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Sample records for gene spacer region

  1. The ribosomal gene spacer region in archaebacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achenbach-Richter, L.; Woese, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    Sequences for the spacer regions that separate the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA genes have been determined for four more (strategically placed) archaebacteria. These confirm the general rule that methanogens and extreme halophiles have spacers that contain a single tRNAala gene, while tRNA genes are not found in the spacer region of the true extreme thermophiles. The present study also shows that the spacer regions from the sulfate reducing Archaeglobus and the extreme thermophile Thermococcus (both of which cluster phylogenetically with the methanogens and extreme halophiles) contain each a tRNAala gene. Thus, not only all methanogens and extreme halophiles show this characteristic, but all organisms on the "methanogen branch" of the archaebacterial tree appear to do so. The finding of a tRNA gene in the spacer region of the extreme thermophile Thermococcus celer is the first known phenotypic property that links this organism with its phylogenetic counterparts, the methanogens, rather than with its phenotypic counterparts, the sulfur-dependent extreme thermophiles.

  2. 16S–23S rRNA Gene Intergenic Spacer Region Variability Helps Resolve Closely Related Sphingomonads

    PubMed Central

    Tokajian, Sima; Issa, Nahla; Salloum, Tamara; Ibrahim, Joe; Farah, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonads comprise a physiologically versatile group many of which appear to be adapted to oligotrophic environments, but several also had features in their genomes indicative of host associations. In this study, the extent variability of the 16S–23S rDNA intergenic spacer (ITS) sequences of 14 ATCC reference sphingomonad strains and 23 isolates recovered from drinking water was investigated through PCR amplification and sequencing. Sequencing analysis of the 16S–23S rRNA gene ITS region revealed that the ITS sizes for all studied isolates varied between 415 and 849 bp, while their G+C content was 42.2–57.9 mol%. Five distinct ITS types were identified: ITSnone (without tRNA genes), ITSAla(TGC), ITSAla(TGC)+Ile(GAT), ITSIle(GAT)+Ala(TGC), and ITS Ile(GAT)+Pseudo. All of the identified tRNAAla(TGC) molecules consisted of 73 bases, and all of the tRNAIle(GAT) molecules consisted of 74 bases. We also detected striking variability in the size of the ITS region among the various examined isolates. Highest variability was detected within the ITS-2. The importance of this study is that this is the first comparison of the 16S–23S rDNA ITS sequence similarities and tRNA genes from sphingomonads. Collectively the data obtained in this study revealed the heterogeneity and extent of variability within the ITS region compared to the 16S rRNA gene within closely related isolates. Sequence and length polymorphisms within the ITS region along with the ITS types (tRNA-containing or lacking and the type of tRNA) and ITS-2 size and sequence similarities allowed us to overcome the limitation we previously encountered in resolving closely related isolates based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence. PMID:26904019

  3. 16S-23S ribosomal RNA spacer regions of Acetobacter europaeus and A. xylinum, tRNA genes and antitermination sequences.

    PubMed

    Sievers, M; Alonso, L; Gianotti, S; Boesch, C; Teuber, M

    1996-08-15

    The 16S-23S ribosomal RNA spacer regions of Acetobacter europaeus DSM 6160, A. xylinum NCIB 11664 and A. xylinum CL27 were amplified by PCR. Specific PCR products were obtained from each strain and their nucleotide sequences determined. The spacer region of A. europaeus comprises 768 nucleotides (nt), that of A. xylinum 778 nt and that of A. xylinum CL27 759 nt. Genes encoding tRNAIle and tRNAAla were identified. Putative antitermination sequences were found between the tRNAAla sequence and the 5'-terminus of the 23S rRNA coding sequence. The boxA element has the nucleotide sequence TGCTCTTTGATA. Based on hybridization data of digested chromosomal DNA with spacer-specific probes, the copy number of the rrn operons on the chromosome of Acetobacter strains is estimated to be four. PMID:8759788

  4. Internal transcribed spacer region sequence analysis using SmartGene IDNS software for the identification of unusual clinical yeast isolates.

    PubMed

    Slechta, E Susan; Hohmann, Sheri L; Simmon, Keith; Hanson, Kimberly E

    2012-07-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of clinically important yeasts is essential given their inherent differences in antifungal susceptibility. We implemented nucleic acid sequencing for those species that could not be identified by phenotypic methods. Internal Transcribed Spacer region 1 and 2 (ITS1 and ITS2) sequences were investigated using SmartGene IDNS software, an rDNA sequence database and analysis program for microbial identification (ID). Over a 2.5-year period, 2,938 specimens were evaluated. Most (94%) isolates were fully identified by conventional methods, with Candida species accounting for the majority of them. Of the 169 organisms that required molecular analysis, 79% were identified to species level, 19% to genus and 2% remained unresolved. Sequenced isolates encompassed 33 unique species of which approximately half (52%) were common pathogens with atypical biochemical profiles and the remainder were rarer yeast species. A significant proportion (33%) of sequenced organisms displayed elevated MICs to fluconazole. Our experience supports the use of molecular techniques as an adjunct to conventional methods for the identification of medically important yeasts. Susceptibility testing alone may provide valuable treatment information in situations where phenotypic assessments are inconclusive and molecular or proteomic testing is not readily available. PMID:22103344

  5. Exchange of Spacer Regions between Rrna Operons in Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, S.; Hill, C. W.

    1990-01-01

    The Escherichia coli rRNA operons each have one of two types of spacer separating the 16S and 23S coding regions. The spacers of four operons encode tRNA(Glu2) and the other three encode both tRNA(Ile) and tRNA(Ala 1 B). We have prepared a series of mutants in which the spacer region of a particular rrn operon has been replaced by the opposite type. Included among these were a mutant retaining only a single copy of the tRNA(Glu2) spacer (at rrnG) and another retaining only a single copy of the tRNA(Ile)-tRNA(Ala 1 B) spacer (at rrnA). While both mutants grew more slowly than controls, the mutant deficient in tRNA(Glu2) spacers was more severely affected. At a frequency of 6 X 10(-5), these mutants phenotypically reverted to faster growing types by increasing the copy number of the deficient spacer. In most of these phenotypic revertants, the deficient spacer type appeared in a rrn operon which previously contained the surplus type, bringing the ratio of spacer types closer to normal. In a few cases, these spacer changes were accompanied by an inversion of the chromosomal material between the donor and recipient rrn operons. Two examples of inversion of one-half of the E. coli chromosome between rrnG and rrnH were observed. The correlation of spacer change with inversion indicated that, in these particular cases, the change was due to an intrachromatid gene conversion event accompanied by a reciprocal crossover rather than reciprocal exchange between sister chromatids. PMID:2168847

  6. Variation in the Spacer Regions Separating tRNA Genes in Renibacterium salmoninarum Distinguishes Recent Clinical Isolates from the Same Location

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Sarah M.; Grayson, T. Hilton; Chambers, Edel M.; Cooper, Lynne F.; Barker, Gavin A.; Gilpin, Martyn L.

    2001-01-01

    A means for distinguishing between clinical isolates of Renibacterium salmoninarum that is based on the PCR amplification of length polymorphisms in the tRNA intergenic spacer regions (tDNA-ILPs) was investigated. The method used primers specific to nucleotide sequences of R. salmoninarum tRNA genes and tRNA intergenic spacer regions that had been generated by using consensus tRNA gene primers. Twenty-one PCR products were sequenced from five isolates of R. salmoninarum from the United States, England, and Scotland, and four complete tRNA genes and spacer regions were identified. Sixteen specific PCR primers were designed and tested singly and in all possible pairwise combinations for their potential to discriminate between isolates from recent clinical outbreaks of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in the United Kingdom. Fourteen of the isolates were cultured from kidney samples taken from fish displaying clinical signs of BKD on five farms, and some of the isolates came from the same farm and at the same time. The tDNA-ILP profiles separated 22 clinical isolates into nine groups and highlighted that some farms may have had more than one source of infection. The grouping of isolates improved on the discriminatory power of previously reported typing methods based on randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and restriction fragment length profiles developed using insertion sequence IS994. Our method enabled us to make divisions between closely related clinical isolates of R. salmoninarum that have identical exact tandem repeat (ETR-A) loci, rRNA intergenic spacer sequences, and IS994 profiles. PMID:11136759

  7. Variation in the spacer regions separating tRNA genes in Renibacterium salmoninarum distinguishes recent clinical isolates from the same location.

    PubMed

    Alexander, S M; Grayson, T H; Chambers, E M; Cooper, L F; Barker, G A; Gilpin, M L

    2001-01-01

    A means for distinguishing between clinical isolates of Renibacterium salmoninarum that is based on the PCR amplification of length polymorphisms in the tRNA intergenic spacer regions (tDNA-ILPs) was investigated. The method used primers specific to nucleotide sequences of R. salmoninarum tRNA genes and tRNA intergenic spacer regions that had been generated by using consensus tRNA gene primers. Twenty-one PCR products were sequenced from five isolates of R. salmoninarum from the United States, England, and Scotland, and four complete tRNA genes and spacer regions were identified. Sixteen specific PCR primers were designed and tested singly and in all possible pairwise combinations for their potential to discriminate between isolates from recent clinical outbreaks of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in the United Kingdom. Fourteen of the isolates were cultured from kidney samples taken from fish displaying clinical signs of BKD on five farms, and some of the isolates came from the same farm and at the same time. The tDNA-ILP profiles separated 22 clinical isolates into nine groups and highlighted that some farms may have had more than one source of infection. The grouping of isolates improved on the discriminatory power of previously reported typing methods based on randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and restriction fragment length profiles developed using insertion sequence IS994. Our method enabled us to make divisions between closely related clinical isolates of R. salmoninarum that have identical exact tandem repeat (ETR-A) loci, rRNA intergenic spacer sequences, and IS994 profiles. PMID:11136759

  8. Comparative analysis of the genes encoding 23S-5S rRNA intergenic spacer regions of Lactobacillus casei-related strains.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Lim, C K; Lee, Y K; Chan, Y N

    2000-03-01

    In this study, investigations into the 23S-5S rRNA intergenic spacer regions (ISRs) of the Lactobacillus casei group were performed. A 1.6 kb fragment, from Lactobacillus paracasei strain ATCC 27092, containing part of the 5S rRNA gene (60 bp), the 5S-23S spacer region (198 bp) and part of the 23S rRNA gene (1295 bp) was cloned and sequenced (GenBank no. AF098107). This fragment was used as a probe to determine the rRNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns of nine strains belonging to the Lactobacillus casei group, along with four other non-Lactobacillus casei lactobacilli species. A pair of PCR primers, 23-Fl and 5-Ru, was designed and used for PCR amplification of the 23S-5S rRNA ISRs of these strains. The ISR length and sequence polymorphisms provided additional information for the taxonomic study of the Lactobacillus casei group. The spacer-length polymorphism of Lactobacillus rhamnosus was distinct from those of the other strains and this observation is consistent with the classification of Lactobacillus rhamnosus proposed by Mori et al. For all Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus paracasei strains, two major bands (approx. 250 and 170 bp in size) were obtained except in the case of Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerans strain NCIMB 9709T, which yielded only one amplified product (250 bp). The sequencing data of the PCR products of seven well-characterized Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus paracasei strains revealed the presence of a 76/80 bp insertion/deletion with some random, single-base substitutions between the longer and shorter spacers for each respective strain. A few base variations were also detected within different strains in this group although the overall sequence similarity was very high (95.9-99.5%). The rRNA RFLP and the spacer sequence of Lactobacillus casei type strain ATCC 393T exhibited unique identities in this cluster. On the other hand, Lactobacillus casei strain ATCC 334 showed a high level of similarity

  9. Update on Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. hominis Typing Based on Nucleotide Sequence Variations in Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions of rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chao-Hung; Helweg-Larsen, Jannik; Tang, Xing; Jin, Shaoling; Li, Baozheng; Bartlett, Marilyn S.; Lu, Jang-Jih; Lundgren, Bettina; Lundgren, Jens D.; Olsson, Mats; Lucas, Sebastian B.; Roux, Patricia; Cargnel, Antonietta; Atzori, Chiara; Matos, Olga; Smith, James W.

    1998-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. hominis isolates from 207 clinical specimens from nine countries were typed based on nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer regions I and II (ITS1 and ITS2, respectively) of rRNA genes. The number of ITS1 nucleotides has been revised from the previously reported 157 bp to 161 bp. Likewise, the number of ITS2 nucleotides has been changed from 177 to 192 bp. The number of ITS1 sequence types has increased from 2 to 15, and that of ITS2 has increased from 3 to 14. The 15 ITS1 sequence types are designated types A through O, and the 14 ITS2 types are named types a through n. A total of 59 types of P. carinii f. sp. hominis were found in this study. PMID:9508304

  10. A Two-Locus Global DNA Barcode for Land Plants: The Coding rbcL Gene Complements the Non-Coding trnH-psbA Spacer Region

    PubMed Central

    Kress, W. John; Erickson, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Background A useful DNA barcode requires sufficient sequence variation to distinguish between species and ease of application across a broad range of taxa. Discovery of a DNA barcode for land plants has been limited by intrinsically lower rates of sequence evolution in plant genomes than that observed in animals. This low rate has complicated the trade-off in finding a locus that is universal and readily sequenced and has sufficiently high sequence divergence at the species-level. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, a global plant DNA barcode system is evaluated by comparing universal application and degree of sequence divergence for nine putative barcode loci, including coding and non-coding regions, singly and in pairs across a phylogenetically diverse set of 48 genera (two species per genus). No single locus could discriminate among species in a pair in more than 79% of genera, whereas discrimination increased to nearly 88% when the non-coding trnH-psbA spacer was paired with one of three coding loci, including rbcL. In silico trials were conducted in which DNA sequences from GenBank were used to further evaluate the discriminatory power of a subset of these loci. These trials supported the earlier observation that trnH-psbA coupled with rbcL can correctly identify and discriminate among related species. Conclusions/Significance A combination of the non-coding trnH-psbA spacer region and a portion of the coding rbcL gene is recommended as a two-locus global land plant barcode that provides the necessary universality and species discrimination. PMID:17551588

  11. Genetic variations in the beta-tubulin gene and the internal transcribed spacer 2 region of Trichuris species from man and baboons

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The whipworm Trichuris trichiura has been estimated to infect 604 – 795 million people worldwide. The current control strategy against trichuriasis using the benzimidazoles (BZs) albendazole (400 mg) or mebendazole (500 mg) as single-dose treatment is not satisfactory. The occurrence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in codons 167, 198 or 200 of the beta-tubulin gene has been reported to convey BZ-resistance in intestinal nematodes of veterinary importance. It was hypothesised that the low susceptibility of T. trichiura to BZ could be due to a natural occurrence of such SNPs. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these SNPs were present in the beta-tubulin gene of Trichuris spp. from humans and baboons. As a secondary objective, the degree of identity between T. trichiura from humans and Trichuris spp. from baboons was evaluated based on the beta-tubulin gene and the internal transcribed spacer 2 region (ITS2). Methods Nucleotide sequences of the beta-tubulin gene were generated by PCR using degenerate primers, specific primers and DNA from worms and eggs of T. trichiura and worms of Trichuris spp. from baboons. The ITS2 region was amplified using adult Trichuris spp. from baboons. PCR products were sequenced and analysed. The beta-tubulin fragments were studied for SNPs in codons 167, 198 or 200 and the ITS2 amplicons were compared with GenBank records of T. trichiura. Results No SNPs in codons 167, 198 or 200 were identified in any of the analysed Trichuris spp. from humans and baboons. Based on the ITS2 region, the similarity between Trichuris spp. from baboons and GenBank records of T. trichiura was found to be 98 – 99%. Conclusions Single nucleotide polymorphisms in codon 167, 198 and 200, known to confer BZ-resistance in other nematodes, were absent in the studied material. This study does not provide data that could explain previous reports of poor BZ treatment efficacy in terms of polymorphism in these codons of beta

  12. The Internal Transcribed Spacer Region of Belonolaimus (Nemata: Belonolaimidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, T.; Szalanski, A. L.; Todd, T. C.; Powers, T. O.

    1997-01-01

    Belonolaimus isolates from six U.S. states were compared by restriction endonuclease digestion of amplified first internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1) of the nuclear ribosomal genes. Seven restriction enzymes were selected for evaluation based on restriction sites inferred from the nucleotide sequence of a South Carolina Belonolaimus isolate. Amplified product size from individuals of each isolate was approximately 700 bp. All Midwestern isolates gave distinct restriction digestion patterns. Isolates identified morphologically as Belonolaimus longicaudatus from Florida, South Carolina, and Palm Springs, California, were identical for ITS1 restriction patterns. The correlation between ITS1 restriction patterns and the distribution of B. longicaudatus isolates suggest that the California isolate is a relatively recent introduction into the state. PMID:19274130

  13. Phylogeny of Porphyromonas gingivalis by Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Region Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rumpf, Robert W.; Griffen, Ann L.; Leys, Eugene J.

    2000-01-01

    Periodontitis has been associated with the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, and previous studies have shown phenotypic differences in the pathogenicities of strains of P. gingivalis. An accurate and comprehensive phylogeny of strains of P. gingivalis would be useful in determining if there is an evolutionary basis to pathogenicity in this species. Previous phylogenies of P. gingivalis strains based on random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) show little agreement. While the 16S ribosomal gene is the standard for phylogenetic reconstruction among bacterial species, it is insufficiently variable for this purpose. In the present study, the phylogeny of P. gingivalis was constructed on the basis of the sequence of the most variable region of the ribosomal operon, the intergenic spacer region (ISR). Heteroduplex analysis of the ISR has been used to study the variability of P. gingivalis strains in periodontitis. In the present study, typing by heteroduplex analysis was compared to ISR sequence-based phylogeny and close agreement was observed. The two strains of P. gingivalis whose heteroduplex types are strongly associated with periodontitis were found to be closely related and were well separated from strains whose heteroduplex types are less strongly associated with disease, suggesting a relationship between pathogenicity and phylogeny. PMID:10790104

  14. Utility of internally transcribed spacer region of rDNA (ITS) and β-tubulin gene sequences to infer genetic diversity and migration patterns of Colletotrichum truncatum infecting Capsicum spp.

    PubMed

    Rampersad, Kandyce; Ramdial, Hema; Rampersad, Sephra N

    2016-01-01

    Anthracnose is among the most economically important diseases affecting pepper (Capsicum spp.) production in the tropics and subtropics. Of the three species of Colletotrichum implicated as causal agents of pepper anthracnose, C. truncatum is considered to be the most destructive in agro-ecosystems worldwide. However, the genetic variation and the migration potential of C. truncatum infecting pepper are not known. Five populations were selected for study and a two-locus (internally transcribed spacer region, ITS1-5.8S-ITS2, and β-tubulin, β-TUB) sequence data set was generated and used in the analyses. Sequences of the ITS region were less informative than β -tubulin gene sequences based on comparisons of DNA polymorphism indices. Trinidad had the highest genetic diversity and also had the largest effective population size in pairwise comparisons with the other populations. The Trinidad population also demonstrated significant genetic differentiation from the other populations. AMOVA and STRUCTURE analyses both suggested significant genetic variation within populations more so than among populations. A consensus Maximum Likelihood tree based on β-TUB gene sequences revealed very little intraspecific diversity for all isolates except for Trinidad. Two clades consisting solely of Trinidad isolates may have diverged earlier than the other isolates. There was also evidence of directional migration among the five populations. These findings may have a direct impact on the development of integrated disease management strategies to control C. truncatum infection in pepper. PMID:26843942

  15. The utility of the internal transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS2) in confirming species boundaries in the genus Gonatocerus:comparison to the cytochrome oxidase subunit I(COI) gene and taxonomic data: molecular key based on ITS2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We sequenced the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region 2(ITS2) from several glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS) [Homalodisca vitripennis Germar (=H.coagulata Say)] egg parasitoid species (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae) belonging to the genus Gonatocerus Nees to test the utility of this fragmen...

  16. Quick identification of acetic acid bacteria based on nucleotide sequences of the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer region and of the PQQ-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    Trcek, Janja

    2005-10-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are well known for oxidizing different ethanol-containing substrates into various types of vinegar. They are also used for production of some biotechnologically important products, such as sorbose and gluconic acids. However, their presence is not always appreciated since certain species also spoil wine, juice, beer and fruits. To be able to follow AAB in all these processes, the species involved must be identified accurately and quickly. Because of inaccuracy and very time-consuming phenotypic analysis of AAB, the application of molecular methods is necessary. Since the pairwise comparison among the 16S rRNA gene sequences of AAB shows very high similarity (up to 99.9%) other DNA-targets should be used. Our previous studies showed that the restriction analysis of 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer region is a suitable approach for quick affiliation of an acetic acid bacterium to a distinct group of restriction types and also for quick identification of a potentially novel species of acetic acid bacterium (Trcek & Teuber 2002; Trcek 2002). However, with the exception of two conserved genes, encoding tRNAIle and tRNAAla, the sequences of 16S-23S rDNA are highly divergent among AAB species. For this reason we analyzed in this study a gene encoding PQQ-dependent ADH as a possible DNA-target. First we confirmed the expression of subunit I of PQQ-dependent ADH (AdhA) also in Asaia, the only genus of AAB which exhibits little or no ADH-activity. Further we analyzed the partial sequences of adhA among some representative species of the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter and Gluconacetobacter. The conserved and variable regions in these sequences made possible the construction of A. acetispecific oligonucleotide the specificity of which was confirmed in PCR-reaction using 45 well-defined strains of AAB as DNA-templates. The primer was also successfully used in direct identification of A. aceti from home made cider vinegar as well as for

  17. Epidemiology of sporadic (non-epidemic) cases of Trichophyton tonsurans infection in Japan based on PCR-RFLP analysis of non-transcribed spacer region of ribosomal RNA gene.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Takashi; Kawasaki, Masako; Anzawa, Kazushi; Fujita, Jun; Ushigami, Tsuyoshi; Takeda, Kiminobu; Sano, Ayako; Takahashi, Yoko; Kamei, Katsuhiko

    2008-05-01

    A number of cases of Trichophyton tonsurans infection have been reported among sportsmen and women participating in wrestling, judo, and sumo wrestling in Japan, but there have also been sporadic reports of cases with no history of contact with these sports. A molecular method using restriction enzyme analysis of PCR-amplified fragments targeting the non-transcribed spacer region (NTS) of ribosomal RNA gene in fungal nuclei was applied to T. tonsurans strains isolated from sporadic cases in Japan. Five of 6 molecular types recorded in Japan, i.e., NTS types I, II, IV, V, and VI, and two new types, designated NTS VII and NTS VIII, were observed among 10 strains isolated from sporadic cases. The NTS IV strains, considered not to be related to the present epidemic, were found to be the most prevalent molecular type accounting for 4 of the 10 strains isolated. NTS I was the most prevalent type in the current epidemic in Japan, but it was cultured from only one patient who was later noted to be the daughter of a retired judo practitioner. Four subjects had histories of living abroad and were considered to have been infected outside Japan. The strains in these cases were NTS II, V, VI, and VII. The results of this study suggested that the NTS IV strains were originally present in Japan at a low incidence, but that there has been a recent influx of NTS I, II, V, VI, and VII from abroad, which has been accompanied by the secondary spread of strains from wrestlers and practitioners of martial arts to the general community. PMID:18503175

  18. Sequencing of the Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Region for Strain Identification of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Rumpf, Robert W.; Griffen, Ann L.; Wen, Bo-Gui; Leys, Eugene J.

    1999-01-01

    The ribosomal intergenic spacer regions (ISRs) of 19 laboratory strains and 30 clinical samples of Porphyromonas gingivalis were amplified by PCR and sequenced to provide a strain identifier. The ISR is a variable region of DNA located between the conserved 16S and 23S rRNA genes. This makes it an ideal locus for differentiation of strains within a species: primers specific for the conserved flanking genes were used to amplify the ISR, which was then sequenced to identify the strain. We have constructed a P. gingivalis ISR sequence database to facilitate strain identification. ISR sequence analysis provides a strain identifier that can be easily reproduced among laboratories and catalogued for unambiguous comparison. PMID:10405432

  19. The nucleotide composition of the spacer sequence influences the expression yield of heterologously expressed genes in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Liebeton, Klaus; Lengefeld, Jette; Eck, Jürgen

    2014-12-10

    Bacillus subtilis is a commonly used host for the heterologous expression of genes in academia and industry. Many factors are known to influence the expression yield in this organism e.g. the complementarity between the Shine-Dalgarno sequence (SD) and the 16S-rRNA or secondary structures in the translation initiation region of the transcript. In this study, we analysed the impact of the nucleotide composition between the SD sequence and the start codon (the spacer sequence) on the expression yield. We demonstrated that a polyadenylate-moiety spacer sequence moderately increases the expression level of laccase CotA from B. subtilis. By screening a library of artificially generated spacer variants, we identified clones with greatly increased expression levels of two model enzymes, the laccase CotA from B. subtilis (11 fold) and the metagenome derived protease H149 (30 fold). Furthermore, we demonstrated that the effect of the spacer sequence is specific to the gene of interest. These results prove the high impact of the spacer sequence on the expression yield in B. subtilis. PMID:24997355

  20. Diagnosis of histoplasmosis by detection of the internal transcribed spacer region of fungal rRNA gene from a paraffin-embedded skin sample from a dog in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Yachiyo; Sano, Ayako; Tamura, Miki; Inomata, Tomo; Kamei, Katsuhiko; Yokoyama, Koji; Kishi, Fukuko; Ito, Junko; Mikami, Yuzuru; Miyaji, Makoto; Nishimura, Kazuko

    2003-07-17

    The lesions of histoplasmosis in dogs in Japan differ from those in dogs in North America. Affected dogs in Japan have had multiple granulomatous or ulcerated foci in skin or gingiva and have not had pulmonary or gastrointestinal lesions. The present report introduces a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnosis of canine histoplasmosis and the characteristic of disease in Japan. The surgically removed skin ulcerate samples from a 5-years-old female Shiba-inu native to Japan without traveling out of the country were evaluated. Tissue samples had many yeast-like organisms in the macrophages. DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue samples. A nested PCR technique was applied. The detected sequence of the internal transcribed spacer of ribosomal RNA gene had 99.7% in homology with Ajellomyces capsulatus (the teleomorph of Histoplasma capsulatum). Clinical manifestations, historical background of equine epizootic lymphangitis in Japan, and a human autochthonous case of histoplasmosis farciminosi indicated that this dog might have been infected with H. capsulatum var. farciminosum as a heteroecism. PMID:12814889

  1. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a universal DNA barcode marker for Fungi.

    PubMed

    Schoch, Conrad L; Seifert, Keith A; Huhndorf, Sabine; Robert, Vincent; Spouge, John L; Levesque, C André; Chen, Wen

    2012-04-17

    Six DNA regions were evaluated as potential DNA barcodes for Fungi, the second largest kingdom of eukaryotic life, by a multinational, multilaboratory consortium. The region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 used as the animal barcode was excluded as a potential marker, because it is difficult to amplify in fungi, often includes large introns, and can be insufficiently variable. Three subunits from the nuclear ribosomal RNA cistron were compared together with regions of three representative protein-coding genes (largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, and minichromosome maintenance protein). Although the protein-coding gene regions often had a higher percent of correct identification compared with ribosomal markers, low PCR amplification and sequencing success eliminated them as candidates for a universal fungal barcode. Among the regions of the ribosomal cistron, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has the highest probability of successful identification for the broadest range of fungi, with the most clearly defined barcode gap between inter- and intraspecific variation. The nuclear ribosomal large subunit, a popular phylogenetic marker in certain groups, had superior species resolution in some taxonomic groups, such as the early diverging lineages and the ascomycete yeasts, but was otherwise slightly inferior to the ITS. The nuclear ribosomal small subunit has poor species-level resolution in fungi. ITS will be formally proposed for adoption as the primary fungal barcode marker to the Consortium for the Barcode of Life, with the possibility that supplementary barcodes may be developed for particular narrowly circumscribed taxonomic groups. PMID:22454494

  2. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a universal DNA barcode marker for Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Schoch, Conrad L.; Seifert, Keith A.; Huhndorf, Sabine; Robert, Vincent; Spouge, John L.; Levesque, C. André; Chen, Wen; Bolchacova, Elena; Voigt, Kerstin; Crous, Pedro W.; Miller, Andrew N.; Wingfield, Michael J.; Aime, M. Catherine; An, Kwang-Deuk; Bai, Feng-Yan; Barreto, Robert W.; Begerow, Dominik; Bergeron, Marie-Josée; Blackwell, Meredith; Boekhout, Teun; Bogale, Mesfin; Boonyuen, Nattawut; Burgaz, Ana R.; Buyck, Bart; Cai, Lei; Cai, Qing; Cardinali, G.; Chaverri, Priscila; Coppins, Brian J.; Crespo, Ana; Cubas, Paloma; Cummings, Craig; Damm, Ulrike; de Beer, Z. Wilhelm; de Hoog, G. Sybren; Del-Prado, Ruth; Dentinger, Bryn; Diéguez-Uribeondo, Javier; Divakar, Pradeep K.; Douglas, Brian; Dueñas, Margarita; Duong, Tuan A.; Eberhardt, Ursula; Edwards, Joan E.; Elshahed, Mostafa S.; Fliegerova, Katerina; Furtado, Manohar; García, Miguel A.; Ge, Zai-Wei; Griffith, Gareth W.; Griffiths, K.; Groenewald, Johannes Z.; Groenewald, Marizeth; Grube, Martin; Gryzenhout, Marieka; Guo, Liang-Dong; Hagen, Ferry; Hambleton, Sarah; Hamelin, Richard C.; Hansen, Karen; Harrold, Paul; Heller, Gregory; Herrera, Cesar; Hirayama, Kazuyuki; Hirooka, Yuuri; Ho, Hsiao-Man; Hoffmann, Kerstin; Hofstetter, Valérie; Högnabba, Filip; Hollingsworth, Peter M.; Hong, Seung-Beom; Hosaka, Kentaro; Houbraken, Jos; Hughes, Karen; Huhtinen, Seppo; Hyde, Kevin D.; James, Timothy; Johnson, Eric M.; Johnson, Joan E.; Johnston, Peter R.; Jones, E.B. Gareth; Kelly, Laura J.; Kirk, Paul M.; Knapp, Dániel G.; Kõljalg, Urmas; Kovács, Gábor M.; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Landvik, Sara; Leavitt, Steven D.; Liggenstoffer, Audra S.; Liimatainen, Kare; Lombard, Lorenzo; Luangsa-ard, J. Jennifer; Lumbsch, H. Thorsten; Maganti, Harinad; Maharachchikumbura, Sajeewa S. N.; Martin, María P.; May, Tom W.; McTaggart, Alistair R.; Methven, Andrew S.; Meyer, Wieland; Moncalvo, Jean-Marc; Mongkolsamrit, Suchada; Nagy, László G.; Nilsson, R. Henrik; Niskanen, Tuula; Nyilasi, Ildikó; Okada, Gen; Okane, Izumi; Olariaga, Ibai; Otte, Jürgen; Papp, Tamás; Park, Duckchul; Petkovits, Tamás; Pino-Bodas, Raquel; Quaedvlieg, William; Raja, Huzefa A.; Redecker, Dirk; Rintoul, Tara L.; Ruibal, Constantino; Sarmiento-Ramírez, Jullie M.; Schmitt, Imke; Schüßler, Arthur; Shearer, Carol; Sotome, Kozue; Stefani, Franck O.P.; Stenroos, Soili; Stielow, Benjamin; Stockinger, Herbert; Suetrong, Satinee; Suh, Sung-Oui; Sung, Gi-Ho; Suzuki, Motofumi; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Tedersoo, Leho; Telleria, M. Teresa; Tretter, Eric; Untereiner, Wendy A.; Urbina, Hector; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Vialle, Agathe; Vu, Thuy Duong; Walther, Grit; Wang, Qi-Ming; Wang, Yan; Weir, Bevan S.; Weiß, Michael; White, Merlin M.; Xu, Jianping; Yahr, Rebecca; Yang, Zhu L.; Yurkov, Andrey; Zamora, Juan-Carlos; Zhang, Ning; Zhuang, Wen-Ying; Schindel, David

    2012-01-01

    Six DNA regions were evaluated as potential DNA barcodes for Fungi, the second largest kingdom of eukaryotic life, by a multinational, multilaboratory consortium. The region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 used as the animal barcode was excluded as a potential marker, because it is difficult to amplify in fungi, often includes large introns, and can be insufficiently variable. Three subunits from the nuclear ribosomal RNA cistron were compared together with regions of three representative protein-coding genes (largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, and minichromosome maintenance protein). Although the protein-coding gene regions often had a higher percent of correct identification compared with ribosomal markers, low PCR amplification and sequencing success eliminated them as candidates for a universal fungal barcode. Among the regions of the ribosomal cistron, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has the highest probability of successful identification for the broadest range of fungi, with the most clearly defined barcode gap between inter- and intraspecific variation. The nuclear ribosomal large subunit, a popular phylogenetic marker in certain groups, had superior species resolution in some taxonomic groups, such as the early diverging lineages and the ascomycete yeasts, but was otherwise slightly inferior to the ITS. The nuclear ribosomal small subunit has poor species-level resolution in fungi. ITS will be formally proposed for adoption as the primary fungal barcode marker to the Consortium for the Barcode of Life, with the possibility that supplementary barcodes may be developed for particular narrowly circumscribed taxonomic groups. PMID:22454494

  3. Determination of internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) in Trichomonas vaginalis isolates and differentiation among Trichomonas species.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Escribano, Alexandra; Nogal-Ruiz, Juan José; Arán, Vicente J; Escario, José Antonio; Gómez-Barrio, Alicia; Alderete, J F

    2014-04-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the 5.8S rRNA gene and the flanked internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of six Trichomonas vaginalis isolates with different metronidazole sensitivity and geographic origin were genotyped. A multiple sequence alignment was performed with different sequences of other isolates available at the GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ databases, which revealed 5 different sequence patterns. Although a stable mutation in position 66 of the ITS1 (C66T) was observed in 26% (9/34) of the T. vaginalis sequences analyzed, there was 99.7% ITS nucleotide sequence identity among isolates for this sequence. The nucleotide sequence variation among other species of the genus Trichomonas ranged from 3.4% to 9.1%. Surprisingly, the % identity between T. vaginalis and Pentatrichomonas hominis was ~83%. There was >40% divergence in the ITS sequence between T. vaginalis and Tritrichomonas spp., including Tritrichomonas augusta, Tritrichomonas muris, and Tritrichomonas nonconforma and with Tetratrichomonas prowazeki. Dendrograms grouped the trichomonadid sequences in robust clades according to their genera. The absence of nucleotide divergence in the hypervariable ITS regions between T. vaginalis isolates suggests the early divergence of the parasite. Importantly, these data show this ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2 region suitable for inter-species differentiation. PMID:24412628

  4. Molecular analysis of 16S-23S spacer regions of Acetobacter species.

    PubMed

    Kretová, M; Grones, J

    2005-01-01

    16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) similarities were determined in 8 Acetobacter and 1 Gluconacetobacter strains. ITS-PCR amplification of the 16S-23S spacers showed 2 products of similar size in 7 strains; only 1 product of similar size was found in the 2 remaining strains. Analysis of the PCR products using restriction endonucleases HaeIII, HpaII and AluI revealed 3 different restriction groups of A. pasteurianus for AluI and HaeIII, and 4 restriction groups for HpaII. ITS nucleotide sequences of all studied strains exhibited a 52-98% similarity. PMID:16408846

  5. Novel mutation in spacer region of POLG associated with ataxia neuropathy spectrum and gastroparesis.

    PubMed

    Bostan, Alionka; Glibert, Gerald; Dachy, Bernard; Dan, Bernard

    2012-09-25

    Clinical expression of POLG mutations is largely variable. We present a patient with a new mutation in spacer region of mitochondrial polymerase gamma protein (P765T). The clinical picture is characterized by the presence of sensory-ataxic neuropathy, ophthalmoplegia, dysarthria and gastroparesis, which had not been previously observed in ataxia neuropathy spectrum. PMID:22805437

  6. Identification of Medically Important Yeast Species by Sequence Analysis of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Leaw, Shiang Ning; Chang, Hsien Chang; Sun, Hsiao Fang; Barton, Richard; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Chang, Tsung Chain

    2006-01-01

    Infections caused by yeasts have increased in previous decades due primarily to the increasing population of immunocompromised patients. In addition, infections caused by less common species such as Pichia, Rhodotorula, Trichosporon, and Saccharomyces spp. have been widely reported. This study extensively evaluated the feasibility of sequence analysis of the rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions for the identification of yeasts of clinical relevance. Both the ITS1 and ITS2 regions of 373 strains (86 species), including 299 reference strains and 74 clinical isolates, were amplified by PCR and sequenced. The sequences were compared to reference data available at the GenBank database by using BLAST (basic local alignment search tool) to determine if species identification was possible by ITS sequencing. Since the GenBank database currently lacks ITS sequence entries for some yeasts, the ITS sequences of type (or reference) strains of 15 species were submitted to GenBank to facilitate identification of these species. Strains producing discrepant identifications between the conventional methods and ITS sequence analysis were further analyzed by sequencing of the D1-D2 domain of the large-subunit rRNA gene for species clarification. The rates of correct identification by ITS1 and ITS2 sequence analysis were 96.8% (361/373) and 99.7% (372/373), respectively. Of the 373 strains tested, only 1 strain (Rhodotorula glutinis BCRC 20576) could not be identified by ITS2 sequence analysis. In conclusion, identification of medically important yeasts by ITS sequencing, especially using the ITS2 region, is reliable and can be used as an accurate alternative to conventional identification methods. PMID:16517841

  7. BIODEGRADABLE BRANCHED POLYCATIONIC POLYMERS WITH VARYING HYDROPHILIC SPACERS FOR NON-VIRAL GENE DELIVERY

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Sue Anne; Hacker, Michael C.; Saraf, Anita; Raphael, Robert M.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2009-01-01

    Biodegradable branched polycationic polymers with varying hydrophilic spacer lengths were synthesized from different triacrylate monomers and the amine monomer 1-(2-aminoethyl)piperazine by Michael addition polymerization. The hydrophilic spacers were varied by the number of ethyleneoxy groups in the triacrylate monomer (E/M) that ranged from 0 to 14. The polymer degradation depended on the spacer length and pH; the amount of ester degraded as determined by 1H-NMR after 14 days was 43.4 ± 2.1% (pH 5.0) and 89.7 ± 1.3% (pH 7.4) for the polymer with 0 E/M compared to 55.7 ± 2.6% (pH 5.0) and 98.5 ± 1.6% (pH 7.4) for the polymer with 14 E/M. Cell viability of rat fibroblasts after exposure to polymer solutions of concentrations up to 1000 μg/mL remained high (above 66.9 ± 12.1% compared to below 7.6 ± 1.1% for polyethylenimine at a concentration of 50 μg/mL or higher) and increased with the spacer length. The polyplexes made with all the synthesized polymers showed higher transfection efficiency (4.5 ± 1.7% to 9.4 ± 2.0%, dependent on the polymer/pDNA weight ratio) with an enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter gene compared to naked pDNA (0.8 ± 0.4%) as quantified by flow cytometry. This study demonstrates that hydrophilic spacers can be incorporated into polycationic polymers to reduce their cytotoxicity and enhance their degradability for non-viral gene delivery. PMID:19678696

  8. Allele-specific germ cell epimutation in the spacer promoter of the 45S ribosomal RNA gene after Cr(III) exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Shiao, Y.-H. . E-mail: shiao@mail.ncifrcf.gov; Crawford, Erik B.; Anderson, Lucy M.; Patel, Pritesh; Ko, Kinarm

    2005-06-15

    Paternal exposure of mice to Cr(III) causes increased tumor risk in offspring; an epigenetic mechanism has been hypothesized. Representational difference analysis of gene methylation in sperm revealed hypomethylation in the 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene after Cr(III) exposure, compared with controls. The most striking effects were seen in the rRNA spacer promoter, a region in the intergenic region of rRNA gene clusters that can influence transcription. Methylation of the rRNA spacer promoter has not been studied heretofore. Sperm DNAs from Cr(III)-treated and control mice were modified by the bisulfite method followed by PCR amplification of the spacer promoter, including 27 CpG sites. Cloning and dideoxy sequencing identified sequence variants (T or G at base -2214) in the spacer promoter. The T allele had less DNA methylation than the G allele in control mice (17 of 17 clones vs. 42 of 72 clones, P = 0.0004). In spite of diversity of sperm DNA methylation patterns, the DNA clones from Cr(III)-exposed mice had fewer methylated CpG sites, by an average of 19% (P < 0.0001). This difference was limited to the G allele. The pyrosequencing technique was applied to quantify the percentage of methylation directly from amplified PCR products. Strikingly, for nine CpG sites including the spacer promoter core region, hypomethylation was highly significant in the Cr(III)-treated group (paired T test, P < 0.0001). Thus, one allele of the 45S rRNA spacer promoter is hypomethylated in sperm germ cells after Cr(III) exposure. This epimutation may lead to increase of tumor risk in the offspring.

  9. Intra-Genomic Internal Transcribed Spacer Region Sequence Heterogeneity and Molecular Diagnosis in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jingwei; Xu, Yingchun; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequencing is the most extensively used technology for accurate molecular identification of fungal pathogens in clinical microbiology laboratories. Intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity, which makes fungal identification based on direct sequencing of PCR products difficult, has rarely been reported in pathogenic fungi. During the process of performing ITS sequencing on 71 yeast strains isolated from various clinical specimens, direct sequencing of the PCR products showed ambiguous sequences in six of them. After cloning the PCR products into plasmids for sequencing, interpretable sequencing electropherograms could be obtained. For each of the six isolates, 10–49 clones were selected for sequencing and two to seven intra-genomic ITS copies were detected. The identities of these six isolates were confirmed to be Candida glabrata (n = 2), Pichia (Candida) norvegensis (n = 2), Candida tropicalis (n = 1) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (n = 1). Multiple sequence alignment revealed that one to four intra-genomic ITS polymorphic sites were present in the six isolates, and all these polymorphic sites were located in the ITS1 and/or ITS2 regions. We report and describe the first evidence of intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity in four different pathogenic yeasts, which occurred exclusively in the ITS1 and ITS2 spacer regions for the six isolates in this study. PMID:26506340

  10. Babesia gibsoni internal transcribed spacer 1 region is highly conserved amongst isolates from dogs across Japan

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Mingming; CAO, Shinuo; VUDRIKO, Patrick; SUZUKI, Hiroshi; SOMA, Takehisa; XUAN, Xuenan

    2016-01-01

    Babesia gibsoni is a tick-borne apicomplexan parasite of dogs that often causes fever and hemolytic anemia with highly variable clinical outcome. In this study, we sequenced the 254bp Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 region (ITS1) of 54 B. gibsoni isolates from 14 different geographical regions of Japan. The 54 isolates shared high sequence identity with each other and with B. gibsoni isolates reported in GenBank database (97.2–100%). Consistent with previous reports, phylogenetic analysis showed that B. gibsoni isolates from Japan formed the same clade with those from U.S.A., Australia, India and Taiwan. Our finding indicates that B. gibsoni ITS1 region is highly conserved among isolates from dogs in Japan, making it a useful genetic marker for molecular epidemiology of the parasite. PMID:26806537

  11. Babesia gibsoni internal transcribed spacer 1 region is highly conserved amongst isolates from dogs across Japan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingming; Cao, Shinuo; Vudriko, Patrick; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Soma, Takehisa; Xuan, Xuenan

    2016-06-01

    Babesia gibsoni is a tick-borne apicomplexan parasite of dogs that often causes fever and hemolytic anemia with highly variable clinical outcome. In this study, we sequenced the 254bp Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 region (ITS1) of 54 B. gibsoni isolates from 14 different geographical regions of Japan. The 54 isolates shared high sequence identity with each other and with B. gibsoni isolates reported in GenBank database (97.2-100%). Consistent with previous reports, phylogenetic analysis showed that B. gibsoni isolates from Japan formed the same clade with those from U.S.A., Australia, India and Taiwan. Our finding indicates that B. gibsoni ITS1 region is highly conserved among isolates from dogs in Japan, making it a useful genetic marker for molecular epidemiology of the parasite. PMID:26806537

  12. Intragenomic Variation in the Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 Region of Dientamoeba fragilis as a Molecular Epidemiological Marker▿

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Aldert; van der Heijden, Harold M.; Greve, Sophie; Speijer, Dave; Landman, Wil J.; van Gool, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a parasite that has been recognized to be a causative agent of gastrointestinal symptoms. Because in most studies only some infected persons experience symptoms, it is possible that D. fragilis is a heterogeneous species with variants that display similar morphologies but different pathogenicities. The search for genetic variation in D. fragilis was based on the small-subunit rRNA gene, which was not found to be useful for molecular epidemiology. In this report, we describe the isolation and characterization of additional rRNA gene cluster sequences, the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1)-5.8S rRNA gene-ITS-2 region. For comparative purposes, we also isolated the ITS-1-5.8S rRNA gene-ITS-2 region of Histomonas meleagridis, a protozoan parasite of birds and a close relative of D. fragilis. This region was found to be highly variable, and 11 different alleles of the ITS-1 sequence could be identified. Variation in the ITS-1 region was found to be intragenomic, with up to four different alleles in a single isolate. So-called C profiles were produced from the ITS-1 repertoire of single isolates,. Analysis of the C profiles of isolates from nonrelated patients identified several clearly distinguishable strains of D. fragilis. Within families, it was shown that members can be infected with the same or different strains of D. fragilis. In conclusion, the ITS-1 region can serve as a molecular epidemiological tool for the subtyping of D. fragilis directly from feces. This may serve as a means of studying the transmission, geographical distribution, and relationships between strains and the pathogenicity of this parasite. PMID:18650356

  13. Reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships in dermatomycete genus Trichophyton Malmsten 1848 based on ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region, partial 28S rRNA and beta-tubulin genes sequences.

    PubMed

    Pchelin, Ivan M; Zlatogursky, Vasily V; Rudneva, Mariya V; Chilina, Galina A; Rezaei-Matehkolaei, Ali; Lavnikevich, Dmitry M; Vasilyeva, Natalya V; Taraskina, Anastasia E

    2016-09-01

    Trichophyton spp. are important causative agents of superficial mycoses. The phylogeny of the genus and accurate strain identification, based on the ribosomal ITS region sequencing, are still under development. The present work is aimed at (i) inferring the genus phylogeny from partial ITS, LSU and BT2 sequences (ii) description of ribosomal ITS region polymorphism in 15 strains of Trichophyton interdigitale. We performed DNA sequence-based species identification and phylogenetic analysis on 48 strains belonging to the genus Trichophyton. Phylogenetic relationships were inferred by maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods on concatenated ITS, LSU and BT2 sequences. Ribosomal ITS region polymorphisms were assessed directly on the alignment. By phylogenetic reconstruction, we reveal major anthropophilic and zoophilic species clusters in the genus Trichophyton. We describe several sequences of the ITS region of T. interdigitale, which do not fit in the traditional polymorphism scheme and propose emendations in this scheme for discrimination between ITS sequence types in T. interdigitale. The new polymorphism scheme will allow inclusion of a wider spectrum of isolates while retaining its explanatory power. This scheme was also found to be partially congruent with NTS typing technique. PMID:27071492

  14. Insertions or Deletions (Indels) in the rrn 16S-23S rRNA Gene Internal Transcribed Spacer Region (ITS) Compromise the Typing and Identification of Strains within the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii (Acb) Complex and Closely Related Members

    PubMed Central

    Maslunka, Christopher; Gifford, Bianca; Tucci, Joseph; Gürtler, Volker; Seviour, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether ITS sequences in the rrn operon are suitable for identifying individual Acinetobacter Acb complex members, we analysed length and sequence differences between multiple ITS copies within the genomes of individual strains. Length differences in ITS reported previously between A. nosocomialis BCRC15417T (615 bp) and other strains (607 bp) can be explained by presence of an insertion (indel 13i/1) in the longer ITS variant. The same Indel 13i/1 was also found in ITS sequences of ten strains of A. calcoaceticus, all 639 bp long, and the 628 bp ITS of Acinetobacter strain BENAB127. Four additional indels (13i/2–13i/5) were detected in Acinetobacter strain c/t13TU 10090 ITS length variants (608, 609, 620, 621 and 630 bp). These ITS variants appear to have resulted from horizontal gene transfer involving other Acinetobacter species or in some cases unrelated bacteria. Although some ITS copies in strain c/t13TU 10090 are of the same length (620 bp) as those in Acinetobacter strains b/n1&3, A. pittii (10 strains), A. calcoaceticus and A. oleivorans (not currently acknowledged as an Acb member), their individual ITS sequences differ. Thus ITS length by itself can not by itself be used to identify Acb complex strains. A shared indel in ITS copies in two separate Acinetobacter species compromises the specificity of ITS targeted probes, as shown with the Aun-3 probe designed to target the ITS in A. pitti. The presence of indel 13i/5 in the ITS of Acinetobacter strain c/t13TU means it too responded positively to this probe. Thus, neither ITS sequencing nor the currently available ITS targeted probes can distinguish reliably between Acb member species. PMID:25141005

  15. Extensive Pyrosequencing Reveals Frequent Intra-Genomic Variations of Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions of Nuclear Ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dezhu; Sun, Yongzhen; Niu, Yunyun; Chen, Zhiduan; Luo, Hongmei; Pang, Xiaohui; Sun, Zhiying; Liu, Chang; Lv, Aiping; Deng, Youping; Larson-Rabin, Zachary; Wilkinson, Mike; Chen, Shilin

    2012-01-01

    Background Internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) is already one of the most popular phylogenetic and DNA barcoding markers. However, the existence of its multiple copies has complicated such usage and a detailed characterization of intra-genomic variations is critical to address such concerns. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we used sequence-tagged pyrosequencing and genome-wide analyses to characterize intra-genomic variations of internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) regions from 178 plant species. We discovered that mutation of ITS2 is frequent, with a mean of 35 variants per species. And on average, three of the most abundant variants make up 91% of all ITS2 copies. Moreover, we found different congeneric species share identical variants in 13 genera. Interestingly, different species across different genera also share identical variants. In particular, one minor variant of ITS2 in Eleutherococcus giraldii was found identical to the ITS2 major variant of Panax ginseng, both from Araliaceae family. In addition, DNA barcoding gap analysis showed that the intra-genomic distances were markedly smaller than those of the intra-specific or inter-specific variants. When each of 5543 variants were examined for its species discrimination efficiency, a 97% success rate was obtained at the species level. Conclusions Identification of identical ITS2 variants across intra-generic or inter-generic species revealed complex species evolutionary history, possibly, horizontal gene transfer and ancestral hybridization. Although intra-genomic multiple variants are frequently found within each genome, the usage of the major variants alone is sufficient for phylogeny construction and species determination in most cases. Furthermore, the inclusion of minor variants further improves the resolution of species identification. PMID:22952830

  16. Paenibacillus larvae 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions: DNA fingerprinting and characterization.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Douglas W

    2012-07-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is the causative agent of American foulbrood in honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae. PCR amplification of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the amplified DNA, was performed using genomic DNA collected from 134 P. larvae strains isolated in Connecticut, six Northern Regional Research Laboratory stock strains, four strains isolated in Argentina, and one strain isolated in Chile. Following electrophoresis of amplified DNA, all isolates exhibited a common migratory profile (i.e., ITS-PCR fingerprint pattern) of six DNA bands. This profile represented a unique ITS-PCR DNA fingerprint that was useful as a fast, simple, and accurate procedure for identification of P. larvae. Digestion of ITS-PCR amplified DNA, using mung bean nuclease prior to electrophoresis, characterized only three of the six electrophoresis bands as homoduplex DNA and indicating three true ITS regions. These three ITS regions, DNA migratory band sizes of 915, 1010, and 1474 bp, signify a minimum of three types of rrn operons within P. larvae. DNA sequence analysis of ITS region DNA, using P. larvae NRRL B-3553, identified the 3' terminal nucleotides of the 16S rRNA gene, 5' terminal nucleotides of the 23S rRNA gene, and the complete DNA sequences of the 5S rRNA, tRNA(ala), and tRNA(ile) genes. Gene organization within the three rrn operon types was 16S-23S, 16S-tRNA(ala)-23S, and l6S-5S-tRNA(ile)-tRNA(ala)-23S and these operons were named rrnA, rrnF, and rrnG, respectively. The 23S rRNA gene was shown by I-CeuI digestion and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of genomic DNA to be present as seven copies. This was suggestive of seven rrn operon copies within the P. larvae genome. Investigation of the 16S-23S rDNA regions of this bacterium has aided the development of a diagnostic procedure and has helped genomic mapping investigations via characterization of the ITS regions. PMID:22510214

  17. Sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region reveals a novel clade of Ichthyophonus sp. from rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, C.; Purcell, M.K.; Gregg, J.L.; LaPatra, S.E.; Winton, J.R.; Hershberger, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    The mesomycetozoean parasite Ichthyophonus hoferi is most commonly associated with marine fish hosts but also occurs in some components of the freshwater rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss aquaculture industry in Idaho, USA. It is not certain how the parasite was introduced into rainbow trout culture, but it might have been associated with the historical practice of feeding raw, ground common carp Cyprinus carpio that were caught by commercial fisherman. Here, we report a major genetic division between west coast freshwater and marine isolates of Ichthyophonus hoferi. Sequence differences were not detected in 2 regions of the highly conserved small subunit (18S) rDNA gene; however, nucleotide variation was seen in internal transcribed spacer loci (ITS1 and ITS2), both within and among the isolates. Intra-isolate variation ranged from 2.4 to 7.6 nucleotides over a region consisting of ~740 bp. Majority consensus sequences from marine/anadromous hosts differed in only 0 to 3 nucleotides (99.6 to 100% nucleotide identity), while those derived from freshwater rainbow trout had no nucleotide substitutions relative to each other. However, the consensus sequences between isolates from freshwater rainbow trout and those from marine/anadromous hosts differed in 13 to 16 nucleotides (97.8 to 98.2% nucleotide identity).

  18. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Indonesia Solanaceae based on DNA sequences of internal transcribed spacer region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Topik; Priyandoko, Didik; Islami, Dina Karina; Wardiny, Putri Yunitha

    2016-02-01

    Solanaceae is one of largest family in Angiosperm group with highly diverse in morphological character. In Indonesia, this group of plant is very popular due to its usefulness as food, ornamental and medicinal plants. However, investigation on phylogenetic relationship among the member of this family in Indonesia remains less attention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the phylogenetics relationship of the family especially distributed in Indonesia. DNA sequences of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of 19 species of Solanaceae and three species of outgroup, which belongs to family Convolvulaceae, Apocynaceae, and Plantaginaceae, were isolated, amplified, and sequenced. Phylogenetic tree analysis based on parsimony method was conducted with using data derived from the ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2, separately, and the combination of all. Results indicated that the phylogenetic tree derived from the combined data established better pattern of relationship than separate data. Thus, three major groups were revealed. Group 1 consists of tribe Datureae, Cestreae, and Petunieae, whereas group 2 is member of tribe Physaleae. Group 3 belongs to tribe Solaneae. The use of the ITS region as a molecular markers, in general, support the global Solanaceae relationship that has been previously reported.

  19. Heterogeneity of the internal transcribed spacer region in Leishmania tropica isolates from southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Ghatee, Mohammad Amin; Sharifi, Iraj; Kuhls, Katrin; Kanannejad, Zahra; Harandi, Majid Fasihi; de Almeida, Marcos E; Hatam, Gholamreza; Mirhendi, Hossein

    2014-09-01

    Most of cutaneous leishmaniasis cases occur in only 7 countries, including Iran. Leishmania tropica is the main cause of anthroponotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in Iran. In order to study the heterogeneity and phylogeny of L. tropica in southern Iran, a total of 61 isolates were obtained from Bam district and the cities Kerman and Shiraz. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) from the ribosomal DNA locus was amplified and then analysed by sequencing. Analysis of the ITS sequences showed four haplotypes in the isolates, including 3 haplotypes among the 58 isolates from the south eastern region, including Bam district and Kerman city, and 2 haplotypes among the 3 isolates from Shiraz city. The results showed a monophyletic structure for the south eastern population. In comparison to GenBank sequences of L. tropica from different countries, most of the southeast Iranian and Indian isolates are comprised in one cluster, while isolates from other countries and few other Iranian isolates group in a different cluster. Analysis of ITS sequences of south eastern L. tropica showed a homogeneous population which could be the basis for other molecular epidemiology studies using more discriminative markers and tracing possible changes in the population structure of L. tropica. PMID:24932536

  20. PCR amplification and characterization of the intergenic spacer region of the ribosomal DNA in Pyrenophora graminea.

    PubMed

    Pecchia, S; Mercatelli, E; Vannacci, G

    1998-09-01

    Successful amplification of the whole intergenic spacer region of the nuclear ribosomal repeat (IGS) in Pyrenophora graminea was obtained with a PCR-based assay. Single amplification products showed length differences. Depending on the length of the IGS-PCR product, ca. 3.8 or 4.4 kb, two groups of isolates could be identified. The RFLP patterns of isolates obtained with the 6-base cutting enzymes Apal, BglII, DraI, EcoRV, HindIII and SacI were similar within each group and different between the two groups. Restriction patterns of IGS-PCR products digested with the 4-base cutting enzyme AluI were polymorphic among isolates in spite of their IGS-PCR product length. In order to characterize the long and short IGS-PCR products the restriction map is shown. The long product shows an additional HindIII site and a BglII site that is lacking in the short product. However, the latter shows a SacI site that is not present in the long IGS-PCR product. Therefore, the described PCR-RFLP analysis of the IGS appears to be a useful tool to resolve genetic variation between P. graminea isolates. PMID:9741081

  1. Molecular identification of isolated fungi from unopened containers of greek yogurt by DNA sequencing of internal transcribed spacer region.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Irshad M; Jacobs, Emily; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    In our previous study, we described the development of an internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1 sequencing method, and used this protocol in species-identification of isolated fungi collected from the manufacturing areas of a compounding company known to have caused the multistate fungal meningitis outbreak in the United States. In this follow-up study, we have analyzed the unopened vials of Greek yogurt from the recalled batch to determine the possible cause of microbial contamination in the product. A total of 15 unopened vials of Greek yogurt belonging to the recalled batch were examined for the detection of fungi in these samples known to cause foodborne illness following conventional microbiological protocols. Fungi were isolated from all of the 15 Greek yogurt samples analyzed. The isolated fungi were genetically typed by DNA sequencing of PCR-amplified ITS1 region of rRNA gene. Analysis of data confirmed all of the isolated fungal isolates from the Greek yogurt to be Rhizomucor variabilis. The generated ITS1 sequences matched 100% with the published sequences available in GenBank. In addition, these yogurt samples were also tested for the presence of five types of bacteria (Salmonella, Listeria, Staphylococcus, Bacillus and Escherichia coli) causing foodborne disease in humans, and found negative for all of them. PMID:25438008

  2. Molecular Identification of Isolated Fungi from Unopened Containers of Greek Yogurt by DNA Sequencing of Internal Transcribed Spacer Region

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Irshad M.; Jacobs, Emily; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    In our previous study, we described the development of an internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1 sequencing method, and used this protocol in species-identification of isolated fungi collected from the manufacturing areas of a compounding company known to have caused the multistate fungal meningitis outbreak in the United States. In this follow-up study, we have analyzed the unopened vials of Greek yogurt from the recalled batch to determine the possible cause of microbial contamination in the product. A total of 15 unopened vials of Greek yogurt belonging to the recalled batch were examined for the detection of fungi in these samples known to cause foodborne illness following conventional microbiological protocols. Fungi were isolated from all of the 15 Greek yogurt samples analyzed. The isolated fungi were genetically typed by DNA sequencing of PCR-amplified ITS1 region of rRNA gene. Analysis of data confirmed all of the isolated fungal isolates from the Greek yogurt to be Rhizomucor variabilis. The generated ITS1 sequences matched 100% with the published sequences available in GenBank. In addition, these yogurt samples were also tested for the presence of five types of bacteria (Salmonella, Listeria, Staphylococcus, Bacillus and Escherichia coli) causing foodborne disease in humans, and found negative for all of them. PMID:25438008

  3. Differentiation of Closely Related Carnobacterium Food Isolates Based on 16S-23S Ribosomal DNA Intergenic Spacer Region Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Kabadjova, Petia; Dousset, Xavier; Le Cam, Virginie; Prevost, Hervé

    2002-01-01

    A novel strategy for identification of Carnobacterium food isolates based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of PCR-amplified 16S-23S ribosomal intergenic spacer regions (ISRs) was developed. PCR amplification from all Carnobacterium strains studied always yielded three ISR amplicons, which were designated the small ISR (S-ISR), the medium ISR (M-ISR), and the large ISR (L-ISR). The lengths of these ISRs varied from one species to another. Carnobacterium divergens NCDO 2763T and C. mobile DSM 4849T generated one major S-ISR band (ca. 400 bp) and minor M-ISR and L-ISR bands (ca. 500 and ca. 600 bp, respectively). The ISRs amplified from C. gallinarum NCFB 2766T and C. piscicola NCDO 2762T were larger (S-ISR, ca. 600 bp; M-ISR, ca. 700 bp; and L-ISR, ca. 800 bp). The L-ISR contained two tDNAs coding for tRNAIle and tRNAAla genes. The M-ISR included one tRNAAla gene, and the S-ISR did not contain a tDNA gene. The RFLP scheme devised involves estimation of variable PCR product sizes together with HinfI, TaqI, and HindIII restriction analysis. Forty-two isolates yielded four unique band patterns that correctly resolved these isolates into four Carnobacterium species. This method is very suitable for rapid, low-cost identification of a wide variety of Carnobacterium species without sequencing. PMID:12406725

  4. Molecular Analysis of Fungal Populations in Patients with Oral Candidiasis Using Internal Transcribed Spacer Region

    PubMed Central

    Ieda, Shinsuke; Moriyama, Masafumi; Takashita, Toru; Maehara, Takashi; Imabayashi, Yumi; Shinozaki, Shoichi; Tanaka, Akihiko; Hayashida, Jun-Nosuke; Furukawa, Sachiko; Ohta, Miho; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Nakamura, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is closely associated with changes in the oral fungal flora and is caused primarily by Candida albicans. Conventional methods of fungal culture are time-consuming and not always conclusive. However, molecular genetic analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of fungal rRNA is rapid, reproducible and simple to perform. In this study we examined the fungal flora in patients with oral candidiasis and investigated changes in the flora after antifungal treatment using length heterogeneity-polymerization chain reaction (LH-PCR) analysis of ITS regions. Fifty-two patients with pseudomembranous oral candidiasis (POC) and 30 healthy controls were included in the study. Fungal DNA from oral rinse was examined for fungal species diversity by LH-PCR. Fungal populations were quantified by real-time PCR and previously-unidentified signals were confirmed by nucleotide sequencing. Relationships between the oral fungal flora and treatment-resistant factors were also examined. POC patients showed significantly more fungal species and a greater density of fungi than control individuals. Sixteen fungi were newly identified. The fungal populations from both groups were composed predominantly of C. albicans, though the ratio of C. dubliniensis was significantly higher in POC patients than in controls. The diversity and density of fungi were significantly reduced after treatment. Furthermore, fungal diversity and the proportion of C. dubliniensis were positively correlated with treatment duration. These results suggest that C. dubliniensis and high fungal flora diversity might be involved in the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis. We therefore conclude that LH-PCR is a useful technique for diagnosing and assessing the severity of oral candidal infection. PMID:24979710

  5. DNA Barcoding Identification of Kadsurae Caulis and Spatholobi Caulis Based on Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 Region and Secondary Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaoxue; Xie, Zhiyong; Wu, Junwei; Tao, Junfei; Xu, Xinjun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kadsurae Caulis and Spatholobi Caulis have very similar Chinese names. Their commodities were hard to distinguish because their stems were very alike after dried and processed. These two herbal drugs were often mixed in clinical use. Objective: Authenticity assurance is crucial for quality control of herbal drugs. Therefore, it is essential to establish a method for identifying the two herbs. Materials and Methods: In this paper, we used the DNA barcoding technology, based on the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) regions, to differentiate Kadsurae Caulis and Spatholobi Caulis. Results: The ITS2 of these two herbs were very different. They were successfully differentiated using the DNA barcoding technique. Conclusions: DNA barcoding was a promising and reliable tool for the identification of medicinal plants. It can be a powerful complementary method for traditional authentication. SUMMARY The internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) regions between Kadsurae Caulis and Spatholobi Caulis varied considerably, totally 139 variable sitesSample 1 was not Kadsurae Caulis as it labeled, but it should be Spatholobi Caulis in fact based on ITS2 regionThe secondary structure can also separate Kadsurae Caulis and Spatholobi Caulis effectivelyDNA barcoding provided an accurate and strong prove to identify these two herbs. Abbreviations used: CTAB: hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, DNA: deoxyribonucleic acid, ITS2:internal transcribed spacer 2, PCR: polymerase chain reaction PMID:27279702

  6. 16S partial gene mitochondrial DNA and internal transcribed spacers ribosomal DNA as differential markers of Trichuris discolor populations.

    PubMed

    Callejón, R; Halajian, A; de Rojas, M; Marrugal, A; Guevara, D; Cutillas, C

    2012-05-25

    Comparative morphological, biometrical and molecular studies of Trichuris discolor isolated from Bos taurus from Spain and Iran was carried out. Furthermore, Trichuris ovis isolated from B. taurus and Capra hircus from Spain has been, molecularly, analyzed. Morphological studies revealed clear differences between T. ovis and T. discolor isolated from B. taurus but differences were not observed between populations of T. discolor isolated from different geographical regions. Nevertheless, the molecular studies based on the amplification and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 ribosomal DNA and 16S partial gene mitochondrial DNA showed clear differences between both populations of T. discolor from Spain and Iran suggesting two cryptic species. Phylogenetic studies corroborated these data. Thus, phylogenetic trees based on ITS1, ITS2 and 16S partial gene sequences showed that individuals of T. discolor from B. taurus from Iran clustered together and separated, with high bootstrap values, of T. discolor isolated from B. taurus from Spain, while populations of T. ovis from B. taurus and C. hircus from Spain clustered together but separated with high bootstrap values of both populations of T. discolor. Furthermore, a comparative phylogenetic study has been carried out with the ITS1and ITS2 sequences of Trichuris species from different hosts. Three clades were observed: the first clustered all the species of Trichuris parasitizing herbivores (T. discolor, T. ovis, Trichuris leporis and Trichuris skrjabini), the second clustered all the species of Trichuris parasitizing omnivores (Trichuris trichiura and Trichuris suis) and finally, the third clustered species of Trichuris parasitizing carnivores (Trichuris muris, Trichuris arvicolae and Trichuris vulpis). PMID:22136768

  7. Diversity of Salmonella Strains Isolated from the Aquatic Environment as Determined by Serotyping and Amplification of the Ribosomal DNA Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Baudart, Julia; Lemarchand, Karine; Brisabois, Anne; Lebaron, Philippe

    2000-01-01

    Salmonella species are pathogenic bacteria often detected in sewage, freshwater, marine coastal water, and groundwater. Salmonella spp. can survive for long periods in natural waters, and the persistence of specific and epidemic strains is of great concern in public health. However, the diversity of species found in the natural environment remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the diversity of Salmonella strains isolated from different natural aquatic systems within a Mediterranean coastal watershed (river, wastewater, and marine coastal areas). A total of 574 strains isolated from these natural environments were identified by both conventional serotyping and the ribosomal spacer-heteroduplex polymorphism (RS-HP) method (M. A. Jensen and N. Straus, PCR Methods Appl. 3:186–194, 1993). More than 40 different serotypes were found, and some serotypes probably mobilized from widespread animal-rearing activities were detected only during storm events. These serotypes may be good indicators of specific contamination sources. Furthermore, the RS-HP method based on the PCR amplification of the intergenic spacer region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes can produce amplicon profiles allowing the discrimination of species at both serotype and intraserotype levels. This method represents a powerful tool that could be used for rapid typing of Salmonella isolates. PMID:10742240

  8. Spacer fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.N.; Bradshaw, R.D.; Wilton, B.S.; Carpenter, R.B.

    1992-05-19

    This patent describes a method for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a conduit extends, the wellbore having a space occupied by a drilling fluid. It comprises displacing the drilling fluid from the space with a spacer fluid comprising: sulfonated styrene-maleic anhydride copolymer, bentonite, welan gum, surfactant and a weighting agent; and displacing the spacer composition and filling the wellbore space with a settable cement composition.

  9. Analysis of the 5.8S rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacers in Naegleria spp. and in N. fowleri.

    PubMed

    Pélandakis, M; Serre, S; Pernin, P

    2000-01-01

    Internal transcribed spacers (ITS) and the 5.8S ribosomal gene of 21 Naegleria fowleri strains and eight other species including Naegleria gruberi were sequenced. The results showed that this region can help differentiate between and within species. The phylogeny of Naegleria spp. deduced from the ITS and the 5.8S gene produced four major lineages, fowleri-lovaniensis, galeacystis-italica-clarki-gruberi-australiensis, andersoni-jamiesoni, and pussardi, that fit perfectly with those inferred from the 18S rRNA gene analysis. The N. gruberi isolate, NG260, was closely related to Naegleria pussardi. The other N. gruberi isolates branched together with Naegleria australiensis in another lineage. The ITS and 5.8S results for N. fowleri were congruent with those previously deduced by RAPD analysis. The phylogenetic analysis inferred from ITS and RAPD data revealed two major groups. The French Cattenom and Chooz and South Pacific strains constituted the first group. The second group encompassed the strains corresponding to the Euro-American and Widespread RAPD variants and shared the same substitution in the 5.8S gene. In addition, it was possible to define species specific primers in ITS regions to rapidly identify N. fowleri. PMID:10750838

  10. DNA polymorphism in morels: complete sequences of the internal transcribed spacer of genes coding for rRNA in Morchella esculenta (yellow morel) and Morchella conica (black morel).

    PubMed Central

    Wipf, D; Munch, J C; Botton, B; Buscot, F

    1996-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the gene coding for rRNA was sequenced in both directions with the gene walking technique in a black morel (Morchella conica) and a yellow morel (M. esculenta) to elucidate the ITS length discrepancy between the two species groups (750-bp ITS in black morels and 1,150-bp ITS in yellow morels. PMID:8795250

  11. Genotyping of Trichomonas vaginalis isolates in Iran by using single stranded conformational polymorphism-PCR technique and internal transcribed spacer regions.

    PubMed

    Matini, M; Rezaeian, M; Mohebali, M; Maghsood, A H; Rabiee, S; Rahimi-Foroushani, A; Fallah, M; Miahipour, A; Rezaie, S

    2012-12-01

    Infection with Trichomonas vaginalis, the causative agent of human urogenital infection, is the most prevalent nonviral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. In spite of the high prevalence and medical importance of trichomoniasis, there is little knowledge about genetic epidemiology and genetic characterisation of this parasite. For this purpose, a Single Stranded Conformation Polymorphism-PCR (SSCP-PCR) typing method was conducted for Iranian T. vaginalis isolates using 5.8s ribosomal gene (rRNA gene) and the flanking internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Nine hundred and fifty vaginal swab samples were examined in which 50 (5.3%) samples were parasitologically positive and used for molecular identification based on SSCP-PCR and nucleotide sequence analyses. Results of the SSCP analysis showed two distinct reproducible banding patterns (I, II) which were confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis in the ITS1 regions. Frequencies of the SSCP banding patterns I and II were 84% (42/50) and 16% (8/50), respectively. In conclusion, SSCP-PCR analysis provided a reliable and sensitive method for strain genotyping of T. vaginalis based on the ITS1/5.8s/ITS2 region. This finding may help us gain more information about correlation between genetic properties and biological features of this parasite. PMID:23202606

  12. PCR amplification of rRNA intergenic spacer regions as a method for epidemiologic typing of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, C P; Stock, F; Beekmann, S E; Williams, E C; Gill, V J

    1995-01-01

    From January to March 1993, a suspected outbreak of antibiotic-associated diarrhea occurred on a pediatric oncology ward of the Clinical Center Hospital at the National Institutes of Health. Isolates of Clostridium difficile obtained from six patients implicated in this outbreak were typed by both PCR amplification of rRNA intergenic spacer regions (PCR ribotyping) and restriction endonuclease analysis of genomic DNA. Comparable results were obtained with both methods; five of the six patients were infected with the same strain of C. difficile. Subsequent analysis of 102 C. difficile isolates obtained from symptomatic patients throughout the Clinical Center revealed the existence of 41 distinct and reproducible PCR ribotypes. These data suggest that PCR ribotyping provides a discriminatory, reproducible, and simple alternative to conventional molecular approaches for typing strains of C. difficile. PMID:7699038

  13. Complete sequence and gene organization of the Nosema heliothidis ribosomal RNA gene region.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shinan; Shen, Zhongyuan; Zhu, Feng; Tang, Xudong; Xu, Li

    2011-01-01

    By sequencing the entire ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene region of Nosema heliothidis isolated from cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera), we showed that its gene organization is similar to the type species, Nosema bombycis: the 5'-large subunit rRNA (2,490 bp)-internal transcribed spacer (192 bp)-small subunit rRNA (1,232 bp)-intergenic spacer (274 bp)-5S rRNA (115 bp)-3'. We constructed two phylogenetic trees, analyzed phylogenetic relationships, examined rRNA organization of microsporidia, and compared the secondary structure of small subunit rRNA with closely related microsporidia. The latter two features may provide important information for the classification and phylogenetic analysis of microsporidia. PMID:21895841

  14. Nature of polymorphisms in 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic transcribed spacer fingerprinting of Bacillus and related genera.

    PubMed

    Daffonchio, Daniele; Cherif, Ameur; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Rizzi, Aurora; Mora, Diego; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Borin, Sara

    2003-09-01

    The intergenic transcribed spacers (ITS) between the 16S and 23S rRNA genetic loci are frequently used in PCR fingerprinting to discriminate bacterial strains at the species and intraspecies levels. We investigated the molecular nature of polymorphisms in ITS-PCR fingerprinting of low-G+C-content spore-forming bacteria belonging to the genera Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Geobacillus, and Paenibacillus: We found that besides the polymorphisms in the homoduplex fragments amplified by PCR, heteroduplex products formed during PCR between amplicons from different ribosomal operons, with or without tRNA genes in the ITS, contribute to the interstrain variability in ITS-PCR fingerprinting patterns obtained in polyacrylamide-based gel matrices. The heteroduplex nature of the discriminating bands was demonstrated by fragment separation in denaturing polyacrylamide gels, by capillary electrophoresis, and by cloning, sequencing, and recombination of purified short and tRNA gene-containing long ITS. We also found that heteroduplex product formation is enhanced by increasing the number of PCR cycles. Homoduplex-heteroduplex polymorphisms (HHP) in a conserved region, such as the 16S and 23S rRNA gene ITS, allowed discrimination of closely related strains and species undistinguishable by other methods, indicating that ITS-HHP analysis is an easy and reproducible additional tool for strain typing. PMID:12957895

  15. The role of extracellular spacer regions in the optimal design of chimeric immune receptors: evaluation of four different scFvs and antigens.

    PubMed

    Guest, Ryan D; Hawkins, Robert E; Kirillova, Natalia; Cheadle, Eleanor J; Arnold, Jennifer; O'Neill, Allison; Irlam, Joely; Chester, Kerry A; Kemshead, John T; Shaw, David M; Embleton, M J; Stern, Peter L; Gilham, David E

    2005-01-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes can be transduced to express antigen-dependent CD3zeta chimeric immune receptors (CIRs), which function independently of the T-cell receptor (TCR). Although the exact function of these domains is unclear, previous studies imply that an extracellular spacer region is required for optimal CIR activity. In this study, four scFvs (in the context of CIRs with or without extracellular spacer regions) were used to target the human tumor-associated antigens carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), the oncofetal antigen 5T4, and the B-cell antigen CD19. In all cases human T-cell populations expressing the CIRs were functionally active against their respective targets, but the anti-5T4 and anti-NCAM CIRs showed enhanced specific cytokine release and cytotoxicity only when possessing an extracellular spacer region. In contrast, the anti-CEA and anti-CD19 CIRs displayed optimal cytokine release activity only in the absence of an extracellular spacer. Interestingly, mapping of the scFv epitopes has revealed that the anti-CEA scFv binds close to the amino-terminal of CEA, which is easily accessible to the CIR. In contrast, CIRs enhanced by a spacer domain appear to bind to epitopes residing closer to the cell membrane, suggesting that a more flexible extracellular domain may be required to permit the efficient binding of such epitopes. These results show that a spacer is not necessary for optimal activity of CIRs but that the optimal design varies. PMID:15838376

  16. Sequence variation in nuclear ribosomal small subunit, internal transcribed spacer and large subunit regions of Rhizophagus irregularis and Gigaspora margarita is high and isolate-dependent.

    PubMed

    Thiéry, Odile; Vasar, Martti; Jairus, Teele; Davison, John; Roux, Christophe; Kivistik, Paula-Ann; Metspalu, Andres; Milani, Lili; Saks, Ülle; Moora, Mari; Zobel, Martin; Öpik, Maarja

    2016-06-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are known to exhibit high intra-organism genetic variation. However, information about intra- vs. interspecific variation among the genes commonly used in diversity surveys is limited. Here, the nuclear small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene, internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene portions were sequenced from 3 to 5 individual spores from each of two isolates of Rhizophagus irregularis and Gigaspora margarita. A total of 1482 Sanger sequences (0.5 Mb) from 239 clones were obtained, spanning ~4370 bp of the ribosomal operon when concatenated. Intrasporal and intra-isolate sequence variation was high for all three regions even though variant numbers were not exhausted by sequencing 12-40 clones per isolate. Intra-isolate nucleotide variation levels followed the expected order of ITS > LSU > SSU, but the values were strongly dependent on isolate identity. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) densities over 4 SNP/kb in the ribosomal operon were detected in all four isolates. Automated operational taxonomic unit picking within the sequence set of known identity overestimated species richness with almost all cut-off levels, markers and isolates. Average intraspecific sequence similarity values were 99%, 96% and 94% for amplicons in SSU, LSU and ITS, respectively. The suitability of the central part of the SSU as a marker for AM fungal community surveys was further supported by its level of nucleotide variation, which is similar to that of the ITS region; its alignability across the entire phylum; its appropriate length for next-generation sequencing; and its ease of amplification in single-step PCR. PMID:27092961

  17. The Mycoplasma gallisepticum 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region sequence as a novel tool for epizootiological studies.

    PubMed

    Raviv, Ziv; Callison, S; Ferguson-Noel, N; Laibinis, V; Wooten, R; Kleven, S H

    2007-06-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) contains two sets of rRNA genes (5S, 16S and 23S) in its genome, but only one of the two is organized in an operon cluster and contains a unique 660-nucleotide intergenic spacer region (IGSR) between the 16S and the 23S rRNA genes. We designed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the specific amplification of the complete MG IGSR segment. The MG IGSR PCR was tested on 18 avian mollicute species and was confirmed as MG specific. The reaction sensitivity was demonstrated by comparing it to the well-established MG mgc2 PCR. The MG IGSR sequence was found to be highly variable (discrimination [D] index of 0.950) among a variety of MG laboratory strains, vaccine strains, and field isolates. The sequencing of the MG IGSR appears to be a valuable single-locus sequence typing (SLST) tool for MG isolate differentiation in diagnostic cases and epizootiological studies. PMID:17626483

  18. Improved Identification of Rapidly Growing Mycobacteria by a 16S–23S Internal Transcribed Spacer Region PCR and Capillary Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Timothy J.; Kong, Fanrong; Jelfs, Peter; Sintchenko, Vitali; Chen, Sharon C-A.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) remains problematic because of evolving taxonomy, limitations of current phenotypic methods and absence of a universal gene target for reliable speciation. This study evaluated a novel method of identification of RGM by amplification of the mycobacterial 16S–23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) followed by resolution of amplified fragments by capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE). Nineteen American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) Mycobacterium strains and 178 clinical isolates of RGM (12 species) were studied. All RGM ATCC strains generated unique electropherograms with no overlap with slowly growing mycobacteria species, including M. tuberculosis. A total of 47 electropherograms for the 178 clinical isolates were observed allowing the speciation of 175/178 (98.3%) isolates, including the differentiation of the closely related species, M. massiliense (M. abscessus subspecies bolletii) and M. abscessus (M. abscessus sensu stricto). ITS fragment size ranged from 332 to 534 bp and 33.7% of clinical isolates generated electropherograms with two distinct peaks, while the remainder where characterized with a single peak. Unique peaks (fragment lengths) were identified for 11/12 (92%) RGM species with only M. moriokaense having an indistinguishable electropherogram from a rarely encountered CGE subtype of M. fortuitum. We conclude that amplification of the 16S–23S ITS gene region followed by resolution of fragments by CGE is a simple, rapid, accurate and reproducible method for species identification and characterization of the RGM. PMID:25013955

  19. A phylogenetic analysis of the genus Carica L. (Caricaceae) based on restriction fragment length variation in a cpDNA intergenic spacer region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phylogenetic relationships among twelve wild and cultivated species of Carica (Caricaceae) were analyzed using restriction fragment length variation in a 3.2-kb PCR amplified intergenic spacer region of the chloroplast DNA. A total of 138 fragments representing 137 restriction sites accounting f...

  20. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a universal DNA barcode marker for Fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six DNA regions were evaluated in a multi-national, multi-laboratory consortium as potential DNA barcodes for Fungi, the second largest kingdom of eukaryotic life. The region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 used as the animal barcode was excluded as a potential marker, because it...

  1. Structural, biocomplexation and gene delivery properties of hydroxyethylated gemini surfactants with varied spacer length.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, Lucia Ya; Gabdrakhmanov, Dinar R; Ibragimova, Alsu R; Vasilieva, Elmira A; Nizameev, Irek R; Kadirov, Marsil K; Ermakova, Elena A; Gogoleva, Natalia E; Faizullin, Dzhigangir A; Pokrovsky, Andrey G; Korobeynikov, Vladislav A; Cheresiz, Sergey V; Zuev, Yuriy F

    2016-04-01

    Gemini surfactants with hexadecyl tails and hydroxyethylated head groups bridged with tetramethylene (G4), hexamethylene (G6) and dodecamethylene (G12) spacers were shown to self-assemble at the lower critical micelle concentration compared to their conventional m-s-m analogs. The lipoplex formation and the plasmid DNA transfer into different kinds of host cells were studied. In the case of eukaryotic cells, high transfection efficacy has been demonstrated for DNA-gemini complexes, which increased as follows: G6G4>G12 has been obtained in the case of transformation of bacterial cells with plasmid DNA-gemini complexes, mediated by electroporation technique. Solely G6 shows transformation efficacy exceeding the control result (uncomplexed DNA), while the inhibitory effect occurs for G4 and G12. Analysis of physico-chemical features of single surfactants and lipoplexes shows that compaction and condensation effects change as follows: G6

  2. Evolution of the rpoB-psbZ region in fern plastid genomes: notable structural rearrangements and highly variable intergenic spacers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The rpoB-psbZ (BZ) region of some fern plastid genomes (plastomes) has been noted to go through considerable genomic changes. Unraveling its evolutionary dynamics across all fern lineages will lead to clarify the fundamental process shaping fern plastome structure and organization. Results A total of 24 fern BZ sequences were investigated with taxon sampling covering all the extant fern orders. We found that: (i) a tree fern Plagiogyria japonica contained a novel gene order that can be generated from either the ancestral Angiopteris type or the derived Adiantum type via a single inversion; (ii) the trnY-trnE intergenic spacer (IGS) of the filmy fern Vandenboschia radicans was expanded 3-fold due to the tandem 27-bp repeats which showed strong sequence similarity with the anticodon domain of trnY; (iii) the trnY-trnE IGSs of two horsetail ferns Equisetum ramosissimum and E. arvense underwent an unprecedented 5-kb long expansion, more than a quarter of which was consisted of a single type of direct repeats also relevant to the trnY anticodon domain; and (iv) ycf66 has independently lost at least four times in ferns. Conclusions Our results provided fresh insights into the evolutionary process of fern BZ regions. The intermediate BZ gene order was not detected, supporting that the Adiantum type was generated by two inversions occurring in pairs. The occurrence of Vandenboschia 27-bp repeats represents the first evidence of partial tRNA gene duplication in fern plastomes. Repeats potentially forming a stem-loop structure play major roles in the expansion of the trnY-trnE IGS. PMID:21486489

  3. Development of PCR primers from internal transcribed spacer region 2 for detection of Phytophthora species infecting potatoes.

    PubMed Central

    Tooley, P W; Bunyard, B A; Carras, M M; Hatziloukas, E

    1997-01-01

    We developed PCR primers and assay methods to detect and differentiate three Phytophthora species which infect potatoes and cause late blight (Phytophthora infestans) and pink rot (P. erythroseptica and P. nicotianae) diseases. Primers based on sequence analysis of internal transcribed spacer region 2 of ribosomal DNA produced PCR products of 456 bp (P. infestans), 136 bp (P. erythroseptica), and 455 bp (P. nicotianae) and were used to detect the pathogens in potato leaf (P. infestans) and tuber (P. infestans, P. erythroseptica, and P. nicotianae) tissue with a sensitivity of 1 to 10 pg of DNA. Leaf and tuber tissue were processed for PCR by a rapid NaOH method as well as a method based on the use of commercially available ion-exchange columns of P. infestans primers and the rapid NaOH extraction method were used to detect late blight in artificially and naturally infected tubers of potato cultivar Red LaSoda. In sampling studies, P. infestans was detected by PCR from artificially infected tubers at 4 days postinoculation, before any visible symptoms were present. The PCR assay and direct tissue extraction methods provide tools which may be used to detect Phytophthora pathogens in potato seedlots and storages and thus limit the transmission and spread of new, aggressive strains of P. infestans in U.S. potato-growing regions. PMID:9097445

  4. The rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacer Region as a Taxonomic Marker for Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Powers, T. O.; Todd, T. C.; Burnell, A. M.; Murray, P. C. B.; Fleming, C. C.; Szalanski, A. L.; Adams, B. A.; Harris, T. S.

    1997-01-01

    The ITS region from a wide taxonomic range of nematodes, including secernentean and adenophorean taxa, and free-living, entomopathogenic, and plant-parasitic species, was evaluated as a taxonomic marker. Size of the amplified product aided in the initial determination of group membership, and also suggested groups that may require taxonomic reevaluation. Congeneric species often displayed identically sized ITS regions, but genera such as Pratylenchus and Tylenchorhynchus had species with large differences in size. ITS heterogeneity in individuals and populations was identified in several nematode taxa. PCR-RFLP of ITS1 is advocated as a method of taxonomic analysis in genera such as Helicotylenchus that contain numerous species with few diagnostic morphological characteristics. PMID:19274180

  5. How does the spacer length of cationic gemini lipids influence the lipoplex formation with plasmid DNA? Physicochemical and biochemical characterizations and their relevance in gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Úbeda, Mónica; Misra, Santosh K; Barrán-Berdón, Ana L; Datta, Sougata; Aicart-Ramos, Clara; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; Kondaiah, Paturu; Junquera, Elena; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Aicart, Emilio

    2012-12-10

    Lipoplexes formed by the pEGFP-C3 plasmid DNA (pDNA) and lipid mixtures containing cationic gemini surfactant of the 1,2-bis(hexadecyl dimethyl ammonium) alkanes family referred to as C16CnC16, where n=2, 3, 5, or 12, and the zwitterionic helper lipid, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) have been studied from a wide variety of physical, chemical, and biological standpoints. The study has been carried out using several experimental methods, such as zeta potential, gel electrophoresis, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), cryo-TEM, gene transfection, cell viability/cytotoxicity, and confocal fluorescence microscopy. As reported recently in a communication (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011, 133, 18014), the detailed physicochemical and biological studies confirm that, in the presence of the studied series lipid mixtures, plasmid DNA is compacted with a large number of its associated Na+ counterions. This in turn yields a much lower effective negative charge, qpDNA−, a value that has been experimentally obtained for each mixed lipid mixture. Consequently, the cationic lipid (CL) complexes prepared with pDNA and CL/DOPE mixtures to be used in gene transfection require significantly less amount of CL than the one estimated assuming a value of qDNA−=−2. This drives to a considerably lower cytotoxicity of the gene vector. Depending on the CL molar composition, α, of the lipid mixture, and the effective charge ratio of the lipoplex, ρeff, the reported SAXS data indicate the presence of two or three structures in the same lipoplex, one in the DOPE-rich region, other in the CL-rich region, and another one present at any CL composition. Cryo-TEMand SAXS studies with C16CnC16/DOPE-pDNA lipoplexes indicate that pDNA is localized between the mixed lipid bilayers of lamellar structures within a monolayer of ∼2 nm. This is consistent with a highly compacted supercoiled pDNA conformation compared with that of linear DNA. Transfection studies were carried out

  6. Molecular organization of 5S rDNAs in Rajidae (Chondrichthyes): Structural features and evolution of piscine 5S rRNA genes and nontranscribed intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Pasolini, Paola; Costagliola, Domenico; Rocco, Lucia; Tinti, Fausto

    2006-05-01

    The genomic and gene organisation of 5S rDNA clusters have been extensively characterized in bony fish and eukaryotes, providing general issues for understanding the molecular evolution of this multigene DNA family. By contrast, the 5S rDNA features have been rarely investigated in cartilaginous fish (only three species). Here, we provide evidence for a dual 5S rDNA gene system in the Rajidae by sequence analysis of the coding region (5S) and adjacent nontranscribed spacer (NTS) in five Mediterranean species of rays (Rajidae), and in a large number of piscine taxa including lampreys and bony fish. As documented in several bony fish, two functional 5S rDNA types were found here also in the rajid genome: a short one (I) and a long one (II), distinguished by distinct 5S and NTS sequences. That the ancestral piscine genome had these two 5S rDNA loci might be argued from the occurrence of homologous dual gene systems that exist in several fish taxa and from 5S phylogenetic relationships. An extensive analysis of NTS-II sequences of Rajidae and Dasyatidae revealed the occurrence of large simple sequence repeat (SSR) regions that are formed by microsatellite arrays. The localization and organization of SSR within the NTS-II are conserved in Rajiformes since the Upper Cretaceous. The direct correlation between the SSRs extension and the NTS length indicated that they might play a role in the maintenance of the larger 5S rDNA clusters in rays. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that NTS-II is a valuable systematic tool limited to distantly related taxa of Rajiformes. PMID:16612546

  7. Phylogenetics of Bonamia parasites based on small subunit and internal transcribed spacer region ribosomal DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kristina M; Stokes, Nancy A; Webb, Stephen C; Hine, P Mike; Kroeck, Marina A; Moore, James D; Morley, Margaret S; Reece, Kimberly S; Burreson, Eugene M; Carnegie, Ryan B

    2014-07-24

    The genus Bonamia (Haplosporidia) includes economically significant oyster parasites. Described species were thought to have fairly circumscribed host and geographic ranges: B. ostreae infecting Ostrea edulis in Europe and North America, B. exitiosa infecting O. chilensis in New Zealand, and B. roughleyi infecting Saccostrea glomerata in Australia. The discovery of B. exitiosa-like parasites in new locations and the observation of a novel species, B. perspora, in non-commercial O. stentina altered this perception and prompted our wider evaluation of the global diversity of Bonamia parasites. Samples of 13 oyster species from 21 locations were screened for Bonamia spp. by PCR, and small subunit and internal transcribed spacer regions of Bonamia sp. ribosomal DNA were sequenced from PCR-positive individuals. Infections were confirmed histologically. Phylogenetic analyses using parsimony and Bayesian methods revealed one species, B. exitiosa, to be widely distributed, infecting 7 oyster species from Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, eastern and western USA, and Tunisia. More limited host and geographic distributions of B. ostreae and B. perspora were confirmed, but nothing genetically identifiable as B. roughleyi was found in Australia or elsewhere. Newly discovered diversity included a Bonamia sp. in Dendostrea sandvicensis from Hawaii, USA, that is basal to the other Bonamia species and a Bonamia sp. in O. edulis from Tomales Bay, California, USA, that is closely related to both B. exitiosa and the previously observed Bonamia sp. from O. chilensis in Chile. PMID:25060496

  8. Identification of Aspergillus fumigatus and Related Species by Nested PCR Targeting Ribosomal DNA Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun; Kong, Fanrong; Li, Ruoyu; Wang, Xiaohong; Wan, Zhe; Wang, Duanli

    2001-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common species that causes invasive aspergillosis. In order to identify A. fumigatus, partial ribosomal DNA (rDNA) from two to six strains of five different Aspergillus species was sequenced. By comparing sequence data from GenBank, we designed specific primer pairs targeting rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of A. fumigatus. A nested PCR method for identification of other A. fumigatus-related species was established by using the primers. To evaluate the specificities and sensitivities of those primers, 24 isolates of A. fumigatus and variants, 8 isolates of Aspergillus nidulans, 7 isolates of Aspergillus flavus and variants, 8 isolates of Aspergillus terreus, 9 isolates of Aspergillus niger, 1 isolate each of Aspergillus parasiticus, Aspergillus penicilloides, Aspergillus versicolor, Aspergillus wangduanlii, Aspergillus qizutongii, Aspergillus beijingensis, and Exophiala dermatitidis, 4 isolates of Candida, 4 isolates of bacteria, and human DNA were used. The nested PCR method specifically identified the A. fumigatus isolates and closely related species and showed a high degree of sensitivity. Additionally, four A. fumigatus strains that were recently isolated from our clinic were correctly identified by this method. Our results demonstrate that these primers are useful for the identification of A. fumigatus and closely related species in culture and suggest further studies for the identification of Aspergillus fumigatus species in clinical specimens. PMID:11376067

  9. Use of the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) Regions to Examine Symbiont Divergence and as a Diagnostic Tool for Sodalis-Related Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Anna K.; Adkins, Kenneth Z.; Rio, Rita V. M.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria excel in most ecological niches, including insect symbioses. A cluster of bacterial symbionts, established within a broad range of insects, share high 16S rRNA similarities with the secondary symbiont of the tsetse fly (Diptera: Glossinidae), Sodalis glossinidius. Although 16S rRNA has proven informative towards characterization of this clade, the gene is insufficient for examining recent divergence due to selective constraints. Here, we assess the application of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, specifically the ITSglu and ITSala,ile, used in conjunction with 16S rRNA to enhance the phylogenetic resolution of Sodalis-allied bacteria. The 16S rRNA + ITS regions of Sodalis and allied bacteria demonstrated significant divergence and were robust towards phylogenetic resolution. A monophyletic clade of Sodalis isolates from tsetse species, distinct from other Enterobacteriaceae, was consistently observed suggesting diversification due to host adaptation. In contrast, the phylogenetic distribution of symbionts isolated from hippoboscid flies and various Hemiptera and Coleoptera were intertwined suggesting either horizontal transfer or a recent establishment from an environmental source. Lineage splitting of Sodalis-allied bacteria into symbiotic and free-living sister groups was also observed. Additionally, we propose an ITS region as a diagnostic marker for the identification of additional Sodalis-allied symbionts in the field. These results expand our knowledge of informative genome regions to assess genetic divergence since splitting from the last common ancestor, of this versatile insect symbiont clade that have become increasingly recognized as valuable towards our understanding of the evolution of symbiosis. These facultative and recently associated symbionts may provide a novel source of traits adaptable to the dynamic ecologies encountered by diverse host backgrounds. PMID:26467831

  10. Bat white-nose syndrome: a real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction test targeting the intergenic spacer region of Geomyces destructanstructans.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muller, Laura K.; Lorch, Jeffrey M.; Lindner, Daniel L.; O'Connor, Michael; Gargas, Andrea; Blehert, David S.

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Geomyces destructans is the causative agent of white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease that has killed millions of North American hibernating bats. We describe a real-time TaqMan PCR test that detects DNA from G. destructans by targeting a portion of the multicopy intergenic spacer region of the rRNA gene complex. The test is highly sensitive, consistently detecting as little as 3.3 fg of genomic DNA from G. destructans. The real-time PCR test specifically amplified genomic DNA from G. destructans but did not amplify target sequence from 54 closely related fungal isolates (including 43 Geomyces spp. isolates) associated with bats. The test was further qualified by analyzing DNA extracted from 91 bat wing skin samples, and PCR results matched histopathology findings. These data indicate the real-time TaqMan PCR method described herein is a sensitive, specific, and rapid test to detect DNA from G. destructans and provides a valuable tool for WNS diagnostics and research.

  11. Bat white-nose syndrome: a real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction test targeting the intergenic spacer region of Geomyces destructans.

    PubMed

    Muller, Laura K; Lorch, Jeffrey M; Lindner, Daniel L; O'Connor, Michael; Gargas, Andrea; Blehert, David S

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Geomyces destructans is the causative agent of white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease that has killed millions of North American hibernating bats. We describe a real-time TaqMan PCR test that detects DNA from G. destructans by targeting a portion of the multicopy intergenic spacer region of the rRNA gene complex. The test is highly sensitive, consistently detecting as little as 3.3 fg genomic DNA from G. destructans. The real-time PCR test specifically amplified genomic DNA from G. destructans but did not amplify target sequence from 54 closely related fungal isolates (including 43 Geomyces spp. isolates) associated with bats. The test was qualified further by analyzing DNA extracted from 91 bat wing skin samples, and PCR results matched histopathology findings. These data indicate the real-time TaqMan PCR method described herein is a sensitive, specific and rapid test to detect DNA from G. destructans and provides a valuable tool for WNS diagnostics and research. PMID:22962349

  12. Molecular phylogeny of pneumocystis based on 5.8S rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacers of rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, ZiHui; Feng, XianMin; Lu, SiQi; Zhang, Fan; Wang, FengYun; Huang, Song

    2008-05-01

    To clarify the phylogenetic relationships and species status of Pneumocystis, the 5.8S rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacers (ITS, 1 and 2) of Pneumocystis rRNA derived from rat, gerbil and human were amplified, cloned and sequenced. The genetic distance matrix of six Pneumocystis species compared with other fungi like Taphrina and Saccharomyces indicated that the Pneumocystis genus contained multiple species including Pneumocystis from gerbil. The phylogenetic tree also showed that Pneumocystis from human and monkey formed one group and four rodent Pneumocystis formed another group. Among the four members, Pneumocystis wakefieldiae was most closely related to Pneumocystis murina and Pneumocystis carinii, and was least related to gerbil Pneumocystis. PMID:18785590

  13. Transcription termination and RNA processing in the 3'-end spacer of mouse ribosomal RNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, T; Kominami, R; Yoshikura, H; Sudo, K; Muramatsu, M

    1987-01-01

    The 3' termini of ribosomal RNA precursors from mouse FM3A cultured cells are mapped to eight sites within 625 bp downstream from the 3' terminus of 28 S rRNA. Three additional sites are mapped in liver RNA from C3H/He strain mice. Two of them, the sites at 570 bp and 625 bp are assumed to be termination sites in vivo, because they correspond to in vitro termination sites of RNA polymerase I, and 45 S RNAs having these 3' termini decay with kinetics distinct from others. The amount of 45 S RNA having the 3' terminus at other sites is variable among several mouse strains, despite their having the same DNA sequence in these regions. The ability to produce 3' termini in these sites seems to follow Mendel's law of inheritance. Therefore, we postulate that these nine sites are RNA processing sites which are controlled genetically. Images PMID:3031586

  14. The complexity of the sylvatic cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi in Rio de Janeiro state (Brazil) revealed by the non-transcribed spacer of the mini-exon gene.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, O; Mangia, R H; Lisboa, C V; Pinho, A P; Morel, C M; Zingales, B; Campbell, D A; Jansen, A M

    1999-02-01

    American trypanosamiasis occurs in nature as a sylvatic cycle, where Trypanosoma cruzi interacts with wild triatomines and mammalian reservoirs, such as marsupials, rodents, armadillos and other animals. Due to difficulties in trying to isolate T. cruzi stocks from the sylvatic cycle, very few studies have been performed in order to understand the parasite infection in natural environments. Traditionally T. cruzi has been considered to be composed of a highly heterogeneous population of parasites. In contrast, the mini-exon and the 24S alpha rRNA gene loci have shown that T. cruzi stocks can be clustered in 2 major phylogenetic groups: lineage 1 and lineage 2. In this report, 68 recently isolated T. cruzi samples from the sylvatic cycle belonging to different geographical areas in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, have been typed based on a variable spot in the non-transcribed spacer of the mini-exon gene. Eight isolates were from triatomines, 26 stocks were from golden-lion tamarins, 31 from opossums, 2 from rodents and 1 from a three-toed sloth. Thirty (44%-30/68) isolates were typed as lineage 1, while 36 (53%-36/68) isolates were typed as lineage 2. Two opossums presented mixed infection. Therefore, 3% (2/68) of the isolates were typed as lineage 1 + lineage 2. Using these geographical regions as models of sylvatic environments, it was observed that 96% of the Didelphis marsupialis were infected by lineage 2 isolates, while all 26 golden-lion tamarins were infected by lineage 1. The results show preferential association of the 2 lineages of T. cruzi with different hosts, composing the complexity of the sylvatic cycle. PMID:10028530

  15. Relationships between 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer DNA and genomic DNA similarities in the taxonomy of phototrophic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, K.; Hisada, T.; Takata, K.; Hiraishi, A.

    2013-04-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of microbial species is essential task in microbiology and biotechnology. In prokaryotic systematics, genomic DNA-DNA hybridization is the ultimate tool to determine genetic relationships among bacterial strains at the species level. However, a practical problem in this assay is that the experimental procedure is laborious and time-consuming. In recent years, information on the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has been used to classify bacterial strains at the species and intraspecies levels. It is unclear how much information on the ITS region can reflect the genome that contain it. In this study, therefore, we evaluate the quantitative relationship between ITS DNA and entire genomic DNA similarities. For this, we determined ITS sequences of several species of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria belonging to the order Rhizobiales, and compared with DNA-DNA relatedness among these species. There was a high correlation between the two genetic markers. Based on the regression analysis of this relationship, 70% DNA-DNA relatedness corresponded to 92% ITS sequence similarity. This suggests the usefulness of the ITS sequence similarity as a criterion for determining the genospecies of the phototrophic bacteria. To avoid the effects of polymorphism bias of ITS on similarities, PCR products from all loci of ITS were used directly as genetic probes for comparison. The results of ITS DNA-DNA hybridization coincided well with those of genomic DNA-DNA relatedness. These collective data indicate that the whole ITS DNA-DNA similarity can be used as an alternative to genomic DNA-DNA similarity.

  16. Cyanobacterial Ecotypes in Different Optical Microenvironments of a 68°C Hot Spring Mat Community Revealed by 16S-23S rRNA Internal Transcribed Spacer Region Variation†

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Mike J.; Kühl, Michael; Wieland, Andrea; Ward, David M.

    2003-01-01

    We examined the population of unicellular cyanobacteria (Synechococcus) in the upper 3-mm vertical interval of a 68°C region of a microbial mat in a hot spring effluent channel (Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming). Fluorescence microscopy and microsensor measurements of O2 and oxygenic photosynthesis demonstrated the existence of physiologically distinct Synechococcus populations at different depths along a light gradient quantified by scalar irradiance microprobes. Molecular methods were used to evaluate whether physiologically distinct populations could be correlated with genetically distinct populations over the vertical interval. We were unable to identify patterns in genetic variation in Synechococcus 16S rRNA sequences that correlate with different vertically distributed populations. However, patterns of variation at the internal transcribed spacer locus separating 16S and 23S rRNA genes suggested the existence of closely related but genetically distinct populations corresponding to different functional populations occurring at different depths. PMID:12732563

  17. Genotyping of a miso and soy sauce fermentation yeast, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, based on sequence analysis of the partial 26S ribosomal RNA gene and two internal transcribed spacers.

    PubMed

    Suezawa, Yasuhiko; Suzuki, Motofumi; Mori, Haruhiko

    2008-09-01

    We analyzed sequences of the D1D2 domain of the 26S ribosomal RNA gene (26S rDNA sequence), the internal transcribed spacer 1, the 5.8S ribosomal RNA gene, and the internal transcribed spacer 2 (the ITS sequence) from 46 strains of miso and soy sauce fermentation yeast, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and a closely related species, Z. mellis, for typing. Based on the 26S rDNA sequence analysis, the Z. rouxii strains were of two types, and the extent of sequence divergence between them was 2.6%. Based on the ITS sequence analysis, they were divided into seven types (I-VII). Between the type strain (type I) and type VI, in particular, a 12% difference was detected. The occurrence of these nine genotypes with a divergence of more than 1% in these two sequences suggests that Z. rouxii is a species complex including novel species and hybrids. Z. mellis strains were of two types (type alpha and type beta) based on the ITS sequence. Z. rouxii could clearly be distinguished from Z. mellis by 26S rDNA and ITS sequence analyses, but not by the 16% NaCl tolerance, when used as the sole key characteristic for differentiation between the two species. PMID:18776675

  18. [Analysis of the sequences of internal transcribed spacers ITS1, ITS2 and the 5.8S ribosomal gene of species of the Amaranthus genus].

    PubMed

    Slugina, M A; Torres Minho, K; Filiushin, M A

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the sequence ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 in 11 samples of the amaranth species (Amaranthus caudatus, A. cruentus, A. hybridus, A. tricolor, A. paniculatus, A. hypohondriacus) was performed. It has been shown that the variability of the sequences of the intergenic spacers ITS1, ITS2 and 5.8S rRNA gene of the amaranth species analyzed is extremely low. A possible secondary structure of the 5.8S rRNA molecule was determined for the first time; three conservative motifs were identified. A single nucleotide substitution found in A. hybridus did not change the loop topology. In the sample of Celosia cristata taken as an external group, a four-nucleotide insertion in the 5'-end of the gene and a one-nucleotide deletion in the fourth hairpin not affecting the general topology of the 5.8S rRNA molecule were found. PMID:25739312

  19. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) variation in the Anastrepha fraterculus cryptic species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae) of the Andean region.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Bruce D; Steck, Gary J; Norrbom, Allen L; Rodriguez, Erick J; Srivastava, Pratibha; Alvarado, Norma Nolazco; Colque, Fredy; Landa, Erick Yábar; Sánchez, Juan José Lagrava; Quisberth, Elizabeth; Peñaranda, Emilio Arévalo; Clavijo, P A Rodriguez; Alvarez-Baca, Jeniffer K; Zapata, Tito Guevara; Ponce, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was sequenced for Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann, 1830) originating from 85 collections from the northern and central Andean countries of South America including Argentina (Tucumán), Bolivia, Perú, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. The ITS1 regions of additional specimens (17 collections) from Central America (México, Guatemala, Costa Rica, and Panamá), Brazil, Caribbean Colombia, and coastal Venezuela were sequenced and together with published sequences (Paraguay) provided context for interpretation. A total of six ITS1 sequence variants were recognized in the Andean region comprising four groups. Type I predominates in the southernmost range of Anastrepha fraterculus. Type II predominates in its northernmost range. In the central and northern Andes, the geographic distributions overlap and interdigitate with a strong elevational effect. A discussion of relationships between observed ITS1 types and morphometric types is included. PMID:26798259

  20. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) variation in the Anastrepha fraterculus cryptic species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae) of the Andean region

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Bruce D.; Steck, Gary J.; Norrbom, Allen L.; Rodriguez, Erick J.; Srivastava, Pratibha; Alvarado, Norma Nolazco; Colque, Fredy; Landa, Erick Yábar; Sánchez, Juan José Lagrava; Quisberth, Elizabeth; Peñaranda, Emilio Arévalo; Clavijo, P. A. Rodriguez; Alvarez-Baca, Jeniffer K.; Zapata, Tito Guevara; Ponce, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was sequenced for Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann, 1830) originating from 85 collections from the northern and central Andean countries of South America including Argentina (Tucumán), Bolivia, Perú, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. The ITS1 regions of additional specimens (17 collections) from Central America (México, Guatemala, Costa Rica, and Panamá), Brazil, Caribbean Colombia, and coastal Venezuela were sequenced and together with published sequences (Paraguay) provided context for interpretation. A total of six ITS1 sequence variants were recognized in the Andean region comprising four groups. Type I predominates in the southernmost range of Anastrepha fraterculus. Type II predominates in its northernmost range. In the central and northern Andes, the geographic distributions overlap and interdigitate with a strong elevational effect. A discussion of relationships between observed ITS1 types and morphometric types is included. PMID:26798259

  1. Anti-spacer double patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, Michael; Huang, Karen; DeVilliers, Anton; Slezak, Mark; Liu, Zhi

    2014-03-01

    With extreme UV not ready for HVM for the 20nm and 14nm nodes, double patterning options that extend the use of 193nm immersion lithography beyond the optical resolution limits, such as LELE (Litho-Etch-Litho-Etch) and SADP (Self Aligned Double Patterning), are being used for critical layers for these nodes. LELE requires very stringent overlay capability of the optical exposure tool. The spacer scheme of SADP starts with a conformal film of material around the mandrels and etched along the mandrel sidewalls to form patterns with doubled frequency. SADP, while having the advantage of being a self-aligned process, adds a number of process steps and strict control of the mandrel profile is required. In this paper, we will demonstrate a novel technique - ASDP (Anti-Spacer Double Patterning), which uses only spin-on materials to achieve self-aligned double patterning. After initial resist patterning, an Anti-Spacer Generator (ASG) material is coated on the resist pattern to create the developable spacer region. Another layer of material is then coated and processed to generate the second pattern in between the first resist pattern. We were able to define 37.5nm half pitch pattern features using this technique as well as sub-resolution features for an asymmetric pattern. In this paper we will review the capability of the process in terms of CD control and LWR (line width roughness) and discuss the limitations of the process.

  2. DEVELOPMENT AND UTILITY OF A ‘ONE-STEP’ SPECIES-SPECIFIC MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTIC MARKER FOR GONATOCERUS MORRILLI DESIGNED TOWARD THE INTERNAL TRANSCRIBED SPACER REGION 2 (ITS2) TO MONITOR ESTABLISHMENT IN CALIFORNIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In addition to the ‘one-step’ species-specific molecular diagnostic ISSR-PCR DNA fingerprinting method, we developed an additional ‘one-step’ molecular diagnostic marker ‘gmtx’ toward Gonatocerus morrilli (Howard) designed toward the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS2) to aid in mo...

  3. Identification of three yeast species using the conventional and internal transcribed spacer region sequencing methods as first or second global record from human superficial infections.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Sater, Mohamed Ahmed; Moubasher, Abdel-Aal Hassan; Soliman, Zeinab

    2016-10-01

    During the mycological analysis of skin and nail samples taken from patients with onychomycosis and tineas in Assiut city, it is interesting to report that yeast fungi were the main causal agents being cultured from 45.79% of total cases. In general, 21 species of yeast were isolated. Some of these are reported for the first time from clinical specimens. From the literature available up-to-date around the world, this study reports for the first time Saccharomycopsis fibuligera as the causal agent of four clinical cases: two onychomycoses, one tinea capitis and one tinea amiantacea. Also, it is reported here the second record for Trichosporon dohaense from a case of onychomycosis of a 40-year-old woman (after its original description in 2009 by Taj-Aldeen et al. J Clin Microbiol 47: 1791). Candida galli was also reported for the first time from clinical specimen (tinea unguium) in 2014 by Galán-Sánchez et al. Mycopathol 178: 303, and this study reports the second case of onychomycosis by C. galli. These strains were identified on the basis of their phenotypic, biochemical, physiological and genotypic features. Strains and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene sequences of these species are deposited at Assiut University Mycological Center Culture Collection (AUMC) and National Center for Biotechnological Information (NCBI) respectively. PMID:27392537

  4. Molecular phylogeny and species delimitation within the ciliate genus Spirostomum (Ciliophora, Postciliodesmatophora, Heterotrichea), using the internal transcribed spacer region.

    PubMed

    Shazib, Shahed Uddin Ahmed; Vďačný, Peter; Kim, Ji Hye; Jang, Seok Won; Shin, Mann Kyoon

    2016-09-01

    Morphological and molecular delimitation of Spirostomum species is currently under debate. We addressed species boundaries within the genus Spirostomum, using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and the secondary structure of the ITS2 molecule, and 18S and 28S (D1D2) sequences additionally. The Spirostomum ITS region is among the shortest within the ciliates hitherto studied. The Spirostomum ITS2 molecule matches the "ring model", but exhibits only two helices radiating from a common loop. According to comparative analyses, they very likely correspond to helices II and III of other eukaryotes. Our phylogenetic analyses of the ITS region revealed a complex genealogical structure within the genus Spirostomum. However, boundaries among Spirostomum species could not be unambiguously determined either by phylogenetic trees, networks or sequence divergence cutoffs, because ITS2 sequences transcended species boundaries of the following morphospecies: S. ambiguum, S. minus, S. subtilis and S. teres. According to molecular diversity analysis, this is very likely caused by polymorphism in S. minus and S. teres, and by the lack of variability in S. ambiguum and S. subtilis. No compensatory base changes (CBCs) were detected in helices of the ITS2 molecule between different Spirostomum species, documenting that CBC analysis per se is not able to effectively discriminate Spirostomum species. PMID:27261253

  5. Improved Bacterial 16S rRNA Gene (V4 and V4-5) and Fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer Marker Gene Primers for Microbial Community Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Walters , William; Hyde, Embriette R.; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Ackermann, Gail; Humphrey, Greg; Parada , Alma; Gilbert, Jack A.; Jansson, Janet K.; Caporaso, Greg; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Apprill, Amy; Knight, Rob

    2015-12-22

    Designing primers for PCR-based taxonomic surveys that amplify a broad range of phylotypes in varied community samples is a difficult challenge, and the comparability of datasets amplified with varied primers requires attention. Here we examine the performance of modified 16S rRNA gene and ITS primers for archaea/bacteria and fungi, respectively, with non-aquatic samples. We moved primer barcodes to the 5’-end, allowing for a range of different 3’ primer pairings, such as the 515f/926r primer pair, which amplifies variable regions 4-5 of the 16S rRNA gene. We additionally demonstrate that modifications to the 515f/806r (variable region 4) 16S primer pair, which improves detection of Thaumarchaeota and SAR11 in marine samples, do not degrade performance on taxa already amplified effectively by the original primer set. Alterations to the fungal ITS primers did result in differential but overall improved performance compared to the original primers. In both cases, the improved primers should be widely adopted for amplicon studies.

  6. Combining nested PCR and restriction digest of the internal transcribed spacer region to characterize arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on roots from the field.

    PubMed

    Renker, Carsten; Heinrichs, Jochen; Kaldorf, Michael; Buscot, François

    2003-08-01

    Identification of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on roots is almost impossible with morphological methods and, due to the presence of contaminating fungi, it is also difficult with molecular biological techniques. To allow broad investigation of the population structure of AMF in the field, we have established a new method to selectively amplify the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of most AMF with a unique primer set. Based on available sequences of the rDNA, one primer pair specific for AMF and a few other fungal groups was designed and combined in a nested PCR with the already established primer pair ITS5/ITS4. Amplification from contaminating organisms was reduced by an AluI restriction after the first reaction of the nested PCR. The method was assessed at five different field sites representing different types of habitats. Members of all major groups within the Glomeromycota (except Archaeosporaceae) were detected at the different sites. Gigasporaceae also proved detectable with the method based on cultivated strains. PMID:12938031

  7. Evaluation of internal transcribed spacer region of ribosomal DNA sequence analysis for molecular characterization of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis isolates from HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Millon, L; Piarroux, R; Drobacheff, C; Monod, M; Grenouillet, F; Bulle, B; Bole, J; Blancard, A; Meillet, D

    2002-12-01

    Molecular typing systems have been needed to study Candida colonization in HIV-infected patients, particularly for investigating virulence and fluconazole resistance. Three methods--electrophoretic karyotyping (EK), detection of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPD)--have been most frequently used. In this study, comparative sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA was evaluated for delineation of Candida isolates from 14 HIV-infected patients. EK, ITS sequence analysis, RFLP and RAPD resulted in 11, 10, 9 and 8 DNA genotypes, respectively, from 39 Candida albicans isolates. The 10 genotypes observed using ITS sequence analysis were defined by six variation sites in the sequence. Molecular typing of sequential oral isolates showed the persistence of the same genotype of C. albicans in nine patients, and genotype variation in one patient. EK and RAPD showed that another patient was co-infected by two distinct genotypes and ITS analysis identified one of the two genotypes as Candida dubliniensis. Comparative ITS sequence analysis is a quick and reproducible method that provides clear and objective results, and it also identifies C. dubliniensis. The discriminatory power of this new typing approach could be improved by concomitant analysis of other DNA polymorphic sequences. PMID:12521117

  8. Molecular variation analysis of Aspergillus flavus using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region

    PubMed Central

    Zarrin, Majid; Erfaninejad, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is the second most common disease-causing species of Aspergillus in humans. The fungus is frequently associated with life-threatening infections in immunocompromised hosts. The primary aim of the present study was to analyze the genetic variability among different isolates of A. flavus using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). A total of 62 A. flavus isolates were tested in the study. Molecular variability was searched for by analysis of the PCR amplification of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of ribosomal DNA using restriction enzymes. PCR using primers for ITS1 and ITS4 resulted in a product of ~600 bp. Amplicons were subjected to digestion with restriction endonucleases EcoRI, HaeIII and TaqI. Digestion of the PCR products using these restriction enzymes produced different patterns of fragments among the isolates, with different sizes and numbers of fragments, revealing genetic variability. In conclusion, ITS-RFLP is a useful molecular tool in screening for nucleotide polymorphisms among A. flavus isolates. PMID:27588085

  9. Analysis of the rDNA internal transcribed spacer region of the Fusarium species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    ZARRIN, MAJID; GANJ, FARZANEH; FARAMARZI, SAMA

    2016-01-01

    The Fusarium species are a widely spread phytopathogen identified in an extensive variety of hosts. The Fusarium genus is one of the most heterogeneous fungi and is difficult to classify. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis is a useful method in detection of DNA polymorphism in objective sequences. The aim of the present study was to identify the phylogenetic associations and usefulness of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a genetic marker within the most clinically important strain of the Fusarium species. A total of 50 strains of Fusarium spp. were used in the study, including environmental, clinical and reference isolates. The primers ITS1 and ITS4 were used in the study. Two restriction enzymes, HaeIII and SmaI, were assessed for the digestion of PCR products. A PCR product of ~550-base pairs was generated for each Fusarium species. The digested products with HaeIII and SmaI demonstrated that the bands generated for the medically significant Fusarium species, including F. solani, F. oxysporum, F. verticillidea, F. proliferatum and F. fujikuri, have different restriction enzyme patterns. In conclusion, it appears that the PCR-RFLP method used in the present study produces a sufficient restriction profile for differentiation of the most medically significant Fusarium species. PMID:27073635

  10. Strain typing of Zygosaccharomyces yeast species using a single molecular method based on polymorphism of the intergenic spacer region (IGS).

    PubMed

    Wrent, Petra; Rivas, Eva-María; Peinado, José M; de Silóniz, María-Isabel

    2010-08-15

    Unlike previously reported methods that need a combination of several typing techniques, we have developed a single method for strain typing of the Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Z. mellis and Z. rouxii spoilage species. Strains belonging to other species have also been included for comparison. We have demonstrated that the IGS-PCR RFLP method has a high discriminative power. Considering the three endonucleases used in this work, we have obtained a variability of 100% for Z. mellis and Z. rouxii strains and up to 70% for Z. bailii. We have also detected two misidentified Z. mellis strains (CBS 711 and CBS 7412) which have RFLP patterns with a set of bands characteristic of Z. rouxii strains. Sequencing of 26S rDNA D1/D2 domains and the 5.8-ITS rDNA region confirmed these strains as Z. rouxii. The method also groups three certified hybrid strains of Zygosaccharomyces in a separate cluster. PMID:20619910

  11. Development of a Reverse Genetic System for Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus: Rescue of Recombinant Fluorescent Virus by Using Salmon Internal Transcribed Spacer Region 1 as a Novel Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Toro-Ascuy, Daniela; Tambley, Carolina; Beltran, Carolina; Mascayano, Carolina; Sandoval, Nicolas; Olivares, Eduardo; Medina, Rafael A.; Spencer, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Infectious salmon anemia (ISA) is a serious disease of marine-farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) caused by ISA virus (ISAV), belonging to the genus Isavirus, family Orthomyxoviridae. There is an urgent need to understand the virulence factors and pathogenic mechanisms of ISAV and to develop new vaccine approaches. Using a recombinant molecular biology approach, we report the development of a plasmid-based reverse genetic system for ISAV, which includes the use of a novel fish promoter, the Atlantic salmon internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS-1). Salmon cells cotransfected with pSS-URG-based vectors expressing the eight viral RNA segments and four cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vectors that express the four proteins of the ISAV ribonucleoprotein complex allowed the generation of infectious recombinant ISAV (rISAV). We generated three recombinant viruses, wild-type rISAV901_09 and rISAVrS6-NotI-HPR containing a NotI restriction site and rISAVS6/EGFP-HPR harboring the open reading frame of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), both within the highly polymorphic region (HPR) of segment 6. All rescued viruses showed replication activity and cytopathic effect in Atlantic salmon kidney-infected cells. The fluorescent recombinant viruses also showed a characteristic cytopathic effect in salmon cells, and the viruses replicated to a titer of 6.5 × 105 PFU/ml, similar to that of the wild-type virus. This novel reverse genetics system offers a powerful tool to study the molecular biology of ISAV and to develop a new generation of ISAV vaccines to prevent and mitigate ISAV infection, which has had a profound effect on the salmon industry. PMID:25480750

  12. From Genus to Phylum: Large-Subunit and Internal Transcribed Spacer rRNA Operon Regions Show Similar Classification Accuracies Influenced by Database Composition

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kuan-Liang; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2014-01-01

    We compared the classification accuracy of two sections of the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, individually and combined, and the 5′ section (about 600 bp) of the large-subunit rRNA (LSU), using a naive Bayesian classifier and BLASTN. A hand-curated ITS-LSU training set of 1,091 sequences and a larger training set of 8,967 ITS region sequences were used. Of the factors evaluated, database composition and quality had the largest effect on classification accuracy, followed by fragment size and use of a bootstrap cutoff to improve classification confidence. The naive Bayesian classifier and BLASTN gave similar results at higher taxonomic levels, but the classifier was faster and more accurate at the genus level when a bootstrap cutoff was used. All of the ITS and LSU sections performed well (>97.7% accuracy) at higher taxonomic ranks from kingdom to family, and differences between them were small at the genus level (within 0.66 to 1.23%). When full-length sequence sections were used, the LSU outperformed the ITS1 and ITS2 fragments at the genus level, but the ITS1 and ITS2 showed higher accuracy when smaller fragment sizes of the same length and a 50% bootstrap cutoff were used. In a comparison using the larger ITS training set, ITS1 and ITS2 had very similar accuracy classification for fragments between 100 and 200 bp. Collectively, the results show that any of the ITS or LSU sections we tested provided comparable classification accuracy to the genus level and underscore the need for larger and more diverse classification training sets. PMID:24242255

  13. Identification of cultured isolates of clinically important yeast species using fluorescent fragment length analysis of the amplified internally transcribed rRNA spacer 2 region

    PubMed Central

    De Baere, Thierry; Claeys, Geert; Swinne, Danielle; Massonet, Caroline; Verschraegen, Gerda; Muylaert, An; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2002-01-01

    Background The number of patients with yeast infection has increased during the last years. Also the variety of species of clinical importance has increased. Correct species identification is often important for efficient therapy, but is currently mostly based on phenotypic features and is sometimes time-consuming and depends largely on the expertise of technicians. Therefore, we evaluated the feasibility of PCR-based amplification of the internally transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS2), followed by fragment size analysis on the ABI Prism 310 for the identification of clinically important yeasts. Results A rapid DNA-extraction method, based on simple boiling-freezing was introduced. Of the 26 species tested, 22 could be identified unambiguously by scoring the length of the ITS2-region. No distinction could be made between the species Trichosporon asteroides and T. inkin or between T. mucoides and T. ovoides. The two varieties of Cryptococcus neoformans (var. neoformans and var. gattii) could be differentiated from each other due to a one bp length difference of the ITS2 fragment. The three Cryptococcus laurentii isolates were split into two groups according to their ITS2-fragment lengths, in correspondence with the phylogenetic groups described previously. Since the obtained fragment lengths compare well to those described previously and could be exchanged between two laboratories, an internationally usable library of ITS2 fragment lengths can be constructed. Conclusions The existing ITS2 size based library enables identification of most of the clinically important yeast species within 6 hours starting from a single colony and can be easily updated when new species are described. Data can be exchanged between laboratories. PMID:12139769

  14. Differentiation of Phylogenetically Related Slowly Growing Mycobacteria Based on 16S-23S rRNA Gene Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Andreas; Fischer, Marga; Hamid, Mohamed E.; Michalke, Sabine; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Mauch, Harald

    1998-01-01

    Interspecific polymorphisms of the 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) are widely used for species identification of mycobacteria. 16S rDNA sequences, however, do not vary greatly within a species, and they are either indistinguishable in some species, for example, in Mycobacterium kansasii and M. gastri, or highly similar, for example, in M. malmoense and M. szulgai. We determined 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of 60 strains in the genus Mycobacterium representing 13 species (M. avium, M. conspicuum, M. gastri, M. genavense, M. kansasii, M. malmoense, M. marinum, M. shimoidei, M. simiae, M. szulgai, M. triplex, M. ulcerans, and M. xenopi). An alignment of these sequences together with additional sequences available in the EMBL database (for M. intracellulare, M. phlei, M. smegmatis, and M. tuberculosis) was established according to primary- and secondary-structure similarities. Comparative sequence analysis applying different treeing methods grouped the strains into species-specific clusters with low sequence divergence between strains belonging to the same species (0 to 2%). The ITS-based tree topology only partially correlated to that based on 16S rDNA, but the main branching orders were preserved, notably, the division of fast-growing from slowly growing mycobacteria, separate branching for M. simiae, M. genavense, and M. triplex, and distinct branches for M. xenopi and M. shimoidei. Comparisons of M. gastri with M. kansasii and M. malmoense with M. szulgai revealed ITS sequence similarities of 93 and 88%, respectively. M. marinum and M. ulcerans possessed identical ITS sequences. Our results show that ITS sequencing represents a supplement to 16S rRNA gene sequences for the differentiation of closely related species. Slowly growing mycobacteria show a high sequence variation in the ITS; this variation has the potential to be used for the development of probes as a rapid approach to mycobacterial identification. PMID:9431937

  15. Novel genetic diversity within Anopheles punctimacula s.l.: phylogenetic discrepancy between the Barcode cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene and the rDNA second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2).

    PubMed

    Loaiza, Jose R; Scott, Marilyn E; Bermingham, Eldredge; Sanjur, Oris I; Rovira, Jose R; Dutari, Larissa C; Linton, Yvonne-Marie; Bickersmith, Sara; Conn, Jan E

    2013-10-01

    Anopheles punctimacula s.l. is a regional malaria vector in parts of Central America, but its role in transmission is controversial due to its unresolved taxonomic status. Two cryptic species, An. malefactor and An. calderoni, have been previously confused with this taxon, and evidence for further genetic differentiation has been proposed. In the present study we collected and morphologically identified adult female mosquitoes of An. punctimacula s.l. from 10 localities across Panama and one in Costa Rica. DNA sequences from three molecular regions, the three prime end of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene (3' COI), the Barcode region in the five prime end of the COI (5' COI), and the rDNA second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) were used to test the hypothesis of new molecular lineages within An. punctimacula s.l. Phylogenetic analyses using the 3' COI depicted six highly supported molecular lineages (A-F), none of which was An. malefactor. In contrast, phylogenetic inference with the 5' COI demonstrated paraphyly. Tree topologies based on the combined COI regions and ITS2 sequence data supported the same six lineages as the 3' COI alone. As a whole this evidence suggests that An. punctimacula s.l. comprises two geographically isolated lineages, but it is not clear whether these are true species. The phylogenetic structure of the An. punctimacula cluster as well as that of other unknown lineages (C type I vs C type II; D vs E) appears to be driven by geographic partition, because members of these assemblages did not overlap spatially. We report An. malefactor for the first time in Costa Rica, but our data do not support the presence of An. calderoni in Panama. PMID:23806568

  16. Novel genetic diversity within Anopheles punctimacula s.l.: Phylogenetic discrepancy between the Barcode cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene and the rDNA second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2)

    PubMed Central

    Loaiza, Jose R.; Scott, Marilyn E.; Bermingham, Eldredge; Sanjur, Oris I.; Rovira, Jose R.; Dutari, Larissa C.; Linton, Yvonne-Marie; Bickersmith, Sara; Conn, Jan E.

    2013-01-01

    Anopheles punctimacula s.l. is a regional malaria vector in parts of Central America, but its role in transmission is controversial due to its unresolved taxonomic status. Two cryptic species, An. malefactor and An. calderoni, have been previously confused with this taxon, and evidence for further genetic differentiation has been proposed. In the present study we collected and morphologically identified adult female mosquitoes of An. punctimacula s.l. from 10 localities across Panama and one in Costa Rica. DNA sequences from three molecular regions, the three prime end of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene (3´ COI), the Barcode region in the five prime end of the COI (5´ COI), and the rDNA second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) were used to test the hypothesis of new molecular lineages within An. punctimacula s.l. Phylogenetic analyses using the 3´ COI depicted six highly supported molecular lineages (A–F), none of which was An. malefactor. In contrast, phylogenetic inference with the 5´ COI demonstrated paraphyly. Tree topologies based on the combined COI regions and ITS2 sequence data supported the same six lineages as the 3´ COI alone. As a whole this evidence suggests that An. punctimacula s.l. comprises two geographically isolated lineages, but it is not clear whether these are true species. The phylogenetic structure of the An. punctimacula cluster as well as that of other unknown lineages (C type I vs C type II; D vs E) appears to be driven by geographic partition, because members of these assemblages did not overlap spatially. We report An. malefactor for the first time in Costa Rica, but our data do not support the presence of An. calderoni in Panama. PMID:23806568

  17. A Real-Time PCR Method for Quantifying Viable Ascaris Eggs Using the First Internally Transcribed Spacer Region of Ribosomal DNA▿

    PubMed Central

    Pecson, Brian M.; Barrios, José Antonio; Johnson, David R.; Nelson, Kara L.

    2006-01-01

    Worldwide, 1.4 billion people are infected with the intestinal worm Ascaris lumbricoides. As a result, Ascaris eggs are commonly found in wastewater and sludges. The current microscopy method for detecting viable Ascaris eggs is time- and labor-intensive. The goal of this study was to develop a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) method to determine the levels of total and viable Ascaris eggs in laboratory solutions using the first internally transcribed spacer (ITS-1) region of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and rRNA. ITS-1 rDNA levels were proportional to Ascaris egg cell numbers, increasing as eggs developed from single cells to mature larvae and ultimately reaching a constant level per egg. Treatments causing >99% inactivation (high heat, moderate heat, ammonia, and UV) eliminated this increase in ITS-1 rDNA levels and caused decreases that were dependent on the treatment type. By taking advantage of this difference in ITS-1 rDNA level between viable, larvated eggs and inactivated, single-celled eggs, qPCR results were used to develop inactivation profiles for the different treatments. No statistical difference from the standard microscopy method was found in 75% of the samples (12 of 16). ITS-1 rRNA was detected only in samples containing viable eggs, but the levels were more variable than rDNA levels and ITS-1 rRNA could not be used for quantification. The detection limit of the rDNA-based method was approximately one larvated egg or 90 single-celled eggs; the detection limit for the rRNA-based method was several orders of magnitude higher. The rDNA qPCR method is promising for both research and regulatory applications. PMID:17056687

  18. Sequencer-Based Capillary Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Targeting the rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) Regions for Accurate Identification of Clinically Important Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sharon C.-A.; Wang, He; Zhang, Li; Fan, Xin; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Cheng, Jing-Wei; Kong, Fanrong; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Accurate species identification of Candida, Cryptococcus, Trichosporon and other yeast pathogens is important for clinical management. In the present study, we developed and evaluated a yeast species identification scheme by determining the rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region length types (LTs) using a sequencer-based capillary gel electrophoresis (SCGE) approach. A total of 156 yeast isolates encompassing 32 species were first used to establish a reference SCGE ITS LT database. Evaluation of the ITS LT database was then performed on (i) a separate set of (n = 97) clinical isolates by SCGE, and (ii) 41 isolates of 41 additional yeast species from GenBank by in silico analysis. Of 156 isolates used to build the reference database, 41 ITS LTs were identified, which correctly identified 29 of the 32 (90.6%) species, with the exception of Trichosporon asahii, Trichosporon japonicum and Trichosporon asteroides. In addition, eight of the 32 species revealed different electropherograms and were subtyped into 2–3 different ITS LTs each. Of the 97 test isolates used to evaluate the ITS LT scheme, 96 (99.0%) were correctly identified to species level, with the remaining isolate having a novel ITS LT. Of the additional 41 isolates for in silico analysis, none was misidentified by the ITS LT database except for Trichosporon mucoides whose ITS LT profile was identical to that of Trichosporon dermatis. In conclusion, yeast identification by the present SCGE ITS LT assay is a fast, reproducible and accurate alternative for the identification of clinically important yeasts with the exception of Trichosporon species. PMID:27105313

  19. Promoter region of mouse Tcrg genes

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimi, Y.; Huang, Y.Y.; Ohta, S.

    1996-06-01

    The mouse T-cell receptor (Tcr){gamma} chain is characterized by a specific expression of V gene segments in the thymus corresponding to consecutive developmental stages; i.e., the Vg5 in fetal, Vg6 in neonatal, and Vg4 and Vg7 in adult. The order of the Vg gene usage correlates with the localization of the Vg gene segment on the chromosome; i.e., the Vg5 gene, being most proximal to the Jg1, is used first, followed by the Vg segments away from the Jg1 in a sequential manner. Since they all rearrange to the same Jg1 gene segment, the sequences in the coding region and/or in the 5{prime} upstream region are responsible for the stage-specific transcription. Also, Goldman and co-workers reported the germline transcription of Vg genes preceding their rearrangement. Therefore, the stage-specific transcription may be involved in the regulation of the stage-specific rearrangement; we sequenced and analyzed the 5{prime} flanking regions of the Vg5, Vg6, Vg4, and Vg7 genes to study the transcriptional relation. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) variation in the Anastrepha fraterculus cryptic species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae) of the Andean region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was sequenced for Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann, 1830) originating from 85 collections from the northern and central Andean countries of South America including Argentina (Tucumán), Bolivia, Perú, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. The IT...

  1. The CRISPR RNA-guided surveillance complex in Escherichia coli accommodates extended RNA spacers

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Michelle L.; Jackson, Ryan N.; Denny, Steven R.; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika; Maksimchuk, Kenneth R.; Lin, Wayne; Bothner, Brian; Wiedenheft, Blake; Beisel, Chase L.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea acquire resistance to foreign genetic elements by integrating fragments of foreign DNA into CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) loci. In Escherichia coli, CRISPR-derived RNAs (crRNAs) assemble with Cas proteins into a multi-subunit surveillance complex called Cascade (CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense). Cascade recognizes DNA targets via protein-mediated recognition of a protospacer adjacent motif and complementary base pairing between the crRNA spacer and the DNA target. Previously determined structures of Cascade showed that the crRNA is stretched along an oligomeric protein assembly, leading us to ask how crRNA length impacts the assembly and function of this complex. We found that extending the spacer portion of the crRNA resulted in larger Cascade complexes with altered stoichiometry and preserved in vitro binding affinity for target DNA. Longer spacers also preserved the in vivo ability of Cascade to repress target gene expression and to recruit the Cas3 endonuclease for target degradation. Finally, longer spacers exhibited enhanced silencing at particular target locations and were sensitive to mismatches within the extended region. These findings demonstrate the flexibility of the Type I-E CRISPR machinery and suggest that spacer length can be modified to fine-tune Cascade activity. PMID:27174938

  2. Combining denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA V3 region and 16S-23S rDNA spacer region polymorphism analyses for the identification of staphylococci from Italian fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Pennacchia, Carmelina; Ercolini, Danilo; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Villani, Francesco

    2003-09-01

    Separation of amplified V3 region from 16S rDNA by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region polymorphism (ISR-PCR) analyses were tested as tool for differentiation of staphylococcal strains commonly isolated from fermented sausages. Variable V3 regions of 25 staphylococcal reference strains and 96 wild strains of species belonging to the genera Staphylococcus, Micrococcus and Kocuria were analyzed. PCR-DGGE profiles obtained were species-specific for S. sciuri, S. haemolyticus, S. hominis, S. auricularis, S. condimenti, S. kloosi, S. vitulus, S. succinus, S. pasteuri, S. capitis and S. (Macrococcus) caseolyticus. Moreover, 7 groups could be distinguished gathering the remaining species as result of the separation of the V3 rDNA amplicons in DGGE. Furthermore, the combination of the results obtained by PCR-DGGE and ISR-PCR analyses allowed a clear differentiation of all the staphylococcal species analysed, with exception of the pairs S. equorum-S. cohnii and S. carnosus-S. schleiferi. The suitability of both molecular techniques and of the combination their results for the identification of staphylococci was validated analysing partial nucleotide sequence of the 16S rDNA of a representative number of wild strains. PMID:14529185

  3. Gene Regions Responding to Skeletal Muscle Atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Frank W.

    1997-01-01

    Our stated specific aims for this project were: 1) Identify the region(s) of the mouse IIb myosin heavy chain (MHC) promoter necessary for in vivo expression in mouse fast-twitch muscle, and 2) Identify the region(s) of the mouse IIb MHC promoter responsive to immobilization in mouse slow-twitch muscle in vivo. We sought to address these specific aims by introducing various MHC IIb promoter/reporter gene constructs directly into the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles of living mice. Although the method of somatic gene transfer into skeletal muscle by direct injection has been successfully used in our laboratory to study the regulation of the skeletal alpha actin gene in chicken skeletal muscle, we had many difficulties utilizing this procedure in the mouse. Because of the small size of the mouse soleus and the difficulty in obtaining consistent results, we elected not to study this muscle as first proposed. Rather, our MHC IIb promoter deletion experiments were performed in the gastrocnemius. Further, we decided to use hindlimb unloading via tail suspension to induce an upregulation of the MHC IIb gene, rather than immobilization of the hindlimbs via plaster casts. This change was made because tail suspension more closely mimics spaceflight, and this procedure in our lab results in a smaller loss of overall body mass than the mouse hindlimb immobilization procedure. This suggests that the stress level during tail suspension is less than during immobilization. This research has provided an important beginning point towards understanding the molecular regulation of the MHC lIb gene in response to unweighting of skeletal muscle Future work will focus on the regulation of MHC IIb mRNA stability in response to altered loading of skeletal muscle

  4. Phylogenetic study of six species of Anopheles mosquitoes in Peninsular Malaysia based on inter-transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS2) of ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques are invaluable for investigation on the biodiversity of Anopheles mosquitoes. This study aimed at investigating the spatial-genetic variations among Anopheles mosquitoes from different areas of Peninsular Malaysia, as well as deciphering evolutionary relationships of the local Anopheles mosquitoes with the mosquitoes from neighbouring countries using the anopheline ITS2 rDNA gene. Methods Mosquitoes were collected, identified, dissected to check infection status, and DNA extraction was performed for PCR with primers targeting the ITS2 rDNA region. Sequencing was done and phylogenetic tree was constructed to study the evolutionary relationship among Anopheles mosquitoes within Peninsular Malaysia, as well as across the Asian region. Results A total of 133 Anopheles mosquitoes consisting of six different species were collected from eight different locations across Peninsular Malaysia. Of these, 65 ITS2 rDNA sequences were obtained. The ITS2 rDNA amplicons of the studied species were of different sizes. One collected species, Anopheles sinensis, shows two distinct pools of population in Peninsular Malaysia, suggesting evolvement of geographic race or allopatric speciation. Conclusion Anopheles mosquitoes from Peninsular Malaysia show close evolutionary relationship with the Asian anophelines. Nevertheless, genetic differences due to geographical segregation can be seen. Meanwhile, some Anopheles mosquitoes in Peninsular Malaysia show vicariance, exemplified by the emergence of distinct cluster of An. sinensis population. PMID:24993022

  5. Molecular phylogenetic studies on filarial parasites based on 5S ribosomal spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Xie, H; Bain, O; Williams, S A

    1994-06-01

    This paper is the first large-scale molecular phylogenetic study on filarial parasites (family Onchocercidae) which includes 16 species of 6 genera: Brugia beaveri Ash et Little, 1962, B. buckleyi Dissanaike et Paramananthan, 1961; B. malayi (Brug, 1927) Buckley, 1960; B. pahangi (Buckley et Edeson, 1956) Buckley, 1960; B. patei (Buckley, Nelson et Heisch, 1958) Buckley, 1960; B. timori Partono et al, 1977; Wuchereria bancrofti (Cobbold, 1877) Seurat, 1921: W. kalimantani Palmieri. Purnomo, Dennis and Marwoto, 1980: Mansonella perstans (Manson, 1891) Eberhard et Orihel, 1984; loa loc, Stiles, 1905; Onchocerca volvulus (Leuckart, 1983) Railliet er Henry, 1910; O. ochengi Bwangamoi, 1969; O. gutturosa Neumann, 1910; Dirofilaria immitis (Leidy, 1856) Railliet e Henry, 1911; Acanthocheilonema viteae (Krepkogorskaya, 1933) Bain, Baker et Chabaud, 1982 and Litomosoides sigmodontis Chandler, 1931. 5S rRNA gene spacer region sequence data were collected by PCR, cloning and dideoxy sequencing. The 5S rRNA gene spacer region sequences were aligned and analyzed by maximum parsimony algorithms, distance methods and maximum likelihood methods to construct phylogenetic trees. Bootstrap analysis was used to test the robustness of the different phylogenetic reconstructions. The data indicated that 5S spacer region sequences are highly conserved within species yet differ significantly between species. Spliced leader sequences were observed in all of the 5S rDNA spacers with no sequence variation, although flanking region sequence and length heterogeneity was observed even within species. All of the various tree-building methods gave very similar results. This study identified four clades which are strongly supported by bootstrap analysis the Brugia clade; the Wuchereria clade; the Brugia-Wuchereria clade and the Onchocerca clade. The analyses indicated that L. sigmodontis and A. viteae may be the most primitive among the 16 species studied. The data did not show any close

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of Pythium insidiosum Thai strains using cytochrome oxidase II (COX II) DNA coding sequences and internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS).

    PubMed

    Kammarnjesadakul, Patcharee; Palaga, Tanapat; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Mendoza, Leonel; Krajaejun, Theerapong; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch; Tongchusak, Songsak; Denduangboripant, Jessada; Chindamporn, Ariya

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the phylogenetic relationship among Pythium insidiosum isolates in Thailand, we investigated the genomic DNA of 31 P. insidiosum strains isolated from humans and environmental sources from Thailand, and two from North and Central America. We used PCR to amplify the partial COX II DNA coding sequences and the ITS regions of these isolates. The nucleotide sequences of both amplicons were analyzed by the Bioedit program. Phylogenetic analysis using genetic distance method with Neighbor Joining (NJ) approach was performed using the MEGA4 software. Additional sequences of three other Pythium species, Phytophthora sojae and Lagenidium giganteum were employed as outgroups. The sizes of the COX II amplicons varied from 558-564 bp, whereas the ITS products varied from approximately 871-898 bp. Corrected sequence divergences with Kimura 2-parameter model calculated for the COX II and the ITS DNA sequences ranged between 0.0000-0.0608 and 0.0000-0.2832, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis using both the COX II and the ITS DNA sequences showed similar trees, where we found three sister groups (A(TH), B(TH), and C(TH)) among P. insidiosum strains. All Thai isolates from clinical cases and environmental sources were placed in two separated sister groups (B(TH) and C(TH)), whereas the Americas isolates were grouped into A(TH.) Although the phylogenetic tree based on both regions showed similar distribution, the COX II phylogenetic tree showed higher resolution than the one using the ITS sequences. Our study indicates that COX II gene is the better of the two alternatives to study the phylogenetic relationships among P. insidiosum strains. PMID:20818919

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi I genotypes in different geographic regions and transmission cycles based on a microsatellite motif of the intergenic spacer of spliced leader genes✯

    PubMed Central

    Cura, Carolina I.; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana M.; Duffy, Tomás; Burgos, Juan M.; Rodriguero, Marcela; Cardinal, Marta V.; Kjos, Sonia; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Blanchet, Denis; De Pablos, Luis M.; Tomasini, Nicolás; Silva, Alex Da; Russomando, Graciela; Cuba Cuba, Cesar A.; Aznar, Christine; Abate, Teresa; Levin, Mariano J.; Osuna, Antonio; Gürtler, Ricardo E.; Diosque, Patricio; Solari, Aldo; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Schijman, Alejandro G.

    2011-01-01

    The intergenic region of spliced-leader (SL-IR) genes from 105 Trypanosoma cruzi I (Tc I) infected biological samples, culture isolates and stocks from 11 endemic countries, from Argentina to the USA were characterised, allowing identification of 76 genotypes with 54 polymorphic sites from 123 aligned sequences. On the basis of the microsatellite motif proposed by Herrera et al. (2007) to define four haplotypes in Colombia, we could classify these genotypes into four distinct Tc I SL-IR groups, three corresponding to the former haplotypes Ia (11 genotypes), Ib (11 genotypes) and Id (35 genotypes); and one novel group, Ie (19 genotypes). Genotypes harboring the Tc Ic motif were not detected in our study. Tc Ia was associated with domestic cycles in southern and northern South America and sylvatic cycles in Central and North America. Tc Ib was found in all transmission cycles from Colombia. Tc Id was identified in all transmission cycles from Argentina and Colombia, including Chagas cardiomyopathy patients, sylvatic Brazilian samples and human cases from French Guiana, Panama and Venezuela. Tc Ie gathered five samples from domestic Triatoma infestans from northern Argentina, nine samples from wild Mepraia spinolai and Mepraia gajardoi and two chagasic patients from Chile and one from a Bolivian patient with chagasic reactivation. Mixed infections by Tc Ia + Tc Id, Tc Ia + Tc Ie and Tc Id + Tc Ie were detected in vector faeces and isolates from human and vector samples. In addition, Tc Ia and Tc Id were identified in different tissues from a heart transplanted Chagas cardiomyopathy patient with reactivation, denoting histotropism. Trypanosoma cruzi I SL-IR genotypes from parasites infecting Triatoma gerstaeckeri and Didelphis virginiana from USA, T. infestans from Paraguay, Rhodnius nasutus and Rhodnius neglectus from Brazil and M. spinolai and M. gajardoi from Chile are to our knowledge described for the first time. PMID:20670628

  8. Organization of spacer DNA in chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, D; Van Holde, K E

    1979-01-01

    Detailed analysis of the DNA fragment patterns produced by DNase I digestion of yeast, HeLa, and chicken erythrocyte nuclei reveals surprising features of nucleosome phasing. First, the spacer regions in phased yeast chromatin must be of lengths (10m + 5) base pairs, where m = 0, 1, 2,....This feature is not seen in parallel studies of chicken erythrocyte chromatin. The 5-base pair increment in the yeast spacer imposes interesting restraints on the higher order structure of yeast chromatin. Second, we have been able to simulate the DNase I cutting patterns and get good agreement with the observed yeast patterns. Third, three different chromatins show a long range periodicity in the DNase I digest pattern, with a period half that of the staphylococcal nuclease repeat. These results suggest that the amount of chromatin observed in discrete extended-ladder bands is a minimum estimate of phasing and in fact phasing may be a more general feature. Images PMID:392519

  9. Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed spacer from serofluid dish, a traditional Chinese fermented food

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peng; Zhao, Yang; Wu, Zhengrong; Liu, Ronghui; Xu, Ruixiang; Yan, Lei; Li, Hongyu

    2015-01-01

    Serofluid dish (or Jiangshui, in Chinese), a traditional food in the Chinese culture for thousands of years, is made from vegetables by fermentation. In this work, microorganism community of the fermented serofluid dish was investigated by the culture-independent method. The metagenomic data in this article contains the sequences of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rRNA genes from 12 different serofluid dish samples. The metagenome comprised of 50,865 average raw reads with an average of 8,958,220 bp and G + C content is 45.62%. This is the first report on metagenomic data of fungal ITS from serofluid dish employing Illumina platform to profile the fungal communities of this little known fermented food from Gansu Province, China. The Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed spacer can be accessed at NCBI, SRA database accession no. SRP067411. PMID:26981389

  10. Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed spacer from serofluid dish, a traditional Chinese fermented food.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Zhao, Yang; Wu, Zhengrong; Liu, Ronghui; Xu, Ruixiang; Yan, Lei; Li, Hongyu

    2016-03-01

    Serofluid dish (or Jiangshui, in Chinese), a traditional food in the Chinese culture for thousands of years, is made from vegetables by fermentation. In this work, microorganism community of the fermented serofluid dish was investigated by the culture-independent method. The metagenomic data in this article contains the sequences of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rRNA genes from 12 different serofluid dish samples. The metagenome comprised of 50,865 average raw reads with an average of 8,958,220 bp and G + C content is 45.62%. This is the first report on metagenomic data of fungal ITS from serofluid dish employing Illumina platform to profile the fungal communities of this little known fermented food from Gansu Province, China. The Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed spacer can be accessed at NCBI, SRA database accession no. SRP067411. PMID:26981389

  11. Comparison of Virulence Gene Identification, Ribosomal Spacer PCR, and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis for Typing of Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Cases of Subclinical Bovine Mastitis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Pamela R F; Middleton, John R; Fox, Lawrence K

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important pathogens causing contagious mastitis in dairy cattle worldwide. The objectives of this study were to determine if recently described S. aureus genotype B was present among previously characterized isolates from cases of bovine intramammary infection in the United States and to compare pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to the combination of ribosomal spacer PCR (RS-PCR) and virulence gene identification for typing of S. aureus strains. The hypothesis was that isolates that were previously characterized as contagious would be identified as genotype B and that the results of the two strain-typing methods would be comparable. Isolates were selected from a collection of S. aureus isolates from eight dairy farms. Mammary quarter milk somatic cell count (SCC) and N-acetyl-β-d-gluconaminidase (NAGase) activity data were known and used to evaluate strain pathogenicity. RS-PCR was performed with conventional gel electrophoresis, and PCR was used for toxin gene identification. RS-PCR patterns were associated with a specific virulence gene pattern, as previously reported. Five RS-PCR banding patterns were identified. None of the isolates were characterized as genotype B. No association between RS-PCR types and milk SCC was found; however, NAGase activity was significantly higher in milk from mammary glands infected with RS-PCR banding type 1 (RSP type 1) than in milk from those infected with RSP type 2. The discriminatory power values were 1.0 and 0.46 for PFGE and RS-PCR, respectively. These data suggest that genotype B may have a limited geographic distribution and that PFGE is more discriminatory than RS-PCR performed with conventional gel electrophoresis for typing of S. aureus isolates of bovine origin. PMID:27194685

  12. The identification and differentiation of the Candida parapsilosis complex species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Barbedo, Leonardo Silva; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-01-01

    Currently, it is accepted that there are three species that were formerly grouped under Candida parapsilosis: C. para- psilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis, andCandida metapsilosis. In fact, the antifungal susceptibility profiles and distinct virulence attributes demonstrate the differences in these nosocomial pathogens. An accurate, fast, and economical identification of fungal species has been the main goal in mycology. In the present study, we searched sequences that were available in the GenBank database in order to identify the complete sequence for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1-5.8S-ITS2 region, which is comprised of the forward and reverse primers ITS1 and ITS4. Subsequently, an in silico polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to differentiate the C. parapsilosis complex species. Ninety-eight clinical isolates from patients with fungaemia were submitted for analysis, where 59 isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 37 were identified as C. orthopsilosis, and two were identified as C. metapsilosis. PCR-RFLP quickly and accurately identified C. parapsilosis complex species, making this method an alternative and routine identification system for use in clinical mycology laboratories. PMID:27074256

  13. New gene coding regions from the horn fly, Haematobia irritans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used an EST approach to isolate new gene coding regions from the horn fly, Haematobia irritans. Two sources of expressed gene sequences were utilized. First, a subtracted library was synthesized from adult mixed sex fly cDNA of an organophosphate and pyrethroid resistant population of flies subtr...

  14. Genetic diversity, plant adaptation regions, and gene pools of switchgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Switchgrass is a perennial grass native to the North American tallgrass prairie and broadly adapted to the central and eastern USA. Movement of plant materials throughout this region creates the potential of contaminating local gene pools with genes that are not native to a locale. The objective o...

  15. Application of Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) Primer and PCR Clamping by LNA Oligonucleotide to Enhance the Amplification of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) Regions in Investigating the Community Structures of Plant–Associated Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Ikenaga, Makoto; Tabuchi, Masakazu; Kawauchi, Tomohiro; Sakai, Masao

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous extraction of host plant DNA severely limits investigations of the community structures of plant–associated fungi due to the similar homologies of sequences in primer–annealing positions between fungi and host plants. Although fungal-specific primers have been designed, plant DNA continues to be excessively amplified by PCR, resulting in the underestimation of community structures. In order to overcome this limitation, locked nucleic acid (LNA) primers and PCR clamping by LNA oligonucleotides have been applied to enhance the amplification of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. LNA primers were designed by converting DNA into LNA, which is specific to fungi, at the forward primer side. LNA oligonucleotides, the sequences of which are complementary to the host plants, were designed by overlapping a few bases with the annealing position of the reverse primer. Plant-specific DNA was then converted into LNA at the shifted position from the 3′ end of the primer–binding position. PCR using the LNA technique enhanced the amplification of fungal ITS regions, whereas those of the host plants were more likely to be amplified without the LNA technique. A denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis displayed patterns that reached an acceptable level for investigating the community structures of plant–associated fungi using the LNA technique. The sequences of the bands detected using the LNA technique were mostly affiliated with known isolates. However, some sequences showed low similarities, indicating the potential to identify novel fungi. Thus, the application of the LNA technique is considered effective for widening the scope of community analyses of plant–associated fungi. PMID:27600711

  16. Two control regions for eukaryotic tRNA gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    DeFranco, D; Schmidt, O; Söll, D

    1980-01-01

    Two Drosophila tRNALys genes with identical coding sequences were shown to transcribe with very different efficiences in nuclear extracts from Xenopus oocytes. The use of recombinant plasmids in which the 5'-flanking sequences of these genes were either "switched" or replaced by defined pBR322 sequences revealed two control regions for tRNA gene transcription. An internal control region comprising the mature tRNA coding sequence (and possibly its 3'-flanking sequences) is sufficient for transcription initiation, and an external control region comprising the 5'-flanking sequences represses this transcription. All transcripts have short leader sequences. Altered precursor tRNAs transcribed from truncated tRNALys genes (missing a single base pair in the acceptor stem) are not processed well in vitro. Images PMID:6774336

  17. Spacer grid assembly and locking mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Jr., Harold J.; Veca, Anthony R.; Donck, Harry A.

    1982-01-01

    A spacer grid assembly is disclosed for retaining a plurality of fuel rods in substantially parallel spaced relation, the spacer grids being formed with rhombic openings defining contact means for engaging from one to four fuel rods arranged in each opening, the spacer grids being of symmetric configuration with their rhombic openings being asymmetrically offset to permit inversion and relative rotation of the similar spacer grids for improved support of the fuel rods. An improved locking mechanism includes tie bars having chordal surfaces to facilitate their installation in slotted circular openings of the spacer grids, the tie rods being rotatable into locking engagement with the slotted openings.

  18. Generator stator core vent duct spacer posts

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, John Wesley; Tong, Wei

    2003-06-24

    Generator stator cores are constructed by stacking many layers of magnetic laminations. Ventilation ducts may be inserted between these layers by inserting spacers into the core stack. The ventilation ducts allow for the passage of cooling gas through the core during operation. The spacers or spacer posts are positioned between groups of the magnetic laminations to define the ventilation ducts. The spacer posts are secured with longitudinal axes thereof substantially parallel to the core axis. With this structure, core tightness can be assured while maximizing ventilation duct cross section for gas flow and minimizing magnetic loss in the spacers.

  19. The distribution of SNPs in human gene regulatory regions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yongjian; Jamison, D Curtis

    2005-01-01

    Background As a result of high-throughput genotyping methods, millions of human genetic variants have been reported in recent years. To efficiently identify those with significant biological functions, a practical strategy is to concentrate on variants located in important sequence regions such as gene regulatory regions. Results Analysis of the most common type of variant, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), shows that in gene promoter regions more SNPs occur in close proximity to transcriptional start sites than in regions further upstream, and a disproportionate number of those SNPs represent nucleotide transversions. Additionally, the number of SNPs found in the predicted transcription factor binding sites is higher than in non-binding site sequences. Conclusion Current information about transcription factor binding site sequence patterns may not be exhaustive, and SNPs may be actively involved in influencing gene expression by affecting the transcription factor binding sites. PMID:16209714

  20. The regions of sequence variation in caulimovirus gene VI.

    PubMed

    Sanger, M; Daubert, S; Goodman, R M

    1991-06-01

    The sequence of gene VI from figwort mosaic virus (FMV) clone x4 was determined and compared with that previously published for FMV clone DxS. Both clones originated from the same virus isolation, but the virus used to clone DxS was propagated extensively in a host of a different family prior to cloning whereas that used to clone x4 was not. Differences in the amino acid sequence inferred from the DNA sequences occurred in two clusters. An N-terminal conserved region preceded two regions of variation separated by a central conserved region. Variation in cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) gene VI sequences, all of which were derived from virus isolates from hosts from one host family, was similar to that seen in the FMV comparison, though the extent of variation was less. Alignment of gene VI domains from FMV and CaMV revealed regions of amino acid sequence identical in both viruses within the conserved regions. The similarity in the pattern of conserved and variable domains of these two viruses suggests common host-interactive functions in caulimovirus gene VI homologues, and possibly an analogy between caulimoviruses and certain animal viruses in the influence of the host on sequence variability of viral genes. PMID:2024500

  1. The 5' flanking region of human epsilon-globin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Baralle, F E; Shoulders, C C; Goodbourn, S; Jeffreys, A; Proudfoot, N J

    1980-01-01

    The structural analysis of the 2.0 kb region upstream from the epsilon-globin gene has been carried out. A genomic DNA map around the gene was worked out in some detail to ensure that the cloned DNA was representative of the actual chromosomal arrangement. Furthermore, a new technique was developed to precisely map a reiterated DNA sequence present 1.5 kb to the 5' side of the gene. The complete nucleotide sequence of the 2.0 kb 5' flanking region was then determined and overlapped with the gene. The sequence included the reiterated DNA sequence which is homologous to the so-called AluI family of repeats. Unusual stretches of sequence 50 nucleotides long, where A + T represent about 90% of the bases, are present at both the 5' and 3' sides of the repeat. Images PMID:6253916

  2. Genetic region characterization (Gene RECQuest) - software to assist in identification and selection of candidate genes from genomic regions

    PubMed Central

    Sadasivam, Rajani S; Sundar, Gayathri; Vaughan, Laura K; Tanik, Murat M; Arnett, Donna K

    2009-01-01

    Background The availability of research platforms like the web tools of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) has transformed the time-consuming task of identifying candidate genes from genetic studies to an interactive process where data from a variety of sources are obtained to select likely genes for follow-up. This process presents its own set of challenges, as the genetic researcher has to interact with several tools in a time-intensive, manual, and cumbersome manner. We developed a method and implemented an effective software system to address these challenges by multidisciplinary efforts of professional software developers with domain experts. The method presented in this paper, Gene RECQuest, simplifies the interaction with existing research platforms through the use of advanced integration technologies. Findings Gene RECQuest is a web-based application that assists in the identification of candidate genes from linkage and association studies using information from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and PubMed. To illustrate the utility of Gene RECQuest we used it to identify genes physically located within a linkage region as potential candidate genes for a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) response on chromosome 18. Conclusion Gene RECQuest provides a tool which enables researchers to easily identify and organize literature supporting their own expertise and make informed decisions. It is important to note that Gene RECQuest is a data acquisition and organization software, and not a data analysis method. PMID:19793396

  3. Gene recovery microdissection (GRM) a process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, A T; Coleman, M A; Tucker, J D

    2001-02-08

    Gene Recovery Microdissection (GRM) is a unique and cost-effective process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes. It accelerates the pace, reduces the cost, and extends the capabilities of functional genomic research, the means by which scientists will put to life-saving, life-enhancing use their knowledge of any plant or animal genome.

  4. Gene search in the FSHD region on 4q35

    SciTech Connect

    Deutekom, J.C.T. van; Romberg, S.; Geel, M. van

    1994-09-01

    In the search for the FSHD gene on 4q35, four overlapping cosmids spanning a region of 95 kb including the deletion-prone repeated units were subcloned as well as subjected to cDNA selection and exon trap strategies. A total of 300 selected clones with an average length of 500 bp were mapped back to the cosmids. None of the clones appeared to be single copy. Sequence data of most clones and the related genomic regions were compared. cDNA clones with a high homolgy (>90%) and a low repetitive hybridization pattern were further analyzed by Zoo- and Northern blotting and by sequence analysis programs like GRAIL. Excellent and good exons could be identified and some clones showed evolutionary conservation. With the best cDNA, genomic and exon trap clones, several cDNA libraries were screened. The obtained cDNAs identified different genes, none of which originated from 4q35. 3{prime} RACE experiments were performed using primers derived of predicted exons especially in a 2.2 kb EcoRI fragment about 20 kb centromeric of the repeats. So far, only non-4q35 genes could be identified. Altogether, our results support other recent studies indicating that the FSHD gene is most likely not encoded by the 3.3 kb repeated units. Moreover, the region centromeric of these repeats appeared to contain abundant repetitive sequences and homologies to several other chromosomes, complicating the identification of the FSHD gene.

  5. Mechanical evaluation of unipolar hip spacer constructs.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Frederick J; Strauss, Eric; Wright, Kevin; Kubiak, Erik N; Di Cesare, Paul E

    2008-10-01

    The strengths of 3 hip spacer constructs--Steinmann pins, a short intramedullary nail (both cement-incorporated), and a Charnley prosthesis--were determined and compared with the strength of a commercially available hip spacer. The hip prosthesis construct was more than twice as strong as the other 2 constructs and was equivalent in strength to the commercial spacer. For spacer applications in which limited weight-bearing is anticipated, the hip prosthesis construct appears more efficacious, but its pros and cons should be compared with those of the commercial product. PMID:19081880

  6. A novel cyclin gene (CCNF) in the region of the polycystic kidney disease gene (PKD1)

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, B.; Pohlschmidt, M.; Leung, L.S.

    1994-11-01

    The major locus for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD1) is located in a gene-rich region on chromosome 16p13.3. Recently the identification of the gene responsible for PKD1 has been described. While searching for candidate genes in this region, the authors isolated a new member of the cyclin family. They have characterized the transcript by sequencing, determination of the exon intron boundaries, and Northern blot analysis. Cyclin F is related to A- and B-type cyclins by sequence, but its function is unknown.

  7. Isolation and characterization of genes from the SMA candidate region

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T.G.; Ta, D.; Wasmuth, J.J.

    1994-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting alpha motor neutrons. SMA has been mapped to 5q12-13, between the genetic markers D5S435 and 38.3. The distance between these markers, which are closest on the opposite sides of the SMA locus, is {approximately}750 kb. An extensive physical map of this region has been constructed by radiation hybrid (RH) mapping and YAC contig assembly. Further analysis of the YAC contig of the SMA region revealed many deletions and duplications within the YACs. The extensive rearrangements in these YACs makes it very difficult to use them to construct a cosmid contig. The YACs and cosmids isolated thus far have been used to isolate expressed sequences using the method of exon amplification. Putative exons were then used to screen various cDNA libraries to isolate the corresponding cDNAs. Genomic sequences that cross-hybridize very strongly to many of the cDNAs are present in two different regions of chromosome 5, in the SMA region and in 5p13-14. These duplications appear to represent genes and partially processed psuedogenes in one or both of the regions and it has been difficult to determine which of the two loci is the functional gene. Other cDNAs located exclusively in the SMA region have also been found. From the two classes of cDNAs (duplicated or single copy), there are four that are good candidates for the disease gene. These include a cDNA that shows homology to a chicken neuronal specific myosin heavy chain gene, an expressed variant of promelanin concentrating hormone, k-cadherin and a glutathion-S-transferase Mu class protein. We are isolating the full length transcripts for each of these and will use them in DGGE and SSCP gel analysis of SMA patients.

  8. Regulatory circuit based on autogenous activation-repression: roles of C-boxes and spacer sequences in control of the PvuII restriction-modification system

    PubMed Central

    Mruk, Iwona; Rajesh, Preeti; Blumenthal, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    Type II restriction-modification (R-M) systems comprise a restriction endonuclease (REase) and a protective methyltransferase (MTase). After R-M genes enter a new cell, MTase must appear before REase or the chromosome will be cleaved. PvuII and some other R-M systems achieve this delay by cotranscribing the REase gene with the gene for an autogenous transcription activator (the controlling or ‘C’ protein C.PvuII). This study reveals, through in vivo titration, that C.PvuII is not only an activator but also a repressor for its own gene. In other systems, this type of circuit can result in oscillatory behavior. Despite the use of identical, symmetrical C protein-binding sequences (C-boxes) in the left and right operators, C.PvuII showed higher in vitro affinity for OL than for OR, implicating the spacer sequences in this difference. Mutational analysis associated the repression with OR, which overlaps the promoter −35 hexamer but is otherwise dispensable for activation. A nonrepressing mutant exhibited poor establishment in new cells. Comparing promoter-operator regions from PvuII and 29 R-M systems controlled by C proteins revealed that the most-highly conserved sequence is the tetranucleotide spacer separating OL from OR. Any changes in that spacer reduced the stability of C.PvuII-operator complexes and abolished activation. PMID:17933763

  9. Regulatory circuit based on autogenous activation-repression: roles of C-boxes and spacer sequences in control of the PvuII restriction-modification system.

    PubMed

    Mruk, Iwona; Rajesh, Preeti; Blumenthal, Robert M

    2007-01-01

    Type II restriction-modification (R-M) systems comprise a restriction endonuclease (REase) and a protective methyltransferase (MTase). After R-M genes enter a new cell, MTase must appear before REase or the chromosome will be cleaved. PvuII and some other R-M systems achieve this delay by cotranscribing the REase gene with the gene for an autogenous transcription activator (the controlling or 'C' protein C.PvuII). This study reveals, through in vivo titration, that C.PvuII is not only an activator but also a repressor for its own gene. In other systems, this type of circuit can result in oscillatory behavior. Despite the use of identical, symmetrical C protein-binding sequences (C-boxes) in the left and right operators, C.PvuII showed higher in vitro affinity for O(L) than for O(R), implicating the spacer sequences in this difference. Mutational analysis associated the repression with O(R), which overlaps the promoter -35 hexamer but is otherwise dispensable for activation. A nonrepressing mutant exhibited poor establishment in new cells. Comparing promoter-operator regions from PvuII and 29 R-M systems controlled by C proteins revealed that the most-highly conserved sequence is the tetranucleotide spacer separating O(L) from O(R). Any changes in that spacer reduced the stability of C.PvuII-operator complexes and abolished activation. PMID:17933763

  10. CRISPR interference and priming varies with individual spacer sequences

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Chaoyou; Seetharam, Arun S.; Musharova, Olga; Severinov, Konstantin; J. Brouns, Stan J.; Severin, Andrew J.; Sashital, Dipali G.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR–Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated) systems allow bacteria to adapt to infection by acquiring ‘spacer’ sequences from invader DNA into genomic CRISPR loci. Cas proteins use RNAs derived from these loci to target cognate sequences for destruction through CRISPR interference. Mutations in the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) and seed regions block interference but promote rapid ‘primed’ adaptation. Here, we use multiple spacer sequences to reexamine the PAM and seed sequence requirements for interference and priming in the Escherichia coli Type I-E CRISPR–Cas system. Surprisingly, CRISPR interference is far more tolerant of mutations in the seed and the PAM than previously reported, and this mutational tolerance, as well as priming activity, is highly dependent on spacer sequence. We identify a large number of functional PAMs that can promote interference, priming or both activities, depending on the associated spacer sequence. Functional PAMs are preferentially acquired during unprimed ‘naïve’ adaptation, leading to a rapid priming response following infection. Our results provide numerous insights into the importance of both spacer and target sequences for interference and priming, and reveal that priming is a major pathway for adaptation during initial infection. PMID:26586800

  11. Divergence of human [alpha]-chain constant region gene sequences: A novel recombinant [alpha]2 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Chintalacharuvu, K. R.; Morrison, S.L. ); Raines, M. )

    1994-06-01

    IgA is the major Ig synthesized in humans and provides the first line of defense at the mucosal surfaces. The constant region of IgA heavy chain is encoded by the [alpha] gene on chromosome 14. Previous studies have indicated the presence of two [alpha] genes, [alpha]1 and [alpha]2 existing in two allotypic forms, [alpha]2 m(1) and [alpha]2 m(2). Here the authors report the cloning and complete nucleotide sequence determination of a novel human [alpha] gene. Nucleotide sequence comparison with the published [alpha] sequences suggests that the gene arose as a consequence of recombination or gene conversion between the two [alpha]2 alleles. The authors have expressed the gene as a chimeric protein in myeloma cells indicating that it encodes a functional protein. The novel IgA resembles IgA2 m(2) in that disulfide bonds link H and L chains. This novel recombinant gene provides insights into the mechanisms of generation of different constant regions and suggests that within human populations, multiple alleles of [alpha] may be present providing IgAs of different structures.

  12. Optimization of Radiation Therapy Techniques for Prostate Cancer With Prostate-Rectum Spacers: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, Gary; Benz, Eileen; Vallee, Jean-Paul; Miralbell, Raymond; Zilli, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Dose-escalated radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer improves disease control but is also associated with worse rectal toxicity. A spacer placed between the prostate and rectum can be used to displace the anterior rectal wall outside of the high-dose radiation regions and potentially minimize radiation-induced rectal toxicity. This systematic review focuses on the published data regarding the different types of commercially available prostate-rectum spacers. Dosimetric results and preliminary clinical data using prostate-rectum spacers in patients with localized prostate cancer treated by curative radiation therapy are compared and discussed.

  13. Increase of the electron mobility in HEMT heterostructures with composite spacers containing AlAs nanolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Vinichenko, A. N. Gladkov, V. P.; Kargin, N. I.; Strikhanov, M. N.; Vasil’evskii, I. S.

    2014-12-15

    The effect of the hybridization of quantum states on electron transport in a two-barrier quantum well δ-doped through a spacer layer at the limit of heavy doping is shown theoretically and experimentally. A method for increasing the electron mobility in the quantum well by suppressing the tunnel coupling with the donor region through the introduction of an AlAs nanobarrier into the spacer layer is proposed. It is experimentally shown that, in the samples with a shallow quantum well, the AlAs nanobarrier introduced into the spacer layer provides a larger than threefold increase in the electron mobility at low temperatures.

  14. Identification of Escherichia coli region III flagellar gene products and description of two new flagellar genes.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, D H; Matsumura, P

    1984-01-01

    Region III flagellar genes in Escherichia coli are involved with the assembly and rotation of the flagella, as well as taxis. We subcloned the flaB operon from a lambda fla transducing phage onto plasmid pMK2004. Two additional genes were found at the flaB locus, and we subdivided the flaB gene into flaB1, flaBII, and flaBIII. The cheY suppressor mutations which have previously been mapped to flaB were further localized to flaB11 (Parkinson et al., J. Bacteriol. 155:265-274, 1983). Until now, gene product identification has not been possible for these genes because of their low levels of gene expression. Overexpression of the flagellar genes was accomplished by placing the flaB operon under the control of the lacUV5 or tac promoters. Plasmid-encoded proteins were examined in a minicell expression system. By correlating various deletions and insertions in the flaB operon with the ability to complement specific flagellar mutants and code for polypeptides, we made the following gene product assignments: flaB 1, 60 kilodaltons; flaB 11, 38 kilodaltons; flaB111, 28 kilodaltons; flaC, 56 kilodaltons; fla0, 16 kilodaltons; and flaE, 54 kilodaltons. Images PMID:6094477

  15. LISA telescope spacer design investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjuan, Josep; Mueller, Guido; Livas, Jeffrey; Preston, Alix; Arsenovic, Petar; Castellucci, Kevin; Generie, Joseph; Howard, Joseph; Stebbins, Robin

    ) and materials such as Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) are considered to be used in the telescope spacer structure. We will describe our experimental efforts to understand and quantify the behavior of different materials and also discuss a first investigation of a specific on-axis SiC telescope spacer for LISA. This work is supported by NASA contract 00069955.

  16. Subclustering of human immunoglobulin kappa light chain variable region genes

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, J.H.; Mountain, J.L.; Cavalli-Sforza, L.L. )

    1993-04-01

    The human immunoglobulin kappa light chain (IgK) locus includes multiple variable region gene segments (V[sub k]) that can be divided into four subgroups. Oligonucleotide primers were designed to amplify specifically gene segments of the V[sub k]I, V[sub k]II, and V[sub k]III subgroups using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Product sequences were subcloned, sequenced, and compared. Phylogenetic analyses of sequences within each subgroup indicate that some subgroups can be subdivided further into [open quotes]sub-subgroups.[close quotes] The history of V[sub k] segment duplications apparently includes at least two separate periods, the first giving rise to the subgroups and the second generating further complexity within each subgroup. Duplications of large pieces of DNA (demonstrated by others through pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) also played a role. Rates of synonymous and nonsynonymous base changes between pairs of sequences suggest that natural selection has played a major role in the evolution of the V[sub k] variable gene segments, leading to sequence conservation in some regions and to increased diversity in others. 34 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Leukemia breakpoint region in 3q21 is gene rich.

    PubMed

    Rynditch, A; Pekarsky, Y; Schnittger, S; Gardiner, K

    1997-07-01

    Rearrangements of the long arm of human chromosome 3, including reciprocal translocations, inversions and deletion/duplication of bands 3q21-3q26, as well as deletions of 3q21 and reciprocal translocations between 3q21 and other chromosomes, are well documented in leukemia. Previous studies showed that the breakpoints within 3q21 cluster within a 10-40 kb region but no candidate genes were described. In this work, we have identified partial cDNAs corresponding to five to nine new transcripts from an 80 kb P1 clone that spans ten breakpoints. These transcripts, with one exception, appear to be expressed only at low levels in the set of cancer cell lines examined. Four transcripts are located between the previously mapped Ribophorin I gene and the most centromeric breakpoint; three map directly within the 20 kb spanning nine independent breakpoints. These data (i) show that among characterized leukemia breakpoint regions 3q21 is unusually gene rich, (ii) provide new candidates for relevance to leukemia in 3q21, and (iii) suggest possibilities for chromatin configuration effects. PMID:9249066

  18. Suppression of cytoplasmic male sterility by nuclear genes alters expression of a novel mitochondrial gene region.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M; Brown, G G

    1991-01-01

    To identify regions of the mitochondrial genome that potentially could specify the "Polima" (pol) cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) of Brassica napus, transcripts of 14 mitochondrial genes from nap (male fertile), pol (male sterile), and nuclear fertility-restored pol cytoplasm plants were analyzed. Transcriptional differences among these plants were detected only with the ATPase subunit 6 (atp6) gene. Structural analysis of the atp6 gene regions of pol and nap mitochondrial DNAs showed that rearrangements in the pol mitochondrial genome occurring upstream of atp6 have generated a chimeric 224-codon open reading frame, designated orf224, that is cotranscribed with atp6. In CMS plants, most transcripts of this region are dicistronic, comprising both orf224 and atp6 sequences. Nuclear restorer genes at either of two distinct loci appear to specifically alter this transcript pattern such that monocistronic atp6 transcripts predominate. The differences in expression of this region appear to result, in part, from differential processing of a tRNA-like element comprising a tRNA pseudogene present immediately upstream of atp6 in both the sterile and fertile mitochondrial DNAs. Possible mechanisms by which expression of the orf224/atp6 locus and the Polima CMS trait may be specifically related are considered. PMID:1840901

  19. Extensive length variation in the ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer of yellow perch (Perca flavescens).

    PubMed

    Kakou, Bidénam; Angers, Bernard; Glémet, Hélène

    2016-03-01

    The intergenic spacer (IGS) is located between ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene copies. Within the IGS, regulatory elements for rRNA gene transcription are found, as well as a varying number of other repetitive elements that are at the root of IGS length heterogeneity. This heterogeneity has been shown to have a functional significance through its effect on growth rate. Here, we present the structural organization of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) IGS based on its entire sequence, as well as the IGS length variation within a natural population. Yellow perch IGS structure has four discrete regions containing tandem repeat elements. For three of these regions, no specific length class was detected as allele size was seemingly normally distributed. However, for one repeat region, PCR amplification uncovered the presence of two distinctive IGS variants representing a length difference of 1116 bp. This repeat region was also devoid of any CpG sites despite a high GC content. Balanced selection may be holding the alleles in the population and would account for the high diversity of length variants observed for adjacent regions. Our study is an important precursor for further work aiming to assess the role of IGS length variation in influencing growth rate in fish. PMID:26841134

  20. Molecular analysis of a NOR site polymorphism in brown trout (Salmo trutta): organization of rDNA intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Castro, J; Sánchez, L; Martínez, P; Lucchini, S D; Nardi, I

    1997-12-01

    Using restriction endonuclease mapping, we have analyzed the organization of rDNA (DNA coding for ribosomal RNA (rRNA)) units in the salmonid fish Salmo trutta, as an initial step toward understand the molecular basis of a nucleolar organizer region (NOR) site polymorphism detected in this species. The size of the rDNA units ranged between 15 and 23 kb, with remarkable variation both within individuals and between populations. Three regions of internal tandem repetitiveness responsible for this length polymorphism were located to the intergenic spacers. NOR site polymorphic individuals showed a higher number of length classes, in some cases forming a complete 1 kb fragment ladder. The amount of rRNA genes was as much as 8-fold higher in polymorphic individuals compared with standard individuals. All individuals from the most polymorphic population showed a 14-kb insertion of unknown nature in a small proportion (below 25%) of the 28S rRNA genes. PMID:18464877

  1. A functional analysis of the spacer of V(D)J recombination signal sequences.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alfred Ian; Fugmann, Sebastian D; Cowell, Lindsay G; Ptaszek, Leon M; Kelsoe, Garnett; Schatz, David G

    2003-10-01

    During lymphocyte development, V(D)J recombination assembles antigen receptor genes from component V, D, and J gene segments. These gene segments are flanked by a recombination signal sequence (RSS), which serves as the binding site for the recombination machinery. The murine Jbeta2.6 gene segment is a recombinationally inactive pseudogene, but examination of its RSS reveals no obvious reason for its failure to recombine. Mutagenesis of the Jbeta2.6 RSS demonstrates that the sequences of the heptamer, nonamer, and spacer are all important. Strikingly, changes solely in the spacer sequence can result in dramatic differences in the level of recombination. The subsequent analysis of a library of more than 4,000 spacer variants revealed that spacer residues of particular functional importance are correlated with their degree of conservation. Biochemical assays indicate distinct cooperation between the spacer and heptamer/nonamer along each step of the reaction pathway. The results suggest that the spacer serves not only to ensure the appropriate distance between the heptamer and nonamer but also regulates RSS activity by providing additional RAG:RSS interaction surfaces. We conclude that while RSSs are defined by a "digital" requirement for absolutely conserved nucleotides, the quality of RSS function is determined in an "analog" manner by numerous complex interactions between the RAG proteins and the less-well conserved nucleotides in the heptamer, the nonamer, and, importantly, the spacer. Those modulatory effects are accurately predicted by a new computational algorithm for "RSS information content." The interplay between such binary and multiplicative modes of interactions provides a general model for analyzing protein-DNA interactions in various biological systems. PMID:14551903

  2. Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia gene region cloned in yeast artificial chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Kere, J. |; Grzeschik, K.H.; Limon, J.; Gremaud, M.; Schlessinger, D.; De La Chapelle, A.

    1993-05-01

    Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA), an X-chromosomal recessive disorder, is expressed in a few females with chromosomal translocations involving bands Xq12-q13. Using available DNA markers from the region and somatic cell hybrids the authors mapped the X-chromosomal breakpoints in two such translocations. The breakpoints were further mapped within a yeast artificial chromosome contig constructed by chromosome walking techniques. Genomic DNA markers that map between the two translocation breakpoints were recovered representing putative portions of the EDA gene. 32 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The Mitochondrial Genome of the Leaf-Cutter Ant Atta laevigata: A Mitogenome with a Large Number of Intergenic Spacers

    PubMed Central

    Rodovalho, Cynara de Melo; Lyra, Mariana Lúcio; Ferro, Milene; Bacci, Maurício

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the nearly complete mitochondrial genome of the leaf-cutter ant Atta laevigata, assembled using transcriptomic libraries from Sanger and Illumina next generation sequencing (NGS), and PCR products. This mitogenome was found to be very large (18,729 bp), given the presence of 30 non-coding intergenic spacers (IGS) spanning 3,808 bp. A portion of the putative control region remained unsequenced. The gene content and organization correspond to that inferred for the ancestral pancrustacea, except for two tRNA gene rearrangements that have been described previously in other ants. The IGS were highly variable in length and dispersed through the mitogenome. This pattern was also found for the other hymenopterans in particular for the monophyletic Apocrita. These spacers with unknown function may be valuable for characterizing genome evolution and distinguishing closely related species and individuals. NGS provided better coverage than Sanger sequencing, especially for tRNA and ribosomal subunit genes, thus facilitating efforts to fill in sequence gaps. The results obtained showed that data from transcriptomic libraries contain valuable information for assembling mitogenomes. The present data also provide a source of molecular markers that will be very important for improving our understanding of genomic evolutionary processes and phylogenetic relationships among hymenopterans. PMID:24828084

  4. Parallel Evolution of Genes and Languages in the Caucasus Region

    PubMed Central

    Balanovsky, Oleg; Dibirova, Khadizhat; Dybo, Anna; Mudrak, Oleg; Frolova, Svetlana; Pocheshkhova, Elvira; Haber, Marc; Platt, Daniel; Schurr, Theodore; Haak, Wolfgang; Kuznetsova, Marina; Radzhabov, Magomed; Balaganskaya, Olga; Romanov, Alexey; Zakharova, Tatiana; Soria Hernanz, David F.; Zalloua, Pierre; Koshel, Sergey; Ruhlen, Merritt; Renfrew, Colin; Wells, R. Spencer; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Balanovska, Elena

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed 40 SNP and 19 STR Y-chromosomal markers in a large sample of 1,525 indigenous individuals from 14 populations in the Caucasus and 254 additional individuals representing potential source populations. We also employed a lexicostatistical approach to reconstruct the history of the languages of the North Caucasian family spoken by the Caucasus populations. We found a different major haplogroup to be prevalent in each of four sets of populations that occupy distinct geographic regions and belong to different linguistic branches. The haplogroup frequencies correlated with geography and, even more strongly, with language. Within haplogroups, a number of haplotype clusters were shown to be specific to individual populations and languages. The data suggested a direct origin of Caucasus male lineages from the Near East, followed by high levels of isolation, differentiation and genetic drift in situ. Comparison of genetic and linguistic reconstructions covering the last few millennia showed striking correspondences between the topology and dates of the respective gene and language trees, and with documented historical events. Overall, in the Caucasus region, unmatched levels of gene-language co-evolution occurred within geographically isolated populations, probably due to its mountainous terrain. PMID:21571925

  5. Parallel evolution of genes and languages in the Caucasus region.

    PubMed

    Balanovsky, Oleg; Dibirova, Khadizhat; Dybo, Anna; Mudrak, Oleg; Frolova, Svetlana; Pocheshkhova, Elvira; Haber, Marc; Platt, Daniel; Schurr, Theodore; Haak, Wolfgang; Kuznetsova, Marina; Radzhabov, Magomed; Balaganskaya, Olga; Romanov, Alexey; Zakharova, Tatiana; Soria Hernanz, David F; Zalloua, Pierre; Koshel, Sergey; Ruhlen, Merritt; Renfrew, Colin; Wells, R Spencer; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Balanovska, Elena

    2011-10-01

    We analyzed 40 single nucleotide polymorphism and 19 short tandem repeat Y-chromosomal markers in a large sample of 1,525 indigenous individuals from 14 populations in the Caucasus and 254 additional individuals representing potential source populations. We also employed a lexicostatistical approach to reconstruct the history of the languages of the North Caucasian family spoken by the Caucasus populations. We found a different major haplogroup to be prevalent in each of four sets of populations that occupy distinct geographic regions and belong to different linguistic branches. The haplogroup frequencies correlated with geography and, even more strongly, with language. Within haplogroups, a number of haplotype clusters were shown to be specific to individual populations and languages. The data suggested a direct origin of Caucasus male lineages from the Near East, followed by high levels of isolation, differentiation, and genetic drift in situ. Comparison of genetic and linguistic reconstructions covering the last few millennia showed striking correspondences between the topology and dates of the respective gene and language trees and with documented historical events. Overall, in the Caucasus region, unmatched levels of gene-language coevolution occurred within geographically isolated populations, probably due to its mountainous terrain. PMID:21571925

  6. Human mucin gene MUC5AC: organization of its 5'-region and central repetitive region.

    PubMed Central

    Escande, F; Aubert, J P; Porchet, N; Buisine, M P

    2001-01-01

    Human mucin gene MUC5AC is clustered with MUC2, MUC5B and MUC6 on chromosome 11p15.5. We report here the full length cDNA sequence upstream of the repetitive region of human MUC5AC. We have also determined the sequence of its large central tandem repeat array. The 5'-region reveals high degree of sequence similarity with MUC2 and MUC5B and codes for 1336 amino acids organized into a signal peptide, four pro-von Willebrand factor-like D domains (D1, D2, D' and D3) and a short domain which connects to the central repetitive region. In the central region, 17 major domains have been identified. Nine code for cysteine-rich domains (Cys-domains 1-9) and exhibit high sequence similarity to the cysteine-rich domains described in the central region of MUC2 and MUC5B. Cys-domains 1-5 are interspersed by domains enriched with serine, threonine, and proline residues. Cys-domains 1-9 are interspersed by four domains (TR1-TR4) composed of various numbers of MUC5AC-type repeats. Southern-blot analyses reveal allelic variations both in length and nucleotide sequence. The length polymorphism which is due to variable numbers of tandem repeats is located in TR1 and TR4, whereas a mutation polymorphism detected with TaqI is located in Cys-domain 6. In this study, the organization of MUC5AC has been entirely elucidated showing extensive similarity to the other chromosome 11p15 MUC genes, particularly MUC5B, and providing additional arguments for common evolution from a single ancestral gene. PMID:11535137

  7. Sequence conservation and functional constraint on intergenic spacers in reduced genomes of the obligate symbiont Buchnera.

    PubMed

    Degnan, Patrick H; Ochman, Howard; Moran, Nancy A

    2011-09-01

    Analyses of genome reduction in obligate bacterial symbionts typically focus on the removal and retention of protein-coding regions, which are subject to ongoing inactivation and deletion. However, these same forces operate on intergenic spacers (IGSs) and affect their contents, maintenance, and rates of evolution. IGSs comprise both non-coding, non-functional regions, including decaying pseudogenes at varying stages of recognizability, as well as functional elements, such as genes for sRNAs and regulatory control elements. The genomes of Buchnera and other small genome symbionts display biased nucleotide compositions and high rates of sequence evolution and contain few recognizable regulatory elements. However, IGS lengths are highly correlated across divergent Buchnera genomes, suggesting the presence of functional elements. To identify functional regions within the IGSs, we sequenced two Buchnera genomes (from aphid species Uroleucon ambrosiae and Acyrthosiphon kondoi) and applied a phylogenetic footprinting approach to alignments of orthologous IGSs from a total of eight Buchnera genomes corresponding to six aphid species. Inclusion of these new genomes allowed comparative analyses at intermediate levels of divergence, enabling the detection of both conserved elements and previously unrecognized pseudogenes. Analyses of these genomes revealed that 232 of 336 IGS alignments over 50 nucleotides in length displayed substantial sequence conservation. Conserved alignment blocks within these IGSs encompassed 88 Shine-Dalgarno sequences, 55 transcriptional terminators, 5 Sigma-32 binding sites, and 12 novel small RNAs. Although pseudogene formation, and thus IGS formation, are ongoing processes in these genomes, a large proportion of intergenic spacers contain functional sequences. PMID:21912528

  8. Molecular characterization of Stenocarpella maydis based on nuclear ribosomal Internal Transcribed Spacer regions between the 18S and 28S nuclear rRNA gene sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diplodia ear rot of maize is caused by the fungus Stenocarpella maydis (syn. Diplodia maydis). Although considered a minor pathogen in the later 1900's, with the increased emphasis on conservation tillage, S. maydis has reestablished itself as an important ear and stalk rot pathogen. While S. maydis...

  9. Structure of rrn operons in pathogenic non-cultivable treponemes: sequence but not genomic position of intergenic spacers correlates with classification of Treponema pallidum and Treponema paraluiscuniculi strains

    PubMed Central

    Čejková, Darina; Zobaníková, Marie; Pospíšilová, Petra; Strouhal, Michal; Mikalová, Lenka; Weinstock, George M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the sequences of the two rRNA (rrn) operons of pathogenic non-cultivable treponemes, comprising 11 strains of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum (TPA), five strains of T. pallidum ssp. pertenue (TPE), two strains of T. pallidum ssp. endemicum (TEN), a simian Fribourg-Blanc strain and a rabbit T. paraluiscuniculi (TPc) strain. PCR was used to determine the type of 16S–23S ribosomal intergenic spacers in the rrn operons from 30 clinical samples belonging to five different genotypes. When compared with the TPA strains, TPc Cuniculi A strain had a 17 bp deletion, and the TPE, TEN and Fribourg-Blanc isolates had a deletion of 33 bp. Other than these deletions, only 17 heterogeneous sites were found within the entire region (excluding the 16S–23S intergenic spacer region encoding tRNA-Ile or tRNA-Ala). The pattern of nucleotide changes in the rrn operons corresponded to the classification of treponemal strains, whilst two different rrn spacer patterns (Ile/Ala and Ala/Ile) appeared to be distributed randomly across species/subspecies classification, time and geographical source of the treponemal strains. It is suggested that the random distribution of tRNA genes is caused by reciprocal translocation between repetitive sequences mediated by a recBCD-like system. PMID:23082031

  10. The Effect of Spacer Morphology on the Aerosolization Performance of Metered-Dose Inhalers

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Sepideh; Nokhodchi, Ali; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory drug delivery has been attracted great interest for the past decades, because of the high incidence of pulmonary diseases. However, despite its invaluable benefits, there are some major drawbacks in respiratory drug delivery, mainly due to the relatively high drug deposition in undesirable regions. One way to improve the efficiency of respiratory drug delivery through metered-dose inhalers (MDI) is placing a respiratory spacer between the inhaler exit and the mouth. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of type and shape of spacer on the aerosolization performance of MDIs. Methods: A commercial Beclomethasone Dipropionate (BDP) MDI alone or equipped with two different spacer devices (roller and pear type) widely distributed in the world pharmaceutical market was used. The effect of spacers was evaluated by calculating aerosolization indexes such as fine particle fraction (FPF), mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMAD) and geometric standard deviation (GSD) using the next generation impactor. Results: Although one of the spacers resulted in superior outcomes than the other one, but it was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The results confirmed that the type and shape of spacer did not substantially influence the aerosolization performance of MDIs. PMID:27478789

  11. Fundamental Oscillation up to 1.42 THz in Resonant Tunneling Diodes by Optimized Collector Spacer Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, Hidetoshi; Sogabe, Riku; Maekawa, Takeru; Suzuki, Safumi; Asada, Masahiro

    2014-05-01

    We report an increase in the oscillation frequency of terahertz oscillators using AlAs/InGaAs double-barrier resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) by optimizing the collector spacer thickness. For high-frequency oscillation of RTDs, the electron delay time, which is composed of the dwell time in the resonance region and the transit time in the collector depletion region, must be reduced. Although the transit time is reduced by a thin collector spacer, the capacitance increases. Thus, an optimum thickness of collector spacer layer exists. In this report, we investigate the dependence of oscillation frequency on the collector spacer thickness. The RTDs were integrated with 20-μm-long slot antennas, and oscillations up to 1.1, 1.42, and 1.29 THz were obtained for spacer thicknesses of 25, 12, and 6 nm, respectively. The optimum spacer thickness for high-frequency oscillation was around 12 nm. The highest frequency in this experiment was 1.42 THz oscillation, with an output power of ~1 μW. We also extracted the electron velocity in the collector depletion region and the dwell time from the dependence of the delay time on the collector spacer thickness.

  12. A transducin-like gene maps to the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene region

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstat-Saslow, D.L.; Reeders, S.T.; Germino, G.G.; Somlo, S. )

    1993-12-01

    A novel human gene (sazD) that maps to the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease region shares sequence similarity with members of the [beta]-transducin superfamily. The cDNA sazD-c predicts an [approximately]58-kDa protein (sazD) with seven internal repeats, similar to the WD-40 motif of the transducin family. The size of this protein family has been expanding rapidly; however, neither the structure nor the function of this repeated motif is known. Preliminary data do not suggest that sazD is mutated in patients with polycystic kidney disease. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Separator-spacer for electrochemical systems

    DOEpatents

    Grimes, Patrick G.; Einstein, Harry; Newby, Kenneth R.; Bellows, Richard J.

    1983-08-02

    An electrochemical cell construction features a novel co-extruded plastic electrode in an interleaved construction with a novel integral separator-spacer. Also featured is a leak and impact resistant construction for preventing the spill of corrosive materials in the event of rupture.

  14. Updates on quick identification of acetic acid bacteria with a focus on the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer and the analysis of cell proteins by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trček, Janja; Barja, François

    2015-03-01

    Acetic acid bacteria have attracted much attention over the past few years, due mainly to their metabolic traits that are of interest to the biotechnology industry. In addition, it turns out that their ecological habitats are almost unlimited since they have been found as symbionts in different insects and also as emerging opportunistic human pathogens. Very surprising is the finding that they colonize niches considered anaerobic, disproving the generalized statement that they are strict aerobes. Since they have taken on different biological roles in our environment, more and more people are charged with the task of identifying them. However, this turns out to be not always easy, especially if we are using phenotypic approaches for identification. A substantial step forward in making the identification of acetic acid bacteria easier was made possible using molecular biological methods, which have been extensively tested since 2000. However, some molecular methods require expensive machines and experienced staff, and moreover the level of their discrimination varies. All these factors must be considered when selecting the most appropriate approach for identifying acetic acid bacteria. With this objective in mind, this review article discusses the benefits and drawbacks of molecular biological methods for identification of acetic acid bacteria, with a focus on the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS regions and the recently described alternative method for identification of acetic acid bacteria, MALDI-TOF MS. PMID:25589227

  15. PCR amplification of the 3' external transcribed and intergenic spacers of the ribosomal DNA repeat unit in three species of Saccharomyces.

    PubMed

    Molina, F I; Jong, S C; Huffman, J L

    1993-04-15

    Two spacer regions outside the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcriptional unit in three species of Saccharomyces, S. cerevisiae, S. carlsbergensis and S. pastorianus, were amplified using the polymerase chain reaction. These regions were composed of the 3' external transcribed spacer (ETS) and the intergenic spacer (IGS). Primers were developed from sequence alignments and by taking the reverse complement of a previously described sequence. The region amplified spanned base position 3110 on the 26S rRNA to base position 27 on the 5S rRNA of S. cerevisiae. Nine of the twelve strains used in this study exhibited different restriction profiles, showing that the spacers are highly variable between species. The results suggest that PCR fingerprinting of the non-coding spacer regions can be used to distinguish between closely related Saccharomyces species and may have potential in DNA profiling of other yeasts. PMID:8099889

  16. Antipsychotic Induced Gene Regulation in Multiple Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Girgenti, Matthew James; Nisenbaum, Laura K.; Bymaster, Franklin; Terwilliger, Rosemarie; Duman, Ronald S; Newton, Samuel Sathyanesan

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs is not well understood. Their complex receptor affinity profiles indicate that their action could extend beyond dopamine receptor blockade. Single gene expression studies and high-throughput gene profiling have shown the induction of genes from several molecular classes and functional categories. Using a focused microarray approach we investigated gene regulation in rat striatum, frontal cortex and hippocampus after chronic administration of haloperidol or olanzapine. Regulated genes were validated by in-situ hybridization, realtime PCR and immunohistochemistry. Only limited overlap was observed in genes regulated by haloperidol and olanzapine. Both drugs elicited maximal gene regulation in the striatum and least in the hippocampus. Striatal gene induction by haloperidol was predominantly in neurotransmitter signaling, G-protein coupled receptors and transcription factors. Olanzapine prominently induced retinoic acid and trophic factor signaling genes in the frontal cortex. The data also revealed the induction of several genes that could be targeted in future drug development efforts. The study uncovered the induction of several novel genes, including somatostatin receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The results demonstrating the regulation of multiple receptors and transcription factors suggests that both typical and atypical antipsychotics could possess a complex molecular mechanism of action. PMID:20070867

  17. Saturation mapping of a gene-rich recombination hot spot region in wheat.

    PubMed Central

    Faris, J D; Haen, K M; Gill, B S

    2000-01-01

    Physical mapping of wheat chromosomes has revealed small chromosome segments of high gene density and frequent recombination interspersed with relatively large regions of low gene density and infrequent recombination. We constructed a detailed genetic and physical map of one highly recombinant region on the long arm of chromosome 5B. This distally located region accounts for 4% of the physical size of the long arm and at least 30% of the recombination along the entire chromosome. Multiple crossovers occurred within this region, and the degree of recombination is at least 11-fold greater than the genomic average. Characteristics of the region such as gene order and frequency of recombination appear to be conserved throughout the evolution of the Triticeae. The region is more prone to chromosome breakage by gametocidal gene action than gene-poor regions, and evidence for genomic instability was implied by loss of gene collinearity for six loci among the homeologous regions. These data suggest that a unique level of chromatin organization exists within gene-rich recombination hot spots. The many agronomically important genes in this region should be accessible by positional cloning. PMID:10655233

  18. 5' control regions of the apolipoprotein(a) gene and members of the related plasminogen gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Wade, D P; Clarke, J G; Lindahl, G E; Liu, A C; Zysow, B R; Meer, K; Schwartz, K; Lawn, R M

    1993-01-01

    Elevated blood levels of apolipoprotein(a), the component of lipoprotein(a) that distinguishes it from low density lipoprotein, are a major risk factor for atherosclerosis. The apolipoprotein(a) gene is highly similar to the plasminogen gene and to at least four other genes or pseudogenes. The 5' untranslated and flanking sequences of these six genes contain extensive regions of near identity and share sequence elements involved in the initiation of transcription and translation. About 1000 base pairs of flanking DNA of each gene are sufficient to promote transcription in cultured hepatocytes. The apolipoprotein(a) gene promoter contains functional interleukin 6-responsive elements, consistent with the reported acute-phase response of apolipoprotein(a). Flanking genomic fragments of the apoliprotein(a) gene from two individuals with vastly different plasma apolipoprotein(a) concentrations have sequence differences that are reflected in differences in the rate of in vitro transcription. Images PMID:7679504

  19. Tube support grid and spacer therefor

    DOEpatents

    Ringsmuth, Richard J.; Kaufman, Jay S.

    1986-01-01

    A tube support grid and spacers therefor provide radially inward preloading of heat exchange tubes to minimize stress upon base welds due to differential thermal expansion. The grid comprises a concentric series of rings and spacers with opposing concave sides for conforming to the tubes and V-shaped ends to provide resilient flexibility. The flexibility aids in assembly and in transmitting seismic vibrations from the tubes to a shroud. The tube support grid may be assembled in place to achieve the desired inwardly radial preloading of the heat exchange tubes. Tab and slot assembly further minimizes stresses in the system. The radii of the grid rings may be preselected to effect the desired radially inward preloading.

  20. Honeycomb spacer crush stength test results

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1993-09-15

    This report discusses aluminum honeycomb spacers, which are used as an energy absorbent material in shipping packages for off site shipment of radioactive materials and which were ordered in two crush strengths, 1,000 psi and 2,000 psi for use in drop tests requested by the Packaging and Transportation group as part of the shipping container rectification process. Both the group as part of the shipping container rectification process. Both the vendor and the SRTC Materials Laboratory performed crush strength measurements on test samples made from the material used to fabricate the actual spacers. The measurements of crush strength made in the SRTC Materials Laboratory are within 100 psi of the measurements made by the manufacturer for all samples tested and all test measurements are within 10% of the specified crush strength, which is acceptable to the P&T group for the planned tests.

  1. Heterogeneous diversity of spacers within CRISPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deem, Michael; He, Jiankui

    2011-03-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) in bacterial and archaeal DNA have recently been shown to be a new type of anti-viral immune system in these organisms. We here study the diversity of spacers in CRISPR under selective pressure. We propose a population dynamics model that explains the biological observation that the leader-proximal end of CRISPR is more diversified and the leader-distal end of CRISPR is more conserved. This result is shown to be in agreement with recent experiments. Our results show that the CRISPR spacer structure is influenced by and provides a record of the viral challenges that bacteria face. 1) J. He and M. W. Deem, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105 (2010) 128102

  2. Improved nuclear fuel assembly grid spacer

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, John; Kaplan, Samuel

    1977-01-01

    An improved fuel assembly grid spacer and method of retaining the basic fuel rod support elements in position within the fuel assembly containment channel. The improvement involves attachment of the grids to the hexagonal channel and of forming the basic fuel rod support element into a grid structure, which provides a design which is insensitive to potential channel distortion (ballooning) at high fluence levels. In addition the improved method eliminates problems associated with component fabrication and assembly.

  3. Polymorphisms in the promoter region of catalase gene and essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao Feng; Cui, Jing; DeStefano, Anita L; Chazaro, Irmarie; Farrer, Lindsay A; Manolis, Athanasios J; Gavras, Haralambos; Baldwin, Clinton T

    2005-01-01

    Genetic variations that predispose individuals to complex disorders, such as essential hypertension, may be found in gene coding regions, intronic regions or in gene promoter regions. Most studies have focused on gene variations that result in amino acid substitutions because they result in different isoforms of the protein, presumably resulting in differences in protein properties. Less attention has been placed on the role of intronic or promoter mutations. In this report, we examined two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the catalase (CAT) gene prompter region in a cohort of hypertensive Caucasians and African Americans with a Mass Spec based Homogenous MassEXTEND assay. We found an association when a specific combination of the two promoter SNPs was examined in Caucasians. No association was observed in African Americans. Our data suggest that genetic variations in the promoter region of catalase gene influence the susceptibility to essential hypertension. In addition, the genetic factors that contribute to hypertension maybe different between ethnic groups. PMID:15735318

  4. Sequence of the dog immunoglobulin alpha and epsilon constant region genes

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, M.; Selinger, D.; Mark, G.E.; Hollis, G.F.; Hickey, G.J.

    1995-03-01

    The immunoglobulin alpha (IGHAC) and epsilon (IGHEC) germline constant region genes were isolated from a dog liver genomic DNA library. Sequence analysis indicates that the dog IGHEC gene is encoded by four exons spread out over 1.7 kilobases (kb). The IGHAC sequence encompasses 1.5 kb and includes all three constant region coding exons. The complete exon/intron sequence of these genes is described. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Cladistic biogeography of Juglans (Juglandaceae) based on chloroplast DNA intergenic spacer sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phylogenetic utility of sequence variation from five chloroplast DNA intergenic spacer (IGS) regions: trnT-trnF, psbA-trnH, atpB-rbcL, trnV-16S rRNA, and trnS-trnfM was examined in the genus Juglans. A total of seventeen taxa representing the four sections within Juglans and an outgroup taxon, ...

  6. Sequence analysis of the ERCC2 gene regions in human, mouse, and hamster reveals three linked genes.

    PubMed

    Lamerdin, J E; Stilwagen, S A; Ramirez, M H; Stubbs, L; Carrano, A V

    1996-06-15

    The ERCC2 (excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair group 2) gene product is involved in transcription-coupled repair as an integral member of the basal transcription factor BTF2/TFIIH complex. Defects in this gene can result in three distinct human disorders, namely the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D, trichothiodystrophy, and Cockayne syndrome. We report the comparative analysis of 91.6 kb of new sequence including 54.3 kb encompassing the human ERCC2 locus, the syntenic region in the mouse (32.6 kb), and a further 4.7 kb of sequence 3' of the previously reported ERCC2 region in the hamster. In addition to ERCC2, our analysis revealed the presence of two previously undescribed genes in all three species. The first is centromeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and is most similar to the kinesin light chain gene in sea urchin. The second gene is telomeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and contains a motif found in ankyrins, some cell cycle proteins, and transcription factors. Multiple EST matches to this putative new gene indicate that it is expressed in several human tissues, including breast. The identification and description of two new genes provides potential candidate genes for disorders mapping to this region of 19q13.2. PMID:8786141

  7. Sequence analysis of the ERCC2 gene regions in human, mouse, and hamster reveals three linked genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lamerdin, J.E.; Stilwagen, S.A.; Ramirez, M.H.

    1996-06-15

    The ERCC2 (excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair group 2) gene product is involved in transcription-coupled repair as an integral member of the basal transcription factor BTF2/TFIIH complex. Defects in this gene can result in three distinct human disorders, namely the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D, trichothiodystrophy, and Cockayne syndrome. We report the comparative analysis of 91.6 kb of new sequence including 54.3 kb encompassing the human ERCC2 locus, the syntenic region in the mouse (32.6 kb), and a further 4.7 kb of sequence 3{prime} of the previously reported ERCC2 region in the hamster. In addition to ERCC2, our analysis revealed the presence of two previously undescribed genes in all three species. The first is centromeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and is most similar to the kinesin light chain gene in sea urchin. The second gene is telomeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and contains a motif found in ankyrins, some cell proteins, and transcription factors. Multiple EST matches to this putative new gene indicate that it is expressed in several human tissues, including breast. The identification and description of two new genes provides potential candidate genes for disorders mapping to this region of 19q13.2. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Identification of a set of genes showing regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Cletus A; Chopra, Vikramjit; Varhol, Richard; Xie, Yuan-Yun; Bohacec, Slavita; Zhao, Yongjun; Lee, Lisa LC; Bilenky, Mikhail; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; He, An; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Goldowitz, Daniel; Marra, Marco A; Holt, Robert A; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Jones, Steven JM

    2008-01-01

    Background The Pleiades Promoter Project aims to improve gene therapy by designing human mini-promoters (< 4 kb) that drive gene expression in specific brain regions or cell-types of therapeutic interest. Our goal was to first identify genes displaying regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain so that promoters designed from orthologous human genes can then be tested to drive reporter expression in a similar pattern in the mouse brain. Results We have utilized LongSAGE to identify regionally enriched transcripts in the adult mouse brain. As supplemental strategies, we also performed a meta-analysis of published literature and inspected the Allen Brain Atlas in situ hybridization data. From a set of approximately 30,000 mouse genes, 237 were identified as showing specific or enriched expression in 30 target regions of the mouse brain. GO term over-representation among these genes revealed co-involvement in various aspects of central nervous system development and physiology. Conclusion Using a multi-faceted expression validation approach, we have identified mouse genes whose human orthologs are good candidates for design of mini-promoters. These mouse genes represent molecular markers in several discrete brain regions/cell-types, which could potentially provide a mechanistic explanation of unique functions performed by each region. This set of markers may also serve as a resource for further studies of gene regulatory elements influencing brain expression. PMID:18625066

  9. Radiological evaluation of acetabular erosion after antibiotic-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate spacer (Spacer-G).

    PubMed

    García-Oltra, Ester; Bori, Guillem; Tomas, Xavier; Gallart, Xavier; Garcia, Sebastian; Soriano, Alex

    2013-06-01

    Different types of hip spacers have been described (hand-made, custom-molded or prefabricated) for treatment of a chronic hip infection. A potential disadvantage of monoblock prefabricated spacer is that it may cause acetabular bone loss. This study assesses the radiological acetabular erosion using an antibiotic-impregnated pre-fabricated polymethylmethacrylate Spacer-G. We retrospectively reviewed the radiographs of thirty five patients who were managed with Spacer-G to treat chronic hip infection. No acetabular erosion were observed in thirty two patients with a mean time from the first to second stage and from the first to the last radiograph of 5.09 and 3.77 months respectively. In three patients the time between the radiographs was more than one year and the second stage was not performed; two developed a protrusion acetabuli whereas the other one a destruction of the acetabular roof. Using a Spacer-G in chronic hip infection treatment for less than one year is not associated with radiological acetabular erosion if the patient is maintained at partial weight bearing. PMID:23142448

  10. Differentiation of Debaryomyces hansenii and Candida famata by rRNA gene intergenic spacer fingerprinting and reassessment of phylogenetic relationships among D. hansenii, C. famata, D. fabryi, C. flareri (=D. subglobosus) and D. prosopidis: description of D. vietnamensis sp. nov. closely related to D. nepalensis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huu-Vang; Gaillardin, Claude; Neuvéglise, Cécile

    2009-06-01

    The intergenic spacer rDNA amplification and AluI fingerprinting (IGSAF) method detected four distinct groups among 170 Debaryomyces hansenii strains: D. hansenii var. hansenii; Candida famata var. famata; D. hansenii var. fabryi and C. famata var. flareri. IGS sequence comparison of representative strains showed that D. hansenii var. hansenii and C. famata var. famata belonged to one species, whereas D. hansenii var. fabryi and C. famata var. flareri belonged to two different ones. This confirmed the following three species recently reinstated: D. hansenii (=C. famata), Debaryomyces fabryi and Debaryomyces subglobosus (=Candida flareri). Accordingly, growth at 37 degrees C may no longer be used to differentiate D. hansenii from D. fabryi. Riboflavin production is more specific for D. fabryi and D. subglobosus strains. IGSAF identified all the other 17 species of the genus Debaryomyces, six of them sharing with D. hansenii an rRNA gene unit harbouring two 5S rRNA genes. The phylogenetic tree established with IGS sequences was congruent with the one based on ACT1, GPD1 and COX2 sequences depicting a distinct D. hansenii clade close to the D. subglobosus, Debaryomyces prosopidis and D. fabryi clade. Description of Debaryomyces vietnamensis sp. nov. (type strain CBS 10535(T), MUCL 51648(T)), closely related to Debaryomyces nepalensis is given. PMID:19385997

  11. Analysis of the regions flanking the human insulin gene and sequence of an Alu family member.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, G I; Pictet, R; Rutter, W J

    1980-01-01

    The regions around the human insulin gene have been studied by heteroduplex, hybridization and sequence analysis. These studies indicated that there is a region of heterogeneous length located approximately 700 bp before the 5' end of the gene; and that the 19 kb of cloned DNA which includes the 1430 bp insulin gene as well as 5650 bp before and 11,500 bp after the gene is single copy sequence except for 500 bp located 6000 bp from the 3' end of the gene. This 500 bp segment contains a member of the Alu family of dispersed middle repetitive sequences as well as another less highly repeated homopolymeric segment. The sequence of this region was determined. This Alu repeat is bordered by 19 bp direct repeats and also contains an 83 bp sequence which is present twice. The regions flanking the human and rat I insulin genes were compared by heteroduplex analysis to localize homologous sequences in the flanking regions which could be involved in the regulation of insulin biosynthesis. The homology between the two genes is restricted to the region encoding preproinsulin and a short region of approximately 60 bp flanking the 5' side of the genes. Images PMID:6253909

  12. Sequence analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer DNA of the crayfish parasite Psorospermium haeckeli.

    PubMed

    Bangyeekhun, E; Ryynänen, H J; Henttonen, P; Huner, J V; Cerenius, L; Söderhäll, K

    2001-10-01

    Two morphotypes of the crayfish parasite Psorospermium haeckeli were isolated from 2 crayfish species of different geographical origin. The oval-shaped sporocysts were obtained from the epidermal and connective tissue beneath the carapace of the noble crayfish Astacus astacus from Sweden and Finland. Elongated spores were isolated from the abdominal muscle tissue of the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii from USA. To compare genetic divergence of 2 morphotypes of the parasite, the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) DNA (ITS 1 and ITS 2) and the 5.8S rRNA gene were cloned and sequenced. The analysed region is variable in length, with the ribosomal ITS sequence of the European morphotype longer than the North American one. Sequence diversity is found mainly in ITS 1 and ITS 2 regions, and there is 66% and 58% similarity between the 2 morphotypes, respectively. Thus, analysis of the ribosomal ITS DNA suggests that P. haeckeli forms obtained from Europe and North America are genetically diverse, which supports the previously reported morphological characteristics. PMID:11710556

  13. Histone and ribosomal RNA repetitive gene clusters linked in tandem array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Histones are the major protein component of chromatin structure. The histone family is made up of a quintet of proteins, four core histones (H2A, H2B, H3 & H4) and the linker histones (H1). Spacers are found between the coding regions. Among insects this quintet of genes is usually clustered and ...

  14. Alternating tandem array of histone and ribosomal RNA gene blocks in the boll weevil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Histones are the major protein component of the ncleosome. The histone family is made up of a quintet of proteins, four core histones (H2A, H2B, H3 & H4) and the linker histones (H1). Spacers are found between the coding regions. Among insects this quintet of genes is usually clustered and the clust...

  15. A spacer protein in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae spindle poly body whose transcript is cell cycle-regulated.

    PubMed

    Kilmartin, J V; Dyos, S L; Kershaw, D; Finch, J T

    1993-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against the 110-kD component of the yeast spindle pole body (SPB) were used to clone the corresponding gene SPC110. SPC110 is identical to NUF1 (Mirzayan, C., C. S. Copeland, and M. Synder. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 116:1319-1332). SPC110/NUF1 has an MluI cell cycle box consensus sequence in its putative promoter region, and we found that the transcript was cell cycle regulated in a similar way to other MluI-regulated transcripts. Spc110p/Nuflp has a long central region with a predicted coiled-coil structure. We expressed this region in Escherichia coli and showed by rotary shadowing that rods of the predicted length were present. The 110-kD component is localized in the SPB to the gap between the central plaque and the sealed ends of the nuclear microtubules near the inner plaque (Rout, M., and J. V. Kilmartin. 1990. J. Cell Biol. 111:1913-1927). We found that rodlike structures bridge this gap. When truncations of SPC110 with deletions in the coiled-coil region of the protein replaced the wild-type gene, the gap between the central plaque and the ends of the microtubules decreased in proportion to the size of the deletion. This suggests that Spc110p connects these two parts of the SPB together and that the coiled-coil domain acts as a spacer element. PMID:7503995

  16. Chronic Ethanol Exposure Produces Time- and Brain Region-Dependent Changes in Gene Coexpression Networks

    PubMed Central

    Osterndorff-Kahanek, Elizabeth A.; Becker, Howard C.; Lopez, Marcelo F.; Farris, Sean P.; Tiwari, Gayatri R.; Nunez, Yury O.; Harris, R. Adron; Mayfield, R. Dayne

    2015-01-01

    Repeated ethanol exposure and withdrawal in mice increases voluntary drinking and represents an animal model of physical dependence. We examined time- and brain region-dependent changes in gene coexpression networks in amygdala (AMY), nucleus accumbens (NAC), prefrontal cortex (PFC), and liver after four weekly cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapor exposure in C57BL/6J mice. Microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles at 0-, 8-, and 120-hours following the last ethanol exposure. Each brain region exhibited a large number of differentially expressed genes (2,000-3,000) at the 0- and 8-hour time points, but fewer changes were detected at the 120-hour time point (400-600). Within each region, there was little gene overlap across time (~20%). All brain regions were significantly enriched with differentially expressed immune-related genes at the 8-hour time point. Weighted gene correlation network analysis identified modules that were highly enriched with differentially expressed genes at the 0- and 8-hour time points with virtually no enrichment at 120 hours. Modules enriched for both ethanol-responsive and cell-specific genes were identified in each brain region. These results indicate that chronic alcohol exposure causes global ‘rewiring‘ of coexpression systems involving glial and immune signaling as well as neuronal genes. PMID:25803291

  17. Functional analysis and nucleotide sequence of the promoter region of the murine hck gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lock, P; Stanley, E; Holtzman, D A; Dunn, A R

    1990-01-01

    The structure and function of the promoter region and exon 1 of the murine hck gene have been characterized in detail. RNase protection analysis has established that hck transcripts initiate from heterogeneous start sites located within the hck gene. Fusion gene constructs containing hck 5'-flanking sequences and the bacterial Neor gene have been introduced into the hematopoietic cell lines FDC-P1 and WEHI-265 by using a self-inactivating retroviral vector. The transcriptional start sites of the fusion gene are essentially identical to those of the endogenous hck gene. Analysis of infected WEHI-265 cell lines treated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reveals a 3- to 5-fold elevation in the levels of endogenous hck mRNA and a 1.4- to 2.6-fold increase in the level of Neor fusion gene transcripts, indicating that hck 5'-flanking sequences are capable of conferring LPS responsiveness on the Neor gene. The 5'-flanking region of the hck gene contains sequences similar to an element which is thought to be involved in the LPS responsiveness of the class II major histocompatibility gene A alpha k. A subset of these sequences are also found in the 5'-flanking regions of other LPS-responsive genes. Moreover, this motif is related to the consensus binding sequence of NF-kappa B, a transcription factor which is known to be regulated by LPS. Images PMID:2388619

  18. Comparative Sequence Analysis of the Sorghum Rph Region and the Maize Rp1 Resistance Gene Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Wusirika; Emberton, John; SanMiguel, Phillip; Ogden, Matthew; Llaca, Victor; Messing, Joachim; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.

    2002-01-01

    A 268-kb chromosomal segment containing sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) genes that are orthologous to the maize (Zea mays) Rp1 disease resistance (R) gene complex was sequenced. A region of approximately 27 kb in sorghum was found to contain five Rp1 homologs, but most have structures indicating that they are not functional. In contrast, maize inbred B73 has 15 Rp1 homologs in two nearby clusters of 250 and 300 kb. As at maize Rp1, the cluster of R gene homologs is interrupted by the presence of several genes that appear to have no resistance role, but these genes were different from the ones found within the maize Rp1 complex. More than 200 kb of DNA downstream from the sorghum Rp1-orthologous R gene cluster was sequenced and found to contain many duplicated and/or truncated genes. None of the duplications currently exist as simple tandem events, suggesting that numerous rearrangements were required to generate the current genomic structure. Four truncated genes were observed, including one gene that appears to have both 5′ and 3′ deletions. The maize Rp1 region is also unusually enriched in truncated genes. Hence, the orthologous maize and sorghum regions share numerous structural features, but all involve events that occurred independently in each species. The data suggest that complex R gene clusters are unusually prone to frequent internal and adjacent chromosomal rearrangements of several types. PMID:12481055

  19. The spacer arm length in cell-penetrating peptides influences chitosan/siRNA nanoparticle delivery for pulmonary inflammation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Eun Ju; Choi, Moonhwan; Lee, Jangwook; Rhim, Taiyoun; Lee, Kuen Yong

    2015-11-01

    Although chitosan and its derivatives have been frequently utilized as delivery vehicles for small interfering RNA (siRNA), it is challenging to improve the gene silencing efficiency of chitosan-based nanoparticles. In this study, we hypothesized that controlling the spacer arm length between a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and a nanoparticle could be critical to enhancing the cellular uptake as well as the gene silencing efficiency of conventional chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles. A peptide consisting of nine arginine units (R9) was used as a CPP, and the spacer arm length was controlled by varying the number of glycine units between the peptide (R9Gn) and the nanoparticle (n = 0, 4, and 10). Various physicochemical characteristics of R9Gn-chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles were investigated in vitro. Increasing the spacing arm length did not significantly affect the complex formation between R9Gn-chitosan and siRNA. However, R9G10-chitosan was much more effective in delivering genes both in vitro and in vivo compared with non-modified chitosan (without the peptide) and R9-chitosan (without the spacer arm). Chitosan derivatives modified with oligoarginine containing a spacer arm can be considered as potential delivery vehicles for various genes.Although chitosan and its derivatives have been frequently utilized as delivery vehicles for small interfering RNA (siRNA), it is challenging to improve the gene silencing efficiency of chitosan-based nanoparticles. In this study, we hypothesized that controlling the spacer arm length between a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and a nanoparticle could be critical to enhancing the cellular uptake as well as the gene silencing efficiency of conventional chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles. A peptide consisting of nine arginine units (R9) was used as a CPP, and the spacer arm length was controlled by varying the number of glycine units between the peptide (R9Gn) and the nanoparticle (n = 0, 4, and 10). Various physicochemical characteristics of

  20. Strong early seed-specific gene regulatory region

    DOEpatents

    Broun, Pierre; Somerville, Chris

    2002-01-01

    Nucleic acid sequences and methods for their use are described which provide for early seed-specific transcription, in order to modulate or modify expression of foreign or endogenous genes in seeds, particularly embryo cells. The method finds particular use in conjunction with modifying fatty acid production in seed tissue.

  1. Strong early seed-specific gene regulatory region

    DOEpatents

    Broun, Pierre; Somerville, Chris

    1999-01-01

    Nucleic acid sequences and methods for their use are described which provide for early seed-specific transcription, in order to modulate or modify expression of foreign or endogenous genes in seeds, particularly embryo cells. The method finds particular use in conjunction with modifying fatty acid production in seed tissue.

  2. Complex repetitive arrangements of gene sequence in the candidate region of the spinal muscular atrophy gene in 5q13

    SciTech Connect

    Theodosiou, A.M.; Nesbit, A.M.; Daniels, R.J.; Campbell, L.; Francis, M.J.; Christodoulou, Z.; Morrison, K.E.; Davies, K.E. |

    1994-12-01

    Childhood-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a heritable neurological disorder, which has been mapped by genetic linkage analysis to chromosome 5q13, in the interval between markers D5S435 and D5S557. Here, we present gene sequences that have been isolated from this interval, several of which show sequence homologies to exons of {beta}-glucuronidase. These gene sequences are repeated several times across the candidate region and are also present on chromosome 5p. The arrangement of these repetitive gene motifs is polymorphic between individuals. The high degree of variability observed may have some influence on the expression of the genes in the region. Since SMA is not inherited as a classical autosomal recessive disease, novel genomic rearrangements arising from aberrant recombination events between the complex repeats may be associated with the phenotype observed.

  3. Isolation and characterization of candidate genes of the 5q13 region in spinal muscular atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, S.; Reboullet, S.; Benichou, B.

    1994-09-01

    Based on a fine genetic and physical map of the region deleted in spinal muscular atrophy, we defined the smallest rearrangements encompassing the SMA gene. This interval is entirely contained in the 903D1 YAC clone. Several approaches to identify candidate genes were applied, including the search for interspecies conservation, exon trapping amplification and direct cDNA selection. Combining these strategies, six different cDNA molecules mapping to the YAC contig were isolated. Four cDNA molecules were isolated using the exon trapping system. They map to chromosome 5p and to more than one locus within the 5q13 region. They are homologous to each other and share sequence homology with the {beta}-glucuronidase gene. Based on interspecies conservation, a fifth candidate gene was identified. Sequence analyses of the cDNAs revealed no homologies with any other described genes. This gene mapped to two loci within the 5q13 region. Two other cDNA molecules isolated by direct cDNA selection are also under investigation. Complete characterization and fine physical mapping of those genes with respect to the physical interval defined by the deletions of the SMA region will allow the identification of the disease gene (or genes).

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELD AND SPACER CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.A.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the heterogeneous, graphite moderated, fluid cooled type and shielding and spacing plugs for the coolant channels thereof are reported. In this design, the coolant passages extend horizontally through the moderator structure, accommodating the fuel elements in abutting end-to-end relationship, and have access openings through the outer shield at one face of the reactor to facilitate loading of the fuel elements. In the outer ends of the channels which extend through the shields are provided spacers and shielding plugs designed to offer minimal reslstance to coolant fluid flow while preventing emanation of harmful radiation through the access openings when closed between loadings.

  5. Single nucleotide polymorphism in transcriptional regulatory regions and expression of environmentally responsive genes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuting; Tomso, Daniel J.; Liu Xuemei; Bell, Douglas A. . E-mail: BELL1@niehs.nih.gov

    2005-09-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human genome are DNA sequence variations that can alter an individual's response to environmental exposure. SNPs in gene coding regions can lead to changes in the biological properties of the encoded protein. In contrast, SNPs in non-coding gene regulatory regions may affect gene expression levels in an allele-specific manner, and these functional polymorphisms represent an important but relatively unexplored class of genetic variation. The main challenge in analyzing these SNPs is a lack of robust computational and experimental methods. Here, we first outline mechanisms by which genetic variation can impact gene regulation, and review recent findings in this area; then, we describe a methodology for bioinformatic discovery and functional analysis of regulatory SNPs in cis-regulatory regions using the assembled human genome sequence and databases on sequence polymorphism and gene expression. Our method integrates SNP and gene databases and uses a set of computer programs that allow us to: (1) select SNPs, from among the >9 million human SNPs in the NCBI dbSNP database, that are similar to cis-regulatory element (RE) consensus sequences; (2) map the selected dbSNP entries to the human genome assembly in order to identify polymorphic REs near gene start sites; (3) prioritize the candidate polymorphic RE containing genes by searching the existing genotype and gene expression data sets. The applicability of this system has been demonstrated through studies on p53 responsive elements and is being extended to additional pathways and environmentally responsive genes.

  6. Immunoglobulin kappa light chain variable region gene complex organization and immunoglobulin genes encoding anti-DNA autoantibodies in lupus mice.

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, R; Strohal, R; Balderas, R S; Johnson, M E; Noonan, D J; Duchosal, M A; Dixon, F J; Theofilopoulos, A N

    1988-01-01

    We have investigated the genetic origin of autoantibody production in several strains of mice that spontaneously develop a systemic lupus erythematosus-like disease. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses of gene loci encoding kappa light chain variable regions (Igk-V) demonstrated, as shown previously for the Ig heavy chain locus, that autoantibody production and disease occur in different Igk-V haplotypes. Moreover, autoimmune mice with known genetic derivation inherited their Igk-V loci essentially unaltered from their nonautoimmune ancestors. New Zealand black lupus mice, with unknown genetic derivation, had a possibly recombinant Igk-V haplotype, composed of V kappa loci that were primarily indistinguishable from those of nonautoimmune strains from either of the two potential donor haplotypes. The heavy and light chain gene segments (variable, diversity, joining) encoding anti-DNA antibodies were diverse and often closely related, or even identical, to those found in antibodies to foreign antigens in normal mice. Only 1 of 11 sequenced variable region genes could not be assigned to existing variable region gene families; however, corresponding germline genes were present in the genome of normal mice as well. These data argue against abnormalities in the genes and mechanisms generating antibody diversity in lupus mice and suggest a remarkable genetic and structural diversity in the generation of anti-DNA binding sites. Images PMID:3138286

  7. Four out of eight genes in a mouse chromosome 7 congenic donor region are candidate obesity genes.

    PubMed

    Sarahan, Kari A; Fisler, Janis S; Warden, Craig H

    2011-09-22

    We previously identified a region of mouse chromosome 7 that influences body fat mass in F2 littermates of congenic × background intercrosses. Current analyses revealed that alleles in the donor region of the subcongenic B6.C-D7Mit318 (318) promoted a twofold increase in adiposity in homozygous lines of 318 compared with background C57BL/6ByJ (B6By) mice. Parent-of-origin effects were discounted through cross-fostering studies and an F1 reciprocal cross. Mapping of the donor region revealed that it has a maximal size of 2.8 Mb (minimum 1.8 Mb) and contains a maximum of eight protein coding genes. Quantitative PCR in whole brain, liver, and gonadal white adipose tissue (GWAT) revealed differential expression between genotypes for three genes in females and two genes in males. Alpha-2,8-sialyltransferase 8B (St8sia2) showed reduced 318 mRNA levels in brain for females and males and in GWAT for females only. Both sexes of 318 mice had reduced Repulsive guidance molecule-a (Rgma) expression in GWAT. In brain, Family with sequence similarity 174 member b (Fam174b) had increased expression in 318 females, whereas Chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 2 (Chd2-2) had reduced expression in 318 males. No donor region genes were differentially expressed in liver. Sequence analysis of coding exons for all genes in the 318 donor region revealed only one single nucleotide polymorphism that produced a nonsynonymous missense mutation, Gln7Pro, in Fam174b. Our findings highlight the difficulty of using expression and sequence to identify quantitative trait genes underlying obesity even in small genomic regions. PMID:21730028

  8. Analysis of the sexual development-promoting region of Schizophyllum commune TRP1 gene.

    PubMed

    Sen, Kikuo; Kinoshita, Hideki; Tazuke, Kazuyuki; Maki, Yoshinori; Yoshiura, Yumi; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Shibai, Hiroshiro; Kurosawa, Shin-Ichi

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to elucidate the mechanism of sexual development of basidiomycetous mushrooms from mating to fruit body formation. Sequencing analysis showed the TRP1 gene of basidiomycete Schizophyllum commune encoded an enzyme with three catalytic regions of GAT (glutamine amidotransferase), IGPS (indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase), and PRAI (5-phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase); among these three regions, the trp1 mutant (Trp(-)) had a missense mutation (L→F) of a 338th amino acid residue of the TRP1 protein within the IGPS region. To investigate the function of IGPS region related to sexual development, dikaryons with high, usual, and no expression of the IGPS region of TRP1 gene were made. The dikaryotic mycelia with high expression of the IGPS formed mature fruit bodies earlier than those with usual and no expression of the IGPS. These results showed that the IGPS region in TRP1 gene promoted sexual development of S. commune. PMID:27296855

  9. The 5' region of the human thromboxane A(2) receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Saffak, T; Nüsing, R M

    2002-07-01

    Thromboxane is an important modulator of hemostasis and smooth muscle tonus and signals via G-protein-coupled thromboxane receptor. Previously, we characterized the TP receptor gene and suggested the presence of three promoter regions within the gene. The aim of the present study was to examine the regulation of transcriptional gene expression. By primer extension experiments the major transcription initiation site was shown to be a doublet at -160/165 bp upstream of the ATG codon in human megakaryoblastic MEG-01 cells, endothelial ECV 304 cells and in human myometrium smooth muscle cells. In the erythroleukemic HEL 1 cells transcription initiation site was identified at -10 bp. Transcriptional activity of the three 5'flanking regions of TP receptor gene representing the putative promoter regions was evaluated by transfection of MEG-01 cells with chimeric constructs containing luciferase gene-encoding sequence. Promoter region I displayed highest transcriptional activity and RT-PCR analysis confirmed the transcription of TP receptor mRNA driven by promoter I. Although, weak transcriptional activity was also observed regarding promoter region II, we were unable to amplify cDNA fragments representing promoter II-driven mRNA synthesis. Considering promoter region III, transcriptional activity was barely detectable. Various deletions of the 3.9 kb promoter I region revealed a size-dependent transcriptional activity. Further, for full activity a 'core' promoter corresponding to the region from -160/165 to -588 bp appeared to be necessary for full transcriptional activity of promoter 1. PMID:12213432

  10. Specific gene hypomethylation and cancer: New insights into coding region feature trends

    PubMed Central

    Daura-Oller, Elias; Cabre, Maria; Montero, Miguel A; Paternain, Jose L; Romeu, Antoni

    2009-01-01

    Giving coding region structural features a role in the hypomethylation of specific genes, the occurrence of G+C content, CpG islands, repeat and retrotransposable elements in demethylated genes related to cancer has been evaluated. A comparative analysis among different cancer types has also been performed. In this work, the inter-cancer coding region features comparative analysis carried out, show insights into what structural trends/patterns are present in the studied cancers. PMID:19707296

  11. Molecular evolution of duplicated amylase gene regions in Drosophila melanogaster: evidence of positive selection in the coding regions and selective constraints in the cis-regulatory regions.

    PubMed Central

    Araki, H; Inomata, N; Yamazaki, T

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we randomly sampled Drosophila melanogaster from Japanese and Kenyan natural populations. We sequenced duplicated (proximal and distal) Amy gene regions to test whether the patterns of polymorphism were consistent with neutral molecular evolution. F(st) between the two geographically distant populations, estimated from Amy gene regions, was 0.084, smaller than reported values for other loci, comparing African and Asian populations. Furthermore, little genetic differentiation was found at a microsatellite locus (DROYANETSB) in these samples (G'st = -0.018). The results of several tests (Tajima's, Fu and Li's, and Wall's tests) were not significantly different from neutrality. However, a significantly higher level of fixed replacement substitutions was detected by a modified McDonald and Kreitman test for both populations. This indicates that positive selection occurred during or immediately after the speciation of D. melanogaster. Sliding-window analysis showed that the proximal region 1, a part of the proximal 5' flanking region, was conserved between D. melanogaster and its sibling species, D. simulans. An HKA test was significant when the proximal region 1 was compared with the 5' flanking region of Alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh), indicating a severe selective constraint on the Amy proximal region 1. These results suggest that natural selection has played an important role in the molecular evolution of Amy gene regions in D. melanogaster. PMID:11156987

  12. The estimation of size and position of contaminating particle adhering to the insulating spacer surface in gas-insulated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Yasin; Nur Budiman, Firmansiah; Béroual, Abderrahmane; Hussain Malik, Nazar; Al-Arainy, Abdulrehman Ali

    2013-05-01

    The presence of metallic particles has been recognized as a dangerous threat in gas-insulated substation (GIS). Such particles are initially free and move toward higher electric field regions such as triple junction i.e., spacer-electrode-gas interface. However, once these particles reach the spacer surface, they adhere to the spacer easily due to electrostatic image forces. From insulation point of view, the triple junction is the weakest point in GIS. The presence of such metallic particles on the spacer surface deteriorates the insulation strength. Thus, in order to improve the reliability of GIS, it is important to identify the size and the position of the particle adhering to the insulating spacer surface. One of the most promising methods to carry out such identification is by recognizing the partial discharges (PDs) provoked by such particles. This paper is aimed to discuss the particle size and position estimation by using the PD patterns and statistical analysis. The PD patterns were acquired using IEC 60270 method. Measurements were made to determine various PD signals caused by particle of different sizes at different locations on the spacer surface. The acquired PD patterns were characterized by a number of statistical parameters. The results show that the implemented technique could be used to distinguish between various particle sizes and positions at different SF6 pressures with a fairly high accuracy.

  13. The non-signaling extracellular spacer domain of chimeric antigen receptors is decisive for in vivo antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Hudecek, Michael; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Kosasih, Paula L.; Silva-Benedict, Anne; Liu, Lingfeng; Rader, Christoph; Jensen, Michael C.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2015-01-01

    The use of synthetic chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) to redirect T cells to recognize tumor provides a powerful new approach to cancer immunotherapy; however the attributes of CARs that ensure optimal in vivo tumor recognition remain to be defined. Here, we analyze the influence of length and composition of IgG-derived extracellular spacer domains on the function of CARs. Our studies demonstrate that CD19-CARs with a long spacer from IgG4 hinge-CH2-CH3 are functional in vitro but lack antitumor activity in vivo due to interaction between the Fc domain within the spacer and the Fc receptor-bearing myeloid cells, leading to activation-induced T-cell death. We demonstrate that in vivo persistence and antitumor effects of CAR-T-cells with a long spacer can be restored by modifying distinct regions in the CH2 domain that are essential for Fc receptor binding. Our studies demonstrate that modifications that abrogate binding to Fc receptors are crucial for CARs in which a long spacer is obligatory for tumor recognition as shown here for a ROR1-specific CAR. These results demonstrate that the length and composition of the extracellular spacer domain that lacks intrinsic signaling function can be decisive in the design of CARs for optimal in vivo activity. PMID:25212991

  14. Mapping the chromosome 16 cadherin gene cluster to a minimal deleted region in ductal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, I J; Aubele, M; Hartmann, E; Braungart, E; Werner, M; Höfler, H; Atkinson, M J

    2001-04-01

    The cadherin family of cell adhesion molecules has been implicated in tumor metastasis and progression. Eight family members have been mapped to the long arm of chromosome 16. Using radiation hybrid mapping, we have located six of these genes within a cluster at 16q21-q22.1. In invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast frequent LOH and accompanying mutation affect the CDH1 gene, which is a member of this chromosome 16 gene cluster. CDH1 LOH also occurs in invasive ductal carcinoma, but in the absence of gene mutation. The proximity of other cadherin genes to 16q22.1 suggests that they may be affected by LOH in invasive ductal carcinomas. Using the mapping data, microsatellite markers were selected which span regions of chromosome 16 containing the cadherin genes. In breast cancer tissues, a high rate of allelic loss was found over the gene cluster region, with CDH1 being the most frequently lost marker. In invasive ductal carcinoma a minimal deleted region was identified within part of the chromosome 16 cadherin gene cluster. This provides strong evidence for the existence of a second 16q22 suppressor gene locus within the cadherin cluster. PMID:11343777

  15. Detection of chromosomal regions showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Bisognin, Andrea; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Danieli, Gian Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Background Rhabdomyosarcoma is a relatively common tumour of the soft tissue, probably due to regulatory disruption of growth and differentiation of skeletal muscle stem cells. Identification of genes differentially expressed in normal skeletal muscle and in rhabdomyosarcoma may help in understanding mechanisms of tumour development, in discovering diagnostic and prognostic markers and in identifying novel targets for drug therapy. Results A Perl-code web client was developed to automatically obtain genome map positions of large sets of genes. The software, based on automatic search on Human Genome Browser by sequence alignment, only requires availability of a single transcribed sequence for each gene. In this way, we obtained tissue-specific chromosomal maps of genes expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma or skeletal muscle. Subsequently, Perl software was developed to calculate gene density along chromosomes, by using a sliding window. Thirty-three chromosomal regions harbouring genes mostly expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma were identified. Similarly, 48 chromosomal regions were detected including genes possibly related to function of differentiated skeletal muscle, but silenced in rhabdomyosarcoma. Conclusion In this study we developed a method and the associated software for the comparative analysis of genomic expression in tissues and we identified chromosomal segments showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, appearing as candidate regions for harbouring genes involved in origin of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma representing possible targets for drug treatment and/or development of tumor markers. PMID:15176974

  16. Enterocytozoon bieneusi genotype nomenclature based on the internal transcribed spacer sequence: a consensus.

    PubMed

    Santín, Mónica; Fayer, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    The standard method for determining the genotypes of Enterocytozoon bieneusi is based on the DNA sequence of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the rRNA gene. There are 81 genotypes with 111 genotype names: 26 genotypes have been identified exclusively in humans, eight have been identified in humans and in other hosts, 27 have been identified exclusively in cattle and pigs, six have been identified exclusively in cats and dogs, and 14 have been identified in miscellaneous hosts. Because none of these genotypes has taxonomic status and therefore do not adhere to the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature regarding naming, some genotypes have received multiple names, each different and in separate publications by different authors. Because of the proliferation of genotypes with overlapping names and multiple hosts the scientific literature has become confusing and difficult to efficiently utilize. To reduce confusion and provide guidance for future publications we tabulated all names, GenBank accession numbers, and author citations and propose that the first published name has precedence and should become the primary name used in all subsequent publications in which genotyping is based on ITS sequencing. In those publications the names and GenBank numbers that were submitted at later dates should also be provided by the authors as synonyms to aid readers and reviewers. PMID:19335772

  17. Histone and Ribosomal RNA Repetitive Gene Clusters of the Boll Weevil are Linked in a Tandem Array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Histones are the major protein component of chromatin structure. The histone family is made up of a quintet of proteins, four core histones (H2A, H2B, H3 & H4) and the linker histones (H1). Spacers are found between the coding regions. Among insects this quintet of genes is usually clustered and ...

  18. Comparison of laboratory colonies and field populations of Tamarixia radiata, an ecto-parasitoid of the Asian Citrus Psyllid, using internal transcribed spacer and cytochrome oxidase subunit l DNA sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic diversity of Tamarixia radiata laboratory colonies derived from collections in China, northern Vietnam, Pakistan, and a mixed colony from Taiwan and southern Vietnam was evaluated using the internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS-1), internal transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS-2) and the...

  19. Anti-cas spacers in orphan CRISPR4 arrays prevent uptake of active CRISPR-Cas I-F systems.

    PubMed

    Almendros, Cristóbal; Guzmán, Noemí M; García-Martínez, Jesús; Mojica, Francisco J M

    2016-01-01

    Archaea and bacteria harbour clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) loci. These arrays encode RNA molecules (crRNA), each containing a sequence of a single repeat-intervening spacer. The crRNAs guide CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins to cleave nucleic acids complementary to the crRNA spacer, thus interfering with targeted foreign elements. Notably, pre-existing spacers may trigger the acquisition of new spacers from the target molecule by means of a primed adaptation mechanism. Here, we show that naturally occurring orphan CRISPR arrays that contain spacers matching sequences of the cognate (absent) cas genes are able to elicit both primed adaptation and direct interference against genetic elements carrying those genes. Our findings show the existence of an anti-cas mechanism that prevents the transfer of a fully equipped CRISPR-Cas system. Hence, they suggest that CRISPR immunity may be undesired by particular prokaryotes, potentially because they could limit possibilities for gaining favourable sequences by lateral transfer. PMID:27573106

  20. Chloroplast genome differences between Asian and American Equisetum arvense (Equisetaceae) and the origin of the hypervariable trnY-trnE intergenic spacer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung Tae; Kim, Ki-Joong

    2014-01-01

    Comparative analyses of complete chloroplast (cp) DNA sequences within a species may provide clues to understand the population dynamics and colonization histories of plant species. Equisetum arvense (Equisetaceae) is a widely distributed fern species in northeastern Asia, Europe, and North America. The complete cp DNA sequences from Asian and American E. arvense individuals were compared in this study. The Asian E. arvense cp genome was 583 bp shorter than that of the American E. arvense. In total, 159 indels were observed between two individuals, most of which were concentrated on the hypervariable trnY-trnE intergenic spacer (IGS) in the large single-copy (LSC) region of the cp genome. This IGS region held a series of 19 bp repeating units. The numbers of the 19 bp repeat unit were responsible for 78% of the total length difference between the two cp genomes. Furthermore, only other closely related species of Equisetum also show the hypervariable nature of the trnY-trnE IGS. By contrast, only a single indel was observed in the gene coding regions: the ycf1 gene showed 24 bp differences between the two continental individuals due to a single tandem-repeat indel. A total of 165 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were recorded between the two cp genomes. Of these, 52 SNPs (31.5%) were distributed in coding regions, 13 SNPs (7.9%) were in introns, and 100 SNPs (60.6%) were in intergenic spacers (IGS). The overall difference between the Asian and American E. arvense cp genomes was 0.12%. Despite the relatively high genetic diversity between Asian and American E. arvense, the two populations are recognized as a single species based on their high morphological similarity. This indicated that the two regional populations have been in morphological stasis. PMID:25157804

  1. Chloroplast Genome Differences between Asian and American Equisetum arvense (Equisetaceae) and the Origin of the Hypervariable trnY-trnE Intergenic Spacer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoung Tae; Kim, Ki-Joong

    2014-01-01

    Comparative analyses of complete chloroplast (cp) DNA sequences within a species may provide clues to understand the population dynamics and colonization histories of plant species. Equisetum arvense (Equisetaceae) is a widely distributed fern species in northeastern Asia, Europe, and North America. The complete cp DNA sequences from Asian and American E. arvense individuals were compared in this study. The Asian E. arvense cp genome was 583 bp shorter than that of the American E. arvense. In total, 159 indels were observed between two individuals, most of which were concentrated on the hypervariable trnY-trnE intergenic spacer (IGS) in the large single-copy (LSC) region of the cp genome. This IGS region held a series of 19 bp repeating units. The numbers of the 19 bp repeat unit were responsible for 78% of the total length difference between the two cp genomes. Furthermore, only other closely related species of Equisetum also show the hypervariable nature of the trnY-trnE IGS. By contrast, only a single indel was observed in the gene coding regions: the ycf1 gene showed 24 bp differences between the two continental individuals due to a single tandem-repeat indel. A total of 165 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were recorded between the two cp genomes. Of these, 52 SNPs (31.5%) were distributed in coding regions, 13 SNPs (7.9%) were in introns, and 100 SNPs (60.6%) were in intergenic spacers (IGS). The overall difference between the Asian and American E. arvense cp genomes was 0.12%. Despite the relatively high genetic diversity between Asian and American E. arvense, the two populations are recognized as a single species based on their high morphological similarity. This indicated that the two regional populations have been in morphological stasis. PMID:25157804

  2. Physical mapping, cloning, and identification of genes within a 500-kb region containing BRCA1.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M A; Jones, K A; Nicolai, H; Bonjardim, M; Black, D; McFarlane, R; de Jong, P; Quirk, J P; Lehrach, H; Solomon, E

    1995-01-01

    BRCA1 is a breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility gene on human chromosome 17q21. We describe a complete and detailed physical map of a 500-kb region of genomic DNA containing the BRCA1 gene and the partial cloning in phage P1 artificial chromosomes. Approximately 70 exons were isolated from this region, 11 of which were components of the BRCA1 gene. Analysis of the other exons revealed a rho-related G protein and the interferon-induced leucine-zipper protein IFP-35. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7753812

  3. Sequence and analysis of the human ABL gene, the BCR gene, and regions involved in the Philadelphia chromosomal translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Burian, D.; Clifton, S.W.; Crabtree, J.

    1995-05-01

    The complete human BCR gene (152j-141 nt) on chromosome 22 and greater than 80% of the human ABL gene (179-512 nt) on chromosome 9 have been sequenced from mapped cosmid and plasmid clones via a shotgun strategy. Because these two chromosomes are translocated with breakpoints within the BCR and ABL genes in Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemias, knowledge of these sequences also might provide insight into the validity of various theories of chromosomal rearrangements. Comparison of these genes with their cDNA sequences reveal the positions of 23 BCR exons and putative alternative BCR first and second exons, as well as the common ABL exons 2-11, respectively. Additionally, these regions include the alternative ABL first exons 1b and 1a, a new gene 5` to the first ABL exon, and an open reading frame with homology to an EST within the BCR fourth intron. Further analysis reveals an Alu homology of 38.83 and 39.35% for the BCR and ABL genes, respectively, with other repeat elements present to a lesser extent. Four new Philadelphia chromosome translocation breakpoints from chronic myelogenous leukemia patients also were sequenced, and the positions of these and several other previously sequenced breakpoints now have been mapped precisely, although no consistent breakpoint features immediately were apparent. Comparative analysis of genomic sequences encompassing the murine homologues to the human ABL exons 1b and 1a, as well as regions encompassing the ABL exons 2 and 3, reveals that although there is a high degree of homology in their corresponding exons and promoter regions, these two vertebrate species show a striking lack of homology outside these regions. 122 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Cloning and characterization of the 5'-flanking region of the Ehox gene

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Woon Kyu . E-mail: wklee@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr; Kim, Yong-Man; Malik, Nasir; Ma Chang; Westphal, Heiner

    2006-03-03

    The paired-like homeobox-containing gene Ehox plays a role in embryonic stem cell differentiation and is highly expressed in the developing placenta and thymus. To understand the mechanisms of regulation of Ehox gene expression, the 5'-flanking region of the Ehox gene was isolated from a mouse BAC library. 5'-RACE analysis revealed a single transcriptional start site 130 nucleotides upstream of the translation initiation codon. Transient transfection with a luciferase reporter gene under the control of serially deleted 5'-flanking sequences revealed that the nt -84 to -68 region contained a positive cis-acting element for efficient expression of the Ehox gene. Mutational analysis of this region and oligonucleotide competition in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed the presence of a CCAAT box, which is a target for transcription nuclear factor Y (NFY). NFY is essential for positive gene regulation. No tissue-specific enhancer was identified in the 1.9-kb 5'-flanking region of the Ehox gene. Ehox is expressed during the early stages of embryo development, specifically in Brain at 9.5 dpc, as well as during the late stages of embryo development. These results suggest that NFY is an essential regulatory factor for Ehox transcriptional activity, which is important for the post-implantation stage of the developing embryo.

  5. Characterization of the 5'-flanking region for the human fibrinogen beta gene.

    PubMed Central

    Huber, P; Dalmon, J; Courtois, G; Laurent, M; Assouline, Z; Marguerie, G

    1987-01-01

    To identify the possible regulatory sequences in the genetic expression of fibrinogen, a human genomic DNA library raised in lambda EMBL 4 phage was screened using cDNA probes coding for the A alpha, B beta and gamma chains of human fibrinogen. The entire fibrinogen locus was characterized and its organization analysed by means of hybridization and restriction mapping. Among the clones identified, a single recombinant lambda phage contained the beta gene and its 5'- and 3'-flanking regions. A 1.5 kb fragment of the immediate 5'-flanking region was sequenced and S1 mapping experiments revealed three transcription start points. Comparison of this sequence with that previously reported for the same region upstream from the human gamma gene revealed no significant homology which suggests that the potential promoting sequences of these genes are different. In contrast, comparison of the 5'-flanking regions of human and rat beta genes revealed a 142 bp sequence of 80% homology situated 16 bp upstream from the human beta gene. This highly conserved region may well represents a potential candidate for a regulatory sequence of the human beta gene. Images PMID:3029722

  6. Characterization of the CYP21 gene 5' flanking region in patients affected by 21-OH deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bobba, A; Marra, E; Lattanzio, P; Iolascon, A; Giannattasio, S

    2000-05-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that mutations in the 5' non-coding region of CYP21 gene could contribute to the various spectrum of disease presentation due to 21-OH deficiency, the 400bp nucleotide sequence upstream of the ATG codon of CYP21 gene has been characterized in 28 CAH patients who have previously been genotyped by screening for the ten most frequent CYP21 mutations. Six specific sequence variations (-4C-->T, -73C-->T, -295T-->C, -294A-->C, -283A-->G, -281T-->G) have been identified in this region of CYP21 gene in 3 out of 28 21-OH deficient patients for whom the coding region mutations have been previously identified. Three of these mutations, -295T-->C, -294A-->C, -283A-->G, are apparently generated by a gene-conversion event, thus giving first evidence that this mechanism also applies to the 5' untranslated region of CYP21 gene in 21-OH deficiency. Four other sequence changes, identified at nucleotide position -279, -331, -350 and -353, could be referred to as normal since they are present also in healthy subjects. It may not be excluded that some of the newly-identified single nucleotide changes in the regulatory region could have a modulatory effect on the CYP21 gene transcriptional activity thus affecting the clinical outcome. PMID:10790214

  7. Molecular characterisation of three regions of the nuclear ribosomal DNA unit and the mitochondrial cox1 gene of Sarcocystis fusiformis from water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Gjerde, Bjørn; Hilali, Mosaad; Mawgood, Sahar Abdel

    2015-09-01

    A total of 33 macroscopically visible (3-11 × 1-5 mm) sarcocysts of Sarcocystis fusiformis were excised from the oesophagus of 12 freshly slaughtered water buffalos in Giza, Egypt. Genomic DNA was extracted from the sarcocysts, and all isolates were characterised at the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1) gene through PCR amplification and direct sequencing, whereas a few selected isolates were characterised at the 18S and 28S ribosomal (r) RNA genes and the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region of the nuclear rDNA unit following cloning. Among the 33 cox1 sequences (1,038-bp long), there was a total of 13 haplotypes, differing from each other by one to seven substitutions and sharing an identity of 99.3-99.9 %. In comparison, the sequence identity was 98.8-99.0 % among eight complete 18S rRNA gene sequences (1,873-1,879-bp long), 98.1-100 % among 28 complete ITS1 sequences (853-864-bp long) and 97.4-99.6 % among five partial 28S rRNA gene sequences (1,607-1,622 bp). At the three nuclear loci, the intraspecific (and intra-isolate) sequence variation was due to both substitutions and indels, which necessitated cloning of the PCR products before sequencing. Some additional clones of the 18S and 28S rRNA genes were highly divergent from the more typical clones, but the true nature of these aberrant clones could not be determined. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses based on either 18S rRNA gene or cox1 nucleotide sequences, placed S. fusiformis closest to Sarcocystis cafferi from the African buffalo, but only the analyses based on cox1 data separated the two taxa clearly from each other and showed that they were separate species (monophyletic clusters and 93 % sequence identity at cox1 versus interleaved sequences and 98.7-99.1 % sequence identity at the 18S rRNA gene). Two cats experimentally infected with sarcocysts of S. fusiformis started shedding small numbers of sporocysts 8-10 days post-infection (dpi) and were euthanized 15

  8. Shared idiotypes and restricted immunoglobulin variable region heavy chain genes characterize murine autoantibodies of various specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Monestier, M; Manheimer-Lory, A; Bellon, B; Painter, C; Dang, H; Talal, N; Zanetti, M; Schwartz, R; Pisetsky, D; Kuppers, R

    1986-01-01

    The study of the Ig variable region heavy chain (VH) genes used to encode antibodies specific for self-epitopes from murine hybridomas showed that three VH families are primarily utilized: VH J558, the largest family, and VH QPC52 and VH 7183, the families most proximal to the Ig joining region heavy chain genes. These monoclonal autoantibodies express cross-reactive idiotopes shared by rheumatoid factors and antibodies specific for Sm. The expression of these idiotypes is independent of major histocompatibility complex and Ig constant region heavy chain haplotypes, self-antigen specificity, and even the VH gene family utilized. Though the experiments described here are limited to murine autoantibodies, similarities exist between murine and human autoimmune diseases. Studies that aim to investigate the relationship between VH gene expression and the presence of cross-reactive idiotypes among human autoantibodies should enable us to better understand the mechanisms of autoimmunity and self-tolerance. Images PMID:2427543

  9. Polymorphisms in the Promoter Region of the Chinese Bovine PPARGC1A Gene

    PubMed Central

    Li, M. J.; Liu, M.; Liu, D.; Lan, X. Y.; Lei, C. Z.; Yang, D. Y.; Chen, H.

    2013-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha protein, encoded by the PPARGC1A gene, plays an important role in energy homeostasis. The genetic variations within the PPARGC1A gene promoter region were scanned in 808 Chinese native bovines belonging to three cattle breeds and yaks. A total of 6 SNPs and one 4 bp insertion variation in the promoter region of the bovine PPARGC1A gene were identified: SNP -259 T>A, -301_-298insCTTT, -915 A>G, -1175 T>G, -1590 C>T, -1665 C>T and -1690 G>A, which are in the binding sites of some important transcription factors: sex-determining region Y (SRY), myeloid-specific zinc finger-1 (MZF-1) and octamer factor 1(Oct-1). It is expected that these polymorphisms may regulate PPARGC1A gene transcription and might have consequences at a regulatory level. PMID:25049813

  10. Circuit-wide Transcriptional Profiling Reveals Brain Region-Specific Gene Networks Regulating Depression Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bagot, Rosemary C; Cates, Hannah M; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Lorsch, Zachary S; Walker, Deena M; Wang, Junshi; Huang, Xiaojie; Schlüter, Oliver M; Maze, Ian; Peña, Catherine J; Heller, Elizabeth A; Issler, Orna; Wang, Minghui; Song, Won-Min; Stein, Jason L; Liu, Xiaochuan; Doyle, Marie A; Scobie, Kimberly N; Sun, Hao Sheng; Neve, Rachael L; Geschwind, Daniel; Dong, Yan; Shen, Li; Zhang, Bin; Nestler, Eric J

    2016-06-01

    Depression is a complex, heterogeneous disorder and a leading contributor to the global burden of disease. Most previous research has focused on individual brain regions and genes contributing to depression. However, emerging evidence in humans and animal models suggests that dysregulated circuit function and gene expression across multiple brain regions drive depressive phenotypes. Here, we performed RNA sequencing on four brain regions from control animals and those susceptible or resilient to chronic social defeat stress at multiple time points. We employed an integrative network biology approach to identify transcriptional networks and key driver genes that regulate susceptibility to depressive-like symptoms. Further, we validated in vivo several key drivers and their associated transcriptional networks that regulate depression susceptibility and confirmed their functional significance at the levels of gene transcription, synaptic regulation, and behavior. Our study reveals novel transcriptional networks that control stress susceptibility and offers fundamentally new leads for antidepressant drug discovery. PMID:27181059

  11. Single electron transistor with P-type sidewall spacer gates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Han; Li, Dong Hua; Lee, Joung-Eob; Kang, Kwon-Chil; Kim, Kyungwan; Park, Byung-Gook

    2011-07-01

    A single-electron transistor (SET) is one of the promising solutions to overcome the scaling limit of the Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET). Up to now, various kinds of SETs are being proposed and SETs with a dual gate (DG) structure using an electrical potential barrier have been demonstrated for room temperature operation. To operate DG-SETs, however, extra bias of side gates is necessary. It causes new problems that the electrode for side gates and the extra bias for electrical barrier increase the complexity in circuit design and operation power consumption, respectively. For the reason, a new mechanism using work function (WF) difference is applied to operate a SET at room temperature by three electrodes. Its structure consists of an undoped active region, a control gate, n-doped source/drain electrodes, and metal/silicide or p-type silicon side gates, and a SET with metal/silicide gates or p-type silicon gates forms tunnel barriers induced by work function between an undoped channel and grounded side gates. Via simulation, the effectiveness of the new mechanism is confirmed through various silicide materials that have different WF values. Furthermore, by considering the realistic conditions of the fabrication process, SET with p-type sidewall spacer gates was designed, and its brief fabrication process was introduced. The characteristics of its electrical barrier and the controllability of its control gate were also confirmed via simulation. Finally, a single-hole transistor with n-type sidewall spacer gates was designed. PMID:22121580

  12. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic analysis of Citrus (L) from north-east India as revealed by meiosis, and molecular analysis of internal transcribed spacer region of rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Hynniewta, Marlykynti; Malik, Surendra Kumar; Rao, Satyawada Rama

    2014-01-01

    The north-eastern region of India is reported to be the center of origin and rich in diversity of Citrus (L.) species, where some wild and endangered species namely Citrus indica, Citrus macroptera, Citrus latipes, Citrus ichagensis and Citrus assamensis exist in their natural and undisturbed habitat. In order to have comprehensive information about the extent of genetic variability and the occurrence of cryptic genomic hybridity between and within various Citrus species, a combined approach involving morphological, cytogenetical and molecular approaches were adopted in the present study. Cytogenetic approaches are known to resolve taxonomic riddles in a more efficient manner, by clearly delineating taxa at species and sub species levels. Male meiotic studies revealed a gametic chromosome number of n = 9, without any evidence of numerical variations. Bivalents outnumbered all other types of associations in pollen mother cells (PMCs) analyzed at diplotene, diakinesis and metaphase I. Univalents were frequently encountered in nine species presently studied, though their presence appropriately did not influence the distributional pattern of the chromosomes at anaphases I and II. The molecular approaches for phylogenetic analysis based on sequence data related to ITS 1, ITS 2 and ITS 1 + 5.8 s + ITS 2 of rDNA using maximum parsimony method and Bayesian inference have thrown light on species inter-relationship and evolution of Citrus species confirming our cytogenetical interpretations. The three true basic species i.e. Citrus medica, Citrus maxima and Citrus reticulata with their unique status have been resolved into distinct clades with molecular approaches as well. C. indica which occupies a unique position in the phylogenetic ladder of the genus Citrus has been resolved as a distinct clade and almost behaving as an out-group. The presences of quadrivalents in C. indica also echo and support its unique position. From our study it is amply clear that C

  13. Improvement of inhaler efficacy by home-made spacer.

    PubMed

    Sritara, P; Janvitayanuchit, S

    1993-12-01

    The delivery of aerosol from a metered dose inhaler (MDI) was reported to be more efficient with a spacer. Hence, a home-made spacer modified from a 950 ml low cost plastic bottle, was compared with a MDI and with a 750 ml imported spacer (Nebuhaler). On three consecutive days, at the same time of day, 20 adult patients with chronic asthma inhaled two puffs of terbutaline sulphate (0.5 mg), delivered from MDI alone, MDI with a 750 ml Nebuhlaer and MDI with a home-made spacer. The following measurements were made: forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and pulse rate. These measurements were carried out immediately before and at 5, 20, 60 min after inhalation of terbutaline. FEV1 was significantly increased (P < 0.05) at 5, 20 and 60 min after administration of terbutaline with MDI via either spacers than with MDI alone but no significant difference was observed between Nebuhaler and the home-made spacer. FVC and pulse rate showed no significant change with each method of administration. In conclusion, terbutaline delivered by MDI and home-made spacer was more effective in bronchodilatation than by MDI alone and was just as effective as MDI and Nebuhaler. The home-made spacer therefore offers a simple, inexpensive and more effective method for delivering aerosol drug. PMID:7798822

  14. Orthognathic model surgery with LEGO key-spacer.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Alfred Chee-Ching; Lee, Alfred Siu Hong; Li, Wai Keung

    2013-12-01

    A new technique of model surgery using LEGO plates as key-spacers is described. This technique requires less time to set up compared with the conventional plaster model method. It also retains the preoperative setup with the same set of models. Movement of the segments can be measured and examined in detail with LEGO key-spacers. PMID:24045189

  15. Regional and cell-specific gene expression patterns during petal development.

    PubMed Central

    Drews, G N; Beals, T P; Bui, A Q; Goldberg, R B

    1992-01-01

    We investigated gene expression patterns that occur during tobacco petal development. Two petal mRNA classes were identified that are present at elevated levels relative to other organs. One class is represented equally in the unpigmented tube and pigmented limb regions of the corolla. The other class accumulates preferentially within the limb region. Limb-specific mRNAs accumulate at different times during corolla development, peak in prevalence prior to flower opening, and are localized in either the epidermal cell layers or the mesophyll. The epidermal- and mesophyll-specific mRNAs change abruptly in concentration within a narrow zone of the limb/tube border. Preferential accumulation of at least one limb-specific mRNA occurs within the corolla upper region early in development prior to limb maturation and pigment accumulation. Limb-specific mRNAs also accumulate preferentially within the unpigmented corolla limb region of Nicotiana sylvestris, a diploid progenitor of tobacco. Runoff transcription studies and experiments with chimeric beta-glucuronidase genes showed that petal gene organ, cell, and region specificities are controlled primarily at the transcriptional level. We conclude that during corolla development transcriptional processes act coordinately on limb-specific genes to regulate their regional expression patterns, but act individually on these genes to define their cell specificities. PMID:1477554

  16. A similar 5'-flanking region is required for estrogen and progesterone induction of ovalbumin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Dean, D C; Gope, R; Knoll, B J; Riser, M E; O'Malley, B W

    1984-08-25

    We have previously transferred an ovalbumin-beta-globin fusion gene (ovalglobin) into primary cultures of chick oviduct cells and demonstrated that an ovalbumin gene 5'-flanking sequence between -221 and -95 is necessary for progesterone-mediated transcriptional induction (Dean, D. C., Knoll, B. J., Riser, M. E., and O'Malley, B. W. (1983) Nature (Lond.) 305, 551-554). Here we compare 5'-flanking sequences required for induction of the ovalglobin gene by 17 beta-estradiol and progesterone. The early gene of simian virus 40 was inserted into the same plasmid as the ovalbumin fusion gene to serve as an internal control. Since transcription of the viral early gene was unaffected by the presence of steroid hormone or deletions in the ovalbumin gene 5'-flanking region, the level of its transcripts could be monitored as a reference standard for ovalglobin transcription. Ovalglobin transcripts initiated principally from the ovalbumin cap site in the presence or absence of progesterone and 17 beta-estradiol. Deletion of 5'-flanking sequences to -197 had little effect on the induction with either hormone, while successive deletions to -180, -161, and -143 resulted in a gradual decrease in the level of induction. Deletion to -95 eliminated the induction. The results of this study indicate that DNA control elements for regulation of the ovalbumin gene by estrogen and progesterone either overlap directly or are clustered in close proximity in the 5'-flanking region near the ovalbumin gene promoter. PMID:6088508

  17. Molecular recordings by directed CRISPR spacer acquisition.

    PubMed

    Shipman, Seth L; Nivala, Jeff; Macklis, Jeffrey D; Church, George M

    2016-07-29

    The ability to write a stable record of identified molecular events into a specific genomic locus would enable the examination of long cellular histories and have many applications, ranging from developmental biology to synthetic devices. We show that the type I-E CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas system of Escherichia coli can mediate acquisition of defined pieces of synthetic DNA. We harnessed this feature to generate records of specific DNA sequences into a population of bacterial genomes. We then applied directed evolution so as to alter the recognition of a protospacer adjacent motif by the Cas1-Cas2 complex, which enabled recording in two modes simultaneously. We used this system to reveal aspects of spacer acquisition, fundamental to the CRISPR-Cas adaptation process. These results lay the foundations of a multimodal intracellular recording device. PMID:27284167

  18. The spacer arm length in cell-penetrating peptides influences chitosan/siRNA nanoparticle delivery for pulmonary inflammation treatment.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eun Ju; Choi, Moonhwan; Lee, Jangwook; Rhim, Taiyoun; Lee, Kuen Yong

    2015-12-21

    Although chitosan and its derivatives have been frequently utilized as delivery vehicles for small interfering RNA (siRNA), it is challenging to improve the gene silencing efficiency of chitosan-based nanoparticles. In this study, we hypothesized that controlling the spacer arm length between a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and a nanoparticle could be critical to enhancing the cellular uptake as well as the gene silencing efficiency of conventional chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles. A peptide consisting of nine arginine units (R9) was used as a CPP, and the spacer arm length was controlled by varying the number of glycine units between the peptide (R9Gn) and the nanoparticle (n = 0, 4, and 10). Various physicochemical characteristics of R9Gn-chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles were investigated in vitro. Increasing the spacing arm length did not significantly affect the complex formation between R9Gn-chitosan and siRNA. However, R9G10-chitosan was much more effective in delivering genes both in vitro and in vivo compared with non-modified chitosan (without the peptide) and R9-chitosan (without the spacer arm). Chitosan derivatives modified with oligoarginine containing a spacer arm can be considered as potential delivery vehicles for various genes. PMID:26568525

  19. An integrative analysis of regional gene expression profiles in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Myers, Emma M; Bartlett, Christopher W; Machiraju, Raghu; Bohland, Jason W

    2015-02-01

    Studies of the brain's transcriptome have become prominent in recent years, resulting in an accumulation of datasets with somewhat distinct attributes. These datasets, which are often analyzed only in isolation, also are often collected with divergent goals, which are reflected in their sampling properties. While many researchers have been interested in sampling gene expression in one or a few brain areas in a large number of subjects, recent efforts from the Allen Institute for Brain Sciences and others have focused instead on dense neuroanatomical sampling, necessarily limiting the number of individual donor brains studied. The purpose of the present work is to develop methods that draw on the complementary strengths of these two types of datasets for study of the human brain, and to characterize the anatomical specificity of gene expression profiles and gene co-expression networks derived from human brains using different specific technologies. The approach is applied using two publicly accessible datasets: (1) the high anatomical resolution Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA, Hawrylycz et al., 2012) and (2) a relatively large sample size, but comparatively coarse neuroanatomical dataset described previously by Gibbs et al. (2010). We found a relatively high degree of correspondence in differentially expressed genes and regional gene expression profiles across the two datasets. Gene co-expression networks defined in individual brain regions were less congruent, but also showed modest anatomical specificity. Using gene modules derived from the Gibbs dataset and from curated gene lists, we demonstrated varying degrees of anatomical specificity based on two classes of methods, one focused on network modularity and the other focused on enrichment of expression levels. Two approaches to assessing the statistical significance of a gene set's modularity in a given brain region were studied, which provide complementary information about the anatomical specificity of a gene

  20. Ectopic recombination within homologous immunoglobulin mu gene constant regions in a mouse hybridoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, M D; Read, L R

    1992-01-01

    We have transferred a pSV2neo vector containing the wild-type constant region of the immunoglobulin mu gene (C mu) into the mutant hybridoma igm482, which bears a 2-bp deletion in the third constant-region exon of its haploid chromosomal mu gene (C mu 3). Independent igm482 transformants contain the wild-type immunoglobulin C mu region stably integrated in ectopic chromosomal positions. We report here that the wild-type immunoglobulin C mu region can function as the donor sequence in a gene conversion event which corrects the 2-bp deletion in the mutant igm482 chromosomal C mu 3 exon. The homologous recombination event restores normal immunoglobulin M production in the mutant cell. Images PMID:1406631

  1. Genetic diversity and molecular evolution of Naga King Chili inferred from internal transcribed spacer sequence of nuclear ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Kehie, Mechuselie; Kumaria, Suman; Devi, Khumuckcham Sangeeta; Tandon, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    Sequences of the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) of nuclear ribosomal DNAs were explored to study the genetic diversity and molecular evolution of Naga King Chili. Our study indicated the occurrence of nucleotide polymorphism and haplotypic diversity in the ITS regions. The present study demonstrated that the variability of ITS1 with respect to nucleotide diversity and sequence polymorphism exceeded that of ITS2. Sequence analysis of 5.8S gene revealed a much conserved region in all the accessions of Naga King Chili. However, strong phylogenetic information of this species is the distinct 13 bp deletion in the 5.8S gene which discriminated Naga King Chili from the rest of the Capsicum sp. Neutrality test results implied a neutral variation, and population seems to be evolving at drift–mutation equilibrium and free from directed selection pressure. Furthermore, mismatch analysis showed multimodal curve indicating a demographic equilibrium. Phylogenetic relationships revealed by Median Joining Network (MJN) analysis denoted a clear discrimination of Naga King Chili from its closest sister species (Capsicumchinense and Capsicumfrutescens). The absence of star-like network of haplotypes suggested an ancient population expansion of this chili. PMID:26862481

  2. Genetic diversity and molecular evolution of Naga King Chili inferred from internal transcribed spacer sequence of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Kehie, Mechuselie; Kumaria, Suman; Devi, Khumuckcham Sangeeta; Tandon, Pramod

    2016-02-01

    Sequences of the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) of nuclear ribosomal DNAs were explored to study the genetic diversity and molecular evolution of Naga King Chili. Our study indicated the occurrence of nucleotide polymorphism and haplotypic diversity in the ITS regions. The present study demonstrated that the variability of ITS1 with respect to nucleotide diversity and sequence polymorphism exceeded that of ITS2. Sequence analysis of 5.8S gene revealed a much conserved region in all the accessions of Naga King Chili. However, strong phylogenetic information of this species is the distinct 13 bp deletion in the 5.8S gene which discriminated Naga King Chili from the rest of the Capsicum sp. Neutrality test results implied a neutral variation, and population seems to be evolving at drift-mutation equilibrium and free from directed selection pressure. Furthermore, mismatch analysis showed multimodal curve indicating a demographic equilibrium. Phylogenetic relationships revealed by Median Joining Network (MJN) analysis denoted a clear discrimination of Naga King Chili from its closest sister species (Capsicum chinense and Capsicum frutescens). The absence of star-like network of haplotypes suggested an ancient population expansion of this chili. PMID:26862481

  3. Macrophage nitric oxide synthase gene: two upstream regions mediate induction by interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Lowenstein, C J; Alley, E W; Raval, P; Snowman, A M; Snyder, S H; Russell, S W; Murphy, W J

    1993-01-01

    The promoter region of the mouse gene for macrophage-inducible nitric oxide synthase (mac-NOS; EC 1.14.13.39) has been characterized. A putative TATA box is 30 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site. Computer analysis reveals numerous potential binding sites for transcription factors, many of them associated with stimuli that induce mac-NOS expression. To localize functionally important portions of the regulatory region, we constructed deletion mutants of the mac-NOS 5' flanking region and placed them upstream of a luciferase reporter gene. The macrophage cell line RAW 264.7, when transfected with a minimal promoter construct, expresses little luciferase activity when stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), or both. Maximal expression depends on two discrete regulatory regions upstream of the putative TATA box. Region I (position -48 to -209) increases luciferase activity approximately 75-fold over the minimal promoter construct. Region I contains LPS-related responsive elements, including a binding site for nuclear factor interleukin 6 (NF-IL6) and the kappa B binding site for NF-kappa B, suggesting that this region regulates LPS-induced expression of the mac-NOS gene. Region II (position -913 to -1029) alone does not increase luciferase expression, but together with region I it causes an additional 10-fold increase in expression. Together the two regions increase expression 750-fold over activity obtained from a minimal promoter construct. Region II contains motifs for binding IFN-related transcription factors and thus probably is responsible for IFN-mediated regulation of LPS-induced mac-NOS. Delineation of these two cooperative regions explains at the level of transcription how IFN-gamma and LPS act in concert to induce maximally the mac-NOS gene and, furthermore, how IFN-gamma augments the inflammatory response to LPS. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7692452

  4. Isolation of cDNAs from the spinal muscular atrophy gene region with yeast artificial chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, H.X.; He, X.X.; Hung, W.Y.

    1994-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by degeneration of anterior horn cells, leading to progressive paralysis of voluntary muscles. The SMA gene(s) is located at 5q11.2-q13.3, between D5S435 and D5S112. To isolate potential candidate gene(s) responsible for SMA, we used the YACs within the SMA gene region as probes to screen a human brainstem cDNA library. Thirteen cDNA clones were isolated. Their sizes range from 0.7 kb to 5 kb. Seven clones were found to be unique in sequence; the remaining six clones contain repetitive sequences. Five out of these seven unique clones have been used as probes to screen a phage genomic DNA library. Phage genomic clones isolated with individual unique cDNA were used for fluorescence in situ hybridization to identify the origin of cDNAs. These five unique sequences are all located in the 5q13 region, indicating the reliability of our screening method. All the thirteen clones have been partially sequenced (about 300 bp) from each end. No homology has been found with any known EST or known genes. No cross hybridization was detected among the unique clones, suggesting that there may be distinct new genes encoded in this region.

  5. Different 3' end regions strongly influence the level of gene expression in plant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ingelbrecht, I L; Herman, L M; Dekeyser, R A; Van Montagu, M C; Depicker, A G

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the functional role of a 3' end region on the expression of a reporter gene in plant cells. In stably transformed plants, expression of the reporter gene without a plant gene 3' end is variable and depends on the fortuitous presence of polyadenylation signals in the downstream sequences. When the reporter gene is flanked by pBR322 DNA, 3'-processing and polyadenylation occurs at (a) cryptic site(s) within these vector sequences. Using a transient gene expression system, we present a deletion analysis of the 3' end of the octopine synthase gene showing that the most proximal polyadenylation signal per se is not sufficient to ensure expression but that a downstream (G)T-rich sequence is also required. Optimal expression of the fusion gene requires more than 98 base pairs and at most 142 base pairs downstream from the most distal polyadenylation site. We analyzed the expression of chimeric genes with 3' end sequences originating from different plant genes. In the transient expression assay, all constructs direct similar neomycin phosphotransferase II activities. However, in stably transformed tissue, the gene constructs displayed characteristic expression levels which varied as much as 60-fold. This result suggests a role for 3' end sequences in post-transcriptional processes such as efficiency of 3'-processing and/or mRNA stability. PMID:2562510

  6. RNA interference improves myopathic phenotypes in mice over-expressing FSHD region gene 1 (FRG1).

    PubMed

    Wallace, Lindsay M; Garwick-Coppens, Sara E; Tupler, Rossella; Harper, Scott Q

    2011-11-01

    Muscular dystrophies, and other diseases of muscle, arise from recessive and dominant gene mutations. Gene replacement strategies may be beneficial for the former, while gene silencing approaches may provide treatment for the latter. In the last two decades, muscle-directed gene therapies were primarily focused on treating recessive disorders. This disparity at least partly arose because feasible mechanisms to silence dominant disease genes lagged behind gene replacement strategies. With the discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) and its subsequent development as a promising new gene silencing tool, the landscape has changed. In this study, our objective was to demonstrate proof-of-principle for RNAi therapy of a dominant myopathy in vivo. We tested the potential of adeno-associated viral (AAV)-delivered therapeutic microRNAs, targeting the human Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1), to correct myopathic features in mice expressing toxic levels of human FRG1 (FRG1(-high) mice). We found that FRG1 gene silencing improved muscle mass, strength, and histopathological abnormalities associated with muscular dystrophy in FRG1(-high) mice, thereby demonstrating therapeutic promise for treatment of dominantly inherited myopathies using RNAi. This approach potentially applies to as many as 29 different gene mutations responsible for myopathies inherited as dominant disorders. PMID:21730972

  7. RNA Interference Improves Myopathic Phenotypes in Mice Over-expressing FSHD Region Gene 1 (FRG1)

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Lindsay M; Garwick-Coppens, Sara E; Tupler, Rossella; Harper, Scott Q

    2011-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies, and other diseases of muscle, arise from recessive and dominant gene mutations. Gene replacement strategies may be beneficial for the former, while gene silencing approaches may provide treatment for the latter. In the last two decades, muscle-directed gene therapies were primarily focused on treating recessive disorders. This disparity at least partly arose because feasible mechanisms to silence dominant disease genes lagged behind gene replacement strategies. With the discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) and its subsequent development as a promising new gene silencing tool, the landscape has changed. In this study, our objective was to demonstrate proof-of-principle for RNAi therapy of a dominant myopathy in vivo. We tested the potential of adeno-associated viral (AAV)-delivered therapeutic microRNAs, targeting the human Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1), to correct myopathic features in mice expressing toxic levels of human FRG1 (FRG1−high mice). We found that FRG1 gene silencing improved muscle mass, strength, and histopathological abnormalities associated with muscular dystrophy in FRG1−high mice, thereby demonstrating therapeutic promise for treatment of dominantly inherited myopathies using RNAi. This approach potentially applies to as many as 29 different gene mutations responsible for myopathies inherited as dominant disorders. PMID:21730972

  8. Discovery of functional non-coding conserved regions in the α-synuclein gene locus

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Lori; Walter, Michael; Ting, Dennis; Schüle, Birgitt

    2014-01-01

    Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the Rep-1 microsatellite marker of the α-synuclein ( SNCA) gene have consistently been shown to be associated with Parkinson’s disease, but the functional relevance is unclear. Based on these findings we hypothesized that conserved cis-regulatory elements in the SNCA genomic region regulate expression of SNCA, and that SNPs in these regions could be functionally modulating the expression of SNCA, thus contributing to neuronal demise and predisposing to Parkinson’s disease. In a pair-wise comparison of a 206kb genomic region encompassing the SNCA gene, we revealed 34 evolutionary conserved DNA sequences between human and mouse. All elements were cloned into reporter vectors and assessed for expression modulation in dual luciferase reporter assays.  We found that 12 out of 34 elements exhibited either an enhancement or reduction of the expression of the reporter gene. Three elements upstream of the SNCA gene displayed an approximately 1.5 fold (p<0.009) increase in expression. Of the intronic regions, three showed a 1.5 fold increase and two others indicated a 2 and 2.5 fold increase in expression (p<0.002). Three elements downstream of the SNCA gene showed 1.5 fold and 2.5 fold increase (p<0.0009). One element downstream of SNCA had a reduced expression of the reporter gene of 0.35 fold (p<0.0009) of normal activity. Our results demonstrate that the SNCA gene contains cis-regulatory regions that might regulate the transcription and expression of SNCA. Further studies in disease-relevant tissue types will be important to understand the functional impact of regulatory regions and specific Parkinson’s disease-associated SNPs and its function in the disease process. PMID:25566351

  9. Analysis of the spacer DNA between the cyclic AMP receptor protein binding site and the lac promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Flatow, U; Rajendrakumar, G V; Garges, S

    1996-01-01

    The role of the spacer region DNA between the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) site and the RNA polymerase in the lac promoter was examined. We wanted to determine whether the wild-type DNA sequence of this region was an absolute requirement for CRP activation of lac transcription. The sequence of a 9-bp stretch of the spacer, from -41 to -49 relative to the start of transcription, was randomized, and the effect of randomization on lac expression was investigated in vitro and in vivo. We found that the spacer contains no specific sequence determinants for CRP activation of lac transcription; fewer than 1% of the mutants displayed greater than a 50% decrease in CRP activation of lac transcription. PMID:8636052

  10. Sequence analysis of the rDNA internal transcribed spacer 2 of five species of South American human malaria mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Fritz, G N

    1998-03-01

    The rDNA internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) was sequenced for 5 species of mosquitoes that may be important vectors of human malaria in certain regions of South America and are difficult to distinguish by morphology: Anopheles evansae, An. nuneztovari, An. rangeli, An. strodei and An. trinkae. ITS2 sequences from samples collected in Ecuador, Bolivia, Venezuela and Brazil were aligned and compared in order to determine the usefulness of this spacer for the elaboration of species specific primers and DNA probes. The ITS2 was found to be different in size (ranging from 333 to 397 bp) and sequence between all pairs of species. Highly variable regions were found primarily at the 3' end of the spacer and were interspersed with relatively conserved sites. Instraspecific sequence variation was limited to a single transversion between specimens of An. rangeli from distant geographic locations suggesting concerted evolution and homogenization of the ITS2. PMID:10520449

  11. Functional elements of the promoter region of the Aspergillus oryzae glaA gene encoding glucoamylase.

    PubMed

    Hata, Y; Kitamoto, K; Gomi, K; Kumagai, C; Tamura, G

    1992-08-01

    Analysis was made of the promoter region of the Aspergillus oryzae glaA gene encoding glucoamylase. Northern blots using a glucoamylase cDNA as a probe indicated that the amount of mRNA corresponding to the glaA gene increased when expression was induced by starch or maltose. The promoter region of the glaA gene was fused to the Escherichia coli uidA gene, encoding beta-glucuronidase (GUS), and the resultant plasmid was introduced into A. oryzae. Expression of GUS protein in the A. oryzae transformants was induced by maltose, indicating that the glaA-GUS gene was regulated at the level of transcription in the presence of maltose. The nucleotide sequence 1.1 kb upstream of the glaA coding region was determined. A comparison of the nucleotide sequence of the A. oryzae glaA promoter with those of A. oryzae amyB, encoding alpha-amylase, and A. niger glaA showed two regions with similar sequences. Deletion and site-specific mutation analysis of these homologous regions indicated that both are essential for direct high-level expression when grown on maltose. PMID:1339327

  12. Genetic Architecture of MAPT Gene Region in Parkinson Disease Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Pascale, Esterina; Di Battista, Maria Elena; Rubino, Alfonso; Purcaro, Carlo; Valente, Marcella; Fattapposta, Francesco; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Meco, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) region has been conceptualized as a model of the interaction between genetics and functional disease outcomes in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson disease (PD). Indeed, haplotype-specific differences in expression and alternative splicing of MAPT transcripts affect cellular functions at different levels, increasing susceptibility to a range of neurodegenerative processes. In order to evaluate a possible link between MAPT variants, PD risk and PD motor phenotype, we analyzed the genetic architecture of MAPT in a cohort of PD patients. We observed a statistically significant association between the H1 haplotype and PD risk (79.5 vs 69.5%; χ(2) = 9.9; OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.4; p = 0.002). The effect was more evident in non tremor dominant (TD) PD subjects (NTD-PD) (82 vs 69.5%; χ(2) = 13.6; OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.4-3; p = 0.0003), while no difference emerged between PD subgroup of tremor dominant patients (TD-PD) and control subjects. Examination of specific intra-H1 variations showed that the H1h subhaplotype was overrepresented in NTD-PD patients compared with controls (p = 0.007; OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.3-6.3). Although we cannot exclude that MAPT variation may be associated with ethnicity, our results may support the hypothesis that MAPT H1 clade and a specific H1 subhaplotype influence the risk of PD and modulate the clinical expression of the disease, including motor phenotype. PMID:27147968

  13. Genetic Architecture of MAPT Gene Region in Parkinson Disease Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Pascale, Esterina; Di Battista, Maria Elena; Rubino, Alfonso; Purcaro, Carlo; Valente, Marcella; Fattapposta, Francesco; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Meco, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) region has been conceptualized as a model of the interaction between genetics and functional disease outcomes in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson disease (PD). Indeed, haplotype-specific differences in expression and alternative splicing of MAPT transcripts affect cellular functions at different levels, increasing susceptibility to a range of neurodegenerative processes. In order to evaluate a possible link between MAPT variants, PD risk and PD motor phenotype, we analyzed the genetic architecture of MAPT in a cohort of PD patients. We observed a statistically significant association between the H1 haplotype and PD risk (79.5 vs 69.5%; χ2 = 9.9; OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2–2.4; p = 0.002). The effect was more evident in non tremor dominant (TD) PD subjects (NTD-PD) (82 vs 69.5%; χ2 = 13.6; OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.4–3; p = 0.0003), while no difference emerged between PD subgroup of tremor dominant patients (TD-PD) and control subjects. Examination of specific intra-H1 variations showed that the H1h subhaplotype was overrepresented in NTD-PD patients compared with controls (p = 0.007; OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.3–6.3). Although we cannot exclude that MAPT variation may be associated with ethnicity, our results may support the hypothesis that MAPT H1 clade and a specific H1 subhaplotype influence the risk of PD and modulate the clinical expression of the disease, including motor phenotype. PMID:27147968

  14. Analysis of tandem gene copies in maize chromosomal regions reconstructed from long sequence reads

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jiaqiang; Feng, Yaping; Kumar, Dibyendu; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Tingting; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Messing, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Haplotype variation not only involves SNPs but also insertions and deletions, in particular gene copy number variations. However, comparisons of individual genomes have been difficult because traditional sequencing methods give too short reads to unambiguously reconstruct chromosomal regions containing repetitive DNA sequences. An example of such a case is the protein gene family in maize that acts as a sink for reduced nitrogen in the seed. Previously, 41–48 gene copies of the alpha zein gene family that spread over six loci spanning between 30- and 500-kb chromosomal regions have been described in two Iowa Stiff Stalk (SS) inbreds. Analyses of those regions were possible because of overlapping BAC clones, generated by an expensive and labor-intensive approach. Here we used single-molecule real-time (Pacific Biosciences) shotgun sequencing to assemble the six chromosomal regions from the Non-Stiff Stalk maize inbred W22 from a single DNA sequence dataset. To validate the reconstructed regions, we developed an optical map (BioNano genome map; BioNano Genomics) of W22 and found agreement between the two datasets. Using the sequences of full-length cDNAs from W22, we found that the error rate of PacBio sequencing seemed to be less than 0.1% after autocorrection and assembly. Expressed genes, some with premature stop codons, are interspersed with nonexpressed genes, giving rise to genotype-specific expression differences. Alignment of these regions with those from the previous analyzed regions of SS lines exhibits in part dramatic differences between these two heterotic groups. PMID:27354512

  15. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes through Integrated Study of Alzheimer’s Disease Affected Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Regina; Moscato, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in older adults that damages the brain and results in impaired memory, thinking and behaviour. The identification of differentially expressed genes and related pathways among affected brain regions can provide more information on the mechanisms of AD. In the past decade, several studies have reported many genes that are associated with AD. This wealth of information has become difficult to follow and interpret as most of the results are conflicting. In that case, it is worth doing an integrated study of multiple datasets that helps to increase the total number of samples and the statistical power in detecting biomarkers. In this study, we present an integrated analysis of five different brain region datasets and introduce new genes that warrant further investigation. Methods The aim of our study is to apply a novel combinatorial optimisation based meta-analysis approach to identify differentially expressed genes that are associated to AD across brain regions. In this study, microarray gene expression data from 161 samples (74 non-demented controls, 87 AD) from the Entorhinal Cortex (EC), Hippocampus (HIP), Middle temporal gyrus (MTG), Posterior cingulate cortex (PC), Superior frontal gyrus (SFG) and visual cortex (VCX) brain regions were integrated and analysed using our method. The results are then compared to two popular meta-analysis methods, RankProd and GeneMeta, and to what can be obtained by analysing the individual datasets. Results We find genes related with AD that are consistent with existing studies, and new candidate genes not previously related with AD. Our study confirms the up-regualtion of INFAR2 and PTMA along with the down regulation of GPHN, RAB2A, PSMD14 and FGF. Novel genes PSMB2, WNK1, RPL15, SEMA4C, RWDD2A and LARGE are found to be differentially expressed across all brain regions. Further investigation on these genes may provide new insights into the development of AD

  16. Information Theoretical Analysis of a Bovine Gene Atlas Reveals Chromosomal Regions with Tissue Specific Gene Expression.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An essential step to understanding the genomic biology of any organism is to comprehensively survey its transcriptome. We present the Bovine Gene Atlas (BGA) a compendium of over 7.2 million unique 20 base Illumina DGE tags representing 100 tissue transcriptomes collected primarily from L1 Dominette...

  17. Genotypic Characterization of Bradyrhizobium Strains Nodulating Endemic Woody Legumes of the Canary Islands by PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of Genes Encoding 16S rRNA (16S rDNA) and 16S-23S rDNA Intergenic Spacers, Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic PCR Genomic Fingerprinting, and Partial 16S rDNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vinuesa, Pablo; Rademaker, Jan L. W.; de Bruijn, Frans J.; Werner, Dietrich

    1998-01-01

    We present a phylogenetic analysis of nine strains of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from nodules of tagasaste (Chamaecytisus proliferus) and other endemic woody legumes of the Canary Islands, Spain. These and several reference strains were characterized genotypically at different levels of taxonomic resolution by computer-assisted analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLPs), 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) RFLPs, and repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) genomic fingerprints with BOX, ERIC, and REP primers. Cluster analysis of 16S rDNA restriction patterns with four tetrameric endonucleases grouped the Canarian isolates with the two reference strains, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110spc4 and Bradyrhizobium sp. strain (Centrosema) CIAT 3101, resolving three genotypes within these bradyrhizobia. In the analysis of IGS RFLPs with three enzymes, six groups were found, whereas rep-PCR fingerprinting revealed an even greater genotypic diversity, with only two of the Canarian strains having similar fingerprints. Furthermore, we show that IGS RFLPs and even very dissimilar rep-PCR fingerprints can be clustered into phylogenetically sound groupings by combining them with 16S rDNA RFLPs in computer-assisted cluster analysis of electrophoretic patterns. The DNA sequence analysis of a highly variable 264-bp segment of the 16S rRNA genes of these strains was found to be consistent with the fingerprint-based classification. Three different DNA sequences were obtained, one of which was not previously described, and all belonged to the B. japonicum/Rhodopseudomonas rDNA cluster. Nodulation assays revealed that none of the Canarian isolates nodulated Glycine max or Leucaena leucocephala, but all nodulated Acacia pendula, C. proliferus, Macroptilium atropurpureum, and Vigna unguiculata. PMID:9603820

  18. AbrB, a regulator of gene expression in Bacillus, interacts with the transcription initiation regions of a sporulation gene and an antibiotic biosynthesis gene.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, J B; Gocht, M; Marahiel, M A; Zuber, P

    1989-01-01

    The abrB gene of Bacillus subtilis is believed to encode a repressor that controls the expression of genes involved in starvation-induced processes such as sporulation and the production of antibiotics and degradative enzymes. Two such genes, spoVG, a sporulation gene of B. subtilis, and tycA, which encodes tyrocidine synthetase I of the tyrocidine biosynthetic pathway in Bacillus brevis, are negatively regulated by abrB in B. subtilis. To examine the role of abrB in the repression of gene transcription, the AbrB protein was purified and then tested for its ability to bind to spoVG and tycA promoter DNA. In a gel mobility shift experiment, AbrB was found to bind to a DNA fragment containing the sequence from -95 to +61 of spoVG. AbrB protein exhibited reduced affinity for DNA of two mutant forms of the spoVG promoter that had been shown to be insensitive to abrB-dependent repression in vivo. These studies showed that an upstream A + T-rich sequence from -37 to -95 was required for optimal AbrB binding. AbrB protein was also observed to bind to the tycA gene within a region between the transcription start site and the tycA coding sequence as well as to a region containing the putative tycA promoter. These findings reinforce the hypothesis that AbrB represses gene expression through its direct interaction with the transcription initiation regions of genes under its control. Images PMID:2554317

  19. Characterization of a gene from the EDM1-PSACH region of human chromosome 19p

    SciTech Connect

    Lennon, G.G.; Giorgi, D.; Martin, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic linkage mapping has indicated that both multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (EDM1), a dominantly inherited chondrodysplasia, and pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH), a skeletal disorder associated with dwarfism, map to a 2-3 Mb region of human chromosome 19p. We have isolated a partial cDNA from this region using hybrid selection, and report on progress towards the characterization of the genomic structure and transcription of the corresponding gene. Sequence analysis of the cDNA to date indicates that this gene is likely to be expressed within extracellular matrix tissues. Defects in this gene or neighboring gene family members may therefore lead to EDM1, PSACH, or other connective tissue and skeletal disorders.

  20. Sequencing of 15 622 gene-bearing BACs clarifies the gene-dense regions of the barley genome.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Amatriaín, María; Lonardi, Stefano; Luo, MingCheng; Madishetty, Kavitha; Svensson, Jan T; Moscou, Matthew J; Wanamaker, Steve; Jiang, Tao; Kleinhofs, Andris; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Wise, Roger P; Stein, Nils; Ma, Yaqin; Rodriguez, Edmundo; Kudrna, Dave; Bhat, Prasanna R; Chao, Shiaoman; Condamine, Pascal; Heinen, Shane; Resnik, Josh; Wing, Rod; Witt, Heather N; Alpert, Matthew; Beccuti, Marco; Bozdag, Serdar; Cordero, Francesca; Mirebrahim, Hamid; Ounit, Rachid; Wu, Yonghui; You, Frank; Zheng, Jie; Simková, Hana; Dolezel, Jaroslav; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Duma, Denisa; Altschmied, Lothar; Blake, Tom; Bregitzer, Phil; Cooper, Laurel; Dilbirligi, Muharrem; Falk, Anders; Feiz, Leila; Graner, Andreas; Gustafson, Perry; Hayes, Patrick M; Lemaux, Peggy; Mammadov, Jafar; Close, Timothy J

    2015-10-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) possesses a large and highly repetitive genome of 5.1 Gb that has hindered the development of a complete sequence. In 2012, the International Barley Sequencing Consortium released a resource integrating whole-genome shotgun sequences with a physical and genetic framework. However, because only 6278 bacterial artificial chromosome (BACs) in the physical map were sequenced, fine structure was limited. To gain access to the gene-containing portion of the barley genome at high resolution, we identified and sequenced 15 622 BACs representing the minimal tiling path of 72 052 physical-mapped gene-bearing BACs. This generated ~1.7 Gb of genomic sequence containing an estimated 2/3 of all Morex barley genes. Exploration of these sequenced BACs revealed that although distal ends of chromosomes contain most of the gene-enriched BACs and are characterized by high recombination rates, there are also gene-dense regions with suppressed recombination. We made use of published map-anchored sequence data from Aegilops tauschii to develop a synteny viewer between barley and the ancestor of the wheat D-genome. Except for some notable inversions, there is a high level of collinearity between the two species. The software HarvEST:Barley provides facile access to BAC sequences and their annotations, along with the barley-Ae. tauschii synteny viewer. These BAC sequences constitute a resource to improve the efficiency of marker development, map-based cloning, and comparative genomics in barley and related crops. Additional knowledge about regions of the barley genome that are gene-dense but low recombination is particularly relevant. PMID:26252423

  1. PCR primers for 30 novel gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera

    PubMed Central

    Wahlberg, Niklas; Peña, Carlos; Ahola, Milla; Wheat, Christopher W.; Rota, Jadranka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report primer pairs for 30 new gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera that can be amplified using a standard PCR protocol. The new primers were tested across diverse Lepidoptera, including nonditrysians and a wide selection of ditrysians. These new gene regions give a total of 11,043 bp of DNA sequence data and they show similar variability to traditionally used nuclear gene regions in studies of Lepidoptera. We feel that a PCR-based approach still has its place in molecular systematic studies of Lepidoptera, particularly at the intrafamilial level, and our new set of primers now provides a route to generating phylogenomic datasets using traditional methods. PMID:27408580

  2. Functional characterization of the human TPH2 5′ regulatory region: untranslated region and polymorphisms modulate gene expression in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guo-Lin; Vallender, Eric J.; Miller, Gregory M.

    2009-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH2) is a recently identified TPH isoform responsible for neuronal serotonin (5-HT) synthesis, and TPH2 polymorphisms are associated with a range of behavioral traits and psychiatric disorders. This study characterized cis-acting elements and three common polymorphisms (−703G/T, −473T/A, and 90A/G) in the 5′ regulatory region of human TPH2 by using luciferase reporter assay, quantitative real-time PCR, and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). The core promoter of human TPH2 was localized to the region between −107 and +7, and the segment of +8 to +53 within the 5′-UTR was found to exert a potent inhibitory effect on gene expression at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In both RN46A and HEK-293 cell lines, the TTA (−703T/−473T/90A) haplotype of the three polymorphisms showed the lowest gene expression compared with other haplotypes, and the −703G/T and −473T/A polymorphisms tended to exert a synergic effect on gene expression dependent upon the sequence of the 5′-UTR. In RN46A, the 90A/G polymorphism significantly increased luciferase activity and mRNA level irrespective of the other two polymorphisms, while in HEK-293 cells the effect of 90A/G was dependent on the alleles at loci −703 and −473. EMSA showed that all the three polymorphisms potentially alter DNA–protein interactions, while the 90A/G polymorphism predictably alters the 5′-UTR secondary structure of mRNA and influences RNA–protein interactions. In conclusion, our present study demonstrates that both the 5′-UTR and common polymorphisms (especially the 90A/G) in the 5′ regulatory region of human TPH2 have a significant impact on gene expression. PMID:17972101

  3. Genetic Divergence in Domesticated and Non-Domesticated Gene Regions of Barley Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Songxian; Sun, Dongfa; Sun, Genlou

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the genetic divergence in the chromosomal regions with domesticated and non-domesticated genes. The objective of our study is to examine the effect of natural selection on shaping genetic diversity of chromosome region with domesticated and non-domesticated genes in barley using 110 SSR markers. Comparison of the genetic diversity loss between wild and cultivated barley for each chromosome showed that chromosome 5H had the highest divergence of 35.29%, followed by 3H, 7H, 4H, 2H, 6H. Diversity ratio was calculated as (diversity of wild type – diversity of cultivated type)/diversity of wild type×100%. It was found that diversity ratios of the domesticated regions on 5H, 1H and 7H were higher than those of non-domesticated regions. Diversity ratio of the domesticated region on 2H and 4H is similar to that of non-domesticated region. However, diversity ratio of the domesticated region on 3H is lower than that of non-domesticated region. Averaged diversity among six chromosomes in domesticated region was 33.73% difference between wild and cultivated barley, and was 27.56% difference in the non-domesticated region. The outcome of this study advances our understanding of the evolution of crop chromosomes. PMID:25812037

  4. Characterization of the 5' flanking region of the human D1A dopamine receptor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Minowa, M T; Minowa, T; Monsma, F J; Sibley, D R; Mouradian, M M

    1992-01-01

    To study how the expression of the D1A dopamine receptor gene is regulated, a human genomic clone was isolated by using a rat cDNA as probe. A 2.3-kilobase genomic fragment spanning -2571 through -236 relative to the adenosine of the first methionine codon was sequenced. The gene has an intron of 116 base pairs in the 5' noncoding region, nucleotides -599 through -484 as determined by S1 mapping and reverse transcription-PCR. It has multiple transcription initiation sites located between -1061 and -1040. The promoter region lacks a TATA box and a CAAT box, is rich in G+C content, and has multiple putative binding sites for transcription factor Sp1. Thus, the promoter region of the human D1A gene has features of "housekeeping" genes. However, it also has consensus sequences for AP1 and AP2 binding sites and a putative cAMP response element. The ability of four deletion mutants of the 2.3-kilobase fragment to modulate transcription of the heterologous chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene in the promoterless plasmid pCAT-Basic was determined. All mutants demonstrated substantial transcriptional activity in the murine neuroblastoma cell line NS20Y, which expresses the D1A gene endogenously. Transient expression assays suggested the presence of a positive modulator between nucleotides -1340 and -1102, and a negative modulator between -1730 and -1341. The four genomic fragments had no or very low transcriptional activity in NB41A3, C6, and Hep G2 cells, which are not known to express this gene. Thus, the human D1A gene belongs to the category of tissue-specific, regulated genes that have housekeeping-type promoters. Images PMID:1557411

  5. Pervasive generation of oppositely oriented spacers during CRISPR adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Shmakov, Sergey; Savitskaya, Ekaterina; Semenova, Ekaterina; Logacheva, Maria D.; Datsenko, Kirill A.; Severinov, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    During the process of prokaryotic CRISPR adaptation, a copy of a segment of foreign deoxyribonucleic acid referred to as protospacer is added to the CRISPR cassette and becomes a spacer. When a protospacer contains a neighboring target interference motif, the specific small CRISPR ribonucleic acid (crRNA) transcribed from expanded CRISPR cassette can protect a prokaryotic cell from virus infection or plasmid transformation and conjugation. We show that in Escherichia coli, a vast majority of plasmid protospacers generate spacers integrated in CRISPR cassette in two opposing orientations, leading to frequent appearance of complementary spacer pairs in a population of cells that underwent CRISPR adaptation. When a protospacer contains a spacer acquisition motif AAG, spacer orientation that generates functional protective crRNA is strongly preferred. All other protospacers give rise to spacers oriented in both ways at comparable frequencies. This phenomenon increases the repertoire of available spacers and should make it more likely that a protective crRNA is formed as a result of CRISPR adaptation. PMID:24728991

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of the promoter region of the porcine apolipoprotein E gene.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jihan; Hu, Bingjun; Mu, Yulian; Xin, Leilei; Yang, Shulin; Li, Kui

    2014-05-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE), a component of lipoproteins plays an important role in the transport and metabolism of cholesterol, and is associated with hyperlipoproteinemia and Alzheimer's disease. In order to further understand the characterization of APOE gene, the promoter of APOE gene of Landrace pigs was analyzed in the present study. The genomic structure and amino acid sequence in pigs were analyzed and found to share high similarity in those of human but low similarity in promoter region. Real-time PCR revealed the APOE gene expression pattern of pigs in diverse tissues. The highest expression level was observed in liver, relatively low expression in other tissues, especially in stomach and muscle. Furthermore, the promoter expressing in Hepa 1-6 was significantly better at driving luciferase expression compared with C2C12 cell. After analysis of porcine APOE gene promoter regions, potential transcription factor binding sites were predicted and two GC signals, a TATA box were indicated. Results of promoter activity analysis indicated that one of potential regulatory elements was located in the region -669 to -259, which was essential for a high expression of the APOE gene. Promoter mutation and deletion analysis further suggested that the C/EBPA binding site within the APOE promoter was responsible for the regulation of APOE transcription. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays also showed the binding site of the transcription factor C/EBPA. This study advances our knowledge of the promoter of the porcine APOE gene. PMID:24464129

  7. Nonessential region of bacteriophage P4: DNA sequence, transcription, gene products, and functions.

    PubMed Central

    Ghisotti, D; Finkel, S; Halling, C; Dehò, G; Sironi, G; Calendar, R

    1990-01-01

    We sequenced the leftmost 2,640 base pairs of bacteriophage P4 DNA, thus completing the sequence of the 11,627-base-pair P4 genome. The newly sequenced region encodes three nonessential genes, which are called gop, beta, and cII (in order, from left to right). The gop gene product kills Escherichia coli when the beta protein is absent; the gop and beta genes are transcribed rightward from the same promoter. The cII gene is transcribed leftward to a rho-independent terminator. Mutation of this terminator creates a temperature-sensitive phenotype, presumably owing to a defect in expression of the beta gene. Images PMID:2403440

  8. POLYMORPHISM IN THE CODING REGION SEQUENCE OF GDF8 GENE IN INDIAN SHEEP.

    PubMed

    Pothuraju, M; Mishra, S K; Kumar, S N; Mohamed, N F; Kataria, R S; Yadav, D K; Arora, R

    2015-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to identify polymorphism in the coding sequence of GDF8gene across indigenous meat type sheep breeds. A 1647 bp sequence was generated, encompassing 208 bp of the 5'UTR, 1128 bp of coding region (exon1, 2 and 3) as well as 311 bp of 3'UTR. The sheep and goat GDF8 gene sequences were observed to be highly conserved as compared to cattle, buffalo, horse and pig. Several nucleotide variations were observed across coding sequence of GDF8 gene in Indian sheep. Three polymorphic sites were identified in the 5'UTR, one in exon 1 and one in the exon 2 regions. Both SNPs in the exonic region were found to be non-synonymous. The mutations c.539T > G and c.821T > A discovered in this study in the exon 1 and exon 2, respectively, have not been previously reported. The information generated provides preliminary indication of the functional diversity present in Indian sheep at the coding region of GDF8gene. The novel as well as the previously reported SNPs discovered in the Indian sheep warrant further analysis to see whether they affect the phenotype. Future studies will need to establish the affect of reported SNPs in the expression of the GDF8 gene in Indian sheep population. PMID:26845859

  9. Core and region-enriched networks of behaviorally regulated genes and the singing genome

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Osceola; Pfenning, Andreas R.; Howard, Jason T.; Blatti, Charles A; Liu, Fang; Ward, James M.; Wang, Rui; Audet, Jean-Nicolas; Kellis, Manolis; Mukherjee, Sayan; Sinha, Saurabh; Hartemink, Alexander J.; West, Anne E.; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2015-01-01

    Songbirds represent an important model organism for elucidating molecular mechanisms that link genes with complex behaviors, in part because they have discrete vocal learning circuits that have parallels with those that mediate human speech. We found that ~10% of the genes in the avian genome were regulated by singing, and we found a striking regional diversity of both basal and singing-induced programs in the four key song nuclei of the zebra finch, a vocal learning songbird. The region-enriched patterns were a result of distinct combinations of region-enriched transcription factors (TFs), their binding motifs, and presinging acetylation of histone 3 at lysine 27 (H3K27ac) enhancer activity in the regulatory regions of the associated genes. RNA interference manipulations validated the role of the calcium-response transcription factor (CaRF) in regulating genes preferentially expressed in specific song nuclei in response to singing. Thus, differential combinatorial binding of a small group of activity-regulated TFs and predefined epigenetic enhancer activity influences the anatomical diversity of behaviorally regulated gene networks. PMID:25504732

  10. Inhalational drug delivery from seven different spacer devices.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, P. W.; O'Callaghan, C.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A study was performed to determine in vitro the difference in drug output of seven currently available spacer devices when used with different inhaled medications. METHODS: A glass multistage liquid impinger (MSLI) was used to determine the amount of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG, 5 mg), salbutamol (100 micrograms), or budesonide (200 micrograms) obtained in various particle size ranges from metered dose inhalers (MDIs) actuated directly into the MSLI or via one of seven different spacer devices; the Fisonair, Nebuhaler, Volumatic, Inspirease, Aerochamber, Aerosol Cloud Enhancer, and Dynahaler. RESULTS: In particles smaller than 5 microns in diameter the dose of DSCG recovered from the Fisonair and Nebuhaler was 118% and 124%, respectively, of that recovered using the MDI alone. The dose recovered from the smaller volume spacers was 90% (Inspirease), 36% (Aerochamber), 33% (Aerosol Cloud Enhancer), and 21% (Dynahaler) of that from the MDI alone. The Volumatic increased the amount of salbutamol in particles smaller than 5 microns to 117% of that from the MDI, and the Inspirease and Aerochamber spacers decreased it by nearly 50%. The amount of budesonide in small particles recovered after use of the Nebuhaler, Inspirease, and the Aerochamber was 92%, 101%, and 78%, respectively, of that from the MDI alone. CONCLUSIONS: Under the test conditions used, large volume spacers such as the Fisonair, Nebuhaler, and Volumatic delivered significantly more DSCG and salbutamol than the smaller spacers tested. The differences between spacers were less for budesonide than the other medications studied. This study shows that there are significant differences in the amount of drug available for inhalation when different spacers are used as inhalational aids with different drugs. Spacer devices need to be fully evaluated for each drug prescribed for them. Images PMID:8795674

  11. Genetic characterization of DNA region containing the trh and ure genes of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Park, K S; Iida, T; Yamaichi, Y; Oyagi, T; Yamamoto, K; Honda, T

    2000-10-01

    We have demonstrated that possession of the gene for thermostable direct hemolysin-related hemolysin (trh) coincides with the presence of the urease gene among clinical Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains and that the location of the two genes are in close proximity on the chromosome. Here, we cloned and sequenced the 15,754-bp DNA region containing the trh gene and the gene cluster for urease production from the chromosome of clinical V. parahaemolyticus (TH3996). We found 16 open reading frames (ORFs) and a lower G+C content (41%) compared with the total genome of this bacterium (46 to 47%). The ure cluster consisted of eight genes, namely, ureDABCEFG and ureR. ureR was located 5.2 kb upstream of the other seven genes in the opposite direction. The genetic organization and sequences of the ure genes resembled those found in Proteus mirabilis. Between ureR and the other ure genes, there were five ORFs, which are homologous with the nickel transport operon (nik) of Escherichia coli. We disrupted each of the ureR, ureC, and nikD genes in TH3996 by homologous recombination and analyzed the phenotype of the mutants. In the presence of urea these mutant strains had dramatically less urease activity than the strain they were derived from. Disruption of ureR, nikD, or ureC, however, had no effect on TRH production. The DNA region containing the trh, nik, and ure genes was found in only trh-positive strains and not in Kanagawa phenomenon-positive and environmental V. parahaemolyticus strains. At the end of the region, an insertion sequence-like element existed. These results suggest that the DNA region was introduced into V. parahaemolyticus in the past through a mechanism mediated by insertion sequences. This is the first reported case that the genes for an ATP-binding cassette-type nickel transport system, which may play a role in nickel transport through bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, are located adjacent to the ure cluster on the genome of an organism. PMID:10992480

  12. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development. PMID:26786896

  13. Identification of differentially methylated regions in new genes associated with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Carolina A; Lewallen, Eric A; Baheti, Saurabh; Bradley, Elizabeth W; Stuart, Michael J; Berry, Daniel J; van Wijnen, Andre J; Westendorf, Jennifer J

    2016-01-15

    Epigenetic changes in articular chondrocytes are associated with osteoarthritis (OA) disease progression. Numerous studies have identified differentially methylated cytosines in OA tissues; however, the consequences of altered CpG methylation at single nucleotides on gene expression and phenotypes are difficult to predict. With the objective of detecting novel genes relevant to OA, we conducted a genome-wide assessment of differentially methylated sites (DMSs) and differentially methylated regions (DMRs). DNA was extracted from visually damaged and normal appearing, non-damaged human knee articular cartilage from the same joint and then subjected to reduced representation bisulfite sequencing. DMRs were identified using a genome-wide systematic bioinformatics approach. A sliding-window of 500 bp was used for screening the genome for regions with clusters of DMSs. Gene expression levels were assessed and cell culture demethylation experiments were performed to further examine top candidate genes associated with damaged articular cartilage. More than 1000 DMRs were detected in damaged osteoarthritic cartilage. Nineteen of these contained five or more DMSs and were located in gene promoters or first introns and exons. Gene expression assessment revealed that hypermethylated DMRs in damaged samples were more consistently associated with gene repression than hypomethylated DMRs were with gene activation. Accordingly, a demethylation agent induced expression of most hypermethylated genes in chondrocytes. Our study revealed the utility of a systematic DMR search as an alternative to focusing on single nucleotide data. In particular, this approach uncovered promising candidates for functional studies such as the hypermethylated protein-coding genes FOXP4 and SHROOM1, which appear to be linked to OA pathology in humans and warrant further investigation. PMID:26484395

  14. Preclinical Evaluation of Bioabsorbable Polyglycolic Acid Spacer for Particle Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Akasaka, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Ryohei; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Mukumoto, Naritoshi; Sulaiman, Nor Shazrina Binti; Nagata, Masaaki; Yamada, Shigeru; Murakami, Masao; Demizu, Yusuke; Fukumoto, Takumi

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a polyglycolic acid (PGA) spacer through physical and animal experiments. Methods and Materials: The spacer was produced with surgical suture material made of PGA, forming a 3-dimensional nonwoven fabric. For evaluation or physical experiments, 150-MeV proton or 320-MeV carbon-ion beams were used to generate 60-mm width of spread-out Bragg peak. For animal experiments, the abdomens of C57BL/6 mice, with or without the inserted PGA spacers, were irradiated with 20 Gy of carbon-ion beam (290 MeV) using the spread-out Bragg peak. Body weight changes over time were scored, and radiation damage to the intestine was investigated using hematoxylin and eosin stain. Blood samples were also evaluated 24 days after the irradiation. Long-term thickness retention and safety were evaluated using crab-eating macaques. Results: No chemical or structural changes after 100 Gy of proton or carbon-ion irradiation were observed in the PGA spacer. Water equivalency of the PGA spacer was equal to the water thickness under wet condition. During 24 days' observation after 20 Gy of carbon-ion irradiation, the body weights of mice with the PGA spacer were relatively unchanged, whereas significant weight loss was observed in those mice without the PGA spacer (P<.05). In mice with the PGA spacer, villus and crypt structure were preserved after irradiation. No inflammatory reactions or liver or renal dysfunctions due to placement of the PGA spacer were observed. In the abdomen of crab-eating macaques, thickness of the PGA spacer was maintained 8 weeks after placement. Conclusions: The absorbable PGA spacer had water-equivalent, bio-compatible, and thickness-retaining properties. Although further evaluation is warranted in a clinical setting, the PGA spacer may be effective to stop proton or carbon-ion beams and to separate normal tissues from the radiation field.

  15. The identification of five novel genes in the cri-du-chat critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, A.D.; Gallardo, T.D.; Lovett, M.

    1994-09-01

    Cri-du-chat is a contiguous gene syndrome associated with deletions in the short arm of chromosome 5 (chr 5). Chr 5p-specific markers have been used to define two critical regions: a larynx malformation region, located at 5p15.3, and a region responsible for the remaining clinical features of the syndrome, which maps to 5p15.2. Thirty cosmids that map to this latter region have been isolated from the LANL chr 5-specific library using 5 STSs. More recently, we have constructed a YAC contig of the region which encompasses 2-3 Mb. The 30 framework cosmids were used in a direct selection with cDNAs from placenta, activated T-cells and cerebellum to isolate an initial set of expressed sequences from this region. Since no genes, to date, have been isolated or localized within the cri-du-chat deletion, a cosmid containing a control reporter gene (ANX6) was used to monitor enrichment. ANX6 cDNAs were enriched by several thousand-fold in the selected cDNAs. A total of nine non overlapping cDNA fragments were obtained from the cDNA pools. These have been ordered within the YAC contig, map to 5 discrete cosmid sets in the critical region and thus conservatively represent five discrete transcription units. The DNA sequences of these fragments are novel by sequence database comparisons. PCR primers were constructed and were used to confirm gene placements in the YAC contig, as well as to investigate the expression profile of these genes in several different tissues and cell types. In one case, these primer sets enabled two of the nine fragments to be linked into a larger cDNA. The nine cDNAs showed various patterns of differential expression in a panel of tissues. These expressed sequences represent the first genes isolated within the cri-du-chat critical region and represent the initial steps in the derivation of a comprehensive inventory and expression profile of the estimated 100 genes that may reside in this region.

  16. Linkage disequilibrium in the region of the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene (PKD1)

    SciTech Connect

    Snarey, A. ); Thomas, S.; Harris, P.C. ); Schneider, M.C. ); Pound, S.E.; Wright, A.F. ); Barton, N.; Somlo, S.; Germino, G.G.; Reeders, S.T.

    1994-08-01

    The gene for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD1) is located on chromosome 16p, between the flanking markers D16S84 and D16S125 (26.6 prox). This region is 750 kb long and has been cloned. The authors have looked at the association of 10 polymorphic markers from the region, with the disease and with each other. This was done in a set of Scottish families that had previously shown association with D16S94, a marker proximal to the PKD1 region. They report significant association between two CA repeat markers and the disease but have not found evidence for a single founder haplotype in these families, indicating the presence of several mutations in this population. Their results favor a location of the PKD1 gene in the proximal part of the candidate region. 25 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  17. Metal-dependent SV40 viruses containing inducible enhancers from the upstream region of metallothionein genes.

    PubMed Central

    Serfling, E; Lübbe, A; Dorsch-Häsler, K; Schaffner, W

    1985-01-01

    We have isolated SV40 recombinant viruses which are dependent on heavy metal ions for efficient propagation. They were obtained after-co-transfection of enhancerless SV40 DNA (the so-called enhancer trap) with sonicated DNA from the mouse metallothionein-I (mMT-I) or human metallothionein-IIA (hMT-IIA) upstream regions. To substitute for the SV40 enhancer, these viruses have incorporated a segment of the immediate upstream region of the metallothionein genes. Two recombinant viruses of the SVMT-I type carry segments of the mMT-I gene from positions -73 to -187 and -39 to -194 inverted with respect to their natural configuration. The overlapping segment contains two of the four metal-responsive elements involved in the induction of the mMT-I gene by heavy metal ions. The SVMT-II recombinant virus contains a segment of the hMT-IIA gene from position -39 to -366 which harbors the metal- and hormone-responsive elements of the hMT-IIA gene. Insertion of the mMT-I segment downstream of a rabbit beta-globin test gene enhances beta-globin transcription upon metal ion stimulation. This shows that the immediate upstream region of the mouse metalliothionein-I gene, when detached from its TATA box, can act as an inducible enhancer. It may be generally true that the enhancer/promoters of inducible genes are composed of several regulatory sequence elements which are interspersed with constitutive elements. The number and spatial arrangement of these elements probably determines the basal versus induced level of expression. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2419129

  18. Potential basis for regulation of the coordinately expressed fibrinogen genes: homology in the 5' flanking regions.

    PubMed Central

    Fowlkes, D M; Mullis, N T; Comeau, C M; Crabtree, G R

    1984-01-01

    The three chains of fibrinogen are encoded by three separate genes whose transcription is coordinately regulated. The breakdown of fibrinogen during the acute-phase reaction leads to a simultaneous increase in alpha-, beta-, and gamma-fibrinogen mRNA in the liver. In a search for the basis of this coordinate increase in transcription, we have determined the sequences of the regions surrounding the points of transcriptional initiation of the three rat fibrinogen genes, 1490 nucleotides upstream and 730 nucleotides downstream. Two unique regions of homology have been found. One region consists of 15 nucleotides that have a common 6-nucleotide core lying between -116 and -160; the other is approximately equal to 100 nucleotides long and is in the -165 to -472 region. In this region, the beta- and gamma-fibrinogen genes are approximately equal to 65% homologous. alpha-Fibrinogen has somewhat less homology with both beta- and gamma-fibrinogen. In addition, the beta-fibrinogen gene has 22 nucleotides at position -480 that are homologous to sequences that have been noted to occur in glucocorticosteroid-regulated genes in a similar position. We feel that these areas of conserved sequences play a role in the regulation of the transcription of fibrinogen. The fibrinogen chains are synthesized as precursor peptides, and the amino-terminal portion, the so-called signal peptide, is removed during the translocation of the peptide chain across the endoplasmic reticulum. We have determined those sequences that encode the signal peptides. Homology in the amino acid sequence between the rat and human signal peptides varies between 52% for alpha-fibrinogen and 66% for beta-fibrinogen. This homology implies that there has been strong selective pressure on this portion of these genes. PMID:6232608

  19. Intronic miR-932 targets the coding region of its host gene, Drosophila neuroligin2.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jinjun; Tu, Renjun; Yuan, Liudi; Xie, Wei

    2016-06-10

    Despite great progress for two decades in microRNAs (miRNAs), the direct regulation of host gene by intragenic (mostly intronic) miRNA is conceptually plausible but evidence-limited. Here, we report that intronic miR-932 could target its host gene via binding with coding sequence (CDS) region rather than regular 3'UTR. The conserved miR-932 is embedded in the fourth intron of Drosophila neuroligin2 (dnlg2), which encodes a synaptic cell adhesion molecule, DNlg2. In silico analysis predicted two putative miR-932 target sites locate in the CDS region of dnlg2 instead of regular 3'-UTR miRNA binding sites. Employing luciferase reporter assay, we further proved that the miR-932 regulates expression of its host gene dnlg2 via the binding CDS region of dnlg2. Consistently, we observed miR-932 downregulated expression of dnlg2 in S2 cell, and the repression of dnlg2 by miR-932 at both protein and RNA level. Furthermore, we found CDS-located site1 is dominant for regulating expression of host dnlg2 by miR-932. In addition to providing thorough examination of one intronic miRNA targeting the CDS region of its host gene, our genome-wide analysis indicated that nearly half of fruitfly and human intronic miRNAs may target their own host gene at coding region. This study would be valuable in elucidating the regulation of intronic miRNA on host gene, and provide new information about the biological context of their genomic arrangements and functions. PMID:26844630

  20. Molecular genetics of a three-gene cluster in the Amy region of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Doane, W W; Thompson, D B; Norman, R A; Hawley, S A

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of amylase RNA levels in the anterior and posterior midgut regions of flies from the Amy1,6 mapA and c Amy2,3 mapC strains of D. melanogaster, reared on yeast and on yeast supplemented with glucose, indicates that the trans-acting map gene controls the abundance of amylase RNA tissue-specifically, i.e., in the adult posterior midgut. This is consistent with the view that its role in controlling Amy expression is that of a transcription factor. Dietary glucose represses Amy expression in the anterior and posterior midgut regions of adults, reducing the abundance of amylase RNA, which suggests that it also controls Amy transcriptional activity. However, the mechanism for glucose repression appears to act systemically in the midgut, in a manner that is independent of the effects of map on Amy expression. A new glucose repressible TU was identified that is located just proximal to the Amy locus in region 54A of polytene chromosome 2R. It is transcribed in the direction opposite to that of the proximal Amy gene and encodes an RNA about 1500 bases long. Its RNA is expressed in both larvae and adults of the above strains of D. melanogaster, but the nature of the product it encodes is unknown. We speculate that all three genes in the cluster at 54A, namely the two Amy gene copies and the new glucose repressible TU, are coordinately controlled by the same mechanism that regulates Amy gene expression in response to dietary glucose. Somatic transformation experiments suggest that 5' cis-regulatory mechanisms required for the correct spatial expression of the proximal and distal Amylase genes from a Canton-S strain of D. melanogaster, Amy-p1 and Amy-d3, are located within 450 bp and 463 bp of their respective translation start sites. These regions also contain sequences responsive to dietary glucose repression, which is mediated at the DNA level of exogenous Amy genes in somatically transformed larvae reared on a yeast + glucose diet. A positive activator is located

  1. Global differential expression of genes located in the Down Syndrome Critical Region in normal human brain

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Julio Cesar; Fajardo, Dianora; Peña, Angela; Sánchez, Adalberto; Domínguez, Martha C; Satizábal, José María

    2014-01-01

    Background: The information of gene expression obtained from databases, have made possible the extraction and analysis of data related with several molecular processes involving not only in brain homeostasis but its disruption in some neuropathologies; principally in Down syndrome and the Alzheimer disease. Objective: To correlate the levels of transcription of 19 genes located in the Down Syndrome Critical Region (DSCR) with their expression in several substructures of normal human brain. Methods: There were obtained expression profiles of 19 DSCR genes in 42 brain substructures, from gene expression values available at the database of the human brain of the Brain Atlas of the Allen Institute for Brain Sciences", (http://human.brain-map.org/). The co-expression patterns of DSCR genes in brain were calculated by using multivariate statistical methods. Results: Highest levels of gene expression were registered at caudate nucleus, nucleus accumbens and putamen among central areas of cerebral cortex. Increased expression levels of RCAN1 that encode by a protein involved in signal transduction process of the CNS were recorded for PCP4 that participates in the binding to calmodulin and TTC3; a protein that is associated with differentiation of neurons. That previously identified brain structures play a crucial role in the learning process, in different class of memory and in motor skills. Conclusion: The precise regulation of DSCR gene expression is crucial to maintain the brain homeostasis, especially in those areas with high levels of gene expression associated with a remarkable process of learning and cognition. PMID:25767303

  2. Asymmetric Distribution of Gene Expression in the Centromeric Region of Rice Chromosome 5

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Wu, Jianzhong; Katayose, Yuichi; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Ikawa, Hiroshi; Itoh, Takeshi; Sasaki, Takuji; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    There is controversy as to whether gene expression is silenced in the functional centromere. The complete genomic sequences of the centromeric regions in higher eukaryotes have not been fully elucidated, because the presence of highly repetitive sequences complicates many aspects of genomic sequencing. We performed resequencing, assembly, and sequence finishing of two P1-derived artificial chromosome clones in the centromeric region of rice (Oryza sativa L.) chromosome 5 (Cen5). The pericentromeric region, where meiotic recombination is silenced, is located at the center of chromosome 5 and is 2.14 Mb long; a total of six restriction-fragment-length polymorphism markers (R448, C1388, S20487S, E3103S, C53260S, and R2059) genetically mapped at 54.6 cM were located in this region. In the pericentromeric region, 28 genes were annotated on the short arm and 45 genes on the long arm. To quantify all transcripts in this region, we performed massive parallel sequencing of mRNA. Transcriptional density (total length of transcribed region/length of the genomic region) and expression level (number of uniquely mapped reads/length of transcribed region) were calculated on the basis of the mapped reads on the rice genome. Transcriptional density and expression level were significantly lower in Cen5 than in the average of the other chromosomal regions. Moreover, transcriptional density in Cen5 was significantly lower on the short arm than on the long arm; the distribution of transcriptional density was asymmetric. The genomic sequence of Cen5 has been integrated into the most updated reference rice genome sequence constructed by the International Rice Genome Sequencing Project. PMID:22639581

  3. Expression of an auxin- and cytokinin-regulated gene in cambial region in Zinnia

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Z.H.; Varner, J.E. )

    1994-07-05

    The expression patterns of a cDNA clone, p48h-10, of an auxin-induced gene were examined in isolated mesophyll cells of Zinnia and in the organs of Zinnia plants. In the isolated mesophyll cells, the mRNA accumulates in 48 hr of culture with 1-naphthaleneacetic acid alone. Because the first cell division occurs before 36 hr of culture, the gene probably is not involved in cell division. Benzyladenine does not induce expression of this gene, but the combination of 1-naphthaleneacetic acid and benzyladenine induces the mRNA accumulation about 24 hr earlier than does 1-naphthaleneacetic acid alone. Tissue print hybridization shows that the mRNA is present predominantly in the cambial region in stems, leaves, and roots and in the vascular bundles in flower buds but does not occur in the apical regions of shoot or root. The characteristics of the gene expression, including auxin- and cytokinin-regulated induction and cambial region localization, encourage the authors to suggest that the gene is involved in the early process of vascular differentiation.

  4. Comparative organization and gene expression profiles of the porcine pseudoautosomal region.

    PubMed

    Das, P J; Mishra, D K; Ghosh, S; Avila, F; Johnson, G A; Chowdhary, B P; Raudsepp, T

    2013-01-01

    The pseudoautosomal region (PAR) has important biological functions in spermatogenesis, male fertility and early development. Even though pig (Sus scrofa, SSC) is an agriculturally and biomedically important species, and its genome is sequenced, current knowledge about the porcine PAR is sparse. Here we defined the PAR in SSCXp/Yp by demarcating the sequence of the pseudoautosomal boundary at X:6,743,567 bp in intron 3-4 of SHROOM2 and showed that SHROOM2 is truncated in SSCY. Cytogenetic mapping of 20 BAC clones containing 15 PAR and X-specific genes revealed that the pig PAR is largely collinear with other mammalian PARs or Xp terminal regions. The results improved the current SSCX sequence assembly and facilitated distinction between the PAR and X-specific genes to study their expression in adult and embryonic tissues. A pilot analysis showed that the PAR genes are expressed at higher levels than X-specific genes during early development, whereas the expression of PAR genes was higher at day 60 compared to day 26, and higher in embryonic tissues compared to placenta. The findings advance the knowledge about the comparative organization of the PAR in mammals and suggest that the region might have important functions in early development in pigs. PMID:23735614

  5. A common deletion at D6S265 in the hemochromatosis gene region

    SciTech Connect

    Pyper, W.R.; Burt, M.J.; Powell, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    Positional cloning of the hemochromatosis (HC) gene on chromosome 6p has utilized a number of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers. While the putative HC gene has been localized within 1 cM of HLA-A, definition of the genetic limits of the HC locus has been controversial. Isolation and characterization of additional markers within this region will enable construction of a physical map upon which the HC gene can located. D6S265 is one such microsatellite, physically mapped within 120 kb centromeric of HLA-A. Recombinant and linkage analysis of this dinucleotide repeat in 24 Australian families segregating for HC positioned D6S265 within 1 cM of the HC gene, while allele association analysis showed allele 1 to be significantly increased in HC patients ({chi}{sup 2}=41.4, p<0.001, RR=5.75). In 6 of the 24 HC families, a D6265 locus deletion was found to segregate with HLA-A25 and HLA-A26 alleles. The D6S265 locus deletion was not associated with expression of HC. This study enables us to exclude candidate HC genes from the deleted region involving D6S265, and gives further support for an area of instability in the HLA class I region.

  6. Polymorphism at the ribosomal DNA spacers and its relation to breeding structure of the widespread mushroom Schizophyllum commune.

    PubMed Central

    James, T Y; Moncalvo, J M; Li, S; Vilgalys, R

    2001-01-01

    The common split-gilled mushroom Schizophyllum commune is found throughout the world on woody substrates. This study addresses the dispersal and population structure of this fungal species by studying the phylogeny and evolutionary dynamics of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) spacer regions. Extensive sampling (n = 195) of sequences of the intergenic spacer region (IGS1) revealed a large number of unique haplotypes (n = 143). The phylogeny of these IGS1 sequences revealed strong geographic patterns and supported three evolutionarily distinct lineages within the global population. The same three geographic lineages were found in phylogenetic analysis of both other rDNA spacer regions (IGS2 and ITS). However, nested clade analysis of the IGS1 phylogeny suggested the population structure of S. commune has undergone recent changes, such as a long distance colonization of western North America from Europe as well as a recent range expansion in the Caribbean. Among all spacer regions, variation in length and nucleotide sequence was observed between but not within the tandem rDNA repeats (arrays). This pattern is consistent with strong within-array and weak among-array homogenizing forces. We present evidence for the suppression of recombination between rDNA arrays on homologous chromosomes that may account for this pattern of concerted evolution. PMID:11139499

  7. No Evidence that MicroRNAs Coevolve with Genes Located in Copy Number Regions.

    PubMed

    Jovelin, Richard

    2015-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a widespread class of regulatory noncoding RNAs with key roles in physiology and development, conferring robustness to noise in regulatory networks. Consistent with this buffering function, it was recently suggested that human miRNAs coevolve with genes in copy number regions (copy number variation [CNV] genes) to reduce dosage imbalance. Here, I compare miRNA regulation between CNV and non-CNV genes in four model organisms. miRNA regulation of CNV genes is elevated in human and fly but reduced in nematode and zebrafish. By analyzing 31 human CNV data sets, careful analysis of human and chimpanzee orthologs, resampling genes within species and comparing structural variant types, I show that the apparent coevolution between CNV genes and miRNAs is due to the strong dependency between 3'-untranslated region length and miRNA target prediction. Deciphering the interplay between CNVs and miRNAs will likely require a deeper understanding of how miRNAs are embedded in regulatory circuits. PMID:25804521

  8. No Evidence that MicroRNAs Coevolve with Genes Located in Copy Number Regions

    PubMed Central

    Jovelin, Richard

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a widespread class of regulatory noncoding RNAs with key roles in physiology and development, conferring robustness to noise in regulatory networks. Consistent with this buffering function, it was recently suggested that human miRNAs coevolve with genes in copy number regions (copy number variation [CNV] genes) to reduce dosage imbalance. Here, I compare miRNA regulation between CNV and non-CNV genes in four model organisms. miRNA regulation of CNV genes is elevated in human and fly but reduced in nematode and zebrafish. By analyzing 31 human CNV data sets, careful analysis of human and chimpanzee orthologs, resampling genes within species and comparing structural variant types, I show that the apparent coevolution between CNV genes and miRNAs is due to the strong dependency between 3′-untranslated region length and miRNA target prediction. Deciphering the interplay between CNVs and miRNAs will likely require a deeper understanding of how miRNAs are embedded in regulatory circuits. PMID:25804521

  9. Promoter region of the human platelet-derived growth factor A-chain gene

    SciTech Connect

    Takimoto, Yasuo; Wang, Zhao Yi; Kobler, K.; Deuel, T.F. )

    1991-03-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) A- and B-chain genes are widely expressed in mammalian tissues and their homodimeric gene products appear to regulate the autocrine growth of both normal and transformed cells. In this study, we analyzed the 5{prime} flanking sequences of the human PDGF A-chain gene to seek elements important to regulating its transcription. The promoter reigon was exceptionally G + C-rich and contained a TATA box but no CAAT box. The transcription start site was identified 845 base pairs 5{prime} to the translation initiation site by S1 nuclease mapping and by primer extension. Both in vitro transcription and transient expression of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene linked to the PDGF A-chain 5{prime} flanking sequences established that the putative promoter region was active, and RNase H mapping established that the three characteristic mRNAs used the same transcription start site, which was used in normal endothelial cells and in two human tumor cell lines that express high levels of A-chain transcripts. The results extablished an exceptionally G + C-rich promoter region and a single transcription start site active for each of the three mRNAs of the PDGF A-chain gene. DNA sites of potential importance in mediating the activation of the PDGF A-chain gene in normal cells and in transformed cell lines expressing high levels of PDGF A-chain were identified.

  10. 14. TYPICAL WORK DECK SHOWING RING SPACERS, CABLE DRUMS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. TYPICAL WORK DECK SHOWING RING SPACERS, CABLE DRUMS AND OTHER SPECIALIZED HARDWARE; VIEW TO SOUTH. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28416, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  11. The evolution of vertebrate somatostatin receptors and their gene regions involves extensive chromosomal rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Somatostatin and its related neuroendocrine peptides have a wide variety of physiological functions that are mediated by five somatostatin receptors with gene names SSTR1-5 in mammals. To resolve their evolution in vertebrates we have investigated the SSTR genes and a large number of adjacent gene families by phylogeny and conserved synteny analyses in a broad range of vertebrate species. Results We find that the SSTRs form two families that belong to distinct paralogons. We observe not only chromosomal similarities reflecting the paralogy relationships between the SSTR-bearing chromosome regions, but also extensive rearrangements between these regions in teleost fish genomes, including fusions and translocations followed by reshuffling through intrachromosomal rearrangements. These events obscure the paralogy relationships but are still tractable thanks to the many genomes now available. We have identified a previously unrecognized SSTR subtype, SSTR6, previously misidentified as either SSTR1 or SSTR4. Conclusions Two ancestral SSTR-bearing chromosome regions were duplicated in the two basal vertebrate tetraploidizations (2R). One of these ancestral SSTR genes generated SSTR2, -3 and -5, the other gave rise to SSTR1, -4 and -6. Subsequently SSTR6 was lost in tetrapods and SSTR4 in teleosts. Our study shows that extensive chromosomal rearrangements have taken place between related chromosome regions in teleosts, but that these events can be resolved by investigating several distantly related species. PMID:23194088

  12. Extended region of nodulation genes in Rhizobium meliloti 1021. I. Phenotypes of Tn5 insertion mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, J.A.; Tu, J.K.; Ogawa, J.; Sanga, R.; Fisher, R.F.; Long, S.R.

    1987-10-01

    Rhizobium meliloti Nod/sup -/ mutant WL131, a derivative of wild-type strain 102F51, was complemented by a clone bank of wild-type R. meliloti 1021 DNA, and clone pRmJT5 was recovered. Transfer of pRmJT5 conferred alfalfa nodulation on other Rhizobium species, indicating a role in host range determination for pRmJT5. Mutagenesis of pRmJT5 revealed several segments in which transposon insertion causes delay in nodulation, and/or marked reduction of the number of nodules formed on host alfalfa plants. The set of mutants indicated five regions in which nod genes are located; one mutant, nod-216, is located in a region not previously reported to encode a nodulation gene. Other mutant phenotypes correlated with the positions of open reading frames for nodH, nodF and nodE, and with a 2.2-kb EcoRI fragment. A mutant in nodG had no altered phenotype in this strain. One nodulation mutant was shown to be a large deletion of the common nod gene region. The authors present a discussion comparing the various studies made on this extended nod gene region.

  13. BIALLELIC POLYMORPHISM IN THE INTRON REGION OF B-TUBULIN GENE OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARASITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nucleotide sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified intron region of the Cryptosporidium parvum B-tubulin gene in 26 human and 15 animal isolates revealed distinct genetic polymorphism between the human and bovine genotypes. The separation of 2 genotypes of C. parvum is...

  14. Genomic instability and mobile genetic elements in regions surrounding two discoidin I genes of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, S J; Firtel, R A

    1984-01-01

    We have found that the genomic regions surrounding the linked discoidin I genes of various Dictyostelium discoideum strains have undergone rapid changes. Wild-type strain NC-4 has three complete discoidin I genes; its axenic derivative strain Ax-3L has duplicated a region starting approximately 1 kilobase upstream from the two linked genes and extending for at least 8 kilobases past the genes. A separately maintained stock, strain Ax-3K, does not have this duplication but has undergone a different rearrangement approximately 3 kilobases farther upstream. We show that there are repeat elements in these rapidly changing regions. At least two of these elements, Tdd-2 and Tdd-3, have characteristics associated with mobile genetic elements. The Tdd-3 element is found in different locations in related strains and causes a 9- to 10-base-pair duplication of the target site DNA. The Tdd-2 and Tdd-3 elements do not cross-hybridize, but they share a 22-base-pair homology near one end. At two separate sites, the Tdd-3 element has transposed into the Tdd-2 element, directly adjacent to the 22-base-pair homology. The Tdd-3 element may use this 22-base-pair region as a preferential site of insertion. Images PMID:6325889

  15. Intact coding region of the serotonin transporter gene in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Altemus, M.; Murphy, D.L.; Greenberg, B.; Lesch, K.P.

    1996-07-26

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that obsessive-compulsive disorder is genetically transmitted in some families, although no genetic abnormalities have been identified in individuals with this disorder. The selective response of obsessive-compulsive disorder to treatment with agents which block serotonin reuptake suggests the gene coding for the serotonin transporter as a candidate gene. The primary structure of the serotonin-transporter coding region was sequenced in 22 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, using direct PCR sequencing of cDNA synthesized from platelet serotonin-transporter mRNA. No variations in amino acid sequence were found among the obsessive-compulsive disorder patients or healthy controls. These results do not support a role for alteration in the primary structure of the coding region of the serotonin-transporter gene in the pathogenesis of obsessive-compulsive disorder. 27 refs.

  16. Mutational analysis of the hepatitis B virus P gene product: domain structure and RNase H activity.

    PubMed Central

    Radziwill, G; Tucker, W; Schaller, H

    1990-01-01

    To correlate the hepatitis B virus P gene with the enzymatic activities predicted to participate in hepadnavirus reverse transcription, a series of P gene mutants containing missense mutations, in-phase insertions, and in-phase deletions was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. These mutants were tested in the context of otherwise intact hepatitis B virus genomes for the ability to produce core particles containing the virus-associated polymerase activity. The results obtained suggest that the P protein consists of three functional domains and a nonessential spacer arranged in the following order: terminal protein, spacer, reverse transcriptase/DNA polymerase, and RNase H. The first two domains are separated by a spacer region which could be deleted to a large extent without significant loss of endogenous polymerase activity. In cotransfection experiments, all P gene mutants could be complemented in trans by constructs expressing the wild-type gene product but not by a second P gene mutant. This indicates that the multifunctional P gene is expressed as a single translational unit and independent of the core gene and furthermore that the gene product is freely diffusible and not processed before core assembly. Images PMID:2153228

  17. Spacer process and alignment assessment for SADP process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattard, L.; McCallum, M.; Morton, R.; Fujiwara, T.; Makino, K.; Tokui, A.; Takahashi, N.; Sasamoto, S.

    2012-03-01

    Self Aligned Double Patterning (SADP) is now widely accepted as a viable technology for the further extension of 193nm immersion lithography towards the 22nm /18nm technology nodes. SADP was primary introduced for the manufacturing of flash memory due to its 1D design geometry. However, SADP is now becoming a main stream technology for advanced technology nodes for logic product. SADP results in alignment marks with reduced image contrast after completion of spacer patterning. Consequently there is an elevated risk that the alignment performance of the cut lithography layer on the spacer [1] may be negatively impacted. Initial studies indicate that it may be necessary to consider new mark designs. In this paper, we will evaluate different types of SADP processes with the alignment system of the Nikon S620D and S621D immersion scanner. We will discuss the performances and the differences observed due to the SADP materials. Included in this study is an intensive characterization of the morphology of the spacer after SADP process. We will use for this a 3D-AFM from Insight, and characterize the spacer profile of the spacer. Using a standard AFM microscope, we can characterize the surface roughness in the inner and the outer part of the wafer. The self aligned spacer process results in asymmetric spacers. Two types of surface (inside and outside) of the spacer are formed. The impact of this asymmetry is also assessed. The roughness difference, between the two parts, will play an important roll in the alignment contrast.

  18. The polycystic kidney disease 1 gene lies in a duplicated genomic region

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.J.; Hughes, J.; Peral, B. |

    1994-09-01

    The polycystic kidney disease 1 (PKD1) gene is situated in chromosomal band 16p13.3 and encodes a 14 kb transcript. The 5{prime} region of the PKD1 gene is located within a 40-50 kb stretch of genomic DNA which is duplicated several times in the more proximal region, 16p13.1. This proximal area gives rise to at least three transcripts designated homologous gene A (HG-A; 21 kb), HG-B (17 kb) and HG-C (8.5 kb). These three transcripts share substantial homology with each other and the PKD1 transcript. However, the 3{prime} 3.8 kb section of the PKD1 transcript is unique because it is encoded by a region of the gene that lies outside the duplicated area. The presence of the duplicate transcripts in all tissues analyzed has hampered attempts to clone and sequence the bone fide PKD1 gene. Comparison of cDNAs known to arise from the PKD1 transcript to those from the HG transcripts reveals that divergence of 2-3% has occurred between these sequences. To overcome the problem of the duplication, a large 15 kb section of genomic DNA has been sequenced together with several large HG cDNAs. Utilizing a radiation hybrid which contains only the 16p13.3 region and expresses low levels of the PKD1 transcript, we are now attempting to clone the duplicated part of the PKD1 gene by exon linking.

  19. Fragile regions and not functional constraints predominate in shaping gene organization in the genus Drosophila.

    PubMed

    von Grotthuss, Marcin; Ashburner, Michael; Ranz, José M

    2010-08-01

    During evolution, gene repatterning across eukaryotic genomes is not uniform. Some genomic regions exhibit a gene organization conserved phylogenetically, while others are recurrently involved in chromosomal rearrangement, resulting in breakpoint reuse. Both gene order conservation and breakpoint reuse can result from the existence of functional constraints on where chromosomal breakpoints occur or from the existence of regions that are susceptible to breakage. The balance between these two mechanisms is still poorly understood. Drosophila species have very dynamic genomes and, therefore, can be very informative. We compared the gene organization of the main five chromosomal elements (Muller's elements A-E) of nine Drosophila species. Under a parsimonious evolutionary scenario, we estimate that 6116 breakpoints differentiate the gene orders of the species and that breakpoint reuse is associated with approximately 80% of the orthologous landmarks. The comparison of the observed patterns of change in gene organization with those predicted under different simulated modes of evolution shows that fragile regions alone can explain the observed key patterns of Muller's element A (X chromosome) more often than for any other Muller's element. High levels of fragility plus constraints operating on approximately 15% of the genome are sufficient to explain the observed patterns of change and conservation across species. The orthologous landmarks more likely to be under constraint exhibit both a remarkable internal functional heterogeneity and a lack of common functional themes with the exception of the presence of highly conserved noncoding elements. Fragile regions rather than functional constraints have been the main determinant of the evolution of the Drosophila chromosomes. PMID:20601587

  20. Identification of Mushroom Species by Automated rRNA Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) and Its Application to a Suspected Case of Food Poisoning with Tricholoma ustale.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Ryota; Yamada, Sayumi; Tu, Zhihao; Sugawara, Akiko; Hoshiba, Toshihiro; Eisaka, Sadao; Yamaguchi, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Automated rRNA intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA), a method of microbiome analysis, was evaluated for species identification of mushrooms based on the specific fragment sizes. We used 51 wild mushroom-fruiting bodies collected in the centre of Hokkaido and two cultivated mushrooms. Samples were hot-air-dried and DNA were extracted by a beads beating procedure. Sequencing analysis of portions of the rRNA gene (rDNA) provided 33 identifications of mushrooms by genus or species. The results of ARISA identification based on the combination of the fragment sizes corresponding to two inter spacer regions (ITS2 and ITS1) of rDNA within±0.1% accuracy showed that 27 out of the 33 species had specific fragment sizes differentiated from other species. The remaining 6 species formed 3 pairs that showed overlapping fragment sizes. In addition, within-species polymorphisms were observed as 1 bp differences among 32 samples of 13 species. ARISA was applied to investigate a case of suspected food poisoning in which the mushroom was thought to be a toxic Kakishimeji. The morphological identification of the mushroom was ambiguous since the remaining sample lacked a part of the fruiting body. Further, yeast colonies had grown on the surface of the fruiting body during storage. The ARISA fragment size of the mushroom showed 7 bp difference from that of the candidate toxic mushroom. Although ARISA could be a useful tools for estimation of mushroom species, especially in case where the fruiting bodies have deteriorated or been processed, further studies are necessary for reliable identification. For example, it may be necessary to adopt more informative genes which could provide clearer species-specific polymorphisms than the ITS regions. PMID:27211917

  1. GeneMarkS: a self-training method for prediction of gene starts in microbial genomes. Implications for finding sequence motifs in regulatory regions.

    PubMed

    Besemer, J; Lomsadze, A; Borodovsky, M

    2001-06-15

    Improving the accuracy of prediction of gene starts is one of a few remaining open problems in computer prediction of prokaryotic genes. Its difficulty is caused by the absence of relatively strong sequence patterns identifying true translation initiation sites. In the current paper we show that the accuracy of gene start prediction can be improved by combining models of protein-coding and non-coding regions and models of regulatory sites near gene start within an iterative Hidden Markov model based algorithm. The new gene prediction method, called GeneMarkS, utilizes a non-supervised training procedure and can be used for a newly sequenced prokaryotic genome with no prior knowledge of any protein or rRNA genes. The GeneMarkS implementation uses an improved version of the gene finding program GeneMark.hmm, heuristic Markov models of coding and non-coding regions and the Gibbs sampling multiple alignment program. GeneMarkS predicted precisely 83.2% of the translation starts of GenBank annotated Bacillus subtilis genes and 94.4% of translation starts in an experimentally validated set of Escherichia coli genes. We have also observed that GeneMarkS detects prokaryotic genes, in terms of identifying open reading frames containing real genes, with an accuracy matching the level of the best currently used gene detection methods. Accurate translation start prediction, in addition to the refinement of protein sequence N-terminal data, provides the benefit of precise positioning of the sequence region situated upstream to a gene start. Therefore, sequence motifs related to transcription and translation regulatory sites can be revealed and analyzed with higher precision. These motifs were shown to possess a significant variability, the functional and evolutionary connections of which are discussed. PMID:11410670

  2. Nuclear reactor spacer grid and ductless core component

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to a nuclear reactor spacer grid member for use in a liquid cooled nuclear reactor and to a ductless core component employing a plurality of these spacer grid members. The spacer grid member is of the egg-shell type and is constructed so that the walls of the cell members of the grid member are formed of a single thickness of metal to avoid tolerance problems. Within each cell member is a hydraulic spring which laterally constrains the nuclear material bearing rod which passes through each cell member against a hardstop in response to coolant flow through the cell member. This hydraulic spring is also suitable for use in a water cooled nuclear reactor. A core component constructed of, among other components, a plurality of these spacer grid members, avoids the use of a full length duct by providing spacer sleeves about the sodium tubes passing through the spacer grid members at locations between the grid members, thereby maintaining a predetermined space between adjacent grid members.

  3. Sidewall spacer optimization for steep switching junctionless transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Manish; Kranti, Abhinav

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we analyze the impact of a high permittivity (high-κ) sidewall spacer and gate dielectric on the occurrence of sub-60 mV/decade subthreshold swing (S-swing) in symmetrical junctionless (JL) double gate (DG) transistors. It is shown that steep S-swing values (≤10 mV/decade) can be achieved in JL devices with a combination of a high permittivity (high-κ) gate dielectric and a narrow low permittivity (low-κ) sidewall spacer. Implementation of a wider high-κ spacer will diminish the degree of impact ionization by the influence of the fringing component of the gate electric field, and will not be useful for steep off-to-on current transition. A wider spacer with low-κ and a narrow spacer with high-κ permittivity will be useful to limit the latching effect that can occur at lower temperatures (250 K). For high temperature operation, the decrease in the impact ionization rate can be compensated by designing a JL transistor with a thicker silicon film. The work demonstrates opportunities to enhance impact ionization at sub bandgap voltages, and proposes optimal guidelines for selecting a sidewall spacer to facilitate steep switching in JL transistors.

  4. Fine mapping of genes within the IDDM8 region in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hinks, Anne; Barton, Anne; John, Sally; Shephard, Neil; Worthington, Jane

    2006-01-01

    The IDDM8 region on chromosome 6q27, first identified as a susceptibility locus for type 1 diabetes, has previously been linked and associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The region contains a number of potential candidate genes, including programmed cell death 2 (PDCD2), the proteosome subunit beta type 1 (PSMB1), delta-like ligand 1 (DLL-1) and TATA box-binding protein (TBP) amongst others. The aim of this study was to fine map the IDDM8 region on chromosome 6q27, focusing on the genes in the region, to identify polymorphisms that may contribute to susceptibility to RA and potentially to other autoimmune diseases. Validated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; n = 65) were selected from public databases from the 330 kb region of IDDM8. These were genotyped using Sequenom MassArray genotyping technology in two datasets; the test dataset comprised 180 RA cases and 180 controls. We tested 50 SNPs for association with RA and any significant associations were genotyped in a second dataset of 174 RA cases and 192 controls, and the datasets were combined before analysis. Association analysis was performed by chi-square test implemented in Stata software and linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analysis was performed using Helix tree version 4.1. There was initial weak evidence of association, with RA, of a number of SNPs around the loc154449 putative gene and within the KIAA1838 gene; however, these associations were not significant in the combined dataset. Our study has failed to detect evidence of association with any of the known genes mapping to the IDDM8 locus with RA. PMID:16945141

  5. Characterization of the promoter region of the gene for the rat neutral and basic amino acid transporter and chromosomal localization of the human gene.

    PubMed Central

    Yan, N; Mosckovitz, R; Gerber, L D; Mathew, S; Murty, V V; Tate, S S; Udenfriend, S

    1994-01-01

    The promoter region of the rat kidney neutral and basic amino acid transporter (NBAT) gene has been isolated and sequenced. The major transcription initiation site was mapped by primer extension. The entire promoter region and a set of 5' deletions within it were expressed at a high level in LLC-PK1 cells using the luciferase indicator gene. Positive and negative regulatory elements in the promoter region were observed. A human genomic clone of the transporter was also obtained and was used to localize the NBAT gene at the p21 region of chromosome 2. Images PMID:8052618

  6. Diversity and Inheritance of Intergenic Spacer Sequences of 45S Ribosomal DNA among Accessions of Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kiwoung; Robin, Arif Hasan Khan; Yi, Go-Eun; Lee, Jonghoon; Chung, Mi-Young; Yang, Tae-Jin; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of plants is present in high copy number and shows variation between and within species in the length of the intergenic spacer (IGS). The 45S rDNA of flowering plants includes the 5.8S, 18S and 25S rDNA genes, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2), and the intergenic spacer 45S-IGS (25S-18S). This study identified six different types of 45S-IGS, A to F, which at 363 bp, 1121 bp, 1717 bp, 1969 bp, 2036 bp and 2111 bp in length, respectively, were much shorter than the reported reference IGS sequences in B. oleracea var. alboglabra. The shortest two IGS types, A and B, lacked the transcription initiation site, non-transcribed spacer, and external transcribed spacer. Functional behavior of those two IGS types in relation to rRNA synthesis is a subject of further investigation. The other four IGSs had subtle variations in the transcription termination site, guanine-cytosine (GC) content, and number of tandem repeats, but the external transcribed spacers of these four IGSs were quite similar in length. The 45S IGSs were found to follow Mendelian inheritance in a population of 15 F1s and their 30 inbred parental lines, which suggests that these sequences could be useful for development of new breeding tools. In addition, this study represents the first report of intra-specific (within subspecies) variation of the 45S IGS in B. oleracea. PMID:26633391

  7. Map position and expression of the genes in the 38 region of Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Butler, H; Levine, S; Wang, X; Bonyadi, S; Fu, G; Lasko, P; Suter, B; Doerig, R

    2001-01-01

    With the completion of the Drosophila genome sequence, an important next step is to extract its biological information by systematic functional analysis of genes. We have produced a high-resolution genetic map of cytological region 38 of Drosophila using 41 deficiency stocks that provide a total of 54 breakpoints within the region. Of a total of 45 independent P-element lines that mapped by in situ hybridization to the region, 14 targeted 7 complementation groups within the 38 region. Additional EMS, X-ray, and spontaneous mutations define a total of 17 complementation groups. Because these two pools partially overlap, the completed analysis revealed 21 distinct complementation groups defined by point mutations. Seven additional functions were defined by trans-heterozygous combinations of deficiencies, resulting in a total of 28 distinct functions. We further produced a developmental expression profile for the 760 kb from 38B to 38E. Of 135 transcription units predicted by GENSCAN, 22 have at least partial homology to mobile genetic elements such as transposons and retroviruses and 17 correspond to previously characterized genes. We analyzed the developmental expression pattern of the remaining genes using poly(A)(+) RNA from ovaries, early and late embryos, larvae, males, and females. We discuss the correlation between GENSCAN predictions and experimentally confirmed transcription units, the high number of male-specific transcripts, and the alignment of the genetic and physical maps in cytological region 38. PMID:11514449

  8. Construction of a yeast artifical chromosome contig spanning the spinal muscular atrophy disease gene region

    SciTech Connect

    Kleyn, P.W.; Wang, C.H.; Vitale, E.; Pan, J.; Ross, B.M.; Grunn, A.; Palmer, D.A.; Warburton, D.; Brzustowicz, L.M.; Gilliam, T.G. ); Lien, L.L.; Kunkel, L.M. )

    1993-07-15

    The childhood spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are the most common, serious neuromuscular disorders of childhood second to Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A single locus for these disorders has been mapped by recombination events to a region of 0.7 centimorgan (range, 0.1-2.1 centimorgans) between loci D5S435 and MAP1B on chromosome 5q11.2-13.3. By using PCR amplification to screen yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) DNA pools and the PCR-vectorette method to amplify YAC ends, a YAC contig was constructed across the disease gene region. Nine walk steps identified 32 YACs, including a minimum of seven overlapping YAC clones (average size, 460 kb) that span the SMA region. The contig is characterized by a collection of 30 YAC-end sequence tag sites together with seven genetic markers. The entire YAC contig spans a minimum of 3.2 Mb; the SMA locus is confined to roughly half of this region. Microsatellite markers generated along the YAC contig segregate with the SMA locus in all families where the flanking markers (D5S435 and MAP1B) recombine. Construction of a YAC contig across the disease gene region is an essential step in isolation of the SMA-encoding gene. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Identification and physical localization of useful genes and markers to a major gene-rich region on wheat group 1S chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, D; Champoux, J A; Bondareva, S N; Gill, K S

    2001-01-01

    The short arm of Triticeae homeologous group 1 chromosomes is known to contain many agronomically important genes. The objectives of this study were to physically localize gene-containing regions of the group 1 short arm, enrich these regions with markers, and study the distribution of genes and recombination. We focused on the major gene-rich region ("1S0.8 region") and identified 75 useful genes along with 93 RFLP markers by comparing 35 different maps of Poaceae species. The RFLP markers were tested by gel blot DNA analysis of wheat group 1 nullisomic-tetrasomic lines, ditelosomic lines, and four single-break deletion lines for chromosome arm 1BS. Seventy-three of the 93 markers mapped to group 1 and detected 91 loci on chromosome 1B. Fifty-one of these markers mapped to two major gene-rich regions physically encompassing 14% of the short arm. Forty-one marker loci mapped to the 1S0.8 region and 10 to 1S0.5 region. Two cDNA markers mapped in the centromeric region and the remaining 24 loci were on the long arm. About 82% of short arm recombination was observed in the 1S0.8 region and 17% in the 1S0.5 region. Less than 1% recombination was observed for the remaining 85% of the physical arm length. PMID:11290727

  10. A YAC contig of the region containing the spinal muscular atrophy gene (SMA): Identification of an unstable region

    SciTech Connect

    Carpten, J.D.; DiDonato, C.J.; Ingraham, S.E.

    1994-11-15

    The authors report a 3.0-Mb YAC contig of the region 5q11.2-q13.3, which is where the spinal muscular atrophy gene has been localized. Three total genomic YAC libraries were screened by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and 45 YACs were recovered. These YACs were characterized for sequence tag site (STS) content, and overlaps were confirmed by vectorette PCR. Of the 45 YACs, 20 were isolated with the polymorphic marker CATT-1, which demonstrates significant allelic association with the SMA gene and maps within the 850-kb interval defined by the markers D5S557 and D5S823. Haplotyping of these YACs and their mother cell line indicates that the majority of YACs from this region contain deletions. Furthermore, a 1.9-Mb CATT-1 YAC that was negative for MAP1B and D5S435 and nonchimeric by FISH analysis provides a minimum distance between MAP1B and D5S435. 30 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Autoclaved metal-on-cement spacer versus static spacer in two-stage revision in periprosthetic knee infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Pin; Wu, Cheng-Chun; Ho, Wei-Pin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic knee infection is troublesome for Orthopedic surgeons and a catastrophy for patients. Reported rates of periprosthetic joint infection following primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are 0.39–2%. Two stage revision arthroplasty, which has success rates exceeding 90%, has been the gold standard for treating subacute and chronic periprosthetic infection following TKA. Antibiotic spacers, a well established means of delivering local antibiotic therapy, maintain soft tissue tension during two stage revision arthroplasty. However, controversy remains around whether static or mobile antibiotic impregnated spacers are superior for treating infection following TKA. Various mobile spacers are available, including cement-on-cement, cement-on-polyethylene and metal-on-polyethylene. In this study, the efficacy of the modified metal-on-cement spacer, consisting of reinsertion of the autoclaved femoral component and implantation of antibiotic-loaded cement in the proximal tibia, is assessed. Materials and Methods: Records of 19 patients diagnosed as periprosthetic knee infection were reviewed in this retrospective study. Among these patients, 10 patients received first stage debridement with the autoclaved metal-on-cement spacer and 8 patients with the static spacer, who eventually underwent two-stage re-implantation, were listed in the final comparison. Patient demographics, infection eradication rates, average range of motion (ROM), surgical time and blood loss during the second-stage of the surgery, and Knee Society (KS) knee scores at last followup after revision total knee replacement were clinically evaluated. Results: At a minimum of 2-year followup after re-implantation, infection eradication rates, surgical times, blood loss during the second-stage of the surgery, and KS knee score after re-implantation were similar for the two groups. Patients receiving autoclaved metal-on-cement spacers had superior ROM after re-implantation compared to

  12. Regional gene expression in the epithelia of the Xenopus tadpole gut.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, A D; Slack, J M; Beck, C W

    2000-08-01

    In recent years much progress has been made in the understanding of the genes and mechanisms involved in specification of the cells of the endoderm, which give rise to the epithelium of the gut and respiratory system. However, little is known about the way in which the gut becomes patterned along its anterior-posterior axis, that is, how boundaries are established between the different epithelia of the gut tube. Here we show that the expression patterns of five genes divide the Xenopus tadpole gut epithelium into at least four regions along this axis in the undifferentiated, 3-day-old gut (stage 41), and that these divisions are maintained until at least 7 days, when cell differentiation is well under way. In addition, the restricted expression patterns of these genes clearly mark the anterior and posterior boundaries of the intestine. Xsox2 is expressed in the anterior gut, spanning the oesophagus and stomach but terminating at the stomach/intestine boundary. Xcad1 and Xcad2, two caudal-type homeobox genes, are expressed in a region with an anterior limit at this boundary and a posterior limit between the colon and proctodeum, therefore covering the whole of the small and large intestines. Intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP) is expressed only in the anterior small intestine, and the even-skipped homeobox gene Xhox3 is expressed in the most posterior part of the gut, the proctodeum. PMID:10940633

  13. Novel polymorphisms of the APOA2 gene and its promoter region affect body traits in cattle.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Li, Caixia; Cai, Hanfang; Xu, Yao; Lan, Xianyong; Lei, Chuzhao; Chen, Hong

    2013-12-01

    Apolipoprotein A-II (APOA2) is one of the major constituents of high-density lipoprotein and plays a critical role in lipid metabolism and obesity. However, similar research for the bovine APOA2 gene is lacking. In this study, polymorphisms of the bovine APOA2 gene and its promoter region were detected in 1021 cows from four breeds by sequencing and PCR-RFLP methods. Totally, we detected six novel mutations which included one mutation in the promoter region, two mutations in the exons and three mutations in the introns. There were four polymorphisms within APOA2 gene were analyzed. The allele A, T, T and G frequencies of the four loci were predominant in the four breeds when in separate or combinations analysis which suggested cows with those alleles to be more adapted to the steppe environment. The association analysis indicated three SVs in Nangyang cows, two SVs in Qinchun cows and the 9 haplotypes in Nangyang cows were significantly associated with body traits (P<0.05 or P<0.01). The results of this study suggested the bovine APOA2 gene may be a strong candidate gene for body traits in the cattle breeding program. PMID:24004543

  14. Sequence analysis of two genomic regions containing the KIT and the FMS receptor tyrosine kinase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Andre, C.; Hampe, A.; Lachaume, P.

    1997-01-15

    The KIT and FMS tyrosine kinase receptors, which are implicated in the control of cell growth and differentiation, stem through duplications from a common ancestor. We have conducted a detailed structural analysis of the two loci containing the KIT and FMS genes. The sequence of the {approximately}90-kb KIT locus reveals the position and size of the 21 introns and of the 5{prime} regulatory region of the KIT gene. The introns and the 3{prime}-untranslated parts of KIT and FMS have been analyzed in parallel. Comparison of the two sequences shows that, while introns of both genes have extensively diverged in size and sequence, this divergence is, at least in part, due to intron expansion through internal duplications, as suggested by the discrete extant analogies. Repetitive elements as well as exon predictions obtained using the GRAIL and GENEFINDER programs are described in detail. These programs led us to identify a novel gene, designated SMF, immediately downstream of FMS, in the opposite orientation. This finding emphasizes the gene-rich characteristic of this genomic region. 49 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Genetic variability in the regulation of gene expression in ten regions of the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Vibin; Smith, Colin; Walker, Robert; De, Tisham; Coin, Lachlan; de Silva, Rohan; Cookson, Mark R; Singleton, Andrew B; Hardy, John; Ryten, Mina; Weale, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Germ-line genetic control of gene expression occurs via expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). We present a large, exon-specific eQTL data set covering ten human brain regions. We found that cis-eQTL signals (within 1 Mb of their target gene) were numerous, and many acted heterogeneously among regions and exons. Co-regulation analysis of shared eQTL signals produced well-defined modules of region-specific co-regulated genes, in contrast to standard coexpression analysis of the same samples. We report cis-eQTL signals for 23.1% of catalogued genome-wide association study hits for adult-onset neurological disorders. The data set is publicly available via public data repositories and via http://www.braineac.org/. Our study increases our understanding of the regulation of gene expression in the human brain and will be of value to others pursuing functional follow-up of disease-associated variants. PMID:25174004

  16. Evaluation of position effect variegation of the transcription of genes from the FSHD candidate region

    SciTech Connect

    Winokur, S.T.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Altherr, M.R.

    1994-09-01

    The gene for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) lies in close proximity to the telomere of 4q. Deletion of several copies of a 3.2 kb tandem repeat have been associated with FSHD, although no genes have been identified within this repeat. We have shown that this repeat, as well as other repeats in the FSHD region, resemble constitutive heterochromatin both by sequence analysis and FISH cross-hybridization. We hypothesize that alterations in chromatin structure near the telomere of 4q due to deletion of these heterochromatic elements may lead to a position effect variegation of nearby genes. To test this hypothesis, we have isolated exons and candidate cDNAs from the FSHD region. A 2 kb polyadenylated cDNA was isolated from both fetal and infant brain cDNA libraries. Another cDNA hybridizes to a 7 kb skeletal muscle transcript on a Northern blot. Both of these cDNAs are chromosome 4-specific and map to the FSHD region. We have examined the expression pattern of these genes by RT-PCR, RNase protection and Northern analysis. Total RNA was isolated from normal and FSHD-affected lymphoblasts and from human-hamster somatic cell hybrids in which the normal and affected chromosomes 4 from FSHD patients were segregated. RT-PCR and RNase protection were then employed as quantitive assays to evaluate the potential for position effect variegation on RNA production in FSHD patients.

  17. Characterization of the 5'-flanking region of the gene for the alpha chain of human fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Hu, C H; Harris, J E; Davie, E W; Chung, D W

    1995-11-24

    The 5'-flanking region of the gene coding for the alpha chain of human fibrinogen was isolated, sequenced, and characterized. The principal site of transcription initiation was determined by primer extension analysis and the RNase protection assay and shown to be at an adenine residue located 55 nucleotides upstream from the initiator methionine codon, or 13,399 nucleotides down-stream from the polyadenylation site of the gene coding for the gamma chain. Transient expression of constructs containing sequentially deleted 5'-flanking sequences of the alpha chain gene fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene showed that the promoter was liver-specific and inducible by interleukin 6 (IL-6). The shortest DNA fragment with significant promoter activity and full response to IL-6 stimulation encompassed the region from -217 to +1 base pairs (bp). Although six potential IL-6 responsive sequences homologous to the type II IL-6 responsive element were present, a single sequence of CTGGGA localized from -122 to -127 bp was shown to be a functional element in IL-6 induction. A hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF-1) binding site, present from -47 to -59 bp, in combination with other upstream elements, was essential for liver-specific expression of the gene. A functional CCAAT/enhancer binding protein site (C/EBP, -134 to -142 bp) was also identified within 217 bp from the transcription initiation site. An additional positive element (-1393 to -1133 bp) and a negative element (-1133 to -749 bp) were also found in the upstream region of the alpha-fibrinogen gene. PMID:7499335

  18. Regulatory region in choline acetyltransferase gene directs developmental and tissue-specific expression in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lönnerberg, P; Lendahl, U; Funakoshi, H; Arhlund-Richter, L; Persson, H; Ibáñez, C F

    1995-01-01

    Acetylcholine, one of the main neurotransmitters in the nervous system, is synthesized by the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT; acetyl-CoA:choline O-acetyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.6). The molecular mechanisms controlling the establishment, maintenance, and plasticity of the cholinergic phenotype in vivo are largely unknown. A previous report showed that a 3800-bp, but not a 1450-bp, 5' flanking segment from the rat ChAT gene promoter directed cell type-specific expression of a reporter gene in cholinergic cells in vitro. Now we have characterized a distal regulatory region of the ChAT gene that confers cholinergic specificity on a heterologous downstream promoter in a cholinergic cell line and in transgenic mice. A 2342-bp segment from the 5' flanking region of the ChAT gene behaved as an enhancer in cholinergic cells but as a repressor in noncholinergic cells in an orientation-independent manner. Combined with a heterologous basal promoter, this fragment targeted transgene expression to several cholinergic regions of the central nervous system of transgenic mice, including basal forebrain, cortex, pons, and spinal cord. In eight independent transgenic lines, the pattern of transgene expression paralleled qualitatively and quantitatively that displayed by endogenous ChAT mRNA in various regions of the rat central nervous system. In the lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord, 85-90% of the transgene expression was targeted to the ventral part of the cord, where cholinergic alpha-motor neurons are located. Transgene expression in the spinal cord was developmentally regulated and responded to nerve injury in a similar way as the endogenous ChAT gene, indicating that the 2342-bp regulatory sequence contains elements controlling the plasticity of the cholinergic phenotype in developing and injured neurons. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7732028

  19. Characterization of the differentially methylated region of the Impact gene that exhibits Glires-specific imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Kohji; Wintle, Richard F; Scherer, Stephen W

    2008-01-01

    Background Imprinted genes are exclusively expressed from one of the two parental alleles in a parent-of-origin-specific manner. In mammals, nearly 100 genes are documented to be imprinted. To understand the mechanism behind this gene regulation and to identify novel imprinted genes, common features of DNA sequences have been analyzed; however, the general features required for genomic imprinting have not yet been identified, possibly due to variability in underlying molecular mechanisms from locus to locus. Results We performed a thorough comparative genomic analysis of a single locus, Impact, which is imprinted only in Glires (rodents and lagomorphs). The fact that Glires and primates diverged from each other as recent as 70 million years ago makes comparisons between imprinted and non-imprinted orthologues relatively reliable. In species from the Glires clade, Impact bears a differentially methylated region, whereby the maternal allele is hypermethylated. Analysis of this region demonstrated that imprinting was not associated with the presence of direct tandem repeats nor with CpG dinucleotide density. In contrast, a CpG periodicity of 8 bp was observed in this region in species of the Glires clade compared to those of carnivores, artiodactyls, and primates. Conclusions We show that tandem repeats are dispensable, establishment of the differentially methylated region does not rely on G+C content and CpG density, and the CpG periodicity of 8 bp is meaningful to the imprinting. This interval has recently been reported to be optimal for de novo methylation by the Dnmt3a-Dnmt3L complex, suggesting its importance in the establishment of imprinting in Impact and other genes. PMID:19014519

  20. Gene organization of the pregnancy-specific glycoprotein region on human chromosome 19: Assembly and analysis of a 700-kb cosmid contig spanning the region

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, A.; Nelson, D.; Gordon, L.

    1994-10-01

    The pregnancy-specific glycoprotein (PSG) gene family consists of 11 closely related genes that form a subgroup of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) gene family on 19q13.2. Using a high-resolution restriction fragment fingerprinting technique, we have assembled 256 cosmids from the PSG region into a single 700-kb contig. Fluorescence in situ hybridization to sperm pronuclei and cosmid walking experiments indicated that this PSG contig was directly telomeric of CGM8 at the telomeric end of the CEA subgroup gene cluster. Detailed restriction mapping and hybridization with gene-specific probes indicated that the order of the 11 previously identified PSG genes is cen - PSG3 - PSG8 - PSG12 - PSG1 - PSG6 - PSG7 - PSG13 - PSG2 - PSG5 - PSG4 - PSG11 - tel. The CEA subgroup gene CGM11 is located at the telomeric end of the PSG gene cluster. The PSG gene are all oriented in tandem with the 5{prime}-3{prime} direction of transcription from telomere to centromere. The detailed map also led to the identification of seven new CEA family genes in the region. One of these (CGM12), located between CGM8 and PSG3, is a member of the CEA subgroup. The remaining six (CGM13 through CGM18) are interspersed among the PSG genes and appear to form a third distinct subgroup within the CEA gene family. 34 refs., 6 figs.

  1. The human growth hormone gene is regulated by a multicomponent locus control region

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Cooke, N.E.; Liebhaber, S.A.; Monks, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    This article describes research involving the five-member human growth hormone (hGH)/chorionic somatomammotropin (hCS) gene cluster and its expression in the placenta. The results indicate that interactions among multiple elements are required to restrict hGH transcription to the pituitary and generate appropriate levels of expression in the mouse genome. In addition, the results suggest a role for shared and unique regulatory sequences in locus control region-mediated expression of the hGH/hCS gene cluster in the pituitary and possibly the placenta. 67 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Campylobacter jejuni acquire new host-derived CRISPR spacers when in association with bacteriophages harboring a CRISPR-like Cas4 protein

    PubMed Central

    Hooton, Steven P. T.; Connerton, Ian F.

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a worldwide cause of human diarrhoeal disease. Clustered Repetitively Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) and associated proteins allow Bacteria and Archaea to evade bacteriophage and plasmid infection. Type II CRISPR systems are found in association with combinations of genes encoding the CRISPR-associated Cas1, Cas2, Cas4 or Csn2, and Cas9 proteins. C. jejuni possesses a minimal subtype II-C CRISPR system containing cas1, cas2, and cas9 genes whilst cas4 is notably absent. Cas4 proteins possess 5′-3′ exonuclease activity to create recombinogenic-ends for spacer acquisition. Here we report a conserved Cas4-like protein in Campylobacter bacteriophages that creates a novel split arrangement between the bacteriophage and host that represents a new twist in the bacteriophage/host co-evolutionary arms race. The continuous association of bacteriophage and host in the carrier state life cycle of C. jejuni provided an opportunity to study spacer acquisition in this species. Remarkably all the spacer sequences observed were of host origin. We hypothesize that Campylobacter bacteriophages can use Cas4-like protein to activate spacer acquisition to use host DNA as an effective decoy to bacteriophage DNA. Bacteria that acquire self-spacers and escape phage infection must overcome CRISPR-mediated autoimmunity either by loss of the interference functions leaving them susceptible to foreign DNA incursion or tolerate changes in gene regulation. PMID:25601859

  3. A YAC contig spanning the hypophosphatemic rickets disease gene (HYP) candidate region

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, F.; Hamvas, R.M.J.; Lehrach, H. ); Rowe, P.S.N.; O'Riordan, J.L.H. ); Econs, M.J.; Drezner, M.K. ); See, C.G.; Benham, F. )

    1994-05-01

    Dominant X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (HYP) is the most common form of familial rickets. Linkage studies have localized the gene for this disorder to Xp22.1 between the markers DXS365 and DXS274, a region estimated to be approximately 3.5 cM. The authors have constructed a 1.5-Mb YAC contig encompassing this region by hybridization screening of high-density YAC clone filters. Rapid chromosome walking was achieved by direct hybridization of a pool of Alu-PCR products derived from a YAC containing DXS365 to the filter grids. Overlaps between YACs in the contig were estimated by hybridization of end probes to YAC digest blots and by analysis of cosmid fingerprints obtained by hybridization of YAC inserts to a flow-sorted chromosome X cosmid library. All YACs in the contig have been verified by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Several YACs spanning the HYP gene candidate region were selected for further analysis by rare-cutter enzyme digestion and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The authors estimate that the markers flanking the disease region, DXS365 and DXS274, are less than 1 Mb apart. This clone contig map provides an essential resource for the isolation of the HYP gene. 47 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Variability of the tandem repeat region of the Escherichia coli tolA gene.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kai; Vanoirbeek, Kristof; Aertsen, Abram; Michiels, Chris W

    2012-06-01

    An intragenic tandem repeat (TR) region has been previously reported in the tolA gene of Escherichia coli. In silico analysis of 123 E. coli tolA sequences from Genbank and PCR analysis of the tolA TR region from 111 additional E. coli strains revealed that this TR region is highly variable. Nine different TR sizes with 8 up to 16 repeat units were found in in silico analysis and 6 of these were also found by PCR analysis. The 13-unit TR emerged as the predominant type using both approaches (47.2% and 86.5%, respectively). Remarkably, TRs in pathogenic strains appeared to be more variable than those in non-pathogens. To demonstrate the occurrence of TR variation in a clonal population, a selection system for TR deletion events was constructed by inserting the 13-unit TR region of MG1655 in frame into a plasmid-borne chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene. The resulting cat gene no longer conferred chloramphenicol resistance unless the insert size was reduced by TR contraction. Using this system, Cm-resistant revertants with a TR contraction were recovered at a frequency of 1.1 × 10(-7), and contraction was shown to be recA-dependent and enhanced in a DNA repair-deficient mutS background. PMID:22659144

  5. Phylogeny of Panax using chloroplast trnC-trnD intergenic region and the utility of trnC-trnD in interspecific studies of plants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chunghee; Wen, Jun

    2004-06-01

    Sequences of the chloroplast trnC-trnD region and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA were obtained for all species of Panax L. (the ginseng plant genus, Araliaceae) to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships. The trnC-trnD phylogeny is congruent with the ITS phylogeny for the diploid taxa of Panax. This study is the first use of the trnC-trnD sequence data for phylogenetic analysis at the interspecific level. We evaluated this DNA region for its phylogenetic utility at the lower taxonomic level for flowering plants. The trnC-trnD region includes the trnC-petN intergenic spacer, the petN gene, the petN-psbM intergenic spacer, the psbM gene, and the psbM-trnD intergenic spacer. The petN and psbM genes are small, 90 and 104-114 bp across angiosperms, respectively, and have conserved sequences. We have designed universal amplification and sequencing primers within these two genes. Using these primers, we have successfully amplified the entire trnC-trnD region for a diversity of flowering plant groups, including Aralia L. (Araliaceae), Calycanthus L. (Calycanthaceae), Corylus L. (Betulaceae), Hamamelis L. (Hamamelidaceae), Hydrocotyle L. (Apiaceae), Illigera Blume (Hernandiaceae), Nelumbo Adans. (Nelumbonaceae), Nolana L. ex L.f. (Solanaceae), Prunus L. (Rosaceae), and Staphylea L. (Staphyleaceae). In Panax, the trnC-trnD region provides a similar number of informative phylogenetic characters as the ITS regions and a slightly higher number of informative characters than the chloroplast ndhF gene. We thus demonstrate the utility of the trnC-trnD region for lower-level phylogenetic studies in flowering plants. PMID:15120387

  6. Identification of hypothalamic arcuate nucleus-specific enhancer region of Kiss1 gene in mice.

    PubMed

    Goto, Teppei; Tomikawa, Junko; Ikegami, Kana; Minabe, Shiori; Abe, Hitomi; Fukanuma, Tatsuya; Imamura, Takuya; Takase, Kenji; Sanbo, Makoto; Tomita, Koichi; Hirabayashi, Masumi; Maeda, Kei-ichiro; Tsukamura, Hiroko; Uenoyama, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Pulsatile secretion of GnRH plays a pivotal role in follicular development via stimulating tonic gonadotropin secretion in mammals. Kisspeptin neurons, located in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), are considered to be an intrinsic source of the GnRH pulse generator. The present study aimed to determine ARC-specific enhancer(s) of the Kiss1 gene by an in vivo reporter assay. Three green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter constructs (long, medium length, and short) were generated by insertion of GFP cDNA at the Kiss1 locus. Transgenic female mice bearing the long and medium-length constructs showed apparent GFP signals in kisspeptin-immunoreactive cells in both the ARC and anteroventral periventricular nucleus, in which another population of kisspeptin neurons are located. On the other hand, transgenic mice bearing 5'-truncated short construct showed few GFP signals in the ARC kisspeptin-immunoreactive cells, whereas they showed colocalization of GFP- and kisspeptin-immunoreactivities in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation and chromosome conformation capture assays revealed recruitment of unoccupied estrogen receptor-α in the 5'-upstream region and intricate chromatin loop formation between the 5'-upstream and promoter regions of Kiss1 locus in the ARC. Taken together, the present results indicate that 5'-upstream region of Kiss1 locus plays a critical role in Kiss1 gene expression in an ARC-specific manner and that the recruitment of estrogen receptor-α and formation of a chromatin loop between the Kiss1 promoter and the 5' enhancer region may be required for the induction of ARC-specific Kiss1 gene expression. These results suggest that the 5'-upstream region of Kiss1 locus functions as an enhancer for ARC Kiss1 gene expression in mice. PMID:25486239

  7. A short upstream promoter region mediates transcriptional regulation of the mouse doublecortin gene in differentiating neurons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Doublecortin (Dcx), a MAP (Microtubule-Associated Protein), is transiently expressed in migrating and differentiating neurons and thereby characterizes neuronal precursors and neurogenesis in developing and adult neurogenesis. In addition, reduced Dcx expression during development has been related to appearance of brain pathologies. Here, we attempt to unveil the molecular mechanisms controlling Dcx gene expression by studying its transcriptional regulation during neuronal differentiation. Results To determine and analyze important regulatory sequences of the Dcx promoter, we studied a putative regulatory region upstream from the mouse Dcx coding region (pdcx2kb) and several deletions thereof. These different fragments were used in vitro and in vivo to drive reporter gene expression. We demonstrated, using transient expression experiments, that pdcx2kb is sufficient to control specific reporter gene expression in cerebellar cells and in the developing brain (E14.5). We determined the temporal profile of Dcx promoter activity during neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) and found that transcriptional activation of the Dcx gene varies along with neuronal differentiation of mESC. Deletion experiments and sequence comparison of Dcx promoters across rodents, human and chicken revealed the importance of a highly conserved sequence in the proximal region of the promoter required for specific and strong expression in neuronal precursors and young neuronal cells. Further analyses revealed the presence in this short sequence of several conserved, putative transcription factor binding sites: LEF/TCF (Lymphoid Enhancer Factor/T-Cell Factor) which are effectors of the canonical Wnt pathway; HNF6/OC2 (Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-6/Oncecut-2) members of the ONECUT family and NF-Y/CAAT (Nuclear Factor-Y). Conclusions Studies of Dcx gene regulatory sequences using native, deleted and mutated constructs suggest that fragments located upstream of the

  8. Possible deletion of a developmentally regulated heavy-chain variable region gene in autoimmune diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Pei-Ming; Olee, Tsaiwei; Kozin, F.; Carson, D.A.; Chen, P.P. ); Olsen, N.J. ); Siminovitch, K.A. )

    1990-10-01

    Several autoantibody-associated variable region (V) genes are preferentially expressed during early ontogenic development, suggesting strongly that they are of developmental and physiological importance. As such, it is possible that polymorphisms in one or more of these genes may alter susceptibility to autoimmune disease. The authors have searched extensively for a probe related to a developmentally regulated V gene that has the power to differentiate among highly homologous V genes in human populations. Using such a probe (i.e., Humhv3005/P1) related to both anti-DNA and anti-IgG autoantibodies, they studied restriction fragment length polymorphisms in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus and found an apparent heavy-chain V (V{sub H}) gene deletion that was nearly restricted to the autoimmune patients. These data suggest that deletions of physiologically important V{sub H} genes may increase the risk of autoimmunity through indirect effects on the development and homeostasis of the B-cell repertoire.

  9. GWAS identifies novel SLE susceptibility genes and explains the association of the HLA region.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, D L; Zidovetzki, R; Alarcón-Riquelme, M E; Tsao, B P; Criswell, L A; Kimberly, R P; Harley, J B; Sivils, K L; Vyse, T J; Gaffney, P M; Langefeld, C D; Jacob, C O

    2014-09-01

    In a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of individuals of European ancestry afflicted with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) the extensive utilization of imputation, step-wise multiple regression, lasso regularization and increasing study power by utilizing false discovery rate instead of a Bonferroni multiple test correction enabled us to identify 13 novel non-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes and confirmed the association of four genes previously reported to be associated. Novel genes associated with SLE susceptibility included two transcription factors (EHF and MED1), two components of the NF-κB pathway (RASSF2 and RNF114), one gene involved in adhesion and endothelial migration (CNTN6) and two genes involved in antigen presentation (BIN1 and SEC61G). In addition, the strongly significant association of multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the HLA region was assigned to HLA alleles and serotypes and deconvoluted into four primary signals. The novel SLE-associated genes point to new directions for both the diagnosis and treatment of this debilitating autoimmune disease. PMID:24871463

  10. Rapid evolution and complex structural organization in genomic regions harboring multiple prolamin genes in the polyploid wheat genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genes encoding wheat prolamins belong to complicated multi-gene families in the wheat genome. To understand the structural complexity of storage protein loci, we sequenced and analyzed orthologous regions containing both gliadin and LMW-glutenin genes from the A and B genomes of a tetraploid wheat ...

  11. Fractionation of Synteny in a Genomic Region Containing Tandemly Duplicated Genes Across Glycine max, Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extended comparison of gene sequences found on homeologous soybean BACs to Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana genomic sequences demonstrated a network of synteny within conserved regions interrupted by gene addition and/or deletions. Consolidation of gene order among all three species prov...

  12. [Regional features of obesity-associated gene polymorphism (rs9939609 FTO gene and gene Trp64Arg ADRB3) in Russian population].

    PubMed

    Baturin, A K; Sorokina, E Iu; Pogozheva, A V; Peskova, E V; Makurina, O N; Tutel'ian, V A

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown a significant association with obesity polymorphisms: rs9939609 gene due to fat mass and obesity FTO in European and some Asian and African American populations Trp64Arg ADRB3 gene in several European populations. Association of variants rs9939609 and Trp64Arg obesity was studied in 1244 the inhabitants of Moscow and Sverdlovsk regions. Genotyping was performed using allele-specific amplification, detection results in real time using TaqMan-probes complementary DNA polymorphic sites. The frequency of the mutant allele of the FTO gene in the population of Moscow and Sverdlovsk region was 45.1%, with the TT genotype was detected in 30.2% of cases, AT--49.5%, AA--20.3%. Women had the presence of the mutant allele more likely than men (48.4 vs. 42.5%). People with obesity were more genotypes AA (26.3%) and AT (52.8%) compared to the surveyed with a BMI of less than 30 kg/m2 (respectively 18.1 and 50.7%). A significantly higher incidence of risk allele A was found in individuals with obesity (52.6 and 43.4%). The presence of the mutant allele of the gene ADRB3 among the population of Moscow and Sverdlovsk regions was noted in 7.4% of cases. While 15.5% of patients had a heterozygous genotype Trp64Arg ADRB3, that is consistent with international research. The frequency of the risk allele and genotype Arg64 Trp64Arg in women (9.3 and 18.5%) was significantly higher than men (6.2 and 12.2%). The presence of the mutant allele and genotype Trp64Arg ADRB3 (respectively, 9.1 and 18.1%) were significantly more marked in the examined obese compared with those with a body mass index less than 30 kg/m2 (7.4 and 14.9%), but these differences were not statistically significant. The results of these studies suggest that genetic variants of the FTO gene rs9939609 genotype and Trp64Arg ADRB3 contribute to the development of obesity among residents of Moscow and Sverdlovsk Region of Russia. The risk of obesity increases in the case of combined polymorphisms in

  13. Brain region-specific altered expression and association of mitochondria-related genes in autism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction (MtD) has been observed in approximately five percent of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). MtD could impair highly energy-dependent processes such as neurodevelopment, thereby contributing to autism. Most of the previous studies of MtD in autism have been restricted to the biomarkers of energy metabolism, while most of the genetic studies have been based on mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Despite the mtDNA, most of the proteins essential for mitochondrial replication and function are encoded by the genomic DNA; so far, there have been very few studies of those genes. Therefore, we carried out a detailed study involving gene expression and genetic association studies of genes related to diverse mitochondrial functions. Methods For gene expression analysis, postmortem brain tissues (anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG), motor cortex (MC) and thalamus (THL)) from autism patients (n=8) and controls (n=10) were obtained from the Autism Tissue Program (Princeton, NJ, USA). Quantitative real-time PCR arrays were used to quantify the expression of 84 genes related to diverse functions of mitochondria, including biogenesis, transport, translocation and apoptosis. We used the delta delta Ct (∆∆Ct) method for quantification of gene expression. DNA samples from 841 Caucasian and 188 Japanese families were used in the association study of genes selected from the gene expression analysis. FBAT was used to examine genetic association with autism. Results Several genes showed brain region-specific expression alterations in autism patients compared to controls. Metaxin 2 (MTX2), neurofilament, light polypeptide (NEFL) and solute carrier family 25, member 27 (SLC25A27) showed consistently reduced expression in the ACG, MC and THL of autism patients. NEFL (P = 0.038; Z-score 2.066) and SLC25A27 (P = 0.046; Z-score 1.990) showed genetic association with autism in Caucasian and Japanese samples, respectively. The expression of

  14. Determination of the core promoter regions of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RPS3 gene.

    PubMed

    Joo, Yoo Jin; Kim, Jin-Ha; Baek, Joung Hee; Seong, Ki Moon; Lee, Jae Yung; Kim, Joon

    2009-01-01

    Ribosomal protein genes (RPG), which are scattered throughout the genomes of all eukaryotes, are subjected to coordinated expression. In yeast, the expression of RPGs is highly regulated, mainly at the transcriptional level. Recent research has found that many ribosomal proteins (RPs) function in multiple processes in addition to protein synthesis. Therefore, detailed knowledge of promoter architecture as well as gene regulation is important in understanding the multiple cellular processes mediated by RPGs. In this study, we investigated the functional architecture of the yeast RPS3 promoter and identified many putative cis-elements. Using beta-galactosidase reporter analysis and EMSA, the core promoter of RPS3 containing UASrpg and T-rich regions was corroborated. Moreover, the promoter occupancy of RPS3 by three transcription factors was confirmed. Taken together, our results further the current understanding of the promoter architecture and trans-elements of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RPS3 gene. PMID:19853675

  15. A second gene for cerulean cataracts maps to the {beta} crystallin region on chromosome 22

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, P.; Yount, J.; Lovrien, E.

    1996-08-01

    Cogenital cataracts are one of the most common major eye abnormalities and often lead to blindness in infants. At least a third of all cases are familial. Within this group, highly penetrant, autosomal dominant forms of congenital cataracts (ADCC) are most common. ADCC is a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, in which at least eight different loci have been identified for nine clinically distinct forms. Among these, Armitage et al. mapped a gene for cerulean blue cataracts to chromosome 17q24. Bodker et al. described a large family with cerulean blue cataracts, in which the affected daughter of affected first cousins was presumed to be homozygous for the purported gene. We report linkage in this family to the region on chromosome 22q that includes two {beta} crystallin genes (CRYBB2, CRYBB3) and one pseudogene (CRYBB2P1). The affected female in question is homozygous at all markers. 25 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. REGIONAL LOCALIZATION AND DEVELOPMENTAL EXPRESSION OF THE BCR GENE IN RODENT BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Fioretos, Thoas; Voncken, Jan Willem; Baram, Tallie Z.; Kamme, Fredrik; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2013-01-01

    The BCR gene is implicated in the development of Ph-positive leukemia through its fusion with the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase gene ABL. The normal 160 kDa Bcr protein has several functional domains, and recently one specific role for Bcr was established in the regulation of respiratory burst activity in white blood cells. Bcr expression levels are relatively constant throughout mouse development until adulthood in brain and in hematopoietic tissues, a pattern that is distinctly different from that of the functionally related n-chimerin gene. In the present study, RNA in situ hybridization was used to explore the normal cellular function of Bcr in rodent brain and hematopoietic organs. The data pinpoint the high bcr expression in the brain to the hippocampal pyramidal cell layer and the dentate gyrus, and to the piriform cortex and the olfactory nuclei, reflecting a potentially interesting function for Bcr in these highly specialized brain regions. PMID:8581068

  17. Multiple octamer binding sites in the promoter region of the bovine alpha s2-casein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Groenen, M A; Dijkhof, R J; van der Poel, J J; van Diggelen, R; Verstege, E

    1992-01-01

    Using a set of overlapping oligonucleotides from the promoter region of the bovine alpha s2-casein gene we have identified two nuclear factors which probably are involved in expression of this gene and the related calcium sensitive alpha s1- and beta-casein genes. One of these factors which was present in extracts of all tissues that have been tested including Hela cells turned out to be the octamer binding protein OCT-1. Oct-1 binds with different affinity to 4 sites at positions centred around -480, -260, -210 and -50. The strongest of these 4 binding sites, the one around position -50, is highly conserved in all calcium sensitive caseins of mouse, rat, rabbit and cattle. The other nuclear factor (MGF, mammary gland factor) which is specifically expressed in the mammary gland, binds to a site around position -90. This binding site is also highly conserved in all calcium sensitive caseins of mouse, rat, rabbit and cattle. Images PMID:1508722

  18. Promoter activity of the 5'-flanking regions of medaka fish soluble guanylate cyclase alpha1 and beta1 subunit genes.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Takehiro; Suzuki, Norio

    2002-01-01

    We examined the spatial expression pattern of medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) soluble guanylate cyclase alpha(1) and beta(1) subunit genes, OlGCS-alpha(1) and OlGCS-beta(1), and characterized the 5'-flanking region required for expression of both genes by introducing various promoter-luciferase fusion-gene constructs into COS-1 cells and medaka fish embryos. The OlGCS-alpha(1) and OlGCS-beta(1) gene transcripts were detected in whole brain and kidney in 7-day and 9-day embryos. Primer-extension analysis demonstrated that there were no differences among various adult organs (brain, eye, kidney, ovary and testis) in the transcription start site of the OlGCS-alpha(1) and OlGCS-beta(1) genes. Neither gene contained the functional TATA box within its 5'-flanking region, and the basal promoter activity was found between nucleotides +33 and +42 in the OlGCS-alpha(1) gene and between nucleotides +146 and +155 in the OlGCS-beta(1) gene. In the assay of medaka fish embryos, the 5'-flanking region of the OlGCS-beta(1) gene exhibited lower promoter activity than that of the OlGCS-alpha(1) gene. In the experiments on dual-luciferase fusion-gene constructs, the 5'-flanking region of the OlGCS-alpha(1) gene connected to the 5'-flanking region of the OlGCS-beta(1) gene was introduced into medaka fish embryos, and the 5'-flanking regions of both subunit genes were shown to mutually influence each other's promoter activity. PMID:11772405

  19. Dependence of Enhancer-Mediated Transcription of the Immunoglobulin μ Gene on Nuclear Matrix Attachment Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrester, William C.; van Genderen, Courtney; Jenuwein, Thomas; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    1994-08-01

    Transcription of the immunoglobulin μ heavy chain locus is regulated by an intronic enhancer that is flanked on both sides by nuclear matrix attachment regions (MARs). These MARs have now been shown to be essential for transcription of a rearranged μ gene in transgenic B lymphocytes, but they were not required in stably transfected tissue culture cells. Normal rates of transcriptional initiation at a variable region promoter and the formation of an extended deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I)-sensitive chromatin domain were dependent on MARs, although DNase I hypersensitivity at the enhancer was detected in the absence of MARs. Thus, transcriptional activation of the μ gene during normal lymphoid development requires a synergistic collaboration between the enhancer and flanking MARs.

  20. The structure of nucleosomal core particles within transcribed and repressed gene regions.

    PubMed Central

    Studitsky, V M; Belyavsky, A V; Melnikova, A F; Mirzabekov, A D

    1988-01-01

    The arrangement of histones along DNA in nucleosomal core particles within transcribed heat shock gene (hsp 70) region and repressed insertion within ribosomal genes of Drosophila was analysed by using protein-DNA crosslinking methods combined with hybridization tests. In addition, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was employed to compare the overall nucleosomal shape and the nucleosomal DNA size. The arrangement of histones along DNA and general compactness of nucleosomes were shown to be rather similar in transcriptionally active and inactive genomic regions. On the other hand, nucleosomes within transcriptionally active chromatin are characterized by a larger size of nucleosomal DNA produced by micrococcal nuclease digestion and some peculiarity in electrophoretic mobility. Images PMID:3144704

  1. Isolation of genes from the Batten candidate region using exon amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, T.J.; D`Arigo, K.L.; Haines, J.L.

    1995-06-05

    In order to identify genes originating from the Batten disease candidate region, we have used the technique of exon amplification to identify transcribed sequences. This procedure produces trapped exon clones, which can represent single exons or multiple exons spliced together and is an efficient method for obtaining probes for physical mapping and for screening cDNA libraries. The source of DNA for these experiments was a collection of chromosome 16 cosmid contigs isolated by the direct subcloning of region-specific yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) and hybridization of inter-alu PCR products from these YACs to the flow-sorted Los Alamos chromosome 16 cosmid library. We are now using the resulting exon probes to screen retina and brain cDNA libraries for candidate JNCL genes. 23 refs., 1 fig.

  2. An improved PCR method for direct identification of Porphyra (Bangiales, Rhodophyta) using conchocelis based on a RUBISCO intergenic spacer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Dong, Dong; Wang, Guangce; Zhang, Baoyu; Peng, Guang; Xu, Pu; Tang, Xiaorong

    2009-09-01

    An improved method of PCR in which the small segment of conchocelis is amplified directly without DNA extraction was used to amplify a RUBISCO intergenic spacer DNA fragment from nine species of red algal genus Porphyra (Bangiales, Rhodophyta), including Porphyra yezoensis (Jiangsu, China), P. haitanensis (Fujian, China), P. oligospermatangia (Qingdao, China), P. katadai (Qingdao, China), P. tenera (Qingdao, China), P. suborboculata (Fujian, China), P. pseudolinearis (Kogendo, Korea), P. linearis (Devon, England), and P. fallax (Seattle, USA). Standard PCR and the method developed here were both conducted using primers specific for the RUBISCO spacer region, after which the two PCR products were sequenced. The sequencing data of the amplicons obtained using both methods were identical, suggesting that the improved PCR method was functional. These findings indicate that the method developed here may be useful for the rapid identification of species of Porphyra in a germplasm bank. In addition, a phylogenetic tree was constructed using the RUBISCO spacer and partial rbcS sequence, and the results were in concordant with possible alternative phylogenies based on traditional morphological taxonomic characteristics, indicating that the RUBISCO spacer is a useful region for phylogenetic studies.

  3. HLA-D region genes and rheumatoid arthritis (RA): importance of DR and DQ genes in conferring susceptibility to RA.

    PubMed Central

    Singal, D P; Green, D; Reid, B; Gladman, D D; Buchanan, W W

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of HLA-D region antigens was studied in three groups (I, IIa, and IIb) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA): group I comprised 43 patients with mild, non-progressive RA, controlled by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs without progression or erosions; group II comprised 94 patients with severe disease, who had earlier been treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and all had incomplete response requiring treatment with gold (sodium aurothiomalate). Of these, 46 patients (group IIa) responded to gold and the disease was well controlled, and the remaining 48 patients (group IIb) did not respond to gold and developed gold induced toxic reactions, including thrombocytopenia or proteinuria, or both. HLA-D region antigens were defined by serological and molecular (Southern blot analysis and oligonucleotide typing) techniques. The results show that DR4 was significantly increased in all three groups of patients. The prevalence of DR1, or DR1 in DR4 negative patients, and DR3 and DR4 associated DQw7 specificities, however, showed differences in these three groups of patients. The prevalence of DR1 and of DR1 in DR4 negative patients was increased only in patients with mild (group I) RA, but not in patients with severe (groups IIa and IIb) disease. On the other hand, the prevalence of DR4 associated DQw7 was significantly increased in patients with severe disease, but not in patients with mild RA. In addition, DR3 was significantly increased only in patients with severe disease who developed gold induced toxic reactions (group IIb). These data suggest that the HLA-D region genes which cause susceptibility to mild RA may be different from those causing susceptibility to severe RA. The results suggest that both DR and DQ (A, B) genes may be important in conferring susceptibility to RA: DR in mild disease and DQ in severe RA. Images PMID:1371662

  4. Localisation of the gene for achondroplasia to the telomeric region of chromosome 4p

    SciTech Connect

    Stoilov, I.; Velinov, M.; Kilpatrick, M.W.

    1994-09-01

    Achondroplasia (ACH), the most common type of genetic dwarfism, is characterized by a variety of skeletal anomalies including disproportionate short stature and rhizomelic shortening of the extremities. The disorder is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, with a prevalence of 1-15 per 100,000 live births. The etiology of ACH remains unknown, although evidence points to a defect in the maturation of the chondrocytes in the growth plate of the cartilage. To determine the location of the gene responsible for ACH, a panel of 14 families with a total of 43 meioses was genotyped for 40 polymorphic markers for loci randomly distributed throughout the genome. The first significant positive Lod score was obtained for the locus D4S127 (Zmax=3.65 at {theta}=0.03). A series of 20 markers for chromosome 4p16.3 loci were then used to determine the most likely position of the ACH gene. Two additional loci, D4S412 and IDUA, showed strong linkage to the disease (Zmax=3.34 at {theta}=0.03 and Zmax=3.35 at {theta}=0.0, respectively). Multipoint analysis and direct counting of recombinants places the ACH gene in a 2.5 cM region between the marker D4S43 and the chromosome 4p telomere. No evidence was found for genetic heterogeneity. The ACH region contains a number of genes, including that for the fibroblast growth factor receptor FGFR3, which are being evaluated as candidates for the ACH gene. This identification of tightly linked polymorphic markers, as well as being the first step in the characterization of the ACH gene, offers the possibility of DNA based prenatal diagnosis of this disorder.

  5. Transmission test for linkage disequilibrium: The insulin gene region and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM)

    SciTech Connect

    Spielman, R.S.; McGinnis, R.E. ); Ewens, W.J. )

    1993-03-01

    A population association has consistently been observed between insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and the class 1 alleles of the region of tandem-repeat DNA (5[prime] flanking polymorphism [5[prime]FP])adjacent to the insulin gene on chromosome 11p. This finding suggests that the insulin gene region contains a gene or genes contributing to IDDM susceptibility. However, several studies that have sought to show linkage with IDDM by testing for cosegregation in affected sib pairs have failed to find evidence for linkage. As means for identifying genes for complex diseases, both the association and the affected-sib-pairs approaches have limitations. It is well known that population association between a disease and a genetic marker can arise as an artifact of population structure, even in the absence of linkage. On the other hand, linkage studies with modest numbers of affected sib pairs may fail to detect linkage, especially if there is linkage heterogeneity. The authors consider an alternative method to test for linkage with a genetic marker when population association has been found. Using data from families with at least one affected child, they evaluate the transmission of the associated marker allele from a heterozygous parent to an affected offspring. This approach has been used by several investigators, but the statistical properties of the method as a test for linkage have not been investigated. In the present paper they describe the statistical basis for this transmission test for linkage disequilibrium (transmission/disequilibrium test [TDT]). They then show the relationship of this test to tests of cosegregation that are based on the proportion of haplotypes or genes identical by descent in affected sibs. The TDT provides strong evidence for linkage between the 5[prime]FP and susceptibility to IDDM. 27 refs., 6 tabs.

  6. Genetic analysis of the cell binding domain region of the chicken fibronectin gene.

    PubMed

    Kubomura, S; Obara, M; Karasaki, Y; Taniguchi, H; Gotoh, S; Tsuda, T; Higashi, K; Ohsato, K; Hirano, H

    1987-11-20

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the cell binding domain region of the chicken fibronectin gene and analyzed it evolutionaly. We present here the complete nucleotide sequence of 4.3 kb HindIII/EcoRI segment from the clone lambda FC23 of the chicken fibronectin gene. There were five exons in this segment. When we lined up the amino acid of exons 28, 29 and 31, three alignments, known as the Type III repeat, appeared. Tetrapeptide, -RGDS-, called the cell binding domain, existed in the second repeat, coding exon 30. It was presumed that the Type III repeats were composed of two exons in the chicken gene, the same as in the rat and humans. We found repeatedly appearing amino-acid sequences such as -TIT- (three arrays in these Type III repeats) but also found one of the amino acids substituted in the tripeptide in these Type III repeats (seven arrays). We analyzed these repeats from the point of view of evolution. We used three of the nucleotide sequences (12-18 bp) coding such -TIT- repeats as a unit length for comparing the various homologies after dividing the coding region into 56 segments. The mutual homology of the divided segments to each one of three showed 53% on average. On the other hand, the mutual nucleotide homology of the Type III repeat was 44%. This suggested that the Type III repeat may have been developed by frequent duplication of small gene units. PMID:2823899

  7. Refined linkage map of chromosome 5 in the region of the spinal muscular atrophy gene

    SciTech Connect

    Melki, J.; Burlet, P.; Clermont, O.; Pascal, F.; Paul, B.; Abdelhak, S.; Munnich, A. ); Sherrington, R.; Gurling, H. Middlesex School of Medicine, London ); Nakamura, Yusuke ); Weissenbach, J. Genethon, Evry ); Lathrop, M. )

    1993-03-01

    The genetic map in the region of human chromosome 5 that harbors the gene for autosomal recessive forms of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has been refined by a multilocus linkage study in 50 SMA-segregating families. Among six markers spanning 8 cM for combined sexes, four were shown to be tightly linked to the SMA locus. Multipoing linkage analysis was used to establish the best estimate of the SMA gene location. The data suggest that the most likely location for the SMA locus is between blocks AFM114ye7 (D5S465)/EF5.15 (D5S125) and MAP-1B/JK53 (D5S112) at a sex-combined genetic distance of 2.4 and 1.7 cM, respectively. Thus the SMA gene lies in the 4-cM region between these two blocks. This information is of primary importance for designing strategies for isolating the SMA gene. 16 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Space Station Long Spacer Element begins processing at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Long Spacer, a component of the International Space Station, arrives and is moved to its test stand in the northeast corner of the high bay in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility. The Long Spacer provides structural support for the outboard Photovoltaic Modules that supply power to the station. Now just a structure, the Long Spacer will have attached to it as part of processing a heat dissipation radiator and two Pump and Flow Control subassemblies that circulate ammonia to cool the solar array electronics. Also to be mounted are ammonia fluid lines as part of the cooling system and the cabling necessary for power and control of the station. The Long Spacer becomes an integral part of a station truss segment when it is mated with the Integrated Equipment Assembly, which stores the electrical power generated by the solar arrays for use by the station modules. The Long Spacer is being processed in preparation for STS-97, currently planned for launch aboard Discovery in April 1999.

  9. Gas-insulated substation spacer surface degradation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, F.Y.; Braun, J.M. )

    1990-06-01

    The objective of the project was to develop surface analysis techniques which can correlate the performance of spacers in SF{sub 6} insulated switchgear with changes in their dielectric and chemical characteristics after exposure to SF{sub 6} arcing byproducts and low energy flashovers. Critical material parameters responsible for spacer performance were investigated by optical and scanning electron microscopy, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, thermogravimetric analysis and electrical surface resistance measurements. Results related to arc byproduct resistance and tracking resistance of seven types of filled epoxy spacer materials are presented. Degradation mechanisms have been proposed to explain the differing material behaviour. The study shows that the interaction of certain types of filler and resin systems with the SF{sub 6} spark and the decomposed gas is responsible for the degradation in impulse withstand performance. A practical technique using surface electrical resistance to detect degraded spacer after exposure to large quantities of arc byproducts has been developed and the construction of a probe for spacer surface assessment was described. 15 refs., 28 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. Impact of spacer thickness on biofouling in forward osmosis.

    PubMed

    Valladares Linares, R; Bucs, Sz S; Li, Z; AbuGhdeeb, M; Amy, G; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-06-15

    Forward osmosis (FO) indirect desalination systems integrate wastewater recovery with seawater desalination. Niche applications for FO systems have been reported recently, due to the demonstrated advantages compared to conventional high-pressure membrane processes such as nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO). Among them, wastewater recovery has been identified to be particularly suitable for practical applications. However, biofouling in FO membranes has rarely been studied in applications involving wastewater effluents. Feed spacers separating the membrane sheets in cross-flow systems play an important role in biofilm formation. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of feed spacer thickness (28, 31 and 46 mil) on biofouling development and membrane performance in a FO system, using identical cross-flow cells in parallel studies. Flux development, biomass accumulation, fouling localization and composition were determined and analyzed. For all spacer thicknesses, operated at the same feed flow and the same run time, the same amount of biomass was found, while the flux reduction decreased with thicker spacers. These observations are in good agreement with biofouling studies for RO systems, considering the key differences between FO and RO. Our findings contradict previous cross-flow studies on particulate/colloidal fouling, where higher cross-flow velocities improved system performance. Thicker spacers reduced the impact of biofouling on FO membrane flux. PMID:24726992

  11. [Prostate-rectum spacers: optimization of prostate cancer irradiation].

    PubMed

    Zilli, T; Benz, E; Miralbell, R

    2014-06-01

    In the curative radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer, improvements in biochemical control observed with dose escalation have been counterbalanced by an increase in radiation-induced toxicity. The injection of biodegradable spacers between prostate and rectum represents a new frontier in the optimization of radiotherapy treatments for patients with localized disease. Transperineal injection of different types of spacers under transrectal ultrasound guidance allows creating a 7-to-20 mm additional space between the prostate and the anterior rectal wall lasting 3 to 12 months. Dosimetrically, a relative reduction in the rectal volume receiving at least 70 Gy (V70) in the order of 43% to 84% is observed with all types of spacers, regardless of the radiotherapy technique used. Preliminary clinical results show for all spacers a good tolerance and a possible reduction in the acute side effects rate. The aim of the present systematic review of the literature is to report on indications as well as dosimetric and clinical advantages of the different types of prostate-rectum spacers commercially available (hydrogel, hyaluronic acid, collagen, biodegradable balloon). PMID:24746454

  12. Seasonal and Regional Differences in Gene Expression in the Brain of a Hibernating Mammal

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Christine; Hampton, Marshall; Andrews, Matthew T.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian hibernation presents a unique opportunity to study naturally occurring neuroprotection. Hibernating ground squirrels undergo rapid and extreme physiological changes in body temperature, oxygen consumption, and heart rate without suffering neurological damage from ischemia and reperfusion injury. Different brain regions show markedly different activity during the torpor/arousal cycle: the cerebral cortex shows activity only during the periodic returns to normothermia, while the hypothalamus is active over the entire temperature range. Therefore, region-specific neuroprotective strategies must exist to permit this compartmentalized spectrum of activity. In this study, we use the Illumina HiSeq platform to compare the transcriptomes of these two brain regions at four collection points across the hibernation season: April Active, October Active, Torpor, and IBA. In the cerebral cortex, 1,085 genes were found to be differentially expressed across collection points, while 1,063 genes were differentially expressed in the hypothalamus. Comparison of these transcripts indicates that the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus implement very different strategies during hibernation, showing less than 20% of these differentially expressed genes in common. The cerebral cortex transcriptome shows evidence of remodeling and plasticity during hibernation, including transcripts for the presynaptic cytomatrix proteins bassoon and piccolo, and extracellular matrix components, including laminins and collagens. Conversely, the hypothalamic transcriptome displays upregulation of transcripts involved in damage response signaling and protein turnover during hibernation, including the DNA damage repair gene RAD50 and ubiquitin E3 ligases UBR1 and UBR5. Additionally, the hypothalamus transcriptome also provides evidence of potential mechanisms underlying the hibernation phenotype, including feeding and satiety signaling, seasonal timing mechanisms, and fuel utilization. This study

  13. Interactions of early adversity with stress-related gene polymorphisms impact regional brain structure in females.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arpana; Labus, Jennifer; Kilpatrick, Lisa A; Bonyadi, Mariam; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Heendeniya, Nuwanthi; Bradesi, Sylvie; Chang, Lin; Mayer, Emeran A

    2016-04-01

    Early adverse life events (EALs) have been associated with regional thinning of the subgenual cingulate cortex (sgACC), a brain region implicated in the development of disorders of mood and affect, and often comorbid functional pain disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Regional neuroinflammation related to chronic stress system activation has been suggested as a possible mechanism underlying these neuroplastic changes. However, the interaction of genetic and environmental factors in these changes is poorly understood. The current study aimed to evaluate the interactions of EALs and candidate gene polymorphisms in influencing thickness of the sgACC. 210 female subjects (137 healthy controls; 73 IBS) were genotyped for stress and inflammation-related gene polymorphisms. Genetic variation with EALs, and diagnosis on sgACC thickness was examined, while controlling for race, age, and total brain volume. Compared to HCs, IBS had significantly reduced sgACC thickness (p = 0.03). Regardless of disease group (IBS vs. HC), thinning of the left sgACC was associated with a significant gene-gene environment interaction between the IL-1β genotype, the NR3C1 haplotype, and a history of EALs (p = 0.05). Reduced sgACC thickness in women with the minor IL-1β allele, was associated with EAL total scores regardless of NR3C1 haplotype status (p = 0.02). In subjects homozygous for the major IL-1β allele, reduced sgACC with increasing levels of EALs was seen only with the less common NR3C1 haplotype (p = 0.02). These findings support an interaction between polymorphisms related to stress and inflammation and early adverse life events in modulating a key region of the emotion arousal circuit. PMID:25630611

  14. Selection of reference genes in different myocardial regions of an in vivo ischemia/reperfusion rat model for normalization of antioxidant gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Changes in cardiac gene expression due to myocardial injury are usually assessed in whole heart tissue. However, as the heart is a heterogeneous system, spatial and temporal heterogeneity is expected in gene expression. Results In an ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) rat model we evaluated gene expression of mitochondrial and cytoplasmatic superoxide dismutase (MnSod, Cu-ZnSod) and thioredoxin reductase (trxr1) upon short (4 h) and long (72 h) reperfusion times in the right ventricle (RV), and in the ischemic/reperfused (IRR) and the remote region (RR) of the left ventricle. Gene expression was assessed by Real-time reverse-transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). In order to select most stable reference genes suitable for normalization purposes, in each myocardial region we tested nine putative reference genes by geNorm analysis. The genes investigated were: Actin beta (actb), Glyceraldehyde-3-P-dehydrogenase (gapdh), Ribosomal protein L13A (rpl13a), Tyrosine 3-monooxygenase (ywhaz), Beta-glucuronidase (gusb), Hypoxanthine guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (hprt), TATA binding box protein (tbp), Hydroxymethylbilane synthase (hmbs), Polyadenylate-binding protein 1 (papbn1). According to our findings, most stable reference genes in the RV and RR were hmbs/hprt and hmbs/tbp/hprt respectively. In the IRR, six reference genes were recommended for normalization purposes; however, in view of experimental feasibility limitations, target gene expression could be normalized against the three most stable reference genes (ywhaz/pabp/hmbs) without loss of sensitivity. In all cases MnSod and Cu-ZnSod expression decreased upon long reperfusion, the former in all myocardial regions and the latter in IRR alone. trxr1 expression did not vary. Conclusions This study provides a validation of reference genes in the RV and in the anterior and posterior wall of the LV of cardiac ischemia/reperfusion model and shows that gene expression should be assessed separately in each region

  15. Cloning and characterizing of the murine IRF-3 gene promoter region.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hua-Guo; Liu, Lifei; Gao, Shan; Jin, Rui; Ren, Wei; Zhou, Guo-Ping

    2016-08-01

    The interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) plays essential roles in inflammation and immune response. Here, we cloned the nucleotide sequence of the 5'-flanking region of the murine IRF-3 gene (mIRF-3) and characterized the molecular mechanisms controlling the mIRF-3 transcriptional activity in NIH3T3 cells. Analyses of a series of 5' deletion constructs demonstrated that a 301 bp region (-255/+46) of the mIRF-3 gene is sufficient for full promoter activity. This region contains IK1, Egr2, Cmyb, E2F1 and YY1 putative transcription factor binding sites. Mutation of Egr2 or YY1 site led to 52-68 % decrease of the mIRF-3 promoter activity, and double Egr2 and YY1 mutation reduced the promoter activity to 20 % of the wild-type promoter activity. Furthermore, knockingdown of endogenous Egr2 or YY1 by a siRNA strategy markedly inhibited the mIRF-3 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that Egr2 and YY1 interact with the mIRF-3 promoter in vivo. These results suggested that the basal promoter activity of the mIRF-3 gene is regulated by transcription factors Egr2 and YY1 in NIH3T3 cells. PMID:26740329

  16. Isolation of cDNA clones from within the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) disease gene region

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, M.; Roy, N.; Tamai, K.

    1994-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a recessive neuromuscular disease characterized by death of spinal cord {alpha} motor neurons, resulting in skeletal muscle atrophy. The critical SMA disease gene region on 5q13.1 contains families of microsatellite repeat sequences which exist at multiple subloci that are dispersed over a 100 to 200 kbp region. We have detected significant linkage disequilibrium between SMA type 1, the most severe form of the disorder, and two subloci of one such microsatellite, the CATT-1 family of microsatellites. Furthermore, a recombination event in a chromosome of an individual with SMA type 1 mapping between the members of two other extended microsatellite families, including CMS-1, has been observed. Combining this with previously reported recombinants refines the critical SMA region to approximately 300 kbp. P1 artificial chromosome (PAC), YAC and cosmid clones which possess both CMS-1 alleles which bracket this recombination event, as well as CATT-1 alleles showing linkage disequilibrium with SMA, have been used to probe cDNA libraries from human and other mammalian sources in search of genes within this interval; three of these cDNAs are currently being tested as candidates for the SMA gene.

  17. Cloning and functional analysis of 5'-upstream region of the Pokemon gene.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yutao; Zhou, Xiaowei; Zhu, Xudong; Zhang, Chuanfu; Yang, Zhixin; Xu, Long; Huang, Peitang

    2008-04-01

    Pokemon, the POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor, not only regulates the expression of many genes, but also plays an important role in cell tumorigenesis. To investigate the molecular mechanism regulating expression of the Pokemon gene in humans, its 5'-upstream region was cloned and analyzed. Transient analysis revealed that the Pokemon promoter is constitutive. Deletion analysis and a DNA decoy assay indicated that the NEG-U and NEG-D elements were involved in negative regulation of the Pokemon promoter, whereas the POS-D element was mainly responsible for its strong activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays suggested that the NEG-U, NEG-D and POS-D elements were specifically bound by the nuclear extract from A549 cells in vitro. Mutation analysis demonstrated that cooperation of the NEG-U and NEG-D elements led to negative regulation of the Pokemon promoter. Moreover, the NEG-U and NEG-D elements needed to be an appropriate distance apart in the Pokemon promoter in order to cooperate. Taken together, our results elucidate the mechanism underlying the regulation of Pokemon gene transcription, and also define a novel regulatory sequence that may be used to decrease expression of the Pokemon gene in cancer gene therapy. PMID:18355317

  18. Linkage disequilibrium in the neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) region: implications for gene mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Jorde, L B; Watkins, W S; Viskochil, D; O'Connell, P; Ward, K

    1993-01-01

    To test the usefulness of linkage disequilibrium for gene mapping, we compared physical distances and linkage disequilibrium among eight RFLPs in the neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) region. Seven of the polymorphisms span most of the NF1 gene, while the remaining polymorphism lies approximately 70 kb 3' to a stop codon in exon 49. By using Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) kindreds, 91-110 unrelated parents were genotyped. A high degree of disequilibrium is maintained among the seven intragenic polymorphisms (r > .82, P < 10(-7)), even though they are separated by as much as 340 kb. The 3' polymorphism is only 68 kb distal to the next polymorphism, but disequilibrium between the 3' polymorphism and all others is comparatively low (magnitude of 4 < .33, P values .27-.001). This result was replicated in three sets of unrelated kindreds: the Utah CEPH families, the non-Utah CEPH families, and an independent set of NF1 families. Trigenic, quadrigenic, three-locus, and four-locus disequilibrium measures were also estimated. There was little evidence of higher-order linkage disequilibrium. As expected for a disease with multiple mutations, no disequilibrium was observed between the disease gene and any of the RFLPs. The observed pattern of high disequilibrium within the gene and a loss of disequilibrium 3' to the stop codon could have implications for gene mapping studies. These are discussed, and guidelines for linkage disequilibrium studies are suggested. PMID:8105688

  19. Perturbation of chromatin structure in the region of the adult beta-globin gene in chicken erythrocyte chromatin.

    PubMed

    Caplan, A; Kimura, T; Gould, H; Allan, J

    1987-01-01

    An EcoRI chromatin fragment containing the adult beta-globin gene and flanking sequences, isolated from chicken erythrocyte nuclei, sediments at a reduced rate relative to bulk chromatin fragments of the same size. We show that the specific retardation cannot be reversed by adding extra linker histones to native chromatin. When the chromatin fragments are unfolded either by removing linker histones or lowering the ionic strength, the difference between globin and bulk chromatin fragments is no longer seen. The refolded chromatin obtained by restoring the linker histones to the depleted chromatin, however, exhibits the original sedimentation difference. This difference is therefore due to a special property of the histone octamers on the active gene that determines the extent of its folding into higher-order structure. That it is not due to the differential binding of linker histones in vitro is shown by measurements of the protein to DNA ratios using CsCl density-gradients. Both before and after selective removal of the linker histones, the globin gene fragment and bulk chromatin fragments exhibit only a marginal difference in buoyant density. In addition, we show that cleavage of the EcoRI fragment by digestion at the 5' and 3' nuclease hypersensitive sites flanking the globin gene liberates a fragment from between these sites that sediments normally. We conclude that the hypersensitive sites per se are responsible for the reduction in sedimentation rate. The non-nucleosomal DNA segments appear to be too long to be incorporated into the chromatin solenoid and thus create spacers between separate solenoidal elements in the chromatin, which can account for its hydrodynamic behaviour. PMID:3586025

  20. Early vertebrate chromosome duplications and the evolution of the neuropeptide Y receptor gene regions

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background One of the many gene families that expanded in early vertebrate evolution is the neuropeptide (NPY) receptor family of G-protein coupled receptors. Earlier work by our lab suggested that several of the NPY receptor genes found in extant vertebrates resulted from two genome duplications before the origin of jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) and one additional genome duplication in the actinopterygian lineage, based on their location on chromosomes sharing several gene families. In this study we have investigated, in five vertebrate genomes, 45 gene families with members close to the NPY receptor genes in the compact genomes of the teleost fishes Tetraodon nigroviridis and Takifugu rubripes. These correspond to Homo sapiens chromosomes 4, 5, 8 and 10. Results Chromosome regions with conserved synteny were identified and confirmed by phylogenetic analyses in H. sapiens, M. musculus, D. rerio, T. rubripes and T. nigroviridis. 26 gene families, including the NPY receptor genes, (plus 3 described recently by other labs) showed a tree topology consistent with duplications in early vertebrate evolution and in the actinopterygian lineage, thereby supporting expansion through block duplications. Eight gene families had complications that precluded analysis (such as short sequence length or variable number of repeated domains) and another eight families did not support block duplications (because the paralogs in these families seem to have originated in another time window than the proposed genome duplication events). RT-PCR carried out with several tissues in T. rubripes revealed that all five NPY receptors were expressed in the brain and subtypes Y2, Y4 and Y8 were also expressed in peripheral organs. Conclusion We conclude that the phylogenetic analyses and chromosomal locations of these gene families support duplications of large blocks of genes or even entire chromosomes. Thus, these results are consistent with two early vertebrate tetraploidizations forming a

  1. Wheeze in childhood: is the spacer good enough?

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, Veena; Rajendra, Barathi; How, Choon How; Ang, Seng Bin

    2014-01-01

    Max was treated with SABA using an MDI and spacer with facemask and responded well to the initial treatment. You explained to the parents that nebulisers are neither required nor recommended in the treatment of wheezing in their child’s situation. You advised the parents on the proper technique of MDI use with spacer and facemask, as well as care of the equipment. You also gave them a clearly written action plan regarding the efficient management of the next episode of wheeze with MDI and spacer. You further explained the side effects of oral bronchodilators and nebulisers, and why you refrained from using them. Max was given a follow-up appointment to assess his progress, and his parents were advised on the situations when they should go to a doctor or the emergency department. PMID:25631964

  2. Metagenomic analysis of fungal taxa inhabiting Mecca region, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Tarek A A; Al-Zahrani, Hassan S; Almaghrabi, Omar A; Sabry, Nevien M; Fuller, Michael P

    2016-09-01

    The data presented contains the sequences of fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) and 18S rRNA gene from a metagenome of the Mecca region, Saudi Arabia. Sequences were amplified using fungal specific primers, which amplified the amplicon aligned between the 18S and 28S rRNA genes. A total of 460 fungal species belonging to 133 genera, 58 families, 33 orders, 13 classes and 4 phyla were identified in four contrasting locations. The raw sequencing data used to perform this analysis along with FASTQ file are located in the NCBI Sequence Read Archive (SRA) under accession numbers: SRR3150823, SRR3144873, SRR3150825 and SRR3150846. PMID:27508121

  3. Genetic Analyses of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequences Suggest Introgression and Duplication in the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Moinard, Magalie; Xu, Jianping; Wang, Shouxian; Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Zhao, Ruilin; Hyde, Kevin D; Callac, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene cluster is widely used in fungal taxonomy and phylogeographic studies. The medicinal and edible mushroom Agaricus subrufescens has a worldwide distribution with a high level of polymorphism in the ITS region. A previous analysis suggested notable ITS sequence heterogeneity within the wild French isolate CA487. The objective of this study was to investigate the pattern and potential mechanism of ITS sequence heterogeneity within this strain. Using PCR, cloning, and sequencing, we identified three types of ITS sequences, A, B, and C with a balanced distribution, which differed from each other at 13 polymorphic positions. The phylogenetic comparisons with samples from different continents revealed that the type C sequence was similar to those found in Oceanian and Asian specimens of A. subrufescens while types A and B sequences were close to those found in the Americas or in Europe. We further investigated the inheritance of these three ITS sequence types by analyzing their distribution among single-spore isolates from CA487. In this analysis, three co-dominant markers were used firstly to distinguish the homokaryotic offspring from the heterokaryotic offspring. The homokaryotic offspring were then analyzed for their ITS types. Our genetic analyses revealed that types A and B were two alleles segregating at one locus ITSI, while type C was not allelic with types A and B but was located at another unlinked locus ITSII. Furthermore, type C was present in only one of the two constitutive haploid nuclei (n) of the heterokaryotic (n+n) parent CA487. These data suggest that there was a relatively recent introduction of the type C sequence and a duplication of the ITS locus in this strain. Whether other genes were also transferred and duplicated and their impacts on genome structure and stability remain to be investigated. PMID:27228131

  4. Genetic Analyses of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequences Suggest Introgression and Duplication in the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Moinard, Magalie; Xu, Jianping; Wang, Shouxian; Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Zhao, Ruilin; Hyde, Kevin D.; Callac, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene cluster is widely used in fungal taxonomy and phylogeographic studies. The medicinal and edible mushroom Agaricus subrufescens has a worldwide distribution with a high level of polymorphism in the ITS region. A previous analysis suggested notable ITS sequence heterogeneity within the wild French isolate CA487. The objective of this study was to investigate the pattern and potential mechanism of ITS sequence heterogeneity within this strain. Using PCR, cloning, and sequencing, we identified three types of ITS sequences, A, B, and C with a balanced distribution, which differed from each other at 13 polymorphic positions. The phylogenetic comparisons with samples from different continents revealed that the type C sequence was similar to those found in Oceanian and Asian specimens of A. subrufescens while types A and B sequences were close to those found in the Americas or in Europe. We further investigated the inheritance of these three ITS sequence types by analyzing their distribution among single-spore isolates from CA487. In this analysis, three co-dominant markers were used firstly to distinguish the homokaryotic offspring from the heterokaryotic offspring. The homokaryotic offspring were then analyzed for their ITS types. Our genetic analyses revealed that types A and B were two alleles segregating at one locus ITSI, while type C was not allelic with types A and B but was located at another unlinked locus ITSII. Furthermore, type C was present in only one of the two constitutive haploid nuclei (n) of the heterokaryotic (n+n) parent CA487. These data suggest that there was a relatively recent introduction of the type C sequence and a duplication of the ITS locus in this strain. Whether other genes were also transferred and duplicated and their impacts on genome structure and stability remain to be investigated. PMID:27228131

  5. Spacer effect on nanostructures and self-assembly in organogels via some bolaform cholesteryl imide derivatives with different spacers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, new bolaform cholesteryl imide derivatives with different spacers were designed and synthesized. Their gelation behaviors in 23 solvents were investigated, and some of them were found to be low molecular mass organic gelators. The experimental results indicated that these as-formed organogels can be regulated by changing the flexible/rigid segments in spacers and organic solvents. Suitable combination of flexible/rigid segments in molecular spacers in the present cholesteryl gelators is favorable for the gelation of organic solvents. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy observations revealed that the gelator molecules self-assemble into different aggregates, from wrinkle and belt to fiber with the change of spacers and solvents. Spectral studies indicated that there existed different H-bond formations between imide groups and assembly modes, depending on the substituent spacers in molecular skeletons. The present work may give some insight into the design and character of new organogelators and soft materials with special molecular structures. PMID:24083361

  6. Nucleotide sequence of the hypervariable region of the human C2 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Z.B.; Volanakis, J.V. )

    1991-03-15

    It has been previously suggested that the multiallelic Bam H1/Sst I RFLPs of the human C2 gene arose through deletion/insertion of a tandemly-repeated minisatellite region. In this study the authors subcloned and sequenced the Sst I polymorphic fragment of the b haplotype of the C2 gene. This restriction fragment is 2,450 bp long and maps 1,550 bp 3{prime} of exon 3. Its nucleotide sequence is characterized by the presence of at least 4 different repeated regions varying in size from 18 to 58 bp. One of these regions starting at position 1,413 is 48 bp long and is repeated five times. The first 3 repeats are in tandem and are separated by 72 bp from two additional tandem repeats. Sequence homology among the 5 repeats ranges between 93 and 98%. Eighty three percent of the nucleotides of the repeated-region are G or C. It seems likely that this nucleotide repeat resulted in the multiallelic RFLPs through a mechanism of unequal recombination or replication slippage.

  7. DNA rearrangement in human follicular lymphoma can involve the 5' or the 3' region of the bcl-2 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujimoto, Y.; Bashir, M.M.; Givol, I.; Cossman, J.; Jaffe, E.; Croce, C.M.

    1987-03-01

    In most human lymphomas, the chromosome translocation t(14;18) occurs within two breakpoint clustering regions on chromosome 18, the major one at the 3' untranslated region of the bcl-2 gene and the minor one at 3' of the gene. Analysis of a panel of follicular lymphoma DNAs using probes for the first exon of the bcl-2 gene indicates that DNA rearrangements may also occur 5' to the involved bcl-2 gene. In this case the IgH locus and the bcl-2 gene are found in an order suggesting that an inversion also occurred during the translocation process. The coding region of the bcl-2 gene, however, are left intact in all cases of follicular lymphoma studied to date.

  8. Exon organization of the mouse entactin gene corresponds to the structural domains of the polypeptide and has regional homology to the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Durkin, M.E.; Chung, A.E.; Wewer, U.M.

    1995-03-20

    Entactin is a widespread basement membrane protein of 150 kDa that binds to type IV collagen and laminin. The complete exon-intron structure of the mouse entactin gene has been determined from {lambda} genomic DNA clones. The gene spans at least 65 kb and contains 20 exons. The exon organization of the mouse entactin gene closely corresponds to the organization of the polypeptide into distinct structural and functional domains. The two amino-terminal globular domains are encoded by three exons each. Single exons encode the two protease-sensitive, O-glycosylated linking regions. The six EGF-like repeats and the single thyroglobulin-type repeat are each encoded by separate exons. The carboxyl-terminal half of entactin displays sequence homology to the growth factor-like region of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, and in both genes this region is encoded by eight exons. The positions of four introns are also conserved in the homologous region of the two genes. These observations suggest that the entactin gene has evolved via exon shuffling. Finally, several sequence polymorphisms useful for gene linkage analysis were found in the 3{prime} noncoding region of the last exon. 52 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Novel application of PhastSystem polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis using restriction fragment length polymorphism--internal transcribed spacer patterns of individuals for molecular identification of entomopathogenic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Pamjav, H; Triga, D; Buzás, Z; Vellai, T; Lucskai, A; Adams, B; Reid, A P; Burnell, A; Griffin, C; Glazer, I; Klein, M G; Fodor, A

    1999-06-01

    différences! [editorial] [editorial]onomic way of identifying and assigning nematodes to taxons, which had already been determined either by comparative sequence analysis of nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region or by other methods of molecular or conventional taxonomy, is provided. Molecular identification of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) can be upgraded by basing it on PhastSystem polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified DNA derived from single nematodes of Steinernema or Heterorhabditis spp. Although analysis from single worms has previously been made on agarose gel, the resolution on PhastSystem PAGE gel is much higher. The DNA sequences selected for analysis were those constituting the internal transcribed spacer region between the 18S and 26S rDNA genes within the rRNA operon. RFLP analysis was carried out by gel electrophoresis on the PhastSystem (Pharmacia) as detailed elsewhere (Triga et al., Electrophoresis 1999, 20, 1272-1277. The downscaling from conventional agarose to PhastSystem gels resulted in pattern of DNA fragments differing from those obtained with agarose gel electrophoresis under conventional conditions by increasing the number of detected fragments. The approach supported previous species identifications and was able to identify several unclassified isolates, such as those from Hungary and Ireland, and provides a method for identification of previously unclassified strains. We confirmed that Heterorhabditis "Irish Type", represented by two strains of different geographical origin, comprise a species different from H. megidis. We also confirmed that strain IS5 belongs to the species H. indicus rather than to H. bacteriophora, as had been suggested previously. PMID:10380767

  10. Characterization of the genomic region containing the Shadow of Prion Protein (SPRN) gene in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Lampo, Evelyne; Van Poucke, Mario; Hugot, Karine; Hayes, Hélène; Van Zeveren, Alex; Peelman, Luc J

    2007-01-01

    Background TSEs are a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases occurring in man and animals. They are caused by prions, alternatively folded forms of the endogenous prion protein, encoded by PRNP. Since differences in the sequence of PRNP can not explain all variation in TSE susceptibility, there is growing interest in other genes that might have an influence on this susceptibility. One of these genes is SPRN, a gene coding for a protein showing remarkable similarities with the prion protein. Until now, SPRN has not been described in sheep, a highly relevant species in prion matters. Results In order to characterize the genomic region containing SPRN in sheep, a BAC mini-contig was built, covering approximately 200,000 bp and containing the genes ECHS1, PAOX, MTG1, SPRN, LOC619207, CYP2E1 and at least partially SYCE1. FISH mapping of the two most exterior BAC clones of the contig positioned this contig on Oari22q24. A fragment of 4,544 bp was also sequenced, covering the entire SPRN gene and 1206 bp of the promoter region. In addition, the transcription profile of SPRN in 21 tissues was determined by RT-PCR, showing high levels in cerebrum and cerebellum, and low levels in testis, lymph node, jejunum, ileum, colon and rectum. Conclusion Annotation of a mini-contig including SPRN suggests conserved linkage between Oari22q24 and Hsap10q26. The ovine SPRN sequence, described for the first time, shows a high level of homology with the bovine, and to a lesser extent with the human SPRN sequence. In addition, transcription profiling in sheep reveals main expression of SPRN in brain tissue, as in rat, cow, man and mouse. PMID:17537256

  11. Isolation of candidate genes from the Batten Disease (JNCL) region using exon amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, T.J.; Haines, J.L.; Buckler, A. |

    1994-09-01

    Batten Disease (juvenile neuronal cercoid lipofuscinosis; JNCL) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder of childhood. Clinically, this autosomal recessive disorder is characterized by loss of vision, seizures, and progressive encephalopathy. The JNCL gene CLN3 has been genetically mapped to a 2 cM region in 16p12.1-11.2 and shows significant allelic association with alleles at five marker loci, D16S288, D16S272, D16S299, D16S298, and SPN, within this interval. Extended haplotype analysis strongly suggests that CLN3 must lie in the vicinity of D16S299/D16S298. We have used these markers as STSs to isolate YACs from the CEPH and Los Alamos flow-sorted chromosome 16 YAC libraries. These YACs, in turn, have been used to generate cosmid contigs by hybridization of inter-Alu PCR products to the gridded Los Alamos chr. 16 cosmid library and by direct sub-cloning. In order to identify genes originating from this region we have used the technique of exon amplification. This procedure produces trapped exon clones, which can represent single exons or multiple exons spliced together and is an efficient method for obtaining probes for physical mapping and for screening cDNA libraries. In all experiments, we have analyzed cosmid DNA using a modification of the original exon amplification procedure that increases both the efficiency and sensitivity of the approach. We have used the resulting exon probes to screen retina and brain cDNA libraries for candidate JNCL genes. Our preliminary studies indicate that the Batten candidate region is gene-rich.

  12. A First-Stage Approximation to Identify New Imprinted Genes through Sequence Analysis of Its Coding Regions

    PubMed Central

    Daura-Oller, Elias; Cabré, Maria; Montero, Miguel A.; Paternáin, José L.; Romeu, Antoni

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, a positive training set of 30 known human imprinted gene coding regions are compared with a set of 72 randomly sampled human nonimprinted gene coding regions (negative training set) to identify genomic features common to human imprinted genes. The most important feature of the present work is its ability to use multivariate analysis to look at variation, at coding region DNA level, among imprinted and non-imprinted genes. There is a force affecting genomic parameters that appears through the use of the appropriate multivariate methods (principle components analysis (PCA) and quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA)) to analyse quantitative genomic data. We show that variables, such as CG content, [bp]% CpG islands, [bp]% Large Tandem Repeats, and [bp]% Simple Repeats, are able to distinguish coding regions of human imprinted genes. PMID:19360135

  13. Analysis of tissue-specific region in sericin 1 gene promoter of Bombyx mori

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yan; Yu Lian; Guo Xiuyang; Guo Tingqing; Wang Shengpeng; Lu Changde . E-mail: cdlu@sibs.ac.cn

    2006-03-31

    The gene encoding sericin 1 (Ser1) of silkworm (Bombyx mori) is specifically expressed in the middle silk gland cells. To identify element involved in this transcription-dependent spatial restriction, truncation of the 5' terminal from the sericin 1 (Ser1) promoter is studied in vivo. A 209 bp DNA sequence upstream of the transcriptional start site (-586 to -378) is found to be responsible for promoting tissue-specific transcription. Analysis of this 209 bp region by overlapping deletion studies showed that a 25 bp region (-500 to -476) suppresses the ectopic expression of the Ser1 promoter. An unknown factor abundant in fat body nuclear extracts is shown to bind to this 25 bp fragment. These results suggest that this 25 bp region and the unknown factor are necessary for determining the tissue-specificity of the Ser1 promoter.

  14. Transport and deposition of pharmaceutical particles in three commercial spacer-MDI combinations.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, A; Normandie, M; Yousefi, M; Saidi, M S; Ahmadi, G

    2014-11-01

    Respiratory drug delivery has been under the research spotlight for the past few decades, mainly due to the high incidence of pulmonary diseases and the fact that this type of delivery offers the highest efficiency for treatment. Despite its invaluable benefits, there are some major drawbacks to respiratory drug delivery, the most important of which being poor delivery efficiency and relatively high drug deposition in undesirable regions, such as the mouth cavity. One way to improve the efficiency of respiratory drug delivery with metered-dose inhalers is placing a respiratory spacer between the inhaler exit and the mouth. It is argued that high drug deposition in the immediate airways of the respiratory system is strongly affected by relatively high initial momentum of pharmaceutical particles leaving the inhaler. A respiratory spacer, however, can provide an expansion region in which the initial momentum of particles can subside. As a result, particles enter the patient׳s oral cavity more gradually and are more likely to reach the desired regions. In this study, the effectiveness of using three commercial spacers paired with a commercial inhaler is examined through numerical investigation of fluid flow and particle transport phenomena. Particles ranging from 1 to 50 µm in diameter are tracked using a Lagrangian point of view and fluid flow fields are resolved using the LRN k-ω turbulence model. A novel particle injection method is introduced and is demonstrated to be able to adequately capture the effects of particle initial momentum. Lastly, a few design suggestions are made. PMID:25243888

  15. Region-specific changes in gene expression in rat brain after chronic treatment with levetiracetam or phenytoin

    PubMed Central

    Hassel, Bjørnar; Taubøll, Erik; Shaw, Renee; Gjerstad, Leif; Dingledine, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Summary Purpose It is commonly assumed that antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) act similarly in the various parts of the brain as long as their molecular targets are present. A few experimental studies on metabolic effects of vigabatrin, levetiracetam, valproate, and lamotrigine have shown that these drugs may act differently in different brain regions. We examined effects of chronic treatment with levetiracetam or phenytoin on mRNA levels to detect regional drug effects in a broad, nonbiased manner. Methods mRNA levels were monitored in three brain regions with oligonucleotide-based microarrays. Results Levetiracetam (150 mg/kg for 90 days) changed the expression of 65 genes in pons/medulla oblongata, two in hippocampus, and one in frontal cortex. Phenytoin (75 mg/kg), in contrast, changed the expression of only three genes in pons/medulla oblongata, but 64 genes in hippocampus, and 327 genes in frontal cortex. Very little overlap between regions or drug treatments was observed with respect to effects on gene expression. Discussion We conclude that chronic treatment with levetiracetam or phenytoin causes region-specific and highly differential effects on gene expression in the brain. Regional effects on gene expression could reflect regional differences in molecular targets of AEDs, and they could influence the clinical profiles of AEDs. PMID:20345932

  16. Reliable differentiation of Meyerozyma guilliermondii from Meyerozyma caribbica by internal transcribed spacer restriction fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Meyerozyma guilliermondii (anamorph Candida guilliermondii) and Meyerozyma caribbica (anamorph Candida fermentati) are closely related species of the genetically heterogenous M. guilliermondii complex. Conventional phenotypic methods frequently misidentify the species within this complex and also with other species of the Saccharomycotina CTG clade. Even the long-established sequencing of large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene remains ambiguous. We also faced similar problem during identification of yeast isolates of M. guilliermondii complex from indigenous bamboo shoot fermentation in North East India. There is a need for development of reliable and accurate identification methods for these closely related species because of their increasing importance as emerging infectious yeasts and associated biotechnological attributes. Results We targeted the highly variable internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) and identified seven restriction enzymes through in silico analysis for differentiating M. guilliermondii from M. caribbica. Fifty five isolates of M. guilliermondii complex which could not be delineated into species-specific taxonomic ranks by API 20 C AUX and LSU rRNA gene D1/D2 sequencing were subjected to ITS-restriction fragment length polymorphism (ITS-RFLP) analysis. TaqI ITS-RFLP distinctly differentiated the isolates into M. guilliermondii (47 isolates) and M. caribbica (08 isolates) with reproducible species-specific patterns similar to the in silico prediction. The reliability of this method was validated by ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 sequencing, mitochondrial DNA RFLP and electrophoretic karyotyping. Conclusions We herein described a reliable ITS-RFLP method for distinct differentiation of frequently misidentified M. guilliermondii from M. caribbica. Even though in silico analysis differentiated other closely related species of M. guilliermondii complex from the above two species, it is yet to be confirmed by in vitro analysis using reference

  17. Functional characterization of transcriptional regulatory elements in the upstream region of the yeast GLK1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, P; Flores, L; de la Cera, T; Moreno, F

    1999-01-01

    The glucokinase gene GLK1 of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is transcriptionally regulated in response to the carbon source of the growth medium. Northern-blot analysis shows that the GLK1 gene is expressed at a basal level in the presence of glucose, de-repressed more than 6-fold under conditions of sugar limitation and more than 25-fold under conditions of ethanol induction. lacZ fusions of the GLK1 gene promoter were constructed and a deletion analysis was performed in order to identify the cis-acting regulatory elements of the promoter that controls GLK1 gene expression. First, the expression seemed to be mediated mainly by one GCR1 and three stress-responsive element (STRE) activating elements. Secondly, an ethanol repression autoregulation (ERA)/twelve-fold TA repeat (TAB) repressor element was identified within the promoter region of the GLK1 gene. A specific and differential protein binding to the STRE was observed with extracts from de-repressed and repressed cells. No differential binding to the GCR1 or ERA/TAB elements was observed with extracts from de-repressed and repressed cells, but, in both cases, the binding was competed for by an excess of the unlabelled GLK1(GCR1) and GLK1(ERA) sequence. The transcription factors Msn2 and Msn4, which bind to the GLK1 upstream region through the STRE, contribute to inductive activation. The transcription factor Gcr1, which binds through the GCR1 element, contributes to constitutive activation. In order to achieve the severe glucose repression of GLK1, constitutive repressor factors acting through the ERA/TAB element must counteract constitutive activation generated by Gcr1 binding to the GCR1 element. Full expression of the GLK1 gene is produced by inductive activation of three STRE when Msn2 and Msn4 proteins are translocated to the nucleus by covalent modification. The combinatorial effect of the entire region leads to the regulated transcription of GLK1, i.e., silent in media with glucose and other

  18. Microglial P2 Purinergic Receptor and Immunomodulatory Gene Transcripts Vary By Region, Sex, and Age in the Healthy Mouse CNS

    PubMed Central

    Crain, Jessica M.; Watters, Jyoti J.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory damage in many neurodegenerative diseases is restricted to certain regions of the CNS, and while microglia have long been implicated in the pathology of many of these disorders, information comparing their gene expression in different CNS regions is lacking. Here we tested the hypothesis that the expression of purinergic receptors, estrogen receptors and other neuroprotective and pro-inflammatory genes differed among CNS regions in healthy mice. Because neurodegenerative diseases vary in incidence by sex and age, we also examined the regional distribution of these genes in male and female mice of four different ages between 21 days and 12 months. We postulated that pro-inflammatory gene expression would be higher in older animals, and lower in young adult females. We found that microglial gene expression differed across the CNS. Estrogen receptor alpha (Esr1) mRNA levels were often lower in microglia from the brainstem/spinal cord than from the cortex, whereas tumor necrosis factor alpha (Tnfα) expression was several times higher. In addition, the regional pattern of gene expression often changed with animal age; for example, no regional differences in P2X7 mRNA levels were detected in 21 day-old animals, but at 7 weeks and older, expression was highest in cerebellar microglia. Lastly, the expression of some genes was sexually dimorphic. In microglia from 12 month-old animals, mRNA levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase, but not Tnfα, were higher in females than males. These data suggest that microglial gene expression is not uniformly more pro-inflammatory in males or older animals. Moreover, microglia from CNS regions in which neuronal damage predominates in neurodegenerative disease do not generally express more pro-inflammatory genes than microglia from regions less frequently affected. This study provides an in-depth assessment of regional-, sex- and age-dependent differences in key microglial transcripts from the healthy mouse CNS. PMID

  19. Characterization of recombinant bacteriophages containing mosquito ribosomal RNA genes

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.J.

    1988-01-01

    A family of nine recombinant bacteriophages containing rRNA genes from cultured cells of the mosquito, Aedes albopictus, has been isolated by screening two different genomic DNA libraries - Charon 30 and EMBL 3 using {sup 32}P-labeled 18S and 28S rRNA as probes. These nine recombinant bacteriophages were characterized by restriction mapping, Southern blotting, and S1 nuclease analysis. The 18S rRNA coding region contains an evolutionarily conserved EcoRI site near the 3{prime}-end, and measures 1800 bp. The 28S rRNA genes were divided into {alpha} and {beta} coding regions measuring 1750 bp and 2000 bp, respectively. The gap between these two regions measures about 340 bp. No insertion sequences were found in the rRNA coding regions. The entire rDNA repeat unit had a minimum length of 15.6 kb, including a nontranscribed spacer region. The non-transcribed spacer region of cloned A. albopictus rDNA contained a common series of seven PvuI sites within a 1250 bp region upstream of the 18S rRNA coding region, and a proportion of this region also showed heterogeneity both in the length and in the restriction sites.

  20. Gene identification and DNA sequence analysis in the GC-poor 20 megabase region of human chromosome 21.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Tong, S; Shen, Y; Kao, F T

    1997-06-24

    In contrast to the distal half of the long arm of chromosome 21, the proximal half of approximately 20 megabases of DNA, including 21q11-21 bands, is low in GC content, CpG islands, and identified genes. Despite intensive searches, very few genes and cDNAs have been found in this region. Since the 21q11-21 region is associated with certain Down syndrome pathologies like mental retardation, the identification of relevant genes in this region is important. We used a different approach by constructing microdissection libraries specifically for this region and isolating unique sequence microclones for detailed molecular analysis. We found that this region is enriched with middle and low-copy repetitive sequences, and is also heavily methylated. By sequencing and homology analysis, we identified a significant number of genes/cDNAs, most of which appear to belong to gene families. In addition, we used unique sequence microclones in direct screening of cDNA libraries and isolated 12 cDNAs for this region. Thus, although the 21q11-21 region is gene poor, it is not completely devoid of genes/cDNAs. The presence of high proportions of middle and low-copy repetitive sequences in this region may have evolutionary significance in the genome organization and function of this region. Since 21q11-21 is heavily methylated, the expression of genes in this region may be regulated by a delicate balance of methylation and demethylation, and the presence of an additional copy of chromosome 21 may seriously disturb this balance and cause specific Down syndrome anomalies including mental retardation. PMID:9192657

  1. The myotonic dystrophy kinase 3{prime}-untranslated region and its effect on gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, C.W.Y.; Sabourin, L.A.; Narang, M.A.

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disease involving the expansion of an unstable CTG repeat in the 3{prime}-untranslated (3{prime}-UTR) region of the DM kinase (DMK) gene. Increased levels of mRNA in congenital compared to normal tissue have been shown, suggesting elevated DMK levels may be responsible for the disease phenotype. To study the effect of the DMK 3{prime}UTR on gene expression, a reporter gene system was constructed using the constitutive CMV promoter with the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) open reading frame and the DMK 3{prime}UTR containing from 5 repeats up to 90 repeats. Transient transfection into a rhabdomyosarcoma cell line shows a three-fold increase in CAT activity from constructs containing a wildtype 3{prime}UTR (5 and 20 repeats) compared to a control construct containing only a poly(A) signal. Reporter constructs with repeats in the protomutation (50 repeats) and mutation (90 repeats) range show a greater than 10-fold increase over control CAT activity. These results suggest the presence of elements in the DMK 3{prime}UTR capable of conferring increased gene expression. We are currently investigating cell-specific activity of the constructs and conducting deletion mapping to identify regulatory elements in the 3{prime}-UTR.

  2. Haplotypes of the steroid 21-hydroxylase gene region encoding mild steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Haglund-Stengler, B; Martin Ritzén, E; Gustafsson, J; Luthman, H

    1991-01-01

    Haplotypes of the complement 4 (C4) and steroid 21-hydroxylase [21-OHase; steroid hydrogen-donor: oxygen oxidoreductase (21-hydroxylating), EC 1.14.99.10] repeated gene complex were studied in nine families with at least one member affected with a mild form of 21-OHase deficiency. DNA probes from different parts of the repeated C4/21-OHase unit were used to follow the segregation of hybridization patterns in the families. Ten structurally distinct haplotypes of the C4/21-OHase gene region were identified, and the encoded phenotype was assigned to 34 of the 36 C4/21-OHase haplotypes. Four structurally different haplotypes with three C4/21-OHase repeat units were found. Eight of the nine haplotypes found with triplications of the C4/21-OHase repeat unit encoded the mild form of 21-OHase deficiency, whereas one particular triplicated haplotype encoded a severe form of the disease. In one case the mild form of 21-OHase deficiency was encoded by a haplotype with a single C4/21-OHase repeat unit. Mild 21-OHase deficiency was predicted in a patient by the presence of a triplicated haplotype. The finding of deranged 21-OHase genes on all triplicated C4/21-OHase haplotypes indicate that most of these common haplotypes carry mutated 21-OHase genes, and thus may cause functional polymorphism of general importance in the population. PMID:1924294

  3. Molecular cloning of the mouse CCK gene: expression in different brain regions and during cortical development.

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, M; Vashishtha, A; Linzer, E; Powell, D J; Friedman, J M

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we describe experiments that address specific issues concerning the regulation of the mouse cholecystokinin gene in brain and intestine. The mouse cholecystokinin gene was cloned and sequenced. Extensive homology among the mouse, man and rat genes was noted particularly in the three exons and the regions upstream of the RNA start site. RNAse protection assays for each of the three exons were used to demonstrate that CCK is expressed in only a subset of tissues and that the same cap site and splice choices are used in brain, intestine as well as in cerebellum, cortex, midbrain, hypothalamus and hippocampus. CCK RNA was also noted to be detectable in kidney. Thus the same gene using the same promoter is expressed in subsets of cells that differ in their biochemical, morphologic and functional characteristics. The level of expression of CCK was also monitored during mouse cortical development and the appearance of CCK RNA was compared to glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), enkephalin and somatostatin. It was noted that each of these cortical markers was first expressed at different times during cortical development. The appearance of CCK RNA during intestinal development was also measured and found to precede appearance in cortex by several days. Images PMID:2011497

  4. Correlations between apolipoprotein E ε4 gene dose and brain-imaging measurements of regional hypometabolism

    PubMed Central

    Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Alexander, Gene E.; Caselli, Richard J.; Bandy, Daniel; Osborne, David; Saunders, Ann M.; Hardy, John

    2005-01-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have abnormally low positron emission tomography (PET) measurements of the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRgl) in regions of the precuneus and the posterior cingulate, parietotemporal, and frontal cortex. Apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 gene dose (i.e., the number of ε4 alleles in a person's APOE genotype) is associated with a higher risk of AD and a younger age at dementia onset. We previously found that cognitively normal late-middle-aged APOE ε4 carriers have abnormally low CMRgl in the same brain regions as patients with probable Alzheimer's dementia. In a PET study of 160 cognitively normal subjects 47–68 years of age, including 36 ε4 homozygotes, 46 heterozygotes, and 78 ε4 noncarriers who were individually matched for their gender, age, and educational level, we now find that ε4 gene dose is correlated with lower CMRgl in each of these brain regions. This study raises the possibility of using PET as a quantitative presymptomatic endophenotype to help evaluate the individual and aggregate effects of putative genetic and nongenetic modifiers of AD risk. PMID:15932949

  5. Conservation of DNA curvature signals in regulatory regions of prokaryotic genes

    PubMed Central

    Jáuregui, Ruy; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Collado-Vides, Julio; Merino, Enrique

    2003-01-01

    DNA curvature plays a well-characterized role in many transcriptional regulation mechanisms. We present evidence for the conservation of curvature signals in putative regulatory regions of several archaeal and eubacterial genomes. Genes with highly curved upstream regions were identified in orthologous groups, based on the annotations of the Cluster of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COG) database. COGs possessing a significant number of genes with curvature signals were analyzed, and conserved properties were found in several cases. Curvature signals related to regulatory sites, previously described in single organisms, were located in a broad spectrum of bacterial genomes. Global regulatory proteins, such as HU, IHF and FIS, known to bind to curved DNA and to be autoregulated, were found to present conserved DNA curvature signals in their regulatory regions, emphasizing the fact that structural parameters of the DNA molecule are conserved elements in the process of transcriptional regulation of some systems. It is currently an open question whether these diverse systems are part of an integrated global regulatory response in different microorganisms. PMID:14627810

  6. Uracil residues dependent on the deaminase AID in immunoglobulin gene variable and switch regions

    PubMed Central

    Maul, Robert W; Saribasak, Huseyin; Martomo, Stella A; McClure, Rhonda L; Yang, William; Vaisman, Alexandra; Gramlich, Hillary S; Schatz, David G; Woodgate, Roger; Wilson, David M; Gearhart, Patricia J

    2013-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates diversity of immunoglobulin genes through deamination of cytosine to uracil. Two opposing models have been proposed for the deamination of DNA or RNA by AID. Although most data support DNA deamination, there is no physical evidence of uracil residues in immunoglobulin genes. Here we demonstrate their presence by determining the sensitivity of DNA to digestion with uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) and abasic endonuclease. Using several methods of detection, we identified uracil residues in the variable and switch regions. Uracil residues were generated within 24 h of B cell stimulation, were present on both DNA strands and were found to replace mainly cytosine bases. Our data provide direct evidence for the model that AID functions by deaminating cytosine residues in DNA. PMID:21151102

  7. Physical mapping of the congenital chloride diarrhea gene region in human chromosome 7

    SciTech Connect

    Kere, J.; Hoeglund, P.; Haila, S.

    1994-09-01

    The gene for congenital chloride diarrhea (CLD; MIM 214700) has been mapped to human chromosome 7 by a linkage study in Finnish families. The markers closest to the gene are D7S496 and D7S501, both with zero recombination fraction. In order to physically map the region and facilitate positional cloning, altogether 25 YAC clones have been isolated from the Washington University chromosome 7 collection of YACs. The clones form 2 contigs, 700 to 900 kb in size, around D7S496 and D7SS01. One YAC from the CEPH collection that bridges these contigs has been identified, but the link remains unconfirmed. Rare-cutter restriction mapping has identified as least 3 CpG islands within 50 to 200 kb of D7S496, supposed to map closest to CLD on the basis of linkage disequilibrium studies. Isolation of candidate cDNAs is in progress.

  8. A gene in the chromosomal region 3p21 with greatly reduced expression in lung cancer is similar to the gene for ubiquitin-activating enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Kok, K; Hofstra, R; Pilz, A; van den Berg, A; Terpstra, P; Buys, C H; Carritt, B

    1993-01-01

    The chromosomal region 3p21 is thought to be the site of a lung tumor suppressor gene. We recently cloned a gene from this region that has greatly reduced expression in almost all lung tumor cell lines examined, in spite of being widely expressed in a variety of other tumor and nontumor cell types. We report here the sequence of this gene and show that it has significant homology to the genes encoding the ubiquitin-activating enzymes of three species, including humans. This suggests it is a second, autosomal member of this gene family in humans and may play a role in the ubiquitin conjugation pathway, which is of central importance in all eukaryotes. PMID:8327486

  9. Multiple regions within the promoter of the murine Ifnar-2 gene confer basal and inducible expression.

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Matthew P; Hertzog, Paul J; Owczarek, Catherine M

    2002-01-01

    The (murine) type I interferon (IFN) receptor, muIfnar-2, is expressed ubiquitously, and exists as both transmembrane and soluble forms. In the present study we show that the gene encoding muIfnar-2 spans approx. 33 kb on mouse chromosome 16, and consists of nine exons and eight introns. The three mRNA splice variants resulting in one transmembrane (muIfnar-2c) and two soluble (muIfnar-2a/2a') mRNA isoforms are generated by alternative RNA processing of the muIfnar-2 gene. Treatment of a range of murine cell lines with a combination of type I and II IFN showed that the muIfnar-2a and -2c mRNA isoforms were up-regulated independently of each other in L929 fibroblasts and hepa-1c1c7 hepatoma cells, but not in M1 myeloid leukaemia cells. Analysis of the 5' flanking region of muIfnar-2 using promoter-luciferase reporter constructs defined three regulatory regions: a region proximal to exon 1, conferring high basal expression, a distal region conferring inducible expression, and a negative regulatory region between the two. These data represent the first promoter analysis of a type I IFN receptor and, taken together with our previous data demonstrating high expression levels and dual biological functions for muIfnar-2a protein, suggests that the regulation of muIfnar-2 isoform expression may be an important way of modulating type I IFN responses. PMID:11939908

  10. Regulation of alpha o expression by the 5'-flanking region of the alpha o gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Mortensen, R; Neer, E J

    1994-11-01

    Many responses of cells to external signals require activation of the heterotrimeric G proteins. These responses depend on the type and amount of G proteins that are expressed. Each cell has a characteristic complement of G protein subunits. For example, the alpha o subunit is very abundant in neural tissues. Very little is known about the mechanisms that determine cellular levels of G proteins. In the present study, we have isolated a genomic clone for mouse alpha o gene and identified the promoter region. There are multiple transcription initiation sites located about 750 base pairs upstream of the translational start site. The promoter region is GC-rich and contains neither a TATA-box nor a CAAT box. Transient expression assays using a series of constructs containing various lengths of the 5'-flanking region of the alpha o promoter demonstrated that the region 300-700 base pairs upstream of the transcription initiation sites is responsible for the basic promoter activity. The relative activity of alpha o promoter is 8-12-fold higher in cells expressing alpha o than in cells lacking alpha o. The level of alpha o in cells may also be regulated at the level of protein translation because deletions in the 5'-noncoding region of alpha o gene increase reporter enzyme expression without a corresponding increase in reporter enzyme mRNA level. Our results suggest that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms are involved in regulating the expression of alpha o in vivo. Transcriptional regulation probably is important for control of tissue-specific expression, while posttranscriptional mechanisms may be used to regulate the alpha o level in cells. PMID:7961675

  11. Isolation and analysis of a novel gene, HXC-26, adjacent to the rab GDP dissociation inhibitor gene located at human chromosome Xq28 region.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, A; Sakai, T; Sugiyama, Y; Kusuda, J; Hashimoto, K; Maeda, H

    1996-10-31

    We screened potential promoter regions from NotI-linking cosmid clones mapped on human chromosome Xq28 region with our constructed trapping vector and isolated six fragments containing transcription activity. Using one of the obtained fragments as a probe, a novel gene was isolated by screening a human skeletal muscle cDNA library. The isolated cDNA, termed HXC-26, contained an open reading frame of 975 nucleotides encoding 325 amino acids (38,848 Da). The HXC-26 gene was composed of 13 exons that span approximately 8 kb. Several potential GC boxes were found in the putative promoter region, but no typical TATA box. The HXC-26 gene associated with a CpG island was located adjacent to the rab GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) gene. PMID:9039504

  12. Cloning and characterization of the promoter regions from the parent and paralogous creatine transporter genes.

    PubMed

    Ndika, Joseph D T; Lusink, Vera; Beaubrun, Claudine; Kanhai, Warsha; Martinez-Munoz, Cristina; Jakobs, Cornelis; Salomons, Gajja S

    2014-01-10

    Interconversion between phosphocreatine and creatine, catalyzed by creatine kinase is crucial in the supply of ATP to tissues with high energy demand. Creatine's importance has been established by its use as an ergogenic aid in sport, as well as the development of intellectual disability in patients with congenital creatine deficiency. Creatine biosynthesis is complemented by dietary creatine uptake. Intracellular transport of creatine is carried out by a creatine transporter protein (CT1/CRT/CRTR) encoded by the SLC6A8 gene. Most tissues express this gene, with highest levels detected in skeletal muscle and kidney. There are lower levels of the gene detected in colon, brain, heart, testis and prostate. The mechanism(s) by which this regulation occurs is still poorly understood. A duplicated unprocessed pseudogene of SLC6A8-SLC6A10P has been mapped to chromosome 16p11.2 (contains the entire SLC6A8 gene, plus 2293 bp of 5'flanking sequence and its entire 3'UTR). Expression of SLC6A10P has so far only been shown in human testis and brain. It is still unclear as to what is the function of SLC6A10P. In a patient with autism, a chromosomal breakpoint that intersects the 5'flanking region of SLC6A10P was identified; suggesting that SLC6A10P is a non-coding RNA involved in autism. Our aim was to investigate the presence of cis-acting factor(s) that regulate expression of the creatine transporter, as well as to determine if these factors are functionally conserved upstream of the creatine transporter pseudogene. Via gene-specific PCR, cloning and functional luciferase assays we identified a 1104 bp sequence proximal to the mRNA start site of the SLC6A8 gene with promoter activity in five cell types. The corresponding 5'flanking sequence (1050 bp) on the pseudogene also had promoter activity in all 5 cell lines. Surprisingly the pseudogene promoter was stronger than that of its parent gene in 4 of the cell lines tested. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first

  13. Adipose and muscle tissue gene expression of two genes (NCAPG and LCORL) located in a chromosomal region associated with cattle feed intake and gain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A region on bovine chromosome 6 has been implicated in cattle birth weight, growth, and length. Non-SMC conodensin I complex subunit G (NCAPG) and ligand dependent nuclear receptor corepressor-like protein (LCORL) are positional candidate genes within this region. Previously identified genetic mark...

  14. Sequencing and functional annotation of the Bacillus subtilis genes in the 200 kb rrnB-dnaB region.

    PubMed

    Lapidus, A; Galleron, N; Sorokin, A; Ehrlich, S D

    1997-11-01

    The 200 kb region of the Bacillus subtilis chromosome spanning from 255 to 275 degrees on the genetic map was sequenced. The strategy applied, based on use of yeast artificial chromosomes and multiplex Long Accurate PCR, proved to be very efficient for sequencing a large bacterial chromosome area. A total of 193 genes of this part of the chromosome was classified by level of knowledge and biological category of their functions. Five levels of gene function understanding are defined. These are: (i) experimental evidence is available of gene product or biological function; (ii) strong homology exists for the putative gene product with proteins from other organisms; (iii) some indication of the function can be derived from homologies with known proteins; (iv) the gene product can be clustered with hypothetical proteins; (v) no indication on the gene function exists. The percentage of detected genes in each category was: 20, 28, 20, 15 and 17, respectively. In the sequenced region, a high percentage of genes are implicated in transport and metabolic linking of glycolysis and the citric acid cycle. A functional connection of several genes from this region and the genes close to 140 degrees in the chromosome was also observed. PMID:9387221

  15. Secondary structure analyses of the nuclear rRNA internal transcribed spacers and assessment of its phylogenetic utility across the Brassicaceae (mustards).

    PubMed

    Edger, Patrick P; Tang, Michelle; Bird, Kevin A; Mayfield, Dustin R; Conant, Gavin; Mummenhoff, Klaus; Koch, Marcus A; Pires, J Chris

    2014-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacers of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene cluster, termed ITS1 and ITS2, are the most frequently used nuclear markers for phylogenetic analyses across many eukaryotic groups including most plant families. The reasons for the popularity of these markers include: 1.) Ease of amplification due to high copy number of the gene clusters, 2.) Available cost-effective methods and highly conserved primers, 3.) Rapidly evolving markers (i.e. variable between closely related species), and 4.) The assumption (and/or treatment) that these sequences are non-functional, neutrally evolving phylogenetic markers. Here, our analyses of ITS1 and ITS2 for 50 species suggest that both sequences are instead under selective constraints to preserve proper secondary structure, likely to maintain complete self-splicing functions, and thus are not neutrally-evolving phylogenetic markers. Our results indicate the majority of sequence sites are co-evolving with other positions to form proper secondary structure, which has implications for phylogenetic inference. We also found that the lowest energy state and total number of possible alternate secondary structures are highly significantly different between ITS regions and random sequences with an identical overall length and Guanine-Cytosine (GC) content. Lastly, we review recent evidence highlighting some additional problematic issues with using these regions as the sole markers for phylogenetic studies, and thus strongly recommend additional markers and cost-effective approaches for future studies to estimate phylogenetic relationships. PMID:24984034

  16. Conservation of sequence in the internal transcribed spacers and 5.8S ribosomal RNA among geographically separated isolates of parasitic scuticociliates (Ciliophora, Orchitophryidae).

    PubMed

    Goggin, C L; Murphy, N E

    2000-02-24

    Nucleotide sequence from the internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 5.8S gene from the ribosomal RNA gene cluster of isolates of the scuticociliate Orchitophrya stellarum from 4 asteroid hosts were compared. Surprisingly, these data (495 bp) were identical for O. stellarum isolated from the testes of Asterias amurensis from Japan; Pisaster ochraceus from British Columbia, Canada; Asterias rubens from The Netherlands; and Asterias vulgaris from Prince Edward Island, Canada. These sequence data were compared to those from 3 scuticociliates which parasitise crustaceans: Mesanophrys pugettensis, M. chesapeakensis and Anophryoides haemophila. No difference was found in this region between the nucleotide sequence of M. pugettensis and M. chesapeakensis. The sequence of Mesanophrys spp. differed by 9.2% in the ITS1 and 4.7% in the ITS2 from that of O. stellarum. The sequence from the ITS1 (135 bp) and ITS2 (233 bp) of A. haemophila differed by 42.6 and 20.5% respectively from those of O. stellarum. Therefore, nucleotide sequence of the ITS regions in these scuticociliates is highly conserved. PMID:10785865

  17. Restriction mapping of a YAC contig in the hemochromatosis gene region

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, M.J.; Smit, D.J.; Pyper, W.R.

    1994-09-01

    Hemochromatosis is a common inherited disorder of iron metabolism that can lead to cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, cardiomyopathy, diabetes and anthropathy. We have mapped the hemochromatosis gene to within 1 cM of HLA-A and the microsatellite D6S105, and our allele association studies have shown that D6S105 is the marker most closely associated with the hemochromatosis gene. We are currently constructing a YAC contig and restriction map of this region as part of a positional cloning strategy to identify the hemochromatosis gene. YACs containing HLA-A or D6S105 were selected, and fluorescent-in-situ-hybridization (FISH) was performed to confirm chromosomal location and exclude chimerism. YAC DNA was digested with a panel of rare cutters, separated by pulsed field gel electrophoresis, Southern blotted and probed with the vector arms to create restriction maps. YAC insert terminal ends were isolated using vectorette methodology. A contig extending 600 kb centromeric and 350 kb telomeric of HLA-A has been established. HLA-A, HLA-F and the microsatellite D6S265 have been positioned on this map. The contig does not yet overlap any D6S105 positive YACs but the telomeric end of the contig has been sequenced and is being used to identify additional YACs to bridge this interval. Restriction mapping of three D6S105 YACs has shown the presence of several CpG islands in this region. As these CpG islands are in close proximity to D6S105, they are being used to isolate coding sequences to determine whether any of these mark the position of the hemochromatosis gene.

  18. Identification of Genomic Regions and the Isoamylase Gene for Reduced Grain Chalkiness in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenqian; Zhou, Qiaoling; Yao, Yue; Qiu, Xianjin; Xie, Kun; Yu, Sibin

    2015-01-01

    Grain chalkiness is an important grain quality related to starch granules in the endosperm. A high percentage of grain chalkiness is a major problem because it diminishes grain quality in rice. Here, we report quantitative trait loci identification for grain chalkiness using high-throughput single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping of a chromosomal segment substitution line population in which each line carried one or a few introduced japonica cultivar Nipponbare segments in the genetic background of the indica cultivar ZS97. Ten quantitative trait loci regions were commonly identified for the percentage of grain chalkiness and the degree of endosperm chalkiness. The allelic effects at nine of these quantitative trait loci reduced grain chalkiness. Furthermore, a quantitative trait locus (qPGC8-2) on chromosome 8 was validated in a chromosomal segment substitution line–derived segregation population, and had a stable effect on chalkiness in a multiple-environment evaluation of the near-isogenic lines. Residing on the qPGC8-2 region, the isoamylase gene (ISA1) was preferentially expressed in the endosperm and revealed some nucleotide polymorphisms between two varieties, Nipponbare and ZS97. Transgenic lines with suppression of ISA1 by RNA interference produced grains with 20% more chalkiness than the control. The results support that the gene may underlie qPGC8-2 for grain chalkiness. The multiple-environment trials of the near-isogenic lines also show that combination of the favorable alleles such as the ISA1 gene for low chalkiness and the GS3 gene for long grains considerably improved grain quality of ZS97, which proves useful for grain quality improvement in rice breeding programs. PMID:25790260

  19. Validation study of genes with hypermethylated promoter regions associated with prostate cancer recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Stott-Miller, Marni; Zhao, Shanshan; Wright, Jonathan L.; Kolb, Suzanne; Bibikova, Marina; Klotzle, Brandy; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Fan, Jian-Bing; Feng, Ziding; Stanford, Janet L.

    2014-01-01

    Background One challenge in prostate cancer (PCa) is distinguishing indolent from aggressive disease at diagnosis. DNA promoter hypermethylation is a frequent epigenetic event in PCa, but few studies of DNA methylation in relation to features of more aggressive tumors or PCa recurrence have been completed. Methods We used the Infinium® HumanMethylation450 BeadChip to assess DNA methylation in tumor tissue from 407 patients with clinically localized PCa who underwent radical prostatectomy. Recurrence status was determined by follow-up patient surveys, medical record review, and linkage with the SEER registry. The methylation status of 14 genes for which promoter hypermethylation was previously correlated with advanced disease or biochemical recurrence was evaluated. Average methylation level for promoter region CpGs in patients who recurred compared to those with no evidence of recurrence was analyzed. For two genes with differential methylation, time to recurrence was examined. Results During an average follow-up of 11.7 years, 104 (26%) patients recurred. Significant promoter hypermethylation in at least 50% of CpG sites in two genes, ABHD9 and HOXD3, was found in tumors from patients who recurred compared to those without recurrence. Evidence was strongest for HOXD3 (lowest P = 9.46x10−6), with higher average methylation across promoter region CpGs associated with reduced recurrence-free survival (P = 2×10−4). DNA methylation profiles did not differ by recurrence status for the other genes. Conclusions These results validate the association between promoter hypermethylation of ADHB9 and HOXD3 and PCa recurrence. Impact Tumor DNA methylation profiling may help distinguish PCa patients at higher risk for disease recurrence. PMID:24718283

  20. A discrete region centered 22 base pairs upstream of the initiation site modulates transcription of Drosophila tRNAAsn genes.

    PubMed Central

    Lofquist, A K; Garcia, A D; Sharp, S J

    1988-01-01

    We have studied the mechanism by which 5'-flanking sequences modulate the in vitro transcription of eucaryotic tRNA genes. Using deletion and linker substitution mutagenesis, we have found that the 5'-flanking sequences responsible for the different in vitro transcription levels of three Drosophila tRNA5Asn genes are contained within a discrete region centered 22 nucleotides upstream from the transcription initiation site. In conjunction with the A-box intragenic control region, this upstream transcription-modulatory region functions in the selection mechanism for the site of transcription initiation. Since the transcription-modulatory region directs the position of the start site and the actual sequence of the transcription-modulatory region determines the level of tRNAAsn gene transcription, the possibility is raised that the transcription-modulatory region directs a transcription initiation event similar to open complex formation at procaryotic promoters. Images PMID:3141790

  1. Filter holder assembly having extended collar spacer ring

    DOEpatents

    Alvin, Mary Anne; Bruck, Gerald J.

    2002-01-01

    A filter holder assembly is provided that utilizes a fail-safe regenerator unit with an annular spacer ring having an extended metal collar for containment and positioning of a compliant ceramic gasket used in the assembly. The filter holder assembly is disclosed for use with advanced composite, filament wound, and metal candle filters.

  2. Mutational analysis of the promoter and the coding region of the 5-HT1A gene

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmann, J.; Noethen, M.M.; Shimron-Abarbanell, D.

    1994-09-01

    Disturbances of serotonergic pathways have been implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Serotonin (5HT) receptors can be subdivided into at least three major families (5HT1, 5HT2, and 5HT3). Five human 5HT1 receptor subtypes have been cloned, namely 1A, 1D{alpha}, 1D{beta}, 1E, and 1F. Of these, the 5HT1A receptor is the best characterized subtype. In the present study we sought to identify genetic variation in the 5HT1A receptor gene which through alteration of protein function or level of expression might contribute to the genetics of neuropsychiatric diseases. The coding region and the 5{prime} promoter region of the 5HT1A gene from 159 unrelated subjects (45 schizophrenic, 46 bipolar affective, and 43 patients with Tourette`s syndrome, as well as 25 controls) were analyzed using SSCA. SSCA revealed the presence of two mutations both located in the coding region of the 5HT1A receptor gene. The first mutation is a rare silent C{r_arrow}T substitution at nucleotide position 549. The second mutation is characterized by a base pair substitution (A{r_arrow}G) at the first position of codon 28 and results in an amino acid exchange (Ile{r_arrow}Val). Since Val28 was found only in a single schizophrenic patient and in none of the other patients or controls, we decided to extend our samples and to use a restriction assay for screening a further 74 schizophrenic, 95 bipolar affective, and 49 patients with Tourette`s syndrome, as well as 185 controls, for the presence of the mutation. In total, the mutation was found in 2 schizophrenic patients, in 3 bipolars, in 1 Tourette patient, and in 5 controls. To our knowledge the Ile-28-Val substitution reported here is the first natural occuring molecular variant which has been identified for a serotonin receptor so far.

  3. Structural alterations of the ribosomal RNA genes in leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, I A

    1992-01-01

    Cloned 6.7 kb EcoR1 fragment of mice rDNA was used as a hybridization probe for rDNA structure analysis in mice, rat and calf haemopoietic tumor and normal cells. EcoR1, BglII and Pst1 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was found in neoplastic rDNA and was not revealed in normal ones. The rRNA gene rearrangements were observed not only in spacer region but in coding sequences of the genes. Leukemic cells reveal also rDNA amplification. A role of genetic rearrangements of rDNA for mechanisms of carcinogenesis is suggested. PMID:1342066

  4. Helical phase dependent action of CRP: effect of the distance between the CRP site and the -35 region on promoter activity.

    PubMed Central

    Ushida, C; Aiba, H

    1990-01-01

    A plasmid carrying a CRP-dependent promoter fused to the lac structural genes was manipulated to construct a set of spacing mutants that have varying lengths between the CRP binding site and the -35 region. The lengths of the spacer were changed over 45 bp by inserting or deleting nucleotides. DNase I footprinting analysis revealed that the spacer length did not affect the binding of cAMP-CRP to the CRP site. The effect of the spacer length on transcription activation by cAMP-CRP was tested in vivo by beta-galactosidase and quantitative S1 assays with crp+ and delta crp cells harboring plasmids. Insertions or deletions of non-integral helical turns, which displace the CRP site onto the opposite face of DNA helix compared to the original promoter, eliminated completely the activation of transcription. In contrast, changing the spacer length by integral helical turns allowed the promoter to respond to CRP, although the degree of activation varied with the length of the spacer. We conclude that stereospecific positioning of CRP and RNA polymerase on the DNA helix is strictly required for CRP action. The data support a model that CRP stimulates transcription by directly contacting RNA polymerase. Images PMID:2173826

  5. Polymorphisms of the ELANE Gene Promoter Region in End-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Rafael; Freitas, Bruno; Miranda, Vasco; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients have a high mortality rate that exceeds that of non-ESRD population. The hemodialysis procedure induces neutrophil activation and elastase release, which might have a role in the inflammatory process and in the development of oxidative stress. The ELANE gene encodes the neutrophil elastase. We analyzed the effect of ELANE promoter region polymorphisms and its relation with the circulating levels of elastase, as well as several clinical, biochemical and inflammatory markers in 123 ESRD patients. We found two duplications in heterozygosity in the promoter region and a new polymorphism, the c.-801G>A. ESRD patients heterozygous for the c.-903T>G polymorphism had no changes in the circulating levels of elastase or other evaluated variables, and those homozygous for the c.-741G>A polymorphism showed significant effects on neutrophils count, as well as in neutrophils/lymphocytes ratio, which might be associated with an increased inflammatory process. PMID:27136588

  6. Use of Gene Expression Programming in regionalization of flow duration curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashmi, Muhammad Z.; Shamseldin, Asaad Y.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a recently introduced artificial intelligence technique known as Gene Expression Programming (GEP) has been employed to perform symbolic regression for developing a parametric scheme of flow duration curve (FDC) regionalization, to relate selected FDC characteristics to catchment characteristics. Stream flow records of selected catchments located in the Auckland Region of New Zealand were used. FDCs of the selected catchments were normalised by dividing the ordinates by their median value. Input for the symbolic regression analysis using GEP was (a) selected characteristics of normalised FDCs; and (b) 26 catchment characteristics related to climate, morphology, soil properties and land cover properties obtained using the observed data and GIS analysis. Our study showed that application of this artificial intelligence technique expedites the selection of a set of the most relevant independent variables out of a large set, because these are automatically selected through the GEP process. Values of the FDC characteristics obtained from the developed relationships have high correlations with the observed values.

  7. Five linkage regions each harbor multiple type 2 diabetes genes in the African American subset of the GENNID Study.

    PubMed

    Hasstedt, Sandra J; Highland, Heather M; Elbein, Steven C; Hanis, Craig L; Das, Swapan K

    2013-06-01

    We previously localized type 2 diabetes (T2D)-susceptibility genes to five chromosomal regions through a genome-wide linkage scan of T2D and age of diagnosis (AOD) in the African American subset of the GENNID sample. To follow up these findings, we repeated the linkage and association analysis using genotypes on an additional 9203 fine-mapping single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected to tag genes under the linkage peaks. In each of the five regions, we confirmed linkage and inferred the presence of ≥2 susceptibility genes. The evidence of multiple susceptibility genes consisted of: (1) multiple linkage peaks in four of the five regions; and (2) association of T2D and AOD with SNPs within ≥2 genes in every region. The associated genes included 3 previously reported to associate with T2D or related traits (GRB10, NEDD4L, LIPG) and 24 novel candidate genes, including genes in lipid metabolism (ACOXL) and cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion (MAGI2, CLDN4, CTNNA2). PMID:23552671

  8. Genome-wide association identifies SLC2A9 and NLN gene regions as associated with entropion in domestic sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Entropion is an inward rolling of the eyelid allowing contact between the eyelashes and cornea that may lead to blindness if not corrected. Although many mammalian species, including humans and dogs, are afflicted by congenital entropion, no specific genes or gene regions related to deve...

  9. Gene Expression in Archaea: Studies of Transcriptional Promoters, Messenger RNA Processing, and Five Prime Untranslated Regions in "Methanocaldococcus Jannashchii"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression in Archaea is less understood than those in Bacteria and Eucarya. In general, three steps are involved in gene expression--transcription, RNA processing, and translation. To expand our knowledge of these processes in Archaea, I have studied transcriptional promoters, messenger RNA processing, and 5'-untranslated regions in…

  10. [Analysis of the structure and expression of the cluster of Drosophila melanogaster genes DIP1, CG32500, CG32819, and CG14476 in the flamenco gene region].

    PubMed

    Potapova, M V; Nefedova, L N; Kim, A I

    2009-10-01

    The flamenco gene controlling transpositions of the gypsy retrovirus is localized in the 20A1-3 region, in which eight open reading frames organized in a cluster were discovered: DIP1, three repeats of CG32500 and CG32819, and CG14476. Analysis of the genes composing the cluster indicates that their transcription in Drosophila melanogaster is a stage-specific process. Comparison of the expression of these genes in the strains OreR, SS, and MS having the flamenco phenotype and in the strain 413 having the flamenco+ phenotype revealed differences only for the DIP1 gene, transcription of this gene being altered only in the OreR strain. Thus, mutant flamenco alleles are differently expressed in different strains. The structural organization of the flamenco gene region was studied in different Drosophila species: D. sechellia, D. simulans, D. mauritiana, D. yakuba, D. erecta, D. virilis, D. ananassae, D. grimshawi, and D. pseudoobscura. The genes of the cluster were found to be highly conserved in genomes of different species, but in none of them, except D. sechellia, the structural organization of the region repeats the structure of the D. melanogaster cluster. PMID:19947543

  11. Prioritization of candidate genes in “QTL-hotspot” region for drought tolerance in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Sandip M; Jaganathan, Deepa; Ruperao, Pradeep; Chen, Charles; Punna, Ramu; Kudapa, Himabindu; Thudi, Mahendar; Roorkiwal, Manish; Katta, Mohan AVSK; Doddamani, Dadakhalandar; Garg, Vanika; Kishor, P B Kavi; Gaur, Pooran M; Nguyen, Henry T; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David; Sutton, Tim; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2015-01-01

    A combination of two approaches, namely QTL analysis and gene enrichment analysis were used to identify candidate genes in the “QTL-hotspot” region for drought tolerance present on the Ca4 pseudomolecule in chickpea. In the first approach, a high-density bin map was developed using 53,223 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in the recombinant inbred line (RIL) population of ICC 4958 (drought tolerant) and ICC 1882 (drought sensitive) cross. QTL analysis using recombination bins as markers along with the phenotyping data for 17 drought tolerance related traits obtained over 1–5 seasons and 1–5 locations split the “QTL-hotspot” region into two subregions namely “QTL-hotspot_a” (15 genes) and “QTL-hotspot_b” (11 genes). In the second approach, gene enrichment analysis using significant marker trait associations based on SNPs from the Ca4 pseudomolecule with the above mentioned phenotyping data, and the candidate genes from the refined “QTL-hotspot” region showed enrichment for 23 genes. Twelve genes were found common in both approaches. Functional validation using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) indicated four promising candidate genes having functional implications on the effect of “QTL-hotspot” for drought tolerance in chickpea. PMID:26478518

  12. Prioritization of candidate genes in "QTL-hotspot" region for drought tolerance in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Kale, Sandip M; Jaganathan, Deepa; Ruperao, Pradeep; Chen, Charles; Punna, Ramu; Kudapa, Himabindu; Thudi, Mahendar; Roorkiwal, Manish; Katta, Mohan A V S K; Doddamani, Dadakhalandar; Garg, Vanika; Kishor, P B Kavi; Gaur, Pooran M; Nguyen, Henry T; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David; Sutton, Tim; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2015-01-01

    A combination of two approaches, namely QTL analysis and gene enrichment analysis were used to identify candidate genes in the "QTL-hotspot" region for drought tolerance present on the Ca4 pseudomolecule in chickpea. In the first approach, a high-density bin map was developed using 53,223 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in the recombinant inbred line (RIL) population of ICC 4958 (drought tolerant) and ICC 1882 (drought sensitive) cross. QTL analysis using recombination bins as markers along with the phenotyping data for 17 drought tolerance related traits obtained over 1-5 seasons and 1-5 locations split the "QTL-hotspot" region into two subregions namely "QTL-hotspot_a" (15 genes) and "QTL-hotspot_b" (11 genes). In the second approach, gene enrichment analysis using significant marker trait associations based on SNPs from the Ca4 pseudomolecule with the above mentioned phenotyping data, and the candidate genes from the refined "QTL-hotspot" region showed enrichment for 23 genes. Twelve genes were found common in both approaches. Functional validation using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) indicated four promising candidate genes having functional implications on the effect of "QTL-hotspot" for drought tolerance in chickpea. PMID:26478518

  13. Xenopus tropicalis nodal-related gene 3 regulates BMP signaling: an essential role for the pro-region.

    PubMed

    Haramoto, Yoshikazu; Tanegashima, Kousuke; Onuma, Yasuko; Takahashi, Shuji; Sekizaki, Hiroyuki; Asashima, Makoto

    2004-01-01

    In vertebrates, nodal-related genes are crucial for specifying mesendodermal cell fates. Six nodal-related genes have been identified in Xenopus, but only one, nodal, has been identified in the mouse. The Xenopus nodal-related gene 3 (Xnr3), however, lacks the mesoderm-inducing activity of the other five nodal-related genes in Xenopus, and can directly induce neural tissue in animal caps by antagonizing BMP signals. In this study, we isolated three clones of the Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis nodal-related gene 3 (Xtnr3) and analyzed their function. The Xtnr3 genes show high homology to Xnr3 and have the same activity. Southern blot and genomic PCR analyses indicate that the X. tropicalis genome has duplications in the Xtnr3 gene sequences and our three clones represent separate gene loci. We also found a partial clone of Xtnr3 that coded for the N-terminal part of its pro-region. Surprisingly, this sequence also induced neural tissue by antagonizing BMP signals, and its coded protein physically associated with BMP4 mature protein. Furthermore, we showed that the pro-region of Xnr5 has the same activity. Together, these findings indicate that the pro-region of nodal-related genes acts antagonistically towards BMP signals, which identifies a novel mechanism for the inhibition of BMP signaling. PMID:14697360

  14. Molecular authentication of Radix Puerariae Lobatae and Radix Puerariae Thomsonii by ITS and 5S rRNA spacer sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ye; Shaw, Pang-Chui; Fung, Kwok-Pui

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, we examined nuclear DNA sequences in an attempt to reveal the relationships between Pueraria lobata (Willd). Ohwi, P. thomsonii Benth., and P. montana (Lour.) Merr. We found that internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA are highly divergent in P. lobata and P. thomsonii, and four types of ITS with different length are found in the two species. On the other hand, DNA sequences of 5S rRNA gene spacer are highly conserved across multiple copies in P. lobata and P. thomsonii, they could be used to identify P. lobata, P. thomsonii, and P. montana of this complex, and may serve as a useful tool in medical authentication of Radix Puerariae Lobatae and Radix Puerariae Thomsonii. PMID:17202681

  15. Characterization of ISR region and development of a PCR assay for rapid detection of the fish pathogen Tenacibaculum soleae.

    PubMed

    López, Jose R; Hamman-Khalifa, Abdel M; Navas, José I; de la Herran, Roberto

    2011-11-01

    The aims of this work were to characterize the 16S-23S internal spacer region of the fish pathogen Tenacibaculum soleae and to develop a PCR assay for its identification and detection. All T. soleae strains tested displayed a single internal spacer region class, containing tRNA(I) (le) and tRNA(A) (la) genes; nevertheless, a considerable intraspecific heterogeneity was observed. However, this region proved to be useful for differentiation of T. soleae from related and non-related species. Species-specific primers were designed targeting the 16S rRNA gene and the internal spacer region region, yielding a 1555-bp fragment. Detection limit was of 1 pg DNA per reaction (< 30 bacterial cells) when using pure cultures. The detection level in the presence of DNA from fish or other bacteria was lower; however, 10 pg were detected at a target/background ratio of 1 : 10(5) . The PCR assay proved to be more sensitive than agar cultivation for the detection of T. soleae from naturally diseased fish, offering a useful tool for diagnosis and for understanding the epidemiology of this pathogen. PMID:22092820

  16. Stability or variation? Patterns of lactase gene and its enhancer region distributions in Brazilian Amerindians.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Deise C; Callegari-Jacques, Sidia M; Petzl-Erler, M Luiza; Tsuneto, Luiza; Salzano, Francisco M; Hutz, Mara H

    2012-03-01

    Lactase persistence (LP) is the phenotypic trait in which lactase secretion is maintained during adulthood. LP is due to mutations in the LCT enhancer region, located 14-kb upstream of the gene. In Europeans, the -13910*T allele is associated with LP. In Africans this allele is rare while other mutations in this same region were related to LP. The LCT is highly polymorphic in human populations, but so far Brazilian Amerindians had not been investigated for these polymorphisms or for the presence of LP mutations. We describe the genetic diversity of the LCT region and the presence of LP enhancer mutations in four native Brazilian populations (Guarani-Kaiowá, Guarani-Ñandeva, Kaingang, and Xavante). Twelve polymorphisms were genotyped by PCR-based methods. The -13910*T allele varied from 0.5% in the Xavante to 7.6% in the Guarani-Ñandeva. These frequencies probably derive from European sources and they correlate with non-native admixture proportions previously estimated for these groups. But since admixture is virtually absent in the Xavante, we suggest that the presence of the LP allele could have been determined by a de novo mutation. No other mutations in the -14 kb enhancer region were found. The LCT was highly polymorphic in the present sample showing 15 haplotypes with a heterogeneous distribution among the four Amerindian populations. This diversity could be due to drift, as indicated by the neutrality test performed. PMID:22271590

  17. Rapid detection and sequencing of alleles in the 3' flanking region of the interleukin-6 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Bowcock, A M; Ray, A; Erlich, H; Sehgal, P B

    1989-01-01

    The 3' flanking region of the interleukin 6 gene is polymorphic due to insertions of different size. Within this region lies a sequence of approximately 500 base pairs that is AT rich. Based on flanking sequence information we have constructed oligonucleotides which prime the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and amplify this AT rich region. The amplification products visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis gave fragment sizes for both homozygous and heterozygous individuals that were concordant with those observed by conventional genomic blotting techniques. Alleles that could not be typed by Southern analysis were resolved with this approach. These results illustrate the value of PCR for the rapid detection of length polymorphisms such as those due to variable numbers of tandem repeats. In contrast to RFLP analysis this procedure takes less than a day to perform, is cheaper, avoids the use of radioactivity and requires far less substrate DNA. Three different human alleles were sequenced, and differences were detected that were due to both large duplications and loss of one or two bases, suggesting that AT rich regions identify highly polymorphic loci. The same primers also amplified non-human primate DNA, allowing a comparison of the human sequence with that of the common chimpanzee and baboon. Images PMID:2789373

  18. [DNA bend sites in the promoter region of the human estrogen receptor alpha gene].

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, K; Sakuma, Y

    1998-12-01

    DNA bend sites in the promoter region of the human estrogen receptor a gene were determined by the circular permutation assay. Among a total of five sites (ERB -4 to -1, and ERB + 1) mapped in the 3 kb region, three matched with the positions of the predicted periodicity while the other two did not. Most of the sites were accompanied by the short poly (dA)-poly (dT) tracts including the potential bend core sequence A2N8A2N8A2 (A/A/A). Fine mapping of the ERB-2 site indicated that this A/A/A and the immediate franking sequences contained motifs for the estrogen response element. This region had a higher affinity for the nuclear scaffold and was included in the core region of the nucleosome structure. However, binding of the nuclear factor(s) to the motifs and disruption of nucleosome structure occurred without ATP. These results suggest that a class of periodic bent DNA could act as a site of multiple interactions among the nuclear scaffold, core histones and nuclear factors. PMID:9893449

  19. Effects of spacer length and terminal group on the crystallization and morphology of biscarbamates: a longer spacer does not reduce the melting temperature.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mostofa Kamal; Sundararajan, Pudupadi R

    2013-05-01

    The effects of alkyl side chain and spacer lengths and the type of terminal group on the morphology and crystallization of a homologous series of biscarbamates (model compounds for polyurethanes) were investigated. Biscarbamates were synthesized with alkyl side chains of various lengths ranging from C4 to C18 and an alkyl spacer group with 12 CH2 units (C12 spacer) between the two hydrogen bonding motifs. The crystallization and morphological features are compared with the previously studied biscarbamates with a C6 spacer. As a token example, we also studied a biscarbamate molecule in which the terminal methyl group was replaced by a phenyl group. We stress four important conclusions of the study: (1) A number of studies in the literature found that the longer alkyl spacers reduced the thermal transition temperatures of the molecules, and such behavior was attributed to an increase in the flexibility of the alkyl spacer. However, the results of the present study are to the contrary. With the biscarbamates studied here, the hydrogen-bonding groups on both sides of the C12 spacer act as "anchors", and the longer spacer does not reduce the melting temperatures compared with those with the C6 spacer. (2) The melt viscosity measurements show shear-thinning behavior, which has been mostly observed with polysaccharides and hydrogen-bonded polymers. (3) Avrami analysis shows a two-stage crystallization, which is not commonly observed in organic small molecule systems. (4) The phenyl end group does not add another self-assembly code in terms of π-stacking but acts as a defect. While formation of crystals was observed for biscarbamates with short alkyl side chains with a C6 spacer, an increase in spacer length to C12 induces spherulitic morphology. Although the overall sizes of the spherulites are the same for both spacers, the rate of spherulite growth was higher and the crystallization rate was lower with the C12 spacer compared with the C6 spacer. In contrast with the

  20. Transcriptome sequencing of purple petal spot region in tree peony reveals differentially expressed anthocyanin structural genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanzhao; Cheng, Yanwei; Ya, Huiyuan; Xu, Shuzhen; Han, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    The pigmented cells in defined region of a petal constitute the petal spots. Petal spots attract pollinators and are found in many angiosperm families. Several cultivars of tree peony contain a single red or purple spot at the base of petal that makes the flower more attractive for the ornamental market. So far, the understanding of the molecular mechanism of spot formation is inadequate. In this study, we sequenced the transcriptome of the purple spot and the white non-spot of tree peony flower. We assembled and annotated 67,892 unigenes. Comparative analyses of the two transcriptomes showed 1,573 differentially expressed genes, among which 933 were up-regulated, and 640 were down-regulated in the purple spot. Subsequently, we examined four anthocyanin structural genes, including PsCHS, PsF3′H, PsDFR, and PsANS, which expressed at a significantly higher level in the purple spot than in the white non-spot. We further validated the digital expression data using quantitative real-time PCR. Our result uncovered transcriptome variance between the spot and non-spot of tree peony flower, and revealed that the co-expression of four anthocyanin structural genes was responsible for spot pigment in tree peony. The data will further help to unravel the genetic mechanism of peony flower spot formation. PMID:26583029

  1. Comparative genomics of Lupinus angustifolius gene-rich regions: BAC library exploration, genetic mapping and cytogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The narrow-leafed lupin, Lupinus angustifolius L., is a grain legume species with a relatively compact genome. The species has 2n = 40 chromosomes and its genome size is 960 Mbp/1C. During the last decade, L. angustifolius genomic studies have achieved several milestones, such as molecular-marker development, linkage maps, and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries. Here, these resources were integratively used to identify and sequence two gene-rich regions (GRRs) of the genome. Results The genome was screened with a probe representing the sequence of a microsatellite fragment length polymorphism (MFLP) marker linked to Phomopsis stem blight resistance. BAC clones selected by hybridization were subjected to restriction fingerprinting and contig assembly, and 232 BAC-ends were sequenced and annotated. BAC fluorescence in situ hybridization (BAC-FISH) identified eight single-locus clones. Based on physical mapping, cytogenetic localization, and BAC-end annotation, five clones were chosen for sequencing. Within the sequences of clones that hybridized in FISH to a single-locus, two large GRRs were identified. The GRRs showed strong and conserved synteny to Glycine max duplicated genome regions, illustrated by both identical gene order and parallel orientation. In contrast, in the clones with dispersed FISH signals, more than one-third of sequences were transposable elements. Sequenced, single-locus clones were used to develop 12 genetic markers, increasing the number of L. angustifolius chromosomes linked to appropriate linkage groups by five pairs. Conclusions In general, probes originating from MFLP sequences can assist genome screening and gene discovery. However, such probes are not useful for positional cloning, because they tend to hybridize to numerous loci. GRRs identified in L. angustifolius contained a low number of interspersed repeats and had a high level of synteny to the genome of the model legume G. max. Our results showed that

  2. Association between VNTR Polymorphism in Promoter Region of Prodynorphin (PDYN) Gene and Methamphetamine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Saify, Khyber; Saadat, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Prodynorphin (PDYN; OMIM: 131340) is the precursor of the dynorphin related peptides which plays an important role in drug abuse. Previous studies have been shown that the expression of PDYN is regulated by a genetic polymorphism of VNTR in the promoter region of the gene. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The present case-control study was performed on 52 (41 males, 11 females) methamphetamine dependence patients and 635 (525 males, 110 females) healthy blood donors frequency matched with the patients according to age and gender, as a control group was participated in the study. RESULTS: The genotypes of VNTR PDYN polymorphism were determined using PCR method. The HL (OR = 1.22, 95%CI: 0.67-2.20, P = 0.500) and LL (OR = 0.86, 95%CI: 0.28-2.57, P = 0.792) genotypes does not alter the risk of methamphetamine dependence, in comparison with the HH genotypes. CONCLUSION: The present study revealed no association between the VNTR polymorphism in the promoter region of the PDYN gene and methamphetamine dependence risk.

  3. Characterization of the recA gene regions of Spiroplasma citri and Spiroplasma melliferum.

    PubMed Central

    Marais, A; Bove, J M; Renaudin, J

    1996-01-01

    In previous studies (A. Marais, J. M. Bove, and J. Renaudin, J. Bacteriol. 178:862-870, 1996), we have shown that the recA gene of Spiroplasma citri R8A2 was restricted to the first 390 nucleotides of the N-terminal part. PCR amplification and sequencing studies of five additional strains of S. citri have revealed that these strains had the same organization at the recA region as the R8A2 strain. In contrast to S. citri, Spiroplasma melliferum was found to contain a full-length recA gene. However, in all five S. melliferum strains tested, a TAA stop codon was found within the N-terminal region of the recA reading frame. Our results suggest that S. melliferum, as well as S. citri, is RecA deficient. In agreement with the recA mutant genotype of S. citri and S. melliferum, we have shown that these organisms are highly sensitive to UV irradiation. PMID:8955327

  4. A cosmid contig and high resolution restriction map of the 2 megabase region containing the Huntington's disease gene.

    PubMed

    Baxendale, S; MacDonald, M E; Mott, R; Francis, F; Lin, C; Kirby, S F; James, M; Zehetner, G; Hummerich, H; Valdes, J

    1993-06-01

    The quest for the mutation responsible for Huntington's disease (HD) has required an exceptionally detailed analysis of a large part of 4p16.3 by molecular genetic techniques, making this stretch of 2.2 megabases one of the best characterized regions of the human genome. Here we describe the construction of a cosmid and P1 clone contig spanning the region containing the HD gene, and the establishment of a detailed, high resolution restriction map. This ordered clone library has allowed the identification of several genes from the region, and has played a vital role in the recent identification of the Huntington's disease gene. The restriction map provides the framework for the detailed analysis of a region extremely rich in coding sequences. This study also exemplifies many of the strategies to be used in the analysis of larger regions of the human genome. PMID:8348156

  5. Apparent gene conversions involving the SMN gene in the region of the spinal muscular atrophy locus on chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    Steege, G. van der; Grootscholten, P.M.; Cobben, J.M.; Scheffer, H.; Buys, C.H.C.M.

    1996-10-01

    The survival motor neuron (SMN) gene has been described as a determining gene for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). SMN has a closely flanking, nearly identical copy ({sup C}BCD541). Gene and copy gene can be discriminated by sequence differences in exons 7 and 8. The large majority of SMA patients show homozygous deletions of at least exons 7 and 8 of the SMN gene. A minority of patients show absence of SMN exon 7 but retention of exon 8. This is explained by results of our present analysis of 13 such patients providing evidence for apparent gene-conversion events between SMN and the centromeric copy gene. Instead of applying a separate analysis for absence or presence of SMN exons 7 and 8, we used a contiguous PCR from intron 6 to exon 8. In every case we found a chimeric gene with a fusion of exon 7 of the copy gene and exon 8 of SMN and absence of a normal SMN gene. Similar events, including the fusion counterpart, were observed in a group of controls, although in the presence of a normal SMN gene. Chimeric genes as the result of fusions of parts of SMN and {sup C}BCD541 apparently are far from rare and may partly explain the frequently observed SMN deletions in SMA patients. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Role of spacer lengths of gemini surfactants in the synthesis of silver nanorods in micellar media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Santanu; Biswas, Joydeep

    2011-07-01

    In this work, we have prepared Ag-nanorods using biscationic gemini surfactant micelles as the media by a seed-mediated wet synthesis method. Towards this end, we first synthesized Ag-nanoseeds of diameter ~7 nm stabilized by trisodium citrate (as the capping agent). Then these Ag-nanoseeds were used to synthesize Ag-nanorods of different aspect ratios. With decreasing Ag-nanoseed concentration, the aspect ratios of the Ag-nanorods stabilized by these gemini surfactants increased gradually. Various Ag-nanoseeds and Ag-nanospecies were characterized using UV-Vis spectroscopy (to know the surface plasmon bands), transmission electron microscopy (to find out their particle sizes and distribution), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. When we used micelles derived from gemini surfactants of shorter spacer -(CH2)n- (n = 2 or 4) to stabilize the Ag-nanorods, the λmax of the longitudinal band shifted more towards the blue region compared to that of the gemini surfactant micelles with a longer spacer -(CH2)n- (n = 5, 12) at a given amount of the Ag-nanoseed solution. So, the growth of Ag-nanorods in the gemini micellar solutions depends on the spacer-chain length of gemini surfactants employed.In this work, we have prepared Ag-nanorods using biscationic gemini surfactant micelles as the media by a seed-mediated wet synthesis method. Towards this end, we first synthesized Ag-nanoseeds of diameter ~7 nm stabilized by trisodium citrate (as the capping agent). Then these Ag-nanoseeds were used to synthesize Ag-nanorods of different aspect ratios. With decreasing Ag-nanoseed concentration, the aspect ratios of the Ag-nanorods stabilized by these gemini surfactants increased gradually. Various Ag-nanoseeds and Ag-nanospecies were characterized using UV-Vis spectroscopy (to know the surface plasmon bands), transmission electron microscopy (to find out their particle sizes and distribution), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. When

  7. Origin and relationships of Saintpaulia (Gesneriaceae) based on ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences.

    PubMed

    Moller, M; Cronk, Q

    1997-07-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of eight species of Saintpaulia H. Wendl., 19 species of Streptocarpus Lindl. (representing all major growth forms within the genus), and two outgroups (Haberlea rhodopensis Friv., Chirita spadiciformis W. T. Wang) were examined using comparative nucleotide sequences from the two internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA. The length of the ITS 1 region ranged from 228 to 249 base pairs (bp) and the ITS 2 region from 196 to 245 bp. Pairwise sequence divergence across both spacers for ingroup and outgroup species ranged from 0 to 29%. Streptocarpus is not monophyletic, and Saintpaulia is nested within Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpella. Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpus is monophyletic. The ITS sequence data demonstrate that the unifoliate Streptocarpus species form a clade, and are also characterized by a unique 47-bp deletion in ITS 2. The results strongly support the monophyly of (1) Saintpaulia, and (2) Saintpaulia plus the African members of the subgenus Streptocarpella of Streptocarpus. The data suggest the evolution of Saintpaulia from Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpella. The differences in flower and vegetative characters are probably due to ecological adaptation leading to a relatively rapid radiation of Saintpaulia. PMID:21708650

  8. The internal transcribed spacer 2 exhibits a common secondary structure in green algae and flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Mai, J C; Coleman, A W

    1997-03-01

    Sequences of the Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (ITS-2) regions of the nuclear rDNA repeats from 111 organisms of the family Volvocaceae (Chlorophyta) and unicellular organisms of the Volvocales, including Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, were determined. The use of thermodynamic energy optimization to generate secondary structures and phylogenetic comparative analysis of the spacer regions revealed a common secondary structure that is conserved despite wide intra- and interfamilial primary sequence divergence. The existence of this conserved higher-order structure is supported by the presence of numerous compensating basepair changes as well as by an evolutionary history of insertions and deletions that nevertheless maintains major aspects of the overall structure. Furthermore, this general structure is preserved across broad phylogenetic lines, as it is observed in the ITS-2s of other chlorophytes, including flowering plants; previous reports of common ITS-2 secondary structures in other eukaryotes were restricted to the order level. The reported ITS-2 structure possesses important conserved structural motifs which may help to mediate cleavages in the ITS-2 that occur during rRNA transcript processing. Their recognition can guide further studies of eukaryotic rRNA processing, and their application to sequence alignments may contribute significantly to the value of ITS-2 sequences in phylogenetic analyses at several taxonomic levels, but particularly in characterizing populations and species. PMID:9060392

  9. Effects of dual-spacer dielectrics on low-power and high-speed performance of sub-10 nm tunneling field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Young Jun; Seo, Jae Hwa; Cho, Seongjae; Kwon, Hyuck-In; Lee, Jung-Hee; Kang, In Man

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose and investigate a dual-spacer dielectric structure for realizing a sub-10 nm tunneling field-effect transistors (TFET) with excellent low-power (LP) and switching performance. The effects of the dual-spacer dielectric were assessed by analyzing the direct current (DC) and radio frequency (RF) performance of the GaAs0.5Sb0.5/In0.53Ga0.47As heterojunction-based short channel TFETs. The dual-spacer dielectric that consists of hafnium oxide (HfO2) and silicon dioxide (SiO2) raises an energy-band on drain-side because of the fringe field induced by the high-k spacer dielectric HfO2. The raised energy-band suppresses direct band-to-band tunneling (BBT) through the channel region and drain-induced barrier thinning (DIBT) phenomenon with improvement in the off-state current (I off) and subthreshold swing (S). The dual-spacer dielectric also influences total gate capacitance (C gg) because the HfO2 in the dual-spacer dielectric increases out-fringe capacitance (C of) in gate-to-drain capacitance (C gd). Although the proposed TFET has a high C gd, the optimized TFET with the HfO2 length (L dual-spacer) of 30 nm achieves a lower intrinsic delay time (τ), a higher cut-off frequency (f T), and a higher maximum oscillation frequency (f max) owing to higher current performance and smaller gate-to-source capacitance (C gs).

  10. Hypomethylation within gene promoter regions and type 1 diabetes in discordant monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Elboudwarej, Emon; Cole, Michael; Briggs, Farren B S; Fouts, Alexandra; Fain, Pamela R; Quach, Hong; Quach, Diana; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Criswell, Lindsey A; Lane, Julie A; Steck, Andrea K; Barcellos, Lisa F; Noble, Janelle A

    2016-04-01

    Genetic susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D) is well supported by epidemiologic evidence; however, disease risk cannot be entirely explained by established genetic variants identified so far. This study addresses the question of whether epigenetic modification of the inherited DNA sequence may contribute to T1D susceptibility. Using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array (450k), a total of seven long-term disease-discordant monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs and five pairs of HLA-identical, disease-discordant non-twin siblings (NTS) were examined for associations between DNA methylation (DNAm) and T1D. Strong evidence for global hypomethylation of CpG sites within promoter regions in MZ twins with TID compared to twins without T1D was observed. DNA methylation data were then grouped into three categories of CpG sites for further analysis, including those within: 1) the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, 2) non-MHC genes with reported T1D association through genome wide association studies (GWAS), and 3) the epigenome, or remainder of sites that did not include MHC and T1D associated genes. Initial results showed modest methylation differences between discordant MZ twins for the MHC region and T1D-associated CpG sites, BACH2, INS-IGF2, and CLEC16A (DNAm difference range: 2.2%-5.0%). In the epigenome CpG set, the greatest methylation differences were observed in MAGI2, FANCC, and PCDHB16, (DNAm difference range: 6.9%-16.1%). These findings were not observed in the HLA-identical NTS pairs. Targeted pyrosequencing of five candidate CpG loci identified using the 450k array in the original discordant MZ twins produced similar results using control DNA samples, indicating strong agreement between the two DNA methylation profiling platforms. However, findings for the top five candidate CpG loci were not replicated in six additional T1D-discordant MZ twin pairs. Our results indicate global DNA hypomethylation within gene promoter regions may contribute to T

  11. Influenza NA and PB1 Gene Segments Interact during the Formation of Viral Progeny: Localization of the Binding Region within the PB1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Gilbertson, Brad; Zheng, Tian; Gerber, Marie; Printz-Schweigert, Anne; Ong, Chi; Marquet, Roland; Isel, Catherine; Rockman, Steven; Brown, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    The influenza A virus genome comprises eight negative-sense viral RNAs (vRNAs) that form individual ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes. In order to incorporate a complete set of each of these vRNAs, the virus uses a selective packaging mechanism that facilitates co-packaging of specific gene segments but whose molecular basis is still not fully understood. Recently, we used a competitive transfection model where plasmids encoding the A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) and A/Udorn/307/72 (Udorn) PB1 gene segments were competed to show that the Udorn PB1 gene segment is preferentially co-packaged into progeny virions with the Udorn NA gene segment. Here we created chimeric PB1 genes combining both Udorn and PR8 PB1 sequences to further define the location within the Udorn PB1 gene that drives co-segregation of these genes and show that nucleotides 1776-2070 of the PB1 gene are crucial for preferential selection. In vitro assays examining specific interactions between Udorn NA vRNA and purified vRNAs transcribed from chimeric PB1 genes also supported the importance of this region in the PB1-NA interaction. Hence, this work identifies an association between viral genes that are co-selected during packaging. It also reveals a region potentially important in the RNP-RNP interactions within the supramolecular complex that is predicted to form prior to budding to allow one of each segment to be packaged in the viral progeny. Our study lays the foundation to understand the co-selection of specific genes, which may be critical to the emergence of new viruses with pandemic potential. PMID:27556479

  12. Influenza NA and PB1 Gene Segments Interact during the Formation of Viral Progeny: Localization of the Binding Region within the PB1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Gilbertson, Brad; Zheng, Tian; Gerber, Marie; Printz-Schweigert, Anne; Ong, Chi; Marquet, Roland; Isel, Catherine; Rockman, Steven; Brown, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    The influenza A virus genome comprises eight negative-sense viral RNAs (vRNAs) that form individual ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes. In order to incorporate a complete set of each of these vRNAs, the virus uses a selective packaging mechanism that facilitates co-packaging of specific gene segments but whose molecular basis is still not fully understood. Recently, we used a competitive transfection model where plasmids encoding the A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) and A/Udorn/307/72 (Udorn) PB1 gene segments were competed to show that the Udorn PB1 gene segment is preferentially co-packaged into progeny virions with the Udorn NA gene segment. Here we created chimeric PB1 genes combining both Udorn and PR8 PB1 sequences to further define the location within the Udorn PB1 gene that drives co-segregation of these genes and show that nucleotides 1776–2070 of the PB1 gene are crucial for preferential selection. In vitro assays examining specific interactions between Udorn NA vRNA and purified vRNAs transcribed from chimeric PB1 genes also supported the importance of this region in the PB1-NA interaction. Hence, this work identifies an association between viral genes that are co-selected during packaging. It also reveals a region potentially important in the RNP-RNP interactions within the supramolecular complex that is predicted to form prior to budding to allow one of each segment to be packaged in the viral progeny. Our study lays the foundation to understand the co-selection of specific genes, which may be critical to the emergence of new viruses with pandemic potential. PMID:27556479

  13. The Borrelia burgdorferi flaB promoter has an extended -10 element and includes a T-rich -35/-10 spacer sequence that is essential for optimal activity

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Aarti; Hathaway, Marianne; Ramamoorthy, Ramesh

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the functional elements of the flaB promoter of Borrelia burgdorferi. Promoter function was examined in a high-passage variant of strain JD1 using a set of 5′ deletions and mutations within the flaB promoter. Expression from the modified flaB promoters was assayed using the gene for green fluorescent protein (gfp) as a reporter. Although the -35 element of the promoter stimulated promoter activity, its disruption did not negate expression. Sequence upstream of the -35 had no effect on expression. The -35/-10 spacer region composed of a T-rich sequence was critical for optimal promoter function. Surprisingly, a Cytosine at the -13 site was found to be more favorable for transcription compared to a Guanosine at the same site. Based on these results and other characteristics, we propose that the B. burgdorferi flaB promoter is an example of an extended -10 promoter. Further, the T-rich spacer is a key element of the flaB promoter that contributes to the abundance of the flagellar core protein in Borrelia species. PMID:19260969

  14. Establishment and optimization of a regionally applicable maize gene-flow model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ning; Hu, Jichao; Jiang, Xiaodong; Lu, Zongzhi; Peng, Yufa; Chen, Wanlong; Yao, Kemin; Zhang, Ming; Jia, Shirong; Pei, Xinwu; Luo, Weihong

    2014-10-01

    Because of the rapid development of transgenic maize, the potential effect of transgene flow on seed purity has become a major concern in public and scientific communities. Setting a proper isolation distance in field experiments and seed production is a possible solution to meet seed-quality standards and ensure adventitious contamination of products is below a specific threshold. By using a Gaussian plume model as basis and data recorded by meteorological stations as input, we have established a simple regionally applicable maize gene-flow model for prediction of the maximum threshold distances (MTD) at which gene-flow frequency is equal to or lower than a threshold value of 1 or 0.1 % (MTD1%, MTD0.1%). After optimization of the model variables, simulated outcrossing rate was a good fit to data obtained from field experiments (y = 1.156x, R (2) = 0.8913, n = 30, P < P 0.01). In the process of model calibration, it was found that only 15.82 % of the total amount of the pollen released by each plant participated in the dispersal process. The variable "a" for genetic pollen competitiveness between donor and recipient was introduced into our model, for the "Zinuo18" and "Su608" used, "a" was 17.47. Finally, the model was successfully used in the spring maize-growing region of Northeast China. The range of MTD1% and MTD0.1% in this region varied from 10 m to 49 m and from 17 m to 125 m, respectively. PMID:24962816

  15. Detailed gene copy number and RNA expression analysis of the 17q12-23 region in primary breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Willis, Simon; Hutchins, Anne-Marie; Hammet, Fleur; Ciciulla, John; Soo, Wee-Kheng; White, David; van der Spek, Peter; Henderson, Michael A; Gish, Kurt; Venter, Deon J; Armes, Jane E

    2003-04-01

    Chromosome region 17q12-23 commonly shows an increase in DNA copy number in breast cancers, suggesting that several oncogenes are located at this site. We performed a high-resolution expression array and comparative genomic hybridization analysis of genes mapped to the entire 17q12-23 region, to identify novel candidate oncogenes. We identified 24 genes that showed significant overexpression in breast cancers with gain of 17q12-23, compared to cancers without gain. These genes included previously identified oncogenes, together with several novel candidate oncogenes. FISH analysis using specific gene probes hybridized to tissue arrays confirmed the underlying amplification of overexpressed genes. This high-resolution analysis of the 17q12-23 region indicates that several established and novel candidate oncogenes, including a Wnt-signaling pathway member, are amplified and overexpressed within individual primary breast cancer samples. We were also able to confirm the presence of two apparently separate and reciprocally amplified groups of genes within this region. Investigation of these genes and their functional interactions will facilitate our understanding of breast oncogenesis and optimal management of this disease. PMID:12619162

  16. Computational and biological analysis of 680 kb of DNA sequence from the human 5q31 cytokine gene cluster region.

    PubMed

    Frazer, K A; Ueda, Y; Zhu, Y; Gifford, V R; Garofalo, M R; Mohandas, N; Martin, C H; Palazzolo, M J; Cheng, J F; Rubin, E M

    1997-05-01

    With the human genome project advancing into what will be a 7- to 10-year DNA sequencing phase, we are presented with the challenge of developing strategies to convert genomic sequence data, as they become available, into biologically meaningful information. We have analyzed 680 kb of noncontiguous DNA sequence from a 1-Mb region of human chromosome 5q31, coupling computational analysis with gene expression studies of tissues isolated from humans as well as from mice containing human YAC transgenes. This genomic interval has been noted previously for containing the cytokine gene cluster and a quantitative trait locus associated with inflammatory diseases. Our analysis identified and verified expression of 16 new genes, as well as 7 previously known genes. Of the total of 23 genes in this region, 78% had similarity matches to sequences in protein databases and 83% had exact expressed sequence tag (EST) database matches. Comparative mapping studies of eight of the new human genes discovered in the 5q31 region revealed that all are located in the syntenic region of mouse chromosome 11q. Our analysis demonstrates an approach for examining human sequence as it is made available from large sequencing programs and has resulted in the discovery of several biomedically important genes, including a cyclin, a transcription factor that is homologous to an oncogene, a protein involved in DNA repair, and several new members of a family of transporter proteins. PMID:9149945

  17. A Novel Mutation in the Promoter Region of the β-Globin Gene: HBB: c.-127G > C.

    PubMed

    Bilgen, Turker; Canatan, Duran; Delibas, Serpil; Keser, Ibrahim

    2016-08-01

    Novel β-globin gene mutations are still occasionally being reported, especially when evaluating milder phenotypes. We report here a novel putative mutation in the promoter region of the β-globin gene and assess its clinical implications. A family, parents and four siblings, with hematological and clinical features suspected of being β-globin gene mutation(s), were involved in this study. In addition to hematological and clinical evaluations of the whole family, molecular analyses of the β-globin gene were performed by direct sequencing. Sequencing of the β-globin gene revealed a novel genomic alteration in the regulatory region of the gene. This novel genomic alteration was defined as HBB: c.-127G > C according to the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) nomenclature. Two siblings were found to be carriers of the HBB: c.-127G > C mutation, while the other two siblings were carriers of the codon 8 (-AA) (HBB: c.25_26delAA) deletion of the β-globin gene. The mother was a compound heterozygote for the codon 8 and HBB: c.-127G > C mutations. Based on hematological and clinical evaluations, we conclude that this novel β-globin gene promoter region change would be associated with a mild phenotype of β-thalassemia (β-thal). PMID:27349616

  18. Differences in Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Producing Escherichia coli Virulence Factor Genes in the Baltic Sea Region

    PubMed Central

    Balode, Arta; Makarova, Mariia; Huik, Kristi; Kõljalg, Siiri; Kaftyreva, Lidia; Miciuleviciene, Jolanta; Naaber, Paul; Rööp, Tiiu; Toompere, Karolin; Suzhaeva, Ludmila; Sepp, Epp

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of different virulence factor (VF) genes in extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli strains isolated from the Baltic Sea region. A total of 432 strains of phenotypically ESBL positive E. coli were collected from 20 institutions located in Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and the region of St. Petersburg in Russia from January to May 2012 and analyzed for phylogenetic group and prevalence of 23 VF genes. The strains were collected from clinical material (urine, blood, wound, and respiratory tract). Bacterial isolates were compared according to phylogenetic group, clinical material, and geographical origin. Most of the VF genes were concentrated within phylogenetic group B2 and/or D. When comparing strains isolated from different countries, it was found that strains originating from Estonia and Latvia belonged mainly to group B2 and strains from Lithuania and Russia mainly to groups B2 and D. The P-fimbrial adhesin gene papEF was more prevalent in Russian strains, colicin gene cvaC in Lithuanian strains, and capsular gene kpsMTII in Latvian strains; serum resistant gene traT was less prevalent in Estonian strains. The regional differences of VF genes remained statistically significant after taking into account the phylogenetic distribution in the countries. PMID:25250320

  19. Differences in extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli virulence factor genes in the Baltic Sea region.

    PubMed

    Lillo, Jana; Pai, Kristiine; Balode, Arta; Makarova, Mariia; Huik, Kristi; Kõljalg, Siiri; Ivanova, Marina; Kaftyreva, Lidia; Miciuleviciene, Jolanta; Naaber, Paul; Parv, Kristel; Pavelkovich, Anastasia; Rööp, Tiiu; Toompere, Karolin; Suzhaeva, Ludmila; Sepp, Epp

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of different virulence factor (VF) genes in extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli strains isolated from the Baltic Sea region. A total of 432 strains of phenotypically ESBL positive E. coli were collected from 20 institutions located in Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and the region of St. Petersburg in Russia from January to May 2012 and analyzed for phylogenetic group and prevalence of 23 VF genes. The strains were collected from clinical material (urine, blood, wound, and respiratory tract). Bacterial isolates were compared according to phylogenetic group, clinical material, and geographical origin. Most of the VF genes were concentrated within phylogenetic group B2 and/or D. When comparing strains isolated from different countries, it was found that strains originating from Estonia and Latvia belonged mainly to group B2 and strains from Lithuania and Russia mainly to groups B2 and D. The P-fimbrial adhesin gene papEF was more prevalent in Russian strains, colicin gene cvaC in Lithuanian strains, and capsular gene kpsMTII in Latvian strains; serum resistant gene traT was less prevalent in Estonian strains. The regional differences of VF genes remained statistically significant after taking into account the phylogenetic distribution in the countries. PMID:25250320

  20. Isolation and sequencing of a putative promoter region of the murine G protein beta 1 subunit (GNB1) gene.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Junichi; Kitanaka, Nobue; Takemura, Motohiko; Wang, Xiao-Bing; Hembree, Cambria M; Goodman, Nancy L; Uhl, George R

    2002-02-01

    The expression of the heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein beta 1 subunit gene (GNB1) is regulated by psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamines. Since the up-regulation appears to be one of the candidate processes of sensitization, it is necessary to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanism of the GNB1 gene regulation for a better understanding the establishment of sensitization. In the present study, we describe the isolation and nucleotide sequence analysis of the GNB1 gene promoter region. We have isolated approximately 10 kb of the 5'-flanking region of the mouse of GNB1 gene and found potential elements involved in putative transcriptional control of the GNB1, such as AP1, AP2, Sp1, cyclic AMP response element, and nuclear factor kappa B recognition sites, within the sequences 0.3 kb upstream from the putative transcription start site. This region was highly rich in G + C content, but lacked TATA or CATT boxes. Comparing the nucleotide sequence of the cDNA clone with the human genome databases using the BLAST program a region containing putative exon 1 and promoter of the human GNB1 gene in chromosome 1 was found. The cloning and sequence analysis of an extensive portion of the 5'-flanking regulatory region of the GNB1 gene provides new insights into the factors involved in the regulation by psychostimulants of GNB1 expression. PMID:12180136

  1. Association between nucleotide substitutions in cytochrome b gene and the control region in human mitochondrial DNA types

    SciTech Connect

    Malyarchuk, B.

    1995-07-01

    Nucleotide sequences of the cytochrome b gene fragment of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) between primers b1 and b2 were determined in eleven eastern Slavs. The group analyzed consisted of samples that differed in hypervariable segment I (HVSI) of the mtDNA control region by one to seven nucleotide substitutions. Three types of the b1 - b2 segment of the cytochrome b gene were registered. A lack of correlation between diversity in the coding (cytochrome b gene) and noncoding (HVSI) regions of mtDNA was shown. Association between substitutions at positions 14905 bp in cytochrome b gene, and also 16126 bp and 16294 bp in the control region of mtDNA, was found. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Regional assignment of the human homebox-containing gene EN1 to chromosome 2q13-q21

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, A.; Muenke, M. ); Logan, C. ); Joyner, A.L. Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Toronto )

    1993-01-01

    The human homeobox-containing genes EN1 and EN2 are closely related to the Drosophila pattern formation gene engrailed (en), which may be important in brain development, as shown by gene expression studies during mouse embryogenesis. Here, we have refined the localization of EN1 to human chromosome 2q13-q21 using a mapping panel of rodent/human cell hybrids containing different regions of chromosome 2 and a lymphoblastoid cell line with an interstitial deletion, del(2) (q21-q23.2). This regional assignment of EN1 increases to 22 the number of currently known genes on human chromosome 2q that have homologs on the proximal region of mouse chromosome 1. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  3. LINKAGE AND RH MAPPING OF 10 GENES TO A QTL REGION FOR FATNESS AND MUSCLING TRAITS ON PIG CHROMOSOME X

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study 10 genes located on human chromosome region Xq13.1 - Xq24 homologous to a QTL region for fatness and body conformation traits were linkage and RH mapped in the pig. PCR primers for amplification of porcine genomic DNAs were designed from orthologous human or porcine (HTR2C) sequences. ...

  4. Retrotransposons in the flanking regions of normal plant genes: a role for copia-like elements in the evolution of gene structure and expression.

    PubMed Central

    White, S E; Habera, L F; Wessler, S R

    1994-01-01

    The wx-K mutation results from the insertion of a copia-like retrotransposon into exon 12 of the maize waxy gene. This retrotransposon, named Hopscotch, has one long open reading frame encoding all of the domains required for transposition. Computer-assisted database searches using Hopscotch and other plant copia-like retroelements as query sequences have revealed that ancient, degenerate retrotransposon insertions are found in close proximity to 21 previously sequenced plant genes. The data suggest that these elements may be involved in gene duplication and the regulation of gene expression. Similar searches using the Drosophila retrotransposon copia did not reveal any retrotransposon-like sequences in the flanking regions of animal genes. These results, together with the recent finding that reverse-transcriptase sequences characteristic of copia-like elements are ubiquitous and diverse in plants, suggest that copia-like retrotransposons are an ancient component of plant genomes. Images PMID:7991537

  5. Functional gene expression differences between inbred alcohol-preferring and —non-prerats in five brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Kimpel, Mark W.; Strother, Wendy N.; McClintick, Jeanette N.; Carr, Lucinda G.; Liang, Tiebing; Edenberg, Howard J.; McBride, William J.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if there are innate differences in gene expression in selected CNS regions between inbred alcohol-preferring (iP) and —non-preferring (iNP) rats. Gene expression was determined in the nucleus accumbens (ACB), amygdala (AMYG), frontal cortex (FC), caudate-putamen (CPU), and hippocampus (HIPP) of alcohol-naïve adult male iP and iNP rats, using Affymetrix Rat Genome U34A microarrays (n = 6/strain). Using Linear Modeling for Microarray Analysis with a false discovery rate threshold of 0.1, there were 16 genes with differential expression in the ACB, 54 in the AMYG, 8 in the FC, 24 in the CPU, and 21 in the HIPP. When examining the main effect of strain across regions, 296 genes were differentially expressed. Although the relatively small number of genes found significant within individual regions precluded a powerful analysis for over-represented Gene Ontology categories, the much larger list resulting from the main effect of strain analysis produced 17 over-represented categories (P <.05), including axon guidance, gliogenesis, negative regulation of programmed cell death, regulation of programmed cell death, regulation of synapse structure function, and transmission of nerve impulse. Co-citation analysis and graphing of significant genes revealed a network involved in the neuropeptide Y (NPY) transmitter system. Correlation of all significant genes with those located within previously established rat alcohol QTLs revealed that of the total of 313 significant genes, 71 are located within such QTLs. The many regional and overall gene expression differences between the iP and iNP rat lines may contribute to the divergent alcohol drinking phenotypes of these rats. PMID:17517326

  6. Male-specific region of the bovine Y chromosome is gene rich with a high transcriptomic activity in testis development.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ti-Cheng; Yang, Yang; Retzel, Ernest F; Liu, Wan-Sheng

    2013-07-23

    The male-specific region of the mammalian Y chromosome (MSY) contains clusters of genes essential for male reproduction. The highly repetitive and degenerative nature of the Y chromosome impedes genomic and transcriptomic characterization. Although the Y chromosome sequence is available for the human, chimpanzee, and macaque, little is known about the annotation and transcriptome of nonprimate MSY. Here, we investigated the transcriptome of the MSY in cattle by direct testis cDNA selection and RNA-seq approaches. The bovine MSY differs radically from the primate Y chromosomes with respect to its structure, gene content, and density. Among the 28 protein-coding genes/families identified on the bovine MSY (12 single- and 16 multicopy genes), 16 are bovid specific. The 1,274 genes identified in this study made the bovine MSY gene density the highest in the genome; in comparison, primate MSYs have only 31-78 genes. Our results, along with the highly transcriptional activities observed from these Y-chromosome genes and 375 additional noncoding RNAs, challenge the widely accepted hypothesis that the MSY is gene poor and transcriptionally inert. The bovine MSY genes are predominantly expressed and are differentially regulated during the testicular development. Synonymous substitution rate analyses of the multicopy MSY genes indicated that two major periods of expansion occurred during the Miocene and Pliocene, contributing to the adaptive radiation of bovids. The massive amplification and vigorous transcription suggest that the MSY serves as a genomic niche regulating male reproduction during bovid expansion. PMID:23842086

  7. Genetic variations in the TERT and CLPTM1L gene region and gastrointestinal stromal tumors risk

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Jian; Xu, Jian; Liu, Fang; Xu, Yongqing; Bu, Xianmin; Dai, Chaoliu; Song, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested polymorphisms in the TERT and CLPTM1L region are associated with carcinogenesis of many distinct cancer types, including gastrointestinal cancers. However, the contribution of polymorphisms in the TERT and CLPTM1L gene region to gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) risk is still unknown. We tested the six tagSNPs on TERT and CLPTM1L region with GIST risk, using a population-based, two-stage, case-control study in 2,000 subjects. Functional validation was conducted to validate our findings of TERT rs2736098 and explore its influence on relative telomere length (RTL) in GIST cells. It showed that variant rs2736098 was significantly associated with increased risk of GIST (per allele OR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.14–1.47, P = 7.03 × 10−5). The difference remain significant after Bonferroni correction (P = 7.03 × 10−5 * 6 = 4.2 × 10−4). Real-time PCR showed carriers of genotype CC have the longest RTL, following by carriers of genotype CT, while carriers of genotype TT have the shortest RTL in GIST tissues (P < 0.001). Our data provide evidence to implicate TERT rs2736098 polymorphism as a novel susceptibility factor for GIST risk. PMID:26372813

  8. Testing for genetic associations in a spina bifida population: analysis of the HOX gene family and human candidate gene regions implicated by mouse models of neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Volcik, K A; Blanton, S H; Kruzel, M C; Townsend, I T; Tyerman, G H; Mier, R J; Northrup, H

    2002-07-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among the most common severely disabling birth defects in the United States, affecting approximately 1-2 of every 1,000 live births. The etiology of NTDs is multifactorial, involving the combined action of both genetic and environmental factors. HOX genes play a central role in establishing the initial body plan by providing positional information along the anterior-posterior body and limb axis and have been implicated in neural tube closure. There are many mouse models that exhibit both naturally occurring NTDs in various mouse strains as well as NTDs that have been created by "knocking out" various genes. A nonparametric linkage method, the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT), was utilized to test the HOX gene family and human equivalents of genes (when known) or the syntenic region in humans to those in mouse models which could play a role in the formation of NTDs. DNA from 459 spina bifida (SB) affected individuals and their parents was tested for linkage and association utilizing polymorphic markers from within or very close to the HOXA, HOXB, HOXC, and HOXD genes as well as from within the genes/gene regions of eight mouse models that exhibit NTDs. No significant findings were obtained for the tested markers. PMID:12116226

  9. SPACER: server for predicting allosteric communication and effects of regulation

    PubMed Central

    Goncearenco, Alexander; Mitternacht, Simon; Yong, Taipang; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Frank; Berezovsky, Igor N.

    2013-01-01

    The SPACER server provides an interactive framework for exploring allosteric communication in proteins with different sizes, degrees of oligomerization and function. SPACER uses recently developed theoretical concepts based on the thermodynamic view of allostery. It proposes easily tractable and meaningful measures that allow users to analyze the effect of ligand binding on the intrinsic protein dynamics. The server shows potential allosteric sites and allows users to explore communication between the regulatory and functional sites. It is possible to explore, for instance, potential effector binding sites in a given structure as targets for allosteric drugs. As input, the server only requires a single structure. The server is freely available at http://allostery.bii.a-star.edu.sg/. PMID:23737445

  10. Flows through sequential orifices with heated spacer reservoirs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Stetz, T. T.

    1982-01-01

    Flow rates and pressure thermal profiles for two phase choked flows of fluid nitrogen were studied theoretically and experimentally in a four sequential orifice configuration. Both theory and experimental evidence demonstrate that heat addition in the first spacer-reservoir adjacent to the inlet orifice is most effective in reducing the flow rate and that heat addition in the last spacer-reservoir is least effective. The flows are choked at the exit orifice for large spacings and at the inlet orifice for small spacings. The moderate addition of heat available for this experiment did not materially alter this result for large spacings; however, significant heat addition for the small spacings tended to shift the choke point to the exit orifice. Nitrogen is used as the working fluid over a range of states from liquid to gas with a reduced inlet stagnation pressure range to P sub r, o = 2.

  11. Structural and functional analysis of the human CD45 gene (PTPRC) upstream region: evidence for a functional promoter within the first intron of the gene

    PubMed Central

    Timón, M; Beverley, P C L

    2001-01-01

    Expression of the leucocyte common antigen (CD45) in mammals is restricted to the nucleated lineages of haematopoietic cells. It appears in early progenitors in the bone marrow and is expressed at the surface of these cells throughout their differentiation. However, at least in T cells, the pattern of expression switches between different isoforms during the successive stages of differentiation in the thymus and after activation in the periphery. In order to understand the mechanisms controlling the transcription of the human CD45 gene, 2·7 kbp of the 5′-flanking region were sequenced and analysed for their ability to direct expression of a reporter gene. The only region with promoter activity was localized within the first intron of the gene. This promoter shows no tissue specificity but could be enhanced by a heterologous enhancer. Mobility shift assays showed complex but specific protein binding. The sequence in this region lacks similarity with known promoters or initiators but is highly conserved in evolution. No transcription initiation could be detected within or downstream of this region, suggesting that this might be a new type of RNA polymerase II promoter able to drive transcription from an upstream sequence. An additional exon was also found upstream of exon 1. The two exons 1 (1a and 1b) are mutually exclusive and both are spliced to exon 2. This makes the structure of the 5′ region of the human CD45 gene identical to its mouse homologue. PMID:11260323

  12. The Inference of Phased Haplotypes for the Immunoglobulin H Chain V Region Gene Loci by Analysis of VDJ Gene Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Marie J.; Chen, Zhiliang; Wang, Yan; Jackson, Katherine J.; Zhang, Lyndon; Boyd, Scott D.; Fire, Andrew Z.; Tanaka, Mark M.; Gaëta, Bruno A.; Collins, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    The existence of many highly similar genes in the lymphocyte receptor gene loci makes them difficult to investigate, and the determination of phased “haplotypes” has been particularly problematic. However, V(D)J gene rearrangements provide an opportunity to infer the association of Ig genes along the chromosomes. The chromosomal distribution of H chain genes in an Ig genotype can be inferred through analysis of VDJ rearrangements in individuals who are heterozygous at points within the IGH locus. We analyzed VDJ rearrangements from 44 individuals for whom sufficient unique rearrangements were available to allow comprehensive genotyping. Nine individuals were identified who were heterozygous at the IGHJ6 locus and for whom sufficient suitable VDJ rearrangements were available to allow comprehensive haplotyping. Each of the 18 resulting IGHV|IGHD|IGHJ haplotypes was unique. Apparent deletion polymorphisms were seen that involved as many as four contiguous, functional IGHV genes. Two deletion polymorphisms involving multiple contiguous IGHD genes were also inferred. Three previously unidentified gene duplications were detected, where two sequences recognized as allelic variants of a single gene were both inferred to be on a single chromosome. Phased genomic data brings clarity to the study of the contribution of each gene to the available repertoire of rearranged VDJ genes. Analysis of rearrangement frequencies suggests that particular genes may have substantially different yet predictable propensities for rearrangement within different haplotypes. Together with data highlighting the extent of haplotypic variation within the population, this suggests that there may be substantial variability in the available Ab repertoires of different individuals. PMID:22205028

  13. Comparative analysis of chicken chromosome 28 provides new clues to the evolutionary fragility of gene-rich vertebrate regions

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Laurie; Yang, Shan; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Baggott, Dan; Christensen, Mari; Hamilton, Aaron; Crooijmans, Richard; Groenen, Martien; Lucas, Susan; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Stubbs, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    The chicken genome draft sequence has provided a valuable resource for studies of an important agricultural and experimental model species and an important data set for comparative analysis. However, some of the most gene-rich segments are missing from chicken genome draft assemblies, limiting the analysis of a substantial number of genes and preventing a closer look at regions that are especially prone to syntenic rearrangements. To facilitate the functional and evolutionary analysis of one especially gene-rich, rearrangement-prone genomic region, we analyzed sequence from BAC clones spanning chicken microchromosome GGA28; as a complement we also analyzed a gene-sparse, stable region from GGA11. In these two regions we documented the conservation and lineage-specific gain and loss of protein-coding genes and precisely mapped the locations of 31 major human-chicken syntenic breakpoints. Altogether, we identified 72 lineage-specific genes, many of which are found at or near syntenic breaks, implicating evolutionary breakpoint regions as major sites of genetic innovation and change. Twenty-two of the 31 breakpoint regions have been reused repeatedly as rearrangement breakpoints in vertebrate evolution. Compared with stable GC-matched regions, GGA28 is highly enriched in CpG islands, as are break-prone intervals identified elsewhere in the chicken genome; evolutionary breakpoints are further enriched in GC content and CpG islands, highlighting a potential role for these features in genome instability. These data support the hypothesis that chromosome rearrangements have not occurred randomly over the course of vertebrate evolution but are focused preferentially within “fragile” regions with unusual DNA sequence characteristics. PMID:17921355

  14. Fine structure mapping of a gene-rich region of wheat carrying Ph1, a suppressor of crossing over between homoeologous chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Gaganpreet K.; Rustgi, Sachin; Shafqat, Mustafa N.; von Wettstein, Diter; Gill, Kulvinder S.

    2008-01-01

    The wheat gene-rich region (GRR) 5L0.5 contains many important genes, including Ph1, the principal regulator of chromosome pairing. Comparative marker analysis identified 32 genes for the GRR controlling important agronomic traits. Detailed characterization of this region was accomplished by first physically localizing 213 wheat group 5L-specific markers, using group 5 nulli-tetrasomics, three Ph1 gene deletion/insertion mutants, and nine terminal deletion lines with their breakpoints around the 5L0.5 region. The Ph1 gene was localized to a much smaller region within the GRR (Ph1 gene region). Of the 61 markers that mapped in the four subregions of the GRR, 9 mapped in the Ph1 gene region. High stringency sequence comparison (e < 1 ×10−25) of 157 group 5L-specific wheat ESTs identified orthologs for 80% sequences in rice and 71% in Arabidopsis. Rice orthologs were present on all rice chromosomes, although most (34%) were on rice chromosome 9 (R9). No single collinear region was identified in Arabidopsis even for a smaller region, such as the Ph1 gene region. Seven of the nine Ph1 gene region markers mapped within a 450-kb region on R9 with the same gene order. Detailed domain/motif analysis of the 91 putative genes present in the 450-kb region identified 26 candidates for the Ph1 gene, including genes involved in chromatin reorganization, microtubule attachment, acetyltransferases, methyltransferases, DNA binding, and meiosis/anther specific proteins. Five of these genes shared common domains/motifs with the meiosis specific genes Zip1, Scp1, Cor1, RAD50, RAD51, and RAD57. Wheat and Arabidopsis homologs for these rice genes were identified. PMID:18398005

  15. Functional analysis of the promoter region of amphioxus β-actin gene: a useful tool for driving gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Li, Guang; Liu, Xin; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yi-Quan

    2014-10-01

    Amphioxus is a promising new animal model for developmental biology. To develop molecular tools for this model, we characterized the promoter region of a cytoplasmic β-actin gene (Bb-actin-6-2) from the Chinese amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri. In situ hybridization and real time-quantitative PCR analyses showed that this gene is expressed in many tissues throughout embryonic development. Cloning of cDNA revealed two isoforms with distinct transcription start sites. Isoform #1 exhibits a similar exon/intron and regulatory element organization to that of vertebrate β-actin, whereas isoform #2 lacks the first exon of isoform #1 and recruits its first intron as a promoter. The activities of upstream promoter regions in the two isoforms were examined using the lacZ reporter system in amphioxus embryos. The proximal promoter of isoform #1 drove reporter gene expression broadly in 58.6 % of injected embryos. That of isoform #2 exhibited much higher activity (91.5 %) than that of isoform #1 or the human EF-1-α gene (38.2 %). We determined the minimal promoter regions of the two isoforms via functional analysis. These two regions, alone or inserted a random DNA fragment upstream, had no detectable activity, but when an upstream enhancer was inserted, the promoters directed reporter gene expression in 61.0 and 93.8 %, respectively, of injected embryos in a tissue-specific manner. Our study not only provides insight into the regulatory mechanism underlying amphioxus Bb-actin-6-2 gene expression, but also identifies two sets of efficient proximal and minimal promoters. These promoters could be used to construct gene expression vectors for transgenic studies using amphioxus as a model. PMID:25078982

  16. Improving electricity production in tubular microbial fuel cells through optimizing the anolyte flow with spiral spacers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Ge, Zheng; Grimaud, Julien; Hurst, Jim; He, Zhen

    2013-04-01

    The use of spiral spacers to create a helical flow for improving electricity generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was investigated in both laboratory and on-site tests. The lab tests found that the MFC with the spiral spacers produced more electricity than the one without the spiral spacers at different recirculation rates or organic loading rates, likely due to the improved transport/distribution of ions and electron mediators instead of the substrates because the organic removal efficiency was not obviously affected by the presence of the spiral spacers. The energy production in the MFC with the spiral spacers reached 0.071 or 0.073 kWh/kg COD in either vertical or horizontal installment. The examination of the MFCs installed in an aeration tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant confirmed the advantage of using the spiral spacers. Those results demonstrate that spiral spacers could be an effective approach to improve energy production in MFCs. PMID:23500582

  17. Increased antibiotic release and equivalent biomechanics of a spacer cement without hard radio contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bitsch, R G; Kretzer, J P; Vogt, S; Büchner, H; Thomsen, M N; Lehner, B

    2015-10-01

    We compared a novel calcium carbonate spacer cement (Copal® spacem) to well-established bone cements. Electron microscopic structure and elution properties of the antibiotics ofloxacin, vancomycin, clindamycin, and gentamicin were examined. A knee wear simulator model for articulating cement spacers was established. Mechanical tests for bending strength, flexural modulus, and compressive and fatigue strength were performed. The electron microscopic analysis showed a microporous structure of the spacer cement, and this promoted a significantly higher and longer antibiotic elution. All spacer cement specimens released the antibiotics for a period of up to 50days with the exception of the vancomycin loading. The spacer cement showed significantly less wear scars and fulfilled the ISO 5833 requirements. The newly developed spacer cement is a hydrophilic antibiotic carrier with an increased release. Cement without hard radio contrast agents can improve tribological behaviour of spacers, and this may reduce reactive wear particles and abrasive bone defects. PMID:26219491

  18. Structural design feasibility study of Space Station long spacer truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armand, Sasan C.; Funk, Gregory P.; Dohogne, Caroline A.

    1994-01-01

    The structural design and configuration feasibility of the long spacer truss assembly that will be used as part of the Space Station Freedom is the focus of this study. The structural analysis discussed herein is derived from the transient loading events presented in the Space Transportation System Interface Control Document (STS ICD). The transient loading events are liftoff, landing, and emergency landing loads. Quasi-static loading events were neglected in this study since the magnitude of the quasi-static acceleration factors is lower than that of the transient acceleration factors. Structural analysis of the proposed configuration of the long spacer truss with four longerons indicated that negative safety margins are possible. As a result, configuration changes were proposed. The primary configuration change suggested was to increase the number of truss longerons to six. The six-longeron truss appears to be a more promising structure than the four-longeron truss because it offers a positive margin of safety and more volume in its second bay (BAY2). This additional volume can be used for resupply of some of the orbital replacement units (such as a battery box). Note that the design effort on the long spacer truss has not fully begun and that calculations and reports of the negative safety margins are, to date, based on concept only.

  19. Spacers' role in the dynamics of hyperbranched polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satmarel, C.; von Ferber, C.; Blumen, A.

    2006-05-01

    We investigate hyperbranched polymers (HBPs) and highlight the relation between their architecture and their viscoelastic behavior, while paying special attention to the role of the chainlike spacer segments between branching points. For this we study the dynamics of HBP in solution, based on the generalized Gaussian structure formalism, an extension of the Rouse model, which disregards hydrodynamical and excluded volume effects. For HBP the dynamical effects display, beside the obvious contributions of localized modes on the spacers, also remarkable features, as we highlight based on the exact renormalization procedure recently developed by us in J. Chem. Phys. 123, 034907 (2005). We exemplify these features by analyzing the dynamics of randomly linked star polymers and study the impact both of the length and of the spacers' mobility on the normal modes' spectra. We compute these modes both by numerical diagonalization and also by employing our renormalization procedure; the excellent agreement between these methods allows us to extend the range of investigations to very large HBP.

  20. Structural design feasibility study of Space Station long spacer truss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armand, Sasan C.; Funk, Gregory P.; Dohogne, Caroline A.

    1994-02-01

    The structural design and configuration feasibility of the long spacer truss assembly that will be used as part of the Space Station Freedom is the focus of this study. The structural analysis discussed herein is derived from the transient loading events presented in the Space Transportation System Interface Control Document (STS ICD). The transient loading events are liftoff, landing, and emergency landing loads. Quasi-static loading events were neglected in this study since the magnitude of the quasi-static acceleration factors is lower than that of the transient acceleration factors. Structural analysis of the proposed configuration of the long spacer truss with four longerons indicated that negative safety margins are possible. As a result, configuration changes were proposed. The primary configuration change suggested was to increase the number of truss longerons to six. The six-longeron truss appears to be a more promising structure than the four-longeron truss because it offers a positive margin of safety and more volume in its second bay (BAY2). This additional volume can be used for resupply of some of the orbital replacement units (such as a battery box). Note that the design effort on the long spacer truss has not fully begun and that calculations and reports of the negative safety margins are, to date, based on concept only.

  1. A Genetic and Molecular Analysis of the 46c Chromosomal Region Surrounding the Fmrfamide Neuropeptide Gene in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, M. A.; Roberts, M. S.; Taghert, P. H.

    1994-01-01

    We have analyzed the FMRFamide neuropeptide gene region of Drosophila melanogaster. This gene maps to the 46C region of chromosome 2R; this interval previously was not well characterized. For this genetic and molecular analysis, we have used X-ray mutagenesis, EMS mutagenesis, and the recently reported local P element transposition method. We identified four overlapping deletions, two of which have proximal breakpoints that define a 50-60-kb region surrounding the FMRFamide gene in 46C. To this small region, we mapped three lethal complementation groups; 10 additional lethal complementation groups were mapped to more distal regions of 46CD. One of these groups corresponds to even-skipped, the other 12 are previously unidentified. Using various lines of evidence we excluded the possibility that FMRFamide corresponds to any of the three lethal complementation groups mapping to its immediate 50-60-kb vicinity. The positions of two of the three lethal complementation groups were identified with P elements using a local transposition scheme. The third lethal complementation group was excluded as being FMRFamide mutants by sequence analysis and by immunocytochemistry with proFMRFamide precursor-specific antibodies. This analysis has (1) provided a genetic map of the 46CD chromosomal region and a detailed molecular map of a portion of the 46C region and (2) provided additional evidence of the utility of local transposition for targeting nearby genes. PMID:8056304

  2. Insertion of part of an intron into the 5[prime] untranslated region of a Caenorhabditis elegans gene converts it into a trans-spliced gene

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, R.; Thomas, J.; Spieth, J.; Blumenthal, T. )

    1991-04-01

    In nematodes, the RNA products of some genes are trans-spliced to a 22-nucleotide spliced leader (SL), while the RNA products of other genes are not. In Caenorhabditis elegans, there are two SLs, Sl1 and SL2, donated by two distinct small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles in a process functionally quite similar to nuclear intron removal. The authors demonstrate here that it is possible to convert a non-trans-spliced gene into a trans-spliced gene by placement of an intron missing only the 5[prime] splice site into the 5[prime] untranslated region. Stable transgenic strains were isolated expressing a gene in which 69 nucleotides of a vit-5 intron, including the 3[prime] splice site, were inserted into the 5[prime] untranslated region of a vit-2/vit-6 fusion gene. The RNA product of this gene was examined by primer extension and PCR amplification. Although the vit-2/vit-6 transgene product is not normally trans-spliced, the majority of transcripts from this altered gene were trans-spliced to SL1. They termed the region of a trans-spliced mRNA precursor between the 5[prime] end and the first 3[prime] splice site an 'outrun'. The results suggest that if a transcript begins with intronlike sequence followed by a 3[prime] splice site, this alone may constitute an outrun and be sufficient to demarcate a transcript as a trans-splice acceptor. These findings leave open the possibility that specific sequences are required to increase the efficiency of trans-splicing.

  3. Insertion of part of an intron into the 5' untranslated region of a Caenorhabditis elegans gene converts it into a trans-spliced gene.

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, R; Thomas, J; Spieth, J; Blumenthal, T

    1991-01-01

    In nematodes, the RNA products of some genes are trans-spliced to a 22-nucleotide spliced leader (SL), while the RNA products of other genes are not. In Caenorhabditis elegans, there are two SLs, SL1 and SL2, donated by two distinct small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles in a process functionally quite similar to nuclear intron removal. We demonstrate here that it is possible to convert a non-trans-spliced gene into a trans-spliced gene by placement of an intron missing only the 5' splice site into the 5' untranslated region. Stable transgenic strains were isolated expressing a gene in which 69 nucleotides of a vit-5 intron, including the 3' splice site, were inserted into the 5' untranslated region of a vit-2/vit-6 fusion gene. The RNA product of this gene was examined by primer extension and PCR amplification. Although the vit-2/vit-6 transgene product is not normally trans-spliced, the majority of transcripts from this altered gene were trans-spliced to SL1. We termed the region of a trans-spliced mRNA precursor between the 5' end and the first 3' splice site an "outron." Our results suggest that if a transcript begins with intronlike sequence followed by a 3' splice site, this alone may constitute an outron and be sufficient to demarcate a transcript as a trans-splice acceptor. These findings leave open the possibility that specific sequences are required to increase the efficiency of trans-splicing. Images PMID:1848665

  4. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the DNA binding region of the chicken fibronectin gene.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, Y; Gotoh, S; Kubomura, S; Higashi, K; Hirano, H

    1988-12-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of 2.0 kb EcoRI segment from the clone lambda FC32 of the genomic chicken fibronectin gene, which is called DNA binding domain. This segment overlapped another clone lambda FC36 and contained three exons which were 16, 17 and 18. They were classified as Type III repeat as originally shown in bovine plasma fibronectin. The average homologies of these three exons among the chicken, rat and human fibronectins in amino acid level are very high (87-98%) compared with that (79-88%) of the exons in the cell binding domain, indicating that this region is highly conservative during the evolution. PMID:3212295

  5. Haplotype analysis of the COMT-ARVCF gene region in Israeli anorexia nervosa family trios.

    PubMed

    Michaelovsky, Elena; Frisch, Amos; Leor, Shani; Stein, Daniel; Danziger, Yardena; Carel, Cynthia; Fennig, Silvana; Mimouni, Marc; Klauck, Sabine M; Benner, Axel; Poustka, Annemarie; Apter, Alan; Weizman, Abraham

    2005-11-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe and complex psychiatric disorder with a significant genetic contribution. Previously, we found an association between AN and the 158Val/Met polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene in a family-based study of 51 Israeli AN trios. In the present study, we extended the original sample to include 85 family trios [66 AN restricting (AN-R) and 19 bingeing/purging (AN-BP) subtype] and performed a family-based transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) analysis for five SNPs in the COMT and two in the adjacent ARVCF gene. Association was found between AN-R and several SNPs in the COMT-ARVCF region including the 158Val/Met polymorphism. TDT analysis of 5-SNP haplotypes in AN-R trios revealed an overall statistically significant transmission disequilibrium (P < 0.001). Specifically, haplotype B [COMT-186C-408G-472G(158Val)-ARVCF-659C(220Pro)-524T(175Val)] was preferentially transmitted (P < 0.001) from parents of AN-R patients to their affected daughters, while haplotype A [COMT-186T-408C-472A(158Met)-ARVCF-659T(220Leu)-524C(175Ala)] was preferentially (P = 0.01) not transmitted. Haplotype B was associated with increased risk (RR 3.38; 0.95CI 1.98-6.43) while haplotype A exhibited a protective effect (RR 0.40; 0.95CI 0.21-0.70) for AN-R. Preferential transmission of the risk alleles and haplotypes from the parents was mostly contributed by the fathers. No significant transmission disequilibrium of alleles or haplotypes was found for AN-BP trios. The risk and protective haplotypes may carry molecular variations in the COMT gene or its vicinity that are relevant to the pathophysiology of restrictive anorexia nervosa in the Israeli-Jewish population. PMID:16118784

  6. Plasmon enhanced fluorescence studies from aligned gold nanorod arrays modified with SiO2 spacer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damm, Signe; Fedele, Stefano; Murphy, Antony; Holsgrove, Kristina; Arredondo, Miryam; Pollard, Robert; Barry, James N.; Dowling, Denis P.; Rice, James H.

    2015-05-01

    Here, we demonstrate that quasi self-standing Au nanorod arrays prepared with plasma polymerisation deposited SiO2 dielectric spacers support surface enhanced fluorescence (SEF) while maintaining high signal reproducibility. We show that it is possible to find a balance between enhanced radiative and non-radiative decay rates at which the fluorescent intensity is maximized. The SEF signal optimised with a 30 nm spacer layer thickness showed a 3.5-fold enhancement with a signal variance of <15% thereby keeping the integrity of the nanorod array. We also demonstrate the decreased importance of obtaining resonance conditions when localized surface plasmon resonance is positioned within the spectral region of Au interband transitions. Procedures for further increasing the SEF enhancement factor are also discussed.

  7. Plasmon enhanced fluorescence studies from aligned gold nanorod arrays modified with SiO{sub 2} spacer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Damm, Signe; Fedele, Stefano; Rice, James H.; Murphy, Antony; Holsgrove, Kristina; Arredondo, Miryam; Pollard, Robert; Barry, James N.; Dowling, Denis P.

    2015-05-04

    Here, we demonstrate that quasi self-standing Au nanorod arrays prepared with plasma polymerisation deposited SiO{sub 2} dielectric spacers support surface enhanced fluorescence (SEF) while maintaining high signal reproducibility. We show that it is possible to find a balance between enhanced radiative and non-radiative decay rates at which the fluorescent intensity is maximized. The SEF signal optimised with a 30 nm spacer layer thickness showed a 3.5-fold enhancement with a signal variance of <15% thereby keeping the integrity of the nanorod array. We also demonstrate the decreased importance of obtaining resonance conditions when localized surface plasmon resonance is positioned within the spectral region of Au interband transitions. Procedures for further increasing the SEF enhancement factor are also discussed.

  8. Antibiotic Spacer Arthroplasty for Revision MTP Arthrodesis: A Novel Means to Build the Implant: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bitterman, Adam; Patel, Milap; Gurtowski, James P

    2016-01-01

    Metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint osteoarthritis (OA), also known as hallux rigidus (HR), is the most common degenerative arthropathy of the foot and is often the result of trauma. There are multiple methods of addressing the patient’s pain and limited function. Arthrodesis is the gold standard to manage severe MTP arthritis with a highly significant union rate. With various techniques of arthrodesis available, ranging from cannulated screw fixation, Kirschner wires, as well as plate and screw fixation, the orthopedic surgeon has multiple modalities to address this ailment; however, when these fail due to infection, the armament is limited. Through the idea of articulating antibiotic spacers in other regions of the body such as the knee and hip, we present a novel technique to the creation of an antibiotic spacer in the setting of a failed infected MTP arthrodesis.  PMID:27114892

  9. Antibiotic Spacer Arthroplasty for Revision MTP Arthrodesis: A Novel Means to Build the Implant: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Bitterman, Adam; Mathew, Cristin; Patel, Milap; Gurtowski, James P

    2016-01-01

    Metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint osteoarthritis (OA), also known as hallux rigidus (HR), is the most common degenerative arthropathy of the foot and is often the result of trauma. There are multiple methods of addressing the patient's pain and limited function. Arthrodesis is the gold standard to manage severe MTP arthritis with a highly significant union rate. With various techniques of arthrodesis available, ranging from cannulated screw fixation, Kirschner wires, as well as plate and screw fixation, the orthopedic surgeon has multiple modalities to address this ailment; however, when these fail due to infection, the armament is limited. Through the idea of articulating antibiotic spacers in other regions of the body such as the knee and hip, we present a novel technique to the creation of an antibiotic spacer in the setting of a failed infected MTP arthrodesis. PMID:27114892

  10. Physical map of the region containing the gene for Batten disease (CLN3)

    SciTech Connect

    Jaervelae, I.E.; Mitchinson, H.M.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1995-06-05

    CLN3 has been mapped genetically to 16p12, to the interval between D16S288 and D16S383, a sex-averaged genetic distance of 2.1 cM. Analysis of disease haplotypes for four microsatellite markers in this interval, D16S288, D16S299, D16S298, and SPN, has shown significant allelic association between one allele at each of these loci and CLN3. All four of the associated markers were used as nucleation sites in the isolation of genomic clones (YACs). A contig was assembled which contains 3 of the 4 associated markers and which confirmed the relative order of these markers. Marker D16S272 has been located on the physical map between D16S288 and D16S299. Restriction mapping has demonstrated the location of possible CpG islands. One gene, STP, has been localized on the YAC contig proximal to D16S298 and is therefore a candidate for CLN3. Other genes, including IL4R, SGLT2, and UQCRC2, have been excluded from this region. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  11. A somatic cell hybrid panel for pig regional gene mapping characterized by molecular cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Yerle, M; Echard, G; Robic, A; Mairal, A; Dubut-Fontana, C; Riquet, J; Pinton, P; Milan, D; Lahbib-Mansais, Y; Gellin, J

    1996-01-01

    A panel of 27 pig x rodent somatic cell hybrids was produced and characterized cytogenetically. The first step of this study consisted of hybridizing a SINE probe to GTG-banded metaphases of each hybrid clone in order to count and identify the normal pig chromosomes and to detect rearranged ones. The second step consisted of using the DNA of each clone as a probe after pIRS-PCR (porcine interspersed repetitive sequence-polymerase chain reaction) amplification to highly enrich it in pig sequences. These probes, hybridized to normal pig metaphase chromosomes, enabled the identification of the complete porcine complement in the hybrid lines. Whole chromosomes and fragments were characterized quickly and precisely, and results were compared. In addition to this cytogenetic characterization, molecular verification was also carried out by using primers specific to six microsatellites and to one gene previously mapped to pig chromosomes. The results obtained allow us to conclude that we have produced a panel that is informative for all porcine chromosomes. This panel constitutes a highly efficient tool to establish not only assignments of genes and markers but also regional localizations on pig chromosomes. PMID:8697807

  12. Toward a study of gene regulatory constraints to morphological evolution of the Drosophila ocellar region.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Hidalgo, Daniel; Becerra-Alonso, David; García-Morales, Diana; Casares, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    The morphology and function of organs depend on coordinated changes in gene expression during development. These changes are controlled by transcription factors, signaling pathways, and their regulatory interactions, which are represented by gene regulatory networks (GRNs). Therefore, the structure of an organ GRN restricts the morphological and functional variations that the organ can experience-its potential morphospace. Therefore, two important questions arise when studying any GRN: what is the predicted available morphospace and what are the regulatory linkages that contribute the most to control morphological variation within this space. Here, we explore these questions by analyzing a small "three-node" GRN model that captures the Hh-driven regulatory interactions controlling a simple visual structure: the ocellar region of Drosophila. Analysis of the model predicts that random variation of model parameters results in a specific non-random distribution of morphological variants. Study of a limited sample of drosophilids and other dipterans finds a correspondence between the predicted phenotypic range and that found in nature. As an alternative to simulations, we apply Bayesian networks methods in order to identify the set of parameters with the largest contribution to morphological variation. Our results predict the potential morphological space of the ocellar complex and identify likely candidate processes to be responsible for ocellar morphological evolution using Bayesian networks. We further discuss the assumptions that the approach we have taken entails and their validity. PMID:27038024

  13. Gene Map of the HLA Region, Graves' Disease and Hashimoto Thyroiditis, and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sasazuki, Takehiko; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Morishima, Satoko; Morishima, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genomic region spanning about 4 Mb is the most gene dense and the polymorphic stretches in the human genome. A total of the 269 loci were identified, including 145 protein coding genes mostly important for immunity and 50 noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Biological function of these ncRNAs remains unknown, becoming hot spot in the studies of HLA-associated diseases. The genomic diversity analysis in the HLA region facilitated by next-generation sequencing will pave the way to molecular understanding of linkage disequilibrium structure, population diversity, histocompatibility in transplantation, and associations with autoimmune diseases. The 4-digit DNA genotyping of HLA for six HLA loci, HLA-A through DP, in the patients with Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) identified six susceptible and three resistant HLA alleles. Their epistatic interactions in controlling the development of these diseases are shown. Four susceptible and one resistant HLA alleles are shared by GD and HT. Two HLA alleles associated with GD or HT control the titers of autoantibodies to thyroid antigens. All these observations led us to propose a new model for the development of GD and HT. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from unrelated donor (UR-HSCT) provides a natural experiment to elucidate the role of allogenic HLA molecules in immune response. Large cohort studies using HLA allele and clinical outcome data have elucidated that (1) HLA locus, allele, and haplotype mismatches between donor and patient, (2) specific amino acid substitution at specific positions of HLA molecules, and (3) ethnic background are all responsible for the immunological events related to UR-HSCT including acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), chronic GVHD, graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect, and graft failure. PMID:26791860

  14. Development and characterization of 3D-printed feed spacers for spiral wound membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Amber; Farhat, Nadia; Bucs, Szilárd S; Linares, Rodrigo Valladares; Picioreanu, Cristian; Kruithof, Joop C; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Kidwell, James; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S

    2016-03-15

    Feed spacers are important for the impact of biofouling on the performance of spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane systems. The objective of this study was to propose a strategy for developing, characterizing, and testing of feed spacers by numerical modeling, three-dimensional (3D) printing of feed spacers and experimental membrane fouling simulator (MFS) studies. The results of numerical modeling on the hydrodynamic behavior of various feed spacer geometries suggested that the impact of spacers on hydrodynamics and biofouling can be improved. A good agreement was found for the modeled and measured relationship between linear flow velocity and pressure drop for feed spacers with the same geometry, indicating that modeling can serve as the first step in spacer characterization. An experimental comparison study of a feed spacer currently applied in practice and a 3D printed feed spacer with the same geometry showed (i) similar hydrodynamic behavior, (ii) similar pressure drop development with time and (iii) similar biomass accumulation during MFS biofouling studies, indicating that 3D printing technology is an alternative strategy for development of thin feed spacers with a complex geometry. Based on the numerical modeling results, a modified feed spacer with low pressure drop was selected for 3D printing. The comparison study of the feed spacer from practice and the modified geometry 3D printed feed spacer established that the 3D printed spacer had (i) a lower pressure drop during hydrodynamic testing, (ii) a lower pressure drop increase in time with the same accumulated biomass amount, indicating that modifying feed spacer geometries can reduce the impact of accumulated biomass on membrane performance. The combination of numerical modeling of feed spacers and experimental testing of 3D printed feed spacers is a promising strategy (rapid, low cost and representative) to develop advanced feed spacers aiming to reduce the impact of

  15. Single nucleotide polymorphism mining and nucleotide sequence analysis of Mx1 gene in exonic regions of Japanese quail

    PubMed Central

    Niraj, Diwesh Kumar; Kumar, Pushpendra; Mishra, Chinmoy; Narayan, Raj; Bhattacharya, Tarun Kumar; Shrivastava, Kush; Bhushan, Bharat; Tiwari, Ashok Kumar; Saxena, Vishesh; Sahoo, Nihar Ranjan; Sharma, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Aim: An attempt has been made to study the Myxovirus resistant (Mx1) gene polymorphism in Japanese quail. Materials and Methods: In the present, investigation four fragments viz. Fragment I of 185 bp (Exon 3 region), Fragment II of 148 bp (Exon 5 region), Fragment III of 161 bp (Exon 7 region), and Fragment IV of 176 bp (Exon 13 region) of Mx1 gene were amplified and screened for polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism technique in 170 Japanese quail birds. Results: Out of the four fragments, one fragment (Fragment II) was found to be polymorphic. Remaining three fragments (Fragment I, III, and IV) were found to be monomorphic which was confirmed by custom sequencing. Overall nucleotide sequence analysis of Mx1 gene of Japanese quail showed 100% homology with common quail and more than 80% homology with reported sequence of chicken breeds. Conclusion: The Mx1 gene is mostly conserved in Japanese quail. There is an urgent need of comprehensive analysis of other regions of Mx1 gene along with its possible association with the traits of economic importance in Japanese quail. PMID:27047057

  16. Independent tuning of double plasmonic waves in a free-standing graphene-spacer-grating-spacer-graphene hybrid slab.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Yao, Jin; Song, Zhengyong; Ye, Longfang; Cai, Guoxiong; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-07-25

    The independent excitation and tuning of double plasmonic waves are realized in a free-standing graphene-spacer-grating-spacer-graphene (GSGSG) hybrid slab, which consists of two graphene field effect transistors placed back-to-back to each other. Resulted from the high transparency and the tight confinement of surface plasmonic mode for the graphene, double plasmonic waves can be independently excited by guided-mode resonances (GMRs). Theoretical and numerical investigations are performed in the mid-infrared band. Furthermore, the tuning of individual GMR resonant wavelengths with respect to the system parameters is studied. The results provide opportunities to engineer the proposed hybrid slab for wavelength selective and multiplexing applications. PMID:27464148

  17. Spacer engineered Trigate SOI TFET: An investigation towards harsh temperature environment applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallikarjunarao; Ranjan, Rajeev; Pradhan, K. P.; Artola, L.; Sahu, P. K.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a novel N-channel Tunnel Field Effect Transistor (TFET) i.e., Trigate Silicon-ON-Insulator (SOI) N-TFET with high-k spacer is proposed for better Sub-threshold swing (SS) and OFF-state current (IOFF) by keeping in mind the sensitivity towards temperature. The proposed model can achieve a Sub-threshold swing less than 35 mV/decade at various temperatures, which is desirable for designing low power CTFET for digital circuit applications. In N-TFET source doping has a significant effect on the ON-state current (ION) level; therefore more electrons will tunnel from source to channel region. High-k Spacer i.e., HfO2 is used to enhance the device performance and also it avoids overlapping of transistors in an integrated circuits (IC's). We have designed a reliable device by performing the temperature analysis on Transfer characteristics, Drain characteristics and also on various performance metrics like ON-state current (ION), OFF-state current (IOFF), ION/IOFF, Trans-conductance (gm), Trans-conductance Generation Factor (TGF), Sub-threshold Swing (SS) to observe the applications towards harsh temperature environment.

  18. Sensitized phenotypic screening identifies gene dosage sensitive region on chromosome 11 that predisposes to disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ermakova, Olga; Piszczek, Lukasz; Luciani, Luisa; Cavalli, Florence M G; Ferreira, Tiago; Farley, Dominika; Rizzo, Stefania; Paolicelli, Rosa Chiara; Al-Banchaabouchi, Mumna; Nerlov, Claus; Moriggl, Richard; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Gross, Cornelius

    2011-01-01

    The identification of susceptibility genes for human disease is a major goal of current biomedical research. Both sequence and structural variation have emerged as major genetic sources of phenotypic variability and growing evidence points to copy number variation as a particularly important source of susceptibility for disease. Here we propose and validate a strategy to identify genes in which changes in dosage alter susceptibility to disease-relevant phenotypes in the mouse. Our approach relies on sensitized phenotypic screening of megabase-sized chromosomal deletion and deficiency lines carrying altered copy numbers of ∼30 linked genes. This approach offers several advantages as a method to systematically identify genes involved in disease susceptibility. To examine the feasibility of such a screen, we performed sensitized phenotyping in five therapeutic areas (metabolic syndrome, immune dysfunction, atherosclerosis, cancer and behaviour) of a 0.8 Mb reciprocal chromosomal duplication and deficiency on chromosome 11 containing 27 genes. Gene dosage in the region significantly affected risk for high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome, antigen-induced immune hypersensitivity, ApoE-induced atherosclerosis, and home cage activity. Follow up studies on individual gene knockouts for two candidates in the region showed that copy number variation in Stat5 was responsible for the phenotypic variation in antigen-induced immune hypersensitivity and metabolic syndrome. These data demonstrate the power of sensitized phenotypic screening of segmental aneuploidy lines to identify disease susceptibility genes. PMID:21204268

  19. Stabilized plasmid-lipid particles for regional gene therapy: formulation and transfection properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y P; Sekirov, L; Saravolac, E G; Wheeler, J J; Tardi, P; Clow, K; Leng, E; Sun, R; Cullis, P R; Scherrer, P

    1999-08-01

    Previous work (Wheeler et al, Gene Therapy 1999; 6: 271-281) has shown that plasmid DNA can be entrapped in 'stabilized plasmid-lipid particles' (SPLP) containing the fusogenic lipid dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), low levels (5-10 mol%) of cationic lipid, and stabilized by a polyethyleneglycol (PEG) coating. The PEG moieties are attached to a ceramide anchor containing an arachidoyl acyl group (PEG-CerC20). These SPLP exhibit low transfection potencies in vitro, due in part to the long residence time of the PEG-CerC20 on the SPLP surface. In this work we employed SPLP stabilized by PEG attached to ceramide containing an octanoyl acyl group (PEG-CerC8), which is able to quickly exchange out of the SPLP, to develop systems that give rise to optimized in vitro and in vivo (regional) transfection. A particular objective was to achieve cationic lipid contents that give rise to maximum transfection levels. It is shown that by performing the dialysis procedure in the presence of increasing concentrations of citrate, SPLP containing up to 30 mol% of the cationic lipid dioleoydimethylammonium chloride (DODAC) could be generated. The SPLP produced could be isolated from empty vesicles by sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and exhibited a narrow size distribution (62 +/- 8 nm, as determined by freeze-fracture electron microscopy) and a high plasmid-to-lipid ratio of 65 microg/micromol (corresponding to one plasmid per particle) regardless of the DODAC content. It was found that isolated SPLP containing 20-24 mol% DODAC resulted in optimum transfection of COS-7 and HepG2 cells in vitro, with luciferase expression levels comparable to those achieved for plasmid DNA-cationic lipid complexes. In vivo studies employing an intraperitoneal B16 tumor model and intraperitoneal administration of SPLP also demonstrated maximum luciferase expression for DODAC contents of 20-24 mol% and significantly improved gene expression in tumor tissue as compared with complexes. We

  20. Cambial-Region-Specific Expression of the Agrobacterium iaa Genes in Transgenic Aspen Visualized by a Linked uidA Reporter Gene1

    PubMed Central

    Tuominen, Hannele; Puech, Laurence; Regan, Sharon; Fink, Siegfried; Olsson, Olof; Sundberg, Björn

    2000-01-01

    The level of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) was locally modified in cambial tissues of transgenic aspen (Populus tremula L. × Populus tremuloides Michx.). We also demonstrate the use of a linked reporter gene to visualize the expression of the iaa genes. The rate-limiting bacterial IAA-biosynthetic gene iaaM and the reporter gene for β-glucuronidase (GUS), uidA, were each fused to the cambial-region-specific Agrobacterium rhizogenes rolC promoter and linked on the same T-DNA. In situ hybridization of the iaaM gene confirmed that histochemical analysis of GUS activity could be used to predict iaaM gene expression. Moreover, quantitative fluorometric analysis of GUS activity allowed estimation of the level of de novo production of IAA in transgenic lines carrying a single-copy insert of the iaaM, uidA T-DNA. Microscale analysis of the IAA concentration across the cambial region tissues showed an increase in IAA concentration of about 35% to 40% in the two transgenic lines, but no changes in the radial distribution pattern of IAA compared with wild-type plants. This increase did not result in any changes in the developmental pattern of cambial derivatives or the cambial growth rate, which emphasizes the importance of the radial distribution pattern of IAA in controlling the development of secondary xylem, and suggests that a moderate increase in IAA concentration does not necessarily stimulate growth. PMID:10859183

  1. Genetic organization, size, and complete sequence of early region 3 genes of human adenovirus type 41.

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, H Y; Pieniazek, N; Pieniazek, D; Luftig, R B

    1996-01-01

    The complete nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequences for open reading frames (ORFs) of the human adenovirus type 41 (Ad41) early region 3 (E3) gene have been determined. The sequence of the Ad41 E3 gene (map units 74 to 83.9) consists of 3,373 nucleotides and has one TATA box and two polyadenylation signals (AATAAA). Analysis of the nucleotide sequence reveals that the E3 gene can encode six ORFs, designated RL1 to RL6. These are all expressed at the mRNA level, as determined by reverse transcription-PCR analysis of AD41-infected cell RNA. When compared with known E3 sequences of most other human adenoviruses deposited in GenBank, the sequences of RL1 to RL3 were found to be unique to subgroup F adenoviruses (Ad40 and Ad41). They encode putative proteins of 173 amino acids (19.4 kDa) and 276 amino acids (31.6 kDa) in one reading frame as well as a 59- amino-acid (6.7 kDa) protein in an overlapping reading frame. RL4 encodes a 90-amino-acid protein (10.1 kDa) with 40% homology to the Ad2 E3 10.4-kDa protein, which induces degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and functions together with the Ad2 E3 14.5-kDa protein to protect mouse cell lines against lysis. RL5 encodes a protein of 107 amino acid residues (12.3 kDa) and is analogous to the Ad E3 14.5-kDa protein. RL6 codes for a protein of 122 amino acids (14.7 kDa) that is analogous to the Ad2 14.7-kDa protein, which functions to protect Ad-infected cells from tumor necrosis factor-induced cytolysis. This finding of three unique (RL1 to RL3) E3 gene ORFs may explain why subgroup F adenoviruses differ substantially from other human adenoviruses in their host range; i.e., they replicate predominantly in the host's gastrointestinal rather than respiratory tract. A recent phylogenetic study that compared subgroup F Ad40 DNA sequences with representatives of subgroups B (Ad3), C (Ad2), and E (Ad4) reached a similar conclusion about the uniqueness of RL1 and RL2. PMID:8642703

  2. Modifications in the head group and in the spacer of cholesterol-based cationic lipids promote transfection in melanoma B16-F10 cells and tumours.

    PubMed

    Reynier, P; Briane, D; Coudert, R; Fadda, G; Bouchemal, N; Bissieres, P; Taillandier, E; Cao, A

    2004-01-01

    A series of four cationic lipids derived from cholesterol was synthesised and their efficiencies to vectorise nucleic acids were compared. The investigation concerns the effects of systematic chemical modifications in the polar head and in the spacer. The cationic lipid molecules used are in the same family of 3beta[N-(N',N',N'-trimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol iodide (TMAEC-Chol), presenting a spacer of two or three carbons and a quaternary ammonium polar head ramified with methyl or ethyl groups. These lipids formed stable liposomes sizing from 100 to 200 nm when prepared with the colipid dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). The goal of this work was to investigate the effect of the chemical structure of these cationic lipids on lipofection. Their ability to form complexes with DNA, their cytotoxicity and their transfection efficiency in vitro and in vivo were studied. Results were compared with those obtained from the well known cholesterol-based cationic lipid DC-Chol. In a melanoma cell line (B16-F10), results showed that either the polar head or the spacer affected the cytotoxicity. Cationic lipids with three ethyl groups in the head are more toxic than those with three methyl groups while cationic lipids with three carbons in the spacer are less toxic than those with two carbons in the spacer. The best transfection level was obtained in vitro and in vivo with cationic lipids having 3C in the spacer. Data indicated that among these lipids, in vivo gene transfer is advantaged by the methylated polar head while in vitro the best level was obtained with the ethylated one. Finally, it was observed that the chemical structure influences the transfection in the presence of serum while the complex charge and the DOPE ratios in liposomes preferentially affect the interaction with erythrocytes. Argumentations are proposed to explain the discrepancies between in vitro and in vivo transfection results concerning the optimal charge ratio and the chemical

  3. The Bacteriophage Carrier State of Campylobacter jejuni Features Changes in Host Non-coding RNAs and the Acquisition of New Host-derived CRISPR Spacer Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hooton, Steven P. T.; Brathwaite, Kelly J.; Connerton, Ian F.

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of self-derived CRISPR DNA protospacers in Campylobacter jejuni PT14 occurs in the presence of bacteriophages encoding a CRISPR-like Cas4 protein. This phenomenon was evident in carrier state infections where both bacteriophages and host are maintained for seemingly indefinite periods as stable populations following serial passage. Carrier state cultures of C. jejuni PT14 have greater aerotolerance in nutrient limited conditions, and may have arisen as an evolutionary response to selective pressures imposed during periods in the extra-intestinal environment. A consequence of this is that bacteriophage and host remain associated and able to survive transition periods where the chances of replicative success are greatly diminished. The majority of the bacteriophage population do not commit to lytic infection, and conversely the bacterial population tolerates low-level bacteriophage replication. We recently examined the effects of Campylobacter bacteriophage/C. jejuni PT14 CRISPR spacer acquisition using deep sequencing strategies of DNA and RNA-Seq to analyze carrier state cultures. This approach identified de novo spacer acquisition in C. jejuni PT14 associated with Class III Campylobacter phages CP8/CP30A but spacer acquisition was oriented toward the capture of host DNA. In the absence of bacteriophage predation the CRISPR spacers in uninfected C. jejuni PT14 cultures remain unchanged. A distinct preference was observed for incorporation of self-derived protospacers into the third spacer position of the C. jejuni PT14 CRISPR array, with the first and second spacers remaining fixed. RNA-Seq also revealed the variation in the synthesis of non-coding RNAs with the potential to bind bacteriophage genes and/or transcript sequences. PMID:27047470

  4. New single nucleotide variation in the promoter region of androgen receptor (AR) gene in hypospadic patients

    PubMed Central

    Borhani, Nasim; Ghaffari Novin, Marefat; Manoochehri, Mehdi; Rouzrokh, Mohsen; Kazemi, Bahram; Koochaki, Ameneh; Hosseini, Ahmad; Masteri Farahani, Reza; Omrani, Mir Davood

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypospadias is one of the most common congenital abnormalities in the male which is characterized by altered development of urethra, foreskin and ventral surface of the penis. Androgen receptor gene plays a critical role in the development of the male genital system by mediating the androgens effects. Objective: In present study, we looked for new variations in androgen receptor promoter and screened its exon 1 for five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in healthy and hypospadias Iranian men. Materials and Methods: In our study, at first DNA was extracted from patients (n=100) and controls (n=100) blood samples. Desired fragments of promoter and exon 1 were amplified using polymerase chain reaction. The promoter region was sequenced for the new variation and exone 1 screened for five SNPs (rs139767835, rs78686797, rs62636528, rs62636529, rs145326748) using restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Results: The results showed a new single nucleotide variation (C→T) at -480 of two patients’ promoter region (2%). None of the mentioned SNPs were detected in patients and controls groups (0%). Conclusion: This finding indicates that new single nucleotide polymorphism in androgen receptor promoter may have role in etiology of hypospadias and development of this anomaly. This article extracted from Ph.D. thesis. (Nasim Borhani) PMID:24799883

  5. Multiple DNA variant association analysis: Application to the insulin gene region in type I diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Julier, C.; Delepine, M.; Lathrop, G.M. |; Villedieu, P.; Froguel, P.; Levy-Marchal, C.; Boitard, C.; Bell, J.; Danze, P.M.; Bianchi, F.

    1994-12-01

    Association and linkage studies have shown that at least one of the genetic factors involved in susceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is contained within a 4.1-kb region of the insulin gene. Sequence analysis has led to the identification of 10 DNA variants in this region that are associated with increased risk for IDDM. These variants are in strong linkage disequilibrium with each other, and previous studies have failed to distinguish between the variant(s) that cause increased susceptibility to IDDM and others that are associated with the disease because of linkage disequilibrium. To address this problem, we have undertaken a large population study of French diabetics and controls and have analyzed genotype patterns for several of the variant sites simultaneously. This has led to the identification of a subset consisting of four variants (-2733AC, -23HphI, -365VNTR, and +1140AC), at least one of which appears to be directly implicated in disease susceptibility. The multiple-DNA-variant association-analysis approach that is applied here to the problem of identifying potential susceptibility variants in IDDM is likely to be important in studies of many other multifactorial diseases.

  6. Phylogeny of sipunculan worms: A combined analysis of four gene regions and morphology.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Anja; Cutler, Edward B; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2007-01-01

    The intra-phyletic relationships of sipunculan worms were analyzed based on DNA sequence data from four gene regions and 58 morphological characters. Initially we analyzed the data under direct optimization using parsimony as optimality criterion. An implied alignment resulting from the direct optimization analysis was subsequently utilized to perform a Bayesian analysis with mixed models for the different data partitions. For this we applied a doublet model for the stem regions of the 18S rRNA. Both analyses support monophyly of Sipuncula and most of the same clades within the phylum. The analyses differ with respect to the relationships among the major groups but whereas the deep nodes in the direct optimization analysis generally show low jackknife support, they are supported by 100% posterior probability in the Bayesian analysis. Direct optimization has been useful for handling sequences of unequal length and generating conservative phylogenetic hypotheses whereas the Bayesian analysis under mixed models provided high resolution in the basal nodes of the tree. PMID:16919974

  7. DNA homologies of ribosomal RNA genes of Neurospora species

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Mimiko, R.; Dutta, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA genes (rDNAs) of Neurospora crassa contain DNA sequences which code for 17S, 5.8S, and 26S rRNAs, in addition to internal and external spacers. As has been reported for many eukaryotes, the DNA sequences which code for 17S, 5.8S, and 26S rRNAs in Neurospora species are probably conserved while the internal and external spacer regions are probably variable sequences. Extensive electron microscopic studies of 45S precursor rRNA of several cold and warm blooded animals confirm that spacer regions vary extensively from species to species. It was desirable to know whether such differences in rDNA sequences exist between Neurospora species. Any such difference should be detectable using standard procedures for DNA homology studies rDNA sequences were isolated from N. crassa mycelial cells using the procedure described previously. The purified rDNA was /sup 3/H-labeled (by nick translation) and reassociated with total DNA isolated from the heterothallic species N. crassa and from three homothalliospecies: N. dodgei, N. lineolata, and N. africana. In addition, /sup 32/P-labeled total DNA of N. crassa was reannealed with unlabeled bulk DNA from N. crassa, N. dodgei, and N. lineolata.

  8. DNA regions bound at low occupancy by transcription factors do not drive patterned reporter gene expression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, William W.; Li, Jingyi Jessica; Hammonds, Ann S.; Brown, James B.; Pfeiffer, Barret D.; Weiszmann, Richard; MacArthur, Stewart; Thomas, Sean; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Eisen, Michael B.; Bickel, Peter J.; Biggin, Mark D.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2012-01-01

    In animals, each sequence-specific transcription factor typically binds to thousands of genomic regions in vivo. Our previous studies of 20 transcription factors show that most genomic regions bound at high levels in Drosophila blastoderm embryos are known or probable functional targets, but genomic regions occupied only at low levels have characteristics suggesting that most are not involved in the cis-regulation of transcription. Here we use transgenic reporter gene assays to directly test the transcriptional activity of 104 genomic regions bound at different levels by the 20 transcription factors. Fifteen genomic regions were selected based solely on the DNA occupancy level of the transcription factor Kruppel. Five of the six most highly bound regions drive blastoderm patterns of reporter transcription. In contrast, only one of the nine lowly bound regions drives transcription at this stage and four of them are not detectably active at any stage of embryogenesis. A larger set of 89 genomic regions chosen using criteria designed to identify functional cis-regulatory regions supports the same trend: genomic regions occupied at high levels by transcription factors in vivo drive patterned gene expression, whereas those occupied only at lower levels mostly do not. These results support studies that indicate that the high cellular concentrations of sequence-specific transcription factors drive extensive, low-occupancy, nonfunctional interactions within the accessible portions of the genome. PMID:23236164

  9. Association of ADHD and the Protogenin gene in the chromosome 15q21.3 reading disabilities linkage region.

    PubMed

    Wigg, K G; Feng, Y; Crosbie, J; Tannock, R; Kennedy, J L; Ickowicz, A; Malone, M; Schachar, R; Barr, C L

    2008-11-01

    Twin studies indicate genetic overlap between symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and reading disabilities (RD), and linkage studies identify several chromosomal regions possibly containing common susceptibility genes, including the 15q region. Based on a translocation finding and association to two specific alleles, the candidate gene, DYX1C1, has been proposed as the susceptibility gene for RD in 15q. Previously, we tested markers in DYX1C1 for association with ADHD. Although we identified association for haplotypes across the gene, we were unable to replicate the association to the specific alleles reported. Thus, the risk alleles for ADHD are yet to be identified. The susceptibility alleles may be in a remote regulatory element, or DYX1C1 may not be the risk gene. To continue study of 15q, we tested a coding region change in DYX1C1, followed by markers across the gene Protogenin (PRTG) in 253 ADHD nuclear families. PRTG was chosen based on its location and because it is closely related to DCC and Neogenin, two genes known to guide migratory cells and axons during development. The markers in DYX1C1 were not associated to ADHD when analyzed individually; however, six markers in PRTG showed significant association with ADHD as a categorical trait (P = 0.025-0.005). Haplotypes in both genes showed evidence for association. We identified association with ADHD symptoms measured as quantitative traits in PRTG, but no evidence for association with two key components of reading, word identification and decoding was observed. These findings, while preliminary, identify association of ADHD to a gene that potentially plays a role in cell migration and axon growth. PMID:19076634

  10. Rapid identification of Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) using ribosomal RNA internal transcribed spacer 1.

    PubMed

    Perera, Omaththage P; Allen, Kerry C; Jain, Devendra; Purcell, Matthew; Little, Nathan S; Luttrell, Randall G

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification of invasive species is crucial for deploying management strategies to prevent establishment. Recent Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) invasions and subsequent establishment in South America has increased the risk of this species invading North America. Morphological similarities make differentiation of H. armigera from the native Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) difficult. Characteristics of adult male genitalia and nucleotide sequence differences in mitochondrial DNA are two of the currently available methods to differentiate these two species. However, current methods are likely too slow to be employed as rapid detection methods. In this study, conserved differences in the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the ribosomal RNA genes were used to develop species-specific oligonucleotide primers that amplified ITS1 fragments of 147 and 334 bp from H. armigera and H. zea, respectively. An amplicon (83 bp) from a conserved region of 18S ribosomal RNA subunit served as a positive control. Melting temperature differences in ITS1 amplicons yielded species-specific dissociation curves that could be used in high resolution melt analysis to differentiate the two Helicoverpa species. In addition, a rapid and inexpensive procedure for obtaining amplifiable genomic DNA from a small amount of tissue was identified. Under optimal conditions, the process was able to detect DNA from one H. armigera leg in a pool of 25 legs. The high resolution melt analysis combined with rapid DNA extraction could be used as an inexpensive method to genetically differentiate large numbers of H. armigera and H. zea using readily available reagents. PMID:26516166

  11. Rapid Identification of Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Using Ribosomal RNA Internal Transcribed Spacer 1

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Omaththage P.; Allen, Kerry C.; Jain, Devendra; Purcell, Matthew; Little, Nathan S.; Luttrell, Randall G.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification of invasive species is crucial for deploying management strategies to prevent establishment. Recent Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) invasions and subsequent establishment in South America has increased the risk of this species invading North America. Morphological similarities make differentiation of H. armigera from the native Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) difficult. Characteristics of adult male genitalia and nucleotide sequence differences in mitochondrial DNA are two of the currently available methods to differentiate these two species. However, current methods are likely too slow to be employed as rapid detection methods. In this study, conserved differences in the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the ribosomal RNA genes were used to develop species-specific oligonucleotide primers that amplified ITS1 fragments of 147 and 334 bp from H. armigera and H. zea, respectively. An amplicon (83 bp) from a conserved region of 18S ribosomal RNA subunit served as a positive control. Melting temperature differences in ITS1 amplicons yielded species-specific dissociation curves that could be used in high resolution melt analysis to differentiate the two Helicoverpa species. In addition, a rapid and inexpensive procedure for obtaining amplifiable genomic DNA from a small amount of tissue was identified. Under optimal conditions, the process was able to detect DNA from one H. armigera leg in a pool of 25 legs. The high resolution melt analysis combined with rapid DNA extraction could be used as an inexpensive method to genetically differentiate large numbers of H. armigera and H. zea using readily available reagents. PMID:26516166

  12. Influence of commonly used primer systems on automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis of bacterial communities in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Purahong, Witoon; Stempfhuber, Barbara; Lentendu, Guillaume; Francioli, Davide; Reitz, Thomas; Buscot, François; Schloter, Michael; Krüger, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Due to the high diversity of bacteria in many ecosystems, their slow generation times, specific but mostly unknown nutrient requirements and syntrophic interactions, isolation based approaches in microbial ecology mostly fail to describe microbial community structure. Thus, cultivation independent techniques, which rely on directly extracted nucleic acids from the environment, are a well-used alternative. For example, bacterial automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (B-ARISA) is one of the widely used methods for fingerprinting bacterial communities after PCR-based amplification of selected regions of the operon coding for rRNA genes using community DNA. However, B-ARISA alone does not provide any taxonomic information and the results may be severely biased in relation to the primer set selection. Fu