These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Generalized Reflection Coefficients  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I consider general reflection coefficients for arbitrary one-dimensional whole line differential or difference operators of order 2. These reflection coefficients are semicontinuous functions of the operator: their absolute value can only go down when limits are taken. This implies a corresponding semicontinuity result for the absolutely continuous spectrum, which applies to a very large class of maps. In particular, we can consider shift maps (thus recovering and generalizing a result of Last-Simon) and flows of the Toda and KdV hierarchies (this is new). Finally, I evaluate an attempt at finding a similar general setup that gives the much stronger conclusion of reflectionless limit operators in more specialized situations.

Remling, Christian

2015-02-01

2

Dynamic stiffness and damping coefficients of aerodynamic tilting-pad journal bearings  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dynamic gas–film forces of aerodynamic bearing often can be characterized by eight linear stiffness and damping coefficients. How to theoretically predict these coefficients is a very difficult issue for tilting-pad gas bearing design because of its structural complexity. The current study presents a novel and universal theoretical analysis method for calculating the dynamic stiffness and damping coefficients of aerodynamic

Yang Lihua; Li Huiguang; Yu Lie

2007-01-01

3

Experimental and theoretical rotordynamic stiffness coefficients for a three-stage brush seal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experimental and theoretical results are presented for a multistage brush seal. Experimental stiffness is obtained from integrating circumferential pressure distribution measured in seal cavities. A CFD analysis is used to predict seal performance. Bristle packs are modeled by the porous medium approach. Leakage is predicted well by the CFD method. Theoretical stiffness coefficients are in reasonable agreement with the measurements. Experimental results are also compared with a three-teeth-on-stator labyrinth seal. The multistage brush seal gives about 60% leakage reduction over the labyrinth seal. Rotordynamic stiffness coefficients are also improved: the brush seal has positive direct stiffness and smaller cross-coupled stiffness.

Pugachev, A. O.; Deckner, M.

2012-08-01

4

Characterization of superconducting magnetic bearings (dynamic stiffness and damping coefficient in axial direction)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High T(sub c) superconductor as a stator and permanent magnets for a rotor were assembled into a superconducting magnetic bearing. The dynamic stiffness and the damping coefficient of the superconducting magnetic bearing in axial direction were measured. The dynamic stiffness depended on an axial gap between superconductor and permanent magnet. The superconducting magnetic bearings are advantageous for a passive bearing, because they have a vibration damping effect that a permanent magnet bearing does not have. The tendency of its vibration damping coefficient indicated an increase as the resonant frequency increased.

Takahata, Ryoichi; Ueyama, Hirochika; Yotsuya, Tsutom

1992-01-01

5

The construction of free–free flexibility matrices as generalized stiffness inverses  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present generalizations of the classical structural flexibility matrix. Direct or indirect computation of flexibilities as ‘influence coefficients’ has traditionally required pre-removal of rigid body modes by imposing appropriate support conditions. Here the flexibility of an individual element or substructure is directly obtained as a particular generalized inverse of the free–free stiffness matrix. This entity is called a free–free flexibility

C. A. Felippa; K. C. Park; M. R. Justino Filho

1998-01-01

6

Stiffness and Damping Coefficient Estimation of Compliant Surface Gas Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Foil gas bearings are a key technology in many commercial and emerging Oil-Free turbomachinery systems. These bearings are non-linear and have been difficult to analytically model in terms of performance characteristics such as load capacity, power loss, stiffness and damping. Previous investigations led to an empirically derived method, a rule-of-thumb, to estimate load capacity. This method has been a valuable tool in system development. The current paper extends this tool concept to include rules for stiffness and damping coefficient estimation. It is expected that these rules will further accelerate the development and deployment of advanced Oil-Free machines operating on foil gas bearings

DellaCorte, Christopher

2010-01-01

7

Stiffness and Damping Coefficient Estimation of Compliant Surface Gas Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Foil gas bearings are a key technology in many commercial and emerging oilfree turbomachinery systems. These bearings are nonlinear and have been difficult to analytically model in terms of performance characteristics such as load capacity, power loss, stiffness, and damping. Previous investigations led to an empirically derived method to estimate load capacity. This method has been a valuable tool in system development. The current work extends this tool concept to include rules for stiffness and damping coefficient estimation. It is expected that these rules will further accelerate the development and deployment of advanced oil-free machines operating on foil gas bearings.

Della-Corte, Christopher

2012-01-01

8

Research on dynamic behaviors in remote pressure-regulating pipeline under the condition of controllable maximum stiffness coefficient  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aiming at remote pressure-regulating system controlled by pilot overflow valve and based on dynamic-characteristics fundamental equation of distributed-parameter model in hydraulic pipelines, the mathematical model of remote-pressure-regulating hydraulic pipelines is deduced. Discussing the controllability of the remote pressure-regulating system shows that the controllability depends on the controllable maximum stiffness coefficient, which mainly includes the length and the inner radius of remote pressure-regulating pipeline, the spring stiffness coefficient of overflow valve, and the properties of hydraulic oil. And if a remote pressure-regulating system wants to work normally and avoid resonance, the conditions of controllable maximum stiffness coefficient must be derived. The concept, controllable maximum stiffness coefficient, and the mathematical models provide theoretical and practical instruction in study of hydraulic remote pressure-regulating system.

Yang, G. L.; Zhang, L. Q.; Zhang, S. Y.

2012-11-01

9

An investigation of angular stiffness and damping coefficients of an axial spline coupling in high-speed rotating machinery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper provided an opportunity to quantify the angular stiffness and equivalent viscous damping coefficients of an axial spline coupling used in high-speed turbomachinery. A unique test methodology and data reduction procedures were developed. The bending moments and angular deflections transmitted across an axial spline coupling were measured while a nonrotating shaft was excited by an external shaker. A rotor dynamics computer program was used to simulate the test conditions and to correlate the angular stiffness and damping coefficients. In addition, sensitivity analyses were performed to show that the accuracy of the dynamic coefficients do not rely on the accuracy of the data reduction procedures.

Ku, C.-P. Roger; Walton, James F., Jr.; Lund, Jorgen W.

1994-01-01

10

Generalized power-law stiffness model for nonlinear dynamics of in-plane cable networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cross-ties are used for mitigating stay-cable vibration, induced by wind and wind-rain on cable-stayed bridges. In-plane cable networks are obtained by connecting the stays by transverse cross-ties. While taut-cable theory has been traditionally employed for simulating the dynamics of cable networks, the use of a nonlinear restoring-force discrete element in each cross-tie has been recently proposed to more realistically replicate the network vibration when snapping or slackening of the restrainer may be anticipated. The solution to the free-vibration dynamics can be determined by "equivalent linearization method". In an exploratory study by the authors a cubic-stiffness spring element, in parallel with a linear one, was used to analyze the restoring-force effect in a cross-tie on the nonlinear dynamics of two simplified systems. This preliminary investigation is generalized in this paper by considering a power-law stiffness model with a generic integer exponent and applied to a prototype network installed on an existing bridge. The study is restricted to the fundamental mode and some of the higher ones. A time-domain lumped-mass algorithm is used for validating the equivalent linearization method. For the prototype network with quadratic-stiffness spring and a positive stiffness coefficient, a stiffening effect is observed, with a ten percent increment in the equivalent frequency for the fundamental mode. Results also show dependency on vibration amplitude. For higher modes the equivalent nonlinear effects can be responsible for an alteration of the linear mode shapes and a transition from a "localized mode" to a "global mode".

Giaccu, Gian Felice; Caracoglia, Luca

2013-04-01

11

Picosecond acoustic diffraction in anisotropic thin film (µm) application to the measurement of stiffness coefficients  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Investigation of thin metallic film properties by means of picosecond ultrasonics has been under the scope of several studies. Generation of longitudinal and shear waves with a wave vector normal to the film free surface has been demonstrated. Such measurements can not provide complete information about properties of anisotropic films. Acute focusing of the laser pump beam (approx 0.5 µm) on the sample surface has recently allowed us to provide evidence of picosecond acoustic diffraction in thin metallic films (approx1 µm) such as aluminum, gold, copper. Waveforms have been experimentally recorded in a gold layer (2 µm thick) for several distances between pump and probe on the sample surface. Due to acoustic diffraction, the acoustic wavefronts propagate at a group velocity which differs from phase velocity in the anisotropic film. However, a specified signal processing allows us analyzing the space repartition of the acoustic wave-vectors for both longitudinal and shear waves. Four stiffness coefficients of the anisotropic gold layer could thus be recovered accurately, demonstrating the feasibility of the measurement.

Audoin, B.; Perton, M.; Chigarev, N.; Rossignol, C.

2007-12-01

12

A generalized concordance correlation coefficient for continuous and categorical data.  

PubMed

This paper discusses a generalized version of the concordance correlation coefficient for agreement data. The concordance correlation coefficient evaluates the accuracy and precision between two measures, and is based on the expected value of the squared function of distance. We have generalized this coefficient by applying alternative functions of distance to produce more robust versions of the concordance correlation coefficient. In this paper we extend the application of this class of estimators to categorical data as well, and demonstrate similarities to the kappa and weighted kappa statistics. We also introduce a stratified concordance correlation coefficient which adjusts for explanatory factors, and an extended concordance correlation coefficient which measures agreement among more than two responses. With these extensions, the generalized concordance correlation coefficient provides a unifying approach to assessing agreement among two or more measures that are either continuous or categorical in scale. PMID:11439426

King, T S; Chinchilli, V M

2001-07-30

13

Accelerated progression of arterial stiffness in dialysis patients compared with the general population  

PubMed Central

Background/Aims The aim of this study was to compare the progression of aortic stiffness in chronic hemodialysis patients (CHP) with that of general population patients (GPP) over a 36-month period and to evaluate the determinants of this progression. Methods The study group included 80 patients undergoing hemodialysis (aged 59.3 ± 11.8 years; duration of dialysis 5.47 ± 5.16 years). The control group consisted of 60 patients (aged 57.5 ± 10.9 years) with a glomerular filtration rate of > 60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) was determined from time diversity propagation of the common carotid artery and femoral artery by Doppler ultrasound. Clinical and biochemical parameters were determined in serum using standard laboratory procedures. Results The mean PWV values at baseline and 36 months were 11.18 ± 2.29 and 11.82 ± 2.34 m/sec in the CHP group, and 9.02 ± 1.89 and 9.29 ± 1.93 m/sec in the GPP group, respectively. The average PWV progressions were 63.95 ± 18.373 cm/sec in CHP and 27.28 ± 28.519 cm/sec in GPP. By multiple regression analysis, hemoglobin (standardized coefficient ? [?st] = -0.405, p = 0.004; ?st = -0.364, p = 0.011), albumin (?st = -0.349, p = 0.042; ?st = -0.303, p = 0.034), CRP (?st = 0.458, p = 0.002; ?st = 0.187, p = 0.008), and total cholesterol (?st = 0.236, p = 0.038; ?st = 0.171, p = 0.078) were independently associated with PWV in the CHP and GPP groups, respectively. Conclusions Accelerated arterial stiffness was more pronounced in the CHP group than in the GPP group. The independent determinants of this progression in both groups include traditional risk factors and blood levels of hemoglobin, albumin and CRP. Cholesterol and uremia-related factors are determinants only in CHP. PMID:23864805

Janakievska, Pavlina; Sotiroski, Kosta; Sikole, Aleksandar

2013-01-01

14

Non-monotonic dependence of the friction coefficient on heterogeneous stiffness  

PubMed Central

The complexity of the frictional dynamics at the microscopic scale makes difficult to identify all of its controlling parameters. Indeed, experiments on sheared elastic bodies have shown that the static friction coefficient depends on loading conditions, the real area of contact along the interfaces and the confining pressure. Here we show, by means of numerical simulations of a 2D Burridge-Knopoff model with a simple local friction law, that the macroscopic friction coefficient depends non-monotonically on the bulk elasticity of the system. This occurs because elastic constants control the geometrical features of the rupture fronts during the stick-slip dynamics, leading to four different ordering regimes characterized by different orientations of the rupture fronts with respect to the external shear direction. We rationalize these results by means of an energetic balance argument. PMID:25345800

Giacco, F.; Ciamarra, M. Pica; Saggese, L.; de Arcangelis, L.; Lippiello, E.

2014-01-01

15

Effects of Cross-Sectional Shape, Solidity, and Distribution of Heat-Transfer Coefficient on the Torsional Stiffness of Thin Wings Subjected to Aerodynamic Heating  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study has been made of the effects of varying the shape, solidity, and heat-transfer coefficient of thin wings with regard to their influence on the torsional-stiffness reduction induced by aerodynamic heating. The variations in airfoil shape include blunting, flattening, and combined blunting and flattening of a solid wing of symmetrical double-wedge cross section. Hollow double-wedge wings of constant skin thickness with and without internal webs also are considered. The effects of heat-transfer coefficients appropriate for laminar and turbulent flow are investigated in addition to a step transition along the chord from a lower to a higher constant value of heat-transfer coefficient. From the results given it is concluded that the flattening of a solid double wedge decreases the reduction in torsional stiffness while slight degrees of blunting increase the loss. The influence of chordwise variations in heat-transfer coefficient due to turbulent and laminar boundary-layer flow on the torsional stiffness of solid wings is negligible. The effect of a step transition in heat-transfer coefficient along the chord of a solid wing can, however, become appreciable. The torsional-stiffness reduction of multiweb and hollow double-wedge wings is substantially less than that calculated for a solid wing subjected to the same heating conditions.

Thomson, Robert G.

1959-01-01

16

Generalized Runge-Kutta methods of order four with stepsize control for stiff ordinary differential equations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary GeneralizedA(a)-stable Runge-Kutta methods of order four with stepsize control are studied. The equations of condition for this class of semiimplicit methods are solved taking the truncation error into consideration. For application anA-stable and anA(89.3°)-stable method with small truncation error are proposed and test results for 25 stiff initial value problems for different tolerances are discussed.

Peter Kaps; Peter Rentrop

1979-01-01

17

Generalized method calculating the effective diffusion coefficient in periodic channels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The method calculating the effective diffusion coefficient in an arbitrary periodic two-dimensional channel, presented in our previous paper [P. Kalinay, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 144101 (2014)], is generalized to 3D channels of cylindrical symmetry, as well as to 2D or 3D channels with particles driven by a constant longitudinal external driving force. The next possible extensions are also indicated. The former calculation was based on calculus in the complex plane, suitable for the stationary diffusion in 2D domains. The method is reformulated here using standard tools of functional analysis, enabling the generalization.

Kalinay, Pavol

2015-01-01

18

Second virial coefficient of a generalized Lennard-Jones potential  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an exact analytical solution for the second virial coefficient of a generalized Lennard-Jones type of pair potential model. The potential can be reduced to the Lennard-Jones, hard-sphere, and sticky hard-sphere models by tuning the potential parameters corresponding to the width and depth of the well. Thus, the second virial solution can also regain the aforementioned cases. Moreover, the obtained expression strongly resembles the one corresponding to the Kihara potential. In fact, the Fk functions are the same. Furthermore, for these functions, the complete expansions at low and high temperature are given. Additionally, we propose an alternative stickiness parameter based on the obtained second virial coefficient.

González-Calderón, Alfredo; Rocha-Ichante, Adrián

2015-01-01

19

Positive effects of antihypertensive treatment on aortic stiffness in the general population.  

PubMed

Aortic stiffness is strongly related to age and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In the present analysis, we investigated whether antihypertensive treatment modulates the association of the aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) with age and with MAP in the general population. In the Czech post-MONICA cross-sectional study, we measured the PWV in 735 subjects (mean age 61.2±7.8 years, 54.1% women, 44.3% on antihypertensive medication). We used a linear regression model to assess the effect of treatment on the PWV. The independent covariates in our analysis included sex, age, MAP, heart rate, body mass index, plasma glucose, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking and observer. The patients receiving treatment were older (64.1±6.7 vs. 58.9±7.8 years), had higher systolic blood pressure (135.9±16.2 vs. 130.1±16.5?mm?Hg) and had higher pulse wave velocity (9.1±2.2 vs. 8.2±2.1?m?s(-1); P for all <0.0001) than untreated subjects. After adjustment for MAP, the use of treatment modified the association between age and the PWV (regression equations, treated patients 9.68-0.009 × age vs. untreated subjects 6.98+0.020 × age, difference of regression slopes, F=11.2; P=0.0009). In analyses adjusted for age, treatment was associated with a smaller increase of the PWV with MAP (treated patients 9.63-0.006 × MAP vs. untreated subjects 7.18+0.010 × MAP, F=10.70; P=0.0001). These results were driven primarily by subjects whose blood pressure was below 140/90?mm?Hg. In the cross-sectional analysis from a random sample of the general population, antihypertensive treatment was associated with a less steep increase in the PWV with age and the mean arterial pressure. Further longitudinal studies are needed to confirm this finding. PMID:24048486

Seidlerová, Jitka; Filipovský, Jan; Mayer, Otto; Wohlfahrt, Peter; Cífková, Renata

2014-01-01

20

Stiffness effects on the dynamics of the bar-mode instability of neutron stars in full general relativity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present results on the effect of the stiffness of the equation of state on the dynamical bar-mode instability in rapidly rotating polytropic models of neutron stars in full general relativity. We determine the change in the threshold for the emergence of the instability for a range of the adiabatic ? index from 2.0 to 3.0, including two values chosen to mimic more realistic equations of state at high densities.

Löffler, Frank; De Pietri, Roberto; Feo, Alessandra; Maione, Francesco; Franci, Luca

2015-03-01

21

General dissipation coefficient in low-temperature warm inflation  

SciTech Connect

In generic particle physics models, the inflaton field is coupled to other bosonic and fermionic fields that acquire large masses during inflation and may decay into light degrees of freedom. This leads to dissipative effects that modify the inflationary dynamics and may generate a nearly-thermal radiation bath, such that inflation occurs in a warm rather than supercooled environment. In this work, we perform a numerical computation and obtain expressions for the associated dissipation coefficient in supersymmetric models, focusing on the regime where the radiation temperature is below the heavy mass threshold. The dissipation coefficient receives contributions from the decay of both on-shell and off-shell degrees of freedom, which are dominant for small and large couplings, respectively, taking into account the light field multiplicities. In particular, we find that the contribution from on-shell decays, although Boltzmann-suppressed, can be much larger than that of virtual modes, which is bounded by the validity of a perturbative analysis. This result opens up new possibilities for realizations of warm inflation in supersymmetric field theories.

Bastero-Gil, Mar [Departamento de Física Teórica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Granada-18071 (Spain); Berera, Arjun; Rosa, João G. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Ramos, Rudnei O., E-mail: mbg@ugr.es, E-mail: ab@ph.ed.ac.uk, E-mail: rudnei@uerj.br, E-mail: joao.rosa@ed.ac.uk [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

2013-01-01

22

Evolution equations for eigenvalues and coefficients of polynomials and related generalized dynamics  

E-print Network

In this paper we suggest new classification of polynomials and evolution equations for the roots and the coefficients remaing the polynomials within proper class. In the basis of the developed evolution equations we built new dynamics generalizing the relativistic dynamics.

Robert M. Yamaleev

2008-05-07

23

Statistical Properties of Generalized Gini Coefficient with Application to Health Inequality Measurement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, we report statistical properties of two classes of generalized Gini coefficients (G1 and G2). The theoretical results were assessed via Monte Carlo simulations. Further, we used G1 and G2 on life expectancy to measure health inequalities among the provinces of China and the states of the United States. For China, the results…

Lai, Dejian; Huang, Jin; Risser, Jan M.; Kapadia, Asha S.

2008-01-01

24

Exact Solutions for The Generalized Zakharov-Kuznetsov Equation with Variable Coefficients Using The Generalized ((G'/G))-expansion Method  

SciTech Connect

In this article, the generalized (G'/G)-expansion method using a generalized wave transformation is applied to find exact traveling wave solutions of the generalized Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation with variable coefficients. As a result, hyperbolic, trigonometric and rational function solutions with parameters are obtained. When these parameters are taken special values, the solitary wave solutions are derived from the hyperbolic function solution. It is shown that the proposed method is direct, effective and can be applied to many other nonlinear evolution equations in mathematical physics.

Zayed, Elsayed M. E.; Abdelaziz, Mahmoud A. M. [Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science, Zagazig University, Zagazig (Egypt)

2010-09-30

25

Chains of oscillators with negative stiffness elements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Negative stiffness is not allowed by thermodynamics and hence materials and systems whose global behaviour exhibits negative stiffness are unstable. However the stability is possible when these materials/systems are elements of a larger system sufficiently stiff to stabilise the negative stiffness elements. In order to investigate the effect of stabilisation we analyse oscillations in a chain of n linear oscillators (masses and springs connected in series) when some of the springs' stiffnesses can assume negative values. The ends of the chain are fixed. We formulated the necessary stability condition: only one spring in the chain can have negative stiffness. Furthermore, the value of negative stiffness cannot exceed a certain critical value that depends upon the (positive) stiffnesses of other springs. At the critical negative stiffness the system develops an eigenmode with vanishing frequency. In systems with viscous damping vanishing of an eigenfrequency does not yet lead to instability. Further increase in the value of negative stiffness leads to the appearance of aperiodic eigenmodes even with light damping. At the critical negative stiffness the low dissipative mode becomes non-dissipative, while for the high dissipative mode the damping coefficient becomes as twice as high as the damping coefficient of the system. A special element with controllable negative stiffness is suggested for designing hybrid materials whose stiffness and hence the dynamic behaviour is controlled by the magnitude of applied compressive force.

Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady V.; Sevel, Greg

2014-12-01

26

Coefficient of performance and its bounds with the figure of merit for a general refrigerator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A general refrigerator model with non-isothermal processes is studied. The coefficient of performance (COP) and its bounds at maximum ? figure of merit are obtained and analyzed. This model accounts for different heat capacities during the heat transfer processes. So, different kinds of refrigerator cycles can be considered. Under the constant heat capacity condition, the upper bound of the COP is the Curzon–Ahlborn (CA) coefficient of performance and is independent of the time durations of the heat exchanging processes. With the maximum ? criterion, in the refrigerator cycles, such as the reversed Brayton refrigerator cycle, the reversed Otto refrigerator cycle and the reversed Atkinson refrigerator cycle, where the heat capacity in the heat absorbing process is not less than that in the heat releasing process, their COPs are bounded by the CA coefficient of performance; otherwise, such as for the reversed Diesel refrigerator cycle, its COP can exceed the CA coefficient of performance. Furthermore, the general refined upper and lower bounds have been proposed.

Long, Rui; Liu, Wei

2015-02-01

27

Derivation of the Probability Plot Correlation Coefficient Test Statistics for the General Extreme Value Distribution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An appropriate probability distribution for estimating an accurate quantile is selected by the goodness of fit test in frequency analysis. Among the goodness of fit tests, the PPCC(probability plot correlation coefficient) test has been known as powerful test. Generally, the PPCC test statistics are influenced by significance levels, sample sizes, plotting position formulas, and shape parameters(in case that a given distribution includes a shape parameter). It is important to select an exact plotting position formula because the PPCC test statistics for given probability distributions are derived from correlation coefficient values based on the selected plotting position formula. After Cunnane(1978) defined the plotting position that related with the mean of data, various plotting position formulas have been developed for considering the effect of coefficients of skewness related with shape parameters. In this study, the PPCC test statistics are derived by using a plotting position formula contained a term of a coefficient of skewness for the GEV(general extreme value) distribution. In addition, the derivation of the PPCC test statistics is performed by considering various sample sizes, significance levels, and shape parameters of the GEV distribution.

Heo, J.; Kim, S.; Jung, Y.; Shin, H.; Kim, T.

2009-12-01

28

Arterial stiffness in diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

Arterial stiffness is an age-related process that is a shared consequence of numerous diseases including diabetes mellitus (DM), and is an independent predictor of mortality both in this population and in the general population. While much has been published about arterial stiffness in patients with DM, a thorough review of the current literature is lacking. Using a systematic literature search strategy, we aimed to summarize our current understanding related to arterial stiffness in DM. We review key studies demonstrating that, among patients with established DM, arterial stiffness is closely related to the progression of complications of DM, including nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy. It is also becoming clear that arterial stiffness can be increased even in pre-diabetic populations with impaired glucose tolerance, and in those with the metabolic syndrome (METS), well before the onset of overt DM. Some data suggests that arterial stiffness can predict the onset of DM. However, future work is needed to further clarify whether large artery stiffness and the pulsatile hemodynamic changes that accompany it are involved in the pathogenesis of DM, and whether interventions targeting arterial stiffness are associated with improved clinical outcomes in DM. We also review of the potential mechanisms of arterial stiffness in DM, with particular emphasis on the role of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and nitric oxide dysregulation, and address potential future directions for research. PMID:25558032

Prenner, Stuart B; Chirinos, Julio A

2015-02-01

29

Group classification and exact solutions of variable-coefficient generalized Burgers equations with linear damping  

E-print Network

Admissible point transformations between Burgers equations with linear damping and time-dependent coefficients are described and used in order to exhaustively classify Lie symmetries of these equations. Optimal systems of one- and two-dimensional subalgebras of the Lie invariance algebras obtained are constructed. The corresponding Lie reductions to ODEs and to algebraic equations are carried out. Exact solutions to particular equations are found. Some generalized Burgers equations are linearized to the heat equation by composing equivalence transformations with the Hopf-Cole transformation.

Oleksandr A. Pocheketa; Roman O. Popovych; Olena O. Vaneeva

2014-06-08

30

A generalized Benford's law for JPEG coefficients and its applications in image forensics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, a novel statistical model based on Benford's law for the probability distributions of the first digits of the block-DCT and quantized JPEG coefficients is presented. A parametric logarithmic law, i.e., the generalized Benford's law, is formulated. Furthermore, some potential applications of this model in image forensics are discussed in this paper, which include the detection of JPEG compression for images in bitmap format, the estimation of JPEG compression Qfactor for JPEG compressed bitmap image, and the detection of double compressed JPEG image. The results of our extensive experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed statistical model.

Fu, Dongdong; Shi, Yun Q.; Su, Wei

2007-02-01

31

Integrability study on a generalized (2+1)-dimensional variable-coefficient Gardner model with symbolic computation  

SciTech Connect

Gardner model describes certain nonlinear elastic structures, ion-acoustic waves in plasmas, and shear flows in ocean and atmosphere. In this paper, by virtue of the computerized symbolic computation, the integrability of a generalized (2+1)-dimensional variable-coefficient Gardner model is investigated. Painleve integrability conditions are derived among the coefficient functions, which reduce all the coefficient functions to be proportional only to {gamma}(t), the coefficient of the cubic nonlinear term u{sup 2}u{sub x}. Then, an independent transformation of the variable t transforms the reduced {gamma}(t)-dependent equation into a constant-coefficient integrable one. Painleve test shows that this is the only case when our original generalized (2+1)-dimensional variable-coefficient Gardner model is integrable.

Lue Xing; Zhang Haiqiang; Xu Tao; Li He [School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box 122, Beijing 100876 (China); Tian Bo [School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box 122, Beijing 100876 (China); State Key Laboratory of Software Development Environment, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications (BUPT), Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box 128, Beijing 100876 (China)

2010-12-15

32

A method for assigning species into groups based on generalized Mahalanobis distance between habitat model coefficients  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Habitat association models are commonly developed for individual animal species using generalized linear modeling methods such as logistic regression. We considered the issue of grouping species based on their habitat use so that management decisions can be based on sets of species rather than individual species. This research was motivated by a study of western landbirds in northern Idaho forests. The method we examined was to separately fit models to each species and to use a generalized Mahalanobis distance between coefficient vectors to create a distance matrix among species. Clustering methods were used to group species from the distance matrix, and multidimensional scaling methods were used to visualize the relations among species groups. Methods were also discussed for evaluating the sensitivity of the conclusions because of outliers or influential data points. We illustrate these methods with data from the landbird study conducted in northern Idaho. Simulation results are presented to compare the success of this method to alternative methods using Euclidean distance between coefficient vectors and to methods that do not use habitat association models. These simulations demonstrate that our Mahalanobis-distance- based method was nearly always better than Euclidean-distance-based methods or methods not based on habitat association models. The methods used to develop candidate species groups are easily explained to other scientists and resource managers since they mainly rely on classical multivariate statistical methods. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

Williams, C.J.; Heglund, P.J.

2009-01-01

33

Optical rogue waves in the generalized inhomogeneous higher-order nonlinear Schrodinger equation with modulating coefficients  

E-print Network

The higher-order dispersive and nonlinear effects (alias {\\it the perturbation terms}) like the third-order dispersion, the self-steepening, and the self-frequency shift play important roles in the study of the ultra-short optical pulse propagation. We consider optical rogue wave solutions and interactions for the generalized higher-order nonlinear Schr\\"odinger (NLS) equation with space- and time-modulated parameters. A proper transformation is presented to reduce the generalized higher-order NLS equation to the integrable Hirota equation with constant coefficients. This transformation allows us to relate certain class of exact solutions of the generalized higher-order NLS equation to the variety of solutions of the integrable Hirota equation. In particular, we illustrate the approach in terms of two lowest-order rational solutions of the Hirota equation as seeding functions to generate rogue wave solutions localized in time that have complicated evolution in space with or without the differential gain or lo...

Yan, Zhenya

2013-01-01

34

Variable stiffness torsion springs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

Alhorn, Dean C. (inventor); Polites, Michael E. (inventor)

1995-01-01

35

Variable stiffness torsion springs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

Alhorn, Dean C. (inventor); Polites, Michael E. (inventor)

1994-01-01

36

A computer program for two-particle generalized coefficients of fractional parentage  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a FORTRAN90 program GCFP for the calculation of the generalized coefficients of fractional parentage (generalized CFPs or GCFP). The approach is based on the observation that the multi-shell CFPs can be expressed in terms of single-shell CFPs, while the latter can be readily calculated employing a simple enumeration scheme of antisymmetric A-particle states and an efficient method of construction of the idempotent matrix eigenvectors. The program provides fast calculation of GCFPs for a given particle number and produces results possessing numerical uncertainties below the desired tolerance. A single j-shell is defined by four quantum numbers, (e,l,j,t). A supplemental C++ program parGCFP allows calculation to be done in batches and/or in parallel. Program summaryProgram title:GCFP, parGCFP Catalogue identifier: AEBI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEBI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17 199 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 88 658 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77/90 ( GCFP), C++ ( parGCFP) Computer: Any computer with suitable compilers. The program GCFP requires a FORTRAN 77/90 compiler. The auxiliary program parGCFP requires GNU-C++ compatible compiler, while its parallel version additionally requires MPI-1 standard libraries Operating system: Linux (Ubuntu, Scientific) (all programs), also checked on Windows XP ( GCFP, serial version of parGCFP) RAM: The memory demand depends on the computation and output mode. If this mode is not 4, the program GCFP demands the following amounts of memory on a computer with Linux operating system. It requires around 2 MB of RAM for the A=12 system at E?2. Computation of the A=50 particle system requires around 60 MB of RAM at E=0 and ˜70 MB at E=2 (note, however, that the calculation of this system will take a very long time). If the computation and output mode is set to 4, the memory demands by GCFP are significantly larger. Calculation of GCFPs of A=12 system at E=1 requires 145 MB. The program parGCFP requires additional 2.5 and 4.5 MB of memory for the serial and parallel version, respectively. Classification: 17.18 Nature of problem: The program GCFP generates a list of two-particle coefficients of fractional parentage for several j-shells with isospin. Solution method: The method is based on the observation that multishell coefficients of fractional parentage can be expressed in terms of single-shell CFPs [1]. The latter are calculated using the algorithm [2,3] for a spectral decomposition of an antisymmetrization operator matrix Y. The coefficients of fractional parentage are those eigenvectors of the antisymmetrization operator matrix Y that correspond to unit eigenvalues. A computer code for these coefficients is available [4]. The program GCFP offers computation of two-particle multishell coefficients of fractional parentage. The program parGCFP allows a batch calculation using one input file. Sets of GCFPs are independent and can be calculated in parallel. Restrictions:A<86 when E=0 (due to the memory constraints); small numbers of particles allow significantly higher excitations, though the shell with j?11/2 cannot get full (it is the implementation constraint). Unusual features: Using the program GCFP it is possible to determine allowed particle configurations without the GCFP computation. The GCFPs can be calculated either for all particle configurations at once or for a specified particle configuration. The values of GCFPs can be printed out with a complete specification in either one file or with the parent and daughter configurations printed in separate files. The latter output mode requires additional time and RAM memory. It is possible to restrict the ( J,T) values of the considered particle configurations. (Here J is the total angular momentum and

Deveikis, A.; Juodagalvis, A.

2008-10-01

37

Comparing Regression Coefficients between Nested Linear Models for Clustered Data with Generalized Estimating Equations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Comparing regression coefficients between models when one model is nested within another is of great practical interest when two explanations of a given phenomenon are specified as linear models. The statistical problem is whether the coefficients associated with a given set of covariates change significantly when other covariates are added into…

Yan, Jun; Aseltine, Robert H., Jr.; Harel, Ofer

2013-01-01

38

Rotordynamic coefficient test results for a four-stage brush seal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experimental results are presented for the direct and cross-coupled stiffness and direct damping coefficients for a four-stage brush seal. Variable test parameters include the inlet pressure, pressure ratio, shaft speed, fluid prerotation, and seal spacing. Direct damping slightly increases with running speed; otherwise, the rotordynamic coefficients are relatively insensitive to changes in the test parameters. Cross-coupled stiffness is generally unchanged by increasing the inlet tangential velocity to the seals, in contrast to conventional labyrinth seals. Comparisons of test results for the four-stage brush seal with an eight-cavity labyrinth showed superior rotordynamic performance for the brush seal, namely, larger values for direct stiffness and lower values for the (destabilizing) cross-coupled stiffness coefficient.

Conner, Kelly J.; Childs, Dara W.

1993-06-01

39

Zero Stiffness Tensegrity Structures M. Schenk a  

E-print Network

words, they remain neutrally stable, require no external work to de- form, and hence have zero stiffness-stress. These structures require specific external loads or states of self-stress to exhibit zero stiffness. The key-standing prestressed pin-jointed structures, which are in general both statically and kinematically indeterminate

Guest, Simon

40

Granular clustering self-consistent analysis for general coefficients of restitution  

E-print Network

We study the equilibrium behavior of one-dimensional granular clusters and one-particle granular gases for a variety of velocity dependent coefficients of restitution $r$. We obtain equations describing of the long time behavior for the cluster's pressure, r.m.s. velocity and granular inter-spacing. We show that for extremely long times, clusters with velocity dependent coefficients of restitution are unstable and dissolve into homogeneous, quasi-elastic gases, but clusters with velocity independent $r$ are permanent. This is in accordance with hydrodynamic studies pointing to the transient nature of density instabilities for granular gases with velocity dependent $r$.

E. Thiesen; W. A. M. Morgado

2006-05-16

41

A generalized method of converting CT image to PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution in PET/CT imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The accuracy of attenuation correction in positron emission tomography scanners depends mainly on deriving the reliable 511-keV linear attenuation coefficient distribution in the scanned objects. In the PET/CT system, the linear attenuation distribution is usually obtained from the intensities of the CT image. However, the intensities of the CT image relate to the attenuation of photons in an energy range of 40 keV-140 keV. Before implementing PET attenuation correction, the intensities of CT images must be transformed into the PET 511-keV linear attenuation coefficients. However, the CT scan parameters can affect the effective energy of CT X-ray photons and thus affect the intensities of the CT image. Therefore, for PET/CT attenuation correction, it is crucial to determine the conversion curve with a given set of CT scan parameters and convert the CT image into a PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution. A generalized method is proposed for converting a CT image into a PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution. Instead of some parameter-dependent phantom calibration experiments, the conversion curve is calculated directly by employing the consistency conditions to yield the most consistent attenuation map with the measured PET data. The method is evaluated with phantom experiments and small animal experiments. In phantom studies, the estimated conversion curve fits the true attenuation coefficients accurately, and accurate PET attenuation maps are obtained by the estimated conversion curves and provide nearly the same correction results as the true attenuation map. In small animal studies, a more complicated attenuation distribution of the mouse is obtained successfully to remove the attenuation artifact and improve the PET image contrast efficiently.

Wang, Lu; Wu, Li-Wei; Wei, Le; Gao, Juan; Sun, Cui-Li; Chai, Pei; Li, Dao-Wu

2014-02-01

42

Evaluation of the stiffness tensor of a fractured medium with ...  

E-print Network

[Ch09] described anisotropic attenuation in a TI medium using Schoenberg's linear-slip ... to the static limit, which yields the desired static stiffnesses coefficients. ...... and S. A. Shapiro, 2007, Finite-difference modeling of wave propagation on ...

43

Evaluation of the stiffness tensor of a fractured medium with ...  

E-print Network

Jul 6, 2012 ... element approach to determine the complex stiffness coefficients of the TIV equivalent ... anisotropic medium, including attenuation, are ...... Shapiro, 2007, Finite-difference modeling of wave propagation on microscale:.

santos,,,

44

Effective stiffness of cracked elastic solids  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the elastic stiffness reduction that accompanies cracking. Basic results are illustrated using simple examples and general approaches of determining the effective stiffness of cracked solids are reviewed. Various approximate methods of obtaining the effective stiffness of cracked solids are demonstrated for the case of aligned uniform cracks. These methods include the dilute approximation, self-consistent method, Mori-Tanaka`s method, differential scheme and shear lag model. Finally, recent numerical results of 3-D periodically cracked solids with high interaction are presented and discussed. 40 refs., 9 figs.

Fares, N. [Polytechnic Univ., Brooklyn, NY (United States)

1992-08-01

45

Threshold bracing stiffness of two story frames  

E-print Network

of an equa- tion relating the frame geometry and loading to the bracing stiffness is derived. The common practice of using a bracing area equal to 2g of the column area is investigated; the result indicated that the value of 2s resulted in a safe design... JOINTED FRAMES 24 General Bracing Stiffness Calculations. Limiting Values of the Bracing Stiffnesses. Numerical Example for the Pin Jointed Frames. Diagonal Bracing. Verification of the 2'-o Rule Conclusions 24 24 28 30 32 37 38 IV. BRACING...

Khader, Ghassan Sudki

1982-01-01

46

Frequency weighting in the feature extraction process: Effects of parameter choice on generalized perceptual linear prediction coefficients  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The generalized perceptual linear prediction (gPLP) feature extraction model incorporates information about the perceptual abilities of the species under study to generate features relevant to that species. The gPLP feature extraction model is based on the source-filter model of vocalization production and quantifies the general shape of the spectral envelope. gPLP coefficients remove excitation information for vocalizations with a low fundamental frequency, but capture harmonic information for vocalizations with a higher fundamental frequency through the use of a filter bank analysis component. Frequency warping, frequency masking, and equal loudness normalization, or frequency weighting, are some of the psychophysical phenomena modeled in the gPLP model. The effects of accounting for these phenomena in the feature extraction process are explored using perceptual spectrograms, statistical tests, and classification tasks. Experiments show that using this perceptual information can provide insights during the analysis of vocalizations and improve classification accuracies. The contribution of other feature extraction parameters including the number of cepstral coefficients and number of filters in the filter bank is also examined. [Work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. IIS-0326395.

Clemins, Patrick J.; Johnson, Michael T.

2005-09-01

47

In-plane stiffness of wooden floor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The seismic response of existing un-reinforced masonry (URM) buildings is strongly dependent on the characteristics of wooden floors and in particular on their in- plane stiffness and on the quality of the connections between the floors and the URM elements. It is generally well-recognized that adequate in plane-stiffness and proper connections improves the three-dimensional response of the whole system and

A. Brignola; S. Podestà; S. Pampanin

48

Measurement of normal contact stiffness of fractal rough surfaces  

E-print Network

We investigate the effects of roughness and fractality on the normal contact stiffness of rough surfaces. Samples of isotropically roughened aluminium surfaces are considered. The roughness and fractal dimension were altered through blasting using different sized particles. Subsequently, surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) was applied to the surfaces in order to modify the surface at the microscale. The surface topology was characterised by interferometry based profilometry. The normal contact stiffness was measured through nanoindentation with a flat tip utilising the partial unloading method. We focus on establishing the relationships between surface stiffness and roughness, combined with the effects of fractal dimension. The experimental results, for a wide range of surfaces, showed that the measured contact stiffness depended very closely on surfaces' root mean squared (RMS) slope and their fractal dimension, with correlation coefficients of around 90\\%, whilst a relatively weak correlation coefficient of 57\\% was found between the contact stiffness and RMS roughness.

Chongpu Zhai; Sébastien Bevand; Yixiang Gan; Dorian Hanaor; Gwénaëlle Proust; Bruno Guelorget; Delphine Retraint

2014-09-03

49

Stiff Quantum Polymers  

E-print Network

At ultralow temperatures, polymers exhibit quantum behavior, which is calculated here for the moments and of the end-to-end distribution in the large-stiffness regime. The result should be measurable for polymers in wide optical traps.

H. Kleinert

2007-05-01

50

The stiff elbow.  

PubMed

Elbow motion is essential for upper extremity function to position the hand in space. Unfortunately, the elbow joint is prone to stiffness following a multitude of traumatic and atraumatic etiologies. Elbow stiffness can be diagnosed with a complete history and physical exam, supplemented with appropriate imaging studies. The stiff elbow is challenging to treat, and thus, its prevention is of paramount importance. When this approach fails, non-operative followed by operative treatment modalities should be pursued. Upon initial presentation in those who have minimal contractures of 6-month duration or less, static and dynamic splinting, serial casting, continuous passive motion, occupational/physical therapy, and manipulation are non-operative treatment modalities that may be attempted. A stiff elbow that is refractory to non-operative management can be treated surgically, either arthroscopically or open, to eliminate soft tissue or bony blocks to motion. In the future, efforts to prevent and treat elbow stiffness may target the basic science mechanisms involved. Our purpose was to review the etiologies, classification, evaluation, prevention, operative, and non-operative treatment of the stiff elbow. PMID:19350328

Nandi, Sumon; Maschke, Steven; Evans, Peter J; Lawton, Jeffrey N

2009-12-01

51

Generalized Cahn-Hilliard equation for solutions with drastically different diffusion coefficients. Application to exsolution in ternary feldspar  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We address mathematical modeling and computer simulations of phase decomposition in a multicomponent system. As opposed to binary alloys with one common diffusion parameter, our main concern is phase decomposition in real geological systems under influence of strongly different interdiffusion coefficients, as it is frequently encountered in mineral solid solutions with coupled diffusion on different sub-lattices. Our goal is to explain deviations from equilibrium element partitioning which are often observed in nature, e.g., in a cooled ternary feldspar. To this end we first adopt the standard Cahn-Hilliard model to the multicomponent diffusion problem and account for arbitrary diffusion coefficients. This is done by using Onsager's approach such that flux of each component results from the combined action of chemical potentials of all components. In a second step the generalized Cahn-Hilliard equation is solved numerically using finite-elements approach. We introduce and investigate several decomposition scenarios that may produce systematic deviations from the equilibrium element partitioning. Both ideal solutions and ternary feldspar are considered. Typically, the slowest component is initially "frozen" and the decomposition effectively takes place only for two "fast" components. At this stage the deviations from the equilibrium element partitioning are indeed observed. These deviations may became "frozen" under conditions of cooling. The final equilibration of the system occurs on a considerably slower time scale. Therefore the system may indeed remain unaccomplished at the observation point. Our approach reveals the intrinsic reasons for the specific phase separation path and rigorously describes it by direct numerical solution of the generalized Cahn-Hilliard equation.

Petrishcheva, E.; Abart, R.

2012-04-01

52

Reflectional transformation for structural stiffness  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a structural reflection-related transformation for structural stiffness. The stiffness transformation addresses reflection of a structure about any of the three coordinate planes and renders the desired stiffness matrix using a stiffness matrix for the same structure before reflection. This transformation is elegant and simple, provides an efficient and technically rigorous approach to derive the required stiffness matrix without structural remodeling, and can be readily programmed to quickly perform the required matrix manipulations. 2 figs.

Vashi, K.M.

1990-01-01

53

Generalized theory of steady-state voltammetry without a supporting electrolyte. Effect of product and substrate diffusion coefficient diversity.  

PubMed

A generalized theory of the steady-state voltammetric response of a microelectrode in the absence of supporting electrolyte and for any values of diffusion coefficients of the substrate and the product of an electrode process is presented. The treatment applies to any reasonable combination of the charge numbers of the substrate, its counterion, and the product. A way to incorporate the activation polarization into the model is also demonstrated. It has been shown that the height, position, and shape of the migrational voltammogram are affected by the ratio of the product to substrate diffusivity (theta). In particular, for the electrode processes with sign retention, unequal diffusivities of electroactive species influence both characteristic points of the voltammogram (the limiting current and the half-wave potential). For charge neutralization processes (uncharged product), the changes in theta parameter are accompanied only by a shift in the half-wave potential. The most dramatic changes in the I-E relation can be observed for the charge reversal processes. In this case, a consecutive increase in theta results in the transition of the voltammogram shape from rapid exponential growth (theta < 1), through ramp shape (theta = 1), to common wave shape (theta > 1). On the basis of the expressions derived for the limiting current (exact and linearized), a possibility of the determination of the diffusion coefficient of the electrode reaction product is demonstrated. In addition, the ranges of theta where the assumption of equal diffusivities of the substrate and the product is obeyed within an insignificant error have been determined quantitatively. The theory has been experimentally verified using voltammetric oxidation of hexacyanoferrate(II). PMID:12349987

Hyk, Wojciech; Stojek, Zbigniew

2002-09-15

54

An Evaluation of Passive Automotive Suspension Systems with Variable Stiffness and Damping Parameters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Passenger discomfort, suspension working space and dynamic tyre loading parameters are calculated for different combinations of spring stiffness and damping coefficient representing the suspension system in a quarter car model subject to realistic random disturbance inputs from roads of widely differing quality. Sprung and unsprung masses and the tyre vertical stiffness and damping coefficient employed derive from a current production

R. S. Sharp; S. A. Hassan

1986-01-01

55

Genetic determinants of arterial stiffness.  

PubMed

Stiffness of large arteries (called arteriosclerosis) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although previous studies have shown that arterial stiffness is moderately heritable, genetic factors contributing to arterial stiffness are largely unknown. In this paper, we reviewed the available literature on genetic variants that are potentially related to arterial stiffness. Most variants have shown mixed depictions of their association with arterial stiffness across multiple studies. Various methods to measure arterial stiffness at different arterial sites can contribute to these inconsistent results. In addition, studies in patient populations with hypertension or atherosclerosis may overestimate the impact of genetic variants on arterial stiffness. Future studies are recommended to standardize current measures of arterial stiffness in different age groups. Studies conducted in normal healthy subjects may also provide better opportunities to find novel genetic variants of arterial stiffness. PMID:25472935

Logan, Jeongok G; Engler, Mary B; Kim, Hyungsuk

2015-02-01

56

Development of a contour map showing generalized skew coefficients of annual peak discharges of rural, unregulated streams in New York, excluding Long Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Flood-frequency relations that are developed by fitting the logarithms of annual peak discharges to a Pearson Type-III distribution are sensitive to skew coefficients. Estimates of population skew for a site are improved when computed from the weighted average of (1) the sample (station) skew, and (2) an unbiased, generalized skew estimate. A weighting technique based on the number of years of record at each of 226 sites was used to develop a contour map of unbiased, generalized skew coefficients for New York. An attempt was made to group (regionalize) the station skew coefficients into five hydrologically similar areas of New York, but the statewide version proved to be as accurate as the regionalized version and therefore was adopted as the final generalized skew-coefficient map for New York. An error analysis showed the statewide contour map to have lower MSE?s (mean square errors) than those computed from (1) the five regional skewcoefficient contour maps, (2) a previously used (1982) nationwide skew coefficient map, and (3) the weighted mean of skew coefficients for sites within each of five hydrologically uniform, but distinct areas of New York.

Lumia, Richard; Baevsky, Yvonne Halpern

2000-01-01

57

Nonlinear stability of oscillatory core-annular flow: A generalized Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation with time periodic coefficients  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this paper the nonlinear stability of two-phase core-annular flow in a pipe is examined when the acting pressure gradient is modulated by time harmonic oscillations and viscosity stratification and interfacial tension is present. An exact solution of the Navier-Stokes equations is used as the background state to develop an asymptotic theory valid for thin annular layers, which leads to a novel nonlinear evolution describing the spatio-temporal evolution of the interface. The evolution equation is an extension of the equation found for constant pressure gradients and generalizes the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation with dispersive effects found by Papageorgiou, Maldarelli & Rumschitzki, Phys. Fluids A 2(3), 1990, pp. 340-352, to a similar system with time periodic coefficients. The distinct regimes of slow and moderate flow are considered and the corresponding evolution is derived. Certain solutions are described analytically in the neighborhood of the first bifurcation point by use of multiple scales asymptotics. Extensive numerical experiments, using dynamical systems ideas, are carried out in order to evaluate the effect of the oscillatory pressure gradient on the solutions in the presence of a constant pressure gradient.

Coward, Adrian V.; Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.; Smyrlis, Yiorgos S.

1994-01-01

58

Analytical formulas, general properties and calculation of transport coefficients in the hadron gas: shear and bulk viscosities  

E-print Network

Elaborated calculations of the shear and the bulk viscosities in the hadron gas, using the ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) model cross sections, are made. These cross sections are analyzed and improved. A special treatment of the resonances is implemented additionally. All this allows for better hydrodynamical description of the experimental data. The previously considered approximation of one constant cross section for all hadrons is justified. It's found that the bulk viscosity of the hadron gas is much larger than the bulk viscosity of the pion gas while the shear viscosity is found to be less sensitive to the hadronic mass spectrum. The maximum of the bulk viscosity of the hadron gas is expected to be approximately in the temperature range ${T=150 190 MeV}$ with zero chemical potentials. This range covers the critical temperature values found from lattice calculations. We comment on some important aspects of calculations of the bulk viscosity, which were not taken into account or were not analyzed well previously. Doing this, a generalized Chapman-Enskog procedure, taking into account deviations from the chemical equilibrium, is outlined. Some general properties, features, the physical meaning of the bulk viscosity and some other comments on the deviations from the chemical equilibrium supplement this discussion. Analytical closed-form expressions for the transport coefficients and some related quantities within a quite large class of cross sections can be obtained. Some examples are explicitly considered. Comparisons with some previous calculations of the viscosities in the hadron gas and the pion gas are done.

Oleg Moroz

2013-09-19

59

Stiff quantum polymers  

E-print Network

At ultralow temperatures, polymers exhibit quantum behavior, which is calculated here for the second and fourth moments of the end-to-end distribution in the large-stiffness regime. The result should be measurable for polymers in wide optical traps.

H. Kleinert

2009-10-19

60

Measuring graphene's bending stiffness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Graphene's unusual combination of in-plane strength and out-of-plane flexibility makes it promising for mechanical applications. A key value is the bending stiffness, which microscopic theories and measurements of phonon modes in graphite put at ?0=1.2 eV.^1 However, theories of the effects of thermal fluctuations in 2D membranes predict that the bending stiffness at longer length scales could be orders of magnitude higher.^2,3 This macroscopic value has not been measured. Here we present the first direct measurement of monolayer graphene's bending stiffness, made by mechanically lifting graphene off a surface in a liquid and observing both motion induced by thermal fluctuations and the deflection caused by gravity's effect on added weights. These experiments reveal a value ?eff=12 keV at room temperature --- four orders of magnitude higher than ?0. These results closely match theoretical predictions of the effects of thermally-induced fluctuations which effectively thicken the membrane, dramatically increasing its bending stiffness at macroscopic length scales. [1] A. Fasolino et al., Nat. Mater. (2007) [2] D. R. Nelson and L. Peliti, J Physique (1987) [3] F. L. Braghin and N. Hasselmann, Phys Rev B (2010)

Blees, Melina; Barnard, Arthur; Roberts, Samantha; Kevek, Joshua W.; Ruyack, Alexander; Wardini, Jenna; Ong, Peijie; Zaretski, Aliaksandr; Wang, Siping; McEuen, Paul L.

2013-03-01

61

In-plane stiffness of shear walls with openings  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, a new method is presented to determine the in-plane stiffness of shear walls with openings, in which the spandrels are assumed flexible, and can translate and rotate under lateral load. The in-plane stiffnesses of shear walls with openings obtained by using the new method are generally much different from the results obtained by the well known three

M. Qamaruddin

1998-01-01

62

Numerical simulations of stiff fluid gravitational singularities  

E-print Network

Numerical simulations of the approach to the singularity in spacetimes with stiff fluid matter are presented here. The spacetimes examined have no symmetries and can be regarded as representing the general behavior of singularities in the presence of such matter. It is found that the singularity is spacelike and that as it is approached, the spacetime dynamics becomes local and non-oscillatory.

Joshua Curtis; David Garfinkle

2005-06-21

63

Transfer having a coupling coefficient higher than its active material  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A coupling coefficient is a measure of the effectiveness with which a shape-changing material (or a device employing such a material) converts the energy in an imposed signal to useful mechanical energy. Device coupling coefficients are properties of the device and, although related to the material coupling coefficients, are generally different from them. This invention describes a class of devices wherein the apparent coupling coefficient can, in principle, approach 1.0, corresponding to perfect electromechanical energy conversion. The key feature of this class of devices is the use of destabilizing mechanical pre-loads to counter inherent stiffness. The approach is illustrated for piezoelectric and thermoelectrically actuated devices. The invention provides a way to simultaneously increase both displacement and force, distinguishing it from alternatives such as motion amplification, and allows transducer designers to achieve substantial performance gains for actuator and sensor devices.

Lesieutre, George A. (Inventor); Davis, Christopher L. (Inventor)

2001-01-01

64

A new theory for multistep discretizations of stiff ordinary differential equations: Stability with large step sizes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A large set of variable coefficient linear systems of ordinary differential equations which possess two different time scales, a slow one and a fast one is considered. A small parameter epsilon characterizes the stiffness of these systems. A system of o.d.e.s. in this set is approximated by a general class of multistep discretizations which includes both one-leg and linear multistep methods. Sufficient conditions are determined under which each solution of a multistep method is uniformly bounded, with a bound which is independent of the stiffness of the system of o.d.e.s., when the step size resolves the slow time scale, but not the fast one. This property is called stability with large step sizes. The theory presented lets one compare properties of one-leg methods and linear multistep methods when they approximate variable coefficient systems of stiff o.d.e.s. In particular, it is shown that one-leg methods have better stability properties with large step sizes than their linear multistep counter parts. The theory also allows one to relate the concept of D-stability to the usual notions of stability and stability domains and to the propagation of errors for multistep methods which use large step sizes.

Majda, G.

1985-01-01

65

Tectorial Membrane Stiffness Gradients  

PubMed Central

The mammalian inner ear processes sound with high sensitivity and fine resolution over a wide frequency range. The underlying mechanism for this remarkable ability is the “cochlear amplifier”, which operates by modifying cochlear micromechanics. However, it is largely unknown how the cochlea implements this modification. Although gradual improvements in experimental techniques have yielded ever-better descriptions of gross basilar membrane vibration, the internal workings of the organ of Corti and of the tectorial membrane have resisted exploration. Although measurements of cochlear function in mice with a gene mutation for ?-tectorin indicate the tectorial membrane's key role in the mechanoelectrical transformation by the inner ear, direct experimental data on the tectorial membrane's physical properties are limited, and only a few direct measurements on tectorial micromechanics are available. Using the hemicochlea, we are able to show that a tectorial membrane stiffness gradient exists along the cochlea, similar to that of the basilar membrane. In artificial perilymph (but with low calcium), the transversal and radial driving point stiffnesses change at a rate of –4.0 dB/mm and ?4.9 dB/mm, respectively, along the length of the cochlear spiral. In artificial endolymph, the stiffness gradient for the transversal component was –3.4 dB/mm. Combined with the changes in tectorial membrane dimensions from base to apex, the radial stiffness changes would be able to provide a second frequency-place map in the cochlea. Young's modulus, which was obtained from measurements performed in the transversal direction, decreased by ?2.6 dB/mm from base to apex. PMID:17496047

Richter, Claus-Peter; Emadi, Gulam; Getnick, Geoffrey; Quesnel, Alicia; Dallos, Peter

2007-01-01

66

Multisoliton solutions in terms of double Wronskian determinant for a generalized variable-coefficient nonlinear Schrödinger equation from plasma physics, arterial mechanics, fluid dynamics and optical communications  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the multisoliton solutions in terms of double Wronskian determinant are presented for a generalized variable-coefficient nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which appears in space and laboratory plasmas, arterial mechanics, fluid dynamics, optical communications and so on. By means of the particularly nice properties of Wronskian determinant, the solutions are testified through direct substitution into the bilinear equations. Furthermore, it

Lue Xing; Hong-Wu Zhu; Zhen-Zhi Yao; Xiang-Hua Meng; Cheng Zhang; Chun-Yi Zhang; Bo Tian

2008-01-01

67

Classification of general n-qubit states under stochastic local operations and classical communication in terms of the rank of coefficient matrix.  

PubMed

We solve the entanglement classification under stochastic local operations and classical communication (SLOCC) for general n-qubit states. For two arbitrary pure n-qubit states connected via local operations, we establish an equation between the two coefficient matrices associated with the states. The rank of the coefficient matrix is preserved under SLOCC and gives rise to a simple way of partitioning all the pure states of n qubits into different families of entanglement classes, as exemplified here. When applied to the symmetric states, this approach reveals that all the Dicke states |?,n> with ?=1,…,[n/2] are inequivalent under SLOCC. PMID:22681051

Li, Xiangrong; Li, Dafa

2012-05-01

68

Elasticity of stiff biopolymers.  

PubMed

We present a statistical mechanical study of stiff polymers, motivated by experiments on actin filaments and the considerable current interest in polymer networks. We obtain simple, approximate analytical forms for the force-extension relations and compare these with numerical treatments. We note the important role of boundary conditions in determining force-extension relations. The theoretical predictions presented here can be tested against single molecule experiments on neurofilaments and cytoskeletal filaments like actin and microtubules. Our work is motivated by the buckling of the cytoskeleton of a cell under compression, a phenomenon of interest to biology. PMID:18233859

Ghosh, Abhijit; Samuel, Joseph; Sinha, Supurna

2007-12-01

69

On Zero Stiffness  

E-print Network

tables [8], com- puter screens [9] (e.g. the Apple G4 iMac), supports for industrial pipes [10,11], and rehabilitation aids [12]. In robotics the use of static balancing enables ma- nipulators to become lighter and faster, as the weight of the links... . 501–511. 23 pr e p r i n t [63] Lin PY, Shieh WB, Chen DZ. A stiffness matrix approach for the design of statically balanced planar articulated manipulators. Mechanism and Machine Theory. 2010;45(12):1877–1891. [64] Park ST, Luu TT. Techniques...

Schenk, Mark; Guest, Simon D.

2013-11-17

70

Dynamic dorsoventral stiffness assessment of the ovine lumbar spine.  

PubMed

Posteroanterior spinal stiffness assessments are common in the evaluating patients with low back pain. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of mechanical excitation frequency on dynamic lumbar spine stiffness. A computer-controlled voice coil actuator equipped with a load cell and LVDT was used to deliver an oscillatory dorsoventral (DV) mechanical force to the L3 spinous process of 15 adolescent Merino sheep. DV forces (48 N peak, approximately 10% body weight) were randomly applied at periodic excitation frequencies of 2.0, 6.0, 11.7 and a 0.5-19.7 Hz sweep. Force and displacement were recorded over a 13-22 s time interval. The in vivo DV stiffness of the ovine spine was frequency dependent and varied 3.7-fold over the 0.5-19.7 Hz mechanical excitation frequency range. Minimum and maximum DV stiffness (force/displacement) were 3.86+/-0.38 and 14.1+/-9.95 N/mm at 4.0 and 19.7 Hz, respectively. Stiffness values based on the swept-sine measurements were not significantly different from corresponding periodic oscillations (2.0 and 6.0 Hz). The mean coefficient of variation in the swept-sine DV dynamic stiffness assessment method was 15%, which was similar to the periodic oscillation method (10-16%). The results indicate that changes in mechanical excitation frequency and animal body mass modulate DV spinal stiffness. PMID:16376350

Keller, Tony S; Colloca, Christopher J

2007-01-01

71

Effects of thrust hydrodynamic bearing stiffness and damping on disk-spindle axial vibration in hard disk drives  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper aims at investigating the effects of variations in thrust hydrodynamic bearing (HDB) parameters such as axial stiffness and damping coefficients on the axial vibration of disk-spindle systems in hard disk drives. For a parametric study, a closed-form axial frequency response function (FRF) of HDB spindle systems is derived as a function of the axial stiffness and damping coefficients

T. Jintanawan; C.-P. Roger Ku; J. Zhu

2004-01-01

72

Extraordinary stiffness tunability through thermal expansion of nonlinear defect modes  

E-print Network

Incremental stiffness characterizes the variation of a material's force response to a small deformation change. Typically materials have an incremental stiffness that is fixed and positive, but recent technologies, such as super-lenses, low frequency band gap materials and acoustic cloaks, are based on materials with zero, negative or extremely high incremental stiffness. So far, demonstrations of this behavior have been limited either to a narrow range of frequencies, temperatures, stiffness or to specific deformations. Here we demonstrate a mechanism to tune the static incremental stiffness that overcomes those limitations. This tunability is achieved by driving a nonlinear defect mode in a lattice. As in thermal expansion, the defect's vibration amplitude affects the force at the boundary, hence the lattice's stiffness. By using the high sensitivities of nonlinear systems near bifurcation points, we tune the magnitude of the incremental stiffness over a wide range: from positive, to zero, to arbitrarily negative values. The particular deformation where the incremental stiffness is modified can be arbitrarily selected varying the defect's driving frequency. We demonstrate this experimentally in a compressed array of spheres and propose a general theoretical model.

Marc Serra-Garcia; Joseph Lydon; Chiara Daraio

2014-11-19

73

Error of Runge-Kutta methods for stiff problems studied via differential algebraic equations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Runge-Kutta methods are studied when applied to stiff differential equations containing a small stiffness parameter ?. The coefficients in the expansion of the global error in powers of ? are the global errors of the Runge-Kutta method applied to a differential algebraic system. A study of these errors and of the remainder of the expansion yields sharp error bounds for

E. Hairer; Ch. Lubich; M. Roche

1988-01-01

74

Bilinearization of the generalized coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation with variable coefficients and gain and dark-bright pair soliton solutions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations (NLSEs) with variable coefficients and gain. The coupled NLSE is a model equation for optical soliton propagation and their interaction in a multimode fiber medium or in a fiber array. By using Hirota's bilinear method, we obtain the bright-bright, dark-bright combinations of a one-soliton solution (1SS) and two-soliton solutions (2SS) for an n -coupled NLSE with variable coefficients and gain. Crucial properties of two-soliton (dark-bright pair) interactions, such as elastic and inelastic interactions and the dynamics of soliton bound states, are studied using asymptotic analysis and graphical analysis. We show that a bright 2 -soliton , in addition to elastic interactions, also exhibits multiple inelastic interactions. A dark 2 -soliton , on the other hand, exhibits only elastic interactions. We also observe a breatherlike structure of a bright 2-soliton, a feature that become prominent with gain and disappears as the amplitude acquires a minimum value, and after that the solitons remain parallel. The dark 2 -soliton , however, remains parallel irrespective of the gain. The results found by us might be useful for applications in soliton control, a fiber amplifier, all optical switching, and optical computing.

Chakraborty, Sushmita; Nandy, Sudipta; Barthakur, Abhijit

2015-02-01

75

Quantitative evaluation of stiffness of commercial suture materials.  

PubMed

The bending stiffness of 22 commercial suture materials of varying size, chemical structure and physical form was quantitatively evaluated using a stiffness tester (Taber V-5, model 150B, Teledyne). The commercial sutures were Chromic catgut; Dexon (polyglycolic acid); Vicryl (polyglactin 910); PDS (polydioxanone); Maxon (polyglycolide-trimethylene carbonate); Silk (coated with silicone); Mersilene (polyester fiber); Tycron (polyester fiber); Ethibond (polyethylene terephthalate coated with polybutylene); Nurolon (nylon 66); Surgilon (nylon 66 coated with silicone); Ethilon (coated nylon 66), Prolene (polypropylene); Dermalene (polyethylene), and Gore-tex (polytetraflouroethylene). These are both natural and synthetic, absorbable and nonabsorbable and monofilament and multifilament sutures. All of these sutures were size 2-0, but Prolene sutures with sizes ranging from 1-0 to 9-0 were also tested to determine the effect of suture size on stiffness. The bending stiffness data obtained showed that a wide range of bending stiffness was observed among the 22 commercial sutures. The most flexible 2-0 suture was Gore-tex, followed by Dexon, Silk, Surgilon, Vicryl (uncoated), Tycron, Nurolon, Mersilene, Ethibond, Maxon, PDS, Ethilon, Prolene, Chromic catgut, coated Vicryl, and lastly, Dermalene. The large porous volume inherent in Gore-tex monofilament suture was the reason for its lowest flexural stiffness. Sutures with a braided structure were generally more flexible than those of a monofilament structure, irrespective of the chemical constituents. Coated sutures had significantly higher stiffness than the corresponding uncoated ones. This is particularly true when polymers rather than wax were used as the coating material. This increase in stiffness is attributable to the loss of mobility under bending force in the fibers and yarns that make up the sutures. An increase in the size of the suture significantly increased the stiffness, and the magnitude of increase depended on the chemical constituent of the suture. The flexural stiffness of sutures was also found to depend on the duration of bending in the test for stiffness. In general, monofilament sutures exhibited the largest time-dependent stiffness. This was most pronounced with the Gore-tex suture. Most braided sutures also showed less time-dependence in stiffness. Nylon sutures did not exhibit this time-dependent phenomenon regardless of physical form. PMID:2919353

Chu, C C; Kizil, Z

1989-03-01

76

Nonlinear vibration of thick stiff fabric with small flexural stiffness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dynamic behaviour of fabric is very complex during weaving, dyeing and finishing processes. Thick stiff fabric vibration has great influence not only on the fabric itself but also on the performance of machine. The theoretic analysis for the nonlinear free vibration of thick stiff fabric with small flexural stiffness is put forward in the paper. The nonlinear partial differential equation is derived by applying the flexible thin plate theory, and then transformed into nonlinear ordinary differential equation by the Galerkin method. The approximate analytical solution is obtained by the homotopy perturbation method.

Chen, J.-P.; Wang, S.-Z.; Wu, W.-Y.; Gu, H.-B.

2008-02-01

77

Stiffness of desiccating insect wings.  

PubMed

The stiffness of insect wings is typically determined through experimental measurements. Such experiments are performed on wings removed from insects. However, the wings are subject to desiccation which typically leads to an increase in their stiffness. Although this effect of desiccation is well known, a comprehensive study of the rate of change in stiffness of desiccating insect wings would be a significant aid in planning experiments as well as interpreting data from such experiments. This communication presents a comprehensive experimental analysis of the change in mass and stiffness of gradually desiccating forewings of Painted Lady butterflies (Vanessa?cardui). Mass and stiffness of the forewings of five butterflies were simultaneously measured every 10 min over a 24 h period. The averaged results show that wing mass declined exponentially by 21.1% over this time period with a time constant of 9.8 h, while wing stiffness increased linearly by 46.2% at a rate of 23.4 µN mm(-1) h(-1). For the forewings of a single butterfly, the experiment was performed over a period of 1 week, and the results show that wing mass declined exponentially by 52.2% with a time constant of 30.2 h until it reached a steady-state level of 2.00 mg, while wing stiffness increased exponentially by 90.7% until it reached a steady-state level of 1.70 mN mm(-1). PMID:21160117

Mengesha, T E; Vallance, R R; Mittal, R

2011-03-01

78

Digital-map grids of mean-annual precipitation for 1961-90, and generalized skew coefficients of annual maximum streamflow for Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This digital report contains two digital-map grids of data that were used to develop peak-flow regression equations in Tortorelli, 1997, 'Techniques for estimating peak-streamflow frequency for unregulated streams and streams regulated by small floodwater retarding structures in Oklahoma,' U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 97-4202. One data set is a grid of mean annual precipitation, in inches, based on the period 1961-90, for Oklahoma. The data set was derived from the PRISM (Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model) mean annual precipitation grid for the United States, developed by Daly, Neilson, and Phillips (1994, 'A statistical-topographic model for mapping climatological precipitation over mountainous terrain:' Journal of Applied Meteorology, v. 33, no. 2, p. 140-158). The second data set is a grid of generalized skew coefficients of logarithms of annual maximum streamflow for Oklahoma streams less than or equal to 2,510 square miles in drainage area. This grid of skew coefficients is taken from figure 11 of Tortorelli and Bergman, 1985, 'Techniques for estimating flood peak discharges for unregulated streams and streams regulated by small floodwater retarding structures in Oklahoma,' U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 84-4358. To save disk space, the skew coefficient values have been multiplied by 100 and rounded to integers with two significant digits. The data sets are provided in an ASCII grid format.

Rea, A.H.; Tortorelli, R.L.

1997-01-01

79

Switchable stiffness scanning microscope probe  

E-print Network

Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has rapidly gained widespread utilization as an imaging device and micro/nano-manipulator during recent years. This thesis investigates the new concept of a dual stiffness scanning probe with ...

Mueller-Falcke, Clemens T. (Clemens Tobias)

2005-01-01

80

Stiff polymer in monomer ensemble  

E-print Network

We make use of the previously developed formalism for a monomer ensemble and include angular dependence of the segments of the polymer chains thus described. In particular we show how to deal with stiffness when the polymer chain is confined to certain regions. We investigate the stiffness from the perspectives of a differential equation, integral equations, or recursive relations for both continuum and lattice models. Exact analytical solutions are presented for two cases, whereas numerical results are shown for a third case.

K. K. Muller-Nedebock; H. L. Frisch; J. K. Percus

2002-01-18

81

Painlevé integrability of a generalized fifth-order KdV equation with variable coefficients: Exact solutions and their interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By means of singularity structure analysis, the integrability of a generalized fifth-order KdV equation is investigated. It is proven that this equation passes the Painlevé test for integrability only for three distinct cases. Moreover, the multi-soliton solutions are presented for this equation under three sets of integrable conditions. Finally, by selecting appropriate parameters, we analyze the evolution of two solitons, which is especially interesting as it may describe the overtaking and the head-on collisions of solitary waves of different shapes and different types.

Xu, Gui-Qiong

2013-05-01

82

Variable stiffness mechanisms with SMA actuators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Variable stiffness is a new branch of smart structures development with several applications related to aircraft. Previous research indicates that temporarily reducing the stiffness of an airplane wing can decrease control actuator sizing and improve aeroelastic roll performance. Some smart materials like shape memory alloys (SMA) can change their material stiffness properties, but they tend to gain stiffness in their

Damin J. Siler; Kimberly B. Demoret

1996-01-01

83

Reliabilities of leg and vertical stiffness during treadmill running.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to determine the intra-participant variabilities (i.e. intra-day and inter-day reliabilities) in leg and vertical stiffness, as well as related kinematic parameters, during treadmill running using the sine-wave method. Twenty-two healthy men ran on a treadmill at 4.44 m/s, and the flight and contact times were measured with a high-speed video camera. Three 30-s running bouts with 2-min inter-bout rests were performed to examine the intra-day reliability, and single 30-s running bouts on three separate days with 24- to 48-h inter-bout intervals were performed to examine the inter-day reliability. The reliability statistics included repeated-measure analyses of variance, average inter-trial correlations, intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs), Cronbach's ? reliability coefficient, and the coefficient of variation. Both leg and vertical stiffness produced high ICCs within 0.972 and 0.982, respectively, and between 0.922 and 0.873 days, respectively. High values were also observed for all of the reliability coefficients. Similar results were found regarding contact time, flight time, step length, and step rate. It was concluded that the measurements of leg and vertical stiffness, as well as related kinematic parameters, obtained using the sine-wave method during treadmill running at 4.44 m/s, were highly reliable, both within and across days. PMID:25438771

Pappas, Panagiotis; Paradisis, Giorgos; Tsolakis, Charilaos; Smirniotou, Athanasia; Morin, Jean-Benoit

2014-11-01

84

Stiffness after total knee arthroplasty.  

PubMed

Stiffness after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) adversely affects outcome and impacts patient function. Various risk factors for stiffness after TKA have been identified, including reduced preoperative knee range of motion, history of prior knee surgery, etiology of arthritis, incorrect positioning or oversizing of components, and incorrect gap balancing. Mechanical and associated causes, such as infection, arthrofibrosis, complex regional pain syndrome, and heterotopic ossification, secondary gain issues have also been identified. Management of stiffness following TKA can be challenging. The condition needs to be assessed and treated in a staged manner. A nonsurgical approach is the first step. Manipulation under anesthesia may be considered within the first 3 months after the index TKA, if physical therapy fails to improve the range of motion. Beyond this point, consideration should be given to surgical intervention such as lysis of adhesions, either arthroscopically or by open arthrotomy. If the cause of stiffness is deemed to be surgical error, such as component malpositioning, revision arthroplasty is indicated. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the various aspects of management of stiffness after TKA. PMID:25513992

Manrique, Jorge; Gomez, Miguel M; Parvizi, Javad

2015-04-01

85

Variable stiffness torsion springs  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their

Dean C. Alhorn; Michael E. Polites

1995-01-01

86

Variable stiffness torsion springs  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their

Dean C. Alhorn; Michael E. Polites

1994-01-01

87

Stiff polymer in monomer ensemble  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We employ an ordered monomer ensemble formalism in order to develop techniques to investigate a stiff polymer chain which is confined to a certain region. In particular, we calculate the segment density for a given location and segment orientation distribution within the confining geometry. With this method the role of the stiffness can be examined by means of differential equations, integral equations, or recursive relations for both continuum and lattice models. A suitable choice of lattice model permits an exact analytical solution for the segment location and orientation density for a chain between two parallel plates. For the stiff polymer in a spherical cavity we develop an integral equation formalism which is treated numerically, and in the same spherical geometry, a different model of the polymer displays a solution of a differential equation.

Müller-Nedebock, K. K.; Frisch, H. L.; Percus, J. K.

2003-01-01

88

Stiff polymer in monomer ensemble.  

PubMed

We employ an ordered monomer ensemble formalism in order to develop techniques to investigate a stiff polymer chain which is confined to a certain region. In particular, we calculate the segment density for a given location and segment orientation distribution within the confining geometry. With this method the role of the stiffness can be examined by means of differential equations, integral equations, or recursive relations for both continuum and lattice models. A suitable choice of lattice model permits an exact analytical solution for the segment location and orientation density for a chain between two parallel plates. For the stiff polymer in a spherical cavity we develop an integral equation formalism which is treated numerically, and in the same spherical geometry, a different model of the polymer displays a solution of a differential equation. PMID:12636521

Müller-Nedebock, K K; Frisch, H L; Percus, J K

2003-01-01

89

Integrability aspects with optical solitons of a generalized variable-coefficient N-coupled higher order nonlinear Schroedinger system from inhomogeneous optical fibers  

SciTech Connect

For describing the long-distance communication and manufacturing problems of N fields propagation in inhomogeneous optical fibers, we consider a generalized variable-coefficient N-coupled nonlinear Schroedinger system with higher order effects such as the third-order dispersion, self-steepening and self-frequency shift. Using the Painleve singularity structure analysis, we obtain two cases for this system to admit the Painleve property. Then for case (1) we derive the optical dark solitons via solving the Hirota bilinear equations; and based on the obtained (2N+1)x(2N+1) Lax pair, we construct the Darboux transformation to obtain the optical bright solitons (including the multisoliton profiles) for case (2). Finally, the features of optical solitons (both dark and bright ones) in inhomogeneous optical fibers are analyzed and graphically discussed.

Lue Xing; Li Juan; Zhang Haiqiang; Xu Tao; Li Lili [School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box 49, Beijing 100876 (China); Tian Bo [School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box 49, Beijing 100876 (China); State Key Laboratory of Software Development Environment, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications (BUPT), Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box 128, Beijing 100876 (China)

2010-04-15

90

Lase Ultrasonic Web Stiffness tester  

SciTech Connect

The objective is to provide a sensor that uses non-contact, laser ultrasonics to measure the stiffness of paper during the manufacturing process. This will allow the manufacturer to adjust the production process in real time, increase filler content, modify fiber refining and as result produce a quality product using less energy. The sensor operates by moving back and forth across the paper web, at pre-selected locations firing a laser at the sheet, measuring the out-of-plane velocity of the sheet then using that measurement to calculate sheet stiffness.

Tim Patterson, Ph.D., IPST at Ga Tech

2009-01-12

91

Stiffness-compensated temperature-insensitive micromechanical resonators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Polysilicon ?mechanical resonators utilizing a novel temperature-dependent electrical stiffness design technique to compensate for temperature-induced frequency shifts have been demonstrated with greatly reduced temperature coefficients (TCf 's) on the order of -0.24 ppm\\/°C, which is 67 times smaller than exhibited by previous uncompensated resonators. With this new resonator design, the total frequency excursion over a 300 K to 380 K

Wan-Thai Hsu; C. T.-C. Nguyen

2002-01-01

92

Arterial Stiffness and Cardiovascular Therapy  

PubMed Central

The world population is aging and the number of old people is continuously increasing. Arterial structure and function change with age, progressively leading to arterial stiffening. Arterial stiffness is best characterized by measurement of pulse wave velocity (PWV), which is its surrogate marker. It has been shown that PWV could improve cardiovascular event prediction in models that included standard risk factors. Consequently, it might therefore enable better identification of populations at high-risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The present review is focused on a survey of different pharmacological therapeutic options for decreasing arterial stiffness. The influence of several groups of drugs is described: antihypertensive drugs (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, calcium channel blockers, beta-blockers, diuretics, and nitrates), statins, peroral antidiabetics, advanced glycation end-products (AGE) cross-link breakers, anti-inflammatory drugs, endothelin-A receptor antagonists, and vasopeptidase inhibitors. All of these have shown some effect in decreasing arterial stiffness. Nevertheless, further studies are needed which should address the influence of arterial stiffness diminishment on major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE). PMID:25170513

Jani?, Miodrag; Lunder, Mojca; Šabovi?, Mišo

2014-01-01

93

Stiffness of compressed fiber mats  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate, using an analytical and a numerical model, the in-plane stiffness of fiber mats. A mat is modeled by randomly depositing thin linear-elastic fibers on top of each other under the influence of an external pressure. The external pressure has the effect of bending the fibers over each other. The fibers are assumed rigidly bonded at contacts. For a

H. Hirvonen; J. Timonen

2000-01-01

94

Conservation Assessment for Groundcedar and Stiff  

E-print Network

;EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Stiff clubmoss (Lycopodium annotinum L.) and groundcedar (Lycopodium complanatum L.; synonym = Diphasiastrum complanatum [L.] Holub.) (Lycopodiaceae) are circumboreal clubmoss species events and invasion by noxious weeds and other invasive plants. Key words: Lycopodium, stiff clubmoss

95

Experimental dynamic stiffness and damping of externally pressurized gas-lubricated journal bearings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A rigid vertical shaft was operated with known amounts of unbalance at speeds to 30,000 rpm and gas supply pressure ratios to 4.8. From measured amplitude and phase angle data, dynamic stiffness and damping coefficients of the bearings were determined. The measured stiffness was proportional to the supply pressure, while damping was little affected by supply pressure. Damping dropped rapidly as the fractional frequency whirl threshold was approached. A small-eccentricity analysis overpredicted the stiffness by 20 to 70 percent. Predicted damping was lower than measured at low speeds but higher at high speeds.

Fleming, D. P.; Thayer, W. J.; Cunningham, R. E.

1976-01-01

96

Direct Stiffness Analysis of Lateral Buckling  

Microsoft Academic Search

A direct stiffness method of analyzing the elastic ftexural-torsional buckling of rigid-jointed plane frames composed of l-section members and subjected to in-plane loads is presented. The in-plane stiffness matrix and the fixed-end resultants are obtained from the member stiffness matrices derived from the in-plane differential equations. These member stiffness matrices are assembled and solved, and their solutions are used to

P. Vacharajittiphan; N. S. Trahair

1974-01-01

97

Direct Stiffness Analysis of Lateral Buckling  

Microsoft Academic Search

A direct stiffness method of analyzing the elastic ftexural-torsional buckling of rigid-jointed plane frames composed of l-section members and subjected to in-plane loads is presented. The in-plane stiffness matrix and the fixed-end resultants are obtained from the member stiffness matrices derived from the in-plane differential equations. These member stiffness matrices are assembled and solved, and their solutions are used to

P. Vacharajittiphan; N. S. Trahair

1994-01-01

98

Beam bending-torsion dynamic stiffness method for calculation of exact vibration modes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The exact dynamic stiffness matrix is derived for a straight and uniform beam element whose elastic and inertial axes are not coincident. Elementary bending-torsion beam theory is used, and bending translation is restricted to one direction. The element matrix can be used in the dynamic stiffness method for calculation of exact natural frequencies, mode shapes, and generalized masses for planar

W. L. Hallauer; R. Y. L. Liu

1982-01-01

99

Simple Formulas and Results for Buckling-Resistance and Stiffness Design of Compression-Loaded Laminated-Composite Cylinders  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simple formulas for the buckling stress of homogeneous, specially orthotropic, laminated-composite cylinders are presented. The formulas are obtained by using nondimensional parameters and equations that facilitate general validation, and are validated against the exact solution for a wide range of cylinder geometries and laminate constructions. Results are presented that establish the ranges of the nondimensional parameters and coefficients used. General results, given in terms of the nondimensional parameters, are presented that encompass a wide range of geometries and laminate constructions. These general results also illustrate a wide spectrum of behavioral trends. Design-oriented results are also presented that provide a simple, clear indication of laminate composition on critical stress, critical strain, and axial stiffness. An example is provided to demonstrate the application of these results to thin-walled column designs.

Nemeth, Michael P.; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.

2009-01-01

100

Substrate Stiffness Regulates Filopodial Activities in Lung Cancer Cells  

PubMed Central

Microenvironment stiffening plays a crucial role in tumorigenesis. While filopodia are generally thought to be one of the cellular mechanosensors for probing environmental stiffness, the effects of environmental stiffness on filopodial activities of cancer cells remain unclear. In this work, we investigated the filopodial activities of human lung adenocarcinoma cells CL1-5 cultured on substrates of tunable stiffness using a novel platform. The platform consists of an optical system called structured illumination nano-profilometry, which allows time-lapsed visualization of filopodial activities without fluorescence labeling. The culturing substrates were composed of polyvinyl chloride mixed with an environmentally friendly plasticizer to yield Young's modulus ranging from 20 to 60 kPa. Cell viability studies showed that the viability of cells cultured on the substrates was similar to those cultured on commonly used elastomers such as polydimethylsiloxane. Time-lapsed live cell images were acquired and the filopodial activities in response to substrates with varying degrees of stiffness were analyzed. Statistical analyses revealed that lung cancer cells cultured on softer substrates appeared to have longer filopodia, higher filopodial densities with respect to the cellular perimeter, and slower filopodial retraction rates. Nonetheless, the temporal analysis of filopodial activities revealed that whether a filopodium decides to extend or retract is purely a stochastic process without dependency on substrate stiffness. The discrepancy of the filopodial activities between lung cancer cells cultured on substrates with different degrees of stiffness vanished when the myosin II activities were inhibited by treating the cells with blebbistatin, which suggests that the filopodial activities are closely modulated by the adhesion strength of the cells. Our data quantitatively relate filopodial activities of lung cancer cells with environmental stiffness and should shed light on the understanding and treatment of cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:24587021

Liou, Yu-Ren; Torng, Wen; Kao, Yu-Chiu; Sung, Kung-Bin; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Kuo, Po-Ling

2014-01-01

101

COMMUNICATION Stiffness of desiccating insect wings  

Microsoft Academic Search

The stiffness of insect wings is typically determined through experimental measurements. Such experiments are performed on wings removed from insects. However, the wings are subject to desiccation which typically leads to an increase in their stiffness. Although this effect of desiccation is well known, a comprehensive study of the rate of change in stiffness of desiccating insect wings would be

T. E. Mengesha; R. R. Vallance; R. Mittal

2011-01-01

102

Parameter estimation for stiff deterministic dynamical systems via ensemble Kalman filter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A commonly encountered problem in numerous areas of applications is to estimate the unknown coefficients of a dynamical system from direct or indirect observations at discrete times of some of the components of the state vector. A related problem is to estimate unobserved components of the state. An egregious example of such a problem is provided by metabolic models, in which the numerous model parameters and the concentrations of the metabolites in tissue are to be estimated from concentration data in the blood. A popular method for addressing similar questions in stochastic and turbulent dynamics is the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), a particle-based filtering method that generalizes classical Kalman filtering. In this work, we adapt the EnKF algorithm for deterministic systems in which the numerical approximation error is interpreted as a stochastic drift with variance based on classical error estimates of numerical integrators. This approach, which is particularly suitable for stiff systems where the stiffness may depend on the parameters, allows us to effectively exploit the parallel nature of particle methods. Moreover, we demonstrate how spatial prior information about the state vector, which helps the stability of the computed solution, can be incorporated into the filter. The viability of the approach is shown by computed examples, including a metabolic system modeling an ischemic episode in skeletal muscle, with a high number of unknown parameters.

Arnold, Andrea; Calvetti, Daniela; Somersalo, Erkki

2014-10-01

103

General expressions for the coupling coefficient, quality and filling factors for a cavity with an insert using energy coupled mode theory.  

PubMed

A cavity (CV) with a dielectric resonator (DR) insert forms an excellent probe for the use in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometers. The probe's coupling coefficient, ?, the quality factor, Q, and the filling factor, ? are vital in assessing the EPR spectrometer's performance. Coupled mode theory (CMT) is used to derive general expressions for these parameters. For large permittivity the dominating factor in ? is the ratio of the DR and CV cross sectional areas rather than the dielectric constant. Thus in some cases, resonators with low dielectric constant can couple much stronger with the cavity than do resonators with a high dielectric constant. When the DR and CV frequencies are degenerate, the coupled ? is the average of the two uncoupled ones. In practical EPR probes the coupled ? is approximately half of that of the DR. The Q of the coupled system generally depends on the eigenvectors, uncoupled frequencies (?1,?2) and the individual quality factors (Q1,Q2). It is calculated for different probe configurations and found to agree with the corresponding HFSS® simulations. Provided there is a large difference between the Q1, Q2 pair and the frequencies of DR and CV are degenerate, Q is approximately equal to double the minimum of Q1 and Q2. In general, the signal enhancement ratio, Iwithinsert/Iempty, is obtained from Q and ?. For low loss DRs it only depends on ?1/?2. However, when the DR has a low Q, the uncoupled Qs are also needed. In EPR spectroscopy it is desirable to excite only a single mode. The separation between the modes, ?, is calculated as a function of ? and Q. It is found to be significantly greater than five times the average bandwidth. Thus for practical probes, it is possible to excite one of the coupled modes without exciting the other. The CMT expressions derived in this article are quite general and are in excellent agreement with the lumped circuit approach and finite numerical simulations. Hence they can also be applied to a loop-gap resonator in a cavity. For the design effective EPR probes, one needs to consider the ?, Q and ? parameters. PMID:24607823

Elnaggar, Sameh Y; Tervo, Richard; Mattar, Saba M

2014-05-01

104

General expressions for the coupling coefficient, quality and filling factors for a cavity with an insert using energy coupled mode theory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A cavity (CV) with a dielectric resonator (DR) insert forms an excellent probe for the use in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometers. The probe’s coupling coefficient, ?, the quality factor, Q, and the filling factor, ? are vital in assessing the EPR spectrometer’s performance. Coupled mode theory (CMT) is used to derive general expressions for these parameters. For large permittivity the dominating factor in ? is the ratio of the DR and CV cross sectional areas rather than the dielectric constant. Thus in some cases, resonators with low dielectric constant can couple much stronger with the cavity than do resonators with a high dielectric constant. When the DR and CV frequencies are degenerate, the coupled ? is the average of the two uncoupled ones. In practical EPR probes the coupled ? is approximately half of that of the DR. The Q of the coupled system generally depends on the eigenvectors, uncoupled frequencies (?1, ?2) and the individual quality factors (Q1, Q2). It is calculated for different probe configurations and found to agree with the corresponding HFSS® simulations. Provided there is a large difference between the Q1, Q2 pair and the frequencies of DR and CV are degenerate, Q is approximately equal to double the minimum of Q1 and Q2. In general, the signal enhancement ratio, I/Iempty, is obtained from Q and ?. For low loss DRs it only depends on ?1/?2. However, when the DR has a low Q, the uncoupled Qs are also needed. In EPR spectroscopy it is desirable to excite only a single mode. The separation between the modes, ?, is calculated as a function of ? and Q. It is found to be significantly greater than five times the average bandwidth. Thus for practical probes, it is possible to excite one of the coupled modes without exciting the other. The CMT expressions derived in this article are quite general and are in excellent agreement with the lumped circuit approach and finite numerical simulations. Hence they can also be applied to a loop-gap resonator in a cavity. For the design effective EPR probes, one needs to consider the ?, Q and ? parameters.

Elnaggar, Sameh Y.; Tervo, Richard; Mattar, Saba M.

2014-05-01

105

STIFF: Converting Scientific FITS Images to TIFF  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

STIFF is a program that converts scientific FITS1 images to the more popular TIFF2 format for illustration purposes. Most FITS readers and converters do not do a proper job at converting FITS image data to 8 bits. 8-bit images stored in JPEG, PNG or TIFF files have the intensities implicitely stored in a non-linear way. Most current FITS image viewers and converters provide the user an incorrect translation of the FITS image content by simply rescaling linearly input pixel values. A first consequence is that the people working on astronomical images usually have to apply narrow intensity cuts or square-root or logarithmic intensity transformations to actually see something on their deep-sky images. A less obvious consequence is that colors obtained by combining images processed this way are not consistent across such a large range of surface brightnesses. Though with other software the user is generally afforded a choice of nonlinear transformations to apply in order to make the faint stuff stand out more clearly in the images, with the limited selection of choices provides, colors will not be accurately rendered, and some manual tweaking will be necessary. The purpose of STIFF is to produce beautiful pictures in an automatic and consistent way.

Bertin, Emmanuel

2011-10-01

106

Analysis and Design of Variable Stiffness Composite Cylinders  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation of the possible performance improvements of thin circular cylindrical shells through the use of the variable stiffness concept is presented. The variable stiffness concept implies that the stiffness parameters change spatially throughout the structure. This situation is achieved mainly through the use of curvilinear fibers within a fiber-reinforced composite laminate, though the possibility of thickness variations and discrete stiffening elements is also allowed. These three mechanisms are incorporated into the constitutive laws for thin shells through the use of Classical Lamination Theory. The existence of stiffness variation within the structure warrants a formulation of the static equilibrium equations from the most basic principles. The governing equations include sufficient detail to correctly model several types of nonlinearity, including the formation of a nonlinear shell boundary layer as well as the Brazier effect due to nonlinear bending of long cylinders. Stress analysis and initial buckling estimates are formulated for a general variable stiffness cylinder. Results and comparisons for several simplifications of these highly complex governing equations are presented so that the ensuing numerical solutions are considered reliable and efficient enough for in-depth optimization studies. Four distinct cases of loading and stiffness variation are chosen to investigate possible areas of improvement that the variable stiffness concept may offer over traditional constant stiffness and/or stiffened structures. The initial investigation deals with the simplest solution for cylindrical shells in which all quantities are constant around the circumference of the cylinder. This axisymmetric case includes a stiffness variation exclusively in the axial direction, and the only pertinent loading scenarios include constant loads of axial compression, pressure, and torsion. The results for these cases indicate that little improvement over traditional laminates exists through the use of curvilinear fibers, mainly due to the presence of a weak link area within the stiffness variation that limits the ultimate load that the structure can withstand. Rigorous optimization studies reveal that even though slight increases in the critical loads can be produced for designs with an arbitrary variation of the fiber orientation angle, the improvements are not significant when compared to traditional design techniques that utilize ring stiffeners and frames. The second problem that is studied involves arbitrary loading of a cylinder with a stiffness variation that changes only in the circumferential direction. The end effects of the cylinder are ignored, so that the problem takes the form of an analysis of a cross-section for a short cylinder segment. Various load cases including axial compression, pressure, torsion, bending, and transverse shear forces are investigated. It is found that the most significant improvements in load-carrying capability exist for cases which involve loads that also vary around the circumference of the shell, namely bending and shear forces. The stiffness variation of the optimal designs contribute to the increased performance in two ways: lowering the stresses in the critical areas through redistribution of the stresses; and providing a relatively stiff region that alters the buckling behavior of the structure. These results lead to an in-depth optimization study involving weight optimization of a fuselage structure subjected to typical design constraints. Comparisons of the curvilinear fiber format to traditional stiffened structures constructed of isotropic and composite materials are included. It is found that standard variable stiffness designs are quite comparable in terms of weight and load-carrying capability yet offer the added advantage of tailorability of distinct regions of the structure that experience drastically different loading conditions. The last two problems presented in this work involve the nonlinear phenomenon of long tubes under bending. Though this scenario is not as applic

Tatting, Brian F.; Guerdal, Zafer

1998-01-01

107

Boundary slip dependency on surface stiffness.  

PubMed

The paper investigates the effects of surface stiffness on the slip process aiming to obtain a better insight of the momentum transfer at nanoscale. The surface stiffness is modeled through the stiffness, ?, of spring potentials, which are employed to construct the thermal walls. It is shown that variations of stiffness, ?, influence the slip mechanism either toward slip or stick conditions. Increasing the values of ? alters the oscillation frequency and the mean displacement of the wall particles toward higher and lower values, respectively. Our results suggest that the amount of slip produced as a function of stiffness follows a common pattern that can be modeled through a fifth-order polynomial function. PMID:20866421

Asproulis, Nikolaos; Drikakis, Dimitris

2010-06-01

108

Estimation of Quasi-Stiffness of the Human Knee in the Stance Phase of Walking  

PubMed Central

Biomechanical data characterizing the quasi-stiffness of lower-limb joints during human locomotion is limited. Understanding joint stiffness is critical for evaluating gait function and designing devices such as prostheses and orthoses intended to emulate biological properties of human legs. The knee joint moment-angle relationship is approximately linear in the flexion and extension stages of stance, exhibiting nearly constant stiffnesses, known as the quasi-stiffnesses of each stage. Using a generalized inverse dynamics analysis approach, we identify the key independent variables needed to predict knee quasi-stiffness during walking, including gait speed, knee excursion, and subject height and weight. Then, based on the identified key variables, we used experimental walking data for 136 conditions (speeds of 0.75–2.63 m/s) across 14 subjects to obtain best fit linear regressions for a set of general models, which were further simplified for the optimal gait speed. We found R2 > 86% for the most general models of knee quasi-stiffnesses for the flexion and extension stages of stance. With only subject height and weight, we could predict knee quasi-stiffness for preferred walking speed with average error of 9% with only one outlier. These results provide a useful framework and foundation for selecting subject-specific stiffness for prosthetic and exoskeletal devices designed to emulate biological knee function during walking. PMID:23533662

Shamaei, Kamran; Sawicki, Gregory S.; Dollar, Aaron M.

2013-01-01

109

Estimation of quasi-stiffness of the human knee in the stance phase of walking.  

PubMed

Biomechanical data characterizing the quasi-stiffness of lower-limb joints during human locomotion is limited. Understanding joint stiffness is critical for evaluating gait function and designing devices such as prostheses and orthoses intended to emulate biological properties of human legs. The knee joint moment-angle relationship is approximately linear in the flexion and extension stages of stance, exhibiting nearly constant stiffnesses, known as the quasi-stiffnesses of each stage. Using a generalized inverse dynamics analysis approach, we identify the key independent variables needed to predict knee quasi-stiffness during walking, including gait speed, knee excursion, and subject height and weight. Then, based on the identified key variables, we used experimental walking data for 136 conditions (speeds of 0.75-2.63 m/s) across 14 subjects to obtain best fit linear regressions for a set of general models, which were further simplified for the optimal gait speed. We found R(2) > 86% for the most general models of knee quasi-stiffnesses for the flexion and extension stages of stance. With only subject height and weight, we could predict knee quasi-stiffness for preferred walking speed with average error of 9% with only one outlier. These results provide a useful framework and foundation for selecting subject-specific stiffness for prosthetic and exoskeletal devices designed to emulate biological knee function during walking. PMID:23533662

Shamaei, Kamran; Sawicki, Gregory S; Dollar, Aaron M

2013-01-01

110

3D FEA simulation of segmented reinforcement variable stiffness composites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reconfigurable and morphing structures may provide significant improvement in overall platform performance through optimization over broad operating conditions. The realization of this concept requires structures, which can accommodate the large deformations necessary with modest weight and strength penalties. Other studies suggest morphing structures need new materials to realize the benefits that morphing may provide. To help meet this need, we have developed novel composite materials based on specially designed segmented reinforcement and shape memory polymer matrices that provide unique combinations of deformation and stiffness properties. To tailor and optimize the design and fabrication of these materials for particular structural applications, one must understand the envelope of morphing material properties as a function of microstructural architecture and constituent properties. Here we extend our previous simulations of these materials by using 3D models to predict stiffness and deformation properties in variable stiffness segmented composite materials. To understand the effect of various geometry tradeoffs and constituent properties on the elastic stiffness in both the high and low stiffness states, we have performed a trade study using a commercial FEA analysis package. The modulus tensor is constructed and deformation properties are computed from representative volume elements (RVE) in which all (6) basic loading conditions are applied. Our test matrix consisted of four composite RVE geometries modeled using combinations of 5 SMP and 3 reinforcement elastic moduli. Effective composite stiffness and deformation results confirm earlier evidence of the essential performance tradeoffs of reduced stiffness for increasing reversible strain accommodation with especially heavy dependencies on matrix modulus and microstructural architecture. Furthermore, our results show these laminar materials are generally orthotropic and indicate that previous calculations of matrix gap and interlaminar strains based on kinematic approximations are accurate to within 10-20% for many material systems. We compare these models with experimental results for a narrow geometry and material set to show the accuracy of the models as compared to physical materials. Our simulations indicate that improved shape memory polymer materials could enable a composite material that can accommodate ~30% strain with a cold state stiffness of ~30GPa. This would improve the current state of the art 5-10x and significantly reduce the weight and stiffness costs of using a morphing component.

Henry, C. P.; McKnight, G. P.; Enke, A.; Bortolin, R.; Joshi, S.

2008-03-01

111

Dynamic phototuning of 3D hydrogel stiffness.  

PubMed

Hydrogels are widely used as in vitro culture models to mimic 3D cellular microenvironments. The stiffness of the extracellular matrix is known to influence cell phenotype, inspiring work toward unraveling the role of stiffness on cell behavior using hydrogels. However, in many biological processes such as embryonic development, wound healing, and tumorigenesis, the microenvironment is highly dynamic, leading to changes in matrix stiffness over a broad range of timescales. To recapitulate dynamic microenvironments, a hydrogel with temporally tunable stiffness is needed. Here, we present a system in which alginate gel stiffness can be temporally modulated by light-triggered release of calcium or a chelator from liposomes. Others have shown softening via photodegradation or stiffening via secondary cross-linking; however, our system is capable of both dynamic stiffening and softening. Dynamic modulation of stiffness can be induced at least 14 d after gelation and can be spatially controlled to produce gradients and patterns. We use this system to investigate the regulation of fibroblast morphology by stiffness in both nondegradable gels and gels with degradable elements. Interestingly, stiffening inhibits fibroblast spreading through either mesenchymal or amoeboid migration modes. We demonstrate this technology can be translated in vivo by using deeply penetrating near-infrared light for transdermal stiffness modulation, enabling external control of gel stiffness. Temporal modulation of hydrogel stiffness is a powerful tool that will enable investigation of the role that dynamic microenvironments play in biological processes both in vitro and in well-controlled in vivo experiments. PMID:25646417

Stowers, Ryan S; Allen, Shane C; Suggs, Laura J

2015-02-17

112

Difference methods for stiff delay differential equations. [DDESUB, in FORTRAN  

SciTech Connect

Delay differential equations of the form y'(t) = f(y(t), z(t)), where z(t) = (y/sub 1/(..cap alpha../sub 1/(y(t))),..., y/sub n/(..cap alpha../sub n/(y(t))))/sup T/ and ..cap alpha../sub i/(y(t)) less than or equal to t, arise in many scientific and engineering fields when transport lags and propagation times are physically significant in a dynamic process. Difference methods for approximating the solution of stiff delay systems require special stability properties that are generalizations of those employed for stiff ordinary differential equations. By use of the model equation y'(t) = py(t) + qy(t-1), with complex p and q, the definitions of A-stability, A( )-stability, and stiff stability have been generalize to delay equations. For linear multistep difference formulas, these properties extend directly from ordinary to delay equations. This straight forward extension is not true for implicit Runge-Kutta methods, as illustrated by the midpoint formula, which is A-stable for ordinary equations, but not for delay equations. A computer code for stiff delay equations was developed using the BDF. 24 figures, 5 tables.

Roth, Mitchell G.

1980-12-01

113

Modifiable Risk Factors for Increased Arterial Stiffness in Outpatient Nephrology  

PubMed Central

Arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality. Arterial stiffness increases with age. However, modifiable risk factors such as smoking, BP and salt intake also impact on PWV. The finding of modifiable risk factors may lead to the identification of treatable factors, and, thus, is of interest to practicing nephrologist. We have now studied the prevalence and correlates of arterial stiffness, assessed by PWV, in 191 patients from nephrology outpatient clinics in order to identify modifiable risk factors for arterial stiffness that may in the future guide therapeutic decision-making. PWV was above normal levels for age in 85/191 (44.5%) patients. Multivariate analysis showed that advanced age, systolic BP, diabetes mellitus, serum uric acid and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy or calcium-containing medication were independent predictors of PWV. A new parameter, Delta above upper limit of normal PWV (Delta PWV) was defined to decrease the weight of age on PWV values. Delta PWV was calculated as (measured PWV) - (upper limit of the age-adjusted PWV values for the general population). Mean±SD Delta PWV was 0.76±1.60 m/sec. In multivariate analysis, systolic blood pressure, active smoking and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy remained independent predictors of higher delta PWV, while age, urinary potassium and beta blocker therapy were independent predictors of lower delta PWV. In conclusion, arterial stiffness was frequent in nephrology outpatients. Systolic blood pressure, smoking, serum uric acid, calcium-containing medications, potassium metabolism and non-use of beta blockers are modifiable factors associated with increased arterial stiffness in Nephrology outpatients. PMID:25880081

Elewa, Usama; Fernandez-Fernandez, Beatriz; Alegre, Raquel; Sanchez-Niño, Maria D.; Mahillo-Fernández, Ignacio; Perez-Gomez, Maria Vanessa; El-Fishawy, Hussein; Belal, Dawlat; Ortiz, Alberto

2015-01-01

114

Simulation methods with extended stability for stiff biochemical Kinetics  

PubMed Central

Background With increasing computer power, simulating the dynamics of complex systems in chemistry and biology is becoming increasingly routine. The modelling of individual reactions in (bio)chemical systems involves a large number of random events that can be simulated by the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA). The key quantity is the step size, or waiting time, ?, whose value inversely depends on the size of the propensities of the different channel reactions and which needs to be re-evaluated after every firing event. Such a discrete event simulation may be extremely expensive, in particular for stiff systems where ? can be very short due to the fast kinetics of some of the channel reactions. Several alternative methods have been put forward to increase the integration step size. The so-called ?-leap approach takes a larger step size by allowing all the reactions to fire, from a Poisson or Binomial distribution, within that step. Although the expected value for the different species in the reactive system is maintained with respect to more precise methods, the variance at steady state can suffer from large errors as ? grows. Results In this paper we extend Poisson ?-leap methods to a general class of Runge-Kutta (RK) ?-leap methods. We show that with the proper selection of the coefficients, the variance of the extended ?-leap can be well-behaved, leading to significantly larger step sizes. Conclusions The benefit of adapting the extended method to the use of RK frameworks is clear in terms of speed of calculation, as the number of evaluations of the Poisson distribution is still one set per time step, as in the original ?-leap method. The approach paves the way to explore new multiscale methods to simulate (bio)chemical systems. PMID:20701766

2010-01-01

115

Elasticity of Stiff Biopolymer Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The elasticity of cells is governed by the cytoskeleton, a partially crosslinked network of relatively stiff filaments forming a several 100 nm thick shell called the actin cortex. While the statistical properties of single cytoskeletal filaments are by now relatively well understood [1], theoretical concepts for the elasticity of stiff polymer networks are still evolving. One major open question is to understand how stresses and strains are transmitted in such networks. As a idealized model system we study the elasticity of a two-dimensional random network of rigid rods ("Mikado model")[2]. The essential features incorporated into the model are the anisotropic elasticity of the rods and the random geometry of the network. We show that there are three distinct scaling regimes, characterized by two distinct length scales on the elastic backbone. In addition to a critical rigidiy percolation region and a homogeneously elastic regime we find a novel intermediate scaling regime, where the elasticity is dominated by bending deformations. We discuss the application of these results to F-Actin and microtubule networks. [1] L. Le Goff, O. Hallatschek, E. Frey, F. Amblard, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 258101 (2002). [2] J. Wilhelm, and E. Frey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 108103 (2003).

Wilhelm, Jan; Frey, Erwin

2004-03-01

116

Stiffness Simulation Using Non-linear FEA  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, Stamping-stiffness coupling simulation techniques are proposed, i.e., stamping, springback and stiffness is simulated with dynamic-explicit FE method, static-implicit FE method, and dynamic-explicit FE method continually. Carrying out process for three steps and some key technical factors are listed. The stiffness for double-curvature box parts is analyzed by this method.The simulation result is compared with experimental one, and satisfied calculation accuracy is obtained.

Xu, W.L.; Ai, J.; Lu, J.X.; Ying, B.H. [Baoshan Iron and Steel Co., LTD, R and D Center Customer Technology Research Center, Shanghai (China)

2005-08-05

117

Arterial Stiffness and ?-Amyloid Progression in Nondemented Elderly Adults  

PubMed Central

IMPORTANCE Recent studies show that cerebral ?-amyloid (A?) deposition is associated with blood pressure and measures of arterial stiffness in nondemented individuals. OBJECTIVE To examine the association between measures of arterial stiffness and change in A? deposition over time. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Deposition of A? was determined in a longitudinal observational study of aging by positron emission tomography using the Pittsburgh compound B twice 2 years apart in 81 nondemented individuals 83 years and older. Arterial stiffness was measured with a noninvasive and automated waveform analyzer at the time closest to the second positron emission tomography scan. All measures were performed under standardized conditions. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured in the central (carotid-femoral and heart-femoral PWV), peripheral (femoral-ankle PWV), and mixed (brachial-ankle PWV) vascular beds. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The change in A? deposition over 2 years was calculated from the 81 individuals with repeat A?-positron emission tomography. RESULTS The proportion of A?-positive individuals increased from 48% at baseline to 75% at follow-up. Brachial-ankle PWV was significantly higher among A?-positive participants at baseline and follow-up. Femoral-ankle PWV was only higher among A?-positive participants at follow-up. Measures of central stiffness and blood pressure were not associated with A? status at baseline or follow-up, but central stiffness was associated with a change in A? deposition over time. Each standard deviation increase in central stiffness (carotid-femoral PWV, P = .001; heart-femoral PWV, P = .004) was linked with increases in A? deposition over 2 years. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE This study showed that A? deposition increases with age in nondemented individuals and that arterial stiffness is strongly associated with the progressive deposition of A? in the brain, especially in this age group. The association between A? deposition changes over time and generalized arterial stiffness indicated a relationship between the severity of subclinical vascular disease and progressive cerebral A? deposition. PMID:24687165

Hughes, Timothy M.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma J. M.; McDade, Eric M.; Klunk, William E.; Cohen, Ann D.; Mathis, Chester A.; DeKosky, Steven T.; Price, Julie C.; Lopez, Oscar L.

2014-01-01

118

Dynamic coefficients of axial spline couplings in high-speed rotating machinery  

SciTech Connect

This paper provided the first opportunity to quantify the angular stiffness and equivalent viscous damping coefficients of an axial spline coupling used in high-speed turbomachinery. The bending moments and angular deflections transmitted across an axial spline coupling were measured while a nonrotating shaft was excited by an external shaker. A rotordynamics computer program was used to simulate the test conditions and to correlate the angular stiffness and damping coefficients. The effects of external force and frequency were also investigated. The angular stiffness and damping coefficients were used to perform a linear steady-state rotordynamics stability analysis, and the unstable natural frequency was calculated and compared to the experimental measurements.

Ku, C.P.R.; Walton, J.F. Jr. (Mechanical Technology Inc., Latham, NY (United States)); Lund, J.W. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Machine Elements)

1994-07-01

119

Finite element based nonlinear normalization of human lumbar intervertebral disc stiffness to account for its morphology.  

PubMed

Disc degeneration, usually associated with low back pain and changes of intervertebral stiffness, represents a major health issue. As the intervertebral disc (IVD) morphology influences its stiffness, the link between mechanical properties and degenerative grade is partially lost without an efficient normalization of the stiffness with respect to the morphology. Moreover, although the behavior of soft tissues is highly nonlinear, only linear normalization protocols have been defined so far for the disc stiffness. Thus, the aim of this work is to propose a nonlinear normalization based on finite elements (FE) simulations and evaluate its impact on the stiffness of human anatomical specimens of lumbar IVD. First, a parameter study involving simulations of biomechanical tests (compression, flexion/extension, bilateral torsion and bending) on 20 FE models of IVDs with various dimensions was carried out to evaluate the effect of the disc's geometry on its compliance and establish stiffness/morphology relations necessary to the nonlinear normalization. The computed stiffness was then normalized by height (H), cross-sectional area (CSA), polar moment of inertia (J) or moments of inertia (Ixx, Iyy) to quantify the effect of both linear and nonlinear normalizations. In the second part of the study, T1-weighted MRI images were acquired to determine H, CSA, J, Ixx and Iyy of 14 human lumbar IVDs. Based on the measured morphology and pre-established relation with stiffness, linear and nonlinear normalization routines were then applied to the compliance of the specimens for each quasi-static biomechanical test. The variability of the stiffness prior to and after normalization was assessed via coefficient of variation (CV). The FE study confirmed that larger and thinner IVDs were stiffer while the normalization strongly attenuated the effect of the disc geometry on its stiffness. Yet, notwithstanding the results of the FE study, the experimental stiffness showed consistently higher CV after normalization. Assuming that geometry and material properties affect the mechanical response, they can also compensate for one another. Therefore, the larger CV after normalization can be interpreted as a strong variability of the material properties, previously hidden by the geometry's own influence. In conclusion, a new normalization protocol for the intervertebral disc stiffness in compression, flexion, extension, bilateral torsion and bending was proposed, with the possible use of MRI and FE to acquire the discs' anatomy and determine the nonlinear relations between stiffness and morphology. Such protocol may be useful to relate the disc's mechanical properties to its degree of degeneration. PMID:24671515

Maquer, Ghislain; Laurent, Marc; Brandejsky, Vaclav; Pretterklieber, Michael L; Zysset, Philippe K

2014-06-01

120

Cerebellar ataxia impairs modulation of arm stiffness during postural maintenance  

PubMed Central

Impedance control enables humans to effectively interact with their environment during postural and movement tasks, adjusting the mechanical behavior of their limbs to account for instability. Previous work has shown that people are able to selectively modulate the end-point stiffness of their arms, adjusting for varying directions of environmental disturbances. Behavioral studies also suggest that separate controllers are used for impedance modulation versus joint torque coordination. Here we tested whether people with cerebellar damage have deficits in impedance control. It is known that these individuals have poor motor coordination, which has typically been attributed to deficits in joint torque control. Subjects performed a static postural maintenance task with two different types of directional force perturbations. On average, patients with cerebellar ataxia modified stiffness differentially for the two perturbation conditions, although significantly less than age-matched control subjects. Thus cerebellar damage may impair the ability to modulate arm impedance. Surprisingly, the patients' intact ability to generally alter their limb stiffness during the postural task (albeit less than age-matched control subjects) improved their movement performance in a subsequent tracing task. The transfer of stiffness control from the static to the movement task may be a strategy that can be used by patients to compensate for their motor deficits. PMID:23843434

Gibo, Tricia L.; Bastian, Amy J.

2013-01-01

121

Painlevé analysis, Lax pair, Bäcklund transformation and multi-soliton solutions for a generalized variable-coefficient KdV-mKdV equation in fluids and plasmas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, a variable-coefficient non-isospectral Korteweg-de Vries-modified Korteweg-de Vries equation arising in fluids and plasmas is investigated. The integrability of such an equation is studied with Painlevé analysis. Under the integrable condition obtained, the Lax pair is also established through the Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur procedure. The equation is transformed into its bilinear form by virtue of which the multi-soliton/breather solutions and Bäcklund transformation are derived. Soliton propagation, multi-soliton, soliton-breather and breather-breather interactions are studied: different types of solitary waves can be seen with the change of variable coefficients, the existence of compression or broadening depends on the sign of the non-uniformity coefficient, and during the soliton-breather interaction, the propagating direction of the breather is not influenced by the elevation (positive amplitude) or depression (negative amplitude) soliton.

Meng, Gao-Qing; Gao, Yi-Tian; Yu, Xin; Shen, Yu-Jia; Qin, Yi

2012-05-01

122

Mechanics and stiffness limitations of a variable stiffness actuator for use in prosthetic limbs  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines an actuation system, intended for use in a prosthetic arm, that mimics the ability of antagonistic muscles in biological systems to modulate the stiffness and position of a joint. The system uses two physical nonlinear springs arranged antagonistically about a joint to generate control of both stiffness and movement. To decouple the net joint stiffness from joint

C. E. English; D. Russell

1999-01-01

123

Arthroscopic Treatment of Stiff Elbow  

PubMed Central

Contracture of the elbow represents a disabling condition that can impair a person's quality of life. Regardless of the event that causes an elbow contracture, the conservative or surgical treatment is usually considered technically difficult and associated with complications. When the conservative treatment fails to restore an acceptable range of motion in the elbow, open techniques have been shown to be successful options. More recently the use of arthroscopy has become more popular for several reasons. These reasons include better visualization of intra-articular structures, less tissue trauma from open incisions, and potentially the ability to begin early postoperative motion. The purpose of this paper is to review the indications, complications, and results of arthroscopic management of a stiff elbow. PMID:22084755

Blonna, Davide; Bellato, Enrico; Marini, Eleonora; Scelsi, Michele; Castoldi, Filippo

2011-01-01

124

High Friction from a Stiff Polymer Using Microfiber Arrays C. Majidi,1,* R. E. Groff,1  

E-print Network

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA 4 Department material, but polypropylene's higher interfacial shear strength provides an effective friction coefficient friction [1]. Dry friction of stiff polymers (E 1 GPa) [2,3] and rubbers [1,4,5] on glass is a well

Fearing, Ron

125

Spectral stiff problems in domains surrounded by thin bands: Asymptotic and uniform estimates for eigenvalues  

Microsoft Academic Search

We consider an asymptotic spectral problem for a second order differential operator, with piecewise constants coefficients, in a two-dimensional domain ??. Here ?? is ??=??????, where ? is a fixed open bounded domain with boundary ?, ?? is a curvilinear strip of variable width O(?), and ?=?¯??¯?. The density and stiffness constants are of order O(??m?t) and O(??t) respectively in

D. Gómez; M. Lobo; S. A. Nazarov; E. Pérez

2006-01-01

126

Stiffness degradation induced by multilayer intralaminar cracking in composite laminates  

Microsoft Academic Search

A theoretical model for the prediction of the elastic properties of a general symmetric laminate containing multilayer matrix cracks is proposed. A five-layer equivalent constraint model (ECM) laminate [SL\\/?p\\/?q\\/?r\\/SR]s and seven others degenerated from such a model laminate by eliminating some of the sublaminates, [?p],[?r], SL and SR, are designed for the analyses of the degraded stiffnesses of the cracked

Junqian Zhang; K. P. Herrmann

1999-01-01

127

Nonlinear and tangent stiffness of imperfect beam columns  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A curved member under axial load is analyzed using beam column theory to determine nonlinear response and the tangent stiffness associated with small displacements from the nonlinear state. Such a result is suitable for incorporation into a general nonlinear analysis using a corotational coordinate system to describe the rigid body type motion of individual members. The method is applied to buckling problems. Several examples are given to show the accuracy of the method.

Anderson, M. S.

1982-01-01

128

Real Stiffness Augmentation for Haptic Augmented Reality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Haptic augmented reality (AR) mixes a real environment with computer-generated virtual haptic stimuli, enabling the system to modulate the haptic attributes of a real object to desired values. This paper reports our second study on this functionality, with stiffness as a goal modulation property. Our first study explored the potential of haptic AR by presenting an effective stiffness modulation system

Seokhee Jeon; Seungmoon Choi

2011-01-01

129

Modelling radiative mean absorption coefficients  

Microsoft Academic Search

We define and compute mean absorption coefficients for the macroscopic models of radiative transfer. These coefficients take into account the anisotropic form of the photon emission and lead to a better computation of a photonic flow far from the radiative equilibrium. They are deduced by averaging a specific radiative intensity on the space of frequency and are generalized versions of

J.-F. Ripoll; B. Dubroca; G. Duffa

2001-01-01

130

Reproducibility of liver stiffness measurements in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients in Egypt.  

PubMed

Elastometry has demonstrated good accuracy, but little is known about its reproducibility. The aim of this study was to assess the intra- and inter-operator reproducibility of liver stiffness measurement among hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients in Egypt. The study was conducted among HCV-infected patients referred for treatment evaluation in two hepatitis treatment centres of Cairo. Two operators took liver stiffness measurement two times per patient the same day. Intra- and inter-reproducibility were estimated by different methods: Bland and Altman graphics, variation coefficient, intraclass correlation coefficient and Kappa coefficient; 7.1?kPa was used as the threshold of significant (?F2) fibrosis whenever needed. Fifty-eight patients were included in the study, and 216 measurements were taken. Failure rate was 7% and associated with overweight. For a value of 7.1?kPa, the inter-operator 95% limits of agreement were estimated at ±2.88?kPa. Intra- and inter-operator coefficients of variation ranged between 11% and 15%, intraclass correlation coefficients [95% confidence interval] between 0.94 [0.86-0.97] and 0.97 [0.95-0.99], and Kappa coefficients between 0.65 [0.44-0.88] and 0.92 [0.81-1.00]. The reliability of liver stiffness measurement is questionable when considering the decision to initiate antiviral therapy because of the percentage of discordance between measurements is notable, especially in the intermediate fibrosis stages. PMID:21692948

Vignier, N; Esmat, G; Elsharkawy, A; Hassany, M; Bonnard, P; Delarocque-Astagneau, E; Said, M; Raafat, R; El-Hoseiny, M; Fontanet, A; Mohamed, M K; Vray, M

2011-07-01

131

Cervical Stiffness Evaluated In Vivo by Endoflip in Pregnant Women  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the stiffness of the pregnant uterine cervix in vivo. Method Five women in early pregnancy and six women in late pregnancy were included. The EndoFlip is a 1-m-long probe with a 12-cm-long bag mounted on the tip. The tip of the probe was inserted into the cervical canal. Sensors spaced at 0.5-cm intervals along the probe were used to determine 16 serial cross-sectional areas of the bag. The diameter of the cervical canal could thereby be determined during inflation with up to 50 ml saline solution. Tissue stiffness was calculated from the geometric profiles and the pressure-strain elastic modulus (EP) at each sensor site. Three parts of the cervix were defined: the uterus-near part, the middle and the vaginal part. The EPmax was defined as the highest EP detected along the cervical canal. Results The EPmax was always found in the middle part of the cervix. The median EPmax was 243 kPa (IQR, 67–422 kPa) for the early pregnant women and 5 kPa (IQR, 4–15 kPa) for those at term. In the early pregnant women the stiffness differed along the cervical length (p<0.05) whereas difference along the cervix was not found for late pregnant women. A positive correlation coefficient (Spearman’s rho) was established between the EPs of the uterus-near and the middle part (0.84), between the vaginal and the middle part (0.81), and between the uterus-near and the vaginal part (0.85). Conclusion This new method can estimate the stiffness along the cervical canal in vivo. This method may be useful in the clinical examination of the biomechanical properties of the uterine cervix. PMID:24603859

Hee, Lene; Liao, Donghua; Sandager, Puk; Gregersen, Hans; Uldbjerg, Niels

2014-01-01

132

Stiffness Control of Surgical Continuum Manipulators  

PubMed Central

This paper introduces the first stiffness controller for continuum robots. The control law is based on an accurate approximation of a continuum robot’s coupled kinematic and static force model. To implement a desired tip stiffness, the controller drives the actuators to positions corresponding to a deflected robot configuration that produces the required tip force for the measured tip position. This approach provides several important advantages. First, it enables the use of robot deflection sensing as a means to both sense and control tip forces. Second, it enables stiffness control to be implemented by modification of existing continuum robot position controllers. The proposed controller is demonstrated experimentally in the context of a concentric tube robot. Results show that the stiffness controller achieves the desired stiffness in steady state, provides good dynamic performance, and exhibits stability during contact transitions. PMID:24273466

Mahvash, Mohsen; Dupont, Pierre E.

2013-01-01

133

Rolling Element Bearing Stiffness Matrix Determination (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Current theoretical bearing models differ in their stiffness estimates because of different model assumptions. In this study, a finite element/contact mechanics model is developed for rolling element bearings with the focus of obtaining accurate bearing stiffness for a wide range of bearing types and parameters. A combined surface integral and finite element method is used to solve for the contact mechanics between the rolling elements and races. This model captures the time-dependent characteristics of the bearing contact due to the orbital motion of the rolling elements. A numerical method is developed to determine the full bearing stiffness matrix corresponding to two radial, one axial, and two angular coordinates; the rotation about the shaft axis is free by design. This proposed stiffness determination method is validated against experiments in the literature and compared to existing analytical models and widely used advanced computational methods. The fully-populated stiffness matrix demonstrates the coupling between bearing radial, axial, and tilting bearing deflections.

Guo, Y.; Parker, R.

2014-01-01

134

The Difference between Stiffness and Quasi-stiffness in the Context of Biomechanical Modeling  

PubMed Central

The ankle contributes the majority of mechanical power during walking and is a frequently studied joint in biomechanics. Specifically, researchers have extensively investigated the torque-angle relationship for the ankle during dynamic tasks, such as walking and running. The slope of this relationship has been termed the “quasi-stiffness.” However, over time, researchers have begun to interchange the concepts of quasi-stiffness and stiffness. This is an especially important distinction as researchers currently begin to investigate the appropriate control systems for recently developed powered prosthetic legs. The quasi-stiffness and stiffness are distinct concepts in the context of powered joints, and are equivalent in the context of passive joints. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the difference between the stiffness and quasi-stiffness using a simple impedance controlled inverted pendulum model and a more sophisticated biped walking model, each with the ability to modify the trajectory of an impedance controller’s equilibrium angle position. In both cases, stiffness values are specified by the controller and the quasi-stiffness are shown during a single step. Both models have widely varying quasi-stiffness but each have a single stiffness value. Therefore, from this simple modeling approach, the differences and similarities between these two concepts are elucidated. PMID:23212310

Rouse, Elliott J.; Gregg, Robert D.; Hargrove, Levi J.; Sensinger, Jonathon W.

2014-01-01

135

The difference between stiffness and quasi-stiffness in the context of biomechanical modeling.  

PubMed

The ankle contributes the majority of mechanical power during walking and is a frequently studied joint in biomechanics. Specifically, researchers have extensively investigated the torque-angle relationship for the ankle during dynamic tasks, such as walking and running. The slope of this relationship has been termed the "quasi-stiffness." However, over time, researchers have begun to interchange the concepts of quasi-stiffness and stiffness. This is an especially important distinction as researchers currently begin to investigate the appropriate control systems for recently developed powered prosthetic legs. The quasi-stiffness and stiffness are distinct concepts in the context of powered joints, and are equivalent in the context of passive joints. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the difference between the stiffness and quasi-stiffness using a simple impedance-controlled inverted pendulum model and a more sophisticated biped walking model, each with the ability to modify the trajectory of an impedance controller's equilibrium angle position. In both cases, stiffness values are specified by the controller and the quasi-stiffness are shown during a single step. Both models have widely varying quasi-stiffness but each have a single stiffness value. Therefore, from this simple modeling approach, the differences and similarities between these two concepts are elucidated. PMID:23212310

Rouse, Elliott J; Gregg, Robert D; Hargrove, Levi J; Sensinger, Jonathon W

2013-02-01

136

A novel approach to elasto-plastic finite element analysis of beam structures using the concept of incremental secant stiffness  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an incremental secant stiffness formulation for materially non-linear analysis of planar beam structures under monotonically increasing external loads. To describe the elasto-plastic behaviour of a typical beam member, a set of non-dimensional plasticity coefficients are introduced to progressively deteriorate the elastic stiffness properties over an incremental load history. The proposed method is developed to provide the accuracy

Y. Wen; Q. Y. Zeng

2010-01-01

137

Topology optimization under stochastic stiffness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Topology optimization is a systematic computational tool for optimizing the layout of materials within a domain for engineering design problems. It allows variation of structural boundaries and connectivities. This freedom in the design space often enables discovery of new, high performance designs. However, solutions obtained by performing the optimization in a deterministic setting may be impractical or suboptimal when considering real-world engineering conditions with inherent variabilities including (for example) variabilities in fabrication processes and operating conditions. The aim of this work is to provide a computational methodology for topology optimization in the presence of uncertainties associated with structural stiffness, such as uncertain material properties and/or structural geometry. Existing methods for topology optimization under deterministic conditions are first reviewed. Modifications are then proposed to improve the numerical performance of the so-called Heaviside Projection Method (HPM) in continuum domains. Next, two approaches, perturbation and Polynomial Chaos Expansion (PCE), are proposed to account for uncertainties in the optimization procedure. These approaches are intrusive, allowing tight and efficient coupling of the uncertainty quantification with the optimization sensitivity analysis. The work herein develops a robust topology optimization framework aimed at reducing the sensitivity of optimized solutions to uncertainties. The perturbation-based approach combines deterministic topology optimization with a perturbation method for the quantification of uncertainties. The use of perturbation transforms the problem of topology optimization under uncertainty to an augmented deterministic topology optimization problem. The PCE approach combines the spectral stochastic approach for the representation and propagation of uncertainties with an existing deterministic topology optimization technique. The resulting compact representations for the response quantities allow for efficient and accurate calculation of sensitivities of response statistics with respect to the design variables. The proposed methods are shown to be successful at generating robust optimal topologies. Examples from topology optimization in continuum and discrete domains (truss structures) under uncertainty are presented. It is also shown that proposed methods lead to significant computational savings when compared to Monte Carlo-based optimization which involve multiple formations and inversions of the global stiffness matrix and that results obtained from the proposed method are in excellent agreement with those obtained from a Monte Carlo-based optimization algorithm.

Asadpoure, Alireza

138

Measurements of leakage, power loss and rotordynamic force coefficients in a hybrid brush seal  

E-print Network

shoedbrush seal. The HBS predicted effective clearance (~50 ?m) is a small fraction of that in an equivalent one-tooth labyrinth seal. Identified HBS direct stiffness coefficients decrease (~15%) as function of rotor speed for an increasing supply pressure...

Baker, Jose Enrique

2009-05-15

139

Identification of force coefficients in flexible rotor-bearing systems - enhancements and further validations  

E-print Network

identification of bearing force parameters, i.e. stiffness and damping coefficients, is one of the most difficult to achieve. Field identification by imbalance response measurements is a simple and often reliable way to determine synchronous speed force...

Balantrapu, Achuta Kishore Rama Krishna

2005-11-01

140

Identification of dynamic force coefficients of a labyrinth and gas damper seal using impact load excitations  

E-print Network

Experiments to identify stiffness and damping force coefficients of a two bladed teeth-on-stator labyrinth seal and a gas damper seal, both of diverging clearance, are presented. Calibrated impact guns excite a housing holding the test seal...

Ransom, David Lawrence

1997-01-01

141

Measuring the Characteristic Topography of Brain Stiffness with Magnetic Resonance Elastography  

PubMed Central

Purpose To develop a reliable magnetic resonance elastography (MRE)-based method for measuring regional brain stiffness. Methods First, simulation studies were used to demonstrate how stiffness measurements can be biased by changes in brain morphometry, such as those due to atrophy. Adaptive postprocessing methods were created that significantly reduce the spatial extent of edge artifacts and eliminate atrophy-related bias. Second, a pipeline for regional brain stiffness measurement was developed and evaluated for test-retest reliability in 10 healthy control subjects. Results This technique indicates high test-retest repeatability with a typical coefficient of variation of less than 1% for global brain stiffness and less than 2% for the lobes of the brain and the cerebellum. Furthermore, this study reveals that the brain possesses a characteristic topography of mechanical properties, and also that lobar stiffness measurements tend to correlate with one another within an individual. Conclusion The methods presented in this work are resistant to noise- and edge-related biases that are common in the field of brain MRE, demonstrate high test-retest reliability, and provide independent regional stiffness measurements. This pipeline will allow future investigations to measure changes to the brain’s mechanical properties and how they relate to the characteristic topographies that are typical of many neurologic diseases. PMID:24312570

Murphy, Matthew C.; Huston, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Glaser, Kevin J.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Chen, Jun; Manduca, Armando; Felmlee, Joel P.; Ehman, Richard L.

2013-01-01

142

High performance composites with active stiffness control.  

PubMed

High performance carbon fiber reinforced composites with controllable stiffness could revolutionize the use of composite materials in structural applications. Here we describe a structural material, which has a stiffness that can be actively controlled on demand. Such a material could have applications in morphing wings or deployable structures. A carbon fiber reinforced-epoxy composite is described that can undergo an 88% reduction in flexural stiffness at elevated temperatures and fully recover when cooled, with no discernible damage or loss in properties. Once the stiffness has been reduced, the required deformations can be achieved at much lower actuation forces. For this proof-of-concept study a thin polyacrylamide (PAAm) layer was electrocoated onto carbon fibers that were then embedded into an epoxy matrix via resin infusion. Heating the PAAm coating above its glass transition temperature caused it to soften and allowed the fibers to slide within the matrix. To produce the stiffness change the carbon fibers were used as resistance heating elements by passing a current through them. When the PAAm coating had softened, the ability of the interphase to transfer load to the fibers was significantly reduced, greatly lowering the flexural stiffness of the composite. By changing the moisture content in PAAm fiber coating, the temperature at which the PAAm softens and the composites undergo a reduction in stiffness can be tuned. PMID:23978266

Tridech, Charnwit; Maples, Henry A; Robinson, Paul; Bismarck, Alexander

2013-09-25

143

Model-based estimation of knee stiffness.  

PubMed

During natural locomotion, the stiffness of the human knee is modulated continuously and subconsciously according to the demands of activity and terrain. Given modern actuator technology, powered transfemoral prostheses could theoretically provide a similar degree of sophistication and function. However, experimentally quantifying knee stiffness modulation during natural gait is challenging. Alternatively, joint stiffness could be estimated in a less disruptive manner using electromyography (EMG) combined with kinetic and kinematic measurements to estimate muscle force, together with models that relate muscle force to stiffness. Here we present the first step in that process, where we develop such an approach and evaluate it in isometric conditions, where experimental measurements are more feasible. Our EMG-guided modeling approach allows us to consider conditions with antagonistic muscle activation, a phenomenon commonly observed in physiological gait. Our validation shows that model-based estimates of knee joint stiffness coincide well with experimental data obtained using conventional perturbation techniques. We conclude that knee stiffness can be accurately estimated in isometric conditions without applying perturbations, which presents an important step toward our ultimate goal of quantifying knee stiffness during gait. PMID:22801482

Pfeifer, Serge; Vallery, Heike; Hardegger, Michael; Riener, Robert; Perreault, Eric J

2012-09-01

144

Stiff Coatings on Compliant Biofibers  

PubMed Central

For lasting holdfast attachment, the mussel Mytilus californianus coats its byssal threads with a protective cuticle 2-5 ?m thick that is 4-6 times stiffer than the underlying collagen fibers. Although cuticle hardness (0.1 GPa) and stiffness (2 GPa) resemble those observed in related mussels, a more effective dispersion of microdamage enables M. californianus byssal threads to sustain strains to almost 120% before cuticle rupture occurs. Underlying factors for the superior damage tolerance of the byssal cuticle were explored in its microarchitecture and in the cuticular protein, mcfp-1. Cuticle microstructure was distinctly granular, with granule diameters (?200 nm) only a quarter of those in M. galloprovincialis cuticle, for example. Compared with homologous proteins in related mussel species, mcfp-1 from M. californianus had a similar mass (?92 kDa) and number of tandemly repeated decapeptides, and contained the same post-translational modifications, namely, trans-4-hydroxyproline, trans-2,3-cis-3,4-dihydroxyproline, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa). The prominence of isoleucine in mcfp-1, however, distinguished it from homologues in other species. The complete protein sequence deduced from cDNAs for two related variants revealed a highly conserved consensus decapeptide PKISYPPTYK that is repeated 64 times and differs slightly from the consensus peptide (AKPSYPPTYK) of both M. galloprovincialis and M. edulis proteins. PMID:19220048

Holten-Andersen, Niels; Zhao, Hua; Waite, J. Herbert

2009-01-01

145

Tectorial membrane. II: Stiffness measurements in vivo.  

PubMed

The tectorial membrane is assumed to play a crucial role in the stimulation of the cochlear hair cells and was thought for decades to serve as a stiff anchor for the tips of the hair-cell stereocilia, particularly those belonging to the OHCs. Yet, its stiffness has never been measured under conditions approximating its normal environment in live animals. We have developed a method for doing this. The tectorial membrane is approached through the lateral wall of scala media. The bony cochlear capsule is removed along scala media over somewhat less than 1/4 turn, and the underlying spiral ligament and stria vascularis are carefully reflected. With the help of a three axial hydraulic manipulator, a flexible micropipette filled with isotonic KCl is inserted into the tectorial membrane at one of two different angles and moved either transversally, away from the basilar membrane, or radially, toward or away from the modiolus. This causes the tectorial membrane to be deformed and the micropipette to bend. The micropipette stiffness is calibrated on an instrument of a new kind, so as to convert the bend into force. The calibration allows us to determine the point stiffness of the tectorial membrane from the amount of micropipette bend. The stiffness of the tectorial membrane per unit length has been calculated from the point stiffness with the help of the deformation pattern. Transversal and radial stiffness magnitudes have been determined in the second cochlear turn in Mongolian gerbils. Both are smaller by almost an order of magnitude than the corresponding aggregate stiffness of the OHC stereocilia. As a consequence, the tectorial membrane cannot act as a stiff anchor for the stereocilia but only as a mass load, except at relatively low sound frequencies where mass effects are negligible. This means that the classical model of shear motion between the tectorial membrane and the reticular lamina must be replaced. PMID:2606804

Zwislocki, J J; Cefaratti, L K

1989-11-01

146

Bounding the Bogoliubov coefficients  

SciTech Connect

While over the last century or more considerable effort has been put into the problem of finding approximate solutions for wave equations in general, and quantum mechanical problems in particular, it appears that as yet relatively little work seems to have been put into the complementary problem of establishing rigourous bounds on the exact solutions. We have in mind either bounds on parametric amplification and the related quantum phenomenon of particle production (as encoded in the Bogoliubov coefficients), or bounds on transmission and reflection coefficients. Modifying and streamlining an approach developed by one of the present authors [M. Visser, Phys. Rev. A 59 (1999) 427-438, (arXiv:quant-ph/9901030)], we investigate this question by developing a formal but exact solution for the appropriate second-order linear ODE in terms of a time-ordered exponential of 2x2 matrices, then relating the Bogoliubov coefficients to certain invariants of this matrix. By bounding the matrix in an appropriate manner, we can thereby bound the Bogoliubov coefficients.

Boonserm, Petarpa [School of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington (New Zealand); Visser, Matt [School of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington (New Zealand)], E-mail: matt.visser@mcs.vuw.ac.nz

2008-11-15

147

Stiffness and Confinement Ratios of SMA Wire Jackets for Confining Concrete  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article discusses the effects of the stiffness and confinement ratios of shape memory alloy (SMA) wire jackets on the behavior of confined concrete. SMA wire jackets are an effective confining material to improve concrete behavior; for example, by increasing peak strength and failure strain. The stiffness and confinement ratios of fiber-reinforced polymer jackets have been extensively discussed and their effects are well known. However, assessment of the stiffness and confinement ratios of SMA wire jackets has not previously been conducted. In this study, we investigate the effects of the stiffness and confinement ratios of steel jackets, and then compare the results with those of SMA wire jackets. In general, the stiffness ratios of SMA wire jackets are relatively smaller than those of steel jackets, and most of them have lower stiffness ratios because the Young's moduli of the SMAs are relatively small. The active confining pressure of the SMA wires does not improve the lower stiffness-ratio effect since the amount of active confining pressure is not sufficiently large.

Choi, Eunsoo; Kim, Dong Joo; Youn, Heejung

2014-07-01

148

Study of a piecewise linear dynamic system with negative and positive stiffness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The present paper mainly focuses on numerical and analytical study of a piecewise linear dynamic oscillator with negative stiffness followed by positive stiffness which has not been studied to date. The dynamic system of interest stems from a previous analytical and experimental research on adaptive negative stiffness for the purpose of seismic protection. Numerical algorithms meant specifically for simulating piecewise smooth (PWS) systems like this nonlinear system are studied. An appropriate combination of negative stiffness and adequate damping can reduce the peak restoring or transmitted force with a slightly larger peak displacement. Essentially, the negative stiffness system in a dynamic system is very beneficial in reducing the amount of force transmitted. The exact solution is derived for free vibration. A modified Lindstedt-Poincaré method (modified L-P method) is adopted to derive approximate periodic solutions for the forced and damped system and its frequency-response curves are obtained through numerical simulation. The modified L-P solution obtained for the forced and damped case is found to agree well with the numerical results. In the piecewise linear dynamic system with initial negative stiffness followed by positive stiffness, it is found that the response remains bounded in a limit cycle. This system behaves similar to a van der Pol oscillator wherein negative damping is followed by positive damping. Presented herein is a special case as defined by the specified parameter ranges; thus, to make it more general future work is needed.

Zou, Keguan; Nagarajaiah, Satish

2015-05-01

149

A Novel Computational Model for Tilting Pad Journal Bearings with Soft Pivot Stiffnesses  

E-print Network

(Z) and constructed K-??M curves?????????????. 45 Figure 18 Imaginary part of TPJB impedance coefficients, Im(Z), versus excitation frequency. Rotor speed ?=6,000 rpm and specific load (W/LD) =1,376 kPa. Pivot stiffness Kpiv=443 MN.../m. Pad inlet thermal mixing coefficient ?=0.5. Measurements in Ref. [13], predicted Re(Z) and constructed C??curves?????????????????.. 46 Figure 19 Imaginary part of TPJB impedance coefficients, Im(Z), versus excitation frequency. Rotor...

Tao, Yujiao 1988-

2012-12-10

150

Programmable variable stiffness 2D surface design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Variable stiffness features can contribute to many engineering applications ranging from robotic joints to shock and vibration mitigation. In addition, variable stiffness can be used in the tactile feedback to provide the sense of touch to the user. A key component in the proposed device is the Biased Magnetorheological Elastomer (B-MRE) where iron particles within the elastomer compound develop a dipole interaction energy. A novel feature of this device is to introduce a field induced shear modulus bias via a permanent magnet which provides an offset with a current input to the electromagnetic control coil to change the compliance or modulus of a base elastomer in both directions (softer or harder). The B-MRE units can lead to the design of a variable stiffness surface. In this preliminary work, both computational and experimental results of the B-MRE are presented along with a preliminary design of the programmable variable stiffness surface design.

Trabia, Sarah; Hwang, Taeseon; Yim, Woosoon

2014-03-01

151

49 CFR 213.359 - Track stiffness.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...STANDARDS Train Operations at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.359 Track stiffness...generated at maximum permissible train speeds, cant deficiencies and surface...generated at maximum permissible train speeds, cant deficiencies and lateral...

2010-10-01

152

External mechanical compression reduces regional arterial stiffness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acute aerobic and resistance exercise has been shown to reduce local muscular artery stiffness in the exercised limb while\\u000a having no effect on the non-exercised limb. The stimulus for these modulations may be related to local muscular compression\\u000a of underlying vasculature. The purpose of this study was to examine arterial stiffness before and after a series of locally\\u000a applied external

Kevin S. Heffernan; David G. Edwards; Lindy Rossow; Sae Young Jae; Bo Fernhall

2007-01-01

153

Exercise, Vascular Stiffness, and Tissue Transglutaminase  

PubMed Central

Background Vascular aging is closely associated with increased vascular stiffness. It has recently been demonstrated that decreased nitric oxide (NO)?induced S?nitrosylation of tissue transglutaminase (TG2) contributes to age?related vascular stiffness. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that exercise restores NO signaling and attenuates vascular stiffness by decreasing TG2 activity and cross?linking in an aging rat model. Methods and Results Rats were subjected to 12 weeks of moderate aerobic exercise. Aging was associated with diminished phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase and phosphorylated vasodilator?stimulated phosphoprotein abundance, suggesting reduced NO signaling. TG2 cross?linking activity was significantly increased in old animals, whereas TG2 abundance remained unchanged. These alterations were attenuated in the exercise cohort. Simultaneous measurement of blood pressure and pulse wave velocity (PWV) demonstrated increased aortic stiffness in old rats, compared to young, at all values of mean arterial pressure (MAP). The PWV?MAP correlation in the old sedentary and old exercise cohorts was similar. Tensile testing of the vessels showed increased stiffness of the aorta in the old phenotype with a modest restoration of mechanical properties toward the young phenotype with exercise. Conclusions Increased vascular stiffness during aging is associated with decreased TG2 S?nitrosylation, increased TG2 cross?linking activity, and increased vascular stiffness likely the result of decreased NO bioavailability. In this study, a brief period of moderate aerobic exercise enhanced NO signaling, attenuated TG cross?linking activity, and reduced ex vivo tensile properties, but failed to reverse functional vascular stiffness in vivo, as measured by PWV. PMID:24721796

Steppan, Jochen; Sikka, Gautam; Jandu, Simran; Barodka, Viachaslau; Halushka, Marc K.; Flavahan, Nicholas A.; Belkin, Alexey M.; Nyhan, Daniel; Butlin, Mark; Avolio, Alberto; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Santhanam, Lakshmi

2014-01-01

154

Stiff limb syndrome: a case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Stiff limb syndrome is a clinical feature of the stiff person syndrome, which is a rare and disabling neurologic disorder characterized by muscle rigidity and episodic spasms that involve axial and limb musculature. It is an autoimmune disorder resulting in a malfunction of aminobutyric acid mediated inhibitory networks in the central nervous system. We describe a patient diagnosed by neurological symptoms of stiff limb syndrome with a good outcome after treatment, and a review of the related literature. Case presentation A 49-year-old male patient presented with a progressive stiffness and painful spasms of his both legs resulting in a difficulty of standing up and walking. The diagnosis of stiff limb syndrome was supported by the dramatically positive response to treatment using diazepam 25 mg/day and baclofen 30 mg/day. Conclusion This clinical case highlights the importance of a therapeutic test to confirm the diagnosis of stiff limb syndrome especially when there is a high clinical suspicion with unremarkable electromyography PMID:20205913

2010-01-01

155

Design of a variable-stiffness robotic hand using pneumatic soft rubber actuators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years, Japanese society has been ageing, engendering a labor shortage of young workers. Robots are therefore expected to be useful in performing tasks such as day-to-day support for elderly people. In particular, robots that are intended for use in the field of medical care and welfare are expected to be safe when operating in a human environment because they often come into contact with people. Furthermore, robots must perform various tasks such as regrasping, grasping of soft objects, and tasks using frictional force. Given these demands and circumstances, a tendon-driven robot hand with a stiffness changing finger has been developed. The finger surface stiffness can be altered by adjusting the input pressure depending on the task. Additionally, the coefficient of static friction can be altered by changing the surface stiffness merely by adjusting the input air pressure. This report describes the basic structure, driving mechanism, and basic properties of the proposed robot hand.

Nagase, Jun-ya; Wakimoto, Shuichi; Satoh, Toshiyuki; Saga, Norihiko; Suzumori, Koichi

2011-10-01

156

Thermal sensitivity of elastic coefficients of langasite and langatate.  

PubMed

Thermal coefficients of elastic constants of langasite and langatate crystals have been determined from frequency-temperature curves of contoured resonators operating in thickness modes. The effect of the trapping of the vibration has been taken into account to improve the accuracy. In a first step, the thermal sensitivities of stiffness coefficients in Lagrangian description are obtained. Thermal sensitivities of the usual elastic constants are further deduced. Predictions of thermally compensated cuts are given. PMID:19942496

Bourquin, Roger; Dulmet, Bernard

2009-10-01

157

Effects of acute eccentric contractions on rat ankle joint stiffness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sensation of joint stiffness is frequently observed after eccentric contractions (ECs) in human, but the joint stiffness of animals after ECs has not been examined previously. This study tested whether a bout of ECs affects rat ankle joint stiffness. We also evaluate muscle passive tension in the rat hindlimb to ex- amine the relationships of ankle joint stiffness with

Ochi Eisuke; Ishii Naokata; Nakazato Koichi

2007-01-01

158

Recombination coefficients for iron ions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Radiative recombination coefficients for all Fe ions are calculated by use of the Milne relation of detailed balance. Analytic fits are made to the dielectronic recombination rates computed by Jacobs (1977) and the Burgess general formula (1965). Higher level rates are treated hydrogenically by a quantum defect method based on the energies of the levels. Recombination coefficients for Fe I to Fe 26 are listed.

Woods, D. T.; Shull, J. M.; Sarazin, C. L.

1981-01-01

159

A parameter optimization method to determine ski stiffness properties from ski deformation data.  

PubMed

The deformation of skis and the contact pressure between skis and snow are crucial factors for carved turns in alpine skiing. The purpose of the current study was to develop and to evaluate an optimization method to determine the bending and torsional stiffness that lead to a given bending and torsional deflection of the ski. Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and classical torsion theory were applied to model the deformation of the ski. Bending and torsional stiffness were approximated as linear combinations of B-splines. To compute the unknown coefficients, a parameter optimization problem was formulated and successfully solved by multiple shooting and least squares data fitting. The proposed optimization method was evaluated based on ski stiffness data and ski deformation data taken from a recently published simulation study. The ski deformation data were used as input data to the optimization method. The optimization method was capable of successfully reproducing the shape of the original bending and torsional stiffness data of the ski with a root mean square error below 1 N m2. In conclusion, the proposed computational method offers the possibility to calculate ski stiffness properties with respect to a given ski deformation. PMID:21451186

Heinrich, Dieter; Mössner, Martin; Kaps, Peter; Nachbauer, Werner

2011-02-01

160

Ultrasonic measurements of stiffness in thermal-mechanically fatigued IM7/5260 composites  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, ultrasonic methods have been developed that can measure the mechanical stiffness of composites. The Lamb wave velocity is directly related to the material parameters, so an effective method exists to ascertain the stiffness of composites by measuring the velocity of these waves. In this study, a Lamb wave measurement system was used to measure the bending and out-of-plane stiffness coefficients of thermoset composite laminates undergoing thermal-mechanical loading. A series of 16 ply and 32 ply composite laminates were subjected to thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) in load frames equipped with special environmental chambers. The composite system studied was a graphite fiber-reinforced bismaleimide thermoset, IM7/5260. The samples were subjected to both high and low temperature profiles as well as high-strain and low-strain profiles. The bending and out-of-plane stiffnesses for composite samples that have undergone over 6,000 cycles of combined thermal and mechanical fatigue are reported. The Lamb wave generated elastic stiffness results have shown decreases of up to 64% at 4,706 cycles for samples subjected to TMF at high temperatures and less than a 10% decrease at over 6,000 cycles for samples subjected to TMF at low temperatures.

Seale, M.D.; Madaras, E.I. (NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States))

1999-08-01

161

Structural stiffness of the Hoffmann simple anterior tibial external fixation frame.  

PubMed

Tibial external fixation frames were constructed on aluminum tube simulating tibia bone. A 20-mm gap was left at the fracture site in order to measure the structural stiffness of the frame rather than the aluminum tube. The performance of the frames were experimentally evaluated and quantified using tests which simulated the loading conditions encountered in normal walking. These included axial compression, anteroposterior (AP) bending, lateral bending and torsional loading of the frame. The parameters studied were (a) number of fixation pins, (b) number of connecting rods and (c) location of clamps on the pins. Four constants were evaluated from these tests using various structural configurations of the frames; these resulted in four stiffness coefficients in compression, AP bending, lateral bending and torsion. Stiffnesses of various frames with different geometric configurations were compared by comparing their appropriate stiffness coefficients. Such comparison can set forth a quantitative guideline in selecting a suitable frame configuration for the type of injury and condition of fracture pattern. This type of quantitative analysis can also be useful in modifying the frame during the postoperative bone healing process. PMID:2729681

Vossoughi, J; Youm, Y; Bosse, M; Burgess, A R; Poka, A

1989-01-01

162

Stiffness and strength of hierarchical polycrystalline materials with imperfect interfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study we investigate the effect of imperfect (not perfectly bonded) interfaces on the stiffness and strength of hierarchical polycrystalline materials. As a case study we consider a honeycomb cellular polycrystal used for drilling and cutting tools. The conclusions of the analysis are, however, general and applicable to any material with structural hierarchy. Regarding the stiffness, generalized expressions for the Voigt and Reuss estimates of the bounds to the effective elastic modulus of heterogeneous materials are derived. The generalizations regard two aspects that are not included in the standard Reuss and Voigt estimates. The first novelty consists in considering finite thickness interfaces between the constituents undergoing damage up to final debonding. The second generalization consists of interfaces not perpendicular or parallel to the loading direction, i.e., when isostress or isostrain conditions are not satisfied. In this case, approximate expressions for the effective elastic modulus are obtained by performing a computational homogenization approach. In the second part of the paper, the homogenized response of a representative volume element (RVE) of the honeycomb cellular polycrystalline material with one or two levels of hierarchy is numerically investigated. This is put forward by using the cohesive zone model (CZM) for finite thickness interfaces recently proposed by the authors and implemented in the finite element program FEAP. From tensile tests we find that the interface nonlinearity significantly contributes to the deformability of the material. Increasing the number of hierarchical levels, the deformability increases. The RVE is tested in two different directions and, due to different orientations of the interfaces and Mixed Mode deformation, anisotropy in stiffness and strength is observed. Stiffness anisotropy is amplified by increasing the number of hierarchical levels. Finally, the interaction between interfaces at different hierarchical levels is numerically characterized. A condition for scale separation, which corresponds to the independence of the material tensile strength from the properties of the interfaces in the second level, is established. When this condition is fulfilled, the material microstructure at the second level can be efficiently replaced by an effective homogeneous continuum with a homogenized stress-strain response. From the engineering point of view, the proposed criterion of scale separation suggests how to design the optimal microstructure of a hierarchical level to maximize the material tensile strength. An interpretation of this phenomenon according to the concept of flaw tolerance is finally presented.

Paggi, Marco; Wriggers, Peter

2012-04-01

163

A novel magnetorheological elastomer isolator with negative changing stiffness for vibration reduction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magneto-rheological elastomers (MREs) have attracted notable credits in the development of smart isolators and absorbers due to their controllable stiffness and damping properties. For the purpose of mitigating unwanted structural and/or machinery vibrations, the traditional MRE-based isolators have been generally proven effective because the MR effect can increase the stiffness when the magnetic field is strengthened. This study presents a novel MRE isolator that experienced reduced stiffness when the applied current was increased. This innovative work was accomplished by applying a hybrid magnet (electromagnet and permanent magnets) onto a multilayered MRE structure. To characterise this negative changing stiffness concept, a multilayered MRE isolator with a hybrid magnet was first designed, fabricated and then tested to measure its properties. An obvious reduction of the effective stiffness and natural frequency of the proposed MRE isolator occurred when the current was continuously adjusted. This device could also work as a conventional MRE isolator as its effective stiffness and natural frequency also increased when a negative current was applied. Further testing was carried out on a one-degree-of-freedom system to assess how effectively this device could isolate vibration. In this experiment, two cases were considered; in each case, the vibration of the primary system was obviously attenuated under ON-OFF control logic, thus demonstrating the feasibility of this novel design as an alternative adaptive vibration isolator.

Yang, J.; Sun, S. S.; Du, H.; Li, W. H.; Alici, G.; Deng, H. X.

2014-10-01

164

Nanoscale directional motion towards regions of stiffness.  

PubMed

How to induce nanoscale directional motion via some intrinsic mechanisms pertaining to a nanosystem remains a challenge in nanotechnology. Here we show via molecular dynamics simulations that there exists a fundamental driving force for a nanoscale object to move from a region of lower stiffness toward one of higher stiffness on a substrate. Such nanoscale directional motion is induced by the difference in effective van der Waals potential energy due to the variation in stiffness of the substrate; i.e., all other conditions being equal, a nanoscale object on a stiffer substrate has lower van der Waals potential energy. This fundamental law of nanoscale directional motion could lead to promising routes for nanoscale actuation and energy conversion. PMID:25615480

Chang, Tienchong; Zhang, Hongwei; Guo, Zhengrong; Guo, Xingming; Gao, Huajian

2015-01-01

165

Running with a load increases leg stiffness.  

PubMed

Spring-mass models have been used to characterize running mechanics and leg stiffness in a variety of conditions, yet it remains unknown how running while carrying a load affects running mechanics and leg stiffness. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that running with a load increases leg stiffness. Twenty-seven subjects ran at a constant speed on a force-measuring treadmill while carrying no load, and while wearing weight vests loaded with 10%, 20%, and 30% of body weight. We measured lower extremity motion and created a scaled musculoskeletal model of each subject, which we used to estimate lower extremity joint angles and leg length. We estimated dimensionless leg stiffness as the ratio of the peak vertical ground reaction force (normalized to body weight) and the change in stance phase leg length (normalized to leg length at initial foot contact). Leg length was calculated as the distance from the center of the pelvis to the center-of-pressure under the foot. We found that dimensionless leg stiffness increased when running with load (p=0.001); this resulted from an increase in the peak vertical ground reaction force (p<0.001) and a smaller change in stance phase leg length (p=0.025). When running with load, subjects had longer ground contact times (p<0.020), greater hip (p<0.001) and knee flexion (p=0.048) at the time of initial foot contact, and greater peak stance phase hip, knee, and ankle flexion (p<0.05). Our results reveal that subjects run in a more crouched posture and with higher leg stiffness to accommodate an added load. PMID:25728581

Silder, Amy; Besier, Thor; Delp, Scott L

2015-04-13

166

Arterial stiffness, pulse pressure, and the kidney.  

PubMed

Classical studies indicate that the contribution of kidneys to hypertension is almost exclusively related to the association between mean arterial pressure (MAP) and vascular resistance. Recent reports including estimates of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) have shown that pulse pressure (PP) and pulse wave velocity, 2 major indices of arterial stiffness, now emerge as significant predictors of cardiovascular risk and age-associated decline in GFR. Such findings are mainly observed in patients with hypertension and renal failure and in atherosclerotic subjects undergoing coronary angiography. In such patients, amplification of PP between ascending and terminal aorta at the renal site is constantly increased over 10mm Hg (P < 0.001), whereas MAP level remains continuously unmodified. This PP amplification is significantly associated with presence of proteinuria. Furthermore, increases in plasma creatinine and aortic stiffness are independently and positively correlated (P < 0.001) both in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. All these relationships associating PP, arterial stiffness, and renal function are mainly observed in patients 60 years of age or older. Furthermore, in renal transplant patients and their donors, subjects have been recruited for evaluations of arterial stiffness and posttransplant decline in GFR. Determinants of GFR decline were evaluated 1 and 9 years after transplantation. The first year GFR decline was related to smoking and acute rejection, whereas the later was significantly and exclusively associated with donor age and aortic stiffness. Thus, in hypertensive humans, the observed association between PP and GFR suggests that the 2 parameters are substantially mediated by arterial stiffness, not exclusively by vascular resistance. PMID:25480804

Safar, Michel E; Plante, Gérard E; Mimran, Albert

2015-05-01

167

Elastic Stiffness of a Skyrmion Crystal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We observe the elastic stiffness and ultrasonic absorption of a Skyrmion crystal in the chiral-lattice magnet MnSi. The Skyrmion crystal lattice exhibits a stiffness 3 orders of magnitude smaller than that of the atomic lattice of MnSi, being as soft as the flux line lattice in type-II superconductors. The observed anisotropic elastic responses are consistent with the cylindrical shape of the Skyrmion spin texture. Phenomenological analysis reveals that the spin-orbit coupling is responsible for the emergence of anisotropic elasticity in the Skyrmion lattice.

Nii, Y.; Kikkawa, A.; Taguchi, Y.; Tokura, Y.; Iwasa, Y.

2014-12-01

168

Theoretical elastic stiffness, structure stability and thermal conductivity of La 2Zr 2O 7 pyrochlore  

Microsoft Academic Search

Elastic stiffness and electronic structure of La2Zr2O7 were calculated by means of the first-principles pseudopotential total energy method. The equation of state (EOS), elastic parameters (including the full set of second-order elastic coefficients, bulk modulus and Young’s modulus) and elastic anisotropy were reported. Furthermore, pressure dependence of crystal structure, electronic structure, and bond strengths were investigated. It is found that,

B. Liu; J. Y. Wang; Y. C. Zhou; T. Liao; F. Z. Li

2007-01-01

169

Arterial stiffness is inversely associated with a better running record in a full course marathon race  

PubMed Central

[Purpose] Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk and may contribute to reduced running capacity in humans. This study investigated the relationship between course record and arterial stiffness in marathoners who participated in the Seoul International Marathon in 2012. [Methods] A total of 30 amateur marathoners (Males n = 28, Females n = 2, mean age = 51.6 ± 8.3 years) were assessed before and after the marathon race. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV) was assessed by VP-1000 plus (Omron Healthcare Co., Ltd., Kyoto, Japan) before and immediately after the marathon race. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to determine the relationship between race record and ba-PWV. In addition, Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to determine the difference in ba-PWV between before and after the race. [Results] There was no significant change in the ba-PWV of marathoners before and after the race (1271.1 ± 185 vs. 1268.8 ± 200 cm/s, P=0.579). Both the full course record (Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.416, P = 0.022) and the record of half line (Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.482, P = 0.007) were positively related with the difference in ba-PWV, suggesting that reduced arterial stiffness is associated with a better running record in the marathon. [Conclusion] These results may suggest that good vascular function contributes to a better running record in the marathon race. PMID:25671202

Jung, Su-Jeen; Park, Jae-Hyoung; Lee, Sewon

2014-01-01

170

Influence of String Stiffness on Piano Tone  

E-print Network

Piano tones vary according to how pianist touches the keys. Many possible factors contribute to the relations between piano touch and tone. Focusing on the stiffness of string, we establish a model for vibration of a real piano string and derive a semi-analytical solution to the vibration equation.

Lai-Mei Nie

2010-12-02

171

Elastin in large artery stiffness and hypertension  

PubMed Central

Large artery stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), is correlated with high blood pressure and may be a causative factor in essential hypertension. The extracellular matrix components, specifically the mix of elastin and collagen in the vessel wall, determine the passive mechanical properties of the large arteries. Elastin is organized into elastic fibers in the wall during arterial development in a complex process that requires spatial and temporal coordination of numerous proteins. The elastic fibers last the lifetime of the organism, but are subject to proteolytic degradation and chemical alterations that change their mechanical properties. This review discusses how alterations in the amount, assembly, organization or chemical properties of the elastic fibers affect arterial stiffness and blood pressure. Strategies for encouraging or reversing alterations to the elastic fibers are addressed. Methods for determining the efficacy of these strategies, by measuring elastin amounts and arterial stiffness, are summarized. Therapies that have a direct effect on arterial stiffness through alterations to the elastic fibers in the wall may be an effective treatment for essential hypertension. PMID:22290157

Wagenseil, Jessica E.; Mecham, Robert P.

2012-01-01

172

Mandibular stiffness in humans: Numerical predictions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The chin is a feature unique to humans. This study evaluates the effect of mandibular symphyseal design on biomechanical masticatory effectiveness as determined by structural stiffness and stress developed under flexural and torsional loading. A simple model of three symphyseal shapes (chin, flat symphysis and lingual buttress), was built to represent human, Neanderthal and higher primate symphyses and these were

I. Ichim; M. V. Swain; J. A. Kieser

2006-01-01

173

Monitoring the Bending Stiffness of DNA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In eukaryotic cells, the accessibility of genomic sequences provides an inherent regulation mechanism for gene expression through variations in bending stiffness encoded by the nucleic acid sequence. Cyclization of dsDNA is the prevailing method for determining DNA bending stiffness. Recent cyclization data for short dsDNA raises several fundamental questions about the soundness of the cyclization method, particularly in cases where the probability of highly bent DNA conformations is low. We herein evaluate the role of T4 DNA ligase in the cyclization reaction by inserting an environmental sensitive base analogue, 2-amino purine, to the DNA molecule. By monitoring the 2-AP fluorescence under standard cyclization conditions, it is found that in addition to trapping highly-bent cyclic DNA conformations, T4 DNA ligase enhances the apparent base pair flip out rate, thus exaggerating the measured flexibility. This result is further confirmed using fluorescence anisotropy experiments. We show that fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements on suitably labeled dsDNA provides an alternative approach for quantifying the bending stiffness of short fragments. DNA bending stiffness results obtained using FRET are compared with literature values.

Yuan, Chongli; Lou, Xiongwen; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Chen, Huimin; Archer, Lynden

2007-03-01

174

Exploiting Variable Stiffness in Explosive Movement Tasks  

E-print Network

-specific impedance profile that leads to better performance is non-trivial. Here, we utilise optimal control) adding additional redundancy in the control (allowing robots to be stiff and accurate or compliant of the environment, is known as a duality principle in impedance control [2]. It is, however, not entirely clear how

Vijayakumar, Sethu

175

Factor Scores, Structure Coefficients, and Communality Coefficients  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents heuristic explanations of factor scores, structure coefficients, and communality coefficients. Common misconceptions regarding these topics are clarified. In addition, (a) the regression (b) Bartlett, (c) Anderson-Rubin, and (d) Thompson methods for calculating factor scores are reviewed. Syntax necessary to execute all four…

Goodwyn, Fara

2012-01-01

176

Non-invasive assessment of arterial stiffness using oscillometric blood pressure measurement  

PubMed Central

Background Arterial stiffness is a major contributor to cardiovascular diseases. Because current methods of measuring arterial stiffness are technically demanding, the purpose of this study was to develop a simple method of evaluating arterial stiffness using oscillometric blood pressure measurement. Methods Blood pressure was conventionally measured in the left upper arm of 173 individuals using an inflatable cuff. Using the time series of occlusive cuff pressure and the amplitudes of pulse oscillations, we calculated local slopes of the curve between the decreasing cuff pressure and corresponding arterial volume. Whole pressure-volume curve was derived from numerical integration of the local slopes. The curve was fitted using an equation and we identified a numerical coefficient of the equation as an index of arterial stiffness (Arterial Pressure-volume Index, API). We also measured brachial-ankle (baPWV) PWV and carotid-femoral (cfPWV) PWV using a vascular testing device and compared the values with API. Furthermore, we assessed carotid arterial compliance using ultrasound images to compare with API. Results The slope of the calculated pressure-volume curve was steeper for compliant (low baPWV or cfPWV) than stiff (high baPWV or cfPWV) arteries. API was related to baPWV (r = -0.53, P < 0.05), cfPWV (r = -0.49, P < 0.05), and carotid arterial compliance (r = 0.32, P < 0.05). A stepwise multiple regression analysis demonstrated that baPWV and carotid arterial compliance were the independent determinants of API, and that API was the independent determinant of baPWV and carotid arterial compliance. Conclusions These results suggest that our method can simply and simultaneously evaluate arterial stiffness and blood pressure based on oscillometric measurements of blood pressure. PMID:22325084

2012-01-01

177

Lamb Wave Stiffness Characterization of Composites Undergoing Thermal-Mechanical Aging  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The introduction of new, advanced composite materials into aviation systems requires a thorough understanding of the long term effects of combined thermal and mechanical loading upon those materials. Analytical methods investigating the effects of intense thermal heating combined with mechanical loading have been investigated. The damage mechanisms and fatigue lives were dependent on test parameters as well as stress levels. Castelli, et al. identified matrix dominated failure modes for out-of-phase cycling and fiber dominated damage modes for in-phase cycling. In recent years, ultrasonic methods have been developed that can measure the mechanical stiffness of composites. To help evaluate the effect of aging, a suitably designed Lamb wave measurement system is being used to obtain bending and out-of-plane stiffness coefficients of composite laminates undergoing thermal-mechanical loading. The system works by exciting an antisymmetric Lamb wave and calculating the velocity at each frequency from the known transducer separation and the measured time-of-flight. The same peak in the waveforms received at various distances is used to measure the time difference between the signals. The velocity measurements are accurate and repeatable to within 1% resulting in reconstructed stiffness values repeatable to within 4%. Given the material density and plate thickness, the bending and out-of-plane shear stiffnesses are calculated from a reconstruction of the dispersion curve. A mechanical scanner is used to move the sensors over the surface to map the time-of-flight, velocity, or stiffnesses of the entire specimen. Access to only one side of the material is required and no immersion or couplants are required because the sensors are dry coupled to the surface of the plate. In this study, the elastic stiffnesses D(sub 11), D(sub 22), A(sub 44), and A(sub 55) as well as time-of-flight measurements for composite samples that have undergone combined thermal and mechanical aging for a duration of 10,000 hours are reported.

Seale, Michael D.; Madaras, Eric I.

2004-01-01

178

Estimating the polyserial correlation coefficient  

Microsoft Academic Search

We develop simple noniterative estimators of the polyserial correlation coefficient. A general relationship between the polyserial correlation and the point polyserial correlation is exploited to give extensions of Pearson's, Brogden's, and Lord's biserial estimators to the multicategory setting. The small sample and asmptotic properties of these estimators are studied in some detail. A comparison with maximum likelihood estimates shows that

Edward J. Bedrick; Frederick C. Breslin

1996-01-01

179

Haptic Stiffness Identification by Veterinarians and Novices: A Comparison  

E-print Network

Haptic Stiffness Identification by Veterinarians and Novices: A Comparison Neil Forrest 1 , Sarah compares the ability of practicing veterinarians and veterinary students to identify stiffness values veterinarians and 14 veterinary students show that the veterinarians performed significantly better than

Tan, Hong Z.

180

Aortic stiffness: pathophysiology, clinical implications, and approach to treatment  

PubMed Central

Aortic stiffness is a hallmark of aging, and classic cardiovascular risk factors play a role in accelerating this process. Current changes in medicine, which focus on preventive care, have led to a growing interest in noninvasive evaluation of aortic stiffness. Aortic stiffness has emerged as a good tool for further risk stratification because it has been linked to increased risk of atherosclerotic heart disease, myocardial infarction, heart failure, and stroke. This has led to the invention and validation of multiple methods to measure aortic stiffness. Pulse wave velocity is emerging as the gold standard for evaluation of aortic stiffness. This review focuses on the pathophysiology involved in aortic stiffness, methods available for evaluation of aortic stiffness, the importance of central pressure as a predictor of future cardiovascular events, and therapies that affect aortic stiffness. PMID:24910511

Sethi, Salil; Rivera, Oscar; Oliveros, Rene; Chilton, Robert

2014-01-01

181

Design and characterization of tunable stiffness flexural bearings  

E-print Network

Compressed flexures have a downwards-tunable stiffness in their compliant directions; their stiffness can theoretically be reduced by up to four orders of magnitude. The compression-stiffiness relation is linear for most ...

Ramirez, Aaron Eduardo

2012-01-01

182

Effective Elastic Stiffness for Periodic Masonry Structures via Eigenstrain Homogenization  

E-print Network

, normally arranged periodically. Studying the in-plane load deformation characteristics of the masonryEffective Elastic Stiffness for Periodic Masonry Structures via Eigenstrain Homogenization Gang eigenstrain method is used to evaluate the effective elastic stiffness of periodic masonry structure

Li, Shaofan

183

Stiffness analysis and experimental validation of robotic systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stiffness can be considered of primary importance in order to guarantee the successful use of any robotic system for a given task. Therefore, this paper proposes procedures for carrying out both numerical and experimental estimations of stiffness performance for multibody robotic systems. The proposed numerical procedure is based on models with lumped parameters for deriving the Cartesian stiffness matrix. Stiffness performance indices are also proposed for comparing stiffness performance. Then, an experimental procedure for the evaluation stiffness performance is proposed as based on a new measuring system named as Milli-CATRASYS (Milli Cassino Tracking System) and on a trilateration technique. Cases of study are reported to show the soundness and engineering feasibility of both the proposed numerical formulation for stiffness analysis and experimental validation of stiffness performance.

Carbone, Giuseppe

2011-06-01

184

A novel variable stiffness actuator: minimizing the energy requirements for the stiffness regulation.  

PubMed

The design of robots required to work in the close vicinity or physically interact with humans such as humanoids machines, rehabilitation or human performance augmentation systems should not follow the traditional design rule 'stiffer is better'. Safety is a particularly vital concern in these systems and to maximize it a different design approach should be used. The role of compliance in improving specific suspects of the robotic system, including safety and energy efficiency, has been studied and validated in many works. This work presents the design and realization of a new variable compliance actuator for robots physically interacting with humans, e.g. prosthesis devices and exoskeleton augmentation systems. The actuator can independently control the equilibrium position and stiffness using two motors. The main novelty of the proposed variable stiffness actuator is that the stiffness regulation is achieved not through the pretension of the elastic elements which needs the stiffness tuning actuator to act against the forces generated by the springs but by mechanically adjusting the fixation of the spring elements. As a result the stiffness actuator does not need to act against the spring forces reducing the energy required for the stiffness adjustment to minimal. PMID:21095917

Tsagarikis, Nikos G; Jafari, Amir; Caldwell, Darwin G

2010-01-01

185

The passive stiffness of the wrist and forearm  

PubMed Central

Because wrist rotation dynamics are dominated by stiffness (Charles SK, Hogan N. J Biomech 44: 614–621, 2011), understanding how humans plan and execute coordinated wrist rotations requires knowledge of the stiffness characteristics of the wrist joint. In the past, the passive stiffness of the wrist joint has been measured in 1 degree of freedom (DOF). Although these 1-DOF measurements inform us of the dynamics the neuromuscular system must overcome to rotate the wrist in pure flexion-extension (FE) or pure radial-ulnar deviation (RUD), the wrist rarely rotates in pure FE or RUD. Instead, understanding natural wrist rotations requires knowledge of wrist stiffness in combinations of FE and RUD. The purpose of this report is to present measurements of passive wrist stiffness throughout the space spanned by FE and RUD. Using a rehabilitation robot designed for the wrist and forearm, we measured the passive stiffness of the wrist joint in 10 subjects in FE, RUD, and combinations. For comparison, we measured the passive stiffness of the forearm (in pronation-supination), as well. Our measurements in pure FE and RUD agreed well with previous 1-DOF measurements. We have linearized the 2-DOF stiffness measurements and present them in the form of stiffness ellipses and as stiffness matrices useful for modeling wrist rotation dynamics. We found that passive wrist stiffness was anisotropic, with greater stiffness in RUD than in FE. We also found that passive wrist stiffness did not align with the anatomical axes of the wrist; the major and minor axes of the stiffness ellipse were rotated with respect to the FE and RUD axes by ?20°. The direction of least stiffness was between ulnar flexion and radial extension, a direction used in many natural movements (known as the “dart-thrower's motion”), suggesting that the nervous system may take advantage of the direction of least stiffness for common wrist rotations. PMID:22649208

Charles, Steven K.; Zollo, Loredana; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Hogan, Neville; Krebs, Hermano I.

2012-01-01

186

AFM characterization of nanopositioner in-plane stiffnesses  

Microsoft Academic Search

A versatile method for measurement of in-plane stiffness of micro-elements was developed and its usefulness has been demonstrated. The in-plane stiffness of a NIST nanopositioner has been measured directly using a colloidal probe in an AFM without any fixture. Using this method it was possible to measure the in-plane stiffness at different locations of the same micro-element. The in-plane stiffness

Seung Ho Yang; Yongsik Kim; Kavuri Premsagar Purushotham; Jae-Myung Yoo; Young-Man Choi; Nicholas Dagalakis

2010-01-01

187

Estimation of Quasi-Stiffness of the Human Hip in the Stance Phase of Walking  

PubMed Central

This work presents a framework for selection of subject-specific quasi-stiffness of hip orthoses and exoskeletons, and other devices that are intended to emulate the biological performance of this joint during walking. The hip joint exhibits linear moment-angular excursion behavior in both the extension and flexion stages of the resilient loading-unloading phase that consists of terminal stance and initial swing phases. Here, we establish statistical models that can closely estimate the slope of linear fits to the moment-angle graph of the hip in this phase, termed as the quasi-stiffness of the hip. Employing an inverse dynamics analysis, we identify a series of parameters that can capture the nearly linear hip quasi-stiffnesses in the resilient loading phase. We then employ regression analysis on experimental moment-angle data of 216 gait trials across 26 human adults walking over a wide range of gait speeds (0.75–2.63 m/s) to obtain a set of general-form statistical models that estimate the hip quasi-stiffnesses using body weight and height, gait speed, and hip excursion. We show that the general-form models can closely estimate the hip quasi-stiffness in the extension (R2?=?92%) and flexion portions (R2?=?89%) of the resilient loading phase of the gait. We further simplify the general-form models and present a set of stature-based models that can estimate the hip quasi-stiffness for the preferred gait speed using only body weight and height with an average error of 27% for the extension stage and 37% for the flexion stage. PMID:24349136

Shamaei, Kamran; Sawicki, Gregory S.; Dollar, Aaron M.

2013-01-01

188

Relation Between Coronary Artery Disease, Aortic Stiffness, and Left Ventricular Structure in a Population Sample  

Microsoft Academic Search

To elucidate the relationship between coronary artery disease (CAD), aortic stiffness, and left ventricular structure, we recruited 55 subjects (33 men; average age, 6361 years) with previously unknown CAD from a healthy general population sample, as well as 55 control subjects matched for gender, age, and serum cholesterol level. We measured arterial blood pressure and the systolic expansion of the

Christoph D. Gatzka; James D. Cameron; Bronwyn A. Kingwell; Anthony M. Dart

189

On bounds for the torsional stiffness of shafts of varying circular cross section  

Microsoft Academic Search

We state upper and lower bound formulas for the torsional stiffness of shafts of varying circular cross section, in accordance with the classical Michell formulation of this problem, through use of the principles of minimum potential and complementary energy. The general results are used to obtain explicit first-approximation bounds which, for the limiting case of the cylindrical shaft, reproduce the

E. Reissner

1978-01-01

190

Response of Tall Building Structures using Panel Elements with In-Plane Rotational Stiffness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Generally, strain based finite elements are useful to assess the response of tall buildings. It should be noted that use of many lower order finite elements may reveal some analytical problems in analysis of tall buildings. The absence of an appropriate in-plane rotational stiffness in some finite elements and the existence of parasitic shear effects in the governing displacement functions

Mohsen Tehranizadeh; Afshin Meshkat-Dini

191

Representations of multi-joint stiffness for prosthetic limb design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human limbs have inherent spring-like properties that have been shown to be important for posture and movement control. When an amputated limb is augmented with a powered prosthesis, the stiffness properties of the resulting limb-prosthesis combination are an important aspect of the performance of the system. Limb stiffness properties are typically represented as stiffness ellipses or isopotential ellipses at the

Chad E. English; Donald L. Russell

2008-01-01

192

The hydrostatic stiffness of flexible floating structures for linear hydroelasticity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The formulation of the hydrostatic stiffness for linear rigid body hydrodynamics is well known. An explicit formulation for an analogous hydrostatic stiffness in linear hydroelasticity, which is applicable to both rigid body and flexible displacement, is not as well-known. Three such formulations have been proposed previously in the literature, none of which is quite correct; all produce an unsymmetric stiffness

L. L. Huang; H. R. Riggs

2000-01-01

193

Haptic Identification of Stiffness and Force Magnitude Steven A. Cholewiak,  

E-print Network

Haptic Identification of Stiffness and Force Magnitude Steven A. Cholewiak, 1 Hong Z. Tan, 1 investigated the channel capacity for transmitting information through stiffness or force magnitude. Specifically, we measured the number of stiffness or force- magnitude levels that can be reliably identified

Tan, Hong Z.

194

Assessing Muscle Stiffness from Quiet Stance in Parkinson's Disease  

E-print Network

Assessing Muscle Stiffness from Quiet Stance in Parkinson's Disease Michael Lauk 1;2;4 , MSc Stiffness from Quiet Stance: Applicability to Parkinson's Disease Abstract In previous studies, we developed this measure to patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We correlated the postural stiffness measure

195

Stiffness tensor random fields through upscaling of planar random materials  

E-print Network

of media having the same random geometries) [1­3] to assess the in-plane stiffness tensor RF. OnceStiffness tensor random fields through upscaling of planar random materials Michael P. Sena: Random microstructure Random fields Stiffness tensor Compliance tensor Mesoscale Correlation structure

Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

196

Active stiffness control of a manipulator in cartesian coordinates  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method of actively controlling the apparent stiffness of a manipulator end effecter is presented. The approach allows the programmer to specify the three transnational and three rotational stiffness of a frame located arbitrarily in hand coordinates. Control of the nominal position of the hand then permits simultaneous position and force control. Stiffness may be changed under program control to

J. Kenneth Salisbury

1980-01-01

197

Torque transmission mechanism with nonlinear passive stiffness using mechanical singularity  

Microsoft Academic Search

To introduce a passive compliant mechanism for robot joints is an effective way for impact absorption. However, because robot joints also require high torque transmission characteristic, the simultaneous implementation of stiffness and softness is a significant issue. In this paper, we develop a torque transmission mechanism with nonlinear passive stiffness that realizes from zero to extremely high stiffness based on

Masafumi Okada; Shintaro Kino

2008-01-01

198

Damage Detection on Sudden Stiffness Reduction Based on Discrete Wavelet Transform  

PubMed Central

The sudden stiffness reduction in a structure may cause the signal discontinuity in the acceleration responses close to the damage location at the damage time instant. To this end, the damage detection on sudden stiffness reduction of building structures has been actively investigated in this study. The signal discontinuity of the structural acceleration responses of an example building is extracted based on the discrete wavelet transform. It is proved that the variation of the first level detail coefficients of the wavelet transform at damage instant is linearly proportional to the magnitude of the stiffness reduction. A new damage index is proposed and implemented to detect the damage time instant, location, and severity of a structure due to a sudden change of structural stiffness. Numerical simulation using a five-story shear building under different types of excitation is carried out to assess the effectiveness and reliability of the proposed damage index for the building at different damage levels. The sensitivity of the damage index to the intensity and frequency range of measurement noise is also investigated. The made observations demonstrate that the proposed damage index can accurately identify the sudden damage events if the noise intensity is limited. PMID:24991647

Chen, Bo; Chen, Zhi-wei; Wang, Gan-jun; Xie, Wei-ping

2014-01-01

199

Age, arterial stiffness, and components of blood pressure in Chinese adults.  

PubMed

Blood pressure (BP) changes with age. We conducted a cross-sectional study in rural Chinese adults to investigate: (1) what is the relationship between age, arterial stiffness, and BP in Chinese men and women; and (2) to what degree can the age-BP relationship be explained by arterial stiffness, controlling for other covariables. These analyses included a total of 1688 subjects (males/females: 623/1065), aged 40 to 88 years. Among them, 353 (20.9%) had hypertension (defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) ? 140 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ? 90 mm Hg). Arterial stiffness was measured by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). baPWV appeared to be more strongly correlated with BP (including SBP, DBP, mean arterial pressure [MAP], pulse pressure [PP]) than age (P < 0.001 for comparisons between Spearman correlation coefficients). Furthermore, baPWV was associated with BP (including SBP, DBP, MAP, and PP) and risk of hypertension in a dose-response fashion, independent of age; in contrast, the age-BP associations were either attenuated or became negative after adjusting for baPWV. Arterial stiffness appears to be an independent contributor to hypertension, even after adjusting for age and other covariables. In contrast, age-BP associations became attenuated or negative after adjusting for baPWV. The utility of baPWV as a diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic indicator for hypertension warrants further investigation. PMID:25546666

Zheng, Meili; Xu, Xiping; Wang, Xiaobin; Huo, Yong; Xu, Xin; Qin, Xianhui; Tang, Genfu; Xing, Houxun; Fan, Fangfang; Cui, Wei; Yang, Xinchun

2014-12-01

200

Strong and stiff aramid nanofiber/carbon nanotube nanocomposites.  

PubMed

Small but strong carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are fillers of choice for composite reinforcement owing to their extraordinary modulus and strength. However, the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites are still much below those for mechanical parameters of individual nanotubes. The gap between the expectation and experimental results arises not only from imperfect dispersion and poor load transfer but also from the unavailability of strong polymers that can be effectively utilized within the composites of nanotubes. Aramid nanofibers (ANFs) with analogous morphological features to nanotubes represent a potential choice to complement nanotubes given their intrinsic high mechanical performance and the dispersible nature, which enables solvent-based processing methods. In this work, we showed that composite films made from ANFs and multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) by vacuum-assisted flocculation and vacuum-assisted layer-by-layer assembly exhibited high ultimate strength of up to 383 MPa and Young's modulus (stiffness) of up to 35 GPa, which represent the highest values among all the reported random CNT nanocomposites. Detailed studies using different imaging and spectroscopic characterizations suggested that the multiple interfacial interactions between nanotubes and ANFs including hydrogen bonding and ?-? stacking are likely the key parameters responsible for the observed mechanical improvement. Importantly, our studies further revealed the attractive thermomechanical characteristics of these nanocomposites with high thermal stability (up to 520 °C) and ultralow coefficients of thermal expansion (2-6 ppm·K(-1)). Our results indicated that ANFs are promising nanoscale building blocks for functional ultrastrong and stiff materials potentially extendable to nanocomposites based on other nanoscale fillers. PMID:25712334

Zhu, Jiaqi; Cao, Wenxin; Yue, Mingli; Hou, Ying; Han, Jiecai; Yang, Ming

2015-03-24

201

Elastic, anelastic, and piezoelectric coefficients of langasite: resonance ultrasound spectroscopy with laser-Doppler interferometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents advanced techniques to determine all independent elastic-stiffness coefficients Cij, the associated internal friction Qij-1, and piezoelectric coefficients eij of monocrystal langasite (La3Ga5SiO14) using a single rectangular parallelepiped specimen. Langasite's crystal structure belongs to the trigonal system with point group 32, and thus possesses six independent Cij, two eij, and two dielectric coefficients ?ij. All of the elastic

Hirotsugu Ogi; N. Nakamura; K. Sato; M. Hirao; S. Uda

2003-01-01

202

Electron profile stiffness and critical gradient studies  

SciTech Connect

Electron profile stiffness was studied in DIII-D L-mode discharges by systematically varying the heat flux in a narrow region with electron cyclotron heating and measuring the local change produced in {nabla}T{sub e}. Electron stiffness was found to slowly increase with toroidal rotation velocity. A critical inverse temperature gradient scale length 1/L{sub C} {approx} 3 m{sup -1} was identified at {rho}=0.6 and found to be independent of rotation. Both the heat pulse diffusivity and the power balance diffusivity, the latter determined by integrating the measured dependence of the heat pulse diffusivity on -{nabla}T{sub e}, were fit reasonably well by a model containing a critical inverse temperature gradient scale length and varying linearly with 1/L{sub T} above the threshold.

DeBoo, J. C.; Petty, C. C.; Burrell, K. H.; Smith, S. P. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); White, A. E. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Doyle, E. J.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L.; Wang, G.; Zeng, L. [University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095-7099 (United States); Holland, C. [University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States); McKee, G. R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2012-08-15

203

The bizarre stiff hip. Possible idiopathic chondrolysis.  

PubMed

Idiopathic chondrolysis of the hip is characterized by pain and limp in adolescence, with progressive loss of articular cartilage space and stiffness of the hip. In our five cases, the best results were obtained in those patients immobilized in a position of function. Those cases in which range-of-motion exercises were carried out resulted in ankylosis in a position of excessive flexion. PMID:1172705

Duncan, J W; Schrantz, J L; Nasca, R J

1975-01-27

204

METHOD OF HYPERBOLIC SYSTEMS WITH STIFF RELAXATION  

SciTech Connect

Three methods are analyzed for solving a linear hyperbolic system that contains stiff relaxation. We show that the semi-discrete discontinuous Galerkin method, with a linear basis, is accurate when the relaxation time is unresolved (asymptotically preserving--AP). A recently developed central method is shown to be non-AP. To discriminate between AP and non-AP methods, we argue that one must study problems that are diffusion dominated.

R. B. LOWRIE; J. E. MOREL

2001-03-01

205

Initial damage influence of stiffness reduction for bronze route Nb 3 Sn strands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nb 3Sn strands are widely used in ITER CICCs, and the axial stiffness reduction induced by the initial damage in the form of filament breakage during processing of the composite strand is intensively related to the operation performance criteria. In this paper, an analytical model is developed to simulate this degradation of bronze route strands. The model contains three sub-models: the effective modulus of a filament with initial damage is investigated by a shear-lag model based on the global load sharing scheme and Weibull fiber strength statistics; the weakened stiffness of the superconducting layer is deduced by the Mori-Tanaka model; and the effective axial modulus of the strand is obtained by the multilayered generalized self-consistent model. The results indicate that the stiffness reduction of a strand presents obvious nonlinear behavior and depends on the initial damage parameter and the evolution of total damage.

Luo, Wei; Zheng, X. J.

2011-10-01

206

Cell stiffness is a biomarker of the metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The metastatic potential of cells is an important parameter in the design of optimal strategies for the personalized treatment of cancer. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we show that ovarian cancer cells are generally softer and display lower intrinsic variability in cell stiffness than non-malignant ovarian epithelial cells. A detailed study of highly invasive ovarian cancer cells (HEY A8) and their less invasive parental cells (HEY), demonstrates that deformability can serve as an accurate biomarker of metastatic potential. Comparative gene expression profiling indicate that the reduced stiffness of highly metastatic HEY A8 cells is associated with actin cytoskeleton remodeling, microscopic examination of actin fiber structure in these cell lines is consistent with this prediction. Our results indicate that cell stiffness not only distinguishes ovarian cancer cells from non-malignant cells, but may also be a useful biomarker to evaluate the relative metastatic potential of ovarian and perhaps other types of cancer cells.

Xu, Wenwei; Mezencev, Roman; Kim, Byungkyu; Wang, Lijuan; McDonald, John; Sulchek, Todd

2013-03-01

207

Anomalies in stiffness and damping of a 2D discrete viscoelastic system due to negative stiffness components  

E-print Network

thin films with unusual in-plane mechanical properties. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reservedAnomalies in stiffness and damping of a 2D discrete viscoelastic system due to negative stiffness Available online 24 February 2006 Abstract The recent development of using negative stiffness inclusions

Lakes, Roderic

208

Nonaffine rubber elasticity for stiff polymer networks  

E-print Network

We present a theory for the elasticity of cross-linked stiff polymer networks. Stiff polymers, unlike their flexible counterparts, are highly anisotropic elastic objects. Similar to mechanical beams stiff polymers easily deform in bending, while they are much stiffer with respect to tensile forces (``stretching''). Unlike in previous approaches, where network elasticity is derived from the stretching mode, our theory properly accounts for the soft bending response. A self-consistent effective medium approach is used to calculate the macroscopic elastic moduli starting from a microscopic characterization of the deformation field in terms of ``floppy modes'' -- low-energy bending excitations that retain a high degree of non-affinity. The length-scale characterizing the emergent non-affinity is given by the ``fiber length'' $l_f$, defined as the scale over which the polymers remain straight. The calculated scaling properties for the shear modulus are in excellent agreement with the results of recent simulations obtained in two-dimensional model networks. Furthermore, our theory can be applied to rationalize bulk rheological data in reconstituted actin networks.

C. Heussinger; B. Schaefer; E. Frey

2007-11-26

209

An improved spinning lens test to determine the stiffness of the human lens  

PubMed Central

It is widely accepted that age-related changes in lens stiffness are significant for the development of presbyopia. However, precise details on the relative importance of age-related changes in the stiffness of the lens, in comparison with other potential mechanisms for the development of presbyopia, have not yet been established. One contributing factor to this uncertainty is the paucity and variability of experimental data on lens stiffness. The available published data generally indicate that stiffness varies spatially within the lens and that stiffness parameters tend to increase with age. However, considerable differences exist between these published data sets, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The current paper describes new and improved methods, based on the spinning lens approach pioneered by Fisher, R.F. (1971) ‘The elastic constants of the human lens’, Journal of Physiology, 212, 147–180, to make measurements on the stiffness of the human lens. These new procedures have been developed in an attempt to eliminate, or at least substantially reduce, various systematic errors in Fisher’s original experiment. An improved test rig has been constructed and a new modelling procedure for determining lens stiffness parameters from observations made during the test has been devised. The experiment involves mounting a human lens on a vertical rotor so that the lens spins on its optical axis (typically at 1000 rpm). An automatic imaging system is used to capture the outline of the lens, while it is rotating, at pre-determined angular orientations. These images are used to quantify the deformations developed in the lens as a consequence of the centripetal forces induced by the rotation. Lens stiffness is inferred using axisymmetric finite element inverse analysis in which a nearly-incompressible neo-Hookean constitutive model is used to represent the mechanics of the lens. A numerical optimisation procedure is used to determine the stiffness parameters that provide a best fit between the finite element model and the experimental data. Sample results are presented for a human lens of age 33 years. PMID:21040722

Burd, H.J.; Wilde, G.S.; Judge, S.J.

2011-01-01

210

In vivo tibial stiffness is maintained by whole bone morphology and cross-sectional geometry in growing female mice  

PubMed Central

Whole bone morphology, cortical geometry, and tissue material properties modulate skeletal stresses and strains that in turn influence skeletal physiology and remodeling. Understanding how bone stiffness, the relationship between applied load and tissue strain, is regulated by developmental changes in bone structure and tissue material properties is important in implementing biophysical strategies for promoting healthy bone growth and preventing bone loss. The goal of this study was to relate developmental patterns of in vivo whole bone stiffness to whole bone morphology, cross-sectional geometry, and tissue properties using a mouse axial loading model. We measured in vivo tibial stiffness in three age groups (6wks, 10wks, 16wks old) of female C57Bl/6 mice during cyclic tibial compression. Tibial stiffness was then related to cortical geometry, longitudinal bone curvature, and tissue mineral density using microcomputed tomography (microCT). Tibial stiffness and the stresses induced by axial compression were generally maintained from 6 to 16wks of age. Growth-related increases in cortical cross-sectional geometry and longitudinal bone curvature had counteracting effects on induced bone stresses and, therefore, maintained tibial stiffness similarly with growth. Tissue mineral density increased slightly from 6 to 16wks of age, and although the effects of this increase on tibial stiffness were not directly measured, its role in the modulation of whole bone stiffness was likely minor over the age range examined. Thus, whole bone morphology, as characterized by longitudinal curvature, along with cortical geometry, plays an important role in modulating bone stiffness during development and should be considered when evaluating and designing in vivo loading studies and biophysical skeletal therapies. PMID:20673665

Main, Russell P.; Lynch, Maureen E.; van der Meulen, Marjolein C.H.

2010-01-01

211

Friction Coefficient for Quarks in Supergravity Duals  

E-print Network

We study quarks moving in strongly-coupled plasmas that have supergravity duals. We compute the friction coefficient of strings dual to such quarks for general static supergravity backgrounds near the horizon. Our results also show that a previous conjecture on the bound has to be modified and higher friction coefficients can be achieved.

E. Antonyan

2006-11-22

212

The directional dependence of elastic stiffness and compliance shear coefficients and shear moduli in cubic materials  

E-print Network

, the complexity of most problems involving dislocations of differing orientation and Burgers vectors is such that average elastic constants must be used. For such averages, Voigt averages over Cijkl are appropriate for situations in which uniform strain can... function of crystal orientation as a single surface whose radius vector is in the direction under consideration and the length of which is proportional to Young’s modulus is well known [1–4]. The representation of the shear modulus, which depends on both...

Knowles, Kevin M.; Howie, Philip R.

2014-12-31

213

Impact of diabetes mellitus on arterial stiffness in a representative sample of an urban Brazilian population  

PubMed Central

Background Independent of other cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, increased arterial stiffness has been established as a predictor of morbidity and mortality. The main aim of this study was to investigate the impact of diabetes on arterial stiffness in a representative sample of an urban Brazilian population plus Amerindians. Methods A total of 1,415 individuals from the general population were randomly selected plus 588 Amerindians from a native community in Brazil. In addition, a sub-sample of 380 individuals from the general population had 5-year follow-up data. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with a non-invasive automatic device (Complior, Colson; Garges les Gonesses, France) and increased arterial stiffness was defined as PWV???12 m/s. Results In the overall group, diabetic individuals had higher frequencies of increased arterial stiffness and hypertension. They also had higher values of PWV, body mass index, total cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic and diastolic blood pressures compared to non-diabetic individuals (p?stiffness frequency were higher in diabetic individuals in both groups (hypertensive and non-hypertensive) (p?stiffness was observed in the diabetic individuals from the overall group (OR?=?2.27; CI?=?1.47-3.52, p?stiffness compared to non-diabetic individuals. Both diabetic and non-diabetic individuals had higher PWV values after 5 years. There was no significant difference in the 5-year PWV progression in diabetic compared to non-diabetic individuals. Conclusions These results confirm, in a sample of Brazilian population, that the presence of diabetes is associated with increased arterial stiffness and it may contribute in part to increased cardiovascular risk in diabetic patients. PMID:23965633

2013-01-01

214

Reproducibility of oscillometrically measured arterial stiffness indices: Results of the SAPALDIA 3 cohort study.  

PubMed

Abstract Background. There is an increasing interest in oscillometric arterial stiffness measurement for cardiovascular risk stratification. We assessed reproducibility of the cuff-based arterial stiffness measures cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI), brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and peripheral augmentation index (pAI) in a subsample of the second follow-up of the Swiss Cohort Study on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Diseases in Adults (SAPALDIA 3). Methods. CAVI, baPWV and pAI were measured twice within 90 days in a representative subsample (n = 105) of SAPALDIA 3 with a mean age of 63 years (52.4% female). Results. The mean coefficient of variation for CAVI was 4.4%, baPWV 3.9%, and pAI 7.4%. The intraclass correlation coefficient ranged from 0.6 for pAI to 0.8 for CAVI, and 0.9 for baPWV. The mixed linear model revealed that 68.7%/80.1%/55.0% of the CAVI/baPWV/pAI variance was accounted for by the subject, 5.2%/8.1%/ < 0.01% by the fieldworker, 6.7%/7.8%/28.5% by variation between measurement days, and 19.4%/4%/16.5% by measurement error. Bland-Altman plots showed no particular dispersion patterns except for pAI. Conclusions. Oscillometric arterial stiffness measurement by CAVI and baPWV has proved to be highly reproducible in Caucasians. Results of the pAI showed lower reproducibility. CAVI and baPWV can be implemented as easy-to-apply arterial stiffness measures in population wide cardiovascular risk assessment in Caucasians. PMID:25594797

Endes, Simon; Caviezel, Seraina; Dratva, Julia; Schaffner, Emmanuel; Schindler, Christian; Rothe, Thomas; Rochat, Thierry; Künzli, Nino; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno

2015-04-01

215

Angiopoietin-2-induced arterial stiffness in CKD.  

PubMed

The mechanism of vascular calcification in CKD is not understood fully, but may involve collagen deposition in the arterial wall upon osteo/chondrocytic transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Increased levels of circulating angiopoietin-2 correlate with markers of CKD progression and angiopoietin-2 regulate inflammatory responses, including intercellular and vascular adhesion and recruitment of VSMCs. Here, we investigate the potential role of angiopoietin-2 in the pathogenesis of arterial stiffness associated with CKD. In a cohort of 416 patients with CKD, the plasma level of angiopoietin-2 correlated independently with the severity of arterial stiffness assessed by pulse wave velocity. In mice subjected to 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy or unilateral ureteral obstruction, plasma levels of angiopoietin-2 also increased. Angiopoietin-2 expression markedly increased in tubular epithelial cells of fibrotic kidneys but decreased in other tissues, including aorta and lung, after 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy. Expression of collagen and profibrotic genes in aortic VSMCs increased in mice after 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy and in mice producing human angiopoietin-2. Angiopoietin-2 stimulated endothelial expression of chemokines and adhesion molecules for monocytes, increased Ly6C(low) macrophages in aorta, and increased the expression of the profibrotic cytokine TGF-?1 in aortic endothelial cells and Ly6C(low) macrophages. Angiopoietin-2 blockade attenuated expression of monocyte chemokines, profibrotic cytokines, and collagen in aorta of mice after 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy. This study identifies angiopoietin-2 as a link between kidney fibrosis and arterial stiffness. Targeting angiopoietin-2 to attenuate inflammation and collagen expression may provide a novel therapy for cardiovascular disease in CKD. PMID:24511140

Chang, Fan-Chi; Chiang, Wen-Chih; Tsai, Ming-Hsuan; Chou, Yu-Hsiang; Pan, Szu-Yu; Chang, Yu-Ting; Yeh, Pei-Ying; Chen, Yi-Ting; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Chen, Yung-Ming; Chu, Tzong-Shinn; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Lin, Shuei-Liong

2014-06-01

216

In-situ fracture stiffness determination  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In-situ experiments to determine the hydrologic and mechanical characteristics of large naturally occurring fractures were conducted at the NAGRA test site in Grimsel, Switzerland. In addition to seismic measurements across a fracture zone in the FRI test area and flow measurements into the zone, deformation of the fracture resulting from pressurization of the zone was also measured. The deformation is modeled in three different ways: as a mathematical crack employing linear elastic fracture mechanics; as a mathematical crack with an additional restraining stiffness between the faces of the crack, and as a row of coplanar two-dimensional cracks.

Hesler, G. J., III; Zheng, Z.; Myer, L. R.

1990-01-01

217

Relative stiffness of flat conductor cables  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The measurement of the bending moment required to obtain a given deflection in short lengths of flat conductor cable (FCC) is presented in this report. Experimental data were taken on 10 different samples of FCC and normalized to express all bending moments (relative stiffness factor) in terms of a cable 5.1 cm (2.0 in.) in width. Data are presented in tabular and graphical form for the covenience of designers who may be interested in finding torques exerted on critical components by short lengths of FCC.

Hankins, J. D.

1976-01-01

218

On waveguide modeling of stiff piano strings.  

PubMed

Bensa et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 114, 1095-1107 (2003), Sec. IV] recently proposed a waveguide model for the transverse displacement of a stiff piano string. The study described here is an attempt to cast a complementary light on this topic, based on a common wave approach instead of a modal approach. A pair of weakly attenuated traveling waves and a pair of fast-decaying waves both satisfy the one-dimensional wave equation developed by Bensa et al. These solutions have to be carefully considered, however, for portions of string interacting with the hammer felt, the bridge, or the capo d'astro bar. PMID:16240835

Ducasse, Eric

2005-09-01

219

Arthrodiastasis for stiff hips in young patients.  

PubMed

Joint distraction (arthrodiastasis) with a unilateral fixator was used to treat 9 patients with stiffness of the hip which had followed Perthes' disease (3), epiphysiolysis (2), congenital dysplasia (2), tuberculosis (1) and idiopathic chondrolysis (1). Their average age was 14 years, and they all had pain, limp and shortening of the leg. Distraction of 0.5 to 1 cm was maintained for an average of 94 days. The average range of movement subsequently was 65 degrees compared with 20 degrees before. The articular space was widened by an average of 2.8 mm, and only 3 patients had pain on follow up. PMID:8407045

Cañadell, J; Gonzales, F; Barrios, R H; Amillo, S

1993-01-01

220

On waveguide modeling of stiff piano strings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bensa et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 114, 1095-1107 (2003), Sec. IV] recently proposed a waveguide model for the transverse displacement of a stiff piano string. The study described here is an attempt to cast a complementary light on this topic, based on a common wave approach instead of a modal approach. A pair of weakly attenuated traveling waves and a pair of fast-decaying waves both satisfy the one-dimensional wave equation developed by Bensa et al. These solutions have to be carefully considered, however, for portions of string interacting with the hammer felt, the bridge, or the capo d'astro bar.

Ducasse, Éric

2005-09-01

221

Discontinuous Galerkin for Stiff Hyperbolic Systems  

SciTech Connect

A Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is applied to hyperbolic systems that contain stiff relaxation terms. We demonstrate that when the relaxation time is under-resolved, DG is accurate in the sense that the method accurately represents the system's Chapman-Enskog (or ''diffusion'') approximation. Moreover, we demonstrate that a high-resolution, finite-volume method using the same time-integration method as DG is very inaccurate in the diffusion limit. Results for DG are presented for the hyperbolic heat equation, the Broadwell model of gas kinetics, and coupled radiation-hydrodynamics.

Lowrie, R.B.; Morel, J.E.

1999-06-27

222

A nonlinear negative stiffness metamaterial unit cell and small-on-large multiscale material model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A persistent challenge in the design of composite materials is the ability to fabricate materials that simultaneously display high stiffness and high loss factors for the creation of structural elements capable of passively suppressing vibro-acoustic energy. Relevant recent research has shown that it is possible to produce composite materials whose macroscopic mechanical stiffness and loss properties surpass those of conventional composites through the addition of trace amounts of materials displaying negative stiffness (NS) induced by phase transformation [R. S. Lakes et al., Nature 410, 565-567 (2001)]. The present work investigates the ability to elicit NS behavior without employing physical phenomena such as inherent nonlinear material behavior (e.g., phase change or plastic deformation) or dynamic effects, but rather the controlled buckling of small-scale structural elements, metamaterials, embedded in a continuous viscoelastic matrix. To illustrate the effect of these buckled elements, a nonlinear hierarchical multiscale material model is derived, which estimates the macroscopic stiffness and loss of a composite material containing pre-strained microscale structured inclusions. The multiscale model consists of two scale transition models, the first being an energy-based nonlinear finite element (FE) method to determine the tangent modulus of the metamaterial unit cell, and the other a classical analytical micromechanical model to determine the effective stiffness and loss tensors of a heterogeneous material for small perturbations from the local strain state of the unit cells. The FE method enables the estimation of an effective nonlinear anisotropic stiffness tensor of a buckled microstructure that produces NS and is sufficiently general to consider geometries different from those given in this work.

Klatt, Timothy; Haberman, Michael R.

2013-07-01

223

Identifying Bearing Rotordynamic Coefficients using an Extended Kalman Filter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An Extended Kalman Filter is developed to estimate the linearized direct and indirect stiffness and damping force coefficients for bearings in rotor-dynamic applications from noisy measurements of the shaft displacement in response to imbalance and impact excitation. The bearing properties are modeled as stochastic random variables using a Gauss-Markov model. Noise terms are introduced into the system model to account for all of the estimation error, including modeling errors and uncertainties and the propagation of measurement errors into the parameter estimates. The system model contains two user-defined parameters that can be tuned to improve the filter s performance; these parameters correspond to the covariance of the system and measurement noise variables. The filter is also strongly influenced by the initial values of the states and the error covariance matrix. The filter is demonstrated using numerically simulated data for a rotor-bearing system with two identical bearings, which reduces the number of unknown linear dynamic coefficients to eight. The filter estimates for the direct damping coefficients and all four stiffness coefficients correlated well with actual values, whereas the estimates for the cross-coupled damping coefficients were the least accurate.

Miller, Brad A.; Howard, Samuel A.

2008-01-01

224

Identifying Bearing Rotodynamic Coefficients Using an Extended Kalman Filter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An Extended Kalman Filter is developed to estimate the linearized direct and indirect stiffness and damping force coefficients for bearings in rotor dynamic applications from noisy measurements of the shaft displacement in response to imbalance and impact excitation. The bearing properties are modeled as stochastic random variables using a Gauss-Markov model. Noise terms are introduced into the system model to account for all of the estimation error, including modeling errors and uncertainties and the propagation of measurement errors into the parameter estimates. The system model contains two user-defined parameters that can be tuned to improve the filter's performance; these parameters correspond to the covariance of the system and measurement noise variables. The filter is also strongly influenced by the initial values of the states and the error covariance matrix. The filter is demonstrated using numerically simulated data for a rotor bearing system with two identical bearings, which reduces the number of unknown linear dynamic coefficients to eight. The filter estimates for the direct damping coefficients and all four stiffness coefficients correlated well with actual values, whereas the estimates for the cross-coupled damping coefficients were the least accurate.

Miller, Brad A.; Howard, Samuel A.

2008-01-01

225

ESTIMATING COTTON EVAPOTRANSPIRATION CROP COEFFICIENTS WITH A MULTISPECTRAL VEGETATION INDEX  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Crop coefficients are a widely used and universally accepted method for estimating the crop evapotranspiration (ETc) component in irrigation scheduling programs. However, uncertainties of generalized basal crop coefficient (Kcb) curves can contribute to ETc estimates that are substantially different...

226

Contact stiffness of randomly rough surfaces.  

PubMed

We investigate the contact stiffness of an elastic half-space and a rigid indenter with randomly rough surface having a power spectrum C2D(q)proportional q(-2H-2), where q is the wave vector. The range of H[symbol: see text] is studied covering a wide range of roughness types from white noise to smooth single asperities. At low forces, the contact stiffness is in all cases a power law function of the normal force with an exponent ?. For H > 2, the simple Hertzian behavior is observed . In the range of 0 < H < 2, the Pohrt-Popov behavior is valid (). For H < 0, a power law with a constant power of approximately 0.9 is observed, while the exact value depends on the number of modes used to produce the rough surface. Interpretation of the three regions is given both in the frame of the three dimensional contact mechanics and the method of dimensionality reduction (MDR). The influence of the long wavelength roll-off is investigated and discussed. PMID:24257034

Pohrt, Roman; Popov, Valentin L

2013-01-01

227

Early arthroscopic release in stiff shoulder  

PubMed Central

Purpose: To evaluate the results of early arthroscopic release in the patients of stiff shoulder Methods: Twenty patients of stiff shoulder, who had symptoms for at least three months and failed to improve with steroid injections and physical therapy of 6 weeks duration, underwent arthroscopic release. The average time between onset of symptoms and the time of surgery was 4 months and 2 weeks. The functional outcome was evaluated using ASES and Constant and Murley scoring systems. Results: All the patients showed significant improvement in the range of motion and relief of pain by end of three months following the procedure. At 12 months, mean improvement in ASES score is 38 points and Constant and Murley score is 4O.5 points. All patients returned to work by 3-5 months (average -4.5 months). Conclusion: Early arthroscopic release showed promising results with reliable increase in range of motion, early relief of symptoms and consequent early return to work. So it is highly recommended in properly selected patients. Level of evidence: Level IV PMID:20300309

Sabat, Dhananjaya; Kumar, Vinod

2008-01-01

228

Dynamics of a Gear System with Faults in Meshing Stiffness  

E-print Network

Gear box dynamics is characterised by a periodically changing stiffness. In real gear systems, a backlash also exists that can lead to a loss in contact between the teeth. Due to this loss of contact the gear has piecewise linear stiffness characteristics, and the gears can vibrate regularly and chaotically. In this paper we examine the effect of tooth shape imperfections and defects. Using standard methods for nonlinear systems we examine the dynamics of gear systems with various faults in meshing stiffness.

Grzegorz Litak; Michael I. Friswell

2004-05-23

229

Rough set theory based robot stiffness tel-control  

Microsoft Academic Search

When the traditional robot stiffness control is applied into the internet environment, the uncertain time delay will bring a very austere problem of impact and stability to the system. So, a RST(rough set theory) based stiffness tel-controller was designed to solve the problem, and the result of experiment show that this controller can ensure the stability of the stiffness tel-control

Yunhong Lei; Jianxin Wang; Guanzhen Wu; Yongqing Zhou

2009-01-01

230

Human vertebral body apparent and hard tissue stiffness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cancellous bone apparent stiffness and strength are dependent upon material properties at the tissue level and trabecular architecture. Microstructurally accurate, large-scale finite element (LS-FE) models were used to predict the experimental apparent stiffness of human vertebral cancellous bone and to estimate the trabecular hard tissue stiffness. Twenty-eight LS-FE models of cylindrical human vertebral cancellous bone specimens (8mm in diameter, 9.5mm

Fu J. Hou; Susan M. Lang; Susan J. Hoshaw; David A. Reimann; David P. Fyhrie

1998-01-01

231

Premature aortic stiffness in systemic lupus erythematosus by transesophageal echocardiography.  

PubMed

To assess aortic stiffness by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and to determine its clinical predictors and relation to age, blood pressure, renal function, and atherosclerosis, 50 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 94% women, with a mean age of 38 ± 12 years, and 22 age and gender-matched healthy controls underwent clinical and laboratory evaluations and multiplane TEE to assess stiffness, intima-media thickness (IMT), and plaques of the proximal, mid, and distal descending thoracic aorta. Stiffness at each level and overall aortic stiffness by the pressure-strain elastic modulus was higher in patients than in controls after adjusting for age (overall, 8.25 ± 4.13 versus 6.1 ± 2.5 Pascal units, p = 0.01). Patients had higher aortic stiffness than controls after adjusting both groups to the same mean age, blood pressure, creatinine, and aortic IMT (p = 0.005). Neither IMT nor plaques were predictors of aortic stiffness. Moreover, normotensive patients, those without aortic plaques, and non-smokers had higher stiffness than controls (all p < 0.05). Age at SLE diagnosis and non-neurologic damage score were the only SLE-specific independent predictors of aortic stiffness (both p ? 0.01). Thus, increased aortic stiffness is an early manifestation of lupus vasculopathy that seems to precede the development of hypertension and atherosclerosis. PMID:20813797

Roldan, C A; Joson, J; Qualls, C R; Sharrar, J; Sibbitt, W L

2010-12-01

232

Computation of grain boundary stiffness and mobility from boundary fluctuations.  

SciTech Connect

Grain boundary stiffness and mobility determine the kinetics of curvature-driven grain growth. Here the stiffness and mobility are computed using an analysis of fluctuations in the grain boundary position during molecular dynamics simulations. This work represents the first determination of grain boundary stiffness for a realistic three-dimensional system. The results indicate that the boundary stiffness for a given boundary plane has a strong dependence on the direction of the boundary distortion. The mobility deduced is comparable with that determined in previous computer simulation studies. The advantages and limitations of the fluctuation approach are discussed.

Hoyt, Jeffrey John; Foiles, Stephen Martin

2005-06-01

233

Towards ultra-stiff materials: Surface effects on nanoporous materials  

SciTech Connect

The significant rise in the strength and stiffness of porous materials at nanoscale cannot be described by conventional scaling laws. This letter investigates the effective Young's modulus of such materials by taking into account surface effect in a microcellular architecture designed for an ultralight material whose stiffness is an order of magnitude higher than most porous materials. We find that by considering the surface effects the predicted stiffness using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory compares well to experimental data for spongelike nanoporous gold with random microstructures. Analytical results show that, of the two factors influencing the effective Young's modulus, the residual stress is more important than the surface stiffness.

Lu, Dingjie; Xie, Yi Min; Huang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Shiwei, E-mail: shiwei.zhou@rmit.edu.au [Centre for Innovative Structures and Materials, School of Civil, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne 3001 (Australia); Li, Qing [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

2014-09-08

234

The relationship between renal resistive index, arterial stiffness, and atherosclerotic burden: the link between macrocirculation and microcirculation.  

PubMed

The renal resistive index (RRI) measured by Doppler sonography is a marker of microvascular status that can be generalized to the whole of the arterial tree. Its association with large-vessel dysfunction, such as arterial stiffness or the atherosclerotic burden, can help to establish physiopathological associations between macrocirculation and microcirculation. The authors conducted a cross-sectional study of hypertensive patients (n=202) and a healthy control group (n=16). Stiffness parameters, atherosclerotic burden, and determination of the RRI in both kidneys were performed. The average RRI was 0.69±0.08 and was significantly greater in patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Renal resistive index positively correlated with age, creatinine, and albuminuria. Positive correlations were found with arterial stiffness parameters (pulse wave velocity, ambulatory arterial stiffness index, and 24-hour pulse pressure), as well as atherosclerotic burden and endothelial dysfunction measured as asymmetric dimethylarginine in serum. In the multivariate analysis, independent factors for increased RRI were age, renal function, 24-hour diastolic blood pressure, and arterial stiffness. The authors concluded that there is an independent association between renal hemodynamics and arterial stiffness. This, together with the atherosclerotic burden and endothelial dysfunction, suggests that there is a physiopathologic relationship between macrovascular and microvascular impairment. PMID:24548343

Calabia, Jordi; Torguet, Pere; Garcia, Isabel; Martin, Nadia; Mate, Gerard; Marin, Adriana; Molina, Carolina; Valles, Marti

2014-03-01

235

Asymmetric vibration in a two-layer vocal fold model with left-right stiffness asymmetry: experiment and simulation.  

PubMed

Vibration characteristics of a self-oscillating two-layer vocal fold model with left-right asymmetry in body-layer stiffness were experimentally and numerically investigated. Two regimes of distinct vibratory pattern were identified as a function of left-right stiffness mismatch. In the first regime with extremely large left-right stiffness mismatch, phonation onset resulted from an eigenmode synchronization process that involved only eigenmodes of the soft fold. Vocal fold vibration in this regime was dominated by a large-amplitude vibration of the soft fold, and phonation frequency was determined by the properties of the soft fold alone. The stiff fold was only enslaved to vibrate at a much reduced amplitude. In the second regime with small left-right stiffness mismatch, eigenmodes of both folds actively participated in the eigenmode synchronization process. The two folds vibrated with comparable amplitude, but the stiff fold consistently led the soft fold in phase for all conditions. A qualitatively good agreement was obtained between experiment and simulation, although the simulations generally underestimated phonation threshold pressure and onset frequency. The clinical implications of the results of this study are also discussed. PMID:22978891

Zhang, Zhaoyan; Luu, Trung Hieu

2012-09-01

236

Asymmetric vibration in a two-layer vocal fold model with left-right stiffness asymmetry: Experiment and simulation  

PubMed Central

Vibration characteristics of a self-oscillating two-layer vocal fold model with left-right asymmetry in body-layer stiffness were experimentally and numerically investigated. Two regimes of distinct vibratory pattern were identified as a function of left-right stiffness mismatch. In the first regime with extremely large left-right stiffness mismatch, phonation onset resulted from an eigenmode synchronization process that involved only eigenmodes of the soft fold. Vocal fold vibration in this regime was dominated by a large-amplitude vibration of the soft fold, and phonation frequency was determined by the properties of the soft fold alone. The stiff fold was only enslaved to vibrate at a much reduced amplitude. In the second regime with small left-right stiffness mismatch, eigenmodes of both folds actively participated in the eigenmode synchronization process. The two folds vibrated with comparable amplitude, but the stiff fold consistently led the soft fold in phase for all conditions. A qualitatively good agreement was obtained between experiment and simulation, although the simulations generally underestimated phonation threshold pressure and onset frequency. The clinical implications of the results of this study are also discussed. PMID:22978891

Zhang, Zhaoyan; Hieu Luu, Trung

2012-01-01

237

The fully implicit stochastic-{alpha} method for stiff stochastic differential equations  

SciTech Connect

A fully implicit integration method for stochastic differential equations with significant multiplicative noise and stiffness in both the drift and diffusion coefficients has been constructed, analyzed and illustrated with numerical examples in this work. The method has strong order 1.0 consistency and has user-selectable parameters that allow the user to expand the stability region of the method to cover almost the entire drift-diffusion stability plane. The large stability region enables the method to take computationally efficient time steps. A system of chemical Langevin equations simulated with the method illustrates its computational efficiency.

Safique Ahmad, Sk. [Supercomputer Education and Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)], E-mail: ahmad@math.tu-Berlin.de; Chandra Parida, Nigam [Supercomputer Education and Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)], E-mail: parida@alumni.iitg.ernet.in; Raha, Soumyendu [Supercomputer Education and Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)], E-mail: raha@serc.iisc.ernet.in

2009-12-01

238

Stochastic resonance in a fractional oscillator with random damping strength and random spring stiffness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the increasingly deep studies in physics and technology, the behavior of fractional oscillators has become a focus of scientific research. In this paper, the stochastic resonance (SR) mechanism of a fractional oscillator with random damping and random spring stiffness is extensively investigated. Using the Shapiro-Loginov formula and the Laplace transformation technique, the exact expression for complex susceptibility is obtained. Resorting to numerical simulations, the SR phenomenon of a fractional oscillator is studied. It is found that the influence of the fractional order of a fractional oscillator induces the SR phenomenon. In particular, the influence of the friction coefficient induces multiresonance.

He, Guitian; Tian, Yan; Wang, Yan

2013-09-01

239

Idiopathic hypertonicity as a cause of stiffness after surgery for developmental dysplasia of the hip?  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION There are various complications reported with surgical treatment of DDH. Most studied complication is avascular necrosis of the femoral head and hip stiffness. The purpose of this report was to describe a case with severe stiffness of the hip due to hypertonicity in periarticular muscles after it was treated for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). PRESENTATION OF CASE Three-year-old patient referred to our institution with bilateral DDH. Two hips were operated separately in one year with anterior open reduction, femoral shortening osteotomy. Third month after last surgery, limited right hip range of motion and limb length discrepency identified. Clinical examination revealed that patient had limited range of motion (ROM) in the right hip and compensated this with pelvis obliquity. Gluteus medius, sartorius and iliofemoral band release performed after examination under general anesthesia. Symptoms were persisted at 3rd week control and examination of the patient in general anesthesia revealed full ROM without increased tension. For the identified hypertonicity, ultrasound guided 100 IU botulinum toxin A injection performed to abductor group and iliopsoas muscles. Fifth month later, no flexor or abductor tension observed, and there was no pelvic obliquity. DISCUSSION Stiffness as a complication is rare and is usually resolved without treatment or simple physical therapy. Usually it is related with immobilization or surgery associated joint contracture, and spontaneous recovery reported. Presented case is diagnosed as hip stiffness due to underlying local hypertonicity. That is resolved with anesthesia and it was treated after using botulinum toxin A injection. CONCLUSION Hypertonicity with hip stiffness after surgical treatment of DDH differ from spontaneous recovering hip range of motion limitation and treatment can only be achieved by reduction of the muscle hypertonicity by neuromuscular junction blockage. PMID:24568944

Akgül, Turgut; Göksan, Süleyman Bora; Eren, ?lker

2014-01-01

240

Antibody biodistribution coefficients  

PubMed Central

Tissue vs. plasma concentration profiles have been generated from a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of monoclonal antibody (mAb). Based on the profiles, we hypothesized that a linear relationship between the plasma and tissue concentrations of non-binding mAbs could exist; and that the relationship may be generally constant irrespective of the absolute mAb concentration, time, and animal species being analyzed. The hypothesis was verified for various tissues in mice, rat, monkey, and human using mAb or antibody-drug conjugate tissue distribution data collected from diverse literature. The relationship between the plasma and various tissue concentrations was mathematically characterized using the antibody biodistribution coefficient (ABC). Estimated ABC values suggest that typically the concentration of mAb in lung is 14.9%, heart 10.2%, kidney 13.7%, muscle 3.97%, skin 15.7%, small intestine 5.22%, large intestine 5.03%, spleen 12.8%, liver 12.1%, bone 7.27%, stomach 4.98%, lymph node 8.46%, adipose 4.78%, brain 0.351%, pancreas 6.4%, testes 5.88%, thyroid 67.5% and thymus is 6.62% of the plasma concentration. The validity of using the ABC to predict mAb concentrations in different tissues of mouse, rat, monkey, and human species was evaluated by generating validation data sets, which demonstrated that predicted concentrations were within 2-fold of the observed concentrations. The use of ABC to infer tissue concentrations of mAbs and related molecules provides a valuable tool for investigating preclinical or clinical disposition of these molecules. It can also help eliminate or optimize biodistribution studies, and interpret efficacy or toxicity of the drug in a particular tissue. PMID:23406896

Shah, Dhaval K.; Betts, Alison M.

2013-01-01

241

Homogenized stiffness matrices for mineralized collagen fibrils and lamellar bone using unit cell finite element models.  

PubMed

Mineralized collagen fibrils have been usually analyzed like a two-phase composite material where crystals are considered as platelets that constitute the reinforcement phase. Different models have been used to describe the elastic behavior of the material. In this work, it is shown that when Halpin-Tsai equations are applied to estimate elastic constants from typical constituent properties, not all crystal dimensions yield a model that satisfy thermodynamic restrictions. We provide the ranges of platelet dimensions that lead to positive definite stiffness matrices. On the other hand, a finite element model of a mineralized collagen fibril unit cell under periodic boundary conditions is analyzed. By applying six canonical load cases, homogenized stiffness matrices are numerically calculated. Results show a monoclinic behavior of the mineralized collagen fibril. In addition, a 5-layer lamellar structure is also considered where crystals rotate in adjacent layers of a lamella. The stiffness matrix of each layer is calculated applying Lekhnitskii transformations, and a new finite element model under periodic boundary conditions is analyzed to calculate the homogenized 3D anisotropic stiffness matrix of a unit cell of lamellar bone. Results are compared with the rule-of-mixtures showing in general good agreement. PMID:23793930

Vercher, Ana; Giner, Eugenio; Arango, Camila; Tarancón, José E; Fuenmayor, F Javier

2014-04-01

242

Evaluation of Compressive Strength and Stiffness of Grouted Soils by Using Elastic Waves  

PubMed Central

Cement grouted soils, which consist of particulate soil media and cementation agents, have been widely used for the improvement of the strength and stiffness of weak ground and for the prevention of the leakage of ground water. The strength, elastic modulus, and Poisson's ratio of grouted soils have been determined by classical destructive methods. However, the performance of grouted soils depends on several parameters such as the distribution of particle size of the particulate soil media, grouting pressure, curing time, curing method, and ground water flow. In this study, elastic wave velocities are used to estimate the strength and elastic modulus, which are generally obtained by classical strength tests. Nondestructive tests by using elastic waves at small strain are conducted before and during classical strength tests at large strain. The test results are compared to identify correlations between the elastic wave velocity measured at small strain and strength and stiffness measured at large strain. The test results show that the strength and stiffness have exponential relationship with elastic wave velocities. This study demonstrates that nondestructive methods by using elastic waves may significantly improve the strength and stiffness evaluation processes of grouted soils. PMID:25025082

Lee, In-Mo; Kim, Jong-Sun; Yoon, Hyung-Koo; Lee, Jong-Sub

2014-01-01

243

Cellular mechanoadaptation to substrate mechanical properties: contributions of substrate stiffness and thickness to cell stiffness measurements using AFM.  

PubMed

Mechanosensing by adherent cells is usually studied by quantifying cell responses on hydrogels that are covalently linked to a rigid substrate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) represents a convenient way of characterizing the mechanoadaptation response of adherent cells on hydrogels of varying stiffness and thickness. Since AFM measurements reflect the effective cell stiffness, therefore, in addition to measuring real cytoskeletal alterations across different conditions, these measurements might also be influenced by the geometry and physical properties of the substrate itself. To better understand how the physical attributes of the gel influence AFM stiffness measurements of cells, we have used finite element analysis to simulate the indentation of cells of various spreads resting on hydrogels of varying stiffness and thickness. Consistent with experimental results, our simulation results indicate that for well spread cells, stiffness values are significantly over-estimated when experiments are performed on cells cultured on soft and thin gels. Using parametric studies, we have developed scaling relationships between the effective stiffness probed by AFM and the bulk cell stiffness, taking cell and tip geometry, hydrogel properties, nuclear stiffness and cell contractility into account. Finally, using simulated mechanoadaptation responses, we have demonstrated that a cell stiffening response may arise purely due to the substrate properties. Collectively, our results demonstrate the need to take hydrogel properties into account while estimating cell stiffness using AFM indentation. PMID:24651595

Vichare, Shirish; Sen, Shamik; Inamdar, Mandar M

2014-02-28

244

Transport coefficients of quantum plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Transport coefficients of fully ionized plasmas with a weakly coupled, completely degenerate electron gas and classical ions with a wide range of coupling strength are expressed within the Bloch transport equation. Using the Kohler variational principle the collision integral of the quantum Boltzmann equation is derived, which accounts for quantum effects through collective plasma oscillations. The physical implications of the results are investigated through comparisons with other theories. For practical applications, electrical and thermal conductivities are derived in simple analytical formulas. The relation between these two transport coefficients is expressed in an explicit form, giving a generalized Wiedemann-Franz law, where the Lorentz ratio is a dependent function of the coupling parameter and the degree of degeneracy of the plasma.

Bennaceur, D.; Khalfaoui, A.H. (Centre de Developpement des Technologies Avancees/Secretariat d'Etat a la Recherche Scientifique et l'Environment, Laboratoire de Fusion Thermonucleaire, 2 boulevard Frantz Fanon, Boite Postale 1017 Alger-gare (Algeria))

1993-09-01

245

Effects of varying machine stiffness and contact area in UltraForm Finishing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

UltraForm Finishing (UFF) is a deterministic, subaperture, computer numerically controlled, grinding and polishing platform designed by OptiPro Systems. UFF is used to grind and polish a variety optics from simple spherical to fully freeform, and numerous materials from glasses to optical ceramics. The UFF system consists of an abrasive belt around a compliant wheel that rotates and contacts the part to remove material. This work aims to measure the stiffness variations in the system and how it can affect material removal rates. The stiffness of the entire system is evaluated using a triaxial load cell to measure forces and a capacitance sensor to measure deviations in height. Because the wheel is conformal and elastic, the shapes of contact areas are also of interest. For the scope of this work, the shape of the contact area is estimated via removal spot. The measured forces and removal spot area are directly related to material removal rate through Preston's equation. Using our current testing apparatus, we will demonstrate stiffness measurements and contact areas for a single UFF belt during different states of its lifecycle and assess the material removal function from spot diagrams as a function of wear. This investigation will ultimately allow us to make better estimates of Preston's coefficient and develop spot-morphing models in an effort to more accurately predict instantaneous material removal functions throughout the lifetime of a belt.

Briggs, Dennis E.; Echaves, Samantha; Pidgeon, Brendan; Travis, Nathan; Ellis, Jonathan D.

2013-09-01

246

The role of gravity or pressure and contact stiffness in granular rheology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The steady-state shear rheology of granular materials is investigated in slow quasistatic and inertial flows. The effect of gravity (thus the local pressure) and the often-neglected contact stiffness are the focus of this study. A series of particle simulations are performed on a weakly frictional granular assembly in a split-bottom geometry considering various magnitudes of gravity and contact stiffnesses. While traditionally the inertial number, i.e., the ratio of stress to strain-rate time scales, is used to describe the flow rheology, we report that a second dimensionless number, the ratio of softness and stress time scales, must also be included to characterize the bulk flow behavior. For slow, quasistatic flows, the density increases while the effective (macroscopic) friction decreases with increase in either particle softness or local pressure. This trend is added to the ? (I) rheology and can be traced back to the anisotropy in the contact network, displaying a linear correlation between the effective friction coefficient and deviatoric fabric in the steady state. When the external rotation rate is increased towards the inertial regime, for a given gravity field and contact stiffness, the effective friction increases faster than linearly with the deviatoric fabric.

Singh, Abhinendra; Magnanimo, Vanessa; Saitoh, Kuniyasu; Luding, Stefan

2015-04-01

247

Determining cantilever stiffness from thermal noise.  

PubMed

We critically discuss the extraction of intrinsic cantilever properties, namely eigenfrequency f n , quality factor Q n and specifically the stiffness k n of the nth cantilever oscillation mode from thermal noise by an analysis of the power spectral density of displacement fluctuations of the cantilever in contact with a thermal bath. The practical applicability of this approach is demonstrated for several cantilevers with eigenfrequencies ranging from 50 kHz to 2 MHz. As such an analysis requires a sophisticated spectral analysis, we introduce a new method to determine k n from a spectral analysis of the demodulated oscillation signal of the excited cantilever that can be performed in the frequency range of 10 Hz to 1 kHz regardless of the eigenfrequency of the cantilever. We demonstrate that the latter method is in particular useful for noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) where the required simple instrumentation for spectral analysis is available in most experimental systems. PMID:23616942

Lübbe, Jannis; Temmen, Matthias; Rahe, Philipp; Kühnle, Angelika; Reichling, Michael

2013-01-01

248

The SSME HPFTP interstage seals: Analysis and experiments for leakage and reaction-force coefficients  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An improved theory for the prediction of the rotordynamic coefficients of turbulent annular seals was developed. Predictions from the theory are compared to the experimental results and an approach for the direct calculation of empirical turbulent coefficients from test data are introduced. An improved short seal solution is shown to do a better job of calculating effective stiffness and damping coefficients than either the original short seal solution or a finite length solution. However, the original short seal solution does a much better job of predicting equivalent added mass coefficient.

Childs, D. W.

1983-01-01

249

Determination of loose spline coupling coefficients of rotor bearing systems in turbomachinery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Analytical and experimental studies have been carried out to determine the stiffness and damping coefficients of loose spline couplings used in high speed rotating machinery from which a realistic assessment of rotor stability can be made at the turbomachinery design stage. This is believed to be the first attempt ever to determine these coefficients experimentally. Experimental modal parameters of the rotor bearing system with a spline coupling are found using modal testing for given spline geometry, misalignment, lubrication condition, torque, and rotational speeds. A dual rotor computer algorithm which contains a spline coupling model is developed in order to calculate the analytical modal parameters. Support bearing coefficients are obtained using a pressure dam bearing computer code which employs lubrication theory. Spline coupling coefficients are determined by adjusting the model until the analytical modal parameters match the experimental modal parameters. Both computer simulations and impact testing show that shaft speed and torque are the most important parameters which affect the system natural frequency and logarithmic decrement. However, the modal parameters are not very sensitive to the spine coupling coefficients. Only the second natural frequency shows any sensitivity to the spline angular stiffness. The lateral stiffness coefficient of the spline coupling decreases as rotational speed increases. Lateral and angular damping do not influence the modal parameter until unreasonably large values are considered. This is due to the large value of damping in the pressure dam bearings. Since the modal parameters are insensitive to the spline coefficients, a set of error bounds for the experimental values are chosen to determine the ranges of the loose spline coupling coefficients. The results show that the value of the spline lateral stiffness is between 2.0 x10(exp 7) and 8.0 x 10(exp 8) N/m and the spline angular stiffness is between 2.0 x 10(exp 5) and 8.0 x 10(exp 8) N/m, and the spline angular stiffness is between 2.0 x 10(exp 6) Nm/rad. However, it is impossible to identify the spline damping coefficients because the effect of the support bearing damping coefficients suppress the nonsynchronous whirling motion due to the spline friction even at speeds above the first critical speed.

Park, Sang Kyu

250

A parallel algorithm for generation and assembly of finite element stiffness and mass matrices  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new algorithm is proposed for parallel generation and assembly of the finite element stiffness and mass matrices. The proposed assembly algorithm is based on a node-by-node approach rather than the more conventional element-by-element approach. The new algorithm's generality and computation speed-up when using multiple processors are demonstrated for several practical applications on multi-processor Cray Y-MP and Cray 2 supercomputers.

Storaasli, O. O.; Carmona, E. A.; Nguyen, D. T.; Baddourah, M. A.

1991-01-01

251

Equations for predicting the layer stiffness moduli in pavement systems containing lime-flyash stabilized materials  

E-print Network

properties from Dynaflect data for the Texas flexible pave- ment system. For pavements of known thickness resting on homogenous subgrade of infinite depth and assuming a Poisson's ratio of 0. 5, Scrivner's approximated equation is of the general form: 4E...EOUATIONS FOR PREDICTING THE LAYER STIFFNESS ' MODULI IN PAVEMENT SYSTEMS CONTAINING LIME-FLYASH STABILIZED MATERIALS A Thesis by SHAH MANZOOR ALAM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AN University in partial fulfillment...

Alam, Shah Manzoor

1984-01-01

252

Design parameter study of a permanent magnet biased magnetic actuator for improving stiffness and linearity  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a study on the design parameters of a permanent magnet (PM) biased magnetic actuator (MA) for improving\\u000a stiffness and linearity of the system by using a dimensional analysis. To reduce the number of parameters and to generalize\\u000a the results for similar systems, the design parameters were non-dimensionalized by significant variables characterizing the\\u000a system. For the study, a

Jee-Uk Chang; Hyeong-Joon Ahn; Dong-Chul Han

2007-01-01

253

Bending stiffness measurements of magnetic tapes and substrates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magnetic coatings are made up of either magnetic particles dispersed in a polymeric matrix or thin continuous films of magnetic material. Magnetic tape stiffness, in both the machine and transverse directions, influences the way in which tapes conform to magnetic heads in magnetic tape drives. For this reason tape stiffness plays an important role in the friction, stiction and wear

William W. Scott; Bharat Bhushan

1997-01-01

254

Real time vision based cell stiffness evaluation toward 100% guarantee  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stiffness is an important index to know the quality of a cell. While there have been a couple of works to evaluate the cell stiffness in real time by combining a micro fluid chip with electric impedance based cell counters, we can not see what is really happening in the channel after all. The challenge of this paper is to

Makoto Kaneko; Yuki Hirose; Wataru Fukui; Mitsuru Higashimori; Tomohiro Kawahara; Yoko Yamanishi; Fumihito Arai

2011-01-01

255

Boundary Stiffness Regulates Fibroblast Behavior in Collagen Gels  

PubMed Central

Recent studies have illustrated the profound dependence of cellular behavior on the stiffness of 2D culture substrates. The goal of this study was to develop a method to alter the stiffness cells experience in a standard 3D collagen gel model without affecting the physiochemical properties of the extracellular matrix. A device was developed utilizing compliant anchors (0.048–0.64 N m?1) to tune the boundary stiffness of suspended collagen gels in between the commonly utilized free and fixed conditions (zero and infinite stiffness boundary stiffness). We demonstrate the principle of operation with finite element analyses and a wide range of experimental studies. In all cases, boundary stiffness has a strong influence on cell behavior, most notably eliciting higher basal tension and activated force (in response to KCl) and more pronounced remodeling of the collagen matrix at higher boundary stiffness levels. Measured equibiaxial forces for gels seeded with 3 million human foreskin fibroblasts range from 0.05 to 1 mN increasing monotonically with boundary stiffness. Estimated force per cell ranges from 17 to 100 nN utilizing representative volume element analysis. This device provides a valuable tool to independently study the effect of the mechanical environment of the cell in a 3D collagen matrix. PMID:20012205

John, Jeffrey; Quinlan, Angela Throm; Silvestri, Chiara; Billiar, Kristen

2010-01-01

256

Stiff, strong, and tough hydrogels with good chemical stability  

E-print Network

for oil packers require high stiffness, high strength, and chemical stability; they need to resist deformaStiff, strong, and tough hydrogels with good chemical stability Jianyu Li,a Zhigang Suoab and Joost an elastic modulus of 5 MPa, a strength of 2.5 MPa, and a fracture energy of 14 000 J mÃ?2 , while maintaining

Suo, Zhigang

257

Kinematic optimization for isotropic stiffness of redundantly actuated parallel manipulators  

Microsoft Academic Search

? Abstract— A kinematic optimization procedure for redundantly actuated parallel manipulator is developed to ensure the isotropic antagonistic stiffness in a workspace. The kinematic parameters of the mechanism are optimized to maximize and equal out antagonistic stiffness of the redundantly actuated manipulator when size and shape of the usable workspace are given but position in the entire workspace is not.

Hyunpyo Shin; SungCheul Lee; Jay I. Jeong; Jongwon Kim

2011-01-01

258

Forced Vibration Isolation System with Stiffness On-Off Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Semi-active vibration systems expend a small amount of energy to change the system parameters such as damping and stiffness. The variable damping and stiffness semi-active systems with base excitations have demonstrated excellent performances in the resonant and high frequency regions. For a forced vibration, it plays an important role in describing a building system with wind loading or a vehicle

Yanqing Liu; Hiroshi Matsuhisa; Hideo Utsuno

2008-01-01

259

Measuring Interfacial Stiffness of Adhesively-Bonded Wood  

E-print Network

1 Measuring Interfacial Stiffness of Adhesively-Bonded Wood Edward A. Le FPInnovations - Engineered Interfacial Stiffness of Adhesively-Bonded Wood Abstract Future Abstract (100 to 150 words) 1. Introduction Adhesive bonds in wood composites have two roles. The first is to hold elements of the composite together

Nairn, John A.

260

Estimation of myocardial mechanical properties with dynamic transverse stiffness.  

PubMed

There are currently no validated methods for accurately estimating regional ventricular mechanical properties. We recently developed a dynamic indentation system that can determine dynamic transverse stiffness (the slope of the relation between the indentation stress and indentation strain during high frequency indentations) in as little as 10 msec. The apparatus consists of an indentation probe coupled to a linear-motor and a computerized control system. This indentation system was tested on beating, canine ventricular septa that were mounted in a biaxial system that could apply strains in the plane of the septum and measure the resulting in-plane stresses. The probe indented the septa with peak displacements of 0.1-0.5 mm at frequencies of 20 and 50 Hz. The transverse stiffness was shown to be related to the in-plane stress and stiffness in the isolated septa. Dynamic transverse stiffness was then used to study the effects of myocardial perfusion on passive tissue stiffness and on contractility. In addition, the transverse stiffness was studied in intact canine hearts during diastole, where it was related to the chamber stiffness. Thus, dynamic transverse stiffness appears to allow estimation of myocardial mechanical properties. PMID:8184749

Halperin, H R; Tsitlik, J E; Rayburn, B K; Resar, J R; Livingston, J Z; Yin, F C

1993-01-01

261

Arterial Stiffness, Its Assessment, Prognostic Value, and Implications for Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Arterial stiffness has been known as a sign of cardiovascular risk since the 19th century. Despite this, accurate measurement and clinical utility have only emerged in recent times. Arterial stiffness and its hemodynamic consequences are now established as predictors of adverse cardiovascular outcome. They are easily and reliably measured using a range of noninvasive techniques, which can be used readily

Audrey Adji; Michael F. O'Rourke; Mayooran Namasivayam

2011-01-01

262

Role of Inflammation in the Pathogenesis of Arterial Stiffness  

PubMed Central

Increased arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease independent from blood pressure. Recent studies have shed new light on the importance of inflammation on the pathogenesis of arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness is associated with the increased activity of angiotensin II, which results in increased NADPH oxidase activity, reduced NO bioavailability and increased production of reactive oxygen species. Angiotensin II signaling activates matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade TGF? precursors to produce active TGF?, which then results in increased arterial fibrosis. Angiotensin II signaling also activates cytokines, including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, TNF-?, interleukin-1, interleukin-17 and interleukin-6. There is also ample clinical evidence that demonstrates the association of inflammation with increased arterial stiffness. Recent studies have shown that reductions in inflammation can reduce arterial stiffness. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, increased aortic pulse wave velocity in patients was significantly reduced by anti tumor necrosis factor-? therapy. Among the major classes of anti hypertensive drugs, drugs that block the activation of the RAS system may be more effective in reducing the progression of arterial stiffness. Thus, there is rationale for targeting specific inflammatory pathways involved in arterial stiffness in the development of future drugs. Understanding the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of arterial stiffness is important to understanding the complex puzzle that is the pathophysiology of arterial stiffening and may be important for future development of novel treatments. PMID:22318811

Park, Sungha

2012-01-01

263

Leg stiffness of sprinters using running-specific prostheses  

E-print Network

stiffness of the prosthesis coupled with differences in the limb posture required to run with the prosthesis forces during sprinting. Keywords: biomechanics; spring­mass model; stiffness; prosthesis; amputee springs that are attached to a socket, which surrounds the residual lower limb of a person

Herr, Hugh

264

Modeling and Control of Stiff Robots for Flexible Manufacturing  

E-print Network

Modeling and Control of Stiff Robots for Flexible Manufacturing #12;#12;Modeling and Control of Stiff Robots for Flexible Manufacturing Isolde Dressler Department of Automatic Control Lund University manufacturing. This thesis contributes to the development of robot concepts that fit the needs of SMEs. A major

265

Force and Stiffness of Passive Magnetic Bearings Using Permanent Magnets.  

E-print Network

1 Force and Stiffness of Passive Magnetic Bearings Using Permanent Magnets. Part 2 : Radial of the force and the stiffness between two ring permanent magnets whose polarization is radial. Such a configuration corresponds to a passive magnetic bearing. The magnetic force exerted between ring permanent

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

266

Transport coefficients of multicomponent gas mixtures  

Microsoft Academic Search

General expressions for the transport coefficients of multicomponent gas mixture have been written in a form where the computations for a given N-component gas mixture and for any order can be done on the computer without feeding the explicit expressions for the matrix elements. (General expressions, available in literature earlier, require seperate computer programs for each order of calculation.) These

Kuldip Singh; A. K. Dham; S. C. Gupta

1989-01-01

267

Calculation and measurement of the influence of flow parameters on rotordynamic coefficients in labyrinth seals  

Microsoft Academic Search

First experimental investigations performed on a new test rig are presented. For a staggered labyrinth seal with fourteen cavities the stiffness coefficient and the leakage flow are measured. The experimental results are compared to calculated results which are obtained by a one-volume bulk-flow theory. A perturbation analysis is made for seven terms. It is found out that the friction factors

K. Kwanka; W. Ortinger; J. Steckel

1994-01-01

268

Passive mechanical models of fish caudal fins: effects of shape and stiffness on self-propulsion.  

PubMed

Fishes are found in a great variety of body forms with tail shapes that vary from forked tuna-like tails to the square-shaped tails found in some deep-bodied species. Hydrodynamic theory suggests that a fish's body and tail shape affects undulatory swimming performance. For example, a narrow caudal peduncle is believed to reduce drag, and a tuna-like tail to increase thrust. Despite the prevalence of these assertions, there is no experimental verification of the hydrodynamic mechanisms that may confer advantages on specific forms. Here, we use a mechanically-actuated flapping foil model to study how two aspects of shape, caudal peduncle depth and presence or absence of a forked caudal fin, may affect different aspects of swimming performance. Four different foil shapes were each made of plastics of three different flexural stiffnesses, permitting us to study how shape might interact with stiffness to produce swimming performance. For each foil, we measured the self-propelling swimming speed. In addition, we measured the forces, torques, cost of transport and power coefficient of each foil swimming at its self-propelling speed. There was no single 'optimal' foil exhibiting the highest performance in all metrics, and for almost all measures of swimming performance, foil shape and flexural stiffness interacted in complicated ways. Particle image velocimetry of several foils suggested that stiffness might affect the relative phasing of the body trailing edge and the caudal fin leading edge, changing the flow incident to the tail, and affecting hydrodynamics of the entire foil. The results of this study of a simplified model of fish body and tail morphology suggest that considerable caution should be used when inferring a swimming performance advantage from body and tail shape alone. PMID:25879846

Feilich, Kara L; Lauder, George V

2015-01-01

269

Identification of intrinsic and reflexive contributions to low-back stiffness: medium-term reliability and construct validity.  

PubMed

This study aimed at testing the reliability and construct validity of a trunk perturbation protocol (TPP) that estimates the intrinsic and reflexive contributions to low-back stiffness. The TPP consists of a series of pseudorandom position-controlled trunk perturbations in an apparatus measuring forces and displacements at the harness surrounding the thorax. Intrinsic and reflexive contributions to low-back stiffness were estimated using a system identification procedure, leading to 12 parameters. Study 1 methods (reliability): 30 subjects performed five 75-s trials, on each of two separate days (eight weeks apart). Reliability was assessed using the generalizability theory, which allowed computing indexes of dependability (?, analogous to intraclass correlation coefficient) and standard errors of measurement (SEM). Study 2 methods (validity): 20 healthy subjects performed three 75-s trials for each of five experimental conditions assumed to provide different lumbar stiffness; testing the construct validity of the TPP using four conditions with different lumbar belt designs and one control condition without. Study 1 results (reliability): Learning was seen between the first and following trials. Consequently, reliability analyses were performed without the first trial. Simulations showed that averaging the scores of three trials can lead to acceptable reliability results for some TPP parameters. Study 2 results (validity): All lumbar belt designs increased low-back intrinsic stiffness, while only some of them decreased reflex stiffness, which support the construct validity of the TPP. Overall, these findings support the use of the TPP to test the effect of rehabilitation or between-groups differences with regards to trunk stiffness. PMID:25529140

Larivière, Christian; Ludvig, Daniel; Kearney, Robert; Mecheri, Hakim; Caron, Jean-Maxime; Preuss, Richard

2015-01-21

270

Measurement of elastic-stiffness tensor of an anisotropic thin film by electromagnetic acoustic resonance.  

PubMed

This paper presents a contactless methodology for determining all independent elastic-stiffness coefficients Cij of a transverse isotropic thin film: C11, C12, C13, C33, and C44. The electromagnetic-acoustic-resonance technique measures the acoustic resonance frequencies of a film-coated specimen with a high accuracy, better than 10(-5), which enables determining the film Cij with the known substrate Cij. The measurement takes two steps. First, through-thickness resonance frequencies of longitudinal and shear modes are measured to determine C33 and C44, and the film thickness. Then, remaining three coefficients are deduced from measurements of the free-vibration resonance frequencies of the layer parallelepiped specimen. Simulations and experiments with monocrystal copper and titanium confirm the reliability of the resultant film Cij within 5%, when the film thickness is more than 0.5% of the substrate. PMID:12159959

Ogi, Hirotsugu; Shimoike, Goh; Takashima, Kazuki; Hirao, Masahiko

2002-05-01

271

Anglepoise lamps, Zero Stiffness, Image ForcesAnglepoise lamps, Zero Stiffness, Image Forces andand EshelbyEshelby BendsBends  

E-print Network

-space Dislocations in infinite bodies feel no forces! #12;2 Image ForcesImage Forces A hypothetical negative1 Anglepoise lamps, Zero Stiffness, Image ForcesAnglepoise lamps, Zero Stiffness, Image ForcesNUtoQ/Sb1vcZjQWBI/AAAAAAAAAeU/ABGRV9DEsks/s400/glass+sphere+with+shadow+8+x+8.jpg Rigid body in neutral

Subramaniam, Anandh

272

Attenuation coefficients of Rayleigh and Lg waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis of the frequency dependence of the attenuation coefficient leads to significant changes in interpretation of seismic\\u000a attenuation data. Here, several published surface-wave attenuation studies are revisited from a uniform viewpoint of the temporal\\u000a attenuation coefficient, denoted by ?. Theoretically, ?( f) is expected to be linear in frequency, with a generally non-zero intercept ??=??(0) related to the variations of

Igor B. Morozov

2010-01-01

273

Radon diffusion coefficients for residential concretes  

SciTech Connect

Radon gas diffusion through concrete can be a significant mechanism for radon entry into dwellings. Measurements of radon diffusion coefficients in the pores of residential concretes ranged from 2.1 x 10{sup {minus}8} m{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1} to 5.2 x 10{sup {minus}7} m{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1}. The pore diffusion coefficients generally increased with the water-cement ratio of the concrete and decreased with its density. A least-squares regression of the diffusion coefficients on concrete density gave an r value of -0.73. 16 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Rogers, V.C.; Nielson, K.K.; Holt, R.B. [Rogers and Associates Engineering Corp., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Snoddy, R. [Acurex Environmental Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1994-09-01

274

Structural stiffness and Coulomb damping in compliant foil journal bearings: Theoretical considerations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Compliant foil bearings operate on either gas or liquid, which makes them very attractive for use in extreme environments such as in high-temperature aircraft turbine engines and cryogenic turbopumps. However, a lack of analytical models to predict the dynamic characteristics of foil bearings forces the bearing designer to rely on prototype testing, which is time-consuming and expensive. In this paper, the authors present a theoretical model to predict the structural stiffness and damping coefficients of the bump foil strip in a journal bearing or damper. Stiffness is calculated based on the perturbation of the journal center with respect to its static equilibrium position. The equivalent viscous damping coefficients are determined based on the area of a closed hysteresis loop of the journal center motion. The authors found, theoretically, that the energy dissipated from this loop was mostly contributed by the frictional motion between contact surfaces. In addition, the source and mechanism of the nonlinear behavior of the bump foil strips were examined. With the introduction of this enhanced model, the analytical tools are now available for the design of compliant foil bearings.

Ku, C.-P. Roger; Heshmat, Hooshang

1994-07-01

275

Sources of Variability in Musculo-Articular Stiffness Measurement  

PubMed Central

The assessment of musculo-articular stiffness (MAS) with the free-oscillation technique is a popular method with a variety of applications. This study examined the sources of variability (load applied and frequency of oscillation) when MAS is assessed. Over two testing occasions, 14 healthy men (27.7±5.2 yr, 1.82±0.04 m, 79.5±8.4 kg) were measured for isometric maximum voluntary contraction and MAS of the knee flexors using submaximal loads relative to the individual's maximum voluntary contraction (MAS%MVC) and a single absolute load (MASABS). As assessment load increased, MAS%MVC (coefficient of variation (CV) ?=? 8.1–12.1%; standard error of measurement (SEM) ?=? 51.6–98.8 Nm?1) and frequency (CV ?=? 4.8–7.0%; SEM ?=? 0.060–0.075 s?1) variability increased consequently. Further, similar levels of variability arising from load (CV ?=? 6.7%) and frequency (CV ?=? 4.8–7.0%) contributed to the overall MAS%MVC variability. The single absolute load condition yielded better reliability scores for MASABS (CV ?=? 6.5%; SEM ?=? 40.2 Nm?1) and frequency (CV ?=? 3.3%; SEM ?=? 0.039 s?1). Low and constant loads for MAS assessment, which are particularly relevant in the clinical setting, exhibited superior reliability compared to higher loads expressed as a percentage of maximum voluntary contraction, which are more suitable for sporting situations. Appropriate sample size and minimum detectable change can therefore be determined when prospective studies are carried out. PMID:23667662

Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Watsford, Mark; Murphy, Aron; De Vito, Giuseppe

2013-01-01

276

An experimental and theoretical comparison of rotordynamic coefficients for sawtooth-pattern damper seals. M.S. Thesis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A brief review of the annular seal theory as related to rotordynamics for liquid seals is presented. Also included is an overview of Childs and Kim's current theory for calculating empirical turbulence coefficients and predicting stiffness and damping coefficients for surface roughened damper seals. The designation sawtooth-pattern refers to a seal stator with a roughness pattern whose cross section normal to the seal axis resembles a sawtooth with the teeth directed against the flow. The net stiffness and damping coefficients for the eleven seals are compared to each other, a smooth seal, and the optimum-configuration damper seal previously tested. The experimental force coefficients, the net damping, and the net stiffness coefficients for four of the sawtooth seals are compared to the predictions of Childs and Kim's analysis. The sawtooth-pattern seal had less net damping than the hole-pattern seal but more than the smooth seal. The stiffness was comparable to the hole-pattern. Both the sawtooth and hole-pattern seals leaked less than the smooth seal, while the sawtooth-pattern seal with maximum damping leaked more than the hole-pattern seal. The theoretical predictions compared relatively poorly to the experimental results obtained for the rotordynamic coefficients of the seals investigation.

Nolan, Steven Anthony

1987-01-01

277

Estimation of Quasi-Stiffness and Propulsive Work of the Human Ankle in the Stance Phase of Walking  

PubMed Central

Characterizing the quasi-stiffness and work of lower extremity joints is critical for evaluating human locomotion and designing assistive devices such as prostheses and orthoses intended to emulate the biological behavior of human legs. This work aims to establish statistical models that allow us to predict the ankle quasi-stiffness and net mechanical work for adults walking on level ground. During the stance phase of walking, the ankle joint propels the body through three distinctive phases of nearly constant stiffness known as the quasi-stiffness of each phase. Using a generic equation for the ankle moment obtained through an inverse dynamics analysis, we identify key independent parameters needed to predict ankle quasi-stiffness and propulsive work and also the functional form of each correlation. These parameters include gait speed, ankle excursion, and subject height and weight. Based on the identified form of the correlation and key variables, we applied linear regression on experimental walking data for 216 gait trials across 26 subjects (speeds from 0.75–2.63 m/s) to obtain statistical models of varying complexity. The most general forms of the statistical models include all the key parameters and have an R2 of 75% to 81% in the prediction of the ankle quasi-stiffnesses and propulsive work. The most specific models include only subject height and weight and could predict the ankle quasi-stiffnesses and work for optimal walking speed with average error of 13% to 30%. We discuss how these models provide a useful framework and foundation for designing subject- and gait-specific prosthetic and exoskeletal devices designed to emulate biological ankle function during level ground walking. PMID:23555839

Shamaei, Kamran; Sawicki, Gregory S.; Dollar, Aaron M.

2013-01-01

278

Estimation of quasi-stiffness and propulsive work of the human ankle in the stance phase of walking.  

PubMed

Characterizing the quasi-stiffness and work of lower extremity joints is critical for evaluating human locomotion and designing assistive devices such as prostheses and orthoses intended to emulate the biological behavior of human legs. This work aims to establish statistical models that allow us to predict the ankle quasi-stiffness and net mechanical work for adults walking on level ground. During the stance phase of walking, the ankle joint propels the body through three distinctive phases of nearly constant stiffness known as the quasi-stiffness of each phase. Using a generic equation for the ankle moment obtained through an inverse dynamics analysis, we identify key independent parameters needed to predict ankle quasi-stiffness and propulsive work and also the functional form of each correlation. These parameters include gait speed, ankle excursion, and subject height and weight. Based on the identified form of the correlation and key variables, we applied linear regression on experimental walking data for 216 gait trials across 26 subjects (speeds from 0.75-2.63 m/s) to obtain statistical models of varying complexity. The most general forms of the statistical models include all the key parameters and have an R(2) of 75% to 81% in the prediction of the ankle quasi-stiffnesses and propulsive work. The most specific models include only subject height and weight and could predict the ankle quasi-stiffnesses and work for optimal walking speed with average error of 13% to 30%. We discuss how these models provide a useful framework and foundation for designing subject- and gait-specific prosthetic and exoskeletal devices designed to emulate biological ankle function during level ground walking. PMID:23555839

Shamaei, Kamran; Sawicki, Gregory S; Dollar, Aaron M

2013-01-01

279

Active Trunk Stiffness Increases with Co-contraction  

PubMed Central

Trunk dynamics, including stiffness, mass and damping were quantified during trunk extension exertions with and without voluntary recruitment of antagonistic co-contraction. The objective of this study was to empirically evaluate the influence of co-activation on trunk stiffness. Muscle activity associated with voluntary co-contraction has been shown to increase joint stiffness in the ankle and elbow. Although biomechanical models assume co-active recruitment causes increase trunk stiffness it has never been empirically demonstrated. Small trunk displacements invoked by pseudorandom force disturbances during trunk extension exertions were recorded from 17 subjects at two co-contraction conditions (minimal and maximal voluntary co-contraction recruitment). EMG data were recorded from eight trunk muscles as a baseline measure of co-activation. Increased EMG activity confirms that muscle recruitment patterns were different between the two co-contraction conditions. Trunk stiffness was determined from analyses of impulse response functions (IRFs) of trunk dynamics wherein the kinematics were represented as a second-order behavior. Trunk stiffness increased 37.8% (p < 0.004) from minimal to maximal co-activation. Results support the assumption used in published models of spine biomechanics that recruitment of trunk muscle co-contraction increases trunk stiffness thereby supporting conclusions from those models that co-contraction may contribute to spinal stability. PMID:16099678

Lee, Patrick J.; Rogers, Ellen L.; Granata, Kevin P.

2006-01-01

280

Use of Guided Acoustic Waves to Assess the Effects of Thermal-Mechanical Cycling on Composite Stiffness  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The introduction of new, advanced composite materials into aviation systems requires it thorough understanding of the long-term effects of combined thermal and mechanical loading. As part of a study to evaluate the effects of thermal-mechanical cycling, it guided acoustic (Lamb) wave measurement system was used to measure the bending and out-of-plane stiffness coefficients of composite laminates undergoing thermal-mechanical loading. The system uses a pulse/receive technique that excites an antisymmetric Lamb mode and measures the time-of-flight over a wide frequency range. Given the material density and plate thickness, the bending and out-of-plane shear stiffnesses are calculated from a reconstruction of the velocity dispersion curve. A series of 16 and 32-ply composite laminates were subjected to it thermal-mechanical loading profile in load frames equipped with special environmental chambers. The composite systems studied were it graphite fiber reinforced amorphous thermoplastic polyimide and it graphite fiber reinforced bismaleimide thermoset. The samples were exposed to both high and low temperature extremes its well as high and low strain profiles. The bending and out-of-plane stiffnesses for composite sample that have undergone over 6,000 cycles of thermal-mechanical loading are reported. The Lamb wave generated elastic stiffness results have shown decreases of up to 20% at 4,936 loading cycles for the graphite/thermoplastic samples and up to 64% at 4,706 loading cycles for the graphite/thermoset samples.

Seale, Michael D.; Madaras, Eric I.

2000-01-01

281

Tissue Cells Feel and Respond to the Stiffness of Their Substrate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Normal tissue cells are generally not viable when suspended in a fluid and are therefore said to be anchorage dependent. Such cells must adhere to a solid, but a solid can be as rigid as glass or softer than a baby's skin. The behavior of some cells on soft materials is characteristic of important phenotypes; for example, cell growth on soft agar gels is used to identify cancer cells. However, an understanding of how tissue cells-including fibroblasts, myocytes, neurons, and other cell types-sense matrix stiffness is just emerging with quantitative studies of cells adhering to gels (or to other cells) with which elasticity can be tuned to approximate that of tissues. Key roles in molecular pathways are played by adhesion complexes and the actin-myosin cytoskeleton, whose contractile forces are transmitted through transcellular structures. The feedback of local matrix stiffness on cell state likely has important implications for development, differentiation, disease, and regeneration.

Discher, Dennis E.; Janmey, Paul; Wang, Yu-li

2005-11-01

282

Pearson's Correlation Coefficient  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This tutorial on Pearson's Correlation Coefficient includes the definition, assumptions, and characteristics of r as well as related statistics and hypothesis test procedures. One section instructs users to find correlation in the WINKS software, but those without the software can still use the tutorial. An exercise is given at the end that can be done with any statistical software package.

283

Point Biserial Correlation Coefficient  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page calculates the point biserial correlation coefficient for the case where one variable is dichotomous and the other is non-dichotomous. This page allows the user to input the data directly or copy and paste from a spreadsheet application and provides data summary.

Lowry, Richard, 1940-

284

Acute effects of submaximal endurance training on arterial stiffness in healthy middle- and long-distance runners.  

PubMed

Measures of arterial stiffness are indicators for cardiovascular health and predictors of cardiovascular events. Arterial stiffness is responsive to acute physiologic stressors such as exercise. However, the acute effects of intensive exercise and recovery on arterial stiffness are controversial. Thirty-seven healthy middle- and long-distance runners (33 men, mean age 26.5±6.6 years) underwent evaluation of their cardiovascular stiffness at rest, after a 15-minute warm-up, immediately after vigorous running 3 km at the pace of their 10-km personal best, and finally 30 minutes after terminating their workout. Peripheral and central systolic blood pressure, as well as augmentation index and pulse wave velocity (PWV), increased during exercise in comparison to baseline (P<.001, general linear model). Thirty minutes after terminating the workout, a drop in peripheral blood pressure (P<.001), central blood pressure (P<.001), and PWV (P=.001) below baseline was observed. Therefore, the authors found that exercise of either moderate or vigorous intensity causes a temporary increase in arterial stiffness in middle- and long-distance runners. PMID:25782686

Müller, Jan; Wilms, Michael; Oberhoffer, Renate

2015-05-01

285

Variations in varus/valgus and internal/external rotational knee laxity and stiffness across the menstrual cycle.  

PubMed

Cyclic variations in genu recurvatum (GR), general joint laxity (GJL), varus-valgus (VV), and internal-external (IER) rotational laxities and stiffnesses were examined in 64 females and 43 males at two time points during the females' menstrual cycle [days of minimum (T1) and maximum (T2) anterior knee laxity (AKL)]. Cyclic increases in AKL (9.5%), GR (37.5%), and GJL (13.6%) were observed in females but not males from T1 to T2 (p < 0.001). Cyclic increases in VV and IER laxity were negligible (1.5-3.2%, p > 0.320). Females compared to males had lower overall VV stiffness at T2 (F 37% stiffness (p = 0.452). Across both time points, females had consistently greater VV (30.2%) and IER (20%) laxity and less VV (32.5%) and IER (24.3%) incremental stiffness (p < 0.001). Low-to-moderate associations were observed between AKL, GR, and GJL with VV and IER laxities and stiffnesses in females as measured at T1 and the change in values from T1 to T2. Whether these findings reflect ligament-specific responses to hormone changes, or implicate changes in injury risk potential across the menstrual cycle requires further study. PMID:20882589

Shultz, Sandra J; Schmitz, Randy J; Beynnon, Bruce D

2011-03-01

286

Pressure element of constant logarithmic stiffness for temperature compensated altimeter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The usual type of altimeter contains a pressure element, the deflections of which are approximately proportional to pressure changes. An evenly divided altitude scale is secured by using a mechanism between the pressure element and pointer which gives the required motion of the pointer. A temperature-compensated altimeter was constructed at the Bureau of Standards for the Bureau of Aeronautics of the Navy Department which contained a manually operated device for controlling the multiplication of the mechanism to the extent necessary for temperature compensation. The introduction of this device made it difficult to adjust the multiplying mechanism to fit an evenly divided altitude scale. To meet this difficulty a pressure element was designed and constructed which gave deflections which were proportional to altitude; that is, to the logarithm of the pressure. The element consisted of a metal bellows of the sylphon type coupled to an internal helical spring which was designed so as to have a variable number of active coils. This report presents a description of and laboratory data relating to the special pressure element for the altimeter. In addition equations which apply generally to springs and pressure elements of constant logarithmic stiffness are developed, including the deflection and the spacing between the coils in terms of the constants of the helical spring and pressure elements. (author)

Brombacher, W G; Cordero, F

1930-01-01

287

Modeling, Modal Properties, and Mesh Stiffness Variation Instabilities of Planetary Gears  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Planetary gear noise and vibration are primary concerns in their applications in helicopters, automobiles, aircraft engines, heavy machinery and marine vehicles. Dynamic analysis is essential to the noise and vibration reduction. This work analytically investigates some critical issues and advances the understanding of planetary gear dynamics. A lumped-parameter model is built for the dynamic analysis of general planetary gears. The unique properties of the natural frequency spectra and vibration modes are rigorously characterized. These special structures apply for general planetary gears with cyclic symmetry and, in practically important case, systems with diametrically opposed planets. The special vibration properties are useful for subsequent research. Taking advantage of the derived modal properties, the natural frequency and vibration mode sensitivities to design parameters are investigated. The key parameters include mesh stiffnesses, support/bearing stiffnesses, component masses, moments of inertia, and operating speed. The eigen-sensitivities are expressed in simple, closed-form formulae associated with modal strain and kinetic energies. As disorders (e.g., mesh stiffness variation. manufacturing and assembling errors) disturb the cyclic symmetry of planetary gears, their effects on the free vibration properties are quantitatively examined. Well-defined veering rules are derived to identify dramatic changes of natural frequencies and vibration modes under parameter variations. The knowledge of free vibration properties, eigen-sensitivities, and veering rules provide important information to effectively tune the natural frequencies and optimize structural design to minimize noise and vibration. Parametric instabilities excited by mesh stiffness variations are analytically studied for multi-mesh gear systems. The discrepancies of previous studies on parametric instability of two-stage gear chains are clarified using perturbation and numerical methods. The operating conditions causing parametric instabilities are expressed in closed-form suitable for design guidance. Using the well-defined modal properties of planetary gears, the effects of mesh parameters on parametric instability are analytically identified. Simple formulae are obtained to suppress particular instabilities by adjusting contact ratios and mesh phasing.

Parker, Robert G.; Lin, Jian; Krantz, Timothy L. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

288

On the determination of the coefficients of the Gaussian general theory of the Earth's magnetism for the year 1885 and about the relationship of the three Earth-magnetic elements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An attempt is made to judge the value of the Gaussian series for the Earth's magnetism. The computation employed to do this uses the method of the least and greatest coefficients. The number of unknown which had to be calculated from the individual groups was at most only four. All symbols of Gauss were retained.

Fritsche, H.

1983-01-01

289

Micropipette Aspiration of Substrate-attached Cells to Estimate Cell Stiffness  

PubMed Central

Growing number of studies show that biomechanical properties of individual cells play major roles in multiple cellular functions, including cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and cell-cell interactions. The two key parameters of cellular biomechanics are cellular deformability or stiffness and the ability of the cells to contract and generate force. Here we describe a quick and simple method to estimate cell stiffness by measuring the degree of membrane deformation in response to negative pressure applied by a glass micropipette to the cell surface, a technique that is called Micropipette Aspiration or Microaspiration. Microaspiration is performed by pulling a glass capillary to create a micropipette with a very small tip (2-50 ?m diameter depending on the size of a cell or a tissue sample), which is then connected to a pneumatic pressure transducer and brought to a close vicinity of a cell under a microscope. When the tip of the pipette touches a cell, a step of negative pressure is applied to the pipette by the pneumatic pressure transducer generating well-defined pressure on the cell membrane. In response to pressure, the membrane is aspirated into the pipette and progressive membrane deformation or "membrane projection" into the pipette is measured as a function of time. The basic principle of this experimental approach is that the degree of membrane deformation in response to a defined mechanical force is a function of membrane stiffness. The stiffer the membrane is, the slower the rate of membrane deformation and the shorter the steady-state aspiration length.The technique can be performed on isolated cells, both in suspension and substrate-attached, large organelles, and liposomes. Analysis is performed by comparing maximal membrane deformations achieved under a given pressure for different cell populations or experimental conditions. A "stiffness coefficient" is estimated by plotting the aspirated length of membrane deformation as a function of the applied pressure. Furthermore, the data can be further analyzed to estimate the Young's modulus of the cells (E), the most common parameter to characterize stiffness of materials. It is important to note that plasma membranes of eukaryotic cells can be viewed as a bi-component system where membrane lipid bilayer is underlied by the sub-membrane cytoskeleton and that it is the cytoskeleton that constitutes the mechanical scaffold of the membrane and dominates the deformability of the cellular envelope. This approach, therefore, allows probing the biomechanical properties of the sub-membrane cytoskeleton. PMID:23051713

Oh, Myung-Jin; Kuhr, Frank; Byfield, Fitzroy; Levitan, Irena

2012-01-01

290

Asymptotic coefficients for one-interacting-level Voigt profiles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The asymptotic behavior of general Voigt profiles with general width and shift functions has been determined by Cope and Lovett (1987). The resulting asymptotic coefficients are functions of the perturber/radiator mass ratio; also, the coefficients for the one-interacting-level (OIL) profiles proposed by Ward et al. (1974) were studied. In this paper, the behavior of the OIL asymptotic coefficients for large mass ratio values is determined, thereby providing a complete picture of OIL asymptotics for all mass ratios.

Cope, D.; Lovett, R. J.

1988-02-01

291

Quantification of magnetically induced changes in ECM local apparent stiffness.  

PubMed

The stiffness of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is known to influence cell behavior. The ability to manipulate the stiffness of ECM has important implications in understanding how cells interact mechanically with their microenvironment. This article describes an approach to manipulating the stiffness ECM, whereby magnetic beads are embedded in the ECM through bioconjugation between the streptavidin-coated beads and the collagen fibers and then manipulated by an external magnetic field. It also reports both analytical results (obtained by formal modeling and numerical simulation) and statistically meaningful experimental results (obtained by atomic force microscopy) that demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. These results clearly suggest the possibility of creating desired stiffness gradients in ECM in vitro to influence cell behavior. PMID:24411265

Herath, Sahan C B; Yue, Du; Hui, Shi; Kim, Min-Cheol; Wang, Dong-An; Wang, Qingguo; Van Vliet, Krystyn J; Asada, Harry; Chen, Peter C Y

2014-01-01

292

Torque-stiffness-controlled dynamic walking with central pattern generators.  

PubMed

Walking behavior is modulated by controlling joint torques in most existing passivity-based bipeds. Controlled Passive Walking with adaptable stiffness exhibits controllable natural motions and energy efficient gaits. In this paper, we propose torque-stiffness-controlled dynamic bipedal walking, which extends the concept of Controlled Passive Walking by introducing structured control parameters and a bio-inspired control method with central pattern generators. The proposed walking paradigm is beneficial in clarifying the respective effects of the external actuation and the internal natural dynamics. We present a seven-link biped model to validate the presented walking. Effects of joint torque and joint stiffness on gait selection, walking performance and walking pattern transitions are studied in simulations. The work in this paper develops a new solution of motion control of bipedal robots with adaptable stiffness and provides insights of efficient and sophisticated walking gaits of humans. PMID:25128320

Huang, Yan; Vanderborght, Bram; Van Ham, Ronald; Wang, Qining

2014-12-01

293

The measurement of plain weft-knitted fabric stiffness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new instrument and a test method are presented in this paper that can evaluate the stiffness of plain weft-knitted fabrics. The WIRA Instrumentation Tester can measure torsion data for various flexible fibre assemblies whilst they are being twisted. The torsional properties of two types of fabrics, namely nonwoven and knitted fabrics, were analyzed. Then, comparisons between bending rigidity and torsional rigidity have been conducted using FAST-2, Shirley, Heart Loop and the new WIRA method for the assessment of fabric stiffness. The results show high correlation between bending rigidity and torsional rigidity in assessment of nonwoven fabric stiffness; they also reveal that the WIRA tester and torsional rigidity are more suitable for characterizing the stiffness of plain weft-knitted fabrics than the other test methods.

Haji Mohamad, Ayhan; Cassidy, Thomas; Brydon, Alan; Halley, Dave

2012-05-01

294

Arterial stiffness estimation based photoplethysmographic pulse wave analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Arterial stiffness is one of the indices of vascular healthiness. It is based on pulse wave analysis. In the case we decompose the pulse waveform for the estimation and determination of arterial elasticity. Firstly, optically measured with photoplethysmograph and then investigating means by four lognormal pulse waveforms for which we can find very good fit between the original and summed decomposed pulse wave. Several studies have demonstrated that these kinds of measures predict cardiovascular events. While dynamic factors, e.g., arterial stiffness, depend on fixed structural features of the vascular wall. Arterial stiffness is estimated based on pulse wave decomposition analysis in the radial and tibial arteries. Elucidation of the precise relationship between endothelial function and vascular stiffness awaits still further study.

Huotari, Matti; Maatta, Kari; Kostamovaara, Juha

2010-11-01

295

Operator-Based Preconditioning of Stiff Hyperbolic Systems  

SciTech Connect

We introduce an operator-based scheme for preconditioning stiff components encoun- tered in implicit methods for hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations posed on regular grids. The method is based on a directional splitting of the implicit operator, followed by a char- acteristic decomposition of the resulting directional parts. This approach allows for solution to any number of characteristic components, from the entire system to only the fastest, stiffness-inducing waves. We apply the preconditioning method to stiff hyperbolic systems arising in magnetohydro- dynamics and gas dynamics. We then present numerical results showing that this preconditioning scheme works well on problems where the underlying stiffness results from the interaction of fast transient waves with slowly-evolving dynamics, scales well to large problem sizes and numbers of processors, and allows for additional customization based on the specific problems under study.

Daniel R. Reynolds, Ravi Samtaney, and Carol S. Woodward

2009-02-09

296

Wing/store flutter with nonlinear pylon stiffness  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent wind tunnel tests and analytical studies show that a store mounted on a pylon with soft pitch stiffness provides substantial increase in flutter speed of fighter aircraft and reduces dependency of flutter on mass and inertia of the store. This concept, termed the decoupler pylon, utilizes a low frequency control system to maintain pitch alignment of the store during maneuvers and changing flight conditions. Under rapidly changing transient loads, however, the alignment control system may allow the store to momentarily bottom against a relatively stiff backup structure in which case the pylon stiffness acts as a hardening nonlinear spring. Such structural nonlinearities are known to affect not only the flutter speed but also the basic behavior of the instability. The influence of pylon stiffness nonlinearities or the flutter characteristics of wing mounted external stores is examined.

Desmarais, R. N.; Reed, W. H., III

1980-01-01

297

Improved Equivalent Linearization Implementations Using Nonlinear Stiffness Evaluation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report documents two new implementations of equivalent linearization for solving geometrically nonlinear random vibration problems of complicated structures. The implementations are given the acronym ELSTEP, for "Equivalent Linearization using a STiffness Evaluation Procedure." Both implementations of ELSTEP are fundamentally the same in that they use a novel nonlinear stiffness evaluation procedure to numerically compute otherwise inaccessible nonlinear stiffness terms from commercial finite element programs. The commercial finite element program MSC/NASTRAN (NASTRAN) was chosen as the core of ELSTEP. The FORTRAN implementation calculates the nonlinear stiffness terms and performs the equivalent linearization analysis outside of NASTRAN. The Direct Matrix Abstraction Program (DMAP) implementation performs these operations within NASTRAN. Both provide nearly identical results. Within each implementation, two error minimization approaches for the equivalent linearization procedure are available - force and strain energy error minimization. Sample results for a simply supported rectangular plate are included to illustrate the analysis procedure.

Rizzi, Stephen A.; Muravyov, Alexander A.

2001-01-01

298

The stiff total knee arthroplasty: causes and cures.  

PubMed

Stiffness following TKA can be related to patient factors, intraoperative technical errors, or postoperative surgical complications. The best management is prevention by providing thorough preoperative patient education, aggressive postoperative physiotherapy, and avoidance of technical errors. PMID:11570479

Dennis, D A

2001-09-01

299

Stiffness Corrections for the Vibration Frequency of a Stretched Wire  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the need of introducing corrections due to wire stiffness arising from end constraints and wire axis distribution curvature in the measurement of ac electrical frequency by exciting transverse standing waves in a stretched steel wire. (SL)

Hornung, H. G.; Durie, M. J.

1977-01-01

300

Cornering stiffness estimation based on vehicle lateral dynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, the cornering stiffness estimation problem based on the vehicle bicycle (one-track) model is studied. Both time-domain and frequency-domain-based methods are analyzed, aiming to estimate the effective cornering stiffness, defined as the ratio between the lateral force and the slip angle at the two axles. Several methods based on the bicycle model were developed, each having specific pros\\/cons

C. Sierra; E. Tseng; A. Jain; H. Peng

2006-01-01

301

On stiffness properties of square honeycombs and other unidirectional composites  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we consider stiffness properties of square symmetric unidirectional two-phase composites with given volume fractions. First, we compare the effective moduli of the stiffest possible (or softest possible) of such materials which satisfy transverse isotropy or square isotropy with that of materials satisfying 3D-isotropy.Next, we present some numerical FEM computations of in-plane stiffness properties of square honeycombs. Our

Stein A. Berggren; Dag Lukkassen; Annette Meidell; Leon Simula

2001-01-01

302

Mesenchymal Stem Cell Durotaxis Depends on Substrate Stiffness Gradient Strength  

PubMed Central

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) respond to niche elasticity, which varies between and within tissues. Stiffness gradients result from pathological conditions but also occur through normal variation, e.g. muscle. MSCs undergo directed migration even in response to shallow stiffness gradients before differentiating. More refined gradients of both stiffness range and strength are needed to better understand mechanical regulation of migration in normal and disease pathologies. We describe polyacrylamide stiffness gradient fabrication using three distinct systems that generate stiffness gradients of physiological (1 Pa/µm), pathological (10 Pa/µm), and step (? 100Pa/um) strength spanning physiologically relevant stiffness for most soft tissue, i.e. 1–12 kPa. MSCs migrated to the stiffest region for each gradient. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that migration velocity scaled directly with gradient strength. Directed migration was reduced in the presence of the contractile agonist lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and cytoskeletal-perturbing drugs nocodazole and cytochalasin; LPA- and nocodazole-treated cells remained spread and protrusive, while cytochalasin-treated cells did not. Untreated and nocodazole-treated cells spread in a similar manner, but nocodazole-treated cells had greatly diminished traction forces. These data suggest that actin is required for migration whereas microtubules are required for directed migration. The data also imply that in vivo, MSCs may have a more significant contribution to repairs in stiffer regions where they may preferentially accumulate. PMID:23390141

Vincent, Ludovic G.; Choi, Yu Suk; Alonso-Latorre, Baldomero; del Álamo, Juan C.; Engler, Adam J.

2013-01-01

303

Stiffness Dependent Separation of Cells in a Microfluidic Device  

PubMed Central

Abnormal cell mechanical stiffness can point to the development of various diseases including cancers and infections. We report a new microfluidic technique for continuous cell separation utilizing variation in cell stiffness. We use a microfluidic channel decorated by periodic diagonal ridges that compress the flowing cells in rapid succession. The compression in combination with secondary flows in the ridged microfluidic channel translates each cell perpendicular to the channel axis in proportion to its stiffness. We demonstrate the physical principle of the cell sorting mechanism and show that our microfluidic approach can be effectively used to separate a variety of cell types which are similar in size but of different stiffnesses, spanning a range from 210 Pa to 23 kPa. Atomic force microscopy is used to directly measure the stiffness of the separated cells and we found that the trajectories in the microchannel correlated to stiffness. We have demonstrated that the current processing throughput is 250 cells per second. This microfluidic separation technique opens new ways for conducting rapid and low-cost cell analysis and disease diagnostics through biophysical markers. PMID:24146787

Wang, Gonghao; Mao, Wenbin; Byler, Rebecca; Patel, Krishna; Henegar, Caitlin; Alexeev, Alexander; Sulchek, Todd

2013-01-01

304

Efficacy of pregabalin in a case of stiff-person syndrome: clinical and neurophysiological evidence.  

PubMed

Symptomatic treatment of stiff-person syndrome (SPS) might be challenging and a significant improvement of stiffness and rigidity is generally reached with high doses of benzodiazepines or baclofen causing side effects. A 71-year old woman diagnosed with SPS complained of marked stiffness of trunk and lower limb muscles with sudden painful spasms. She was unable to walk and she could not lean on her right leg. Cortical silent period (CSP) duration evaluated from right abductor pollicis brevis (APB) with transcranial magnetic stimulation was shortened. Polygraphic electromyographic (EMG) evaluation from paraspinal and leg muscles disclosed continuous motor unit activity at rest with interference muscular pattern. Symptomatic treatment with diazepam was withdrawn because of excessive sedation. In order to relieve the intense lumbar pain, she was prescribed pregabalin; since the day after, rigidity and painful spasms dramatically improved and she could walk without assistance. The clinical benefit persisted at 3 months follow-up and was paralleled by almost complete disappearance of EMG activity at rest and prolongation of CSP. The clinical and electrophysiological data in this SPS patient suggest the possible efficacy of pregabalin as symptomatic treatment without any significant side effects, which needs to be replicated in larger case series. PMID:22082988

Squintani, G; Bovi, T; Ferigo, L; Musso, A M; Ottaviani, S; Moretto, G; Morgante, F; Tinazzi, M

2012-03-15

305

Stiff muscle fibers in calf muscles of patients with cerebral palsy lead to high passive muscle stiffness.  

PubMed

Cerebral palsy (CP), caused by an injury to the developing brain, can lead to alterations in muscle function. Subsequently, increased muscle stiffness and decreased joint range of motion are often seen in patients with CP. We examined mechanical and biochemical properties of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, which are involved in equinus muscle contracture. Passive mechanical testing of single muscle fibers from gastrocnemius and soleus muscle of patients with CP undergoing surgery for equinus deformity showed a significant increase in fiber stiffness (p<0.01). Bundles of fibers that included their surrounding connective tissues showed no stiffness difference (p=0.28).). When in vivo sarcomere lengths were measured and fiber and bundle stiffness compared at these lengths, both fibers and bundles of patients with CP were predicted to be much stiffer in vivo compared to typically developing (TD) individuals. Interestingly, differences in fiber and bundle stiffness were not explained by typical biochemical measures such as titin molecular weight (a giant protein thought to impact fiber stiffness) or collagen content (a proxy for extracellular matrix amount). We suggest that the passive mechanical properties of fibers and bundles are thus poorly understood. PMID:25138654

Mathewson, Margie A; Chambers, Henry G; Girard, Paul J; Tenenhaus, Mayer; Schwartz, Alexandra K; Lieber, Richard L

2014-12-01

306

BIOMECHANICS OF DOLPHIN HEARING: A COMPARISON OF MIDDLE AND INNER EAR STIFFNESS WITH OTHER MAMMALIAN  

E-print Network

BIOMECHANICS OF DOLPHIN HEARING: A COMPARISON OF MIDDLE AND INNER EAR STIFFNESS WITH OTHER was to measure both middle ear stiffness and basilar membrane stiffness for the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops that the point stiffness of the bottlenose dolphin basilar membrane has a gradient from 20 N/m near the base to 1

307

Longitudinal perspective on the conundrum of central arterial stiffness, blood pressure, and aging.  

PubMed

The age-associated increase in arterial stiffness has long been considered to parallel or to cause the age-associated increase in blood pressure (BP). Yet, the rates at which pulse wave velocity (PWV), a measure of arterial stiffness, and BP trajectories change over time within individuals who differ by age and sex have not been assessed and compared. This study determined the evolution of BP and aortic PWV trajectories during a 9.4-year follow-up in >4000 community-dwelling men and women of 20 to 100 years of age at entry into the SardiNIA Study. Linear mixed effects model analyses revealed that PWV accelerates with time during the observation period, at about the same rate over the entire age range in both men and women. In men, the longitudinal rate at which BP changed over time, however, did not generally parallel that of PWV acceleration: at ages>40 years the rates of change in systolic BP (SBP) and pulse pressure (PP) increase plateaued and then declined so that SBP, itself, also declined at older ages, whereas PP plateaued. In women, SBP, diastolic BP, and mean BP increased at constant rates across all ages, producing an increasing rate of increase in PP. Therefore, increased aortic stiffness is implicated in the age-associated increase in SBP and PP. These findings indicate that PWV is not a surrogate for BP and that arterial properties other than arterial wall stiffness that vary by age and sex also modulate the BP trajectories during aging and lead to the dissociation of PWV, PP, and SBP trajectories in men. PMID:25225210

Scuteri, Angelo; Morrell, Christopher H; Orrù, Marco; Strait, James B; Tarasov, Kirill V; Ferreli, Liana Anna Pina; Loi, Francesco; Pilia, Maria Grazia; Delitala, Alessandro; Spurgeon, Harold; Najjar, Samer S; AlGhatrif, Majd; Lakatta, Edward G

2014-12-01

308

Gender Differences in Leg Stiffness and Stiffness Recruitment Strategy During Two-Legged Hopping  

PubMed Central

The authors compared leg stiffness (KVERT), muscle activation, and joint movement patterns between 11 men and 10 women during hopping. Physically active and healthy men and women performed continuous 2-legged hopping at their preferred rate and at 3.0 Hz. Compared with men, women demonstrated decreased KVERT; however, after the authors normalized for body mass, gender differences in KVERT were eliminated. In comparison with men, women also demonstrated increased quadriceps and soleus activity, as well as greater quadriceps-to-hamstrings coactivation ratios. There were no significant gender differences for joint movement patterns (p > .05). The relationship between the observed gender differences in muscle recruitment and the increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury in women requires further study. PMID:15730945

Padua, Darin A.; Arnold, Brent L.; Carcia, Christopher R.; Granata, Kevin P.

2006-01-01

309

LSENS, a general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for gas-phase reactions: User's guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for complex, homogeneous, gas-phase reactions is described. The main features of the code, LSENS, are its flexibility, efficiency and convenience in treating many different chemical reaction models. The models include static system, steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow, shock initiated reaction, and a perfectly stirred reactor. In addition, equilibrium computations can be performed for several assigned states. An implicit numerical integration method, which works efficiently for the extremes of very fast and very slow reaction, is used for solving the 'stiff' differential equation systems that arise in chemical kinetics. For static reactions, sensitivity coefficients of all dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of dependent variables and/or the rate coefficient parameters can be computed. This paper presents descriptions of the code and its usage, and includes several illustrative example problems.

Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Bittker, David A.

1993-01-01

310

A simple method for measuring stiffness during running.  

PubMed

The spring-mass model, representing a runner as a point mass supported by a single linear leg spring, has been a widely used concept in studies on running and bouncing mechanics. However, the measurement of leg and vertical stiffness has previously required force platforms and high-speed kinematic measurement systems that are costly and difficult to handle in field conditions. We propose a new "sine-wave" method for measuring stiffness during running. Based on the modeling of the force-time curve by a sine function,this method allows leg and vertical stiffness to be estimated from just a few simple mechanical parameters: body mass, forward velocity, leg length, flight time, and contact time. We compared this method to force-platform-derived stiffness measurements for treadmill dynamometer and overground running conditions, at velocities ranging from 3.33 m.s-1 to maximal running velocity in both recreational and highly trained runners. Stiffness values calculated with the proposed method ranged from 0.67 % to 6.93 % less than the force platform method, and thus were judged to be acceptable. Furthermore, significant linear regressions (p < 0.01) close to the identity line were obtained between force platform and sine-wave model values of stiffness. Given the limits inherent in the use of the spring-mass model, it was concluded that this sine-wave method allows leg and stiffness estimates in running on the basis of a few mechanical parameters, and could be useful in further field measurements. PMID:16082017

Morin, Jean Benoît; Dalleau, Georges; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Jeannin, Thibault; Belli, Alain

2005-05-01

311

The conundrum of arterial stiffness, elevated blood pressure, and aging.  

PubMed

Isolated systolic hypertension is a major health burden that is expanding with the aging of our population. There is evidence that central arterial stiffness contributes to the rise in systolic blood pressure (SBP); at the same time, central arterial stiffening is accelerated in patients with increased SBP. This bidirectional relationship created a controversy in the field on whether arterial stiffness leads to hypertension or vice versa. Given the profound interdependency of arterial stiffness and blood pressure, this question seems intrinsically challenging, or probably naïve. The aorta's function of dampening the pulsatile flow generated by the left ventricle is optimal within a physiological range of distending pressure that secures the required distal flow, keeps the aorta in an optimal mechanical conformation, and minimizes cardiac work. This homeostasis is disturbed by age-associated, minute alterations in aortic hemodynamic and mechanical properties that induce short- and long-term alterations in each other. Hence, it is impossible to detect an "initial insult" at an epidemiological level. Earlier manifestations of these alterations are observed in young adulthood with a sharp decline in aortic strain and distensibility accompanied by an increase in diastolic blood pressure. Subsequently, aortic mechanical reserve is exhausted, and aortic remodeling with wall stiffening and dilatation ensue. These two phenomena affect pulse pressure in opposite directions and different magnitudes. With early remodeling, there is an increase in pulse pressure, due to the dominance of arterial wall stiffness, which in turn accelerates aortic wall stiffness and dilation. With advanced remodeling, which appears to be greater in men, the effect of diameter becomes more pronounced and partially offsets the effect of wall stiffness leading to plateauing in pulse pressure in men and slower increase in pulse pressure (PP) than that of wall stiffness in women. The complex nature of the hemodynamic changes with aging makes the "one-size-fits-all" approach suboptimal and urges for therapies that address the vascular profile that underlies a given blood pressure, rather than the blood pressure values themselves. PMID:25687599

AlGhatrif, Majd; Lakatta, Edward G

2015-02-01

312

Effects of Age, Gender and Level of Co-contraction on Elbow and Shoulder Rotational Stiffness and Damping in the Impulsively End-Loaded Upper Extremity.  

PubMed

Whether an arm will buckle under an impulsive end-load should partly depend on the elastic and viscous properties of the pretensed arm muscles. In measuring these properties we hypothesized that neither age, gender, nor muscle pre-contraction level would affect the bilinear elbow or shoulder lumped rotational stiffness or damping parameters in the impulsively end-loaded upper extremity of 38 healthy men and women. Subjects were instructed to preactivate triceps to either 25, 50 or 75% of maximum myoelectric activity levels. Then a standardized impulsive end-load was applied via a 6-axis load cell to the wrist of the slightly flexed arm in the prone posture. Arm kinematic responses were acquired at 280 Hz and an inverse dynamics analysis was used to estimate the bilinear rotational stiffnesses and damping parameters at the elbow and shoulder. The results show that pre-contraction level affected normalized joint rotational stiffness and damping coefficients (p < 0.02). Age affected the initial stiffness for the elbow (p < 0.05), and gender affected that of the shoulder in the sagittal plane (p < 0.006). Arm muscle strength was positively related to normalized stiffness at the elbow, but not the shoulder. We conclude that age, gender and pre-contraction level each affect the viscoelastic behavior of the end-loaded upper extremity in healthy adults. PMID:25395216

Lee, Yunju; Ashton-Miller, James A

2014-11-14

313

Evaluation of fatigue life of CRM-reinforced SMA and its relationship to dynamic stiffness.  

PubMed

Fatigue cracking is an essential problem of asphalt concrete that contributes to pavement damage. Although stone matrix asphalt (SMA) has significantly provided resistance to rutting failure, its resistance to fatigue failure is yet to be fully addressed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of crumb rubber modifier (CRM) on stiffness and fatigue properties of SMA mixtures at optimum binder content, using four different modification levels, namely, 6%, 8%, 10%, and 12% CRM by weight of the bitumen. The testing undertaken on the asphalt mix comprises the dynamic stiffness (indirect tensile test), dynamic creep (repeated load creep), and fatigue test (indirect tensile fatigue test) at temperature of 25°C. The indirect tensile fatigue test was conducted at three different stress levels (200, 300, and 400 kPa). Experimental results indicate that CRM-reinforced SMA mixtures exhibit significantly higher fatigue life compared to the mixtures without CRM. Further, higher correlation coefficient was obtained between the fatigue life and resilient modulus as compared to permanent strain; thus resilient modulus might be a more reliable indicator in evaluating the fatigue life of asphalt mixture. PMID:25050406

Mashaan, Nuha Salim; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Abdel Aziz, Mahrez; Ibrahim, Mohd Rasdan; Katman, Herda Yati; Koting, Suhana

2014-01-01

314

Enhancing the pulse contour analysis-based arterial stiffness estimation using a novel photoplethysmographic parameter.  

PubMed

In this paper, we propose a novel method for enhancing pulse contour analysis-based arterial stiffness estimation using a simple and low-complexity photoplethysmographic parameter (P2Ocd). The method first eliminates baseline wanders in the digital volume pulse (DVP) by applying a simple morphological filter. The filtered DVP signal is then transformed into a slope sum function signal to simplify the pulse peak detection process by enhancing the upslope of the DVP signal while suppressing its downslope. An adaptive thresholding scheme is applied to detect pulse peaks from the transformed signal. Pulse onsets are then identified as the minimum values between consecutive pulse peaks. The P2Ocd is finally calculated by dividing the time interval between the pulse peak and the pulse onset by the pulse length. In order to assess the agreement of the P2Ocd with an established technique, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity, we performed Bland-Altman and correlation analyses. Furthermore, we evaluated the P2Ocd-based arterial stiffness estimation in terms of prediction accuracy (% error rate) and repeatability (coefficient of variation). The results show that the proposed measurement agrees well with the established technique and shows a high repeatability; it also has a better predictive accuracy than that of conventional methods. In addition, we show that the proposed parameter further improves the predictive accuracy by combining it with age. The proposed method is therefore highly applicable to small ubiquitous healthcare applications. PMID:25561448

Jang, Dae-Geun; Park, Seung-Hun; Hahn, Minsoo

2015-01-01

315

Evaluation of Fatigue Life of CRM-Reinforced SMA and Its Relationship to Dynamic Stiffness  

PubMed Central

Fatigue cracking is an essential problem of asphalt concrete that contributes to pavement damage. Although stone matrix asphalt (SMA) has significantly provided resistance to rutting failure, its resistance to fatigue failure is yet to be fully addressed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of crumb rubber modifier (CRM) on stiffness and fatigue properties of SMA mixtures at optimum binder content, using four different modification levels, namely, 6%, 8%, 10%, and 12% CRM by weight of the bitumen. The testing undertaken on the asphalt mix comprises the dynamic stiffness (indirect tensile test), dynamic creep (repeated load creep), and fatigue test (indirect tensile fatigue test) at temperature of 25°C. The indirect tensile fatigue test was conducted at three different stress levels (200, 300, and 400?kPa). Experimental results indicate that CRM-reinforced SMA mixtures exhibit significantly higher fatigue life compared to the mixtures without CRM. Further, higher correlation coefficient was obtained between the fatigue life and resilient modulus as compared to permanent strain; thus resilient modulus might be a more reliable indicator in evaluating the fatigue life of asphalt mixture. PMID:25050406

Mashaan, Nuha Salim; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Abdel Aziz, Mahrez; Ibrahim, Mohd Rasdan; Katman, Herda Yati

2014-01-01

316

Evaluating pulp stiffness from fibre bundles by ultrasound  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A non-destructive ultrasonic tester was developed to measure the stiffness of pulp bundles. The mechanical properties of pulp are important when estimating the behaviour of paper under stress. Currently available pulp tests are tedious and alter the fibres structurally and mechanically. The developed tester employs (933 ± 15) kHz tweezer-like ultrasonic transducers and time-of-flight measurement through (9.0 ± 2.5) mm long and (0.8 ± 0.1) mm thick fibre bundles kept at (19.1 ± 0.4) °C and (62 ± 1)% RH. We determined the stiffness of soft wood pulps produced by three kraft pulping modifications: standard kraft pulp, (5.2 ± 0.4) GPa, prehydrolysis kraft pulp, (4.3 ± 0.4) GPa, and alkali extracted prehydrolysis kraft pulp, (3.3 ± 0.4) GPa. Prehydrolysis and alkali extraction processes mainly lowered the hemicellulose content of the pulps, which essentially decreased the fibre-wall stiffness hence impairing the stiffness of the fibre networks. Our results indicate that the method allows ranking of pulps according to their stiffness determined from bundle-like samples taken at an early phase of the papermaking process.

Karppinen, Timo; Montonen, Risto; Määttänen, Marjo; Ekman, Axel; Myllys, Markko; Timonen, Jussi; Hæggström, Edward

2012-06-01

317

Measuring Ascending Aortic Stiffness In Vivo in Mice Using Ultrasound  

PubMed Central

We present a protocol for measuring in vivo aortic stiffness in mice using high-resolution ultrasound imaging. Aortic diameter is measured by ultrasound and aortic blood pressure is measured invasively with a solid-state pressure catheter. Blood pressure is raised then lowered incrementally by intravenous infusion of vasoactive drugs phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside. Aortic diameter is measured for each pressure step to characterize the pressure-diameter relationship of the ascending aorta. Stiffness indices derived from the pressure-diameter relationship can be calculated from the data collected. Calculation of arterial compliance is described in this protocol. This technique can be used to investigate mechanisms underlying increased aortic stiffness associated with cardiovascular disease and aging. The technique produces a physiologically relevant measure of stiffness compared to ex vivo approaches because physiological influences on aortic stiffness are incorporated in the measurement. The primary limitation of this technique is the measurement error introduced from the movement of the aorta during the cardiac cycle. This motion can be compensated by adjusting the location of the probe with the aortic movement as well as making multiple measurements of the aortic pressure-diameter relationship and expanding the experimental group size. PMID:25489936

Kuo, Maggie M.; Barodka, Viachaslau; Abraham, Theodore P.; Steppan, Jochen; Shoukas, Artin A.; Butlin, Mark; Avolio, Alberto; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Santhanam, Lakshmi

2014-01-01

318

Increased Cardiovascular Stiffness and Impaired Age-related Functional Status.  

PubMed

Our objective was to determine if increased cardiovascular (CV) stiffness is associated with disability in middle-aged and older adults at risk for congestive heart failure. CV stiffness (brachial pulse pressure/left ventricular stroke volume indexed to body surface area) and total disability (the summed assessment of activities of daily living, mobility, and instrumental activities of daily living) were measured in 445 individuals. A subset of 109 randomly selected individuals also underwent physical function testing. Total disability was associated with CV stiffness (p = .01), driven by an association with mobility (p = .005), but not activities of daily living (p = .13) or instrumental activities of daily living (p = .61). After accounting for age, these correlations remained significant for men (p = .04), but not for women. CV stiffness was also associated with increased 400-m walk time (p = .02). In middle-aged and elderly men at risk for congestive heart failure, CV stiffness is associated with decreased mobility and physical function, and increased overall disability. PMID:24963155

Andersen, Mousumi M; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Morgan, Timothy M; Hire, Don G; Vasu, Sujethra; Brinkley, Tina E; Kitzman, Dalane W; Hamilton, Craig A; Soots, Sandra; Hundley, William G

2015-05-01

319

Generating random walks and polygons with stiffness in confinement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this paper is to explore ways to generate random walks and polygons in confinement with a bias toward stiffness. Here the stiffness refers to the curvature angle between two consecutive edges along the random walk or polygon. The stiffer the walk (polygon), the smaller this angle on average. Thus random walks and polygons with an elevated stiffness have lower than expected curvatures. The authors introduced and studied several generation algorithms with a stiffness parameter s\\gt 0 that regulates the expected curvature angle at a given vertex in which the random walks and polygons are generated one edge at a time using conditional probability density functions. Our generating algorithms also allow the generation of unconfined random walks and polygons with any desired mean curvature angle. In the case of random walks and polygons confined in a sphere of fixed radius, we observe that, as expected, stiff random walks or polygons are more likely to be close to the confinement boundary. The methods developed here require that the random walks and random polygons be rooted at the center of the confinement sphere.

Diao, Y.; Ernst, C.; Saarinen, S.; Ziegler, U.

2015-03-01

320

Control of the stiffness of robotic appendages using dielectric elastomers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new robotic leg design is presented that utilizes dielectric elastomers (3M VHB 4910) to rapidly control stiffness changes for enhanced mobility and agility of a field demonstrated hexapod robot. It has been shown that stiffness changes of electro-active membranes made of dielectric elastomers can overcome challenges with other polymer materials that use heat to create modulus and stiffness changes. Applied electric fields eliminate issues with thermal transport rates and thermo-mechanical delaminatation. The dielectric elastomer is characterized uniaxially to understand its hyperelastic and viscoelastic properties. The uniaxial data is fit to a hyperelastic and viscoelastic finite deformation model. The material is then pre-stretched biaxially to stretch ratios ranging from 200%, 300% and 400%. A set of electro-mechanical transverse load experiments are then utilized to obtain up to 92% reduction in stiffness that is controlled by an electric field. The results are compared to a finite deformation membrane finite element model to understand and improve field driven stiffness changes for real-time robotic applications.

Morton, Jeffrey

321

Fractal diffusion coefficient from dynamical zeta functions  

E-print Network

Dynamical zeta functions provide a powerful method to analyze low dimensional dynamical systems when the underlying symbolic dynamics is under control. On the other hand even simple one dimensional maps can show an intricate structure of the grammar rules that may lead to a non smooth dependence of global observable on parameters changes. A paradigmatic example is the fractal diffusion coefficient arising in a simple piecewise linear one dimensional map of the real line. Using the Baladi-Ruelle generalization of the Milnor-Thurnston kneading determinant we provide the exact dynamical zeta function for such a map and compute the diffusion coefficient from its smallest zero.

G. Cristadoro

2005-09-28

322

Computational methods for the identification of spatially varying stiffness and damping in beams  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A numerical approximation scheme for the estimation of functional parameters in Euler-Bernoulli models for the transverse vibration of flexible beams with tip bodies is developed. The method permits the identification of spatially varying flexural stiffness and Voigt-Kelvin viscoelastic damping coefficients which appear in the hybrid system of ordinary and partial differential equations and boundary conditions describing the dynamics of such structures. An inverse problem is formulated as a least squares fit to data subject to constraints in the form of a vector system of abstract first order evolution equations. Spline-based finite element approximations are used to finite dimensionalize the problem. Theoretical convergence results are given and numerical studies carried out on both conventional (serial) and vector computers are discussed.

Banks, H. T.; Rosen, I. G.

1986-01-01

323

Time-varying torsional stiffness identification on a vertical beam using Chebyshev polynomials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper investigates the performance of the Chebyshev polynomial basis to identify the time-varying mechanical impedance of a vertical beam in torsion. The projection, derivation and product properties of Chebyshev polynomials were used to linearize the differential equation of 1-DOF mechanical systems having multiple time-varying parameters. This allowed the identification of a reduced set of projection coefficients without prior knowledge of initial system states conditions. The method was then applied to experimental data obtained from an equilateral beam excited in torsion while one beam support location was changed over time. Results showed 6.62×10-2% error in stiffness predictions compared to theoretical estimates. Signal filtering was critical to avoid contamination by bending modes of the beam and prior knowledge of inertia led to better results.

Martel, François; Rancourt, Denis; Chochol, Catherine; St-Amant, Yves; Chesne, Simon; Rémond, Didier

2015-03-01

324

Coefficients of associated Legendre functions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The exact coefficients for the explicit forms of the associated Legendre functions Pm for integer values of m,n=0,1,2,...25 are presented in tabular form together with two cross-referenced listings of the zeroes for these functions rounded to five decimal places. The unfactored coefficients and the interger coefficients are presented in adjacent columns for each function. The greatest common factor and divisor have been removed and listed separately for the integer coefficients.

Peasley, Q. D.

1976-01-01

325

Estimation of Stiffness Parameter on the Common Carotid Artery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The arteriosclerosis is on the increase with an aging or change of our living environment. For that reason, diagnosis of the common carotid artery using echocardiogram is doing to take precautions carebropathy. Up to the present, several methods to measure stiffness parameter of the carotid artery have been proposed. However, they have analyzed at the only one point of common carotid artery. In this paper, we propose the method of analysis extended over a wide area of common carotid artery. In order to measure stiffness parameter of common carotid artery from echocardiogram, it is required to detect two border curves which are boundaries between vessel wall and blood. The method is composed of two steps. The first step is the detection of border curves, and the second step is the calculation of stiffness parameter using diameter of common carotid artery. Experimental results show the validity of the proposed method.

Koya, Yoshiharu; Mizoshiri, Isao; Matsui, Kiyoaki; Nakamura, Takashi

326

Effect of surface stress on the stiffness of cantilever plates.  

PubMed

Measurements over the past 30 years have indicated that surface stress can significantly affect the stiffness of microcantilever plates. Several one-dimensional models based on beam theory have been proposed to explain this phenomenon, but are found to be in violation of Newton's third law, in spite of their good agreement with measurements. In this Letter, we review this work and rigorously examine the effect of surface stress on the stiffness of cantilever plates using a full three-dimensional model. This study establishes the relationship between surface stress and cantilever stiffness, and in so doing elucidates its scaling behavior with cantilever dimensions. The use of short nanoscale cantilevers thus presents the most promising avenue for future investigations. PMID:18233163

Lachut, Michael J; Sader, John E

2007-11-16

327

Etiology and Surgical Interventions for Stiff Total Knee Replacements  

PubMed Central

Stiffness is the most prevalent early local complication of primary total knee replacement, affecting approximately 6 to 7% of patients undergoing surgery. The definition of stiffness after total knee replacement in terms of restriction of the arc of motion has evolved in the last 2 decades as patients and physicians expect better postoperative functional outcomes. Gentle manipulation under anesthesia within 3 to 4 months of surgery improves the range of motion in most patients. However, approximately 1% of patients, including those in which the window for manipulation has passed, will require further surgical interventions, which may include arthroscopy with lysis of adhesions, open debridement with exchange of the polyethylene insert, or revision of one or more components. This review will focus on describing the etiology of the problem and the results of the different surgical interventions for stiffness after total knee replacement. PMID:18751792

Leali, Alejandro; Haas, Steven

2007-01-01

328

Improved compression buckling for rectangular composite plates by stiffness tailoring  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Buckling resistance is often a controlling criterion in the design of structural elements. Design concepts that lead to increased buckling loads (or strains) can directly lower the structural cost and/or weight by a number of means. This study quantifies the improvements that can be achieved in compression buckling loads of rectangular composite plates by using a simple stiffness tailoring concept. The approach is to position the unidirectional lamina through the thickness and over the planform of the plate so that the buckling load is increased with no loss in in-plane stiffness or increase in weight. Finite element analyses have been used to determine the effects of tailoring on the buckling load of plates with various boundary conditions, aspect ratios, thicknesses, and membrane stiffnesses. Increases in buckling loads (or strains) of nearly 200 percent over the uniform plate buckling loads are shown possible with this tailoring concept.

Biggers, Sherrill B.; Srinivasan, Sundar

1991-01-01

329

Aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch and mortality in dialysis population.  

PubMed

We hypothesized that increased aortic stiffness (central elastic artery) combined with a decrease in brachial stiffness (peripheral muscular artery) leads to the reversal of the physiological stiffness gradient (ie, mismatch), promoting end-organ damages through increased forward pressure wave transmission into the microcirculation. We, therefore, examined the effect of aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch on mortality in patients in need of dialysis. In a prospective observational study, aortic-brachial arterial stiffness mismatch (pulse wave velocity ratio) was assessed using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity divided by carotid-radial pulse wave velocity in 310 adult patients on dialysis. After a median follow-up of 29 months, 146 (47%) deaths occurred. The hazard ratio (HR) for mortality related to PWV ratio in a Cox regression analysis was 1.43 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-1.64; P<0.001 per 1 SD) and was still significant after adjustments for confounding factors, such as age, dialysis vintage, sex, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, smoking status, and weight (HR, 1.23; 95% CI: 1.02-1.49). The HRs for changes in 1 SD of augmentation index (HR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.12-1.63), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.11-1.50), and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.67-0.95) were statistically significant in univariate analysis, but were no longer statistically significant after adjustment for age. In conclusion, aortic-brachial arterial stiffness mismatch was strongly and independently associated with increased mortality in this dialysis population. Further studies are required to confirm these finding in lower-risk groups. PMID:25452473

Fortier, Catherine; Mac-Way, Fabrice; Desmeules, Simon; Marquis, Karine; De Serres, Sacha A; Lebel, Marcel; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Agharazii, Mohsen

2015-02-01

330

Solving stiff differential equations with the method of patches  

SciTech Connect

The authors introduce a new method for solving very stiff sets of ordinary differential equations. The basic idea is to replace the original nonlinear equations with a set of equally stiff equations that are piecewise linear, and therefore can be solved exactly. They demonstrate the value of the method on small systems of equations for which some other methods are inefficient or produce spurious solutions, estimate error bounds, and discuss extensions of the method of larger systems of equations and to partial differential equations.

Brydon, D. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)] [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Marder, M. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)] [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Pearson, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1998-08-10

331

Thermal Testing of Tow-Placed, Variable Stiffness Panels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Commercial systems for precise placement of pre-preg composite tows are enabling technology that allows fabrication of advanced composite structures in which the tows may be precisely laid down along curvilinear paths within a given ply. For laminates with curvilinear tow paths, the fiber orientation angle varies continuously throughout the laminate, and is not required to be straight and parallel in each ply as in conventional composite laminates. Hence, the stiffness properties vary as a function of location in the laminate, and the associated composite structure is called a "variable stiffness" composite structure.

Wu, K. Chauncey; Guerdal, Zafer

2001-01-01

332

Effect of Hybridization on Stiffness Properties of Woven Textile Composites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The present study focuses on stiffness properties of woven textile reinforced polymeric composites with respect to hybridization, and geometry of reinforcement. The analyzed composites represent combinations of different fibre materials (E-glass, Kevlar 49, carbon HM) in a predetermined fabric geometry (a plane weave embedded in thermosetting polymeric resin) serving controlled properties and required performance. The effects of hybridization on the stiffness properties of woven textile composites have been studied with respect to the fibres materials, the unbalancing degree of fabrics, and the variation of compactness and undulation of yarns. Some undesirable effects in fabric geometry can be overcome by the combined effects of hybridization and compactness.

Bejan, Liliana; Taranu, Nicolae; Sîrbu, Adriana

2013-04-01

333

[Stiff baby syndrome is a rare cause of neonatal hypertonicity.  

PubMed

Stiff baby syndrome (hyperekplexia) is a rare genetic disorder. The condition can easily be misdiagnosed as epilepsy or severe sepsis because of hypertonicity and seizure-like episodes and has an increased risk of severe apnoea and sudden infant death. Tapping of the nasal bridge inducing a startle response is the clinical hallmark. We report cases of two sisters born with stiff baby syndrome with hypertonicity, exaggerated startle reaction and cyanosis. The syndrome has a good prognosis if treated with clonazepam and both cases were developmental normal after one year. PMID:25350416

Rønne, Maria Sode; Nielsen, Preben Berg; Mogensen, Christian Backer

2014-02-24

334

The Effects of Massage on Pain, Stiffness, and Fatigue Levels Associated with Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Case Study  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To study the effects of massage on pain, stiffness, and fatigue in a patient recently diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods: A 47-year-old woman with AS diagnosed 11 months earlier received 7 massages across a 28-day period. Her pain, stiffness, and fatigue were recorded using visual analogue scales daily during the study period. Spinal mobility was measured at each massage session with finger-to-floor measurements for both forward and lateral flexion. The client also used a daily journal to supply pertinent information on quality of life. Results: Improvement was recorded in all dependent variables, with stiffness intensity showing the greatest improvement, to a final value of 0.75 from an initial value of 5. Duration of stiffness also showed improvement, to a final value of 1.2 from an initial value of 3.5. Improvement was also found in general pain (final value: 1; initial value: 4), fatigue (final value: 1.5; initial value 5), and forward and lateral flexion (forward flexion distance—final: 4 inches; initial: 6 inches; lateral flexion, left distance: final, 16.5 inches; initial, 21 inches; right distance: final, 16.5 inches; initial, 20.5 inches). Conclusions: Massage shows promise as a treatment for symptoms associated with AS. Further study is needed to validate these effects and to determine the feasibility of massage as an adjunct to standard care for AS patients with mild-to-moderate symptoms of AS. PMID:21589691

Chunco, Rosemary

2011-01-01

335

Estimation of deformation and stiffness of fractures close to tunnels using data from single-hole hydraulic testing and grouting  

SciTech Connect

Sealing of tunnels in fractured rocks is commonly performed by pre- or post-excavation grouting. The grouting boreholes are frequently drilled close to the tunnel wall, an area where rock stresses can be low and fractures can more easily open up during grout pressurization. In this paper we suggest that data from hydraulic testing and grouting can be used to identify grout-induced fracture opening, to estimate fracture stiffness of such fractures, and to evaluate its impact on the grout performance. A conceptual model and a method are presented for estimating fracture stiffness. The method is demonstrated using grouting data from four pre-excavation grouting boreholes at a shallow tunnel (50 m) in Nygard, Sweden, and two post-excavation grouting boreholes at a deep tunnel (450 m) in Aespoe HRL, Sweden. The estimated stiffness of intersecting fractures for the boreholes at the shallow Nygard tunnel are low (2-5 GPa/m) and in agreement with literature data from field experiments at other fractured rock sites. Higher stiffness was obtained for the deeper tunnel boreholes at Aespoe which is reasonable considering that generally higher rock stresses are expected at greater depths. Our method of identifying and evaluating the properties and impact of deforming fractures might be most applicable when grouting takes place in boreholes adjacent to the tunnel wall, where local stresses might be low and where deforming (opening) fractures may take most of the grout.

Fransson, A.; Tsang, C.-F.; Rutqvist, J.; Gustafson, G.

2010-05-01

336

Association of Inflammatory Gene Polymorphisms and Conventional Risk Factors With Arterial Stiffness by Age  

PubMed Central

Background Inflammatory gene polymorphisms are potentially associated with atherosclerosis risk, but their age-related effects are unclear. To investigate the age-related effects of inflammatory gene polymorphisms on arterial stiffness, we conducted cross-sectional and 5-year follow-up studies using the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) as a surrogate marker of arterial stiffness. Methods We recruited 1850 adults aged 34 to 69 years from the Japanese general population. Inflammatory gene polymorphisms were selected from NF-kB1, CD14, IL-6, IL-10, MCP-1, ICAM-1, and TNF-?. Associations of CAVI with genetic and conventional risk factors were estimated by sex and age group (34–49, 50–59, and 60–69 years) using a general linear model. The association with 5-year change in CAVI was examined longitudinally. Results Glucose intolerance was associated with high CAVI among women in all age groups, while hypertension was associated with high CAVI among participants in all age groups, except younger women. Mean CAVI for the CD14 CC genotype was lower than those for the TT and CT genotypes (P for trend = 0.005), while the CD14 polymorphism was associated with CAVI only among men aged 34 to 49 years (P = 0.006). No association of the other 6 polymorphisms with CAVI was observed. No association with 5-year change in CAVI was apparent. Conclusions Inflammatory gene polymorphisms were not associated with arterial stiffness. To confirm these results, further large-scale prospective studies are warranted. PMID:24077340

Kheradmand, Motahare; Niimura, Hideshi; Kuwabara, Kazuyo; Nakahata, Noriko; Nakamura, Akihiko; Ogawa, Shin; Mantjoro, Eva Mariane; Shimatani, Keiichi; Nerome, Yasuhito; Owaki, Tetsuhiro; Kusano, Ken; Takezaki, Toshiro

2013-01-01

337

An activity coefficient model for proteins.  

PubMed

Modeling of the properties of biochemical components is gaining increasing interest due to its potential for further application within the area of biochemical process development. Generally protein solution properties such as protein solubility are expressed through component activity coefficients which are studied here. The original UNIQUAC model is chosen for the representation of protein activity coefficients and, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time it has been directly applied to protein solutions. Ten different protein-salt-water systems with four different proteins, serum albumin, alphacymotrypsin, beta-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin, are investigated. A root-mean-squared deviation of 0.54% is obtained for the model by comparing calculated protein activity coefficients and protein activity coefficients deduced from osmotic measurements through virial expansion. Model predictions are used to analyze the effect of salt concentrations, pH, salt types, and temperature on protein activity coefficients and also on protein solubility and demonstrate consistency with results from other references. PMID:18636445

Agena, S M; Bogle, I D; Pessoa, F L

1997-07-01

338

Confidence interval estimation of a common correlation coefficient  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a generalized variable approach for confidence interval estimation of a common correlation coefficient from several independent samples drawn from bivariate normal populations. This approach can provide one-sided bounds and two-sided confidence intervals with satisfying coverage probabilities regardless of the number of samples, sample sizes and magnitude of the common correlation coefficient while the large sample approach can

Lili Tian; Gregory E. Wilding

2008-01-01

339

Factor Scores, Structure and Communality Coefficients: A Primer  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

(Purpose) The purpose of this paper is to present an easy-to-understand primer on three important concepts of factor analysis: Factor scores, structure coefficients, and communality coefficients. Given that statistical analyses are a part of a global general linear model (GLM), and utilize weights as an integral part of analyses (Thompson, 2006;…

Odum, Mary

2011-01-01

340

Estimating cotton evapotranspiration crop coefficients with a multispectral vegetation index  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crop coefficients are a widely used and universally accepted method for estimating the crop evapotranspiration (ET c) component in irrigation scheduling programs. However, uncertainties of generalized basal crop coefficient ( K cb) curves can contribute to ET c estimates that are substantially different from actual ET c. Limited research with corn has shown improvements to irrigation scheduling due to better

Douglas J. Hunsaker; Paul J. Pinter Jr; Edward M. Barnes; Bruce A. Kimball

2003-01-01

341

Wheat basal crop coefficients determined by normalized difference vegetation index  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crop coefficient methodologies are widely used to estimate actual crop evapotranspiration (ETc) for determining irrigation scheduling. Generalized crop coefficient curves presented in the literature are limited to providing estimates of ETc for “optimum” crop condition within a field, which often need to be modified for local conditions and cultural practices, as well as adjusted for the variations from normal crop

Douglas J. Hunsaker; Paul J. Pinter Jr; Bruce A. Kimball

2005-01-01

342

Experimental and theoretical rotordynamic coefficients and leakage of straight smooth annular gas seals  

E-print Network

s and s are the measured orthogonal stator accelerations, x and y are the measured shaker component input forces. Childs [17], states that the added mass terms for labyrinth gas seals are negligible, and the rotordynamic coefficients do not change for small... of subtracting the baseline data is to remove the external damping and stiffness attributed to the air inlet and exhaust hoses, pitch stabilizers, radial stiffeners, and stingers. Additionally the leakage effects of the exit labyrinth seals were subtracted...

Kerr, Bradley Gray

2005-02-17

343

Arterial stiffness in chronic kidney disease: causes and consequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic kidney disease is associated with elevated cardiovascular risk, and heart failure and arrhythmias are the biggest causes of cardiovascular death in this population. Increased arterial stiffness is a hallmark of chronic kidney disease and is associated with adverse alterations in cardiac structure and function that may predispose to an increased risk of cardiovascular death. These changes are already apparent

Colin D Chue; Jonathan N Townend; Richard P Steeds; Charles J Ferro

2010-01-01

344

Exploiting Passive Dynamics with Variable Stiffness Actuation in Robot Brachiation  

E-print Network

actuation and control has been discussed in the study of passive dynamic walking where biped robotsExploiting Passive Dynamics with Variable Stiffness Actuation in Robot Brachiation Jun Nakanishi will be able to exploit the passive dynamics of the robot. Finally, numerical evaluations on a two- link

Vijayakumar, Sethu

345

Verifying Stiffness Parameters Of Filament-Wound Cylinders  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Predicted engineering stiffness parameters of filament-wound composite-material cylinders verified with respect to experimental data, by use of equations developed straightforwardly from applicable formulation of Hooke's law. Equations derived in engineering study of filament-wound rocket-motor cases, also applicable to other cylindrical pressure vessels made of orthotropic materials.

Verderaime, V.; Rheinfurth, M.

1994-01-01

346

Perception of Delayed Stiffness Assaf Pressman, Sensory Motor Performance Program,  

E-print Network

the effect of a delay on perception of surfaces stiffness. We used a forced choice paradigm in which subjects visual feedback. Virtual surfaces were obtained by generating an elastic force proportional to the penetration of the handle of a manipulandum inside a virtual boundary. The elastic force was either

Karniel, Amir

347

Magnetorheological brush - a soft structure with highly tuneable stiffness.  

PubMed

By combining the field-stiffening effect of magnetorheological (MR) elastomers and the Euler buckling mechanism, we developed a brush-like magneto-active structure with highly tuneable stiffness. When the applied mechanical load is within a certain range, the effective stiffness of the structure can be tuned by several orders of magnitude with the applied magnetic field. The performance of the structure and its dependence on various synthesis parameters, such as the curing field and filler concentration, were investigated experimentally. It is found that the increase in the critical load for buckling is more than the contribution from the stiffening of the MR elastomer. To unravel the relationship between the stiffness increase and the applied field, a theoretical model with coupled mechanical deformation and magnetic field is established. The prediction of the model agrees well with experimental results. The theory may also be used to model the behaviour of other similar materials, such as MR gels. The MR brush developed in this research holds promise for potential applications in smart structures or devices that require mechanical stiffness to be tuneable in a relatively large range. As the amplification mechanism is independent of the base material, it could be used in conjunction with emerging MR materials for further enhanced performance. PMID:24652105

Huang, Xiao; Mohla, Akshi; Hong, Wei; Bastawros, Ashraf F; Feng, Xi-Qiao

2014-03-14

348

Riparian Sediment Delivery Ratio: Stiff Diagrams and Artifical Neural Networks  

EPA Science Inventory

Various methods are used to estimate sediment transport through riparian buffers and grass jilters with the sediment delivery ratio having been the most widely applied. The U.S. Forest Service developed a sediment delivery ratio using the stiff diagram and a logistic curve to int...

349

Simultaneously high stiffness and damping in nanoengineered microtruss composites.  

PubMed

Materials combining high stiffness and mechanical energy dissipation are needed in automotive, aviation, construction, and other technologies where structural elements are exposed to dynamic loads. In this paper we demonstrate that a judicious combination of carbon nanotube engineered trusses held in a dissipative polymer can lead to a composite material that simultaneously exhibits both high stiffness and damping. Indeed, the combination of stiffness and damping that is reported is quite high in any single monolithic material. Carbon nanotube (CNT) microstructures grown in a novel 3D truss topology form the backbone of these nanocomposites. The CNT trusses are coated by ceramics and by a nanostructured polymer film assembled using the layer-by-layer technique. The crevices of the trusses are then filled with soft polyurethane. Each constituent of the composite is accurately modeled, and these models are used to guide the manufacturing process, in particular the choice of the backbone topology and the optimization of the mechanical properties of the constituent materials. The resulting composite exhibits much higher stiffness (80 times) and similar damping (specific damping capacity of 0.8) compared to the polymer. Our work is a step forward in implementing the concept of materials by design across multiple length scales. PMID:24620996

Meaud, Julien; Sain, Trisha; Yeom, Bongjun; Park, Sei Jin; Shoultz, Anna Brieland; Hulbert, Gregory; Ma, Zheng-Dong; Kotov, Nicholas A; Hart, A John; Arruda, Ellen M; Waas, Anthony M

2014-04-22

350

A Multiwell Platform for Studying Stiffness-Dependent Cell Biology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adherent cells are typically cultured on rigid substrates that are orders of magnitude stiffer than their tissue of origin. Here, we describe a method to rapidly fabricate 96 and 384 well platforms for routine screening of cells in tissue-relevant stiffness contexts. Briefly, polyacrylamide (PA) hydrogels are cast in glass-bottom plates, functionalized with collagen, and sterilized for cell culture. The Young's

Justin D. Mih; Asma S. Sharif; Fei Liu; Aleksandar Marinkovic; Matthew M. Symer; Daniel J. Tschumperlin; Nic D. Leipzig

2011-01-01

351

How crouch gait can dynamically induce stiff-knee gait.  

PubMed

Children with cerebral palsy frequently experience foot dragging and tripping during walking due to a lack of adequate knee flexion in swing (stiff-knee gait). Stiff-knee gait is often accompanied by an overly flexed knee during stance (crouch gait). Studies on stiff-knee gait have mostly focused on excessive knee muscle activity during (pre)swing, but the passive dynamics of the limbs may also have an important effect. To examine the effects of a crouched posture on swing knee flexion, we developed a forward-dynamic model of human walking with a passive swing knee, capable of stable cyclic walking for a range of stance knee crouch angles. As crouch angle during stance was increased, the knee naturally flexed much less during swing, resulting in a 'stiff-knee' gait pattern and reduced foot clearance. Reduced swing knee flexion was primarily due to altered gravitational moments around the joints during initial swing. We also considered the effects of increased push-off strength and swing hip flexion torque, which both increased swing knee flexion, but the effect of crouch angle was dominant. These findings demonstrate that decreased knee flexion during swing can occur purely as the dynamical result of crouch, rather than from altered muscle function or pathoneurological control alone. PMID:20162360

van der Krogt, Marjolein M; Bregman, Daan J J; Wisse, Martijn; Doorenbosch, Caroline A M; Harlaar, Jaap; Collins, Steven H

2010-04-01

352

Substrate stiffness affects skeletal myoblast differentiation in vitro  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To maximize the therapeutic efficacy of cardiac muscle constructs produced by stem cells and tissue engineering protocols, suitable scaffolds should be designed to recapitulate all the characteristics of native muscle and mimic the microenvironment encountered by cells in vivo. Moreover, so not to interfere with cardiac contractility, the scaffold should be deformable enough to withstand muscle contraction. Recently, it was suggested that the mechanical properties of scaffolds can interfere with stem/progenitor cell functions, and thus careful consideration is required when choosing polymers for targeted applications. In this study, cross-linked poly-?-caprolactone membranes having similar chemical composition and controlled stiffness in a supra-physiological range were challenged with two sources of myoblasts to evaluate the suitability of substrates with different stiffness for cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, muscle-specific and non-related feeder layers were prepared on stiff surfaces to reveal the contribution of biological and mechanical cues to skeletal muscle progenitor differentiation. We demonstrated that substrate stiffness does affect myogenic differentiation, meaning that softer substrates can promote differentiation and that a muscle-specific feeder layer can improve the degree of maturation in skeletal muscle stem cells.

Romanazzo, Sara; Forte, Giancarlo; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Uto, Koichiro; Pagliari, Stefania; Aoyagi, Takao; Traversa, Enrico; Taniguchi, Akiyoshi

2012-12-01

353

Flexural stiffness of feather shafts: geometry rules over material properties.  

PubMed

Flight feathers of birds interact with the flow field during flight. They bend and twist under aerodynamic loads. Two parameters are mainly responsible for flexibility in feathers: the elastic modulus (Young's modulus, E) of the material (keratin) and the geometry of the rachises, more precisely the second moment of area (I). Two independent methods were employed to determine Young's modulus of feather rachis keratin. Moreover, the second moment of area and the bending stiffness of feather shafts from fifth primaries of barn owls (Tyto alba) and pigeons (Columba livia) were calculated. These species of birds are of comparable body mass but differ in wing size and flight style. Whether their feather material (keratin) underwent an adaptation in stiffness was previously unknown. This study shows that no significant variation in Young's modulus between the two species exists. However, differences in Young's modulus between proximal and distal feather regions were found in both species. Cross-sections of pigeon rachises were particularly well developed and rich in structural elements, exemplified by dorsal ridges and a well-pronounced transversal septum. In contrast, cross-sections of barn owl rachises were less profiled but had a higher second moment of area. Consequently, the calculated bending stiffness (EI) was higher in barn owls as well. The results show that flexural stiffness is predominantly influenced by the geometry of the feathers rather than by local material properties. PMID:22246249

Bachmann, Thomas; Emmerlich, Jens; Baumgartner, Werner; Schneider, Jochen M; Wagner, Hermann

2012-02-01

354

Accelerated Stochastic Simulation of the Stiff Enzyme-Substrate Reaction  

E-print Network

1 Accelerated Stochastic Simulation of the Stiff Enzyme-Substrate Reaction Yang Cao a) Dept, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 Abstract: The enzyme-catalyzed conversion of a substrate this process, the intermediate enzyme-substrate complex is usually much more likely to decay into its original

Cao, Yang

355

INTERIOR VIEW WITH STIFF LEG LADLE CRANE OPERATOR, LUKE WALKER, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

INTERIOR VIEW WITH STIFF LEG LADLE CRANE OPERATOR, LUKE WALKER, POURING OFF SLAG FROM LADLE AS SKIMMER, BRUCE ELLIOTT, RAKES THE SLAG FROM THE MOLTEN METAL. - American Cast Iron Pipe Company, Mixer Building, 1501 Thirty-first Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

356

Cardiovascular Health and Arterial Stiffness: The Maine Syracuse Longitudinal Study  

PubMed Central

Ideal cardiovascular health is a recently defined construct by the American Heart Association (AHA) to promote cardiovascular disease reduction. Arterial stiffness is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The extent to which the presence of multiple prevalent cardiovascular risk factors and health behaviors is associated with arterial stiffness is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the AHA construct of cardiovascular health and arterial stiffness, as indexed by pulse wave velocity and pulse pressure. The AHA health metrics, comprising of four health behaviors (smoking, body mass index, physical activity, and diet) and three health factors (total cholesterol, blood pressure, and fasting plasma glucose) were evaluated among 505 participants in the Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study. Outcome measures were carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse pressure measured at 4 to 5-year follow-up. Better cardiovascular health, comprising both health factors and behaviors, was associated with lower arterial stiffness, as indexed by pulse wave velocity and pulse pressure. Those with at least five health metrics at ideal levels had significantly lower PWV (9.8 m/s) than those with two or less ideal health metrics (11.7 m/s) (P<0.001). This finding remained with the addition of demographic and PWV-related variables (P=0.004). PMID:24384629

Crichton, Georgina E; Elias, Merrill F; Robbins, Michael A

2014-01-01

357

Materials of Controlled Shape and Stiffness with Photocurable Microfluidic Endoskeleton  

E-print Network

demonstrated the use of 3D microvascular networks in a self-healing material, which is inspired by the functionality of natural skin derived from its vesicular blood network.[30] Their self-healing compositeMaterials of Controlled Shape and Stiffness with Photocurable Microfluidic Endoskeleton By Suk Tai

Velev, Orlin D.

358

Hyperbolic conservation laws with stiff relaxation terms and entropy  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the limiting behavior of systems of hyperbolic conservation lawswith stiff relaxation terms. Reduced systems, inviscid and viscous local conservationlaws, and weakly nonlinear limits are derived through asymptotic expansions.An entropy condition is introduced for N \\\\Theta N systems that ensuresthe hyperbolicity of the reduced inviscid system. The resulting characteristicspeeds are shown to be interlaced with those of the original

Gui-Qiang Chen; C. David Levermore; Tai-Ping Liu

1994-01-01

359

SUPPORTING INFORMATION Stress-Induced Variations in the Stiffness  

E-print Network

surface stress load. Subproblem (2): Beam structure with no surface stress load and a specified in-plane subproblems gives the required in-plane deformation of the original problem, with exact satisfaction of freeSUPPORTING INFORMATION Stress-Induced Variations in the Stiffness of Micro- and Nano

Roukes, Michael L.

360

Stiffness design method of symmetric laminates using lamination parameters  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method is proposed for determining laminate configurations corresponding to the lamination parameters of a symmetric laminate whose in-plane and out-of-plane stiffness characteristics are governed by four in-plane and four out-of-plane lamination parameters, respectively. The relation between the lamination parameters is obtained, and the limitation of conventional laminates is discussed from the design viewpoint.

Hisao Fukunaga; Hideki Sekine

1992-01-01

361

Improved compression buckling for rectangular composite plates by stiffness tailoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

Buckling resistance is often a controlling criterion in the design of structural elements. Design concepts that lead to increased buckling loads (or strains) can directly lower the structural cost and\\/or weight by a number of means. This study quantifies the improvements that can be achieved in compression buckling loads of rectangular composite plates by using a simple stiffness tailoring concept.

Sherrill B. Biggers; Sundar Srinivasan

1991-01-01

362

SOIL HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES INFLUENCED BY STIFF-STEMMED GRASS HEDGES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Stiff-stemmed grass hedges planted in narrow rows within a field offer an opportunity for effective erosion control at a reasonable cost. The effectiveness of the hedges, however, may depend on soil hydraulic properties as influenced by a hedge. The objective of this study was to characterize and ...

363

Exercise Blood Pressure Response, Albuminuria, and Arterial Stiffness in Hypertension  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundA hypertensive response to exercise is associated with high cardiovascular risk, whereas the data about its relation to surrogates of subclinical atherosclerosis are scarce. We investigated the relationships of a hypertensive response to exercise with urinary albumin excretion and arterial stiffness in hypertensives.

Costas Tsioufis; Kyriakos Dimitriadis; Costas Thomopoulos; Dimitrios Tsiachris; Maria Selima; Elli Stefanadi; Dimitrios Tousoulis; Ioannis Kallikazaros; Christodoulos Stefanadis

2008-01-01

364

Design optimization of a twist compliant mechanism with nonlinear stiffness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A contact-aided compliant mechanism called a twist compliant mechanism (TCM) is presented in this paper. This mechanism has nonlinear stiffness when it is twisted in both directions along its axis. The inner core of the mechanism is primarily responsible for its flexibility in one twisting direction. The contact surfaces of the cross-members and compliant sectors are primarily responsible for its high stiffness in the opposite direction. A desired twist angle in a given direction can be achieved by tailoring the stiffness of a TCM. The stiffness of a compliant twist mechanism can be tailored by varying thickness of its cross-members, thickness of the core and thickness of its sectors. A multi-objective optimization problem with three objective functions is proposed in this paper, and used to design an optimal TCM with desired twist angle. The objective functions are to minimize the mass and maximum von-Mises stress observed, while minimizing or maximizing the twist angles under specific loading conditions. The multi-objective optimization problem proposed in this paper is solved for an ornithopter flight research platform as a case study, with the goal of using the TCM to achieve passive twisting of the wing during upstroke, while keeping the wing fully extended and rigid during the downstroke. Prototype TCMs have been fabricated using 3D printing and tested. Testing results are also presented in this paper.

Tummala, Y.; Frecker, M. I.; Wissa, A. A.; Hubbard, J. E., Jr.

2014-10-01

365

THE STIFFNESS OF THE FLAGELLA OF IMPALED BULL SPERM  

E-print Network

system. We have previously reported that external ATP and ADP BIOPHYSICAL JOURNAL VOLUME 13 1973 437 #12, 1971, 1972 a and c). The effect of ATP and ADP on stiffness is presently reported. METHODS Bull semen diluted to five times its volume with citrate-egg yolk diluent (Rikmenspoel, 1965 a) was generously

Lindemann, Charles

366

On Zero Stiffness Mark Schenk and Simon D Guest  

E-print Network

the remarkable ability to undergo large elastic deformations without requiring external work. Several equivalent that each approach brings. 1 Introduction A fascinating combination of geometry, stiffness and prestress external work -- in effect, these elastic structures behave as mechanisms. This remarkable property forms

Guest, Simon

367

Composite Materials with Viscoelastic Stiffness Greater Than Diamond  

E-print Network

. Stone,3 R. S. Lakes4 * We show that composite materials can exhibit a viscoelastic modulus (Young of single foam cells (3). The elastic modulus, a stress/strain ratio, is a measure of material stiffness compressibility has been observed in small-cell foams (10). Negative compressibility differs from negative thermal

Lakes, Roderic

368

Substrata Mechanical Stiffness Can Regulate Adhesion of Viable Bacteria  

E-print Network

Substrata Mechanical Stiffness Can Regulate Adhesion of Viable Bacteria Jenny A. Lichter,, M. Todd, 2008 The competing mechanisms that regulate adhesion of bacteria to surfaces and subsequent biofilm and hospital-acquired infections due to bacteria, there is considerable interest in better understanding

Van Vliet, Krystyn J.

369

Discontinuous Galerkin for Hyperbolic Systems with Stiff Relaxation  

SciTech Connect

A Discontinuous Galerkin method is applied to hyperbolic systems that contain stiff relaxation terms. We demonstrate that when the relaxation time is unresolved, the method is accurate in the sense that it accurately represents the system's Chapman-Enskog approximation. Results are presented for the hyperbolic heat equation and coupled radiation-hydrodynamics.

Lowrie, R.B.; Morel, J.E.

1999-05-24

370

Acute exercise modifies titin phosphorylation and increases cardiac myofilament stiffness  

PubMed Central

Titin-based myofilament stiffness is largely modulated by phosphorylation of its elastic I-band regions N2-Bus (decreases passive stiffness, PT) and PEVK (increases PT). Here, we tested the hypothesis that acute exercise changes titin phosphorylation and modifies myofilament stiffness. Adult rats were exercised on a treadmill for 15 min, untrained animals served as controls. Titin phosphorylation was determined by Western blot analysis using phosphospecific antibodies to Ser4099 and Ser4010 in the N2-Bus region (PKG and PKA-dependent. respectively), and to Ser11878 and Ser 12022 in the PEVK region (PKC? and CaMKII?-dependent, respectively). Passive tension was determined by step-wise stretching of isolated skinned cardiomyocytes to sarcomere length (SL) ranging from 1.9 to 2.4 ?m and showed a significantly increased PT from exercised samples, compared to controls. In cardiac samples titin N2-Bus phosphorylation was significantly decreased by 40% at Ser4099, however, no significant changes were observed at Ser4010. PEVK phosphorylation at Ser11878 was significantly increased, which is probably mediated by the observed exercise-induced increase in PKC? activity. Interestingly, relative phosphorylation of Ser12022 was substantially decreased in the exercised samples. Surprisingly, in skeletal samples from acutely exercised animals we detected a significant decrease in PEVK phosphorylation at Ser11878 and an increase in Ser12022 phosphorylation; however, PKC? activity remained unchanged. In summary, our data show that a single exercise bout of 15 min affects titin domain phosphorylation and titin-based myocyte stiffness with obviously divergent effects in cardiac and skeletal muscle tissues. The observed changes in titin stiffness could play an important role in adapting the passive and active properties of the myocardium and the skeletal muscle to increased physical activity. PMID:25477822

Müller, Anna E.; Kreiner, Matthias; Kötter, Sebastian; Lassak, Philipp; Bloch, Wilhelm; Suhr, Frank; Krüger, Martina

2014-01-01

371

Partitioning coefficients between olivine and silicate melts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Variation of Nernst partition coefficients (D) between olivine and silicate melts cannot be neglected when modeling partial melting and fractional crystallization. Published natural and experimental olivine\\/liquidD data were examined for covariation with pressure, temperature, olivine forsterite content, and melt SiO2, H2O, MgO and MgO\\/MgO+FeOtotal. Values of olivine\\/liquidD generally increase with decreasing temperature and melt MgO content, and with increasing melt

J. H. Bédard

2005-01-01

372

Partitioning coefficients between olivine and silicate melts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Variation of Nernst partition coefficients (D) between olivine and silicate melts cannot be neglected when modeling partial melting and fractional crystallization. Published natural and experimental olivine\\/liquidD data were examined for covariation with pressure, temperature, olivine forsterite content, and melt SiO2, H2O, MgO and MgO\\/MgO + FeOtotal. Values of olivine\\/liquidD generally increase with decreasing temperature and melt MgO content, and with

J. H. Bédard

2005-01-01

373

Reference Material for Seebeck Coefficients  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes a measurement method and a measuring system to determine absolute Seebeck coefficients of thermoelectric bulk materials with the aim of establishing reference materials for Seebeck coefficients. Reference materials with known thermoelectric properties are essential to allow a reliable benchmarking of different thermoelectric materials for application in thermoelectric generators to convert thermal into electrical energy or vice versa. A temperature gradient (1 to 8) K is induced across the sample, and the resulting voltage is measured by using two differential Au/Pt thermocouples. On the basis of the known absolute Seebeck coefficients of Au and Pt, the unknown Seebeck coefficient of the sample is calculated. The measurements are performed in inert atmospheres and at low pressure (30 to 60) mbar in the temperature range between 300 K and 860 K. The measurement results of the Seebeck coefficients of metallic and semiconducting samples are presented. Achievable relative measurement uncertainties of the Seebeck coefficient are on the order of a few percent.

Edler, F.; Lenz, E.; Haupt, S.

2015-03-01

374

Chaotic Scattering Theory of Transport and Reaction-Rate Coefficients  

E-print Network

The chaotic scattering theory is here extended to obtain escape-rate expressions for the transport coefficients appropriate for a simple classical fluid, or for a chemically reacting system. This theory allows various transport coefficients such as the coefficients of viscosity, thermal conductivity, etc., to be expressed in terms of the positive Lyapunov exponents and Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy of a set of phase space trajectories that take place on an appropriate fractal repeller. This work generalizes the previous results of Gaspard and Nicolis for the coefficient of diffusion of a particle moving in a fixed array of scatterers.

J. R. Dorfman; P. Gaspard

1994-05-16

375

Calculation and measurement of the influence of flow parameters on rotordynamic coefficients in labyrinth seals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

First experimental investigations performed on a new test rig are presented. For a staggered labyrinth seal with fourteen cavities the stiffness coefficient and the leakage flow are measured. The experimental results are compared to calculated results which are obtained by a one-volume bulk-flow theory. A perturbation analysis is made for seven terms. It is found out that the friction factors have great impact on the dynamic coefficients. They are obtained by turbulent flow computation by a finite-volume model with the Reynolds equations used as basic equations.

Kwanka, K.; Ortinger, W.; Steckel, J.

1994-01-01

376

Nonlinear Decoupled Motion-Stiffness Control and Collision Detection/Reaction for the VSA-II Variable Stiffness Device  

E-print Network

Nonlinear Decoupled Motion-Stiffness Control and Collision Detection/Reaction for the VSA that avoids control singularities is characterized. Moreover, a momentum-based collision detection scheme of the proposed nonlinear control to rapidly let the arm bounce away after detecting the impact, while limiting

De Luca, Alessandro

377

Coefficient Alpha: A Reliability Coefficient for the 21st Century?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Coefficient alpha is almost universally applied to assess reliability of scales in psychology. We argue that researchers should consider alternatives to coefficient alpha. Our preference is for structural equation modeling (SEM) estimates of reliability because they are informative and allow for an empirical evaluation of the assumptions…

Yang, Yanyun; Green, Samuel B.

2011-01-01

378

Effects of mechanical forces on cytoskeletal remodeling and stiffness of cultured smooth muscle cells  

E-print Network

that disruption of the actin filaments can reduce the stiffness substantially, whereas there can be little contribution to the overall cell stiffness by the microtubules or intermediate filaments. To investigate the effect of mechanical stretching on cytoskeletal...

Na, Sungsoo

2009-06-02

379

Helix versus coil polypeptide macromers: gel networks with decoupled stiffness and permeability  

E-print Network

As a platform for investigating the individual effects of substrate stiffness, permeability, and ligand density on cellular behavior, we developed a set of hydrogels with stiffness tuned by polymer backbone rigidity, ...

Oelker, Abigail M.

380

jamSheets: Thin Interfaces with Tunable Stiffness Enabled by Layer Jamming  

E-print Network

This works introduces layer jamming as an enabling technology for designing deformable, stiffness-tunable, thin sheet interfaces. Interfaces that exhibit tunable stiffness properties can yield dynamic haptic feedback and ...

Ou, Jifei

381

Stiffness of the substrate influences the phenotype of embryonic chicken cardiac myocytes  

E-print Network

Stiffness of the substrate influences the phenotype of embryonic chicken cardiac myocytes Piyush on the beating rate, force of contraction, and cytoskeletal structure of embryonic chicken cardiac myocytes Words: substrate stiffness, focal adhesions, beating force, embryonic chicken, cardiac myocytes

Bashir, Rashid

382

Associations of endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness with intradialytic hypotension and hypertension  

PubMed Central

Intradialytic hypotension and hypertension are both independently associated with mortality among persons with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis. Endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness are two possible mechanisms underlying these phenomena, but their association with hemodynamic instability during dialysis has not been evaluated. Thirty patients were recruited from chronic dialysis units at San Francisco General Hospital and San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Endothelial dysfunction was assessed with flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery after upper arm occlusion. Arterial stiffness was assessed using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity measured by tonometry. Intradialytic hypotension and hypertension were defined as the average decrease in systolic blood pressure (SBP) over 1 week, as well as the frequency over 1 month of hypotension or hypertension. Every 5% decrease in flow-mediated dilation was associated with a 7.5mmHg decrease in SBP after adjustment for phosphorus, body mass index, atherosclerosis, and ultrafiltration (P=0.02). Every 5 m/s increase in pulse wave velocity was associated with an 8mmHg increase in SBP after adjustment for predialysis SBP and ultrafiltration (P=0.03). Over 1 month, every 5% lower flow-mediated dilation was associated with a 10% higher frequency of hypotension (P=0.09), and every 5 m/s increase in pulse wave velocity was associated with an 15% higher frequency of hypertension (P=0.02). In a cross-sectional analysis of 30 dialysis patients, endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness were independently associated with intradialytic hypotension and intradialytic hypertension, respectively. Elucidating these potential mechanisms of hemodynamic instability during dialysis may facilitate development of treatment strategies specific to this pathophysiology. PMID:21658174

DUBIN, Ruth; OWENS, Christopher; GASPER, Warren; GANZ, Peter; JOHANSEN, Kirsten

2011-01-01

383

Zero finite-temperature charge stiffness within the half-filled 1D Hubbard model  

SciTech Connect

Even though the one-dimensional (1D) Hubbard model is solvable by the Bethe ansatz, at half-filling its finite-temperature T>0 transport properties remain poorly understood. In this paper we combine that solution with symmetry to show that within that prominent T=0 1D insulator the charge stiffness D(T) vanishes for T>0 and finite values of the on-site repulsion U in the thermodynamic limit. This result is exact and clarifies a long-standing open problem. It rules out that at half-filling the model is an ideal conductor in the thermodynamic limit. Whether at finite T and U>0 it is an ideal insulator or a normal resistor remains an open question. That at half-filling the charge stiffness is finite at U=0 and vanishes for U>0 is found to result from a general transition from a conductor to an insulator or resistor occurring at U=U{sub c}=0 for all finite temperatures T>0. (At T=0 such a transition is the quantum metal to Mott–Hubbard-insulator transition.) The interplay of the ?-spin SU(2) symmetry with the hidden U(1) symmetry beyond SO(4) is found to play a central role in the unusual finite-temperature charge transport properties of the 1D half-filled Hubbard model. -- Highlights: •The charge stiffness of the half-filled 1D Hubbard model is evaluated. •Its value is controlled by the model symmetry operator algebras. •We find that there is no charge ballistic transport at finite temperatures T>0. •The hidden U(1) symmetry controls the U=0 phase transition for T>0.

Carmelo, J.M.P., E-mail: carmelo@fisica.uminho.pt [Center and Department of Physics, University of Minho, Campus Gualtar, P-4710-057 Braga (Portugal) [Center and Department of Physics, University of Minho, Campus Gualtar, P-4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China); Institut für Theoretische Physik III, Universität Stuttgart, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Gu, Shi-Jian [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China) [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Physics and ITP, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Sacramento, P.D. [CFIF, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal) [CFIF, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China)

2013-12-15

384

Annular honeycomb seals: Test results for leakage and rotordynamic coefficients - Comparisons to labyrinth and smooth configurations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test results are presented for leakage and rotordynamic coefficients for seven honeycomb seals. All seals have the same radius, length, and clearance; however, the cell depths and diameters are varied. Rotordynamic data, which are presented, consist of the direct and cross-coupled stiffness coefficients and the direct damping coefficients. The rotordynamic-coefficient data show a considerable sensitivity to changes in cell dimensions; however, no clear trends are identifiable. Comparisons of test data for the honeycomb seals with labyrinth and smooth annular seals shows the honeycomb seal had the best sealing (minimum leakage) performance, followed in order by the labyrinth and smooth seals. For prerotated fluids entering the seal, in the direction of shaft rotation, the honeycomb seal has the best rotordynamic stability followed in order by the labyrinth and smooth. For no prerotation, or fluid prerotation against shaft rotation, the labyrinth seal has the best rotordynamic stability followed in order by the smooth and honeycomb seals.

Childs, D.; Elrod, D.; Hale, K.

1989-01-01

385

Annular honeycomb seals: Test results for leakage and rotordynamic coefficients; comparisons to labyrinth and smooth configurations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test results are presented for leakage and rotordynamic coefficients for seven honeycomb seals. All seals have the same radius, length, and clearance; however, the cell depths and diameters are varied. Rotordynamic data, which are presented, consist of the direct and cross-coupled stiffness coefficients and the direct damping coefficients. The rotordynamic-coefficient data show a considerable sensitivity to changes in cell dimensions; however, no clear trends are identifiable. Comparisons of test data for the honeycomb seals with labyrinth and smooth annular seals show the honeycomb seal had the best sealing (minimum leakage) performance, followed in order by the labyrinth and smooth seals. For prerotated fluid entering the seal, in the direction of shaft rotation, the honeycomb seal has the best rotordynamic stability followed in order by the labyrinth and smooth. For no prerotation, or fluid prerotation against shaft rotation, the labyrinth seal has the best rotordynamic stability followed in order by the smooth and honeycomb seals.

Childs, Dara W.; Elrod, David; Hale, Keith

1989-01-01

386

Prediction of in-plane stiffness properties of non-crimp fabric laminates by means of 3D finite element analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Non-crimp fabric (NCF) composites are constituted by differently oriented layers of ideally unidirectional fibre tows. However, a slight waviness always appears in the tows. The applicability of the general laminate theory (GLT) to obtain the stiffness properties of NCF laminates is elucidated in this paper. For this purpose, a 3D finite element (FE) model of the representative unit cell (RUC)

Amparo González; Enrique Graciani; Federico París

2008-01-01

387

Source and Message Factors in Persuasion: A Reply to Stiff's Critique of the Elaboration Likelihood Model.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Answers James Stiff's criticism of the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) of persuasion. Corrects certain misperceptions of the ELM and criticizes Stiff's meta-analysis that compares ELM predictions with those derived from Kahneman's elastic capacity model. Argues that Stiff's presentation of the ELM and the conclusions he draws based on the data…

Petty, Richard E.; And Others

1987-01-01

388

Association of Arterial Stiffness with Silent Cerebrovascular Lesions: The Ohasama Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Arterial stiffness is a risk factor for symptomatic stroke, and is associated with symptomatic cerebral infarction and cognitive impairment. Hence, we hypothesized that arterial stiffness would be a significant determinant of silent cerebrovascular lesions. Methods: The subjects were 363 individuals without symptomatic cerebrovascular lesions who had their arterial stiffness assessed by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) measurement. The subjects

Rieko Hatanaka; Taku Obara; Daisuke Watabe; Tomofumi Ishikawa; Takeo Kondo; Kazuki Ishikura; Tomoyuki Aikawa; Yoko Aono; Azusa Hara; Hirohito Metoki; Kei Asayama; Masahiro Kikuya; Nariyasu Mano; Takayoshi Ohkubo; Shin-Ichi Izumi; Yutaka Imai

2011-01-01

389

Multijoint Muscle Regulation Mechanisms Examined by Measured Human Arm Stiffness and EMG Signals  

E-print Network

Multijoint Muscle Regulation Mechanisms Examined by Measured Human Arm Stiffness and EMG Signals stiffness and EMG signals. J. Neurophysiol. 81: 1458­1468, 1999. Stiffness properties of the musculo activation during static force control in the horizontal plane by means of surface electromyographic (EMG

Osu, Rieko

390

Stiffness mapping of planar compliant parallel mechanisms in a serial arrangement  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a stiffness mapping of a mechanism having two planar compliant parallel mechanisms in a serial arrangement. The stiffness matrix of the mechanism is obtained by taking a derivative of the static equilibrium equations. A derivative of spring force connecting two moving bodies is derived and it is applied to obtain the stiffness matrix of the mechanism. A

Hyun K. Jung; Carl D. Crane; Rodney G. Roberts

391

Arterial stiffness identification of the human carotid artery using the stressstrain relationship in vivo  

E-print Network

Arterial stiffness identification of the human carotid artery using the stress­strain relationship in revised form 20 September 2011 Accepted 20 September 2011 Available online xxxx Keywords: Arterial stiffness Carotid artery Collagen Elastin Stress­strain relationship a b s t r a c t Arterial stiffness

Konofagou, Elisa E.

392

Independent Stiffness and Force Control of Pneumatic Actuators for Contact Stability during  

E-print Network

Independent Stiffness and Force Control of Pneumatic Actuators for Contact Stability during Robot that controls the stiffness and force of pneumatic actuator independently. This independent control of stiffness control, since the force is defined in terms of motion variables, the desired force term appears as high

393

Assessment of a portable device for the quantitative measurement of ankle joint stiffness in spastic individuals  

E-print Network

Assessment of a portable device for the quantitative measurement of ankle joint stiffness-rater reliability. The device could easily distinguish between stiff and control ankle joints. A portable device can be a useful diagnostic tool to obtain reliable information of stiffness for the ankle joint. a b

Gorassini, Monica

394

The differential effects of gender, anthropometry, and prior hormonal state on frontal plane knee joint stiffness  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundGender differences in passive frontal plane knee stiffness may contribute to the increased anterior cruciate ligament injury rate in females. Gender-based stiffness differences have been attributed to anthropometric variations, but little data exist describing this relationship. Furthermore, sex hormone levels appear to influence joint stiffness, but the differential effects of instantaneous and prior hormonal concentrations remain unknown. This study sought

Martha L. Cammarata; Yasin Y. Dhaher

2008-01-01

395

Aortic Stiffness Is an Independent Predictor of Primary Coronary Events in Hypertensive Patients A Longitudinal Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Arterial stiffness may predict coronary heart disease beyond classic risk factors. In a longitudinal study, we assessed the predictive value of arterial stiffness on coronary heart disease in patients with essential hypertension and without known clinical cardiovascular disease. Aortic stiffness was determined from carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity at baseline in 1045 hypertensives. The risk assessment of coronary heart disease was

Pierre Boutouyrie; Anne Isabelle Tropeano; Roland Asmar; Isabelle Gautier; Athanase Benetos; Patrick Lacolley; Stéphane Laurent

396

Increased Central Artery Stiffness in Impaired Glucose Metabolism and Type 2 Diabetes The Hoorn Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Impaired glucose metabolism (IGM) and type 2 diabetes (DM-2) are associated with high cardiovascular disease risk. Increases in peripheral and central artery stiffness may represent pathophysiologic pathways through which glucose tolerance status leads to cardiovascular disease. Peripheral artery stiffness increases with deteriorating glucose tolerance status, whereas this trend remains unclear for central artery stiffness. Therefore, we investigated the associations between

Miranda T. Schram; Ronald M. A Henry; Rob A. J. M van Dijk; Piet J. Kostense; Jacqueline M. Dekker; Giel Nijpels; Robert J. Heine; Lex M. Bouter; Nico Westerhof; Coen D. A. Stehouwer

2010-01-01

397

Arterial stiffness and wave reflections in diabetes type 2 and normal subjects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increase vascular stiffness may be associated with increased pulse wave velocity and with greater amplitude of reflected waves from the peripherical arteries. Diabetes is associated with increased arterial stiffness. We evaluated whether diabetics had an increased aortic stiffness and an increase of augmentation index calculated as a measure of arterial wave reflexion. Aortic pressure waveforms derived both from the radial

Joao Maldonado; Telmo Pereira; Jose A. Silva; Jorge J. Polonia

2002-01-01

398

Study of DCT coefficient distributions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many image and video compression schemes perform the discrete cosine transform (DCT) to represent image data in frequency space. An analysis of a broad suite of images confirms previous finding that a Laplacian distribution can be used to model the luminance AC coefficients. This model is expanded and applied to color space (Cr\\/Cb) coefficients. In MPEG, the DCT is used

Stephen Smoot

1996-01-01

399

Recursive Construction of Operator Product Expansion Coefficients  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We derive a novel formula for the derivative of operator product expansion (OPE) coefficients with respect to a coupling constant. The formula involves just the OPE coefficients themselves but no further input, and is in this sense self-consistent. Furthermore, unlike other formal identities of this general nature in quantum field theory (such as the formal expression for the Lagrangian perturbation of a correlation function), our formula requires no further UV-renormalization, i.e., it is completely well-defined from the start. This feature is a result of a cancelation of UV- and IR-divergences between various terms in our identity. Our proof, and an analysis of the features of the identity, is given for the example of massive, Euclidean {\\varphi^4} theory in 4 dimensional Euclidean space. It relies on the renormalization group flow equation method and is valid to arbitrary, but finite orders in perturbation theory. The final formula, however, makes neither explicit reference to the renormalization group flow, nor to perturbation theory, and we conjecture that it also holds non-perturbatively. Our identity can be applied constructively because it gives a novel recursive algorithm for the computation of OPE coefficients to arbitrary (finite) perturbation order in terms of the zeroth order coefficients corresponding to the underlying free field theory, which in turn are trivial to obtain. We briefly illustrate the relation of this method to more standard methods for computing the OPE in some simple examples.

Holland, Jan; Hollands, Stefan

2015-02-01

400

Spurious Behavior of Shock-Capturing Methods: Problems Containing Stiff Source Terms and Discontinuities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The goal of this paper is to relate numerical dissipations that are inherited in high order shock-capturing schemes with the onset of wrong propagation speed of discontinuities. For pointwise evaluation of the source term, previous studies indicated that the phenomenon of wrong propagation speed of discontinuities is connected with the smearing of the discontinuity caused by the discretization of the advection term. The smearing introduces a nonequilibrium state into the calculation. Thus as soon as a nonequilibrium value is introduced in this manner, the source term turns on and immediately restores equilibrium, while at the same time shifting the discontinuity to a cell boundary. The present study is to show that the degree of wrong propagation speed of discontinuities is highly dependent on the accuracy of the numerical method. The manner in which the smearing of discontinuities is contained by the numerical method and the overall amount of numerical dissipation being employed play major roles. Moreover, employing finite time steps and grid spacings that are below the standard Courant-Friedrich-Levy (CFL) limit on shockcapturing methods for compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations containing stiff reacting source terms and discontinuities reveals surprising counter-intuitive results. Unlike non-reacting flows, for stiff reactions with discontinuities, employing a time step and grid spacing that are below the CFL limit (based on the homogeneous part or non-reacting part of the governing equations) does not guarantee a correct solution of the chosen governing equations. Instead, depending on the numerical method, time step and grid spacing, the numerical simulation may lead to (a) the correct solution (within the truncation error of the scheme), (b) a divergent solution, (c) a wrong propagation speed of discontinuities solution or (d) other spurious solutions that are solutions of the discretized counterparts but are not solutions of the governing equations. The present investigation for three very different stiff system cases confirms some of the findings of Lafon & Yee (1996) and LeVeque & Yee (1990) for a model scalar PDE. The findings might shed some light on the reported difficulties in numerical combustion and problems with stiff nonlinear (homogeneous) source terms and discontinuities in general.

Yee, Helen M. C.; Kotov, D. V.; Wang, Wei; Shu, Chi-Wang

2013-01-01

401

Stabilized multilevel Monte Carlo method for stiff stochastic differential equations  

SciTech Connect

A multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method for mean square stable stochastic differential equations with multiple scales is proposed. For such problems, that we call stiff, the performance of MLMC methods based on classical explicit methods deteriorates because of the time step restriction to resolve the fastest scales that prevents to exploit all the levels of the MLMC approach. We show that by switching to explicit stabilized stochastic methods and balancing the stabilization procedure simultaneously with the hierarchical sampling strategy of MLMC methods, the computational cost for stiff systems is significantly reduced, while keeping the computational algorithm fully explicit and easy to implement. Numerical experiments on linear and nonlinear stochastic differential equations and on a stochastic partial differential equation illustrate the performance of the stabilized MLMC method and corroborate our theoretical findings.

Abdulle, Assyr, E-mail: assyr.abdulle@epfl.ch; Blumenthal, Adrian, E-mail: adrian.blumenthal@epfl.ch

2013-10-15

402

Analysis of stiffness loss in cross-ply composite laminates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A constitutive model of the damage state for composite laminates, first proposed by Allen et al. (1987), is used with a damage evolution criterion based on strain energy to predict the stiffness loss due to matrix cracking in cross-ply laminated composite plates. Although the constitutive model does not require the determination of many constants, the state of damage is described by a vector of internal state variables (ISVs), which contains information on the crack geometry and fracture modes. The effects of relative ply thicknesses, crack density, and crack opening profile on the vector of ISVs are determined. The analysis results compare favorably with experimental measurements of progressive stiffness loss in damaged cross-ply graphite-epoxy laminates obtained from other studies.

Tay, T. E.; Lim, E. H.

403

Dense brushes of stiff polymers or filaments in fluid flow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dense filamentous brush-like structures are present in many biological interfacial systems (e.g., glycocalyx layer in blood vessels) to control their surface properties. Such structures can regulate the softness of a surface and modify fluid flow. In this letter, we propose a theoretical model which predicts quantitatively flow-induced deformation of a dense brush of stiff polymers or filaments, whose persistence length is larger or comparable to their contour length. The model is validated by detailed mesoscopic simulations and characterizes different contributions to brush deformation including hydrodynamic friction due to flow and steric excluded-volume interactions between grafted filaments. This theoretical model can be used to describe the effect of a stiff-polymer brush on fluid flow and to aid in the quantification of experiments.

Römer, F.; Fedosov, D. A.

2015-03-01

404

Force, Torque and Stiffness: Interactions in Perceptual Discrimination  

PubMed Central

Three experiments investigated whether force and torque cues interact in haptic discrimination of force, torque and stiffness, and if so, how. The statistical relation between force and torque was manipulated across four experimental conditions: Either one type of cue varied while the other was constant, or both varied so as to be positively correlated, negatively correlated, or uncorrelated. Experiment 1 showed that the subjects’ ability to discriminate force was improved by positively correlated torque but impaired with uncorrelated torque, as compared to the constant torque condition. Corresponding effects were found in Experiment 2 for the influence of force on torque discrimination. These findings indicate that force and torque are integrated in perception, rather than being processed as separate dimensions. A further experiment demonstrated facilitation of stiffness discrimination by correlated force and torque, whether the correlation was positive or negative. The findings suggest new means of augmenting haptic feedback to facilitate perception of the properties of soft objects. PMID:21359137

Wu, Bing; Klatzky, Roberta L.; Hollis, Ralph L.

2011-01-01

405

Vibration in Planetary Gear Systems with Unequal Planet Stiffnesses  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An algorithm suitable for a minicomputer was developed for finding the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a planetary gear system which has unequal stiffnesses between the Sun/planet and planet/ring gear meshes. Mode shapes are represented in the form of graphical computer output that illustrates the lateral and rotational motion of the three coaxial gears and the planet gears. This procedure permits the analysis of gear trains utilizing nonuniform mesh conditions and user specified masses, stiffnesses, and boundary conditions. Numerical integration of the equations of motion for planetary gear systems indicates that this algorithm offers an efficient means of predicting operating speeds which may result in high dynamic tooth loads.

Frater, J. L.; August, R.; Oswald, F. B.

1982-01-01

406

Derivation of stiffness matrix in constitutive modeling of magnetorheological elastomer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) are a class of smart materials whose mechanical properties change instantly by the application of a magnetic field. Based on the specially orthotropic, transversely isotropic stress-strain relationships and effective permeability model, the stiffness matrix of constitutive equations for deformable chain-like MRE is considered. To valid the components of shear modulus in this stiffness matrix, the magnetic-structural simulations with finite element method (FEM) are presented. An acceptable agreement is illustrated between analytical equations and numerical simulations. For the specified magnetic field, sphere particle radius, distance between adjacent particles in chains and volume fractions of ferrous particles, this constitutive equation is effective to engineering application to estimate the elastic behaviour of chain-like MRE in an external magnetic field.

Leng, D.; Sun, L.; Sun, J.; Lin, Y.

2013-02-01

407

Stiffness and damping characteristics of aluminum in creep  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tensile creep tests conducted at 200 C were performed on annealed commercially pure aluminum specimens in order to measure the dominant elevated temperature dislocation processes. Testing consisted of applying small lateral loads to measure flexural stiffness, and vibrating the specimens laterally in order to measure dynamic modulus and internal damping. It was concluded that (1) the strain hardening increased static stiffness and decreased internal damping during early creep, and (2) the dynamic modulus remained essentially constant at the elastic value during creep. These results imply that primary creep may constitute a mechanism of recovery of dislocatory disorder induced by yielding the material during loading, and that the inelastic modulus utilized as a mathematical concept in several creep buckling theories is not a directly measurable material property.

Berkovits, A.

1977-01-01

408

Suppression of large-scale perturbations by stiff solid  

E-print Network

Evolution of large-scale scalar perturbations in the presence of stiff solid (solid with pressure to energy density ratio > 1/3) is studied. If the solid dominated the dynamics of the universe long enough, the perturbations could end up suppressed by as much as several orders of magnitude. To avoid too steep large-angle power spectrum of CMB, radiation must have prevailed over the solid long enough before recombination.

Vladimír Balek; Matej Škovran

2015-01-28

409

Analysis of results of surgical treatment of posttraumatic stiff elbow  

PubMed Central

Background: Surgical management of posttraumatic elbow stiffness has been reported with poor outcome following treatment. Sequential release in earlier stages of stiffness yielded much better results. The goal of our study was to assess the outcome in improvement of the range of motion of the elbow after surgical release and to analyze a tailor-made approach according to individual needs to yield good result. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was conducted in 47 cases of elbow stiffness due to various types of injuries. All the cases were treated with sequential release if there was no progress after adequate supervised conservative management except in unreduced dislocations. All the cases were followed up for a minimum period of 24 months. Overall outcome was rated with the functional scoring system by Mayo Clinic Performance Index. Results: Twenty-five (44.68%) out of 47 patients had excellent results with a mean preoperative range of motion of 33.9° and postoperative range of motion of 105° with net gain in range of motion of 71.1° (‘t’ test value is 19.27, P < 0.01). None of the patients had elbow instability. Patients not having heterotopic ossification, who underwent surgery from three to six months post injury had a mean gain of 73.5°. In patients who waited for more than six months had mean gain of 66.8°. However, the results in cases having heterotopic ossification followed a slightly different pattern. In cases where release was performed from three months to six months had mean gain of 77.5°. Cases in which release was performed after six months had gain of 57.1°. Conclusions: In cases of posttraumatic elbow stiffness after a failed initial conservative treatment, early arthrolysis with sequential surgical soft tissue release yields good result than delayed surgery. PMID:19826527

Rex, Chandrabose; Suresh Kumar, PM; Srimannarayana, Addagalla; Chugh, S; Ravichandran, M; Harish, DN

2008-01-01

410

Stiffness Study of Wound-Filament Pressure Vessels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Report presents theoretical and experimental study of stiffness of lightweight, jointed pressure vessels made of wound graphite fibers and epoxy. Specimens fabricated from layers of graphite fibers, wet with epoxy, on aluminum mandrel. Segment ends thickened with interspersed layers of axially oriented fibers to reduce pinhole bearing stresses and local deformations. Segments cured at 390 degrees F (199 degrees C). Report presents results of vibrational tests of one-quarter-scale models of wound-filament pressure vessels.

Verderaime, V.

1986-01-01

411

Lung Function Is Associated with Arterial Stiffness in Children  

PubMed Central

Background In older adults, an independent association exists between impaired lung function and cardiovascular disease. This interaction might be related to the effects of aging and/or smoking. In order to explore possible childhood antecedents to this association, we hypothesized that decreased lung function and vascular stiffness might be related, in early life. Objective To determine the relationship between lung function and carotid augmentation index (AIx), a measure of vascular stiffness, in 8-year old children. Methods Data on brachial blood pressure, lung function (FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC, obtained by spirometry) and carotid AIx75 (AIx standardised to an arbitrary heart rate of 75 beats per minute, obtained by applanation tonometry) was available in 249 community-based 8-year old children. These healthy children had been subjects in a randomised controlled trial of two interventions (omega-3 fatty acid supplementation and house-dust mite avoidance) to prevent asthma. Smoking in pregnancy and childhood environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure was prospectively collected by questionnaire. The association between lung function and carotid AIx75 was assessed in multivariate models that included sex, height, smoking status during pregnancy, ETS exposure and randomisation groups (house dust mite avoidance and dietary intervention) as covariates. Results In the fully adjusted models, Carotid AIx75 was independently associated with FEV1 (standardised ??=??0.17,b?=??6.72, partial R2?=?.02, p?=?0.03), FVC (standardised ??=??0.29, b?=??9.31, partial R2?=?0.04, p<0.001) and FEV1/FVC (standardised ??=?.13, b?=?18.4, partial R2?=?0.02, p?=?0.04). Conclusion Lower lung volumes are associated with increased vascular stiffness at an early age. The interaction between lung function and vascular stiffness may thus represent more than just age-related alterations in both the pulmonary and vascular systems. PMID:22046271

Ayer, Julian G.; Belousova, Elena G.; Harmer, Jason A.; Toelle, Brett; Celermajer, David S.; Marks, Guy B.

2011-01-01

412

Magnetic bearing stiffness control using frequency band filtering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Active magnetic bearings can be implemented with frequency band-reject filtering that decreases the bearing stiffness and damping at a small bandwidth around a chosen frequency. The control scheme was used for reducing a rotor dynamic force, such as an imbalance force, transmitted to the bearing stator. The scheme creates additional system vibration modes at the same frequency. It also shows that the amount of force reduction is limited by the stability requirement of these modes.

Chen, H. Ming

1989-01-01

413

Association between arterial stiffness and peritoneal small solute transport rate.  

PubMed

While cardiovascular disease accounts for 40-50% of the mortality in dialysis patients, and while a high peritoneal transport in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) is an independent predictor of outcome, it is unclear if there are any links. Aortic stiffness has become established as a cardiovascular risk factor. We thus studied pulse wave velocity (PWV) in CAPD patients to explore the possible link between peritoneal small solute transport and aortic stiffness. CAPD patients (n = 76, 27 M/49 F) in our center were included in the present study. Aortic stiffness was assessed by brachial pulse pressure (PP) and carotid-femoral PWV. Patients' peritoneal small solute transport rate was assessed by D/P(cr) at 4 h. Extracellular water over total body water (E/T ratio) was assessed by means of bioimpedance analysis. C-reactive protein was also measured. Carotid-femoral PWV was positively associated with patients' age (r = 0.555; P < 0.01), time on peritoneal dialysis (r = 0.332; P < 0.01), diabetic status (r = 0.319; P < 0.01), D/P(cr) (r = 0.241; P < 0.05), PP (r = 0.475; P < 0.01), and E/T (r = 0.606; P < 0.01). In a multivariate regression analysis, carotid-femoral PWV was independently determined by E/T (P < 0.01), PP (P < 0.01), age (P < 0.01), and D/P(cr) (P < 0.05). D/P(cr), in addition to E/T, age, and PP, was an independent predictor of elevated carotid-femoral PWV in CAPD patients, suggesting that there might be a link between high aortic stiffness and increased peritoneal small solute transport rate. PMID:18471172

Zhe, Xing-wei; Tian, Xin-kui; Chen, Wei; Guo, Li-juan; Gu, Yue; Chen, Hui-min; Tang, Li-jun; Wang, Tao

2008-05-01

414

Cardiomyocyte subdomain contractility arising from microenvironmental stiffness and topography.  

PubMed

Cellular structure and function are interdependent. To understand this relationship in beating heart cells, individual neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) were analyzed one and 3 days after plating when cultured on different stiffness (100, 400 kPa) and surface structures (flat or [Formula: see text] high, [Formula: see text] diameter, microposts spaced [Formula: see text] apart) manufactured from polydimethylsiloxane. Myofibril structure seen by immunohistochemistry was organized in three dimensions when NRVMs were attached to microposts. On day three, paxillin distribution near the post serving as cellular anchorage was quantified on both soft posts (12.04 % of total voxel count) and stiff posts (8.16 %). Living NRVMs were analyzed using line scans for sarcomeric shortening and shortening velocity, and traction force microscopy for surface stress and surface tension. One day after plating, NRVMs shortened more on soft posts ([Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text]) compared to either soft flat ([Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text]), stiff posts ([Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text]) or stiff flat ([Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text]). NRVMs have decreased shortening and shortening velocity on soft posts ([Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text]) compared to soft flat ([Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text]) substrates. The surface stress and surface tension increased over time for both soft post ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]) and flat ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]) substrates. Paxillin displacement during contraction on day three was significantly greater in NRVMs attached to soft posts [Formula: see text] compared to flat [Formula: see text] substrates. The volume and time creating four-dimensional data, interpreted by structural engineering theory, demonstrate subdomain structure is maintained by the counterbalance between the external load acting upon and the internal forces generated by the cardiomyocyte. These findings provide further insight into localized regulation of cellular mechanical function. PMID:25273278

Broughton, Kathleen M; Russell, Brenda

2014-10-01

415

STIFF-INPLANE TILTROTOR AEROMECHANICS INVESTIGATION USING TWO MULTIBODY ANALYSES  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the development of two multibody dynami cs models to predict the whirl-flutter stability of a stiff-inplane tiltrotor wind-tunnel model and correlates the predic- tions with experimental data. Comprehensive, multibody-b ased dynamics analyses of rotorcraft enable modeling and simulation of the rotor system at a high l evel of detail so that complex mechanics and nonlinear effects associated

Jinwei Shen; Pierangelo Masarati; Beatrice Roget; David J. Piatak; Mark W. Nixon; Jeffrey D. Singleton

416

Nonlinear Effects in Stiffness Modeling of Robotic Manipulators  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper focuses on the enhanced stiffness modeling of robotic manipulators\\u000aby taking into account influence of the external force\\/torque acting upon the\\u000aend point. It implements the virtual joint technique that describes the\\u000acompliance of manipulator elements by a set of localized six-dimensional\\u000asprings separated by rigid links and perfect joints. In contrast to the\\u000aconventional formulation, which is

Anatoly Pashkevich; Alexandr Klimchik; Damien Chablat

2009-01-01

417

Lamb wave assessment of stiffness degradation in fatigued composites  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Lamb wave scanning system that measures the elastic properties of a material was used to characterize fatigue damage in composites. The Lamb Wave Imager™ (LWI) uses a pulse\\/receive technique that excites a flexural Lamb mode and measure the time-of-flight over a wide frequency range. Given the material density and plate thickness, the bending and out-of-plane shear stiffnesses are calculated

Michael D. Seale; Eric I. Madaras

2000-01-01

418

Arterial Stiffness and Endothelial Function in Patients With Thalassemia Major  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background—Increased iron store has been linked to risk of cardiovascular disease. Structural alterations of arteries in -thalassemia major patients and in vitro functional disturbance of vascular endothelial cells by thalassemic serum have been described. We sought to determine whether arterial stiffness and endothelial function are altered in vivo. Methods and Results—Thirty thalassemia patients (16 male) aged 22.27.4 years were recruited.

Y. F. Cheung; Godfrey C. F. Chan; S. Y. Ha

419

Testing biomimetic structures in bioinspired robots: how vertebrae control the stiffness of the body and the behavior of fish-like swimmers.  

PubMed

Our goal is to describe a specific case of a general process gaining traction amongst biologists: testing biological hypotheses with biomimetic structures that operate in bioinspired robots. As an example, we present MARMT (mobile autonomous robot for mechanical testing), a surface-swimmer that undulates a submerged biomimetic tail to power cruising and accelerations. Our goal was to test the hypothesis that stiffness of the body controls swimming behavior and that both stiffness and behavior can be altered by changes in the morphology of the vertebral column. To test this hypothesis, we built biomimetic vertebral columns (BVC) outfitted with variable numbers of rigid ring centra; as the number of centra increased the axial length of the intervertebral joints decreased. Each kind of BVC was tested in dynamic bending to measure the structure's apparent stiffness as the storage and loss moduli. In addition, each kind of BVC was used as the axial skeleton in a tail that propelled MARMT. We varied MARMT's tail-beat frequency, lateral amplitude of the tail, and swimming behavior. MARMT's locomotor performance was measured using an on-board accelerometer and external video. As the number of vertebrae in the BVC of fixed length increased, so, too, did the BVC's storage modulus, the BVC's loss modulus, MARMT's mean speed during cruising, and MARMT's peak acceleration during a startle response. These results support the hypothesis that stiffness of the body controls swimming behavior and that both stiffness and behavior can be altered by changes in the morphology of the vertebral column. PMID:21576117

Long, John H; Krenitsky, Nicole M; Roberts, Sonia F; Hirokawa, Jonathan; de Leeuw, Josh; Porter, Marianne E

2011-07-01

420

Influence of Cohesive Energy and Chain Stiffness on Polymer Glass Formation  

E-print Network

The generalized entropy theory is applied to assess the joint influence of the microscopic cohesive energy and chain stiffness on glass formation in polymer melts using a minimal model containing a single bending energy and a single (monomer averaged) nearest neighbor van der Waals energy. The analysis focuses on the combined impact of the microscopic cohesive energy and chain stiffness on the magnitudes of the isobaric fragility parameter $m_P$ and the glass transition temperature $T_g$. The computations imply that polymers with rigid structures and weak nearest neighbor interactions are the most fragile, while $T_g$ becomes larger when the chains are stiffer and/or nearest neighbor interactions are stronger. Two simple fitting formulas summarize the computations describing the dependence of $m_P$ and $T_g$ on the microscopic cohesive and bending energies. The consideration of the combined influence of the microscopic cohesive and bending energies leads to the identification of some important design concepts, such as iso-fragility and iso-$T_g$ lines, where, for instance, iso-fragility lines are contours with constant $m_P$ but variable $T_g$. Several thermodynamic properties are found to remain invariant along the iso-fragility lines, while no special characteristics are detected along the iso-$T_g$ lines. Our analysis supports the widely held view that fragility provides more fundamental insight for the description of glass formation than $T_g$.

Wen-Sheng Xu; Karl F. Freed

2014-09-24

421

Zero finite-temperature charge stiffness within the half-filled 1D Hubbard model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Even though the one-dimensional (1D) Hubbard model is solvable by the Bethe ansatz, at half-filling its finite-temperature T>0 transport properties remain poorly understood. In this paper we combine that solution with symmetry to show that within that prominent T=0 1D insulator the charge stiffness D(T) vanishes for T>0 and finite values of the on-site repulsion U in the thermodynamic limit. This result is exact and clarifies a long-standing open problem. It rules out that at half-filling the model is an ideal conductor in the thermodynamic limit. Whether at finite T and U>0 it is an ideal insulator or a normal resistor remains an open question. That at half-filling the charge stiffness is finite at U=0 and vanishes for U>0 is found to result from a general transition from a conductor to an insulator or resistor occurring at U=Uc=0 for all finite temperatures T>0. (At T=0 such a transition is the quantum metal to Mott-Hubbard-insulator transition.) The interplay of the ?-spin SU(2) symmetry with the hidden U(1) symmetry beyond SO(4) is found to play a central role in the unusual finite-temperature charge transport properties of the 1D half-filled Hubbard model.

Carmelo, J. M. P.; Gu, Shi-Jian; Sacramento, P. D.

2013-12-01

422

Stiffness vs Damping in the Cochlea: A Negative Conclusion?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While the notion of an active mechanism at work in the inner ear giving rise to amplification of low-level stimuli is widely considered to be firmly established, the nature of the underlying mechanisms(s) is however still a topic of significant debate. Disparate arguments have been about the nature of the underlying active term, specifically whether it manifests as a negative stiffness (position-dependent) or a negative damping (velocity-dependent). We analytically describe here that for a for an autonomous second-order resonator, a negative stiffness alone is insufficient to produce a super-critical Hopf bifurcation (a property commonly attributed to argue for amplification) and a negative damping is required. Moreover, an autonomous resonator with a negative stiffness alone cannot exhibit limit cycles (i.e., spontaneous oscillations). These observations are thus consistent with the notion that an active mechanism contributes in a velocity-dependent fashion. While simple second-order models alone are likely too simple to capture essential features of the ear, our results can help guide interpretation of more detailed/complex approaches (e.g., coupled oscillators, stochastic forcing).

Binder, Andrew J.; Aranyosi, A. J.; Bergevin, Christopher

2011-11-01

423

Strength and stiffness reduction factors for infilled frames with openings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Framed structures are usually infilled with masonry walls. They may cause a significant increase in both stiffness and strength, reducing the deformation demand and increasing the energy dissipation capacity of the system. On the other hand, irregular arrangements of the masonry panels may lead to the concentration of damage in some regions, with negative effects; for example soft story mechanisms and shear failures in short columns. Therefore, the presence of infill walls should not be neglected, especially in regions of moderate and high seismicity. To this aim, simple models are available for solid infills walls, such as the diagonal no-tension strut model, while infilled frames with openings have not been adequately investigated. In this study, the effect of openings on the strength and stiffness of infilled frames is investigated by means of about 150 experimental and numerical tests. The main parameters involved are identified and a simple model to take into account the openings in the infills is developed and compared with other models proposed by different researchers. The model, which is based on the use of strength and stiffness reduction factors, takes into account the opening dimensions and presence of reinforcing elements around the opening. An example of an application of the proposed reduction factors is also presented.

Decanini, Luis D.; Liberatore, Laura; Mollaioli, Fabrizio

2014-09-01

424

Matrix Stiffness Affects Endocytic Uptake of MK2-Inhibitor Peptides  

PubMed Central

In this study, the role of substrate stiffness on the endocytic uptake of a cell-penetrating peptide was investigated. The cell-penetrating peptide, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase activated protein kinase II (MK2), enters a primary mesothelial cell line predominantly through caveolae. Using tissue culture polystyrene and polyacrylamide gels of varying stiffness for cell culture, and flow cytometry quantification and enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISA) for uptake assays, we showed that the amount of uptake of the peptide is increased on soft substrates. Further, peptide uptake per cell increased at lower cell density. The improved uptake seen on soft substrates in vitro better correlates with in vivo functional studies where 10–100 µM concentrations of the MK2 inhibitor cell penetrating peptide demonstrated functional activity in several disease models. Additional characterization showed actin polymerization did not affect uptake, while microtubule polymerization had a profound effect on uptake. This work demonstrates that cell culture substrate stiffness can play a role in endocytic uptake, and may be an important consideration to improve correlations between in vitro and in vivo drug efficacy. PMID:24400117

Brugnano, Jamie L.; Panitch, Alyssa

2014-01-01

425

Tunable elastic stiffness of plasma-sprayed zirconia coatings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Plasma-sprayed zirconia is widely used in aero-engines as thermal barrier coating material. The material has an open porosity and a network of very thin microcracks. The porosity and the microcracks give rise to the low elastic stiffness. When the plasm sprayed zirconia is immersed in a liquid the microcracks can be filled with the liquid by capillary forces. Although there is only a small amount of infiltrated material the zirconia shows a strong increase in elastic stiffness. We have measured the elastic behavior after infiltration and as function of temperature by ultrasonic pulse echo technique. It could be observed that the solidification of the infiltrated fluid at lower temperatures leads to a further increase of the elastic stiffness. The temperature controlled liquid-solid phase transition can therefore be used to change reversibly the elastic properties of this ceramic material. The desired switching temperature can be chosen by appropriate fluids. A possible application of this material is the vibration damping of coated structures by temperature controlled changing of resonance frequencies.

Bamberg, Joachim; Schwaminger, Christian

1999-07-01

426

Torsional directed walks, entropic elasticity, and DNA?twist?stiffness  

PubMed Central

DNA and other biopolymers differ from classical polymers because of their torsional stiffness. This property changes the statistical character of their conformations under tension from a classical random walk to a problem we call the “torsional directed walk.” Motivated by a recent experiment on single lambda-DNA molecules [Strick, T.?R., Allemand, J.-F., Bensimon, D., Bensimon, A. & Croquette, V. (1996) Science 271, 1835–1837], we formulate the torsional directed walk problem and solve it analytically in the appropriate force regime. Our technique affords a direct physical determination of the microscopic twist stiffness C and twist-stretch coupling D relevant for DNA functionality. The theory quantitatively fits existing experimental data for relative extension as a function of overtwist over a wide range of applied force; fitting to the experimental data yields the numerical values C = 120 nm and D = 50 nm. Future experiments will refine these values. We also predict that the phenomenon of reduction of effective twist stiffness by bend fluctuations should be testable in future single-molecule experiments, and we give its analytic form. PMID:9405627

Moroz, J. David; Nelson, Philip

1997-01-01

427

Normalized stiffness ratios for mechanical characterization of isotropic acoustic foams.  

PubMed

This paper presents a method for the mechanical characterization of isotropic foams at low frequency. The objective of this study is to determine the Young's modulus, the Poisson's ratio, and the loss factor of commercially available foam plates. The method is applied on porous samples having square and circular sections. The main idea of this work is to perform quasi-static compression tests of a single foam sample followed by two juxtaposed samples having the same dimensions. The load and displacement measurements lead to a direct extraction of the elastic constants by means of normalized stiffness and normalized stiffness ratio which depend on Poisson's ratio and shape factor. The normalized stiffness is calculated by the finite element method for different Poisson ratios. The no-slip boundary conditions imposed by the loading rigid plates create interfaces with a complex strain distribution. Beforehand, compression tests were performed by means of a standard tensile machine in order to determine the appropriate pre-compression rate for quasi-static tests. PMID:25669274

Sahraoui, Sohbi; Brouard, Bruno; Benyahia, Lazhar; Parmentier, Damien; Geslain, Alan

2013-12-01

428

Torsional Directed Walks, Entropic Elasticity, and DNA Twist Stiffness  

E-print Network

DNA and other biopolymers differ from classical polymers due to their torsional stiffness. This property changes the statistical character of their conformations under tension from a classical random walk to a problem we call the `torsional directed walk'. Motivated by a recent experiment on single lambda-DNA molecules [Strick et al., Science 271 (1996) 1835], we formulate the torsional directed walk problem and solve it analytically in the appropriate force regime. Our technique affords a direct physical determination of the microscopic twist stiffness C and twist-stretch coupling D relevant for DNA functionality. The theory quantitatively fits existing experimental data for relative extension as a function of overtwist over a wide range of applied force; fitting to the experimental data yields the numerical values C=120nm and D=50nm. Future experiments will refine these values. We also predict that the phenomenon of reduction of effective twist stiffness by bend fluctuations should be testable in future single-molecule experiments, and we give its analytic form.

J. David Moroz; Philip Nelson

1997-08-21

429

Length-dependent [Ca2+] sensitivity adds stiffness to muscle.  

PubMed

It is well documented that muscle fibers become more sensitive for [Ca2+] with increasing sarcomere length. In mechanical terms this length-dependent [Ca2+] sensitivity (LDCS) adds to the stiffness of muscle fibers, because muscle force, normalized for the force-length relationship at maximal stimulation, increases with contractile element (CE) length. Although LDCS is well-documented in the physiological literature, it is ignored in most motor control studies. The aim of the present study was to investigate the importance of LDCS as a contributor to the stiffness of a muscle. Comparison of experimental data with predictions derived from the model of activation dynamics proposed by Hatze (Myocybernetic Control Models of Skeletal Muscle, University of South Africa, Pretoria, 1981, pp. 31-42) indicated that this model captures the main characteristics of LDCS well. It was shown that LDCS accounts for the experimentally observed shifts in optimum length at sub-maximal stimulation levels. Furthermore, it was shown that in conditions with low-to-medium muscle stimulation, the contribution of LDCS to the total amount of stiffness provided by the muscle is substantial. It was concluded that LDCS is an important muscle property and should be taken into account in studies concerning motor control. PMID:16023468

Kistemaker, Dinant A; Van Soest, Arthur Knoek J; Bobbert, Maarten F

2005-09-01

430

Solute concentration effect on osmotic reflection coefficient.  

PubMed Central

A theory for the effect of concentration on osmotic reflection coefficient, correct to first order, was developed at the molecular level by considering the effect of solute-solute interactions on solute concentration and the fluid stress tensor within a solvent-filled pore. The solvent was modeled as a continuous fluid and potential energies between solute molecules and the pore wall were assumed to be pairwise additive. Although the theory is more general, calculations are presented only for excluded volume effects (hard-sphere for solute, hard-wall for pore). The relationship between the first-order concentration effect and the infinite dilution value of reflection coefficient appears to be geometry independent. The theory is discussed in light of experimental studies of osmotic flow that have recently appeared in the literature. PMID:6626681

Adamski, R P; Anderson, J L

1983-01-01

431

Extracellular matrix stiffness and composition jointly regulate the induction of malignant phenotypes in mammary epithelium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In vitro models of normal mammary epithelium have correlated increased extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness with malignant phenotypes. However, the role of increased stiffness in this transformation remains unclear because of difficulties in controlling ECM stiffness, composition and architecture independently. Here we demonstrate that interpenetrating networks of reconstituted basement membrane matrix and alginate can be used to modulate ECM stiffness independently of composition and architecture. We find that, in normal mammary epithelial cells, increasing ECM stiffness alone induces malignant phenotypes but that the effect is completely abrogated when accompanied by an increase in basement-membrane ligands. We also find that the combination of stiffness and composition is sensed through ?4 integrin, Rac1, and the PI3K pathway, and suggest a mechanism in which an increase in ECM stiffness, without an increase in basement membrane ligands, prevents normal ?6?4 integrin clustering into hemidesmosomes.

Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Koshy, Sandeep T.; Branco da Cunha, Cristiana; Shin, Jae-Won; Verbeke, Catia S.; Allison, Kimberly H.; Mooney, David J.

2014-10-01

432

Scaling of Fluid Flow and Seismic Stiffness of Fractures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A firm understanding of the relationship between the hydraulic and mechanical properties of fractures has been long sought. Seismic techniques probe the mechanical properties of fractures, e.g. fracture specific stiffness. Providing a connection between fluid flow and fracture stiffness would enable remote estimation of the flow properties in the subsurface. Linking theses two properties would improve society's ability to assess the risk related to the extraction of drinkable water, oil production, and the storage of CO2 in subsurface reservoirs. This relationship is complicated because the subsurface is composed of a hierarchy of structures and processes that span a large range of length and time scales. A scaling approach enables researchers to translate laboratory measurements towards the field scale and vise a versa. We performed a computational study of the scaling of the flow-stiffness relationship for planar fractures with uncorrelated aperture distributions. Three numerical models were required to study the scaling properties of the flow-stiffness relationship for single fractures. Firstly, the fracture topologies where constructed using a stratified continuum percolation method. Only uncorrelated fracture geometries were considered to provide a baseline of understanding for the different interacting critical thresholds occurring in the hydraulic and mechanical properties. Secondly, fracture stiffness was calculated by modeling the deformation of asperities and a deformable half space. This model computed the displacement-stress curves for a given fracture, from which the stiffness was extracted. Thirdly, due to the sensitive nature of the critical phenomena associated with fluid flow through fractures, two network flow models were used for verification. The fractures were first modeled as a network of elliptical pipes and the corresponding linear system of equations was solved. The second method consisted of using a lattice grid network, where the flow is computed using the "cubic law." Fractures were generated at five sizes (1, 0.5, 0.25, 0.125, and 0.0625m) to provide an order of magnitude variation. Each fracture was constructed such that the contact area ranged from approximately 5% to 30%. The rocks were given the properties of granite and stressed to a maximum load of 70MPa. The deformation solver was given 50 steps to reach the final load so that its flow rate could be monitored during each loading step. The results clearly showed a dependence on scale. Under low loads flow-stiffness was in an effective medium regime. However as the load increased, a distinct scale dependence emerged. This occurs because as the load increases there is an overall increase in contact area, which in turn moves the flow dynamics into a critical regime. From this finite size scaling effect, we analyzed how the uncorrelated topologies length scales changed under load to compute the flow exponents for the system. Acknowledgments: Geosciences Research Program, Office of Basic Energy Sciences US Department of Energy (DE-FG02-09ER16022), the Geo-mathematical Imaging Group at Purdue University, and the Purdue Research Foundation.

Petrovitch, C.; Nolte, D.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

2011-12-01

433

The Seebeck coefficient of iodine  

E-print Network

THE SEEBECK COEFFICIENT OF IODINE A Thesis By DOMINGO M. PEREZ-F~EZ Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1968 Major Subject...; Physics THE SEEBECK COEFFICIENT OF IODINE A Thesis By DOMINGO M. PEREZ-FERNANDEZ Approved as to style and content by: ( airman of Co ittee) (Member) (Head of Depa ment) (Member) ( ember) (Member) (Member) January 1968 ACKNONLEDGEMENTS...

Perez-Fernandez, Domingo Miguel

1968-01-01

434

Converting Sabine absorption coefficients to random incidence absorption coefficients.  

PubMed

Absorption coefficients measured by the chamber method are referred to as Sabine absorption coefficients, which sometimes exceed unity due to the finite size of a sample and non-uniform intensity in the reverberation chambers under test. In this study, conversion methods from Sabine absorption coefficients to random incidence absorption coefficients are proposed. The overestimations of the Sabine absorption coefficient are investigated theoretically based on Miki's model for porous absorbers backed by a rigid wall or an air cavity, resulting in conversion factors. Additionally, three optimizations are suggested: An optimization method for the surface impedances for locally reacting absorbers, the flow resistivity for extendedly reacting absorbers, and the flow resistance for fabrics. With four porous type absorbers, the conversion methods are validated. For absorbers backed by a rigid wall, the surface impedance optimization produces the best results, while the flow resistivity optimization also yields reasonable results. The flow resistivity and flow resistance optimization for extendedly reacting absorbers are also found to be successful. However, the theoretical conversion factors based on Miki's model do not guarantee reliable estimations, particularly at frequencies below 250 Hz and beyond 2500?Hz. PMID:23742349

Jeong, Cheol-Ho

2013-06-01

435

Direct Extraction of One-loop Integral Coefficients  

SciTech Connect

We present a general procedure for obtaining the coefficients of the scalar bubble and triangle integral functions of one-loop amplitudes. Coefficients are extracted by considering two-particle and triple unitarity cuts of the corresponding bubble and triangle integral functions. After choosing a specific parameterization of the cut loop momentum we can uniquely identify the coefficients of the desired integral functions simply by examining the behavior of the cut integrand as the unconstrained parameters of the cut loop momentum approach infinity. In this way we can produce compact forms for scalar integral coefficients. Applications of this method are presented for both QCD and electroweak processes, including an alternative form for the recently computed three-mass triangle coefficient in the six-photon amplitude A{sub 6}(1{sup -}, 2{sup +}, 3{sup -}, 4{sup +}, 5{sup -}, 6{sup +}). The direct nature of this extraction procedure allows for a very straightforward automation of the procedure.

Forde, Darren

2007-04-16

436

A new correlation coefficient for bivariate time-series data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The correlation in time series has received considerable attention in the literature. Its use has attained an important role in the social sciences and finance. For example, pair trading in finance is concerned with the correlation between stock prices, returns, etc. In general, Pearson’s correlation coefficient is employed in these areas although it has many underlying assumptions which restrict its use. Here, we introduce a new correlation coefficient which takes into account the lag difference of data points. We investigate the properties of this new correlation coefficient. We demonstrate that it is more appropriate for showing the direction of the covariation of the two variables over time. We also compare the performance of the new correlation coefficient with Pearson’s correlation coefficient and Detrended Cross-Correlation Analysis (DCCA) via simulated examples.

Erdem, Orhan; Ceyhan, Elvan; Varli, Yusuf

2014-11-01

437

Breaking the Meyer-Overton rule: predicted effects of varying stiffness and interfacial activity on the intrinsic potency of anesthetics.  

PubMed Central

Exceptions to the Meyer-Overton rule are commonly cited as evidence against indirect, membrane-mediated mechanisms of general anesthesia. However, another interpretation is possible within the context of an indirect mechanism in which solubilization of an anesthetic in the membrane causes a redistribution of lateral pressures in the membrane, which in turn shifts the conformational equilibrium of membrane proteins such as ligand-gated ion channels. It is suggested that compounds of different stiffness and interfacial activity have different intrinsic potencies, i.e., they cause widely different redistributions of the pressure profile (and thus different effects on protein conformational equilibria) per unit concentration of the compound in the membrane. Calculations incorporating the greater stiffness of perfluoromethylenic chains and the large interfacial attraction of hydroxyl groups predict the higher intrinsic potency of short alkanols than alkanes, the cutoffs in potency of alkanes and alkanols and the much shorter cutoffs for their perfluorinated analogues. Both effects, increased stiffness and interfacial activity, are present in unsaturated hydrocarbon solutes, and the intrinsic potencies are predicted to depend on the magnitude of both effects and on the number and locations of multiple bonds within the molecule. Most importantly, the intrinsic potencies of polymeric alkanols with regularly spaced hydroxyl groups are predicted to rise with increasing chain length, without cutoff; such molecules should serve to distinguish unambiguously between indirect mechanisms and direct binding mechanisms of anesthesia. PMID:11325730

Cantor, R S

2001-01-01

438

Modal Proporties of Beams and Plates on Resilient Supports with Rotational and Translational Complex Stiffness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For beam and plate vibrations, energy dissipation may be mostly attributed to internal damping inside the structure and external damping at the supports. Surface damping treatment is one of the most effective tools to control vibrations of beam and plate in general. Sometimes it is not always desirable, however, to apply this damping treatment, for practical reasons. In such cases, one must rely on the damping treatment at the supports. In this presentation, the effects of damped compliant boundary conditions on modal parameters are investigated for two types of continuous systems; an elastic beam and a circular plate. The impedances at the boundaries to translational and rotational motions are given by springs with complex stiffness. The governing equations are solved numerically to obtain the natural frequencies and modal loss factors. Numerical results are represented in dimensionless terms, based on which a procedure of selecting the support parameters is illustrated to obtain desirable modal properties.

Kang, K.-H.; Kim, K.-J.

1996-02-01

439

Derivatives of buckling loads and vibration frequencies with respect to stiffness and initial strain parameters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A uniform variational approach to sensitivity analysis of vibration frequencies and bifurcation loads of nonlinear structures is developed. Two methods of calculating the sensitivities of bifurcation buckling loads and vibration frequencies of nonlinear structures, with respect to stiffness and initial strain parameters, are presented. A direct method requires calculation of derivatives of the prebuckling state with respect to these parameters. An adjoint method bypasses the need for these derivatives by using instead the strain field associated with the second-order postbuckling state. An operator notation is used and the derivation is based on the principle of virtual work. The derivative computations are easily implemented in structural analysis programs. This is demonstrated by examples using a general purpose, finite element program and a shell-of-revolution program.

Haftka, Raphael T.; Cohen, Gerald A.; Mroz, Zenon

1990-01-01

440

The influence of ankle-foot orthosis stiffness on walking performance in individuals with lower-limb impairments  

E-print Network

The influence of ankle-foot orthosis stiffness on walking performance in individuals with lower sintering Stiffness Background: Passive-dynamic ankle-foot orthoses utilize stiffness to improve gait performance through elastic energy storage and return. However, the influence of ankle-foot orthosis stiffness

441

On the Emulation of Stiff Walls and Static Friction with a Magnetically Levitated Input\\/Output Device  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses issues of mechanical emulation of stiff walls and stick-slip friction with a 6-DOF magnetically levitated joystick. In the case of stiff wall emulation, it is shown that the PD control implementation commonly used severely limits achievable wall damping and stiffness. It is also shown that the perceived surface stiffness can be increased without loss of stability by

S. e. Salcudean; T. d. Vlaar

1996-01-01

442

Elastic Coefficients of Zn1- x Be x O Solid Solutions: a First-Principles Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ZnO-BeO solid solutions (Zn1- x Be x O, ZBO) are wide-band semiconductors that also display a strong spontaneous polarization. We present here the results of density functional theory calculations to determine the elastic stiffness coefficients as a function of the Be concentration x. We construct three distinct supercells for ZBO solid solutions, including the prototypical wurtzite ( P63 mc) structure and orthorhombic supercells with Pmn21/ Pna21 or P21 symmetry. The components of the elastic stiffness tensor and the bulk modulus of ZBO in the three constructs are almost identical. The bulk modulus of ZBO solid solutions varies from 139.5 GPa to 211.6 GPa for x = 0 and x = 1, respectively, with bowing parameter of 41.9 GPa.

Dong, L.; Alpay, S. P.

2012-11-01

443

The Relationship of Magnetic Stiffness Between Single and Multiple YBCO Superconductors over Permanent Magnet Guideway  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For YBCO bulk levitating over a permanent magnet guideway (PMG), the magnetic stiffness is connected directly with the pinning properties of the measured sample. An experimental setup has been built to investigate the vertical and lateral magnetic stiffness of five high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk arrays over a PMG by two methods: the additive method, i.e., calculating the summation of the measured magnetic stiffness values of each HTS bulk in the array; the direct method, i.e., measuring directly the magnetic stiffness of the HTS bulk array. From the experimental results, it is found that the resultant magnetic stiffness of the HTS bulk array composing of multiple YBCO bulk is related with the magnetic stiffness of each individual single bulk, but the additive method does not predict the magnetic stiffness of the array very well because of the interaction between adjacent HTS bulk. The resultant magnetic stiffness of the HTS bulk array is less than the summation magnetic stiffness of each single HTS bulk. One numerical method is used to calculate the magnetic stiffness for comparing with experimental results. The results may be helpful to the design and optimization of the superconducting magnetic levitation system.

Lu, Yiyun; Lu, Bingjuan; Wang, Suyu

2011-09-01

444

Multi-fingered haptic palpation utilizing granular jamming stiffness feedback actuators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes a multi-fingered haptic palpation method using stiffness feedback actuators for simulating tissue palpation procedures in traditional and in robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery. Soft tissue stiffness is simulated by changing the stiffness property of the actuator during palpation. For the first time, granular jamming and pneumatic air actuation are combined to realize stiffness modulation. The stiffness feedback actuator is validated by stiffness measurements in indentation tests and through stiffness discrimination based on a user study. According to the indentation test results, the introduction of a pneumatic chamber to granular jamming can amplify the stiffness variation range and reduce hysteresis of the actuator. The advantage of multi-fingered palpation using the proposed actuators is proven by the comparison of the results of the stiffness discrimination performance using two-fingered (sensitivity: 82.2%, specificity: 88.9%, positive predicative value: 80.0%, accuracy: 85.4%, time: 4.84 s) and single-fingered (sensitivity: 76.4%, specificity: 85.7%, positive predicative value: 75.3%, accuracy: 81.8%, time: 7.48 s) stiffness feedback.

Li, Min; Ranzani, Tommaso; Sareh, Sina; Seneviratne, Lakmal D.; Dasgupta, Prokar; Wurdemann, Helge A.; Althoefer, Kaspar

2014-09-01

445

Kinematic Characterization of Left Ventricular Chamber Stiffness and Relaxation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Heart failure is the most common cause of hospitalization today, and diastolic heart failure accounts for 40-50% of cases. Therefore, it is critical to identify diastolic dysfunction at a subclinical stage so that appropriate therapy can be administered before ventricular function is further, and perhaps irreversibly impaired. Basic concepts in physics such as kinematic modeling provide a unique method with which to characterize cardiovascular physiology, specifically diastolic function (DF). The advantage of an approach that is standard in physics, such as the kinematic modeling is its causal formulation that functions in contrast to correlative approaches traditionally utilized in the life sciences. Our research group has pioneered theoretical and experimental quantitative analysis of DF in humans, using both non-invasive (echocardiography, cardiac MRI) and invasive (simultaneous catheterization-echocardiography) methods. Our group developed and validated the Parametrized Diastolic Filling (PDF) formalism which is motivated by basic physiologic principles (LV is a mechanical suction pump at the mitral valve opening) that obey Newton's Laws. PDF formalism is a kinematic model of filling employing an equation of motion, the solution of which accurately predicts all E-wave contours in acco