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Sample records for gene oct4b mrna

  1. Altered expression of apoptotic genes in response to OCT4B1 suppression in human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Mohammad Reza; Najafi, Ali; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi; Asadi, Malek Hosein; Mowla, Seyed Javad

    2014-10-01

    OCT4B1 is a newly discovered spliced variant of OCT4 which is primarily expressed in pluripotent and tumor cells. Based on our previous studies, OCT4B1 is significantly overexpressed in tumors, where it endows an anti-apoptotic property to tumor cells. However, the mechanism by which OCT4B1 regulates the apoptotic pathway is not yet elucidated. Here, we investigated the effects of OCT4B1 suppression on the expression alteration of 84 genes involved in apoptotic pathway. The AGS (gastric adenocarcinoma), 5637 (bladder tumor), and U-87MG (brain tumor) cell lines were transfected with OCT4B1 or irrelevant siRNAs. The expression level of apoptotic genes was then quantified using a human apoptosis panel-PCR kit. Our data revealed an almost similar pattern of alteration in the expression profile of apoptotic genes in all three studied cell lines, following OCT4B1 suppression. In general, the expression of more than 54 apoptotic genes (64 % of arrayed genes) showed significant changes. Among these, some up-regulated (CIDEA, CIDEB, TNFRSF1A, TNFRSF21, TNFRSF11B, TNFRSF10B, and CASP7) and down-regulated (BCL2, BCL2L11, TP73, TP53, BAD, TRAF3, TRAF2, BRAF, BNIP3L, BFAR, and BAX) genes had on average more than tenfold gene expression alteration in all three examined cell lines. With some minor exceptions, suppression of OCT4B1 caused upregulation of pro-apoptotic and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes in transfected tumor cells. Uncovering OCT4B1 down-stream targets could further elucidate its part in tumorigenesis, and could lead to finding a new approach to combat cancer, based on targeting OCT4B1. PMID:25008565

  2. Down-regulation of HSP40 gene family following OCT4B1 suppression in human tumor cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Mohammad Reza; Asadi, MalekHosein; Mowla, Seyed Javad; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossin; Ahmadi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The OCT4B1, as one of OCT4 variants, is expressed in cancer cell lines and tissues more than other variants and plays an important role in apoptosis and stress (heat shock protein) pathways. The present study was designed to determine the effects of OCT4B1 silencing on expressional profile of HSP40 gene family expression in three different human tumor cell lines. Materials and Methods: The OCT4B1 expression was suppressed by specific siRNA transfection in AGS (gastric adenocarcinoma), 5637 (bladder tumor) and U-87MG (brain tumor) cell lines employing Lipofectamine reagent. Real-time PCR array technique was employed for RNA qualification. The fold changes were calculated using RT2 Profiler PCR array data analysis software version 3.5. Results: Our results indicated that fifteen genes (from 36 studied genes) were down-regulated and two genes (DNAJC11 and DNAJC5B) were up-regulated in all three studied tumor cell lines by approximately more than two folds. The result of other studied genes (19 genes) showed different expressional pattern (up or down-expression) based on tumor cell lines. Conclusion: According to the findings of the present study, we may suggest that there is a direct correlation between OCT4B1 expression in tumor cell lines (and tissues) and HSP40 family gene expressions to escape from apoptosis and cancer expansion. PMID:27081464

  3. Altered Expression of High Molecular Weight Heat Shock Proteins after OCT4B1 Suppression in Human Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Mohammad Reza; Kazemi Arababadi, Mohammad; Asadi, Malek Hossein; Mowla, Seyed Javad

    2016-01-01

    Objective OCT4B1, a novel variant of OCT4, is expressed in cancer cell lines and tis- sues. Based on our previous reports, OCT4B1 appears to have a crucial role in regulating apoptosis as well as stress response [heat shock proteins (HSPs)] pathways. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of OCT4B1 silencing on the expression of high molecular weight HSPs in three different human tumor cell lines. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, OCT4B1 expression was suppressed in AGS (gastric adenocarcinoma), 5637 (bladder tumor) and U-87MG (brain tumor) cell lines using RNAi strategy. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array was em- ployed for expression level analysis and the fold changes were calculated using RT2 Pro- filer PCR array data analysis software version 3.5. Results Our data revealed up-regulation of HSPD1 (from HSP60 family) as well as HSPA14, HSPA1L, HSPA4, HSPA5 and HSPA8 (from HSP70 family) following OCT4B1 knock-down in all three cell lines. In contrast, the expression of HSP90AA1 and HSP90AB1 (from HSP90 family) as well as HSPA1B and HSPA6 (from HSP70 family) was down-regulated under similar conditions. Other stress-related genes showed varying ex- pression pattern in the examined tumor cell lines. Conclusion Our data suggest a direct or indirect correlation between the expression of OCT4B1 and HSP90 gene family. However, OCT4B1 expression was not strongly corre- lated with the expression of HSP70 and HSP60 gene families. PMID:26862520

  4. Oct4B, CD90, and CD73 are upregulated in bladder tissue following electro-resection of the bladder

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Takumi; Tonooka, Akiko; Okuno, Yumiko; Hattori-Kato, Mami; Mikami, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We tested the hypothesis that stimulation by electro-resection of bladder tissue induces stem cells in the tissue repair process. Materials & Methods: After primary transurethral resection of a bladder tumor and surrounding tissue (TUR-Bt), second TUR-Bt was performed. Tissues excised by second TUR-Bt were immunohistochemically stained for Oct4, a marker of pluripotency, and for CD90 and CD73, markers of mesenchymal stromal cells, when no bladder tumor cells remained. Results and Conclusions: Oct4B protein was sporadically stained in the cytoplasm of interstitial cells in four out of eight cases. CD90 and CD73 are upregulated in interstitial and vascular endothelial cells without CD45 expression. Mesenchymal stromal cells, but not pluripotent stem cells, may be mainly involved in bladder tissue repair. PMID:27397997

  5. Gene regulation by structured mRNA elements.

    PubMed

    Wachter, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The precise temporal and spatial coordination of gene activity, based on the integration of internal and external signals, is crucial for the accurate functioning of all biological processes. Although the basic principles of gene expression were established some 60 years ago, recent research has revealed a surprising complexity in the control of gene activity. Many of these gene regulatory mechanisms occur at the level of the mRNA, including sophisticated gene control tasks mediated by structured mRNA elements. We now know that mRNA folds can serve as highly specific receptors for various types of molecules, as exemplified by metabolite-binding riboswitches, and interfere with pro- and eukaryotic gene expression at the level of transcription, translation, and RNA processing. Gene regulation by structured mRNA elements comprises versatile strategies including self-cleaving ribozymes, RNA-folding-mediated occlusion or presentation of cis-regulatory sequences, and sequestration of trans-acting factors including other RNAs and proteins. PMID:24780087

  6. mRNA modifications: Dynamic regulators of gene expression?

    PubMed Central

    Hoernes, Thomas Philipp; Hüttenhofer, Alexander; Erlacher, Matthias David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The expression of a gene is a tightly regulated process and is exerted by a myriad of different mechanisms. Recently, RNA modifications located in coding sequences of mRNAs, have been identified as potential regulators of gene expression. N6-methyladenosine (m6A), 5-methylcytosine (m5C), pseudouridine (Ψ) and N1-methyladenosine (m1A) have been found within open reading frames of mRNAs. The presence of these mRNA modifications has been implicated to modulate the fate of an mRNA, ranging from maturation to its translation and even degradation. However, many aspects concerning the biological functions of mRNA modifications remain elusive. Recently, systematic in vitro studies allowed a first glimpse of the direct interplay of mRNA modifications and the efficiency and fidelity of ribosomal translation. It thereby became evident that the effects of mRNA modifications were, astonishingly versatile, depending on the type, position or sequence context. The incorporation of a single modification could either prematurely terminate protein synthesis, reduce the peptide yield or alter the amino acid sequence identity. These results implicate that mRNA modifications are a powerful mechanism to post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. PMID:27351916

  7. mRNA Composition and Control of Bacterial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Liang, S.-T.; Xu, Y.-C.; Dennis, P.; Bremer, H.

    2000-01-01

    The expression of any given bacterial protein is predicted to depend on (i) the transcriptional regulation of the promoter and the translational regulation of its mRNA and (ii) the synthesis and translation of total (bulk) mRNA. This is because total mRNA acts as a competitor to the specific mRNA for the binding of initiation-ready free ribosomes. To characterize the effects of mRNA competition on gene expression, the specific activity of β-galactosidase expressed from three different promoter-lacZ fusions (Pspc-lacZ, PRNAI-lacZ, and PRNAII-lacZ) was measured (i) in a relA+ background during exponential growth at different rates and (ii) in relA+ and ΔrelA derivatives of Escherichia coli B/r after induction of a mild stringent or a relaxed response to raise or lower, respectively, the level of ppGpp. Expression from all three promoters was stimulated during slow exponential growth or at elevated levels of ppGpp and was reduced during fast exponential growth or at lower levels of ppGpp. From these observations and from other considerations, we propose (i) that the concentration of free, initiation-ready ribosomes is approximately constant and independent of the growth rate and (ii) that bulk mRNA made during slow growth and at elevated levels of ppGpp is less efficiently translated than bulk mRNA made during fast growth and at reduced levels of ppGpp. These features lead to an indirect enhancement in the expression of LacZ (or of any other protein) during growth in media of poor nutritional quality and at increased levels of ppGpp. PMID:10809680

  8. GeneTack database: genes with frameshifts in prokaryotic genomes and eukaryotic mRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Antonov, Ivan; Baranov, Pavel; Borodovsky, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Database annotations of prokaryotic genomes and eukaryotic mRNA sequences pay relatively low attention to frame transitions that disrupt protein-coding genes. Frame transitions (frameshifts) could be caused by sequencing errors or indel mutations inside protein-coding regions. Other observed frameshifts are related to recoding events (that evolved to control expression of some genes). Earlier, we have developed an algorithm and software program GeneTack for ab initio frameshift finding in intronless genes. Here, we describe a database (freely available at http://topaz.gatech.edu/GeneTack/db.html) containing genes with frameshifts (fs-genes) predicted by GeneTack. The database includes 206 991 fs-genes from 1106 complete prokaryotic genomes and 45 295 frameshifts predicted in mRNA sequences from 100 eukaryotic genomes. The whole set of fs-genes was grouped into clusters based on sequence similarity between fs-proteins (conceptually translated fs-genes), conservation of the frameshift position and frameshift direction (-1, +1). The fs-genes can be retrieved by similarity search to a given query sequence via a web interface, by fs-gene cluster browsing, etc. Clusters of fs-genes are characterized with respect to their likely origin, such as pseudogenization, phase variation, etc. The largest clusters contain fs-genes with programed frameshifts (related to recoding events). PMID:23161689

  9. Stability regulation of mRNA and the control of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cheadle, Chris; Fan, Jinshui; Cho-Chung, Yoon S; Werner, Thomas; Ray, Jill; Do, Lana; Gorospe, Myriam; Becker, Kevin G

    2005-11-01

    Microarray technology has become highly valuable for identifying complex global changes in gene expression patterns. Standard techniques measure changes in total cellular poly(A) mRNA levels. The assumption that changes in gene expression as measured by these techniques are directly and well correlated with changes in rates of new gene synthesis form the basis of attempts to connect coordinated changes in gene expression with shared transcription regulatory elements. Yet systematic attempts at this approach remain difficult to demonstrate convincingly. One reason for this difficulty may result from the intricate convergence of both transcriptional and mRNA turnover events which, together, directly influence steady-state mRNA levels. Recent technical advances have led to the successful scale-up and application of nuclear run-on procedures directly to microarrays. This development has allowed a gene-by-gene comparison between new gene synthesis in the nucleus and measured changes in total cellular polyA mRNA. Results from these studies have begun to challenge the strict interpretation of changes in gene expression measured by conventional microarrays as being closely correlated with changes in mRNA transcription rate, but rather they tend to support the significant expansion of the role played by changes in mRNA stability regulation to standard analyses of gene expression. Gene expression profiles obtained from both polyA mRNA (whole-cell) and nuclear run-on (newly transcribed) RNA across a time course of one hour following the activation of human Jurkat T cells with PMA plus ionomycin revealed that regulation of mRNA stability may account for as much as 50% of all measurements of changes in total cellular polyA mRNA in this system. Stability regulation was inferred by the absence of corresponding regulation of nuclear gene transcription activity for groups of genes strongly regulated at the whole cell level and which were also resistant to inhibition by Actinomycin

  10. Circadian oscillations in period gene mRNA levels are transcriptionally regulated.

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, P E; Hall, J C; Rosbash, M

    1992-01-01

    The period (per) gene is involved in regulating circadian rhythms in Drosophila melanogaster. The per gene is expressed in a circadian manner, where fluctuations in per mRNA abundance are influenced by its own translation product, which also cycles in abundance. Since per gene expression is necessary for circadian rhythmicity, we sought to determine how certain features of this feedback loop operate. The results of this study reveal that fluctuations in per mRNA are primarily controlled by fluctuations in per gene transcription, that per mRNA has a relatively short half-life, and that sequences sufficient to drive per mRNA cycling are present in 1.3 kilobases of 5' flanking sequences. These and other results indicate that the per feedback loop has all of the basic properties necessary to be a component of a circadian oscillator. Images PMID:1465387

  11. Nonsense mutations in the human. beta. -globin gene affect mRNA metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Baserga, S.J.; Benz, E.J. Jr. )

    1988-04-01

    A number of premature translation termination mutations (nonsense mutations) have been described in the human {alpha}- and {beta}-globin genes. Studies on mRNA isolated from patients with {beta}{sup 0}-thalassemia have shown that for both the {beta}-17 and the {beta}-39 mutations less than normal levels of {beta}-globin mRNA accumulate in peripheral blood cells. (The codon at which the mutation occurs designates the name of the mutation; there are 146 codons in human {beta}-globin mRNA). In vitro studies using the cloned {beta}-39 gene have reproduced this effect in a heterologous transfection system and have suggested that the defect resides in intranuclear metabolism. The authors have asked if this phenomenon of decreased mRNA accumulation is a general property of nonsense mutations and if the effect depends on the location or the type of mutation. Toward this end, they have studied the effect of five nonsense mutations and two missense mutations on the expression of human {beta}-globin mRNA in a heterologous transfection system. In all cases studied, the presence of a translation termination codon correlates with a decrease in the steady-state level of mRNA. The data suggest that the metabolism of a mammalian mRNA is affected by the presence of a mutation that affects translation.

  12. Genetic organization and mRNA expression of enolase genes of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Postlethwait, P; Sundstrom, P

    1995-04-01

    In previous work, we cloned a Candida albicans cDNA for the glycolytic enzyme enolase and found a single, abundant enolase transcript on Northern (RNA) blots and a single protein on immunoblots, using antiserum raised against a recombinant enolase fusion protein. Because C. albicans enolase is abundantly produced during infection and elicits strong host immune responses, the mechanisms regulating enolase production are important for understanding the growth of C. albicans in vivo. To obtain more information on enolase gene expression by C. albicans, we used the enolase cDNA clone to investigate the genetic organization of enolase genes and the steady-state levels of enolase mRNA under several growth conditions. Gene disruption techniques in combination with Southern blot analyses of genomic DNA showed the presence of two enolase gene loci that could be distinguished by the locations of ClaI and Mn/I sites in their 3' flanking regions. Enolase steady-state mRNA levels were greatest during the middle phase of the logarithmic growth curve and were low during stationary phase. Minimal differences in enolase mRNA levels between yeast cells and hyphae were found. Propagation of C. albicans in glucose did not cause increased enolase mRNA levels compared with growth in a nonfermentable carbon source (pyruvate). It was concluded that two gene loci exist for C. albicans enolase and that enolase mRNA is constitutively produced at high levels during active metabolism. PMID:7896700

  13. Expression profiling of Drosophila mitochondrial genes via deep mRNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Tatiana Teixeira; Dolezal, Marlies; Schlötterer, Christian; Ottenwälder, Birgit

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria play an essential role in several cellular processes. Nevertheless, very little is known about patterns of gene expression of genes encoded by the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In this study, we used next-generation sequencing (NGS) for transcription profiling of genes encoded in the mitochondrial genome of Drosophila melanogaster and D. pseudoobscura. The analysis of males and females in both species indicated that the expression pattern was conserved between the two species, but differed significantly between both sexes. Interestingly, mRNA levels were not only different among genes encoded by separate transcription units, but also showed significant differences among genes located in the same transcription unit. Hence, mRNA abundance of genes encoded by mtDNA seems to be heavily modulated by post-transcriptional regulation. Finally, we also identified several transcripts with a noncanonical structure, suggesting that processing of mitochondrial transcripts may be more complex than previously assumed. PMID:19843606

  14. Determination of an effective housekeeping gene for the quantification of mRNA for forensic applications.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Lilliana I; Tate, Courtney M; Knott, Erika L; McDaniel, Jade E; Rogers, Stephanie S; Koons, Barbara W; Kavlick, Mark F; Craig, Rhonda L; Robertson, James M

    2012-07-01

    The potential application of mRNA for the identification of biological fluids using molecular techniques has been a recent development in forensic serology. Constitutively expressed housekeeping genes can assess the amount of mRNA recovered from a sample, establish its suitability for downstream applications, and provide a reference point to corroborate the identity of the fluid. qPCR was utilized to compare the expression levels of housekeeping genes from forensic-like body fluid stains to establish the most appropriate assessment of human mRNA quantity prior to profiling. Although variability was observed between fluids and individuals, results indicated that beta-2 microglobulin exhibited the highest expression for all body fluids examined and across donors. A one-way analysis of variance was performed for housekeeping gene variability between donors (at the α, 0.05, significance level), and the results indicated significant differences for semen, vaginal secretions, and menstrual blood. PMID:22309221

  15. Kinetic models of the interference of gene transcription to ncRNA and mRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2011-06-01

    The experiments indicate that the transcription of genes into ncRNA can positively or negatively interfere with transcription into mRNA. We propose two kinetic models describing this effect. The first model is focused on the ncRNA-induced chromatin modification facilitating the transcription of the downstream gene into mRNA. The second model includes the competition between the transcription into ncRNA and the binding of activator to a regulatory site of the downstream gene transcribed into mRNA. Our analysis based on the mean-field kinetic equations and Monte Carlo simulations shows the likely dependences of the transcription rate on RNA polymerase concentration in situations with different rate-limiting steps. Our models can also be used to scrutinize the dependence of the transcription rate on other kinetic parameters. Our kinetic Monte Carlo simulations show that the first model predicts stochastic bursts in the mRNA formation provided that the transcription into ncRNA is slow, while the second model predicts in addition anti-phase stochastic bursts in the mRNA and ncRNA formation provided that that the protein attachment to and detachment from a regulatory site is slow.

  16. mRNA as gene therapeutic: how to control protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tavernier, Geertrui; Andries, Oliwia; Demeester, Jo; Sanders, Niek N; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Rejman, Joanna

    2011-03-30

    For many years, it was generally accepted that mRNA is too unstable to be efficiently used for gene therapy purposes. In the last decade, however, several research groups faced this challenge and not only proved the feasibility of mRNA-mediated transfection with surprising results regarding transfection efficiency and duration of protein expression, but also were able to demonstrate major advantages over the use of pDNA. These advantages will be the first issue discussed in this review, which first of all addresses the notions that mRNA does not need to cross the nuclear barrier to exert its biological activity and in addition lacks CpG motifs, which reduces its immunogenicity. Secondly, it provides insight in the (in)stability of the mRNA molecule, in how mRNA can be modified to increase its half-life and in the necessities of exogenously produced mRNA to be successfully used in transfection protocols. Furthermore, this review gives an in-depth overview of the different techniques and vehicles for intracellular mRNA delivery exploited by us and other groups, comprising electroporation, gene gun injection, lipo- and polyplexes. Finally, it covers recent literature describing specific applications for mRNA based gene delivery, showing that until now most attention has been paid to vaccination strategies. This review offers a comprehensive overview of current knowledge of the major theoretical as well as practical aspects of mRNA-mediated transfection, showing both its possibilities and its pitfalls and should therefore be useful for a diverse scientific audience. PMID:20970469

  17. Differential accumulation of nif structural gene mRNA in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Jacobson, Marty; Ludwig, Marcus; Boyd, Eric S; Bryant, Donald A; Dean, Dennis R; Peters, John W

    2011-09-01

    Northern analysis was employed to investigate mRNA produced by mutant strains of Azotobacter vinelandii with defined deletions in the nif structural genes and in the intergenic noncoding regions. The results indicate that intergenic RNA secondary structures effect the differential accumulation of transcripts, supporting the high Fe protein-to-MoFe protein ratio required for optimal diazotrophic growth. PMID:21725008

  18. Unification of gene expression data applying standard mRNA quantification references for comparable analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High throughput quantitative measurements of gene expression data have problems of reproducibility and comparability due to a lack of standard mRNA quantification references. Efforts have been made to safeguard data fidelity, yet generating quality expression data of inherent value remains a challe...

  19. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay among coagulation factor genes

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Shirin

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Haemostasis prevents blood loss following vascular injury. It depends on the unique concert of events involving platelets and specific blood proteins, known as coagulation factors. The clotting system requires precise regulation and coordinated reactions to maintain the integrity of the vasculature. Clotting insufficiency mostly occurs due to genetically inherited coagulation factor deficiencies such as hemophilia. Materials and Methods: A relevant literature search of PubMed was performed using the keywords coagulation factors, Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and premature translation termination codons. Search limitations included English language and human-based studies. Results: Mutations that cause premature translation termination codons probably account for one-third of genetically inherited diseases. Transcripts bearing aberrant termination codons are selectively identified and eliminated by an evolutionarily conserved posttranscriptional pathway known as nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). There are many pieces of evidence of decay among coagulation factor genes. However, the hemophilia gene (F8) does not seem to be subjected to NMD. Since the F8 gene is located on the X-chromosome, a connection between X-linked traits and mRNA decay could be assumed. Conclusion: Considering that not all genes go through decay, this review focuses on the basics of the mechanism in coagulation genes. It is interesting to determine whether this translation-coupled surveillance system represents a general rule for the genes encoding components of the same physiological cascade. PMID:27279976

  20. Relationship of serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and haplotypes to mRNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Sarah L; Dodelzon, Katerina; Sandhu, Harinder K; Philibert, Robert A

    2005-07-01

    The serotonin transporter (5HTT; chromosomal location 17q12) is an important regulator of serotonergic neurotransmission and is the site of action for a number of antidepressant medications. Sequence variation at a VNTR known as the 5HTTLPR, which is 1.4 kb upstream of the translation start of 5HTT, has been associated in some studies with increased vulnerability to depression, neuroticism, and autism. Support for these clinical observations has included laboratory findings that 5HTTLPR variation is associated with changes in 5HTT gene translation. We re-examined these earlier laboratory findings by directly measuring 5HTT mRNA levels and genotyping four loci spanning the 5HTT gene using RNA and DNA prepared from 85 independent lymphoblast cell lines. Using this data, haplotypes were inferred and the resulting single point and haplotypes data analyzed by univariate and regression analyses. Consistent with the original findings, we found a significant effect of the 5HTTLPR on mRNA production. In contrast to previous reports, the effect on 5HTT mRNA production appeared to be mediated through an additive, not dominant, mechanism. Neither genotype nor haplotype at three other 5HTT loci were associated with alterations in mRNA production, although the small number of samples homozygous for the three most common haplotypes limits these findings. We conclude that further examination of the role of 5HTT sequence variation in regulating 5HTT mRNA production is warranted. PMID:15858822

  1. Embedding mRNA Stability in Correlation Analysis of Time-Series Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Lorenzo; De Santis, Alberto; Salvucci, Samanta; Morelli, Giorgio; Ruberti, Ida

    2008-01-01

    Current methods for the identification of putatively co-regulated genes directly from gene expression time profiles are based on the similarity of the time profile. Such association metrics, despite their central role in gene network inference and machine learning, have largely ignored the impact of dynamics or variation in mRNA stability. Here we introduce a simple, but powerful, new similarity metric called lead-lag R2 that successfully accounts for the properties of gene dynamics, including varying mRNA degradation and delays. Using yeast cell-cycle time-series gene expression data, we demonstrate that the predictive power of lead-lag R2 for the identification of co-regulated genes is significantly higher than that of standard similarity measures, thus allowing the selection of a large number of entirely new putatively co-regulated genes. Furthermore, the lead-lag metric can also be used to uncover the relationship between gene expression time-series and the dynamics of formation of multiple protein complexes. Remarkably, we found a high lead-lag R2 value among genes coding for a transient complex. PMID:18670596

  2. hnRNP-U enhances the expression of specific genes by stabilizing mRNA.

    PubMed

    Yugami, Masato; Kabe, Yasuaki; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Wada, Tadashi; Handa, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) are thought to be involved in pre-mRNA processing. hnRNP-U, also termed scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A), binds to pre-mRNA and nuclear matrix/scaffold attachment region DNA elements. However, its role in the regulation of gene expression is as yet poorly understood. In the present study, we show that hnRNP-U specifically enhances the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA by increasing its stability, possibly through binding to the 3' untranslated region. We also show that hnRNP-U enhances the expression of several other genes as well, including GADD45A, HEXIM1, HOXA2, IER3, NHLH2, and ZFY, by binding to and stabilizing these mRNAs. These results suggest that hnRNP-U enhances the expression of specific genes by regulating mRNA stability. PMID:17174306

  3. Comparison of Protamine 1 to Protamine 2 mRNA Ratio and YBX2 gene mRNA Content in Testicular Tissue of Fertile and Azoospermic Men

    PubMed Central

    Moghbelinejad, Sahar; Najafipour, Reza; Hashjin, Amir Samimi

    2015-01-01

    Background Although aberrant protamine (PRM) ratios have been observed in infertile men, the mechanisms that implicit the uncoupling of PRM1 and PRM2 expression remain unclear. To uncover these mechanisms, in this observational study we have compared the PRM1/PRM2 mRNA ratio and mRNA contents of two regulatory factors of these genes. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, sampling was performed by a multi-step method from 50 non-obstructive azoospermic and 12 normal men. After RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT- QPCR) was used to analyze the PRM1, PRM2, Y box binding protein 2 (YBX2) and JmjC-containing histone demethylase 2a (JHDM2A) genes in testicular biopsies of the studied samples. Results The PRM1/PRM2 mRNA ratio differed significantly among studied groups, namely 0.21 ± 0.13 in azoospermic samples and -0.8 ± 0.22 in fertile samples. The amount of PRM2 mRNA, significantly reduced in azoospermic patients. Azoospermic men exhibited significant under expression of YBX2 gene compared to controls (P<0.001). mRNA content of this gene showed a positive correlation with PRM mRNA ratio (R=0.6, P=0.007). JHDM2A gene expression ratio did not show any significant difference between the studied groups (P=0.3). We also observed no correlation between JHDM2A mRNA content and the PRM mRNA ratio (R=0.2, P=0.3). Conclusion We found significant correlation between the aberrant PRM ratio (PRM2 under expression) and lower YBX2 mRNA content in testicular biopsies of azoospermic men compared to controls, which suggested that downregulation of the YBX2 gene might be involved in PRM2 under expression. These molecules could be useful biomarkers for predicting male infertility. PMID:26644857

  4. Connecting protein and mRNA burst distributions for stochastic models of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgart, Vlad; Jia, Tao; Fenley, Andrew T.; Kulkarni, Rahul

    2011-08-01

    The intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression can lead to large variability in protein levels for genetically identical cells. Such variability in protein levels can arise from infrequent synthesis of mRNAs which in turn give rise to bursts of protein expression. Protein expression occurring in bursts has indeed been observed experimentally and recent studies have also found evidence for transcriptional bursting, i.e. production of mRNAs in bursts. Given that there are distinct experimental techniques for quantifying the noise at different stages of gene expression, it is of interest to derive analytical results connecting experimental observations at different levels. In this work, we consider stochastic models of gene expression for which mRNA and protein production occurs in independent bursts. For such models, we derive analytical expressions connecting protein and mRNA burst distributions which show how the functional form of the mRNA burst distribution can be inferred from the protein burst distribution. Additionally, if gene expression is repressed such that observed protein bursts arise only from single mRNAs, we show how observations of protein burst distributions (repressed and unrepressed) can be used to completely determine the mRNA burst distribution. Assuming independent contributions from individual bursts, we derive analytical expressions connecting means and variances for burst and steady-state protein distributions. Finally, we validate our general analytical results by considering a specific reaction scheme involving regulation of protein bursts by small RNAs. For a range of parameters, we derive analytical expressions for regulated protein distributions that are validated using stochastic simulations. The analytical results obtained in this work can thus serve as useful inputs for a broad range of studies focusing on stochasticity in gene expression.

  5. Unmasking Upstream Gene Expression Regulators with miRNA-corrected mRNA Data

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, Stephanie; Bu, Dengpan; Wang, Jiaqi; Bionaz, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Expressed micro-RNA (miRNA) affects messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance, hindering the accuracy of upstream regulator analysis. Our objective was to provide an algorithm to correct such bias. Large mRNA and miRNA analyses were performed on RNA extracted from bovine liver and mammary tissue. Using four levels of target scores from TargetScan (all miRNA:mRNA target gene pairs or only the top 25%, 50%, or 75%). Using four levels of target scores from TargetScan (all miRNA:mRNA target gene pairs or only the top 25%, 50%, or 75%) and four levels of the magnitude of miRNA effect (ME) on mRNA expression (30%, 50%, 75%, and 83% mRNA reduction), we generated 17 different datasets (including the original dataset). For each dataset, we performed upstream regulator analysis using two bioinformatics tools. We detected an increased effect on the upstream regulator analysis with larger miRNA:mRNA pair bins and higher ME. The miRNA correction allowed identification of several upstream regulators not present in the analysis of the original dataset. Thus, the proposed algorithm improved the prediction of upstream regulators. PMID:27279737

  6. Hypoxia-induced gene expression results from selective mRNA partitioning to the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Jonas J.; Naarmann-de Vries, Isabel S.; Ujvari, Stefanie J.; Klinger, Bertram; Kasim, Mumtaz; Benko, Edgar; Ostareck-Lederer, Antje; Ostareck, Dirk H.; Bondke Persson, Anja; Lorenzen, Stephan; Meier, Jochen C.; Blüthgen, Nils; Persson, Pontus B.; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Mrowka, Ralf; Fähling, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a primary energy-consuming process in the cell. Therefore, under hypoxic conditions, rapid inhibition of global mRNA translation represents a major protective strategy to maintain energy metabolism. How some mRNAs, especially those that encode crucial survival factors, continue to be efficiently translated in hypoxia is not completely understood. By comparing specific transcript levels in ribonucleoprotein complexes, cytoplasmic polysomes and endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound ribosomes, we show that the synthesis of proteins encoded by hypoxia marker genes is favoured at the ER in hypoxia. Gene expression profiling revealed that transcripts particularly increased by the HIF-1 transcription factor network show hypoxia-induced enrichment at the ER. We found that mRNAs favourably translated at the ER have higher conservation scores for both the 5′- and 3′-untranslated regions (UTRs) and contain less upstream initiation codons (uAUGs), indicating the significance of these sequence elements for sustained mRNA translation under hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, we found enrichment of specific cis-elements in mRNA 5′- as well as 3′-UTRs that mediate transcript localization to the ER in hypoxia. We conclude that transcriptome partitioning between the cytoplasm and the ER permits selective mRNA translation under conditions of energy shortage. PMID:25753659

  7. mRNA trans-splicing in gene therapy for genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Berger, Adeline; Maire, Séverine; Gaillard, Marie-Claude; Sahel, José-Alain; Hantraye, Philippe; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing, or SMaRT, is a promising strategy to design innovative gene therapy solutions for currently intractable genetic diseases. SMaRT relies on the correction of mutations at the post-transcriptional level by modifying the mRNA sequence. To achieve this, an exogenous RNA is introduced into the target cell, usually by means of gene transfer, to induce a splice event in trans between the exogenous RNA and the target endogenous pre-mRNA. This produces a chimeric mRNA composed partly of exons of the latter, and partly of exons of the former, encoding a sequence free of mutations. The principal challenge of SMaRT technology is to achieve a reaction as complete as possible, i.e., resulting in 100% repairing of the endogenous mRNA target. The proof of concept of SMaRT feasibility has already been established in several models of genetic diseases caused by recessive mutations. In such cases, in fact, the repair of only a portion of the mutant mRNA pool may be sufficient to obtain a significant therapeutic effect. However in the case of dominant mutations, the target cell must be freed from the majority of mutant mRNA copies, requiring a highly efficient trans-splicing reaction. This likely explains why only a few examples of SMaRT approaches targeting dominant mutations are reported in the literature. In this review, we explain in details the mechanism of trans-splicing, review the different strategies that are under evaluation to lead to efficient trans-splicing, and discuss the advantages and limitations of SMaRT. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:487-498. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1347 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27018401

  8. Contributions of transcription and mRNA decay to gene expression dynamics of fission yeast in response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Marguerat, Samuel; Lawler, Katherine; Brazma, Alvis; Bähler, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    The cooperation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels of control to shape gene regulation is only partially understood. Here we show that a combination of two simple and non-invasive genomic techniques, coupled with kinetic mathematical modeling, affords insight into the intricate dynamics of RNA regulation in response to oxidative stress in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This study reveals a dominant role of transcriptional regulation in response to stress, but also points to the first minutes after stress induction as a critical time when the coordinated control of mRNA turnover can support the control of transcription for rapid gene regulation. In addition, we uncover specialized gene expression strategies associated with distinct functional gene groups, such as simultaneous transcriptional repression and mRNA destabilization for genes encoding ribosomal proteins, delayed mRNA destabilization with varying contribution of transcription for ribosome biogenesis genes, dominant roles of mRNA stabilization for genes functioning in protein degradation, and adjustment of both transcription and mRNA turnover during the adaptation to stress. We also show that genes regulated independently of the bZIP transcription factor Atf1p are predominantly controlled by mRNA turnover, and identify putative cis-regulatory sequences that are associated with different gene expression strategies during the stress response. This study highlights the intricate and multi-faceted interplay between transcription and RNA turnover during the dynamic regulatory response to stress. PMID:25007214

  9. mRNA Expression of Ovine Angiopoietin-like Protein 4 Gene in Adipose Tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Jing, Jiong-Jie; Jia, Xia-Li; Qiao, Li-Ying; Liu, Jian-Hua; Liang, Chen; Liu, Wen-Zhong

    2016-05-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is involved in a variety of functions, including lipoprotein metabolism and angiogenesis. To reveal the role of ANGPTL4 in fat metabolism of sheep, ovine ANGPTL4 mRNA expression was analyzed in seven adipose tissues from two breeds with distinct tail types. Forty-eight animals with the gender ratio of 1:1 for both Guangling Large Tailed (GLT) and Small Tailed Han (STH) sheep were slaughtered at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 months of age, respectively. Adipose tissues were collected from greater and lesser omental, subcutaneous, retroperitoneal, perirenal, mesenteric, and tail fats. Ontogenetic mRNA expression of ANGPTL4 in these adipose tissues from GTL and STH was studied by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that ANGPTL4 mRNA expressed in all adipose tissues studied with the highest in subcutaneous and the lowest in mesenteric fat depots. Months of age, tissue and breed are the main factors that significantly influence the mRNA expression. These results provide new insights into ovine ANGPTL4 gene expression and clues for its function mechanism. PMID:26954186

  10. mRNA Expression of Ovine Angiopoietin-like Protein 4 Gene in Adipose Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Jing, Jiong-Jie; Jia, Xia-Li; Qiao, Li-Ying; Liu, Jian-Hua; Liang, Chen; Liu, Wen-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is involved in a variety of functions, including lipoprotein metabolism and angiogenesis. To reveal the role of ANGPTL4 in fat metabolism of sheep, ovine ANGPTL4 mRNA expression was analyzed in seven adipose tissues from two breeds with distinct tail types. Forty-eight animals with the gender ratio of 1:1 for both Guangling Large Tailed (GLT) and Small Tailed Han (STH) sheep were slaughtered at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 months of age, respectively. Adipose tissues were collected from greater and lesser omental, subcutaneous, retroperitoneal, perirenal, mesenteric, and tail fats. Ontogenetic mRNA expression of ANGPTL4 in these adipose tissues from GTL and STH was studied by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that ANGPTL4 mRNA expressed in all adipose tissues studied with the highest in subcutaneous and the lowest in mesenteric fat depots. Months of age, tissue and breed are the main factors that significantly influence the mRNA expression. These results provide new insights into ovine ANGPTL4 gene expression and clues for its function mechanism. PMID:26954186

  11. Gene structure, chromosomal location, and basis for alternative mRNA splicing of the human VCAM1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Cybulsky, M.I.; Fries, J.W.U.; Williams, A.J.; Sultan, P.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.; Collins, T. ); Eddy, R.; Byers, M.; Shows, T. )

    1991-09-01

    Vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) is a cell surface glycoprotein adhesive for certain blood leukocytes and tumor cells, which is expressed by activated endothelium in a variety of pathologic conditions including atherosclerosis. Genomic clones encoding the VCAM1 gene were isolated and the organization of the gene was determined. The gene, which is present in a single copy in the human genome, contains 9 exons spanning {approx}25 kilobases of DNA. Exons 2-8 contain C2 or H-type immunoglobulin domains. At least two different VCAM-1 precursors can be generated from the human gene as a result of alternative mRNA splicing events, which include or exclude exon 5. A consensus TATAA element is located upstream of the transcriptional start site. The VCAM1 promoter contains consensus binding sites for NF-{kappa}B, the GATA family of transcription factors, as well as an AP1 site. The VCAM1 gene was assigned to the 1p31-32 region of chromosome 1 based on the analysis of human-mouse hybrid cell lines and in situ hybridization. Structural analysis of the human VCAM1 gene provides the basis for alternative mRNA splicing and an initial approach to elucidating the regulation of VCAM-1 expression.

  12. mRNA expression profiles of calmodulin and liver receptor homolog-1 genes in chickens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z-C; Xiao, L-H; Wang, Y; Chen, S-Y; Yang, Z-Q; Zhao, X-L; Zhu, Q; Liu, Y-P

    2012-01-01

    Calmodulin (CALM), a calcium-binding protein, is expressed in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis; it plays a pivotal role in the reproductive system by regulating gonadotropin-releasing hormone signaling. Downstream of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal signaling pathways, liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) is involved in female gonadal hormone synthesis. In the chicken, although the two genes are known to be associated with reproductive traits, the interaction between gonadotropins and gonadal steroids remains unclear. We used quantitative real-time PCR to quantify the tissular (hypothalamus, pituitary, ovary, liver, kidney, oviduct, heart) and ontogenetic (12, 18, 32, and 45 weeks) mRNA expression profiles of CALM and LRH-1 in Erlang Mountainous chickens to determine their roles in the endocrine control of fertility, and compared these profiles with expression in Roman chickens. We found that the relative expressions of CALM and LRH-1 genes had the highest levels in the pituitary and ovary at 32 weeks. The expression level of CALM mRNA in the pituitary of Roman chickens was significantly higher than that in Erlang Mountainous chickens at 32 and 45 weeks, while the LRH-1 transcript level in the ovaries of Roman chickens was significantly lower than that of Erlang Mountainous chickens at 32 and 45 weeks. In summary, the transcript levels of CALM and LRH-1 genes are associated with chicken reproductive traits; in addition, we found that the CALM gene is the key regulator in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal signaling network. PMID:23079841

  13. Genomic Analysis and mRNA Expression of Equine Type I Interferon Genes

    PubMed Central

    Detournay, Olivier; Morrison, David A.; Wagner, Bettina; Zarnegar, Behdad

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying all of the type I interferon (IFN) genes of the horse and at monitoring their expression in equine cells on in vitro induction. We identified 32 putative type I IFN loci on horse chromosome 23 and an unplaced genomic scaffold. A phylogentic analysis characterized these into 8 different type I IFN classes, that is, putative functional genes for 6 IFN-α, 4 IFN-β, 8 IFN-ω (plus 4 pseudogenes), 3 IFN-δ (plus 1 pseudogene), 1 IFN-κ and 1 IFN-ɛ, plus 1 IFN-ν pseudogene, and 3 loci belonging to what has previously been called IFN-αω. Our analyses indicate that the IFN-αω genes are quite distinct from both IFN-α and IFN-ω, and we refer to this type I IFN as IFN-μ. Results from cell cultures showed that leukocytes readily expressed IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-δ, IFN-μ, and IFN-ω mRNA on induction with, for example, live virus; while fibroblasts only expressed IFN-β mRNA on stimulation. IFN-κ or IFN-ɛ expression was not consistently induced in these cell cultures. Thus, the equine type I IFN family comprised 8 classes, 7 of which had putative functional genes, and mRNA expression of 5 was induced in vitro. Moreover, a relatively low number of IFN-α subtypes was found in the horse compared with other eutherian mammals. PMID:23772953

  14. Nuclear gene silencing directs reception of long-distance mRNA silencing in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Brosnan, C A; Mitter, N; Christie, M; Smith, N A; Waterhouse, P M; Carroll, B J

    2007-09-11

    In plants, silencing of mRNA can be transmitted from cell to cell and also over longer distances from roots to shoots. To investigate the long-distance mechanism, WT and mutant shoots were grafted onto roots silenced for an mRNA. We show that three genes involved in a chromatin silencing pathway, NRPD1a encoding RNA polymerase IVa, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 2 (RDR2), and DICER-like 3 (DCL3), are required for reception of long-distance mRNA silencing in the shoot. A mutant representing a fourth gene in the pathway, argonaute4 (ago4), was also partially compromised in the reception of silencing. This pathway produces 24-nt siRNAs and resulted in decapped RNA, a known substrate for amplification of dsRNA by RDR6. Activation of silencing in grafted shoots depended on RDR6, but no 24-nt siRNAs were detected in mutant rdr6 shoots, indicating that RDR6 also plays a role in initial signal perception. After amplification of decapped transcripts, DCL4 and DCL2 act hierarchically as they do in antiviral resistance to produce 21- and 22-nt siRNAs, respectively, and these guide mRNA degradation. Several dcl genotypes were also tested for their capacity to transmit the mobile silencing signal from the rootstock. dcl1-8 and a dcl2 dcl3 dcl4 triple mutant are compromised in micro-RNA and siRNA biogenesis, respectively, but were unaffected in signal transmission. PMID:17785412

  15. RNA editing by G-nucleotide insertion in mumps virus P-gene mRNA transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, R G; Lamb, R A

    1990-01-01

    A guanine nucleotide insertion event has been shown to occur at a specific site within mumps virus P-gene mRNA transcripts. The region of the mRNA containing the site expected to be used for RNA editing and the complementary portion of the genomic RNA were cloned, and their nucleotide sequences were obtained. The genomic RNA was found to possess six C residues at the insertion site, whereas 63% of the P-gene-specific mRNA transcripts were found to have from two to five G residues inserted at this position in the RNA. An unedited mRNA was shown to encode the mumps virus cysteine-rich protein V, and mRNA transcripts containing two and four inserted G residues were translated to yield the mumps virus P and I proteins, respectively. Images PMID:2166809

  16. DNA Micelle Flares for Intracellular mRNA Imaging and Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Sam Wu, Cuichen; Jimenez, Elizabeth; Zhu, Zhi; Dajac, Joshua G.; You, Mingxu; Han, Da

    2013-01-01

    Multifunctional DNA micelles: Molecular beacon micelle flares (MBMFs), based on diacyllipid-molecular beacon conjugate (L-MB) self-assembly, have been developed for combined mRNA detection and gene therapy. The advantages of these micelle flares include easy probe synthesis, efficient cellular uptake, enhanced enzymatic stability, high signal-to-background ratio, excellent target selectivity, and superior biocompatibility. In addition, these probes possess a hydrophobic cavity that can be used for additional hydrophobic agents, holding great promise for constructing an all-in-one nucleic acid probe. PMID:23319350

  17. Promoter Methylation and mRNA Expression of Response Gene to Complement 32 in Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Eskandari-Nasab, Ebrahim; Hashemi, Mohammad; Rafighdoost, Firoozeh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Response gene to complement 32 (RGC32), induced by activation of complements, has been characterized as a cell cycle regulator; however, its role in carcinogenesis is still controversial. In the present study we compared RGC32 promoter methylation patterns and mRNA expression in breast cancerous tissues and adjacent normal tissues. Materials and Methods. Sixty-three breast cancer tissues and 63 adjacent nonneoplastic tissues were included in our study. Design. Nested methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (Nested-MSP) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) were used to determine RGC32 promoter methylation status and its mRNA expression levels, respectively. Results. RGC32 methylation pattern was not different between breast cancerous tissue and adjacent nonneoplastic tissue (OR = 2.30, 95% CI = 0.95–5.54). However, qPCR analysis displayed higher levels of RGC32 mRNA in breast cancerous tissues than in noncancerous tissues (1.073 versus 0.959; P = 0.001), irrespective of the promoter methylation status. The expression levels and promoter methylation of RGC32 were not correlated with any of patients' clinical characteristics (P > 0.05). Conclusion. Our findings confirmed upregulation of RGC32 in breast cancerous tumors, but it was not associated with promoter methylation patterns. PMID:27118972

  18. Identification of cold acclimated genes in leaves of Citrus unshiu by mRNA differential display.

    PubMed

    Lang, Ping; Zhang, Can-Kui; Ebel, Robert C; Dane, Fenny; Dozier, William A

    2005-10-10

    Citrus unshiu is freeze tolerant to -10 degrees C when fully acclimated after exposure to cold, nonfreezing temperatures. To gain an understanding of its cold tolerance mechanism, mRNA differential display reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (DDRT-PCR) and quantitative relative RT-PCR were used to study gene expression under a gradual cold-acclimation temperature regime. Six up-regulated and two down regulated genes were identified based on their amino acid sequences. The identified proteins encoded by the up-regulated genes were: 14-3-3 protein, 40S ribosomal protein S23, putative 60S ribosomal protein L15, nucleoside diphosphate kinase III protein, regulator of chromosome condensation-like protein, and amino acid permease 6. The proteins encoded by the two down-regulated genes were: miraculin-like protein and beta-galactosidase. Their individual function has been briefly reviewed based on published information. In addition to the findings in this study, we compared the function of cold responsive genes of Poncirus trifoliata, a very cold hardy relative of Citrus species that is freeze tolerant to -30 degrees C when fully acclimated, to the function of genes in the current study. PMID:16125877

  19. Identification of Powdery Mildew Responsive Genes in Hevea brasiliensis through mRNA Differential Display

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Bi, Zhenghong; Di, Rong; Liang, Peng; He, Qiguang; Liu, Wenbo; Miao, Weiguo; Zheng, Fucong

    2016-01-01

    Powdery mildew is an important disease of rubber trees caused by Oidium heveae B. A. Steinmann. As far as we know, none of the resistance genes related to powdery mildew have been isolated from the rubber tree. There is little information available at the molecular level regarding how a rubber tree develops defense mechanisms against this pathogen. We have studied rubber tree mRNA transcripts from the resistant RRIC52 cultivar by differential display analysis. Leaves inoculated with the spores of O. heveae were collected from 0 to 120 hpi in order to identify pathogen-regulated genes at different infection stages. We identified 78 rubber tree genes that were differentially expressed during the plant–pathogen interaction. BLAST analysis for these 78 ESTs classified them into seven functional groups: cell wall and membrane pathways, transcription factor and regulatory proteins, transporters, signal transduction, phytoalexin biosynthesis, other metabolism functions, and unknown functions. The gene expression for eight of these genes was validated by qRT-PCR in both RRIC52 and the partially susceptible Reyan 7-33-97 cultivars, revealing the similar or differential changes of gene expressions between these two cultivars. This study has improved our overall understanding of the molecular mechanisms of rubber tree resistance to powdery mildew. PMID:26840302

  20. Identification of Powdery Mildew Responsive Genes in Hevea brasiliensis through mRNA Differential Display.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Bi, Zhenghong; Di, Rong; Liang, Peng; He, Qiguang; Liu, Wenbo; Miao, Weiguo; Zheng, Fucong

    2016-01-01

    Powdery mildew is an important disease of rubber trees caused by Oidium heveae B. A. Steinmann. As far as we know, none of the resistance genes related to powdery mildew have been isolated from the rubber tree. There is little information available at the molecular level regarding how a rubber tree develops defense mechanisms against this pathogen. We have studied rubber tree mRNA transcripts from the resistant RRIC52 cultivar by differential display analysis. Leaves inoculated with the spores of O. heveae were collected from 0 to 120 hpi in order to identify pathogen-regulated genes at different infection stages. We identified 78 rubber tree genes that were differentially expressed during the plant-pathogen interaction. BLAST analysis for these 78 ESTs classified them into seven functional groups: cell wall and membrane pathways, transcription factor and regulatory proteins, transporters, signal transduction, phytoalexin biosynthesis, other metabolism functions, and unknown functions. The gene expression for eight of these genes was validated by qRT-PCR in both RRIC52 and the partially susceptible Reyan 7-33-97 cultivars, revealing the similar or differential changes of gene expressions between these two cultivars. This study has improved our overall understanding of the molecular mechanisms of rubber tree resistance to powdery mildew. PMID:26840302

  1. Herpes simplex virus infection selectively stimulates accumulation of beta interferon reporter gene mRNA by a posttranscriptional mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, J D; Pitha, P M; Hayward, G S

    1992-01-01

    To study the mechanism of a novel herpes simplex virus (HSV) activity that stimulates expression of reporter genes containing beta interferon (IFN-beta)-coding sequences, we have established permanent DNA-transfected cell lines that each contain two distinct hybrid genes encoding mRNA species with different half-lives. These reporter genes comprised either the human IFN-beta- or bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT)-coding and 3' untranslated regions placed under the transcriptional control of the powerful major immediate-early promoter-enhancer region (IE94) from simian cytomegalovirus. Most of the dual-transfected cell lines yielded significant levels of steady-state IE94-CAT mRNA and abundant constitutive synthesis of CAT enzyme activity, whereas no accumulation of IE94-IFN mRNA could be detected. However, infection with HSV type 1 resulted in a 300-fold increase in IE94-IFN-specific mRNA transcripts, compared with no more than 3- to 5-fold stimulation of IE94-CAT-specific mRNA. In contrast, cycloheximide treatment increased stable mRNA levels and transcription initiation rates from both the IE94-IFN and IE94-CAT hybrid genes. Run-on transcription assays in isolated nuclei suggested that induction of IE94-IFN gene expression by HSV type 1 occurred predominantly at the posttranscriptional level. Enhancement of the unstable IFN mRNA species after HSV infection was also observed in cell lines containing a simian virus 40 enhancer-driven IFN gene (SV2-IFN). Similarly, in transient-transfection assays, both SV2-IFN and IE94-IFN gave only low basal mRNA synthesis, but superinfection with HSV again led to high-level accumulation of IFN mRNA. Finally, substitution of the SV2-IFN gene 3' region with poly(A) and splicing signals from the SV2-CAT gene cassette led to stabilization of the IFN mRNA even in the absence of HSV. Therefore, we conclude that HSV infection leads to selective accumulation of IFN-beta mRNA by a posttranscriptional mechanism that is

  2. Immunochemical isolation of gamma-globulin mRNA and estimation of immunoglobulin gene reiteration.

    PubMed

    Muto, M

    1977-01-01

    The polyribosomes synthesizing gamma-globulin have been isolated by the achievement of specific precipitation using bentonite-treated anti-IgG antibody. The RNA extracted from the immunochemically precipitated polysomes was tested for its ability to direct the synthesis of proteins in a cell-free system. The specific gamma-globulin-synthesizing activity (cpm of gamma-globulin synthesized/microgram RNA) of this RNA was 10-fold greater than that from total polysomes. gamma-globulin mRNA (messenger RNA) isolated by immunoprecipitation was more than 89% pure with respect to contamination by other species of mRNA. The products synthesized by the cell-free system were also analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulphate(SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This RNA has been hybridized with mouse myeloma DNA. The estimation of immunoglobulin gene reiteration was carried out using hybridization kinetics with consideration given to the DNA/RNA ratio since the estimation from the "half Cot value" is not accurate. The results suggest that in the mouse there are about 20 copies per subgroup of genes coding for the variable region of the H and L chains. PMID:927224

  3. Overexpression of p53 mRNA in colorectal cancer and its relationship to p53 gene mutation.

    PubMed Central

    el-Mahdani, N.; Vaillant, J. C.; Guiguet, M.; Prévot, S.; Bertrand, V.; Bernard, C.; Parc, R.; Béréziat, G.; Hermelin, B.

    1997-01-01

    We analysed the frequency of p53 mRNA overexpression in a series of 109 primary colorectal carcinomas and its association with p53 gene mutation, which has been correlated with short survival. Sixty-nine of the 109 cases (63%) demonstrated p53 mRNA overexpression, without any correlation with stage or site of disease. Comparison with p53 gene mutation indicated that, besides cases in which p53 gene mutation and p53 mRNA overexpression were either both present (40 cases) or both absent (36 cases), there were also cases in which p53 mRNA was overexpressed in the absence of any mutation (29 cases) and those with a mutant gene in which the mRNA was not overexpressed (four cases). Moreover, the mutant p53 tumours exhibited an increase of p53 mRNA expression, which was significantly higher in tumours expressing the mutated allele alone than in tumours expressing both wild- and mutated-type alleles. These data (1) show that p53 mRNA overexpression is a frequent event in colorectal tumours and is not predictive of the status of the gene, i.e. whether or not a mutation is present; (2) provide further evidence that p53 protein overexpression does not only result from an increase in the half-life of mutated p53 and suggest that inactivation of the p53 function in colorectal cancers involves at least two distinct mechanisms, including p53 overexpression and/or mutation; and (3) suggest that p53 mRNA overexpression is an early event, since it is not correlated with Dukes stage. PMID:9052405

  4. mRNA expression levels of hypoxia-induced and stem cell-associated genes in human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Bache, Matthias; Rot, Swetlana; Keßler, Jacqueline; Güttler, Antje; Wichmann, Henri; Greither, Thomas; Wach, Sven; Taubert, Helge; Söling, Ariane; Bilkenroth, Udo; Kappler, Matthias; Vordermark, Dirk

    2015-06-01

    The roles of hypoxia-induced and stem cell-associated genes in the development of malignancy and tumour progression are well known. However, there are a limited number of studies analysing the impact of mRNA expression levels of hypoxia-induced and stem cell-associated genes in the tissues of brain tumours and glioblastoma patients. In this study, tumour tissues from patients with glioblastoma multiforme and tumour adjacent tissues were analysed. We investigated mRNA expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α), carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) and osteopontin (OPN), and stem cell-associated genes survivin, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), Nanog and octamer binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4) using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Our data revealed higher mRNA expression levels of hypoxia-induced and stem cell-associated genes in tumour tissue than levels in the tumour adjacent tissues in patients with glioblastoma multiforme. A strong positive correlation between the mRNA expression levels of HIF-2α, CA9, VEGF, GLUT-1 and OPN suggests a specific hypoxia-associated profile of mRNA expression in glioblastoma multiforme. Additionally, the results indicate the role of stem-cell-related genes in tumour hypoxia. Kaplan-Maier analysis revealed that high mRNA expression levels of hypoxia-induced markers showed a trend towards shorter overall survival in glioblastoma patients (P=0.061). Our data suggest that mRNA expression levels of hypoxia-induced genes are important tumour markers in patients with glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:25963717

  5. The cellular growth rate controls overall mRNA turnover, and modulates either transcription or degradation rates of particular gene regulons

    PubMed Central

    García-Martínez, José; Delgado-Ramos, Lidia; Ayala, Guillermo; Pelechano, Vicent; Medina, Daniel A.; Carrasco, Fany; González, Ramón; Andrés-León, Eduardo; Steinmetz, Lars; Warringer, Jonas; Chávez, Sebastián; Pérez-Ortín, José E.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed 80 different genomic experiments, and found a positive correlation between both RNA polymerase II transcription and mRNA degradation with growth rates in yeast. Thus, in spite of the marked variation in mRNA turnover, the total mRNA concentration remained approximately constant. Some genes, however, regulated their mRNA concentration by uncoupling mRNA stability from the transcription rate. Ribosome-related genes modulated their transcription rates to increase mRNA levels under fast growth. In contrast, mitochondria-related and stress-induced genes lowered mRNA levels by reducing mRNA stability or the transcription rate, respectively. We also detected these regulations within the heterogeneity of a wild-type cell population growing in optimal conditions. The transcriptomic analysis of sorted microcolonies confirmed that the growth rate dictates alternative expression programs by modulating transcription and mRNA decay. The regulation of overall mRNA turnover keeps a constant ratio between mRNA decay and the dilution of [mRNA] caused by cellular growth. This regulation minimizes the indiscriminate transmission of mRNAs from mother to daughter cells, and favors the response capacity of the latter to physiological signals and environmental changes. We also conclude that, by uncoupling mRNA synthesis from decay, cells control the mRNA abundance of those gene regulons that characterize fast and slow growth. PMID:26717982

  6. The cellular growth rate controls overall mRNA turnover, and modulates either transcription or degradation rates of particular gene regulons.

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, José; Delgado-Ramos, Lidia; Ayala, Guillermo; Pelechano, Vicent; Medina, Daniel A; Carrasco, Fany; González, Ramón; Andrés-León, Eduardo; Steinmetz, Lars; Warringer, Jonas; Chávez, Sebastián; Pérez-Ortín, José E

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed 80 different genomic experiments, and found a positive correlation between both RNA polymerase II transcription and mRNA degradation with growth rates in yeast. Thus, in spite of the marked variation in mRNA turnover, the total mRNA concentration remained approximately constant. Some genes, however, regulated their mRNA concentration by uncoupling mRNA stability from the transcription rate. Ribosome-related genes modulated their transcription rates to increase mRNA levels under fast growth. In contrast, mitochondria-related and stress-induced genes lowered mRNA levels by reducing mRNA stability or the transcription rate, respectively. We also detected these regulations within the heterogeneity of a wild-type cell population growing in optimal conditions. The transcriptomic analysis of sorted microcolonies confirmed that the growth rate dictates alternative expression programs by modulating transcription and mRNA decay.The regulation of overall mRNA turnover keeps a constant ratio between mRNA decay and the dilution of [mRNA] caused by cellular growth. This regulation minimizes the indiscriminate transmission of mRNAs from mother to daughter cells, and favors the response capacity of the latter to physiological signals and environmental changes. We also conclude that, by uncoupling mRNA synthesis from decay, cells control the mRNA abundance of those gene regulons that characterize fast and slow growth. PMID:26717982

  7. Regulation of adeno-associated virus gene expression in 293 cells: control of mRNA abundance and translation

    SciTech Connect

    Trempe, J.P.; Carter, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    The authors studied the effects of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) rep gene on the control of gene expression from the AAV p/sub 40/ promoter in 293 cells in the absence of an adenovirus coinfection. AAV vectors containing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene were used to measure the levels of cat expression and steady-state mRNA from p/sub 40/. When the rep gene was present in cis or in trans, cat expression from p/sub 40/ was decreased 3- to 10-fold, but there was a 2- to 10-fold increase in the level of p/sub 40/ mRNA. Conversely, cat expression increased and the p/sub 40/ mRNA level decreased in the absence of the rep gene. Both wild-type and carboxyl-terminal truncated Rep proteins were capable of eliciting both effects. These data suggest two roles for the pleiotropic AAV rep gene: as a translational inhibitor and as a positive regulator of p/sub 40/ mRNA levels. They also provide additional evidence for a cis-acting negative regulatory region which decreases RNA from the AAV p/sub 5/ promoter in a fashion independent of rep.

  8. No detectable reiteration of genes coding for mouse MOPC 41 immunoglobulin light-chain mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Farace, M G; Aellen, M F; Briand, P A; Faust, C H; Vassalli, P; Mach, B

    1976-01-01

    RNA fractions rich in immunoglobulin light (L)-chain mRNA were isolated from mouse myeloma MOPC 41 by procedures previously described, and chemically labeled with 125I. These RNA fractions were hybridized with MOPC 41 DNA under conditions of DNA excess. Hybridization conditions were chosen under which the entire sequence of the L-chain mRNA probe, thus including the variable region, remains available for hybridization throughout the reaction. The hybridization (C0t) curve showed double transition kinetics, with one component corresponding to about 250 gene copies and the other to about two to four copies. In contrast, when MOPC 41 L-chain mRNA was further purified as a single band by gel elecptrophoresis in 99% formamide, the hybridization curve showed only a single transition, corresponding to about two to four genes, with the disappearance of the "reiterated" component. That component resulted therefore from contaminating RNA species. The data indicate that no reiteration can be detected by RNase or by hydroxylapatite for the genes corresponding to the entire sequence of MOPC 41 L-chain mRNA, including the untranslated segments, within the limits of detectability of short reiterated segments. It thus appears that there is only one or very few genes corresponding to the 41 L-chain variable region "subgroup" in MOPC 41 DNA. The possibility that the variable genes of plasmocytes might result frm a combination of several nonreiterated germline genes is discussed. Images PMID:815907

  9. Isolation of genes involved in colorectal metastasis by differential display of mRNA species

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, C.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Antalis, T.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic events that give rise to malignant colorectal tumors have been determined in some detail. Much less is known about the genes involved in metastasis of these neoplasms. A useful resource to study this process is the pair of cell lines, SW480 and SW620, which are derived from the primary and metastatic components, respectively, of the same colorectal tumor. We are using the method of differential display of mRNA species to isolate genes that are differentially expressed in these two cell lines. Differential display is carried out in triplicate, using three different RNA extractions from each cell line. Only fragments that are consistently up- or down-regulated in one cell line compared to another are examined further. Less than 1% of fragments are differentially expressed. These are cloned, sequenced, and used for Northern blot and reverse transcriptase-PCR in order to examine their differential expression further. The RNA sources for this expression analysis are (i) SW480 and SW620 cells, (ii) other pairs of primary and metastatic colorectal cell lines, (iii) primary and metastatic tissue from patients with colorectal cancer.

  10. Molecular cloning and mRNA expression analysis of sheep MYL3 and MYL4 genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunlan; Wang, Jianmin; Wang, Guizhi; Ji, Zhibin; Hou, Lei; Liu, Zhaohua; Chao, Tianle

    2016-02-15

    Using longissimus dorsi muscles of Dorper sheep as the experimental materials, the complete cDNAs of ovine MYL3 (Myosin light chain 3) and MYL4 (Myosin light chain 4) genes were cloned using RT-PCR, 5' RACE and 3' RACE. We obtained 925-bp and 869-bp full-length cDNAs and submitted their sequences to GenBank as accession numbers of KJ710703 and KJ768855, respectively. The cDNAs contained 600-bp and 582-bp open reading frames (ORFs) and encoded proteins comprising 199 and 193 amino acid residues, respectively. Neither protein was predicted to have a signal peptide, but both were predicted to have several N-glycosylation, O-glycosylation, and phosphorylation sites. The secondary structures of MYL3 and MYL4 were predicted to be 40.70% and 48.70% α- helical, respectively. Sequence alignment showed that the MYL3 and MYL4 proteins of Ovis aries both shared more than 91% amino acid sequence similarity with those of Mus musculus, Homo sapiens, Rattus norvegicus, Bos taurus, and Sus scrofa. The levels of MYL3 and MYL4 mRNA in various sheep tissues were determined using qRT-PCR. The results showed that both mRNAs were highly expressed in the heart. This study has established a foundation for further investigation of the ovine MYL3 and MYL4 genes. PMID:26656596

  11. The full-length transcript of a caulimovirus is a polycistronic mRNA whose genes are trans activated by the product of gene VI.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, H B; Gowda, S; Wu, F C; Shepherd, R J

    1992-05-01

    Gene expression of figwort mosaic virus (FMV), a caulimovirus, was investigated by electroporation of Nicotiana edwardsonii cell suspension protoplasts with cloned viral constructs in which a reporter gene was inserted at various positions on the genome. The results showed that the genome of FMV contains two promoters; one is used for the production of a full-length RNA and another initiates synthesis of a separate monocistronic RNA for gene VI. Evidence is provided that the full-length transcript, the probable template for reverse transcription, can serve as a polycistronic mRNA for translation of genes I through V and perhaps also gene VI. Expression of all the genes on the polycistronic mRNA is trans activated by the gene VI protein. Reporter gene expression appears most efficient when its start codon is in close proximity to the stop codon of the preceding gene, as for the native genes of caulimoviruses. We propose that the gene VI product enables expression of the polycistronic mRNA by promoting reinitiation of ribosomes to give translational coupling of individual genes. PMID:1560539

  12. Reduced XPC DNA repair gene mRNA levels in clinically normal parents of xeroderma pigmentosum patients.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sikandar G; Oh, Kyu-Seon; Shahlavi, Tala; Ueda, Takahiro; Busch, David B; Inui, Hiroki; Emmert, Steffen; Imoto, Kyoko; Muniz-Medina, Vanessa; Baker, Carl C; DiGiovanna, John J; Schmidt, Deborah; Khadavi, Arash; Metin, Ahmet; Gozukara, Engin; Slor, Hanoch; Sarasin, Alain; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2006-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XP-C) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. Patients with two mutant alleles of the XPC DNA repair gene have sun sensitivity and a 1000-fold increase in skin cancers. Clinically normal parents of XP-C patients have one mutant allele and one normal allele. As a step toward evaluating cancer risk in these XPC heterozygotes we characterized cells from 16 XP families. We identified 15 causative mutations (5 frameshift, 6 nonsense and 4 splicing) in the XPC gene in cells from 16 XP probands. All had premature termination codons (PTC) and absence of normal XPC protein on western blotting. The cell lines from 26 parents were heterozygous for the same mutations. We employed a real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR assay as a rapid and sensitive method to measure XPC mRNA levels. The mean XPC mRNA levels in the cell lines from the XP-C probands were 24% (P<10(-7)) of that in 10 normal controls. This reduced XPC mRNA level in cells from XP-C patients was caused by the PTC that induces nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. The mean XPC mRNA levels in cell lines from the heterozygous XP-C carriers were intermediate (59%, P=10(-4)) between the values for the XP patients and the normal controls. This study demonstrates reduced XPC mRNA levels in XP-C patients and heterozygotes. Thus, XPC mRNA levels may be evaluated as a marker of cancer susceptibility in carriers of mutations in the XPC gene. PMID:16081512

  13. mRNA deep sequencing reveals 75 new genes and a complex transcriptional landscape in Mimivirus.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Matthieu; Audic, Stéphane; Poirot, Olivier; Hingamp, Pascal; Seltzer, Virginie; Byrne, Deborah; Lartigue, Audrey; Lescot, Magali; Bernadac, Alain; Poulain, Julie; Abergel, Chantal; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2010-05-01

    Mimivirus, a virus infecting Acanthamoeba, is the prototype of the Mimiviridae, the latest addition to the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses. The Mimivirus genome encodes close to 1000 proteins, many of them never before encountered in a virus, such as four amino-acyl tRNA synthetases. To explore the physiology of this exceptional virus and identify the genes involved in the building of its characteristic intracytoplasmic "virion factory," we coupled electron microscopy observations with the massively parallel pyrosequencing of the polyadenylated RNA fractions of Acanthamoeba castellanii cells at various time post-infection. We generated 633,346 reads, of which 322,904 correspond to Mimivirus transcripts. This first application of deep mRNA sequencing (454 Life Sciences [Roche] FLX) to a large DNA virus allowed the precise delineation of the 5' and 3' extremities of Mimivirus mRNAs and revealed 75 new transcripts including several noncoding RNAs. Mimivirus genes are expressed across a wide dynamic range, in a finely regulated manner broadly described by three main temporal classes: early, intermediate, and late. This RNA-seq study confirmed the AAAATTGA sequence as an early promoter element, as well as the presence of palindromes at most of the polyadenylation sites. It also revealed a new promoter element correlating with late gene expression, which is also prominent in Sputnik, the recently described Mimivirus "virophage." These results-validated genome-wide by the hybridization of total RNA extracted from infected Acanthamoeba cells on a tiling array (Agilent)--will constitute the foundation on which to build subsequent functional studies of the Mimivirus/Acanthamoeba system. PMID:20360389

  14. Brain-derived peptides increase blood-brain barrier GLUT1 glucose transporter gene expression via mRNA stabilization.

    PubMed

    Boado, R J

    1998-10-23

    The present investigation studied the effect of the brain-derived peptide preparation Cerebrolysin (CI, EBEWE, Austria) on the turnover rate and gene expression of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) GLUT1 glucose transporter mRNA. Studies were performed in brain endothelial cultured cells transfected with the human (h) GLUT1 transcript. In control cells, the full length 2.8 Kb hGLUT1 mRNA was rapidly degraded following transfection, and the abundance of this transcript at 4 and 6 h was comparable to background mRNA levels seen in cells transfected without hGLUT1 mRNA. On the contrary, the decay of the hGLUT1 mRNA was stabilized in CI-treated cells resulting in a marked reduction in the fractional turnover rate (72.4 and 4.0%/h, control and CI, respectively). In parallel experiments, CI induced a significant increase in the levels of immunoreactive GLUT1 protein measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In conclusion, data presented here demonstrate that factors in CI increase BBB-GLUT1 transcript stability, and that this is associated with an induction of BBB-GLUT1 gene expression in brain endothelial cultured cells. PMID:9832194

  15. Nuclear receptor and target gene mRNA abundance in duodenum and colon of dogs with chronic enteropathies.

    PubMed

    Greger, D L; Gropp, F; Morel, C; Sauter, S; Blum, J W

    2006-11-01

    Nuclear receptors (NR), such as constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), pregnane X receptor (PXR) and peroxisome proliferator-associated receptors alpha and gamma (PPARalpha, PPARgamma) are mediators of inflammation and may be involved in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and food responsive diarrhea (FRD) of dogs. The present study compared mRNA abundance of NR and NR target genes [multi drug-resistance gene-1 (MDR1), multiple drug-resistance-associated proteins (MRD2, MRD3), cytochrome P450 (CYP3A12), phenol-sulfating phenol sulfotransferase (SULT1A1) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST A3-3)] in biopsies obtained from duodenum and colon of dogs with IBD and FRD and healthy control dogs (CON; n=7 per group). Upon first presentation of dogs, mRNA levels of PPARalpha, PPARgamma, CAR, PXR and RXRalpha in duodenum as well as PPARgamma, CAR, PXR and RXRalpha in colon were not different among groups (P>0.10). Although mRNA abundance of PPARalpha in colon of dogs with FRD was similar in both IBD and CON (P>0.10), PPARalpha mRNA abundance was higher in IBD than CON (P<0.05). Levels of mRNA of MDR1 in duodenum were higher in FRD than IBD (P<0.05) or CON (P<0.001). Compared with CON, abundances of mRNA for MRP2, CYP3A12 and SULT1A1 were higher in both FRD and IBD than CON (P<0.05). Differences in mRNA levels of PPARalpha and MRP2 in colon and MDR1, MRP2, CYP3A12 and SULT1A1 in duodenum may be indicative for enteropathy in FRD and (or) IBD dogs relative to healthy dogs. More importantly, increased expression of MDR1 in FRD relative to IBD in duodenum may be a useful diagnostic marker to distinguish dogs with FRD from dogs with IBD. PMID:16446074

  16. In Vitro Synthesis, Delivery, and Bioavailability of Exogenous mRNA in Gene Transfer Mediated by PiggyBac Transposition.

    PubMed

    Bire, Solenne; Ishac, Nicole; Rouleux-Bonnin, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, nonviral gene transfer is currently of great importance for introducing exogenous genes into genomes and for ensuring that transgene expression is suitable for therapeutic and bioproduction purposes. The piggyBac transposon-based system is particularly interesting since it is easy to engineer and has a large cargo capacity, up to 100 kb. In its setup, the system requires only the piggyBac transposase protein and the transgene delineated by the two piggyBac-specific inverted terminal repeats. Usually the source of transposase is carried by a DNA plasmid. However, the principal drawback of this method is the lasting presence of the transposase, due to episomal persistence or possible integration of the transposase gene vector into the cell's genome. This can lead to genotoxic effects such as multiple genomic integration events and remobilization of the transposon vector once it has been integrated. One alternative to improve the safety of the system is to deliver the transposase as in vitro-synthesized messenger RNA in order to define a very narrow expression window during which a one-shot transposition process would occur. Issues that can be encountered when working on mRNA cell transfer are related to the quality of the synthetic mRNA, the system used to introduce mRNA into the cells and the bioavailability of the mRNA molecules. Here we describe a method to produce mRNA, verify its quality, determine which transfecting reagents can be used and how this mRNA is available to promote the transposition process in HeLa cells. Additionally, we illustrate this method in stromal mesenchymal cell lines in order to support hematopoiesis. PMID:27236801

  17. Characterization of the ptr5{sup +} gene involved in nuclear mRNA export in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Nobuyoshi; Ikeda, Terumasa; Mizuki, Fumitaka; Tani, Tokio

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We cloned the ptr5{sup +} gene involved in nuclear mRNA export in fission yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ptr5{sup +} gene was found to encode nucleoporin 85 (Nup85). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Seh1p and Mlo3p are multi-copy suppressors for the ptr5 mutation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ptr5p/Nup85p functions in nuclear mRNA export through the mRNA export factor Rae1p. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ptr5p/Nup85p interacts genetically with pre-mRNA splicing factors. -- Abstract: To analyze the mechanisms of mRNA export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, we have isolated eleven mutants, ptr [poly(A){sup +} RNA transport] 1 to 11, which accumulate poly(A){sup +} RNA in the nucleus at a nonpermissive temperature in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Of those, the ptr5-1 mutant shows dots- or a ring-like accumulation of poly(A){sup +} RNA at the nuclear periphery after shifting to the nonpermissive temperature. We cloned the ptr5{sup +} gene and found that it encodes a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), nucleoporin 85 (Nup85). The ptr5-1 mutant shows no defects in protein transport, suggesting the specific involvement of Ptr5p/Nup85p in nuclear mRNA export in S. pombe. We identified Seh1p, a nucleoporin interacting with Nup85p, an mRNA-binding protein Mlo3p, and Sac3p, a component of the TREX-2 complex involved in coupling of nuclear mRNA export with transcription, as multi-copy suppressors for the ptr5-1 mutation. In addition, we found that the ptr5-1 mutation is synthetically lethal with a mutation of the mRNA export factor Rae1p, and that the double mutant exaggerates defective nuclear mRNA export, suggesting that Ptr5p/Nup85p is involved in nuclear mRNA export through Rae1p. Interestingly, the ptr5-1 mutation also showed synthetic effects with several prp pre-mRNA splicing mutations, suggesting a functional linkage between the NPCs and the splicing apparatus in the yeast nucleus.

  18. Spaceflight has compartment- and gene-specific effects on mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins in rat femur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, G. L.; Morey-Holton, E.; Turner, R. T.

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the possibility that the abnormal bone matrix produced during spaceflight may be associated with reduced expression of bone matrix protein genes. To test this possibility, we investigated the effects of a 14-day spaceflight (SLS-2 experiment) on steady-state mRNA levels for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), osteocalcin, osteonectin, and prepro-alpha(1) subunit of type I collagen in the major bone compartments of rat femur. There were pronounced site-specific differences in the steady-state levels of expression of the mRNAs for the three bone matrix proteins and GAPDH in normal weight-bearing rats, and these relationships were altered after spaceflight. Specifically, spaceflight resulted in decreases in mRNA levels for GAPDH (decreased in proximal metaphysis), osteocalcin (decreased in proximal metaphysis), osteonectin (decreased in proximal and distal metaphysis), and collagen (decreased in proximal and distal metaphysis) compared with ground controls. There were no changes in mRNA levels for matrix proteins or GAPDH in the shaft and distal epiphysis. These results demonstrate that spaceflight leads to site- and gene-specific decreases in mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that spaceflight-induced decreases in bone formation are caused by concomitant decreases in expression of genes for bone matrix proteins.

  19. Structure and expression of the human L-myc gene reveal a complex pattern of alternative mRNA processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, F.; Battey, J.; Nau, M.; Brooks, B.; Seifter, E.; De Greve, J.; Birrer, M.; Sausville, E.; Minna, J.

    1988-01-01

    The authors' analyzed in detail the structure of the L-myc gene isolated from human placental DNA and characterized its expression in several small-cell lung cancer cell lines. The gene is composed of three exons and two introns spanning 6.6 kilobases in human DNA. Several distinct mRNA species are produced in all small-cell lung cancer cell lines that express L-myc. These transcripts are generated from a single gene by alternative splicing of introns 1 and 2 and by use of alternative polyadenylation signals. In some mRNAs that is a long open reading frame with a predicted translated protein of 364 residues. Amino acid sequence comparison with c-myc and N-myc demonstrated multiple discrete regions with extensive homology. In contrast, other mRNA transcripts, generated by alternative processing, could encode a truncated protein with a novel carboxy-terminal end.

  20. mRNA Noise Reveals that Activators Induce a Biphasic Response in the Promoter Kinetics of Highly Regulated Genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Katie; To, Tsz-Leung; Maheshri, Narendra

    2012-02-01

    A dominant source of fluctuations in gene expression is thought to be the process of transcription. The statistics of these fluctuations arise from the kinetics of transcription. Multiple studies suggest the bulk of fluctuations can be understood by a simple process where genes are inactive for exponentially distributed times punctuated by geometric bursts of mRNA. Yet it's largely unknown how cis and trans factors affect the two lumped kinetic parameters, burst size and burst frequency, that describe this process. Importantly, how these parameters are regulated in a single gene can qualitatively affect the dynamical behavior of the network it is embedded within. Here, we ask whether transcriptional activators increase gene expression by increasing the burst size or burst frequency. We do so by deducing these parameters from steady-state mRNA distributions measured in individual yeast cells using single molecule mRNA FISH. We find that for both a synthetic and natural promoter, activators appear to first increase burst size, then burst frequency. We suggest this biphasic response may be common to all highly regulated genes and was previously unappreciated because of measurement techniques. Furthermore, its origins appear to relate to cis events at the promoter, and may arise from combinations of basal and activator-dependent bursts. Our measurements shed new light on transcriptional mechanisms and should assist in building synthetic promoters with tunable statistics.

  1. The use of logic relationships to model colon cancer gene expression networks with mRNA microarray data.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Xiaogang; Wang, Jinlian; Li, Hui; Perozzi, Rhoda E; Perozzi, Edmund F

    2008-08-01

    The ultimate goal of genomics research is to describe the network of molecules and interactions that govern all biological functions and disease processes in cells. Nonlinear interactions among genes in terms of their logic relationships play a key role for deciphering the networks of molecules that underlie cellular function. We present a method based on a graph coloring scheme and information theory to identify the gene expression network with lower and higher order logic interactions of genes. The analysis of oncogenes and suppressor genes from a colon cancer mRNA microarray dataset identifies a gene expression network with directionality and weights that reflects intracellular communication pathways. The success of the proposed method in mining hidden, complicated gene interactions and reliably interpreting experimental results suggests that the proposed method is a useful tool for understanding cancer systems. Extension of this method holds the potential to be fruitful for understanding other complex, nonsymmetric systems. PMID:18249040

  2. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation. PMID:27112822

  3. mRNA export protein THOC5 as a tool for identification of target genes for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tran, Doan Duy Hai; Saran, Shashank; Koch, Alexandra; Tamura, Teruko

    2016-04-10

    Recent evidence indicates that mRNA export is selective, giving priority to a subset of mRNAs that control diverse biological processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, stress response, and cell survival as well as tumor development. The depletion of a member of the mRNA export complex, the THO complex, impairs the expression of only a subset of genes, but causes dramatic changes in phenotype, such as cell cycle inhibition, abnormal differentiation, and importantly apoptosis of stem cells and cancer cells but not normal epithelial cells, hepatocytes, or fibroblasts. Recent exosome sequence data revealed that over 100 driver gene mutations with a number of signaling pathways are involved in human cancer formation, indicating that multiple signaling pathways will need to be inhibited for cancer therapy. In this review we firstly describe a basic feature and function of the mRNA export complex, THO, secondly, the biological alteration upon depletion of a member of the THO complex in normal and cancer cells, and thirdly, identification of its target genes. Finally we describe our recent data on selection of targeting candidates from THOC5 dependent genes for application in cancer therapy. PMID:26828015

  4. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J.; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation. PMID:27112822

  5. Alternative mRNA Splicing from the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) Gene Generates Isoforms with Distinct Subcellular mRNA Localization Patterns in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Rune; Daugaard, Tina F.; Holm, Ida E.; Nielsen, Anders Lade

    2013-01-01

    The intermediate filament network of astrocytes includes Glial fibrillary acidic protein (Gfap) as a major component. Gfap mRNA is alternatively spliced resulting in generation of different protein isoforms where Gfapα is the most predominant isoform. The Gfapδ isoform is expressed in proliferating neurogenic astrocytes of the developing human brain and in the adult human and mouse brain. Here we provide a characterization of mouse Gfapδ mRNA and Gfapδ protein. RT-qPCR analysis showed that Gfapδ mRNA and Gfapα mRNA expression is coordinately increased in the post-natal period. Immunohistochemical staining of developing mouse brain samples showed that Gfapδ is expressed in the sub-ventricular zones in accordance with the described localization in the developing and adult human brain. Immunofluorescence analysis verified incorporation of Gfapδ into the Gfap intermediate filament network and overlap in Gfapδ and Gfapα subcellular localization. Subcellular mRNA localization studies identified different localization patterns of Gfapδ and Gfapα mRNA in mouse primary astrocytes. A larger fraction of Gfapα mRNA showed mRNA localization to astrocyte protrusions compared to Gfapδ mRNA. The differential mRNA localization patterns were dependent on the different 3′-exon sequences included in Gfapδ and Gfapα mRNA. The presented results show that alternative Gfap mRNA splicing results in isoform-specific mRNA localization patterns with resulting different local mRNA concentration ratios which have potential to participate in subcellular region-specific intermediate filament dynamics during brain development, maintenance and in disease. PMID:23991052

  6. BayMiR: inferring evidence for endogenous miRNA-induced gene repression from mRNA expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Popular miRNA target prediction techniques use sequence features to determine the functional miRNA target sites. These techniques commonly ignore the cellular conditions in which miRNAs interact with their targets in vivo. Gene expression data are rich resources that can complement sequence features to take into account the context dependency of miRNAs. Results We introduce BayMiR, a new computational method, that predicts the functionality of potential miRNA target sites using the activity level of the miRNAs inferred from genome-wide mRNA expression profiles. We also found that mRNA expression variation can be used as another predictor of functional miRNA targets. We benchmarked BayMiR, the expression variation, Cometa, and the TargetScan “context scores” on two tasks: predicting independently validated miRNA targets and predicting the decrease in mRNA abundance in miRNA overexpression assays. BayMiR performed better than all other methods in both benchmarks and, surprisingly, the variation index performed better than Cometa and some individual determinants of the TargetScan context scores. Furthermore, BayMiR predicted miRNA target sets are more consistently annotated with GO and KEGG terms than similar sized random subsets of genes with conserved miRNA seed regions. BayMiR gives higher scores to target sites residing near the poly(A) tail which strongly favors mRNA degradation using poly(A) shortening. Our work also suggests that modeling multiplicative interactions among miRNAs is important to predict endogenous mRNA targets. Conclusions We develop a new computational method for predicting the target mRNAs of miRNAs. BayMiR applies a large number of mRNA expression profiles and successfully identifies the mRNA targets and miRNA activities without using miRNA expression data. The BayMiR package is publicly available and can be readily applied to any mRNA expression data sets. PMID:24001276

  7. Identification of reference housekeeping-genes for mRNA expression studies in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kar, Parmita; Chawla, Himika; Saha, Soma; Tandon, Nikhil; Goswami, Ravinder

    2016-06-01

    Selection of appropriate housekeeping-genes as reference is important in mRNA expression-related experiments. It is more important in diabetes since hyperglycemia per se can influence expression of housekeeping-genes. RNA expression of Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase, β-actin and 18S-ribosomal-RNA, Hypoxanthine-phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT), Tyrosine-3-monooxygenase/tryptophan (YHWAZ), β2-microglobin (β2M), TATA-binding-protein (TBP), and Ubiquitin C and cytochrome1 (CYC1) assessed in circulating-lymphocytes-(PBMC) of patients with type-1-diabetes and healthy controls. The stability ('M' value <1.02) and number of housekeeping-genes required for normalization in qRT-PCR were determined by 'ge-norm software.' Vitamin-D-receptor (VDR) was used as a target gene. All the nine genes tested had sufficient 'M' value in diabetes and healthy controls. However, housekeeping-genes indicated a relatively higher stability of expression in healthy controls in comparison to diabetes. Use of single housekeeping-genes brought gross variation in the calculation of VDR-mRNA copies. The ge-norm software suggested geometric mean of five housekeeping-genes for ideal normalization in diabetes (CYC1, β-actin, YHWAZ, HPRT, and β2M) and only three in controls (CYC1, β-actin, and TBP). HbA1c did not correlate with expression of any of the nine housekeeping-genes. Thus, geometric mean of CYC1, β-actin, YHWAZ, HPRT, and β2M needs to be used for ideal normalization of mRNA in type-1-diabetes. Similar studies are required in other population. PMID:27160934

  8. Effect of propionate on mRNA expression of key genes for gluconeogenesis in liver of dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Koser, Stephanie L; Bequette, Brian J; Donkin, Shawn S

    2015-12-01

    glucagon in calves receiving propionate were not different than controls. Calves receiving propionate had increased PCK1 mRNA, tended to have increased G6PC mRNA, and had similar PC mRNA compared with saline controls. These data indicate a tendency for in vivo effects of propionate to alter hepatic gene expression in mid-lactation cows and neonatal calves, which are consistent with a feed-forward effect of propionate to regulate its own metabolism toward gluconeogenesis through changes in hepatic PCK1 mRNA. PMID:26409969

  9. A Versatile Panel of Reference Gene Assays for the Measurement of Chicken mRNA by Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Helena J.; Van Borm, Steven; Young, John R.; Fife, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR assays are widely used for the quantification of mRNA within avian experimental samples. Multiple stably-expressed reference genes, selected for the lowest variation in representative samples, can be used to control random technical variation. Reference gene assays must be reliable, have high amplification specificity and efficiency, and not produce signals from contaminating DNA. Whilst recent research papers identify specific genes that are stable in particular tissues and experimental treatments, here we describe a panel of ten avian gene primer and probe sets that can be used to identify suitable reference genes in many experimental contexts. The panel was tested with TaqMan and SYBR Green systems in two experimental scenarios: a tissue collection and virus infection of cultured fibroblasts. GeNorm and NormFinder algorithms were able to select appropriate reference gene sets in each case. We show the effects of using the selected genes on the detection of statistically significant differences in expression. The results are compared with those obtained using 28s ribosomal RNA, the present most widely accepted reference gene in chicken work, identifying circumstances where its use might provide misleading results. Methods for eliminating DNA contamination of RNA reduced, but did not completely remove, detectable DNA. We therefore attached special importance to testing each qPCR assay for absence of signal using DNA template. The assays and analyses developed here provide a useful resource for selecting reference genes for investigations of avian biology. PMID:27537060

  10. Effects of seawater acclimation on mRNA levels of corticosteroid receptor genes in osmoregulatory and immune systems in trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yada, T.; Hyodo, S.; Schreck, C.B.

    2008-01-01

    Influence of environmental salinity on expression of distinct corticosteroid receptor (CR) genes, glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-1 and -2, and mineralcorticoid receptor (MR), was examined in osmoregulatory and hemopoietic organs and leucocytes of steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). There was no significant difference in plasma cortisol levels between freshwater (FW)- or seawater (SW)-acclimated trout, whereas Na+, K+-ATPase was activated in gill of SW fish. Plasma lysozyme levels also showed a significant increase after acclimation to SW. In SW-acclimated fish, mRNA levels of GR-1, GR-2, and MR were significantly higher in gill and body kidney than those in FW. Head kidney and spleen showed no significant change in these CR mRNA levels after SW-acclimation. On the other hand, leucocytes isolated from head kidney and peripheral blood showed significant decreases in mRNA levels of CR in SW-acclimated fish. These results showed differential regulation of gene expression of CR between osmoregulatory and immune systems. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Human intronless genes: Functional groups, associated diseases, evolution, and mRNA processing in absence of splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Grzybowska, Ewa A.

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Functional characteristics of intronless genes (IGs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diseases associated with IGs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Origin and evolution of IGs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mRNA processing without splicing. -- Abstract: Intronless genes (IGs) constitute approximately 3% of the human genome. Human IGs are essentially different in evolution and functionality from the IGs of unicellular eukaryotes, which represent the majority in their genomes. Functional analysis of IGs has revealed a massive over-representation of signal transduction genes and genes encoding regulatory proteins important for growth, proliferation, and development. IGs also often display tissue-specific expression, usually in the nervous system and testis. These characteristics translate into IG-associated diseases, mainly neuropathies, developmental disorders, and cancer. IGs represent recent additions to the genome, created mostly by retroposition of processed mRNAs with retained functionality. Processing, nuclear export, and translation of these mRNAs should be hampered dramatically by the lack of splice factors, which normally tightly cover mature transcripts and govern their fate. However, natural IGs manage to maintain satisfactory expression levels. Different mechanisms by which IGs solve the problem of mRNA processing and nuclear export are discussed here, along with their possible impact on reporter studies.

  12. Characterization and mRNA expression profile of the TbNre1 gene of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Tuber borchii.

    PubMed

    Guescini, Michele; Stocchi, L; Sisti, D; Zeppa, S; Polidori, E; Ceccaroli, P; Saltarelli, R; Stocchi, V

    2009-02-01

    This study focuses on the cloning and characterization of the major nitrogen regulator element from the ectomycorrhizal fungus Tuber borchii, TbNre1. Sequence analysis of the predicted protein and complementation experiments in Neurospora crassa demonstrated that the cloned gene is orthologous to areA/nit-2 gene. Transcriptional expression investigations by real-time RT-PCR showed TbNre1 up-regulation in the presence of nitrate or in the absence of nitrogen during free-living mycelium growth. On the contrary, TbNre1 mRNA levels remained at basal values in the presence of preferred nitrogen sources like ammonium and glutamine. Furthermore, TbNre1 mRNA was found to be up-regulated during T. borchii and T. platyphyllos interaction. All these data suggest that the regulatory protein TBNRE1 could play a major role in regulating N metabolism genes of T. borchii in the free living mycelium and in T. borchii-T. platyphyllos interaction. Finally, the possible role of the transcription factor TBNRE1 in the induction of proteases and virulence-like genes, necessary in ectomycorrhizal establishment, was also discussed. PMID:19115055

  13. Aberrant mRNA processing of the maize Rp1-D rust resistance gene in wheat and barley.

    PubMed

    Ayliffe, Michael A; Steinau, Martin; Park, Robert F; Rooke, Lee; Pacheco, Maria G; Hulbert, Scot H; Trick, Harold N; Pryor, Anthony J

    2004-08-01

    The maize Rp1-D gene confers race-specific resistance against Puccinia sorghi (common leaf rust) isolates containing a corresponding avrRp1-D avirulence gene. An Rp1-D genomic clone and a similar Rp1-D transgene regulated by the maize ubiquitin promoter were transformed independently into susceptible maize lines and shown to confer Rp1-D resistance, demonstrating that this resistance can be transferred as a single gene. Transfer of these functional transgenes into wheat and barley did not result in novel resistances when these plants were challenged with isolates of wheat stem rust (P. graminis), wheat leaf rust (P. triticina), or barley leaf rust (P. hordei). Regardless of the promoter employed, low levels of gene expression were observed. When constitutive promoters were used for transgene expression, a majority of Rp1-D transcripts were truncated in the nucleotide binding site-encoding region by premature polyadenylation. This aberrant mRNA processing was unrelated to gene function because an inactive version of the gene also generated such transcripts. These data demonstrate that resistance gene transfer between species may not be limited only by divergence of signaling effector molecules and pathogen avirulence ligands, but potentially also by more fundamental gene expression and transcript processing limitations. PMID:15305606

  14. merA gene expression in aquatic environments measured by mRNA production and Hg(II) volatilization.

    PubMed Central

    Nazaret, S; Jeffrey, W H; Saouter, E; Von Haven, R; Barkay, T

    1994-01-01

    The relationship of merA gene expression (specifying the enzyme mercuric reductase) to mercury volatilization in aquatic microbial communities was investigated with samples collected at a mercury-contaminated freshwater pond, Reality Lake, in Oak Ridge, Tenn. Levels of merA mRNA transcripts and the rate of inorganic mercury [Hg(II)] volatilization were related to the concentration of mercury in the water and to heterotrophic activity in field samples and laboratory incubations of pond water in which microbial heterotrophic activity and Hg(II) concentration were manipulated. Levels of merA-specific mRNA and Hg(II) volatilization were influenced more by microbial metabolic activity than by the concentration of mercury. merA-specific transcripts were detected in some samples which did not reduce Hg(II), suggesting that rates of mercury volatilization in environmental samples may not always be proportional to merA expression. PMID:7527625

  15. Ochratoxin a lowers mRNA levels of genes encoding for key proteins of liver cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hundhausen, Christoph; Boesch-Saadatmandi, Christine; Matzner, Nicole; Lang, Florian; Blank, Ralf; Wolffram, Siegfried; Blaschek, Wolfgang; Rimbach, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a nephro- and hepatotoxic mycotoxin that frequently contaminates food and feedstuffs. Although recent studies have indicated that OTA modulates renal gene expression, little is known regarding its impact on differential gene expression in the liver. Therefore a microarray study of the HepG2 liver cell transcriptome in response to OTA exposure (0, 0.25, 2.5 micromol/l for 24 h) was performed using Affymetrix GeneChip technology. Selected microarray results were verified by real-time PCR and Western blotting as independent methods. Out of 14,500 genes present on the microarray, 13 and 250 genes were down-regulated by 0.25 and 2.5 micromol/l OTA, respectively. Reduced mRNA levels of calcineurin A beta (PPP3CB), which regulates inflammatory signalling pathways in immune cells, and of the uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), which has been suggested to control the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), were observed in response to 0.25 micromol/l OTA. A particularly strong down-regulation due to 2.5 micromol/l OTA was evident for the mRNA levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) and tubulin beta 1 (TUBB1) which have been demonstrated to function as a pro-survival factor in hepatocytes and as an important cytoskeletal component, respectively. In addition, many genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism, including phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1), stearoyl-Coenzyme A desaturase 1 (SCD), and glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1), were down-regulated by OTA. Furthermore, OTA significantly inhibited the capacitative calcium entry into the HepG2 cells, indicating an alteration of calcium homeostasis. Overall, OTA dose-dependently affects multiple genes encoding for key proteins of liver cell metabolism. PMID:19287073

  16. Depletion of three combined THOC5 mRNA export protein target genes synergistically induces human hepatocellular carcinoma cell death.

    PubMed

    Saran, S; Tran, D D H; Ewald, F; Koch, A; Hoffmann, A; Koch, M; Nashan, B; Tamura, T

    2016-07-21

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a frequent form of cancer with a poor prognosis and with limited possibilities of medical intervention. It has been shown that over 100 putative driver genes are associated with multiple recurrently altered pathways in HCC, suggesting that multiple pathways will need to be inhibited for any therapeutic method. mRNA processing is regulated by a complex RNA-protein network that is essential for the maintenance of homeostasis. THOC5, a member of mRNA export complex, has a role in less than 1% of mRNA processing, and is required for cell growth and differentiation, but not for cell survival in normal fibroblasts, hepatocytes and macrophages. In this report, we show that 50% depletion of THOC5 in human HCC cell lines Huh7 and HepG2 induced apoptosis. Transcriptome analysis using THOC5-depleted cells revealed that 396 genes, such as transmembrane BAX inhibitor motif containing 4 (TMBIM4), transmembrane emp24-like trafficking protein 10 (Tmed10) and D-tyrosyl-tRNA deacylase 2 (Dtd2) genes were downregulated in both cell lines. The depletion of one of these THOC5 target genes in Huh7 or HepG2 did not significantly induce cell death, suggesting that these may be fine tuners for HCC cell survival. However, the depletion of a combination of these genes synergistically increased the number of TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling)-positive HCC. It must be noted that the depletion of these genes did not induce cell death in the hepatocyte cell line, THLE-2 cells. THOC5 expression was enhanced in 78% of cytological differentiation grading G2 and G3 tumor in primary HCC. Furthermore, the expression of a putative glycoprotein, Tmed10, is correlated to THOC5 expression level in primary HCCs, suggesting that this protein may be a novel biomarker for HCC. These data imply that the suppression of the multiple THOC5 target genes may represent a novel strategy for HCC therapy. PMID:26549021

  17. Profiles of mRNA expression for genes involved in implantation, early and middle phases of secretion stage in human endometrium.

    PubMed

    Maslova, M A; Smol'nikova, V Yu; Savilova, A M; Burmenskaya, O V; Bystritskii, A A; Tabolova, V K; Korneeva, I E; Demura, T A; Donnikov, A E

    2015-04-01

    The expression of mRNA of 36 genes involved in implantation was studied by reverse transcription and real-time PCR. Significant differences in mRNA expression during the early and middle stages of the secretion phase were detected for genes mmp7, vegf, il2m, il1β, il8, il18, tnfα, il10, tgfβ, igfbp2, etc. PMID:25894777

  18. Final report: FASEB Summer Research Conference on ''Post-transcriptional control of gene expression: Effectors of mRNA decay'' [agenda and attendees list

    SciTech Connect

    Maquat, Lynne

    2002-12-01

    The goal of this meeting was to provide an interactive forum for scientists working on prokaryotic and eukaryotic mRNA decay. A special seminar presented by a leader in the field of mRNA decay in S. cerevisiae focused on what is known and what needs to be determined, not only for yeast but for other organisms. The large attendance (110 participants) reflects the awareness that mRNA decay is a key player in gene regulation in a way that is affected by the many steps that precede mRNA formation. Sessions were held on the following topics: mRNA transport and mRNP; multicomponent eukaryotic nucleases; nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and nonsense-associated altered splicing; Cis-acting sequences/Trans-acting factors of mRNA decay; translational accuracy; multicomponent bacterial nucleases; interplay between mRNA polyadenylation, translation and decay in prokaryotes and prokaryotic organelles; and RNA interference and other RNA mediators of gene expression. In addition to the talks and two poster sessions, there were three round tables: (1) Does translation occur in the nucleus? (2) Differences and similarities in the mechanisms of mRNA decay in different eukaryotes, and (3) RNA surveillance in bacteria?

  19. Molecular cloning, mRNA expression, and characterization of HSP90 gene from Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir japonica sinensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Zha, Jie; Zhang, Zhenhua; Huang, Hua; Sun, Hongying; Song, Daxiang; Zhou, Kaiya

    2009-07-01

    HSP90 is a highly conserved molecular chaperone important in the maturation of a broad spectrum of proteins. Using expressed sequence tag (EST) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) techniques, an HSP90 gene designated as EjsHSP90 was cloned and characterized from the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir japonica sinensis. The full-length cDNA of EjsHSP90 is 2,517 bp and contains an open reading frame of 2157 bp which encodes a 718 amino acid polypeptide (82.8 kDa) bearing characteristics of the HSP90 family and an ATP binding domain. Sequence alignment shows that EjsHSP90 shared 79%-96% identity with HSP90 sequences reported in other animals, and it shares identical structural features. Fluorescent real-time quantitative RT-PCR approach was performed to examine the expression profiles of EjsHSP90 mRNA by testing its relative level in three types of tissues at three different developmental stages, respectively. We found that EjsHSP90 is expressed throughout the three developmental stages but expression levels varied among different body parts of crabs. EjsHSP90 mRNA expression in the abdomen of the first crab stage is consistently higher than that of the other two stages, suggesting that EjsHSP90 gene is involved in the crabs' early developmental process, especially in the crab brachyurization process. Results from quantitative RT-PCR excluded the possibility that the expression of EjsHSP90 mRNA is induced primarily by osmotic stress. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that HSP90 gene is informative and complementary for reconstruction of arthropod phylogenetic relationships. PMID:19166961

  20. p53 Pulses Diversify Target Gene Expression Dynamics in an mRNA Half-Life-Dependent Manner and Delineate Co-regulated Target Gene Subnetworks.

    PubMed

    Porter, Joshua R; Fisher, Brian E; Batchelor, Eric

    2016-04-27

    The transcription factor p53 responds to DNA double-strand breaks by increasing in concentration in a series of pulses of fixed amplitude, duration, and period. How p53 pulses influence the dynamics of p53 target gene expression is not understood. Here, we show that, in bulk cell populations, patterns of p53 target gene expression cluster into groups with stereotyped temporal behaviors, including pulsing and rising dynamics. These behaviors correlate statistically with the mRNA decay rates of target genes: short mRNA half-lives produce pulses of gene expression. This relationship can be recapitulated by mathematical models of p53-dependent gene expression in single cells and cell populations. Single-cell transcriptional profiling demonstrates that expression of a subset of p53 target genes is coordinated across time within single cells; p53 pulsing attenuates this coordination. These results help delineate how p53 orchestrates the complex DNA damage response and give insight into the function of pulsatile signaling pathways. PMID:27135539

  1. The spfash mouse: a missense mutation in the ornithine transcarbamylase gene also causes aberrant mRNA splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, P E; Rosenberg, L E

    1989-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase (ornithine carbamoyltransferase; carbamoyl-phosphate:L-ornithine carbamoyltransferase, EC 2.1.3.3) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme of the mammalian urea cycle. The X chromosome-linked spfash mutation in the mouse causes partial ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and has served as a model for the human disease. We show here that the spfash mutation is a guanine to adenine transition of the last nucleotide of the fourth exon of the ornithine transcarbamylase gene. This nucleotide change produces two remarkably different effects. First, this transition causes ornithine transcarbamylase mRNA deficiency because the involved exon nucleotide plays a part in the recognition of the adjacent splice donor site. As a result of the mutation, ornithine transcarbamylase pre-mRNA is spliced inefficiently both at this site and at a cryptic splice donor site 48 bases into the adjacent intron. Second, two mutant proteins are translated from these mRNAs. From the correctly spliced mRNA, the transition results in a change of amino acid 129 from arginine to histidine. This missense substitution has no discernable effect on mitochondrial import, subunit assembly, or enzyme activity. On the other hand, the elongated mRNA resulting from mis-splicing is translated into a dysfunctional ornithine transcarbamylase subunit elongated by the insertion of 16 amino acid residues. Images PMID:2471197

  2. Quantification of diatom gene expression in the sea by selecting uniformly transcribed mRNA as the basis for normalization.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lee-Kuo; Tsui, Feng-Hsiu; Chang, Jeng

    2012-09-01

    To quantify gene expressions by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (Q-RT-PCR) in natural diatom assemblages, it is necessary to seek a biomass reference specific to the target species. Two housekeeping genes, TBP (encoding the TATA box-binding protein) and EFL (encoding the translation elongation factor-like protein), were evaluated as candidates for reference genes in Q-RT-PCR assays. Transcript levels of TBP and EFL were relatively stable under various test conditions including growth stages, light-dark cycle phases, and nutrient stresses in Skeletonema costatum and Chaetoceros affinis, and TBP expression was more stable than that of EFL. Next, the sequence diversity of diatom assemblages was evaluated by obtaining 32 EFL and 29 TBP homologous gene fragments from the East China Sea (ECS). Based on sequence alignments, EFL and TBP primer sets were designed for Chaetoceros and Skeletonema groups in the ECS. An evaluation of primer specificity and PCR efficiency indicated that the EFL primer sets performed better. To demonstrate the applicability of EFL primer sets in the ECS, they were employed to measure mRNA levels of the FcpB (fucoxanthin-chlorophyll protein) gene in diatoms. The results correctly revealed prominent diel variations in FcpB expression and confirmed EFL as a good reference gene. PMID:22706063

  3. Quantification of Diatom Gene Expression in the Sea by Selecting Uniformly Transcribed mRNA as the Basis for Normalization

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Lee-Kuo; Tsui, Feng-Hsiu

    2012-01-01

    To quantify gene expressions by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (Q-RT-PCR) in natural diatom assemblages, it is necessary to seek a biomass reference specific to the target species. Two housekeeping genes, TBP (encoding the TATA box-binding protein) and EFL (encoding the translation elongation factor-like protein), were evaluated as candidates for reference genes in Q-RT-PCR assays. Transcript levels of TBP and EFL were relatively stable under various test conditions including growth stages, light-dark cycle phases, and nutrient stresses in Skeletonema costatum and Chaetoceros affinis, and TBP expression was more stable than that of EFL. Next, the sequence diversity of diatom assemblages was evaluated by obtaining 32 EFL and 29 TBP homologous gene fragments from the East China Sea (ECS). Based on sequence alignments, EFL and TBP primer sets were designed for Chaetoceros and Skeletonema groups in the ECS. An evaluation of primer specificity and PCR efficiency indicated that the EFL primer sets performed better. To demonstrate the applicability of EFL primer sets in the ECS, they were employed to measure mRNA levels of the FcpB (fucoxanthin-chlorophyll protein) gene in diatoms. The results correctly revealed prominent diel variations in FcpB expression and confirmed EFL as a good reference gene. PMID:22706063

  4. Antisense targeting of 3' end elements involved in DUX4 mRNA processing is an efficient therapeutic strategy for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: a new gene-silencing approach.

    PubMed

    Marsollier, Anne-Charlotte; Ciszewski, Lukasz; Mariot, Virginie; Popplewell, Linda; Voit, Thomas; Dickson, George; Dumonceaux, Julie

    2016-04-15

    Defects in mRNA 3'end formation have been described to alter transcription termination, transport of the mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, stability of the mRNA and translation efficiency. Therefore, inhibition of polyadenylation may lead to gene silencing. Here, we choose facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) as a model to determine whether or not targeting key 3' end elements involved in mRNA processing using antisense oligonucleotide drugs can be used as a strategy for gene silencing within a potentially therapeutic context. FSHD is a gain-of-function disease characterized by the aberrant expression of the Double homeobox 4 (DUX4) transcription factor leading to altered pathogenic deregulation of multiple genes in muscles. Here, we demonstrate that targeting either the mRNA polyadenylation signal and/or cleavage site is an efficient strategy to down-regulate DUX4 expression and to decrease the abnormally high-pathological expression of genes downstream of DUX4. We conclude that targeting key functional 3' end elements involved in pre-mRNA to mRNA maturation with antisense drugs can lead to efficient gene silencing and is thus a potentially effective therapeutic strategy for at least FSHD. Moreover, polyadenylation is a crucial step in the maturation of almost all eukaryotic mRNAs, and thus all mRNAs are virtually eligible for this antisense-mediated knockdown strategy. PMID:26787513

  5. Influence of beta-blockers on the myocardial mRNA expressions of circadian clock- and metabolism-related genes.

    PubMed

    Ushijima, Kentarou; Maekawa, Tomohiro; Ishikawa-Kobayashi, Eiko; Ando, Hitoshi; Shiga, Tsuyoshi; Fujimura, Akio

    2013-01-01

    Daily rhythms are regulated by a master clock-system in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and by a peripheral clock-system in each organ. Because norepinephrine is one of the timekeepers for the myocardial circadian clock that influences cardiac metabolism, it is speculated that a beta-blocker may affect the circadian clock and metabolism in heart tissue. In this study, thirty mg/kg/day of propranolol (a lipophilic beta-blocker) or atenolol (a hydrophilic beta-blocker) was given orally to Wistar rats for 4 weeks. The mRNA expressions of Bmal1 and E4BP4 in heart tissue were suppressed by the beta-blockers. However, the mRNA expressions of these clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus were unchanged. Myocardial mRNA expressions of lactate dehydrogenase a and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 were also suppressed by the beta-blockers. In addition, ATP content in heart tissue was significantly elevated by the beta-blockers throughout 24 hours. The effects of propranolol and atenolol did not differ significantly. This study showed for the first time that a beta-blocker affects myocardial clock gene expression. Propranolol and atenolol increased ATP content in heart tissue throughout 24 hours. The influences of beta-blockers may be negligible on the SCN, and may be independent of lipid solubility on heart tissue. It is well known that these drugs exert a protective effect against myocardial ischemia, which may be mediated by an increase in the preservation of myocardial ATP. PMID:23394803

  6. Structure of the coding region and mRNA variants of the apyrase gene from pea (Pisum sativum)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibata, K.; Abe, S.; Davies, E.

    2001-01-01

    Partial amino acid sequences of a 49 kDa apyrase (ATP diphosphohydrolase, EC 3.6.1.5) from the cytoskeletal fraction of etiolated pea stems were used to derive oligonucleotide DNA primers to generate a cDNA fragment of pea apyrase mRNA by RT-PCR and these primers were used to screen a pea stem cDNA library. Two almost identical cDNAs differing in just 6 nucleotides within the coding regions were found, and these cDNA sequences were used to clone genomic fragments by PCR. Two nearly identical gene fragments containing 8 exons and 7 introns were obtained. One of them (H-type) encoded the mRNA sequence described by Hsieh et al. (1996) (DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank Z32743), while the other (S-type) differed by the same 6 nucleotides as the mRNAs, suggesting that these genes may be alleles. The six nucleotide differences between these two alleles were found solely in the first exon, and these mutation sites had two types of consensus sequences. These mRNAs were found with varying lengths of 3' untranslated regions (3'-UTR). There are some similarities between the 3'-UTR of these mRNAs and those of actin and actin binding proteins in plants. The putative roles of the 3'-UTR and alternative polyadenylation sites are discussed in relation to their possible role in targeting the mRNAs to different subcellular compartments.

  7. Gene (mRNA) expression in canine atopic dermatitis: microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Merryman-Simpson, Annemarie E; Wood, Shona H; Fretwell, Neale; Jones, Paul G; McLaren, William M; McEwan, Neil A; Clements, Dylan N; Carter, Stuart D; Ollier, William E; Nuttall, Tim

    2008-04-01

    Genes potentially involved in the pathology of canine atopic dermatitis (AD) were identified using gene expression microarrays. Total RNA extracted from skin biopsies was hybridized to an Agilent Technologies custom-designed 22K canine array. The arrays were analysed using Genedata Analyst software. Data were corrected for multiple hypothesis testing and tested for significance using the National Institute on Aging array analysis tool. For comparison, data were divided into separate groups: lesional atopic (n = 16), nonlesional atopic (n = 17) and healthy controls (n = 9). Fifty-four genes were differentially expressed at a significance level of 0.05 in canine AD compared to healthy controls. Sixteen genes were differentially expressed in both nonlesional and lesional atopic skin, 26 genes only in nonlesional skin and 12 only in lesional skin. These genes were associated with innate immune and inflammatory responses, cell cycle, apoptosis, barrier formation and transcriptional regulation. The most dysregulated gene in lesional skin was S100A8, which showed an almost 23-fold increase in expression. This is a pro-inflammatory cytokine located in the epidermal differentiation complex. Microarray analysis is a novel technique in canine AD. Significant changes in gene expression were identified in atopic skin. These were relevant to skin barrier formation and the immune response, suggesting that they both participate in AD. Gene expression restricted to lesional skin may be involved in inflammatory changes, whereas those shared or restricted to nonlesional skin may reflect the atopic phenotype. Investigating gene polymorphisms in the targets identified in this study will help improve our understanding of the genetic basis of this disease. PMID:18336422

  8. Integrated Analysis of DNA Methylation and mRNA Expression Profiles Data to Identify Key Genes in Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiang; Liu, Xingang; Li, Xiaodan; Guan, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Lung adenocarcinoma (LAC) is the most frequent type of lung cancer and has a high metastatic rate at an early stage. This study is aimed at identifying LAC-associated genes. Materials and Methods. GSE62950 downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus included a DNA methylation dataset and an mRNA expression profiles dataset, both of which included 28 LAC tissue samples and 28 adjacent normal tissue samples. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened by Limma package in R, and their functions were predicted by enrichment analysis using TargetMine online tool. Then, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using STRING and Cytoscape. Finally, LAC-associated methylation sites were identified by CpGassoc package in R and mapped to the DEGs to obtain LAC-associated DEGs. Results. Total 913 DEGs were identified in LAC tissues. In the PPI networks, MAD2L1, AURKB, CCNB2, CDC20, and WNT3A had higher degrees, and the first four genes might be involved in LAC through interaction. Total 8856 LAC-associated methylation sites were identified and mapped to the DEGs. And there were 29 LAC-associated methylation sites located in 27 DEGs (e.g., SH3GL2, BAI3, CDH13, JAM2, MT1A, LHX6, and IGFBP3). Conclusions. These key genes might play a role in pathogenesis of LAC. PMID:27610375

  9. Integrated Analysis of DNA Methylation and mRNA Expression Profiles Data to Identify Key Genes in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiang; Li, Xiaodan; Guan, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Lung adenocarcinoma (LAC) is the most frequent type of lung cancer and has a high metastatic rate at an early stage. This study is aimed at identifying LAC-associated genes. Materials and Methods. GSE62950 downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus included a DNA methylation dataset and an mRNA expression profiles dataset, both of which included 28 LAC tissue samples and 28 adjacent normal tissue samples. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened by Limma package in R, and their functions were predicted by enrichment analysis using TargetMine online tool. Then, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using STRING and Cytoscape. Finally, LAC-associated methylation sites were identified by CpGassoc package in R and mapped to the DEGs to obtain LAC-associated DEGs. Results. Total 913 DEGs were identified in LAC tissues. In the PPI networks, MAD2L1, AURKB, CCNB2, CDC20, and WNT3A had higher degrees, and the first four genes might be involved in LAC through interaction. Total 8856 LAC-associated methylation sites were identified and mapped to the DEGs. And there were 29 LAC-associated methylation sites located in 27 DEGs (e.g., SH3GL2, BAI3, CDH13, JAM2, MT1A, LHX6, and IGFBP3). Conclusions. These key genes might play a role in pathogenesis of LAC. PMID:27610375

  10. Exploiting aberrant mRNA expression in autism for gene discovery and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jinting; Yang, Ence; Yang, Jizhou; Zeng, Yong; Ji, Guoli; Cai, James J

    2016-07-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by substantial phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity, which greatly complicates the identification of genetic factors that contribute to the disease. Study designs have mainly focused on group differences between cases and controls. The problem is that, by their nature, group difference-based methods (e.g., differential expression analysis) blur or collapse the heterogeneity within groups. By ignoring genes with variable within-group expression, an important axis of genetic heterogeneity contributing to expression variability among affected individuals has been overlooked. To this end, we develop a new gene expression analysis method-aberrant gene expression analysis, based on the multivariate distance commonly used for outlier detection. Our method detects the discrepancies in gene expression dispersion between groups and identifies genes with significantly different expression variability. Using this new method, we re-visited RNA sequencing data generated from post-mortem brain tissues of 47 ASD and 57 control samples. We identified 54 functional gene sets whose expression dispersion in ASD samples is more pronounced than that in controls, as well as 76 co-expression modules present in controls but absent in ASD samples due to ASD-specific aberrant gene expression. We also exploited aberrantly expressed genes as biomarkers for ASD diagnosis. With a whole blood expression data set, we identified three aberrantly expressed gene sets whose expression levels serve as discriminating variables achieving >70 % classification accuracy. In summary, our method represents a novel discovery and diagnostic strategy for ASD. Our findings may help open an expression variability-centered research avenue for other genetically heterogeneous disorders. PMID:27131873

  11. The vasopressin mRNA poly(A) tract is unusually long and increases during stimulation of vasopressin gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Carrazana, E J; Pasieka, K B; Majzoub, J A

    1988-01-01

    We developed a method, termed an H-blot, by which the poly(A) tract of any specific mRNA may be detected by RNA filter hybridization after its removal from the body of the mRNA by a RNase H-catalyzed endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3' untranslated region. Using this method, we studied the modulation of the length of the poly(A) tract of rat vasopressin mRNA in vivo during changes in the levels of this mRNA resulting from a physiologic stimulus, osmotic stress. The poly(A) tract of hypothalamic vasopressin mRNA in hydrated rats was, quite remarkably, approximately 250 nucleotides in length, in contrast to that of somatostatin mRNA, which was approximately 30 nucleotides long. Vasopressin mRNA poly(A) tail length increased progressively from approximately 250 to approximately 400 nucleotides with the application of the hyperosmotic stimulus and declined to base line after its removal; somatostatin mRNA poly(A) tail length did not change during osmotic stress. The poly(A) tract length of total hypothalamic mRNA was between 35 and 140 nucleotides and also did not change with osmotic stress. Modulation of poly(A) tract length of specific mRNAs during stimulation of gene expression may provide an additional level of genetic regulation. Images PMID:2841576

  12. The vasopressin mRNA poly(A) tract is unusually long and increases during stimulation of vasopressin gene expression in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Carrazana, E.J.; Pasieka, K.B.; Majzoub, J.A.

    1988-06-01

    The authors developed a method, termed an H-blot, by which the poly(A) tract of any specific mRNA may be detected by RNA filter hybridization after its removal from the body of the mRNA by a RNase H-catalyzed endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3' untranslated region. Using this method, they studied the modulation of the length of the poly(A) tract of rat vasopressin mRNA in vivo during changes in the levels of this mRNA resulting from a physiologic stimulus, osmotic stress. The poly(A) tract of hypothalamic vasopressin mRNA in hydrated rats was, quite remarkably, --250 nucleotides in length, in contrast to that of somatostatin mRNA, which was --30 nucleotides long. Vasopressin mRNA poly(A) tail length increased progressively from --250 to --400 nucleotides with the application of the hyperosmotic stimulus and declined to base line after its removal; somatostatin mRNA poly(A) tail length did not change during osmotic stress. The poly(A) tract length of total hypothalamic mRNA was between 35 and 140 nucleotides and also did not change with osmotic stress. Modulation of poly(A) tract length of specific mRNAs during stimulation of gene expression may provide an additional level of genetic regulation.

  13. Integrating mRNA and miRNA Weighted Gene Co-Expression Networks with eQTLs in the Nucleus Accumbens of Subjects with Alcohol Dependence.

    PubMed

    Mamdani, Mohammed; Williamson, Vernell; McMichael, Gowon O; Blevins, Tana; Aliev, Fazil; Adkins, Amy; Hack, Laura; Bigdeli, Tim; van der Vaart, Andrew D; Web, Bradley Todd; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Kalsi, Gursharan; Kendler, Kenneth S; Miles, Michael F; Dick, Danielle; Riley, Brien P; Dumur, Catherine; Vladimirov, Vladimir I

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is known to lead to gene expression changes in the brain. After performing weighted gene co-expression network analyses (WGCNA) on genome-wide mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression in Nucleus Accumbens (NAc) of subjects with alcohol dependence (AD; N = 18) and of matched controls (N = 18), six mRNA and three miRNA modules significantly correlated with AD were identified (Bonferoni-adj. p≤ 0.05). Cell-type-specific transcriptome analyses revealed two of the mRNA modules to be enriched for neuronal specific marker genes and downregulated in AD, whereas the remaining four mRNA modules were enriched for astrocyte and microglial specific marker genes and upregulated in AD. Gene set enrichment analysis demonstrated that neuronal specific modules were enriched for genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial dysfunction and MAPK signaling. Glial-specific modules were predominantly enriched for genes involved in processes related to immune functions, i.e. cytokine signaling (all adj. p≤ 0.05). In mRNA and miRNA modules, 461 and 25 candidate hub genes were identified, respectively. In contrast to the expected biological functions of miRNAs, correlation analyses between mRNA and miRNA hub genes revealed a higher number of positive than negative correlations (χ2 test p≤ 0.0001). Integration of hub gene expression with genome-wide genotypic data resulted in 591 mRNA cis-eQTLs and 62 miRNA cis-eQTLs. mRNA cis-eQTLs were significantly enriched for AD diagnosis and AD symptom counts (adj. p = 0.014 and p = 0.024, respectively) in AD GWAS signals in a large, independent genetic sample from the Collaborative Study on Genetics of Alcohol (COGA). In conclusion, our study identified putative gene network hubs coordinating mRNA and miRNA co-expression changes in the NAc of AD subjects, and our genetic (cis-eQTL) analysis provides novel insights into the etiological mechanisms of AD. PMID:26381263

  14. Integrating mRNA and miRNA Weighted Gene Co-Expression Networks with eQTLs in the Nucleus Accumbens of Subjects with Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Blevins, Tana; Aliev, Fazil; Adkins, Amy; Hack, Laura; Bigdeli, Tim; D. van der Vaart, Andrew; Web, Bradley Todd; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Kalsi, Gursharan; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Miles, Michael F.; Dick, Danielle; Riley, Brien P.; Dumur, Catherine; Vladimirov, Vladimir I.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is known to lead to gene expression changes in the brain. After performing weighted gene co-expression network analyses (WGCNA) on genome-wide mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression in Nucleus Accumbens (NAc) of subjects with alcohol dependence (AD; N = 18) and of matched controls (N = 18), six mRNA and three miRNA modules significantly correlated with AD were identified (Bonferoni-adj. p≤ 0.05). Cell-type-specific transcriptome analyses revealed two of the mRNA modules to be enriched for neuronal specific marker genes and downregulated in AD, whereas the remaining four mRNA modules were enriched for astrocyte and microglial specific marker genes and upregulated in AD. Gene set enrichment analysis demonstrated that neuronal specific modules were enriched for genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial dysfunction and MAPK signaling. Glial-specific modules were predominantly enriched for genes involved in processes related to immune functions, i.e. cytokine signaling (all adj. p≤ 0.05). In mRNA and miRNA modules, 461 and 25 candidate hub genes were identified, respectively. In contrast to the expected biological functions of miRNAs, correlation analyses between mRNA and miRNA hub genes revealed a higher number of positive than negative correlations (χ2 test p≤ 0.0001). Integration of hub gene expression with genome-wide genotypic data resulted in 591 mRNA cis-eQTLs and 62 miRNA cis-eQTLs. mRNA cis-eQTLs were significantly enriched for AD diagnosis and AD symptom counts (adj. p = 0.014 and p = 0.024, respectively) in AD GWAS signals in a large, independent genetic sample from the Collaborative Study on Genetics of Alcohol (COGA). In conclusion, our study identified putative gene network hubs coordinating mRNA and miRNA co-expression changes in the NAc of AD subjects, and our genetic (cis-eQTL) analysis provides novel insights into the etiological mechanisms of AD. PMID:26381263

  15. Prenylation differentially inhibits insulin-dependent immediate early gene mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Franklin, J Lee; Amsler, Maggie O; Messina, Joseph L

    2016-06-01

    Increased activity of prenyl transferases is observed in pathological states of insulin resistance, diabetes, and obesity. Thus, functional inhibitors of farnesyl transferase (FTase) and geranylgeranyl transferase (GGTase) may be promising therapeutic treatments. We previously identified insulin responsive genes from a rat H4IIE hepatoma cell cDNA library, including β-actin, EGR1, Pip92, c-fos, and Hsp60. In the present study, we investigated whether acute treatment with FTase and GGTase inhibitors would alter insulin responsive gene initiation and/or elongation rates. We observed differential regulation of insulin responsive gene expression, suggesting a differential sensitivity of these genes to one or both of the specific protein prenylation inhibitors. PMID:27086854

  16. Polymorphisms of the IL8 gene correlate with milking traits, SCS and mRNA level in Chinese Holstein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renjin; Yang, Zhangping; Ji, Dejun; Mao, Yongjiang; Chen, Ying; Li, Yunlong; Wu, Haitao; Wang, Xiaolong; Chang, Lingling

    2011-08-01

    To explore the relation of Interleukin-8 (IL8) gene polymorphism with immunity against mastitis in dairy cow, the polymorphism of IL8 gene was investigated in 610 Chinese Holstein cow from 30 bull families in a dairy farm in Shanghai using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) technique, and milk yield, milk fat percentage, milk protein percentage, 305 day corrected milk yield, 305 day milk fat yield, 305 day milk protein yield and somatic cell score (SCS) were measured and analyzed, and the mRNA levels of IL8 genotypes in blood were detected by real-time PCR. The results showed that three genotypes, KK, KA and AA were detected with frequencies of 0.187, 0.451, and 0.362, respectively. The gene frequencies of K and A were 0.412 and 0.588, respectively. The significant association of the IL8 mutations with milk yield, 305 day milk protein yield, 305 day corrected milk yield and 305 day milk fat yield, SCS, and significant association with milk protein percentage were identified, while their association with milk fat percentage were not significant. KK had higher milk yield, 305 day milk protein yield, 305 day corrected milk yield and 305 day milk fat yield than AA or KA, and the least square mean of SCS of KK was significantly lower than that of AA or KA. AA had significant lower milk protein yield than KK or KA. The relative IL8 mRNA level of KK in blood was the highest. These findings demonstrated that IL8 genotype significantly correlated with mastitis resistance and the locus could be a useful genetic marker for mastitis resistance selection and breeding in Chinese Holstein. PMID:21113675

  17. Control of gene expression by mRNA transport and turnover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genes are regulated primarily by their rate of transcript initiation. However, recent research in eukaryotic transcript degradation, export, and localization indicate that these processes contribute significantly to the amount of any given transcript in a cell. This review chapter looks at general...

  18. Cholesterol Status Modulates mRNA and Protein Levels of Genes Associated with Cholesterol Metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary saturated (S), monounsaturated (MU) and polyunsaturated (PU) fatty acids (FA) and cholesterol have been shown to be major determinants of plasma lipoprotein profiles. The objective was to determine the effect of whole body cholesterol status and dietary fatty acid saturation on genes associ...

  19. Translational control of germ cell-expressed mRNA imposed by alternative splicing: opioid peptide gene expression in rat testis.

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, J E; Collard, M W; Douglass, J O

    1989-01-01

    The three genes encoding the opioid peptide precursors (prodynorphin, proenkephalin, and proopiomelanocortin) are expressed in the rat testis. The sizes of the three opioid mRNAs in the testis differ from the sizes of the corresponding mRNAs in other rat tissues in which these genes are expressed. The smaller testicular proopiomelanocortin mRNA has previously been demonstrated to arise from alternative transcriptional initiation. In the present study, we found that the smaller testicular prodynorphin mRNA, expressed in Sertoli cells, results from alternative mRNA processing. Exon 2, which makes up 5' untranslated sequence, is removed from the mature transcript. Polysome analysis of brain and testis RNA indicates that the alteration of the prodynorphin leader sequence in the testis-specific transcript does not affect the efficiency of translation of this mRNA. The larger testicular proenkephalin transcript, expressed in developing germ cells, also results from alternative mRNA processing. Alternative acceptor site usage in the splicing of intron A results in a germ cell-specific proenkephalin transcript with a 491-nucleotide 5' untranslated leader sequence preceding the preproenkephalin-coding sequence. Polysome analysis indicates that this germ cell-specific proenkephalin mRNA is not efficiently translated. Mechanisms by which alternative mRNA splicing may serve to confer translational regulation upon the testicular proenkephalin transcript are discussed. Images PMID:2573832

  20. Early gene expression in bacteriophage T7. I. In vivo synthesis, inactivation, and translational utilization of early mRNA's.

    PubMed

    Hercules, K; Jovanovich, S; Sauerbrier, W

    1976-02-01

    In vivo decay rates for the individual T7 early mRNA species were determined. The physical half-lives, measured at 37 C, range from 1.1 min for gene 0.7 RNA to 4.5 min for gene 0.3 RNA. Physical half-lives, as observed after rifampin inhibition of RNA synthesis and polyacylamide electrophoresis of RNAs, are approximately 30% longer than functional half-lives, as observed by 14C-labeled amino acid uptake into individual T7 early proteins. The different RNA species are synthesized at grossly different rates, 0.3 RNA at four times the rate of 1.0 RNA, 0.7 RNA at twice the rate, and 1.1 and 1.3 RNAs at about the same or a slightly lower rate than 1.0 RNA. Rho-factor-mediated termination of transcription behind genes 0.3, 0.7, and perhaps behind 1.0 is inferred from these data. The in vivo translational utilization of the individual T7 early-message species was found to vary by not more than a factor of 2. PMID:1255850

  1. Parameter estimation methods for gene circuit modeling from time-series mRNA data: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ming; Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Wang, Xiaolei; Wang, Suojin; Gao, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Parameter estimation is a challenging computational problem in the reverse engineering of biological systems. Because advances in biotechnology have facilitated wide availability of time-series gene expression data, systematic parameter estimation of gene circuit models from such time-series mRNA data has become an important method for quantitatively dissecting the regulation of gene expression. By focusing on the modeling of gene circuits, we examine here the performance of three types of state-of-the-art parameter estimation methods: population-based methods, online methods and model-decomposition-based methods. Our results show that certain population-based methods are able to generate high-quality parameter solutions. The performance of these methods, however, is heavily dependent on the size of the parameter search space, and their computational requirements substantially increase as the size of the search space increases. In comparison, online methods and model decomposition-based methods are computationally faster alternatives and are less dependent on the size of the search space. Among other things, our results show that a hybrid approach that augments computationally fast methods with local search as a subsequent refinement procedure can substantially increase the quality of their parameter estimates to the level on par with the best solution obtained from the population-based methods while maintaining high computational speed. These suggest that such hybrid methods can be a promising alternative to the more commonly used population-based methods for parameter estimation of gene circuit models when limited prior knowledge about the underlying regulatory mechanisms makes the size of the parameter search space vastly large. PMID:25818863

  2. An international comparability study on quantification of mRNA gene expression ratios: CCQM-P103.1.

    PubMed

    Devonshire, Alison S; Sanders, Rebecca; Whale, Alexandra S; Nixon, Gavin J; Cowen, Simon; Ellison, Stephen L R; Parkes, Helen; Pine, P Scott; Salit, Marc; McDaniel, Jennifer; Munro, Sarah; Lund, Steve; Matsukura, Satoko; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Kawaharasaki, Mamoru; Granjeiro, José Mauro; Falagan-Lotsch, Priscila; Saraiva, Antonio Marcos; Couto, Paulo; Yang, Inchul; Kwon, Hyerim; Park, Sang-Ryoul; Demšar, Tina; Žel, Jana; Blejec, Andrej; Milavec, Mojca; Dong, Lianhua; Zhang, Ling; Sui, Zhiwei; Wang, Jing; Viroonudomphol, Duangkamol; Prawettongsopon, Chaiwat; Partis, Lina; Baoutina, Anna; Emslie, Kerry; Takatsu, Akiko; Akyurek, Sema; Akgoz, Muslum; Vonsky, Maxim; Konopelko, L A; Cundapi, Edna Matus; Urquiza, Melina Pérez; Huggett, Jim F; Foy, Carole A

    2016-06-01

    Measurement of RNA can be used to study and monitor a range of infectious and non-communicable diseases, with profiling of multiple gene expression mRNA transcripts being increasingly applied to cancer stratification and prognosis. An international comparison study (Consultative Committee for Amount of Substance (CCQM)-P103.1) was performed in order to evaluate the comparability of measurements of RNA copy number ratio for multiple gene targets between two samples. Six exogenous synthetic targets comprising of External RNA Control Consortium (ERCC) standards were measured alongside transcripts for three endogenous gene targets present in the background of human cell line RNA. The study was carried out under the auspices of the Nucleic Acids (formerly Bioanalysis) Working Group of the CCQM. It was coordinated by LGC (United Kingdom) with the support of National Institute of Standards and Technology (USA) and results were submitted from thirteen National Metrology Institutes and Designated Institutes. The majority of laboratories performed RNA measurements using RT-qPCR, with datasets also being submitted by two laboratories based on reverse transcription digital polymerase chain reaction and one laboratory using a next-generation sequencing method. In RT-qPCR analysis, the RNA copy number ratios between the two samples were quantified using either a standard curve or a relative quantification approach. In general, good agreement was observed between the reported results of ERCC RNA copy number ratio measurements. Measurements of the RNA copy number ratios for endogenous genes between the two samples were also consistent between the majority of laboratories. Some differences in the reported values and confidence intervals ('measurement uncertainties') were noted which may be attributable to choice of measurement method or quantification approach. This highlights the need for standardised practices for the calculation of fold change ratios and uncertainties in the

  3. Estrogen-dependent activation of the avian very low density apolipoprotein II and vitellogenin genes. Transient alterations in mRNA polyadenylation and stability early during induction.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, A W; Deeley, R G

    1988-10-01

    Administration of estrogen to egg-laying vertebrates activates unscheduled, hepatic expression of major, egg-yolk protein genes in immature animals and mature males. Two avian yolk protein genes, encoding very low density apolipoprotein II (apoVLDLII) and vitellogenin II, are dormant prior to stimulation with estrogen, but within three days their cognate mRNAs accumulate to become two of the most abundant species in the liver. Accumulation of these mRNAs has been attributed to both induction of transcription and selective, estrogen-dependent mRNA stabilization. We have detected alterations in the size of apoVLDLII mRNA that occur during the first 24 hours that are attributable to a shift in the extent of polyadenylation as steady-state is approached. In vitro transcription assays indicate that primary activation of both genes takes place relatively slowly and that maximal rates of mRNA accumulation occur when the apoVLDLII and vitellogenin II genes are expressed at only 30% and 10% of their fully induced levels, respectively. Transcription data combined with the structural alteration of apoVLDLII mRNA suggest that stability of the two mRNAs may change as steady-state is approached. We have assessed the compatibility of this suggestion with earlier estimates of the kinetics of accumulation of both mRNAs by developing a generally useful algorithm that predicts approach to steady-state kinetics under conditions where both the rate of synthesis and mRNA stability change throughout the accumulation phase of the response. The results predict that the stability of both mRNAs decreases by at least two- to threefold during the approach to steady-state and that, although an additional destabilization of apoVLDLII mRNA may occur following withdrawal of estrogen, the steady-state stability of vitellogenin mRNA is not significantly decreased upon removal of hormone. PMID:3210227

  4. Comparative analyses of gene copy number and mRNA expression in GBM tumors and GBM xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, J. Graeme; Yeh, Ru-Fang; Ray, Amrita; Wang, Nicholas J.; Smirnov, Ivan; Yu, Mamie; Hariono, Sujatmi; Silber, Joachim; Feiler, Heidi S.; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.; Vandenberg, Scott R.; Berger, Mitchel S.; James, C. David

    2009-04-03

    Development of model systems that recapitulate the molecular heterogeneity observed among glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors will expedite the testing of targeted molecular therapeutic strategies for GBM treatment. In this study, we profiled DNA copy number and mRNA expression in 21 independent GBM tumor lines maintained as subcutaneous xenografts (GBMX), and compared GBMX molecular signatures to those observed in GBM clinical specimens derived from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The predominant copy number signature in both tumor groups was defined by chromosome-7 gain/chromosome-10 loss, a poor-prognosis genetic signature. We also observed, at frequencies similar to that detected in TCGA GBM tumors, genomic amplification and overexpression of known GBM oncogenes, such as EGFR, MDM2, CDK6, and MYCN, and novel genes, including NUP107, SLC35E3, MMP1, MMP13, and DDX1. The transcriptional signature of GBMX tumors, which was stable over multiple subcutaneous passages, was defined by overexpression of genes involved in M phase, DNA replication, and chromosome organization (MRC) and was highly similar to the poor-prognosis mitosis and cell-cycle module (MCM) in GBM. Assessment of gene expression in TCGA-derived GBMs revealed overexpression of MRC cancer genes AURKB, BIRC5, CCNB1, CCNB2, CDC2, CDK2, and FOXM1, which form a transcriptional network important for G2/M progression and/or checkpoint activation. Our study supports propagation of GBM tumors as subcutaneous xenografts as a useful approach for sustaining key molecular characteristics of patient tumors, and highlights therapeutic opportunities conferred by this GBMX tumor panel for testing targeted therapeutic strategies for GBM treatment.

  5. Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis requires an endoribonuclease-containing multisubunit complex that controls mRNA levels for the matrix gene repressor SinR.

    PubMed

    DeLoughery, Aaron; Dengler, Vanina; Chai, Yunrong; Losick, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis is largely governed by a circuit in which the response regulator Spo0A turns on the gene for the anti-repressor SinI. SinI, in turn, binds to and inactivates SinR, a dedicated repressor of genes for matrix production. Mutants of the genes ylbF, ymcA and yaaT are blocked in biofilm formation, but the mechanism by which they act has been mysterious. A recent report attributed their role in biofilm formation to stimulating Spo0A activity. However, we detect no measurable effect on the transcription of sinI. Instead, we find that the block in biofilm formation is caused by an increase in the levels of SinR and of its mRNA. Evidence is presented that YlbF, YmcA and YaaT interact with, and control the activity of, RNase Y, which is known to destabilize sinR mRNA. We also show that the processing of another target of RNase Y, cggR-gapA mRNA, similarly depends on YlbF and YmcA. Our work suggests that sinR mRNA stability is an additional posttranscriptional control mechanism governing the switch to multicellularity and raises the possibility that YlbF, YmcA and YaaT broadly regulate mRNA stability as part of an RNase Y-containing, multi-subunit complex. PMID:26434553

  6. Colorimetric In Situ Hybridization Identifies MYC Gene Signal Clusters Correlating With Increased Copy Number, mRNA, and Protein in Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Carlo; Kendrick, Samantha; Johnson, Nathalie; Gascoyne, Randy; Chan, Wing C.; Weisenburger, Dennis; Braziel, Rita; Cook, James R.; Tubbs, Raymond; Campo, Elias; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Delabie, Jan; Jaffe, Elaine; Zhang, Wenjun; Brunhoeber, Patrick; Nitta, Hiro; Grogan, Tom; Rimsza, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities of the MYC oncogene on chromosome 8 are characteristic of Burkitt lymphoma and other aggressive B-cell lymphomas, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We recently described a colorimetric in situ hybridization (CISH) method for detecting extra copies of the MYC gene in DLBCL and the frequent occurrence of excess copies of discrete MYC signals in the context of diploidy or polyploidy of chromosome 8, which correlated with increased mRNA signals. We further observed enlarged MYC signals, which were counted as a single gene copy but, by their dimension and unusual shape, likely consisted of “clusters” of MYC genes. In this study, we sought to further characterize these clusters of MYC signals by determining whether the presence of these correlated with other genetic features, mRNA levels, protein, and overall survival. We found that MYC clusters correlated with an abnormal MYC locus and with increased mRNA. MYC mRNA correlated with protein levels, and both increased mRNA and protein correlated with poorer overall survival. MYC clusters were seen in both the germinal center and activated B-cell subtypes of DLBCL. Clusters of MYC signals may be an underappreciated, but clinically important, feature of aggressive B-cell lymphomas with potential prognostic and therapeutic relevance. PMID:23355209

  7. In situ, real-time catabolic gene expression: Extraction and characterization of naphthalene dioxygenase mRNA transcripts from groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.S.; Bakermans, C.; Madsen, E.L.

    1999-01-01

    The authors developed procedures for isolating and characterizing in situ-transcribed mRNA from groundwater microorganisms catabolizing naphthalene at a coal tar waste-contaminated site. Groundwater was pumped through 0.22-{micro}m-pore-size filters, which were then frozen to dry ice-ethanol. RNA was extracted from the frozen filters by boiling sodium dodecyl sulfate lysis and acidic phenol-chloroform extraction. Transcript characterization was performed with a series of PCR primers designed to amplify nahAc homologs. Several primer pairs were found to amplify nahAc homologs representing the entire diversity of the naphthalene-degrading genes. The environmental RNA extract was reverse transcribed, and the resultant mixture of cDNAs was amplified by PCR. A digoxigenin-labeled probe mixture was produced by PCR amplification of groundwater cDNA. This probe mixture hybridized under stringent conditions with the corresponding PCR products from naphthalene-degrading bacteria carrying a variety of nahAc homologs, indicating that diverse dioxygenase transcripts had been retrieved from groundwater. Diluted and undiluted cDNA preparations were independently amplified, and 28 of the resulting PCR products were cloned and sequenced. Sequence comparisons revealed two major groups related to the dioxygenase genes ndoB and dntAc, previously cloned from Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9816-4 and Burkholderia sp. strain DNT, respectively. A distinctive subgroup of sequences was found only in experiments performed with the undiluted cDNA preparation. To the authors` knowledge, these results are the first to directly document in situ transcription of genes encoding naphthalene catabolism at a contaminated site by indigenous microorganisms. The retrieved sequences represent greater diversity than has been detected at the study site by culture-based approaches.

  8. Expression of multiple Bacillus subtilis genes is controlled by decay of slrA mRNA from Rho-dependent 3′ ends

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Kearns, Daniel B.; Bechhofer, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Timely turnover of RNA is an important element in the control of bacterial gene expression, but relatively few specific targets of RNA turnover regulation are known. Deletion of the Bacillus subtilis pnpA gene, encoding the major 3′ exonuclease turnover enzyme, polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), was shown previously to cause a motility defect correlated with a reduced level of the 32-gene fla/che flagellar biosynthesis operon transcript. fla/che operon transcript abundance has been shown to be inhibited by an excess of the small regulatory protein, SlrA, and here we find that slrA mRNA accumulated in the pnpA-deletion mutant. Mutation of slrA was epistatic to mutation of pnpA for the motility-related phenotype. Further, Rho-dependent termination was required for PNPase turnover of slrA mRNA. When the slrA gene was provided with a Rho-independent transcription terminator, gene regulation was no longer PNPase-dependent. Thus we show that the slrA transcript is a direct target of PNPase and that regulation of RNA turnover is a major determinant of motility gene expression. The interplay of specific transcription termination and mRNA decay mechanisms suggests selection for fine-tuning of gene expression. PMID:26857544

  9. Methylation and mRNA expression levels of P15, death-associated protein kinase, and suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 genes in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin; Tan, Lin; He, Zhenxin

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to investigate the methylation status and mRNA expression levels of P15, death-associated protein kinase (DAPK), and suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS1) genes in multiple myeloma (MM). Materials and Methods: The bone marrow samples of 54 MM patients were collected and the methylation status of the P15, DAPK, and SOCS1 gene promoter regions was determined by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Automated sequencing technology was used to sequence the amplified products in order to analyze the base methylation sites. mRNA expression levels were determined using real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results: Among the 54 MM patients, the positive methylation rates of the P15, DAPK, and SOCS1 genes were 27.78%, 18.52%, and 16.67%, respectively. The methylation results were confirmed by sequencing. The positive methylation rates of the P15, DAPK, and SOCS1 genes showed no correlation with patient gender, age, typing, staging, and grouping (P>0.05). There was no significant difference in the mRNA expression levels of the P15, DAPK, and SOCS1 genes between the MM patient group and the control group (P>0.05). Conclusions: Aberrant methylation of the P15, DAPK, and SOCS1 genes exists in MM, and these genes may play certain roles in pathogenesis of MM. There was no significant difference in mRNA expression levels between the methylated group and the non-methylated group, suggesting that these genes are regulated by other mechanisms during their transcription.

  10. Differential regulation of mRNA stability controls the transient expression of genes encoding Drosophila antimicrobial peptide with distinct immune response characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Youheng; Xiao, Qianghai; Zhang, Ting; Mou, Zongchun; You, Jia; Ma, Wei-Jun

    2009-01-01

    The tight regulation of transiently expressed antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with a distinct antimicrobial spectrum and different expression kinetics contributes greatly to the properly regulated immune response for resistance to pathogens and for the maintenance of mutualistic microbiota in Drosophila. The important role of differential regulation of AMP expression at the posttranscriptional level needs to be elucidated. It was observed that the highly expressed Cecropin A1 (CecA1) mRNA encoding a broad antimicrobial spectrum AMP against both bacteria and fungi decayed more quickly than did the moderately expressed Diptericin mRNA encoding AMP against Gram negative bacteria. The mRNA stability of AMPs is differentially regulated and is attributed to the specific interaction between cis-acting ARE in 3′-UTR of AMP mRNA and the RNA destabilizing protein transactor Tis11 as shown in co-immunoprecipitation of the Tis11 RNP complex with CecA1 mRNA but not other AMP mRNA. The p38MAPK was further demonstrated to play a crucial role in stabilizing ARE-bearing mRNAs by inhibiting Tis11-mediated degradation in LPS induced AMP expression. This evidence suggests an evolutionarily conserved and functionally important molecular basis for and effective approach to exact control of AMP gene expression. These mechanisms thereby orchestrate a well balanced and dynamic antimicrobial spectrum of innate immunity to resist infection and maintain resident microbiota properly. PMID:19726583

  11. Differential regulation of mRNA stability controls the transient expression of genes encoding Drosophila antimicrobial peptide with distinct immune response characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wei, Youheng; Xiao, Qianghai; Zhang, Ting; Mou, Zongchun; You, Jia; Ma, Wei-Jun

    2009-10-01

    The tight regulation of transiently expressed antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with a distinct antimicrobial spectrum and different expression kinetics contributes greatly to the properly regulated immune response for resistance to pathogens and for the maintenance of mutualistic microbiota in Drosophila. The important role of differential regulation of AMP expression at the posttranscriptional level needs to be elucidated. It was observed that the highly expressed Cecropin A1 (CecA1) mRNA encoding a broad antimicrobial spectrum AMP against both bacteria and fungi decayed more quickly than did the moderately expressed Diptericin mRNA encoding AMP against Gram negative bacteria. The mRNA stability of AMPs is differentially regulated and is attributed to the specific interaction between cis-acting ARE in 3'-UTR of AMP mRNA and the RNA destabilizing protein transactor Tis11 as shown in co-immunoprecipitation of the Tis11 RNP complex with CecA1 mRNA but not other AMP mRNA. The p38MAPK was further demonstrated to play a crucial role in stabilizing ARE-bearing mRNAs by inhibiting Tis11-mediated degradation in LPS induced AMP expression. This evidence suggests an evolutionarily conserved and functionally important molecular basis for and effective approach to exact control of AMP gene expression. These mechanisms thereby orchestrate a well balanced and dynamic antimicrobial spectrum of innate immunity to resist infection and maintain resident microbiota properly. PMID:19726583

  12. Changes in Denitrifier Abundance, Denitrification Gene mRNA Levels, Nitrous Oxide Emissions, and Denitrification in Anoxic Soil Microcosms Amended with Glucose and Plant Residues▿

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Sherri L.; Dandie, Catherine E.; Patten, Cheryl L.; Zebarth, Bernie J.; Burton, David L.; Trevors, Jack T.; Goyer, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    In agricultural cropping systems, crop residues are sources of organic carbon (C), an important factor influencing denitrification. The effects of red clover, soybean, and barley plant residues and of glucose on denitrifier abundance, denitrification gene mRNA levels, nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, and denitrification rates were quantified in anoxic soil microcosms for 72 h. nosZ gene abundances and mRNA levels significantly increased in response to all organic carbon treatments over time. In contrast, the abundance and mRNA levels of Pseudomonas mandelii and closely related species (nirSP) increased only in glucose-amended soil: the nirSP guild abundance increased 5-fold over the 72-h incubation period (P < 0.001), while the mRNA level significantly increased more than 15-fold at 12 h (P < 0.001) and then subsequently decreased. The nosZ gene abundance was greater in plant residue-amended soil than in glucose-amended soil. Although plant residue carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratios varied from 15:1 to 30:1, nosZ gene and mRNA levels were not significantly different among plant residue treatments, with an average of 3.5 × 107 gene copies and 6.9 × 107 transcripts g−1 dry soil. Cumulative N2O emissions and denitrification rates increased over 72 h in both glucose- and plant-tissue-C-treated soil. The nirSP and nosZ communities responded differently to glucose and plant residue amendments. However, the targeted denitrifier communities responded similarly to the different plant residues under the conditions tested despite changes in the quality of organic C and different C:N ratios. PMID:20154105

  13. Two distinct genes for ADP/ATP translocase are expressed at the mRNA level in adult human liver

    SciTech Connect

    Houldsworth, J.; Attardi, G.

    1988-01-01

    Several clones hybridizing with a bovine ADP/ATP translocase cDNA were isolated from an adult human liver cDNA library in the vector pEX1. DNA sequence analysis revealed that these clones encode two distinct forms of translocase. In particular, two clones specifying the COOH-end-proximal five-sixths of the protein exhibit a 9% amino acid sequence divergence and totally dissimilar 3' untranslated regions. One of these cDNAs is nearly identical in sequence to an ADP/ATP translocase clone (hp2F1) recently isolated from a human fibroblast cDNA library with three amino acid changes and a few differences in the 3' untranslated region. Another clone isolated from the pEX1 library contains a reading frame encoding the remaining, NH/sub 2/-end-proximal, 37 amino acids of the translocase. This sequence differs significantly (14% amino acid sequence divergence) from the corresponding segment of hp2F1, and the 5' untranslated regions of the two clones are totally dissimilar. RNA transfer hybridization experiments utilizing the clones isolated from the pEX1 library revealed the presence in HeLa cells of three distinct mRNA species. The pattern of hybridization and the sizes of these mRNAs suggest a greater complexity of organization and expression of the ADP/ATP translocase genes in human cells than indicated by the analysis of the cDNA clones.

  14. Optimization of the piggyBac Transposon Using mRNA and Insulators: Toward a More Reliable Gene Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Bire, Solenne; Ley, Déborah; Casteret, Sophie; Mermod, Nicolas; Bigot, Yves; Rouleux-Bonnin, Florence

    2013-01-01

    Integrating and expressing stably a transgene into the cellular genome remain major challenges for gene-based therapies and for bioproduction purposes. While transposon vectors mediate efficient transgene integration, expression may be limited by epigenetic silencing, and persistent transposase expression may mediate multiple transposition cycles. Here, we evaluated the delivery of the piggyBac transposase messenger RNA combined with genetically insulated transposons to isolate the transgene from neighboring regulatory elements and stabilize expression. A comparison of piggyBac transposase expression from messenger RNA and DNA vectors was carried out in terms of expression levels, transposition efficiency, transgene expression and genotoxic effects, in order to calibrate and secure the transposition-based delivery system. Messenger RNA reduced the persistence of the transposase to a narrow window, thus decreasing side effects such as superfluous genomic DNA cleavage. Both the CTF/NF1 and the D4Z4 insulators were found to mediate more efficient expression from a few transposition events. We conclude that the use of engineered piggyBac transposase mRNA and insulated transposons offer promising ways of improving the quality of the integration process and sustaining the expression of transposon vectors. PMID:24312663

  15. FGFR1 mRNA and Protein Expression, not Gene Copy Number, Predict FGFR TKI Sensitivity Across All Lung Cancer Histologies

    PubMed Central

    Wynes, Murry W.; Hinz, Trista K.; Gao, Dexiang; Martini, Michael; Marek, Lindsay A.; Ware, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Michael G.; Böhm, Diana; Perner, Sven; Helfrich, Barbara A.; Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Jassem, Jacek; Wojtylak, Szymon; Sejda, Aleksandra; Gozgit, Joseph M.; Bunn, Paul A.; Camidge, D. Ross; Tan, Aik-Choon; Hirsch, Fred R.; Heasley, Lynn E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose FGFR1 gene copy number (GCN) is being evaluated as a biomarker for FGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) response in squamous-cell lung cancers (SCC). The exclusive use of FGFR1 GCN for predicting FGFR TKI sensitivity assumes increased GCN is the only mechanism for biologically-relevant increases in FGFR1 signaling. Herein, we tested whether FGFR1 mRNA and protein expression may serve as better biomarkers of FGFR TKI sensitivity in lung cancer. Experimental Design Histologically diverse lung cancer cell lines were submitted to assays for ponatinib sensitivity, a potent FGFR TKI. A tissue microarray comprised of resected lung tumors was submitted to FGFR1 GCN and mRNA analyses and the results were validated with TCGA lung cancer data. Results 14/58 cell lines exhibited ponatinib sensitivity (IC50 values ≤ 50 nM) that correlated with FGFR1 mRNA and protein expression, but not with FGFR1 GCN or histology. Moreover, ponatinib sensitivity associated with mRNA expression of the ligands, FGF2 and FGF9. In resected tumors, 22% of adenocarcinomas and 28% of SCCs expressed high FGFR1 mRNA. Importantly, only 46% of SCCs with increased FGFR1 GCN expressed high mRNA. Lung cancer TCGA data validated these findings and unveiled overlap of FGFR1 mRNA positivity with KRAS and PIK3CA mutations. Conclusions FGFR1 dependency is frequent across various lung cancer histologies and FGFR1 mRNA may serve as a better biomarker of FGFR TKI response in lung cancer than FGFR1 GCN. The study provides important and timely insight into clinical testing of FGFR TKIs in lung cancer and other solid tumor types. PMID:24771645

  16. Cholesterol Side-Chain Cleavage Gene Expression in Theca Cells: Augmented Transcriptional Regulation and mRNA Stability in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nelson-DeGrave, Velen L.; Legro, Richard S.; Strauss, Jerome F.; McAllister, Jan M.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperandrogenism is characteristic of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Ovarian theca cells isolated from PCOS follicles and maintained in long-term culture produce elevated levels of progestins and androgens compared to normal theca cells. Augmented steroid production in PCOS theca cells is associated with changes in the expression of genes for several steroidogenic enzymes, including CYP11A1, which encodes cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage. Here, we further examined CYP11A1 gene expression, at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level in normal and PCOS theca cells propagated in long-term culture utilizing quantitative RT-PCR, functional promoter analyses, and mRNA degradation studies. The minimal element(s) that conferred increased basal and cAMP-dependent CYP11A1 promoter function were determined. CYP11A1 mRNA half-life in normal and PCOS theca cells was compared. Results of these cumulative studies showed that basal and forskolin stimulated steady state CYP11A1 mRNA abundance and CYP11A1 promoter activity were increased in PCOS theca cells. Deletion analysis of the CYP11A1 promoter demonstrated that augmented promoter function in PCOS theca cells results from increased basal regulation conferred by a minimal sequence between −160 and −90 bp of the transcriptional start site. The transcription factor, nuclear factor 1C2, was observed to regulate basal activity of this minimal CYP11A1 element. Examination of mRNA stability in normal and PCOS theca cells demonstrated that CYP11A1 mRNA half-life increased >2-fold, from approximately 9.22+/−1.62 h in normal cells, to 22.38+/−0.92 h in PCOS cells. Forskolin treatment did not prolong CYP11A1 mRNA stability in either normal or PCOS theca cells. The 5′-UTR of CYP11A1 mRNA confers increased basal mRNA stability in PCOS cells. In conclusion, these studies show that elevated steady state CYP11A1 mRNA abundance in PCOS cells results from increased transactivation of the CYP

  17. No change in mRNA expression of immune-related genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells challenged with Theileria annulata in Murrah buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Manjit; Kumar, Amod; Bhushan, Bharat; Ghosh, Srikant; Saravanan, B C; Sulabh, Sourabh; Parida, Subhashree; Gaur, Gyanendra Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) act as carrier to Theileria annulata and show less clinical sign of tropical theileriosis as compared to indigenous and exotic cattle. Differential expression of immune-related genes such as major histocompatibility complex, class II, DQ alpha 1 (MHC-DQα), signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPA), prion protein (PRNP), Toll-like receptor 10 (TLR10), c-musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog (cMAF) and V-maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog B (MAFB) genes influence host resistance to this disease in exotic, crossbred and indigenous cattle. In the present study we examined the differential mRNA expression of the abovesaid immune-related genes in response to T. annulata infection in buffaloes. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) harvested from blood samples of buffaloes were challenged with ground-up tick supernatant carrying T. annulata sporozoites in vitro. After 48h of in vitro challenge qPCR was employed to measure the relative mRNA expression of MHC-DQα, SIRPA, PRNP, TLR10, cMAF and MAFB genes in infected and control PBMCs. In the current study, the selected genes showed no change in mRNA expression after T.annulata infection which indicates that they have little role in providing host resistance to theileriosis in buffaloes. PMID:26997138

  18. Intrahepatic mRNA Expression of FAS, FASL, and FOXP3 Genes Is Associated with the Pathophysiology of Chronic HCV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Amoras, Ednelza da Silva Graça; Gomes, Samara Tatielle Monteiro; Freitas, Felipe Bonfim; Santana, Bárbara Brasil; Ishak, Geraldo; Ferreira de Araújo, Marialva Tereza; Demachki, Sâmia; Conde, Simone Regina Souza da Silva; Ishak, Marluísa de Oliveira Guimarães; Ishak, Ricardo; Vallinoto, Antonio Carlos Rosário

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the relative mRNA expression of Fas receptor (FAS), Fas ligand (FASL), and forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3) in liver biopsy specimens obtained from patients with viral and non-viral chronic hepatitis and correlate their expression with the fibrosis stage. A total of 51 liver biopsy specimens obtained from HBV (n = 6), HCV (n = 28), and non-viral hepatic disease (NVHD) (n = 9) patients and from individuals with normal liver histology (n = 8) (control—CT) were analyzed. Quantifications of the target genes were assessed using qPCR, and liver biopsies according to the METAVIR classification. The mRNA expression levels of FAS and FASL were lower in the CT group compared to the groups of patients. The increase in the mRNA expression of FAS and FASL was correlated with higher levels of inflammation and disease progression, followed by a decline in tissues with cirrhosis, and it was also associated with increased levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Higher mRNA expression of FOXP3 was observed in the HCV and NVHD groups, with the peak observed among patients with cirrhosis. The increased FOXP3 mRNA expression was positively correlated with increased FAS and FASL mRNA expression and the AST and ALT levels in all patients. Conclusions: These results suggest that regardless of the cause, the course of chronic liver disease may be modulated by the analyzed genes and correlated with an increase in regulatory T cells during the liver damage followed by hepatocyte destruction by Fas/FasL system and subsequent non specific lymphocytic infiltrate accumulation. PMID:27243827

  19. Post-transcriptional Repair of a Split Heat Shock Protein 90 Gene by mRNA trans-Splicing*♦

    PubMed Central

    Nageshan, Rishi Kumar; Roy, Nainita; Hehl, Adrian B.; Tatu, Utpal

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 participates in diverse biological processes ranging from protein folding, cell cycle, signal transduction and development to evolution in all eukaryotes. It is also critically involved in regulating growth of protozoa such as Dictyostelium discoideum, Leishmania donovani, Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Trypanosoma evansi. Selective inhibition of Hsp90 has also been explored as an intervention strategy against important human diseases such as cancer, malaria, or trypanosomiasis. Giardia lamblia, a simple protozoan parasite of humans and animals, is an important cause of diarrheal disease with significant morbidity and some mortality in tropical countries. Here we show that the G. lamblia cytosolic hsp90 (glhsp90) is split in two similar sized fragments located 777 kb apart on the same scaffold. Intrigued by this unique arrangement, which appears to be specific for the Giardiinae, we have investigated the biosynthesis of GlHsp90. We used genome sequencing to confirm the split nature of the giardial hsp90. However, a specific antibody raised against the peptide detected a product with a mass of about 80 kDa, suggesting a post-transcriptional rescue of the genomic defect. We show evidence for the joining of the two independent Hsp90 transcripts in-trans to one long mature mRNA presumably by RNA splicing. The splicing junction carries hallmarks of classical cis-spliced introns, suggesting that the regular cis-splicing machinery may be sufficient for repair of the open reading frame. A complementary 26-nt sequence in the “intron” regions adjacent to the splice sites may assist in positioning the two pre-mRNAs for processing. This is the first example of post-transcriptional rescue of a split gene by trans-splicing. PMID:21209094

  20. Post-transcriptional repair of a split heat shock protein 90 gene by mRNA trans-splicing.

    PubMed

    Nageshan, Rishi Kumar; Roy, Nainita; Hehl, Adrian B; Tatu, Utpal

    2011-03-01

    Heat shock protein 90 participates in diverse biological processes ranging from protein folding, cell cycle, signal transduction and development to evolution in all eukaryotes. It is also critically involved in regulating growth of protozoa such as Dictyostelium discoideum, Leishmania donovani, Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Trypanosoma evansi. Selective inhibition of Hsp90 has also been explored as an intervention strategy against important human diseases such as cancer, malaria, or trypanosomiasis. Giardia lamblia, a simple protozoan parasite of humans and animals, is an important cause of diarrheal disease with significant morbidity and some mortality in tropical countries. Here we show that the G. lamblia cytosolic hsp90 (glhsp90) is split in two similar sized fragments located 777 kb apart on the same scaffold. Intrigued by this unique arrangement, which appears to be specific for the Giardiinae, we have investigated the biosynthesis of GlHsp90. We used genome sequencing to confirm the split nature of the giardial hsp90. However, a specific antibody raised against the peptide detected a product with a mass of about 80 kDa, suggesting a post-transcriptional rescue of the genomic defect. We show evidence for the joining of the two independent Hsp90 transcripts in-trans to one long mature mRNA presumably by RNA splicing. The splicing junction carries hallmarks of classical cis-spliced introns, suggesting that the regular cis-splicing machinery may be sufficient for repair of the open reading frame. A complementary 26-nt sequence in the "intron" regions adjacent to the splice sites may assist in positioning the two pre-mRNAs for processing. This is the first example of post-transcriptional rescue of a split gene by trans-splicing. PMID:21209094

  1. In Vivo mRNA Profiling of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli from Diverse Phylogroups Reveals Common and Group-Specific Gene Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Bielecki, Piotr; Muthukumarasamy, Uthayakumar; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Bielecka, Agata; Pohl, Sarah; Schanz, Ansgar; Niemeyer, Ute; Oumeraci, Tonio; von Neuhoff, Nils; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT mRNA profiling of pathogens during the course of human infections gives detailed information on the expression levels of relevant genes that drive pathogenicity and adaptation and at the same time allows for the delineation of phylogenetic relatedness of pathogens that cause specific diseases. In this study, we used mRNA sequencing to acquire information on the expression of Escherichia coli pathogenicity genes during urinary tract infections (UTI) in humans and to assign the UTI-associated E. coli isolates to different phylogenetic groups. Whereas the in vivo gene expression profiles of the majority of genes were conserved among 21 E. coli strains in the urine of elderly patients suffering from an acute UTI, the specific gene expression profiles of the flexible genomes was diverse and reflected phylogenetic relationships. Furthermore, genes transcribed in vivo relative to laboratory media included well-described virulence factors, small regulatory RNAs, as well as genes not previously linked to bacterial virulence. Knowledge on relevant transcriptional responses that drive pathogenicity and adaptation of isolates to the human host might lead to the introduction of a virulence typing strategy into clinical microbiology, potentially facilitating management and prevention of the disease. PMID:25096872

  2. The Lactobacillus acidophilus S-layer protein gene expression site comprises two consensus promoter sequences, one of which directs transcription of stable mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Boot, H J; Kolen, C P; Andreadaki, F J; Leer, R J; Pouwels, P H

    1996-01-01

    S-proteins are proteins which form a regular structure (S-layer) on the outside of the cell walls of many bacteria. Two S-protein-encoding genes are located in opposite directions on a 6.0-kb segment of the chromosome of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 bacteria. Inversion of this chromosomal segment occurs through recombination between two regions with identical sequences, thereby interchanging the expressed and the silent genes. In this study, we show that the region involved in recombination also has a function in efficient S-protein production. Two promoter sequences are present in the S-protein gene expression site, although only the most downstream promoter (P-1) is used to direct mRNA synthesis. S-protein mRNA directed by this promoter has a half-life of 15 min. Its untranslated leader can form a stable secondary structure in which the 5' end is base paired, whereas the ribosome-binding site is exposed. Truncation of this leader sequence results in a reduction in protein production, as shown by reporter gene analysis of Lactobacillus casei. The results obtained indicate that the untranslated leader sequence of S-protein mRNA is involved in efficient S-protein production. PMID:8808926

  3. HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENES1 Is Required for Circadian Periodicity through the Promotion of Nucleo-Cytoplasmic mRNA Export in Arabidopsis[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor, Dana R.; Gould, Peter; Foreman, Julia; Griffiths, Jayne; Bird, Susannah; Page, Rhiannon; Stewart, Kelly; Steel, Gavin; Young, Jack; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Millar, Andrew J.; Halliday, Karen J.; Hall, Anthony J.; Penfield, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Cold acclimation has been shown to be attenuated by the degradation of the INDUCER OF CBF EXPRESSION1 protein by the E3 ubiquitin ligase HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENES1 (HOS1). However, recent work has suggested that HOS1 may have a wider range of roles in plants than previously appreciated. Here, we show that hos1 mutants are affected in circadian clock function, exhibiting a long-period phenotype in a wide range of temperature and light environments. We demonstrate that hos1 mutants accumulate polyadenylated mRNA in the nucleus and that the circadian defect in hos1 is shared by multiple mutants with aberrant mRNA export, but not in a mutant attenuated in nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of microRNAs. As revealed by RNA sequencing, hos1 exhibits gross changes to the transcriptome with genes in multiple functional categories being affected. In addition, we show that hos1 and other previously described mutants with altered mRNA export affect cold signaling in a similar manner. Our data support a model in which altered mRNA export is important for the manifestation of hos1 circadian clock defects and suggest that HOS1 may indirectly affect cold signaling through disruption of the circadian clock. PMID:24254125

  4. Isolation of three testis-specific genes (TSA303, TSA806, TSA903) by a differential mRNA display method

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, Kouichi; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Hayashi, Seitaku; Nakamura, Yusuke

    1996-09-01

    We isolated three human testis-specific genes by a differential mRNA display method. The cDNAs contained open reading frames of 1620, 453, and 333 nucleotides, encoding 540, 151, 111 amino acids, respectively. The first of these genes, designated TSA303, encodes a novel protein homologous to TCP20, one of the subunits of the human TRiC chaperonin complex that can bind newly synthesized or unstable folding intermediates of polypeptides and assist substrate proteins in folding, assembly, and transport. The second, TSA806, encodes a novel protein containing 3.3 contiguous repeats of the cdc10/swi6 (ankyrin) motif that was originally found in products of cell cycle control genes of yeast and cell fate determination genes in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans. The third gene, TSA903, encodes a protein homologous to the C-terminal region of murine uridine monophosphate kinase. Northern blot analysis confirmed that in 16 human adult tissues examined, each of these genes was expressed specifically in the testis. From the results of cDNA screening of nearly 1 million plaques, the abundance of each transcript in a preparation of total mRNA was estimated as 0.0004% (TSA303), 0.0006% (TSA806), and 0.0002% (TSA903). Our results imply that the differential display method is a powerful tool for isolation of tissue-specific genes even if they are expressed at a level as low as 1 in several hundred thousand to a million molecules of total mRNA. 38 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  5. Gene expression profiling reveals differences in microenvironment interaction between patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia expressing high versus low ZAP70 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Stamatopoulos, Basile; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Equeter, Carole; Meuleman, Nathalie; Sorée, Anne; De Bruyn, Cécile; Hanosset, Delphine; Bron, Dominique; Martiat, Philippe; Lagneaux, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    Background Zeta-associated protein 70 (ZAP70) is a widely recognized prognostic factor in chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but mechanisms by which its higher expression leads to a poor outcome must still be fully explained. Design and Methods In an attempt to unveil unfavorable cellular properties linked to high ZAP70 expression, we used gene expression profiling to identify genes associated with disparities in B cells from chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients expressing high versus low ZAP70 mRNA, measured by quantitative real-time PCR. Two groups of 7 patients were compared, selected on the basis of either high or low ZAP70 mRNA expression. Results Twenty-seven genes were differentially expressed with an FDR<10%, and several genes were significant predictors of treatment-free survival (TFS) and/or overall survival; PDE8A and FCRL family genes (down-regulated in ZAP70+ patients) could predict TFS and overall survival; ITGA4 mRNA (up-regulated in ZAP70+ patients) could significantly predict overall survival. Importantly, gene set enrichment analysis revealed overrepresentation of adhesion/migration genes. We therefore investigated in vitro adhesion/migration capacity of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells into a stromal microenvironment or in response to conditioned medium. We showed that ZAP70+ cells had better adhesion/migration capacities and only ZAP70+ patient cells responded to microenvironment contact by CXCR4 downregulation. Conclusions We concluded that several prognostic factors are the reflection of microenvironment interactions and that the increased adhesion/migratory capacity of ZAP70+ cells in their microenvironment can explain their better survival and thus the aggressiveness of the disease. PMID:19377082

  6. alpha-Amanitin-insensitive transcription of mouse beta major-globin 5'-flanking and structural gene sequences correlates with mRNA expression.

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, D P; Ross, J

    1984-01-01

    A small proportion of the RNAs of mouse reticulocytes consists of beta major-globin mRNA sequences linked to sequences transcribed from the 5'-flanking region of the beta major-globin gene. These upstream RNAs are polyadenylylated and contain 700-800 nucleotides, and their 5' regions are heterogeneous. RNAs with similar or identical 5' regions are transcribed in cell-free extracts from a circular mouse beta major-globin gene template. Synthesis of most of the upstream RNAs in vitro is not inhibited by low levels (1 microgram/ml) of alpha-amanitin, indicating that they are transcribed by an enzyme(s) different from RNA polymerase II. During culture of mouse erythroleukemia cells with dimethyl sulfoxide, globin mRNA and upstream RNAs accumulate with similar kinetics. In contrast, upstream RNAs are not detected in hemin-treated cells. Images PMID:6595660

  7. Detection of Gene Expression in Genetically Engineered Microorganisms and Natural Phytoplankton Populations in the Marine Environment by mRNA Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pichard, Scott L; Paul, John H

    1991-06-01

    A simple method that combines guanidinium isothiocyanate RNA extraction and probing with antisense and sense RNA probes is described for analysis of microbial gene expression in planktonic populations. Probing of RNA sample extracts with sense-strand RNA probes was used as a control for nonspecific hybridization or contamination of mRNA with target DNA. This method enabled detection of expression of a plasmid-encoded neomycin phosphotransferase gene (nptII) in as few as 10Vibrio cells per ml in 100 ml of seawater. We have used this method to detect expression of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase large-subunit gene (rbcL) in Synechococcus cultures and natural phytoplankton populations in the Dry Tortugas, Florida. During a 36-h diel study, rbcL expression of the indigenous phytoplankton was greatest in the day, least at night (1100, 0300, and 0100 h), and variable at dawn or dusk (0700 and 1900 h). These results are the first report of gene expression in natural populations by mRNA isolation and probing. This methodology should be useful for the study of gene expression in microorganisms released into the environment for agricultural or bioremediation purposes and indigenous populations containing highly conserved target gene sequences. PMID:16348507

  8. Identification of Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimer-Responsive Genes Using UVB-Irradiated Human Keratinocytes Transfected with In Vitro-Synthesized Photolyase mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Boros, Gábor; Miko, Edit; Muramatsu, Hiromi; Weissman, Drew; Emri, Eszter; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Szegedi, Andrea; Horkay, Irén; Emri, Gabriella; Karikó, Katalin; Remenyik, Éva

    2015-01-01

    Major biological effects of UVB are attributed to cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), the most common photolesions formed on DNA. To investigate the contribution of CPDs to UVB-induced changes of gene expression, a model system was established by transfecting keratinocytes with pseudouridine-modified mRNA (Ψ-mRNA) encoding CPD-photolyase. Microarray analyses of this model system demonstrated that more than 50% of the gene expression altered by UVB was mediated by CPD photolesions. Functional classification of the gene targets revealed strong effects of CPDs on the regulation of the cell cycle and transcriptional machineries. To confirm the microarray data, cell cycle-regulatory genes, CCNE1 and CDKN2B that were induced exclusively by CPDs were selected for further investigation. Following UVB irradiation, expression of these genes increased significantly at both mRNA and protein levels, but not in cells transfected with CPD-photolyase Ψ-mRNA and exposed to photoreactivating light. Treatment of cells with inhibitors of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) blocked the UVB-dependent upregulation of both genes suggesting a role for JNK in relaying the signal of UVB-induced CPDs into transcriptional responses. Thus, photolyase mRNA-based experimental platform demonstrates CPD-dependent and -independent events of UVB-induced cellular responses, and, as such, has the potential to identify novel molecular targets for treatment of UVB-mediated skin diseases. PMID:26121660

  9. Expression of mRNA Encoding Mcu and Other Mitochondrial Calcium Regulatory Genes Depends on Cell Type, Neuronal Subtype, and Ca2+ Signaling.

    PubMed

    Márkus, Nóra M; Hasel, Philip; Qiu, Jing; Bell, Karen F S; Heron, Samuel; Kind, Peter C; Dando, Owen; Simpson, T Ian; Hardingham, Giles E

    2016-01-01

    Uptake of Ca2+ into the mitochondrial matrix controls cellular metabolism and survival-death pathways. Several genes are implicated in controlling mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake (mitochondrial calcium regulatory genes, MCRGs), however, less is known about the factors which influence their expression level. Here we have compared MCRG mRNA expression, in neural cells of differing type (cortical neurons vs. astrocytes), differing neuronal subtype (CA3 vs. CA1 hippocampus) and in response to Ca2+ influx, using a combination of qPCR and RNA-seq analysis. Of note, we find that the Mcu-regulating Micu gene family profile differs substantially between neurons and astrocytes, while expression of Mcu itself is markedly different between CA3 and CA1 regions in the adult hippocampus. Moreover, dynamic control of MCRG mRNA expression in response to membrane depolarization-induced Ca2+ influx is also apparent, resulting in repression of Letm1, as well as Mcu. Thus, the mRNA expression profile of MCRGs is not fixed, which may cause differences in the coupling between cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca2+, as well as diversity of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake mechanisms. PMID:26828201

  10. Expression of mRNA Encoding Mcu and Other Mitochondrial Calcium Regulatory Genes Depends on Cell Type, Neuronal Subtype, and Ca2+ Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Márkus, Nóra M.; Hasel, Philip; Qiu, Jing; Bell, Karen F. S.; Heron, Samuel; Kind, Peter C.; Dando, Owen; Simpson, T. Ian; Hardingham, Giles E.

    2016-01-01

    Uptake of Ca2+ into the mitochondrial matrix controls cellular metabolism and survival-death pathways. Several genes are implicated in controlling mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake (mitochondrial calcium regulatory genes, MCRGs), however, less is known about the factors which influence their expression level. Here we have compared MCRG mRNA expression, in neural cells of differing type (cortical neurons vs. astrocytes), differing neuronal subtype (CA3 vs. CA1 hippocampus) and in response to Ca2+ influx, using a combination of qPCR and RNA-seq analysis. Of note, we find that the Mcu-regulating Micu gene family profile differs substantially between neurons and astrocytes, while expression of Mcu itself is markedly different between CA3 and CA1 regions in the adult hippocampus. Moreover, dynamic control of MCRG mRNA expression in response to membrane depolarization-induced Ca2+ influx is also apparent, resulting in repression of Letm1, as well as Mcu. Thus, the mRNA expression profile of MCRGs is not fixed, which may cause differences in the coupling between cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca2+, as well as diversity of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake mechanisms. PMID:26828201

  11. Nonsense mutations in the rhodopsin gene that give rise to mild phenotypes trigger mRNA degradation in human cells by nonsense-mediated decay.

    PubMed

    Roman-Sanchez, Ramon; Wensel, Theodore G; Wilson, John H

    2016-04-01

    Eight different nonsense mutations in the human rhodopsin gene cause retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited degenerative disease of the retina that can lead to complete blindness. Although all these nonsense mutations lead to premature termination codons (PTCs) in rhodopsin mRNA, some display dominant inheritance, while others are recessive. Because nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) can degrade mRNAs containing PTCs and modulate the inheritance patterns of genetic diseases, we asked whether any of the nonsense mutations in the rhodopsin gene generated mRNAs that were susceptible to degradation by NMD. We hypothesized that nonsense mutations that caused mild RP phenotypes would trigger NMD, whereas those that did not engage NMD would cause more severe RP phenotypes-presumably due to the toxicity of the truncated protein. To test our hypothesis, we transfected human rhodopsin nonsense mutants into HEK293 and HT1080 human cells and measured transcript levels by qRT-PCR. In both cell lines, rhodopsin mutations Q64X and Q344X, which cause severe phenotypes that are dominantly inherited, yielded the same levels of rhodopsin mRNA as wild type. By contrast, rhodopsin mutations W161X and E249X, which cause recessive RP, showed decreased rhodopsin mRNA levels, consistent with NMD. Rhodopsin mutant Y136X, a dominant mutation that causes late-onset RP with a very mild pathology, also gave lower mRNA levels. Treatment of cells with Wortmannin, an inhibitor of NMD, eliminated the degradation of Y136X, W161X, and E249X rhodopsin mRNAs. These results suggest that NMD modulates the severity of RP in patients with nonsense mutations in the rhodopsin gene. PMID:26416182

  12. Chronic toxicity of pesticides to the mRNA expression levels of metallothioneins and cytochrome P450 1A genes in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Ceyhun, Saltuk Bugrahan; Aksakal, Ercüment; Kirim, Birsen; Atabeyoglu, Kübra; Erdogan, Orhan

    2012-03-01

    The hazardous effects of pesticides on various metabolic pathways are a great problem for environmental health and should be well determined. In the present study, the authors treated rainbow trout with 0.6 μg/L deltamethrin for 28 days and 1.6 mg/L 2,2-dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate for 21 days. After this time period, the authors observed alterations in mRNA expression levels of MT-A, MT-B and CYP-1A. Chronic exposure to low levels of pesticides may have a more significant effect on fish populations than acute poisoning. While both pesticides caused a significant increase on mRNA levels of MT-A and CYP-1A, MT-B mRNA levels were increased significantly only upon deltamethin administration. The significant increase in mRNA levels of the corresponding genes may be considered as a defence mechanism in addition to the antioxidants against oxidative stress, as well as a detoxification mechanism against adverse effects of pesticides. PMID:21665904

  13. The NR3C1 Glucocorticoid Receptor Gene Polymorphisms May Modulate the TGF-beta mRNA Expression in Asthma Patients.

    PubMed

    Panek, Michał; Pietras, Tadeusz; Fabijan, Artur; Zioło, Jan; Wieteska, Łukasz; Małachowska, Beata; Fendler, Wojciech; Szemraj, Janusz; Kuna, Piotr

    2015-08-01

    Glucocorticosteroids (GCs) are basic drugs in therapy of a number of diseases, including chronic diseases of the respiratory system. They are the most important anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of asthma. GCs after binding to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) form the complex (transcription factor), which acts on promoter and regulatory parts of genes enhancing the expression of anti-inflammatory proteins and decreasing the proinflammatory protein synthesis, including numerous cytokines mediating inflammation in the course of asthma. Non-sensitivity or resistance to GCs favours an increase in the TGF-β expression. This cytokine plays a central role in asthma inducing fibroblast differentiation and extracellular matrix synthesis. TGF-β isoforms, 1, 2 and 3, are located on chromosome 19q13, 1q41 and 14q24, respectively. GCs reduce TGF-β 1 and TGF-β 2 production and significantly decrease the expression of upregulated TGF-β 1 and TGF-β 2 mRNA induced by exogenous TGF-β. In asthma, TGF-β may play a role in the development of the peribronchiolar and subepithelial fibrosis, which contributes to a significant clinical exacerbation of asthma. Therefore, it is possible that NR3C1 glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphisms could exert varied effects on the TGF-β mRNA expression and fibrotic process in lungs of asthmatic patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of polymorphic forms (Tth111I, BclI, ER22/23EK, N363S) of the NR3C1 gene on the level of the TGF-β 1 mRNA expression. A total of 173 patients with asthma and 163 healthy volunteers participated in the study. Genotyping of Tth111I, BclI, ER22/23EK, and N363S polymorphisms of the NR3C1 gene was performed by using PCR-HRM and PCR-RFLP techniques. TGF-β mRNA was assessed by real time RT-PCR. Tth111I SNP significantly (p = 0.0115) correlated with the TGF-β 1 mRNA expression level. The significance of AA and GG genotypes of Tth111I SNP in increasing and decreasing the level of the TGF-β 1

  14. In vivo mRNA profiling of uropathogenic Escherichia coli from diverse phylogroups reveals common and group-specific gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Bielecki, Piotr; Muthukumarasamy, Uthayakumar; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Bielecka, Agata; Pohl, Sarah; Schanz, Ansgar; Niemeyer, Ute; Oumeraci, Tonio; von Neuhoff, Nils; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Häussler, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    mRNA profiling of pathogens during the course of human infections gives detailed information on the expression levels of relevant genes that drive pathogenicity and adaptation and at the same time allows for the delineation of phylogenetic relatedness of pathogens that cause specific diseases. In this study, we used mRNA sequencing to acquire information on the expression of Escherichia coli pathogenicity genes during urinary tract infections (UTI) in humans and to assign the UTI-associated E. coli isolates to different phylogenetic groups. Whereas the in vivo gene expression profiles of the majority of genes were conserved among 21 E. coli strains in the urine of elderly patients suffering from an acute UTI, the specific gene expression profiles of the flexible genomes was diverse and reflected phylogenetic relationships. Furthermore, genes transcribed in vivo relative to laboratory media included well-described virulence factors, small regulatory RNAs, as well as genes not previously linked to bacterial virulence. Knowledge on relevant transcriptional responses that drive pathogenicity and adaptation of isolates to the human host might lead to the introduction of a virulence typing strategy into clinical microbiology, potentially facilitating management and prevention of the disease. Importance: Urinary tract infections (UTI) are very common; at least half of all women experience UTI, most of which are caused by pathogenic Escherichia coli strains. In this study, we applied massive parallel cDNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to provide unbiased, deep, and accurate insight into the nature and the dimension of the uropathogenic E. coli gene expression profile during an acute UTI within the human host. This work was undertaken to identify key players in physiological adaptation processes and, hence, potential targets for new infection prevention and therapy interventions specifically aimed at sabotaging bacterial adaptation to the human host. PMID:25096872

  15. mRNA expression profile of multidrug-resistant genes in acute lymphoblastic leukemia of children, a prognostic value for ABCA3 and ABCA2.

    PubMed

    Rahgozar, Soheila; Moafi, Alireza; Abedi, Marjan; Entezar-E-Ghaem, Mansureh; Moshtaghian, Jamal; Ghaedi, Kamran; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Montazeri, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is an important cause of treatment failure in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The ABC family of membrane transporters is proposed, albeit with controversy, to be involved in this process. The present study aims to investigate the mRNA expression profile of several genes of this family, including ABCA2, ABCA3, ABCB1/MDR1, MRP1/ABCC1, MRP3/ABCC3, ABCG2/BCRP, and the intracellular transporter MVP/LRP, in childhood ALL, and to evaluate their association with response to therapy. Some genes in the present research are being studied for the first time in Iran. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we evaluated 27 children with ALL at diagnosis and 15 children with normal bone marrow. The status of response to therapy was assessed one year after the onset of therapy through investigating the IgH/TCRγ gene rearrangements. Our findings indicate a considerable and direct relationship between mRNA expression levels of ABCA2, ABCA3, MDR1, and MRP1 genes and positive minimal residual disease (MRD) measured after one year of treatment. Statistical analysis revealed that expression of these genes higher than the cutoff point will raise the risk of MRD by 15-, 6.25-, 12-, and 9-fold, respectively. No relationship was found between of MVP/LRP, MRP3 and ABCG2 genes expression and ALL prognoses. Considering the direct and significant relationship between the increased expression of ABCA2, ABCA3, MDR1, and MRP1 genes and positive risk of MRD in children with ALL, evaluating the expression profile of these genes on diagnosis may identify high risk individuals and help plan a more efficient treatment strategy. PMID:24145140

  16. Evidence for genetic regulation of mRNA expression of the dosage-sensitive gene retinoic acid induced-1 (RAI1) in human brain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Tao, Yu; Song, Fan; Yuan, Xi; Wang, Jian; Saffen, David

    2016-01-01

    RAI1 (retinoic acid induced-1) is a dosage-sensitive gene that causes Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) when mutated or deleted and Potocki-Lupski Syndrome (PTLS) when duplicated, with psychiatric features commonly observed in both syndromes. How common genetic variants regulate this gene, however, is unknown. In this study, we found that RAI1 mRNA expression in Chinese prefrontal and temporal cortex correlate with genotypes of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the RAI1 5'-upstream region. Using genotype imputation, "R(2)-Δ(2)" analysis, and data from the RegulomeDB database, we identified SNPs rs4925102 and rs9907986 as possible regulatory variants, accounting for approximately 30-40% of the variance in RAI1 mRNA expression in both brain regions. Specifically, rs4925102 and rs9907986 are predicted to disrupt the binding of retinoic acid RXR-RAR receptors and the transcription factor DEAF1 (Deformed epidermal autoregulatory factor-1), respectively. Consistent with these predictions, we observed binding of RXRα and RARα to the predicted RAI1 target in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Retinoic acid is crucial for early development of the central neural system, and DEAF1 is associated with intellectual disability. The observation that a significant portion of RAI1 mRNA expression is genetically controlled raises the possibility that common RAI1 5'-region regulatory variants contribute more generally to psychiatric disorders. PMID:26743651

  17. Modulation of Ergot Alkaloids in a Grass-Endophyte Symbiosis by Alteration of mRNA Concentrations of an Ergot Alkaloid Synthesis Gene.

    PubMed

    Mulinti, Prashanthi; Florea, Simona; Schardl, Christopher L; Panaccione, Daniel G

    2016-06-22

    The profile of ergot alkaloids in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) containing the endophytic fungus Epichloë typhina × festucae includes high concentrations of the early pathway metabolites ergotryptamine and chanoclavine-I in addition to the pathway end-product ergovaline. Because these alkaloids differ in activity, we investigated strategies to alter their relative concentrations. An RNAi-based approach reduced the concentration of mRNA from the gene easA, which encodes an enzyme required for a ring closure that separates ergotryptamine and chanoclavine-I from ergovaline. Lower easA mRNA concentrations correlated with lower concentrations of ergovaline and higher concentrations of ergotryptamine and chanoclavine-I. Overexpression of easA led to higher concentrations of ergovaline in leaf blades but not in pseudostems; concentrations of the early pathway metabolites were not altered in overexpression strains. The data indicate that altering the concentration of mRNA from a single gene can change alkaloid flux, but the magnitude of the change was limited and variable. PMID:27248330

  18. Evidence for genetic regulation of mRNA expression of the dosage-sensitive gene retinoic acid induced-1 (RAI1) in human brain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Tao, Yu; Song, Fan; Yuan, Xi; Wang, Jian; Saffen, David

    2016-01-01

    RAI1 (retinoic acid induced-1) is a dosage-sensitive gene that causes Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) when mutated or deleted and Potocki-Lupski Syndrome (PTLS) when duplicated, with psychiatric features commonly observed in both syndromes. How common genetic variants regulate this gene, however, is unknown. In this study, we found that RAI1 mRNA expression in Chinese prefrontal and temporal cortex correlate with genotypes of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the RAI1 5′-upstream region. Using genotype imputation, “R2-Δ2” analysis, and data from the RegulomeDB database, we identified SNPs rs4925102 and rs9907986 as possible regulatory variants, accounting for approximately 30–40% of the variance in RAI1 mRNA expression in both brain regions. Specifically, rs4925102 and rs9907986 are predicted to disrupt the binding of retinoic acid RXR-RAR receptors and the transcription factor DEAF1 (Deformed epidermal autoregulatory factor-1), respectively. Consistent with these predictions, we observed binding of RXRα and RARα to the predicted RAI1 target in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Retinoic acid is crucial for early development of the central neural system, and DEAF1 is associated with intellectual disability. The observation that a significant portion of RAI1 mRNA expression is genetically controlled raises the possibility that common RAI1 5′-region regulatory variants contribute more generally to psychiatric disorders. PMID:26743651

  19. Quantitative analysis of the mRNA expression levels of BCL2 and BAX genes in human osteoarthritis and normal articular cartilage: An investigation into their differential expression.

    PubMed

    Karaliotas, Georgios I; Mavridis, Konstantinos; Scorilas, Andreas; Babis, George C

    2015-09-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is primarily characterized by articular cartilage degeneration and chondrocyte loss. Although the role of apoptosis in cartilage pathobiology remains to be elucidated, the apoptotic B‑cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2) gene family is considered to be involved in OA. The purpose of the present study was to quantitatively analyze the mRNA expression profiles of the BCL2‑associated X protein (BAX) and BCL2 genes in human OA and in normal cartilage. Cartilage tissue samples were obtained from 78 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty for OA (OA group) and orthopedic interventions for causes other than OA (control group). Total RNA was isolated from the cartilage tissue specimens and reverse transcribed into cDNA. A highly sensitive and specific reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay was developed for quantification of the mRNA levels of BAX and BCL2, using beta‑2 microglobulin as an endogenous control for normalization purposes. Gene expression analysis was performed using the comparative Ct (2(‑ΔΔCt)) method. The mRNA expression of BAX presented an increasing trend in the OA group compared with the control group, although without statistically significace (P=0.099). By contrast, the expression ratio of BCL2/BAX was found to be significantly decreased (2.76‑fold) in the OA group compared with the normal cartilage control group (P=0.022). A notable 4.6‑fold overexpression of median mRNA levels of BAX was also observed in patients with stage III OA compared with the control (P=0.034), while the BCL2/BAX ratio was markedly (2.5‑fold) decreased (P=0.024). A marked positive correlation was observed between the mRNA levels of BAX and BCL2 in the control group (r(s)=0.728; P<0.001), which was also present in the OA group, although to a lesser degree (r(s)=0.532; P<0.001). These results further implicate apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA, through molecular mechanisms, which include the aberrant expression of the

  20. mRNA Levels of Imprinted Genes in Bovine In Vivo Oocytes, Embryos and Cross Species Comparisons with Humans, Mice and Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zongliang; Dong, Hong; Zheng, Xinbao; Marjani, Sadie L.; Donovan, David M.; Chen, Jingbo; Tian, Xiuchun (Cindy)

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-six imprinted genes were quantified in bovine in vivo produced oocytes and embryos using RNA-seq. Eighteen were detectable and their transcriptional patterns were: largely decreased (MEST and PLAGL1); first decreased and then increased (CDKN1C and IGF2R); peaked at a specific stage (PHLDA2, SGCE, PEG10, PEG3, GNAS, MEG3, DGAT1, ASCL2, NNAT, and NAP1L5); or constantly low (DIRAS3, IGF2, H19 and RTL1). These patterns reflect mRNAs that are primarily degraded, important at a specific stage, or only required at low quantities. The mRNAs for several genes were surprisingly abundant. For instance, transcripts for the maternally imprinted MEST and PLAGL1, were high in oocytes and could only be expressed from the maternal allele suggesting that their genomic imprints were not yet established/recognized. Although the mRNAs detected here were likely biallelically transcribed before the establishment of imprinted expression, the levels of mRNA during these critical stages of development have important functional consequences. Lastly, we compared these genes to their counterparts in mice, humans and pigs. Apart from previously known differences in the imprinting status, the mRNA levels were different among these four species. The data presented here provide a solid reference for expression profiles of imprinted genes in embryos produced using assisted reproductive biotechnologies. PMID:26638780

  1. Growth inhibition of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells by sgRNA targeting the cyclin D1 mRNA based on TRUE gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Satoshi; Oridate, Nobuhiko; Nashimoto, Masayuki; Fukuda, Satoshi; Tamura, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) exhibits increased expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1). Previous studies have shown a correlation between poor prognosis of HNSCC and cyclin D1 overexpression. tRNase ZL-utilizing efficacious gene silencing (TRUE gene silencing) is one of the RNA-mediated gene expression control technologies that have therapeutic potential. This technology is based on a unique enzymatic property of mammalian tRNase ZL, which is that it can cleave any target RNA at any desired site by recognizing a pre-tRNA-like complex formed between the target RNA and an artificial small guide RNA (sgRNA). In this study, we designed several sgRNAs targeting human cyclin D1 mRNA to examine growth inhibition of HNSCC cells. Transfection of certain sgRNAs decreased levels of cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in HSC-2 and HSC-3 cells, and also inhibited their proliferation. The combination of these sgRNAs and cisplatin showed more than additive inhibition of cancer cell growth. These findings demonstrate that TRUE gene silencing of cyclin D1 leads to inhibition of the growth of HNSCC cells and suggest that these sgRNAs alone or combined with cisplatin may be a useful new therapy for HNSCCs. PMID:25437003

  2. LDLR gene synonymous mutation c.1813C>T results in mRNA splicing variation in a kindred with familial hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed

    Ho, Clement K M; Musa, Fathel Rahman; Bell, Christine; Walker, Simon W

    2015-11-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia, one of the most common inherited diseases in the general population, is associated with mutations in at least three different genes including the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), apolipoprotein B (APOB) and protein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) genes. In this report, we describe an unclassified DNA variant (c.1813C>T; p.Leu605Leu) within exon 12 of the LDLR gene in a kindred in which familial hypercholesterolaemia is associated with c.1813C>T heterozygosity. In silico analysis suggested that c.1813C>T might affect splicing of the LDLR gene by creating a cryptic donor splice site, which was confirmed by RT-PCR coupled with cDNA sequencing, to result in the loss of 34 base pairs in the coding sequence. The latter truncated mRNA is predicted to generate a frameshift leading to a premature stop at codon 652 and early termination of the low density lipoprotein receptor polypeptide chain, and thus provides a molecular basis for the hypercholesterolaemic phenotype. This case report highlights the emerging utility of RNA studies for the molecular diagnosis of familial hypercholesterolaemia in patients with potential mRNA splicing variants. PMID:25624525

  3. Bovine DNase I: gene organization, mRNA expression, and changes in the topological distribution of the protein during apoptosis in lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    De María, Alicia; Arruti, Cristina

    2003-12-19

    Genomic DNA sequencing and alignment with the known DNase I mRNA showed that the bovine gene consists of 9 exons and that only the last 8 encode the protein, since initial ATG was found at exon II. RT-PCR was used to identify DNase I mRNA in lens epithelium in vivo and in cultured epithelial cells. We found DNase I transcripts having the same nucleotide sequence as the pancreas form and others lacking almost all exon V. The lens protein presented a slightly higher relative molecular weight than the pancreatic enzyme. Lens DNase I was located in secretory pathway organelles and excluded from the nucleus. Nevertheless, in apoptotic lens epithelial cells in vitro, DNase I translocated to the nucleus and co-localized with TUNEL positive chromatin aggregates. These results indicate that cells in the lens epithelium constitutively express DNase I, and suggest a direct involvement of this nuclease in the final phases of chromatin degradation. PMID:14680812

  4. Alternative splicing of human T-cell-specific MAL mRNA and its correlation with the exon/intron organization of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Rancano, C.; Rubio, T.; Alonso, M.A. )

    1994-05-15

    Sequence analysis of the T-cell-specific MAL gene revealed four exons, each encoding a hydrophobic, presumably membrane-associated, segment and its adjacent hydrophilic sequence. Amplification by the polymerase chain reaction of cDNA from different T-cell samples indicated the existence of four different forms of MAL mRNA, termed MAL-a, -b, -c, and -d, that arise from differential usage of exons II and/or III. As the three introns were located between complete codons, the reading frame was maintained in all the transcripts. A model resembling the structures postulated for different proteolipid proteins is proposed for the protein encoded by each alternative mRNA species. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  5. RPL13A as a reference gene for normalizing mRNA transcription of ovarian cancer cells with paclitaxel and 10-hydroxycamptothecin treatments.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zehua; Yu, Yang; Quan, Chao; Guan, Rongwei; Jin, Yan; Wu, Jie; Xu, Lidan; Chen, Feng; Bai, Jing; Sun, Wenjing; Fu, Songbin

    2015-04-01

    Gene transcription analysis is important in cancer research, and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR) has been demonstrated to be an effective method to evaluate gene transcription in cancer. RT‑qPCR requires an internal reference gene with a consistent level of mRNA transcription across various experimental conditions. However, it has been suggested that different treatments, including anticancer therapy, may influence the transcriptional stability of internal reference genes. Paclitaxel (PTX) and 10‑hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) are widely used to treat various types of cancer, and a suitable internal reference gene is required in order to analyze the transcription profiles of the cells following treatment. In the current study, the transcriptional stability of 30 candidate reference genes was investigated in cancer cells following treatment with PTX and HCPT. The two ovarian cancer cell lines, UACC‑1598 and SKOV3, were treated with PTX and HCPT for 24 and 48 h, and the transcriptional levels of the candidate reference genes were subsequently evaluated by RT‑qPCR analysis. The transcriptional stability of the selected genes was then analyzed using qbase+ and NormFinder software. A total of 9 genes were demonstrated to exhibit high transcriptional stability and one of these genes, ribosomal protein L13a (RPL13A), was identified to exhibit high transcriptional stability in every group. The current study identified various reference genes suitable under different circumstances, while RPL13A was indicated to be the most suitable reference gene for analyzing the transcription profile of ovarian cancer cells following treatment with PTX and HCPT. PMID:25523336

  6. Correlation between Heart-type Fatty Acid-binding Protein Gene Polymorphism and mRNA Expression with Intramuscular Fat in Baicheng-oil Chicken.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; He, Jianzhong; Yang, Wenxuan; Muhantay, Gemenggul; Chen, Ying; Xing, Jinming; Liu, Jianzhu

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to determine the polymorphism and mRNA expression pattern of the heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) gene and their association with intramuscular fat (IMF) content in the breast and leg muscles of Baicheng oil chicken (BOC). A total of 720 chickens, including 240 black Baicheng oil chicken (BBOC), 240 silky Baicheng oil chicken (SBOC), and 240 white Baicheng oil chicken (WBOC) were raised. Three genotypes of H-FABP gene second extron following AA, AB, and BB were detected by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) strategy. The G939A site created AA genotype and G956A site created BB genotype. The content of IMF in AA genotype in breast muscle of BBOC was significantly higher than that of AB (p = 0.0176) and the genotype in leg muscle of WBOC was significantly higher than that of AB (p = 0.0145). The G939A site could be taken as genetic marker for higher IMF content selecting for breast muscle of BBOC and leg muscle of WBOC. The relative mRNA expression of H-FABP was measured by real-time PCR at 30, 60, 90, and 120 d. The IMF content significantly increased with age in both muscles. The mRNA expression level of H-FABP significantly decreased with age in both muscles of the three types of chickens. Moreover, a significant negative correlation between H-FABP abundance and IMF content in the leg muscles of WBOC (p = 0.035) was observed. The mRNA expression of H-FABP negatively correlated with the IMF content in both breast and leg muscles of BOC sat slaughter time. PMID:26323394

  7. Correlation between Heart-type Fatty Acid-binding Protein Gene Polymorphism and mRNA Expression with Intramuscular Fat in Baicheng-oil Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; He, Jianzhong; Yang, Wenxuan; Muhantay, Gemenggul; Chen, Ying; Xing, Jinming; Liu, Jianzhu

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the polymorphism and mRNA expression pattern of the heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) gene and their association with intramuscular fat (IMF) content in the breast and leg muscles of Baicheng oil chicken (BOC). A total of 720 chickens, including 240 black Baicheng oil chicken (BBOC), 240 silky Baicheng oil chicken (SBOC), and 240 white Baicheng oil chicken (WBOC) were raised. Three genotypes of H-FABP gene second extron following AA, AB, and BB were detected by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) strategy. The G939A site created AA genotype and G956A site created BB genotype. The content of IMF in AA genotype in breast muscle of BBOC was significantly higher than that of AB (p = 0.0176) and the genotype in leg muscle of WBOC was significantly higher than that of AB (p = 0.0145). The G939A site could be taken as genetic marker for higher IMF content selecting for breast muscle of BBOC and leg muscle of WBOC. The relative mRNA expression of H-FABP was measured by real-time PCR at 30, 60, 90, and 120 d. The IMF content significantly increased with age in both muscles. The mRNA expression level of H-FABP significantly decreased with age in both muscles of the three types of chickens. Moreover, a significant negative correlation between H-FABP abundance and IMF content in the leg muscles of WBOC (p = 0.035) was observed. The mRNA expression of H-FABP negatively correlated with the IMF content in both breast and leg muscles of BOC sat slaughter time. PMID:26323394

  8. Dietary sunflower oil modulates milk fatty acid composition without major changes in adipose and mammary tissue fatty acid profile or related gene mRNA abundance in sheep.

    PubMed

    Castro-Carrera, T; Frutos, P; Leroux, C; Chilliard, Y; Hervás, G; Belenguer, A; Bernard, L; Toral, P G

    2015-04-01

    There are very few studies in ruminants characterizing mammary and adipose tissue (AT) expression of genes and gene networks for diets causing variations in milk fatty acid (FA) composition without altering milk fat secretion, and even less complementing this information with data on tissue FA profiles. This work was conducted in sheep in order to investigate the response of the mammary gland and the subcutaneous and perirenal AT, in terms of FA profile and mRNA abundance of genes involved in lipid metabolism, to a diet known to modify milk FA composition. Ten lactating Assaf ewes were randomly assigned to two treatments consisting of a total mixed ration based on alfalfa hay and a concentrate (60 : 40) supplemented with 0 (control diet) or 25 (SO diet) g of sunflower oil/kg of diet dry matter for 7 weeks. Milk composition, including FA profile, was analysed after 48 days on treatments. On day 49, the animals were euthanized and tissue samples were collected to analyse FA and mRNA abundance of 16 candidate genes. Feeding SO did not affect animal performance but modified milk FA composition. Major changes included decreases in the concentration of FA derived from de novo synthesis (e.g. 12:0, 14:0 and 16:0) and increases in that of long-chain FA (e.g. 18:0, c9-18:1, trans-18:1 isomers and c9,t11-CLA); however, they were not accompanied by significant variations in the mRNA abundance of the studied lipogenic genes (i.e. ACACA, FASN, LPL, CD36, FABP3, SCD1 and SCD5) and transcription factors (SREBF1 and PPARG), or in the constituent FA of mammary tissue. Regarding the FA composition of AT, the little influence of SO did not appear to be linked to changes in gene mRNA abundance (decreases of GPAM and SREBF1 in both tissues, and of PPARG in the subcutaneous depot). Similarly, the great variation between AT (higher contents of saturated FA and trans-18:1 isomers in the perirenal, and of cis-18:1, c9,t11-CLA and n-3 PUFA in the subcutaneous AT) could not be related to

  9. TATA boxes in gene transcription and poly (A) tails in mRNA stability: New perspective on the effects of berberine

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhi-Yi; Lu, Xi; Lei, Fan; Chai, Yu-Shuang; Wang, Yu-Gang; Jiang, Jing-Fei; Feng, Tian-Shi; Wang, Xin-Pei; Yu, Xuan; Yan, Xiao-Jin; Xing, Dong-Ming; Du, Li-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Berberine (BBR) is a natural compound with variable pharmacological effects and a broad panel of target genes. We investigated berberine’s pharmacological activities from the perspective of its nucleotide-binding ability and discovered that BBR directly regulates gene expression by targeting TATA boxes in transcriptional regulatory regions as well as the poly adenine (poly (A)) tail at the mRNA terminus. BBR inhibits gene transcription by binding the TATA boxes in the transcriptional regulatory region, but it promotes higher levels of expression by targeting the poly (A) tails of mRNAs. The present study demonstrates that TATA boxes and poly (A) tails are the first and second primary targets by which BBR regulates gene expression. The final outcome of gene regulation by BBR depends on the structure of the individual gene. This is the first study to reveal that TATA boxes and poly (A) tails are direct targets for BBR in its regulation of gene expression. Our findings provide a novel explanation for the complex activities of a small molecule compound in a biological system and a novel horizon for small molecule-compound pharmacological studies. PMID:26671652

  10. Drug-induced mRNA signatures are enriched for the minority of genes that are highly heritable.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tianxiang; Brodin, Petter; Davis, Mark M; Jojic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    The blood gene expression signatures are used as biomarkers for immunological and non- immunological diseases. Therefore, it is important to understand the variation in blood gene expression patterns and the factors (heritable/non-heritable) that underlie this variation. In this paper, we study the relationship between drug effects on the one hand, and heritable and non-heritable factors influencing gene expression on the other. Understanding of this relationship can help select appropriate targets for drugs aimed at reverting disease phenotypes to healthy states. In order to estimate heritable and non-heritable effects on gene expression, we use Twin-ACE model on a gene expression dataset MuTHER, measured in blood samples from monozygotic and dizygotic twins. In order to associate gene expression with drug effects, we use CMap database. We show that, even though the expressions of most genes are driven by non-heritable factors, drugs are more likely to influence expression of genes, driven by heritable rather than non-heritable factors. We further study this finding in the context of a gene regulatory network. We investigate the relationship between the drug effects on gene expression and propagation of heritable and non-heritable factors through regulatory networks. We find that the decisive factor in determining whether a gene will be influenced by a drug is the flow of heritable effects supplied to the gene through regulatory network. PMID:25592599

  11. Demonstration of mRNA editing and localization of guide RNA genes in kinetoplast-mitochondria of the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens.

    PubMed

    Maslov, D A; Hollar, L; Haghighat, P; Nawathean, P

    1998-06-01

    Maxicircle molecules of kDNA in several isolates of Phytomonas were detected by hybridization with the 12S rRNA gene probe from Leishmania tarentolae. The estimated size of maxicircles is isolate-specific and varies from 27 to 36 kb. Fully edited and polyadenylated mRNA for kinetoplast-encoded ribosomal protein S12 (RPS12) was found in the steady-state kinetoplast RNA isolated from Phytomonas serpens strain 1G. Two minicircles (1.45 kb) from this strain were also sequenced. Each minicircle contains two 120 bp conserved regions positioned 180 degrees apart, a region enriched with G and T bases and a variable region. One minicircle encodes a gRNA for the first block of editing of RPSl2 mRNA, and the other encodes a gRNA with unknown function. A gRNA gene for the second block of RPSl2 was found on a minicircle sequenced previously. On each minicircle, a gRNA gene is located in the variable region in a similar position and orientation with respect to the conserved regions. PMID:9662707

  12. The feathering gene is linked to degranulation and oxidative burst not cytokine/chemokine mRNA expression levels or Salmonella enteritidis organ invasion in broilers.

    PubMed

    Swaggerty, Christina L; He, Haiqi; Genovese, Kenneth J; Kaiser, Pete; Pevzner, Igal Y; Kogut, Michael H

    2006-12-01

    In the past, we showed differences in heterophil function between parental broilers (A [fast feathering] > B [slow feathering]) and their F1 reciprocal crosses (D [fast feathering] > C [slow feathering]). In the present study, we evaluated the linkage of the feathering gene to heterophil function, pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine mRNA expression levels, and resistance to Salmonella enteritidis organ invasion. Heterophils were isolated from 2-day-old chickens (C and D) separated into males and females - slow males and females (SM and SF), and fast males and females (FM and FF). Heterophil functions of degranulation and oxidative burst were measured. Heterophils from FF chickens (183+/-8.9) released more (P < 0.05) beta-d-glucuronidase (microM) than heterophils from SF chickens (149+/-3.7); FF heterophils (4.6 x 10(4)) generated a significantly (P < 0.05) greater oxidative burst (mean relative fluorescent units) compared with SF heterophils (4.2 x 10(4)). Interleukin-6, CXCLi2, and interferon-alpha mRNA expression levels were quantitated by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. No differences were observed between SM and FM or between SF and FF heterophils. Finally, 1-day-old chickens were administered S. enteritidis and liver/spleen organ invasion was quantitated. No differences were observed between the number of S. enteritidis-positive FF and SF chickens, but FM were significantly (P < 0.05) more resistant to S. enteritidis organ invasion than SM chickens. The data indicate degranulation and oxidative burst were linked with the feathering gene; however, interleukin-6, CXCLi2, and interferon-alpha mRNA expression levels were not. Furthermore, susceptibility to in vitro S. enteritidis organ invasion was not linked to the feathering gene. PMID:17121735

  13. Evaluation of mRNA Expression Levels of cyp51A and mdr1, Candidate Genes for Voriconazole Resistance in Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Fattahi, Azam; Zaini, Farideh; Kordbacheh, Parivash; Rezaie, Sasan; Safara, Mahin; Fateh, Roohollah; Farahyar, Shirin; Kanani, Ali; Heidari, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Background: Voriconazole Resistance (VRC-R) in Aspergillus flavus isolates impacts the management of aspergillosis, since azoles are the first choice for prophylaxis and therapy. However, to the best of our knowledge, the mechanisms underlying voriconazole resistance are poorly understood. Objectives: The present study was designed to evaluate mRNA expression levels of cyp51A and mdr1 genes in voriconazole resistant A. flavus by a Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) technique. Materials and Methods: Five A. flavus isolates with resistance to VRC were examined by a RT-PCR approach. Results: Four out of five isolates revealed cyp51A and mdr1 mRNA overexpression. Interestingly, the isolate, which was negative for cyp51A and mdr1 mRNA expression showed a high voriconazole Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). Furthermore, a computational-based analysis predicted that voriconazole resistance could be mediated through cooperation with a network protein interaction. Conclusions: Our experimental and in silico findings may provide new insight in the complex molecular pathways of drug resistance and also could assist design an efficient therapeutic strategy for aspergillosis treatment. PMID:26865941

  14. Identification by a Digital Gene Expression Displayer (DGED) and test by RT-PCR analysis of new mRNA candidate markers for colorectal cancer in peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Lauriola, Mattia; Ugolini, Giampaolo; Rosati, Giancarlo; Zanotti, Simone; Montroni, Isacco; Manaresi, Alessio; Zattoni, Davide; Rivetti, Stefano; Mattei, Gabriella; Coppola, Domenico; Strippoli, Pierluigi; Taffurelli, Mario; Solmi, Rossella

    2010-08-01

    Evidence from the literature widely supports the efficacy of screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) in reducing mortality. A blood-based assay, potentially, represents a more accessible early detection tool for the identification of circulating tumour cells originating from a primary tumour site in the body. The present work aimed at identifying a set of specific mRNAs expressed in colon tissue but not in blood cells. These mRNAs may represent useful markers for early detection of circulating colon cancer cells by a simple, qualitative RT-PCR assay, following RNA extraction from peripheral blood samples. Using a data-mining tool called cDNA digital gene expression displayer (DGED), based on serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) from the Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) database, 4-colon and 14-blood cDNA libraries were analyzed. We selected 7 genes expressed in colon tissue but not in blood and were able to test 6 of them by RT-PCR in peripheral blood of CRC patients and healthy controls. We present a relatively easy and highly reproducible technique for the detection of mRNA expression of genes as candidate markers of malignancy in blood samples of patients with colon cancer. SAGE DGED provided a list of the best candidate mRNAs predicted to detect colon cells in the blood, namely those encoding the following proteins: hypothetical protein LOC644844 (LOC644844, whose cDNA was not amplifiable), fatty acid binding protein 1 (FABP1), carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 (CEACAM5), mucin 13 cell surface associated (MUC13), guanylate cyclase activator 2A (GUCA2A), amiloride binding protein 1 (ABP1), galactoside-binding, solute carrier family 26, member 3 (SLC26A3). The mRNA expression of these genes was evaluated in 8 samples from subjects diagnosed with CRC and 9 from healthy controls. We observed the expression of 2 of the 6 investigated genes in the blood samples of the vast majority of patients considered, but also in a subset of the

  15. Transcriptional Autoregulation and Inhibition of mRNA Translation of Amino Acid Regulator Gene cpcA of Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Bernd; Valerius, Oliver; Andermann, Meike; Braus, Gerhard H.

    2001-01-01

    The CPCA protein of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans is a member of the c-Jun-like transcriptional activator family. It acts as central transcription factor of the cross-pathway regulatory network of amino acid biosynthesis and is functionally exchangeable for the general control transcriptional activator Gcn4p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to GCN4, expression of cpcA is strongly regulated by two equally important mechanisms with additive effects that lead to a fivefold increased CPCA protein amount under amino acid starvation conditions. One component of cpcA regulation involves a transcriptional autoregulatory mechanism via a CPCA recognition element (CPRE) in the cpcA promoter that causes a sevenfold increased cpcA mRNA level when cells are starved for amino acids. Point mutations in the CPRE cause a constitutively low mRNA level of cpcA and a halved protein level when amino acids are limited. Moreover, two upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the 5′ region of the cpcA mRNA are important for a translational regulatory mechanism. Destruction of both short uORFs results in a sixfold increased CPCA protein level under nonstarvation conditions and a 10-fold increase under starvation conditions. Mutations in both the CPRE and uORF regulatory elements lead to an intermediate effect, with a low cpcA mRNA level but a threefold increased CPCA protein level independent of amino acid availability. These data argue for a combined regulation of cpcA that includes a translational regulation like that of yeast GCN4 as well as a transcriptional regulation like that of the mammalian jun and fos genes. PMID:11553722

  16. Effect of ration size on fillet fatty acid composition, phospholipid allostasis and mRNA expression patterns of lipid regulatory genes in gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Benedito-Palos, Laura; Calduch-Giner, Josep A; Ballester-Lozano, Gabriel F; Pérez-Sánchez, Jaume

    2013-04-14

    The effect of ration size on muscle fatty acid (FA) composition and mRNA expression levels of key regulatory enzymes of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism have been addressed in juveniles of gilthead sea bream fed a practical diet over the course of an 11-week trial. The experimental setup included three feeding levels: (i) full ration until visual satiety, (ii) 70 % of satiation and (iii) 70 % of satiation with the last 2 weeks at the maintenance ration. Feed restriction reduced lipid content of whole body by 30 % and that of fillet by 50 %. In this scenario, the FA composition of fillet TAG was not altered by ration size, whereas that of phospholipids was largely modified with a higher retention of arachidonic acid and DHA. The mRNA transcript levels of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferases, phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase and FA desaturase 2 were not regulated by ration size in the present experimental model. In contrast, mRNA levels of stearoyl-CoA desaturases were markedly down-regulated by feed restriction. An opposite trend was found for a muscle-specific lipoprotein lipase, which is exclusive of fish lineage. Several upstream regulatory transcriptions were also assessed, although nutritionally mediated changes in mRNA transcripts were almost reduced to PPARα and β, which might act in a counter-regulatory way on lipolysis and lipogenic pathways. This gene expression pattern contributes to the construction of a panel of biomarkers to direct marine fish production towards muscle lean phenotypes with increased retentions of long-chain PUFA. PMID:22856503

  17. Estrogenic environmental contaminants alter the mRNA abundance profiles of genes involved in gonadal differentiation of the American bullfrog

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Stephanie E.; Veldhoen, Nik; Helbing, Caren C.; Ramirez, Claire A.; Malpas, Janae M.; Propper, Catherine R.

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife and human populations are exposed to anthropogenic mixtures of chemicals in the environment that may adversely influence normal reproductive function and development. We determined the effects of exposure to estrogenic chemicals and wastewater effluent (WWE) on developing gonads of the American bullfrog, Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana, a species whose widespread distribution make it an ideal model for environmental monitoring for endocrine effects of chemical contaminants. Premetamorphic bullfrog tadpoles were exposed to treatment vehicle, 17β-estradiol (E2; 10−9 M) or 4-tert-octylphenol (OP; 10−9 M, 10−8 M, and 10−7 M). Additionally, gonadal differentiation was evaluated in bullfrog tadpoles from a WWE-containing site versus those from a reference location receiving no WWE. In both studies, phenotypic sex, steroidogenic factor-1 (nr5a1), and aromatase (cyp19a1) mRNA levels using quantitative real-time PCR were determined. Exposure to E2 or OP did not alter sex ratios. In controls, both nr5a1 and cyp19a1 transcript levels exhibited sexual dimorphism, with males demonstrating higher levels of nr5a1 and females greater abundance of cyp19a1. However, E2 exposure increased cyp19a1 mRNA abundance in testes and decreased levels in ovaries, eliminating the sexual dimorphism observed in controls. E2-exposed males exhibited increased nr5a1 transcript levels in the testes compared to controls, while females demonstrated no E2 effect. OP treatment had no effect on female cyp19a1 mRNA abundance, but exposure to 10−7 M OP increased testicular transcript levels. Treatment with 10−9 and 10−8 M OP, but not 10−7 M, resulted in decreased abundance of nr5a1 transcript in both ovaries and testes. Animals from the field had sexually dimorphic gonadal levels of cyp19a1, but both sexes from the WWE site exhibited elevated cyp19a1 transcript abundance compared to the reference location. Individual chemical compounds and anthropogenic wastewater effluent dispersed

  18. Versican gene expression in human articular cartilage and comparison of mRNA splicing variation with aggrecan.

    PubMed Central

    Grover, J; Roughley, P J

    1993-01-01

    The chondrocytes in human articular cartilage from subjects of all ages express mRNAs for both of the aggregating proteoglycans aggrecan and versican, although the level of expression of versican mRNA is much lower than that of aggrecan mRNA. Aggrecan shows alternative splicing of the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain within its C-terminal globular region, but there is no evidence for a major difference in situ in the relative expression of this domain with age. At all ages studied from birth to the mature adult, a greater proportion of transcripts lacked the EGF domain. The relative proportions of the two transcripts did not change upon culture and passage of isolated chondrocytes. In contrast, the neighbouring complement regulatory protein (CRP)-like domain was predominantly expressed irrespective of age, but cell culture did result in variation of the splicing of this domain. Versican possesses two EGF-like domains and one CRP-like domain, but at all ages the three domains were predominantly present in all transcripts. This situation persisted upon culture and passage of the chondrocytes. Thus, unlike aggrecan, the versican expressed by human articular cartilage does not appear to undergo alternative splicing of its C-terminal globular region, either in cartilage in situ or in chondrocytes in culture. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8484718

  19. Zinc-bearing zeolite clinoptilolite improves tissue zinc accumulation in laying hens by enhancing zinc transporter gene mRNA abundance.

    PubMed

    Li, Linfeng; Li, Ping; Chen, Yueping; Wen, Chao; Zhuang, Su; Zhou, Yanmin

    2015-08-01

    A study was conducted to investigate effects of zinc-bearing zeolite clinoptilolite (ZnCP), as an alternative for zinc sulfate (ZnSO4), on laying performance, tissue Zn accumulation and Zn transporter genes expression in laying hens. Hy-Line Brown laying hens were allocated to three treatments, each of which had six replicates with 15 hens per replicate, receiving basal diet supplemented with ZnSO4 (control, 80 mg Zn/kg diet), 0.23% ZnCP (40.25 mg Zn/kg diet) and 0.46% ZnCP (80.50 mg Zn/kg diet) for 8 weeks, respectively. Compared with control, hens fed diet containing 0.23% ZnCP had similar Zn content in measured tissues (P > 0.05). A higher ZnCP inclusion (0.46%) enhanced Zn accumulation in liver (P < 0.05) and pancreas (P < 0.05). In addition, ZnCP inclusion increased blood iron (Fe) content (P < 0.05). ZnCP supplementation enhanced jejunal metallothionein-4 (MT-4) messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance (P < 0.05). ZnCP inclusion at a higher level (0.46%) increased mRNA expression of MT-4 in pancreas (P < 0.05) and zinc transporter-1 (ZnT-1) in jejunum (P < 0.05). The highest ZnT-2 mRNA abundance in jejunum was found in hens fed 0.23% ZnCP inclusion diet (P < 0.05). The results indicated that ZnCP reached a higher bioavailability as compared with ZnSO4 as evidenced by enhanced tissue Zn accumulation and Zn transporter genes expression. PMID:25597922

  20. Effects of Dietary Selenium Against Lead Toxicity on mRNA Levels of 25 Selenoprotein Genes in the Cartilage Tissue of Broiler Chicken.

    PubMed

    Gao, H; Liu, C P; Song, S Q; Fu, J

    2016-07-01

    The interactions between the essential element selenium (Se) and the toxic element lead (Pb) have been reported extensively; however, little is known about the effect of Se on Pb toxicity and the expression pattern of selenoproteins in the cartilage of chicken. To investigate the effects of Se on Pb toxicity and the messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions of selenoproteins in cartilage tissue, an in vitro study was performed on 1-day-old broiler chickens (randomly allocated into four groups) with diet of different concentration of Se and Pb. After 90 days, the meniscus cartilage and sword cartilage tissue were examined for the mRNA levels of 25 selenoprotein genes. The results showed that Se and Pb influenced the expression of selenoprotein genes in the chicken cartilage tissue. In detail, Se could alleviate the downtrend of the expression of Gpx1, Gpx2, Gpx4, Txnrd2, Txnrd3, Dio1, Dio2, Seli, Selu, Sepx1, Selk, Selw, Selo, Selm, Sep15, Sepnn1, Sels, and Selt induced by Pb exposure in the meniscus cartilage. In the sword cartilage, Se alleviated the downtrend of the expression of Gpx2, Gpx3, Gpx4, Txnrd1, Txnrd2, Dio2, Dio3, Seli, Selh, SPS2, Sepx1, Selk, Selw, Selo, Selm, Sep15, Selpb, Sepn1, and Selt induced by Pb exposure. The present study provided some compensated data about the roles of Se against Pb toxicity in the regulation of selenoprotein expression. PMID:26643179

  1. Continuous Monitoring of Specific mRNA Expression Responses with a Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer-Based DNA Nano-tweezer Technique That Does Not Require Gene Recombination.

    PubMed

    Shigeto, Hajime; Nakatsuka, Keisuke; Ikeda, Takeshi; Hirota, Ryuichi; Kuroda, Akio; Funabashi, Hisakage

    2016-08-16

    This letter discusses the feasibility of continuously monitoring specific mRNA expression responses in a living cell with a probe structured as a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based DNA nano-tweezer (DNA-NT). The FRET-based DNA-NT, self-assembled from three single-stranded DNAs, alters its structure from an open state to a closed state in recognition of a target mRNA, resulting in the closing of the distal relation of previously modified FRET-paired fluorescent dyes and generating a FRET signal. The expressions of glucose transporters (GLUT) 1 and 4 in a mouse hepato-carcinoma (Hepa 1-6 cells) were selected as the target model. Live-cell imaging analysis of Hepa 1-6 cells with both FRET-based DNA-NTs indicated that the behaviors of the FRET signals integrated in each individual cell were similar to those measured with the conventional mass analysis technique of semiquantitative real-time (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR). From these results, it is concluded that continuous monitoring of gene expression response without gene recombination is feasible with a FRET-based DNA-NT, even in a single cell manner. PMID:27458920

  2. A Large Number of Nuclear Genes in the Human Parasite Blastocystis Require mRNA Polyadenylation to Create Functional Termination Codons

    PubMed Central

    Klimeš, Vladimír; Gentekaki, Eleni; Roger, Andrew J.; Eliáš, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Termination codons in mRNA molecules are typically specified directly by the sequence of the corresponding gene. However, in mitochondria of a few eukaryotic groups, some mRNAs contain the termination codon UAA deriving one or both adenosines from transcript polyadenylation. Here, we show that a similar phenomenon occurs for a substantial number of nuclear genes in Blastocystis spp., divergent unicellular eukaryote gut parasites. Our analyses of published genomic data from Blastocystis sp. subtype 7 revealed that polyadenylation-mediated creation of termination codons occurs in approximately 15% of all nuclear genes. As this phenomenon has not been noticed before, the procedure previously employed to annotate the Blastocystis nuclear genome sequence failed to correctly define the structure of the 3′-ends of hundreds of genes. From sequence data we have obtained from the distantly related Blastocystis sp. subtype 1 strain, we show that this phenomenon is widespread within the Blastocystis genus. Polyadenylation in Blastocystis appears to be directed by a conserved GU-rich element located four nucleotides downstream of the polyadenylation site. Thus, the highly precise positioning of the polyadenylation in Blastocystis has allowed reduction of the 3′-untranslated regions to the point that, in many genes, only one or two nucleotides of the termination codon are left. PMID:25015079

  3. The regulation of gene expression in transformed maize aleurone and endosperm protoplasts. Analysis of promoter activity, intron enhancement, and mRNA untranslated regions on expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gallie, D R; Young, T E

    1994-01-01

    Gene expression in the aleurone and endosperm is highly regulated during both seed development and germination. Studies of alpha-amylase expression in the aleurone of barley (Hordeum vulgare) have generated the current paradigm for hormonal control of gene expression in germinating cereal grain. Gene expression studies in both the aleurone and endosperm tissues of maize (Zea mays) seed have been hampered because of a lack of an efficient transformation system. We report here the rapid isolation of protoplasts from maize aleurone and endosperm tissue, their transformation using polyethylene glycol or electroporation, and the regulation of gene expression in these cells. Adh1 promoter activity was reduced relative to the 35S promoter in aleurone and endosperm protoplasts compared to Black Mexican Sweet suspension cells in which it was nearly as strong as the 35S promoter. Intron-mediated stimulation of expression was substantially higher in transformed aleurone or endosperm protoplasts than in cell-suspension culture protoplasts, and the data suggest that the effect of an intron may be affected by cell type. To examine cytoplasmic regulation, the 5' and 3' untranslated regions from a barley alpha-amylase were fused to the firefly luciferase-coding region, and their effect on translation and mRNA stability was examined following the delivery of in vitro synthesized mRNA to aleurone and endosperm protoplasts. The alpha-amylase untranslated regions regulated translational efficiency in a tissue-specific manner, increasing translation in aleurone or endosperm protoplasts but not in maize or carrot cell-suspension protoplasts, in animal cells, or in in vitro translation lysates. PMID:7824660

  4. Resistance to antidepressant treatment is associated with polymorphisms in the leptin gene, decreased leptin mRNA expression, and decreased leptin serum levels

    PubMed Central

    Kloiber, Stefan; Ripke, Stephan; Kohli, Martin A.; Reppermund, Simone; Salyakina, Daria; Uher, Rudolf; McGuffin, Peter; Perlis, Roy H.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Pütz, Benno; Hennings, Johannes; Brückl, Tanja; Klengel, Torsten; Bettecken, Thomas; Ising, Marcus; Uhr, Manfred; Dose, Tatjana; Unschuld, Paul G.; Zihl, Josef; Binder, Elisabeth; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Holsboer, Florian; Lucae, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Leptin, a peptide hormone from adipose tissue and key player in weight regulation, has been suggested to be involved in sleep and cognition and to exert antidepressant-like effects, presumably via its action on the HPA-axis and hippocampal function. This led us to investigate whether genetic variants in the leptin gene, the level of leptin mRNA-expression and leptin serum concentrations are associated with response to antidepressant treatment. Our sample consisted of inpatients from the Munich Antidepressant Response Signature (MARS) project with weekly Hamilton Depression ratings, divided into two subsamples. In the exploratory sample (n=251) 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering the leptin gene region were genotyped. We found significant associations of several SNPs with impaired antidepressant treatment outcome and impaired cognitive performance after correction for multiple testing. The SNP (rs10487506) showing the highest association with treatment response (p=3.9 × 10−5) was analyzed in the replication sample (n=358) and the association could be verified (p=0.021) with response to tricyclic antidepressants. In an additional meta-analysis combining results from the MARS study with data from the Genome-based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression (GENDEP) and the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) studies, nominal associations of several polymorphisms in the upstream vicinity of rs10487506 with treatment outcome were detected (p=0.001). In addition, we determined leptin mRNA expression in lymphocytes and leptin serum levels in subsamples of the MARS study. Unfavorable treatment outcome was accompanied with decreased leptin mRNA and leptin serum levels. Our results suggest an involvement of leptin in antidepressant action and cognitive function in depression with genetic polymorphisms in the leptin gene, decreased leptin gene expression and leptin deficiency in serum being risk factors for resistance to antidepressant

  5. Resistance to antidepressant treatment is associated with polymorphisms in the leptin gene, decreased leptin mRNA expression, and decreased leptin serum levels.

    PubMed

    Kloiber, Stefan; Ripke, Stephan; Kohli, Martin A; Reppermund, Simone; Salyakina, Daria; Uher, Rudolf; McGuffin, Peter; Perlis, Roy H; Hamilton, Steven P; Pütz, Benno; Hennings, Johannes; Brückl, Tanja; Klengel, Torsten; Bettecken, Thomas; Ising, Marcus; Uhr, Manfred; Dose, Tatjana; Unschuld, Paul G; Zihl, Josef; Binder, Elisabeth; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Holsboer, Florian; Lucae, Susanne

    2013-07-01

    Leptin, a peptide hormone from adipose tissue and key player in weight regulation, has been suggested to be involved in sleep and cognition and to exert antidepressant-like effects, presumably via its action on the HPA-axis and hippocampal function. This led us to investigate whether genetic variants in the leptin gene, the level of leptin mRNA-expression and leptin serum concentrations are associated with response to antidepressant treatment. Our sample consisted of inpatients from the Munich Antidepressant Response Signature (MARS) project with weekly Hamilton Depression ratings, divided into two subsamples. In the exploratory sample (n=251) 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering the leptin gene region were genotyped. We found significant associations of several SNPs with impaired antidepressant treatment outcome and impaired cognitive performance after correction for multiple testing. The SNP (rs10487506) showing the highest association with treatment response (p=3.9×10(-5)) was analyzed in the replication sample (n=358) and the association could be verified (p=0.021) with response to tricyclic antidepressants. In an additional meta-analysis combining results from the MARS study with data from the Genome-based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression (GENDEP) and the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR(⁎)D) studies, nominal associations of several polymorphisms in the upstream vicinity of rs10487506 with treatment outcome were detected (p=0.001). In addition, we determined leptin mRNA expression in lymphocytes and leptin serum levels in subsamples of the MARS study. Unfavorable treatment outcome was accompanied with decreased leptin mRNA and leptin serum levels. Our results suggest an involvement of leptin in antidepressant action and cognitive function in depression with genetic polymorphisms in the leptin gene, decreased leptin gene expression and leptin deficiency in serum being risk factors for resistance to antidepressant

  6. Gene microarray analysis of lncRNA and mRNA expression profiles in patients with hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jieyu; Li, Wenming; Jin, Tong; Xiang, Xuan; Li, Maocai; Wang, Juan; Li, Guojun; Pan, Xinliang; Lei, Dapeng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in the development and progression of many types of cancer. However, the mechanisms by which lncRNAs influence development and progression of hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HSCC) are unclear. Method: We investigated differences in lncRNA and mRNA expression profiles between 3 pairs of HSCC tissues and adjacent nontumor tissues by microarray analysis. Results: In HSCC tissues, 1299 lncRNAs were significantly upregulated (n=669) or downregulated (n=630) compared to levels in adjacent nontumor tissues. Moreover, 1432 mRNAs were significantly upregulated (n=684) or downregulated (n=748) in HSCC tissues. We randomly selected 2 differentially expressed lncRNAs (AB209630, AB019562) and 2 differentially expressed mRNAs (SPP1, TJP2) for confirmation of microarray results using qRT-PCR. The qRT-PCR results matched well with the microarray data. The differentially expressed lncRNAs and mRNAs were distributed on each of the chromosomes, including the X and Y chromosomes. Pathway analysis indicated that the biological functions of differentially expressed mRNAs were related to 48 cellular pathways that may be associated with HSCC development. GO analysis revealed that 593 mRNAs involved in biological processes, 50 mRNAs involved in cellular components, and 46 mRNAs involved in molecular functions were upregulated in the carcinomas; 280 mRNAs involved in biological processes, 58 mRNAs involved in cellular components, and 71 mRNAs involved in molecular functions were downregulated in the carcinomas. In addition, 8 enhancer-like lncRNAs and 21 intergenic lncRNAs with their adjacent mRNA pairs were identified as coregulated transcripts. Conclusion: These findings provide insight into the mechanisms underlying HSCC tumorigenesis and will facilitate identification of new therapeutic targets and diagnostic biomarkers for this disease. PMID:26131061

  7. Quantitative mRNA expression analysis of selected genes in patients with early-stage hypothyroidism induced by treatment with iodine-131.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kun; Gao, Rui; Yu, Yan; Zhang, Weixiao; Yang, Yuxuan; Yang, Aimin

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the molecular markers indicative of early-stage hypothyroidism induced by treatment with iodine-131, in order to assist in further investigations of radio iodine‑induced hypothyroidism. A total of 59 patients diagnosed with hyperthyroidism (male/female, 16/43; median age, 46.4 years) and 27 healthy subjects (male/female, 7/21; median age, 44.6 years) were included in the present study. All patients were treated with appropriate doses of iodine‑131 and, three months following treatment, the patients were subdivided into two groups: A group with early‑stage hypothyroidism symptoms, and a group with non‑early‑stage hypothyroidism, including euthyroid patients and patients remaining with hyperthyroidism. Tissue samples from the patients and healthy subjects were collected by fine needle biopsies, and the mRNA expression levels of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2), nuclear factor (NF)‑κB, Ku70, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), early growth response 1 (Egr‑1), TP53 and ataxia telangiectasia mutated were analyzed using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction prior to iodine‑131 treatment. The association of the variation of target genes with susceptibility to early‑stage hypothyroidism was analyzed. Compared with normal subjects, the mRNA expression levels of Ku70 (0.768, vs. 3.304, respectively; P<0.001) and EGFR (0.859, vs. 1.752, respectively; P<0.05) were significantly higher, whereas those of NF‑κB (0.884, vs. 0.578, respectively; P<0.05) and Bcl‑2 (1.235, vs. 0.834, respectively; P<0.05) were lower in the hyperthyroid patients. Following treatment with iodine‑131, 30 of the 59 (50.8%) patients with hyperthyroidism were diagnosed with early‑stage hypothyroidism, and in the early‑stage hypothyroidism group, the mRNA expression levels of Bcl‑2 were significantly decreased (P<0.05), whereas those of Egr‑1 (P<0.05) were significantly increased, compared with the non

  8. Sequence polymorphism of GroEL gene in natural population of Bacillus and Brevibacillus spp. that showed variation in thermal tolerance capacity and mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Sen, R; Tripathy, S; Padhi, S K; Mohanty, S; Maiti, N K

    2014-10-01

    GroEL, a class I chaperonin, plays an important role in the thermal adaptation of the cell and helps to maintain the viability of the cell under heat shock condition. Function of groEL in vivo depends on the maintenance of proper structure of the protein which in turn depends on the nucleotide and amino acid sequence of the gene. In this study, we investigated the changes in nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the partial groEL gene that may affect the thermotolerance capacity as well as mRNA expression of bacterial isolates. Sequences among the same species having differences in the amino acid level were identified as different alleles. The effect of allelic variation on the groEL gene expression was analyzed by comparison and relative quantification in each allele under thermal shock condition by RT-PCR. Evaluation of K a/K s ratio among the strains of same species showed that the groEL gene of all the species had undergone similar functional constrain during evolution. The strains showing similar thermotolerance capacity was found to carry same allele of groEL gene. The isolates carrying allele having amino acid substitution inside the highly ATP/ADP or Mg(2+)-binding region could not tolerate thermal stress and showed lower expression of the groEL gene. Our results indicate that during evolution of these bacterial species the groEL gene has undergone the process of natural selection, and the isolates have evolved with the groEL allelic sequences that help them to withstand the thermal stress during their interaction with the environment. PMID:24894903

  9. RNA-binding protein regulates plant DNA methylation by controlling mRNA processing at the intronic heterochromatin-containing gene IBM1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingang; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Tang, Kai; Wang, Bangshing; Zhang, Huiming; Lei, Mingguang; Lu, Kun; Mangrauthia, Satendra K.; Wang, Pengcheng; Zhao, Yang; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation-dependent heterochromatin formation is a conserved mechanism of epigenetic silencing of transposons and other repeat elements in many higher eukaryotes. Genes adjacent to repetitive elements are often also subjected to this epigenetic silencing. Consequently, plants have evolved antisilencing mechanisms such as active DNA demethylation mediated by the REPRESSOR OF SILENCING 1 (ROS1) family of 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases to protect these genes from silencing. Some transposons and other repeat elements have found residence in the introns of genes. It is unclear how these intronic repeat elements-containing genes are regulated. We report here the identification of ANTI-SILENCING 1 (ASI1), a bromo-adjacent homology domain and RNA recognition motif-containing protein, from a forward genetic screen for cellular antisilencing factors in Arabidopsis thaliana. ASI1 is required to prevent promoter DNA hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing of some transgenes. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis reveals that ASI1 has a similar role to that of the histone H3K9 demethylase INCREASE IN BONSAI METHYLATION 1 (IBM1) in preventing CHG methylation in the bodies of thousands of genes. We found that ASI1 is an RNA-binding protein and ensures the proper expression of IBM1 full-length transcript by associating with an intronic heterochromatic repeat element of IBM1. Through mRNA sequencing, we identified many genes containing intronic transposon elements that require ASI1 for proper expression. Our results suggest that ASI1 associates with intronic heterochromatin and binds the gene transcripts to promote their 3′ distal polyadenylation. The study thus reveals a unique mechanism by which higher eukaryotes deal with the collateral effect of silencing intronic repeat elements. PMID:24003136

  10. Dietary Fucoxanthin Increases Metabolic Rate and Upregulated mRNA Expressions of the PGC-1alpha Network, Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Fusion Genes in White Adipose Tissues of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meng-Ting; Chou, Hong-Nong; Huang, Ching-jang

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism for how fucoxanthin (FX) suppressed adipose accumulation is unclear. We aim to investigate the effects of FX on metabolic rate and expressions of genes related to thermogenesis, mitochondria biogenesis and homeostasis. Using a 2 × 2 factorial design, four groups of mice were respectively fed a high sucrose (50% sucrose) or a high-fat diet (23% butter + 7% soybean oil) supplemented with or without 0.2% FX. FX significantly increased oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production and reduced white adipose tissue (WAT) mass. The mRNA expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), cell death-inducing DFFA-like effecter a (CIDEA), PPARα, PPARγ, estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), β3-adrenergic receptor (β3-AR) and deiodinase 2 (Dio2) were significantly upregulated in inguinal WAT (iWAT) and epididymal WAT (eWAT) by FX. Mitochondrial biogenic genes, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1) and NRF2, were increased in eWAT by FX. Noticeably, FX upregulated genes of mitochondrial fusion, mitofusin 1 (Mfn1), Mfn2 and optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), but not mitochondrial fission, Fission 1, in both iWAT and eWAT. In conclusion, dietary FX enhanced the metabolic rate and lowered adipose mass irrespective of the diet. These were associated with upregulated genes of the PGC-1α network and mitochondrial fusion in eWAT and iWAT. PMID:24534841

  11. Association between mRNA expression of chemotherapy-related genes and clinicopathological features in colorectal cancer: A large-scale population analysis.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Yuji; Nukatsuka, Mamoru; Takechi, Teiji; Fukushima, Masakazu

    2016-02-01

    To establish the individualized treatment of patients with colorectal cancer, factors associated with chemotherapeutic effects should be identified. However, to the best of our knowledge, few studies are available on this topic, although it is known that the prognosis of patients and sensitivity to chemotherapy depend on the location of the tumor and that the tumor location is important for individualized treatment. In this study, primary tumors obtained from 1,129 patients with colorectal cancer were used to measure the mRNA expression levels of the following genes associated with the effects of standard chemotherapy for colorectal cancer: 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-related thymidylate synthase (TYMS), dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) and thymidine phosphorylase (TYMP); folate-related dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), folylpolyglutamate synthase (FPGS) and gamma-glutamyl hydrolase (GGH); irinotecan-related topoisomerase I (TOP1); oxaliplatin-related excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1); biologic agent-related vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Large-scale population analysis was performed to determine the association of gene expression with the clinicopathological features, in particular, the location of the colorectal cancer. From the results of our analysis of the mRNA expression of these 10 genes, we noted the strongest correlation between DPYD and TYMP, followed by TYMS and DHFR. The location of the colorectal cancer was classified into 4 regions (the right‑ and left-sided colon, rectosigmoid and rectum) and was compared with gene expression. A significant difference in all genes, apart from VEGF, was noted. Of the remaining 9 genes, the highest expression of TYMS and DPYD was observed in the right‑sided colon; the highest expression of GGH and EGFR was noted in the left-sided colon; the highest expression of DHFR, FPGS, TOP1 and ERCC1 was noted in the rectosigmoid, whereas TYMP expression was

  12. Association between mRNA expression of chemotherapy-related genes and clinicopathological features in colorectal cancer: A large-scale population analysis

    PubMed Central

    SHIMAMOTO, YUJI; NUKATSUKA, MAMORU; TAKECHI, TEIJI; FUKUSHIMA, MASAKAZU

    2016-01-01

    To establish the individualized treatment of patients with colorectal cancer, factors associated with chemotherapeutic effects should be identified. However, to the best of our knowledge, few studies are available on this topic, although it is known that the prognosis of patients and sensitivity to chemotherapy depend on the location of the tumor and that the tumor location is important for individualized treatment. In this study, primary tumors obtained from 1,129 patients with colorectal cancer were used to measure the mRNA expression levels of the following genes associated with the effects of standard chemotherapy for colorectal cancer: 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-related thymidylate synthase (TYMS), dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) and thymidine phosphorylase (TYMP); folate-related dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), folylpolyglutamate synthase (FPGS) and gamma-glutamyl hydrolase (GGH); irinotecan-related topoisomerase I (TOP1); oxaliplatin-related excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1); biologic agent-related vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Large-scale population analysis was performed to determine the association of gene expression with the clinicopathological features, in particular, the location of the colorectal cancer. From the results of our analysis of the mRNA expression of these 10 genes, we noted the strongest correlation between DPYD and TYMP, followed by TYMS and DHFR. The location of the colorectal cancer was classified into 4 regions (the right- and left-sided colon, rectosigmoid and rectum) and was compared with gene expression. A significant difference in all genes, apart from VEGF, was noted. Of the remaining 9 genes, the highest expression of TYMS and DPYD was observed in the right-sided colon; the highest expression of GGH and EGFR was noted in the left-sided colon; the highest expression of DHFR, FPGS, TOP1 and ERCC1 was noted in the rectosigmoid, whereas TYMP expression was

  13. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase I gene in Synechogobius hasta: Cloning, mRNA expression and transcriptional regulation by insulin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kun; Zheng, Jia-Lang; Luo, Zhi; Chen, Qi-Liang; Zhu, Qing-Ling; Wei-Hu

    2016-01-15

    We cloned seven complete CPT I cDNA sequences (CPT I α1a-1a, CPT I α1a-1b, CPT I α1a-1c, CPT I α1a-2, CPT I α2a, CPT I α2b1a, CPT I β) and a partial cDNA sequence (CPT I α2b1b) from Synechogobius hasta. Phylogenetic analysis shows that there are four CPT I duplications in S. hasta, CPT I duplication resulting in CPT I α and CPT I β, CPT I α duplication producing CPT I α1 and CPT I α2, CPT I α2 duplication generating CPT I α2a and CPT I α2b, and CPT I α2b duplication creating CPT I α2b1a and CPT I α2b1b. Alternative splicing of CPT Iα1a results in the generation of four CPT I isoforms, CPT I α1a-1a, CPT I α1a-1b, CPT I α1a-1c and CPT I α1a-2. Five CPT I transcripts (CPT I α1a, CPT I α2a, CPT I α2b1a, CPT I α2b1b and CPT I β) mRNAs are expressed in a wide range of tissues, but their abundance of each CPT I mRNA shows the tissue-dependent expression patterns. Insulin incubation significantly reduces the mRNA expression of CPT Iα1a and CPT Iα2a, but not other transcripts in hepatocytes of S. hasta. For the first time, our study demonstrates CPT Iα2b duplication and CPT I α1a alternative splicing in fish at transcriptional level, and the CPT I mRNAs are differentially regulated by insulin in vitro, suggesting that four CPT I isoforms may play different physiological roles during insulin signaling. PMID:26506441

  14. Methylation of the tryptophan hydroxylase‑2 gene is associated with mRNA expression in patients with major depression with suicide attempts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuqi; Chang, Zaohuo; Chen, Jionghua; Ling, Yang; Liu, Xiaowei; Feng, Zhang; Chen, Caixia; Xia, Minghua; Zhao, Xingfu; Ying, Wang; Qing, Xu; Li, Guilin; Zhang, Changsong

    2015-08-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH2) contributes to alterations in the function of neuronal serotonin (5-HT), which are associated with various psychopathologies, including major depressive disorder (MDD) or suicidal behavior. The methylation of a single CpG site in the promoter region of TPH2 affects gene expression. Suicide and MDD are strongly associated and genetic factors are at least partially responsible for the variability in suicide risk. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether variations in TPH2 methylation in peripheral blood samples may predispose patients with MDD to suicide attempts. TPH2 mRNA expression levels differed significantly between 50 patients with MDD who had attempted suicide (MDD + suicide group) and 75 control patients with MDD (MDD group); TPH2 expression levels were significantly decreased (P=0.0005) in the patients who had attempted suicide. Furthermore, the frequency of TPH2 methylation was 36.0% in the MDD + suicide group, while it was 13.0% in the MDD group. The results of the present study demonstrated that methylation in the promoter region of TPH2 significantly affected the mRNA expression levels of TPH2, thus suggesting that methylation of the TPH2 promoter may silence TPH2 mRNA expression in MDD patients with or without suicidal behavior. In addition, there was a significant correlation between the methylation status of the TPH2 promoter and depression, hopelessness and cognitive impairment in the MDD + suicide group. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that TPH2 expression was regulated by DNA methylation of the TPH2 promoter region in patients with MDD. PMID:25955598

  15. Influence of BMP-2 on early follicular development and mRNA expression of oocyte specific genes in bovine preantral follicles cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Rodrigo O D S; da Cunha, Ellen V; Portela, Antonia M L R; Passos, José R S; Costa, José J N; Silva, Anderson W B; Saraiva, Márcia V A; Peixoto, Christina A; Donato, Mariana A M; van den Hurk, Robert; Silva, José R V

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluates the effect of different concentrations (0, 10, 50 and 100ng/mL) of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) on primordial and secondary follicle development. It also investigates the effects of FSH and BMP-2 on the growth, morphology, ultrastructure and expression of mRNA for GDF9, NLRP5 and NPM2 genes in secondary follicles cultured for 18 days. The presence of BMP-2 at all tested concentrations increased the development of primordial follicles in vitro, but the highest concentration of BMP-2 (100 ng/mL) reduced the percentage of normal follicles when compared with tissues cultured with 10 ng/mL BMP-2. During culture of secondary follicles, in contrast to higher concentrations (50 or 100 ng/mL), 10 ng/mL BMP-2 kept the morphology of follicles during initial stages of in vitro culture. This concentration of BMP-2 also benefits maintenance of the ultrastructure of 18-day cultured follicles. The presence of both BMP-2 and FSH in culture medium resulted in a significant (P<0.05) increase in follicular diameter after 18 days of culture. However, both FSH and BMP-2 reduced follicular mRNA expression of GDF9 and NLRP5 when compared to follicles cultured in media containing only FSH. In combination with FSH, BMP-2 reduced the mRNA levels of NPM2, when compared to follicles cultured in control medium. It is concluded from these data that 10 ng/mL BMP-2 promotes the growth of primordial in vitro and it helps to maintain the ultrastructure of secondary follicles, while FSH is more important for better expression of follicular markers like GDF9 and NLRP5. PMID:26435174

  16. The arabidopsis polyamine transporter LHRI/AtPUT3 modulates heat responsive gene expression by regulating mRNA stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyamines (PA) involve in the gene regulation by interacting with various anionic macromolecules such as DNA, RNA and proteins and modulating their structure and function. Previous studies have showed that changing in polyamine biosynthesis alters plant response to different abiotic stresses. Here,...

  17. Calmodulin Gene Family in Potato: Developmental and Touch-Induced Expression of the mRNA Encoding a Novel Isoform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takezawa, D.; Liu, Z. H.; An, G.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Eight genomic clones of potato calmodulin (PCM1 to 8) were isolated and characterized. Sequence comparisons of different genes revealed that the deduced amino acid sequence of PCM1 had several unique substitutions, especially in the fourth Ca(2+)-binding area. The expression patterns of different genes were studied by northern analysis using the 3'-untranslated regions as probes. The expression of PCM1, 5, and 8 was highest in the stolon tip and it decreased during tuber development. The expression of PCM6 did not vary much in the tissues tested, except in the leaves, where the expression was lower; whereas, the expression of PCM4 was very low in all the tissues. The expression of PCM2 and PCM3 was not detected in any of the tissues tested. Among these genes, only PCM1 showed increased expression following touch stimulation. To study the regulation of PCM1, transgenic potato plants carrying the PCM1 promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene were produced. GUS expression was found to be developmentally regulated and touch-responsive, indicating a positive correlation between the expression of PCM1 and GUS mRNAs. These results suggest that the 5'-flanking region of PCM1 controls developmental and touch-induced expression. X-Gluc staining patterns revealed that GUS localization is high in meristematic tissues such as the stem apex, stolon tip, and vascular regions.

  18. Ascorbic acid supplementation down-regulates the alcohol induced oxidative stress, hepatic stellate cell activation, cytotoxicity and mRNA levels of selected fibrotic genes in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Abhilash, P A; Harikrishnan, R; Indira, M

    2012-02-01

    Both oxidative stress and endotoxins mediated immunological reactions play a major role in the progression of alcoholic hepatic fibrosis. Ascorbic acid has been reported to reduce alcohol-induced toxicity and ascorbic acid levels are reduced in alcoholics. Hence, we investigated the hepatoprotective action of ascorbic acid in the reversal of alcohol-induced hepatic fibrosis in male guinea pigs (n = 36), and it was compared with the animals abstenting from alcohol treatment. In comparison with the alcohol abstention group, there was a reduction in the activities of toxicity markers and levels of lipid and protein peroxidation products, expression of α-SMA, caspase-3 activity and mRNA levels of CYP2E1, TGF-β(1), TNF-α and α(1)(I) collagen in liver of the ascorbic acid-supplemented group. The ascorbic acid content in liver was significantly reduced in the alcohol-treated guinea pigs. But it was reversed to normal level in the ascorbic acid-supplemented group. The anti-fibrotic action of ascorbic acid in the rapid regression of alcoholic liver fibrosis may be attributed to decrease in the oxidative stress, hepatic stellate cells activation, cytotoxicity and mRNA expression of fibrotic genes CYP2E1, TGF-β(1), TNF-α and α(1) (I) collagen in hepatic tissues. PMID:22149461

  19. The effect of lysophosphatidic acid during in vitro maturation of bovine oocytes: embryonic development and mRNA abundances of genes involved in apoptosis and oocyte competence.

    PubMed

    Boruszewska, Dorota; Torres, Ana Catarina; Kowalczyk-Zieba, Ilona; Diniz, Patricia; Batista, Mariana; Lopes-da-Costa, Luis; Woclawek-Potocka, Izabela

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we examined whether LPA can be synthesized and act during in vitro maturation of bovine cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs). We found transcription of genes coding for enzymes of LPA synthesis pathway (ATX and PLA2) and of LPA receptors (LPAR 1-4) in bovine oocytes and cumulus cells, following in vitro maturation. COCs were matured in vitro in presence or absence of LPA (10(-5) M) for 24 h. Supplementation of maturation medium with LPA increased mRNA abundance of FST and GDF9 in oocytes and decreased mRNA abundance of CTSs in cumulus cells. Additionally, oocytes stimulated with LPA had higher transcription levels of BCL2 and lower transcription levels of BAX resulting in the significantly lower BAX/BCL2 ratio. Blastocyst rates on day 7 were similar in the control and the LPA-stimulated COCs. Our study demonstrates for the first time that bovine COCs are a potential source and target of LPA action. We postulate that LPA exerts an autocrine and/or paracrine signaling, through several LPARs, between the oocyte and cumulus cells. LPA supplementation of maturation medium improves COC quality, and although this was not translated into an enhanced in vitro development until the blastocyst stage, improved oocyte competence may be relevant for subsequent in vivo survival. PMID:24729661

  20. Comparison of the Expression Profiles of Immune Response Gene mRNA in Umbilical and Venous Blood of Newborns of the First Day of Life.

    PubMed

    Nepsha, O S; Nikitina, I V; Donnikov, A E; Bystritsky, A A; Mullabaeva, S M; Pavlovich, S V; Aleksandrova, N V

    2016-04-01

    The expression of immune response gene mRNA in the umbilical and venous blood were compared in newborns of the first day of life with and without signs of infection. The expression of il1b, il6, il8, il10, il12a, il15, il18, tnfa, tgfb1, tbx21, gata3, foxp3, rorc2, cd45, cd68, cd69, tlr2, tlr4, tlr9, and mmp8 mRNA was evaluated in umbilical and venous blood cells of newborns by reverse transcription real time PCR. In full-term newborns without signs of infection, the expression of il8, tlr2, tlr4, and mmp8 in venous blood was higher than in umbilical blood, while in preterm newborns, the levels of mmp8 transcript were elevated while the levels of tlr9, cd45, and gata3 were reduced. The expression of some markers differed in the umbilical and venous blood and in newborns with congenital infectious disease and without signs of infection. PMID:27165068

  1. Lesions in the mRNA cap-binding gene ABA HYPERSENSITIVE 1 suppress FRIGIDA-mediated delayed flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Isabel C; Michaels, Scott D; Schomburg, Fritz M; Amasino, Richard M

    2004-10-01

    Recessive mutations that suppress the late-flowering phenotype conferred by FRIGIDA (FRI) and FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and which also result in serrated leaf morphology were identified in T-DNA and fast-neutron mutant populations. Molecular analysis showed that the mutations are caused by lesions in the gene encoding the large subunit of the nuclear mRNA cap-binding protein, ABH1 (ABA hypersensitive1). The suppression of late flowering is caused by the inability of FRI to increase FLC mRNA levels in the abh1 mutant background. The serrated leaf morphology of abh1 is similar to the serrate (se) mutant and, like abh1, se is also a suppressor of FRI-mediated late flowering although it is a weaker suppressor than abh1. Unlike se, in abh1 the rate of leaf production and the number of juvenile leaves are not altered. The abh1 lesion affects several developmental processes, perhaps because the processing of certain mRNAs in these pathways is more sensitive to loss of cap-binding activity than the majority of cellular mRNAs. PMID:15361145

  2. Molecular Cloning and mRNA Expression of Heat Shock Protein Genes and Their Response to Cadmium Stress in the Grasshopper Oxya chinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuping; Liu, Yaoming; Zhang, Jianzhen; Guo, Yaping; Ma, Enbo

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are highly conserved molecular chaperones that are synthesized in response to stress. In this study, we cloned the full-length sequences of the Grp78 (glucose-regulated protein 78), Hsp70, Hsp90, and Hsp40 genes from the Chinese rice grasshopper Oxya chinensis. The full-length cDNA sequences of OcGrp78, OcHsp70, OcHsp90, and OcHsp40 contain open reading frames of 1947, 1920, 2172, and 1042 bp that encode proteins of 649, 640, 724, and 347 amino acids, respectively. Fluorescent real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was performed to quantify the relative transcript levels of these Hsp genes in different tissues and developmental stages. The mRNAs encoding these four Hsp genes were present at all developmental stages and in all tissues examined but were expressed at varying levels. Additionally, we investigated the mRNA expression profiles of these four Hsps in O. chinensis subjected to Cadmium (Cd) stress. OcGrp78, OcHsp70, OcHsp90, and OcHsp40 mRNA expression was induced under acute Cd stress; the levels reached a maximum within a short time (6 h), were reduced significantly at 12 h, and were lowered to or below control levels by 48 h. Regarding induction efficiency, OcHsp70 was the most sensitive gene to acute Cd stress. Chronic Cd exposure showed that dietary Cd treatment induced increased OcGrp78, OcHsp90, and OcHsp40 expression. However, dietary Cd induced a significant reduction of OcHsp70 expression. In the period tested, no significant difference in the mortality of the grasshoppers was observed. Our results suggest that these four Hsps genes, especially OcHsp70, are sensitive to acute Cd stress and could be used as molecular markers for toxicology studies. However, our results also indicate that OcHsp70 is not suitable for use as a molecular marker of chronic Cd contamination. PMID:26135744

  3. Molecular Cloning and mRNA Expression of Heat Shock Protein Genes and Their Response to Cadmium Stress in the Grasshopper Oxya chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuping; Liu, Yaoming; Zhang, Jianzhen; Guo, Yaping; Ma, Enbo

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are highly conserved molecular chaperones that are synthesized in response to stress. In this study, we cloned the full-length sequences of the Grp78 (glucose-regulated protein 78), Hsp70, Hsp90, and Hsp40 genes from the Chinese rice grasshopper Oxya chinensis. The full-length cDNA sequences of OcGrp78, OcHsp70, OcHsp90, and OcHsp40 contain open reading frames of 1947, 1920, 2172, and 1042 bp that encode proteins of 649, 640, 724, and 347 amino acids, respectively. Fluorescent real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was performed to quantify the relative transcript levels of these Hsp genes in different tissues and developmental stages. The mRNAs encoding these four Hsp genes were present at all developmental stages and in all tissues examined but were expressed at varying levels. Additionally, we investigated the mRNA expression profiles of these four Hsps in O. chinensis subjected to Cadmium (Cd) stress. OcGrp78, OcHsp70, OcHsp90, and OcHsp40 mRNA expression was induced under acute Cd stress; the levels reached a maximum within a short time (6 h), were reduced significantly at 12 h, and were lowered to or below control levels by 48 h. Regarding induction efficiency, OcHsp70 was the most sensitive gene to acute Cd stress. Chronic Cd exposure showed that dietary Cd treatment induced increased OcGrp78, OcHsp90, and OcHsp40 expression. However, dietary Cd induced a significant reduction of OcHsp70 expression. In the period tested, no significant difference in the mortality of the grasshoppers was observed. Our results suggest that these four Hsps genes, especially OcHsp70, are sensitive to acute Cd stress and could be used as molecular markers for toxicology studies. However, our results also indicate that OcHsp70 is not suitable for use as a molecular marker of chronic Cd contamination. PMID:26135744

  4. ADAR2 affects mRNA coding sequence edits with only modest effects on gene expression or splicing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dillman, Allissa A; Cookson, Mark R; Galter, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases bind double stranded RNA and convert adenosine to inosine. Editing creates multiple isoforms of neurotransmitter receptors, such as with Gria2. Adar2 KO mice die of seizures shortly after birth, but if the Gria2 Q/R editing site is mutated to mimic the edited version then the animals are viable. We performed RNA-Seq on frontal cortices of Adar2(-/-) Gria2(R/R) mice and littermates. We found 56 editing sites with significantly diminished editing levels in Adar2 deficient animals with the majority in coding regions. Only two genes and 3 exons showed statistically significant differences in expression levels. This work illustrates that ADAR2 is important in site-specific changes of protein coding sequences but has relatively modest effects on gene expression and splicing in the adult mouse frontal cortex. PMID:26669816

  5. Low-level laser irradiation alters mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trajano, L. A. S. N.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Silva, C. L.; Carvalho, L.; Mencalha, A. L.; Stumbo, A. C.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    Low-level lasers are used for the treatment of diseases in soft and bone tissues, but few data are available regarding their effects on genomic stability. In this study, we investigated mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts exposed to low-level infrared laser. C2C12 myoblast cultures in different fetal bovine serum concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (10, 35 and 70 J cm‑2), and collected for the evaluation of DNA repair gene expression. Laser exposure increased gene expression related to base excision repair (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1), nucleotide excision repair (excision repair cross-complementation group 1 and xeroderma pigmentosum C protein) and genomic stabilization (ATM serine/threonine kinase and tumor protein p53) in normal and low fetal bovine serum concentrations. Results suggest that genomic stability could be part of a biostimulation effect of low-level laser therapy in injured muscles.

  6. Coordination of m(6)A mRNA Methylation and Gene Transcription by ZFP217 Regulates Pluripotency and Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Aguilo, Francesca; Zhang, Fan; Sancho, Ana; Fidalgo, Miguel; Di Cecilia, Serena; Vashisht, Ajay; Lee, Dung-Fang; Chen, Chih-Hung; Rengasamy, Madhumitha; Andino, Blanca; Jahouh, Farid; Roman, Angel; Krig, Sheryl R; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Weijia; Wohlschlegel, James A; Wang, Jianlong; Walsh, Martin J

    2015-12-01

    Epigenetic and epitranscriptomic networks have important functions in maintaining the pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and somatic cell reprogramming. However, the mechanisms integrating the actions of these distinct networks are only partially understood. Here we show that the chromatin-associated zinc finger protein 217 (ZFP217) coordinates epigenetic and epitranscriptomic regulation. ZFP217 interacts with several epigenetic regulators, activates the transcription of key pluripotency genes, and modulates N6-methyladenosine (m(6)A) deposition on their transcripts by sequestering the enzyme m(6)A methyltransferase-like 3 (METTL3). Consistently, Zfp217 depletion compromises ESC self-renewal and somatic cell reprogramming, globally increases m(6)A RNA levels, and enhances m(6)A modification of the Nanog, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc mRNAs, promoting their degradation. ZFP217 binds its own target gene mRNAs, which are also METTL3 associated, and is enriched at promoters of m(6)A-modified transcripts. Collectively, these findings shed light on how a transcription factor can tightly couple gene transcription to m(6)A RNA modification to ensure ESC identity. PMID:26526723

  7. In vitro Effects of Four Native Brazilian Medicinal Plants in CYP3A4 mRNA Gene Expression, Glutathione Levels, and P-Glycoprotein Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mazzari, Andre L. D. A.; Milton, Flora; Frangos, Samantha; Carvalho, Ana C. B.; Silveira, Dâmaris; de Assis Rocha Neves, Francisco; Prieto, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Erythrina mulungu Benth. (Fabaceae), Cordia verbenacea A. DC. (Boraginaceae), Solanum paniculatum L. (Solanaceae) and Lippia sidoides Cham. (Verbenaceae) are medicinal plant species native to Brazil shortlisted by the Brazilian National Health System for future clinical use. However, nothing is known about their effects in metabolic and transporter proteins, which could potentially lead to herb-drug interactions (HDI). In this work, we assess non-toxic concentrations (100 μg/mL) of the plant infusions for their in vitro ability to modulate CYP3A4 mRNA gene expression and intracellular glutathione levels in HepG2 cells, as well as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity in vincristine-resistant Caco-2 cells (Caco-2 VCR). Their mechanisms of action were further studied by measuring the activation of human pregnane X receptor (hPXR) in transiently co-transfected HeLa cells and the inhibition of γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) in HepG2 cells. Our results show that P-gp activity was not affected in any case and that only Solanum paniculatum was able to significantly change CYP3A4 mRNA gene expression (twofold decrease, p < 0.05), this being correlated with an antagonist effect upon hPXR (EC50 = 0.38 mg/mL). Total intracellular glutathione levels were significantly depleted by exposure to Solanum paniculatum (-44%, p < 0.001), Lippia sidoides (-12%, p < 0.05) and Cordia verbenacea (-47%, p < 0.001). The latter plant extract was able to decrease GGT activity (-48%, p < 0.01). In conclusion, this preclinical study shows that the administration of some of these herbal medicines may be able to cause disturbances to metabolic mechanisms in vitro. Although Erythrina mulungu appears safe in our tests, active pharmacovigilance is recommended for the other three species, especially in the case of Solanum paniculatum. PMID:27594838

  8. Effect of insoluble fibre on intestinal morphology and mRNA expression pattern of inflammatory, cell cycle and growth marker genes in a piglet model.

    PubMed

    Schedle, Karl; Pfaffl, Michael W; Plitzner, Christian; Meyer, Heinrich H D; Windisch, Wilhelm

    2008-12-01

    The effects of insoluble dietary fibre differing in lignin content on intestinal morphology and mRNA expression was tested in an animal model of 48 weaned piglets. Engaged fibre sources were wheat bran (rich in cellulose and hemicellulose) and pollen from Chinese Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) (rich in lignin), respectively. The fibre sources were added to a basal diet as follows: no addition (control), 3.0% wheat bran, 1.27% pine pollen, and 2.55% pine pollen. The 12 animals of each feeding group were fed four experimental diets ad libitum for 37 days and were then slaughtered for retrieving tissue samples from stomach, jejunum, ileum, colon and mesenterial lymph nodes. Both fibre sources increased villus height of mucosa in jejunum (+10% on average) and ileum (+16% on average). Results of mRNA expression rates of inflammatory, cell cycle and growth marker genes (NFkappaB, TNFalpha, TGFbeta, Caspase3, CDK4, IGF1) were specific to fibre source and tissue: wheat bran induced an up-regulation of NFkappaB in stomach and jejunum, as well as TNFalpha and TGFbeta, and Caspase3 in jejunum. Pine pollen induced down regulation of NFkappaB, TNFalpha, TGFbeta, Caspase3, CDK4 and IGF1 in the colon as well as up-regulation of NFkappaB and TGFbeta in mesenterial lymph nodes. Finally, an overall data comparison based on a hierarchical cluster analysis showed a close relation between gene regulation in different gut sections and organs, as well as between small intestine morphology and zootechnical performance. PMID:19143227

  9. In vitro Effects of Four Native Brazilian Medicinal Plants in CYP3A4 mRNA Gene Expression, Glutathione Levels, and P-Glycoprotein Activity.

    PubMed

    Mazzari, Andre L D A; Milton, Flora; Frangos, Samantha; Carvalho, Ana C B; Silveira, Dâmaris; de Assis Rocha Neves, Francisco; Prieto, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    Erythrina mulungu Benth. (Fabaceae), Cordia verbenacea A. DC. (Boraginaceae), Solanum paniculatum L. (Solanaceae) and Lippia sidoides Cham. (Verbenaceae) are medicinal plant species native to Brazil shortlisted by the Brazilian National Health System for future clinical use. However, nothing is known about their effects in metabolic and transporter proteins, which could potentially lead to herb-drug interactions (HDI). In this work, we assess non-toxic concentrations (100 μg/mL) of the plant infusions for their in vitro ability to modulate CYP3A4 mRNA gene expression and intracellular glutathione levels in HepG2 cells, as well as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity in vincristine-resistant Caco-2 cells (Caco-2 VCR). Their mechanisms of action were further studied by measuring the activation of human pregnane X receptor (hPXR) in transiently co-transfected HeLa cells and the inhibition of γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) in HepG2 cells. Our results show that P-gp activity was not affected in any case and that only Solanum paniculatum was able to significantly change CYP3A4 mRNA gene expression (twofold decrease, p < 0.05), this being correlated with an antagonist effect upon hPXR (EC50 = 0.38 mg/mL). Total intracellular glutathione levels were significantly depleted by exposure to Solanum paniculatum (-44%, p < 0.001), Lippia sidoides (-12%, p < 0.05) and Cordia verbenacea (-47%, p < 0.001). The latter plant extract was able to decrease GGT activity (-48%, p < 0.01). In conclusion, this preclinical study shows that the administration of some of these herbal medicines may be able to cause disturbances to metabolic mechanisms in vitro. Although Erythrina mulungu appears safe in our tests, active pharmacovigilance is recommended for the other three species, especially in the case of Solanum paniculatum. PMID:27594838

  10. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human nescient helix-loop-helix 2 (NHLH2) gene reduce mRNA stability and DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Al Rayyan, Numan; Wankhade, Umesh D; Bush, Korie; Good, Deborah J

    2013-01-01

    Nescient helix-loop-helix-2 (NHLH2) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, which has been implicated, using mouse knockouts, in adult body weight regulation and fertility. A scan of the known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NHLH2 gene revealed one in the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR), which lies within an AUUUA RNA stability motif. A second SNP is nonsynonymous within the coding region of NHLH2, and was found in a genome-wide association study for obesity. Both of these SNPs were examined for their effect on NLHL2 by creating mouse mimics and examining mRNA stability, and protein function in mouse hypothalamic cell lines. The 3'UTR SNP causes increased instability and, when the SNP-containing Nhlh2 3'UTR is attached to luciferase mRNA, reduced protein levels in cells. The nonsynonymous SNP at position 83 in the protein changes an alanine residue, conserved in NHLH2 orthologs through the Drosophila sp. to a proline residue. This change affects migration of the protein on an SDS-PAGE gel, and appears to alter secondary structure of the protein, as predicted using in silico methods. These results provide functional information on two rare human SNPs in the NHLH2 gene. One of these has been linked to human obese phenotypes, while the other is present in a relatively high proportion of individuals. Given their effects on NHLH2 protein levels, both SNPs deserve further analysis in whether they are causative and/or additive for human body weight and fertility phenotypes. PMID:23026212

  11. Influence of functional polymorphisms in TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-10 cytokine genes on mRNA expression levels and risk of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Juliana Garcia; Rossi, Ana Flávia Teixeira; Nizato, Daniela Manchini; Cadamuro, Aline Cristina Targa; Jorge, Yvana Cristina; Valsechi, Marina Curado; Venâncio, Larissa Paola Rodrigues; Rahal, Paula; Pavarino, Érika Cristina; Goloni-Bertollo, Eny Maria; Silva, Ana Elizabete

    2015-12-01

    Functional polymorphisms in promoter regions can produce changes in the affinity of transcription factors, thus altering the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression levels of inflammatory cytokines associated with the risk of cancer development. The goal of this study was to evaluate the influence that polymorphisms in the cytokine genes known as TNF-α-308 G/A (rs1800629), TNF-α-857 C/T (rs1799724), IL-8-251 T/A (rs4073), IL-8-845 T/C (rs2227532), and IL-10-592 C/A (rs1800872) have on changes to mRNA expression levels and on the risks of chronic gastritis (CG) and gastric cancer (GC). A sample of 723 individuals was genotyped using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. Relative mRNA expression levels were measured using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Polymorphisms TNF-α-308 G/A and IL-8-251 A/T were not associated with risks of these gastric lesions. However, TNF-α-857 C/T, IL-8-845 T/C, and IL-10-592 C/A were found to be associated with a higher risk of GC, and IL-10-592 C/A was found to be associated with a higher risk of CG. The relative mRNA expression levels (RQ) of TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-10 were markedly downregulated in the CG group (median RQs = 0.128, 0.247, and 0.614, respectively), while the RQ levels of TNF-α in the GC group were upregulated (RQ = 2.749), but were basal for IL-8 (RQ = 1.053) and downregulated for IL-10 (RQ = 0.179). When the groups were stratified according to wild-type and polymorphic alleles, only for IL-8-845 T/C the polymorphic allele was found to influence the expression levels of this cytokine. IL-8-845 C allele carriers were significantly upregulated in both groups (GC and CG; RQ = 3.138 and 2.181, respectively) when compared to TT homozygotes (RQ = -0.407 and 0.165, respectively). In silico analysis in the IL-8 promoter region revealed that the presence of the variant C allele in position -845 is responsible for the presence of the binding

  12. The imprinted SNRPN gene is associated with a polycistronic mRNA and an imprinting control element

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, S.; Nicholls, R.D.; Seip, J.

    1994-09-01

    The small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associated protein SmN (SNRPN) gene is located in the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) critical region in chromosome 15q11-q13. We have previously shown that it is functionally imprinted in humans, being only expressed from the paternal allele and differentially methylated on parental alleles. Therefore, SNRPN may have a role in PWS, although genetic studies suggest that at least two genes may be necessary for the classical PWS phenotype. We have characterized the SNRPN genomic structure, and shown that it comprises ten exons. Surprisingly, we identified an open reading frame (ORF) in the first three exons, 190-bp 5{prime} to the SmN ORF. Notably, the majority of base substitutions bewteen human and rodents in the upstream ORF occurred in the wobble position of codons, suggesting selection for a protein coding function. This ORF, which we name SNURF (SNRPN upstream reading frame) encodes a putative polypeptide of 71 amino acids. By analogy to prokaryotic operons that encode proteins with related functions, it is possible that SNURF may have a role in pre-mRNA splicing.

  13. Deep mRNA Sequencing of the Tritonia diomedea Brain Transcriptome Provides Access to Gene Homologues for Neuronal Excitability, Synaptic Transmission and Peptidergic Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Senatore, Adriano; Edirisinghe, Neranjan; Katz, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The sea slug Tritonia diomedea (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Nudibranchia), has a simple and highly accessible nervous system, making it useful for studying neuronal and synaptic mechanisms underlying behavior. Although many important contributions have been made using Tritonia, until now, a lack of genetic information has impeded exploration at the molecular level. Results We performed Illumina sequencing of central nervous system mRNAs from Tritonia, generating 133.1 million 100 base pair, paired-end reads. De novo reconstruction of the RNA-Seq data yielded a total of 185,546 contigs, which partitioned into 123,154 non-redundant gene clusters (unigenes). BLAST comparison with RefSeq and Swiss-Prot protein databases, as well as mRNA data from other invertebrates (gastropod molluscs: Aplysia californica, Lymnaea stagnalis and Biomphalaria glabrata; cnidarian: Nematostella vectensis) revealed that up to 76,292 unigenes in the Tritonia transcriptome have putative homologues in other databases, 18,246 of which are below a more stringent E-value cut-off of 1x10-6. In silico prediction of secreted proteins from the Tritonia transcriptome shotgun assembly (TSA) produced a database of 579 unique sequences of secreted proteins, which also exhibited markedly higher expression levels compared to other genes in the TSA. Conclusions Our efforts greatly expand the availability of gene sequences available for Tritonia diomedea. We were able to extract full length protein sequences for most queried genes, including those involved in electrical excitability, synaptic vesicle release and neurotransmission, thus confirming that the transcriptome will serve as a useful tool for probing the molecular correlates of behavior in this species. We also generated a neurosecretome database that will serve as a useful tool for probing peptidergic signalling systems in the Tritonia brain. PMID:25719197

  14. To translate, or not to translate: viral and host mRNA regulation by interferon-stimulated genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Melody M H; MacDonald, Margaret R; Rice, Charles M

    2015-06-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) is one of the first lines of cellular defense against viral pathogens. As a result of IFN signaling, a wide array of IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) products is upregulated to target different stages of the viral life cycle. We review recent findings implicating a subset of ISGs in translational regulation of viral and host mRNAs. Translation inhibition is mediated either by binding to viral RNA or by disrupting physiological interactions or levels of the translation complex components. In addition, many of these ISGs localize to translationally silent cytoplasmic granules, such as stress granules and processing bodies, and intersect with the microRNA (miRNA)-mediated silencing pathway to regulate translation of cellular mRNAs. PMID:25748385

  15. Effects of Feed Contaminant Deoxynivalenol on Plasma Cytokines and mRNA Expression of Immune Genes in the Intestine of Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Soodoi, Chimidtseren; Sasgary, Soleman; Strasser, Alois; Böhm, Josef

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the individual and combined effects of dietary deoxynivalenol (DON) and a microbial feed additive on plasma cytokine level and on the expression of immune relevant genes in jejunal tissues of broilers. A total of 40 broiler chicks were obtained from a commercial hatchery and divided randomly into four groups (10 birds per group). Birds were reared in battery cages from one day old for 5 weeks. The dietary groups were 1) control birds fed basal diet; 2) DON group fed basal diet contaminated with 10 mg DON/ kg feed; 3) DON + Mycofix group fed basal diet contaminated with 10 mg DON/ kg feed and supplemented with a commercial feed additive, Mycofix® Select (MS) (2.5 kg/ton of feed); 4) Mycofix group fed basal diet supplemented with MS (2.5 kg/ton of feed). At 35 days, the plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 8 (IL-8) were quantified by ELISA test kits. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-8, IL-1β, interferon gamma (IFNγ), transforming growth factor beta receptor I (TGFBR1) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells 1 (NF-κβ1) in jejunum were quantified by qRT-PCR. The results showed that the plasma TNF-α decreased in response to DON, while in combination with MS, the effect of DON was reduced. DON down-regulated the relative gene expression of IL-1β, TGFBR1 and IFN-γ, and addition of MS to the DON contaminated diet compensates these effects on IL-1β, TGFBR1 but not for IFN-γ. Furthermore, supplementation of MS to either DON contaminated or control diet up-regulated the mRNA expression of NF-κβ1. In conclusion, DON has the potential to provoke and modulate immunological reactions of broilers and subsequently could increase their susceptibility to disease. The additive seemed to have almost as much of an effect as DON, albeit on different genes. PMID:23977054

  16. Effects of feed contaminant deoxynivalenol on plasma cytokines and mRNA expression of immune genes in the intestine of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Ghareeb, Khaled; Awad, Wageha A; Soodoi, Chimidtseren; Sasgary, Soleman; Strasser, Alois; Böhm, Josef

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the individual and combined effects of dietary deoxynivalenol (DON) and a microbial feed additive on plasma cytokine level and on the expression of immune relevant genes in jejunal tissues of broilers. A total of 40 broiler chicks were obtained from a commercial hatchery and divided randomly into four groups (10 birds per group). Birds were reared in battery cages from one day old for 5 weeks. The dietary groups were 1) control birds fed basal diet; 2) DON group fed basal diet contaminated with 10 mg DON/ kg feed; 3) DON + Mycofix group fed basal diet contaminated with 10 mg DON/ kg feed and supplemented with a commercial feed additive, Mycofix® Select (MS) (2.5 kg/ton of feed); 4) Mycofix group fed basal diet supplemented with MS (2.5 kg/ton of feed). At 35 days, the plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 8 (IL-8) were quantified by ELISA test kits. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-8, IL-1β, interferon gamma (IFNγ), transforming growth factor beta receptor I (TGFBR1) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells 1 (NF-κβ1) in jejunum were quantified by qRT-PCR. The results showed that the plasma TNF-α decreased in response to DON, while in combination with MS, the effect of DON was reduced. DON down-regulated the relative gene expression of IL-1β, TGFBR1 and IFN-γ, and addition of MS to the DON contaminated diet compensates these effects on IL-1β, TGFBR1 but not for IFN-γ. Furthermore, supplementation of MS to either DON contaminated or control diet up-regulated the mRNA expression of NF-κβ1. In conclusion, DON has the potential to provoke and modulate immunological reactions of broilers and subsequently could increase their susceptibility to disease. The additive seemed to have almost as much of an effect as DON, albeit on different genes. PMID:23977054

  17. Differential gene expression and characterization of tissue-specific cDNA clones in oil palm using mRNA differential display.

    PubMed

    San, Cha Thye; Shah, Farida Habib

    2005-12-01

    The mRNA differential display method was utilized to study the differential expression and regulation of genes in two species of oil palm, the commercially grown variety Elaeis guineensis, var. tenera and the South American species, Elaeis oleifera. We demonstrated the differential expression of genes in the mesocarp and kernel at the week of active oil synthesis (15 week after anthesis) during fruit development as compare to the roots and leaves and the isolation of tissue-specific and species-specific cDNA clones. A total of eight specific cDNA clones were isolated and their specificities were confirmed by Northern hybridization and classified into three groups. Group one contains four clones (KT3, KT4, KT5 and KT6) that are kernel-specific for E. guineensis, tenera and E. oleifera. The second group represents clone FST1, which is mesocarp and kernel-specific for E. guineensis, tenera and E. oleifera. The third group represents clones MLT1, MLT2 and MLO1 that are mesocarp and leaf-specific. Northern analysis showed that their expressions were developmentally regulated. Nucleotide sequencing and homology search in GenBank data revealed that clones KT3 and KT4 encode for the same maturation protein PM3. While clones MLT1 and MLT2 encode for S-ribonuclease binding protein and fibrillin, respectively. The other clones (KT5, KT6, FST1 and MLO1) did not display any significant homology to any known protein. PMID:16328884

  18. Cloning of the Aegiceras corniculatum class I chitinase gene (AcCHI I) and the response of AcCHI I mRNA expression to cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ying; Wang, You-Shao; Cheng, Hao; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Yeok, Foong Swee

    2015-10-01

    Chitinases in terrestrial plants have been reported these are involved in heavy metal tolerance/detoxification. This is the first attempt to reveal chitinase gene (AcCHI I) and its function on metal detoxification in mangroves Aegiceras corniculatum. RT-PCR and RACE techniques were used to clone AcCHI I, while real-time quantitative PCR was employed to assess AcCHI I mRNA expressions in response to Cadmium (Cd). The deduced AcCHI I protein consists of 316 amino acids, including a signal peptide region, a chitin-binding domain (CBD) and a catalytic domain. Protein homology modeling was performed to identify potential features in AcCHI I. The CBD structure of AcCHI I might be critical for metal tolerance/homeostasis of the plant. Clear tissue-specific differences in AcCHI I expression were detected, with higher transcript levels detected in leaves. Results demonstrated that a short duration of Cd exposure (e.g., 3 days) promoted AcCHI I expression in roots. Upregulated expression was also detected in leaves under 10 mg/kg Cd concentration stress. The present study demonstrates that AcCHI I may play an important role in Cd tolerance/homeostasis in the plant. Further studies of the AcCHI I protein, gene overexpression, the promoter and upstream regulation will be necessary for clarifying the functions of AcCHI I. PMID:26044931

  19. Concordant Association of Insulin Degrading Enzyme Gene (IDE) Variants with IDE mRNA, Aß, and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Ansari, Morad; Wilcox, Samantha L.; Kashino, Mariah R.; Ma, Li; Younkin, Linda H.; Younkin, Samuel G.; Younkin, Curtis S.; Dincman, Toros A.; Howard, Melissa E.; Howell, Chanley C.; Stanton, Chloe M.; Watson, Christopher M.; Crump, Michael; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Polasek, Ozren; Brown, Kristelle; Passmore, Peter; Craig, David; McGuinness, Bernadette; Todd, Stephen; Kehoe, Patrick G.; Mann, David M.; Smith, A. David; Beaumont, Helen; Warden, Donald; Holmes, Clive; Heun, Reinhard; Kölsch, Heike; Kalsheker, Noor; Pankratz, V. Shane; Dickson, Dennis W.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Wright, Alan F.; Younkin, Steven G.; Morgan, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Background The insulin-degrading enzyme gene (IDE) is a strong functional and positional candidate for late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). Methodology/Principal Findings We examined conserved regions of IDE and its 10 kb flanks in 269 AD cases and 252 controls thereby identifying 17 putative functional polymorphisms. These variants formed eleven haplotypes that were tagged with ten variants. Four of these showed significant association with IDE transcript levels in samples from 194 LOAD cerebella. The strongest, rs6583817, which has not previously been reported, showed unequivocal association (p = 1.5×10−8, fold-increase = 2.12,); the eleven haplotypes were also significantly associated with transcript levels (global p = 0.003). Using an in vitro dual luciferase reporter assay, we found that rs6583817 increases reporter gene expression in Be(2)-C (p = 0.006) and HepG2 (p = 0.02) cell lines. Furthermore, using data from a recent genome-wide association study of two Croatian isolated populations (n = 1,879), we identified a proxy for rs6583817 that associated significantly with decreased plasma Aβ40 levels (ß = −0.124, p = 0.011) and total measured plasma Aβ levels (b = −0.130, p = 0.009). Finally, rs6583817 was associated with decreased risk of LOAD in 3,891 AD cases and 3,605 controls. (OR = 0.87, p = 0.03), and the eleven IDE haplotypes (global p = 0.02) also showed significant association. Conclusions Thus, a previously unreported variant unequivocally associated with increased IDE expression was also associated with reduced plasma Aß40 and decreased LOAD susceptibility. Genetic association between LOAD and IDE has been difficult to replicate. Our findings suggest that targeted testing of expression SNPs (eSNPs) strongly associated with altered transcript levels in autopsy brain samples may be a powerful way to identify genetic associations with LOAD that would otherwise be difficult to detect

  20. Substrate stiffness regulates apoptosis and the mRNA expression of extracellular matrix regulatory genes in the rat annular cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue-Hui; Zhao, Chang-Qing; Jiang, Lei-Sheng; Dai, Li-Yang

    2011-03-01

    Cells are subjected to static tension of different magnitudes when cultured on substrates with different stiffnesses. It has long been recognized that mechanical stress is an important modulator of the intervertebral disc degeneration. Here we studied the influence of substrate stiffness on cell morphology, apoptosis and extracellular matrix (ECM) metabolism of the rat annulus fibrosus (AF) cells which are known to be mechanosensitive cells. Polyacrylamide gel substrates with three different stiffnesses were prepared by varying the concentration of acrylamide and bisacrylamide, and the elastic modulus of the different gel substrates were measured with atomic force microscopy (AFM). First-passage rat annular cells were cultured on soft, intermediate, rigid substrates or plastics for 24 or 48 h. The percentages of apoptotic cells were detected by flow cytometry and caspase-3 activity, and morphologic changes were visualized by Hoechst 33258 staining and F-actin staining. In addition, the expression of ECM genes (Col1α1, Col2α1, aggrecan, MMP-3, MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5) were analyzed by RT-PCR. The three different substrates had elastic moduli varying between 1±0.23 kPa (soft, 5% gel with 0.06% bis), 32±2.89 kPa (intermediate, 10% gel with 0.13% bis) and 63±3.45 kPa (rigid, 10% gel with 0.26% bis) with a thickness about 60-70 μm. Most of the rat AF cells appeared small and rounded, and lost most of their stress fibers when cultured on soft substrate. There was a significant increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells in the rat AF cells cultured on soft and intermediate substrates relative to those on plastic surface, with a parallel decrease in the area of cell spreading and nucleus. The AF cells grown on intermediate or rigid substrate had reduced expression of Col1α1, Col2α1 and aggrecan and enhanced expression of MMP-3, MMP-13, and ADAMTS-5 at 24h or 48 h, respectively, relative to those cultured on plastic surface. Conversely, we observed an up

  1. Fibulin-2 (FBLN2): Human cDNA sequence, mRNA expression, and mapping of the gene on human and mouse chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.Z.; Pan, T.C.; Zhang, Z.Y.

    1994-07-15

    Fibulin-2 is a new extracellular matrix protein recently identified by characterizing mouse cDNA clones. Fibulin-2 mRNA is prominently expressed in mouse heart tissue and is present in low amounts in other tissues. In this study, the authors isolated and sequenced a 4.1-kb human fibulin-2 cDNA, which encoded a mature protein of 1157 amino acids preceded by a 27-residue signal sequence. The predicted polypeptide contains three consecutive anaphylatoxin-related segments (domain I) in its central region followed by 10 EGF-like repeats (domain II), 9 of which have a consensus sequence for calcium binding. The 408-residue N-terminal region consists of two separate subdomains, a cysteine-rich segment of 150 residues (Na subdomain) and a cysteine-free segment with a stretch of acidic amino acids (Nb subdomain). The 115-residue C-terminal segment (domain III) is similar to the C variant of fibulin-1. The amino acid sequences of the human and mouse fibulin-2 share {approximately}90% identity in domains Na, I, II, and III but only 62% identity in domain Nb. The human cDNA lacks an EGF-like repeat, which is alternatively spliced in the mouse cDNA clones, and a potential cell-binding Arg-Gly-Asp sequence found in the Nb domain of the mouse counterpart. Northern blot analysis of mRNA from various human tissues reveals an abundant 4.5-kb transcript in heart, placenta, and ovary tissue. The expression pattern differs from that of fibulin-1. The fibulin-2 gene was localized by in situ hybridization to the p24-p25 region of human chromosome 3 and to the band D-E of mouse chromosome 6. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Changes of Antioxidant Function and the mRNA Expression Levels of Apoptosis Genes in Duck Ovaries Caused by Molybdenum or/and Cadmium.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huabin; Xia, Bing; Zhang, Mengmeng; Liao, Yilin; Yang, Zhi; Hu, Guoliang; Zhang, Caiying

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the effects of molybdenum (Mo) combined with cadmium (Cd) on the antioxidant function and the mRNA expression levels of apoptosis-related genes in duck ovaries, 60 healthy 11-old-day female ducks were treated with hexaammonium molybdate ([(NH4)6Mo7O24·4H2O]) or/and cadmium sulfate (3CdSO4·8H2O) at different doses on a daily basis for 120 days. On the 120th day, ten female birds in each group were euthanized, and the ovaries and blood were collected to determine the antioxidant indexes and the mRNA expression levels of Bak-1, Bcl-2, and caspase-3 in ovaries. In addition, ovary tissues were subjected to histopathological analysis with optical microscope. The total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity decreased significantly (P < 0.01) in treated groups comparing with control while the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity increased (P < 0.01) both in ovary tissue and serum. The Bak-1 and caspase-3 expressions were upregulated while the Bcl-2 was downgraded by Mo or/and Cd. Biomolecules were affected in all metal-treated groups, whereas combined-treated animals showed greater effects. What is more, pathological damage in Mo and Cd combination treated groups was more severe. The results from the present study indicated that Mo or/and Cd caused oxidative stress and apoptosis in duck ovaries. Combination of Mo and Cd showed additive or synergistic effect leading to apoptosis and oxidative stress, and the pathway might be the mitochondrial pathway. PMID:26446861

  3. Effect of nutrition on plasma lipid profile and mRNA levels of ovarian genes involved in steroid hormone synthesis in Hu sheep during luteal phase.

    PubMed

    Ying, S J; Xiao, S H; Wang, C L; Zhong, B S; Zhang, G M; Wang, Z Y; He, D Y; Ding, X L; Xing, H J; Wang, F

    2013-11-01

    Ovarian steroid hormones regulate follicular growth and atresia. This study aims to determine whether key ovarian sterol-regulatory genes are differentially expressed in Hu sheep under different short-term nutritional regimens. Estrus was synchronized using intravaginal progestagen sponges. The ewes were assigned randomly to 3 groups. On d 6 to 12 of their estrous cycle, the control (CON) group received a maintenance diet (1.0×M), the supplemented (SUP) group received 1.5×M, and the restricted (R) group received 0.5×M. On d 7 to 12, blood samples were taken. The sheep were slaughtered at the end of the treatment, and their organs and ovaries were collected. The plasma concentrations of urea (P<0.01), total cholesterol (P<0.01), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P<0.01), NEFA (P<0.01), FSH (P<0.05), and estradiol (P<0.05) increased with decreasing dietary intake, whereas plasma triglyceride (P<0.01) and triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations decreased (P<0.05). The ewes in the R group had higher spleen weight and percentage of spleen to BW and lower liver and small intestine weights and percentage of liver/stomach to BW than the SUP group ewes (P<0.05). Nutritional restriction decreased the cytochrome p450 (CYP17A1) and estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) mRNA expression (P<0.05) and increased the cytochrome p450 aromatase (CYP19A1) mRNA expression (P<0.05) in follicles>2.5 mm. Follicle size affected the mRNA expression of very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), estrogen receptor 2 (ESR2), FSH receptor (FSHR), CYP17A1, and CYP19A1 (P<0.05). In conclusion, we suggest that a potential mechanism by which short-term negative energy balance inhibits follicular growth may involve responses to disrupted reproductive hormone concentrations and influenced the intrafollicular expression of CYP17A1, CYP19A1, and ESR1. This result may be due to increased plasma urea and lipid concentrations. PMID:24045481

  4. A Genome-Wide mRNA Screen and Functional Analysis Reveal FOXO3 as a Candidate Gene for Chicken Growth

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Biao; Xu, Jiguo; He, Xiaomei; Xu, Haiping; Li, Guihuan; Du, Hongli; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2015-01-01

    Chicken growth performance provides direct economic benefits to the poultry industry. However, the underlying genetic mechanisms are unclear. The objective of this study was to identify candidate genes associated with chicken growth and investigate their potential mechanisms. We used RNA-Seq to study the breast muscle transcriptome in high and low tails of Recessive White Rock (WRRh, WRRl) and Xinghua chickens (XHh, XHl). A total of 60, 23, 153 and 359 differentially expressed genes were detected in WRRh vs. WRRl, XHh vs. XHl, WRRh vs. XHh and WRRl vs. XHl, respectively. GO, KEGG pathway and gene network analyses showed that CEBPB, FBXO32, FOXO3 and MYOD1 played key roles in growth. The functions of FBXO32 and FOXO3 were validated. FBXO32 was predominantly expressed in leg muscle, heart and breast muscle. After decreased FBXO32 expression, growth-related genes such as PDK4, IGF2R and IGF2BP3 were significantly down-regulated (P < 0.05). FBXO32 was significantly (P < 0.05) associated with carcass and meat quality traits, but not growth traits. FOXO3 was predominantly expressed in breast and leg muscle. In both of these tissues, the FOXO3 mRNA level in XH was significantly higher than that in WRR chickens with normal body weight (P < 0.05). In DF-1 cells, siRNA knockdown of FOXO3 significantly (P < 0.01) inhibited the MYOD expression and significantly up-regulated (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05) the expression of growth-related genes including CEBPB, FBXO32, GH, GHR, IGF1R, IGF2R, IGF2BP1, IGF2BP3, INSR, PDK1 and PDK4. Moreover, 18 SNPs were identified in FOXO3. G66716193A was significantly (P < 0.05) associated with growth traits. The sites C66716002T, C66716195T and A66716179G were significantly (P < 0.05) associated with growth or carcass traits. These results demonstrated that FOXO3 is a candidate gene influencing chicken growth. Our observations provide new clues to understand the molecular basis of chicken growth. PMID:26366565

  5. Molecular cloning and mRNA expression of a hepcidin gene from the spinyhead croaker, Collichthys lucidus.

    PubMed

    Sang, C; Lin, Y; Jiang, K; Zhang, F; Song, W

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are important components that participate in host innate immune activities and play crucial roles in host defense against microbial invasion. Hepcidin is an antimicrobial peptide and iron-regulatory molecule that primarily functions in the liver. In the present study, we first obtained a full-length cDNA sequence of hepcidin and its corresponding genomic DNA sequence from Collichthys lucidus using RT-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), and then analyzed these sequences using bioinformatics software. The results showed that C. lucidus hepcidin (CL-hepc) possesses two introns and three exons in the genomic DNA, with a length of 816 bp. The open reading frame was 264 bp, encoding an 87 amino acid peptide, and with high similarity (88.89%) to 83416593 Larimichthys crocea (ABC18307) and relatively low similarity (47.73%) to 158358729 L. crocea (ABY84845.1). The pre-peptide contained a signal peptide (28 amino acids), a prodomain (34 amino acids), and a mature peptide (25 amino acids). The predicted 25 amino acid hepcidin mature peptide included 8 conserved cysteine residues. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed specific expression patterns of CL-hepc, with the highest expression observed in the liver, relatively low expression observed in the gill and spleen, and almost no expression detected in other tissues analyzed. In conclusion, we identified a hepcidin from C. lucidus that has common expression patterns with other hepcidins. However, as this hepcidin is inconsistent with two other hepcidins from L. crocea in terms of the phylogenetic tree, the presence of another hepcidin gene warrants further investigation. PMID:26662398

  6. Sexual maturation, serum steroid concentrations, and mRNA expression of IGF-1, luteinizing and progesterone hormone receptors and survivin gene in Japanese quail hens.

    PubMed

    Shit, N; Sastry, K V H; Singh, R P; Pandey, N K; Mohan, J

    2014-03-15

    In avian species, sexual maturation represents the evidence of start laying, which is a consequence of the development of ovarian follicles. These follicles are the functional reproductive unit whose maturation and viability critically depends on endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine factors beyond the signals from the central nervous system. The present study was undertaken to investigate the correlation of sexual maturity with tissue growth, mRNA expression of certain genes, and serum steroid concentrations in Japanese quail hens. To carry out the present study, a total of forty Japanese quail hens (5 weeks) were housed individually under uniform husbandry condition with ad libitum quail layer ration and water at 14-hour photo schedule. On sixth week onwards, four birds were sacrificed at each time on 1, 3, 7, 10, 13, 16, 19, 22, 25, and 28 days. Serum was extracted aseptically to analyze the gonadal steroid hormones (estrogen and progesterone) and corticosterone to investigate the liaison with sexual maturation of the species. Expression analyses of four genes i.e., insulin-like growth factor-1, luteinizing hormone receptor, progesterone receptor, and survivin were carried out in the three largest ovarian yellow follicles. A significant (P < 0.05) increase in body weight gain and oviduct weight was recorded during the phase of sexual maturation. Smaller follicles revealed higher insulin-like growth factor-1 and survivin gene expression, whereas the reverse result was manifested in both the luteinizing and progesterone hormone receptors. In biochemical study, the gonadal steroids (estrogen and progesterone) were recorded higher at the first half of the experiment when a gradual decrease in corticosterone concentration was confirmed from the very beginning of this study. This result substantiated that sexual maturation in Japanese quail may be completed by the time of 8 weeks after its birth in support of the analyzed information studied in the current investigation

  7. The effect of 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 treatment on the mRNA levels of β catenin target genes in mice with colonic inactivation of both APC alleles

    PubMed Central

    DeWitt, Marsha; Johnson, Robert L.; Snyder, Paul; Fleet, James C.

    2015-01-01

    In colon cancer, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) inactivating gene mutations increase nuclear β-catenin levels and stimulate proliferation. In vitro, 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), suppresses β-catenin-mediated gene transcription by inducing vitamin D receptor (VDR)-β-catenin interactions. We examined whether acute treatment with 1,25(OH)2D could suppress β-catenin-mediated gene transcription in the hyperplastic colonic lesions ofmice with colon-specific deletion of both APC gene alleles (CAC; APCΔ580/Δ580). At four weeks of age, CAC; APCΔ580/Δ580 and control mice were injected with vehicle or 1,25(OH)2D (1 μg/kg body weight) once a day for three days and then killed six hours after the last injection. mRNA levels of β-catenin target genes were elevated in the colon of CAC; APCΔ580/Δ580 mice. 1,25(OH)2D increased 25 hydroxyvitamin D-24 hydroxylase mRNA levels in the colon of CAC; APCΔ580/Δ580 and control mice indicating the treatments activated the VDR. However, 1,25(OH)2D had no effect on either β-catenin target gene mRNA levels or the proliferation index in CAC; APCΔ580/Δ580 or control mice. VDR mRNA and protein levels were lower (−65% and −90%) in the colon of CAC; APCΔ580/Δ580 mice compared to control mice, suggesting loss of colon responsiveness to vitamin D. Consistent with this, vitamin D-induced expression of Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 6 mRNA was reduced in the colon of CAC; APCΔ580/Δ580 mice. Our data show that short term exposure to 1,25(OH)2D does not suppress colonic β-catenin signaling in vivo. PMID:25597951

  8. Gene expression profiling by mRNA sequencing reveals increased expression of immune/inflammation-related genes in the hippocampus of individuals with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Y; Kim, J; Shin, J-Y; Kim, J-II; Seo, J-S; Webster, M J; Lee, D; Kim, S

    2013-01-01

    Whole-genome expression profiling in postmortem brain tissue has recently provided insight into the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Previous microarray and RNA-Seq studies identified several biological processes including synaptic function, mitochondrial function and immune/inflammation response as altered in the cortex of subjects with schizophrenia. Now using RNA-Seq data from the hippocampus, we have identified 144 differentially expressed genes in schizophrenia cases as compared with unaffected controls. Immune/inflammation response was the main biological process over-represented in these genes. The upregulation of several of these genes, IFITM1, IFITM2, IFITM3, APOL1 (Apolipoprotein L1), ADORA2A (adenosine receptor 2A), IGFBP4 and CD163 were validated in the schizophrenia subjects using data from the SNCID database and with quantitative RT-PCR. We identified a co-expression module associated with schizophrenia that includes the majority of differentially expressed genes related to immune/inflammation response as well as with the density of parvalbumin-containing neurons in the hippocampus. The results indicate that abnormal immune/inflammation response in the hippocampus may underlie the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and may be associated with abnormalities in the parvalbumin-containing neurons that lead to the cognitive deficits of the disease. PMID:24169640

  9. Altered mRNA expression of the Rb and p16 tumor suppressor genes and of CDK4 in transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder associated with tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Quentin, Thomas; Henke, Christian; Korabiowska, Monika; Schlott, Thilo; Zimmerman, Britt; Kunze, Ekkehard

    2004-01-01

    Based on the concept that tumor suppressor genes are involved in the pathogenesis of urinary bladder carcinogenesis, we analysed the mRNA expression of the retinoblastoma (Rb) and p16 (CDKN2, INK4A, MTS1) genes as well as of the proto-oncogene cyclin D-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) in 71 transitional cell carcinomas (TCC) of the urinary bladder in relation to the tumor grades and stages, and with reference to certain lifestyle and occupational risk factors. Using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, high-stage muscle invasive TCC expressed the Rb, p16 and CDK4 mRNA at lower levels than low-stage superficial cancers, indicating down-regulation to be linked with tumor progression. The drop of the expression in the group of grade 2 TCC when invading the muscle layer compared to grade 2 carcinomas with a superficial pattern of growth is considered to represent a key event in promoting urothelial carcinogenesis in this subset of carcinomas. The protein expression of the Rb gene evaluated by immunohistochemistry proved to be closely related to the tumor grades and stages as well as to the mRNA expression, high-grade and high-stage TCC disclosing a lower rate of positive immunoreactivity than low-grade and low-stage carcinomas. The p16 protein product was expressed at a lower level in grade 3 than in grade 1 TCC, but there was no correlation with the tumor stages or the mRNA expression. TCC with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the INK4A region showed a decreased expression of p16 mRNA compared to those without an allelic loss. Tobacco smoke was not identified to substantially modulate the Rb/p16/CDK4 pathways, except for a ten-fold elevated mRNA expression of the p16 gene in TCC of light compared to heavy smokers. Heavy coffee consumption was associated with a reduced expression of CDK4 mRNA. Among occupational exposures, TCC of patients in contact with stone dust, paints and lacquer, plastics, wood and wood preservers and chemical solvents

  10. Induction of sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to the formation of N6-methyladenosine in mRNA: a potential mechanism for the activity of the IME4 gene.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Mary J; Shambaugh, Mary Eileen; Timpte, Candace S; Bokar, Joseph A

    2002-10-15

    N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is present at internal sites in mRNA isolated from all higher eukaryotes, but has not previously been detected in the mRNA of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This nucleoside modification occurs only in a sequence- specific context that appears to be conserved across diverse species. The function of this modification is not fully established, but there is some indirect evidence that m6A may play a role in the efficiency of mRNA splicing, transport or translation. The S.cerevisiae gene IME4, which is important for induction of sporulation, is very similar to the human gene MT-A70, which has been shown to be a critical subunit of the human mRNA [N6-adenosine]-methyltransferase. This observation led to the hypothesis that yeast sporulation may be dependent upon methylation of yeast mRNA, mediated by Ime4p. In this study we show that induction of sporulation leads to the appearance of low levels of m6A in yeast mRNA and that this modification requires IME4. Moreover, single amino acid substitutions in the putative catalytic residues of Ime4p lead to severe sporulation defects in a strain whose sporulation ability is completely dependent on this protein. Collectively, these data suggest very strongly that the activation of sporulation by Ime4p is the result of its proposed methyltransferase activity and provide the most direct evidence to date of a physiologic role of m6A in a gene regulatory pathway. PMID:12384598

  11. Fructose containing sugars modulate mRNA of lipogenic genes ACC and FAS and protein levels of transcription factors ChREBP and SREBP1c with no effect on body weight or liver fat.

    PubMed

    Janevski, Mile; Ratnayake, Sunil; Siljanovski, Svetlana; McGlynn, Maree A; Cameron-Smith, David; Lewandowski, Paul

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of high-glucose, high-fructose and high-sucrose diets on weight gain, liver lipid metabolism and gene expression of proteins involved with hepatic fat metabolism. Rats were fed a diet containing either 60% glucose, 60% fructose, 60% sucrose, or a standard chow for 28 days. Results indicated that high-fructose and high-sucrose diets were associated with higher mRNA levels of gene transcripts involved with fat synthesis; ACC, FAS and ChREBP, with no change in SREBP-1C mRNA. The protein level of ChREBP and SREBP1c was similar in liver homogenates from all groups, but were higher in nuclear fractions from the liver of high-fructose and high-sucrose fed rats. The mRNA level of gene transcripts involved with fat oxidation was the same in all three diets, whilst a high-fructose diet was associated with greater amount of mRNA of the fat transporter CD36. Despite the changes in mRNA of lipogenic proteins, the body weight of animals from each group was the same and the livers from rats fed high-fructose and high-sucrose diets did not contain more fat than control diet livers. In conclusion, changing the composition of the principal monosaccharide in the diet to a fructose containing sugar elicits changes in the level of hepatic mRNA of lipogenic and fat transport proteins and protein levels of their transcriptional regulators; however this is not associated with any changes in body weight or liver fat content. PMID:22159273

  12. mRNA stability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J

    1995-01-01

    This review concerns how cytoplasmic mRNA half-lives are regulated and how mRNA decay rates influence gene expression. mRNA stability influences gene expression in virtually all organisms, from bacteria to mammals, and the abundance of a particular mRNA can fluctuate manyfold following a change in the mRNA half-life, without any change in transcription. The processes that regulate mRNA half-lives can, in turn, affect how cells grow, differentiate, and respond to their environment. Three major questions are addressed. Which sequences in mRNAs determine their half-lives? Which enzymes degrade mRNAs? Which (trans-acting) factors regulate mRNA stability, and how do they function? The following specific topics are discussed: techniques for measuring eukaryotic mRNA stability and for calculating decay constants, mRNA decay pathways, mRNases, proteins that bind to sequences shared among many mRNAs [like poly(A)- and AU-rich-binding proteins] and proteins that bind to specific mRNAs (like the c-myc coding-region determinant-binding protein), how environmental factors like hormones and growth factors affect mRNA stability, and how translation and mRNA stability are linked. Some perspectives and predictions for future research directions are summarized at the end. PMID:7565413

  13. Analysis of anomalous CD44 gene expression in human breast, bladder, and colon cancer and correlation of observed mRNA and protein isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    Woodman, A. C.; Sugiyama, M.; Yoshida, K.; Sugino, T.; Borgya, A.; Goodison, S.; Matsumura, Y.; Tarin, D.

    1996-01-01

    Many studies have now demonstrated disorganized overexpression of the CD44 gene in various types of human malignant tumors, and this abnormality has emerged as an interesting candidate marker for early cancer diagnosis. The purpose of this work was to analyze and compare the patterns of transcription and translation of this gene in human breast (ZR75-1; MDAMB-435 clone 4A4) and colon (HT29) tumor cell lines and in tumors of the breast, bladder, and colon, with the aim of identifying the most suitable analyte for diagnostic purposes. Transcription was studied by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction using CD44-specific primers and probes complementary to exons in the standard (exons 3 to 5 and 16 to 18) and variably expressed regions of this gene (exons 7, 8, 10, 11, and 15). Translation was investigated by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies specific to the standard form of CD44 and to the products of the same variant exons. Southern blot hybridization analysis of the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction products showed a large number of CD44 transcripts in tumor cells. Direct comparison of these Southern blots with Western blots on matched tumor-cell-line extracts indicated that most of the diverse mRNA isoforms did not detectably translate into proteins. However, immunohistochemistry of normal and malignant breast (n = 17 and 23, respectively), bladder (n = 5 and 19), and colon (n = 19 and 19) tissue specimens showed increased staining of CD44 standard and CD44 variant proteins in the carcinoma cells. Combination of this information with the data from reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis indicates that the overexpression at the protein level involves only a minority of the aberrant RNA transcripts. We conclude that the development of methods for the accurate quantitation of over-abundant CD44 RNA species in clinical samples offers the most promising approach to

  14. Maternal separation enhances conditioned fear and decreases the mRNA levels of the neurotensin receptor 1 gene with hypermethylation of this gene in the rat amygdala.

    PubMed

    Toda, Hiroyuki; Boku, Shuken; Nakagawa, Shin; Inoue, Takeshi; Kato, Akiko; Takamura, Naoki; Song, Ning; Nibuya, Masashi; Koyama, Tsukasa; Kusumi, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Stress during postnatal development is associated with an increased risk for depression, anxiety disorders, and substance abuse later in life, almost as if mental illness is able to be programed by early life stressors. Recent studies suggest that such "programmed" effects can be caused by epigenetic regulation. With respect to conditioned fear, previous studies have indicated that early life stress influences its development in adulthood, whereas no potential role of epigenetic regulation has been reported. Neurotensin (NTS) is an endogenous neuropeptide that has receptors densely located in the amygdala and hippocampus. Recently, NTS systems have constituted an emerging target for the treatment of anxiety. The aim of the present work is to clarify whether the NTS system is involved in the disturbance of conditioned fear in rats stressed by maternal separation (MS). The results showed that MS enhanced freezing behaviors in fear-conditioned stress and reduced the gene expression of NTS receptor (NTSR) 1 but not of NTS or NTSR2 in the amygdalas of adult rats. The microinjection of a NTSR1 antagonist into the amygdala increased the percentage of freezing in conditioned fear, whereas the microinjection of NTSR1 agonist decreased freezing. These results suggest that NTSR1 in the amygdala may play a role in the effects of MS on conditioned fear stress in adult rats. Moreover, MS increased DNA methylation in the promoter region of NTSR1 in the amygdala. Taken together, MS may leave epigenetic marks in the NTSR1 gene in the amygdala, which may enhance conditioned fear in adulthood. The MS-induced alternations of DNA methylation in the promoter region of NTSR1 in the amygdala may be associated with vulnerability to the development of anxiety disorders and depression in adulthood. PMID:24831231

  15. Expression characteristics of neutrophil and mononuclear-phagocyte related genes mRNA in the stable angina pectoris and acute myocardial infarction stages of coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuan-Rong; Wang, Le-Min; Gong, Zhu; Jiang, Jin-Fa; Duan, Qiang-Lin; Yan, Wen-Wen; Liu, Xiao-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate expression differences of neutrophil and mononuclear phagocyte related gene mRNAs among acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stable angina (SA) and control groups, and then discuss their expression characteristics in the stable angina pectoris (SAP) and AMI stages of coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods Whole Human Genome Oligo Microarrays were applied to assess the differential expression characteristics of neutrophil and mononuclear phagocyte related mRNAs in patients with AMI (n = 20), SA (n = 20) and controls (n = 20). Results (1) Almost all colony-stimulating factors (CSF) and their receptors related mRNAs was up-regulated in AMI and SA groups compared with the control group, and the expression of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor receptor (GM-CSFR) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR) mRNAs in the AMI group was significantly up-regulated compared with the other two groups (P < 0.01). (2) The expression of mRNAs related to monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), CCR2 (MCP-1 receptor) and CXCR2 (IL-8 receptor) was significantly up-regulated (P < 0.01) in AMI group compared with SA and control groups. IL-8 mRNA expression in the AMI group was clearly higher than the controls (P < 0.05). (3) All mRNAs expression related to opsonic receptors (IgG FcR and C3bR/C4bR) was significantly up-regulated in AMI group compared with SA and control group (P < 0.01), and the SA group showed an upward trend compared with controls. (4) Most pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-related mRNAs expression was up-regulated in AMI group compared with SA and control groups. Most toll-like receptor (TLR) mRNAs expression was significantly up-regulated (P < 0.01) than the SA and control groups; macrophage scavenger receptor (MSR) mRNA was significantly up-regulated in AMI group compared with the control group (P < 0.01), and the SA group showed an upward trend compared with the controls. Conclusions The expression

  16. Intrauterine growth restriction in neonatal piglets affects small intestinal mucosal permeability and mRNA expression of redox-sensitive genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Degroote, Jeroen; Van Ginneken, Chris; Van Poucke, Mario; Vergauwen, Hans; Dam, Thi Minh Tho; Vanrompay, Daisy; Peelman, Luc J; De Smet, Stefaan; Michiels, Joris

    2016-02-01

    Neonates with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) show lower efficiency of nutrient utilization compared to normal birth weight (NBW) newborns. This study was conducted using neonatal piglets as a model to test the hypothesis that IUGR affects the intestinal barrier function, intestinal structure, and antioxidant system development during the suckling period. The small intestinal mucosae were obtained from IUGR and NBW littermates in the suckling period (d 0, 3, 8, and 19 postnatal). The epithelial barrier function was assessed by FITC-dextran 4 (FD4) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) fluxes across the epithelium, histomorphologic measurements, and expression of tight-junction proteins. Redox status represented by the glutathione disulfide/glutathione ratio and malondialdehyde concentrations was determined, whereas mRNA expressions of some redox-sensitive proteins were quantified. Results showed that IUGR piglets exhibited a 2-fold higher intestinal permeability in the proximal small intestine on d 0 (P < 0.05), and this difference between IUGR and NBW piglets was widened to 3 and 4 times for FD4 and HRP, respectively (P < 0.05), on d 3. In accordance, expression of occludin was down-regulated at the transcriptional level in IUGR piglets at d 0 and 19 (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the transcription of heme oxygenase 1, catalase, and thioredoxin reductase genes was down-regulated in IUGR piglets, mainly on postnatal d 0 and 19 (P < 0.01). It appears that IUGR subjects have a lower capacity to mount an antioxidant response in the early postnatal period. Collectively, these results add to our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for intestinal dysfunction in IUGR neonates. PMID:26514167

  17. The human and mouse homologs of the yeat RAD52 gene: cDNA cloning, sequence analysis, assignment to human chromosome 12p12.2-p13, and mRNA expression in mouse tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z.; Chen, D.J.; Denison, K.

    1995-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD52 gene is involved in DNA double-strand break repair and mitotic/meiotic recombination. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of yeast S. cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and Kluyveromyces lactis and chicken is highly conserved. Using the technology of mixed oligonucleotide primed amplification of cDNA (MOPAC), two mouse RAD52 homologous cDNA fragments were amplified and sequenced. Subsequently, we have cloned the cDNA of the human and mouse homologs of yeast RAD52 gene by screening cDNA libraries using the identified mouse cDNA fragments. Sequence analysis of cDNA derived amino acid revealed a highly conserved N-terminus among human, mouse, chicken, and yeast RAD52 genes. The human RAD52 gene was assigned to chromosome 12p12.2-p13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization, R-banding, and DNA analysis of somatic cell hybrids. Unlike chicken RAD52 and mouse RAD51, no significant difference in mouse RAD52 mRNA level was found among mouse heart, brain, spleen, lung, liver, skeletal muscle, kidney, and testis. In addition to an {approximately}1.9-kb RAD52 mRNA band that is present in all of the tested tissues, an extra mRNA species of {approximately}0.85 kb was detectable in mouse testis. 40 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis of mRNA transcripts for highly sensitive gene expression profiling in near real time.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhiyong; Young, Brandon; Baird, Alison E; Soper, Steven A

    2013-08-20

    Expression analysis of mRNAs transcribed from certain genes can be used as important sources of biomarkers for in vitro diagnostics. While the use of reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) can provide excellent analytical sensitivity for monitoring transcript numbers, more sensitive approaches for expression analysis that can report results in near real-time are needed for many critical applications. We report a novel assay that can provide exquisite limits-of-quantitation and consists of reverse transcription (RT) followed by a ligase detection reaction (LDR) with single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (spFRET) to provide digital readout through molecular counting. For this assay, no PCR was employed, which enabled short assay turnaround times. To facilitate implementation of the assay, a cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) microchip, which was fabricated using hot embossing, was employed to carry out the LDR in a continuous flow format with online single-molecule detection following the LDR. As demonstrators of the assay's utility, MMP-7 mRNA was expression profiled from several colorectal cancer cell lines. It was found that the RT-LDR/spFRET assay produced highly linear calibration plots even in the low copy number regime. Comparison to RT-qPCR indicated a better linearity over the low copy number range investigated (10-10,000 copies) with an R(2) = 0.9995 for RT-LDR/spFRET and R(2) = 0.98 for RT-qPCR. In addition, differentiating between copy numbers of 10 and 50 could be performed with higher confidence using RT-LDR/spFRET. To demonstrate the short assay turnaround times obtainable using the RT-LDR/spFRET assay, a two thermal cycle LDR was carried out on amphiphysin gene transcripts that can serve as important diagnostic markers for ischemic stroke. The ability to supply diagnostic information on possible stroke events in short turnaround times using RT-LDR/spFRET will enable clinicians to treat patients effectively with appropriate time

  19. Association Analysis of Myosin Heavy-chain Genes mRNA Transcription with the Corresponding Proteins Expression of Longissimus Muscle in Growing Pigs.

    PubMed

    Men, X M; Deng, B; Tao, X; Qi, K K; Xu, Z W

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this work was to investigate the correlations between MyHC mRNA transcription and their corresponding protein expressions in porcine longissimus muscle (LM) during postnatal growth of pigs. Five DLY (Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire) crossbred pigs were selected, slaughtered and sampled at postnatal 7, 30, 60, 120, and 180 days, respectively. Each muscle was subjected to quantity MyHCs protein contents through an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), to quantity myosin heavy-chains (MyHCs) mRNA abundances using real-time polymerase chain reaction. We calculated the proportion (%) of each MyHC to total of four MyHC for two levels, respectively. Moreover, the activities of several key energy metabolism enzymes were determined in LM. The result showed that mRNA transcription and protein expression of MyHC I, IIa, IIx and IIb in LM all presented some obvious changes with postnatal aging of pigs, especially at the early stage after birth, and their mRNA transcriptions were easy to be influenced than their protein expressions. The relative proportion of each MyHC mRNA was significantly positively related to that of its corresponding protein (p<0.01), and MyHC I mRNA proportion was positively correlated with creatine kinase (CK), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activities (p<0.05). These data suggested that MyHC mRNA transcription can be used to reflect MyHC expression, metabolism property and adaptive plasticity of porcine skeletal muscles, and MyHC mRNA composition could be a molecular index reflecting muscle fiber type characteristics. PMID:26949945

  20. Association Analysis of Myosin Heavy-chain Genes mRNA Transcription with the Corresponding Proteins Expression of Longissimus Muscle in Growing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Men, X. M.; Deng, B.; Tao, X.; Qi, K. K.; Xu, Z. W.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work was to investigate the correlations between MyHC mRNA transcription and their corresponding protein expressions in porcine longissimus muscle (LM) during postnatal growth of pigs. Five DLY (Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire) crossbred pigs were selected, slaughtered and sampled at postnatal 7, 30, 60, 120, and 180 days, respectively. Each muscle was subjected to quantity MyHCs protein contents through an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), to quantity myosin heavy-chains (MyHCs) mRNA abundances using real-time polymerase chain reaction. We calculated the proportion (%) of each MyHC to total of four MyHC for two levels, respectively. Moreover, the activities of several key energy metabolism enzymes were determined in LM. The result showed that mRNA transcription and protein expression of MyHC I, IIa, IIx and IIb in LM all presented some obvious changes with postnatal aging of pigs, especially at the early stage after birth, and their mRNA transcriptions were easy to be influenced than their protein expressions. The relative proportion of each MyHC mRNA was significantly positively related to that of its corresponding protein (p<0.01), and MyHC I mRNA proportion was positively correlated with creatine kinase (CK), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activities (p<0.05). These data suggested that MyHC mRNA transcription can be used to reflect MyHC expression, metabolism property and adaptive plasticity of porcine skeletal muscles, and MyHC mRNA composition could be a molecular index reflecting muscle fiber type characteristics. PMID:26949945

  1. Explore the dynamic alternation of gene PLAC4 mRNA expression levels in maternal plasma in second trimester for nonivasive detection of trisomy 21

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hai-Yan; Chen, Dao-Zhen; Lu, Mu-Dan; Tang, Ye; Xiao, Jian-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Noninvasive prenatal detection of trisomy 21 (T21) has been achieved by measuring the ratio of two alleles of a single nucleotide polymorphism in circulating placenta specific 4 (PLAC4) mRNA in maternal plasma with a few assays in recent years. Our research is to explore the variations of PLAC4 mRNA expression level in maternal plasma with normal pregnancies in second trimester, which can provide pregnant women deeper insights with suitable detection period for the non-invasive prenatal detection of T21. Methods We measured a serial plasma PLAC4 mRNA concentrations weekly from the same 25 singleton normal pregnant women. We recruited maternal plasma samples from 45 singleton pregnant women, comprising of 25 euploid pregnancies (control group; range, 17 to 21 weeks) and 20 T21 pregnancies (T21 group; range, 19 to 24 weeks). With the application of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, we achieved an insight of PLAC4 mRNA expression levels in maternal plasma during second trimester with euploid pregnancies. Results Among the control group, the levels of PLAC4 mRNA expression in the gestation of 17 to 18 weeks were significantly less than those in the gestation of 18 to 21 weeks (P<0.05). The average PLAC4 mRNA concentration of the normal pregnant women was not higher than that of the T21 group (P>0.05). Conclusion The PLAC4 mRNA showed a higher level of expression in the gestation of 18 to 21 weeks with an euploid pregnancy of pregnant women. We also found that there was no significant difference in plasma PLAC4 mRNA concentration between the normal and the T21 pregnancies in second trimester. PMID:26217595

  2. [Determination of the amount of YB-1 gene mRNA in the breast tumor tissues to predict the course of disease].

    PubMed

    Gens, G P; Moiseeva, N I; Stromskaia, T P; Rybalkina, E Iu; Vaĭman, A V; Stavrovskaia, A A

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop a test of the multifunctional protein YB-1 in the intraoperative biopsy specimen to predict the course of breast cancer (BC). Its tasks were to use of real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-RCR) to substantiate the data previously obtained by semiquantitative RT-PCR and to clarify whether there was a correlation between the amount of YB-1 mRNA in the BC tissue and the status of steroid hormone receptors of these tumors. The determination of the tumor amount of YB-1 mRNA was shown to predict the course of BC: a statistically significant correlation was found between the higher content of YB-1 mRNA and the aggressive course of BC--the emergence of distant metastases. Comparing the content of YB-1 mRNA and the hormonal status of a tumor (the number of estrogen and progesterone receptors) revealed no correlations. The findings indicate that the determination of YB-1 mRNA by both real-time RT-PCR and semiquantitative RT-PCR may be used to predict BC metastases in distant organs. PMID:20397575

  3. mRNA expression levels and genetic status of genes involved in the EGFR and NF-κB pathways in metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has a dismal prognosis. EGFR is overexpressed or mutated in a large proportion of cases. Downstream components of the EGFR pathway and crosstalk with the NF-κB pathway have not been examined at the clinical level. We explored the prognostic significance of the mRNA expression of nine genes in the EGFR and NF-κB pathways and of BRCA1 and RAP80 in patients in whom EGFR and K-ras gene status had previously been determined. In addition, NFKBIA and DUSP22 gene status was also determined. Methods mRNA expression of the eleven genes was determined by QPCR in 60 metastatic NSCLC patients and in nine lung cancer cell lines. Exon 3 of NFKBIA and exon 6 of DUSP22 were analyzed by direct sequencing. Results were correlated with outcome to platinum-based chemotherapy in patients with wild-type EGFR and to erlotinib in those with EGFR mutations. Results BRCA1 mRNA expression was correlated with EZH2, AEG-1, Musashi-2, CYLD and TRAF6 expression. In patients with low levels of both BRCA1 and AEG-1, PFS was 13.02 months, compared to 5.4 months in those with high levels of both genes and 7.7 months for those with other combinations (P = 0.025). The multivariate analysis for PFS confirmed the prognostic role of high BRCA1/AEG-1 expression (HR, 3.1; P = 0.01). Neither NFKBIA nor DUSP22 mutations were found in any of the tumour samples or cell lines. Conclusions The present study provides a better understanding of the behaviour of metastatic NSCLC and identifies the combination of BRCA1 and AEG-1 expression as a potential prognostic model. PMID:21951562

  4. Environmental enrichment attenuates the age-related decline in the mRNA expression of steroidogenic enzymes and reduces the methylation state of the steroid 5α-reductase type 1 gene in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, María F; Varayoud, Jorgelina; Moreno-Piovano, Guillermo S; Luque, Enrique H; Ramos, Jorge G

    2015-09-01

    We analyzed the effects of aging and environmental enrichment on the mRNA expression and DNA methylation state of steroidogenic enzymes in the hippocampus. The effects of aging were evaluated by comparing young adult (90-day-old) and middle-aged (450-day-old) female Wistar rats. To elucidate the effects of environmental enrichment, a subgroup of middle-aged rats exposed to sensory and social stimulation for 105 days was compared to rats housed under standard laboratory conditions. Aging decreased the transcription of neurosteroidogenic-related genes and increased the promoter methylation state of cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage, 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD) and 5α-reductase-1. Exposure of middle-aged rats to environmental enrichment increased mRNA levels of 5α-reductase-1, 3α-HSD and cytochrome P450 17α-hydroxylase/c17,20-lyase and decreased the methylation state of the 5α-reductase-1 gene. Thus, sensory and social stimulation attenuate the age-related decline in the mRNA expression of hippocampal steroidogenic enzymes. Epigenetic mechanisms associated with differential promoter methylation could be involved. PMID:26021641

  5. The role of the LRPPRC (leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat cassette) gene in cytochrome oxidase assembly: mutation causes lowered levels of COX (cytochrome c oxidase) I and COX III mRNA.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fenghao; Morin, Charles; Mitchell, Grant; Ackerley, Cameron; Robinson, Brian H

    2004-08-15

    Leigh syndrome French Canadian (LSFC) is a variant of cytochrome oxidase deficiency found in Québec and caused by mutations in the LRPPRC (leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat cassette) gene. Northern blots showed that the LRPPRC mRNA levels seen in skeletal muscle>heart>placenta>kidney>liver>lung=brain were proportionally almost opposite in strength to the severity of the enzymic cytochrome oxidase defect. The levels of COX (cytochrome c oxidase) I and COX III mRNA visible on Northern blots were reduced in LSFC patients due to the common (A354V, Ala354-->Val) founder mutation. The amount of LRPPRC protein found in both fibroblast and liver mitochondria from LSFC patients was consistently reduced to <30% of control levels. Import of [(35)S]methionine LRPPRC into rat liver mitochondria was slower for the mutant (A354V) protein. A titre of LRPPRC protein was also found in nuclear fractions that could not be easily accounted for by mitochondrial contamination. [35S]Methionine labelling of mitochondrial translation products showed that the translation of COX I, and perhaps COX III, was specifically reduced in the presence of the mutation. These results suggest that the gene product of LRPPRC, like PET 309p, has a role in the translation or stability of the mRNA for mitochondrially encoded COX subunits. A more diffuse distribution of LRPPRC in LSFC cells compared with controls was evident when viewed by immunofluorescence microscopy, with less LRPPRC present in peripheral mitochondria. PMID:15139850

  6. Two CYP3A-like genes in the marine mussel Mytilus edulis: mRNA expression modulation following short-term exposure to endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Cubero-Leon, Elena; Puinean, A Mirel; Labadie, Pierre; Ciocan, Corina; Itoh, Naoki; Kishida, Mitsuyo; Osada, Makoto; Minier, Christophe; Hill, Elizabeth M; Rotchell, Jeanette M

    2012-03-01

    Members of the vertebrate CYP3A subfamily are involved in the metabolism of steroids and a wide range of xenobiotics. In this study two CYP3A-like mRNAs have been isolated from the mussel (Mytilus edulis), and their seasonal expression profile and modulation by estrogens examined. Sexual dimorphism of CYP3A-like mRNA expression was not observed in mussel gonads of individuals collected throughout a year. Nevertheless, natural variation in gonadal CYP3A-like mRNA expression was observed, with highest levels of CYP3A isoform1 and lowest levels of CYP3A isoform2 mRNA during the maturation and spawning season. Exposure to a 10% sewage treatment works extract did not result in any significant changes in mRNA expression of CYP3A-like. In contrast, exposure to E2 (200 ng/L) and TBT (100 ng/L) significantly down-regulated the expression of CYP3A-like isoform1 but not CYP3A-like isoform2 suggesting differential regulation. PMID:22189070

  7. Molecular analysis of methylmalonic acidemia: Identification of novel mutations in the methylmalonyl-CoA mutase gene with decreased level of mutant mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Ogasawara, M.; Matsubara, Y.; Mikami, H.; Narisawa, K.

    1994-09-01

    Deficiency of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM) results in methylmalonic acidemia, which is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and clinically characterized by metabolic ketoacidosis. Previous studies of Caucasian and African American patients identified seven MCM mutations, and we also detected four missense substitutions (Ala197Thr, Val368Asp, Arg369His and Val669Glu). However, mutations with decreased level of MCM mRNA, which accounts for at least 25% of mutations among Caucasian patients, have not been reported. Our study on eight Japanese patients indicated that 13 of 16 mutant alleles (81%) showed decreased level of MCM mRNA, suggesting that these {open_quotes}low message{close_quotes} alleles are likely to be common contributors to MCM deficiency. Reverse transcription/polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of MCM mRNA followed by analysis on a fluorescent fragment analyzer indicated that the level of these mutant mRNAs was less than 1% controls. We were able to amplify such mutant mRNAs by nested PCR and directly determine the primary structure. Sequence analysis revealed three novel mutations: a G-to-T substitution at nucleotide position 425, a 2 bp deletion at nt 769 and 770, and a G-to-T substitution at nt 326. The first mutation (G425T) resulted in the substitution of a termination codon for glutamic acid at amino acid position 117. The analysis of 17 Japanese patients revealed the presence of G425T in 7 alleles (21%), suggesting a relatively high incidence of the mutation among Japanese patients. This observation is in sharp contrast to previous reports describing diverse heterogeneity of MCM mutations among Caucasians. Our report is the first to identify MCM mutations that decrease the stability of MCM mRNA. Amplification of trace amount of mRNA followed by sequencing analysis may provide useful tool for identifying such mutations.

  8. Analysis of mRNA expression for genes associated with regulatory T lymphocytes (CD25, FoxP3, CTLA4, and IDO) after experimental infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus of low or high virulence in beef calves.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Roberto A; Hurley, David J; Woolums, Amelia R; Parrish, Jacqueline E; Brock, Kenny V

    2014-12-01

    Immunosuppression caused by bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has been associated with lymphocyte depletion, leukopenia and impairment of leukocyte function; however, no work has been done on the relationship between BVDV and regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs). The objective of this study was to compare the mRNA expression of genes associated with Tregs (CD25, FoxP3, CTLA4, and IDO), after experimental infection of beef calves with low (LV) or high (HV) virulence BVDV. Thirty BVDV-naïve calves were randomly assigned to three groups. Calves were intra-nasally inoculated with LV (n=10, strain SD-1) or HV (n=10, strain 1373) BVDV or BVDV-free cell culture medium (control, n=10). Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine the expression of target genes in tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes and spleen on day 5 post-infection. The mRNA expression of CD25 was up-regulated in tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes of LV (P<0.05), but not in HV compared to the control group. The expression of FoxP3 and CTLA4 was not increased in tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes of either of the BVDV-inoculated groups. A dramatic up-regulation of IDO mRNA was observed in tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes of LV (P<0.05), but not HV compared to the control calves. In conclusion, experimental infection with BVDV did not provide evidence of Treg activation based on expression of FoxP3 and CTL4. Differential expression of CD25 and IDO mRNA on day 5 post-infection with HV or LV BVDV might reflect temporal differences in transcription occurring during the immune response elicited by these viral strains, or differences in viral infectivity of the host cells. PMID:25456194

  9. Evolution of the Antisense Overlap between Genes for Thyroid Hormone Receptor and Rev-erbα and Characterization of an Exonic G-Rich Element That Regulates Splicing of TRα2 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Stephen H.; Morales, Christopher H.; Duyck, Tessa H.; Waters, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    The α-thyroid hormone receptor gene (TRα) codes for two functionally distinct proteins: TRα1, the α-thyroid hormone receptor; and TRα2, a non-hormone-binding variant. The final exon of TRα2 mRNA overlaps the 3’ end of Rev-erbα mRNA, which encodes another nuclear receptor on the opposite strand of DNA. To understand the evolution of this antisense overlap, we sequenced these genes and mRNAs in the platypus Orthorhynchus anatinus. Despite its strong homology with other mammals, the platypus TRα/Rev-erbα locus lacks elements essential for expression of TRα2. Comparative analysis suggests that alternative splicing of TRα2 mRNA expression evolved in a stepwise fashion before the divergence of eutherian and marsupial mammals. A short G-rich element (G30) located downstream of the alternative 3’splice site of TRα2 mRNA and antisense to the 3’UTR of Rev-erbα plays an important role in regulating TRα2 splicing. G30 is tightly conserved in eutherian mammals, but is absent in marsupials and monotremes. Systematic deletions and substitutions within G30 have dramatically different effects on TRα2 splicing, leading to either its inhibition or its enhancement. Mutations that disrupt one or more clusters of G residues enhance splicing two- to three-fold. These results suggest the G30 sequence can adopt a highly structured conformation, possibly a G-quadruplex, and that it is part of a complex splicing regulatory element which exerts both positive and negative effects on TRα2 expression. Since mutations that strongly enhance splicing in vivo have no effect on splicing in vitro, it is likely that the regulatory role of G30 is mediated through linkage of transcription and splicing. PMID:26368571

  10. Evolution of the Antisense Overlap between Genes for Thyroid Hormone Receptor and Rev-erbα and Characterization of an Exonic G-Rich Element That Regulates Splicing of TRα2 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Munroe, Stephen H; Morales, Christopher H; Duyck, Tessa H; Waters, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    The α-thyroid hormone receptor gene (TRα) codes for two functionally distinct proteins: TRα1, the α-thyroid hormone receptor; and TRα2, a non-hormone-binding variant. The final exon of TRα2 mRNA overlaps the 3' end of Rev-erbα mRNA, which encodes another nuclear receptor on the opposite strand of DNA. To understand the evolution of this antisense overlap, we sequenced these genes and mRNAs in the platypus Orthorhynchus anatinus. Despite its strong homology with other mammals, the platypus TRα/Rev-erbα locus lacks elements essential for expression of TRα2. Comparative analysis suggests that alternative splicing of TRα2 mRNA expression evolved in a stepwise fashion before the divergence of eutherian and marsupial mammals. A short G-rich element (G30) located downstream of the alternative 3'splice site of TRα2 mRNA and antisense to the 3'UTR of Rev-erbα plays an important role in regulating TRα2 splicing. G30 is tightly conserved in eutherian mammals, but is absent in marsupials and monotremes. Systematic deletions and substitutions within G30 have dramatically different effects on TRα2 splicing, leading to either its inhibition or its enhancement. Mutations that disrupt one or more clusters of G residues enhance splicing two- to three-fold. These results suggest the G30 sequence can adopt a highly structured conformation, possibly a G-quadruplex, and that it is part of a complex splicing regulatory element which exerts both positive and negative effects on TRα2 expression. Since mutations that strongly enhance splicing in vivo have no effect on splicing in vitro, it is likely that the regulatory role of G30 is mediated through linkage of transcription and splicing. PMID:26368571

  11. Luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone receptors and their transcribed genes (mRNA) are present in the lower urinary tract of intact male and female dogs.

    PubMed

    Ponglowhapan, S; Church, D B; Scaramuzzi, R J; Khalid, M

    2007-01-15

    In dogs, one of the side effects of neutering is the development of urinary incontinence. The relationship between neutering and urinary incontinence caused by acquired urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence (USMI) has been reported. Recently, GnRH analogue treatment that suppresses elevated plasma gonadotrophin concentrations post-spaying has been successfully used in incontinent bitches. These data and the fact that non-gonadal tissues may contain receptors for LH (LHR) and FSH (FSHR) suggest that there might be a functional relationship between gonadotrophins and the lower urinary tract in dogs. This study aimed to investigate the presence of LHR and FSHR in the lower urinary tract of intact male and female dogs. Four regions of the lower urinary tract, i.e. (i) body of the bladder, (ii) neck of the bladder, (iii) proximal urethra and (iv) distal urethra were collected from 10 healthy dogs (5 males and 5 anoestrous females). In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were performed to characterise the presence of receptor mRNA and receptor protein. Staining was rated semi-quantitatively, incorporating both the distribution and intensity of specific staining. The distribution of receptor expression in different tissue layers (epithelium, subepithelial stroma and muscle) in each region was statistically analyzed. Luteinizing hormone receptor and FSHR mRNA and protein were present in all four regions and in three tissue layers of males and females. Irrespective of region and layer, female dogs expressed significantly higher expression for LHR mRNA (P<0.001), LHR protein (P<0.05) and FSHR protein (P<0.001). The expression of LHR and FSHR mRNA and protein was not uniform and depended on region, tissue layer and gender. The expression of LHR mRNA was higher in the bladder, compared to the urethra (P<0.05). The FSHR mRNA significantly increased from the bladder to the urethra. Protein expression for LHR and FSHR was highest in the proximal urethra (P<0.05). The

  12. Isolation of mRNA from specific tissues of Drosophila by mRNA tagging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Edenberg, Howard J; Davis, Ronald L

    2005-01-01

    To study the function of specific cells or tissues using genomic tools like microarray analyses, it is highly desirable to obtain mRNA from a homogeneous source. However, this is particularly challenging for small organisms, like Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. We have optimized and applied a new technique, mRNA tagging, to isolate mRNA from specific tissues of D.melanogaster. A FLAG-tagged poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) is expressed in a specific tissue and mRNA from that tissue is thus tagged by the recombinant PABP and separated from mRNA in other tissues by co-immunoprecipitation with a FLAG-tag specific antibody. The fractionated mRNA is then amplified and used as probe in microarray experiments. As a test system, we employed the procedures to identify genes expressed in Drosophila photoreceptor cells. We found that most known photoreceptor cell-specific mRNAs were identified by mRNA tagging. Furthermore, at least 11 novel genes have been identified as enriched in photoreceptor cells. mRNA tagging is a powerful general method for profiling gene expression in specific tissues and for identifying tissue-specific genes. PMID:16204451

  13. The Minor Allele of rs7574865 in the STAT4 Gene Is Associated with Increased mRNA and Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lamana, Amalia; López-Santalla, Mercedes; Castillo-González, Raquel; Ortiz, Ana María; Martín, Javier; García-Vicuña, Rosario; González-Álvaro, Isidoro

    2015-01-01

    Objective The T allele of rs7574865 in STAT4 confers risk of developing autoimmune disorders. However, its functional significance remains unclear. Here we analyze how rs7574865 affects the transcription of STAT4 and its protein expression. Methods We studied 201 patients (80% female; median age, 54 years; median disease duration, 5.4 months) from PEARL study. Demographic, clinical, laboratory and therapeutic data were collected at each visit. IL-6 serum levels were measured by enzyme immune assay. The rs7574865 was genotyped using TaqMan probes. The expression levels of STAT4 mRNA were determined at 182 visits from 69 patients using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. STAT4 protein was assessed by western blot in 62 samples from 34 patients. To determine the effect of different variables on the expression of STAT4 mRNA and protein, we performed multivariate longitudinal analyses using generalized linear models. Results After adjustment for age, disease activity and glucocorticoid dose as confounders, the presence of at least one copy of the T allele of rs7574865 was significantly associated with higher levels of STAT4 mRNA. Similarly, TT patients showed significantly higher levels of STAT4 protein than GG patients. IL-6 induced STAT4 and STAT5 phosphorylation in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Patients carrying at least one T allele of rs7574865 displayed lower levels of serum IL-6 compared to GG homozygous; by contrast the production of C-reactive protein was similar in both populations. Conclusion Our data suggest that the presence of the rs7574865 T allele enhances STAT4 mRNA transcription and protein expression. It may enhance the signaling of molecules depending on the STAT4 pathway. PMID:26569609

  14. Cyclin-dependent kinase 7 controls mRNA synthesis by affecting stability of preinitiation complexes, leading to altered gene expression, cell cycle progression, and survival of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Kelso, Timothy W R; Baumgart, Karen; Eickhoff, Jan; Albert, Thomas; Antrecht, Claudia; Lemcke, Sarah; Klebl, Bert; Meisterernst, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7) activates cell cycle CDKs and is a member of the general transcription factor TFIIH. Although there is substantial evidence for an active role of CDK7 in mRNA synthesis and associated processes, the degree of its influence on global and gene-specific transcription in mammalian species is unclear. In the current study, we utilize two novel inhibitors with high specificity for CDK7 to demonstrate a restricted but robust impact of CDK7 on gene transcription in vivo and in in vitro-reconstituted reactions. We distinguish between relative low- and high-dose responses and relate them to distinct molecular mechanisms and altered physiological responses. Low inhibitor doses cause rapid clearance of paused RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules and sufficed to cause genome-wide alterations in gene expression, delays in cell cycle progression at both the G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, and diminished survival of human tumor cells. Higher doses and prolonged inhibition led to strong reductions in RNAPII carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) phosphorylation, eventual activation of the p53 program, and increased cell death. Together, our data reason for a quantitative contribution of CDK7 to mRNA synthesis, which is critical for cellular homeostasis. PMID:25047832

  15. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 7 Controls mRNA Synthesis by Affecting Stability of Preinitiation Complexes, Leading to Altered Gene Expression, Cell Cycle Progression, and Survival of Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kelso, Timothy W. R.; Baumgart, Karen; Eickhoff, Jan; Albert, Thomas; Antrecht, Claudia; Lemcke, Sarah; Klebl, Bert

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7) activates cell cycle CDKs and is a member of the general transcription factor TFIIH. Although there is substantial evidence for an active role of CDK7 in mRNA synthesis and associated processes, the degree of its influence on global and gene-specific transcription in mammalian species is unclear. In the current study, we utilize two novel inhibitors with high specificity for CDK7 to demonstrate a restricted but robust impact of CDK7 on gene transcription in vivo and in in vitro-reconstituted reactions. We distinguish between relative low- and high-dose responses and relate them to distinct molecular mechanisms and altered physiological responses. Low inhibitor doses cause rapid clearance of paused RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules and sufficed to cause genome-wide alterations in gene expression, delays in cell cycle progression at both the G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, and diminished survival of human tumor cells. Higher doses and prolonged inhibition led to strong reductions in RNAPII carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) phosphorylation, eventual activation of the p53 program, and increased cell death. Together, our data reason for a quantitative contribution of CDK7 to mRNA synthesis, which is critical for cellular homeostasis. PMID:25047832

  16. The translocation (6;9), associated with a specific subtype of acute myeloid leukemia, results in the fusion of two genes, dek and can, and the expression of a chimeric, leukemia-specific dek-can mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    von Lindern, M; Fornerod, M; van Baal, S; Jaegle, M; de Wit, T; Buijs, A; Grosveld, G

    1992-01-01

    The translocation (6;9) is associated with a specific subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Previously, it was found that breakpoints on chromosome 9 are clustered in one of the introns of a large gene named Cain (can). cDNA probes derived from the 3' part of can detect an aberrant, leukemia-specific 5.5-kb transcript in bone marrow cells from t(6;9) AML patients. cDNA cloning of this mRNA revealed that it is a fusion of sequences encoded on chromosome 6 and 3' can. A novel gene on chromosome 6 which was named dek was isolated. In dek the t(6;9) breakpoints also occur in one intron. As a result the dek-can fusion gene, present in t(6;9) AML, encodes an invariable dek-can transcript. Sequence analysis of the dek-can cDNA showed that dek and can are merged without disruption of the original open reading frames and therefore the fusion mRNA encodes a chimeric DEK-CAN protein of 165 kDa. The predicted DEK and CAN proteins have molecular masses of 43 and 220 kDa, respectively. Sequence comparison with the EMBL data base failed to show consistent homology with any known protein sequences. Images PMID:1549122

  17. Effects of the PPARα agonist WY-14,643 on plasma lipids, enzymatic activities and mRNA expression of lipid metabolism genes in a marine flatfish, Scophthalmus maximus.

    PubMed

    Urbatzka, R; Galante-Oliveira, S; Rocha, E; Lobo-da-Cunha, A; Castro, L F C; Cunha, I

    2015-07-01

    Fibrates and other lipid regulator drugs are widespread in the aquatic environment including estuaries and coastal zones, but little is known on their chronic effects on non-target organisms as marine fish. In the present study, turbot juveniles were exposed to the PPARα model agonist WY-14,643 for 21 days by repeated injections at the concentrations of 5mg/kg (lo-WY) and 50mg/kg (hi-WY), and samples taken after 7 and 21 days. Enzyme activity and mRNA expression of palmitoyl-CoA oxidase and catalase in the liver were analyzed as first response, which validated the experiment by demonstrating interactions with the peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation and oxidative stress pathways in the hi-WY treatment. In order to get mechanistic insights, alterations of plasma lipids (free cholesterol, FC; HDL associated cholesterol, C-HDL; triglycerides, TG; non-esterified fatty acids, NEFA) and hepatic mRNA expression of 17 genes involved in fatty acid and lipid metabolism were studied. The exposure to hi-WY reduced the quantity of plasma FC, C-HDL, and NEFA. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and apolipoprotein E mRNA expression were higher in hi-WY, and indicated an increased formation of VLDL particles and energy mobilization from liver. It is speculated that energy depletion by PPARα agonists may contribute to a higher susceptibility to environmental stressors. PMID:25974001

  18. A temperature-sensitive allele of a putative mRNA splicing helicase down-regulates many cell wall genes and causes radial swelling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Howles, Paul A; Gebbie, Leigh K; Collings, David A; Varsani, Arvind; Broad, Ronan C; Ohms, Stephen; Birch, Rosemary J; Cork, Ann H; Arioli, Tony; Williamson, Richard E

    2016-05-01

    The putative RNA helicase encoded by the Arabidopsis gene At1g32490 is a homolog of the yeast splicing RNA helicases Prp2 and Prp22. We isolated a temperature-sensitive allele (rsw12) of the gene in a screen for root radial swelling mutants. Plants containing this allele grown at the restrictive temperature showed weak radial swelling, were stunted with reduced root elongation, and contained reduced levels of cellulose. The role of the protein was further explored by microarray analysis. By using both fold change cutoffs and a weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) to investigate coexpression of genes, we found that the radial swelling phenotype was not linked to genes usually associated with primary cell wall biosynthesis. Instead, the mutation has strong effects on expression of secondary cell wall related genes. Many genes potentially associated with secondary walls were present in the most significant WGCNA module, as were genes coding for arabinogalactans and proteins with GPI anchors. The proportion of up-regulated genes that possess introns in rsw12 was above that expected if splicing was unrelated to the activity of the RNA helicase, suggesting that the helicase does indeed play a role in splicing in Arabidopsis. The phenotype may be due to a change in the expression of one or more genes coding for cell wall proteins. PMID:27008640

  19. The novel regulatory ncRNA, NfiS, optimizes nitrogen fixation via base pairing with the nitrogenase gene nifK mRNA in Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Yuhua; Yan, Yongliang; Deng, Zhiping; Chen, Ming; Lu, Wei; Lu, Chao; Shang, Liguo; Yang, Zhimin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Wei; Li, Yun; Ke, Qi; Lu, Jiasi; Xu, Yuquan; Zhang, Liwen; Xie, Zhihong; Cheng, Qi; Elmerich, Claudine; Lin, Min

    2016-01-01

    Unlike most Pseudomonas, the root-associated bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 fixes nitrogen after the horizontal acquisition of a nitrogen-fixing (nif) island. A genome-wide search for small noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in P. stutzeri A1501 identified the novel P. stutzeri-specific ncRNA NfiS in the core genome, whose synthesis was significantly induced under nitrogen fixation or sorbitol stress conditions. The expression of NfiS was RNA chaperone Hfq-dependent and activated by the sigma factor RpoN/global nitrogen activator NtrC/nif-specific activator NifA regulatory cascade. The nfiS-deficient mutant displayed reduced nitrogenase activity, as well as increased sensitivity to multiple stresses, such as osmotic and oxidative stresses. Secondary structure prediction and complementation studies confirmed that a stem-loop structure was essential for NfiS to regulate the nitrogenase gene nifK mRNA synthesis and thus nitrogenase activity. Microscale thermophoresis and physiological analysis showed that NfiS directly pairs with nifK mRNA and ultimately enhances nitrogenase activity by increasing the translation efficiency and the half-life of nifK mRNA. Our data also suggest structural and functional divergence of NfiS evolution in diazotrophic and nondiazotrophic backgrounds. It is proposed that NfiS was recruited by nifK mRNA as a novel regulator to integrate the horizontally acquired nif island into host global networks. PMID:27407147

  20. The novel regulatory ncRNA, NfiS, optimizes nitrogen fixation via base pairing with the nitrogenase gene nifK mRNA in Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yuhua; Yan, Yongliang; Deng, Zhiping; Chen, Ming; Lu, Wei; Lu, Chao; Shang, Liguo; Yang, Zhimin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Wei; Li, Yun; Ke, Qi; Lu, Jiasi; Xu, Yuquan; Zhang, Liwen; Xie, Zhihong; Cheng, Qi; Elmerich, Claudine; Lin, Min

    2016-07-26

    Unlike most Pseudomonas, the root-associated bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 fixes nitrogen after the horizontal acquisition of a nitrogen-fixing (nif) island. A genome-wide search for small noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in P. stutzeri A1501 identified the novel P. stutzeri-specific ncRNA NfiS in the core genome, whose synthesis was significantly induced under nitrogen fixation or sorbitol stress conditions. The expression of NfiS was RNA chaperone Hfq-dependent and activated by the sigma factor RpoN/global nitrogen activator NtrC/nif-specific activator NifA regulatory cascade. The nfiS-deficient mutant displayed reduced nitrogenase activity, as well as increased sensitivity to multiple stresses, such as osmotic and oxidative stresses. Secondary structure prediction and complementation studies confirmed that a stem-loop structure was essential for NfiS to regulate the nitrogenase gene nifK mRNA synthesis and thus nitrogenase activity. Microscale thermophoresis and physiological analysis showed that NfiS directly pairs with nifK mRNA and ultimately enhances nitrogenase activity by increasing the translation efficiency and the half-life of nifK mRNA. Our data also suggest structural and functional divergence of NfiS evolution in diazotrophic and nondiazotrophic backgrounds. It is proposed that NfiS was recruited by nifK mRNA as a novel regulator to integrate the horizontally acquired nif island into host global networks. PMID:27407147

  1. Collagen V-induced nasal tolerance downregulates pulmonary collagen mRNA gene and TGF-beta expression in experimental systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate collagen deposition, mRNA collagen synthesis and TGF-beta expression in the lung tissue in an experimental model of scleroderma after collagen V-induced nasal tolerance. Methods Female New Zealand rabbits (N = 12) were immunized with 1 mg/ml of collagen V in Freund's adjuvant (IM). After 150 days, six immunized animals were tolerated by nasal administration of collagen V (25 μg/day) (IM-TOL) daily for 60 days. The collagen content was determined by morphometry, and mRNA expressions of types I, III and V collagen were determined by Real-time PCR. The TGF-beta expression was evaluated by immunostaining and quantified by point counting methods. To statistic analysis ANOVA with Bonferroni test were employed for multiple comparison when appropriate and the level of significance was determined to be p < 0.05. Results IM-TOL, when compared to IM, showed significant reduction in total collagen content around the vessels (0.371 ± 0.118 vs. 0.874 ± 0.282, p < 0.001), bronchioles (0.294 ± 0.139 vs. 0.646 ± 0.172, p < 0.001) and in the septal interstitium (0.027 ± 0.014 vs. 0.067 ± 0.039, p = 0.026). The lung tissue of IM-TOL, when compared to IM, showed decreased immunostaining of types I, III and V collagen, reduced mRNA expression of types I (0.10 ± 0.07 vs. 1.0 ± 0.528, p = 0.002) and V (1.12 ± 0.42 vs. 4.74 ± 2.25, p = 0.009) collagen, in addition to decreased TGF-beta expression (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Collagen V-induced nasal tolerance in the experimental model of SSc regulated the pulmonary remodeling process, inhibiting collagen deposition and collagen I and V mRNA synthesis. Additionally, it decreased TGF-beta expression, suggesting a promising therapeutic option for scleroderma treatment. PMID:20047687

  2. Genome-wide analysis of differential mRNA expression of Amsacta moorei entomopoxvirus, mediated by the gene encoding a viral protein kinase (AMV197).

    PubMed

    Muratoglu, Hacer; Nalcacioglu, Remziye; Arif, Basil M; Demirbag, Zihni

    2016-04-01

    Insect-born entomopoxviruses (Fam: Poxviridae) are potentially important bio-pesticide against insect pests and expression vectors as well as vectors for transient human gene therapies including recombinant viral vaccines. For these reasons, it is necessary to understand the regulatory genes functions to improve its biotechnological potential. Here, we focused on the characterization of serine/threonine (Ser/Thr; ORF AMV197) protein kinase gene from the Amsacta moorei entomopoxvirus (AMEV), the type species of the genus Betaentomopoxvirus. Transcription of the parental and an amv197-null recombinant AMEV was compared by whole-genome gene expression microarray analysis. Blast2GO analysis reflected a broad diversity of upregulated and downregulated genes. Results showed that expression levels of 102 genes (45%) out of 226 tested genes changed significantly in the recombinant AMEV infected cells. Of these transcripts, 72 (70.58%) were upregulated and 30 (29.41%) were downregulated throughout the infection period. Genes involved in DNA repair, replication and nucleotide metabolism, transcription and RNA modification, and protein modification were mostly upregulated at different times in cells infected with the recombinant virus. Furthermore, transcription of all studied cellular genes including metabolism of apoptosis (Nedd2-like caspase, hemolin and elongation factor-1 alpha (ef1a) gene) was downregulated in the absence of amv197. Quantitative real time reverse transcription-PCR confirmed viral transcriptional changes obtained by microarray. The results of this study indicated that the product of amv197 appears to affect the transcriptional regulation of most viral and many cellular genes. Further investigations are, however, needed to narrow down the role of AMV197 throughout the infection process. PMID:26820433

  3. Imaging Real-Time Gene Expression in Living Systems with Single-Transcript Resolution: Image Analysis of Single mRNA Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Amber L.; Condeelis, John S.; Singer, Robert H.; Zenklusen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes a method for establishing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) calibration curve using dilutions of recombinant GFP and blue fluorescent beads. The total fluorescence intensity (TFI) per mRNA molecule is first calculated by imaging serial dilutions of purified enhanced GFP (eGFP) to determine the TFI within a specific volume. A calibration curve of fluorescence intensity in a given voxel per molecule of GFP is then used to determine the number of GFP molecules in the sample of formaldehyde fixed cells to be imaged. This is followed by a method for detection of single molecules in formaldehyde-fixed and live cells. These cells have been cotransfected with mRNA reporter and MCP-xFP plasmids, where MCP-xFP refers to a fluorescent protein fused to the MS2 capsid protein. It is important to collect micrographs and establish the calibration curve on the same day that the cells are imaged, using the same equipment configuration, camera settings, and image acquisition parameters. Single-molecule measurements using GFP are performed as in Femino et al. (1998, 2003) and Fusco et al. (2003). PMID:21356979

  4. VEGF-A mRNA processing, stability and translation: a paradigm for intricate regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level

    PubMed Central

    Arcondéguy, Tania; Lacazette, Eric; Millevoi, Stefania; Prats, Hervé; Touriol, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A (VEGF-A) is a potent secreted mitogen crucial for physiological and pathological angiogenesis. Post-transcriptional regulation of VEGF-A occurs at multiple levels. Firstly, alternative splicing gives rise to different transcript variants encoding diverse isoforms that exhibit distinct biological properties with regard to receptor binding and extra-cellular localization. Secondly, VEGF-A mRNA stability is regulated by effectors such as hypoxia or growth factors through the binding of stabilizing and destabilizing proteins at AU-rich elements located in the 3′-untranslated region. Thirdly, translation of VEGF-A mRNA is a controlled process involving alternative initiation codons, internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs), an upstream open reading frame (uORF), miRNA targeting and a riboswitch in the 3′ untranslated region. These different levels of regulation cooperate for the crucial fine-tuning of the expression of VEGF-A variants. This review will be focused on our current knowledge of the complex post-transcriptional regulatory switches that modulate the cellular VEGF-A level, a paradigmatic model of post-transcriptional regulation. PMID:23851566

  5. Nucleotide sequence of the gene coding for yeast cytoplasmic aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (APS); mapping of the 5' and 3' termini of AspRS mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Sellami, M; Fasiolo, F; Dirheimer, G; Ebel, J P; Gangloff, J

    1986-01-01

    A 3.8 Kb DNA fragment, which contains the structural gene of aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (AspRS) and its flanking regions, has been fully sequenced by the combined M13/dideoxy chain terminator method. From the single open reading frame of correct length (1671 bp) we deduced an amino acid sequence consistent with that of several peptides of AspRS. No significant internal sequence repeats were observed in the primary structure of the protein. The AspRS gene (APS) has a codon usage pattern typical of non abundant proteins. S1 nuclease analysis of APS mRNA showed a major start 17 bases downstream from a "TATA box" and stops near an RNA polymerase terminator sequence. Images PMID:3513127

  6. Identification of novel mRNA transcripts of the nm23-M1 gene that are modulated during mouse embryo development and are differently expressed in adult murine tissues.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, F; Capozza, F; Bruno, T; Fanciulli, M; Lombardi, D

    1998-12-01

    The nm23-M1, a putative metastasis-suppressor gene, and its homologs are involved in development and differentiation. We have shown previously that in vitro neuronal cell proliferation and differentiation can be modulated by nm23-M1 expression levels. In the present study, by the yeast two-hybrid system, we have shown that, at the onset of mouse tissue differentiation, the Nm23-M1 protein forms either homodimers, or heterodimers with Nm23-M2. Furthermore, we have isolated two cDNA variants of the nm23-M1 gene in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR). The two variants related to novel mRNA transcripts that are modulated in mouse embryo and are differently expressed in adult murine tissues. PMID:9881672

  7. mRNA imprinting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Following its synthesis in the nucleus, mRNA undergoes various stages that are critical for the proper synthesis, localization and possibly functionality of its encoded protein. Recently, we have shown that two RNA polymerase II (Pol II) subunits, Rpb4p and Rpb7p, associate with the nascent transcript co-transcriptionally. This “mRNA imprinting” lasts throughout the mRNA lifetime and is required for proper regulation of all major stages that the mRNA undergoes. Other possible cases of co-transcriptional imprinting are discussed. Since mRNAs can be transported from the synthesizing cell to other cells, we propose that mRNA imprinting can also affect the phenotype of the recipient cells. This can be viewed as “mRNA-based epigenetics.” PMID:21686103

  8. Promoter Region Hypermethylation and mRNA Expression of MGMT and p16 Genes in Tissue and Blood Samples of Human Premalignant Oral Lesions and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Vikram; Makker, Annu; Tewari, Shikha; Yadu, Alka; Shilpi, Priyanka; Kumar, Sandeep; Agarwal, S. P.; Goel, Sudhir K.

    2014-01-01

    Promoter methylation and relative gene expression of O6-methyguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) and p16 genes were examined in tissue and blood samples of patients with premalignant oral lesions (PMOLs) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Methylation-specific PCR and reverse transcriptase PCR were performed in 146 tissue and blood samples from controls and patients with PMOLs and OSCC. In PMOL group, significant promoter methylation of MGMT and p16 genes was observed in 59% (P = 0.0010) and 57% (P = 0.0016) of tissue samples, respectively, and 39% (P = 0.0135) and 33% (P = 0.0074) of blood samples, respectively. Promoter methylation of both genes was more frequent in patients with OSCC, that is, 76% (P = 0.0001) and 82% (P = 0.0001) in tissue and 57% (P = 0.0002) and 70% (P = 0.0001) in blood, respectively. Significant downregulation of MGMT and p16 mRNA expression was observed in both tissue and blood samples from patients with PMOLs and OSCC. Hypermethylation-induced transcriptional silencing of MGMT and p16 genes in both precancer and cancer suggests important role of these changes in progression of premalignant state to malignancy. Results support use of blood as potential surrogate to tissue samples for screening or diagnosing PMOLs and early OSCC. PMID:24991542

  9. The cDNA cloning and mRNA expression of cytoplasmic Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) gene in scallop Chlamys farreri.

    PubMed

    Ni, Duojiao; Song, Linsheng; Gao, Qiang; Wu, Longtao; Yu, Yundong; Zhao, Jianmin; Qiu, Limei; Zhang, Huan; Shi, Fangfang

    2007-11-01

    Cu, Zn superoxide dismutases (SODs) are metalloenzymes that represent one important line of defence against reactive oxygen species (ROS). A cytoplasmic Cu, Zn SOD cDNA sequence was cloned from scallop Chlamys farreri by the homology-based cloning technique. The full-length cDNA of scallop cytoplasmic Cu, Zn SOD (designated CfSOD) was 1022 bp with a 459 bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 153 amino acids. The predicted amino acid sequence of CfSOD shared high identity with cytoplasmic Cu, Zn SOD in molluscs, insects, mammals and other animals, such as cytoplasmic Cu, Zn SOD in oyster Crassostrea gigas (CAD42722), mosquito Aedes aegypti (ABF18094), and cow Bos taurus (XP_584414). A quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) assay was developed to assess the mRNA expression of CfSOD in different tissues and the temporal expression of CfSOD in scallop challenged with Listonella anguillarum, Micrococcus luteus and Candida lipolytica respectively. Higher-level mRNA expression of CfSOD was detected in the tissues of haemocytes, gill filaments and kidney. The expression of CfSOD dropped in the first 8-16 h and then recovered after challenge with L. anguillarum and M. luteus, but no change was induced by the C. lipolytica challenge. The results indicated that CfSOD was a constitutive and inducible acute-phase protein, and could play an important role in the immune responses against L. anguillarum and M. luteus infection. PMID:17574438

  10. Increased MET Gene Copy Number but Not mRNA Level Predicts Postoperative Recurrence in Patients with Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczuk, Oksana; Kozlowski, Miroslaw; Niklinska, Wiesława; Kisluk, Joanna; Niklinska, Barbara Joanna; Niklinski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship of MET copy number (CN) and MET mRNA expression to other molecular alterations, clinicopathologic characteristics, and survival of patients with resected non–small cell lung cancer. One hundred fifty-one paired surgical samples of tumor and tumor-distant normal lung tissues were analyzed by comparative quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods with commercially available assays and the CopyCaller software v. 1.0 for post-PCR data processing (downloadable from www.appliedbiosystems.com). MET copy gain (set as more than 3.0 copies per cell) was found in 18.5% of the samples and occurred more frequently in the adenocarcinomas (ADCs) with an increased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) CN (P = .001 and .030 for EGFR and HER2, respectively) and in the ADCs with EGFR activating mutations (P = .051) but did not correlate with KRAS dosage or mutational status. MET mRNA level was 1.76-fold higher [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.29-2.40] in the tumor compared to unaffected lung tissue and associated significantly with MET CN (beta coefficient, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.22-1.87; P < .001). In the multivariable analysis, patients diagnosed with ADC with increased MET CN had a significantly higher risk of disease recurrence (hazard ratio, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.20-2.57; P = .004). An increased MET CN in combination with histologic type appears to be a prognostic factor in patients with ADC after a curative surgery. PMID:25389455

  11. Dendrosomal curcumin nanoformulation downregulates pluripotency genes via miR-145 activation in U87MG glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Tahmasebi Mirgani, Maryam; Isacchi, Benedetta; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Marra, Fabio; Bilia, Anna Rita; Mowla, Seyed Javad; Najafi, Farhood; Babaei, Esmael

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma is an invasive tumor of the central nervous system. Tumor recurrence resulting from ineffective current treatments, mainly due to the blood–brain barrier, highlights the need for innovative therapeutic alternatives. The recent availability of nanotechnology represents a novel targeted strategy in cancer therapy. Natural products have received considerable attention for cancer therapy because of general lower side effects. Curcumin is a new candidate for anticancer treatment, but its low bioavailability and water solubility represent the main disadvantages of its use. Here, curcumin was efficiently encapsulated in a nontoxic nanocarrier, termed dendrosome, to overcome these problems. Dendrosomal curcumin was prepared as 142 nm spherical structures with constant physical and chemical stability. The inhibitory role of dendrosomal curcumin on the proliferation of U87MG cells, a cellular model of glioblastoma, was evaluated by considering master genes of pluripotency and regulatory miRNA (microribonucleic acid). Methylthiazol tetrazolium assay and flow cytometry were used to detect the antiproliferative effects of dendrosomal curcumin. Annexin-V-FLUOS and caspase assay were used to quantify apoptosis. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the expression of OCT4 (octamer binding protein 4) gene variants (OCT4A, OCT4B, and OCT4B1), SOX-2 (SRY [sex determining region Y]-box 2), Nanog, and miR-145. Dendrosomal curcumin efficiently suppresses U87MG cells growth with no cytotoxicity related to dendrosome. Additionally, the accumulation of cells in the SubG1 phase was observed in a time- and dose-dependent manner as well as higher rates of apoptosis after dendrosomal curcumin treatment. Conversely, nonneoplastic cells were not affected by this formulation. Dendrosomal curcumin significantly decreased the relative expression of OCT4A, OCT4B1, SOX-2, and Nanog along with noticeable overexpression of miR-145 as the upstream regulator. This

  12. Dendrosomal curcumin nanoformulation downregulates pluripotency genes via miR-145 activation in U87MG glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tahmasebi Mirgani, Maryam; Isacchi, Benedetta; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Marra, Fabio; Bilia, Anna Rita; Mowla, Seyed Javad; Najafi, Farhood; Babaei, Esmael

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma is an invasive tumor of the central nervous system. Tumor recurrence resulting from ineffective current treatments, mainly due to the blood-brain barrier, highlights the need for innovative therapeutic alternatives. The recent availability of nanotechnology represents a novel targeted strategy in cancer therapy. Natural products have received considerable attention for cancer therapy because of general lower side effects. Curcumin is a new candidate for anticancer treatment, but its low bioavailability and water solubility represent the main disadvantages of its use. Here, curcumin was efficiently encapsulated in a nontoxic nanocarrier, termed dendrosome, to overcome these problems. Dendrosomal curcumin was prepared as 142 nm spherical structures with constant physical and chemical stability. The inhibitory role of dendrosomal curcumin on the proliferation of U87MG cells, a cellular model of glioblastoma, was evaluated by considering master genes of pluripotency and regulatory miRNA (microribonucleic acid). Methylthiazol tetrazolium assay and flow cytometry were used to detect the antiproliferative effects of dendrosomal curcumin. Annexin-V-FLUOS and caspase assay were used to quantify apoptosis. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the expression of OCT4 (octamer binding protein 4) gene variants (OCT4A, OCT4B, and OCT4B1), SOX-2 (SRY [sex determining region Y]-box 2), Nanog, and miR-145. Dendrosomal curcumin efficiently suppresses U87MG cells growth with no cytotoxicity related to dendrosome. Additionally, the accumulation of cells in the SubG1 phase was observed in a time- and dose-dependent manner as well as higher rates of apoptosis after dendrosomal curcumin treatment. Conversely, nonneoplastic cells were not affected by this formulation. Dendrosomal curcumin significantly decreased the relative expression of OCT4A, OCT4B1, SOX-2, and Nanog along with noticeable overexpression of miR-145 as the upstream regulator. This suggests

  13. Avian Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1-3 Family Genes: Isoforms, Evolutionary Relationships, and mRNA Expression in Chicken Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Kawata, Minami; Ikushiro, Shin-Ichi; Sakaki, Toshiyuki; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) of chicken and other avian species have been studied primarily with microsomes or characterized by cloning and protein expression. However, the overall existing isoforms in avian CYP1-3 families or dominant isoforms in avian xenobiotic metabolism have not yet been elucidated. In this study, we aimed to clarify and classify all of the existing isoforms of CYP1-3 in avian species using available genome assemblies for chicken, zebra finch, and turkey. Furthermore, we performed qRT-PCR assay to identify dominant CYP genes in chicken liver. Our results suggested that avian xenobiotic-metabolizing CYP genes have undergone unique evolution such as CYP2C and CYP3A genes, which have undergone avian-specific gene duplications. qRT-PCR experiments showed that CYP2C45 was the most highly expressed isoform in chicken liver, while CYP2C23b was the most highly induced gene by phenobarbital. Considering together with the result of further enzymatic characterization, CYP2C45 may have a dominant role in chicken xenobiotic metabolism due to the constitutive high expression levels, while CYP2C23a and CYP2C23b can be greatly induced by chicken xenobiotic receptor (CXR) activators. These findings will provide not only novel insights into avian xenobiotic metabolism, but also a basis for the further characterization of each CYP gene. PMID:24098714

  14. Cytoplasmic mRNA turnover and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Borbolis, Fivos; Syntichaki, Popi

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) turnover that determines the lifetime of cytoplasmic mRNAs is a means to control gene expression under both normal and stress conditions, whereas its impact on ageing and age-related disorders has just become evident. Gene expression control is achieved at the level of the mRNA clearance as well as mRNA stability and accessibility to other molecules. All these processes are regulated by cis-acting motifs and trans-acting factors that determine the rates of translation and degradation of transcripts. Specific messenger RNA granules that harbor the mRNA decay machinery or various factors, involved in translational repression and transient storage of mRNAs, are also part of the mRNA fate regulation. Their assembly and function can be modulated to promote stress resistance to adverse conditions and over time affect the ageing process and the lifespan of the organism. Here, we provide insights into the complex relationships of ageing modulators and mRNA turnover mechanisms. PMID:26432921

  15. The Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 vhs-UL41 Gene Secures Viral Replication by Temporarily Evading Apoptotic Cellular Response to Infection: Vhs-UL41 Activity Might Require Interactions with Elements of Cellular mRNA Degradation Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Barzilai, Ari; Zivony-Elbom, Ifaat; Sarid, Ronit; Noah, Eran; Frenkel, Niza

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection is associated with early destabilization/degradation of infected cell mRNAs and consequent shutoff of host protein synthesis by the activity of the virion-associated host shutoff (vhs) UL41 protein. Wild-type (wt) virus destabilized/degraded the housekeeping β-actin and α-tubulin mRNAs as well host stress functions, like the heat shock 70 protein induced postinfection. vhs mutants did not degrade the mRNAs. Elaborate studies by others have been concerned with the mode of mRNA degradation and the mRNAs affected. We now describe vhs activity in primary cultures of mouse cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Specifically, (i) upon infection in the presence of actinomycin D to test activity of input viral particles, there was a generalized inhibition of protein synthesis, which depended on the input multiplicity of infection (MOI). (ii) Low-MOI infection with vhs-1 mutant virus was associated with increased synthesis of all apparent proteins. Higher MOIs caused some shutoff, albeit significantly lower than that of wt virus. This pattern could reflect an interaction(s) of vhs-1 protein with host machinery involved in cellular mRNA destabilization/degradation, sequestering this activity. (iii) wt virus infection was associated with cell survival, at least for a while, whereas mutant virus induced apoptotic cell death at earlier times. (iv) wt virus replicated well in the CGNs, whereas there was no apparent replication of the vhs-1 mutant virus. (v) The vhs-1 mutant could serve as helper virus for composite amplicon vectors carrying marker genes and the human p53 gene. Ongoing studies test the use of vhs-1-based composite oncolytic vectors towards cancer gene therapy. PMID:16352574

  16. Simulated microgravity reduces mRNA levels of multidrug resistance genes 4 and 5 in non-metastatic human melanoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiermann, Peter; Tsiockas, Wasiliki; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Gerzer, Rupert; Ivanova, Krassimira

    Multidrug resistance proteins (MRP) are members of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily that are able to export a large variety of substances into the extracellular space in-cluding nucleoside and nucleotide base analogs used in antiviral and anticancer therapy. MRP4 and 5 (MRP4/5) particularly transport cyclic nucleotides, e.g. guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophos-phate (cGMP). The second messenger cGMP, which is synthesized by the catalytic activity of the guanylyl cyclase (GC), plays an import role in vasodilatation, smooth muscle relaxation, and nitric oxide (NO)-induced perturbation of melanocyte-extracellular matrix interactions. In previous studies we have reported that different GC isoforms are responsible for cGMP synthe-sis in melanocytic cells. Normal human melanocytes and non-metastatic melanoma cell lines predominantly express the NO-sensitive soluble GC isoform (sGC), a heterodimeric protein consisting of α and β subunits. Metastatic melanoma cells lack the expression of the β sub-unit and show up-regulated activities of the particulate isoforms. We have further found that long-term exposure to hypergravity (5 g for 24 h) induced an increased cGMP export in normal human melanocytes, and non-metastatic, but not in metastatic human melanoma cells as a re-sult of up-regulated MRP4/5 expression. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether simulated microgravity may also alter the expression of MRP4/5 in non-metastatic melanoma cells. Experiments were performed using a fast-rotating clinostat (60 rpm) with one rotation axis. The non-metastatic 1F6 melanoma cells were exposed to simulated microgravity (up to 1.21x10-2 g) for 24 h. The mRNA analyses were performed by a relative calibrator-normalized and efficiency corrected quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Light Cycler R , Roche). Our data show a reduced expression of approximately 35% for MRP4 and of 50% for MRP5 in simulated microgravity in comparison to 1 g controls. Also, the

  17. Maternal dietary vitamin D carry-over alters offspring growth, skeletal mineralisation and tissue mRNA expressions of genes related to vitamin D, calcium and phosphorus homoeostasis in swine.

    PubMed

    Amundson, Laura A; Hernandez, Laura L; Laporta, Jimena; Crenshaw, Thomas D

    2016-09-01

    Maternal dietary vitamin D carry-over effects were assessed in young pigs to characterise skeletal abnormalities in a diet-induced model of kyphosis. Bone abnormalities were previously induced and bone mineral density (BMD) reduced in offspring from sows fed diets with inadequate vitamin D3. In a nested design, pigs from sows (n 23) fed diets with 0 (-D), 8·125 (+D) or 43·750 (++D) µg D3/kg from breeding through lactation were weaned and, within litter, fed nursery diets arranged as a 2×2 factorial design with 0 (-D) or 7·0 (+D) µg D3/kg, each with 95 % (95P) or 120 % (120P) of P requirements. Selected pigs were euthanised before colostrum consumption at birth (0 weeks, n 23), weaning (3 weeks, n 22) and after a growth period (8 weeks, n 185) for BMD, bone mechanical tests and tissue mRNA analysis. Pigs produced by +D or ++D sows had increased gain at 3 weeks (P<0·05), and at 8 weeks had increased BMD and improved femur mechanical properties. However, responses to nursery diets depended on maternal diets (P<0·05). Relative mRNA expressions of genes revealed a maternal dietary influence at birth in bone osteocalcin and at weaning in kidney 24-hydroxylase (P<0·05). Nursery treatments affected mRNA expressions at 8 weeks. Detection of a maternal and nursery diet interaction (P<0·05) provided insights into the long-term effects of maternal nutritional inputs. Characterising early stages of bone abnormalities provided inferences for humans and animals about maternal dietary influence on offspring skeletal health. PMID:27480125

  18. mRNA levels of imprinted genes in bovine in vivo oocytes, embryos and cross species comparisons in humans, mice and pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-six confirmed imprinted genes in the bovine were quantified in in vivo produced oocytes and embryos. Eighteen were detectable and their transcriptional abundance were categorized into five patterns: largely decreased (MEST and PLAGL1); first decreased and then increased (CDKN1C and IGF2R); p...

  19. Molecular Characterization, mRNA Expression and Alternative Splicing of Ryanodine Receptor Gene in the Brown Citrus Aphid, Toxoptera citricida (Kirkaldy)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke-Yi; Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Yuan, Guo-Rui; Shang, Feng; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) play a critical role in regulating the release of intracellular calcium, which enables them to be effectively targeted by the two novel classes of insecticides, phthalic acid diamides and anthranilic diamides. However, less information is available about this target site in insects, although the sequence and structure information of target molecules are essential for designing new control agents of high selectivity and efficiency, as well as low non-target toxicity. Here, we provided sufficient information about the coding sequence and molecular structures of RyR in T. citricida (TciRyR), an economically important pest. The full-length TciRyR cDNA was characterized with an open reading frame of 15,306 nucleotides, encoding 5101 amino acid residues. TciRyR was predicted to embrace all the hallmarks of ryanodine receptor, typically as the conserved C-terminal domain with consensus calcium-biding EF-hands (calcium-binding motif) and six transmembrane domains, as well as a large N-terminal domain. qPCR analysis revealed that the highest mRNA expression levels of TciRyR were observed in the adults, especially in the heads. Alternative splicing in TciRyR was evidenced by an alternatively spliced exon, resulting from intron retention, which was different from the case of RyR in Myzus persicae characterized with no alternative splicing events. Diagnostic PCR analysis indicated that the splicing of this exon was not only regulated in a body-specific manner but also in a stage-dependent manner. Taken together, these results provide useful information for new insecticide design and further insights into the molecular basis of insecticide action. PMID:26154764

  20. Molecular Characterization, mRNA Expression and Alternative Splicing of Ryanodine Receptor Gene in the Brown Citrus Aphid, Toxoptera citricida (Kirkaldy).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-Yi; Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Yuan, Guo-Rui; Shang, Feng; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) play a critical role in regulating the release of intracellular calcium, which enables them to be effectively targeted by the two novel classes of insecticides, phthalic acid diamides and anthranilic diamides. However, less information is available about this target site in insects, although the sequence and structure information of target molecules are essential for designing new control agents of high selectivity and efficiency, as well as low non-target toxicity. Here, we provided sufficient information about the coding sequence and molecular structures of RyR in T. citricida (TciRyR), an economically important pest. The full-length TciRyR cDNA was characterized with an open reading frame of 15,306 nucleotides, encoding 5101 amino acid residues. TciRyR was predicted to embrace all the hallmarks of ryanodine receptor, typically as the conserved C-terminal domain with consensus calcium-biding EF-hands (calcium-binding motif) and six transmembrane domains, as well as a large N-terminal domain. qPCR analysis revealed that the highest mRNA expression levels of TciRyR were observed in the adults, especially in the heads. Alternative splicing in TciRyR was evidenced by an alternatively spliced exon, resulting from intron retention, which was different from the case of RyR in Myzus persicae characterized with no alternative splicing events. Diagnostic PCR analysis indicated that the splicing of this exon was not only regulated in a body-specific manner but also in a stage-dependent manner. Taken together, these results provide useful information for new insecticide design and further insights into the molecular basis of insecticide action. PMID:26154764

  1. Understanding of altered N-glycosylation-related gene expression in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells subjected to elevated ammonium concentration by digital mRNA counting.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tae Kwang; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Lee, Gyun Min

    2015-08-01

    To understand the effects of ammonium on N-glycosylation, recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cells that produce the Fc-fusion protein were cultivated in serum-free suspension cultures with 10 mM ammonium addition. The addition of ammonium to the cultures reduced the relative proportion of acidic isoforms and sialic acid content of an Fc-fusion protein. Fifty two N-glycosylation-related gene expressions were assessed by the NanoString nCounter system, which provides a digital readout using custom-designed color-coded probes. Among these queried genes, thirteen genes (gale, nans, gpi, man2a1, b4galt5, b4galt7, st3gal2, st3gal5, glb1, hexa, hexb, neu1, and neu3) were up-regulated over 1.5 times in the culture with ammonium addition after 5 days of culture; however, none of the 54 genes were significantly different after 3 days of culture. In particular, the expression level of neu1 (sialidase-1) and neu3 (sialidase-3), which play a role in reduction of sialylation, increased over 2 times. Likewise, the protein expression levels of sialidase-1 and sialidase-3 determined by Western blot analysis were also increased significantly in the culture with ammonium addition. Transient transfection of neu-1 or neu3-targeted siRNAs significantly improved the sialic acid content of the Fc-fusion protein in the culture with ammonium addition, indicating that the decreased sialic acid content was in part due to the increased expression level of sialidase. Taken together, the results obtained in this study provide a better understanding of the detrimental effect of ammonium on N-glycosylation, especially sialylation, in rCHO cells. PMID:25728222

  2. Different forms of Go alpha mRNA arise by alternative splicing of transcripts from a single gene on human chromosome 16.

    PubMed Central

    Murtagh, J J; Eddy, R; Shows, T B; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1991-01-01

    Go alpha, (gene symbol GNA01), a member of the signal-transducing guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein family, has been implicated in ion channel regulation. Some tissues contain multiple Go alpha mRNAs of different sizes that differ in the 3' untranslated regions (UTRs). Using sequence-specific 48-base oligonucleotides, two complementary to the different 3' UTRs and one complementary to the coding region, we investigated the origin of the multiple Go alpha transcripts, the organization of the Go alpha gene, the interspecies conservation of 3' UTRs, and the chromosomal localization of Go alpha. Oligonucleotides labeled to high specific activity by using terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase each hybridized with a single band of restriction enzyme-digested mouse and human DNAs. In three of four digests of human DNA, the two probes specific for the different 3' UTRs hybridized with the same restriction fragment. Thus, these nucleotide sequences are in close proximity in the human genome. The order of the UTRs in the bovine, human, and mouse genomes was confirmed directly by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing. Hybridization of bovine oligonucleotide sequence with mouse and human genomic DNA indicated a high degree of interspecies sequence conservation: conservation was confirmed by PCR amplification and sequencing. Bands detected by both UTR probes, as well as the predominant bands detected by a bovine Go alpha cDNA, segregated with human chromosome 16 on Southern blot analysis of human-mouse somatic cell hybrids. We conclude that Go alpha mRNAs with different 3' UTRs arise by alternative splicing of transcripts from a single gene. The UTRs, which exhibit a high degree of interspecies conservation, may play a role in regulation of Go alpha expression during differentiation or in specific tissues. The use of oligonucleotide probes of the type described here represents a new strategy, potentially widely applicable for mapping and elucidating

  3. Digital mRNA profiling of N-glycosylation gene expression in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells treated with sodium butyrate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Min; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Lee, Eun Gyo; Lee, Gyun Min

    2014-02-10

    To understand the effects of sodium butyrate (NaBu) on protein glycosylation, recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cells producing Fc-fusion glycoprotein were subjected to 3mM NaBu. The addition of NaBu to the cultures reduced the relative proportion of acidic isoforms and sialic acid content of the glycoprotein. Fifty-two N-glycosylation-related gene expressions were also assessed by the NanoString nCounter system, which can provide a direct digital readout using custom-designed color-coded probes. Among them, ten genes (ugp, slc35a2, ganc, man1a, man1c, mgat5a, st3gal5, glb1, neu1, and neu3) were up-regulated and three genes (b4galt2, st3gal3, and neu2) were down-regulated significantly. Altered expression patterns in st3gal3, neu1, and neu3, which have roles in the sialic acid biosynthesis pathway, correlated with reduced sialic acid content of the glycoprotein by NaBu. Taken together, the results obtained in this study provide a better understanding of the detrimental effect of NaBu on N-glycosylation in rCHO cells. PMID:24333461

  4. Rapid evolution and gene expression: a rapidly evolving Mendelian trait that silences field crickets has widespread effects on mRNA and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Pascoal, S; Liu, X; Ly, T; Fang, Y; Rockliffe, N; Paterson, S; Shirran, S L; Botting, C H; Bailey, N W

    2016-06-01

    A major advance in modern evolutionary biology is the ability to start linking phenotypic evolution in the wild with genomic changes that underlie that evolution. We capitalized on a rapidly evolving Hawaiian population of crickets (Teleogryllus oceanicus) to test hypotheses about the genomic consequences of a recent Mendelian mutation of large effect which disrupts the development of sound-producing structures on male forewings. The resulting silent phenotype, flatwing, persists because of natural selection imposed by an acoustically orienting parasitoid, but it interferes with mate attraction. We examined gene expression differences in developing wing buds of wild-type and flatwing male crickets using RNA-seq and quantitative proteomics. Most differentially expressed (DE) transcripts were down-regulated in flatwing males (625 up vs. 1716 down), whereas up- and down-regulated proteins were equally represented (30 up and 34 down). Differences between morphs were clearly not restricted to a single pathway, and we recovered annotations associated with a broad array of functions that would not be predicted a priori. Using a candidate gene detection test based on homology, we identified 30% of putative Drosophila wing development genes in the cricket transcriptome, but only 10% were DE. In addition to wing-related annotations, endocrine pathways and several biological processes such as reproduction, immunity and locomotion were DE in the mutant crickets at both biological levels. Our results illuminate the breadth of genetic pathways that are potentially affected in the early stages of adaptation. PMID:26999731

  5. Up-Regulation of mRNA Ventricular PRNP Prion Protein Gene Expression in Air Pollution Highly Exposed Young Urbanites: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Glucose Regulated Protein 78, and Nanosized Particles

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Franco-Lira, Maricela; González-Maciel, Angélica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Harritt, Lou; Pérez-Guillé, Beatriz; Ferreira-Azevedo, Lara; Drecktrah, Dan; Zhu, Hongtu; Sun, Qiang; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Aragón-Flores, Mariana; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana; Diaz, Philippe; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian

    2013-01-01

    Mexico City Metropolitan Area children and young adults exposed to high concentrations of air pollutants including fine and ultrafine particulate matter (PM) vs. clean air controls, exhibit myocardial inflammation and inflammasome activation with a differential right and left ventricular expression of key inflammatory genes and inflammasomes. We investigated the mRNA expression levels of the prion protein gene PRNP, which plays an important role in the protection against oxidative stress and metal toxicity, and the glucose regulated protein 78, a key protein in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling, in ventricular autopsy samples from 30 children and young adults age 19.97 ± 6.8 years with a lifetime of low (n:4) vs. high (n:26) air pollution exposures. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies were carried out in human ventricles, and electron microscopy studies were also done in 5 young, highly exposed Mexico City dogs. There was significant left ventricular PRNP and bi-ventricular GRP78 mRNA up-regulation in Mexico City young urbanites vs. controls. PRNP up-regulation in the left ventricle was significantly different from the right, p < 0.0001, and there was a strong left ventricular PRNP and GRP78 correlation (p = 0.0005). Marked abnormalities in capillary endothelial cells, numerous nanosized particles in myocardial ER and in abnormal mitochondria characterized the highly exposed ventricles. Early and sustained cardiac ER stress could result in detrimental irreversible consequences in urban children, and while highly complex systems maintain myocardial homeostasis, failure to compensate for chronic myocardial inflammation, oxidative and ER stress, and particles damaging myocardial organelles may prime the development of pathophysiological cardiovascular states in young urbanites. Nanosized PM could play a key cardiac myocyte toxicity role. PMID:24287918

  6. Cytokine-dependent and–independent gene expression changes and cell cycle block revealed in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected host cells by comparative mRNA profiling

    PubMed Central

    Costales, Jaime A; Daily, Johanna P; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2009-01-01

    Background The requirements for growth and survival of the intracellular pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi within mammalian host cells are poorly understood. Transcriptional profiling of the host cell response to infection serves as a rapid read-out for perturbation of host physiology that, in part, reflects adaptation to the infective process. Using Affymetrix oligonucleotide array analysis we identified common and disparate host cell responses triggered by T. cruzi infection of phenotypically diverse human cell types. Results We report significant changes in transcript abundance in T. cruzi-infected fibroblasts, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells (2852, 2155 and 531 genes respectively; fold-change ≥ 2, p-value < 0.01) 24 hours post-invasion. A prominent type I interferon response was observed in each cell type, reflecting a secondary response to secreted cytokine in infected cultures. To identify a core cytokine-independent response in T. cruzi-infected fibroblasts and endothelial cells transwell plates were used to distinguish cytokine-dependent and -independent gene expression profiles. This approach revealed the induction of metabolic and signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, amino acid catabolism and response to wounding as common themes in T. cruzi-infected cells. In addition, the downregulation of genes involved in mitotic cell cycle and cell division predicted that T. cruzi infection may impede host cell cycle progression. The observation of impaired cytokinesis in T. cruzi-infected cells, following nuclear replication, confirmed this prediction. Conclusion Metabolic pathways and cellular processes were identified as significantly altered at the transcriptional level in response to T. cruzi infection in a cytokine-independent manner. Several of these alterations are supported by previous studies of T. cruzi metabolic requirements or effects on the host. However, our methods also revealed a T. cruzi-dependent block in the host cell cycle, at

  7. Messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticle tumour vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-06-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA's biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research.

  8. Screening genes associated with myocardial infarction and transverse aortic constriction using a combined analysis of miRNA and mRNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Luo, Jinlong; Wan, Lei; Hu, Tao; Li, Shusheng; Zhan, Chengye

    2015-10-25

    Myocardial infarction (MI) and transverse aortic constriction (TAC) are two models of cardiac hypertrophy. To study mechanisms of MI and TAC, GSE415 and GSE14267 were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. GSE415 included left ventricle (LV) and intraventricular septum samples from mice that underwent MI, TAC or sham operation. GSE14267 included normal and MI samples from non-transgenic mice. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) were screened using limma package. Functional enrichment analysis was performed for DEGs using DAVID. Common DEGs of different groups were conducted for protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis using STRING and visualized in PPI network by Cytoscape. Furthermore, targets were predicted for differentially expressed miRNAs using TarMir database. Totally, 277 DEGs, 31 common DEGs (e.g. SFRP2), 6 differentially expressed miRNAs (e.g. mmu-miR-448) and 1 miRNA-mRNA pair (mmu-miR-448→SIM2) were screened out. DEGs were significantly enriched in biological processes related to muscle development and ion transportation. In the PPI network for common DEGs, LOX (degree=7), POSTN (degree=5), SPARC (degree=4) and TIMP1 (degree=3) were with higher degrees. In addition, they might function by interacting with each other (e.g. LOX-TIMP1, LOX-POSTN, SPARC-TIMP1 and SPARC-POSTN). In conclusion, LOX, POSTN, SPARC, TIMP1 and SFRP2 might affect MI and TAC.3. PMID:26250077

  9. Identification of putative genes involved in the development of Tuber borchii fruit body by mRNA differential display in agarose gel.

    PubMed

    Zeppa, Sabrina; Guidi, Chiara; Zambonelli, Alessandra; Potenza, Lucia; Vallorani, Luciana; Pierleoni, Raffaella; Sacconi, Cinzia; Stocchi, Vilberto

    2002-12-01

    In order to analyse gene expression during fruit body development of the ectomychorrizal fungus Tuber borchii Vittad., a modified differential display procedure was set up. The procedure used is easier and faster than the traditional one and generates reproducible cDNA banding patterns that can be resolved on a standard ethidium bromide-agarose gel. From 16 cDNA fingerprints, 25 amplicons with apparent differential expression were identified and cloned without a previous reamplification. Fifteen clones showed significant similarity to known proteins that are involved in dikaryosis and fruiting, cell division, transport across membranes, mitochondrial division, intermediary metabolism, biosynthesis of isoprenoid compounds and putative RNA/DNA binding. Northern blot analyses confirmed that seven cDNAs were indeed differentially expressed during fruit body development. The characterisation of these cDNAs represents a starting point in understanding the molecular mechanisms of cellular differentiation leading to the development of the T. borchii fruit body. PMID:12491010

  10. Type 2 Diabetes Monocyte MicroRNA and mRNA Expression: Dyslipidemia Associates with Increased Differentiation-Related Genes but Not Inflammatory Activation

    PubMed Central

    Baldeón R., Lucy; Weigelt, Karin; de Wit, Harm; Ozcan, Behiye; van Oudenaren, Adri; Sempértegui, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric; Grosse, Laura; van Zonneveld, Anton-Jan; Drexhage, Hemmo A.; Leenen, Pieter J. M.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that inflammatory macrophages in adipose tissue are involved in insulin resistance of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Due to a relative paucity of data on circulating monocytes in T2D, it is unclear whether the inflammatory changes of adipose tissue macrophages are reflected in these easily accessible cells. Objective To study the expression pattern of microRNAs and mRNAs related to inflammation in T2D monocytes. Design A microRNA finding study on monocytes of T2D patients and controls using array profiling was followed by a quantitative Real Time PCR (qPCR) study on monocytes of an Ecuadorian validation cohort testing the top over/under-expressed microRNAs. In addition, monocytes of the validation cohort were tested for 24 inflammation-related mRNAs and 2 microRNAs previously found deregulated in (auto)-inflammatory monocytes. Results In the finding study, 142 significantly differentially expressed microRNAs were identified, 15 having the strongest power to discriminate T2D patients from controls (sensitivity 66%, specificity 90%). However, differences in expression of these microRNAs between patients and controls were small. On the basis of >1.4 or <0.6-fold change expression 5 microRNAs were selected for further validation. One microRNA (miR-34c-5p) was validated as significantly over-expressed in T2D monocytes. In addition, we found over expression of 3 mRNAs (CD9, DHRS3 and PTPN7) in the validation cohort. These mRNAs are important for cell morphology, adhesion, shape change, and cell differentiation. Classical inflammatory genes (e.g. TNFAIP3) were only over-expressed in monocytes of patients with normal serum lipids. Remarkably, in dyslipidemia, there was a reduction in the expression of inflammatory genes (e.g. ATF3, DUSP2 and PTGS2). Conclusions The expression profile of microRNAs/mRNAs in monocytes of T2D patients indicates an altered adhesion, differentiation, and shape change potential. Monocyte inflammatory activation was only found

  11. Molecular cloning, mRNA expression and tissue distribution analysis of Slc7a11 gene in alpaca (Lama paco) skins associated with different coat colors.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xue; Meng, Xiaolin; Wang, Liangyan; Song, Yunfei; Zhang, Danli; Ji, Yuankai; Li, Xuejun; Dong, Changsheng

    2015-01-25

    Slc7a11 encoding solute carrier family 7 member 11 (amionic amino acid transporter light chain, xCT), has been identified to be a critical genetic regulator of pheomelanin synthesis in hair and melanocytes. To better understand the molecular characterization of Slc7a11 and the expression patterns in skin of white versus brown alpaca (lama paco), we cloned the full length coding sequence (CDS) of alpaca Slc7a11 gene and analyzed the expression patterns using Real Time PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The full length CDS of 1512bp encodes a 503 amino acid polypeptide. Sequence analysis showed that alpaca xCT contains 12 transmembrane regions consistent with the highly conserved amino acid permease (AA_permease_2) domain similar to other vertebrates. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that alpaca xCT had the highest identity and shared the same branch with Camelus ferus. Real Time PCR and Western blotting suggested that xCT was expressed at significantly high levels in brown alpaca skin, and transcripts and protein possessed the same expression pattern in white and brown alpaca skins. Additionally, immunohistochemical analysis further demonstrated that xCT staining was robustly increased in the matrix and root sheath of brown alpaca skin compared with that of white. These results suggest that Slc7a11 functions in alpaca coat color regulation and offer essential information for further exploration on the role of Slc7a11 in melanogenesis. PMID:25455099

  12. Molecular Cloning, Characterization and mRNA Expression of a Chitin Synthase 2 Gene from the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Yang, Wen-Jia; Cong, Lin; Xu, Kang-Kang; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Chitin synthase (CHS), a potential target for eco-friendly insecticides, plays an essential role in chitin formation in insects. In this study, a full-length cDNA encoding chitin synthase 2 (BdCHS2) was cloned and characterized in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis. The BdCHS2 cDNA had 4417 nucleotides, containing an open reading frame of 4122 nucleotides, which encoded 1373 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 158.5 kDa. Phylogenetic analysis with other insect CHSs suggested that BdCHS2 belongs to insect CHS2. The BdCHS2 transcript was predominately found in midgut but was detected at low levels in fat body, Malpighian tubules, integument, and trachea. Moreover, BdCHS2 was expressed in all developmental stages, and highly expressed in the feeding stages. There was a positive relationship between BdCHS2 expression and total chitin content during development. Furthermore, both the gene expression and chitin content in midgut decreased when the insect was fed for 24 h, then starved for 24 h, while they increased dramatically and rapidly under the condition of starvation for 24 h then feeding for 24 h. These results suggest that BdCHS2 may play an important role in regulating chitin content of the midgut, and subsequently affect the growth and development of B. dorsalis. PMID:23965972

  13. Effects of DNA replication on mRNA noise.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Joseph R; Cole, John A; Fei, Jingyi; Ha, Taekjip; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida A

    2015-12-29

    There are several sources of fluctuations in gene expression. Here we study the effects of time-dependent DNA replication, itself a tightly controlled process, on noise in mRNA levels. Stochastic simulations of constitutive and regulated gene expression are used to analyze the time-averaged mean and variation in each case. The simulations demonstrate that to capture mRNA distributions correctly, chromosome replication must be realistically modeled. Slow relaxation of mRNA from the low copy number steady state before gene replication to the high steady state after replication is set by the transcript's half-life and contributes significantly to the shape of the mRNA distribution. Consequently both the intrinsic kinetics and the gene location play an important role in accounting for the mRNA average and variance. Exact analytic expressions for moments of the mRNA distributions that depend on the DNA copy number, gene location, cell doubling time, and the rates of transcription and degradation are derived for the case of constitutive expression and subsequently extended to provide approximate corrections for regulated expression and RNA polymerase variability. Comparisons of the simulated models and analytical expressions to experimentally measured mRNA distributions show that they better capture the physics of the system than previous theories. PMID:26669443

  14. Effects of DNA replication on mRNA noise

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Joseph R.; Cole, John A.; Fei, Jingyi; Ha, Taekjip; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida A.

    2015-01-01

    There are several sources of fluctuations in gene expression. Here we study the effects of time-dependent DNA replication, itself a tightly controlled process, on noise in mRNA levels. Stochastic simulations of constitutive and regulated gene expression are used to analyze the time-averaged mean and variation in each case. The simulations demonstrate that to capture mRNA distributions correctly, chromosome replication must be realistically modeled. Slow relaxation of mRNA from the low copy number steady state before gene replication to the high steady state after replication is set by the transcript’s half-life and contributes significantly to the shape of the mRNA distribution. Consequently both the intrinsic kinetics and the gene location play an important role in accounting for the mRNA average and variance. Exact analytic expressions for moments of the mRNA distributions that depend on the DNA copy number, gene location, cell doubling time, and the rates of transcription and degradation are derived for the case of constitutive expression and subsequently extended to provide approximate corrections for regulated expression and RNA polymerase variability. Comparisons of the simulated models and analytical expressions to experimentally measured mRNA distributions show that they better capture the physics of the system than previous theories. PMID:26669443

  15. Identification, mRNA expression, and functional analysis of chitin synthase 1 gene and its two alternative splicing variants in oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Jia; Xu, Kang-Kang; Cong, Lin; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Two alternative splicing variants of chitin synthase 1 gene (BdCHS1) were cloned and characterized from the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). The cDNA of both variants (BdCHS1a and BdCHS1b) consisted of 5,552 nucleotides (nt), with an open reading frame (ORF) of 4,776 nt, encoding a protein of 1,592 amino acid residues, plus 685- and 88-nt of 5'- and 3'-noncoding regions, respectively. The alternative splicing site was located between positions 3,784-3,960 and formed a pair of mutually exclusive exons (a/b) that were same in size (177 nt), but showed only 65% identity at the nucleotide level. During B. dorsalis growth and development, BdCHS1 and BdCHS1a were both mainly expressed during the larval-pupal and pupal-adult transitions, while BdCHS1b was mainly expressed during pupal-adult metamorphosis and in the middle of the pupal stage. BdCHS1a was predominately expressed in the integument whereas BdCHS1b was mainly expressed in the trachea. The 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) induced the expression of BdCHS1 and its variants. Injection of dsRNA of BdCHS1, BdCHS1a, and BdCHS1b into third-instar larvae significantly reduced the expression levels of the corresponding variants, generated phenotypic defects, and killed most of the treated larvae. Furthermore, silencing of BdCHS1 and BdCHS1a had a similar result in that the larva was trapped in old cuticle and died without tanning completely, while silencing of BdCHS1b has no effect on insect morphology. These results demonstrated that BdCHS1 plays an important role in the larval-pupal transition and the expression of BdCHS1 in B. dorsalis is regulated by 20E. PMID:23569438

  16. Identification, mRNA Expression, and Functional Analysis of Chitin Synthase 1 Gene and Its Two Alternative Splicing Variants in Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Jia; Xu, Kang-Kang; Cong, Lin; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Two alternative splicing variants of chitin synthase 1 gene (BdCHS1) were cloned and characterized from the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). The cDNA of both variants (BdCHS1a and BdCHS1b) consisted of 5,552 nucleotides (nt), with an open reading frame (ORF) of 4,776 nt, encoding a protein of 1,592 amino acid residues, plus 685- and 88-nt of 5′- and 3′-noncoding regions, respectively. The alternative splicing site was located between positions 3,784-3,960 and formed a pair of mutually exclusive exons (a/b) that were same in size (177 nt), but showed only 65% identity at the nucleotide level. During B. dorsalis growth and development, BdCHS1 and BdCHS1a were both mainly expressed during the larval-pupal and pupal-adult transitions, while BdCHS1b was mainly expressed during pupal-adult metamorphosis and in the middle of the pupal stage. BdCHS1a was predominately expressed in the integument whereas BdCHS1b was mainly expressed in the trachea. The 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) induced the expression of BdCHS1 and its variants. Injection of dsRNA of BdCHS1, BdCHS1a, and BdCHS1b into third-instar larvae significantly reduced the expression levels of the corresponding variants, generated phenotypic defects, and killed most of the treated larvae. Furthermore, silencing of BdCHS1 and BdCHS1a had a similar result in that the larva was trapped in old cuticle and died without tanning completely, while silencing of BdCHS1b has no effect on insect morphology. These results demonstrated that BdCHS1 plays an important role in the larval-pupal transition and the expression of BdCHS1 in B. dorsalis is regulated by 20E. PMID:23569438

  17. Molecular Characteristics, mRNA Expression, and Alternative Splicing of a Ryanodine Receptor Gene in the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Guo-Rui; Shi, Wen-Zhi; Yang, Wen-Jia; Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a distinct class of ligand-gated channels controlling the release of calcium from intracellular stores. The emergence of diamide insecticides, which selectively target insect RyRs, has promoted the study of insect RyRs. In the present study, the full-length RyR cDNA (BdRyR) was cloned and characterized from the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), a serious pest of fruits and vegetables throughout East Asia and the Pacific Rim. The cDNA of BdRyR contains a 15,420-bp open reading frame encoding 5,140 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 582.4 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.38. BdRyR shows a high level of amino acid sequence identity (78 to 97%) to other insect RyR isoforms. All common structural features of the RyRs are present in the BdRyR, including a well-conserved C-terminal domain containing consensus calcium-binding EF-hands and six transmembrane domains, and a large N-terminal domain. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed that BdRyR was expressed at the lowest and highest levels in egg and adult, respectively, and that the BdRyR expression levels in the third instar larva, pupa and adult were 166.99-, 157.56- and 808.56-fold higher, respectively, than that in the egg. Among different adult body parts, the highest expression level was observed in the thorax compared with the head and abdomen. In addition, four alternative splice sites were identified in the BdRyR gene, with the first, ASI, being located in the central part of the predicted second spore lysis A/RyR domain. Diagnostic PCR analyses revealed that alternative splice variants were generated not only in a tissue-specific manner but also in a developmentally regulated manner. These results lay the foundation for further understanding the structural and functional properties of BdRyR, and the molecular mechanisms for target site resistance in B. dorsalis. PMID:24740254

  18. A novel approach to understanding the role of polymorphic forms of the NR3C1 and TGF-β1 genes in the modulation of the expression of IL-5 and IL-15 mRNA in asthmatic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Panek, Michał; Jonakowski, Mateusz; Zioło, Jan; Wieteska, Łukasz; Małachowska, Beata; Pietras, Tadeusz; Szemraj, Janusz; Kuna, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify polymorphic forms of the nuclear receptor subfamily 3, group C, member 1 (NR3C1) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) genes and evaluate their impact on the expression levels of interleukin (IL)-5 and IL‑15 in asthma. The study was conducted on a control group consisting of 91 people (54 women and 37 men). The patient group consisted of 130 participants (86 women and 44 men). Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction‑restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR‑RFLP) and PCR‑high resolution melting (HRM) methods. Interleukin expression was measured by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The frequency of the polymorphic forms in the analyzed group were observed to be: Tth111I (rs10052957) controls AA 0.0440, AG 0.5714, GG 0.3846, patients AA 0.1538/AG 0.4692, GG 0.3769; ER22/23EK (rs6189 /rs6190) controls AG 0.0556, GG 0.9444, patients AG 0.0385, GG 0.9615; N363S (rs6195) controls AA 0.6444, AG 0.2667, GG 0.0889, patients AA 0.7846, AG 0.1385, GG 0.0769; BclI (rs41423247) controls CC 0.0879, CG 0.5604, GG 0.3516, patients CC 0.1008, CG 0.5736, GG 0.3256; C‑509T (rs1800469) controls TT 0.0805, CT 0.6322, CC 0.2874, patients TT 0.1102, CT 0.5669, CC 0.3228. The results indicated that the C‑509T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the TGF-β1 gene contributed to an increase in the IL‑5 mRNA expression levels. The GG genotype of the N363S SNP of the NR3C1 gene was observed to result in an increase in the expression levels of IL‑15. The present study indicated that the selected SNPs of the NR3C1 and TGF‑β1 genes demonstrate a regulatory effect on the expression of IL‑5 and IL‑15. Therefore, genetic variation affects inflammation in asthma and the clinical course of the disease. PMID:27081784

  19. Alternative mRNA splice variants of the rat ClC-2 chloride channel gene are expressed in lung: genomic sequence and organization of ClC-2.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, S; Zeitlin, P L

    1997-01-01

    The ClC-2 epithelial cell chloride channel is a voltage-, tonicity- and pH-regulated member of the ClC super family. We have previously shown that rat lung ClC-2 (rClC-2) is down-regulated at birth, and molecular diversity is generated by alternative splicing [Murray et al. (1995) Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. 12, 597-604; Murray et al. (1996) Am. J. Physiol. 271, L829-L837; Chu et al . (1996) Nucleic Acids Res. 24, 3453-3457]. To investigate other possible mRNA splice variations, we sequenced the entire rClC-2 gene and found that ClC-2Sa (formerly ClC-2S) results from the deletion of exon 20. The preceding intron 19 has an unusually high CT content and a rare AAG acceptor site. Because both features were also found in intron 13, we next tested the hypothesis that intron 13 would be involved in alternative splicing. As predicted, a second splice product, ClC-2Sb, was found by RT-PCR, but only in lung. When we compared the genomic maps of rClC-2 and human ClC-1 (hClC-1), striking similarities were found in each exon except for rClC-2 exon 20, which is absent in hClC-1. These observations suggest that ClC-1 and ClC-2 may have evolved by gene duplication, mutation and DNA rearrangement. PMID:9321672

  20. INDUCTION OF GENE EXPRESSION IN SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS (CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS) TREATED WITH 17B-ESTRADIOL, DIETHYLSTILBESTROL, OR ETHINYLESTRADIOL: THE USE OF MRNA FINGERPRINTS AS AN INDICATOR OF GENE REGULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recent interest in hormonally active environmental contaminants has sparked a drive to find sensitive methods to measure their effects on wildlife. A molecular-based assay has been developed to measure the induction of gene expression in sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variega...

  1. Sensitivity of mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Poker, Gilad; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    Using the dynamic mean-field approximation of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), we investigate the effect of small changes in the initiation, elongation, and termination rates along the mRNA strand on the steady-state protein translation rate. We show that the sensitivity of mRNA translation is equal to the sensitivity of the maximal eigenvalue of a symmetric, nonnegative, tridiagonal, and irreducible matrix. This leads to new analytical results as well as efficient numerical schemes that are applicable for large-scale models. Our results show that in the usual endogenous case, when initiation is more rate-limiting than elongation, the sensitivity of the translation rate to small mutations rapidly increases towards the 5′ end of the ORF. When the initiation rate is high, as may be the case for highly expressed and/or heterologous optimized genes, the maximal sensitivity is with respect to the elongation rates at the middle of the mRNA strand. We also show that the maximal possible effect of a small increase/decrease in any of the rates along the mRNA is an increase/decrease of the same magnitude in the translation rate. These results are in agreement with previous molecular evolutionary and synthetic biology experimental studies. PMID:26238363

  2. Analysis of cellulose synthase genes from domesticated apple identifies collinear genes WDR53 and CesA8A: partial co-expression, bicistronic mRNA, and alternative splicing of CESA8A

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Gea; Spadiut, Oliver; Kerschbamer, Christine; Giorno, Filomena; Baric, Sanja; Ezcurra, Inés

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose synthase (CesA) genes constitute a complex multigene family with six major phylogenetic clades in angiosperms. The recently sequenced genome of domestic apple, Malus×domestica, was mined for CesA genes, by blasting full-length cellulose synthase protein (CESA) sequences annotated in the apple genome against protein databases from the plant models Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus trichocarpa. Thirteen genes belonging to the six angiosperm CesA clades and coding for proteins with conserved residues typical of processive glycosyltransferases from family 2 were detected. Based on their phylogenetic relationship to Arabidopsis CESAs, as well as expression patterns, a nomenclature is proposed to facilitate further studies. Examination of their genomic organization revealed that MdCesA8-A is closely linked and co-oriented with WDR53, a gene coding for a WD40 repeat protein. The WDR53 and CesA8 genes display conserved collinearity in dicots and are partially co-expressed in the apple xylem. Interestingly, the presence of a bicistronic WDR53–CesA8A transcript was detected in phytoplasma-infected phloem tissues of apple. The bicistronic transcript contains a spliced intergenic sequence that is predicted to fold into hairpin structures typical of internal ribosome entry sites, suggesting its potential cap-independent translation. Surprisingly, the CesA8A cistron is alternatively spliced and lacks the zinc-binding domain. The possible roles of WDR53 and the alternatively spliced CESA8 variant during cellulose biosynthesis in M.×domestica are discussed. PMID:23048131

  3. Testosterone (T)-induced changes in arcuate nucleus cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript and NPY mRNA are attenuated in old compared to young male brown Norway rats: contribution of T to age-related changes in cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript and NPY gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Elliott H; Wolden-Hanson, Tami; Matsumoto, Alvin M

    2002-03-01

    The age-related decrease in serum T levels is associated with impairments in food intake and weight regulation and alterations in brain peptides that regulate energy balance. To test the hypothesis that reduced T levels contribute to altered hypothalamic cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and NPY gene expression, the mRNA content of these neuropeptides was measured by in situ hybridization in sham-operated (intact), castrated, and T-replaced castrated young and old male Brown Norway rats. T levels in T-replaced young and old rats were similar to those in intact young animals. Compared with castrated rats, arcuate nucleus CART mRNA was lower and NPY mRNA was higher in both young and old T-replaced castrated animals, suggesting reciprocal regulation of these peptides by T; these T-induced changes were localized primarily in the rostral arcuate and were markedly attenuated in old animals. Compared with intact animals, paraventricular nucleus CART mRNA was lower in castrated animals and similar in T-replaced young and old rats. We conclude that hypothalamic CART and NPY neurons remain responsive to T regulation in old rats, albeit less so than in young animals, suggesting that the age-related reduction of T contributes in part to altered brain neuropeptide gene expression favoring anorexia and wasting with aging. PMID:11861518

  4. Mechanism of Cytoplasmic mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a fundamental process in gene expression that depends upon the abundance and accessibility of the mRNA transcript as well as the activity of many protein and RNA-protein complexes. Here we focus on the intricate mechanics of mRNA translation in the cytoplasm of higher plants. This chapter includes an inventory of the plant translational apparatus and a detailed review of the translational processes of initiation, elongation, and termination. The majority of mechanistic studies of cytoplasmic translation have been carried out in yeast and mammalian systems. The factors and mechanisms of translation are for the most part conserved across eukaryotes; however, some distinctions are known to exist in plants. A comprehensive understanding of the complex translational apparatus and its regulation in plants is warranted, as the modulation of protein production is critical to development, environmental plasticity and biomass yield in diverse ecosystems and agricultural settings. PMID:26019692

  5. Sodium Channel Inhibitors Reduce DMPK mRNA and Protein.

    PubMed

    Witherspoon, Luke; O'Reilly, Sean; Hadwen, Jeremiah; Tasnim, Nafisa; MacKenzie, Alex; Farooq, Faraz

    2015-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by an expanded trinucleotide (CTG)n tract in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene. This results in the aggregation of an expanded mRNA forming toxic intranuclear foci which sequester splicing factors. We believe down-regulation of DMPK mRNA represents a potential, and as yet unexplored, DM1 therapeutic avenue. Consequently, a computational screen for agents which down-regulate DMPK mRNA was undertaken, unexpectedly identifying the sodium channel blockers mexiletine, prilocaine, procainamide, and sparteine as effective suppressors of DMPK mRNA. Analysis of DMPK mRNA in C2C12 myoblasts following treatment with these agents revealed a reduction in the mRNA levels. In vivo analysis of CD1 mice also showed DMPK mRNA and protein down-regulation. The role of DMPK mRNA suppression in the documented efficacy of this class of compounds in DM1 is worthy of further investigation. PMID:26011798

  6. Cellular resistance to HIV-1 infection in target cells coincides with a rapid induction of X-DING-CD4 mRNA: indication of the unique host innate response to virus regulated through function of the X-DING-CD4 gene.

    PubMed

    Shilpi, Rasheda Y; Sachdeva, Rakhee; Simm, Malgorzata

    2012-08-01

    Clinical reports indicate that some infected individuals control HIV-1 replication through undefined mechanisms. Our group reported that a human protein named X-DING-CD4 holds a potent antiviral activity, blocking transcription of HIV-1 LTR through the inhibition of NF-κB/DNA binding. Based on observations that transformed HIV-1 resistant CD4(+) T cells produce higher levels of soluble X-DING-CD4 protein upon their exposure to virus, we hypothesized that resistance to HIV-1 in these cells may be regulated through function of the X-DING-CD4 gene. Real-time PCR evaluations of X-DING-CD4 mRNA expression confirmed our hypothesis; HIV-1 exposure caused rapid up-regulation of X-DING-CD4 mRNA in resistant, but not susceptible, cells; and the burst of X-DING-CD4 mRNA expression correlated with restriction of HIV-1 transcription. Subsequently, we examined the activity of the X-DING-CD4 gene in monocytes and macrophages from (n = 13) HIV-negative donors. The assessment of HIV-1 gag mRNA showed that the majority of cells were permissive to virus replication; however, macrophages from four donors were refractory to HIV-1 infection. In response to virus, these cells up-regulated X-DING-CD4 gene expression by 2- to 1000-fold. These data provide evidence that the X-DING-CD4 gene contributes to early cellular protection from HIV infection in some individuals and this protection depends solely on the unique genetic regulation of the host. PMID:22042911

  7. Application of a Master Equation for Quantitative mRNA Analysis Using qRT-PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The qRT-PCR has been widely accepted as the assay of choice for mRNA quantification. Gene expression as measured by mRNA dynamics varies in response to different conditions and environmental stimuli. For conventional practice, housekeeping genes have been applied as internal reference for data nor...

  8. mRNA transcript therapy.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Drew

    2015-02-01

    mRNA is the central molecule of all forms of life. It is generally accepted that current life on Earth descended from an RNA world. mRNA, after its first therapeutic description in 1992, has recently come into increased focus as a method to deliver genetic information. The recent solution to the two main difficulties in using mRNA as a therapeutic, immune stimulation and potency, has provided the basis for a wide range of applications. While mRNA-based cancer immunotherapies have been in clinical trials for a few years, novel approaches; including, in vivo delivery of mRNA to replace or supplement proteins, mRNA-based generation of pluripotent stem cells, or genome engineering using mRNA-encoded meganucleases are beginning to be realized. This review presents the current state of mRNA drug technologies and potential applications, as well as discussing the challenges and prospects in mRNA development and drug discovery. PMID:25359562

  9. Accelerated mRNA decay in conditional mutants of yeast mRNA capping enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Schwer, B; Mao, X; Shuman, S

    1998-01-01

    Current models of mRNA decay in yeast posit that 3' deadenylation precedes enzymatic removal of the 5' cap, which then exposes the naked end to 5' exonuclease action. Here, we analyzed gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells bearing conditional mutations of Ceg1 (capping enzyme), a 52 kDa protein that transfers GMP from GTP to the 5' end of mRNA to form the GpppN cap structure. Shift of ceg1 mutants to restrictive temperature elicited a rapid decline in the rate of protein synthesis, which correlated with a sharp reduction in the steady-state levels of multiple individual mRNAs. ceg1 mutations prevented the accumulation of SSA1 and SSA4 mRNAs that were newly synthesized at the restrictive temperature. Uncapped poly(A)+ SSA4 mRNA accumulated in cells lacking the 5' exoribonuclease Xrn1. These findings provide genetic evidence for the long-held idea that the cap guanylate is critical for mRNA stability. The deadenylation-decapping-degradation pathway appears to be short-circuited when Ceg1 is inactivated. PMID:9547258

  10. Signaling Pathways That Control mRNA Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa; Denmon, Andria P.

    2013-01-01

    Cells regulate their genomes mainly at the level of transcription and at the level of mRNA decay. While regulation at the level of transcription is clearly important, the regulation of mRNA turnover by signaling networks is essential for a rapid response to external stimuli. Signaling pathways result in posttranslational modification of RNA binding proteins by phosphorylation, ubiquitination, methylation, acetylation etc. These modifications are important for rapid remodeling of dynamic ribonucleoprotein complexes and triggering mRNA decay. Understanding how these posttranslational modifications alter gene expression is therefore a fundamental question in biology. In this review we highlight recent findings on how signaling pathways and cell cycle checkpoints involving phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and arginine methylation affect mRNA turnover. PMID:23602935

  11. Nuclear Retention of mRNA in Mammalian Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bahar Halpern, Keren; Caspi, Inbal; Lemze, Doron; Levy, Maayan; Landen, Shanie; Elinav, Eran; Ulitsky, Igor; Itzkovitz, Shalev

    2015-01-01

    Summary mRNA is thought to predominantly reside in the cytoplasm, where it is translated and eventually degraded. Although nuclear retention of mRNA has a regulatory potential, it is considered extremely rare in mammals. Here, to explore the extent of mRNA retention in metabolic tissues, we combine deep sequencing of nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA fractions with single-molecule transcript imaging in mouse beta cells, liver, and gut. We identify a wide range of protein-coding genes for which the levels of spliced polyadenylated mRNA are higher in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm. These include genes such as the transcription factor ChREBP, Nlrp6, Glucokinase, and Glucagon receptor. We demonstrate that nuclear retention of mRNA can efficiently buffer cytoplasmic transcript levels from noise that emanates from transcriptional bursts. Our study challenges the view that transcripts predominantly reside in the cytoplasm and reveals a role of the nucleus in dampening gene expression noise. PMID:26711333

  12. Stochastic mRNA synthesis in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Raj, Arjun; Peskin, Charles S; Tranchina, Daniel; Vargas, Diana Y; Tyagi, Sanjay

    2006-10-01

    Individual cells in genetically homogeneous populations have been found to express different numbers of molecules of specific proteins. We investigated the origins of these variations in mammalian cells by counting individual molecules of mRNA produced from a reporter gene that was stably integrated into the cell's genome. We found that there are massive variations in the number of mRNA molecules present in each cell. These variations occur because mRNAs are synthesized in short but intense bursts of transcription beginning when the gene transitions from an inactive to an active state and ending when they transition back to the inactive state. We show that these transitions are intrinsically random and not due to global, extrinsic factors such as the levels of transcriptional activators. Moreover, the gene activation causes burst-like expression of all genes within a wider genomic locus. We further found that bursts are also exhibited in the synthesis of natural genes. The bursts of mRNA expression can be buffered at the protein level by slow protein degradation rates. A stochastic model of gene activation and inactivation was developed to explain the statistical properties of the bursts. The model showed that increasing the level of transcription factors increases the average size of the bursts rather than their frequency. These results demonstrate that gene expression in mammalian cells is subject to large, intrinsically random fluctuations and raise questions about how cells are able to function in the face of such noise. PMID:17048983

  13. Regulation and deregulation of mRNA translation during myeloid maturation.

    PubMed

    Khanna-Gupta, Arati

    2011-02-01

    Gene expression in the eukaryotic cell is regulated at a number of levels, including transcription of genomic DNA into messenger RNA (mRNA), nucleocytoplasmic export of mRNA, and translation of the exported mRNA into proteins in the cytoplasm by ribosomes. The role played by epigenetics and transcription factors associated with the control of gene expression in the developing neutrophil has been well documented and appreciated over the years. A wealth of information on the role played by transcription factors in myeloid biology has contributed to our understanding of both normal and abnormal neutrophil development. However, regulation of mRNA translation in myeloid cell maturation is much less well-studied. A better understanding of the translational control of myeloid gene expression may provide important insights into both normal and abnormal myeloid maturation. This review summarizes our current understanding of the regulation of myeloid gene expression at the mRNA translational level. PMID:21093533

  14. Gene activity during germination of spores of the fern, Onoclea sensibilis. Cell-free translation analysis of mRNA of spores and the effect of alpha-amanitin on spore germination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raghavan, V.

    1992-01-01

    Poly(A)-RNA fractions of dormant, dark-imbibed (non-germinating) and photoinduced (germinating) spores of Onoclea sensibilis were poor templates in the rabbit reticulocyte lysate protein synthesizing system, but the translational efficiency of poly(A)+RNA was considerably higher than that of unfractionated RNA. Poly(A)+RNA isolated from photoinduced spores had a consistently higher translational efficiency than poly(A)+RNA from dark-imbibed spores. Analysis of the translation products by one-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed no qualitative differences in the mRNA populations of dormant, dark-imbibed, and photoinduced spores. However, poly(A)+RNA from dark-imbibed spores appeared to encode in vitro fewer detectable polypeptides at a reduced intensity than photoinduced spores. A DNA clone encoding the large subunit of maize ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase hybridized at strong to moderate intensity to RNA isolated from dark-imbibed spores, indicating the absence of mRNA degradation. Although alpha-amanitin did not inhibit the germination of spores, the drug prevented the elongation of the rhizoid and protonemal initial with a concomitant effect on the synthesis of poly(A)+RNA. These results are consistent with the view that some form of translational control involving stored mRNA operates during dark-imbibition and photoinduced germination of spores.

  15. Myc and mRNA capping.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Sianadh; Cowling, Victoria H

    2015-05-01

    c-Myc is upregulated in response to growth factors and transmits the signal to proliferate by altering the gene expression landscape. When genetic alterations result in growth factor-independent c-Myc expression, it can become an oncogene. The majority of human tumour types exhibit a degree of c-Myc deregulation, resulting in unrestrained cell proliferation. c-Myc binds proximal to the promoter region of genes and recruits co-factors including histone acetyltransferases and RNA pol II kinases, which promote transcription. c-Myc also promotes formation of the cap structure at the 5' end of mRNA. The cap is 7-methylguanosine linked to the first transcribed nucleotide of RNA pol II transcripts via a 5' to 5' triphosphate bridge. The cap is added to the first transcribed nucleotide by the capping enzymes, RNGTT and RNMT-RAM. During the early stages of transcription, the capping enzymes are recruited to RNA pol II phosphorylated on Serine-5 of the C-terminal domain. The mRNA cap protects transcripts from degradation during transcription and recruits factors which promote RNA processing including, splicing, export and translation initiation. The proportion of transcripts with a cap structure is increased by elevating c-Myc expression, resulting in increased rates of translation. c-Myc promotes capping by promoting RNA pol II phosphorylation and by upregulating the enzyme SAHH which neutralises the inhibitory bi-product of methylation reactions, SAH. c-Myc-induced capping is required for c-Myc-dependent gene expression and cell proliferation. Targeting capping may represent a new therapeutic opportunity to inhibit c-Myc function in tumours. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Myc proteins in cell biology and pathology. PMID:24681440

  16. Rhythmic control of mRNA stability modulates circadian amplitude of mouse Period3 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Kyung-Ha; Kim, Do-Yeon; Kwak, Eunyee; Kim, Seunghwan; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2015-03-01

    The daily oscillations observed in most living organisms are endogenously generated with a period of 24 h, and the underlying structure of periodic oscillation is an autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loop. The mechanisms of untranslated region (UTR)-mediated post-transcriptional regulation (e.g., mRNA degradation and internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-mediated translation) have been suggested to fine-tune the expression of clock genes. Mouse Period3 (mPer3) is one of the paralogs of Period gene and its function is important in peripheral clocks and sleep physiology. mPer3 mRNA displays a circadian oscillation as well as a circadian phase-dependent stability, while the stability regulators still remain unknown. In this study, we identify three proteins - heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K, polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB), and hnRNP D - that bind to mPer3 mRNA 3'-UTR. We show that hnRNP K is a stabilizer that increases the amplitude of circadian mPer3 mRNA oscillation and hnRNP D is a destabilizer that decreases it, while PTB exhibits no effect on mPer3 mRNA expression. Our experiments describe their cytoplasmic roles for the mRNA stability regulation and the circadian amplitude formation. Moreover, our mathematical model suggests a mechanism through which post-transcriptional mRNA stability modulation provides not only the flexibility of oscillation amplitude, but also the robustness of the period and the phase for circadian mPer3 expression. Mouse Period3 (mPer3) is one of well-known clock genes. We identified three 3'-UTR-binding proteins that modulate the mRNA stability, and they influenced to the amplitude of circadian mPer3 mRNA oscillation. Our mathematical model not only showed the relationship between mRNA stability and its oscillation profile but provided the molecular mechanism for the robustness of the period and the phase in circadian oscillation. hnK, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K; hnD, hn

  17. Gene Cloning and mRNA Expression of Glutamate Dehydrogenase in the Liver, Brain, and Intestine of the Swamp Eel, Monopterus albus (Zuiew), Exposed to Freshwater, Terrestrial Conditions, Environmental Ammonia, or Salinity Stress

    PubMed Central

    Tok, Chia Y.; Chew, Shit F.; Ip, Yuen K.

    2011-01-01

    The swamp eel, Monopterus albus, is an obligatory air-breathing teleost which can undergo long period of emersion, has high environmental and tissue ammonia tolerance, and can survive in brackish water. We obtained a cDNA sequence of glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh), which consisted of a 133-bp 5′ UTR, a complete coding sequence region spanning 1629 bp and a 3′ UTR of approximately 717 bp, from the liver, intestine, and brain of M. albus. The translated Gdh amino acid sequence had 542 residues, and it formed a monophyletic clade with Bostrychus sinensis Gdh1a, Tetraodon nigroviridis Gdh1a, Chaenocephalus aceratus Gdh1a, Salmo salar Gdh1a1 and Gdh1a2, and O. mykiss Gdh1a. One day of exposure to terrestrial conditions or 75 mmol l−1 NH4Cl, but not to water at salinity 20, resulted in a significant increase in mRNA expression of gdh1a and Gdh amination activity in the liver of M. albus. However, exposure to brackish water, but not to terrestrial conditions or 75 mmol l−1 NH4Cl, led to a significant increase in the mRNA expression of gdh1a and Gdh amination activity in the intestine. By contrast, all the three experimental conditions had no significant effects on the mRNA expression of gdh1a in the brain of M. albus, despite a significant decrease in the Gdh amination activity in the brain of fish exposed to 75 mmol l−1 NH4Cl for 6 days. Our results indicate for the first time that the mRNA expression of gdh1a was differentially up-regulated in the liver and intestine of M. albus in response to ammonia toxicity and salinity stress, respectively. The increases in mRNA expression of gdh1a and Gdh amination activity would probably lead to an increase in glutamate production in support of increased glutamine synthesis for the purpose of ammonia detoxification or cell volume regulation under these two different environmental conditions. PMID:22319499

  18. Messenger RNA (mRNA) Nanoparticle Tumour Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Phua, Kyle K.L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-01-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA’s biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research. PMID:24904987

  19. SURVIV for survival analysis of mRNA isoform variation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shihao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Chengyang; Wu, Ying Nian; Xing, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The rapid accumulation of clinical RNA-seq data sets has provided the opportunity to associate mRNA isoform variations to clinical outcomes. Here we report a statistical method SURVIV (Survival analysis of mRNA Isoform Variation), designed for identifying mRNA isoform variation associated with patient survival time. A unique feature and major strength of SURVIV is that it models the measurement uncertainty of mRNA isoform ratio in RNA-seq data. Simulation studies suggest that SURVIV outperforms the conventional Cox regression survival analysis, especially for data sets with modest sequencing depth. We applied SURVIV to TCGA RNA-seq data of invasive ductal carcinoma as well as five additional cancer types. Alternative splicing-based survival predictors consistently outperform gene expression-based survival predictors, and the integration of clinical, gene expression and alternative splicing profiles leads to the best survival prediction. We anticipate that SURVIV will have broad utilities for analysing diverse types of mRNA isoform variation in large-scale clinical RNA-seq projects. PMID:27279334

  20. SURVIV for survival analysis of mRNA isoform variation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shihao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Chengyang; Wu, Ying Nian; Xing, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The rapid accumulation of clinical RNA-seq data sets has provided the opportunity to associate mRNA isoform variations to clinical outcomes. Here we report a statistical method SURVIV (Survival analysis of mRNA Isoform Variation), designed for identifying mRNA isoform variation associated with patient survival time. A unique feature and major strength of SURVIV is that it models the measurement uncertainty of mRNA isoform ratio in RNA-seq data. Simulation studies suggest that SURVIV outperforms the conventional Cox regression survival analysis, especially for data sets with modest sequencing depth. We applied SURVIV to TCGA RNA-seq data of invasive ductal carcinoma as well as five additional cancer types. Alternative splicing-based survival predictors consistently outperform gene expression-based survival predictors, and the integration of clinical, gene expression and alternative splicing profiles leads to the best survival prediction. We anticipate that SURVIV will have broad utilities for analysing diverse types of mRNA isoform variation in large-scale clinical RNA-seq projects. PMID:27279334

  1. Effects of herpes simplex virus on mRNA stability.

    PubMed Central

    Strom, T; Frenkel, N

    1987-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus virions contain one or more functions which mediate shutoff of host protein synthesis, disaggregation of host polyribosomes, and degradation of host mRNA. We studied aspects of the host shutoff mechanism by using herpes simplex virus type 1 mutants deficient in virion-induced shutoff of host protein synthesis (G. S. Read and N. Frenkel, J. Virol. 46:498-512, 1983). Shutoff of host protein synthesis by the wild-type virus was associated with degradation of host mRNAs, including beta-actin, alpha-tubulin, and heat shock protein 70. In contrast, the virion host shutoff (vhs) mutants were deficient to various degrees in their ability to induce host mRNA degradation; the extent of mRNA degradation correlated well with the extent of inhibition of host protein synthesis. This finding suggests that inhibition of host protein synthesis and degradation of host mRNA were mediated by the same virion-associated function. Virion-induced degradation of host mRNA was not prevented by inhibitors of ribosome translocation, nor could it be augmented, for mutant vhs-1, by drugs which disaggregate polyribosomes. This suggests that mRNA in polyribosomes, as well as nonpolyribosomal mRNA, is susceptible to virion-induced degradation. Finally, the half-life of viral transcripts was also prolonged in cells infected with the vhs-1 mutant virus, suggesting that the vhs function indiscriminately decreased the half-lives of both host and viral mRNAs. The vhs function may thus play a dual role in virus infection. (i) It inhibits host gene expression, and (ii) it enables rapid transitions in the expression of viral genes which are sequentially transcribed as infection progresses. Images PMID:3035220

  2. Highly metastatic hepatocellular carcinomas induced in male F344 rats treated with N-nitrosomorpholine in combination with other hepatocarcinogens show a high incidence of p53 gene mutations along with altered mRNA expression of tumor-related genes.

    PubMed

    Masui, T; Nakanishi, H; Inada, K; Imai, T; Mizoguchi, Y; Yada, H; Futakuchi, M; Shirai, T; Tatematsu, M

    1997-01-15

    The carcinogenic and metastatic processes are thought to consist of a sequence of steps, and animal models featuring highly metastatic lesions are clearly necessary to allow analysis of the whole process of transformation from preneoplastic changes to high grade metastatic tumors, and to access effectiveness of therapeutic treatments of advanced cancers in vivo. The purpose of the present study was to establish a model and to screen for reported genetic alterations in induced lesions. In the present study, it was confirmed that lung metastasis of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) induced in male F344 rats by N-nitrosomorpholine (NNM), given in the drinking water at a dose of 120 ppm for 24 weeks, was significantly enhanced by additional carcinogenic pretreatments and that a single i.p. injection of 100 mg/kg body weight N-diethylnitrosamine (DEN) alone was sufficient for that purpose. Molecular biological analyses of the induced lesions revealed point mutations in the p53 gene in 60.9% of HCCs, and elevated expression of mRNAs for p53, c-myc, c-fos, TGF-alpha, TGF-beta1, alpha-fetoprotein, GST-P, and GGT, and decreased mRNA expression of EGF and EGFR in HCCs when compared to controls. No obvious association of gene alterations with metastatic potential of primary tumors was found except for an increase in the incidence of p53 mutations. Since the process of metastasis is thought to be sequential and selective, further comparative analysis of metastatic and primary lesions should clarify the mechanisms involved in the multi-step process of metastasis. PMID:9029167

  3. Post-transcriptional regulation tends to attenuate the mRNA noise and to increase the mRNA gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Changhong; Wang, Shuqiang; Zhou, Tianshou; Jiang, Yiguo

    2015-10-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation is ubiquitous in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, but how it impacts gene expression remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze a simple gene model in which we assume that mRNAs are produced in a constitutive manner but are regulated post-transcriptionally by a decapping enzyme that switches between the active state and the inactive state. We derive the analytical mRNA distribution governed by a chemical master equation, which can be well used to analyze the mechanism of how post-transcription regulation influences the mRNA expression level including the mRNA noise. We demonstrate that the mean mRNA level in the stochastic case is always higher than that in the deterministic case due to the stochastic effect of the enzyme, but the size of the increased part depends mainly on the switching rates between two enzyme states. More interesting is that we find that in contrast to transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional regulation tends to attenuate noise in mRNA. Our results provide insight into the role of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling the transcriptional noise.

  4. Leveraging Rules of Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay for Genome Engineering and Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Popp, Maximilian W; Maquat, Lynne E

    2016-06-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a eukaryotic mRNA quality control and regulatory process that plays direct roles in human health and disease. In this Minireview, we discuss how understanding the molecular events that trigger NMD can facilitate strategic targeting of genes via CRISPR/Cas9 technologies and also inform disease diagnostics and treatments. PMID:27259145

  5. Endoribonucleases--enzymes gaining spotlight in mRNA metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li, Wai Ming; Barnes, Tavish; Lee, Chow H

    2010-02-01

    The efficient turnover of messenger RNA represents an important mechanism that allows the cell to control gene expression. Until recently, the mechanism of mRNA decay was mainly attributed to exonucleases, comprising enzymes that degrade RNAs from the ends of the molecules. This article summarizes the endoribonucleases, comprising enzymes that cleave RNA molecules internally, which were identified in more recent years in eukaryotic mRNA metabolism. Endoribonucleases have received little attention in the past, based on the difficulty in their identification and a lack of understanding of their physiological significance. This review aims to compare the similarities and differences among this group of enzymes, as well as their known cellular functions. Despite the many differences in protein structure, and thus difficulties in identifying them based on amino acid sequence, most endoribonucleases possess essential cellular functions and have been shown to play an important role in mRNA turnover. PMID:19968858

  6. All things must pass: contrasts and commonalities in eukaryotic and bacterial mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Belasco, Joel G

    2010-07-01

    Despite its universal importance for controlling gene expression, mRNA degradation was initially thought to occur by disparate mechanisms in eukaryotes and bacteria. This conclusion was based on differences in the structures used by these organisms to protect mRNA termini and in the RNases and modifying enzymes originally implicated in mRNA decay. Subsequent discoveries have identified several striking parallels between the cellular factors and molecular events that govern mRNA degradation in these two kingdoms of life. Nevertheless, some key distinctions remain, the most fundamental of which may be related to the different mechanisms by which eukaryotes and bacteria control translation initiation. PMID:20520623

  7. Nerve growth factor mRNA in brain: localization by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Rennert, P.D.; Heinrich, G.

    1986-07-31

    Nerve Growth Factor is a 118 amino acid polypeptide that plays an important role in the differentiation and survival of neurons. The recent discovery that a mRNA that encodes beta Nerve Growth Factor is present in brain suggests that the Nerve Growth Factor gene may not only regulate gene expression of peripheral but also of central neurons. To identify the site(s) of Nerve Growth Factor mRNA production in the brain and to determine which cells express the Nerve Growth Factor gene, the technique of in situ hybridization was employed. A 32P-labeled RNA probe complementary to Nerve Growth Factor mRNA hybridized to cells in the stratum granulosum of the dentate gyrus and the stratum pyramidale of the hippocampus. These observations identify for the first time cellular sites of Nerve Growth Factor gene expression in the central nervous system, and suggest that Nerve Growth Factor mRNA is produced by neurons.

  8. Connections Underlying Translation and mRNA Stability.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Aditya; Green, Rachel

    2016-09-11

    Gene expression and regulation in organisms minimally depends on transcription by RNA polymerase and on the stability of the RNA product (for both coding and non-coding RNAs). For coding RNAs, gene expression is further influenced by the amount of translation by the ribosome and by the stability of the protein product. The stabilities of these two classes of RNA, non-coding and coding, vary considerably: tRNAs and rRNAs tend to be long lived while mRNAs tend to be more short lived. Even among mRNAs, however, there is a considerable range in stability (ranging from seconds to hours in bacteria and up to days in metazoans), suggesting a significant role for stability in the regulation of gene expression. Here, we review recent experiments from bacteria, yeast and metazoans indicating that the stability of most mRNAs is broadly impacted by the actions of ribosomes that translate them. Ribosomal recognition of defective mRNAs triggers "mRNA surveillance" pathways that target the mRNA for degradation [Shoemaker and Green (2012) ]. More generally, even the stability of perfectly functional mRNAs appears to be dictated by overall rates of translation by the ribosome [Herrick et al. (1990), Presnyak et al. (2015) ]. Given that mRNAs are synthesized for the purpose of being translated into proteins, it is reassuring that such intimate connections between mRNA and the ribosome can drive biological regulation. In closing, we consider the likelihood that these connections between protein synthesis and mRNA stability are widespread or whether other modes of regulation dominate the mRNA stability landscape in higher organisms. PMID:27261255

  9. Influenza virus mRNA trafficking through host nuclear speckles.

    PubMed

    Mor, Amir; White, Alexander; Zhang, Ke; Thompson, Matthew; Esparza, Matthew; Muñoz-Moreno, Raquel; Koide, Kazunori; Lynch, Kristen W; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Fontoura, Beatriz M A

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a human pathogen with a genome composed of eight viral RNA segments that replicate in the nucleus. Two viral mRNAs are alternatively spliced. The unspliced M1 mRNA is translated into the matrix M1 protein, while the ion channel M2 protein is generated after alternative splicing. These proteins are critical mediators of viral trafficking and budding. We show that the influenza virus uses nuclear speckles to promote post-transcriptional splicing of its M1 mRNA. We assign previously unknown roles for the viral NS1 protein and cellular factors to an intranuclear trafficking pathway that targets the viral M1 mRNA to nuclear speckles, mediates splicing at these nuclear bodies and exports the spliced M2 mRNA from the nucleus. Given that nuclear speckles are storage sites for splicing factors, which leave these sites to splice cellular pre-mRNAs at transcribing genes, we reveal a functional subversion of nuclear speckles to promote viral gene expression. PMID:27572970

  10. Genetic Diversity and mRNA Expression of Porcine MHC Class I Chain-Related 2 (SLA-MIC2) Gene and Development of a High-Resolution Typing Method

    PubMed Central

    Dinka, Hunduma; Nguyen, DinhTruong; Choi, Hojun; Cho, Hyesun; Choi, Minkyeung; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Park, Jin-Ki; Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Park, Chankyu

    2015-01-01

    The genetic structure and function of MHC class I chain-related (MIC) genes in the pig genome have not been well characterized, and show discordance in available data. Therefore, we have experimentally characterized the exon-intron structure and functional copy expression pattern of the pig MIC gene, SLA-MIC2. We have also studied the genetic diversity of SLA-MIC2 from seven different breeds using a high-resolution genomic sequence-based typing (GSBT) method. Our results showed that the SLA-MIC2 gene has a similar molecular organization as the human and cattle orthologs, and is expressed in only a few tissues including the small intestine, lung, and heart. A total of fifteen SLA-MIC2 alleles were identified from typing 145 animals, ten of which were previously unreported. Our analysis showed that the previously reported and tentatively named SLA-MIC2*05, 07, and 01 alleles occurred most frequently. The observed heterozygosity varied from 0.26 to 0.73 among breeds. The number of alleles of the SLA-MIC2 gene in pigs is somewhat lower compared to the number of alleles of the porcine MHC class I and II genes; however, the level of heterozygosity was similar. Our results indicate the comprehensiveness of using genomic DNA-based typing for the systemic study of the SLA-MIC2 gene. The method developed for this study, as well as the detailed information that was obtained, could serve as fundamental tools for understanding the influence of the SLA-MIC2 gene on porcine immune responses. PMID:26305091

  11. Conserved Non-Coding Sequences are Associated with Rates of mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Spangler, Jacob B.; Feltus, Frank Alex

    2013-01-01

    Steady-state mRNA levels are tightly regulated through a combination of transcriptional and post-transcriptional control mechanisms. The discovery of cis-acting DNA elements that encode these control mechanisms is of high importance. We have investigated the influence of conserved non-coding sequences (CNSs), DNA patterns retained after an ancient whole genome duplication event, on the breadth of gene expression and the rates of mRNA decay in Arabidopsis thaliana. The absence of CNSs near α duplicate genes was associated with a decrease in breadth of gene expression and slower mRNA decay rates while the presence CNSs near α duplicates was associated with an increase in breadth of gene expression and faster mRNA decay rates. The observed difference in mRNA decay rate was fastest in genes with CNSs in both non-transcribed and transcribed regions, albeit through an unknown mechanism. This study supports the notion that some Arabidopsis CNSs regulate the steady-state mRNA levels through post-transcriptional control mechanisms and that CNSs also play a role in controlling the breadth of gene expression. PMID:23675377

  12. The Nuclear PolyA-Binding Protein Nab2p Is Essential for mRNA Production.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Manfred; Olszewski, Pawel; Pelechano, Vicent; Gupta, Ishaan; Steinmetz, Lars M; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2015-07-01

    Polyadenylation of mRNA is a key step in eukaryotic gene expression. However, despite the major impact of poly(A) tails on mRNA metabolism, the precise roles of poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) in nuclear mRNA biogenesis remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that rapid nuclear depletion of the S. cerevisiae PABP Nab2p leads to a global loss of cellular mRNA, but not of RNA lacking poly(A) tails. Disappearance of mRNA is a nuclear event, but not due to decreased transcription. Instead, the absence of Nab2p results in robust nuclear mRNA decay by the ribonucleolytic RNA exosome in a polyadenylation-dependent process. We conclude that Nab2p is required to protect early mRNA and therefore constitutes a crucial nuclear mRNA biogenesis factor. PMID:26119729

  13. Vibrational force alters mRNA expression in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Vincent, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    Serum-deprived mouse osteoblastic (MC3T3E1) cells were subjected to a vibrational force modeled by NASA to simulate a space shuttle launch (7.83 G rms). The mRNA levels for eight genes were investigated to determine the effect of vibrational force on mRNA expression. The mRNA levels of two growth-related protooncogenes, c-fos and c-myc, were up-regulated significantly within 30 min after vibration, whereas those of osteocalcin as well as transforming growth factor-beta1 were decreased significantly within 3 h after vibration. No changes were detected in the levels of beta-actin, histone H4, or cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 after vibration. No basal levels of cyclooxygenase-2 expression were detected. In addition, the extracellular concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent autocrine/paracrine growth factor in bone, were not significantly altered after vibration most likely due to the serum deprivation state of the osteoblasts. In comparison with the gravitational launch profile, vibrational-induced changes in gene expression were greater both in magnitude and number of genes activated. Taken together, these data suggest that the changes in mRNA expression are due to a direct mechanical effect of the vibrational force on the osteoblast cells and not to changes in the local PGE2 concentrations. The finding that launch forces induce gene expression is of utmost importance since many of the biological experiments do not dampen vibrational loads on experimental samples. This lack of dampening of vibrational forces may partially explain why 1-G onboard controls sometimes do not reflect 1-G ground controls. These data may also suggest that scientists use extra ground controls that are exposed to launch forces, have these forces dampened on launched samples, or use facilities such as Biorack that provide an onboard 1-G centrufuge in order to control for space shuttle launch forces.

  14. mRNA transcription in nuclei isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Jerome, J F; Jaehning, J A

    1986-01-01

    We developed an improved method for the isolation of transcriptionally active nuclei from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which allows analysis of specific transcripts. When incubated with alpha-32P-labeled ribonucleoside triphosphates in vitro, nuclei isolated from haploid or diploid cells transcribed rRNA, tRNA, and mRNAs in a strand-specific manner, as shown by slot blot hybridization of the in vitro synthesized RNA to cloned genes encoding 5.8S, 18S and 28S rRNAs, tRNATyr, and GAL7, URA3, TY1 and HIS3 mRNAs. A yeast strain containing a high-copy-number plasmid which overproduced GAL7 mRNA was initially used to facilitate detection of a discrete message. We optimized conditions for the transcription of genes expressed by each of the three yeast nuclear RNA polymerases. Under optimal conditions, labeled transcripts could be detected from single-copy genes normally expressed at low levels in the cells (HIS3 and URA3). We determined that the alpha-amanitin sensitivity of transcript synthesis in the isolated nuclei paralleled the sensitivity of the corresponding purified RNA polymerases; in particular, mRNA synthesis was 50% sensitive to 1 microgram of alpha-amanitin per ml, establishing transcription of mRNA by RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:3537708

  15. Quantitative Imaging of Single mRNA Splice Variants in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyuwan; Cui, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Alternative mRNA splicing is a fundamental process of gene regulation via the precise control of the post-transcriptional step that occurs before mRNA translation. Errors in RNA splicing have been known to correlate with different diseases; however, a key limitation is the lack of technologies for live cell monitoring and quantification to understand the process of alternative splicing. Here, we report a spectroscopic strategy for quantitative imaging of mRNA splice variants in living cells, using nanoplasmonic dimer antennas. The spatial and temporal distribution of three selected splice variants of the breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA1 were monitored at single copy resolution by measuring the hybridization dynamics of nanoplasmonic antennas targeting complementary mRNA sequences in live cells. Our study provides valuable insights on RNA and its transport in living cells, which has the potential to enhance our understanding of cellular protein complex, pharmacogenomics, genetic diagnosis, and gene therapies. PMID:24747838

  16. Expression of the ctenophore Brain Factor 1 forkhead gene ortholog (ctenoBF-1) mRNA is restricted to the presumptive mouth and feeding apparatus: implications for axial organization in the Metazoa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Atsuko; Martindale, Mark Q.

    2002-01-01

    Ctenophores are thoroughly modern animals whose ancestors are derived from a separate evolutionary branch than that of other eumetazoans. Their major longitudinal body axis is the oral-aboral axis. An apical sense organ, called the apical organ, is located at the aboral pole and contains a highly innervated statocyst and photodetecting cells. The apical organ integrates sensory information and controls the locomotory apparatus of ctenophores, the eight longitudinal rows of ctene/comb plates. In an effort to understand the developmental and evolutionary organization of axial properties of ctenophores we have isolated a forkhead gene from the Brain Factor 1 (BF-1) family. This gene, ctenoBF-1, is the first full-length nuclear gene reported from ctenophores. This makes ctenophores the most basal metazoan (to date) known to express definitive forkhead class transcription factors. Orthologs of BF-1 in vertebrates, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans are expressed in anterior neural structures. Surprisingly, in situ hybridizations with ctenoBF-1 antisense riboprobes show that this gene is not expressed in the apical organ of ctenophores. CtenoBF-1 is expressed prior to first cleavage. Transcripts become localized to the aboral pole by the 8-cell stage and are inherited by ectodermal micromeres generated from this region at the 16- and 32-cell stages. Expression in subsets of these cells persists and is seen around the edge of the blastopore (presumptive mouth) and in distinct ectodermal regions along the tentacular poles. Following gastrulation, stomodeal expression begins to fade and intense staining becomes restricted to two distinct domains in each tentacular feeding apparatus. We suggest that the apical organ is not homologous to the brain of bilaterians but that the oral pole of ctenophores corresponds to the anterior pole of bilaterian animals.

  17. Application of talcum powder, trichloroacetic acid and silver nitrate in female rats for non-surgical sterilization: evaluation of the apoptotic pathway mRNA and miRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Yumrutas, Onder; Kara, Murat; Atilgan, Remzi; Kavak, Salih Burcin; Bozgeyik, Ibrahim; Sapmaz, Ekrem

    2015-04-01

    There are several methods used for non-surgical sterilization in birth control including quinacrine, trichloroacetic acid (TCA), erythromycin, tetracycline, silver nitrate and talcum powder. Among these, talcum powder, TCA and silver nitrate are the most commonly used. However, the toxic and carcinogenic activities of these chemicals in ovarian tissue have been poorly elucidated. This study demonstrates the expression levels of antioxidant, apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes after administration of talc powder, TCA and silver nitrate for non-surgical sterilization in female rat models. The expression changes of some microRNAs (miR-15b, miR-21, miR-34a and miR-98) that play key roles in the apoptosis pathway were also included. All expression analyses were evaluated with real-time PCR. The expression levels of all genes appeared to be upregulated in the talcum powder group, but the results were not statistically significant. Increased expression of Gsr and Sod1 genes was statistically significant in the talcum powder group. In TCA and silver nitrate group, expression of all genes was appeared to be elevated but only the Gsr expression was statistically significant in the TCA-administrated group; there were no statistically significant changes in the silver nitrate group. miRNA expression levels were increased in talcum powder and TCA-administrated groups, but these results were not significant. Expression levels of miR-15b, miR-21 and miR-98 in the silver nitrate group were significantly increased. Consequently, these chemicals appear to be non-carcinogenic agents for rat ovarian tissue which do not induce apoptosis. However, talcum powder and TCA can be considered as agents that are toxic to ovarian tissue. PMID:25885949

  18. Mammalian transcription in support of hybrid mRNA and protein synthesis in testis and lung.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Carolyn; Sikora, Curtis; Lawson, Vannice; Dong, Karen; Cheng, Min; Oko, Richard; van der Hoorn, Frans A

    2006-12-15

    Post-transcriptional mechanisms including differential splicing expand the protein repertoire beyond that provided by the one gene-one protein model. Trans-splicing has been observed in mammalian systems but is low level (sometimes referred to as noise), and a contribution to hybrid protein expression is unclear. In the study of rat sperm tail proteins a cDNA, called 1038, was isolated representing a hybrid mRNA derived in part from the ornithine decarboxylase antizyme 3 (Oaz3) gene located on rat chromosome 2 fused to sequences encoded by a novel gene on chromosome 4. Cytoplasmic Oaz3 mRNA is completely testis specific. However, in several tissues Oaz3 is transcribed and contributes to hybrid 1038 mRNA synthesis, without concurrent Oaz3 mRNA synthesis. 1038 mRNA directs synthesis of a hybrid 14-kDa protein, part chromosome 2- and part chromosome 4-derived as shown in vitro and in transfected cells. Antisera that recognize a chromosome 4-encoded C-terminal peptide confirm the hybrid character of endogenous 14-kDa protein and its presence in sperm tail structures and 1038-positive tissue. Our data suggest that the testis-specific OAZ3 gene may be an example of a mammalian gene that in several tissues is transcribed to contribute to a hybrid mRNA and protein. This finding expands the repertoire of known mechanisms available to cells to generate proteome diversity. PMID:17040916

  19. RPFdb: a database for genome wide information of translated mRNA generated from ribosome profiling.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shang-Qian; Nie, Peng; Wang, Yan; Wang, Hongwei; Li, Hongyu; Yang, Zhilong; Liu, Yizhi; Ren, Jian; Xie, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Translational control is crucial in the regulation of gene expression and deregulation of translation is associated with a wide range of cancers and human diseases. Ribosome profiling is a technique that provides genome wide information of mRNA in translation based on deep sequencing of ribosome protected mRNA fragments (RPF). RPFdb is a comprehensive resource for hosting, analyzing and visualizing RPF data, available at www.rpfdb.org or http://sysbio.sysu.edu.cn/rpfdb/index.html. The current version of database contains 777 samples from 82 studies in 8 species, processed and reanalyzed by a unified pipeline. There are two ways to query the database: by keywords of studies or by genes. The outputs are presented in three levels. (i) Study level: including meta information of studies and reprocessed data for gene expression of translated mRNAs; (ii) Sample level: including global perspective of translated mRNA and a list of the most translated mRNA of each sample from a study; (iii) Gene level: including normalized sequence counts of translated mRNA on different genomic location of a gene from multiple samples and studies. To explore rich information provided by RPF, RPFdb also provides a genome browser to query and visualize context-specific translated mRNA. Overall our database provides a simple way to search, analyze, compare, visualize and download RPF data sets. PMID:26433228

  20. Targeted Mutagenesis in Plant Cells through Transformation of Sequence-Specific Nuclease mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Stoddard, Thomas J.; Clasen, Benjamin M.; Baltes, Nicholas J.; Demorest, Zachary L.; Voytas, Daniel F.; Zhang, Feng; Luo, Song

    2016-01-01

    Plant genome engineering using sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) promises to advance basic and applied plant research by enabling precise modification of endogenous genes. Whereas DNA is an effective means for delivering SSNs, DNA can integrate randomly into the plant genome, leading to unintentional gene inactivation. Further, prolonged expression of SSNs from DNA constructs can lead to the accumulation of off-target mutations. Here, we tested a new approach for SSN delivery to plant cells, namely transformation of messenger RNA (mRNA) encoding TAL effector nucleases (TALENs). mRNA delivery of a TALEN pair targeting the Nicotiana benthamiana ALS gene resulted in mutation frequencies of approximately 6% in comparison to DNA delivery, which resulted in mutation frequencies of 70.5%. mRNA delivery resulted in three-fold fewer insertions, and 76% were <10bp; in contrast, 88% of insertions generated through DNA delivery were >10bp. In an effort to increase mutation frequencies using mRNA, we fused several different 5’ and 3’ untranslated regions (UTRs) from Arabidopsis thaliana genes to the TALEN coding sequence. UTRs from an A. thaliana adenine nucleotide α hydrolases-like gene (At1G09740) enhanced mutation frequencies approximately two-fold, relative to a no-UTR control. These results indicate that mRNA can be used as a delivery vehicle for SSNs, and that manipulation of mRNA UTRs can influence efficiencies of genome editing. PMID:27176769

  1. Promoter-bound trinucleotide repeat mRNA drives epigenetic silencing in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Colak, Dilek; Zaninovic, Nikica; Cohen, Michael S; Rosenwaks, Zev; Yang, Wang-Yong; Gerhardt, Jeannine; Disney, Matthew D; Jaffrey, Samie R

    2014-02-28

    Epigenetic gene silencing is seen in several repeat-expansion diseases. In fragile X syndrome, the most common genetic form of mental retardation, a CGG trinucleotide-repeat expansion adjacent to the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene promoter results in its epigenetic silencing. Here, we show that FMR1 silencing is mediated by the FMR1 mRNA. The FMR1 mRNA contains the transcribed CGG-repeat tract as part of the 5' untranslated region, which hybridizes to the complementary CGG-repeat portion of the FMR1 gene to form an RNA·DNA duplex. Disrupting the interaction of the mRNA with the CGG-repeat portion of the FMR1 gene prevents promoter silencing. Thus, our data link trinucleotide-repeat expansion to a form of RNA-directed gene silencing mediated by direct interactions of the trinucleotide-repeat RNA and DNA. PMID:24578575

  2. Promoter-Bound Trinucleotide Repeat mRNA Drives Epigenetic Silencing in Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Colak, Dilek; Zaninovic, Nikica; Cohen, Michael S.; Rosenwaks, Zev; Yang, Wang-Yong; Gerhardt, Jeannine; Disney, Matthew D.; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic gene silencing is seen in several repeat-expansion diseases. In fragile X syndrome, the most common genetic form of mental retardation, a CGG trinucleotide–repeat expansion adjacent to the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene promoter results in its epigenetic silencing. Here, we show that FMR1 silencing is mediated by the FMR1 mRNA. The FMR1 mRNA contains the transcribed CGG-repeat tract as part of the 5′ untranslated region, which hybridizes to the complementary CGG-repeat portion of the FMR1 gene to form an RNA·DNA duplex. Disrupting the interaction of the mRNA with the CGG-repeat portion of the FMR1 gene prevents promoter silencing. Thus, our data link trinucleotide-repeat expansion to a form of RNA-directed gene silencing mediated by direct interactions of the trinucleotide-repeat RNA and DNA. PMID:24578575

  3. The life of an mRNA in space and time

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ari, Ya'ara; Brody, Yehuda; Kinor, Noa; Mor, Amir; Tsukamoto, Toshiro; Spector, David L.; Singer, Robert H.; Shav-Tal, Yaron

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear transcribed genes produce mRNA transcripts destined to travel from the site of transcription to the cytoplasm for protein translation. Certain transcripts can be further localized to specific cytoplasmic regions. We examined the life cycle of a transcribed β-actin mRNA throughout gene expression and localization, in a cell system that allows the in vivo detection of the gene locus, the transcribed mRNAs and the cytoplasmic β-actin protein that integrates into the actin cytoskeleton. Quantification showed that RNA polymerase II elongation progressed at a rate of 3.3 kb/minute and that transactivator binding to the promoter was transient (40 seconds), and demonstrated the unique spatial structure of the coding and non-coding regions of the integrated gene within the transcription site. The rates of gene induction were measured during interphase and after mitosis, demonstrating that daughter cells were not synchronized in respect to transcription initiation of the studied gene. Comparison of the spatial and temporal kinetics of nucleoplasmic and cytoplasmic mRNA transport showed that the β-actin-localization response initiates from the existing cytoplasmic mRNA pool and not from the newly synthesized transcripts arising after gene induction. It was also demonstrated that mechanisms of random movement were predominant in mediating the efficient translocation of mRNA in the eukaryotic cell. PMID:20427315

  4. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Cristian; Bartholomäus, Alexander; Fedyunin, Ivan; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-10-01

    Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of positions. A secondary structure upstream of the stop codon is enriched in genes terminated by UAA codon with likely implications in translation termination. The global analysis further substantiates a common recognition signature of RNase E to initiate endonucleolytic cleavage. This work determines for the first time the E. coli RNA structurome, highlighting the contribution of mRNA secondary structure as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation and mRNA degradation. PMID:26495981

  5. Nucleolin links to arsenic-induced stabilization of GADD45alpha mRNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yadong; Bhatia, Deepak; Xia, Hongfeng; Castranova, Vince; Shi, Xianglin; Chen, Fei

    2006-01-01

    The present study shows that arsenic induces GADD45alpha (growth arrest and DNA damage inducible gene 45alpha) mainly through post-transcriptional mechanism. Treatment of the human bronchial epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B, with arsenic(III) chloride (As3+) resulted in a significant increase in GADD45alpha protein and mRNA. However, As3+ only exhibited a marginal effect on the transcription of the GADD45alpha gene. The accumulation of GADD45alpha mRNA is largely achieved by the stabilization of GADD45alpha mRNA in the cellular response to As3+. As3+ is able to induce binding of mRNA stabilizing proteins, nucleolin and less potently, HuR, to the GADD45alpha mRNA. Although As3+ was unable to affect the expression of nucleolin, treatment of the cells with As3+ resulted in re-distribution of nucleolin from nucleoli to nucleoplasm. Silencing of the nucleolin mRNA by RNA interference reversed As3+-induced stabilization of the GADD45alpha mRNA and accumulation of the GADD45alpha protein. Stabilization of GADD45alpha mRNA, thus, represents a novel mechanism contributing to the production of GADD45alpha and cell cycle arrest in response to As3+. PMID:16421274

  6. Nucleolin links to arsenic-induced stabilization of GADD45α mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yadong; Bhatia, Deepak; Xia, Hongfeng; Castranova, Vince; Shi, Xianglin; Chen, Fei

    2006-01-01

    The present study shows that arsenic induces GADD45α (growth arrest and DNA damage inducible gene 45α) mainly through post-transcriptional mechanism. Treatment of the human bronchial epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B, with arsenic(III) chloride (As3+) resulted in a significant increase in GADD45α protein and mRNA. However, As3+ only exhibited a marginal effect on the transcription of the GADD45α gene. The accumulation of GADD45α mRNA is largely achieved by the stabilization of GADD45α mRNA in the cellular response to As3+. As3+ is able to induce binding of mRNA stabilizing proteins, nucleolin and less potently, HuR, to the GADD45α mRNA. Although As3+ was unable to affect the expression of nucleolin, treatment of the cells with As3+ resulted in re-distribution of nucleolin from nucleoli to nucleoplasm. Silencing of the nucleolin mRNA by RNA interference reversed As3+-induced stabilization of the GADD45α mRNA and accumulation of the GADD45α protein. Stabilization of GADD45α mRNA, thus, represents a novel mechanism contributing to the production of GADD45α and cell cycle arrest in response to As3+. PMID:16421274

  7. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Fedyunin, Ivan; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of positions. A secondary structure upstream of the stop codon is enriched in genes terminated by UAA codon with likely implications in translation termination. The global analysis further substantiates a common recognition signature of RNase E to initiate endonucleolytic cleavage. This work determines for the first time the E. coli RNA structurome, highlighting the contribution of mRNA secondary structure as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation and mRNA degradation. PMID:26495981

  8. Regulation of mRNA Trafficking by Nuclear Pore Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Amandine; Palancade, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades, multiple studies have explored the mechanisms governing mRNA export out of the nucleus, a crucial step in eukaryotic gene expression. During transcription and processing, mRNAs are assembled into messenger ribonucleoparticles (mRNPs). mRNPs are then exported through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), which are large multiprotein assemblies made of several copies of a limited number of nucleoporins. A considerable effort has been put into the dissection of mRNA export through NPCs at both cellular and molecular levels, revealing the conserved contributions of a subset of nucleoporins in this process, from yeast to vertebrates. Several reports have also demonstrated the ability of NPCs to sort out properly-processed mRNPs for entry into the nuclear export pathway. Importantly, changes in mRNA export have been associated with post-translational modifications of nucleoporins or changes in NPC composition, depending on cell cycle progression, development or exposure to stress. How NPC modifications also impact on cellular mRNA export in disease situations, notably upon viral infection, is discussed. PMID:25184662

  9. Stabilization of tubulin mRNA by inhibition of protein synthesis in sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Z Y; Brandhorst, B P

    1988-01-01

    An increased level of unpolymerized tubulin caused by depolymerization of microtubules in sea urchin larvae resulted in a rapid loss of tubulin mRNA, which was prevented by nearly complete inhibition of protein synthesis. Results of an RNA run-on assay indicated that inhibition of protein synthesis does not alter tubulin gene transcription. Analysis of the decay of tubulin mRNA in embryos in which RNA synthesis was inhibited by actinomycin D indicated that inhibition of protein synthesis prevents the destabilization of tubulin mRNA. The effect was similar whether mRNA was maintained on polysomes in the presence of emetine or anisomycin or displaced from the polysomes in the presence of puromycin or pactamycin; thus, the stabilization of tubulin mRNA is not dependent on the state of the polysomes after inhibition of protein synthesis. Even after tubulin mRNA declined to a low level after depolymerization of microtubules, it could be rescued by treatment of embryos with inhibitors of protein synthesis. Tubulin mRNA could be induced to accumulate prematurely in gastrulae but not in plutei if protein synthesis was inhibited, an observation that is indicative of the importance of the autogenous regulation of tubulin mRNA stability during embryogenesis. Possible explanations for the role of protein synthesis in the control of mRNA stability are discussed. Images PMID:3211150

  10. Exaptive origins of regulated mRNA decay in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Fursham M; Makeyev, Eugene V

    2016-09-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is extensively controlled at the level of mRNA stability and the mechanisms underlying this regulation are markedly different from their archaeal and bacterial counterparts. We propose that two such mechanisms, nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) and motif-specific transcript destabilization by CCCH-type zinc finger RNA-binding proteins, originated as a part of cellular defense against RNA pathogens. These branches of the mRNA turnover pathway might have been used by primeval eukaryotes alongside RNA interference to distinguish their own messages from those of RNA viruses and retrotransposable elements. We further hypothesize that the subsequent advent of "professional" innate and adaptive immunity systems allowed NMD and the motif-triggered mechanisms to be efficiently repurposed for regulation of endogenous cellular transcripts. This scenario explains the rapid emergence of archetypical mRNA destabilization pathways in eukaryotes and argues that other aspects of post-transcriptional gene regulation in this lineage might have been derived through a similar exaptation route. PMID:27438915

  11. Towards Targeted Delivery Systems: Ligand Conjugation Strategies for mRNA Nanoparticle Tumor Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Phua, Kyle K. L.

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles encapsulating messenger RNA (mRNA) as a vaccine has recently attracted much attention because of encouraging results achieved in many nonviral genetic antitumor vaccination studies. Notably, in all of these studies, mRNA nanoparticles are passively targeted to dendritic cells (DCs) through careful selection of vaccination sites. Hence, DC-targeted mRNA nanoparticle vaccines may be an imminent next step forward. In this brief report, we will discuss established conjugation strategies that have been successfully applied to both polymeric and liposomal gene delivery systems. We will also briefly describe promising DC surface receptors amenable for targeting mRNA nanoparticles. Practicable conjugation strategies and receptors reviewed in this paper will provide a convenient reference to facilitate future development of targeted mRNA nanoparticle vaccine. PMID:26819957

  12. Visualization of dynamics of single endogenous mRNA labeled in live mouse.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Yoon; Lim, Hyungsik; Yoon, Young J; Follenzi, Antonia; Nwokafor, Chiso; Lopez-Jones, Melissa; Meng, Xiuhua; Singer, Robert H

    2014-01-24

    The transcription and transport of messenger RNA (mRNA) are critical steps in regulating the spatial and temporal components of gene expression, but it has not been possible to observe the dynamics of endogenous mRNA in primary mammalian tissues. We have developed a transgenic mouse in which all β-actin mRNA is fluorescently labeled. We found that β-actin mRNA in primary fibroblasts localizes predominantly by diffusion and trapping as single mRNAs. In cultured neurons and acute brain slices, we found that multiple β-actin mRNAs can assemble together, travel by active transport, and disassemble upon depolarization by potassium chloride. Imaging of brain slices revealed immediate early induction of β-actin transcription after depolarization. Studying endogenous mRNA in live mouse tissues provides insight into its dynamic regulation within the context of the cellular and tissue microenvironment. PMID:24458643

  13. Oxidized frying oil and its polar fraction fed to pregnant mice are teratogenic and alter mRNA expressions of vitamin A metabolism genes in the liver of dams and their fetuses.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chin-Fang; Lin, Yu-Shun; Chiang, Zong-Cian; Lu, Shui-Yuan; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Chang, Sunny Li-Yun; Chao, Pei-Min

    2014-05-01

    We previously observed a higher incidence of congenital malformations in the fetuses of dams fed an oxidized frying oil (OFO)-containing diet during pregnancy. In this study, we hypothesized that, during pregnancy, maternal ingestion of OFO, specifically the oxidized components (i.e. the polar fraction), modulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARα) or aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transactivity, altering the metabolism of retinoic acid (RA), a well-characterized morphogen, resulting in teratogenesis. Pregnant C57BL/6J mice were divided into four groups which, from d1 (conception) to d18, were fed a diet containing 10 g/100 g of fresh soybean oil (SO), OFO or the non-polar (NP) or polar (PO) fraction of OFO. Reporter assays testing the transactivity of PPARα and AhR showed that free fatty acids from OFO, specifically the PO fraction, up-regulated PPARα transactivity and down-regulated AhR transactivity. In vivo study showed that the PO fraction group had a significantly higher number of dead fetuses and resorptions per litter than the SO and NP fraction groups. The incidence of abnormalities in terms of gross morphology and skeletal ossification of the fetus was greatest in the PO fraction group, followed by the OFO group, both values being significantly higher than in the other two groups. Hepatic expression of genes encoding enzymes associated with RA synthesis and catabolism in dams and fetuses was differentially affected by PO fraction assault. We conclude that OFO-mediated teratogenesis is associated with disturbed RA metabolism in the dams and fetuses caused, at least in part, by modulation of PPARα and AhR transactivity by the oxidized components in OFO. PMID:24656387

  14. Genome-wide analysis of mRNA decay patterns during early Drosophila development

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The modulation of mRNA levels across tissues and time is key for the establishment and operation of the developmental programs that transform the fertilized egg into a fully formed embryo. Although the developmental mechanisms leading to differential mRNA synthesis are heavily investigated, comparatively little attention is given to the processes of mRNA degradation and how these relate to the molecular programs controlling development. Results Here we combine timed collection of Drosophila embryos and unfertilized eggs with genome-wide microarray technology to determine the degradation patterns of all mRNAs present during early fruit fly development. Our work studies the kinetics of mRNA decay, the contributions of maternally and zygotically encoded factors to mRNA degradation, and the ways in which mRNA decay profiles relate to gene function, mRNA localization patterns, translation rates and protein turnover. We also detect cis-regulatory sequences enriched in transcripts with common degradation patterns and propose several proteins and microRNAs as developmental regulators of mRNA decay during early fruit fly development. Finally, we experimentally validate the effects of a subset of cis-regulatory sequences and trans-regulators in vivo. Conclusions Our work advances the current understanding of the processes controlling mRNA degradation during early Drosophila development, taking us one step closer to the understanding of mRNA decay processes in all animals. Our data also provide a valuable resource for further experimental and computational studies investigating the process of mRNA decay. PMID:20858238

  15. Regulation of the mRNA half-life in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Griseri, Paola; Pagès, Gilles

    2014-08-10

    The control of the half-life of mRNA plays a central role in normal development and in disease progression. Several pathological conditions, such as breast cancer, correlate with deregulation of the half-life of mRNA encoding growth factors, oncogenes, cell cycle regulators and inflammatory cytokines that participate in cancer. Substantial stability means that a mRNA will be available for translation for a longer time, resulting in high levels of protein gene products, which may lead to prolonged responses that subsequently result in over-production of cellular mediators that participate in cancer. The stability of these mRNA is regulated at the 3'UTR level by different mechanisms involving mRNA binding proteins, micro-RNA, long non-coding RNA and alternative polyadenylation. All these events are tightly inter-connected to each other and lead to steady state levels of target mRNAs. Compelling evidence also suggests that both mRNA binding proteins and regulatory RNAs which participate to mRNA half-life regulation may be useful prognostic markers in breast cancers, pointing to a potential therapeutic approach to treatment of patients with these tumors. In this review, we summarize the main mechanisms involved in the regulation of mRNA decay and discuss the possibility of its implication in breast cancer aggressiveness and the efficacy of targeted therapy. PMID:25114848

  16. Regulation of the mRNA half-life in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Griseri, Paola; Pagès, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    The control of the half-life of mRNA plays a central role in normal development and in disease progression. Several pathological conditions, such as breast cancer, correlate with deregulation of the half-life of mRNA encoding growth factors, oncogenes, cell cycle regulators and inflammatory cytokines that participate in cancer. Substantial stability means that a mRNA will be available for translation for a longer time, resulting in high levels of protein gene products, which may lead to prolonged responses that subsequently result in over-production of cellular mediators that participate in cancer. The stability of these mRNA is regulated at the 3’UTR level by different mechanisms involving mRNA binding proteins, micro-RNA, long non-coding RNA and alternative polyadenylation. All these events are tightly inter-connected to each other and lead to steady state levels of target mRNAs. Compelling evidence also suggests that both mRNA binding proteins and regulatory RNAs which participate to mRNA half-life regulation may be useful prognostic markers in breast cancers, pointing to a potential therapeutic approach to treatment of patients with these tumors. In this review, we summarize the main mechanisms involved in the regulation of mRNA decay and discuss the possibility of its implication in breast cancer aggressiveness and the efficacy of targeted therapy. PMID:25114848

  17. Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 regulates transport of ITPR1 mRNA for synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Daisuke; Kuroda, Keisuke; Tanaka, Motoki; Namba, Takashi; Iizuka, Yukihiko; Taya, Shinichiro; Shinoda, Tomoyasu; Hikita, Takao; Muraoka, Shinsuke; Iizuka, Michiro; Nimura, Ai; Mizoguchi, Akira; Shiina, Nobuyuki; Sokabe, Masahiro; Okano, Hideyuki; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2015-05-01

    Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is a susceptibility gene for major psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. DISC1 has been implicated in neurodevelopment in relation to scaffolding signal complexes. Here we used proteomic analysis to screen for DISC1 interactors and identified several RNA-binding proteins, such as hematopoietic zinc finger (HZF), that act as components of RNA-transporting granules. HZF participates in the mRNA localization of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 1 (ITPR1), which plays a key role in synaptic plasticity. DISC1 colocalizes with HZF and ITPR1 mRNA in hippocampal dendrites and directly associates with neuronal mRNAs, including ITPR1 mRNA. The binding potential of DISC1 for ITPR1 mRNA is facilitated by HZF. Studies of Disc1-knockout mice have revealed that DISC1 regulates the dendritic transport of Itpr1 mRNA by directly interacting with its mRNA. The DISC1-mediated mRNA regulation is involved in synaptic plasticity. We show that DISC1 binds ITPR1 mRNA with HZF, thereby regulating its dendritic transport for synaptic plasticity. PMID:25821909

  18. Biomaterials for mRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Reesor, Emma K G; Xu, Yingjie; Zope, Harshal R; Zetter, Bruce R; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-12-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) has recently emerged with remarkable potential as an effective alternative to DNA-based therapies because of several unique advantages. mRNA does not require nuclear entry for transfection activity and has a negligible chance of integrating into the host genome which excludes the possibility of potentially detrimental genomic alternations. Chemical modification of mRNA has further enhanced its stability and decreased its activation of innate immune responses. Additionally, mRNA has been found to have rapid expression and predictable kinetics. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous application of mRNA remains challenging given its unfavorable attributes, such as large size, negative charge and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation. Further refinement of mRNA delivery modalities is therefore essential for its development as a therapeutic tool. This review provides an exclusive overview of current state-of-the-art biomaterials and nanotechnology platforms for mRNA delivery, and discusses future prospects to bring these exciting technologies into clinical practice. PMID:26280625

  19. Biomaterials for mRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Reesor, Emma K. G.; Xu, Yingjie; Zope, Harshal R.; Zetter, Bruce R.; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) has recently emerged with remarkable potential as an effective alternative to DNA-based therapies because of several unique advantages. mRNA does not require nuclear entry for transfection activity and has a negligible chance of integrating into the host genome which excludes the possibility of potentially detrimental genomic alternations. Chemical modification of mRNA has further enhanced its stability and decreased its activation of innate immune responses. Additionally, mRNA has been found to have rapid expression and predictable kinetics. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous application of mRNA remains challenging given its unfavorable attributes, such as large size, negative charge and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation. Further refinement of mRNA delivery modalities is therefore essential for its development as a therapeutic tool. This review provides an exclusive overview of current state-of-the-art biomaterials and nanotechnology platforms for mRNA delivery, and discusses future prospects to bring these exciting technologies into clinical practice. PMID:26280625

  20. Analysis of xanthine dehydrogenase mRNA levels in mutants affecting the expression of the rosy locus.

    PubMed Central

    Covington, M; Fleenor, D; Devlin, R B

    1984-01-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) mRNA levels were measured in a number of mutants and natural variants affecting XDH gene expression. Two variants, ry+4 and ry+10, contain cis-acting elements which map to a region flanking the 5' end of the XDH gene. Ry+4, which has 2-3 times more XDH protein than a wild type strain, has 3.2 times more XDH mRNA. Ry+10 has 50% of the wild type XDH level and 54% of the wild type XDH mRNA level. Three rosy mutants which map within the structural gene were also examined. Two of these had little if any XDH mRNA, but the third mutant had 1.3 times more XDH mRNA than wild type flies. Another mutant, ry2 , which contains no XDH protein and has a 9KB transposable element inserted into the XDH gene, has normal levels of XDH mRNA transcripts which are also the same size as those found in the wild type strain. Changes in XDH mRNA levels were measured during Drosophila development and found to parallel changes in the amount of XDH protein. In addition, there were no large changes in the size of XDH mRNA during development. Images PMID:6588363

  1. Gravitational loading of a simulated launch alters mRNA expression in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1996-01-01

    Serum-deprived mouse osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1a) were centrifuged under a regime designed to simulate a space shuttle launch (maximum of 3g). Messenger RNA levels for eight genes involved in bone growth and maintenance were determined using RT-PCR. Following 30 min of centrifugation, mRNA level for early response gene c-fos was significantly increased 89% (P < 0.05). The c-fos induction was transient and returned to control levels after 3 h. The mRNA level for the mineralization marker gene osteocalcin was significantly decreased to 44% of control level (P < 0.005) 3 h after centrifugation. No changes in mRNA levels were detected for c-myc, TGFbeta1, TGFbeta2, cyclophilin A, or actin. No basal mRNA level for TGFbeta3 was detected. In addition, no change in the steady-state synthesis of prostaglandin E2 was detected, possibly due to lack of lipid substrates in serum-deprived cells, suggesting that the increase in c-fos mRNA in response to gravitational loading is a result of mechanical stimulation. These results indicate that a small magnitude mechanical loading, such as that experienced during a shuttle launch, can alter mRNA levels in quiescent osteoblastic cells.

  2. Posttranscriptional regulation of urokinase receptor mRNA: identification of a novel urokinase receptor mRNA binding protein in human mesothelioma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, S; Kumar, A; Idell, S

    1997-01-01

    Treatment of human pleural mesothelioma (MS-1) cells with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and cycloheximide results in 17- and 10-fold, respectively, increases in steady-state expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) mRNA. Studies of transcriptional inhibition by actinomycin D showed four- and sixfold extensions of uPAR mRNA half-life in MS-1 cells treated with PMA and cycloheximide, respectively, suggesting that uPAR gene expression involves a posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism. Using gel mobility shift and UV cross-linking assays, we identified a 50-kDa uPAR mRNA binding protein (uPAR mRNABp) that selectively bound to a 51-nucleotide (nt) fragment of mRNA corresponding to the uPAR coding region. We investigated the possibility that this 51-nt protein binding fragment of uPAR mRNA contains regulatory information for message stability. Chimeric beta-globin/uPAR/beta-globin mRNA containing the 51-nt protein binding fragment was able to destabilize otherwise stable beta-globin mRNA. Conversely, a control chimeric beta-globin/uPAR/beta-globin mRNA containing a 51-nt fragment of the uPAR coding region that does not bind uPAR mRNABp was stable under identical conditions. Binding of uPAR mRNABp to uPAR mRNA was abolished after treatment with cycloheximide and rapidly down-regulated by PMA. These data suggest that the 51-nt protein binding fragment of uPAR mRNA may be involved in mRNA turnover as well as in cycloheximide-induced uPAR message stabilization. Our results indicate a novel mechanism of uPAR gene regulation in which cis elements within a 51-nt coding region interact with a uPAR mRNABp to regulate uPAR message stability. PMID:9032234

  3. Leptin mRNA expresses in the bull reproductive organ.

    PubMed

    Abavisani, A; Baghbanzadeh, A; Shayan, P; Tajik, P; Dehghani, H; Mirtorabi, M

    2009-12-01

    Leptin, a 167-amino acid hormone, is secreted mainly by fat tissue. It has some powerful effects on the regulation of metabolism and reproductive function through endocrine and probably paracrine mechanisms. The contribution rate of leptin function on the male reproductive system is not still clear. Characterization of leptin expression in reproductive organs will suggest that in addition to its endocrine action, leptin has also paracrine/autocrine effects on reproduction. The expression of functional leptin receptor mRNA has been already recognized in testis of rodents, human and cattle. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of leptin mRNA in the bovine testis, because it will be the first step for understanding of its paracrine/autocrine effects on the male reproductive organs in cattle. The present study was the first to showed leptin mRNA expression in the testis of Holstein cattle using reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. RT-PCR products were amplified with nested PCR using inner leptin primer pairs to emphasis the first results. Besides, bovine beta actin gene was acted as an internal positive control as well as RNA purification marker. Our findings suggest that in addition to its endocrine actions at the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, leptin can has an autocrine and/or paracrine role in bull testicular function. PMID:19466574

  4. Decreased albumin mRNA in immunodeficient wasted' mice

    SciTech Connect

    Libertin, C.R.; Buczek, N.; Weaver, P.; Mobarhan, S.; Woloschak, G.E. Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1991-03-15

    Mice bearing the autosomal recessive gene wst (wst/wst) develop a wasting syndrome' that leads to death by 28-32 days of age. These mice have faulty repair of damage induced by ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency at secretory sites, and neurologic abnormalities. In addition to a progressively more apparent wasted phenotype, wst/wst mice show other features of failure to thrive and malnutrition. Daily body weights of the animals revealed a loss in weight between 25 and 30 days of age, a time during which normal littermates were progressively and rapidly gaining weight. Albumin mRNA levels were measured by dilution dot blot hybridizations of liver-derived RNA preparations from wasted mice, littermates, and parental controls. In all wasted mice, albumin mRNA levels were reduced 5 to 10 fold compared to controls. Northern blots revealed that the albumin mRNA present in wasted mice was normal in length though reduced in amount. These results suggest there may be a relationship between low albumin synthesis and the wasting syndrome of the wst/wst mouse.

  5. Cytochrome P450IA mRNA expression in feral Hudson River tomcod

    SciTech Connect

    Kreamer, G.L.; Squibb, K.; Gioeli, D.; Garte, S.J.; Wirgin, I. )

    1991-06-01

    The authors sought to determine if levels of cytochrome P450IA gene expression are environmentally induced in feral populations of Hudson River tomcod, a cancer prone fish, and whether laboratory exposure of tomcod to artificially spiked and naturally contaminated Hudson sediments can elicit a significant response. Using Northern blot analysis, they found levels of P450IA mRNA in tomcod collected from two Hudson River sites higher than those in tomcod from a river in Maine. Depuration of environmentally induced Hudson tomcod P450IA mRNA was rapid, with an initial detectable decline in P450 gene expression by 8 hr and basal levels reached by 5 days. Intraperitoneal injection of {beta}-napthoflavone in depurated Hudson tomcod resulted in a 15-fold induction of P450 gene expression within 26 hr. Exposure of depurated Hudson tomcod to natural sediment spiked with two PAHs resulted in a 7-fold induction of P450 gene expression. Exposure of depurated tomcod to sediment from a contaminated Hudson site also resulted in a 7- to 15-fold induction of P450IA mRNA expression. Northern blot analysis revealed a second polymorphic cytochrome P450IA mRNA band in some tomcod which was also detected by Southern blot analysis. Induction of cytochrome P450IA mRNA in Atlantic tomcod may provide a sensitive biomarker of environmentally relevant concentrations of some pollutants in the Hudson and other northeastern tidal rivers.

  6. Absolute mRNA quantification of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 by qRT-PCR using universal RNA controls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Real time quantitative RT-PCR is considered as standard for gene expression and mRNA estimate. As a calibration standard, a conserved control gene such as housekeeping genes is commonly used for data normalization and analysis. A significant problem has been observed with increased applications; h...

  7. Identification and association of the single nucleotide polymorphisms, C-509T, C+466T and T+869C, of the TGF-β1 gene in patients with asthma and their influence on the mRNA expression level of TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Panek, Michał; Pietras, Tadeusz; Fabijan, Artur; Zioło, Jan; Wieteska, Lukasz; Małachowska, Beata; Fendler, Wojciech; Szemraj, Janusz; Kuna, Piotr

    2014-10-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is an important fibrogenic and immunomodulatory cytokine participating in the pathogenesis of a number of illnesses related to the growth, differentiation and migration of cells. It also plays a key role in inflammation, atherosclerosis, vascular inflammation and asthma. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between the expression of the TGF-β1 gene and its genetic polymorphisms, and the disease phenotype. The study comprised 173 patients with asthma, as well as 163 healthy volunteers as a control group. The gender profiles of the groups were similar (p=0.8415). Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-high resolution melting (HRM). The results were verified by sequencing. Gene expression was evaluated by RT-PCR. This study evaluated the role and frequency of genetic polymorphisms (C-509T, C+466T and T+869C) of the TGF-β1 gene in the study group (patients with asthma) and the control group (healthy volunteers). The results obtained for the patients and healthy controls were as follows: C-509T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (controls, TT/CT/CC-0.4444/0.5309/0.0247; patients, TT/CT/CC-0.3699/0.6012/0.0289), C+466T SNP (controls, TT/CT/CC-1.000/0.000/0.000; patients, TT/CT/CC-1.000/0.000/0.000) and T+869C SNP (controls, TT/CT/CC-1.000/0.000/0.000; patients, TT/CT/CC-1.000/0.000/0.000). Only the C-509T polymorphism was found to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of asthma, as well as a risk factor in the loss of the clinical control of the disease [TT vs. CC/CT, odds ratio (OR) 2.38; confidence interval (CI) 1.22-4.66; p=0.0103]. A significant difference was noted between the study and control groups with regard to the mRNA expression of TGF-β1 (p=0.0133). A higher level of expression of the TGF-β1 gene correlated with the time of diagnosis of patients over 16 years of age (p=0.0255). This study demonstrates that the C-509T SNP is a significant clinical risk factor for

  8. Herpes simplex virus virion stimulatory protein mRNA leader contains sequence elements which increase both virus-induced transcription and mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Blair, E D; Blair, C C; Wagner, E K

    1987-08-01

    To investigate the role of 5' noncoding leader sequence of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) mRNA in infected cells, the promoter for the 65,000-dalton virion stimulatory protein (VSP), a beta-gamma polypeptide, was introduced into plasmids bearing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene together with various lengths of adjacent viral leader sequences. Plasmids containing longer lengths of leader sequence gave rise to significantly higher levels of CAT enzyme in transfected cells superinfected with HSV-1. RNase T2 protection assays of CAT mRNA showed that transcription was initiated from an authentic viral cap site in all VSP-CAT constructs and that CAT mRNA levels corresponded to CAT enzyme levels. Use of cis-linked simian virus 40 enhancer sequences demonstrated that the effect was virus specific. Constructs containing 12 and 48 base pairs of the VSP mRNA leader gave HSV infection-induced CAT activities intermediate between those of the leaderless construct and the VSP-(+77)-CAT construct. Actinomycin D chase experiments demonstrated that the longest leader sequences increased hybrid CAT mRNA stability at least twofold in infected cells. Cotransfection experiments with a cosmid bearing four virus-specified transcription factors (ICP4, ICP0, ICP27, and VSP-65K) showed that sequences from -3 to +77, with respect to the viral mRNA cap site, also contained signals responsive to transcriptional activation. PMID:3037112

  9. Sex Differences in Global mRNA Content of Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Amy C.; Fu, Minghua H.; Isfort, Robert J.; Varbanov, Alex R.; Qu, Xiaoyan A.; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Women oxidize more fat as compared to men during endurance exercise and several groups have shown that the mRNA content of selected genes related to fat oxidation are higher in women (e.g. hormone sensitive lipase, β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, CD36). One of the possible mechanisms is that women tend to have a higher area percentage of type I skeletal muscle fibers as compared with men. Consequently, we hypothesized that sex would influence the basal mRNA and protein content for genes involved in metabolism and the determination of muscle fiber type. Muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis were collected from healthy men and women. We examined mRNA content globally using Affymetrix GeneChips, and selected genes were examined and/or confirmed by RT-PCR. Furthermore, we examined protein content by Western blot analysis. Stringent gene array analysis revealed 66 differentially expressed genes representing metabolism, mitochondrial function, transport, protein biosynthesis, cell proliferation, signal transduction pathways, transcription and translation. Stringent gene array analysis and RT-PCR confirmed that mRNA for; acyl-coenzyme A acyltransferase 2 (ACAA2), trifunctional protein β (HADHB), catalase, lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2) were higher in women. Targeted gene analysis revealed that myosin heavy chain I (MHCI), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)δ were higher in women compared with men. Surprisingly, there were no significant sex based differences in protein content for HADHB, ACAA2, catalase, PPARδ, and MHC1. In conclusion, the differences in the basal mRNA content in resting skeletal muscle suggest that men and women are transcriptionally “primed” for known physiological differences in metabolism however the mechanism behind sex differences in fiber type remains to be determined. PMID:19623254

  10. Selective translation of heat shock mRNA in Drosophila melanogaster depends on sequence information in the leader.

    PubMed Central

    Klemenz, R; Hultmark, D; Gehring, W J

    1985-01-01

    One of the effects of a temperature increase above 35 degrees C on Drosophila melanogaster is a rapid switch in selectivity of the translational apparatus. Protein synthesis from normal, but not from heat shock, mRNA is much reduced. Efficient translation at high temperature might be a result of the primary sequence of heat shock genes. Alternatively a mRNA modification mechanism, altered as a consequence of heat shock, might allow for efficient high temperature translation of any mRNA synthesized during a heat shock. The gene for alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) was fused to the controlling elements of a heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) gene. Authentic Adh mRNA, synthesized from this fusion gene at elevated temperatures was not translated during heat shock. A second Adh fusion gene in which the mRNA synthesized contained the first 95 nucleotides of the Hsp70 non-translated leader sequence gave rise, at high temperature, to mRNA which was translated during the heat shock. Thus, the signal(s) in the mRNAs controlling translation efficiency at heat shock temperatures is encoded within the heat shock genes. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 8. PMID:2933251

  11. A selective splicing variant of hepcidin mRNA in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Toki, Yasumichi; Sasaki, Katsunori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Masayo; Hatayama, Mayumi; Ito, Satoshi; Ikuta, Katsuya; Shindo, Motohiro; Hasebe, Takumu; Nakajima, Shunsuke; Sawada, Koji; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Torimoto, Yoshihiro; Ohtake, Takaaki; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Hepcidin is a main regulator of iron metabolism, of which abnormal expression affects intestinal absorption and reticuloendothelial sequestration of iron by interacting with ferroportin. It is also noted that abnormal iron accumulation is one of the key factors to facilitate promotion and progression of cancer including hepatoma. By RT-PCR/agarose gel electrophoresis of hepcidin mRNA in a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HLF, a smaller mRNA band was shown in addition to the wild-type hepcidin mRNA. From sequencing analysis, this additional band was a selective splicing variant of hepcidin mRNA lacking exon 2 of HAMP gene, producing the transcript that encodes truncated peptide lacking 20 amino acids at the middle of preprohepcidin. In the present study, we used the digital PCR, because such a small amount of variant mRNA was difficult to quantitate by the conventional RT-PCR amplification. Among seven hepatoma-derived cell lines, six cell lines have significant copy numbers of this variant mRNA, but not in one cell line. In the transient transfection analysis of variant-type hepcidin cDNA, truncated preprohepcidin has a different character comparing with native preprohepcidin: its product is insensitive to digestion, and secreted into the medium as a whole preprohepcidin form without maturation. Loss or reduction of function of HAMP gene by aberrantly splicing may be a suitable phenomenon to obtain the proliferating advantage of hepatoma cells. PMID:27264950

  12. The transcription factor ERG recruits CCR4-NOT to control mRNA decay and mitotic progression.

    PubMed

    Rambout, Xavier; Detiffe, Cécile; Bruyr, Jonathan; Mariavelle, Emeline; Cherkaoui, Majid; Brohée, Sylvain; Demoitié, Pauline; Lebrun, Marielle; Soin, Romuald; Lesage, Bart; Guedri, Katia; Beullens, Monique; Bollen, Mathieu; Farazi, Thalia A; Kettmann, Richard; Struman, Ingrid; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Kruys, Véronique; Simonis, Nicolas; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Dequiedt, Franck

    2016-07-01

    Control of mRNA levels, a fundamental aspect in the regulation of gene expression, is achieved through a balance between mRNA synthesis and decay. E26-related gene (Erg) proteins are canonical transcription factors whose previously described functions are confined to the control of mRNA synthesis. Here, we report that ERG also regulates gene expression by affecting mRNA stability and identify the molecular mechanisms underlying this function in human cells. ERG is recruited to mRNAs via interaction with the RNA-binding protein RBPMS, and it promotes mRNA decay by binding CNOT2, a component of the CCR4-NOT deadenylation complex. Transcriptome-wide mRNA stability analysis revealed that ERG controls the degradation of a subset of mRNAs highly connected to Aurora signaling, whose decay during S phase is necessary for mitotic progression. Our data indicate that control of gene expression by mammalian transcription factors may follow a more complex scheme than previously anticipated, integrating mRNA synthesis and degradation. PMID:27273514

  13. Prolyl carboxypeptidase mRNA expression in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Kwon; Diano, Sabrina

    2014-01-13

    Prolyl carboxypeptidase (PRCP), a serine protease, is widely expressed in the body including liver, lung, kidney and brain, with a variety of known substrates such as plasma prekallikrein, bradykinin, angiotensins II and III, and α-MSH, suggesting its role in the processing of tissue-specific substrates. In the brain, PRCP has been shown to inactivate hypothalamic α-MSH, thus modulating melanocortin signaling in the control of energy metabolism. While its expression pattern has been reported in the hypothalamus, little is known on the distribution of PRCP throughout the mouse brain. This study was undertaken to determine PRCP expression in the mouse brain. Radioactive in situ hybridization was performed to determine endogenous PRCP mRNA expression. In addition, using a gene-trap mouse model for PRCP deletion, X-gal staining was performed to further determine PRCP distribution. Results from both approaches showed that PRCP gene is broadly expressed in the brain. PMID:24161824

  14. Astrocyte cultures derived from human brain tissue express angiotensinogen mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Milsted, A.; Barna, B.P.; Ransohoff, R.M.; Brosnihan, K.B.; Ferrario, C.M. )

    1990-08-01

    The authors have identified human cultured cell lines that are useful for studying angiotensinogen gene expression and its regulation in the central nervous system. A model cell system of human central nervous system origin expressing angiotensinogen has not previously been available. Expression of angiotensinogen mRNA appears to be a basal property of noninduced human astrocytes, since astrocytic cell lines derived from human glioblastomas or nonneoplastic human brain tissue invariably produced angiotensinogen mRNA. In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that angiotensinogen mRNA production was not limited to a subpopulation of astrocytes because >99% of cells in these cultures contained angiotensinogen mRNA. These cell lines will be useful in studies of the molecular mechanisms controlling angiotensin synthesis and the role of biologically active angiotensin in the human brain by allowing the authors to examine regulation of expression of the renin-angiotensin system in human astrocyte cultures.

  15. Dietary glycerol for quail: association between productive performance and COX III mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Silva, S C C; Gasparino, E; Batista, E; Tanamati, F; Vesco, A P D; Lala, B; de Oliveira, D P

    2016-01-01

    This study was carry out to evaluate mRNA expression of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase III in the Pectoralis superficialis muscle of 28-day-old quails fed diets containing 0, 8, and 12% glycerol. Total RNA was extracted (N = 10) and cDNA was amplified using specifics primers for qRT-PCR. Feed efficiency and feed intake were evaluated. COX III mRNA expression in breast muscle was higher in the group fed with 12% glycerol (0.863 AU); no differences were observed in the expression of this gene between the muscle of animals fed diets without glycerol (0.357 AU) and 8% glycerol (0.415 AU). Quails that showed greater COX III mRNA expression also showed the lowest feed efficiency. These results show that there is a difference in COX III mRNA expression in breast muscle of 28-day-old quail fed diets different concentrations of glycerol. PMID:27323091

  16. Biological activity of mRNA immobilized on nitrocellulose in NaI.

    PubMed Central

    Bresser, J; Hubbell, H R; Gillespie, D

    1983-01-01

    In 12.2 molal NaI and at 25 degrees C or below, mRNA bound to nitrocellulose while DNA and rRNA did not. Neither the poly(A) tract nor the cap were required for binding. The immobilized RNA could be translated, reverse transcribed, hybridized with radioactive probes, or released for further manipulation. mRNA was efficiently transferred from polyacrylamide to nitrocellulose in NaI. Baking was not required to fix NaI-immobilized mRNA to nitrocellulose. When cells dissolved in 12.2 molal NaI were filtered through nitrocellulose, mRNA became selectively bound (quickblot). The quick-blot system utilizing protease and detergents to prepare cells for NaI solubilization was especially suitable in quantitative, rapid screening of cells for expression of specific genes. Expression of highly repeated DNA sequences was detected in human leukemia cells. Images PMID:6579539

  17. Serum KIBRA mRNA and Protein Expression and Cognitive Functions in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Talarowska, Monika; Szemraj, Janusz; Kowalczyk, Małgorzata; Gałecki, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Background Genes participating in synaptic signalling or plasticity in brain regions such as the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the hippocampus have been implicated in cognition. Recently, a new gene (KIBRA, WWC1) has been added to this group due to its impact on memory performance. Recurrent depressive disorder (rDD) is a multifactorial disease, that one of the typical features is cognitive impairment. The main objective of this study was to perform an analysis of the KIBRA gene on both mRNA and protein levels in patients suffering from rDD and to investigate the relationship between KIBRA expression and cognitive performance. Material/Methods The study comprised 236 subjects: patients with rDD (n=131) and healthy subjects (n=105, HS). Cognitive function assessment was based on: Trail Making Test, The Stroop Test, Verbal Fluency Test and Auditory Verbal Learning Test. Results Both mRNA and protein expression levels of KIBRA gene were significantly higher in healthy subjects when compared to rDD. The presented relationship is clear even after taking age, education and sex of the examined subjects into consideration. No statistically significant relationship was found in the experiments between any of the conducted tests and KIBRA gene expression on mRNA level for both the rDD and HS groups. The presented study has limitations related to the fact that patients were being treated with antidepressant. This is relevant due to the fact that some antidepressants may affect mRNA expression. Number of patients and healthy subjects may result in the lack of statistical significance in some cases. Conclusions 1. The results of our study show decreased expression of the KIBRA gene on both mRNA and protein levels in depression. 2. We did not find any significant relationship between KIBRA gene expression and cognitive functions in case of both the healthy subjects and the patients affected by rDD. PMID:26768155

  18. Enhanced Delivery and Potency of Self-Amplifying mRNA Vaccines by Electroporation in Situ.

    PubMed

    Cu, Yen; Broderick, Kate E; Banerjee, Kaustuv; Hickman, Julie; Otten, Gillis; Barnett, Susan; Kichaev, Gleb; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based vaccines such as viral vectors, plasmid DNA (pDNA), and mRNA are being developed as a means to address limitations of both live-attenuated and subunit vaccines. DNA vaccines have been shown to be potent in a wide variety of animal species and several products are now licensed for commercial veterinary but not human use. Electroporation delivery technologies have been shown to improve the generation of T and B cell responses from synthetic DNA vaccines in many animal species and now in humans. However, parallel RNA approaches have lagged due to potential issues of potency and production. Many of the obstacles to mRNA vaccine development have recently been addressed, resulting in a revival in the use of non-amplifying and self-amplifying mRNA for vaccine and gene therapy applications. In this paper, we explore the utility of EP for the in vivo delivery of large, self-amplifying mRNA, as measured by reporter gene expression and immunogenicity of genes encoding HIV envelope protein. These studies demonstrated that EP delivery of self-amplifying mRNA elicited strong and broad immune responses in mice, which were comparable to those induced by EP delivery of pDNA. PMID:26344119

  19. Enhanced Delivery and Potency of Self-Amplifying mRNA Vaccines by Electroporation in Situ

    PubMed Central

    Cu, Yen; Broderick, Kate E.; Banerjee, Kaustuv; Hickman, Julie; Otten, Gillis; Barnett, Susan; Kichaev, Gleb; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Ulmer, Jeffrey B.; Geall, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based vaccines such as viral vectors, plasmid DNA (pDNA), and mRNA are being developed as a means to address limitations of both live-attenuated and subunit vaccines. DNA vaccines have been shown to be potent in a wide variety of animal species and several products are now licensed for commercial veterinary but not human use. Electroporation delivery technologies have been shown to improve the generation of T and B cell responses from synthetic DNA vaccines in many animal species and now in humans. However, parallel RNA approaches have lagged due to potential issues of potency and production. Many of the obstacles to mRNA vaccine development have recently been addressed, resulting in a revival in the use of non-amplifying and self-amplifying mRNA for vaccine and gene therapy applications. In this paper, we explore the utility of EP for the in vivo delivery of large, self-amplifying mRNA, as measured by reporter gene expression and immunogenicity of genes encoding HIV envelope protein. These studies demonstrated that EP delivery of self-amplifying mRNA elicited strong and broad immune responses in mice, which were comparable to those induced by EP delivery of pDNA. PMID:26344119

  20. Viral Nucleases Induce an mRNA Degradation-Transcription Feedback Loop in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Abernathy, Emma; Gilbertson, Sarah; Alla, Ravi; Glaunsinger, Britt

    2015-08-12

    Gamma-herpesviruses encode a cytoplasmic mRNA-targeting endonuclease, SOX, that cleaves most cellular mRNAs. Cleaved fragments are subsequently degraded by the cellular 5'-3' mRNA exonuclease Xrn1, thereby suppressing cellular gene expression and facilitating viral evasion of host defenses. We reveal that mammalian cells respond to this widespread cytoplasmic mRNA decay by altering RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription in the nucleus. Measuring RNAPII recruitment to promoters and nascent mRNA synthesis revealed that the majority of affected genes are transcriptionally repressed in SOX-expressing cells. The transcriptional feedback does not occur in response to the initial viral endonuclease-induced cleavage, but instead to degradation of the cleaved fragments by cellular exonucleases. In particular, Xrn1 catalytic activity is required for transcriptional repression. Notably, viral mRNA transcription escapes decay-induced repression, and this escape requires Xrn1. Collectively, these results indicate that mRNA decay rates impact transcription and that gamma-herpesviruses use this feedback mechanism to facilitate viral gene expression. PMID:26211836

  1. Expression and regulation of Icer mRNA in the Syrian hamster pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Elena; Garidou, Marie-Laure; Dardente, Hugues; Salingre, Anthony; Pévet, Paul; Simonneaux, Valérie

    2003-04-10

    Inducible-cAMP early repressor (ICER) is a potent inhibitor of CRE (cAMP-related element)-driven gene transcription. In the rat pineal gland, it has been proposed to be part of the mechanisms involved in the shutting down of the transcription of the gene coding for arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT, the melatonin rhythm-generating enzyme). In this study, we report that ICER is expressed in the pineal gland of the photoperiodic rodent Syrian hamster although with some difference compared to the rat. In the Syrian hamster pineal, Icer mRNA levels, low at daytime, displayed a 20-fold increase during the night. Nighttime administration of a beta-adrenergic antagonist, propranolol, significantly reduced Icer mRNA levels although daytime administration of a beta-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, was unable to raise the low amount of Icer mRNA. These observations indicate that Icer mRNA expression is induced by the clock-driven norepinephrine release and further suggest that this stimulation is restricted to nighttime, as already observed for Aa-nat gene transcription. Furthermore, we found that the daily profile of Icer mRNA displayed photoperiodic variation with a lengthening of the nocturnal peak in short versus long photoperiod. These data indicate that ICER may be involved in both daily and seasonal regulation of melatonin synthesis in the Syrian hamster. PMID:12670714

  2. Short interfering RNA induced generation and translation of stable 5' mRNA cleavage intermediates.

    PubMed

    Singhania, Richa; Pavey, Sandra; Payne, Elizabeth; Gu, Wenyi; Clancy, Jennifer; Jubair, Luqman; Preiss, Thomas; Saunders, Nicholas; McMillan, Nigel A J

    2016-08-01

    Sequence-specific degradation of homologous mRNA is the main mechanism by which short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) suppress gene expression. Generally, it is assumed that the mRNA fragments resulting from Ago2 cleavage are rapidly degraded, thus making the transcript translation-incompetent. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the post-cleavage mRNA decay are not completely understood and the fate of cleavage intermediates has been poorly studied. Using specific siRNAs and short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) we show that the 5' and 3' mRNA cleavage fragments of human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) E6/7 mRNA, over-expressed in cervical malignancies, are unevenly degraded. Intriguingly, the 5' mRNA fragment was more abundant and displayed a greater stability than the corresponding 3' mRNA fragment in RNAi-treated cells. Further analysis revealed that the 5' mRNA fragment was polysome-associated, indicating its active translation, and this was further confirmed by using tagged E7 protein to show that C-terminally truncated proteins were produced in treated cells. Overall, our findings provide new insight into the degradation of siRNA-targeted transcripts and show that RNAi can alter protein expression in cells as a result of preferential stabilization and translation of the 5' cleavage fragment. These results challenge the current model of siRNA-mediated RNAi and provide a significant step forward towards understanding non-canonical pathways of siRNA gene silencing. PMID:27321990

  3. Self-amplifying mRNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luis A; Kommareddy, Sushma; Maione, Domenico; Uematsu, Yasushi; Giovani, Cinzia; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Otten, Gillis R; Yu, Dong; Mandl, Christian W; Mason, Peter W; Dormitzer, Philip R; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief introduction to nucleic acid-based vaccines and recent research in developing self-amplifying mRNA vaccines. These vaccines promise the flexibility of plasmid DNA vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity and safety. The key to realizing the full potential of these vaccines is efficient delivery of nucleic acid to the cytoplasm of a cell, where it can amplify and express the encoded antigenic protein. The hydrophilicity and strong net negative charge of RNA impedes cellular uptake. To overcome this limitation, electrostatic complexation with cationic lipids or polymers and physical delivery using electroporation or ballistic particles to improve cellular uptake has been evaluated. This chapter highlights the rapid progress made in using nonviral delivery systems for RNA-based vaccines. Initial preclinical testing of self-amplifying mRNA vaccines has shown nonviral delivery to be capable of producing potent and robust innate and adaptive immune responses in small animals and nonhuman primates. Historically, the prospect of developing mRNA vaccines was uncertain due to concerns of mRNA instability and the feasibility of large-scale manufacturing. Today, these issues are no longer perceived as barriers in the widespread implementation of the technology. Currently, nonamplifying mRNA vaccines are under investigation in human clinical trials and can be produced at a sufficient quantity and quality to meet regulatory requirements. If the encouraging preclinical data with self-amplifying mRNA vaccines are matched by equivalently positive immunogenicity, potency, and tolerability in human trials, this platform could establish nucleic acid vaccines as a versatile new tool for human immunization. PMID:25620012

  4. Thymidylate synthase protein and p53 mRNA form an in vivo ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Chu, E; Copur, S M; Ju, J; Chen, T M; Khleif, S; Voeller, D M; Mizunuma, N; Patel, M; Maley, G F; Maley, F; Allegra, C J

    1999-02-01

    A thymidylate synthase (TS)-ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex composed of TS protein and the mRNA of the tumor suppressor gene p53 was isolated from cultured human colon cancer cells. RNA gel shift assays confirmed a specific interaction between TS protein and the protein-coding region of p53 mRNA, and in vitro translation studies demonstrated that this interaction resulted in the specific repression of p53 mRNA translation. To demonstrate the potential biological role of the TS protein-p53 mRNA interaction, Western immunoblot analysis revealed nearly undetectable levels of p53 protein in TS-overexpressing human colon cancer H630-R10 and rat hepatoma H35(F/F) cell lines compared to the levels in their respective parent H630 and H35 cell lines. Polysome analysis revealed that the p53 mRNA was associated with higher-molecular-weight polysomes in H35 cells compared to H35(F/F) cells. While the level of p53 mRNA expression was identical in parent and TS-overexpressing cell lines, the level of p53 RNA bound to TS in the form of RNP complexes was significantly higher in TS-overexpressing cells. The effect of TS on p53 expression was also investigated with human colon cancer RKO cells by use of a tetracycline-inducible system. Treatment of RKO cells with a tetracycline derivative, doxycycline, resulted in 15-fold-induced expression of TS protein and nearly complete suppression of p53 protein expression. However, p53 mRNA levels were identical in transfected RKO cells in the absence and presence of doxycycline. Taken together, these findings suggest that TS regulates the expression of p53 at the translational level. This study identifies a novel pathway for regulating p53 gene expression and expands current understanding of the potential role of TS as a regulator of cellular gene expression. PMID:9891091

  5. Thymidylate Synthase Protein and p53 mRNA Form an In Vivo Ribonucleoprotein Complex

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Edward; Copur, Sitki M.; Ju, Jingfang; Chen, Tian-men; Khleif, Samir; Voeller, Donna M.; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Patel, Mahendra; Maley, Gladys F.; Maley, Frank; Allegra, Carmen J.

    1999-01-01

    A thymidylate synthase (TS)-ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex composed of TS protein and the mRNA of the tumor suppressor gene p53 was isolated from cultured human colon cancer cells. RNA gel shift assays confirmed a specific interaction between TS protein and the protein-coding region of p53 mRNA, and in vitro translation studies demonstrated that this interaction resulted in the specific repression of p53 mRNA translation. To demonstrate the potential biological role of the TS protein-p53 mRNA interaction, Western immunoblot analysis revealed nearly undetectable levels of p53 protein in TS-overexpressing human colon cancer H630-R10 and rat hepatoma H35(F/F) cell lines compared to the levels in their respective parent H630 and H35 cell lines. Polysome analysis revealed that the p53 mRNA was associated with higher-molecular-weight polysomes in H35 cells compared to H35(F/F) cells. While the level of p53 mRNA expression was identical in parent and TS-overexpressing cell lines, the level of p53 RNA bound to TS in the form of RNP complexes was significantly higher in TS-overexpressing cells. The effect of TS on p53 expression was also investigated with human colon cancer RKO cells by use of a tetracycline-inducible system. Treatment of RKO cells with a tetracycline derivative, doxycycline, resulted in 15-fold-induced expression of TS protein and nearly complete suppression of p53 protein expression. However, p53 mRNA levels were identical in transfected RKO cells in the absence and presence of doxycycline. Taken together, these findings suggest that TS regulates the expression of p53 at the translational level. This study identifies a novel pathway for regulating p53 gene expression and expands current understanding of the potential role of TS as a regulator of cellular gene expression. PMID:9891091

  6. Negative regulation of neuromedin U mRNA expression in the rat pars tuberalis by melatonin.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Sayaka; Sakata, Ichiro; Nagasaka, Mai; Higaki, Yuriko; Sakai, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    The pars tuberalis (PT) is part of the anterior pituitary gland surrounding the median eminence as a thin cell layer. The characteristics of PT differ from those of the pars distalis (PD), such as cell composition and gene expression, suggesting that the PT has a unique physiological function compared to the PD. Because the PT highly expresses melatonin receptor type 1, it is considered a mediator of seasonal and/or circadian signals of melatonin. Expression of neuromedin U (NMU) that is known to regulate energy balance has been previously reported in the rat PT; however, the regulatory mechanism of NMU mRNA expression and secretion in the PT are still obscure. In this study, we examined both the diurnal change of NMU mRNA expression in the rat PT and the effects of melatonin on NMU in vivo. In situ hybridization and quantitative PCR analysis of laser microdissected PT samples revealed that NMU mRNA expression in the PT has diurnal variation that is high during the light phase and low during the dark phase. Furthermore, melatonin administration significantly suppressed NMU mRNA expression in the PT in vivo. On the other hand, 48 h fasting did not have an effect on PT-NMU mRNA expression, and the diurnal change of NMU mRNA expression was maintained. We also found the highest expression of neuromedin U receptor type 2 (NMUR2) mRNA in the third ventricle ependymal cell layer, followed by the arcuate nucleus and the spinal cord. These results suggest that NMU mRNA expression in the PT is downregulated by melatonin during the dark phase and shows diurnal change. Considering that NMU mRNA in the PT showed the highest expression level in the brain, PT-NMU may act on NMUR2 in the brain, especially in the third ventricle ependymal cell layer, with a circadian rhythm. PMID:23843987

  7. Negative Regulation of Neuromedin U mRNA Expression in the Rat Pars Tuberalis by Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Aizawa, Sayaka; Sakata, Ichiro; Nagasaka, Mai; Higaki, Yuriko; Sakai, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    The pars tuberalis (PT) is part of the anterior pituitary gland surrounding the median eminence as a thin cell layer. The characteristics of PT differ from those of the pars distalis (PD), such as cell composition and gene expression, suggesting that the PT has a unique physiological function compared to the PD. Because the PT highly expresses melatonin receptor type 1, it is considered a mediator of seasonal and/or circadian signals of melatonin. Expression of neuromedin U (NMU) that is known to regulate energy balance has been previously reported in the rat PT; however, the regulatory mechanism of NMU mRNA expression and secretion in the PT are still obscure. In this study, we examined both the diurnal change of NMU mRNA expression in the rat PT and the effects of melatonin on NMU in vivo. In situ hybridization and quantitative PCR analysis of laser microdissected PT samples revealed that NMU mRNA expression in the PT has diurnal variation that is high during the light phase and low during the dark phase. Furthermore, melatonin administration significantly suppressed NMU mRNA expression in the PT in vivo. On the other hand, 48 h fasting did not have an effect on PT-NMU mRNA expression, and the diurnal change of NMU mRNA expression was maintained. We also found the highest expression of neuromedin U receptor type 2 (NMUR2) mRNA in the third ventricle ependymal cell layer, followed by the arcuate nucleus and the spinal cord. These results suggest that NMU mRNA expression in the PT is downregulated by melatonin during the dark phase and shows diurnal change. Considering that NMU mRNA in the PT showed the highest expression level in the brain, PT-NMU may act on NMUR2 in the brain, especially in the third ventricle ependymal cell layer, with a circadian rhythm. PMID:23843987

  8. Alternative splicing of parathyroid hormone-related protein mRNA: expression and stability

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, R S; Luchin, A I; Richard, V; Brena, R M; Lima, D; Rosol, T J

    2011-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is a multifunctional protein that is often dysregulated in cancer. The human PTHrP gene is alternatively spliced into three isoforms, each with a unique 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR), encoding 139, 173 and 141 amino acid proteins. The regulation of PTHrP mRNA isoform expression has not been completely elucidated, but it may be affected by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In this study, we examined differences in the PTHrP mRNA isoform expression in two squamous carcinoma cell lines (SCC2/88 and HARA), an immortalized keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT), and spontaneous human lung cancer with adjacent normal tissue. In addition, the effect of TGF-β1 on PTHrP mRNA isoform expression and stability was examined. Cell-type specific expression of PTHrP mRNA isoforms occurred between the various cell lines, normal human lung, and immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT). PTHrP isoform expression pattern was significantly altered between normal lung tissue and the adjacent lung cancer. In vitro studies revealed that TGF-β1 differentially altered the mRNA steady-state levels and mRNA stability of the PTHrP isoforms. Protein–RNA binding studies identified different proteins binding to the 3′-UTR of the PTHrP isoforms (139) and (141), which may be important in the differential mRNA stability and response to cytokines between the PTHrP isoforms. The data demonstrate that there is cell-type specific expression of PTHrP mRNA isoforms, and disruption of the normal regulation during cancer progression may in part be associated with TGF-β1-induced changes in PTHrP mRNA isoform expression and stability. PMID:15291755

  9. The role of ribonucleases in regulating global mRNA levels in the model organism Thermus thermophilus HB8

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RNA metabolism, including RNA synthesis and RNA degradation, is one of the most conserved biological systems and has been intensively studied; however, the degradation network of ribonucleases (RNases) and RNA substrates is not fully understood. Results The genome of the extreme thermophile, Thermus thermophilus HB8 includes 15 genes that encode RNases or putative RNases. Using DNA microarray analyses, we examined the effects of disruption of each RNase on mRNA abundance. Disruption of the genes encoding RNase J, RecJ-like protein and RNase P could not be isolated, indicating that these RNases are essential for cell viability. Disruption of the TTHA0252 gene, which was not previously considered to be involved in mRNA degradation, affected mRNA abundance, as did disruption of the putative RNases, YbeY and PhoH-like proteins, suggesting that they have RNase activity. The effects on mRNA abundance of disruption of several RNase genes were dependent on the phase of cell growth. Disruption of the RNase Y and RNase HII genes affected mRNA levels only during the log phase, whereas disruption of the PhoH-like gene affected mRNA levels only during the stationary phase. Moreover, disruption of the RNase R and PNPase genes had a greater impact on mRNA abundance during the stationary phase than the log phase, whereas the opposite was true for the TTHA0252 gene disruptant. Similar changes in mRNA levels were observed after disruption of YbeY or PhoH-like genes. The changes in mRNA levels in the bacterial Argonaute disruptant were similar to those in the RNase HI and RNase HII gene disruptants, suggesting that bacterial Argonaute is a functional homolog of RNase H. Conclusion This study suggests that T. thermophilus HB8 has 13 functional RNases and that each RNase has a different function in the cell. The putative RNases, TTHA0252, YbeY and PhoH-like proteins, are suggested to have RNase activity and to be involved in mRNA degradation. In addition, PhoH-like and Ybe

  10. Laser Capture Microdissection and Real-Time PCR for Measuring mRNA in Giant Cells Induced by Meloidogyne javanica.

    PubMed

    He, Bin; Magill, C; Starr, J L

    2005-09-01

    The techniques of laser capture microdissection and quantitative RT-PCR were investigated as methods for measuring mRNA in giant cells induced by Meloidogyne javanica. Laser capture microdissection allowed precise sampling of giant cells at 1 to 3 weeks after inoculation. The expression of three genes (a water channel protein gene Rb7, a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase (LHA4), and a hexose kinase (HXK1) was measured based on mRNA extracted from tissue samples and quantitated using reversetranscription real-time PCR. These genes were chosen arbitrarily to represent different aspects of primary metabolism. The amount of HXK1 mRNA in giant cells was not different from that in root meristem or cortical cells when compared on the basis of number of molecules per unit tissue volume, and was similar at all sample times. Amount of mRNA for LHA4 and Rb7 was much greater in giant cells than in cortical cells, but only Rb7 was also greater in giant cells than in root meristem cells. Numbers of mRNA molecules of LHA4 increased linearly in giant cells from 1 to 3 weeks after inoculation, whereas the amount of Rb7 mRNA was similar at 1 and 2 weeks after inoculation but increased at 3 weeks after inoculation. The amount of mRNA for these two genes was similar at all sample times in cortical and root-tip cells. Apparent up regulation of some genes in giant cells may be due primarily to the increased number of copies of the gene in giant cells, whereas for other genes up regulation may also involve increased transcription of the increased number of copies of the gene. PMID:19262878

  11. RNA Polymerase II cluster dynamics predict mRNA output in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won-Ki; Jayanth, Namrata; English, Brian P; Inoue, Takuma; Andrews, J Owen; Conway, William; Grimm, Jonathan B; Spille, Jan-Hendrik; Lavis, Luke D; Lionnet, Timothée; Cisse, Ibrahim I

    2016-01-01

    Protein clustering is a hallmark of genome regulation in mammalian cells. However, the dynamic molecular processes involved make it difficult to correlate clustering with functional consequences in vivo. We developed a live-cell super-resolution approach to uncover the correlation between mRNA synthesis and the dynamics of RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) clusters at a gene locus. For endogenous β-actin genes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we observe that short-lived (~8 s) Pol II clusters correlate with basal mRNA output. During serum stimulation, a stereotyped increase in Pol II cluster lifetime correlates with a proportionate increase in the number of mRNAs synthesized. Our findings suggest that transient clustering of Pol II may constitute a pre-transcriptional regulatory event that predictably modulates nascent mRNA output. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13617.001 PMID:27138339

  12. mRNA transport in yeast: time to reinvestigate the functions of the nucleolus.

    PubMed Central

    Schneiter, R; Kadowaki, T; Tartakoff, A M

    1995-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport of mRNA is vital to gene expression and may prove to be key to its regulation. Genetic approaches in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have led to the identification of conditional mutants defective in mRNA transport. Mutations in approximately two dozen genes result in accumulation of transcripts, trapped at various sites in the nucleus, as detected by in situ hybridization. Phenotypic and molecular analyses of many of these mRNA transport mutants suggest that, in yeast, the function of the nucleus is not limited to the biogenesis of pre-ribosomes but may also be important for transport of poly(A)+ RNA. A similar function of the animal cell nucleolus is suggested by several observations. Images PMID:7626803

  13. Cytoplasmic Control of Sense-Antisense mRNA Pairs.

    PubMed

    Sinturel, Flore; Navickas, Albertas; Wery, Maxime; Descrimes, Marc; Morillon, Antonin; Torchet, Claire; Benard, Lionel

    2015-09-22

    Transcriptome analyses have revealed that convergent gene transcription can produce many 3'-overlapping mRNAs in diverse organisms. Few studies have examined the fate of 3'-complementary mRNAs in double-stranded RNA-dependent nuclear phenomena, and nothing is known about the cytoplasmic destiny of 3'-overlapping messengers or their impact on gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that the complementary tails of 3'-overlapping mRNAs can interact in the cytoplasm and promote post-transcriptional regulatory events including no-go decay (NGD) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genome-wide experiments confirm that these messenger-interacting mRNAs (mimRNAs) form RNA duplexes in wild-type cells and thus have potential roles in modulating the mRNA levels of their convergent gene pattern under different growth conditions. We show that the post-transcriptional fate of hundreds of mimRNAs is controlled by Xrn1, revealing the extent to which this conserved 5'-3' cytoplasmic exoribonuclease plays an unexpected but key role in the post-transcriptional control of convergent gene expression. PMID:26344770

  14. Beta-integrin of Anopheles gambiae: mRNA cloning and analysis of structure and expression.

    PubMed

    Mahairaki, V; Lycett, G; Blass, C; Louis, C

    2001-06-01

    We have isolated an mRNA encoding a beta integrin subunit of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae. Our analysis predicts a protein that is very similar to betaPS, the fruitfly orthologue. The gene is expressed during all developmental stages and it is found in all body parts, including the midgut. Finally, the expression of the gene does not seem to be modulated during blood meals, except for a substantial increase 48 h posthaematophagy, when digestion is nearly complete. PMID:11437913

  15. Tissue-specific mRNA expression profiling in grape berry tissues

    PubMed Central

    Grimplet, Jerome; Deluc, Laurent G; Tillett, Richard L; Wheatley, Matthew D; Schlauch, Karen A; Cramer, Grant R; Cushman, John C

    2007-01-01

    Background Berries of grape (Vitis vinifera) contain three major tissue types (skin, pulp and seed) all of which contribute to the aroma, color, and flavor characters of wine. The pericarp, which is composed of the exocarp (skin) and mesocarp (pulp), not only functions to protect and feed the developing seed, but also to assist in the dispersal of the mature seed by avian and mammalian vectors. The skin provides volatile and nonvolatile aroma and color compounds, the pulp contributes organic acids and sugars, and the seeds provide condensed tannins, all of which are important to the formation of organoleptic characteristics of wine. In order to understand the transcriptional network responsible for controlling tissue-specific mRNA expression patterns, mRNA expression profiling was conducted on each tissue of mature berries of V. vinifera Cabernet Sauvignon using the Affymetrix GeneChip® Vitis oligonucleotide microarray ver. 1.0. In order to monitor the influence of water-deficit stress on tissue-specific expression patterns, mRNA expression profiles were also compared from mature berries harvested from vines subjected to well-watered or water-deficit conditions. Results Overall, berry tissues were found to express approximately 76% of genes represented on the Vitis microarray. Approximately 60% of these genes exhibited significant differential expression in one or more of the three major tissue types with more than 28% of genes showing pronounced (2-fold or greater) differences in mRNA expression. The largest difference in tissue-specific expression was observed between the seed and pulp/skin. Exocarp tissue, which is involved in pathogen defense and pigment production, showed higher mRNA abundance relative to other berry tissues for genes involved with flavonoid biosynthesis, pathogen resistance, and cell wall modification. Mesocarp tissue, which is considered a nutritive tissue, exhibited a higher mRNA abundance of genes involved in cell wall function and

  16. Conceptual Modeling of mRNA Decay Provokes New Hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Somekh, Judith; Haimovich, Gal; Guterman, Adi; Dori, Dov; Choder, Mordechai

    2014-01-01

    Biologists are required to integrate large amounts of data to construct a working model of the system under investigation. This model is often informal and stored mentally or textually, making it prone to contain undetected inconsistencies, inaccuracies, or even contradictions, not much less than a representation in free natural language. Using Object-Process Methodology (OPM), a formal yet visual and humanly accessible conceptual modeling language, we have created an executable working model of the mRNA decay process in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as the import of its components to the nucleus following mRNA decay. We show how our model, which incorporates knowledge from 43 articles, can reproduce outcomes that match the experimental findings, evaluate hypotheses, and predict new possible outcomes. Moreover, we were able to analyze the effects of the mRNA decay model perturbations related to gene and interaction deletions, and predict the nuclear import of certain decay factors, which we then verified experimentally. In particular, we verified experimentally the hypothesis that Rpb4p, Lsm1p, and Pan2p remain bound to the RNA 3′-untralslated region during the entire process of the 5′ to 3′ degradation of the RNA open reading frame. The model has also highlighted erroneous hypotheses that indeed were not in line with the experimental outcomes. Beyond the scientific value of these specific findings, this work demonstrates the value of the conceptual model as an in silico vehicle for hypotheses generation and testing, which can reinforce, and often even replace, risky, costlier wet lab experiments. PMID:25255440

  17. The role of cytokine mRNA stability in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Seko, Yuko; Cole, Steven; Kasprzak, Wojciech; Shapiro, Bruce A; Ragheb, Jack A

    2006-05-01

    Inflammatory cytokines such as interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-2, tumor-necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and IL-17 play an important role in the pathogenesis of cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Cytokine gene expression is tightly regulated at the post-transcriptional level. Cytokine mRNA decay is dependent not only upon cis-elements in the RNA but also upon trans-acting factors such as the RNA binding proteins TTP, HuR, AUF-1, Nucleolin and YB-1. Physiologic signals, for instance signaling through the CD28 receptor on T cells, can modulate the half-life of a select subset of cytokine mRNAs, such as IL-2. Distinct cis- and trans-acting elements in human and mouse IL-2 mRNA may account for the different pattern of CD28-mediated mRNA stabilization in these two species. TTP-deficient mice or mice with a deletion of the TNF-alpha mRNA ARE element develop a complex inflammatory syndrome that is associated with a prolonged TNF-alpha mRNA half-life and elevated levels of circulating TNF-alpha. This syndrome can be prevented by treatment with TNF-alpha blocking antibodies. Evidence from mice with altered cytokine mRNA stability, along with human data, suggests that imbalance between the stability and decay of inflammatory cytokine mRNAs could represent a basic mechanism leading to autoimmunity. PMID:16782553

  18. Reductive Decationizable Block Copolymers for Stimuli-Responsive mRNA Delivery.

    PubMed

    Nuhn, Lutz; Kaps, Leonard; Diken, Mustafa; Schuppan, Detlef; Zentel, Rudolf

    2016-06-01

    Messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNAs) are considered as promising alternatives for transient gene therapy, but to overcome their poor pharmacokinetic properties, smart carriers are required for cellular uptake and stimuli-responsive release. In this work, a synthetic concept toward reductive decationizable cationic block copolymers for mRNA complexation is introduced. By combination of RAFT block copolymerization with postpolymerization modification, cationic block copolymers are generated with disulfide-linked primary amines. They allow effective polyplex formation with negatively charged mRNA and subsequent release under reductive conditions of the cytoplasm. In first in vitro experiments with fibroblasts and macrophages, tailor-made block copolymers mediate cell-specific mRNA transfection, as quantified by polyplex uptake and mRNA-encoding gene expression. Furthermore, RAFT polymerization provides access to heterotelechelic polymers with orthogonally addressable endgroup functionalities utilized to ligate targeting units onto the polyplex-forming block copolymers. The results exemplify the broad versatility of this reductive decationizable mRNA carrier system, especially toward further advanced mRNA delivery applications. PMID:27075781

  19. Reduced secreted mu mRNA synthesis in selective IgM deficiency of Bloom's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, N; Ozawa, T; Kato, Y; Motoyoshi, F; Kasahara, K; Kameyama, T; Orii, T

    1992-01-01

    Serum IgM concentrations were low although serum IgG and IgA concentrations were normal in both our patients with Bloom's syndrome. Although the percentages of surface IgM-bearing cells were not reduced, the numbers of IgM-secreting cells were markedly reduced. The membrane-bound mu (microns) and secreted mu (microseconds) mRNAs are produced from transcripts of a single immunoglobulin mu gene by alternative RNA processing pathways. The control of microseconds mRNA synthesis depends on the addition of poly(A) to microseconds C-terminal segment. In both patients, mu mRNA was well detected but microseconds C-terminal mRNA was scarcely detected, suggesting that microns mRNA was well transcribed but microseconds mRNA was not. There was, at least, no mutation or deletion in the microseconds C-terminal coding sequence, the RNA splice site (GG/TAAAC) at the 5' end of microseconds C-terminal segment and the AATAAA poly(A) signal sequence in both patients. Our results suggest that selective IgM deficiency in Bloom's syndrome is due to an abnormality in the maturation of surface IgM-bearing B cells into IgM-secreting cells and a failure of microseconds mRNA synthesis. Moreover, reduced microseconds mRNA synthesis may be due to the defect on developmental regulation of the site at which poly(A) is added to transcripts of the mu gene. Images Fig. 2 PMID:1563106

  20. Sequence specificity of mRNA N6-adenosine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Csepany, T; Lin, A; Baldick, C J; Beemon, K

    1990-11-25

    The sequence specificity of chicken mRNA N6-adenosine methyltransferase has been investigated in vivo. Localization of six new N6-methyladenosine sites on Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) virion RNA has confirmed our extended consensus sequence for methylation: RGACU, where R is usually a G (7/12). We have also observed A (2/12) and U (3/12) at the -2 position (relative to m6A at +1) but never a C. At the +3 position, the U was observed 10/12 times; an A and a C were observed once each in weakly methylated sequences. The extent of methylation varied between the different sites up to a maximum of about 90%. To test the significance of this consensus sequence, it was altered by site-specific mutagenesis, and methylation was assayed after transfection of mutated RSV DNA into chicken embryo fibroblasts. We found that changing the G at -1 or the U at +3 to any other residue inhibited methylation. However, inhibition of methylation at all four of the major sites in the RSV src gene did not detectably alter the steady-state levels of the three viral RNA species or viral infectivity. Additional mutants that inactivated the src protein kinase activity produced less virus and exhibited relatively less src mRNA in infected cells. PMID:2173695

  1. Motion of individual ribosomes along mRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visscher, Koen

    2004-11-01

    Ribosomes move along messenger RNA to translate a sequence of ribonucleotides into a corresponding sequence of amino acids that make up a protein. Efficient motion of ribosomes along the mRNA requires hydrolysis of GTP, converting chemical energy into mechanical work, like better known molecular motors such as kinesin. However, motion is just one of the many tasks of the ribosome, whereas for kinesin, motion itself is the main goal. In keeping with these functional differences, the ribosome is also much larger consisting of more than 50 proteins and with half of its mass made up of ribosomal RNA. Such structural complexity enables indirect ways of coupling GTP hydrolysis to directed motion. In order to elucidate the mechanochemical coupling in ribosomes we have developed a single-molecule assay based on using optical tweezers to record the motion of individual ribosomes along mRNA. Translation rates of 2-4 codons/s have been observed. However, when increasing the force opposing motion, we observe backward slippage of ribosomes along homopolymeric poly(U) messages. Currently, it is not clear if the motor operates in reverse or if backward motion has become completely uncoupled from GTP hydrolysis. Interestingly, force-induced backward motion is of biological relevance because of its possible role in -1 frameshifting, a mechanism used by viruses to regulate gene expression at the level of translation.

  2. REDUCED NITRIC OXIDE PRODUCTION AND INOS MRNA EXPRESSION IN IFN-G STIMULATED CHICKEN MACROPHAGES TRANSFECTED WITH INOS SIRNAS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Utilizing RNA interference technology with siRNA in the HD-11 macrophage cell line, we determined how the inhibition or knock-down of the iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) gene affected IFN-y' induced macrophage production of nitric oxide (NO) and mRNA expression of genes involved in this biolo...

  3. The Choice of Alternative 5' Splice Sites in Influenza Virus M1 mRNA is Regulated by the Viral Polymerase Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Shin-Ru; Nemeroff, Martin E.; Krug, Robert M.

    1995-07-01

    The influenza virus M1 mRNA has two alternative 5' splice sites: a distal 5' splice site producing mRNA_3 that has the coding potential for 9 amino acids and a proximal 5' splice site producing M2 mRNA encoding the essential M2 ion-channel protein. Only mRNA_3 was made in uninfected cells transfected with DNA expressing M1 mRNA. Similarly, using nuclear extracts from uninfected cells, in vitro splicing of M1 mRNA yielded only mRNA_3. Only when the mRNA_3 5' splice site was inactivated by mutation was M2 mRNA made in uninfected cells and in uninfected cell extracts. In influenza virus-infected cells, M2 mRNA was made, but only after a delay, suggesting that newly synthesized viral gene product(s) were needed to activate the M2 5' splice site. We present strong evidence that these gene products are the complex of the three polymerase proteins, the same complex that functions in the transcription and replication of the viral genome. Gel shift experiments showed that the viral polymerase complex bound to the 5' end of the viral M1 mRNA in a sequence-specific and cap-dependent manner. During in vitro splicing catalyzed by uninfected cell extracts, the binding of the viral polymerase complex blocked the mRNA_3 5' splice site, resulting in the switch to the M2 mRNA 5' splice site and the production of M2 mRNA.

  4. Influenza virus NS1 protein inhibits pre-mRNA splicing and blocks mRNA nucleocytoplasmic transport.

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, P; Beloso, A; Ortín, J

    1994-01-01

    The influenza virus RNA segment 8 encodes two proteins, NS1 and NS2, by differential splicing. The collinear transcript acts as mRNA for NS1 protein, while the spliced mRNA encodes NS2 protein. The splicing of NS1 mRNA was studied in cells transfected with a recombinant plasmid that has the cDNA of RNA segment 8 cloned under the SV40 late promoter and polyadenylation signals. As described for influenza virus-infected cells, NS1 mRNA was poorly spliced to yield NS2 mRNA. However, inactivation of the NS1 gene, but not the NS2 gene, led to a substantial increase in the splicing efficiency, as shown by the relative accumulations of NS1 and NS2 mRNAs. This effect was not specific for NS1 mRNA, since the splicing of the endogenous SV40 early transcript was altered in such a way that t-Ag mRNA was almost eliminated. These changes in the splicing pattern coincided with a strong inhibition of the mRNA nucleocytoplasmic transport. Both NS1 and NS2 mRNAs were retained in the nucleus of cells expressing NS1 protein, but no effect was observed when only NS2 protein was expressed. Furthermore, other mRNAs tested, such as T-Ag mRNA and the non-spliceable nucleoprotein transcript, were also retained in the nucleus upon expression of NS1 protein, suggesting that it induced a generalized block of mRNA export from the nucleus. Images PMID:8313914

  5. Differential regulation of plastid mRNA stability. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, D.B.

    1993-09-01

    Our goal is to identify cis-acting sequences and transacting factors that function in plastid mRNA maturation, stabilization, and/or decay through an in vitro and in vivo analysis of mRNA:protein interactions. Our previous results emphasized the study of 3{prime}end inverted repeat sequences (IRs) that serve both as mRNA processing elements and stability determinants, and associate with plastid proteins that potentially play enzymatic, structural and/or regulatory roles. We seek to define, by single base and internal deletion mutagenesis, the sequence and structural requirements for protein binding to the 3{prime} IRs of petD and psbA mRNAs; to purify RNA-binding proteins that demonstrate gene- or sequence-specific binding, or that are implicated in RNA stabilization or decay; and to investigate the native form of mRNA in the plastid, by attempting to purify ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles from organelles. Our view of mRNA decay is that it is regulated by three interactive components: RNA structure, ribonucleases and RNA-binding proteins. We have used mutagenesis to study the role of RNA structure in regulating RNA decay rates, and to identify protein binding and endonuclease recognition sites. We have identified at least three endonuclease activities; one that cleaves psbA RNA; and two whose cleavage patterns with petD 3{prime} IR-RNA has been studied (endoC1 and endoC2). Additionally, we have continued to analyze the properties of the major RNA processing exoribonuclease. We have concentrated our efforts on three RNA-binding proteins. A 100 kd protein with properties suggestive of a mammalian RNP component has been purified. A protein of 55 kd that may also be an endonuclease has been partially purified. We have studied the interaction of a 29 kd protein with the petD stem/loop, and its role in RNA processing. Recently, we have used a novel gel shift/SDS-PAGE technique to identify new RNA-binding proteins.

  6. mRNA retroposition in human cells: processed pseudogene formation.

    PubMed Central

    Maestre, J; Tchénio, T; Dhellin, O; Heidmann, T

    1995-01-01

    Using a sensitive assay for detection of reverse transcription events, we demonstrate that human HeLa cells can 'retropose', i.e. reverse transcribe and integrate, the mRNA of a naive reporter gene, at a low but detectable frequency. Furthermore, we show that the retroposed copies have all the hallmarks of the processed pseudogenes naturally found in the mammalian genome: they lack intron and 5' promoter sequence, they have acquired a 3' poly(A) tail, and they are flanked by short repeats (< 15 bp) of target DNA sequence. These results demonstrate that human cells possess an endogenous reverse transcription activity, which is not restricted to transcripts of transposable elements, and which is likely to be involved in the formation, still ongoing, of a large fraction of the eukaryotic genome. Images PMID:8557053

  7. Engineering protein-responsive mRNA switch in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Endo, Kei; Saito, Hirohide

    2014-01-01

    Engineering of translation provides an alternative regulatory layer for controlling transgene expression in addition to transcriptional regulation. Synthetic mRNA switches that modulate translation of a target gene of interest in response to an intracellular protein could be a key regulator to construct a genetic circuit. Insertion of a protein binding RNA sequence in the 5' UTR of mRNA would allow for the generation of a protein-responsive RNA switch. Here we describe the design principle of the switch and methods for tuning and analyzing its translational activity in mammalian cells. PMID:24549620

  8. Regulation of mRNA translation during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Weissman, Jonathan S; Vale, Ronald D

    2015-01-01

    Passage through mitosis is driven by precisely-timed changes in transcriptional regulation and protein degradation. However, the importance of translational regulation during mitosis remains poorly understood. Here, using ribosome profiling, we find both a global translational repression and identified ∼200 mRNAs that undergo specific translational regulation at mitotic entry. In contrast, few changes in mRNA abundance are observed, indicating that regulation of translation is the primary mechanism of modulating protein expression during mitosis. Interestingly, 91% of the mRNAs that undergo gene-specific regulation in mitosis are translationally repressed, rather than activated. One of the most pronounced translationally-repressed genes is Emi1, an inhibitor of the anaphase promoting complex (APC) which is degraded during mitosis. We show that full APC activation requires translational repression of Emi1 in addition to its degradation. These results identify gene-specific translational repression as a means of controlling the mitotic proteome, which may complement post-translational mechanisms for inactivating protein function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07957.001 PMID:26305499

  9. MicroRNA-mediated target mRNA cleavage and 3'-uridylation in human cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kai; Lin, Jing; Zandi, Roza; Roth, Jack A; Ji, Lin

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in targeted gene silencing by facilitating posttranscriptional and translational repression. However, the precise mechanism of mammalian miRNA-mediated gene silencing remains to be elucidated. Here, we used a stem-loop array reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay to analyse miRNA-induced mRNA recognition, cleavage, posttranscriptional modification, and degradation. We detected endogenous let-7 miRNA-induced and Argonaute-catalysed endonucleolytic cleavage on target mRNAs at various sites within partially paired miRNA:mRNA sequences. Most of the cleaved mRNA 5'-fragments were 3'-oligouridylated by activities of terminal uridylyl transferases (TUTases) in miRNA-induced silencing complexes and temporarily accumulated in the cytosol for 5'-3' degradation or other molecular fates. Some 3'-5' decayed mRNA fragments could also be captured by the miRNA-induced silencing complex stationed at the specific miRNA:mRNA target site and oligouridylated by other TUTases at its proximity without involving Argonaute-mediated RNA cleavage. Our findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanics of mammalian miRNA-mediated gene silencing by coordinated target mRNA recognition, cleavage, uridylation and degradation. PMID:27440378

  10. Quantitative imaging of single mRNA splice variants in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyuwan; Cui, Yi; Lee, Luke P.; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Alternative messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing is a fundamental process of gene regulation, and errors in RNA splicing are known to be associated with a variety of different diseases. However, there is currently a lack of quantitative technologies for monitoring mRNA splice variants in cells. Here, we show that a combination of plasmonic dimer probes and hyperspectral imaging can be used to detect and quantify mRNA splice variants in living cells. The probes are made from gold nanoparticles functionalized with oligonucleotides and can hybridize to specific mRNA sequences, forming nanoparticle dimers that exhibit distinct spectral shifts due to plasmonic coupling. With this approach, we show that the spatial and temporal distribution of three selected splice variants of the breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA1, can be monitored at single-copy resolution by measuring the hybridization dynamics of the nanoplasmonic dimers. Our study provides insights into RNA and its transport in living cells, which could improve our understanding of cellular protein complexes, pharmacogenomics, genetic diagnosis and gene therapies.

  11. Permissive effect of dexamethasone on the increase of proenkephalin mRNA induced by depolarization of chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Naranjo, J.R.; Mocchetti, I.; Schwartz, J.P.; Costa, E.

    1986-03-01

    In cultured bovine chromaffin cells, changes in the dynamic state of enkephalin stores elicited experimentally were studied by measuring cellular proenkephalin mRNA, as well as enkephalin precursors and authentic enkephalin content of cells and culture media. In parallel, tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and catecholamine cell content were also determined. Low concentrations (0.5-100 pM) of dexamethasone increased the cell contents of proenkephalin mRNA and enkephalin-containing peptides. High concentrations of the hormone(1 ..mu..M) were required to increase the cell contents of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and catecholamines. Depolarization of the cells with 10 ..mu..M veratridine resulted in a depletion of enkephalin and catecholamine stores after 24 hr. The enkephalin, but not the catecholamine, content was restored by 48 hr. An increase in proenkephalin mRNA content might account for the recovery; this increase was curtailed by tetrodotoxin and enhanced by 10 pM dexamethasone. Tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA content was not significantly modified by depolarization, even in the presence of 1 ..mu..M dexamethasone. Aldosterone, progesterone, testosterone, or estradiol (1 ..mu..M) failed to change proenkephalin mRNA. Hence, dexamethasone appears to exert a specific permissive action on the stimulation of the proenkephalin gene elicited by depolarization. Though the catecholamines and enkephalins are localized in the same chromaffin granules and are coreleased by depolarization, the genes coding for the processes that are rate limiting in the production of these neuromodulators can be differentially regulated.

  12. Inhibition of pyrimidine synthesis reverses viral virulence factor-mediated block of mRNA nuclear export

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Das, Priyabrata; Schmolke, Mirco; Manicassamy, Balaji; Wang, Yaming; Deng, Xiaoyi; Cai, Ling; Tu, Benjamin P.; Forst, Christian V.; Roth, Michael G.; Levy, David E.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; de Brabander, Jef; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2012-01-01

    The NS1 protein of influenza virus is a major virulence factor essential for virus replication, as it redirects the host cell to promote viral protein expression. NS1 inhibits cellular messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) processing and export, down-regulating host gene expression and enhancing viral gene expression. We report in this paper the identification of a nontoxic quinoline carboxylic acid that reverts the inhibition of mRNA nuclear export by NS1, in the absence or presence of the virus. This quinoline carboxylic acid directly inhibited dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH), a host enzyme required for de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis, and partially reduced pyrimidine levels. This effect induced NXF1 expression, which promoted mRNA nuclear export in the presence of NS1. The release of NS1-mediated mRNA export block by DHODH inhibition also occurred in the presence of vesicular stomatitis virus M (matrix) protein, another viral inhibitor of mRNA export. This reversal of mRNA export block allowed expression of antiviral factors. Thus, pyrimidines play a necessary role in the inhibition of mRNA nuclear export by virulence factors. PMID:22312003

  13. mRNA for low density lipoprotein receptor in brain and spinal cord of immature and mature rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, S.L.; Russell, D.W.; Goldstein, J.L.; Brown, M.S.

    1987-09-01

    Hybridization studies with (/sup 32/P)cDNA probes revealed detectable amounts of mRNA for the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor in the central nervous system (CNS) of rabbits. mRNA levels were highest in the medulla/pons and spinal cord, which were the most heavily myelinated regions that were studied. Lower, but detectable levels were present in cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, thalamus, midbrain, and cerebellum. In the medulla/pons and spinal cord, the levels of receptor mRNA were in a range comparable to that detected in the liver. The levels of receptor mRNA in whole brain were constant from 3 days of age to adulthood and, thus, did not vary in proportion to the rate of myelin synthesis. LDL receptor mRNA in the CNS was produced by the same gene that produced the liver and adrenal mRNA as revealed by the demonstration of a deletion in the neural mRNA of Watanabe-heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits identical to the deletion in the LDL receptor gene of these mutant animals. Using antibodies directed against the bovine LDL receptor, the authors showed that LDL receptor protein is present in the medulla/pons of adult cows. The cell types that express LDL receptors in the CNS and the functions of these receptors are unknown.

  14. Novel beta-spectrin mutations in hereditary spherocytosis associated with decreased levels of mRNA.

    PubMed

    Maciag, Monika; Płochocka, Danuta; Adamowicz-Salach, Anna; Burzyńska, Beata

    2009-08-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is one of the most frequent and heterogeneous inherited haemolytic anaemias. It is associated with abnormalities of several erythrocyte membrane proteins. We investigated relative mRNA quantification of red blood cell membrane protein genes using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in order to better characterize HS cases and to select genes to search for mutations in patients with spherocytosis. qPCR experiments indicated that the spectrin beta gene (SPTB) could be involved in anaemia pathogenesis. DNA analysis of SPTB in the HS subjects with decreased SPTB mRNA levels revealed the presence of five previously undescribed mutations: R1756X, 781delT and IVS22nt-4G>A, 1502insA and IVS20nt-2A>G. PMID:19538529

  15. Selecting Reliable mRNA Expression Measurements Across Platforms Improves Downstream Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Pan; Diao, Lixia; Shen, Li; Li, Lerong; Heymach, John Victor; Girard, Luc; Minna, John D.; Coombes, Kevin R.; Byers, Lauren Averett; Wang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    With increasing use of publicly available gene expression data sets, the quality of the expression data is a critical issue for downstream analysis, gene signature development, and cross-validation of data sets. Thus, identifying reliable expression measurements by leveraging multiple mRNA expression platforms is an important analytical task. In this study, we propose a statistical framework for selecting reliable measurements between platforms by modeling the correlations of mRNA expression levels using a beta-mixture model. The model-based selection provides an effective and objective way to separate good probes from probes with low quality, thereby improving the efficiency and accuracy of the analysis. The proposed method can be used to compare two microarray technologies or microarray and RNA sequencing measurements. We tested the approach in two matched profiling data sets, using microarray gene expression measurements from the same samples profiled on both Affymetrix and Illumina platforms. We also applied the algorithm to mRNA expression data to compare Affymetrix microarray data with RNA sequencing measurements. The algorithm successfully identified probes/genes with reliable measurements. Removing the unreliable measurements resulted in significant improvements for gene signature development and functional annotations. PMID:27199546

  16. New potential markers of in vitro tomato morphogenesis identified by mRNA differential display.

    PubMed

    Torelli, A; Soragni, E; Bolchi, A; Petrucco, S; Ottonello, S; Branca, C

    1996-12-01

    The identification of plant genes involved in early phases of in vitro morphogenesis can not only contribute to our understanding of the processes underlying growth regulator-controlled determination, but also provide novel markers for evaluating the outcome of in vitro regeneration experiments. To search for such genes and to monitor changes in gene expression accompanying in vitro regeneration, we have adapted the mRNA differential display technique to the comparative analysis of a model system of tomato cotyledons that can be driven selectively toward either shoot or callus formation by means of previously determined growth regulator supplementations. Hormone-independent transcriptional modulation (mainly down-regulation) has been found to be the most common event, indicating that a non-specific reprogramming of gene expression quantitatively predominates during the early phases of in vitro culture. However, cDNA fragments representative of genes that are either down-regulated or induced in a programme-specific manner could also be identified, and two of them (G35, G36) were further characterized. One of these cDNA fragments, G35, corresponds to an mRNA that is down-regulated much earlier in callus- (day 2) than in shoot-determined explants (day 6). The other, G36, identifies an mRNA that is transiently expressed in shoot-determined explants only, well before any macroscopic signs of differentiation become apparent, and thus exhibits typical features of a morphogenetic marker. PMID:8980540

  17. Protein and mRNA characterization in high and low metastasis adenoid cystic carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie-lin; Zhu, Nai-shuo; Wang, Ying; Guan, Xiao-feng; Zheng, Zhao-xin

    2004-12-01

    Metastasis and invasion, the important characteristics of malignant tumors, are closely associated with a series of changes in the expression of genes and proteins. In this study, we compare mRNA and protein expression in high and low metastasis adenoid cystic carcinoma cell lines by mRNA suppression subtractive hybridization and two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with peptide mass fingerprint analysis. 34 differentially expressed genes were obtained using suppression subtractive hybridization experiments including 6 highly expressed gene sequences in the high metastasis cell line, and 28 in the low metastasis cell line. RNA dot blot hybridization further confirmed the results after excluding false positives. For protein analysis, ten significantly different protein spots were detected using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis technique combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MALDI- TOF-MS). The results then compare with the SWISS PROT database. These results suggest that high tumor metastasis of adenoid cystic carcinoma is associated with multiple genes whose function include angiogenesis, protein synthesis, signal transduction, modulation of cell cycle, molecular chaperones, and immune co-stimulating molecule. Moreover, the results of the phenotypic function-related expression mapping analysis at the mRNA and protein level revealed obvious complementarities, providing important clues for further study of the molecular mechanism of metastasis, metastasis control and possible targets for cancer gene therapy. PMID:15663007

  18. Characterization of proteins associating with 5' terminus of PGHS-1 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Bunimov, Natalia; Laneuville, Odette

    2010-06-01

    Induction of Prostaglandin Endoperoxide H Synthase-1 (PGHS-1) gene has been previously documented in a few studies during events such as development and cellular differentiation. However, molecular mechanisms governing the regulation of PGHS-1 gene expression and contributing to changes in protein levels are poorly understood. Using the MEG-01 cell model of PGHS-1 gene induction, our laboratory has previously demonstrated that the 5'UTR and the first two exons of PGHS-1 mRNA had a significant impact on decreasing the translational efficiency of a reporter gene and suggested that the presence of a secondary structure is required for conservation of this activity. This 5'end of PGHS-1 mRNA sequence has also been shown to associate with nucleolin protein. In the current study, we set to investigate the protein composition of the mRNP (messenger ribonucleoprotein) associating with the 5'end of PGHS-1 mRNA and to identify its protein members. RNA/protein binding assays coupled with LC-MS analysis identified serpin B1 and NF45 (nuclear factor 45) proteins as potential members of PGHS-1 mRNP complex. Immunoprecipitation experiments using MEG-01 protein extracts validated mass spectrometry data and confirmed binding of nucleolin, serpin B1, NF45 and NF90. The RNA fraction was extracted from immunoprecipitated mRNP complexes and association of RNA binding proteins, serpin B1, NF45 and NF90, to PGHS-1 mRNA target sequence was confirmed by RT-PCR. Together these data suggest that serpin B1, NF45 and NF90 associate with PGHS-1 mRNA and can potentially participate in the formation a single or a number of PGHS-1 ribonucleoprotein complexes, through nucleolin that possibly serves as a docking base for other protein complex members. PMID:20112001

  19. Prolonged fasting and cortisol reduce myostatin mRNA levels in tilapia larvae; short-term fasting elevates.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Buel D; Weber, Gregory M; Kelley, Kevin M; Levine, Michael A

    2003-05-01

    Myostatin negatively regulates muscle growth and development and has recently been characterized in several fishes. We measured fasting myostatin mRNA levels in adult tilapia skeletal muscle and in whole larvae. Although fasting reduced some growth indexes in adults, skeletal muscle myostatin mRNA levels were unaffected. By contrast, larval myostatin mRNA levels were sometimes elevated after a short-term fast and were consistently reduced with prolonged fasting. These effects were specific for myostatin, as mRNA levels of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphatase were unchanged. Cortisol levels were elevated in fasted larvae with reduced myostatin mRNA, whereas in addition immersion of larvae in 1 ppm (2.8 microM) cortisol reduced myostatin mRNA in a time-dependent fashion. These results suggest that larval myostatin mRNA levels may initially rise but ultimately fall during a prolonged fast. The reduction is likely mediated by fasting-induced hypercortisolemia, indicating divergent evolutionary mechanisms of glucocorticoid regulation of myostatin mRNA, since these steroids upregulate myostatin gene expression in mammals. PMID:12676749

  20. hnRNP L binds to CA repeats in the 3'UTR of bcl-2 mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Hyoung; Lim, Mi-Hyun; Youn, Dong-Ye; Jung, Seung Eun; Ahn, Young Soo; Tsujimoto, Yoshihide; Lee, Jeong-Hwa

    2009-05-08

    We previously reported that the CA-repeat sequence in the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of bcl-2 mRNA is involved in the decay of bcl-2 mRNA. However, the trans-acting factor for the CA element in bcl-2 mRNA remains unidentified. The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L (hnRNP L), an intron splicing factor, has been reported to bind to CA repeats and CA clusters in the 3'UTR of several genes. We reported herein that the CA repeats of bcl-2 mRNA have the potential to form a distinct ribonuclear protein complex in cytoplasmic extracts of MCF-7 cells, as evidenced by RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays (REMSA). A super-shift assay using the hnRNP L antibody completely shifted the complex. Immunoprecipitation with the hnRNP L antibody and MCF-7 cells followed by RT-PCR revealed that hnRNP L interacts with endogenous bcl-2 mRNA in vivo. Furthermore, the suppression of hnRNP L in MCF-7 cells by the transfection of siRNA for hnRNP L resulted in a delay in the degradation of RNA transcripts including CA repeats of bcl-2 mRNA in vitro, suggesting that the interaction between hnRNPL and CA repeats of bcl-2 mRNA participates in destabilizing bcl-2 mRNA.

  1. Circadian and feeding rhythms differentially affect rhythmic mRNA transcription and translation in mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Atger, Florian; Gobet, Cédric; Marquis, Julien; Martin, Eva; Wang, Jingkui; Weger, Benjamin; Lefebvre, Grégory; Descombes, Patrick; Naef, Felix; Gachon, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Diurnal oscillations of gene expression are a hallmark of rhythmic physiology across most living organisms. Such oscillations are controlled by the interplay between the circadian clock and feeding rhythms. Although rhythmic mRNA accumulation has been extensively studied, comparatively less is known about their transcription and translation. Here, we quantified simultaneously temporal transcription, accumulation, and translation of mouse liver mRNAs under physiological light–dark conditions and ad libitum or night-restricted feeding in WT and brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1)-deficient animals. We found that rhythmic transcription predominantly drives rhythmic mRNA accumulation and translation for a majority of genes. Comparison of wild-type and Bmal1 KO mice shows that circadian clock and feeding rhythms have broad impact on rhythmic gene expression, Bmal1 deletion affecting surprisingly both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Translation efficiency is differentially regulated during the diurnal cycle for genes with 5′-Terminal Oligo Pyrimidine tract (5′-TOP) sequences and for genes involved in mitochondrial activity, many harboring a Translation Initiator of Short 5′-UTR (TISU) motif. The increased translation efficiency of 5′-TOP and TISU genes is mainly driven by feeding rhythms but Bmal1 deletion also affects amplitude and phase of translation, including TISU genes. Together this study emphasizes the complex interconnections between circadian and feeding rhythms at several steps ultimately determining rhythmic gene expression and translation. PMID:26554015

  2. Role of miRNAs and alternative mRNA 3'-end cleavage and polyadenylation of their mRNA targets in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Soetanto, R; Hynes, C J; Patel, H R; Humphreys, D T; Evers, M; Duan, G; Parker, B J; Archer, S K; Clancy, J L; Graham, R M; Beilharz, T H; Smith, N J; Preiss, T

    2016-05-01

    miRNAs play critical roles in heart disease. In addition to differential miRNA expression, miRNA-mediated control is also affected by variable miRNA processing or alternative 3'-end cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) of their mRNA targets. To what extent these phenomena play a role in the heart remains unclear. We sought to explore miRNA processing and mRNA APA in cardiomyocytes, and whether these change during cardiac hypertrophy. Thoracic aortic constriction (TAC) was performed to induce hypertrophy in C57BL/6J mice. RNA extracted from cardiomyocytes of sham-treated, pre-hypertrophic (2 days post-TAC), and hypertrophic (7 days post-TAC) mice was subjected to small RNA- and poly(A)-test sequencing (PAT-Seq). Differential expression analysis matched expectations; nevertheless we identified ~400 mRNAs and hundreds of noncoding RNA loci as altered with hypertrophy for the first time. Although multiple processing variants were observed for many miRNAs, there was little change in their relative proportions during hypertrophy. PAT-Seq mapped ~48,000 mRNA 3'-ends, identifying novel 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs) for over 7000 genes. Importantly, hypertrophy was associated with marked changes in APA with a net shift from distal to more proximal mRNA 3'-ends, which is predicted to decrease overall miRNA repression strength. We independently validated several examples of 3'UTR proportion change and showed that alternative 3'UTRs associate with differences in mRNA translation. Our work suggests that APA contributes to altered gene expression with the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and provides a rich resource for a systems-level understanding of miRNA-mediated regulation in physiological and pathological states of the heart. PMID:27032571

  3. mRNA Decay of Most Arabidopsis miRNA Targets Requires Slicer Activity of AGO11[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression in animals and plants. They guide RNA-induced silencing complexes to complementary target mRNA, thereby mediating mRNA degradation or translational repression. ARGONAUTE (AGO) proteins bind directly to miRNAs and may catalyze cleavage (slicing) of target mRNAs. In animals, miRNA target degradation via slicing occurs only exceptionally, and target mRNA decay is induced via AGO-dependent recruitment of deadenylase complexes. Conversely, plant miRNAs generally direct slicing of their targets, but it is unclear whether slicer-independent mechanisms of target mRNA decay also exist, and, if so, how much they contribute to miRNA-induced mRNA decay. Here, we compare phenotypes and transcript profiles of ago1 null and slicer-deficient mutants in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We also construct conditional loss-of-function mutants of AGO1 to allow transcript profiling in true leaves. Although phenotypic differences between ago1 null and slicer-deficient mutants can be discerned, the results of both transcript profiling approaches indicate that slicer activity is required for mRNA repression of the vast majority of miRNA targets. A set of genes exhibiting up-regulation specifically in ago1 null, but not in ago1 slicer-deficient mutants was also identified, leaving open the possibility that AGO1 may have functions in gene regulation independent of small RNAs. PMID:27208258

  4. Glucose induces FGF21 mRNA expression through ChREBP activation in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Katsumi; Takeda, Jun; Horikawa, Yukio

    2009-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) has beneficial effects of improving the plasma glucose and lipid profiles in diabetic rodents. Here, we investigated carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) involvement in the regulation of FGF21 mRNA expression in liver. Glucose stimulation and adenoviral overexpression of dominant active ChREBP increased FGF21 mRNA. Consistently, adenoviral expression of dominant negative Mlx inhibited glucose induction of FGF21 mRNA. Furthermore, deletion studies of mouse FGF21 gene promoter (-2000 to +65 bp) revealed a glucose responsive region between -74 and -52 bp. These findings suggest that FGF21 expression is regulated by ChREBP. PMID:19660458

  5. Degradation of Gadd45 mRNA by nonsense-mediated decay is essential for viability

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jonathan O; Moore, Kristin A; Chapin, Alex; Hollien, Julie; Metzstein, Mark M

    2016-01-01

    The nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway functions to degrade both abnormal and wild-type mRNAs. NMD is essential for viability in most organisms, but the molecular basis for this requirement is unknown. Here we show that a single, conserved NMD target, the mRNA coding for the stress response factor growth arrest and DNA-damage inducible 45 (GADD45) can account for lethality in Drosophila lacking core NMD genes. Moreover, depletion of Gadd45 in mammalian cells rescues the cell survival defects associated with NMD knockdown. Our findings demonstrate that degradation of Gadd45 mRNA is the essential NMD function and, surprisingly, that the surveillance of abnormal mRNAs by this pathway is not necessarily required for viability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12876.001 PMID:26952209

  6. Analysis and in vitro localization of internal methylated adenine residues in dihydrofolate reductase mRNA.

    PubMed

    Rana, A P; Tuck, M T

    1990-08-25

    A T7 RNA transcript coding for mouse dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) was utilized as a substrate for the N6-methyladenosine mRNA methyltransferase isolated from HeLa cell nuclei. This transcript acted as a 3 fold better substrate than either prolactin mRNA or a synthetic RNA substrate which contained multiple methylation consensus sequences. Formation of internal N6-methyladenine (m6A) residues in the DHFR transcript was shown to increase slightly by the absence of a 7-methylguanine-2'-O-methyl cap structure. Using T7 transcripts from different regions of the DHFR gene, the majority of the m6A residues were localized to the coding region and a segment of the transcript just 3' to the coding region. This data suggests that DHFR mRNA contains multiple methylation sites with most of these sites concentrated in the coding region of the transcript. PMID:2395644

  7. OPIATE EXPOSURE AND WITHDRAWAL DYNAMICALLY REGULATE mRNA EXPRESSION IN THE SEROTONERGIC DORSAL RAPHE NUCLEUS

    PubMed Central

    Lunden, Jason; Kirby, Lynn G.

    2013-01-01

    Previous results from our lab suggest that hypofunctioning of the serotonergic (5-HT) dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is involved in stress-induced opiate reinstatement. To further investigate the effects of morphine dependence and withdrawal on the 5-HT DRN system, we measured gene expression at the level of mRNA in the DRN during a model of morphine dependence, withdrawal and post withdrawal stress exposure in rats. Morphine pellets were implanted for 72h and then either removed or animals were injected with naloxone to produce spontaneous or precipitated withdrawal, respectively. Animals exposed to these conditions exhibited withdrawal symptoms including weight loss, wet dog shakes and jumping behavior. Gene expression for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB, corticotrophin releasing-factor (CRF)-R1, CRF-R2, GABAA-α1, μ-opioid receptor (MOR), 5-HT1A, tryptophan hydroxylase2 and the 5-HT transporter was then measured using quantitative real-time PCR at multiple time-points across the model of morphine exposure, withdrawal and post withdrawal stress. Expression levels of BDNF, TrkB and CRF-R1 mRNA were decreased during both morphine exposure and following seven days of withdrawal. CRF-R2 mRNA expression was elevated after seven days of withdrawal. 5-HT1A receptor mRNA expression was decreased following 3 hours of morphine exposure, while TPH2 mRNA expression was decreased after seven days of withdrawal with swim stress. There were no changes in the expression of GABAA-α1, MOR or 5-HT transporter mRNA. Collectively these results suggest that alterations in neurotrophin support, CRF-dependent stress signaling, 5-HT synthesis and release may underlie 5-HT DRN hypofunction that can potentially lead to stress-induced opiate relapse. PMID:24055683

  8. Amylase mRNA transcripts in normal tissues and neoplasms: the implication of different expressions of amylase isogenes.

    PubMed

    Seyama, K; Nukiwa, T; Takahashi, K; Takahashi, H; Kira, S

    1994-01-01

    To understand the cellular origin and mechanism of gene expression in amylase-producing cancers, the phenotyping of amylase isogenes by the polymerase chain reaction and restriction-fragment-length polymorphism using restriction endonucleases TaqI, DdeI, HinfI, and AfaI were performed for 3 amylase-producing lung adenocarcinomas, 16 lung cancers without hyperamylasemia, other human malignant neoplasms, cultured cell lines, and normal tissues. In addition, amylase mRNA transcripts were semi-quantified by the limited polymerase chain reaction. Amylase mRNA transcripts were detected in all of the tissues examined. The AMY1 gene (salivary type) was exclusively and highly expressed in the salivary glands and the amylase-producing lung adenocarcinomas. Coexpression of the AMY1 gene and AMY2 gene (pancreatic type) was observed in most of the lung cancers without hyperamylasemia, lung tissue, and cells scraped from the tracheal epithelium, thyroid, and female genital tract (ovary, fallopian tube, and uterus cervix), while minimal levels of mRNA transcripts of the AMY2 gene were detected in other malignant neoplasms, various normal tissues, and the cultured cell lines. All mRNA transcripts identified as being those of the AMY2 gene were further identified as being from the AMY2B gene except for the transcripts from the pancreas, in which the AMY2A gene and AMY2B gene were coexpressed. On the basis of these results, the clinical occurrence of amylase-producing cancer likely relates to the tissues expressing the AMY1 gene, while the AMY2B gene, which evolutionarily is the oldest gene among human amylase isogenes, is constitutively expressed in various tissues. PMID:7507116

  9. Posttranscriptional regulation of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stefanovic, B; Hellerbrand, C; Holcik, M; Briendl, M; Aliebhaber, S; Brenner, D A

    1997-01-01

    The hepatic stellate cell (HSC) is the primary cell responsible for the dramatic increase in the synthesis of type I collagen in the cirrhotic liver. Quiescent HSCs contain a low level of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA, while activated HSCs contain about 60- to 70-fold more of this mRNA. The transcription rate of the collagen alpha1(I) gene is only two fold higher in activated HSCs than in quiescent HSCs. In assays using actinomycin D or 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole riboside collagen alpha1(I) mRNA has estimated half-lives of 1.5 h in quiescent HSCs and 24 h in activated HSCs. Thus, this 16-fold change in mRNA stability is primarily responsible for the increase in collagen alpha1(I) mRNA steady-state level in activated HSCs. We have identified a novel RNA-protein interaction targeted to the C-rich sequence in the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' untranslated region (UTR). This sequence is localized 24 nucleotides 3' to the stop codon. In transient transfection experiments, mutation of this sequence diminished accumulation of an mRNA transcribed from a collagen alpha1(I) minigene and in stable transfections decreased the half-life of collagen alpha1(I) minigene mRNA. Binding to the collagen alpha1(I) 3' UTR is present in cytoplasmic extracts of activated but not quiescent HSCs. It contains as a subunit alphaCP, which is also found in the complex involved in stabilization of alpha-globin mRNA. The auxiliary factors necessary to promote binding of alphaCP to the collagen 3' UTR are distinct from the factors necessary for binding to the alpha-globin sequence. Since alphaCP is expressed in both quiescent and activated HSCs, these auxiliary factors are responsible for the differentially expressed RNA-protein interaction at the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' UTR. PMID:9271398

  10. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells using non-synthetic mRNA.

    PubMed

    Rohani, L; Fabian, C; Holland, H; Naaldijk, Y; Dressel, R; Löffler-Wirth, H; Binder, H; Arnold, A; Stolzing, A

    2016-05-01

    Here we describe some of the crucial steps to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) using mRNA transfection. Our approach uses a V. virus-derived capping enzyme instead of a cap-analog, ensuring 100% proper cap orientation for in vitro transcribed mRNA. V. virus' 2'-O-Methyltransferase enzyme creates a cap1 structure found in higher eukaryotes and has higher translation efficiency compared to other methods. Use of the polymeric transfection reagent polyethylenimine proved superior to other transfection methods. The mRNA created via this method did not trigger an intracellular immune response via human IFN-gamma (hIFN-γ) or alpha (hIFN-α) release, thus circumventing the use of suppressors. Resulting mRNA and protein were expressed at high levels for over 48h, thus obviating daily transfections. Using this method, we demonstrated swift activation of pluripotency associated genes in human fibroblasts. Low oxygen conditions further facilitated colony formation. Differentiation into different germ layers was confirmed via teratoma assay. Reprogramming with non-synthetic mRNA holds great promise for safe generation of iPSCs of human origin. Using the protocols described herein we hope to make this method more accessible to other groups as a fast, inexpensive, and non-viral reprogramming approach. PMID:27064648

  11. Proteins involved in the degradation of cytoplasmic mRNA in the major eukaryotic model systems

    PubMed Central

    Siwaszek, Aleksandra; Ukleja, Marta; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The process of mRNA decay and surveillance is considered to be one of the main posttranscriptional gene expression regulation platforms in eukaryotes. The degradation of stable, protein-coding transcripts is normally initiated by removal of the poly(A) tail followed by 5’-cap hydrolysis and degradation of the remaining mRNA body by Xrn1. Alternatively, the exosome complex degrades mRNA in the 3’>5’direction. The newly discovered uridinylation-dependent pathway, which is present in many different organisms, also seems to play a role in bulk mRNA degradation. Simultaneously, to avoid the synthesis of incorrect proteins, special cellular machinery is responsible for the removal of faulty transcripts via nonsense-mediated, no-go, non-stop or non-functional 18S rRNA decay. This review is focused on the major eukaryotic cytoplasmic mRNA degradation pathways showing many similarities and pointing out main differences between the main model-species: yeast, Drosophila, plants and mammals. PMID:25483043

  12. Detection of MDR1 mRNA expression with optimized gold nanoparticle beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiumei; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-03-01

    MDR1 (multidrug resistance gene) mRNA expression is a promising biomarker for the prediction of doxorubicin resistance in clinic. However, the traditional technical process in clinic is complicated and cannot perform the real-time detection mRNA in living single cells. In this study, the expression of MDR1 mRNA was analyzed based on optimized gold nanoparticle beacon in tumor cells. Firstly, gold nanoparticle (AuNP) was modified by thiol-PEG, and the MDR1 beacon sequence was screened and optimized using a BLAST bioinformatics strategy. Then, optimized MDR1 molecular beacons were characterized by transmission electron microscope, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopies. The cytotoxicity of MDR1 molecular beacon on L-02, K562 and K562/Adr cells were investigated by MTT assay, suggesting that MDR1 molecular beacon was low inherent cytotoxicity. Dark field microscope was used to investigate the cellular uptake of hDAuNP beacon assisted with ultrasound. Finally, laser scanning confocal microscope images showed that there was a significant difference in MDR1 mRNA expression in K562 and K562/Adr cells, which was consistent with the results of q-PCR measurement. In summary, optimized MDR1 molecular beacon designed in this study is a reliable strategy for detection MDR1 mRNA expression in living tumor cells, and will be a promising strategy for in guiding patient treatment and management in individualized medication.

  13. Abundance of specific mRNA transcripts impacts hatching success in European eel, Anguilla anguilla L.

    PubMed

    Rozenfeld, Christoffer; Butts, Ian A E; Tomkiewicz, Jonna; Zambonino-Infante, Jose-Luis; Mazurais, David

    2016-01-01

    Maternal mRNA governs early embryonic development in fish and variation in abundance of maternal transcripts may contribute to variation in embryonic survival and hatch success in European eel, Anguilla anguilla. Previous studies have shown that quantities of the maternal gene products β-tubulin, insulin-like growth factor 2 (igf2), nucleoplasmin (npm2), prohibitin 2 (phb2), phosphatidylinositol glycan biosynthesis class F protein 5 (pigf5), and carnitine O-palmitoyltransferase liver isoform-like 1 (cpt1) are associated with embryonic developmental competence in other teleosts. Here, the relations between relative mRNA abundance of these genes in eggs and/or embryos and egg quality, was studied and analyzed. We compared egg quality of the two groups: i) batches with hatching and ii) batches with no hatching. Results showed no significant differences in relative mRNA abundance between the hatch and no hatching groups for any of the selected genes at 0, 2.5, and 5HPF. However, at 30HPF the hatch group showed significantly higher abundance of cpt1a, cpt1b, β-tubulin, phb2, and pigf5 transcripts than the no hatch group. Therefore, these results indicate that up-regulation of the transcription of these genes in European eel after the mid-blastula transition, may be needed to sustain embryonic development and hatching success. PMID:26415730

  14. PABPN1-Dependent mRNA Processing Induces Muscle Wasting

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Yotam; van Putten, Maaike; Paniagua-Soriano, Guillem; Krom, Yvonne D.; Florea, Bogdan I.; Raz, Vered

    2016-01-01

    Poly(A) Binding Protein Nuclear 1 (PABPN1) is a multifunctional regulator of mRNA processing, and its expression levels specifically decline in aging muscles. An expansion mutation in PABPN1 is the genetic cause of oculopharyngeal muscle dystrophy (OPMD), a late onset and rare myopathy. Moreover, reduced PABPN1 expression correlates with symptom manifestation in OPMD. PABPN1 regulates alternative polyadenylation site (PAS) utilization. However, the impact of PAS utilization on cell and tissue function is poorly understood. We hypothesized that altered PABPN1 expression levels is an underlying cause of muscle wasting. To test this, we stably down-regulated PABPN1 in mouse tibialis anterior (TA) muscles by localized injection of adeno-associated viruses expressing shRNA to PABPN1 (shPab). We found that a mild reduction in PABPN1 levels causes muscle pathology including myofiber atrophy, thickening of extracellular matrix and myofiber-type transition. Moreover, reduced PABPN1 levels caused a consistent decline in distal PAS utilization in the 3’-UTR of a subset of OPMD-dysregulated genes. This alternative PAS utilization led to up-regulation of Atrogin-1, a key muscle atrophy regulator, but down regulation of proteasomal genes. Additionally reduced PABPN1 levels caused a reduction in proteasomal activity, and transition in MyHC isotope expression pattern in myofibers. We suggest that PABPN1-mediated alternative PAS utilization plays a central role in aging-associated muscle wasting. PMID:27152426

  15. PABPN1-Dependent mRNA Processing Induces Muscle Wasting.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Muhammad; Raz, Yotam; van Putten, Maaike; Paniagua-Soriano, Guillem; Krom, Yvonne D; Florea, Bogdan I; Raz, Vered

    2016-05-01

    Poly(A) Binding Protein Nuclear 1 (PABPN1) is a multifunctional regulator of mRNA processing, and its expression levels specifically decline in aging muscles. An expansion mutation in PABPN1 is the genetic cause of oculopharyngeal muscle dystrophy (OPMD), a late onset and rare myopathy. Moreover, reduced PABPN1 expression correlates with symptom manifestation in OPMD. PABPN1 regulates alternative polyadenylation site (PAS) utilization. However, the impact of PAS utilization on cell and tissue function is poorly understood. We hypothesized that altered PABPN1 expression levels is an underlying cause of muscle wasting. To test this, we stably down-regulated PABPN1 in mouse tibialis anterior (TA) muscles by localized injection of adeno-associated viruses expressing shRNA to PABPN1 (shPab). We found that a mild reduction in PABPN1 levels causes muscle pathology including myofiber atrophy, thickening of extracellular matrix and myofiber-type transition. Moreover, reduced PABPN1 levels caused a consistent decline in distal PAS utilization in the 3'-UTR of a subset of OPMD-dysregulated genes. This alternative PAS utilization led to up-regulation of Atrogin-1, a key muscle atrophy regulator, but down regulation of proteasomal genes. Additionally reduced PABPN1 levels caused a reduction in proteasomal activity, and transition in MyHC isotope expression pattern in myofibers. We suggest that PABPN1-mediated alternative PAS utilization plays a central role in aging-associated muscle wasting. PMID:27152426

  16. CDKN3 mRNA as a Biomarker for Survival and Therapeutic Target in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barrón, Eira Valeria; Roman-Bassaure, Edgar; Sánchez-Sandoval, Ana Laura; Espinosa, Ana María; Guardado-Estrada, Mariano; Medina, Ingrid; Juárez, Eligia; Alfaro, Ana; Bermúdez, Miriam; Zamora, Rubén; García-Ruiz, Carlos; Gomora, Juan Carlos; Kofman, Susana; Pérez-Armendariz, E. Martha; Berumen, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 (CDKN3) gene, involved in mitosis, is upregulated in cervical cancer (CC). We investigated CDKN3 mRNA as a survival biomarker and potential therapeutic target for CC. CDKN3 mRNA was measured in 134 CC and 25 controls by quantitative PCR. A 5-year survival study was conducted in 121 of these CC patients. Furthermore, CDKN3-specific siRNAs were used to investigate whether CDKN3 is involved in proliferation, migration, and invasion in CC-derived cell lines (SiHa, CaSki, HeLa). CDKN3 mRNA was on average 6.4-fold higher in tumors than in controls (p = 8 x 10−6, Mann-Whitney). A total of 68.2% of CC patients over expressing CDKN3 gene (fold change ≥ 17) died within two years of diagnosis, independent of the clinical stage and HPV type (Hazard Ratio = 5.0, 95% CI: 2.5–10, p = 3.3 x 10−6, Cox proportional-hazards regression). In contrast, only 19.2% of the patients with lower CDKN3 expression died in the same period. In vitro inactivation of CDKN3 decreased cell proliferation on average 67%, although it had no effect on cell migration and invasion. CDKN3 mRNA may be a good survival biomarker and potential therapeutic target in CC. PMID:26372210

  17. Urinary cell mRNA profiles predictive of human kidney allograft status.

    PubMed

    Lee, John R; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Dadhania, Darshana; Ding, Ruchuang; Sharma, Vijay K; Schwartz, Joseph E; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2014-03-01

    Kidney allograft status is currently characterized using the invasive percutaneous needle core biopsy procedure. The procedure has become safer over the years, but challenges and complications still exist including sampling error, interobserver variability, bleeding, arteriovenous fistula, graft loss, and even death. Because the most common type of acute rejection is distinguished by inflammatory cells exiting the intravascular compartment and gaining access to the renal tubular space, we reasoned that a kidney allograft may function as an in vivo flow cytometer and sort cells involved in rejection into urine. To test this idea, we developed quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for absolute quantification of mRNA and pre-amplification protocols to overcome the low RNA yield from urine. Here, we review our single center urinary cell mRNA profiling studies that led to the multicenter Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation (CTOT-04) study and the discovery and validation of a 3-gene signature of 18S rRNA-normalized measures of CD3ε mRNA and IP-10 mRNA and 18S rRNA that is diagnostic and predictive of acute cellular rejection in the kidney allograft. We also review our development of a 4-gene signature of mRNAs for vimentin, NKCC2, E-cadherin, and 18S rRNA diagnostic of interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy (IF/TA). PMID:24517436

  18. Molecular cloning of amyloid cDNA derived from mRNA of the Alzheimer disease brain: coding and noncoding regions of the fetal precursor mRNA are expressed in the cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Zain, S.B.; Salim, M.; Chou, W.G.; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E.M.; Majocha, R.E.; Marotta, C.A.

    1988-02-01

    To gain insight into factors associated with the excessive accumulation of ..beta..-amyloid in the Alzheimer disease (AD) brain, the present studies were initiated to distinguish between a unique primary structure of the AD-specific amyloid precursor mRNA vis a vis other determinants that may affect amyloid levels. Previous molecular cloning experiments focused on amyloid derived from sources other than AD cases. In the present work, the authors cloned and characterized amyloid cDNA derived directly from AD brain mRNA. Poly(A)/sup +/ RNA from AD cortices was used for the preparation of lambdagt11 recombinant cDNA libraries. An insert of 1564 nucleotides was isolated that included the ..beta..-amyloid domain and corresponded to 75% of the coding region and approx. = 70% of the 3'-noncoding region of the fetal precursor amyloid cDNA reported by others. On RNA blots, the AD amyloid mRNA consisted of a doublet of 3.2 and 3.4 kilobases. In control and AD cases, the amyloid mRNA levels were nonuniform and were independent of glial-specific mRNA levels. Based on the sequence analysis data, they conclude that a segment of the amyloid gene is expressed in the AD cortex as a high molecular weight precursor mRNA with major coding and 3'-noncoding regions that are identical to the fetal brain gene product.

  19. Expression of the mRNA encoding truncated PPAR alpha does not correlate with hepatic insensitivity to peroxisome proliferators.

    PubMed

    Hanselman, J C; Vartanian, M A; Koester, B P; Gray, S A; Essenburg, A D; Rea, T J; Bisgaier, C L; Pape, M E

    2001-01-01

    Two alternatively spliced forms of human PPAR alpha mRNA, PPAR alpha1 and PPAR alpha2, have been identified. PPAR alpha1 mRNA gives rise to an active PPAR alpha protein while PPAR alpha2 mRNA gives rise to a form of PPAR which lacks the ligand-binding domain. PPAR alpha2 is unable to activate a peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE) reporter gene construct in transient transfection assays. Both PPAR alpha1 and PPAR alpha2 mRNA are present in human liver, kidney, testes, heart, small intestine, and smooth muscle. In human liver, PPAR alpha2 mRNA abundance is approximately half that of PPAR alpha1 mRNA; a correlation analysis of PPAR alpha1 and PPAR alpha2 mRNA mass revealed an r-value of 0.75 (n = 18). Additional studies with intact liver from various species, showed that the PPAR alpha2/PPAR alpha1 mRNA ratios in rat, rabbit, and mouse liver were less than 0.10; significantly lower than the 0.3 and 0.5 ratios observed in monkey and human livers, respectively. To determine if a high PPAR alpha2/PPAR alpha1 mRNA ratio was associated with insensitivity to peroxisome proliferators, we treated human, rat, and rabbit hepatocytes with WY14643, a potent PPAR alpha activator, and measured acyl CoA oxidase (ACO) mRNA levels. Rat ACO mRNA levels increased markedly in response to WY14643 while human and rabbit hepatocytes were unresponsive. Thus, although the PPAR alpha2/PPAR alpha1 mRNA ratio is low in rabbits, this species is not responsive to peroxisome proliferators. Further studies with male and female rats, which vary significantly in their response to peroxisome proliferators, showed little difference in the ratio of PPAR alpha2/PPAR alpha1 mRNA. These data suggest that selective PPAR alpha2 mRNA expression is not the basis for differential species or gender responses to peroxisome proliferators. PMID:11269670

  20. Re-splicing of mature mRNA in cancer cells promotes activation of distant weak alternative splice sites

    PubMed Central

    Kameyama, Toshiki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Mayeda, Akila

    2012-01-01

    Transcripts of the human tumor susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) are aberrantly spliced in many cancers. A major aberrant splicing event on the TSG101 pre-mRNA involves joining of distant alternative 5′ and 3′ splice sites within exon 2 and exon 9, respectively, resulting in the extensive elimination of the mRNA. The estimated strengths of the alternative splice sites are much lower than those of authentic splice sites. We observed that the equivalent aberrant mRNA could be generated from an intron-less TSG101 gene expressed ectopically in breast cancer cells. Remarkably, we identified a pathway-specific endogenous lariat RNA consisting solely of exonic sequences, predicted to be generated by a re-splicing between exon 2 and exon 9 on the spliced mRNA. Our results provide evidence for a two-step splicing pathway in which the initial constitutive splicing removes all 14 authentic splice sites, thereby bringing the weak alternative splice sites into close proximity. We also demonstrate that aberrant multiple-exon skipping of the fragile histidine triad (FHIT) pre-mRNA in cancer cells occurs via re-splicing of spliced FHIT mRNA. The re-splicing of mature mRNA can potentially generate mutation-independent diversity in cancer transcriptomes. Conversely, a mechanism may exist in normal cells to prevent potentially deleterious mRNA re-splicing events. PMID:22675076

  1. miR-155 targets Caspase-3 mRNA in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Rebecca; Liepelt, Anke; Mossanen, Jana C; Dueck, Anne; Simons, Nadine; Mohs, Antje; Trautwein, Christian; Meister, Gunter; Marx, Gernot; Ostareck-Lederer, Antje; Ostareck, Dirk H

    2016-01-01

    To secure the functionality of activated macrophages in the innate immune response, efficient life span control is required. Recognition of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) by toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) induces downstream signaling pathways, which merge to induce the expression of cytokine genes and anti-apoptotic genes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important inflammatory response modulators, but information about their functional impact on apoptosis is scarce. To identify miRNAs differentially expressed in response to LPS, cDNA libraries from untreated and LPS-activated murine macrophages were analyzed by deep sequencing and regulated miRNA expression was verified by Northern blotting and qPCR. Employing TargetScan(TM) we identified CASPASE-3 (CASP-3) mRNA that encodes a key player in apoptosis as potential target of LPS-induced miR-155. LPS-dependent primary macrophage activation revealed TLR4-mediated enhancement of miR-155 expression and CASP-3 mRNA reduction. Endogenous CASP-3 and cleaved CASP-3 protein declined in LPS-activated macrophages. Accumulation of miR-155 and CASP-3 mRNA in miRNA-induced silencing complexes (miRISC) was demonstrated by ARGONAUTE 2 (AGO2) immunoprecipitation. Importantly, specific antagomir transfection effectively reduced mature miR-155 and resulted in significantly elevated CASP-3 mRNA levels in activated macrophages. In vitro translation assays demonstrated that the target site in the CASP-3 mRNA 3'UTR mediates miR-155-dependent Luciferase reporter mRNA destabilization. Strikingly, Annexin V staining of macrophages transfected with antagomir-155 and stimulated with LPS prior to staurosporine (SSP) treatment implied that LPS-induced miR-155 prevents apoptosis through CASP-3 mRNA down-regulation. In conclusion, we report that miR-155-mediated CASP-3 mRNA destabilization in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages suppresses apoptosis, as a prerequisite to maintain their crucial function in inflammation. PMID:26574931

  2. mRNA 3′end processing: A tale of the tail reaches the clinic

    PubMed Central

    Hollerer, Ina; Grund, Kerstin; Hentze, Matthias W; Kulozik, Andreas E

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances reveal mRNA 3′end processing as a highly regulated process that fine-tunes posttranscriptional gene expression. This process can affect the site and/or the efficiency of 3′end processing, controlling the quality and the quantity of substrate mRNAs. The regulation of 3′end processing plays a central role in fundamental physiology such as blood coagulation and innate immunity. In addition, errors in mRNA 3′end processing have been associated with a broad spectrum of human diseases, including cancer. We summarize and discuss the paradigmatic shift in the understanding of 3′end processing as a mechanism of posttranscriptional gene regulation that has reached clinical medicine. PMID:24408965

  3. pEVL: A Linear Plasmid for Generating mRNA IVT Templates With Extended Encoded Poly(A) Sequences.

    PubMed

    Grier, Alexandra E; Burleigh, Stephen; Sahni, Jaya; Clough, Courtnee A; Cardot, Victoire; Choe, Dongwook C; Krutein, Michelle C; Rawlings, David J; Jensen, Michael C; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Jacoby, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    Increasing demand for large-scale synthesis of in vitro transcribed (IVT) mRNA is being driven by the increasing use of mRNA for transient gene expression in cell engineering and therapeutic applications. An important determinant of IVT mRNA potency is the 3' polyadenosine (poly(A)) tail, the length of which correlates with translational efficiency. However, present methods for generation of IVT mRNA rely on templates derived from circular plasmids or PCR products, in which homopolymeric tracts are unstable, thus limiting encoded poly(A) tail lengths to ~120 base pairs (bp). Here, we have developed a novel method for generation of extended poly(A) tracts using a previously described linear plasmid system, pJazz. We find that linear plasmids can successfully propagate poly(A) tracts up to ~500 bp in length for IVT mRNA production. We then modified pJazz by removing extraneous restriction sites, adding a T7 promoter sequence upstream from an extended multiple cloning site, and adding a unique type-IIS restriction site downstream from the encoded poly(A) tract to facilitate generation of IVT mRNA with precisely defined encoded poly(A) tracts and 3' termini. The resulting plasmid, designated pEVL, can be used to generate IVT mRNA with consistent defined lengths and terminal residue(s). PMID:27093168

  4. The Rtr1p CTD phosphatase autoregulates its mRNA through a degradation pathway involving the REX exonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Hodko, Domagoj; Ward, Taylor; Chanfreau, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Rtr1p is a phosphatase that impacts gene expression by modulating the phosphorylation status of the C-terminal domain of the large subunit of RNA polymerase II. Here, we show that Rtr1p is a component of a novel mRNA degradation pathway that promotes its autoregulation through turnover of its own mRNA. We show that the 3′UTR of the RTR1 mRNA contains a cis element that destabilizes this mRNA. RTR1 mRNA turnover is achieved through binding of Rtr1p to the RTR1 mRNP in a manner that is dependent on this cis element. Genetic evidence shows that Rtr1p-mediated decay of the RTR1 mRNA involves the 5′-3′ DExD/H-box RNA helicase Dhh1p and the 3′-5′ exonucleases Rex2p and Rex3p. Rtr1p and Rex3p are found associated with Dhh1p, suggesting a model for recruiting the REX exonucleases to the RTR1 mRNA for degradation. Rtr1p-mediated decay potentially impacts additional transcripts, including the unspliced BMH2 pre-mRNA. We propose that Rtr1p may imprint its RNA targets cotranscriptionally and determine their downstream degradation mechanism by directing these transcripts to a novel turnover pathway that involves Rtr1p, Dhh1p, and the REX family of exonucleases. PMID:26843527

  5. Imaging single mRNAs to study dynamics of mRNA export in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bensidoun, Pierre; Raymond, Pascal; Oeffinger, Marlene; Zenklusen, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Regulation of mRNA and protein expression occurs at many levels, initiated at transcription and followed by mRNA processing, export, localization, translation and mRNA degradation. The ability to study mRNAs in living cells has become a critical tool to study and analyze how the various steps of the gene expression pathway are carried out. Here we describe a detailed protocol for real time fluorescent RNA imaging using the PP7 bacteriophage coat protein, which allows mRNA detection with high spatial and temporal resolution in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and can be applied to study various stages of mRNA metabolism. We describe the different parameters required for quantitative single molecule imaging in yeast, including strategies for genomic integration, expression of a PP7 coat protein GFP fusion protein, microscope setup and analysis strategies. We illustrate the method's use by analyzing the behavior of nuclear mRNA in yeast and the role of the nuclear basket in mRNA export. PMID:26784711

  6. Regulation of bovine pyruvate carboxylase mRNA and promoter expression by thermal stress.

    PubMed

    White, H M; Koser, S L; Donkin, S S

    2012-09-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in gluconeogenesis from lactate and is a determinant of tricarboxylic acid cycle carbon flux. Bovine PC 5' untranslated region (UTR) mRNA variants are the products of a single PC gene containing 3 promoter regions (P3, P2, and P1, 5' to 3') that are responsive to physiological and nutritional stressors. The objective of this study was to determine the direct effects of thermal stress on PC mRNA and gene expression in bovine hepatocyte monolayer cultures, rat hepatoma (H4IIE) cells, and Madin-Darby bovine kidney epithelial (MDBK) cells. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3 Holstein bull calves and used to prepare monolayer cultures. Rat hepatoma cells and MDBK cells were obtained from American Type Culture Collection, Manassas, VA. Beginning 24 h after initial seeding, cells were subjected to either 37°C (control) or 42°C (thermal stress) for 24 h. Treatments were applied in triplicate in a minimum of 3 independent cell preparations. For bovine primary hepatocytes, endogenous expression of bovine PC mRNA increased (P < 0.1) with 24 h of thermal stress (1.31 vs. 2.79 ± 0.49, arbitrary units, control vs. thermal stress, respectively), but there was no change (P ≥ 0.1) in cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) mRNA expression. Similarly, exposure of MDBK cells to thermal stress increased (P < 0.1) expression of bovine PC mRNA without altering (P ≥ 0.1) PEPCK-C mRNA expression. Conversely, there was no effect (P ≥ 0.1) of thermal stress on endogenous rat PC (0.47 vs. 0.30 ± 0.08, control vs. thermal stress) or PEPCK-C (1.61 vs. 1.20 ± 0.48, arbitrary units, control vs. thermal stress, respectively) mRNA expressions in H4IIE cells. To further investigate the regulation of PC, H4IIE cells were transiently transfected with bovine promoter-luciferase constructs containing either P1, P2, or P3, and exposed to thermal stress for 23 h. Activity of P1 was suppressed (P < 0.1) 5-fold, activity of P2

  7. Evidence for a Complex Class of Nonadenylated mRNA in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, J. Lynn; Fouts, David L.; Manning, Jerry E.

    1980-01-01

    The amount, by mass, of poly(A+) mRNA present in the polyribosomes of third-instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster, and the relative contribution of the poly(A+) mRNA to the sequence complexity of total polysomal RNA, has been determined. Selective removal of poly(A+) mRNA from total polysomal RNA by use of either oligo-dT-cellulose, or poly(U)-sepharose affinity chromatography, revealed that only 0.15% of the mass of the polysomal RNA was present as poly(A+) mRNA. The present study shows that this RNA hybridized at saturation with 3.3% of the single-copy DNA in the Drosophila genome. After correction for asymmetric transcription and reactability of the DNA, 7.4% of the single-copy DNA in the Drosophila genome is represented in larval poly(A+) mRNA. This corresponds to 6.73 x 106 nucleotides of mRNA coding sequences, or approximately 5,384 diverse RNA sequences of average size 1,250 nucleotides. However, total polysomal RNA hybridizes at saturation to 10.9% of the single-copy DNA sequences. After correcting this value for asymmetric transcription and tracer DNA reactability, 24% of the single-copy DNA in Drosophila is represented in total polysomal RNA. This corresponds to 2.18 x 107 nucleotides of RNA coding sequences or 17,440 diverse RNA molecules of size 1,250 nucleotides. This value is 3.2 times greater than that observed for poly(A+) mRNA, and indicates that ≃69% of the polysomal RNA sequence complexity is contributed by nonadenylated RNA. Furthermore, if the number of different structural genes represented in total polysomal RNA is ≃1.7 x 104, then the number of genes expressed in third-instar larvae exceeds the number of chromomeres in Drosophila by about a factor of three. This numerology indicates that the number of chromomeres observed in polytene chromosomes does not reflect the number of structural gene sequences in the Drosophila genome. PMID:6777246

  8. mRNA quality control goes transcriptional

    PubMed Central

    Kilchert, Cornelia; Vasiljeva, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNAs are extensively processed to generate functional transcripts, which are 5′ capped, spliced and 3′ polyadenylated. Accumulation of unprocessed (aberrant) mRNAs can be deleterious for the cell, hence processing fidelity is closely monitored by QC (quality control) mechanisms that identify erroneous transcripts and initiate their selective removal. Nucleases including Xrn2/Rat1 and the nuclear exosome have been shown to play an important role in the turnover of aberrant mRNAs. Recently, with the growing appreciation that mRNA processing occurs concomitantly with polII (RNA polymerase II) transcription, it has become evident that QC acts at the transcriptional level in addition to degrading aberrant RNAs. In the present review, we discuss mechanisms that allow cells to co-transcriptionally initiate the removal of RNAs as well as down-regulate transcription of transcripts where processing repeatedly fails. PMID:24256272

  9. mRNA deadenylation and telomere disease

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Philip J.; Bessler, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is an inherited BM failure disorder that is associated with mutations in genes involved with telomere function and maintenance; however, the genetic cause of many instances of DC remains uncharacterized. In this issue of the JCI, Tummala and colleagues identify mutations in the gene encoding the poly(A)-specific ribonuclease (PARN) in individuals with a severe form of DC in three different families. PARN deficiency resulted in decreased expression of genes required for telomere maintenance and an aberrant DNA damage response, including increased levels of p53. Together, the results of this study support PARN as a DC-associated gene and suggest a potential link between p53 and telomere shortening. PMID:25893598

  10. Control of mRNA turnover as a mechanism of glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, I E; de la Cruz, B J; Prieto, S

    1998-11-01

    The phenomenon of glucose repression in yeast is concerned with the repression of a large number of genes when glucose is an abundant carbon source and almost all of the energy requirements of the cell can be satisfied from glycolysis. Prominent among the repressed genes are those encoding mitochondrial proteins required for respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. Past studies have characterized a pathway by which a signal generated from extracellular glucose is transmitted to the nucleus. The ultimate outcome is the repression of transcription of numerous genes, but also the induction of a limited number of others. The emphasis has been almost exclusively on transcriptional control mechanisms. A discovery made originally with the transcript of the SDH2 gene prompted an investigation of post-transcriptional mechanisms, and more specifically a study of the turnover rate of this mRNA in the absence and presence of glucose. SDH2 mRNA has a very short half-life in medium with glucose (YPD) and a significantly longer half-life in medium with glycerol (YPG). Experimental evidence and recent progress in understanding of (1) mRNA turnover in yeast and (2) initiation of translation on the 5' untranslated region of mRNAs, lead to a working hypothesis with the following major features: the carbon source, via a signaling pathway involving kinase/phosphatase activities, controls the rate of initiation, and thus influences a competition between eukaryotic initiation factors (prominently eIF4E, eIF4G, eIF3) binding to the capped mRNA and a decapping activity (DCP1) which is one of the rate limiting activities in the turnover of such mRNAs. PMID:9839444

  11. Dynamics of c-fos and ICER mRNA expression in rat forebrain following lithium chloride injection.

    PubMed

    Spencer, C M; Houpt, T A

    2001-09-30

    Lithium is commonly used as a treatment for affective disorders in humans and as a toxin to produce conditioned taste aversions in rats. LiCl administration in rats has been correlated with activation of c-fos and cAMP-mediated gene transcription in many brain regions; however, little is known about the timing or duration of gene activation. We hypothesized that c-fos gene transcription is rapidly stimulated by LiCl, followed later by the expression of the inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) transcription factor, a negative modulator of cAMP-mediated gene transcription. By in situ hybridization, we analyzed the timecourse of c-fos and ICER mRNA expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and the supraoptic nucleus (SON) at seven time points (0, 0.3, 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 h) after intraperitoneal LiCl injection (0.15 M, 12 ml/kg, 76 mg/kg). Expression of c-fos mRNA peaked between 20 min and 1 h and returned to baseline by 3 h in the CeA, PVN and SON. ICER mRNA was detected in these regions at 20 min, peaked at 1-3 h and returned to nearly baseline 9 h following LiCl injection. The time lag between c-fos mRNA expression and ICER mRNA expression within the same regions is consistent with ICER terminating c-fos gene transcription. However, no refractory period was detected for restimulation of c-fos transcription by a second injection of LiCl during the period of peak ICER mRNA expression, suggesting the involvement of other transcriptional modulators. PMID:11589989

  12. GTP cyclohydrolase I mRNA: novel splice variants in the slime mould Physarum polycephalum and in human monocytes (THP-1) indicate conservation of mRNA processing.

    PubMed Central

    Golderer, G; Werner, E R; Heufler, C; Strohmaier, W; Gröbner, P; Werner-Felmayer, G

    2001-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (EC 3.5.4.16) is the first enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin [(6R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin, H(4)-biopterin] in mammals and of folic acid in bacteria. Here we have characterized the GTP cyclohydrolase I gene structure and two mRNA species from Physarum polycephalum, an acellular slime mould that synthesizes H(4)-biopterin and metabolites of the folic acid biosynthetic pathway. Its GTP cyclohydrolase I gene consists of seven exons, and the two GTP cyclohydrolase I cDNA species isolated from Physarum encode for proteins with 228 (25.7 kDa) and 195 (22.1 kDa) amino acids. Furthermore, we identified two previously undescribed mRNA species in interferon-gamma-treated human myelomonocytoma cells (THP-1) in addition to the cDNA coding for the fully functional 250-residue (27.9 kDa) protein, which is identical with that in human phaeochromocytoma cells. One of the new splice variants codes for a 233-residue (25.7 kDa) protein, whereas the other codes for the full-length protein but is alternatively spliced within the 3'-untranslated region. In heterologous expression, the shorter proteins of Physarum as well as of THP-1 cells identified here are degraded by proteolysis. Accordingly, only the 27.9 kDa protein was detectable in Western blots from THP-1 cell extracts. Quantification of GTP cyclohydrolase I mRNA species in different human cell types with and without cytokine treatment showed that in addition to the correct mRNA the two splice variants isolated here, as well as the two splice variants known from human liver, are strongly induced by cytokines in cell types with inducible GTP cyclohydrolase I (THP-1, dermal fibroblasts), but not in cell types with constitutive GTP cyclohydrolase I expression (SK-N-SH, Hep-G2). As in human liver, splicing of the new mRNA variant found in THP-1 cells occurs at the boundary of exons 5 and 6. Strikingly, the 195-residue protein from Physarum is alternatively spliced at a homologous position

  13. Clinical usefulness of WT1 mRNA expression in bone marrow detected by a new WT1 mRNA assay kit for monitoring acute myeloid leukemia: a comparison with expression of WT1 mRNA in peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Kunio; Nishiyama, Takahiro; Ishiyama, Ken; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Miyazaki, Kanji; Suzuki, Kenshi; Masaie, Hiroaki; Okada, Masaya; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Imai, Kiyotoshi; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki; Yokoyama, Yasuhisa; Chiba, Shigeru; Hata, Tomoko; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Takeuchi, Jin; Nannya, Yasuhito; Kurokawa, Mineo; Ueda, Yasunori; Koga, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Haruo; Takaku, Fumimaro

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown the clinical usefulness of Wilms' tumor 1 gene (WT1) mRNA expression in peripheral blood (PB) as a minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring marker in 191 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients using the WT1 mRNA assay kit "Otsuka" (Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.; "former kit"). In contrast, the usefulness of WT1 mRNA expression in bone marrow (BM) has been investigated in only a limited number of subjects using former kit. Following that previous study, a next-generation kit, WT1 mRNA assay kit II "Otsuka" (Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.; "new kit") has been newly developed. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the performance of the new kit and to investigate the clinical usefulness of WT1 mRNA expression in BM. The PB and BM were collected on the same day from 164 blood disease patients, including 118 AML patients. WT1 mRNA expression was determined using the new and former kits and the values obtained were compared. The performance of new kit was shown to be equivalent to that of former kit. As reported in PB, WT1 mRNA expression in BM was found to be a useful marker for monitoring disease status as well as for a diagnosis of early stage relapse in AML patients. PMID:26520650

  14. Coupling of histone methylation and RNA processing by the nuclear mRNA cap-binding complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Zicong; Jiang, Danhua; Fu, Xing; Luo, Xiao; Liu, Renyi; He, Yuehui

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, genes are transcribed into pre-mRNAs that are subsequently processed into mature mRNAs by adding a 5'-cap and a 3'-polyA tail and splicing introns. Pre-mRNA processing involves their binding proteins and processing factors, whereas gene transcription often involves chromatin modifiers. It has been unclear how the factors involved in chromatin modifications and RNA processing function in concert to control mRNA production. Here, we show that in Arabidopsis thaliana, the evolutionarily conserved nuclear mRNA cap-binding complex (CBC) forms multi-protein complexes with a conserved histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase complex called COMPASS-like and a histone 3 lysine 36 (H3K36) methyltransferase to integrate active histone methylations with co-transcriptional mRNA processing and cap preservation, leading to a high level of mature mRNA production. We further show that CBC is required for H3K4 and H3K36 trimethylation, and the histone methyltransferases are required for CBC-mediated mRNA cap preservation and efficient pre-mRNA splicing at their target loci, suggesting that these factors are functionally interdependent. Our study reveals novel roles for histone methyltransferases in RNA-processing-related events and provides mechanistic insights into how the 'downstream' RNA CBC controls eukaryotic gene transcription. PMID:27249350

  15. Evaluation of mRNA marker specificity for the identification of five human body fluids by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Richard, Mara L Lennard; Harper, Kathryn A; Craig, Rhonda L; Onorato, Anthony J; Robertson, James M; Donfack, Joseph

    2012-07-01

    The identification of forensically relevant human body fluids through messenger RNA (mRNA) profiling is of interest to the forensic community. Previous studies have proposed several tissue-specific mRNA markers to achieve this goal. Seven markers for the following genes were selected for evaluation in this study: histatin 3 (HTN3) and statherin (STATH) for saliva, mucin 4 (MUC4) for vaginal secretions, matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7) for menstrual blood, delta-aminolevulinate synthase 2 (ALAS2) for peripheral blood, and protamine 2 (PRM2) and transglutaminase 4 (TGM4) for semen. The expression of these markers was examined in each body fluid. All mRNA markers were present in their target body fluids. Peripheral blood and saliva showed little cross-reactivity with the selected markers. However, a high level of cross-reactivity was observed between the vaginal secretion marker MUC4 and saliva stains. Semen showed a high level of cross-reactivity with the selected markers. Co-expression of the predicted body fluid markers was detected in menstrual blood and vaginal secretion stains. The expression pattern of these mRNA markers varied through the menstrual cycle time points tested. Differences in gene expression levels and marker cross-reactivity were observed in the donors tested. Despite the presence of cross-reactivity and co-expression, each of the body fluids examined have distinct gene expression profiles, allowing for body fluid identification based on mRNA profiling. PMID:22001154

  16. Profiling alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms for prostate cancer classification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chaolin; Li, Hai-Ri; Fan, Jian-Bing; Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica; Downs, Tracy; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Michael Q

    2006-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer illness and death among men in the United States and world wide. There is an urgent need to discover good biomarkers for early clinical diagnosis and treatment. Previously, we developed an exon-junction microarray-based assay and profiled 1532 mRNA splice isoforms from 364 potential prostate cancer related genes in 38 prostate tissues. Here, we investigate the advantage of using splice isoforms, which couple transcriptional and splicing regulation, for cancer classification. Results As many as 464 splice isoforms from more than 200 genes are differentially regulated in tumors at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 0.05. Remarkably, about 30% of genes have isoforms that are called significant but do not exhibit differential expression at the overall mRNA level. A support vector machine (SVM) classifier trained on 128 signature isoforms can correctly predict 92% of the cases, which outperforms the classifier using overall mRNA abundance by about 5%. It is also observed that the classification performance can be improved using multivariate variable selection methods, which take correlation among variables into account. Conclusion These results demonstrate that profiling of splice isoforms is able to provide unique and important information which cannot be detected by conventional microarrays. PMID:16608523

  17. Light differentially regulates cell division and the mRNA abundance of pea nucleolin during de-etiolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichler, S. A.; Balk, J.; Brown, M. E.; Woodruff, K.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    The abundance of plant nucleolin mRNA is regulated during de-etiolation by phytochrome. A close correlation between the mRNA abundance of nucleolin and mitosis has also been previously reported. These results raised the question of whether the effects of light on nucleolin mRNA expression were a consequence of light effects on mitosis. To test this we compared the kinetics of light-mediated increases in cell proliferation with that of light-mediated changes in the abundance of nucleolin mRNA using plumules of dark-grown pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings. These experiments show that S-phase increases 9 h after a red light pulse, followed by M-phase increases in the plumule leaves at 12 h post-irradiation, a time course consistent with separately measured kinetics of red light-induced increases in the expression of cell cycle-regulated genes. These increases in cell cycle-regulated genes are photoreversible, implying that the light-induced increases in cell proliferation are, like nucleolin mRNA expression, regulated via phytochrome. Red light stimulates increases in the mRNA for nucleolin at 6 h post-irradiation, prior to any cell proliferation changes and concurrent with the reported timing of phytochrome-mediated increases of rRNA abundance. After a green light pulse, nucleolin mRNA levels increase without increasing S-phase or M-phase. Studies in animals and yeast indicate that nucleolin plays a significant role in ribosome biosynthesis. Consistent with this function, pea nucleolin can rescue nucleolin deletion mutants of yeast that are defective in rRNA synthesis. Our data show that during de-etiolation, the increased expression of nucleolin mRNA is more directly regulated by light than by mitosis.

  18. hnRNP-Q1 represses nascent axon growth in cortical neurons by inhibiting Gap-43 mRNA translation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kathryn R.; McAninch, Damian S.; Stefanovic, Snezana; Xing, Lei; Allen, Megan; Li, Wenqi; Feng, Yue; Mihailescu, Mihaela Rita; Bassell, Gary J.

    2016-01-01

    Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by mRNA-binding proteins is critical for neuronal development and function. hnRNP-Q1 is an mRNA-binding protein that regulates mRNA processing events, including translational repression. hnRNP-Q1 is highly expressed in brain tissue, suggesting a function in regulating genes critical for neuronal development. In this study, we have identified Growth-associated protein 43 (Gap-43) mRNA as a novel target of hnRNP-Q1 and have demonstrated that hnRNP-Q1 represses Gap-43 mRNA translation and consequently GAP-43 function. GAP-43 is a neuronal protein that regulates actin dynamics in growth cones and facilitates axonal growth. Previous studies have identified factors that regulate Gap-43 mRNA stability and localization, but it remains unclear whether Gap-43 mRNA translation is also regulated. Our results reveal that hnRNP-Q1 knockdown increased nascent axon length, total neurite length, and neurite number in mouse embryonic cortical neurons and enhanced Neuro2a cell process extension; these phenotypes were rescued by GAP-43 knockdown. Additionally, we have identified a G-quadruplex structure in the 5′ untranslated region of Gap-43 mRNA that directly interacts with hnRNP-Q1 as a means to inhibit Gap-43 mRNA translation. Therefore hnRNP-Q1–mediated repression of Gap-43 mRNA translation provides an additional mechanism for regulating GAP-43 expression and function and may be critical for neuronal development. PMID:26658614

  19. An investigation of nutrient-dependent mRNA translation in Drosophila larvae.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Sabarish; Grewal, Savraj S

    2014-01-01

    The larval period of the Drosophila life cycle is characterized by immense growth. In nutrient rich conditions, larvae increase in mass approximately two hundred-fold in five days. However, upon nutrient deprivation, growth is arrested. The prevailing view is that dietary amino acids drive this larval growth by activating the conserved insulin/PI3 kinase and Target of rapamycin (TOR) pathways and promoting anabolic metabolism. One key anabolic process is protein synthesis. However, few studies have attempted to measure mRNA translation during larval development or examine the signaling requirements for nutrient-dependent regulation. Our work addresses this issue. Using polysome analyses, we observed that starvation rapidly (within thirty minutes) decreased larval mRNA translation, with a maximal decrease at 6-18 hours. By analyzing individual genes, we observed that nutrient-deprivation led to a general reduction in mRNA translation, regardless of any starvation-mediated changes (increase or decrease) in total transcript levels. Although sugars and amino acids are key regulators of translation in animal cells and are the major macronutrients in the larval diet, we found that they alone were not sufficient to maintain mRNA translation in larvae. The insulin/PI3 kinase and TOR pathways are widely proposed as the main link between nutrients and mRNA translation in animal cells. However, we found that genetic activation of PI3K and TOR signaling, or regulation of two effectors - 4EBP and S6K - could not prevent the starvation-mediated translation inhibition. Similarly, we showed that the nutrient stress-activated eIF2α kinases, GCN2 and PERK, were not required for starvation-induced inhibition of translation in larvae. These findings indicate that nutrient control of mRNA translation in larvae is more complex than simply amino acid activation of insulin and TOR signaling. PMID:25305039

  20. Identification of European starling GnRH-I precursor mRNA and its seasonal regulation.

    PubMed

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; Cadigan, Penelope A; Wang, Ariel; Liu, Jennifer; Bentley, George E

    2009-07-01

    Songbirds show dynamic seasonal changes in their reproductive activities during the year. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I) is critical for the control of reproduction in vertebrates. The molecular mechanisms controlling reproduction are not well understood in songbirds, largely because the GnRH-I precursor polypeptide gene was unknown until now. Here, we report the complete sequence and seasonal regulation of GnRH-I precursor polypeptide mRNA in a songbird, European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). The translated starling GnRH-I precursor polypeptide contained an amino acid sequence that can be processed into chicken GnRH-I peptide (pEHWSYGLQPG-NH(2)). However, the overall homology of GnRH-I precursor polypeptide (including a 23 amino acid signal peptide, the decapeptide hormone and Gly-Lys-Arg cleavage site followed by 55 amino acid GnRH-associated peptide sequences) between starling and chicken was only 58%. GnRH-I mRNA and GnRH-I peptide were observed to be co-localized in the preoptic area of sexually mature birds using in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. GnRH-I mRNA exhibited large variance in photosensitive birds, and converged to a high level in photostimulated birds. Subsequently, GnRH-I mRNA decreased to below detectability in most of the photorefractory birds. Changes were also observed in GnRH-I peptide levels, although changes in GnRH-I peptide were not as marked. Our data indicate that GnRH-I mRNA synthesis commences but is variable in photosensitive birds, stabilizes in photostimulated birds, then ceases when birds become photorefractory. Finer-scale investigation into temporal regulation of GnRH-I precursor polypeptide mRNA will provide insight into its regulation by environmental, social and physiological cues. PMID:19362556

  1. Dual Posttranscriptional Regulation via a Cofactor-Responsive mRNA Leader

    PubMed Central

    Patterson-Fortin, Laura M.; Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Riboswitches are cis-acting mRNA elements that regulate gene expression in response to ligand binding. Recently, a class of riboswitches was proposed to respond to the molybdenum cofactor (Moco), which serves as a redox center for metabolic enzymes. The 5′ leader of the Escherichia coli moaABCDE transcript exemplifies this candidate riboswitch class. This mRNA encodes enzymes for Moco biosynthesis, and moaA expression is feedback inhibited by Moco. Previous RNA-seq analyses showed that moaA mRNA copurified with the RNA binding protein CsrA (carbon storage regulator), suggesting that CsrA binds to this RNA in vivo. Among its global regulatory roles, CsrA represses stationary phase metabolism and activates central carbon metabolism. Here, we used gel mobility shift analysis to determine that CsrA binds specifically and with high affinity to the moaA 5′ mRNA leader. Northern blotting and studies with a series of chromosomal lacZ reporter fusions showed that CsrA posttranscriptionally activates moaA expression without altering moaA mRNA levels, indicative of translation control. Deletion analyses, nucleotide replacement studies and footprinting with CsrA-FeBABE identified two sites for CsrA binding. Toeprinting assays suggested that CsrA binding causes changes in moaA RNA structure. We propose that the moaA mRNA leader forms an aptamer, which serves as a target of posttranscriptional regulation by at least two different factors, Moco and the protein CsrA. While we are not aware of similar dual posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms, additional examples are likely to emerge. PMID:23274138

  2. Ammonium Chloride Ingestion Attenuates Exercise-Induced mRNA Levels in Human Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mündel, Toby; Pilegaard, Henriette; Hawke, Emma; Leikis, Murray; Lopez-Villalobos, Nicolas; Oliveira, Rodrigo S. F.; Bishop, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Minimizing the decrease in intracellular pH during high-intensity exercise training promotes greater improvements in mitochondrial respiration. This raises the intriguing hypothesis that pH may affect the exercise-induced transcription of genes that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. Eight males performed 10x2-min cycle intervals at 80% V˙O2peak intensity on two occasions separated by ~2 weeks. Participants ingested either ammonium chloride (ACID) or calcium carbonate (PLA) the day before and on the day of the exercise trial in a randomized, counterbalanced order, using a crossover design. Biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis muscle before and after exercise. The mRNA level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor co-activator 1α (PGC-1α), citrate synthase, cytochome c and FOXO1 was elevated at rest following ACID (P<0.05). During the PLA condition, the mRNA content of mitochondrial- and glucose-regulating proteins was elevated immediately following exercise (P<0.05). In the early phase (0–2 h) of post-exercise recovery during ACID, PGC-1α, citrate synthase, cytochome C, FOXO1, GLUT4, and HKII mRNA levels were not different from resting levels (P>0.05); the difference in PGC-1α mRNA content 2 h post-exercise between ACID and PLA was not significant (P = 0.08). Thus, metabolic acidosis abolished the early post-exercise increase of PGC-1α mRNA and the mRNA of downstream mitochondrial and glucose-regulating proteins. These findings indicate that metabolic acidosis may affect mitochondrial biogenesis, with divergent responses in resting and post-exercise skeletal muscle. PMID:26656911

  3. Identification of Edc3p as an enhancer of mRNA decapping in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kshirsagar, Meenakshi; Parker, Roy

    2004-01-01

    The major pathway of mRNA decay in yeast initiates with deadenylation, followed by mRNA decapping and 5'-3' exonuclease digestion. An in silico approach was used to identify new proteins involved in the mRNA decay pathway. One such protein, Edc3p, was identified as a conserved protein of unknown function having extensive two-hybrid interactions with several proteins involved in mRNA decapping and 5'-3' degradation including Dcp1p, Dcp2p, Dhh1p, Lsm1p, and the 5'-3' exonuclease, Xrn1p. We show that Edc3p can stimulate mRNA decapping of both unstable and stable mRNAs in yeast when the decapping enzyme is compromised by temperature-sensitive alleles of either the DCP1 or the DCP2 genes. In these cases, deletion of EDC3 caused a synergistic mRNA-decapping defect at the permissive temperatures. The edc3Delta had no effect when combined with the lsm1Delta, dhh1Delta, or pat1Delta mutations, which appear to affect an early step in the decapping pathway. This suggests that Edc3p specifically affects the function of the decapping enzyme per se. Consistent with a functional role in decapping, GFP-tagged Edc3p localizes to cytoplasmic foci involved in mRNA decapping referred to as P-bodies. These results identify Edc3p as a new protein involved in the decapping reaction. PMID:15020463

  4. An investigation of nutrient-dependent mRNA translation in Drosophila larvae