) CO2 fixation pathway. Additionally, genetic and metabolomic experiments revealed that NADH-activated phosphoribulokinase is an intermediate in the signalling pathway. Thus, nitrogenase activity appears to be linked to cbb gene repression through phosphoribulokinase. PMID:26306848

  5. C/EBPβ regulates multiple IL-1β-induced human astrocyte inflammatory genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background CCAAT enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)β regulates gene expression in multiple organ systems and cell types, including astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). Inflammatory stimuli, interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 and lipopolysaccharide induce astrocyte C/EBPβ expression. C/EBPβ is detectable in brains of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD) and HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD) patients, yet little is known about how C/EBPβ contributes to astrocyte gene regulation during neuroinflammation. Methods The expression of 92 human inflammation genes was compared between IL-1β-treated primary human astrocytes and astrocytes transfected with C/EBPβ-specific small interfering (si)RNA prior to IL-1β treatment for 12 h. Transcripts altered by > two-fold compared to control were subjected to one-way analysis of variance and Newman-Keuls post-test for multiple comparisons. Expression of two genes, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and bradykinin receptor B2 (BDKRB2) was further confirmed in additional human astrocyte donors. Astrocytes were treated with mitogen-activated protein kinase-selective inhibitors, then with IL-1β for 12 or 24 h followed by COX-2 and BDKRB2, expression analyses. Results IL-1β altered expression of 29 of 92 human inflammation genes by at least two-fold in primary human astrocytes in 12 h. C/EBPβ knockdown affected expression of 17 out of 29 IL-1β-regulated genes by > 25%. Two genes relevant to neuroinflammation, COX-2 and BDKRB2, were robustly decreased and increased, respectively, in response to C/EBPβ knockdown, and expression was confirmed in two additional donors. COX-2 and BDKRB2 mRNA remained altered in siRNA-transfected astrocytes at 12, 24 or 72 h. Inhibiting p38 kinase (p38K) activation blocked IL-1β-induced astrocyte COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, but not IL-1β-induced astrocyte BDKRB2 expression. Inhibiting extracellular

  6. Establishment of tetracycline-inducible gene expression systems in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, Noriko; Mon, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Masateru; Lee, Jae Man; Koga, Katsumi; Kawaguchi, Yutaka; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2009-04-01

    Tetracycline-inducible gene expression (Tet-on) system has become one of the first choices for the control of transgenes expression in mammal and drosophila. However, the Tet-on systems that have been established in mammalian system or tuned into drosophila do not function in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. To construct a functional Tet-on system in B. mori, we modified rtTA by introducing a transcription activation domain of immediate-early gene 1 of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus and nuclear localization signal of SV40 large T-antigen. The modified rtTA can activate the transcription from 9 x tetO promoter in the silkworm cells up to 250-fold in the presence of doxycycline. PMID:19066730

  7. Renal hemodynamic changes induced by captopril and angiotensin-converting enzyme gene polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Mizuiri, S; Hemmi, H; Inoue, A; Takano, M; Kadomatsu, S; Tanimoto, H; Tanegashima, M; Hayashi, I; Fushimi, T; Hasegawa, A

    1997-01-01

    We studied the relationship between renal hemodynamic changes induced by a single acute administration of captopril (50 mg p.o.) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in 27 healthy human volunteers, 7 with DD genotype, 10 with ID, and 10 with II genotype. The increase in effective renal plasma flow (p < 0.02) and the fall in renal vascular resistance (p < 0.01) in response to captopril were significantly less in subjects with the DD genotype than in subjects with the other genotypes. These data suggest that intrarenal ACE inhibition by captopril differs according to ACE gene ID polymorphism in healthy humans. PMID:9069453

  8. Mitochondrial dysfunction induces SESN2 gene expression through Activating Transcription Factor 4.

    PubMed

    Garaeva, Alisa A; Kovaleva, Irina E; Chumakov, Peter M; Evstafieva, Alexandra G

    2016-01-01

    We found that inhibitors of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes III (myxothiazol) and I (piericidin A) in some epithelial carcinoma cell lines induce transcription of the p53-responsive SESN2 gene that plays an important role in stress response and homeostatic regulation. However, the effect did not depend on p53 because i) there was no induction of p53 after the treatment with piericidin A; ii) after the treatment with myxothiazol the peak of SESN2 gene upregulation occurred as early as 5h, before the onset of p53 activation (13h); iii) a supplementation with uridine that abolishes the p53 activation in response to myxothiazol did not abrogate the induction of SESN2 transcripts; iv) in the p53 negative HCT116 p53 -/- cells SESN2 transcription could be also induced by myxothiazol. In response to the respiratory chain inhibitors we observed an induction of ATF4, the key transcription factor of the integrated stress response (ISR). We found that the induction of SESN2 transcripts could be prevented by the ISR inhibitory small molecule ISRIB. Also, by inhibiting or overexpressing ATF4 with specific shRNA or ATF4-expressing constructs, respectively, we have confirmed the role of ATF4 in the SESN2 gene upregulation induced by mitochondrial dysfunction. At a distance of 228 bp upstream from the SESN2 transcription start site we found a candidate sequence for the ATF4 binding site and confirmed its requirement for the induction of SESN2 in luciferase reporter experiments. We suggest that the upregulation of SESN2 by mitochondrial dysfunction provides a homeostatic feedback that attenuates biosynthetic processes during temporal losses of energy supply from mitochondria thereby assisting better adaptation and viability of cells in hostile environments. PMID:26771712

  9. Profiles of metabolites and gene expression in rats with chemically induced hepatic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Heijne, Wilbert H M; Lamers, Robert-Jan A N; van Bladeren, Peter J; Groten, John P; van Nesselrooij, Joop H J; van Ommen, Ben

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated whether integrated analysis of transcriptomics and metabolomics data increased the sensitivity of detection and provided new insight in the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity. Metabolite levels in plasma or urine were analyzed in relation to changes in hepatic gene expression in rats that received bromobenzene to induce acute hepatic centrilobular necrosis. Bromobenzene-induced lesions were only observed after treatment with the highest of 3 dose levels. Multivariate statistical analysis showed that metabolite profiles of blood plasma were largely different from controls when the rats were treated with bromobenzene, also at doses that did not elicit histopathological changes. Changes in levels of genes and metabolites were related to the degree of necrosis, providing putative novel markers of hepatotoxicity. Levels of endogenous metabolites like alanine, lactate, tyrosine and dimethylglycine differed in plasma from treated and control rats. The metabolite profiles of urine were found to be reflective of the exposure levels. This integrated analysis of hepatic transcriptomics and plasma metabolomics was able to more sensitively detect changes related to hepatotoxicity and discover novel markers. The relation between gene expression and metabolite levels was explored and additional insight in the role of various biological pathways in bromobenzene-induced hepatic necrosis was obtained, including the involvement of apoptosis and changes in glycolysis and amino acid metabolism. The complete Table 2 is available as a supplemental file online at http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/openurlasp?genre=journal&issn=0192-6233. To access the file, click on the issue link for 33(4), then select this article. A download option appears at the bottom of this abstract. In order to access the full article online, you must either have an individual subscription or a member subscription accessed through www.toxpath.org. PMID:16036859

  10. Transcriptional inhibition of the Catalase gene in phosphine-induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Li, Li; Zhang, Fanhua; Wang, Yuejin

    2015-10-01

    Phosphine (PH3) is a toxic substance to pest insects and is therefore commonly used in pest control. The oxidative damage induced by PH3 is considered to be one of the primary mechanisms of its toxicity in pest insects; however, the precise mode of PH3 action in this process is still unclear. In this study, we evaluated the responses of several oxidative biomarkers and two of the main antioxidant enzymes, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), after fumigation treatment with PH3 in Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. The results showed that larvae exposed to sub-lethal levels of PH3 (0.028 mg/L) exhibited lower aerobic respiration rates and higher levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Furthermore, unlike SOD, the activity and expression of CAT and its encoding gene were downregulated by PH3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Finally, the responses of six potential transcription factors of PH3 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction to explore the regulation mechanism of DmCAT by PH3. There were no significant effects of PH3 on three nuclear factor-kappa B homologs (DORSAL, DIF, and RELISH) or two activator protein-1 genes (JUN and FOS), while dramatic inhibition of DNA replication-related element factor (DREF) expression was observed after fumigation with PH3, suggesting that PH3 could inhibit the expression of DmCAT via the DRE/DREF system. These results confirmed that PH3 induces oxidative stress and targets CAT by downregulating its encoding gene in Drosophila. Our results provide new insight into the signal transduction mechanism between PH3 and its target genes. PMID:26453223

  11. Gibberellin-induced expression of Fe uptake-related genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Keita; Furukawa, Jun; Bidadi, Haniyeh; Asahina, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Satoh, Shinobu

    2014-01-01

    In dicots, iron (Fe) is acquired from the soil by IRT1 (IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER 1) and FRO2 (FERRIC REDUCTION OXIDASE 2) that are localized at the root epidermis. IRT1 and FRO2 expression is induced by local and systemic signals under Fe-deficient conditions in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, the expression of IRT1, FRO2, bHLH038 and bHLH39 (the latter two of which control IRT1 and FRO2 expression) was promoted by GA4 treatment of gibberellin (GA) deficient ga3ox1 ga3ox2 mutants. In contrast, the expression of FIT, which encodes a transcription factor necessary for IRT1 and FRO2 induction under Fe deficiency, was not induced by the application of GA4. The induction of those genes triggered by shoot-applied GA4 was observed, even in the fit-2 mutant which had reduced endogenous GA levels caused by treatment with paclobutrazol (PBZ), a GA biosynthesis inhibitor. These results suggested that FIT was not a key regulator in the GA responses under Fe-sufficient conditions. On the other hand, among Fe uptake-related genes, the expression of IRT1, bHLH038 and bHLH39 was lower in ga3ox1 ga3ox2 compared with the wild type (WT) under Fe-sufficient conditions, but the expression of all Fe uptake-related genes decreased under Fe-deficient conditions. Additionally, the PBZ treatment decreased IRT1 expression in the WT under Fe-deficient conditions, but not in the fit-2 mutant. These data suggest the contribution of GA to the induction of Fe uptake-related genes under Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient conditions, possibly in FIT-independent and FIT-dependent manners, respectively. PMID:24192296

  12. The tobacco Cel7 gene promoter is auxin-responsive and locally induced in nematode feeding sites of heterologous plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerging evidence suggests that plant cell wall modifying enzymes induced by root-parasitic nematodes play important roles in feeding cell formation. We previously identified a tobacco endo-B-1,4-glucanase (cellulase) gene, NtCel7, that was strongly induced in both root-knot and cyst nematode feedi...

  13. Testosterone-induced permanent changes of hepatic gene expression in female mice sustained during Plasmodium chabaudi malaria infection.

    PubMed

    Delić, Denis; Gailus, Nicole; Vohr, Hans-Werner; Dkhil, Mohamed; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Wunderlich, Frank

    2010-12-01

    Testosterone has been previously shown to induce persistent susceptibility to Plasmodium chabaudi malaria in otherwise resistant female C57BL/6 mice. Here, we investigate as to whether this conversion coincides with permanent changes of hepatic gene expression profiles. Female mice aged 10-12 weeks were treated with testosterone for 3 weeks; then, testosterone treatment was discontinued for 12 weeks before challenging with 10⁶ P. chabaudi-infected erythrocytes. Hepatic gene expression was examined after 12 weeks of testosterone withdrawal and after subsequent infection with P. chabaudi at peak parasitemia, using Affymetrix microarrays with 22 ,690 probe sets representing 14, 000 genes. The expression of 54 genes was found to be permanently changed by testosterone, which remained changed during malaria infection. Most genes were involved in liver metabolism: the female-prevalent genes Cyp2b9, Cyp2b13, Cyp3a41, Cyp3a44, Fmo3, Sult2a2, Sult3a1, and BC014805 were repressed, while the male-prevalent genes Cyp2d9, Cyp7b1, Cyp4a10, Ugt2b1, Ugt2b38, Hsd3b5, and Slco1a1 were upregulated. Genes encoding different nuclear receptors were not persistently changed. Moreover, testosterone induced persistent upregulation of genes involved in hepatocellular carcinoma such as Lama3 and Nox4, whereas genes involved in immune response such as Ifnγ and Igk-C were significantly decreased. Our data provide evidence that testosterone is able to induce specific and robust long-term changes of gene expression profiles in the female mouse liver. In particular, those changes, which presumably indicate masculinized liver metabolism and impaired immune response, may be critical for the testosterone-induced persistent susceptibility of mice to P. chabaudi malaria. PMID:20844152

  14. Constitutive and Inducible Expression of the rRNA Methylase Gene erm(B) in Campylobacter

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fengru; Shen, Jianzhong; Zhang, Maojun; Wu, Congming

    2015-01-01

    Macrolides are the antimicrobials of choice for treating human campylobacteriosis. The recent emergence of erm(B) in Campylobacter bacteria threatens the utility of this class of antibiotics. Here we report the constitutive and inducible expression of erm(B) in Campylobacter isolates derived from diarrheal patients and food-producing animals. Constitutive expression of erm(B) was associated with insertion and deletion in the regulatory region of the gene, providing the first documentation of the differential expression of erm(B) in Campylobacter bacteria. PMID:26259800

  15. Pheromone-induced expression of immediate early genes in the mouse vomeronasal sensory system.

    PubMed

    Haga-Yamanaka, Sachiko; Touhara, Kazushige

    2013-01-01

    Immediate early genes (IEGs) are powerful tools for visualizing activated neurons and extended circuits that are stimulated by sensory input. Several kinds of IEGs (e.g., c-fos, egr-1) have been utilized for detecting activated receptor neurons in the pheromone sensory organ called the vomeronasal organ (VNO), as well as for mapping the neurons within the central nervous system (CNS) excited by pheromones.In this chapter, we describe the procedure for the detection of pheromone-induced neural activation in the VNO and CNS using the c-Fos immunostaining technique. PMID:24014367

  16. Cross-species comparison of genomewide gene expression profiles reveals induction of hypoxia-inducible factor-responsive genes in iron-deprived intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zihua; Gulec, Sukru

    2010-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms mediating the induction of metal ion homeostasis-related genes in the mammalian intestine during iron deficiency remain unknown. To elucidate relevant regulatory pathways, genomewide gene expression profiles were determined in fully differentiated human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells. Cells were deprived of iron (or not) for 6 or 18 h, and Gene Chip analyses were subsequently performed (Affymetrix). More than 2,000 genes were differentially expressed; genes related to monosaccharide metabolism, regulation of gene expression, hypoxia, and cell death were upregulated, while those related to mitotic cell cycle were downregulated. A large proportion of induced genes are hypoxia responsive, and promoter enrichment analyses revealed a statistical overrepresentation of hypoxia response elements (HREs). Immunoblot experiments demonstrated a >60-fold increase in HIF2α protein abundance in iron-deprived cells; HIF1α levels were unchanged. Furthermore, comparison of the Caco-2 cell data set with a Gene Chip data set from iron-deficient rat intestine revealed 29 common upregulated genes; the majority are hypoxia responsive, and their promoters are enriched for HREs. We conclude that the compensatory response of the intestinal epithelium to iron deprivation relates to hypoxia and that stabilization of HIF2α may be the primary event mediating metabolic and morphological changes observed during iron deficiency. PMID:20702690

  17. Keratinocyte Growth Factor Gene Electroporation into Skeletal Muscle as a Novel Gene Therapeutic Approach for Elastase-Induced Pulmonary Emphysema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tobinaga, Shuichi; Matsumoto, Keitaro; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Furukawa, Katsuro; Abo, Takafumi; Yamasaki, Naoya; Tsuchiya, Tomoshi; Miyazaki, Takuro; Koji, Takehiko

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is a progressive disease with airspace destruction and an effective therapy is needed. Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) promotes pulmonary epithelial proliferation and has the potential to induce lung regeneration. The aim of this study was to determine the possibility of using KGF gene therapy for treatment of a mouse emphysema model induced by porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE). Eight-week-old BALB/c male mice treated with intra-tracheal PPE administration were transfected with 80 μg of a recombinant human KGF (rhKGF)-expressing FLAG-CMV14 plasmid (pKGF-FLAG gene), or with the pFLAG gene expressing plasmid as a control, into the quadriceps muscle by electroporation. In the lung, the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was augmented, and surfactant protein A (SP-A) and KGF receptor (KGFR) were co-expressed in PCNA-positive cells. Moreover, endogenous KGF and KGFR gene expression increased significantly by pKGF-FLAG gene transfection. Arterial blood gas analysis revealed that the PaO2 level was not significantly reduced on day 14 after PPE instillation with pKGF-FLAG gene transfection compared to that of normal mice. These results indicated that KGF gene therapy with electroporation stimulated lung epithelial proliferation and protected depression of pulmonary function in a mouse emphysema model, suggesting a possible method of treating pulmonary emphysema. PMID:26160987

  18. A dual cis-regulatory code links IRF8 to constitutive and inducible gene expression in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Mancino, Alessandra; Termanini, Alberto; Barozzi, Iros; Ghisletti, Serena; Ostuni, Renato; Prosperini, Elena; Ozato, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor (TF) interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) controls both developmental and inflammatory stimulus-inducible genes in macrophages, but the mechanisms underlying these two different functions are largely unknown. One possibility is that these different roles are linked to the ability of IRF8 to bind alternative DNA sequences. We found that IRF8 is recruited to distinct sets of DNA consensus sequences before and after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. In resting cells, IRF8 was mainly bound to composite sites together with the master regulator of myeloid development PU.1. Basal IRF8–PU.1 binding maintained the expression of a broad panel of genes essential for macrophage functions (such as microbial recognition and response to purines) and contributed to basal expression of many LPS-inducible genes. After LPS stimulation, increased expression of IRF8, other IRFs, and AP-1 family TFs enabled IRF8 binding to thousands of additional regions containing low-affinity multimerized IRF sites and composite IRF–AP-1 sites, which were not premarked by PU.1 and did not contribute to the basal IRF8 cistrome. While constitutively expressed IRF8-dependent genes contained only sites mediating basal IRF8/PU.1 recruitment, inducible IRF8-dependent genes contained variable combinations of constitutive and inducible sites. Overall, these data show at the genome scale how the same TF can be linked to constitutive and inducible gene regulation via distinct combinations of alternative DNA-binding sites. PMID:25637355

  19. Hydroxycamptothecin-induced apoptotic gene expression profiling by PCR array in human Tenon’s capsule fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wei; Zhang, Yinong; Zhang, Qing; Wang, Qinghua; Wu, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Studies have indicated that hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) induces apoptosis of fibroblasts. In this study, we investigated the apoptotic gene expression profiling in HCPT-treated -human Tenon’s capsule fibroblasts (HTCFs) and identify the most implicated gene in apoptotic signaling of HTCFs by HCPT. Method HTCFs were incubated with HCPT at 0, 0.25 and 4 mg/L for 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. Anti-proliferative effects were measured by MTT assay. Apoptosis was determined using the Annexin V-FITC/PI apoptosis detection kit and apoptotic cells were identified by flow cytometry. A PCR array was employed to analyze the most implicated apoptotic genes during HCPT-induced apoptosis in HTCFs. Results from our studies showed that HCPT induced apoptosis in HTCFs in a concentration-and time-dependent manner. The apoptotic HTCFs was increased by 9.38% with a multiplicity at 4 mg/L HCPT. PCR array demonstrated remarkable changes in 88 apoptotic genes, including 9 up-regulated genes and 36 down-regulated genes. HCPT treatment induced the upregulation of CHOP and downregulation of XIAP in HTCFs. To conclude, our results support HCPT induced the apoptosis of HTCFs, involving the activation of mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum stresses as well as the downregulation expression of XIAP. PMID:26045770

  20. Differential Gene Expression Patterns in Chicken Cardiomyocytes during Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Youwen; Guo, Dingzong

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is both an exogenous and endogenous cytotoxic agent that can reliably induce apoptosis in numerous cell types for studies on apoptosis signaling pathways. However, little is known of these apoptotic processes in myocardial cells of chicken, a species prone to progressive heart failure. Sequencing of mRNA transcripts (RNA-Seq) allows for the identification of differentially expressed genes under various physiological and pathological conditions to elucidate the molecular pathways involved, including cellular responses to exogenous and endogenous toxins. We used RNA-seq to examine genes differentially expressed during H2O2-induced apoptosis in primary cultures of embryonic chicken cardiomyocytes. Following control or H2O2 treatment, RNA was extracted and sequencing performed to identify novel transcripts up- or downregulated in the H2O2 treatment group and construct protein−protein interaction networks. Of the 19,268 known and 2,160 novel transcripts identified in both control and H2O2 treatment groups, 4,650 showed significant differential expression. Among them, 55.63% were upregulated and 44.37% downregulated. Initiation of apoptosis by H2O2 was associated with upregulation of caspase-8, caspase-9, and caspase-3, and downregulation of anti-apoptotic genes API5 and TRIA1. Many other differentially expressed genes were associated with metabolic pathways (including ‘Fatty acid metabolism’, ‘Alanine, aspartate, and glutamate metabolism’, and ‘Biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids’) and cell signaling pathways (including ‘PPAR signaling pathway’, ‘Adipocytokine signaling pathway’, ‘TGF-beta signaling pathway’, ‘MAPK signaling pathway’, and ‘p53 signaling pathway’). In chicken cardiomyocytes, H2O2 alters the expression of numerous genes linked to cell signaling and metabolism as well as genes directly associated with apoptosis. In particular, H2O2 also affects the biosynthesis and processing of proteins and

  1. Jasmonate-Inducible Genes Are Activated in Rice by Pathogen Attack without a Concomitant Increase in Endogenous Jasmonic Acid Levels.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, P.; Buchala, A.; Silverman, P.; Seskar, M.; Raskin, I.; Metraux, J. P.

    1997-05-01

    The possible role of the octadecanoid signaling pathway with jasmonic acid (JA) as the central component in defense-gene regulation of pathogen-attacked rice was studied. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings were treated with JA or inoculated with the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea (Hebert) Barr., and gene-expression patterns were compared between the two treatments. JA application induced the accumulation of a number of pathogenesis-related (PR) gene products at the mRNA and protein levels, but pathogen attack did not enhance the levels of (-)-JA during the time required for PR gene expression. Pathogen-induced accumulation of PR1-like proteins was reduced in plants treated with tetcyclacis, a novel inhibitor of jasmonate biosynthesis. There was an additive and negative interaction between JA and an elicitor from M. grisea with respect to induction of PR1-like proteins and of an abundant JA-and wound-induced protein of 26 kD, respectively. Finally, activation of the octadecanoid signaling pathway and induction of a number of PR genes by exogenous application of JA did not confer local acquired resistance to rice. The data suggest that accumulation of nonconjugated (-)-JA is not necessary for induction of PR genes and that JA does not orchestrate localized defense responses in pathogen-attacked rice. Instead, JA appears to be embedded in a signaling network with another pathogen-induced pathway(s) and may be required at a certain minimal level for induction of some PR genes. PMID:12223690

  2. cis-Jasmone induces Arabidopsis genes that affect the chemical ecology of multitrophic interactions with aphids and their parasitoids

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Toby J. A.; Matthes, Michaela C.; Chamberlain, Keith; Woodcock, Christine M.; Mohib, Abdul; Webster, Ben; Smart, Lesley E.; Birkett, Michael A.; Pickett, John A.; Napier, Johnathan A.

    2008-01-01

    It is of adaptive value for a plant to prepare its defenses when a threat is detected, and certain plant volatiles associated with insect damage, such as cis-jasmone (CJ), are known to switch-on defense metabolism. We used aphid and aphid parasitoid responses to Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system for studying gene expression and defense chemistry and its impact at different trophic levels. Differential responses to volatiles of induced Arabidopsis occurred for specialist and generalist insects: the generalist aphid, Myzus persicae, was repelled, whereas the specialist, Lipaphis erysimi, was attracted; the generalist aphid parasitoid Aphidius ervi was attracted, but the specialist parasitoid Diaeretiella rapae was not affected. A. ervi also spent longer foraging on induced plants than on untreated ones. Transcriptomic analyses of CJ-induced Arabidopsis plants revealed that a limited number of genes, including a gene for a cytochrome P450, CYP81D11, were strongly up-regulated in the treated plants. We examined transgenic Arabidopsis lines constitutively overexpressing this gene in bioassays and found insect responses similar to those obtained for wild-type plants induced with CJ, indicating the importance of this gene in the CJ-activated defense response. Genes involved in glucosinolate biosynthesis and catabolism are unaffected by CJ and, because these genes relate to interactions with herbivores and parasitoids specific to this family of plants (Brassicaceae), this finding may explain the differences in behavioral response of specialist and generalist insects. PMID:18356298

  3. Wound-inducible nuclear protein binds DNA fragments that regulate a proteinase inhibitor II gene from potato.

    PubMed Central

    Palm, C J; Costa, M A; An, G; Ryan, C A

    1990-01-01

    Deletion analysis from the 3' to the 5' end of the promoter region of the wound-inducible potato proteinase inhibitor IIK gene has identified a 421-base sequence at -136 to -557 that is necessary for expression. Utilizing DNA band-shift assays, a 10-base sequence within the 421-base region was found to bind a nuclear protein from wounded tomato leaves. This 10-base sequence is adjacent to an 8-base consensus sequence at -147 to -155 that is present in the promoter region of several elicitor-inducible genes from various other plants. The evidence suggests that a complex set of cis- and trans-acting elements within the -136 to -165 region of the potato IIK gene may be involved with the signaling mechanisms that regulate the inducibility of this gene in response to pest and pathogen attacks. Images PMID:2405385

  4. Development of a heat-shock inducible gene expression system in the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    PubMed

    Sumiya, Nobuko; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Misumi, Osami; Miyagishima, Shin-ya

    2014-01-01

    The cell of the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae contains a single chloroplast and mitochondrion, the division of which is tightly synchronized by a light/dark cycle. The genome content is extremely simple, with a low level of genetic redundancy, in photosynthetic eukaryotes. In addition, transient transformation and stable transformation by homologous recombination have been reported. However, for molecular genetic analyses of phenomena that are essential for cellular growth and survival, inducible gene expression/suppression systems are needed. Here, we report the development of a heat-shock inducible gene expression system in C. merolae. CMJ101C, encoding a small heat shock protein, is transcribed only when cells are exposed to an elevated temperature. Using a superfolder GFP as a reporter protein, the 200-bp upstream region of CMJ101C orf was determined to be the optimal promoter for heat-shock induction. The optimal temperature to induce expression is 50°C, at which C. merolae cells are able to proliferate. At least a 30-min heat shock is required for the expression of a protein of interest and a 60-min heat shock yields the maximum level of protein expression. After the heat shock, the mRNA level decreases rapidly. As an example of the system, the expression of a dominant negative form of chloroplast division DRP5B protein, which has a mutation in the GTPase domain, was induced. Expression of the dominant negative DRP5B resulted in the appearance of aberrant-shaped cells in which two daughter chloroplasts and the cells are still connected by a small DRP5B positive tube-like structure. This result suggests that the dominant negative DRP5B inhibited the final scission of the chloroplast division site, but not the earlier stages of division site constriction. It is also suggested that cell cycle progression is not arrested by the impairment of chloroplast division at the final stage. PMID:25337786

  5. Protection of podocytes from hyperhomocysteinemia-induced injury by deletion of gp91phox gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun; Hu, Jun-Jun; Xia, Min; Boini, Krishna M.; Brimson, Christopher A.; Laperle, Laura A.; Li, Pin-Lan

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, mice lacking gp91phox gene were used to address the role of NADPH oxidase in hyperhomocysteinemia-induced podocyte injury. It was found that the folate-free diet increased plasma homocysteine levels, but failed to increase O2.− production in the glomeruli from gp91phox gene knockout (gp91−/−) mice, compared with wild-type (gp91+/+) mice. Proteinuria and glomerular damage index (GDI) were significantly lower, while the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was higher in gp91−/− than gp91+/+ mice when they were on the folate-free diet (Urine albumin excretion: 21.23±1.88 vs. 32.86±4.03 μg/24 h; GDI: 1.17±0.18 vs. 2.59 ±0.49; and GFR: 53.01±4.69 vs. 40.98±1.44 μL/min). Hyperhomocysteinemia-induced decrease in nephrin expression and increase in desmin expression in gp91+/+ mice were not observed in gp91−/− mice. Morphologically, foot process effacement and podocyte loss due to hyperhomocysteinemia were significantly attenuated in gp91−/− mice. In in vitro studies of podocytes, homocysteine was found to increase gp91phox expression and O2.− generation, which was substantially inhibited by gp91phox siRNA. Functionally, homocysteine-induced decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) production was abolished by gp91phox siRNA or diphenyleneiodonium, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor. These results suggest that the functional integrity of NADPH oxidase is essential for hyperhomocysteinemia-induced podocyte injury and glomerulosclerosis. PMID:20116427

  6. Early osteoblastic differentiation induced by dexamethasone enhances adenoviral gene delivery to marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Blum, Jeremy S; Parrott, M Brandon; Mikos, Antonios G; Barry, Michael A

    2004-03-01

    We investigated the implications of induced osteogenic differentiation on gene delivery in multipotent rat marrow stromal cells (MSCs). Prior to genetic manipulation cells were cultured with or without osteogenic supplements (5x10(-8) M dexamethasone, 160 microM l-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate, and 10 mM beta-glycerophosphate). Comparison of liposome, retroviral, and adenoviral vectors demonstrated that all three vectors could mediate gene delivery to primary rat MSCs. When these vectors were applied in the absence or presence of osteogenic supplements, we found that MSCs differentiated prior to transduction with adenovirus type 5 vectors produced a 300% increase in transgene expression compared to MSCs that were not exposed to osteogenic supplements. This differentiation effect appeared specific to adenoviral mediated gene delivery, since there was minimal increase in retroviral gene delivery and no increase in liposome gene delivery when MSCs were treated with osteogenic supplements. In addition, we also determined this increase in transgene production to occur at a higher concentration of dexamethasone (5x10(-8) M) in the culture medium of MSCs prior to adenoviral transduction. We found that this increased transgene production could be extended to the osteogenic protein, human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (hBMP-2). When delivered by an adenoviral vector, hBMP-2 transgene production could be increased from 1.4 ng/10(5) cells/3 days to 4.3 ng/10(5) cells/3 days by culture of MSCs with osteogenic supplements prior to transduction. These results indicate that the utility of MSCs as a therapeutic protein delivery mechanism through genetic manipulation can be enhanced by pre-culture of these cells with dexamethasone. PMID:15013104

  7. Fibrates induce mdr2 gene expression and biliary phospholipid secretion in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Chianale, J; Vollrath, V; Wielandt, A M; Amigo, L; Rigotti, A; Nervi, F; Gonzalez, S; Andrade, L; Pizarro, M; Accatino, L

    1996-01-01

    Disruption of the murine mdr2 gene leads to the complete absence of biliary phospholipids. We tested the hypothesis that the increase in biliary phospholipid output induced by fibrates is mediated via induction of the hepatic mdr2 gene and its encoded product, the P-glucoprotein canalicular flippase. Increased levels of mdr2 mRNA were observed in the liver of mice treated with different fibrates: ciprofibrate, 660+/-155% (as compared with control group); clofibrate, 611+/-77%; bezafibrate, 410+/-47%; fenofibrate, 310+/-52%; gemfibrozil, 190+/-25% (P <0.05 compared with control group). Induction of expression of the mdr gene family was specific to the mdr2 gene. Two- to three-fold increases in P-glycoprotein immunodetection were evident on the canalicular plasma-membrane domain of clofibrate- and ciprofibrate-treated mice. Biliary phospholipid output increased from 4.2+/-1.2 nmol/min per g of liver in the control group to 8.5+/-0.6, 7.1+/-2.9 and 5.8+/-2.5 in ciprofibrate-, clofibrate- and bezafibrate-treated mice respectively (P <0.05 compared with control group). Moreover, a significant correlation between biliary phospholipid output and the relative levels of mdr2 mRNA was found (r=0.86; P <0.05). In treated animals, bile flow as well as cholesterol and bile acid outputs remained unchanged. Our findings constitute the first evidence that pharmacological modulation of biliary lipid secretion mediated by fibrates can be related to the overexpression of a specific liver gene product, the mdr2 P-glycoprotein, and are consistent with the hypothesis that the mdr2 P-glycoprotein isoform plays a crucial role in the secretion of biliary phospholipid. PMID:8615769

  8. Light-Induced Expression of a MYB Gene Regulates Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Red Apples1

    PubMed Central

    Takos, Adam M.; Jaffé, Felix W.; Jacob, Steele R.; Bogs, Jochen; Robinson, Simon P.; Walker, Amanda R.

    2006-01-01

    Anthocyanins are secondary metabolites found in higher plants that contribute to the colors of flowers and fruits. In apples (Malus domestica Borkh.), several steps of the anthocyanin pathway are coordinately regulated, suggesting control by common transcription factors. A gene encoding an R2R3 MYB transcription factor was isolated from apple (cv Cripps' Pink) and designated MdMYB1. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence suggests that this gene encodes an ortholog of anthocyanin regulators in other plants. The expression of MdMYB1 in both Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants and cultured grape cells induced the ectopic synthesis of anthocyanin. In the grape (Vitis vinifera) cells MdMYB1 stimulated transcription from the promoters of two apple genes encoding anthocyanin biosynthetic enzymes. In ripening apple fruit the transcription of MdMYB1 was correlated with anthocyanin synthesis in red skin sectors of fruit. When dark-grown fruit were exposed to sunlight, MdMYB1 transcript levels increased over several days, correlating with anthocyanin synthesis in the skin. MdMYB1 gene transcripts were more abundant in red skin apple cultivars compared to non-red skin cultivars. Several polymorphisms were identified in the promoter of MdMYB1. A derived cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence marker designed to one of these polymorphisms segregated with the inheritance of skin color in progeny from a cross of an unnamed red skin selection (a sibling of Cripps' Pink) and the non-red skin cultivar Golden Delicious. We conclude that MdMYB1 coordinately regulates genes in the anthocyanin pathway and the expression level of this regulator is the genetic basis for apple skin color. PMID:17012405

  9. Thalidomide induced early gene expression perturbations indicative of human embryopathy in mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xiugong Sprando, Robert L.; Yourick, Jeffrey J.

    2015-08-15

    Developmental toxicity testing has traditionally relied on animal models which are costly, time consuming, and require the sacrifice of large numbers of animals. In addition, there are significant disparities between human beings and animals in their responses to chemicals. Thalidomide is a species-specific developmental toxicant that causes severe limb malformations in humans but not in mice. Here, we used microarrays to study transcriptomic changes induced by thalidomide in an in vitro model based on differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). C57BL/6 mESCs were allowed to differentiate spontaneously and RNA was collected at 24, 48, and 72 h after exposure to 0.25 mM thalidomide. Global gene expression analysis using microarrays revealed hundreds of differentially expressed genes upon thalidomide exposure that were enriched in gene ontology (GO) terms and canonical pathways associated with embryonic development and differentiation. In addition, many genes were found to be involved in small GTPases-mediated signal transduction, heart development, and inflammatory responses, which coincide with clinical evidences and may represent critical embryotoxicities of thalidomide. These results demonstrate that transcriptomics in combination with mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation is a promising alternative model for developmental toxicity assessment. - Highlights: • Studied genomic changes in mouse embryonic stem cells upon thalidomide exposure • Identified gene expression changes that may represent thalidomide embryotoxicity • The toxicogenomic changes coincide well with known thalidomide clinical outcomes. • The mouse embryonic stem cell model is suitable for developmental toxicity testing. • The model has the potential for high-throughput screening of a multitude of compounds.

  10. Methylmercury-induced changes in gene transcription associated with neuroendocrine disruption in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richter, Catherine A.; Martyniuk, Christopher J.; Annis, Mandy L.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Chasar, Lia C.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    Methyl-mercury (MeHg) is a potent neuroendocrine disruptor that impairs reproductive processes in fish. The objectives of this study were to (1) characterize transcriptomic changes induced by MeHg exposure in the female largemouth bass (LMB) hypothalamus under controlled laboratory conditions, (2) investigate the health and reproductive impacts of MeHg exposure on male and female largemouth bass (LMB) in the natural environment, and (3) identify MeHg-associated gene expression patterns in whole brain of female LMB from MeHg-contaminated habitats. The laboratory experiment was a single injection of 2.5 μg MeHg/g body weight for 96 h exposure. The field survey compared river systems in Florida, USA with comparably lower concentrations of MeHg (Wekiva, Santa Fe, and St. Johns Rivers) in fish and one river system with LMB that contained elevated concentrations of MeHg (St. Marys River). Microarray analysis was used to quantify transcriptomic responses to MeHg exposure. Although fish at the high-MeHg site did not show overt health or reproductive impairment, there were MeHg-responsive genes and pathways identified in the laboratory study that were also altered in fish from the high-MeHg site relative to fish at the low-MeHg sites. Gene network analysis suggested that MeHg regulated the expression targets of neuropeptide receptor and steroid signaling, as well as structural components of the cell. Disease-associated gene networks related to MeHg exposure, based upon expression data, included cerebellum ataxia, movement disorders, and hypercalcemia. Gene responses in the CNS are consistent with the documented neurotoxicological and neuroendocrine disrupting effects of MeHg in vertebrates.

  11. Endophytic Bacillus spp. produce antifungal lipopeptides and induce host defence gene expression in maize.

    PubMed

    Gond, Surendra K; Bergen, Marshall S; Torres, Mónica S; White, James F

    2015-03-01

    Endophytes are mutualistic symbionts within healthy plant tissues. In this study we isolated Bacillus spp. from seeds of several varieties of maize. Bacillus amyloliquifaciens or Bacillus subtilis were found to be present in all maize varieties examined in this study. To determine whether bacteria may produce antifungal compounds, generally lipopeptides in Bacillus spp., bacterial cultures were screened for production of lipopeptides. Lipopeptides were extracted by acid precipitation from liquid cultures of Bacillus spp. Lipopeptide extracts from Bacillus spp. isolated from Indian popcorn and yellow dent corn showed inhibitory activity against Fusarium moniliforme at 500μg per disk. Using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry we detected the presence of antifungal iturin A, fengycin and bacillomycin in these isolates. PCR amplification also showed the presence of genes for iturin A and fengycin. B. subtilis (SG_JW.03) isolated from Indian popcorn showed strong inhibition of Arabidopsis seed mycoflora and enhanced seedling growth. We tested for the induction of defence gene expression in the host plant after treatment of plants with B. subtilis (SG_JW.03) and its lipopeptide extract using RT-qPCR. Roots of Indian popcorn seedlings treated with a suspension of B. subtilis (SG_JW.03) showed the induction of pathogenesis-related genes, including PR-1 and PR-4, which relate to plant defence against fungal pathogens. The lipopeptide extract alone did not increase the expression of these pathogenesis-related genes. Based on our study of maize endophytes, we hypothesize that, bacterial endophytes that naturally occur in many maize varieties may function to protect hosts by secreting antifungal lipopeptides that inhibit pathogens as well as inducing the up-regulation of pathogenesis-related genes of host plants (systemic acquired resistance). PMID:25497916

  12. Hypoxia-induced protein binding to O2-responsive sequences on the tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Norris, M L; Millhorn, D E

    1995-10-01

    We reported recently that the gene that encodes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of catecholamines, is regulated by hypoxia in the dopaminergic cells of the mammalian carotid body (Czyzyk-Krzeska, M. F., Bayliss, D. A., Lawson, E. E. & Millhorn, D. E. (1992) J. Neurochem. 58, 1538-1546) and in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells (Czyzyk-Krzeska, M. F., Furnari, B. A., Lawson, E. E. & Millhorn, D. E. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 760-764). Regulation of this gene during low O2 conditions occurs at both the level of transcription and RNA stability. Increased transcription during hypoxia is regulated by a region of the proximal promoter that extends from -284 to + 27 bases, relative to transcription start site. The present study was undertaken to further characterize the sequences that confer O2 responsiveness of the TH gene and to identify hypoxia-induced protein interactions with these sequences. Results from chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assays identified a region between bases -284 and -150 that contains the essential sequences for O2 regulation. This region contains a number of regulatory elements including AP1, AP2, and HIF-1. Gel shift assays revealed enhanced protein interactions at the AP1 and HIF-1 elements of the native gene. Further investigations using supershift and shift-Western analysis showed that c-Fos and JunB bind to the AP1 element during hypoxia and that these protein levels are stimulated by hypoxia. Mutation of the AP1 sequence prevented stimulation of transcription of the TH-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene by hypoxia. PMID:7559551

  13. Inducible expression of photoacoustic reporter gene tyrosinase in cells using a single plasmid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paproski, Robert J.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2012-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that tyrosinase is a reporter gene for photoacoustic imaging since tyrosinase is the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of melanin, a pigment capable of producing strong photoacoustic signals. We previously created a cell line capable of inducible tyrosinase expression (important due to toxicity of melanin) by stably transfecting tyrosinase in MCF-7 Tet-OnR cell line (Clontech) which expresses a doxycycline-controlled transactivator. Unfortunately, Clontech provides few Tet-On Advanced cell lines making it difficult to have inducible tyrosinase expression in cell lines not provided by Clontech. In order to simplify the creation of cell lines with inducible expression of tyrosinase, we created a single plasmid that encodes both the transactivator as well as tyrosinase. PCR was used to amplify both the transactivator and tyrosinase from the Tet-OnR Advanced and pTRE-Tight-TYR plasmids, respectively. Both PCR products were cloned into the pEGFP-N1 plasmid and the newly created plasmid was transfected into ZR-75-1, MCF-7, and MIA PaCa-1 cells using lipofectamine. After several days, brown melanin was only observed in cells incubated with doxycycline, suggesting that the newly created single plasmid allowed inducible tyrosinase expression in many different cells lines.

  14. cGMP Is Required for Gibberellic Acid-Induced Gene Expression in Barley Aleurone.

    PubMed Central

    Penson, S. P.; Schuurink, R. C.; Fath, A.; Gubler, F.; Jacobsen, J. V.; Jones, R. L.

    1996-01-01

    The occurrence and roles of cGMP were investigated in aleurone layers and protoplasts isolated from barley (cv Himalaya) grain. Levels of cGMP in freshly isolated barley aleurone layers ranged from 0.065 to 0.08 pmol/g fresh weight of tissue, and cGMP levels increased transiently after incubation in gibberellic acid (GA). Abscisic acid (ABA) did not increase cGMP levels in aleurone layers. LY 83583 (LY), an inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase, prevented the GA-induced increase in cGMP and inhibited GA-induced [alpha]-amylase synthesis and secretion. The inhibitory effects of LY could be overcome by membrane-permeant analogs of cGMP. LY also prevented GA-induced accumulation of [alpha]-amylase and GAMYB mRNAs. cGMP alone was not sufficient to induce the accumulation of [alpha]-amylase or GAMYB mRNA. LY had a less dramatic effect on the accumulation of mRNAs encoding the ABA-responsive gene Rab21. We conclude that cGMP plays an important role in GA, but not ABA, signaling in the barley aleurone cell. PMID:12239379

  15. Factor-induced Reprogramming and Zinc Finger Nuclease-aided Gene Targeting Cause Different Genome Instability in β-Thalassemia Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs)*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ning; Shan, Yongli; Liao, Baojian; Kong, Guanyi; Wang, Cheng; Huang, Ke; Zhang, Hui; Cai, Xiujuan; Chen, Shubin; Pei, Duanqing; Chen, Nansheng; Pan, Guangjin

    2015-01-01

    The generation of personalized induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) followed by targeted genome editing provides an opportunity for developing customized effective cellular therapies for genetic disorders. However, it is critical to ascertain whether edited iPSCs harbor unfavorable genomic variations before their clinical application. To examine the mutation status of the edited iPSC genome and trace the origin of possible mutations at different steps, we have generated virus-free iPSCs from amniotic cells carrying homozygous point mutations in β-hemoglobin gene (HBB) that cause severe β-thalassemia (β-Thal), corrected the mutations in both HBB alleles by zinc finger nuclease-aided gene targeting, and obtained the final HBB gene-corrected iPSCs by excising the exogenous drug resistance gene with Cre recombinase. Through comparative genomic hybridization and whole-exome sequencing, we uncovered seven copy number variations, five small insertions/deletions, and 64 single nucleotide variations (SNVs) in β-Thal iPSCs before the gene targeting step and found a single small copy number variation, 19 insertions/deletions, and 340 single nucleotide variations in the final gene-corrected β-Thal iPSCs. Our data revealed that substantial but different genomic variations occurred at factor-induced somatic cell reprogramming and zinc finger nuclease-aided gene targeting steps, suggesting that stringent genomic monitoring and selection are needed both at the time of iPSC derivation and after gene targeting. PMID:25795783

  16. Identification of rapidly induced genes in the response of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) to water deficit and abscisic acid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is an important crop, but droughts often affect peanut production. There is a lack of genomic information available for peanut; therefore, little is known about the molecular basis of its drought stress response. Results Previously, we found that peanut stomata close rapidly during water deficit and in response to abscisic acid (ABA) treatment, and many genes show changes in their expression levels. To screen for candidate genes involved in the water deficit response, we used the Illumina HiSeq2000/MiSeq sequencing platform to conduct a global transcriptome analysis of peanut seedlings under water deficit with or without an ABA pretreatment. Three peanut tissues (leaves, roots, and stems) collected at each of three developmental stages (four-leaf, flowering, and podding stages) were used to construct sequence libraries. Then, 4.96 × 107 raw sequence reads were generated and the high quality reads were assembled into 47,842 unigenes. We analyzed these sequence libraries to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) under water deficit with or without ABA pretreatment. In total, 621 genes were induced rapidly (≥1.5 fold change compared with control) under water deficit, 2,665 genes were induced rapidly under water deficit + ABA pretreatment, and 279 genes overlapped between water deficit and water deficit + ABA pretreatment. Of the 279 overlapping genes, 264 showed the same expression pattern and 15 showed opposite expression patterns. Among the DEGs, 257 were highly induced (>5 fold) by water deficit + ABA pretreatment, while 19 were highly induced (>5 fold) by water deficit alone. The genes induced under water deficit + ABA pretreatment included 100 putative transcription factor (TF) genes, while those induced under water deficit alone included only 22 putative TF genes. To validate the transcriptome results, we conducted quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses to quantify the transcript levels of nine

  17. Influences of XDH genotype by gene-gene interactions with SUCLA2 for thiopurine-induced leukopenia in Korean patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Kyung; Hong, Myunghee; Ye, Byong Duk; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Park, Sang Hyoung; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Hwang, Sung-Wook; Kwak, Min Seob; Lee, Ho-Su; Song, Kyuyoung; Yang, Suk-Kyun

    2016-06-01

    Background The impact of genetic variation in the thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) gene on thiopurine-induced leukopenia has been well demonstrated. Although xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) is the second major contributor to azathioprine breakdown, polymorphisms in XDH have rarely been studied in IBD patients. We aim to access association between XDH variants and thiopurine-induced leukopenia by gene-gene interaction in a Crohn's disease (CD) population. Study A total of 964 CD patients treated with thiopurines were recruited from a tertiary referral center. The association between four XDH variants (p.Gly172Arg, p.Asn1109Thr, p.Arg149Cys, and p.Thr910Lys) and thiopurine-induced leukopenia was analyzed in cases with early leukopenia (n = 66), late leukopenia (n = 264), and in controls without leukopenia (n = 632). Three non-synonymous SNPs, which we previously reported association with thiopurine-induced leukopenia, NUDT15 (p.Arg139Cys), SUCLA2 (p.Ser199Thr), and TPMT *3C were selected for epistasis analysis with the XDH variants. Results There was no significant association for two variants of XDH and thiopurine-induced leukopenia. In the epistasis analysis, only XDH (p.Asn1109Thr) * SUCLA2 (p.Ser199Thr) showed a statistically significant association with early leukopenia [odds ratio (OR) = 0.16; p = 0.03]. After genotype stratification, a positive association on the background of SUCLA2 wild-type (199Ser) between the XDH (p.Asn1109Thr) and early leukopenia (OR = 4.39; p = 0.01) was detected. Conclusion Genes associated with thiopurine-induced leukopenia can act in a complex interactive manner. Further studies are warranted to explore the mechanisms underlying the effects of the combination of XDH (p.Asn1109Thr) and SUCLA2 (199Ser) on thiopurine-induced leukopenia. PMID:26863601

  18. Ca(2+) regulates fluid shear-induced cytoskeletal reorganization and gene expression in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, N. X.; Ryder, K. D.; Pavalko, F. M.; Turner, C. H.; Burr, D. B.; Qiu, J.; Duncan, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    Osteoblasts subjected to fluid shear increase the expression of the early response gene, c-fos, and the inducible isoform of cyclooxygenase, COX-2, two proteins linked to the anabolic response of bone to mechanical stimulation, in vivo. These increases in gene expression are dependent on shear-induced actin stress fiber formation. Here, we demonstrate that MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells respond to shear with a rapid increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) that we postulate is important to subsequent cellular responses to shear. To test this hypothesis, MC3T3-E1 cells were grown on glass slides coated with fibronectin and subjected to laminar fluid flow (12 dyn/cm(2)). Before application of shear, cells were treated with two Ca(2+) channel inhibitors or various blockers of intracellular Ca(2+) release for 0. 5-1 h. Although gadolinium, a mechanosensitive channel blocker, significantly reduced the [Ca(2+)](i) response, neither gadolinium nor nifedipine, an L-type channel Ca(2+) channel blocker, were able to block shear-induced stress fiber formation and increase in c-fos and COX-2 in MC3T3-E1 cells. However, 1, 2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-AM, an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, or thapsigargin, which empties intracellular Ca(2+) stores, completely inhibited stress fiber formation and c-fos/COX-2 production in sheared osteoblasts. Neomycin or U-73122 inhibition of phospholipase C, which mediates D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3))-induced intracellular Ca(2+) release, also completely suppressed actin reorganization and c-fos/COX-2 production. Pretreatment of MC3T3-E1 cells with U-73343, the inactive isoform of U-73122, did not inhibit these shear-induced responses. These results suggest that IP(3)-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) release is required for modulating flow-induced responses in MC3T3-E1 cells.

  19. Gene Transcriptional and Metabolic Profile Changes in Mimetic Aging Mice Induced by D-Galactose

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue-Yue; Zhu, Xiao-Juan; Li, Rong-Hua; Mu, Chang-Kao; Wang, Chun-Lin; Song, Wei-Wei

    2015-01-01

    D-galactose injection has been shown to induce many changes in mice that represent accelerated aging. This mouse model has been widely used for pharmacological studies of anti-aging agents. The underlying mechanism of D-galactose induced aging remains unclear, however, it appears to relate to glucose and 1ipid metabolic disorders. Currently, there has yet to be a study that focuses on investigating gene expression changes in D-galactose aging mice. In this study, integrated analysis of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabonomics and gene expression profiles was used to investigate the changes in transcriptional and metabolic profiles in mimetic aging mice injected with D-galactose. Our findings demonstrated that 48 mRNAs were differentially expressed between control and D-galactose mice, and 51 potential biomarkers were identified at the metabolic level. The effects of D-galactose on aging could be attributed to glucose and 1ipid metabolic disorders, oxidative damage, accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), reduction in abnormal substance elimination, cell apoptosis, and insulin resistance. PMID:26176541

  20. Water-Deficit Inducible Expression of a Cytokinin Biosynthetic