Science.gov

Sample records for generalized stiffness coefficients

  1. Generalized stiffness coefficients for ITER superconducting cables, direct FE modeling and initial configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemov, A. S.; Boso, D. P.; Voynov, I. B.; Borovkov, A. I.; Schrefler, B. A.

    2010-05-01

    Superconducting coils are one of the key technical solutions used for generation of high magnetic field in modern tokamaks. Nb 3Sn superconductivity depends not only on temperature and magnetic field as e.g. NbTi, but also on the strain state of the strands inside the conductor. It is hence very important to be able to predict the mechanical deformations due to manufacturing processes and operating conditions. The conductors for ITER, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor currently under construction, have a complex structure that makes analytical estimations of stiffness applicable only for the first cabling stages. In this work, a wide range of numerical simulations has been performed, by using several types of finite element models. This paper shows some analytical estimations for stretching and twisting and compares them with the numerical results of the different models. Some comparisons with experimental tests are also presented. Furthermore, it is shown that direct finite element analyses are compulsory for higher cable stages, but need the knowledge of the initial configuration as precise as possible for meaningful simulations. This problem is also addressed in this paper.

  2. Stiffness and thermoelastic coefficients for composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Tenek, Lazarus H.

    1992-01-01

    Simple analytic expressions are presented for the stiffness and thermoelastic coefficients of composite laminates in terms of the material properties of the individual layers. Expressions for the derivatives of the various coefficients with respect to each of the material properties and fiber orientation angles are also included. For typical high-performance composites, numerical values are given showing the effects of the stacking sequence and the fiber orientation angle of quasi-isotropic and angle-ply laminates on the values of the various coefficients and their sensitivity derivatives. The expressions for the thermoelastic coefficients and the sensitivity derivatives are given herein for the first time.

  3. Generalized Hansen Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, Sławomir; Métris, Gilles; Vokrouhlický, David

    2004-02-01

    Hansen coefficients X kn,j were originally defined for integer superscript n referring to the power of distance. We show, that most of the theory of Hansen coefficients remains valid for X kγ,j, when γ is a real number. The generalized coefficients can be applied in a variety of perturbed problems that involve some drag effects. A more detailed discussion of the case X 0(2n+1)/2,j is given.

  4. A Generalized Kappa Coefficient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uebersax, John S.

    1982-01-01

    A more general method for calculating the Kappa measure of nominal rating agreement among multiple raters is presented. It can be used across a broad range of rating designs, including those in which raters vary with respect to their base rates and how many subjects they rate in common. (Author/BW)

  5. Experimental and theoretical rotordynamic stiffness coefficients for a three-stage brush seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugachev, A. O.; Deckner, M.

    2012-08-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented for a multistage brush seal. Experimental stiffness is obtained from integrating circumferential pressure distribution measured in seal cavities. A CFD analysis is used to predict seal performance. Bristle packs are modeled by the porous medium approach. Leakage is predicted well by the CFD method. Theoretical stiffness coefficients are in reasonable agreement with the measurements. Experimental results are also compared with a three-teeth-on-stator labyrinth seal. The multistage brush seal gives about 60% leakage reduction over the labyrinth seal. Rotordynamic stiffness coefficients are also improved: the brush seal has positive direct stiffness and smaller cross-coupled stiffness.

  6. Stiffness and Damping Coefficient Estimation of Compliant Surface Gas Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Foil gas bearings are a key technology in many commercial and emerging Oil-Free turbomachinery systems. These bearings are non-linear and have been difficult to analytically model in terms of performance characteristics such as load capacity, power loss, stiffness and damping. Previous investigations led to an empirically derived method, a rule-of-thumb, to estimate load capacity. This method has been a valuable tool in system development. The current paper extends this tool concept to include rules for stiffness and damping coefficient estimation. It is expected that these rules will further accelerate the development and deployment of advanced Oil-Free machines operating on foil gas bearings

  7. Stiffness and Damping Coefficient Estimation of Compliant Surface Gas Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Della-Corte, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Foil gas bearings are a key technology in many commercial and emerging oilfree turbomachinery systems. These bearings are nonlinear and have been difficult to analytically model in terms of performance characteristics such as load capacity, power loss, stiffness, and damping. Previous investigations led to an empirically derived method to estimate load capacity. This method has been a valuable tool in system development. The current work extends this tool concept to include rules for stiffness and damping coefficient estimation. It is expected that these rules will further accelerate the development and deployment of advanced oil-free machines operating on foil gas bearings.

  8. Generalized Coefficients for Hopf Cyclic Cohomology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh, Mohammad; Kucerovsky, Dan; Rangipour, Bahram

    2014-09-01

    A category of coefficients for Hopf cyclic cohomology is defined. It is shown that this category has two proper subcategories of which the smallest one is the known category of stable anti Yetter-Drinfeld modules. The middle subcategory is comprised of those coefficients which satisfy a generalized SAYD condition depending on both the Hopf algebra and the (co)algebra in question. Some examples are introduced to show that these three categories are different. It is shown that all components of Hopf cyclic cohomology work well with the new coefficients we have defined.

  9. An investigation of angular stiffness and damping coefficients of an axial spline coupling in high-speed rotating machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, C.-P. Roger; Walton, James F., Jr.; Lund, Jorgen W.

    1994-01-01

    This paper provided an opportunity to quantify the angular stiffness and equivalent viscous damping coefficients of an axial spline coupling used in high-speed turbomachinery. A unique test methodology and data reduction procedures were developed. The bending moments and angular deflections transmitted across an axial spline coupling were measured while a nonrotating shaft was excited by an external shaker. A rotor dynamics computer program was used to simulate the test conditions and to correlate the angular stiffness and damping coefficients. In addition, sensitivity analyses were performed to show that the accuracy of the dynamic coefficients do not rely on the accuracy of the data reduction procedures.

  10. Hansen Coefficients and Generalized Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacaglia, G. E. O.

    Hansen's coefficients for the Fourier series in terms of the mean anomaly correspond to a rotation of the orbital plane proportional to the eccentricity of the orbit. Here, they are given in terms of Bessel functions and generalized associated Legendre functions. These functions arise naturally when one considers the transformation of spherical harmonics under rotation.

  11. Determination of Nonlinear Stiffness Coefficients for Finite Element Models with Application to the Random Vibration Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muravyov, Alexander A.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, a method for obtaining nonlinear stiffness coefficients in modal coordinates for geometrically nonlinear finite-element models is developed. The method requires application of a finite-element program with a geometrically non- linear static capability. The MSC/NASTRAN code is employed for this purpose. The equations of motion of a MDOF system are formulated in modal coordinates. A set of linear eigenvectors is used to approximate the solution of the nonlinear problem. The random vibration problem of the MDOF nonlinear system is then considered. The solutions obtained by application of two different versions of a stochastic linearization technique are compared with linear and exact (analytical) solutions in terms of root-mean-square (RMS) displacements and strains for a beam structure.

  12. Planar lattices with tailorable coefficient of thermal expansion and high stiffness based on dual-material triangle unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Kai; Chen, Haosen; Pei, Yongmao; Fang, Daining

    2016-01-01

    The unexpected thermal distortions and failures in engineering raise the big concern about thermal expansion controlling. Thus, design of tailorable coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is urgently needed for the materials used in large temperature variation circumstance. Here, inspired by multi-fold rotational symmetry in crystallography, we have devised six kinds of periodic planar lattices, which incorporate tailorable CTE and high specific biaxial stiffness. Fabrication process, which overcame shortcomings of welding or adhesion connection, was developed for the dual-material planar lattices. The analytical predictions agreed well with the CTE measurements. It is shown that the planar lattices fabricated from positive CTE constituents, can give large positive, near zero and even negative CTEs. Furthermore, a generalized stationary node method was proposed for aperiodic lattices and even arbitrary structures with desirable thermal expansion. As an example, aperiodic quasicrystal lattices were designed and exhibited zero thermal expansion property. The proposed method for the lattices of lightweight, robust stiffness, strength and tailorable thermal expansion is useful in the engineering applications.

  13. Experimental Investigation of Kinetic Energy and Momentum Coefficients in Regular Channels with Stiff and Flexible Elements Simulating Submerged Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubrak, Elżbieta; Kubrak, Janusz; Kiczko, Adam

    2015-10-01

    The paper addresses the problem of determination of the energy and momentum coefficients for flows through a partly vegetated channel. These coefficients are applied to express the fluid kinetic energy and momentum equations as functions of a mean velocity. The study is based on laboratory measurements of water velocity distributions in a straight rectangular flume with stiff and flexible stems and plastic imitations of the Canadian waterweed. The coefficients were established for the vegetation layer, surface layer and the whole flow area. The results indicate that the energy and momentum coefficients increase significantly with water depth and the number of stems per unit channel area. New regression relationships for both coefficients are given.

  14. Generalized power-law stiffness model for nonlinear dynamics of in-plane cable networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaccu, Gian Felice; Caracoglia, Luca

    2013-04-01

    Cross-ties are used for mitigating stay-cable vibration, induced by wind and wind-rain on cable-stayed bridges. In-plane cable networks are obtained by connecting the stays by transverse cross-ties. While taut-cable theory has been traditionally employed for simulating the dynamics of cable networks, the use of a nonlinear restoring-force discrete element in each cross-tie has been recently proposed to more realistically replicate the network vibration when snapping or slackening of the restrainer may be anticipated. The solution to the free-vibration dynamics can be determined by "equivalent linearization method". In an exploratory study by the authors a cubic-stiffness spring element, in parallel with a linear one, was used to analyze the restoring-force effect in a cross-tie on the nonlinear dynamics of two simplified systems. This preliminary investigation is generalized in this paper by considering a power-law stiffness model with a generic integer exponent and applied to a prototype network installed on an existing bridge. The study is restricted to the fundamental mode and some of the higher ones. A time-domain lumped-mass algorithm is used for validating the equivalent linearization method. For the prototype network with quadratic-stiffness spring and a positive stiffness coefficient, a stiffening effect is observed, with a ten percent increment in the equivalent frequency for the fundamental mode. Results also show dependency on vibration amplitude. For higher modes the equivalent nonlinear effects can be responsible for an alteration of the linear mode shapes and a transition from a "localized mode" to a "global mode".

  15. Development of Sensitivity Analysis Algorithm for a Straight-Line Beam Structure by the Transfer Stiffness Coefficient Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Deok-Hong; Choi, Myung-Soo

    This paper describes the sensitivity analysis algorithm extending the concept of the transfer stiffness coefficient method (TSCM) which is suitable to analyze accurately vibrations of complex and large structures on a personal computer with small computer memories. This sensitivity analysis algorithm is based on the concept transferring the sensitivities of the stiffness coefficient with respect to design parameters. In this paper, the free vibration analysis algorithm by the TSCM for a straight-line structure is shortly introduced and the free vibration sensitivity analysis algorithm is formulated by the present method. To demonstrate the validity of the present method, a straight-line beam structure with various boundary conditions is proposed as a numerical example. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors and their derivatives for the beam obtained by the present method are compared with those of the Fox's method and the reanalysis on a personal computer.

  16. Dynamic stiffness matrix of a rectangular plate for the general case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, J. R.; Papkov, S. O.; Liu, X.; Kennedy, D.

    2015-04-01

    The dynamic stiffness matrix of a rectangular plate for the most general case is developed by solving the bi-harmonic equation and finally casting the solution in terms of the force-displacement relationship of the freely vibrating plate. Essentially the frequency dependent dynamic stiffness matrix of the plate when all its sides are free is derived, making it possible to achieve exact solution for free vibration of plates or plate assemblies with any boundary conditions. Previous research on the dynamic stiffness formulation of a plate was restricted to the special case when the two opposite sides of the plate are simply supported. This restriction is quite severe and made the general purpose application of the dynamic stiffness method impossible. The theory developed in this paper overcomes this long-lasting restriction. The research carried out here is basically fundamental in that the bi-harmonic equation which governs the free vibratory motion of a plate in harmonic oscillation is solved in an exact sense, leading to the development of the dynamic stiffness method. It is significant that the ingeniously sought solution presented in this paper is completely general, covering all possible cases of elastic deformations of the plate. The Wittrick-Williams algorithm is applied to the ensuing dynamic stiffness matrix to provide solutions for some representative problems. A carefully selected sample of mode shapes is also presented.

  17. Linear equations in general purpose codes for stiff ODEs

    SciTech Connect

    Shampine, L. F.

    1980-02-01

    It is noted that it is possible to improve significantly the handling of linear problems in a general-purpose code with very little trouble to the user or change to the code. In such situations analytical evaluation of the Jacobian is a lot cheaper than numerical differencing. A slight change in the point at which the Jacobian is evaluated results in a more accurate Jacobian in linear problems. (RWR)

  18. Inhomogeneous generalizations of Bianchi Type VIh universes with stiff perfect fluid and radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S. R.; Prasad, A.

    1995-03-01

    Families of inhomogeneous models filled with a stiff perfect fluid and radiation have been derived in which there is no flow of total momentum. The models are generalizations of those of Bianchi Type VIh and are discussed for some particular forms of the arbitrary functions appearing in them.

  19. Non-monotonic dependence of the friction coefficient on heterogeneous stiffness.

    PubMed

    Giacco, F; Ciamarra, M Pica; Saggese, L; de Arcangelis, L; Lippiello, E

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of the frictional dynamics at the microscopic scale makes difficult to identify all of its controlling parameters. Indeed, experiments on sheared elastic bodies have shown that the static friction coefficient depends on loading conditions, the real area of contact along the interfaces and the confining pressure. Here we show, by means of numerical simulations of a 2D Burridge-Knopoff model with a simple local friction law, that the macroscopic friction coefficient depends non-monotonically on the bulk elasticity of the system. This occurs because elastic constants control the geometrical features of the rupture fronts during the stick-slip dynamics, leading to four different ordering regimes characterized by different orientations of the rupture fronts with respect to the external shear direction. We rationalize these results by means of an energetic balance argument. PMID:25345800

  20. Non-monotonic dependence of the friction coefficient on heterogeneous stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacco, F.; Ciamarra, M. Pica; Saggese, L.; de Arcangelis, L.; Lippiello, E.

    2014-10-01

    The complexity of the frictional dynamics at the microscopic scale makes difficult to identify all of its controlling parameters. Indeed, experiments on sheared elastic bodies have shown that the static friction coefficient depends on loading conditions, the real area of contact along the interfaces and the confining pressure. Here we show, by means of numerical simulations of a 2D Burridge-Knopoff model with a simple local friction law, that the macroscopic friction coefficient depends non-monotonically on the bulk elasticity of the system. This occurs because elastic constants control the geometrical features of the rupture fronts during the stick-slip dynamics, leading to four different ordering regimes characterized by different orientations of the rupture fronts with respect to the external shear direction. We rationalize these results by means of an energetic balance argument.

  1. Non-monotonic dependence of the friction coefficient on heterogeneous stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Giacco, F.; Ciamarra, M. Pica; Saggese, L.; de Arcangelis, L.; Lippiello, E.

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of the frictional dynamics at the microscopic scale makes difficult to identify all of its controlling parameters. Indeed, experiments on sheared elastic bodies have shown that the static friction coefficient depends on loading conditions, the real area of contact along the interfaces and the confining pressure. Here we show, by means of numerical simulations of a 2D Burridge-Knopoff model with a simple local friction law, that the macroscopic friction coefficient depends non-monotonically on the bulk elasticity of the system. This occurs because elastic constants control the geometrical features of the rupture fronts during the stick-slip dynamics, leading to four different ordering regimes characterized by different orientations of the rupture fronts with respect to the external shear direction. We rationalize these results by means of an energetic balance argument. PMID:25345800

  2. Polynomial Spline Estimation for A Generalized Additive Coefficient Model

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Lan; Liang, Hua

    2010-01-01

    We study a semiparametric generalized additive coefficient model, in which linear predictors in the conventional generalized linear models is generalized to unknown functions depending on certain covariates, and approximate the nonparametric functions by using polynomial spline. The asymptotic expansion with optimal rates of convergence for the estimators of the nonparametric part is established. Semiparametric generalized likelihood ratio test is also proposed to check if a nonparametric coefficient can be simplified as a parametric one. A conditional bootstrap version is suggested to approximate the distribution of the test under the null hypothesis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies are conducted to examine the finite sample performance of the proposed methods. We further apply the proposed model and methods to a data set from a human visceral Leishmaniasis (HVL) study conduced in Brazil from 1994 to 1997. Numerical results outperform the traditional generalized linear model and the proposed generalized additive coefficient model is preferable. PMID:20216928

  3. Note on the Generalized Hansen and Laplace Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, Jacques

    2005-03-01

    Recently, Breiter et al. [Celest. Mech. Dyn. Astron., 2004, 88, 153 161] reported the computation of Hansen coefficients X k γ ,m for non-integer values of γ. In fact, the Hansen coefficients are closely related to the Laplace b s (m), and generalized Laplace coefficients b s,r (m) [Laskar and Robutel, 1995, Celest. Mech. Dyn. Astron., 62, 193 217] that do not require s,r to be integers. In particular, the coefficients X 0 γ ,m have very simple expressions in terms of the usual Laplace coefficients b γ +2 (m), and all their properties derive easily from the known properties of the Laplace coefficients.

  4. Effects of Cross-Sectional Shape, Solidity, and Distribution of Heat-Transfer Coefficient on the Torsional Stiffness of Thin Wings Subjected to Aerodynamic Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Robert G.

    1959-01-01

    A study has been made of the effects of varying the shape, solidity, and heat-transfer coefficient of thin wings with regard to their influence on the torsional-stiffness reduction induced by aerodynamic heating. The variations in airfoil shape include blunting, flattening, and combined blunting and flattening of a solid wing of symmetrical double-wedge cross section. Hollow double-wedge wings of constant skin thickness with and without internal webs also are considered. The effects of heat-transfer coefficients appropriate for laminar and turbulent flow are investigated in addition to a step transition along the chord from a lower to a higher constant value of heat-transfer coefficient. From the results given it is concluded that the flattening of a solid double wedge decreases the reduction in torsional stiffness while slight degrees of blunting increase the loss. The influence of chordwise variations in heat-transfer coefficient due to turbulent and laminar boundary-layer flow on the torsional stiffness of solid wings is negligible. The effect of a step transition in heat-transfer coefficient along the chord of a solid wing can, however, become appreciable. The torsional-stiffness reduction of multiweb and hollow double-wedge wings is substantially less than that calculated for a solid wing subjected to the same heating conditions.

  5. A rotor unbalance response based approach to the identification of the closed-loop stiffness and damping coefficients of active magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin; Di, Long; Cheng, Changli; Xu, Yuanping; Lin, Zongli

    2016-01-01

    The stiffness and damping coefficients of active magnetic bearings (AMBs) have direct influence on the dynamic response of a rotor bearing system, including the bending critical speeds, modes of vibrations and stability. Rotor unbalance response is informative in the identification of these bearing support parameters. In this paper, we propose a method for identifying closed-loop AMB stiffness and damping coefficients based on the rotor unbalance response. We will use a flexible rotor-AMB test rig to help describe the proposed method as well as to validate the identification results. First, based on a rigid body model of the rotor, a formula is derived that computes the nominal values of the bearing stiffness and damping coefficients at a given rotating speed from the experimentally measured rotor unbalance response at the given speed. Then, based on a finite element model of the rotor, an error response surface is constructed for each parameter to estimate the identification errors induced by the rotor flexibility. The final identified values of the stiffness and damping coefficients equal the sums of the nominal values initially computed from the unbalance response and the identification errors determined by the error response surfaces. The proposed identification method is carried out on the rotor-AMB test rig. In order to validate the identification results, the identified values of the closed-loop AMB stiffness and damping coefficients are combined with the finite element model of the rotor to form a full model of the rotor-AMB test rig, from which the model unbalance responses at various rotating speeds are determined through simulation and compared with the experimental measurements. The close agreements between the simulation results and the measurements validate the proposed identification method.

  6. Inflationary weak anisotropic model with general dissipation coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Saleem, Rabia

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores the dynamics of warm intermediate and logamediate inflationary models during weak dissipative regime with a general form of dissipative coefficient. We analyze these models within the framework of locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I universe. In both cases, we evaluate solution of inflaton, effective scalar potential, dissipative coefficient, slow-roll parameters, scalar and tensor power spectra, scalar spectral index and tensor to scalar ratio under slow-roll approximation. We constrain the model parameters using recent data and conclude that anisotropic inflationary universe model with generalized dissipation coefficient remains compatible with WMAP9, Planck and BICEP2 data. Finally, we have checked the effects of bulk viscous pressure on this considered model and found that it remains compatible with recent data only for intermediate case.

  7. Bone Strength and Arterial Stiffness Impact on Cardiovascular Mortality in a General Population

    PubMed Central

    Avramovska, Maja; Sikole, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis and increased arterial stiffness independently have been found to be associated with higher cardiovascular events rates in the general population (GP). We examined 558 patients from GP by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) measurements at baseline, with 36-month follow-up period. DXA assessed bone mineral density of femoral neck (BMD FN) and lumbar spine (BMD LS). Carotid-femoral PWV was assessed by pulsed-Doppler. The aim of our study is to find correlation between bone strength and arterial stiffness and their impact on cardiovascular mortality in GP. The mean ± SD of BMD FN, BMD LS, and PWV was 0.852 ± 0.1432 g/cm2, 0.934 ± 0.1546 g/cm2, and 9.209 ± 1.9815 m/s. In multiple regression analysis we found BMD FN (βst = −6.0094, p < 0.0001), hypertension (βst = 1.7340, p < 0.0091), and diabetes (βst = 0.4595, p < 0.0046). With Cox-regression analysis, after 17 cardiovascular events, the significant covariates retained by the backward model were BMD FN (b = −2.4129, p = 0.015) and PWV (b = 0.2606, p = 0.0318). The cut-off values were PWV = 9.4 m/s, BMD FN = 0.783 g/cm2, and BMD LS = 0.992 g/cm2. The results for BMD FN and PWV hazard ratio risk were 1.116 and 1.297, respectively. BMD FN as a measure of bone strength and PWV as a measure of arterial stiffness are strong independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality in GP. PMID:27047700

  8. Generalized drag coefficient applicable for all flow regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, B.R.

    1986-05-26

    A generalized drag coefficient correlation for particulate settling in power-law-type fluids is applicable for all flow regimes from Stokes' (laminar) to Newton's flow (turbulence). The major advantage of this correlation for hydrocarbon reservoirs is that it correctly asymptotes to a modified Stokes' law (viscous effects) at low Reynolds value (Re) numbers and to the turbulent drag coefficient C/sub D/ approx. = 0.44 at large values of Re (inertia dominance). The use of Stokes' law can greatly underestimate the drag coefficient and grossly overestimate the terminal settling velocity at large Re. In many respects, this article is a review and extension of drag coefficient correlations used in hydraulic fracturing on particulate settling in Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. Since most non-Newtonian correlations are for creeping flow (Re' < 0.1), the major emphasis will be to extend these correlations to Newton's flow. A comparison with experimental data and empirical correlations of other investigators is included to verify the validity and applicability of the extended correlation.

  9. Stiffness jump in the generalized XY model on the square lattice.

    PubMed

    Hübscher, David M; Wessel, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    We study the thermal phase transitions in the generalized classical XY model on the two-dimensional square lattice using single-cluster Monte Carlo simulations. In particular, we examine the (spin-wave) stiffness (helicity modulus) jump at the transition between the low-temperature algebraic phases and the disordered high-temperature regime. Employing a finite-size scaling ansatz from conformal field theory to estimate the termination of the algebraic phases that does not require knowledge of the critical properties, we provide an unbiased estimate of the stiffness jump. Our results are in full accord with the Berzinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless scenario, i.e., the jump in the helicity modulus does not depend explicitly on the strength of the nematic coupling, but relates directly to the vorticity of the vortex excitations that drive the phase transition. We comment on previous work on related models, where Berzinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition temperatures were based on scaling assumptions contradicted by our findings. PMID:23848632

  10. Second virial coefficient of a generalized Lennard-Jones potential.

    PubMed

    González-Calderón, Alfredo; Rocha-Ichante, Adrián

    2015-01-21

    We present an exact analytical solution for the second virial coefficient of a generalized Lennard-Jones type of pair potential model. The potential can be reduced to the Lennard-Jones, hard-sphere, and sticky hard-sphere models by tuning the potential parameters corresponding to the width and depth of the well. Thus, the second virial solution can also regain the aforementioned cases. Moreover, the obtained expression strongly resembles the one corresponding to the Kihara potential. In fact, the Fk functions are the same. Furthermore, for these functions, the complete expansions at low and high temperature are given. Additionally, we propose an alternative stickiness parameter based on the obtained second virial coefficient. PMID:25612707

  11. GYutsis: heuristic based calculation of general recoupling coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dyck, D.; Fack, V.

    2003-08-01

    General angular momentum recoupling coefficients can be expressed as a summation formula over products of 6- j coefficients. Yutsis, Levinson and Vanagas developed graphical techniques for representing the general recoupling coefficient as a cubic graph and they describe a set of reduction rules allowing a stepwise generation of the corresponding summation formula. This paper is a follow up to [Van Dyck and Fack, Comput. Phys. Comm. 151 (2003) 353-368] where we described a heuristic algorithm based on these techniques. In this article we separate the heuristic from the algorithm and describe some new heuristic approaches which can be plugged into the generic algorithm. We show that these new heuristics lead to good results: in many cases we get a more efficient summation formula than our previous approach, in particular for problems of higher order. In addition the new features and the use of our program GYutsis, which implements these techniques, is described both for end users and application programmers. Program summaryTitle of program: CycleCostAlgorithm, GYutsis Catalogue number: ADSA Program Summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADSA Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland. Users may obtain the program also by downloading either the compressed tar file gyutsis.tgz (for Unix and Linux) or the zip file gyutsis.zip (for Windows) from our website ( http://caagt.rug.ac.be/yutsis/). An applet version of the program is also available on our website and can be run in a web browser from the URL http://caagt.rug.ac.be/yutsis/GYutsisApplet.html. Licensing provisions: none Computers for which the program is designed: any computer with Sun's Java Runtime Environment 1.4 or higher installed. Programming language used: Java 1.2 (Compiler: Sun's SDK 1.4.0) No. of lines in program: approximately 9400 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 544 117 Distribution format: tar gzip file Nature of physical problem: A general recoupling coefficient for an arbitrary number of (integer or half-integer) angular momenta can be expressed as a formula consisting of products of 6- j coefficients summed over a certain number of variables. Such a formula can be generated using the program GYutsis (with a graphical user front end) or CycleCostAlgorithm (with a text-mode user front end). Method of solution: Using the graphical techniques of Yutsis, Levinson and Vanagas (1962) a summation formula for a general recoupling coefficient is obtained by representing the coefficient as a Yutsis graph and by performing a selection of reduction rules valid for such graphs. Each reduction rule contributes to the final summation formula by a numerical factor or by an additional summation variable. Whereas an optimal summation formula (i.e. with a minimum number of summation variables) is hard to obtain, we present here some new heuristic approaches for selecting an edge from a k-cycle in order to transform it into an ( k-1)-cycle ( k>3) in such a way that a 'good' summation formula is obtained. Typical running time: From instantaneously for the typical problems to 30 s for the heaviest problems on a Pentium II-350 Linux-system with 256 MB RAM.

  12. General relativistic radiation hydrodynamics of accretion flows - II. Treating stiff source terms and exploring physical limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roedig, C.; Zanotti, O.; Alic, D.

    2012-10-01

    We present the implementation of an implicit-explicit (IMEX) Runge-Kutta numerical scheme for general relativistic (GR) hydrodynamics coupled to an optically thick radiation field in two existing GR-(magneto)hydrodynamics codes. We argue that the necessity of such an improvement arises naturally in most astrophysically relevant regimes where the optical thickness is high as the equations become stiff. By performing several simple 1D tests, we verify the codes' new ability to deal with this stiffness and show consistency. Then, still in one spatial dimension, we compute a luminosity versus accretion rate diagram for the set-up of spherical accretion on to a Schwarzschild black hole and find good agreement with previous work which included more radiation processes than we currently have available. Lastly, we revisit the supersonic Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton (BHL) accretion in two dimensions where we can now present simulations of realistic temperatures, down to T ˜ 106 K or less. Here we find that radiation pressure plays an important role, but also that these highly dynamical set-ups push our approximate treatment towards the limit of physical applicability. The main features of radiation hydrodynamics BHL flows manifest as (i) an effective adiabatic index approaching γeff ˜ 4/3; (ii) accretion rates two orders of magnitude lower than without radiation pressure, but still super-Eddington; (iii) luminosity estimates around the Eddington limit, hence with an overall radiative efficiency as small as ηBHL˜10-2; (iv) strong departures from thermal equilibrium in shocked regions; (v) no appearance of the flip-flop instability. We conclude that the current optically thick approximation to the radiation transfer does give physically substantial improvements over the pure hydro also in set-ups departing from equilibrium, and, once accompanied by an optically thin treatment, is likely to provide a fundamental tool for investigating accretion flows in a large variety of astrophysical systems.

  13. Generalized semiparametric varying-coefficient models for longitudinal data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Li

    In this dissertation, we investigate the generalized semiparametric varying-coefficient models for longitudinal data that can flexibly model three types of covariate effects: time-constant effects, time-varying effects, and covariate-varying effects, i.e., the covariate effects that depend on other possibly time-dependent exposure variables. First, we consider the model that assumes the time-varying effects are unspecified functions of time while the covariate-varying effects are parametric functions of an exposure variable specified up to a finite number of unknown parameters. The estimation procedures are developed using multivariate local linear smoothing and generalized weighted least squares estimation techniques. The asymptotic properties of the proposed estimators are established. The simulation studies show that the proposed methods have satisfactory finite sample performance. ACTG 244 clinical trial of HIV infected patients are applied to examine the effects of antiretroviral treatment switching before and after HIV developing the 215-mutation. Our analysis shows benefit of treatment switching before developing the 215-mutation. The proposed methods are also applied to the STEP study with MITT cases showing that they have broad applications in medical research.

  14. Thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) rs7212 polymorphism is associated with arterial stiffness in the Brazilian general population.

    PubMed

    Alvim, R O; Santos, P C J L; Ferreira, N E; Mill, J G; Krieger, J E; Pereira, A C

    2012-05-01

    Thioredoxin interacting protein plays a pivotal role in several important processes of cardiovascular homeostasis by functioning as a biological sensor for biomechanical and oxidative stress. However, the effects of genetic variants in the modulation of arterial stiffness are unknown. In this scenario, the present study evaluated the relationship between the TXNIP rs7212 polymorphism and arterial stiffness. In the overall sample and in the diabetic group, individuals carrying CG+GG genotypes had higher PWV values compared with CC genotype group (10.0 vs 9.8?m?s (-1), P=0.03; 12.3 vs 11.2?m?s(-1), P=0.01; respectively). Our findings indicated that the G allele may contribute to increased arterial stiffness in the Brazilian general population and suggest a possible interaction with diabetes. PMID:22113441

  15. General dissipation coefficient in low-temperature warm inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Bastero-Gil, Mar; Berera, Arjun; Rosa, João G.; Ramos, Rudnei O. E-mail: ab@ph.ed.ac.uk E-mail: joao.rosa@ed.ac.uk

    2013-01-01

    In generic particle physics models, the inflaton field is coupled to other bosonic and fermionic fields that acquire large masses during inflation and may decay into light degrees of freedom. This leads to dissipative effects that modify the inflationary dynamics and may generate a nearly-thermal radiation bath, such that inflation occurs in a warm rather than supercooled environment. In this work, we perform a numerical computation and obtain expressions for the associated dissipation coefficient in supersymmetric models, focusing on the regime where the radiation temperature is below the heavy mass threshold. The dissipation coefficient receives contributions from the decay of both on-shell and off-shell degrees of freedom, which are dominant for small and large couplings, respectively, taking into account the light field multiplicities. In particular, we find that the contribution from on-shell decays, although Boltzmann-suppressed, can be much larger than that of virtual modes, which is bounded by the validity of a perturbative analysis. This result opens up new possibilities for realizations of warm inflation in supersymmetric field theories.

  16. Ecological optimization and coefficient of performance bounds of general refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Rui; Liu, Wei

    2016-02-01

    An analysis of COP and its bounds at maximum ecological criterion for general refrigerators is conducted. For generality, both the non-isothermal heat transfer processes and the internal dissipations are considered. Under different situations, the COP under the maximum ecological criterion have been studied systematically. And the general upper and lower bounds of the optimal COP have been obtained. Furthermore under maximum ecological criterion, the COP of general endoreversible refrigerators have also been studied. And the COP bounds of different kinds of refrigerators have been analyzed. As actual refrigerators may not operate under the condition of maximum COP or maximum cooling load, but operate under the maximum ecological condition which indicates the best compromise between the refrigeration rate and the loss of refrigeration rate. This paper could provide a practical insight for designing and operating actual refrigerators.

  17. Sensitivity of overall vehicle stiffness to local joint stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chon, Choon T.

    1987-01-01

    How overall vehicle stiffness is affected by local joint stiffness is discussed. By using the principle of virtual work and the minimum strain energy theorem, a closed form expression for the sensitivity coefficient was derived. The insensitivity of the vehicle stiffness to a particular joint, when its stiffness exceeds a certain value (or threshold value), was proven mathematically. In order to investigate the sensitivity of the structure to the joint stiffness, a so-called stick model was created, and the modeling technique is briefly described. Some data on joint stiffness of tested vehicles are also presented.

  18. In-plane, flexural, twisting and thickness-shear coefficients for stiffness and damping of a monolayer filamentary composite, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bert, C. W.; Chang, S.

    1972-01-01

    Elastic and damping analyses resulting in determinations of the various stiffnesses and associated loss tangents for the complete characterization of the elastic and damping behavior of a monofilament composite layer are presented. For the determination of the various stiffnesses, either an elementary mechanics-of-materials formulation or a more rigorous mixed-boundary-value elasticity formulation is used. The solution for the latter formulation is obtained by means of the boundary-point least-square error technique. Kimball-Lovell type damping is assumed for each of the constituent materials. For determining the loss tangents associated with the various stiffnesses, either the viscoelastic correspondence principle or an energy analysis based on the appropriate elastic stress distribution is used.

  19. Trial equation method for solving the generalized Fisher equation with variable coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triki, Houria; Wazwaz, Abdul-Majid

    2016-03-01

    We investigate a generalized Fisher equation with temporally varying coefficients, describing the dynamics of a field in inhomogeneous media. A class of exact soliton solutions of this equation is presented, and some of which are derived for the first time. The trial equation method is applied to obtain these soliton solutions. The constraint conditions for the existence of these solutions are also exhibited.

  20. Statistical Properties of Generalized Gini Coefficient with Application to Health Inequality Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Dejian; Huang, Jin; Risser, Jan M.; Kapadia, Asha S.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we report statistical properties of two classes of generalized Gini coefficients (G1 and G2). The theoretical results were assessed via Monte Carlo simulations. Further, we used G1 and G2 on life expectancy to measure health inequalities among the provinces of China and the states of the United States. For China, the results…

  1. Exact Solutions for The Generalized Zakharov-Kuznetsov Equation with Variable Coefficients Using The Generalized (G'/G)-expansion Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayed, Elsayed M. E.; Abdelaziz, Mahmoud A. M.

    2010-09-01

    In this article, the generalized G'/G-expansion method using a generalized wave transformation is applied to find exact traveling wave solutions of the generalized Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation with variable coefficients. As a result, hyperbolic, trigonometric and rational function solutions with parameters are obtained. When these parameters are taken special values, the solitary wave solutions are derived from the hyperbolic function solution. It is shown that the proposed method is direct, effective and can be applied to many other nonlinear evolution equations in mathematical physics.

  2. Coefficient of performance and its bounds with the figure of merit for a general refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Rui; Liu, Wei

    2015-02-01

    A general refrigerator model with non-isothermal processes is studied. The coefficient of performance (COP) and its bounds at maximum χ figure of merit are obtained and analyzed. This model accounts for different heat capacities during the heat transfer processes. So, different kinds of refrigerator cycles can be considered. Under the constant heat capacity condition, the upper bound of the COP is the Curzon-Ahlborn (CA) coefficient of performance and is independent of the time durations of the heat exchanging processes. With the maximum χ criterion, in the refrigerator cycles, such as the reversed Brayton refrigerator cycle, the reversed Otto refrigerator cycle and the reversed Atkinson refrigerator cycle, where the heat capacity in the heat absorbing process is not less than that in the heat releasing process, their COPs are bounded by the CA coefficient of performance; otherwise, such as for the reversed Diesel refrigerator cycle, its COP can exceed the CA coefficient of performance. Furthermore, the general refined upper and lower bounds have been proposed.

  3. A generalized concordance correlation coefficient based on the variance components generalized linear mixed models for overdispersed count data.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Josep L

    2010-09-01

    The classical concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) to measure agreement among a set of observers assumes data to be distributed as normal and a linear relationship between the mean and the subject and observer effects. Here, the CCC is generalized to afford any distribution from the exponential family by means of the generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs) theory and applied to the case of overdispersed count data. An example of CD34+ cell count data is provided to show the applicability of the procedure. In the latter case, different CCCs are defined and applied to the data by changing the GLMM that fits the data. A simulation study is carried out to explore the behavior of the procedure with a small and moderate sample size. PMID:19817740

  4. General Boundary-Value Problems for the Heat Conduction Equation with Piecewise-Continuous Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsii, R. M.; Pazen, O. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    A constructive scheme for the construction of a solution of a mixed problem for the heat conduction equation with piecewise-continuous coefficients coordinate-dependent in the final interval is suggested and validated in the present work. The boundary conditions are assumed to be most general. The scheme is based on: the reduction method, the concept of quasi-derivatives, the currently accepted theory of the systems of linear differential equations, the Fourier method, and the modified method of eigenfunctions. The method based on this scheme should be related to direct exact methods of solving mixed problems that do not employ the procedures of constructing Green's functions or integral transformations. Here the theorem of eigenfunction expansion is adapted for the case of coefficients that have discontinuity points of the 1st kind. The results obtained can be used, for example, in investigating the process of heat transfer in a multilayer slab under conditions of ideal thermal contact between the layers. A particular case of piecewise-continuous coefficients is considered. A numerical example of calculation of a temperature field in a real four-layer building slab under boundary conditions of the 3rd kind (conditions of convective heat transfer) that model the phenomenon of fire near one of the external surfaces is given.

  5. A method for assigning species into groups based on generalized Mahalanobis distance between habitat model coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, C.J.; Heglund, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Habitat association models are commonly developed for individual animal species using generalized linear modeling methods such as logistic regression. We considered the issue of grouping species based on their habitat use so that management decisions can be based on sets of species rather than individual species. This research was motivated by a study of western landbirds in northern Idaho forests. The method we examined was to separately fit models to each species and to use a generalized Mahalanobis distance between coefficient vectors to create a distance matrix among species. Clustering methods were used to group species from the distance matrix, and multidimensional scaling methods were used to visualize the relations among species groups. Methods were also discussed for evaluating the sensitivity of the conclusions because of outliers or influential data points. We illustrate these methods with data from the landbird study conducted in northern Idaho. Simulation results are presented to compare the success of this method to alternative methods using Euclidean distance between coefficient vectors and to methods that do not use habitat association models. These simulations demonstrate that our Mahalanobis-distance- based method was nearly always better than Euclidean-distance-based methods or methods not based on habitat association models. The methods used to develop candidate species groups are easily explained to other scientists and resource managers since they mainly rely on classical multivariate statistical methods. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  6. Integrability study on a generalized (2+1)-dimensional variable-coefficient Gardner model with symbolic computation

    SciTech Connect

    Lue Xing; Zhang Haiqiang; Xu Tao; Li He; Tian Bo

    2010-12-15

    Gardner model describes certain nonlinear elastic structures, ion-acoustic waves in plasmas, and shear flows in ocean and atmosphere. In this paper, by virtue of the computerized symbolic computation, the integrability of a generalized (2+1)-dimensional variable-coefficient Gardner model is investigated. Painleve integrability conditions are derived among the coefficient functions, which reduce all the coefficient functions to be proportional only to {gamma}(t), the coefficient of the cubic nonlinear term u{sup 2}u{sub x}. Then, an independent transformation of the variable t transforms the reduced {gamma}(t)-dependent equation into a constant-coefficient integrable one. Painleve test shows that this is the only case when our original generalized (2+1)-dimensional variable-coefficient Gardner model is integrable.

  7. General expressions and physical origin of the coupling coefficient of arbitrary tuned coupled electromagnetic resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elnaggar, Sameh Y.; Tervo, Richard J.; Mattar, Saba M.

    2015-11-01

    The theory and operation of various devices and systems, such as wireless power transfer via magnetic resonant coupling, magneto-inductive wave devices, magnetic resonance spectroscopy probes, and metamaterials can rely on coupled tuned resonators. The coupling strength is usually expressed in terms of the coupling coefficient κ, which can have electrical κE and/or magnetic κM components. In the current article, general expressions of κ are derived. The relation between the complex Poynting equation in its microscopic form and κ is made and discussed in detail. It is shown that κ can be expressed in terms of the interaction energy between the resonators' modes. It thus provides a general form that combines the magnetic and electric components of κ. The expressions make it possible to estimate the frequencies and fields of the coupled modes for arbitrarily oriented and spaced resonators. Thus, enabling the calculation of system specific parameters such as the transfer efficiency of wireless power transfer systems, resonator efficiency for electron spin resonance probes, and dispersion relations of magneto-inductive and stereo-metamaterials structures.

  8. A computer program for two-particle generalized coefficients of fractional parentage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveikis, A.; Juodagalvis, A.

    2008-10-01

    We present a FORTRAN90 program GCFP for the calculation of the generalized coefficients of fractional parentage (generalized CFPs or GCFP). The approach is based on the observation that the multi-shell CFPs can be expressed in terms of single-shell CFPs, while the latter can be readily calculated employing a simple enumeration scheme of antisymmetric A-particle states and an efficient method of construction of the idempotent matrix eigenvectors. The program provides fast calculation of GCFPs for a given particle number and produces results possessing numerical uncertainties below the desired tolerance. A single j-shell is defined by four quantum numbers, (e,l,j,t). A supplemental C++ program parGCFP allows calculation to be done in batches and/or in parallel. Program summaryProgram title:GCFP, parGCFP Catalogue identifier: AEBI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEBI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17 199 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 88 658 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77/90 ( GCFP), C++ ( parGCFP) Computer: Any computer with suitable compilers. The program GCFP requires a FORTRAN 77/90 compiler. The auxiliary program parGCFP requires GNU-C++ compatible compiler, while its parallel version additionally requires MPI-1 standard libraries Operating system: Linux (Ubuntu, Scientific) (all programs), also checked on Windows XP ( GCFP, serial version of parGCFP) RAM: The memory demand depends on the computation and output mode. If this mode is not 4, the program GCFP demands the following amounts of memory on a computer with Linux operating system. It requires around 2 MB of RAM for the A=12 system at E⩽2. Computation of the A=50 particle system requires around 60 MB of RAM at E=0 and ˜70 MB at E=2 (note, however, that the calculation of this system will take a very long time). If the computation and output mode is set to 4, the memory demands by GCFP are significantly larger. Calculation of GCFPs of A=12 system at E=1 requires 145 MB. The program parGCFP requires additional 2.5 and 4.5 MB of memory for the serial and parallel version, respectively. Classification: 17.18 Nature of problem: The program GCFP generates a list of two-particle coefficients of fractional parentage for several j-shells with isospin. Solution method: The method is based on the observation that multishell coefficients of fractional parentage can be expressed in terms of single-shell CFPs [1]. The latter are calculated using the algorithm [2,3] for a spectral decomposition of an antisymmetrization operator matrix Y. The coefficients of fractional parentage are those eigenvectors of the antisymmetrization operator matrix Y that correspond to unit eigenvalues. A computer code for these coefficients is available [4]. The program GCFP offers computation of two-particle multishell coefficients of fractional parentage. The program parGCFP allows a batch calculation using one input file. Sets of GCFPs are independent and can be calculated in parallel. Restrictions:A<86 when E=0 (due to the memory constraints); small numbers of particles allow significantly higher excitations, though the shell with j⩾11/2 cannot get full (it is the implementation constraint). Unusual features: Using the program GCFP it is possible to determine allowed particle configurations without the GCFP computation. The GCFPs can be calculated either for all particle configurations at once or for a specified particle configuration. The values of GCFPs can be printed out with a complete specification in either one file or with the parent and daughter configurations printed in separate files. The latter output mode requires additional time and RAM memory. It is possible to restrict the ( J,T) values of the considered particle configurations. (Here J is the total angular momentum and T is the total isospin of the system.) The program parGCFP produces several result files the number of which equals to the number of particle configurations. To work correctly, the program GCFP needs to be compiled to read parameters from the standard input (the default setting). Running time: It depends on the size of the problem. The minimum time is required, if the computation and output mode ( CompMode) is not 4, but the resulting file is larger. A system with A=12 particles at E=0 (all 9411 GCFPs) took around 1 sec on a Pentium4 2.8 GHz processor with 1 MB L2 cache. The program required about 14 min to calculate all 1.3×10 GCFPs of E=1. The time for all 5.5×10 GCFPs of E=2 was about 53 hours. For this number of particles, the calculation time of both E=0 and E=1 with CompMode = 1 and 4 is nearly the same, when no other processes are running. The case of E=2 could not be calculated with CompMode = 4, because the RAM memory was insufficient. In general, the latter CompMode requires a longer computation time, although the resulting files are smaller in size. The program parGCFP puts virtually no time overhead. Its parallel version speeds-up the calculation. However, the results need to be collected from several files created for each configuration. References: [1] J. Levinsonas, Works of Lithuanian SSR Academy of Sciences 4 (1957) 17. [2] A. Deveikis, A. Bončkus, R. Kalinauskas, Lithuanian Phys. J. 41 (2001) 3. [3] A. Deveikis, R.K. Kalinauskas, B.R. Barrett, Ann. Phys. 296 (2002) 287. [4] A. Deveikis, Comput. Phys. Comm. 173 (2005) 186. (CPC Catalogue ID. ADWI_v1_0)

  9. Comparing Regression Coefficients between Nested Linear Models for Clustered Data with Generalized Estimating Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Jun; Aseltine, Robert H., Jr.; Harel, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    Comparing regression coefficients between models when one model is nested within another is of great practical interest when two explanations of a given phenomenon are specified as linear models. The statistical problem is whether the coefficients associated with a given set of covariates change significantly when other covariates are added into…

  10. Variable stiffness torsion springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

  11. Variable stiffness torsion springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

  12. A generalized method of converting CT image to PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution in PET/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Wu, Li-Wei; Wei, Le; Gao, Juan; Sun, Cui-Li; Chai, Pei; Li, Dao-Wu

    2014-02-01

    The accuracy of attenuation correction in positron emission tomography scanners depends mainly on deriving the reliable 511-keV linear attenuation coefficient distribution in the scanned objects. In the PET/CT system, the linear attenuation distribution is usually obtained from the intensities of the CT image. However, the intensities of the CT image relate to the attenuation of photons in an energy range of 40 keV-140 keV. Before implementing PET attenuation correction, the intensities of CT images must be transformed into the PET 511-keV linear attenuation coefficients. However, the CT scan parameters can affect the effective energy of CT X-ray photons and thus affect the intensities of the CT image. Therefore, for PET/CT attenuation correction, it is crucial to determine the conversion curve with a given set of CT scan parameters and convert the CT image into a PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution. A generalized method is proposed for converting a CT image into a PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution. Instead of some parameter-dependent phantom calibration experiments, the conversion curve is calculated directly by employing the consistency conditions to yield the most consistent attenuation map with the measured PET data. The method is evaluated with phantom experiments and small animal experiments. In phantom studies, the estimated conversion curve fits the true attenuation coefficients accurately, and accurate PET attenuation maps are obtained by the estimated conversion curves and provide nearly the same correction results as the true attenuation map. In small animal studies, a more complicated attenuation distribution of the mouse is obtained successfully to remove the attenuation artifact and improve the PET image contrast efficiently.

  13. Generalized non-local surface susceptibility model and Fresnel coefficients for the characterization of periodic metafilms with bianisotropic scatterers

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitriadis, Alexandros I.; Kantartzis, Nikolaos V.; Tsiboukis, Theodoros D.; Hafner, Christian

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: •Formulas for E/M fields radiated by continuous surface polarization distributions. •Non-local effective surface susceptibility model for periodic metafilms. •Generalized reflection and transmission coefficients for an arbitrary metafilm. •Successful treatment of non-planar scatterer arrays and spatial dispersion effects. -- Abstract: A non-local surface susceptibility model for the consistent description of periodic metafilms formed by arbitrarily-shaped, electrically-small, bianisotropic scatterers is developed in this paper. The rigorous scheme is based on the point-dipole approximation technique and is valid for any polarization and propagation direction of an electromagnetic wave impinging upon the metafilm, unlike existing approaches whose applicability is practically confined to very specific cases of incidence. Next, the universal form of the resulting surface susceptibility matrix is employed for the derivation of the generalized Fresnel coefficients for such surfaces, which enable the comprehensive interpretation of several significant, yet relatively unexamined, physical interactions. Essentially, these coefficients include eight distinct terms, corresponding to the co-polarized and cross-polarized reflection and transmission coefficients for the two orthogonal eigenpolarizations of a linearly-polarized incident plane wave. The above formulas are, then, utilized for the prediction of the scattering properties of metafilms with different planar and non-planar resonators, which are characterized via the featured model and two previously reported local ones. Their comparison with numerical simulation outcomes substantiates the merits of the proposed method, reveals important aspects of the underlying physics, and highlights the differences between the various modeling procedures.

  14. Generalization of Connor and Hastie's ripple-trapping coefficient, G(. cap alpha. )

    SciTech Connect

    Goldston, R.J.; Towner, H.H.

    1980-02-01

    In their calculation of transport due to ripple trapping, Connor and Hastie employ a factor G(..cap alpha..) to take into account the poloidal variation of the depth and shape of the local magnetic wells. They assume, however, that the toroidal-field ripple strength, delta, is independent of the poloidal angle. This letter generalizes G to treat any arbitrary poloidal variation of delta, and also high-beta, non-circular plasma configurations of arbitrary aspect ratio.

  15. Generalized Skew Coefficients of Annual Peak Flows for Rural, Unregulated Streams in West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkins, John T.; Wiley, Jeffrey B.; Paybins, Katherine S.

    2009-01-01

    Generalized skew was determined from analysis of records from 147 streamflow-gaging stations in or near West Virginia. The analysis followed guidelines established by the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data described in Bulletin 17B, except that stations having 50 or more years of record were used instead of stations with the less restrictive recommendation of 25 or more years of record. The generalized-skew analysis included contouring, averaging, and regression of station skews. The best method was considered the one with the smallest mean square error (MSE). MSE is defined as the following quantity summed and divided by the number of peaks: the square of the difference of an individual logarithm (base 10) of peak flow less the mean of all individual logarithms of peak flow. Contouring of station skews was the best method for determining generalized skew for West Virginia, with a MSE of about 0.2174. This MSE is an improvement over the MSE of about 0.3025 for the national map presented in Bulletin 17B.

  16. Cardiovascular Event Risk Dynamics Over Time in Older Patients on Dialysis: A Generalized Multiple-Index Varying Coefficient Model Approach

    PubMed Central

    Estes, Jason P.; Nguyen, Danh V.; Dalrymple, Lorien S.; Mu, Yi; Şentürk, Damla

    2014-01-01

    Among patients on dialysis, cardiovascular disease and infection are leading causes of hospitalization and death. Although recent studies have found that the risk of cardiovascular events is higher after an infection-related hospitalization, studies have not fully elucidated how the risk of cardiovascular events changes over time for patients on dialysis. In this work, we characterize the dynamics of cardiovascular event risk trajectories for patients on dialysis while conditioning on survival status via multiple time indices: (1) time since the start of dialysis, (2) time since the pivotal initial infection-related hospitalization and (3) the patient’s age at the start of dialysis. This is achieved by using a new class of generalized multiple-index varying coefficient (GM-IVC) models. The proposed GM-IVC models utilize a multiplicative structure and one-dimensional varying coefficient functions along each time and age index to capture the cardiovascular risk dynamics before and after the initial infection-related hospitalization among the dynamic cohort of survivors. We develop a two-step estimation procedure for the GM-IVC models based on local maximum likelihood. We report new insights on the dynamics of cardiovascular events risk using the United States Renal Data System database, which collects data on nearly all patients with end-stage renal disease in the U.S. Finally, simulation studies assess the performance of the proposed estimation procedures. PMID:24766178

  17. Using dominance relationship coefficients based on linkage disequilibrium and linkage with a general complex pedigree to increase mapping resolution.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Van der Werf, J H J

    2006-10-01

    Dominance (intralocus allelic interactions) plays often an important role in quantitative trait variation. However, few studies about dominance in QTL mapping have been reported in outbred animal or human populations. This is because common dominance effects can be predicted mainly for many full sibs, which do not often occur in outbred or natural populations with a general pedigree. Moreover, incomplete genotypes for such a pedigree make it infeasible to estimate dominance relationship coefficients between individuals. In this study, identity-by-descent (IBD) coefficients are estimated on the basis of population-wide linkage disequilibrium (LD), which makes it possible to track dominance relationships between unrelated founders. Therefore, it is possible to use dominance effects in QTL mapping without full sibs. Incomplete genotypes with a complex pedigree and many markers can be efficiently dealt with by a Markov chain Monte Carlo method for estimating IBD and dominance relationship matrices (D(RM)). It is shown by simulation that the use of D(RM) increases the likelihood ratio at the true QTL position and the mapping accuracy and power with complete dominance, overdominance, and recessive inheritance modes when using 200 genotyped and phenotyped individuals. PMID:16951069

  18. Generalized Cahn-Hilliard equation for solutions with drastically different diffusion coefficients. Application to exsolution in ternary feldspar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrishcheva, E.; Abart, R.

    2012-04-01

    We address mathematical modeling and computer simulations of phase decomposition in a multicomponent system. As opposed to binary alloys with one common diffusion parameter, our main concern is phase decomposition in real geological systems under influence of strongly different interdiffusion coefficients, as it is frequently encountered in mineral solid solutions with coupled diffusion on different sub-lattices. Our goal is to explain deviations from equilibrium element partitioning which are often observed in nature, e.g., in a cooled ternary feldspar. To this end we first adopt the standard Cahn-Hilliard model to the multicomponent diffusion problem and account for arbitrary diffusion coefficients. This is done by using Onsager's approach such that flux of each component results from the combined action of chemical potentials of all components. In a second step the generalized Cahn-Hilliard equation is solved numerically using finite-elements approach. We introduce and investigate several decomposition scenarios that may produce systematic deviations from the equilibrium element partitioning. Both ideal solutions and ternary feldspar are considered. Typically, the slowest component is initially "frozen" and the decomposition effectively takes place only for two "fast" components. At this stage the deviations from the equilibrium element partitioning are indeed observed. These deviations may became "frozen" under conditions of cooling. The final equilibration of the system occurs on a considerably slower time scale. Therefore the system may indeed remain unaccomplished at the observation point. Our approach reveals the intrinsic reasons for the specific phase separation path and rigorously describes it by direct numerical solution of the generalized Cahn-Hilliard equation.

  19. Magnetic negative stiffness dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiang; Zhu, Songye

    2015-07-01

    This communication presents the design principle and experimental validation of two novel configurations of magnetic negative stiffness dampers (MNSDs), both of which are composed of several permanent magnets arranged in a conductive pipe. The MNSD, as a passive device, efficiently integrates negative stiffness and eddy-current damping in a simple and compact design, in which the negative stiffness behavior depends on the different arrangements of the permanent magnets. When applied to structural vibration control, passive MNSD may achieve a performance comparable with semi-active or active control in some applications. Laboratory experiments of small-scale prototypes successfully verified the proposed MNSD design concept.

  20. Theory versus experiment for the rotordynamic coefficients of annular gas seals. II - Constant-clearance and convergent-tapered geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, C. C.; Childs, D. W.; Nicks, C.; Elrod, D.

    1985-01-01

    The leakage and rotordynamic coefficients of constant-clearance and convergent-tapered annular gas seals were measured in an experimental test facility. The results are presented along with the theoretically predicted values. Of particular interest is the prediction that optimally tapered seals have significantly larger direct stiffness than straight seals. The experimental results verify this prediction. Generally the theory does quite well, but fails to predict the large increase in direct stiffness when the fluid is pre-rotated.

  1. Nonlinear stability of oscillatory core-annular flow: A generalized Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation with time periodic coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coward, Adrian V.; Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.; Smyrlis, Yiorgos S.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the nonlinear stability of two-phase core-annular flow in a pipe is examined when the acting pressure gradient is modulated by time harmonic oscillations and viscosity stratification and interfacial tension is present. An exact solution of the Navier-Stokes equations is used as the background state to develop an asymptotic theory valid for thin annular layers, which leads to a novel nonlinear evolution describing the spatio-temporal evolution of the interface. The evolution equation is an extension of the equation found for constant pressure gradients and generalizes the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation with dispersive effects found by Papageorgiou, Maldarelli & Rumschitzki, Phys. Fluids A 2(3), 1990, pp. 340-352, to a similar system with time periodic coefficients. The distinct regimes of slow and moderate flow are considered and the corresponding evolution is derived. Certain solutions are described analytically in the neighborhood of the first bifurcation point by use of multiple scales asymptotics. Extensive numerical experiments, using dynamical systems ideas, are carried out in order to evaluate the effect of the oscillatory pressure gradient on the solutions in the presence of a constant pressure gradient.

  2. Optimized stiffness for linear time-invariant dynamic system according to a new system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeraklaew, Tawiwat

    2012-11-01

    This paper deals with a linear time-invariant dynamic system such as spring-mass-damper system. General dynamic systems are quite commonly to be redesigned for another purpose of using. For example, if one automobile must be redesigned to have more weights, the existing suspension must be replaced due to that gained weight. Therefore the stiffness and damping coefficient must be recomputed in order to make the automobile become suitable for using as previous. Here the spring-mass-damper system is used as an example to demonstrate the technique through dynamic optimization where the problem is solved in two categories as minimum energy and maximum jerk. Once the state and control variables are provided from the problem of minimum energy and maximum jerk, respectively, these parameter will be substituted in dynamic equations and leave the stiffness and damping coefficient as the unknown parameters to be solved.

  3. Reflectional transformation for structural stiffness

    SciTech Connect

    Vashi, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a structural reflection-related transformation for structural stiffness. The stiffness transformation addresses reflection of a structure about any of the three coordinate planes and renders the desired stiffness matrix using a stiffness matrix for the same structure before reflection. This transformation is elegant and simple, provides an efficient and technically rigorous approach to derive the required stiffness matrix without structural remodeling, and can be readily programmed to quickly perform the required matrix manipulations. 2 figs.

  4. Stiff person syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nikhilesh, J; Sayeed, Z A; Saravanan, P K; Paul, J

    2001-05-01

    This communication considers a patient with episodic muscle spasms. Pharmacological intervention and electrophysiological studies provided adequate evidence confirming the diagnosis of stiff person syndrome. Electrophysiological studies in present communication similar to earlier reports, confirmed once again the autonomous state of the anterior horn cell in this disease process. PMID:11361276

  5. Rigorous Justification of the Localized Approximation to the Beam-Shape Coefficients in Generalized Lorenz-Mie Theory. Part 1; On-Axis Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, James A.; Gouesbet, Gerard

    1994-01-01

    Generalized Lorenz-Mie theory describes electromagnetic scattering of an arbitrary light beam by a spherical particle. The computationally most expensive feature of the theory is the evaluation of the beam-shape coefficients, which give the decomposition of the incident light beam into partial waves. The so-called localized approximation to these coefficients for a focused Gaussian beam is an analytical function whose use greatly simplifies Gaussian-beam scattering calculations. A mathematical justification and physical interpretation of the localized approximation is presented for on-axis beams.

  6. Genetic impact dominates over environmental effects in development of carotid artery stiffness: a twin study.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Tamás; Osztovits, János; Pintér, Alexandra; Littvay, Levente; Cseh, Domonkos; Tárnoki, Adám D; Tárnoki, Dávid L; Jermendy, Adám L; Steinbach, Rita; Métneki, Júlia; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Kollai, Márk; Jermendy, György

    2014-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and all-cause mortality. Quantifying the genetic influence on the stiff arterial phenotype allows us to better predict the development of arterial stiffness. In this study, we aimed to determine the heritability of carotid artery stiffness in healthy twins. We studied 98 twin pairs of both sexes. We determined carotid artery stiffness locally using echo tracking and applanation tonometry. We estimated the heritability of stiffness parameters using structural equation modeling. The carotid distensibility coefficient showed the highest heritability (64%, 95% confidence interval 45-77%). The incremental elastic modulus, compliance and stiffness index β also showed substantial heritability (62%, 61% and 58%, respectively). The remaining 36-42% phenotypic variance was attributed to unshared environmental effects. Genetic influence appears to dominate over environmental factors in the development of carotid artery stiffness. Environmental factors may have an important role in favorably influencing the genetic predisposition for accelerated arterial stiffening. PMID:24089266

  7. Multisoliton solutions in terms of double Wronskian determinant for a generalized variable-coefficient nonlinear Schroedinger equation from plasma physics, arterial mechanics, fluid dynamics and optical communications

    SciTech Connect

    Lue Xing Zhu Hongwu; Yao Zhenzhi; Meng Xianghua; Zhang Cheng; Zhang Chunyi; Tian Bo

    2008-08-15

    In this paper, the multisoliton solutions in terms of double Wronskian determinant are presented for a generalized variable-coefficient nonlinear Schroedinger equation, which appears in space and laboratory plasmas, arterial mechanics, fluid dynamics, optical communications and so on. By means of the particularly nice properties of Wronskian determinant, the solutions are testified through direct substitution into the bilinear equations. Furthermore, it can be proved that the bilinear Baecklund transformation transforms between (N - 1)- and N-soliton solutions.

  8. The determining of the coefficient of safety of bearing ability of anisotropic bars in the general case of their complex resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibgatullin, K. E.; Sibgatullin, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    The bars of any form made of a uniform anisotropic material are considered. Generally in the cross section of a bar all internal power factors (IPF) - three forces and three moments are other than zero. Values IPF are known from the solution of the corresponding task. The coefficient of a stock of bearing ability of a bar is defined by a way of comparison of known vector IPF vec R* with the corresponding required vector of durability vec R in IPF space.

  9. Third Order Elastic Coefficients of Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.

    2006-12-01

    We present a methodology to determine third order elastic (TOE) coefficients of rock from velocity measurements at different hydrostatic stress level. TOE coefficients help us to obtain a quantitative measure of the variation of velocity with stress. It is one of the most general ways to parameterize the stress sensitivity of rocks. We usually determine the isotropic TOE coefficients from measurements of all the independent stiffness elements under non-hydrostatic stress. However, for initially isotropic or weakly anisotropic rocks, most of the laboratory experiments are carried out under hydrostatic stress. In that case, the measurements of P- and S-wave velocities at different hydrostatic pressure alone are not enough to invert for the isotropic TOE parameters. In this underdetermined situation, more information about the rock microstructure causing the non-linearity is required to predict seismic velocities at any arbitrary stress state. Our workflow is based on the model of Mavko et al. (1995) to compute stress-induced anisotropy. This model assumes that the cause of elastic nonlinearity is the presence of compliant crack-like pore. The pressure dependence of generalized compliances is mainly governed by normal tractions resolved across cracks. This assumption allows one to map the pressure dependence from hydrostatic stress to any state of stress. Applying the model of Mavko et al. (1995), we obtain the full stiffness tensor at different non-hydrostatic stress levels from the usual Vp and Vs measurements. Changes in elastic stiffness elements from a reference state of stress are then used to invert for the TOE coefficients, C111, C112 and C123 using the third order stress- strain relations. This method allows us to compute the TOE elements using hydrostatic measurements of an initially isotropic rock. We show an application of the workflow with laboratory measurements of P- and S-wave velocities under varying hydrostatic stress. This enables us to express stress sensitivity of a rock using simple parameters without requiring a lot of measurements. We also show examples of linking different reservoir properties like sorting, clay content, organic content etc. with the stress sensitivity of the rock through TOE coefficients.

  10. A new theory for multistep discretizations of stiff ordinary differential equations: Stability with large step sizes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majda, G.

    1985-01-01

    A large set of variable coefficient linear systems of ordinary differential equations which possess two different time scales, a slow one and a fast one is considered. A small parameter epsilon characterizes the stiffness of these systems. A system of o.d.e.s. in this set is approximated by a general class of multistep discretizations which includes both one-leg and linear multistep methods. Sufficient conditions are determined under which each solution of a multistep method is uniformly bounded, with a bound which is independent of the stiffness of the system of o.d.e.s., when the step size resolves the slow time scale, but not the fast one. This property is called stability with large step sizes. The theory presented lets one compare properties of one-leg methods and linear multistep methods when they approximate variable coefficient systems of stiff o.d.e.s. In particular, it is shown that one-leg methods have better stability properties with large step sizes than their linear multistep counter parts. The theory also allows one to relate the concept of D-stability to the usual notions of stability and stability domains and to the propagation of errors for multistep methods which use large step sizes.

  11. Dynamically variable negative stiffness structures.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Christopher B; Shahan, David W; Smith, Sloan P; Keefe, Andrew C; McKnight, Geoffrey P

    2016-02-01

    Variable stiffness structures that enable a wide range of efficient load-bearing and dexterous activity are ubiquitous in mammalian musculoskeletal systems but are rare in engineered systems because of their complexity, power, and cost. We present a new negative stiffness-based load-bearing structure with dynamically tunable stiffness. Negative stiffness, traditionally used to achieve novel response from passive structures, is a powerful tool to achieve dynamic stiffness changes when configured with an active component. Using relatively simple hardware and low-power, low-frequency actuation, we show an assembly capable of fast (<10 ms) and useful (>100×) dynamic stiffness control. This approach mitigates limitations of conventional tunable stiffness structures that exhibit either small (<30%) stiffness change, high friction, poor load/torque transmission at low stiffness, or high power active control at the frequencies of interest. We experimentally demonstrate actively tunable vibration isolation and stiffness tuning independent of supported loads, enhancing applications such as humanoid robotic limbs and lightweight adaptive vibration isolators. PMID:26989771

  12. The generalized correlation for the evaluation of the influence of the Stefan flow on the heat transfer coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskakov, A. P.; Rakov, O. A.

    2013-11-01

    The analytical equations for the steady-state heat-and-mass transfer in the steam evaporation/condensation processes from the steam-gas mixtures on the planar and spherical surfaces are derived. The vapor flow through the motionless dry gas is considered according to the method proposed by Maxwell for the solution of the diffusion problems. The relationships for the calculation of the coefficients taking into account an increase in the mass output and an increase or a decrease in the heat emission (depending on the directions of the heat-and-mass flows) as a result of the influence of the Stefan flow are presented. The derived relationships can be used to calculate the apparatuses in which the steam evaporation or condensation from the steam-gas mixture occurs (the coolers of the vapor from deaerators, the apparatuses for the deep utilization of the heat of the combustion products, the condensation boilers, etc.).

  13. Dynamically variable negative stiffness structures

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Christopher B.; Shahan, David W.; Smith, Sloan P.; Keefe, Andrew C.; McKnight, Geoffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Variable stiffness structures that enable a wide range of efficient load-bearing and dexterous activity are ubiquitous in mammalian musculoskeletal systems but are rare in engineered systems because of their complexity, power, and cost. We present a new negative stiffness–based load-bearing structure with dynamically tunable stiffness. Negative stiffness, traditionally used to achieve novel response from passive structures, is a powerful tool to achieve dynamic stiffness changes when configured with an active component. Using relatively simple hardware and low-power, low-frequency actuation, we show an assembly capable of fast (<10 ms) and useful (>100×) dynamic stiffness control. This approach mitigates limitations of conventional tunable stiffness structures that exhibit either small (<30%) stiffness change, high friction, poor load/torque transmission at low stiffness, or high power active control at the frequencies of interest. We experimentally demonstrate actively tunable vibration isolation and stiffness tuning independent of supported loads, enhancing applications such as humanoid robotic limbs and lightweight adaptive vibration isolators. PMID:26989771

  14. The File Drawer Problem in Reliability Generalization: A Strategy to Compute a Fail-Safe N with Reliability Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Ryan T.; Shields, Alan L.

    2008-01-01

    Meta-analytic reliability generalizations (RGs) are limited by the scarcity of reliability reporting in primary articles, and currently, RG investigators lack a method to quantify the impact of such nonreporting. This article introduces a stepwise procedure to address this challenge. First, the authors introduce a formula that allows researchers…

  15. Rogue wave solutions for the higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation with variable coefficients by generalized Darboux transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Qiang; Chen, Jian

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we study a higher-order variable coefficient nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation, which plays an important role in the control of the ultrashort optical pulse propagation in nonlinear optical systems. Then, we construct a generalized Darboux transformation (GDT) for the higher-order variable coefficient NLS equation. The Nth order rogue wave solution is obtained by the iterative rule and it can be expressed by the determinant form. As application, we calculate rogue waves (RWs) from first- to fourth-order in accordance with different kinds of parameters. In particular, the dynamical properties and spatial-temporal structures of RWs are discussed and compared with Hirota equation through some figures.

  16. Dynamic dorsoventral stiffness assessment of the ovine lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Keller, Tony S; Colloca, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    Posteroanterior spinal stiffness assessments are common in the evaluating patients with low back pain. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of mechanical excitation frequency on dynamic lumbar spine stiffness. A computer-controlled voice coil actuator equipped with a load cell and LVDT was used to deliver an oscillatory dorsoventral (DV) mechanical force to the L3 spinous process of 15 adolescent Merino sheep. DV forces (48 N peak, approximately 10% body weight) were randomly applied at periodic excitation frequencies of 2.0, 6.0, 11.7 and a 0.5-19.7 Hz sweep. Force and displacement were recorded over a 13-22 s time interval. The in vivo DV stiffness of the ovine spine was frequency dependent and varied 3.7-fold over the 0.5-19.7 Hz mechanical excitation frequency range. Minimum and maximum DV stiffness (force/displacement) were 3.86+/-0.38 and 14.1+/-9.95 N/mm at 4.0 and 19.7 Hz, respectively. Stiffness values based on the swept-sine measurements were not significantly different from corresponding periodic oscillations (2.0 and 6.0 Hz). The mean coefficient of variation in the swept-sine DV dynamic stiffness assessment method was 15%, which was similar to the periodic oscillation method (10-16%). The results indicate that changes in mechanical excitation frequency and animal body mass modulate DV spinal stiffness. PMID:16376350

  17. Infinite-dimensional symmetries of a general class of variable coefficient evolution equations in 2+1 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basarab-Horwath, P.; Güngör, F.; Özemir, C.

    2013-11-01

    We consider generalized KP-Burgers equations and attempt to identify subclasses admitting Virasoro or Kac-Moody type algebras as their symmetries. We give reductions to ODEs constructed from invariance requirement under these infinite-dimensional Lie symmetry algebras and integrate them in cases where it is possible. We also look at the conditions under which the equation passes the Painlevé test and construct some exact solutions by truncation.

  18. Dynamic stiffness removal for direct numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Tianfeng; Law, Chung K.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2009-08-15

    A systematic approach was developed to derive non-stiff reduced mechanisms for direct numerical simulations (DNS) with explicit integration solvers. The stiffness reduction was achieved through on-the-fly elimination of short time-scales induced by two features of fast chemical reactivity, namely quasi-steady-state (QSS) species and partial-equilibrium (PE) reactions. The sparse algebraic equations resulting from QSS and PE approximations were utilized such that the efficiency of the dynamic stiffness reduction is high compared with general methods of time-scale reduction based on Jacobian decomposition. Using the dimension reduction strategies developed in our previous work, a reduced mechanism with 52 species was first derived from a detailed mechanism with 561 species. The reduced mechanism was validated for ignition and extinction applications over the parameter range of equivalence ratio between 0.5 and 1.5, pressure between 10 and 50 atm, and initial temperature between 700 and 1600 K for ignition, and worst-case errors of approximately 30% were observed. The reduced mechanism with dynamic stiffness removal was then applied in homogeneous and 1-D ignition applications, as well as a 2-D direct numerical simulation of ignition with temperature inhomogeneities at constant volume with integration time-steps of 5-10 ns. The integration was numerically stable and good accuracy was achieved. (author)

  19. Travelling Wave Solutions for the Burgers Equation and the Korteweg-de Vries Equation with Variable Coefficients Using the Generalized (Ǵ/G)-Expansion Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayed, Elsayed M. E.; Abdelaziz, Mahmoud A. M.

    2010-12-01

    In this article, a generalized (Ǵ/G)-expansion method is used to find exact travelling wave solutions of the Burgers equation and the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation with variable coefficients. As a result, hyperbolic, trigonometric, and rational function solutions with parameters are obtained. When these parameters are taking special values, the solitary wave solutions are derived from the hyperbolic function solution. It is shown that the proposed method is direct, effective, and can be applied to many other nonlinear evolution equations in mathematical physics.

  20. Digital-map grids of mean-annual precipitation for 1961-90, and generalized skew coefficients of annual maximum streamflow for Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rea, A.H.; Tortorelli, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    This digital report contains two digital-map grids of data that were used to develop peak-flow regression equations in Tortorelli, 1997, 'Techniques for estimating peak-streamflow frequency for unregulated streams and streams regulated by small floodwater retarding structures in Oklahoma,' U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 97-4202. One data set is a grid of mean annual precipitation, in inches, based on the period 1961-90, for Oklahoma. The data set was derived from the PRISM (Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model) mean annual precipitation grid for the United States, developed by Daly, Neilson, and Phillips (1994, 'A statistical-topographic model for mapping climatological precipitation over mountainous terrain:' Journal of Applied Meteorology, v. 33, no. 2, p. 140-158). The second data set is a grid of generalized skew coefficients of logarithms of annual maximum streamflow for Oklahoma streams less than or equal to 2,510 square miles in drainage area. This grid of skew coefficients is taken from figure 11 of Tortorelli and Bergman, 1985, 'Techniques for estimating flood peak discharges for unregulated streams and streams regulated by small floodwater retarding structures in Oklahoma,' U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 84-4358. To save disk space, the skew coefficient values have been multiplied by 100 and rounded to integers with two significant digits. The data sets are provided in an ASCII grid format.

  1. Artificial muscles with adjustable stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutlu, Rahim; Alici, Gursel

    2010-04-01

    This paper reports on a stiffness enhancement methodology based on using a suitably designed contact surface with which cantilevered-type conducting polymer bending actuators are in contact during operation. The contact surface constrains the bending behaviour of the actuators. Depending on the topology of the contact surface, the resistance of the polymer actuators to deformation, i.e. stiffness, is varied. As opposed to their predecessors, these polymer actuators operate in air. Finite element analysis and modelling are used to quantify the effect of the contact surface on the effective stiffness of a trilayer cantilevered beam, which represents a one-end-free, the-other-end-fixed polypyrrole (PPy) conducting polymer actuator under a uniformly distributed load. After demonstrating the feasibility of the adjustable stiffness concept, experiments were conducted to determine the stiffness of bending-type conducting polymer actuators in contact with a range (20-40 mm in radius) of circular contact surfaces. The numerical and experimental results presented demonstrate that the stiffness of the actuators can be varied using a suitably profiled contact surface. The larger the radius of the contact surface is, the higher is the stiffness of the polymer actuators. The outcomes of this study suggest that, although the stiffness of the artificial muscles considered in this study is constant for a given geometric size, and electrical and chemical operation conditions, it can be changed in a nonlinear fashion to suit the stiffness requirement of a considered application. The stiffness enhancement methodology can be extended to other ionic-type conducting polymer actuators.

  2. General model for estimating partition coefficients to organisms and their tissues using the biological compositions and polyparameter linear free energy relationships.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Brown, Trevor N; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2013-06-18

    Equilibrium partition coefficients of organic chemicals from water to an organism or its tissues are typically estimated by using the total lipid content in combination with the octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)). This estimation method can cause systematic errors if (1) different lipid types have different sorptive capacities, (2) nonlipid components such as proteins have a significant contribution, and/or (3) K(ow) is not a suitable descriptor. As an alternative, this study proposes a more general model that uses detailed organism and tissue compositions (i.e., contents of storage lipid, membrane lipid, albumin, other proteins, and water) and polyparameter linear free energy relationships (PP-LFERs). The values calculated by the established PP-LFER-composition-based model agree well with experimental in vitro partition coefficients and in vivo steady-state concentration ratios from the literature with a root mean squared error of 0.32-0.53 log units, without any additional fitting. This model estimates a high contribution of the protein fraction to the overall tissue sorptive capacity in lean tissues (e.g., muscle), in particular for H-bond donor polar compounds. Direct model comparison revealed that the simple lipid-octanol model still calculates many tissue-water partition coefficients within 1 log unit of those calculated by the PP-LFER-composition-based model. Thus, the lipid-octanol model can be used as an order-of-magnitude approximation, for example, for multimedia fate modeling, but may not be suitable for more accurate predictions. Storage lipid-rich phases (e.g., adipose, milk) are prone to particularly large systematic errors. The new model provides useful implications for validity of lipid-normalization of concentrations in organisms, interpretation of biomonitoring results, and assessment of toxicity. PMID:23672211

  3. Reliability of Unilateral Vertical Leg Stiffness Measures Assessed During Bilateral Hopping.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Sean J; Fletcher, Iain M; Richards, Joanna

    2015-10-01

    The assessment of vertical leg stiffness is an important consideration given its relationship to performance. Vertical stiffness is most commonly assessed during a bilateral hopping task. The current study sought to determine the intersession reliability, quantified by the coefficient of variation, of vertical stiffness during bilateral hopping when assessed for the left and right limbs independently, which had not been previously investigated. On 4 separate occasions, 10 healthy males performed 30 unshod bilateral hops on a dual force plate system with data recorded independently for the left and right limbs. Vertical stiffness was calculated as the ratio of peak ground reaction force to the peak negative displacement of the center of mass during each hop and was averaged over the sixth through tenth hops. For vertical stiffness, average coefficients of variation of 15.3% and 14.3% were observed for the left and right limbs, respectively. An average coefficient of variation of 14.7% was observed for bilateral vertical stiffness. The current study reports that calculations of unilateral vertical stiffness demonstrate reliability comparable to bilateral calculations. Determining unilateral vertical stiffness values and relative discrepancies may allow a coach to build a more complete stiffness profile of an individual athlete and better inform the training process. PMID:25880542

  4. Stiffness, thermal expansion, and thermal bending formulation of stiffened, fiber-reinforced composite panels

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, C.S.

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented for formulating stiffness terms and thermal coefficients of stiffened, fiber-reinforced composite panels. The method is robust enough to handle panels with general cross sectional shapes, including those which are unsymmetric and/or unbalanced. Nonlinear, temperature and load dependent constitutive material data of each laminate are used to 'build-up' the stiffened panel membrane, bending, and membrane-bending coupling stiffness terms and thermal coefficients. New thermal coefficients are introduced to quantify panel response from through-the-thickness temperature gradients. A technique of implementing this capability with a single plane of shell finite elements using the MSC/NASTRAN analysis program (FEA) is revealed that provides accurate solutions of entire airframes or engines with coarsely meshed models. An example of a composite, hat-stiffened panel is included to demonstrate errors that occur when an unsymmetric panel is symmetrically formulated as traditionally done. The erroneous results and the correct ones produced from this method are compared to analysis from discretely meshed three-dimensional FEA. 14 refs.

  5. Bone stiffness in children: part I. In vivo assessment of the stiffness of femur and tibia in children.

    PubMed

    Chotel, Franck; Braillon, Pierre; Sailhan, Frdric; Gadeyne, Sylvain; Panczer, Grard; Pedrini, Christian; Berard, Jrme

    2008-01-01

    Although there are many publications concerning the mechanical behavior of adult bone, there are few data about mechanical properties of children's bone. In vivo bone stiffness measurement with Orthometer device has been validated and extensively used in adults to assess bone healing after fracture or lengthening. We hypothesized that in vivo stiffness measurement with Orthometer was applicable in children and was correlated with age, height, body weight, and corpulence index. The purpose was to establish baseline stiffness values for femur and tibia in growing children.Sixteen bone measurements (7 femurs and 9 tibias) were obtained during application of an external fixator for leg lengthening in 11 children aged between 5.5 and 16.7 years. A 3-point bending test with an Orthometer was carried out on the intact bone (before osteotomy) under general anesthesia. The anteroposterior stiffness measurement was successful in all children of the series, aged from 5.5 to 16.7 years. A wide variation of femoral and tibial bone stiffness values were observed. The use of a unique value as in adults as the end point of bending stiffness during bone healing process is not possible for children. The anteroposterior bone stiffness was found to have linear correlation with children's height and body weight, but not with age and corpulence indexes. The original data obtained by this study will give a stiffness reference for height and weight and could be useful as reference values for monitoring of healing process after fracture or limb lengthening. PMID:18580368

  6. Stiffness adaptations in shod running.

    PubMed

    Divert, Carolyn; Baur, Heiner; Mornieux, Guillaume; Mayer, Frank; Belli, Alain

    2005-11-01

    When mechanical parameters of running are measured, runners have to be accustomed to testing conditions. Nevertheless, habituated runners could still show slight evolutions of their patterns at the beginning of each new running bout. This study investigated runners' stiffness adjustments during shoe and barefoot running and stiffness evolutions of shoes. Twenty-two runners performed two 4-minute bouts at 3.61 m.s-1 shod and barefoot after a 4-min warm-up period. Vertical and leg stiffness decreased during the shoe condition but remained stable in the barefoot condition, p < 0.001. Moreover, an impactor test showed that shoe stiffness increased significantly during the first 4 minutes, p < 0.001. Beyond the 4th minute, shoe properties remained stable. Even if runners were accustomed to the testing condition, as running pattern remained stable during barefoot running, they adjusted their leg and vertical stiffness during shoe running. Moreover, as measurements were taken after a 4-min warm-up period, it could be assumed that shoe properties were stable. Then the stiffness adjustment observed during shoe running might be due to further habituations of the runners to the shod condition. To conclude, it makes sense to run at least 4 minutes before taking measurements in order to avoid runners' stiffness alteration due to shoe property modifications. However, runners could still adapt to the shoe. PMID:16498177

  7. Hyperekplexia and stiff-baby syndrome: an identical neurological disorder?

    PubMed

    Cioni, G; Biagioni, E; Bottai, P; Castellacci, A M; Paolicelli, P B

    1993-03-01

    Hyperekplexia (startle disease) is an unusual, familial, neurological disorder characterized by abnormally enhanced startle response, followed in most cases by momentary generalized muscular stiffness. These attacks may cause the patients to fall rigidly, while remaining fully conscious. Startle symptomatology has generally an onset in infancy and is often accompanied, during the first years of life, by rigidity, sleep myoclonus, motor delay, regurgitation and apneic spells, which may cause sudden death. Stiff-baby syndrome is a familial disorder characterized by marked rigidity, with neonatal onset and gradual reduction during infancy, regurgitations, motor delay and attacks of stiffness. We report 4 new cases of hyperekplexia from two different families and another infant with stiff-baby syndrome discussing clinical, electrophysiological and genetic aspects of both neurological disorders in relation to other reported cases. We suggest a continuum between these familial syndromes, which are often misinterpreted as epilepsy or other disorders. PMID:8509269

  8. Implicit Extrapolation Methods for Variable Coefficient Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, M.; Ruede, U.

    1996-01-01

    Implicit extrapolation methods for the solution of partial differential equations are based on applying the extrapolation principle indirectly. Multigrid tau-extrapolation is a special case of this idea. In the context of multilevel finite element methods, an algorithm of this type can be used to raise the approximation order, even when the meshes are nonuniform or locally refined. Here previous results are generalized to the variable coefficient case and thus become applicable for nonlinear problems. The implicit extrapolation multigrid algorithm converges to the solution of a higher order finite element system. This is obtained without explicitly constructing higher order stiffness matrices but by applying extrapolation in a natural form within the algorithm. The algorithm requires only a small change of a basic low order multigrid method.

  9. Integrability aspects with optical solitons of a generalized variable-coefficient N-coupled higher order nonlinear Schroedinger system from inhomogeneous optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Lue Xing; Li Juan; Zhang Haiqiang; Xu Tao; Li Lili; Tian Bo

    2010-04-15

    For describing the long-distance communication and manufacturing problems of N fields propagation in inhomogeneous optical fibers, we consider a generalized variable-coefficient N-coupled nonlinear Schroedinger system with higher order effects such as the third-order dispersion, self-steepening and self-frequency shift. Using the Painleve singularity structure analysis, we obtain two cases for this system to admit the Painleve property. Then for case (1) we derive the optical dark solitons via solving the Hirota bilinear equations; and based on the obtained (2N+1)x(2N+1) Lax pair, we construct the Darboux transformation to obtain the optical bright solitons (including the multisoliton profiles) for case (2). Finally, the features of optical solitons (both dark and bright ones) in inhomogeneous optical fibers are analyzed and graphically discussed.

  10. Time simulation of flutter with large stiffness changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpel, Mordechay; Wieseman, Carol D.

    1992-01-01

    Time simulation of flutter, involving large local structural changes, is formulated with a state-space model that is based on a relatively small number of generalized coordinates. Free-free vibration modes are first calculated for a nominal finite-element model with relatively large fictitious masses located at the area of structural changes. A low-frequency subset of these modes is then transformed into a set of structural modal coordinates with which the entire simulation is performed. These generalized coordinates and the associated oscillatory aerodynamic force coefficient matrices are used to construct an efficient time-domain, state-space model for a basic aeroelastic case. The time simulation can then be performed by simply changing the mass, stiffness, and damping coupling terms when structural changes occur. It is shown that the size of the aeroelastic model required for time simulation with large structural changes at a few apriori known locations is similar to that required for direct analysis of a single structural case. The method is applied to the simulation of an aeroelastic wind-tunnel model. The diverging oscillations are followed by the activation of a tip-ballast decoupling mechanism that stabilizes the system but may cause significant transient overshoots.

  11. Evaluation of Arterial Stiffness by Echocardiography: Methodological Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jae Yeong

    2016-01-01

    As humans age, degenerative changes in the arterial structure gradually progress and result in the stiffening of the arteries, which is called arteriosclerosis. Arterial stiffness is now an established risk factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This stiffening has adverse effects for both the general population as well as for patients with CVD. Measurements of pulse wave velocity and pulse wave analysis are the two most commonly used methods in the evaluation of arterial stiffness, but these methods just allow indirect measures of arterial stiffness. Echocardiography is the most widely used imaging modality in the evaluation of cardiac structure and function and with recent technical advances, it has become possible to evaluate the structure, function and blood flow hemodynamics of the arteries using echocardiography. In the present review, we will discuss the current status of echocardiography in the evaluation of arterial stiffness, especially focusing on the methodological aspects. PMID:27231673

  12. Stiffness and damping of elastomeric O-ring bearing mounts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, A. J.

    1977-01-01

    A test rig to measure the dynamic stiffness and damping of elastomer O rings was described. Test results for stiffness and loss coefficient in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 1000 Hz are presented. Results are given for three different materials, for five temperatures, for three amplitudes, for five values of squeeze for three values of stretch for three values of cross-section diameter and for three values of groove width. All test data points were plotted. In addition, trend summary plots were presented which compare the effect of material, temperature, amplitude, squeeze, stretch, cross-section diameter, and groove width. O ring deflections under a static load for different material were presented; and effective static stiffness values were compared with dynamic values.

  13. A strain dependent stiffness of stiff cohesionless and cohesive soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipiński, Mirosław J.; Wdowska, Małgorzata K.

    2012-10-01

    In the last three decades an interest has grown in prediction of soil stiffness. In case of dense cohesionless soils or natural overconsolidated cohesive soils the working strain to which soil stiffness is referred to covers the range 0.01-1.0%. On the basis of results of comprehensive experimental worked based on advanced triaxial tests results two formulae for Young's modulus distribution accounting for strain range were derived for fine dense sand and heavy overconsolidated sandy clay. The formula for sand accounts also for stress level. In case of overconsolidated sandy clay, stress history, in the form of yield stress, is also accounted for.

  14. Exact solutions for generalized variable-coefficients Ginzburg-Landau equation: Application to Bose-Einstein condensates with multi-body interatomic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kengne, E.; Lakhssassi, A.; Vaillancourt, R.; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2012-12-15

    We present a double-mapping method (D-MM), a natural combination of a similarity with F-expansion methods, for obtaining general solvable nonlinear evolution equations. We focus on variable-coefficients complex Ginzburg-Landau equations (VCCGLE) with multi-body interactions. We show that it is easy by this method to find a large class of exact solutions of Gross-Pitaevskii and Gross-Pitaevskii-Ginzburg equations. We apply the D-MM to investigate the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensation with two- and three-body interactions. As a surprising result, we obtained that it is very easy to use the built D-MM to obtain a large class of exact solutions of VCCGLE with two-body interactions via a generalized VCCGLE with two- and three-body interactions containing cubic-derivative terms. The results show that the proposed method is direct, concise, elementary, and effective, and can be a very effective and powerful mathematical tool for solving many other nonlinear evolution equations in physics.

  15. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ELBOW STIFFNESS

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Luis Alfredo Gómez; Dal Molin, Fabio Farina; Visco, Adalberto; Fernandes, Luis Filipe Daneu; dos Santos, Murilo Cunha Rafael; Cardozo Filho, Nivaldo Souza; Gómez Cordero, Nicolas Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    To present the arthroscopic surgical technique and the evaluation of the results from this technique for treating elbow stiffness. Methods: Between April 2007 and January 2010, ten elbows of ten patients with elbow stiffness underwent arthroscopic treatment to release the range of motion. The minimum follow-up was 11 months, with an average of 27 months. All the patients were male and their average age was 32.8 years (ranging from 22 to 48 years). After the arthroscopic treatment, they were followed up weekly in the first month and every three months thereafter. The clinical evaluation was made using the criteria of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). Results: All the patients were satisfied with the results from the arthroscopic treatment. The average UCLA score was 33.8 points. Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment for elbow stiffness is a minimally invasive surgical technique that was shown to be efficient for treating this complication.

  16. Lase Ultrasonic Web Stiffness tester

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Patterson, Ph.D., IPST at Ga Tech

    2009-01-12

    The objective is to provide a sensor that uses non-contact, laser ultrasonics to measure the stiffness of paper during the manufacturing process. This will allow the manufacturer to adjust the production process in real time, increase filler content, modify fiber refining and as result produce a quality product using less energy. The sensor operates by moving back and forth across the paper web, at pre-selected locations firing a laser at the sheet, measuring the out-of-plane velocity of the sheet then using that measurement to calculate sheet stiffness.

  17. Nonlinear Dynamics of Stiff Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.; Langer, Stephen A.

    1995-08-01

    A formalism is presented for the nonlinear dynamics of inextensible stiff polymers within the model of local viscous dissipation. By casting the internal elastic forces in an intrinsic representation, enforcing the constraint of local inextensibility through a Lagrange multiplier function, and utilizing techniques from the differential geometry of curve motion, the dynamics of configurations of arbitrary complexity is reduced to a scalar partial differential equation amenable to analytical and efficient numerical study. As an example, the formalism is applied to the ``folding'' dynamics of stiff polymers with pairwise self-interactions and intrinsic curvature.

  18. Cosmology with a stiff matter era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2015-11-01

    We consider the possibility that the Universe is made of a dark fluid described by a quadratic equation of state P =K ρ2 , where ρ is the rest-mass density and K is a constant. The energy density ɛ =ρ c2+K ρ2 is the sum of two terms: a rest-mass term ρ c2 that mimics "dark matter" (P =0 ) and an internal energy term u =K ρ2=P that mimics a "stiff fluid" (P =ɛ ) in which the speed of sound is equal to the speed of light. In the early universe, the internal energy dominates and the dark fluid behaves as a stiff fluid (P ˜ɛ , ɛ ∝a-6). In the late universe, the rest-mass energy dominates and the dark fluid behaves as pressureless dark matter (P ≃0 , ɛ ∝a-3). We provide a simple analytical solution of the Friedmann equations for a universe undergoing a stiff matter era, a dark matter era, and a dark energy era due to the cosmological constant. This analytical solution generalizes the Einstein-de Sitter solution describing the dark matter era, and the Λ CDM model describing the dark matter era and the dark energy era. Historically, the possibility of a primordial stiff matter era first appeared in the cosmological model of Zel'dovich where the primordial universe is assumed to be made of a cold gas of baryons. A primordial stiff matter era also occurs in recent cosmological models where dark matter is made of relativistic self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). When the internal energy of the dark fluid mimicking stiff matter is positive, the primordial universe is singular like in the standard big bang theory. It expands from an initial state with a vanishing scale factor and an infinite density. We consider the possibility that the internal energy of the dark fluid is negative (while, of course, its total energy density is positive), so that it mimics anti-stiff matter. This happens, for example, when the BECs have an attractive self-interaction with a negative scattering length. In that case, the primordial universe is nonsingular and bouncing like in loop quantum cosmology. At t =0 , the scale factor is finite and the energy density is equal to zero. The universe first has a phantom behavior where the energy density increases with the scale factor, then a normal behavior where the energy density decreases with the scale factor. For the sake of generality, we consider a cosmological constant of arbitrary sign. When the cosmological constant is positive, the Universe asymptotically reaches a de Sitter regime where the scale factor increases exponentially rapidly with time. This can account for the accelerating expansion of the Universe that we observe at present. When the cosmological constant is negative (anti-de Sitter), the evolution of the Universe is cyclic. Therefore, depending on the sign of the internal energy of the dark fluid and on the sign of the cosmological constant, we obtain analytical solutions of the Friedmann equations describing singular and nonsingular expanding, bouncing, or cyclic universes.

  19. Theory versus experiment for the rotordynamic coefficients of annular gas seals. Part 2: Constant clearance and convergent-tapered geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, C. C.; Childs, D. W.; Nicks, C.; Elrod, D.

    1985-01-01

    The leakage and rotordynamic coefficients of constant-clearance and convergent-tapered annular gas seals were measured in an experimental test facility. The results are presented along with the theoretically predicted values. Of particular interest is the prediction that optimally tapered seals have significantly larger direct siffness than straight seals. The experimental results verify this prediction. Generally the theory does quite well, but fails to predict the large increase in direct stiffness when the fluid is pre-rotated.

  20. Positive Association Between Adipose Tissue and Bone Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Berg, R M; Wallaschofski, H; Nauck, M; Rettig, R; Markus, M R P; Laqua, R; Friedrich, N; Hannemann, A

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is often considered to have a protective effect against osteoporosis. On the other hand, several recent studies suggest that adipose tissue may have detrimental effects on bone quality. We therefore aimed to investigate the associations between body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), visceral adipose tissue (VAT) or abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), and bone stiffness. The study involved 2685 German adults aged 20-79 years, who participated in either the second follow-up of the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-2) or the baseline examination of the SHIP-Trend cohort. VAT and abdominal SAT were quantified by magnetic resonance imaging. Bone stiffness was assessed by quantitative ultrasound (QUS) at the heel (Achilles InSight, GE Healthcare). The individual risk for osteoporotic fractures was determined based on the QUS-derived stiffness index and classified in low, medium, and high risk. Linear regression models, adjusted for sex, age, physical activity, smoking status, risky alcohol consumption, diabetes, and height (in models with VAT or abdominal SAT as exposure), revealed positive associations between BMI, WC, VAT or abdominal SAT, and the QUS variables broadband-ultrasound attenuation or stiffness index. Moreover, BMI was positively associated with speed of sound. Our study shows that all anthropometric measures including BMI and, WC as well as abdominal fat volume are positively associated with bone stiffness in the general population. As potential predictors of bone stiffness, VAT and abdominal SAT are not superior to easily available measures like BMI or WC. PMID:25929703

  1. Bending Stiffness of Multiwall Sandwich

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical and experimental study was carried out to understand the extensional and flexural behavior of multiwall sandwich, a metallic insulation composed of alternate layers of flat and dimpled foil. The multiwall sandwich was structurally analyzed by using several simplifying assumptions combined with a finite element analysis. The simplifying assumptions made in this analysis were evaluated by bending and tensile tests. Test results validate the assumption that flat sheets in compression do not significantly contribute to the flexural stiffness of multiwall sandwich for the multiwall geometry tested. However, calculations show that thicker flat sheets may contribute significantly to bending stiffness and cannot be ignored. Results of this analytical approach compare well with test data; both show that the extensional stiffness of the dimpled sheet in he 0 deg direction is about 30 percent of that for a flat sheet, and that in the 45 deg direction, it is about 10 percent. The analytical and experimental multiwall bending stiffness showed good agreement for the particular geometry tested.

  2. Arterial stiffness: a brief review

    PubMed Central

    Shirwany, Najeeb A; Zou, Ming-hui

    2010-01-01

    Physical stiffening of the large arteries is the central paradigm of vascular aging. Indeed, stiffening in the larger central arterial system, such as the aortic tree, significantly contributes to cardiovascular diseases in older individuals and is positively associated with systolic hypertension, coronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure and atrial fibrillation, which are the leading causes of mortality in the developed countries and also in the developing world as estimated in 2010 by World Health Organizations. Thus, better, less invasive and more accurate measures of arterial stiffness have been developed, which prove useful as diagnostic indices, pathophysiological markers and predictive indicators of disease. This article presents a review of the structural determinants of vascular stiffening, its pathophysiologic determinants and its implications for vascular research and medicine. A critical discussion of new techniques for assessing vascular stiffness is also presented. PMID:20802505

  3. Endothelial dysfunction and low-grade inflammation are associated with greater arterial stiffness over a 6-year period.

    PubMed

    van Bussel, Bas C; Schouten, Fleur; Henry, Ronald M; Schalkwijk, Casper G; de Boer, Michiel R; Ferreira, Isabel; Smulders, Yvo M; Twisk, Jos W; Stehouwer, Coen D

    2011-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and low-grade inflammation are associated with cardiovascular disease. Arterial stiffening plays an important role in cardiovascular disease and, thus, may be a mechanism through which endothelial dysfunction and/or low-grade inflammation lead to cardiovascular disease. We investigated the associations between, on the one hand, biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction (soluble endothelial selectin, thrombomodulin, and both vascular and intercellular adhesion molecules 1 and von Willebrand factor) and of low-grade inflammation (C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A, interleukin 6, interleukin 8, tumor necrosis factor-α and, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1) and, on the other hand, arterial stiffness over a 6-year period, in 293 healthy adults (155 women). Biomarkers were combined into mean z scores. Carotid, femoral, and brachial arterial stiffness and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity were determined by ultrasonography. Measurements were obtained when individuals were 36 and 42 years of age. Associations were analyzed with generalized estimating equation and adjusted for sex, height, and mean arterial pressure. The endothelial dysfunction z score was inversely associated with femoral distensibility (β: -0.51 [95% CI: -0.95 to -0.06]) and compliance coefficients (β: -0.041 [95% CI: -0.076 to -0.006]) but not with carotid or brachial stiffness or carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity. The low-grade inflammation z score was inversely associated with femoral distensibility (β: -0.51 [95% CI: -0.95 to -0.07]) and compliance coefficients (β: -0.050 [95% CI: -0.084 to -0.016]) and with carotid distensibility coefficient (β: -0.910 [95% CI: -1.810 to -0.008]) but not with brachial stiffness or carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity. Biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction and low-grade inflammation are associated with greater arterial stiffness. This provides evidence that arterial stiffening may be a mechanism through which endothelial dysfunction and low-grade inflammation lead to cardiovascular disease. PMID:21859964

  4. Numerical simulation of callus healing for optimization of fracture fixation stiffness.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Malte; Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita; Simon, Ulrich; Wehner, Tim

    2014-01-01

    The stiffness of fracture fixation devices together with musculoskeletal loading defines the mechanical environment within a long bone fracture, and can be quantified by the interfragmentary movement. In vivo results suggested that this can have acceleratory or inhibitory influences, depending on direction and magnitude of motion, indicating that some complications in fracture treatment could be avoided by optimizing the fixation stiffness. However, general statements are difficult to make due to the limited number of experimental findings. The aim of this study was therefore to numerically investigate healing outcomes under various combinations of shear and axial fixation stiffness, and to detect the optimal configuration. A calibrated and established numerical model was used to predict fracture healing for numerous combinations of axial and shear fixation stiffness under physiological, superimposed, axial compressive and translational shear loading in sheep. Characteristic maps of healing outcome versus fixation stiffness (axial and shear) were created. The results suggest that delayed healing of 3 mm transversal fracture gaps will occur for highly flexible or very rigid axial fixation, which was corroborated by in vivo findings. The optimal fixation stiffness for ovine long bone fractures was predicted to be 1000-2500 N/mm in the axial and >300 N/mm in the shear direction. In summary, an optimized, moderate axial stiffness together with certain shear stiffness enhances fracture healing processes. The negative influence of one improper stiffness can be compensated by adjustment of the stiffness in the other direction. PMID:24991809

  5. Calculation of the aerodynamic loading of swept and unswept flexible wings of arbitrary stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diederich, Franklin W

    1950-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating the aerodynamic loading, the divergence speed, and certain stability derivatives of swept and unswept wings and tail surfaces of arbitrary stiffness. Provision is made for using either stiffness curves and root rotation constants or structural influence coefficients in the analysis. Computing forms, tables of numerical constants required in the analysis, and an illustrative example are included to facilitate calculations by means of the method.

  6. “An Impediment to Living Life”: Why and How Should We Measure Stiffness in Polymyalgia Rheumatica?

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, Sarah Louise; Hughes, Rodney; Walsh, Margaret; Day, John; Newton, Marion; Pease, Colin; Kirwan, John; Morris, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore patients’ concepts of stiffness in polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR), and how they think stiffness should be measured. Methods Eight focus groups were held at three centres involving 50 patients with current/previous PMR. Each group had at least one facilitator and one rapporteur making field notes. An interview schedule was used to stimulate discussion. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using an inductive thematic approach. Results Major themes identified were: symptoms: pain, stiffness and fatigue; functional impact; impact on daily schedule; and approaches to measurement. The common subtheme for the experience of stiffness was “difficulty in moving”, and usually considered as distinct from the experience of pain, albeit with a variable overlap. Some participants felt stiffness was the “overwhelming” symptom, in that it prevented them carrying out “fundamental activities” and “generally living life”. Diurnal variation in stiffness was generally described in relation to the daily schedule but was not the same as stiffness severity. Some participants suggested measuring stiffness using a numeric rating scale or a Likert scale, while others felt that it was more relevant and straightforward to measure difficulty in performing everyday activities rather than about stiffness itself. Conclusions A conceptual model of stiffness in PMR is presented where stiffness is an important part of the patient experience and impacts on their ability to live their lives. Stiffness is closely related to function and often regarded as interchangeable with pain. From the patients’ perspective, visual analogue scales measuring pain and stiffness were not the most useful method for reporting stiffness; participants preferred numerical rating scales, or assessments of function to reflect how stiffness impacts on their daily lives. Assessing function may be a pragmatic solution to difficulties in quantifying stiffness. PMID:25955770

  7. Elastic metamaterial beam with remotely tunable stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Wei; Yu, Zhengyue; Wang, Xiaole; Lai, Yun; Yellen, Benjamin B.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate a dynamically tunable elastic metamaterial, which employs remote magnetic force to adjust its vibration absorption properties. The 1D metamaterial is constructed from a flat aluminum beam milled with a linear array of cylindrical holes. The beam is backed by a thin elastic membrane, on which thin disk-shaped permanent magnets are mounted. When excited by a shaker, the beam motion is tracked by a Laser Doppler Vibrometer, which conducts point by point scanning of the vibrating element. Elastic waves are unable to propagate through the beam when the driving frequency excites the first elastic bending mode in the unit cell. At these frequencies, the effective mass density of the unit cell becomes negative, which induces an exponentially decaying evanescent wave. Due to the non-linear elastic properties of the membrane, the effective stiffness of the unit cell can be tuned with an external magnetic force from nearby solenoids. Measurements of the linear and cubic static stiffness terms of the membrane are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements of the bandgap shift as a function of the applied force. In this implementation, bandgap shifts by as much as 40% can be achieved with ˜30 mN of applied magnetic force. This structure has potential for extension in 2D and 3D, providing a general approach for building dynamically tunable elastic metamaterials for applications in lensing and guiding elastic waves.

  8. STIFF: Converting Scientific FITS Images to TIFF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, Emmanuel

    2011-10-01

    STIFF is a program that converts scientific FITS1 images to the more popular TIFF2 format for illustration purposes. Most FITS readers and converters do not do a proper job at converting FITS image data to 8 bits. 8-bit images stored in JPEG, PNG or TIFF files have the intensities implicitely stored in a non-linear way. Most current FITS image viewers and converters provide the user an incorrect translation of the FITS image content by simply rescaling linearly input pixel values. A first consequence is that the people working on astronomical images usually have to apply narrow intensity cuts or square-root or logarithmic intensity transformations to actually see something on their deep-sky images. A less obvious consequence is that colors obtained by combining images processed this way are not consistent across such a large range of surface brightnesses. Though with other software the user is generally afforded a choice of nonlinear transformations to apply in order to make the faint stuff stand out more clearly in the images, with the limited selection of choices provides, colors will not be accurately rendered, and some manual tweaking will be necessary. The purpose of STIFF is to produce beautiful pictures in an automatic and consistent way.

  9. Stiffness matrix formulation for double row angular contact ball bearings: Analytical development and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunduz, Aydin; Singh, Rajendra

    2013-10-01

    Though double row angular contact ball bearings are widely used in industrial, automotive, and aircraft applications, the scientific literature on double row bearings is sparse. It is also shown that the stiffness matrices of two single row bearings may not be simply superposed to obtain the stiffness matrix of a double row bearing. To overcome the deficiency in the literature, a new, comprehensive, analytical approach is proposed based on the Hertzian theory for back-to-back, face-to-face, and tandem arrangements. The elements of the five-dimensional stiffness matrix for double row angular contact ball bearings are computed given either the mean bearing displacement or the mean load vector. The diagonal elements of the proposed stiffness matrix are verified with a commercial code for all arrangements under three loading scenarios. Some changes in stiffness coefficients are investigated by varying critical kinematic and geometric parameters to provide more insight. Finally, the calculated natural frequencies of a shaft-bearing experiment are successfully compared with measurements, thus validating the proposed stiffness formulation. For double row angular contact ball bearings, the moment stiffness and cross-coupling stiffness terms are significant, and the contact angle changes under loads. The proposed formulation is also valid for paired (duplex) bearings which behave as an integrated double row unit when the surrounding structural elements are sufficiently rigid.

  10. Engineering tools for variable stiffness vibration suppression and isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winthrop, Michael F.

    With the advent of smart materials, the concept of semi-active control or dynamic control of stiffness and/or damping for vibration control of structures has become practical and has seen limited use. Semi-active control has advantages over active and passive control methods, since it provides almost as much capability as active control while requiring much less power. Its main disadvantage is its inherent nonlinearity, greatly complicating engineering design. The purpose of this research is to extend semi-active control vibration isolation tools and methods, considering applications for space launch and on-orbit systems. After surveying the literature, variable stiffness using a general on-off control law with constant damping is examined in several contexts. First, the single degree of freedom problem is solved in exact form and approximated for the initial value problem. Results include development of an optimal control policy for all possible variable stiffness settings and a large range of viscous damping settings, guaranteed stability regions, and new possibilities for fast settling time even with an overdamped system. Second, the sinusoidally forced problem was approximated and a near optimal control policy was formulated. Third, the results of the initial value problem were extended to two multi-degree of freedom problems. The problems examined are representative of a cross section of a simple space telescope structure and of a variable stiffness beam. Besides providing new engineering design tools and insight into the nonlinear behavior of variable stiffness concepts, the results open several future research possibilities.

  11. Stiffness analysis of corrugated flexure beam used in compliant mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nianfeng; Liang, Xiaohe; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-07-01

    Conventional flexible joints generally have limited range of motion and high stress concentration. To overcome these shortcomings, corrugated flexure beam(CF beam) is designed because of its large flexibility obtained from longer overall length on the same span. The successful design of compliant mechanisms using CF beam requires manipulation of the stiffnesses as the design variables. Empirical equations of the CF beam stiffness components, except of the torsional stiffness, are obtained by curve-fitting method. The application ranges of all the parameters in each empirical equation are also discussed. The ratio of off-axis to axial stiffness is considered as a key characteristic of an effective compliant joint. And parameter study shows that the radius of semi-circular segment and the length of straight segment contribute most to the ratio. At last, CF beam is used to design translational and rotational flexible joints, which also verifies the validity of the empirical equations. CF beam with large flexibility is presented, and empirical equations of its stiffness are proposed to facilitate the design of flexible joint with large range of motion.

  12. Simple Formulas and Results for Buckling-Resistance and Stiffness Design of Compression-Loaded Laminated-Composite Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Simple formulas for the buckling stress of homogeneous, specially orthotropic, laminated-composite cylinders are presented. The formulas are obtained by using nondimensional parameters and equations that facilitate general validation, and are validated against the exact solution for a wide range of cylinder geometries and laminate constructions. Results are presented that establish the ranges of the nondimensional parameters and coefficients used. General results, given in terms of the nondimensional parameters, are presented that encompass a wide range of geometries and laminate constructions. These general results also illustrate a wide spectrum of behavioral trends. Design-oriented results are also presented that provide a simple, clear indication of laminate composition on critical stress, critical strain, and axial stiffness. An example is provided to demonstrate the application of these results to thin-walled column designs.

  13. Parameter estimation for stiff deterministic dynamical systems via ensemble Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Andrea; Calvetti, Daniela; Somersalo, Erkki

    2014-10-01

    A commonly encountered problem in numerous areas of applications is to estimate the unknown coefficients of a dynamical system from direct or indirect observations at discrete times of some of the components of the state vector. A related problem is to estimate unobserved components of the state. An egregious example of such a problem is provided by metabolic models, in which the numerous model parameters and the concentrations of the metabolites in tissue are to be estimated from concentration data in the blood. A popular method for addressing similar questions in stochastic and turbulent dynamics is the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), a particle-based filtering method that generalizes classical Kalman filtering. In this work, we adapt the EnKF algorithm for deterministic systems in which the numerical approximation error is interpreted as a stochastic drift with variance based on classical error estimates of numerical integrators. This approach, which is particularly suitable for stiff systems where the stiffness may depend on the parameters, allows us to effectively exploit the parallel nature of particle methods. Moreover, we demonstrate how spatial prior information about the state vector, which helps the stability of the computed solution, can be incorporated into the filter. The viability of the approach is shown by computed examples, including a metabolic system modeling an ischemic episode in skeletal muscle, with a high number of unknown parameters.

  14. Spin-coefficient formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Ezra Ted; Penrose, Roger

    2009-06-01

    The spin-coefficient formalism (SC formalism) (also known in the literature as Newman-Penrose formalism (NP formalism) ) is a commonly used technique based on the use of null tetrads, with ideas taken from 2-component spinors, for the detailed treatment of 4-dimensional space-times satisfying the equations of Einstein's theory of general relativity.

  15. Dynamic phototuning of 3D hydrogel stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Stowers, Ryan S.; Allen, Shane C.; Suggs, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels are widely used as in vitro culture models to mimic 3D cellular microenvironments. The stiffness of the extracellular matrix is known to influence cell phenotype, inspiring work toward unraveling the role of stiffness on cell behavior using hydrogels. However, in many biological processes such as embryonic development, wound healing, and tumorigenesis, the microenvironment is highly dynamic, leading to changes in matrix stiffness over a broad range of timescales. To recapitulate dynamic microenvironments, a hydrogel with temporally tunable stiffness is needed. Here, we present a system in which alginate gel stiffness can be temporally modulated by light-triggered release of calcium or a chelator from liposomes. Others have shown softening via photodegradation or stiffening via secondary cross-linking; however, our system is capable of both dynamic stiffening and softening. Dynamic modulation of stiffness can be induced at least 14 d after gelation and can be spatially controlled to produce gradients and patterns. We use this system to investigate the regulation of fibroblast morphology by stiffness in both nondegradable gels and gels with degradable elements. Interestingly, stiffening inhibits fibroblast spreading through either mesenchymal or amoeboid migration modes. We demonstrate this technology can be translated in vivo by using deeply penetrating near-infrared light for transdermal stiffness modulation, enabling external control of gel stiffness. Temporal modulation of hydrogel stiffness is a powerful tool that will enable investigation of the role that dynamic microenvironments play in biological processes both in vitro and in well-controlled in vivo experiments. PMID:25646417

  16. Torsional stiffness degradation and aerostatic divergence of suspension bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. T.; Ge, Y. J.; Yang, Y. X.

    2013-07-01

    The mechanism of aerostatic torsional divergence (ATD) of long-span suspension bridges is investigated. A theoretical analysis on the basis of a generalized model is presented, showing that the vertical motion of a bridge deck is crucial to the torsional stiffness of the whole suspended system, and that the vertical motion of either cable with a magnitude beyond a certain threshold could result in a sudden degradation of the torsional stiffness of the system. This vertical motion-induced degradation of stiffness is recognized as the main reason for the ATD. Long-span suspension bridges are susceptible to such a type of divergence, especially when they are immersed in turbulent wind fields. The divergences that occur in turbulent wind fields differ significantly from those in smooth wind fields, and the difference is well explained by the generalized model that the loosening of any one cable could result in the vanishing of the part of stiffness provided by the whole cable system. The mechanism revealed in this paper leads to a definition of the critical wind speed of the ATD in a turbulent flow; that is, the one resulting in a vertical motion so large as to loosen either cable to a stressless state. Numerical results from the nonlinear finite-element (FE) analysis of the Xihoumen suspension bridge, in conjunction with observations from wind tunnel tests on an aero-elastic full bridge model, are in support of the viewpoint presented in this study.

  17. Modifiable risk factors for increased arterial stiffness in outpatient nephrology.

    PubMed

    Elewa, Usama; Fernandez-Fernandez, Beatriz; Alegre, Raquel; Sanchez-Niño, Maria D; Mahillo-Fernández, Ignacio; Perez-Gomez, Maria Vanessa; El-Fishawy, Hussein; Belal, Dawlat; Ortiz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality. Arterial stiffness increases with age. However, modifiable risk factors such as smoking, BP and salt intake also impact on PWV. The finding of modifiable risk factors may lead to the identification of treatable factors, and, thus, is of interest to practicing nephrologist. We have now studied the prevalence and correlates of arterial stiffness, assessed by PWV, in 191 patients from nephrology outpatient clinics in order to identify modifiable risk factors for arterial stiffness that may in the future guide therapeutic decision-making. PWV was above normal levels for age in 85/191 (44.5%) patients. Multivariate analysis showed that advanced age, systolic BP, diabetes mellitus, serum uric acid and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy or calcium-containing medication were independent predictors of PWV. A new parameter, Delta above upper limit of normal PWV (Delta PWV) was defined to decrease the weight of age on PWV values. Delta PWV was calculated as (measured PWV) - (upper limit of the age-adjusted PWV values for the general population). Mean±SD Delta PWV was 0.76±1.60 m/sec. In multivariate analysis, systolic blood pressure, active smoking and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy remained independent predictors of higher delta PWV, while age, urinary potassium and beta blocker therapy were independent predictors of lower delta PWV. In conclusion, arterial stiffness was frequent in nephrology outpatients. Systolic blood pressure, smoking, serum uric acid, calcium-containing medications, potassium metabolism and non-use of beta blockers are modifiable factors associated with increased arterial stiffness in Nephrology outpatients. PMID:25880081

  18. Modifiable Risk Factors for Increased Arterial Stiffness in Outpatient Nephrology

    PubMed Central

    Elewa, Usama; Fernandez-Fernandez, Beatriz; Alegre, Raquel; Sanchez-Niño, Maria D.; Mahillo-Fernández, Ignacio; Perez-Gomez, Maria Vanessa; El-Fishawy, Hussein; Belal, Dawlat; Ortiz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality. Arterial stiffness increases with age. However, modifiable risk factors such as smoking, BP and salt intake also impact on PWV. The finding of modifiable risk factors may lead to the identification of treatable factors, and, thus, is of interest to practicing nephrologist. We have now studied the prevalence and correlates of arterial stiffness, assessed by PWV, in 191 patients from nephrology outpatient clinics in order to identify modifiable risk factors for arterial stiffness that may in the future guide therapeutic decision-making. PWV was above normal levels for age in 85/191 (44.5%) patients. Multivariate analysis showed that advanced age, systolic BP, diabetes mellitus, serum uric acid and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy or calcium-containing medication were independent predictors of PWV. A new parameter, Delta above upper limit of normal PWV (Delta PWV) was defined to decrease the weight of age on PWV values. Delta PWV was calculated as (measured PWV) - (upper limit of the age-adjusted PWV values for the general population). Mean±SD Delta PWV was 0.76±1.60 m/sec. In multivariate analysis, systolic blood pressure, active smoking and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy remained independent predictors of higher delta PWV, while age, urinary potassium and beta blocker therapy were independent predictors of lower delta PWV. In conclusion, arterial stiffness was frequent in nephrology outpatients. Systolic blood pressure, smoking, serum uric acid, calcium-containing medications, potassium metabolism and non-use of beta blockers are modifiable factors associated with increased arterial stiffness in Nephrology outpatients. PMID:25880081

  19. Simulation methods with extended stability for stiff biochemical Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background With increasing computer power, simulating the dynamics of complex systems in chemistry and biology is becoming increasingly routine. The modelling of individual reactions in (bio)chemical systems involves a large number of random events that can be simulated by the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA). The key quantity is the step size, or waiting time, τ, whose value inversely depends on the size of the propensities of the different channel reactions and which needs to be re-evaluated after every firing event. Such a discrete event simulation may be extremely expensive, in particular for stiff systems where τ can be very short due to the fast kinetics of some of the channel reactions. Several alternative methods have been put forward to increase the integration step size. The so-called τ-leap approach takes a larger step size by allowing all the reactions to fire, from a Poisson or Binomial distribution, within that step. Although the expected value for the different species in the reactive system is maintained with respect to more precise methods, the variance at steady state can suffer from large errors as τ grows. Results In this paper we extend Poisson τ-leap methods to a general class of Runge-Kutta (RK) τ-leap methods. We show that with the proper selection of the coefficients, the variance of the extended τ-leap can be well-behaved, leading to significantly larger step sizes. Conclusions The benefit of adapting the extended method to the use of RK frameworks is clear in terms of speed of calculation, as the number of evaluations of the Poisson distribution is still one set per time step, as in the original τ-leap method. The approach paves the way to explore new multiscale methods to simulate (bio)chemical systems. PMID:20701766

  20. Analysis and Design of Variable Stiffness Composite Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatting, Brian F.; Guerdal, Zafer

    1998-01-01

    An investigation of the possible performance improvements of thin circular cylindrical shells through the use of the variable stiffness concept is presented. The variable stiffness concept implies that the stiffness parameters change spatially throughout the structure. This situation is achieved mainly through the use of curvilinear fibers within a fiber-reinforced composite laminate, though the possibility of thickness variations and discrete stiffening elements is also allowed. These three mechanisms are incorporated into the constitutive laws for thin shells through the use of Classical Lamination Theory. The existence of stiffness variation within the structure warrants a formulation of the static equilibrium equations from the most basic principles. The governing equations include sufficient detail to correctly model several types of nonlinearity, including the formation of a nonlinear shell boundary layer as well as the Brazier effect due to nonlinear bending of long cylinders. Stress analysis and initial buckling estimates are formulated for a general variable stiffness cylinder. Results and comparisons for several simplifications of these highly complex governing equations are presented so that the ensuing numerical solutions are considered reliable and efficient enough for in-depth optimization studies. Four distinct cases of loading and stiffness variation are chosen to investigate possible areas of improvement that the variable stiffness concept may offer over traditional constant stiffness and/or stiffened structures. The initial investigation deals with the simplest solution for cylindrical shells in which all quantities are constant around the circumference of the cylinder. This axisymmetric case includes a stiffness variation exclusively in the axial direction, and the only pertinent loading scenarios include constant loads of axial compression, pressure, and torsion. The results for these cases indicate that little improvement over traditional laminates exists through the use of curvilinear fibers, mainly due to the presence of a weak link area within the stiffness variation that limits the ultimate load that the structure can withstand. Rigorous optimization studies reveal that even though slight increases in the critical loads can be produced for designs with an arbitrary variation of the fiber orientation angle, the improvements are not significant when compared to traditional design techniques that utilize ring stiffeners and frames. The second problem that is studied involves arbitrary loading of a cylinder with a stiffness variation that changes only in the circumferential direction. The end effects of the cylinder are ignored, so that the problem takes the form of an analysis of a cross-section for a short cylinder segment. Various load cases including axial compression, pressure, torsion, bending, and transverse shear forces are investigated. It is found that the most significant improvements in load-carrying capability exist for cases which involve loads that also vary around the circumference of the shell, namely bending and shear forces. The stiffness variation of the optimal designs contribute to the increased performance in two ways: lowering the stresses in the critical areas through redistribution of the stresses; and providing a relatively stiff region that alters the buckling behavior of the structure. These results lead to an in-depth optimization study involving weight optimization of a fuselage structure subjected to typical design constraints. Comparisons of the curvilinear fiber format to traditional stiffened structures constructed of isotropic and composite materials are included. It is found that standard variable stiffness designs are quite comparable in terms of weight and load-carrying capability yet offer the added advantage of tailorability of distinct regions of the structure that experience drastically different loading conditions. The last two problems presented in this work involve the nonlinear phenomenon of long tubes under bending. Though this scenario is not as applicable to fuselage structures as the previous problems, the mechanisms that produce the nonlinear effect are ideally suited to be controlled by the variable stiffness concept. This is due to the fact that the dominating influence for long cylinders under bending is the ovalization of the cross-section, which is governed mainly by the stiffness parameters of the cylindrical shell. Possible improvement of the critical buckling moments for these structures is investigated using either a circumferential or axial stiffness variation. For the circumferential case involving infinite length cylinders, it is found that slight improvements can be observed by designing structures that resist the cross-sectional deformation yet do not detract from the buckling resistance at the critical location. The results also indicate that buckling behavior is extremely dependent on cylinder length. This effect is most easily seen in the solution of finite length cylinders under bending that contain an axial stiffness variation. For these structures, the only mechanism that exhibits improved response are those that effectively shorten the length of the cylinder, thus reducing the cross-sectional deformation due to the forced restraint at the ends. It was found that the use of curvilinear fibers was not able to achieve this effect in sufficient degree to resist the deformation, but that ring stiffeners produced the desired response admirably. Thus, it is shown that the variable stiffness concept is most effective at improving the bending response of long cylinders through the use of a circumferential stiffness variation.

  1. Stiffness Simulation Using Non-linear FEA

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.L.; Ai, J.; Lu, J.X.; Ying, B.H.

    2005-08-05

    In this paper, Stamping-stiffness coupling simulation techniques are proposed, i.e., stamping, springback and stiffness is simulated with dynamic-explicit FE method, static-implicit FE method, and dynamic-explicit FE method continually. Carrying out process for three steps and some key technical factors are listed. The stiffness for double-curvature box parts is analyzed by this method.The simulation result is compared with experimental one, and satisfied calculation accuracy is obtained.

  2. Experimental stiffness of tapered bore seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    The stiffness of tapered-bore ring seals was measured with air as the sealed fluid. Static stiffness agreed fairly well with results of a previous analysis. Cross-coupled stiffness due to shaft rotation was much less than predicted. It is suggested that part of the disparity may be due to simplifying assumptions in the analysis; however, these do not appear to account for the entire difference observed.

  3. Leg stiffness measures depend on computational method.

    PubMed

    Hébert-Losier, Kim; Eriksson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Leg stiffness is often computed from ground reaction force (GRF) registrations of vertical hops to estimate the force-resisting capacity of the lower-extremity during ground contact, with leg stiffness values incorporated in a spring-mass model to describe human motion. Individual biomechanical characteristics, including leg stiffness, were investigated in 40 healthy males. Our aim is to report and discuss the use of 13 different computational methods for evaluating leg stiffness from a double-legged repetitive hopping task, using only GRF registrations. Four approximations for the velocity integration constant were combined with three mathematical expressions, giving 12 methods for computing stiffness using double integrations. One frequency-based method that considered ground contact times was also trialled. The 13 methods thus defined were used to compute stiffness in four extreme cases, which were the stiffest, and most compliant, consistent and variable subjects. All methods provided different stiffness measures for a given individual, but the between-method variations in stiffness were consistent across the four atypical subjects. The frequency-based method apparently overestimated the actual stiffness values, whereas double integrations' measures were more consistent. In double integrations, the choice of the integration constant and mathematical expression considerably affected stiffness values, as variations during hopping were more or less emphasized. Stating a zero centre of mass position at take-off gave more consistent results, and taking a weighted-average of the force or displacement curve was more forgiving to variations in performance. In any case, stiffness values should always be accompanied by a detailed description of their evaluation methods, as our results demonstrated that computational methods affect calculated stiffness. PMID:24188972

  4. Coarse-graining stiff bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Español, P.; de la Torre, J. A.; Ferrario, M.; Ciccotti, G.

    2011-11-01

    The method of constraints in molecular dynamics is useful because it avoids the resolution of high frequency motions with very small time steps. However, the price to pay is that both the dynamics and the statistics of a constrained system differ from those of the unconstrained one. Instead of using constraints, we propose to dispose of high frequency motions by a coarse-graining procedure in which fast variables are eliminated. These fast variables are thus modeled as friction and thermal fluctuations. We illustrate the methodology with a simple model case, a diatomic molecule in a monoatomic solvent, in which the bond between the atoms of a diatomic molecule is stiff. Although the example is very simple and does not display the interesting effects of "wrong" statistics of the constrained system (i.e. the well-known issue connected to the Fixman potential), it is well suited to give the proof of concept of the whole procedure.

  5. The fully implicit stochastic- ? method for stiff stochastic differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safique Ahmad, Sk.; Chandra Parida, Nigam; Raha, Soumyendu

    2009-12-01

    A fully implicit integration method for stochastic differential equations with significant multiplicative noise and stiffness in both the drift and diffusion coefficients has been constructed, analyzed and illustrated with numerical examples in this work. The method has strong order 1.0 consistency and has user-selectable parameters that allow the user to expand the stability region of the method to cover almost the entire drift-diffusion stability plane. The large stability region enables the method to take computationally efficient time steps. A system of chemical Langevin equations simulated with the method illustrates its computational efficiency.

  6. Bilinearization of the generalized coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation with variable coefficients and gain and dark-bright pair soliton solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Sushmita; Nandy, Sudipta; Barthakur, Abhijit

    2015-02-01

    We investigate coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations (NLSEs) with variable coefficients and gain. The coupled NLSE is a model equation for optical soliton propagation and their interaction in a multimode fiber medium or in a fiber array. By using Hirota's bilinear method, we obtain the bright-bright, dark-bright combinations of a one-soliton solution (1SS) and two-soliton solutions (2SS) for an n -coupled NLSE with variable coefficients and gain. Crucial properties of two-soliton (dark-bright pair) interactions, such as elastic and inelastic interactions and the dynamics of soliton bound states, are studied using asymptotic analysis and graphical analysis. We show that a bright 2 -soliton , in addition to elastic interactions, also exhibits multiple inelastic interactions. A dark 2 -soliton , on the other hand, exhibits only elastic interactions. We also observe a breatherlike structure of a bright 2-soliton, a feature that become prominent with gain and disappears as the amplitude acquires a minimum value, and after that the solitons remain parallel. The dark 2 -soliton , however, remains parallel irrespective of the gain. The results found by us might be useful for applications in soliton control, a fiber amplifier, all optical switching, and optical computing.

  7. Concept for design of variable stiffness damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohr, J. J.

    1967-01-01

    Damping mechanism, containing polymeric-like materials is applicable to a wide range of shock and vibration. The polymeric-like material changes from a relatively stiff material to a relatively soft, rubbery material in the region of their glass transition temperatures. The energy absorption characteristics and stiffness are controllable with temperature.

  8. Nonparticipatory Stiffness in the Male Perioral Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Shin-Ying; Barlow, Steven M.; Lee, Jaehoon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to extend previous published findings in the authors' laboratory using a new automated technology to quantitatively characterize nonparticipatory perioral stiffness in healthy male adults. Method: Quantitative measures of perioral stiffness were sampled during a nonparticipatory task using a

  9. Nonparticipatory Stiffness in the Male Perioral Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Shin-Ying; Barlow, Steven M.; Lee, Jaehoon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to extend previous published findings in the authors' laboratory using a new automated technology to quantitatively characterize nonparticipatory perioral stiffness in healthy male adults. Method: Quantitative measures of perioral stiffness were sampled during a nonparticipatory task using a…

  10. Relative stiffness of flat-conductor cable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Bending moment data were taken on ten different cable samples and normalized to express all stiffness factors in terms of cable 5.1 cm in width. Relative stiffness data and nominal physical characteristics are tabulated and presented in graphical form for designers who may be interested in finding torques exerted on critical components by short lengths of cable.

  11. Curvature dependent modulation of fish fin stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Khoi; Yu, Ning; Bandi, Mahesh; Venkadesan, Madhusudhan; Mandre, Shreyas

    Propulsion and maneuvering ability of fishes depends on the stiffness of their fins. However, increasing stiffness by simply adding material to thicken the fin would incur a substantial energetic cost associated with flapping the fin. We propose that fishes increase stiffness of the fin not by building thicker fins, but by geometrically coupling out-of-plane bending of the fin's rays with in-plane stretching of a stiff membrane that connects the rays. We present a model of fin elasticity for ray-finned fish, where we decompose the fin into a series of elastic beams (rays) with springy interconnections (membrane). In one limit, where the membranes are infinitely extensible, the fin's stiffness is no more than the sum of the stiffness of individual rays. At the other limit of an inextensible membrane, fin stiffness reaches an asymptotic maximum. The asymptote value increases monotonically with curvature. We propose that musculature at the base of the fin controls fin curvature, and thereby modulates stiffness.

  12. Rolling Element Bearing Stiffness Matrix Determination (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Parker, R.

    2014-01-01

    Current theoretical bearing models differ in their stiffness estimates because of different model assumptions. In this study, a finite element/contact mechanics model is developed for rolling element bearings with the focus of obtaining accurate bearing stiffness for a wide range of bearing types and parameters. A combined surface integral and finite element method is used to solve for the contact mechanics between the rolling elements and races. This model captures the time-dependent characteristics of the bearing contact due to the orbital motion of the rolling elements. A numerical method is developed to determine the full bearing stiffness matrix corresponding to two radial, one axial, and two angular coordinates; the rotation about the shaft axis is free by design. This proposed stiffness determination method is validated against experiments in the literature and compared to existing analytical models and widely used advanced computational methods. The fully-populated stiffness matrix demonstrates the coupling between bearing radial, axial, and tilting bearing deflections.

  13. Multi-flexible-body dynamics capturing motion-induced stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, Arun K.; Lemak, Mark E.; Dickens, John M.

    1989-01-01

    A multi-flexible-body dynamics formulation incorporating a recently developed theory for capturing motion induced stiffness for a arbitrary structure undergoing large rotation and translation accompanied by small vibrations is presented. In essence, the method consists of correcting prematurely linearized dynamical equations for an arbitrary flexible body with generalized active forces due to geometric stiffness corresponding to a system of twelve inertia forces and nine inertia couples distributed over the body. Equations of motion are derived by means of Kane's method. A useful feature of the formulation is its treatment of prescribed motions and interaction forces. Results of simulations of motions of three flexible spacecraft, involving stiffening during spinup motion, dynamic buckling, and a repositioning maneuver, demonstrate the validity and generality of the theory.

  14. Nonlinear and tangent stiffness of imperfect beam columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, M. S.

    1982-01-01

    A curved member under axial load is analyzed using beam column theory to determine nonlinear response and the tangent stiffness associated with small displacements from the nonlinear state. Such a result is suitable for incorporation into a general nonlinear analysis using a corotational coordinate system to describe the rigid body type motion of individual members. The method is applied to buckling problems. Several examples are given to show the accuracy of the method.

  15. The Difference between Stiffness and Quasi-stiffness in the Context of Biomechanical Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Elliott J.; Gregg, Robert D.; Hargrove, Levi J.; Sensinger, Jonathon W.

    2014-01-01

    The ankle contributes the majority of mechanical power during walking and is a frequently studied joint in biomechanics. Specifically, researchers have extensively investigated the torque-angle relationship for the ankle during dynamic tasks, such as walking and running. The slope of this relationship has been termed the “quasi-stiffness.” However, over time, researchers have begun to interchange the concepts of quasi-stiffness and stiffness. This is an especially important distinction as researchers currently begin to investigate the appropriate control systems for recently developed powered prosthetic legs. The quasi-stiffness and stiffness are distinct concepts in the context of powered joints, and are equivalent in the context of passive joints. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the difference between the stiffness and quasi-stiffness using a simple impedance controlled inverted pendulum model and a more sophisticated biped walking model, each with the ability to modify the trajectory of an impedance controller’s equilibrium angle position. In both cases, stiffness values are specified by the controller and the quasi-stiffness are shown during a single step. Both models have widely varying quasi-stiffness but each have a single stiffness value. Therefore, from this simple modeling approach, the differences and similarities between these two concepts are elucidated. PMID:23212310

  16. Stiff Coatings on Compliant Biofibers

    PubMed Central

    Holten-Andersen, Niels; Zhao, Hua; Waite, J. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    For lasting holdfast attachment, the mussel Mytilus californianus coats its byssal threads with a protective cuticle 2-5 μm thick that is 4-6 times stiffer than the underlying collagen fibers. Although cuticle hardness (0.1 GPa) and stiffness (2 GPa) resemble those observed in related mussels, a more effective dispersion of microdamage enables M. californianus byssal threads to sustain strains to almost 120% before cuticle rupture occurs. Underlying factors for the superior damage tolerance of the byssal cuticle were explored in its microarchitecture and in the cuticular protein, mcfp-1. Cuticle microstructure was distinctly granular, with granule diameters (∼200 nm) only a quarter of those in M. galloprovincialis cuticle, for example. Compared with homologous proteins in related mussel species, mcfp-1 from M. californianus had a similar mass (∼92 kDa) and number of tandemly repeated decapeptides, and contained the same post-translational modifications, namely, trans-4-hydroxyproline, trans-2,3-cis-3,4-dihydroxyproline, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa). The prominence of isoleucine in mcfp-1, however, distinguished it from homologues in other species. The complete protein sequence deduced from cDNAs for two related variants revealed a highly conserved consensus decapeptide PKISYPPTYK that is repeated 64 times and differs slightly from the consensus peptide (AKPSYPPTYK) of both M. galloprovincialis and M. edulis proteins. PMID:19220048

  17. Wave Propagation of Myocardial Stretch: Correlation with Myocardial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Pislaru, Cristina; Pellikka, Patricia A.; Pislaru, Sorin V.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of flow propagation during diastole in the left ventricle (LV) has been well described. Little is known about the associated waves propagating along the heart wall s. These waves may have a mechanism similar to pulse wave propagation in arteries. The major goal of the study was to evaluate the effect of myocardial stiffness and preload on this wave transmission. Methods Longitudinal late diastolic deformation and wave speed (Vp) of myocardial stretch in the anterior LV wall were measured using sonomicrometry in sixteen pigs. Animals with normal and altered myocardial stiffness (acute myocardial infarction) were studied with and without preload alterations. Elastic modulus estimated from Vp (EVP; Moens-Korteweg equation) was compared to incremental elastic modulus obtained from exponential end -diastolic stress-strain relation (ESS). Myocardial distensibility and α-and β-coefficients of stress-strain relations were calculated. Results Vp was higher at reperfusion compared to baseline (2.6±1.3 m/s vs. 1.3±0.4 m/s; p=0.005) and best correlated with ESS (r 2=0.80, p<0.0001), β-coefficient (r2=0.78, p<0.0001), distensibility (r2=0.47, p=0.005), and wall thickness/diameter ratio (r2=0.42, p=0.009). Elastic moduli (EVP and ESS) were strongly correlated (r2=0.83, p<0.0001). Increasing preload increased Vp and EVP and decreased distensibility. At multivariate analysis, ESS, wall thickness, and end-diastolic and systolic LV pressures were independent predictors of Vp (r2model=0.83, p<0.0001). Conclusions The main determinants of wave propagation of longitudinal myocardial stretch were myocardial stiffness and LV geometry and pressure. This local wave speed could potentially be measured noninvasively by echocardiography. PMID:25193091

  18. Wave propagation of myocardial stretch: correlation with myocardial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Pislaru, Cristina; Pellikka, Patricia A; Pislaru, Sorin V

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of flow propagation during diastole in the left ventricle (LV) has been well described. Little is known about the associated waves propagating along the heart walls. These waves may have a mechanism similar to pulse wave propagation in arteries. The major goal of the study was to evaluate the effect of myocardial stiffness and preload on this wave transmission. Longitudinal late diastolic deformation and wave speed (Vp) of myocardial stretch in the anterior LV wall were measured using sonomicrometry in 16 pigs. Animals with normal and altered myocardial stiffness (acute myocardial infarction) were studied with and without preload alterations. Elastic modulus estimated from Vp (E VP; Moens-Korteweg equation) was compared to incremental elastic modulus obtained from exponential end-diastolic stress-strain relation (E SS). Myocardial distensibility and α- and β-coefficients of stress-strain relations were calculated. Vp was higher at reperfusion compared to baseline (2.6 ± 1.3 vs. 1.3 ± 0.4 m/s; p = 0.005) and best correlated with E SS (r2 = 0.80, p < 0.0001), β-coefficient (r2 = 0.78, p < 0.0001), distensibility (r2 = 0.47, p = 0.005), and wall thickness/diameter ratio (r2 = 0.42, p = 0.009). Elastic moduli (E VP and E SS) were strongly correlated (r2 = 0.83, p < 0.0001). Increasing preload increased Vp and E VP and decreased distensibility. At multivariate analysis, E SS, wall thickness, and end-diastolic and systolic LV pressures were independent predictors of Vp (r2 model = 0.83, p < 0.0001). In conclusion, the main determinants of wave propagation of longitudinal myocardial stretch were myocardial stiffness and LV geometry and pressure. This local wave speed could potentially be measured noninvasively by echocardiography. PMID:25193091

  19. Model-Based Estimation of Knee Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Serge; Vallery, Heike; Hardegger, Michael; Riener, Robert; Perreault, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    During natural locomotion, the stiffness of the human knee is modulated continuously and subconsciously according to the demands of activity and terrain. Given modern actuator technology, powered transfemoral prostheses could theoretically provide a similar degree of sophistication and function. However, experimentally quantifying knee stiffness modulation during natural gait is challenging. Alternatively, joint stiffness could be estimated in a less disruptive manner using electromyography (EMG) combined with kinetic and kinematic measurements to estimate muscle force, together with models that relate muscle force to stiffness. Here we present the first step in that process, where we develop such an approach and evaluate it in isometric conditions, where experimental measurements are more feasible. Our EMG-guided modeling approach allows us to consider conditions with antagonistic muscle activation, a phenomenon commonly observed in physiological gait. Our validation shows that model-based estimates of knee joint stiffness coincide well with experimental data obtained using conventional perturbation techniques. We conclude that knee stiffness can be accurately estimated in isometric conditions without applying perturbations, which presents an important step towards our ultimate goal of quantifying knee stiffness during gait. PMID:22801482

  20. Stiff substrates enhance cultured neuronal network activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Quan-You; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Xie, Jing; Li, Chen-Xu; Chen, Wei-Yi; Liu, Bai-Lin; Wu, Xiao-an; Li, Shu-Na; Huo, Bo; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Zhao, Hu-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical property of extracellular matrix and cell-supporting substrates is known to modulate neuronal growth, differentiation, extension and branching. Here we show that substrate stiffness is an important microenvironmental cue, to which mouse hippocampal neurons respond and integrate into synapse formation and transmission in cultured neuronal network. Hippocampal neurons were cultured on polydimethylsiloxane substrates fabricated to have similar surface properties but a 10-fold difference in Young's modulus. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channel currents determined by patch-clamp recording were greater in neurons on stiff substrates than on soft substrates. Ca2+ oscillations in cultured neuronal network monitored using time-lapse single cell imaging increased in both amplitude and frequency among neurons on stiff substrates. Consistently, synaptic connectivity recorded by paired recording was enhanced between neurons on stiff substrates. Furthermore, spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic activity became greater and more frequent in neurons on stiff substrates. Evoked excitatory transmitter release and excitatory postsynaptic currents also were heightened at synapses between neurons on stiff substrates. Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence to show that substrate stiffness is an important biophysical factor modulating synapse connectivity and transmission in cultured hippocampal neuronal network. Such information is useful in designing instructive scaffolds or supporting substrates for neural tissue engineering. PMID:25163607

  1. Is the negative equivalent stiffness of a system possible?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mohan

    2016-01-01

    The negative stiffness concept is seldom encountered in high school courses as well as in college courses. This paper reports a system with negative equivalent stiffness, which is the most important component in constructing a quasi-zero stiffness isolator.

  2. Dynamic stiffness formulation for free orthotropic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbel, O.; Casimir, J. B.; Hammami, L.; Tawfiq, I.; Haddar, M.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a procedure for developing the dynamic stiffness matrix of a free orthotropic Kirchhoff plate. The dynamic stiffness matrix is computed for free edge boundary conditions of the plate that allow assembly procedures. The method is based on a strong formulation of Kirchhoff plate equations and series solutions, taking advantage of the symmetry and Gorman type decomposition of the free boundary conditions. The performances of the so-called Dynamic Stiffness Method (DSM) are evaluated by comparing the harmonic responses of an orthotropic Kirchhoff plate with those obtained from the Finite Element Method using four noded quadrilateral elements.

  3. “Smooth Muscle Cell Stiffness Syndrome”—Revisiting the Structural Basis of Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Sehgel, Nancy L.; Vatner, Stephen F.; Meininger, Gerald A.

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, the pervasiveness of increased arterial stiffness in patients with cardiovascular disease has become increasingly apparent. Though, this phenomenon has been well documented in humans and animal models of disease for well over a century, there has been surprisingly limited development in a deeper mechanistic understanding of arterial stiffness. Much of the historical literature has focused on changes in extracellular matrix proteins—collagen and elastin. However, extracellular matrix changes alone appear insufficient to consistently account for observed changes in vascular stiffness, which we observed in our studies of aortic stiffness in aging monkeys. This led us to examine novel mechanisms operating at the level of the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC)—that include increased cell stiffness and adhesion to extracellular matrix—which that may be interrelated with other mechanisms contributing to arterial stiffness. We introduce these observations as a new concept—the Smooth Muscle Cell Stiffness Syndrome (SMCSS)—within the field of arterial stiffness and posit that stiffening of vascular cells impairs vascular function and may contribute stiffening to the vasculature with aging and cardiovascular disease. Importantly, this review article revisits the structural basis of arterial stiffness in light of these novel findings. Such classification of SMCSS and its contextualization into our current understanding of vascular mechanics may be useful in the development of strategic therapeutics to directly target arterial stiffness. PMID:26635621

  4. Vascular stiffness in insulin resistance and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Guanghong; Aroor, Annayya R.; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.; Meininger, Gerald A.; Sowers, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes are associated with a substantially increased prevalence of vascular fibrosis and stiffness, with attendant increased risk of cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. Although the underlying mechanisms and mediators of vascular stiffness are not well understood, accumulating evidence supports the role of metabolic and immune dysregulation related to increased adiposity, activation of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system, reduced bioavailable nitric oxide, increased vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) and ECM remodeling in the pathogenesis of vascular stiffness. This review will give a brief overview of the relationship between obesity, insulin resistance and increased vascular stiffness to provide a contemporary understanding of the proposed underlying mechanisms and potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:26321962

  5. Macroscopic Stiffness of Breast Tumors Predicts Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Fenner, Joseph; Stacer, Amanda C.; Winterroth, Frank; Johnson, Timothy D.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical properties of tumors differ substantially from normal cells and tissues. Changes in stiffness or elasticity regulate pro-metastatic behaviors of cancer cells, but effects have been documented predominantly in isolated cells or in vitro cell culture systems. To directly link relative stiffness of tumors to cancer progression, we combined a mouse model of metastatic breast cancer with ex vivo measurements of bulk moduli of freshly excised, intact tumors. We found a high, inverse correlation between bulk modulus of resected tumors and subsequent local recurrence and metastasis. More compliant tumors were associated with more frequent, larger local recurrences and more extensive metastases than mice with relatively stiff tumors. We found that collagen content of resected tumors correlated with bulk modulus values. These data establish that relative differences in tumor stiffness correspond with tumor progression and metastasis, supporting further testing and development of tumor compliance as a prognostic biomarker in breast cancer. PMID:24981707

  6. Programmable variable stiffness 2D surface design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabia, Sarah; Hwang, Taeseon; Yim, Woosoon

    2014-03-01

    Variable stiffness features can contribute to many engineering applications ranging from robotic joints to shock and vibration mitigation. In addition, variable stiffness can be used in the tactile feedback to provide the sense of touch to the user. A key component in the proposed device is the Biased Magnetorheological Elastomer (B-MRE) where iron particles within the elastomer compound develop a dipole interaction energy. A novel feature of this device is to introduce a field induced shear modulus bias via a permanent magnet which provides an offset with a current input to the electromagnetic control coil to change the compliance or modulus of a base elastomer in both directions (softer or harder). The B-MRE units can lead to the design of a variable stiffness surface. In this preliminary work, both computational and experimental results of the B-MRE are presented along with a preliminary design of the programmable variable stiffness surface design.

  7. Dynamic influences of changing gear tooth stiffness

    SciTech Connect

    Morguel, O.K.; Esat, I.

    1997-07-01

    One of the principal sources of vibratory excitation of gear a system is due to the angular speed fluctuation of meshing gears due to non-linearities and profile errors and tooth and supporting bearings flexibility. The transmission error is also influenced by the varying force at the contact point of the meshing gear teeth. The varying contact force itself is influenced by the varying tooth stiffness due to change of orientation of teeth relative to each other, during the contact phase of each pair. This paper presents a simplified single degree of freedom gear system. It is assumed that one member of the gear pair is rigid and flexibility of the gear tooth is attributed only to one section of the gear system. This enables the equation to be simplified to a single degree of freedom system. The resulting non-linear equation is solved iteratively by employing a method which combines piecewise linearization for the stiffness and resulting contact orientation shift due to shaft and tooth flexibility. The contact shift will be referred as the phase shift in this report. The early finding indicates that there are significant differences between the response of the system incorporating three different tooth stiffness, namely, constant tooth stiffness, rectangular wave tooth stiffness and sinusoidal tooth stiffness. The results also implies that any design specification associated with gears has to include gear tooth influences, especially if the excitation is of a major concern. The rectangular stiffness variation which most accurately describes the tooth stiffness gives a response fluctuation, studied in the frequency domain shows that the effective natural frequencies fluctuates between certain upper and lower limits. Thus the paper suggest that any design study should consider these limits.

  8. An analysis of traction drive torsional stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohn, D. A.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1983-01-01

    The tangential compliance of elastic bodies in concentrated contact applied to traction drive elements to determine their torsional stiffness was analyzed. Static loading and rotating conditions are considered. The effects of several design variables are shown. The theoretical torsional stiffness of a fixed ratio multiroller drive is computed and compared to experimental values. It is shown that the torsional compliance of the traction contacts themselves is a relatively small portion of the overall drive system compliance.

  9. Stiff limb syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Stiff limb syndrome is a clinical feature of the stiff person syndrome, which is a rare and disabling neurologic disorder characterized by muscle rigidity and episodic spasms that involve axial and limb musculature. It is an autoimmune disorder resulting in a malfunction of aminobutyric acid mediated inhibitory networks in the central nervous system. We describe a patient diagnosed by neurological symptoms of stiff limb syndrome with a good outcome after treatment, and a review of the related literature. Case presentation A 49-year-old male patient presented with a progressive stiffness and painful spasms of his both legs resulting in a difficulty of standing up and walking. The diagnosis of stiff limb syndrome was supported by the dramatically positive response to treatment using diazepam 25 mg/day and baclofen 30 mg/day. Conclusion This clinical case highlights the importance of a therapeutic test to confirm the diagnosis of stiff limb syndrome especially when there is a high clinical suspicion with unremarkable electromyography PMID:20205913

  10. Stiffness of Railway Soil-Steel Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machelski, Czesław

    2015-12-01

    The considerable influence of the soil backfill properties and that of the method of compacting it on the stiffness of soil-steel structures is characteristic of the latter. The above factors (exhibiting randomness) become apparent in shell deformation measurements conducted during construction and proof test loading. A definition of soil-shell structure stiffness, calculated on the basis of shell deflection under the service load, is proposed in the paper. It is demonstrated that the stiffness is the inverse of the deflection influence function used in structural mechanics. The moving load methodology is shown to be useful for testing, since it makes it possible to map the shell deflection influence line also in the case of group loads (concentrated forces), as in bridges. The analyzed cases show that the shell's span, geometry (static scheme) and the height of earth fill influence the stiffness of the structure. The soil-steel structure's characteristic parameter in the form of stiffness k is more suitable for assessing the quality of construction works than the proposed in code geometric index ω applied to beam structures. As shown in the given examples, parameter k is more effective than stiffness parameter λ used to estimate the deformation of soil-steel structures under construction. Although the examples concern railway structures, the methodology proposed in the paper is suitable also for road bridges.

  11. OroSTIFF: Face-referenced measurement of perioral stiffness in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Shin-Ying; Kieweg, Douglas; Lee, Jaehoon

    2010-01-01

    A new device and automated measurement technology known as OroSTIFF is described to characterize non-participatory perioral stiffness in healthy adults for eventual application to patients with orofacial movement disorders associated with neuromotor disease, traumatic injury, or congenital clefts of the upper lip. Previous studies of perioral biomechanics required head stabilization for extended periods of time during measurement which precluded sampling patients with involuntary body/head movements (dyskinesias), or pediatric subjects. The OroSTIFF device is face-referenced and avoids the complications associated with head-restraint. Supporting data of non-participatory perioral tissue stiffness using OroSTIFF are included from 10 male and 10 female healthy subjects. The OroSTIFF device incorporates a pneumatic glass air cylinder actuator instrumented for pressure, and an integrated subminiature displacement sensor to encode lip aperture. Perioral electromyograms were simultaneously sampled to confirm passive muscle state for the superior and inferior divisions of the orbicularis oris muscles. Perioral stiffness, derived as a quotient from resultant force (ΔF) and interangle span (ΔX), was modeled with multilevel regression techniques. Real-time calculation of the perioral stiffness function demonstrated a significant quadratic relation between imposed interangle stretch and resultant force. This stiffness growth function also differed significantly between males and females. This study demonstrates the OroSTIFF ‘proof-of-concept’ for cost-effective non-invasive stimulus generation and derivation of perioral stiffness in a group of healthy unrestrained adults, and a case study to illustrate the dose-dependent effects of Levodopa on perioral stiffness in an individual with advanced Parkinson’s disease who exhibited marked dyskinesia and rigidity. PMID:20185131

  12. Calculation of the lateral control of swept and unswept flexible wings of arbitrary stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diederich, Franklin W

    1951-01-01

    A method similar to that of NACA rep. 1000 is presented for calculating the effectiveness and the reversal speed of lateral-control devices on swept and unswept wings of arbitrary stiffness. Provision is made for using either stiffness curves and root-rotation constants or structural influence coefficients in the analysis. Computing forms and an illustrative example are included to facilitate calculations by means of the method. The effectiveness of conventional aileron configurations and the margin against aileron reversal are shown to be relatively low for swept wings at all speeds and for all wing plan forms at supersonic speeds.

  13. Study of a piecewise linear dynamic system with negative and positive stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Keguan; Nagarajaiah, Satish

    2015-05-01

    The present paper mainly focuses on numerical and analytical study of a piecewise linear dynamic oscillator with negative stiffness followed by positive stiffness which has not been studied to date. The dynamic system of interest stems from a previous analytical and experimental research on adaptive negative stiffness for the purpose of seismic protection. Numerical algorithms meant specifically for simulating piecewise smooth (PWS) systems like this nonlinear system are studied. An appropriate combination of negative stiffness and adequate damping can reduce the peak restoring or transmitted force with a slightly larger peak displacement. Essentially, the negative stiffness system in a dynamic system is very beneficial in reducing the amount of force transmitted. The exact solution is derived for free vibration. A modified Lindstedt-Poincar method (modified L-P method) is adopted to derive approximate periodic solutions for the forced and damped system and its frequency-response curves are obtained through numerical simulation. The modified L-P solution obtained for the forced and damped case is found to agree well with the numerical results. In the piecewise linear dynamic system with initial negative stiffness followed by positive stiffness, it is found that the response remains bounded in a limit cycle. This system behaves similar to a van der Pol oscillator wherein negative damping is followed by positive damping. Presented herein is a special case as defined by the specified parameter ranges; thus, to make it more general future work is needed.

  14. Logistic Regression with Random Coefficients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longford, Nicholas T.

    An approximation to the likelihood for the generalized linear models with random coefficients is derived and is the basis for an approximate Fisher scoring algorithm. The method is illustrated on the logistic regression model for one-way classification, but it has an extension to the class of generalized linear models and to more complex data…

  15. Longitudinal relaxation of initially straight flexible and stiff polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrakopoulos, Panagiotis; Dissanayake, Inuka

    2004-11-01

    The present talk considers the relaxation of a single flexible or stiff polymer chain from an initial straight configuration in a viscous solvent. This problem commonly arises when strong flows are turned off in both industrial and biological applications. The problem is also motivated by recent experiments with single biopolymer molecules relaxing after being fully extended by applied forces as well as by the recent development of micro-devices involving stretched tethered biopolymers. Our results are applicable to a wide array of synthetic polymers such as polyacrylamides, Kevlar and polyesters as well as biopolymers such as DNA, actin filaments, microtubules and MTV. In this talk we discuss the mechanism of the polymer relaxation as was revealed through Brownian Dynamics simulations covering a broad range of time scales and chain stiffness. After the short-time free diffusion, the chain's longitudinal reduction at early intermediate times is shown to constitute a universal behavior for any chain stiffness caused by a quasi-steady relaxation of tensions associated with the deforming action of the Brownian forces. Stiff chains are shown to exhibit a late intermediate-time longitudinal reduction associated with a relaxation of tensions affected by the deforming Brownian and the restoring bending forces. The longitudinal and transverse relaxations are shown to obey different laws, i.e. the chain relaxation is anisotropic at all times. In the talk, we show how from the knowledge of the relaxation mechanism, we can predict and explain the polymer properties including the polymer stress and the solution birefringence. In addition, a generalized stress-optic law is derived valid for any time and chain stiffness. All polymer properties which depend on the polymer length are shown to exhibit two intermediate-time behaviors with the early one to constitute a universal behavior for any chain stiffness. This work was supported in part by the Minta Martin Research Fund. The computations were performed on multiprocessor computers provided by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) in Illinois (grant DMR000003), and by an Academic Equipment Grant from Sun Microsystems Inc.

  16. Conformational Analysis of Stiff Chiral Polymers with End-Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Seob; Chirikjian, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    We present a Lie-group-theoretic method for the kinematic and dynamic analysis of chiral semi-flexible polymers with end constraints. The first is to determine the minimum energy conformations of semi-flexible polymers with end constraints, and the second is to perform normal mode analysis based on the determined minimum energy conformations. In this paper, we use concepts from the theory of Lie groups and principles of variational calculus to model such polymers as inextensible or extensible chiral elastic rods with coupling between twisting and bending stiffnesses, and/or between twisting and extension stiffnesses. This method is general enough to include any stiffness and chirality parameters in the context of elastic filament models with the quadratic elastic potential energy function. As an application of this formulation, the analysis of DNA conformations is discussed. We demonstrate our method with examples of DNA conformations in which topological properties such as writhe, twist, and linking number are calculated from the results of the proposed method. Given these minimum energy conformations, we describe how to perform the normal mode analysis. The results presented here build both on recent experimental work in which DNA mechanical properties have been measured, and theoretical work in which the mechanics of non-chiral elastic rods has been studied. PMID:20198114

  17. Experimental exposure to diesel exhaust increases arterial stiffness in man

    PubMed Central

    Lundbck, Magnus; Mills, Nicholas L; Lucking, Andrew; Barath, Stefan; Donaldson, Ken; Newby, David E; Sandstrm, Thomas; Blomberg, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Exposure to air pollution is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity, although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Vascular dysfunction reduces arterial compliance and increases central arterial pressure and left ventricular after-load. We determined the effect of diesel exhaust exposure on arterial compliance using a validated non-invasive measure of arterial stiffness. Methods In a double-blind randomized fashion, 12 healthy volunteers were exposed to diesel exhaust (approximately 350 ?g/m3) or filtered air for one hour during moderate exercise. Arterial stiffness was measured using applanation tonometry at the radial artery for pulse wave analysis (PWA), as well as at the femoral and carotid arteries for pulse wave velocity (PWV). PWA was performed 10, 20 and 30 min, and carotid-femoral PWV 40 min, post-exposure. Augmentation pressure (AP), augmentation index (AIx) and time to wave reflection (Tr) were calculated. Results Blood pressure, AP and AIx were generally low reflecting compliant arteries. In comparison to filtered air, diesel exhaust exposure induced an increase in AP of 2.5 mmHg (p = 0.02) and in AIx of 7.8% (p = 0.01), along with a 16 ms reduction in Tr (p = 0.03), 10 minutes post-exposure. Conclusion Acute exposure to diesel exhaust is associated with an immediate and transient increase in arterial stiffness. This may, in part, explain the increased risk for cardiovascular disease associated with air pollution exposure. If our findings are confirmed in larger cohorts of susceptible populations, this simple non-invasive method of assessing arterial stiffness may become a useful technique in measuring the impact of real world exposures to combustion derived-air pollution. PMID:19284640

  18. A unit-cell model of textile composite beams for predicting stiffness properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankar, Bhavani V.; Marrey, Ramesh V.

    1993-01-01

    Flexural stiffness properties of a textile composite beam are obtained from a finite-element model of the unit cell. Three linearly independent deformations, namely, pure extension, pure bending and pure shear, are applied to the unit cell. The top and bottom surfaces of the beam are assumed to be traction free. Periodic boundary conditions on the lateral boundaries of the unit cell are enforced by multi-point constraint elements. From the forces acting on the unit cell, the flexural stiffness coefficients of the composite beam are obtained. The difficulties in determining the transverse shear stiffness are discussed, and a modified approach is presented. The methods are first verified by applying them to isotropic and bimaterial beams for which the results are known, and then illustrated for a simple plain-weave textile composite.

  19. Design of a variable-stiffness robotic hand using pneumatic soft rubber actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Jun-ya; Wakimoto, Shuichi; Satoh, Toshiyuki; Saga, Norihiko; Suzumori, Koichi

    2011-10-01

    In recent years, Japanese society has been ageing, engendering a labor shortage of young workers. Robots are therefore expected to be useful in performing tasks such as day-to-day support for elderly people. In particular, robots that are intended for use in the field of medical care and welfare are expected to be safe when operating in a human environment because they often come into contact with people. Furthermore, robots must perform various tasks such as regrasping, grasping of soft objects, and tasks using frictional force. Given these demands and circumstances, a tendon-driven robot hand with a stiffness changing finger has been developed. The finger surface stiffness can be altered by adjusting the input pressure depending on the task. Additionally, the coefficient of static friction can be altered by changing the surface stiffness merely by adjusting the input air pressure. This report describes the basic structure, driving mechanism, and basic properties of the proposed robot hand.

  20. On the correspondence between a large class of dynamical systems and stochastic processes described by the generalized Fokker-Planck equation with state-dependent diffusion and drift coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianucci, Marco

    2015-05-01

    In this paper using a projection approach and defining the adjoint-Lie time evolution of differential operators, that generalizes the ordinary time evolution of functions, we obtain a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution function of a part of interest of a large class of dynamical systems. The main assumptions are the weak interaction between the part of interest and the rest of the system (typically non linear) and the average linear response to external perturbations of the irrelevant part. We do not use ad hoc statistical assumptions to introduce as given a priori phenomenological equilibrium or transport coefficients. The drift terms induced by the interaction with the irrelevant part is obtained with a procedure that is reminiscent of that developed some years ago by Bianucci and Grigolini (see for example (Bianucci et al 1995 Phys. Rev. E 51 3002)) to derive in a ‘genuine’ way thermodynamics and statistical mechanics of macroscopic variables of interest starting from microscopic dynamics. However here we stay in a more broad and formal context where the system of interest could be dissipative and the interaction between the two systems could be non Hamiltonian, thus the approach of the cited paper can not be used to obtain the diffusion part of the Fokker-Planck equation. To face the problem of dealing with the series of differential operators stemming from the projection approach applied to this general case, we introduce the formalism of the Lie derivative and the corresponding adjoint-Lie time evolution of differential operators. In this theoretical framework we are able to obtain well defined analytic functions both for the drift and the diffusion coefficients of the Fokker-Planck equation. We think that the basic elements of Lie algebra introduced in our projection approach can be useful to achieve even more general and more formally elegant results than those here presented. Thus we consider this paper as a first step of this formal path to statistical mechanics of complex systems.

  1. Effect of chain stiffness on interfacial slip in nanoscale polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priezjev, Nikolai

    2013-11-01

    The results obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of the friction at an interface between polymer melts and weakly attractive crystalline surfaces are reported. We consider a coarse-grained bead-spring model of linear chains with adjustable intrinsic stiffness. The structure and relaxation dynamics of polymer chains near interfaces are quantified by the radius of gyration and decay of the time autocorrelation function of the first normal mode. We found that the friction coefficient at small slip velocities exhibits a distinct maximum which appears due to shear-induced alignment of semiflexible chain segments in contact with solid walls. At large slip velocities, the friction coefficient is independent of the chain stiffness. The data for the friction coefficient and shear viscosity are used to elucidate main trends in the nonlinear shear rate dependence of the slip length. The influence of chain stiffness on the relationship between the friction coefficient and the structure factor in the first fluid layer is discussed. Financial support from the National Science Foundation (CBET-1033662) is gratefully acknowledged.

  2. Hyper-damping properties of a stiff and stable linear oscillator with a negative stiffness element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, I.; Chronopoulos, D.; Spitas, V.; Koulocheris, D.

    2015-06-01

    A simple, stiff, statically and dynamically stable linear oscillator incorporating a negative stiffness element is used as a template to provide a generic theoretical basis for a novel vibration damping and isolation concept. This oscillator is designed to present the same overall static stiffness, the same mass and to use the same damping element as a reference classical linear SDoF oscillator. Thus, no increase of the structure mass or the viscous damping is needed, as in the case of a traditional linear isolator, no decrease of the overall structure stiffness is required as in the case of 'zero-stiffness' oscillators with embedded negative stiffness elements. The difference from these two templates consists entirely in the proper redistribution and reallocation of the stiffness and the damping elements of the system. Once such an oscillator is optimally designed, it is shown to exhibit an extraordinary apparent damping ratio, which is even several orders of magnitude higher than that of the original SDoF system, especially in cases where the original damping of the SDoF system is extremely low. This extraordinary damping behavior is a result of the phase difference between the positive and the negative stiffness elastic forces, which is in turn a consequence of the proper redistribution of the stiffness and the damping elements. This fact ensures that an adequate level of elastic forces exists throughout the entire frequency range, able to counteract the inertial and the excitation forces. Consequently, a resonance phenomenon, which is inherent in the original linear SDoF system, cannot emerge in the proposed oscillator. The optimal parameter selection for the design of the negative stiffness oscillator is discussed. To further exhibit the advantages that such a design can generate, the suggested oscillator is implemented within a periodic acoustic metamaterial structure, inducing a radical increase in the damping of the propagating acoustic waves. The concept may find numerous technological applications, either as traditional vibration isolators or within advanced composite materials and metamaterials.

  3. Nanoscale Directional Motion towards Regions of Stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tienchong; Zhang, Hongwei; Guo, Zhengrong; Guo, Xingming; Gao, Huajian

    2015-01-01

    How to induce nanoscale directional motion via some intrinsic mechanisms pertaining to a nanosystem remains a challenge in nanotechnology. Here we show via molecular dynamics simulations that there exists a fundamental driving force for a nanoscale object to move from a region of lower stiffness toward one of higher stiffness on a substrate. Such nanoscale directional motion is induced by the difference in effective van der Waals potential energy due to the variation in stiffness of the substrate; i.e., all other conditions being equal, a nanoscale object on a stiffer substrate has lower van der Waals potential energy. This fundamental law of nanoscale directional motion could lead to promising routes for nanoscale actuation and energy conversion.

  4. Nanoscale directional motion towards regions of stiffness.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tienchong; Zhang, Hongwei; Guo, Zhengrong; Guo, Xingming; Gao, Huajian

    2015-01-01

    How to induce nanoscale directional motion via some intrinsic mechanisms pertaining to a nanosystem remains a challenge in nanotechnology. Here we show via molecular dynamics simulations that there exists a fundamental driving force for a nanoscale object to move from a region of lower stiffness toward one of higher stiffness on a substrate. Such nanoscale directional motion is induced by the difference in effective van der Waals potential energy due to the variation in stiffness of the substrate; i.e., all other conditions being equal, a nanoscale object on a stiffer substrate has lower van der Waals potential energy. This fundamental law of nanoscale directional motion could lead to promising routes for nanoscale actuation and energy conversion. PMID:25615480

  5. Arterial stiffness, pulse pressure, and the kidney.

    PubMed

    Safar, Michel E; Plante, Gérard E; Mimran, Albert

    2015-05-01

    Classical studies indicate that the contribution of kidneys to hypertension is almost exclusively related to the association between mean arterial pressure (MAP) and vascular resistance. Recent reports including estimates of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) have shown that pulse pressure (PP) and pulse wave velocity, 2 major indices of arterial stiffness, now emerge as significant predictors of cardiovascular risk and age-associated decline in GFR. Such findings are mainly observed in patients with hypertension and renal failure and in atherosclerotic subjects undergoing coronary angiography. In such patients, amplification of PP between ascending and terminal aorta at the renal site is constantly increased over 10mm Hg (P < 0.001), whereas MAP level remains continuously unmodified. This PP amplification is significantly associated with presence of proteinuria. Furthermore, increases in plasma creatinine and aortic stiffness are independently and positively correlated (P < 0.001) both in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. All these relationships associating PP, arterial stiffness, and renal function are mainly observed in patients 60 years of age or older. Furthermore, in renal transplant patients and their donors, subjects have been recruited for evaluations of arterial stiffness and posttransplant decline in GFR. Determinants of GFR decline were evaluated 1 and 9 years after transplantation. The first year GFR decline was related to smoking and acute rejection, whereas the later was significantly and exclusively associated with donor age and aortic stiffness. Thus, in hypertensive humans, the observed association between PP and GFR suggests that the 2 parameters are substantially mediated by arterial stiffness, not exclusively by vascular resistance. PMID:25480804

  6. Factor Scores, Structure Coefficients, and Communality Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Fara

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents heuristic explanations of factor scores, structure coefficients, and communality coefficients. Common misconceptions regarding these topics are clarified. In addition, (a) the regression (b) Bartlett, (c) Anderson-Rubin, and (d) Thompson methods for calculating factor scores are reviewed. Syntax necessary to execute all four…

  7. Assessments of endothelial function and arterial stiffness are reproducible in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Miguelez, Paula; Seigler, Nichole; Bass, Leon; Dillard, Thomas A; Harris, Ryan A

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated cardiovascular disease risk is observed in patients with COPD. Non-invasive assessments of endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness have recently emerged to provide mechanistic insight into cardiovascular disease risk in COPD; however, the reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness has yet to be investigated in this patient population. Objectives This study sought to examine the within-day and between-day reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness in patients with COPD. Methods Baseline diameter, peak diameter, flow-mediated dilation, augmentation index, augmentation index at 75 beats per minute, and pulse wave velocity were assessed three times in 17 patients with COPD (six males, eleven females, age range 47–75 years old; forced expiratory volume in 1 second =51.5% predicted). Session A and B were separated by 3 hours (within-day), whereas session C was conducted at least 7 days following session B (between-day). Reproducibility was assessed by: 1) paired t-tests, 2) coefficients of variation, 3) coefficients of variation prime, 4) intra-class correlation coefficient, 5) Pearson’s correlations (r), and 6) Bland–Altman plots. Five acceptable assessments were required to confirm reproducibility. Results Six out of six within-day criteria were met for endothelial function and arterial stiffness outcomes. Six out of six between-day criteria were met for baseline and peak diameter, augmentation index and pulse wave velocity, whereas five out of six criteria were met for flow-mediated dilation. Conclusion The present study provides evidence for within-day and between-day reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness in patients with COPD. PMID:26396509

  8. Atherosclerosis, arterial stiffness and antihypertensive drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Safar, Michel E; Smulyan, Harold

    2007-01-01

    Increased aortic stiffness is a consequence of cardiovascular (CV) aging and may be observed in the elderly with or without hypertension. Hypertension and arterial stiffness are independent risk factors for CV events, but such events may also be complicated by atherosclerosis, especially in the older population. The purpose of this chapter is to determine whether, in the presence of atherosclerosis, systolic hypertension in the elderly requires specific drug therapy. It will be shown that, in addition to the targeted drug treatment of associated hypercholesterolemia and/or hyperglycemia, the major problem nowadays is to find specific antihypertensive drugs causing a selective reduction of systolic blood pressure (SBP). PMID:17075219

  9. The stiff shoulder; A case study.

    PubMed

    Hall, Kevin; Mercer, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    Clinicians working in outpatient departments and advanced practitioner clinics frequently encounter patients presenting with multidirectional stiffness of the glenohumeral joint. This case report describes the assessment and treatment of a patient presenting with glenohumeral joint stiffness and describes the possible differential diagnoses. The evidence base used to inform the decision-making process is presented and the use of radiology that helped to ultimately establish the diagnosis is discussed. The clinical reasoning process of applying knowledge and experience to identify patient problems and to make appropriate decisions that result in positive patient outcomes is discussed. The case report highlights the importance of early diagnosis. PMID:26096901

  10. Damping properties of stay cable-passive damper system with effects of cable sag and damper stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Min; Zhang, Guangqiao

    2013-04-01

    The present paper derivate the asymptotic solution of modal damping of one taut stay cable attached with one passive damper including damper stiffness and viscous damping. The effect of the damper stiffness on the modal damping of the stay cable-passive system was analytical investigated. On the basis of the asymptotic solution of modal damping of one stay cable attached with one passive damper with the effect of cable stiffness and by using the decay factor of damper stiffness and the decay factor of cable sag, maximum modal damping ratio and corresponding optimal damping coefficient, which indicates the relationships of the characteristics of the damper and the cable sag was theoretically analyzed. Numerical analysis of parameters on the effect of dynamic performance of the controlled stay cable was conducted.

  11. Cancer cell stiffness: integrated roles of three-dimensional matrix stiffness and transforming potential.

    PubMed

    Baker, Erin L; Lu, Jing; Yu, Dihua; Bonnecaze, Roger T; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2010-10-01

    While significant advances have been made toward revealing the molecular mechanisms that influence breast cancer progression, much less is known about the associated cellular mechanical properties. To this end, we use particle-tracking microrheology to investigate the interplay among intracellular mechanics, three-dimensional matrix stiffness, and transforming potential in a mammary epithelial cell (MEC) cancer progression series. We use a well-characterized model system where human-derived MCF10A MECs overexpress either ErbB2, 14-3-3ζ, or both ErbB2 and 14-3-3ζ, with empty vector as a control. Our results show that MECs possessing ErbB2 transforming potential stiffen in response to elevated matrix stiffness, whereas non-transformed MECs or those overexpressing only 14-3-3ζ do no exhibit this response. We further observe that overexpression of ErbB2 alone is associated with the highest degree of intracellular sensitivity to matrix stiffness, and that the effect of transforming potential on intracellular stiffness is matrix-stiffness-dependent. Moreover, our intracellular stiffness measurements parallel cell migration behavior that has been previously reported for these MEC sublines. Given the current knowledge base of breast cancer mechanobiology, these findings suggest that there may be a positive relationship among intracellular stiffness sensitivity, cell motility, and perturbed mechanotransduction in breast cancer. PMID:20923638

  12. Immediate effects of kinematic taping on lower extremity muscle tone and stiffness in flexible flat feet

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joong-San; Um, Gi-Mai; Choi, Jung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the immediate effects of kinematic taping on the tone and stiffness in the leg muscles of subjects with flexible flat feet. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 30 subjects, 15 in the kinematic taping and 15 in the sham taping group, were administered respective taping interventions. Subsequently, the foot pressure and the tone and stiffness in the tibialis anterior, rectus femoris, medial gastrocnemius, and the long head of the biceps femoris muscles of both the lower extremities were measured. [Results] The foot pressure of the dominant leg significantly decreased in the kinematic taping group. The muscle tone and stiffness in the rectus femoris muscle of the dominant and non-dominant leg, tibialis anterior muscle of the dominant leg, medial gastrocnemius muscle of the non-dominant leg, and the stiffness in the dominant leg significantly decreased. The muscle tone and stiffness generally increased in the sham taping group. However, no significant difference was observed between the 2 groups. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that kinematic taping on flexible flat feet had positive effects of immediately reducing the abnormally increased foot pressure and the tone and stiffness in the lower extremity muscles. PMID:27190479

  13. Meta-Analysis of Coefficient Alpha

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Michael C.; Maeda, Yukiko

    2006-01-01

    The meta-analysis of coefficient alpha across many studies is becoming more common in psychology by a methodology labeled reliability generalization. Existing reliability generalization studies have not used the sampling distribution of coefficient alpha for precision weighting and other common meta-analytic procedures. A framework is provided for…

  14. Comparison of surgical outcome in impingement syndrome with and without stiff shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Young; Pandher, Dilbans Singh; Moon, Gi-Hyuk; Yoo, Moon-Jib; Lee, Sung Tae

    2008-01-01

    Background: In impingment syndrome with associated stiff shoulder the general protocol of management is to conservatively treat the stiff shoulder followed by operative treatment of the impingement syndrome. This consecutive prospective study was carried out to evaluate the functional outcome of surgical management for impingement syndrome associated with stiff shoulder and to compare the results with surgical management of impingement syndrome alone. Materials and Methods: We evaluated a total of 100 patients with impingement syndrome, consisting of 76 patients with impingement syndrome alone (Group A) and 24 patients of stiff shoulder associated with impingement syndrome (Group B). Group A patients were treated by subacromial decompression alone and Group B patients were treated by closed manipulation under anesthesia followed by subacromial decompression. Results: According to the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) evaluation score satisfactory results were obtained in 80% patients of Group A and 67% patients of Group B, while for patients with diabetes [(n = 18), Group A (n = 11), Group B (n = 7)] satisfactory results were achieved in 82% of patients of Group A(9/11) and 43% of Group B(3/7). Overall, Group B patients had a lower range of motion for external rotation postoperatively, thus indicating that procedures to improve the external rotation, such as a release of the rotator interval or anterior capsule, might be considered in conjunction with other surgical procedures in patients with impingement syndrome with associated stiffness to further improve functional outcome. Conclusion: Acromioplasty can be performed in stiff shoulder associated with impingement syndrome without fears of further worsening of stiffness from adhesions with the exposed raw undersurface of acromian. Patients with diabetes mellitus and shoulder stiffness tend to have poor clinical outcomes and must receive appropriate counseling preoperatively. PMID:19826525

  15. The stiffness characteristics of hybrid Ilizarov fixators.

    PubMed

    Baran, Onder; Havitcioglu, Hasan; Tatari, Hasan; Cecen, Berivan

    2008-10-20

    The use of hybrid Ilizarov models around femoral area is gaining clinical popularity lately. Hybrid systems show different mechanical properties. The purpose of this report is to examine the stiffness characteristics of the C-arch and half-pins on the hybrid Ilizarov fixators. Eight models that included standard Ilizarov and hybrid models were applied to six femoral sawbones. The distal part of fixation was composed of a two-ring frame applied identically to all bones. The difference of the configuration was at the proximal part, where half-pins with or without C-arches were either added to the proximal two-ring frame or replaced the proximal one- or two-ring frame. Osteotomy was performed in the femoral diaphysis and the bone was distracted 2cm. The stability of the system was tested with the axial compression testing machine. Displacements between the adjacent fracture sides were measured with the video extensometer in three dimensions. We found that proximal half-pin applications alone had less stiffness, but half-pins with C-arch had more stiffness than the model including only half-pins. Additional half-pins onto one- or two-ring frames had more longitudinal stiffness, but this system showed weak resistance against transverse displacement. PMID:18789446

  16. Frequency-Dependent Fracture Specific Stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Folz, M. A.; Acosta-Colon, A.

    2003-12-01

    Monitoring the hydraulic properties of fractures remotely through their seismic signatures is an important goal for field hydrology. Empirical studies have shown that the hydraulic properties of a fracture are implicitly related to the fracture specific stiffness through the amount and distribution of contact area and apertures that arise from two rough surfaces in contact. Complicating this simple picture are seismic measurements that indicate frequency-dependent stiffness, i.e., a scale-dependent fracture stiffness where the scale is set by the wavelength. Thus relating the hydraulic properties of fractures to seismic measurements becomes a scale dependent problem. We have performed laboratory experiments to examine the phenomenon of frequency dependent fracture specific stiffness to aid in the assessment of the hydraulic properties of a fracture using seismic techniques. To this end, we have developed a photolithographic technique with which we can construct synthetic fractures of known fracture geometry with feature sizes controlled over several orders of magnitude. The synthetic fracture (and the control non-fractured samples) are made from acrylic cylinders that measure 15.0 cm in diameter by 7.7 cm in height. The diameter of the samples enables us to sample the acoustic properties of the fracture using acoustic lens over regions that range in scale from 10 mm to 60 mm. A confinement cell controls the normal stress on the fracture. Seismic measurements were made with broadband compressional-mode piezoelectric transducers enabling one-order of magnitude in frequency. We found that when the wavelength is smaller than the asperity size, a linear dependence of fracture specific stiffness on frequency occurs. In this geometric ray regime the asymptotic value of the transmission function provides a direct measure of the contact area of the fracture. On the other hand, when the asperity spacing is less than an eighth of a wavelength, the fracture behaves as a displacement discontinuity and exhibits a frequency-independent fracture specific stiffness. For intermediate asperity spacings, mixed behavior (that may include resonant scattering) was observed. By understanding how to interpret fracture specific stiffness as a function of frequency, we seek to develop a better interpretation of the hydraulic properties of fractures based on seismic measurements. Acknowledgments: The Authors acknowledge support of this research by the Geosciences Research Program, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy. LJPN wishes to acknowledge Purdue University Faculty Scholar

  17. Stability with large step sizes for multistep discretizations of stiff ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majda, George

    1986-01-01

    One-leg and multistep discretizations of variable-coefficient linear systems of ODEs having both slow and fast time scales are investigated analytically. The stability properties of these discretizations are obtained independent of ODE stiffness and compared. The results of numerical computations are presented in tables, and it is shown that for large step sizes the stability of one-leg methods is better than that of the corresponding linear multistep methods.

  18. Childhood Onset of Stiff-Man Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Clardy, Stacey L.; Lennon, Vanda A.; Dalmau, Josep; Pittock, Sean J.; Jones, H. Royden; Renaud, Deborah L.; Harper, Charles M.; Matsumoto, Joseph Y.; McKeon, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Reports of pediatric-onset stiff-man syndrome (SMS) are rare. This may be an underrecognized disorder in child neurology practice. OBJECTIVE To describe patients with disorders in the SMS spectrum beginning in childhood. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This study was a medical record review and serological evaluation conducted at child and adult neurology clinics at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Systematic review of the literature was conducted of patients who presented from 1984-2012 with onset of symptomatic SMS occurring at age 18 years or younger. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Response to symptomatic and immunotherapies, patient and physician reported, including modified Rankin scale. RESULTS We identified 8 patients with childhood-onset SMS, representing 5% of patients with SMS evaluated at Mayo Clinic during a period of 29 years (4 were girls). The median age at symptom onset was 11 years (range, 1-14 years). The diagnosis in 3 patients was not established until adulthood (median symptom duration at diagnosis, 14 years; range, 0-46 years). The phenotypes encountered were: classic SMS (n = 5, involving the low back and lower extremities), variant SMS (n = 2, limited to 1 limb [with dystonic posture] or back), and progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (n = 1). Initial misdiagnoses included functional movement disorder (n = 2), generalized dystonia and parkinsonism (n = 1), and hereditary spastic paraparesis (n = 1). Six patients had 1 or more coexisting autoimmune disorders: type 1 diabetes mellitus (n = 4), thyroid disease (n = 2), and vitiligo (n = 2). Serologic study results revealed glutamic acid decarboxylase 65–IgG in all cases (median value, 754 nmol/L; range, 0.06-3847 nmol/L; normal value, ≤0.02 nmol/L) and glycine receptor antibody in 3 cases. Improvements were noted with symptomatic therapy (diazepam, 6 of 6 patients treated, and oral baclofen, 3 of 3 treated) and immunotherapy (intravenous immune globulin, 3 of 4 treated and plasmapheresis, 3 of 4 treated). The 3 patients with glycine receptor antibody all improved with immunotherapy. At last follow-up, 4 patients had mild or no symptoms, but 4 had moderate or severe residual symptoms and required maintenance symptomatic therapy (n = 5) and immunotherapy (n = 4). Ten of 12 pediatric SMS cases identified by literature review had a severe whole-body phenotype resembling progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Childhood-onset SMS is a rare but underrecognized and treatable disorder. Serological and electrophysiological testing aid diagnosis. PMID:24100349

  19. Steel Rack Connections: Identification of Most Influential Factors and a Comparison of Stiffness Design Methods

    PubMed Central

    Shah, S. N. R.; Sulong, N. H. Ramli; Shariati, Mahdi; Jumaat, M. Z.

    2015-01-01

    Steel pallet rack (SPR) beam-to-column connections (BCCs) are largely responsible to avoid the sway failure of frames in the down-aisle direction. The overall geometry of beam end connectors commercially used in SPR BCCs is different and does not allow a generalized analytic approach for all types of beam end connectors; however, identifying the effects of the configuration, profile and sizes of the connection components could be the suitable approach for the practical design engineers in order to predict the generalized behavior of any SPR BCC. This paper describes the experimental behavior of SPR BCCs tested using a double cantilever test set-up. Eight sets of specimens were identified based on the variation in column thickness, beam depth and number of tabs in the beam end connector in order to investigate the most influential factors affecting the connection performance. Four tests were repeatedly performed for each set to bring uniformity to the results taking the total number of tests to thirty-two. The moment-rotation (M-θ) behavior, load-strain relationship, major failure modes and the influence of selected parameters on connection performance were investigated. A comparative study to calculate the connection stiffness was carried out using the initial stiffness method, the slope to half-ultimate moment method and the equal area method. In order to find out the more appropriate method, the mean stiffness of all the tested connections and the variance in values of mean stiffness according to all three methods were calculated. The calculation of connection stiffness by means of the initial stiffness method is considered to overestimate the values when compared to the other two methods. The equal area method provided more consistent values of stiffness and lowest variance in the data set as compared to the other two methods. PMID:26452047

  20. The impact of the type of derotation mechanism on the stiffness of the Ilizarov fixator.

    PubMed

    Morasiewicz, Piotr; Filipiak, Jarosław; Konietzko, Marcin; Dragan, Szymon

    2012-01-01

    One of the applications of the Ilizarov apparatus is the correction of rotational deformities. There are several types of designs commonly used for derotation. Different types of derotators have different mechanical properties, which affect the stability of the entire Ilizarov apparatus. The aim of this study was to determine the stiffness of the Ilizarov fixator depending on the type of derotation mechanism. We analyse three types of derotators: the type Z, the type H, and the cubicoid derotator. The tests were conducted on physical models in which the fixator analysed was fitted to polyethylene pipe segments. The reference fixator was the Ilizarov apparatus in the configuration adapted for thigh lengthening. The pipe segments intersected at a point corresponding to the osteotomy site of the distal thigh. The fixator was assembled with one proximal arch fixed with two Schanz screws, a proximal ring fixed with two Kirschner wires (K-wires), a middle free ring, and a distal ring fixed with three K-wires. There were three different types of derotation mechanisms installed between the proximal and middle rings. We determined the axial stiffness kA and the transverse stiffnesses of the compared fixators in two planes: frontal kM-L and sagittal kA-P. The results of the research lead to two basic conclusions. Firstly, the use of any of the derotators analysed has no negative impact on the stiffness of the Ilizarov apparatus. Secondly, similar stiffness values of the fixators with different derotation mechanisms suggest their equal applicability and the choice between them can be made based on practical considerations. In the case of axial stiffness, the differences do not exceed 7.5%. The highest value of stiffness kA was obtained for the type H derotator, while the lowest value was obtained for the type Z derotator. There is a greater difference in the case of transverse stiffness in the sagittal plane, which only concerns the fixator with the type Z derotators. The stiffness coefficient kA-P for that fixator is lower by approximately 19% compared to the reference fixator. PMID:22742714

  1. Global stiffness of hex-can assembly in a uniform force field. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, F.D.; Bennett, J.

    1980-07-01

    Two approximate constitutive equations are derived that can be used to represent the global stiffness of a hexagonal cross-section duct in a uniform force field. The first equation uses a single coefficient that can be determined from Poisson's ratio for the material and the duct geometry. This equation is useful for isothermal applications. The second equation can be used to account for temperature-varying material properties and requires that two coefficients be determined from Poisson's ratio and the duct geometry. These equations are useful both in reactor safety analysis and design.

  2. The interleukin-6 –174 G/C promoter polymorphism and arterial stiffness; the Rotterdam Study

    PubMed Central

    Sie, Mark PS; Mattace-Raso, Francesco US; Uitterlinden, André G; Arp, Pascal P; Hofman, Albert; Pols, Huibert AP; Hoeks, Arnold PG; Reneman, Robert S; Asmar, Roland; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Witteman, Jacqueline CM

    2008-01-01

    Arterial stiffness normally increases with age and has been established as a precursor of cardiovascular disease. Interleukin-6 is a pleiotropic inflammatory cytokine with an important role in the inflammatory cascade, such as up-regulation of C-reactive protein (CRP). The interleukin-6 –174-G/C promoter polymorphism appears to influence levels of inflammatory markers, which have been shown to be associated with arterial stiffness. We studied the association of this polymorphism with levels of interleukin-6 and CRP and with arterial stiffness. The study (n = 3849) was embedded in the Rotterdam Study, a prospective, population-based study. Analyses on the association between the –174-G/C polymorphism and pulse wave velocity, distensibility coefficient, and pulse pressure were performed using analyses of variance. Analyses on the levels of inflammatory markers and arterial stiffness were performed using linear regression analyses. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, known cardiovascular risk factors, and atherosclerosis. We found pulse wave velocity to be 0.35 m/s higher for CC-homozygotes vs. wildtype GG-homozygotes (p = 0.018) with evidence for an allele-dose effect (p trend = 0.013), and a similar pattern for pulse pressure (p trend = 0.041). No apparent consistent association with the distensibility coefficient was found. CRP levels were associated with pulse wave velocity (p = 0.007). In conclusion, the interleukin-6 –174 G/C polymorphism is associated with increased arterial stiffness and pulse pressure. PMID:19066003

  3. Airfoil design: Finding the balance between design lift and structural stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Christian; Gaudern, Nicholas; Zahle, Frederik; Vronsky, Tomas

    2014-06-01

    When upscaling wind turbine blades there is an increasing need for high levels of structural efficiency. In this paper the relationships between the aerodynamic characteristics; design lift and lift-drag ratio; and the structural characteristics were investigated. Using a unified optimization setup, airfoils were designed with relative thicknesses between 18% and 36%, a structural box height of 85% of the relative thickness, and varying box widths in chordwise direction between 20% and 40% of the chord length. The results from these airfoil designs showed that for a given flapwise stiffness, the design lift coefficient increases if the box length reduces and at the same time the relative thickness increases. Even though the conclusions are specific to the airfoil design approach used, the study indicated that an increased design lift required slightly higher relative thickness compared to airfoils with lower design lift to maintain the flapwise stiffness. Also, the study indicated that the lift-drag ratio as a function of flapwise stiffness was relatively independent of the airfoil design with a tendency that the lift-drag ratio decreased for large box lengths. The above conclusions were supported by an analysis of the three airfoil families Riso-C2, DU and FFA, where the lift-drag ratio as a function of flapwise stiffness was decreasing, but relatively independent of the airfoil design, and the design lift coefficient was varying depending on the design philosophy. To make the analysis complete also design lift and lift- drag ratio as a function of edgewise and torsional stiffness were shown.

  4. Lamb Wave Stiffness Characterization of Composites Undergoing Thermal-Mechanical Aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seale, Michael D.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of new, advanced composite materials into aviation systems requires a thorough understanding of the long term effects of combined thermal and mechanical loading upon those materials. Analytical methods investigating the effects of intense thermal heating combined with mechanical loading have been investigated. The damage mechanisms and fatigue lives were dependent on test parameters as well as stress levels. Castelli, et al. identified matrix dominated failure modes for out-of-phase cycling and fiber dominated damage modes for in-phase cycling. In recent years, ultrasonic methods have been developed that can measure the mechanical stiffness of composites. To help evaluate the effect of aging, a suitably designed Lamb wave measurement system is being used to obtain bending and out-of-plane stiffness coefficients of composite laminates undergoing thermal-mechanical loading. The system works by exciting an antisymmetric Lamb wave and calculating the velocity at each frequency from the known transducer separation and the measured time-of-flight. The same peak in the waveforms received at various distances is used to measure the time difference between the signals. The velocity measurements are accurate and repeatable to within 1% resulting in reconstructed stiffness values repeatable to within 4%. Given the material density and plate thickness, the bending and out-of-plane shear stiffnesses are calculated from a reconstruction of the dispersion curve. A mechanical scanner is used to move the sensors over the surface to map the time-of-flight, velocity, or stiffnesses of the entire specimen. Access to only one side of the material is required and no immersion or couplants are required because the sensors are dry coupled to the surface of the plate. In this study, the elastic stiffnesses D(sub 11), D(sub 22), A(sub 44), and A(sub 55) as well as time-of-flight measurements for composite samples that have undergone combined thermal and mechanical aging for a duration of 10,000 hours are reported.

  5. Stiffness modeling of compliant parallel mechanisms and applications in the performance analysis of a decoupled parallel compliant stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yao; Li, Tie-Min; Wang, Li-Ping

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigates the stiffness modeling of compliant parallel mechanism (CPM) based on the matrix method. First, the general compliance matrix of a serial flexure chain is derived. The stiffness modeling of CPMs is next discussed in detail, considering the relative positions of the applied load and the selected displacement output point. The derived stiffness models have simple and explicit forms, and the input, output, and coupling stiffness matrices of the CPM can easily be obtained. The proposed analytical model is applied to the stiffness modeling and performance analysis of an XY parallel compliant stage with input and output decoupling characteristics. Then, the key geometrical parameters of the stage are optimized to obtain the minimum input decoupling degree. Finally, a prototype of the compliant stage is developed and its input axial stiffness, coupling characteristics, positioning resolution, and circular contouring performance are tested. The results demonstrate the excellent performance of the compliant stage and verify the effectiveness of the proposed theoretical model. The general stiffness models provided in this paper will be helpful for performance analysis, especially in determining coupling characteristics, and the structure optimization of the CPM.

  6. Light weight high-stiffness stage platen

    DOEpatents

    Spence, Paul A.

    2001-01-01

    An improved light weight, stiff stage platen for photolithography is provided. The high stiffness of the stage platen is exemplified by a relatively high first resonant vibrational mode as determined, for instance, by finite element modal analysis. The stage platen can be employed to support a chuck that is designed to secure a mask or wafer. The stage platen includes a frame that has interior walls that define an interior region and that has exterior walls wherein the outer surfaces of at least two adjacent walls are reflective mirror surfaces; and a matrix of ribs within the interior region that is connected to the interior walls wherein the stage platen exhibits a first vibrational mode at a frequency of greater than about 1000 Hz.

  7. The stiffness tailoring of megawatt wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. M.; Li, C.; Ye, Z.; Wu, P.; Lu, Y. F.

    2013-12-01

    Wind power has developed rapidly in recently years, the wind turbine's blades determine the performance of the device and the power. In this paper, we used integrated tailoring aimed at institutional characteristics of horizontal axis wind turbine with the composite laminated plate theory, then analyzed the composite blades of wind turbine by combining experimental analysis and finite elements method, and finally studied the influences that composite material properties on stiffness tailoring with changes in the number of different layers.

  8. Stiff modes in spinvalve simulations with OOMMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitropoulos, Spyridon; Tsiantos, Vassilis; Ovaliadis, Kyriakos; Kechrakos, Dimitris; Donahue, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Micromagnetic simulations are an important tool for the investigation of magnetic materials. Micromagnetic software uses various techniques to solve differential equations, partial or ordinary, involved in the dynamic simulations. Euler, Runge-Kutta, Adams, and BDF (Backward Differentiation Formulae) are some of the methods used for this purpose. In this paper, spinvalve simulations are investigated. Evidence is presented showing that these systems have stiff modes, and that implicit methods such as BDF are more effective than explicit methods in such cases.

  9. Aortic stiffness in normal and hypertensive pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Avni, B; Frenkel, G; Shahar, L; Golik, A; Sherman, D; Dishy, V

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether aortic stiffness, as assessed by pulse wave analysis, could reliably discriminate between normal and hypertensive pregnancies. One hundred pregnant women were studied: five with severe pre-eclampsia, 27 with gestational hypertension, 14 with chronic hypertension and 54 with normal pregnancy. Central hemodynamic parameters were obtained by an applanation tonometry and included central aortic systolic blood pressure (CSBP), central aortic diastolic blood pressure (CDBP), augmentation pressure (AP), augmentation index (AIx), AIx corrected to a heart rate of 75 (AIx@75) and time to reflection (Tr). All measures of aortic stiffness, including AP, AIx and AIx@75 were significantly higher in women with gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia compared with normal pregnancies and women with chronic hypertension (p < 0.05 for all comparisons). There were no significant differences between normal pregnancies and women with chronic hypertension (p > 0.05 for all comparisons). Tr was significantly shorter in women with pre-eclampsia and gestational hypertension compared with normal pregnancies (p < 0.05). Aortic stiffness, as assessed by pulse wave analysis, is significantly increased in women with pre-eclampsia and gestational hypertension but not in treated women with chronic hypertension. Pulse wave analysis has a potential as a screening tool in women at high risk for pre-eclampsia. The final role of this method should be determined in prospective studies. PMID:20001391

  10. Lipedema is associated with increased aortic stiffness.

    PubMed

    Szolnoky, G; Nemes, A; Gavallér, H; Forster, T; Kemény, L

    2012-06-01

    Lipedema is a disproportional obesity due to unknown pathomechanism. Its major hallmark is frequent hematoma formation related to increased capillary fragility and reduced venoarterial reflex. Beyond microangiopathy, both venous and lymphatic dysfunction have also been documented. However, arterial circulation in lipedema has not been examined, and therefore we explored aortic elastic properties by echocardiography. Fourteen women with and 14 without lipedema were included in the study. Each subject consented to blood pressure measurement, physical examination, and transthoracic echocardiography. Aortic stiffness index (beta), distensibility, and strain were evaluated from aortic diameter and blood pressure data. Mean systolic (30.0 +/- 3.2 vs. 25.5 +/- 3.6, P < 0.05) and diastolic (27.8 +/- 3.3 vs. 22.3 +/- 3.1) aortic diameters (in mm) and aortic stiffness index (9.05 +/- 7.45 vs. 3.76 +/- 1.22, P < 0.05) were significantly higher, while aortic strain (0.082 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.143 +/- 0.038, P < 0.05) and distensibility (2.24 +/- 1.07 vs. 4.38 +/- 1.61, P < 0.05) were significantly lower in lipedematous patients compared to controls. Thus, lipedema is characterized with increased aortic stiffness. PMID:23057152

  11. Strong and stiff aramid nanofiber/carbon nanotube nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiaqi; Cao, Wenxin; Yue, Mingli; Hou, Ying; Han, Jiecai; Yang, Ming

    2015-03-24

    Small but strong carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are fillers of choice for composite reinforcement owing to their extraordinary modulus and strength. However, the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites are still much below those for mechanical parameters of individual nanotubes. The gap between the expectation and experimental results arises not only from imperfect dispersion and poor load transfer but also from the unavailability of strong polymers that can be effectively utilized within the composites of nanotubes. Aramid nanofibers (ANFs) with analogous morphological features to nanotubes represent a potential choice to complement nanotubes given their intrinsic high mechanical performance and the dispersible nature, which enables solvent-based processing methods. In this work, we showed that composite films made from ANFs and multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) by vacuum-assisted flocculation and vacuum-assisted layer-by-layer assembly exhibited high ultimate strength of up to 383 MPa and Young's modulus (stiffness) of up to 35 GPa, which represent the highest values among all the reported random CNT nanocomposites. Detailed studies using different imaging and spectroscopic characterizations suggested that the multiple interfacial interactions between nanotubes and ANFs including hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking are likely the key parameters responsible for the observed mechanical improvement. Importantly, our studies further revealed the attractive thermomechanical characteristics of these nanocomposites with high thermal stability (up to 520 °C) and ultralow coefficients of thermal expansion (2-6 ppm·K(-1)). Our results indicated that ANFs are promising nanoscale building blocks for functional ultrastrong and stiff materials potentially extendable to nanocomposites based on other nanoscale fillers. PMID:25712334

  12. Hepatic and Splenic Stiffness Augmentation Assessed with MR Elastography in an in vivo Porcine Portal Hypertension Model

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Meng; Kolipaka, Arunark; Woodrum, David A.; Glaser, Kevin J.; Romano, Anthony J; Manduca, Armando; Talwalkar, Jayant A.; Araoz, Philip A.; McGee, Kiaran P.; Anavekar, Nandan S.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the influence of portal pressure on the shear stiffness of the liver and spleen in a well-controlled in vivo porcine model with MR Elastography (MRE). A significant correlation between portal pressure and tissue stiffness could be used to noninvasively assess increased portal venous pressure (portal hypertension), which is a frequent clinical condition caused by cirrhosis of the liver and is responsible for the development of many lethal complications. Materials and Methods During multiple intra-arterial infusions of Dextran-40 in three adult domestic pigs in vivo, 3-D abdominal MRE was performed with left ventricle and portal catheters measuring blood pressure simultaneously. Least-squares linear regressions were used to analyze the relationship between tissue stiffness and portal pressure. Results Liver and spleen stiffness have a dynamic component that increases significantly following an increase in portal or left ventricular pressure. Correlation coefficients with the linear regressions between stiffness and pressure exceeded 0.8 in most cases. Conclusion The observed stiffness-pressure relationship of the liver and spleen could provide a promising noninvasive method for assessing portal pressure. Using MRE to study the tissue mechanics associated with portal pressure may provide new insights into the natural history and pathophysiology of hepatic diseases and may have significant diagnostic value in the future. PMID:23418135

  13. Estimation of Quasi-Stiffness of the Human Hip in the Stance Phase of Walking

    PubMed Central

    Shamaei, Kamran; Sawicki, Gregory S.; Dollar, Aaron M.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a framework for selection of subject-specific quasi-stiffness of hip orthoses and exoskeletons, and other devices that are intended to emulate the biological performance of this joint during walking. The hip joint exhibits linear moment-angular excursion behavior in both the extension and flexion stages of the resilient loading-unloading phase that consists of terminal stance and initial swing phases. Here, we establish statistical models that can closely estimate the slope of linear fits to the moment-angle graph of the hip in this phase, termed as the quasi-stiffness of the hip. Employing an inverse dynamics analysis, we identify a series of parameters that can capture the nearly linear hip quasi-stiffnesses in the resilient loading phase. We then employ regression analysis on experimental moment-angle data of 216 gait trials across 26 human adults walking over a wide range of gait speeds (0.75–2.63 m/s) to obtain a set of general-form statistical models that estimate the hip quasi-stiffnesses using body weight and height, gait speed, and hip excursion. We show that the general-form models can closely estimate the hip quasi-stiffness in the extension (R2 = 92%) and flexion portions (R2 = 89%) of the resilient loading phase of the gait. We further simplify the general-form models and present a set of stature-based models that can estimate the hip quasi-stiffness for the preferred gait speed using only body weight and height with an average error of 27% for the extension stage and 37% for the flexion stage. PMID:24349136

  14. Turtle utricle dynamic behavior using a combined anatomically accurate model and experimentally measured hair bundle stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J.L.; Grant, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Anatomically correct turtle utricle geometry was incorporated into two finite element models. The geometrically accurate model included appropriately shaped macular surface and otoconial layer, compact gel and column filament (or shear) layer thicknesses and thickness distributions. The first model included a shear layer where the effects of hair bundle stiffness was included as part of the shear layer modulus. This solid model’s undamped natural frequency was matched to an experimentally measured value. This frequency match established a realistic value of the effective shear layer Young’s modulus of 16 Pascals. We feel this is the most accurate prediction of this shear layer modulus and fits with other estimates (Kondrachuk, 2001b). The second model incorporated only beam elements in the shear layer to represent hair cell bundle stiffness. The beam element stiffness’s were further distributed to represent their location on the neuroepithelial surface. Experimentally measured striola hair cell bundles mean stiffness values were used in the striolar region and the mean extrastriola hair cell bundles stiffness values were used in this region. The results from this second model indicated that hair cell bundle stiffness contributes approximately 40% to the overall stiffness of the shear layer– hair cell bundle complex. This analysis shows that high mass saccules, in general, achieve high gain at the sacrifice of frequency bandwidth. We propose the mechanism by which this can be achieved is through increase the otoconial layer mass. The theoretical difference in gain (deflection per acceleration) is shown for saccules with large otoconial layer mass relative to saccules and utricles with small otoconial layer mass. Also discussed is the necessity of these high mass saccules to increase their overall system shear layer stiffness. Undamped natural frequencies and mode shapes for these sensors are shown. PMID:25445820

  15. Damage Detection on Sudden Stiffness Reduction Based on Discrete Wavelet Transform

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Chen, Zhi-wei; Wang, Gan-jun; Xie, Wei-ping

    2014-01-01

    The sudden stiffness reduction in a structure may cause the signal discontinuity in the acceleration responses close to the damage location at the damage time instant. To this end, the damage detection on sudden stiffness reduction of building structures has been actively investigated in this study. The signal discontinuity of the structural acceleration responses of an example building is extracted based on the discrete wavelet transform. It is proved that the variation of the first level detail coefficients of the wavelet transform at damage instant is linearly proportional to the magnitude of the stiffness reduction. A new damage index is proposed and implemented to detect the damage time instant, location, and severity of a structure due to a sudden change of structural stiffness. Numerical simulation using a five-story shear building under different types of excitation is carried out to assess the effectiveness and reliability of the proposed damage index for the building at different damage levels. The sensitivity of the damage index to the intensity and frequency range of measurement noise is also investigated. The made observations demonstrate that the proposed damage index can accurately identify the sudden damage events if the noise intensity is limited. PMID:24991647

  16. Age, arterial stiffness, and components of blood pressure in Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Meili; Xu, Xiping; Wang, Xiaobin; Huo, Yong; Xu, Xin; Qin, Xianhui; Tang, Genfu; Xing, Houxun; Fan, Fangfang; Cui, Wei; Yang, Xinchun

    2014-12-01

    Blood pressure (BP) changes with age. We conducted a cross-sectional study in rural Chinese adults to investigate: (1) what is the relationship between age, arterial stiffness, and BP in Chinese men and women; and (2) to what degree can the age-BP relationship be explained by arterial stiffness, controlling for other covariables. These analyses included a total of 1688 subjects (males/females: 623/1065), aged 40 to 88 years. Among them, 353 (20.9%) had hypertension (defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥ 140 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥ 90 mm Hg). Arterial stiffness was measured by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). baPWV appeared to be more strongly correlated with BP (including SBP, DBP, mean arterial pressure [MAP], pulse pressure [PP]) than age (P < 0.001 for comparisons between Spearman correlation coefficients). Furthermore, baPWV was associated with BP (including SBP, DBP, MAP, and PP) and risk of hypertension in a dose-response fashion, independent of age; in contrast, the age-BP associations were either attenuated or became negative after adjusting for baPWV. Arterial stiffness appears to be an independent contributor to hypertension, even after adjusting for age and other covariables. In contrast, age-BP associations became attenuated or negative after adjusting for baPWV. The utility of baPWV as a diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic indicator for hypertension warrants further investigation. PMID:25546666

  17. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Stiffness as a Mechanism for Increased Aortic Stiffness with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Hongyu; Zhu, Yi; Sun, Zhe; Trzeciakowski, Jerome P.; Gansner, Meredith; Depre, Christophe; Resuello, Ranillo R.G.; Natividad, Filipinas F.; Hunter, William C.; Genin, Guy M.; Elson, Elliot L.; Vatner, Dorothy E.; Meininger, Gerald A.; Vatner, Stephen F.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Increased aortic stiffness, an important feature of many vascular diseases, e.g., aging, hypertension, atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysms, is assumed due to changes in extracellular matrix (ECM). Objective We tested the hypothesis that the mechanisms also involve intrinsic stiffening of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Methods and Results Stiffness was measured in vitro both by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in a reconstituted tissue model, using VSMCs from aorta of young versus old male monkeys (Macaca fascicularis, n=7/group), where aortic stiffness increases by 200 % in vivo. The apparent elastic modulus was increased (P<0.05) in old VSMCs (41.7±0.5 kPa) versus young (12.8±0.3 kPa), but not after disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton with cytochalasin D. Stiffness of the VSMCs in the reconstituted tissue model was also higher (P<0.05) in old (23.3±3.0 kPa) than in young (13.7±2.4 kPa). Conclusions These data support the novel concept, not appreciated previously, that increased vascular stiffness with aging is due not only to changes in ECM, but also to intrinsic changes in VSMCs. PMID:20634486

  18. Constrained hierarchical least square nonlinear equation solvers. [for indefinite stiffness and large structural deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, J.; Lackney, J.

    1986-01-01

    The current paper develops a constrained hierarchical least square nonlinear equation solver. The procedure can handle the response behavior of systems which possess indefinite tangent stiffness characteristics. Due to the generality of the scheme, this can be achieved at various hierarchical application levels. For instance, in the case of finite element simulations, various combinations of either degree of freedom, nodal, elemental, substructural, and global level iterations are possible. Overall, this enables a solution methodology which is highly stable and storage efficient. To demonstrate the capability of the constrained hierarchical least square methodology, benchmarking examples are presented which treat structure exhibiting highly nonlinear pre- and postbuckling behavior wherein several indefinite stiffness transitions occur.

  19. Numerical solution of stiff systems of ordinary differential equations with applications to electronic circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    Systems of ordinary differential equations in which the magnitudes of the eigenvalues (or time constants) vary greatly are commonly called stiff. Such systems of equations arise in nuclear reactor kinetics, the flow of chemically reacting gas, dynamics, control theory, circuit analysis and other fields. The research reported develops an A-stable numerical integration technique for solving stiff systems of ordinary differential equations. The method, which is called the generalized trapezoidal rule, is a modification of the trapezoidal rule. However, the method is computationally more efficient than the trapezoidal rule when the solution of the almost-discontinuous segments is being calculated.

  20. Apparatus for measurement of coefficient of friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slifka, A. J.; Siegwarth, J. D.; Sparks, L. L.; Chaudhuri, Dilip K.

    An apparatus designed to measure the coefficient of friction in certain controlled atmospheres is described. The coefficient of friction observed during high-load tests was nearly constant, with an average value of 0.56. This value is in general agreement with that found in the literature and also with the initial friction coefficient value of 0.67 measured during self-mated friction of 440C steel in an oxygen environment.

  1. Vertical stiffness and muscle strain in professional Australian football.

    PubMed

    Serpell, Benjamin G; Scarvell, Jennie M; Ball, Nick B; Smith, Paul N

    2014-12-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to establish if vertical stiffness was greater in professional Australian rules footballers who sustained a lower limb skeletal muscle strain compared to those who did not, and to establish if a relationship between age, or training history, and vertical stiffness existed. Thirty-one participants underwent weekly rebound jump testing on a force platform over two seasons. Vertical stiffness was calculated for injured players and the uninjured cohort 1 and 3 weeks prior to sustaining an injury and at the end of preseason. Eighteen athletes were in the "uninjured" cohort and 13 in the "injured" cohort. No significant difference in vertical stiffness was observed between groups (P = 0.18 for absolute stiffness; P = 0.08 for stiffness relative to body mass), within groups (P = 0.83 and P = 0.88, respectively) or for a time*cohort interaction (P = 0.77 and P = 0.80, respectively). No relationship between age and vertical stiffness existed (r = -0.06 for absolute and relative stiffness), or training history and vertical stiffness (r = -0.01 and 0.00 for absolute and relative stiffness, respectively) existed. These results and others lend to suggest that vertical stiffness is not related to lower limb muscle strain injury. PMID:25058314

  2. Regional brain stiffness changes across the Alzheimer's disease spectrum☆

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Matthew C.; Jones, David T.; Jack, Clifford R.; Glaser, Kevin J.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Manduca, Armando; Felmlee, Joel P.; Carter, Rickey E.; Ehman, Richard L.; Huston, John

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an MRI-based technique to noninvasively measure tissue stiffness. Currently well established for clinical use in the liver, MRE is increasingly being investigated to measure brain stiffness as a novel biomarker of a variety of neurological diseases. The purpose of this work was to apply a recently developed MRE pipeline to measure regional brain stiffness changes in human subjects across the Alzheimer's disease (AD) spectrum, and to gain insights into the biological processes underlying those stiffness changes by correlating stiffness with existing biomarkers of AD. The results indicate that stiffness changes occur mostly in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes, in accordance with the known topography of AD pathology. Furthermore, stiffness in those areas correlates with existing imaging biomarkers of AD including hippocampal volumes and amyloid PET. Additional analysis revealed preliminary but significant evidence that the relationship between brain stiffness and AD severity is nonlinear and non-monotonic. Given that similar relationships have been observed in functional MRI experiments, we used task-free fMRI data to test the hypothesis that brain stiffness was sensitive to structural changes associated with altered functional connectivity. The analysis revealed that brain stiffness is significantly and positively correlated with default mode network connectivity. Therefore, brain stiffness as measured by MRE has potential to provide new and essential insights into the temporal dynamics of AD, as well as the relationship between functional and structural plasticity as it relates to AD pathophysiology. PMID:26900568

  3. Contact stiffness and damping of liquid films in dynamic atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rong-Guang; Leng, Yongsheng

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical properties and dissipation behaviors of nanometers confined liquid films have been long-standing interests in surface force measurements. The correlation between the contact stiffness and damping of the nanoconfined film is still not well understood. We establish a novel computational framework through molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for the first time to study small-amplitude dynamic atomic force microscopy (dynamic AFM) in a simple nonpolar liquid. Through introducing a tip driven dynamics to mimic the mechanical oscillations of the dynamic AFM tip-cantilever assembly, we find that the contact stiffness and damping of the confined film exhibit distinct oscillations within 6-7 monolayer distances, and they are generally out-of-phase. For the solid-like film with integer monolayer thickness, further compression of the film before layering transition leads to higher stiffness and lower damping, while much lower stiffness and higher damping occur at non-integer monolayer distances. These two alternating mechanisms dominate the mechanical properties and dissipation behaviors of simple liquid films under cyclic elastic compression and inelastic squeeze-out. Our MD simulations provide a direct picture of correlations between the structural property, mechanical stiffness, and dissipation behavior of the nanoconfined film.

  4. Textural and sensory properties of trifoliate yam (Dioscorea dumetorum) flour and stiff dough 'amala'.

    PubMed

    Abiodun, O A; Akinoso, R

    2015-05-01

    The use of trifoliate yam (Dioscorea dumetorum) flour for stiff dough 'amala' production is one of the ways to curb under-utilization of the tuber. The study evaluates the textural and sensory properties of trifoliate yam flour and stiff dough. Freshly harvested trifoliate yam tubers were peeled, washed, sliced and blanched (60 (°)C for 10 min). The sliced yam were soaked in water for 12 h, dried and milled into flour. Pasting viscosities, functional properties, brown index and sensory attributes of the flour and stiff dough were analyzed. Peak, holding strength and final viscosities ranged from 84.09 to 213.33 RVU, 81.25 to 157.00 RVU and 127.58 to 236.17 RVU respectively. White raw flour had higher viscosity than the yellow flours. The swelling index, water absorption capacity and bulk density ranged from 1.46 to 2.28, 2.11 to 2.92 ml H2O/g and 0.71 to 0.88 g/cm(3) respectively. Blanching method employed improved the swelling index and water absorption capacity of flour. The brown index values of flour and stiff dough ranged from 6.73 to 18.36 and 14.63-46.72 respectively. Sensory evaluation revealed significant differences in the colour, odour and general acceptability of the product when compared with the stiff dough from white yam. PMID:25892788

  5. Strength and stiffness of uniaxially tensioned reinforced concrete panels subjected to membrane shear

    SciTech Connect

    Hilmy, S.I.; White, R.N.; Gergely, P.

    1982-06-01

    This report addresses four major topics in the general area of cracking and shear effects in concrete containment structures: (a) extensional stiffness of orthogonally reinforced flat concrete specimens subjected to tension in one direction only, (b) shear strength and shear stiffness of these same specimens when subjected to combined uniaxial tension and shear, (c) development of a preliminary analytical model for the prediction of the initial shear modulus and its degradation with increasing uniaxial tension levels, and (d) a comparative correlation of experimental results with results from earlier studies on similar specimens and on other types of shear specimens tested in many different laboratories. Eleven specimens with two-way orthogonal reinforcement were tested. Test parameters included the applied tension level (0, 0.3f/sub y/, 0.6f/sub y/, and 0.9f/sub y/), type of shear loading (monotonic and reversed cyclic), and level of applied shear stress. Prior to application of shear loading, measurements of extensional stiffness were conducted at reinforcing tension levels up to 0.6f/sub y/, and empirical expressions for crack width and extensional stiffness were derived. Stiffness degradation produced by subsequent shear loadings was also assessed.

  6. Effects of implant stiffness, shape, and medialization depth on the acoustic outcomes of medialization laryngoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaoyan; Chhetri, Dinesh K.; Bergeron, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Medialization laryngoplasty is commonly used to treat glottic insufficiency. In this study, we investigated the effects of implant stiffness (Young’s modulus), medialization depth, and implant medial surface shape on acoustic outcomes. Study Design Basic science study using ex vivo laryngeal phonation model. Methods In an ex vivo human larynx phonation model, bilateral medialization laryngoplasties were performed with implants of varying stiffness, medial surface shape (rectangular, divergent and convergent), and varying depths of medialization. The subglottal pressure, the flow rate, and the outside sound were measured as the implant parameters were varied. Results Medialization through the use of implants generally improved the harmonic-to-noise ratio (HNR) and the number of harmonics excited in the outside sound spectra. The degree of acoustic improvement depended on the implant insertion depth, stiffness, and to a lesser degree implant shape. Varying implant insertion depth led to large variations in phonation for stiff implants, but had much smaller effects for soft implants. Conclusions Implants with stiffness comparable to vocal folds provided more consistent improvement in acoustic outcomes across different implant conditions. Further investigations are required to better understand the underlying mechanisms. PMID:25499519

  7. Relieving the effect of static load errors in nonlinear vibration isolation mounts through stiffness asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, A. D.; Neild, S. A.; Friswell, M. I.

    2015-03-01

    High Static Low Dynamic Stiffness (HSLDS) mounts consist of nonlinear springs that support a high static load with low static displacement, whilst maintaining locally low stiffness near equilibrium, to give a low natural frequency and consequently good isolation properties. Recent analysis has investigated such devices when the force-displacement relationship is an odd function about the equilibrium position, and analysed the consequences of different shapes of these functions. However many devices that have the HSLDS characteristic do not meet the assumptions of this analysis, in that the force-displacement relationship is generally asymmetric about equilibrium. Furthermore, even devices that do meet this assumption may be subject to significant adjustment error, particularly in the context of air vehicles where manoeuvres such as banked turns can cause an apparent variation in gravitational acceleration, and a consequent variation in the weight of the payload. This change in static load moves the payload away from its intended region of low stiffness. The current paper provides analysis of these situations, and shows that the performance of a mount with a symmetric stiffness-displacement relationship is highly sensitive to errors in the static loading. It is then shown that a mount with an asymmetric stiffness-displacement function can offer significant performance advantages when there are adjustment errors in the loading of the mount.

  8. Nanocharacterization of the negative stiffness of ferroelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour Skandani, A.; Ctvrtlik, R.; Al-Haik, M.

    2014-08-01

    Phase changing materials such as ferroelectric materials could exhibit negative stiffness under certain thermomechanical environments. This negative stiffness is embodied by a deflection along the opposite direction of the applied load. So far negative stiffness materials were investigated with the specific morphology of embedded inclusions in stiff matrices then the resulting composite is studied to measure the behavior of each constituent indirectly. In this study, a modified nonisothermal nanoindentation method is developed to measure the negative stiffness of triglycine sulfate single crystal directly. This in-situ method is intended to first demonstrate the feasibility of detecting the negative stiffness via nanoindentation and nanocreep of a ferroelectric material at its Curie point and then to quantify the negative stiffness without the need for embedding the crystal within a stiffer matrix.

  9. Cell stiffness is a biomarker of the metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenwei; Mezencev, Roman; Kim, Byungkyu; Wang, Lijuan; McDonald, John; Sulchek, Todd; Sulchek Team; McDonald Team

    2013-03-01

    The metastatic potential of cells is an important parameter in the design of optimal strategies for the personalized treatment of cancer. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we show that ovarian cancer cells are generally softer and display lower intrinsic variability in cell stiffness than non-malignant ovarian epithelial cells. A detailed study of highly invasive ovarian cancer cells (HEY A8) and their less invasive parental cells (HEY), demonstrates that deformability can serve as an accurate biomarker of metastatic potential. Comparative gene expression profiling indicate that the reduced stiffness of highly metastatic HEY A8 cells is associated with actin cytoskeleton remodeling, microscopic examination of actin fiber structure in these cell lines is consistent with this prediction. Our results indicate that cell stiffness not only distinguishes ovarian cancer cells from non-malignant cells, but may also be a useful biomarker to evaluate the relative metastatic potential of ovarian and perhaps other types of cancer cells.

  10. Commentary on Coefficient Alpha: A Cautionary Tale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Samuel B.; Yang, Yanyun

    2009-01-01

    The general use of coefficient alpha to assess reliability should be discouraged on a number of grounds. The assumptions underlying coefficient alpha are unlikely to hold in practice, and violation of these assumptions can result in nontrivial negative or positive bias. Structural equation modeling was discussed as an informative process both to…

  11. Arterial stiffness in mild primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Mishaela R; Maurer, Mathew S; McMahon, Donald J; Bilezikian, John P; Silverberg, Shonni J

    2005-06-01

    When primary hyperparathyroidism was a more symptomatic disease, it was often associated with increased cardiovascular risk. As the clinical manifestations of the disease have changed to a milder, more asymptomatic disorder, investigation is shifting to more subtle cardiovascular abnormalities. We measured arterial stiffness in 39 patients with mild primary hyperparathyroidism [serum calcium, 2.66 +/- 0.2 mmol/liter (10.7 +/- 0.6 mg/dl); PTH, 21.7 +/- 9.5 pmol/liter (89 +/- 39 pg/ml)] and in 134 controls. Arterial stiffness was measured mathematically at the radial artery with a noninvasive device as the "augmentation index" (AIx). The AIx measures the difference between the second and first systolic peaks in the pressure waveform and correlates with increased cardiovascular risk. When physiological variables affecting augmentation index and potentially confounding cardiovascular risk factors (age, gender, heart rate, height, blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, smoking, and hyperlipidemia) were adjusted for, primary hyperparathyroidism was an independent predictor of increased augmentation index (B = 3.37; P < 0.03). A matched-pair analysis showed that 15% of the variance in AIx was uniquely accounted for by the presence of primary hyperparathyroidism. The presence of primary hyperparathyroidism was a stronger predictor of elevated AIx than age, gender, smoking, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, or diabetes mellitus. AIx was also directly correlated with evidence of more active parathyroid disease, including higher PTH levels (r = +0.42; P < 0.05) and lower bone mineral density at the distal one-third radius (r = -0.33; P < 0.05). The diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism was therefore an independent predictor of increased AIx, an early measure of arterial stiffness, and the increase was associated with evidence of more active parathyroid disease. PMID:15769995

  12. Substrate Stiffness Affects Human Keratinocyte Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zarkoob, Hoda; Bodduluri, Sandeep; Ponnaluri, Sailahari V.; Selby, John C.; Sander, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of epidermal organization and function in response to a variety of pathophysiological insults is critically dependent on coordinated keratinocyte migration, proliferation, and stratification during the process of wound healing. These processes are mediated by the reconfiguration of both cell-cell (desmosomes, adherens junctions) and cell-matrix (focal adhesions, hemidesmosomes) junctions and the cytoskeletal filament networks that they serve to interconnect. In this study, we investigated the role of substrate elasticity (stiffness) on keratinocyte colony formation in vitro during the process of nascent epithelial sheet formation as triggered by the calcium switch model of keratinocyte culture. Keratinocytes cultured on pepsin digested type I collagen coated soft (nominal E = 1.2 kPa) polyacrylamide gels embedded with fluorescent microspheres exhibited (i) smaller spread contact areas, (ii) increased migration velocities, and (iii) increased rates of colony formation with more cells per colony than did keratinocytes cultured on stiff (nominal E = 24 kPa) polyacrylamide gels. As assessed by tracking of embedded microsphere displacements, keratinocytes cultured on soft substrates generated large local substrate deformations that appeared to recruit adjacent keratinocytes into joining an evolving colony. Together with the observed differences in keratinocyte kinematics and substrate deformations, we developed two ad hoc analyses, termed distance rank (DR) and radius of cooperativity (RC), that help to objectively ascribe what we perceive as increasingly cooperative behavior of keratinocytes cultured on soft versus stiff gels during the process of colony formation. We hypothesize that the differences in keratinocyte colony formation observed in our experiments could be due to cell-cell mechanical signaling generated via local substrate deformations that appear to be correlated with the increased expression of β4 integrin within keratinocytes positioned along the periphery of an evolving cell colony. PMID:26019727

  13. Laser application on haptics: Tactile stiffness measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, L.; Memeo, M.; Cannella, F.; Valente, M.; Caldwell, D. G.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2012-06-01

    There is a great interest in exploring the proprieties of the sense of the touch, its detailed knowledge in fact is a key issue in the area of robotics, haptics and human-machine interaction. In this paper, the authors focus their attention on a novel measurement method for the assessment of the tactile stiffness based on a original test rig; tactile stiffness is defined as the ratio between force, exerted by the finger, and the displacement of the finger tip operated during the test. To reach this scope, the paper describes a specific experimental test-rig used for the evaluation of subject tactile sensitivity, where finger force applied during tests as well as displacement and velocity of displacement, operated by the subject under investigation, are measured. Results show that tactile stiffness is linear respect to stimuli spatial difference (which is proportional to the difficulty to detect the variation of them). In particular, it has been possible to relate the force and displacement measured during the tests. The relationship between the response of the subject to the grating, velocity and force is determined. These results permit to carry out the further experimental tests on the same subject avoiding the use of a load cell and therefore simplifying the measurement test rig and data post-processing. Indeed, the first aspect (use of a load cell) can be relevant, because the grating positions are different, requiring a specific re-calibration and setting before each trial; while the second aspect allows simplify the test rig complexity and the processing algorithm.

  14. Discontinuous Galerkin for Stiff Hyperbolic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrie, R.B.; Morel, J.E.

    1999-06-27

    A Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is applied to hyperbolic systems that contain stiff relaxation terms. We demonstrate that when the relaxation time is under-resolved, DG is accurate in the sense that the method accurately represents the system's Chapman-Enskog (or ''diffusion'') approximation. Moreover, we demonstrate that a high-resolution, finite-volume method using the same time-integration method as DG is very inaccurate in the diffusion limit. Results for DG are presented for the hyperbolic heat equation, the Broadwell model of gas kinetics, and coupled radiation-hydrodynamics.

  15. Spin stiffness of vector spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Frank; Weigel, Martin

    2011-09-01

    We study domain-wall excitations for O(m) vector spin glasses in the limit m→∞, where the energy landscape is simplified considerably compared to XY or Heisenberg models due to the complete disappearance of metastability. Using numerical ground-state calculations and appropriate pairs of complementary boundary conditions, domain-wall defects are inserted into the systems and their excitation energies are measured. This allows us to determine the stiffness exponents for lattices of a range of spatial dimensions d=2,…,7. Compiling these results, we can finally determine the lower critical dimension of the model. The outcome is compared to estimates resulting from field-theoretic calculations.

  16. Variable Stiffness Structure for limb attachment.

    PubMed

    Bureau, Maxime; Keller, Thierry; Perry, Joel; Velik, Rosemarie; Veneman, Jan F

    2011-01-01

    In robotic rehabilitation, the way of attaching the robotic device to the users' limb constitutes a crucial element of product quality, particularly for assuring good fitting, comfort, accuracy, usability, and safety. In this article, we present a new technological concept - 'Variable Stiffness Structure' - allowing for an improvement of these aspects in the 'robotic device to limb' - connection by offering a compound of materials that are together able to switch from a flexible textile-like state to a more rigid state by applying negative pressure. The paper describes the concept and the basic behaviour of the material, based on experiments. PMID:22275554

  17. On waveguide modeling of stiff piano strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducasse, Éric

    2005-09-01

    Bensa et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 114, 1095-1107 (2003), Sec. IV] recently proposed a waveguide model for the transverse displacement of a stiff piano string. The study described here is an attempt to cast a complementary light on this topic, based on a common wave approach instead of a modal approach. A pair of weakly attenuated traveling waves and a pair of fast-decaying waves both satisfy the one-dimensional wave equation developed by Bensa et al. These solutions have to be carefully considered, however, for portions of string interacting with the hammer felt, the bridge, or the capo d'astro bar.

  18. POST-TRAUMATIC STIFFNESS OF THE ELBOW

    PubMed Central

    Filh, Geraldo Motta; Galvão, Marcus Vinicius

    2015-01-01

    Elbow stiffness is a common problem after joint trauma, causing functional impairment of the upper limb. The severity of the dysfunction depends on the nature of the initial trauma and the treatment used. Appropriate clinical evaluation and complementary examinations are essential for therapeutic planning. Several surgical techniques are now available and the recommendation must be made in accordance with patient characteristics, degree of joint limitation and the surgeon's skill. Joint incongruence and degeneration have negative effects on the prognosis, but heterotrophic ossification alone has been correlated with a favorable surgical prognosis. PMID:27022563

  19. Relative stiffness of flat conductor cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    The measurement of the bending moment required to obtain a given deflection in short lengths of flat conductor cable (FCC) is presented in this report. Experimental data were taken on 10 different samples of FCC and normalized to express all bending moments (relative stiffness factor) in terms of a cable 5.1 cm (2.0 in.) in width. Data are presented in tabular and graphical form for the covenience of designers who may be interested in finding torques exerted on critical components by short lengths of FCC.

  20. An improved spinning lens test to determine the stiffness of the human lens

    PubMed Central

    Burd, H.J.; Wilde, G.S.; Judge, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    It is widely accepted that age-related changes in lens stiffness are significant for the development of presbyopia. However, precise details on the relative importance of age-related changes in the stiffness of the lens, in comparison with other potential mechanisms for the development of presbyopia, have not yet been established. One contributing factor to this uncertainty is the paucity and variability of experimental data on lens stiffness. The available published data generally indicate that stiffness varies spatially within the lens and that stiffness parameters tend to increase with age. However, considerable differences exist between these published data sets, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The current paper describes new and improved methods, based on the spinning lens approach pioneered by Fisher, R.F. (1971) The elastic constants of the human lens, Journal of Physiology, 212, 147180, to make measurements on the stiffness of the human lens. These new procedures have been developed in an attempt to eliminate, or at least substantially reduce, various systematic errors in Fishers original experiment. An improved test rig has been constructed and a new modelling procedure for determining lens stiffness parameters from observations made during the test has been devised. The experiment involves mounting a human lens on a vertical rotor so that the lens spins on its optical axis (typically at 1000rpm). An automatic imaging system is used to capture the outline of the lens, while it is rotating, at pre-determined angular orientations. These images are used to quantify the deformations developed in the lens as a consequence of the centripetal forces induced by the rotation. Lens stiffness is inferred using axisymmetric finite element inverse analysis in which a nearly-incompressible neo-Hookean constitutive model is used to represent the mechanics of the lens. A numerical optimisation procedure is used to determine the stiffness parameters that provide a best fit between the finite element model and the experimental data. Sample results are presented for a human lens of age 33 years. PMID:21040722

  1. Vibration transmission through rolling element bearings. I - Bearing stiffness formulation. II - System studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, T. C.; Singh, R.

    1990-01-01

    How vibratory motion can be transmitted from the rotating shaft to the casing and other connecting structures in rotating mechanical equipment is addressed here by developing a new mathematical model of precision rolling element bearings. A new grating stiffness matrix is proposed in order to demonstrate a coupling between the shaft bending motion and the flexural motion of the casing plate. It is shown that the translational bearing stiffness coefficients currently used in rotor dynamic models are a small subset of the proposed matrix. The theory is validated by examples, and the proposed bearing formulation is then extended to demonstrate its superiority over existing models in vibration transmission analyses. It is shown that the model can easily be incorporated into analytical or numerical models typically used for dynamic analyses.

  2. Identifying Bearing Rotordynamic Coefficients using an Extended Kalman Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Brad A.; Howard, Samuel A.

    2008-01-01

    An Extended Kalman Filter is developed to estimate the linearized direct and indirect stiffness and damping force coefficients for bearings in rotor-dynamic applications from noisy measurements of the shaft displacement in response to imbalance and impact excitation. The bearing properties are modeled as stochastic random variables using a Gauss-Markov model. Noise terms are introduced into the system model to account for all of the estimation error, including modeling errors and uncertainties and the propagation of measurement errors into the parameter estimates. The system model contains two user-defined parameters that can be tuned to improve the filter s performance; these parameters correspond to the covariance of the system and measurement noise variables. The filter is also strongly influenced by the initial values of the states and the error covariance matrix. The filter is demonstrated using numerically simulated data for a rotor-bearing system with two identical bearings, which reduces the number of unknown linear dynamic coefficients to eight. The filter estimates for the direct damping coefficients and all four stiffness coefficients correlated well with actual values, whereas the estimates for the cross-coupled damping coefficients were the least accurate.

  3. Identifying Bearing Rotodynamic Coefficients Using an Extended Kalman Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Brad A.; Howard, Samuel A.

    2008-01-01

    An Extended Kalman Filter is developed to estimate the linearized direct and indirect stiffness and damping force coefficients for bearings in rotor dynamic applications from noisy measurements of the shaft displacement in response to imbalance and impact excitation. The bearing properties are modeled as stochastic random variables using a Gauss-Markov model. Noise terms are introduced into the system model to account for all of the estimation error, including modeling errors and uncertainties and the propagation of measurement errors into the parameter estimates. The system model contains two user-defined parameters that can be tuned to improve the filter's performance; these parameters correspond to the covariance of the system and measurement noise variables. The filter is also strongly influenced by the initial values of the states and the error covariance matrix. The filter is demonstrated using numerically simulated data for a rotor bearing system with two identical bearings, which reduces the number of unknown linear dynamic coefficients to eight. The filter estimates for the direct damping coefficients and all four stiffness coefficients correlated well with actual values, whereas the estimates for the cross-coupled damping coefficients were the least accurate.

  4. Investigating bias in squared regression structure coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Nimon, Kim F.; Zientek, Linda R.; Thompson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The importance of structure coefficients and analogs of regression weights for analysis within the general linear model (GLM) has been well-documented. The purpose of this study was to investigate bias in squared structure coefficients in the context of multiple regression and to determine if a formula that had been shown to correct for bias in squared Pearson correlation coefficients and coefficients of determination could be used to correct for bias in squared regression structure coefficients. Using data from a Monte Carlo simulation, this study found that squared regression structure coefficients corrected with Pratt's formula produced less biased estimates and might be more accurate and stable estimates of population squared regression structure coefficients than estimates with no such corrections. While our findings are in line with prior literature that identified multicollinearity as a predictor of bias in squared regression structure coefficients but not coefficients of determination, the findings from this study are unique in that the level of predictive power, number of predictors, and sample size were also observed to contribute bias in squared regression structure coefficients. PMID:26217273

  5. Changes in force and stiffness induced by fatigue and intracellular acidification in frog muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Edman, K A; Lou, F

    1990-01-01

    1. Changes in force and stiffness were recorded simultaneously during 1 s isometric (fixed ends) tetani of single fibres isolated from the anterior tibialis muscle of Rana temporaria (temperature 1-3 degrees C; sarcomere length, 2.10 micron). Stiffness was measured as the change in force that occurred in response to a 4 kHz sinusoidal length oscillation of the fibre. Some experiments were performed in which stiffness was determined from a fast (0.2 ms) length step that was applied to a 'tendon-free' segment of the muscle fibre during the tetanus plateau. 2. A moderate degree of fatigue was produced by decreasing the time between tetani from 300 s (control) to 15 s. By this treatment the maximum tetanic force (Ftet) was reversibly reduced to 70-75% of the control value. Maximum tetanic stiffness (Stet) was related to Ftet according to the following regression (both variables expressed as percentage of their control values): Stet = 0.369 Ftet + 62.91 (correlation coefficient, 0.95; P less than 0.001). A 25% decrease in isometric force during fatigue was thus associated with merely 9% reduction of fibre stiffness. 3. Whereas the rate of rise of force during tetanus was markedly reduced by fatiguing stimulation, the rate of rise of stiffness was only slightly affected. 4. Intracellular acidification (produced by raised extracellular CO2 concentration) largely reproduced the contractile changes observed during fatigue. However, for a given decrease in tetanic force there was a smaller reduction in fibre stiffness during acidosis than during fatigue. 5. Caffeine (0.5 mM) added to the fibre after development of fatigue and intracellular acidosis greatly potentiated the isometric twitch but did not affect maximum tetanic force. This finding provides evidence that the contractile system was fully activated during the tetanus plateau both in the fatigued state and during acidosis. 6. The results suggest that the decrease in contractile strength after frequent tetanization (intervals between tetani, 15 s) is attributable to altered kinetics of cross-bridge function leading to reduced number of active cross-bridges and, most significantly, to reduced force output of the individual bridge. The possible role of increased intracellular H+ concentration in the development of muscle fatigue is discussed. PMID:2391650

  6. Coefficients of Effective Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Roger H.

    1981-01-01

    Under certain conditions, a validity Coefficient of Effective Length (CEL) can produce highly misleading results. A modified coefficent is suggested for use when empirical studies indicate that underlying assumptions have been violated. (Author/BW)

  7. Urinary Albumin Excretion is Increased in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Associated with Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Becetti, Karima; Oeser, Annette; Ormseth, Michelle; Solus, Joseph F.; Raggi, Paolo; Stein, C. Michael; Chung, Cecilia P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). High urinary albumin excretion is a risk factor for CVD in the general population, but its role in atherosclerosis in patients with RA is not well defined. Methods We determined the urine albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR) in 136 patients with RA and 79 controls. Individuals with diabetes or a clinical history of CVD were excluded. We measured coronary artery calcium (CAC) with electron beam computer tomography and augmentation index (AIX) using pulse wave analysis. In patients with RA, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and concentrations of vascular cell adhesion protein-1 (VCAM-1), interleukin-10 (IL-10), C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and cystatin-C were measured and results correlated with UACR. Results Patients with RA had higher UACR [median (IQR): 7.6 (4.0-15.5) mg/g than control subjects: 5.6 (3.3-9.0)mg/g, p=0.02]. The presence of CAC was not associated with UACR in RA or control subjects. In patients with RA, UACR was significantly correlated with AIX (rho=0.24, p=0.01), higher levels of VCAM-1 (rho=0.2, p=0.01) and lower levels of IL-10 (rho=-0.2, p=0.02). The association between AIX and higher UACR remained significant in multivariate analysis [β coefficient of 1.9 (95% CI 0.4-3.4), p=0.01 that adjusted for age, sex, and race]. Conclusion Urinary albumin excretion was higher in RA patients than controls and correlated with increased arterial stiffness, higher VCAM-1, and lower IL-10 concentrations. PMID:25641887

  8. Stiffness calculation and application of spline-ball bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Bo-Zhong; Zhou, Yu-Ming; Yang, De-Hua

    2006-12-01

    Spline-ball bearing is widely adopted in large precision instruments because of its distinctive performance. For the sake of carrying out detail investigation of a full instrument system, practical stiffness formulae of such bearing are introduced with elastic contact mechanics, which are successfully applied for calculating the stiffness of the bearing used in astronomical telescope. Appropriate treatment of the stiffness of such bearing in the finite element analysis is also discussed and illustrated.

  9. Transport coefficients of quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bennaceur, D.; Khalfaoui, A.H. )

    1993-09-01

    Transport coefficients of fully ionized plasmas with a weakly coupled, completely degenerate electron gas and classical ions with a wide range of coupling strength are expressed within the Bloch transport equation. Using the Kohler variational principle the collision integral of the quantum Boltzmann equation is derived, which accounts for quantum effects through collective plasma oscillations. The physical implications of the results are investigated through comparisons with other theories. For practical applications, electrical and thermal conductivities are derived in simple analytical formulas. The relation between these two transport coefficients is expressed in an explicit form, giving a generalized Wiedemann-Franz law, where the Lorentz ratio is a dependent function of the coupling parameter and the degree of degeneracy of the plasma.

  10. Feasibility and repeatability for in vivo measurements of stiffness gradients in the canine gastrocnemius tendon using an acoustoelastic strain gauge

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, Michelle; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Delaney, Fern; Danielson, Kelson; Vanderby, Ray; Muir, Peter; Forrest, Lisa J

    2014-01-01

    B-mode ultrasound is an established imaging modality for evaluating canine tendon injury. However, full extent of tendon injury often remains difficult to estimate, as small changes in sonographic appearance are associated with large changes in biomechanical strength. The acoustoelastic strain gauge (ASG) is an ultrasound-based tissue evaluation technique that relates the change in echo intensity observed during relaxation or stretching of tendons to the tissue’s mechanical properties. This technique deduces stiffness gradient (the rate of change of normalized stiffness as a function of tissue strain) by analyzing the ultrasound dynamic images captured from gradually deforming tissue. Acoustoelastic strain gauge has been proven to accurately model strain and stiffness within tendons in vitro. To determine the feasibility and repeatability for in vivo ASG measurements of canine tendon function, stiffness gradients for the gastrocnemius tendons of ten clinically normal dogs were recorded by two non-independent observers at three sites (musculotendinous junction, mid tendon, and insertion). Average stiffness gradient indices (0.0132, 0.0141, 0.0136) and dispersion values (0.0053, 0.0054, 0.0057) for each site, respectively, were consistent with published mechanical properties for normal canine tendon. Mean differences of the average stiffness gradient index and dispersion value between observers and between limbs for each site were less than 16%. Using interclass coefficients (ICC), intraobserver (ICC 0.79–0.98) and interobserver (ICC 0.77–0.95) reproducibility was good to excellent. Right and left limb values were symmetric (ICC 0.74–0.92). Findings from this study indicated that ASG is a feasible and repeatable technique for measuring stiffness gradients in canine tendons. PMID:23663072

  11. The acute effect of maximal exercise on central and peripheral arterial stiffness indices and hemodynamics in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Melo, Xavier; Fernhall, Bo; Santos, Diana A; Pinto, Rita; Pimenta, Nuno M; Sardinha, Luís B; Santa-Clara, Helena

    2016-03-01

    This study compared the effects of a bout of maximal running exercise on arterial stiffness in children and adults. Right carotid blood pressure and artery stiffness indices measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), compliance and distensibility coefficients, stiffness index α and β (echo-tracking), contralateral carotid blood pressure, and upper and lower limb and central/aortic PWV (applanation tonometry) were taken at rest and 10 min after a bout of maximal treadmill running in 34 children (7.38 ± 0.38 years) and 45 young adults (25.22 ± 0.91 years) having similar aerobic potential. Two-by-two repeated measures analysis of variance and analysis of covariance were used to detect differences with exercise between groups. Carotid pulse pressure (PP; η(2) = 0.394) increased more in adults after exercise (p < 0.05). Compliance (η(2) = 0.385) decreased in particular in adults and in those with high changes in distending pressure, similarly to stiffness index α and β. Carotid PWV increased more in adults and was related to local changes in PP but not mean arterial pressure (MAP). Stiffness in the lower limbs decreased (η(2) = 0.115) but apparently only in those with small MAP changes (η(2) = 0.111). No significant exercise or group interaction effects were found when variables were adjusted to height. An acute bout of maximal exercise can alter arterial stiffness and hemodynamics in the carotid artery and within the active muscle beds. Arterial stiffness and hemodynamic response to metabolic demands during exercise in children simply reflect their smaller body size and may not indicate a particular physiological difference compared with adults. PMID:26842667

  12. Towards ultra-stiff materials: Surface effects on nanoporous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Dingjie; Xie, Yi Min; Huang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Shiwei; Li, Qing

    2014-09-08

    The significant rise in the strength and stiffness of porous materials at nanoscale cannot be described by conventional scaling laws. This letter investigates the effective Young's modulus of such materials by taking into account surface effect in a microcellular architecture designed for an ultralight material whose stiffness is an order of magnitude higher than most porous materials. We find that by considering the surface effects the predicted stiffness using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory compares well to experimental data for spongelike nanoporous gold with random microstructures. Analytical results show that, of the two factors influencing the effective Young's modulus, the residual stress is more important than the surface stiffness.

  13. Recent Advances in Hypertension: Arterial Stiffness and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Gary F.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, increased aortic stiffness has emerged as an important risk factor for target organ damage and cardiovascular disease events. Aortic stiffness can be assessed as pulse wave velocity (PWV), which is a measure of aortic wall stiffness, and pulse pressure (PP), which is affected by wall stiffness and the interaction between flow and diameter. Because these stiffness measures have different sensitivities to geometry and other factors, they are only moderately correlated and play a complementary role in risk prediction. Arterial stiffness has long been viewed as a complication of hypertension that integrates long-term adverse effects of elevated blood pressure and other risk factors. However, PWV is only modestly correlated with risk factors other than age and blood pressure, which likely explains the ability of PWV to add to standard risk prediction models and reclassify risk in a clinically relevant manner. Recent studies have demonstrated that stiffness can antedate and contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension, raising the possibility that early assessment of arterial stiffness may provide insight into complications including hypertension that develop years later. The role that stiffness plays in the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular disease has sparked considerable interest in defining basic mechanisms that stiffen the aortic wall, increase PP and contribute to target organ damage with a hope that elucidation of these mechanisms will allow for development of more effective treatments. PMID:24752432

  14. Synthesis of stiffness and mass matrices from experimental vibration modes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    With highly complex structures, it is sometimes desirable to derive a dynamic model of the system from experimental vibration data. This paper presents algorithms for synthesizing the mass and stiffness matrices from experimentally derived modal data in a way which preserves the physical significance of the individual mass and stiffness elements. The synthesizing procedures allow for the incorporation of other mass and stiffness data, whether empirical or based on the analyst's insight. The mass and stiffness matrices are derived for a cantilever beam example and are compared with those obtained using earlier techniques.

  15. Transverse shear stiffness of laminated anisotropic shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, G. A.

    1978-01-01

    Equations are derived for the transverse shear stiffness of laminated anisotropic shells. Without making assumptions for thickness distribution for either transverse shear stresses or strains, constitutive equations for the transverse shear deformation theory of anisotropic heterogeneous shells are found. The equations are based on Taylor series expansions about a generic point for stress resultants and couples, identically satisfying plate equilibrium equations. These equations are used to find statically correct expressions for in-surface stresses, transverse shear stresses, and the area density of transverse shear strain energy, in terms of transverse shear stress resultants and redundants. The application of Castigliano's theorem of least work minimizes shear strain energy with respect to the redundants. Examples are presented for several laminated walls. Good agreement is found between the results and those of exact three-dimensional elasticity solutions for the cylindrical bending of a plate.

  16. Determining cantilever stiffness from thermal noise

    PubMed Central

    Lübbe, Jannis; Temmen, Matthias; Rahe, Philipp; Kühnle, Angelika

    2013-01-01

    Summary We critically discuss the extraction of intrinsic cantilever properties, namely eigenfrequency f n, quality factor Q n and specifically the stiffness k n of the nth cantilever oscillation mode from thermal noise by an analysis of the power spectral density of displacement fluctuations of the cantilever in contact with a thermal bath. The practical applicability of this approach is demonstrated for several cantilevers with eigenfrequencies ranging from 50 kHz to 2 MHz. As such an analysis requires a sophisticated spectral analysis, we introduce a new method to determine k n from a spectral analysis of the demodulated oscillation signal of the excited cantilever that can be performed in the frequency range of 10 Hz to 1 kHz regardless of the eigenfrequency of the cantilever. We demonstrate that the latter method is in particular useful for noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) where the required simple instrumentation for spectral analysis is available in most experimental systems. PMID:23616942

  17. Tachocline dynamics: convective overshoot at stiff interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Benjamin; Lecoanet, Daniel; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Burns, Keaton; Vasil, Geoffrey M.

    2016-05-01

    The solar tachocline lies at the base of the solar convection zone. At this internal interface, motions from the unstable convection zone above overshoot and penetrate downward into the stiffly stable radiative zone below, driving gravity waves, mixing, and possibly pumping and storing magnetic fields. Here we study the dynamics of convective overshoot across very stiff interfaces with some properties similar to the internal boundary layer within the Sun. We use the Dedalus pseudospectral framework and study fully compressible dynamics at moderate to high Peclet number and low Mach number, probing a regime where turbulent transport is important. In this preliminary work, we find that the depth of convective overshoot is well described by a simple buoyancy equilibration model, and we consider implications for dynamics at the solar tachocline.

  18. Determining cantilever stiffness from thermal noise.

    PubMed

    Lübbe, Jannis; Temmen, Matthias; Rahe, Philipp; Kühnle, Angelika; Reichling, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We critically discuss the extraction of intrinsic cantilever properties, namely eigenfrequency f n , quality factor Q n and specifically the stiffness k n of the nth cantilever oscillation mode from thermal noise by an analysis of the power spectral density of displacement fluctuations of the cantilever in contact with a thermal bath. The practical applicability of this approach is demonstrated for several cantilevers with eigenfrequencies ranging from 50 kHz to 2 MHz. As such an analysis requires a sophisticated spectral analysis, we introduce a new method to determine k n from a spectral analysis of the demodulated oscillation signal of the excited cantilever that can be performed in the frequency range of 10 Hz to 1 kHz regardless of the eigenfrequency of the cantilever. We demonstrate that the latter method is in particular useful for noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) where the required simple instrumentation for spectral analysis is available in most experimental systems. PMID:23616942

  19. Parametric Stiffness Control of Flexible Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, F. C.; Rand, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    An unconventional method for control of flexible space structures using feedback control of certain elements of the stiffness matrix is discussed. The advantage of using this method of configuration control is that it can be accomplished in practical structures by changing the initial stress state in the structure. The initial stress state can be controlled hydraulically or by cables. The method leads, however, to nonlinear control equations. In particular, a long slender truss structure under cable induced initial compression is examined. both analytical and numerical analyses are presented. Nonlinear analysis using center manifold theory and normal form theory is used to determine criteria on the nonlinear control gains for stable or unstable operation. The analysis is made possible by the use of the exact computer algebra system MACSYMA.

  20. Stiffness control of balance in quiet standing.

    PubMed

    Winter, D A; Patla, A E; Prince, F; Ishac, M; Gielo-Perczak, K

    1998-09-01

    Our goal was to provide some insights into how the CNS controls and maintains an upright standing posture, which is an integral part of activities of daily living. Although researchers have used simple performance measures of maintenance of this posture quite effectively in clinical decision making, the mechanisms and control principles involved have not been clear. We propose a relatively simple control scheme for regulation of upright posture that provides almost instantaneous corrective response and reduces the operating demands on the CNS. The analytic model is derived and experimentally validated. A stiffness model was developed for quiet standing. The model assumes that muscles act as springs to cause the center-of-pressure (COP) to move in phase with the center-of-mass (COM) as the body sways about some desired position. In the sagittal plane this stiffness control exists at the ankle plantarflexors, in the frontal plane by the hip abductors/adductors. On the basis of observations that the COP-COM error signal continuously oscillates, it is evident that the inverted pendulum model is severely underdamped, approaching the undamped condition. The spectrum of this error signal is seen to match that of a tuned mass, spring, damper system, and a curve fit of this "tuned circuit" yields omega n the undamped natural frequency of the system. The effective stiffness of the system, Ke, is then estimated from Ke = I omega n2, and the damping B is estimated from B = BW X I, where BW is the bandwidth of the tuned response (in rad/s), and I is the moment of inertia of the body about the ankle joint. Ten adult subjects were assessed while standing quietly at three stance widths: 50% hip-to-hip distance, 100 and 150%. Subjects stood for 2 min in each position with eyes open; the 100% stance width was repeated with eyes closed. In all trials and in both planes, the COP oscillated virtually in phase (within 6 ms) with COM, which was predicted by a simple 0th order spring model. Sway amplitude decreased as stance width increased, and Ke increased with stance width. A stiffness model would predict sway to vary as Ke-0.5. The experimental results were close to this prediction: sway was proportional to Ke(-0.55). Reactive control of balance was not evident for several reasons. The visual system does not appear to contribute because no significant difference between eyes open and eyes closed results was found at 100% stance width. Vestibular (otolith) and joint proprioceptive reactive control were discounted because the necessary head accelerations, joint displacements, and velocities were well below reported thresholds. Besides, any reactive control would predict that COP would considerably lag (150-250 ms) behind the COM. Because the average COP was only 4 ms delayed behind the COM, reactive control was not evident; this small delay was accounted for by the damping in the tuned mechanical system. PMID:9744933

  1. Digital Photoplethysmography for Assessment of Arterial Stiffness: Repeatability and Comparison with Applanation Tonometry

    PubMed Central

    Östling, Gerd; Nilsson, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Arterial stiffness is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and can be assessed by applanation tonometry by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIX) by pressure pulse wave analysis (PWA). As an inexpensive and operator independent alternative, photoelectric plethysmography (PPG) has been introduced with analysis of the digital volume pulse wave (DPA) and its second derivatives of wave reflections. Objective The objective was to investigate the repeatability of arterial stiffness parameters measured by digital pulse wave analysis (DPA) and the associations to applanation tonometry parameters. Methods and Results 112 pregnant and non-pregnant individuals of different ages and genders were examined with SphygmoCor arterial wall tonometry and Meridian DPA finger photoplethysmography. Coefficients of repeatability, Bland-Altman plots, intraclass correlation coefficients and correlations to heart rate (HR) and body height were calculated for DPA variables, and the DPA variables were compared to tonometry variables left ventricular ejection time (LVET), PWV and AIX. No DPA variable showed any systematic measurement error or excellent repeatability, but dicrotic index (DI), dicrotic dilatation index (DDI), cardiac ejection elasticity index (EEI), aging index (AI) and second derivatives of the crude pulse wave curve, b/a and e/a, showed good repeatability. Overall, the correlations to AIX were better than to PWV, with correlations coefficients >0.70 for EEI, AI and b/a. Considering the level of repeatability and the correlations to tonometry, the overall best DPA parameters were EEI, AI and b/a. The two pansystolic time parameters, ejection time compensated (ETc) by DPA and LVET by tonometry, showed a significant but weak correlation. Conclusion For estimation of the LV function, ETc, EEI and b/a are suitable, for large artery stiffness EEI, and for small arteries DI and DDI. The only global parameter, AI, showed a high repeatability and the overall best correlations with AIX and PWV. PMID:26291079

  2. Study of ultrasound stiffness imaging methods using tissue mimicking phantoms.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Seshadri, Suresh

    2014-02-01

    A pilot study was carried out to investigate the performance of ultrasound stiffness imaging methods namely Ultrasound Elastography Imaging (UEI) and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Imaging. Specifically their potential for characterizing different classes of solid mass lesions was analyzed using agar based tissue mimicking phantoms. Composite tissue mimicking phantom was prepared with embedded inclusions of varying stiffness from 50 kPa to 450 kPa to represent different stages of cancer. Acoustic properties such as sound speed, attenuation coefficient and acoustic impedance were characterized by pulse echo ultrasound test at 5 MHz frequency and they are ranged from (1564 ± 88 to 1671 ± 124 m/s), (0.6915 ± 0.123 to 0.8268 ± 0.755 db cm(-1)MHz(-1)) and (1.61 × 10(6) ± 0.127 to 1.76 × 10(6) ± 0.045 kg m(-2)s(-1)) respectively. The elastic property Young's Modulus of the prepared samples was measured by conducting quasi static uni axial compression test under a strain rate of 0.5mm/min upto 10 % strain, and the values are from 50 kPa to 450 kPa for a variation of agar concentration from 1.7% to 6.6% by weight. The composite phantoms were imaged by Siemens Acuson S2000 (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) machine using linear array transducer 9L4 at 8 MHz frequency; strain and displacement images were collected by UEI and ARFI. Shear wave velocity 4.43 ± 0.35 m/s was also measured for high modulus contrast (18 dB) inclusion and X.XX m/s was found for all other inclusions. The images were pre processed and parameters such as Contrast Transfer Efficiency and lateral image profile were computed and reported. The results indicate that both ARFI and UEI represent the abnormalities better than conventional US B mode imaging whereas UEI enhances the underlying modulus contrast into improved strain contrast. The results are corroborated with literature and also with clinical patient images. PMID:24083832

  3. Cellular mechanoadaptation to substrate mechanical properties: contributions of substrate stiffness and thickness to cell stiffness measurements using AFM.

    PubMed

    Vichare, Shirish; Sen, Shamik; Inamdar, Mandar M

    2014-02-28

    Mechanosensing by adherent cells is usually studied by quantifying cell responses on hydrogels that are covalently linked to a rigid substrate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) represents a convenient way of characterizing the mechanoadaptation response of adherent cells on hydrogels of varying stiffness and thickness. Since AFM measurements reflect the effective cell stiffness, therefore, in addition to measuring real cytoskeletal alterations across different conditions, these measurements might also be influenced by the geometry and physical properties of the substrate itself. To better understand how the physical attributes of the gel influence AFM stiffness measurements of cells, we have used finite element analysis to simulate the indentation of cells of various spreads resting on hydrogels of varying stiffness and thickness. Consistent with experimental results, our simulation results indicate that for well spread cells, stiffness values are significantly over-estimated when experiments are performed on cells cultured on soft and thin gels. Using parametric studies, we have developed scaling relationships between the effective stiffness probed by AFM and the bulk cell stiffness, taking cell and tip geometry, hydrogel properties, nuclear stiffness and cell contractility into account. Finally, using simulated mechanoadaptation responses, we have demonstrated that a cell stiffening response may arise purely due to the substrate properties. Collectively, our results demonstrate the need to take hydrogel properties into account while estimating cell stiffness using AFM indentation. PMID:24651595

  4. Three-dimensional stiffness of the carpal arch.

    PubMed

    Gabra, Joseph N; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The carpal arch of the wrist is formed by irregularly shaped carpal bones interconnected by numerous ligaments, resulting in complex structural mechanics. The purpose of this study was to determine the three-dimensional stiffness characteristics of the carpal arch using displacement perturbations. It was hypothesized that the carpal arch would exhibit an anisotropic stiffness behavior with principal directions that are oblique to the conventional anatomical axes. Eight (n=8) cadavers were used in this study. For each specimen, the hamate was fixed to a custom stationary apparatus. An instrumented robot arm applied three-dimensional displacement perturbations to the ridge of trapezium and corresponding reaction forces were collected. The displacement-force data were used to determine a three-dimensional stiffness matrix using least squares fitting. Eigendecomposition of the stiffness matrix was used to identify the magnitudes and directions of the principal stiffness components. The carpal arch structure exhibited anisotropic stiffness behaviors with a maximum principal stiffness of 16.4±4.6N/mm that was significantly larger than the other principal components of 3.1±0.9 and 2.6±0.5N/mm (p<0.001). The principal direction of the maximum stiffness was pronated within the cross section of the carpal tunnel which is accounted for by the stiff transverse ligaments that tightly bind distal carpal arch. The minimal principal stiffness is attributed to the less constraining articulation between the trapezium and scaphoid. This study provides advanced characterization of the wrist׳s three-dimensional structural stiffness for improved insight into wrist biomechanics, stability, and function. PMID:26617368

  5. The fully implicit stochastic-{alpha} method for stiff stochastic differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Safique Ahmad, Sk. Chandra Parida, Nigam Raha, Soumyendu

    2009-12-01

    A fully implicit integration method for stochastic differential equations with significant multiplicative noise and stiffness in both the drift and diffusion coefficients has been constructed, analyzed and illustrated with numerical examples in this work. The method has strong order 1.0 consistency and has user-selectable parameters that allow the user to expand the stability region of the method to cover almost the entire drift-diffusion stability plane. The large stability region enables the method to take computationally efficient time steps. A system of chemical Langevin equations simulated with the method illustrates its computational efficiency.

  6. Asymmetric vibration in a two-layer vocal fold model with left-right stiffness asymmetry: Experiment and simulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaoyan; Hieu Luu, Trung

    2012-01-01

    Vibration characteristics of a self-oscillating two-layer vocal fold model with left-right asymmetry in body-layer stiffness were experimentally and numerically investigated. Two regimes of distinct vibratory pattern were identified as a function of left-right stiffness mismatch. In the first regime with extremely large left-right stiffness mismatch, phonation onset resulted from an eigenmode synchronization process that involved only eigenmodes of the soft fold. Vocal fold vibration in this regime was dominated by a large-amplitude vibration of the soft fold, and phonation frequency was determined by the properties of the soft fold alone. The stiff fold was only enslaved to vibrate at a much reduced amplitude. In the second regime with small left-right stiffness mismatch, eigenmodes of both folds actively participated in the eigenmode synchronization process. The two folds vibrated with comparable amplitude, but the stiff fold consistently led the soft fold in phase for all conditions. A qualitatively good agreement was obtained between experiment and simulation, although the simulations generally underestimated phonation threshold pressure and onset frequency. The clinical implications of the results of this study are also discussed. PMID:22978891

  7. Measuring Seebeck Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A high temperature Seebeck coefficient measurement apparatus and method with various features to minimize typical sources of errors is described. Common sources of temperature and voltage measurement errors which may impact accurate measurement are identified and reduced. Applying the identified principles, a high temperature Seebeck measurement apparatus and method employing a uniaxial, four-point geometry is described to operate from room temperature up to 1300K. These techniques for non-destructive Seebeck coefficient measurements are simple to operate, and are suitable for bulk samples with a broad range of physical types and shapes.

  8. JKTLD: Limb darkening coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, John

    2015-11-01

    JKTLD outputs theoretically-calculated limb darkening (LD) strengths for equations (LD laws) which predict the amount of LD as a function of the part of the star being observed. The coefficients of these laws are obtained by bilinear interpolation (in effective temperature and surface gravity) in published tables of coefficients calculated from stellar model atmospheres by several researchers. Many observations of stars require the strength of limb darkening (LD) to be estimated, which can be done using theoretical models of stellar atmospheres; JKTLD can help in these circumstances.

  9. Decoupling the role of stiffness from other hydroxyapatite signalling cues in periosteal derived stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Giorgio; Ferretti, Concetta; Tirella, Annalisa; Ahluwalia, Arti; Mattioli-Belmonte, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Bone extracellular matrix (ECM) is a natural composite made of collagen and mineral hydroxyapatite (HA). Dynamic cell-ECM interactions play a critical role in regulating cell differentiation and function. Understanding the principal ECM cues promoting osteogenic differentiation would be pivotal for both bone tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Altering the mineral content generally modifies the stiffness as well as other physicochemical cues provided by composite materials, complicating the “cause-effect” analysis of resultant cell behaviour. To isolate the contribution of mechanical cues from other HA-derived signals, we developed and characterised composite HA/gelatin scaffolds with different mineral contents along with a set of stiffness-matched HA-free gelatin scaffolds. Samples were seeded with human periosteal derived progenitor cells (PDPCs) and cultured over 7 days, analysing their resultant morphology and gene expression. Our results show that both stiffness and HA contribute to directing PDPC osteogenic differentiation, highlighting the role of stiffness in triggering the expression of osteogenic genes and of HA in accelerating the process, particularly at high concentrations. PMID:26035412

  10. Evaluation of compressive strength and stiffness of grouted soils by using elastic waves.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Mo; Kim, Jong-Sun; Yoon, Hyung-Koo; Lee, Jong-Sub

    2014-01-01

    Cement grouted soils, which consist of particulate soil media and cementation agents, have been widely used for the improvement of the strength and stiffness of weak ground and for the prevention of the leakage of ground water. The strength, elastic modulus, and Poisson's ratio of grouted soils have been determined by classical destructive methods. However, the performance of grouted soils depends on several parameters such as the distribution of particle size of the particulate soil media, grouting pressure, curing time, curing method, and ground water flow. In this study, elastic wave velocities are used to estimate the strength and elastic modulus, which are generally obtained by classical strength tests. Nondestructive tests by using elastic waves at small strain are conducted before and during classical strength tests at large strain. The test results are compared to identify correlations between the elastic wave velocity measured at small strain and strength and stiffness measured at large strain. The test results show that the strength and stiffness have exponential relationship with elastic wave velocities. This study demonstrates that nondestructive methods by using elastic waves may significantly improve the strength and stiffness evaluation processes of grouted soils. PMID:25025082

  11. Evaluation of Compressive Strength and Stiffness of Grouted Soils by Using Elastic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In-Mo; Kim, Jong-Sun; Yoon, Hyung-Koo; Lee, Jong-Sub

    2014-01-01

    Cement grouted soils, which consist of particulate soil media and cementation agents, have been widely used for the improvement of the strength and stiffness of weak ground and for the prevention of the leakage of ground water. The strength, elastic modulus, and Poisson's ratio of grouted soils have been determined by classical destructive methods. However, the performance of grouted soils depends on several parameters such as the distribution of particle size of the particulate soil media, grouting pressure, curing time, curing method, and ground water flow. In this study, elastic wave velocities are used to estimate the strength and elastic modulus, which are generally obtained by classical strength tests. Nondestructive tests by using elastic waves at small strain are conducted before and during classical strength tests at large strain. The test results are compared to identify correlations between the elastic wave velocity measured at small strain and strength and stiffness measured at large strain. The test results show that the strength and stiffness have exponential relationship with elastic wave velocities. This study demonstrates that nondestructive methods by using elastic waves may significantly improve the strength and stiffness evaluation processes of grouted soils. PMID:25025082

  12. Homogenized stiffness matrices for mineralized collagen fibrils and lamellar bone using unit cell finite element models.

    PubMed

    Vercher, Ana; Giner, Eugenio; Arango, Camila; Tarancn, Jos E; Fuenmayor, F Javier

    2014-04-01

    Mineralized collagen fibrils have been usually analyzed like a two-phase composite material where crystals are considered as platelets that constitute the reinforcement phase. Different models have been used to describe the elastic behavior of the material. In this work, it is shown that when Halpin-Tsai equations are applied to estimate elastic constants from typical constituent properties, not all crystal dimensions yield a model that satisfy thermodynamic restrictions. We provide the ranges of platelet dimensions that lead to positive definite stiffness matrices. On the other hand, a finite element model of a mineralized collagen fibril unit cell under periodic boundary conditions is analyzed. By applying six canonical load cases, homogenized stiffness matrices are numerically calculated. Results show a monoclinic behavior of the mineralized collagen fibril. In addition, a 5-layer lamellar structure is also considered where crystals rotate in adjacent layers of a lamella. The stiffness matrix of each layer is calculated applying Lekhnitskii transformations, and a new finite element model under periodic boundary conditions is analyzed to calculate the homogenized 3D anisotropic stiffness matrix of a unit cell of lamellar bone. Results are compared with the rule-of-mixtures showing in general good agreement. PMID:23793930

  13. A short note on the counter-intuitive spurious behaviors in stiff reacting flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Wang, Jian-Hang

    2015-06-01

    A well known spurious numerical phenomenon may occur in solving stiff detonation problems due to the under-resolved numerical solution in both space and time. Most people believe that decreasing numerical dissipation or stiffness will delay or eliminate the onset of spurious numerical phenomenon. However, several counter-intuitive spurious behaviors were observed by H.C. Yee et al. (2013) [10] recently and the mechanism of the generation of these strange phenomena remains an open question. The goal of this short note is to give a reasonable explanation for these counter-intuitive spurious behaviors existing in the detonation problems (the simplified 2 × 2 system and the reactive Euler equations) with stiff reacting source terms and discontinuities. In developing the mechanism of spurious numerical phenomenon in detonation problems, we find the parameters of the intermediate state are very important because they determine whether the spurious phenomenon will happen or not. Furthermore, these counter-intuitive spurious behaviors are mainly due to the oscillation of those intermediate state parameters as the time step or grid is refined gradually. These findings may help us to get a further understanding of some of the difficulties in numerical combustion and problems with stiff nonlinear source terms and discontinuities in general.

  14. Extending the Constant Coefficient Solution Technique to Variable Coefficient Ordinary Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Ahmed; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a class of second-order ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with variable coefficients whose closed-form solutions can be obtained by the same method used to solve ODEs with constant coefficients. General solutions for the homogeneous case are discussed.

  15. Pulmonary vascular wall stiffness: An important contributor to the increased right ventricular afterload with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhijie; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with structural and mechanical changes in the pulmonary vascular bed that increase right ventricular (RV) afterload. These changes, characterized by narrowing and stiffening, occur in both proximal and distal pulmonary arteries (PAs). An important consequence of arterial narrowing is increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Arterial stiffening, which can occur in both the proximal and distal pulmonary arteries, is an important index of disease progression and is a significant contributor to increased RV afterload in PH. In particular, arterial narrowing and stiffening increase the RV afterload by increasing steady and oscillatory RV work, respectively. Here we review the current state of knowledge of the causes and consequences of pulmonary arterial stiffening in PH and its impact on RV function. We review direct and indirect techniques for measuring proximal and distal pulmonary arterial stiffness, measures of arterial stiffness including elastic modulus, incremental elastic modulus, stiffness coefficient β and others, the changes in cellular function and the extracellular matrix proteins that contribute to pulmonary arterial stiffening, the consequences of PA stiffening for RV function and the clinical implications of pulmonary vascular stiffening for PH progression. Future investigation of the relationship between PA stiffening and RV dysfunction may facilitate new therapies aimed at improving RV function and thus ultimately reducing mortality in PH. PMID:22034607

  16. The influence of leaflet skin friction and stiffness on the performance of bioprosthetic aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Dellimore, K; Kemp, I; Scheffer, C; Weich, H; Doubell, A

    2013-12-01

    Leaflet skin friction and stiffness were found to have a significant influence on the systolic performance of a 19 mm diameter bioprosthetic aortic valve based on fluid-structure interaction simulations at a heart rate of 72 bpm. Four different leaflet skin friction coefficients (0.0, 9.2 × 10(-4), 4.8 × 10(-2) and 4.8 × 10(-1)) were simulated along with three different leaflet elastic moduli (3.0 × 10(6), 3.5 × 10(6), 4.0 × 10(6) N m(-2)). Higher leaflet skin friction was found to increase the magnitude of the systolic transvalvular pressure gradient and the peak velocity through the valve, as well as decrease the valve orifice area. The results for the leaflet opening and closing kinematics also showed that higher leaflet skin friction combined with higher leaflet stiffness produces longer rapid valve opening, closing and ejection times, as well as smaller valve orifice areas. These results are consistent with clinical findings for calcified aortic valves and suggest that valve performance under stenotic conditions is strongly influenced by the combined effect of increasing leaflet stiffness and surface roughness caused by calcification. PMID:24264225

  17. Effects of varying machine stiffness and contact area in UltraForm Finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Dennis E.; Echaves, Samantha; Pidgeon, Brendan; Travis, Nathan; Ellis, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    UltraForm Finishing (UFF) is a deterministic, subaperture, computer numerically controlled, grinding and polishing platform designed by OptiPro Systems. UFF is used to grind and polish a variety optics from simple spherical to fully freeform, and numerous materials from glasses to optical ceramics. The UFF system consists of an abrasive belt around a compliant wheel that rotates and contacts the part to remove material. This work aims to measure the stiffness variations in the system and how it can affect material removal rates. The stiffness of the entire system is evaluated using a triaxial load cell to measure forces and a capacitance sensor to measure deviations in height. Because the wheel is conformal and elastic, the shapes of contact areas are also of interest. For the scope of this work, the shape of the contact area is estimated via removal spot. The measured forces and removal spot area are directly related to material removal rate through Preston's equation. Using our current testing apparatus, we will demonstrate stiffness measurements and contact areas for a single UFF belt during different states of its lifecycle and assess the material removal function from spot diagrams as a function of wear. This investigation will ultimately allow us to make better estimates of Preston's coefficient and develop spot-morphing models in an effort to more accurately predict instantaneous material removal functions throughout the lifetime of a belt.

  18. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness Regulates Osteogenic Differentiation through MAPK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jun-Ha; Byun, Mi Ran; Kim, A. Rum; Kim, Kyung Min; Cho, Hang Jun; Lee, Yo Han; Kim, Juwon; Jeong, Mi Gyeong; Hwang, Eun Sook; Hong, Jeong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation is regulated by the extracellular matrix (ECM) through activation of intracellular signaling mediators. The stiffness of the ECM was shown to be an important regulatory factor for MSC differentiation, and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) was identified as an effector protein for MSC differentiation. However, the detailed underlying mechanism regarding the role of ECM stiffness and TAZ in MSC differentiation is not yet fully understood. In this report, we showed that ECM stiffness regulates MSC fate through ERK or JNK activation. Specifically, a stiff hydrogel matrix stimulates osteogenic differentiation concomitant with increased nuclear localization of TAZ, but inhibits adipogenic differentiation. ERK and JNK activity was significantly increased in cells cultured on a stiff hydrogel. TAZ activation was induced by ERK or JNK activation on a stiff hydrogel because exposure to an ERK or JNK inhibitor significantly decreased the nuclear localization of TAZ, indicating that ECM stiffness-induced ERK or JNK activation is important for TAZ-driven osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that ECM stiffness regulates MSC differentiation through ERK or JNK activation. PMID:26262877

  19. Mechanically stiff, electrically conductive composites of polymers and carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Kucheyev, Sergei O.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Hamza, Alex V.

    2015-07-21

    Using SWNT-CA as scaffolds to fabricate stiff, highly conductive polymer (PDMS) composites. The SWNT-CA is immersing in a polymer resin to produce a SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin. The SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin is cured to produce the stiff and electrically conductive composite of carbon nanotube aerogel and polymer.

  20. On the determination of the coefficients of the Gaussian general theory of the Earth's magnetism for the year 1885 and about the relationship of the three Earth-magnetic elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritsche, H.

    1983-01-01

    An attempt is made to judge the value of the Gaussian series for the Earth's magnetism. The computation employed to do this uses the method of the least and greatest coefficients. The number of unknown which had to be calculated from the individual groups was at most only four. All symbols of Gauss were retained.

  1. In vivo measurement of bending stiffness in fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Hente, Reiner; Cordey, Jacques; Perren, Stephan M

    2003-01-01

    Background Measurement of the bending stiffness a healing fracture represents a valid variable in the assessment of fracture healing. However, currently available methods typically have high measurement errors, even for mild pin loosening. Furthermore, these methods cannot provide actual values of bending stiffness, which precludes comparisons among individual fractures. Thus, even today, little information is available with regards to the fracture healing pattern with respect to actual values of bending stiffness. Our goals were, therefore: to develop a measurement device that would allow accurate and sensitive measurement of bending stiffness, even in the presence of mild pin loosening; to describe the course of healing in individual fractures; and help to evaluate whether the individual pattern of bending stiffness can be predicted at an early stage of healing. Methods A new measurement device has been developed to precisely measure the bending stiffness of the healing fracture by simulating four-point-bending. The system was calibrated on aluminum models and intact tibiae. The influence of pin loosening on measurement error was evaluated. The system was tested at weekly intervals in an animal experiment to determine the actual bending stiffness of the fracture. Transverse fractures were created in the right tibia of twelve sheep, and then stabilized with an external fixator. At ten weeks, bending stiffness of the tibiae were determined in a four-point-bending test device to validate the in-vivo-measurement data. Results In-vivo bending stiffness can be measured accurately and sensitive, even in the early phase of callus healing. Up to a bending stiffness of 10 Nm/degree, measurement error was below 3.4% for one pin loose, and below 29.3% for four pins loose, respectively. Measurement of stiffness data over time revealed a significant logarithmic increase between the third and seventh weeks, whereby the logarithmic rate of change among sheep was similar, but started from different levels. Comparative measurements showed that early individual changes between the third and fourth weeks can be used as a predictor of bending stiffness at seven weeks (r = 0.928) and at ten weeks (r = 0.710). Conclusion Bending stiffness can be measured precisely, with less error in the case of pin loosening. Prediction of the future healing course of the individual fracture can be assessed by changes from the third to the fourth week, with differences in stiffness levels. Therefore, the initial status of the fracture seems to have a high impact on the individual healing course. PMID:14599296

  2. The SSME HPFTP interstage seals: Analysis and experiments for leakage and reaction-force coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    An improved theory for the prediction of the rotordynamic coefficients of turbulent annular seals was developed. Predictions from the theory are compared to the experimental results and an approach for the direct calculation of empirical turbulent coefficients from test data are introduced. An improved short seal solution is shown to do a better job of calculating effective stiffness and damping coefficients than either the original short seal solution or a finite length solution. However, the original short seal solution does a much better job of predicting equivalent added mass coefficient.

  3. A parameter identification method for the rotordynamic coefficients of a high Reynolds number hydrostatic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouvas, C.; Childs, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    In identifying the rotordynamic coefficients of a high-Reynolds-number hydrostatic bearing, fluid-flow induced forces present a unique problem, in that they provide an unmeasureable and uncontrollable excitation to the bearing. An analysis method is developed that effectively eliminates the effects of fluid-flow induced excitation on the estimation of the bearing rotordynamic coefficients, by using power spectral densities. In addition to the theoretical development, the method is verified experimentally by single-frequency testing, and repeatability tests. Results obtained for a bearing are the twelve rotordynamic coefficients (stiffness, damping, and inertia coefficients) as functions of eccentricity ratio, speed, and supply pressure.

  4. Stiffness coupling application to modal synthesis program, users guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhar, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV computer program used to perform modal synthesis of structures by stiffness coupling, using the dynamic transformation method is described. The program was named SCAMP (Stiffness Coupling Approach Modal-Synthesis Program). The program begins with the entry of a substructure's physical mode shapes and eigenvalues or a substructure's mass and stiffness matrix. If the mass and stiffness matrices are entered, the eigen problem for the individual substructure is solved. Provisions are included for a maximum of 20 substructures which are coupled by stiffness matrix springs. Each substructure has a number degrees of freedom (DOF), except that for DOF greater than 100; vector sets having maximum row and column size of 100 were generated prior to entering SCAMP. The substructures are then coupled together via coupling springs, and the dynamic transformation is used to reduce the size of the eigen problem.

  5. The Focal Adhesion: A Regulated Component of Aortic Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Saphirstein, Robert J.; Gao, Yuan Z.; Jensen, Mikkel H.; Gallant, Cynthia M.; Vetterkind, Susanne; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Morgan, Kathleen G.

    2013-01-01

    Increased aortic stiffness is an acknowledged predictor and cause of cardiovascular disease. The sources and mechanisms of vascular stiffness are not well understood, although the extracellular matrix (ECM) has been assumed to be a major component. We tested here the hypothesis that the focal adhesions (FAs) connecting the cortical cytoskeleton of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to the matrix in the aortic wall are a component of aortic stiffness and that this component is dynamically regulated. First, we examined a model system in which magnetic tweezers could be used to monitor cellular cortical stiffness, serum-starved A7r5 aortic smooth muscle cells. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an activator of myosin that increases cell contractility, increased cortical stiffness. A small molecule inhibitor of Src-dependent FA recycling, PP2, was found to significantly inhibit LPA-induced increases in cortical stiffness, as well as tension-induced increases in FA size. To directly test the applicability of these results to force and stiffness development at the level of vascular tissue, we monitored mouse aorta ring stiffness with small sinusoidal length oscillations during agonist-induced contraction. The alpha-agonist phenylephrine, which also increases myosin activation and contractility, increased tissue stress and stiffness in a PP2- and FAK inhibitor 14-attenuated manner. Subsequent phosphotyrosine screening and follow-up with phosphosite-specific antibodies confirmed that the effects of PP2 and FAK inhibitor 14 in vascular tissue involve FA proteins, including FAK, CAS, and paxillin. Thus, in the present study we identify, for the first time, the FA of the VSMC, in particular the FAK-Src signaling complex, as a significant subcellular regulator of aortic stiffness and stress. PMID:23626821

  6. Leg stiffness adjustment during hopping at different intensities and frequencies.

    PubMed

    Mrdakovic, Vladimir; Ilic, Dusko; Vulovic, Radun; Matic, Milan; Jankovic, Nenad; Filipovic, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Understanding leg and joint stiffness adjustment during maximum hopping may provide important information for developing more effective training methods. It has been reported that ankle stiffness has major influence on stable spring-mass dynamics during submaximal hopping, and that knee stiffness is a major determinant for hopping performance during maximal hopping task. Furthermore, there are no reports on how the height of the previous hop could affect overall stiffness modulation of the subsequent maximum one. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether and how the jump height of the previous hop affects leg and joint stiffness for subsequent maximum hop. Ten participants completed trials in which they repeatedly hopped as high as possible (MX task) and trials in which they were instructed to perform several maximum hops with 3 preferred (optimal) height hops between each of them (P3MX task). Both hopping tasks were performed at 2.2 Hz hopping frequency and at the participant's preferred (freely chosen) frequency as well. By comparing results of those hopping tasks, we found that ankle stiffness at 2.2 Hz ( p = 0.041) and knee stiffness at preferred frequency ( p = 0.045) was significantly greater for MX versus P3MX tasks. Leg stiffness for 2.2 Hz hopping is greater than for the preferred frequency. Ankle stiffness is greater for 2.2 Hz than for preferred frequencies; opposite stands for knee stiffness. The results of this study suggest that preparatory hop height can be considered as an important factor for modulation of maximum hop. PMID:25308379

  7. Convergent-tapered annular seals - Analysis and testing for rotordynamic coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.; Dressman, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    A combined analytical-computational method has been developed to calculate the pressure field and dynamic coefficients for tapered high-pressure annular seals. Completely developed turbulent flow is assumed in both the circumferential and axial directions, according to Hirs' (1973) bulk-flow turbulent-lubrication equations. In a numerical experiment with the method, a short bearing approximation is used to derive an analytical expression for the first-order (dynamic) pressure gradient. This expression is integrated numerically to define dynamic coefficients of the seal. Numerical results of the integration are compared with previous results for straight and tapered seals. It is found that direct stiffness and leakage coefficients increase in the present seal, while the remaining coefficients decrease. An optimal taper angle is shown to exist with respect to: (1) the direct stiffness and (2) the ratio of direct stiffness to leakage. On the basis of the optimal taper angle calculations, stiffness increases on the order of 40 to 50 percent are predicted. Experimental results for three taper angles are presented, and are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  8. Piezoelectric resonance shifting using tunable nonlinear stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reissman, Timothy; Wolff, Eric M.; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2009-03-01

    Piezoelectric cantilever devices for energy harvesting purposes have typically been tuned by manipulating beam dimensions or by placement of a tip mass. While these techniques do lend themselves well to designing a highly tuned resonance, the design is fixed and causes each system to be unique to a specific driving frequency. In this work, we demonstrate the design of a nonlinear tuning technique via a variable external, attractive magnetic force. With this design, the resonance of the piezoelectric energy harvester is able to be tuned with the adjustment of a slider mechanism. The magnetic design uses the well of attraction principle in order to create a varying nonlinear stiffness, which shifts the resonance of the coupled piezoelectric beam. The significance of this work is the design of a piezoelectric energy harvesting system with a variable resonance frequency that can be adjusted for changes in the driving frequencies over a wide range without the replacement of any system components; thus, extending the usefulness of these vibration energy harvesting devices over a larger frequency span.

  9. Controlled Unusual Stiffness of Mechanical Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wooju; Kang, Da-Young; Song, Jihwan; Moon, Jun Hyuk; Kim, Dongchoul

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical metamaterials that are engineered with sub-unit structures present unusual mechanical properties depending on the loading direction. Although they show promise, their practical utility has so far been somewhat limited because, to the best of our knowledge, no study about the potential of mechanical metamaterials made from sophisticatedly tailored sub-unit structures has been made. Here, we present a mechanical metamaterial whose mechanical properties can be systematically designed without changing its chemical composition or weight. We study the mechanical properties of triply periodic bicontinuous structures whose detailed sub-unit structure can be precisely fabricated using various sub-micron fabrication methods. Simulation results show that the effective wave velocity of the structures along with different directions can be designed to introduce the anisotropy of stiffness by changing a volume fraction and aspect ratio. The ratio of Young’s modulus to shear modulus can be increased by up to at least 100, which is a 3500% increase over that of isotropic material (2.8, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene). Furthermore, Poisson’s ratio of the constituent material changes the ratio while Young’s modulus does not influence it. This study presents the promising potential of mechanical metamaterials for versatile industrial and biomedical applications. PMID:26837466

  10. Controlled Unusual Stiffness of Mechanical Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wooju; Kang, Da-Young; Song, Jihwan; Moon, Jun Hyuk; Kim, Dongchoul

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical metamaterials that are engineered with sub-unit structures present unusual mechanical properties depending on the loading direction. Although they show promise, their practical utility has so far been somewhat limited because, to the best of our knowledge, no study about the potential of mechanical metamaterials made from sophisticatedly tailored sub-unit structures has been made. Here, we present a mechanical metamaterial whose mechanical properties can be systematically designed without changing its chemical composition or weight. We study the mechanical properties of triply periodic bicontinuous structures whose detailed sub-unit structure can be precisely fabricated using various sub-micron fabrication methods. Simulation results show that the effective wave velocity of the structures along with different directions can be designed to introduce the anisotropy of stiffness by changing a volume fraction and aspect ratio. The ratio of Young's modulus to shear modulus can be increased by up to at least 100, which is a 3500% increase over that of isotropic material (2.8, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene). Furthermore, Poisson's ratio of the constituent material changes the ratio while Young's modulus does not influence it. This study presents the promising potential of mechanical metamaterials for versatile industrial and biomedical applications. PMID:26837466

  11. Stiffness nanotomography of human epithelial cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staunton, Jack R.; Doss, Bryant L.; Gilbert, C. Michael; Kasas, Sandor; Ros, Robert

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical stiffness of individual cells is important in both cancer initiation and metastasis. We present atomic force microscopy (AFM) based nanoindentation experiments on various human mammary and esophagus cell lines covering the spectrum from normal immortalized cells to highly metastatic ones. The combination of an AFM with a confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (FLIM) in conjunction with the ability to move the sample and objective independently allow for precise alignment of AFM probe and laser focus with an accuracy down to a few nanometers. This enables us to correlate the mechanical properties with the point of indentation in the FLIM image. We are using force-volume measurements as well as force indentation curves on distinct points on the cells to compare the elastic moduli of the nuclei, nucleoli, and the cytoplasm, and how they vary within and between individual cells and cell lines. Further, a detailed analysis of the force-indentation curves allows study of the cells' mechanical properties at different indentation depths and to generate 3D elasticity maps.

  12. Effect of ATP on actin filament stiffness.

    PubMed

    Janmey, P A; Hvidt, S; Oster, G F; Lamb, J; Stossel, T P; Hartwig, J H

    1990-09-01

    Actin is an adenine nucleotide-binding protein and an ATPase. The bound adenine nucleotide stabilizes the protein against denaturation and the ATPase activity, although not required for actin polymerization, affects the kinetics of this assembly Here we provide evidence for another effect of adenine nucleotides. We find that actin filaments made from ATP-containing monomers, the ATPase activity of which hydrolyses ATP to ADP following polymerization, are stiff rods, whereas filaments prepared from ADP-monomers are flexible. ATP exchanges with ADP in such filaments and stiffens them. Because both kinds of actin filaments contain mainly ADP, we suggest the alignment of actin monomers in filaments that have bound and hydrolysed ATP traps them conformationally and stores elastic energy. This energy would be available for release by actin-binding proteins that transduce force or sever actin filaments. These data support earlier proposals that actin is not merely a passive cable, but has an active mechanochemical role in cell function. PMID:2168523

  13. Controlled Unusual Stiffness of Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wooju; Kang, Da-Young; Song, Jihwan; Moon, Jun Hyuk; Kim, Dongchoul

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical metamaterials that are engineered with sub-unit structures present unusual mechanical properties depending on the loading direction. Although they show promise, their practical utility has so far been somewhat limited because, to the best of our knowledge, no study about the potential of mechanical metamaterials made from sophisticatedly tailored sub-unit structures has been made. Here, we present a mechanical metamaterial whose mechanical properties can be systematically designed without changing its chemical composition or weight. We study the mechanical properties of triply periodic bicontinuous structures whose detailed sub-unit structure can be precisely fabricated using various sub-micron fabrication methods. Simulation results show that the effective wave velocity of the structures along with different directions can be designed to introduce the anisotropy of stiffness by changing a volume fraction and aspect ratio. The ratio of Young’s modulus to shear modulus can be increased by up to at least 100, which is a 3500% increase over that of isotropic material (2.8, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene). Furthermore, Poisson’s ratio of the constituent material changes the ratio while Young’s modulus does not influence it. This study presents the promising potential of mechanical metamaterials for versatile industrial and biomedical applications.

  14. Sources of Variability in Musculo-Articular Stiffness Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Watsford, Mark; Murphy, Aron; De Vito, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of musculo-articular stiffness (MAS) with the free-oscillation technique is a popular method with a variety of applications. This study examined the sources of variability (load applied and frequency of oscillation) when MAS is assessed. Over two testing occasions, 14 healthy men (27.7±5.2 yr, 1.82±0.04 m, 79.5±8.4 kg) were measured for isometric maximum voluntary contraction and MAS of the knee flexors using submaximal loads relative to the individual's maximum voluntary contraction (MAS%MVC) and a single absolute load (MASABS). As assessment load increased, MAS%MVC (coefficient of variation (CV)  =  8.1–12.1%; standard error of measurement (SEM)  =  51.6–98.8 Nm−1) and frequency (CV  =  4.8–7.0%; SEM  =  0.060–0.075 s−1) variability increased consequently. Further, similar levels of variability arising from load (CV  =  6.7%) and frequency (CV  =  4.8–7.0%) contributed to the overall MAS%MVC variability. The single absolute load condition yielded better reliability scores for MASABS (CV  =  6.5%; SEM  =  40.2 Nm−1) and frequency (CV  =  3.3%; SEM  =  0.039 s−1). Low and constant loads for MAS assessment, which are particularly relevant in the clinical setting, exhibited superior reliability compared to higher loads expressed as a percentage of maximum voluntary contraction, which are more suitable for sporting situations. Appropriate sample size and minimum detectable change can therefore be determined when prospective studies are carried out. PMID:23667662

  15. A Treatise on Equivalent-Plate Stiffnesses for Stiffened Laminated-Composite Plates and Plate-Like Lattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    A survey of studies conducted since 1914 on the use of equivalent-plate stiffnesses in modeling the overall, stiffness-critical response of stiffened plates and shells is presented. Two detailed, comprehensive derivations of first-approximation equivalent-plate stiffnesses are also presented that are based on the Reissner-Mindlin-type, first-order transverse-shear deformation theory for anisotropic plates. Equivalent-plate stiffness expressions, and a corresponding symbolic manipulation computer program, are also presented for several different stiffener configurations. These expressions are very general and exhibit the full range of anisotropies permitted by the Reissner-Mindlin-type, first-order transverse-shear deformation theory for anisotropic plates. The expressions presented in the present study were also compared with available, previously published results. For the most part, the previously published results are for special cases of the general expressions presented herein and are almost in complete agreement. Analysis is also presented that extends the use of the equivalent-plate stiffness expressions to sandwich plates.

  16. Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness Mapping technique for identifying nonlinear structural elements from frequency response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Zheng, G. T.

    2016-02-01

    A simple and general Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness Mapping technique is proposed for identifying the parameters or the mathematical model of a nonlinear structural element with steady-state primary harmonic frequency response functions (FRFs). The Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness is defined as the complex ratio between the internal force and the displacement response of unknown element. Obtained with the test data of responses' frequencies and amplitudes, the real and imaginary part of Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness are plotted as discrete points in a three dimensional space over the displacement amplitude and the frequency, which are called the real and the imaginary Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness map, respectively. These points will form a repeatable surface as the Equivalent Dynamic stiffness is only a function of the corresponding data as derived in the paper. The mathematical model of the unknown element can then be obtained by surface-fitting these points with special functions selected by priori knowledge of the nonlinear type or with ordinary polynomials if the type of nonlinearity is not pre-known. An important merit of this technique is its capability of dealing with strong nonlinearities owning complicated frequency response behaviors such as jumps and breaks in resonance curves. In addition, this technique could also greatly simplify the test procedure. Besides there is no need to pre-identify the underlying linear parameters, the method uses the measured data of excitation forces and responses without requiring a strict control of the excitation force during the test. The proposed technique is demonstrated and validated with four classical single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) numerical examples and one experimental example. An application of this technique for identification of nonlinearity from multiple-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) systems is also illustrated.

  17. Assessment of liver stiffness in patients with HCV and mixed cryoglobulinemia undergoing rituximab treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) is a HCV-related lymphoproliferative disorder generally associated with advanced liver disease. Liver stiffness has been significantly correlated with histopathological stage of fibrosis. Moreover, it was influenced by necroinflammatory activity. Rituximab (RTX) is a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody inducing transient B lymphocytes depletion that was shown to be useful and safe in the majority of HCV MC patients, leading also to improvement of cirrhotic syndrome. Aim of this study was to evaluate the modifications of liver stiffness following RTX treatment in HCV-related MC patients. Materials and methods Fourteen consecutive patients (10 F, 4 M; mean age 60.43 ± 43) with HCV-related chronic hepatitis (n = 10) or cirrhosis (n = 4) and MC, eligible for RTX treatment, were prospectively enrolled. Intravenous injection of 1 g of RTX was performed at day 0 and at day 15. Assessment of stiffness was carried out by Fibroscan® (Echosens, Paris-France) at baseline, 15 days after the first infusion, and at month 1, 3 and 6 after therapy. Results MC symptoms significantly improved during the study, especially during the first 3 months. Liver stiffness observed 3 months after treatment was significantly reduced when compared with pre-treatment values (p = 0.01). This difference disappeared after 6 months of follow-up. Cytofluorimetric analysis showed a decrease of CD19+ peripheral blood cells, with the nadir at month 3 after therapy and B cell compartment reconstitution after 6 months. Conclusion This study, for the first time showed that RTX-treatment in HCV-related MC induces a reduction of liver stiffness that is strictly associated with the B-cell depletion. PMID:24456582

  18. Stability analysis and backward whirl investigation of cracked rotors with time-varying stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Shudeifat, Mohammad A.

    2015-07-01

    The dynamic stability of dynamical systems with time-periodic stiffness is addressed here. Cracked rotor systems with time-periodic stiffness are well-known examples of such systems. Time-varying area moments of inertia at the cracked element cross-section of a cracked rotor have been used to formulate the time-periodic finite element stiffness matrix. The semi-infinite coefficient matrix obtained by applying the harmonic balance (HB) solution to the finite element (FE) equations of motion is employed here to study the dynamic stability of the system. Consequently, the sign of the determinant of a scaled version of a sub-matrix of this semi-infinite coefficient matrix at a finite number of harmonics in the HB solution is found to be sufficient for identifying the major unstable zones of the system in the parameter plane. Specifically, it is found that the negative determinant always corresponds to unstable zones in all of the systems considered. This approach is applied to a parametrically excited Mathieu's equation, a two degree-of-freedom linear time-periodic dynamical system, a cracked Jeffcott rotor and a finite element model of the cracked rotor system. Compared to the corresponding results obtained by Floquet's theory, the sign of the determinant of the scaled sub-matrix is found to be an efficient tool for identifying the major unstable zones of the linear time-periodic parametrically excited systems, especially large-scale FE systems. Moreover, it is found that the unstable zones for a FE cracked rotor with an open transverse crack model only appear at the backward whirl. The theoretical and experimental results have been found to agree well for verifying that the open crack model excites the backward whirl amplitudes at the critical backward whirling rotational speeds.

  19. Arterial Stiffness, Distensibility, and Strain in Asthmatic Children.

    PubMed

    Akyüz Özkan, Esra; Serin, Halil İbrahim; Khosroshahi, Hashem E; Kılıç, Mahmut; Ekim, Meral; Beysel, Perihan; Geçit, U Aliye; Domur, Esra

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We hypothesized that since asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease, it could lead to the early development of atherosclerosis in childhood-onset asthma. The aim of this study was to investigate arterial stiffness, distensibility, and strain of different peripheral arteries, the parameters of which can be used to detect atherosclerosis in asthmatic children. MATERIAL AND METHODS We studied 22 pediatric patients with asthma and 18 healthy children. Fasting blood glucose and cholesterol levels were evaluated to exclude children with diabetes and hyperlipidemia, which are risk factors for atherosclerosis. Renal, carotid, and brachial arteries diameters were measured. Using the measured data, stiffness, distensibility, and strain of the arteries of all children were calculated. RESULTS Pulse pressure, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, cholesterols, and glucose levels of the obese individuals were similar to the controls. In carotid arteries there were no statistical differences regarding stiffness, distensibility, and strain. According to multiple ANCOVA analysis, distensibility and strain of right and left brachial arteries and right renal artery were higher, whereas right renal artery stiffness was lower in asthmatic children than in controls. Approximately one-fifth of the change in the left and right brachial arteries and right renal artery distensibility and strain and a small portion of the change in the right renal artery stiffness were associated with asthma. In contrast, left renal artery distensibility, strain, and stiffness were not associated with asthma. CONCLUSIONS Peripheral arteries had higher distensibility and strain, and lower stiffness in asthmatic children than in controls. PMID:26803723

  20. Simvastatin Ameliorates Matrix Stiffness-Mediated Endothelial Monolayer Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Lampi, Marsha C.; Faber, Courtney J.; Huynh, John; Bordeleau, Francois; Zanotelli, Matthew R.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffening accompanies both aging and atherosclerosis, and age-related stiffening of the arterial intima increases RhoA activity and cell contractility contributing to increased endothelium permeability. Notably, statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors whose pleiotropic effects include disrupting small GTPase activity; therefore, we hypothesized the statin simvastatin could be used to attenuate RhoA activity and inhibit the deleterious effects of increased age-related matrix stiffness on endothelial barrier function. Using polyacrylamide gels with stiffnesses of 2.5, 5, and 10 kPa to mimic the physiological stiffness of young and aged arteries, endothelial cells were grown to confluence and treated with simvastatin. Our data indicate that RhoA and phosphorylated myosin light chain activity increase with matrix stiffness but are attenuated when treated with the statin. Increases in cell contractility, cell-cell junction size, and indirect measurements of intercellular tension that increase with matrix stiffness, and are correlated with matrix stiffness-dependent increases in monolayer permeability, also decrease with statin treatment. Furthermore, we report that simvastatin increases activated Rac1 levels that contribute to endothelial barrier enhancing cytoskeletal reorganization. Simvastatin, which is prescribed clinically due to its ability to lower cholesterol, alters the endothelial cell response to increased matrix stiffness to restore endothelial monolayer barrier function, and therefore, presents a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent atherogenesis initiated by age-related arterial stiffening. PMID:26761203

  1. Mechanically Stiff Nanocomposite Hydrogels at Ultralow Nanoparticle Content.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Manish K; Xavier, Janet R; Carrow, James K; Desai, Prachi; Alge, Daniel; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K

    2016-01-26

    Although hydrogels are able to mimic native tissue microenvironments, their utility for biomedical applications is severely hampered due to limited mechanical stiffness and low toughness. Despite recent progress in designing stiff and tough hydrogels, it is still challenging to achieve a cell-friendly, high modulus construct. Here, we report a highly efficient method to reinforce collagen-based hydrogels using extremely low concentrations of a nanoparticulate-reinforcing agent that acts as a cross-link epicenter. Extraordinarily, the addition of these nanoparticles at a 10 000-fold lower concentration relative to polymer resulted in a more than 10-fold increase in mechanical stiffness and a 20-fold increase in toughness. We attribute the high stiffness of the nanocomposite network to the chemical functionality of the nanoparticles, which enabled the cross-linking of multiple polymeric chains to the nanoparticle surface. The mechanical stiffness of the nanoengineered hydrogel can be tailored between 0.2 and 200 kPa simply by manipulating the size of the nanoparticles (4, 8, and 12 nm), as well as the concentrations of the nanoparticles and polymer. Moreover, cells can be easily encapsulated within the nanoparticulate-reinforced hydrogel network, showing high viability. In addition, encapsulated cells were able to sense and respond to matrix stiffness. Overall, these results demonstrate a facile approach to modulate the mechanical stiffness of collagen-based hydrogels and may have broad utility for various biomedical applications, including use as tissue-engineered scaffolds and cell/protein delivery vehicles. PMID:26670176

  2. Effect of ECM Stiffness on Integrin-Ligand Binding Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Gawain; Wen, Qi

    2014-03-01

    Many studies have shown that cells respond to the stiffness of their extracellular matrix (ECM). However, the mechanism of this stiffness sensing is not fully understood. We believe that cells probe stiffness by applying intracellular force to the ECM via the integrin-mediated adhesions. The linkage of integrins to the cytoskeleton has been modeled as a slip clutch, which has been shown to affect focal adhesion formation and hence force transmission in a stiffness dependent manner. In contrast, the bonds between integrins and ECM have been characterized as ``catch bonds.'' It is unclear how ECM viscoelasticity affects these catch bonds. We report, for the first time, the effects of ECM stiffness on the binding strength of integrins to ECM ligands by measuring the rupture force of individual integrin-ligand bonds of cells on collagen-coated polyacrylamide gels. Results show that the integrin-collagen bonds of 3T3 fibroblasts are nearly four times stronger on a stiff (30 kPa) gel than on a soft (3 kPa) gel. The stronger integrin bonds on stiffer substrates can promote focal adhesion formation. This suggests that the substrate stiffness regulates the cell-ECM adhesions not only by affecting the cytoskeleton-integrin links but also by modulating the binding of integrins to the ECM.

  3. Arterial Stiffness, Distensibility, and Strain in Asthmatic Children

    PubMed Central

    Özkan, Esra Akyüz; Serin, Halil İbrahim; Khosroshahi, Hashem E.; Kılıç, Mahmut; Ekim, Meral; Beysel, Perihan; Geçit, U. Aliye; Domur, Esra

    2016-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that since asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease, it could lead to the early development of atherosclerosis in childhood-onset asthma. The aim of this study was to investigate arterial stiffness, distensibility, and strain of different peripheral arteries, the parameters of which can be used to detect atherosclerosis in asthmatic children. Material/Methods We studied 22 pediatric patients with asthma and 18 healthy children. Fasting blood glucose and cholesterol levels were evaluated to exclude children with diabetes and hyperlipidemia, which are risk factors for atherosclerosis. Renal, carotid, and brachial arteries diameters were measured. Using the measured data, stiffness, distensibility, and strain of the arteries of all children were calculated. Results Pulse pressure, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, cholesterols, and glucose levels of the obese individuals were similar to the controls. In carotid arteries there were no statistical differences regarding stiffness, distensibility, and strain. According to multiple ANCOVA analysis, distensibility and strain of right and left brachial arteries and right renal artery were higher, whereas right renal artery stiffness was lower in asthmatic children than in controls. Approximately one-fifth of the change in the left and right brachial arteries and right renal artery distensibility and strain and a small portion of the change in the right renal artery stiffness were associated with asthma. In contrast, left renal artery distensibility, strain, and stiffness were not associated with asthma. Conclusions Peripheral arteries had higher distensibility and strain, and lower stiffness in asthmatic children than in controls. PMID:26803723

  4. Classical and numerical approaches to determining V-section band clamp axial stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrans, Simon M.; Khodabakhshi, Goodarz; Muller, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    V-band clamp joints are used in a wide range of applications to connect circular flanges, for ducts, pipes and the turbocharger housing. Previous studies and research on V-bands are either purely empirical or analytical with limited applicability on the variety of V-band design and working conditions. In this paper models of the V-band are developed based on the classical theory of solid mechanics and the finite element method to study the behaviour of theV-bands under axial loading conditions. The good agreement between results from the developed FEA and the classical model support the suitability of the latter to modelV-band joints with diameters greater than 110mm under axial loading. The results from both models suggest that the axial stiffness for thisV-band cross section reaches a peak value for V-bands with radius of approximately 150 mmacross a wide range of coefficients of friction. Also, it is shown that the coefficient of friction and the wedge angle have a significant effect on the axial stiffness of V-bands.

  5. Structural stiffness and Coulomb damping in compliant foil journal bearings: Theoretical considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, C.-P. Roger; Heshmat, Hooshang

    1994-07-01

    Compliant foil bearings operate on either gas or liquid, which makes them very attractive for use in extreme environments such as in high-temperature aircraft turbine engines and cryogenic turbopumps. However, a lack of analytical models to predict the dynamic characteristics of foil bearings forces the bearing designer to rely on prototype testing, which is time-consuming and expensive. In this paper, the authors present a theoretical model to predict the structural stiffness and damping coefficients of the bump foil strip in a journal bearing or damper. Stiffness is calculated based on the perturbation of the journal center with respect to its static equilibrium position. The equivalent viscous damping coefficients are determined based on the area of a closed hysteresis loop of the journal center motion. The authors found, theoretically, that the energy dissipated from this loop was mostly contributed by the frictional motion between contact surfaces. In addition, the source and mechanism of the nonlinear behavior of the bump foil strips were examined. With the introduction of this enhanced model, the analytical tools are now available for the design of compliant foil bearings.

  6. Impact of blood pressure perturbations on arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jisok; Pearman, Miriam E; Park, Wonil; Alkatan, Mohammed; Machin, Daniel R; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2015-12-15

    Although the associations between chronic levels of arterial stiffness and blood pressure (BP) have been fairly well studied, it is not clear whether and how much arterial stiffness is influenced by acute perturbations in BP. The primary aim of this study was to determine magnitudes of BP dependence of various measures of arterial stiffness during acute BP perturbation maneuvers. Fifty apparently healthy subjects, including 25 young (20-40 yr) and 25 older adults (60-80 yr), were studied. A variety of BP perturbations, including head-up tilt, head-down tilt, mental stress, isometric handgrip exercise, and cold pressor test, were used to encompass BP changes induced by physical, mental, and/or mechanical stimuli. When each index of arterial stiffness was plotted with mean BP, all arterial stiffness indices, including cardio-ankle vascular index or CAVI (r = 0.50), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity or cfPWV (r = 0.51), brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity or baPWV (r = 0.61), arterial compliance (r = -0.42), elastic modulus (r = 0.52), arterial distensibility (r = -0.32), β-stiffness index (r = 0.19), and Young's modulus (r = 0.35) were related to mean BP (all P < 0.01). Changes in CAVI, cfPWV, baPWV, and elastic modulus were significantly associated with changes in mean BP in the pooled conditions, while changes in arterial compliance, arterial distensibility, β-stiffness index, and Young's modulus were not. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that BP changes in response to various forms of pressor stimuli were associated with the corresponding changes in arterial stiffness indices and that the strengths of associations with BP varied widely depending on what arterial stiffness indices were examined. PMID:26468262

  7. X-Ray And Acoustic Measurements Yield Stiffnesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madaras, Eric Irvine; Kline, Ronald A.

    1993-01-01

    Analytical technique combines ultrasonic scanning measurements of local velocity of sound in specimen of material with x-ray computed tomographic measurements of local mass density to compute local stiffness of material. Stiffnesses at various locations in specimen then used in finite-element mathematical model of elastic behavior of specimen to compute local stresses, local strains, and overall deformations. Technique enhances value of quantitative nondestructive x-ray and ultrasonic measurements. Especially useful in characterization of carbon/carbon composites and other advanced materials not homogeneous and for which customary simplifying assumption of constant density and/or constant stiffness not valid.

  8. Parametric signal amplification to create a stiff optical bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somiya, K.; Kataoka, Y.; Kato, J.; Saito, N.; Yano, K.

    2016-02-01

    An optical cavity consisting of optically trapped mirrors makes a resonant bar that can be stiffer than diamond. A limitation of the stiffness arises in the length of the optical bar as a consequence of the finite light speed. High laser power and light mass mirrors are essential for realization of a long and stiff optical bar that can be useful for example in the gravitational-wave detector aiming at the observation of a signal from neutron-star collisions, supernovae, etc. In this letter, we introduce a parametric signal amplification scheme that realizes the long and stiff optical bar with a non-linear crystal inside the signal-recycling cavity.

  9. An experimental and theoretical comparison of rotordynamic coefficients for sawtooth-pattern damper seals. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, Steven Anthony

    1987-01-01

    A brief review of the annular seal theory as related to rotordynamics for liquid seals is presented. Also included is an overview of Childs and Kim's current theory for calculating empirical turbulence coefficients and predicting stiffness and damping coefficients for surface roughened damper seals. The designation sawtooth-pattern refers to a seal stator with a roughness pattern whose cross section normal to the seal axis resembles a sawtooth with the teeth directed against the flow. The net stiffness and damping coefficients for the eleven seals are compared to each other, a smooth seal, and the optimum-configuration damper seal previously tested. The experimental force coefficients, the net damping, and the net stiffness coefficients for four of the sawtooth seals are compared to the predictions of Childs and Kim's analysis. The sawtooth-pattern seal had less net damping than the hole-pattern seal but more than the smooth seal. The stiffness was comparable to the hole-pattern. Both the sawtooth and hole-pattern seals leaked less than the smooth seal, while the sawtooth-pattern seal with maximum damping leaked more than the hole-pattern seal. The theoretical predictions compared relatively poorly to the experimental results obtained for the rotordynamic coefficients of the seals investigation.

  10. Estimation of Quasi-Stiffness and Propulsive Work of the Human Ankle in the Stance Phase of Walking

    PubMed Central

    Shamaei, Kamran; Sawicki, Gregory S.; Dollar, Aaron M.

    2013-01-01

    Characterizing the quasi-stiffness and work of lower extremity joints is critical for evaluating human locomotion and designing assistive devices such as prostheses and orthoses intended to emulate the biological behavior of human legs. This work aims to establish statistical models that allow us to predict the ankle quasi-stiffness and net mechanical work for adults walking on level ground. During the stance phase of walking, the ankle joint propels the body through three distinctive phases of nearly constant stiffness known as the quasi-stiffness of each phase. Using a generic equation for the ankle moment obtained through an inverse dynamics analysis, we identify key independent parameters needed to predict ankle quasi-stiffness and propulsive work and also the functional form of each correlation. These parameters include gait speed, ankle excursion, and subject height and weight. Based on the identified form of the correlation and key variables, we applied linear regression on experimental walking data for 216 gait trials across 26 subjects (speeds from 0.75–2.63 m/s) to obtain statistical models of varying complexity. The most general forms of the statistical models include all the key parameters and have an R2 of 75% to 81% in the prediction of the ankle quasi-stiffnesses and propulsive work. The most specific models include only subject height and weight and could predict the ankle quasi-stiffnesses and work for optimal walking speed with average error of 13% to 30%. We discuss how these models provide a useful framework and foundation for designing subject- and gait-specific prosthetic and exoskeletal devices designed to emulate biological ankle function during level ground walking. PMID:23555839

  11. Pressure element of constant logarithmic stiffness for temperature compensated altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brombacher, W G; Cordero, F

    1930-01-01

    The usual type of altimeter contains a pressure element, the deflections of which are approximately proportional to pressure changes. An evenly divided altitude scale is secured by using a mechanism between the pressure element and pointer which gives the required motion of the pointer. A temperature-compensated altimeter was constructed at the Bureau of Standards for the Bureau of Aeronautics of the Navy Department which contained a manually operated device for controlling the multiplication of the mechanism to the extent necessary for temperature compensation. The introduction of this device made it difficult to adjust the multiplying mechanism to fit an evenly divided altitude scale. To meet this difficulty a pressure element was designed and constructed which gave deflections which were proportional to altitude; that is, to the logarithm of the pressure. The element consisted of a metal bellows of the sylphon type coupled to an internal helical spring which was designed so as to have a variable number of active coils. This report presents a description of and laboratory data relating to the special pressure element for the altimeter. In addition equations which apply generally to springs and pressure elements of constant logarithmic stiffness are developed, including the deflection and the spacing between the coils in terms of the constants of the helical spring and pressure elements. (author)

  12. [Anesthetic Management for a Patient with Stiff-person Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kumiko; Murao, Kohei; Kimoto-Shirakawa, Michiyo; Takahira, Kazuyo; Toorabally, Farah; Shingu, Koh

    2016-02-01

    The stiff-person syndrome (SPS) is a rare autoimmune neurologic disorder that affects the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) mediated inhibitory network in the central nervous system with anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies. SPS is characterized by muscle rigidity and painful episodic spasms in axial and lower limb muscles. This case report describes successful peri-operative management of a 61-year-old female (height, 158 cm; weight, 60 kg, ASA-PS 2) with her right upper arm fracture who was scheduled for open reduction and internal fixation. This patient had bulbar paralysis, dysphagia and muscle rigidity associated with a high titer of anti-GAD auto antibodies (2,800 U x ml(-1)). She was diagnosed as SPS and has been treated with predonisolone (30 mg x day(-1)) and diazepam (20 mg x day(-1)) for 1 year. Predonisolone (15 mg) and diazepam (30 mg) was given orally before induction of general anesthesia with propofol, remifentanil and rocuronium bromide. Posture change from supine to beach-chair position led to sudden drop in blood pressure to 38/25 mmHg, which recovered promptly by injecting intravenous ephedrine hydrochloride (28 mg) and hydrocortisone (100 mg). Postanesthetic course was uneventful without postoperative neurologic abnormalities. PMID:27017773

  13. Rhythmic contraction generates adjustable passive stiffness in rabbit detrusor

    PubMed Central

    Almasri, Atheer M.; Ratz, Paul H.; Bhatia, Hersch; Klausner, Adam P.

    2010-01-01

    The length-tension (L-T) relationships in airway and vascular smooth muscles have been shown to adapt with length changes over time. Our prior studies have shown that the active and passive L-T relationships in rabbit detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) can adapt and that DSM exhibits adjustable passive stiffness (APS) characterized by a passive L-T curve that is a function of strain and activation history. The present study demonstrates that passive tension due to APS can represent a substantial fraction of total tension over a broad length range. Our previous studies have shown that maximal KCl-induced contractions at short muscle lengths generate APS that is revealed by increased pseudo-steady-state passive tension at longer lengths compared with previous measurements at those lengths. The objective of the present study was to determine the mechanisms involved in APS generation. Increasing the number of KCl-induced contractions or the duration of a contraction increased the amount of APS generated. Furthermore, a fraction of APS was restored in calcium-free solution and was sensitive to the general serine and threonine protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine. Most importantly, rhythmic contraction (RC) generated APS, and because RC occurs spontaneously in human bladder, a physiological role for RC was potentially identified. PMID:20056849

  14. On the characteristics of a quasi-zero stiffness isolator using Euler buckled beam as negative stiffness corrector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingtian; Huang, Xiuchang; Hua, Hongxing

    2013-07-01

    The characteristics of a passive nonlinear isolator which is developed by parallelly adding a negative stiffness corrector to a linear spring are studied. The negative stiffness corrector, which is formed by Euler buckled beams can offer negative stiffness to the isolator at the equilibrium position in order to lower the overall dynamic stiffness of the isolator and without sacrificing the support capacity compared to the linear isolator. The static characteristics of the stiffness corrector as well as the nonlinear isolator are presented and the system parameters which can offer zero stiffness at the equilibrium point are derived. The restoring force of the nonlinear isolator after loaded is approximated using the Taylor expansion to pure cubic stiffness. The dynamic equation is established and the frequency response curves (FRCs) are obtained by using the Harmonic Balance Method (HBM) for both force and displacement excitations. The force and displacement transmissibility of the nonlinear isolator are defined and investigated, and the isolation performance is compared with an equivalent linear isolator which can support the same mass with the same static deflection as the nonlinear isolator. The effects of the amplitude of the excitation and damping ratio on the transmissibility performance are considered. The results demonstrate that the proposed zero dynamic stiffness nonlinear isolator can outperform the equivalent linear one for certain frequencies, and the performance is related to the magnitude of the excitation amplitude. Unlike the linear isolator, in the nonlinear isolator for base displacement excitation, unbounded response or transmissibility can occur which is not observed for force excitation case. The performance can also be improved by adjusting the configurations of the beams. Some useful guidelines for choosing system parameters such as the properties of the beams and the stiffness relationship between the beams and the linear spring are given.

  15. Stiff DAE integrator with sensitivity analysis capabilities

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-11-26

    IDAS is a general purpose (serial and parallel) solver for differential equation (ODE) systems with senstivity analysis capabilities. It provides both forward and adjoint sensitivity analysis options.

  16. Use of Guided Acoustic Waves to Assess the Effects of Thermal-Mechanical Cycling on Composite Stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seale, Michael D.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2000-01-01

    The introduction of new, advanced composite materials into aviation systems requires it thorough understanding of the long-term effects of combined thermal and mechanical loading. As part of a study to evaluate the effects of thermal-mechanical cycling, it guided acoustic (Lamb) wave measurement system was used to measure the bending and out-of-plane stiffness coefficients of composite laminates undergoing thermal-mechanical loading. The system uses a pulse/receive technique that excites an antisymmetric Lamb mode and measures the time-of-flight over a wide frequency range. Given the material density and plate thickness, the bending and out-of-plane shear stiffnesses are calculated from a reconstruction of the velocity dispersion curve. A series of 16 and 32-ply composite laminates were subjected to it thermal-mechanical loading profile in load frames equipped with special environmental chambers. The composite systems studied were it graphite fiber reinforced amorphous thermoplastic polyimide and it graphite fiber reinforced bismaleimide thermoset. The samples were exposed to both high and low temperature extremes its well as high and low strain profiles. The bending and out-of-plane stiffnesses for composite sample that have undergone over 6,000 cycles of thermal-mechanical loading are reported. The Lamb wave generated elastic stiffness results have shown decreases of up to 20% at 4,936 loading cycles for the graphite/thermoplastic samples and up to 64% at 4,706 loading cycles for the graphite/thermoset samples.

  17. Charts relating the compressive buckling stress of longitudinally supported plates to the effective deflectional and rotational stiffness of the supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Roger A; Semonian, Joseph W

    1954-01-01

    A stability analysis is made of a long flat rectangular plate subjected to a uniform longitudinal compressive stress and supported along its longitudinal edges and along one or more longitudinal lines by elastic line supports. The elastic supports possess deflectional and rotational stiffness. Such configuration is an idealization of the compression cover skin and internal structure of a wing and tail surfaces. The results of the analysis are presented in the form of charts in which the buckling-stress coefficient is plotted against the buckle length of the plate for a wide range of support stiffnesses. The charts make possible the determination of the compressive buckling stress of plates supported by members whose stiffness may or may not be defined by elementary beam bending and twisting theory but yet whose effective restraint is amenable to evaluation. The deflectional and rotational stiffness provided by longitudinal stiffeners and full-depth webs is discussed and numerical examples are given to illustrate the application of the charts to the design of wing structures.

  18. Operator-Based Preconditioning of Stiff Hyperbolic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Daniel R.; Samtaney, Ravi; Woodward, Carol S.

    2009-02-09

    We introduce an operator-based scheme for preconditioning stiff components encoun- tered in implicit methods for hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations posed on regular grids. The method is based on a directional splitting of the implicit operator, followed by a char- acteristic decomposition of the resulting directional parts. This approach allows for solution to any number of characteristic components, from the entire system to only the fastest, stiffness-inducing waves. We apply the preconditioning method to stiff hyperbolic systems arising in magnetohydro- dynamics and gas dynamics. We then present numerical results showing that this preconditioning scheme works well on problems where the underlying stiffness results from the interaction of fast transient waves with slowly-evolving dynamics, scales well to large problem sizes and numbers of processors, and allows for additional customization based on the specific problems under study.

  19. Improved Equivalent Linearization Implementations Using Nonlinear Stiffness Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Muravyov, Alexander A.

    2001-01-01

    This report documents two new implementations of equivalent linearization for solving geometrically nonlinear random vibration problems of complicated structures. The implementations are given the acronym ELSTEP, for "Equivalent Linearization using a STiffness Evaluation Procedure." Both implementations of ELSTEP are fundamentally the same in that they use a novel nonlinear stiffness evaluation procedure to numerically compute otherwise inaccessible nonlinear stiffness terms from commercial finite element programs. The commercial finite element program MSC/NASTRAN (NASTRAN) was chosen as the core of ELSTEP. The FORTRAN implementation calculates the nonlinear stiffness terms and performs the equivalent linearization analysis outside of NASTRAN. The Direct Matrix Abstraction Program (DMAP) implementation performs these operations within NASTRAN. Both provide nearly identical results. Within each implementation, two error minimization approaches for the equivalent linearization procedure are available - force and strain energy error minimization. Sample results for a simply supported rectangular plate are included to illustrate the analysis procedure.

  20. Stiffness Corrections for the Vibration Frequency of a Stretched Wire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornung, H. G.; Durie, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the need of introducing corrections due to wire stiffness arising from end constraints and wire axis distribution curvature in the measurement of ac electrical frequency by exciting transverse standing waves in a stretched steel wire. (SL)

  1. Variational principles for stiffnesses of a non-homogeneous plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolpakov, A. G.

    1999-10-01

    Lagrange- and Castigliano-type variational principles for a non-homogeneous plate of periodic structure are derived on the basis of the homogenization method. The obtained principles provide, in particular, Voigt-Reuss-like bounds for the stiffnesses.

  2. Wing/store flutter with nonlinear pylon stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmarais, R. N.; Reed, W. H., III

    1980-01-01

    Recent wind tunnel tests and analytical studies show that a store mounted on a pylon with soft pitch stiffness provides substantial increase in flutter speed of fighter aircraft and reduces dependency of flutter on mass and inertia of the store. This concept, termed the decoupler pylon, utilizes a low frequency control system to maintain pitch alignment of the store during maneuvers and changing flight conditions. Under rapidly changing transient loads, however, the alignment control system may allow the store to momentarily bottom against a relatively stiff backup structure in which case the pylon stiffness acts as a hardening nonlinear spring. Such structural nonlinearities are known to affect not only the flutter speed but also the basic behavior of the instability. The influence of pylon stiffness nonlinearities or the flutter characteristics of wing mounted external stores is examined.

  3. Stiffness of Carpentry Connections - Numerical Modelling vs. Experimental Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekeliak, Miloš; Gocál, Jozef; Vičan, Josef

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, numerical modelling of the traditional carpentry connection with mortise and tenon is presented. Numerical modelling is focused on its stiffness and the results are compared to results of experimental tests carried out by (Feio, 2005) [6]. To consider soft behaviour of wood in carpentry connections, which are related to its surface roughness and geometrical accuracy of the contact surfaces, the characteristics of the normal contact stiffness, determined experimentally, are introduced in the numerical model. Parametric study by means of numerical modelling with regard to the sensitivity of connection stiffness to contact stiffness is presented. Based on the study results, in conclusion there are presented relevant differences between the results of numerical modelling and experimental tests (Feio, 2005) [6].

  4. Quantification of Magnetically Induced Changes in ECM Local Apparent Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Herath, Sahan C.B.; Yue, Du; Hui, Shi; Kim, Min-Cheol; Wang, Dong-an; Wang, Qingguo; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.; Asada, Harry; Chen, Peter C.Y.

    2014-01-01

    The stiffness of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is known to influence cell behavior. The ability to manipulate the stiffness of ECM has important implications in understanding how cells interact mechanically with their microenvironment. This article describes an approach to manipulating the stiffness ECM, whereby magnetic beads are embedded in the ECM through bioconjugation between the streptavidin-coated beads and the collagen fibers and then manipulated by an external magnetic field. It also reports both analytical results (obtained by formal modeling and numerical simulation) and statistically meaningful experimental results (obtained by atomic force microscopy) that demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. These results clearly suggest the possibility of creating desired stiffness gradients in ECM in vitro to influence cell behavior. PMID:24411265

  5. Improving Spanning-Knee External Fixator Stiffness: A Biomechanical Study.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mihir J; Reisman, William M; Hutton, William C

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to test and compare external fixator construct stiffness using pin-to-bar clamps or multipin clamps across 2 external fixation systems. Constructs were tested with 8-mm and 11-mm-diameter bar systems and pin-to-bar or multipin clamps. Three construct designs were tested: construct 1 with a single crossbar and pin-to-bar clamps, construct 2 with 2 crossbars and pin-to-bar clamps, and construct 3 with 2 crossbars and multipin clamps. The stiffness of each construct (N = 24) was tested using anterior-posterior bending. Two crossbars and pin-to-bar clamps resulted in the highest mean stiffness. Constructs with a single crossbar and pin-to-bar clamps had a similar average stiffness compared with constructs with 2 crossbars and multipin clamps. Pin-to-bar clamps with 2 crossbars result in stronger spanning-knee external fixators than constructs using multipin clamps. PMID:26866321

  6. Sliding stiff diagrams: A sophisticated ground water analytical tool

    SciTech Connect

    Tonjes, D.J.; Heil, J.H.; Black, J.A.

    1995-07-01

    Stiff diagrams are a multivariate method of analysis used to describe the chemical state of ground water. The use of stiff diagrams to describe multiconstituent contamination sites, such as landfills, has distinct advantages over single constituent analyses. Problems associated with traditional Stiff diagram analyses, such as diagram attenuation, can be addressed by allowing the scale of the diagram to vary with the ionic strength of the analyzed sample. The use of these sliding scale Stiff diagrams reveals the chemical state of the ground water over wide ranges of constituent concentrations and thus allows for sensitive and sophisticated depictions of complicated contamination sites in a fashion that is extremely difficult to replicate with single constituent analyses. This approach has possible applications for understanding and tracing the mixing and chemical changes in uncontaminated settings.

  7. Analytical method to determine flexoelectric coupling coefficient at nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hao; Pei, Yongmao; Hong, Jiawang; Fang, Daining

    2016-03-01

    Flexoelectricity is defined as the coupling between the strain gradient and polarization, which is expected to be remarkable at nanoscale. However, measuring the flexoelectricity at nanoscale is challenging. In the present work, an analytical method for measuring the flexoelectric coupling coefficient based on nanocompression technique is proposed. It is found that the flexoelectricity can induce stiffness softening of the dielectric nano-cone-frustum. This phenomenon becomes more significant when the sample size decreases or the half cone angle increases. This method avoids measuring the electric polarization or current at nanoscale with dynamical loading, which can be beneficial to the flexoelectric measurement at nanoscale and design of flexoelectric nanodevices.

  8. Influence of Compression and Stiffness Apparel on Vertical Jump Performance.

    PubMed

    Wannop, John W; Worobets, Jay T; Madden, Ryan; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2016-04-01

    Wannop, JW, Worobets, JT, Madden, R, and Stefanyshyn, DJ. Influence of compression and stiffness apparel on vertical jump performance. J Strength Cond Res 30(4): 1093-1101, 2016-Compression apparel alters both compression of the soft tissues and the hip joint stiffness of athletes. It is not known whether it is the compression elements, the stiffness elements, or some combination that increases performance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine how systematically increasing upper leg compression and hip joint stiffness independently from one another affects vertical jumping performance. Ten male athletes performed countermovement vertical jumps in 8 concept apparel conditions and 1 control condition (loose fitting shorts). The 8 apparel conditions, 4 that specifically altered the amount of compression exerted on the thigh and 4 that altered the hip joint stiffness by means of elastic thermoplastic polyurethane bands, were tested on 2 separate testing sessions (one testing the compression apparel and the other testing the stiffness apparel). Maximum jump height was measured, while kinematic data of the hip, knee, and ankle joint were recorded with a high-speed camera (480 Hz). Both compression and stiffness apparel can have a positive influence on vertical jumping performance. The increase in jump height for the optimal compression was due to increased hip joint range of motion and a trend of increasing the jump time. Optimal stiffness also increased jump height and had the trend of decreasing the hip joint range of motion and hip joint angular velocity. The exact mechanisms by which apparel interventions alter performance is not clear, but it may be due to alterations to the force-length and force-velocity relationships of muscle. PMID:27003453

  9. The initial torsional stiffness of shells with interior webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Paul

    1935-01-01

    A method of calculating the stresses and torsional stiffness of thin shells with interior webs is summarized. Comparisons between experimental and calculated results are given for 3 duralumin beams, 5 stainless steel beams and 2 duralumin wings. It is concluded that if the theoretical stiffness is multiplied by a correction factor of 0.9, experimental values may be expected to check calculated values within about 10 percent.

  10. Gear mesh stiffness and load sharing in planetary gearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasuba, R.; August, R.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive computerized analysis was developed for determining load sharing among planetary gears. The load sharing is established as a function of transmitted torque, degree of sun gear fixity, component flexibility, gear tooth quality, and phasing of individual planet gears. A nonlinear variable gear tooth mesh stiffness model was used to simulate the sun/plant and planet/ring gear meshes. The determined load sharing and gear mesh stiffness parameters then can be used for the subsequent assessment of dynamic load factors.

  11. Effects of age and diabetes on scleral stiffness.

    PubMed

    Coudrillier, Baptiste; Pijanka, Jacek; Jefferys, Joan; Sorensen, Thomas; Quigley, Harry A; Boote, Craig; Nguyen, Thao D

    2015-07-01

    The effects of diabetes on the collagen structure and material properties of the sclera are unknown but may be important to elucidate whether diabetes is a risk factor for major ocular diseases such as glaucoma. This study provides a quantitative assessment of the changes in scleral stiffness and collagen fiber alignment associated with diabetes. Posterior scleral shells from five diabetic donors and seven non-diabetic donors were pressurized to 30?mm Hg. Three-dimensional surface displacements were calculated during inflation testing using digital image correlation (DIC). After testing, each specimen was subjected to wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) measurements of its collagen organization. Specimen-specific finite element models of the posterior scleras were generated from the experimentally measured geometry. An inverse finite element analysis was developed to determine the material properties of the specimens, i.e., matrix and fiber stiffness, by matching DIC-measured and finite element predicted displacement fields. Effects of age and diabetes on the degree of fiber alignment, matrix and collagen fiber stiffness, and mechanical anisotropy were estimated using mixed effects models accounting for spatial autocorrelation. Older age was associated with a lower degree of fiber alignment and larger matrix stiffness for both diabetic and non-diabetic scleras. However, the age-related increase in matrix stiffness was 87% larger in diabetic specimens compared to non-diabetic controls and diabetic scleras had a significantly larger matrix stiffness (p?=?0.01). Older age was associated with a nearly significant increase in collagen fiber stiffness for diabetic specimens only (p?=?0.06), as well as a decrease in mechanical anisotropy for non-diabetic scleras only (p?=?0.04). The interaction between age and diabetes was not significant for all outcomes. This study suggests that the age-related increase in scleral stiffness is accelerated in eyes with diabetes, which may have important implications in glaucoma. PMID:25751456

  12. Pediatric stiff-person syndrome with renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M. Veerendra; Savida, P.

    2016-01-01

    Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) is an autoimmune neuronitis with progressive myoclonus and stiffness. It is a rare but treatable disorder with few case reports in children. SPS is due to autoantibodies against the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase which is present in neuronal and nonneuronal tissues. This is the case report of an 8-year-old boy with clinical and investigational features suggestive of SPS with associated myoglobin-induced renal failure, who completely recovered with treatment. PMID:26933366

  13. Modeling, Modal Properties, and Mesh Stiffness Variation Instabilities of Planetary Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Robert G.; Lin, Jian; Krantz, Timothy L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Planetary gear noise and vibration are primary concerns in their applications in helicopters, automobiles, aircraft engines, heavy machinery and marine vehicles. Dynamic analysis is essential to the noise and vibration reduction. This work analytically investigates some critical issues and advances the understanding of planetary gear dynamics. A lumped-parameter model is built for the dynamic analysis of general planetary gears. The unique properties of the natural frequency spectra and vibration modes are rigorously characterized. These special structures apply for general planetary gears with cyclic symmetry and, in practically important case, systems with diametrically opposed planets. The special vibration properties are useful for subsequent research. Taking advantage of the derived modal properties, the natural frequency and vibration mode sensitivities to design parameters are investigated. The key parameters include mesh stiffnesses, support/bearing stiffnesses, component masses, moments of inertia, and operating speed. The eigen-sensitivities are expressed in simple, closed-form formulae associated with modal strain and kinetic energies. As disorders (e.g., mesh stiffness variation. manufacturing and assembling errors) disturb the cyclic symmetry of planetary gears, their effects on the free vibration properties are quantitatively examined. Well-defined veering rules are derived to identify dramatic changes of natural frequencies and vibration modes under parameter variations. The knowledge of free vibration properties, eigen-sensitivities, and veering rules provide important information to effectively tune the natural frequencies and optimize structural design to minimize noise and vibration. Parametric instabilities excited by mesh stiffness variations are analytically studied for multi-mesh gear systems. The discrepancies of previous studies on parametric instability of two-stage gear chains are clarified using perturbation and numerical methods. The operating conditions causing parametric instabilities are expressed in closed-form suitable for design guidance. Using the well-defined modal properties of planetary gears, the effects of mesh parameters on parametric instability are analytically identified. Simple formulae are obtained to suppress particular instabilities by adjusting contact ratios and mesh phasing.

  14. Effect of Different Phases of Menstrual Cycle on Reflection Index, Stiffness index and Pulse wave velocity in Healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    TA, Sandhya

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Arterial compliance will result in stabilizing the fluctuations in arterial pressure and blood flow. So arterial stiffness can be a good indicator for monitoring the cardiovascular system. Arterial stiffness can be measured using indices like reflection index (RI), stiffness index (SI) and Brachial Finger Pulse Wave Velocity (BFPWV). Objectives: Aim of our study was to evaluate the changes in RI, SI and BFPWV during different phases of the menstrual cycle and to correlate RI with SI in healthy female subjects between the age group of 18-30 years from Bangalore, India. Materials and Methods: Basal recordings of RI and SI were determined by Photo Pulse Plethysmography (PPG) picked up from the fingertip using BIOPAC system and BFPWV was obtained using Doppler. Recordings were obtained at three different time points during the menstrual cycle. Analysis was done using repeated measures ANOVA with Bonferroni correction. Result: There was a significant decrease in above parameters p <0.05 during the mid-cycle. Correlation between RI and SI was also significant p<0.05. Conclusion: These findings suggests that the menstrual cycle affects the arterial stiffness and one of the factor is oestrogen. Hence, women are less prone to the incidence of cardiovascular diseases before menopause. Screening for arterial stiffness in a general population, using these indices is valid, economical and reliable. PMID:25386420

  15. Simultaneous measurement of real contact area and fault normal stiffness during frictional sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeler, N. M.; Nagata, K.; Kilgore, B. D.; Nakatani, M.

    2010-12-01

    The tectonic stresses that lead to earthquake slip are concentrated in small regions of solid contact between asperities or gouge particles within the fault. Fault strength is proportional to the contact area within the shearing portion of the fault zone and many fault properties of interest to earthquake hazard research, e.g., occurrence time, recurrence interval, precursory slip, triggered earthquake slip, are controlled by processes acting at the highly stressed contact regions. Unfortunately the contact-scale physical processes controlling earthquake occurrence cannot be easily observed or measured directly. In this pilot study we simultaneously directly measure contact area using transmitted light intensity (LI) [Dieterich and Kilgore, 1994; 1996] and continuously monitor the normal stiffness of the fault using acoustic wave transmission (AT) [Nagata et al., 2008]. The objective of our study is to determine relations amongst contacting area, stiffness, strength, normal stress, shear displacement, and time of contact during sliding. Interface stiffness is monitored using acoustic compressive waves transmitted across the fault. Because the fault is more compliant in compression than the surrounding rock, the fault has an elastic wave transmission coefficient that depends on the fault normal stiffness. Contact area is measured by LI: regions in contact transmit light efficiently while light is scattered elsewhere; therefore transmitted light intensity is presumed proportional to contact area. LI and AT are expected to be correlated; e.g., an elastic contact model suggests that stiffness goes as the square root of contact area. We observe LI and AT for sliding at slip speeds between 0.01 and 10 microns/s and normal stresses between 1 and 2.5 MPa while conducting standard velocity-step, normal stress-step and slide-hold-slide tests. AT and LI correlate during all tests, at all conditions. If the physical relationship, or even an empirical calibration between AT and LI can be established for rough fault surfaces, contact area could be measured with AT for non-transparent materials and at higher normal stresses than in the present experiments.

  16. Therapeutic modification of arterial stiffness: An update and comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ching-Fen; Liu, Pang-Yen; Wu, Tsung-Jui; Hung, Yuan; Yang, Shih-Ping; Lin, Gen-Min

    2015-01-01

    Arterial stiffness has been recognized as a marker of cardiovascular disease and associated with long-term worse clinical outcomes in several populations. Age, hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, known as traditional vascular risk factors, as well as diabetes, obesity, and systemic inflammation lead to both atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness. Targeting multiple modifiable risk factors has become the main therapeutic strategy to improve arterial stiffness in patients at high cardiovascular risk. Additionally to life style modifications, long-term ω-3 fatty acids (fish oil) supplementation in diet may improve arterial stiffness in the population with hypertension or metabolic syndrome. Pharmacological treatment such as renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system antagonists, metformin, and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors were useful in individuals with hypertension and diabetes. In obese population with obstructive sleep apnea, weight reduction, aerobic exercise, and continuous positive airway pressure treatment may also improve arterial stiffness. In the populations with chronic inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, a use of antibodies against tumor necrosis factor-alpha could work effectively. Other therapeutic options such as renal sympathetic nerve denervation for patients with resistant hypertension are investigated in many ongoing clinical trials. Therefore our comprehensive review provides knowledge in detail regarding many aspects of pathogenesis, measurement, and management of arterial stiffness in several populations, which would be helpful for physicians to make clinical decision. PMID:26635922

  17. Non-crossbridge stiffness in active muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Colombini, Barbara; Nocella, Marta; Bagni, Maria Angela

    2016-01-01

    Stretching of an activated skeletal muscle induces a transient tension increase followed by a period during which the tension remains elevated well above the isometric level at an almost constant value. This excess of tension in response to stretching has been called 'static tension' and attributed to an increase in fibre stiffness above the resting value, named 'static stiffness'. This observation was originally made, by our group, in frog intact muscle fibres and has been confirmed more recently, by us, in mammalian intact fibres. Following stimulation, fibre stiffness starts to increase during the latent period well before crossbridge force generation and it is present throughout the whole contraction in both single twitches and tetani. Static stiffness is dependent on sarcomere length in a different way from crossbridge force and is independent of stretching amplitude and velocity. Static stiffness follows a time course which is distinct from that of active force and very similar to the myoplasmic calcium concentration time course. We therefore hypothesize that static stiffness is due to a calcium-dependent stiffening of a non-crossbridge sarcomere structure, such as the titin filament. According to this hypothesis, titin, in addition to its well-recognized role in determining the muscle passive tension, could have a role during muscle activity. PMID:26792325

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Durotaxis Depends on Substrate Stiffness Gradient Strength

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Ludovic G.; Choi, Yu Suk; Alonso-Latorre, Baldomero; del Álamo, Juan C.; Engler, Adam J.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) respond to niche elasticity, which varies between and within tissues. Stiffness gradients result from pathological conditions but also occur through normal variation, e.g. muscle. MSCs undergo directed migration even in response to shallow stiffness gradients before differentiating. More refined gradients of both stiffness range and strength are needed to better understand mechanical regulation of migration in normal and disease pathologies. We describe polyacrylamide stiffness gradient fabrication using three distinct systems that generate stiffness gradients of physiological (1 Pa/µm), pathological (10 Pa/µm), and step (≥ 100Pa/um) strength spanning physiologically relevant stiffness for most soft tissue, i.e. 1–12 kPa. MSCs migrated to the stiffest region for each gradient. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that migration velocity scaled directly with gradient strength. Directed migration was reduced in the presence of the contractile agonist lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and cytoskeletal-perturbing drugs nocodazole and cytochalasin; LPA- and nocodazole-treated cells remained spread and protrusive, while cytochalasin-treated cells did not. Untreated and nocodazole-treated cells spread in a similar manner, but nocodazole-treated cells had greatly diminished traction forces. These data suggest that actin is required for migration whereas microtubules are required for directed migration. The data also imply that in vivo, MSCs may have a more significant contribution to repairs in stiffer regions where they may preferentially accumulate. PMID:23390141

  19. Changes in human knee ligament stiffness secondary to osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Fishkin, Zair; Miller, David; Ritter, Christopher; Ziv, Israel

    2002-03-01

    Stiffness of the medial (MCL) and lateral (LCL) collateral ligaments was compared between a group of 10 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty for varus degenerative osteoarthritis (OAP), a group of 10 osteoarthritic cadaveric knees (OAC), and a group of 10 non-osteoarthritic cadaveric knees (NOA). A load-elongation curve was obtained for the medial and lateral compartments of each knee using an instrumented Moreland spreader. A strain gage (SG) was attached to the spreader handle and strain was calibrated to load applied against the spread distance. In extension, medial compartment stiffness of the OAP, OAC, and NOA groups was 60.7+/-16, 52.8+/-9.3 and 21.4+/-5.0 N/mm, respectively. Lateral compartment stiffness in extension was 29.2+/-9.2, 33.3+/-10.3 and 19.5+/-5.3 N/mm, for OAP, OAC, and NOA, respectively. Differences in stiffness between the OAP and OAC groups were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). However, the osteoarthritic groups (OAP and OAC) demonstrated a statistically significantly (p < 0.05) increase in ligament stiffness when compared to the NOA group. Following knee arthroplasty, stiffer medial structures in extension may lead to flexion contracture and accelerated polyethylene wear. Adequate bone resection, in conjunction with soft tissue release may alleviate the threefold increase in stiffness observed in the medial compartment secondary to OA without jeopardizing joint stability. PMID:11918298

  20. Therapeutic modification of arterial stiffness: An update and comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Fen; Liu, Pang-Yen; Wu, Tsung-Jui; Hung, Yuan; Yang, Shih-Ping; Lin, Gen-Min

    2015-11-26

    Arterial stiffness has been recognized as a marker of cardiovascular disease and associated with long-term worse clinical outcomes in several populations. Age, hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, known as traditional vascular risk factors, as well as diabetes, obesity, and systemic inflammation lead to both atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness. Targeting multiple modifiable risk factors has become the main therapeutic strategy to improve arterial stiffness in patients at high cardiovascular risk. Additionally to life style modifications, long-term ω-3 fatty acids (fish oil) supplementation in diet may improve arterial stiffness in the population with hypertension or metabolic syndrome. Pharmacological treatment such as renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system antagonists, metformin, and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors were useful in individuals with hypertension and diabetes. In obese population with obstructive sleep apnea, weight reduction, aerobic exercise, and continuous positive airway pressure treatment may also improve arterial stiffness. In the populations with chronic inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, a use of antibodies against tumor necrosis factor-alpha could work effectively. Other therapeutic options such as renal sympathetic nerve denervation for patients with resistant hypertension are investigated in many ongoing clinical trials. Therefore our comprehensive review provides knowledge in detail regarding many aspects of pathogenesis, measurement, and management of arterial stiffness in several populations, which would be helpful for physicians to make clinical decision. PMID:26635922

  1. Age-related differences in trunk intrinsic stiffness.

    PubMed

    Vazirian, Milad; Shojaei, Iman; Tromp, Rebecca L; Nussbaum, Maury A; Bazrgari, Babak

    2016-04-11

    Age-related differences in trunk intrinsic stiffness, as an important potential contributor to spinal stability, were investigated here because of: (1) the role of spinal instability in low back pain (LBP) development; (2) the increasing prevalence of LBP with age, and (3) the increasing population of older people in the workforce. Sixty individuals aged 20-70 years, in five equal-size age groups, completed a series of displacement-controlled perturbation tests in an upright standing posture while holding four different levels of trunk extension efforts. In addition to examining any age-related difference in trunk intrinsic stiffness, the current design assessed the effects of gender, level of effort, and any differences in lower back neuromuscular patterns on trunk intrinsic stiffness. No significant differences in trunk intrinsic stiffness were found between the age groups. However, stiffness was significantly larger among males and increased with the level of extension effort. No influences of differences in neuromuscular pattern were observed. Since the passive contribution of trunk tissues in the upright standing posture is minimal, our values of estimated trunk intrinsic stiffness primarily represent the volitional contribution of the lower back musculoskeletal system to spinal stability. Therefore, it seems unlikely that the alterations in volitional behavior of the lower back musculature, caused by aging (e.g., as reflected in reduced strength), diminish their contributions to the spinal stability. PMID:26459489

  2. Standardized sensitivity coefficients for power system networks

    SciTech Connect

    Barcelo, W.R.; Lemmon, W.W. )

    1988-11-01

    A simple mathematical transformation for converting power system network sensitivity coefficients from one reference frame to another is derived using a generalized power center concept. The generalized power center consists of a swing power center and an angle center. A standard power center is presented wherein the swing power and angle centers are set equal to the load center. The resulting standardized sensitivity coefficients are independent of the swing bus. Solving a Lagrangian formulation of the economic dispatch problem results in the direct calculation of true system incremental cost only when standardized sensitivity coefficients are used. Results are presented for several practical cases involving the Jacobian and DC load flow matrices and several different power centers. The importance of the swing power sensitivity vector is identified and other key network relationships are developed.

  3. Symmetry-general least-squares extraction of elastic data for strained materials from ab initio calculations of stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Page, Yvon; Saxe, Paul

    2002-03-01

    A symmetry-general approach for the least-squares, therefore precise, extraction of elastic coefficients for strained materials is reported. It analyzes stresses calculated ab initio for properly selected strains. The problem, its implementation, and its solution strategy all differ radically from a previous energy-strain approach that we published last year, but the normal equations turn out to be amenable to the same constrainment scheme that makes both approaches symmetry general. The symmetry considerations governing the automated selection of appropriately strained models and their Cartesian systems are detailed. The extension to materials under general stress is discussed and implemented. VASP was used for ab initio calculation of stresses. A comprehensive range of examples includes a triclinic material (kyanite) and simple materials with a range of symmetries at zero pressure, MgO under hydrostatic pressure, Ti4As3 under [001] uniaxial strain, and Si under [001] uniaxial stress. The MgO case agrees with recent experimental work including elastic coefficients as well as their first and second derivatives. The curves of elastic coefficients for Si show a gradual increase in the 33 compliance coefficient, leading to a collapse of the material at -11.7 GPa, compared with -12.0 GPa experimentally. Interpretation of results for Be using two approximations [local density (LDA), generalized gradient (GGA)], two approaches (stress strain and energy strain), two potential types (projector augmented wave and ultrasoft), and two quantum engines (VASP and ORESTES) expose the utmost importance of the cell data used for the elastic calculations and the lesser importance of the other factors. For stiffness at relaxed cell data, differences are shown to originate mostly in the considerable overestimation of the residual compressive stresses at x-ray cell data by LDA, resulting in a smaller relaxed cell, thus larger values for diagonal stiffness coefficients. The symmetry generality of the approach described here enabled the creation of a robust user interface going seamlessly from the database search to the printout of the elastic coefficients. With it, even nonspecialist users can reliably produce technologically relevant results like those discussed here in a simple point-and-click fashion from corresponding entries in the CRYSTMET® and ICSD® structure databases, i.e., for all pure-phase nonorganic materials with known crystal structure. The case of Ti4As3 exposes, on a first cluster of properties, stiffness, compliance, and the isotropic properties that can be derived from them, the current reality of mining crystal structure databases with ab initio software for technological properties that were never measured before. Further developments in that direction are currently underway.

  4. Stiffness threshold of randomly distributed carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuli; Pan, Fei; Guo, Zaoyang; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Jianyu

    2015-11-01

    For carbon nanotube (CNT) networks, with increasing network density, there may be sudden changes in the properties, such as the sudden change in electrical conductivity at the electrical percolation threshold. In this paper, the change in stiffness of the CNT networks is studied and especially the existence of stiffness threshold is revealed. Two critical network densities are found to divide the stiffness behavior into three stages: zero stiffness, bending dominated and stretching dominated stages. The first critical network density is a criterion to judge whether or not the network is capable of carrying load, defined as the stiffness threshold. The second critical network density is a criterion to measure whether or not most of the CNTs in network are utilized effectively to carry load, defined as bending-stretching transitional threshold. Based on the geometric probability analysis, a theoretical methodology is set up to predict the two thresholds and explain their underlying mechanisms. The stiffness threshold is revealed to be determined by the statical determinacy of CNTs in the network, and can be estimated quantitatively by the stabilization fraction of network, a newly proposed parameter in this paper. The other threshold, bending-stretching transitional threshold, which signs the conversion of dominant deformation mode, is verified to be well evaluated by the proposed defect fraction of network. According to the theoretical analysis as well as the numerical simulation, the average intersection number on each CNT is revealed as the only dominant factor for the electrical percolation and the stiffness thresholds, it is approximately 3.7 for electrical percolation threshold, and 5.2 for the stiffness threshold of 2D networks. For 3D networks, they are 1.4 and 4.4. And it also affects the bending-stretching transitional threshold, together with the CNT aspect ratio. The average intersection number divided by the fourth root of CNT aspect ratio is found to be an invariant at the bending-stretching transitional threshold, which is 6.7 and 6.3 for 2D and 3D networks, respectively. Based on this study, a simple piecewise expression is summarized to describe the relative stiffness of CNT networks, in which the relative stiffness of networks depends on the relative network density as well as the CNT aspect ratio. This formula provides a solid theoretical foundation for the design optimization and property prediction of CNT networks.

  5. Hydration Status Is Associated with Aortic Stiffness, but Not with Peripheral Arterial Stiffness, in Chronically Hemodialysed Patients.

    PubMed

    Bia, Daniel; Galli, Cintia; Valtuille, Rodolfo; Zócalo, Yanina; Wray, Sandra A; Armentano, Ricardo L; Cabrera Fischer, Edmundo I

    2015-01-01

    Background. Adequate fluid management could be essential to minimize high arterial stiffness observed in chronically hemodialyzed patients (CHP). Aim. To determine the association between body fluid status and central and peripheral arterial stiffness levels. Methods. Arterial stiffness was assessed in 65 CHP by measuring the pulse wave velocity (PWV) in a central arterial pathway (carotid-femoral) and in a peripheral pathway (carotid-brachial). A blood pressure-independent regional arterial stiffness index was calculated using PWV. Volume status was assessed by whole-body multiple-frequency bioimpedance. Patients were first observed as an entire group and then divided into three different fluid status-related groups: normal, overhydration, and dehydration groups. Results. Only carotid-femoral stiffness was positively associated (P < 0.05) with the hydration status evaluated through extracellular/intracellular fluid, extracellular/Total Body Fluid, and absolute and relative overhydration. Conclusion. Volume status and overload are associated with central, but not peripheral, arterial stiffness levels with independence of the blood pressure level, in CHP. PMID:26167301

  6. Hydration Status Is Associated with Aortic Stiffness, but Not with Peripheral Arterial Stiffness, in Chronically Hemodialysed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bia, Daniel; Galli, Cintia; Valtuille, Rodolfo; Zócalo, Yanina; Wray, Sandra A.; Armentano, Ricardo L.; Cabrera Fischer, Edmundo I.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Adequate fluid management could be essential to minimize high arterial stiffness observed in chronically hemodialyzed patients (CHP). Aim. To determine the association between body fluid status and central and peripheral arterial stiffness levels. Methods. Arterial stiffness was assessed in 65 CHP by measuring the pulse wave velocity (PWV) in a central arterial pathway (carotid-femoral) and in a peripheral pathway (carotid-brachial). A blood pressure-independent regional arterial stiffness index was calculated using PWV. Volume status was assessed by whole-body multiple-frequency bioimpedance. Patients were first observed as an entire group and then divided into three different fluid status-related groups: normal, overhydration, and dehydration groups. Results. Only carotid-femoral stiffness was positively associated (P < 0.05) with the hydration status evaluated through extracellular/intracellular fluid, extracellular/Total Body Fluid, and absolute and relative overhydration. Conclusion. Volume status and overload are associated with central, but not peripheral, arterial stiffness levels with independence of the blood pressure level, in CHP. PMID:26167301

  7. Effects of arterial stiffness, pulse wave velocity, and wave reflections on the central aortic pressure waveform.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Wilmer W; Denardo, Scott J; Wilkinson, Ian B; McEniery, Carmel M; Cockcroft, John; O'Rourke, Michael F

    2008-04-01

    Brachial systolic and pulse blood pressures (BPs) are better predictors of adverse cardiovascular (CV) events than diastolic BP in individuals older than 50 years. The principal cause of increased systolic and pulse BP is increased stiffness of the elastic arteries as a result of degeneration and hyperplasia of the arterial wall. Recent studies have shown that central BP, the pressure exerted on the heart, brain, and kidneys, is a better predictor of CV risk than brachial BP. As stiffness increases, reflected wave amplitude increases and augments pressure in late systole, producing an increase in left ventricular afterload and myocardial oxygen demand. Vasoactive drugs have little direct effect on large human elastic arteries but can markedly modify wave reflection by altering stiffness of the muscular arteries and changing pulse wave velocity of the reflected wave from the periphery to the heart. Vasodilators decrease the amplitude and increase the travel time (or delay) of the reflected wave, causing a generalized decrease in systolic BP. The decrease in systolic BP brought about by this mechanism is grossly underestimated when systolic BP is measured in the brachial artery. PMID:18401227

  8. Electron temperature critical gradient and transport stiffness in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. P.; Petty, C. C.; White, A. E.; Holland, C.; Bravenec, R.; Austin, M. E.; Zeng, L.; Meneghini, O.

    2015-08-01

    In a continuing effort to validate turbulent transport models, the electron energy flux has been probed as a function of electron temperature gradient on the DIII-D tokamak. In the scan of gradient, a critical electron temperature gradient has been found in the electron heat fluxes and stiffness at various radii in L-mode plasmas. The TGLF reduced turbulent transport model (Staebler et al 2007 Phys. Plasmas 14 055909) and full gyrokinetic GYRO model (Candy and Waltz 2003 J. Comput. Phys. 186 545) recover the general trend of increasing electron energy flux with increasing electron temperature gradient scale length, but they do not predict the absolute level of transport at all radii and gradients. Comparing the experimental observations of incremental (heat pulse) diffusivity and stiffness to the models’ reveals that TGLF reproduces the trends in increasing diffusivity and stiffness with increasing electron temperature gradient scale length with a critical gradient behavior. The critical gradient of TGLF is found to have a dependence on q95, contrary to the independence of the experimental critical gradient from q95.

  9. Efficacy of pregabalin in a case of stiff-person syndrome: clinical and neurophysiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Squintani, G; Bovi, T; Ferigo, L; Musso, A M; Ottaviani, S; Moretto, G; Morgante, F; Tinazzi, M

    2012-03-15

    Symptomatic treatment of stiff-person syndrome (SPS) might be challenging and a significant improvement of stiffness and rigidity is generally reached with high doses of benzodiazepines or baclofen causing side effects. A 71-year old woman diagnosed with SPS complained of marked stiffness of trunk and lower limb muscles with sudden painful spasms. She was unable to walk and she could not lean on her right leg. Cortical silent period (CSP) duration evaluated from right abductor pollicis brevis (APB) with transcranial magnetic stimulation was shortened. Polygraphic electromyographic (EMG) evaluation from paraspinal and leg muscles disclosed continuous motor unit activity at rest with interference muscular pattern. Symptomatic treatment with diazepam was withdrawn because of excessive sedation. In order to relieve the intense lumbar pain, she was prescribed pregabalin; since the day after, rigidity and painful spasms dramatically improved and she could walk without assistance. The clinical benefit persisted at 3 months follow-up and was paralleled by almost complete disappearance of EMG activity at rest and prolongation of CSP. The clinical and electrophysiological data in this SPS patient suggest the possible efficacy of pregabalin as symptomatic treatment without any significant side effects, which needs to be replicated in larger case series. PMID:22082988

  10. The influence of thyroarytenoid and cricothyroid muscle activation on vocal fold stiffness and eigenfrequencies

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jun; Zhang, Zhaoyan

    2013-01-01

    The influence of the thyroarytenoid (TA) and cricothyroid (CT) muscle activation on vocal fold stiffness and eigenfrequencies was investigated in a muscularly controlled continuum model of the vocal folds. Unlike the general understanding that vocal fold fundamental frequency was determined by vocal fold tension, this study showed that vocal fold eigenfrequencies were primarily determined by vocal fold stiffness. This study further showed that, with reference to the resting state of zero strain, vocal fold stiffness in both body and cover layers increased with either vocal fold elongation or shortening. As a result, whether vocal fold eigenfrequencies increased or decreased with CT/TA activation depended on how the CT/TA interaction influenced vocal fold deformation. For conditions of strong CT activation and thus an elongated vocal fold, increasing TA contraction reduced the degree of vocal fold elongation and thus reduced vocal fold eigenfrequencies. For conditions of no CT activation and thus a resting or slightly shortened vocal fold, increasing TA contraction increased the degree of vocal fold shortening and thus increased vocal fold eigenfrequencies. In the transition region of a slightly elongated vocal fold, increasing TA contraction first decreased and then increased vocal fold eigenfrequencies. PMID:23654401

  11. The equilibrium state method for hyperbolic conservation laws with stiff reaction terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Liu, Hong; Chen, Fang; Wang, Jian Hang

    2014-04-01

    A new fractional-step method is proposed for numerical simulations of hyperbolic conservation laws with stiff source terms arising from chemically reactive flows. In stiff reaction problems, a well-known spurious numerical phenomenon, the incorrect propagation speed of discontinuities, may occur in general fractional-step algorithm due to the underresolved numerical solution in both space and time. The basic idea of the present proposed scheme is to replace the cell average representation with a two-equilibrium states reconstruction during the reaction step, which allows us to obtain the correct propagation of discontinuities for stiff reaction problems in an underresolved mesh. Because the definition of these two-equilibrium states for each transition cell is independent of its neighboring cells, the proposed method can be extended to multi-dimensional problems directly. In addition, this method is promising to deal with more complicated real-world problems after being extended to multi-species/multi-reactions system. Extensive numerical examples for one- and two-dimensional scalar and Euler system demonstrate the reliability and robustness of this novel method.

  12. Increased postflight carotid artery stiffness and inflight insulin resistance resulting from 6-mo spaceflight in male and female astronauts.

    PubMed

    Hughson, Richard L; Robertson, Andrew D; Arbeille, Philippe; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Rush, James W E; Fraser, Katelyn S; Greaves, Danielle K

    2016-03-01

    Removal of the normal head-to-foot gravity vector and chronic weightlessness during spaceflight might induce cardiovascular and metabolic adaptations related to changes in arterial pressure and reduction in physical activity. We tested hypotheses that stiffness of arteries located above the heart would be increased postflight, and that blood biomarkers inflight would be consistent with changes in vascular function. Possible sex differences in responses were explored in four male and four female astronauts who lived on the International Space Station for 6 mo. Carotid artery distensibility coefficient (P = 0.005) and β-stiffness index (P = 0.006) reflected 17-30% increases in arterial stiffness when measured within 38 h of return to Earth compared with preflight. Spaceflight-by-sex interaction effects were found with greater changes in β-stiffness index in women (P = 0.017), but greater changes in pulse wave transit time in men (P = 0.006). Several blood biomarkers were changed from preflight to inflight, including an increase in an index of insulin resistance (P < 0.001) with a spaceflight-by-sex term suggesting greater change in men (P = 0.034). Spaceflight-by-sex interactions for renin (P = 0.016) and aldosterone (P = 0.010) indicated greater increases in women than men. Six-month spaceflight caused increased arterial stiffness. Altered hydrostatic arterial pressure gradients as well as changes in insulin resistance and other biomarkers might have contributed to alterations in arterial properties, including sex differences between male and female astronauts. PMID:26747504

  13. Rotational Raman lidar for obtaining aerosol scattering coefficients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dukhyeon; Cha, Hyungki

    2005-07-01

    Two-channel lidar signals that are composed of total rotational scattering and elastic signals provide good information about aerosol scattering coefficients. We can calculate the aerosol backscattering coefficient and extinction coefficient directly, without making any assumption or calibration. Generally, a high-spectral-resolution lidar is used for aerosol monitoring, but we have designed a new low-spectral-resolution lidar system that contains both kinds of scattering information simultaneously, and we have retrieved the aerosol scattering coefficient. The results show that there is no need to assume any relation between aerosol backscattering and extinction or to consider any wavelength calibration to determine the aerosol scattering coefficient. PMID:16075552

  14. Muscle Synergies Heavily Influence the Neural Control of Arm Endpoint Stiffness and Energy Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, Joshua M.; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Much debate has arisen from research on muscle synergies with respect to both limb impedance control and energy consumption. Studies of limb impedance control in the context of reaching movements and postural tasks have produced divergent findings, and this study explores whether the use of synergies by the central nervous system (CNS) can resolve these findings and also provide insights on mechanisms of energy consumption. In this study, we phrase these debates at the conceptual level of interactions between neural degrees of freedom and tasks constraints. This allows us to examine the ability of experimentally-observed synergies—correlated muscle activations—to control both energy consumption and the stiffness component of limb endpoint impedance. In our nominal 6-muscle planar arm model, muscle synergies and the desired size, shape, and orientation of endpoint stiffness ellipses, are expressed as linear constraints that define the set of feasible muscle activation patterns. Quadratic programming allows us to predict whether and how energy consumption can be minimized throughout the workspace of the limb given those linear constraints. We show that the presence of synergies drastically decreases the ability of the CNS to vary the properties of the endpoint stiffness and can even preclude the ability to minimize energy. Furthermore, the capacity to minimize energy consumption—when available—can be greatly affected by arm posture. Our computational approach helps reconcile divergent findings and conclusions about task-specific regulation of endpoint stiffness and energy consumption in the context of synergies. But more generally, these results provide further evidence that the benefits and disadvantages of muscle synergies go hand-in-hand with the structure of feasible muscle activation patterns afforded by the mechanics of the limb and task constraints. These insights will help design experiments to elucidate the interplay between synergies and the mechanisms of learning, plasticity, versatility and pathology in neuromuscular systems. PMID:26867014

  15. Longitudinal perspective on the conundrum of central arterial stiffness, blood pressure, and aging.

    PubMed

    Scuteri, Angelo; Morrell, Christopher H; Orr, Marco; Strait, James B; Tarasov, Kirill V; Ferreli, Liana Anna Pina; Loi, Francesco; Pilia, Maria Grazia; Delitala, Alessandro; Spurgeon, Harold; Najjar, Samer S; AlGhatrif, Majd; Lakatta, Edward G

    2014-12-01

    The age-associated increase in arterial stiffness has long been considered to parallel or to cause the age-associated increase in blood pressure (BP). Yet, the rates at which pulse wave velocity (PWV), a measure of arterial stiffness, and BP trajectories change over time within individuals who differ by age and sex have not been assessed and compared. This study determined the evolution of BP and aortic PWV trajectories during a 9.4-year follow-up in >4000 community-dwelling men and women of 20 to 100 years of age at entry into the SardiNIA Study. Linear mixed effects model analyses revealed that PWV accelerates with time during the observation period, at about the same rate over the entire age range in both men and women. In men, the longitudinal rate at which BP changed over time, however, did not generally parallel that of PWV acceleration: at ages>40 years the rates of change in systolic BP (SBP) and pulse pressure (PP) increase plateaued and then declined so that SBP, itself, also declined at older ages, whereas PP plateaued. In women, SBP, diastolic BP, and mean BP increased at constant rates across all ages, producing an increasing rate of increase in PP. Therefore, increased aortic stiffness is implicated in the age-associated increase in SBP and PP. These findings indicate that PWV is not a surrogate for BP and that arterial properties other than arterial wall stiffness that vary by age and sex also modulate the BP trajectories during aging and lead to the dissociation of PWV, PP, and SBP trajectories in men. PMID:25225210

  16. Muscle Synergies Heavily Influence the Neural Control of Arm Endpoint Stiffness and Energy Consumption.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Joshua M; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J

    2016-02-01

    Much debate has arisen from research on muscle synergies with respect to both limb impedance control and energy consumption. Studies of limb impedance control in the context of reaching movements and postural tasks have produced divergent findings, and this study explores whether the use of synergies by the central nervous system (CNS) can resolve these findings and also provide insights on mechanisms of energy consumption. In this study, we phrase these debates at the conceptual level of interactions between neural degrees of freedom and tasks constraints. This allows us to examine the ability of experimentally-observed synergies-correlated muscle activations-to control both energy consumption and the stiffness component of limb endpoint impedance. In our nominal 6-muscle planar arm model, muscle synergies and the desired size, shape, and orientation of endpoint stiffness ellipses, are expressed as linear constraints that define the set of feasible muscle activation patterns. Quadratic programming allows us to predict whether and how energy consumption can be minimized throughout the workspace of the limb given those linear constraints. We show that the presence of synergies drastically decreases the ability of the CNS to vary the properties of the endpoint stiffness and can even preclude the ability to minimize energy. Furthermore, the capacity to minimize energy consumption-when available-can be greatly affected by arm posture. Our computational approach helps reconcile divergent findings and conclusions about task-specific regulation of endpoint stiffness and energy consumption in the context of synergies. But more generally, these results provide further evidence that the benefits and disadvantages of muscle synergies go hand-in-hand with the structure of feasible muscle activation patterns afforded by the mechanics of the limb and task constraints. These insights will help design experiments to elucidate the interplay between synergies and the mechanisms of learning, plasticity, versatility and pathology in neuromuscular systems. PMID:26867014

  17. A piezoelectric-based infinite stiffness generation method for strain-type load sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuwen; Shao, Shubao; Chen, Jie; Xu, Minglong

    2015-11-01

    Under certain application conditions like nanoindentation technology and the mechanical property measurement of soft materials, the elastic deformation of strain-type load sensors affects their displacement measurement accuracy. In this work, a piezoelectric-based infinite stiffness generation method for strain-type load sensors that compensates for this elastic deformation is presented. The piezoelectric material-based deformation compensation method is proposed. An Hottinger Baldwin Messtechnik GmbH (HBM) Z30A/50N load sensor acts as the foundation of the method presented in this work. The piezoelectric stack is selected based on its size, maximum deformation value, blocking force and stiffness. Then, a clamping and fixing structure is designed to integrate the HBM sensor with the piezoelectric stack. The clamping and fixing structure, piezoelectric stack and HBM load sensor comprise the sensing part of the enhanced load sensor. The load-deformation curve and the voltage-deformation curve of the enhanced load sensor are then investigated experimentally. Because a hysteresis effect exists in the piezoelectric structure, the relationship between the control signal and the deformation value of the piezoelectric material is nonlinear. The hysteresis characteristic in a quasi-static condition is studied and fitted using a quadratic polynomial, and its coefficients are analyzed to enable control signal prediction. Applied arithmetic based on current theory and the fitted data is developed to predict the control signal. Finally, the experimental effects of the proposed method are presented. It is shown that when a quasi-static load is exerted on this enhanced strain-type load sensor, the deformation is reduced and the equivalent stiffness appears to be almost infinite.

  18. Analysis and design of variable stiffness composite cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatting, Brian Frederick

    An investigation of the possible performance improvements of thin circular cylindrical shells through the use of the variable stiffness concept is presented. The variable stiffness concept implies that the stiffness parameters change spatially throughout the structure. This situation is achieved mainly through the use of curvilinear fibers within a fiber-reinforced composite laminate. The governing static equilibrium equations include sufficient detail to correctly model several types of nonlinearity, including the formation of a nonlinear shell boundary layer as well as the Brazier effect due to nonlinear bending of long cylinders. Four distinct cases of loading and stiffness variation are chosen to investigate. The initial investigation deals cylindrical shells in which all quantities are constant around the circumference of the cylinder. This axisymmetric case includes a stiffness variation exclusively in the axial direction, and the only pertinent loading scenarios include constant loads of axial compression, pressure, and torsion. The results for these cases indicate that little improvement over traditional laminates exists through the use of curvilinear fibers. The second problem involves arbitrary loading of a cylinder with a stiffness variation only in the circumferential direction. The problem takes the form of an analysis of a cross-section for a short cylinder segment. It is found that the most significant improvements in load-carrying capability exist for loads that also vary around the circumference of the shell, namely bending and shear forces. The stiffness variation of the optimal designs contribute to the increased performance in two ways: lowering the stresses in the critical areas through redistribution; and providing a relatively stiff region that alters the buckling behavior of the structure. These results led to an in-depth optimization study involving weight optimization of a fuselage structure subjected to typical design constraints. It is found that standard variable stiffness designs a offer the added advantage of tailorability of distinct regions of the structure that experience drastically different loading conditions. The last two problems work involve the nonlinear phenomenon of long tubes under bending. The dominating influence for long cylinders under bending is the ovalization of the cross-section. Possible improvement of the critical buckling moments for these structures is investigated using either a circumferential or axial stiffness variation. For the circumferential case involving infinite length cylinders, slight improvements can be observed by designing structures that resist the cross-sectional deformation yet do not detract from the buckling resistance at the critical location. The results also indicate that buckling behavior is extremely dependent on cylinder length. For finite length cylinders contain an axial stiffness variation, the only mechanism that exhibits improved response are those that effectively shorten the length of the cylinder. The use of curvilinear fibers was not able to achieve this effect in sufficient degree to resist the deformation, but ring stiffeners produced the desired response. Thus the variable stiffness concept is most effective at improving the bending response of long cylinders through the use of a circumferential stiffness variation. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  19. Huge Seebeck coefficients in nonaqueous electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, M.; Nakamae, S.; Roger, M.; Guenoun, P.

    2011-03-01

    The Seebeck coefficients of the nonaqueous electrolytes tetrabutylammonium nitrate, tetraoctylphosphonium bromide, and tetradodecylammonium nitrate in 1-octanol, 1-dodecanol, and ethylene-glycol are measured in a temperature range from T = 30 °C to T = 45 °C. The Seebeck coefficient is generally of the order of a few hundreds of microvolts per Kelvin for aqueous solution of inorganic ions. Here we report huge values of 7 mV/K at 0.1 M concentration for tetrabutylammonium nitrate in 1-dodecanol. These striking results open the question of unexpectedly large kosmotrope or "structure making" effects of tetraalkylammonium ions on the structure of alcohols.

  20. Thermomagnetic coefficients in terms of thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Andrei; Reyzer, Michael; Mitin, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    Nernst-Ettingshausen coefficient in relatively strong magnetic fields is obtained and expressed via thermodynamics parameters. The relation is general and applicable to any strongly interacting systems. Contrary to a number of recent publications, this relation clearly demonstrates that the magnetization currents as well as superconducting currents do not transfer any entropy and do not participate in thermomagnetic transport. The developed machinery is applied to thermomagnetic effects in the fluctuation area. The results demonstrate that in the interacting Fermi systems the thermomagnetic coefficient is always proportional to the ratio of kT to the Fermi energy. Work is supported by NSF.

  1. Evaluating pulp stiffness from fibre bundles by ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karppinen, Timo; Montonen, Risto; Määttänen, Marjo; Ekman, Axel; Myllys, Markko; Timonen, Jussi; Hæggström, Edward

    2012-06-01

    A non-destructive ultrasonic tester was developed to measure the stiffness of pulp bundles. The mechanical properties of pulp are important when estimating the behaviour of paper under stress. Currently available pulp tests are tedious and alter the fibres structurally and mechanically. The developed tester employs (933 ± 15) kHz tweezer-like ultrasonic transducers and time-of-flight measurement through (9.0 ± 2.5) mm long and (0.8 ± 0.1) mm thick fibre bundles kept at (19.1 ± 0.4) °C and (62 ± 1)% RH. We determined the stiffness of soft wood pulps produced by three kraft pulping modifications: standard kraft pulp, (5.2 ± 0.4) GPa, prehydrolysis kraft pulp, (4.3 ± 0.4) GPa, and alkali extracted prehydrolysis kraft pulp, (3.3 ± 0.4) GPa. Prehydrolysis and alkali extraction processes mainly lowered the hemicellulose content of the pulps, which essentially decreased the fibre-wall stiffness hence impairing the stiffness of the fibre networks. Our results indicate that the method allows ranking of pulps according to their stiffness determined from bundle-like samples taken at an early phase of the papermaking process.

  2. Pharmacological bronchodilation is partially mediated by reduced airway wall stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Ansell, T K; Noble, P B; Mitchell, H W; McFawn, P K

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose In asthmatic patients, airflow limitation is at least partly reversed by administration of pharmacological bronchodilators, typically β2-adrenoceptor agonists. In addition to receptor-mediated bronchodilation, the dynamic mechanical environment of the lung itself can reverse bronchoconstriction. We have now explored the possibility that bronchodilators exert a synergistic effect with oscillatory loads by virtue of reducing airway wall stiffness, and therefore, enhancing the bronchodilatory response to breathing manoeuvres. Experimental Approach Whole porcine bronchial segments in vitro were contracted to carbachol and relaxed to the non-specific β-adrenoceptor agonist, isoprenaline, under static conditions or during simulated breathing manoeuvres. Key Results The bronchodilatory response to isoprenaline was greater during breathing manoeuvres compared with the response under static conditions. As the bronchodilatory response to breathing manoeuvres is dependent upon airway smooth muscle (ASM) strain, and therefore, airway wall stiffness, our findings are likely to be explained by the effect of isoprenaline on reducing airway wall stiffness, which increased ASM strain, producing greater bronchodilation. Conclusions and Implications A contribution of reduced airway stiffness and increased ASM strain to the bronchodilator action of isoprenaline is shown, suggesting that oscillatory loads act synergistically with pharmacologically mediated bronchodilation. The implications for the treatment of asthma are that reducing airway wall stiffness represents a potential target for novel pharmacological agents. PMID:24846164

  3. Stiffness Feedback for Myoelectric Forearm Prostheses Using Vibrotactile Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Witteveen, Heidi J B; Luft, Frauke; Rietman, Johan S; Veltink, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    The ability to distinguish object stiffness is a very important aspect in object handling, but completely lacking in current myoelectric prostheses. In human hands both tactile and proprioceptive sensory information are required for stiffness determination. Therefore, it was investigated whether it is possible to distinguish object stiffness with vibrotactile feedback of hand opening and grasping force. Three configurations consisting of an array of coin motors and a single miniature vibrotactile transducer were investigated. Ten healthy subjects and seven subjects with upper limb loss due to amputation or congenital defects performed virtual grasping tasks, in which they controlled hand opening and grasping force. They were asked to determine the stiffness of a grasped virtual object from four options. With hand opening feedback alone or in combination with grasping force feedback, correct stiffness determination was achieved in around 60% of the cases and significantly higher than the 25% achieved without feedback or grasping force feedback alone. Despite the equal performance results, the combination of hand opening and grasping force feedback was preferred by the subjects over the hand opening feedback alone. No differences between feedback configurations and between subjects with upper limb loss and healthy subjects were found. PMID:23799698

  4. Increased Cardiovascular Stiffness and Impaired Age-related Functional Status

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Mousumi M.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Morgan, Timothy M.; Hire, Don G.; Vasu, Sujethra; Brinkley, Tina E.; Kitzman, Dalane W.; Hamilton, Craig A.; Soots, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to determine if increased cardiovascular (CV) stiffness is associated with disability in middle-aged and older adults at risk for congestive heart failure. CV stiffness (brachial pulse pressure/left ventricular stroke volume indexed to body surface area) and total disability (the summed assessment of activities of daily living, mobility, and instrumental activities of daily living) were measured in 445 individuals. A subset of 109 randomly selected individuals also underwent physical function testing. Total disability was associated with CV stiffness (p = .01), driven by an association with mobility (p = .005), but not activities of daily living (p = .13) or instrumental activities of daily living (p = .61). After accounting for age, these correlations remained significant for men (p = .04), but not for women. CV stiffness was also associated with increased 400-m walk time (p = .02). In middle-aged and elderly men at risk for congestive heart failure, CV stiffness is associated with decreased mobility and physical function, and increased overall disability. PMID:24963155

  5. Dynamically tuned magnetostrictive spring with electrically controlled stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidler, Justin J.; Asnani, Vivake M.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the design and testing of an electrically controllable magnetostrictive spring that has a dynamically tunable stiffness (i.e., a magnetostrictive Varispring). The device enables in situ stiffness tuning or stiffness switching for vibration control applications. Using a nonlinear electromechanical transducer model and an analytical solution of linear, mechanically induced magnetic diffusion, Terfenol-D is shown to have a faster rise time to stepped voltage inputs and a significantly higher magnetic diffusion cut-off frequency relative to Galfenol. A Varispring is manufactured using a laminated Terfenol-D rod. Further rise time reductions are achieved by minimizing the rod’s diameter and winding the electromagnet with larger wire. Dynamic tuning of the Varispring’s stiffness is investigated by measuring the Terfenol-D rod’s strain response to dynamic, compressive, axial forces in the presence of sinusoidal or square wave control currents. The Varispring’s rise time is \\lt 1 ms for 1 A current switches. Continuous modulus changes up to 21.9 GPa and 500 Hz and square wave modulus changes (dynamic {{Δ }}E effect) up to 12.3 GPa and 100 Hz are observed. Stiffness tunability and tuning bandwidth can be considerably increased by operating about a more optimal bias stress and improving the control of the electrical input.

  6. Arthroscopic chondral cyst excision in a stiff Perthes' hip.

    PubMed

    Pardiwala, Dinshaw N; Nagda, Taral V

    2007-08-01

    Persistent hip stiffness in Perthes' disease indicates a poor prognosis and is a therapeutic challenge. We report a case of a 13-year-old boy with a stiff Perthes' hip that was nonresponsive to prolonged nonsurgical treatment. Imaging revealed Catterall group IV Perthes' disease in an advanced reossification stage, with a focal defect in the weight-bearing area of the capital femoral epiphysis. A focal, compressible chondral elevation was detected on hip arthroscopy; on incision, flocculent fluid was released. After the cyst was excised, microfracture revascularization of the chondral defect was undertaken. Postoperatively, the patient had immediate pain relief, correction of deformity, and restoration of painless range of motion; this has continued for 4 years since surgery was performed. Persistence of an unhealed necrotic segment in Perthes' disease has traditionally been associated with osteochondritis dissecans; however, in this case, the unhealed and nonossified segment produced an elevated painful chondral cyst that caused spasm and stiffness of the hip. Although 2 distinct types of chondral lesions have been described in Perthes' disease, stiffness arising because of these lesions has not been reported. Patients with this unusual third type of chondral lesion of the capital femoral epiphysis, which causes persistent stiffness in Perthes' hip, may be identified and successfully treated with the use of arthroscopic techniques. PMID:17681219

  7. Modeling Short-Range Stiffness of Feline Lower Hindlimb Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lei; Perreault, Eric J.; Maas, Huub; Sandercock, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The short-range stiffness (SRS) of skeletal muscles is a critical property for understanding muscle contributions to limb stability, since it represents a muscle’s capacity to resist external perturbations before reflexes or voluntary actions can intervene. A number of studies have demonstrated that a simple model, consisting of a force-dependent active stiffness connected in series with a constant passive stiffness, is sufficient to characterize the SRS of individual muscles over the entire range of obtainable forces. The purpose of this study was to determine if such a model could be used to characterize the SRS-force relationship in a number of architecturally distinct muscles. Specifically, we hypothesized that the active and passive stiffness components for a specific muscle can be estimated from anatomical measurements, assuming uniform active and passive stiffness properties across all muscles. This hypothesis was evaluated in six feline lower hindlimb muscle types with different motor unit compositions and architectures. The SRS-force relationships for each muscle type were predicted based on anatomical measurements and compared to experimental data. The model predictions were accurate to within 30%, when uniform scaling properties were assumed across all muscles. Errors were greatest for the extensor digitorum longus (EDL). When this muscle was removed from the analysis, prediction errors dropped to less than 8%. Subsequent analyses suggested that these errors may have resulted from differences in the tendon elastic modulus, as compared to the other muscles tested. PMID:18499113

  8. Diabetes and Risk of Arterial Stiffness: A Mendelian Randomization Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Huang, Ya; Xie, Lan; Peng, Kui; Ding, Lin; Lin, Lin; Wang, Po; Hao, Mingli; Chen, Yuhong; Sun, Yimin; Qi, Lu; Wang, Weiqing; Ning, Guang; Bi, Yufang

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to explore the causal association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and increased arterial stiffness. We performed a Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis in 11,385 participants from a well-defined community study in Shanghai during 2011-2013. We genotyped 34 T2D-associated common variants identified in East Asians and created a genetic risk score (GRS). We assessed arterial stiffness noninvasively with the measurement of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). We used the instrumental variable (IV) estimator to qualify the causal relationship between T2D and increased arterial stiffness. We found each 1-SD increase in T2D_GRS was associated with 6% higher risk in increased arterial stiffness (95% CI 1.01, 1.12), after adjustment of other metabolic confounders. Using T2D_GRS as the IV, we demonstrated a causal relationship between T2D and arterial stiffening (odds ratio 1.24, 95% CI 1.06, 1.47; P = 0.008). When categorizing the genetic loci according to their effect on insulin secretion or resistance, we found genetically determined decrease in insulin secretion was associated with increase in baPWV (βIV = 122.3 cm/s, 95% CI 41.9, 204.6; P = 0.0005). In conclusion, our results provide evidence supporting a causal association between T2D and increased arterial stiffness in a Chinese population. PMID:26953161

  9. NAFLD and Increased Aortic Stiffness: Parallel or Common Physiopathological Mechanisms?

    PubMed Central

    Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane A.; Leite, Nathalie C.; Cardoso, Claudia R. L.; Salles, Gil F.

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the leading cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. Liver inflammation and fibrosis related to NAFLD contribute to disease progression and increasing liver-related mortality and morbidity. Increasing data suggest that NAFLD may be linked to atherosclerotic vascular disease independent of other established cardiovascular risk factors. Central arterial stiffness has been recognized as a measure of cumulative cardiovascular risk marker load, and the measure of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) is regarded as the gold standard assessment of aortic stiffness. It has been shown that increased aortic stiffness predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several clinical settings, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, a well-known condition associated with advanced stages of NAFLD. Furthermore, recently-published studies reported a strong association between NAFLD and increased arterial stiffness, suggesting a possible link in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and NAFLD. We sought to review the published data on the associations between NAFLD and aortic stiffness, in order to better understand the interplay between these two conditions and identify possible common physiopathological mechanisms. PMID:27104526

  10. Determination of the stiffness of the equine cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Pagger, H; Schmidburg, I; Peham, C; Licka, T

    2010-12-01

    This aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the stiffness of the equine cervical spine depends on the direction of force applied and on spinal position. Muscles and nuchal ligament were removed from the cervical spines of 17 horses that were without a history of cervical or neurological disease. The cervical spines were then flexed/extended dorsoventrally (with the spine straight and with the occiput rotated 30° against T1) and laterolaterally. Mean dorsoventral stiffness was 297 N/m (± 135) in flexion, 1347 N/m (± 2083) in extension, 421 N/m (± 164) in lateral flexion, 279 N/m (± 93) in rotated flexion, and 386 N/m (± 191) in rotated extension. There was a positive correlation between the length of cervical spine and stiffness for dorsoventral flexion (r = 0.63; P < 0.01) and extension (r = 0.53; P < 0.05). The stiffness of the equine cervical spine depended on the direction of the loading and was 2-7 times less than thoracolumbar stiffness in horses. PMID:19850500

  11. Optimal semi-active damping of cables with bending stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boston, C.; Weber, F.; Guzzella, L.

    2011-05-01

    The problem of optimal semi-active damping of cables with bending stiffness is investigated with an evolutionary algorithm. The developed damping strategy is validated on a single strand cable with a linear motor attached close to the anchor position. The motor is operated in force feedback mode during free decay of cable vibrations, during which time the decay ratios of the cable modes are measured. It is shown from these experiments that the damping ratios predicted in simulation are close to those measured. The semi-active damping strategy found by the evolutionary algorithm is very similar in character to that for a cable without bending stiffness, being the superposition of an amplitude-dependent friction and negative stiffness element. However, due to the bending stiffness of the cable, the tuning of the above elements as a function of the relevant cable parameters is greatly altered, especially for damper positions close to a fixed end anchor, where the mode shape depends strongly on bending stiffness. It is furthermore demonstrated that a semi-active damper is able to dissipate significantly more energy for a cable with simply supported ends compared to fixed ends due to larger damper strokes and thereby increased energy dissipation in the device.

  12. Comparative Analysis of the Flexural Stiffness of Pinniped Vibrissae

    PubMed Central

    Ginter Summarell, Carly C.; Ingole, Sudeep; Fish, Frank E.; Marshall, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrissae are important components of the mammalian tactile sensory system and are used to detect vibrotactile stimuli in the environment. Pinnipeds have the largest and most highly innervated vibrissae among mammals, and the hair shafts function as a biomechanical filter spanning the environmental stimuli and the neural mechanoreceptors deep in the follicle-sinus complex. Therefore, the material properties of these structures are critical in transferring vibrotactile information to the peripheral nervous system. Vibrissae were tested as cantilever beams and their flexural stiffness (EI) was measured to test the hypotheses that the shape of beaded vibrissae reduces EI and that vibrissae are anisotropic. EI was measured at two locations on each vibrissa, 25% and 50% of the overall length, and at two orientations to the point force. EI differed in orientations that were normal to each other, indicating a functional anisotropy. Since vibrissae taper from base to tip, the second moment of area (I) was lower at 50% than 25% of total length. The anterior orientation exhibited greater EI values at both locations compared to the dorsal orientation for all species. Smooth vibrissae were generally stiffer than beaded vibrissae. The profiles of beaded vibrissae are known to decrease the amplitude of vibrations when protruded into a flow field. The lower EI values of beaded vibrissae, along with the reduced vibrations, may function to enhance the sensitivity of mechanoreceptors to detection of small changes in flow from swimming prey by increasing the signal to noise ratio. This study builds upon previous morphological and hydrodynamic analyses of vibrissae and is the first comparative study of the mechanical properties of pinniped vibrissae. PMID:26132102

  13. Extended graphynes: simple scaling laws for stiffness, strength and fracture.

    PubMed

    Cranford, Steven W; Brommer, Dieter B; Buehler, Markus J

    2012-12-21

    The mono-atomistic structure and chemical stability of graphene provides a promising platform to design a host of novel graphene-like materials. Using full atomistic first-principles based ReaxFF molecular dynamics, here we perform a systematic comparative study of the stability, structural and mechanical properties of graphynes - a variation of the sp(2) carbon motif wherein the characteristic hexagons of graphene are linked by sp(1) acetylene (single- and triple-bond) carbyne-like chains. The introduction of acetylene links introduces an effective penalty in terms of stability, elastic modulus (i.e., stiffness), and failure strength, which can be predicted as a function of acetylene repeats, or, equivalently, lattice spacing. We quantify the mechanical properties of experimental accessible graphdiyne, with a modulus on the order of 470 to 580 GPa and a ultimate strength on the order of 36 GPa to 46 GPa (direction dependent). We derive general scaling laws for the cumulative effects of additional acetylene repeats, formulated through a simple discrete spring-network framework, allowing extrapolation of mechanical performance to highly extended graphyne structures. Onset of local tensile buckling results in a transitional regime characterized by a severe reduction of strength (ultimate stress), providing a new basis for scaling extended structures. Simple fracture simulations support the scaling functions, while uncovering a "two-tier" failure mode for extended graphynes, wherein structural realignment facilitates stress transfer beyond initial failure. Finally, the specific modulus and strength (normalized by areal density) is found to be near-constant, suggesting applications for light-weight, yet structurally robust molecular components. PMID:23142928

  14. Ultraprecision, high stiffness CNC grinding machines for ductile mode grinding of brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Patrick A.; Carlisle, Keith; Shore, Paul; Read, R. F.

    1990-10-01

    Under certain controlled conditions it is now possible to machine brittle materials such as glasses and ceramics using single or multi-point diamond tools (grinding), so that material is removed by plastic flow, leaving crack-free surfaces. This process is called 'shear' or 'ductile' mode grinding. It represents a major breakthrough in modern manufacturing engineering since it promises to enable: - complex optical components, both transmission and reflecting to be generated by advanced CNC machines with very little (or even zero) subsequent polishing. - complex shaped components such as turbine blades, nozzle guide vanes, etc. to be finish machined after near net shape forming, to high precision in advanced ceramics such as silicon nitride, without inducing micro-cracking and thus lowering ultimate rupture strength and fatigue life. Ductile mode "damage free" grinding occurs when the volume of materials stressed by each grit of the grinding wheel is small enough to yield rather than exhibit brittle fracture, i.e. cracking. In practice, this means maintaining the undeformed chip thickness to below the ductile-brittle transition value; this varies from material to material but is generally in the order of 0.1 pm or 100 nm, (hence the term "nanogrinding" is sometimes used) . Thus the critical factors for operating successfully in the ductile regime are machine system accuracy and dynamic stiffness between each grit and the workpiece. In detail this means: (i) High precision 'truing' of the diamond grits, together with dressing of the wheel bond to ensure adequate ' openness'; (ii) Design and build of the grinding wheel spindle with very high dynamic stiffness; error motions, radial and axial, must be considerably less than 100 nfl. (iii) Design and build of the workpiece carriage motion system with very high dynamic stiffness; error motions, linear or rotary, must be well within 100 nm. (iv) Smooth, rumble-free, high-stiffness servo-drives controlling the motions which form the chip. In general, and as a rule of thumb, a machine "loop-stiffness" (between tool and workpiece) not less than 300 N,4im (static) is necessary.

  15. Drag Coefficient of Hexadecane Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Yoshinobu; Hishida, Makoto; Kajimoto, Sadaaki; Tanaka, Gaku

    This paper deals with the drag coefficient of solidified hexadecane particles and their free rising velocity in liquid. The drag coefficient was experimentally investigated in Reynolds number range of about 40-300. The present experimental results are summarized in the following; (1) the drag coefficient of solidified hexadecane particles formed in liquid coolant by direct contact cooling is higher than that of a smooth surface sphere, this high drag coefficient seems to be attributed to the non-smooth surface of the solidified hexadecane particles, (2) experimental correlation for the drag coefficient of the solidified hexadecane particles was proposed, (3 ) the measured rising velocity of the solidified hexadecane particle agrees well with the calculated one, (4) the drag coefficients of hexadecane particles that were made by pouring hexadecane liquid into a solid hollow sphere agreed well with the drag coefficient of smooth surface sphere.

  16. Evaluation of Fatigue Life of CRM-Reinforced SMA and Its Relationship to Dynamic Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Mashaan, Nuha Salim; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Abdel Aziz, Mahrez; Ibrahim, Mohd Rasdan; Katman, Herda Yati

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue cracking is an essential problem of asphalt concrete that contributes to pavement damage. Although stone matrix asphalt (SMA) has significantly provided resistance to rutting failure, its resistance to fatigue failure is yet to be fully addressed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of crumb rubber modifier (CRM) on stiffness and fatigue properties of SMA mixtures at optimum binder content, using four different modification levels, namely, 6%, 8%, 10%, and 12% CRM by weight of the bitumen. The testing undertaken on the asphalt mix comprises the dynamic stiffness (indirect tensile test), dynamic creep (repeated load creep), and fatigue test (indirect tensile fatigue test) at temperature of 25°C. The indirect tensile fatigue test was conducted at three different stress levels (200, 300, and 400 kPa). Experimental results indicate that CRM-reinforced SMA mixtures exhibit significantly higher fatigue life compared to the mixtures without CRM. Further, higher correlation coefficient was obtained between the fatigue life and resilient modulus as compared to permanent strain; thus resilient modulus might be a more reliable indicator in evaluating the fatigue life of asphalt mixture. PMID:25050406

  17. Evaluation of fatigue life of CRM-reinforced SMA and its relationship to dynamic stiffness.

    PubMed

    Mashaan, Nuha Salim; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Abdel Aziz, Mahrez; Ibrahim, Mohd Rasdan; Katman, Herda Yati; Koting, Suhana

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue cracking is an essential problem of asphalt concrete that contributes to pavement damage. Although stone matrix asphalt (SMA) has significantly provided resistance to rutting failure, its resistance to fatigue failure is yet to be fully addressed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of crumb rubber modifier (CRM) on stiffness and fatigue properties of SMA mixtures at optimum binder content, using four different modification levels, namely, 6%, 8%, 10%, and 12% CRM by weight of the bitumen. The testing undertaken on the asphalt mix comprises the dynamic stiffness (indirect tensile test), dynamic creep (repeated load creep), and fatigue test (indirect tensile fatigue test) at temperature of 25C. The indirect tensile fatigue test was conducted at three different stress levels (200, 300, and 400 kPa). Experimental results indicate that CRM-reinforced SMA mixtures exhibit significantly higher fatigue life compared to the mixtures without CRM. Further, higher correlation coefficient was obtained between the fatigue life and resilient modulus as compared to permanent strain; thus resilient modulus might be a more reliable indicator in evaluating the fatigue life of asphalt mixture. PMID:25050406

  18. Enhancing the pulse contour analysis-based arterial stiffness estimation using a novel photoplethysmographic parameter.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dae-Geun; Park, Seung-Hun; Hahn, Minsoo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel method for enhancing pulse contour analysis-based arterial stiffness estimation using a simple and low-complexity photoplethysmographic parameter (P2Ocd). The method first eliminates baseline wanders in the digital volume pulse (DVP) by applying a simple morphological filter. The filtered DVP signal is then transformed into a slope sum function signal to simplify the pulse peak detection process by enhancing the upslope of the DVP signal while suppressing its downslope. An adaptive thresholding scheme is applied to detect pulse peaks from the transformed signal. Pulse onsets are then identified as the minimum values between consecutive pulse peaks. The P2Ocd is finally calculated by dividing the time interval between the pulse peak and the pulse onset by the pulse length. In order to assess the agreement of the P2Ocd with an established technique, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity, we performed Bland-Altman and correlation analyses. Furthermore, we evaluated the P2Ocd-based arterial stiffness estimation in terms of prediction accuracy (% error rate) and repeatability (coefficient of variation). The results show that the proposed measurement agrees well with the established technique and shows a high repeatability; it also has a better predictive accuracy than that of conventional methods. In addition, we show that the proposed parameter further improves the predictive accuracy by combining it with age. The proposed method is therefore highly applicable to small ubiquitous healthcare applications. PMID:25561448

  19. LSENS, a general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for gas-phase reactions: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Bittker, David A.

    1993-01-01

    A general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for complex, homogeneous, gas-phase reactions is described. The main features of the code, LSENS, are its flexibility, efficiency and convenience in treating many different chemical reaction models. The models include static system, steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow, shock initiated reaction, and a perfectly stirred reactor. In addition, equilibrium computations can be performed for several assigned states. An implicit numerical integration method, which works efficiently for the extremes of very fast and very slow reaction, is used for solving the 'stiff' differential equation systems that arise in chemical kinetics. For static reactions, sensitivity coefficients of all dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of dependent variables and/or the rate coefficient parameters can be computed. This paper presents descriptions of the code and its usage, and includes several illustrative example problems.

  20. Tissue stiffness dictates development, homeostasis, and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Handorf, Andrew M; Zhou, Yaxian; Halanski, Matthew A; Li, Wan-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Tissue development is orchestrated by the coordinated activities of both chemical and physical regulators. While much attention has been given to the role that chemical regulators play in driving development, researchers have recently begun to elucidate the important role that the mechanical properties of the extracellular environment play. For instance, the stiffness of the extracellular environment has a role in orienting cell division, maintaining tissue boundaries, directing cell migration, and driving differentiation. In addition, extracellular matrix stiffness is important for maintaining normal tissue homeostasis, and when matrix mechanics become imbalanced, disease progression may ensue. In this article, we will review the important role that matrix stiffness plays in dictating cell behavior during development, tissue homeostasis, and disease progression. PMID:25915734

  1. Tissue Stiffness Dictates Development, Homeostasis, and Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Handorf, Andrew M; Zhou, Yaxian; Halanski, Matthew A; Li, Wan-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tissue development is orchestrated by the coordinated activities of both chemical and physical regulators. While much attention has been given to the role that chemical regulators play in driving development, researchers have recently begun to elucidate the important role that the mechanical properties of the extracellular environment play. For instance, the stiffness of the extracellular environment has a role in orienting cell division, maintaining tissue boundaries, directing cell migration, and driving differentiation. In addition, extracellular matrix stiffness is important for maintaining normal tissue homeostasis, and when matrix mechanics become imbalanced, disease progression may ensue. In this article, we will review the important role that matrix stiffness plays in dictating cell behavior during development, tissue homeostasis, and disease progression. PMID:25915734

  2. Estimation of Stiffness Parameter on the Common Carotid Artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koya, Yoshiharu; Mizoshiri, Isao; Matsui, Kiyoaki; Nakamura, Takashi

    The arteriosclerosis is on the increase with an aging or change of our living environment. For that reason, diagnosis of the common carotid artery using echocardiogram is doing to take precautions carebropathy. Up to the present, several methods to measure stiffness parameter of the carotid artery have been proposed. However, they have analyzed at the only one point of common carotid artery. In this paper, we propose the method of analysis extended over a wide area of common carotid artery. In order to measure stiffness parameter of common carotid artery from echocardiogram, it is required to detect two border curves which are boundaries between vessel wall and blood. The method is composed of two steps. The first step is the detection of border curves, and the second step is the calculation of stiffness parameter using diameter of common carotid artery. Experimental results show the validity of the proposed method.

  3. Quantifying molecular stiffness and interaction with lateral force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weymouth, Alfred John; Hofmann, Thomas; Giessibl, Franz J

    2014-03-01

    The spatial resolution of atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be drastically increased by terminating the tip with a single carbon monoxide (CO) molecule. However, the CO molecule is not stiff, and lateral forces, such as those around the sides of molecules, distort images. This issue begs a larger question of how AFM can probe structures that are laterally weak. Lateral force microscopy (LFM) can probe lateral stiffnesses that are not accessible to normal-force AFM, resulting in higher spatial resolution. With LFM, we determined the torsional spring constant of a CO-terminated tip molecule to be 0.24 newtons per meter. This value is less than that of a surface molecule and an example of a system whose stiffness is a product not only of bonding partners but also local environment. PMID:24505131

  4. The interday reliability of leg and ankle musculotendinous stiffness measures.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Ken A; Murphy, Aron J; Watsford, Mark L; Rees, Sven

    2006-11-01

    Two popular methods of assessing lower body musculotendinous stiffness include the hopping and oscillation tests. The disparity and paucity of reliability data prompted this investigation into leg musculotendinous stiffness (Kleg) and ankle musculotendinous stiffness (Kank) measures. Kleg and Kank were assessed on three separate occasions in 20 female subjects. Kleg was determined using bilateral hopping procedures conducted at 2.2 Hz and 3.2 Hz frequencies. Kank was assessed by perturbation of the subject's ankle musculotendinous unit on an instrumented calf raise apparatus at 70% of maximum isometric force (MIF). Excellent reliability was produced for all Kleg measures between all days, whereas Kank exhibited acceptable reliability after one session of familiarization. No relationship was evident between Kleg and Kank. It was concluded that no familiarization session was required for Kleg at the test frequencies and conditions tested, whereas at least one familiarization session was needed to ensure the reliable assessment of Kank. PMID:17293626

  5. Tuning the stiffness asymmetry of optical tweezers via polarization control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Jinmyoung; Choi, Jai-Min

    2016-03-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of tailoring the landscape of the optical potential by using the polarization state of a trap laser beam as a tuning knob. Two groups of polystyrene spheres, i.e., 300 nm and 1 μm, are optically trapped individually to investigate the effect of the intrinsic and a strongly-modified optical field distribution on the resulting trap stiffness, respectively. The angular variations of the orthogonal pair of stiffnesses, k x and k y , with the polarization state of the trap laser beam were systematically analyzed, and the results show that polarization control could provide a wide tuning range of trap-stiffness asymmetry ( s T = 1- k x / k y ). The implication of asymmetry control of the optical potential is briefly discussed.

  6. Design and experiment of a high-static-low-dynamic stiffness isolator using a negative stiffness magnetic spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yisheng; Zhang, Xinong; Luo, Yajun; Yan, Bo; Ma, Chicheng

    2016-01-01

    To improve the vibration isolation performance under low frequency excitation, a negative stiffness magnetic spring (NSMS) is employed to reduce the resonance frequency of the linear isolator. The NSMS comprising a pair of coaxial ring permanent magnets is installed in parallel with the mechanical spring to counteract its positive stiffness. The major feature of the isolator is that it has high static low dynamic stiffness (HSLDS). In this paper, the model of the HSLDS isolator and the NSMS is analyzed firstly; and the magnetic force and stiffness exerted between the inner magnet and the outer magnet is then calculated based on the Amperian current model. After analyzing the effect of the geometric parameters of the magnets on the stiffness characteristic of the NSMS, a designing procedure for the NSMS is proposed. Then the nonlinear dynamic equation of the isolator is established and numerical simulation is performed to obtain the transmissibility. Finally, the detailed design of the HSLDS isolator is given and an experimental setup is proposed. The experimental results demonstrate that the NSMS can reduce the resonance frequency of the isolator indeed; and the isolation performance of the proposed isolator is improved accordingly.

  7. Aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch and mortality in dialysis population.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Catherine; Mac-Way, Fabrice; Desmeules, Simon; Marquis, Karine; De Serres, Sacha A; Lebel, Marcel; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Agharazii, Mohsen

    2015-02-01

    We hypothesized that increased aortic stiffness (central elastic artery) combined with a decrease in brachial stiffness (peripheral muscular artery) leads to the reversal of the physiological stiffness gradient (ie, mismatch), promoting end-organ damages through increased forward pressure wave transmission into the microcirculation. We, therefore, examined the effect of aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch on mortality in patients in need of dialysis. In a prospective observational study, aortic-brachial arterial stiffness mismatch (pulse wave velocity ratio) was assessed using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity divided by carotid-radial pulse wave velocity in 310 adult patients on dialysis. After a median follow-up of 29 months, 146 (47%) deaths occurred. The hazard ratio (HR) for mortality related to PWV ratio in a Cox regression analysis was 1.43 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-1.64; P<0.001 per 1 SD) and was still significant after adjustments for confounding factors, such as age, dialysis vintage, sex, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, smoking status, and weight (HR, 1.23; 95% CI: 1.02-1.49). The HRs for changes in 1 SD of augmentation index (HR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.12-1.63), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.11-1.50), and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.67-0.95) were statistically significant in univariate analysis, but were no longer statistically significant after adjustment for age. In conclusion, aortic-brachial arterial stiffness mismatch was strongly and independently associated with increased mortality in this dialysis population. Further studies are required to confirm these finding in lower-risk groups. PMID:25452473

  8. Computational methods for the identification of spatially varying stiffness and damping in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Rosen, I. G.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical approximation scheme for the estimation of functional parameters in Euler-Bernoulli models for the transverse vibration of flexible beams with tip bodies is developed. The method permits the identification of spatially varying flexural stiffness and Voigt-Kelvin viscoelastic damping coefficients which appear in the hybrid system of ordinary and partial differential equations and boundary conditions describing the dynamics of such structures. An inverse problem is formulated as a least squares fit to data subject to constraints in the form of a vector system of abstract first order evolution equations. Spline-based finite element approximations are used to finite dimensionalize the problem. Theoretical convergence results are given and numerical studies carried out on both conventional (serial) and vector computers are discussed.

  9. Semi-active damping with negative stiffness for multi-mode cable vibration mitigation: approximate collocated control solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, F.; Distl, H.

    2015-11-01

    This paper derives an approximate collocated control solution for the mitigation of multi-mode cable vibration by semi-active damping with negative stiffness based on the control force characteristics of clipped linear quadratic regulator (LQR). The control parameters are derived from optimal modal viscous damping and corrected in order to guarantee that both the equivalent viscous damping coefficient and the equivalent stiffness coefficient of the semi-active cable damper force are equal to their desired counterparts. The collocated control solution with corrected control parameters is numerically validated by free decay tests of the first four cable modes and combinations of these modes. The results of the single-harmonic tests demonstrate that the novel approach yields 1.86 times more cable damping than optimal modal viscous damping and 1.87 to 2.33 times more damping compared to a passive oil damper whose viscous damper coefficient is optimally tuned to the targeted mode range of the first four modes. The improvement in case of the multi-harmonic vibration tests, i.e. when modes 1 and 3 and modes 2 and 4 are vibrating at the same time, is between 1.55 and 3.81. The results also show that these improvements are obtained almost independent of the cable anti-node amplitude. Thus, the proposed approximate real-time applicable collocated semi-active control solution which can be realized by magnetorheological dampers represents a promising tool for the efficient mitigation of stay cable vibrations.

  10. 'Tuning' the variable stiffness head gasket: An interactive computational approach

    SciTech Connect

    Glander, D.W.; Punch, E.F.

    1987-01-01

    Problems of bore distortion, combustion blowby and gasket fatigue in lightweight engine blocks are ultimately related to the gasket sealing pressure distribution. For both conventional embossed steel gaskets and composite ones this distribution can be modified by suitable local changes in gasket stiffness. Current methods of gasket optimization concentrate on large scale iterative finite element analysis of the head/gasket/block system, with major computational costs. This paper presents a more economical alternative in which condensed compliance matrices are obtained either from elementary NASTRAN runs or by experimental means. The algorithm enables the gasket engineer to 'tune' the gasket to the desired sealing pressure profile with acceptable stiffness variations.

  11. Influence of substrate stiffness on the phenotype of heart cells.

    PubMed

    Bhana, Bashir; Iyer, Rohin K; Chen, Wen Li Kelly; Zhao, Ruogang; Sider, Krista L; Likhitpanichkul, Morakot; Simmons, Craig A; Radisic, Milica

    2010-04-15

    Adult cardiomyocytes (CM) retain little capacity to regenerate, which motivates efforts to engineer heart tissues that can emulate the functional and mechanical properties of native myocardium. Although the effects of matrix stiffness on individual CM have been explored, less attention was devoted to studies at the monolayer and the tissue level. The purpose of this study was to characterize the influence of substrate mechanical stiffness on the heart cell phenotype and functional properties. Neonatal rat heart cells were seeded onto collagen-coated polyacrylamide (PA) substrates with Young's moduli of 3, 22, 50, and 144 kPa. Collagen-coated glass coverslips without PA represented surfaces with effectively "infinite" stiffness. The local elastic modulus of native neonatal rat heart tissue was measured to range from 4.0 to 11.4 kPa (mean value of 6.8 kPa) and for native adult rat heart tissue from 11.9 to 46.2 kPa (mean value of 25.6 kPa), motivating our choice of the above PA gel stiffness. Overall, by 120 h of cultivation, the lowest stiffness PA substrates (3 kPa) exhibited the lowest excitation threshold (ET; 3.5 +/- 0.3 V/cm), increased troponin I staining (52% positively stained area) but reduced cell density, force of contraction (0.18 +/- 0.1 mN/mm(2)), and cell elongation (aspect ratio = 1.3-1.4). Higher stiffness (144 kPa) PA substrates exhibited reduced troponin I staining (30% positively stained area), increased fibroblast density (70% positively stained area), and poor electrical excitability. Intermediate stiffness PA substrates of stiffness comparable to the native adult rat myocardium (22-50 kPa) were found to be optimal for heart cell morphology and function, with superior elongation (aspect ratio > 4.3), reasonable ET (ranging from 3.95 +/- 0.8 to 4.4 +/- 0.7 V/cm), high contractile force development (ranging from 0.52 +/- 0.2 to 1.60 +/- 0.6 mN/mm(2)), and well-developed striations, all consistent with a differentiated phenotype. PMID:20014437

  12. Effect of Hybridization on Stiffness Properties of Woven Textile Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, Liliana; Taranu, Nicolae; Sîrbu, Adriana

    2013-04-01

    The present study focuses on stiffness properties of woven textile reinforced polymeric composites with respect to hybridization, and geometry of reinforcement. The analyzed composites represent combinations of different fibre materials (E-glass, Kevlar 49, carbon HM) in a predetermined fabric geometry (a plane weave embedded in thermosetting polymeric resin) serving controlled properties and required performance. The effects of hybridization on the stiffness properties of woven textile composites have been studied with respect to the fibres materials, the unbalancing degree of fabrics, and the variation of compactness and undulation of yarns. Some undesirable effects in fabric geometry can be overcome by the combined effects of hybridization and compactness.

  13. Stiffness measurement using terahertz and acoustic waves for biological samples.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jong-Hyun; Yang, Young-Joong; Park, Jinho; Son, Heyjin; Park, Hochong; Park, Gun-Sik; Ahn, Chang-Beom

    2015-12-14

    A method is proposed to measure sample stiffness using terahertz wave and acoustic stimulation. The stiffness-dependent vibration is measured using terahertz wave (T-ray) during an acoustic stimulation. To quantify the vibration, time of the peak amplitude of the reflected T-ray is measured. In our experiment, the T-ray is asynchronously applied during the period of the acoustic stimulation, and multiple measurements are taken to use the standard deviation and the maximum difference in the peak times to estimate the amplitude of the vibration. Some preliminary results are shown using biological samples. PMID:26699056

  14. Further understanding of Huygens’ coupled clocks: The effect of stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Ramirez, J.; Aihara, K.; Fey, R. H. B.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2014-03-01

    A simplified model of the classical Huygens’ experiment on synchronization of pendulum clocks is examined. The model consists of two pendula coupled by an elastically supported rigid bar. The synchronized limit behaviour of the system, i.e. in-phase and anti-phase synchronization of the pendula, is studied as a function of the stiffness of the spring that supports the coupling bar. It is demonstrated that the stiffness has a large influence on the existence, stability, and oscillation frequency of the in-phase solution. The relationship between the obtained results and experimental results that have been reported in the literature, including Huygens’ original observations, is stressed.

  15. Fuzzy evaluation of stiffness of tissue by means of micromanipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majima, Sumiko; Matsushima, Kozo

    1993-09-01

    We have developed a bilateral controlled remote micro-manipulator system for medical application. By operating this system an opretor can perceive the stiffness of small part of tissue with his/her tactile sense and the visco-elastic parameters of the tissue are identified from the measerments of the displacement and the reaction force on the slave manipulator. Firstly the relation between the tactile sense and the identified viscoelastic parameters is experimentally obtained. And then using this relation a method which evaluates the stiffness of the tissue by means of the fuzzy reasoning is proposed.

  16. Thermal Testing of Tow-Placed, Variable Stiffness Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Guerdal, Zafer

    2001-01-01

    Commercial systems for precise placement of pre-preg composite tows are enabling technology that allows fabrication of advanced composite structures in which the tows may be precisely laid down along curvilinear paths within a given ply. For laminates with curvilinear tow paths, the fiber orientation angle varies continuously throughout the laminate, and is not required to be straight and parallel in each ply as in conventional composite laminates. Hence, the stiffness properties vary as a function of location in the laminate, and the associated composite structure is called a "variable stiffness" composite structure.

  17. Coarse-grained protein-protein stiffnesses and dynamics from all-atom simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Stephen D.; Henley, C. L.

    2010-03-01

    Large protein assemblies, such as virus capsids, may be coarse-grained as a set of rigid units linked by generalized (rotational and stretching) harmonic springs. We present an ab initio method to obtain the elastic parameters and overdamped dynamics for these springs from all-atom molecular-dynamics simulations of one pair of units at a time. The computed relaxation times of this pair give a consistency check for the simulation, and we can also find the corrective force needed to null systematic drifts. As a first application we predict the stiffness of an HIV capsid layer and the relaxation time for its breathing mode.

  18. The application of automatic differentiation techniques for the prediction of rotor-dynamic coefficients of labyrinth seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fürst, Jiří

    2016-03-01

    The article describes the development of bulk-flow code for the prediction of rotor-dynamic coefficients of labyrinth seals. The code is based on the so-called single control volume approach by Childs and Scharrer [1] and the the forces are evaluated using the automatic differentiation technique. The resulting code is very simple and provides reasonable predictions of stiffness and damping coefficients at short computational time.

  19. Kubo formulas for second-order hydrodynamic coefficients.

    PubMed

    Moore, Guy D; Sohrabi, Kiyoumars A

    2011-03-25

    At second order in gradients, conformal relativistic hydrodynamics depends on the viscosity η and on five additional "second-order" hydrodynamical coefficients τ(Π), κ, λ₁, λ₂, and λ₃. We derive Kubo relations for these coefficients, relating them to equilibrium, fully retarded three-point correlation functions of the stress tensor. We show that the coefficient λ₃ can be evaluated directly by Euclidean means and does not in general vanish. PMID:21517309

  20. Quadrature formulas for Fourier coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojanov, Borislav; Petrova, Guergana

    2009-09-01

    We consider quadrature formulas of high degree of precision for the computation of the Fourier coefficients in expansions of functions with respect to a system of orthogonal polynomials. In particular, we show the uniqueness of a multiple node formula for the Fourier-Tchebycheff coefficients given by Micchelli and Sharma and construct new Gaussian formulas for the Fourier coefficients of a function, based on the values of the function and its derivatives.

  1. Analytic properties of Hansen coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadov, Sergey Yu.

    2008-04-01

    Hansen’s coefficients in the theory of elliptic motion with eccentricity e are studied as functions of the parameter η = (1 - e 2)1/2. Their analytic behavior in the complex η plane is described and some symmetry relations are derived. In particular, for every Hansen coefficient, multiplication by suitable powers of e and η results in an entire analytic function of η. Consequently, Hansen’s coefficients can be in principle computed by means of rapidly convergent series in powers of η. A representation of Hansen’s coefficients in terms of two entire functions of e 2 follows.

  2. Coefficient Alpha: A Reliability Coefficient for the 21st Century?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yanyun; Green, Samuel B.

    2011-01-01

    Coefficient alpha is almost universally applied to assess reliability of scales in psychology. We argue that researchers should consider alternatives to coefficient alpha. Our preference is for structural equation modeling (SEM) estimates of reliability because they are informative and allow for an empirical evaluation of the assumptions…

  3. Flexural stiffnesses of and dimensional stability in circular quasi-isotropic laminate mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung-Pyo

    Composite fiber reinforced plastics are being given favorable consideration for emerging applications in large aperture telescopes, such as the Hubble telescope or communication dishes. Many lightweight mirror fabrication concepts are currently being pursued. Presently, the technology is limited because it has an incomplete understanding of the mechanics associated with quasi-isotropic laminates for diffraction-limited displacement constraints, and lack of understanding for effects of resin buffer layers on composite mirrors for high surface smoothness. In this dissertation document, radial stiffness associated with stacking sequence effects in quasi-isotropic laminates (pi/n, where n=3, 4, and 6) and dimensional stability in the composite laminates are investigated numerically. The numerical results show that directional dependency of flexural stiffness in the laminates, which is strongly associated with stacking sequences, is a significant factor causing unfavorable sinusoidal surface waviness. The maximum radial flexural stiffness variation is found as +/-12.85% in pi/3 laminate while a minimum of +/-5.63% is found in pi/4 laminate. Mechanics of maximum asymmetry by +/-2º misorientation based on ideal pi/n laminate lay-ups are evaluated and the results are compared with ideal lay-up sequence cases. The calculated extensional and flexural stiffness values from the maximum asymmetric cases are within less than 0.05%. As such, the radial flexural stiffness variations in quasi-isotropic laminates are shown to be more problematic than asymmetry caused by common manufacturing variance. The types of surface deformations in quasi-isotropic laminates associated with directional dependency of flexural stiffness are evaluated using finite element analyses. Also, fiber print-through in replicated composite mirrors and the effects of the resin buffer layer present in the mirrors for mitigation of the fiber print-through are investigated and discussed. Numerical results reveal that there will be an unfavorable sinusoidal surface deformation in each ideal p/n laminate and the shapes are strongly associated with principal fiber directions due to stacking sequence effects. The surface deformations in quasi-isotropic laminates are shown to be typical and such surface deformations are inevitable when composite mirrors are fabricated from discrete layers of anisotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastics. Moreover, the use of additional resin layers appears to more adversely influence the composite mirror substrates. The validation of predicted surface deformations and dimensional distortions are achieved by comparing experimental results on a 8-inch-diameter composite mirror sample fabricated at the University of Kansas Dept. of Aerospace Engineering (KUAE) and Bennett Optical Research (BOR). A study of quasi-homogeneous materials such as short fiber products as alternative composite materials is investigated. Furthermore, the relation between resin property effects and corresponding resin thickness effects is evaluated and discussed. The analyses provide information on alternative types of materials that primarily affect optical performance and thus are most important for precision optics. Based on the results, locally varying radial surface deformations in quasi-isotropic laminates fabricated from continuous fiber reinforced plastics distort optical performance. These surface deformations might be eliminated by utilizing short fiber materials and a soft resin system with a very low coefficient of thermal expansion compared to conventional resins.

  4. Metabolic syndrome is a significant and independent risk factor for increased arterial stiffness in Japanese subjects.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Hiroki; Kishi, Reiko; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2009-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease; however, the impact of MetS on arterial stiffness has not been fully established in the general Japanese population. We analyzed the relationship between MetS and the severity of arterial stiffness using brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in 2744 male and 358 female subjects aged 38-62 years, adjusted for conventional risk factors and C-reactive protein. The prevalence rates of MetS identified by Japanese criteria were 22.7% (n=624) and 7.8% (n=28) in male and female subjects, respectively. The subjects with MetS had significantly greater mean values of baPWV than those without MetS among both male and female subjects (1444+/-209 vs. 1294+/-165 cm/s in male subjects, P<0.001; 1379+/-151 vs. 1220+/-171 cm/s in female subjects, P<0.001). After adjustment for atherosclerotic variables such as age, smoking habits, total cholesterol and C-reactive protein, the odds ratio (OR) of MetS for increased baPWV was 3.65 in male subjects (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.99-4.47, P<0.001) and 8.02 in female subjects (95% CI: 3.18-20.25 P<0.001). In conclusion, MetS was identified as a significant and independent risk factor for increased arterial stiffness in both the male and female general population in Japan. PMID:19779485

  5. Contribution of collagen fibers to the compressive stiffness of cartilaginous tissues.

    PubMed

    Römgens, Anne M; van Donkelaar, Corrinus C; Ito, Keita

    2013-11-01

    Cartilaginous tissues such as the intervertebral disk are predominantly loaded under compression. Yet, they contain abundant collagen fibers, which are generally assumed to contribute to tensile loading only. Fiber tension is thought to originate from swelling of the proteoglycan-rich nucleus. However, in aged or degenerate disk, proteoglycans are depleted, whereas collagen content changes little. The question then rises to which extend the collagen may contribute to the compressive stiffness of the tissue. We hypothesized that this contribution is significant at high strain magnitudes and that the effect depends on fiber orientation. In addition, we aimed to determine the compression of the matrix. Bovine inner and outer annulus fibrosus specimens were subjected to incremental confined compression tests up to 60 % strain in radial and circumferential direction. The compressive aggregate modulus was determined per 10 % strain increment. The biochemical composition of the compressed specimens and uncompressed adjacent tissue was determined to compute solid matrix compression. The stiffness of all specimens increased nonlinearly with strain. The collagen-rich outer annulus was significantly stiffer than the inner annulus above 20 % compressive strain. Orientation influenced the modulus in the collagen-rich outer annulus. Finally, it was shown that the solid matrix was significantly compressed above 30 % strain. Therefore, we concluded that collagen fibers significantly contribute to the compressive stiffness of the intervertebral disk at high strains. This is valuable for understanding the compressive behavior of collagen-reinforced tissues in general, and may be particularly relevant for aging or degenerate disks, which become more fibrous and less hydrated. PMID:23443749

  6. Stiffness of modified Type 1a linear external skeletal fixators.

    PubMed

    Reaugh, H F; Rochat, M C; Bruce, C W; Galloway, D S; Payton, M E

    2007-01-01

    Modifications of a Type 1a external skeletal fixator (ESF) frame were evaluated by alternately placing transfixation pins on opposite sides of the connecting rod (Type 1a-MOD) or by placing additional connecting rods on either of the two inside (Type 1a-INSIDE) or two outside (Type 1a-OUTSIDE) transfixation pins. The objective of this study was to evaluate the stiffness of these modifications in terms of axial compression (AC), cranial-caudal bending (CCB), and medial-lateral bending (MLB). We hypothesized that these designs would allow significant increase in unilateral frame stiffness, over Type 1a, without proportional increase in frame complexity or technical difficulty of application. All of the ESF frames were constructed using large IMEX SKtrade mark clamps, 3.2 mm threaded fixation pins, 9.5 mm carbon fibre connecting rods and Delrin rods as bone models. Nine, eight pin frames of each design were constructed, and subjected to repetitive non-destructive loading forces (AC, CCB, MLB) using a materials testing machine. Frame construct stiffness for each force (AC, CCB, MLB) was derived from load-deformation curve analysis and displayed in N/mm. Data revealed the 1a-MOD and 1a-OUTSIDE constructs had significantly increased stiffness in CCB and AC as compared to the Type 1a constructs while all of the modified constructs were significantly stiffer in MLB than the Type 1a constructs. PMID:18038001

  7. Verifying Stiffness Parameters Of Filament-Wound Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.; Rheinfurth, M.

    1994-01-01

    Predicted engineering stiffness parameters of filament-wound composite-material cylinders verified with respect to experimental data, by use of equations developed straightforwardly from applicable formulation of Hooke's law. Equations derived in engineering study of filament-wound rocket-motor cases, also applicable to other cylindrical pressure vessels made of orthotropic materials.

  8. Extracellular matrix stiffness dictates Wnt expression through integrin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing; Zu, Yan; Li, Jing; Du, Shuyuan; Xu, Yipu; Zhang, Lang; Jiang, Li; Wang, Zhao; Chien, Shu; Yang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness plays a significant role in regulating the phenotypes and behaviors of many cell types. However, the mechanism underlying the sensing of mechanical cues and subsequent elasticity-triggered pathways remains largely unknown. We observed that stiff ECM significantly enhanced the expression level of several members of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in both bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and primary chondrocytes. The activation of β-catenin by stiff ECM is not dependent on Wnt signals but is elevated by the activation of integrin/ focal adhesion kinase (FAK) pathway. The accumulated β-catenin then bound to the wnt1 promoter region to up-regulate the gene transcription, thus constituting a positive feedback of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. With the amplifying effect of positive feedback, this integrin-activated β-catenin/Wnt pathway plays significant roles in mediating the enhancement of Wnt signal on stiff ECM and contributes to the regulation of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and primary chondrocyte phenotype maintenance. The present integrin-regulated Wnt1 expression and signaling contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of cell behaviors by ECM elasticity. PMID:26854061

  9. Variable stiffness and damping suspension system for train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuaishuai; Deng, Huaxia; Li, Weihua

    2014-03-01

    As the vibration of high speed train becomes fierce when the train runs at high speed, it is crucial to develop a novel suspension system to negotiate train's vibration. This paper presents a novel suspension based on Magnetorheological fluid (MRF) damper and MRF based smart air spring. The MRF damper is used to generate variable damping while the smart air spring is used to generate field-dependent stiffness. In this paper, the two kind smart devices, MRF dampers and smart air spring, are developed firstly. Then the dynamic performances of these two devices are tested by MTS. Based on the testing results, the two devices are equipped to a high speed train which is built in ADAMS. The skyhook control algorithm is employed to control the novel suspension. In order to compare the vibration suppression capability of the novel suspension with other kind suspensions, three other different suspension systems are also considered and simulated in this paper. The other three kind suspensions are variable damping with fixed stiffness suspension, variable stiffness with fixed damping suspension and passive suspension. The simulation results indicate that the variable damping and stiffness suspension suppresses the vibration of high speed train better than the other three suspension systems.

  10. Stiffness, not inertial coupling, determines path curvature of wrist motions.

    PubMed

    Charles, Steven K; Hogan, Neville

    2012-02-01

    When humans rotate their wrist in flexion-extension, radial-ulnar deviation, and combinations, the resulting paths (like the path of a laser pointer on a screen) exhibit a distinctive pattern of curvature. In this report we show that the passive stiffness of the wrist is sufficient to account for this pattern. Simulating the dynamics of wrist rotations using a demonstrably realistic model under a variety of conditions, we show that wrist stiffness can explain all characteristics of the observed pattern of curvature. We also provide evidence against other possible causes. We further demonstrate that the phenomenon is robust against variations in human wrist parameters (inertia, damping, and stiffness) and choice of model inputs. Our findings explain two previously observed phenomena: why faster wrist rotations exhibit more curvature and why path curvature rotates with pronation-supination of the forearm. Our results imply that, as in reaching, path straightness is a goal in the planning and control of wrist rotations. This requires humans to predict and compensate for wrist dynamics, but, unlike reaching, nonlinear inertial coupling (e.g., Coriolis acceleration) is insignificant. The dominant term to be compensated is wrist stiffness. PMID:22131378

  11. Stiffness and hysteresis properties of some prosthetic feet.

    PubMed

    van Jaarsveld, H W; Grootenboer, H J; de Vries, J; Koopman, H F

    1990-12-01

    A prosthetic foot is an important element of a prosthesis, although it is not always fully recognized that the properties of the foot, along with the prosthetic knee joint and the socket, are in part responsible for the stability and metabolic energy cost during walking. The stiffness and the hysteresis, which are the topics of this paper, are not properly prescribed, but could be adapted to improve the prosthetic walking performance. The shape is strongly related to the cosmetic appearance and so can not be altered to effect these improvements. Because detailed comparable data on foot stiffness and hysteresis, which are necessary to quantify the differences between different types of feet, are absent in literature, these properties were measured by the authors in a laboratory setup for nine different prosthetic feet, bare and with two different shoes. One test cycle consisted of measurements of load deformation curves in 66 positions, representing the range from heel strike to toe-off. The hysteresis is defined by the energy loss as a part of the total deformation energy. Without shoes significant differences in hysteresis between the feet exist, while with sport shoes the differences in hysteresis between the feet vanish for the most part. Applying a leather shoe leads to an increase of hysteresis loss for all tested feet. The stiffness turned out to be non-constant, so mean stiffness is used.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2095529

  12. Flexural stiffness of feather shafts: geometry rules over material properties.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Thomas; Emmerlich, Jens; Baumgartner, Werner; Schneider, Jochen M; Wagner, Hermann

    2012-02-01

    Flight feathers of birds interact with the flow field during flight. They bend and twist under aerodynamic loads. Two parameters are mainly responsible for flexibility in feathers: the elastic modulus (Young's modulus, E) of the material (keratin) and the geometry of the rachises, more precisely the second moment of area (I). Two independent methods were employed to determine Young's modulus of feather rachis keratin. Moreover, the second moment of area and the bending stiffness of feather shafts from fifth primaries of barn owls (Tyto alba) and pigeons (Columba livia) were calculated. These species of birds are of comparable body mass but differ in wing size and flight style. Whether their feather material (keratin) underwent an adaptation in stiffness was previously unknown. This study shows that no significant variation in Young's modulus between the two species exists. However, differences in Young's modulus between proximal and distal feather regions were found in both species. Cross-sections of pigeon rachises were particularly well developed and rich in structural elements, exemplified by dorsal ridges and a well-pronounced transversal septum. In contrast, cross-sections of barn owl rachises were less profiled but had a higher second moment of area. Consequently, the calculated bending stiffness (EI) was higher in barn owls as well. The results show that flexural stiffness is predominantly influenced by the geometry of the feathers rather than by local material properties. PMID:22246249

  13. Riparian Sediment Delivery Ratio: Stiff Diagrams and Artifical Neural Networks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various methods are used to estimate sediment transport through riparian buffers and grass jilters with the sediment delivery ratio having been the most widely applied. The U.S. Forest Service developed a sediment delivery ratio using the stiff diagram and a logistic curve to int...

  14. Cardiovascular Health and Arterial Stiffness: The Maine Syracuse Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Crichton, Georgina E; Elias, Merrill F; Robbins, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Ideal cardiovascular health is a recently defined construct by the American Heart Association (AHA) to promote cardiovascular disease reduction. Arterial stiffness is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The extent to which the presence of multiple prevalent cardiovascular risk factors and health behaviors is associated with arterial stiffness is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the AHA construct of cardiovascular health and arterial stiffness, as indexed by pulse wave velocity and pulse pressure. The AHA health metrics, comprising of four health behaviors (smoking, body mass index, physical activity, and diet) and three health factors (total cholesterol, blood pressure, and fasting plasma glucose) were evaluated among 505 participants in the Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study. Outcome measures were carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse pressure measured at 4 to 5-year follow-up. Better cardiovascular health, comprising both health factors and behaviors, was associated with lower arterial stiffness, as indexed by pulse wave velocity and pulse pressure. Those with at least five health metrics at ideal levels had significantly lower PWV (9.8 m/s) than those with two or less ideal health metrics (11.7 m/s) (P<0.001). This finding remained with the addition of demographic and PWV-related variables (P=0.004). PMID:24384629

  15. Creatine supplementation and its effect on musculotendinous stiffness and performance.

    PubMed

    Watsford, Mark L; Murphy, Aron J; Spinks, Warwick L; Walshe, Andrew D

    2003-02-01

    Anecdotal reports suggesting that creatine (Cr) supplementation may cause side effects, such as an increased incidence of muscle strains or tears, require scientific examination. In this study, it was hypothesized that the rapid fluid retention and "dry matter growth" evident after Cr supplementation may cause an increase in musculotendinous stiffness. Intuitively, an increase in musculotendinous stiffness would increase the chance of injury during exercise. Twenty men were randomly allocated to a control or an experimental group and were examined for musculotendinous stiffness of the triceps surae and for numerous performance indices before and after Cr ingestion. The Cr group achieved a significant increase in body mass (79.7 +/- 10.8 kg vs. 80.9 +/- 10.7 kg), counter movement jump height (40.2 +/- 4.8 cm vs. 42.7 +/- 5.9 cm), and 20-cm drop jump height (32.3 +/- 3.3 cm vs. 35.1 +/- 4.8 cm) after supplementation. No increase was found for musculotendinous stiffness at any assessment load. There were no significant changes in any variables within the control group. These findings have both performance- and injury-related implications. Primarily, anecdotal evidence suggesting that Cr supplementation causes muscular strain injuries is not supported by this study. In addition, the increase in jump performance is indicative of performance enhancement in activities requiring maximal power output. PMID:12580652

  16. [Progress on cervical muscle strength and soft tissue stiffness testing].

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming; Zhang, Shi-min

    2015-08-01

    Biomechanical evaluation of neck muscles has important significance in the diagnosis and treatment for cervical spondylosis, the neck muscle strength and soft tissue stiffness test is two aspects of biomechanical testing. Isometric muscle testing operation is relatively simple, the cost is lower, which can evaluate the muscle force below grade 3. However, isokinetic muscle strength testing can assess the muscle strength of joint motion in any position. It is hard to distinguish stiffness difference in different soft tissues when the load-displacement curve is used to evaluate the local soft tissue stiffness. Elasticity imaging technique can not only show the elastic differences of different tissues by images, but also quantify the elastic modulus of subcutaneous tissues and muscles respectively. Nevertheless, it is difficult to observe the flexibility of the cervical spine by means of the analysis of the whole neck stiffness. In a word, a variety of test method will conduce not only the biomechanical evaluation of neck muscles, but also making an effective biomechanics mathematical model of neck muscles. Besides, isokinetic muscle testing and the elasticity imaging technology still need further validation and optimization before they are better applied to neck muscles biomechanical testing. PMID:26502535

  17. Diabetes and diastolic function: stiffness and relaxation from transmitral flow.

    PubMed

    Riordan, Matt M; Chung, Charles S; Kovcs, Sndor J

    2005-12-01

    To characterize the mechanism by which diabetes affects the heart in diabetic (n = 15) and age-matched control subjects (n = 15), we quantified and compared diastolic function (DF) in terms of chamber stiffness and viscosity/relaxation by analyzing Doppler E- and E'-waves and simultaneous (high-fidelity) hemodynamic data. We compared tau, standard Doppler indexes and indexes of stiffness and viscosity/relaxation computed via the parameterized diastolic filling (PDF) formalism. Three PDF parameters uniquely characterize each E-wave in terms of load (x(o)), viscoelasticity or viscosity/relaxation (c) and stiffness (k). Significant differences for c (p = 0.00004), the peak atrioventricular pressure gradient (kx(o)) (p = 0.02) and the stored elastic energy available for early filling (1/2kx(o)2) (p = 0.04) were found. The only conventional index attaining significance was E-wave acceleration time (p = 0.007). Neither time constant of isovolumic relaxation (tau) nor E-wave deceleration time, E', k or x(o) differentiated between groups. We conclude that PDF based DF assessment differentiates between diabetic and nondiabetic controls better than conventional echo- or cath-based indexes. Our results in humans agree with published results from animal studies. We conclude that diabetes affects the heart via a quantifiable increase in chamber viscoelasticity (c) rather than an increase in chamber stiffness (k) and that phenotypic characterization of diabetic cardiomyopathy is facilitated by DF assessment via the PDF formalism. PMID:16344121

  18. Simultaneously high stiffness and damping in nanoengineered microtruss composites.

    PubMed

    Meaud, Julien; Sain, Trisha; Yeom, Bongjun; Park, Sei Jin; Shoultz, Anna Brieland; Hulbert, Gregory; Ma, Zheng-Dong; Kotov, Nicholas A; Hart, A John; Arruda, Ellen M; Waas, Anthony M

    2014-04-22

    Materials combining high stiffness and mechanical energy dissipation are needed in automotive, aviation, construction, and other technologies where structural elements are exposed to dynamic loads. In this paper we demonstrate that a judicious combination of carbon nanotube engineered trusses held in a dissipative polymer can lead to a composite material that simultaneously exhibits both high stiffness and damping. Indeed, the combination of stiffness and damping that is reported is quite high in any single monolithic material. Carbon nanotube (CNT) microstructures grown in a novel 3D truss topology form the backbone of these nanocomposites. The CNT trusses are coated by ceramics and by a nanostructured polymer film assembled using the layer-by-layer technique. The crevices of the trusses are then filled with soft polyurethane. Each constituent of the composite is accurately modeled, and these models are used to guide the manufacturing process, in particular the choice of the backbone topology and the optimization of the mechanical properties of the constituent materials. The resulting composite exhibits much higher stiffness (80 times) and similar damping (specific damping capacity of 0.8) compared to the polymer. Our work is a step forward in implementing the concept of materials by design across multiple length scales. PMID:24620996

  19. Smart fabric adaptive stiffness for active vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albanese, Anne-Marie; Cunefare, Kenneth A.

    2004-07-01

    Unconstrained magnetorheological-elastomers (MRE) experience a stiffness increase and elastomeric deformation in response to an applied magnetic field. An MRE consists of ferromagnetic particles dispersed in a host elastomer matrix. This study considers whether the stiffness change of MRE springs is due to magnetic particle-to-particle interactions or to elastomer deformation. If the stiffening is attributable to magnetic particle interaction, then it should occur even in the absence of the elastomer. To test this hypothesis, a smart fabric consisting of low-carbon steel thread in one direction and nonmagnetic thread in the other was created. Two extension springs were placed in parallel with this smart fabric, and placed in between two iron masses. An electromagnet coil wound about one of the masses provided the source of magnetic field across the smart fabric. The frequency response of the device was measured when the coil was driven by a DC current, at 0.5 Amp increments, from 0 to 4. The device exhibited a 33% increase in stiffness at 4 Amps compared to the stiffness at 0 Amps. While this shift is not as large as shifts observed in MREs, the design was not optimized for iron content, and only had a 0.6% iron content.

  20. Influence of passive stiffness of hamstrings on postural stability.

    PubMed

    Kuszewski, Michał; Gnat, Rafał; Sobota, Grzegorz; Myśliwiec, Andrzej

    2015-03-29

    The aim of the study was to explore whether passive stiffness of the hamstrings influences the strategy of maintaining postural stability. A sample of 50 subjects was selected; the final analyses were based on data of 41 individuals (33 men, 8 women) aged 21 to 29 (mean = 23.3, SD = 1.1) years. A quasi- experimental ex post facto design with repeated measures was used. Categories of independent variables were obtained directly prior to the measurement of the dependent variables. In stage one of the study, passive knee extension was measured in the supine position to assess hamstring stiffness. In stage two, the magnitude of postural sway in antero-posterior direction was measured, while varying the body position on a stabilometric platform, both with and without visual control. The margin of safety was used as a measure of postural control. The magnitude of the margin of safety increased significantly between the open-eye and closed-eye trials. However, although we registered a visible tendency for a larger increase of the margin of safety associated with lower levels of passive hamstrings stiffness, no significant differences were found. Therefore, this study demonstrated that hamstring stiffness did not influence the strategy used to maintain postural stability. PMID:25964809

  1. Influence of Passive Stiffness of Hamstrings on Postural Stability

    PubMed Central

    Kuszewski, Michał; Gnat, Rafał; Sobota, Grzegorz; Myśliwiec, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore whether passive stiffness of the hamstrings influences the strategy of maintaining postural stability. A sample of 50 subjects was selected; the final analyses were based on data of 41 individuals (33 men, 8 women) aged 21 to 29 (mean = 23.3, SD = 1.1) years. A quasi- experimental ex post facto design with repeated measures was used. Categories of independent variables were obtained directly prior to the measurement of the dependent variables. In stage one of the study, passive knee extension was measured in the supine position to assess hamstring stiffness. In stage two, the magnitude of postural sway in antero-posterior direction was measured, while varying the body position on a stabilometric platform, both with and without visual control. The margin of safety was used as a measure of postural control. The magnitude of the margin of safety increased significantly between the open-eye and closed-eye trials. However, although we registered a visible tendency for a larger increase of the margin of safety associated with lower levels of passive hamstrings stiffness, no significant differences were found. Therefore, this study demonstrated that hamstring stiffness did not influence the strategy used to maintain postural stability. PMID:25964809

  2. Adipocyte Stiffness Increases with Accumulation of Lipid Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Shoham, Naama; Girshovitz, Pinhas; Katzengold, Rona; Shaked, Natan T.; Benayahu, Dafna; Gefen, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Adipogenesis and increase in fat tissue mass are mechanosensitive processes and hence should be influenced by the mechanical properties of adipocytes. We evaluated subcellular effective stiffnesses of adipocytes using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and interferometric phase microscopy (IPM), and we verified the empirical results using finite element (FE) simulations. In the AFM studies, we found that the mean ratio of stiffnesses of the lipid droplets (LDs) over the nucleus was 0.83 ± 0.14, from which we further evaluated the ratios of LDs over cytoplasm stiffness, as being in the range of 2.5 to 8.3. These stiffness ratios, indicating that LDs are stiffer than cytoplasm, were verified by means of FE modeling, which simulated the AFM experiments, and provided good agreement between empirical and model-predicted structural behavior. In the IPM studies, we found that LDs mechanically distort their intracellular environment, which again indicated that LDs are mechanically stiffer than the surrounding cytoplasm. Combining these empirical and simulation data together, we provide in this study evidence that adipocytes stiffen with differentiation as a result of accumulation of LDs. Our results are relevant to research of adipose-related diseases, particularly overweight and obesity, from a mechanobiology and cellular mechanics perspectives. PMID:24655518

  3. Magnetorheological brush - a soft structure with highly tuneable stiffness.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao; Mohla, Akshi; Hong, Wei; Bastawros, Ashraf F; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2014-03-14

    By combining the field-stiffening effect of magnetorheological (MR) elastomers and the Euler buckling mechanism, we developed a brush-like magneto-active structure with highly tuneable stiffness. When the applied mechanical load is within a certain range, the effective stiffness of the structure can be tuned by several orders of magnitude with the applied magnetic field. The performance of the structure and its dependence on various synthesis parameters, such as the curing field and filler concentration, were investigated experimentally. It is found that the increase in the critical load for buckling is more than the contribution from the stiffening of the MR elastomer. To unravel the relationship between the stiffness increase and the applied field, a theoretical model with coupled mechanical deformation and magnetic field is established. The prediction of the model agrees well with experimental results. The theory may also be used to model the behaviour of other similar materials, such as MR gels. The MR brush developed in this research holds promise for potential applications in smart structures or devices that require mechanical stiffness to be tuneable in a relatively large range. As the amplification mechanism is independent of the base material, it could be used in conjunction with emerging MR materials for further enhanced performance. PMID:24652105

  4. Nanostructured conducting polymers for stiffness controlled cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyen, Eric; Hama, Adel; Ismailova, Esma; Assaud, Loic; Malliaras, George; Hanbücken, Margrit; Owens, Roisin M.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a facile and reproducible method, based on ultra thin porous alumina membranes, to produce cm2 ordered arrays of nano-pores and nano-pillars on any kind of substrates. In particular our method enables the fabrication of conducting polymers nano-structures, such as poly[3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene]:poly[styrene sulfonate] (PEDOT:PSS). Here, we demonstrate the potential interest of those templates with controlled cell adhesion studies. The triggering of the eventual fate of the cell (proliferation, death, differentiation or migration) is mediated through chemical cues from the adsorbed proteins and physical cues such as surface energy, stiffness and topography. Interestingly, as well as through material properties, stiffness modifications can be induced by nano-topography, the ability of nano-pillars to bend defining an effective stiffness. By controlling the diameter, length, depth and material of the nano-structures, one can possibly tune the effective stiffness of a (nano) structured substrate. First results indicate a possible change in the fate of living cells on such nano-patterned devices, whether they are made of conducting polymer (soft material) or silicon (hard material).

  5. SOIL HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES INFLUENCED BY STIFF-STEMMED GRASS HEDGES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stiff-stemmed grass hedges planted in narrow rows within a field offer an opportunity for effective erosion control at a reasonable cost. The effectiveness of the hedges, however, may depend on soil hydraulic properties as influenced by a hedge. The objective of this study was to characterize and ...

  6. Initial post-buckling of variable-stiffness curved panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. C.; Raju, G.; Weaver, P. M.

    2014-11-01

    Variable-stiffness shells are curved composite structures in which the fibre-reinforcement follow curvilinear paths in space. Having a wider design space than traditional composite shells, they have the potential to improve a wide variety of weight-critical structures. In this paper, a new method for computing the initial post-buckling response of variable-stiffness cylindrical panels is presented, based on the differential quadrature method. Integro-differential governing and boundary equations governing the problem, derived with Koiter's theory (Koiter, 1945), are solved using a mixed generalised differential quadrature (GDQ) and integral quadrature (GIQ) approach. The post-buckling behaviour is determined on the basis of a quadratic expansion of the displacement fields. Orthogonality of the mode-shapes in the expansion series is ensured by a novel use of the Moore-Penrose generalised matrix inverse for solving the GDQ-GIQ equations. The new formulation is validated against benchmark analytical post-buckling results for constant stiffness plates and shells, and compared with non-linear finite-element (FE) analysis for variable-stiffness shells. Stability estimates are found to be in good agreement with incremental FE results in the vicinity of the buckling load, requiring only a fraction of the number of variables used by the current method.

  7. Stiffness gradients in vascular bundles of the palm Washingtonia robusta

    PubMed Central

    Rüggeberg, Markus; Speck, Thomas; Paris, Oskar; Lapierre, Catherine; Pollet, Brigitte; Koch, Gerald; Burgert, Ingo

    2008-01-01

    Palms can grow at sites exposed to high winds experiencing large dynamic wind and gust loads. Their stems represent a system of stiff fibrous elements embedded in the soft parenchymatous tissue. The proper design of the interface of the stiffening elements and the parenchyma is crucial for the functioning of the stem. The strategy of the palm to compromise between stiff fibre caps and the soft parenchymatous tissue may serve as a model system for avoiding stress discontinuities in inhomogeneous and anisotropic fibre-reinforced composite materials. We investigated the mechanical, structural and biochemical properties of the fibre caps of the palm Washingtonia robusta at different levels of hierarchy with high spatial resolution. A gradual decrease in stiffness across the fibre cap towards the surrounding parenchymatous tissue was observed. Structural adaptations at the tissue level were found in terms of changes in cell cross sections and cell wall thickness. At the cell wall level, gradients across the fibre cap were found in the degree of orientation of the microfibrils and in the lignin level and composition. The impact of these structural variations in the local material stiffness distribution is discussed. PMID:18595839

  8. Method of measurement of optical cable stiffness at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdin, Vladimir A.; Alekhin, Ivan N.; Nikulina, Tatiana G.

    2014-04-01

    In this article the new method of determination of optical cable stiffness at low temperatures is offered. The method is allows to simplify process of measurements. Thus presence of technicians at climatic chamber in the course of measurements is not required.

  9. Substrate stiffness affects skeletal myoblast differentiation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanazzo, Sara; Forte, Giancarlo; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Uto, Koichiro; Pagliari, Stefania; Aoyagi, Takao; Traversa, Enrico; Taniguchi, Akiyoshi

    2012-12-01

    To maximize the therapeutic efficacy of cardiac muscle constructs produced by stem cells and tissue engineering protocols, suitable scaffolds should be designed to recapitulate all the characteristics of native muscle and mimic the microenvironment encountered by cells in vivo. Moreover, so not to interfere with cardiac contractility, the scaffold should be deformable enough to withstand muscle contraction. Recently, it was suggested that the mechanical properties of scaffolds can interfere with stem/progenitor cell functions, and thus careful consideration is required when choosing polymers for targeted applications. In this study, cross-linked poly-ɛ-caprolactone membranes having similar chemical composition and controlled stiffness in a supra-physiological range were challenged with two sources of myoblasts to evaluate the suitability of substrates with different stiffness for cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, muscle-specific and non-related feeder layers were prepared on stiff surfaces to reveal the contribution of biological and mechanical cues to skeletal muscle progenitor differentiation. We demonstrated that substrate stiffness does affect myogenic differentiation, meaning that softer substrates can promote differentiation and that a muscle-specific feeder layer can improve the degree of maturation in skeletal muscle stem cells.

  10. INTERIOR VIEW WITH STIFF LEG LADLE CRANE OPERATOR, LUKE WALKER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH STIFF LEG LADLE CRANE OPERATOR, LUKE WALKER, POURING OFF SLAG FROM LADLE AS SKIMMER, BRUCE ELLIOTT, RAKES THE SLAG FROM THE MOLTEN METAL. - American Cast Iron Pipe Company, Mixer Building, 1501 Thirty-first Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  11. Extracellular matrix stiffness dictates Wnt expression through integrin pathway.

    PubMed

    Du, Jing; Zu, Yan; Li, Jing; Du, Shuyuan; Xu, Yipu; Zhang, Lang; Jiang, Li; Wang, Zhao; Chien, Shu; Yang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness plays a significant role in regulating the phenotypes and behaviors of many cell types. However, the mechanism underlying the sensing of mechanical cues and subsequent elasticity-triggered pathways remains largely unknown. We observed that stiff ECM significantly enhanced the expression level of several members of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in both bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and primary chondrocytes. The activation of β-catenin by stiff ECM is not dependent on Wnt signals but is elevated by the activation of integrin/ focal adhesion kinase (FAK) pathway. The accumulated β-catenin then bound to the wnt1 promoter region to up-regulate the gene transcription, thus constituting a positive feedback of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. With the amplifying effect of positive feedback, this integrin-activated β-catenin/Wnt pathway plays significant roles in mediating the enhancement of Wnt signal on stiff ECM and contributes to the regulation of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and primary chondrocyte phenotype maintenance. The present integrin-regulated Wnt1 expression and signaling contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of cell behaviors by ECM elasticity. PMID:26854061

  12. A torsion quasi-zero stiffness vibration isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiaxi; Xu, Daolin; Bishop, Steven

    2015-03-01

    A torsion vibration isolator with quasi-zero stiffness (QZS) is proposed to attenuate the transmission of torsional vibration along a shaft system, which also plays a role of coupling between shafts. A pre-compressed cam-roller mechanism is designed to provide torsional negative stiffness that counteracts with the positive torsion stiffness of the vulcanized rubber between shafts. With the design parameters are set to satisfy a unique condition, the stiffness of the isolator delivers a QZS property about the equilibrium position. A nonlinear mathematical model is developed and its dynamic characteristics are further analyzed by using the Harmonic Balance method. A typical folded resonance curve occurs when the vibration amplitude is plotted as the excitation frequency is varied, illustrating a jump phenomenon in the response. The efficiency of vibration attenuation is estimated under a designed torque load, showing that the torsion QZS vibration isolator outperforms the corresponding linear counterpart, especial in low frequency ranges. Furthermore, the torque transmissibility of the QZS isolator is also studied to demonstrate the performance of the QZS isolator when the actual torque deviates from the design load.

  13. Variable Stiffness Spar Wind-Tunnel Model Development and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florance, James R.; Heeg, Jennifer; Spain, Charles V.; Ivanco, Thomas G.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Lively, Peter S.

    2004-01-01

    The concept of exploiting wing flexibility to improve aerodynamic performance was investigated in the wind tunnel by employing multiple control surfaces and by varying wing structural stiffness via a Variable Stiffness Spar (VSS) mechanism. High design loads compromised the VSS effectiveness because the aerodynamic wind-tunnel model was much stiffer than desired in order to meet the strength requirements. Results from tests of the model include stiffness and modal data, model deformation data, aerodynamic loads, static control surface derivatives, and fuselage standoff pressure data. Effects of the VSS on the stiffness and modal characteristics, lift curve slope, and control surface effectiveness are discussed. The VSS had the most effect on the rolling moment generated by the leading-edge outboard flap at subsonic speeds. The effects of the VSS for the other control surfaces and speed regimes were less. The difficulties encountered and the ability of the VSS to alter the aeroelastic characteristics of the wing emphasize the need for the development of improved design and construction methods for static aeroelastic models. The data collected and presented is valuable in terms of understanding static aeroelastic wind-tunnel model development.

  14. Arterial stiffness of lifelong Japanese female pearl divers.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hirofumi; Tomoto, Tsubasa; Kosaki, Keisei; Sugawara, Jun

    2016-05-15

    Japanese female pearl divers called Ama specialize in free diving in the cold sea for collecting foods and pearls in oysters. Exercising in the water combined with marked bradycardia and pressor responses provides a circulatory challenge to properly buffer or cushion elevated cardiac pulsations. Because Ama perform repeated free dives throughout their lives, it is possible that they may have adapted similar arterial structure and function to those seen in diving mammals. We compared arterial stiffness of lifelong Japanese pearl divers with age-matched physically inactive adults living in the same fishing villages. A total of 115 Japanese female pearl divers were studied. Additionally, 50 physically inactive adults as well as 33 physically active adults (participating in community fitness programs) living in the same coastal villages were also studied. There were no differences in age (∼65 yr), body mass index, and brachial blood pressure between the groups. Measures of arterial stiffness, cardio-ankle vascular index and β-stiffness index were lower (P < 0.05) in pearl divers and physically active adults than in their physically inactive peers. Augmentation pressure and augmentation index adjusted for the heart rate of 75 beats/min were lower (P < 0.05) in pearl divers than in other groups. These results indicate that lifelong Japanese pearl divers demonstrate reduced arterial stiffness and arterial wave reflection compared with age-matched physically inactive peers living in the same fishing villages. PMID:26984889

  15. Estimation of deformation and stiffness of fractures close to tunnels using data from single-hole hydraulic testing and grouting

    SciTech Connect

    Fransson, A.; Tsang, C.-F.; Rutqvist, J.; Gustafson, G.

    2010-05-01

    Sealing of tunnels in fractured rocks is commonly performed by pre- or post-excavation grouting. The grouting boreholes are frequently drilled close to the tunnel wall, an area where rock stresses can be low and fractures can more easily open up during grout pressurization. In this paper we suggest that data from hydraulic testing and grouting can be used to identify grout-induced fracture opening, to estimate fracture stiffness of such fractures, and to evaluate its impact on the grout performance. A conceptual model and a method are presented for estimating fracture stiffness. The method is demonstrated using grouting data from four pre-excavation grouting boreholes at a shallow tunnel (50 m) in Nygard, Sweden, and two post-excavation grouting boreholes at a deep tunnel (450 m) in Aespoe HRL, Sweden. The estimated stiffness of intersecting fractures for the boreholes at the shallow Nygard tunnel are low (2-5 GPa/m) and in agreement with literature data from field experiments at other fractured rock sites. Higher stiffness was obtained for the deeper tunnel boreholes at Aespoe which is reasonable considering that generally higher rock stresses are expected at greater depths. Our method of identifying and evaluating the properties and impact of deforming fractures might be most applicable when grouting takes place in boreholes adjacent to the tunnel wall, where local stresses might be low and where deforming (opening) fractures may take most of the grout.

  16. Dynamic modeling of linear beam-like structures using the Equivalent Beam Stiffness method Part I: Development and benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vest, Todd A.; Darlow, Mark S.

    1991-07-01

    Analysts of beam-like structures are perennially challenged by complex geometries which are not readily translated into beam element models. The Equivalent Beam Stiffness method, or simply EBS, is presented as an extension to and improvement upon the technique of Thomas and Littlewood in which the effective stiffness diameter profile of a freely suspended rotor was estimated by applying the Euler-Bernoulli beam equation to the measured first lateral bending mode shape. The result was a set of new diameters which replaced those determined from drawings. Based upon the more generally applicable Timoshenko form, the EBS method accounts for transverse inertia and shear deformation effects, the latter requiring an a priori estimate of the equivalent stiffness diameter. Additional improvement is provided by using a continuous description of the mass and inertia properties, rather than the lumped-mass representation used previously, and an analytical approach to the extraction procedure. This allows the bending stiffness to be determined throughout the structure, while other methods to the inverse beam dynamics problem, mostly optimisation-based, determine discrete values. The effects of measurement errors are examined and it is shown the EBS method provides reasonable extractions in the presence of noise levels akin to careful modal test data. The successful application of the technique to two full-scale turbine shafts will be discussed in Part II.

  17. An acoustic startle alters knee joint stiffness and neuromuscular control.

    PubMed

    DeAngelis, A I; Needle, A R; Kaminski, T W; Royer, T R; Knight, C A; Swanik, C B

    2015-08-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the nervous system contributes to non-contact knee ligament injury, but limited evidence has measured the effect of extrinsic events on joint stability. Following unanticipated events, the startle reflex leads to universal stiffening of the limbs, but no studies have investigated how an acoustic startle influences knee stiffness and muscle activation during a dynamic knee perturbation. Thirty-six individuals were tested for knee stiffness and muscle activation of the quadriceps and hamstrings. Subjects were seated and instructed to resist a 40-degree knee flexion perturbation from a relaxed state. During some trials, an acoustic startle (50 ms, 1000 Hz, 100 dB) was applied 100 ms prior to the perturbation. Knee stiffness, muscle amplitude, and timing were quantified across time, muscle, and startle conditions. The acoustic startle increased short-range (no startle: 0.044 ± 0.011 N·m/deg/kg; average startle: 0.047 ± 0.01 N·m/deg/kg) and total knee stiffness (no startle: 0.036 ± 0.01 N·m/deg/kg; first startle 0.027 ± 0.02 N·m/deg/kg). Additionally, the startle contributed to decreased [vastus medialis (VM): 13.76 ± 33.6%; vastus lateralis (VL): 6.72 ± 37.4%] but earlier (VM: 0.133 ± 0.17 s; VL: 0.124 ± 0.17 s) activation of the quadriceps muscles. The results of this study indicate that the startle response can significantly disrupt knee stiffness regulation required to maintain joint stability. Further studies should explore the role of unanticipated events on unintentional injury. PMID:25212407

  18. Mediation analysis of aortic stiffness and renal microvascular function.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Todd; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Gotal, John D; Torjesen, Alyssa A; Inker, Lesley A; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Levey, Andrew S; Mitchell, Gary F

    2015-05-01

    Aortic stiffening, assessed by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, is associated with CKD. Transmission of excessive flow pulsatility into the low-impedance renal microvasculature may mediate this association. However, direct analyses of macrovascular-microvascular relations in the kidney are limited. Using arterial tonometry, iohexol clearance, and magnetic resonance imaging, we related arterial stiffness, GFR, urinary albumin excretion, and potential mediators, including renal artery pulsatility index, renal vascular resistance, and arterial volume in the cortex, in 367 older adults (ages 72-92 years) participating in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study. In a model adjusted for age, sex, heart rate, and body size, aortic stiffness was related to GFR (Slope of regression B=-2.28±0.85 ml/min per SD, P=0.008) but not urine albumin (P=0.09). After accounting for pulsatility index, the relation between aortic stiffness and GFR was no longer significant (P=0.10). Mediation analysis showed that 34% of the relation between aortic stiffness and GFR was mediated by pulsatility index (95% confidence interval of indirect effect, -1.35 to -0.29). An additional 20% or 36% of the relation was mediated by lower arterial volume in the cortex or higher renal vascular resistance, respectively, when offered as mediators downstream from higher pulsatility index (95% confidence interval of indirect effect including arterial volume in the cortex, -2.22 to -0.40; 95% confidence interval of indirect effect including renal vascular resistance, -2.51 to -0.76). These analyses provide the first evidence that aortic stiffness may contribute to lower GFR by transferring excessive flow pulsatility into the susceptible renal microvasculature, leading to dynamic constriction or vessel loss. PMID:25294231

  19. RADIONUCLIDE RISK COEFFICIENT UNCERTAINTY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has published excess cancer risk coefficients for the US population in Federal Guidance Report 13 (FGR 13). FGR 13 gives separate risk coefficients for food ingestion, water ingestion, inhalation, and external exposure for each of over 800 radionuclides. Some information on...

  20. Stiffness of sphere–plate contacts at MHz frequencies: dependence on normal load, oscillation amplitude, and ambient medium

    PubMed Central

    Vlachová, Jana; König, Rebekka

    2015-01-01

    Summary The stiffness of micron-sized sphere–plate contacts was studied by employing high frequency, tangential excitation of variable amplitude (0–20 nm). The contacts were established between glass spheres and the surface of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), where the resonator surface had been coated with either sputtered SiO2 or a spin-cast layer of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The results from experiments undertaken in the dry state and in water are compared. Building on the shifts in the resonance frequency and resonance bandwidth, the instrument determines the real and the imaginary part of the contact stiffness, where the imaginary part quantifies dissipative processes. The method is closely analogous to related procedures in AFM-based metrology. The real part of the contact stiffness as a function of normal load can be fitted with the Johnson–Kendall–Roberts (JKR) model. The contact stiffness was found to increase in the presence of liquid water. This finding is tentatively explained by the rocking motion of the spheres, which couples to a squeeze flow of the water close to the contact. The loss tangent of the contact stiffness is on the order of 0.1, where the energy losses are associated with interfacial processes. At high amplitudes partial slip was found to occur. The apparent contact stiffness at large amplitude depends linearly on the amplitude, as predicted by the Cattaneo–Mindlin model. This finding is remarkable insofar, as the Cattaneo–Mindlin model assumes Coulomb friction inside the sliding region. Coulomb friction is typically viewed as a macroscopic concept, related to surface roughness. An alternative model (formulated by Savkoor), which assumes a constant frictional stress in the sliding zone independent of the normal pressure, is inconsistent with the experimental data. The apparent friction coefficients slightly increase with normal force, which can be explained by nanoroughness. In other words, contact splitting (i.e., a transport of shear stress across many small contacts, rather than a few large ones) can be exploited to reduce partial slip. PMID:25977855

  1. On the role of CFRP reinforcement for wood beams stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianasi, A. C.

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, carbon fiber composites have been increasingly used in different ways in reinforcing structural elements. Specifically, the use of composite materials as a reinforcement for wood beams under bending loads requires paying attention to several aspects of the problem such as the number of the composite layers applied on the wood beams. Study consolidation of composites revealed that they are made by bonding fibrous material impregnated with resin on the surface of various elements, to restore or increase the load carrying capacity (bending, cutting, compression or torque) without significant damage of their rigidity. Fibers used in building applications can be fiberglass, aramid or carbon. Items that can be strengthened are concrete, brick, wood, steel and stone, and in terms of structural beams, walls, columns and floors. This paper describes an experimental study which was designed to evaluate the effect of composite material on the stiffness of the wood beams. It proposes a summary of the fundamental principles of analysis of composite materials and the design and use. The type of reinforcement used on the beams is the carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheet and plates and also an epoxy resin for bonding all the elements. Structural epoxy resins remain the primary choice of adhesive to form the bond to fiber-reinforced plastics and are the generally accepted adhesives in bonded CFRP-wood connections. The advantages of using epoxy resin in comparison to common wood-laminating adhesives are their gap-filling qualities and the low clamping pressures that are required to form the bond between carbon fiber plates or sheets and the wood beams. Mechanical tests performed on the reinforced wood beams showed that CFRP materials may produce flexural displacement and lifting increases of the beams. Observations of the experimental load-displacement relationships showed that bending strength increased for wood beams reinforced with CFRP composite plates and sheets compared to those without CFRP reinforcement. The main conclusion of the tests is that the tensioning forces allow beam taking a maximum load for a while, something that is particularly useful when we consider a real construction, so in case of excess lift beam, we have time to take strengthening measures and when is about a catastrophic request (earthquake) the construction remain partially functional. The experiments have shown that the method of increasing resistance of wood constructions with composite materials is good for it. The solution is easy to implement and has low costs.

  2. Calculation and measurement of the influence of flow parameters on rotordynamic coefficients in labyrinth seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwanka, K.; Ortinger, W.; Steckel, J.

    1994-01-01

    First experimental investigations performed on a new test rig are presented. For a staggered labyrinth seal with fourteen cavities the stiffness coefficient and the leakage flow are measured. The experimental results are compared to calculated results which are obtained by a one-volume bulk-flow theory. A perturbation analysis is made for seven terms. It is found out that the friction factors have great impact on the dynamic coefficients. They are obtained by turbulent flow computation by a finite-volume model with the Reynolds equations used as basic equations.

  3. Recursive Construction of Operator Product Expansion Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Jan; Hollands, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    We derive a novel formula for the derivative of operator product expansion (OPE) coefficients with respect to a coupling constant. The formula involves just the OPE coefficients themselves but no further input, and is in this sense self-consistent. Furthermore, unlike other formal identities of this general nature in quantum field theory (such as the formal expression for the Lagrangian perturbation of a correlation function), our formula requires no further UV-renormalization, i.e., it is completely well-defined from the start. This feature is a result of a cancelation of UV- and IR-divergences between various terms in our identity. Our proof, and an analysis of the features of the identity, is given for the example of massive, Euclidean theory in 4 dimensional Euclidean space. It relies on the renormalization group flow equation method and is valid to arbitrary, but finite orders in perturbation theory. The final formula, however, makes neither explicit reference to the renormalization group flow, nor to perturbation theory, and we conjecture that it also holds non-perturbatively. Our identity can be applied constructively because it gives a novel recursive algorithm for the computation of OPE coefficients to arbitrary (finite) perturbation order in terms of the zeroth order coefficients corresponding to the underlying free field theory, which in turn are trivial to obtain. We briefly illustrate the relation of this method to more standard methods for computing the OPE in some simple examples.

  4. Bitplane Image Coding With Parallel Coefficient Processing.

    PubMed

    Auli-Llinas, Francesc; Enfedaque, Pablo; Moure, Juan C; Sanchez, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Image coding systems have been traditionally tailored for multiple instruction, multiple data (MIMD) computing. In general, they partition the (transformed) image in codeblocks that can be coded in the cores of MIMD-based processors. Each core executes a sequential flow of instructions to process the coefficients in the codeblock, independently and asynchronously from the others cores. Bitplane coding is a common strategy to code such data. Most of its mechanisms require sequential processing of the coefficients. The last years have seen the upraising of processing accelerators with enhanced computational performance and power efficiency whose architecture is mainly based on the single instruction, multiple data (SIMD) principle. SIMD computing refers to the execution of the same instruction to multiple data in a lockstep synchronous way. Unfortunately, current bitplane coding strategies cannot fully profit from such processors due to inherently sequential coding task. This paper presents bitplane image coding with parallel coefficient (BPC-PaCo) processing, a coding method that can process many coefficients within a codeblock in parallel and synchronously. To this end, the scanning order, the context formation, the probability model, and the arithmetic coder of the coding engine have been re-formulated. The experimental results suggest that the penalization in coding performance of BPC-PaCo with respect to the traditional strategies is almost negligible. PMID:26441420

  5. Treatment and Rehabilitation of Knee Joints Straight Stiffness After Burns.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jinshu; Xu, Minghuo; Wu, Wenwen; Hu, Yuan; Shi, Xiuxiu; Hou, Shuxun

    2015-12-01

    The knee release surgery and postoperative rehabilitation of patients after burns and knee straight stiffness were investigated. Eleven patients were treated for 16 side burns and knee stiffness who consisted of nine males and two females, aged 19 to 54 years (mean = 33.2). The duration of the patients' knee stiffness ranged from 8 to 26 months, with an average of 12.6 months. Their preoperative flexion ranged from 5° to 50°, with an average of 26.2°. Their preoperative Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) knee scores ranged from 46 to 72 points, with an average of 55.8 points. All stiff knees were treated with release surgery, along with total release of intra-articular adhesion and excision of vastus intermedius. After the arthrolysis of the stiff knee joint, the tight skin was completely loose in the adhesions. The soft tissue contracture was not grafted, but the shade fascia was freed to increase skin ductility. All knee joints were released to more than 90° of flexion in the operation, and reversed fascia flaps were used to suture the loss of the deep fascia at the position of flexion of 90°. After the operation, the knee joint was fixed in flexion for 72 h while being actively cared for by early rehabilitation. Subsequently, the patient's skin coverage, joint motion, and joint function recovery were observed. Based on the follow-up of the patients for the following 16 to 36 months (mean = 25.7), the knee flexion of the patients ranged from 110° to 135°, with an average of 122.2° and 96° increase (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the patients had better skin ductility to meet the increase in joint flexion. HSS knee function scores at the end of follow-up ranged from 93 to 100 points, with an average of 97.5 points and an increase of 41.7 points (P < 0.01). The joint function improved significantly. The arthrolysis of straight stiff knee joints after burns can ease muscle contracture and free the shade fascia, thus avoiding the need to undergo skin grafting. Short-term fixation of the joints after surgery and active flexion rehabilitation may also be the key to improve skin ductility and joint function of the patients. PMID:27011516

  6. Zero finite-temperature charge stiffness within the half-filled 1D Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Carmelo, J.M.P.; Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084; Institut für Theoretische Physik III, Universität Stuttgart, D-70550 Stuttgart ; Gu, Shi-Jian; Department of Physics and ITP, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong ; Sacramento, P.D.; Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084

    2013-12-15

    Even though the one-dimensional (1D) Hubbard model is solvable by the Bethe ansatz, at half-filling its finite-temperature T>0 transport properties remain poorly understood. In this paper we combine that solution with symmetry to show that within that prominent T=0 1D insulator the charge stiffness D(T) vanishes for T>0 and finite values of the on-site repulsion U in the thermodynamic limit. This result is exact and clarifies a long-standing open problem. It rules out that at half-filling the model is an ideal conductor in the thermodynamic limit. Whether at finite T and U>0 it is an ideal insulator or a normal resistor remains an open question. That at half-filling the charge stiffness is finite at U=0 and vanishes for U>0 is found to result from a general transition from a conductor to an insulator or resistor occurring at U=U{sub c}=0 for all finite temperatures T>0. (At T=0 such a transition is the quantum metal to Mott–Hubbard-insulator transition.) The interplay of the η-spin SU(2) symmetry with the hidden U(1) symmetry beyond SO(4) is found to play a central role in the unusual finite-temperature charge transport properties of the 1D half-filled Hubbard model. -- Highlights: •The charge stiffness of the half-filled 1D Hubbard model is evaluated. •Its value is controlled by the model symmetry operator algebras. •We find that there is no charge ballistic transport at finite temperatures T>0. •The hidden U(1) symmetry controls the U=0 phase transition for T>0.

  7. Ultrasound strain elastography in assessment of resting biceps brachii muscle stiffness in patients with Parkinson's disease: a primary observation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; He, Wen; Du, Li-Juan; Li, Shuo; Cheng, Ling-Gang; Shih, George; Rubin, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of ultrasound strain elastography (SE) for the assessment of resting biceps brachii muscle (BBM) stiffness in patients with Parkinson's diseases (PD). From May 2014 to December 2014, we prospectively performed SE of BBM in 14 patients with PD and 10 healthy controls. Based on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale for scoring muscle rigidity (UPDRS, part III), muscle rigidity scores in 14 patients with PD included 3 patients with high rigidity (UPDRS III-IV) and 11 patients with low rigidity (UPDRS I-II). Ultrasound strain was represented by the deformation of the BBM and subcutaneous soft tissues that was produced by external compression with a sand bag (1.5 kg) tied onto an ultrasound transducer. Deformation was estimated with two-dimensional speckle tracking. The difference in strain ratio (SR, defined as mean BBM strain divided by mean subcutaneous soft tissue strain) between PD and healthy controls was tested by unpaired t test. The correlation between SR and muscle rigidity score was analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient. The reliability of SR in assessment of BBM stiffness was tested using intraclass correlation coefficient. In our result, the SR in PD and healthy controls measured 2.65±0.36 and 3.30±0.27, respectively. A significant difference in SR was noted between the healthy controls and PD (P=.00011). A negative correlation was found between SR and UPDRS rigidity score (r=-0.78). Our study suggests that the SR of BBM to reference tissue can be used as a quantitative biomarker in assessing resting muscle stiffness associated with muscle rigidity in PD. PMID:27133683

  8. Spin-wave stiffness parameter in ferrimagnetic systems: Nanoparticulate powders of (Mg,Zn ) Fe2O4 mixed ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, A.; Pessoni, H. V. S.; Machado, F. L. A.

    2015-11-01

    We have evaluated the spin-wave stiffness parameter in nanoparticulate powders of Mg1 -xZnxFe2O4 ( 0.0 ≤x ≤0.6 ) mixed ferrites from magnetization data obtained at two different ranges of temperature: 5 -300 K and 300 -750 K . At the lower temperature range the T-dependence of the saturation magnetization, Ms, data could be fitted to the Bloch's law with T3 /2 . The spin-wave stiffness parameters D were determined from the coefficient of T3 /2 ; being ˜132 and ˜86 meVÅ for x = 0.0 and 0.6, respectively, with the corresponding exchange constant JAB of ˜1.10 and ˜0.72 meV , respectively. The values of D determined from the experimental Curie temperature Tc were ˜212 and ˜163 meVÅ2 for x = 0.0 and 0.6, respectively, with the corresponding exchange constant JAB of ˜1.77 and ˜1.30 meV . The difference in both JAB and D values obtained from the coefficient of T3 /2 and from Tc may be attributed to the fact that the magnetic measurements were performed at a different range of temperatures. The results are discussed in terms of the cation distribution among A- and B-sites of occupation on these spinel ferrites.

  9. Strong, tough and stiff bioinspired ceramics from brittle constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouville, Florian; Maire, Eric; Meille, Sylvain; van de Moortèle, Bertrand; Stevenson, Adam J.; Deville, Sylvain

    2014-05-01

    High strength and high toughness are usually mutually exclusive in engineering materials. In ceramics, improving toughness usually relies on the introduction of a metallic or polymeric ductile phase, but this decreases the material’s strength and stiffness as well as its high-temperature stability. Although natural materials that are both strong and tough rely on a combination of mechanisms operating at different length scales, the relevant structures have been extremely difficult to replicate. Here, we report a bioinspired approach based on widespread ceramic processing techniques for the fabrication of bulk ceramics without a ductile phase and with a unique combination of high strength (470 MPa), high toughness (22 MPa m1/2), and high stiffness (290 GPa). Because only mineral constituents are needed, these ceramics retain their mechanical properties at high temperatures (600 °C). Our bioinspired, material-independent approach should find uses in the design and processing of materials for structural, transportation and energy-related applications.

  10. Stiff filamentous virus translocations through solid-state nanopores.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Angus; de Haan, Hendrick W; Tang, Jay X; Stein, Derek

    2014-01-01

    The ionic conductance through a nanometer-sized pore in a membrane changes when a biopolymer slides through it, making nanopores sensitive to single molecules in solution. Their possible use for sequencing has motivated numerous studies on how DNA, a semi-flexible polymer, translocates nanopores. Here we study voltage-driven dynamics of the stiff filamentous virus fd with experiments and simulations to investigate the basic physics of polymer translocations. We find that the electric field distribution aligns an approaching fd with the nanopore, promoting its capture, but it also pulls fd sideways against the membrane after failed translocation attempts until thermal fluctuations reorient the virus for translocation. fd is too stiff to translocate in folded configurations. It therefore translocates linearly, exhibiting a voltage-independent mobility and obeying first-passage-time statistics. Surprisingly, lengthwise Brownian motion only partially accounts for the translocation velocity fluctuations. We also observe a voltage-dependent contribution whose origin is only partially determined. PMID:24932700

  11. Force, Torque and Stiffness: Interactions in Perceptual Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bing; Klatzky, Roberta L.; Hollis, Ralph L.

    2011-01-01

    Three experiments investigated whether force and torque cues interact in haptic discrimination of force, torque and stiffness, and if so, how. The statistical relation between force and torque was manipulated across four experimental conditions: Either one type of cue varied while the other was constant, or both varied so as to be positively correlated, negatively correlated, or uncorrelated. Experiment 1 showed that the subjects’ ability to discriminate force was improved by positively correlated torque but impaired with uncorrelated torque, as compared to the constant torque condition. Corresponding effects were found in Experiment 2 for the influence of force on torque discrimination. These findings indicate that force and torque are integrated in perception, rather than being processed as separate dimensions. A further experiment demonstrated facilitation of stiffness discrimination by correlated force and torque, whether the correlation was positive or negative. The findings suggest new means of augmenting haptic feedback to facilitate perception of the properties of soft objects. PMID:21359137

  12. Analysis of Brace Stiffness Influence on Stability of the Truss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajewski, M.; Iwicki, P.

    2015-02-01

    The paper is devoted to the numerical and experimental research of stability of a truss with side elastic supports at the top chord. The structure is a model of a real roof truss scaled by factor 1/4. The linear buckling analysis and non-linear static analysis were carried out. The buckling length factor for the compressed top chord was calculated and the limit load for the imperfect truss shell model with respect to brace stiffness was obtained. The relation between brace normal force and loading of the truss is presented. The threshold stiffness of braces necessary to obtain the maximum buckling load was found. The truss load bearing capacity obtained from numerical analysis was compared with Eurocode 3 requirements.

  13. Vibration in Planetary Gear Systems with Unequal Planet Stiffnesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frater, J. L.; August, R.; Oswald, F. B.

    1982-01-01

    An algorithm suitable for a minicomputer was developed for finding the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a planetary gear system which has unequal stiffnesses between the Sun/planet and planet/ring gear meshes. Mode shapes are represented in the form of graphical computer output that illustrates the lateral and rotational motion of the three coaxial gears and the planet gears. This procedure permits the analysis of gear trains utilizing nonuniform mesh conditions and user specified masses, stiffnesses, and boundary conditions. Numerical integration of the equations of motion for planetary gear systems indicates that this algorithm offers an efficient means of predicting operating speeds which may result in high dynamic tooth loads.

  14. Controllable-stiffness components based on magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginder, John M.; Nichols, Mark E.; Elie, Larry D.; Clark, Seamus M.

    2000-06-01

    So-called magnetorheological (MR) elastomers, comprising rubbery polymers loaded with magnetizable particles that are aligned in a magnetic field, possess dynamic stiffness and damping that can subsequently be controlled by applied fields. Tunable automotive bushings and mounts incorporating these materials and an embedded magnetic field source have been constructed. In this article, the response of these components to dynamic mechanical loading is described. They behave essentially as elastomeric springs with stiffness and damping that is increased by tens of percent with an applied electrical current. Their time of response to a change in current is less than ten milliseconds. In addition to a tunable spring or force generator, these components may also serve as deflection sensors.

  15. Derivation of stiffness matrix in constitutive modeling of magnetorheological elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, D.; Sun, L.; Sun, J.; Lin, Y.

    2013-02-01

    Magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) are a class of smart materials whose mechanical properties change instantly by the application of a magnetic field. Based on the specially orthotropic, transversely isotropic stress-strain relationships and effective permeability model, the stiffness matrix of constitutive equations for deformable chain-like MRE is considered. To valid the components of shear modulus in this stiffness matrix, the magnetic-structural simulations with finite element method (FEM) are presented. An acceptable agreement is illustrated between analytical equations and numerical simulations. For the specified magnetic field, sphere particle radius, distance between adjacent particles in chains and volume fractions of ferrous particles, this constitutive equation is effective to engineering application to estimate the elastic behaviour of chain-like MRE in an external magnetic field.

  16. Ultrasonographic vascular mechanics to assess arterial stiffness: a review.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Rogério; Vieira, Maria João; Gonçalves, Alexandra; Cardim, Nuno; Gonçalves, Lino

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, the role of arterial stiffness in the development of cardiovascular diseases has been explored more extensively. Local arterial stiffness may be gauged via ultrasound, measuring pulse transit time relative to changing vessel diameters and distending pressures. Recently, direct vessel-wall tracking systems have been devised based on new ultrasonographic methodologies, such as tissue Doppler imaging and speckle-tracking analysis-vascular mechanics. These advances have been evaluated in varying arterial distributions, are proved surrogates of pulse wave velocity, and are ascending in clinical importance. In the course of this review, we describe fundamental concepts and methodologies involved in ultrasound assessment of vascular mechanics. We also present relevant clinical studies and discuss the potential clinical utility of such diagnostic pursuits. PMID:26546802

  17. Stabilized multilevel Monte Carlo method for stiff stochastic differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Abdulle, Assyr Blumenthal, Adrian

    2013-10-15

    A multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method for mean square stable stochastic differential equations with multiple scales is proposed. For such problems, that we call stiff, the performance of MLMC methods based on classical explicit methods deteriorates because of the time step restriction to resolve the fastest scales that prevents to exploit all the levels of the MLMC approach. We show that by switching to explicit stabilized stochastic methods and balancing the stabilization procedure simultaneously with the hierarchical sampling strategy of MLMC methods, the computational cost for stiff systems is significantly reduced, while keeping the computational algorithm fully explicit and easy to implement. Numerical experiments on linear and nonlinear stochastic differential equations and on a stochastic partial differential equation illustrate the performance of the stabilized MLMC method and corroborate our theoretical findings.

  18. Dense brushes of stiff polymers or filaments in fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römer, F.; Fedosov, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    Dense filamentous brush-like structures are present in many biological interfacial systems (e.g., glycocalyx layer in blood vessels) to control their surface properties. Such structures can regulate the softness of a surface and modify fluid flow. In this letter, we propose a theoretical model which predicts quantitatively flow-induced deformation of a dense brush of stiff polymers or filaments, whose persistence length is larger or comparable to their contour length. The model is validated by detailed mesoscopic simulations and characterizes different contributions to brush deformation including hydrodynamic friction due to flow and steric excluded-volume interactions between grafted filaments. This theoretical model can be used to describe the effect of a stiff-polymer brush on fluid flow and to aid in the quantification of experiments.

  19. Annular honeycomb seals: Test results for leakage and rotordynamic coefficients - Comparisons to labyrinth and smooth configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D.; Elrod, D.; Hale, K.

    1989-01-01

    Test results are presented for leakage and rotordynamic coefficients for seven honeycomb seals. All seals have the same radius, length, and clearance; however, the cell depths and diameters are varied. Rotordynamic data, which are presented, consist of the direct and cross-coupled stiffness coefficients and the direct damping coefficients. The rotordynamic-coefficient data show a considerable sensitivity to changes in cell dimensions; however, no clear trends are identifiable. Comparisons of test data for the honeycomb seals with labyrinth and smooth annular seals shows the honeycomb seal had the best sealing (minimum leakage) performance, followed in order by the labyrinth and smooth seals. For prerotated fluids entering the seal, in the direction of shaft rotation, the honeycomb seal has the best rotordynamic stability followed in order by the labyrinth and smooth. For no prerotation, or fluid prerotation against shaft rotation, the labyrinth seal has the best rotordynamic stability followed in order by the smooth and honeycomb seals.

  20. Annular honeycomb seals: Test results for leakage and rotordynamic coefficients; comparisons to labyrinth and smooth configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Dara W.; Elrod, David; Hale, Keith

    1989-01-01

    Test results are presented for leakage and rotordynamic coefficients for seven honeycomb seals. All seals have the same radius, length, and clearance; however, the cell depths and diameters are varied. Rotordynamic data, which are presented, consist of the direct and cross-coupled stiffness coefficients and the direct damping coefficients. The rotordynamic-coefficient data show a considerable sensitivity to changes in cell dimensions; however, no clear trends are identifiable. Comparisons of test data for the honeycomb seals with labyrinth and smooth annular seals show the honeycomb seal had the best sealing (minimum leakage) performance, followed in order by the labyrinth and smooth seals. For prerotated fluid entering the seal, in the direction of shaft rotation, the honeycomb seal has the best rotordynamic stability followed in order by the labyrinth and smooth. For no prerotation, or fluid prerotation against shaft rotation, the labyrinth seal has the best rotordynamic stability followed in order by the smooth and honeycomb seals.

  1. Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    2001-07-31

    A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

  2. Arterial stiffness, central hemodynamics, and cardiovascular risk in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Palatini, Paolo; Casiglia, Edoardo; Gąsowski, Jerzy; Głuszek, Jerzy; Jankowski, Piotr; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Saladini, Francesca; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Van Bortel, Luc; Wojciechowska, Wiktoria; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina

    2011-01-01

    This review summarizes several scientific contributions at the recent Satellite Symposium of the European Society of Hypertension, held in Milan, Italy. Arterial stiffening and its hemodynamic consequences can be easily and reliably measured using a range of noninvasive techniques. However, like blood pressure (BP) measurements, arterial stiffness should be measured carefully under standardized patient conditions. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has been proposed as the gold standard for arterial stiffness measurement and is a well recognized predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcome. Systolic BP and pulse pressure in the ascending aorta may be lower than pressures measured in the upper limb, especially in young individuals. A number of studies suggest closer correlation of end-organ damage with central BP than with peripheral BP, and central BP may provide additional prognostic information regarding cardiovascular risk. Moreover, BP-lowering drugs can have differential effects on central aortic pressures and hemodynamics compared with brachial BP. This may explain the greater beneficial effect provided by newer antihypertensive drugs beyond peripheral BP reduction. Although many methodological problems still hinder the wide clinical application of parameters of arterial stiffness, these will likely contribute to cardiovascular assessment and management in future clinical practice. Each of the abovementioned parameters reflects a different characteristic of the atherosclerotic process, involving functional and/or morphological changes in the vessel wall. Therefore, acquiring simultaneous measurements of different parameters of vascular function and structure could theoretically enhance the power to improve risk stratification. Continuous technological effort is necessary to refine our methods of investigation in order to detect early arterial abnormalities. Arterial stiffness and its consequences represent the great challenge of the twenty-first century for affluent countries, and “de-stiffening” will be the goal of the next decades. PMID:22174583

  3. Magnetic bearing stiffness control using frequency band filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H. Ming

    1989-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings can be implemented with frequency band-reject filtering that decreases the bearing stiffness and damping at a small bandwidth around a chosen frequency. The control scheme was used for reducing a rotor dynamic force, such as an imbalance force, transmitted to the bearing stator. The scheme creates additional system vibration modes at the same frequency. It also shows that the amount of force reduction is limited by the stability requirement of these modes.

  4. On a high-potential variable flexural stiffness device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henke, Markus; Gerlach, Gerald

    2013-05-01

    There are great efforts in developing effective composite structures for lightweight constructions for nearly every field of engineering. This concerns for example aeronautics and spacecrafts, but also automotive industry and energy harvesting applications. Modern concepts of lightweight components try to make use of structures with properties which can be adjusted in a controllable was. However, classic composite materials can only slightly adapt to varying environmental conditions because most materials, like carbon or glass-fiber composites show properties which are time-constant and not changeable. This contribution describes the development, the potential and the limitations of novel smart, self-controlling structures which can change their mechanical properties - e.g. their flexural stiffness - by more then one order of magnitude. These structures use a multi-layer approach with a 10-layer stack of 0.75 mm thick polycarbonate. The set-up is analytically described and its mechanical behavior is predicted by finite element analysis done with ABAQUS. The layers are braided together by an array of shape memory alloy (SMA) wires, which can be activated independently. Depending on the temperature applied by the electrical current flowing through the wires and the corresponding contraction the wires can tightly clamp the layers so that they cannot slide against each other due to friction forces. In this case the multilayer acts as rigid beam with high stiffness. If the friction-induced shear stress is smaller than a certain threshold, then the layers can slide over each other and the multilayer becomes compliant under bending load. The friction forces between the layers and, hence, the stiffness of the beam is controlled by the electrical current through the wires. The more separate parts of SMA wires the structure has the larger is the number of steps of stiffness changes of the flexural beam.

  5. High stiffness seals for rotor critical speed control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    An annular seal is analyzed in which the inlet clearance is larger than the outlet clearance; the flow path may be either stepped or tapered. This design produces radial stiffness 1.7 to 14 times that of a constant clearance seal having the same minimum clearance. When sealing high pressure fluids, such a seal improves rotor stability and can be used to shift troublesome critical speeds to a more suitable location.

  6. High stiffness seals for rotor critical speed control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    An annular seal is analyzed in which the inlet clearance is larger than the outlet clearance; the flow path may be either stepped or tapered. This design produces radial stiffnesses 1.7 to 14 times that of a constant-clearance seal having the same minimum clearance. When sealing high-pressure fluids, such as a seal can improve rotor stability and can be used to shift troublesome critical speeds to a more suitable location.

  7. Trunk stiffness and dynamics during active extension exertions.

    PubMed

    Moorhouse, Kevin M; Granata, Kevin P

    2005-10-01

    Spinal stability is related to the recruitment and control of active muscle stiffness. Stochastic system identification techniques were used to calculate the effective stiffness and dynamics of the trunk during active trunk extension exertions. Twenty-one healthy adult subjects (10 males, 11 females) wore a harness with a cable attached to a servomotor such that isotonic flexion preloads of 100, 135, and 170 N were applied at the T10 level of the trunk. A pseudorandom stochastic force sequence (bandwidth 0-10 Hz, amplitude +/-30 N) was superimposed on the preload causing small amplitude trunk movements. Nonparametric impulse response functions of trunk dynamics were computed and revealed that the system exhibited underdamped second-order behavior. Second-order trunk dynamics were determined by calculating the best least-squares fit to the IRF. The quality of the model was quantified by comparing estimated and observed displacement variance accounted for (VAF), and quality of the second-order fits was calculated as a percentage and referred to as fit accuracy. Mean VAF and fit accuracy were 87.8 +/- 4.0% and 96.0 +/- 4.3%, respectively, indicating that the model accurately represented active trunk kinematic response. The accuracy of the kinematic representation was not influenced by preload or gender. Mean effective stiffness was 2.78 +/- 0.96 N/mm and increased significantly with preload (p < 0.001), but did not vary with gender (p = 0.425). Mean effective damping was 314 +/- 72 Ns/m and effective trunk mass was 37.0 +/- 9.3 kg. We conclude that stochastic system identification techniques should be used to calculate effective trunk stiffness and dynamics. PMID:16084200

  8. A new strategy for stiffness evaluation of sheet metal parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Q.; Volk, W.; Düster, A.; Rank, E.

    2011-08-01

    In the automotive industry, surfaces of styling models are shaped very often in physical models. For example, in the styling process of a car body important design work is realized by clay models and the resulting geometry information typically comes from optical scans. The scanned data is given in the form of point clouds which is then utilized in the virtual planning process for engineering work, e.g. to evaluate the load-carrying capacity. This is an important measure for the stiffness of the car body panels. In this contribution, the following two issues are discussed: what is the suitable geometric representation of the stiffness of the car body and how it is computed if only discrete point clouds exist. In the first part, the suitable geometric representation is identified by constructing continuous CAD models with different geometric parameters, e.g. Gaussian curvature and mean curvature. The stiffness of models is then computed in LS-DYNA and the influence of different geometric parameters is presented based on the simulation result. In the second part, the point clouds from scanned data, rather than continuous CAD models, are directly utilized to estimate the Gaussian curvature, which is normally derived from continuous surfaces. The discrete Gauss-Bonnet algorithm is applied to estimate the Gaussian curvature of the point clouds and the sensitivity of the algorithm with respect to the mesh quality is analyzed. In this way, the stiffness evaluation process in an early stage can be accelerated since the transformation from discrete data to continuous CAD data is labor-intensive. The discrete Gauss-Bonnet algorithm is finally applied to a sheet metal model of the BMW 3 series.

  9. Normalized stiffness ratios for mechanical characterization of isotropic acoustic foams.

    PubMed

    Sahraoui, Sohbi; Brouard, Bruno; Benyahia, Lazhar; Parmentier, Damien; Geslain, Alan

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a method for the mechanical characterization of isotropic foams at low frequency. The objective of this study is to determine the Young's modulus, the Poisson's ratio, and the loss factor of commercially available foam plates. The method is applied on porous samples having square and circular sections. The main idea of this work is to perform quasi-static compression tests of a single foam sample followed by two juxtaposed samples having the same dimensions. The load and displacement measurements lead to a direct extraction of the elastic constants by means of normalized stiffness and normalized stiffness ratio which depend on Poisson's ratio and shape factor. The normalized stiffness is calculated by the finite element method for different Poisson ratios. The no-slip boundary conditions imposed by the loading rigid plates create interfaces with a complex strain distribution. Beforehand, compression tests were performed by means of a standard tensile machine in order to determine the appropriate pre-compression rate for quasi-static tests. PMID:25669274

  10. Stiffness vs Damping in the Cochlea: A Negative Conclusion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Andrew J.; Aranyosi, A. J.; Bergevin, Christopher

    2011-11-01

    While the notion of an active mechanism at work in the inner ear giving rise to amplification of low-level stimuli is widely considered to be firmly established, the nature of the underlying mechanisms(s) is however still a topic of significant debate. Disparate arguments have been about the nature of the underlying active term, specifically whether it manifests as a negative stiffness (position-dependent) or a negative damping (velocity-dependent). We analytically describe here that for a for an autonomous second-order resonator, a negative stiffness alone is insufficient to produce a super-critical Hopf bifurcation (a property commonly attributed to argue for amplification) and a negative damping is required. Moreover, an autonomous resonator with a negative stiffness alone cannot exhibit limit cycles (i.e., spontaneous oscillations). These observations are thus consistent with the notion that an active mechanism contributes in a velocity-dependent fashion. While simple second-order models alone are likely too simple to capture essential features of the ear, our results can help guide interpretation of more detailed/complex approaches (e.g., coupled oscillators, stochastic forcing).

  11. Ultrasonic guided interface waves at a soft-stiff boundary.

    PubMed

    Bostron, Jason H; Rose, Joseph L; Moose, Clark A

    2013-12-01

    Interface waves traveling along the boundary between two solids have been studied for nearly a century. However, little attention has been given to the case where interface waves travel at the boundary between a soft and stiff solid and when the soft material is relatively light and viscoelastic. In this paper, the characteristics of interface waves that propagate along a soft-stiff boundary are described. These waves are similar to a leaky Rayleigh-like wave on the stiff solid in terms of the wave velocity and displacement wave structure. Analytical and finite element models are used to model and simulate wave propagation. An example problem of bond evaluation for coatings on metal structures is considered. Experiments on 2.5 cm thick steel plate with 2.5 cm viscoelastic coatings show good agreement to models. Additionally, the results of models and experiments show several promising features that may be used to evaluate bonds in a non-destructive evaluation approach. PMID:25669246

  12. Arterial Stiffness and Wave Reflection: Biomarkers of Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Gary F.

    2009-01-01

    Arterial stiffness and excessive pressure pulsatility have emerged as important risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Arterial stiffness increases with age and in the presence of traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes and lipid disorders. Pathologic stiffening of large arteries with advancing age and risk factor exposure predominantly involves the elastic aorta and carotid arteries, whereas stiffness changes are relatively limited in muscular arteries. Aortic stiffening is associated with increased pulse wave velocity and pulse pressure, which are related but distinct measures of the pulsatile energy content of the pressure waveform. A dramatic increase in pulsatile energy content of pressure and flow waves in the arterial system places considerable pulsatile stress on the heart, large arteries and distal circulation. Large artery stiffening is associated with abnormalities in microvascular structure and function that may contribute to tissue damage, particularly in susceptible high flow organs such as the brain and kidneys. This brief review summarizes results of recent research on risk factors for and adverse effects of large artery stiffening. PMID:20161241

  13. Dynamic Stiffness Analysis of Axially Loaded Timoshenko Beam with Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenberger, Moshe

    2010-05-01

    The structural vibratory characteristics of structural elements are affected by cracks which are found in several locations and depth along the elements. Cracks are modeled as mass less rotational springs that are characterized by their depth. Using the dynamic stiffness method it is possible to obtain a condensed reduced order system of equations without any loss of accuracy due to the size reduction. The dynamic stiffness matrices for these cases are derived from the differential equations of motion analytically, including the discontinuities introduced by the presence of the cracks. The assembly of the structural dynamic stiffness is performed in this paper by steps, i.e. after the addition of each element a condensation procedure is carried out to reduce the problem size. The condensation is performed analytically and the resulting matrix is maintained at the size of 4 by 4 matrix. After all cracked sub-elements were assembled the two end boundary restraints are introduced for the completion of the derivation. The advantages of the proposed procedure are demonstrated in several examples. In these the exact characteristic of the procedure is shown, and the results are compared to existing results in the open literature.

  14. Human corneal epithelial cell response to substrate stiffness.

    PubMed

    Molladavoodi, Sara; Kwon, Hyock-Ju; Medley, John; Gorbet, Maud

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that mechanical stimulus can affect cellular behavior. While induced differentiation in stem cells and proliferation and directional migration in fibroblasts are reported as responses to mechanical stimuli, little is known about the response of cells from the cornea. In the present study, we investigated whether changes in substrate stiffness (measured by elastic modulus) affected the behavior of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). Polyacrylamide substrates with different elastic moduli (compliant, medium and stiff) were prepared and HCECs were cultured on them. HCECs responses, including cell viability, apoptosis, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression, integrin-?3?1 expression and changes in cytoskeleton structure (actin fibers) and migratory behavior, were studied. No statistically significant cell activation, as measured by ICAM-1 expression, was observed. However, on compliant substrates, a higher number of cells were found to be apoptotic and disrupted actin fibers were observed. Furthermore, cells displayed a statistically significant lower migration speed on compliant substrates when compared with the stiffer substrates. Thus, corneal epithelial cells respond to changes in substrate stiffness, which may have implications in the understanding and perhaps treatment of corneal diseases, such as keratoconus. PMID:25305512

  15. Strength and stiffness reduction factors for infilled frames with openings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decanini, Luis D.; Liberatore, Laura; Mollaioli, Fabrizio

    2014-09-01

    Framed structures are usually infilled with masonry walls. They may cause a significant increase in both stiffness and strength, reducing the deformation demand and increasing the energy dissipation capacity of the system. On the other hand, irregular arrangements of the masonry panels may lead to the concentration of damage in some regions, with negative effects; for example soft story mechanisms and shear failures in short columns. Therefore, the presence of infill walls should not be neglected, especially in regions of moderate and high seismicity. To this aim, simple models are available for solid infills walls, such as the diagonal no-tension strut model, while infilled frames with openings have not been adequately investigated. In this study, the effect of openings on the strength and stiffness of infilled frames is investigated by means of about 150 experimental and numerical tests. The main parameters involved are identified and a simple model to take into account the openings in the infills is developed and compared with other models proposed by different researchers. The model, which is based on the use of strength and stiffness reduction factors, takes into account the opening dimensions and presence of reinforcing elements around the opening. An example of an application of the proposed reduction factors is also presented.

  16. Origami tubes assembled into stiff, yet reconfigurable structures and metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Filipov, Evgueni T.; Tachi, Tomohiro; Paulino, Glaucio H.

    2015-01-01

    Thin sheets have long been known to experience an increase in stiffness when they are bent, buckled, or assembled into smaller interlocking structures. We introduce a unique orientation for coupling rigidly foldable origami tubes in a “zipper” fashion that substantially increases the system stiffness and permits only one flexible deformation mode through which the structure can deploy. The flexible deployment of the tubular structures is permitted by localized bending of the origami along prescribed fold lines. All other deformation modes, such as global bending and twisting of the structural system, are substantially stiffer because the tubular assemblages are overconstrained and the thin sheets become engaged in tension and compression. The zipper-coupled tubes yield an unusually large eigenvalue bandgap that represents the unique difference in stiffness between deformation modes. Furthermore, we couple compatible origami tubes into a variety of cellular assemblages that can enhance mechanical characteristics and geometric versatility, leading to a potential design paradigm for structures and metamaterials that can be deployed, stiffened, and tuned. The enhanced mechanical properties, versatility, and adaptivity of these thin sheet systems can provide practical solutions of varying geometric scales in science and engineering. PMID:26351693

  17. Paradoxical impact of cholesterol on lipid packing and cell stiffness.

    PubMed

    Ayee, Manuela A; Levitan, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Cell stiffness or deformability is a fundamental property that is expected to play a major role in multiple cellular functions. It is well known that cell stiffness is dominated by the intracellular cytoskeleton that, together with the plasma membrane, forms a membrane-cytoskeleton envelope. However, our understanding of how lipid composition of plasma membrane regulates physical properties of the underlying cytoskeleton is only starting to emerge. In this review, we first briefly describe the impact of cholesterol on the physical properties of lipid bilayers in model membranes and in living cells, with the dominant effect of increasing the order of membrane lipids and decreasing membrane fluidity. Then, we discuss accumulating evidence that removal of cholesterol, paradoxically, decreases the mobility of membrane proteins and increases cellular stiffness, with both effects being dependent on the integrity of the cytoskeleton. Finally, we discuss emerging evidence that oxidized modifications of low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) have the same effects on endothelial biomechanical properties as cholesterol depletion, an effect that is mediated by the incorporation of oxysterols into the membrane. PMID:27100504

  18. Helical growth trajectories in plant roots interacting with stiff barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbode, Sharon; Noar, Roslyn; Harrison, Maria

    2009-03-01

    Plant roots successfully navigate heterogeneous soil environments with varying nutrient and water concentrations, as well as a variety of stiff obstacles. While it is thought that the ability of roots to penetrate into a stiff lower soil layer is important for soil erosion, little is known about how a root actually responds to a rigid interface. We have developed a laser sheet imaging technique for recording the 3D growth dynamics of plant roots interacting with stiff barriers. We find that a root encountering an angled interface does not grow in a straight line along the surface, but instead follows a helical trajectory. These experiments build on the pioneering studies of roots grown on a tilted 2D surface, which reported ``root waving,'' a similar curved pattern thought to be caused by the root's sensitivity to both gravity and the rigid surface on which it is grown. Our measurements extend these results to the more physiologically relevant case of 3D growth, where the spiral trajectory can be altered by tuning the relative strengths of the gravity and touch stimuli, providing some intuition for the physical mechanism driving it.

  19. Increased central arterial stiffness and altered cerebrovascular haemodynamic properties in South Asian older adults.

    PubMed

    Brar, I; Robertson, A D; Hughson, R L

    2016-05-01

    South Asians (SA) suffer from a higher burden of heart disease and stroke compared with White Caucasians (CA). We hypothesized that increased arterial stiffness in older adults of SA origin would be associated with greater cerebrovascular pulsatile pressure and flow characteristics compared with CA older adults. Forty-four SA and CA older adults, free of known cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, were assessed. Vascular ageing was characterized by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity, carotid pulse pressure, compliance coefficient (CC) and intima-media thickness (IMT). Duplex ultrasonography of the internal carotid arteries estimated anterior cerebral blood flow (aCBF) and cerebrovascular resistance (aCVR), and transcranial Doppler ultrasound quantified middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity, resistive index (RI) and pulsatility index (PI). Fasting blood samples were collected to assess glycaemic status, lipid profile and C-reactive protein. SA had higher carotid pulse pressure and lower CC indicating stiffer arteries compared with CA. Multiple regression analyses revealed that ethnic differences in arterial stiffness were associated with glycated haemoglobin level in SA. Among SA, an inverse association was observed between carotid CC and aCVR. In turn, aCVR was associated with a steeper reduction in aCBF in SA than in CA. IMT was strongly associated with greater PI and RI (r>0.81, P<0.001) in SA, whereas a weaker relationship for PI (r=0.46, P=0.03) and no significant relationship for RI were found in CA. The study found stronger associations between pulsatile cerebrovascular haemodynamics and structural and functional alterations in central arteries in SA that may underlie the elevated risk for cerebrovascular disease. PMID:26178590

  20. Optimal design of variable-stiffness fiber-reinforced composites using cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setoodeh, Shahriar

    The growing number of applications of composite materials in aerospace and naval structures along with advancements in manufacturing technologies demand continuous innovations in the design of composite structures. In the traditional design of composite laminates, fiber orientation angles are constant for each layer and are usually limited to 0, 90, and +/-45 degrees. To fully benefit from the directional properties of composite laminates, such limitations have to be removed. The concept of variable-stiffness laminates allows the stiffness properties to vary spatially over the laminate. Through tailoring of fiber orientations and laminate thickness spatially in an optimal fashion, mechanical properties of a part can be improved. In this thesis, the optimal design of variable-stiffness fiber-reinforced composite laminates is studied using an emerging numerical engineering optimization scheme based on the cellular automata paradigm. A cellular automaton (CA) based design scheme uses local update rule for both field variables (displacements) and design variables (lay-up configuration and laminate density measure) in an iterative fashion to convergence to an optimal design. In the present work, the displacements are updated based on the principle of local equilibrium and the design variables are updated according to the optimality criteria for minimum compliance design. A closed form displacement update rule for constant thickness isotropic continua is derived, while for the general anisotropic continua with variable thickness a numeric update rule is used. Combined lay-up and topology design of variable-stiffness flat laminates is performed under the action of in-plane loads and bending loads. An optimality criteria based formulation is used to obtain local design rules for minimum compliance design subject to a volume constraint. It is shown that the design rule splits into a two step application. In the first step an optimal lay-up configuration is computed and in the second step the density measure is obtained. The spatial lay-up design problem is formulated using both fiber angles and lamination parameters as design variables. A weighted average formulation is used to handle multiple load case designs. Numerical studies investigate the performance of the proposed design methodology. The optimal lay-up configuration is independent of the lattice density with more details emerging as the density is increased. Moreover, combined topology and lay-up designs are free of checkerboard patterns. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  1. Spurious Behavior of Shock-Capturing Methods: Problems Containing Stiff Source Terms and Discontinuities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Helen M. C.; Kotov, D. V.; Wang, Wei; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to relate numerical dissipations that are inherited in high order shock-capturing schemes with the onset of wrong propagation speed of discontinuities. For pointwise evaluation of the source term, previous studies indicated that the phenomenon of wrong propagation speed of discontinuities is connected with the smearing of the discontinuity caused by the discretization of the advection term. The smearing introduces a nonequilibrium state into the calculation. Thus as soon as a nonequilibrium value is introduced in this manner, the source term turns on and immediately restores equilibrium, while at the same time shifting the discontinuity to a cell boundary. The present study is to show that the degree of wrong propagation speed of discontinuities is highly dependent on the accuracy of the numerical method. The manner in which the smearing of discontinuities is contained by the numerical method and the overall amount of numerical dissipation being employed play major roles. Moreover, employing finite time steps and grid spacings that are below the standard Courant-Friedrich-Levy (CFL) limit on shockcapturing methods for compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations containing stiff reacting source terms and discontinuities reveals surprising counter-intuitive results. Unlike non-reacting flows, for stiff reactions with discontinuities, employing a time step and grid spacing that are below the CFL limit (based on the homogeneous part or non-reacting part of the governing equations) does not guarantee a correct solution of the chosen governing equations. Instead, depending on the numerical method, time step and grid spacing, the numerical simulation may lead to (a) the correct solution (within the truncation error of the scheme), (b) a divergent solution, (c) a wrong propagation speed of discontinuities solution or (d) other spurious solutions that are solutions of the discretized counterparts but are not solutions of the governing equations. The present investigation for three very different stiff system cases confirms some of the findings of Lafon & Yee (1996) and LeVeque & Yee (1990) for a model scalar PDE. The findings might shed some light on the reported difficulties in numerical combustion and problems with stiff nonlinear (homogeneous) source terms and discontinuities in general.

  2. Muscular contributions to dynamic dorsoventral lumbar spine stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Colloca, Christopher J.; Harrison, Deed E.; Moore, Robert J.; Gunzburg, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Spinal musculature plays a major role in spine stability, but its importance to spinal stiffness is poorly understood. We studied the effects of graded trunk muscle stimulation on the in vivo dynamic dorsoventral (DV) lumbar spine stiffness of 15 adolescent Merino sheep. Constant voltage supramaximal electrical stimulation was administered to the L3L4 interspinous space of the multifidus muscles using four stimulation frequencies (2.5, 5, 10, and 20Hz). Dynamic stiffness was quantified at rest and during muscle stimulation using a computer-controlled testing apparatus that applied variable frequency (0.4619.7Hz) oscillatory DV forces (13-N preload to 48-N peak) to the L3 spinous process of the prone-lying sheep. Five mechanical excitation trials were randomly performed, including four muscle stimulation trials and an unstimulated or resting trial. The secant stiffness (ky=DV force/L3 displacement, kN/m) and loss angle (phase angle, deg) were determined at 44 discrete mechanical excitation frequencies. Results indicated that the dynamic stiffness varied 3.7-fold over the range of mechanical excitation frequencies examined (minimum resting ky=3.860.38N/mm at 4.0Hz; maximum ky=14.19.95N/mm at 19.7Hz). Twenty hertz muscle stimulation resulted in a sustained supramaximal contraction that significantly (P<0.05) increased ky up to twofold compared to rest (mechanical excitation at 3.6Hz). Compared to rest, ky during the 20Hz muscle stimulation was significantly increased for 34 of 44 mechanical excitation frequencies (mean increase=55.1%, P<0.05), but was most marked between 2.55 and 4.91Hz (mean increase=87.5%, P<0.05). For lower frequency, sub-maximal muscle stimulation, there was a graded change in ky, which was significantly increased for 32/44 mechanical excitation frequencies (mean increase=40.4%, 10Hz stimulus), 23/44 mechanical excitation frequencies (mean increase=10.5%, 5Hz stimulus), and 11/44 mechanical excitation frequencies (mean increase=4.16%, 2.5Hz stimulus) when compared to rest. These results indicate that the dynamic mechanical behavior of the ovine spine is modulated by muscle stimulation, and suggests that muscle contraction plays an important role in stabilizing the lumbar spine. PMID:16649029

  3. Thermomechanical characterization of graphite/polymide composites. [Stiffness; strength; shear properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    The stiffness, strength and shear properties of three polyimide resins (NR-150B2, PMR-15 and CPI-2237) combined with three different moduli graphite fibers (C-6000, F-5A and GY-70) were determined at 20 to 371/sup 0/. Stiffness retention with increasing temperature is affected only by the thermal integrity of the polymide matrix. No loss in modulus occurs up to 316/sup 0/C for the PMR-15 and CPI-2237 based composites (T/sub g/ = 377/sup 0/C) or to 260/sup 0/C for the NR-150B2 based material (T/sub g/ approx. = 349/sup 0/C), with any of the three fibers. Both flexure and shear strengths show fiber dependent behavior with temperature. The higher modulus fiber composites (F-5A, GY-70) undergo little strength change up to 343/sup 0/C. Composite strengths of the lower modulus fibers (C-6000), however, degrade by as much as 50% over the same temperature range. Thermal-oxidative stability of the various graphite fibers, and its effect on interfacial strength degradation, are considered primary causes for the fiber-type dominated strength behavior. In general, strength retention appears directly related to degree of graphitization (modulus) of the fibers. The accumulated mechanical property data, some previously unknown, are correlated with microstructural features such as the fiber-matrix adhesion, porosity and processing defects. 11 figures.

  4. Dynamic stiffness matrix of a poroelastic multi-layered site and its Green's functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianwen, Liang; Hongbing, You

    2004-12-01

    Few studies of wave propagation in layered saturated soils have been reported in the literature. In this paper, a general solution of the equation of wave motion in saturated soils, based on one kind of practical Biot’s equation, was deduced by introducing wave potentials. Then exact dynamic-stiffness matrices for a poroelastic soil layer and halfspace were derived, which extended Wolfs theory for an elastic layered site to the case of poroelasticity, thus resolving a fundamental problem in the field of wave propagation and soil-structure interaction in a poroelastic layered soil site. By using the integral transform method, Green’s functions of horizontal and vertical uniformly distributed loads in a poroelastic layered soil site were given. Finally, the theory was verified by numerical examples and dynamic responses by comparing three different soil sites. This study has the following advantages: all parameters in the dynamic-stiffness matrices have explicitly physical meanings and the thickness of the sub-layers does not affect the precision of the calculation which is very convenient for engineering applications. The present theory can degenerate into Wolfs theory and yields numerical results approaching those for an ideal elastic layered site when porosity tends to zero.

  5. Stiffness and force in activated frog skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, G; Griffiths, P J; Taylor, S

    1986-02-01

    Single fibers, isolated intact from frog skeletal muscles, were held firmly very near to each end by stiff metal clasps fastened to the tendons. The fibers were then placed horizontally between two steel hooks inserted in eyelets of the tendon clasps. One hook was attached to a capacitance gauge force transducer (resonance frequency up to approximately 50 kHz) and the other was attached to a moving-coil length changer. This allowed us to impose small, rapid releases (complete in less than 0.15 ms) and high frequency oscillations (up to 13 kHz) to one end of a resting or contracting fiber and measure the consequences at the other end with fast time resolution at 4 to 6 degrees C. The stiffness of short fibers (1.8-2.6 mm) was determined directly from the ratio of force to length variations produced by the length changer. The resonance frequency of short fibers was so high (approximately 40 kHz) that intrinsic oscillations were not detectably excited. The stiffness of long fibers, on the other hand, was calculated from measurement of the mechanical resonance frequency of a fiber. Using both short and long fibers, we measured the sinusoids of force at one end of a contracting fiber that were produced by relatively small sinusoidal length changes at the other end. The amplitudes of the sinusoidal length changes were small compared with the size of step changes that produce nonlinear force-extension relations. The sinusoids of force from long fibers changed amplitude and shifted phase with changes in oscillation frequency in a manner expected of a transmission line composed of mass, compliance, and viscosity, similar to that modelled by (Ford, L. E., A. F. Huxley, and R. M. Simmons, 1981, J. Physiol. (Lond.), 311:219-249). A rapid release during the plateau of tetanic tension in short fibers caused a fall in force and stiffness, a relative change in stiffness that putatively was much smaller than that of force. Our results are, for the most part, consistent with the cross-bridge model of force generation proposed by Huxley, A. F., and R. M. Simmons (1971, Nature (Lond.), 213:533-538). However, stiffness in short fibers developed markedly faster than force during the tetanus rise. Thus our findings show the presence of one or more noteworthy cross-bridge states at the onset and during the rise of active tension towards a plateau in that attachment apparently is followed by a relatively long delay before force generation occurs. A set of equations is given in the Appendix that describes the frequency dependence of the applied sinusoid and its response. This model predicts that frequency dependent changes can be used as a measure of a change in stiffness. PMID:3955178

  6. Scaling of Fluid Flow and Seismic Stiffness of Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovitch, C.; Nolte, D.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    A firm understanding of the relationship between the hydraulic and mechanical properties of fractures has been long sought. Seismic techniques probe the mechanical properties of fractures, e.g. fracture specific stiffness. Providing a connection between fluid flow and fracture stiffness would enable remote estimation of the flow properties in the subsurface. Linking theses two properties would improve society's ability to assess the risk related to the extraction of drinkable water, oil production, and the storage of CO2 in subsurface reservoirs. This relationship is complicated because the subsurface is composed of a hierarchy of structures and processes that span a large range of length and time scales. A scaling approach enables researchers to translate laboratory measurements towards the field scale and vise a versa. We performed a computational study of the scaling of the flow-stiffness relationship for planar fractures with uncorrelated aperture distributions. Three numerical models were required to study the scaling properties of the flow-stiffness relationship for single fractures. Firstly, the fracture topologies where constructed using a stratified continuum percolation method. Only uncorrelated fracture geometries were considered to provide a baseline of understanding for the different interacting critical thresholds occurring in the hydraulic and mechanical properties. Secondly, fracture stiffness was calculated by modeling the deformation of asperities and a deformable half space. This model computed the displacement-stress curves for a given fracture, from which the stiffness was extracted. Thirdly, due to the sensitive nature of the critical phenomena associated with fluid flow through fractures, two network flow models were used for verification. The fractures were first modeled as a network of elliptical pipes and the corresponding linear system of equations was solved. The second method consisted of using a lattice grid network, where the flow is computed using the "cubic law." Fractures were generated at five sizes (1, 0.5, 0.25, 0.125, and 0.0625m) to provide an order of magnitude variation. Each fracture was constructed such that the contact area ranged from approximately 5% to 30%. The rocks were given the properties of granite and stressed to a maximum load of 70MPa. The deformation solver was given 50 steps to reach the final load so that its flow rate could be monitored during each loading step. The results clearly showed a dependence on scale. Under low loads flow-stiffness was in an effective medium regime. However as the load increased, a distinct scale dependence emerged. This occurs because as the load increases there is an overall increase in contact area, which in turn moves the flow dynamics into a critical regime. From this finite size scaling effect, we analyzed how the uncorrelated topologies length scales changed under load to compute the flow exponents for the system. Acknowledgments: Geosciences Research Program, Office of Basic Energy Sciences US Department of Energy (DE-FG02-09ER16022), the Geo-mathematical Imaging Group at Purdue University, and the Purdue Research Foundation.

  7. Stiffness detection and reduction in discrete stochastic simulation of biochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Watson, Layne T.; Cao, Yang

    2011-02-01

    Typical multiscale biochemical models contain fast-scale and slow-scale reactions, where "fast" reactions fire much more frequently than "slow" ones. This feature often causes stiffness in discrete stochastic simulation methods such as Gillespie's algorithm and the Tau-Leaping method leading to inefficient simulation. This paper proposes a new strategy to automatically detect stiffness and identify species that cause stiffness for the Tau-Leaping method, as well as two stiffness reduction methods. Numerical results on a stiff decaying dimerization model and a heat shock protein regulation model demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed methods for multiscale biochemical systems.

  8. Hyperemia-Related Changes in Arterial Stiffness: Comparison between Pulse Wave Velocity and Stiffness Index in the Vascular Reactivity Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Torrado, Juan; Bia, Daniel; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Ignacio; Farro, Federico; Armentano, Ricardo L.

    2012-01-01

    Carotid-to-radial pulse wave velocity (PWVcr) has been proposed to evaluate endothelial function. However, the measurement of PWVcr is not without limitations. A new simple approach could have wide application. Stiffness index (SI) is obtained by analysis of the peripheral pulse wave and gives reproducible information about stiffness of large arteries. This study assessed the effects of hyperemia on SI and compared it with PWVcr in 14 healthy subjects. Both were measured at rest and during 8 minutes after ischemia. SI temporal course was determined. At 1 minute, SI and PWVcr decreased (5.58 ± 0.24 to 5.34 ± 0.23 m/s, P < 0.05; 7.8 ± 1.0 to 7.2 ± 0.9 m/s; P < 0.05, resp.). SI was positively related to PWVcr in baseline (r = 0.62 , P < 0.05), at 1 minute (r = 0.79, P < 0.05), and during the whole experimental session (r = 0.52, P < 0.05). Conclusion. Hyperemia significantly decreases SI in healthy subjects. SI was related to PWVcr and could be used to facilitate the evaluation of hyperemia-related changes in arterial stiffness. PMID:22919496

  9. Recursive calculation of Hansen coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branham, Richard L., Jr.

    1990-06-01

    Hansen coefficients are used in expansions of the elliptic motion. Three methods for calculating the coefficients are studied: Tisserand's method, the Von Zeipel-Andoyer (VZA) method with explicit representation of the polynomials required to compute the Hansen coefficients, and the VZA method with the values of the polynomials calculated recursively. The VZA method with explicit polynomials is by far the most rapid, but the tabulation of the polynomials only extends to 12th order in powers of the eccentricity, and unless one has access to the polynomials in machine-readable form their entry is laborious and error-prone. The recursive calculation of the VZA polynomials, needed to compute the Hansen coefficients, while slower, is faster than the calculation of the Hansen coefficients by Tisserand's method, up to 10th order in the eccentricity and is still relatively efficient for higher orders. The main advantages of the recursive calculation are the simplicity of the program and one's being able to extend the expansions to any order of eccentricity with ease. Because FORTRAN does not implement recursive procedures, this paper used C for all of the calculations. The most important conclusion is recursion's genuine usefulness in scientific computing.

  10. Fabrication of hydrogel substrates with stiffness step variations using controlled surface wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Mahmudur; Lee, Donghee; Ryu, Sangjin

    2013-11-01

    Living cells can respond to changes in the stiffness of the surrounding matrix. Well-known examples include the durotaxis of motile cells and the stiffness-dependent differentiation of stem cells. Such mechanobiological behaviors of living cells have been investigated on hydrogel substrates of which the compliance is either static or varying in one direction. Although various techniques have been developed to fabricate hydrogel substrates of controllable stiffness distributions, however, the fabricated substrates have only hydrogel regions of varying stiffness, lacking regions of static stiffness. Therefore, it has been difficult to compare cells' responses to static stiffness and varying stiffness under the same culture condition. Thus, we aim to fabricate polyacrylamide gel substrates consisting of alternating regions of static stiffness and stiffness gradient. For controlled positioning of gel solutions with different relative concentrations of acrylamide and the crosslinker, we generated superhydrophilic regions surrounded by hydrophobic barriers on glass and then filled the regions with the gel solutions. When sandwiched by another glass surface, the gel solutions experienced limited mixing only at interfaces, which created stiffness gradients between static stiffness regions.

  11. Testing biomimetic structures in bioinspired robots: how vertebrae control the stiffness of the body and the behavior of fish-like swimmers.

    PubMed

    Long, John H; Krenitsky, Nicole M; Roberts, Sonia F; Hirokawa, Jonathan; de Leeuw, Josh; Porter, Marianne E

    2011-07-01

    Our goal is to describe a specific case of a general process gaining traction amongst biologists: testing biological hypotheses with biomimetic structures that operate in bioinspired robots. As an example, we present MARMT (mobile autonomous robot for mechanical testing), a surface-swimmer that undulates a submerged biomimetic tail to power cruising and accelerations. Our goal was to test the hypothesis that stiffness of the body controls swimming behavior and that both stiffness and behavior can be altered by changes in the morphology of the vertebral column. To test this hypothesis, we built biomimetic vertebral columns (BVC) outfitted with variable numbers of rigid ring centra; as the number of centra increased the axial length of the intervertebral joints decreased. Each kind of BVC was tested in dynamic bending to measure the structure's apparent stiffness as the storage and loss moduli. In addition, each kind of BVC was used as the axial skeleton in a tail that propelled MARMT. We varied MARMT's tail-beat frequency, lateral amplitude of the tail, and swimming behavior. MARMT's locomotor performance was measured using an on-board accelerometer and external video. As the number of vertebrae in the BVC of fixed length increased, so, too, did the BVC's storage modulus, the BVC's loss modulus, MARMT's mean speed during cruising, and MARMT's peak acceleration during a startle response. These results support the hypothesis that stiffness of the body controls swimming behavior and that both stiffness and behavior can be altered by changes in the morphology of the vertebral column. PMID:21576117

  12. Transport coefficients of a hot pion gas

    SciTech Connect

    Davesne, D.

    1996-06-01

    General expressions for transport coefficients of a single-component gas (namely, thermal conductivity and shear and bulk viscosities) of bosons are derived from a Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport equation by means of the Chapman-Enskog method to first order. These expressions are then used for the calculation of the associated transport relaxation times and applied to the pion gas produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. The influence of Bose enhancement factors on transport properties can be seen by comparison with previous calculations. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  13. Seebeck coefficient of one electron

    SciTech Connect

    Durrani, Zahid A. K.

    2014-03-07

    The Seebeck coefficient of one electron, driven thermally into a semiconductor single-electron box, is investigated theoretically. With a finite temperature difference ΔT between the source and charging island, a single electron can charge the island in equilibrium, directly generating a Seebeck effect. Seebeck coefficients for small and finite ΔT are calculated and a thermally driven Coulomb staircase is predicted. Single-electron Seebeck oscillations occur with increasing ΔT, as one electron at a time charges the box. A method is proposed for experimental verification of these effects.

  14. Eddy mixing coefficient on Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atreya, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    Data on the composition, thermal structure, and Lyman-alpha dayglow of Saturn, when analyzed in conjunction with photochemical models of the hydrocarbons and the atomic hydrogen production, yield the homopause value of the eddy diffusion coefficient to be approximately 100 million/sq cm per sec. The equatorial value of the eddy diffusion coefficient at the homopause of Saturn is thus found to be approximately 100 times greater than on Jupiter. The mesosphere (and presumably, troposphere) of Saturn appears to be considerably more turbulent than the upper atmosphere of Jupiter.

  15. Flow coefficients of monosleeve valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldron, C D

    1941-01-01

    The flow coefficients of the intake and the exhaust ports of a sleeve-valve cylinder were measured by attaching the cylinder to a large tank and measuring the changes in pressure and temperature in the tank that were caused by short periods of air flow through the valve ports. The derivation of the equations on which the flow coefficients are based is given. The distribution of total pressure in the arms of the sleeve-valve intake manifold was measured. The arms are found to have as little as 75 percent of the total pressure within the manifold entrance.

  16. The decoupled direct method for calculating sensitivity coefficients in chemical kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunker, Alan M.

    1984-09-01

    A version of the direct method for calculating first-order sensitivity coefficients is extended to nonlinear, time-dependent models defined by stiff differential equations. In this approach the auxiliary equations for the sensitivity coefficients are solved separately from the model equations. Accuracy and stability are maintained by using exactly the same time steps and numerical approximations in calculating the sensitivities as are used in calculating the model solution. The decoupling procedure also greatly increases the efficiency of the method by taking advantage of the fact that the auxiliary equations for different sensitivity coefficients are quite similar. The decoupled direct method is applied to stiff chemical mechanisms for the oxidation of hydrocarbons in the atmosphere, the pyrolysis of ethane, and the oxidation of formaldehyde in the presence of carbon monoxide. Sensitivity coefficients are also calculated for the three mechanisms by a method employing Green's function and by actually varying the input parameters. Based on these results, the decoupled direct method has advantages in simplicity, stability, accuracy, efficiency, storage requirements, and program size over other methods, including those using Green's function. Specifically, the decoupled direct method is as much as a factor of 6 more efficient than a recent version of the Green's function method. Extensions of the decoupled direct method are also discussed.

  17. Portal Hypertension in Patients with Liver Cirrhosis: Diagnostic Accuracy of Spleen Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Takuma, Yoshitaka; Nouso, Kazuhiro; Morimoto, Youichi; Tomokuni, Junko; Sahara, Akiko; Takabatake, Hiroyuki; Matsueda, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Purpose To evaluate the accuracy of spleen stiffness (SS) and liver stiffness (LS) measured by using acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in the diagnosis of portal hypertension in patients with liver cirrhosis, with the hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) as a reference standard. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained for this prospective single-center study. From February 2012 to August 2013, 60 patients with liver cirrhosis (mean age, 70.8 years; age range, 34-88 years; 34 men, 26 women) with HVPG, LS, and SS measurements and gastrointestinal endoscopy and laboratory data were included if they met the following criteria: no recent episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding, no history of splenectomy, no history of partial splenic embolization, no history of β-blocker therapy, and absence of portal thrombosis. The efficacy of the parameters for the evaluation of portal hypertension was analyzed by using the Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results The correlation coefficient between SS and HVPG (r = 0.876) was significantly better than that between LS and HVPG (r = 0.609, P < .0001). The areas under the ROC curve of SS for the identification of clinically important portal hypertension (HVPG ≥ 10 mm Hg), severe portal hypertension (HVPG ≥ 12 mm Hg), esophageal varices (EVs), and high-risk EVs were significantly higher (0.943, 0.963, 0.937, and 0.955, respectively) than those of LS, spleen diameter, platelet count, and platelet count to spleen diameter ratio (P < .05 for all). SS could be used to accurately rule out the presence of clinically important portal hypertension, severe portal hypertension, EVs, and high-risk EVs (negative likelihood ratios, 0.051, 0.056, 0.054, and 0.074, respectively). Conclusion SS is reliable and has better diagnostic performance than LS for identifying portal hypertension in liver cirrhosis. (©) RSNA, 2015 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26588019

  18. Determination of absolute internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorri, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Papadakis, P.; Konki, J.; Cox, D. M.; Auranen, K.; Partanen, J.; Sandzelius, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Uusitalo, J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Smallcombe, J.; Davies, P. J.; Barton, C. J.; Jenkins, D. G.

    2016-03-01

    A non-reference based method to determine internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer is carried out for transitions in the nuclei of 154Sm, 152Sm and 166Yb. The Normalised-Peak-to-Gamma method is in general an efficient tool to extract internal conversion coefficients. However, in many cases the required well-known reference transitions are not available. The data analysis steps required to determine absolute internal conversion coefficients with the SAGE spectrometer are presented. In addition, several background suppression methods are introduced and an example of how ancillary detectors can be used to select specific reaction products is given. The results obtained for ground-state band E2 transitions show that the absolute internal conversion coefficients can be extracted using the methods described with a reasonable accuracy. In some cases of less intense transitions only an upper limit for the internal conversion coefficient could be given.

  19. A new correlation coefficient for bivariate time-series data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Orhan; Ceyhan, Elvan; Varli, Yusuf

    2014-11-01

    The correlation in time series has received considerable attention in the literature. Its use has attained an important role in the social sciences and finance. For example, pair trading in finance is concerned with the correlation between stock prices, returns, etc. In general, Pearson’s correlation coefficient is employed in these areas although it has many underlying assumptions which restrict its use. Here, we introduce a new correlation coefficient which takes into account the lag difference of data points. We investigate the properties of this new correlation coefficient. We demonstrate that it is more appropriate for showing the direction of the covariation of the two variables over time. We also compare the performance of the new correlation coefficient with Pearson’s correlation coefficient and Detrended Cross-Correlation Analysis (DCCA) via simulated examples.

  20. Nonlinear Varying Coefficient Models with Applications to Studying Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kürüm, Esra; Li, Runze; Wang, Yang; SEntürk, Damla

    2014-03-01

    Motivated by a study on factors affecting the level of photosynthetic activity in a natural ecosystem, we propose nonlinear varying coefficient models, in which the relationship between the predictors and the response variable is allowed to be nonlinear. One-step local linear estimators are developed for the nonlinear varying coefficient models and their asymptotic normality is established leading to point-wise asymptotic confidence bands for the coefficient functions. Two-step local linear estimators are also proposed for cases where the varying coefficient functions admit different degrees of smoothness; bootstrap confidence intervals are utilized for inference based on the two-step estimators. We further propose a generalized F test to study whether the coefficient functions vary over a covariate. We illustrate the proposed methodology via an application to an ecology data set and study the finite sample performance by Monte Carlo simulation studies. PMID:24976756

  1. Direct Extraction of One-loop Integral Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Forde, Darren

    2007-04-16

    We present a general procedure for obtaining the coefficients of the scalar bubble and triangle integral functions of one-loop amplitudes. Coefficients are extracted by considering two-particle and triple unitarity cuts of the corresponding bubble and triangle integral functions. After choosing a specific parameterization of the cut loop momentum we can uniquely identify the coefficients of the desired integral functions simply by examining the behavior of the cut integrand as the unconstrained parameters of the cut loop momentum approach infinity. In this way we can produce compact forms for scalar integral coefficients. Applications of this method are presented for both QCD and electroweak processes, including an alternative form for the recently computed three-mass triangle coefficient in the six-photon amplitude A{sub 6}(1{sup -}, 2{sup +}, 3{sup -}, 4{sup +}, 5{sup -}, 6{sup +}). The direct nature of this extraction procedure allows for a very straightforward automation of the procedure.

  2. Nonlinear Varying Coefficient Models with Applications to Studying Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kürüm, Esra; Li, Runze; Wang, Yang; ŞEntürk, Damla

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by a study on factors affecting the level of photosynthetic activity in a natural ecosystem, we propose nonlinear varying coefficient models, in which the relationship between the predictors and the response variable is allowed to be nonlinear. One-step local linear estimators are developed for the nonlinear varying coefficient models and their asymptotic normality is established leading to point-wise asymptotic confidence bands for the coefficient functions. Two-step local linear estimators are also proposed for cases where the varying coefficient functions admit different degrees of smoothness; bootstrap confidence intervals are utilized for inference based on the two-step estimators. We further propose a generalized F test to study whether the coefficient functions vary over a covariate. We illustrate the proposed methodology via an application to an ecology data set and study the finite sample performance by Monte Carlo simulation studies. PMID:24976756

  3. Effects of safflower seed extract on arterial stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Katsuya; Tsubaki, Shigekazu; Fujita, Masami; Koyama, Naoto; Takahashi, Michio; Takazawa, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Safflower seed extract (SSE) contains characteristic polyphenols and serotonin derivatives (N-( p-coumaroyl) serotonin and N-feruloylserotonin), which are reported to inhibit oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), formation of atherosclerotic plaques, and improve arterial stiffness as assessed by pulse wave analysis in animal models. The effects of long-term supplementation with SSE on arterial stiffness in human subjects were evaluated. This doubleblind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 77 males (35–65 years) and 15 postmenopausal females (55–65 years) with high-normal blood pressure or mild hypertension who were not undergoing treatment. Subjects received SSE (70 mg/day as serotonin derivatives) or placebo for 12 weeks, and pulse wave measurements, ie, second derivative of photoplethysmogram (SDPTG), augmentation index, and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) were conducted at baseline, and at weeks 4, 8, and 12. Vascular age estimated by SDPTG aging index improved in the SSE-supplemented group when compared with the placebo group at four (P = 0.0368) and 12 weeks (P = 0.0927). The trend of augmentation index reduction (P = 0.072 versus baseline) was observed in the SSE-supplemented group, but reduction of baPWV by SSE supplementation was not observed. The SSE-supplemented group also showed a trend towards a lower malondialdehyde-modified-LDL autoantibody titer at 12 weeks from baseline. These results suggest long-term ingestion of SSE in humans could help to improve arterial stiffness. PMID:21127697

  4. Manipulation under Anesthesia for Stiffness after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ju-Hyung; Oh, Jin-Cheol; Park, Sang-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the incidence of manipulation under anesthesia (MUA) for stiffness after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and the degree of joint motion recovery after MUA. Materials and Methods A total of 4,449 TKAs (2,973 patients) were performed between March 2000 and August 2014. Cases that underwent MUA for stiffness after TKA were reviewed. TKAs were performed using the conventional procedure in 329 cases and using the minimally invasive procedure in 4,120 cases. The preoperative range of joint motion, timing of manipulation, diagnosis and the range of joint motion before and after MUA were retrospectively investigated. Results MUA was carried out in 22 cases (16 patients), resulting in the incidence of 0.5%. The incidence after the conventional procedure was 1.2% and 0.4% after the minimally invasive procedure. In the manipulated knees, the preoperative range of motion (ROM) was 102.5°±26.7°, and the preoperative diagnosis was osteoarthritis in 19 cases, rheumatoid arthritis in two, and infection sequela in one. MUA was performed 4.7±3.0 weeks after TKA. The average ROM was 64.5°±13.5° before manipulation. At an average of 64.3±41.3 months after manipulation, the ROM was recovered to 113.4°±31.2°, which was an additional 49.9° improvement in flexion. Conclusions The satisfactory recovery of joint movement was achieved when MUA for stiffness was performed relatively early after TKA. PMID:26676186

  5. The association between in utero hyperinsulinemia and adolescent arterial stiffness.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Tam WH; Ma RC; Yip GW; Yang X; Li AM; Ko GT; Lao TT; Chan JC

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the relationship between in utero hyperinsulinemia and children's arterial stiffness at adolescence.METHODS: Indices of arterial stiffness were measured using the SphygmoCor apparatus in 129 adolescents (42 offsprings of mother with gestational diabetes and 87 offsprings of mother with normal glucose tolerance during pregnancy) at 15 years of age.RESULTS: Adolescent of mothers with gestational diabetes had similar central aortic blood pressure, augmentation pressure (AP), augmentation index (AI), and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) as that of controls. However, both umbilical cord C-peptide and insulin levels correlated positively AI (R=0.28 and 0.24; p=0.011 and 0.035, respectively), and umbilical insulin level correlated positively with AP (R=0.25; p=0.025). The correlations were significant between umbilical cord C-peptide and AP (R=0.24; p=0.035) and AI (R=0.29; p=0.011) after adjustment for subjects' age, sex, body weight and height. Adolescents who had umbilical cord C-peptide levels at highest quartile (n=25), based on the reference ranges of the original cohort, had a significant greater PWV (5.26±0.12 m/s vs 4.98±0.12 m/s; p=0.0049) than those with C-peptide levels at the lower 3 quartiles (n=57) after adjustment for age, sex, body weight and height.CONCLUSIONS: In utero hyperinsulinemia appears to increase the offspring's arterial stiffness at early adolescence.

  6. Material stiffness effects on neurite alignment to photopolymerized micropatterns.

    PubMed

    Tuft, Bradley W; Zhang, Lichun; Xu, Linjing; Hangartner, Austin; Leigh, Braden; Hansen, Marlan R; Guymon, C Allan

    2014-10-13

    The ability to direct neurite growth into a close proximity of stimulating elements of a neural prosthesis, such as a retinal or cochlear implant (CI), may enhance device performance and overcome current spatial signal resolution barriers. In this work, spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), which are the target neurons to be stimulated by CIs, were cultured on photopolymerized micropatterns with varied matrix stiffnesses to determine the effect of rigidity on neurite alignment to physical cues. Micropatterns were generated on methacrylate thin film surfaces in a simple, rapid photopolymerization step by photomasking the prepolymer formulation with parallel line-space gratings. Two methacrylate series, a nonpolar HMA-co-HDDMA series and a polar PEGDMA-co-EGDMA series, with significantly different surface wetting properties were evaluated. Equivalent pattern periodicity was maintained across each methacrylate series based on photomask band spacing, and the feature amplitude was tuned to a depth of 2 μm amplitude for all compositions using the temporal control afforded by the UV curing methodology. The surface morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and white light interferometry. All micropatterned films adsorb similar amounts of laminin from solution, and no significant difference in SGN survival was observed when the substrate compositions were compared. SGN neurite alignment significantly increases with increasing material modulus for both methacrylate series. Interestingly, SGN neurites respond to material stiffness cues that are orders of magnitude higher (GPa) than what is typically ascribed to neural environments (kPa). The ability to understand neurite response to engineered physical cues and mechanical properties such as matrix stiffness will allow the development of advanced biomaterials that direct de novo neurite growth to address the spatial signal resolution limitations of current neural prosthetics. PMID:25211120

  7. Reflex ankle stiffness is inversely correlated with natural body sway.

    PubMed

    Julien, Brianna L; Bendrups, Andrew P

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to determine whether effective ankle stiffness (EAS), measured during slow unperceived perturbations of stance, is related to natural anterior-posterior body sway. Because the perturbations are not perceived, any neural component of the response to perturbation is assumed to be "reflex", in the broad sense of an involuntary response to a stimulus. Subjects stood on a force platform for three 10-min trials. EAS was obtained from the average slope (Δτ/Δα) of the relation between ankle torque (τ) and ankle angle (α), recorded during repeated perturbations delivered at the waist by a weak spring. EAS was normalised using the subject's "load stiffness" (LS), calculated from mass (m) and height (h) above the ankle joint (m·g·h). Sway was obtained from fluctuations in ankle angle prior to perturbation. Variation in EAS and sway between subjects provided spread of data for correlation. There were no significant changes in EAS or sway across trials. All subjects had higher EAS than LS and mean EAS (1124Nm/rad) was significantly greater (p<0.01) than mean LS (531Nm/rad). There was a strong significant inverse correlation between mean sway and mean normalised EAS (r=-0.68, p=0.03). We conclude that the body, in response to slow unperceived perturbations, simulates an inverted pendulum with a stiffness of about twice LS and that EAS is largely generated by neural modulation of postural muscles. The inverse correlation between EAS and body sway suggests that the reflex mechanisms responding to perturbation also influence the extent of natural sway. PMID:27004645

  8. Kinematic Characterization of Left Ventricular Chamber Stiffness and Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossahebi, Sina

    Heart failure is the most common cause of hospitalization today, and diastolic heart failure accounts for 40-50% of cases. Therefore, it is critical to identify diastolic dysfunction at a subclinical stage so that appropriate therapy can be administered before ventricular function is further, and perhaps irreversibly impaired. Basic concepts in physics such as kinematic modeling provide a unique method with which to characterize cardiovascular physiology, specifically diastolic function (DF). The advantage of an approach that is standard in physics, such as the kinematic modeling is its causal formulation that functions in contrast to correlative approaches traditionally utilized in the life sciences. Our research group has pioneered theoretical and experimental quantitative analysis of DF in humans, using both non-invasive (echocardiography, cardiac MRI) and invasive (simultaneous catheterization-echocardiography) methods. Our group developed and validated the Parametrized Diastolic Filling (PDF) formalism which is motivated by basic physiologic principles (LV is a mechanical suction pump at the mitral valve opening) that obey Newton's Laws. PDF formalism is a kinematic model of filling employing an equation of motion, the solution of which accurately predicts all E-wave contours in accordance with the rules of damped harmonic oscillatory motion. The equation's lumped parameters---ventricular stiffness, ventricular viscoelasticity/relaxation and ventricular load---are obtained by solving the 'inverse problem'. The parameters' physiologic significance and clinical utility have been repeatedly demonstrated in multiple clinical settings. In this work we apply our kinematic modeling approach to better understand how the heart works as it fills in order to advance the relationship between physiology and mathematical modeling. Through the use of this modeling, we thereby define and validate novel, causal indexes of diastolic function such as early rapid filling energy, diastatic stiffness, and relaxation and stiffness components of E-wave deceleration time.

  9. Quantifying Local Stiffness Variations in Radiofrequency Ablations with Dynamic Indentation

    PubMed Central

    DeWall, Ryan J.; Varghese, Tomy; Brace, Christopher L.

    2012-01-01

    Elastographic imaging can be used to monitor ablation procedures, however confident and clear determination of the ablation boundary is essential to ensure complete treatment of the pathological target. To investigate the potential for ablation boundary representation on elastographic images, local variations in the viscoelastic properties in radiofrequency ablated regions that were formed in vivo in porcine liver tissue were quantified using dynamic indentation. Spatial stiffness maps were then correlated to stained histology, the gold standard for determination of the ablation periphery or boundary. Regions of interest in eleven radiofrequency ablation samples were indented at 18–24 locations each, including the central zone of complete necrosis and more peripheral transition zones including normal tissue. Storage modulus and rate of stiffening were both greatest in the central ablation zone and decreased with radial distance away from the center. The storage modulus and modulus contrast at the ablation outer transition zone boundary were 3.1 ± 1.0 kPa and 1.6 ± 0.4, respectively, and 36.2 ± 9.1 kPa and 18.3 ± 5.5 at the condensation boundary within the ablation zone. Elastographic imaging modalities were then compared to gross pathology in ex vivo bovine liver tissue. Area estimated from strain, shear wave velocity, and gross pathology images were 470 mm2, 560 mm2, and 574 mm2, respectively, and ablation widths were 19.4 mm, 20.7 mm, and 23.0 mm. This study has provided insights into spatial stiffness distributions within radiofrequency ablations and suggests that low stiffness contrast on the ablation periphery leads to the observed underestimation of ablation extent on elastographic images. PMID:22167553

  10. Prediction of stream volatilization coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, Ronald E.

    1990-01-01

    Equations are developed for predicting the liquid-film and gas-film reference-substance parameters for quantifying volatilization of organic solutes from streams. Molecular weight and molecular-diffusion coefficients of the solute are used as correlating parameters. Equations for predicting molecular-diffusion coefficients of organic solutes in water and air are developed, with molecular weight and molal volume as parameters. Mean absolute errors of prediction for diffusion coefficients in water are 9.97% for the molecular-weight equation, 6.45% for the molal-volume equation. The mean absolute error for the diffusion coefficient in air is 5.79% for the molal-volume equation. Molecular weight is not a satisfactory correlating parameter for diffusion in air because two equations are necessary to describe the values in the data set. The best predictive equation for the liquid-film reference-substance parameter has a mean absolute error of 5.74%, with molal volume as the correlating parameter. The best equation for the gas-film parameter has a mean absolute error of 7.80%, with molecular weight as the correlating parameter.

  11. Some properties of Hansen's coefficients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribanov, A. V.

    Precise formulae for Hansen's coefficients X0n,m calculation when |n| ≤ 20 and |m| ≤ 20 are constructed. By using properties of the hypergeometrical function estimates of X0n,m for any higher indexes are obtained.

  12. Tables of the coefficients A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, N.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical coefficients required to express the angular distribution for the rotationally elastic or inelastic scattering of electrons from a diatomic molecule were tabulated for the case of nitrogen and in the energy range from 0.20 eV to 10.0 eV. Five different rotational states are considered.

  13. Aerodynamic coefficients and transformation tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Joseph S

    1918-01-01

    The problem of the transformation of numerical values expressed in one system of units into another set or system of units frequently arises in connection with aerodynamic problems. Report contains aerodynamic coefficients and conversion tables needed to facilitate such transformation. (author)

  14. Profile Loss Coefficient Definitions Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Calzada, Pedro

    2011-09-01

    A critical and integrated view on the profile loss coefficient definitions commonly used in turbomachinery is offered. By solving the compressible flow equations in boundary layers (characterized by their integral parameters) mixing at constant area the dependence of different loss coefficients (total pressure loss and kinetic energy loss coefficient, KSI) on the Mach number and boundary layer characteristics is investigated. KSI appears as the best parameter to measure the merit of the process since it is fundamentally independent of Mach number and only dependent on the boundary layer parameters. Results from expressions obtained by different formulations and levels of approximations are compared with the solution of the full set of compressible equations. KSI estimated by the expression 2θ/(t - δ*) + (δ*/t)2 is identified as the best parameter of merit to be used as profile loss coefficient. Additionally a comparison between losses from boundary layers discharging into constant area and discharging into constant pressure is given and the relevance played by the shape parameter, H, in the latter case is remarked.

  15. Photoinduced variable stiffness of spiropyran-based composites

    SciTech Connect

    Samoylova, E.; Ceseracciu, L.; Allione, M.; Diaspro, A.; Barone, A. C.; Athanassiou, A.

    2011-11-14

    A quantitative demonstration of reversible stiffness upon appropriate light stimulus in a spiropyran-polymeric composite is presented. The polymeric films containing 3% wt. of the photochromic spiropyran were irradiated with alternating ultraviolet and visible light and the storage modulus was measured. A reversible change in modulus of about 7% was observed. The modulus change was attributed to an interaction of the polar merocyanine with the polymeric chains and/or to a variation of effective free volume induced by merocyanine aggregates formed in the polymer upon ultraviolet irradiation. The effect is fully reversed when the merocyanine isomers turn back to the spiropyran state after visible irradiation.

  16. Material selection for acoustic radiators that are light and stiff.

    PubMed

    Porter, S P; Markley, D C; Van Tol, D J; Meyer, R J

    2011-01-01

    The headmass is a key element in tonpilz transducer design. As an acoustic radiator, a successful headmass must be built from a material that is both light and stiff. To assess the suitability of ceramics for this application, the authors used the mechanical properties of candidate materials to perform a theoretical comparison based on the flexural behavior of square plates. Although not a comprehensive metric for identifying the best headmass materials, the headmass flexure may be usefully employed as a first-level selection criteria. A software routine based on thin plate and thick plate theory was created to evaluate the flexural behavior in candidate materials. PMID:21302996

  17. Convexity and Stiffness in Energy Functions for Electrostatic Simulations.

    PubMed

    Pujos, Justine S; Maggs, A C

    2015-04-14

    We study the properties of convex functionals which have been proposed for the simulation of charged molecular systems within the Poisson-Boltzmann approximation. We consider the extent to which the functionals reproduce the true fluctuations of electrolytes and thus the one-loop correction to mean field theory-including the Debye-Hückel correction to the free energy of ionic solutions. We also compare the functionals for use in numerical optimization of a mean field model of a charged polymer and show that different functionals have very different stiffnesses leading to substantial differences in accuracy and speed. PMID:26574353

  18. A method for measuring exchange stiffness in ferromagnetic films

    SciTech Connect

    Girt, Erol; Huttema, W.; Montoya, E.; Kardasz, B.; Eyrich, C.; Heinrich, B.; Mryasov, O. N.; Dobin, A. Yu.; Karis, O.

    2011-04-01

    An exchange stiffness, A{sub ex}, in ferromagnetic films is obtained by fitting the M(H) dependence of two ferromagnetic layers antiferromagnetically coupled across a nonmagnetic spacer layer with a simple micromagnetic model. In epitaxial and textured structures this method allows measuring A{sub ex} between the crystallographic planes perpendicular to the growth direction of ferromagnetic films. Our results show that A{sub ex} between [0001] planes in textured Co grains is 1.54 {+-} 0.12 x 10{sup -11} J/m.

  19. Arterial stiffness in adult patients after Fontan procedure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Increased arterial stiffness is a risk factor of atherosclerosis and cardio-vascular complications. The aim of the study was to determine whether peripheral vascular function might be an early marker of impaired health status in patients with a single ventricle after Fontan procedure. Methods and results Twenty five consecutive adults (11 women and 14 men) aged 24.7 ± 6.2 years after the Fontan procedure and 25 sex, age and BMI match healthy volunteers underwent physical examination, blood analysis, transthoracic echocardiography and noninvasive assessment of aortic stiffness. Augmented pressure and Augmentation Index (AIx) were both significantly elevated in Fontan when compared to the controls (6,08 ± 0,7 vs. 2,0 ± 3,7; p = 0.002 and 17,01 ± 3,3 vs. 6,05 ± 11; p < 0.001, respectively). There were no differences in pulse wave velocity (PWV), mean blood pressure (BP), brachial pulse pressure (PP), central: systolic BP, diastolic BP and PP. In Fontan group we find negative correlation between PWV and SatO2 (r = −0.68; p = 0.04) and positive correlation with WBC (0.72; p = 0.72; p = 0.013), INR (0.81; p = 0.008), TNFα (r = 0.45; p = 0.04), and postoperative time (r = 0.77; p = 0.02). AIx correlates positively only with age at surgery (r = 0.45; p = 0.04). Bilirubin level correlates positively with brachial PP (r = 0.71; p = 0.02) and central PP (r = 0.68; p = 0.03). The multivariate model showed that SatO2 (β = −0.44, p = 0.04) was the only independent predictor of PWV (R2 = 0.32, p = 0.03). Conclusion Adult Fontan patients have an increased arterial stiffness assessed by a noninvasive technique. Low arterial oxygen saturation postoperative time, age at surgery, white blood cells, TNFα and bilirubin level are associated with arterial stiffening in these patients. The combination of blood parameters of the hepatic function and noninvasive measurements of arterial stiffness could be helpful in comprehensive care of patients with Fontan circulation. PMID:24716671

  20. Photoinduced variable stiffness of spiropyran-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoylova, E.; Ceseracciu, L.; Allione, M.; Diaspro, A.; Barone, A. C.; Athanassiou, A.

    2011-11-01

    A quantitative demonstration of reversible stiffness upon appropriate light stimulus in a spiropyran-polymeric composite is presented. The polymeric films containing 3% wt. of the photochromic spiropyran were irradiated with alternating ultraviolet and visible light and the storage modulus was measured. A reversible change in modulus of about 7% was observed. The modulus change was attributed to an interaction of the polar merocyanine with the polymeric chains and/or to a variation of effective free volume induced by merocyanine aggregates formed in the polymer upon ultraviolet irradiation. The effect is fully reversed when the merocyanine isomers turn back to the spiropyran state after visible irradiation.