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Sample records for gene structure identification

  1. Identification of Enzyme Genes Using Chemical Structure Alignments of Substrate-Product Pairs.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Yuki; Yamada, Takuji; Okuda, Shujiro; Nakagawa, Zenichi; Kotera, Masaaki; Tokimatsu, Toshiaki; Kanehisa, Minoru; Goto, Susumu

    2016-03-28

    Although there are several databases that contain data on many metabolites and reactions in biochemical pathways, there is still a big gap in the numbers between experimentally identified enzymes and metabolites. It is supposed that many catalytic enzyme genes are still unknown. Although there are previous studies that estimate the number of candidate enzyme genes, these studies required some additional information aside from the structures of metabolites such as gene expression and order in the genome. In this study, we developed a novel method to identify a candidate enzyme gene of a reaction using the chemical structures of the substrate-product pair (reactant pair). The proposed method is based on a search for similar reactant pairs in a reference database and offers ortholog groups that possibly mediate the given reaction. We applied the proposed method to two experimentally validated reactions. As a result, we confirmed that the histidine transaminase was correctly identified. Although our method could not directly identify the asparagine oxo-acid transaminase, we successfully found the paralog gene most similar to the correct enzyme gene. We also applied our method to infer candidate enzyme genes in the mesaconate pathway. The advantage of our method lies in the prediction of possible genes for orphan enzyme reactions where any associated gene sequences are not determined yet. We believe that this approach will facilitate experimental identification of genes for orphan enzymes. PMID:26822930

  2. A Metastate HMM with Application to Gene Structure Identification in Eukaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters-Hilt, Stephen; Baribault, Carl

    2010-12-01

    We introduce a generalized-clique hidden Markov model (HMM) and apply it to gene finding in eukaryotes ( C. elegans). We demonstrate a HMM structure identification platform that is novel and robustly-performing in a number of ways. The generalized clique HMM begins by enlarging the primitive hidden states associated with the individual base labels (as exon, intron, or junk) to substrings of primitive hidden states, or footprint states, having a minimal length greater than the footprint state length. The emissions are likewise expanded to higher order in the fundamental joint probability that is the basis of the generalized-clique, or "metastate", HMM. We then consider application to eukaryotic gene finding and show how such a metastate HMM improves the strength of coding/noncoding-transition contributions to gene-structure identification. We will describe situations where the coding/noncoding-transition modeling can effectively recapture the exon and intron heavy tail distribution modeling capability as well as manage the exon-start needle-in-the-haystack problem. In analysis of the C. elegans genome we show that the sensitivity and specificity (SN,SP) results for both the individual-state and full-exon predictions are greatly enhanced over the standard HMM when using the generalized-clique HMM.

  3. The structure of the human peripherin gene (PRPH) and identification of potential regulatory elements

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, J.; Ley, C.A.; Parysek, L.M.

    1994-07-15

    The authors determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the coding region of the human peripherin gene (PRPH), as well as 742 bp 5{prime} to the cap site and 584 bp 3{prime} to the stop codon, and compared its structure and sequence to the rat and mouse genes. The overall structure of 9 exons separated by 8 introns is conserved among these three mammalian species. The nucleotide sequences of the human peripherin gene exons were 90% identical to the rat gene sequences, and the predicted human peripherin protein differed from rat peripherin at only 18 of 475 amino acid residues. Comparison of the 5{prime} flanking regions of the human peripherin gene and rodent genes revealed extensive areas of high homology. Additional conserved segments were found in introns 1 and 2. Within the 5{prime} region, potential regulatory sequences, including a nerve growth factor negative regulatory element, a Hox protein binding site, and a heat shock element, were identified in all peripherin genes. The positional conservation of each element suggests that they may be important in the tissue-specific, developmental-specific, and injury-specific expression of the peripherin gene. 24 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Identification of a Gene Essential for Sheathed Structure Formation in Sphaerotilus natans, a Filamentous Sheathed Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Toshihiko; Kanagawa, Takahiro; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2002-01-01

    Sphaerotilus natans, a filamentous bacterium that causes bulking in activated sludge processes, can assume two distinct morphologies, depending on the substrate concentration for growth; in substrate-rich media it grows as single rod-shaped cells, whereas in substrate-limited media it grows as filaments. To identify genes responsible for sheath formation, we carried out transposon Tn5 mutagenesis. Of the approximately 20,000 mutants obtained, 7 did not form sheathed structures. Sequencing of the Tn5-flanking regions showed that five of the seven Tn5 insertions converged at the same open reading frame, designated sthA. The deduced amino acids encoded by sthA were found to be homologous to glycosyltransferase, which is known to be involved in linking sugars to lipid carriers during bacterial exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Disruption of the gene of the wild-type strain by inserting a kanamycin resistance gene cassette also resulted in sheathless growth under either type of nutrient condition. These findings indicate that sthA is a crucial component responsible for sheath formation. PMID:11772646

  5. Identification, sequencing and structural analysis of a nifA-like gene of Acetobacter diazotrophicus.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, K R; Morgan, T; Meletzus, D; Galler, R; Baldani, J I; Kennedy, C

    1999-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid, pAD101, containing a DNA fragment of Acetobacter diazotrophicus strain PAL5 was isolated by its ability to restore Nif+ phenotype to a nifA- ntrC- double mutant of Azotobacter vinelandii. Hybridization with the nifA genes of Azospirillum brasilense located the nifA gene more precisely to specific fragments of pAD101. DNA sequencing of appropriate subclones of pAD101 revealed that the nifA gene was adjacent to the nifB gene in A. diazotrophicus, and the 5' end of the nifB gene was located downstream of the nitrogenase MoFe subunit gene, nifK. The deduced aminoacid sequence of A. diazotrophicus nifA and nifB gene were most similar to the NifA and NifB proteins of Azorhizobium caulinodans and Rhodobacter capsulatus, respectively. In addition, nucleotide sequences upstream of the A. diazotrophicus nifA-encoding region indicate features similar to those in the A. caulinodans nifA promoter region involved in O2 and fixed N regulation of nifA expression. PMID:10530336

  6. Molecular structure of uvrC gene of Escherichia coli: identification of DNA sequences required for transcription of the uvrC gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, S; Dowhan, W; Moses, R E

    1982-01-01

    We have carried out experiments to identify the regulatory regions of the uvrC gene of Escherichia coli. A uvrC+ plasmid, pUV7, containing the intact transcriptional unit for the uvrC gene, was used to subclone either the structural gene or combinations of the structural gene and 5'-flanking sequences. The plasmids so constructed were tested for ability to restore UV-resistant phenotype to uvrC- cells as an indication of expression of the uvrC gene. The chromosomal DNA in plasmid pUV7 was probed for strong binding with E. coli RNA polymerase in an attempt to identify a restriction fragment which bears the regulatory sequences for the uvrC transcriptional unit. The results indicate that DNA sequences at least 0.9 Kb upstream from the structural gene, but not the 5'-proximal sequences, regulate expression of the uvrC gene. Analysis of protein synthesis encoded by plasmid pUV7 and its derivatives suggest that there may be another gene that lies between the promoter and the uvrC gene and codes for a 27,000-Mr protein. The relation of this gene to uvrC function is not clear. Images PMID:6292835

  7. Mapping of the Proteinase B Structural Gene PRB1, in SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE and Identification of Nonsense Alleles within the Locus

    PubMed Central

    Zubenko, George S.; Mitchell, Aaron P.; Jones, Elizabeth W.

    1980-01-01

    We report the mapping of the structural gene for proteinase B, PRB1. It is located 1.1 cM proximal to CAN1 on the left arm of chromosome V of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have identified 34 amber and 12 ochre mutations among the 126 prb1 mutations in our collection. PMID:7009321

  8. Genome-wide identification of BURP domain-containing genes in rice reveals a gene family with diverse structures and responses to abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xipeng; Hou, Xin; Xie, Kabin; Xiong, Lizhong

    2009-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that a gene family encoding proteins containing BURP domains have diverse functions in plants, but systematic characterization of this gene family have not been reported. In this study, 17 BURP family genes (OsBURP01-17) were identified and analyzed in rice (Oryza sativa L.). These genes have diverse exon-intron structures and distinct organization of putative motifs. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of BURP protein sequences from rice and other plant species, the BURP family was classified into seven subfamilies, including two subfamilies (BURP V and BURP VI) with members from rice only and one subfamily (BURP VII) with members from monocotyledons only. Two BURP gene clusters, belonging to BURP V and BURP VI, were located in the duplicated region on chromosome 5 and 6 of rice, respectively. Transcript level analysis of BURP genes of rice in various tissues and organs revealed different tempo-spatial expression patterns, suggesting that these genes may function at different stages of plant growth and development. Interestingly, all the genes of the BURP VII subfamily were predominantly expressed in flower organs. We also investigated the expression patterns of BURP genes of rice under different stress conditions. The results suggested that, except for two genes (OsBURP01 and OsBURP13), all other members were induced by at least one of the stresses including drought, salt, cold, and abscisic acid treatment. Two genes (OsBURP05 and OsBURP16) were responsive to all the stress treatments and most of the OsBURP genes were responsive to salt stress. Promoter sequence analysis revealed an over-abundance of stress-related cis-elements in the stress-responsive genes. The data presented here provide important clues for elucidating the functions of genes of this family. PMID:19363683

  9. Identification of the genetic locus for the structural gene and a new regulatory gene for the synthesis of repressible alkaline phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Y.; Toh-e, A.; Oshima, Y.

    1982-02-01

    Two lines of evidence showed that the PHO8 gene encodes the structure of repressible, nonspecific alkaline phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: (I) the enzyme produced by a temperature-sensitive pho8 mutant at the permissive temperature (25/sup 0/C) was more thermolabile than that of the wild-type strain, and (II) the PHO8 gene showed a gene dosage effect on the enzyme activity. The pho8 locus has been mapped on chromosome IV, 8 centimorgans distal to rna3. A new mutant carrying the pho9 gene was isolated which lacks repressible alkaline phosphatase, but has the normal phenotype for the synthesis of repressible acid phosphatase. The pho9 gene segregated independently of all known pho-regulatory genes and did not show the gene dosage effect on repressible alkaline phosphatase activity. The pho9/pho9 diploid hardly sporulated and showed no commitment to intragenic recombination when it was inoculated on sporulation medium. Hence the pho9 mutant has a phenotype similar to the pep4 mutant, which was isolated as a pleiotropic mutant with reduced levels of proteinases A and B carboxypeptidase Y. An allelism test indicated that pho9 and pep4 are allelic.

  10. Identification of putative methanol dehydrogenase (moxF) structural genes in methylotrophs and cloning of moxF genes from Methylococcus capsulatus bath and Methylomonas albus BG8.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, R L; Haygood, M G; Lidstrom, M E

    1988-01-01

    An open-reading-frame fragment of a Methylobacterium sp. strain AM1 gene (moxF) encoding a portion of the methanol dehydrogenase structural protein has been used as a hybridization probe to detect similar sequences in a variety of methylotrophic bacteria. This hybridization was used to isolate clones containing putative moxF genes from two obligate methanotrophic bacteria, Methylococcus capsulatus Bath and Methylomonas albus BG8. The identity of these genes was confirmed in two ways. A T7 expression vector was used to produce methanol dehydrogenase protein in Escherichia coli from the cloned genes, and in each case the protein was identified by immunoblotting with antiserum against the Methylomonas albus methanol dehydrogenase. In addition, a moxF mutant of Methylobacterium strain AM1 was complemented to a methanol-positive phenotype that partially restored methanol dehydrogenase activity, using broad-host-range plasmids containing the moxF genes from each methanotroph. The partial complementation of a moxF mutant in a facultative serine pathway methanol utilizer by moxF genes from type I and type X obligate methane utilizers suggests broad functional conservation of the methanol oxidation system among gram-negative methylotrophs. Images PMID:3129400

  11. Identification of putative methanol dehydrogenase (moxF) structural genes in methylotrophs and cloning of moxF genes from methylococcus capsulatus bath and Methylomonas albus BG8

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, R.L.; Haygood, M.G.; Lidstrom, M.E.

    1988-05-01

    An open-reading-frame fragment of a Methylobacterium sp. strain AM1 gene (moxF) encoding a portion of the methanol dehydrogenase structural protein has been used as a hybridization probe to detect similar sequences in a variety of methylotrophic bacteria. This hybridization was used to isolate clones containing putative moxF genes from two obligate methanotrophic bacteria, Methylococcus capsulatus Bath and Methylomonas albus BG8. The identity of these genes was confirmed in two ways. A T7 expression vector was used to produce methanol dehydrogenase protein in Escherichia coli from the cloned genes,a and in each case the protein was identified by immunoblotting with antiserum against the Methylomonas albus methanol dehydrogenase. In addition, a moxF mutant of Methylobacterium strain AM1 was complemented to a methanol-positive phenotype that partially restored methanol dehydrogenase activity, using broad-host-range plasmids containing the moxF genes from each methanotroph. The partial complementation of a moxF mutant in a facultative serine pathway methanol utilizer by moxF genes from type I and type X obligate methane utilizers suggests broad functional conservation of the methanol oxidation system among gram-negative methylotrophs.

  12. Identification of causal genes for complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Hormozdiari, Farhad; Kichaev, Gleb; Yang, Wen-Yun; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Eskin, Eleazar

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of variants associated with common diseases and complex traits, only a handful of these variants are validated to be causal. We consider ‘causal variants’ as variants which are responsible for the association signal at a locus. As opposed to association studies that benefit from linkage disequilibrium (LD), the main challenge in identifying causal variants at associated loci lies in distinguishing among the many closely correlated variants due to LD. This is particularly important for model organisms such as inbred mice, where LD extends much further than in human populations, resulting in large stretches of the genome with significantly associated variants. Furthermore, these model organisms are highly structured and require correction for population structure to remove potential spurious associations. Results: In this work, we propose CAVIAR-Gene (CAusal Variants Identification in Associated Regions), a novel method that is able to operate across large LD regions of the genome while also correcting for population structure. A key feature of our approach is that it provides as output a minimally sized set of genes that captures the genes which harbor causal variants with probability ρ. Through extensive simulations, we demonstrate that our method not only speeds up computation, but also have an average of 10% higher recall rate compared with the existing approaches. We validate our method using a real mouse high-density lipoprotein data (HDL) and show that CAVIAR-Gene is able to identify Apoa2 (a gene known to harbor causal variants for HDL), while reducing the number of genes that need to be tested for functionality by a factor of 2. Availability and implementation: Software is freely available for download at genetics.cs.ucla.edu/caviar. Contact: eeskin@cs.ucla.edu PMID:26072484

  13. Identification, structural characterisation and expression analysis of a defensin gene from the tiger beetle Calomera littoralis (Coleoptera: Cicindelidae).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-García, María Juliana; García-Reina, Andrés; Machado, Vilmar; Galián, José

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a defensin gene (Clit-Def) has been characterised in the tiger beetle Calomera littoralis for the first time. Bioinformatic analysis showed that the gene has an open reading frame of 246bp that contains a 46 amino acid mature peptide. The phylogenetic analysis showed a high variability in the coleopteran defensins analysed. The Clit-Def mature peptide has the features to be involved in the antimicrobial function: a predicted cationic isoelectric point of 8.94, six cysteine residues that form three disulfide bonds, and the typical cysteine-stabilized α-helix β-sheet (CSαβ) structural fold. Real time quantitative PCR analysis showed that Clit-Def was upregulated in the different body parts analysed after infection with lipopolysaccharides of Escherichia coli, and also indicated that has an expression peak at 12h post infection. The expression patterns of Clit-Def suggest that this gene plays important roles in the humoral system in the adephagan beetle Calomera littoralis. PMID:27210512

  14. Genomic structure of the human plasma prekallikrein gene, identification of allelic variants, and analysis in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, H; Anderson, P J; Freedman, B I; Rich, S S; Bowden, D W

    2000-10-15

    Kallikreins are serine proteases that catalyze the release of kinins and other vasoactive peptides. Previously, we have studied one tissue-specific (H. Yu et al., 1996, J. Am. Soc. Nephrol. 7: 2559-2564) and one plasma-specific (H. Yu et al., 1998, Hypertension 31: 906-911) human kallikrein gene in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Short sequence repeat polymorphisms for the human plasma kallikrein gene (KLKB1; previously known as KLK3) on chromosome 4 were associated with ESRD in an African American study population. This study of KLKB1 in ESRD has been extended by determining the genomic structure of KLKB1 and searching for allelic variants that may be associated with ESRD. Exon-spanning PCR primer sets were identified by serial testing of primer pairs designed from KLKB1 cDNA sequence and DNA sequencing of PCR products. Like the rat plasma kallikrein gene and the closely related human factor XI gene, the human KLKB1 gene contains 15 exons and 14 introns. The longest intron, F, is almost 12 kb long. The total length of the gene is approximately 30 kb. Sequence of the 5'-proximal promoter region of KLKB1 was obtained by shotgun cloning of genomic fragments from a bacterial artificial clone containing the KLKB1 gene, followed by screening of the clones using exon 1-specific probes. Primers flanking the exons and 5'-proximal promoter region were used to screen for allelic variants in the genomic DNA from ESRD patients and controls using the single-strand conformation polymorphism technique. We identified 12 allelic variants in the 5'-proximal promoter and 7 exons. Of note were a common polymorphism (30% of the population) at position 521 of KLKB1 cDNA, which leads to the replacement of asparagine with a serine at position 124 in the heavy chain of the A2 domain of the protein. In addition, an A716C polymorphism in exon 7 resulting in the amino acid change H189P in the A3 domain of the heavy chain was observed in 5 patients belonging to 3 ESRD families. A third

  15. Complete sequence of the Rous sarcoma virus env gene: identification of structural and functional regions of its product.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, E; Hill, E; Hardwick, M; Bhown, A; Schwartz, D E; Tizard, R

    1983-01-01

    The amino-terminal amino acid sequences of gp85 and gp37, the envelope glycoproteins of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), were determined. Alignment of these sequences with the amino acid sequence predicted from the complete nucleotide sequence of the Prague strain of RSV, subgroup C (PR-C), has allowed us to delineate the env gene-coding region of this virus. The coding sequences for gp85 and gp37 have been placed in an open reading frame that extends from nucleotide 5045 to nucleotide 6862 and predict sizes of 341 amino acids (36,962 molecular weight) for gp85 and 198 amino acids (21,566 molecular weight) for gp37. Carbohydrate makes a significant contribution to the observed molecular weights of these polypeptides--the amino acid sequence contains 14 potential glycosylation sites (Asn-X-Ser/Thr) in gp85 and two in gp37. Experiments aimed at estimating the number of carbohydrate side chains yielded results consistent with most or all of these sites being occupied. Although an initiation codon is located early (codon 4) in the open reading frame, it is likely that splicing yields an mRNA on which translation initiates at the same AUG as that of the gag gene to produce a nascent polypeptide in which gp85 is preceded by a 62-amino-acid-long leader peptide. This leader contains the hydrophobic sequence (signal sequence) necessary for translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum and is completely removed from the env gene product during translation. The polyprotein precursor, Pr95env, is cleaved to gp85 and gp37 at the carboxyl side of the basic sequence:-Arg-Arg-Lys-Arg-. gp85 is attached through a disulphide linkage to gp37, and although the positions of the cysteines involved in this linkage are not known, the presence of a 27-amino-acid-long hydrophobic region at the carboxy-terminus of gp37 is consistent with its role as a membrane anchor for the viral glycoprotein complex. The location of host range variable regions with respect to the possible tertiary structure of

  16. Mapping of the structural gene of pseudorabies virus glycoprotein A and identification of two non-glycosylated precursor polypeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Mettenleiter, T C; Lukacs, N; Rziha, H J

    1985-01-01

    Cell-free translation of pseudorabies virus RNA isolated during the late phase of the infectious cycle yielded a variety of polypeptides. A monoclonal antibody directed against one of the major viral glycoproteins, gA, immunoprecipitated two polypeptides ranging in molecular weight from 78K to 83K. To localize the structural gene for gA, we used cloned BamHI fragments of the viral DNA to select specific mRNA species and immunoprecipitated their in vitro translation products with the anti-gA monoclonal antibody. This allowed us to map the genomic region encoding the mRNA for the gA within the short unique region of the viral genome on BamHI fragments 7 and 12. Additional polypeptides encoded by this region were characterized by their electrophoretic mobility. In three virus strains tested a similar, but strain-specific, pattern of the two gA precursors was found which was not dependent on the host cell or the state of infection after reaching the late phase. Images PMID:2981362

  17. Identification of a Caulobacter basal body structural gene and a cis-acting site required for activation of transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Dingwall, A; Gober, J W; Shapiro, L

    1990-01-01

    The genes that encode the components and regulatory proteins of the Caulobacter crescentus flagellum are transcribed at specific times in the cell cycle. One of these genes, flbN, is required early in the flagellar assembly process. The flbN gene was cloned and sequenced, and the time of transcription activation was determined. The derived amino acid sequence indicates that fibN encodes a 25-kilodalton protein with a cleavable leader peptide. The flbN-encoded protein has 30.8% identity with the protein encoded by the Salmonella typhimurium basal body L-ring gene, flgH. Site-directed mutagenesis and gel mobility shift assays identified a binding site at -100 from the transcription start site for a trans-acting protein, RF-2, that functions to partially activate flbN transcription at a defined time in the cell cycle. The RF-2 binding region is similar to a NifA binding site normally used in the activation of some sigma 54 promoters involved in nitrogen fixation in other bacteria. Transcription of a flbN-reporter gene fusion in an Escherichia coli background was dependent on the presence of a NifA transcription factor supplied by a plasmid-borne Rhizobium meliloti gene encoding NifA. A deletion or base changes in the RF-2 binding region eliminated expression of the flbN gene in E. coli even when a NifA protein was provided in trans, suggesting that a sigma 54 promoter with an upstream activator element is used by the C. crescentus flbN gene. A consensus sequence for a sigma 54 promoter was found at the appropriate distance 5' to one of two identified transcription start sites. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that a conserved nucleotide in this sigma 54 promoter consensus sequence was required for transcription. Deletion of the region 5' to the apparent sigma 54 promoter caused a complete loss of transcription activation. Transcription activation of flbN in C. crescentus involves the combination of several elements: the NifA-like site is required for full

  18. A genomewide survey of homeobox genes and identification of novel structure of the Hox cluster in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Chai, Chun-Li; Zhang, Ze; Huang, Fei-Fei; Wang, Xian-Yan; Yu, Quan-You; Liu, Bin-Bin; Tian, Tian; Xia, Qing-You; Lu, Cheng; Xiang, Zhong-Huai

    2008-12-01

    Homeobox genes encode transcriptional factors that play crucial roles in a variety of developmental pathways from unicellular to multicellular eukaryotes. We have identified 102 homeobox genes in the typical insect of Lepidoptera, Bombyx mori, based on the newly assembled genome sequence with 9X coverage. These identified homeobox genes were categorized into nine classes including at least 74 families. The available ESTs and microarray data at present confirmed that more than half of them were expressed during silkworm developmental processes. Orthologs of pb, zen and ftz were newly identified in the Bombyx Hox cluster on chromosome 6. Interestingly, a special group of 12 tandemly duplicated homeobox genes was found located between Bmpb and Bmzen in the Bombyx Hox cluster, suggesting that Hox cluster might have experienced a lineage-specific expansion in the silkworm. A detailed analysis on genome data reveals that a split exists between Bmlab and Bmpb. Our data provide valuable information for future research on the development and evolution of silkworm. PMID:19280701

  19. Isolated populations and complex disease gene identification

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansson, Kati; Naukkarinen, Jussi; Peltonen, Leena

    2008-01-01

    The utility of genetically isolated populations (population isolates) in the mapping and identification of genes is not only limited to the study of rare diseases; isolated populations also provide a useful resource for studies aimed at improved understanding of the biology underlying common diseases and their component traits. Well characterized human populations provide excellent study samples for many different genetic investigations, ranging from genome-wide association studies to the characterization of interactions between genes and the environment. PMID:18771588

  20. Structural system identification: Structural dynamics model validation

    SciTech Connect

    Red-Horse, J.R.

    1997-04-01

    Structural system identification is concerned with the development of systematic procedures and tools for developing predictive analytical models based on a physical structure`s dynamic response characteristics. It is a multidisciplinary process that involves the ability (1) to define high fidelity physics-based analysis models, (2) to acquire accurate test-derived information for physical specimens using diagnostic experiments, (3) to validate the numerical simulation model by reconciling differences that inevitably exist between the analysis model and the experimental data, and (4) to quantify uncertainties in the final system models and subsequent numerical simulations. The goal of this project was to develop structural system identification techniques and software suitable for both research and production applications in code and model validation.

  1. Precorrin-6x reductase from Pseudomonas denitrificans: purification and characterization of the enzyme and identification of the structural gene.

    PubMed Central

    Blanche, F; Thibaut, D; Famechon, A; Debussche, L; Cameron, B; Crouzet, J

    1992-01-01

    Precorrin-6x reductase, which catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of precorrin-6x to a dihydro derivative named precorrin-6y, was purified 14,300-fold to homogeneity with an 8% yield from extracts of a recombinant strain of Pseudomonas denitrificans. Precorrin-6y was identified by fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry. It was converted in high yield (90%) to hydrogenobyrinic acid by cell-free protein preparations from P. denitrificans. For the purification and characterization of precorrin-6x reductase, a coupled-enzyme radioenzymatic assay was developed in which precorrin-6y was methylated in situ by the cobL gene product (F. Blanche, A. Famechon, D. Thibaut, L. Debussche, B. Cameron, J. Crouzet, J. Bacteriol. 174:1050-1052, 1992) in the presence of [methyl-3H]S-adenosyl-L-methionine. Molecular weights of precorrin-6x reductase obtained by gel filtration (Mr congruent to 27,000) and by analytical sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (Mr congruent to 31,000) were consistent with the enzyme being a monomer. Km values of 3.6 +/- 0.2 microM for precorrin-6x and 23.5 +/- 3.5 microM for NADPH and a Vmax value of 17,000 U mg-1 were obtained at pH 7.7. The N-terminal sequence (six amino acids) and three internal sequences obtained after tryptic digestion of the enzyme were determined by microsequencing and established that precorrin-6x reductase is encoded by the cobK gene, located on a previously described 8.7-kb EcoRI fragment (J. Crouzet, B. Cameron, L. Cauchois, S. Rigault, M.-C. Rouyez, F. Blanche, D. Thibaut, and L. Debussche, J. Bacteriol. 172:5980-5990, 1990). However, the coding sequence was shown to be on the strand complementary to the one previously proposed as the coding strand. Images PMID:1732193

  2. Identification of acquired antimicrobial resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    Zankari, Ea; Hasman, Henrik; Cosentino, Salvatore; Vestergaard, Martin; Rasmussen, Simon; Lund, Ole; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Larsen, Mette Voldby

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Identification of antimicrobial resistance genes is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms and the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available in routine diagnostic laboratories and is anticipated to substitute traditional methods for resistance gene identification. Thus, the current challenge is to extract the relevant information from the large amount of generated data. Methods We developed a web-based method, ResFinder that uses BLAST for identification of acquired antimicrobial resistance genes in whole-genome data. As input, the method can use both pre-assembled, complete or partial genomes, and short sequence reads from four different sequencing platforms. The method was evaluated on 1862 GenBank files containing 1411 different resistance genes, as well as on 23 de-novo-sequenced isolates. Results When testing the 1862 GenBank files, the method identified the resistance genes with an ID = 100% (100% identity) to the genes in ResFinder. Agreement between in silico predictions and phenotypic testing was found when the method was further tested on 23 isolates of five different bacterial species, with available phenotypes. Furthermore, ResFinder was evaluated on WGS chromosomes and plasmids of 30 isolates. Seven of these isolates were annotated to have antimicrobial resistance, and in all cases, annotations were compatible with the ResFinder results. Conclusions A web server providing a convenient way of identifying acquired antimicrobial resistance genes in completely sequenced isolates was created. ResFinder can be accessed at www.genomicepidemiology.org. ResFinder will continuously be updated as new resistance genes are identified. PMID:22782487

  3. Familial Identification: Population Structure and Relationship Distinguishability

    PubMed Central

    Rohlfs, Rori V.; Fullerton, Stephanie Malia; Weir, Bruce S.

    2012-01-01

    With the expansion of offender/arrestee DNA profile databases, genetic forensic identification has become commonplace in the United States criminal justice system. Implementation of familial searching has been proposed to extend forensic identification to family members of individuals with profiles in offender/arrestee DNA databases. In familial searching, a partial genetic profile match between a database entrant and a crime scene sample is used to implicate genetic relatives of the database entrant as potential sources of the crime scene sample. In addition to concerns regarding civil liberties, familial searching poses unanswered statistical questions. In this study, we define confidence intervals on estimated likelihood ratios for familial identification. Using these confidence intervals, we consider familial searching in a structured population. We show that relatives and unrelated individuals from population samples with lower gene diversity over the loci considered are less distinguishable. We also consider cases where the most appropriate population sample for individuals considered is unknown. We find that as a less appropriate population sample, and thus allele frequency distribution, is assumed, relatives and unrelated individuals become more difficult to distinguish. In addition, we show that relationship distinguishability increases with the number of markers considered, but decreases for more distant genetic familial relationships. All of these results indicate that caution is warranted in the application of familial searching in structured populations, such as in the United States. PMID:22346758

  4. The pregnancy-specific glycoprotein (PSG) gene cluster on human chromosome 19: Fine structure of the 11 PSG genes and identification of 6 new genes forming a third subgroup within the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family

    SciTech Connect

    Teglund, S.; Fraengsmyr, L.; Hammarstroem, S.

    1994-10-01

    The human pregnancy-specific glycoprotein (PSG) genes belong to the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family, which in turn is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. We have analyzed a 700-kb cosmid contig spanning the PSG region on chromosome 19q13.2. The region contains 11 closely related PSG genes organized in tandem with a highly conserved structure and organization. Seven novel genes (CGM12 to CGM18) were found in the PSG region. CGM12 belongs to the CEA subgroup and appears to be a pseudogene. CGM13 to CGM18 forms a third new subgroup within the CEA gene family. The members of this new subgroup show 94-99% identity to each other but only 70-80% to other members of either the CEA or the PSG subgroups. They are composed of exons encoding two IgC-like domains and short hydrophilic carboxyl terminals similar to those of the PSGs. Unlike any of the known CEA family genes, however, they seem to lack the exon for an IgV-like N-terminal domain. 54 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. The gene identification problem: An overview for developers

    SciTech Connect

    Fickett, J.W.

    1995-03-27

    The gene identification problem is the problem of interpreting nucleotide sequences by computer, in order to provide tentative annotation on the location, structure, and functional class of protein-coding genes. This problem is of self-evident importance, and is far from being fully solved, particularly for higher eukaryotes, Thus it is not surprising that the number of algorithm and software developers working in this area is rapidly increasing. The present paper is an overview of the field, with an emphasis on eukaryotes, for such developers.

  6. Structure of the human glucokinase gene and identification of a missense mutation in a Japanese patient with early-onset non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Sakura, Hiroshi; Eto, Kazuhiro; Ueno, Hirohisa; Yazaki, Yoshio; Kadowaki, Takashi ); Kadowaki, Hiroko; Simokawa, Kotaro; Akanuma, Yasuo ); Koda, Naoya; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu )

    1992-12-01

    Glucokinase is thought to play a glucose-sensor role in the pancreas, and abnormalities in its structure, function, and regulation can induce diabetes. The authors isolated the human glucokinase gene, and determined its genomic structure including exon-intron boundaries. Structure of the glucokinase gene in human was very similar to that in rat. Then, by screening Japanese diabetic patients using polymerase chain reaction - single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and direct-sequencing strategies, they identified a missense mutation substituting ariginine (AGG) for glycine (GGG) at position 261 in exon 7 of the glucokinase gene in a patient with early-onset non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM). 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Genome-wide identification, structural analysis and new insights into late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) gene family formation pattern in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu; Xiong, Ziyi; Zheng, Jianxiao; Xu, Dongyang; Zhu, Zeyang; Xiang, Jun; Gan, Jianping; Raboanatahiry, Nadia; Yin, Yongtai; Li, Maoteng

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a diverse and large group of polypeptides that play important roles in desiccation and freezing tolerance in plants. The LEA family has been systematically characterized in some plants but not Brassica napus. In this study, 108 BnLEA genes were identified in the B. napus genome and classified into eight families based on their conserved domains. Protein sequence alignments revealed an abundance of alanine, lysine and glutamic acid residues in BnLEA proteins. The BnLEA gene structure has few introns (<3), and they are distributed unevenly across all 19 chromosomes in B. napus, occurring as gene clusters in chromosomes A9, C2, C4 and C5. More than two-thirds of the BnLEA genes are associated with segmental duplication. Synteny analysis revealed that most LEA genes are conserved, although gene losses or gains were also identified. These results suggest that segmental duplication and whole-genome duplication played a major role in the expansion of the BnLEA gene family. Expression profiles analysis indicated that expression of most BnLEAs was increased in leaves and late stage seeds. This study presents a comprehensive overview of the LEA gene family in B. napus and provides new insights into the formation of this family. PMID:27072743

  8. Genome-wide identification, structural analysis and new insights into late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) gene family formation pattern in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yu; Xiong, Ziyi; Zheng, Jianxiao; Xu, Dongyang; Zhu, Zeyang; Xiang, Jun; Gan, Jianping; Raboanatahiry, Nadia; Yin, Yongtai; Li, Maoteng

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a diverse and large group of polypeptides that play important roles in desiccation and freezing tolerance in plants. The LEA family has been systematically characterized in some plants but not Brassica napus. In this study, 108 BnLEA genes were identified in the B. napus genome and classified into eight families based on their conserved domains. Protein sequence alignments revealed an abundance of alanine, lysine and glutamic acid residues in BnLEA proteins. The BnLEA gene structure has few introns (<3), and they are distributed unevenly across all 19 chromosomes in B. napus, occurring as gene clusters in chromosomes A9, C2, C4 and C5. More than two-thirds of the BnLEA genes are associated with segmental duplication. Synteny analysis revealed that most LEA genes are conserved, although gene losses or gains were also identified. These results suggest that segmental duplication and whole-genome duplication played a major role in the expansion of the BnLEA gene family. Expression profiles analysis indicated that expression of most BnLEAs was increased in leaves and late stage seeds. This study presents a comprehensive overview of the LEA gene family in B. napus and provides new insights into the formation of this family. PMID:27072743

  9. Structural Aspects of System Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, Keith

    1973-01-01

    The problem of identifying linear dynamical systems is studied by considering structural and deterministic properties of linear systems that have an impact on stochastic identification algorithms. In particular considered is parametrization of linear systems so that there is a unique solution and all systems in appropriate class can be represented. It is assumed that a parametrization of system matrices has been established from a priori knowledge of the system, and the question is considered of when the unknown parameters of this system can be identified from input/output observations. It is assumed that the transfer function can be asymptotically identified, and the conditions are derived for the local, global and partial identifiability of the parametrization. Then it is shown that, with the right formulation, identifiability in the presence of feedback can be treated in the same way. Similarly the identifiability of parametrizations of systems driven by unobserved white noise is considered using the results from the theory of spectral factorization.

  10. Identification of genes associated with melanoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Tao; Wang, Hongyi; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Yu; Hui, Qiang; Tao, Kai

    2015-11-01

    The aims of the study were to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between primary melanomas and metastasis melanomas (MMs), and to investigate the mechanisms of MMs. The microarray data GSE8401 including 31 primary melanomas and 52 MMs were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. DEGs were identified using the Linear Models for Microarray Data package. The functional and pathway enrichment analyses were performed for DEGs. Identification of transcription factors, tumor-associated genes (TAGs), and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) were performed with the TRANSFAC, TAG, and TSGene databases, respectively. A protein-protein interaction network was constructed using Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes. The modules construction and analysis was performed using Molecular Complex Detection and Gene Cluster with Literature Profiles, respectively. In total, 1004 upregulated and 1008 downregulated DEGs were identified. The upregulated DEGs, such as CDK1, BRCA1, MAD2L1, and PCNA, were significantly enriched in cell cycles, DNA replication, and mismatch repair. The downregulated DEGs, such as COLIAL, COL4A5, COL18A1, and LAMC2, were enriched in cell adhesion and extracellular matrix-receptor interaction. BRCA1 was identified as a transcription factor and TSG, and COL18A1 and LAMC2 were identified as a TSG and TAG, respectively. The upregulated DEGs had higher degrees in the protein-protein interaction network and module, such as PCNA, CDK1, and MAD2L1, and the heat map showed they were clustered in the functions of cell cycle and division. These results may demonstrate the potential roles of DEGs such as CDK1, BRCA1, COL18A1, and LAMC2 in the mechanism of MM. PMID:26678934

  11. Structural system identification of a composite shell

    SciTech Connect

    Red-Horse, J.R.; Carne, T.G.; James, G.H.; Witkowski, W.R.

    1991-12-31

    Structural system identification is undergoing a period of renewed interest. Probabilistic approaches to physical parameter identification in analysis finite element models make uncertainty in test results an important issue. In this paper, we investigate this issue with a simple, though in many ways representative, structural system. The results of two modal parameter identification techniques are compared and uncertainty estimates, both through bias and random errors, are quantified. The importance of the interaction between test and analysis is also highlighted. 25 refs.

  12. Structural system identification of a composite shell

    SciTech Connect

    Red-Horse, J.R.; Carne, T.G.; James, G.H.; Witkowski, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    Structural system identification is undergoing a period of renewed interest. Probabilistic approaches to physical parameter identification in analysis finite element models make uncertainty in test results an important issue. In this paper, we investigate this issue with a simple, though in many ways representative, structural system. The results of two modal parameter identification techniques are compared and uncertainty estimates, both through bias and random errors, are quantified. The importance of the interaction between test and analysis is also highlighted. 25 refs.

  13. Recovery of Dominant, Autosomal Flightless Mutants of Drosophila Melanogaster and Identification of a New Gene Required for Normal Muscle Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, R. M.; Ball, E.; Stark, M.; Lawn, A.; Sparrow, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    To identify further mutations affecting muscle function and development in Drosophila melanogaster we recovered 22 autosomal dominant flightless mutations. From these we have isolated eight viable and lethal alleles of the muscle myosin heavy chain gene, and seven viable alleles of the indirect flight muscle (IFM)-specific Act88F actin gene. The Mhc mutations display a variety of phenotypic effects, ranging from reductions in myosin heavy chain content in the indirect flight muscles only, to reductions in the levels of this protein in other muscles. The Act88F mutations range from those which produce no stable actin and have severely abnormal myofibrillar structure, to those which accumulate apparently normal levels of actin in the flight muscles but which still have abnormal myofibrils and fly very poorly. We also recovered two recessive flightless mutants on the third chromosome. The remaining five dominant flightless mutations are all lethal alleles of a gene named lethal(3)Laker. The Laker alleles have been characterized and the gene located in polytene bands 62A10,B1-62B2,4. Laker is a previously unidentified locus which is haplo-insufficient for flight. In addition, adult wild-type heterozygotes and the lethal larval trans-heterozygotes show abnormalities of muscle structure indicating that the Laker gene product is an important component of muscle. PMID:8056306

  14. Identification and characteristics of the structural gene for the Drosophila eye colour mutant sepia, encoding PDA synthase, a member of the omega class glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaekwang; Suh, Hyunsuk; Kim, Songhee; Kim, Kiyoung; Ahn, Chiyoung; Yim, Jeongbin

    2006-09-15

    The eye colour mutant sepia (se1) is defective in PDA {6-acetyl-2-amino-3,7,8,9-tetrahydro-4H-pyrimido[4,5-b]-[1,4]diazepin-4-one or pyrimidodiazepine} synthase involved in the conversion of 6-PTP (2-amino-4-oxo-6-pyruvoyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropteridine; also known as 6-pyruvoyltetrahydropterin) into PDA, a key intermediate in drosopterin biosynthesis. However, the identity of the gene encoding this enzyme, as well as its molecular properties, have not yet been established. Here, we identify and characterize the gene encoding PDA synthase and show that it is the structural gene for sepia. Based on previously reported information [Wiederrecht, Paton and Brown (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 2195-2200; Wiederrecht and Brown (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 14121-14127; Andres (1945) Drosoph. Inf. Serv. 19, 45; Ingham, Pinchin, Howard and Ish-Horowicz (1985) Genetics 111, 463-486; Howard, Ingham and Rushlow (1988) Genes Dev. 2, 1037-1046], we isolated five candidate genes predicted to encode GSTs (glutathione S-transferases) from the presumed sepia locus (region 66D5 on chromosome 3L). All cloned and expressed candidates exhibited relatively high thiol transferase and dehydroascorbate reductase activities and low activity towards 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, characteristic of Omega class GSTs, whereas only CG6781 catalysed the synthesis of PDA in vitro. The molecular mass of recombinant CG6781 was estimated to be 28 kDa by SDS/PAGE and 56 kDa by gel filtration, indicating that it is a homodimer under native conditions. Sequencing of the genomic region spanning CG6781 revealed that the se1 allele has a frameshift mutation from 'AAGAA' to 'GTG' at nt 190-194, and that this generates a premature stop codon. Expression of the CG6781 open reading frame in an se1 background rescued the eye colour defect as well as PDA synthase activity and drosopterins content. The extent of rescue was dependent on the dosage of transgenic CG6781. In conclusion, we have discovered a new catalytic

  15. Identification of 31 novel mutations in the F8 gene in Spanish hemophilia A patients: structural analysis of 20 missense mutations suggests new intermolecular binding sites.

    PubMed

    Venceslá, Adoración; Corral-Rodríguez, María Angeles; Baena, Manel; Cornet, Mónica; Domènech, Montserrat; Baiget, Montserrat; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Tizzano, Eduardo F

    2008-04-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by a wide variety of mutations in the factor 8 (F8) gene, leading to absent or deficient factor VIII (FVIII). We analyzed the F8 gene of 267 unrelated Spanish patients with HA. After excluding patients with the common intron-1 and intron-22 inversions and large deletions, we detected 137 individuals with small mutations, 31 of which had not been reported previously. Eleven of these were nonsense, frameshift, and splicing mutations, whereas 20 were missense changes. We assessed the impact of the 20 substitutions based on currently available information about FV and FVIII structure and function relationship, including previously reported results of replacements at these and topologically equivalent positions. Although most changes are likely to cause gross structural perturbations and concomitant cofactor instability, p.Ala375Ser is predicted to affect cofactor activation. Finally, 3 further mutations (p.Pro64Arg, p.Gly494Val, and p.Asp2267Gly) appear to affect cofactor interactions with its carrier protein, von Willebrand factor, with the scavenger receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), and/or with the substrate of the FVIIIapi*FIXa (Xase) complex, factor X. Characterization of these novel mutations is important for adequate genetic counseling in HA families, but also contributes to a better understanding of FVIII structure-function relationship. PMID:18184865

  16. Identification of 31 novel mutations in the F8 gene in Spanish hemophilia A patients: structural analysis of 20 missense mutations suggests new intermolecular binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Venceslá, Adoración; Corral-Rodríguez, María Ángeles; Baena, Manel; Cornet, Mónica; Domènech, Montserrat; Baiget, Montserrat; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo

    2008-01-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by a wide variety of mutations in the factor 8 (F8) gene, leading to absent or deficient factor VIII (FVIII). We analyzed the F8 gene of 267 unrelated Spanish patients with HA. After excluding patients with the common intron-1 and intron-22 inversions and large deletions, we detected 137 individuals with small mutations, 31 of which had not been reported previously. Eleven of these were nonsense, frameshift, and splicing mutations, whereas 20 were missense changes. We assessed the impact of the 20 substitutions based on currently available information about FV and FVIII structure and function relationship, including previously reported results of replacements at these and topologically equivalent positions. Although most changes are likely to cause gross structural perturbations and concomitant cofactor instability, p.Ala375Ser is predicted to affect cofactor activation. Finally, 3 further mutations (p.Pro64Arg, p.Gly494Val, and p.Asp2267Gly) appear to affect cofactor interactions with its carrier protein, von Willebrand factor, with the scavenger receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein (LRP), and/or with the substrate of the FVIIIapi•FIXa (Xase) complex, factor X. Characterization of these novel mutations is important for adequate genetic counseling in HA families, but also contributes to a better understanding of FVIII structure-function relationship. PMID:18184865

  17. System identification. [of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    1993-01-01

    Major issues in system identification are summarized and recent advances are reviewed. Modal testing and system identification used in control theory are examined, and the mathematical relationships and conversions of the models appropriate to modal testing and those appropriate to modern control design methods are discussed. The importance of obtaining input and output matrices in modal testing is emphasized, and the changes that may be needed in modal testing procedures to meet the needs of the control system designer are addressed. Directions for future research are considered.

  18. Identification and molecular characterization of defensin gene from the ant Formica aquilonia.

    PubMed

    Viljakainen, L; Pamilo, P

    2005-08-01

    The effectors of the insect immune system are antimicrobial peptides. With the aim of studying the evolution of immune system genes, we identified a gene encoding the antimicrobial peptide defensin from a social insect, the wood ant Formica aquilonia. In this article we report the identification and characterization of this gene. We also compare the ant defensin gene structure to that previously obtained from two other hymenopteran species, the honeybee, Apis mellifera, and the bumblebee, Bombus ignitus. The ant defensin gene structure differs from both of these bee defensins with respect to the number and length of introns and exons. PMID:16033427

  19. Identification of essential genes and synthetic lethal gene combinations in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hirotada; Baba, Tomoya; Yokoyama, Katsushi; Takeuchi, Rikiya; Nomura, Wataru; Makishi, Kazuichi; Otsuka, Yuta; Dose, Hitomi; Wanner, Barry L

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe the systematic identification of single genes and gene pairs, whose knockout causes lethality in Escherichia coli K-12. During construction of precise single-gene knockout library of E. coli K-12, we identified 328 essential gene candidates for growth in complex (LB) medium. Upon establishment of the Keio single-gene deletion library, we undertook the development of the ASKA single-gene deletion library carrying a different antibiotic resistance. In addition, we developed tools for identification of synthetic lethal gene combinations by systematic construction of double-gene knockout mutants. We introduce these methods herein. PMID:25636612

  20. [Hydrophidae identification through analysis on Cyt b gene barcode].

    PubMed

    Liao, Li-xi; Zeng, Ke-wu; Tu, Peng-fei

    2015-08-01

    Hydrophidae, one of the precious traditional Chinese medicines, is generally drily preserved to prevent corruption, but it is hard to identify the species of Hydrophidae through the appearance because of the change due to the drying process. The identification through analysis on gene barcode, a new technique in species identification, can avoid the problem. The gene barcodes of the 6 species of Hydrophidae like Lapemis hardwickii were aquired through DNA extraction and gene sequencing. These barcodes were then in sequence alignment and test the identification efficency by BLAST. Our results revealed that the barcode sequences performed high identification efficiency, and had obvious difference between intra- and inter-species. These all indicated that Cyt b DNA barcoding can confirm the Hydrophidae identification. PMID:26790288

  1. The identification of wadB, a new glycosyltransferase gene, confirms the branched structure and the role in virulence of the lipopolysaccharide core of Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Gil-Ramírez, Yolanda; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Palacios-Chaves, Leyre; Zúñiga-Ripa, Amaia; Grilló, María-Jesús; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; Hanniffy, Sean; Moriyón, Ignacio; Iriarte, Maite

    2014-08-01

    Brucellosis is a worldwide extended zoonosis caused by Brucella spp. These gram-negative bacteria are not readily detected by innate immunity, a virulence-related property largely linked to their surface lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The role of the LPS lipid A and O-polysaccharide in virulence is well known. Moreover, mutation of the glycosyltransferase gene wadC of Brucella abortus, although not affecting O-polysaccharide assembly onto the lipid-A core section causes a core oligosaccharide defect that increases recognition by innate immunity. Here, we report on a second gene (wadB) encoding a LPS core glycosyltransferase not involved in the assembly of the O-polysaccharide-linked core section. As compared to wild-type B. abortus, a wadB mutant was sensitive to bactericidal peptides and non-immune serum, and was attenuated in mice and dendritic cells. These observations show that as WadC, WadB is also involved in the assembly of a branch of Brucella LPS core and support the concept that this LPS section is a virulence-related structure. PMID:24927935

  2. Structural damage assessment as an identification problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajela, Prabhat; Soeiro, F. J.

    1989-01-01

    Damage assessment of structural assemblies is treated as an identification problem. A brief review of identification methods is first presented with particular focus on the output error approach. The use of numerical optimization methods in identifying the location and extent of damage in structures is studied. The influence of damage on eigenmode shapes and static displacements is explored as a means of formulating a measure of damage in the structure. Preliminary results obtained in this study are presented and special attention is directed at the shortcomings associated with the nonlinear programming approach to solving the optimization problem.

  3. Lessons learned from gene identification studies in Mendelian epilepsy disorders.

    PubMed

    Hardies, Katia; Weckhuysen, Sarah; De Jonghe, Peter; Suls, Arvid

    2016-07-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are now routinely used for gene identification in Mendelian disorders. Setting up cost-efficient NGS projects and managing the large amount of variants remains, however, a challenging job. Here we provide insights in the decision-making processes before and after the use of NGS in gene identification studies. Genetic factors are thought to have a role in ~70% of all epilepsies, and a variety of inheritance patterns have been described for seizure-associated gene defects. We therefore chose epilepsy as disease model and selected 35 NGS studies that focused on patients with a Mendelian epilepsy disorder. The strategies used for gene identification and their respective outcomes were reviewed. High-throughput NGS strategies have led to the identification of several new epilepsy-causing genes, enlarging our knowledge on both known and novel pathomechanisms. NGS findings have furthermore extended the awareness of phenotypical and genetic heterogeneity. By discussing recent studies we illustrate: (I) the power of NGS for gene identification in Mendelian disorders, (II) the accelerating pace in which this field evolves, and (III) the considerations that have to be made when performing NGS studies. Nonetheless, the enormous rise in gene discovery over the last decade, many patients and families included in gene identification studies still remain without a molecular diagnosis; hence, further genetic research is warranted. On the basis of successful NGS studies in epilepsy, we discuss general approaches to guide human geneticists and clinicians in setting up cost-efficient gene identification NGS studies. PMID:26603999

  4. Highly parallel identification of essential genes in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Biao; Cheung, Hiu Wing; Subramanian, Aravind; Sharifnia, Tanaz; Okamoto, Michael; Yang, Xiaoping; Hinkle, Greg; Boehm, Jesse S; Beroukhim, Rameen; Weir, Barbara A; Mermel, Craig; Barbie, David A; Awad, Tarif; Zhou, Xiaochuan; Nguyen, Tuyen; Piqani, Bruno; Li, Cheng; Golub, Todd R; Meyerson, Matthew; Hacohen, Nir; Hahn, William C; Lander, Eric S; Sabatini, David M; Root, David E

    2008-12-23

    More complete knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer will improve prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Efforts such as The Cancer Genome Atlas are systematically characterizing the structural basis of cancer, by identifying the genomic mutations associated with each cancer type. A powerful complementary approach is to systematically characterize the functional basis of cancer, by identifying the genes essential for growth and related phenotypes in different cancer cells. Such information would be particularly valuable for identifying potential drug targets. Here, we report the development of an efficient, robust approach to perform genome-scale pooled shRNA screens for both positive and negative selection and its application to systematically identify cell essential genes in 12 cancer cell lines. By integrating these functional data with comprehensive genetic analyses of primary human tumors, we identified known and putative oncogenes such as EGFR, KRAS, MYC, BCR-ABL, MYB, CRKL, and CDK4 that are essential for cancer cell proliferation and also altered in human cancers. We further used this approach to identify genes involved in the response of cancer cells to tumoricidal agents and found 4 genes required for the response of CML cells to imatinib treatment: PTPN1, NF1, SMARCB1, and SMARCE1, and 5 regulators of the response to FAS activation, FAS, FADD, CASP8, ARID1A and CBX1. Broad application of this highly parallel genetic screening strategy will not only facilitate the rapid identification of genes that drive the malignant state and its response to therapeutics but will also enable the discovery of genes that participate in any biological process. PMID:19091943

  5. In silico identification of genes in bacteriophage DNA.

    PubMed

    Kropinski, Andrew M; Borodovsky, Mark; Carver, Tim J; Cerdeño-Tárraga, Ana M; Darling, Aaron; Lomsadze, Alexandre; Mahadevan, Padmanabhan; Stothard, Paul; Seto, Donald; Van Domselaar, Gary; Wishart, David S

    2009-01-01

    One of the most satisfying aspects of a genome sequencing project is the identification of the genes contained within it.These are of two types: those which encode tRNAs and those which produce proteins. After a general introduction on the properties of protein-encoding genes and the utility of the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLASTX) to identify genes through homologs, a variety of tools are discussed by their creators. These include for genome annotation: GeneMark, Artemis, and BASys; and, for genome comparisons: Artemis Comparison Tool (ACT), Mauve, CoreGenes, and GeneOrder. PMID:19082552

  6. Identification of Complex Carbon Nanotube Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A variety of complex carbon nanotube (CNT) structures have been observed experimentally. These include sharp bends, branches, tori, and helices. They are believed to be formed by using topological defects such as pentagons and heptagons to connect different CNT. The effects of type, number, and arrangement (separation and orientation) of defects on atomic structures and energetics of complex CNT are investigated using topology, quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics calculations. Energetically stable models are derived for identification of observed complex CNT structures.

  7. Identification of Cancer Related Genes Using a Comprehensive Map of Human Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lukk, Margus; Xue, Vincent; Parkinson, Helen; Rung, Johan; Brazma, Alvis

    2016-01-01

    Rapid accumulation and availability of gene expression datasets in public repositories have enabled large-scale meta-analyses of combined data. The richness of cross-experiment data has provided new biological insights, including identification of new cancer genes. In this study, we compiled a human gene expression dataset from ∼40,000 publicly available Affymetrix HG-U133Plus2 arrays. After strict quality control and data normalisation the data was quantified in an expression matrix of ∼20,000 genes and ∼28,000 samples. To enable different ways of sample grouping, existing annotations where subjected to systematic ontology assisted categorisation and manual curation. Groups like normal tissues, neoplasmic tissues, cell lines, homoeotic cells and incompletely differentiated cells were created. Unsupervised analysis of the data confirmed global structure of expression consistent with earlier analysis but with more details revealed due to increased resolution. A suitable mixed-effects linear model was used to further investigate gene expression in solid tissue tumours, and to compare these with the respective healthy solid tissues. The analysis identified 1,285 genes with systematic expression change in cancer. The list is significantly enriched with known cancer genes from large, public, peer-reviewed databases, whereas the remaining ones are proposed as new cancer gene candidates. The compiled dataset is publicly available in the ArrayExpress Archive. It contains the most diverse collection of biological samples, making it the largest systematically annotated gene expression dataset of its kind in the public domain. PMID:27322383

  8. Identification of four soybean reference genes for gene expression normalization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene expression analysis requires the use of reference genes stably expressed independently of specific tissues or environmental conditions. Housekeeping genes (e.g., actin, tubulin, ribosomal, polyubiquitin and elongation factor 1-alpha) are commonly used as reference genes with the assumption tha...

  9. Parameter identification of civil engineering structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, J. N.; Sun, C. T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper concerns the development of an identification method required in determining structural parameter variations for systems subjected to an extended exposure to the environment. The concept of structural identifiability of a large scale structural system in the absence of damping is presented. Three criteria are established indicating that a large number of system parameters (the coefficient parameters of the differential equations) can be identified by a few actuators and sensors. An eight-bay-fifteen-story frame structure is used as example. A simple model is employed for analyzing the dynamic response of the frame structure.

  10. Crystal Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv AldR (Rv2779c), a Regulator of the ald Gene: DNA BINDING AND IDENTIFICATION OF SMALL MOLECULE INHIBITORS.

    PubMed

    Dey, Abhishek; Shree, Sonal; Pandey, Sarvesh Kumar; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2016-06-01

    Here we report the crystal structure of M. tuberculosis AldR (Rv2779c) showing that the N-terminal DNA-binding domains are swapped, forming a dimer, and four dimers are assembled into an octamer through crystal symmetry. The C-terminal domain is involved in oligomeric interactions that stabilize the oligomer, and it contains the effector-binding sites. The latter sites are 30-60% larger compared with homologs like MtbFFRP (Rv3291c) and can consequently accommodate larger molecules. MtbAldR binds to the region upstream to the ald gene that is highly up-regulated in nutrient-starved tuberculosis models and codes for l-alanine dehydrogenase (MtbAld; Rv2780). Further, the MtbAldR-DNA complex is inhibited upon binding of Ala, Tyr, Trp and Asp to the protein. Studies involving a ligand-binding site G131T mutant show that the mutant forms a DNA complex that cannot be inhibited by adding the amino acids. Comparative studies suggest that binding of the amino acids changes the relative spatial disposition of the DNA-binding domains and thereby disrupt the protein-DNA complex. Finally, we identified small molecules, including a tetrahydroquinoline carbonitrile derivative (S010-0261), that inhibit the MtbAldR-DNA complex. The latter molecules represent the very first inhibitors of a feast/famine regulatory protein from any source and set the stage for exploring MtbAldR as a potential anti-tuberculosis target. PMID:27006398

  11. Bioinformatic Identification of Conserved Cis-Sequences in Coregulated Genes.

    PubMed

    Bülow, Lorenz; Hehl, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatics tools can be employed to identify conserved cis-sequences in sets of coregulated plant genes because more and more gene expression and genomic sequence data become available. Knowledge on the specific cis-sequences, their enrichment and arrangement within promoters, facilitates the design of functional synthetic plant promoters that are responsive to specific stresses. The present chapter illustrates an example for the bioinformatic identification of conserved Arabidopsis thaliana cis-sequences enriched in drought stress-responsive genes. This workflow can be applied for the identification of cis-sequences in any sets of coregulated genes. The workflow includes detailed protocols to determine sets of coregulated genes, to extract the corresponding promoter sequences, and how to install and run a software package to identify overrepresented motifs. Further bioinformatic analyses that can be performed with the results are discussed. PMID:27557771

  12. Two Rules of Identification for Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollen, Kenneth A.; Davis, Walter R.

    2009-01-01

    Identification of structural equation models remains a challenge to many researchers. Although empirical tests of identification are readily available in structural equation modeling software, these examine local identification and rely on sample estimates of parameters. Rules of identification are available, but do not include all models…

  13. Identification of novel osteochondrosis--Associated genes.

    PubMed

    Mirams, Michiko; Ayodele, Babatunde A; Tatarczuch, Liliana; Henson, Frances M; Pagel, Charles N; Mackie, Eleanor J

    2016-03-01

    During the early stages of articular osteochondrosis, cartilage is retained in subchondral bone, but the pathophysiology of this condition of growing humans and domestic animals is poorly understood. A subtractive hybridization study was undertaken to compare gene expression between the cartilage of early experimentally induced equine osteochondrosis lesions and control cartilage. Of the many putative differentially expressed genes identified, eight were confirmed by quantitative PCR analysis as differentially expressed, in addition to those already known to be associated with early lesions. Genes encoding vacuolar H(+)-ATPase V0 subunit d2 (ATP6V0D2), cathepsin K, integrin-binding sialoprotein, integrin αV, low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4, lumican, osteopontin, and thymosin β4 (TMSB4) were expressed at higher levels in lesions than in control cartilage. These genes included 34 genes not previously identified in cartilage. Some genes identified as associated with early lesions are known chondrocyte hypertrophy-associated genes, and in transmission electron microscopy studies normal hypertrophic chondrocytes were observed in lesions. Differential expression of ATP6V0D2 and TMSB4 in the cartilage of early naturally occurring osteochondrosis lesions was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. These results identify novel osteochondrosis-associated genes and provide evidence that articular osteochondrosis does not necessarily result from failure of chondrocytes to undergo hypertrophy. PMID:26296056

  14. Structural identification of Commodore Barry Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catbas, Fikret N.; Grimmelsman, Kirk A.; Aktan, A. Emin

    2000-06-01

    The Commodore Barry Bridge is a major long-span bridge across the Delaware River connecting the cities of Bridgeport, New Jersey and Chester, Pennsylvania. A Structural Identification (St-Id) study of Commodore Barry Bridge is presented. The objective of this structural identification approach is to characterize the as-is structural condition and the loading environment of the bridge through experimental information and analytical modeling. The attributes that make long-span bridges different for utilization of experimental and analytical applications as compared to short-span bridges are presented. Some of the experimental, analytical and information tools which are utilized for this research are discussed. The details of constructing a preliminary analytical model after conceptualization of the structural characteristics are presented. Development of the 3D analytical model, and the model characteristics such as elements used, boundary and continuity representations are summarized. The experimental techniques that are necessary for the structural identification of a long span bridge are defined and application examples are provided from the Commodore Barry Bridge. Experiences gained during the applications of different forms of dynamic tests, instrumented monitoring and controlled static and crawl speed load tests are presented with example experimental data. Correlation of experimental results and analytical simulations are presented. Immediate and possible future uses of information generated are summarized.

  15. Identification of genes and gene products necessary for bacterial bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Engebrecht, J; Silverman, M

    1984-07-01

    Expression of luminescence in Escherichia coli was recently achieved by cloning genes from the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. One DNA fragment on a hybrid plasmid encoded regulatory functions and enzymatic activities necessary for light production. We report the results of a genetic analysis to identify the luminescence genes (lux) that reside on this recombinant plasmid. lux gene mutations were generated by hydroxylamine treatment, and these mutations were ordered on a linear map by complementation in trans with a series of polar transposon insertions on other plasmids. lux genes were defined by complementation of lux gene defects on pairs of plasmids in trans in E. coli. Hybrid plasmids were also used to direct the synthesis of polypeptides in the E. coli minicell system. Seven lux genes and the corresponding gene products were identified from the complementation analysis and the minicell programing experiments. These genes, in the order of their position on a linear map, and the apparent molecular weights of the gene products are luxR (27,000), luxI (25,000), luxC (53,000), luxD (33,000), luxA (40,000), luxB (38,000), and luxE (42,000). From the luminescence phenotypes of E. coli containing mutant plasmids, functions were assigned to these genes: luxA, luxB, luxC, luxD, and luxE encode enzymes for light production and luxR and luxI encode regulatory functions. PMID:6377310

  16. Missing gene identification using functional coherence scores

    PubMed Central

    Chitale, Meghana; Khan, Ishita K.; Kihara, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing metabolic and signaling pathways is an effective way of interpreting a genome sequence. A challenge in a pathway reconstruction is that often genes in a pathway cannot be easily found, reflecting current imperfect information of the target organism. In this work, we developed a new method for finding missing genes, which integrates multiple features, including gene expression, phylogenetic profile, and function association scores. Particularly, for considering function association between candidate genes and neighboring proteins to the target missing gene in the network, we used Co-occurrence Association Score (CAS) and PubMed Association Score (PAS), which are designed for capturing functional coherence of proteins. We showed that adding CAS and PAS substantially improve the accuracy of identifying missing genes in the yeast enzyme-enzyme network compared to the cases when only the conventional features, gene expression, phylogenetic profile, were used. Finally, it was also demonstrated that the accuracy improves by considering indirect neighbors to the target enzyme position in the network using a proper network-topology-based weighting scheme. PMID:27552989

  17. Chromatin Structure Regulates Gene Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, W. Jason; Yabuki, Munehisa; Ordinario, Ellen C; Bednarski, David W; Quay, Simon; Maizels, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Homology-directed repair is a powerful mechanism for maintaining and altering genomic structure. We asked how chromatin structure contributes to the use of homologous sequences as donors for repair using the chicken B cell line DT40 as a model. In DT40, immunoglobulin genes undergo regulated sequence diversification by gene conversion templated by pseudogene donors. We found that the immunoglobulin Vλ pseudogene array is characterized by histone modifications associated with active chromatin. We directly demonstrated the importance of chromatin structure for gene conversion, using a regulatable experimental system in which the heterochromatin protein HP1 (Drosophila melanogaster Su[var]205), expressed as a fusion to Escherichia coli lactose repressor, is tethered to polymerized lactose operators integrated within the pseudo-Vλ donor array. Tethered HP1 diminished histone acetylation within the pseudo-Vλ array, and altered the outcome of Vλ diversification, so that nontemplated mutations rather than templated mutations predominated. Thus, chromatin structure regulates homology-directed repair. These results suggest that histone modifications may contribute to maintaining genomic stability by preventing recombination between repetitive sequences. PMID:17880262

  18. Identification and characterization of Nasonia Pax genes

    PubMed Central

    Keller, R. G.; Desplan, C.; Rosenberg, M. I.

    2010-01-01

    Pax genes are a group of critical developmental transcriptional regulators in both invertebrates and vertebrates, characterized by the presence of a paired DNA-binding domain. Pax proteins also often contain an octapeptide motif and a C-terminal homeodomain. The genome of Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera) has recently become available, and analysis of this genome alongside Apis mellifera allowed us to contribute to the phylogeny of this gene family in insects. Nasonia, a parasitic wasp, has independently evolved a similar mode of development to that of the wellstudied Drosophila, making it an excellent model system for comparative studies of developmental gene networks. We report the characterization of the seven Nasonia Pax genes. We describe their genomic organization, and the embryonic expression of three of them, and uncover wider conservation of the octapeptide motif than previously described. PMID:20167022

  19. Hierarchical Bayesian model updating for structural identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behmanesh, Iman; Moaveni, Babak; Lombaert, Geert; Papadimitriou, Costas

    2015-12-01

    A new probabilistic finite element (FE) model updating technique based on Hierarchical Bayesian modeling is proposed for identification of civil structural systems under changing ambient/environmental conditions. The performance of the proposed technique is investigated for (1) uncertainty quantification of model updating parameters, and (2) probabilistic damage identification of the structural systems. Accurate estimation of the uncertainty in modeling parameters such as mass or stiffness is a challenging task. Several Bayesian model updating frameworks have been proposed in the literature that can successfully provide the "parameter estimation uncertainty" of model parameters with the assumption that there is no underlying inherent variability in the updating parameters. However, this assumption may not be valid for civil structures where structural mass and stiffness have inherent variability due to different sources of uncertainty such as changing ambient temperature, temperature gradient, wind speed, and traffic loads. Hierarchical Bayesian model updating is capable of predicting the overall uncertainty/variability of updating parameters by assuming time-variability of the underlying linear system. A general solution based on Gibbs Sampler is proposed to estimate the joint probability distributions of the updating parameters. The performance of the proposed Hierarchical approach is evaluated numerically for uncertainty quantification and damage identification of a 3-story shear building model. Effects of modeling errors and incomplete modal data are considered in the numerical study.

  20. Aquifer Structure Identification Using Stochastic Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Dylan R; Dai, Zhenxue; Wolfsberg, Andrew V; Vrugt, Jasper A

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a stochastic inverse method for aquifer structure identification using sparse geophysical and hydraulic response data. The method is based on updating structure parameters from a transition probability model to iteratively modify the aquifer structure and parameter zonation. The method is extended to the adaptive parameterization of facies hydraulic parameters by including these parameters as optimization variables. The stochastic nature of the statistical structure parameters leads to nonconvex objective functions. A multi-method genetically adaptive evolutionary approach (AMALGAM-SO) was selected to perform the inversion given its search capabilities. Results are obtained as a probabilistic assessment of facies distribution based on indicator cokriging simulation of the optimized structural parameters. The method is illustrated by estimating the structure and facies hydraulic parameters of a synthetic example with a transient hydraulic response.

  1. Identification of the Syrian hamster cardiomyopathy gene.

    PubMed

    Nigro, V; Okazaki, Y; Belsito, A; Piluso, G; Matsuda, Y; Politano, L; Nigro, G; Ventura, C; Abbondanza, C; Molinari, A M; Acampora, D; Nishimura, M; Hayashizaki, Y; Puca, G A

    1997-04-01

    The BIO14.6 hamster is a widely used model for autosomal recessive cardiomyopathy. These animals die prematurely from progressive myocardial necrosis and heart failure. The primary genetic defect leading to the cardiomyopathy is still unknown. Recently, a genetic linkage map localized the cardiomyopathy locus on hamster chromosome 9qa2.1-b1, excluding several candidate genes. We now demonstrate that the cardiomyopathy results from a mutation in the delta-sarcoglycan gene that maps to the disease locus. This mutation was completely coincident with the disease in backcross and F2 pedigrees. This constitutes the first animal model identified for human sarcoglycan disorders. PMID:9097966

  2. Robust structural identification via polyhedral template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler Larsen, Peter; Schmidt, Søren; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2016-06-01

    Successful scientific applications of large-scale molecular dynamics often rely on automated methods for identifying the local crystalline structure of condensed phases. Many existing methods for structural identification, such as common neighbour analysis, rely on interatomic distances (or thresholds thereof) to classify atomic structure. As a consequence they are sensitive to strain and thermal displacements, and preprocessing such as quenching or temporal averaging of the atomic positions is necessary to provide reliable identifications. We propose a new method, polyhedral template matching (PTM), which classifies structures according to the topology of the local atomic environment, without any ambiguity in the classification, and with greater reliability than e.g. common neighbour analysis in the presence of thermal fluctuations. We demonstrate that the method can reliably be used to identify structures even in simulations near the melting point, and that it can identify the most common ordered alloy structures as well. In addition, the method makes it easy to identify the local lattice orientation in polycrystalline samples, and to calculate the local strain tensor. An implementation is made available under a Free and Open Source Software license.

  3. Rapid Identification of Genes Contributing to FH Resistance in Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of wheat and barley with improved Fusarium head blight resistance will be greatly aided by knowledge of the plant genes that make essential contributions to the FHB resistance mechanism. This knowledge will permit identification of the best naturally occurring variants for use in breedin...

  4. Identification of a Colonial Chordate Histocompatibility Gene

    PubMed Central

    Voskoboynik, Ayelet; Newman, Aaron M.; Corey, Daniel M.; Sahoo, Debashis; Pushkarev, Dmitry; Neff, Norma F.; Passarelli, Benedetto; Koh, Winston; Ishizuka, Katherine J.; Palmeri, Karla J.; Dimov, Ivan K.; Keasar, Chen; Fan, H. Christina; Mantalas, Gary L.; Sinha, Rahul; Penland, Lolita; Quake, Stephen R.; Weissman, Irving L.

    2013-01-01

    Histocompatibility is the basis by which multicellular organisms of the same species distinguish self from non-self. Relatively little is known about the mechanisms underlying histocompatibility reactions in lower organisms. Botryllus schlosseri is a colonial urochordate, a sister group of vertebrates, that exhibits a genetically determined natural transplantation reaction, whereby self-recognition between colonies leads to formation of parabionts with a common vasculature, whereas rejection occurs between incompatible colonies. Using genetically defined lines, whole-transcriptome sequencing, and genomics, we identified a single gene that encodes self/non-self and determines “graft” outcomes in this organism. This gene is significantly upregulated in colonies poised to undergo fusion or rejection, is highly expressed in the vasculature, and is functionally linked to histocompatibility outcomes. These findings establish a platform for advancing the science of allorecognition. PMID:23888037

  5. Rotavirus gene structure and function.

    PubMed Central

    Estes, M K; Cohen, J

    1989-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure and function of the genes and proteins of the rotaviruses has expanded rapidly. Information obtained in the last 5 years has revealed unexpected and unique molecular properties of rotavirus proteins of general interest to virologists, biochemists, and cell biologists. Rotaviruses share some features of replication with reoviruses, yet antigenic and molecular properties of the outer capsid proteins, VP4 (a protein whose cleavage is required for infectivity, possibly by mediating fusion with the cell membrane) and VP7 (a glycoprotein), show more similarities with those of other viruses such as the orthomyxoviruses, paramyxoviruses, and alphaviruses. Rotavirus morphogenesis is a unique process, during which immature subviral particles bud through the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). During this process, transiently enveloped particles form, the outer capsid proteins are assembled onto particles, and mature particles accumulate in the lumen of the ER. Two ER-specific viral glycoproteins are involved in virus maturation, and these glycoproteins have been shown to be useful models for studying protein targeting and retention in the ER and for studying mechanisms of virus budding. New ideas and approaches to understanding how each gene functions to replicate and assemble the segmented viral genome have emerged from knowledge of the primary structure of rotavirus genes and their proteins and from knowledge of the properties of domains on individual proteins. Localization of type-specific and cross-reactive neutralizing epitopes on the outer capsid proteins is becoming increasingly useful in dissecting the protective immune response, including evaluation of vaccine trials, with the practical possibility of enhancing the production of new, more effective vaccines. Finally, future analyses with recently characterized immunologic and gene probes and new animal models can be expected to provide a basic understanding of what regulates the

  6. Gene-based and semantic structure of the Gene Ontology as a complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronnello, Claudia; Tumminello, Michele; Miccichè, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    The last decade has seen the advent and consolidation of ontology based tools for the identification and biological interpretation of classes of genes, such as the Gene Ontology. The Gene Ontology (GO) is constantly evolving over time. The information accumulated time-by-time and included in the GO is encoded in the definition of terms and in the setting up of semantic relations amongst terms. Here we investigate the Gene Ontology from a complex network perspective. We consider the semantic network of terms naturally associated with the semantic relationships provided by the Gene Ontology consortium. Moreover, the GO is a natural example of bipartite network of terms and genes. Here we are interested in studying the properties of the projected network of terms, i.e. a gene-based weighted network of GO terms, in which a link between any two terms is set if at least one gene is annotated in both terms. One aim of the present paper is to compare the structural properties of the semantic and the gene-based network. The relative importance of terms is very similar in the two networks, but the community structure changes. We show that in some cases GO terms that appear to be distinct from a semantic point of view are instead connected, and appear in the same community when considering their gene content. The identification of such gene-based communities of terms might therefore be the basis of a simple protocol aiming at improving the semantic structure of GO. Information about terms that share large gene content might also be important from a biomedical point of view, as it might reveal how genes over-expressed in a certain term also affect other biological processes, molecular functions and cellular components not directly linked according to GO semantics.

  7. Structure-based identification of catalytic residues

    PubMed Central

    Yahalom, Ran; Reshef, Dan; Wiener, Ayana; Frankel, Sagiv; Kalisman, Nir; Lerner, Boaz; Keasar, Chen

    2011-01-01

    The identification of catalytic residues is an essential step in functional characterization of enzymes. We present a purely structural approach to this problem, which is motivated by the difficulty of evolution-based methods to annotate structural genomics targets that have few or no homologs in the databases. Our approach combines a state-of-the-art support vector machine (SVM) classifier with novel structural features that augment structural clues by spatial averaging and Z-scoring. Special attention is paid to the class imbalance problem that stems from the overwhelming number of non-catalytic residues in enzymes compared to catalytic residues. This problem is tackled by: 1) optimizing the classifier to maximize a performance criterion that considers both type I and type II errors in the classification of catalytic and non-catalytic residues; 2) under-sampling non-catalytic residues before SVM training; and 3) during SVM training, penalizing errors in learning catalytic residues more than errors in learning non-catalytic residues. Tested on four enzyme datasets – one specifically designed by us to mimic the structural genomics scenario and three previously-evaluated datasets – our structure-based classifier is never inferior to similar structure-based classifiers and comparable to classifiers that use both structural and evolutionary features. In addition to evaluation of the performance of catalytic residue identification, we also present detailed case studies on three proteins. This analysis suggests that many false positive predictions may correspond to binding sites and other functional residues. A web server that implements the method, our own-designed database, and the source code of the programs are publicly available at http://www.cs.bgu.ac.il/~meshi/functionPrediction. PMID:21491495

  8. Structure-based identification of catalytic residues.

    PubMed

    Yahalom, Ran; Reshef, Dan; Wiener, Ayana; Frankel, Sagiv; Kalisman, Nir; Lerner, Boaz; Keasar, Chen

    2011-06-01

    The identification of catalytic residues is an essential step in functional characterization of enzymes. We present a purely structural approach to this problem, which is motivated by the difficulty of evolution-based methods to annotate structural genomics targets that have few or no homologs in the databases. Our approach combines a state-of-the-art support vector machine (SVM) classifier with novel structural features that augment structural clues by spatial averaging and Z scoring. Special attention is paid to the class imbalance problem that stems from the overwhelming number of non-catalytic residues in enzymes compared to catalytic residues. This problem is tackled by: (1) optimizing the classifier to maximize a performance criterion that considers both Type I and Type II errors in the classification of catalytic and non-catalytic residues; (2) under-sampling non-catalytic residues before SVM training; and (3) during SVM training, penalizing errors in learning catalytic residues more than errors in learning non-catalytic residues. Tested on four enzyme datasets, one specifically designed by us to mimic the structural genomics scenario and three previously evaluated datasets, our structure-based classifier is never inferior to similar structure-based classifiers and comparable to classifiers that use both structural and evolutionary features. In addition to the evaluation of the performance of catalytic residue identification, we also present detailed case studies on three proteins. This analysis suggests that many false positive predictions may correspond to binding sites and other functional residues. A web server that implements the method, our own-designed database, and the source code of the programs are publicly available at http://www.cs.bgu.ac.il/∼meshi/functionPrediction. PMID:21491495

  9. Computational Identification of Novel Genes: Current and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Klasberg, Steffen; Bitard-Feildel, Tristan; Mallet, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    While it has long been thought that all genomic novelties are derived from the existing material, many genes lacking homology to known genes were found in recent genome projects. Some of these novel genes were proposed to have evolved de novo, ie, out of noncoding sequences, whereas some have been shown to follow a duplication and divergence process. Their discovery called for an extension of the historical hypotheses about gene origination. Besides the theoretical breakthrough, increasing evidence accumulated that novel genes play important roles in evolutionary processes, including adaptation and speciation events. Different techniques are available to identify genes and classify them as novel. Their classification as novel is usually based on their similarity to known genes, or lack thereof, detected by comparative genomics or against databases. Computational approaches are further prime methods that can be based on existing models or leveraging biological evidences from experiments. Identification of novel genes remains however a challenging task. With the constant software and technologies updates, no gold standard, and no available benchmark, evaluation and characterization of genomic novelty is a vibrant field. In this review, the classical and state-of-the-art tools for gene prediction are introduced. The current methods for novel gene detection are presented; the methodological strategies and their limits are discussed along with perspective approaches for further studies. PMID:27493475

  10. Identification of genes and gene clusters involved in mycotoxin synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research methods to identify and characterize genes involved in mycotoxin biosynthetic pathways have evolved considerably over the years. Before whole genome sequences were available (e.g. pre-genomics), work focused primarily on chemistry, biosynthetic mutant strains and molecular analysis of sing...

  11. Identification of the gene responsible for Best macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Petrukhin, K; Koisti, M J; Bakall, B; Li, W; Xie, G; Marknell, T; Sandgren, O; Forsman, K; Holmgren, G; Andreasson, S; Vujic, M; Bergen, A A; McGarty-Dugan, V; Figueroa, D; Austin, C P; Metzker, M L; Caskey, C T; Wadelius, C

    1998-07-01

    Best macular dystrophy (BMD), also known as vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2; OMIM 153700), is an autosomal dominant form of macular degeneration characterized by an abnormal accumulation of lipofuscin within and beneath the retinal pigment epithelium cells. In pursuit of the disease gene, we limited the minimum genetic region by recombination breakpoint analysis and mapped to this region a novel retina-specific gene (VMD2). Genetic mapping data, identification of five independent disease-specific mutations and expression studies provide evidence that mutations within the candidate gene are a cause of BMD. The 3' UTR of the candidate gene contains a region of antisense complementarity to the 3' UTR of the ferritin heavy-chain gene (FTH1), indicating the possibility of antisense interaction between VMD2 and FTH1 transcripts. PMID:9662395

  12. Genome Scanning in Haemophilus influenzae for Identification of Essential Genes

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Karl A.; Chovan, Linda; Hessler, Paul

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a method for identifying essential genes by using an in vitro transposition system, with a small (975 bp) insertional element containing an antibiotic resistance cassette, and mapping these inserts relative to the deduced open reading frames of Haemophilus influenzae by PCR and Southern analysis. Putative essential genes are identified by two methods: mutation exclusion or zero time analysis. Mutation exclusion consists of growing an insertional library and identifying open reading frames that do not contain insertional elements: in a growing population of bacteria, insertions in essential genes are excluded. Zero time analysis consists of monitoring the fate of individual insertions after transformation in a growing culture: the loss of inserts in essential genes is observed over time. Both methods of analysis permit the identification of genes required for bacterial survival. Details of the mutant library construction and the mapping strategy, examples of mutant exclusion, and zero time analysis are presented. PMID:10438768

  13. rpoB Gene Sequencing for Identification of Corynebacterium Species

    PubMed Central

    Khamis, Atieh; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    The genus Corynebacterium is a heterogeneous group of species comprising human and animal pathogens and environmental bacteria. It is defined on the basis of several phenotypic characters and the results of DNA-DNA relatedness and, more recently, 16S rRNA gene sequencing. However, the 16S rRNA gene is not polymorphic enough to ensure reliable phylogenetic studies and needs to be completely sequenced for accurate identification. The almost complete rpoB sequences of 56 Corynebacterium species were determined by both PCR and genome walking methods. In all cases the percent similarities between different species were lower than those observed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, even for those species with degrees of high similarity. Several clusters supported by high bootstrap values were identified. In order to propose a method for strain identification which does not require sequencing of the complete rpoB sequence (approximately 3,500 bp), we identified an area with a high degree of polymorphism, bordered by conserved sequences that can be used as universal primers for PCR amplification and sequencing. The sequence of this fragment (434 to 452 bp) allows accurate species identification and may be used in the future for routine sequence-based identification of Corynebacterium species. PMID:15364970

  14. Identification of the thiamin pyrophosphokinase gene in rainbow trout: characteristic structure and expression of seven splice variants in tissues and cell lines and during embryo development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yuge, Shinya; Richter, Catherine A.; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Nicks, Diane; Saloka, Stephanie K.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Li, Weiming

    2012-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphokinase (TPK) converts thiamin to its active form, thiamin diphosphate. In humans, TPK expression is down-regulated in some thiamin deficiency related syndrome, and enhanced during pregnancy. Rainbow trout are also vulnerable to thiamin deficiency in wild life and are useful models for thiamin metabolism research. We identified the tpk gene transcript including seven splice variants in the rainbow trout. Almost all cell lines and tissues examined showed co-expression of several tpk splice variants including a potentially major one at both mRNA and protein levels. However, relative to other tissues, the longest variant mRNA expression was predominant in the ovary and abundant in embryos. During embryogenesis, total tpk transcripts increased abruptly in early development, and decreased to about half of the peak shortly after hatching. In rainbow trout, the tpk transcript complex is ubiquitously expressed for all tissues and cells examined, and its increase in expression could be important in the early-middle embryonic stages. Moreover, decimated tpk expression in a hepatoma cell line relative to hepatic and gonadal cell lines appears to be consistent with previously reported down-regulation of thiamin metabolism in cancer.

  15. Identification of key residues essential for the structural fold and receptor selectivity within the A-chain of human gene-2 (H2) relaxin.

    PubMed

    Chan, Linda J; Rosengren, K Johan; Layfield, Sharon L; Bathgate, Ross A D; Separovic, Frances; Samuel, Chrishan S; Hossain, Mohammed A; Wade, John D

    2012-11-30

    Human gene-2 (H2) relaxin is currently in Phase III clinical trials for the treatment of acute heart failure. It is a 53-amino acid insulin-like peptide comprising two chains and three disulfide bonds. It interacts with two of the relaxin family peptide (RXFP) receptors. Although its cognate receptor is RXFP1, it is also able to cross-react with RXFP2, the native receptor for a related peptide, insulin-like peptide 3. In order to understand the basis of this cross-reactivity, it is important to elucidate both binding and activation mechanisms of this peptide. The primary binding mechanism of this hormone has been extensively studied and well defined. H2 relaxin binds to the leucine-rich repeats of RXFP1 and RXFP2 using B-chain-specific residues. However, little is known about the secondary interaction that involves the A-chain of H2 relaxin and transmembrane exoloops of the receptors. We demonstrate here through extensive mutation of the A-chain that the secondary interaction between H2 relaxin and RXFP1 is not driven by any single amino acid, although residues Tyr-3, Leu-20, and Phe-23 appear to contribute. Interestingly, these same three residues are important drivers of the affinity and activity of H2 relaxin for RXFP2 with additional minor contributions from Lys-9, His-12, Lys-17, Arg-18, and Arg-22. Our results provide new insights into the mechanism of secondary activation interaction of RXFP1 and RXFP2 by H2 relaxin, leading to a potent and RXFP1-selective analog, H2:A(4-24)(F23A), which was tested in vitro and in vivo and found to significantly inhibit collagen deposition similar to native H2 relaxin. PMID:23024363

  16. Identification and manipulation of Rhizobium phytohormone genes

    SciTech Connect

    Ditta, G.S.

    1988-06-27

    The goal of this project was to determine whether phytohormone production by the gram-negative bacterium Rhizobium meliloti is required for successful modulation and symbiosis with alfalfa. specifically, we undertook the study of indoleacetic acid (IAA; auxin) production by R. meliloti and sought to create a mutant totally deficient in IAA biosynthesis. For many years it has been known that rhizobia are capable of synthesizing and excreting IAA, and it has often been suggested that this could be of importance for the initiation of root nodule development. Published work demonstrating the involvement of bacterial IAA genes in pathogenesis by Pseudomonas syringae and Agrobacterium tumefaciens further emphasized the need for this type of study in Rhizobium.

  17. Identification of structural and morphogenesis genes of Pseudoalteromonas phage φRIO-1 and placement within the evolutionary history of Podoviridae.

    PubMed

    Hardies, Stephen C; Thomas, Julie A; Black, Lindsay; Weintraub, Susan T; Hwang, Chung Y; Cho, Byung C

    2016-02-01

    The virion proteins of Pseudoalteromonas phage φRIO-1 were identified and quantitated by mass spectrometry and gel densitometry. Bioinformatic methods customized to deal with extreme divergence defined a φRIO-1 tail structure homology group of phages, which was further related to T7 tail and internal virion proteins (IVPs). Similarly, homologs of tubular tail components and internal virion proteins were identified in essentially all completely sequenced podoviruses other than those in the subfamily Picovirinae. The podoviruses were subdivided into several tail structure homology groups, in addition to the RIO-1 and T7 groups. Molecular phylogeny indicated that these groups all arose about the same ancient time as the φRIO-1/T7 split. Hence, the T7-like infection mechanism involving the IVPs was an ancestral property of most podoviruses. The IVPs were found to variably host both tail lysozyme domains and domains destined for the cytoplasm, including the N4 virion RNA polymerase embedded within an IVP-D homolog. PMID:26748333

  18. Identification of structural and morphogenesis genes of Pseudoalteromonas phage φRIO-1 and placement within the evolutionary history of Podoviridae

    PubMed Central

    Hardies, Stephen C.; Thomas, Julie A.; Black, Lindsay; Weintraub, Susan T.; Hwang, Chung Y.; Cho, Byung C.

    2016-01-01

    The virion proteins of Pseudoalteromonas phage φRIO-1 were identified and quantitated by mass spectrometry and gel densitometry. Bioinformatic methods customized to deal with extreme divergence defined a φRIO-1 tail structure homology group of phages, which was further related to T7 tail and internal virion proteins (IVPs). Similarly, homologs of tubular tail components and internal virion proteins were identified in essentially all completely sequenced podoviruses other than those in the subfamily Picovirinae. The podoviruses were subdivided into several tail structure homology groups, in addition to the RIO-1 and T7 groups. Molecular phylogeny indicated that these groups all arose about the same ancient time as the φRIO-1/T7 split. Hence, the T7-like infection mechanism involving the IVPs was an ancestral property of most podoviruses. The IVPs were found to variably host both tail lysozyme domains and domains destined for the cytoplasm, including the N4 virion RNA polymerase embedded within an IVP-D homolog. PMID:26748333

  19. Identification of genes in genomic and EST sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, C.; Adams, M.D.; Kerlavage, A.R.; Dubnick, M.; McCombie, W.R.; Martin-Gallardo, A.; Venter, J.C.; White, O.

    1993-12-31

    Currently-available software tools are capable of predicting the locations of most protein-coding genes in anonymous genomic DNA sequences. The use of predicted exxon to select primers for PCR amplification from cDNA libraries allows the complete structures of novel genes to be determined efficiently. As the number of expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences increases, the fraction of genes that can be localized in genomic sequences by searching EST databases will rapidly approach unity. The challenge for automated DNA sequence analysis is now to develop methods for accurately predicting gene structure and alternative splicing patterns. Substantially improving current accuracies in gene structure prediction will require retrospective comparative analysis of sequences from different organisms and gene families.

  20. Identification of genes induced by neuregulin in cultured myotubes.

    PubMed

    Fu, A K; Cheung, W M; Ip, F C; Ip, N Y

    1999-09-01

    The formation of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) involves a series of inductive interactions between motor neurons and muscle fibers. The neural signals proposed to induce the mRNA expression of acetylcholine receptors in muscle include neuregulin (NRG). In the present study, we have employed RNA fingerprinting by arbitrarily primed PCR analysis to identify the differentially expressed transcripts following NRG treatment in cultured myotubes. Nine partial cDNA fragments were isolated; the mRNA expression of eight of these genes was found to be up-regulated by NRG. The spatial and temporal expression profiles of these NRG-regulated genes in rat tissues during development suggest potential functional roles during the formation of NMJ in vivo. Our findings not only allowed the identification of novel genes, but also suggested possible functions for some known genes that are consistent with their potential roles at the NMJ. Furthermore, the identification of G-protein beta1 subunit and G-protein-coupled receptor as NRG-regulated genes has provided the first demonstration that activation of the NRG signaling pathway can induce the expression of components in the G-protein signaling cascade. PMID:10576892

  1. Multivariate entropy distance method for prokaryotic gene identification.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Zhengqing; Zhu, Huaiqiu; Wang, Jin; She, Zhen-Su

    2004-06-01

    A new simple method is found for efficient and accurate identification of coding sequences in prokaryotic genome. The method employs a Shannon description of artificial language for DNA sequences. It consists in translating a DNA sequence into a pseudo-amino acid sequence with 20 fundamental words according to the universal genetic code. With an entropy-density profile (EDP), the method maps a sequence of finite length to a vector and then analyzes its position in the 20-dimensional phase space depending on its nature. It is found that the ratio of the relative distance to an averaged coding and non-coding EDP over a small number (up to one) of open reading frames (ORFs) can serve as a good coding potential. An iterative algorithm is designed for finding a set of "root" sequences using this coding potential. A multivariate entropy distance (MED) algorithm is then proposed for the identification of prokaryotic genes; it has a feature to combine the use of a coding potential and an EDP-based sequence similarity analysis. The current version of MED is unsupervised, parameter-free and simple to implement. It is demonstrated to be able to detect 95-99% genes with 10-30% of additional genes when tested against the RefSeq database of NCBI and to detect 97.5-99.8% of confirmed genes with known functions. It is also shown to be able to find a set of (functionally known) genes that are missed by other well-known gene finding algorithms. All measurements show that the MED algorithm reaches a similar performance level as the algorithms like GeneMark and Glimmer for prokaryotic gene prediction. PMID:15297987

  2. Ab initio gene identification: prokaryote genome annotation with GeneScan and GLIMMER.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Gautam; Ramaswamy, Ramakrishna

    2002-02-01

    We compare the annotation of three complete genomes using the ab initio methods of gene identification GeneScan and GLIMMER. The annotation given in GenBank, the standard against which these are compared, has been made using GeneMark. We find a number of novel genes which are predicted by both methods used here, as well as a number of genes that are predicted by GeneMark, but are not identified by either of the nonconsensus methods that we have used. The three organisms studied here are all prokaryotic species with fairly compact genomes. The Fourier measure forms the basis for an efficient non-consensus method for gene prediction, and the algorithm GeneScan exploits this measure. We have bench-marked this program as well as GLIMMER using 3 complete prokaryotic genomes. An effort has also been made to study the limitations of these techniques for complete genome analysis. GeneScan and GLIMMER are of comparable accuracy insofar as gene-identification is concerned, with sensitivities and specificities typically greater than 0.9. The number of false predictions (both positive and negative) is higher for GeneScan as compared to GLIMMER, but in a significant number of cases, similar results are provided by the two techniques. This suggests that there could be some as-yet unidentified additional genes in these three genomes, and also that some of the putative identifications made hitherto might require re-evaluation. All these cases are discussed in detail. PMID:11927773

  3. Large-Scale Identification of Virulence Genes from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Polissi, Alessandra; Pontiggia, Andrea; Feger, Georg; Altieri, Mario; Mottl, Harald; Ferrari, Livia; Simon, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the major cause of bacterial pneumonia, and it is also responsible for otitis media and meningitis in children. Apart from the capsule, the virulence factors of this pathogen are not completely understood. Recent technical advances in the field of bacterial pathogenesis (in vivo expression technology and signature-tagged mutagenesis [STM]) have allowed a large-scale identification of virulence genes. We have adapted to S. pneumoniae the STM technique, originally used for the discovery of Salmonella genes involved in pathogenicity. A library of pneumococcal chromosomal fragments (400 to 600 bp) was constructed in a suicide plasmid vector carrying unique DNA sequence tags and a chloramphenicol resistance marker. The recent clinical isolate G54 was transformed with this library. Chloramphenicol-resistant mutants were obtained by homologous recombination, resulting in genes inactivated by insertion of the suicide vector carrying a unique tag. In a mouse pneumonia model, 1.250 candidate clones were screened; 200 of these were not recovered from the lungs were therefore considered virulence-attenuated mutants. The regions flanking the chloramphenicol gene of the attenuated mutants were amplified by inverse PCR and sequenced. The sequence analysis showed that the 200 mutants had insertions in 126 different genes that could be grouped in six classes: (i) known pneumococcal virulence genes; (ii) genes involved in metabolic pathways; (iii) genes encoding proteases; (iv) genes coding for ATP binding cassette transporters; (v) genes encoding proteins involved in DNA recombination/repair; and (vi) DNA sequences that showed similarity to hypothetical genes with unknown function. To evaluate the virulence attenuation for each mutant, all 126 clones were individually analyzed in a mouse septicemia model. Not all mutants selected in the pneumonia model were confirmed in septicemia, thus indicating the existence of virulence factors specific for pneumonia

  4. Identification of p53-target genes in Danio rerio

    PubMed Central

    Mandriani, Barbara; Castellana, Stefano; Rinaldi, Carmela; Manzoni, Marta; Venuto, Santina; Rodriguez-Aznar, Eva; Galceran, Juan; Nieto, M. Angela; Borsani, Giuseppe; Monti, Eugenio; Mazza, Tommaso; Merla, Giuseppe; Micale, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    To orchestrate the genomic response to cellular stress signals, p53 recognizes and binds to DNA containing specific and well-characterized p53-responsive elements (REs). Differences in RE sequences can strongly affect the p53 transactivation capacity and occur even between closely related species. Therefore, the identification and characterization of a species-specific p53 Binding sistes (BS) consensus sequence and of the associated target genes may help to provide new insights into the evolution of the p53 regulatory networks across different species. Although p53 functions were studied in a wide range of species, little is known about the p53-mediated transcriptional signature in Danio rerio. Here, we designed and biochemically validated a computational approach to identify novel p53 target genes in Danio rerio genome. Screening all the Danio rerio genome by pattern-matching-based analysis, we found p53 RE-like patterns proximal to 979 annotated Danio rerio genes. Prioritization analysis identified a subset of 134 candidate pattern-related genes, 31 of which have been investigated in further biochemical assays. Our study identified runx1, axin1, traf4a, hspa8, col4a5, necab2, and dnajc9 genes as novel direct p53 targets and 12 additional p53-controlled genes in Danio rerio genome. The proposed combinatorial approach resulted to be highly sensitive and robust for identifying new p53 target genes also in additional animal species. PMID:27581768

  5. Identification of p53-target genes in Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Mandriani, Barbara; Castellana, Stefano; Rinaldi, Carmela; Manzoni, Marta; Venuto, Santina; Rodriguez-Aznar, Eva; Galceran, Juan; Nieto, M Angela; Borsani, Giuseppe; Monti, Eugenio; Mazza, Tommaso; Merla, Giuseppe; Micale, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    To orchestrate the genomic response to cellular stress signals, p53 recognizes and binds to DNA containing specific and well-characterized p53-responsive elements (REs). Differences in RE sequences can strongly affect the p53 transactivation capacity and occur even between closely related species. Therefore, the identification and characterization of a species-specific p53 Binding sistes (BS) consensus sequence and of the associated target genes may help to provide new insights into the evolution of the p53 regulatory networks across different species. Although p53 functions were studied in a wide range of species, little is known about the p53-mediated transcriptional signature in Danio rerio. Here, we designed and biochemically validated a computational approach to identify novel p53 target genes in Danio rerio genome. Screening all the Danio rerio genome by pattern-matching-based analysis, we found p53 RE-like patterns proximal to 979 annotated Danio rerio genes. Prioritization analysis identified a subset of 134 candidate pattern-related genes, 31 of which have been investigated in further biochemical assays. Our study identified runx1, axin1, traf4a, hspa8, col4a5, necab2, and dnajc9 genes as novel direct p53 targets and 12 additional p53-controlled genes in Danio rerio genome. The proposed combinatorial approach resulted to be highly sensitive and robust for identifying new p53 target genes also in additional animal species. PMID:27581768

  6. Identification of an integron containing the quinolone resistance gene qnrA1 in Shewanella xiamenensis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-yi; Mu, Xiao-dong; Zhu, Yuan-qi; Xi, Lijun; Xiao, Zijun

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated multidrug resistance in Shewanella xiamenensis isolated from an estuarine water sample in China during 2014. This strain displayed resistance or decreased susceptibility to ampicillin, aztreonam, cefepime, cefotaxime, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, kanamycin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The antimicrobial resistance genes aacA3, blaOXA-199, qnrA1 and sul1 were identified by PCR amplification and by sequencing. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and DNA hybridization experiments showed that the quinolone resistance gene qnrA1 was chromosomally located. qnrA1 was located in a complex class 1 integron, downstream from an ISCR1, and bracketed by two copies of qacEΔ1-sul1 genes. This integron is similar to In825 with four gene cassettes aacA3, catB11c, dfrA1z and aadA2az. An IS26-mel-mph2-IS26 structure was also detected in the flanking sequences, conferring resistance to macrolides. This is the first identification of the class 1 integron in S. xiamenensis. This is also the first identification of the qnrA1 gene and IS26-mediated macrolide resistance genes in S. xiamenensis. Presence of a variety of resistance genetic determinants in environmental S. xiamenensis suggests the possibility that this species may serve as a potential vehicle of antimicrobial resistance genes in aquatic environments. PMID:26316545

  7. Bioinformatics-Based Identification of Candidate Genes from QTLs Associated with Cell Wall Traits in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjan, Priya; Yin, Tongming; Zhang, Xinye; Kalluri, Udaya C; Yang, Xiaohan; Jawdy, Sara; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2009-11-01

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies are an integral part of plant research and are used to characterize the genetic basis of phenotypic variation observed in structured populations and inform marker-assisted breeding efforts. These QTL intervals can span large physical regions on a chromosome comprising hundreds of genes, thereby hampering candidate gene identification. Genome history, evolution, and expression evidence can be used to narrow the genes in the interval to a smaller list that is manageable for detailed downstream functional genomics characterization. Our primary motivation for the present study was to address the need for a research methodology that identifies candidate genes within a broad QTL interval. Here we present a bioinformatics-based approach for subdividing candidate genes within QTL intervals into alternate groups of high probability candidates. Application of this approach in the context of studying cell wall traits, specifically lignin content and S/G ratios of stem and root in Populus plants, resulted in manageable sets of genes of both known and putative cell wall biosynthetic function. These results provide a roadmap for future experimental work leading to identification of new genes controlling cell wall recalcitrance and, ultimately, in the utility of plant biomass as an energy feedstock.

  8. Ensemble Positive Unlabeled Learning for Disease Gene Identification

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peng; Li, Xiaoli; Chua, Hon-Nian; Kwoh, Chee-Keong; Ng, See-Kiong

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of genes have been experimentally confirmed in recent years as causative genes to various human diseases. The newly available knowledge can be exploited by machine learning methods to discover additional unknown genes that are likely to be associated with diseases. In particular, positive unlabeled learning (PU learning) methods, which require only a positive training set P (confirmed disease genes) and an unlabeled set U (the unknown candidate genes) instead of a negative training set N, have been shown to be effective in uncovering new disease genes in the current scenario. Using only a single source of data for prediction can be susceptible to bias due to incompleteness and noise in the genomic data and a single machine learning predictor prone to bias caused by inherent limitations of individual methods. In this paper, we propose an effective PU learning framework that integrates multiple biological data sources and an ensemble of powerful machine learning classifiers for disease gene identification. Our proposed method integrates data from multiple biological sources for training PU learning classifiers. A novel ensemble-based PU learning method EPU is then used to integrate multiple PU learning classifiers to achieve accurate and robust disease gene predictions. Our evaluation experiments across six disease groups showed that EPU achieved significantly better results compared with various state-of-the-art prediction methods as well as ensemble learning classifiers. Through integrating multiple biological data sources for training and the outputs of an ensemble of PU learning classifiers for prediction, we are able to minimize the potential bias and errors in individual data sources and machine learning algorithms to achieve more accurate and robust disease gene predictions. In the future, our EPU method provides an effective framework to integrate the additional biological and computational resources for better disease gene predictions

  9. Ensemble positive unlabeled learning for disease gene identification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Li, Xiaoli; Chua, Hon-Nian; Kwoh, Chee-Keong; Ng, See-Kiong

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of genes have been experimentally confirmed in recent years as causative genes to various human diseases. The newly available knowledge can be exploited by machine learning methods to discover additional unknown genes that are likely to be associated with diseases. In particular, positive unlabeled learning (PU learning) methods, which require only a positive training set P (confirmed disease genes) and an unlabeled set U (the unknown candidate genes) instead of a negative training set N, have been shown to be effective in uncovering new disease genes in the current scenario. Using only a single source of data for prediction can be susceptible to bias due to incompleteness and noise in the genomic data and a single machine learning predictor prone to bias caused by inherent limitations of individual methods. In this paper, we propose an effective PU learning framework that integrates multiple biological data sources and an ensemble of powerful machine learning classifiers for disease gene identification. Our proposed method integrates data from multiple biological sources for training PU learning classifiers. A novel ensemble-based PU learning method EPU is then used to integrate multiple PU learning classifiers to achieve accurate and robust disease gene predictions. Our evaluation experiments across six disease groups showed that EPU achieved significantly better results compared with various state-of-the-art prediction methods as well as ensemble learning classifiers. Through integrating multiple biological data sources for training and the outputs of an ensemble of PU learning classifiers for prediction, we are able to minimize the potential bias and errors in individual data sources and machine learning algorithms to achieve more accurate and robust disease gene predictions. In the future, our EPU method provides an effective framework to integrate the additional biological and computational resources for better disease gene predictions

  10. Unraveling algal lipid metabolism: Recent advances in gene identification.

    PubMed

    Khozin-Goldberg, Inna; Cohen, Zvi

    2011-01-01

    Microalgae are now the focus of intensive research due to their potential as a renewable feedstock for biodiesel. This research requires a thorough understanding of the biochemistry and genetics of these organisms' lipid-biosynthesis pathways. Genes encoding lipid-biosynthesis enzymes can now be identified in the genomes of various eukaryotic microalgae. However, an examination of the predicted proteins at the biochemical and molecular levels is mandatory to verify their function. The essential molecular and genetic tools are now available for a comprehensive characterization of genes coding for enzymes of the lipid-biosynthesis pathways in some algal species. This review mainly summarizes the novel information emerging from recently obtained algal gene identification. PMID:20709142

  11. Optimal matrix approximants in structural identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, C. A.; Smith, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    Problems of model correlation and system identification are central in the design, analysis, and control of large space structures. Of the numerous methods that have been proposed, many are based on finding minimal adjustments to a model matrix sufficient to introduce some desirable quality into that matrix. In this work, several of these methods are reviewed, placed in a modern framework, and linked to other previously known ideas in computational linear algebra and optimization. This new framework provides a point of departure for a number of new methods which are introduced here. Significant among these is a method for stiffness matrix adjustment which preserves the sparsity pattern of an original matrix, requires comparatively modest computational resources, and allows robust handling of noisy modal data. Numerical examples are included to illustrate the methods presented herein.

  12. Color code identification in coded structured light.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Li, Youfu; Zhu, Limin

    2012-08-01

    Color code is widely employed in coded structured light to reconstruct the three-dimensional shape of objects. Before determining the correspondence, a very important step is to identify the color code. Until now, the lack of an effective evaluation standard has hindered the progress in this unsupervised classification. In this paper, we propose a framework based on the benchmark to explore the new frontier. Two basic facets of the color code identification are discussed, including color feature selection and clustering algorithm design. First, we adopt analysis methods to evaluate the performance of different color features, and the order of these color features in the discriminating power is concluded after a large number of experiments. Second, in order to overcome the drawback of K-means, a decision-directed method is introduced to find the initial centroids. Quantitative comparisons affirm that our method is robust with high accuracy, and it can find or closely approach the global peak. PMID:22859022

  13. GeneLook: a novel ab initio gene identification system suitable for automated annotation of prokaryotic sequences.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Tatsunari; Ikemura, Toshimichi; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2005-02-14

    With the rapid increases in the amounts of sequence data for prokaryotic genomes, it has become important to develop systems for automated and accurate genome annotation. We present herein a novel ab initio gene identification system, GeneLook, that predicts protein-coding open reading frames (ORFs) with high sensitivity and specificity with no prior knowledge of the sequence composition. The system predicts protein-coding ORFs in two stages, seed ORF selection and main prediction. In the selection of reliable seed ORFs containing at least 200 codons, GeneLook predicts translation start sites and operon structures through searches for ribosome-binding sites and a novel operon prediction algorithm. The codon and nucleotide frequencies of seed ORFs are then used to determine values for two new coding-potential parameters for identification of protein-coding ORFs of at least 34 codons and for another parameter that improves the prediction accuracy for GC-rich genomes. In the main prediction, GeneLook uses these parameters to identify the most likely genes of a given minimal length. We assessed the performance of GeneLook with two indices, sensitivity and specificity that are defined as true positives (TP)/(TP+false negatives) and TP/(TP+false positives), respectively. This system predicted protein-coding ORFs for Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis with sensitivities of 96.5% and 96.2%, respectively, and specificities of 96.9% and 96.1%, respectively. The system also identified 94.1% of annotated genes of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa genome, which is GC-rich, with high specificity (97.2%). Furthermore, GeneLook identified protein-coding ORFs with high accuracy from a wide variety of prokaryotic genomes. PMID:15716020

  14. Identification of Master Regulator Genes in Human Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Sawle, A D; Kebschull, M; Demmer, R T; Papapanou, P N

    2016-08-01

    Analytic approaches confined to fold-change comparisons of gene expression patterns between states of health and disease are unable to distinguish between primary causal disease drivers and secondary noncausal events. Genome-wide reverse engineering approaches can facilitate the identification of candidate genes that may distinguish between causal and associative interactions and may account for the emergence or maintenance of pathologic phenotypes. In this work, we used the algorithm for the reconstruction of accurate cellular networks (ARACNE) to analyze a large gene expression profile data set (313 gingival tissue samples from a cross-sectional study of 120 periodontitis patients) obtained from clinically healthy (n = 70) or periodontitis-affected (n = 243) gingival sites. The generated transcriptional regulatory network of the gingival interactome was subsequently interrogated with the master regulator inference algorithm (MARINA) and gene expression signature data from healthy and periodontitis-affected gingiva. Our analyses identified 41 consensus master regulator genes (MRs), the regulons of which comprised between 25 and 833 genes. Regulons of 7 MRs (HCLS1, ZNF823, XBP1, ZNF750, RORA, TFAP2C, and ZNF57) included >500 genes each. Gene set enrichment analysis indicated differential expression of these regulons in gingival health versus disease with a type 1 error between 2% and 0.5% and with >80% of the regulon genes in the leading edge. Ingenuity pathway analysis showed significant enrichment of 36 regulons for several pathways, while 6 regulons (those of MRs HCLS1, IKZF3, ETS1, NHLH2, POU2F2, and VAV1) were enriched for >10 pathways. Pathways related to immune system signaling and development were the ones most frequently enriched across all regulons. The unbiased analysis of genome-wide regulatory networks can enhance our understanding of the pathobiology of human periodontitis and, after appropriate validation, ultimately identify target molecules of

  15. Gene identification in bacterial and organellar genomes using GeneScan.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, R; Srinivasan, R

    1999-03-30

    The performance of the GeneScan algorithm for gene identification has been improved by incorporation of a directed iterative scanning procedure. Application is made here to the cases of bacterial and organnellar genomes. The sensitivity of gene identification was 100% in Plasmodium falciparum plastid-like genome (35 kb) and in 98% in the Mycoplasma genitalium genome (approximately 580 kb) and the Haemophilus influenzae Rd genome (approximately 1.8 Mb). Sensitivity was found to improve in both the Open Reading Frames (ORFs) which have been identified as genes (by homology or by other methods) and those that are classified as hypothetical. False positive assignments (at the nucleotide level) were 0.25% in H. influenzae genome and 0.3% in M. genitalium. There were no false positive assignments in the plastid-like genome. The agreement between the GeneScan predictions and GeneMark predictions of putative ORFs was 97% in M. genitalium genome and 86% in H. influenzae genome. In terms of an exact match between predicted genes/ORFs and the annotation in the databank, GeneScan performance was evaluated to be between 72% and 90% in different genomes. We predict five putative ORFs that were not annotated earlier in the GenBank files for both M. genitalium and H. influenzae genomes. Our preliminary analysis of the newly sequenced G + C rich genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv also shows comparable sensitivity (99%). PMID:10353188

  16. Genome-wide identification and functional analyses of calmodulin genes in Solanaceous species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Calmodulin (CaM) is a major calcium sensor in all eukaryotes. It binds calcium and modulates the activity of a wide range of downstream proteins in response to calcium signals. However, little is known about the CaM gene family in Solanaceous species, including the economically important species, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and the gene silencing model plant, Nicotiana benthamiana. Moreover, the potential function of CaM in plant disease resistance remains largely unclear. Results We performed genome-wide identification of CaM gene families in Solanaceous species. Employing bioinformatics approaches, multiple full-length CaM genes were identified from tomato, N. benthamiana and potato (S. tuberosum) genomes, with tomato having 6 CaM genes, N. benthamiana having 7 CaM genes, and potato having 4 CaM genes. Sequence comparison analyses showed that three tomato genes, SlCaM3/4/5, two potato genes StCaM2/3, and two sets of N. benthamiana genes, NbCaM1/2/3/4 and NbCaM5/6, encode identical CaM proteins, yet the genes contain different intron/exon organization and are located on different chromosomes. Further sequence comparisons and gene structural and phylogenetic analyses reveal that Solanaceous species gained a new group of CaM genes during evolution. These new CaM genes are unusual in that they contain three introns in contrast to only a single intron typical of known CaM genes in plants. The tomato CaM (SlCaM) genes were found to be expressed in all organs. Prediction of cis-acting elements in 5' upstream sequences and expression analyses demonstrated that SlCaM genes have potential to be highly responsive to a variety of biotic and abiotic stimuli. Additionally, silencing of SlCaM2 and SlCaM6 altered expression of a set of signaling and defense-related genes and resulted in significantly lower resistance to Tobacco rattle virus and the oomycete pathogen, Pythium aphanidermatum. Conclusions The CaM gene families in the Solanaceous species tomato, N

  17. Application of centrality measures in the identification of critical genes in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Ambedkar, Chintagunta; Reddi, Kiran Kumar; Muppalaneni, Naresh Babu; Kalyani, Duggineni

    2015-01-01

    The connectivity of a protein and its structure is related to its functional properties. Many experimental approaches have been employed for the identification of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) associated candidate genes. Therefore, it is of interest to use var ious graph centrality measures integrated with the genes associated with the human Diabetes Mellitus network for the identification of potential targets. We used 2728 genes known to cause Diabetes Mellitus from Jensenlab (Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Protein Research, Denmark) for this analysis. A protein-protein interaction network was further constructed using a tool Centralities in Biological Networks (CentiBiN) with 1020 nodes after eliminating the duplicates, parallel edges, self -loop edges and unknown Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) IDS. We used fourteen centralities measures which are useful in identifying the structural characteristic of individuals in the network. The results of the centrality measures are highly correlated. Thus, we identified genes that are critically associated with DM. We further report the top ten genes of all fourteen centrality measures for further consideration as targets for DM. PMID:25848169

  18. Identification and structure of the nasR gene encoding a nitrate- and nitrite-responsive positive regulator of nasFEDCBA (nitrate assimilation) operon expression in Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, B S; Lin, J T; Stewart, V

    1994-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources through the nitrate assimilatory pathway. The structural genes for assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases together with genes necessary for nitrate transport form an operon, nasFEDCBA. Expression of the nasF operon is regulated both by general nitrogen control and also by nitrate or nitrite induction. We have identified a gene, nasR, that is necessary for nitrate and nitrite induction. The nasR gene, located immediately upstream of the nasFEDCBA operon, encodes a 44-kDa protein. The NasR protein shares carboxyl-terminal sequence similarity with the AmiR protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the positive regulator of amiE (aliphatic amidase) gene expression. In addition, we present evidence that the nasF operon is not autogenously regulated. Images PMID:8051020

  19. Identification and structure of the nasR gene encoding a nitrate- and nitrite-responsive positive regulator of nasFEDCBA (nitrate assimilation) operon expression in Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al.

    PubMed

    Goldman, B S; Lin, J T; Stewart, V

    1994-08-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources through the nitrate assimilatory pathway. The structural genes for assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases together with genes necessary for nitrate transport form an operon, nasFEDCBA. Expression of the nasF operon is regulated both by general nitrogen control and also by nitrate or nitrite induction. We have identified a gene, nasR, that is necessary for nitrate and nitrite induction. The nasR gene, located immediately upstream of the nasFEDCBA operon, encodes a 44-kDa protein. The NasR protein shares carboxyl-terminal sequence similarity with the AmiR protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the positive regulator of amiE (aliphatic amidase) gene expression. In addition, we present evidence that the nasF operon is not autogenously regulated. PMID:8051020

  20. AthaMap web tools for the analysis and identification of co-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Galuschka, Claudia; Schindler, Martin; Bülow, Lorenz; Hehl, Reinhard

    2007-01-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of cis-regulatory elements for the whole Arabidopsis thaliana genome. This database has been extended by new tools to identify common cis-regulatory elements in specific regions of user-provided gene sets. A resulting table displays all cis-regulatory elements annotated in AthaMap including positional information relative to the respective gene. Further tables show overviews with the number of individual transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) present and TFBS common to the whole set of genes. Over represented cis-elements are easily identified. These features were used to detect specific enrichment of drought-responsive elements in cold-induced genes. For identification of co-regulated genes, the output table of the colocalization function was extended to show the closest genes and their relative distances to the colocalizing TFBS. Gene sets determined by this function can be used for a co-regulation analysis in microarray gene expression databases such as Genevestigator or PathoPlant. Additional improvements of AthaMap include display of the gene structure in the sequence window and a significant data increase. AthaMap is freely available at http://www.athamap.de/. PMID:17148485

  1. Identification of highly synchronized subnetworks from gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There has been a growing interest in identifying context-specific active protein-protein interaction (PPI) subnetworks through integration of PPI and time course gene expression data. However the interaction dynamics during the biological process under study has not been sufficiently considered previously. Methods Here we propose a topology-phase locking (TopoPL) based scoring metric for identifying active PPI subnetworks from time series expression data. First the temporal coordination in gene expression changes is evaluated through phase locking analysis; The results are subsequently integrated with PPI to define an activity score for each PPI subnetwork, based on individual member expression, as well topological characteristics of the PPI network and of the expression temporal coordination network; Lastly, the subnetworks with the top scores in the whole PPI network are identified through simulated annealing search. Results Application of TopoPL to simulated data and to the yeast cell cycle data showed that it can more sensitively identify biologically meaningful subnetworks than the method that only utilizes the static PPI topology, or the additive scoring method. Using TopoPL we identified a core subnetwork with 49 genes important to yeast cell cycle. Interestingly, this core contains a protein complex known to be related to arrangement of ribosome subunits that exhibit extremely high gene expression synchronization. Conclusions Inclusion of interaction dynamics is important to the identification of relevant gene networks. PMID:23901792

  2. Identification of Nitrogen-Fixing Genes and Gene Clusters from Metagenomic Library of Acid Mine Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Huaqun; Liang, Yili; Cong, Jing; Liu, Xueduan

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is an essential function of acid mine drainage (AMD) microbial communities. However, most acidophiles in AMD environments are uncultured microorganisms and little is known about the diversity of nitrogen-fixing genes and structure of nif gene cluster in AMD microbial communities. In this study, we used metagenomic sequencing to isolate nif genes in the AMD microbial community from Dexing Copper Mine, China. Meanwhile, a metagenome microarray containing 7,776 large-insertion fosmids was constructed to screen novel nif gene clusters. Metagenomic analyses revealed that 742 sequences were identified as nif genes including structural subunit genes nifH, nifD, nifK and various additional genes. The AMD community is massively dominated by the genus Acidithiobacillus. However, the phylogenetic diversity of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms is much higher than previously thought in the AMD community. Furthermore, a 32.5-kb genomic sequence harboring nif, fix and associated genes was screened by metagenome microarray. Comparative genome analysis indicated that most nif genes in this cluster are most similar to those of Herbaspirillum seropedicae, but the organization of the nif gene cluster had significant differences from H. seropedicae. Sequence analysis and reverse transcription PCR also suggested that distinct transcription units of nif genes exist in this gene cluster. nifQ gene falls into the same transcription unit with fixABCX genes, which have not been reported in other diazotrophs before. All of these results indicated that more novel diazotrophs survive in the AMD community. PMID:24498417

  3. Genomewide Identification of Genes Under Directional Selection: Gene Transcription QST Scan in Diverging Atlantic Salmon Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Roberge, C.; Guderley, H.; Bernatchez, L.

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionary genomics has benefited from methods that allow identifying evolutionarily important genomic regions on a genomewide scale, including genome scans and QTL mapping. Recently, genomewide scanning by means of microarrays has permitted assessing gene transcription differences among species or populations. However, the identification of differentially transcribed genes does not in itself suffice to measure the role of selection in driving evolutionary changes in gene transcription. Here, we propose and apply a “transcriptome scan” approach to investigating the role of selection in shaping differential profiles of gene transcription among populations. We compared the genomewide transcription levels between two Atlantic salmon subpopulations that have been diverging for only six generations. Following assessment of normality and unimodality on a gene-per-gene basis, the additive genetic basis of gene transcription was estimated using the animal model. Gene transcription h2 estimates were significant for 1044 (16%) of all detected cDNA clones. In an approach analogous to that of genome scans, we used the distribution of the QST values estimated from intra- and intersubpopulation additive genetic components of the transcription profiles to identify 16 outlier genes (average QST estimate = 0.11) whose transcription levels are likely to have evolved under the influence of directional selection within six generations only. Overall, this study contributes both empirically and methodologically to the quantitative genetic exploration of gene transcription data. PMID:17720934

  4. Gene Identification Algorithms Using Exploratory Statistical Analysis of Periodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Shashi Bajaj; Sen, Pradip Kumar

    2010-10-01

    Studying periodic pattern is expected as a standard line of attack for recognizing DNA sequence in identification of gene and similar problems. But peculiarly very little significant work is done in this direction. This paper studies statistical properties of DNA sequences of complete genome using a new technique. A DNA sequence is converted to a numeric sequence using various types of mappings and standard Fourier technique is applied to study the periodicity. Distinct statistical behaviour of periodicity parameters is found in coding and non-coding sequences, which can be used to distinguish between these parts. Here DNA sequences of Drosophila melanogaster were analyzed with significant accuracy.

  5. Annotation of human chromosome 21 for relevance to Down syndrome: gene structure and expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Katheleen; Slavov, Dobromir; Bechtel, Lawrence; Davisson, Muriel

    2002-06-01

    Down syndrome is caused by an extra copy of human chromosome 21 and the resultant dosage-related overexpression of genes contained within it. To efficiently direct experiments to determine specific gene-phenotype correlations, it is necessary to identify all genes within 21q and assess their functional associations and expression patterns. Analysis of the complete finished sequence of 21q resulted in annotated 225 genes and gene models, most of which were incomplete and/or had little or no experimental verification. Here we correct or complete the genomic structures of 16 genes, 4 of which were not reported in the annotation of the complete sequence. Our data include the identification of six genes encoding short or ambiguous open reading frames; the identification of three cases in which alternative splicing produces two structurally unrelated protein sequences; and the identification of six genes encoding proteins with functional motifs, two genes with unusually low similarity to their orthologous mouse proteins, and four genes with significant conservation in Drosophila melanogaster. We further demonstrate that an additional nine gene models represent bona fide transcripts and develop expression patterns for these genes plus nine additional novel chromosome 21 genes and four paralogous genes mapping elsewhere in the human genome. These data have implications for generating complete transcript maps of chromosome 21 and for the entire human genome, and for defining expression abnormalities in Down syndrome and mouse models. PMID:12036298

  6. Applications of graph theory in protein structure identification.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Zhang, Shenggui; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the identification of proteins on the proteome wide scale. Among different kinds of protein structure identification methods, graph-theoretic methods are very sharp ones. Due to their lower costs, higher effectiveness and many other advantages, they have drawn more and more researchers' attention nowadays. Specifically, graph-theoretic methods have been widely used in homology identification, side-chain cluster identification, peptide sequencing and so on. This paper reviews several methods in solving protein structure identification problems using graph theory. We mainly introduce classical methods and mathematical models including homology modeling based on clique finding, identification of side-chain clusters in protein structures upon graph spectrum, and de novo peptide sequencing via tandem mass spectrometry using the spectrum graph model. In addition, concluding remarks and future priorities of each method are given. PMID:22165974

  7. Identification of Tuberculosis Susceptibility Genes with Human Macrophage Gene Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Tran Thi Hong; Thorsson, Vesteinn; Simmons, Cameron P.; Quyen, Nguyen Than Ha; Thwaites, Guy E.; Thi Ngoc Lan, Nguyen; Hibberd, Martin; Teo, Yik Y.; Seielstad, Mark; Aderem, Alan; Farrar, Jeremy J.; Hawn, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    Although host genetics influences susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB), few genes determining disease outcome have been identified. We hypothesized that macrophages from individuals with different clinical manifestations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection would have distinct gene expression profiles and that polymorphisms in these genes may also be associated with susceptibility to TB. We measured gene expression levels of >38,500 genes from ex vivo Mtb-stimulated macrophages in 12 subjects with 3 clinical phenotypes: latent, pulmonary, and meningeal TB (n = 4 per group). After identifying differentially expressed genes, we confirmed these results in 34 additional subjects by real-time PCR. We also used a case-control study design to examine whether polymorphisms in differentially regulated genes were associated with susceptibility to these different clinical forms of TB. We compared gene expression profiles in Mtb-stimulated and unstimulated macrophages and identified 1,608 and 199 genes that were differentially expressed by >2- and >5-fold, respectively. In an independent sample set of 34 individuals and a subset of highly regulated genes, 90% of the microarray results were confirmed by RT-PCR, including expression levels of CCL1, which distinguished the 3 clinical groups. Furthermore, 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CCL1 were found to be associated with TB in a case-control genetic association study with 273 TB cases and 188 controls. To our knowledge, this is the first identification of CCL1 as a gene involved in host susceptibility to TB and the first study to combine microarray and DNA polymorphism studies to identify genes associated with TB susceptibility. These results suggest that genome-wide studies can provide an unbiased method to identify critical macrophage response genes that are associated with different clinical outcomes and that variation in innate immune response genes regulate susceptibility to TB. PMID:19057661

  8. Stochastic system identification in structural dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Erdal

    1988-01-01

    Recently, new identification methods have been developed by using the concept of optimal-recursive filtering and stochastic approximation. These methods, known as stochastic identification, are based on the statistical properties of the signal and noise, and do not require the assumptions of current methods. The criterion for stochastic system identification is that the difference between the recorded output and the output from the identified system (i.e., the residual of the identification) should be equal to white noise. In this paper, first a brief review of the theory is given. Then, an application of the method is presented by using ambient vibration data from a nine-story building.

  9. Identification of novel virulence-associated genes via genome analysis of hypothetical genes.

    PubMed

    Garbom, Sara; Forsberg, Ake; Wolf-Watz, Hans; Kihlberg, Britt-Marie

    2004-03-01

    The sequencing of bacterial genomes has opened new perspectives for identification of targets for treatment of infectious diseases. We have identified a set of novel virulence-associated genes (vag genes) by comparing the genome sequences of six human pathogens that are known to cause persistent or chronic infections in humans: Yersinia pestis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Helicobacter pylori, Borrelia burgdorferi, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Treponema pallidum. This comparison was limited to genes annotated as hypothetical in the T. pallidum genome project. Seventeen genes with unknown functions were found to be conserved among these pathogens. Insertional inactivation of 14 of these genes generated nine mutants that were attenuated for virulence in a mouse infection model. Out of these nine genes, five were found to be specifically associated with virulence in mice as demonstrated by infection with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in-frame deletion mutants. In addition, these five vag genes were essential only in vivo, since all the mutants were able to grow in vitro. These genes are broadly conserved among bacteria. Therefore, we propose that the corresponding vag gene products may constitute novel targets for antimicrobial therapy and that some vag mutants could serve as carrier strains for live vaccines. PMID:14977936

  10. Identification and characterization of essential genes in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tim; Birsoy, Kıvanç; Hughes, Nicholas W; Krupczak, Kevin M; Post, Yorick; Wei, Jenny J; Lander, Eric S; Sabatini, David M

    2015-11-27

    Large-scale genetic analysis of lethal phenotypes has elucidated the molecular underpinnings of many biological processes. Using the bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system, we constructed a genome-wide single-guide RNA library to screen for genes required for proliferation and survival in a human cancer cell line. Our screen revealed the set of cell-essential genes, which was validated with an orthogonal gene-trap-based screen and comparison with yeast gene knockouts. This set is enriched for genes that encode components of fundamental pathways, are expressed at high levels, and contain few inactivating polymorphisms in the human population. We also uncovered a large group of uncharacterized genes involved in RNA processing, a number of whose products localize to the nucleolus. Last, screens in additional cell lines showed a high degree of overlap in gene essentiality but also revealed differences specific to each cell line and cancer type that reflect the developmental origin, oncogenic drivers, paralogous gene expression pattern, and chromosomal structure of each line. These results demonstrate the power of CRISPR-based screens and suggest a general strategy for identifying liabilities in cancer cells. PMID:26472758

  11. Identification and characterization of essential genes in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tim; Birsoy, Kıvanç; Hughes, Nicholas W.; Krupczak, Kevin M.; Post, Yorick; Wei, Jenny J.; Lander, Eric S.; Sabatini, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale genetic analysis of lethal phenotypes has elucidated the molecular underpinnings of many biological processes. Using the bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system, we constructed a genome-wide single-guide RNA (sgRNA) library to screen for genes required for proliferation and survival in a human cancer cell line. Our screen revealed the set of cell-essential genes, which was validated by an orthogonal gene-trap-based screen and comparison with yeast gene knockouts. This set is enriched for genes that encode components of fundamental pathways, are expressed at high levels, and contain few inactivating polymorphisms in the human population. We also uncovered a large group of uncharacterized genes involved in RNA processing, a number of whose products localize to the nucleolus. Lastly, screens in additional cell lines showed a high degree of overlap in gene essentiality, but also revealed differences specific to each cell line and cancer type that reflect the developmental origin, oncogenic drivers, paralogous gene expression pattern, and chromosomal structure of each line. These results demonstrate the power of CRISPR-based screens and suggest a general strategy for identifying liabilities in cancer cells. PMID:26472758

  12. Identification of genes for bone mineral density variation by computational disease gene identification strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Gloria H Y; Deng, Hong-Wen; Kung, Annie W C; Huang, Qing-Yang

    2011-11-01

    We previously used five freely available bioinformatics tools (Prioritizer, Geneseeker, PROSPECTR and SUSPECTS, Disease Gene Prediction, and Endeavour) to analyze the thirteen well-replicated osteoporosis susceptibility loci and identify a subset of most likely candidate osteoporosis susceptibility genes (Huang et al. in J Hum Genet 53:644-655, 2008). In the current study, we experimentally tested the association between bone mineral density (BMD) and the 9 most likely candidate genes [LAMC2(1q25-q31), MATN3(2p24-p23), ITGAV(2q31-q32), ACVR1(2q23-q24), TDGF1(3p21.31), EGF(4q25), IGF1(12q22-q23), ZIC2(13q32), BMP2(20p12)] which were pinpointed by 4 or more bioinformatics tools. Forty tag SNPs in nine candidate genes were genotyped in a southern Chinese female case-control cohort consisting of 1643 subjects. Single- and multi-marker association analyses were performed using logistic regression analysis implemented by PLINK. Potential transcription factor binding sites were predicted by MatInspector. The strongest association was observed between rs10178256 (MATN3) and trochanter (P < 0.001) and total hip BMD (P = 0.002). The SNP rs6214 (IGF1) showed consistent association with BMD at all the four measured skeletal sites (P = 0.005-0.044). Prediction of transcription factor binding suggested that the minor allele G of rs10178256 might abolish the binding of MESP1 and MESP2 which play vital roles in bone homeostasis, whereas the minor allele G of rs6214 might create an additional binding site for XBP1, a constitutive regulator of endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Our data suggested that variants in MATN3 and IGF1 were involved in BMD regulation in southern Chinese women. PMID:21638018

  13. Identification of Escherichia coli region III flagellar gene products and description of two new flagellar genes.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, D H; Matsumura, P

    1984-01-01

    Region III flagellar genes in Escherichia coli are involved with the assembly and rotation of the flagella, as well as taxis. We subcloned the flaB operon from a lambda fla transducing phage onto plasmid pMK2004. Two additional genes were found at the flaB locus, and we subdivided the flaB gene into flaB1, flaBII, and flaBIII. The cheY suppressor mutations which have previously been mapped to flaB were further localized to flaB11 (Parkinson et al., J. Bacteriol. 155:265-274, 1983). Until now, gene product identification has not been possible for these genes because of their low levels of gene expression. Overexpression of the flagellar genes was accomplished by placing the flaB operon under the control of the lacUV5 or tac promoters. Plasmid-encoded proteins were examined in a minicell expression system. By correlating various deletions and insertions in the flaB operon with the ability to complement specific flagellar mutants and code for polypeptides, we made the following gene product assignments: flaB 1, 60 kilodaltons; flaB 11, 38 kilodaltons; flaB111, 28 kilodaltons; flaC, 56 kilodaltons; fla0, 16 kilodaltons; and flaE, 54 kilodaltons. Images PMID:6094477

  14. Identification and characterization of a novel gene (CTPsH) homologous to murine CTP synthase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, B.Z.; Dng, J.H.; Roe, C.R.

    1994-09-01

    CTP synthase (CTPs) plays an important role in pyrimidine metabolism in eukaryotic cells. Alteration of this enzyme was associated with multidrug resistant phenotype of cancer cells to several cytotoxic pyrimidine ribonucleosides. In order to elucidate the mechanism of this type of drug resistance, a murine CTP synthase cDNA has been previously isolated from a mouse liver cDNA library. Here report the identification of a new gene which is highly similar to mouse CTPs gene. A cDNA clone, designated CTPsH, contained an open reading frame of 1758 nucleotides that predicts a polypeptide of 586 amino acids with an M(r) of 66,002.6. The predicted amino acid sequence shares 79% identity with mouse liver CTPs gene. Both genes are expressed in a wide variety of tissues, as judged by RNA blot analysis, but the relative levels of the two mRNAs differ. So far this is the only gene which shares many features with murine CTPs gene. The availability of the CTPsH would provide an opportunity to characterize the biological function of this gene. The possible role of this new gene (CTPsH) in drug resistance of malignant cells is under investigation.

  15. Dynamic Identification for Control of Large Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    This is a compilation of reports by the one author on one subject. It consists of the following five journal articles: (1) A Parametric Study of the Ibrahim Time Domain Modal Identification Algorithm; (2) Large Modal Survey Testing Using the Ibrahim Time Domain Identification Technique; (3) Computation of Normal Modes from Identified Complex Modes; (4) Dynamic Modeling of Structural from Measured Complex Modes; and (5) Time Domain Quasi-Linear Identification of Nonlinear Dynamic Systems.

  16. Identification of large structures on orbit - A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denman, Eugene E.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Junkins, John L.; Kamat, Manohar; Hasselman, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    This paper seeks to provide a brief overview of the somewhat unfamiliar concept underlying system identification especially as it applies to large flexible space structures. Having elaborated on the concept, the authors provide a detailed description of the identification process including model development, its experimental validation and final certification. This discussion is followed by a classification of the different identification methods and a brief evaluation of the potential of existing methodology to address special circumstances of large flexible space structures. The paper concludes by making a few recommendations that are deemed necessary to meet the enormous challenges posed by the deployment or erection of large space structures.

  17. Identification and characterization of phenylpyruvate decarboxylase genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Vuralhan, Zeynep; Morais, Marcos A; Tai, Siew-Leng; Piper, Matthew D W; Pronk, Jack T

    2003-08-01

    Catabolism of amino acids via the Ehrlich pathway involves transamination to the corresponding alpha-keto acids, followed by decarboxylation to an aldehyde and then reduction to an alcohol. Alternatively, the aldehyde may be oxidized to an acid. This pathway is functional in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, since during growth in glucose-limited chemostat cultures with phenylalanine as the sole nitrogen source, phenylethanol and phenylacetate were produced in quantities that accounted for all of the phenylalanine consumed. Our objective was to identify the structural gene(s) required for the decarboxylation of phenylpyruvate to phenylacetaldehyde, the first specific step in the Ehrlich pathway. S. cerevisiae possesses five candidate genes with sequence similarity to genes encoding thiamine diphosphate-dependent decarboxylases that could encode this activity: YDR380w/ARO10, YDL080C/THI3, PDC1, PDC5, and PDC6. Phenylpyruvate decarboxylase activity was present in cultures grown with phenylalanine as the sole nitrogen source but was absent from ammonia-grown cultures. Furthermore, the transcript level of one candidate gene (ARO10) increased 30-fold when phenylalanine replaced ammonia as the sole nitrogen source. Analyses of phenylalanine catabolite production and phenylpyruvate decarboxylase enzyme assays indicated that ARO10 was sufficient to encode phenylpyruvate decarboxylase activity in the absence of the four other candidate genes. There was also an alternative activity with a higher capacity but lower affinity for phenylpyruvate. The candidate gene THI3 did not itself encode an active phenylpyruvate decarboxylase but was required along with one or more pyruvate decarboxylase genes (PDC1, PDC5, and PDC6) for the alternative activity. The K(m) and V(max) values of the two activities differed, showing that Aro10p is the physiologically relevant phenylpyruvate decarboxylase in wild-type cells. Modifications to this gene could therefore be important for metabolic engineering

  18. Identification of quorum sensing-controlled genes in Burkholderia ambifaria

    PubMed Central

    Chapalain, Annelise; Vial, Ludovic; Laprade, Natacha; Dekimpe, Valérie; Perreault, Jonathan; Déziel, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) comprises strains with a virulence potential toward immunocompromised patients as well as plant growth–promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Owing to the link between quorum sensing (QS) and virulence, most studies among Bcc species have been directed toward QS of pathogenic bacteria. We have investigated the QS of B. ambifaria, a PGPR only infrequently recovered from patients. The cepI gene, responsible for the synthesis of the main signaling molecule N-octanoylhomoserine lactone (C8-HSL), was inactivated. Phenotypes of the B. ambifaria cepI mutant we observed, such as increased production of siderophores and decreased proteolytic and antifungal activities, are in agreement with those of other Bcc cepI mutants. The cepI mutant was then used as background strain for a whole-genome transposon-insertion mutagenesis strategy, allowing the identification of 20 QS-controlled genes, corresponding to 17 loci. The main functions identified are linked to antifungal and antimicrobial properties, as we have identified QS-controlled genes implicated in the production of pyrrolnitrin, burkholdines (occidiofungin-like molecules), and enacyloxins. This study provides insights in the QS-regulated functions of a PGPR, which could lead to beneficial potential biotechnological applications. PMID:23382083

  19. Identification of novel hereditary cancer genes by whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sokolenko, Anna P; Suspitsin, Evgeny N; Kuligina, Ekatherina Sh; Bizin, Ilya V; Frishman, Dmitrij; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2015-12-28

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) provides a powerful tool for medical genetic research. Several dozens of WES studies involving patients with hereditary cancer syndromes have already been reported. WES led to breakthrough in understanding of the genetic basis of some exceptionally rare syndromes; for example, identification of germ-line SMARCA4 mutations in patients with ovarian hypercalcemic small cell carcinomas indeed explains a noticeable share of familial aggregation of this disease. However, studies on common cancer types turned out to be more difficult. In particular, there is almost a dozen of reports describing WES analysis of breast cancer patients, but none of them yet succeeded to reveal a gene responsible for the significant share of missing heritability. Virtually all components of WES studies require substantial improvement, e.g. technical performance of WES, interpretation of WES results, mode of patient selection, etc. Most of contemporary investigations focus on genes with autosomal dominant mechanism of inheritance; however, recessive and oligogenic models of transmission of cancer susceptibility also need to be considered. It is expected that the list of medically relevant tumor-predisposing genes will be rapidly expanding in the next few years. PMID:26427841

  20. Search-based model identification of smart-structure damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, B. J.; Macalou, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a combined model and parameter identification approach, based on modal analysis and artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, for identifying damage or flaws in a rotating truss structure incorporating embedded piezoceramic sensors. This smart structure example is representative of a class of structures commonly found in aerospace systems and next generation space structures. Artificial intelligence techniques of classification, heuristic search, and an object-oriented knowledge base are used in an AI-based model identification approach. A finite model space is classified into a search tree, over which a variant of best-first search is used to identify the model whose stored response most closely matches that of the input. Newly-encountered models can be incorporated into the model space. This adaptativeness demonstrates the potential for learning control. Following this output-error model identification, numerical parameter identification is used to further refine the identified model. Given the rotating truss example in this paper, noisy data corresponding to various damage configurations are input to both this approach and a conventional parameter identification method. The combination of the AI-based model identification with parameter identification is shown to lead to smaller parameter corrections than required by the use of parameter identification alone.

  1. Overview of gene structure in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Spieth, John; Lawson, Daniel; Davis, Paul; Williams, Gary; Howe, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    In the early stage of the C. elegans sequencing project, the ab initio gene prediction program Genefinder was used to find protein-coding genes. Subsequently, protein-coding genes structures have been actively curated by WormBase using evidence from all available data sources. Most coding loci were identified by the Genefinder program, but the process of gene curation results in a continual refinement of the details of gene structure, involving the correction and confirmation of intron splice sites, the addition of alternate splicing forms, the merging and splitting of incorrect predictions, and the creation and extension of 5' and 3' ends. The development of new technologies results in the availability of further data sources, and these are incorporated into the evidence used to support the curated structures. Non-coding genes are more difficult to curate using this methodology, and so the structures for most of these have been imported from the literature or from specialist databases of ncRNA data. This article describes the structure and curation of transcribed regions of genes. PMID:25368915

  2. A Model-Based Joint Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes and Phenotype-Associated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Minseok; Shin, Su-kyung; Kwon, Eun-Young; Kim, Sung-Eun; Bae, Yun-Jung; Lee, Seungyeoun; Sung, Mi-Kyung; Choi, Myung-Sook; Park, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, many analytical methods and tools have been developed for microarray data. The detection of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) among different treatment groups is often a primary purpose of microarray data analysis. In addition, association studies investigating the relationship between genes and a phenotype of interest such as survival time are also popular in microarray data analysis. Phenotype association analysis provides a list of phenotype-associated genes (PAGs). However, it is sometimes necessary to identify genes that are both DEGs and PAGs. We consider the joint identification of DEGs and PAGs in microarray data analyses. The first approach we used was a naïve approach that detects DEGs and PAGs separately and then identifies the genes in an intersection of the list of PAGs and DEGs. The second approach we considered was a hierarchical approach that detects DEGs first and then chooses PAGs from among the DEGs or vice versa. In this study, we propose a new model-based approach for the joint identification of DEGs and PAGs. Unlike the previous two-step approaches, the proposed method identifies genes simultaneously that are DEGs and PAGs. This method uses standard regression models but adopts different null hypothesis from ordinary regression models, which allows us to perform joint identification in one-step. The proposed model-based methods were evaluated using experimental data and simulation studies. The proposed methods were used to analyze a microarray experiment in which the main interest lies in detecting genes that are both DEGs and PAGs, where DEGs are identified between two diet groups and PAGs are associated with four phenotypes reflecting the expression of leptin, adiponectin, insulin-like growth factor 1, and insulin. Model-based approaches provided a larger number of genes, which are both DEGs and PAGs, than other methods. Simulation studies showed that they have more power than other methods. Through analysis of

  3. A Model-Based Joint Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes and Phenotype-Associated Genes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Samuel Sunghwan; Kim, Yongkang; Yoon, Joon; Seo, Minseok; Shin, Su-Kyung; Kwon, Eun-Young; Kim, Sung-Eun; Bae, Yun-Jung; Lee, Seungyeoun; Sung, Mi-Kyung; Choi, Myung-Sook; Park, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, many analytical methods and tools have been developed for microarray data. The detection of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) among different treatment groups is often a primary purpose of microarray data analysis. In addition, association studies investigating the relationship between genes and a phenotype of interest such as survival time are also popular in microarray data analysis. Phenotype association analysis provides a list of phenotype-associated genes (PAGs). However, it is sometimes necessary to identify genes that are both DEGs and PAGs. We consider the joint identification of DEGs and PAGs in microarray data analyses. The first approach we used was a naïve approach that detects DEGs and PAGs separately and then identifies the genes in an intersection of the list of PAGs and DEGs. The second approach we considered was a hierarchical approach that detects DEGs first and then chooses PAGs from among the DEGs or vice versa. In this study, we propose a new model-based approach for the joint identification of DEGs and PAGs. Unlike the previous two-step approaches, the proposed method identifies genes simultaneously that are DEGs and PAGs. This method uses standard regression models but adopts different null hypothesis from ordinary regression models, which allows us to perform joint identification in one-step. The proposed model-based methods were evaluated using experimental data and simulation studies. The proposed methods were used to analyze a microarray experiment in which the main interest lies in detecting genes that are both DEGs and PAGs, where DEGs are identified between two diet groups and PAGs are associated with four phenotypes reflecting the expression of leptin, adiponectin, insulin-like growth factor 1, and insulin. Model-based approaches provided a larger number of genes, which are both DEGs and PAGs, than other methods. Simulation studies showed that they have more power than other methods. Through analysis of

  4. Identification and characterization of a welwitindolinone alkaloid biosynthetic gene cluster in the stigonematalean Cyanobacterium Hapalosiphon welwitschii.

    PubMed

    Hillwig, Matthew L; Fuhrman, Heather A; Ittiamornkul, Kuljira; Sevco, Tyler J; Kwak, Daniel H; Liu, Xinyu

    2014-03-21

    The identification of a 36 kb welwitindolinone (wel) biosynthetic gene cluster in Hapalosiphon welwitschii UTEX B1830 is reported. Characterization of the enzymes responsible for assembling the early biosynthetic intermediates geranyl pyrophosphate and 3-((Z)-2′-isocyanoethenyl)indole as well as a dedicated N-methyltransferase in the maturation of N-methylwelwitindolinone C isothiocyanate solidified the link between the wel pathway and welwitindolinone biosynthesis. Comparative analysis of the ambiguine and welwitindolinone biosynthetic pathways in two different organisms provided insights into the origins of diverse structures within hapalindole-type molecules. PMID:24677572

  5. Identification of the Scopularide Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Scopulariopsis brevicaulis.

    PubMed

    Lukassen, Mie Bech; Saei, Wagma; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Tamminen, Anu; Kumar, Abhishek; Kempken, Frank; Wiebe, Marilyn G; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2015-07-01

    Scopularide A is a promising potent anticancer lipopeptide isolated from a marine derived Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strain. The compound consists of a reduced carbon chain (3-hydroxy-methyldecanoyl) attached to five amino acids (glycine, l-valine, d-leucine, l-alanine, and l-phenylalanine). Using the newly sequenced S. brevicaulis genome we were able to identify the putative biosynthetic gene cluster using genetic information from the structurally related emericellamide A from Aspergillus nidulans and W493-B from Fusarium pseudograminearum. The scopularide A gene cluster includes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS1), a polyketide synthase (PKS2), a CoA ligase, an acyltransferase, and a transcription factor. Homologous recombination was low in S. brevicaulis so the local transcription factor was integrated randomly under a constitutive promoter, which led to a three to four-fold increase in scopularide A production. This indirectly verifies the identity of the proposed biosynthetic gene cluster. PMID:26184239

  6. Identification of the Scopularide Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Scopulariopsis brevicaulis

    PubMed Central

    Lukassen, Mie Bech; Saei, Wagma; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Tamminen, Anu; Kumar, Abhishek; Kempken, Frank; Wiebe, Marilyn G.; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2015-01-01

    Scopularide A is a promising potent anticancer lipopeptide isolated from a marine derived Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strain. The compound consists of a reduced carbon chain (3-hydroxy-methyldecanoyl) attached to five amino acids (glycine, l-valine, d-leucine, l-alanine, and l-phenylalanine). Using the newly sequenced S. brevicaulis genome we were able to identify the putative biosynthetic gene cluster using genetic information from the structurally related emericellamide A from Aspergillus nidulans and W493-B from Fusarium pseudograminearum. The scopularide A gene cluster includes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS1), a polyketide synthase (PKS2), a CoA ligase, an acyltransferase, and a transcription factor. Homologous recombination was low in S. brevicaulis so the local transcription factor was integrated randomly under a constitutive promoter, which led to a three to four-fold increase in scopularide A production. This indirectly verifies the identity of the proposed biosynthetic gene cluster. PMID:26184239

  7. Structural damage identification using mathematical optimization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Mo-How Herman

    1991-01-01

    An identification procedure is proposed to identify damage characteristics (location and size of the damage) from dynamic measurements. This procedure was based on minimization of the mean-square measure of difference between measurement data (natural frequencies and mode shapes) and the corresponding predictions obtained from the computational model. The procedure is tested for simulated damage in the form of stiffness changes in a simple fixed free spring mass system and symmetric cracks in a simply supported Bernoulli Euler beam. It is shown that when all the mode information is used in the identification procedure it is possible to uniquely determine the damage properties. Without knowing the complete set of modal information, a restricted region in the initial data space has been found for realistic and convergent solution from the identification process.

  8. Identification of key genes involved in root development of tomato using expressed sequence tag analysis.

    PubMed

    Kalidhasan, N; Joshi, Deepti; Bhatt, Tarun Kumar; Gupta, Aditya Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Root system of plants are actually fascinating structures, not only critical for plant development, but also important for storage and conduction. Due to its agronomic importance, identification of genes involved in root development has been a subject of intense study. Tomato is the one of the most consumed vegetables in the world. Tomato has been used as model system for dicot plants because of its small genome, well-established transformation techniques and well-constructed physical map. The present study is targeted to identify of root specific genes expressed temporally and also gene(s) involved in lateral root and profuse root development. A total of 890 ESTs were identified from five EST libraries constructed using SSH approach which included temporal gene regulation (early and late) and genes involved in morphogenetic traits (lateral and profuse rooting). One hundred sixty-one unique ESTs identified from various libraries were categorized based on their putative functions and deposited in NCBI-dbEST database. In addition, 36 ESTs were selected for validation of their expression by RT-PCR. The present findings will help in shedding light to the unexplored developmental process of root growth in tomato and plant in general. PMID:26600676

  9. Identification of novel Notch target genes in T cell leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Nicholas; Zeef, Leo; Portillo, Virginia; Fennessy, Carl; Warrander, Fiona; Hoyle, Sarah; Buckle, Anne-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Background Dysregulated Notch signalling is believed to play an important role in the development and maintenance of T cell leukaemia. At a cellular level, Notch signalling promotes proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) cells. In this study we aimed to identify novel transcriptional targets of Notch signalling in the T-ALL cell line, Jurkat. Results RNA was prepared from Jurkat cells retrovirally transduced with an empty vector (GFP-alone) or vectors containing constitutively active forms of Notch (N1ΔE or N3ΔE), and used for Affymetrix microarray analysis. A subset of genes found to be regulated by Notch was chosen for real-time PCR validation and in some cases, validation at the protein level, using several Notch-transduced T-ALL and non-T-ALL leukaemic cell lines. As expected, several known transcriptional target of Notch, such as HES1 and Deltex, were found to be overexpressed in Notch-transduced cells, however, many novel transcriptional targets of Notch signalling were identified using this approach. These included the T cell costimulatory molecule CD28, the anti-apoptotic protein GIMAP5, and inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (1D1). Conclusion The identification of such downstream Notch target genes provides insights into the mechanisms of Notch function in T cell leukaemia, and may help identify novel therapeutic targets in this disease. PMID:19508709

  10. Human glucose phosphate isomerase: Exon mapping and gene structure

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Weiming; Lee, Pauline; Beutler, E.

    1995-10-10

    The structure of the gene for human glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) has been determined. Three GPI clones were isolated from a human genomic library by using a full-length GPI cDNA probe and were characterized. Oligonucleotides based on the known cDNA sequence were used as primers in amplification and sequence analyses. This led to the identification of the exon-intron junctions. By this approach, 18 exons and 17 introns have been identified. The exons range in size from 44 to 431 nucleotides. The intronic sequences surrounding the exons provide useful information for the identification of mutations that give rise to human GPI deficiency associated with chronic hemolytic anemia. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Chicken rRNA Gene Cluster Structure

    PubMed Central

    Dyomin, Alexander G.; Koshel, Elena I.; Kiselev, Artem M.; Saifitdinova, Alsu F.; Galkina, Svetlana A.; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Kostareva, Anna A.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, whose activity results in nucleolus formation, constitute an extremely important part of genome. Despite the extensive exploration into avian genomes, no complete description of avian rRNA gene primary structure has been offered so far. We publish a complete chicken rRNA gene cluster sequence here, including 5’ETS (1836 bp), 18S rRNA gene (1823 bp), ITS1 (2530 bp), 5.8S rRNA gene (157 bp), ITS2 (733 bp), 28S rRNA gene (4441 bp) and 3’ETS (343 bp). The rRNA gene cluster sequence of 11863 bp was assembled from raw reads and deposited to GenBank under KT445934 accession number. The assembly was validated through in situ fluorescent hybridization analysis on chicken metaphase chromosomes using computed and synthesized specific probes, as well as through the reference assembly against de novo assembled rRNA gene cluster sequence using sequenced fragments of BAC-clone containing chicken NOR (nucleolus organizer region). The results have confirmed the chicken rRNA gene cluster validity. PMID:27299357

  12. Identification and Characterization of the Sucrose Synthase 2 Gene (Sus2) in Durum Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Volpicella, Mariateresa; Fanizza, Immacolata; Leoni, Claudia; Gadaleta, Agata; Nigro, Domenica; Gattulli, Bruno; Mangini, Giacomo; Blanco, Antonio; Ceci, Luigi R.

    2016-01-01

    Sucrose transport is the central system for the allocation of carbon resources in vascular plants. Sucrose synthase (SUS), which reversibly catalyzes sucrose synthesis and cleavage, represents a key enzyme in the control of the flow of carbon into starch biosynthesis. In the present study the genomic identification and characterization of the Sus2-2A and Sus2-2B genes coding for SUS in durum wheat (cultivars Ciccio and Svevo) is reported. The genes were analyzed for their expression in different tissues and at different seed maturation stages, in four tetraploid wheat genotypes (Svevo, Ciccio, Primadur, and 5-BIL42). The activity of the encoded proteins was evaluated by specific activity assays on endosperm extracts and their structure established by modeling approaches. The combined results of sucrose synthase 2 expression and activity levels were then considered in the light of their possible involvement in starch yield. PMID:27014292

  13. Identification and Validation of Housekeeping Genes for Gene Expression Analysis of Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lemma, Silvia; Avnet, Sofia; Salerno, Manuela; Chano, Tokuhiro; Baldini, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The characterization of cancer stem cell (CSC) subpopulation, through the comparison of the gene expression signature in respect to the native cancer cells, is particularly important for the identification of novel and more effective anticancer strategies. However, CSC have peculiar characteristics in terms of adhesion, growth, and metabolism that possibly implies a different modulation of the expression of the most commonly used housekeeping genes (HKG), like b-actin (ACTB). Although it is crucial to identify which are the most stable HKG genes to normalize the data derived from quantitative Real-Time PCR analysis to obtain robust and consistent results, an exhaustive validation of reference genes in CSC is still missing. Here, we isolated CSC spheres from different musculoskeletal sarcomas and carcinomas as a model to investigate on the stability of the mRNA expression of 15 commonly used HKG, in respect to the native cells. The selected genes were analysed for the variation coefficient and compared using the popular algorithms NormFinder and geNorm to evaluate stability ranking. As a result, we found that: 1) Tata Binding Protein (TBP), Tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein zeta polypeptide (YWHAZ), Peptidylprolyl isomerase A (PPIA), and Hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS) are the most stable HKG for the comparison between CSC and native cells; 2) at least four reference genes should be considered for robust results; 3) the use of ACTB should not be recommended, 4) specific HKG should be considered for studies that are focused only on a specific tumor type, like sarcoma or carcinoma. Our results should be taken in consideration for all the studies of gene expression analysis of CSC, and will substantially contribute for future investigations aimed to identify novel anticancer therapy based on CSC targeting. PMID:26894994

  14. Identification of a Maize Locus That Modulates the Hypersensitive Defense Response, Using Mutant-Assisted Gene Identification and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Chintamanani, Satya; Hulbert, Scot H.; Johal, Gurmukh S.; Balint-Kurti, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Potentially useful naturally occurring genetic variation is often difficult to identify as the effects of individual genes are subtle and difficult to observe. In this study, a novel genetic technique called Mutant-Assisted Gene Identification and Characterization is used to identify naturally occurring loci modulating the hypersensitive defense response (HR) in maize. Mutant-Assisted Gene Identification and Characterization facilitates the identification of naturally occurring alleles underlying phenotypic variation from diverse germplasm, using a mutant phenotype as a “reporter.” In this study the reporter phenotype was caused by a partially dominant autoactive disease resistance gene, Rp1-D21, which caused HR lesions to form spontaneously all over the plant. Here it is demonstrated that the Rp1-D21 phenotype is profoundly affected by genetic background. By crossing the Rp1-D21 gene into the IBM mapping population, it was possible to map and identify Hrml1 on chromosome 10, a locus responsible for modulating the HR phenotype conferred by Rp1-D21. Other loci with smaller effects were identified on chromosomes 1 and 9. These results demonstrate that Mutant-Assisted Gene Identification and Characterization is a viable approach for identifying naturally occurring useful genetic variation. PMID:20176981

  15. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of WRKY Gene Family in Capsicum annuum L.

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Wei-Ping; Snyder, John C.; Wang, Shu-Bin; Liu, Jin-Bing; Pan, Bao-Gui; Guo, Guang-Jun; Wei, Ge

    2016-01-01

    The WRKY family of transcription factors is one of the most important families of plant transcriptional regulators with members regulating multiple biological processes, especially in regulating defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, little information is available about WRKYs in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). The recent release of completely assembled genome sequences of pepper allowed us to perform a genome-wide investigation for pepper WRKY proteins. In the present study, a total of 71 WRKY genes were identified in the pepper genome. According to structural features of their encoded proteins, the pepper WRKY genes (CaWRKY) were classified into three main groups, with the second group further divided into five subgroups. Genome mapping analysis revealed that CaWRKY were enriched on four chromosomes, especially on chromosome 1, and 15.5% of the family members were tandemly duplicated genes. A phylogenetic tree was constructed depending on WRKY domain' sequences derived from pepper and Arabidopsis. The expression of 21 selected CaWRKY genes in response to seven different biotic and abiotic stresses (salt, heat shock, drought, Phytophtora capsici, SA, MeJA, and ABA) was evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR; Some CaWRKYs were highly expressed and up-regulated by stress treatment. Our results will provide a platform for functional identification and molecular breeding studies of WRKY genes in pepper. PMID:26941768

  16. Stability of gene contributions and identification of outliers in multivariate analysis of microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Baty, Florent; Jaeger, Daniel; Preiswerk, Frank; Schumacher, Martin M; Brutsche, Martin H

    2008-01-01

    Background Multivariate ordination methods are powerful tools for the exploration of complex data structures present in microarray data. These methods have several advantages compared to common gene-by-gene approaches. However, due to their exploratory nature, multivariate ordination methods do not allow direct statistical testing of the stability of genes. Results In this study, we developed a computationally efficient algorithm for: i) the assessment of the significance of gene contributions and ii) the identification of sample outliers in multivariate analysis of microarray data. The approach is based on the use of resampling methods including bootstrapping and jackknifing. A statistical package of R functions was developed. This package includes tools for both inferring the statistical significance of gene contributions and identifying outliers among samples. Conclusion The methodology was successfully applied to three published data sets with varying levels of signal intensities. Its relevance was compared with alternative methods. Overall, it proved to be particularly effective for the evaluation of the stability of microarray data. PMID:18570644

  17. Structural damage identification using piezoelectric impedance and Bayesian inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuai, Q.; Zhou, K.; Tang, J.

    2015-04-01

    Structural damage identification is a challenging subject in the structural health monitoring research. The piezoelectric impedance-based damage identification, which usually utilizes the matrix inverse-based optimization, may in theory identify the damage location and damage severity. However, the sensitivity matrix is oftentimes ill-conditioned in practice, since the number of unknowns may far exceed the useful measurements/inputs. In this research, a new method based on intelligent inference framework for damage identification is presented. Bayesian inference is used to directly predict damage location and severity using impedance measurement through forward prediction and comparison. Gaussian process is employed to enrich the forward analysis result, thereby reducing computational cost. Case study is carried out to illustrate the identification performance.

  18. Isolation and identification of gene-specific microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Lung; Chang, Donald C; Ying, Shao-Yao

    2013-01-01

    Computer programming has identified hundreds of genomic hairpin sequences, many with functions remain to be determined. Because direct transfection of hairpin-like miRNA precursors (pre)-miRNAs in mammalian cells is not always sufficient to trigger effective RNA-induced gene silencing complex (RISC) assembly, a key step for RNA interference (RNAi)-related gene silencing, we developed an intronic miRNA-expressing system to overcome this problem by inserting a hairpin-like pre-miRNA structure into the intron region of a gene and successfully increased the efficiency and effectiveness of miRNA-associated RNAi induction in vitro and in vivo. This intronic miRNA biogenesis has been found to depend on a coupled interaction of nascent precursor messenger RNA transcription and intron excision within a specific nuclear region proximal to genomic perichromatin fibrils. The intronic miRNA was transcribed by RNA type II polymerases, coexpressed with a primary gene transcript, and excised out of its encoding gene transcript by intracellular RNA splicing and processing mechanisms. Currently, some ribonuclease III endonucleases have been found to be involved in the processing of spliced introns and probably facilitating the intronic miRNA maturation. Using this miRNA generation system, we have shown for the first time that the intron-derived miRNAs were able to induce strong RNAi effects in not only human and mouse cells but also zebrafishes, chicken embryos, and adult mice. We have also developed an miRNA isolation protocol, based on the complementarity between the designed miRNA and its target gene sequence, to purify and identify the mature miRNAs generated by the intronic miRNA-expressing system. Several intronic miRNA identities and structures are currently confirmed to be active in vitro and in vivo. According to this proven-of-principle method, we now have full knowledge to design pre-miRNA inserts that are more efficient and effective for the intronic mi

  19. Improved Stochastic Subspace System Identification for Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Loh, Chin-Hsiung

    2015-07-01

    Structural health monitoring acquires structural information through numerous sensor measurements. Vibrational measurement data render the dynamic characteristics of structures to be extracted, in particular of the modal properties such as natural frequencies, damping, and mode shapes. The stochastic subspace system identification has been recognized as a power tool which can present a structure in the modal coordinates. To obtain qualitative identified data, this tool needs to spend computational expense on a large set of measurements. In study, a stochastic system identification framework is proposed to improve the efficiency and quality of the conventional stochastic subspace system identification. This framework includes 1) measured signal processing, 2) efficient space projection, 3) system order selection, and 4) modal property derivation. The measured signal processing employs the singular spectrum analysis algorithm to lower the noise components as well as to present a data set in a reduced dimension. The subspace is subsequently derived from the data set presented in a delayed coordinate. With the proposed order selection criteria, the number of structural modes is determined, resulting in the modal properties. This system identification framework is applied to a real-world bridge for exploring the feasibility in real-time applications. The results show that this improved system identification method significantly decreases computational time, while qualitative modal parameters are still attained.

  20. Structure, expression and functions of MTA genes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Wang, Rui-An

    2016-05-15

    Metastatic associated proteins (MTA) are integrators of upstream regulatory signals with the ability to act as master coregulators for modifying gene transcriptional activity. The MTA family includes three genes and multiple alternatively spliced variants. The MTA proteins neither have their own enzymatic activity nor have been shown to directly interact with DNA. However, MTA proteins interact with a variety of chromatin remodeling factors and complexes with enzymatic activities for modulating the plasticity of nucleosomes, leading to the repression or derepression of target genes or other extra-nuclear and nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD)-complex independent activities. The functions of MTA family members are driven by the steady state levels and subcellular localization of MTA proteins, the dynamic nature of modifying signals and enzymes, the structural features and post-translational modification of protein domains, interactions with binding proteins, and the nature of the engaged and resulting features of nucleosomes in the proximity of target genes. In general, MTA1 and MTA2 are the most upregulated genes in human cancer and correlate well with aggressive phenotypes, therapeutic resistance, poor prognosis and ultimately, unfavorable survival of cancer patients. Here we will discuss the structure, expression and functions of the MTA family of genes in the context of cancer cells. PMID:26869315

  1. Identification of a novel transcript of human MD2 gene.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chen; Shen, A-Dong

    2016-09-15

    Myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD2) regulates bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggered anti-bacterial immune response as a broker between LPS and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). In this study, we identified a novel naturally occurring spliceosome of human MD2, termed as MD2-T3. This transcript lacked two exons of MD2 gene. By protein structure analysis and literature review, we predicted that MD2-T3 isoform might execute regulatory biological effects such as limiting LPS-triggered TLR4 signaling. PMID:27317890

  2. The Arabidopsis Root Transcriptome by Serial Analysis of Gene Expression. Gene Identification Using the Genome Sequence1

    PubMed Central

    Fizames, Cécile; Muños, Stéphane; Cazettes, Céline; Nacry, Philippe; Boucherez, Jossia; Gaymard, Frédéric; Piquemal, David; Delorme, Valérie; Commes, Thérèse; Doumas, Patrick; Cooke, Richard; Marti, Jacques; Sentenac, Hervé; Gojon, Alain

    2004-01-01

    Large-scale identification of genes expressed in roots of the model plant Arabidopsis was performed by serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), on a total of 144,083 sequenced tags, representing at least 15,964 different mRNAs. For tag to gene assignment, we developed a computational approach based on 26,620 genes annotated from the complete sequence of the genome. The procedure selected warrants the identification of the genes corresponding to the majority of the tags found experimentally, with a high level of reliability, and provides a reference database for SAGE studies in Arabidopsis. This new resource allowed us to characterize the expression of more than 3,000 genes, for which there is no expressed sequence tag (EST) or cDNA in the databases. Moreover, 85% of the tags were specific for one gene. To illustrate this advantage of SAGE for functional genomics, we show that our data allow an unambiguous analysis of most of the individual genes belonging to 12 different ion transporter multigene families. These results indicate that, compared with EST-based tag to gene assignment, the use of the annotated genome sequence greatly improves gene identification in SAGE studies. However, more than 6,000 different tags remained with no gene match, suggesting that a significant proportion of transcripts present in the roots originate from yet unknown or wrongly annotated genes. The root transcriptome characterized in this study markedly differs from those obtained in other organs, and provides a unique resource for investigating the functional specificities of the root system. As an example of the use of SAGE for transcript profiling in Arabidopsis, we report here the identification of 270 genes differentially expressed between roots of plants grown either with NO3- or NH4NO3 as N source. PMID:14730065

  3. The structure of neutrophil defensin genes.

    PubMed

    Linzmeier, R; Michaelson, D; Liu, L; Ganz, T

    1993-04-26

    Defensins are a family of microbicidal peptides abundant in the granules of mammalian neutrophils, in rabbit alveolar macrophages, and in human and murine intestinal Paneth cells. We cloned and sequenced the genes of three neutrophil-specific defensins. Human HNP-1 and HNP-3 are nearly identical and rabbit NP-3a is closely related. The four known neutrophil-specific defensin genes are strikingly similar in the structure and organization of their three exons and two introns, but the three defensin genes expressed in macrophages (MCP-1 and -2) or Paneth cells (HD-5) are organized differently: HD-5 had only two exons, and MCP-1 and -2 have a comparatively short first intron. The diverse genomic organization of defensin genes may contribute to their cell-specific expression. PMID:8477861

  4. Identification and characterisation of synaptonemal complex genes in monotremes.

    PubMed

    Casey, Aaron E; Daish, Tasman J; Grutzner, Frank

    2015-08-10

    The platypus and echidna are the only extant species belonging to the clade of monotremata, the most basal mammalian lineage. The platypus is particularly well known for its mix of mammalian and reptilian characteristics and work in recent years has revealed this also extends to the genetic level. Amongst the monotreme specific features is the unique multiple sex chromosome system (5X4Y in the echidna and 5X5Y in the platypus), which forms a chain in meiosis. This raises questions about sex chromosome organisation at meiosis, including whether there has been changes in genes coding for synaptonemal complex proteins which are involved in homologous synapsis. Here we investigate the key structural components of the synaptonemal complex in platypus and echidna, synaptonemal complex proteins 1, 2 and 3 (SYCP1, SYCP2 and SYCP3). SYCP1 and SYCP2 orthologues are present, conserved and expressed in platypus testis. SYCP3 in contrast is highly diverged, but key residues required for self-association are conserved, while those required for tetramer stabilisation and DNA binding are missing. We also discovered a second SYCP3-like gene (SYCP3-like) in the same region. Comparison with the recently published Y-borne SYCP3 amino acid sequences revealed that SYCP3Y is more similar to SYCP3 in other mammals than the monotreme autosomal SYCP3. It is currently unclear if these changes in the SYCP3 gene repertoire are related to meiotic organisation of the extraordinary monotreme sex chromosome system. PMID:25981592

  5. GENE STRUCTURE, ORGANIZATION, AND EXPRESSION IN ARCHAEBACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Major advances have recently been made in understanding the molecular biology of the archaebacteria. n this review, we compare the structure of protein and stable RNA-encoding genes cloned and sequenced from each of the major classes of archaebacteria: the methanogens, extreme ha...

  6. Rice functionality, starch structure and the genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Through collaborative efforts among USDA scientists at Beaumont, Texas, we have gained in-depth knowledge of how rice functionality, i.e. the texture of the cooked rice, rice processing properties, and starch gelatinization temperature, are associated with starch-synthesis genes and starch structure...

  7. Nuclear structure, gene expression and development.

    PubMed

    Brown, K

    1999-01-01

    This article considers the extent to which features of nuclear structure are involved in the regulation of genome function. The recent renaissance in imaging technology has inspired a new determination to assign specific functions to nuclear domains or structures, many of which have been described as "factories" to express the idea that they coordinate nuclear processes in an efficient way. Visual data have been combined with genetic and biochemical information to support the idea that nuclear organization has functional significance. Particular DNA sequences or chromatin structures may nucleate domains that are permissive or restrictive of transcription, to which active or inactive loci could be recruited. Associations within the nucleus, as well as many nuclear structures, are transient and change dynamically during cell cycle progression and development. Despite this complexity, elucidation of the possible structural basis of epigenetic phenomena, such as the inheritance of a "cellular memory" of gene expression status, is an important goal for cell biology. Topics for discussion include the regulatory effect of chromatin structure on gene expression, putative "nuclear addresses" for genes and proteins, the functional significance of nuclear bodies, and the role of the nuclear matrix in nuclear compartmentalization. PMID:10651237

  8. Identification of Significant Association and Gene-Gene Interaction of GABA Receptor Subunit Genes in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Ma, D. Q.; Whitehead, P. L.; Menold, M. M.; Martin, E. R.; Ashley-Koch, A. E.; Mei, H.; Ritchie, M. D.; DeLong, G. R.; Abramson, R. K.; Wright, H. H.; Cuccaro, M. L.; Hussman, J. P.; Gilbert, J. R.; Pericak-Vance, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    Autism is a common neurodevelopmental disorder with a significant genetic component. Existing research suggests that multiple genes contribute to autism and that epigenetic effects or gene-gene interactions are likely contributors to autism risk. However, these effects have not yet been identified. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, has been implicated in autism etiology. Fourteen known autosomal GABA receptor subunit genes were studied to look for the genes associated with autism and their possible interactions. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were screened in the following genes: GABRG1, GABRA2, GABRA4, and GABRB1 on chromosome 4p12; GABRB2, GABRA6, GABRA1, GABRG2, and GABRP on 5q34-q35.1; GABRR1 and GABRR2 on 6q15; and GABRA5, GABRB3, and GABRG3 on 15q12. Intronic and/or silent mutation SNPs within each gene were analyzed in 470 white families with autism. Initially, SNPs were used in a family-based study for allelic association analysis—with the pedigree disequilibrium test and the family-based association test—and for genotypic and haplotypic association analysis—with the genotype-pedigree disequilibrium test (geno-PDT), the association in the presence of linkage (APL) test, and the haplotype family-based association test. Next, with the use of five refined independent marker sets, extended multifactor-dimensionality reduction (EMDR) analysis was employed to identify the models with locus joint effects, and interaction was further verified by conditional logistic regression. Significant allelic association was found for markers RS1912960 (in GABRA4; P = .01) and HCV9866022 (in GABRR2; P = .04). The geno-PDT found significant genotypic association for HCV8262334 (in GABRA2), RS1912960 and RS2280073 (in GABRA4), and RS2617503 and RS12187676 (in GABRB2). Consistent with the allelic and genotypic association results, EMDR confirmed the main effect at RS1912960 (in GABRA4). EMDR also identified a

  9. Network-Based Enriched Gene Subnetwork Identification: A Game-Theoretic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Abolfazl; Afghah, Fatemeh; Singh, Salendra; Varadan, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Identifying subsets of genes that jointly mediate cancer etiology, progression, or therapy response remains a challenging problem due to the complexity and heterogeneity in cancer biology, a problem further exacerbated by the relatively small number of cancer samples profiled as compared with the sheer number of potential molecular factors involved. Pure data-driven methods that merely rely on multiomics data have been successful in discovering potentially functional genes but suffer from high false-positive rates and tend to report subsets of genes whose biological interrelationships are unclear. Recently, integrative data-driven models have been developed to integrate multiomics data with signaling pathway networks in order to identify pathways associated with clinical or biological phenotypes. However, these approaches suffer from an important drawback of being restricted to previously discovered pathway structures and miss novel genomic interactions as well as potential crosstalk among the pathways. In this article, we propose a novel coalition-based game-theoretic approach to overcome the challenge of identifying biologically relevant gene subnetworks associated with disease phenotypes. The algorithm starts from a set of seed genes and traverses a protein–protein interaction network to identify modulated subnetworks. The optimal set of modulated subnetworks is identified using Shapley value that accounts for both individual and collective utility of the subnetwork of genes. The algorithm is applied to two illustrative applications, including the identification of subnetworks associated with (i) disease progression risk in response to platinum-based therapy in ovarian cancer and (ii) immune infiltration in triple-negative breast cancer. The results demonstrate an improved predictive power of the proposed method when compared with state-of-the-art feature selection methods, with the added advantage of identifying novel potentially functional gene subnetworks

  10. The Phaseolus vulgaris ZIP gene family: identification, characterization, mapping, and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Astudillo, Carolina; Fernandez, Andrea C.; Blair, Matthew W.; Cichy, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Zinc is an essential mineral for humans and plants and is involved in many physiological and biochemical processes. In humans, Zn deficiency has been associated with retarded growth and reduction of immune response. In plants, Zn is an essential component of more than 300 enzymes including RNA polymerase, alkaline phosphatase, alcohol dehydrogenase, Cu/Zn superoxidase dismutase, and carbonic anhydrase. The accumulation of Zn in plants involves many genes and characterization of the role of these genes will be useful in biofortification. Here we report the identification and phlyogenetic and sequence characterization of the 23 members of the ZIP (ZRT, IRT like protein) family of metal transporters and three transcription factors of the bZIP family in Phaseolus vulgaris L. Expression patterns of seven of these genes were characterized in two bean genotypes (G19833 and DOR364) under two Zn treatments. Tissue analyzed included roots and leaves at vegetative and flowering stages, and pods at 20 days after flowering. Four of the genes, PvZIP12, PvZIP13, PvZIP16, and Pv bZIP1, showed differential expression based on tissue, Zn treatment, and/or genotype. PvZIP12 and PvZIP13 were both more highly expressed in G19833 than DOR364. PvZIP12 was most highly expressed in vegetative leaves under the Zn (−) treatment. PvZIP16 was highly expressed in leaf tissue, especially leaf tissue at flowering stage grown in the Zn (−) treatment. Pv bZIP1 was most highly expressed in leaf and pod tissue. The 23 PvZIP genes and three bZIP genes were mapped on the DOR364 × G19833 linkage map. PvZIP12, PvZIP13, and PvZIP18, Pv bZIP2, and Pv bZIP3 were located near QTLs for Zn accumulation in the seed. Based on the expression and mapping results, PvZIP12 is a good candidate gene for increasing seed Zn concentration and increase understanding of the role of ZIP genes in metal uptake, distribution, and accumulation of zinc in P. vulgaris. PMID:23908661

  11. Identification and Engineering of the Cytochalasin Gene Cluster from Aspergillus clavatus NRRL 1

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Kangjian; Chooi, Yit-Heng; Tang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Cytochalasins are a group of fungal secondary metabolites with diverse structures and bioactivities, including cytochalasin E produced by Aspergillus clavatus, which is a potent anti-angiogenic agent. Here, we report the identification and characterization of the cytochalasin gene cluster from A. clavatus NRRL 1. As a producer of cytochalasin E and K, the genome of A. clavatus was analyzed and the ~30 kb ccs gene cluster was identified based on the presence of a polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetases (PKS-NRPS) and a putative Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO). Deletion of the central PKS-NRPS gene, ccsA, abolished the production of cytochalasin E and K, confirming the association between the natural products and the gene cluster. Based on bioinformatic analysis, a putative biosynthetic pathway is proposed. Furthermore, overexpression of the pathway specific regulator ccsR elevated the titer of cytochalasin E from 25 mg/L to 175 mg/L. Our results not only shed light on the biosynthesis of cytochalasins, but also provided genetic tools for increasing and engineering the production. PMID:21983160

  12. Structures of two molluscan hemocyanin genes: Significance for gene evolution

    PubMed Central

    Lieb, Bernhard; Altenhein, Benjamin; Markl, Jürgen; Vincent, Alexandra; van Olden, Erin; van Holde, Kensal E.; Miller, Karen I.

    2001-01-01

    We present here the description of genes coding for molluscan hemocyanins. Two distantly related mollusks, Haliotis tuberculata and Octopus dofleini, were studied. The typical architecture of a molluscan hemocyanin subunit, which is a string of seven or eight globular functional units (FUs, designated a to h, about 50 kDa each), is reflected by the gene organization: a series of eight structurally related coding regions in Haliotis, corresponding to FU-a to FU-h, with seven highly variable linker introns of 174 to 3,198 bp length (all in phase 1). In Octopus seven coding regions (FU-a to FU-g) are found, separated by phase 1 introns varying in length from 100 bp to 910 bp. Both genes exhibit typical signal (export) sequences, and in both cases these are interrupted by an additional intron. Each gene also contains an intron between signal peptide and FU-a and in the 3′ untranslated region. Of special relevance for evolutionary considerations are introns interrupting those regions that encode a discrete functional unit. We found that five of the eight FUs in Haliotis each are encoded by a single exon, whereas FU-f, FU-g, and FU-a are encoded by two, three and four exons, respectively. Similarly, in Octopus four of the FUs each correspond to an uninterrupted exon, whereas FU-b, FU-e, and FU-f each contain a single intron. Although the positioning of the introns between FUs is highly conserved in the two mollusks, the introns within FUs show no relationship either in location nor phase. It is proposed that the introns between FUs were generated as the eight-unit polypeptide evolved from a monomeric precursor, and that the internal introns have been added later. A hypothesis for evolution of the ring-like quaternary structure of molluscan hemocyanins is presented. PMID:11287637

  13. Express Sequence Tag Analysis - Identification of Anseriformes Trypsin Genes from Full-Length cDNA Library of the Duck (Anas platyrhynchos) and Characterization of Their Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haining; Cai, Shasha; Gao, Jiuxiang; Wang, Chen; Qiao, Xue; Wang, Hui; Feng, Lan; Wang, Yipeng

    2016-02-01

    Trypsins are key proteins important in animal protein digestion by breaking down the peptide bonds on the carboxyl side of lysine and arginine residues, hence it has been used widely in various biotechnological processes. In the current study, a full-length cDNA library with capacity of 5·10(5) CFU/ml from the duck (Anas platyrhynchos) was constructed. Using express sequence tag (EST) sequencing, genes coding two trypsins were identified and two full-length trypsin cDNAs were then obtained by rapid-amplification of cDNA end (RACE)-PCR. Using Blast, they were classified into the trypsin I and II subfamilies, but both encoded a signal peptide, an activation peptide, and a 223-a.a. mature protein located in the C-terminus. The two deduced mature proteins were designated as trypsin-IAP and trypsin-IIAP, and their theoretical isoelectric points (pI) and molecular weights (MW) were 7.99/23466.4 Da and 4.65/24066.0 Da, respectively. Molecular characterizations of genes were further performed by detailed bioinformatics analysis. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that trypsin-IIAP has an evolution pattern distinct from trypsin-IAP, suggesting its evolutionary advantage. Then the duck trypsin-IIAP was expressed in an Escherichia coli system, and its kinetic parameters were measured. The three dimensional structures of trypsin-IAP and trypsin-IIAP were predicted by homology modeling, and the conserved residues required for functionality were identified. Two loops controlling the specificity of the trypsin and the substrate-binding pocket represented in the model are almost identical in primary sequences and backbone tertiary structures of the trypsin families. PMID:27260395

  14. Identification of microRNA Genes in Three Opisthorchiids

    PubMed Central

    Ovchinnikov, Vladimir Y.; Afonnikov, Dmitry A.; Vasiliev, Gennady V.; Kashina, Elena V.; Sripa, Banchob; Mordvinov, Viacheslav A.; Katokhin, Alexey V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Opisthorchis felineus, O. viverrini, and Clonorchis sinensis (family Opisthorchiidae) are parasitic flatworms that pose a serious threat to humans in some countries and cause opisthorchiasis/clonorchiasis. Chronic disease may lead to a risk of carcinogenesis in the biliary ducts. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that control gene expression at post-transcriptional level and are implicated in the regulation of various cellular processes during the parasite- host interplay. However, to date, the miRNAs of opisthorchiid flukes, in particular those essential for maintaining their complex biology and parasitic mode of existence, have not been satisfactorily described. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a SOLiD deep sequencing-bioinformatic approach, we identified 43 novel and 18 conserved miRNAs for O. felineus (miracidia, metacercariae and adult worms), 20 novel and 16 conserved miRNAs for O. viverrini (adult worms), and 33 novel and 18 conserved miRNAs for C. sinensis (adult worms). The analysis of the data revealed differences in the expression level of conserved miRNAs among the three species and among three the developmental stages of O. felineus. Analysis of miRNA genes revealed two gene clusters, one cluster-like region and one intronic miRNA in the genome. The presence and structure of the two gene clusters were validated using a PCR-based approach in the three flukes. Conclusions This study represents a comprehensive description of miRNAs in three members of the family Opistorchiidae, significantly expands our knowledge of miRNAs in multicellular parasites and provides a basis for understanding the structural and functional evolution of miRNAs in these metazoan parasites. Results of this study also provides novel resources for deeper understanding the complex parasite biology, for further research on the pathogenesis and molecular events of disease induced by the liver flukes. The present data may also facilitate the development of novel

  15. Identification of a Maize Locus that Modulates the Hypersensitive Defense Response, Using Mutant-Assisted Gene Identification and Characterization (MAGIC)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is the most visible and arguably the most important defense response in plants, although the details of how it is controlled and executed remain patchy. In this paper a novel genetic technique called MAGIC (Mutant-Assisted Gene Identification and Characterization) i...

  16. Molecular cloning, sequence identification, and gene expression analysis of bovine ADCY2 gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Y X; Jin, H G; Yan, C G; Ren, C Y; Jiang, C J; Jin, C D; Seo, K S; Jin, X

    2014-06-01

    Adenylyl cyclase 2 (ADCY2), a class B member of adenylyl cyclases, is important in accelerating phosphor-acidification as well as glycogen synthesis and breakdown. Given its distinct role in flesh tenderization after butchering, we cloned and sequenced the ADCY2 gene from Yanbian cattle and assessed its expression in bovine tissues. A 2947 bp nucleotide sequence representing the full-length cDNA of bovine ADCY2 gene was obtained by 5' and 3' remote analysis computations for gene expression. Analyses of the putative protein sequence showed that ADCY2 had high homology among species, except with the non-mammal Oreochromis niloticus. Gene structural domain analyses in humans and rats indicated that the ADCY2 protein had no flaw; only the transmembrane domain was reduced and the CYCc structure domain was shortened. Assessment of ADCY2 expression in bovine tissues by real-time PCR showed that the highest expression was in the testes, followed by the longissimus dorsi, tensor fasciae latae, and latissimus dorsi. These data will serve as a foundation for further insight into the cattle ADCY2 gene. PMID:24797538

  17. Experimental identification of smart material coupling effects in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesne, S.; Jean-Mistral, C.; Gaudiller, L.

    2013-07-01

    Smart composite structures have an enormous potential for industrial applications, in terms of mass reduction, high material resistance and flexibility. The correct characterization of these complex structures is essential for active vibration control or structural health monitoring applications. The identification process generally calls for the determination of a generalized electromechanical coupling coefficient. As this process can in practice be difficult to implement, an original approach, presented in this paper, has been developed for the identification of the coupling effects of a smart material used in a composite curved beam. The accuracy of the proposed identification technique is tested by applying active modal control to the beam, using a reduced model based on this identification. The studied structure was as close to reality as possible, and made use of integrated transducers, low-cost sensors, clamped boundary conditions and substantial, complex excitation sources. PVDF (polyvinylidene fluoride) and MFC (macrofiber composite) transducers were integrated into the composite structure, to ensure their protection from environmental damage. The experimental identification described here was based on a curve fitting approach combined with the reduced model. It allowed a reliable, powerful modal control system to be built, controlling two modes of the structure. A linear quadratic Gaussian algorithm was used to determine the modal controller-observer gains. The selected modes were found to have an attenuation as strong as -13 dB in experiments, revealing the effectiveness of this method. In this study a generalized approach is proposed, which can be extended to most complex or composite industrial structures when they are subjected to vibration.

  18. Genome-level identification, gene expression, and comparative analysis of porcine ß-defensin genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Beta-defensins (β-defensins) are innate immune peptides with evolutionary conservation across a wide range of species and has been suggested to play important roles in innate immune reactions against pathogens. However, the complete β-defensin repertoire in the pig has not been fully addressed. Result A BLAST analysis was performed against the available pig genomic sequence in the NCBI database to identify β-defensin-related sequences using previously reported β-defensin sequences of pigs, humans, and cattle. The porcine β-defensin gene clusters were mapped to chromosomes 7, 14, 15 and 17. The gene expression analysis of 17 newly annotated porcine β-defensin genes across 15 tissues using semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed differences in their tissue distribution, with the kidney and testis having the largest pBD expression repertoire. We also analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the mature peptide region of pBD genes from 35 pigs of 7 breeds. We found 8 cSNPs in 7 pBDs. Conclusion We identified 29 porcine β-defensin (pBD) gene-like sequences, including 17 unreported pBDs in the porcine genome. Comparative analysis of β-defensin genes in the pig genome with those in human and cattle genomes showed structural conservation of β-defensin syntenic regions among these species. PMID:23150902

  19. Identification of civil structures with nonproportional damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jann N.; Lei, Ying

    2000-04-01

    Recently, the method of Hilbert transform has been used successfully by the authors to identify parameters of linear structures with real eigenvalues and eigenvectors, e.g., structures with proportional damping. Frequently, linear structures may not have proportional damping so that normal modes do not exist. In this case, all the eigenvalues, eigenvectors and modeshapes are complex. In this paper, the Hilbert transform and the method of Empirical Mode Decomposition are used to identify the parameters of structures with nonproportional damping using the impulse response data. Measured impulse response signals are first decomposed into Intrinsic Mode Functions using the method of Empirical Mode Decomposition with intermittency criteria. An Intrinsic Mode Function (IMF) contains only one characteristic time scale (frequency), which may involve the contribution of a complex conjugate pair of modes with a unique frequency and a damping ratio, referred to as the modal response. It is shown that all the modal responses can be obtained from IMFs. Then, each modal response is decomposed in the frequency-time domain to yield instantaneous phase angle and amplitude as functions of time using the Hilbert transform. Based on only a single measurement of the impulse response time history at one location, the complex eigenvalues of the linear structure can be identified using a simple analysis procedure. When the response time histories are measured at all locations, the proposed methodology is capable of identifying the complex modeshapes as well as the mass, damping and stiffness matrices of the structure. The effectiveness and accuracy of the methodology presented are demonstrated through numerical simulations. It is shown that complete dynamic characteristics of linear structures with nonproportional damping can be identified effectively using the Hilbert transform and the Empirical Mode Decomposition method.

  20. Identification and function analysis of contrary genes in Dupuytren's contracture.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xianglu; Tian, Feng; Tian, Lijie

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the expression of genes involved in Dupuytren's contracture (DC), using bioinformatic methods. The profile of GSE21221 was downloaded from the gene expression ominibus, which included six samples, derived from fibroblasts and six healthy control samples, derived from carpal-tunnel fibroblasts. A Distributed Intrusion Detection System was used in order to identify differentially expressed genes. The term contrary genes is proposed. Contrary genes were the genes that exhibited opposite expression patterns in the positive and negative groups, and likely exhibited opposite functions. These were identified using Coexpress software. Gene ontology (GO) function analysis was conducted for the contrary genes. A network of GO terms was constructed using the reduce and visualize gene ontology database. Significantly expressed genes (801) and contrary genes (98) were screened. A significant association was observed between Chitinase-3-like protein 1 and ten genes in the positive gene set. Positive regulation of transcription and the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-inducing kinase activity exhibited the highest degree values in the network of GO terms. In the present study, the expression of genes involved in the development of DC was analyzed, and the concept of contrary genes proposed. The genes identified in the present study are involved in the positive regulation of transcription and activation of NF-κB-inducing kinase activity. The contrary genes and GO terms identified in the present study may potentially be used for DC diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25760233

  1. Combining skin texture and facial structure for face identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoni, R. E.; Canosa, R. L.

    2012-03-01

    Current face identification systems are not robust enough to accurately identify the same individual in different images with changes in head pose, facial expression, occlusion, length of hair, illumination, aging, etc. This is especially a problem for facial images that are captured using low resolution video cameras or webcams. This paper introduces a new technique for facial identification in low resolution images that combines facial structure with skin texture to accommodate changes in lighting and head pose. Experiments using this new technique show that combining facial structure features with skin texture features results in a facial identification system for low resolution images that is more robust to pose and illumination conditions than either technique used alone.

  2. A phylogenetic approach to the identification of phosphoglucomutase genes.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, D B; Tomkins, J; Lovegrove, J U; Hopkinson, D A; McMillan, W O

    1998-04-01

    The expanding molecular database provides unparalleled opportunities for characterizing genes and for studying groups of related genes. We use sequences drawn from the database to construct an evolutionary framework for examining the important glycolytic enzyme phosphoglucomutase (PGM). Phosphoglucomutase plays a pivotal role in the synthesis and utilization of glycogen and is present in all organisms. In humans, there are three well-described isozymes, PGMI, PGM2, and PGM3. PGM1 was cloned 5 years ago; however, repeated attempts using both immunological approaches and molecular probes designed from PGM1 have failed to isolate either PGM2 or PGM3. Using a phylogenetic strategy, we first identified 47 highly divergent prokaryotic and eukaryotic PGM-like sequences from the database. Although overall amino acid identity often fell below 20%, the relative order, position, and sequence of three structural motifs, the active site and the magnesium--and sugar-binding sites, were conserved in all 47 sequences. The phylogenetic history of these sequences was complex and marked by duplications and translocations; two instances of transkingdom horizontal gene transfer were identified. Nonetheless, the sequences fell within six well-defined evolutionary lineages, three of which contained only prokaryotes. Of the two prokaryotic/eukaryotic lineages, one contained bacterial, yeast, slimemold, invertebrate, and vertebrate homologs to human PGM1 and the second contained likely homologs to human PGM2. Indeed, an amino acid sequence, derived from a partial human cDNA, that fell within the second cross-kingdom lineage bears several characteristics expected for PGM2. A third lineage may contain homologs to human PGM3. On a general level, our phylogenetic-based approach shows promise for the further utilization of the extensive molecular database. PMID:9549096

  3. Gene Expression Analysis for the Identification of Genes Involved in Early Tumour Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, Stefano; Scarpulla, Salvatore; Lagana, Alessandro; Memeo, Lorenzo; Gulisano, Massimo

    Prostatic tissues can undergo to cancer insurgence and prostate cancer is one of the most common types of malignancies affecting adult men in the United States. Primary adenocarcinoma of the seminal vesi-cles (SVCA) is a very rare neoplasm with only 48 histologically confirmed cases reported in the European and United States literature. Prostatic tissues, seminal vesicles and epididymis belongs all to the same microenvironment, shows a very close morphology and share the same embryological origin. Despite these common features the rate of cancer occurrence is very different. The understanding of molecular differences between non neoplastic prostatic tissues and non neoplastic epididymis or seminal vesicles may suggest potential mechanisms of resistance to tumour occurrence. The comparison of expression patterns of non neoplastic prostatic and seminal vesicles tissues to identify differentially expressed genes can help researchers in the identification of biological actors involved in the early stages of the tumour development.

  4. Identification, Phylogeny, and Transcript of Chitinase Family Genes in Sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yachun; Xu, Liping; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Zhuqing; Yang, Yuting; Chen, Yun; Que, Youxiong

    2015-01-01

    Chitinases are pathogensis-related proteins, which play an important role in plant defense mechanisms. The role of the sugarcane chitinase family genes remains unclear due to the highly heterozygous and aneuploidy chromosome genetic background of sugarcane. Ten differentially expressed chitinase genes (belonging to class I~VII) were obtained from RNA-seq analysis of both incompatible and compatible sugarcane genotypes during Sporisorium scitamineum challenge. Their structural properties and expression patterns were analyzed. Seven chitinases (ScChiI1, ScChiI2, ScChiI3, ScChiIII1, ScChiIII2, ScChiIV1 and ScChiVI1) showed more positive with early response and maintained increased transcripts in the incompatible interaction than those in the compatible one. Three (ScChiII1, ScChiV1 and ScChiVII1) seemed to have no significant difference in expression patterns between incompatible and compatible interactions. The ten chitinases were expressed differentially in response to hormone treatment as well as having distinct tissue specificity. ScChiI1, ScChiIV1 and ScChiVII1 were induced by various abiotic stresses (NaCl, CuCl2, PEG and 4 °C) and their involvement in plant immunity was demonstrated by over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. The results suggest that sugarcane chitinase family exhibit differential responses to biotic and abiotic stress, providing new insights into their function. PMID:26035173

  5. Identification of genes that mediate protection against soybean pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the last twenty years, over 40 resistance genes (R-genes) have been cloned and characterized from plants. Of these, only three have been cloned in soybean. Cloning of resistance genes in soybean has been hampered by a complex, duplicated genome, clustering of R-genes, and lack of tools to charac...

  6. Structure-retention diagrams of ceramides established for their identification.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, Karen; Chaminade, Pierre; Baillet, Arlette

    2002-10-11

    Molecular species analysis of ceramides was carried out using porous graphitic carbon with gradient elution: chloroform-methanol from 45:55 to 85:15 with a slope at 2.7%/min. These conditions gave a linear relationship between retention data and structure of ceramides. It was demonstrated that linearity occurred when a high slope value of linear gradient elution was used. Thereby the linear diagram was evolved by plotting the adjusted retention time against the total number of carbon atoms of ceramide molecules. Each line represents one ceramide class. Such a Structure-Retention Diagram describes ceramide retention and thus constitutes an identification method using only retention data. This Structure-Retention Diagram was assessed and compared to another obtained from octadesyl-grafted silica in terms of their reproducibility, precision and ability to provide ceramide identification. Better identification was obtained using the results from both Structure-Retention Diagrams. This approach with a two-dimensional separation system allowed to take advantage of the specificity of both identification models. PMID:12437165

  7. Direct structural parameter identification by modal test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.-C.; Kuo, C.-P.; Garba, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A direct identification procedure is proposed to obtain the mass and stiffness matrices based on the test measured eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The method is based on the theory of matrix perturbation in which the correct mass and stiffness matrices are expanded in terms of analytical values plus a modification matrix. The simplicity of the procedure enables real time operation during the structural testing.

  8. Genome-wide identification, classification, and expression analysis of sHSP genes in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp pekinensis).

    PubMed

    Tao, P; Guo, W L; Li, B Y; Wang, W H; Yue, Z C; Lei, J L; Zhong, X M

    2015-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are essential for the plant's normal development and stress responses, especially the heat stress response. The information regarding sHSP genes in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp pekinensis) is sparse, hence we performed a genome-wide analysis to identify sHSP genes in this species. We identified 26 non-redundant sHSP genes distributed on all chromosomes, except chromosome A7, with one additional sHSP gene identified from an expressed sequence tag library. Chinese cabbage was found to contain more sHSP genes than Arabidopsis. The 27 sHSP genes were classified into 11 subfamilies. We identified 22 groups of sHSP syntenic orthologous genes between Chinese cabbage and Arabidopsis. In addition, eight groups of paralogous genes were uncovered in Chinese cabbage. Protein structures of the 27 Chinese cabbage sHSPs were modeled using Phyre2, which revealed that all of them contain several conserved β strands across different subfamilies. In general, gene structure was conserved within each subfamily between Chinese cabbage and Arabidopsis, except for peroxisome sHSP. Analysis of promoter motifs showed that most sHSP genes contain heat shock elements or variants. We also found that biased gene loss has occurred during the evolution of the sHSP subfamily in Chinese cabbage. Expression analysis indicated that the greatest transcript abundance of most Chinese cabbage sHSP genes was found in siliques and early cotyledon embryos. Thus, genome-wide identification and characterization of sHSP genes is a first and important step in the investigation of sHSPs in Chinese cabbage. PMID:26505345

  9. [Identification of Sorghum genes responsible for resistance to Green bug].

    PubMed

    Radchenko, E E

    2000-04-01

    Genes responsible for resistance to greenbug (Schizaphis graminum Rond.) were identified in sorghum. The dominant (Sgr1) and recessive (Sgr2) genes for resistance were revealed in sample k-457 (PI264453, United States). The samples i-589430 (PI264453, Spain) and k-3852 (Sarvasi, Hungary) carry gene Sgr1. These accessions are assumed to also have gene Sgr2. The samples k-9921 (Shallu, United States) and k-9922 (KS-30, United States) have incompletely dominant resistance gene Sgr3. A symbol Sgr4 was assigned to the dominant gene from sample k-6694 (Deer, United States). The dominant Sgr5 and recessive Sgr6 genes were revealed in the samples k-1362 (Durra Belaya, Syria) and k-1240 (Dzhugara Belaya, China). The cultivar Sorgogradskoe (k-9436, Rostovskaya oblast) has gene Sgr5. The samples k-10092 (Odesskii 360, Ukraine) and k-5091 (Cherhata, Marocco) are assumed to have genes Sgr5 and Sgr6. Sample k-924 (Dzhugara Belaya, China) is protected by the dominant gene Srg7 and recessive gene Sgr8. Sample k-923 (Dzhugara Belaya, China) has at least one of these genes. Two dominant complementary genes for resistance (Sgr9 and Sgr10) were revealed in sample k-930 (Dzhugara Belaya, China). One of two dominant genes of sample k-1237 (Dzhugara Belaya, China) was assigned the symbol Sgr11. Genes Sgr5-Sgr11 responsible for resistance to greenbug are new and were not previously used in breeding. PMID:10822813

  10. Identification and control of structures in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meirovitch, L.

    1985-01-01

    Work during the period January 1 to June 30, 1985 has concentrated on the completion of the derivation of the equations of motion for the Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) as well on the development of a control scheme for the maneuvering of the spacecraft. The report consists of a paper presented at the Fifth Symposium on Dynamics and Control of Large Structures, June 12 to 14, 1985 at Blacksburg, VA.

  11. Recent literature on structural modeling, identification, and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The literature on the mathematical modeling of large space structures is first reviewed, with attention given to continuum models, model order reduction, substructuring, and computational techniques. System identification and mode verification are then discussed with reference to the verification of mathematical models of large space structures. In connection with analysis, the paper surveys recent research on eigensolvers and dynamic response solvers for large-order finite-element-based models.

  12. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the 14-3-3 Family Genes in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Cheng; Cheng, Linming; Shen, Jingqin; Zhang, Yunhong; Cao, Huimin; Lu, Dan; Shen, Chenjia

    2016-01-01

    The 14-3-3 gene family, which is conserved in eukaryotes, is involved in protein-protein interactions and mediates signal transduction. However, detailed investigations of the 14-3-3 gene family in Medicago truncatula are largely unknown. In this study, the identification and study of M. truncatula 14-3-3-family genes were performed based on the latest M. truncatula genome. In the M. truncatula genome, 10 14-3-3 family genes were identified, and they can be grouped into ε and non-ε groups. An exon-intron analysis showed that the gene structures are conserved in the same group. The protein structure analysis showed that 14-3-3 proteins in M. truncatula are composed of nine typical antiparallel α-helices. The expression patterns of Mt14-3-3 genes indicated that they are expressed in all tissues. Furthermore, the gene expression levels of Mt14-3-3 under hormone treatment and Sinorhizobium meliloti infection showed that the Mt14-3-3 genes were involve in nodule formation. Our findings lay a solid foundation for further functional studies of 14-3-3 in M. truncatula. PMID:27047505

  13. Structure of the human retinoblastoma gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, F.D.; Huang, Hueijen S.; To, Hoang; Young, Lihjiuan S.; Oro, A.; Bookstein, R.; Lee, E.Y.H.P.; Lee, Wenhwa )

    1989-07-01

    Complete inactivation of the human retinoblastoma gene (RB) is believed to be an essential step in tumorigenesis of several different cancers. To provide a framework for understanding inactivation mechanisms, the structure of RB was delineated. The RB transcript is encoded in 27 exons dispersed over about 200 kilobases (kb) of genomic DNA. The length of individual exons ranges from 31 to 1,889 base pairs (bp). The largest intron spans >60 kb and the smallest one has only 80 bp. Deletion of exons 13-17 is frequently observed in various types of tumors, including retinoblastoma, breast cancer, and osteosarcoma, and the presence of a potential hot spot for recombination in the region is predicted. A putative leucine-zipper motif is exclusively encoded by exon 20. The detailed RB structure presented should prove useful in defining potential functional domains of its encoded protein. Transcription of RB is initiated at multiple positions and the sequences surrounding the initiation sites have a high G+C content. A typical upstream TATA box is not present. Localization of the RB promoter region was accomplished by utilizing a heterologous expression system containing a bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. Deletion analysis revealed that a region as small as 70 bp is sufficient for RB promoter activity, similar to other previously characterized G+C-rich gene promoters. Several direct repeats and possible stem-and-loop structures are found in the promoter region.

  14. Identification of Candidate Genes in Rice for Resistance to Sheath Blight Disease by Whole Genome Sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent advances in whole genome sequencing have allowed identification of genes for disease susceptibility in humans. The objective of our research was to exploit whole genome sequences of 13 rice (Oryza sativa L.) inbred lines to identify non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) and candidate genes for resista...

  15. Chromosomal Anomalies in Individuals with Autism: A Strategy Towards the Identification of Genes Involved in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castermans, Dries; Wilquet, Valerie; Steyaert, Jean; van de Ven, Wim; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Devriendt, Koen

    2004-01-01

    We review the different strategies currently used to try to identify susceptibility genes for idiopathic autism. Although identification of genes is usually straightforward in Mendelian disorders, it has proved to be much more difficult to establish in polygenic disorders like autism. Neither genome screens of affected siblings nor the large…

  16. Diagnostic test for prenatal identification of Down's syndrome and mental retardation and gene therapy therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Desmond J.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2000-01-01

    A a diagnostic test useful for prenatal identification of Down syndrome and mental retardation. A method for gene therapy for correction and treatment of Down syndrome. DYRK gene involved in the ability to learn. A method for diagnosing Down's syndrome and mental retardation and an assay therefor. A pharmaceutical composition for treatment of Down's syndrome mental retardation.

  17. Rapid detection and identification of Clostridium chauvoei by PCR based on flagellin gene sequence.

    PubMed

    Kojima, A; Uchida, I; Sekizaki, T; Sasaki, Y; Ogikubo, Y; Tamura, Y

    2001-02-26

    We developed a one-step polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system that specifically detects Clostridium chauvoei. Oligonucleotide primers were designed to amplify a 516-bp fragment of the structural flagellin gene. The specificity of the PCR was investigated by analyzing 59 strains of clostridia, and seven strain of other genera. A 516-bp fragment could be amplified from all the C. chauvoei strains tested, and no amplification was observed by using DNAs from the other strains tested, including Clostridium septicum. Similarly, this PCR-based method specifically detected C. chauvoei DNA sequences in samples of muscle and exudate of obtained from mice within 12h of inoculation. In tests using samples of muscle or liver, the limit of detection was about 200 organisms per reaction. These results suggest that the one-step PCR system may be useful for direct detection and identification of C. chauvoei in clinical specimens. PMID:11182502

  18. Structure of the human retinoblastoma gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, F D; Huang, H J; To, H; Young, L J; Oro, A; Bookstein, R; Lee, E Y; Lee, W H

    1989-01-01

    Complete inactivation of the human retinoblastoma gene (RB) is believed to be an essential step in tumorigenesis of several different cancers. To provide a framework for understanding inactivation mechanisms, the structure of RB was delineated. The RB transcript is encoded in 27 exons dispersed over about 200 kilobases (kb) of genomic DNA. The length of individual exons ranges from 31 to 1889 base pairs (bp). The largest intron spans greater than 60 kb and the smallest one has only 80 bp. Deletion of exons 13-17 is frequently observed in various types of tumors, including retinoblastoma, breast cancer, and osteosarcoma, and the presence of a potential "hot spot" for recombination in the region is predicted. A putative "leucine-zipper" motif is exclusively encoded by exon 20. The detailed RB structure presented here should prove useful in defining potential functional domains of its encoded protein. Transcription of RB is initiated at multiple positions and the sequences surrounding the initiation sites have a high G + C content. A typical upstream TATA box is not present. Localization of the RB promoter region was accomplished by utilizing a heterologous expression system containing a bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. Deletion analysis revealed that a region as small as 70 bp is sufficient for RB promoter activity, similar to other previously characterized G + C-rich gene promoters. Several direct repeats and possible stem-and-loop structures are found in the promoter region. No enhancer element was detected within the 7.3 kb of upstream sequence studied. Several features of the RB promoter are reminiscent of the characteristics associated with many "housekeeping" genes, consistent with its ubiquitous expression pattern. Images PMID:2748600

  19. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of WNK kinase gene family in rice.

    PubMed

    Manuka, Rakesh; Saddhe, Ankush Ashok; Kumar, Kundan

    2015-12-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases represent one of the largest gene families involved in diverse regulatory functions. WNK (With No Lysine) kinases are members of ser/thr protein kinase family, which lack conserved catalytic lysine (K) residue at protein kinase subdomain II and is replaced by either asparagine, serine or glycine residues. They are involved in regulation of flowering time, circadian rhythms and abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis thaliana. In the present study, we have identified 9 members of WNK in rice, showed resemblance to Arabidopsis and human WNK and clustered into five main clades phylogenetically. The predicted genes structure, bonafide conserved signature motif and domains strongly support their identity, as members of WNK kinase family. We have analyzed their chromosomal distribution, physio-chemical properties, subcellular localizations and cis-elements in the promoter regions in silico. Further, transcript analysis of OsWNK by qRT-PCR revealed their differential regulation in tissue specific and abiotic stresses libraries. In conclusion, the identification of nine OsWNK and transcript level expression pattern under abiotic stress using qRT-PCR in rice will significantly contribute towards the understanding of WNK genes in monocots and thus provide a set up for functional genomics studies of WNK protein kinases. PMID:26414948

  20. Identification and characterization of mouse otic sensory lineage genes

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Byron H.; Durruthy-Durruthy, Robert; Laske, Roman D.; Losorelli, Steven; Heller, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate embryogenesis gives rise to all cell types of an organism through the development of many unique lineages derived from the three primordial germ layers. The otic sensory lineage arises from the otic vesicle, a structure formed through invagination of placodal non-neural ectoderm. This developmental lineage possesses unique differentiation potential, giving rise to otic sensory cell populations including hair cells, supporting cells, and ganglion neurons of the auditory and vestibular organs. Here we present a systematic approach to identify transcriptional features that distinguish the otic sensory lineage (from early otic progenitors to otic sensory populations) from other major lineages of vertebrate development. We used a microarray approach to analyze otic sensory lineage populations including microdissected otic vesicles (embryonic day 10.5) as well as isolated neonatal cochlear hair cells and supporting cells at postnatal day 3. Non-otic tissue samples including periotic tissues and whole embryos with otic regions removed were used as reference populations to evaluate otic specificity. Otic populations shared transcriptome-wide correlations in expression profiles that distinguish members of this lineage from non-otic populations. We further analyzed the microarray data using comparative and dimension reduction methods to identify individual genes that are specifically expressed in the otic sensory lineage. This analysis identified and ranked top otic sensory lineage-specific transcripts including Fbxo2, Col9a2, and Oc90, and additional novel otic lineage markers. To validate these results we performed expression analysis on select genes using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Fbxo2 showed the most striking pattern of specificity to the otic sensory lineage, including robust expression in the early otic vesicle and sustained expression in prosensory progenitors and auditory and vestibular hair cells and supporting cells. PMID:25852475

  1. Frequency domain identification experiment on a large flexible structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, D. S.; Hadaegh, F. Y.; Yam, Y.; Scheid, R. E.; Mettler, E.; Milman, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    Recent experiences in the field of flexible structure control in space have indicated a need for on-orbit system identification to support robust control redesign to avoid in-flight instabilities and maintain high spacecraft performance. The authors highlight an automated frequency domain system identification methodology recently developed to fill this need. The methodology supports (1) the estimation of system quantities useful for robust control analysis and design, (2) experiment design tailored to performing system identification in a typically constrained on-orbit environment, and (3) the automation of operations to reduce human-in-the-loop requirements. A basic overview of the methodology is presented first, followed by an experimental verification of the approach performed on the JPL/AFAL testbed facility.

  2. Model structure identification based on ensemble model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hoey, S.; van der Kwast, J.; Nopens, I.; Seuntjens, P.; Pereira, F.

    2012-04-01

    Identifying the most appropriate hydrological model for a given problem is more than fitting the parameters of a fixed model structure to reproduce the measured hydrograph. Defining the most appropriate model structure is dependent of the modeling objective, the characteristics of the system under investigation and the available data. To be able to adapt to the different conditions and to propose different hypotheses of the underlying system, a flexible model structure is preferred in combination with a rejectionist analysis based on different diagnostics supporting the model objective. By confronting the model structures with the model diagnostics, an identification of the dominant processes is attempted. In the presented work, a set of 24 model structures was constructed, by combining interchangeable components representing different hypotheses of the system under study, the Nete catchment in Belgium. To address the effect of different model diagnostics on the performance of the selected model structures, an optimization of the model structures was performed to identify the parameter sets minimizing specific objective functions, focusing on low or high flow conditions. Furthermore, the different model structures are compared simultaneously within the Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) approach. The rejection of inadequate model structures by specifying limits of acceptance and weighting of the accepted ones is the basis of the GLUE approach. Multiple measures are combined to give guidance about the suitability of the different structures and information about the identifiability and uncertainty of the parameters is extracted from the ensemble of selected structures. The results of the optimization demonstrate the relationship between the selected objective function and the behaviour of the model structures, but also the compensation for structural differences by different parameter values resulting in similar performance. The optimization gives

  3. Structure of the human hexabrachion (tenascin) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Gulcher, J R; Nies, D E; Alexakos, M J; Ravikant, N A; Sturgill, M E; Marton, L S; Stefansson, K

    1991-01-01

    The structure of the gene encoding human hexabrachion (tenascin) has been determined from overlapping clones isolated from a human genomic bacteriophage library. The genomic inserts were characterized by restriction mapping, Southern blot analysis, PCR, and DNA sequencing. The coding region of the hexabrachion gene spans approximately 80 kilobases of DNA and consists of 27 exons separated by 26 introns. The exon-intron structure supports a hypothesis based on the cDNA sequence that the hexabrachion gene is an assembly of DNA modules that are also found elsewhere in the genome. Single exons may encode a module, a portion of a module, or a group of modules. The 15 type III units similar to those found in fibronectin are each encoded either by a single exon or by two exons interrupted by an intron. All type III units known to be spliced out of the smaller forms of the protein are encoded by one exon. The fibrinogen-like domain of 210 amino acids is encoded by five exons. The 14.5 epidermal growth factor-like repeats are all encoded by a single exon. Images PMID:1719530

  4. Joint time-frequency domain identification of nonlinearly controlled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Gang; Sain, Michael K.; Spencer, Billie F., Jr.; Pham, Khanh D.

    2006-05-01

    This paper introduces a 3-step approach for the identification of a linear structure that is controlled by nonlinear damping devices. First, the structure with the integrated nonlinear damper is subjected to random vibration test and the frequency response function (FRF) of the structure is calculated from the input-output data of the physical system. Based on the frequency domain data, a state space model is then estimated using a recently developed FRF curve-fitting technique that is designed especially for lightly damped structures with control inputs. Finally an iterative process is used to optimize the model performance in the time domain and an integrated model of the nonlinearly controlled structure is derived by interconnecting the structure model with that of the nonlinear damper. The complete approach is illustrated by the modeling of a base-isolated structure controlled by a magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper.

  5. Identification of Sinorhizobium meliloti Genes Regulated during Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Cabanes, Didier; Boistard, Pierre; Batut, Jacques

    2000-01-01

    RNA fingerprinting by arbitrarily primed PCR was used to isolate Sinorhizobium meliloti genes regulated during the symbiotic interaction with alfalfa (Medicago sativa). Sixteen partial cDNAs were isolated whose corresponding genes were differentially expressed between symbiotic and free-living conditions. Thirteen sequences corresponded to genes up-regulated during symbiosis, whereas three were instead repressed during establishment of the symbiotic interaction. Seven cDNAs corresponded to known or predicted nif and fix genes. Four presented high sequence similarity with genes not yet identified in S. meliloti, including genes encoding a component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, a cell surface protein component, a copper transporter, and an argininosuccinate lyase. Finally, five cDNAs did not exhibit any similarity with sequences present in databases. A detailed expression analysis of the nine non-nif-fix genes provided evidence for an unexpected variety of regulatory patterns, most of which have not been described so far. PMID:10850975

  6. Primary gene structure and expression studies of rodent paracellin-1.

    PubMed

    Weber, S; Schlingmann, K P; Peters, M; Nejsum, L N; Nielsen, S; Engel, H; Grzeschik, K H; Seyberth, H W; Gröne, H J; Nüsing, R; Konrad, M

    2001-12-01

    The novel member of the claudin multigene family, paracellin-1/claudin-16, encoded by the gene PCLN1, is a renal tight junction protein that is involved in the paracellular transport of magnesium and calcium in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop. Mutations in human PCLN1 are associated with familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis, an autosomal recessive disease that is characterized by severe renal magnesium and calcium loss. The complete coding sequences of mouse and rat Pcln1 and the murine genomic structure are here presented. Full-length cDNAs are 939 and 1514 bp in length in mouse and rat, respectively, encoding a putative open-reading frame of 235 amino acids in both species with 99% identity. Exon-intron analysis of the human and mouse genes revealed a 100% homology of coding exon lengths and splice-site loci. By radiation hybrid mapping, the murine Pcln1 gene was assigned directly to marker D16Mit133 on mouse chromosome 16 (syntenic to a locus on human chromosome 3q27, which harbors the human PCLN1 gene). Mouse multiple-tissue Northern blot showed Pcln1 expression exclusively in the kidney. The expression profile along the nephron was analyzed by reverse transcriptase-PCR on microdissected nephron segments and immunohistochemistry of rat kidney. Paracellin-1 expression was restricted to distal tubular segments including the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop, the distal tubule, and the collecting duct. The identification and characterization of the rodent Pcln1 genes provide the basis for further studies of paracellin-1 function in suitable animal models. PMID:11729235

  7. Presliding friction identification based upon the Maxwell Slip model structure.

    PubMed

    Rizos, Demosthenis D; Fassois, Spilios D

    2004-06-01

    The problem of presliding friction identification based upon the Maxwell Slip model structure, which is capable of accounting for the presliding hysteresis with nonlocal memory, is considered. The model structure's basic properties are examined, based upon which a priori identifiability is established, the role of initial conditions on identification is investigated, and the necessary and sufficient conditions for a posteriori identifiability are derived. Using them, guidelines for excitation signal design are also formulated. Building upon these results, two new methods, referred to as Dynamic Linear Regression (DLR) and NonLinear Regression (NLR), are postulated for presliding friction identification. Both may be thought of as different extensions of the conventional Linear Regression (LR) method that uses threshold preassignment: The DLR by introducing extra dynamics in the form of a vector finite impulse response filter, and the NLR by relaxing threshold preassignment through a special nonlinear regression procedure. The effectiveness of both methods is assessed via Monte Carlo experiments and identification based upon laboratory signals. The results indicate that both methods achieve significant improvements over the LR. The DLR offers the highest accuracy, with the NLR striking a very good balance between accuracy and parametric complexity. PMID:15189071

  8. Automated output-only dynamic identification of civil engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainieri, C.; Fabbrocino, G.

    2010-04-01

    Modal-based damage detection algorithms are well-known techniques for structural health assessment, but they are not commonly used due to the lack of automated modal identification and tracking procedures. Development of such procedures is not a trivial task since traditional modal identification requires extensive interaction from an expert user. Nevertheless, computational efforts have to be carefully considered. If fast on-line data processing is crucial for quickly varying in time systems (such as a rocket burning fuel), a number of vibration-based condition monitoring applications are performed at very different time scales, resulting in satisfactory time steps for on-line data analysis. Moreover, promising results in the field of automated modal identification have been recently achieved. In the present paper, a literature review on this topic is presented and recent developments concerning fully automated output-only modal identification procedures are described. Some case studies are also reported in order to validate the approach. They are characterized by different levels of complexity, in terms of mode coupling, dynamic interaction effects and level of vibration. Advantages and drawbacks of the proposed approach will be pointed out with reference to available experimental results. The final objective is the implementation of a fully automated system for vibration-based structural health monitoring of civil engineering structures and identification of adequate requirements about sensor number and layout, record duration and hardware characteristics able to ensure a reliable low-cost health assessment of constructions. Results of application of the proposed methodology to modal parameter estimation in operational conditions and during ground motions induced by the recent L'Aquila earthquake will be finally presented and discussed.

  9. Identification and expression of the Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin gene.

    PubMed

    Lally, E T; Kieba, I R; Demuth, D R; Rosenbloom, J; Golub, E E; Taichman, N S; Gibson, C W

    1989-02-28

    The leukotoxin produced by the oral bacterium Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has been implicated in the pathogenesis of juvenile periodontitis. In order to elucidate the structure of the leukotoxin, molecular cloning of the leukotoxin gene was carried out. A DNA library of A. actinomycetemcomitans, strain JP2, was constructed by partial digestion of genomic DNA with Sau3AI and ligation of 0.5 to 5.0 kilobase pair fragments into the Bam HI site of the plasmid vector pENN-vrf. After transformation into E. coli RR1 (lambda cI857), the clones were screened for the production of A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin with polyclonal antibody. Six immunoreactive clones were identified. The clones expressed proteins which ranged from 21-80 kilodaltons, and the clone designated pII-2, producing the largest protein was selected for further study. Antibodies eluted from immobilized pII-2 protein also recognized the native A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin molecule indicating that both molecules shared at least one epitope. DNA sequence analysis demonstrated that there are regions of significant amino acid sequence homology between the cloned A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin and two other cytolysins, Escherichia coli alpha-hemolysin and Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin, suggesting that a family of cytolysins may exist which share a common mechanism of killing but vary in their target cell specificity. PMID:2647082

  10. Identification of cellular senescence-specific genes by comparative transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Taiki; Nakano, Masayuki; Nakashima, Akio; Onishi, Kengo; Yamao, Shunsuke; Enari, Masato; Kikkawa, Ushio; Kamada, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence is defined as permanent cell cycle arrest induced by various stresses. Although the p53 transcriptional activity is essential for senescence induction, the downstream genes that are crucial for senescence remain unsolved. Here, by using a developed experimental system in which cellular senescence or apoptosis is induced preferentially by altering concentration of etoposide, a DNA-damaging drug, we compared gene expression profiles of senescent and apoptotic cells by microarray analysis. Subtraction of the expression profile of apoptotic cells identified 20 genes upregulated specifically in senescent cells. Furthermore, 6 out of 20 genes showed p53-dependent upregulation by comparing gene expression between p53-proficient and -deficient cells. These 6 genes were also upregulated during replicative senescence of normal human diploid fibroblasts, suggesting that upregulation of these genes is a general phenomenon in senescence. Among these genes, 2 genes (PRODH and DAO) were found to be directly regulated by p53, and ectopic expression of 4 genes (PRODH, DAO, EPN3, and GPR172B) affected senescence phenotypes induced by etoposide treatment. Collectively, our results identified several proteins as novel downstream effectors of p53-mediated senescence and provided new clues for further research on the complex signalling networks underlying the induction and maintenance of senescence. PMID:27545311

  11. Identification of cellular senescence-specific genes by comparative transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, Taiki; Nakano, Masayuki; Nakashima, Akio; Onishi, Kengo; Yamao, Shunsuke; Enari, Masato; Kikkawa, Ushio; Kamada, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence is defined as permanent cell cycle arrest induced by various stresses. Although the p53 transcriptional activity is essential for senescence induction, the downstream genes that are crucial for senescence remain unsolved. Here, by using a developed experimental system in which cellular senescence or apoptosis is induced preferentially by altering concentration of etoposide, a DNA-damaging drug, we compared gene expression profiles of senescent and apoptotic cells by microarray analysis. Subtraction of the expression profile of apoptotic cells identified 20 genes upregulated specifically in senescent cells. Furthermore, 6 out of 20 genes showed p53-dependent upregulation by comparing gene expression between p53-proficient and -deficient cells. These 6 genes were also upregulated during replicative senescence of normal human diploid fibroblasts, suggesting that upregulation of these genes is a general phenomenon in senescence. Among these genes, 2 genes (PRODH and DAO) were found to be directly regulated by p53, and ectopic expression of 4 genes (PRODH, DAO, EPN3, and GPR172B) affected senescence phenotypes induced by etoposide treatment. Collectively, our results identified several proteins as novel downstream effectors of p53-mediated senescence and provided new clues for further research on the complex signalling networks underlying the induction and maintenance of senescence. PMID:27545311

  12. Direct structural damping identification method using complex FRFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Vikas

    2015-03-01

    Most of the identification methods are based only on the viscous damping model and uses modal data. In this paper, a new FRF-based direct structural damping identification method is proposed. The proposed method is a direct method and identifies structural damping matrix explicitly. As the new method is a FRF-based method, it overcomes the problem of closely spaced modes for damping identification. The accuracy of identified structural damping matrix depends upon the accuracy of finite element model. In this paper, FRF-based model updating method is used to obtain accurate mass and stiffness matrices. Thus, the procedure to obtain accurate structural damping matrix is a two-step procedure. In the first step, mass and stiffness matrices are updated and in the second step, structural damping matrix is identified using updated mass and stiffness matrices, which are obtained in the previous step. The effectiveness of the new method is demonstrated by three numerical examples and one experimental example. The numerical studies of lumped mass system, fixed-fixed beam and L-shaped frame structure are carried out. The effects of coordinate incompleteness, ill-conditioning and robustness of method under presence of noise are investigated. The proposed method is able to predict FRFs accurately for the frequency range covering the modes considered. However, beyond the considered modes, the predicted FRFs do not match the experimental FRFs. It is suggested in this work that ill-conditioning problem should be dealt by considering all the modes in the frequency range of interest. The performance of the proposed method is investigated for cases of light, medium and heavily damped structures. The numerical studies are followed by experimental case study of cantilever beam structure. The effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing the predicted and the experimental FRFs. The results have shown that the proposed method is able to predict accurately the

  13. PA26 is a candidate gene for heterotaxia in humans: identification of a novel PA26-related gene family in human and mouse.

    PubMed

    Peeters, H; Debeer, P; Bairoch, A; Wilquet, V; Huysmans, C; Parthoens, E; Fryns, J P; Gewillig, M; Nakamura, Y; Niikawa, N; Van de Ven, W; Devriendt, K

    2003-05-01

    Heterotaxia is an aetiologically heterogeneous condition caused by an abnormal left-right axis formation, resulting in reversed left-right polarity of one or more organ systems. In a patient with heterotaxia and a de novo reciprocal translocation t(6;18)(q21;q21), we found that the PA26 gene was disrupted by the 6q21 breakpoint. Northern blot analysis showed decreased expression of the PA26 gene in an Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cell line of this patient. During early embryogenesis of Xenopus, the orthologue of PA26, XPA26 is exclusively expressed in the notochord, a midline structure. This further supports a possible role of PA26 in human situs determination. Mutation analysis of human PA26 gene in 40 unrelated individuals with unexplained heterotaxia failed to identify mutations, indicating that PA26 mutations are not a frequent cause of heterotaxia in humans. Analysis of the PA26 gene structure resulted in the identification of a novel PA26-related gene family, which we have named the sestrin family, and which comprises three closely related genes in human and in mouse. PMID:12607115

  14. Gene structure, phylogeny and expression profile of the sucrose synthase gene family in cacao (Theobroma cacao L.).

    PubMed

    Li, Fupeng; Hao, Chaoyun; Yan, Lin; Wu, Baoduo; Qin, Xiaowei; Lai, Jianxiong; Song, Yinghui

    2015-09-01

    In higher plants, sucrose synthase (Sus, EC 2.4.1.13) is widely considered as a key enzyme involved in sucrose metabolism. Although, several paralogous genes encoding different isozymes of Sus have been identified and characterized in multiple plant genomes, to date detailed information about the Sus genes is lacking for cacao. This study reports the identification of six novel Sus genes from economically important cacao tree. Analyses of the gene structure and phylogeny of the Sus genes demonstrated evolutionary conservation in the Sus family across cacao and other plant species. The expression of cacao Sus genes was investigated via real-time PCR in various tissues, different developmental phases of leaf, flower bud and pod. The Sus genes exhibited distinct but partially redundant expression profiles in cacao, with TcSus1, TcSus5 and TcSus6, being the predominant genes in the bark with phloem, TcSus2 predominantly expressing in the seed during the stereotype stage. TcSus3 and TcSus4 were significantly detected more in the pod husk and seed coat along the pod development, and showed development dependent expression profiles in the cacao pod. These results provide new insights into the evolution, and basic information that will assist in elucidating the functions of cacao Sus gene family. PMID:26440085

  15. Identification and Functional Analysis of the Nocardithiocin Gene Cluster in Nocardia pseudobrasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Kanae; Komaki, Hisayuki; Gonoi, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Nocardithiocin is a thiopeptide compound isolated from the opportunistic pathogen Nocardia pseudobrasiliensis. It shows a strong activity against acid-fast bacteria and is also active against rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here, we report the identification of the nocardithiocin gene cluster in N. pseudobrasiliensis IFM 0761 based on conserved thiopeptide biosynthesis gene sequence and the whole genome sequence. The predicted gene cluster was confirmed by gene disruption and complementation. As expected, strains containing the disrupted gene did not produce nocardithiocin while gene complementation restored nocardithiocin production in these strains. The predicted cluster was further analyzed using RNA-seq which showed that the nocardithiocin gene cluster contains 12 genes within a 15.2-kb region. This finding will promote the improvement of nocardithiocin productivity and its derivatives production. PMID:26588225

  16. Identification of genes containing expanded purine repeats in the human genome and their apparent protective role against cancer.

    PubMed

    Singh, Himanshu Narayan; Rajeswari, Moganty R

    2016-01-01

    Purine repeat sequences present in a gene are unique as they have high propensity to form unusual DNA-triple helix structures. Friedreich's ataxia is the only human disease that is well known to be associated with DNA-triplexes formed by purine repeats. The purpose of this study was to recognize the expanded purine repeats (EPRs) in human genome and find their correlation with cancer pathogenesis. We developed "PuRepeatFinder.pl" algorithm to identify non-overlapping EPRs without pyrimidine interruptions in the human genome and customized for searching repeat lengths, n ≥ 200. A total of 1158 EPRs were identified in the genome which followed Wakeby distribution. Two hundred and ninety-six EPRs were found in geneic regions of 282 genes (EPR-genes). Gene clustering of EPR-genes was done based on their cellular function and a large number of EPR-genes were found to be enzymes/enzyme modulators. Meta-analysis of 282 EPR-genes identified only 63 EPR-genes in association with cancer, mostly in breast, lung, and blood cancers. Protein-protein interaction network analysis of all 282 EPR-genes identified proteins including those in cadherins and VEGF. The two observations, that EPRs can induce mutations under malignant conditions and that identification of some EPR-gene products in vital cell signaling-mediated pathways, together suggest the crucial role of EPRs in carcinogenesis. The new link between EPR-genes and their functionally interacting proteins throws a new dimension in the present understanding of cancer pathogenesis and can help in planning therapeutic strategies. Validation of present results using techniques like NGS is required to establish the role of the EPR genes in cancer pathology. PMID:25990537

  17. Identification and Interpretation of Longitudinal Gene Expression Changes in Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Rajicic, Natasa; Cuschieri, Joseph; Finkelstein, Dianne M.; Miller-Graziano, Carol L.; Hayden, Douglas; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Moore, Ernest; O'Keefe, Grant; Pelik, Kimberly; Warren, H. Shaw; Schoenfeld, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The relationship between leukocyte gene expression and recovery of respiratory function after injury may provide information on the etiology of multiple organ dysfunction. Objectives To find a list of genes for which expression after injury predicts respiratory recovery, and to identify which networks and pathways characterize these genes. Methods Blood was sampled at 12 hours and at 1, 4, 7, 21 and 28 days from 147 patients who had been admitted to the hospital after blunt trauma. Leukocyte gene expression was measured using Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays. A linear model, fit to each probe-set expression value, was used to impute the gene expression trajectory over the entire follow-up period. The proportional hazards model score test was used to calculate the statistical significance of each probe-set trajectory in predicting respiratory recovery. A list of genes was determined such that the expected proportion of false positive results was less than 10%. These genes were compared to the Gene Ontology for ‘response to stimulus’ and, using Ingenuity software, were mapped into networks and pathways. Measurements and Main Results The median time to respiratory recovery was 6 days. There were 170 probe-sets representing 135 genes that were found to be related to respiratory recovery. These genes could be mapped to nine networks. Two known pathways that were activated were antigen processing and presentation and JAK- signaling. Conclusions The examination of the relationship of gene expression over time with a patient's clinical course can provide information which may be useful in determining the mechanism of recovery or lack of recovery after severe injury. PMID:21187951

  18. Identification of major blast resistance genes in the southern US

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance (R) genes in rice play important roles in preventing infections of rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. In order to identify more R genes for different rice growing areas in the Southern US, an extensive field survey of the blast fungus was performed from 2012 to 2013. A total of 500 is...

  19. Identification of LytSR-regulated genes from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, E W; Bayles, K W

    1996-10-01

    In this report, the characterization of a Staphylococcus aureus operon containing two LytSR-regulated genes, lrgA and lrgB, is described. Sequence and mutagenesis studies of these genes suggest that lrgA encodes a murein hydrolase exporter similar to bacteriophage holin proteins while lrgB may encode a protein having murein hydrolase activity. PMID:8824633

  20. Systematic analysis of mutation distribution in three dimensional protein structures identifies cancer driver genes.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Akihiro; Okada, Yukinori; Boroevich, Keith A; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2016-01-01

    Protein tertiary structure determines molecular function, interaction, and stability of the protein, therefore distribution of mutation in the tertiary structure can facilitate the identification of new driver genes in cancer. To analyze mutation distribution in protein tertiary structures, we applied a novel three dimensional permutation test to the mutation positions. We analyzed somatic mutation datasets of 21 types of cancers obtained from exome sequencing conducted by the TCGA project. Of the 3,622 genes that had ≥3 mutations in the regions with tertiary structure data, 106 genes showed significant skew in mutation distribution. Known tumor suppressors and oncogenes were significantly enriched in these identified cancer gene sets. Physical distances between mutations in known oncogenes were significantly smaller than those of tumor suppressors. Twenty-three genes were detected in multiple cancers. Candidate genes with significant skew of the 3D mutation distribution included kinases (MAPK1, EPHA5, ERBB3, and ERBB4), an apoptosis related gene (APP), an RNA splicing factor (SF1), a miRNA processing factor (DICER1), an E3 ubiquitin ligase (CUL1) and transcription factors (KLF5 and EEF1B2). Our study suggests that systematic analysis of mutation distribution in the tertiary protein structure can help identify cancer driver genes. PMID:27225414

  1. Systematic analysis of mutation distribution in three dimensional protein structures identifies cancer driver genes

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Akihiro; Okada, Yukinori; Boroevich, Keith A.; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2016-01-01

    Protein tertiary structure determines molecular function, interaction, and stability of the protein, therefore distribution of mutation in the tertiary structure can facilitate the identification of new driver genes in cancer. To analyze mutation distribution in protein tertiary structures, we applied a novel three dimensional permutation test to the mutation positions. We analyzed somatic mutation datasets of 21 types of cancers obtained from exome sequencing conducted by the TCGA project. Of the 3,622 genes that had ≥3 mutations in the regions with tertiary structure data, 106 genes showed significant skew in mutation distribution. Known tumor suppressors and oncogenes were significantly enriched in these identified cancer gene sets. Physical distances between mutations in known oncogenes were significantly smaller than those of tumor suppressors. Twenty-three genes were detected in multiple cancers. Candidate genes with significant skew of the 3D mutation distribution included kinases (MAPK1, EPHA5, ERBB3, and ERBB4), an apoptosis related gene (APP), an RNA splicing factor (SF1), a miRNA processing factor (DICER1), an E3 ubiquitin ligase (CUL1) and transcription factors (KLF5 and EEF1B2). Our study suggests that systematic analysis of mutation distribution in the tertiary protein structure can help identify cancer driver genes. PMID:27225414

  2. Identification of chemosensory receptor genes from vertebrate genomes.

    PubMed

    Niimura, Yoshihito

    2013-01-01

    Chemical senses are essential for the survival of animals. In vertebrates, mainly three different types of receptors, olfactory receptors (ORs), vomeronasal receptors type 1 (V1Rs), and vomeronasal receptors type 2 (V2Rs), are responsible for the detection of chemicals in the environment. Mouse or rat genomes contain >1,000 OR genes, forming the largest multigene family in vertebrates, and have >100 V1R and V2R genes as well. Recent advancement in genome sequencing enabled us to computationally identify nearly complete repertories of OR, V1R, and V2R genes from various organisms, revealing that the numbers of these genes are highly variable among different organisms depending on each species' living environment. Here I would explain bioinformatic methods to identify the entire repertoires of OR, V1R, and V2R genes from vertebrate genome sequences. PMID:24014356

  3. Identification of Single- and Multiple-Class Specific Signature Genes from Gene Expression Profiles by Group Marker Index

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yu-Shuen; Aguan, Kripamoy; Pal, Nikhil R.; Chung, I-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Informative genes from microarray data can be used to construct prediction model and investigate biological mechanisms. Differentially expressed genes, the main targets of most gene selection methods, can be classified as single- and multiple-class specific signature genes. Here, we present a novel gene selection algorithm based on a Group Marker Index (GMI), which is intuitive, of low-computational complexity, and efficient in identification of both types of genes. Most gene selection methods identify only single-class specific signature genes and cannot identify multiple-class specific signature genes easily. Our algorithm can detect de novo certain conditions of multiple-class specificity of a gene and makes use of a novel non-parametric indicator to assess the discrimination ability between classes. Our method is effective even when the sample size is small as well as when the class sizes are significantly different. To compare the effectiveness and robustness we formulate an intuitive template-based method and use four well-known datasets. We demonstrate that our algorithm outperforms the template-based method in difficult cases with unbalanced distribution. Moreover, the multiple-class specific genes are good biomarkers and play important roles in biological pathways. Our literature survey supports that the proposed method identifies unique multiple-class specific marker genes (not reported earlier to be related to cancer) in the Central Nervous System data. It also discovers unique biomarkers indicating the intrinsic difference between subtypes of lung cancer. We also associate the pathway information with the multiple-class specific signature genes and cross-reference to published studies. We find that the identified genes participate in the pathways directly involved in cancer development in leukemia data. Our method gives a promising way to find genes that can involve in pathways of multiple diseases and hence opens up the possibility of using an existing

  4. Identification of novel TCDD-regulated genes by microarray analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, Paul R.; Zheng, Wenchao; Ko, Alex Y.; Jefcoate, Colin R. . E-mail: jefcoate@facstaff.wisc.edu

    2005-02-01

    TCDD exposure of multipotential C3H10T1/2 fibroblasts for 72 h altered the expression of over 1000 genes, including coordinated changes across large functionally similar gene clusters. TCDD coordinately induced 23 cell cycle-related genes similar to epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced levels but without any affect on the major mitogenic signaling pathway (extracellular signal-regulated kinase, ERK). TCDD treatment also decreased glycolytic and ribosomal clusters. Most of these TCDD-induced changes were attenuated by the presence of EGF or an adipogenic stimulus, each added during the final 24 h. TCDD prevented 10% of EGF-induced gene responses and 40% of adipogenic responses. Over 100 other genes responded to TCDD during adipogenesis. This group of responses included complete suppression of three proliferins and stimulations of several cytokine receptors. Despite these varied secondary effects of TCDD, direct AhR activation measured by integrated AhR-responsive luciferase reporters was similar under quiescent, EGF-stimulated or adipogenic conditions. Only 23 genes were similarly induced by TCDD regardless of conditions and 10 were suppressed. These 23 genes include: 4 genes previously recognized to contain AhR response elements (cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1B1, CYP1A1, NAD(P)H quinone reductase 1 (NQO1), and aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1); two novel oxidative genes (alcohol dehydrogenase 3 and superoxide dismutase 3); and glypican 1, a plasma membrane proteoglycan that affects cell signaling. Further experiments demonstrated that TCDD maximally induced NQO1, glypican 1 and alcohol dehydrogenase 3 by 6 h. Glypican 1 activates the actions of many growth factors and therefore may contribute to secondary effects on gene expression.

  5. Identification of Neural Outgrowth Genes using Genome-Wide RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Sepp, Katharine J.; Hong, Pengyu; Lizarraga, Sofia B.; Liu, Judy S.; Mejia, Luis A.; Walsh, Christopher A.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    While genetic screens have identified many genes essential for neurite outgrowth, they have been limited in their ability to identify neural genes that also have earlier critical roles in the gastrula, or neural genes for which maternally contributed RNA compensates for gene mutations in the zygote. To address this, we developed methods to screen the Drosophila genome using RNA-interference (RNAi) on primary neural cells and present the results of the first full-genome RNAi screen in neurons. We used live-cell imaging and quantitative image analysis to characterize the morphological phenotypes of fluorescently labelled primary neurons and glia in response to RNAi-mediated gene knockdown. From the full genome screen, we focused our analysis on 104 evolutionarily conserved genes that when downregulated by RNAi, have morphological defects such as reduced axon extension, excessive branching, loss of fasciculation, and blebbing. To assist in the phenotypic analysis of the large data sets, we generated image analysis algorithms that could assess the statistical significance of the mutant phenotypes. The algorithms were essential for the analysis of the thousands of images generated by the screening process and will become a valuable tool for future genome-wide screens in primary neurons. Our analysis revealed unexpected, essential roles in neurite outgrowth for genes representing a wide range of functional categories including signalling molecules, enzymes, channels, receptors, and cytoskeletal proteins. We also found that genes known to be involved in protein and vesicle trafficking showed similar RNAi phenotypes. We confirmed phenotypes of the protein trafficking genes Sec61alpha and Ran GTPase using Drosophila embryo and mouse embryonic cerebral cortical neurons, respectively. Collectively, our results showed that RNAi phenotypes in primary neural culture can parallel in vivo phenotypes, and the screening technique can be used to identify many new genes that have

  6. Parameter identification of material constants in a composite shell structure

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.R.; Carne, T.G.

    1988-01-01

    One of the basic requirements in engineering analysis is the development of a mathematical model describing the system. Frequently, comparisons with test data are used as a measurement of the adequacy of the model. An attempt is typically made to update or improve the model to provide a test-verified analysis tool. System identification provides a systematic procedure for accomplishing this task. The terms system identification, parameter estimation, and model correlation all refer to techniques that use test information to update or verify mathematical models. The goal of system identification is to improve the correlation of model predictions with measured test data, and produce accurate, predictive models. For nonmetallic structures the modeling task is often difficult due to uncertainties in the elastic constants. In this work a parameter identification procedure was used to determine the elastic constants of a cylindrical, graphite epoxy composite shell. A finite element model of the shell was created, which included uncertain orthotropic elastic constants. A modal survey test was then performed on the shell. The resulting modal data, along with the finite element model of the shell, were used in a Bayes estimation algorithm. This permitted the use of covariance matrices to weight the confidence in the initial parameter values as well as confidence in the measured test data. The estimation procedure also employed the concept of successive linearization to obtain an approximate solution to the original nonlinear estimation problem. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Identification and Evaluation of Reference Genes for Quantitative Analysis of Brazilian Pine (Araucaria angustifolia Bertol. Kuntze) Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Juliana; Mosini, Amanda C.; dos Santos, André L. W.; Rossi, Magdalena; Floh, Eny I. S.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of gene expression is a fundamental experimental approach in many fields of plant biology, but it requires the use of internal controls representing constitutively expressed genes for reliable transcript quantification. In this study, we identified fifteen putative reference genes from an A. angustifolia transcriptome database. Variation in transcript levels was first evaluated in silico by comparing read counts and then by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), resulting in the identification of six candidate genes. The consistency of transcript abundance was also calculated applying geNorm and NormFinder software packages followed by a validation approach using four target genes. The results presented here indicate that a diverse set of samples should ideally be used in order to identify constitutively expressed genes, and that the use of any two reference genes in combination, of the six tested genes, is sufficient for effective expression normalization. Finally, in agreement with the in silico prediction, a comprehensive analysis of the qRT-PCR data combined with validation analysis revealed that AaEIF4B-L and AaPP2A are the most suitable reference genes for comparative studies of A. angustifolia gene expression. PMID:26313945

  8. Genomewide identification of genes under directional selection: gene transcription Q(ST) scan in diverging Atlantic salmon subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Roberge, C; Guderley, H; Bernatchez, L

    2007-10-01

    Evolutionary genomics has benefited from methods that allow identifying evolutionarily important genomic regions on a genomewide scale, including genome scans and QTL mapping. Recently, genomewide scanning by means of microarrays has permitted assessing gene transcription differences among species or populations. However, the identification of differentially transcribed genes does not in itself suffice to measure the role of selection in driving evolutionary changes in gene transcription. Here, we propose and apply a "transcriptome scan" approach to investigating the role of selection in shaping differential profiles of gene transcription among populations. We compared the genomewide transcription levels between two Atlantic salmon subpopulations that have been diverging for only six generations. Following assessment of normality and unimodality on a gene-per-gene basis, the additive genetic basis of gene transcription was estimated using the animal model. Gene transcription h(2) estimates were significant for 1044 (16%) of all detected cDNA clones. In an approach analogous to that of genome scans, we used the distribution of the Q(ST) values estimated from intra- and intersubpopulation additive genetic components of the transcription profiles to identify 16 outlier genes (average Q(ST) estimate = 0.11) whose transcription levels are likely to have evolved under the influence of directional selection within six generations only. Overall, this study contributes both empirically and methodologically to the quantitative genetic exploration of gene transcription data. PMID:17720934

  9. Genetic region characterization (Gene RECQuest) - software to assist in identification and selection of candidate genes from genomic regions

    PubMed Central

    Sadasivam, Rajani S; Sundar, Gayathri; Vaughan, Laura K; Tanik, Murat M; Arnett, Donna K

    2009-01-01

    Background The availability of research platforms like the web tools of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) has transformed the time-consuming task of identifying candidate genes from genetic studies to an interactive process where data from a variety of sources are obtained to select likely genes for follow-up. This process presents its own set of challenges, as the genetic researcher has to interact with several tools in a time-intensive, manual, and cumbersome manner. We developed a method and implemented an effective software system to address these challenges by multidisciplinary efforts of professional software developers with domain experts. The method presented in this paper, Gene RECQuest, simplifies the interaction with existing research platforms through the use of advanced integration technologies. Findings Gene RECQuest is a web-based application that assists in the identification of candidate genes from linkage and association studies using information from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and PubMed. To illustrate the utility of Gene RECQuest we used it to identify genes physically located within a linkage region as potential candidate genes for a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) response on chromosome 18. Conclusion Gene RECQuest provides a tool which enables researchers to easily identify and organize literature supporting their own expertise and make informed decisions. It is important to note that Gene RECQuest is a data acquisition and organization software, and not a data analysis method. PMID:19793396

  10. Identification of uncertain structural parameters in flexible boosters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, Shujiro; Kawaguchi, Jun'ichiro; Matsuo, Hiroki

    A novel algorithm for identification of unknown structural parameters in flexible boosters is presented here. In this method, first of all coefficient matrices in recursive form are estimated based on sensor outputs, which is followed by identifying structural parameters utilizing matrix relations between those and system description form. This algorithm is relatively robust and promising, since neither modal coordinates nor state reconstruction is required, in which tremendous amount of efforts have been to be concentrated to. Numerical discussion here was carried out and it demonstrated its practical effectiveness.

  11. Structure identification methods for atomistic simulations of crystalline materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stukowski, Alexander

    2012-05-28

    Here, we discuss existing and new computational analysis techniques to classify local atomic arrangements in large-scale atomistic computer simulations of crystalline solids. This article includes a performance comparison of typical analysis algorithms such as common neighbor analysis (CNA), centrosymmetry analysis, bond angle analysis, bond order analysis and Voronoi analysis. In addition we propose a simple extension to the CNA method that makes it suitable for multi-phase systems. Finally, we introduce a new structure identification algorithm, the neighbor distance analysis, which is designed to identify atomic structure units in grain boundaries.

  12. An adaptive identification and control scheme for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, J. V.

    1988-01-01

    A unified identification and control scheme capable of achieving space at form performance objectives under nominal or failure conditions is described. Preliminary results are also presented, showing that the methodology offers much promise for effective robust control of large space structures. The control method is a multivariable, adaptive, output predictive controller called Model Predictive Control (MPC). MPC uses a state space model and input reference trajectories of set or tracking points to adaptively generate optimum commands. For a fixed model, MPC processes commands with great efficiency, and is also highly robust. A key feature of MPC is its ability to control either nonminimum phase or open loop unstable systems. As an output controller, MPC does not explicitly require full state feedback, as do most multivariable (e.g., Linear Quadratic) methods. Its features are very useful in LSS operations, as they allow non-collocated actuators and sensors. The identification scheme is based on canonical variate analysis (CVA) of input and output data. The CVA technique is particularly suited for the measurement and identification of structural dynamic processes - that is, unsteady transient or dynamically interacting processes such as between aerodynamics and structural deformation - from short, noisy data. CVA is structured so that the identification can be done in real or near real time, using computationally stable algorithms. Modeling LSS dynamics in 1-g laboratories has always been a major impediment not only to understanding their behavior in orbit, but also to controlling it. In cases where the theoretical model is not confirmed, current methods provide few clues concerning additional dynamical relationships that are not included in the theoretical models. CVA needs no a priori model data, or structure; all statistically significant dynamical states are determined using natural, entropy-based methods. Heretofore, a major limitation in applying adaptive

  13. Identification of key target genes and pathways in laryngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Du, Jintao; Liu, Jun; Wen, Bei

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to screen the key genes associated with laryngeal carcinoma and to investigate the molecular mechanism of laryngeal carcinoma progression. The gene expression profile of GSE10935 [Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) accession number], including 12 specimens from laryngeal papillomas and 12 specimens from normal laryngeal epithelia controls, was downloaded from the GEO database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened in laryngeal papillomas compared with normal controls using Limma package in R language, followed by Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis and pathway enrichment analysis. Furthermore, the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of DEGs was constructed using Cytoscape software and modules were analyzed using MCODE plugin from the PPI network. Furthermore, significant biological pathway regions (sub-pathway) were identified by using iSubpathwayMiner analysis. A total of 67 DEGs were identified, including 27 up-regulated genes and 40 down-regulated genes and they were involved in different GO terms and pathways. PPI network analysis revealed that Ras association (RalGDS/AF-6) domain family member 1 (RASSF1) was a hub protein. The sub-pathway analysis identified 9 significantly enriched sub-pathways, including glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and nitrogen metabolism. Genes such as phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1), carbonic anhydrase II (CA2), and carbonic anhydrase XII (CA12) whose node degrees were >10 were identified in the disease risk sub-pathway. Genes in the sub-pathway, such as RASSF1, PGK1, CA2 and CA12 were presumed to serve critical roles in laryngeal carcinoma. The present study identified DEGs and their sub-pathways in the disease, which may serve as potential targets for treatment of laryngeal carcinoma. PMID:27446427

  14. Identification of driving network of cellular differentiation from single sample time course gene expression data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ye; Wolanyk, Nathaniel; Ilker, Tunc; Gao, Shouguo; Wang, Xujing

    Methods developed based on bifurcation theory have demonstrated their potential in driving network identification for complex human diseases, including the work by Chen, et al. Recently bifurcation theory has been successfully applied to model cellular differentiation. However, there one often faces a technical challenge in driving network prediction: time course cellular differentiation study often only contains one sample at each time point, while driving network prediction typically require multiple samples at each time point to infer the variation and interaction structures of candidate genes for the driving network. In this study, we investigate several methods to identify both the critical time point and the driving network through examination of how each time point affects the autocorrelation and phase locking. We apply these methods to a high-throughput sequencing (RNA-Seq) dataset of 42 subsets of thymocytes and mature peripheral T cells at multiple time points during their differentiation (GSE48138 from GEO). We compare the predicted driving genes with known transcription regulators of cellular differentiation. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of our proposed methods, as well as potential further improvements of our methods.

  15. Comparative gene identification 58/α/β hydrolase domain 5 lacks lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Derek; Dinh, Anna; Kurz, Daniel; Shah, Dharika; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M.; Brasaemle, Dawn L.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding comparative gene identification 58 (CGI-58)/α/β hydrolase domain 5 (ABHD5) cause Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome, characterized by excessive triacylglycerol storage in cells and tissues. CGI-58 has been identified as a coactivator of adipose TG lipase (ATGL) and a lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT). We developed a molecular model of CGI-58 structure and then mutated predicted active site residues and performed LPAAT activity assays of recombinant WT and mutated CGI-58. When mutations of predicted catalytic residues failed to reduce LPAAT activity, we determined that LPAAT activity was due to a bacterial contaminant of affinity purification procedures, plsC, the sole LPAAT in Escherichia coli. Purification protocols were optimized to reduce plsC contamination, in turn reducing LPAAT activity. When CGI-58 was expressed in SM2-1(DE3) cells that lack plsC, lysates lacked LPAAT activity. Additionally, mouse CGI-58 expressed in bacteria as a glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein and human CGI-58 expressed in yeast lacked LPAAT activity. Previously reported lipid binding activity of CGI-58 was revisited using protein-lipid overlays. Recombinant CGI-58 failed to bind lysophosphatidic acid, but interestingly, bound phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P] and phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate [PI(5)P]. Prebinding CGI-58 with PI(3)P or PI(5)P did not alter its coactivation of ATGL in vitro. In summary, purified recombinant CGI-58 that is functional as an ATGL coactivator lacks LPAAT activity. PMID:24879803

  16. Identification of the two rotavirus genes determining neutralization specificities

    SciTech Connect

    Offit, P.A.; Blavat, G.

    1986-01-01

    Bovine rotavirus NCDV and simian rotavirus SA-11 represent two distinct rotavirus serotypes. A genetic approach was used to determine which viral gene segments segregated with serotype-specific viral neutralization. There were 16 reassortant rotarviruses derived by coinfection of MA-104 cells in vitro with the SA-11 and NCDV strains. The parental origin of reassortant rotavirus double-stranded RNA segments was determined by gene segment mobility in polyacrylamide gels and by hybridization with radioactively labeled parental viral transcripts. The authors found that two rotavirus gene segments found previously to code for outer capsid proteins vp3 and vp7 cosegreated with virus neutralization specificities.

  17. Primary structure and regulation of vegetative specific genes of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, C K; Manning, S S; Ken, R

    1989-01-01

    We have examined the expression and structure of several genes belonging to two classes of vegetative specific genes of the simple eukaryote, Dictyostelium discoideum. In amebae grown on bacteria, deactivation of all vegetative specific genes occurred at the onset of development and very little mRNA exists by 8 to 10 hours. In contrast, when cells were grown in axenic broth, the mRNA levels remained constant until a dramatic drop occurred around 10 to 12 hours. Thus, regulation of both classes of genes during the first several hours of development is dependent upon the prior growth conditions. Analysis of genomic clones has resulted in the identification of two V genes, V1 and V18, as ribosomal protein genes. Several other V genes were not found to be ribosomal protein genes, suggesting that in Dictyostelium non-ribosomal protein genes may be coordinately regulated with the ribosomal protein genes. Finally, using deletion analysis we show that the promoters of two of the V genes are composed of a constitutive positive element(s) located upstream of sequences involved in the regulated expression of these genes and within the first 545 upstream bp for V18 and 850 bp for V14. The regions involved in regulated expression were localized between -7 and -222 for V18 and -70 and -368 for V14. The sequences conferring protein synthesis sensitivity were shown to reside between -502 and -61 of the H4 promoter. Images PMID:2602140

  18. Application of Euclidean distance measurement and principal component analysis for gene identification.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Antara; Barman, Soma

    2016-06-01

    Gene systems are extremely complex, heterogeneous, and noisy in nature. Many statistical tools which are used to extract relevant feature from genes provide fuzzy and ambiguous information. High-dimensional gene expression database available in public domain usually contains thousands of genes. Efficient prediction method is demanding nowadays for accurate identification of such database. Euclidean distance measurement and principal component analysis methods are applied on such databases to identify the genes. In both methods, prediction algorithm is based on homology search approach. Digital Signal Processing technique along with statistical method is used for analysis of genes in both cases. A two-level decision logic is used for gene classification as healthy or cancerous. This binary logic minimizes the prediction error and improves prediction accuracy. Superiority of the method is judged by receiver operating characteristic curve. PMID:26877227

  19. Identification and characterization of T-cell antigen receptor-related genes in phylogenetically diverse vertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Rast, J P; Haire, R N; Litman, R T; Pross, S; Litman, G W

    1995-01-01

    Characterization of the structure, multiplicity, organization, and cell lineage-specific expression of T-cell receptor (TCR) genes of nonmammalian vertebrate species is central to the understanding of the evolutionary origins of rearranging genes of the vertebrate immune system. We recently described a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) strategy that relies on short sequence similarities shared by nearly all vertebrate TCR and immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) regions and have used this approach to isolate a TCR beta (TCRB) homolog from a cartilaginous fish. Using these short PCR products as probes in spleen cDNA and genomic libraries, we were able to isolate a variety of unique TCR and TCR-like genes. Here we report the identification and characterization of a chicken TCR gamma (TCRG) homolog, apparent Xenopus and pufferfish TCR alpha (TCRA) homologs, and two horned shark TCR delta (TCRD)-like genes. In addition, we have identified what could be a novel representative of the Ig gene superfamily in the pufferfish. This method of using short, minimally degenerate PCR primers should speed progress in the phylogenetic investigations of the TCR and related genes and lend important insights into both the origins and functions of these unique gene systems. PMID:7642232

  20. Identification of essential genes of the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium associated with periodontal disease onset and progression. Genetic tools for the manipulation of bacterial genomes allow for in-depth mechanistic studies of metabolism, physiology, interspecies and host-pathogen interactions. Analysis of the essential genes, protein-coding sequences necessary for survival of P. gingivalis by transposon mutagenesis has not previously been attempted due to the limitations of available transposon systems for the organism. We adapted a Mariner transposon system for mutagenesis of P. gingivalis and created an insertion mutant library. By analyzing the location of insertions using massively-parallel sequencing technology we used this mutant library to define genes essential for P. gingivalis survival under in vitro conditions. Results In mutagenesis experiments we identified 463 genes in P. gingivalis strain ATCC 33277 that are putatively essential for viability in vitro. Comparing the 463 P. gingivalis essential genes with previous essential gene studies, 364 of the 463 are homologues to essential genes in other species; 339 are shared with more than one other species. Twenty-five genes are known to be essential in P. gingivalis and B. thetaiotaomicron only. Significant enrichment of essential genes within Cluster of Orthologous Groups ‘D’ (cell division), ‘I’ (lipid transport and metabolism) and ‘J’ (translation/ribosome) were identified. Previously, the P. gingivalis core genome was shown to encode 1,476 proteins out of a possible 1,909; 434 of 463 essential genes are contained within the core genome. Thus, for the species P. gingivalis twenty-two, seventy-seven and twenty-three percent of the genome respectively are devoted to essential, core and accessory functions. Conclusions A Mariner transposon system can be adapted to create mutant libraries in P. gingivalis amenable to analysis by next-generation sequencing technologies. In silico analysis

  1. Applications of nonlinear system identification to structural health monitoring.

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C. R.; Sohn, H.; Robertson, A. N.

    2004-01-01

    The process of implementing a damage detection strategy for aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering infrastructure is referred to as structural health monitoring (SHM). In many cases damage causes a structure that initially behaves in a predominantly linear manner to exhibit nonlinear response when subject to its operating environment. The formation of cracks that subsequently open and close under operating loads is an example of such damage. The damage detection process can be significantly enhanced if one takes advantage of these nonlinear effects when extracting damage-sensitive features from measured data. This paper will provide an overview of nonlinear system identification techniques that are used for the feature extraction process. Specifically, three general approaches that apply nonlinear system identification techniques to the damage detection process are discussed. The first two approaches attempt to quantify the deviation of the system from its initial linear characteristics that is a direct result of damage. The third approach is to extract features from the data that are directly related to the specific nonlinearity associated with the damaged condition. To conclude this discussion, a summary of outstanding issues associated with the application of nonlinear system identification techniques to the SHM problem is presented.

  2. The fur Gene as a New Phylogenetic Marker for Vibrionaceae Species Identification

    PubMed Central

    Gram, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Microbial taxonomy is essential in all areas of microbial science. The 16S rRNA gene sequence is one of the main phylogenetic species markers; however, it does not provide discrimination in the family Vibrionaceae, where other molecular techniques allow better interspecies resolution. Although multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) has been used successfully in the identification of Vibrio species, the technique has several limitations. They include the fact that several locus amplifications and sequencing have to be performed, which still sometimes lead to doubtful identifications. Using an in silico approach based on genomes from 103 Vibrionaceae strains, we demonstrate here the high resolution of the fur gene in the identification of Vibrionaceae species and its usefulness as a phylogenetic marker. The fur gene showed within-species similarity higher than 95%, and the relationships inferred from its use were in agreement with those observed for 16S rRNA analysis and MLSA. Furthermore, we developed a fur PCR sequencing-based method that allowed identification of Vibrio species. The discovery of the phylogenetic power of the fur gene and the development of a PCR method that can be used in amplification and sequencing of the gene are of general interest whether for use alone or together with the previously suggested loci in an MLSA. PMID:25662978

  3. A Genomic Signature and the Identification of New Sporulation Genes

    PubMed Central

    Abecasis, Ana B.; Serrano, Mónica; Alves, Renato; Quintais, Leonor

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial endospores are the most resistant cell type known to humans, as they are able to withstand extremes of temperature, pressure, chemical injury, and time. They are also of interest because the endospore is the infective particle in a variety of human and livestock diseases. Endosporulation is characterized by the morphogenesis of an endospore within a mother cell. Based on the genes known to be involved in endosporulation in the model organism Bacillus subtilis, a conserved core of about 100 genes was derived, representing the minimal machinery for endosporulation. The core was used to define a genomic signature of about 50 genes that are able to distinguish endospore-forming organisms, based on complete genome sequences, and we show this 50-gene signature is robust against phylogenetic proximity and other artifacts. This signature includes previously uncharacterized genes that we can now show are important for sporulation in B. subtilis and/or are under developmental control, thus further validating this genomic signature. We also predict that a series of polyextremophylic organisms, as well as several gut bacteria, are able to form endospores, and we identified 3 new loci essential for sporulation in B. subtilis: ytaF, ylmC, and ylzA. In all, the results support the view that endosporulation likely evolved once, at the base of the Firmicutes phylum, and is unrelated to other bacterial cell differentiation programs and that this involved the evolution of new genes and functions, as well as the cooption of ancestral, housekeeping functions. PMID:23396918

  4. A genomic signature and the identification of new sporulation genes.

    PubMed

    Abecasis, Ana B; Serrano, Mónica; Alves, Renato; Quintais, Leonor; Pereira-Leal, José B; Henriques, Adriano O

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial endospores are the most resistant cell type known to humans, as they are able to withstand extremes of temperature, pressure, chemical injury, and time. They are also of interest because the endospore is the infective particle in a variety of human and livestock diseases. Endosporulation is characterized by the morphogenesis of an endospore within a mother cell. Based on the genes known to be involved in endosporulation in the model organism Bacillus subtilis, a conserved core of about 100 genes was derived, representing the minimal machinery for endosporulation. The core was used to define a genomic signature of about 50 genes that are able to distinguish endospore-forming organisms, based on complete genome sequences, and we show this 50-gene signature is robust against phylogenetic proximity and other artifacts. This signature includes previously uncharacterized genes that we can now show are important for sporulation in B. subtilis and/or are under developmental control, thus further validating this genomic signature. We also predict that a series of polyextremophylic organisms, as well as several gut bacteria, are able to form endospores, and we identified 3 new loci essential for sporulation in B. subtilis: ytaF, ylmC, and ylzA. In all, the results support the view that endosporulation likely evolved once, at the base of the Firmicutes phylum, and is unrelated to other bacterial cell differentiation programs and that this involved the evolution of new genes and functions, as well as the cooption of ancestral, housekeeping functions. PMID:23396918

  5. Gene identification programs in bread wheat: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, Jaber; Naghavi, Mohammadreza; Rad, Sara Naseri; Yolmeh, Tahereh; Shirazi, Milaveh; Naderi, Ramin; Nasiri, Mojtaba; Ahmadi, Sayvan

    2013-01-01

    Seven ab initio web-based gene prediction programs (i.e., AUGUSTUS, BGF, Fgenesh, Fgenesh+, GeneID, Genemark.hmm, and HMMgene) were assessed to compare their prediction accuracy using protein-coding sequences of bread wheat. At both nucleotide and exon levels, Fgenesh+ was deduced as the superior program and BGF followed by Fgenesh were resided in the next positions, respectively. Conversely, at gene level, Fgenesh with the value of predicting more than 75% of all the genes precisely, concluded as the best ones. It was also found out that programs such as Fgenesh+, BGF, and Fgenesh, because of harboring the highest percentage of correct predictive exons appear to be much more applicable in achieving more trustworthy results, while using both GeneID and HMMgene the percentage of false negatives would be expected to enhance. Regarding initial exon, overall, the frequency of accurate recognition of 3' boundary was significantly higher than that of 5' and the reverse was true if terminal exon is taken into account. Lastly, HMMgene and Genemark.hmm, overall, presented independent tendency against GC content, while the others appear to be slightly more sensitive if GC-poor sequences are employed. Our results, overall, exhibited that to make adequate opportunity in acquiring remarkable results, gene finders still need additional improvements. PMID:24124688

  6. Identification of differently expressed genes in human colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao; Zhang, Yi-Zeng; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Wang, Gang; Yi, Zeng-Ni

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the differently expressed genes in human colorectal adenocarcinoma. METHODS: The integrated approach for gene expression profiling that couples suppression subtractive hybridization, high-throughput cDNA array, sequencing, bioinformatics analysis, and reverse transcriptase real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out. A set of cDNA clones including 1260 SSH inserts amplified by PCR was arrayed using robotic printing. The cDNA arrays were hybridized with florescent-labeled probes prepared from RNA of human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HCRAC) and normal colorectal tissues. RESULTS: A total of 86 genes were identified, 16 unknown genes and 70 known genes. The transcription factor Sox9 influencing cell differentiation was downregulated. At the same time, Heat shock protein 10 KDis downregulated and Calmoulin is up-regulated. CONCLUSION: Downregulation of heat shock protein 10 KD lost its inhibition of Ras, and then attenuated the Ras GTPase signaling pathway, increased cell proliferation and inhibited cell apoptosis. Down-regulated transcription factor So x 9 influences cell differentiation and cell-specific gene expression. Down-regulated So x 9 also decreases its binding to calmodulin, accumulates calmodulin as receptor-activated kinase and phosphorylase kinase due to the activation of PhK. PMID:16534841

  7. Identification of effector genes from the phytopathogenic Oomycete Plasmopara viticola through the analysis of gene expression in germinated zoospores.

    PubMed

    Mestre, Pere; Piron, Marie-Christine; Merdinoglu, Didier

    2012-07-01

    Grapevine downy mildew caused by the Oomycete Plasmopara viticola is one of the most important diseases affecting Vitis spp. The current strategy of control relies on chemical fungicides. An alternative to the use of fungicides is using downy mildew resistant varieties, which is cost-effective and environmentally friendly. Knowledge about the genetic basis of the resistance to P. viticola has progressed in the recent years, but little data are available about P. viticola genetics, in particular concerning the nature of its avirulence genes. Identifying pathogen effectors as putative avirulence genes is a necessary step in order to understand the biology of the interaction. It is also important in order to select the most efficient combination of resistance genes in a strategy of pyramiding. On the basis of knowledge from other Oomycetes, P. viticola effectors can be identified by using a candidate gene strategy based on data mining of genomic resources. In this paper we describe the development of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) from P. viticola by creating a cDNA library from in vitro germinated zoospores and the sequencing of 1543 clones. We present 563 putative nuclear P. viticola unigenes. Sequence analysis reveals 54 ESTs from putative secreted hydrolytic enzymes and effectors, showing the suitability of this material for the analysis of the P. viticola secretome and identification of effector genes. Next generation sequencing of cDNA from in vitro germinated zoospores should result in the identification of numerous candidate avirulence genes in the grapevine/downy mildew interaction. PMID:22749169

  8. Interval based fuzzy systems for identification of important genes from microarray gene expression data: Application to carcinogenic development.

    PubMed

    De, Rajat K; Ghosh, Anupam

    2009-12-01

    In the present article, we develop two interval based fuzzy systems for identification of some possible genes mediating the carcinogenic development in various tissues. The methodology involves dimensionality reduction, classifying the genes through incorporation of the notion of linguistic fuzzy sets low, medium and high, and finally selection of some possible genes mediating a particular disease, obtained by a rule generation/grouping technique. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology, is demonstrated using five microarray gene expression datasets dealing with human lung, colon, sarcoma, breast cancer and leukemia. Moreover, the superior capability of the methodology in selecting important genes, over five other existing gene selection methods, viz., Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM), Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), Neighborhood analysis (NA), Bayesian Regularization (BR) and Data-adaptive (DA) is demonstrated, in terms of the enrichment of each GO category of the important genes based on P-values. The results are appropriately validated by earlier investigations, gene expression profiles and t-test. The proposed methodology has been able to select genes that are more biologically significant in mediating the development of a disease than those obtained by the others. PMID:19591962

  9. Identification of Novel Human Genes Evolutionarily Conserved in Caenorhabditis elegans by Comparative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chun-Hung; Chou, Chang-Yuan; Ch'ang, Lan-Yang; Liu, Chung-Shyan; Lin, Wen-chang

    2000-01-01

    Modern biomedical research greatly benefits from large-scale genome-sequencing projects ranging from studies of viruses, bacteria, and yeast to multicellular organisms, like Caenorhabditis elegans. Comparative genomic studies offer a vast array of prospects for identification and functional annotation of human ortholog genes. We presented a novel comparative proteomic approach for assembling human gene contigs and assisting gene discovery. The C. elegans proteome was used as an alignment template to assist in novel human gene identification from human EST nucleotide databases. Among the available 18,452 C. elegans protein sequences, our results indicate that at least 83% (15,344 sequences) of C. elegans proteome has human homologous genes, with 7,954 records of C. elegans proteins matching known human gene transcripts. Only 11% or less of C. elegans proteome contains nematode-specific genes. We found that the remaining 7,390 sequences might lead to discoveries of novel human genes, and over 150 putative full-length human gene transcripts were assembled upon further database analyses. [The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession nos. AF132936–AF132973, AF151799–AF151909, and AF152097.] PMID:10810093

  10. Identification of Predictive Gene Markers for Multipotent Stromal Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Bellayr, Ian H; Marklein, Ross A; Lo Surdo, Jessica L; Bauer, Steven R; Puri, Raj K

    2016-06-01

    Multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) are known for their distinctive ability to differentiate into different cell lineages, such as adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteocytes. They can be isolated from numerous tissue sources, including bone marrow, adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and others. Because of their differentiation potential and secretion of growth factors, MSCs are believed to have an inherent quality of regeneration and immune suppression. Cellular expansion is necessary to obtain sufficient numbers for use; however, MSCs exhibit a reduced capacity for proliferation and differentiation after several rounds of passaging. In this study, gene markers of MSC proliferation were identified and evaluated for their ability to predict proliferative quality. Microarray data of human bone marrow-derived MSCs were correlated with two proliferation assays. A collection of 24 genes were observed to significantly correlate with both proliferation assays (|r| >0.70) for eight MSC lines at multiple passages. These 24 identified genes were then confirmed using an additional set of MSCs from eight new donors using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The proliferative potential of the second set of MSCs was measured for each donor/passage for confluency fraction, fraction of EdU+ cells, and population doubling time. The second set of MSCs exhibited a greater proliferative potential at passage 4 in comparison to passage 8, which was distinguishable by 15 genes; however, only seven of the genes (BIRC5, CCNA2, CDC20, CDK1, PBK, PLK1, and SPC25) demonstrated significant correlation with MSC proliferation regardless of passage. Our analyses revealed that correlation between gene expression and proliferation was consistently reduced with the inclusion of non-MSC cell lines; therefore, this set of seven genes may be more strongly associated with MSC proliferative quality. Our results pave the way to determine the quality of an MSC population for a

  11. The IL-9 receptor gene (IL9R): Genomic structure, chromosomal localization in the pseudoautosomal region of the long arm of sex chromosomes, and identification of IL9R pseudogenes at 9qter, 10pter, 16pter, 18pter

    SciTech Connect

    Kermouni, A.; Godelaine, D.; Lurquin, C.; Szikora, J.P.

    1995-09-20

    Cosmids containing the human IL-9 receptor (R) gene (IL9R) have been isolated from a genomic library using the IL9R cDNA as a probe. We have shown that the human IL9R gene is composed of 11 exons and 10 introns, stretching over {approx} 17 kb, and is located within the pseudoautosomal region of the Xq and Yq chromosome, in the vicinity of the telomere. Analysis of the 5` flanking region revealed multiple transcription initiation sites as well as potential binding motifs for AP1, AP2, AP3, Sp1, and NF-kB, although this region lacks a TATA box. Using the human IL9R cosmid as a probe to perform fluorescence in situ hybridization, additional signals were identified in the subtelomeric regions of chromosomes 9q, 10p, 16p, and 18p. IL9R homologs located on chromosomes 9 and 18 were partially characterized, while those located on chromosomes 16 and 10 were completely sequenced. Although they are similiar to the IL9R gene ({approx} 90% identity), none of these copies encodes a functional receptor: none of them contains sequences homologous to the 5` flanking region or exon 1 of the IL9R gene, and the remaining ORFs have been inactivated by various point mutations and deletions. Taken together, our results indicate that the IL9R gene is located at Xq28 and Yq12, in the long arm pseudoautosomal region, and that four IL9R pseudogenes are located on 9q34, 10p15, 16p13.3 and 18p11.3, probably dispersed as the result of translocations during evolution. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Plant enolase: gene structure, expression, and evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Straeten, D; Rodrigues-Pousada, R A; Goodman, H M; Van Montagu, M

    1991-01-01

    Enolase genes were cloned from tomato and Arabidopsis. Comparison of their primary structures with other enolases revealed a remarkable degree of conservation, except for the presence of an insertion of 5 amino acids unique to plant enolases. Expression of the enolase genes was studied under various conditions. Under normal growth conditions, steady-state messenger and enzyme activity levels were significantly higher in roots than in green tissue. Large inductions of mRNA, accompanied by a moderate increase in enzyme activity, were obtained by an artificial ripening treatment in tomato fruits. However, there was little effect of anaerobiosis on the abundance of enolase messenger. In heat shock conditions, no induction of enolase mRNA was observed. We also present evidence that, at least in Arabidopsis, the hypothesis that there exists a complete set of glycolytic enzymes in the chloroplast is not valid, and we propose instead the occurrence of a substrate shuttle in Arabidopsis chloroplasts for termination of the glycolytic cycle. PMID:1841726

  13. Human retinoblastoma susceptibility gene: cloning, identification, and sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.; Bookstein, R.; Hong, F.; Young, L.; Shew, J.; Lee, E.Y.P.

    1987-03-13

    Recent evidence indicates the existence of a genetic locus in chromosome region 13q14 that confers susceptibility to retinoblastoma, a cancer of the eye in children. A gene encoding a messenger RNA of 4.6 kilobases (kb), located in the proximity of esterase D, was identified as the retinoblastoma susceptibility (RB) gene on the basis of chromosomal location, homozygous deletion, and tumor-specific alterations in expression. Transcription of this gene was abnormal in six of six retinoblastomas examined: in two tumors, RB mRNA was not detectable, while four others expressed variable quantities of RB mRNA with decreased molecular size of about 4.0 kb. In contrast, full-length RB mRNA was present in human fetal retina and placenta, and in other tumors such as neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma. DNA from retinoblastoma cells had a homozygous gene deletion in one case and hemizygous deletion in another case, while the remainder were not grossly different from normal human control DNA. The gene contains at least 12 exons distributed in a region of over 100 kb. Sequence analysis of complementary DNA clones yielded a single long open reading frame that could encode a hypothetical protein of 816 amino acids.

  14. Identification of somatic gene mutations in penile squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ferrándiz-Pulido, Carla; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Masferrer, Emili; Vivancos, Ana; Somoza, Rosa; Marés, Roso; Valverde, Claudia; Salvador, Carlos; Placer, Jose; Morote, Juan; Pujol, Ramon M; Ramon y Cajal, Santiago; de Torres, Ines; Toll, Agusti; García-Patos, Vicente

    2015-10-01

    There is a lack of studies on somatic gene mutations and cell signaling driving penile carcinogenesis. Our objective was to analyze somatic mutations in genes downstream of EGFR in penile squamous cell carcinomas, especially the mTOR and RAS/MAPK pathways. We retrospectively analyzed somatic mutations in 10 in situ and 65 invasive penile squamous cell carcinomas by using Sequenom's Mass Spectrometry iPlex Technology and Oncocarta v1.0 Panel. The DNA was extracted from FFPE blocks and we identified somatic missense mutations in three in situ tumors and in 19 invasive tumors, mostly in PIK3CA, KRAS, HRAS, NRAS, and PDGFA genes. Somatic mutations in the PIK3CA gene or RAS family genes were neither associated with tumor grade, stage or outcome, and were equally often identified in hrHPV positive and in hrHPV negative tumors that showed no p53 expression. Mutations in PIK3CA, KRAS, and HRAS are frequent in penile squamous cell carcinoma and likely play a role in the development of p53-negative tumors. Although the presence of these mutations does not seem to correlate with tumoral behavior or outcome, they could be biomarkers of treatment failure with anti-EGFR mAb in patients with penile squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26216163

  15. Essential gene identification and drug target prioritization in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenqi; Sillaots, Susan; Lemieux, Sebastien; Davison, John; Kauffman, Sarah; Breton, Anouk; Linteau, Annie; Xin, Chunlin; Bowman, Joel; Becker, Jeff; Jiang, Bo; Roemer, Terry

    2007-03-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent airborne filamentous fungal pathogen in humans, causing severe and often fatal invasive infections in immunocompromised patients. Currently available antifungal drugs to treat invasive aspergillosis have limited modes of action, and few are safe and effective. To identify and prioritize antifungal drug targets, we have developed a conditional promoter replacement (CPR) strategy using the nitrogen-regulated A. fumigatus NiiA promoter (pNiiA). The gene essentiality for 35 A. fumigatus genes was directly demonstrated by this pNiiA-CPR strategy from a set of 54 genes representing broad biological functions whose orthologs are confirmed to be essential for growth in Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Extending this approach, we show that the ERG11 gene family (ERG11A and ERG11B) is essential in A. fumigatus despite neither member being essential individually. In addition, we demonstrate the pNiiA-CPR strategy is suitable for in vivo phenotypic analyses, as a number of conditional mutants, including an ERG11 double mutant (erg11BDelta, pNiiA-ERG11A), failed to establish a terminal infection in an immunocompromised mouse model of systemic aspergillosis. Collectively, the pNiiA-CPR strategy enables a rapid and reliable means to directly identify, phenotypically characterize, and facilitate target-based whole cell assays to screen A. fumigatus essential genes for cognate antifungal inhibitors. PMID:17352532

  16. Utility of rpoB Gene Sequencing for Identification of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    de Zwaan, Rina; van Ingen, Jakko

    2014-01-01

    In the Netherlands, clinical isolation of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has increased over the past decade. Proper identification of isolates is important, as NTM species differ strongly in clinical relevance. Most of the currently applied identification methods cannot distinguish between all different Mycobacterium species and complexes within species. rpoB gene sequencing exhibits a promising level of discrimination among rapidly and slowly growing mycobacteria, including the Mycobacterium avium complex. In this study, we prospectively compared rpoB gene sequencing with our routine algorithm of reverse line blot identification combined with partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing of 455 NTM isolates. rpoB gene sequencing identified 403 isolates to species level as 45 different known species and identified 44 isolates to complex level, and eight isolates remained unidentifiable to species level. In contrast, our reference reverse line blot assay with adjunctive 16S rRNA gene sequencing identified 390 isolates to species level (30 distinct species) and identified 56 isolates to complex level, and nine isolates remained unidentified. The higher discriminatory power of rpoB gene sequencing results largely from the distinction of separate species within complexes and subspecies. Also, Mycobacterium gordonae, Mycobacterium kansasii, and Mycobacterium interjectum were separated into multiple groupings with relatively low sequence similarity (98 to 94%), suggesting that these are complexes of closely related species. We conclude that rpoB gene sequencing is a more discriminative identification technique than the combination of reverse line blot and 16S rRNA gene sequencing and could introduce a major improvement in clinical care of NTM disease and the research on the epidemiology and clinical relevance of NTM. PMID:24808238

  17. Gene identification and classification in the Synechocystis genomic sequence by recursive gene mark analysis.

    PubMed

    Hirosawa, M; Isono, K; Hayes, W; Borodovsky, M

    1997-01-01

    The GeneMark method has proven to be an efficient gene-finding tool for the analysis of prokaryotic genomic sequence data. We have developed a procedure of deriving and utilizing several GeneMark models in order to get better gene-detection performance. Upon applying this procedure to the 1.0 Mb contiguous DNA sequence of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803, we were able to cluster predicted genes into distinct classes and to produce the class-specific GeneMark models reflecting statistical characteristics of each gene class. One gene class apparently includes genes of exogenous origin. Using class-specific models reduces the gene under prediction error rate down to 1.7% in comparison with 8.1% reported in the previous study when only one GeneMark model was used. PMID:9522117

  18. Systematic identification of signal-activated stochastic gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Neuert, Gregor; Munsky, Brian; Tan, Rui Zhen; Teytelman, Leonid; Khammash, Mustafa; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2013-02-01

    Although much has been done to elucidate the biochemistry of signal transduction and gene regulatory pathways, it remains difficult to understand or predict quantitative responses. We integrate single-cell experiments with stochastic analyses, to identify predictive models of transcriptional dynamics for the osmotic stress response pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We generate models with varying complexity and use parameter estimation and cross-validation analyses to select the most predictive model. This model yields insight into several dynamical features, including multistep regulation and switchlike activation for several osmosensitive genes. Furthermore, the model correctly predicts the transcriptional dynamics of cells in response to different environmental and genetic perturbations. Because our approach is general, it should facilitate a predictive understanding for signal-activated transcription of other genes in other pathways or organisms. PMID:23372015

  19. Identification of Genes Associated with Chlorophyll Accumulation in Flower Petals

    PubMed Central

    Ohmiya, Akemi; Hirashima, Masumi; Yagi, Masafumi; Tanase, Koji; Yamamizo, Chihiro

    2014-01-01

    Plants have an ability to prevent chlorophyll accumulation, which would mask the bright flower color, in their petals. In contrast, leaves contain substantial amounts of chlorophyll, as it is essential for photosynthesis. The mechanisms of organ-specific chlorophyll accumulation are unknown. To identify factors that determine the chlorophyll content in petals, we compared the expression of genes related to chlorophyll metabolism in different stages of non-green (red and white) petals (very low chlorophyll content), pale-green petals (low chlorophyll content), and leaves (high chlorophyll content) of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.). The expression of many genes encoding chlorophyll biosynthesis enzymes, in particular Mg-chelatase, was lower in non-green petals than in leaves. Non-green petals also showed higher expression of genes involved in chlorophyll degradation, including STAY-GREEN gene and pheophytinase. These data suggest that the absence of chlorophylls in carnation petals may be caused by the low rate of chlorophyll biosynthesis and high rate of degradation. Similar results were obtained by the analysis of Arabidopsis microarray data. In carnation, most genes related to chlorophyll biosynthesis were expressed at similar levels in pale-green petals and leaves, whereas the expression of chlorophyll catabolic genes was higher in pale-green petals than in leaves. Therefore, we hypothesize that the difference in chlorophyll content between non-green and pale-green petals is due to different levels of chlorophyll biosynthesis. Our study provides a basis for future molecular and genetic studies on organ-specific chlorophyll accumulation. PMID:25470367

  20. Identification of genes associated with chlorophyll accumulation in flower petals.

    PubMed

    Ohmiya, Akemi; Hirashima, Masumi; Yagi, Masafumi; Tanase, Koji; Yamamizo, Chihiro

    2014-01-01

    Plants have an ability to prevent chlorophyll accumulation, which would mask the bright flower color, in their petals. In contrast, leaves contain substantial amounts of chlorophyll, as it is essential for photosynthesis. The mechanisms of organ-specific chlorophyll accumulation are unknown. To identify factors that determine the chlorophyll content in petals, we compared the expression of genes related to chlorophyll metabolism in different stages of non-green (red and white) petals (very low chlorophyll content), pale-green petals (low chlorophyll content), and leaves (high chlorophyll content) of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.). The expression of many genes encoding chlorophyll biosynthesis enzymes, in particular Mg-chelatase, was lower in non-green petals than in leaves. Non-green petals also showed higher expression of genes involved in chlorophyll degradation, including STAY-GREEN gene and pheophytinase. These data suggest that the absence of chlorophylls in carnation petals may be caused by the low rate of chlorophyll biosynthesis and high rate of degradation. Similar results were obtained by the analysis of Arabidopsis microarray data. In carnation, most genes related to chlorophyll biosynthesis were expressed at similar levels in pale-green petals and leaves, whereas the expression of chlorophyll catabolic genes was higher in pale-green petals than in leaves. Therefore, we hypothesize that the difference in chlorophyll content between non-green and pale-green petals is due to different levels of chlorophyll biosynthesis. Our study provides a basis for future molecular and genetic studies on organ-specific chlorophyll accumulation. PMID:25470367

  1. Identification of Mechanosensitive Genes during Embryonic Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Nowlan, Niamh C.; Prendergast, Patrick J.; Murphy, Paula

    2008-01-01

    Although it is known that mechanical forces are needed for normal bone development, the current understanding of how biophysical stimuli are interpreted by and integrated with genetic regulatory mechanisms is limited. Mechanical forces are thought to be mediated in cells by “mechanosensitive” genes, but it is a challenge to demonstrate that the genetic regulation of the biological system is dependant on particular mechanical forces in vivo. We propose a new means of selecting candidate mechanosensitive genes by comparing in vivo gene expression patterns with patterns of biophysical stimuli, computed using finite element analysis. In this study, finite element analyses of the avian embryonic limb were performed using anatomically realistic rudiment and muscle morphologies, and patterns of biophysical stimuli were compared with the expression patterns of four candidate mechanosensitive genes integral to bone development. The expression patterns of two genes, Collagen X (ColX) and Indian hedgehog (Ihh), were shown to colocalise with biophysical stimuli induced by embryonic muscle contractions, identifying them as potentially being involved in the mechanoregulation of bone formation. An altered mechanical environment was induced in the embryonic chick, where a neuromuscular blocking agent was administered in ovo to modify skeletal muscle contractions. Finite element analyses predicted dramatic changes in levels and patterns of biophysical stimuli, and a number of immobilised specimens exhibited differences in ColX and Ihh expression. The results obtained indicate that computationally derived patterns of biophysical stimuli can be used to inform a directed search for genes that may play a mechanoregulatory role in particular in vivo events or processes. Furthermore, the experimental data demonstrate that ColX and Ihh are involved in mechanoregulatory pathways and may be key mediators in translating information from the mechanical environment to the molecular

  2. EMDomics: a robust and powerful method for the identification of genes differentially expressed between heterogeneous classes

    PubMed Central

    Nabavi, Sheida; Schmolze, Daniel; Maitituoheti, Mayinuer; Malladi, Sadhika; Beck, Andrew H.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: A major goal of biomedical research is to identify molecular features associated with a biological or clinical class of interest. Differential expression analysis has long been used for this purpose; however, conventional methods perform poorly when applied to data with high within class heterogeneity. Results: To address this challenge, we developed EMDomics, a new method that uses the Earth mover’s distance to measure the overall difference between the distributions of a gene’s expression in two classes of samples and uses permutations to obtain q-values for each gene. We applied EMDomics to the challenging problem of identifying genes associated with drug resistance in ovarian cancer. We also used simulated data to evaluate the performance of EMDomics, in terms of sensitivity and specificity for identifying differentially expressed gene in classes with high within class heterogeneity. In both the simulated and real biological data, EMDomics outperformed competing approaches for the identification of differentially expressed genes, and EMDomics was significantly more powerful than conventional methods for the identification of drug resistance-associated gene sets. EMDomics represents a new approach for the identification of genes differentially expressed between heterogeneous classes and has utility in a wide range of complex biomedical conditions in which sample classes show within class heterogeneity. Availability and implementation: The R package is available at http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/EMDomics.html Contact: abeck2@bidmc.harvard.edu Supplementary information: supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26515818

  3. Identification of metastasis-associated genes in colorectal cancer through an integrated genomic and transcriptomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Sihua

    2013-01-01

    Objective Identification of colorectal cancer (CRC) metastasis genes is one of the most important issues in CRC research. For the purpose of mining CRC metastasis-associated genes, an integrated analysis of microarray data was presented, by combined with evidence acquired from comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) data. Methods Gene expression profile data of CRC samples were obtained at Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) website. The 15 important chromosomal aberration sites detected by using CGH technology were used for integrated genomic and transcriptomic analysis. Significant Analysis of Microarray (SAM) was used to detect significantly differentially expressed genes across the whole genome. The overlapping genes were selected in their corresponding chromosomal aberration regions, and analyzed by using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID). Finally, SVM-T-RFE gene selection algorithm was applied to identify metastasis-associated genes in CRC. Results A minimum gene set was obtained with the minimum number [14] of genes, and the highest classification accuracy (100%) in both PRI and META datasets. A fraction of selected genes are associated with CRC or its metastasis. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that integration analysis is an effective strategy for mining cancer-associated genes. PMID:24385689

  4. The Phytocyanin Gene Family in Rice (Oryza sativa L.): Genome-Wide Identification, Classification and Transcriptional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Haoli; Zhao, Heming; Liu, Zhi; Zhao, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Background Phytocyanins (PCs) are plant-specific blue copper proteins involved in electron transport, and a large number of known PCs are considered to be chimeric arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs). To date there has not been a genome-wide overview of the OsPC gene family. Therefore, as the first step and a useful strategy to elucidate the functions of OsPCs, there is an urgent need for a thorough genome-wide analysis of this gene family. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, a total of 62 OsPC genes were identified through a comprehensive bioinformatics analysis of the rice (Oryza sativa L.) genome. Based on phylogeny and motif constitution, the family of OsPCs was classified into three subclasses: uclacyanin-like proteins (OsUCLs), stellacyanin-like proteins (OsSCLs) and early nodulin-like proteins (OsENODLs). Structure and glycosylation prediction indicated that 46 OsPCs were glycosylphosphatigylinositol-anchored proteins and 38 OsPCs were chimeric AGPs. Gene duplication analysis revealed that chromosomal segment and tandem duplications contributed almost equally to the expansion of this gene family, and duplication events were mostly happened in the OsUCL subfamily. The expression profiles of OsPC genes were analyzed at different stages of vegetative and reproductive development and under abiotic stresses. It revealed that a large number of OsPC genes were abundantly expressed in the various stages of development. Moreover, 17 genes were regulated under the treatments of abiotic stresses. Conclusions/Significance The genome-wide identification and expression analysis of OsPC genes should facilitate research in this gene family and give new insights toward elucidating their functions in higher plants. PMID:21984902

  5. Frequency Response Function Based Damage Identification for Aerospace Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Joseph Acton

    Structural health monitoring technologies continue to be pursued for aerospace structures in the interests of increased safety and, when combined with health prognosis, efficiency in life-cycle management. The current dissertation develops and validates damage identification technology as a critical component for structural health monitoring of aerospace structures and, in particular, composite unmanned aerial vehicles. The primary innovation is a statistical least-squares damage identification algorithm based in concepts of parameter estimation and model update. The algorithm uses frequency response function based residual force vectors derived from distributed vibration measurements to update a structural finite element model through statistically weighted least-squares minimization producing location and quantification of the damage, estimation uncertainty, and an updated model. Advantages compared to other approaches include robust applicability to systems which are heavily damped, large, and noisy, with a relatively low number of distributed measurement points compared to the number of analytical degrees-of-freedom of an associated analytical structural model (e.g., modal finite element model). Motivation, research objectives, and a dissertation summary are discussed in Chapter 1 followed by a literature review in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 gives background theory and the damage identification algorithm derivation followed by a study of fundamental algorithm behavior on a two degree-of-freedom mass-spring system with generalized damping. Chapter 4 investigates the impact of noise then successfully proves the algorithm against competing methods using an analytical eight degree-of-freedom mass-spring system with non-proportional structural damping. Chapter 5 extends use of the algorithm to finite element models, including solutions for numerical issues, approaches for modeling damping approximately in reduced coordinates, and analytical validation using a composite

  6. Identification and mapping of paralogous genes on a known genomic DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Bina, Minou

    2006-01-01

    The completion of whole genome sequencing projects offers the opportunity to examine the organization of genes and the discovery of evolutionarily related genes in a given species. For the beginners in the field, through a specific example, this chapter provides a step-by-step procedure for identifying paralogous genes, using the genome browser at UCSC (http://genome.ucsc.edu/). The example describes identification and mapping in the human genome, the paralogs of TCF12/HTF4. The example identifies TCF3 and TCF4 as paralogs of the TCF12/HTF4 gene. The example also identifies a related sequence, corresponding to a pseudogene, in one of the introns of the JAK2 gene. The procedure described should be applicable to the discovery and creation of maps of paralogous genes in the genomic DNA sequences that are available at the genome browser at UCSC. PMID:16888348

  7. Identification and structural elucidation of ozonation transformation products of estrone

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quantitative methods for the analysis of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) are abundant in the scientific literature. However, there are few reports on systematic methods of identification and structural identification of transformation products. For this reason, a new method based on high-resolution mass spectrometry and differential analysis was developed in order to facilitate and accelerate the process of identification and structural elucidation of transformation products CECs. This method was applied to the study of ozonation transformation products (OTPs) of the natural hormone estrone (E1). Results A control compare trend experiment consisting in the comparison of a control sample to several samples having been exposed to decreasing concentrations of O3(aq) indicated that 593 peaks could be associated with OTPs. After applying various filters to remove background noise, sample contaminants and signal spikes, this data set was reduced to 16 candidate peaks. By inspection of the shape of these peaks, only two compounds OTP-276 (m/z 275.12930) and OTP-318 (m/z 317.14008) were considered as good candidates for further study. Multi-stage tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) experiments of SPE extracts of the ozonated samples of E1 and of a deuterium-labeled analogue (E1-d4) showed that OTP-276 and OTP-318 had carboxylic acid and hydroxyl functional groups, as previously reported for OTPs of other hormones. Structures for these two compounds were proposed based on their MSn spectra. Conclusion These results indicate that the method proposed is a systematic and rapid approach to study transformation products of CECs. PMID:23618537

  8. Identification of genetic elements associated with EPSPS gene amplification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed populations can have high genetic plasticity and rapid responses to environmental selection pressures. For example, 100-fold amplification of the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene evolved to confer resistance to glyphosate, the world's most important herbicide, in the wee...

  9. IDENTIFICATION OF EPILEPSY GENES IN HUMAN AND MOUSE*

    PubMed Central

    Meisler, Miriam H.; Kearney, Jennifer; Ottman, Ruth; Escayg, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The development of molecular markers and genomic resources has facilitated the isolation of genes responsible for rare monogenic epilepsies in human and mouse. Many of the identified genes encode ion channels or other components of neuronal signaling. The electrophysiological properties of mutant alleles indicate that neuronal hyperexcitability is one cellular mechanism underlying seizures. Genetic heterogeneity and allelic variability are hallmarks of human epilepsy. For example, mutations in three different sodium channel genes can produce the same syndrome, GEFS+, while individuals with the same allele can experience different types of seizures. Haploinsufficiency for the sodium channel SCN1A has been demonstrated by the severe infantile epilepsy and cognitive deficits in heterozygotes for de novo null mutations. Large-scale patient screening is in progress to determine whether less severe alleles of the genes responsible for monogenic epilepsy may contribute to the common types of epilepsy in the human population. The development of pharmaceuticals directed towards specific epilepsy genotypes can be anticipated, and the introduction of patient mutations into the mouse genome will provide models for testing these targeted therapies. PMID:11700294

  10. Identification of a gene regulatory network associated with prion replication

    PubMed Central

    Marbiah, Masue M; Harvey, Anna; West, Billy T; Louzolo, Anais; Banerjee, Priya; Alden, Jack; Grigoriadis, Anita; Hummerich, Holger; Kan, Ho-Man; Cai, Ying; Bloom, George S; Jat, Parmjit; Collinge, John; Klöhn, Peter-Christian

    2014-01-01

    Prions consist of aggregates of abnormal conformers of the cellular prion protein (PrPC). They propagate by recruiting host-encoded PrPC although the critical interacting proteins and the reasons for the differences in susceptibility of distinct cell lines and populations are unknown. We derived a lineage of cell lines with markedly differing susceptibilities, unexplained by PrPC expression differences, to identify such factors. Transcriptome analysis of prion-resistant revertants, isolated from highly susceptible cells, revealed a gene expression signature associated with susceptibility and modulated by differentiation. Several of these genes encode proteins with a role in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling, a compartment in which disease-related PrP is deposited. Silencing nine of these genes significantly increased susceptibility. Silencing of Papss2 led to undersulphated heparan sulphate and increased PrPC deposition at the ECM, concomitantly with increased prion propagation. Moreover, inhibition of fibronectin 1 binding to integrin α8 by RGD peptide inhibited metalloproteinases (MMP)-2/9 whilst increasing prion propagation. In summary, we have identified a gene regulatory network associated with prion propagation at the ECM and governed by the cellular differentiation state. PMID:24843046