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Sample records for general toroidal geometry

  1. Theory of Alfven wave heating in general toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tataronis, J.A.; Salat, A.

    1981-09-01

    A general treatment of Alfven wave heating based on the linearized equations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is given. The conclusion of this study is that the geometry of the plasma equilium could play an important role on the effectiveness of this heating mechanism, and for certain geometries the fundamental equations may not possess solutions which satisfy prescribed boundary conditions.

  2. On the Ideal Boundary Condition in a General Toroidal Geometry for a Mixed Magnetic Field Representation

    SciTech Connect

    X. Z. Tang

    2000-12-18

    Subtleties of implementing the standard perfectly conducting wall boundary condition in a general toroidal geometry are clarified for a mixed scalar magnetic field representation. An iterative scheme based on Ohm's law is given.

  3. Particle simulations in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Aydemir, A.Y.

    1992-09-01

    A computational tool to be used in kinetic simulations of toroidal plasmas is being developed. The initial goal of the project is to develop an electrostatic gyrokinetic model for studying transport and stability problems in tokamaks. In this brief report, preliminary results from the early stages of this effort are presented.

  4. Reversed Field Pinch Dynamics in Toroidal and Cylindrical Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Jorge A.; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David C.

    2014-10-01

    The effect of the curvature of the imposed magnetic field on Reversed Field Pinch dynamics is investigated by comparing the flow of a magnetofluid in a torus with aspect ratio 1.83, with the flow in a periodic cylinder. It is found that an axisymmetric toroidal mode is always present in the toroidal, but absent in the cylindrical configuration. In particular, in contrast to the cylinder, the toroidal case presents a double poloidal recirculation cell with a shear localized at the plasma edge. Quasi-single-helicity states are found to be more persistent in toroidal than in periodic cylinder geometry. This work was supported by the contract SiCoMHD (ANR-Blanc 2011-045), computing time was supplied by IDRIS, project 22206.

  5. Nonlinear particle simulation of ion cyclotron waves in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kuley, A. Lin, Z.; Bao, J.; Wei, X. S.; Xiao, Y.

    2015-12-10

    Global particle simulation model has been developed in this work to provide a first-principles tool for studying the nonlinear interactions of radio frequency (RF) waves with plasmas in tokamak. In this model, ions are considered as fully kinetic particles using the Vlasov equation and electrons are treated as guiding centers using the drift kinetic equation with realistic electron-to-ion mass ratio. Boris push scheme for the ion motion has been developed in the toroidal geometry using magnetic coordinates and successfully verified for the ion cyclotron and ion Bernstein waves in global gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC). The nonlinear simulation capability is applied to study the parametric decay instability of a pump wave into an ion Bernstein wave side band and a low frequency ion cyclotron quasi mode.

  6. General Linear Rf-Current Drive Calculation in Toroidal Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. P.; Harvey, R. W.; Prater, R.

    2009-04-01

    A new general linear calculation of RF current drive has been implemented in the GENRAY all-frequencies RF ray tracing code. This is referred to as the ADJ-QL package, and is based on the Karney, et al. [1] relativistic Green function calculator, ADJ, generalized to non-circular plasmas in toroidal geometry, and coupled with full, bounce-averaged momentum-space RF quasilinear flux [2] expressions calculated at each point along the RF ray trajectories. This approach includes momentum conservation, polarization effects and the influence of trapped electrons. It is assumed that the electron distribution function remains close to a relativistic Maxwellian function. Within the bounds of these assumptions, small banana width, toroidal geometry and low collisionality, the calculation is applicable for all-frequencies RF electron current drive including electron cyclotron, lower hybrid, fast waves and electron Bernstein waves. GENRAY ADJ-QL calculations of the relativistic momentum-conserving current drive have been applied in several cases: benchmarking of electron cyclotron current drive in ITER against other code results; and electron Bernstein and high harmonic fast wave current drive in NSTX. The impacts of momentum conservation on the current drive are also shown for these cases.

  7. Neoclassical viscosity effects on resistive magnetohydrodynamic modes in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.G.; Oh, Y.H.; Choi, D.I. ); Kim, J.Y.; Horton, W. )

    1992-03-01

    The flux-surface-averaged linearized resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary-layer equations including the compressibility, diamagnetic drift, and neoclassical viscosity terms are derived in toroidal geometry. These equations describe the resistive layer dynamics of resistive MHD modes over the collisionality regime between the banana plateau and the Pfirsch--Schlueter. From the resulting equations, the effects of neoclassical viscosity on the stability of the tearing and resistive ballooning modes are investigated numerically. Also, a study is given for the problem of how the neoclassical resistive MHD mode is generated as the collisionality is reduced. It is shown that the neoclassical viscosity terms give a significant destabilizing effect for the tearing and resistive ballooning modes. This destabilization comes mainly from the reduction of the stabilizing effect of the parallel ion sound compression by the ion neoclassical viscosity. In the banana-plateau collisionality limit, where the compressibility is negligible, the dispersion relations of the tearing and resistive ballooning modes reduce to the same form, with the threshold value of the driving force given by {Delta}{sub {ital c}}=0. On the other hand, with the finite neoclassical effect it is found that the neoclassical resistive MHD instability is generated in agreement with previous results. Furthermore, it is shown that this later instability can be generated in a wide range of the collisionality including near the Pfirsch--Schlueter regime as well as the banana-plateau regime, suggesting that this mode is a probable cause of anomalous transport.

  8. Ballooning mode spectrum in general toroidal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dewar, R.L.; Glasser, A.H.

    1982-04-01

    A WKB formalism for constructing normal modes of short-wavelength ideal hydromagnetic, pressure-driven instabilities (ballooning modes) in general toroidal magnetic containment devices with sheared magnetic fields is developed. No incompressibility approximation is made. A dispersion relation is obtained from the eigenvalues of a fourth order system of ordinary differential equations to be solved by integrating along a line of force. Higher order calculations are performed to find the amplitude equation and the phase change at a caustic. These conform to typical WKB results. In axisymmetric systems, the ray equations are integrable, and semiclassical quantization leads to a growth rate spectrum consisting of an infinity of discrete eigenvalues, bounded above by an accumulation point. However, each eigenvalue is infinitely degenerate. In the nonaxisymmetric case, the rays are unbounded in a four dimensional phase space, and semiclassical quantization breaks down, leading to broadening of the discrete eigenvalues and accumulation point of the axisymmetric case into continuum bands. Analysis of a model problem indicates that the broadening of the discrete eigenvalues is numerically very small, the dominant effect being broadening of the accumulation point.

  9. General 2 charge geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Marika

    2006-03-01

    Two charge BPS horizon free supergravity geometries are important in proposals for understanding black hole microstates. In this paper we construct a new class of geometries in the NS1-P system, corresponding to solitonic strings carrying fermionic as well as bosonic condensates. Such geometries are required to account for the full microscopic entropy of the NS1-P system. We then briefly discuss the properties of the corresponding geometries in the dual D1-D5 system.

  10. The universal instability in general geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Helander, P.; Plunk, G. G.

    2015-09-15

    The “universal” instability has recently been revived by Landreman et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 095003 (2015)], who showed that it indeed exists in plasma geometries with straight (but sheared) magnetic field lines. Here, it is demonstrated analytically that this instability can be presented in more general sheared and toroidal geometries. In a torus, the universal instability is shown to be closely related to the trapped-electron mode, although the trapped-electron drive is usually dominant. However, this drive can be weakened or eliminated, as in the case in stellarators with the maximum-J property, leaving the parallel Landau resonance to drive a residual mode, which is identified as the universal instability.

  11. Axisymmetric toroidal modes of general relativistic magnetized neutron star models

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, Hidetaka; Lee, Umin E-mail: lee@astr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2014-07-20

    We calculate axisymmetric toroidal modes of magnetized neutron stars with a solid crust in the general relativistic Cowling approximation. We assume that the interior of the star is threaded by a poloidal magnetic field, which is continuous at the surface with an outside dipole field. We examine the cases of the field strength B{sub S} ∼ 10{sup 16} G at the surface. Since separation of variables is not possible for the oscillations of magnetized stars, we employ finite series expansions for the perturbations using spherical harmonic functions. We find discrete normal toroidal modes of odd parity, but no toroidal modes of even parity are found. The frequencies of the toroidal modes form distinct mode sequences and the frequency in a given mode sequence gradually decreases as the number of radial nodes of the eigenfunction increases. From the frequency spectra computed for neutron stars of different masses, we find that the frequency is almost exactly proportional to B{sub S} and is well represented by a linear function of R/M for a given B{sub S}, where M and R are the mass and radius of the star. The toroidal mode frequencies for B{sub S} ∼ 10{sup 15} G are in the frequency range of the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) detected in the soft-gamma-ray repeaters, but we find that the toroidal normal modes cannot explain all the detected QPO frequencies.

  12. General Relativity: Geometry Meets Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Dietrick E.

    1975-01-01

    Observing the relationship of general relativity and the geometry of space-time, the author questions whether the rest of physics has geometrical explanations. As a partial answer he discusses current research on subatomic particles employing geometric transformations, and cites the existence of geometrical definitions of physical quantities such…

  13. Geometry of generalized depolarizing channels

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, Christian K.

    2009-10-15

    A generalized depolarizing channel acts on an N-dimensional quantum system to compress the 'Bloch ball' in N{sup 2}-1 directions; it has a corresponding compression vector. We investigate the geometry of these compression vectors and prove a conjecture of Dixit and Sudarshan [Phys. Rev. A 78, 032308 (2008)], namely, that when N=2{sup d} (i.e., the system consists of d qubits), and we work in the Pauli basis then the set of all compression vectors forms a simplex. We extend this result by investigating the geometry in other bases; in particular we find precisely when the set of all compression vectors forms a simplex.

  14. Modeling of Feedback Stabilization of External MHD Modes in Toroidal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. S.; Chance, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.

    2000-10-01

    The intelligent shell feedback scheme(C.M. Bishop, Plasma Phys. Contr. Nucl. Fusion 31), 1179 (1989). seeks to utilize external coils to suppress the unstable MHD modes slowed down by the resistive shell. We present a new formulation and numerical results of the interaction between the plasma and its outside vacuum region, with complete plasma response and the inclusion of a resistive vessel in general toroidal geometry. This is achieved by using the Green's function technique, which is a generalization of that previously used for the VACUUM(M.S. Chance, Phys. Plasmas 4), 2161 (1997). code and coupled with the ideal MHD code GATO. The effectiveness of different realizations of the intelligent shell concept is gauged by their ability to minimize the available free energy to drive the MHD mode. Computations indicate poloidal coverage of 30% of the total resistive wall surface area and 6 or 7 segments of ``intelligent coil'' arrays superimposed on the resistive wall will allow recovery of up to 90% the effectiveness of the ideal shell in stabilizing the ideal external kink.

  15. MHD Stability Trends from Perturbed Equilibria: Possible Limitations with Toroidal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, K. J.; Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Turnbull, A. D.; Cowley, S.

    2003-10-01

    The effects of equilibrium changes on ideal MHD properties are usually studied using numerical parameter scans. Previously, we introduced a new technique to explore these dependencies: changes in the potential energy δ W due to equilibrium changes are found with an expansion of the energy principle, rather than an eigenvalue-solver code. Validation of the approach in toroidal geometry attempted to use GATO (an ideal MHD stability code) and DIII-D shot 87009. The approach should succeed with the global modes of 87009; however, ˜ 0.1% changes to qo predicted δ W rapidly increasing. Perturbing β of other toroidal equilibria resulted in similar behavior. We first review results for a cylindrical equilibrium and for 87009. Between the cylindrical case and 87009 lie several other equilibria, which should produce intermediate results. We examine several of these intermediate equilibria, starting with the cylindrical case and changing aspect ratio, shape and profiles until ending at 87009.

  16. Role of geometry in optothermal response of toroidal ultra-high-Q cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, Soheil; Armani, Andrea M.

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-high quality factor (UHQ) resonant cavities are able to store light for long periods of time, resulting in high circulating intensities. As a result, numerous nonlinear optical phenomena appear, such as radiation pressure oscillations and lasing. However, deleterious behaviors also occur, such as optothermal broadening of the resonant linewidth. The degree of distortion is directly related to the circulating power in the cavity, the material absorption, and the thermo-optic coefficient of the cavity material. Specifically, a portion of the circulating power is absorbed by the material and converted to heat. This thermal energy is able to induce a refractive index change in the cavity which is experimentally observed as a resonant wavelength change. This behavior has been observed in numerous cavities, but one interesting case is the toroidal cavity, as it has a particularly complex geometry providing multiple thermal transport pathways. To accurately capture this complex behavior, we have developed a COMSOL Multiphysics model which combines the thermal and optical components. The model uses the non-uniform optical mode profile as the heat source. As such, changes in device geometry and wavelength are inherently captured. To verify the modeling, we characterize the optothermal threshold for a series of toroidal cavities across a range of wavelengths and device geometries. Additionally, the thermal time constant of the structure is explored. Of note, the membrane thickness is shown to play a critical role in the optothermal behaviors.

  17. Solution of the Quiet Implicit Particle-In Moment Equations in Toroidal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nystrom, William David

    A computer program, QIP3D, has been developed to solve the Quiet Implicit Particle- in-cell (QIP) moment equations in three-dimensional toroidal geometry. This model provides an efficient algorithm for computing the time evolution of the full two-fluid (ion/electron) plasma. The coordinate system is based on a conformal mapping of the poloidal plane from a circular outer boundary and origin coincident with the magnetic axis to form a logically polar computational mesh. A Fourier, pseudospectral representation is employed for the poloidal and toroidal angles and finite differencing for the radial coordinate. The QIP equations are differenced implicitly in time and solved using a predictor -corrector algorithm. The implicit electric field equation (and other elliptic equations) are solved using advanced iterative methods. Efficient algorithms implement the required matrix-vector product and preconditioner. Two series of calculations in toroidal geometry with q_0 = 0.9 establish the two -fluid physics of the m = 1 internal kink mode where q _0 is the safety factor at the magnetic axis and m is the poloidal mode number. In each series, the mode is excited and exhibits the proper eigenmode structure. With the aspect ratio, A = R_0/a, constant at 10 and beta_0 varying from 0.0 to 0.01, the growth rate of the kink is found to increase with beta_0 and to be in quantitative agreement with previous calculations. Here, R _0 is the distance of the magnetic axis from the axis of rotational symmetry for the torus, a is the minor radius of the torus and beta_0 is the ratio of kinetic pressure to magnetic field pressure at the magnetic axis. With beta _0 = 0.0 and A varied from 5 to 10, the growth rate is found to be independent of A in agreement with theory.

  18. Viscous damping of toroidal angular momentum in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W. M.

    2014-09-15

    The Braginskii viscous stress tensor formalism was generalized to accommodate non-axisymmetric 3D magnetic fields in general toroidal flux surface geometry in order to provide a representation for the viscous damping of toroidal rotation in tokamaks arising from various “neoclassical toroidal viscosity” mechanisms. In the process, it was verified that the parallel viscosity contribution to damping toroidal angular momentum still vanishes even in the presence of toroidal asymmetries, unless there are 3D radial magnetic fields.

  19. Two-Dimensional x-y and r-z Geometry Multigroup Transport Code System for Large Toroidal Reactors.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1980-06-16

    Version: 00 Although TRIDENT-CTR is a follow-on code to TRIDENT, it has incorporated several features that make it significantly different. It can handle a wide range of irregular geometric domains in both x-y and r-z geometries. However, it was principally designed to solve shielding and blanket problems for large toroidal reactors. TRIDENT-CTR is a two-dimensional, x-y and r-z geometry, multigroup, neutral particle transport code. The use of triangular finite elements gives it the geometric flexibilitymore » to cope with the nonorthogonal shapes of many toroidal designs. The code is capable of handling a wide variety of problems having irregular domains in both x-y and r-z geometries.« less

  20. Invisibility cloaks for toroids.

    PubMed

    You, Yu; Kattawar, George W; Yang, Ping

    2009-04-13

    The material properties of toroidal invisibility cloaks are derived based on the coordinate transformation method. The permittivity and permeability tensors for toroidal cloaks are substantially different from those for spherical cloaks, but quite similar to those for 2D cylindrical cloaks because a singularity is involved at the inner boundary in both the cases. The cloaking effect is confirmed by the electric field distribution in the vicinity of toroidal cloaks simulated from the generalized discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) method. This study extends the concept of electromagnetic cloaking of arbitrarily-shaped objects to a complex geometry. PMID:19365485

  1. Drift in toroidal configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelidis, E. A.

    1990-12-01

    This paper considers possible mechanisms involved in amplifying the drift velocity of plasma particles, under conditions of toroidal geometry. It is shown that particles constrained to move on an axisymmetric circular spheroidal surface, develop a sinusoidal motion with a characteristic frequency which depends on the energy of the particles, the value of the isoflux surface, and the value of the general momentum. It is also shown that the incorporation of the effects of toroidal geometry in the Lorentz equation produces a nonambipolar charge-dependent particle flux amplified by a factor 2(q/epsilon) squared.

  2. Modelling of 3D fields due to ferritic inserts and test blanket modules in toroidal geometry at ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Äkäslompolo, Simppa; Cavinato, Mario; Koechl, Florian; Kurki-Suonio, Taina; Li, Li; Parail, Vassili; Saibene, Gabriella; Särkimäki, Konsta; Sipilä, Seppo; Varje, Jari

    2016-06-01

    Computations in toroidal geometry are systematically performed for the plasma response to 3D magnetic perturbations produced by ferritic inserts (FIs) and test blanket modules (TBMs) for four ITER plasma scenarios: the 15 MA baseline, the 12.5 MA hybrid, the 9 MA steady state, and the 7.5 MA half-field helium plasma. Due to the broad toroidal spectrum of the FI and TBM fields, the plasma response for all the n  =  1–6 field components are computed and compared. The plasma response is found to be weak for the high-n (n  >  4) components. The response is not globally sensitive to the toroidal plasma flow speed, as long as the latter is not reduced by an order of magnitude. This is essentially due to the strong screening effect occurring at a finite flow, as predicted for ITER plasmas. The ITER error field correction coils (EFCC) are used to compensate the n  =  1 field errors produced by FIs and TBMs for the baseline scenario for the purpose of avoiding mode locking. It is found that the middle row of the EFCC, with a suitable toroidal phase for the coil current, can provide the best correction of these field errors, according to various optimisation criteria. On the other hand, even without correction, it is predicted that these n  =  1 field errors will not cause substantial flow damping for the 15 MA baseline scenario.

  3. PC-based package for interactive assessment of MHD equilibrium and poloidal field coil design in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, W.P.

    1987-01-01

    In the assessment of Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium and Poloidal Field Coil (PFC) arrangement for toroidal axisymmetric geometry, the Grad-Shafranov equation must be solved, either analytically or numerically. Existing numerical tools have been developed primarily for mainframe usage and can prove cumbersome for screening assessments and parametric evaluations. The objective of this thesis was to develop a personal computer (PC)-based calculational tool for assessing MHD/PFC problems in a highly interactive mode, well suited for scoping studies. The approach adopted involves a two-step process: first the MHD equilibrium is calculated and then the PFC arrangement, consistent with the equilibrium, is determined in an interactive design environment. The PC-based system developed consists of two programs: (1) PCEQ, which solve the MHD equilibrium problem and (2) PFDE-SIGN, which is employed to arrive at a PFC arrangement. PCEQ provides an output file including, but not limited to, the following: poloidal beta, total beta, safety factors, q, on axis and on edge. PCEQ plots the following contours and/or profiles: flux, pressure and toroidal current density, safety factor, and ratio of plasma toroidal field to vacuum field.

  4. Fatigue life analysis for traction drives with application to a toroidal type geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, J. J.; Loewenthal, S. H.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1976-01-01

    A contact fatigue life analysis for traction drives was developed which was based on a modified Lundberg-Palmgren theory. The analysis was used to predict life for a cone-roller toroidal traction drive. A 90-percent probability of survival was assumed for the calculated life. Parametric results were presented for life and Hertz contact stress as a function of load, drive ratio, and size. A design study was also performed. The results were compared to previously published work for the dual cavity toroidal drive as applied to a typical compact passenger vehicle drive train. For a representative duty cycle condition wherein the engine delivers 29 horsepower at 2000 rpm with the vehicle moving at 48.3 km/hr (30 mph) the drive life was calculated to be 19,200 km (11 900 miles).

  5. A PC-based package for interactive assessment of MHD equilibrium and poloidal field coil design in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, W.; Steiner, D.

    1989-03-01

    A personal computer system was developed for use in the assessment of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium and Poloidal Field Coil (PFC) arrangement in toroidal axisymmetric geometry. This system involves two steps: first MHD equilibrium is calculated with the program PCEQ, then the PFC arrangement, consistent with the equilibrium, is determined in an interactive design environment using the program PFDESIGN. The PCEQ/PFDESIGN system was used to examine equilibrium for the STARFIRE reactor concept, including the design of two different PFC arrangements. The MHD/PFC calculations agree to within a few percent of mainframe code results, demonstrating the utility and accuracy of PCEQ/PFDESIGN, proving it to be an ideal tool for scoping studies.

  6. Velocity-Space Diffusion Coefficients Due to Full-Wave ICRF Fields in Toroidal Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.W.; Jaeger, F.; Berry, L.A.; Batchelor, D.B.; D'Azevedo, E.; Carter, M.D.; Ershov, N.M.; Smirnov, A.P.; Bonoli, P.; Wright, J.C.; Smithe, D.N.

    2005-09-26

    Jaeger et al. have calculated bounce-averaged QL diffusion coefficients from AORSA full-wave fields, based on non-Maxwellian distributions from CQL3D Fokker-Planck code. A zero banana-width approximation is employed. Complementing this calculation, a fully numerical calculation of ion velocity diffusion coefficients using the full-wave fields in numerical tokamak equilibria has been implemented to determine the finite orbit width effects. The un-approximated Lorentz equation of motion is integrated to obtain the change in velocity after one complete poloidal transit of the tokamak. Averaging velocity changes over initial starting gyro-phase and toroidal angle gives bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients. The coefficients from the full-wave and Lorentz orbit methods are compared for an ITER DT second harmonic tritium ICRF heating case: the diffusion coefficients are similar in magnitude but reveal substantial finite orbit effects.

  7. Novel Design for Centrifugal Countercurrent Chromatography: II. Studies on Novel Geometries of Zigzag Toroidal Tubing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Aisa, Haji Akber; Ito, Yoichiro

    2010-01-01

    The toroidal column using a zigzag pattern has been improved in both retention of the stationary phase and peak resolution. To further improve the retention of stationary phase and peak resolution, a series of novel geometric designs of tubing (plain, mid-clamping, flattened and flat-twisted tubing) was evaluated their performance in CCC. The results showed that the tubing which was flattened vertically against centrifugal force (vert-flattened tubing) produced the best peak resolution among them. Using vert-flattened tubing a series of experiments was performed to study the effects of column capacity and sample size. The results indicated that a 0.25 ml capacity column is ideal for analysis of small amount samples. PMID:20454530

  8. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of microturbulence for general magnetic geometry and experimental profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Yong; Holod, Ihor; Wang, Zhixuan; Lin, Zhihong; Zhang, Taige

    2015-02-15

    Developments in gyrokinetic particle simulation enable the gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) to simulate turbulent transport in tokamaks with realistic equilibrium profiles and plasma geometry, which is a critical step in the code–experiment validation process. These new developments include numerical equilibrium representation using B-splines, a new Poisson solver based on finite difference using field-aligned mesh and magnetic flux coordinates, a new zonal flow solver for general geometry, and improvements on the conventional four-point gyroaverage with nonuniform background marker loading. The gyrokinetic Poisson equation is solved in the perpendicular plane instead of the poloidal plane. Exploiting these new features, GTC is able to simulate a typical DIII-D discharge with experimental magnetic geometry and profiles. The simulated turbulent heat diffusivity and its radial profile show good agreement with other gyrokinetic codes. The newly developed nonuniform loading method provides a modified radial transport profile to that of the conventional uniform loading method.

  9. Toroidal Nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    We will discuss how nematic liquid crystals organize inside toroidal droplets. When the director is parallel to the bounding surface, we find spontaneous reflection symmetry breaking, which we attribute to the role played by saddle-splay contributions to the Frank free energy. When the director is perpendicular to the bounding surface, we find that the structure is reminiscent of the escape radial configuration seen in cylinders, but with a central doubly-twisted organization, which we attribute to the geometry of the torus. We will end by presenting recent experiments with active nematics on the toroidal surface. In this case, topology and activity both affect the structure and dynamics of the material.

  10. GGADT: Generalized Geometry Anomalous Diffraction Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, John; Tarczon, Michael; Draine, Bruce T.

    2015-10-01

    GGADT uses anomalous diffraction theory (ADT) to compute the differential scattering cross section (or the total cross sections as a function of energy) for a specified grain of arbitrary geometry (natively supports spheres, ellipsoids, and clusters of spherical monomers). It is written in Fortran 95. ADT is valid when the grain is large compared to the wavelength of incident light. GGADT can calculate either the integrated cross sections (absorption, scattering, extinction) as a function of energy, or it can calculate the differential scattering cross section as a function of scattering angle.

  11. 8. General view of truss geometry at center of span ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. General view of truss geometry at center of span from lower parking lot, looking northwest - Lower Rollstone Street Bridge, Spanning Nashua River on Rollstone Street, Fitchburg, Worcester County, MA

  12. Axisymmetric electrostatic magnetohydrodynamic oscillations in tokamaks with general cross-sections and toroidal flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. S.; Guo, Wenfeng

    2016-06-01

    The frequency spectrum and mode structure of axisymmetric electrostatic oscillations [the zonal flow (ZF), sound waves (SW), geodesic acoustic modes (GAM), and electrostatic mean flows (EMF)] in tokamaks with general cross-sections and toroidal flows are studied analytically using the electrostatic approximation for magnetohydrodynamic modes. These modes constitute the "electrostatic continua." Starting from the energy principle for a tokamak plasma with toroidal rotation, we showed that these modes are completely stable. The ZF, the SW, and the EMF could all be viewed as special cases of the general GAM. The Euler equations for the general GAM are obtained and are solved analytically for both the low and high range of Mach numbers. The solution consists of the usual countable infinite set of eigen-modes with discrete eigen-frequencies, and two modes with lower frequencies. The countable infinite set is identified with the regular GAM. The lower frequency mode, which is also divergence free as the plasma rotation tends to zero, is identified as the ZF. The other lower (zero) frequency mode is a pure geodesic E×B flow and not divergence free is identified as the EMF. The frequency of the EMF is shown to be exactly 0 independent of plasma cross-section or its flow Mach number. We also show that in general, sound waves with no geodesic components are (almost) completely lost in tokamaks with a general cross-sectional shape. The exception is the special case of strict up-down symmetry. In this case, half of the GAMs would have no geodesic displacements. They are identified as the SW. Present day tokamaks, although not strictly up-down symmetric, usually are only slightly up-down asymmetric. They are expected to share the property with the up-down symmetric tokamak in that half of the GAMs would be more sound wave-like, i.e., have much weaker coupling to the geodesic components than the other half of non-sound-wave-like modes with stronger coupling to the geodesic

  13. An alternative topological field theory of generalized complex geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Noriaki; Tokunaga, Tatsuya

    2007-09-01

    We propose a new topological field theory on generalized complex geometry in two dimension using AKSZ formulation. Zucchini's model is A model in the case that the generalized complex structure depends on only a symplectic structure. Our new model is B model in the case that the generalized complex structure depends on only a complex structure.

  14. Pulsed Laser Nonlinear Thomson Scattering for General Scattering Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft; A. Doyuran; James Rosenzweig

    2005-05-01

    In a recent paper it has been shown that single electron Thomson backscatter calculations can be performed including the effects of pulsed high intensity lasers. In this paper we present a more detailed treatment of the problem and present results for more general scattering geometries. In particular, we present new results for 90 degree Thomson scattering. Such geometries have been increasingly studied as X-ray sources of short-pulse radiation. Also, we present a clearer physical basis for these different cases.

  15. Moment-equation methods for calculating neoclassical transport coefficients in general toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, H.; Nishimura, S.

    2008-04-15

    A detailed comparison is made between moment-equation methods presented by H. Sugama and S. Nishimura [Phys. Plasmas 9, 4637 (2002)] and by M. Taguchi [Phys. Fluids B 4, 3638 (1992)] for calculating neoclassical transport coefficients in general toroidal plasmas including nonsymmetric systems. It is shown that these methods can be derived from the drift kinetic equation with the same collision model used for correctly taking account of collisional momentum conservation. In both methods, the Laguerre polynomials of the energy variable are employed to expand the guiding-center distribution function and to obtain the moment equations, by which the radial neoclassical transport fluxes and the parallel flows are related to the thermodynamic forces. The methods are given here in the forms applicable for an arbitrary truncation number of the Laguerre-polynomial expansion so that their accuracies can be improved by increasing the truncation number. Differences between results from the two methods appear when the Laguerre-polynomial expansion is truncated up to a finite order because different weight functions are used in them to derive the moment equations. At each order of the truncation, the neoclassical transport coefficients obtained from the Sugama-Nishimura method show the Onsager symmetry and satisfy the ambipolar-diffusion condition intrinsically for symmetric systems. Also, numerical examples are given to show how the transport coefficients converge with the truncation number increased for the two methods.

  16. Geometric Transitions, Topological Strings, and Generalized Complex Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Wu-yen; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2007-06-29

    Mirror symmetry is one of the most beautiful symmetries in string theory. It helps us very effectively gain insights into non-perturbative worldsheet instanton effects. It was also shown that the study of mirror symmetry for Calabi-Yau flux compactification leads us to the territory of ''Non-Kaehlerity''. In this thesis we demonstrate how to construct a new class of symplectic non-Kaehler and complex non-Kaehler string theory vacua via generalized geometric transitions. The class admits a mirror pairing by construction. From a variety of sources, including super-gravity analysis and KK reduction on SU(3) structure manifolds, we conclude that string theory connects Calabi-Yau spaces to both complex non-Kaehler and symplectic non-Kaehler manifolds and the resulting manifolds lie in generalized complex geometry. We go on to study the topological twisted models on a class of generalized complex geometry, bi-Hermitian geometry, which is the most general target space for (2, 2) world-sheet theory with non-trivial H flux turned on. We show that the usual Kaehler A and B models are generalized in a natural way. Since the gauged supergravity is the low energy effective theory for the compactifications on generalized geometries, we study the fate of flux-induced isometry gauging in N = 2 IIA and heterotic strings under non-perturbative instanton effects. Interestingly, we find we have protection mechanisms preventing the corrections to the hyper moduli spaces. Besides generalized geometries, we also discuss the possibility of new NS-NS fluxes in a new doubled formalism.

  17. Integrable perturbed magnetic fields in toroidal geometry: An exact analytical flux surface label for large aspect ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Kallinikos, N.; Isliker, H.; Vlahos, L.; Meletlidou, E.

    2014-06-15

    An analytical description of magnetic islands is presented for the typical case of a single perturbation mode introduced to tokamak plasma equilibrium in the large aspect ratio approximation. Following the Hamiltonian structure directly in terms of toroidal coordinates, the well known integrability of this system is exploited, laying out a precise and practical way for determining the island topology features, as required in various applications, through an analytical and exact flux surface label.

  18. Generalization of the electronic susceptibility for arbitrary molecular geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherrer, Arne; Dreßler, Christian; Ahlert, Paul; Sebastiani, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    We generalize the explicit representation of the electronic susceptibility χ[R](r, r') for arbitrary molecular geometries R. The electronic susceptibility is a response function that yields the response of the molecular electronic charge density at linear order to an arbitrary external perturbation. We address the dependence of this response function on the molecular geometry. The explicit representation of the molecular geometry dependence is achieved by means of a Taylor expansion in the nuclear coordinates. Our approach relies on a recently developed low-rank representation of the response function χ[R](r, r') which allows a highly condensed storage of the expansion and an efficient application within dynamical chemical environments. We illustrate the performance and accuracy of our scheme by computing the vibrationally induced variations of the response function of a water molecule and its resulting Raman spectrum.

  19. Generalized quantum gravity condensates for homogeneous geometries and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriti, Daniele; Pranzetti, Daniele; Ryan, James P.; Sindoni, Lorenzo

    2015-12-01

    We construct a generalized class of quantum gravity condensate states that allows the description of continuum homogeneous quantum geometries within the full theory. They are based on similar ideas already applied to extract effective cosmological dynamics from the group field theory formalism, and thus also from loop quantum gravity. However, they represent an improvement over the simplest condensates used in the literature, in that they are defined by an infinite superposition of graph-based states encoding in a precise way the topology of the spatial manifold. The construction is based on the definition of refinement operators on spin network states, written in a second quantized language. The construction also lends itself easily to application to the case of spherically symmetric quantum geometries.

  20. Electrostatic toroidal drift mode turbulence in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshman, S.P.; Diamond, P.H.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Chen, L.; Molvig, K.; Whitson, J.C.; Smith, J.

    1980-01-01

    The kinetic theory of turbulent effects due to electron orbit stochasticity was combined with linear response in toroidal geometry. A review of the linear theory is given. The toroidal electron response is given in the ballooning representation. (MOW)

  1. Generalized -deformed correlation functions as spectral functions of hyperbolic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, L.; Bytsenko, A. A.; Guimarães, M. E. X.

    2014-08-01

    We analyze the role of vertex operator algebra and 2d amplitudes from the point of view of the representation theory of infinite-dimensional Lie algebras, MacMahon and Ruelle functions. By definition p-dimensional MacMahon function, with , is the generating function of p-dimensional partitions of integers. These functions can be represented as amplitudes of a two-dimensional c = 1 CFT, and, as such, they can be generalized to . With some abuse of language we call the latter amplitudes generalized MacMahon functions. In this paper we show that generalized p-dimensional MacMahon functions can be rewritten in terms of Ruelle spectral functions, whose spectrum is encoded in the Patterson-Selberg function of three-dimensional hyperbolic geometry.

  2. Electron cyclotron current drive efficiency in general tokamak geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Chan, V. S.; Prater, R.

    2003-01-01

    Green's-function techniques are used to calculate electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency in general tokamak geometry in the low-collisionality regime. Fully relativistic electron dynamics is employed in the theoretical formulation. The high-velocity collision model is used to model Coulomb collisions and a simplified quasi-linear rf diffusion operator describes wave-particle interactions. The approximate analytic solutions which are benchmarked with a widely used ECCD model, facilitate time-dependent simulations of tokamak operational scenarios using the non-inductive current drive of electron cyclotron waves.

  3. Third Elementary Dipole Moment: Toroidal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordrey, Vincent; Eshete, Amanuel; Majewski, Walerian

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we study the generally unknown characteristics of toroids, magnets without magnetic poles. Toroids have never seemed interesting enough to be studied for their physical features in labs due to the fact that they have no magnetic fields on the outside, but rather a very strong magnetic field trapped inside. Toroidal solenoids or magnets (rings magnetized circumferentially) interact with the external magnetic field only through its curl, which can be created either by an electric current, or by a time-dependent electric flux. We confirmed a theoretical prediction, that a toroid would not interact with the curl-less magnetic field of a current-carrying wire running outside of the torus's hole. We used our toroids as magnetic curlmeters, measuring the torque on the toroid, when the current-carrying wire runs through the toroid. From this torque we found the toroidal dipole moment. We are experimenting on detecting the escape of the inner magnetic field of the toroid outside of it, when magnetic toroid rotates or when electric toroid is driven by AC voltage. We also will discuss toroidal (or anapole) moments of fundamental particles, nuclei and atoms, and toroids' applications in metamaterials.

  4. A convergence study for the Laguerre expansion in the moment equation method for neoclassical transport in general toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, S.; Sugama, H.; Maassberg, H.; Beidler, C. D.; Murakami, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Hirooka, S.

    2010-08-15

    The dependence of neoclassical parallel flow calculations on the maximum order of Laguerre polynomial expansions is investigated in a magnetic configuration of the Large Helical Device [S. Murakami, A. Wakasa, H. Maassberg, et al., Nucl. Fusion 42, L19 (2002)] using the monoenergetic coefficient database obtained by an international collaboration. On the basis of a previous generalization (the so-called Sugama-Nishimura method [H. Sugama and S. Nishimura, Phys. Plasmas 15, 042502 (2008)]) to an arbitrary order of the expansion, the 13 M, 21 M, and 29 M approximations are compared. In a previous comparison, only the ion distribution function in the banana collisionality regime of single-ion-species plasmas in tokamak configurations was investigated. In this paper, the dependence of the problems including electrons and impurities in the general collisionality regime in an actual nonsymmetric toroidal configuration is reported. In particular, qualities of approximations for the electron distribution function are investigated in detail.

  5. Fixed boundary toroidal plasma equilibria with toroidal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yanqiang; Hu, Yemin; Xiang, Nong

    2016-04-01

    The fixed boundary toroidal plasma equilibria with toroidal flows are investigated by solving the modified Grad-Shafranov equation numerically in the cylindrical coordinate system. For normal equilibrium configurations with geometry and profiles similar to usual tokamaks with no flow, it is found that the effect of flow is to lead to an outward shift of the magnetic flux surfaces, together with the profiles of pressure, and mass and current densities. The shifts could become significant when the toroidal flow Mach number exceeds 0.5. For non-conventional current profiles, even for the usual tokamak geometry, novel current reversal equilibrium configurations may result, sometimes with changed topology in the poloidal flux function. This change in the topology of plasma equilibrium can be attributed to the large toroidal flow. The computed results may correspond to situations of intense tangential injection during the low toroidal current phase in expected experimental situations.

  6. Intrinsic rotation of toroidally confined magnetohydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Morales, Jorge A; Bos, Wouter J T; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David C

    2012-10-26

    The spatiotemporal self-organization of viscoresistive magnetohydrodynamics in a toroidal geometry is studied. Curl-free toroidal magnetic and electric fields are imposed. It is observed in our simulations that a flow is generated, which evolves from dominantly poloidal to toroidal when the Lundquist numbers are increased. It is shown that this toroidal organization of the flow is consistent with the tendency of the velocity field to align with the magnetic field. Up-down asymmetry of the geometry causes the generation of a nonzero toroidal angular momentum. PMID:23215195

  7. Geometry of the generalized Bloch sphere for qutrits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Sandeep K.; Neethi Simon, B.; Singh, Rajeev; Simon, Sudhavathani

    2016-04-01

    The geometry of the generalized Bloch sphere Ω3, the state space of a qutrit, is studied. Closed form expressions for Ω3, its boundary ∂Ω3, and the set of extremals {{{Ω }}}3{{ext}} are obtained by use of an elementary observation. These expressions and analytic methods are used to classify the 28 two-sections and the 56 three-sections of Ω3 into unitary equivalence classes, completing the works of earlier authors. It is shown, in particular, that there are families of two-sections and of three-sections which are equivalent geometrically but not unitarily, a feature that does not appear to have been appreciated earlier. A family of three-sections of obese-tetrahedral shape whose symmetry corresponds to the 24-element tetrahedral point group T d is examined in detail. This symmetry is traced to the natural reduction of the adjoint representation of SU(3), the symmetry underlying Ω3, into direct sum of the two-dimensional and the two (inequivalent) three-dimensional irreducible representations of T d .

  8. Toroidal reactor

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John M.; Furth, Harold P.; Tenney, Fred H.

    1988-12-06

    Method for producing fusion power wherein a neutral beam is injected into a toroidal bulk plasma to produce fusion reactions during the time permitted by the slowing down of the particles from the injected beam in the bulk plasma.

  9. Generalization in Place Learning and Geometry Knowledge in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tommasi, Luca; Thinus-Blanc, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    Rats were trained to search for a food reward hidden under sawdust in the center of a square-shaped enclosure designed to force orientation on the basis of the overall geometry of the environment. They were then tested in a number of enclosures differing in shape and in size (rectangular-, double-side square-, and equilateral triangle-shaped…

  10. Magnetic Properties of 3D Printed Toroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollig, Lindsey; Otto, Austin; Hilpisch, Peter; Mowry, Greg; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Renewable Energy; Alternatives Lab (REAL) Team

    Transformers are ubiquitous in electronics today. Although toroidal geometries perform most efficiently, transformers are traditionally made with rectangular cross-sections due to the lower manufacturing costs. Additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) can easily achieve toroidal geometries by building up a part through a series of 2D layers. To get strong magnetic properties in a 3D printed transformer, a composite filament is used containing Fe dispersed in a polymer matrix. How the resulting 3D printed toroid responds to a magnetic field depends on two structural factors of the printed 2D layers: fill factor (planar density) and fill pattern. In this work, we investigate how the fill factor and fill pattern affect the magnetic properties of 3D printed toroids. The magnetic properties of the printed toroids are measured by a custom circuit that produces a hysteresis loop for each toroid. Toroids with various fill factors and fill patterns are compared to determine how these two factors can affect the magnetic field the toroid can produce. These 3D printed toroids can be used for numerous applications in order to increase the efficiency of transformers by making it possible for manufacturers to make a toroidal geometry.

  11. GASP- General Aviation Synthesis Program. Volume 2: Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hague, D.

    1978-01-01

    The gross characteristics of an aircraft under study are specified to the subroutines SIZE. The principal quantities specified are both geometric (lengths and areas) and operational (altitude and Mach number). The sequence of computations carried out by SIZE is controlled by the parameter NPC which is passed into SIZE by COMMON. When NPC-0, the computation is initialized. Subsequently, NPC is set to 2 and the program advances through the geometric computations. Geometry models for the fuselage, wing, empennage, cabin pressurization, and nacelle area are examined.

  12. Cosmology for quadratic gravity in generalized Weyl geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán Jiménez, Jose; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Koivisto, Tomi S.

    2016-04-01

    A class of vector-tensor theories arises naturally in the framework of quadratic gravity in spacetimes with linear vector distortion. Requiring the absence of ghosts for the vector field imposes an interesting condition on the allowed connections with vector distortion: the resulting one-parameter family of connections generalises the usual Weyl geometry with polar torsion. The cosmology of this class of theories is studied, focusing on isotropic solutions wherein the vector field is dominated by the temporal component. De Sitter attractors are found and inhomogeneous perturbations around such backgrounds are analysed. In particular, further constraints on the models are imposed by excluding pathologies in the scalar, vector and tensor fluctuations. Various exact background solutions are presented, describing a constant and an evolving dark energy, a bounce and a self-tuning de Sitter phase. However, the latter two scenarios are not viable under a closer scrutiny.

  13. Toroidal Theory of MHD Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Goedbloed, J.P.

    2004-03-15

    We continue with the adventures of the Alfven wave and its two magnetosonic companions as they travel in the curved space of magnetic surfaces and field lines (Sec. 2), find themselves trapped in singularities of an unprecedented richness (Sec. 3), decide to get themselves better maps of the landscape to do the required twisting while some of their youthful energy is leaking away (Sec. 4), cause trouble at the edge of a powerful empire (Sec. 5), and finally see the light in a distant future (Sec. 6). Needed on the trip are the evolution equations of both ideal and resistive MHD 'derived' in reference [1], the solutions to the toroidal equilibrium equations discussed in reference [2], the general background on spectral theory of inhomogeneous plasmas presented in reference [3], which is extended in the two directions of toroidal geometry and resistivity in this lecture [4]. This leads to such intricate dynamics that numerical techniques are virtually the only way to proceed. This aspect is further elaborated in reference [5] on numerical techniques.

  14. Toroidal Alfven wave stability in ignited tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Fu, G.Y.; Van Dam, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of fusion-product alpha particles on the stability of global-type shear Alfven waves in an ignited tokamak plasma are investigated in toroidal geometry. Finite toroidicity can lead to stabilization of the global Alfven eigenmodes, but it induces a new global shear Alfven eigenmodes, which is strongly destabilized via transit resonance with alpha particles. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Multidimensional Plasma Sheath Modeling Using The Three Fluid Plasma Model in General Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilly, Robert; Shumlak, Uri

    2012-10-01

    There has been renewed interest in the use of plasma actuators for high speed flow control applications. In the plasma actuator, current is driven through the surrounding weakly ionized plasma to impart control moments on the hypersonic vehicle. This expanded general geometry study employs the three-fluid (electrons, ions,neutrals) plasma model as it allows the capture of electron inertial effects, as well as energy and momentum transfer between the charged and neutral species. Previous investigations have typically assumed an electrostatic electric field. This work includes the full electrodynamics in general geometries. Past work utilizing the research code WARPX (Washington Approximate Riemann Problem) employed cartesian grids. In this work, the problem is expanded to general geometries with the euler fluid equations employing Braginskii closure. In addition, WARPX general geometry grids are generated from Cubit or CAD files. Comparisons are made against AFRL magnetized plasma actuator experiments.

  16. A General Method for Calculating the External Magnetic Field from a Cylindrical Magnetic Source using Toroidal Functions

    SciTech Connect

    J Selvaggi; S Salon; O Kwon CVK Chari

    2006-02-14

    An alternative method is developed to compute the magnetic field from a circular cylindrical magnetic source. Specifically, a Fourier series expansion whose coefficients are toroidal functions is introduced which yields an alternative to the more familiar spherical harmonic solution or the Elliptic integral solution. This alternate formulation coupled with a method called charge simulation allows one to compute the external magnetic field from an arbitrary magnetic source in terms of a toroidal expansion. This expansion is valid on any finite hypothetical external observation cylinder. In other words, the magnetic scalar potential or the magnetic field intensity is computed on a exterior cylinder which encloses the magnetic source. This method can be used to accurately compute the far field where a finite element formulation is known to be inaccurate.

  17. Generalized Particle Swarm Algorithm for HCR Gearing Geometry Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmanović, Siniša; Vereš, Miroslav; Rackov, Milan

    2012-12-01

    Temperature scuffing evidenced by damage to teeth flanks of gears is one of the mostimportant problems needing to be solved in the process of gearing design and calculation. Accordingto current valid standards, such calculations can be resolved with a high level of reliability for all theusual gearing types. However, suitable calculations for HCR gears have not been adequatelyresearched to date. It has been identified that in HCR gears some different process of scuffingformation occurs during the gear`s operation. In this article, the authors describe a new method forfinding optimal solutions for * a1 h , * a 2 h and x1, using a Generalized Particle Swarm OptimizationAlgorithm.

  18. Logically rectangular mixed methods for Darcy flow on general geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Arbogast, T.; Keenan, P.T.; Wheeler, M.F.; Yotov, I.

    1995-12-31

    The authors consider an expanded mixed finite element formulation (cell centered finite difference) for Darcy flow with a tensor absolute permeability. The reservoir can be geometrically general with internal features, but the computational domain is rectangular. The method is defined on a curvilinear grid that need not be orthogonal, obtained by mapping the rectangular, computational grid. The original flow problem becomes a similar problem with a modified permeability on the computational grid. Quadrature rules turn the mixed method into a cell-centered finite difference method with a 9 point stencil in 2-D and 19 in 3-D. As shown by theory and experiment, if the modified permeability on the computational domain is smooth, then the convergence rate is optimal and both pressure and velocity are superconvergent at certain points. If not, Lagrange multiplier pressures can be introduced on boundaries of elements so that optimal convergence is retained. This modification presents only small changes in the solution process; in fact, the same parallel domain decomposition algorithms can be applied with little or no change to the code if the modified permeability is smooth over the subdomains. This Lagrange multiplier procedure can be used to extend the difference scheme to multi-block domains, and to give a coupling with unstructured grids. In all cases, the mixed formulation is locally conservative. Computational results illustrate the advantage and convergence of this method.

  19. Moment free toroidal magnet

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, Peter

    1983-01-01

    A toroidal magnet for confining a high magnetic field for use in fusion reactor research and nuclear particle detection. The magnet includes a series of conductor elements arranged about and fixed at its small major radius portion to the outer surface of a central cylindrical support each conductor element having a geometry such as to maintain the conductor elements in pure tension when a high current flows therein, and a support assembly which redistributes all or part of the tension which would otherwise arise in the small major radius portion of each coil element to the large major radius portion thereof.

  20. Toroidal linear force-free magnetic fields with axial symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandas, M.; Romashets, E.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Interplanetary magnetic flux ropes are often described as linear force-free fields. To account for their curvature, toroidal configurations must be used. The aim is to find an analytic description of a linear force-free magnetic field of the toroidal geometry in which the cross section of flux ropes can be controlled. Methods: The solution is found as a superposition of fields given by linear force-free cylinders tangential to a generating toroid. The cylindrical field is expressed in a series of terms that are not all cylindrically symmetric. Results: We found the general form of a toroidal linear force-free magnetic field. The field is azimuthally symmetric with respect to the torus axis. It depends on a set of coefficients that enables controlling the flux rope shape (cross section) to some extent. By varying the coefficients, flux ropes with circular and elliptic cross sections were constructed. Numerical comparison suggests that the simple analytic formula for calculating the helicity in toroidal flux ropes of the circular cross section can be used for flux ropes with elliptic cross sections if the minor radius in the formula is set to the geometric mean of the semi-axes of the elliptic cross section.

  1. PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) GENERALIZED GEOMETRY HOLDUP CALCULATIONS & TOTAL MEASUREMENT UNCERTAINTY

    SciTech Connect

    KEELE BD

    2005-02-01

    A collimated portable gamma-ray detector will be used to quantify the plutonium content of items that can be approximated as a point, line, or area geometry with respect to the detector. These items can include ducts, piping, glove boxes, isolated equipment inside of gloveboxes, and HEPA filters. The Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH) model is used for the reduction of counting data. This document specifies the calculations to reduce counting data into contained plutonium and the associated total measurement uncertainty.

  2. Inflatable nested toroid structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christopher J. (Inventor); Raboin, Jasen L. (Inventor); Spexarth, Gary R. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An inflatable structure comprises at least two generally toroidal, inflatable modules. When in a deployed mode, the first, inner module has a major diameter less than that of a second, outer module and is positioned within the inner circumference of the outer module such that the first module is nested circumferentially alongside the second module. The inflatable structure, in a non-deployed, non-inflated mode, is of compact configuration and adapted to be transported to a site of deployment. When deployed, the inflatable structure is of substantially increased interior volume. In one embodiment, access between the interior of the first module and the second module is provided by at least one port or structural pass-through. In another embodiment, the inflatable structure includes at least one additional generally toroidal module external of and circumferentially surrounding the second module.

  3. A personal-computer-based package for interactive assessment of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and poloidal field coil design in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, W.P. ); Steiner, D. . Dept. of Nuclear Science)

    1989-07-01

    A personal-computer (PC)-based calculational approach assesses magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium and poloidal field (PF) coil arrangement in a highly interactive mode, well suited for tokamak scoping studies. The system developed involves a two-step process: the MHD equilibrium is calculated and then a PF coil arrangement, consistent with the equilibrium is determined in an interactive design environment. In this paper the approach is used to examine four distinctly different toroidal configurations: the STARFIRE rector, a spherical torus (ST), the Big Dee, and an elongated tokamak. In these applications the PC-based results are benchmarked against those of a mainframe code for STARFIRE, ST, and Big Dee. The equilibrium and PF coil arrangement calculations obtained with the PC approach agree within a few percent with those obtained with the mainframe code.

  4. MOCUM: A two-dimensional method of characteristics code based on unstructured meshing for general geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Satvat, N.

    2012-07-01

    A transport theory code MOCUM based on the Method of Characteristics (MOC) as the flux solver with an advanced general geometry processor is developed for two-dimensional lattice and full core neutronics modeling. The core structure is represented by Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) that uses Boolean operations to build complex geometries from simple polygons. Arbitrary-precision arithmetic is also used in the process of building CSG objects to eliminate the round-off error from the commonly used double precision numbers. Then, the constructed core frame will be decomposed and refined into a conforming Delaunay triangulation to ensure the quality of the meshes. The MOC solver kernel is fully paralleled using OpenMP and the developed numerical code is validated by several benchmarks representing various core geometries. For the cases modeled, the maximum percentage error for multiplication factor and the pin power compared to reference values are 0.1% and 0.7% respectively. (authors)

  5. KENO-VI: A Monte Carlo Criticality Program with generalized quadratic geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbach, D.F.; Petrie, L.M.; Landers, N.F.

    1993-07-01

    This report discusses KENO-VI which is a new version of the KENO monte Carlo Criticality Safety developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The purpose of KENO-VI is to provide a criticality safety code similar to KENO-V.a that possesses a more general and flexible geometry package. KENO-VI constructs and processes geometry data as sets of quadratic equations. A lengthy set of simple, easy-to-use geometric functions, similar to those provided in KENO-V.a., and the ability to build more complex geometric shapes represented by sets of quadratic equations are the heart of the geometry package in KENO-VI. The code`s flexibility is increased by allowing intersecting geometry regions, hexagonal as well as cuboidal arrays, and the ability to specify an array boundary that intersects the array.

  6. Axial magnetic field and toroidally streaming fast ions in the dense plasma focus are natural consequences of conservation laws in the curved axisymmetric geometry of the current sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2014-10-01

    Direct measurement of axial magnetic field in the PF-1000 dense plasma focus (DPF), and its reported correlation with neutron emission, call for a fresh look at previous reports of existence of axial magnetic field component in the DPF from other laboratories, and associated data suggesting toroidal directionality of fast ions participating in fusion reactions, with a view to understand the underlying physics. In this context, recent work dealing with application of the hyperbolic conservation law formalism to the DPF is extended in this paper to a curvilinear coordinate system, which reflects the shape of the DPF current sheath. Locally unidirectional shock propagation in this coordinate system enables construction of a system of 7 one-dimensional hyperbolic conservation law equations with geometric source terms, taking into account all the components of magnetic field and flow velocity. Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions for this system lead to expressions for the axial magnetic field and three components of fluid velocity having high ion kinetic energy.

  7. Axial magnetic field and toroidally streaming fast ions in the dense plasma focus are natural consequences of conservation laws in the curved axisymmetric geometry of the current sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2014-10-15

    Direct measurement of axial magnetic field in the PF-1000 dense plasma focus (DPF), and its reported correlation with neutron emission, call for a fresh look at previous reports of existence of axial magnetic field component in the DPF from other laboratories, and associated data suggesting toroidal directionality of fast ions participating in fusion reactions, with a view to understand the underlying physics. In this context, recent work dealing with application of the hyperbolic conservation law formalism to the DPF is extended in this paper to a curvilinear coordinate system, which reflects the shape of the DPF current sheath. Locally unidirectional shock propagation in this coordinate system enables construction of a system of 7 one-dimensional hyperbolic conservation law equations with geometric source terms, taking into account all the components of magnetic field and flow velocity. Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions for this system lead to expressions for the axial magnetic field and three components of fluid velocity having high ion kinetic energy.

  8. Generalized Thomson problem in arbitrary dimensions and non-euclidean geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batle, J.; Bagdasaryan, Armen; Abdel-Aty, M.; Abdalla, S.

    2016-06-01

    Systems of identical particles with equal charge are studied under a special type of confinement. These classical particles are free to move inside some convex region S and on the boundary of it Ω (the S d - 1 -sphere, in our case). We shall show how particles arrange themselves under the sole action of the Coulomb repulsion in many dimensions in the usual Euclidean space, therefore generalizing the so called Thomson problem to many dimensions. Also, we explore how the problem varies when non-Euclidean geometries are considered. We shall see that optimal configurations in all cases possess a high degree of symmetry, regardless of the concomitant dimension or geometry.

  9. Kinetic studies of microinstabilities in toroidal plasmas: Simulation and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.W.; Haham, T.S.; Parker, S.E.; Perkins, F.W.; Rath, S.; Rewoldt, G.; Reynders, J.V.W.; Santoro, R.A.; Tang, W.M.

    1992-12-01

    A comprehensive program for the development and use of particle simulation techniques for solving the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations on massively parallel computers has been carried out at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. This is a key element of our ongoing theoretical efforts to systematically investigate physics issues vital to understanding tokamak plasmas. In this paper, our focus is on spatial-gradient-driven microinstabilities. Their importance is supported by the recent progress in achieving a physics-based understanding of anomalous transport in toroidal systems which has been based on the proposition that these drift-type electrostatic modes dependent on ion temperature gradient (ITG) and trapped particle effects are dominant in the bulk ( confinement'') region. Although their presence is consistent with a number of significant confinement trends, results from high temperature tokamaks such as TFTR have highlighted the need for better insight into the nonlinear properties of such instabilities in long-mean-free-path plasmas. In addressing this general issue, we report important new results including (i) the first fully toroidal 3D gyrokinetic simulation of ITG modes and (ii) realistic toroidal eigenmode calculations demonstrating the unique capability to deal with large scale kinetic behavior extending over many rational surfaces. The effects of ITG modes (iii) on the inward pinch of impurities in 3D slab geometry and (iv) on the existence of microtearing modes in 2D slab are also discussed. Finally, (v) sheared toroidal flow effects on trapped-particle modes are presented.

  10. Kinetic studies of microinstabilities in toroidal plasmas: Simulation and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.W.; Haham, T.S.; Parker, S.E.; Perkins, F.W.; Rath, S.; Rewoldt, G.; Reynders, J.V.W.; Santoro, R.A.; Tang, W.M.

    1992-12-01

    A comprehensive program for the development and use of particle simulation techniques for solving the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations on massively parallel computers has been carried out at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. This is a key element of our ongoing theoretical efforts to systematically investigate physics issues vital to understanding tokamak plasmas. In this paper, our focus is on spatial-gradient-driven microinstabilities. Their importance is supported by the recent progress in achieving a physics-based understanding of anomalous transport in toroidal systems which has been based on the proposition that these drift-type electrostatic modes dependent on ion temperature gradient (ITG) and trapped particle effects are dominant in the bulk (``confinement``) region. Although their presence is consistent with a number of significant confinement trends, results from high temperature tokamaks such as TFTR have highlighted the need for better insight into the nonlinear properties of such instabilities in long-mean-free-path plasmas. In addressing this general issue, we report important new results including (i) the first fully toroidal 3D gyrokinetic simulation of ITG modes and (ii) realistic toroidal eigenmode calculations demonstrating the unique capability to deal with large scale kinetic behavior extending over many rational surfaces. The effects of ITG modes (iii) on the inward pinch of impurities in 3D slab geometry and (iv) on the existence of microtearing modes in 2D slab are also discussed. Finally, (v) sheared toroidal flow effects on trapped-particle modes are presented.

  11. Generalized functional formulation for multi-fractal representation of basin hydraulic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, JongChun; Paik, Kyungrock

    2015-04-01

    Natural rivers exhibit power-functional variability in their width, depth, and velocity with flow discharge (Leopold and Maddock, 1953). This relation named hydraulic geometry has been empirically supported by many field studies across the world (e.g., Leopold et al., 1964; Stall and Fok, 1968). The relationship appears either at a fixed cross-section, showing temporal variability, or along a downstream direction across an entire basin, showing spatial variability, the latter named downstream or basin hydraulic geometry. Theoretical studies that attempt to explain the power-law phenomenon (fractal), have assumed that the watershed is homogeneous hydrologically and geologically. Nevertheless, real watersheds are often subject to spatially heterogeneous conditions, due to various reasons including partial area storm coverage (Sólyom and Tucker, 2004) and transmission losses on bed and banks (Lane et al., 1997). In this setting, hydraulic geometry relationships are likely to deviate from monotonic power-law relationship and to follow rather more complex multi-fractal characteristics. In fact, deviation from single power-law was reported for at-a-station relationship of midwest rivers in US (Dodov and Foufoula-Georgiou, 2004). In the case of downstream variation, we identify significant multi-fractal characteristics over the Colorado River basin where strong heterogeneity in geological and hydrological settings presents. Conventional power-law hydraulic geometry relationships cannot express the functional variability for these cases. Motivated by this fact, we generalize the hydraulic geometry functional formulation in this study to express multi-fractal relationships. To do so, we couple the formulation of Paik and Kumar (2004), which generalized at-a-station and downstream relationships, with the formulation of Dodov and Foufoula-Georgiou (2004) which was proposed for multi-scaling in at-a-station relationship. The proposed formulation is successfully evaluated with

  12. T-duality and exceptional generalized geometry through symmetries of dg-manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupercio, Ernesto; Rengifo, Camilo; Uribe, Bernardo

    2014-09-01

    We study dg-manifolds which are R[2]-bundles over R[1]-bundles over manifolds, we calculate its symmetries, its derived symmetries and we introduce the concept of T-dual dg-manifolds. Within this framework, we construct the T-duality map as a degree -1 map between the cohomologies of the T-dual dg-manifolds and we show an explicit isomorphism between the differential graded algebra of the symmetries of the T-dual dg-manifolds. We, furthermore, show how the algebraic structure underlying Bn generalized geometry could be recovered as derived dg-Leibniz algebra of the fixed points of the T-dual automorphism acting on the symmetries of a self T-dual dg-manifold, and we show how other types of algebraic structures underlying exceptional generalized geometry could be obtained as derived symmetries of certain dg-manifolds.

  13. Effective geometries and generalized uncertainty principle corrections to the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Ernesto; Villalba, Fabián D.; Bargueño, Pedro

    2016-06-01

    In this work we construct several black-hole metrics which are consistent with the generalized uncertainty principle logarithmic correction to the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy formula. After preserving the event horizon at the usual position, a singularity at the Planck scale is found. Finally, these geometries are shown to be realized by certain model of non-linear electrodynamics, which resembles previously studied regular black-hole solutions.

  14. Generalized complex geometry of pure backgrounds in 10 and 11 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prins, Daniël; Tsimpis, Dimitrios

    2015-04-01

    Pure backgrounds are a natural generalization of supersymmetric Calabi-Yau compactifications in the presence of flux. They are described in the language of generalized SU(d)× SU(d) structures and generalized complex geometry, and they exhibit some interesting general patterns: the internal manifold is generalized Calabi-Yau, whereas the Ramond-Ramond flux is exact in a precise sense, as discussed in this paper. We have shown that although these two characteristics do persist in the case of generic 10-dimensional Euclidean type II pure backgrounds, they do not capture the full content of supersymmetry. We also discuss the uplift of real Euclidean type IIA pure backgrounds to supersymmetric backgrounds of Lorentzian 11-dimensional supergravity.

  15. Internal connectivity of meandering rivers: Statistical generalization of channel hydraulic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapiga, M. J.; Smith, V. B.; Nittrouer, J. A.; Mohrig, D.; Parker, G.

    2015-09-01

    The geometry of rivers has been characterized in terms of downstream and at-a-station hydraulic geometry, based on individual cross sections. Such analyses do not, however, provide insight as to how these cross sections are connected. We generalize the concept of hydraulic geometry, using data on bathymetry from four reaches of meandering rivers that include at least five bends. We quantify connectivity in terms of the probability that a connected path exists such that a given attribute remains within specified bounds along it. While the concept is general, here we apply it to vessel navigability. We develop a predictor for navigability in meandering rivers, which requires only the following, relatively easily obtained input: vessel draft, vessel width, bankfull depth, bankfull width, relative difference between current and bankfull water surface elevation, and length of desired navigation path. The predictor is applicable to both bankfull and below-bankfull stage. A key input parameter is the standard deviation of the probability distribution of depth. This parameter, in and of itself, yields no information on connectivity as it does not capture the spatial orientation of depth variation. We find, however, that (a) the probability function for connectivity does depend on this parameter, and (b) its use allows for an approximate similarity collapse of the probability function, so providing a quasi-universal predictive relation applying to all four reaches. The results also suggest potential application to more complex forms for connectivity that involve other or multiple in-stream physical variables.

  16. Advances on BYY harmony learning: information theoretic perspective, generalized projection geometry, and independent factor autodetermination.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei

    2004-07-01

    The nature of Bayesian Ying-Yang harmony learning is reexamined from an information theoretic perspective. Not only its ability for model selection and regularization is explained with new insights, but also discussions are made on its relations and differences from the studies of minimum description length (MDL), Bayesian approach, the bit-back based MDL, Akaike information criterion (AIC), maximum likelihood, information geometry, Helmholtz machines, and variational approximation. Moreover, a generalized projection geometry is introduced for further understanding such a new mechanism. Furthermore, new algorithms are also developed for implementing Gaussian factor analysis (FA) and non-Gaussian factor analysis (NFA) such that selecting appropriate factors is automatically made during parameter learning. PMID:15461081

  17. Toroidal circular dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raybould, T. A.; Fedotov, V. A.; Papasimakis, N.; Kuprov, I.; Youngs, I. J.; Chen, W. T.; Tsai, D. P.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that the induced toroidal dipole, represented by currents flowing on the surface of a torus, makes a distinct and indispensable contribution to circular dichroism. We show that toroidal circular dichroism supplements the well-known mechanism involving electric dipole and magnetic dipole transitions. We illustrate this with rigorous analysis of the experimentally measured polarization-sensitive transmission spectra of an artificial metamaterial, constructed from elements of toroidal symmetry. We argue that toroidal circular dichroism will be found in large biomolecules with elements of toroidal symmetry and should be taken into account in the interpretation of circular dichroism spectra of organics.

  18. Shuttleless toroid winder

    DOEpatents

    Lindenmeyer, Carl W.

    1981-01-01

    A lower support receives a toroid at a winding station with the axis of the toroid aligned with a slot in the support. An upper guide member applies an axial force to hold the toroid against the lower support. A pair of movable jaws carried by an indexing mechanism engage the outer surface of the toroid to apply a radial holding force. While the toroid is thus held, a wire is placed axially through the toroid, assisted by a funnel-shaped surface in the upper guide member, and is drawn tight about the toroid by a pair of cooperating draw rollers. When operated in the "full cycle" mode, the operator then actuates a switch which energizes a power drive to release the axial clamp and to drive the indexing mechanism and the jaws to rotate the toroid about its axis. At the same time, the wire is ejected from the draw rollers beneath the toroid so that the operator may grasp it to form another loop. When the toroid is fully indexed, the jaws release it, and the upper guide member is returned to clamp the toroid axially while the indexing mechanism is returned to its starting position. The apparatus may also be operated in a "momentary contact" mode in which the mechanism is driven only for the time a switch is actuated.

  19. Experimental Investigation of the Natural Frequencies of Liquids in Toroidal Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarty, John Locke; Leonard, H. Wayne; Walton, William C., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    Several toroidal configurations applicable to missile and space-vehicle liquid storage systems were oscillated to study the natural frequencies of the antisymmetric modes of contained liquids over a range of liquid depths and tank sizes. Natural frequencies for tank oscillations parallel to the free surface of both vertical and horizontal tank orientations. Natural frequencies were obtained. The data are presented in terms of dimensionless parameters which are obtained by relating experimentally determined natural liquid frequencies to analytical expressions developed through consideration of the physics of the problem and from existing solutions for liquids in tanks having similar boundaries at the liquid surface. The experimental results obtained for the toroids indicate that these parameters are applicable to the prediction of the natural frequencies of fluids in toroids of general geometry and size.

  20. General Relativity Exactly Described by Use of Newton's Laws within a Curved Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savickas, David

    2014-03-01

    The connection between general relativity and Newtonian mechanics is shown to be much closer than generally recognized. When Newton's second law is written in a curved geometry by using the physical components of a vector as defined in tensor calculus, and by replacing distance within the momentum's velocity by the vector metric ds in a curved geometry, the second law can then be easily shown to be exactly identical to the geodesic equation of motion occurring in general relativity. By using a time whose vector direction is constant, as similarly occurs in Newtonian mechanics, this equation can be separated into two equations one of which is a curved three-dimensional equation of motion and the other is an equation for energy. For the gravitational field of an isolated particle, they yield the Schwarzschild equations. They can be used to describe gravitation for any array of masses for which the Newtonian gravitational potential is known, and is applied here to describe motion in the gravitational field of a thin mass-rod.

  1. A versatile and low order hybrid stress element for general shell geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, David S.; Pian, Theodore H. H.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid stress general shell element is developed based on the Hellinger-Reissner principle modified for relaxed element compatibility conditions. The element is based on a consistent first order thin shell theory with Love Kirchhoff hypotheses. It is of quadrilateral shape with only four corner nodes and five degrees of freedom per node. The geometry of the element is approximated through a bi-cubic polynomial surface patch. Numerical examples consist of torsion-loaded slit cylinder and pinched cylinder with open ends and rigid diaphragmed ends. Also, the representation of the rigid body motion is studied by series of parametric eigenvalue analysis of the stiffness matrix.

  2. Exact Descriptions of General Relativity Derived from Newtonian Mechanics within Curved Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savickas, David

    2015-04-01

    General relativity and Newtonian mechanics are shown to be exactly related when Newton's second law is written in a curved geometry by using the physical components of a vector as is defined in tensor calculus. By replacing length within the momentum's velocity by the vector metric in a curved geometry the second law can then be shown to be exactly identical to the geodesic equation of motion occurring in general relativity. When time's vector direction is constant, as similarly occurs in Newtonian mechanics, this equation can be reduced to a curved three-dimensional equation of motion that yields the the Schwarzschild equations of motion for an isolated particle. They can be used to describe gravitational behavior for any array of masses for which the Newtonian gravitational potential is known, and is shown to describe a mass particle's behavior in the gravitational field of a thin mass-rod. This use of Newton's laws allows relativistic behavior to be described in a physically comprehensible manner. D. Savickas, Int. J. Mod. Phys. D 23 1430018, (2014).

  3. The effect of toroidicity on reversed field pinch dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Jorge A.; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David C.

    2014-09-01

    The influence of the curvature of the imposed magnetic field on reversed field pinch dynamics is investigated by comparing the flow of a magnetofluid in a torus with aspect ratio 1.83, with the flow in a periodic cylinder. It is found that an axisymmetric toroidal mode is always present in the toroidal, but absent in the cylindrical configuration. In particular, in contrast to the cylinder, the toroidal case presents a double poloidal recirculation cell with a shear localized at the plasma edge. Quasi-single-helicity states are found to be more persistent in toroidal than in periodic cylinder geometry.

  4. Toroidal Lasing Spaser

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yao-Wei; Chen, Wei Ting; Wu, Pin Chieh; Fedotov, Vassili A.; Zheludev, Nikolay I.; Tsai, Din Ping

    2013-01-01

    Toroidal shapes are often found in bio-molecules, viruses, proteins and fats, but only recently it was proved experimentally that toroidal structures can support exotic high-frequency electromagnetic excitations that are neither electric or magnetic multipoles. Such excitations, known as toroidal moments, could be playing an important role in enhancing inter-molecular interaction and energy transfer due to its higher electromagnetic energy confinement and weaker coupling to free space. Using a model toroidal metamaterial system, we show that coupling optical gain medium with high Q-factor toroidal resonance mode can enhance the single pass amplification to up to 65 dB. This offers an opportunity of creating the “toroidal” lasing spaser, a source of coherent optical radiation that is fueled by toroidal plasmonic oscillations in the nanostructure. PMID:23393619

  5. Helicopter rotor wake geometry and its influence in forward flight. Volume 1: Generalized wake geometry and wake effect on rotor airloads and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. A.; Landgrebe, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    An analytic investigation to generalize wake geometry of a helicopter rotor in steady level forward flight and to demonstrate the influence of wake deformation in the prediction of rotor airloads and performance is described. Volume 1 presents a first level generalized wake model based on theoretically predicted tip vortex geometries for a selected representative blade design. The tip vortex distortions are generalized in equation form as displacements from the classical undistorted tip vortex geometry in terms of vortex age, blade azimuth, rotor advance ratio, thrust coefficient, and number of blades. These equations were programmed to provide distorted wake coordinates at very low cost for use in rotor airflow and airloads prediction analyses. The sensitivity of predicted rotor airloads, performance, and blade bending moments to the modeling of the tip vortex distortion are demonstrated for low to moderately high advance ratios for a representative rotor and the H-34 rotor. Comparisons with H-34 rotor test data demonstrate the effects of the classical, predicted distorted, and the newly developed generalized wake models on airloads and blade bending moments. Use of distorted wake models results in the occurrence of numerous blade-vortex interactions on the forward and lateral sides of the rotor disk. The significance of these interactions is related to the number and degree of proximity to the blades of the tip vortices. The correlation obtained with the distorted wake models (generalized and predicted) is encouraging.

  6. A geometry and texture coupled flexible generalization of urban building models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Man; Zhang, Liqiang; Takis Mathiopoulos, P.; Xie, Wenqing; Ding, Yusi; Wang, Hao

    2012-06-01

    In the past, numerous research efforts have focused on generalization of city building models. However, a generic procedure for creating flexible generalization results supporting the fast and efficient update of original building models with various complexities is still an open problem. Moreover, building clusters created in previously published generalization methods are not flexible enough to meet the various requirements for both legible and realistic visualization. Motivated by these observations, this paper proposes a new method for generating a flexible generalization outcome which enables convenient updating of original building models. It also proposes a flexible preprocessing of this generalized information to render a legible and realistic urban scene. This is accomplished by introducing a novel component structure, termed as FEdge, particularly designed for efficiently managing the geometry and texture information in building cluster instances (both original building models and building clusters) during the generalization, visualization and updating processes. Furthermore, a multiple representation structure, referred to as Evolved Buffer-Tree (EBT), is also introduced. The purpose of the EBT is to organize building cluster instances and to employ more flexible LODs for both legible and realistic visualization of urban scenes. FEdge has an intuitive planar shape which can be effectively used in representing rough 3D facade composed by detailed continuous meshes. Each FEdge is given a unique identifier, referred to as FEdge Index. In the proposed generalization scheme, firstly each original building model treated as a building cluster instance is abstracted and presented as FEdge Indices. These FEdge Indices are then used for producing generalized building cluster instances in the EBT portably, and to support convenient model updating and flexible preprocessing of the generalization results for renderable building cluster instances. Secondly, to achieve

  7. General semi-structured grid generation for complex three-dimensional geometries with disparate length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khawaja, Aly Salim

    A general prismatic mesh generator capable of discretizing flow domains for arbitrary 3-D geometries is presented. The overall project objective was to be able to perform routine viscous flow simulations for engineering design and analysis. The suitability of the hybrid prismatic/tetrahedral grid generation approach for numerical computations of flow phenomena over complex bodies was to be authenticated. The prismatic elements are used in close proximity to the body surface to resolve the viscous stresses whereas tetrahedral elements tessellate the rest of the domain. Such an approach allows the exploitation of the best of both, structured and unstructured grid generation approaches. A special algorithm is developed to allow the prisms to march along general splined boundary surfaces. The method uses a 2-D marching scheme in the parametric domain and performs coordinate transfers to the real space. The inclusion of such a scheme allows the use of periodic boundary conditions to reduce solver memory requirements and broaden the range of applicability of the grid generator. The work also introduces the novel ideas of multi-zone and unstructured prismatic mesh generation to allow different levels of grid resolution within the same geometry and to treat disparate length scales. Both these developments are aimed at optimizing the discretized flow domain with the fewest elements and reducing the time step restrictions of the solver by increasing the volumes of the individual cells. Several quality enhancement and validity checks are presented along with an automatic mesh regeneration mechanism for improved overall quality. The combination of the developed algorithms allows for the discretization of realistic 3-D geometries without much user intervention. Applications of the hybrid prismatic/tetrahedral grid generator are presented from various fields such as the aerospace, turbomachinery and offshore industries. The robustness and efficiency of the prismatic grid

  8. Unifying the Geometry of General Relativity with the Virtual Particle Nature of Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubenstein, John

    2007-03-01

    General Relativity (GR) and Quantum Electro-Dynamics (QED) utilize different underlying assumptions regarding the nature of vacuum and space-time. GR requires the actual geometry of space-time to change in the presence of mass resulting in gravitation. QED operates within flat space-time and propagates forces through the exchange of virtual photons. Efforts to unify these theories are -- despite their mathematical elegance -- complex, cumbersome and incomplete. The inability to achieve unification may suggest a need to re-think basic conceptual models. The IWPD Research Center has found evidence suggesting that time -- as a unique degree of freedom -- may be illusionary. Our research suggests that time may be ``embedded'' within a spatial dimension through a geometric manipulation of the light cone in Minkowski space-time. This interpretation of space-time provides predictions that are experimentally verifiable and suggests a conceptual path for the unification of GR and QED.

  9. Development of a general method for obtaining the geometry of microfluidic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Razavi, Mohammad Sayed Salimpour, M. R.; Shirani, Ebrahim

    2014-01-15

    In the present study, a general method for geometry of fluidic networks is developed with emphasis on pressure-driven flows in the microfluidic applications. The design method is based on general features of network's geometry such as cross-sectional area and length of channels. Also, the method is applicable to various cross-sectional shapes such as circular, rectangular, triangular, and trapezoidal cross sections. Using constructal theory, the flow resistance, energy loss and performance of the network are optimized. Also, by this method, practical design strategies for the fabrication of microfluidic networks can be improved. The design method enables rapid prediction of fluid flow in the complex network of channels and is very useful for improving proper miniaturization and integration of microfluidic networks. Minimization of flow resistance of the network of channels leads to universal constants for consecutive cross-sectional areas and lengths. For a Y-shaped network, the optimal ratios of consecutive cross-section areas (A{sub i+1}/A{sub i}) and lengths (L{sub i+1}/L{sub i}) are obtained as A{sub i+1}/A{sub i} = 2{sup −2/3} and L{sub i+1}/L{sub i} = 2{sup −1/3}, respectively. It is shown that energy loss in the network is proportional to the volume of network. It is also seen when the number of channels is increased both the hydraulic resistance and the volume occupied by the network are increased in a similar manner. Furthermore, the method offers that fabrication of multi-depth and multi-width microchannels should be considered as an integral part of designing procedures. Finally, numerical simulations for the fluid flow in the network have been performed and results show very good agreement with analytic results.

  10. General relativity exactly described in terms of Newton's laws within curved geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savickas, D.

    2014-07-01

    Many years ago Milne and McCrea showed in their well-known paper that the Hubble expansion occurring in general relativity could be exactly described by the use of Newtonian mechanics. It will be shown that a similar method can be extended to, and used within, curved geometries when Newton's second law is expressed within a four-dimensional curved spacetime. The second law will be shown to yield an equation that is exactly identical to the geodesic equation of motion of general relativity. This in itself yields no new information concerning relativity since the equation is mathematically identical to the relativistic equation. However, when the time in the second law is defined to have a constant direction as effectively occurs in Newtonian mechanics, and no longer acts as a fourth dimension as exists in relativity theory, it separates into a vector equation in a curved three-dimensional space and an additional second scalar equation that describes conservation of energy. It is shown that the curved Newtonian equations of motion define the metric coefficients which occur in the Schwarzschild solution and that they also define its equations of motion. Also, because the curved Newtonian equations developed here use masses as gravitational sources, as occurs in Newtonian mechanics, they make it possible to derive the solution for other kinds of mass distributions and are used here to find the metric equation for a thin mass-rod and the equation of motion for a mass particle orbiting it in its relativistic gravitational field.

  11. A discrete ordinates approximation to the neutron transport equation applied to generalized geometries

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.

    1992-12-01

    A method for applying the discrete ordinates method for solution of the neutron transport equation in arbitary two-dimensional meshes has been developed. The finite difference approach normally used to approximate spatial derivatives in extrapolating angular fluxes across a cell is replaced by direct solution of the characteristic form of the transport equation for each discrete direction. Thus, computational cells are not restricted to the traditional shape of a mesh element within a given coordinate system. However, in terms of the treatment of energy and angular dependencies, this method resembles traditional discrete ordinates techniques. Using the method developed here, a general two-dimensional space can be approximated by an irregular mesh comprised of arbitrary polygons. The present work makes no assumptions about the orientations or the number of sides in a given cell, and computes all geometric relationships between each set of sides in each cell for each discrete direction. A set of non-reentrant polygons can therefore be used to represent any given two dimensional space. Results for a number of test problems have been compared to solutions obtained from traditional methods, with good agreement. Comparisons include benchmarks against analytical results for problems with simple geometry, as well numerical results obtained from traditional discrete ordinates methods by applying the ANISN and TWOTRAN computer programs. Numerical results were obtained for problems ranging from simple one-dimensional geometry to complicated multidimensional configurations. These results have demonstrated the ability of the developed method to closely approximate complex geometrical configurations and to obtain accurate results for problems that are extremely difficult to model using traditional methods.

  12. tt * geometry in 3 and 4 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecotti, Sergio; Gaiotto, Davide; Vafa, Cumrun

    2014-05-01

    We consider the vacuum geometry of supersymmetric theories with 4 supercharges, on a flat toroidal geometry. The 2 dimensional vacuum geometry is known to be captured by the tt * geometry. In the case of 3 dimensions, the parameter space is ( T 2 × ) N and the vacuum geometry turns out to be a solution to a generalization of monopole equations in 3 N dimensions where the relevant topological ring is that of line operators. We compute the generalization of the 2d cigar amplitudes, which lead to S 2 × S 1 or S 3 partition functions which are distinct from the supersymmetric partition functions on these spaces, but reduce to them in a certain limit. We show the sense in which these amplitudes generalize the structure of 3d Chern-Simons theories and 2d RCFT's. In the case of 4 dimensions the parameter space is of the form X M,N = ( T 3 × ) M × T 3 N , and the vacuum geometry is a solution to a mixture of generalized monopole equations and generalized instanton equations (known as hyper-holomorphic connections). In this case the topological rings are associated to surface operators. We discuss the physical meaning of the generalized Nahm transforms which act on all of these geometries.

  13. A generalization of the Drude-Smith formula for magneto-optical conductivities in Faraday geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, F. W.; Xu, W.; Li, L. L.; Zhang, C.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we generalize the impulse response approach and Poisson statistics proposed by Smith [Phys. Rev. B 64, 155106 (2001)] to evaluate the longitudinal and transverse magneto-optical conductivities in an electron gas system in Faraday geometry. Comparing with the standard Drude model, the coefficients an are introduced in the Drude-Smith formula to describe the backscattering or localization effect for the nth electronic scattering event. Such a formula can also be applied to study the elements of the dielectric function matrix in the presence of magnetic and radiation fields in electron gas systems. This theoretical work is primely motivated by recent experimental activities in measuring the real and imaginary parts of longitudinal and transverse magneto-optical conductivities in condensed matter materials and electronic devices using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. We believe that the results obtained from this study can provide an appropriate theoretical tool in reproducing the experimental findings and in fitting with experimental data to determine the important sample and material parameters.

  14. Twisted Quantum Toroidal Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Naihuan; Liu, Rongjia

    2014-09-01

    We construct a principally graded quantum loop algebra for the Kac-Moody algebra. As a special case a twisted analog of the quantum toroidal algebra is obtained together with the quantum Serre relations.

  15. Induced toroid structures and toroid polarizabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Costescu, A.; Radescu, E.E.

    1987-06-01

    The frequency-dependent toroid dipole polarizability ..gamma..(..omega..) of a (nonrelativistic, spinless) hydrogenlike atom in its ground state is calculated analytically in terms of two Gauss hypergeometric functions. The static result reads ..gamma..(..omega.. = 0) = (23/60)..cap alpha../sup 2/Z/sup -4/a/sub 0/ /sup 5/(..cap alpha.. = fine-structure constant, Z = nucleus charge number, a/sub 0/ = Bohr radius). Comparing the present evaluations for atoms with previous ones for pions, one sees that the role of the induced toroid moments (as against that of the usual electric ones) increases considerably towards smaller distances (or higher characteristic excitation energies). It might become dramatic at the subhadronic level.

  16. Toroidal core winder

    DOEpatents

    Potthoff, Clifford M.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for placing wire windings on a toroidal body, such as a transformer core, having an orifice in its center. The apparatus comprises a wire storage spool, a wire loop holding continuous belt maintained in a C-shaped loop by a belt supporting structure and provision for turning the belt to place and tighten loops of wire on a toroidal body, which is disposed within the gap of the C-shaped belt loop.

  17. A generalized 2D pencil beam scaling algorithm for proton dose calculation in heterogeneous slab geometries

    PubMed Central

    Westerly, David C.; Mo, Xiaohu; Tomé, Wolfgang A.; Mackie, Thomas R.; DeLuca, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Pencil beam algorithms are commonly used for proton therapy dose calculations. Szymanowski and Oelfke [“Two-dimensional pencil beam scaling: An improved proton dose algorithm for heterogeneous media,” Phys. Med. Biol. 47, 3313–3330 (2002)10.1088/0031-9155/47/18/304] developed a two-dimensional (2D) scaling algorithm which accurately models the radial pencil beam width as a function of depth in heterogeneous slab geometries using a scaled expression for the radial kernel width in water as a function of depth and kinetic energy. However, an assumption made in the derivation of the technique limits its range of validity to cases where the input expression for the radial kernel width in water is derived from a local scattering power model. The goal of this work is to derive a generalized form of 2D pencil beam scaling that is independent of the scattering power model and appropriate for use with any expression for the radial kernel width in water as a function of depth. Methods: Using Fermi-Eyges transport theory, the authors derive an expression for the radial pencil beam width in heterogeneous slab geometries which is independent of the proton scattering power and related quantities. The authors then perform test calculations in homogeneous and heterogeneous slab phantoms using both the original 2D scaling model and the new model with expressions for the radial kernel width in water computed from both local and nonlocal scattering power models, as well as a nonlocal parameterization of Molière scattering theory. In addition to kernel width calculations, dose calculations are also performed for a narrow Gaussian proton beam. Results: Pencil beam width calculations indicate that both 2D scaling formalisms perform well when the radial kernel width in water is derived from a local scattering power model. Computing the radial kernel width from a nonlocal scattering model results in the local 2D scaling formula under-predicting the pencil beam width by as

  18. Applications to engineering design of the general geometry, grid & analysis (GGA) object in DT-NURBES

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, B.; Ferguson, D.

    1996-12-31

    The DT-NURBS spline geometry subroutine library is a Non-Uniform Rational B-spline library developed with the goal of providing a common mathematical base for integrating geometrically dependent analysis tools with design geometry; and as a tool for use in the development of multi-disciplinary applications. In this paper we will describe the approach taken with the DT-NURBS library, the basic library entities themselves and how they can be used to affect the integration of diverse geometries and analyses.

  19. Heterotic free fermionic and symmetric toroidal orbifold models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanasopoulos, P.; Faraggi, A. E.; Nibbelink, S. Groot; Mehta, V. M.

    2016-04-01

    Free fermionic models and symmetric heterotic toroidal orbifolds both constitute exact backgrounds that can be used effectively for phenomenological explorations within string theory. Even though it is widely believed that for Z_2× Z_2 orbifolds the two descriptions should be equivalent, a detailed dictionary between both formulations is still lacking. This paper aims to fill this gap: we give a detailed account of how the input data of both descriptions can be related to each other. In particular, we show that the generalized GSO phases of the free fermionic model correspond to generalized torsion phases used in orbifold model building. We illustrate our translation methods by providing free fermionic realizations for all Z_2× Z_2 orbifold geometries in six dimensions.

  20. The Effects of Teaching Descriptive Geometry in General Engineering 103 on Spatial Relations Tests Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallings, William M.

    It was hypothesized that instruction in descriptive geometry produces an increase in SRT scores. The resultant data do not firmly support this hypothesis. It is suggested that this study be replicated with the use of randomly selected control groups. (MS)

  1. Prediction of plasma rotation and neoclassical toroidal viscosity in KSTAR discharges based on plasma fluid formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Cheonho; Stacey, Weston

    2015-11-01

    Braginskii's flow rate of strain tensor formalism, as extended first to low collisional plasmas in axisymmetric circular toroidal flux surface geometry, then to elongated axisymmetric flux surface geometry, has recently been extended to 3-D non-axisymmetric toroidal flux surface geometry. In toroidally non-axisymmetric plasmas, the leading order neoclassical parallel viscosity terms in the flow rate of strain tensor do not vanish to cause flux surface averaged toroidal angular momentum damping and eventually slow down the plasma rotation. The formalism of Ref. 5 provides a means to systematically evaluate the ``neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV)'' in curvilinear plasma geometry based on the plasma fluid equations. As the first step of its application, a practical formalism for circular plasmas, given in the appendix of Ref. 5, will be applied to KSTAR discharges to predict the rotation and NTV, which can also be compared with actual rotation measurements to numerically validate the NTV damping effects.

  2. Video Toroid Cavity Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2004-08-10

    A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

  3. Toroidal magnet system

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro; Baker, Charles C.

    1981-01-01

    In a plasma device having a toroidal plasma containment vessel, a toroidal field-generating coil system includes fixed linking coils each formed of first and second sections with the first section passing through a central opening through the containment vessel and the second section completing the linking coil to link the containment vessel. A plurality of removable unlinked coils are each formed of first and second C-shaped sections joined to each other at their open ends with their bights spaced apart. The second C-shaped section of each movable coil is removably mounted adjacent the second section of a linking coil, with the containment vessel disposed between the open ends of the first and second C-shaped sections. Electric current is passed through the linking and removable coils in opposite sense in the respective adjacent second sections to produce a net toroidal field.

  4. The geometrical structure of quantum theory as a natural generalization of information geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Reginatto, Marcel

    2015-01-13

    Quantum mechanics has a rich geometrical structure which allows for a geometrical formulation of the theory. This formalism was introduced by Kibble and later developed by a number of other authors. The usual approach has been to start from the standard description of quantum mechanics and identify the relevant geometrical features that can be used for the reformulation of the theory. Here this procedure is inverted: the geometrical structure of quantum theory is derived from information geometry, a geometrical structure that may be considered more fundamental, and the Hilbert space of the standard formulation of quantum mechanics is constructed using geometrical quantities. This suggests that quantum theory has its roots in information geometry.

  5. The geometrical structure of quantum theory as a natural generalization of information geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reginatto, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Quantum mechanics has a rich geometrical structure which allows for a geometrical formulation of the theory. This formalism was introduced by Kibble and later developed by a number of other authors. The usual approach has been to start from the standard description of quantum mechanics and identify the relevant geometrical features that can be used for the reformulation of the theory. Here this procedure is inverted: the geometrical structure of quantum theory is derived from information geometry, a geometrical structure that may be considered more fundamental, and the Hilbert space of the standard formulation of quantum mechanics is constructed using geometrical quantities. This suggests that quantum theory has its roots in information geometry.

  6. Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2002-09-01

    The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

  7. Appearance of toroidal structure in dissipating laser-generated sparks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassif, D.; Hüwel, L.

    2000-03-01

    We have investigated the temporal and spatial evolution of laser-induced plasmas in pure nitrogen. A 1064 nm, 20 ns pulse from a neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser with pulse energies ranging from 175 to 500 mJ is tightly focused to produce a spark at various, near-atmospheric pressures. Spatially resolved Rayleigh scattered light from a time-delayed, 355 nm Nd:YAG laser pulse traversing the spark at right angles is collected with an image intensifier gated, linear diode array. At a delay time of 30 μs, the laser plasma remnant appears as a nearly spherically symmetric region with a center temperature of about 4500 K. After around 100 μs, the hot gas starts to change into a toroidal shape expanding radially at an average speed of a few meters per second. The final torus size increases with decreasing pressure and increasing laser power. This general behavior of the plasma afterglow can be reconciled with a numerical model, where in the aftermath of the spark shock wave a pair of vortices is produced which in turn moves the residual hot gas into the observed toroidal geometry.

  8. Geometry of the submanifolds of SEXn. II. The generalized fundamental equations for the hypersubmanifold of SEXn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kyung Tae; Lee, Jong Woo

    1989-08-01

    A connection which is both Einstein and semisymmetric is called an SE connection, and a generalized n-dimensional Riemannian manifold on which the differential geometric structure is imposed by g λμ through an SE connection is called an n-dimensional SE manifold and denoted by SEXn. This paper is a direct continuation of earlier work. In this paper, we derive the generalized fundamental equations for the hypersubmanifold of SEXn, including generalized Gauss formulas, generalized Weingarten equations, and generalized Gauss-Codazzi equations.

  9. Applications of a generalized pressure correction algorithm for flows in complicated geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyy, W.; Braaten, M. E.

    An overview is given of recent progress in developing a unified numerical algorithm capable of solving flow over a wide range of Mach and Reynolds numbers in complex geometries. The algorithm is based on the pressure correction method, combined treatment of the Cartesian and contravariant velocity components on arbitrary coordinates, and second-order accurate discretization. A number of two- and three-dimensional flow problems including the effects of electric currents, turbulence, combustion, multiple phases, and compressibility are presented to demonstrate the capability of the present algorithm. Some related technical issues, such as the skewness of the grid distribution and the promise of parallel computation, are also addressed.

  10. Diffusiophoresis of a charged toroidal polyelectrolyte.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Shiojenn; Hsu, Yen-Rei; Hsu, Jyh-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Considering recent application of concentration driven motion of charged nanoparticles in sensing technology, we model the diffusiophoresis of an isolated toroidal polyelectrolyte (PE) for the first time. Choosing an aqueous KCl solution for illustration, its behavior under various conditions is simulated by varying the double layer thickness, the size of toroid, and its softness and fixed charge density. We show that the behavior of the present PE can be different both quantitatively and qualitatively from that of the corresponding spherical PE. This arises from the competition of the hydrodynamic force and the electric force acting on a PE. The geometry and the nature of a PE can also influence appreciably its behavior, yielding complicated and interesting results. PMID:26970033

  11. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W.

    2015-12-15

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≫ 1, where τ{sub R} and τ{sub V} represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  12. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W.

    2015-12-01

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τR/τV ≫ 1, where τR and τV represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τR/τV ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  13. Polytope ARTMAP: pattern classification without vigilance based on general geometry categories.

    PubMed

    Gomes Amorim, Dinani; Fernández Delgado, Manuel; Barro Ameneiro, Senén

    2007-09-01

    This paper proposes polytope ARTMAP (PTAM), an adaptive resonance theory (ART) network for classification tasks which does not use the vigilance parameter. This feature is due to the geometry of categories in PTAM, which are irregular polytopes whose borders approximate the borders among the output predictions. During training, the categories expand only towards the input pattern without category overlap. The category expansion in PTAM is naturally limited by the other categories, and not by the category size, so the vigilance is not necessary. PTAM works in a fully automatic way for pattern classification tasks, without any parameter tuning, so it is easier to employ for nonexpert users than other classifiers. PTAM achieves lower error than the leading ART networks on a complete collection of benchmark data sets, except for noisy data, without any parameter optimization. PMID:18220182

  14. Tokamak with liquid metal toroidal field coil

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro; Schaffer, Michael J.

    1981-01-01

    Tokamak apparatus includes a pressure vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within the pressure vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside said liner. Electric current is passed through the liquid metal over a conductive path linking the toroidal space to produce a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof.

  15. Method to integrate full particle orbit in toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, X. S.; Xiao, Y.; Kuley, A.; Lin, Z.

    2015-09-01

    It is important to integrate full particle orbit accurately when studying charged particle dynamics in electromagnetic waves with frequency higher than cyclotron frequency. We have derived a form of the Boris scheme using magnetic coordinates, which can be used effectively to integrate the cyclotron orbit in toroidal geometry over a long period of time. The new method has been verified by a full particle orbit simulation in toroidal geometry without high frequency waves. The full particle orbit calculation recovers guiding center banana orbit. This method has better numeric properties than the conventional Runge-Kutta method for conserving particle energy and magnetic moment. The toroidal precession frequency is found to match that from guiding center simulation. Many other important phenomena in the presence of an electric field, such as E × B drift, Ware pinch effect and neoclassical polarization drift are also verified by the full orbit simulation.

  16. General solution of 2D and 3D superconducting quasiclassical systems: coalescing vortices and nanoisland geometries.

    PubMed

    Amundsen, Morten; Linder, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    An extension of quasiclassical Keldysh-Usadel theory to higher spatial dimensions than one is crucial in order to describe physical phenomena like charge/spin Hall effects and topological excitations like vortices and skyrmions, none of which are captured in one-dimensional models. We here present a numerical finite element method which solves the non-linearized 2D and 3D quasiclassical Usadel equation relevant for the diffusive regime. We show the application of this on three model systems with non-trivial geometries: (i) a bottlenecked Josephson junction with external flux, (ii) a nanodisk ferromagnet deposited on top of a superconductor and (iii) superconducting islands in contact with a ferromagnet. In case (i), we demonstrate that one may control externally not only the geometrical array in which superconducting vortices arrange themselves, but also to cause coalescence and tune the number of vortices. In case (iii), we show that the supercurrent path can be tailored by incorporating magnetic elements in planar Josephson junctions which also lead to a strong modulation of the density of states. The finite element method presented herein paves the way for gaining insight in physical phenomena which have remained largely unexplored due to the complexity of solving the full quasiclassical equations in higher dimensions. PMID:26961921

  17. General solution of 2D and 3D superconducting quasiclassical systems: coalescing vortices and nanoisland geometries

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Morten; Linder, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    An extension of quasiclassical Keldysh-Usadel theory to higher spatial dimensions than one is crucial in order to describe physical phenomena like charge/spin Hall effects and topological excitations like vortices and skyrmions, none of which are captured in one-dimensional models. We here present a numerical finite element method which solves the non-linearized 2D and 3D quasiclassical Usadel equation relevant for the diffusive regime. We show the application of this on three model systems with non-trivial geometries: (i) a bottlenecked Josephson junction with external flux, (ii) a nanodisk ferromagnet deposited on top of a superconductor and (iii) superconducting islands in contact with a ferromagnet. In case (i), we demonstrate that one may control externally not only the geometrical array in which superconducting vortices arrange themselves, but also to cause coalescence and tune the number of vortices. In case (iii), we show that the supercurrent path can be tailored by incorporating magnetic elements in planar Josephson junctions which also lead to a strong modulation of the density of states. The finite element method presented herein paves the way for gaining insight in physical phenomena which have remained largely unexplored due to the complexity of solving the full quasiclassical equations in higher dimensions. PMID:26961921

  18. A test of general relativity from the three-dimensional orbital geometry of a binary pulsar.

    PubMed

    van Straten, W; Bailes, M; Britton, M; Kulkarni, S R; Anderson, S B; Manchester, R N; Sarkissian, J

    2001-07-12

    Binary pulsars provide an excellent system for testing general relativity because of their intrinsic rotational stability and the precision with which radio observations can be used to determine their orbital dynamics. Measurements of the rate of orbital decay of two pulsars have been shown to be consistent with the emission of gravitational waves as predicted by general relativity, but independent verification was not possible. Such verification can in principle be obtained by determining the orbital inclination in a binary pulsar system using only classical geometrical constraints. This would permit a measurement of the expected retardation of the pulse signal arising from the general relativistic curvature of space-time in the vicinity of the companion object (the 'Shapiro delay'). Here we report high-precision radio observations of the binary millisecond pulsar PSR J0437-4715, which establish the three-dimensional structure of its orbit. We see the Shapiro delay predicted by general relativity, and we determine the mass of the neutron star and its white dwarf companion. The determination of such masses is necessary in order to understand the origin and evolution of neutron stars. PMID:11449265

  19. Looking beyond Lewis Structures: A General Chemistry Molecular Modeling Experiment Focusing on Physical Properties and Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Cole, Renee S.; Sarkar, Somnath

    2011-01-01

    We present a guided-inquiry experiment using Spartan Student Version, ready to be adapted and implemented into a general chemistry laboratory course. The experiment provides students an experience with Spartan Molecular Modeling software while discovering the relationships between the structure and properties of molecules. Topics discussed within…

  20. Simulated Textures of Toroidal Nematic Liquid Crystal Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Perry; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2014-03-01

    Nematic liquid crystals under confinement by curved surfaces can produce complex hierarchical structures whose design principles and properties have yet to be unraveled. Here we focus on toroidal geometries and perform computer simulations of the nematic textures seen between crossed-polarizers. We find agreement with experiments using director fields that exhibit pronounced twist deformations with contributions from bend and splay.

  1. Generalized Hall-effect measurement geometries and limitations of van der Pauw-type Hall-effect measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Boerger, D.M.; Kramer, J.J.; Partain, L.D.

    1981-01-01

    A rigorous derivation is given to generalize the allowed, Hall effect, sample shapes from the restrictive, rectangular parallelepiped configurations to a much more general class of geometries characterized by mirror symmetry for materials whose mobile carriers have surfaces of constant energy in k-bar space that are well described by ellipsoids. However, this mirror symmetry condition is more restrictive than the almost arbitrary sample shapes proposed with the van der Pauw technique for thin films. Experimental data taken on n-type CdS at liquid-nitrogen temperatures in magnetic field strengths of 8 and 145 kG show that errors ranging from 1 to 600% can result from van der Pauw-type geometries depending on how much the sample shape and/or contact arrangement differs from the mirror symmetry. An empirically derived averaging technique is described that reduces the observed errors to less than 13% even with van der Pauw-type shapes that do not meet the mirror symmetry conditions.

  2. A generalized reverse projection method for fan beam geometry under partially coherent illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z.; Wang, Z. L.; Gao, K.; Zhang, K.; Ge, X.; Wang, D. J.; Wang, S. H.; Chen, J.; Pan, Z. Y.; Zhu, P. P.; Wu, Z. Y.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, a generalized reverse projection (RP) method for grating-based fan beam phase contrast imaging is presented. Compared to the original RP method, rays rather than projection images are taken into account during the information extraction process. We also discuss the influence of partial coherence on the extracted information. Theoretical derivations and numerical simulations are performed to confirm the validity of the method.

  3. The Segmented Bifilar Contrawound Toroidal Helical Antenna.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanvoorhies, Kurt Louis

    The segmented bifilar contrawound toroidal helical antenna, a.k.a. QuadContra antenna creates a toroidal magnetic current whose radiated electromagnetic fields emulate those of an electric dipole located normal to the plane of the toroidal helix. This antenna is a magnetic dual of the constant current electric loop antenna. Its principal advantages of reduced size and low profile result from both its circular geometry and from the velocity factor of its slow wave contrawound helical structure. This antenna is constructed by winding two conductors in contrawound relation to each other on a toroidal form, dividing the winding into an even number of segments, and reversing the pitch sense of each conductor from one segment to another. Feed ports are located on the conductors at the segment boundaries, and are connected in alternate phase to a central signal terminal via balanced and tuned transmission line elements. At resonance, each winding segment supports a quarter-wave sinusoidal current distribution. Toroidal electric current components are canceled, and poloidal current components are enhanced in the resulting anti-symmetric mode current distribution. This study measured and simulated the velocity factor, input impedance, bandwidth and simulated the radiation gain and pattern for a variety of linear and toroidal structures. The velocity factor, modeled as a power function of the ratio of axial winding length to wire length, was two to three times slower for the anti-symmetric mode contrawound helix than for a comparable monofilar helix. The radiation characteristics of the antenna were simulated using the OSU ESP4 Moment Method based program, after making extensive improvements to accommodate a wide variety of antenna configurations and to automatically find resonant frequencies. The simulated QuadContra antenna radiates with vertically polarization in a dipole-like pattern having a gain about 2 dB less than the dipole. The gain falls off dramatically for

  4. Deformation energy of a toroidal nucleus and plane fragmentation barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchard, C.; Royer, G.

    1996-02-01

    The path leading to pumpkin-like configurations and toroidal shapes is investigated using a one-parameter shape sequence. The deformation energy is determined within the analytical expressions obtained for the various shape-dependent functions and the generalized rotating liquid drop model taking into account the proximity energy and the temperature. With increasing mass and angular momentum, a potential well appears in the toroidal shape path. For the heaviest systems, the pocket is large and locally favourable with respect to the plane fragmentation barriers which might allow the formation of evanescent toroidal systems which would rapidly decay in several fragments to minimize the surface tension.

  5. Advanced Toroidal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a new magnetic confinement plasma device under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that will lead to improvements in toroidal magnetic fusion reactors. The ATF is a type of stellerator, known as a ''torsatron'' which theoretically has the capability to operate at greater than or equal to8% beta in steady state. The ATF plasma has a major radius of 2.1 m, an average minor radius of 0.3 m, and a field of 2 T for a 2 s duration or 1 T steady state. The ATF device consists of a helical field (HF) coil set, a set of poloidal field (PF) coils, an exterior shell structure to support the coils, and a thin, helically contoured vacuum vessel inside the coils. The ATF replaces the Impurities Studies Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at ORNL and will use the ISX-B auxiliary systems including 4 MW of electron cyclotron heating. The ATF is scheduled to start operation in late 1986. An overview of the ATF device is presented, including details of the construction process envisioned. 9 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Equivalent plate analysis of aircraft wing box structures with general planform geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    A new equivalent plate analysis formulation is described which is capable of modeling aircraft wing structures with a general planform such as cranked wing boxes. Multiple trapezoidal segments are used to represent such planforms. A Ritz solution technique is used in conjunction with global displacement functions which encompass all the segments. This Ritz solution procedure is implemented efficiently into a computer program so that it can be used by rigorous optimization algorithms for application in early preliminary design. A direct method to interface this structural analysis procedure with aerodynamic programs for use in aeroelastic calculations is described. This equivalent plate analysis procedure is used to calculate the static deflections and stresses and vibration frequencies and modes of an example wing configuration. The numerical results are compared with results from a finite element model of the same configuration to illustrate typical levels of accuracy and computation times resulting from use of this procedure.

  7. Equivalent plate analysis of aircraft wing box structures with general planform geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    A new equilvalent plate analysis formulation is described which is capable of modeling aircraft wing structures with a general planform such as cranked wing boxes. Multiple trapezoidal segments are used to represent such planforms. A Ritz solution technique is used in conjunction with global displacement functions which encompass all the segments. This Ritz solution procedure is implemented efficiently into a computer program so that it can be used by rigorous optimization algorithms for application in early preliminary design. A direct method to interface this structural analysis procedure with aerodynamic programs for use in aeroelastic calculations is described. This equivalent plate analysis procedure is used to calculate the static deflections and stresses and vibration frequencies and modes of an example wing configuration. The numerical results are compared with results from a finite element model of the same configuration to illustrate typical levels of accuracy and computation times resulting from use of this procedure.

  8. Kinetic treatment of nonlinear magnetized plasma motions - General geometry and parallel waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khabibrakhmanov, I. KH.; Galinskii, V. L.; Verheest, F.

    1992-01-01

    The expansion of kinetic equations in the limit of a strong magnetic field is presented. This gives a natural description of the motions of magnetized plasmas, which are slow compared to the particle gyroperiods and gyroradii. Although the approach is 3D, this very general result is used only to focus on the parallel propagation of nonlinear Alfven waves. The derivative nonlinear Schroedinger-like equation is obtained. Two new terms occur compared to earlier treatments, a nonlinear term proportional to the heat flux along the magnetic field line and a higher-order dispersive term. It is shown that kinetic description avoids the singularities occurring in magnetohydrodynamic or multifluid approaches, which correspond to the degenerate case of sound speeds equal to the Alfven speed, and that parallel heat fluxes cannot be neglected, not even in the case of low parallel plasma beta. A truly stationary soliton solution is derived.

  9. Accurate prediction model of bead geometry in crimping butt of the laser brazing using generalized regression neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Y. M.; Chang, Y.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, G. J.; Shao, X. Y.

    2015-12-01

    There are few researches that concentrate on the prediction of the bead geometry for laser brazing with crimping butt. This paper addressed the accurate prediction of the bead profile by developing a generalized regression neural network (GRNN) algorithm. Firstly GRNN model was developed and trained to decrease the prediction error that may be influenced by the sample size. Then the prediction accuracy was demonstrated by comparing with other articles and back propagation artificial neural network (BPNN) algorithm. Eventually the reliability and stability of GRNN model were discussed from the points of average relative error (ARE), mean square error (MSE) and root mean square error (RMSE), while the maximum ARE and MSE were 6.94% and 0.0303 that were clearly less than those (14.28% and 0.0832) predicted by BPNN. Obviously, it was proved that the prediction accuracy was improved at least 2 times, and the stability was also increased much more.

  10. Quantum fields in toroidal topology

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna, F.C.; Malbouisson, A.P.C.; Santana, A.E.

    2011-10-15

    The standard representation of c*-algebra is used to describe fields in compactified space-time dimensions characterized by topologies of the type {Gamma}{sub D}{sup d}=(S{sup 1}){sup d}xM{sup D-d}. The modular operator is generalized to introduce representations of isometry groups. The Poincare symmetry is analyzed and then we construct the modular representation by using linear transformations in the field modes, similar to the Bogoliubov transformation. This provides a mechanism for compactification of the Minkowski space-time, which follows as a generalization of the Fourier integral representation of the propagator at finite temperature. An important result is that the 2x2 representation of the real-time formalism is not needed. The end result on calculating observables is described as a condensate in the ground state. We initially analyze the free Klein-Gordon and Dirac fields, and then formulate non-abelian gauge theories in {Gamma}{sub D}{sup d}. Using the S-matrix, the decay of particles is calculated in order to show the effect of the compactification. - Highlights: > C*-algebra is used to describe fields in compactified space-time dimensions. > The space-time is characterized by toroidal topologies. > Representations of the Poincare group are studied by using the modular operator. > We derive non-abelian gauge theories in compactified regions of space-time. > We show the compactification effect in the decay of particles using the S-matrix.

  11. Dynamics of the Disruption Halo Current Toroidal Asymmetry in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    S.P. Gerhardt

    2012-09-27

    This paper describes the dynamics of disruption halo current non-axisymmetries in the lower divertor of the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al. Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. While. The halo currents typically have a strongly asymmetric structure where they enter the divertor floor, and this asymmetry has been observed to complete up to 7 toroidal revolutions over the duration of the halo current pulse. However, the rotation speed and toroidal extend of the asymmetry can vary significantly during the pulse. The rotation speed, halo current pulse duration, and total number of revolutions tend to be smaller in cases with large halo currents. The halo current pattern is observed to become toroidally symmetric at the end of the halo current pulse. It is proposed that this symmeterization is due to the loss of most or all of the closed field line geometry in the final phase of the vertical displacement event.

  12. Visualizing the Formation and Collapse of DNA Toroids

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, Bram; Noom, Maarten C.; van Mameren, Joost; Battle, Christopher; MacKintosh, Fred C.; Wuite, Gijs J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In living organisms, DNA is generally confined into very small volumes. In most viruses, positively charged multivalent ions assist the condensation of DNA into tightly packed toroidal structures. Interestingly, such cations can also induce the spontaneous formation of DNA toroids in vitro. To resolve the condensation dynamics and stability of DNA toroids, we use a combination of optical tweezers and fluorescence imaging to visualize in real-time spermine-induced (de)condensation in single DNA molecules. By actively controlling the DNA extension, we are able to follow (de)condensation under tension with high temporal and spatial resolution. We show that both processes occur in a quantized manner, caused by individual DNA loops added onto or removed from a toroidal condensate that is much smaller than previously observed in similar experiments. Finally, we present an analytical model that qualitatively captures the experimentally observed features, including an apparent force plateau. PMID:20441754

  13. Instability of Toroidal Magnetic Field in Jets and Plerions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1998-01-01

    Astrophysical jets and pulsar-fed supernova remnants (plerions) are expected to develop highly organized magnetic structures dominated by concentric loops of toroidal field, Bφ. It has been argued that such structures could explain the polarization properties of some jets and contribute to their lateral confinement through magnetic tension forces. A concentric toroidal field geometry is also central to the Rees-Gunn model for the Crab Nebula, the archetypal plerion, and leads to the deduction that the Crab pulsar's wind must have a weak magnetic field. Yet this kind of equilibrium between magnetic and gas pressure forces, the ``equilibrium Z-pinch'' of the controlled fusion literature, is well known to be susceptible to disruptive localized instabilities, even when the magnetic field is weak and/or boundary conditions (e.g., a dense external medium) slow or suppress global modes. Thus, the magnetic field structures imputed to the interiors of jets and plerions are unlikely to persist for very long. To determine the growth rates of Z-pinch instabilities under astrophysical conditions, I derive a dispersion relation that is valid for the relativistic fluids of which jets and plerions may be composed, in the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) limit. The dominant instabilities are kink (m = 1) and pinch (m = 0) modes. The former generally dominate, destroying the concentric field structure and probably driving the system toward a more chaotic state in which the mean field strength is independent of radius (and in which resistive dissipation of the field may be enhanced). I estimate the timescales over which the field structure is likely to be rearranged and relate these to distances along relativistic jets and radii from the central pulsar in a plerion. I conclude that the central tenet of the Rees-Gunn model for the Crab Nebula, the existence of a concentric toroidal field well outside the pulsar wind's termination shock, is physically unrealistic. With this assumption

  14. Effects of electron-cyclotron-resonance-heating-induced internal kink mode on the toroidal rotation in the KSTAR Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Seol, J; Lee, S G; Park, B H; Lee, H H; Terzolo, L; Shaing, K C; You, K I; Yun, G S; Kim, C C; Lee, K D; Ko, W H; Kwak, J G; Kim, W C; Oh, Y K; Kim, J Y; Kim, S S; Ida, K

    2012-11-01

    It is observed that the magnitude of the toroidal rotation speed is reduced by the central electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) regardless of the direction of the toroidal rotation. The magnetohydrodynamics activities generally appear with the rotation change due to ECRH. It is shown that the internal kink mode is induced by the central ECRH and breaks the toroidal symmetry. When the magnetohydrodynamics activities are present, the toroidal plasma viscosity is not negligible. The observed effects of ECRH on the toroidal plasma rotation are explained by the neoclassical toroidal viscosity in this Letter. It is found that the neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque caused by the internal kink mode damps the toroidal rotation. PMID:23215391

  15. Grinding Inside A Toroidal Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Walter; Adams, James F.; Burley, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    Weld lines ground smooth within about 0.001 in. Grinding tool for smoothing longitudinal weld lines inside toroidal cavity includes curved tunnel jig to guide grinding "mouse" along weld line. Curvature of tunnel jig matched to shape of toroid so grinding ball in mouse follows circular arc of correct radius as mouse is pushed along tunnel. Tool enables precise control of grindout shape, yet easy to use.

  16. PEGASUS Toroidal Experimental Facility*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, B.; Pegasus Group

    1998-11-01

    P EGASUS began operations in June 98 and will study the characteristics of Extremely Low-Aspect Ratio Tokamak (ELART) plasmas. The 2.0m diameter, thin-walled (6.35 mm) vacuum vessel is a continuous stainless steel shell with generous port access. Initial pump down base pressure was 5 × 10-8 torr. The high stress ohmic solenoid is powered by a 15 kV, 4.5 MJ capacitor bank and will be impedance-matched through a 10:1 step-down transformer to extend the pulse length. Operating at peak fields of 13 - 20 T, the solenoid can achieve a flux swing of up to 190mV-s over 60 ms. The toroidal field of 0.1 T on axis is powered by a 3 MVA AC/DC converter capable of 3.5 kA at 600 VDC. The equilibrium and shaping field magnets are powered by 2.2 F of commutated capacitor banks plus a 0.5 MVA programmable switching supply. Modest waveform control is available to compensate for the resistive vacuum vessel and aid in plasma shaping for elongated and diverted plasmas. Operational diagnostics include internal magnetic pickup loops, high resolution and fast framing cameras, and impurity monitoring systems. * *Supported by U.S. DoE grant No. DE-FG02-96ER54375

  17. PARTICLE-HOLE NATURE OF THE LIGHT HIGH-SPIN TOROIDAL ISOMERS

    SciTech Connect

    Staszczak, A.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Nuclei under non-collective rotation with a large angular momentum above some threshold can assume a toroidal shape. In our previous work, we showed by using cranked Skyrme Hartree Fock approach that even even, N = Z, high-K, toroidal isomeric states may have general occurrences for light nuclei with 28 < A < 52. We present here some additional results and systematics on the particle-hole nature of these high-spin toroidal isomers.

  18. Toroidal plasma enhanced CVD of diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Zvanya, John Cullen, Christopher Morris, Thomas Krchnavek, Robert R.; Holber, William Basnett, Andrew Basnett, Robert; Hettinger, Jeffrey

    2014-09-01

    An inductively coupled toroidal plasma source is used as an alternative to microwave plasmas for chemical vapor deposition of diamond films. The source, operating at a frequency of 400 kHz, synthesizes diamond films from a mixture of argon, methane, and hydrogen. The toroidal design has been adapted to create a highly efficient environment for diamond film deposition: high gas temperature and a short distance from the sample to the plasma core. Using a toroidal plasma geometry operating in the medium frequency band allows for efficient (≈90%) coupling of AC line power to the plasma and a scalable path to high-power and large-area operation. In test runs, the source generates a high flux of atomic hydrogen over a large area, which is favorable for diamond film growth. Using a deposition temperature of 900–1050 °C and a source to sample distance of 0.1–2.0 cm, diamond films are deposited onto silicon substrates. The results showed that the deposition rate of the diamond films could be controlled using the sample temperature and source to sample spacing. The results also show the films exhibit good-quality polycrystalline diamond as verified by Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction results show that the samples exhibit diamond (111) and diamond (022) crystallites. The Raman results show that the sp{sup 3} peak has a narrow spectral width (FWHM 12 ± 0.5 cm{sup −1}) and that negligible amounts of the sp{sup 2} band are present, indicating good-quality diamond films.

  19. Toroidal Simulations of Sawteeth with Diamagnetic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beidler, Matthew; Cassak, Paul; Jardin, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    The sawtooth crash in tokamaks limits the core temperature, adversely impacts confinement, and seeds disruptions. Adequate knowledge of the physics governing the sawtooth crash and a predictive capability of its ramifications has been elusive, including an understanding of incomplete reconnection, i.e., why sawteeth often cease prematurely before processing all available magnetic flux. There is an indication that diamagnetic suppression could play an important role in this phenomenon. While computational tools to study toroidal plasmas have existed for some time, extended-MHD physics have only recently been integrated. Interestingly, incomplete reconnection has been observed in simulations when diamagnetic effects are present. In the current study, we employ the three-dimensional, extended-MHD code M3D-C1 to study the sawtooth crash in a toroidal geometry. In particular, we describe how magnetic reconnection at the q = 1 rational surface evolves when self-consistently increasing diamagnetic effects are present. We also explore how the termination of reconnection may lead to core-relaxing ideal-MHD instabilities.

  20. Drift Mode Calculations in Nonaxisymmetric Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rewoldt; L.-P. Ku; W.A. Cooper; W.M. Tang

    1999-07-01

    A fully kinetic assessment of the stability properties of toroidal drift modes has been obtained for nonaxisymmetric (stellarator) geometry, in the electrostatic limit. This calculation is a comprehensive solution of the linearized gyrokinetic equation, using the lowest-order ''ballooning representation'' for high toroidal mode number instabilities, with a model collision operator. Results for toroidal drift waves destabilized by temperature gradients and/or trapped particle dynamics are presented, using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equilibria generated as part of a design effort for a quasiaxisymmetric stellarator. Comparisons of these results with those obtained for typical tokamak cases indicate that the basic trends are similar.

  1. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    general 3D geometries on GPUs, but compared to production codes like Serpent and MCNP, WARP ha

  2. Reduced-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of toroidally and poloidally localized edge localized modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelzl, M.; Guenter, S.; Mueller, W.-C.; Lackner, K.; Krebs, I.; Wenninger, R. P.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2012-08-15

    We use the non-linear reduced-magnetohydrodynamic code JOREK to study edge localized modes (ELMs) in the geometry of the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. Toroidal mode numbers, poloidal filament sizes, and radial propagation speeds of filaments into the scrape-off layer are in good agreement with observations for type-I ELMs in ASDEX Upgrade. The observed instabilities exhibit a toroidal and poloidal localization of perturbations which is compatible with the 'solitary magnetic perturbations' recently discovered in ASDEX Upgrade [R. Wenninger et al., 'Solitary magnetic perturbations at the ELM onset,' Nucl. Fusion (accepted)]. This localization can only be described in numerical simulations with high toroidal resolution.

  3. Progress in toroidal confinement and fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1987-10-01

    During the past 30 years, the characteristic T/sub i/n tau/sub E/-value of toroidal-confinement experiments has advanced by more than seven orders of magnitude. Part of this advance has been due to an increase of gross machine parameters. Most of this advance has been due to an increase of gross machine parameters. Most of the advance is associated with improvements in the ''quality of plasma confinement.'' The combined evidence of spherator and tokamak research clarifies the role of magnetic-field geometry in determining confinement and points to the importance of shielding out plasma edge effects. A true physical understanding of anomalous transport remains to be achieved. 39 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Report for collisional and chaotic transport of energetic particles in toroidal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, J.R.; Shasharina, S.G.

    1995-04-01

    The authors have made progress in two general areas of confinement plasma physics. (1) We studies a new loss mechanism of the toroidally trapped particles related to the up-down asymmetry of ripple in a tokamak. (2) We estimated the bootstrap current of the particles making transitions between the toroidally and locally states in non-axisymmetric tori, stellarators and tokamaks.

  5. Concentric Nested Toroidal Inflatable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Raboin, Jasen L.; Spexarth, Gary R.

    2010-01-01

    Assemblies comprising multiple limited- height toroidal inflatable structures nested in a concentric arrangement have been invented to obtain more design flexibility than can be obtained in single taller, wider toroidal inflatable structures (see figure). Originally intended for use as containers for habitats for humans in outer space or on remote planets, these and related prior inflatable structures could also be useful on Earth as lightweight, compactly stowable, portable special-purpose buildings that could be transported to remote locations and there inflated to full size and shape. In the case of a single inflatable toroidal structure, one important source of lack of design flexibility is the fact that an increase in outer diameter (which is sometimes desired) is necessarily accompanied by an increase in height (which is sometimes undesired). Increases in diameter and height can also cause difficulty in utilization of the resulting larger volume, in that it can become necessary to partition the volume by means of walls and floors, and features (e.g., stairs or ladders) must be added to enable vertical movement between floors. Moreover, ascending and descending between floors in a gravitational environment could pose unacceptable difficulty for the inhabitants under some circumstances. Another source of lack of design flexibility in a single toroidal inflatable structure is that for a given inflation pressure, an increase in the outer diameter of the structure necessarily entails an increase in the maximum stress in the structure. Because it is necessary to keep the maximum stress within the load-bearing capability of the structural materials, consistent with other aspects of the design, this may translate to a limit on the outer diameter. In an assembly comprising concentric nested toroidal structures, an increase in outer diameter does not necessarily entail an increase in height or a maximum stress in excess of the load-bearing capability of the structural

  6. Quantum toroidal moments of nanohelix eigenstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Johnny; Encinosa, Mario

    2015-09-01

    Developments in the area of metamaterial research have generated interest in toroidal moments and their treatment in the quantum regime. A quantum mechanical method of determining toroidal moments due to current circulating on a toroidal helix is presented. The Hamiltonian of a negatively charged spinless particle constrained to motion in the vicinity of a toroidal helix having loops of arbitrary eccentricity is developed. The resulting three dimensional Schr¨odinger equation is reduced to a one dimensional form inclusive of curvature effects. Low-lying eigenfunctions of the toroidal helix system are determined along with corresponding toroidal moments. A disagreement, not predicted by a classical treatment, arises between toroidal moments of elliptic toroidal helix systems when vertical and horizontal eccentricity are transposed.

  7. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    general 3D geometries on GPUs, but compared to production codes like Serpent and MCNP, WARP has limited capabilities. Despite WARP's lack of features, its novel algorithm implementations show that high performance can be achieved on a GPU despite the inherently divergent program flow and sparse data access patterns. WARP is not ready for everyday nuclear reactor calculations, but is a good platform for further development of GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo neutron transport. In it's current state, it may be a useful tool for multiplication factor searches, i.e. determining reactivity coefficients by perturbing material densities or temperatures, since these types of calculations typically do not require many flux tallies. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  8. Toroidal Tank Development for Upper-stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom; Roberts, Keith

    2003-01-01

    The advantages, development, and fabrication of toroidal propellant tanks are profiled in this viewgraph presentation. Several images are included of independent research and development (IR&D) of toroidal propellant tanks at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Other images in the presentation give a brief overview of Thiokol conformal tank technology development. The presentation describes Thiokol's approach to continuous composite toroidal tank fabrication in detail. Images are shown of continuous and segmented toroidal tanks fabricated by Thiokol.

  9. Transport and dynamics in toroidal fusion systems. Report of second year progress, 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schnack, D.D.

    1994-05-09

    In this document the author describes an extension of the spatial gridding techniques to an MHD model suitable for the description of the dynamics of toroidal fusion devices. Since the dominant MHD modes in these devices have relatively long toroidal wavelength, the toroidal coordinate is approximated with finite Fourier series. The unstructured, triangular mesh is used to describe the details of the poloidal geometry. With some exceptions, the hydrodynamic variables are treated in a manner analogous to that used in CFD. These quantities (mass, energy, and momentum) are volume based densities that satisfy scalar or vector conservation laws. The electromagnetic variables (the magnetic flux density B and the electric current density J) are area based densities that satisfy pseudo-vector conservation laws, and have no counterpart in fluid dynamics. These variables are also constrained to remain solenoidal. These quantities are represented on the triangular mesh in a new manner that is an extension of that used on rectangular, structured meshes. In this work the author has chosen to solve the primitive MHD equations in order to make the resulting codes and techniques more generally applicable to problems beyond the narrow scope of tokamak plasmas. The temporal stiffness problems inherent in this description of tokamak dynamics that motivate the reduced MHD model are addressed here with the semi-implicit method of time integration. Finally, the author remarks that, while the present work deals strictly with the MHD equations, other volume based fluid descriptions, such as diffusive transport could easily be adapted to these techniques and coupled with the description of the electromagnetic field presented here.

  10. Physics models in the toroidal transport code PROCTR

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, H.C.

    1990-08-01

    The physics models that are contained in the toroidal transport code PROCTR are described in detail. Time- and space-dependent models are included for the plasma hydrogenic-ion, helium, and impurity densities, the electron and ion temperatures, the toroidal rotation velocity, and the toroidal current profile. Time- and depth-dependent models for the trapped and mobile hydrogenic particle concentrations in the wall and a time-dependent point model for the number of particles in the limiter are also included. Time-dependent models for neutral particle transport, neutral beam deposition and thermalization, fusion heating, impurity radiation, pellet injection, and the radial electric potential are included and recalculated periodically as the time-dependent models evolve. The plasma solution is obtained either in simple flux coordinates, where the radial shift of each elliptical, toroidal flux surface is included to maintain an approximate pressure equilibrium, or in general three-dimensional torsatron coordinates represented by series of helical harmonics. The detailed coupling of the plasma, scrape-off layer, limiter, and wall models through the neutral transport model makes PROCTR especially suited for modeling of recycling and particle control in toroidal plasmas. The model may also be used in a steady-state profile analysis mode for studying energy and particle balances starting with measured plasma profiles.

  11. A Model for Task Design with Focus on Exploration, Explanation, and Generalization in a Dynamic Geometry Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahlgren, Maria; Brunström, Mats

    2014-01-01

    The increasing availability of new technologies in schools provides new possibilities for the integration of technology in mathematics education. However, research has shown that there is a need for new kinds of task that utilize the affordances provided by new technology. Numerous studies have demonstrated that dynamic geometry environments…

  12. Topology of tokamak plasma equilibria with toroidal current reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Paulo; Bizarro, Joao P. S.

    2012-01-15

    Some general principles about scalar functions with critical points are used to rigorously ascertain that magnetic equilibria with both toroidal current reversal and nested magnetic surfaces are atypical solutions and highly unstable to arbitrary perturbations of boundary conditions and other parameters. The cause for such is shown to lie in the condition of nested magnetic surfaces and not in the possibility of current reversal and consequent vanishing of the poloidal field inside the plasma. Rather than supporting the claim that instability against experimentally driven perturbations forbids configurations with toroidal current reversal, it is argued that these can be attained if an axisymmetric island system is allowed for in order to break the condition of nested magnetic surfaces. A number of results previously reported in the literature are discussed and reinterpreted under the proposed framework, providing some physical insight on the nature of equilibria with toroidal current reversal.

  13. Electromagnetic effects on toroidal momentum transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, M. Ansar; Eriksson, A.; Weiland, J.

    2010-12-15

    A parametric study of electromagnetic effects on toroidal momentum transport has been performed. The work is based on a new version of the Weiland model where symmetry breaking toroidicity effects derived from the stress tensor have been taken into account. The model includes a self-consistent calculation of the toroidal momentum diffusivity, which contains both diagonal and off-diagonal contributions to the momentum flux. It is found that electromagnetic effects considerably increase the toroidal momentum pinch. They are sometimes strong enough to make the total toroidal momentum flux inward.

  14. Experimental tests of a toroidal electrostatic analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D.T.; Ghielmetti, A.G.; Shelley, E.G.; Marshall, J.A.; Burch, J.L.; Booker, T.L.

    1987-04-01

    A toroidal electrostatic analyzer of a design suitable for space plasma instrumentation has been constructed and tested. Experimental results are compared with second-order ion optical theory and are in good agreement. Verifying the ion optics of the toroid was simplified by use of a position-sensing microchannel-plate detector mounted on a positioning system with three translational degrees of freedom located at the toroid exit. The toroidal analyzer described here is the first optical element in a fully toroidal mass spectrograph intended for analysis of kilovolt magnetospheric plasmas.

  15. Perturbing macroscopic magnetohydrodynamic stability for toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, Kathryn J.

    We have introduced a new perturbative technique to rapidly explore the dependence of long wavelength ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities on equilibrium profiles, shaping properties, and wall parameters. Traditionally, these relations are studied with numerical parameter scans using computationally intensive stability codes. Our perturbative technique first finds the equilibrium and stability using traditional methods. Subsequent small changes in the original equilibrium parameters change the stability. We quickly find the new stability with an expansion of the energy principle, rather than with another run of the stability codes. We first semi-analytically apply the technique to the screw pinch after eliminating compressional Alfven wave effects. The screw pinch results validate the approach, but also indicate that allowable perturbations to equilibria with certain features may be restricted. Next, we extend the approach to toroidal geometry using experimental equilibria and a simple constructed equilibrium, with the ideal MHD stability code GATO. Stability properties are successfully predicted from perturbed toroidal equilibria when only the vacuum beyond the plasma is perturbed (through wall parameter variations), rather than the plasma itself. Small plasma equilibrium perturbations to both experimental and simple equilibria result in very large errors to the predicted stability, and valid results are found only over a narrow range of most perturbations. Despite the large errors produced when changing plasma parameters, the wall perturbations revealed two useful applications of this technique. Because the calculations are non-iterative matrix multiplications, the convergence issues that can disrupt a full MHD stability code are absent. Marginal stability, therefore, is much easier to find with the perturbative technique. Also, the perturbed results can be input as the initial guess for the eigenvalue for a full stability code, and improve subsequent

  16. Electromagnetic Torque in Tokamaks with Toroidal Asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Nikolas Christopher

    Toroidal rotation and rotation shear strongly influences stability and confinement in tokamaks. Breaking of the toroidal symmetry by fields orders of magnitude smaller than the axisymmetric field can, however, produce electromagnetic torques that significantly affect the plasma rotation, stability and confinement. These electromagnetic torques are the study of this thesis. There are two typical types of electromagnetic torques in tokamaks: 1) "resonant torques" for which a plasma current defined by a single toroidal and single poloidal harmonic interact with external currents and 2) "nonresonant torques" for which the global plasma response to nonaxisymmetric fields is phase shifted by kinetic effects that drive the rotation towards a neoclassical offset. This work describes the diagnostics and analysis necessary to evaluate the torque by measuring the rate of momentum transfer per unit area in the vacuum region between the plasma and external currents using localized magnetic sensors to measure the Maxwell stress. These measurements provide model independent quantification of both the resonant and nonresonant electromagnetic torques, enabling direct verification of theoretical models. Measured values of the nonresonant torque are shown to agree well with the perturbed equilibrium nonambipolar transport (PENT) code calculation of torque from cross field transport in nonaxisymmetric equilibria. A combined neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) theory, valid across a wide range of kinetic regimes, is fully implemented for the first time in general aspect ratio and shaped plasmas. The code captures pitch angle resonances, reproducing previously inaccessible collisionality limits in the model. The complete treatment of the model enables benchmarking to the hybrid kinetic MHD stability codes MARS-K and MISK, confirming the energy-torque equivalency principle in perturbed equilibria. Experimental validations of PENT results confirm the torque applied by nonaxisymmetric

  17. Toroidal momentum transport in a tokamak due to profile shearing

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, R.; Grosshauser, S. R.; Hornsby, W. A.; Migliano, P.; Peeters, A. G.; Camenen, Y.; Casson, F. J.

    2014-06-15

    The effect of profile shearing on toroidal momentum transport is studied in linear and non-linear gyro-kinetic simulations. Retaining the radial dependence of both plasma and geometry parameters leads to a momentum flux that has contributions both linear in the logarithmic gradients of density and temperature, as well as contributions linear in the derivatives of the logarithmic gradients. The effect of the turbulence intensity gradient on momentum transport is found to be small for the studied parameters. Linear simulations at fixed normalized toroidal wave number predict a weak dependence of the momentum flux on the normalized Larmor radius ρ{sub *}=ρ/R. Non-linear simulations, however, at sufficiently small ρ{sub *} show a linear scaling of the momentum flux with ρ{sub *}. The obtained stationary rotation gradients are in the range of, although perhaps smaller than, current experiments. For a reactor plasma, however, a rather small rotation gradient should result from profile shearing.

  18. From non- to super-radiating manipulation of a dipolar emitter coupled to a toroidal metastructure.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Xin, Xing-Xing; Shao, Jian; Wang, Ying-Hua; Li, Jia-Qi; Zhou, Lin; Dong, Zheng-Gao

    2015-11-16

    Toroidal dipolar response in a metallic metastructure, composed of double flat rings, is utilized to manipulate the radiation pattern of a single dipolar emitter (e.g., florescent molecule/atom or quantum dot). Strong Fano-type radiation spectrum can be obtained when these two coupling dipoles are spatially overlapped, leading to significant radiation suppression (so-called nonradiating source) attributed to the dipolar destructive interference. Moreover, this nonradiating configuration will become a directionally super-radiating nanoantenna after a radial displacement of the emitter with respect to the toroidal flat-ring geometry, which emits linearly polarized radiation with orders of power enhancement in a particular orientation. The demonstrated radiation characteristics from a toroidal-dipole-mediated dipolar emitter indicate a promising manipulation capability of the dipolar emission source by intriguing toroidal dipolar response. PMID:26698422

  19. An Algorithm to Generate Toroidal and Helical CAGE Structures Using Pentagons, Hexagons and Heptagons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazgan, Efe; Taşci, Emre; Erkoç, Şakir

    An algorithm to generate toroidal or helical cage structures has been developed. Any toroidal or helical structure can be generated following four stages. In the first stage a Fonseca type unit cell and its symmetrical counterpart is formed which represents one-fifth of a toroid. In the second stage one-fifth fragment of the torus is fully obtained by applying geometry optimization to the structure obtained in the first stage. In the third stage the torus fragment obtained in the second stage is reproduced five times and connected to each other to generate either toroidal or helical structure. In the last stage a final optimization process is reapplied to get the complete structure desired.

  20. Toroidal modeling of plasma response and resonant magnetic perturbation field penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. Q.; Kirk, A.; Sun, Y.; Cahyna, P.; Chapman, I. T.; Denner, P.; Fishpool, G.; Garofalo, A. M.; Harrison, J. R.; Nardon, E.; the MAST Team

    2012-12-01

    The penetration dynamics of the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field is simulated in the full toroidal geometry, under realistic plasma conditions in MAST experiments. The physics associated with several aspects of the RMP penetration—the plasma response and rotational screening, the resonant and non-resonant torques and the toroidal momentum balance—are highlighted. In particular, the plasma response is found to significantly amplify the non-resonant component of the RMP field for some of the MAST plasmas. A fast rotating plasma, in response to static external magnetic fields, experiences a more distributed electromagnetic torque due to the resonance with continuum waves in the plasma. At fast plasma flow (such as for the MAST plasma), the electromagnetic torque is normally dominant over the neoclassical toroidal viscous (NTV) torque. However, at sufficiently slow plasma flow, the NTV torque can play a significant role in the toroidal momentum balance, thanks to the precession drift resonance enhanced, so-called superbanana plateau regime.

  1. Hybrid guiding-centre/full-orbit simulations in non-axisymmetric magnetic geometry exploiting general criterion for guiding-centre accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfefferlé, D.; Graves, J. P.; Cooper, W. A.

    2015-05-01

    To identify under what conditions guiding-centre or full-orbit tracing should be used, an estimation of the spatial variation of the magnetic field is proposed, not only taking into account gradient and curvature terms but also parallel currents and the local shearing of field-lines. The criterion is derived for general three-dimensional magnetic equilibria including stellarator plasmas. Details are provided on how to implement it in cylindrical coordinates and in flux coordinates that rely on the geometric toroidal angle. A means of switching between guiding-centre and full-orbit equations at first order in Larmor radius with minimal discrepancy is shown. Techniques are applied to a MAST (mega amp spherical tokamak) helical core equilibrium in which the inner kinked flux-surfaces are tightly compressed against the outer axisymmetric mantle and where the parallel current peaks at the nearly rational surface. This is put in relation with the simpler situation B(x, y, z) = B0[sin(kx)ey + cos(kx)ez], for which full orbits and lowest order drifts are obtained analytically. In the kinked equilibrium, the full orbits of NBI fast ions are solved numerically and shown to follow helical drift surfaces. This result partially explains the off-axis redistribution of neutral beam injection fast particles in the presence of MAST long-lived modes (LLM).

  2. Hollow nanotubular toroidal polymer microrings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jiyeong; Baek, Kangkyun; Kim, Myungjin; Yun, Gyeongwon; Ko, Young Ho; Lee, Nam-Suk; Hwang, Ilha; Kim, Jeehong; Natarajan, Ramalingam; Park, Chan Gyung; Sung, Wokyung; Kim, Kimoon

    2014-02-01

    Despite the remarkable progress made in the self-assembly of nano- and microscale architectures with well-defined sizes and shapes, a self-organization-based synthesis of hollow toroids has, so far, proved to be elusive. Here, we report the synthesis of polymer microrings made from rectangular, flat and rigid-core monomers with anisotropically predisposed alkene groups, which are crosslinked with each other by dithiol linkers using thiol-ene photopolymerization. The resulting hollow toroidal structures are shape-persistent and mechanically robust in solution. In addition, their size can be tuned by controlling the initial monomer concentrations, an observation that is supported by a theoretical analysis. These hollow microrings can encapsulate guest molecules in the intratoroidal nanospace, and their peripheries can act as templates for circular arrays of metal nanoparticles.

  3. Prospects for toroidal fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.D.

    1994-06-01

    Work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak has refined understanding of the realities of a deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning magnetic fusion reactor. An ITER-like tokamak reactor using ITER costs and performance would lead to a cost of electricity (COE) of about 130 mills/kWh. Advanced tokamak physics to be tested in the Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX), coupled with moderate components in engineering, technology, and unit costs, should lead to a COE comparable with best existing fission systems around 60 mills/kWh. However, a larger unit size, {approximately}2000 MW(e), is favored for the fusion system. Alternative toroidal configurations to the conventional tokamak, such as the stellarator, reversed-field pinch, and field-reversed configuration, offer some potential advantage, but are less well developed, and have their own challenges.

  4. Experimental studies of compact toroids

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The Berkeley Compact Toroid Experiment (BCTX) device is a plasma device with a Marshall-gun generated, low aspect ratio toroidal plasma. The device is capable of producing spheromak-type discharges and may, with some modification, produce low-aspect ratio tokamak configurations. A unique aspect of this experimenal devie is its large lower hybrid (LH) heating system, which consists of two 450MHz klystron tubes generating 20 megawatts each into a brambilla-type launching structure. Successful operation with one klystron at virtually full power (18 MW) has been accomplished with 110 {mu}s pulse length. A second klystron is currently installed in its socket and magnet but has not been added to the RF drive system. This report describes current activities and accomplishments and describes the anticipated results of next year's activity.

  5. Toroidal midplane neutral beam armor and plasma limiter

    DOEpatents

    Kugel, H.W.; Hand, S.W. Jr.; Ksayian, H.

    1985-05-31

    This invention contemplates an armor shield/plasma limiter positioned upon the inner wall of a toroidal vacuum chamber within which is magnetically confined an energetic plasma in a tokamak nuclear fusion reactor. The armor shield/plasma limiter is thus of a general semi-toroidal shape and is comprised of a plurality of adjacent graphite plates positioned immediately adjacent to each other so as to form a continuous ring upon and around the toroidal chamber's inner wall and the reactor's midplane coil. Each plate has a generally semi-circular outer circumference and a recessed inner portion and is comprised of upper and lower half sections positioned immediately adjacent to one another along the midplane of the plate. With the upper and lower half sections thus joined, a channel or duct is provided within the midplane of the plate in which a magnetic flux loop is positioned. The magnetic flux loop is thus positioned immediately adjacent to the fusing toroidal plasma and serves as a diagnostic sensor with the armor shield/plasma limiter minimizing the amount of power from the energetic plasma as well as from the neutral particle beams heating the plasma incident upon the flux loop.

  6. Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schnack, Dalton D

    2006-05-16

    This document reports the successful completion of the OFES Theory Milestone for FY2005, namely, Perform parametric studies to better understand the edge physics regimes of laboratory experiments. Simulate at increased resolution (up to 20 toroidal modes), with density evolution, late into the nonlinear phase and compare results from different types of edge modes. Simulate a single case including a study of heat deposition on nearby material walls. The linear stability properties and nonlinear evolution of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) in tokamak plasmas are investigated through numerical computation. Data from the DIII-D device at General Atomics (http://fusion.gat.com/diii-d/) is used for the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria, but edge parameters are varied to reveal important physical effects. The equilibrium with very low magnetic shear produces an unstable spectrum that is somewhat insensitive to dissipation coefficient values. Here, linear growth rates from the non-ideal NIMROD code (http://nimrodteam.org) agree reasonably well with ideal, i.e. non-dissipative, results from the GATO global linear stability code at low toroidal mode number (n) and with ideal results from the ELITE edge linear stability code at moderate to high toroidal mode number. Linear studies with a more realistic sequence of MHD equilibria (based on DIII-D discharge 86166) produce more significant discrepancies between the ideal and non-ideal calculations. The maximum growth rate for the ideal computations occurs at toroidal mode index n=10, whereas growth rates in the non-ideal computations continue to increase with n unless strong anisotropic thermal conduction is included. Recent modeling advances allow drift effects associated with the Hall electric field and gyroviscosity to be considered. A stabilizing effect can be observed in the preliminary results, but while the distortion in mode structure is readily apparent at n=40, the growth rate is only 13% less than the non-ideal MHD

  7. Toroidal cell and battery. [Patent application

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, W.J.

    1981-04-01

    A toroidal storage battery designed to handle relatively high amp-hour loads is described. The cell includes a wound core disposed within a pair of toroidal channel shaped electrodes spaced apart by nylon insulator. The shape of the case electrodes of this toroidal cell allows a first planar doughnut shaped surface and the inner cylindrical case wall to be used as a first electrode and a second planar doughnut shaped surface and the outer cylindrical case wall to be used as a second electrode. Connectors may be used to stack two or more toroidal cells together by connecting substantially the entire surface area of the first electrode of a first cell to substantially the entire surface area of the second electrode of a second cell. The central cavity of each toroidal cell may be used as a conduit for pumping a fluid through the toroidal cell to thereby cool the cell. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

  8. ATF (Advanced Toroidal Facility) data management

    SciTech Connect

    Kannan, K.L.; Baylor, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    Data management for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF), a stellarator located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is provided by DMG, a locally developed, VAX-based software system. DMG is a data storage and retrieval software system that provides the user interface to ATF raw and analyzed data. Data are described in terms of data models and data types and are organized as signals into files, which are internally documented. The system was designed with user accessibility, software maintainability, and extensibility as primary goals. Extensibility features include compatibility with ATF as it moves from pulsed to steady-state operation and capability for use of the DMG system with experiments other than ATF. DMG is implemented as a run-time library of routines available as a shareable image. General-purpose and specialized data acquisition and analysis applications have been developed using the DMG system. This paper describes the DMG system and the interfaces to it. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Plastic Finite Element Analysis of D0 Toroid Iron Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Wands, R.; /Fermilab

    1987-11-23

    The assembly of the DO toroid iron involves the use of large groove welds to connect massive blocks of steel. These welds are very heavily constrained, and large thermal strains develop which have produced large cracks in the base metal near the weld. The effort to solve these problems has involved investigations of weld geometry, weld preparation, and the metallurgy of both the base metal and the welding rod. The purpose of this analysis was to compare the effects of two welding rods with markedly different yield strengths and post-yieding behaviour on the plastic strains developed in the base metal near the weld.

  10. Toroidal transformer design program with application to inverter circuitry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, J. A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Estimates of temperature, weight, efficiency, regulation, and final dimensions are included in the output of the computer program for the design of transformers for use in the basic parallel inverter. The program, written in FORTRAN 4, selects a tape wound toroidal magnetic core and, taking temperature, materials, core geometry, skin depth, and ohmic losses into account, chooses the appropriate wire sizes and number of turns for the center tapped primary and single secondary coils. Using the program, 2- and 4-kilovolt-ampere transformers are designed for frequencies from 200 to 3200 Hz and the efficiency of a basic transistor inverter is estimated.

  11. Fabrication of toroidal composite pressure vessels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dodge, W.G.; Escalona, A.

    1996-11-24

    A method for fabricating composite pressure vessels having toroidal geometry was evaluated. Eight units were fabricated using fibrous graphite material wrapped over a thin-walled aluminum liner. The material was wrapped using a machine designed for wrapping, the graphite material was impregnated with an epoxy resin that was subsequently thermally cured. The units were fabricated using various winding patterns. They were hydrostatically tested to determine their performance. The method of fabrication was demonstrated. However, the improvement in performance to weight ratio over that obtainable by an all metal vessel probably does not justify the extra cost of fabrication.

  12. Implications of polarized DT plasmas for toroidal fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Jassby, D.L.

    1983-05-01

    Spin polarization of the deuterons and tritons in a reacting plasma can result in an increase in the fusion reactivity and variation of the angular distribution of emission of the fusion neutrons. The increased fusion reactivity relaxes the confinement-temperature conditions for breakeven and ignition. We have determined the effect of varying the angular distribution of the fusion neutrons on the spatial distribution of fusion neturon current and flux at the first wall, on the global tritium breeding ratio, and on the first-wall radiation damage in low-aspect-ratio toroidal geometry.

  13. Atomic physics effects on dissipative toroidal drift wave stability

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, M.A.; Hahm, T.S.

    1992-02-01

    The effects of atomic physics processes such as ionization, charge exchange, and radiation on the linear stability of dissipative drift waves are investigated in toroidal geometry both numerically and analytically. For typical TFTR and TEXT edge parameters, overall linear stability is determined by the competition between the destabilizing influence of ionization and the stabilizing effect due to the electron temperature gradient. An analytical expression for the linear marginal stability condition, {eta}{sub e}{sup crit}, is derived. The instability is most likely to occur at the extreme edge of tokamaks with a significant ionization source and a steep electron density gradient.

  14. Two-Dimensional Ballooning Transformation with Applications to Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong

    A general formulation for high-n (n is the toroidal mode number) modes in an axisymmetric toroidal plasma is presented, based on the two dimensional (2-D) ballooning transformation. It is shown that this formulation is more general than the conventional ballooning theory, and reduces to the conventional theory in a special case. Toroidal Alfven waves are studied using the 2 -D ballooning formulation. A perturbation theory is systematically developed for the continuum damping of the toroidal Alfven eigenmode (TAE). A formula, similar to the Fermi golden rule for decaying systems in quantum mechanics, is derived for the continuum damping rate of the TAE; the decay (damping) rate is expressed explicitly in terms of the coupling of the TAE to the continuum spectrum. Numerical results are obtained and compared to previous calculations. Kinetic effects on toroidal Alfven waves are studied. Multiple -gap coupling is included automatically by the 2-D ballooning formulation. A new branch of modes, the kinetic toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (KTAE), emerges as a result of kinetic effects. This mode resides just above the toroidal shear Alfven gap, and has a structure similar to the TAE. Numerical results for the kinetic damping rates for the TAE and the KTAE are obtained, and multiple-gap coupling effects are studied by comparing with the single gap theory of Mett and Mahajan (Phys. Fluids B 4 2885 (1992)).

  15. Turbulent Equipartition Theory of Toroidal Momentum Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    T.S. Hahm, P.H. Diamond, O.D. Gurcan, and G. Rewaldt

    2008-01-31

    The mode-independet part of magnetic curvature driven turbulent convective (TuroCo) pinch of the angular momentum density [Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 14,072302 (2007)] which was originally derived from the gyrokinetic equation, can be interpreted in terms of the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory. It is shown that the previous results can be obtained from the local conservation of "magnetically weighted angular momentum density," nmi U|| R/B2, and its homogenization due to turbulent flows. It is also demonstrated that the magnetic curvature modification of the parallel acceleration in the nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame, which was shown to be responsible for the TEP part of the TurCo pinch of angular momentum density in the previous work, is closely related to the Coriolis drift coupling to the perturbed electric field. In addition, the origin of the diffusive flux in the rotating frame is highlighted. Finally, it is illustratd that there should be a difference in scalings between the momentum pinch originated from inherently toroidal effects and that coming from other mechanisms which exist in a simpler geometry.

  16. Turbulent equipartition theory of toroidal momentum pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T. S.; Rewoldt, G.; Diamond, P. H.; Gurcan, O. D.

    2008-05-15

    The mode-independent part of the magnetic curvature driven turbulent convective (TurCo) pinch of the angular momentum density [Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 072302 (2007)], which was originally derived from the gyrokinetic equation, can be interpreted in terms of the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory. It is shown that the previous results can be obtained from the local conservation of 'magnetically weighted angular momentum density', nm{sub i}U{sub parallel}R/B{sup 2}, and its homogenization due to turbulent flows. It is also demonstrated that the magnetic curvature modification of the parallel acceleration in the nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame, which was shown to be responsible for the TEP part of the TurCo pinch of angular momentum density in the previous work, is closely related to the Coriolis drift coupling to the perturbed electric field. In addition, the origin of the diffusive flux in the rotating frame is highlighted. Finally, it is illustrated that there should be a difference in scalings between the momentum pinch originated from inherently toroidal effects and that coming from other mechanisms that exist in a simpler geometry.

  17. The geometry of generalized force matching and related information metrics in coarse-graining of molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalligiannaki, Evangelia; Harmandaris, Vagelis; Katsoulakis, Markos A.; Plecháč, Petr

    2015-08-01

    Using the probabilistic language of conditional expectations, we reformulate the force matching method for coarse-graining of molecular systems as a projection onto spaces of coarse observables. A practical outcome of this probabilistic description is the link of the force matching method with thermodynamic integration. This connection provides a way to systematically construct a local mean force and to optimally approximate the potential of mean force through force matching. We introduce a generalized force matching condition for the local mean force in the sense that allows the approximation of the potential of mean force under both linear and non-linear coarse graining mappings (e.g., reaction coordinates, end-to-end length of chains). Furthermore, we study the equivalence of force matching with relative entropy minimization which we derive for general non-linear coarse graining maps. We present in detail the generalized force matching condition through applications to specific examples in molecular systems.

  18. The geometry of generalized force matching and related information metrics in coarse-graining of molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kalligiannaki, Evangelia; Harmandaris, Vagelis; Plecháč, Petr

    2015-08-28

    Using the probabilistic language of conditional expectations, we reformulate the force matching method for coarse-graining of molecular systems as a projection onto spaces of coarse observables. A practical outcome of this probabilistic description is the link of the force matching method with thermodynamic integration. This connection provides a way to systematically construct a local mean force and to optimally approximate the potential of mean force through force matching. We introduce a generalized force matching condition for the local mean force in the sense that allows the approximation of the potential of mean force under both linear and non-linear coarse graining mappings (e.g., reaction coordinates, end-to-end length of chains). Furthermore, we study the equivalence of force matching with relative entropy minimization which we derive for general non-linear coarse graining maps. We present in detail the generalized force matching condition through applications to specific examples in molecular systems.

  19. Dynamics of toroidal spiral strings around five-dimensional black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Igata, Takahisa; Ishihara, Hideki

    2010-02-15

    We examine the separability of the Nambu-Goto equation for test strings in a shape of toroidal spiral in a five-dimensional Kerr-AdS black hole. In particular, for a 'Hopf loop' string which is a special class of the toroidal spiral strings, we show the complete separation of variables occurs in two cases, Kerr background and Kerr-AdS background with equal angular momenta. We also obtain the dynamical solution for the Hopf loop around a black hole and for the general toroidal spiral in Minkowski background.

  20. From the generalized uncertainty relations on fuzzy AdS 2 to the Poincaré geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, H.; Hashemi, A.; Lotfizadeh, M.

    2012-03-01

    The positive and discrete unitary irreps of SU(1,1) are used to construct fuzzy (Euclidean) AdS 2. Two different types of uncertainty relation involving the Weyl-Heisenberg and a weaker type are studied. It is shown that there are no generalized coherent states which simultaneously minimize the Weyl-Heisenberg uncertainty relations among three non-commuting embedding coordinates of the fuzzy AdS 2. However, generalized squeezed states that simultaneously satisfy the three weaker uncertainty relations do exist, and reproduce some properties of the classical AdS 2. Up to a common scaling factor in terms of the irrep label, the expectation values of the non-commuting coordinates over such states are described in the same manner as the classical AdS 2, in terms of the Poincaré coordinates. The expectation values on the fuzzy AdS 2 tend to their corresponding values in the commutative limit.

  1. Electrostatics of a Family of Conducting Toroids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2009-01-01

    An exact solution is found for the electrostatic potential of a family of conducting charged toroids. The toroids are characterized by two lengths "a" and "b", with "a" greater than or equal to "2b". They are closed, with no hole in the "doughnut". The results are obtained by considering the potential of two equal charges, displaced from the…

  2. Toroidal current asymmetry in tokamak disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H. R.

    2014-10-15

    It was discovered on JET that disruptions were accompanied by toroidal asymmetry of the toroidal plasma current I{sub ϕ}. It was found that the toroidal current asymmetry was proportional to the vertical current moment asymmetry with positive sign for an upward vertical displacement event (VDE) and negative sign for a downward VDE. It was observed that greater displacement leads to greater measured I{sub ϕ} asymmetry. Here, it is shown that this is essentially a kinematic effect produced by a VDE interacting with three dimensional MHD perturbations. The relation of toroidal current asymmetry and vertical current moment is calculated analytically and is verified by numerical simulations. It is shown analytically that the toroidal variation of the toroidal plasma current is accompanied by an equal and opposite variation of the toroidal current flowing in a thin wall surrounding the plasma. These currents are connected by 3D halo current, which is π/2 radians out of phase with the n = 1 toroidal current variations.

  3. Closed expressions for the magnetic field of toroidal multipole configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, G.V.

    1983-04-01

    Closed analytic expressions for the vector potential and the magnetic field for the lower order toroidal multipoles are presented. These expressions can be applied in the study of tokamak plasma cross section shaping. An example of such an application is included. These expressions also allow the vacuum fields required for plasma equilibrium to be specified in a general form independent of a particular coil configuration.

  4. Antenna excitation of drift wave in a toroidal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, A.; Ricci, P.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Labit, B.; Mueller, S. H.; Podesta, M.; Poli, F. M.; Skiff, F.

    2007-10-15

    In a magnetized toroidal plasma, an antenna tunable in vertical wave number is used to excite density perturbations. Coherent detection is performed by means of Langmuir probes to directly determine both the wave vector and the plasma response induced by the antenna. Comparison between the theoretical density response predicted by the generalized Hasegawa-Wakatani model, and the experimentally determined density response enables us the identification of one peak of the plasma response as a drift wave.

  5. Radial Eigenmodes for a Toroidal Waveguide with Rectangular Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Rui Li

    2012-07-01

    In applying mode expansion to solve the CSR impedance for a section of toroidal vacuum chamber with rectangular cross section, we identify the eigenvalue problem for the radial eigenmodes which is different from that for cylindrical structures. In this paper, we present the general expressions of the radial eigenmodes, and discuss the properties of the eigenvalues on the basis of the Sturm-Liouville theory.

  6. Cutoff frequency of toroidal plasma waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Zakeri-Khatir, H.; Aghamir, F. M.

    2015-02-15

    The cutoff frequencies of E and H-modes of empty and plasma filled toroidal waveguides are evaluated. The effects of space curvature and plasma density on cutoff frequencies for both modes are investigated. Using a suitable variable change, a scalar wave equation in the direction of propagation was obtained. The study indicates that the curvature in the direction of wave propagation in toroidal waveguide has an analogous effect as a straight waveguide filled with anisotropic media. The Rayleigh-Schrodinger perturbation method was employed to solve for cutoff frequencies in the first order of approximation. In the limit of small space curvature, the toroidal waveguide cutoff frequencies for both E and H-modes approach those of TM and TE modes of empty cylindrical waveguide with a radius equal to toroidal waveguide minor radius. The analysis shows that the curvature in the direction of propagation in toroidal waveguides leads to the removal of the degeneracy between E and H-modes.

  7. Asymmetric Magnon Excitation by Spontaneous Toroidal Ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayami, Satoru; Kusunose, Hiroaki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-05-01

    The effects of spontaneous toroidal ordering on magnetic excitation are theoretically investigated for a localized spin model that includes a staggered Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction and anisotropic exchange interactions, which arise from the antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling and the multiorbital correlation effect. We show that the model exhibits a Néel-type antiferromagnetic order, which simultaneously accompanies a ferroic toroidal order. We find that the occurrence of toroidal order modulates the magnon dispersion in an asymmetric way with respect to the wave number: a toroidal dipole order on the zigzag chain leads to a band-bottom shift, while a toroidal octupole order on the honeycomb lattice gives rise to a valley splitting. These asymmetric magnon excitations could be a source of unusual magnetic responses, such as nonreciprocal magnon transport. A variety of modulations are discussed while changing the lattice and magnetic symmetries. The implications regarding candidate materials for asymmetric magnon excitations are presented.

  8. Development of Toroidal Core Transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, Francisco

    2014-05-31

    The original objective of this project was to design, build and test a few prototypes of singlephase dry-type distribution transformers of 25 kVA, 2.4 kV primary to 120 V transformers using cores made of a continuous steel strip shaped like a doughnut (toroid). At different points during the development of the project, the scope was enhanced to include the more practical case of a 25 kVA transformer for a 13.8 kV primary system voltage. Later, the scope was further expanded to design and build a 50 kVA unit to transformer voltage from 7.62 kV to 2x120 V. This is a common transformer used by Con Edison of New York and they are willing to test it in the field. The project officially started in September 2009 and ended in May 2014. The progress was reported periodically to DOE in eighteen quarterly reports. A Continuation Application was submitted to DOE in June 2010. In May 2011 we have requested a non-cost extension of the project. In December 2011, the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) was updated to reflect the real conditions and situation of the project as of 2011. A second Continuation Application was made and funding was approved in 2013 by DOE and the end date was extended to May 2014.The technical challenges that were overcome in this project include: the development of the technology to pass the impulse tests, derive a model for the thermal performance, produce a sound mechanical design, and estimate the inrush current. However, the greatest challenge that we faced during the development of the project was the complications of procuring the necessary parts and materials to build the transformers. The actual manufacturing process is relatively fast, but getting all parts together is a very lengthy process. The main products of this project are two prototypes of toroidal distribution transformers of 7.62 kV (to be used in a 13.8 kV system) to 2x120 V secondary (standard utilization voltage); one is rated at 25 kVA and the other at 50 kVA. The 25 k

  9. Turbulent Transport in Fusion Plasmas, Effects of Toroidicity and Fluid Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, Jan

    2009-11-10

    Basic aspects of turbulent transport in toroidal magnetized plasmas are discussed. In particular Kadomtsev's mixing length estimate is found to work well for the Cyclone base case at the experimental gradient. Generalizations to include non-Markovian effects and off diagonal fluxes are given. The importance of toroidal effects is stressed These enter particularly strongly in convective or off diagonal fluxes. This feature applies also to momentum ttransport.

  10. Tokamak with mechanical compression of toroidal magnetic field

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1981-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes a pressure vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A collapsible toroidal liner disposed within the pressure vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside said liner. A toroidal magnetic field is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. A toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. Pressure is applied to the liquid metal to collapse the liner and reduce the volume of the toroidal space, thereby increasing the toroidal magnetic flux density therein.

  11. NCSX Toroidal Field Coil Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kalish, M.; Rushinski, J.; Myatt, L.; Brooks, A.; Dahlgren, F.; Chrzanowski, J.; Reiersen, W.; Freudenberg, K.

    2005-10-07

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is an experimental device whose design and construction is underway at the Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The primary coil systems for the NCSX device consist of the twisted plasma-shaping Modular Coils, the Poloidal Field Coils, and the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. The TF Coils are D-shaped coils wound from hollow copper conductor, and vacuum impregnated with a glass-epoxy resin system. There are 18 identical, equally spaced TF coils providing 1/R field at the plasma. They operate within a cryostat, and are cooled by LN2, nominally, to 80K. Wedge shaped castings are assembled to the inboard face of these coils, so that inward radial loads are reacted via the nesting of each of the coils against their adjacent partners. This paper outlines the TF Coil design methodology, reviews the analysis results, and summarizes how the design and analysis support the design requirements.

  12. Establishing a Stereoscopic Technique for Determining the Kinematic Properties of Solar Wind Transients based on a Generalized Self-similarly Expanding Circular Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. A.; Perry, C. H.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Harrison, R. A.; Lugaz, N.; Möstl, C.; Liu, Y. D.; Steed, K.

    2013-11-01

    The twin-spacecraft STEREO mission has enabled simultaneous white-light imaging of the solar corona and inner heliosphere from multiple vantage points. This has led to the development of numerous stereoscopic techniques to investigate the three-dimensional structure and kinematics of solar wind transients such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Two such methods—triangulation and the tangent to a sphere—can be used to determine time profiles of the propagation direction and radial distance (and thereby radial speed) of a solar wind transient as it travels through the inner heliosphere, based on its time-elongation profile viewed by two observers. These techniques are founded on the assumption that the transient can be characterized as a point source (fixed phi, FP, approximation) or a circle attached to Sun-center (harmonic mean, HM, approximation), respectively. These geometries constitute extreme descriptions of solar wind transients, in terms of their cross-sectional extent. Here, we present the stereoscopic expressions necessary to derive propagation direction and radial distance/speed profiles of such transients based on the more generalized self-similar expansion (SSE) geometry, for which the FP and HM geometries form the limiting cases; our implementation of these equations is termed the stereoscopic SSE method. We apply the technique to two Earth-directed CMEs from different phases of the STEREO mission, the well-studied event of 2008 December and a more recent event from 2012 March. The latter CME was fast, with an initial speed exceeding 2000 km s-1, and highly geoeffective, in stark contrast to the slow and ineffectual 2008 December CME.

  13. ESTABLISHING A STEREOSCOPIC TECHNIQUE FOR DETERMINING THE KINEMATIC PROPERTIES OF SOLAR WIND TRANSIENTS BASED ON A GENERALIZED SELF-SIMILARLY EXPANDING CIRCULAR GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, J. A.; Perry, C. H.; Harrison, R. A.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Lugaz, N.; Möstl, C.; Liu, Y. D.; Steed, K.

    2013-11-10

    The twin-spacecraft STEREO mission has enabled simultaneous white-light imaging of the solar corona and inner heliosphere from multiple vantage points. This has led to the development of numerous stereoscopic techniques to investigate the three-dimensional structure and kinematics of solar wind transients such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Two such methods—triangulation and the tangent to a sphere—can be used to determine time profiles of the propagation direction and radial distance (and thereby radial speed) of a solar wind transient as it travels through the inner heliosphere, based on its time-elongation profile viewed by two observers. These techniques are founded on the assumption that the transient can be characterized as a point source (fixed φ, FP, approximation) or a circle attached to Sun-center (harmonic mean, HM, approximation), respectively. These geometries constitute extreme descriptions of solar wind transients, in terms of their cross-sectional extent. Here, we present the stereoscopic expressions necessary to derive propagation direction and radial distance/speed profiles of such transients based on the more generalized self-similar expansion (SSE) geometry, for which the FP and HM geometries form the limiting cases; our implementation of these equations is termed the stereoscopic SSE method. We apply the technique to two Earth-directed CMEs from different phases of the STEREO mission, the well-studied event of 2008 December and a more recent event from 2012 March. The latter CME was fast, with an initial speed exceeding 2000 km s{sup –1}, and highly geoeffective, in stark contrast to the slow and ineffectual 2008 December CME.

  14. Toroidal solar collection and energy storage apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, K.J.

    1980-09-23

    Vehicular tires are generally toroidal heat collection elements of a solar heating system. Liquid or gaseous fluid flow is circulated between the tires and a space to be heated for transferring the heat from the tires to the space. The tires are generally vertically stacked within a thermally insulated enclosure which includes a double glazed window located so that solar rays impinge on and heat the tires. Heat storage media such as water, rock or pebble beds, or phase change material in an elongated coiled jacket may be provided within the tires. Downwardly inclined vanes either partially cut from the tire walls or attached to the tires or attached to separators between the tires, provide additional surface area to absorb the solar radiation and to also direct airflow radially inward into the center of the tires. When the vanes are formed by cutting from the tires, they are naturally hinged for elevational angulation and a cable linkage is provided to simultaneously adjust the elevation of the vanes or to close the apertures in the tire walls formed by the cutting out of the vanes. The window is selectively obstructed from light and heat transfer therethrough either by means of a removeable cover or by thermally insulating sliding opaque sheets within the walls of the enclosure which are selectively positionable between the double glazing.

  15. Poloidal field amplification in a coaxial compact toroid accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, R. D.; Hwang, D. Q.; Howard, S.; Brockington, S. J.; Evans, R. W.

    2008-09-01

    The Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX) produces spheromak-like compact toroids (SCTs) without external power switching, initiating a discharge by pulsed gas injection into a formation region containing a seed magnetic field generated by a solenoidal coil. After formation, the plasma is driven by an inductively delayed capacitor bank into an acceleration region, where surface axial and toroidal magnetic fields are measured at several axial positions. Due to strong eddy-current effects, formation-region magnetic field cannot be simply computed; instead, it is measured using the response of axial and radial test coils in the formation region to short solenoid test current pulses. A temporal and spatial reconstruction method is developed allowing formation-region field to be computed from the test-coil data for any CTIX discharge of identical solenoid geometry. By varying the peak value and timing of solenoidal current, curves of peak accelerator-region field as a function of initial formation-region field are developed. Curves of peak accelerator-region axial magnetic field are thereby found to be highly nonlinear functions of formation-region field, showing a threshold value for the formation-region field of approximately 5 G, above which acceleration-region field saturates at values between 2 and 12 kG. The direction of acceleration-region axial field reverses sign when the direction of solenoid current is reversed. Saturated accelerator-region axial field is a function of axial position and accelerator voltage, and is typically comparable to toroidal field at the same location. The ratio of accelerator-region to formation-region axial field commonly exceeds 1000 near the onset of saturation. This large amplification is of practical advantage for delayed plasma breakdown on CTIX, allowing a modest seed field to produce high poloidal fields, which are necessary for intense SCT acceleration. The results may also provide a useful benchmark for numerical

  16. Low-loss metamaterial electromagnetically induced transparency based on electric toroidal dipolar response

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hai-ming; Liu, Shao-bin Liu, Si-yuan; Ding, Guo-wen; Yang, Hua; Yu, Zhi-yang; Zhang, Hai-feng; Wang, Shen-yun

    2015-02-23

    In this paper, a low-loss and high transmission analogy of electromagnetically induced transparency based on electric toroidal dipolar response is numerically and experimentally demonstrated. It is obtained by the excitation of the low-loss electric toroidal dipolar response, which confines the magnetic field inside a dielectric substrate with toroidal geometry. The metamaterial electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) structure is composed of the cut wire and asymmetric split-ring resonators. The transmission level is as high as 0.88, and the radiation loss is greatly suppressed, which can be proved by the surface currents distributions, the magnetic field distributions, and the imaginary parts of the effective permeability and permittivity. It offers an effective way to produce low-loss and high transmission metamaterial EIT.

  17. Dual-band toroidal-dipole-induced transparency in optical regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Dong, Zheng-Gao; Zhu, Ming-Jie; Shao, Jian; Wang, Ying-Hua; Li, Jia-Qi

    2016-09-01

    The interference between toroidal and electric dipoles in the optical regime is investigated in a metallic composite metastructure composed of a 12-fold double-bar and an upright rod. It shows that toroidal and electric dipoles can be simultaneously excited, exhibiting a plasmon analog of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and suppressing the far-field radiation. By shifting the upright rod transversally, another transparency window emerges due to the asymmetry of the geometry, resulting in dual-band EIT-like behavior. The result not only contributes to the understanding of optical toroidal dipoles, but also creates the possibility of designing optical devices based on the dual-band EIT-like effect.

  18. General Purpose Monte Carlo Multigroup Neutron and Gamma-Ray Transport Code System with Array Geometry Capability. We recommend C00474/ALLCP/02 MORSE-CGA.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1991-05-01

    Version 00 MORSE-CGA was developed to add the capability of modelling rectangular lattices for nuclear reactor cores or for multipartitioned structures. It thus enhances the capability of the MORSE code system. The MORSE code is a multipurpose neutron and gamma-ray transport Monte Carlo code. It has been designed as a tool for solving most shielding problems. Through the use of multigroup cross sections, the solution of neutron, gamma-ray, or coupled neutron-gamma-ray problems may be obtainedmore » in either the forward or adjoint mode. Time dependence for both shielding and criticality problems is provided. General three-dimensional geometry may be used with an albedo option available at any material surface. Isotropic or anisotropic scattering up to a P16 expansion of the angular distribution is allowed.« less

  19. Zonal Toroidal Harmonic Expansions of External Gravitational Fields for Ring-like Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    We present an expression of the external gravitational field of a general ring-like object with axial and plane symmetries such as oval toroids or annular disks with an arbitrary density distribution. The main term is the gravitational field of a uniform, infinitely thin ring representing the limit of zero radial width and zero vertical height of the object. The additional term is derived from a zonal toroidal harmonic expansion of a general solution of Laplace’s equation outside the Brillouin toroid of the object. The special functions required are the point value and the first-order derivative of the zonal toroidal harmonics of the first kind, namely, the Legendre function of the first kind of half integer degree and an argument that is not less than unity. We developed a recursive method to compute them from two pairs of seed values explicitly expressed by some complete elliptic integrals. Numerical experiments show that appropriately truncated expansions converge rapidly outside the Brillouin toroid. The truncated expansion can be evaluated so efficiently that, for an oval toroid with an exponentially damping density profile, it is 3000–10,000 times faster than the two-dimensional numerical quadrature. A group of the Fortran 90 programs required in the new method and their sample outputs are available electronically.

  20. Effects of neoclassical toroidal viscosity induced by the intrinsic error fields and toroidal field ripple on the toroidal rotation in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. H.; Seol, J.; Ko, W. H.; Terzolo, L.; Aydemir, A. Y.; In, Y.; Ghim, Y.-c.; Lee, S. G.

    2016-08-01

    Effects of neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) induced by intrinsic error fields and toroidal field ripple on cocurrent toroidal rotation in H-mode tokamak plasmas are investigated. It is expected that large NTV torque can be localized at the edge region through the 1/ν-regime in the vicinity of E r ˜ 0 in the cocurrent rotating H-mode plasma. Numerical simulation on toroidal rotation demonstrates that the edge localized NTV torque determined by the intrinsic error fields and toroidal field ripples in the level of most tokamaks can damp the toroidal rotation velocity over the whole region while reducing the toroidal rotation pedestal which is clearly observed in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak. It is found that the NTV torque changes the toroidal rotation gradient in the pedestal region dramatically, but the toroidal rotation profile in the core region responds rigidly without a change in the gradient. On the other hand, it shows that the NTV torque induced by the intrinsic error fields and toroidal field ripple in the level of the KSTAR tokamak, which are expected to be smaller than most tokamaks by at least one order of magnitude, is negligible in determining the toroidal rotation velocity profile. Experimental observation on the toroidal rotation change by the externally applied nonaxisymmetric magnetic fields on KSTAR also suggests that NTV torque arising from nonaxisymmetric magnetic fields can damp the toroidal rotation over the whole region while diminishing the toroidal rotation pedestal.

  1. Axisymmetric curvature-driven instability in a model divertor geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, W. A.; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 ; Ryutov, D. D.

    2013-09-15

    A model problem is presented which qualitatively describes a pressure-driven instability which can occur near the null-point in the divertor region of a tokamak where the poloidal field becomes small. The model problem is described by a horizontal slot with a vertical magnetic field which plays the role of the poloidal field. Line-tying boundary conditions are applied at the planes defining the slot. A toroidal field lying parallel to the planes is assumed to be very strong, thereby constraining the possible structure of the perturbations. Axisymmetric perturbations which leave the toroidal field unperturbed are analyzed. Ideal magnetohydrodynamics is used, and the instability threshold is determined by the energy principle. Because of the boundary conditions, the Euler equation is, in general, non-separable except at marginal stability. This problem may be useful in understanding the source of heat transport into the private flux region in a snowflake divertor which possesses a large region of small poloidal field, and for code benchmarking as it yields simple analytic results in an interesting geometry.

  2. Tokamak with in situ magnetohydrodynamic generation of toroidal magnetic field

    DOEpatents

    Schaffer, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes an electrically conductive metal pressure vessel for defining a chamber and confining liquid therein. A liner disposed within said chamber defines a toroidal space within the liner and confines gas therein. The metal vessel provides an electrically conductive path linking the toroidal space. Liquid metal is forced outwardly through the chamber outside of the toroidal space to generate electric current in the conductive path and thereby generate a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof.

  3. Steady state compact toroidal plasma production

    DOEpatents

    Turner, William C.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for maintaining steady state compact toroidal plasmas. A compact toroidal plasma is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and held in close proximity to the gun electrodes by applied magnetic fields or magnetic fields produced by image currents in conducting walls. Voltage supply means maintains a constant potential across the electrodes producing an increasing magnetic helicity which drives the plasma away from a minimum energy state. The plasma globally relaxes to a new minimum energy state, conserving helicity according to Taylor's relaxation hypothesis, and injecting net helicity into the core of the compact toroidal plasma. Controlling the voltage so as to inject net helicity at a predetermined rate based on dissipative processes maintains or increases the compact toroidal plasma in a time averaged steady state mode.

  4. Bow-shaped toroidal field coils

    SciTech Connect

    Bonanos, P.

    1981-05-01

    Design features of Bow-Shaped Toroidal Field Coils are described and compared with circular and D shaped coils. The results indicate that bow coils can produce higher field strengths, store more energy and be made demountable. The design offers the potential for the production of ultrahigh toroidal fields. Included are representative coil shapes and their engineering properties, a suggested structural design and an analysis of a specific case.

  5. Measuring Properties of Magnetic Reconnection in Nonlinear Resistive and Two-Fluid Toroidal Simulations of Sawteeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beidler, Matthew; Cassak, Paul; Jardin, Stephen; Ferraro, Nathaniel

    2015-11-01

    The sawtooth crash in tokamaks limits the core temperature, harms confinement, and seeds disruptions. A predictive capability of its ramifications has been elusive. Extended-MHD physics is needed to properly analyze the magnetic reconnection that occurs during the crash phase, but it has only recently been integrated into codes using a toroidal geometry. In this study, we employ the three-dimensional toroidal, extended-MHD code M3D-C1 to study reconnection during the sawtooth crash. We study the nonlinear evolution of a test equilibrium in a non-reduced field representation for resistive-MHD and the two-fluid model. We find that the toroidal mode growth rates for the two-fluid reconnection process exhibit a nonlinear acceleration and greatly exceed that of a similar resistive MHD model, more closely in line with experimental results. Furthermore, by sampling the two-fluid simulation data in the plane perpendicular to the helical (m,n) =(1,1) mode, we present the first observation of the quadrupole out-of-plane magnetic field appearing during sawtooth reconnection with the Hall term. We also explore how reconnection as viewed in the helically perpendicular plane varies toroidally, which affects the symmetry of the reconnection geometry and the local diamagnetic effects.

  6. A toroidal trap for cold {}^{87}{Rb} atoms using an rf-dressed quadrupole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, A.; Mishra, S. R.; Ram, S. P.; Tiwari, S. K.; Rawat, H. S.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the trapping of cold {}87{Rb} atoms in a toroidal geometry using a radio frequency (rf) dressed quadrupole magnetic trap formed by superposing a strong rf-field on a quadrupole trap. This rf-dressed quadrupole trap has the minimum potential away from the quadrupole trap centre on a circular path which facilitates trapping in toroidal geometry. In these experiments, the laser cooled atoms were first trapped in a quadrupole trap, then cooled evaporatively using a weak rf-field, and finally trapped in an rf-dressed quadrupole trap. The radius of the toroid could be varied by varying the frequency of the dressing rf-field. It has also been demonstrated that a single rf source and an antenna can be used for the rf-evaporative cooling as well as for the rf-dressing of atoms. The atoms trapped in the toroidal trap may have applications in the realization of an atom gyroscope as well as in studying the quantum gases in low dimensions.

  7. Low-n shear Alfven spectra in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Chance, M.S.

    1985-11-01

    In toroidal plasmas, the toroidal magnetic field is nonuniform over a magnetic surface and causes coupling of different poloidal harmonics. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the toroidicity not only breaks up the shear Alfven continuous spectrum, but also creates new, discrete, toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes with frequencies inside the continuum gaps. Potential applications of the low-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes on plasma heating and instabilities are addressed. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  8. The Min system as a general cell geometry detection mechanism: branch lengths in Y-shaped Escherichia coli cells affect Min oscillation patterns and division dynamics.

    PubMed

    Varma, Archana; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Young, Kevin D

    2008-03-01

    In Escherichia coli, division site placement is regulated by the dynamic behavior of the MinCDE proteins, which oscillate from pole to pole and confine septation to the centers of normal rod-shaped cells. Some current mathematical models explain these oscillations by considering interactions among the Min proteins without recourse to additional localization signals. So far, such models have been applied only to regularly shaped bacteria, but here we test these models further by employing aberrantly shaped E. coli cells as miniature reactors. The locations of MinCDE proteins fused to derivatives of green fluorescent protein were monitored in branched cells with at least three conspicuous poles. MinCDE most often moved from one branch to another in an invariant order, following a nonreversing clockwise or counterclockwise direction over the time periods observed. In cells with two short branches or nubs, the proteins oscillated symmetrically from one end to the other. The locations of FtsZ rings were consistent with a broad MinC-free zone near the branch junctions, and Min rings exhibited the surprising behavior of moving quickly from one possible position to another. Using a reaction-diffusion model that reproduces the observed MinCD oscillations in rod-shaped and round E. coli, we predict that the oscillation patterns in branched cells are a natural response of Min behavior in cellular geometries having different relative branch lengths. The results provide further evidence that Min protein oscillations act as a general cell geometry detection mechanism that can locate poles even in branched cells. PMID:18178745

  9. Finite beta plasma equilibrium in toroidally linked mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Ilgisonis, V.I.; Berk, H.L.; Pastukhov, V.P.

    1993-07-01

    The problem of finite pressure plasma equilibrium in a system with closed magnetic field lines consisting of quadrupole mirrors linked by simple toroidal cells with elliptical cross-sections is analyzed. An appropriate analytical procedure is developed, that uses conformal mapping techniques, which enables one to obtain the magnetic field structure for the free boundary equilibrium problem. This method has general applicability for finding analytic solutions of the two-dimensional Dirichlet problem outside of an arbitrary closed contour. Using this method, the deformations of the plasma equilibrium configuration due to finite plasma pressure in the toroidal cell are calculated analytically to the second order in {lambda}-expansion, where {lambda} {approximately} {beta}/{epsilon}E, {beta} is the ratio of plasma pressure to the magnetic field pressure, {epsilon} is the inverse aspect ratio and E is the ellipticity of the plasma cross-section. The outer displacement of the plasma column is shown to depend nonlinearly on the increase of plasma pressure, and does not prevent the achievement of substantial {beta} {approximately} 10% in the toroidal cells.

  10. Rotation shear induced fluctuation decorrelation in a toroidal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    The enhanced decorrelation of fluctuations by the combined effects of the E {times} B flow (V{sub E}) shear, the parallel flow (V{sub {parallel}}) shear, and the magnetic shear is studied in toroidal geometry. A two-point nonlinear analysis previously utilized in a cylindrical model shows that the reduction of the radial correlation length below its ambient turbulence value ({Delta}r{sub 0}) is characterized by the ratio between the shearing rate {omega}{sub s} and the ambient turbulence scattering rate {Delta}{omega}{sub T}. The derived shearing rate is given by {omega}{sub s}{sup 2} = ({Delta}r{sub 0}){sup 2}[1/{Delta}{phi}{sup 2}{l_brace}{partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}r(qV{sub E}/r){r_brace}{sup 2} + 1/{Delta}{eta}{sup 2}{l_brace}{partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}r(V{parallel}/qR){r_brace}{sup 2}], where {Delta}{phi} and {Delta}{eta} are the correlation angles of the ambient turbulence along the toroidal and parallel directions. This result deviates significantly from the cylindrical result for high magnetic shear or for ballooning-like fluctuations. For suppression of flute-like fluctuations, only the radial shear of qV{sub E}/r contributes, and the radial shear of V{parallel}/qR is irrelevant regardless of the plasma rotation direction.

  11. Noncommutative Geometry and Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connes, Alain

    2006-11-01

    In this very short essay we shall describe a "spectral" point of view on geometry which allows to start taking into account the lessons from both renormalization and of general relativity. We shall first do that for renormalization and explain in rough outline the content of our recent collaborations with Dirk Kreimer and Matilde Marcolli leading to the universal Galois symmetry of renormalizable quantum field theories provided by the renormalization group in its cosmic Galois group incarnation. As far as general relativity is concerned, since the functional integral cannot be treated in the traditional perturbative manner, it relies heavily as a "sum over geometries" on the chosen paradigm of geometric space. This will give us the occasion to discuss, in the light of noncommutative geometry, the issue of "observables" in gravity and our joint work with Ali Chamseddine on the spectral action, with a first attempt to write down a functional integral on the space of noncommutative geometries.

  12. Neoclassical transport in toroidal plasmas with nonaxisymmetric flux surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.

    2015-05-01

    The capability to treat nonaxisymmetric flux surface geometry has been added to the drift-kinetic code NEO (Belli and Candy 2008 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 095010). Geometric quantities (i.e. metric elements) are supplied by a recently-developed local 3D equilibrium solver, allowing neoclassical transport coefficients to be systematically computed while varying the 3D plasma shape in a simple and intuitive manner. Code verification is accomplished via detailed comparison with 3D Pfirsch-Schlüter theory. A discussion of the various collisionality regimes associated with 3D transport is given, with an emphasis on non-ambipolar particle flux, neoclassical toroidal viscosity, energy flux and bootstrap current. Finally, we compute the transport in the presence of ripple-type perturbations in a DIII-D-like H-mode edge plasma.

  13. Compact toroidal ion-trap design and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, M. J.; Gorman, C. H.

    2010-10-15

    We present the design of a type of compact toroidal, or 'halo', ion trap. Such traps may be useful for mass spectrometry, studying small Coulomb cluster rings, quantum-information applications, or other quantum simulations where a ring topology is of interest. We present results from a Monte Carlo optimization of the trap design parameters using finite-element analysis simulations that minimize higher-order anharmonic terms in the trapping pseudopotential, while maintaining complete control over ion placement at the pseudopotential node in three dimensions using static bias fields. These simulations are based on a practical electrode design using readily available parts, yet can be easily scaled to any size trap with similar electrode spacings. We also derive the conditions for a crystal structure transition for two ions in the compact halo trap, the first nontrivial transition for Coulomb crystals in this geometry.

  14. Long-wavelength microinstabilities in toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, W.W.; Rewoldt, G.

    1993-01-01

    Realistic kinetic toroidal eigenmode calculations have been carried out to support a proper assessment of the influence of long-wavelength microturbulence on transport in tokamak plasmas. In order to efficiently evaluate large-scale kinetic behavior extending over many rational surfaces, significant improvements have been made to a toroidal finite element code used to analyze the fully two-dimensional (r,[theta]) mode structures of trapped-ion and toroidal ion temperature gradient (ITG) instabilities. It is found that even at very long wavelengths, these eigenmodes exhibit a strong ballooning character with the associated radial structure relatively insensitive to ion Landau damping at the rational surfaces. In contrast to the long-accepted picture that the radial extent of trapped-ion instabilities is characterized by the ion-gyroradius-scale associated with strong localization between adjacent rational surfaces, present results demonstrate that under realistic conditions, the actual scale is governed by the large-scale variations in the equilibrium gradients. Applications to recent measurements of fluctuation properties in TFTR L-mode plasmas indicate that the theoretical trends appear consistent with spectral characteristics as well as rough heuristic estimates of the transport level. Benchmarking calculations in support of the development of a three-dimensional toroidal gyrokinetic code indicate reasonable agreement with respect to both the properties of the eigenfunctions and the magnitude of the eigenvalues during the linear phase of the simulations of toroidal ITG instabilities.

  15. Long-wavelength microinstabilities in toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, W.W.; Rewoldt, G.

    1993-01-01

    Realistic kinetic toroidal eigenmode calculations have been carried out to support a proper assessment of the influence of long-wavelength microturbulence on transport in tokamak plasmas. In order to efficiently evaluate large-scale kinetic behavior extending over many rational surfaces, significant improvements have been made to a toroidal finite element code used to analyze the fully two-dimensional (r,{theta}) mode structures of trapped-ion and toroidal ion temperature gradient (ITG) instabilities. It is found that even at very long wavelengths, these eigenmodes exhibit a strong ballooning character with the associated radial structure relatively insensitive to ion Landau damping at the rational surfaces. In contrast to the long-accepted picture that the radial extent of trapped-ion instabilities is characterized by the ion-gyroradius-scale associated with strong localization between adjacent rational surfaces, present results demonstrate that under realistic conditions, the actual scale is governed by the large-scale variations in the equilibrium gradients. Applications to recent measurements of fluctuation properties in TFTR L-mode plasmas indicate that the theoretical trends appear consistent with spectral characteristics as well as rough heuristic estimates of the transport level. Benchmarking calculations in support of the development of a three-dimensional toroidal gyrokinetic code indicate reasonable agreement with respect to both the properties of the eigenfunctions and the magnitude of the eigenvalues during the linear phase of the simulations of toroidal ITG instabilities.

  16. Tokamak with liquid metal for inducing toroidal electrical field

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1981-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes a vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within said vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner confines gas therein. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside the liner. A magnetic field is established in the liquid metal to develop magnetic flux linking the toroidal space. The gas is ionized. The liquid metal and the toroidal space are moved relative to one another transversely of the space to generate electric current in the ionized gas in the toroidal space about its major axis and thereby heat plasma developed in the toroidal space.

  17. Bose-Einstein condensates in toroidal traps: Instabilities, swallow-tail loops, and self-trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baharian, Soheil; Baym, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    We study the stability and dynamics of an ultracold bosonic gas trapped in a toroidal geometry and driven by rotation in the absence of dissipation. We first delineate, via the Bogoliubov mode expansion, the regions of stability and the nature of instabilities of the system for both repulsive and attractive interaction strengths. To study the response of the system to variations in the rotation rate, we introduce a “disorder” potential, breaking the rotational symmetry. We demonstrate the breakdown of adiabaticity as the rotation rate is slowly varied and find forced tunneling between the system's eigenstates. The nonadiabaticity is signaled by the appearance of a swallow-tail loop in the lowest-energy level, a general sign of hysteresis. Then, we show that this system is in one-to-one correspondence with a trapped gas in a double-well potential and thus exhibits macroscopic quantum self-trapping. Finally, we show that self-trapping is a direct manifestation of the behavior of the lowest-energy level.

  18. Toroidal equilibrium with low frequency wave driven currents

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1984-12-01

    In the absence of an emf the parallel current, j/sub parallel/, in a steady state tokamak will consist of a neoclassical portion plus a wave-driven contribution. Using the drift kinetic equation, the quasilinear (wave-driven) current is computed for high phase speed waves in a torus, and this is combined with the neoclassical term to obtain the general expression for the flux surface average . For a given pressure profile this technique fully determines the MHD equilibrium, permitting the study of a new class of toroidal equilibria.

  19. Ferroic nature of magnetic toroidal order.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Anne S; Meier, Dennis; Fiebig, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Electric dipoles and ferroelectricity violate spatial inversion symmetry, and magnetic dipoles and ferromagnetism break time-inversion symmetry. Breaking both symmetries favours magnetoelectric charge-spin coupling effects of enormous interest, such as multiferroics, skyrmions, polar superconductors, topological insulators or dynamic phenomena such as electromagnons. Extending the rationale, a novel type of ferroic order violating space- and time-inversion symmetry with a single order parameter should exist. This existence is fundamental and the inherent magnetoelectric coupling is technologically interesting. A uniform alignment of magnetic vortices, called ferrotoroidicity, was proposed to represent this state. Here we demonstrate that the magnetic vortex pattern identified in LiCoPO4 exhibits the indispensable hallmark of such a ferroic state, namely hysteretic poling of ferrotoroidic domains in the conjugate toroidal field, along with a distinction of toroidal from non-toroidal poling effects. This consolidates ferrotoroidicity as fourth form of ferroic order. PMID:25190207

  20. Quasisymmetric toroidal plasmas with large mean flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, H.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Nunami, M.; Nishimura, S.

    2011-08-15

    Geometric conditions for quasisymmetric toroidal plasmas with large mean flows on the order of the ion thermal speed are investigated. Equilibrium momentum balance equations including the inertia term due to the large flow velocity are used to show that, for rotating quasisymmetric plasmas with no local currents crossing flux surfaces, all components of the metric tensor should be independent of the toroidal angle in the Boozer coordinates, and consequently these systems need to be rigorously axisymmetric. Unless the local radial currents vanish, the Boozer coordinates do not exist and the toroidal flow velocity cannot take any value other than a very limited class of eigenvalues corresponding to very rapid rotation especially for low beta plasmas.

  1. Colloquium: Geometry and optimal packing of twisted columns and filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grason, Gregory M.

    2015-04-01

    This Colloquium presents recent progress in understanding constraints and consequences of close-packing geometry of filamentous or columnar materials possessing nontrivial textures, focusing, in particular, on the common motifs of twisted and toroidal structures. The mathematical framework is presented that relates spacing between linelike, filamentous elements to their backbone orientations, highlighting the explicit connection between the interfilament metric properties and the geometry of non-Euclidean surfaces. The consequences of the hidden connection between packing in twisted filament bundles and packing on positively curved surfaces, like the Thomson problem, are demonstrated for the defect-riddled ground states of physical models of twisted filament bundles. The connection between the "ideal" geometry of fibrations of curved three-dimensional space, including the Hopf fibration, and the non-Euclidean constraints of filament packing in twisted and toroidal bundles is presented, with a focus on the broader dependence of metric geometry on the simultaneous twisting and folding of multifilament bundles.

  2. Toroidal Precession as a Geometric Phase

    SciTech Connect

    J.W. Burby and H. Qin

    2012-09-26

    Toroidal precession is commonly understood as the orbit-averaged toroidal drift of guiding centers in axisymmetric and quasisymmetric configurations. We give a new, more natural description of precession as a geometric phase effect. In particular, we show that the precession angle arises as the holonomy of a guiding center's poloidal trajectory relative to a principal connection. The fact that this description is physically appropriate is borne out with new, manifestly coordinate-independent expressions for the precession angle that apply to all types of orbits in tokamaks and quasisymmetric stellarators alike. We then describe how these expressions may be fruitfully employed in numerical calculations of precession.

  3. The effect of sheared toroidal rotation on pressure driven magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegna, C. C.

    2016-05-01

    The impact of sheared toroidal rotation on the evolution of pressure driven magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas is investigated using a resistive magnetohydrodynamics model augmented by a neoclassical Ohm's law. Particular attention is paid to the asymptotic matching data as the Mercier indices are altered in the presence of sheared flow. Analysis of the nonlinear island Grad-Shafranov equation shows that sheared flows tend to amplify the stabilizing pressure/curvature contribution to pressure driven islands in toroidal tokamaks relative to the island bootstrap current contribution. As such, sheared toroidal rotation tends to reduce saturated magnetic island widths.

  4. Electromagnetic toroidal excitations in matter and free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papasimakis, N.; Fedotov, V. A.; Savinov, V.; Raybould, T. A.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2016-03-01

    The toroidal dipole is a localized electromagnetic excitation, distinct from the magnetic and electric dipoles. While the electric dipole can be understood as a pair of opposite charges and the magnetic dipole as a current loop, the toroidal dipole corresponds to currents flowing on the surface of a torus. Toroidal dipoles provide physically significant contributions to the basic characteristics of matter including absorption, dispersion and optical activity. Toroidal excitations also exist in free space as spatially and temporally localized electromagnetic pulses propagating at the speed of light and interacting with matter. We review recent experimental observations of resonant toroidal dipole excitations in metamaterials and the discovery of anapoles, non-radiating charge-current configurations involving toroidal dipoles. While certain fundamental and practical aspects of toroidal electrodynamics remain open for the moment, we envision that exploitation of toroidal excitations can have important implications for the fields of photonics, sensing, energy and information.

  5. Electromagnetic toroidal excitations in matter and free space.

    PubMed

    Papasimakis, N; Fedotov, V A; Savinov, V; Raybould, T A; Zheludev, N I

    2016-03-01

    The toroidal dipole is a localized electromagnetic excitation, distinct from the magnetic and electric dipoles. While the electric dipole can be understood as a pair of opposite charges and the magnetic dipole as a current loop, the toroidal dipole corresponds to currents flowing on the surface of a torus. Toroidal dipoles provide physically significant contributions to the basic characteristics of matter including absorption, dispersion and optical activity. Toroidal excitations also exist in free space as spatially and temporally localized electromagnetic pulses propagating at the speed of light and interacting with matter. We review recent experimental observations of resonant toroidal dipole excitations in metamaterials and the discovery of anapoles, non-radiating charge-current configurations involving toroidal dipoles. While certain fundamental and practical aspects of toroidal electrodynamics remain open for the moment, we envision that exploitation of toroidal excitations can have important implications for the fields of photonics, sensing, energy and information. PMID:26906961

  6. A concrete anti-de Sitter black hole with dynamical horizon having toroidal cross-sections and its characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadras, Pouria; Firouzjaee, J. T.; Mansouri, Reza

    2012-11-01

    We propose a special solution of Einstein equations in the general Vaidya form representing a dynamical black hole having horizon cross-sections with toroidal topology. The concrete model enables us to study for the first time dynamical horizons with toroidal topology, its area law, and the question of matter flux inside the horizon, without using a cut-and-paste technology to construct the solution.

  7. Molecular Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desseyn, H. O.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Compares linear-nonlinear and planar-nonplanar geometry through the valence-shell electron pairs repulsion (V.S.E.P.R.), Mulliken-Walsh, and electrostatic force theories. Indicates that although the V.S.E.P.R. theory has more advantages for elementary courses, an explanation of the best features of the different theories offers students a better…

  8. Toroidal angular momentum transport with non-axisymmetric magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, J.; Park, B. H.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we calculate the radial transport of the toroidal angular momentum in the presence of non-axisymmetric magnetic fields. It is shown that the radial transport of the toroidal angular momentum, R 2 ∇ ζ . V , is proportional to the first order of gyro-radius. This implies that the neoclassical toroidal viscosity caused by asymmetric magnetic fields can change the toroidal rotation significantly.

  9. PULSAR WIND NEBULAE WITH THICK TOROIDAL STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, Roger A.; Reynolds, Stephen P. E-mail: reynolds@ncsu.edu

    2011-10-10

    We investigate a class of pulsar wind nebulae that show synchrotron emission from a thick toroidal structure. The best studied such object is the small radio and X-ray nebula around the Vela pulsar, which can be interpreted as the result of interaction of a mildly supersonic inward flow with the recent pulsar wind. Such a flow near the center of a supernova remnant can be produced in a transient phase when the reverse shock reaches the center of the remnant. Other nebulae with a thick toroidal structure are G106.6+2.9 and G76.9+1.0. Their structure contrasts with young pulsar nebulae like the Crab Nebula and 3C 38, which show a more chaotic, filamentary structure in the synchrotron emission. In both situations, a torus-jet structure is present where the pulsar wind passes through a termination shock, indicating the flow is initially toroidal. We suggest that the difference is due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability that operates when the outer boundary of the nebula is accelerating into freely expanding supernova ejecta. The instability gives rise to mixing in the Crab and related objects, but is not present in the nebulae with thick toroidal regions.

  10. Toroidal Alfven eigenmode-induced ripple trapping

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Fredrickson, E.; Darrow, D.; Zarnstorff, M.; Wilson, R.; Zweben, S.; Hill, K.; Chen, Y.; Fu, G.

    1995-08-01

    Toroidal Alfven eigenmodes are shown to be capable of inducing ripple trapping of high-energy particles in tokamaks, causing intense localized particle loss. The effect has been observed in TFTR [R. Hawryluk, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion {bold 33}, 1509 (1991)]. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  11. Dynamical model for the toroidal sporadic meteors

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorný, Petr; Vokrouhlický, David; Nesvorný, David; Campbell-Brown, Margaret; Brown, Peter E-mail: vokrouhl@cesnet.cz E-mail: margaret.campbell@uwo.ca

    2014-07-01

    More than a decade of radar operations by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar have allowed both young and moderately old streams to be distinguished from the dispersed sporadic background component. The latter has been categorized according to broad radiant regions visible to Earth-based observers into three broad classes: the helion and anti-helion source, the north and south apex sources, and the north and south toroidal sources (and a related arc structure). The first two are populated mainly by dust released from Jupiter-family comets and new comets. Proper modeling of the toroidal sources has not to date been accomplished. Here, we develop a steady-state model for the toroidal source of the sporadic meteoroid complex, compare our model with the available radar measurements, and investigate a contribution of dust particles from our model to the whole population of sporadic meteoroids. We find that the long-term stable part of the toroidal particles is mainly fed by dust released by Halley type (long period) comets (HTCs). Our synthetic model reproduces most of the observed features of the toroidal particles, including the most troublesome low-eccentricity component, which is due to a combination of two effects: particles' ability to decouple from Jupiter and circularize by the Poynting-Robertson effect, and large collision probability for orbits similar to that of the Earth. Our calibrated model also allows us to estimate the total mass of the HTC-released dust in space and check the flux necessary to maintain the cloud in a steady state.

  12. On steady poloidal and toroidal flows in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    McClements, K. G.

    2010-08-15

    The effects of poloidal and toroidal flows on tokamak plasma equilibria are examined in the magnetohydrodynamic limit. ''Transonic'' poloidal flows of the order of the sound speed multiplied by the ratio of poloidal magnetic field to total field B{sub {theta}/}B can cause the (normally elliptic) Grad-Shafranov (GS) equation to become hyperbolic in part of the solution domain. It is pointed out that the range of poloidal flows for which the GS equation is hyperbolic increases with plasma beta and B{sub {theta}/}B, thereby complicating the problem of determining spherical tokamak plasma equilibria with transonic poloidal flows. It is demonstrated that the calculation of the hyperbolicity criterion can be easily modified when the assumption of isentropic flux surfaces is replaced with the more tokamak-relevant one of isothermal flux surfaces. On the basis of the latter assumption, a simple expression is obtained for the variation of density on a flux surface when poloidal and toroidal flows are simultaneously present. Combined with Thomson scattering measurements of density and temperature, this expression could be used to infer information on poloidal and toroidal flows on the high field side of a tokamak plasma, where direct measurements of flows are not generally possible. It is demonstrated that there are four possible solutions of the Bernoulli relation for the plasma density when the flux surfaces are assumed to be isothermal, corresponding to four distinct poloidal flow regimes. Finally, observations and first principles-based theoretical modeling of poloidal flows in tokamak plasmas are briefly reviewed and it is concluded that there is no clear evidence for the occurrence of supersonic poloidal flows.

  13. Neoclassical Drift of Circulating Orbits Due toToroidal Electric Field in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Qin; Guan, Xiaoyin; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-07-19

    In tokamaks, Ware pinch is a well known neoclassical effect for trapped particles in response to a toroidal electric field. It is generally believed that there exists no similar neoclassical effect for circulating particles without collisions. However, this belief is erroneous, and misses an important effect. We show both analytically and numerically that under the influence of a toroidal electric field parallel to the current, the circulating orbits drift outward toward the outer wall with a characteristic velocity O ({var_epsilon}{sup -1}) larger than the E x B velocity, where {var_epsilon} is the inverse aspect-ratio of a tokamak. During a RF overdrive, the toroidal electric field is anti-parallel to the current. As a consequence, all charged particles, including backward runaway electrons, will drift inward towards the inner wall.

  14. Geometry and physics

    PubMed Central

    Atiyah, Michael; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Hitchin, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    We review the remarkably fruitful interactions between mathematics and quantum physics in the past decades, pointing out some general trends and highlighting several examples, such as the counting of curves in algebraic geometry, invariants of knots and four-dimensional topology. PMID:20123740

  15. Dark Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Dobado, A.; Maroto, A. L.

    Extra-dimensional theories contain additional degrees of freedom related to the geometry of the extra space which can be interpreted as new particles. Such theories allow to reformulate most of the fundamental problems of physics from a completely different point of view. In this essay, we concentrate on the brane fluctuations which are present in brane-worlds, and how such oscillations of the own space-time geometry along curved extra dimensions can help to resolve the Universe missing mass problem. The energy scales involved in these models are low compared to the Planck scale, and this means that some of the brane fluctuations distinctive signals could be detected in future colliders and in direct or indirect dark matter searches.

  16. The linear tearing instability in three dimensional, toroidal gyro-kinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hornsby, W. A. Migliano, P.; Buchholz, R.; Kroenert, L.; Weikl, A.; Peeters, A. G.; Zarzoso, D.; Poli, E.; Casson, F. J.

    2015-02-15

    Linear gyro-kinetic simulations of the classical tearing mode in three-dimensional toroidal geometry were performed using the global gyro-kinetic turbulence code, GKW. The results were benchmarked against a cylindrical ideal MHD and analytical theory calculations. The stability, growth rate, and frequency of the mode were investigated by varying the current profile, collisionality, and the pressure gradients. Both collisionless and semi-collisional tearing modes were found with a smooth transition between the two. A residual, finite, rotation frequency of the mode even in the absence of a pressure gradient is observed, which is attributed to toroidal finite Larmor-radius effects. When a pressure gradient is present at low collisionality, the mode rotates at the expected electron diamagnetic frequency. However, the island rotation reverses direction at high collisionality. The growth rate is found to follow a η{sup 1∕7} scaling with collisional resistivity in the semi-collisional regime, closely following the semi-collisional scaling found by Fitzpatrick. The stability of the mode closely follows the stability analysis as performed by Hastie et al. using the same current and safety factor profiles but for cylindrical geometry, however, here a modification due to toroidal coupling and pressure effects is seen.

  17. Capillary toroid cavity detector for high pressure NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Chen, Michael J.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; ter Horst, Marc

    2007-09-11

    A Toroid Cavity Detector (TCD) is provided for implementing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of chemical reactions under conditions of high pressures and temperatures. A toroid cavity contains an elongated central conductor extending within the toroid cavity. The toroid cavity and central conductor generate an RF magnetic field for NMR analysis. A flow-through capillary sample container is located within the toroid cavity adjacent to the central conductor to subject a sample material flowing through the capillary to a static magnetic field and to enable NMR spectra to be recorded of the material in the capillary under a temperature and high pressure environment.

  18. Toroidal modeling of penetration of the resonant magnetic perturbation field

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yueqiang; Kirk, A.

    2013-04-15

    A toroidal, quasi-linear model is proposed to study the penetration dynamics of the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field into the plasma. The model couples the linear, fluid plasma response to a toroidal momentum balance equation, which includes torques induced by both fluid electromagnetic force and by (kinetic) neoclassical toroidal viscous (NTV) force. The numerical results for a test toroidal equilibrium quantify the effects of various physical parameters on the field penetration and on the plasma rotation braking. The neoclassical toroidal viscous torque plays a dominant role in certain region of the plasma, for the RMP penetration problem considered in this work.

  19. Matter in the form of toroidal electromagnetic vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Wilhelm F.

    2015-09-01

    The creation of charged elementary particles from neutral photons is explained as a conversion process of electromagnetic (EM) energy from linear to circular motion at the speed of light into two localized, toroidal shaped vortices of trapped EM energy that resist change of motion, perceptible as particles with inertia and hence mass. The photon can be represented as a superposition of left and right circular polarized transverse electric fields of opposite polarity originating from a common zero potential axis, the optical axis of the photon. If these components are separated by interaction with a strong field (nucleon) they would curl up into two electromagnetic vortices (EMV) due to longitudinal magnetic field components forming toroids. These vortices are perceptible as opposite charged elementary particles e+/- . These spinning toroids generate extended oscillating fields that interact with stationary field oscillations. The velocity-dependent frequency differences cause beat signals equivalent to matter waves, leading to interference. The extended fields entangled with every particle explain wave particle duality issues. Spin and magnetic moment are the natural outcome of these gyrating particles. As the energy and hence mass of the electron increases with acceleration so does its size shrink proportional to its reduced wavelength. The artificial weak and strong nuclear forces can be easily explained as different manifestations of the intermediate EM forces. The unstable neutron consists of a proton surrounded by a contracted and captured electron. The associated radial EM forces represent the weak nuclear force. The deuteron consists of two axially separated protons held together by a centrally captured electron. The axial EM forces represent the strong nuclear force, providing stability for "neutrons" only within nucleons. The same principles were applied to determine the geometries of force-balanced nuclei. The alpha-particle emerges as a very compact

  20. Toroidal dipole excitations in metamolecules formed by interacting plasmonic nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Derek W.; Jenkins, Stewart D.; Ruostekoski, Janne; Fedotov, Vassili A.; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2016-03-01

    We show how the elusive toroidal dipole moment appears as a radiative excitation eigenmode in a metamolecule resonator that is formed by pairs of plasmonic nanorods. We analyze one such nanorod configuration—a toroidal metamolecule. We find that the radiative interactions in the toroidal metamolecule can be qualitatively represented by a theoretical model based on an electric point dipole arrangement. Both a finite-size rod model and the point dipole approximation demonstrate how the toroidal dipole moment is subradiant and difficult to excite by incident light. By means of breaking the geometric symmetry of the metamolecule, the toroidal mode can be excited by linearly polarized light and appears as a Fano resonance dip in the forward scattered light. We provide simple optimization protocols for maximizing the toroidal dipole mode excitation. This opens up possibilities for simplified control and driving of metamaterial arrays consisting of toroidal dipole unit-cell resonators.

  1. Measurement of toroidal vessel eddy current during plasma disruption on J-TEXT.

    PubMed

    Liu, L J; Yu, K X; Zhang, M; Zhuang, G; Li, X; Yuan, T; Rao, B; Zhao, Q

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have employed a thin, printed circuit board eddy current array in order to determine the radial distribution of the azimuthal component of the eddy current density at the surface of a steel plate. The eddy current in the steel plate can be calculated by analytical methods under the simplifying assumptions that the steel plate is infinitely large and the exciting current is of uniform distribution. The measurement on the steel plate shows that this method has high spatial resolution. Then, we extended this methodology to a toroidal geometry with the objective of determining the poloidal distribution of the toroidal component of the eddy current density associated with plasma disruption in a fusion reactor called J-TEXT. The preliminary measured result is consistent with the analysis and calculation results on the J-TEXT vacuum vessel. PMID:26827315

  2. Transport and dynamics in toroidal fusion systems. Final report, 1992--1995

    SciTech Connect

    Schnack, D D

    1995-09-15

    This document is organized as follows. Discussions are presented on the properties of structured and unstructured meshes, and the data structures useful for describing them. Issues related to the triangulation of an arbitrary set of points in a plane are also discussed. A derivation is made of a finite volume approximation to the resistive MHD equations suitable for use on an unstructured, triangular mesh in toroidal geometry. Boundary conditions are discussed. The specific MHD model, and its implementation on the unstructured mesh, is discussed. A discussion is presented of methods of time integration, and descriptions are given for implementation of semi-implicit and fully implicit algorithms. Examples of the application of the method are given. Included are standard, two- dimensional hydrodynamic and MHD shock problems, as well as applications of the method to the equilibrium and stability of toroidal fusion plasmas in two and three dimensions. The initial results with mesh adaptation are also described.

  3. Measurement of toroidal vessel eddy current during plasma disruption on J-TEXT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L. J.; Yu, K. X.; Zhang, M.; Zhuang, G.; Li, X.; Yuan, T.; Rao, B.; Zhao, Q.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have employed a thin, printed circuit board eddy current array in order to determine the radial distribution of the azimuthal component of the eddy current density at the surface of a steel plate. The eddy current in the steel plate can be calculated by analytical methods under the simplifying assumptions that the steel plate is infinitely large and the exciting current is of uniform distribution. The measurement on the steel plate shows that this method has high spatial resolution. Then, we extended this methodology to a toroidal geometry with the objective of determining the poloidal distribution of the toroidal component of the eddy current density associated with plasma disruption in a fusion reactor called J-TEXT. The preliminary measured result is consistent with the analysis and calculation results on the J-TEXT vacuum vessel.

  4. PENGEOM-A general-purpose geometry package for Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport in material systems defined by quadric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almansa, Julio; Salvat-Pujol, Francesc; Díaz-Londoño, Gloria; Carnicer, Artur; Lallena, Antonio M.; Salvat, Francesc

    2016-02-01

    The Fortran subroutine package PENGEOM provides a complete set of tools to handle quadric geometries in Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport. The material structure where radiation propagates is assumed to consist of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces. The PENGEOM subroutines (a subset of the PENELOPE code) track particles through the material structure, independently of the details of the physics models adopted to describe the interactions. Although these subroutines are designed for detailed simulations of photon and electron transport, where all individual interactions are simulated sequentially, they can also be used in mixed (class II) schemes for simulating the transport of high-energy charged particles, where the effect of soft interactions is described by the random-hinge method. The definition of the geometry and the details of the tracking algorithm are tailored to optimize simulation speed. The use of fuzzy quadric surfaces minimizes the impact of round-off errors. The provided software includes a Java graphical user interface for editing and debugging the geometry definition file and for visualizing the material structure. Images of the structure are generated by using the tracking subroutines and, hence, they describe the geometry actually passed to the simulation code.

  5. Effects of inhomogeneous partial absorption and the geometry of the boundary on population evolution of molecules diffusing in general porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Seungoh

    2009-08-01

    We consider aspects of the population dynamics, inside a bound domain, of diffusing agents carrying an attribute which is stochastically destroyed upon contact with the boundary. The normal mode analysis of the relevant Helmholtz equation under the partially absorbing, but uniform, boundary condition provides a starting framework in understanding detailed evolution dynamics of the attribute in the time domain. In particular, the boundary-localized depletion has been widely employed in practical applications that depend on geometry of various porous media such as rocks, cement, bones, and cheese. While direct relationship between the pore geometry and the diffusion-relaxation spectrum forms the basis for such applications and has been extensively studied, relatively less attention has been paid to the spatial variation in the boundary condition. In this work, we focus on the way the pore geometry and the inhomogeneous depletion strength of the boundary become intertwined and thus obscure the direct relationship between the spectrum and the geometry. It is often impossible to gauge experimentally the degree to which such interference occurs. We fill this gap by perturbatively incorporating classes of spatially varying boundary conditions and derive their consequences that are observable through numerical simulations or controlled experiments on glass bead packs and artificially fabricated porous media. We identify features of the spectrum that are most sensitive to the inhomogeneity, apply the method to the spherical pore with a simple hemispherical binary distribution of the depletion strength, and obtain bounds for the induced change in the slowest relaxation mode.

  6. REVIEW ARTICLE: Control of non-axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2010-10-01

    The control of non-axisymmetric toroidal plasmas, stellarators, has a different character than the control of tokamaks for two reasons. Non-axisymmetric magnetic fields (1) can provide an arbitrarily large fraction of the poloidal magnetic field and (2) can strongly center the plasma in the chamber making it impossible to lose position control. The focus of stellarator design is on plasmas that are stable without feedback, need little or no change in the external magnetic field as the plasma evolves, and require no external power to maintain the desired magnetic configuration. The physics of non-axisymmetric fields is the same whether in a tokamak or a stellarator and whether introduced intentionally or accidentally. Fundamental physics indicates that plasma shape, which is controlled by the distribution of the external magnetic field that is normal to the plasma surface, is the primary control for fusion plasmas. The importance of non-axisymmetric control is set by the importance of toroidal plasma physics. Informed decisions on the development strategy of tokamaks, as well as magnetic fusion in general, require an understanding of the capabilities and difficulties of plasma control at various levels of non-axisymmetric shaping.

  7. Toroidal magnetic confinement of non-neutral plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Zensho; Ogawa, Yuichi; Morikawa, Junji; Himura, Haruhiko; Kondo, Shigeo; Nakashima, Chihiro; Kakuno, Shuichi; Iqbal, Muhamad; Volponi, Francesco; Shibayama, Norihisa; Tahara, Shigeru

    1999-12-10

    A new method of toroidal non-neutral plasma trap has been developed with applying the chaos-induced radial transport of particles near a magnetic null point. A pure electron plasma is produced by injecting an electron beam. The poloidal gyroradius of an electron at the energy of 1 keV is of order 10 mm, which determines the length scale of the chaotic region. Amongst various applications of toroidal non-neutral plasmas, a possibility of producing very high-{beta} plasma, which is suitable for advanced fusion, has been examined. The self-electric field of a non-neutral plasma can generate a strong shear flow. When the flow velocity is comparable to the Alfven speed (which is smaller than the ion sound speed, if {beta}>1), a high-{beta} equilibrium can be produced in which the plasma pressure is primarily balanced by the dynamic pressure of the flow. This configuration is described by a generalized Bernoulli law.

  8. Toroidal Magnetic Confinement of Non-Neutral Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zensho Yoshida; Yuichi Ogawa; Junji Morikawa; Haruhiko Himura; Shigeo Kondo; Chihiro Nakashima; Shuichi Kakuno; Muhamad Iqbal; Francesco Volponi; Norihisa Shibayama; Shigeru Tahara

    1999-12-31

    A new method of toroidal non-neutral plasma trap has been developed with applying the chaos-induced radial transport of particles near a magnetic null point. A pure electron plasma is produced by injecting an electron beam. The poloidal gyro-radius of an electron at the energy of 1 keV is of order 10 mm, which determines the length scale of the chaotic region. Amongst various applications of toroidal non-neutral plasmas, a possibility of producing very high-{beta} plasma, which is suitable for advanced fusion, has been examined. The self-electric field of a non-neutral plasma can generate a strong shear flow. When the flow velocity is comparable to the Alfven speed (which is smaller than the ion sound speed, if {beta} > 1), a high-{beta} equilibrium can be produced in which the plasma pressure is primarily balanced by the dynamic pressure of the flow. This configuration is described by a generalized Bernoulli law.

  9. Solar concentrator with a toroidal relay module.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jhe-Syuan; Liang, Chao-Wen

    2015-10-01

    III-V multijunction solar cells require solar concentrators with a high concentration ratio to reduce per watt cost and to increase solar energy transforming efficiency. This paper discusses a novel solar concentrator design that features a high concentration ratio, high transfer efficiency, thin profile design, and a high solar acceptance angle. The optical design of the concentrator utilizes a toroidal relay module, which includes both the off-axis relay lens and field lens design in a single concentric toroidal lens shape. The optical design concept of the concentrator is discussed and the simulation results are shown. The given exemplary design has an aspect ratio of 0.24, a high averaged optical concentration ratio 1230×, a maximum efficiency of 76.8%, and the solar acceptance angle of ±0.9°. PMID:26479646

  10. Plasmonic Toroidal Metamolecules Assembled by DNA Origami.

    PubMed

    Urban, Maximilian J; Dutta, Palash K; Wang, Pengfei; Duan, Xiaoyang; Shen, Xibo; Ding, Baoquan; Ke, Yonggang; Liu, Na

    2016-05-01

    We show hierarchical assembly of plasmonic toroidal metamolecules that exhibit tailored optical activity in the visible spectral range. Each metamolecule consists of four identical origami-templated helical building blocks. Such toroidal metamolecules show a stronger chiroptical response than monomers and dimers of the helical building blocks. Enantiomers of the plasmonic structures yield opposite circular dichroism spectra. Experimental results agree well with the theoretical simulations. We also show that given the circular symmetry of the structures s distinct chiroptical response along their axial orientation can be uncovered via simple spin-coating of the metamolecules on substrates. Our work provides a new strategy to create plasmonic chiral platforms with sophisticated nanoscale architectures for potential applications such as chiral sensing using chemically based assembly systems. PMID:27082140