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Sample records for gene promoter sequences

  1. Sequence and regulation of the porcine FSHR gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wangjun; Han, Jing; Cao, Rui; Zhang, Jinbi; Li, Bojiang; Liu, Zequn; Liu, Kaiqing; Li, Qifa; Pan, Zengxiang; Chen, Jie; Liu, Honglin

    2015-03-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) plays a crucial role in animal reproduction and exerts its physiological functions by interacting with the FSH receptor (FSHR). The FSHR is exclusively expressed in granulose cells in the ovary and its expression level is closely related to granulose cell differentiation and follicle maturation. In mammal, most of the follicles undergo atresia, while follicle atresia is mainly caused by granulosa cell apoptosis. However, knowledge on the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms of the porcine FSHR gene in granulosa cell is still limited. In this study, approximately 2.1kb of the proximal promoter sequence of the porcine FSHR gene were obtained by genome walking, and the regulatory elements and transcription factors in the porcine FSHR promoter sequence were predicted. Furthermore, the core promoter region (-1195/-598) of the porcine FSHR gene was identified using a luciferase assay. Subsequently, the relationship between expression levels of the porcine FSHR gene and histone H3K9 acetylation levels around the core promoter region (-787/-572) in vivo and invitro were analyzed. Our results showed that an increased FSHR gene expression level was accompanied with an increase in histone H3K9 acetylation levels, suggesting that histone H3K9 acetylation could regulate the expression of the porcine FSHR gene. PMID:25599592

  2. Characterization of promoter sequence of toll-like receptor genes in Vechur cattle

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, R.; Jayavardhanan, K. K.; Aravindakshan, T. V.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the promoter sequence of toll-like receptor (TLR) genes in Vechur cattle, an indigenous breed of Kerala with the sequence of Bos taurus and access the differences that could be attributed to innate immune responses against bovine mastitis. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were collected from Jugular vein of Vechur cattle, maintained at Vechur cattle conservation center of Kerala Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, using an acid-citrate-dextrose anticoagulant. The genomic DNA was extracted, and polymerase chain reaction was carried out to amplify the promoter region of TLRs. The amplified product of TLR2, 4, and 9 promoter regions was sequenced by Sanger enzymatic DNA sequencing technique. Results: The sequence of promoter region of TLR2 of Vechur cattle with the B. taurus sequence present in GenBank showed 98% similarity and revealed variants for four sequence motifs. The sequence of the promoter region of TLR4 of Vechur cattle revealed 99% similarity with that of B. taurus sequence but not reveals significant variant in motifregions. However, two heterozygous loci were observed from the chromatogram. Promoter sequence of TLR9 gene also showed 99% similarity to B. taurus sequence and revealed variants for four sequence motifs. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that significant variation in the promoter of TLR2 and 9 genes in Vechur cattle breed and may potentially link the influence the innate immunity response against mastitis diseases. PMID:27397987

  3. Identification of potential regulatory motifs in odorant receptor genes by analysis of promoter sequences

    PubMed Central

    Michaloski, Jussara S.; Galante, Pedro A.F.

    2006-01-01

    Mouse odorant receptors (ORs) are encoded by >1000 genes dispersed throughout the genome. Each olfactory neuron expresses one single OR gene, while the rest of the genes remain silent. The mechanisms underlying OR gene expression are poorly understood. Here, we investigated if OR genes share common cis-regulatory sequences in their promoter regions. We carried out a comprehensive analysis in which the upstream regions of a large number of OR genes were compared. First, using RLM-RACE, we generated cDNAs containing the complete 5′-untranslated regions (5′-UTRs) for a total number of 198 mouse OR genes. Then, we aligned these cDNA sequences to the mouse genome so that the 5′ structure and transcription start sites (TSSs) of the OR genes could be precisely determined. Sequences upstream of the TSSs were retrieved and browsed for common elements. We found DNA sequence motifs that are overrepresented in the promoter regions of the OR genes. Most motifs resemble O/E-like sites and are preferentially localized within 200 bp upstream of the TSSs. Finally, we show that these motifs specifically interact with proteins extracted from nuclei prepared from the olfactory epithelium, but not from brain or liver. Our results show that the OR genes share common promoter elements. The present strategy should provide information on the role played by cis-regulatory sequences in OR gene regulation. PMID:16902085

  4. Interference in transcription of overexpressed genes by promoter-proximal downstream sequences.

    PubMed

    Turchinovich, A; Surowy, H M; Tonevitsky, A G; Burwinkel, B

    2016-01-01

    Despite a high sequence homology among four human RNAi-effectors Argonaute proteins and their coding sequences, the efficiency of ectopic overexpression of AGO3 and AGO4 coding sequences in human cells is greatly reduced as compared to AGO1 and AGO2. While investigating this phenomenon, we documented the existence of previously uncharacterized mechanism of gene expression regulation, which is manifested in greatly varying basal transcription levels from the RNApolII promoters depending on the promoter-proximal downstream sequences. Specifically, we show that distinct overexpression of Argonaute coding sequences cannot be explained by mRNA degradation in the cytoplasm or nucleus, and exhibits on transcriptional level. Furthermore, the first 1000-2000 nt located immediately downstream the promoter had the most critical influence on ectopic gene overexpression. The transcription inhibiting effect, associated with those downstream sequences, subsided with increasing distance to the promoter and positively correlated with promoter strength. We hypothesize that the same mechanism, which we named promoter proximal inhibition (PPI), could generally contribute to basal transcription levels of genes, and could be mainly responsible for the essence of difficult-to-express recombinant proteins. Finally, our data reveal that expression of recombinant proteins in human cells can be greatly enhanced by using more permissive promoter adjacent downstream sequences. PMID:27485701

  5. Interference in transcription of overexpressed genes by promoter-proximal downstream sequences

    PubMed Central

    Turchinovich, A.; Surowy, H. M.; Tonevitsky, A. G.; Burwinkel, B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite a high sequence homology among four human RNAi-effectors Argonaute proteins and their coding sequences, the efficiency of ectopic overexpression of AGO3 and AGO4 coding sequences in human cells is greatly reduced as compared to AGO1 and AGO2. While investigating this phenomenon, we documented the existence of previously uncharacterized mechanism of gene expression regulation, which is manifested in greatly varying basal transcription levels from the RNApolII promoters depending on the promoter-proximal downstream sequences. Specifically, we show that distinct overexpression of Argonaute coding sequences cannot be explained by mRNA degradation in the cytoplasm or nucleus, and exhibits on transcriptional level. Furthermore, the first 1000–2000 nt located immediately downstream the promoter had the most critical influence on ectopic gene overexpression. The transcription inhibiting effect, associated with those downstream sequences, subsided with increasing distance to the promoter and positively correlated with promoter strength. We hypothesize that the same mechanism, which we named promoter proximal inhibition (PPI), could generally contribute to basal transcription levels of genes, and could be mainly responsible for the essence of difficult-to-express recombinant proteins. Finally, our data reveal that expression of recombinant proteins in human cells can be greatly enhanced by using more permissive promoter adjacent downstream sequences. PMID:27485701

  6. Functional analysis and nucleotide sequence of the promoter region of the murine hck gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lock, P; Stanley, E; Holtzman, D A; Dunn, A R

    1990-01-01

    The structure and function of the promoter region and exon 1 of the murine hck gene have been characterized in detail. RNase protection analysis has established that hck transcripts initiate from heterogeneous start sites located within the hck gene. Fusion gene constructs containing hck 5'-flanking sequences and the bacterial Neor gene have been introduced into the hematopoietic cell lines FDC-P1 and WEHI-265 by using a self-inactivating retroviral vector. The transcriptional start sites of the fusion gene are essentially identical to those of the endogenous hck gene. Analysis of infected WEHI-265 cell lines treated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reveals a 3- to 5-fold elevation in the levels of endogenous hck mRNA and a 1.4- to 2.6-fold increase in the level of Neor fusion gene transcripts, indicating that hck 5'-flanking sequences are capable of conferring LPS responsiveness on the Neor gene. The 5'-flanking region of the hck gene contains sequences similar to an element which is thought to be involved in the LPS responsiveness of the class II major histocompatibility gene A alpha k. A subset of these sequences are also found in the 5'-flanking regions of other LPS-responsive genes. Moreover, this motif is related to the consensus binding sequence of NF-kappa B, a transcription factor which is known to be regulated by LPS. Images PMID:2388619

  7. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene from Zymomonas mobilis: cloning, sequencing, and identification of promoter region

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T.; Sewell, G.W.; Ingram, L.O.

    1987-12-01

    The gene encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was isolated from a library of Zymomonas mobilis DNA fragments by complementing a deficient strain of Escherichia coli. It contained tandem promoters which were recognized by E. coli but appeared to function less efficiently than the enteric lac promoter in E. coli. The open reading frame for this gene encoded 337 amino acids with an aggregate molecular weight of 36,099 (including the N-terminal methionine). The primary amino acid sequence for this gene had considerable functional homology and amino acid identity with other eukaryotic and bacterial genes. Based on this comparison, the gap gene from Z. mobilis appeared to be most closely related to that of the thermophilic bacteria and to the chloroplast isozymes. Comparison of this gene with other glycolytic enzymes from Z. mobilis revealed a conserved pattern of codon bias and several common features of gene structure. A tentative transcriptional consensus sequence is proposed for Z. mobilis based on comparison of the five known promoters for three glycolytic enzymes.

  8. The cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter sequence alters the level and patterns of activity of adjacent tissue- and organ-specific gene promoters.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xuelian; Deng, Wei; Luo, Keming; Duan, Hui; Chen, Yongqin; McAvoy, Richard; Song, Shuiqing; Pei, Yan; Li, Yi

    2007-08-01

    Here we report the effect of the 35S promoter sequence on activities of the tissue- and organ-specific gene promoters in tobacco plants. In the absence of the 35S promoter sequence the AAP2 promoter is active only in vascular tissues as indicated by expression of the AAP2:GUS gene. With the 35S promoter sequence in the same T-plasmid, transgenic plants exhibit twofold to fivefold increase in AAP2 promoter activity and the promoter becomes active in all tissue types. Transgenic plants hosting the ovary-specific AGL5:iaaM gene (iaaM coding an auxin biosynthetic gene) showed a wild-type phenotype except production of seedless fruits, whereas plants hosting the AGL5:iaaM gene along with the 35S promoter sequence showed drastic morphological alterations. RT-PCR analysis confirms that the phenotype was caused by activation of the AGL5:iaaM gene in non-ovary organs including roots, stems and flowers. When the pollen-, ovule- and early embryo-specific PAB5:barnase gene (barnase coding a RNase gene) was transformed, the presence of 35S promoter sequence drastically reduced transformation efficiencies. However, the transformation efficiencies were restored in the absence of 35S promoter, indicating that the 35S promoter might activate the expression of PAB5:barnase in non-reproductive organs such as calli and shoot primordia. Furthermore, if the 35S promoter sequence was replaced with the NOS promoter sequence, no alteration in AAP2, AGL5 or PAB5 promoter activities was observed. Our results demonstrate that the 35S promoter sequence can convert an adjacent tissue- and organ-specific gene promoter into a globally active promoter. PMID:17340093

  9. Genome-wide discovery of cis-elements in promoter sequences using gene expression.

    PubMed

    Troukhan, Maxim; Tatarinova, Tatiana; Bouck, John; Flavell, Richard B; Alexandrov, Nickolai N

    2009-04-01

    The availability of complete or nearly complete genome sequences, a large number of 5' expressed sequence tags, and significant public expression data allow for a more accurate identification of cis-elements regulating gene expression. We have implemented a global approach that takes advantage of available expression data, genomic sequences, and transcript information to predict cis-elements associated with specific expression patterns. The key components of our approach are: (1) precise identification of transcription start sites, (2) specific locations of cis-elements relative to the transcription start site, and (3) assessment of statistical significance for all sequence motifs. By applying our method to promoters of Arabidopsis thaliana and Mus musculus, we have identified motifs that affect gene expression under specific environmental conditions or in certain tissues. We also found that the presence of the TATA box is associated with increased variability of gene expression. Strong correlation between our results and experimentally determined motifs shows that the method is capable of predicting new functionally important cis-elements in promoter sequences. PMID:19231992

  10. Over-represented localized sequence motifs in ribosomal protein gene promoters of basal metazoans.

    PubMed

    Perina, Drago; Korolija, Marina; Roller, Maša; Harcet, Matija; Jeličić, Branka; Mikoč, Andreja; Cetković, Helena

    2011-07-01

    Equimolecular presence of ribosomal proteins (RPs) in the cell is needed for ribosome assembly and is achieved by synchronized expression of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) with promoters of similar strengths. Over-represented motifs of RPG promoter regions are identified as targets for specific transcription factors. Unlike RPs, those motifs are not conserved between mammals, drosophila, and yeast. We analyzed RPGs proximal promoter regions of three basal metazoans with sequenced genomes: sponge, cnidarian, and placozoan and found common features, such as 5'-terminal oligopyrimidine tracts and TATA-boxes. Furthermore, we identified over-represented motifs, some of which displayed the highest similarity to motifs abundant in human RPG promoters and not present in Drosophila or yeast. Our results indicate that humans over-represented motifs, as well as corresponding domains of transcription factors, were established very early in metazoan evolution. The fast evolving nature of RPGs regulatory network leads to formation of other, lineage specific, over-represented motifs. PMID:21457775

  11. Allelic mutations in noncoding genomic sequences construct novel transcription factor binding sites that promote gene overexpression.

    PubMed

    Tian, Erming; Børset, Magne; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Brede, Gaute; Våtsveen, Thea K; Hov, Håkon; Waage, Anders; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D; Epstein, Joshua; Sundan, Anders

    2015-11-01

    The growth and survival factor hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is expressed at high levels in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. We report here that elevated HGF transcription in MM was traced to DNA mutations in the promoter alleles of HGF. Sequence analysis revealed a previously undiscovered single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and crucial single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the promoters of myeloma cells that produce large amounts of HGF. The allele-specific mutations functionally reassembled wild-type sequences into the motifs that affiliate with endogenous transcription factors NFKB (nuclear factor kappa-B), MZF1 (myeloid zinc finger 1), and NRF-2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2). In vitro, a mutant allele that gained novel NFKB-binding sites directly responded to transcriptional signaling induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) to promote high levels of luciferase reporter. Given the recent discovery by genome-wide sequencing (GWS) of numerous non-coding mutations in myeloma genomes, our data provide evidence that heterogeneous SNVs in the gene regulatory regions may frequently transform wild-type alleles into novel transcription factor binding properties to aberrantly interact with dysregulated transcriptional signals in MM and other cancer cells. PMID:26220195

  12. Control of gene conversion and somatic hypermutation by immunoglobulin promoter and enhancer sequences.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu Yuan; Fugmann, Sebastian D; Schatz, David G

    2006-12-25

    It is thought that gene conversion (GCV) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes occur in two steps: the generation of uracils in DNA by activation-induced cytidine deaminase, followed by their subsequent repair by various DNA repair pathways to generate sequence-diversified products. It is not known how either of the two steps is targeted specifically to Ig loci. Because of the tight link between transcription and SHM, we have investigated the role of endogenous Ig light chain (IgL) transcriptional control elements in GCV/SHM in the chicken B cell line DT40. Promoter substitution experiments led to identification of a strong RNA polymerase II promoter incapable of supporting efficient GCV/SHM. This surprising finding indicates that high levels of transcription are not sufficient for robust GCV/SHM in Ig loci. Deletion of the IgL enhancer in a context in which high-level transcription was not compromised showed that the enhancer is not necessary for GCV/SHM. Our results indicate that cis-acting elements are important for Ig gene diversification, and we propose that targeting specificity is achieved through the combined action of several Ig locus elements that include the promoter. PMID:17178919

  13. Genetic and Functional Sequence Variants of the SIRT3 Gene Promoter in Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiaoyun; Pang, Shuchao; Huang, Jian; Cui, Yinghua; Yan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD), including myocardial infarction (MI), is a common complex disease that is caused by atherosclerosis. Although a large number of genetic variants have been associated with CAD, only 10% of CAD cases could be explained. It has been proposed that low frequent and rare genetic variants may be main causes for CAD. SIRT3, a mitochondrial deacetylase, plays important roles in mitochondrial function and metabolism. Lack of SIRT3 in experimental animal leads to several age-related diseases, including cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, SIRT3 gene variants may contribute to the MI development. In this study, SIRT3 gene promoter was genetically and functionally analyzed in large cohorts of MI patients (n = 319) and ethnic-matched controls (n = 322). Total twenty-three DNA sequence variants (DSVs) were identified, including 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Six novel heterozygous DSVs, g.237307A>G, g.237270G>A, g.237023_25del, g.236653C>A, g.236628G>C, g.236557T>C, and two SNPs g.237030C>T (rs12293349) and g.237022C>G (rs369344513), were identified in nine MI patients, but in none of controls. Three SNPs, g.236473C>T (rs11246029), g.236380_81ins (rs71019893) and g.236370C>G (rs185277566), were more significantly frequent in MI patients than controls (P<0.05). These DSVs and SNPs, except g.236557T>C, significantly decreased the transcriptional activity of the SIRT3 gene promoter in cultured HEK-293 cells and H9c2 cells. Therefore, these DSVs identified in MI patients may change SIRT3 level by affecting the transcriptional activity of SIRT3 gene promoter, contributing to the MI development as a risk factor. PMID:27078640

  14. A gene-specific non-enhancer sequence is critical for expression from the promoter of the small heat shock protein gene αB-crystallin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Deciphering of the information content of eukaryotic promoters has remained confined to universal landmarks and conserved sequence elements such as enhancers and transcription factor binding motifs, which are considered sufficient for gene activation and regulation. Gene-specific sequences, interspersed between the canonical transacting factor binding sites or adjoining them within a promoter, are generally taken to be devoid of any regulatory information and have therefore been largely ignored. An unanswered question therefore is, do gene-specific sequences within a eukaryotic promoter have a role in gene activation? Here, we present an exhaustive experimental analysis of a gene-specific sequence adjoining the heat shock element (HSE) in the proximal promoter of the small heat shock protein gene, αB-crystallin (cryab). These sequences are highly conserved between the rodents and the humans. Results Using human retinal pigment epithelial cells in culture as the host, we have identified a 10-bp gene-specific promoter sequence (GPS), which, unlike an enhancer, controls expression from the promoter of this gene, only when in appropriate position and orientation. Notably, the data suggests that GPS in comparison with the HSE works in a context-independent fashion. Additionally, when moved upstream, about a nucleosome length of DNA (−154 bp) from the transcription start site (TSS), the activity of the promoter is markedly inhibited, suggesting its involvement in local promoter access. Importantly, we demonstrate that deletion of the GPS results in complete loss of cryab promoter activity in transgenic mice. Conclusions These data suggest that gene-specific sequences such as the GPS, identified here, may have critical roles in regulating gene-specific activity from eukaryotic promoters. PMID:24589182

  15. Using a Solver Over the String Pattern Domain to Analyze Gene Promoter Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigotti, Christophe; Mitašiūnaitė, Ieva; Besson, Jérémy; Meyniel, Laurène; Boulicaut, Jean-François; Gandrillon, Olivier

    This chapter illustrates how inductive querying techniques can be used to support knowledge discovery from genomic data. More precisely, it presents a data mining scenario to discover putative transcription factor binding sites in gene promoter sequences. We do not provide technical details about the used constraintbased data mining algorithms that have been previously described. Our contribution is to provide an abstract description of the scenario, its concrete instantiation and also a typical execution on real data. Our main extraction algorithm is a complete solver dedicated to the string pattern domain: it computes string patterns that satisfy a given conjunction of primitive constraints. We also discuss the processing steps necessary to turn it into a useful tool. In particular, we introduce a parameter tuning strategy, an appropriate measure to rank the patterns, and the post-processing approaches that can be and have been applied.

  16. The nucleotide sequence of the promoter region of hisS, the structural gene for histidyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Eisenbeis, S J; Parker, J

    1982-05-01

    A plasmid has been constructed which carries hisS, the structural gene for histidyl-RNA synthetase of E. coli, on a 1.6-kb fragment bounded by PvuII and BstEII sites. The DNA sequence of both ends of this fragment was determined. The amino-terminal sequence of histidyl-tRNA synthetase was also determined to locate the promoter proximal coding region and the frame in which it is read. Three promoters were identified by consensus criteria. The region surrounding these promoters contains extensive twofold symmetry. PMID:6290315

  17. Comparisons of Ribosomal Protein Gene Promoters Indicate Superiority of Heterologous Regulatory Sequences for Expressing Transgenes in Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Khachatoorian, Careen; Judelson, Howard S.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular genetics approaches in Phytophthora research can be hampered by the limited number of known constitutive promoters for expressing transgenes and the instability of transgene activity. We have therefore characterized genes encoding the cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins of Phytophthora and studied their suitability for expressing transgenes in P. infestans. Phytophthora spp. encode a standard complement of 79 cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins. Several genes are duplicated, and two appear to be pseudogenes. Half of the genes are expressed at similar levels during all stages of asexual development, and we discovered that the majority share a novel promoter motif named the PhRiboBox. This sequence is enriched in genes associated with transcription, translation, and DNA replication, including tRNA and rRNA biogenesis. Promoters from the three P. infestans genes encoding ribosomal proteins S9, L10, and L23 and their orthologs from P. capsici were tested for their ability to drive transgenes in stable transformants of P. infestans. Five of the six promoters yielded strong expression of a GUS reporter, but the stability of expression was higher using the P. capsici promoters. With the RPS9 and RPL10 promoters of P. infestans, about half of transformants stopped making GUS over two years of culture, while their P. capsici orthologs conferred stable expression. Since cross-talk between native and transgene loci may trigger gene silencing, we encourage the use of heterologous promoters in transformation studies. PMID:26716454

  18. Induction and maintenance of DNA methylation in plant promoter sequences by apple latent spherical virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Kon, Tatsuya; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) is an efficient virus-induced gene silencing vector in functional genomics analyses of a broad range of plant species. Here, an Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation (agroinoculation) system was developed for the ALSV vector, and virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing (VITGS) is described in plants infected with the ALSV vector. The cDNAs of ALSV RNA1 and RNA2 were inserted between the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the NOS-T sequences in a binary vector pCAMBIA1300 to produce pCALSR1 and pCALSR2-XSB or pCALSR2-XSB/MN. When these vector constructs were agroinoculated into Nicotiana benthamiana plants with a construct expressing a viral silencing suppressor, the infection efficiency of the vectors was 100%. A recombinant ALSV vector carrying part of the 35S promoter sequence induced transcriptional gene silencing of the green fluorescent protein gene in a line of N. benthamiana plants, resulting in the disappearance of green fluorescence of infected plants. Bisulfite sequencing showed that cytosine residues at CG and CHG sites of the 35S promoter sequence were highly methylated in the silenced generation zero plants infected with the ALSV carrying the promoter sequence as well as in progeny. The ALSV-mediated VITGS state was inherited by progeny for multiple generations. In addition, induction of VITGS of an endogenous gene (chalcone synthase-A) was demonstrated in petunia plants infected with an ALSV vector carrying the native promoter sequence. These results suggest that ALSV-based vectors can be applied to study DNA methylation in plant genomes, and provide a useful tool for plant breeding via epigenetic modification. PMID:25426109

  19. Study of promoter and structural gene sequence of whiB7 in MDR and XDR forms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Arjomandzadegan, M; Sadrnia, M; Surkova, L K; Titov, L P

    2011-06-01

    Resistance phenomenon in M tuberculosis is mainly based on decreased permeability of the bacterial envelope and function of effluent pumps. The regulatory gene of the whiB7 transcription determines drug resistance in these bacteria. Increases in WhiB7 protein activity induce transcription of resistance genes leading to intrinsic multidrug resistance. The aim of this work was to evaluate the whiB7 gene sequence in susceptible, MDR and XDR clinical isolates of M tuberculosis in order to further design an inhibitor. Thirty-three clinical isolates of MTB identified as susceptible, MDR and XDR-TB were investigated by PCR for sequencing of the entire promoter (429 bp), structural gene (279 bp) and the end of the upstream gene uvrD (265 bp). No differences were detected in the sequences of the structural gene in susceptible and MDR with XDR isolates and all of them terminated at TGA as stop codon. Examination of sequence profiles of the promoter part of whiB7 by several sets of primers proved that there were no differences between sequence of susceptible, MDR and XDR isolates by type strain (H37Rr). Furthermore, the structure of WhiB7 protein was studied in achieved sequences from clinical isolates. We found that the promoter and structural gene of whiB7 are highly conservative in clinical susceptible and resistant isolates. It is a key finding that would assist in the design of an inhibitor for the WhiB7 protein in all clinical forms in further studies. PMID:22224334

  20. Sequences contained within the promoter of the human thymidine kinase gene can direct cell-cycle regulation of heterologous fusion genes.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y K; Wells, S; Lau, Y F; Lee, A S

    1988-01-01

    Recent evidence on the transcriptional regulation of the human thymidine kinase (TK) gene raises the possibility that cell-cycle regulatory sequences may be localized within its promoter. A hybrid gene that combines the TK 5' flanking sequence and the coding region of the bacterial neomycin-resistance gene (neo) has been constructed. Upon transfection into a hamster fibroblast cell line K12, the hybrid gene exhibits cell-cycle-dependent expression. Deletion analysis reveals that the region important for cell-cycle regulation is within -441 to -63 nucleotides from the transcriptional initiation site. This region (-441 to -63) also confers cell-cycle regulation to the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) promoter, which is not expressed in a cell-cycle manner. We conclude that the -441 to -63 sequence within the human TK promoter is important for cell-cycle-dependent expression. Images PMID:3413063

  1. Isolation and sequencing of a putative promoter region of the murine G protein beta 1 subunit (GNB1) gene.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Junichi; Kitanaka, Nobue; Takemura, Motohiko; Wang, Xiao-Bing; Hembree, Cambria M; Goodman, Nancy L; Uhl, George R

    2002-02-01

    The expression of the heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein beta 1 subunit gene (GNB1) is regulated by psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamines. Since the up-regulation appears to be one of the candidate processes of sensitization, it is necessary to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanism of the GNB1 gene regulation for a better understanding the establishment of sensitization. In the present study, we describe the isolation and nucleotide sequence analysis of the GNB1 gene promoter region. We have isolated approximately 10 kb of the 5'-flanking region of the mouse of GNB1 gene and found potential elements involved in putative transcriptional control of the GNB1, such as AP1, AP2, Sp1, cyclic AMP response element, and nuclear factor kappa B recognition sites, within the sequences 0.3 kb upstream from the putative transcription start site. This region was highly rich in G + C content, but lacked TATA or CATT boxes. Comparing the nucleotide sequence of the cDNA clone with the human genome databases using the BLAST program a region containing putative exon 1 and promoter of the human GNB1 gene in chromosome 1 was found. The cloning and sequence analysis of an extensive portion of the 5'-flanking regulatory region of the GNB1 gene provides new insights into the factors involved in the regulation by psychostimulants of GNB1 expression. PMID:12180136

  2. A genome-wide cis-regulatory element discovery method based on promoter sequences and gene co-expression networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Deciphering cis-regulatory networks has become an attractive yet challenging task. This paper presents a simple method for cis-regulatory network discovery which aims to avoid some of the common problems of previous approaches. Results Using promoter sequences and gene expression profiles as input, rather than clustering the genes by the expression data, our method utilizes co-expression neighborhood information for each individual gene, thereby overcoming the disadvantages of current clustering based models which may miss specific information for individual genes. In addition, rather than using a motif database as an input, it implements a simple motif count table for each enumerated k-mer for each gene promoter sequence. Thus, it can be used for species where previous knowledge of cis-regulatory motifs is unknown and has the potential to discover new transcription factor binding sites. Applications on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis have shown that our method has a good prediction accuracy and outperforms a phylogenetic footprinting approach. Furthermore, the top ranked gene-motif regulatory clusters are evidently functionally co-regulated, and the regulatory relationships between the motifs and the enriched biological functions can often be confirmed by literature. Conclusions Since this method is simple and gene-specific, it can be readily utilized for insufficiently studied species or flexibly used as an additional step or data source for previous transcription regulatory networks discovery models. PMID:23368633

  3. The lgtABCDE gene cluster, involved in lipooligosaccharide biosynthesis in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, contains multiple promoter sequences.

    PubMed

    Braun, Derek C; Stein, Daniel C

    2004-02-01

    Biosynthesis of the variable core domain of lipooligosaccharide (LOS) in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is mediated by glycosyl transferases encoded by lgtABCDE. Changes within homopolymeric runs within lgtA, lgtC, and lgtD affect the expression state of these genes, with the nature of the LOS expressed determined by the functionality of these genes. However, the mechanism for modulating the amount of multiple LOS chemotypes expressed in a single cell is not understood. Using mutants containing polar disruptions within the lgtABCDE locus, we determined that the expression of this locus is mediated by multiple promoters and that disruption of transcription from these promoters alters the relative levels of simultaneously expressed LOS chemotypes. Expression of the lgtABCDE locus was quantified by using xylE transcriptional fusions, and the data indicate that this locus is transcribed in trace amounts and that subtle changes in transcription result in phenotypic changes. By using rapid amplification of 5' cDNA ends, transcriptional start sites and promoter sequences were identified within lgtABCDE. Most of these promoters possessed 50 to 67% homology with the consensus gearbox promoter sequence of Escherichia coli. PMID:14761998

  4. Genomic structure analysis of promoter sequence of a mouse mu opioid receptor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Min, B H; Augustin, L B; Felsheim, R F; Fuchs, J A; Loh, H H

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated mouse mu opioid receptor genomic clones (termed MOR) containing the entire amino acid coding sequence corresponding to rat MOR-1 cDNA, including additional 5' flanking sequence. The mouse MOR gene is > 53 kb long, and the coding sequence is divided by three introns, with exon junctions in codons 95 and 213 and between codons 386 and 387. The first intron is > 26 kb, the second is 0.8 kb, and the third is > 12 kb. Multiple transcription initiation sites were observed, with four major sites confirmed by 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends and RNase protection located between 291 and 268 bp upstream of the translation start codon. Comparison of the 5' flanking sequence with a transcription factor database revealed putative cis-acting regulatory elements for transcription factors affected by cAMP, as well as those involved in the action of gluco- and mineralocorticoids, cytokines, and immune-cell-specific factors. Images PMID:8090773

  5. Regulation of vitellogenin gene expression in transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans: short sequences required for activation of the vit-2 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    MacMorris, M; Broverman, S; Greenspoon, S; Lea, K; Madej, C; Blumenthal, T; Spieth, J

    1992-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans vitellogenin genes are subject to sex-, stage-, and tissue-specific regulation: they are expressed solely in the adult hermaphrodite intestine. Comparative sequence analysis of the DNA immediately upstream of these genes revealed the presence of two repeated heptameric elements, vit promoter element 1 (VPE1) and VPE2. VPE1 has the consensus sequence TGTCAAT, while VPE2, CTGATAA, shares the recognition sequence of the GATA family of transcription factors. We report here a functional analysis of the VPEs within the 5'-flanking region of the vit-2 gene using stable transgenic lines. The 247 upstream bp containing the VPEs was sufficient for high-level, regulated expression. Furthermore, none of the four deletion mutations or eight point mutations tested resulted in expression of the reporter gene in larvae, males, or inappropriate hermaphrodite tissues. Mutation of the VPE1 closest to the TATA box inactivated the promoter, in spite of the fact that four additional close matches to the VPE1 consensus sequence are present within the 5'-flanking 200 bp. Each of these upstream VPE1-like sequences could be mutated without loss of high-level transgene expression, suggesting that if these VPE1 sequences play a role in regulating vit-2, their effects are more subtle. A site-directed mutation in the overlapping VPE1 and VPE2 at -98 was sufficient to inactivate the promoter, indicating that one or both of these VPEs must be present for activation of vit-2 transcription. Similarly, a small perturbation of the VPE2 at -150 resulted in reduction of fp155 expression, while a more extensive mutation in this element eliminated expression. On the other hand, deletion of this VPE2 and all upstream DNA still permitted correctly regulated expression, although at a very low level, suggesting that this VPE2 performs an important role in activation of vit-2 expression but may not be absolutely required. The results, taken together, demonstrate that both VPE1 and

  6. Regulation of vitellogenin gene expression in transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans: short sequences required for activation of the vit-2 promoter.

    PubMed

    MacMorris, M; Broverman, S; Greenspoon, S; Lea, K; Madej, C; Blumenthal, T; Spieth, J

    1992-04-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans vitellogenin genes are subject to sex-, stage-, and tissue-specific regulation: they are expressed solely in the adult hermaphrodite intestine. Comparative sequence analysis of the DNA immediately upstream of these genes revealed the presence of two repeated heptameric elements, vit promoter element 1 (VPE1) and VPE2. VPE1 has the consensus sequence TGTCAAT, while VPE2, CTGATAA, shares the recognition sequence of the GATA family of transcription factors. We report here a functional analysis of the VPEs within the 5'-flanking region of the vit-2 gene using stable transgenic lines. The 247 upstream bp containing the VPEs was sufficient for high-level, regulated expression. Furthermore, none of the four deletion mutations or eight point mutations tested resulted in expression of the reporter gene in larvae, males, or inappropriate hermaphrodite tissues. Mutation of the VPE1 closest to the TATA box inactivated the promoter, in spite of the fact that four additional close matches to the VPE1 consensus sequence are present within the 5'-flanking 200 bp. Each of these upstream VPE1-like sequences could be mutated without loss of high-level transgene expression, suggesting that if these VPE1 sequences play a role in regulating vit-2, their effects are more subtle. A site-directed mutation in the overlapping VPE1 and VPE2 at -98 was sufficient to inactivate the promoter, indicating that one or both of these VPEs must be present for activation of vit-2 transcription. Similarly, a small perturbation of the VPE2 at -150 resulted in reduction of fp155 expression, while a more extensive mutation in this element eliminated expression. On the other hand, deletion of this VPE2 and all upstream DNA still permitted correctly regulated expression, although at a very low level, suggesting that this VPE2 performs an important role in activation of vit-2 expression but may not be absolutely required. The results, taken together, demonstrate that both VPE1 and

  7. Breast cancer gene therapy using an adenovirus encoding human IL-2 under control of mammaglobin promoter/enhancer sequences.

    PubMed

    Chaurasiya, S; Hew, P; Crosley, P; Sharon, D; Potts, K; Agopsowicz, K; Long, M; Shi, C; Hitt, M M

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) has been used clinically for the treatment of some malignancies, but the toxicities associated with systemic IL-2 therapy are a major challenge. Here we have determined whether transcriptional targeting of IL-2 to breast cancer (BrCa) using an engineered human mammaglobin promoter/enhancer (MPE2) is a feasible option for reducing IL-2-associated toxicities while still achieving a meaningful antitumor effect. We have constructed nonreplicating adenovirus vectors encoding either a reporter gene (luciferase) or human IL-2 (hIL-2) complementary DNA under control of the MPE2 sequence, the murine cytomegalovirus immediate early (MCMV) promoter or the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter. Luciferase and hIL-2 complementary DNAs under the control of the MPE2 sequence in adenovirus vectors were expressed at high levels in BrCa cells and at lower levels in normal cells of human and murine origin. Cancer specificity of the hTERT promoter was found to be similar to that of the MPE2 promoter in cells of human origin, but reduced specificity in murine cells. The MPE2 regulatory sequence demonstrated excellent tissue specificity in a mouse tumor model. Whereas the MCMV promoter-controlled IL-2 vector generated high liver toxicity in mice, the MPE2-controlled IL-2 vector generated little or no liver toxicity. Both IL-2 vectors exerted significant tumor growth delay; however, attempts to further enhance antitumor activity of the IL-2 vectors by combining with the proapoptotic drug procaspase activating compound 1 (PAC1) were unsuccessful. PMID:27151235

  8. Regulated expression of the human cytomegalovirus pp65 gene: Octamer sequence in the promoter is required for activation by viral gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Depto, A.S.; Stenberg, R.M.

    1989-03-01

    To better understand the regulation of late gene expression in human cytomegalovirus (CMV)-infected cells, the authors examined expression of the gene that codes for the 65-kilodalton lower-matrix phosphoprotein (pp65). Analysis of RNA isolated at 72 h from cells infected with CMV Towne or ts66, a DNA-negative temperature-sensitive mutant, supported the fact that pp65 is expressed at low levels prior to viral DNA replication but maximally expressed after the initiation of viral DNA replication. To investigate promoter activation in a transient expression assay, the pp65 promoter was cloned into the indicator plasmid containing the gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). Transfection of the promoter-CAT construct and subsequent superinfection with CMV resulted in activation of the promoter at early times after infection. Cotransfection with plasmids capable of expressing immediate-early (IE) proteins demonstrated that the promoter was activated by IE proteins and that both IE regions 1 and 2 were necessary. These studies suggest that interactions between IE proteins and this octamer sequence may be important for the regulation and expression of this CMV gene.

  9. Association between a polymorphic poly-T repeat sequence in the promoter of the somatostatin gene and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Monique; Brisson, Diane; Gaudet, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Despite the numerous common pathways connecting blood pressure regulation to somatostatin (SST) metabolism, the SST gene has never been seen as a significant blood pressure modulator. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between a poly-T repeat sequence (rs34872250) in the promoter of the SST gene and blood pressure, according to the obesity status. We genotyped 1918 French-Canadian subjects from a founder population. Analyses were performed according to the length of the poly-T repeat sequence on both alleles and divided into two groups, the 13/13-13/14 group and the 13/15-13/16 group. The effect of age, gender, body mass index, antihypertensive drugs and diabetic status were considered. Systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressures are significantly higher among the 13/15-13/16 group in the whole sample (P<0.05). Whereas the differences remain significant in women, they turn to be non-significant when men are considered alone. The risk of hypertension is increased in the 13/15-13/16 group, particularly among overweight/obese subjects. Systolic blood pressure is significantly higher among overweight/obese carriers of the 13/15-13/16 alleles in the whole sample (P<0.001), in men (P=0.006) and in women (P=0.002), even after correction for age and antihypertensive drugs. These results suggest that the poly-T repeat sequence polymorphism in the promoter of the SST gene is associated with significant variations of blood pressure and could modulate the risk of hypertension, particularly among women. PMID:26818653

  10. Identification of Promoter Motifs Involved in the Network of Phytochrome A-Regulated Gene Expression by Combined Analysis of Genomic Sequence and Microarray Data1[w

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Matthew E.; Quail, Peter H.

    2003-01-01

    Several hundred Arabidopsis genes, transcriptionally regulated by phytochrome A (phyA), were previously identified using an oligonucleotide microarray. We have now identified, in silico, conserved sequence motifs in the promoters of these genes by comparing the promoter sequences to those of all the genes present on the microarray from which they were sampled. This was done using a Perl script (called Sift) that identifies over-represented motifs using an enumerative approach. The utility of Sift was verified by analysis of circadian-regulated promoters known to contain a biologically significant motif. Several elements were then identified in phyA-responsive promoters by their over-representation. Five previously undescribed motifs were detected in the promoters of phyA-induced genes. Four novel motifs were found in phyA-repressed promoters, plus a motif that strongly resembles the DE1 element. The G-box, CACGTG, was a prominent hit in both induced and repressed phyA-responsive promoters. Intriguingly, two distinct flanking consensus sequences were observed adjacent to the G-box core sequence: one predominating in phyA-induced promoters, the other in phyA-repressed promoters. Such different conserved flanking nucleotides around the core motif in these two sets of promoters may indicate that different members of the same family of DNA-binding proteins mediate phyA induction and repression. An increased abundance of G-box sequences was observed in the most rapidly phyA-responsive genes and in the promoters of phyA-regulated transcription factors, indicating that G-box-binding transcription factors are upstream components in a transcriptional cascade that mediates phyA-regulated development. PMID:14681527

  11. Capture and identification of proteins that bind to a GGA-rich sequence from the ERBB2 gene promoter region.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian; Zhang, Huiping; Wang, Yuexi; McGown, Linda B

    2012-10-01

    The ERBB2 gene (HER2/neu) is overexpressed in many human breast cancers. It is an important therapeutic target and its product protein is a key biomarker for breast cancer. A 28-bp GGA repeat sequence (Pu28-mer) in the nuclease hypersensitive site of the ERBB2 promoter region may play an important role in the regulation of ERBB2 transcription, possibly involving the formation of a G-quadruplex. In order to investigate this possibility, an affinity MALDI-MS approach was used for in vitro protein capture from nuclear extracts from cultured MCF-7 and BT-474 cancer cells at Pu28-mer and control oligonucleotide-modified surfaces. Captured proteins from MCF-7 cells were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Based on these results, Western blot was then used to interrogate captured proteins from both MCF-7 and the Her-2/neu-positive BT-474 cells. Results support the formation of a G-quadruplex by Pu28-mer, indicated by circular dichroism spectroscopy, that selectively captures transcription factors including Ku70, Ku80, PURA, nucleolin, and hnRNP K. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed binding of Ku70, Ku80, PURA, and nucleolin to ERBB2 promoter in the live BT-474 cells. These findings may lead to a better understanding of the role of non-duplex DNA structures in gene regulation and provide a more complete picture of the regulation of ErbB2 expression in breast cancer. The results also provide a blueprint for development of "genome-inspired" aptamers based on the Pu28-mer sequence for in vitro and in vivo detection of proteins related to regulation of ERBB2 gene expression and breast cancer. PMID:22899247

  12. The Promoter of a Lysosomal Membrane Transporter Gene, CTNS, Binds Sp-1, Shares Sequences with the Promoter of an Adjacent Gene, CARKL, and Causes Cystinosis If Mutated in a Critical Region

    PubMed Central

    Phornphutkul, Chanika; Anikster, Yair; Huizing, Marjan; Braun, Paula; Brodie, Chaya; Chou, Janice Y.; Gahl, William A.

    2001-01-01

    Although >55 CTNS mutations occur in patients with the lysosomal storage disorder cystinosis, no regulatory mutations have been reported, because the promoter has not been defined. Using CAT reporter constructs of sequences 5′ to the CTNS coding sequence, we identified the CTNS promoter as the region encompassing nucleotides −316 to +1 with respect to the transcription start site. This region contains an Sp-1 regulatory element (GGCGGCG) at positions −299 to −293, which binds authentic Sp-1, as shown by electrophoretic-mobility–shift assays. Three patients exhibited mutations in the CTNS promoter. One patient with nephropathic cystinosis carried a −295 G→C substitution disrupting the Sp-1 motif, whereas two patients with ocular cystinosis displayed a −303 G→T substitution in one case and a −303 T insertion in the other case. Each mutation drastically reduced CAT activity when inserted into a reporter construct. Moreover, each failed either to cause a mobility shift when exposed to nuclear extract or to compete with the normal oligonucleotide’s mobility shift. The CTNS promoter region shares 41 nucleotides with the promoter region of an adjacent gene of unknown function, CARKL, whose start site is 501 bp from the CTNS start site. However, the patients’ CTNS promoter mutations have no effect on CARKL promoter activity. These findings suggest that the CTNS promoter region should be examined in patients with cystinosis who have fewer than two coding-sequence mutations. PMID:11505338

  13. Detailed analysis of Helicobacter pylori Fur-regulated promoters reveals a Fur box core sequence and novel Fur-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Pich, Oscar Q; Carpenter, Beth M; Gilbreath, Jeremy J; Merrell, D Scott

    2012-06-01

    In Helicobacter pylori, iron balance is controlled by the Ferric uptake regulator (Fur), an iron-sensing repressor protein that typically regulates expression of genes implicated in iron transport and storage. Herein, we carried out extensive analysis of Fur-regulated promoters and identified a 7-1-7 motif with dyad symmetry (5'-TAATAATnATTATTA-3'), which functions as the Fur box core sequence of H. pylori. Addition of this sequence to the promoter region of a typically non-Fur regulated gene was sufficient to impose Fur-dependent regulation in vivo. Moreover, mutation of this sequence within Fur-controlled promoters negated regulation. Analysis of the H. pylori chromosome for the occurrence of the Fur box established the existence of well-conserved Fur boxes in the promoters of numerous known Fur-regulated genes, and revealed novel putative Fur targets. Transcriptional analysis of the new candidate genes demonstrated Fur-dependent repression of HPG27_51, HPG27_52, HPG27_199, HPG27_445, HPG27_825 and HPG27_1063, as well as Fur-mediated activation of the cytotoxin associated gene A, cagA (HPG27_507). Furthermore, electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed specific binding of Fur to the promoters of each of these genes. Future experiments will determine whether loss of Fur regulation of any of these particular genes contributes to the defects in colonization exhibited by the H. pylori fur mutant. PMID:22507395

  14. Nucleotide sequence and in vivo expression of the ilvY and ilvC genes in Escherichia coli K12. Transcription from divergent overlapping promoters.

    PubMed

    Wek, R C; Hatfield, G W

    1986-02-15

    The ilvC gene of Escherichia coli K12 encodes acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase, the second enzyme in the parallel isoleucine-valine biosynthetic pathway. Previous data have shown that transcription of the ilvC gene is induced by the acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase substrates, acetohydroxybutyrate or acetolactate, and that this substrate induction of ilvC expression is mediated by a positive activator encoded by the ilvY gene. We report here the isolation and complete nucleotide sequence of the ilvY and ilvC genes. The ilvY and ilvC genes encode polypeptides of Mr 33,200 and 54,000, respectively. In vitro transcription-translation of these gene templates results in the synthesis of gene products of these identical molecular weights. The ilvC gene is transcribed in the same direction as the genes of the adjacent ilvGMEDA operon. The ilvY gene is transcribed in a direction opposite to the ilvC and ilvGMEDA genes. The in vivo transcriptional initiation sites of the ilvY and ilvC genes have been determined by S1 nuclease protection experiments. These transcriptional initiation sites are 45 nucleotides apart, and transcription of the ilvY and ilvC genes is initiated via divergent overlapping promoters. The nucleotide sequence of the ilvY and ilvC promoters and 5'-coding regions of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 have been determined. A comparison of these sequences with E. coli K12 suggests regions important in the promotion, regulation, and translation of the ilvY and ilvC genes. A model is presented in which the ilvY-encoded activator binds to an operator site in the overlapping promoter region and reciprocally regulates the transcription of the ilvY and ilvC genes. The carboxyl-terminal amino acid sequence of threonine deaminase encoded by the ilvA gene of the ilv-GMEDA operon of E. coli K12 has been identified by homology with the previously deduced threonine deaminase amino acid sequence encoded by the ilv1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Based on the deduced

  15. Sequence analysis of the promoter regions of the classical class I gene RT1.A and two other class I genes of the rat MHC

    SciTech Connect

    Lambracht, D.; Wonigeit, K.

    1995-04-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules present peptides to CD8+ T cells and thus play key role in immunosurveillance by T-cell-mediated mechanisms. Their expression depends on complex control mechanisms at two major levels: (1) regulation of transcription mediated through the promoter region and additional regulatory elements of the individual class I gene, and (2) availability of appropriate peptides in the endoplasmic reticulum required to stabilize the ternary complex consisting of class I {alpha} chain, {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin ({beta}{sub 2}m), and peptide. In addition, differences in the ability of different {alpha} chains to bind {beta}{sub 2}m can influence the transport to and turnover within the cell membrane. We have now analyzed the promoter regions of class I genes of the LEW rat strain carrying the RT1{sup 1} haplotype. The analysis of three class I genes in this region has led to the identification of characteristic regulatory sequences. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Promoter sequence of 3-phosphoglycerate kinase gene 2 of lactic acid-producing fungus rhizopus oryzae and a method of expressing a gene of interest in fungal species

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Johnway [Richland, WA; Skeen, Rodney S [Pendleton, OR

    2003-03-04

    The present invention provides the promoter clone discovery of phosphoglycerate kinase gene 2 of a lactic acid-producing filamentous fungal strain, Rhizopus oryzae. The isolated promoter can constitutively regulate gene expression under various carbohydrate conditions. In addition, the present invention also provides a design of an integration vector for the transformation of a foreign gene in Rhizopus oryzae.

  17. Promoter sequence of 3-phosphoglycerate kinase gene 1 of lactic acid-producing fungus rhizopus oryzae and a method of expressing a gene of interest in fungal species

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Johnway [Richland, WA; Skeen, Rodney S [Pendleton, OR

    2002-10-15

    The present invention provides the promoter clone discovery of phosphoglycerate kinase gene 1 of a lactic acid-producing filamentous fungal strain, Rhizopus oryzae. The isolated promoter can constitutively regulate gene expression under various carbohydrate conditions. In addition, the present invention also provides a design of an integration vector for the transformation of a foreign gene in Rhizopus oryzae.

  18. Protein factors in Blastocladiella emersonii cell extracts recognize similar sequence elements in the promoters of the genes encoding cAMP-dependent protein kinase subunits.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, J C; Marques, M V; Gomes, S L

    1997-08-01

    Blastocladiella emersonii contains a single cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), which is similar to the mammalian type II isoforms. Its activity is regulated during development by changes in the levels of the catalytic (C) and regulatory (R) subunits, which occur in parallel with changes in levels of the corresponding mRNAs, suggesting coordinate transcriptional control of the expression of both subunits. Both R and C mRNA levels are low in vegetative cells, rise sharply during sporulation and decrease to basal levels again after germination. To investigate sequence elements common to both Blastocladiella R and C gene promoters, which might be involved in the coordinate regulation of these genes, their 5'-flanking regions were analyzed by gel mobility shift and DNase I footprinting assays. We determined that different DNA-protein complexes are generated when fragments of the R and C gene promoters are incubated with extracts from cells expressing (sporulating cells) or not expressing (vegetative cells) both subunits, and competition experiments suggested that similar protein factors bind to both promoters. DNase I footprinting experiments have indicated that a sequence common to both R and C promoters, and similar to mammalian E-boxes, binds factors present in extracts from vegetative and sporulating cells, whereas sequences flanking the E-boxes in both promoters showed a change in the pattern of DNase I digestion only when the vegetative cell extract was used. This result suggests that the composition of the protein complexes binding to these regions changes during sporulation. PMID:9294034

  19. Cloning of mouse telomerase reverse transcriptase gene promoter and identification of proximal core promoter sequences essential for the expression of transgenes in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Si, Shao-Yan; Song, Shu-Jun; Zhang, Jian-Zhong; Liu, Jun-Li; Liang, Shuang; Feng, Kai; Zhao, Gang; Tan, Xiao-Qing

    2011-08-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex, whose function is to add motif-specific nucleotides to the end of chromosomes. Telomerase consists of three major subunits, the telomerase RNA template (hTR), the telomerase-associated protein (TEP1) and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). TERT is the most important component responsible for the catalytic activity of telomerase and a rate-limiting determinant of the activity. Telomerase activities were at high levels in approximately 90% of mouse cancers or tumor-derived cell lines through TERT transcriptional up-regulation. Unlike human telomerase, telomerase activity exists in colon, liver, ovary and testis but not in brain, heart, stomach and muscle in normal mouse tissues. In this study, we prepared 5' truncations of 1086 bp fragments upstream of the initiating ATG codon of the mTERT gene to construct luciferase reporter gene plasmids, and transfected these plasmids into a normal mouse cell line and several cancer lines to identify the core promoter region essential for transcriptional activation in cancer cells by a luciferase assay. We constructed a eukaryotic expression vector of membrane-expressing staphylococcal endotoxin A (SEA) gene driven by the core promoter region of the mTERT gene and observed if the core promoter region could express the SEA gene in these cancer cells, but not in normal cells following transfection with the construct. The results showed that the transcriptional activities of each fragment of the mTERT gene promoter in the cancer cell lines Hepa1-6, B16 and CT26 were higher than those in NIH3T3 cells, and the proximal 333-bp fragment was the core promoter of the mTERT gene in the cancer cells. The proximal 333-bp fragment was able to make the SEA express on the surface of the cancer cells, but not in NIH3T3 cells. It provides a foundation for cancer targeting gene therapy by using the mTERT gene promoter. PMID:21567104

  20. The Lactobacillus acidophilus S-layer protein gene expression site comprises two consensus promoter sequences, one of which directs transcription of stable mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Boot, H J; Kolen, C P; Andreadaki, F J; Leer, R J; Pouwels, P H

    1996-01-01

    S-proteins are proteins which form a regular structure (S-layer) on the outside of the cell walls of many bacteria. Two S-protein-encoding genes are located in opposite directions on a 6.0-kb segment of the chromosome of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 bacteria. Inversion of this chromosomal segment occurs through recombination between two regions with identical sequences, thereby interchanging the expressed and the silent genes. In this study, we show that the region involved in recombination also has a function in efficient S-protein production. Two promoter sequences are present in the S-protein gene expression site, although only the most downstream promoter (P-1) is used to direct mRNA synthesis. S-protein mRNA directed by this promoter has a half-life of 15 min. Its untranslated leader can form a stable secondary structure in which the 5' end is base paired, whereas the ribosome-binding site is exposed. Truncation of this leader sequence results in a reduction in protein production, as shown by reporter gene analysis of Lactobacillus casei. The results obtained indicate that the untranslated leader sequence of S-protein mRNA is involved in efficient S-protein production. PMID:8808926

  1. Automated conserved non-coding sequence (CNS) discovery reveals differences in gene content and promoter evolution among grasses

    PubMed Central

    Turco, Gina; Schnable, James C.; Pedersen, Brent; Freeling, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Conserved non-coding sequences (CNS) are islands of non-coding sequence that, like protein coding exons, show less divergence in sequence between related species than functionless DNA. Several CNSs have been demonstrated experimentally to function as cis-regulatory regions. However, the specific functions of most CNSs remain unknown. Previous searches for CNS in plants have either anchored on exons and only identified nearby sequences or required years of painstaking manual annotation. Here we present an open source tool that can accurately identify CNSs between any two related species with sequenced genomes, including both those immediately adjacent to exons and distal sequences separated by >12 kb of non-coding sequence. We have used this tool to characterize new motifs, associate CNSs with additional functions, and identify previously undetected genes encoding RNA and protein in the genomes of five grass species. We provide a list of 15,363 orthologous CNSs conserved across all grasses tested. We were also able to identify regulatory sequences present in the common ancestor of grasses that have been lost in one or more extant grass lineages. Lists of orthologous gene pairs and associated CNSs are provided for reference inbred lines of arabidopsis, Japonica rice, foxtail millet, sorghum, brachypodium, and maize. PMID:23874343

  2. Two regulatory proteins that bind to the basic transcription element (BTE), a GC box sequence in the promoter region of the rat P-4501A1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Imataka, H; Sogawa, K; Yasumoto, K; Kikuchi, Y; Sasano, K; Kobayashi, A; Hayami, M; Fujii-Kuriyama, Y

    1992-01-01

    The cDNAs for two DNA binding proteins of BTE, a GC box sequence in the promoter region of the P-450IA1(CYP1A1) gene, have been isolated from a rat liver cDNA library by using the BTE sequence as a binding probe. While one is for the rat equivalent to human Sp1, the other encodes a primary structure of 244 amino acids, a novel DNA binding protein designated BTEB. Both proteins contain a zinc finger domain of Cys-Cys/His-His motif that is repeated three times with sequence similarity of 72% to each other, otherwise they share little or no similarity. The function of BTEB was analysed by transfection of plasmids expressing BTEB and/or Sp1 with appropriate reporter plasmids into a monkey cell line CV-1 and compared with Sp1. BTEB and Sp1 activated the expression of genes with repeated GC box sequences in promoters such as the simian virus 40 early promoter and the human immunodeficiency virus-1 long terminal repeat promoter. In contrast, BTEB repressed the activity of a promoter containing BTE, a single GC box of the CYP1A1 gene that is stimulated by Sp1. When the BTE sequence was repeated five times, however, BTEB turned out to be an activator of the promoter. RNA blot analysis showed that mRNAs for BTEB and Sp1 were expressed in all tissues tested, but their concentrations varied independently in tissues. The former mRNA was rich in the brain, kidney, lung and testis, while the latter was relatively abundant in the thymus and spleen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:1356762

  3. Gene expression promoted by the SV40 DNA targeting sequence and the hypoxia-responsive element under normoxia and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sacramento, C B; Moraes, J Z; Denapolis, P M A; Han, S W

    2010-08-01

    The main objective of the present study was to find suitable DNA-targeting sequences (DTS) for the construction of plasmid vectors to be used to treat ischemic diseases. The well-known Simian virus 40 nuclear DTS (SV40-DTS) and hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) sequences were used to construct plasmid vectors to express the human vascular endothelial growth factor gene (hVEGF). The rate of plasmid nuclear transport and consequent gene expression under normoxia (20% O2) and hypoxia (less than 5% O2) were determined. Plasmids containing the SV40-DTS or HRE sequences were constructed and used to transfect the A293T cell line (a human embryonic kidney cell line) in vitro and mouse skeletal muscle cells in vivo. Plasmid transport to the nucleus was monitored by real-time PCR, and the expression level of the hVEGF gene was measured by ELISA. The in vitro nuclear transport efficiency of the SV40-DTS plasmid was about 50% lower under hypoxia, while the HRE plasmid was about 50% higher under hypoxia. Quantitation of reporter gene expression in vitro and in vivo, under hypoxia and normoxia, confirmed that the SV40-DTS plasmid functioned better under normoxia, while the HRE plasmid was superior under hypoxia. These results indicate that the efficiency of gene expression by plasmids containing DNA binding sequences is affected by the concentration of oxygen in the medium. PMID:20640386

  4. Sequence analysis of mouse vomeronasal receptor gene clusters reveals common promoter motifs and a history of recent expansion

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Robert P.; Cutforth, Tyler; Axel, Richard; Hood, Leroy; Trask, Barbara J.

    2002-01-01

    We have analyzed the organization and sequence of 73 V1R genes encoding putative pheromone receptors to identify regulatory features and characterize the evolutionary history of the V1R family. The 73 V1Rs arose from seven ancestral genes around the time of mouse–rat speciation through large local duplications, and this expansion may contribute to speciation events. Orthologous V1R genes appear to have been lost during primate evolution. Exceptional noncoding homology is observed across four V1R subfamilies at one cluster and thus may be important for locus-specific transcriptional regulation. PMID:11752409

  5. Tissue-specific binding of testis nuclear proteins to a sequence element within the promoter of the testis-specific histone H1t gene.

    PubMed

    Grimes, S R; Wolfe, S A; Koppel, D A

    1992-08-01

    The rat histone H1t gene is transcribed only in testis germinal cells. This testis-specific chromosomal protein is first synthesized during spermatogenesis in pachytene spermatocytes and the entire complement of testis histones is replaced during the midspermatid stage of spermiogenesis by positively charged transition nuclear proteins TP1 and TP2. Mobility shift assays conducted using crude nuclear protein extracts from different tissues and an 18-bp DNA sequence element within the H1t promoter as a probe reveal binding only with nuclear proteins from testis. The binding is specifically competed with an excess of the same unlabeled DNA fragment but not with heterologous competitors. A larger oligonucleotide corresponding to the same sequence element plus 18 bp of the adjacent downstream H1/CCAAT element binds nuclear proteins from all tissues tested, but a unique low mobility band is formed only with testis extracts. Protein-DNA crosslinking experiments reveal that two major polypeptides with molecular weights of approximately 13 and 30 kDa bind to the 18-bp H1t promoter sequence element. This strong correlation between the tissue where the H1t gene is transcribed and the presence of testis-specific nuclear proteins that bind to a sequence element within the testis histone H1t promoter supports the possibility that these DNA-binding proteins may participate in formation of an active transcription initiation complex with the testis H1t promoter. PMID:1632632

  6. Sequence Elements Upstream of the Core Promoter Are Necessary for Full Transcription of the Capsule Gene Operon in Streptococcus pneumoniae Strain D39

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Zhensong; Sertil, Odeniel; Cheng, Yongxin; Zhang, Shanshan; Liu, Xue; Wang, Wen-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major bacterial pathogen in humans. Its polysaccharide capsule is a key virulence factor that promotes bacterial evasion of human phagocytic killing. While S. pneumoniae produces at least 94 antigenically different types of capsule, the genes for biosynthesis of almost all capsular types are arranged in the same locus. The transcription of the capsular polysaccharide (cps) locus is not well understood. This study determined the transcriptional features of the cps locus in the type 2 virulent strain D39. The initial analysis revealed that the cps genes are cotranscribed from a major transcription start site at the −25 nucleotide (G) upstream of cps2A, the first gene in the locus. Using unmarked chromosomal truncations and a luciferase-based transcriptional reporter, we showed that the full transcription of the cps genes not only depends on the core promoter immediately upstream of cps2A, but also requires additional elements upstream of the core promoter, particularly a 59-bp sequence immediately upstream of the core promoter. Unmarked deletions of these promoter elements in the D39 genome also led to significant reduction in CPS production and virulence in mice. Lastly, common cps gene (cps2ABCD) mutants did not show significant abnormality in cps transcription, although they produced significantly less CPS, indicating that the CpsABCD proteins are involved in the encapsulation of S. pneumoniae in a posttranscriptional manner. This study has yielded important information on the transcriptional characteristics of the cps locus in S. pneumoniae. PMID:25733517

  7. Histone Acetylation Accompanied with Promoter Sequences Displaying Differential Expression Profiles of B-Class MADS-Box Genes for Phalaenopsis Floral Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chia-Chi; Wu, Pei-Shan; Chen, Tien-Chih; Yu, Chun-Wei; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Wu, Keqiang; Wu, Wen-Luan; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Five B-class MADS-box genes, including four APETALA3 (AP3)-like PeMADS2∼5 and one PISTILLATA (PI)-like PeMADS6, specify the spectacular flower morphology in orchids. The PI-like PeMADS6 ubiquitously expresses in all floral organs. The four AP3-like genes, resulted from two duplication events, express ubiquitously at floral primordia and early floral organ stages, but show distinct expression profiles at late floral organ primordia and floral bud stages. Here, we isolated the upstream sequences of PeMADS2∼6 and studied the regulatory mechanism for their distinct gene expression. Phylogenetic footprinting analysis of the 1.3-kb upstream sequences of AP3-like PeMADS2∼5 showed that their promoter regions have sufficiently diverged and contributed to their subfunctionalization. The amplified promoter sequences of PeMADS2∼6 could drive beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene expression in all floral organs, similar to their expression at the floral primordia stage. The promoter sequence of PeMADS4, exclusively expressed in lip and column, showed a 1.6∼3-fold higher expression in lip/column than in sepal/petal. Furthermore, we noted a 4.9-fold increase in histone acetylation (H3K9K14ac) in the translation start region of PeMADS4 in lip as compared in petal. All these results suggest that the regulation via the upstream sequences and increased H3K9K14ac level may act synergistically to display distinct expression profiles of the AP3-like genes at late floral organ primordia stage for Phalaenopsis floral morphogenesis. PMID:25501842

  8. Histone acetylation accompanied with promoter sequences displaying differential expression profiles of B-class MADS-box genes for phalaenopsis floral morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Chi; Wu, Pei-Shan; Chen, Tien-Chih; Yu, Chun-Wei; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Wu, Keqiang; Wu, Wen-Luan; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Five B-class MADS-box genes, including four APETALA3 (AP3)-like PeMADS2∼5 and one PISTILLATA (PI)-like PeMADS6, specify the spectacular flower morphology in orchids. The PI-like PeMADS6 ubiquitously expresses in all floral organs. The four AP3-like genes, resulted from two duplication events, express ubiquitously at floral primordia and early floral organ stages, but show distinct expression profiles at late floral organ primordia and floral bud stages. Here, we isolated the upstream sequences of PeMADS2∼6 and studied the regulatory mechanism for their distinct gene expression. Phylogenetic footprinting analysis of the 1.3-kb upstream sequences of AP3-like PeMADS2∼5 showed that their promoter regions have sufficiently diverged and contributed to their subfunctionalization. The amplified promoter sequences of PeMADS2∼6 could drive beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene expression in all floral organs, similar to their expression at the floral primordia stage. The promoter sequence of PeMADS4, exclusively expressed in lip and column, showed a 1.6∼3-fold higher expression in lip/column than in sepal/petal. Furthermore, we noted a 4.9-fold increase in histone acetylation (H3K9K14ac) in the translation start region of PeMADS4 in lip as compared in petal. All these results suggest that the regulation via the upstream sequences and increased H3K9K14ac level may act synergistically to display distinct expression profiles of the AP3-like genes at late floral organ primordia stage for Phalaenopsis floral morphogenesis. PMID:25501842

  9. Molecular mechanisms of human single-minded 2 (SIM2) gene expression: identification of a promoter site in the SIM2 genomic sequence.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, A; Tochigi, J; Kudoh, J; Minoshima, S; Shimizu, N; Shimizu, Y

    2001-05-30

    We previously postulated that the single-minded 2 (SIM2) gene identified on the human chromosome 21q22.2 is a good candidate gene for the pathogenesis of mental retardation in Down syndrome because its mouse homolog exhibits preferential expression in the mouse diencephalon during early embryogenesis. We analyzed the genomic sequence of the entire SIM2 gene which consists of 11 exons and spans over 50 kb. As a step toward understanding the molecular mechanisms of SIM2 gene expression, we have analyzed the human SIM2 gene expression in nine established human cell lines. Three transcripts of 3.6, 4.4, and 6.0 kb were detected in the glioblastoma cell line, T98G, neuroblastoma cell line, TGW, and transformed embryonic kidney cell line, 293. The RACE analysis using SIM2-expressing human cell line T98G provided evidence for the transcription start site at approximately 1.2 kb upstream of the translation initiation site. The transfection assay using various deletion constructs with reporter gene suggested the presence of a presumptive promoter region. Transient transfection assay in T98G cell line revealed a significant promoter activity located in the 60 bp sequence between nt -1385 and -1325 upstream region of the translation initiation site. This 60 bp sequence contains cis-elements for c-myb, E47 and E2F transcription factors. Moreover, the gel retardation assay using oligo-DNA of various cis-element sequences indicated the presence of protein factor(s) which bind to the cis-element for c-myb. These results suggested that binding of a protein transcription factor(s) such as c-myb or that alike regulates transcription of the SIM2 gene by binding to a small upstream region. PMID:11404025

  10. A fusion promoter created by a new insertion sequence, IS1490, activates transcription of 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid catabolic genes in Burkholderia cepacia AC1100.

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, A; Hendrickson, W

    1997-01-01

    Transposition and transcriptional activation by insertion sequences in Burkholderia cepacia AC1100 were investigated. Two closely related new elements, IS1413 and IS1490, were identified and characterized. These elements are not highly related to other insertion sequences identified in AC1100 or other B. cepacia isolates. Based on their structures and the sequences of the inverted terminal repeats and the putative transposase protein, the insertion elements (IS elements) are similar to IST2 of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and several related elements. All the IS elements that have been identified in this strain are found in multiple copies (10 to 40), and they have high-level promoter activity capable of stimulating transcription from a distance up to 500 bp from a target gene. Strain AC1100 was originally isolated after prolonged selection for the ability to utilize the herbicide 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) as a sole carbon source. Three IS elements are located near the first gene of the 2,4,5-T catabolic pathway, tftA. IS1490 inserted 110 bp upstream of tftA and created a fusion promoter responsible for constitutive transcription of the gene. Our results confirm the hypothesis that IS elements play a central role in transcription of 2,4,5-T genes and likely have stimulated rapid evolution of the metabolic pathway. PMID:9098071

  11. Two short sequences in OsNAR2.1 promoter are necessary for fully activating the nitrate induced gene expression in rice roots

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Feng, Huimin; Huang, Daimin; Song, Miaoquan; Fan, Xiaorong; Xu, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate is an essential nitrogen source and serves as a signal to control growth and gene expression in plants. In rice, OsNAR2.1 is an essential partner of multiple OsNRT2 nitrate transporters for nitrate uptake over low and high concentration range. Previously, we have reported that −311 bp upstream fragment from the translational start site in the promoter of OsNAR2.1 gene is the nitrate responsive region. To identify the cis-acting DNA elements necessary for nitrate induced gene expression, we detected the expression of beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter in the transgenic rice driven by the OsNAR2.1 promoter with different lengths and site mutations of the 311 bp region. We found that −129 to −1 bp region is necessary for the nitrate-induced full activation of OsNAR2.1. Besides, the site mutations showed that the 20 bp fragment between −191 and −172 bp contains an enhancer binding site necessary to fully drive the OsNAR2.1 expression. Part of the 20 bp fragment is commonly presented in the sequences of different promoters of both the nitrate induced NAR2 genes and nitrite reductase NIR1 genes from various higher plants. These findings thus reveal the presence of conserved cis-acting element for mediating nitrate responses in plants. PMID:26150107

  12. Mouse thymidine kinase: the promoter sequence and the gene and pseudogene structures in normal cells and in thymidine kinase deficient mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Seiser, C; Knöfler, M; Rudelstorfer, I; Haas, R; Wintersberger, E

    1989-01-01

    The mouse genome carries one gene and two pseudogenes for cytoplasmic thymidine kinase. The overall structure of these genes was determined with the help of cosmids and lambda phage clones and the upstream sequence containing the promoter was determined. The data allow an allocation of bands seen in the complex patterns of genomic Southern blots obtained from the DNA of wild type cells and of thymidine kinase deficient mutants to the gene as well as to the two pseudogenes. The much used LTK cell line was found to lack the entire gene but to retain the pseudogenes. Two other TK cell lines had DNA patterns indistinguishable from the wild type. Whereas the LTK line did not produce any TKmRNA, the two other mutants had normal amounts of TKmRNA but no cytoplasmic TK activity. Images PMID:2911464

  13. Functional analysis of the long terminal repeats of intracisternal A-particle genes: Sequences within the U3 region determine both the efficiency and direction of promoter activity

    SciTech Connect

    Christy, R.J.; Huang, R.C.C.

    1988-03-01

    The transcriptional activity of five intracisternal A-particle (IAP) long terminal repeats (LTRs) in mouse embryonal carcinoma PCC3-A/1 cells and in Ltk/sup -/ cells was determined. The authors tested the promoter activity of the LTRs by coupling them to the reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) or guanosine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (gpt). Each LTR was tested for promoter function in both the sense (5' to 3') and antisense (3' to 5') orientation preceding the reporter gene. The transcriptional activity of individual IAP gene LTRs varied considerably, and the LTR from IAP81 possessed promoter activity in both directions. The bidirectional activity of the IAP81 LTR was confirmed by monitoring Ecogpt expression in stably transfected Ltk/sup -/ cells, with the initiation sites for sense and antisense transcription being localized to within the IAP81 LTR by S1 nuclease mapping. Deletions of LTR81 show that for normal 5'-to-3' gene transcription (sense direction), the /sup 3'/U3/R region determines the basal level of transcription, whereas sequences within the /sup 5'/U3 region enhance transcription four- to fivefold. Deletion mapping for antisense transcription indicates that a 64-base-pair region (nucleotides 47 to 110) within the U3 region is essential for activity. These data indicate that the U3 region contains all the regulatory elements for bidirectional transcription in IAP LTRs.

  14. Violation of an evolutionarily conserved immunoglobulin diversity gene sequence preference promotes production of dsDNA-specific IgG antibodies.

    PubMed

    Silva-Sanchez, Aaron; Liu, Cun Ren; Vale, Andre M; Khass, Mohamed; Kapoor, Pratibha; Elgavish, Ada; Ivanov, Ivaylo I; Ippolito, Gregory C; Schelonka, Robert L; Schoeb, Trenton R; Burrows, Peter D; Schroeder, Harry W

    2015-01-01

    Variability in the developing antibody repertoire is focused on the third complementarity determining region of the H chain (CDR-H3), which lies at the center of the antigen binding site where it often plays a decisive role in antigen binding. The power of VDJ recombination and N nucleotide addition has led to the common conception that the sequence of CDR-H3 is unrestricted in its variability and random in its composition. Under this view, the immune response is solely controlled by somatic positive and negative clonal selection mechanisms that act on individual B cells to promote production of protective antibodies and prevent the production of self-reactive antibodies. This concept of a repertoire of random antigen binding sites is inconsistent with the observation that diversity (DH) gene segment sequence content by reading frame (RF) is evolutionarily conserved, creating biases in the prevalence and distribution of individual amino acids in CDR-H3. For example, arginine, which is often found in the CDR-H3 of dsDNA binding autoantibodies, is under-represented in the commonly used DH RFs rearranged by deletion, but is a frequent component of rarely used inverted RF1 (iRF1), which is rearranged by inversion. To determine the effect of altering this germline bias in DH gene segment sequence on autoantibody production, we generated mice that by genetic manipulation are forced to utilize an iRF1 sequence encoding two arginines. Over a one year period we collected serial serum samples from these unimmunized, specific pathogen-free mice and found that more than one-fifth of them contained elevated levels of dsDNA-binding IgG, but not IgM; whereas mice with a wild type DH sequence did not. Thus, germline bias against the use of arginine enriched DH sequence helps to reduce the likelihood of producing self-reactive antibodies. PMID:25706374

  15. Massively parallel sequencing of phyllodes tumours of the breast reveals actionable mutations, and TERT promoter hotspot mutations and TERT gene amplification as likely drivers of progression.

    PubMed

    Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte Ky; Murray, Melissa; Burke, Kathleen A; Edelweiss, Marcia; Geyer, Felipe C; Macedo, Gabriel S; Inagaki, Akiko; Papanastasiou, Anastasios D; Martelotto, Luciano G; Marchio, Caterina; Lim, Raymond S; Ioris, Rafael A; Nahar, Pooja K; Bruijn, Ino De; Smyth, Lillian; Akram, Muzaffar; Ross, Dara; Petrini, John H; Norton, Larry; Solit, David B; Baselga, Jose; Brogi, Edi; Ladanyi, Marc; Weigelt, Britta; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-03-01

    Phyllodes tumours (PTs) are breast fibroepithelial lesions that are graded based on histological criteria as benign, borderline or malignant. PTs may recur locally. Borderline PTs and malignant PTs may metastasize to distant sites. Breast fibroepithelial lesions, including PTs and fibroadenomas, are characterized by recurrent MED12 exon 2 somatic mutations. We sought to define the repertoire of somatic genetic alterations in PTs and whether these may assist in the differential diagnosis of these lesions. We collected 100 fibroadenomas, 40 benign PTs, 14 borderline PTs and 22 malignant PTs; six, six and 13 benign, borderline and malignant PTs, respectively, and their matched normal tissue, were subjected to targeted massively parallel sequencing (MPS) using the MSK-IMPACT sequencing assay. Recurrent MED12 mutations were found in 56% of PTs; in addition, mutations affecting cancer genes (eg TP53, RB1, SETD2 and EGFR) were exclusively detected in borderline and malignant PTs. We found a novel recurrent clonal hotspot mutation in the TERT promoter (-124 C>T) in 52% and TERT gene amplification in 4% of PTs. Laser capture microdissection revealed that these mutations were restricted to the mesenchymal component of PTs. Sequencing analysis of the entire cohort revealed that the frequency of TERT alterations increased from benign (18%) to borderline (57%) and to malignant PTs (68%; p < 0.01), and TERT alterations were associated with increased levels of TERT mRNA (p < 0.001). No TERT alterations were observed in fibroadenomas. An analysis of TERT promoter sequencing and gene amplification distinguished PTs from fibroadenomas with a sensitivity and a positive predictive value of 100% (CI 95.38-100%) and 100% (CI 85.86-100%), respectively, and a sensitivity and a negative predictive value of 39% (CI 28.65-51.36%) and 68% (CI 60.21-75.78%), respectively. Our results suggest that TERT alterations may drive the progression of PTs, and may assist in the differential diagnosis

  16. Promoter architectures and developmental gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Haberle, Vanja; Lenhard, Boris

    2016-09-01

    Core promoters are minimal regions sufficient to direct accurate initiation of transcription and are crucial for regulation of gene expression. They are highly diverse in terms of associated core promoter motifs, underlying sequence composition and patterns of transcription initiation. Distinctive features of promoters are also seen at the chromatin level, including nucleosome positioning patterns and presence of specific histone modifications. Recent advances in identifying and characterizing promoters using next-generation sequencing-based technologies have provided the basis for their classification into functional groups and have shed light on their modes of regulation, with important implications for transcriptional regulation in development. This review discusses the methodology and the results of genome-wide studies that provided insight into the diversity of RNA polymerase II promoter architectures in vertebrates and other Metazoa, and the association of these architectures with distinct modes of regulation in embryonic development and differentiation. PMID:26783721

  17. Prediction of fine-tuned promoter activity from DNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    Siwo, Geoffrey; Rider, Andrew; Tan, Asako; Pinapati, Richard; Emrich, Scott; Chawla, Nitesh; Ferdig, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative prediction of transcriptional activity of genes using promoter sequence is fundamental to the engineering of biological systems for industrial purposes and understanding the natural variation in gene expression. To catalyze the development of new algorithms for this purpose, the Dialogue on Reverse Engineering Assessment and Methods (DREAM) organized a community challenge seeking predictive models of promoter activity given normalized promoter activity data for 90 ribosomal protein promoters driving expression of a fluorescent reporter gene. By developing an unbiased modeling approach that performs an iterative search for predictive DNA sequence features using the frequencies of various k-mers, inferred DNA mechanical properties and spatial positions of promoter sequences, we achieved the best performer status in this challenge. The specific predictive features used in the model included the frequency of the nucleotide G, the length of polymeric tracts of T and TA, the frequencies of 6 distinct trinucleotides and 12 tetranucleotides, and the predicted protein deformability of the DNA sequence. Our method accurately predicted the activity of 20 natural variants of ribosomal protein promoters (Spearman correlation r = 0.73) as compared to 33 laboratory-mutated variants of the promoters (r = 0.57) in a test set that was hidden from participants. Notably, our model differed substantially from the rest in 2 main ways: i) it did not explicitly utilize transcription factor binding information implying that subtle DNA sequence features are highly associated with gene expression, and ii) it was entirely based on features extracted exclusively from the 100 bp region upstream from the translational start site demonstrating that this region encodes much of the overall promoter activity. The findings from this study have important implications for the engineering of predictable gene expression systems and the evolution of gene expression in naturally occurring

  18. Unveiling Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Promoters: Sequence Definition and Genomic Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Shana de Souto; Sant'Anna, Fernando Hayashi; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2012-01-01

    Several Mycoplasma species have had their genome completely sequenced, including four strains of the swine pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Nevertheless, little is known about the nucleotide sequences that control transcriptional initiation in these microorganisms. Therefore, with the objective of investigating the promoter sequences of M. hyopneumoniae, 23 transcriptional start sites (TSSs) of distinct genes were mapped. A pattern that resembles the σ70 promoter −10 element was found upstream of the TSSs. However, no −35 element was distinguished. Instead, an AT-rich periodic signal was identified. About half of the experimentally defined promoters contained the motif 5′-TRTGn-3′, which was identical to the −16 element usually found in Gram-positive bacteria. The defined promoters were utilized to build position-specific scoring matrices in order to scan putative promoters upstream of all coding sequences (CDSs) in the M. hyopneumoniae genome. Two hundred and one signals were found associated with 169 CDSs. Most of these sequences were located within 100 nucleotides of the start codons. This study has shown that the number of promoter-like sequences in the M. hyopneumoniae genome is more frequent than expected by chance, indicating that most of the sequences detected are probably biologically functional. PMID:22334569

  19. Bioinformatic Identification of Conserved Cis-Sequences in Coregulated Genes.

    PubMed

    Bülow, Lorenz; Hehl, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatics tools can be employed to identify conserved cis-sequences in sets of coregulated plant genes because more and more gene expression and genomic sequence data become available. Knowledge on the specific cis-sequences, their enrichment and arrangement within promoters, facilitates the design of functional synthetic plant promoters that are responsive to specific stresses. The present chapter illustrates an example for the bioinformatic identification of conserved Arabidopsis thaliana cis-sequences enriched in drought stress-responsive genes. This workflow can be applied for the identification of cis-sequences in any sets of coregulated genes. The workflow includes detailed protocols to determine sets of coregulated genes, to extract the corresponding promoter sequences, and how to install and run a software package to identify overrepresented motifs. Further bioinformatic analyses that can be performed with the results are discussed. PMID:27557771

  20. Cell-specific expression of the analgesic-antitumor peptide coding sequence under the control of the human α-fetoprotein gene promoter and enhancer

    PubMed Central

    JIN, SISI; LIN, XIANFAN; GUAN, HUAQIN; WU, JINMING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to construct a gene-modified hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-specific analgesic-antitumor peptide (AGAP) expression vector regulated by the α-fetoprotein (AFP) promoter and enhancer, in order to evaluate its effect. The AFP promoter is generally used in HCC-specific gene therapy strategies. However, this approach is limited by the weak activity of the AFP promoter. Linking the AFP enhancer and promoter has been shown to generate a stronger and more HCC-selective promoter. The AGAP DNA fragment was amplified from the total RNA of the Chinese scorpion, Buthus martensii Karsch. The fragment was subsequently cloned into the pAFP plasmid with the minimal essential DNA fragment, which included the AFP gene promoter and enhancer, to construct the recombinant plasmid, pAFP-AGAP. The plasmid was transfected into HepG2 cells and the mRNA expression levels of AGAP were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In addition, Cell Counting Kit 8 (CCK-8) was used to analyze the cytotoxicity of plasmid transfection. The length, position and orientation of the inserted AGAP gene were all confirmed to be correct; thus, the recombinant vector was successfully constructed. Using RT-PCR and CCK-8 analysis, the mRNA expression levels of AGAP and the cytotoxicity in AFP-producing human HCC cells were determined. The AFP promoter and enhancer were found to specifically accelerate the expression of the target genes within the cells that were positive for AFP. Therefore, the method used in the present study was demonstrated to be a novel integration of traditional Chinese medicine with western medicine. PMID:25667643

  1. Bayesian classification for promoter prediction in human DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercher, J.-F.; Jardin, P.; Duriez, B.

    2006-11-01

    Many Computational methods are yet available for data retrieval and analysis of genomic sequences, but some functional sites are difficult to characterize. In this work, we examine the problem of promoter localization in human DNA sequences. Promoters are regulatory regions that governs the expression of genes, and their prediction is reputed difficult, so that this issue is still open. We present the Chaos Game representation (CGR) of DNA sequences which has many interesting properties, and the notion of `genomic signature' that proved relevant in phylogeny applications. Based on this notion, we develop a (naïve) bayesian classifier, evaluate its performances, and show that its adaptive implementation enable to reveal or assess core-promoter positions along a DNA sequence.

  2. Cloning and sequence analysis of myostatin promoter in sheep.

    PubMed

    Du, Rong; Chen, Yong-Fu; An, Xiao-Rong; Yang, Xing-Yuan; Ma, Yi; Zhang, Lei; Yuan, Xiao-Li; Chen, Li-Mei; Qin, Jian

    2005-12-01

    To better understand the structure and function of the myostatin's gene promoter region in sheep, we cloned and sequenced a 1.517 kb fragment containing the 5'-regulatory region of the sheep myostatin gene (GenBank accession number is AY918121). The promoter sequence consists of three TATA boxes, one CAAT box, and eight putative E-boxes. Some putative muscle growth response elements for Octamer-binding factor 1(Octamer), Activator protein 1(AP1), Growth factor independence 1 zinc finger protein (Gfi-1B), Myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), Muscle-specific Mt binding site (MTBF), Glucocorticoid response elements (GRE) and Progesterone receptor binding site (PRE) were detected. Some of the motifs are conserved as compared to with that in the goat, bovine and porcine myostatin promoters. However, some differences were also found. PMID:16287620

  3. Expression of the human T-cell receptor V beta 5.3 in Escherichia coli by thermal induction of the trc promoter: nucleotide sequence of the lacIts gene.

    PubMed

    Adari, H; Andrews, B; Ford, P J; Hannig, G; Brosius, J; Makrides, S C

    1995-11-01

    We have constructed a vector, pKBi, for the high-level expression of the variable beta chain 5.3 (V beta 5.3) of the human T-cell receptor in Escherichia coli. This vector incorporates the trc promoter, a polylinker, two transcription terminators, and the tetracycline resistance gene. Furthermore, the vector contains the lacIts gene that encodes a temperature-sensitive (ts) lac repressor, thus obviating both the need to use IPTG as a transcriptional inducer, and bacterial strains that harbor either the lacI or lacIq genes. The sequence of the lacIts gene shows an open reading frame of 1,080 nucleotides encoding 360 amino acids, and differs from the lacI gene at nucleotide 559 (with reference to the first nucleotide of the start codon). This nucleotide changes from G to A, causing amino acid residue 187 to change from glycine (GGC) to serine (AGC). This mutation imparts thermal sensitivity to the lac repressor protein. This is the first time that a TCR V beta region has been expressed at high levels (up to 28 mg/liter of culture) without fusion partners. The availability of the lacIts gene for thermal induction of the trc promoter, and the presence of the tetracycline resistance gene should make the expression vector pKBi particularly attractive for the efficient production of human therapeutic proteins in bacteria. PMID:7576181

  4. Functional analysis of bipartite begomovirus coat protein promoter sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Lacatus, Gabriela; Sunter, Garry

    2008-06-20

    We demonstrate that the AL2 gene of Cabbage leaf curl virus (CaLCuV) activates the CP promoter in mesophyll and acts to derepress the promoter in vascular tissue, similar to that observed for Tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV). Binding studies indicate that sequences mediating repression and activation of the TGMV and CaLCuV CP promoter specifically bind different nuclear factors common to Nicotiana benthamiana, spinach and tomato. However, chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrates that TGMV AL2 can interact with both sequences independently. Binding of nuclear protein(s) from different crop species to viral sequences conserved in both bipartite and monopartite begomoviruses, including TGMV, CaLCuV, Pepper golden mosaic virus and Tomato yellow leaf curl virus suggests that bipartite begomoviruses bind common host factors to regulate the CP promoter. This is consistent with a model in which AL2 interacts with different components of the cellular transcription machinery that bind viral sequences important for repression and activation of begomovirus CP promoters.

  5. Epigenetic regulation of transposable element derived human gene promoters.

    PubMed

    Huda, Ahsan; Bowen, Nathan J; Conley, Andrew B; Jordan, I King

    2011-04-01

    It was previously thought that epigenetic histone modifications of mammalian transposable elements (TEs) serve primarily to defend the genome against deleterious effects associated with their activity. However, we recently showed that, genome-wide, human TEs can also be epigenetically modified in a manner consistent with their ability to regulate host genes. Here, we explore the ability of TE sequences to epigenetically regulate individual human genes by focusing on the histone modifications of promoter sequences derived from TEs. We found 1520 human genes that initiate transcription from within TE-derived promoter sequences. We evaluated the distributions of eight histone modifications across these TE-promoters, within and between the GM12878 and K562 cell lines, and related their modification status with the cell-type specific expression patterns of the genes that they regulate. TE-derived promoters are significantly enriched for active histone modifications, and depleted for repressive modifications, relative to the genomic background. Active histone modifications of TE-promoters peak at transcription start sites and are positively correlated with increasing expression within cell lines. Furthermore, differential modification of TE-derived promoters between cell lines is significantly correlated with differential gene expression. LTR-retrotransposon derived promoters in particular play a prominent role in mediating cell-type specific gene regulation, and a number of these LTR-promoter genes are implicated in lineage-specific cellular functions. The regulation of human genes mediated by histone modifications targeted to TE-derived promoters is consistent with the ability of TEs to contribute to the epigenomic landscape in a way that provides functional utility to the host genome. PMID:21215797

  6. Genome Sequence of the Banana Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BS006.

    PubMed

    Gamez, Rocío M; Rodríguez, Fernando; Bernal, Johan F; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens is an important plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR Bacillus amyloliquefaciens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences encode genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, ribosomally synthesized antibacterial peptides, in addition to genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds. PMID:26607897

  7. Genome Sequence of the Banana Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BS006

    PubMed Central

    Gamez, Rocío M.; Rodríguez, Fernando; Bernal, Johan F.; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens is an important plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR Bacillus amyloliquefaciens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences encode genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, ribosomally synthesized antibacterial peptides, in addition to genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds. PMID:26607897

  8. Genome Sequence of the Banana Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PS006

    PubMed Central

    Gamez, Rocío M.; Rodríguez, Fernando; Ramírez, Sandra; Gómez, Yolanda; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a well-known plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report here the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR P. fluorescens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences contains genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, and genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds. PMID:27151797

  9. Genome Sequence of the Banana Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PS006.

    PubMed

    Gamez, Rocío M; Rodríguez, Fernando; Ramírez, Sandra; Gómez, Yolanda; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a well-known plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report here the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR P. fluorescens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences contains genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, and genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds. PMID:27151797

  10. Repetitive sequence environment distinguishes housekeeping genes

    PubMed Central

    Eller, C. Daniel; Regelson, Moira; Merriman, Barry; Nelson, Stan; Horvath, Steve; Marahrens, York

    2007-01-01

    Housekeeping genes are expressed across a wide variety of tissues. Since repetitive sequences have been reported to influence the expression of individual genes, we employed a novel approach to determine whether housekeeping genes can be distinguished from tissue-specific genes their repetitive sequence context. We show that Alu elements are more highly concentrated around housekeeping genes while various longer (>400-bp) repetitive sequences ("repeats"), including Long Interspersed Nuclear Element 1 (LINE-1) elements, are excluded from these regions. We further show that isochore membership does not distinguish housekeeping genes from tissue-specific genes and that repetitive sequence environment distinguishes housekeeping genes from tissue-specific genes in every isochore. The distinct repetitive sequence environment, in combination with other previously published sequence properties of housekeeping genes, were used to develop a method of predicting housekeeping genes on the basis of DNA sequence alone. Using expression across tissue types as a measure of success, we demonstrate that repetitive sequence environment is by far the most important sequence feature identified to date for distinguishing housekeeping genes. PMID:17141428

  11. Repetitive Sequence Variations in the Promoter Region of the Adhesin-Encoding Gene sabA of Helicobacter pylori Affect Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Vivian C.; Acio, Catherine R.; Bredehoft, Amy K.; Zhu, Laurence; Hallinger, Daniel R.; Quinlivan-Repasi, Vanessa; Harvey, Samuel E.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of diseases elicited by the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is partially determined by the effectiveness of adaptation to the variably acidic environment of the host stomach. Adaptation includes appropriate adherence to the gastric epithelium via outer membrane protein adhesins such as SabA. The expression of sabA is subject to regulation via phase variation in the promoter and coding regions as well as repression by the two-component system ArsRS. In this study, we investigated the role of a homopolymeric thymine [poly(T)] tract −50 to −33 relative to the sabA transcriptional start site in H. pylori strain J99. We quantified sabA expression in H. pylori J99 by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), demonstrating significant changes in sabA expression associated with experimental manipulations of poly(T) tract length. Mimicking the length increase of this tract by adding adenines instead of thymines had similar effects, while the addition of other nucleotides failed to affect sabA expression in the same manner. We hypothesize that modification of the poly(T) tract changes DNA topology, affecting regulatory protein interaction(s) or RNA polymerase binding efficiency. Additionally, we characterized the interaction between the sabA promoter region and ArsR, a response regulator affecting sabA expression. Using recombinant ArsR in electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), we localized binding to a sequence with partial dyad symmetry −20 and +38 relative to the sabA +1 site. The control of sabA expression by both ArsRS and phase variation at two distinct repeat regions suggests the control of sabA expression is both complex and vital to H. pylori infection. PMID:25022855

  12. Core promoter sequence in yeast is a major determinant of expression level

    PubMed Central

    Lubliner, Shai; Regev, Ifat; Lotan-Pompan, Maya; Edelheit, Sarit; Weinberger, Adina; Segal, Eran

    2015-01-01

    The core promoter is the regulatory sequence to which RNA polymerase is recruited and where it acts to initiate transcription. Here, we present the first comprehensive study of yeast core promoters, providing massively parallel measurements of core promoter activity and of TSS locations and relative usage for thousands of native and designed sequences. We found core promoter activity to be highly correlated to the activity of the entire promoter and that sequence variation in different core promoter regions substantially tunes its activity in a predictable way. We also show that location, orientation, and flanking bases critically affect TATA element function, that transcription initiation in highly active core promoters is focused within a narrow region, that poly(dA:dT) orientation has a functional consequence at the 3′ end of promoters, and that orthologous core promoters across yeast species have conserved activities. Our results demonstrate the importance of core promoters in the quantitative study of gene regulation. PMID:25969468

  13. Acinetobacter cyclohexanone monooxygenase: gene cloning and sequence determination.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y C; Peoples, O P; Walsh, C T

    1988-01-01

    The gene coding for cyclohexanone monooxygenase from Acinetobacter sp. strain NCIB 9871 was isolated by immunological screening methods. We located and determined the nucleotide sequence of the gene. The structural gene is 1,626 nucleotides long and codes for a polypeptide of 542 amino acids; 389 nucleotides 5' and 108 nucleotides 3' of the coding region are also reported. The complete amino acid sequence of the enzyme was derived by translation of the nucleotide sequence. From a comparison of the amino acid sequence with consensus sequences of nucleotide-binding folds, we identified a potential flavin-binding site at the NH2 terminus of the enzyme (residues 6 to 18) and a potential nicotinamide-binding site extending from residue 176 to residue 208 of the protein. An overproduction system for the gene to facilitate genetic manipulations was also constructed by using the tac promoter vector pKK223-3 in Escherichia coli. Images PMID:3338974

  14. Mechanism of gene amplification via yeast autonomously replicating sequences.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Shelly; Kaul, Sanjana; Dhar, M K

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation was aimed at understanding the molecular mechanism of gene amplification. Interplay of fragile sites in promoting gene amplification was also elucidated. The amplification promoting sequences were chosen from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARS, 5S rRNA regions of Plantago ovata and P. lagopus, proposed sites of replication pausing at Ste20 gene locus of S. cerevisiae, and the bend DNA sequences within fragile site FRA11A in humans. The gene amplification assays showed that plasmid bearing APS from yeast and human beings led to enhanced protein concentration as compared to the wild type. Both the in silico and in vitro analyses were pointed out at the strong bending potential of these APS. In addition, high mitotic stability and presence of TTTT repeats and SAR amongst these sequences encourage gene amplification. Phylogenetic analysis of S. cerevisiae ARS was also conducted. The combinatorial power of different aspects of APS analyzed in the present investigation was harnessed to reach a consensus about the factors which stimulate gene expression, in presence of these sequences. It was concluded that the mechanism of gene amplification was that AT rich tracts present in fragile sites of yeast serve as binding sites for MAR/SAR and DNA unwinding elements. The DNA protein interactions necessary for ORC activation are facilitated by DNA bending. These specific bindings at ORC promote repeated rounds of DNA replication leading to gene amplification. PMID:25685838

  15. Mechanism of Gene Amplification via Yeast Autonomously Replicating Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation was aimed at understanding the molecular mechanism of gene amplification. Interplay of fragile sites in promoting gene amplification was also elucidated. The amplification promoting sequences were chosen from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARS, 5S rRNA regions of Plantago ovata and P. lagopus, proposed sites of replication pausing at Ste20 gene locus of S. cerevisiae, and the bend DNA sequences within fragile site FRA11A in humans. The gene amplification assays showed that plasmid bearing APS from yeast and human beings led to enhanced protein concentration as compared to the wild type. Both the in silico and in vitro analyses were pointed out at the strong bending potential of these APS. In addition, high mitotic stability and presence of TTTT repeats and SAR amongst these sequences encourage gene amplification. Phylogenetic analysis of S. cerevisiae ARS was also conducted. The combinatorial power of different aspects of APS analyzed in the present investigation was harnessed to reach a consensus about the factors which stimulate gene expression, in presence of these sequences. It was concluded that the mechanism of gene amplification was that AT rich tracts present in fragile sites of yeast serve as binding sites for MAR/SAR and DNA unwinding elements. The DNA protein interactions necessary for ORC activation are facilitated by DNA bending. These specific bindings at ORC promote repeated rounds of DNA replication leading to gene amplification. PMID:25685838

  16. Sequence Variability in Staphylococcal Enterotoxin Genes seb, sec, and sed

    PubMed Central

    Johler, Sophia; Sihto, Henna-Maria; Macori, Guerrino; Stephan, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Ingestion of staphylococcal enterotoxins preformed by Staphylococcus aureus in food leads to staphylococcal food poisoning, the most prevalent foodborne intoxication worldwide. There are five major staphylococcal enterotoxins: SEA, SEB, SEC, SED, and SEE. While variants of these toxins have been described and were linked to specific hosts or levels or enterotoxin production, data on sequence variation is still limited. In this study, we aim to extend the knowledge on promoter and gene variants of the major enterotoxins SEB, SEC, and SED. To this end, we determined seb, sec, and sed promoter and gene sequences of a well-characterized set of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus strains originating from foodborne outbreaks, human infections, human nasal colonization, rabbits, and cattle. New nucleotide sequence variants were detected for all three enterotoxins and a novel amino acid sequence variant of SED was detected in a strain associated with human nasal colonization. While the seb promoter and gene sequences exhibited a high degree of variability, the sec and sed promoter and gene were more conserved. Interestingly, a truncated variant of sed was detected in all tested sed harboring rabbit strains. The generated data represents a further step towards improved understanding of strain-specific differences in enterotoxin expression and host-specific variation in enterotoxin sequences. PMID:27258311

  17. Compilation and analysis of DNA sequences associated with apparent streptomycete promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Strohl, W R

    1992-01-01

    The DNA sequences associated with 139 apparent streptomycete transcriptional start sites are compiled and compared. Of these, 29 promoters appeared to belong to a group which are similar to those recognized by eubacterial RNA polymerases containing sigma 70-like subunits. The other 110 putative promoter regions contain a wide diversity of sequences; several of these promoters have obvious sequence similarities in the -10 and/or -35 regions. The apparent Shine-Dalgarno regions of 44 streptomycete genes are also examined and compared. These were found to have a wide range of degree of complementarity to the 3' end of streptomycete 16S rRNA. Eleven streptomycete genes are described and compared in which transcription and translation are proposed to be initiated from the same or nearby nucleotide. An updated consensus sequence for the E sigma 70-like promoters is proposed and a potential group of promoter sequences containing guanine-rich -35 regions also is identified. PMID:1549509

  18. Core Promoter Functions in the Regulation of Gene Expression of Drosophila Dorsal Target Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Zehavi, Yonathan; Kuznetsov, Olga; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Juven-Gershon, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    Developmental processes are highly dependent on transcriptional regulation by RNA polymerase II. The RNA polymerase II core promoter is the ultimate target of a multitude of transcription factors that control transcription initiation. Core promoters consist of core promoter motifs, e.g. the initiator, TATA box, and the downstream core promoter element (DPE), which confer specific properties to the core promoter. Here, we explored the importance of core promoter functions in the dorsal-ventral developmental gene regulatory network. This network includes multiple genes that are activated by different nuclear concentrations of Dorsal, an NFκB homolog transcription factor, along the dorsal-ventral axis. We show that over two-thirds of Dorsal target genes contain DPE sequence motifs, which is significantly higher than the proportion of DPE-containing promoters in Drosophila genes. We demonstrate that multiple Dorsal target genes are evolutionarily conserved and functionally dependent on the DPE. Furthermore, we have analyzed the activation of key Dorsal target genes by Dorsal, as well as by another Rel family transcription factor, Relish, and the dependence of their activation on the DPE motif. Using hybrid enhancer-promoter constructs in Drosophila cells and embryo extracts, we have demonstrated that the core promoter composition is an important determinant of transcriptional activity of Dorsal target genes. Taken together, our results provide evidence for the importance of core promoter composition in the regulation of Dorsal target genes. PMID:24634215

  19. Archaeal promoter architecture and mechanism of gene activation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Nan; Ao, Xiang; Liang, Yun Xiang; She, Qunxin

    2011-01-01

    Sulfolobus solfataricus and Sulfolobus islandicus contain several genes exhibiting D-arabinose-inducible expression and these systems are ideal for studying mechanisms of archaeal gene expression. At sequence level, only two highly conserved cis elements are present on the promoters: a regulatory element named ara box directing arabinose-inducible expression and the basal promoter element TATA, serving as the binding site for the TATA-binding protein. Strikingly, these promoters possess a modular structure that allows an essentially inactive basal promoter to be strongly activated. The invoked mechanisms include TFB (transcription factor B) recruitment by the ara-box-binding factor to activate gene expression and modulation of TFB recruitment efficiency to yield differential gene expression. PMID:21265754

  20. Pilus genes of Neisseria gonorrheae: chromosomal organization and DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Meyer, T F; Billyard, E; Haas, R; Storzbach, S; So, M

    1984-10-01

    We have mapped two regions of the Neisseria gonorrheae genome, pilE1 and pilE2, which are involved in pilus expression. When the cells are in the piliated P+ state, these two loci carry sequences necessary for pilin production. A silent locus, pilS1, also maps near pilE1 and pilE2. pilS1 contains structural gene information but lacks pilus promoter sequences. The pilus gene sequences in pilE1 and pilE2 are identical in strain MS11. PMID:6148752

  1. Genome organization in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae: identification of promoter-like sequences.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; de Souto Weber, Shana; Cattani, Amanda Malvessi; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2014-08-01

    Information related to open reading frame (ORF) organization, transcription regulation and promoter sequence has been available for the Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae 7448 genome, demonstrating that the ORFs are continuously transcribed (cotranscription) in large clusters. A species-specific position-specific scoring matrix was applied to scan for putative promoters upstream of all coding sequences on a genome scale in M. hyopneumoniae. This study consisted of a detailed in silico promoter localization analysis by scanning the position-specific promoters upstream of predicted ORF clusters (OCs) and mCs (monocistronic genes) in the M. hyopneumoniae whole genome; this was combined with experimental data for the promoterless ORFs. Promoter-like sequences were found in 86% of the OCs (from the OC first gene) and in 85% of the mCs. A transcription analysis of the promoterless ORF was performed by RT-PCR. This strategy allowed the definition of a specific promoter sequence for all OCs and mCs indicating that all the transcriptional units are preceded by putative promoter sequences (matrix and manually located) and providing evidence for functional gene organization in the M. hyopneumoniae genome. These results shown that the species-specific, position-specific scoring matrix for promoter prediction is effective, further increasing the knowledge of gene organization and transcription initiation in mycoplasmas. PMID:24844214

  2. Characterization of the human 5-lipoxygenase gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshiko, S.; Radmark, O.; Samuelsson, B. )

    1990-12-01

    Nucleotide sequences that direct transcription of the human 5-lipoxygenase gene have been examined by ligation to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity in transfected HeLa and HL-60 cells. Various lengths of 5{prime}-flanking sequences up to 5.9 kilobase pairs 5{prime} of the transcriptional initiation sites were tested. Two positive and two negative apparent regulatory regions were seen. Part of the promoter sequence ({minus}179 to {minus}56 from ATG), which includes five repeated GC boxes (the putative Spl binding sequence) was essential for transcription in both HeLa and HL-60 cells. Gel-shift assays (using the DNA fragment {minus}212 to {minus}88) revealed that the transcriptional factor Spl could bind to this region of the 5-lipoxygenase promoter. Furthermore, HL-60 nuclear extracts contained specific nuclear factor(s) binding to 5-lipoxygenase promoter DNA, which could not be detected in HeLa cell nuclear extracts.

  3. Architecture of a yeast U6 RNA gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Eschenlauer, J B; Kaiser, M W; Gerlach, V L; Brow, D A

    1993-01-01

    The promoters of vertebrate and yeast U6 small nuclear RNA genes are structurally dissimilar, although both are recognized by RNA polymerase III. Vertebrate U6 RNA genes have exclusively upstream promoters, while the U6 RNA gene from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SNR6) has internal and downstream promoter elements that match the tRNA gene intragenic A- and B-block elements, respectively. Substitution of the SNR6 A or B block greatly diminished U6 RNA accumulation in vivo, and a subcellular extract competent for RNA polymerase III transcription generated nearly identical DNase I protection patterns over the SNR6 downstream B block and a tRNA gene intragenic B block. We conclude that the SNR6 promoter is functionally similar to tRNA gene promoters, although the effects of extragenic deletion mutations suggest that the downstream location of the SNR6 B block imposes unique positional constraints on its function. Both vertebrate and yeast U6 RNA genes have an upstream TATA box element not normally found in tRNA genes. Substitution of the SNR6 TATA box altered the site of transcription initiation in vivo, while substitution of sequences further upstream had no effect on SNR6 transcription. We present a model for the SNR6 transcription complex that explains these results in terms of their effects on the binding of transcription initiation factor TFIIIB. Images PMID:8474459

  4. Topoisomerase I has a strong binding preference for a conserved hexadecameric sequence in the promoter region of the rRNA gene from Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, A H; Gocke, E; Bonven, B J; Nielsen, O F; Westergaard, O

    1985-01-01

    Topoisomerase I is in situ associated with DNaseI hypersensitive sites located in the promotor and terminator regions of the extrachromosomal rDNA in Tetrahymena thermophila at sites with sequences fitting the motif (sequence in text) Reconstitution experiments with purified topoisomerase I and cloned fragments of rDNA demonstrate that the enzyme exhibits the same binding and cleavage properties on naked DNA. These observations are striking as topoisomerase I previously has been found to exhibit low sequence specificity. The specific binding of the enzyme has an absolute requirement for divalent cations with a preference for Ca2+. The strong binding to the hexadecamer has been characterized by competition experiments, and it has been used to determine the molecular weight of the enzyme. Images PMID:2987828

  5. Cloning and sequence analyses of cDNAs for interferon- and virus-induced human Mx proteins reveal that they contain putative guanine nucleotide-binding sites: functional study of the corresponding gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Horisberger, M A; McMaster, G K; Zeller, H; Wathelet, M G; Dellis, J; Content, J

    1990-01-01

    The human protein p78 is induced and accumulated in cells treated with type I interferon or with some viruses. It is the human homolog of the mouse Mx protein involved in resistance to influenza virus. A full-length cDNA clone encoding the human p78 protein was cloned and sequenced. It contained an open reading frame of 662 amino acids, corresponding to a polypeptide with a predicted molecular weight of 75,500, in good agreement with the Mr of 78,000 determined on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels for the purified natural p78 protein. The cloned gene was expressed in vitro and corresponded in size, pI, antigenic determinant(s), and NH2 terminus sequence to the natural p78 protein. A second cDNA was cloned which encoded a 633-amino-acid protein sharing 63% homology with human p78. This p78-related protein was translated in reticulocyte lysates where it shared an antigenic determinant(s) with p78. A putative 5' regulatory region of 83 base pairs contained within the gene promoter region upstream of the presumed p78 mRNA cap site conferred human alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) inducibility to the cat reporter gene. The p78 protein accumulated to high levels in cells treated with IFN-alpha. In contrast, the p78-related protein was not expressed at detectable levels. The rate of decay of p78 levels in diploid cells after a 24-h treatment with IFN-alpha was much slower than the rate of decay of the antiviral state against influenza A virus and vesicular stomatitis virus, suggesting that the p78 protein is probably not involved in an antiviral mechanism. Furthermore, we showed that these proteins, as well as the homologous mouse Mx protein, possess three consensus elements in proper spacing, characteristic of GTP-binding proteins. Images PMID:2154602

  6. Nucleosomal promoter variation generates gene expression noise

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christopher R.; Boeger, Hinrich

    2014-01-01

    Gene product molecule numbers fluctuate over time and between cells, confounding deterministic expectations. The molecular origins of this noise of gene expression remain unknown. Recent EM analysis of single PHO5 gene molecules of yeast indicated that promoter molecules stochastically assume alternative nucleosome configurations at steady state, including the fully nucleosomal and nucleosome-free configuration. Given that distinct configurations are unequally conducive to transcription, the nucleosomal variation of promoter molecules may constitute a source of gene expression noise. This notion, however, implies an untested conjecture, namely that the nucleosomal variation arises de novo or intrinsically (i.e., that it cannot be explained as the result of the promoter’s deterministic response to variation in its molecular surroundings). Here, we show—by microscopically analyzing the nucleosome configurations of two juxtaposed physically linked PHO5 promoter copies—that the configurational variation, indeed, is intrinsically stochastic and thus, a cause of gene expression noise rather than its effect. PMID:25468975

  7. Synthetic muscle promoters: activities exceeding naturally occurring regulatory sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, X.; Eastman, E. M.; Schwartz, R. J.; Draghia-Akli, R.

    1999-01-01

    Relatively low levels of expression from naturally occurring promoters have limited the use of muscle as a gene therapy target. Myogenic restricted gene promoters display complex organization usually involving combinations of several myogenic regulatory elements. By random assembly of E-box, MEF-2, TEF-1, and SRE sites into synthetic promoter recombinant libraries, and screening of hundreds of individual clones for transcriptional activity in vitro and in vivo, several artificial promoters were isolated whose transcriptional potencies greatly exceed those of natural myogenic and viral gene promoters.

  8. Nucleotide sequence of a human tRNA gene heterocluster

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.N.; Pirtle, I.L.; Pirtle, R.M.

    1986-05-01

    Leucine tRNA from bovine liver was used as a hybridization probe to screen a human gene library harbored in Charon-4A of bacteriophage lambda. The human DNA inserts from plaque-pure clones were characterized by restriction endonuclease mapping and Southern hybridization techniques, using both (3'-/sup 32/P)-labeled bovine liver leucine tRNA and total tRNA as hybridization probes. An 8-kb Hind III fragment of one of these ..gamma..-clones was subcloned into the Hind III site of pBR322. Subsequent fine restriction mapping and DNA sequence analysis of this plasmid DNA indicated the presence of four tRNA genes within the 8-kb DNA fragment. A leucine tRNA gene with an anticodon of AAG and a proline tRNA gene with an anticodon of AGG are in a 1.6-kb subfragment. A threonine tRNA gene with an anticodon of UGU and an as yet unidentified tRNA gene are located in a 1.1-kb subfragment. These two different subfragments are separated by 2.8 kb. The coding regions of the three sequenced genes contain characteristic internal split promoter sequences and do not have intervening sequences. The 3'-flanking region of these three genes have typical RNA polymerase III termination sites of at least four consecutive T residues.

  9. Bacillus licheniformis APase I gene promoter: a strong well-regulated promoter in B. subtilis.

    PubMed

    Lee, J K; Edwards, C W; Hulett, F M

    1991-05-01

    The 5' regulatory region and the portion of the structural gene coding for the amino-terminal sequence of alkaline phosphatase I (APase I) were isolated from Bacillus licheniformis MC14 using a synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide deduced from the amino acid sequence of the enzyme. The DNA sequence analysis of this region revealed an open reading frame of 129 amino acids containing the amino-terminal sequence of the mature APase protein. The protein sequence was preceded by a putative signal sequence of 32 amino acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence of the partial APase clone as well as the experimentally determined amino acid sequence of the enzyme indicated that B. licheniformis APase retains the important features conserved among other APases of Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and various human tissues. Heterologous expression studies of the promoter using a fusion with the lacZ gene indicated that it functions as a very strong inducible promoter in B. subtilis that is tightly regulated by phosphate concentration. PMID:1907637

  10. Computational approach towards promoter sequence comparison via TF mapping using a new distance measure.

    PubMed

    Meera, A; Rangarajan, Lalitha; Bhat, Savithri

    2011-03-01

    We propose a method for identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in the given promoter sequence and mapping the transcription factors (TFs). The proposed algorithm searches the +1 transcription start site (TSS) for eukaryotic and prokaryotic sequences individually. The algorithm was tested with sequences from both eukaryotes and prokaryotes for at least 9 experimentally verified and validated functional TFs in promoter sequences. The order and type of TF binding to the promoter of genes encoding central metabolic pathway (CMP) enzyme was tabulated. A new similarity measure was devised for scoring the similarity between a pair of promoter sequences based on the number and order of motifs. Further, these were grouped in clusters considering the scores between them. The distance between each of the clusters in individual pathway was calculated and a phylogenetic tree was developed. This method is further applied to other pathways such as lipid and amino acid biosynthesis to retrieve and compare experimentally verified and conserved TFBS. PMID:21369887

  11. Transcriptional Silencing by Hairpin RNAs Complementary to a Gene Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yongjun; Kalantari, Roya; Dodd, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Double-stranded RNAs can target gene promoters and inhibit transcription. To date, most research has focused on synthetic RNA duplexes. Transcriptional silencing by hairpin RNAs would facilitate a better understanding of endogenous RNA-mediated regulation of transcription within cells. Here we examine transcriptional silencing of progesterone receptor (PR) expression by hairpin RNAs. We identify the guide strand as the strand complementary to an antisense transcript at the PR promoter and that hairpin RNAs are active transcriptional silencing agents. The sequence of the hairpin loop affects activity, with the highest activity achieved when the loop has the potential for full complementarity to the antisense transcript target. Introduction of centrally mismatched bases relative to the target transcript does not prevent transcriptional silencing unless the mismatches are present on both the guide and passenger strands. These data demonstrate that hairpin RNAs can cause transcriptional silencing and offer insights into the mechanism of gene modulation by RNAs that target gene promoters. PMID:22703280

  12. [Cloning and characterization of D-113 gene promoter from cotton].

    PubMed

    Luo, Ke-Ming; Guo, Yu-Long; Xiao, Yue-Hua; Hou, Lei; Pei, Yan

    2002-02-01

    To study the expression of late embryogenesis abundant gene in seeds, the 1,024 bp 5' flanking sequence of D-113 gene, a late embryogenesis abundant gene of Gossypium hirsutum cv. Coker 312, was cloned by PCR. The similarity compared with the sequence of Lea protein gene family published was 92.50%. There are three putative ABREs and one enhancer-like which riches A/T in the promoter. The promoter was fused to the beta-glucuronidase gene to form pLD II. Via a particle bombardment, pLD II was introduced into embryogenic calli of cotton and seeds of Brassica napus which were all treated with abscisic acid for 3d before bombardment, also into roots, stems and leafs of cotton. Transient expression was measured histochemically as spot number 24 h after bombardment. GUS sexpression was observed in the seeds of Brassica napus and the embryogenic calli of cotton, but not found in roots and leaves of cotton. Those results indicated that the expression of D-113 gene promoter was embryo specific. PMID:11902000

  13. Sequence Determinants of Circadian Gene Expression Phase in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, Vikram

    2013-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 exhibits global biphasic circadian oscillations in gene expression under constant-light conditions. Class I genes are maximally expressed in the subjective dusk, whereas class II genes are maximally expressed in the subjective dawn. Here, we identify sequence features that encode the phase of circadian gene expression. We find that, for multiple genes, an ∼70-nucleotide promoter fragment is sufficient to specify class I or II phase. We demonstrate that the gene expression phase can be changed by random mutagenesis and that a single-nucleotide substitution is sufficient to change the phase. Our study provides insight into how the gene expression phase is encoded in the cyanobacterial genome. PMID:23204469

  14. Sequences promoting the transcription of the human XA gene overlapping P450c21A correctly predict the presence of a novel, adrenal-specific, truncated form of tenascin-X

    SciTech Connect

    Tee, Meng Kian; Thomson, A.A.; Bristow, J.; Miller, W.L.

    1995-07-20

    A compact region in the human class III major histocompatibility locus contains the human genes for the fourth component of human complement (C4) and steroid 21-hydroxylase (P450c21) in one transcriptional orientation, while the gene for the extracellular matrix protein tenascin-X (TN-X) overlaps the last exon of P450c21 on the opposite strand of DNA in the opposite transcriptional orientation. This complex locus is duplicated into A and B loci, so that the organization is 5{prime}-C4A-21A-XA-C4B-21B-XB-3{prime}. Although this duplication event truncated the 65-kb X(B) gene to a 4.5-kb XA gene, the XA gene is transcriptionally active in the adrenal cortex. To examine the basis of the tissue-specific expression of XA and C4B, we cloned the 1763-bp region that lies between the cap sites for XA and C4B and analyzed its promoter activity in both the XA and the C4 orientations. Powerful, liver-specific sequences lie within the first 75 to 138 bp from the C4B cap site, and weaker elements lie within 128 bp of the XA cap site that function in both liver and adrenal cells. Because these 128 bp upstream from the XA cap site are perfectly preserved in the XB gene encoding TN-X, we sought to determine whether a transcript similar to XA arises within the SB gene. RNase protection assays, cDNA cloning, and RT/PCR show that adrenal cells contain a novel transcript, termed short XB (XB-S), which has the same open reading frame as TN-X. Cell-free translation and immunoblotting show that this transcript encodes a novel 74-kDa XB-S protein that is identical to the carboxy-terminal 673 residues of TN-X. Because this protein consists solely of fibronectin type III repeats and a fibrinogen-like domain, it appears to correspond to an evolutionary precursor of the tenascin family of extracellular matrix proteins. 40 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Use of yeast nuclear DNA sequences to define the mitochondrial RNA polymerase promoter in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Marczynski, G T; Schultz, P W; Jaehning, J A

    1989-01-01

    We have extended an earlier observation that the TATA box for the nuclear GAL10 gene serves as a promoter for the mitochondrial RNA polymerase in in vitro transcription reactions (C. S. Winkley, M. J. Keller, and J. A. Jaehning, J. Biol. Chem. 260:14214-14223, 1985). In this work, we demonstrate that other nuclear genes also have upstream sequences that function in vitro as mitochondrial RNA polymerase promoters. These genes include the GAL7 and MEL1 genes, which are regulated in concert with the GAL10 gene, the sigma repetitive element, and the 2 microns plasmid origin of replication. We used in vitro transcription reactions to test a large number of nuclear DNA sequences that contain critical mitochondrial promoter sequences as defined by Biswas et al. (T. K. Biswas, J. C. Edwards, M. Rabinowitz, and G. S. Getz, J. Biol. Chem. 262:13690-13696, 1987). The results of these experiments allowed us to extend the definition of essential promoter elements. This extended sequence, -ACTATAAACGatcATAG-, was frequently found in the upstream regulatory regions of nuclear genes. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesized that either (i) a catalytic RNA polymerase related to the mitochondrial enzyme functions in the nucleus of the yeast cell or (ii) a DNA sequence recognition factor is shared by the two genetic compartments. By using cells deficient in the catalytic core of the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (rpo41-) and sensitive assays for transcripts initiating from the nuclear promoter sequences, we have conclusively ruled out a role for the catalytic RNA polymerase in synthesizing transcripts from all of the nuclear sequences analyzed. The possibility that a DNA sequence recognition factor functions in both the nucleus and the mitochondria remains to be tested. Images PMID:2677667

  16. Gene Sequence Homology of Chemokines Across Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The abundance of expressed gene and protein sequences available in the biological information databases facilitates comparison of protein homologies. A high degree of sequence similarity typically implies homology regarding structure and function and may provide clues to antibody cross-reactivities...

  17. GENE SEQUENCE HOMOLOGY OF CHEMOKINES ACROSS SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The abundance of expressed gene and protein sequences available in the biological information databases facilitates comparison of protein homologies. A high degree of sequence similarity typically implies homology regarding structure and function and may provide clues to antibody cross-react...

  18. Cloning of a marine cyanobacterial promoter for foreign gene expression using a promoter probe vector

    SciTech Connect

    Sode, Koji; Hatano, Naoaki; Tatara, Masahiro

    1996-06-01

    A marine cyanobacterial promoter was cloned to allow efficient foreign gene expression. This was carried out using chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) as a marker protein. For rapid and simple measurement of CAT activity, a method based on a fluorescently labeled substrate was improved by utilizing HPLC equipped with a flow-through fluorescent spectrophotometer. This method was used in conjunction with a newly constructed promoter probe vector. Cyanobacterial transformants, harboring plasmid containing a cloned 2-kbp marine cyanobacterial genomic fragment, showed a 10-fold higher CAT activity, compared with that achieved using the kanamycin-resistant gene promoter. From the sequence analysis of the cloned fragment, a putative promoter region was found. 20 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. In vitro mapping of Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Storbeck, C.J.; Sabourin, L.; Baird, S.

    1994-09-01

    The Myotonic Dystrophy Kinase (DMK) gene has been cloned and shared homology to serine/threonine protein kinases. Overexpression of this gene in stably transfected mouse myoblasts has been shown to inhibit fusion into myotubes while myoblasts stably transfected with an antisense construct show increased fusion potential. These experiments, along with data showing that the DM gene is highly expressed in muscle have highlighted the possibility of DMK being involved in myogenesis. The promoter region of the DM gene lacks a consensus TATA box and CAAT box, but harbours numerous transcription binding sites. Clones containing extended 5{prime} upstream sequences (UPS) of DMK only weakly drive the reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) when transfected into C2C12 mouse myoblasts. However, four E-boxes are present in the first intron of the DM gene and transient assays show increased expression of the CAT gene when the first intron is present downstream of these 5{prime} UPS in an orientation dependent manner. Comparison between mouse and human sequence reveals that the regions in the first intron where the E-boxes are located are highly conserved. The mapping of the promoter and the importance of the first intron in the control of DMK expression will be presented.

  20. Characterization of a barley Rubisco activase gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.A.; Rundle, S.J.; Zielinski, R. )

    1990-05-01

    Barley Rubisco Activase (Rca) is a nuclear encoded chloroplast enzyme that activates Rubisco to catalytic competence. Rca mRNA accumulation in barley is light-regulated; the 5{prime}-flanking region of a highly expressed barley Rca gene (HvRca-1) contains several sequence motifs similar to those found in the promoter of other light-regulated, nuclear genes. We have characterized the cis-acting regulatory regions of HvRca-1 by deletion analysis of the 5{prime} flanking region of a cloned gene. These constructs have been assayed in vitro by gel mobility shift assays, as well as by DNA footprinting. Putative regulatory sequences detected in vitro have also been tested in vivo by constructing chimeric genes consisting of deletion mutant promoters fused to a promoterless {beta}-glucuronidase reporter gene. Comparison of results obtained from complimentary parallel in vitro and in vivo assays of identical promoter deletions have provided information on cis-acting regulatory regions of HvRca-1.

  1. Universal light-switchable gene promoter system

    DOEpatents

    Quail, Peter H.; Huq, Enamul; Tepperman, James; Sato, Sae

    2005-02-22

    An artificial promoter system that can be fused upstream of any desired gene enabling reversible induction or repression of the expression of the gene at will in any suitable host cell or organisms by light is described. The design of the system is such that a molecule of the plant photoreceptor phytochrome is targeted to the specific DNA binding site in the promoter by a protein domain that is fused to the phytochrome and that specifically recognizes this binding site. This bound phytochrome, upon activation by light, recruits a second fusion protein consisting of a protein that binds to phytochrome only upon light activation and a transcriptional activation domain that activates expression of the gene downstream of the promoter.

  2. Gene Discovery through Expressed Sequence Tag Sequencing in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Verdun, Ramiro E.; Di Paolo, Nelson; Urmenyi, Turan P.; Rondinelli, Edson; Frasch, Alberto C. C.; Sanchez, Daniel O.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) constitutes a useful approach for gene identification that, in the case of human pathogens, might result in the identification of new targets for chemotherapy and vaccine development. As part of the Trypanosoma cruzi genome project, we have partially sequenced the 5′ ends of 1,949 clones to generate ESTs. The clones were randomly selected from a normalized CL Brener epimastigote cDNA library. A total of 14.6% of the clones were homologous to previously identified T. cruzi genes, while 18.4% had significant matches to genes from other organisms in the database. A total of 67% of the ESTs had no matches in the database, and thus, some of them might be T. cruzi-specific genes. Functional groups of those sequences with matches in the database were constructed according to their putative biological functions. The two largest categories were protein synthesis (23.3%) and cell surface molecules (10.8%). The information reported in this paper should be useful for researchers in the field to analyze genes and proteins of their own interest. PMID:9784549

  3. Characterization of the human CD4 gene promoter: transcription from the CD4 gene core promoter is tissue-specific and is activated by Ets proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, P; Giovane, A; Wasylyk, B; Klatzmann, D

    1993-01-01

    We analyzed the 5' transcription control sequences of the human CD4 gene. We located the transcription initiation site and showed that the CD4 core promoter (positions -40 to +16) lacks a classical "TATA" or initiator positioning consensus sequence but directs precise and efficient transcription when coupled to the ubiquitously active simian virus 40 enhancer. The transcriptional activity of the CD4 gene promoter correlated with CD4 expression in various cell types. Interestingly, the CD4 core promoter also displayed a tissue-specific transcriptional activity. Within this fragment, three nucleic acid sequences are completely conserved in the murine CD4 gene. One of these sequences contains a perfect ETS consensus sequence. Another ETS consensus sequence is located 1060 nt upstream. Electrophoretic-mobility-shift assays showed that the core promoter ETS motif binds an Ets-related protein specifically expressed at high levels in CD4+ cells. Moreover, in CD4- cells, overexpression of Ets-1 or Ets-2 efficiently and specifically activated transcription from the CD4 promoter and core promoter. These data indicate that Ets transcription factors play a central role in controlling CD4 gene expression, by binding to both a classical remote site and an unusual proximal activator sequence. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8356078

  4. Sequences far downstream from the classical tRNA promoter elements bind RNA polymerase III transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Young, L S; Rivier, D H; Sprague, K U

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the interaction of transcription factors TFIIIC and TFIIID with a silkworm alanine tRNA gene. Previous functional analysis showed that the promoter for this gene is unusually large compared with the classical tRNA promoter elements (the A and B boxes) and includes sequences downstream from the transcription termination site. The goal of the experiments reported here was to determine which sequences within the full promoter make stable contacts with transcription factors. We show that when TFIIIC and TFIIID are combined, a complex is formed with the tRNA(Ala)C gene. Neither factor alone can form this complex. DNase I digestion of gene-factor complexes reveals that most of the tRNA(Ala)C promoter is in contact with factors. The protected region extends from -1 to at least +136 and includes both the A and B boxes and the previously identified downstream promoter sequences. Analysis of mutant promoters shows that sequence-specific contacts throughout the protected region are required for binding. The role of 3'-flanking sequences in transcription factor binding explains the contribution of these sequences to the tRNA(Ala)C promoter. We discuss the possibility that such sequences affect promoter strength in other tRNA genes. Images PMID:1996100

  5. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the Lactobacillus casei lactate dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S F; Baek, S J; Pack, M Y

    1991-01-01

    An allosteric L-(+)-lactate dehydrogenase gene of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 was cloned in Escherichia coli, and the nucleotide sequence of the gene was determined. The gene was composed of an open reading frame of 981 bp, starting with a GTG codon and ending with a TAA codon. The sequences for the promoter and ribosome binding site were identified, and a sequence for a structure resembling a rho-independent transcription terminator was also found. Images PMID:1768113

  6. DNA sequence of the yeast transketolase gene.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, T S; Kwee, I L; Nakada, T; Largman, C; Martin, B M

    1992-02-18

    Transketolase (EC 2.2.1.1) is the enzyme that, together with aldolase, forms a reversible link between the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways. We have cloned and sequenced the transketolase gene from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). This is the first transketolase gene of the pentose phosphate shunt to be sequenced from any source. The molecular mass of the proposed translated protein is 73,976 daltons, in good agreement with the observed molecular mass of about 75,000 daltons. The 5'-nontranslated region of the gene is similar to other yeast genes. There is no evidence of 5'-splice junctions or branch points in the sequence. The 3'-nontranslated region contains the polyadenylation signal (AATAAA), 80 base pairs downstream from the termination codon. A high degree of homology is found between yeast transketolase and dihydroxyacetone synthase (formaldehyde transketolase) from the yeast Hansenula polymorpha. The overall sequence identity between these two proteins is 37%, with four regions of much greater similarity. The regions from amino acid residues 98-131, 157-182, 410-433, and 474-489 have sequence identities of 74%, 66%, 83%, and 82%, respectively. One of these regions (157-182) includes a possible thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) binding domain, and another (410-433) may contain the catalytic domain. PMID:1737042

  7. [Modifications of gene expression by tumor promoters].

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Zhao, Q; Guo, S; Zhao, M; Cheng, S

    1995-02-01

    The modifications of gene expression by tumor promoters were analyzed in vitro and in vivo. The results of slot blot hybridizations showed that tumor promoter TPA induced c-fos and c-myc expressions in mouse fibroblast cell line BALB/3T3 and rat liver, decreased the levels of Rb RNA in BALB/3T3 cell line and of alpha 1-I3 RNA in rat liver. It was also demonstrated that tumor promoter phenobarbital influenced c-fos and c-myc expressions and decreased alpha 1I3 mRNA level in rat liver during a long term experiment. Phenobarbital was found to have no effect on c-fos and c-myc expressions in rat liver during a short experiment. Tumor promoters induced the expressions of c-fos and c-myc which were positively-related to cancer formation and inhibited the expressions of Rb and alpha 1-I3 which were negatively-related to cancer formation. This implied that tumor promotion played an important role in cancer development and tumor promoters exerted their effects selectively according to the attributes of different genes. PMID:7540119

  8. Isolation and sequence analysis of napin seed specific promoter from Iranian Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, Maryam; Zebarjadi, Alireza; Najaphy, Abdollah; Kahrizi, Danial

    2015-06-01

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) has become an important crop during the last 30years. In addition to a high lipid level, the seeds also have a significant protein content, which constitutes 20-25% of the dry seed weight. The synthesis of storage proteins is primarily controlled at transcriptional level and seed-specific expression has been shown to be conferred upon the promoter regions of many storage protein genes. Napin is one of the main storage proteins in rapeseed(')s embryo that is produced in seed developing stage. Its promoter region located at 5' upstream of the napin gene has already been isolated (GenBank number, EU416279.1). In current research, seed-specific promoter (napin) of Iranian B. napus L. was isolated from the genomic DNA and cloned into pBI121 plant binary vector to use in future researches. For this purpose, the napin promoter was amplified by PCR method using specific primers, cloned in pSK(+) vector and sequenced. Sequencing analysis showed that the cloned promoter contained all of conserved motifs such as TATA box (TATAAA), RY repeats (CATGCA), dist-B (TCAAACACC) and prox-B elements (GCCACTTGTC), G-box (CACGTG) and CAAT Motifs, which constituted the seed-specific promoter activity and according to this analysis, the seed-specific promoter activity of cloned sequence was predicted. Based on sequence distances of nucleotide sequences, our sequence had the highest similarity (99.8%) whit B. napus sequence (with EU416279.1 accession number). Finally the promoter obtained might be interesting not only as a useful tool for biotechnological application but also for fundamental research. PMID:25797503

  9. Promoter region of mouse Tcrg genes

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimi, Y.; Huang, Y.Y.; Ohta, S.

    1996-06-01

    The mouse T-cell receptor (Tcr){gamma} chain is characterized by a specific expression of V gene segments in the thymus corresponding to consecutive developmental stages; i.e., the Vg5 in fetal, Vg6 in neonatal, and Vg4 and Vg7 in adult. The order of the Vg gene usage correlates with the localization of the Vg gene segment on the chromosome; i.e., the Vg5 gene, being most proximal to the Jg1, is used first, followed by the Vg segments away from the Jg1 in a sequential manner. Since they all rearrange to the same Jg1 gene segment, the sequences in the coding region and/or in the 5{prime} upstream region are responsible for the stage-specific transcription. Also, Goldman and co-workers reported the germline transcription of Vg genes preceding their rearrangement. Therefore, the stage-specific transcription may be involved in the regulation of the stage-specific rearrangement; we sequenced and analyzed the 5{prime} flanking regions of the Vg5, Vg6, Vg4, and Vg7 genes to study the transcriptional relation. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Alternative promoters of gene MAGE4a

    SciTech Connect

    De Plaen, E.; Naerhuyzen, B.; De Smet, C.

    1997-03-01

    Gene MAGE-4 (HGMW-approved symbol MAGE4) is expressed in several types of tumors, but not in normal tissues, except testis and placenta. The 5{prime} end of this gene contains eight homologous exons spread over a 5.8-kb region. These exons are alternatively spliced to a unique second exon and a unique third exon, which encodes a protein of 317 amino acids. The analysis of transcripts found in testis, placenta, and a sarcoma cell line showed that each of the alternative first exons is used in at least one of these tissues. Various regions of the promoter of the fifth alternative exon (1.5) were cloned in a luciferase reporter plasmid, and the constructs were transfected in a sarcoma cell line that expresses MAGE-4. Two Ets motifs located between positions -70 and -29 relative to the transcription start site were found to drive 55% of the promoter activity. A region containing an Sp1 consensus binding site located upstream of the two Ets motifs was found to be responsible for 44% of the transcriptional activity. MAGE-4a promoters 1.4 and 1.6, which also contain the Sp1 and the two Ets binding motifs, supported a level of transcription comparable to that of promoter 1.5, whereas promoter 1.1, which contains only one Ets binding site, was sixfold less active. In line with observations made with gene MAGE-1 (HGMW-approved symbol MAGE1), we found that promoter 1.5 stimulated a high level of transcription in a melanoma cell line that does not express MAGE-4. This suggests that the tumor-specific expression of MAGE genes is not determined by the presence of specific transcription factors. 26 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. The nucleotide sequence of the mouse immunoglobulin epsilon gene: comparison with the human epsilon gene sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, N; Ueda, S; Hayashida, H; Miyata, T; Honjo, T

    1982-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the immunoglobulin epsilon gene cloned from newborn mouse DNA. The epsilon gene sequence allows prediction of the amino acid sequence of the constant region of the epsilon chain and comparison of it with sequences of the human epsilon and other mouse immunoglobulin genes. The epsilon gene was shown to be under the weakest selection pressure at the protein level among the immunoglobulin genes although the divergence at the synonymous position is similar. Our results suggest that the epsilon gene may be dispensable, which is in accord with the fact that IgE has only obscure roles in the immune defense system but has an undesirable role as a mediator of hypersensitivity. The sequence data suggest that the human and murine epsilon genes were derived from different ancestors duplicated a long time ago. The amino acid sequence of the epsilon chain is more homologous to those of the gamma chains than the other mouse heavy chains. Two membrane exons, separated by an 80-base intron, were identified 1.7 kb 3' to the CH4 domain of the epsilon gene and shown to conserve a hydrophobic portion similar to those of other heavy chain genes. RNA blot hybridization showed that the epsilon membrane exons are transcribed into two species of mRNA in an IgE hybridoma. Images Fig. 4. PMID:6329728

  12. Promoter sequences and algorithmical methods for identifying them.

    PubMed

    Vanet, A; Marsan, L; Sagot, M F

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of currently available mathematical models and algorithmical methods for trying to identify promoter sequences. The methods concern both searching in a genome for a previously defined consensus and extracting a consensus from a set of sequences. Such methods were often tailored for either eukaryotes or prokaryotes although this does not preclude use of the same method for both types of organisms. The survey therefore covers all methods; however, emphasis is placed on prokaryotic promoter sequence identification. Illustrative applications of the main extracting algorithms are given for three bacteria. PMID:10673015

  13. Isolation of the promoters of Atlantic salmon MHCII genes.

    PubMed

    Syed, Mohasina; Vestrheim, Olav; Mikkelsen, Birthe; Lundin, Maria

    2003-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) has a central role in the immune response of vertebrates with its function of presenting antigenic peptides to the T-cell receptors. We have isolated the promoters and intron 1 of MHCIIalpha and MHCIIbeta genes of Atlantic salmon. To isolate these promoters, we constructed an Atlantic salmon ( Salmo salar) promoter finder kit (analogous to the commercially available "human promoter finder kit"). By nucleotide sequence alignment of known MHCII promoter regions, we identified the 3 conserved regulatory X, X2, and Y boxes in the salmon promoters. The W box was not found. In contrast, a salmon-specific putative W box was identified. Both of the isolated Atlantic salmon MHCIIalpha and beta promoters (included in patent applications by Genomar A/S, Oslo, Norway) were found to be functional since they both gave positive yellow fluorescence protein signal when inserted as promoters in the pEYFP-1 reporter plasmid and transfected into the salmon head kidney cell line (SHK-1). PMID:14502397

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pantoea sp. Strain AS-PWVM4

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Indu; Kaur, Sukhvir; Devi, Usha; Kumar, Navinder; Sharma, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Nonpathogenic Pantoea spp. have been shown to confer biofertilizer and biocontrol activities, indicating their potential for increasing crop yield. Herein, we provide the high-quality genome sequence of Pantoea sp. strain AS-PWVM4, a Gram-negative motile plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium isolated from a pomegranate plant. The 4.9-Mb genome contains genes related to plant growth promotion and the synthesis of siderophores. PMID:24309733

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus methylotrophicus Strain B25, a Potential Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Brutel, Aline; Lemainque, Arnaud; Mairey, Barbara; Médigue, Claudine; Vallenet, David; Lefort, Francois; Grizard, Damien

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome of Bacillus methylotrophicus strain B25, isolated in Switzerland, was sequenced. Its size is 3.85 Mb, and several genes that may contribute to plant growth-promoting activities were identified in silico. PMID:26966215

  16. Nemertean Toxin Genes Revealed through Transcriptome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Whelan, Nathan V.; Kocot, Kevin M.; Santos, Scott R.; Halanych, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Nemerteans are one of few animal groups that have evolved the ability to utilize toxins for both defense and subduing prey, but little is known about specific nemertean toxins. In particular, no study has identified specific toxin genes even though peptide toxins are known from some nemertean species. Information about toxin genes is needed to better understand evolution of toxins across animals and possibly provide novel targets for pharmaceutical and industrial applications. We sequenced and annotated transcriptomes of two free-living and one commensal nemertean and annotated an additional six publicly available nemertean transcriptomes to identify putative toxin genes. Approximately 63–74% of predicted open reading frames in each transcriptome were annotated with gene names, and all species had similar percentages of transcripts annotated with each higher-level GO term. Every nemertean analyzed possessed genes with high sequence similarities to known animal toxins including those from stonefish, cephalopods, and sea anemones. One toxin-like gene found in all nemerteans analyzed had high sequence similarity to Plancitoxin-1, a DNase II hepatotoxin that may function well at low pH, which suggests that the acidic body walls of some nemerteans could work to enhance the efficacy of protein toxins. The highest number of toxin-like genes found in any one species was seven and the lowest was three. The diversity of toxin-like nemertean genes found here is greater than previously documented, and these animals are likely an ideal system for exploring toxin evolution and industrial applications of toxins. PMID:25432940

  17. Nemertean toxin genes revealed through transcriptome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Nathan V; Kocot, Kevin M; Santos, Scott R; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2014-12-01

    Nemerteans are one of few animal groups that have evolved the ability to utilize toxins for both defense and subduing prey, but little is known about specific nemertean toxins. In particular, no study has identified specific toxin genes even though peptide toxins are known from some nemertean species. Information about toxin genes is needed to better understand evolution of toxins across animals and possibly provide novel targets for pharmaceutical and industrial applications. We sequenced and annotated transcriptomes of two free-living and one commensal nemertean and annotated an additional six publicly available nemertean transcriptomes to identify putative toxin genes. Approximately 63-74% of predicted open reading frames in each transcriptome were annotated with gene names, and all species had similar percentages of transcripts annotated with each higher-level GO term. Every nemertean analyzed possessed genes with high sequence similarities to known animal toxins including those from stonefish, cephalopods, and sea anemones. One toxin-like gene found in all nemerteans analyzed had high sequence similarity to Plancitoxin-1, a DNase II hepatotoxin that may function well at low pH, which suggests that the acidic body walls of some nemerteans could work to enhance the efficacy of protein toxins. The highest number of toxin-like genes found in any one species was seven and the lowest was three. The diversity of toxin-like nemertean genes found here is greater than previously documented, and these animals are likely an ideal system for exploring toxin evolution and industrial applications of toxins. PMID:25432940

  18. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of bacteriophage BF23 late genes 24 and 25 encoding tail proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, S; Kaneko, T; Ishimaru, H; Moriwaki, H; Mizobuchi, K

    1994-01-01

    Two bacteriophage BF23 late genes, genes 24 and 25, were isolated on a 7.4-kb PstI fragment from the phage DNA, and their nucleotide sequences were determined. Gene 24 encodes a minor tail protein with the expected M(r) of 34,309, and gene 25 located 4 bp upstream of gene 24 encodes a major tail protein with the expected M(r) of 50,329. When total cellular RNA isolated from either phage-infected cells or cells bearing the cloned genes was analyzed by the primer extension method using the primers specific to either gene 25 or gene 24, we identified a possible late gene promoter, designated P25, in the 5'-flanking region of gene 25. This promoter was similar in structure to Escherichia coli promoters for sigma 70. Studies of the translational gene 25- and gene 24-lacZ fusions in the cloned gene system revealed that the promoter P25 was responsible for the expression of both genes 25 and 24 even in the absence of the regulatory genes which were absolutely required for late gene expression in the normal phage-infected cells. These results indicate that the two genes constitute an operon under the control of P25 and that the regulatory gene products of BF23 do not participate directly in specifying the late gene promoter. Images PMID:7961500

  19. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence of plant-growth promoting Serratia proteamaculans S4.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Saraswoti; Goodwin, Lynne A; Högberg, Nils; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Alström, Sadhna; Bruce, David; Quintana, Beverly; Munk, Christine; Daligault, Hajnalka; Teshima, Hazuki; Davenport, Karen; Reitenga, Krista; Green, Lance; Chain, Patrick; Erkkila, Tracy; Gu, Wei; Zhang, Xiaojing; Xu, Yan; Kunde, Yulia; Chertkov, Olga; Han, James; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Szeto, Ernest; Mavromatis, Kostas; Huntemann, Marcel; Nolan, Matt; Pitluck, Sam; Deshpande, Shweta; Markowitz, Victor; Pagani, Ioanna; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Finlay, Roger D

    2013-07-30

    Serratia proteamaculans S4 (previously Serratia sp. S4), isolated from the rhizosphere of wild Equisetum sp., has the ability to stimulate plant growth and to suppress the growth of several soil-borne fungal pathogens of economically important crops. Here we present the non-contiguous, finished genome sequence of S. proteamaculans S4, which consists of a 5,324,944 bp circular chromosome and a 129,797 bp circular plasmid. The chromosome contains 5,008 predicted genes while the plasmid comprises 134 predicted genes. In total, 4,993 genes are assigned as protein-coding genes. The genome consists of 22 rRNA genes, 82 tRNA genes and 58 pseudogenes. This genome is a part of the project "Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth-promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens" awarded through the 2010 DOE-JGI's Community Sequencing Program. PMID:24501629

  20. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence of plant-growth promoting Serratia proteamaculans S4

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Lynne A.; Högberg, Nils; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Alström, Sadhna; Bruce, David; Quintana, Beverly; Munk, Christine; Daligault, Hajnalka; Teshima, Hazuki; Davenport, Karen; Reitenga, Krista; Green, Lance; Chain, Patrick; Erkkila, Tracy; Gu, Wei; Zhang, Xiaojing; Xu, Yan; Kunde, Yulia; Chertkov, Olga; Han, James; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Szeto, Ernest; Mavromatis, Kostas; Huntemann, Marcel; Nolan, Matt; Pitluck, Sam; Deshpande, Shweta; Markowitz, Victor; Pagani, Ioanna; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Finlay, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    Serratia proteamaculans S4 (previously Serratia sp. S4), isolated from the rhizosphere of wild Equisetum sp., has the ability to stimulate plant growth and to suppress the growth of several soil-borne fungal pathogens of economically important crops. Here we present the non-contiguous, finished genome sequence of S. proteamaculans S4, which consists of a 5,324,944 bp circular chromosome and a 129,797 bp circular plasmid. The chromosome contains 5,008 predicted genes while the plasmid comprises 134 predicted genes. In total, 4,993 genes are assigned as protein-coding genes. The genome consists of 22 rRNA genes, 82 tRNA genes and 58 pseudogenes. This genome is a part of the project “Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth-promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens” awarded through the 2010 DOE-JGI’s Community Sequencing Program. PMID:24501629

  1. High-fidelity promoter profiling reveals widespread alternative promoter usage and transposon-driven developmental gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Batut, Philippe; Dobin, Alexander; Plessy, Charles; Carninci, Piero; Gingeras, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Many eukaryotic genes possess multiple alternative promoters with distinct expression specificities. Therefore, comprehensively annotating promoters and deciphering their individual regulatory dynamics is critical for gene expression profiling applications and for our understanding of regulatory complexity. We introduce RAMPAGE, a novel promoter activity profiling approach that combines extremely specific 5′-complete cDNA sequencing with an integrated data analysis workflow, to address the limitations of current techniques. RAMPAGE features a streamlined protocol for fast and easy generation of highly multiplexed sequencing libraries, offers very high transcription start site specificity, generates accurate and reproducible promoter expression measurements, and yields extensive transcript connectivity information through paired-end cDNA sequencing. We used RAMPAGE in a genome-wide study of promoter activity throughout 36 stages of the life cycle of Drosophila melanogaster, and describe here a comprehensive data set that represents the first available developmental time-course of promoter usage. We found that >40% of developmentally expressed genes have at least two promoters and that alternative promoters generally implement distinct regulatory programs. Transposable elements, long proposed to play a central role in the evolution of their host genomes through their ability to regulate gene expression, contribute at least 1300 promoters shaping the developmental transcriptome of D. melanogaster. Hundreds of these promoters drive the expression of annotated genes, and transposons often impart their own expression specificity upon the genes they regulate. These observations provide support for the theory that transposons may drive regulatory innovation through the distribution of stereotyped cis-regulatory modules throughout their host genomes. PMID:22936248

  2. Metallothionein cDNA, promoter, and genomic sequences of the tropical green mussel, Perna viridis.

    PubMed

    Khoo, H W; Patel, K H

    1999-09-01

    The primary structure of the cDNA and metallothionein (MT) genomic sequences of the tropical green mussel (Perna viridis) was determined. The complete cDNA sequences were obtained using degenerate primers designed from known metallothionein consensus amino acid sequences from the temperate species Mytilus edulis. The amino acid sequences of P. viridis metallothionein deduced from the coding region consisted of 72 amino acids with 21 cysteine residues and 9 Cys-X-Cys motifs corresponding to Type I MT class of other species. Two different genomic sequences coding for the same mRNA were obtained. Each putative gene contained a unique 5'UTR and two unique introns located at the same splice sites. The promoters for both genes were different in length and both contained metal responsive elements and active protein-binding sites. The structures of the genomic clones were compared with those of other species. J. Exp. Zool. 284:445-453, 1999. PMID:10451422

  3. Temperature influences on the expression of GFP promoted by the upstream sequence of cpcB from Arthrospira platensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yongzhong; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2007-07-01

    In order to investigate the regulation mechanism of the phycocyanin gene, a series of functional analyses of the upstream sequence of cpcB gene from Arthrospira platensis were conducted in E. coli with green fluorescent protein encoding gene (gfp) as the reporter. Results showed that the gfp gene could express at a high level under the promotion of the upstream sequence, suggesting the existence of some strong promoter elements in it. The expression of GFP was influenced by temperature. Higher temperature led to higher expression level. The bioinformatics analyses followed by mutation analyses on the secondary structure of translation initiation region (TIR) revealed that RNA thermosensor might account for the temperature regulation.

  4. DNA sequence of the Serratia marcescens lipoprotein gene

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kenzo; Inouye, Masayori

    1980-01-01

    The Serratia marcescens gene for the outer membrane lipoprotein (lpp) was cloned in λ phage vector Charon 14. The recombinant phage was very unstable, and the lpp gene with a 300-base-pair deletion at the transcription termination site was further cloned in pBR322. The DNA sequence of 834 base pairs encompassing the lpp gene was determined and compared with that of the Escherichia coli lpp gene. The sequence comparisons exhibit several unique features. (i) The promoter region is highly conserved (84% homology) and has an extremely high A+T content (78%) as in E. coli (80%). (ii) The 5′ nontranslated region of the lipoprotein mRNA is also highly conserved (95% homology). (iii) In the DNA sequence corresponding to the signal peptide of this secretory protein, there are three drastic changes, including addition of one base pair and deletion of four base pairs in S. marcescens as compared to E. coli. The resultant alterations in the amino acid sequence, however, do not change the basic properties of the signal peptide, which are assumed to be essential for its function in the secretory mechanism. (iv) The DNA sequence from the amino terminus to the 51st residue of the mature lipoprotein is highly conserved (95% homology) and there is no amino acid substitution. (v) The DNA sequence corresponding to the seven amino acid residues at the carboxyl terminus has only 42% homology, resulting in four amino acid substitutions. (vi) Within the section of 40 base pairs beginning with the termination codon (UAA) and ending immediately before the oligo(T) transcription termination site in the E. coli lpp gene, there is about 60% homology. However, after this section, there is no obvious homology between the two sequences, probably because of a deletion of 300 base pairs at this region. (vii) Seven stable stem-and-loop structures could be formed in the mRNA region. (viii) Alterations in the third position of codons used in the lpp gene suggest that the gene has evolved somewhat

  5. Rat hepatic glutaminase: identification of the full coding sequence and characterization of a functional promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Chung-Bok, M I; Vincent, N; Jhala, U; Watford, M

    1997-01-01

    Glutamine catabolism in mammalian liver is catalysed by a unique isoenzyme of phosphate-activated glutaminase. The full coding and 5' untranslated sequence for rat hepatic glutaminase was isolated by screening lambda ZAP cDNA libraries and a Charon 4a rat genomic library. The sequence produces a mRNA 2225 nt in length, encoding a polypeptide of 535 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 59.2 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence of rat liver glutaminase shows 86% similarity to that of rat kidney glutaminase and 65% similarity to a putative glutaminase from Caenorhabditis elegans. A genomic clone to rat liver glutaminase was isolated that contains 3.5 kb of the gene and 7.5 kb of the 5' flanking region. The 1 kb immediately upstream of the hepatic glutaminase gene (from -1022 to +48) showed functional promoter activity in HepG2 hepatoma cells. This promoter region did not respond to treatment with cAMP, but was highly responsive (10-fold stimulation) to the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. Subsequent 5' deletion analysis indicated that the promoter region between -103 and +48 was sufficient for basal promoter activity. This region does not contain an identifiable TATA element, indicating that transcription of the glutaminase gene is driven by a TATA-less promoter. The region responsive to glucocorticoids was mapped to -252 to -103 relative to the transcription start site. PMID:9164856

  6. Was cDNA sequences modulate transgene expression of was promoter-driven lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Miguel G; Benabdellah, Karim; Muñoz, Pilar; Frecha, Cecilia; Cobo, Marién; Martín, Francisco

    2009-11-01

    Abstract The development of vectors that express a therapeutic transgene efficiently and specifically in hematopoietic cells (HCs) is an important goal for gene therapy of hematological disorders. We have previously shown that a 500-bp fragment from the proximal Was gene promoter in a lentiviral vector (LV) was sufficient to achieve more than 100-fold higher levels of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein in HCs than in nonhematopoietic cells (non-HCs). We show now that this differential was reduced up to 10 times when the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (eGFP) was expressed instead of Was in the same LV backbone. Insertion of Was cDNA sequences downstream of eGFP in these LVs had a negative effect on transgene expression. This effect varied in different cell types but, overall, Was cDNA sequences increased the hematopoietic specificity of Was promoter-driven LV. We have characterized the minimal fragment required to increase hematopoietic specificity and have demonstrated that the mechanism involves Was promoter regulation and RNA processing. In addition, we have shown that Was cDNA sequences interfere with the enhancer activity of the woodchuck posttranscriptional regulatory element. These results represent the first data showing the role of Was intragenic sequences in gene regulation. PMID:19630517

  7. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jin; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Zhenyu; Heikkila, John J.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2013-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 genome contains a single circular chromosome that is 6,183,388 bp with a 60.05% G+C content. The bacterial genome contains 5,423 predicted protein-coding sequences that occupy 87.2% of the genome. Nineteen genomic islands (GIs) were predicted and thirty one complete putative insertion sequences were identified. Genes potentially involved in plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, trehalose production, siderophore production, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization were determined. Moreover, genes that contribute to the environmental fitness of UW4 were also observed including genes responsible for heavy metal resistance such as nickel, copper, cadmium, zinc, molybdate, cobalt, arsenate, and chromate. Whole-genome comparison with other completely sequenced Pseudomonas strains and phylogeny of four concatenated “housekeeping” genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD) of 128 Pseudomonas strains revealed that UW4 belongs to the fluorescens group, jessenii subgroup. PMID:23516524

  8. The complete genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jin; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Zhenyu; Heikkila, John J; Glick, Bernard R

    2013-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 genome contains a single circular chromosome that is 6,183,388 bp with a 60.05% G+C content. The bacterial genome contains 5,423 predicted protein-coding sequences that occupy 87.2% of the genome. Nineteen genomic islands (GIs) were predicted and thirty one complete putative insertion sequences were identified. Genes potentially involved in plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, trehalose production, siderophore production, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization were determined. Moreover, genes that contribute to the environmental fitness of UW4 were also observed including genes responsible for heavy metal resistance such as nickel, copper, cadmium, zinc, molybdate, cobalt, arsenate, and chromate. Whole-genome comparison with other completely sequenced Pseudomonas strains and phylogeny of four concatenated "housekeeping" genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD) of 128 Pseudomonas strains revealed that UW4 belongs to the fluorescens group, jessenii subgroup. PMID:23516524

  9. Sequence Requirements for Myosin Gene Expression and Regulation in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Okkema, P. G.; Harrison, S. W.; Plunger, V.; Aryana, A.; Fire, A.

    1993-01-01

    Four Caenorhabditis elegans genes encode muscle-type specific myosin heavy chain isoforms: myo-1 and myo-2 are expressed in the pharyngeal muscles; unc-54 and myo-3 are expressed in body wall muscles. We have used transformation-rescue and lacZ fusion assays to determine sequence requirements for regulated myosin gene expression during development. Multiple tissue-specific activation elements are present for all four genes. For each of the four genes, sequences upstream of the coding region are tissue-specific promoters, as shown by their ability to drive expression of a reporter gene (lacZ) in the appropriate muscle type. Each gene contains at least one additional tissue-specific regulatory element, as defined by the ability to enhance expression of a heterologous promoter in the appropriate muscle type. In rescue experiments with unc-54, two further requirements apparently independent of tissue specificity were found: sequences within the 3' non-coding region are essential for activity while an intron near the 5' end augments expression levels. The general intron stimulation is apparently independent of intron sequence, indicating a mechanistic effect of splicing. To further characterize the myosin gene promoters and to examine the types of enhancer sequences in the genome, we have initiated a screen of C. elegans genomic DNA for fragments capable of enhancing the myo-2 promoter. The properties of enhancers recovered from this screen suggest that the promoter is limited to muscle cells in its ability to respond to enhancers. PMID:8244003

  10. Synthetic promoter elements obtained by nucleotide sequence variation and selection for activity

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Gerald M.; Meech, Robyn; Owens, Geoffrey C.; Jones, Frederick S.

    2000-01-01

    Eukaryotic transcriptional regulation in different cells involves large numbers and arrangements of cis and trans elements. To survey the number of cis regulatory elements that are active in different contexts, we have devised a high-throughput selection procedure permitting synthesis of active cis motifs that enhance the activity of a minimal promoter. This synthetic promoter construction method (SPCM) was used to identify >100 DNA sequences that showed increased promoter activity in the neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2A. After determining DNA sequences of selected synthetic promoters, database searches for known elements revealed a predominance of eight motifs: AP2, CEBP, GRE, Ebox, ETS, CREB, AP1, and SP1/MAZ. The most active of the selected synthetic promoters contain composites of a number of these motifs. Assays of DNA binding and promoter activity of three exemplary motifs (ETS, CREB, and SP1/MAZ) were used to prove the effectiveness of SPCM in uncovering active sequences. Up to 10% of 133 selected active sequences had no match in currently available databases, raising the possibility that new motifs and transcriptional regulatory proteins to which they bind may be revealed by SPCM. The method may find uses in constructing databases of active cis motifs, in diagnostics, and in gene therapy. PMID:10725347

  11. Functional Capacity of Shiga-Toxin Promoter Sequences in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mejías, María P.; Fernández-Brando, Romina J.; Panek, Cecilia A.; Ramos, Maria V.; Fernández, Gabriela C.; Isturiz, Martín; Ghiringhelli, Pablo D.; Palermo, Marina S.

    2013-01-01

    Shiga toxins (Stx) are the main virulence factors in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) infections, causing diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The genes encoding for Shiga toxin-2 (Stx2) are located in a bacteriophage. The toxin is formed by a single A subunit and five B subunits, each of which has its own promoter sequence. We have previously reported the expression of the B subunit within the eukaryotic environment, probably driven by their own promoter. The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of the eukaryotic machinery to recognize stx2 sequences as eukaryotic-like promoters. Vero cells were transfected with a plasmid encoding Stx2 under its own promoter. The cytotoxic effect on these cells was similar to that observed upon incubation with purified Stx2. In addition, we showed that Stx2 expression in Stx2-insensitive BHK eukaryotic cells induced drastic morphological and cytoskeletal changes. In order to directly evaluate the capacity of the wild promoter sequences of the A and B subunits to drive protein expression in mammalian cells, GFP was cloned under eukaryotic-like putative promoter sequences. GFP expression was observed in 293T cells transfected with these constructions. These results show a novel and alternative way to synthesize Stx2 that could contribute to the global understanding of EHEC infections with immediate impact on the development of treatments or vaccines against HUS. PMID:23451160

  12. Effects of DMSO, glycerol, betaine and their combinations in detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene promoter sequence in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.

    PubMed

    Jurišić, Vladimir; Obradović, Jasmina; Tošić, Natasa; Pavlović, Sonja; Kulić, Milan; Djordjević, Nataša

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of frequently used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) additives DMSO, glycerol and betaine on amplification of GC-rich epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene promoter region, in order to detect the presence of -216G>T and -191C>A gene variations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. PCR products and restriction fragments were detected by electrophoresis on 8% polyacrylamide gel and 3% agarose gel. Our analysis shows that single used additives including DMSO in concentration of 7% and 10%, glycerol in concentration of 10%, 15% and 20%, as well as betaine in concentration of 1M, 1.5M and 2M significantly enhanced the yield and specificity of PCR reaction. In addition, the combination of 10% DMSO with 15% glycerol has shown positive effects, whereas other analyzed combinations of additives failed to amplify the EGFR promoter region. PMID:27284695

  13. Mutations of the ompK36 Porin Gene and Promoter Impact Responses of Sequence Type 258, KPC-2-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Strains to Doripenem and Doripenem-Colistin

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, Cornelius J.; Chen, Liang; Hong, Jae H.; Cheng, Shaoji; Hao, Binghua; Shields, Ryan K.; Farrell, Annie N.; Doi, Yohei; Zhao, Yanan; Perlin, David S.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.

    2013-01-01

    Doripenem-colistin exerts synergy against some, but not all, Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae strains in vitro. We determined if doripenem MICs and/or ompK36 porin gene mutations impacted the responses of 23 sequence type 258 (ST258), KPC-2-producing strains to the combination of doripenem (8 μg/ml) and colistin (2 μg/ml) during time-kill assays. The median doripenem and colistin MICs were 32 and 4 μg/ml. Doripenem MICs did not correlate with KPC-2 expression levels. Five and 18 strains had wild-type and mutant ompK36, respectively. The most common mutations were IS5 promoter insertions (n = 7) and insertions encoding glycine and aspartic acid at amino acid (aa) positions 134 and 135 (ins aa134-135 GD; n = 8), which were associated with higher doripenem MICs than other mutations or wild-type ompK36 (all P values ≤ 0.04). Bactericidal activity (24 h) was achieved by doripenem-colistin against 12%, 43%, and 75% of ins aa134-135 GD, IS5, and wild-type/other mutants, respectively (P = 0.04). Doripenem-colistin was more active in time-kill studies than colistin at 12 and 24 h if the doripenem MIC was ≤8 μg/ml (P = 0.0007 and 0.09, respectively), but not if the MIC was >8 μg/ml (P = 0.10 and 0.16). Likewise, doripenem-colistin was more active at 12 and 24 h against the wild type/other mutants than ins aa134-135 GD or IS5 mutants (P = 0.007 and 0.0007). By multivariate analysis, the absence of ins aa134-135 GD or IS5 mutations was the only independent predictor of doripenem-colistin responses at 24 h (P = 0.002). In conclusion, ompK36 genotypes identified ST258 KPC-K. pneumoniae strains that were most likely to respond to doripenem-colistin. PMID:23939888

  14. Draft genome sequence of Pantoea ananatis B1-9, a nonpathogenic plant growth-promoting bacterium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Jin Hee; Kang, Beom Ryong; Rong, Xiaoqing; McSpadden Gardener, Brian B; Ji, Hyung Jin; Park, Chang-Seuk; Kim, Young Cheol

    2012-02-01

    Pantoea ananatis B1-9 is an endophytic Gram-negative rhizobacterium that was isolated for its ability to promote plant growth and improve crop yield in the field. Here we report the draft genome sequence of P. ananatis B1-9. Comparison of this sequence to the sequenced genome of a plant-pathogenic P. ananatis strain, LMG20103, indicated that the pathogenesis-related genes were absent, but a subset of gene functions that may be related to its plant growth promotion were present. PMID:22247529

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens XK-4-1, a Plant Growth-Promoting Endophyte with Antifungal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hsiang, Tom; Zhou, Yi; Zhou, Jinglong

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of a bacterial plant-growth-promoting endophyte, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens XK-4-1, which consists of one circular chromosome of 3,941,805 bp with 3,702 coding sequences (CDSs). The data presented highlight multiple sets of functional genes associated with its plant-beneficial characteristics. PMID:26564038

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Delftia tsuruhatensis MTQ3, a Strain of Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium with Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qihui; Wang, Chengqiang; Guo, Haimeng; Xia, Zhilin; Ye, Jiangping; Liu, Kai; Yang, Yanan; Hou, Xiaoyang; Liu, Hu; Wang, Jun; Du, Binghai; Ding, Yanqin

    2015-01-01

    Delftia tsuruhatensis MTQ3 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) isolated from tobacco rhizosphere. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of D. tsuruhatensis MTQ3. Several functional genes related to antimicrobial activity and environment adaption have been found in the genome. This is the first genome sequence of D. tsuruhatensis related to PGPR. PMID:26251486

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens XK-4-1, a Plant Growth-Promoting Endophyte with Antifungal Activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhengxiang; Hsiang, Tom; Zhou, Yi; Zhou, Jinglong

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of a bacterial plant-growth-promoting endophyte, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens XK-4-1, which consists of one circular chromosome of 3,941,805 bp with 3,702 coding sequences (CDSs). The data presented highlight multiple sets of functional genes associated with its plant-beneficial characteristics. PMID:26564038

  18. Reporter Gene Silencing in Targeted Mouse Mutants Is Associated with Promoter CpG Island Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Kirov, Julia V.; Adkisson, Michael; Nava, A. J.; Cipollone, Andreana; Willis, Brandon; Engelhard, Eric K.; Lloyd, K. C. Kent; de Jong, Pieter; West, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted mutations in mouse disrupt local chromatin structure and may lead to unanticipated local effects. We evaluated targeted gene promoter silencing in a group of six mutants carrying the tm1a Knockout Mouse Project allele containing both a LacZ reporter gene driven by the native promoter and a neo selection cassette. Messenger RNA levels of the reporter gene and targeted gene were assessed by qRT-PCR, and methylation of the promoter CpG islands and LacZ coding sequence were evaluated by sequencing of bisulfite-treated DNA. Mutants were stratified by LacZ staining into presumed Silenced and Expressed reporter genes. Silenced mutants had reduced relative quantities LacZ mRNA and greater CpG Island methylation compared with the Expressed mutant group. Within the silenced group, LacZ coding sequence methylation was significantly and positively correlated with CpG Island methylation, while promoter CpG methylation was only weakly correlated with LacZ gene mRNA. The results support the conclusion that there is promoter silencing in a subset of mutants carrying the tm1a allele. The features of targeted genes which promote local silencing when targeted remain unknown. PMID:26275310

  19. Reporter Gene Silencing in Targeted Mouse Mutants Is Associated with Promoter CpG Island Methylation.

    PubMed

    Kirov, Julia V; Adkisson, Michael; Nava, A J; Cipollone, Andreana; Willis, Brandon; Engelhard, Eric K; Lloyd, K C Kent; de Jong, Pieter; West, David B

    2015-01-01

    Targeted mutations in mouse disrupt local chromatin structure and may lead to unanticipated local effects. We evaluated targeted gene promoter silencing in a group of six mutants carrying the tm1a Knockout Mouse Project allele containing both a LacZ reporter gene driven by the native promoter and a neo selection cassette. Messenger RNA levels of the reporter gene and targeted gene were assessed by qRT-PCR, and methylation of the promoter CpG islands and LacZ coding sequence were evaluated by sequencing of bisulfite-treated DNA. Mutants were stratified by LacZ staining into presumed Silenced and Expressed reporter genes. Silenced mutants had reduced relative quantities LacZ mRNA and greater CpG Island methylation compared with the Expressed mutant group. Within the silenced group, LacZ coding sequence methylation was significantly and positively correlated with CpG Island methylation, while promoter CpG methylation was only weakly correlated with LacZ gene mRNA. The results support the conclusion that there is promoter silencing in a subset of mutants carrying the tm1a allele. The features of targeted genes which promote local silencing when targeted remain unknown. PMID:26275310

  20. Multiple Mobile Promoter Regions for the Rare Carbapenem Resistance Gene of Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Podglajen, I.; Breuil, J.; Rohaut, A.; Monsempes, C.; Collatz, E.

    2001-01-01

    Two novel insertion sequences (IS), IS1187 and IS1188, are described upstream from the carbapenem resistance gene cfiA in strains of Bacteroides fragilis. Mapping, with the RACE procedure, of transcription start sites of cfiA in these and two other previously reported IS showed that transcription of this rarely encountered gene is initiated close to a variety of B. fragilis consensus promoter sequences, as recently defined (D. P. Bayley, E. R. Rocha, and C. J. Smith, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 193:149–154, 2000). In the cases of IS1186 and IS1188, these sequences overlap with putative Eς70 promoter sequences, while in IS942 and IS1187 such sequences can be observed either upstream or downstream of the B. fragilis promoters. PMID:11344163

  1. A new idea for simple and rapid monitoring of gene expression: requirement of nucleotide sequences encoding an N-terminal HA tag in the T7 promoter-driven expression in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jeong-Mi; Kim, Goo-Young; Rhim, Hyangshuk

    2012-10-01

    Mammalian expression vectors are used to overexpress genes of interest in mammalian cells. High temperature requirement protein A1 (HtrA1), used as a specific target, was expressed from the pHA-M-HtrA1 plasmid in HEK293T cells, inducing cell death. Expression of HtrA1 was driven by the pHA-M-HtrA1 mammalian expression vector in E. coli resulting in growth suppression of E. coli in an HtrA1 serine protease-dependent manner. By using various combinations of promoters, target genes and N-terminal tags, the T7 promoter and N-terminal HA tag in the mammalian expression vector were shown to be responsible for expression of target genes in E. coli. Thus the pHA-M-HtrA1 plasmid can be used as a novel, rapid pre-test system for expression and cytotoxicity of the specific target gene in E. coli before assessing its functions in mammalian cells. PMID:22714269

  2. DNA duplex stability as discriminative characteristic for Escherichia coli σ(54)- and σ(28)- dependent promoter sequences.

    PubMed

    de Avila e Silva, Scheila; Forte, Franciele; T S Sartor, Ivaine; Andrighetti, Tahila; J L Gerhardt, Günther; Longaray Delamare, Ana Paula; Echeverrigaray, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The advent of modern high-throughput sequencing has made it possible to generate vast quantities of genomic sequence data. However, the processing of this volume of information, including prediction of gene-coding and regulatory sequences remains an important bottleneck in bioinformatics research. In this work, we integrated DNA duplex stability into the repertoire of a Neural Network (NN) capable of predicting promoter regions with augmented accuracy, specificity and sensitivity. We took our method beyond a simplistic analysis based on a single sigma subunit of RNA polymerase, incorporating the six main sigma-subunits of Escherichia coli. This methodology employed successfully re-discovered known promoter sequences recognized by E. coli RNA polymerase subunits σ(24), σ(28), σ(32), σ(38), σ(54) and σ(70), with highlighted accuracies for σ(28)- and σ(54)- dependent promoter sequences (values obtained were 80% and 78.8%, respectively). Furthermore, the discrimination of promoters according to the σ factor made it possible to extract functional commonalities for the genes expressed by each type of promoter. The DNA duplex stability rises as a distinctive feature which improves the recognition and classification of σ(28)- and σ(54)- dependent promoter sequences. The findings presented in this report underscore the usefulness of including DNA biophysical parameters into NN learning algorithms to increase accuracy, specificity and sensitivity in promoter beyond what is accomplished based on sequence alone. PMID:24172230

  3. Analysis of cis-sequence of subgenomic transcript promoter from the Figwort mosaic virus and comparison of promoter activity with the cauliflower mosaic virus promoters in monocot and dicot cells.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Somnath; Dey, Nrisingha; Maiti, Indu B

    2002-12-01

    A sub-genomic transcript (Sgt) promoter was isolated from the Figwort mosaic virus (FMV) genomic clone. The FMV Sgt promoter was linked to heterologous coding sequences to form a chimeric gene construct. The 5'-3'-boundaries required for maximal activity and involvement of cis-sequences for optimal expression in plants were defined by 5'-, 3'-end deletion and internal deletion analysis of FMV Sgt promoter fragments coupled with a beta-glucuronidase reporter gene in both transient protoplast expression experiments and in transgenic plants. A 301 bp FMV Sgt promoter fragment (sequence -270 to +31 from the transcription start site; TSS) provided maximum promoter activity. The TSS of the FMV Sgt promoter was determined by primer extension analysis using total RNA from transgenic plants developed for FMV Sgt promoter: uidA fusion gene. An activator domain located upstream of the TATA box at -70 to -100 from TSS is absolutely required for promoter activity and its function is critically position-dependent with respect to TATA box. Two sequence motifs AGATTTTAAT (coordinates -100 to -91) and GTAAGCGC (coordinates -80 to -73) were found to be essential for promoter activity. The FMV Sgt promoter is less active in monocot cells; FMV Sgt promoter expression level was about 27.5-fold higher in tobacco cells compared to that in maize cells. Comparative expression analysis of FMV Sgt promoter with cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter showed that the FMV Sgt promoter is about 2-fold stronger than the CaMV 35S promoter. The FMV Sgt promoter is a constitutive promoter; expression level in seedlings was in the order: root>leaf>stem. PMID:12457962

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobium Mesorhizobium amorphae, Isolated from Zinc-Lead Mine Tailings

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiuli; Lin, Yanbing; Johnstone, Laurel; Baltrus, David A.; Miller, Susan J.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we describe the draft genome sequence of Mesorhizobium amorphae strain CCNWGS0123, isolated from nodules of Robinia pseudoacacia growing on zinc-lead mine tailings. A large number of metal(loid) resistance genes, as well as genes reported to promote plant growth, were identified, presenting a great future potential for aiding phytoremediation in metal(loid)-contaminated soil. PMID:22247533

  5. Efficient chimeric plant promoters derived from plant infecting viral promoter sequences.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Sefali; Ranjan, Rajiv; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Maiti, Indu B; Dey, Nrisingha

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, we developed a set of three chimeric/hybrid promoters namely FSgt-PFlt, PFlt-UAS-2X and MSgt-PFlt incorporating different important domains of Figwort Mosaic Virus sub-genomic transcript promoter (FSgt, -270 to -60), Mirabilis Mosaic Virus sub-genomic transcript promoter (MSgt, -306 to -125) and Peanut Chlorotic Streak Caulimovirus full-length transcript promoter (PFlt-, -353 to +24 and PFlt-UAS, -353 to -49). We demonstrated that these chimeric/hybrid promoters can drive the expression of reporter genes in different plant species including tobacco, Arabidopsis, petunia, tomato and spinach. FSgt-PFlt, PFlt-UAS-2X and MSgt-PFlt promoters showed 4.2, 1.5 and 1.2 times stronger GUS activities compared to the activity of the CaMV35S promoter, respectively, in tobacco protoplasts. Protoplast-derived recombinant promoter driven GFP showed enhanced accumulation compared to that obtained under the CaMV35S promoter. FSgt-PFlt, PFlt-UAS-2X and MSgt-PFlt promoters showed 3.0, 1.3 and 1.0 times stronger activities than the activity of the CaMV35S² (a modified version of the CaMV35S promoter with double enhancer domain) promoter, respectively, in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum, var. Samsun NN). Alongside, we observed a fair correlation between recombinant promoter-driven GUS accumulation with the corresponding uidA-mRNA level in transgenic tobacco. Histochemical (X-gluc) staining of whole transgenic seedlings and fluorescence images of ImaGene Green™ treated floral parts expressing the GUS under the control of recombinant promoters also support above findings. Furthermore, we confirmed that these chimeric promoters are inducible in the presence of 150 μM salicylic acid (SA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Taken altogether, we propose that SA/ABA inducible chimeric/recombinant promoters could be used for strong expression of gene(s) of interest in crop plants. PMID:24178585

  6. Tandem gene arrays in Trypanosoma brucei: Comparative phylogenomic analysis of duplicate sequence variation

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Andrew P

    2007-01-01

    Background The genome sequence of the protistan parasite Trypanosoma brucei contains many tandem gene arrays. Gene duplicates are created through tandem duplication and are expressed through polycistronic transcription, suggesting that the primary purpose of long, tandem arrays is to increase gene dosage in an environment where individual gene promoters are absent. This report presents the first account of the tandem gene arrays in the T. brucei genome, employing several related genome sequences to establish how variation is created and removed. Results A systematic survey of tandem gene arrays showed that substantial sequence variation existed across the genome; variation from different regions of an array often produced inconsistent phylogenetic affinities. Phylogenetic relationships of gene duplicates were consistent with concerted evolution being a widespread homogenising force. However, tandem duplicates were not usually identical; therefore, any homogenising effect was coincident with divergence among duplicates. Allelic gene conversion was detected using various criteria and was apparently able to both remove and introduce sequence variation. Tandem arrays containing structural heterogeneity demonstrated how sequence homogenisation and differentiation can occur within a single locus. Conclusion The use of multiple genome sequences in a comparative analysis of tandem gene arrays identified substantial sequence variation among gene duplicates. The distribution of sequence variation is determined by a dynamic balance of conservative and innovative evolutionary forces. Gene trees from various species showed that intraspecific duplicates evolve in concert, perhaps through frequent gene conversion, although this does not prevent sequence divergence, especially where structural heterogeneity physically separates a duplicate from its neighbours. In describing dynamics of sequence variation that have consequences beyond gene dosage, this survey provides a basis for

  7. Sequence and expression of a halobacterial beta-galactosidase gene.

    PubMed

    Holmes, M L; Dyall-Smith, M L

    2000-04-01

    Studies of gene expression in haloarchaea have been greatly hindered by the lack of a convenient reporter gene. In a previous study, a beta-galactosidase from Haloferax alicantei was purified and several peptide sequences determined. The peptide sequences have now been used to clone the entire beta-galactosidase gene (designated bgaH) along with some flanking chromosomal DNA. The deduced amino acid sequence of BgaH was 665 amino acids (74 kDa) and showed greatest amino acid similarity to members of glycosyl hydrolase family 42 [classification of Henrissat, B., and Bairoch, A. (1993) New families in the classification of glycosyl hydrolases based on amino acid sequence similarities. Biochem J 293: 781-788]. Within this family, BgaH was most similar (42-43% aa identity) to enzymes from extremely thermophilic bacteria such as Thermotoga and Thermus. Family 42 enzymes are only distantly related to the Sulfolobus LacS and Escherichia coli LacZ enzymes (families one and two respectively). Three open reading frames (ORFs) upstream of bgaH were readily identified by database searches as glucose-fructose oxidoreductase, 2-dehydro-3-deoxyphosphogluconate aldolase and 2-keto-3-deoxygluconate kinase, enzymes that are also involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Downstream of bgaH there was an ORF which contained a putative fibronectin III motif. The bgaH gene was engineered into a halobacterial plasmid vector and introduced into Haloferax volcanii, a widely used strain that lacks detectable beta-galactosidase activity. Transformants were shown to express the enzyme; colonies turned blue when sprayed with Xgal and enzyme activity could be easily quantitated using a standard ONPG assay. In an accompanying publication, Patenge et al. (2000) have demonstrated the utility of bgaH as a promoter reporter in Halobacterium salinarum. PMID:10760168

  8. Essential and nonessential sequences in malPp, a positively controlled promoter in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Raibaud, O; Gutierrez, C; Schwartz, M

    1985-03-01

    A plasmid bearing the malPp promoter was digested with Bal31 to obtain a set of deletions with closely spaced endpoints in the upstream region of this promoter. Some of these deletions were sequenced, and their effect on malPQ expression was determined after having transferred them onto the chromosome. We found that a site which binds the cyclic AMP receptor protein in vitro and which is centered at position -93 with respect to the site of transcription initiation could be deleted without affecting malPQ expression. In contrast, the activity of the malPp promoter decreased abruptly when the deletions reached position -72. The downstream region of the promoter was analyzed by using a technique of "sequence replacement" which involved the selection of Mal+ pseudorevertants from strains which carried small deletions in the -25 region. The pseudorevertants, which expressed the malPQ operon in a manner indistinguishable from wild type, had grossly different sequences downstream from position -38, except for a few positions, some of which must be important for promoter function. By combining all presently available information, it is suggested that the malPp promoter contains three binding sites for its activator, the product of gene malT. These sites are defined by three quasi-identical hexanucleotides present in one orientation around position -37 and twice in the other orientation around positions -60 and -73. PMID:3156124

  9. The genomic sequence of the murine major vault protein and its promoter.

    PubMed

    Mossink, Marieke; van Zon, Arend; Fränzel-Luiten, Erna; Schoester, Martijn; Scheffer, George L; Scheper, Rik J; Sonneveld, Pieter; Wiemer, Erik A C

    2002-07-10

    Vaults are ribonucleoproteins of unknown function, consisting of three different proteins and multiple copies of small untranslated RNA molecules. One of the protein subunits has been identified as TEP1, a protein that is also associated with the telomerase complex. Another protein appears to contain a functional PARP domain and is hence called VPARP. The third protein, major vault protein (MVP), is believed to make up 70% of the total mass of the vault complex and to be responsible for the typical barrel-shaped structure of vaults. We have isolated the murine MVP cDNA and compared the amino acid sequence with MVP from other species. Over 90% of sequence identity was found between mouse, human and rat, and a considerable degree of identity between mouse and MVPs from lower eukaryotes. We also found that the genomic structure of the murine MVP gene closely resembles the organization of the human MVP gene, both consisting of 15 exons of which most have exactly the same size. Finally we have isolated a genomic region upstream (and partially overlapping) the first untranslated exon, that displayed promoter activity in a luciferase reporter assay. Furthermore, we showed that the sequences from the first exon together with the 5'-end of the first intron enhance the promoter activity, implying the presence of essential promoter elements in this region. Alignment of the murine promoter region with the homologous sequences of the human gene revealed an identity of 58%. The apparent presence of conserved promoter elements suggests a similar regulation of human and murine MVP expression. PMID:12234684

  10. Silencing of CHD5 Gene by Promoter Methylation in Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rui; Meng, Fanyi; Wang, Nisha; Ma, Wenli; Yan, Qitao

    2014-01-01

    Chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 5 (CHD5) was previously proposed to function as a potent tumor suppressor by acting as a master regulator of a tumor-suppressive network. CHD5 is down-regulated in several cancers, including leukemia and is responsible for tumor generation and progression. However, the mechanism of CHD5 down-regulation in leukemia is largely unknown. In this study, quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blotting analyses revealed that CHD5 was down-regulated in human leukemia cell lines and samples. Luciferase reporter assays showed that most of the baseline regulatory activity was localized from 500 to 200 bp upstream of the transcription start site. Bisulfite DNA sequencing of the identified regulatory element revealed that the CHD5 promoter was hypermethylated in human leukemia cells and samples. Thus, CHD5 expression was inversely correlated with promoter DNA methylation in these samples. Treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (DAC) activates CHD5 expression in human leukemia cell lines. In vitro luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that methylation of the CHD5 promoter repressed its promoter activity. Furthermore, a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay combined with qualitative PCR identified activating protein 2 (AP2) as a potential transcription factor involved in CHD5 expression and indicated that treatment with DAC increases the recruitment of AP2 to the CHD5 promoter. In vitro transcription-factor activity studies showed that AP2 over-expression was able to activate CHD5 promoter activity. Our findings indicate that repression of CHD5 gene expression in human leukemia is mediated in part by DNA methylation of its promoter. PMID:24454811

  11. A multistep bioinformatic approach detects putative regulatory elements in gene promoters

    PubMed Central

    Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Coppe, Alessandro; Bisognin, Andrea; Pizzi, Cinzia; Danieli, Gian Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Background Searching for approximate patterns in large promoter sequences frequently produces an exceedingly high numbers of results. Our aim was to exploit biological knowledge for definition of a sheltered search space and of appropriate search parameters, in order to develop a method for identification of a tractable number of sequence motifs. Results Novel software (COOP) was developed for extraction of sequence motifs, based on clustering of exact or approximate patterns according to the frequency of their overlapping occurrences. Genomic sequences of 1 Kb upstream of 91 genes differentially expressed and/or encoding proteins with relevant function in adult human retina were analyzed. Methodology and results were tested by analysing 1,000 groups of putatively unrelated sequences, randomly selected among 17,156 human gene promoters. When applied to a sample of human promoters, the method identified 279 putative motifs frequently occurring in retina promoters sequences. Most of them are localized in the proximal portion of promoters, less variable in central region than in lateral regions and similar to known regulatory sequences. COOP software and reference manual are freely available upon request to the Authors. Conclusion The approach described in this paper seems effective for identifying a tractable number of sequence motifs with putative regulatory role. PMID:15904489

  12. Isolated yeast promoter sequence and a method of regulated heterologous expression

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Johnway; Skeen, Rodney S.; Hooker, Brian S.; Anderson, Daniel B.

    2005-05-31

    The present invention provides the promoter clone discovery of a glucoamylase gene of a starch utilizing yeast strain Schwanniomyces castellii. The isolated glucoamylase promoter is an inducible promoter, which can regulate strong gene expression in starch culture medium.

  13. Compensation for differences in gene copy number among yeast ribosomal proteins is encoded within their promoters

    PubMed Central

    Zeevi, Danny; Sharon, Eilon; Lotan-Pompan, Maya; Lubling, Yaniv; Shipony, Zohar; Raveh-Sadka, Tali; Keren, Leeat; Levo, Michal; Weinberger, Adina; Segal, Eran

    2011-01-01

    Coordinate regulation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes is key for controlling cell growth. In yeast, it is unclear how this regulation achieves the required equimolar amounts of the different RP components, given that some RP genes exist in duplicate copies, while others have only one copy. Here, we tested whether the solution to this challenge is partly encoded within the DNA sequence of the RP promoters, by fusing 110 different RP promoters to a fluorescent gene reporter, allowing us to robustly detect differences in their promoter activities that are as small as ∼10%. We found that single-copy RP promoters have significantly higher activities, suggesting that proper RP stoichiometry is indeed partly encoded within the RP promoters. Notably, we also partially uncovered how this regulation is encoded by finding that RP promoters with higher activity have more nucleosome-disfavoring sequences and characteristic spatial organizations of these sequences and of binding sites for key RP regulators. Mutations in these elements result in a significant decrease of RP promoter activity. Thus, our results suggest that intrinsic (DNA-dependent) nucleosome organization may be a key mechanism by which genomes encode biologically meaningful promoter activities. Our approach can readily be applied to uncover how transcriptional programs of other promoters are encoded. PMID:22009988

  14. Sequence analysis of a cluster of twenty-one tRNA genes in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Green, C J; Vold, B S

    1983-01-01

    The DNA sequence of a cluster of twenty-one tRNA genes distal to a rRNA gene set in B. subtilis was determined. None of the tRNA genes are repeated in the sequence. The only classes of tRNAs that are not represented are those for cysteine, glutamine, tryptophan, and tyrosine. Three of the tRNA genes in this cluster do not have the 3'-CCA sequence encoded in the gene. There is no RNA polymerase terminator sequence in the region between the 5S gene and the first tRNA gene or within the tRNA gene cluster. A terminator sequence was found directly after the last tRNA gene. This rRNA and tRNA gene cluster probably represents one transcriptional unit. However, there may be an RNA polymerase promoter site within this sequence, which raises some interesting questions concerning the regulation of transcription for these tRNA genes. PMID:6310512

  15. Isolation and characterization of oil palm constitutive promoter derived from ubiquitin extension protein (uep1) gene.

    PubMed

    Masura, Subhi Siti; Parveez, Ghulam Kadir Ahmad; Ismail, Ismanizan

    2010-09-30

    The ubiquitin extension protein (uep1) gene was identified as a constitutively expressed gene in oil palm. We have isolated and characterized the 5' region of the oil palm uep1 gene, which contains an 828 bp sequence upstream of the uep1 translational start site. Construction of a pUEP1 transformation vector, which contains gusA reporter gene under the control of uep1 promoter, was carried out for functional analysis of the promoter through transient expression studies. It was found that the 5' region of uep1 functions as a constitutive promoter in oil palm and could drive GUS expression in all tissues tested, including embryogenic calli, embryoid, immature embryo, young leaflet from mature palm, green leaf, mesocarp and meristematic tissues (shoot tip). This promoter could also be used in dicot systems as it was demonstrated to be capable of driving gusA gene expression in tobacco. PMID:20123048

  16. Characterization of tissue-specific transcription by the human synapsin I gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, G. Univ. of Texas, Dallas ); Greengard, P. ); Suedhof, T.C. )

    1991-04-15

    Synapsin Ia and synapsin Ib are abundant synaptic vesicle proteins that are derived by differential splicing from a single gene. To identify control elements directing the neuronal expression of synapsins Ia/b, the authors functionally analyzed the promoter region of the human synapsin I gene. A hybrid gene was constructed containing 2 kilobases of 5{prime} flanking sequence from the synapsin I gene fused to the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase and transfected into 12 different neuronal and nonneuronal cell lines. In general, expression of the chimeric reporter gene showed excellent correlation with endogenous expression of synapsin I in different neuronal cell lines, whereas transcription was low in all nonneuronal cell lines examined. The addition of the simian virus 40 enhancer promoted non-tissue-specific expression. Deletion mutagenesis of the synapsin I promoter revealed the presence of positive and negative sequence elements. A basal (constitutive) promoter that directs reporter gene expression in neuronal and nonneuronal cell lines was mapped to the region {minus}115 to +47. The promoter region from {minus}422 to {minus}22 contains positive elements that upon fusion with the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter potentiate its transcription in PC12 and neuroblastoma cells but not in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

  17. ARID3B Directly Regulates Ovarian Cancer Promoting Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bobbs, Alexander; Gellerman, Katrina; Hallas, William Morgan; Joseph, Stancy; Yang, Chao; Kurkewich, Jeffrey; Cowden Dahl, Karen D.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-binding protein AT-Rich Interactive Domain 3B (ARID3B) is elevated in ovarian cancer and increases tumor growth in a xenograft model of ovarian cancer. However, relatively little is known about ARID3B's function. In this study we perform the first genome wide screen for ARID3B direct target genes and ARID3B regulated pathways. We identified and confirmed numerous ARID3B target genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by microarray and quantitative RT-PCR. Using motif-finding algorithms, we characterized a binding site for ARID3B, which is similar to the previously known site for the ARID3B paralogue ARID3A. Functionality of this predicted site was demonstrated by ChIP analysis. We next demonstrated that ARID3B induces expression of its targets in ovarian cancer cell lines. We validated that ARID3B binds to an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) enhancer and increases mRNA expression. ARID3B also binds to the promoter of Wnt5A and its receptor FZD5. FZD5 is highly expressed in ovarian cancer cell lines, and is upregulated by exogenous ARID3B. Both ARID3B and FZD5 expression increase adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) components including collagen IV, fibronectin and vitronectin. ARID3B-increased adhesion to collagens II and IV require FZD5. This study directly demonstrates that ARID3B binds target genes in a sequence-specific manner, resulting in increased gene expression. Furthermore, our data indicate that ARID3B regulation of direct target genes in the Wnt pathway promotes adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. PMID:26121572

  18. Enhancer activity of Helitron in sericin-1 gene promoter from Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke; Li, Chun-Feng; Wu, Jie; Wei, Jun-Hong; Zou, Yong; Han, Min-Jin; Zhou, Ze-Yang

    2016-06-01

    Sericin is a kind of water-soluble protein expressed specifically in the middle silk gland of Bombyx mori. When the sericin-1 gene promoter was cloned and a transgenic vector was constructed to express a foreign protein, a specific Helitron, Bmhel-8, was identified in the sericin-1 gene promoter sequence in some genotypes of Bombyx mori and Bombyx mandarina. Given that the Bmhel-8 Helitron transposon was present only in some genotypes, it could be the source of allelic variation in the sericin-1 promoter. The length of the sericin-1 promoter sequence is approximately 1063 or 643 bp. The larger size of the sequence or allele is ascribed to the presence of Bmhel-8. Silkworm genotypes can be homozygous for either the shorter or larger promoter sequence or heterozygous, containing both alleles. Bmhel-8 in the sericin-1 promoter exhibits enhancer activity, as demonstrated by a dual-luciferase reporter system in BmE cell lines. Furthermore, Bmhel-8 displays enhancer activity in a sericin-1 promoter-driven gene expression system but does not regulate the tissue-specific expression of sericin-1. PMID:27067405

  19. C DNA SEQUENCE OF CHANNEL CATFISH PEROXIREDOXIN 6 GENE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peroxiredoxin 6 gene (Prdx6) of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, was cloned and sequenced. Total RNA from channel catfish tissues was isolated, reverse transcribed and amplified. The sequence of the channel catfish Prdx6 gene consists of 1003 nucleotides. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence ...

  20. Analysis of aberrant methylation on promoter sequences of tumor suppressor genes and total DNA in sputum samples: a promising tool for early detection of COPD and lung cancer in smokers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a disorder associated to cigarette smoke and lung cancer (LC). Since epigenetic changes in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) are clearly important in the development of LC. In this study, we hypothesize that tobacco smokers are susceptible for methylation in the promoter region of TSGs in airway epithelial cells when compared with non-smoker subjects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of detection of genes promoter methylation in sputum specimens, as a complementary tool to identify LC biomarkers among smokers with early COPD. Methods We determined the amount of DNA in induced sputum from patients with COPD (n = 23), LC (n = 26), as well as in healthy subjects (CTR) (n = 33), using a commercial kit for DNA purification, followed by absorbance measurement at 260 nm. The frequency of CDKN2A, CDH1 and MGMT promoter methylation in the same groups was determined by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP). The Fisher’s exact test was employed to compare frequency of results between different groups. Results DNA concentration was 7.4 and 5.8 times higher in LC and COPD compared to the (CTR) (p < 0.0001), respectively. Methylation status of CDKN2A and MGMT was significantly higher in COPD and LC patients compared with CTR group (p < 0.0001). Frequency of CDH1 methylation only showed a statistically significant difference between LC patients and CTR group (p < 0.05). Conclusions We provide evidence that aberrant methylation of TSGs in samples of induced sputum is a useful tool for early diagnostic of lung diseases (LC and COPD) in smoker subjects. Virtual slides The abstract MUST finish with the following text: Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1127865005664160 PMID:22818553

  1. Identification of a DNA methylation-dependent activator sequence in the pseudoxanthoma elasticum gene, ABCC6.

    PubMed

    Arányi, Tamás; Ratajewski, Marcin; Bardóczy, Viola; Pulaski, Lukasz; Bors, András; Tordai, Attila; Váradi, András

    2005-05-13

    ABCC6 encodes MRP6, a member of the ABC protein family with an unknown physiological role. The human ABCC6 and its two pseudogenes share 99% identical DNA sequence. Loss-of-function mutations of ABCC6 are associated with the development of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), a recessive hereditary disorder affecting the elastic tissues. Various disease-causing mutations were found in the coding region; however, the mutation detection rate in the ABCC6 coding region of bona fide PXE patients is only approximately 80%. This suggests that polymorphisms or mutations in the regulatory regions may contribute to the development of the disease. Here, we report the first characterization of the ABCC6 gene promoter. Phylogenetic in silico analysis of the 5' regulatory regions revealed the presence of two evolutionarily conserved sequence elements embedded in CpG islands. The study of DNA methylation of ABCC6 and the pseudogenes identified a correlation between the methylation of the CpG island in the proximal promoter and the ABCC6 expression level in cell lines. Both activator and repressor sequences were uncovered in the proximal promoter by reporter gene assays. The most potent activator sequence was one of the conserved elements protected by DNA methylation on the endogenous gene in non-expressing cells. Finally, in vitro methylation of this sequence inhibits the transcriptional activity of the luciferase promoter constructs. Altogether these results identify a DNA methylation-dependent activator sequence in the ABCC6 promoter. PMID:15760889

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of the Biocontrol and Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain UM270.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Salmerón, Julie E; Hernández-León, Rocio; Orozco-Mosqueda, Ma Del Carmen; Valencia-Cantero, Eduardo; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Santoyo, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas fluorescens strain UM270 was isolated form the rhizosphere of wild Medicago spp. A previous work has shown that this pseudomonad isolate was able to produce diverse diffusible and volatile compounds involved in plant protection and growth promotion. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the rhizobacterium P. fluorescens strain UM270. The sequence covers 6,047,974 bp of a single chromosome, with 62.66 % G + C content and no plasmids. Genome annotations predicted 5,509 genes, 5,396 coding genes, 59 RNA genes and 110 pseudogenes. Genome sequence analysis revealed the presence of genes involved in biological control and plant-growth promoting activities. We anticipate that the P. fluorescens strain UM270 genome will contribute insights about bacterial plant protection and beneficial properties through genomic comparisons among fluorescent pseudomonads. PMID:26767092

  3. Promoter DNA demethylation of Keap1 gene in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong-Zhi; Zhao, Xiang-Zhi; Zhang, Xue-Song; Zhang, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Researches have shown that the onset of diabetes is closely associated with oxidative stress and the chronic exposure leads to the development of complications such as diabetic cardiomyopathy. One of the central adaptive responses against the oxidative stresses is the activation of the nuclear transcriptional factor, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which then activates more than 20 different antioxidative enzymes. Kelch-like ECH associated protein 1 (Keap1) targets and binds to Nrf2 for proteosomal degradation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the status of Nrf2 mediated antioxidant system in myocardial biopsies of non-diabetic (NDM) and type-2 diabetic (DM-T2) cardiomyopathy patients. The western blot analysis of antioxidant proteins, real-time PCR analysis of Nrf2/Keap1 gene and bisulphate DNA sequencing analysis to study the methylation status of the CpG islands of Keap1 promoter DNA were performed. The immunoblot analysis showed the decreased level of antioxidant proteins other than Keap1 in the diabetic cardiopathy patients. Similarly, mRNA levels of Keap1 showed 5-fold increase in diabetic patients. Further analysis on promoter region of Keap1 gene revealed 80% demethylation in diabetic patients. Altogether, our results indicated that demethylation of the CpG islands in the Keap1 promoter will activate the expression of Keap1 protein, which then increases the targeting of Nrf2 for proteosomal degradation. Decreased Nrf2 activity represses the transcription of many antioxidant enzyme genes and alters the redox-balance up on diabetes. Thus, our study clearly demonstrates the failure of Nrf2 mediated antioxidant system revealed in biopsies of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25674242

  4. Nucleotide sequence of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed Central

    Nishibuchi, M; Kaper, J B

    1985-01-01

    The gene encoding the thermostable direct hemolysin of Vibrio parahaemolyticus was characterized. This gene (designated tdh) was subcloned into pBR322 in Escherichia coli, and the functional tdh gene was localized to a 1.3-kilobase HindIII fragment. This fragment was sequenced, and the structural gene was found to encode a mature protein of 165 amino acid residues. The mature protein sequence was preceded by a putative signal peptide sequence of 24 amino acids. A putative tdh promoter, determined by its similarity to concensus sequences, was not functional in E. coli. However, a promoter that was functional in E. coli was shown to exist further upstream by use of a promoter probe plasmid. A 5.7-kilobase SalI fragment containing the structural gene and both potential promoters was cloned into a broad-host-range plasmid and mobilized into a Kanagawa phenomenon-negative V. parahaemolyticus strain. In contrast to E. coli, where the hemolysin was detected only in cell lysates, introduction of the cloned gene into V. parahaemolyticus resulted in the production of extracellular hemolysin. Images PMID:3988703

  5. Gene and translation initiation site prediction in metagenomic sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Hyatt, Philip Douglas; LoCascio, Philip F; Hauser, Loren John; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2012-01-01

    Gene prediction in metagenomic sequences remains a difficult problem. Current sequencing technologies do not achieve sufficient coverage to assemble the individual genomes in a typical sample; consequently, sequencing runs produce a large number of short sequences whose exact origin is unknown. Since these sequences are usually smaller than the average length of a gene, algorithms must make predictions based on very little data. We present MetaProdigal, a metagenomic version of the gene prediction program Prodigal, that can identify genes in short, anonymous coding sequences with a high degree of accuracy. The novel value of the method consists of enhanced translation initiation site identification, ability to identify sequences that use alternate genetic codes and confidence values for each gene call. We compare the results of MetaProdigal with other methods and conclude with a discussion of future improvements.

  6. Photoregulation of a phytochrome gene promoter from oat transferred into rice by particle bombardment.

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, W B; Christensen, A H; Klein, T; Fromm, M; Quail, P H

    1989-01-01

    The regulatory photoreceptor phytochrome controls the transcription of its own phy genes in a negative feedback fashion. We have exploited microprojectile-mediated gene transfer to develop a rapid transient expression assay system for the study of DNA sequences involved in the phytochrome-regulated expression of these genes. The 5'-flanking sequence and part of the structural region of an oat phy gene have been fused to a reporter coding sequence (chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, CAT) and introduced into intact darkgrown seedlings by using high-velocity microprojectiles. Expression is assayable in less than 24 hr from bombardment. The introduced oat phy-CAT fusion gene is expressed and down-regulated by white light in barley, rice, and oat, whereas no expression is detected in three dicots tested, tobacco, cucumber, and Arabidopsis thaliana. In bombarded rice shoots, red/far-red light-reversible repression of expression of the heterologous oat phy-CAT gene shows that it is regulated by phytochrome in a manner parallel to that of the endogenous rice phy genes. These data indicate that the transduction pathway components and promoter sequences involved in autoregulation of phy expression have been evolutionarily conserved between oat and rice. The experiments show the feasibility of using high-velocity microprojectile-mediated gene transfer for the rapid analysis of light-controlled monocot gene promoters in monocot tissues that until now have been recalcitrant to such studies. Images PMID:2602370

  7. Identification of genes in genomic and EST sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, C.; Adams, M.D.; Kerlavage, A.R.; Dubnick, M.; McCombie, W.R.; Martin-Gallardo, A.; Venter, J.C.; White, O.

    1993-12-31

    Currently-available software tools are capable of predicting the locations of most protein-coding genes in anonymous genomic DNA sequences. The use of predicted exxon to select primers for PCR amplification from cDNA libraries allows the complete structures of novel genes to be determined efficiently. As the number of expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences increases, the fraction of genes that can be localized in genomic sequences by searching EST databases will rapidly approach unity. The challenge for automated DNA sequence analysis is now to develop methods for accurately predicting gene structure and alternative splicing patterns. Substantially improving current accuracies in gene structure prediction will require retrospective comparative analysis of sequences from different organisms and gene families.

  8. A cis-regulatory sequence from a short intergenic region gives rise to a strong microbe-associated molecular pattern-responsive synthetic promoter.

    PubMed

    Lehmeyer, Mona; Hanko, Erik K R; Roling, Lena; Gonzalez, Lilian; Wehrs, Maren; Hehl, Reinhard

    2016-06-01

    The high gene density in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves only relatively short intergenic regions for potential cis-regulatory sequences. To learn more about the regulation of genes harbouring only very short upstream intergenic regions, this study investigates a recently identified novel microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-responsive cis-sequence located within the 101 bp long intergenic region upstream of the At1g13990 gene. It is shown that the cis-regulatory sequence is sufficient for MAMP-responsive reporter gene activity in the context of its native promoter. The 3' UTR of the upstream gene has a quantitative effect on gene expression. In context of a synthetic promoter, the cis-sequence is shown to achieve a strong increase in reporter gene activity as a monomer, dimer and tetramer. Mutation analysis of the cis-sequence determined the specific nucleotides required for gene expression activation. In transgenic A. thaliana the synthetic promoter harbouring a tetramer of the cis-sequence not only drives strong pathogen-responsive reporter gene expression but also shows a high background activity. The results of this study contribute to our understanding how genes with very short upstream intergenic regions are regulated and how these regions can serve as a source for MAMP-responsive cis-sequences for synthetic promoter design. PMID:26833485

  9. Type 1 plaminogen activator inhibitor gene: Functional analysis and glucocorticoid regulation of its promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Van Zonneveld, A.J.; Curriden, S.A.; Loskutoff, D.J. )

    1988-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 is an important component of the fibrinolytic system and its biosynthesis is subject to complex regulation. To study this regulation at the level of transcription, the authors have identified and sequenced the promoter of the human plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene. Nuclease protection experiments were performed by using endothelial cell mRNA and the transcription initiation (cap) site was established. Sequence analysis of the 5{prime} flanking region of the gene revealed a perfect TATA box at position {minus}28 to position {minus}23, the conserved distance from the cap site. Comparative functional studies with the firefly luciferase gene as a reporter gene showed that fragments derived from this 5{prime} flanking region exhibited high promoter activity when transfected into bovine aortic endothelial cells and mouse Ltk{sup {minus}} fibroblasts but were inactive when introduced into HeLa cells. These studies indicate that the fragments contain the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 promoter and that it is expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Although the fragments were also silent in rat FTO2B hepatoma cells, their promoter activity could be induced up to 40-fold with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. Promoter deletion mapping experiments and studies involving the fusion of promoter fragments to a heterologous gene indicated that dexamethasone induction is mediated by a glucocorticoid responsive element with enhancer-like properties located within the region between nucleotides {minus}305 and +75 of the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene.

  10. Brain-specific genes have identifier sequences in their introns.

    PubMed Central

    Milner, R J; Bloom, F E; Lai, C; Lerner, R A; Sutcliffe, J G

    1984-01-01

    The 82-nucleotide identifier (ID) sequence is present in the rat genome in 1-1.5 X 10(5) copies and in cDNA clones of precursors of brain-specific mRNAs. One brain-specific gene contains more than one ID sequence in its introns. There is an excess of ID sequences to brain genes, and some ID sequences appear to have been inserted as mobile elements into other genetic locations. Therefore, brain genes contain ID sequences in their introns, but not all ID sequences are located in brain gene introns. A brain ID consensus sequence has been obtained by comparing 8 ID nucleotide sequences. Images PMID:6583673

  11. Identification and characterization of the human XIST gene promoter: implications for models of X chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Hendrich, B D; Plenge, R M; Willard, H F

    1997-01-01

    The XIST gene in both humans and mice is expressed exclusively from the inactive X chromosome and is required for X chromosome inactivation to occur early in development. In order to understand transcriptional regulation of the XIST gene, we have identified and characterized the human XIST promoter and two repeated DNA elements that modulate promoter activity. As determined by reporter gene constructs, the XIST minimal promoter is constitutively active at high levels in human male and female cell lines and in transgenic mice. We demonstrate that this promoter activity is dependent in vitro upon binding of the common transcription factors SP1, YY1 and TBP. We further identify two cis -acting repeated DNA sequences that influence reporter gene activity. First, DNA fragments containing a set of highly conserved repeats located within the 5'-end of XIST stimulate reporter activity 3-fold in transiently transfected cell lines. Second, a 450 bp alternating purine-pyrimidine repeat located 25 kb upstream of the XIST promoter partially suppresses promoter activity by approximately 70% in transient transfection assays. These results indicate that the XIST promoter is constitutively active and that critical steps in the X inactivation process must involve silencing of XIST on the active X chromosome by factors that interact with and/or recognize sequences located outside the minimal promoter. PMID:9185579

  12. Molecular cloning and characterization of the promoter region of the porcine apolipoprotein E gene.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jihan; Hu, Bingjun; Mu, Yulian; Xin, Leilei; Yang, Shulin; Li, Kui

    2014-05-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE), a component of lipoproteins plays an important role in the transport and metabolism of cholesterol, and is associated with hyperlipoproteinemia and Alzheimer's disease. In order to further understand the characterization of APOE gene, the promoter of APOE gene of Landrace pigs was analyzed in the present study. The genomic structure and amino acid sequence in pigs were analyzed and found to share high similarity in those of human but low similarity in promoter region. Real-time PCR revealed the APOE gene expression pattern of pigs in diverse tissues. The highest expression level was observed in liver, relatively low expression in other tissues, especially in stomach and muscle. Furthermore, the promoter expressing in Hepa 1-6 was significantly better at driving luciferase expression compared with C2C12 cell. After analysis of porcine APOE gene promoter regions, potential transcription factor binding sites were predicted and two GC signals, a TATA box were indicated. Results of promoter activity analysis indicated that one of potential regulatory elements was located in the region -669 to -259, which was essential for a high expression of the APOE gene. Promoter mutation and deletion analysis further suggested that the C/EBPA binding site within the APOE promoter was responsible for the regulation of APOE transcription. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays also showed the binding site of the transcription factor C/EBPA. This study advances our knowledge of the promoter of the porcine APOE gene. PMID:24464129

  13. The TATA-less promoter of VP1, a plant gene controlling seed germination.

    PubMed

    Carrari, F; Frankel, N; Lijavetzky, D; Benech-Arnold, R; Sánchez, R; Iusem, N D

    2001-01-01

    Vp1 is a seed-specific gene involved in the control of dormancy and germination. We here present the complete sequence of the sorghum vp1 promoter/enhancer region highlighting its main features, especially the lack of canonical TATA and CAAT boxes and the presence of elements responsive to abscisic acid and light. The region closest to the start of transcription is highly homologous to the partial proximal sequence reported for the maize vp1 promoter. This region is interrupted by a 57-nt stretch containing 14 CT microsatellite repeats. We observed a poor overall homology to the promoter from abi3 gene, the Arabidopsis counterpart bearing a similar coding sequence. However, there exists a high degree of homology (89%) between a TATA-rich 103-bp stretch of the sorghum vp1 promoter located about 700 nt upstream of the startpoint and miniature inverted transposable elements (MITEs) interspersed within the sorghum seed-specific kafirin cluster. This sorghum MITE-like element displays considerable homology (68%) to the TATA-less promoter from the sorghum NADP-malate dehydrogenase gene and lesser similarity to the Tourist, Pilgrim and Batuta MITEs previously identified within the promoter from the maize Abp1 (auxin-binding protein) gene. PMID:11761708

  14. The complete sequence of soybean chlorotic mottle virus DNA and the identification of a novel promoter.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, A; Verver, J; Shimada, A; Saito, M; Goldbach, R; Van Kammen, A; Miki, K; Kameya-Iwaki, M; Hibi, T

    1989-12-11

    The complete nucleotide sequence of an infectious clone of soybean chlorotic mottle virus (SoyCMV) DNA was determined and compared with those of three other caulimoviruses, cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV), carnation etched ring virus and figwort mosaic virus. The double-stranded DNA genome of SoyCMV (8,175 bp) contained nine open reading frames (ORFs) and one large intergenic region. The primer binding sites, gene organization and size of ORFs were similar to those of the other caulimoviruses, except for ORF I, which was split into ORF Ia and Ib. The amino acid sequences deduced from each ORF showed only short, highly homologous regions in several of the corresponding ORFs of the three other caulimoviruses. A promoter fragment of 378 bp in SoyCMV ORF III showed a strong expression activity, comparable to that of the CaMV 35S promoter, in tobacco mesophyll protoplasts as determined by a beta-glucuronidase assay using electrotransfection. The fragment contained CAAT and TATA boxes but no transcriptional enhancer signal as reported for the CaMV 35S promoter. Instead, it had sequences homologous to a part of the translational enhancer signal reported for the 5'-leader sequence of tobacco mosaic virus RNA. PMID:2602148

  15. Excision of plastid marker genes using directly repeated DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Mudd, Elisabeth A; Madesis, Panagiotis; Avila, Elena Martin; Day, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Excision of marker genes using DNA direct repeats makes use of the predominant homologous recombination pathways present in the plastids of algae and plants. The method is simple, efficient, and widely applicable to plants and microalgae. Marker excision frequency is dependent on the length and number of directly repeated sequences. When two repeats are used a repeat size of greater than 600 bp promotes efficient excision of the marker gene. A wide variety of sequences can be used to make the direct repeats. Only a single round of transformation is required, and there is no requirement to introduce site-specific recombinases by retransformation or sexual crosses. Selection is used to maintain the marker and ensure homoplasmy of transgenic plastid genomes. Release of selection allows the accumulation of marker-free plastid genomes generated by marker excision, which is spontaneous, random, and a unidirectional process. Positive selection is provided by linking marker excision to restoration of the coding region of an herbicide resistance gene from two overlapping but incomplete coding regions. Cytoplasmic sorting allows the segregation of cells with marker-free transgenic plastids. The marker-free shoots resulting from direct repeat-mediated excision of marker genes have been isolated by vegetative propagation of shoots in the T0 generation. Alternatively, accumulation of marker-free plastid genomes during growth, development and flowering of T0 plants allows the collection of seeds that give rise to a high proportion of marker-free T1 seedlings. The simplicity and convenience of direct repeat excision facilitates its widespread use to isolate marker-free crops. PMID:24599849

  16. Expression of multi-functional cellulase gene mfc in Coprinus cinereus under control of different basidiomycete promoters.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shujie; Yang, Peizhou; Guo, Liqiong; Lin, Junfang; Lou, Nannan

    2009-10-01

    Multi-functional cellulase gene mfc was expressed in Coprinus cinereus under naturally non-inductive conditions using three heterologous promoters. Endo-beta-1,4-glucanase expression was achieved in solid and liquid media with promoter sequences from the Lentinula edodesgpd gene, the Flammulina velutipes gpd gene and the Volvariella volvaceagpd gene. As measured by enzyme activity in liquid cultures, a 613-bp gpd promoter fragment from L. edodes was most efficient, followed by a 752-bp gpd fragment from F. velutipes. The V. volvacea gpd promoter sequence was less active, in comparison. Irrespective of the promoter used, enzymatic activities increase 34-fold for highly active transformants and 29-fold for less active one by using cellulase-inducing medium. The highest activities of endo-beta-1,4-glucanase (34.234 U/ml) and endo-beta-1,4-xylanase (263.695 U/ml) were reached by using the L. edodesgpd promoter. PMID:19442518

  17. Using shotgun sequence data to find active restriction enzyme genes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Posfai, Janos; Morgan, Richard D; Vincze, Tamas; Roberts, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    Whole genome shotgun sequence analysis has become the standard method for beginning to determine a genome sequence. The preparation of the shotgun sequence clones is, in fact, a biological experiment. It determines which segments of the genome can be cloned into Escherichia coli and which cannot. By analyzing the complete set of sequences from such an experiment, it is possible to identify genes lethal to E. coli. Among this set are genes encoding restriction enzymes which, when active in E. coli, lead to cell death by cleaving the E. coli genome at the restriction enzyme recognition sites. By analyzing shotgun sequence data sets we show that this is a reliable method to detect active restriction enzyme genes in newly sequenced genomes, thereby facilitating functional annotation. Active restriction enzyme genes have been identified, and their activity demonstrated biochemically, in the sequenced genomes of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987 and Methylococcus capsulatus. PMID:18988632

  18. Complete genome sequence of the rapeseed plant-growth promoting Serratia plymuthica strain AS9

    SciTech Connect

    Neupane, Saraswoti; Hogberg, Nils; Alstrom, Sadhna; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Lu, Megan; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Fiebig, Anne; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Pagani, Ioanna; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Finlay, Roger D.

    2012-01-01

    Serratia plymuthica are plant-associated, plant beneficial species belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. The members of the genus Serratia are ubiquitous in nature and their life style varies from endophytic to free-living. S. plymuthica AS9 is of special interest for its ability to inhibit fungal pathogens of rapeseed and to promote plant growth. The genome of S. plymuthica AS9 comprises a 5,442,880 bp long circular chromosome that consists of 4,952 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome is part of the project entitled Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens awarded through the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010).

  19. Complete genome sequence of the rapeseed plant-growth promoting Serratia plymuthica strain AS9

    PubMed Central

    Högberg, Nils; Alström, Sadhna; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Lu, Megan; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Tapia, Roxanne; Fiebig, Anne; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Finlay, Roger D.

    2012-01-01

    Serratia plymuthica are plant-associated, plant beneficial species belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. The members of the genus Serratia are ubiquitous in nature and their life style varies from endophytic to free-living. S. plymuthica AS9 is of special interest for its ability to inhibit fungal pathogens of rapeseed and to promote plant growth. The genome of S. plymuthica AS9 comprises a 5,442,880 bp long circular chromosome that consists of 4,952 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome is part of the project entitled “Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens” awarded through the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010). PMID:22675598

  20. Nucleotide sequence of the gene for human prothrombin

    SciTech Connect

    Degen, S.J.F.; Davie, E.W.

    1987-09-22

    A human genomic DNA library was screened for the gene coding for human prothrombin with a cDNA coding for the human protein. Eighty-one positive lambda phage were identified, and three were chosen for further characterization. These three phage hybridized with 5' and/or 3' probes prepared from the prothrombin cDNA. The complete DNA sequence of 21 kilobases of the human prothrombin gene was determined and included a 4.9-kilobase region that was previously sequenced. The gene for human prothrombin contains 14 exons separated by 13 intervening sequences. The exons range in size from 25 to 315 base pairs, while the introns range from 84 to 9447 base pairs. Ninety percent of the gene is composed of intervening sequence. All the intron splice junctions are consistent with sequences found in other eukaryotic genes, except for the presence of GC rather than GT on the 5' end of intervening sequence L. Thirty copies of Alu repetitive DNA and two copies of partial KpnI repeats were identified in clusters within several of the intervening sequences, and these repeats represent 40% of the DNA sequence of the gene. The size, distribution, and sequence homology of the introns within the gene were the compared to those of the genes for the other vitamin K dependent proteins and several other serine proteases.

  1. Genome Sequencing of a Mung Bean Plant Growth Promoting Strain of P. aeruginosa with Biocontrol Ability

    PubMed Central

    Illakkiam, Devaraj; Shankar, Manoharan; Ponraj, Paramasivan; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PGPR2 is a mung bean rhizosphere strain that produces secondary metabolites and hydrolytic enzymes contributing to excellent antifungal activity against Macrophomina phaseolina, one of the prevalent fungal pathogens of mung bean. Genome sequencing was performed using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine generating 1,354,732 reads (6,772,433 sequenced bases) achieving ~25-fold coverage of the genome. Reference genome assembly using MIRA 3.4.0 yielded 198 contigs. The draft genome of PGPR2 encoded 6803 open reading frames, of which 5314 were genes with predicted functions, 1489 were genes of known functions, and 80 were RNA-coding genes. Strain specific and core genes of P. aeruginosa PGPR2 that are relevant to rhizospheric habitat were identified by pangenome analysis. Genes involved in plant growth promoting function such as synthesis of ACC deaminase, indole-3-acetic acid, trehalose, mineral scavenging siderophores, hydrogen cyanide, chitinases, acyl homoserine lactones, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, and phytases were identified. In addition, niche-specific genes such as phosphate solubilising 3-phytase, adhesins, pathway-specific transcriptional regulators, a diguanylate cyclase involved in cellulose synthesis, a receptor for ferrienterochelin, a DEAD/DEAH-box helicase involved in stress tolerance, chemotaxis/motility determinants, an HtpX protease, and enzymes involved in the production of a chromanone derivative with potent antifungal activity were identified. PMID:25184130

  2. Regulation of sesquiterpene cyclase gene expression. Characterization of an elicitor- and pathogen-inducible promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Yin, S; Mei, L; Newman, J; Back, K; Chappell, J

    1997-01-01

    The promoter for a tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) sesquiterpene cyclase gene, a key regulatory step in sesquiterpene phytoalexin biosynthesis, has been analyzed. The EAS4 promoter was fused to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene, and the temporal and spatial expression patterns of GUS activity were examined in stably transformed plants and in transient expression assays using electroporated protoplasts of tobacco. No GUS activity was observed in any tissues under normal growth conditions. A low level of GUS activity was detected in wounded leaf, root, and stem tissues, whereas a much higher level was observed when these tissues were challenged with elicitors or microbial pathogens. The GUS expression pattern directed by the EAS4 promoter was identical to the induction patterns observed for the endogenous sesquiterpene cyclase genes. Neither exogenous salicylic acid nor methyl jasmonate induced GUS expression; and H2O2 induced GUS expression to only a limited extent. Although the EAS4 promoter contains cis-sequences resembling previously identified transcriptional control motifs, other cis-sequences important for quantitative and qualitative gene expression were identified by deletion and gain-of-function analyses. The EAS4 promoter differs from previously described pathogen-/elicitor-inducible promoters because it only supports inducible gene expression and directs unique spatial expression patterns. PMID:9342864

  3. Identification of distal silencing elements in the murine interferon-A11 gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Roffet, P; Lopez, S; Navarro, S; Bandu, M T; Coulombel, C; Vignal, M; Doly, J; Vodjdani, G

    1996-01-01

    The murine interferon-A11 (Mu IFN-A11) gene is a member of the IFN-A multigenic family. In mouse L929 cells, the weak response of the gene's promoter to viral induction is due to a combination of both a point mutation in the virus responsive element (VRE) and the presence of negatively regulating sequences surrounding the VRE. In the distal part of the promoter, the negatively acting E1E2 sequence was delimited. This sequence displays an inhibitory effect in either orientation or position on the inducibility of a virus-responsive heterologous promoter. It selectively represses VRE-dependent transcription but is not able to reduce the transcriptional activity of a VRE-lacking promoter. In a transient transfection assay, an E1E2-containing DNA competitor was able to derepress the native Mu IFN-A11 promoter. Specific nuclear factors bind to this sequence; thus the binding of trans-regulators participates in the repression of the Mu IFN-A11 gene. The E1E2 sequence contains an IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-binding site. Recombinant IRF2 binds this sequence and anti-IRF2 antibodies supershift a major complex formed with nuclear extracts. The protein composing the complex is 50 kDa in size, indicating the presence of IRF2 or antigenically related proteins in the complex. The Mu IFN-A11 gene is the first example within the murine IFN-A family, in which a distal promoter element has been identified that can negatively modulate the transcriptional response to viral induction. PMID:8760352

  4. Heterologous gene expression driven by carbonic anhydrase gene promoter in Dunaliella salina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yurong; Lu, Yumin; Wang, Tianyun; Hou, Weihong; Xue, Lexun

    2006-12-01

    Dunaliella salina, a halotolerant unicellular green alga without a rigid cell wall, can live in salinities ranging from 0.05 to 5 mol/L NaCl. These features of D. salina make it an ideal host for the production of antibodies, oral vaccine, and commercially valuable polypeptides. To produce high level of heterologous proteins from D. salina, highly efficient promoters are required to drive expression of target genes under controlled condition. In the present study, we cloned a 5' franking region of 1.4 kb from the carbonic anhydrase ( CAH) gene of D. salina by genomic walking and PCR. The fragment was ligated to the pMD18-T vector and characterized. Sequence analysis indicated that this region contained conserved motifs, including a TATA- like box and CAAT-box. Tandem (GT)n repeats that had a potential role of transcriptional control, were also found in this region. The transcription start site (TSS) of the CAH gene was determined by 5' RACE and nested PCR method. Transformation assays showed that the 1.4 kb fragment was able to drive expression of the selectable bar (bialaphos resistance) gene when the fusion was transformed into D. salina by biolistics. Northern blotting hybridizations showed that the bar transcript was most abundant in cells grown in 2 mol/L NaCl, and less abundant in 0.5 mol/L NaCl, indicating that expression of the bar gene was induced at high salinity. These results suggest the potential use of the CAH gene promoter to induce the expression of heterologous genes in D. salina under varied salt condition.

  5. Nonessential region of bacteriophage P4: DNA sequence, transcription, gene products, and functions.

    PubMed Central

    Ghisotti, D; Finkel, S; Halling, C; Dehò, G; Sironi, G; Calendar, R

    1990-01-01

    We sequenced the leftmost 2,640 base pairs of bacteriophage P4 DNA, thus completing the sequence of the 11,627-base-pair P4 genome. The newly sequenced region encodes three nonessential genes, which are called gop, beta, and cII (in order, from left to right). The gop gene product kills Escherichia coli when the beta protein is absent; the gop and beta genes are transcribed rightward from the same promoter. The cII gene is transcribed leftward to a rho-independent terminator. Mutation of this terminator creates a temperature-sensitive phenotype, presumably owing to a defect in expression of the beta gene. Images PMID:2403440

  6. Recognition of Yeast Species from Gene Sequence Comparisons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review discusses recognition of yeast species from gene sequence comparisons, which have been responsible for doubling the number of known yeasts over the past decade. The resolution provided by various single gene sequences is examined for both ascomycetous and basidiomycetous species, and th...

  7. Reclassification of ascomycetous yeasts from gene sequence analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the past decade, identification of yeasts and their classification has been based almost exclusively on gene sequence analysis. Primarily as a result of using diagnostic gene sequences, such as D1/D2 LSU and ITS ribosomal RNAs, the number of known species has doubled. With the faster sequen...

  8. Organization and sequence of the human alpha-lactalbumin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, L; Emery, D C; Davies, M S; Parker, D; Craig, R K

    1987-01-01

    A recombinant bacteriophage containing the entire alpha-lactalbumin gene was isolated from a human genomic library constructed in bacteriophage lambda L47. Within this recombinant the 2.5 kb alpha-lactalbumin gene is flanked by about 5 kb of sequence on either side. The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene and its immediate flanking sequences were determined and compared with those of the rat alpha-lactalbumin gene. These studies showed that the size, organization and sequence of the exons have been highly conserved, whereas the introns have diverged considerably. In particular, the first intron of the human gene was found to contain an Alu repetitive sequence not present in the rat. A high degree of homology (67%) was also observed in the 5' flanking regions, extending as far as 655 nucleotide residues upstream of the transcriptional initiation site. Comparison of the 5' flanking sequences of these two alpha-lactalbumin genes with those of five casein genes has revealed the presence of a highly conserved region [consensus sequence: RGAAGRAAA(N)TGGACAGAAATCAA(CG)TTTCTA], extending from position -140 to -110 in all seven sequences examined, suggesting a possible regulatory role in the hormonal control or tissue-specific expression of milk protein genes in the mammary gland. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2954544

  9. Motif discovery in promoters of genes co-localized and co-expressed during myeloid cells differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Coppe, Alessandro; Ferrari, Francesco; Bisognin, Andrea; Danieli, Gian Antonio; Ferrari, Sergio; Bicciato, Silvio; Bortoluzzi, Stefania

    2009-01-01

    Genes co-expressed may be under similar promoter-based and/or position-based regulation. Although data on expression, position and function of human genes are available, their true integration still represents a challenge for computational biology, hampering the identification of regulatory mechanisms. We carried out an integrative analysis of genomic position, functional annotation and promoters of genes expressed in myeloid cells. Promoter analysis was conducted by a novel multi-step method for discovering putative regulatory elements, i.e. over-represented motifs, in a selected set of promoters, as compared with a background model. The combination of transcriptional, structural and functional data allowed the identification of sets of promoters pertaining to groups of genes co-expressed and co-localized in regions of the human genome. The application of motif discovery to 26 groups of genes co-expressed in myeloid cells differentiation and co-localized in the genome showed that there are more over-represented motifs in promoters of co-expressed and co-localized genes than in promoters of simply co-expressed genes (CEG). Motifs, which are similar to the binding sequences of known transcription factors, non-uniformly distributed along promoter sequences and/or occurring in highly co-expressed subset of genes were identified. Co-expressed and co-localized gene sets were grouped in two co-expressed genomic meta-regions, putatively representing functional domains of a high-level expression regulation. PMID:19059999

  10. Evaluation of a novel promoter from Populus trichocarpa for mature xylem tissue specific gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Phap; Cho, Jin-Seong; Choi, Young-Im; Lee, Sang-Won; Han, Kyung-Hwan; Ko, Jae-Heung

    2016-07-01

    Wood (i.e., secondary xylem) is an important raw material for many industrial applications. Mature xylem (MX) tissue-specific genetic modification offers an effective means to improve the chemical and physical properties of the wood. Here, we describe a promoter that drives strong gene expression in a MX tissue-specific manner. Using whole-transcriptome genechip analyses of different tissue types of poplar, we identified five candidate genes that had strong expression in the MX tissue. The putative promoter sequences of the five MX-specific genes were evaluated for their promoter activity in both transgenic Arabidopsis and poplar. Among them, we found the promoter of Potri.013G007900.1 (called the PtrMX3 promoter) had the strongest activity in MX and thus was further characterized. In the stem and root tissues of transgenic Arabidopsis plants, the PtrMX3 promoter activity was found exclusively in MX tissue. MX-specific activity of the promoter was reproduced in the stem tissue of transgenic poplar plants. The PtrMX3 promoter activity was not influenced by abiotic stresses or exogenously applied growth regulators, indicating the PtrMX3 promoter is bona fide MX tissue-specific. Our study provides a strong MX-specific promoter for MX-specific modifications of woody biomass. PMID:27038601

  11. Isolation and characterization of a polyubiquitin gene and its promoter region from Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    PubMed

    Azad, Muhammad Abul Kalam; Morita, Kunio; Ohnishi, Jun-ichi; Kore-eda, Shin

    2013-01-01

    Transcript levels of the polyubiquitin gene McUBI1 had been reported to be constant during Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) induction in the facultative CAM plant, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum. Here, we report the sequences of the full-length cDNA of McUBI1 and its promoter, and validation of the McUBI1 promoter as an internal control driving constitutive expression in transient assays using the dual-luciferase system to investigate the regulation of CAM-related gene expression. The McUBI1 promoter drove strong, constitutive expression during CAM induction. We compared the activities of this promoter with those of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter in detached C3- and CAM-performing M. crystallinum and tobacco leaves. We confirmed stable expression of the genes controlled by the McUBI1 promoter with far less variability than under the CaMV 35S promoter in M. crystallinum, whereas both promoters worked well in tobacco. We found the McUBI1 promoter more suitable than the CaMV 35S promoter as an internal control for transient expression assays in M. crystallinum. PMID:23470760

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Strain Co1-6, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium of Calendula officinalis

    PubMed Central

    White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; Spanberger, Nora; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with broad-spectrum antagonistic activity against plant-pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes, consists of a single 3.9-Mb circular chromosome. The genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol and PGP properties. PMID:26272562

  13. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium of Calendula officinalis

    SciTech Connect

    Koeberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; Spanberger, Nora; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-13

    The genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with broad-spectrum antagonistic activities against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria and nematodes, consists of a single 3.9 Mb circular chromosome. The genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol and PGP properties.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium of Calendula officinalis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; Spanberger, Nora; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-13

    The genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with broad-spectrum antagonistic activity against plant-pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes, consists of a single 3.9-Mb circular chromosome. The genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol and PGP properties.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus methylotrophicus FKM10, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Isolated from Apple Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chengqiang; Hu, Xiuna; Liu, Kai; Hou, Qihui; Yang, Qianqian

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus methylotrophicus FKM10 is a strain of plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium with antimicrobial activity, which was isolated from apple rhizosphere. Here, we present the genome sequence of B. methylotrophicus FKM10. Two scaffolds were finally assembled, and several functional genes related to its antimicrobial activity were discovered. PMID:26868409

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Brevibacillus brevis DZQ7, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium with Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qihui; Wang, Chengqiang; Hou, Xiaoyang; Xia, Zhilin; Ye, Jiangping; Liu, Kai; Liu, Hu; Wang, Jun; Guo, Haimeng; Yu, Xiaoning; Yang, Yanan; Du, Binghai; Ding, Yanqin

    2015-01-01

    Brevibacillus brevis DZQ7 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) isolated from tobacco rhizosphere. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. brevis DZQ7. Several functional genes related to antimicrobial activity were identified in the genome. PMID:26294619

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus methylotrophicus FKM10, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Isolated from Apple Rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengqiang; Hu, Xiuna; Liu, Kai; Hou, Qihui; Yang, Qianqian; Ding, Yanqin; Du, Binghai

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus methylotrophicus FKM10 is a strain of plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium with antimicrobial activity, which was isolated from apple rhizosphere. Here, we present the genome sequence of B. methylotrophicus FKM10. Two scaffolds were finally assembled, and several functional genes related to its antimicrobial activity were discovered. PMID:26868409

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Strain Co1-6, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium of Calendula officinalis.

    PubMed

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A; Erschen, Sabine; Spanberger, Nora; El-Arabi, Tarek F; Jansson, Janet K; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with broad-spectrum antagonistic activity against plant-pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes, consists of a single 3.9-Mb circular chromosome. The genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol and PGP properties. PMID:26272562

  19. Fusion genes and their discovery using high throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Annala, M J; Parker, B C; Zhang, W; Nykter, M

    2013-11-01

    Fusion genes are hybrid genes that combine parts of two or more original genes. They can form as a result of chromosomal rearrangements or abnormal transcription, and have been shown to act as drivers of malignant transformation and progression in many human cancers. The biological significance of fusion genes together with their specificity to cancer cells has made them into excellent targets for molecular therapy. Fusion genes are also used as diagnostic and prognostic markers to confirm cancer diagnosis and monitor response to molecular therapies. High-throughput sequencing has enabled the systematic discovery of fusion genes in a wide variety of cancer types. In this review, we describe the history of fusion genes in cancer and the ways in which fusion genes form and affect cellular function. We also describe computational methodologies for detecting fusion genes from high-throughput sequencing experiments, and the most common sources of error that lead to false discovery of fusion genes. PMID:23376639

  20. Regulation of the promoter of rat apolipoprotein A-I gene in cultured cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Y.; Pan, T.; Wu, T.; Hao, Q.; Yamin, T.; Kroon, P.A.

    1987-05-01

    In order to study the regulation of the promoter of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I gene, they joined the 5' end of rat apo A-I gene (1.9 Kb) to the coding region of bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. The chimeric gene produced high levels of CAT activity in both mouse L cells and Hep G2 cells in transient expression assays. Ethanol increased the levels of rat apo A-I promoter activity in both cells. However, dexamethasone increased rat apo A-I promoter activity only in Hep G2 cells. Similar results were obtained in stable expression cell lines. Nucleotide deletion experiments showed DNA sequences between -149 and -469 base pairs upstream from the rat apo A-I transcription site are required for the high level of expression and that the regulatory sequences are located further upstream. These data demonstrated that the 5' end of rat apo A-I gene contains sequences which are responsible for the regulation of apo A-I expression by ethanol and dexamethasone and that the expression and regulation of rat apo A-I promoter are cell specific.

  1. Identification of a novel first exon in the human dystrophin gene and of a new promoter located more than 500 kb upstream of the nearest known promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagawa, H.; Nishio, H.; Takeshima, Y.

    1994-09-01

    The dystrophin gene, which is muted in patients with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies, is the largest known human gene. Five alternative promoters have been characterized until now. Here we show that a novel dystrophin isoform with a different first exon can be produced through transcription initiation at a previously-unidentified alternative promoter. The case study presented is that of patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who had a deletion extending from 5{prime} end of the dystrophin gene to exon 2, including all promoters previously mapped in the 5{prime} part of the gene. Transcripts from lymphoblastoid cells were found to contain sequences corresponding to exon 3, indicating the presence of new promoter upstream of this exon. The nucleotide sequence of amplified cDNA corresponding to the 5{prime} end of the new transcript indicated that the 5{prime} end of exon 3 was extended by 9 codons, only the last (most 3{prime}) of which codes for methionine. The genomic nucleotide sequence upstream from the new exon, as determined using inverse polymerase chain reaction, revealed the presence of sequences similar to a TATA box, an octamer motif and an MEF-2 element. The identified promoter/exon did not map to intron 2, as might have been expected, but to a position more than 500 kb upstream of the most 5{prime} of the previously-identified promoters, thereby adding 500 kb to the dystrophin gene. The sequence of part of the new promoter region is very similar to that of certain medium reiteration frequency repetitive sequences. These findings may help us understand the molecular evolution of the dystrophin gene.

  2. A sequencing strategy for identifying variation throughout the prion gene of BSE-affected cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle prion gene (PRNP) polymorphisms have been associated with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) susceptibility. We developed a method for sequencing bovine PRNP through all exons, introns and part of the promoter (25.2 kb) that accounts for known variation. The method can be used to detect...

  3. Tuning Gene Expression in Yarrowia lipolytica by a Hybrid Promoter Approach▿†

    PubMed Central

    Blazeck, John; Liu, Leqian; Redden, Heidi; Alper, Hal

    2011-01-01

    The development of strong and tunable promoter elements is necessary to enable metabolic and pathway engineering applications for any host organism. Here, we have expanded and generalized a hybrid promoter approach to produce libraries of high-expressing, tunable promoters in the nonconventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. These synthetic promoters are comprised of two modular components: the enhancer element and the core promoter element. By exploiting this basic promoter architecture, we have overcome native expression limitations and provided a strategy for both increasing the native promoter capacity and producing libraries for tunable gene expression in a cellular system with ill-defined genetic tools. In doing so, this work has created the strongest promoters ever reported for Y. lipolytica. Furthermore, we have characterized these promoters at the single-cell level through the use of a developed fluorescence-based assay as well as at the transcriptional and whole-cell levels. The resulting promoter libraries exhibited a range of more than 400-fold in terms of mRNA levels, and the strongest promoters in this set had 8-fold-higher fluorescence levels than those of typically used endogenous promoters. These results suggest that promoters in Y. lipolytica are enhancer limited and that this limitation can be partially or fully alleviated through the addition of tandem copies of upstream activation sequences (UASs). Finally, this work illustrates that tandem copies of UAS regions can serve as synthetic transcriptional amplifiers that may be generically used to increase the expression levels of promoters. PMID:21926196

  4. Sequence-directed nucleosome-depletion is sufficient to activate transcription from a yeast core promoter in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Yuichi; Morohashi, Nobuyuki; Tomita, Nobuyuki; Mitchell, Aaron P; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Shimizu, Mitsuhiro

    2016-07-22

    Nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs) (also called nucleosome-free regions or NFRs) are often found in the promoter regions of many yeast genes, and are formed by multiple mechanisms, including the binding of activators and enhancers, the actions of chromatin remodeling complexes, and the specific DNA sequences themselves. However, it remains unclear whether NDR formation per se is essential for transcriptional activation. Here, we examined the relationship between nucleosome organization and gene expression using a defined yeast reporter system, consisting of the CYC1 minimal core promoter and the lacZ gene. We introduced simple repeated sequences that should be either incorporated in nucleosomes or excluded from nucleosomes in the site upstream of the TATA boxes. The (CTG)12, (GAA)12 and (TGTAGG)6 inserts were incorporated into a positioned nucleosome in the core promoter region, and did not affect the reporter gene expression. In contrast, the insertion of (CGG)12, (TTAGGG)6, (A)34 or (CG)8 induced lacZ expression by 10-20 fold. Nucleosome mapping analyses revealed that the inserts that induced the reporter gene expression prevented nucleosome formation, and created an NDR upstream of the TATA boxes. Thus, our results demonstrated that NDR formation dictated by DNA sequences is sufficient for transcriptional activation from the core promoter in vivo. PMID:27208777

  5. Cloning and partial characterization of the mouse glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (GFAT) gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Sayeski, P P; Wang, D; Su, K; Han, I O; Kudlow, J E

    1997-01-01

    Glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (GFAT) is the enzyme that is rate limiting in the synthesis of glucosamine and hexosamines. Glucosamine has been proposed to contribute to the glucotoxicity of diabetes. Evidence that the gene encoding GFAT is transcriptionally regulated prompted us to clone and characterize its promoter. The position of the mouse GFAT promoter relative to the translational start site was located by primer extension and found to be 149 bp upstream of the translational start site. A 1.9 kb SacI fragment of the GFAT gene was found to contain the promoter and 88 bp of sequence downstream of the transcriptional start site. This promoter segment could drive expression of a luciferase reporter gene, could confer correct transcriptional initiation to the reporter and could confer the EGF-responsiveness previously observed in the native gene. The mouse GFAT promoter lacks a canonical TATA box and has several GC boxes within a highly GC-rich region. Deletional analysis of the promoter indicated that a proximal element extending to -120 relative to the transcriptional start site could confer reporter expression at a level of 57% of the 1.9 kb construct. Detailed analysis of this proximal region by DNase I footprinting, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and site-directed mutagenesis indicated that Sp1 binds to three elements in this proximal promoter segment and plays a vital role in regulation of transcription from this gene. PMID:9060444

  6. Sequence homologies in the protamine gene family of rainbow trout.

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, J M; McKenzie, D; Zhao, H Z; States, J C; Dixon, G H

    1983-01-01

    We have sequenced five different rainbow trout protamine genes plus their flanking regions. The genes are not clustered and do not contain intervening sequences. There is an extremely high degree of sequence conservation in the coding and 3' untranslated regions of the gene. Downstream sequences exhibit little homology though conserved regions are found 250 base pairs 3' to the gene. There are four regions upstream of the gene that are highly conserved in the six clones, including the canonical Goldberg - Hogness box which is 45 base pairs 5' to the coding region. A second homologous region is found 90 bases upstream. Although in the same approximate location as the CAAT box found upstream of other genes, it does not contain the canonical CAAT sequence. Further upstream of the protamine genes at -115 there is an A-T rich sequence while a 25 base pair conserved sequence is located 150 bases upstream. In addition we report the presence of a potential Z-DNA region of predominantly A-C repeats approximately one kilobase downstream of one of the genes. Images PMID:6308564

  7. Insect and wound induced GUS gene expression from a Beta vulgaris proteinase inhibitor gene promoter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inducible gene promoters that are specifically activated by pathogen invasion or insect pest attack are needed for effective expression of resistance genes to control plant diseases. In the present study, a promoter from a serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) shown to be up-regulated in resist...

  8. Overlapping activator sequences determined for two oppositely oriented promoters in halophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Martina; Marschaus, Larissa; Reuff, Muriel; Besche, Verena; Sartorius-Neef, Simone; Pfeifer, Felicitas

    2008-01-01

    Transcription of the genomic region involved in gas vesicle formation in Halobacterium salinarum (p-vac) and Haloferax mediterranei (mc-vac) is driven by two divergent promoters, PA and PD, separated by only 35 nt. Both promoters are activated by the transcription activator GvpE which in the case of PmcA requires a 20-nt sequence (UAS) consisting of two conserved 8-nt sequence portions located upstream of BRE. Here, we determined the two UAS elements in the promoter region of p-vac by scanning mutageneses using constructs containing PpD (without PpA) fused to the bgaH reporter gene encoding an enzyme with β-galactosidase activity, or the dual reporter construct pApD with PpD fused to bgaH and PpA to an altered version of gvpA. The two UAS elements found exhibited a similar extension and distance to BRE as previously determined for the UAS in PmcA. Their distal 8-nt portions almost completely overlapped in the centre of PpD–PpA, and mutations in this region negatively affected the GvpE-mediated activation of both promoters. Any alteration of the distance between BRE and UAS resulted in the loss of the GvpE activation, as did a complete substitution of the proximal 8-nt portion, underlining that a close location of UAS and BRE was very important. PMID:18056077

  9. A viral satellite DNA vector-induced transcriptional gene silencing via DNA methylation of gene promoter in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ju, Zheng; Wang, Lei; Cao, Dongyan; Zuo, Jinhua; Zhu, Hongliang; Fu, Daqi; Luo, Yunbo; Zhu, Benzhong

    2016-09-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has been widely used for plant functional genomics study at the post-transcriptional level using various DNA or RNA viral vectors. However, while virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing (VITGS) via DNA methylation of gene promoter was achieved using several plant RNA viral vectors, it has not yet been done using a satellite DNA viral vector. In this study, a viral satellite DNA associated with tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV), which has been modified as a VIGS vector in previous research, was developed as a VITGS vector. Firstly, the viral satellite DNA VIGS vector was further optimized to a more convenient p1.7A+2mβ vector with high silencing efficiency of the phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Secondly, the constructed VITGS vector (TYLCCNV:35S), which carried a portion of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, could successfully induce heritable transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene in the 35S-GFP transgenic N. benthamiana line 16c plants. Moreover, bisulfite sequencing results revealed higher methylated cytosine residues at CG, CHG and CHH sites of the 35S promoter sequence in TYLCCNV:35S-inoculated plants than in TYLCCNV-inoculated line 16c plants (control). Overall, these results demonstrated that the viral satellite DNA vector could be used as an effective VITGS vector to study DNA methylation in plant genomes. PMID:27422476

  10. Structural analysis and promoter characterization of the human collagenase-3 gene (MMP13)

    SciTech Connect

    Pendas, A.M.; Balbin, M.; Llano, E.

    1997-03-01

    Human collagenase-3 (MMP13) is a recently identified member of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family that is expressed in breast carcinomas and in articular cartilage from arthritic patients. In this work we have isolated and characterized genomic clones coding for human collagenase-3. This gene is composed of 10 exons and 9 introns and spans over 12.5 kb. The overall organization of the collagenase-3 gene is similar to that of other MMP genes clustered at chromosome 11q22, including fibroblast collagenase (MMP-1), matrilysin (MMP-7), and macrophage metalloelastase (MMP-12), but is more distantly related to genes coding for stromelysin-3 (MMP-11), gelatinase-A (MMP-2), and gelatinase-B (MMP-9), which map outside of this gene cluster. Nucleotide sequence analysis of about 1 kb of the 5{prime}-flanking region of the collagenase-3 gene revealed the presence of a TATA box, an AP-1 motif, a PEA-3 consensus sequence, an osteoblast specific element (OSE-2), and a TGF-{beta} inhibitory element. Transient transfection experiments in HeLa and COS-1 cells with chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT)-containing constructs showed that the AP-1 site is functional and responsible for the observed inducibility of the reporter gene by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). However, and in contrast to other MMP genes, no significative synergistic effect on CAT activity between the AP-1 and PEA-3 elements found in the collagenase-3 gene promoter was found. DNA binding analysis with nuclear extracts from HeLa cells revealed the formation of specific complexes between collagenase-3 promoter sequences containing the AP-1 site and nuclear proteins. The presence of this AP-1 functional site, which is able to confer responsiveness to a variety of tumor promoters and oncogene products, may contribute to explaining the high-level expression of collagenase-3 in breast carcinomas and degenerative joint diseases. 48 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Nucleotide sequence of SHV-2 beta-lactamase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Garbarg-Chenon, A.; Godard, V.; Labia, R.; Nicolas, J.C. )

    1990-07-01

    The nucleotide sequence of plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase SHV-2 from Salmonella typhimurium (SHV-2pHT1) was determined. The gene was very similar to chromosomally encoded beta-lactamase LEN-1 of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Compared with the sequence of the Escherichia coli SHV-2 enzyme (SHV-2E.coli) obtained by protein sequencing, the deduced amino acid sequence of SHV-2pHT1 differed by three amino acid substitutions.

  12. Optimization of gene sequences under constant mutational pressure and selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczuk, M.; Gierlik, A.; Mackiewicz, P.; Cebrat, S.; Dudek, M. R.

    1999-12-01

    We have analyzed the influence of constant mutational pressure and selection on the nucleotide composition of DNA sequences of various size, which were represented by the genes of the Borrelia burgdorferi genome. With the help of MC simulations we have found that longer DNA sequences accumulate much less base substitutions per sequence length than short sequences. This leads us to the conclusion that the accuracy of replication may determine the size of genome.

  13. Alu sequence involvement in transcriptional insulation of the keratin 18 gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Thorey, I S; Ceceña, G; Reynolds, W; Oshima, R G

    1993-01-01

    The human keratin 18 (K18) gene is expressed in a variety of adult simple epithelial tissues, including liver, intestine, lung, and kidney, but is not normally found in skin, muscle, heart, spleen, or most of the brain. Transgenic animals derived from the cloned K18 gene express the transgene in appropriate tissues at levels directly proportional to the copy number and independently of the sites of integration. We have investigated in transgenic mice the dependence of K18 gene expression on the distal 5' and 3' flanking sequences and upon the RNA polymerase III promoter of an Alu repetitive DNA transcription unit immediately upstream of the K18 promoter. Integration site-independent expression of tandemly duplicated K18 transgenes requires the presence of either an 825-bp fragment of the 5' flanking sequence or the 3.5-kb 3' flanking sequence. Mutation of the RNA polymerase III promoter of the Alu element within the 825-bp fragment abolishes copy number-dependent expression in kidney but does not abolish integration site-independent expression when assayed in the absence of the 3' flanking sequence of the K18 gene. The characteristics of integration site-independent expression and copy number-dependent expression are separable. In addition, the formation of the chromatin state of the K18 gene, which likely restricts the tissue-specific expression of this gene, is not dependent upon the distal flanking sequences of the 10-kb K18 gene but rather may depend on internal regulatory regions of the gene. Images PMID:7692231

  14. DNA sequence and expression of the 36-kilodalton outer membrane protein gene of Brucella abortus.

    PubMed Central

    Ficht, T A; Bearden, S W; Sowa, B A; Adams, L G

    1989-01-01

    The cloning of the gene(s) encoding a 36-kilodalton (kDa) cell envelope protein of Brucella abortus has been previously described (T. A. Ficht, S. W. Bearden, B. A. Sowa, and L. G. Adams, Infect, Immun. 56:2036-2046, 1988). In an attempt to define the nature of the previously described duplication at this locus we have sequenced 3,500 base pairs of genomic DNA encompassing this region. The duplication represented two similar open reading frames which shared more than 85% homology at the nucleotide level but differed primarily because of the absence of 108 nucleotides from one of the two gene copies. These two genes were read from opposite strands and potentially encoded proteins which are 96% homologous. The predicted gene products were identical over the first 100 amino acids, including 22-amino-acid-long signal sequences. The amino acid composition of the predicted proteins was similar to that obtained for the Brucella porin isolated by Verstreate et al. (D. R. Verstreate, M. T. Creasy, N. T. Caveney, C. L. Baldwin, M. W. Blab, and A. J. Winter, Infect. Immun. 35:979-989, 1982) and presumably represented two copies of the porin gene, tentatively identified as omp 2a (silent) and omp 2b (expressed). The homology between the two genes extended to and included Shine-Dalgarno sequences 7 base pairs upstream from the ATG start codons. Homology at the 3' ends extended only as far as the termination codon, but both genes had putative rho-independent transcription termination sites. Localization of the promoters proved more difficult, since the canonical procaryotic sequences could not be identified in the region upstream of either gene. Promoter activity was demonstrated by ligation to a promoterless lacZ gene in pMC1871. However, only one active promoter could be identified by using this system. A 36-kDa protein was synthesized in E. coli with the promoter in the native orientation and was identical in size to the protein produced in laboratory-grown B. abortus. When

  15. Characterization of the promoter, signal sequence, and amino terminus of a secreted beta-galactosidase from "Streptomyces lividans".

    PubMed Central

    Eckhardt, T; Strickler, J; Gorniak, L; Burnett, W V; Fare, L R

    1987-01-01

    The gene for a secreted 130-kilodalton beta-galactosidase from "Streptomyces lividans" has been cloned, its promoter, signal sequence, and amino terminal region have been localized, and their nucleotide sequence has been determined. The signal sequence extends over 56 amino acids and shows the characteristic-features of signal sequences, including a hydrophilic amino terminus followed by a hydrophobic core near the signal cleavage site. The secretion of beta-galactosidase depends on the presence of the signal sequence. beta-Galactosidase is the major protein in culture supernatants and extracts of strains expressing the cloned beta-galactosidase gene and represents a valuable tool in the study of protein secretion in Streptomyces spp. Images PMID:2442141

  16. Genomic organization and 5{prime}-flanking DNA sequence of the murine stomatin gene (Epb72)

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, P.G.; Turetsky, T.; Mentzer, W.C.

    1996-06-15

    Stomatin is a poorly understood integral membrane protein that is absent from the erythrocyte membranes of many patients with hereditary stomatocytosis. This report describes the cloning of the murine stomatin chromosomal gene, determination of its genomic structure, and characterization of the 5{prime}-flanking genomic DNA sequences. The stomatin gene is encoded by seven exons spread over {approximately}25 kb of genomic DNA. There is no concordance between the exon structure of the stomatin gene and the locations of three domains predicted on the basis of protein structure. Inspection of the 5{prime}-flanking DNA sequences reveals features of a TATA-less housekeeping gene promoter and consensus sequences for a number of potential DNA-binding proteins. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Characterization of the human p53 gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, S.P.; Crawford, L.

    1989-05-01

    Transcriptional deregulation of the p53 gene may play an important part in the genesis of some tumors. The authors report here an accurate determination of the transcriptional start sites of the human p53 gene and show that the majority of p53 mRNA molecules do not contain a postulated stem-loop structure at their 5' ends. Recombinant plasmids of the human p53 promoter-leader region fused to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (cat) were constructed. After transfection into rodent or human cells, a 350-base-pair fragment spanning the promoter region conferred 4% of the CAT activity mediated by the simian virus 40 early promoter/enhancer. They monitored the efficiency with which 15 3' and 5' promoter deletion constructs initiated transcription. Their results show that an 85-base-pair fragment, previously thought to have resided in exon 1, is that is required for full promoter activity.

  18. Hematopoietic gene promoters subjected to a group-combinatorial study of DNA samples: identification of a megakaryocytic selective DNA signature

    PubMed Central

    Hazony, Yehonathan; Lu, Jun; St. Hilaire, Cynthia; Ravid, Katya

    2006-01-01

    Identification of common sub-sequences for a group of functionally related DNA sequences can shed light on the role of such elements in cell-specific gene expression. In the megakaryocytic lineage, no one single unique transcription factor was described as linage specific, raising the possibility that a cluster of gene promoter sequences presents a unique signature. Here, the megakaryocytic gene promoter group, which consists of both human and mouse 5′ non-coding regions, served as a case study. A methodology for group-combinatorial search has been implemented as a customized software platform. It extracts the longest common sequences for a group of related DNA sequences and allows for single gaps of varying length, as well as double- and multiple-gap sequences. The results point to common DNA sequences in a group of genes that is selectively expressed in megakaryocytes, and which does not appear in a large group of control, random and specific sequences. This suggests a role for a combination of these sequences in cell-specific gene expression in the megakaryocytic lineage. The data also point to an intrinsic cross-species difference in the organization of 5′ non-coding sequences within the mammalian genomes. This methodology may be used for the identification of regulatory sequences in other lineages. PMID:16936310

  19. Classification of Arabidopsis thaliana gene sequences: clustering of coding sequences into two groups according to codon usage improves gene prediction.

    PubMed

    Mathé, C; Peresetsky, A; Déhais, P; Van Montagu, M; Rouzé, P

    1999-02-01

    While genomic sequences are accumulating, finding the location of the genes remains a major issue that can be solved only for about a half of them by homology searches. Prediction methods are thus required, but unfortunately are not fully satisfying. Most prediction methods implicitly assume a unique model for genes. This is an oversimplification as demonstrated by the possibility to group coding sequences into several classes in Escherichia coli and other genomes. As no classification existed for Arabidopsis thaliana, we classified genes according to the statistical features of their coding sequences. A clustering algorithm using a codon usage model was developed and applied to coding sequences from A. thaliana, E. coli, and a mixture of both. By using it, Arabidopsis sequences were clustered into two classes. The CU1 and CU2 classes differed essentially by the choice of pyrimidine bases at the codon silent sites: CU2 genes often use C whereas CU1 genes prefer T. This classification discriminated the Arabidopsis genes according to their expressiveness, highly expressed genes being clustered in CU2 and genes expected to have a lower expression, such as the regulatory genes, in CU1. The algorithm separated the sequences of the Escherichia-Arabidopsis mixed data set into five classes according to the species, except for one class. This mixed class contained 89 % Arabidopsis genes from CU1 and 11 % E. coli genes, mostly horizontally transferred. Interestingly, most genes encoding organelle-targeted proteins, except the photosynthetic and photoassimilatory ones, were clustered in CU1. By tailoring the GeneMark CDS prediction algorithm to the observed coding sequence classes, its quality of prediction was greatly improved. Similar improvement can be expected with other prediction systems. PMID:9925779

  20. Precise nucleosome positioning in the promoter of the chicken beta A globin gene.

    PubMed

    Kefalas, P; Gray, F C; Allan, J

    1988-01-25

    Histone octamers were reconstituted onto 5' end-labelled DNA fragments derived from the promoter region of the chicken beta A globin gene. The location of the reconstituted histone octamer with respect to the DNA sequence of each fragment was assessed by Exonuclease III digestion of purified nucleosome monomers. By this approach we have found a strong preference for histone octamers to be positioned over nucleotides -206 to -62 relative to the gene cap site. This stretch of DNA contains all those 5' beta globin sequences which, by DNase footprinting, bind specific protein factors and incorporates three promoter consensus sequence motifs. The upstream terminal 32 base pairs of this DNA segment contains the binding sites for the erythrocyte specific G-string binding protein and transcription factor Spl and appears to be relatively weakly bound to the histone octamer. PMID:3340546

  1. Precise nucleosome positioning in the promoter of the chicken beta A globin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kefalas, P; Gray, F C; Allan, J

    1988-01-01

    Histone octamers were reconstituted onto 5' end-labelled DNA fragments derived from the promoter region of the chicken beta A globin gene. The location of the reconstituted histone octamer with respect to the DNA sequence of each fragment was assessed by Exonuclease III digestion of purified nucleosome monomers. By this approach we have found a strong preference for histone octamers to be positioned over nucleotides -206 to -62 relative to the gene cap site. This stretch of DNA contains all those 5' beta globin sequences which, by DNase footprinting, bind specific protein factors and incorporates three promoter consensus sequence motifs. The upstream terminal 32 base pairs of this DNA segment contains the binding sites for the erythrocyte specific G-string binding protein and transcription factor Spl and appears to be relatively weakly bound to the histone octamer. Images PMID:3340546

  2. Single molecule targeted sequencing for cancer gene mutation detection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Deng, Liwei; Yan, Qin; Gao, Yongqian; Wu, Zengding; Cai, Jinsen; Ji, Daorui; Li, Gailing; Wu, Ping; Jin, Huan; Zhao, Luyang; Liu, Song; Ge, Liangjin; Deem, Michael W; He, Jiankui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid decline in cost of sequencing, it is now affordable to examine multiple genes in a single disease-targeted clinical test using next generation sequencing. Current targeted sequencing methods require a separate step of targeted capture enrichment during sample preparation before sequencing. Although there are fast sample preparation methods available in market, the library preparation process is still relatively complicated for physicians to use routinely. Here, we introduced an amplification-free Single Molecule Targeted Sequencing (SMTS) technology, which combined targeted capture and sequencing in one step. We demonstrated that this technology can detect low-frequency mutations using artificially synthesized DNA sample. SMTS has several potential advantages, including simple sample preparation thus no biases and errors are introduced by PCR reaction. SMTS has the potential to be an easy and quick sequencing technology for clinical diagnosis such as cancer gene mutation detection, infectious disease detection, inherited condition screening and noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. PMID:27193446

  3. Single molecule targeted sequencing for cancer gene mutation detection

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Deng, Liwei; Yan, Qin; Gao, Yongqian; Wu, Zengding; Cai, Jinsen; Ji, Daorui; Li, Gailing; Wu, Ping; Jin, Huan; Zhao, Luyang; Liu, Song; Ge, Liangjin; Deem, Michael W.; He, Jiankui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid decline in cost of sequencing, it is now affordable to examine multiple genes in a single disease-targeted clinical test using next generation sequencing. Current targeted sequencing methods require a separate step of targeted capture enrichment during sample preparation before sequencing. Although there are fast sample preparation methods available in market, the library preparation process is still relatively complicated for physicians to use routinely. Here, we introduced an amplification-free Single Molecule Targeted Sequencing (SMTS) technology, which combined targeted capture and sequencing in one step. We demonstrated that this technology can detect low-frequency mutations using artificially synthesized DNA sample. SMTS has several potential advantages, including simple sample preparation thus no biases and errors are introduced by PCR reaction. SMTS has the potential to be an easy and quick sequencing technology for clinical diagnosis such as cancer gene mutation detection, infectious disease detection, inherited condition screening and noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. PMID:27193446

  4. Efficiency of ligation-mediated PCR and TAIL-PCR methods for isolation of RbcS promoter sequences from green microalgae Ankistrodesmus convolutus.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Tran; Chi, Vu Thi Quynh; Abdullah, Mohd Puad; Omar, Hishamuddin; Napis, Suhaimi

    2012-01-01

    Isolation of promoter sequences from known gene sequences is a tedious task in genome-related research. An efficient method of obtaining the promoter sequences is necessary in order to successfully use targeted promoters for genetic manipulations. Here, efficiency and usefulness of two PCR-based methods, namely: ligation-mediated PCR and thermal asymmetric interlaced (TAIL) PCR, for isolation of promoter sequences of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit (RbcS) gene from green microalgae Ankistrodesmus convolutus (A. convolutus) were evaluated. The results showed that the amplification efficiency of TAIL-PCR was higher than that of the ligation-mediated PCR method, i.e. the amplified promoter fragments of 1.2 and 0.8 kb in length or promoter sequences of 813 and 606 bp (after eliminating the unreadable sequences). The use of TAIL-PCR described here presents a low cost and efficient strategy for the isolation of promoter sequences of known genes, especially in GC-rich regions, and species with little or no available genome information such as A. convolutus. PMID:22642102

  5. Different promoter affinities account for specificity in MYC-dependent gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzin, Francesca; Benary, Uwe; Baluapuri, Apoorva; Walz, Susanne; Jung, Lisa Anna; von Eyss, Björn; Kisker, Caroline; Wolf, Jana; Eilers, Martin; Wolf, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced expression of the MYC transcription factor is observed in the majority of tumors. Two seemingly conflicting models have been proposed for its function: one proposes that MYC enhances expression of all genes, while the other model suggests gene-specific regulation. Here, we have explored the hypothesis that specific gene expression profiles arise since promoters differ in affinity for MYC and high-affinity promoters are fully occupied by physiological levels of MYC. We determined cellular MYC levels and used RNA- and ChIP-sequencing to correlate promoter occupancy with gene expression at different concentrations of MYC. Mathematical modeling showed that binding affinities for interactions of MYC with DNA and with core promoter-bound factors, such as WDR5, are sufficient to explain promoter occupancies observed in vivo. Importantly, promoter affinity stratifies different biological processes that are regulated by MYC, explaining why tumor-specific MYC levels induce specific gene expression programs and alter defined biological properties of cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15161.001 PMID:27460974

  6. Genetic analysis of the TBX3 gene promoter in ventricular septal defects.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongfeng; Qiao, Yanli; Meng, Haihong; Pang, Shuchao; Huang, Wenhui; Zhang, Hongyu; Yan, Bo

    2013-01-10

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common birth defect in humans. Genetic causes and underlying molecular mechanisms for CHD remain largely unknown. T-box transcription factor 3 (TBX3) plays a critical role in the developing heart in a dose-dependent manner. TBX3 represses chamber myocardial gene expression. Mutations in TBX3 gene have been associated to ulnar-mammary syndrome with multiple developmental defects, including cardiac defects. We hypothesized that the sequence variants within TBX3 gene promoter that change TBX3 levels may mediate CHD development. In this study, TBX3 gene promoter was genetically analyzed in large cohorts of patients with ventricular septal defect (VSD) (n=325) and ethnic-matched healthy controls (n=359). Seven sequence variants, including two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (g.3863 C>T and g.4095G>T), three novel deletions (g.4433_4435del, g.4672_4675del and g.4820_4821del) and two novel insertions (g.3913_3914ins and g.4735_4736ins), were identified. Five of the seven variants were identified in VSD patients and controls with similar frequencies. Two other variants were found only in controls. These variants, which were observed in high frequencies, did not modify or interrupt the critical binding site for basic transcription factors. Taken together, these results suggested that the sequence variants within the TBX3 gene promoter did not contribute to VSD etiology. PMID:23116943

  7. Functional elements of the promoter region of the Aspergillus oryzae glaA gene encoding glucoamylase.

    PubMed

    Hata, Y; Kitamoto, K; Gomi, K; Kumagai, C; Tamura, G

    1992-08-01

    Analysis was made of the promoter region of the Aspergillus oryzae glaA gene encoding glucoamylase. Northern blots using a glucoamylase cDNA as a probe indicated that the amount of mRNA corresponding to the glaA gene increased when expression was induced by starch or maltose. The promoter region of the glaA gene was fused to the Escherichia coli uidA gene, encoding beta-glucuronidase (GUS), and the resultant plasmid was introduced into A. oryzae. Expression of GUS protein in the A. oryzae transformants was induced by maltose, indicating that the glaA-GUS gene was regulated at the level of transcription in the presence of maltose. The nucleotide sequence 1.1 kb upstream of the glaA coding region was determined. A comparison of the nucleotide sequence of the A. oryzae glaA promoter with those of A. oryzae amyB, encoding alpha-amylase, and A. niger glaA showed two regions with similar sequences. Deletion and site-specific mutation analysis of these homologous regions indicated that both are essential for direct high-level expression when grown on maltose. PMID:1339327

  8. Cloning, sequence, and expression of a lipase gene from Pseudomonas cepacia: lipase production in heterologous hosts requires two Pseudomonas genes.

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, S; Skov, K W; Diderichsen, B

    1991-01-01

    The lipA gene encoding an extracellular lipase from Pseudomonas cepacia was cloned and sequenced. Downstream from the lipase gene an open reading frame was identified, and the corresponding gene was named limA. lipA was well expressed only in the presence of limA. limA exerts its effect both in cis and in trans and therefore produces a diffusible gene product, presumably a protein of 344 amino acids. Replacement of the lipA expression signals (promoter, ribosome-binding site, and signal peptide-coding sequences) by heterologous signals from gram-positive bacteria still resulted in limA-dependent lipA expression in Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Streptomyces lividans. Images PMID:1987151

  9. The regulation of the Oct-1 gene transcription is mediated by two promoters.

    PubMed

    Pankratova, Elizaveta V; Sytina, Elena V; Luchina, Nadejda N; Krivega, Ivan V

    2003-07-01

    The ubiquitous transcription factor Oct-1 is a member of the POU domain family of regulatory proteins. Target genes controlled by Oct-1 include housekeeping genes, e.g. the genes encoding histon H2B or snRNAs, as well as tissue-specific genes, e.g. the genes encoding the light and heavy chains of immunoglobulines, some interleukins, and others. Oct-1 pre-mRNA may be spliced in several ways, resulting in production of several protein isoforms that may differ functionally. The 5'-end of the Oct-1 gene contains two exons-exon 1U and exon 1L that alternatively present in Oct-1 mRNA. We studied regulation of transcription of the Oct-1 gene using reporter gene assays of promoter-luciferase gene-constructs. It was shown that transcription of the Oct-1 gene is regulated by two promoters located upstream of the exon 1U and upstream of the exon 1L. The promoter located upstream of the exon 1U contains G/C-rich sequences and multiple Sp1 sites, while the promoter located upstream of the exon 1L contains A/T-rich motifs and autoregulation-related cis-elements: two octamer sites ATGCAAAT, two octamer related sites and multiple TAAT-core sites. Exons 1U and 1L in the human OTF-1 locus encoding the Oct-1 gene are located at the distance of 108 kbp. In the murine locus otf-1 the distance between exons 1U and 1L is 67 kbp. We suggest that the two promoters can differ functionally. PMID:12853155

  10. Degenerative primer design and gene sequencing validation for select turkey genes.

    PubMed

    Hutsko, Stephanie L; Lilburn, Michael S; Wick, Macdonald

    2016-06-01

    We successfully designed and validated degenerative primers for turkey genes MUC2, RPS13, TBP and TFF2 based on chicken sequences in order to use gene transcription analysis to evaluate (quantify) the mucin transcription to probiotic supplementation in turkeys. Primers were designed for the genes MUC2, TFF2, RPS13 and TBP using a degenerative primer design method based on the available Gallus gallus sequences. All primer sets, which produced a single PCR amplicon of the expected sizes, were cloned into the TOPO(®) vector and then transformed into TOP 10(®) competent cells. Plasmid DNA isolation was performed on the TOP10(®) cell culture and sent for sequencing. Sequences were analyzed using NCBI BLAST. All genes sequenced had over 90% homology with both the chicken and predicted turkey sequences. The sequences were used to design new 100% homologous primer sets for the genes of interest. PMID:27053625

  11. Nucleotide sequence and expression of the gene encoding the EcoRII modification enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Som, S; Bhagwat, A S; Friedman, S

    1987-01-01

    The gene coding for the EcoRII modification enzyme has been cloned and the nucleotide sequence of 1933 base pairs containing the gene has been determined. The gene codes for a protein of 477 amino acids. Two transcriptional start sites have been mapped by S1 mapping. One deletion that removes 34 N-terminal amino acids was found to have partial enzyme activity. Comparison of the EcoRII methylase sequence with other cytosine methylases revealed several domains of partial homology among all cytosine methylases. Cloning the gene in multicopy pUC vectors increased the expression by 6-18 fold. A 40 fold overproduction of the EcoRII methylase was obtained by cloning the gene in the expression vector carrying the lambda PL promoter. Images PMID:3029675

  12. Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth Promoting Endophytic Bacterium Enterobacter sp. 638

    PubMed Central

    Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel; Hoffman, Adam; Zhang, Yian-Biao; Walla, Michael D.; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Newman, Lee; Monchy, Sébastien

    2010-01-01

    Enterobacter sp. 638 is an endophytic plant growth promoting gamma-proteobacterium that was isolated from the stem of poplar (Populus trichocarpa×deltoides cv. H11-11), a potentially important biofuel feed stock plant. The Enterobacter sp. 638 genome sequence reveals the presence of a 4,518,712 bp chromosome and a 157,749 bp plasmid (pENT638-1). Genome annotation and comparative genomics allowed the identification of an extended set of genes specific to the plant niche adaptation of this bacterium. This includes genes that code for putative proteins involved in survival in the rhizosphere (to cope with oxidative stress or uptake of nutrients released by plant roots), root adhesion (pili, adhesion, hemagglutinin, cellulose biosynthesis), colonization/establishment inside the plant (chemiotaxis, flagella, cellobiose phosphorylase), plant protection against fungal and bacterial infections (siderophore production and synthesis of the antimicrobial compounds 4-hydroxybenzoate and 2-phenylethanol), and improved poplar growth and development through the production of the phytohormones indole acetic acid, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol. Metabolite analysis confirmed by quantitative RT–PCR showed that, the production of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol is induced by the presence of sucrose in the growth medium. Interestingly, both the genetic determinants required for sucrose metabolism and the synthesis of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol are clustered on a genomic island. These findings point to a close interaction between Enterobacter sp. 638 and its poplar host, where the availability of sucrose, a major plant sugar, affects the synthesis of plant growth promoting phytohormones by the endophytic bacterium. The availability of the genome sequence, combined with metabolome and transcriptome analysis, will provide a better understanding of the synergistic interactions between poplar and its growth promoting endophyte Enterobacter sp. 638. This information can be further exploited to

  13. Conserved cis-regulatory modules in promoters of genes encoding wheat high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits

    PubMed Central

    Ravel, Catherine; Fiquet, Samuel; Boudet, Julie; Dardevet, Mireille; Vincent, Jonathan; Merlino, Marielle; Michard, Robin; Martre, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The concentration and composition of the gliadin and glutenin seed storage proteins (SSPs) in wheat flour are the most important determinants of its end-use value. In cereals, the synthesis of SSPs is predominantly regulated at the transcriptional level by a complex network involving at least five cis-elements in gene promoters. The high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) are encoded by two tightly linked genes located on the long arms of group 1 chromosomes. Here, we sequenced and annotated the HMW-GS gene promoters of 22 electrophoretic wheat alleles to identify putative cis-regulatory motifs. We focused on 24 motifs known to be involved in SSP gene regulation. Most of them were identified in at least one HMW-GS gene promoter sequence. A common regulatory framework was observed in all the HMW-GS gene promoters, as they shared conserved cis-regulatory modules (CCRMs) including all the five motifs known to regulate the transcription of SSP genes. This common regulatory framework comprises a composite box made of the GATA motifs and GCN4-like Motifs (GLMs) and was shown to be functional as the GLMs are able to bind a bZIP transcriptional factor SPA (Storage Protein Activator). In addition to this regulatory framework, each HMW-GS gene promoter had additional motifs organized differently. The promoters of most highly expressed x-type HMW-GS genes contain an additional box predicted to bind R2R3-MYB transcriptional factors. However, the differences in annotation between promoter alleles could not be related to their level of expression. In summary, we identified a common modular organization of HMW-GS gene promoters but the lack of correlation between the cis-motifs of each HMW-GS gene promoter and their level of expression suggests that other cis-elements or other mechanisms regulate HMW-GS gene expression. PMID:25429295

  14. A novel DNA replication origin identified in the human heat shock protein 70 gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Taira, T; Iguchi-Ariga, S M; Ariga, H

    1994-01-01

    A general and sensitive method for the mapping of initiation sites of DNA replication in vivo, developed by Vassilev and Johnson, has revealed replication origins in the region of simian virus 40 ori, in the regions upstream from the human c-myc gene and downstream from the Chinese hamster dihydrofolate reductase gene, and in the enhancer region of the mouse immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene. Here we report that the region containing the promoter of the human heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) gene was identified as a DNA replication origin in HeLa cells by this method. Several segments of the region were cloned into pUC19 and examined for autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) activity. The plasmids carrying the segments replicated episomally and semiconservatively when transfected into HeLa cells. The segments of ARS activity contained the sequences previously identified as binding sequences for a c-myc protein complex (T. Taira, Y. Negishi, F. Kihara, S. M. M. Iguchi-Ariga, and H. Ariga, Biochem. Biophys. Acta 1130:166-174, 1992). Mutations introduced within the c-myc protein complex binding sequences abolished the ARS activity. Moreover, the ARS plasmids stably replicated at episomal state for a long time in established cell lines. The results suggest that the promoter region of the human hsp70 gene plays a role in DNA replication as well as in transcription. Images PMID:8065368

  15. Modular organization and development activity of an Arabidopsis thaliana EF-1 alpha gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Curie, C; Axelos, M; Bardet, C; Atanassova, R; Chaubet, N; Lescure, B

    1993-04-01

    The activity of the Arabidopsis thalana A1 EF-1 alpha gene promoter was analyzed in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. The 5' upstream sequence of the A1 gene and several promoter deletions were fused to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) coding region. Promoter activity was monitored by quantitative and histochemical assays of GUS activity. The results show that the A1 promoter exhibits a modular organization. Sequences both upstream and downstream relative to the transcription initiation site are involved in quantitative and tissue-specific expression during vegetative growth. One upstream element may be involved in the activation of expression in meristematic tissues; the downstream region, corresponding to an intron within the 5' non-coding region (5'IVS), is important for expression in roots; both upstream and downstream sequences are required for expression in leaves, suggesting combinatorial properties of EF-1 alpha cis-regulatory elements. This notion of specific combinatorial regulation is reinforced by the results of transient expression experiments in transfected Arabidopsis protoplasts. The deletion of the 5'IVS has much more effect on expression when the promoter activity is under the control of A1 EF-1 alpha upstream sequences than when these upstream sequences were replaced by the 35S enhancer. Similarly, a synthetic oligonucleotide corresponding to an A1 EF-1 alpha upstream cis-acting element (the TEF1 box), is able to restore partially the original activity when fused to a TEF1-less EF1-alpha promoter but has no significant effect when fused to an enhancer-less 35S promoter. PMID:8492811

  16. Nucleotide sequence of the regulatory locus controlling expression of bacterial genes for bioluminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Engebrecht, J; Silverman, M

    1987-01-01

    Production of light by the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri and by recombinant hosts containing cloned lux genes is controlled by the density of the culture. Density-dependent regulation of lux gene expression has been shown to require a locus consisting of the luxR and luxI genes and two closely linked divergent promoters. As part of a genetic analysis to understand the regulation of bioluminescence, we have sequenced the region of DNA containing this control circuit. Open reading frames corresponding to luxR and luxI were identified; transcription start sites were defined by S1 nuclease mapping and sequences resembling promoter elements were located. Images PMID:3697093

  17. Methylation Status of Vitamin D Receptor Gene Promoter in Benign and Malignant Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pilon, Catia; Rebellato, Andrea; Urbanet, Riccardo; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Cappellesso, Rocco; Sasano, Hironobu; Fassina, Ambrogio

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed a decreased expression of vitamin D receptor (VDR) mRNA/protein in a small group of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) tissues, suggesting the loss of a protective role of VDR against malignant cell growth in this cancer type. Downregulation of VDR gene expression may result from epigenetics events, that is, methylation of cytosine nucleotide of CpG islands in VDR gene promoter. We analyzed methylation of CpG sites in the VDR gene promoter in normal adrenals and adrenocortical tumor samples. Methylation of CpG-rich 5′ regions was assessed by bisulfite sequencing PCR using bisulfite-treated DNA from archival microdissected paraffin-embedded adrenocortical tissues. Three normal adrenals and 23 various adrenocortical tumor samples (15 adenomas and 8 carcinomas) were studied. Methylation in the promoter region of VDR gene was found in 3/8 ACCs, while no VDR gene methylation was observed in normal adrenals and adrenocortical adenomas. VDR mRNA and protein levels were lower in ACCs than in benign tumors, and VDR immunostaining was weak or negative in ACCs, including all 3 methylated tissue samples. The association between VDR gene promoter methylation and reduced VDR gene expression is not a rare event in ACC, suggesting that VDR epigenetic inactivation may have a role in adrenocortical carcinogenesis. PMID:26843863

  18. Aleurone nuclear proteins bind to similar elements in the promoter regions of two gibberellin-regulated alpha-amylase genes.

    PubMed

    Rushton, P J; Hooley, R; Lazarus, C M

    1992-09-01

    Binding of nuclear proteins from wild oat aleurone protoplasts to the promoter regions of two gibberellin-regulated wheat alpha-amylase genes (alpha-Amy1/18 and alpha-Amy2/54) has been studied by gel retardation and DNase 1 footprinting. Gel retardation studies using 300-430 bp fragments of the promoters showed similar binding characteristics with nuclear extracts from both gibberellin A1-treated and untreated protoplasts. DNase 1 footprints localised binding of nuclear proteins from gibberellin A1-treated aleurone protoplasts to regions in both promoters. Similar sequence elements in the promoter regions of both genes were protected from digestion although the location and number of footprints in each promoter region were different. Each footprint contained either a sequence similar to the cAMP and/or phorbol ester response elements, or a hyphenated palindrome sequence. The presence of cAMP and/or phorbol ester response element-like sequences in the footprints suggests that transcription factors of the bZIP type may be involved in the expression of alpha-amylase genes in aleurone cells. Footprints containing hyphenated palindrome sequences, found in the promoter regions of both genes, suggest the possible involvement of other classes of transcription factor. The conserved alpha-amylase promoter sequence TAA-CAGA was also shown to bind nuclear protein in the alpha-Amy2/54 promoter. These observations are discussed in relation to alpha-amylase gene expression in aleurone and to functional data concerning these genes. PMID:1511135

  19. rpoB Gene Sequencing for Identification of Corynebacterium Species

    PubMed Central

    Khamis, Atieh; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    The genus Corynebacterium is a heterogeneous group of species comprising human and animal pathogens and environmental bacteria. It is defined on the basis of several phenotypic characters and the results of DNA-DNA relatedness and, more recently, 16S rRNA gene sequencing. However, the 16S rRNA gene is not polymorphic enough to ensure reliable phylogenetic studies and needs to be completely sequenced for accurate identification. The almost complete rpoB sequences of 56 Corynebacterium species were determined by both PCR and genome walking methods. In all cases the percent similarities between different species were lower than those observed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, even for those species with degrees of high similarity. Several clusters supported by high bootstrap values were identified. In order to propose a method for strain identification which does not require sequencing of the complete rpoB sequence (approximately 3,500 bp), we identified an area with a high degree of polymorphism, bordered by conserved sequences that can be used as universal primers for PCR amplification and sequencing. The sequence of this fragment (434 to 452 bp) allows accurate species identification and may be used in the future for routine sequence-based identification of Corynebacterium species. PMID:15364970

  20. GeneTack database: genes with frameshifts in prokaryotic genomes and eukaryotic mRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Antonov, Ivan; Baranov, Pavel; Borodovsky, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Database annotations of prokaryotic genomes and eukaryotic mRNA sequences pay relatively low attention to frame transitions that disrupt protein-coding genes. Frame transitions (frameshifts) could be caused by sequencing errors or indel mutations inside protein-coding regions. Other observed frameshifts are related to recoding events (that evolved to control expression of some genes). Earlier, we have developed an algorithm and software program GeneTack for ab initio frameshift finding in intronless genes. Here, we describe a database (freely available at http://topaz.gatech.edu/GeneTack/db.html) containing genes with frameshifts (fs-genes) predicted by GeneTack. The database includes 206 991 fs-genes from 1106 complete prokaryotic genomes and 45 295 frameshifts predicted in mRNA sequences from 100 eukaryotic genomes. The whole set of fs-genes was grouped into clusters based on sequence similarity between fs-proteins (conceptually translated fs-genes), conservation of the frameshift position and frameshift direction (-1, +1). The fs-genes can be retrieved by similarity search to a given query sequence via a web interface, by fs-gene cluster browsing, etc. Clusters of fs-genes are characterized with respect to their likely origin, such as pseudogenization, phase variation, etc. The largest clusters contain fs-genes with programed frameshifts (related to recoding events). PMID:23161689

  1. Promoter region of the human platelet-derived growth factor A-chain gene

    SciTech Connect

    Takimoto, Yasuo; Wang, Zhao Yi; Kobler, K.; Deuel, T.F. )

    1991-03-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) A- and B-chain genes are widely expressed in mammalian tissues and their homodimeric gene products appear to regulate the autocrine growth of both normal and transformed cells. In this study, we analyzed the 5{prime} flanking sequences of the human PDGF A-chain gene to seek elements important to regulating its transcription. The promoter reigon was exceptionally G + C-rich and contained a TATA box but no CAAT box. The transcription start site was identified 845 base pairs 5{prime} to the translation initiation site by S1 nuclease mapping and by primer extension. Both in vitro transcription and transient expression of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene linked to the PDGF A-chain 5{prime} flanking sequences established that the putative promoter region was active, and RNase H mapping established that the three characteristic mRNAs used the same transcription start site, which was used in normal endothelial cells and in two human tumor cell lines that express high levels of A-chain transcripts. The results extablished an exceptionally G + C-rich promoter region and a single transcription start site active for each of the three mRNAs of the PDGF A-chain gene. DNA sites of potential importance in mediating the activation of the PDGF A-chain gene in normal cells and in transformed cell lines expressing high levels of PDGF A-chain were identified.

  2. Characterization of the promoter region of the gene for the rat neutral and basic amino acid transporter and chromosomal localization of the human gene.

    PubMed Central

    Yan, N; Mosckovitz, R; Gerber, L D; Mathew, S; Murty, V V; Tate, S S; Udenfriend, S

    1994-01-01

    The promoter region of the rat kidney neutral and basic amino acid transporter (NBAT) gene has been isolated and sequenced. The major transcription initiation site was mapped by primer extension. The entire promoter region and a set of 5' deletions within it were expressed at a high level in LLC-PK1 cells using the luciferase indicator gene. Positive and negative regulatory elements in the promoter region were observed. A human genomic clone of the transporter was also obtained and was used to localize the NBAT gene at the p21 region of chromosome 2. Images PMID:8052618

  3. Transcriptional promoter of the human alpha 1(V) collagen gene (COL5A1).

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S; Greenspan, D S

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized the 5' region of the human alpha 1(V) collagen gene (COL5A1). The transcriptional promoter is shown to have a number of features characteristic of the promoters of 'housekeeping' and growth-control-related genes. It lacks obvious TATA and CAAT boxes, has multiple transcription start sites, has a high GC content, lies within a well-defined CpG island and has a number of consensus sites for the potential binding of transcription factor Sp1. This type of promoter structure, while unusual for a collagen gene, is consistent with the broad distribution of expression of COL5A1 and is reminiscent of the promoter structures of the genes encoding type VI collagen, which has a similarly broad distribution of expression. Stepwise deletion of COL5A1 5' sequences, placed upstream of a heterologous reporter gene, yielded a gradual decrease in promoter activity, indicating that the COL5A1 promoter is composed of an array of cis-acting elements. A minimal promoter region contained within the 212 bp immediately upstream of the major transcription start site contained no consensus sequences for the binding of known transcription factors, but gel mobility shift assays showed this region to bind nuclear factors, including Sp1, at a number of sites. The major transcription start site is flanked by an upstream 34-bp oligopurine/oligopyrimidine stretch, or 'GAGA' box, and a downstream 56-bp GAGA box which contains a 10-bp mirror repeat and is sensitive to cleavage with S1 nuclease. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:7646438

  4. Limited specificity of promoter constructs for gene therapy in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Pollmann, Annika; Kabisch, Hartmut; Block, Andreas; Müller, Jürgen; Hellwinkel, Olaf J C

    2004-10-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS), a malignant bone neoplasia in childhood, has poor prognosis if metastases appear in the lung. A novel therapeutic approach could consist in a gene therapeutic treatment of OS metastases. However, if promiscuous viral vectors are applied for the delivery of potentially toxic transgenes, their misdelivery into normal tissues could cause severe complications. This problem could be circumvented by application of OS-specific promoters for transgene expression control. We analysed the function of promoters described to be tumour-, osteosarcoma- or osteoblast-specific. Expression rates driven by osteoblast- specific fragments from the collagen1A1-promoter, the human Osteocalcin-promoter, the bone-sialoprotein promoter and the beta-catenin promoter depending on vitamin supplementation were analysed in five OS cell lines, in normal lung fibroblasts and in a non-osteoblastic prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP) by dual luciferase assays. In addition, an unspecific but doxycyclin-repressible promoter construct (pAd.3r-luc) was examined. We found that all constructs were active in OS cell lines to varying extents. The complete human Osteocalcin promoter and the bone-sialoprotein promoter were partially induced by vitamin D3 or C respectively while the pAd.3r-luc activity could be shut down by doxycyclin. In contrast, the human Osteocalcin-promoter was not activated by vitamin D3 in LNCaP cells; its action remained relatively low. Interestingly, excepting the beta-catenin promoter, we measured strong activities of all promoters in lung fibroblast cells. Our study demonstrates that promoter activity should be evaluated not only for the target cells of the gene therapeutic approaches, but also for neighbouring normal tissues. Unspecific but repressible promoters could represent an alternative. PMID:15375610

  5. Promoter library designed for fine-tuned gene expression in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Hartner, Franz S.; Ruth, Claudia; Langenegger, David; Johnson, Sabrina N.; Hyka, Petr; Lin-Cereghino, Geoffrey P.; Lin-Cereghino, Joan; Kovar, Karin; Cregg, James M.; Glieder, Anton

    2008-01-01

    Although frequently used as protein production host, there is only a limited set of promoters available to drive the expression of recombinant proteins in Pichia pastoris. Fine-tuning of gene expression is often needed to maximize product yield and quality. However, for efficient knowledge-based engineering, a better understanding of promoter function is indispensable. Consequently, we created a promoter library by deletion and duplication of putative transcription factor-binding sites within the AOX1 promoter (PAOX1) sequence. This first library initially spanned an activity range between ∼6% and >160% of the wild-type promoter activity. After characterization of the promoter library employing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) variant, the new regulatory toolbox was successfully utilized in a ‘real case’, i.e. the expression of industrial enzymes. Characterization of the library under repressing, derepressing and inducing conditions displayed at least 12 cis-acting elements involved in PAOX1-driven high-level expression. Based on this deletion analysis, novel short artificial promoter variants were constructed by combining cis-acting elements with basal promoter. In addition to improving yields and quality of heterologous protein production, the new PAOX1 synthetic promoter library constitutes a basic toolbox to fine-tune gene expression in metabolic engineering and sequential induction of protein expression in synthetic biology. PMID:18539608

  6. Efficient transcription of the human angiotensin II type 2 receptor gene requires intronic sequence elements.

    PubMed Central

    Warnecke, C; Willich, T; Holzmeister, J; Bottari, S P; Fleck, E; Regitz-Zagrosek, V

    1999-01-01

    To investigate mechanisms of human angiotensin II type 2 receptor (hAT2) gene regulation we functionally characterized the promoter and downstream regions of the gene. 5'-Terminal deletion mutants from -1417/+100 to -46/+100 elicited significant but low functional activity in luciferase reporter gene assays with PC12W cells. Inclusion into the promoter constructs of intron 1 and the transcribed region of the hAT2 gene up to the translation start enhanced luciferase activity 6.7+/-1.6-fold and 11.6+/-1.7-fold (means+/-S.E.M.) respectively, whereas fusion of the promoter to the spliced 5' untranslated region of hAT2 cDNA did not, which indicated an enhancement caused by intronic sequence elements. Reverse transcriptase-mediated PCR confirmed that the chimaeric hAT2-luciferase mRNA was regularly spliced in PC12W cells. A Northern blot analysis of transfected cells showed levels of luciferase mRNA expression consistent with the respective enzyme activities. Mapping of intron 1 revealed that a 12 bp sequence in the centre of the intron was required for the increase in promoter activity, whereas the 5' adjacent intronic region mediated a decrease in luciferase activity. Mutation of the 12 bp region led to altered protein binding and markedly decreased luciferase activity. Cloned into a promoterless luciferase vector, a 123 bp intron 1 fragment was able to direct reporter gene expression to the same activity as occurred in conjunction with the 5' flanking region. These results indicate that sequence elements in intron 1 are necessary for efficient transcription of hAT2. In reporter gene assays, intron 1 might by itself function as a promoter and initiate transcription from an alternative start point. PMID:10229654

  7. A short upstream promoter region mediates transcriptional regulation of the mouse doublecortin gene in differentiating neurons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Doublecortin (Dcx), a MAP (Microtubule-Associated Protein), is transiently expressed in migrating and differentiating neurons and thereby characterizes neuronal precursors and neurogenesis in developing and adult neurogenesis. In addition, reduced Dcx expression during development has been related to appearance of brain pathologies. Here, we attempt to unveil the molecular mechanisms controlling Dcx gene expression by studying its transcriptional regulation during neuronal differentiation. Results To determine and analyze important regulatory sequences of the Dcx promoter, we studied a putative regulatory region upstream from the mouse Dcx coding region (pdcx2kb) and several deletions thereof. These different fragments were used in vitro and in vivo to drive reporter gene expression. We demonstrated, using transient expression experiments, that pdcx2kb is sufficient to control specific reporter gene expression in cerebellar cells and in the developing brain (E14.5). We determined the temporal profile of Dcx promoter activity during neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) and found that transcriptional activation of the Dcx gene varies along with neuronal differentiation of mESC. Deletion experiments and sequence comparison of Dcx promoters across rodents, human and chicken revealed the importance of a highly conserved sequence in the proximal region of the promoter required for specific and strong expression in neuronal precursors and young neuronal cells. Further analyses revealed the presence in this short sequence of several conserved, putative transcription factor binding sites: LEF/TCF (Lymphoid Enhancer Factor/T-Cell Factor) which are effectors of the canonical Wnt pathway; HNF6/OC2 (Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-6/Oncecut-2) members of the ONECUT family and NF-Y/CAAT (Nuclear Factor-Y). Conclusions Studies of Dcx gene regulatory sequences using native, deleted and mutated constructs suggest that fragments located upstream of the

  8. Flagellin gene sequence variation in the genus Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Bellingham, N F; Morgan, J A; Saunders, J R; Winstanley, C

    2001-07-01

    Flagellin gene (fliC) sequences from 18 strains of Pseudomonas sensu stricto representing 8 different species, and 9 representative fliC sequences from other members of the gamma sub-division of proteobacteria, were compared. Analysis was performed on N-terminal, C-terminal and whole fliC sequences. The fliC analyses confirmed the inferred relationship between P. mendocina, P. oleovorans and P. aeruginosa based on 16S rRNA sequence comparisons. In addition, the analyses indicated that P. putida PRS2000 was closely related to P. fluorescens SBW25 and P. fluorescens NCIMB 9046T, but suggested that P. putida PaW8 and P. putida PRS2000 were more closely related to other Pseudomonas spp. than they were to each other. There were a number of inconsistencies in inferred evolutionary relationships between strains, depending on the analysis performed. In particular, whole flagellin gene comparisons often differed from those obtained using N- and C-terminal sequences. However, there were also inconsistencies between the terminal region analyses, suggesting that phylogenetic relationships inferred on the basis of fliC sequence should be treated with caution. Although the central domain of fliC is highly variable between Pseudomonas strains, there was evidence of sequence similarities between the central domains of different Pseudomonas fliC sequences. This indicates the possibility of recombination in the central domain of fliC genes within Pseudomonas species, and between these genes and those from other bacteria. PMID:11518318

  9. A silent composite hemoglobinopathy characterized by gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zorai, A; Moumni, I; Benmansour, I; Chaouachi, D; Ghanem, A; Abbes, S

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 35-year-old Tunisian women with a chronic anemia non investigated for a long time. Laboratory analysis using advanced technology of DNA sequencing revealed a compound heterozygote for Hb O Arab and cd 39 beta degrees-thalassemia. It's the first time that such a genotype has been characterized by gene sequencing. PMID:23461145

  10. First draft genome sequencing of indole acetic acid producing and plant growth promoting fungus Preussia sp. BSL10.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Latif; Asaf, Sajjad; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Al-Rawahi, Ahmed; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-05-10

    Preussia sp. BSL10, family Sporormiaceae, was actively producing phytohormone (indole-3-acetic acid) and extra-cellular enzymes (phosphatases and glucosidases). The fungus was also promoting the growth of arid-land tree-Boswellia sacra. Looking at such prospects of this fungus, we sequenced its draft genome for the first time. The Illumina based sequence analysis reveals an approximate genome size of 31.4Mbp for Preussia sp. BSL10. Based on ab initio gene prediction, total 32,312 coding sequences were annotated consisting of 11,967 coding genes, pseudogenes, and 221 tRNA genes. Furthermore, 321 carbohydrate-active enzymes were predicted and classified into many functional families. PMID:26995610