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1

Vibration Analysis of a Framework Structure by Generalized Transfer Stiffness Coefficient Method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A generalized transfer stiffness coefficient method using graph theory is developed in order to improve the applicability of the transfer stiffness coefficient method. In the new method, an analytical model is expressed by a weighted signal-flow graph, and the graph is contracted according to the series and parallel contraction rules. The computational complexity and the memory requirement for the contraction process are both minimized by choosing the optimal contraction route. In addition, it is possible to develop a data-driving program that is applicable to various structures without updating the source program. An algorithm based on the present method is formulated for the in-plane longitudinal and flexural coupled free and forced vibration analyses of a two-dimensional framework structure. Furthermore, an overview for applying the method to a three-dimensional framework structure is briefly presented. The validity of the present algorithm is confirmed by the results of numerical computations.

Bonkobara, Yasuhiro; Kondou, Takahiro; Ayabe, Takashi; Choi, Myung-Soo

2

Generalized stiffness coefficients for ITER superconducting cables, direct FE modeling and initial configuration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Superconducting coils are one of the key technical solutions used for generation of high magnetic field in modern tokamaks. Nb 3Sn superconductivity depends not only on temperature and magnetic field as e.g. NbTi, but also on the strain state of the strands inside the conductor. It is hence very important to be able to predict the mechanical deformations due to manufacturing processes and operating conditions. The conductors for ITER, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor currently under construction, have a complex structure that makes analytical estimations of stiffness applicable only for the first cabling stages. In this work, a wide range of numerical simulations has been performed, by using several types of finite element models. This paper shows some analytical estimations for stretching and twisting and compares them with the numerical results of the different models. Some comparisons with experimental tests are also presented. Furthermore, it is shown that direct finite element analyses are compulsory for higher cable stages, but need the knowledge of the initial configuration as precise as possible for meaningful simulations. This problem is also addressed in this paper.

Nemov, A. S.; Boso, D. P.; Voynov, I. B.; Borovkov, A. I.; Schrefler, B. A.

2010-05-01

3

Stiffness and thermoelastic coefficients for composite laminates  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simple analytic expressions are presented for the stiffness and thermoelastic coefficients of composite laminates in terms of the material properties of the individual layers. Expressions for the derivatives of the various coefficients with respect to each of the material properties and fiber orientation angles are also included. For typical high-performance composites, numerical values are given showing the effects of the stacking sequence and the fiber orientation angle of quasi-isotropic and angle-ply laminates on the values of the various coefficients and their sensitivity derivatives. The expressions for the thermoelastic coefficients and the sensitivity derivatives are given herein for the first time.

Noor, Ahmed K.; Tenek, Lazarus H.

1992-01-01

4

Updating Bearing Stiffness and Damping Coefficients of a Rotor System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Finite element (FE) models of structures have been quite useful in both static and dynamic analyses of structures. However, quite often, these models are not reliable enough since predictions based on them may not be found to have acceptable correlation with experimentally obtained data. This paper attempts updating of bearing radial and tilt stiffness as well as damping parameters of a rotor system by using inverse eigen sensitivity method (IESM). Non-proportional viscous damping model has been used in modelling damping coefficients of bearings. The state space form of equations of motion of the system is used in applying the IESM for model updating. The results show that both stiffness and damping coefficients of bearings can be effectively found out by using the IESM. The method is found to update the eigenvalues quite well even under the presence of measurement noise.

Chouksey, M.; Dutt, J. K.; Modak, S. V.

2013-10-01

5

Identities for generalized hypergeometric coefficients  

SciTech Connect

Generalizations of hypergeometric functions to arbitrarily many symmetric variables are discussed, along with their associated hypergeometric coefficients, and the setting within which these generalizations arose. Identities generalizing the Euler identity for {sub 2}F{sub 1}, the Saalschuetz identity, and two generalizations of the {sub 4}F{sub 3} Bailey identity, among others, are given. 16 refs.

Biedenharn, L.C.; Louck, J.D.

1991-01-01

6

The construction of free–free flexibility matrices as generalized stiffness inverses  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present generalizations of the classical structural flexibility matrix. Direct or indirect computation of flexibilities as ‘influence coefficients’ has traditionally required pre-removal of rigid body modes by imposing appropriate support conditions. Here the flexibility of an individual element or substructure is directly obtained as a particular generalized inverse of the free–free stiffness matrix. This entity is called a free–free flexibility

C. A. Felippa; K. C. Park; M. R. Justino Filho

1998-01-01

7

Stiffness and Damping Coefficient Estimation of Compliant Surface Gas Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Foil gas bearings are a key technology in many commercial and emerging oilfree turbomachinery systems. These bearings are nonlinear and have been difficult to analytically model in terms of performance characteristics such as load capacity, power loss, stiffness, and damping. Previous investigations led to an empirically derived method to estimate load capacity. This method has been a valuable tool in system development. The current work extends this tool concept to include rules for stiffness and damping coefficient estimation. It is expected that these rules will further accelerate the development and deployment of advanced oil-free machines operating on foil gas bearings.

Della-Corte, Christopher

2012-01-01

8

Stiffness and Damping Coefficient Estimation of Compliant Surface Gas Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Foil gas bearings are a key technology in many commercial and emerging Oil-Free turbomachinery systems. These bearings are non-linear and have been difficult to analytically model in terms of performance characteristics such as load capacity, power loss, stiffness and damping. Previous investigations led to an empirically derived method, a rule-of-thumb, to estimate load capacity. This method has been a valuable tool in system development. The current paper extends this tool concept to include rules for stiffness and damping coefficient estimation. It is expected that these rules will further accelerate the development and deployment of advanced Oil-Free machines operating on foil gas bearings

DellaCorte, Christopher

2010-01-01

9

General frost growth mechanism on solid substrates with different stiffness.  

PubMed

Preventing or delaying frost formation on surfaces is of significant importance in many aspects of our daily life. Despite many efforts and improvements recently achieved in the design of new icephobic materials and substrates, not all proposed solutions are universally applicable and frost formation still remains a problem in need of further flexible solutions. In this respect, we propose to take benefit from the tunable viscoelastic properties of soft polymer gel substrates, since they are known to strongly influence the dropwise condensation process of water, and to investigate condensation frosting on them. Using polymer gels with different stiffness and a hard substrate as a reference, we demonstrate their ability to delay frost formation compared to recent results reported in the literature on other solid substrates and in particular on superhydrophobic surfaces. By investigating the frost front propagation we singled out a general behavior of its dynamic evolution consisting of two processes presenting two different time scales. This general growth appears to be independent of experimental conditions as well as substrate stiffness. PMID:24456462

Petit, Julien; Bonaccurso, Elmar

2014-02-01

10

Generalized Fibonacci polynomials and Fibonomial coefficients  

E-print Network

, Fibonacci number, Fibonomial coefficient, Lucas number q-analogue, valuation AMS subject classificationGeneralized Fibonacci polynomials and Fibonomial coefficients Tewodros Amdeberhan Department (2000): Primary 05A10; Secondary 11B39, 11B65. Running title: Fibonacci polynomials and Fibonomial

Sagan, Bruce

11

Picosecond acoustic diffraction in anisotropic thin film (µm) application to the measurement of stiffness coefficients  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Investigation of thin metallic film properties by means of picosecond ultrasonics has been under the scope of several studies. Generation of longitudinal and shear waves with a wave vector normal to the film free surface has been demonstrated. Such measurements can not provide complete information about properties of anisotropic films. Acute focusing of the laser pump beam (approx 0.5 µm) on the sample surface has recently allowed us to provide evidence of picosecond acoustic diffraction in thin metallic films (approx1 µm) such as aluminum, gold, copper. Waveforms have been experimentally recorded in a gold layer (2 µm thick) for several distances between pump and probe on the sample surface. Due to acoustic diffraction, the acoustic wavefronts propagate at a group velocity which differs from phase velocity in the anisotropic film. However, a specified signal processing allows us analyzing the space repartition of the acoustic wave-vectors for both longitudinal and shear waves. Four stiffness coefficients of the anisotropic gold layer could thus be recovered accurately, demonstrating the feasibility of the measurement.

Audoin, B.; Perton, M.; Chigarev, N.; Rossignol, C.

2007-12-01

12

Path-Counting Formulas for Generalized Kinship Coefficients and Condensed Identity Coefficients  

PubMed Central

An important computation on pedigree data is the calculation of condensed identity coefficients, which provide a complete description of the degree of relatedness of two individuals. The applications of condensed identity coefficients range from genetic counseling to disease tracking. Condensed identity coefficients can be computed using linear combinations of generalized kinship coefficients for two, three, four individuals, and two pairs of individuals and there are recursive formulas for computing those generalized kinship coefficients (Karigl, 1981). Path-counting formulas have been proposed for the (generalized) kinship coefficients for two (three) individuals but there have been no path-counting formulas for the other generalized kinship coefficients. It has also been shown that the computation of the (generalized) kinship coefficients for two (three) individuals using path-counting formulas is efficient for large pedigrees, together with path encoding schemes tailored for pedigree graphs. In this paper, we propose a framework for deriving path-counting formulas for generalized kinship coefficients. Then, we present the path-counting formulas for all generalized kinship coefficients for which there are recursive formulas and which are sufficient for computing condensed identity coefficients. We also perform experiments to compare the efficiency of our method with the recursive method for computing condensed identity coefficients on large pedigrees. PMID:25165486

Cheng, En; Ozsoyoglu, Z. Meral

2014-01-01

13

Non-monotonic dependence of the friction coefficient on heterogeneous stiffness  

PubMed Central

The complexity of the frictional dynamics at the microscopic scale makes difficult to identify all of its controlling parameters. Indeed, experiments on sheared elastic bodies have shown that the static friction coefficient depends on loading conditions, the real area of contact along the interfaces and the confining pressure. Here we show, by means of numerical simulations of a 2D Burridge-Knopoff model with a simple local friction law, that the macroscopic friction coefficient depends non-monotonically on the bulk elasticity of the system. This occurs because elastic constants control the geometrical features of the rupture fronts during the stick-slip dynamics, leading to four different ordering regimes characterized by different orientations of the rupture fronts with respect to the external shear direction. We rationalize these results by means of an energetic balance argument. PMID:25345800

Giacco, F.; Ciamarra, M. Pica; Saggese, L.; de Arcangelis, L.; Lippiello, E.

2014-01-01

14

Non-monotonic dependence of the friction coefficient on heterogeneous stiffness.  

PubMed

The complexity of the frictional dynamics at the microscopic scale makes difficult to identify all of its controlling parameters. Indeed, experiments on sheared elastic bodies have shown that the static friction coefficient depends on loading conditions, the real area of contact along the interfaces and the confining pressure. Here we show, by means of numerical simulations of a 2D Burridge-Knopoff model with a simple local friction law, that the macroscopic friction coefficient depends non-monotonically on the bulk elasticity of the system. This occurs because elastic constants control the geometrical features of the rupture fronts during the stick-slip dynamics, leading to four different ordering regimes characterized by different orientations of the rupture fronts with respect to the external shear direction. We rationalize these results by means of an energetic balance argument. PMID:25345800

Giacco, F; Ciamarra, M Pica; Saggese, L; de Arcangelis, L; Lippiello, E

2014-01-01

15

Non-monotonic dependence of the friction coefficient on heterogeneous stiffness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The complexity of the frictional dynamics at the microscopic scale makes difficult to identify all of its controlling parameters. Indeed, experiments on sheared elastic bodies have shown that the static friction coefficient depends on loading conditions, the real area of contact along the interfaces and the confining pressure. Here we show, by means of numerical simulations of a 2D Burridge-Knopoff model with a simple local friction law, that the macroscopic friction coefficient depends non-monotonically on the bulk elasticity of the system. This occurs because elastic constants control the geometrical features of the rupture fronts during the stick-slip dynamics, leading to four different ordering regimes characterized by different orientations of the rupture fronts with respect to the external shear direction. We rationalize these results by means of an energetic balance argument.

Giacco, F.; Ciamarra, M. Pica; Saggese, L.; de Arcangelis, L.; Lippiello, E.

2014-10-01

16

Generalized method calculating the effective diffusion coefficient in periodic channels.  

PubMed

The method calculating the effective diffusion coefficient in an arbitrary periodic two-dimensional channel, presented in our previous paper [P. Kalinay, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 144101 (2014)], is generalized to 3D channels of cylindrical symmetry, as well as to 2D or 3D channels with particles driven by a constant longitudinal external driving force. The next possible extensions are also indicated. The former calculation was based on calculus in the complex plane, suitable for the stationary diffusion in 2D domains. The method is reformulated here using standard tools of functional analysis, enabling the generalization. PMID:25573552

Kalinay, Pavol

2015-01-01

17

Second virial coefficient of a generalized Lennard-Jones potential.  

PubMed

We present an exact analytical solution for the second virial coefficient of a generalized Lennard-Jones type of pair potential model. The potential can be reduced to the Lennard-Jones, hard-sphere, and sticky hard-sphere models by tuning the potential parameters corresponding to the width and depth of the well. Thus, the second virial solution can also regain the aforementioned cases. Moreover, the obtained expression strongly resembles the one corresponding to the Kihara potential. In fact, the Fk functions are the same. Furthermore, for these functions, the complete expansions at low and high temperature are given. Additionally, we propose an alternative stickiness parameter based on the obtained second virial coefficient. PMID:25612707

González-Calderón, Alfredo; Rocha-Ichante, Adrián

2015-01-21

18

Stiffness matrix of manipulators with passive joints: computational aspects 1 Abstract--The paper focuses on stiffness matrix computation  

E-print Network

of a robotic system. To evaluate stiffness properties, several methods can be applied such as Finite Element that are applicable in the general case and allow obtaining the desired matrix either in analytical or numerical form [1] and other authors. Here, the matrix K aggregates the stiffness coefficients of all elastic

Boyer, Edmond

19

Generalized approximations of reflection coefficients in orthorhombic media  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reflection coefficients of qP- (quasi-P) and qS- (quasi-S) incident waves in orthorhombic media can be explicitly expressed by means of impedance matrices. In this paper, we extend previous studies and derive the generalized and linearized equations of reflectivity for all four types of waves in the symmetry-axis plane. These approximations have sufficient accuracy over a wide range of angles, therefore they are suitable for characterizing the seismic amplitude responses of unconventional resources. For example, they can be applied to represent the amplitude variation with offset for shale gas or coalbed methane reservoirs with strong anisotropy and complicated symmetry. Reduced equations are then derived in a transverse isotropic medium with a vertical symmetry axis (VTI) or a horizontal axis (HTI) for the anisotropic amplitude inversion. They retain higher accuracy than the corresponding previously published expressions at a strongly anisotropic interface, because they include the second-order terms of anisotropic parameters contrast. Numerical analyses on the inverse problem using different linearized expressions show the practical value of the new derived expressions in the joint inversion of the qPqP- and qPqS-waves for elastic parameters and anisotropic parameters.

Zhang, Feng; Li, Xiangyang

2013-10-01

20

Sensitivity of overall vehicle stiffness to local joint stiffness  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

How overall vehicle stiffness is affected by local joint stiffness is discussed. By using the principle of virtual work and the minimum strain energy theorem, a closed form expression for the sensitivity coefficient was derived. The insensitivity of the vehicle stiffness to a particular joint, when its stiffness exceeds a certain value (or threshold value), was proven mathematically. In order to investigate the sensitivity of the structure to the joint stiffness, a so-called stick model was created, and the modeling technique is briefly described. Some data on joint stiffness of tested vehicles are also presented.

Chon, Choon T.

1987-01-01

21

Group analysis of variable coefficient generalized fifth-order KdV equations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We carry out group analysis of a class of generalized fifth-order Korteweg-de Vries equations with time dependent coefficients. Admissible transformations, Lie symmetries and similarity reductions of equations from the class are classified exhaustively. A criterion of reducibility of variable coefficient fifth-order KdV equations to their constant coefficient counterparts is derived. Some exact solutions are presented.

Kuriksha, O.; Pošta, S.; Vaneeva, O.

2014-12-01

22

General dissipation coefficient in low-temperature warm inflation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In generic particle physics models, the inflaton field is coupled to other bosonic and fermionic fields that acquire large masses during inflation and may decay into light degrees of freedom. This leads to dissipative effects that modify the inflationary dynamics and may generate a nearly-thermal radiation bath, such that inflation occurs in a warm rather than supercooled environment. In this work, we perform a numerical computation and obtain expressions for the associated dissipation coefficient in supersymmetric models, focusing on the regime where the radiation temperature is below the heavy mass threshold. The dissipation coefficient receives contributions from the decay of both on-shell and off-shell degrees of freedom, which are dominant for small and large couplings, respectively, taking into account the light field multiplicities. In particular, we find that the contribution from on-shell decays, although Boltzmann-suppressed, can be much larger than that of virtual modes, which is bounded by the validity of a perturbative analysis. This result opens up new possibilities for realizations of warm inflation in supersymmetric field theories.

Bastero-Gil, Mar; Berera, Arjun; Ramos, Rudnei O.; Rosa, João G.

2013-01-01

23

Mass Transfer Correlation Coefficients for Two-Phase Systems: A General Review for Liquid-Liquid  

Microsoft Academic Search

A general review of the mass transfer correlation coefficients available in the literature was done. The emphasis was for liquid-liquid phases and the main mathematical forms of the correlations accessible are reported. In general, there is a necessity of general models. More work has to be done in this area in order to establish more general models that permit reporting

VICTOR VASQUEZ; RENATO G. BAUTISTA

1997-01-01

24

Integrable Generalized KdV and MKdV Equations with Spatiotemporally Varying Coefficients  

E-print Network

A technique based on extended Lax Pairs is first considered to derive variable-coefficient generalizations of various Lax-integrable NLPDE hierarchies recently introduced in the literature. As illustrative examples, we consider generalizations of KdV equations and three variants of generalized MKdV equations. It is demonstrated that the techniques yield Lax- or S-integrable NLPDEs with both time- AND space-dependent coefficients which are thus more general than almost all cases considered earlier via other methods such as the Painleve Test, Bell Polynomials, and various similarity methods. However, this technique, although operationally effective, has the significant disadvantage that, for any integrable system with spatiotemporally varying coefficients, one must guess a generalization of the structure of the known Lax Pair for the corresponding system with constant coefficients. Motivated by the somewhat arbitrary nature of the above procedure, we embark in this paper on an attempt to systematize the derivation of Lax-integrable sytems with variable coefficients. Hence we attempt to apply the Estabrook-Wahlquist (EW) prolongation technique, a relatively self-consistent procedure requiring little prior information. However, this immediately requires that the technique be significantly generalized or broadened in several different ways, including solving matrix partial differential equations instead of algebraic ones. The new and extended EW technique whch results is illustrated by algorithmically deriving generalized Lax-integrable versions of the generalized fifth-order KdV, and MKdV equations.

Matthew Russo; S. Roy Choudhury

2014-09-23

25

In-plane, flexural, twisting and thickness-shear coefficients for stiffness and damping of a monolayer filamentary composite, part 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Elastic and damping analyses resulting in determinations of the various stiffnesses and associated loss tangents for the complete characterization of the elastic and damping behavior of a monofilament composite layer are presented. For the determination of the various stiffnesses, either an elementary mechanics-of-materials formulation or a more rigorous mixed-boundary-value elasticity formulation is used. The solution for the latter formulation is obtained by means of the boundary-point least-square error technique. Kimball-Lovell type damping is assumed for each of the constituent materials. For determining the loss tangents associated with the various stiffnesses, either the viscoelastic correspondence principle or an energy analysis based on the appropriate elastic stress distribution is used.

Bert, C. W.; Chang, S.

1972-01-01

26

On a generalized Kadomtsev Petviashvili equation with variable coefficients via symbolic computation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Considering the inhomogeneities of media, a generalized Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation with time-dependent coefficients is hereby investigated with the aid of symbolic computation. The exact analytic one- and two-soliton solutions under certain constraints are obtained by employing the variable-coefficient balancing-act method and Hirota method. Based on its bilinear form, the Lax pair, auto-Bäcklund transformation (in both the bilinear form and the Lax pair form) and nonlinear superposition formula for such an equation are presented. Moreover, some figures are plotted to analyze the effects of the coefficient functions on the stabilities and propagation characteristics of the solitonic waves.

Li, Li-Li; Tian, Bo; Zhang, Chun-Yi; Xu, Tao

2007-11-01

27

On Zero Stiffness  

E-print Network

constant amount of material deformation within the zero stiffness mode. A classic example is the Rolamite linear bearing [43]; see Figure 6. A flat blade spring is wrapped around two cylinders; for any displaced configuration of the two rollers... to a change in temperature it will first develop a spherical curvature due to the different thermal expansion coefficients of the two layers, before bifurcating into a cylindrical configuration [28]. As the orientation of the cylindrical axis is ar...

Schenk, Mark; Guest, Simon D.

2013-11-17

28

Generalized Caroli formula for the transmission coefficient with lead-lead coupling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a generalized transmission coefficient formula for the lead-junction-lead system, in which interaction between the leads has been taken into account. Based on this formula, the Caroli formula could be easily recovered and a transmission coefficient formula for interface problem in the ballistic system can be obtained. The condition of validity for the formula is carefully explored. We mainly focus on heat transport. However, the corresponding electrical transport could be similarly dealt with. Also, an illustrative example is given to clarify the precise meaning of the quantities used in the formula, such as the concept of the reduced interacting matrix in different situations. In addition, an explicit transmission coefficient formula for a general one-dimensional interface setup is obtained based on the derived interface formula.

Li, Huanan; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Wang, Jian-Sheng

2012-07-01

29

Statistical Properties of Generalized Gini Coefficient with Application to Health Inequality Measurement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, we report statistical properties of two classes of generalized Gini coefficients (G1 and G2). The theoretical results were assessed via Monte Carlo simulations. Further, we used G1 and G2 on life expectancy to measure health inequalities among the provinces of China and the states of the United States. For China, the results…

Lai, Dejian; Huang, Jin; Risser, Jan M.; Kapadia, Asha S.

2008-01-01

30

Longitudinal Data Analysis. A Comparison Between Generalized Estimating Equations and Random Coefficient Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The analysis of data from longitudinal studies requires special techniques, which take into account the fact that the repeated measurements within one individual are correlated. In this paper, the two most commonly used techniques to analyze longitudinal data are compared: generalized estimating equations (GEE) and random coefficient analysis. Both techniques were used to analyze a longitudinal dataset with six measurements

Jos W. R. Twisk

2004-01-01

31

Stiff magnetofluid cosmological model  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the behavior of the magnetic field in a cosmological model filled with a stiff perfect fluid in general relativity. The magnetic field is due to an electric current along the x axis. The behavior of the model when a magnetic field is absent is also discussed.

Bali, R.; Tyagi, A.

1988-05-01

32

Soliton-like solutions to the generalized Burgers-Huxley equation with variable coefficients  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we consider the generalized Burgers-Huxley equation with arbitrary power of nonlinearity and timedependent coefficients. We analyze the traveling wave problem and explicitly find new soliton-like solutions for this extended equation by using the ansatz of Zhao et al. [X. Zhao, D. Tang, L. Wang, Phys. Lett. A 346 (2005) 288-291]. We also employ the solitary wave ansatz method to derive the exact bright and dark soliton solutions for the considered evolution equation. The physical parameters in the soliton solutions are obtained as function of the time-dependent model coefficients. The conditions of existence of solitons are presented. As a result, rich exact travelling wave solutions, which contain new soliton-like solutions, bell-shaped solitons and kink-shaped solitons for the generalized Burgers-Huxley equation with time-dependent coefficients, are obtained. The methods employed here can also be used to solve a large class of nonlinear evolution equations with variable coefficients.

Triki, Houria; Wazwaz, Abdul-Majid

2013-12-01

33

Elbow Stiffness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The elbow is affected more frequently than any other joint by post-traumatic loss of motion. It is not clear why the elbow\\u000a tends to develop stiffness after trauma. Its anatomic complexity certainly plays a relevant role:\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a • the presence of the three most congruous joints in a single capsule and a synovial space;\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a • the lateral collateral ligament

Andrea Celli; Luigi Celli

34

On the integrability of a generalized variable-coefficient Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By considering the inhomogeneities of media, a generalized variable-coefficient Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (vc-KP) equation is investigated, which can be used to describe many nonlinear phenomena in fluid dynamics and plasma physics. In this paper, we systematically investigate the complete integrability of the generalized vc-KP equation under an integrable constraint condition. With the aid of generalized Bell’s polynomials, its bilinear formalism, bilinear Bäcklund transformations, Lax pairs and Darboux covariant Lax pairs are succinctly constructed, which can be reduced to the ones of several integrable equations such as KdV, cylindrical KdV, KP, cylindrical KP, generalized cylindrical KP, non-isospectral KP equations, etc. Moreover, the infinite conservation laws of the equation are found by using its Lax equations. All conserved densities and fluxes are given with explicit recursion formulas. Furthermore, an extra auxiliary variable is introduced to obtain the bilinear formalism, based on which, the soliton solutions and Riemann theta function periodic wave solutions are presented. The influence of inhomogeneity coefficients on solitonic structures and interaction properties are discussed for physical interest and possible applications by some graphic analysis. Finally, a limiting procedure is presented to analyze in detail the asymptotic behavior of the periodic waves and the relations between the periodic wave solutions and soliton solutions.

Tian, Shou-Fu; Zhang, Hong-Qing

2012-02-01

35

High friction from a stiff polymer using microfiber arrays.  

PubMed

High dry friction requires intimate contact between two surfaces and is generally obtained using soft materials with an elastic modulus less than 10 MPa. We demonstrate that high-friction properties similar to rubberlike materials can also be obtained using microfiber arrays constructed from a stiff thermoplastic (polypropylene, 1 GPa). The fiber arrays have a smaller true area of contact than a rubberlike material, but polypropylene's higher interfacial shear strength provides an effective friction coefficient of greater than 5 at normal loads of 8 kPa. At the pressures tested, the fiber arrays showed more than an order of magnitude increase in shear resistance compared to the bulk material. Unlike softer materials, vertical fiber arrays of stiff polymer demonstrate no measurable adhesion on smooth surfaces due to high tensile stiffness. PMID:17026251

Majidi, C; Groff, R E; Maeno, Y; Schubert, B; Baek, S; Bush, B; Maboudian, R; Gravish, N; Wilkinson, M; Autumn, K; Fearing, R S

2006-08-18

36

A Monte Carlo study of effects of chain stiffness and chain ends on dilute solution behavior of polymers. II. Second virial coefficient  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A Monte Carlo (MC) study is made of the second virial coefficient A2 for polymers using two freely rotating chains, each of bond angle 109°, with the Lennard-Jones 6-12 intramolecular and intermolecular potentials between beads in a cutoff version for the number of bonds in the chain ranging from 6 to 1000 in the ? and good-solvent conditions. It is found that effects of chain ends on A2 are appreciable for small molecular weight M, as was expected, and that the second virial coefficient A2,? at the ? temperature, at which the ratio /M of the mean-square radius of gyration to M becomes a constant independent of M for very large M, remains slightly negative even for such large (but finite) M where the effects of chain ends disappear. Such behavior of A2,?, which cannot be explained within the framework of the binary cluster theory, is shown to be understandable if possible effects of three-segment interactions are considered. The present MC data for A2 (along with the previous ones for ) may then be consistently explained by the existent theory based on the helical wormlike chain model only if a minor correction is made to the theoretical A2,? in almost the same range where the effects of chain ends are appeciable. The present MC data are also compared with experimental data, and it is shown that the latter may also be similarly explained.

Yamakawa, Hiromi; Yoshizaki, Takenao

2003-07-01

37

Group classification and exact solutions of variable-coefficient generalized Burgers equations with linear damping  

E-print Network

Admissible point transformations between Burgers equations with linear damping and time-dependent coefficients are described and used in order to exhaustively classify Lie symmetries of these equations. Optimal systems of one- and two-dimensional subalgebras of the Lie invariance algebras obtained are constructed. The corresponding Lie reductions to ODEs and to algebraic equations are carried out. Exact solutions to particular equations are found. Some generalized Burgers equations are linearized to the heat equation by composing equivalence transformations with the Hopf-Cole transformation.

Oleksandr A. Pocheketa; Roman O. Popovych; Olena O. Vaneeva

2014-06-08

38

Integrability study on a generalized (2+1)-dimensional variable-coefficient Gardner model with symbolic computation  

SciTech Connect

Gardner model describes certain nonlinear elastic structures, ion-acoustic waves in plasmas, and shear flows in ocean and atmosphere. In this paper, by virtue of the computerized symbolic computation, the integrability of a generalized (2+1)-dimensional variable-coefficient Gardner model is investigated. Painleve integrability conditions are derived among the coefficient functions, which reduce all the coefficient functions to be proportional only to {gamma}(t), the coefficient of the cubic nonlinear term u{sup 2}u{sub x}. Then, an independent transformation of the variable t transforms the reduced {gamma}(t)-dependent equation into a constant-coefficient integrable one. Painleve test shows that this is the only case when our original generalized (2+1)-dimensional variable-coefficient Gardner model is integrable.

Lue Xing; Zhang Haiqiang; Xu Tao; Li He [School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box 122, Beijing 100876 (China); Tian Bo [School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box 122, Beijing 100876 (China); State Key Laboratory of Software Development Environment, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications (BUPT), Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box 128, Beijing 100876 (China)

2010-12-15

39

A method for assigning species into groups based on generalized Mahalanobis distance between habitat model coefficients  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Habitat association models are commonly developed for individual animal species using generalized linear modeling methods such as logistic regression. We considered the issue of grouping species based on their habitat use so that management decisions can be based on sets of species rather than individual species. This research was motivated by a study of western landbirds in northern Idaho forests. The method we examined was to separately fit models to each species and to use a generalized Mahalanobis distance between coefficient vectors to create a distance matrix among species. Clustering methods were used to group species from the distance matrix, and multidimensional scaling methods were used to visualize the relations among species groups. Methods were also discussed for evaluating the sensitivity of the conclusions because of outliers or influential data points. We illustrate these methods with data from the landbird study conducted in northern Idaho. Simulation results are presented to compare the success of this method to alternative methods using Euclidean distance between coefficient vectors and to methods that do not use habitat association models. These simulations demonstrate that our Mahalanobis-distance- based method was nearly always better than Euclidean-distance-based methods or methods not based on habitat association models. The methods used to develop candidate species groups are easily explained to other scientists and resource managers since they mainly rely on classical multivariate statistical methods. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

Williams, C.J.; Heglund, P.J.

2009-01-01

40

Generalized derivation of an exact relationship linking different coefficients that characterize thermodynamic effects of preferential interactions.  

PubMed

In solutions consisting of solvent water (component '1') and two solute components ('2' and '3'), various thermodynamic effects of differences between solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions are quantitatively characterized by state functions commonly called 'preferential interaction coefficients': gamma(mu(1),mu(3)) triple bond (delta(m3)/delta(m2))(T,mu(1),mu(3)) and gamma(mu(k)) triple bond (delta(m3)/delta(m2))(T,P,mu(k)), where k = 1,2 or 3. These different derivatives are not all directly accessible to experimental determination, nor are they entirely equivalent for analyses and interpretations of thermodynamic and molecular effects of preferential interactions. Consequently, various practical and theoretical considerations arise when, for a given system, different kinds of preferential interaction coefficients have significantly different numerical values. Previously we derived the exact relationship linking all three coefficients of the type gamma(mu(k), and hence identified the physical origins of the differences between gamma(mu(1)) and gamma(mu(3)) that have been experimentally determined for each of various common biochemical solutes interacting with a protein [J. Phys. Chem. B, 106 (2002) 418-433]. Continuing our investigation of exact thermodynamic linkages among different types of preferential interaction coefficients, we present here a generalized derivation of the relationship linking gamma(mu(1),mu(3)), gamma(mu(3)) and gamma(mu(1)), with no restrictions on m(2), m(3) or any physical characteristic of either solute component (such as partial molar volume). Hence, we show that (gamma(mu(1),mu(3)) - gamma(mu(3))) is related directly to (gamma(mu(3)) - gamma(mu(1))), for which the physical determinants have been considered in detail previously, and to a factor dependent on the ratio of the partial molar volumes V3/V1. Our generalized expression also provides a basis for calculating gamma(mu(1),mu(3)), even in situations where preferential interactions could not be investigated by equilibrium dialysis. To demonstrate this applicability, we analyze isopiestic distillation data for aqueous solutions containing urea and NaCl, two small solute components that cannot be selectively dialyzed. PMID:12488023

Anderson, Charles F; Felitsky, Daniel J; Hong, Jiang; Record, M Thomas

2002-12-10

41

Variable stiffness torsion springs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

Alhorn, Dean C. (inventor); Polites, Michael E. (inventor)

1994-01-01

42

Variable stiffness torsion springs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

Alhorn, Dean C. (inventor); Polites, Michael E. (inventor)

1995-01-01

43

Aerodynamic Coefficient Prediction of a General Transport Aircraft Using Neural Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fast, reliable, and accurate methodology for predicting aerodynamic coefficients of airfoils and transport aircraft was elaborated employing the neural network technique. Basic aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number for a given airfoil or wing-body configuration. In this latter case, the coefficients are also dependent on the wing geometry of the

Ricardo Wallach; Bento S. Mattos; Roberto da Mota Girardi; Marcelo Curvo

44

A computer program for two-particle generalized coefficients of fractional parentage  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a FORTRAN90 program GCFP for the calculation of the generalized coefficients of fractional parentage (generalized CFPs or GCFP). The approach is based on the observation that the multi-shell CFPs can be expressed in terms of single-shell CFPs, while the latter can be readily calculated employing a simple enumeration scheme of antisymmetric A-particle states and an efficient method of construction of the idempotent matrix eigenvectors. The program provides fast calculation of GCFPs for a given particle number and produces results possessing numerical uncertainties below the desired tolerance. A single j-shell is defined by four quantum numbers, (e,l,j,t). A supplemental C++ program parGCFP allows calculation to be done in batches and/or in parallel. Program summaryProgram title:GCFP, parGCFP Catalogue identifier: AEBI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEBI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17 199 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 88 658 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77/90 ( GCFP), C++ ( parGCFP) Computer: Any computer with suitable compilers. The program GCFP requires a FORTRAN 77/90 compiler. The auxiliary program parGCFP requires GNU-C++ compatible compiler, while its parallel version additionally requires MPI-1 standard libraries Operating system: Linux (Ubuntu, Scientific) (all programs), also checked on Windows XP ( GCFP, serial version of parGCFP) RAM: The memory demand depends on the computation and output mode. If this mode is not 4, the program GCFP demands the following amounts of memory on a computer with Linux operating system. It requires around 2 MB of RAM for the A=12 system at E?2. Computation of the A=50 particle system requires around 60 MB of RAM at E=0 and ˜70 MB at E=2 (note, however, that the calculation of this system will take a very long time). If the computation and output mode is set to 4, the memory demands by GCFP are significantly larger. Calculation of GCFPs of A=12 system at E=1 requires 145 MB. The program parGCFP requires additional 2.5 and 4.5 MB of memory for the serial and parallel version, respectively. Classification: 17.18 Nature of problem: The program GCFP generates a list of two-particle coefficients of fractional parentage for several j-shells with isospin. Solution method: The method is based on the observation that multishell coefficients of fractional parentage can be expressed in terms of single-shell CFPs [1]. The latter are calculated using the algorithm [2,3] for a spectral decomposition of an antisymmetrization operator matrix Y. The coefficients of fractional parentage are those eigenvectors of the antisymmetrization operator matrix Y that correspond to unit eigenvalues. A computer code for these coefficients is available [4]. The program GCFP offers computation of two-particle multishell coefficients of fractional parentage. The program parGCFP allows a batch calculation using one input file. Sets of GCFPs are independent and can be calculated in parallel. Restrictions:A<86 when E=0 (due to the memory constraints); small numbers of particles allow significantly higher excitations, though the shell with j?11/2 cannot get full (it is the implementation constraint). Unusual features: Using the program GCFP it is possible to determine allowed particle configurations without the GCFP computation. The GCFPs can be calculated either for all particle configurations at once or for a specified particle configuration. The values of GCFPs can be printed out with a complete specification in either one file or with the parent and daughter configurations printed in separate files. The latter output mode requires additional time and RAM memory. It is possible to restrict the ( J,T) values of the considered particle configurations. (Here J is the total angular momentum and

Deveikis, A.; Juodagalvis, A.

2008-10-01

45

Comparing Regression Coefficients between Nested Linear Models for Clustered Data with Generalized Estimating Equations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Comparing regression coefficients between models when one model is nested within another is of great practical interest when two explanations of a given phenomenon are specified as linear models. The statistical problem is whether the coefficients associated with a given set of covariates change significantly when other covariates are added into…

Yan, Jun; Aseltine, Robert H., Jr.; Harel, Ofer

2013-01-01

46

Soliton solutions for a generalized fifth-order KdV equation with t-dependent coefficients  

Microsoft Academic Search

We consider a generalized fifth-order KdV equation with time-dependent coefficients exhibiting higher-degree nonlinear terms. This nonlinear evolution equation describes the interaction between a water wave and a floating ice cover and gravity-capillary waves. By means of the subsidiary ordinary differential equation method, some new exact soliton solutions are derived. Among these solutions, we can find the well known bright and

Houria Triki; Anjan Biswas

2011-01-01

47

Numerical solutions of boundary value problems for variable coefficient generalized KdV equations using Lie symmetries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The exhaustive group classification of a class of variable coefficient generalized KdV equations is presented, which completes and enhances results existing in the literature. Lie symmetries are used for solving an initial and boundary value problem for certain subclasses of the above class. Namely, the found Lie symmetries are applied in order to reduce the initial and boundary value problem for the generalized KdV equations (which are PDEs) to an initial value problem for nonlinear third-order ODEs. The latter problem is solved numerically using the finite difference method. Numerical solutions are computed and the vast parameter space is studied.

Vaneeva, O. O.; Papanicolaou, N. C.; Christou, M. A.; Sophocleous, C.

2014-09-01

48

A generalized method of converting CT image to PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution in PET/CT imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The accuracy of attenuation correction in positron emission tomography scanners depends mainly on deriving the reliable 511-keV linear attenuation coefficient distribution in the scanned objects. In the PET/CT system, the linear attenuation distribution is usually obtained from the intensities of the CT image. However, the intensities of the CT image relate to the attenuation of photons in an energy range of 40 keV-140 keV. Before implementing PET attenuation correction, the intensities of CT images must be transformed into the PET 511-keV linear attenuation coefficients. However, the CT scan parameters can affect the effective energy of CT X-ray photons and thus affect the intensities of the CT image. Therefore, for PET/CT attenuation correction, it is crucial to determine the conversion curve with a given set of CT scan parameters and convert the CT image into a PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution. A generalized method is proposed for converting a CT image into a PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution. Instead of some parameter-dependent phantom calibration experiments, the conversion curve is calculated directly by employing the consistency conditions to yield the most consistent attenuation map with the measured PET data. The method is evaluated with phantom experiments and small animal experiments. In phantom studies, the estimated conversion curve fits the true attenuation coefficients accurately, and accurate PET attenuation maps are obtained by the estimated conversion curves and provide nearly the same correction results as the true attenuation map. In small animal studies, a more complicated attenuation distribution of the mouse is obtained successfully to remove the attenuation artifact and improve the PET image contrast efficiently.

Wang, Lu; Wu, Li-Wei; Wei, Le; Gao, Juan; Sun, Cui-Li; Chai, Pei; Li, Dao-Wu

2014-02-01

49

Generalized non-local surface susceptibility model and Fresnel coefficients for the characterization of periodic metafilms with bianisotropic scatterers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A non-local surface susceptibility model for the consistent description of periodic metafilms formed by arbitrarily-shaped, electrically-small, bianisotropic scatterers is developed in this paper. The rigorous scheme is based on the point-dipole approximation technique and is valid for any polarization and propagation direction of an electromagnetic wave impinging upon the metafilm, unlike existing approaches whose applicability is practically confined to very specific cases of incidence. Next, the universal form of the resulting surface susceptibility matrix is employed for the derivation of the generalized Fresnel coefficients for such surfaces, which enable the comprehensive interpretation of several significant, yet relatively unexamined, physical interactions. Essentially, these coefficients include eight distinct terms, corresponding to the co-polarized and cross-polarized reflection and transmission coefficients for the two orthogonal eigenpolarizations of a linearly-polarized incident plane wave. The above formulas are, then, utilized for the prediction of the scattering properties of metafilms with different planar and non-planar resonators, which are characterized via the featured model and two previously reported local ones. Their comparison with numerical simulation outcomes substantiates the merits of the proposed method, reveals important aspects of the underlying physics, and highlights the differences between the various modeling procedures.

Dimitriadis, Alexandros I.; Kantartzis, Nikolaos V.; Tsiboukis, Theodoros D.; Hafner, Christian

2015-01-01

50

General formula for the thermoelectric transport phenomena based on Fermi liquid theory: Thermoelectric power, Nernst coefficient, and thermal conductivity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On the basis of linear response transport theory, the general expressions for the thermoelectric transport coefficients, such as thermoelectric power (S), Nernst coefficient (?), and thermal conductivity (?), are derived by using Fermi liquid theory. The obtained expression is exact for the most singular term in terms of 1/?*k (?*k being the quasiparticle damping rate). We utilize Ward identities for the heat velocity which is derived by the local energy conservation law. The derived expressions enable us to calculate various thermoelectric transport coefficients in a systematic way, within the framework of the conserving approximation of Baym and Kadanoff. Thus the present expressions are very useful for studying strongly correlated electrons such as high-Tc superconductors, organic metals, and heavy fermion systems, where the current vertex correction (VC) is expected to play important roles. By using the derived expression, we calculate the thermal conductivity ? in a free-dispersion model up to second order with respect to the on-site Coulomb potential U. We find that it is slightly enhanced due to the VC for the heat current, although the VC for electron current makes the conductivity (?) of this system diverge, reflecting the absence of the umklapp process.

Kontani, Hiroshi

2003-01-01

51

Generalized Skew Coefficients of Annual Peak Flows for Rural, Unregulated Streams in West Virginia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Generalized skew was determined from analysis of records from 147 streamflow-gaging stations in or near West Virginia. The analysis followed guidelines established by the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data described in Bulletin 17B, except that stations having 50 or more years of record were used instead of stations with the less restrictive recommendation of 25 or more years of record. The generalized-skew analysis included contouring, averaging, and regression of station skews. The best method was considered the one with the smallest mean square error (MSE). MSE is defined as the following quantity summed and divided by the number of peaks: the square of the difference of an individual logarithm (base 10) of peak flow less the mean of all individual logarithms of peak flow. Contouring of station skews was the best method for determining generalized skew for West Virginia, with a MSE of about 0.2174. This MSE is an improvement over the MSE of about 0.3025 for the national map presented in Bulletin 17B.

Atkins, John T.; Wiley, Jeffrey B.; Paybins, Katherine S.

2009-01-01

52

Stiff-Person Syndrome  

MedlinePLUS

... the NINDS demonstrated the effectiveness of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) treatment in reducing stiffness and lowering sensitivity to noise, ... in people with SPS. What is the prognosis? Treatment with IVIg, anti-anxiety drugs, muscle relaxants, anti-convulsants, and ...

53

Zero stiffness tensegrity structures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tension members with a zero rest length allow the construction of tensegrity structures that are in equilibrium along a continuous path of configurations, and thus exhibit mechanism-like properties; equivalently, they have zero stiffness. The zero-stiffness modes are not internal mechanisms, as they involve first-order changes in member length, but are a direct result of the use of the special tension

M. Schenk; S. D. Guest; J. L. Herder

2007-01-01

54

The stiff elbow.  

PubMed

Elbow motion is essential for upper extremity function to position the hand in space. Unfortunately, the elbow joint is prone to stiffness following a multitude of traumatic and atraumatic etiologies. Elbow stiffness can be diagnosed with a complete history and physical exam, supplemented with appropriate imaging studies. The stiff elbow is challenging to treat, and thus, its prevention is of paramount importance. When this approach fails, non-operative followed by operative treatment modalities should be pursued. Upon initial presentation in those who have minimal contractures of 6-month duration or less, static and dynamic splinting, serial casting, continuous passive motion, occupational/physical therapy, and manipulation are non-operative treatment modalities that may be attempted. A stiff elbow that is refractory to non-operative management can be treated surgically, either arthroscopically or open, to eliminate soft tissue or bony blocks to motion. In the future, efforts to prevent and treat elbow stiffness may target the basic science mechanisms involved. Our purpose was to review the etiologies, classification, evaluation, prevention, operative, and non-operative treatment of the stiff elbow. PMID:19350328

Nandi, Sumon; Maschke, Steven; Evans, Peter J; Lawton, Jeffrey N

2009-12-01

55

Accelerated initial stiffness schemes for elastoplasticity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Iterative methods for the solution of non-linear finite element equations are generally based on variants of the Newton-Raphson method. When they are stable, full Newton-Raphson schemes usually converge rapidly but may be expensive for some types of problems (for example, when the tangent stiffness matrix is unsymmetric). Initial stiffness schemes, on the other hand, are extremely robust but may require large numbers of iterations for cases where the plastic zone is extensive. In most geomechanics applications it is generally preferable to use a tangent stiffness scheme, but there are situations in which initial stiffness schemes are very useful. These situations include problems where a nonassociated flow rule is used or where the zone of plastic yielding is highly localized.This paper surveys the performance of several single-parameter techniques for accelerating the convergence of the initial stiffness scheme. Some simple but effective modifications to these procedures are also proposed. In particular, a modified version of Thomas' acceleration scheme is developed which has a good rate of convergence. Previously published results on the performance of various acceleration algorithms for initial stiffness iteration are rare and have been restricted to relatively simple yield criteria and simple problems. In this study, detailed numerical results are presented for the expansion of a thick cylinder, the collapse of a rigid strip footing, and the failure of a vertical cut. These analyses use the Mohr-Coulomb and Tresca yield criteria which are popular in soil mechanics.

Sloan, Scott W.; Sheng, Daichao; Abbo, Andrew J.

2000-05-01

56

Genetic Determinants of Arterial Stiffness.  

PubMed

Stiffness of large arteries (called arteriosclerosis) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although previous studies have shown that arterial stiffness is moderately heritable, genetic factors contributing to arterial stiffness are largely unknown. In this paper, we reviewed the available literature on genetic variants that are potentially related to arterial stiffness. Most variants have shown mixed depictions of their association with arterial stiffness across multiple studies. Various methods to measure arterial stiffness at different arterial sites can contribute to these inconsistent results. In addition, studies in patient populations with hypertension or atherosclerosis may overestimate the impact of genetic variants on arterial stiffness. Future studies are recommended to standardize current measures of arterial stiffness in different age groups. Studies conducted in normal healthy subjects may also provide better opportunities to find novel genetic variants of arterial stiffness. PMID:25472935

Logan, Jeongok G; Engler, Mary B; Kim, Hyungsuk

2014-12-01

57

Stiff-system problems and solutions at LLNL  

SciTech Connect

Difficult stiff system problems encountered at LLNL are typified by those arising from various atmospheric kinetics models, which include reaction kinetics and transport in up to two space dimensions. Approaches devised for these problems resulted in several general purpose stiff system solvers. These have since evolved into a new systematized collection of solvers, called ODEPACK, based on backward differentiation formulas in the stiff case. A model kinetics-transport problem is used to illustrate the various solvers.

Hindmarsh, A.C.

1982-03-01

58

Measuring graphene's bending stiffness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Graphene's unusual combination of in-plane strength and out-of-plane flexibility makes it promising for mechanical applications. A key value is the bending stiffness, which microscopic theories and measurements of phonon modes in graphite put at ?0=1.2 eV.^1 However, theories of the effects of thermal fluctuations in 2D membranes predict that the bending stiffness at longer length scales could be orders of magnitude higher.^2,3 This macroscopic value has not been measured. Here we present the first direct measurement of monolayer graphene's bending stiffness, made by mechanically lifting graphene off a surface in a liquid and observing both motion induced by thermal fluctuations and the deflection caused by gravity's effect on added weights. These experiments reveal a value ?eff=12 keV at room temperature --- four orders of magnitude higher than ?0. These results closely match theoretical predictions of the effects of thermally-induced fluctuations which effectively thicken the membrane, dramatically increasing its bending stiffness at macroscopic length scales. [1] A. Fasolino et al., Nat. Mater. (2007) [2] D. R. Nelson and L. Peliti, J Physique (1987) [3] F. L. Braghin and N. Hasselmann, Phys Rev B (2010)

Blees, Melina; Barnard, Arthur; Roberts, Samantha; Kevek, Joshua W.; Ruyack, Alexander; Wardini, Jenna; Ong, Peijie; Zaretski, Aliaksandr; Wang, Siping; McEuen, Paul L.

2013-03-01

59

Column dampers with negative stiffness: high damping at small amplitude  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High structural damping combined with high initial stiffness is achieved at small amplitude via negative stiffness elements. These elements consist of columns in the vicinity of the post-buckling transition between contact of flat surfaces and edges of the ends for which negative incremental structural stiffness occurs. The column configuration provides a high initial structural stiffness equal to the intrinsic stiffness of the column material. Columns of the polymers polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polycarbonate were used. By tuning the pre-strain, a very high mechanical damping was achieved for small amplitude oscillations. The product of effective stiffness and effective damping as a figure of merit |Eeff|tan?eff of about 1.5 GPa was achieved for polymer column dampers in the linear domain and about 1.62 GPa in the small amplitude nonlinear domain. For most materials this value generally never exceeds 0.6 GPa.

Kalathur, H.; Lakes, R. S.

2013-08-01

60

Development of a contour map showing generalized skew coefficients of annual peak discharges of rural, unregulated streams in New York, excluding Long Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Flood-frequency relations that are developed by fitting the logarithms of annual peak discharges to a Pearson Type-III distribution are sensitive to skew coefficients. Estimates of population skew for a site are improved when computed from the weighted average of (1) the sample (station) skew, and (2) an unbiased, generalized skew estimate. A weighting technique based on the number of years of record at each of 226 sites was used to develop a contour map of unbiased, generalized skew coefficients for New York. An attempt was made to group (regionalize) the station skew coefficients into five hydrologically similar areas of New York, but the statewide version proved to be as accurate as the regionalized version and therefore was adopted as the final generalized skew-coefficient map for New York. An error analysis showed the statewide contour map to have lower MSE?s (mean square errors) than those computed from (1) the five regional skewcoefficient contour maps, (2) a previously used (1982) nationwide skew coefficient map, and (3) the weighted mean of skew coefficients for sites within each of five hydrologically uniform, but distinct areas of New York.

Lumia, Richard; Baevsky, Yvonne Halpern

2000-01-01

61

BÄCKLUND Transformation and Analytic Solutions for a Generalized Variable-Coefficient Modified Korteweg-De Vries Model from Fluid Dynamics and Plasmas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate a generalized variable-coefficient modified Korteweg-de Vries model with perturbed factor and external force (vc-GmKdV) describing fluid dynamics and space plasmas. In this paper, we propose an extended variable-coefficient balancing-act method (Evc-BAM), which is concise and straightforward, to obtain the generalized analytic solutions including solitary wave solution of the vc-GmKdV model with symbolic computation. Meanwhile, using the Evc-BAM, we obtain an auto-Bäcklund transformation for the vc-GmKdV model on the relevant constraint conditions of the coefficient functions. Using the given auto-Bäcklund transformation, the solutions of special equations for the vc-GmKdV model are also obtained as the variable-coefficient Korteweg-de Vries (vc-KdV) equation, the generalized KdV equation with perturbed factor and external force (GKdV), the variable-coefficient modified Korteweg-de Vries (vc-mKdV) equation, and the variable-coefficient cylindrical modified Korteweg-de Vries (vc-cmKdV) equation, respectively.

Sun, Fu-Wei; Gao, Yi-Tian; Zhang, Chun-Yi; Xu, Xiao-Ge

62

Nonlinear stability of oscillatory core-annular flow: A generalized Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation with time periodic coefficients  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this paper the nonlinear stability of two-phase core-annular flow in a pipe is examined when the acting pressure gradient is modulated by time harmonic oscillations and viscosity stratification and interfacial tension is present. An exact solution of the Navier-Stokes equations is used as the background state to develop an asymptotic theory valid for thin annular layers, which leads to a novel nonlinear evolution describing the spatio-temporal evolution of the interface. The evolution equation is an extension of the equation found for constant pressure gradients and generalizes the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation with dispersive effects found by Papageorgiou, Maldarelli & Rumschitzki, Phys. Fluids A 2(3), 1990, pp. 340-352, to a similar system with time periodic coefficients. The distinct regimes of slow and moderate flow are considered and the corresponding evolution is derived. Certain solutions are described analytically in the neighborhood of the first bifurcation point by use of multiple scales asymptotics. Extensive numerical experiments, using dynamical systems ideas, are carried out in order to evaluate the effect of the oscillatory pressure gradient on the solutions in the presence of a constant pressure gradient.

Coward, Adrian V.; Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.; Smyrlis, Yiorgos S.

1994-01-01

63

Elasticity of stiff biopolymers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a statistical mechanical study of stiff polymers, motivated by experiments on actin filaments and the considerable current interest in polymer networks. We obtain simple, approximate analytical forms for the force-extension relations and compare these with numerical treatments. We note the important role of boundary conditions in determining force-extension relations. The theoretical predictions presented here can be tested against single molecule experiments on neurofilaments and cytoskeletal filaments like actin and microtubules. Our work is motivated by the buckling of the cytoskeleton of a cell under compression, a phenomenon of interest to biology.

Ghosh, Abhijit; Samuel, Joseph; Sinha, Supurna

2007-12-01

64

Elasticity of stiff biopolymers.  

PubMed

We present a statistical mechanical study of stiff polymers, motivated by experiments on actin filaments and the considerable current interest in polymer networks. We obtain simple, approximate analytical forms for the force-extension relations and compare these with numerical treatments. We note the important role of boundary conditions in determining force-extension relations. The theoretical predictions presented here can be tested against single molecule experiments on neurofilaments and cytoskeletal filaments like actin and microtubules. Our work is motivated by the buckling of the cytoskeleton of a cell under compression, a phenomenon of interest to biology. PMID:18233859

Ghosh, Abhijit; Samuel, Joseph; Sinha, Supurna

2007-12-01

65

Multisoliton solutions in terms of double Wronskian determinant for a generalized variable-coefficient nonlinear Schrödinger equation from plasma physics, arterial mechanics, fluid dynamics and optical communications  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the multisoliton solutions in terms of double Wronskian determinant are presented for a generalized variable-coefficient nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which appears in space and laboratory plasmas, arterial mechanics, fluid dynamics, optical communications and so on. By means of the particularly nice properties of Wronskian determinant, the solutions are testified through direct substitution into the bilinear equations. Furthermore, it

Lue Xing; Hong-Wu Zhu; Zhen-Zhi Yao; Xiang-Hua Meng; Cheng Zhang; Chun-Yi Zhang; Bo Tian

2008-01-01

66

Cosmology with a stiff matter era  

E-print Network

We provide a simple analytical solution of the Friedmann equations for a universe made of stiff matter, dust matter, and dark energy. A stiff matter era is present in the cosmological model of Zel'dovich (1972) where the primordial universe is assumed to be made of a cold gas of baryons. It also occurs in certain cosmological models where dark matter is made of relativistic self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). When the energy density of the stiff matter is positive, the primordial universe is singular. It starts from a state with a vanishing scale factor and an infinite density. We consider the possibility that the energy density of the stiff matter is negative (anti-stiff matter). This happens, for example, when the BECs have an attractive self-interaction. In that case, the primordial universe is non-singular. It starts from a state in which the scale factor is finite and the energy density is equal to zero. For the sake of generality, we consider a cosmological constant of arbitrary sign. When the cosmological constant is positive, the universe asymptotically reaches a de Sitter phase where the scale factor increases exponentially rapidly. This can account for the accelerating expansion of the universe that we observe at present. When the cosmological constant is negative (anti-de Sitter), the evolution of the universe is cyclic. Therefore, depending on the sign of the energy density of the stiff matter and of the dark energy, we obtain singular and non-singular expanding or cyclic universes.

Pierre-Henri Chavanis

2014-11-27

67

Rigorous Justification of the Localized Approximation to the Beam-Shape Coefficients in Generalized Lorenz-Mie Theory. Part 1; On-Axis Beams  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Generalized Lorenz-Mie theory describes electromagnetic scattering of an arbitrary light beam by a spherical particle. The computationally most expensive feature of the theory is the evaluation of the beam-shape coefficients, which give the decomposition of the incident light beam into partial waves. The so-called localized approximation to these coefficients for a focused Gaussian beam is an analytical function whose use greatly simplifies Gaussian-beam scattering calculations. A mathematical justification and physical interpretation of the localized approximation is presented for on-axis beams.

Lock, James A.; Gouesbet, Gerard

1994-01-01

68

Working Stiff: PBS  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A feature at Public Broadcasting Service's Web Lab, this site offers tales and advice from the front lines of working America. The Workplace Diaries section offers daily updates from the "Work-A-Day World." Diarists include a Northwest customer service rep, a Midwest teacher, an Illinois casino worker, and a Midwest utility worker. The Free Advice section allows users to submit workplace troubles to the site's expert problem-solver. Current Feature Articles include a guide to interoffice romance and a discussion of worker privacy in the workplace. Additional offerings at the site include a worker forum, Stress-O-Meter, and the Working Stiff Action Guide, which contains information on workplace activism.

69

Soliton-like solutions of a generalized variable-coefficient higher order nonlinear Schrödinger equation from inhomogeneous optical fibers with symbolic computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the long-distance communication and manufacturing problems in optical fibers, the propagation of subpicosecond or femtosecond optical pulses can be governed by the variable-coefficient nonlinear Schrödinger equation with higher order effects, such as the third-order dispersion, self-steepening and self-frequency shift. In this paper, we firstly determine the general conditions for this equation to be integrable by employing the Painlevé analysis.

Juan Li; Hai-Qiang Zhang; Tao Xu; Ya-Xing Zhang; Bo Tian

2007-01-01

70

Algorithms of calculation and formation of matrices of the geometrical and generalized angular radiation coefficients for the working space of a rotating furnace  

Microsoft Academic Search

The algorithms of the calculation of the angular and generalized angular radiation coefficients and formation of their matrixes\\u000a are elaborated in order to perform mathematical modeling by the zone method of radiation heat exchange in a rotating furnace.\\u000a The correctness of these algorithms is confirmed by the fact that a computer simulation with these algorithms gives radiation\\u000a parameters that satisfy

E. I. Meshkov; T. E. Gerasimenko; M. A. Kovaleva

2009-01-01

71

The determining of the coefficient of safety of bearing ability of anisotropic bars in the general case of their complex resistance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The bars of any form made of a uniform anisotropic material are considered. Generally in the cross section of a bar all internal power factors (IPF) – three forces and three moments are other than zero. Values IPF are known from the solution of the corresponding task. The coefficient of a stock of bearing ability of a bar is defined by a way of comparison of known vector IPF vec R* with the corresponding required vector of durability vec R in IPF space.

Sibgatullin, K. E.; Sibgatullin, E. S.

2014-12-01

72

New solitons for the Hirota equation and generalized higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation with variable coefficients  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, multisoliton solutions of the Hirota equation with variable coefficients are obtained by the Darboux transformation based on the Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur technology. As an example, we discuss the evolutional behaviour of a two-soliton solution in a soliton control fibre system. The results reveal that one may control the interaction between the pulses by choosing the third-order dispersion parameters d4

Chao-Qing Dai; Jie-Fang Zhang

2006-01-01

73

Quantitative evaluation of stiffness of commercial suture materials.  

PubMed

The bending stiffness of 22 commercial suture materials of varying size, chemical structure and physical form was quantitatively evaluated using a stiffness tester (Taber V-5, model 150B, Teledyne). The commercial sutures were Chromic catgut; Dexon (polyglycolic acid); Vicryl (polyglactin 910); PDS (polydioxanone); Maxon (polyglycolide-trimethylene carbonate); Silk (coated with silicone); Mersilene (polyester fiber); Tycron (polyester fiber); Ethibond (polyethylene terephthalate coated with polybutylene); Nurolon (nylon 66); Surgilon (nylon 66 coated with silicone); Ethilon (coated nylon 66), Prolene (polypropylene); Dermalene (polyethylene), and Gore-tex (polytetraflouroethylene). These are both natural and synthetic, absorbable and nonabsorbable and monofilament and multifilament sutures. All of these sutures were size 2-0, but Prolene sutures with sizes ranging from 1-0 to 9-0 were also tested to determine the effect of suture size on stiffness. The bending stiffness data obtained showed that a wide range of bending stiffness was observed among the 22 commercial sutures. The most flexible 2-0 suture was Gore-tex, followed by Dexon, Silk, Surgilon, Vicryl (uncoated), Tycron, Nurolon, Mersilene, Ethibond, Maxon, PDS, Ethilon, Prolene, Chromic catgut, coated Vicryl, and lastly, Dermalene. The large porous volume inherent in Gore-tex monofilament suture was the reason for its lowest flexural stiffness. Sutures with a braided structure were generally more flexible than those of a monofilament structure, irrespective of the chemical constituents. Coated sutures had significantly higher stiffness than the corresponding uncoated ones. This is particularly true when polymers rather than wax were used as the coating material. This increase in stiffness is attributable to the loss of mobility under bending force in the fibers and yarns that make up the sutures. An increase in the size of the suture significantly increased the stiffness, and the magnitude of increase depended on the chemical constituent of the suture. The flexural stiffness of sutures was also found to depend on the duration of bending in the test for stiffness. In general, monofilament sutures exhibited the largest time-dependent stiffness. This was most pronounced with the Gore-tex suture. Most braided sutures also showed less time-dependence in stiffness. Nylon sutures did not exhibit this time-dependent phenomenon regardless of physical form. PMID:2919353

Chu, C C; Kizil, Z

1989-03-01

74

A Novel Computational Model for Tilting Pad Journal Bearings with Soft Pivot Stiffnesses  

E-print Network

the thermal expansion of the journal and pad surfaces. The pad inlet thermal mixing coefficient (lambda) influences moderately the predicted fluid film temperature field. Pad pivot flexibility decreases significantly and dominates the bearing stiffness...

Tao, Yujiao 1988-

2012-12-10

75

A generalized theory for eccentric and misalignment effects in high-pressure annular seals  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High-pressure annular seal leakage and dynamic coefficients vary with eccentricity and misalignment. Recent seal leakage data with both concentric and fully eccentric alignments support the seal leakage model with surface roughness and eccentricity effects included. In this paper, the seal dynamic coefficient calculation has been generalized and allows direct calculation of the seal dynamic coefficients at any circumferential location. The generalized solution agrees with the results obtained by using the calculated values of an earlier paper and performing a coordinate transformation. The analysis results coincide with the measured data in showing that the stiffness and damping matrices of seal coefficients are not skew symmetric, and the main diagonal seal coefficients are not equal. The measured direct stiffnesses were found higher than predicted by the concentric seal theory, but this may be explained by the presence of eccentricity in the test operating mode.

Chen, W. C.; Jackson, E. D.

1986-01-01

76

The generalized correlation for the evaluation of the influence of the Stefan flow on the heat transfer coefficient  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The analytical equations for the steady-state heat-and-mass transfer in the steam evaporation/condensation processes from the steam-gas mixtures on the planar and spherical surfaces are derived. The vapor flow through the motionless dry gas is considered according to the method proposed by Maxwell for the solution of the diffusion problems. The relationships for the calculation of the coefficients taking into account an increase in the mass output and an increase or a decrease in the heat emission (depending on the directions of the heat-and-mass flows) as a result of the influence of the Stefan flow are presented. The derived relationships can be used to calculate the apparatuses in which the steam evaporation or condensation from the steam-gas mixture occurs (the coolers of the vapor from deaerators, the apparatuses for the deep utilization of the heat of the combustion products, the condensation boilers, etc.).

Baskakov, A. P.; Rakov, O. A.

2013-11-01

77

Implicit Extrapolation Methods for Variable Coefficient Problems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Implicit extrapolation methods for the solution of partial differential equations are based on applying the extrapolation principle indirectly. Multigrid tau-extrapolation is a special case of this idea. In the context of multilevel finite element methods, an algorithm of this type can be used to raise the approximation order, even when the meshes are nonuniform or locally refined. Here previous results are generalized to the variable coefficient case and thus become applicable for nonlinear problems. The implicit extrapolation multigrid algorithm converges to the solution of a higher order finite element system. This is obtained without explicitly constructing higher order stiffness matrices but by applying extrapolation in a natural form within the algorithm. The algorithm requires only a small change of a basic low order multigrid method.

Jung, M.; Ruede, U.

1996-01-01

78

Integral of exponent of a polynomial is a generalized hypergeometric function of the coefficients of the polynomial  

E-print Network

We show that the integral \\int e^{S(x_1,...,x_n)}dx_1...dx_n, for an arbitrary polynomial S, satisfies a generalized hypergeometric system of differential equations in the sense of I. M. Gelfand et al.

Alexander Stoyanovsky

2010-12-14

79

Digital-map grids of mean-annual precipitation for 1961-90, and generalized skew coefficients of annual maximum streamflow for Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This digital report contains two digital-map grids of data that were used to develop peak-flow regression equations in Tortorelli, 1997, 'Techniques for estimating peak-streamflow frequency for unregulated streams and streams regulated by small floodwater retarding structures in Oklahoma,' U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 97-4202. One data set is a grid of mean annual precipitation, in inches, based on the period 1961-90, for Oklahoma. The data set was derived from the PRISM (Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model) mean annual precipitation grid for the United States, developed by Daly, Neilson, and Phillips (1994, 'A statistical-topographic model for mapping climatological precipitation over mountainous terrain:' Journal of Applied Meteorology, v. 33, no. 2, p. 140-158). The second data set is a grid of generalized skew coefficients of logarithms of annual maximum streamflow for Oklahoma streams less than or equal to 2,510 square miles in drainage area. This grid of skew coefficients is taken from figure 11 of Tortorelli and Bergman, 1985, 'Techniques for estimating flood peak discharges for unregulated streams and streams regulated by small floodwater retarding structures in Oklahoma,' U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 84-4358. To save disk space, the skew coefficient values have been multiplied by 100 and rounded to integers with two significant digits. The data sets are provided in an ASCII grid format.

Rea, A.H.; Tortorelli, R.L.

1997-01-01

80

On a conjecture of A. Magnus concerning the asymptotic behavior of the recurrence coefficients of the generalized Jacobi polynomials  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1995 Magnus posed a conjecture about the asymptotics of the recurrence\\u000acoefficients of orthogonal polynomials with respect to the weights on [-1,1] of\\u000athe form\\u000a $$\\u000a (1-x)^\\\\alpha (1+x)^\\\\beta |x_0 - x|^\\\\gamma \\\\times a jump at x_0, $$ with\\u000a$\\\\alpha, \\\\beta, \\\\gamma>-1$ and $x_0 \\\\in (-1,1)$. We show rigorously that\\u000aMagnus' conjecture is correct even in a more general situation,

A. Foulquié Moreno; Andrei Martínez-Finkelshtein; V. L. Sousa

2010-01-01

81

Wave propagation is long chains of springs with negative stiffness elements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate dynamic stability, oscillations and wave propagation in a 1D chain of n (n>>1) linear oscillators (masses and springs connected in series) with viscous damping when some of the springs' stiffnesses can assume negative values. We assume that the ends of the chain are fixed. Such chains can model interaction of rotating non-spherical grains or particles in the cases when some of them produce the effect of apparent negative stiffness (this depends upon the shape factor and the magnitude of compression in the vicinity of the grain). It is shown that for such a system to be stable not more than one spring is allowed to have negative stiffness. Furthermore, the value of negative stiffness cannot exceed a certain critical value that depends upon the (positive) stiffness of other springs. At the critical value the system develops an eigenmode with vanishing frequency. In systems with small viscous damping vanishing of an eigenfrequency does not yet lead to instability. Further increase in the value of negative stiffness leads to the appearance of aperiodic eigenmodes with low and high damping. At the critical negative stiffness the low dissipative mode becomes non-dissipative, while for the high dissipative mode the damping coefficient becomes as twice as high as the damping coefficient of the system. We consider systems of larger dimensions with chains that are non-interacting. We determine the concentration of the negative stiffness springs at which the system maintains its dynamic stability.

Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena

2014-05-01

82

Lase Ultrasonic Web Stiffness tester  

SciTech Connect

The objective is to provide a sensor that uses non-contact, laser ultrasonics to measure the stiffness of paper during the manufacturing process. This will allow the manufacturer to adjust the production process in real time, increase filler content, modify fiber refining and as result produce a quality product using less energy. The sensor operates by moving back and forth across the paper web, at pre-selected locations firing a laser at the sheet, measuring the out-of-plane velocity of the sheet then using that measurement to calculate sheet stiffness.

Tim Patterson, Ph.D., IPST at Ga Tech

2009-01-12

83

Theory versus experiment for the rotordynamic coefficients of annular gas seals. Part 2: Constant clearance and convergent-tapered geometry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The leakage and rotordynamic coefficients of constant-clearance and convergent-tapered annular gas seals were measured in an experimental test facility. The results are presented along with the theoretically predicted values. Of particular interest is the prediction that optimally tapered seals have significantly larger direct siffness than straight seals. The experimental results verify this prediction. Generally the theory does quite well, but fails to predict the large increase in direct stiffness when the fluid is pre-rotated.

Nelson, C. C.; Childs, D. W.; Nicks, C.; Elrod, D.

1985-01-01

84

Arterial Stiffness and Cardiovascular Therapy  

PubMed Central

The world population is aging and the number of old people is continuously increasing. Arterial structure and function change with age, progressively leading to arterial stiffening. Arterial stiffness is best characterized by measurement of pulse wave velocity (PWV), which is its surrogate marker. It has been shown that PWV could improve cardiovascular event prediction in models that included standard risk factors. Consequently, it might therefore enable better identification of populations at high-risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The present review is focused on a survey of different pharmacological therapeutic options for decreasing arterial stiffness. The influence of several groups of drugs is described: antihypertensive drugs (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, calcium channel blockers, beta-blockers, diuretics, and nitrates), statins, peroral antidiabetics, advanced glycation end-products (AGE) cross-link breakers, anti-inflammatory drugs, endothelin-A receptor antagonists, and vasopeptidase inhibitors. All of these have shown some effect in decreasing arterial stiffness. Nevertheless, further studies are needed which should address the influence of arterial stiffness diminishment on major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE). PMID:25170513

Jani?, Miodrag; Lunder, Mojca; Šabovi?, Mišo

2014-01-01

85

The Association between Abdominal Visceral Fat and Carotid Stiffness Is Mediated by Circulating Inflammatory Markers in Uncomplicated Type 2 Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Central obesity, insulin resistance, inflammation, as well as vascularchangesarecommoninpatientswithtype2diabetes. In this study we assessed the relationship among stiffness of the carotid artery, visceral fat, and circulating inflammatory markers in type 2 diabetic subjects. Carotid stiffness, quan- tified as the distensibility coefficient (DC), was measured by ultrasound in asymptomatic, normotensive patients with un- complicated, well-controlled type 2 diabetes and in controls.

Michaela Diamant; Hildo J. Lamb; Marcel A. van de Ree; Edwin L. Endert; Ymte Groeneveld; Michiel L. Bots; Piet J. Kostense; Jasper K. Radder

86

Numerical Simulation of Callus Healing for Optimization of Fracture Fixation Stiffness  

PubMed Central

The stiffness of fracture fixation devices together with musculoskeletal loading defines the mechanical environment within a long bone fracture, and can be quantified by the interfragmentary movement. In vivo results suggested that this can have acceleratory or inhibitory influences, depending on direction and magnitude of motion, indicating that some complications in fracture treatment could be avoided by optimizing the fixation stiffness. However, general statements are difficult to make due to the limited number of experimental findings. The aim of this study was therefore to numerically investigate healing outcomes under various combinations of shear and axial fixation stiffness, and to detect the optimal configuration. A calibrated and established numerical model was used to predict fracture healing for numerous combinations of axial and shear fixation stiffness under physiological, superimposed, axial compressive and translational shear loading in sheep. Characteristic maps of healing outcome versus fixation stiffness (axial and shear) were created. The results suggest that delayed healing of 3 mm transversal fracture gaps will occur for highly flexible or very rigid axial fixation, which was corroborated by in vivo findings. The optimal fixation stiffness for ovine long bone fractures was predicted to be 1000–2500 N/mm in the axial and >300 N/mm in the shear direction. In summary, an optimized, moderate axial stiffness together with certain shear stiffness enhances fracture healing processes. The negative influence of one improper stiffness can be compensated by adjustment of the stiffness in the other direction. PMID:24991809

Steiner, Malte; Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita; Simon, Ulrich; Wehner, Tim

2014-01-01

87

Integrability aspects with optical solitons of a generalized variable-coefficient N-coupled higher order nonlinear Schroedinger system from inhomogeneous optical fibers  

SciTech Connect

For describing the long-distance communication and manufacturing problems of N fields propagation in inhomogeneous optical fibers, we consider a generalized variable-coefficient N-coupled nonlinear Schroedinger system with higher order effects such as the third-order dispersion, self-steepening and self-frequency shift. Using the Painleve singularity structure analysis, we obtain two cases for this system to admit the Painleve property. Then for case (1) we derive the optical dark solitons via solving the Hirota bilinear equations; and based on the obtained (2N+1)x(2N+1) Lax pair, we construct the Darboux transformation to obtain the optical bright solitons (including the multisoliton profiles) for case (2). Finally, the features of optical solitons (both dark and bright ones) in inhomogeneous optical fibers are analyzed and graphically discussed.

Lue Xing; Li Juan; Zhang Haiqiang; Xu Tao; Li Lili [School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box 49, Beijing 100876 (China); Tian Bo [School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box 49, Beijing 100876 (China); State Key Laboratory of Software Development Environment, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications (BUPT), Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box 128, Beijing 100876 (China)

2010-04-15

88

Conservation Assessment for Groundcedar and Stiff  

E-print Network

;EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Stiff clubmoss (Lycopodium annotinum L.) and groundcedar (Lycopodium complanatum L.; synonym = Diphasiastrum complanatum [L.] Holub.) (Lycopodiaceae) are circumboreal clubmoss species events and invasion by noxious weeds and other invasive plants. Key words: Lycopodium, stiff clubmoss

89

Response of initial field to stiffness perturbation  

E-print Network

Response of initial elastic field to stiffness perturbation and its possible application is investigated. Virtual thermal softening is used to produce the stiffness reduction for demonstration. It is interpreted that the redistribution of the initial strain will be developed by the non-uniform temperature elevation, as which leads to the non-uniform reduction of the material stiffness. Therefore, the initial filed is related to the stiffness perturbation and incremental field in a matrix form after eliminating the thermal expansion effect.

Chen-Wu Wu

2014-03-19

90

Two-stage complex Rosenbrock schemes for stiff systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New two-stage Rosenbrock schemes with complex coefficients are proposed for stiff systems of differential equations. The schemes are fourth-order accurate and satisfy enhanced stability requirements. A one-parameter family of L1-stable schemes with coefficients explicitly calculated by formulas involving only fractions and radicals is constructed. A single L2-stable scheme is found in this family. The coefficients of the fourth-order accurate L4-stable scheme previously obtained by P.D Shirkov are refined. Several fourth-order schemes are constructed that are high-order accurate for linear problems and possess the limiting order of L-decay. The schemes proposed are proved to converge. A symbolic computation algorithm is developed that constructs order conditions for multistage Rosenbrock schemes with complex coefficients. This algorithm is used to design the schemes proposed and to obtain fifth-order accurate conditions.

Al'Shin, A. B.; Al'Shina, E. A.; Limonov, A. G.

2009-02-01

91

Substrate Stiffness Regulates Filopodial Activities in Lung Cancer Cells  

PubMed Central

Microenvironment stiffening plays a crucial role in tumorigenesis. While filopodia are generally thought to be one of the cellular mechanosensors for probing environmental stiffness, the effects of environmental stiffness on filopodial activities of cancer cells remain unclear. In this work, we investigated the filopodial activities of human lung adenocarcinoma cells CL1-5 cultured on substrates of tunable stiffness using a novel platform. The platform consists of an optical system called structured illumination nano-profilometry, which allows time-lapsed visualization of filopodial activities without fluorescence labeling. The culturing substrates were composed of polyvinyl chloride mixed with an environmentally friendly plasticizer to yield Young's modulus ranging from 20 to 60 kPa. Cell viability studies showed that the viability of cells cultured on the substrates was similar to those cultured on commonly used elastomers such as polydimethylsiloxane. Time-lapsed live cell images were acquired and the filopodial activities in response to substrates with varying degrees of stiffness were analyzed. Statistical analyses revealed that lung cancer cells cultured on softer substrates appeared to have longer filopodia, higher filopodial densities with respect to the cellular perimeter, and slower filopodial retraction rates. Nonetheless, the temporal analysis of filopodial activities revealed that whether a filopodium decides to extend or retract is purely a stochastic process without dependency on substrate stiffness. The discrepancy of the filopodial activities between lung cancer cells cultured on substrates with different degrees of stiffness vanished when the myosin II activities were inhibited by treating the cells with blebbistatin, which suggests that the filopodial activities are closely modulated by the adhesion strength of the cells. Our data quantitatively relate filopodial activities of lung cancer cells with environmental stiffness and should shed light on the understanding and treatment of cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:24587021

Liou, Yu-Ren; Torng, Wen; Kao, Yu-Chiu; Sung, Kung-Bin; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Kuo, Po-Ling

2014-01-01

92

Zero Stiffness Tensegrity Structures M. Schenk a  

E-print Network

Zero Stiffness Tensegrity Structures M. Schenk a S.D. Guest b, J.L. Herder a aMechanical, Maritime members with a zero rest length allow the construction of tensegrity struc- tures that are in equilibrium interesting observations regarding zero stiffness tensegrity structures. Key words: zero stiffness, tensegrity

Guest, Simon

93

Simple Formulas and Results for Buckling-Resistance and Stiffness Design of Compression-Loaded Laminated-Composite Cylinders  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simple formulas for the buckling stress of homogeneous, specially orthotropic, laminated-composite cylinders are presented. The formulas are obtained by using nondimensional parameters and equations that facilitate general validation, and are validated against the exact solution for a wide range of cylinder geometries and laminate constructions. Results are presented that establish the ranges of the nondimensional parameters and coefficients used. General results, given in terms of the nondimensional parameters, are presented that encompass a wide range of geometries and laminate constructions. These general results also illustrate a wide spectrum of behavioral trends. Design-oriented results are also presented that provide a simple, clear indication of laminate composition on critical stress, critical strain, and axial stiffness. An example is provided to demonstrate the application of these results to thin-walled column designs.

Nemeth, Michael P.; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.

2009-01-01

94

Arterial stiffness: a brief review  

PubMed Central

Physical stiffening of the large arteries is the central paradigm of vascular aging. Indeed, stiffening in the larger central arterial system, such as the aortic tree, significantly contributes to cardiovascular diseases in older individuals and is positively associated with systolic hypertension, coronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure and atrial fibrillation, which are the leading causes of mortality in the developed countries and also in the developing world as estimated in 2010 by World Health Organizations. Thus, better, less invasive and more accurate measures of arterial stiffness have been developed, which prove useful as diagnostic indices, pathophysiological markers and predictive indicators of disease. This article presents a review of the structural determinants of vascular stiffening, its pathophysiologic determinants and its implications for vascular research and medicine. A critical discussion of new techniques for assessing vascular stiffness is also presented. PMID:20802505

Shirwany, Najeeb A; Zou, Ming-hui

2010-01-01

95

Stiffness matrix formulation for double row angular contact ball bearings: Analytical development and validation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Though double row angular contact ball bearings are widely used in industrial, automotive, and aircraft applications, the scientific literature on double row bearings is sparse. It is also shown that the stiffness matrices of two single row bearings may not be simply superposed to obtain the stiffness matrix of a double row bearing. To overcome the deficiency in the literature, a new, comprehensive, analytical approach is proposed based on the Hertzian theory for back-to-back, face-to-face, and tandem arrangements. The elements of the five-dimensional stiffness matrix for double row angular contact ball bearings are computed given either the mean bearing displacement or the mean load vector. The diagonal elements of the proposed stiffness matrix are verified with a commercial code for all arrangements under three loading scenarios. Some changes in stiffness coefficients are investigated by varying critical kinematic and geometric parameters to provide more insight. Finally, the calculated natural frequencies of a shaft-bearing experiment are successfully compared with measurements, thus validating the proposed stiffness formulation. For double row angular contact ball bearings, the moment stiffness and cross-coupling stiffness terms are significant, and the contact angle changes under loads. The proposed formulation is also valid for paired (duplex) bearings which behave as an integrated double row unit when the surrounding structural elements are sufficiently rigid.

Gunduz, Aydin; Singh, Rajendra

2013-10-01

96

STIFF: Converting Scientific FITS Images to TIFF  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

STIFF is a program that converts scientific FITS1 images to the more popular TIFF2 format for illustration purposes. Most FITS readers and converters do not do a proper job at converting FITS image data to 8 bits. 8-bit images stored in JPEG, PNG or TIFF files have the intensities implicitely stored in a non-linear way. Most current FITS image viewers and converters provide the user an incorrect translation of the FITS image content by simply rescaling linearly input pixel values. A first consequence is that the people working on astronomical images usually have to apply narrow intensity cuts or square-root or logarithmic intensity transformations to actually see something on their deep-sky images. A less obvious consequence is that colors obtained by combining images processed this way are not consistent across such a large range of surface brightnesses. Though with other software the user is generally afforded a choice of nonlinear transformations to apply in order to make the faint stuff stand out more clearly in the images, with the limited selection of choices provides, colors will not be accurately rendered, and some manual tweaking will be necessary. The purpose of STIFF is to produce beautiful pictures in an automatic and consistent way.

Bertin, Emmanuel

2011-10-01

97

Analysis and Design of Variable Stiffness Composite Cylinders  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation of the possible performance improvements of thin circular cylindrical shells through the use of the variable stiffness concept is presented. The variable stiffness concept implies that the stiffness parameters change spatially throughout the structure. This situation is achieved mainly through the use of curvilinear fibers within a fiber-reinforced composite laminate, though the possibility of thickness variations and discrete stiffening elements is also allowed. These three mechanisms are incorporated into the constitutive laws for thin shells through the use of Classical Lamination Theory. The existence of stiffness variation within the structure warrants a formulation of the static equilibrium equations from the most basic principles. The governing equations include sufficient detail to correctly model several types of nonlinearity, including the formation of a nonlinear shell boundary layer as well as the Brazier effect due to nonlinear bending of long cylinders. Stress analysis and initial buckling estimates are formulated for a general variable stiffness cylinder. Results and comparisons for several simplifications of these highly complex governing equations are presented so that the ensuing numerical solutions are considered reliable and efficient enough for in-depth optimization studies. Four distinct cases of loading and stiffness variation are chosen to investigate possible areas of improvement that the variable stiffness concept may offer over traditional constant stiffness and/or stiffened structures. The initial investigation deals with the simplest solution for cylindrical shells in which all quantities are constant around the circumference of the cylinder. This axisymmetric case includes a stiffness variation exclusively in the axial direction, and the only pertinent loading scenarios include constant loads of axial compression, pressure, and torsion. The results for these cases indicate that little improvement over traditional laminates exists through the use of curvilinear fibers, mainly due to the presence of a weak link area within the stiffness variation that limits the ultimate load that the structure can withstand. Rigorous optimization studies reveal that even though slight increases in the critical loads can be produced for designs with an arbitrary variation of the fiber orientation angle, the improvements are not significant when compared to traditional design techniques that utilize ring stiffeners and frames. The second problem that is studied involves arbitrary loading of a cylinder with a stiffness variation that changes only in the circumferential direction. The end effects of the cylinder are ignored, so that the problem takes the form of an analysis of a cross-section for a short cylinder segment. Various load cases including axial compression, pressure, torsion, bending, and transverse shear forces are investigated. It is found that the most significant improvements in load-carrying capability exist for cases which involve loads that also vary around the circumference of the shell, namely bending and shear forces. The stiffness variation of the optimal designs contribute to the increased performance in two ways: lowering the stresses in the critical areas through redistribution of the stresses; and providing a relatively stiff region that alters the buckling behavior of the structure. These results lead to an in-depth optimization study involving weight optimization of a fuselage structure subjected to typical design constraints. Comparisons of the curvilinear fiber format to traditional stiffened structures constructed of isotropic and composite materials are included. It is found that standard variable stiffness designs are quite comparable in terms of weight and load-carrying capability yet offer the added advantage of tailorability of distinct regions of the structure that experience drastically different loading conditions. The last two problems presented in this work involve the nonlinear phenomenon of long tubes under bending. Though this scenario is not as applic

Tatting, Brian F.; Guerdal, Zafer

1998-01-01

98

Parameter estimation for stiff deterministic dynamical systems via ensemble Kalman filter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A commonly encountered problem in numerous areas of applications is to estimate the unknown coefficients of a dynamical system from direct or indirect observations at discrete times of some of the components of the state vector. A related problem is to estimate unobserved components of the state. An egregious example of such a problem is provided by metabolic models, in which the numerous model parameters and the concentrations of the metabolites in tissue are to be estimated from concentration data in the blood. A popular method for addressing similar questions in stochastic and turbulent dynamics is the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), a particle-based filtering method that generalizes classical Kalman filtering. In this work, we adapt the EnKF algorithm for deterministic systems in which the numerical approximation error is interpreted as a stochastic drift with variance based on classical error estimates of numerical integrators. This approach, which is particularly suitable for stiff systems where the stiffness may depend on the parameters, allows us to effectively exploit the parallel nature of particle methods. Moreover, we demonstrate how spatial prior information about the state vector, which helps the stability of the computed solution, can be incorporated into the filter. The viability of the approach is shown by computed examples, including a metabolic system modeling an ischemic episode in skeletal muscle, with a high number of unknown parameters.

Arnold, Andrea; Calvetti, Daniela; Somersalo, Erkki

2014-10-01

99

Dynamic phototuning of 3D hydrogel stiffness.  

PubMed

Hydrogels are widely used as in vitro culture models to mimic 3D cellular microenvironments. The stiffness of the extracellular matrix is known to influence cell phenotype, inspiring work toward unraveling the role of stiffness on cell behavior using hydrogels. However, in many biological processes such as embryonic development, wound healing, and tumorigenesis, the microenvironment is highly dynamic, leading to changes in matrix stiffness over a broad range of timescales. To recapitulate dynamic microenvironments, a hydrogel with temporally tunable stiffness is needed. Here, we present a system in which alginate gel stiffness can be temporally modulated by light-triggered release of calcium or a chelator from liposomes. Others have shown softening via photodegradation or stiffening via secondary cross-linking; however, our system is capable of both dynamic stiffening and softening. Dynamic modulation of stiffness can be induced at least 14 d after gelation and can be spatially controlled to produce gradients and patterns. We use this system to investigate the regulation of fibroblast morphology by stiffness in both nondegradable gels and gels with degradable elements. Interestingly, stiffening inhibits fibroblast spreading through either mesenchymal or amoeboid migration modes. We demonstrate this technology can be translated in vivo by using deeply penetrating near-infrared light for transdermal stiffness modulation, enabling external control of gel stiffness. Temporal modulation of hydrogel stiffness is a powerful tool that will enable investigation of the role that dynamic microenvironments play in biological processes both in vitro and in well-controlled in vivo experiments. PMID:25646417

Stowers, Ryan S; Allen, Shane C; Suggs, Laura J

2015-02-17

100

Within- and between-day reliability of spinal stiffness measurements obtained using a computer controlled mechanical indenter in individuals with and without low back pain.  

PubMed

Instrumented spinal stiffness measurements have shown high test-retest reliability. However, factors that may affect reliability have yet to be investigated. The objective of this study was to compare the: 1) within- and between-day reliability of a mechanical indentation device (MID) in measuring spinal stiffness, 2) measurement precision of averaging multiple measurements, and 3) reliability of stiffness measurements between individuals with and without low back pain (LBP). The spinal stiffness of 26 volunteers with and without LBP was measured 3 times by MID in each of two visits 1-4 days apart. Two stiffness measures were calculated from the resulting force-displacement data: global stiffness and terminal stiffness. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to estimate reliability. Measurement precision was measured by minimal detectable changes, bias and 95% limits of agreement. Using the mean of three spinal stiffness measurements, the measurement precision was improved by 33.7% over a single measurement. Averaging three measurements, the within- and between-day reliability point estimates of both global and terminal stiffness were 0.99 and 0.98, respectively. The reliability estimates of spinal stiffness measurement using MID were not significantly altered by the participants' LBP status across all circumstances (95% confidence intervals overlapped). With our experimental protocol, averaging three spinal stiffness measurements using MID produces reliable stiffness measurements regardless of individuals' LBP status. PMID:23465962

Wong, Arnold Y L; Kawchuk, Greg; Parent, Eric; Prasad, Narasimha

2013-10-01

101

An experimental study on oil-film dynamic coefficients  

Microsoft Academic Search

The oil-film force of hydrodynamic bearing is often characterized by a set of linear stiffness and damping coefficients. This paper presents an experimental method to recognize these coefficients and establishes their characteristics under varieties of operating conditions. The fundamental test model is obtained from a Taylor series expansion of bearing reaction force. A delicate test rig is constructed and experimental

Hua Zhou; Sanxing Zhao; Hua Xu; Jun Zhu

2004-01-01

102

Leg stiffness measures depend on computational method.  

PubMed

Leg stiffness is often computed from ground reaction force (GRF) registrations of vertical hops to estimate the force-resisting capacity of the lower-extremity during ground contact, with leg stiffness values incorporated in a spring-mass model to describe human motion. Individual biomechanical characteristics, including leg stiffness, were investigated in 40 healthy males. Our aim is to report and discuss the use of 13 different computational methods for evaluating leg stiffness from a double-legged repetitive hopping task, using only GRF registrations. Four approximations for the velocity integration constant were combined with three mathematical expressions, giving 12 methods for computing stiffness using double integrations. One frequency-based method that considered ground contact times was also trialled. The 13 methods thus defined were used to compute stiffness in four extreme cases, which were the stiffest, and most compliant, consistent and variable subjects. All methods provided different stiffness measures for a given individual, but the between-method variations in stiffness were consistent across the four atypical subjects. The frequency-based method apparently overestimated the actual stiffness values, whereas double integrations' measures were more consistent. In double integrations, the choice of the integration constant and mathematical expression considerably affected stiffness values, as variations during hopping were more or less emphasized. Stating a zero centre of mass position at take-off gave more consistent results, and taking a weighted-average of the force or displacement curve was more forgiving to variations in performance. In any case, stiffness values should always be accompanied by a detailed description of their evaluation methods, as our results demonstrated that computational methods affect calculated stiffness. PMID:24188972

Hébert-Losier, Kim; Eriksson, Anders

2014-01-01

103

Arterial Stiffness and ?-Amyloid Progression in Nondemented Elderly Adults  

PubMed Central

IMPORTANCE Recent studies show that cerebral ?-amyloid (A?) deposition is associated with blood pressure and measures of arterial stiffness in nondemented individuals. OBJECTIVE To examine the association between measures of arterial stiffness and change in A? deposition over time. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Deposition of A? was determined in a longitudinal observational study of aging by positron emission tomography using the Pittsburgh compound B twice 2 years apart in 81 nondemented individuals 83 years and older. Arterial stiffness was measured with a noninvasive and automated waveform analyzer at the time closest to the second positron emission tomography scan. All measures were performed under standardized conditions. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured in the central (carotid-femoral and heart-femoral PWV), peripheral (femoral-ankle PWV), and mixed (brachial-ankle PWV) vascular beds. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The change in A? deposition over 2 years was calculated from the 81 individuals with repeat A?-positron emission tomography. RESULTS The proportion of A?-positive individuals increased from 48% at baseline to 75% at follow-up. Brachial-ankle PWV was significantly higher among A?-positive participants at baseline and follow-up. Femoral-ankle PWV was only higher among A?-positive participants at follow-up. Measures of central stiffness and blood pressure were not associated with A? status at baseline or follow-up, but central stiffness was associated with a change in A? deposition over time. Each standard deviation increase in central stiffness (carotid-femoral PWV, P = .001; heart-femoral PWV, P = .004) was linked with increases in A? deposition over 2 years. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE This study showed that A? deposition increases with age in nondemented individuals and that arterial stiffness is strongly associated with the progressive deposition of A? in the brain, especially in this age group. The association between A? deposition changes over time and generalized arterial stiffness indicated a relationship between the severity of subclinical vascular disease and progressive cerebral A? deposition. PMID:24687165

Hughes, Timothy M.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma J. M.; McDade, Eric M.; Klunk, William E.; Cohen, Ann D.; Mathis, Chester A.; DeKosky, Steven T.; Price, Julie C.; Lopez, Oscar L.

2014-01-01

104

Cerebellar ataxia impairs modulation of arm stiffness during postural maintenance.  

PubMed

Impedance control enables humans to effectively interact with their environment during postural and movement tasks, adjusting the mechanical behavior of their limbs to account for instability. Previous work has shown that people are able to selectively modulate the end-point stiffness of their arms, adjusting for varying directions of environmental disturbances. Behavioral studies also suggest that separate controllers are used for impedance modulation versus joint torque coordination. Here we tested whether people with cerebellar damage have deficits in impedance control. It is known that these individuals have poor motor coordination, which has typically been attributed to deficits in joint torque control. Subjects performed a static postural maintenance task with two different types of directional force perturbations. On average, patients with cerebellar ataxia modified stiffness differentially for the two perturbation conditions, although significantly less than age-matched control subjects. Thus cerebellar damage may impair the ability to modulate arm impedance. Surprisingly, the patients' intact ability to generally alter their limb stiffness during the postural task (albeit less than age-matched control subjects) improved their movement performance in a subsequent tracing task. The transfer of stiffness control from the static to the movement task may be a strategy that can be used by patients to compensate for their motor deficits. PMID:23843434

Gibo, Tricia L; Bastian, Amy J; Okamura, Allison M

2013-10-01

105

Cerebellar ataxia impairs modulation of arm stiffness during postural maintenance  

PubMed Central

Impedance control enables humans to effectively interact with their environment during postural and movement tasks, adjusting the mechanical behavior of their limbs to account for instability. Previous work has shown that people are able to selectively modulate the end-point stiffness of their arms, adjusting for varying directions of environmental disturbances. Behavioral studies also suggest that separate controllers are used for impedance modulation versus joint torque coordination. Here we tested whether people with cerebellar damage have deficits in impedance control. It is known that these individuals have poor motor coordination, which has typically been attributed to deficits in joint torque control. Subjects performed a static postural maintenance task with two different types of directional force perturbations. On average, patients with cerebellar ataxia modified stiffness differentially for the two perturbation conditions, although significantly less than age-matched control subjects. Thus cerebellar damage may impair the ability to modulate arm impedance. Surprisingly, the patients' intact ability to generally alter their limb stiffness during the postural task (albeit less than age-matched control subjects) improved their movement performance in a subsequent tracing task. The transfer of stiffness control from the static to the movement task may be a strategy that can be used by patients to compensate for their motor deficits. PMID:23843434

Gibo, Tricia L.; Bastian, Amy J.

2013-01-01

106

Arthroscopic Treatment of Stiff Elbow  

PubMed Central

Contracture of the elbow represents a disabling condition that can impair a person's quality of life. Regardless of the event that causes an elbow contracture, the conservative or surgical treatment is usually considered technically difficult and associated with complications. When the conservative treatment fails to restore an acceptable range of motion in the elbow, open techniques have been shown to be successful options. More recently the use of arthroscopy has become more popular for several reasons. These reasons include better visualization of intra-articular structures, less tissue trauma from open incisions, and potentially the ability to begin early postoperative motion. The purpose of this paper is to review the indications, complications, and results of arthroscopic management of a stiff elbow. PMID:22084755

Blonna, Davide; Bellato, Enrico; Marini, Eleonora; Scelsi, Michele; Castoldi, Filippo

2011-01-01

107

Feasibility of simultaneous temperature and tissue stiffness detection by MRE.  

PubMed

Temperature and tissue stiffness are two indices that can be used to monitor MRI-guided focused ultrasound thermal therapy. It would be beneficial to have both measures available to monitor treatment progression during thermal therapy. MR Elastography (MRE) has already been shown to provide tissue stiffness information; the purpose of this work is to demonstrate how temperature can be derived from the same MRE data acquisition. MRE data were acquired from 1.5% agarose phantoms and ex vivo porcine muscle tissue (from a grocery store) while they were heated slowly. The temperatures were measured using a fluorescent thermometer. The phase average from the MRE acquisition was used to calculate the phase shift induced by the proton resonance frequency shift associated with the temperature change. The results show that the phase shift due to temperature extracted from MRE data correlate well with the temperature change recorded by thermometer, yielding a temperature coefficient of -0.0096 ppm/ degrees C for the agarose phantom, and -0.0103 ppm/ degrees C for the ex vivo porcine tissue. These results indicate that it is possible to simultaneously measure both temperature and tissue shear stiffness using a new method of MRE data reconstruction. PMID:16463357

Le, Yuan; Glaser, Kevin; Rouviere, Olivier; Ehman, Richard; Felmlee, Joel P

2006-03-01

108

Spontaneous wrinkle branching by gradient stiffness.  

PubMed

The concept of coherency loss is proposed to understand wrinkle branching as a pathway toward hierarchical wrinkling pattern formation in a compressed film-substrate system with gradient stiffness of the film or substrate. A simple model indicates that the wrinkle branching arises when the characteristic length of the stiffness inhomogeneity zone is larger than the coherency persistent length, which depends on the amplitude of the stiffness inhomogeneity. Numerical simulations of nonlinear wrinkles based on the model of the Föppl-von Kármán plate on compliant substrates show how regulating the size and amplitude of the stiffness inhomogeneities results in branched wrinkles in striking agreement with the existing observations. The paper reveals the origin of such kinds of branched wrinkles and may provide a guideline for controllable hierarchical wrinkles by patterning the stiffness gradient. PMID:23030926

Ni, Yong; Yang, Dong; He, Linghui

2012-09-01

109

Rolling Element Bearing Stiffness Matrix Determination (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Current theoretical bearing models differ in their stiffness estimates because of different model assumptions. In this study, a finite element/contact mechanics model is developed for rolling element bearings with the focus of obtaining accurate bearing stiffness for a wide range of bearing types and parameters. A combined surface integral and finite element method is used to solve for the contact mechanics between the rolling elements and races. This model captures the time-dependent characteristics of the bearing contact due to the orbital motion of the rolling elements. A numerical method is developed to determine the full bearing stiffness matrix corresponding to two radial, one axial, and two angular coordinates; the rotation about the shaft axis is free by design. This proposed stiffness determination method is validated against experiments in the literature and compared to existing analytical models and widely used advanced computational methods. The fully-populated stiffness matrix demonstrates the coupling between bearing radial, axial, and tilting bearing deflections.

Guo, Y.; Parker, R.

2014-01-01

110

The Difference between Stiffness and Quasi-stiffness in the Context of Biomechanical Modeling  

PubMed Central

The ankle contributes the majority of mechanical power during walking and is a frequently studied joint in biomechanics. Specifically, researchers have extensively investigated the torque-angle relationship for the ankle during dynamic tasks, such as walking and running. The slope of this relationship has been termed the “quasi-stiffness.” However, over time, researchers have begun to interchange the concepts of quasi-stiffness and stiffness. This is an especially important distinction as researchers currently begin to investigate the appropriate control systems for recently developed powered prosthetic legs. The quasi-stiffness and stiffness are distinct concepts in the context of powered joints, and are equivalent in the context of passive joints. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the difference between the stiffness and quasi-stiffness using a simple impedance controlled inverted pendulum model and a more sophisticated biped walking model, each with the ability to modify the trajectory of an impedance controller’s equilibrium angle position. In both cases, stiffness values are specified by the controller and the quasi-stiffness are shown during a single step. Both models have widely varying quasi-stiffness but each have a single stiffness value. Therefore, from this simple modeling approach, the differences and similarities between these two concepts are elucidated. PMID:23212310

Rouse, Elliott J.; Gregg, Robert D.; Hargrove, Levi J.; Sensinger, Jonathon W.

2014-01-01

111

Rotordynamic coefficients for stepped annular gas seals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Governing equations for the flow through high-pressure annular step seals typical of floating ring seals employed in aircraft gas turbines are identified. These equations are based on a fully developed bulk-flow model using Moody's friction factor equation, and two empirical loss coefficient expressions. All terms in the governing equations (including circumferential velocity, convective acceleration, and shear dissipation) are retained, and a perturbation/numerical integration solution technique is developed to solve these equations. The analysis procedure is then applied to three different stepped seal configurations. In each case, the stepped seals leaked more than corresponding straight seals. The stepped seals also have smaller whirl stability ratios, thus reducing the destabilizing effect on forward whirling rotors. However, the effect of a step on the direct stiffness coefficient was mixed. For two of the configurations, the introduction of a step always increased direct stiffness. But in the third case, a small step resulted in decreasing direct stiffness from a positive value to a negative value. As step height increased further, the stiffness again became positive.

Nelson, Clayton C.; Dunn, Mark S.; Scharrer, Joseph K.

112

Wave propagation of myocardial stretch: correlation with myocardial stiffness.  

PubMed

The mechanism of flow propagation during diastole in the left ventricle (LV) has been well described. Little is known about the associated waves propagating along the heart walls. These waves may have a mechanism similar to pulse wave propagation in arteries. The major goal of the study was to evaluate the effect of myocardial stiffness and preload on this wave transmission. Longitudinal late diastolic deformation and wave speed (Vp) of myocardial stretch in the anterior LV wall were measured using sonomicrometry in 16 pigs. Animals with normal and altered myocardial stiffness (acute myocardial infarction) were studied with and without preload alterations. Elastic modulus estimated from Vp (E VP; Moens-Korteweg equation) was compared to incremental elastic modulus obtained from exponential end-diastolic stress-strain relation (E SS). Myocardial distensibility and ?- and ?-coefficients of stress-strain relations were calculated. Vp was higher at reperfusion compared to baseline (2.6 ± 1.3 vs. 1.3 ± 0.4 m/s; p = 0.005) and best correlated with E SS (r2 = 0.80, p < 0.0001), ?-coefficient (r2 = 0.78, p < 0.0001), distensibility (r2 = 0.47, p = 0.005), and wall thickness/diameter ratio (r2 = 0.42, p = 0.009). Elastic moduli (E VP and E SS) were strongly correlated (r2 = 0.83, p < 0.0001). Increasing preload increased Vp and E VP and decreased distensibility. At multivariate analysis, E SS, wall thickness, and end-diastolic and systolic LV pressures were independent predictors of Vp (r2 model = 0.83, p < 0.0001). In conclusion, the main determinants of wave propagation of longitudinal myocardial stretch were myocardial stiffness and LV geometry and pressure. This local wave speed could potentially be measured noninvasively by echocardiography. PMID:25193091

Pislaru, Cristina; Pellikka, Patricia A; Pislaru, Sorin V

2014-11-01

113

Measuring the Characteristic Topography of Brain Stiffness with Magnetic Resonance Elastography  

PubMed Central

Purpose To develop a reliable magnetic resonance elastography (MRE)-based method for measuring regional brain stiffness. Methods First, simulation studies were used to demonstrate how stiffness measurements can be biased by changes in brain morphometry, such as those due to atrophy. Adaptive postprocessing methods were created that significantly reduce the spatial extent of edge artifacts and eliminate atrophy-related bias. Second, a pipeline for regional brain stiffness measurement was developed and evaluated for test-retest reliability in 10 healthy control subjects. Results This technique indicates high test-retest repeatability with a typical coefficient of variation of less than 1% for global brain stiffness and less than 2% for the lobes of the brain and the cerebellum. Furthermore, this study reveals that the brain possesses a characteristic topography of mechanical properties, and also that lobar stiffness measurements tend to correlate with one another within an individual. Conclusion The methods presented in this work are resistant to noise- and edge-related biases that are common in the field of brain MRE, demonstrate high test-retest reliability, and provide independent regional stiffness measurements. This pipeline will allow future investigations to measure changes to the brain’s mechanical properties and how they relate to the characteristic topographies that are typical of many neurologic diseases. PMID:24312570

Murphy, Matthew C.; Huston, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Glaser, Kevin J.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Chen, Jun; Manduca, Armando; Felmlee, Joel P.; Ehman, Richard L.

2013-01-01

114

Tectorial membrane. II: Stiffness measurements in vivo.  

PubMed

The tectorial membrane is assumed to play a crucial role in the stimulation of the cochlear hair cells and was thought for decades to serve as a stiff anchor for the tips of the hair-cell stereocilia, particularly those belonging to the OHCs. Yet, its stiffness has never been measured under conditions approximating its normal environment in live animals. We have developed a method for doing this. The tectorial membrane is approached through the lateral wall of scala media. The bony cochlear capsule is removed along scala media over somewhat less than 1/4 turn, and the underlying spiral ligament and stria vascularis are carefully reflected. With the help of a three axial hydraulic manipulator, a flexible micropipette filled with isotonic KCl is inserted into the tectorial membrane at one of two different angles and moved either transversally, away from the basilar membrane, or radially, toward or away from the modiolus. This causes the tectorial membrane to be deformed and the micropipette to bend. The micropipette stiffness is calibrated on an instrument of a new kind, so as to convert the bend into force. The calibration allows us to determine the point stiffness of the tectorial membrane from the amount of micropipette bend. The stiffness of the tectorial membrane per unit length has been calculated from the point stiffness with the help of the deformation pattern. Transversal and radial stiffness magnitudes have been determined in the second cochlear turn in Mongolian gerbils. Both are smaller by almost an order of magnitude than the corresponding aggregate stiffness of the OHC stereocilia. As a consequence, the tectorial membrane cannot act as a stiff anchor for the stereocilia but only as a mass load, except at relatively low sound frequencies where mass effects are negligible. This means that the classical model of shear motion between the tectorial membrane and the reticular lamina must be replaced. PMID:2606804

Zwislocki, J J; Cefaratti, L K

1989-11-01

115

Stiffness and Confinement Ratios of SMA Wire Jackets for Confining Concrete  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article discusses the effects of the stiffness and confinement ratios of shape memory alloy (SMA) wire jackets on the behavior of confined concrete. SMA wire jackets are an effective confining material to improve concrete behavior; for example, by increasing peak strength and failure strain. The stiffness and confinement ratios of fiber-reinforced polymer jackets have been extensively discussed and their effects are well known. However, assessment of the stiffness and confinement ratios of SMA wire jackets has not previously been conducted. In this study, we investigate the effects of the stiffness and confinement ratios of steel jackets, and then compare the results with those of SMA wire jackets. In general, the stiffness ratios of SMA wire jackets are relatively smaller than those of steel jackets, and most of them have lower stiffness ratios because the Young's moduli of the SMAs are relatively small. The active confining pressure of the SMA wires does not improve the lower stiffness-ratio effect since the amount of active confining pressure is not sufficiently large.

Choi, Eunsoo; Kim, Dong Joo; Youn, Heejung

2014-07-01

116

Semiparametric Estimation of Index Coefficients  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper gives a solution to the problem of estimating coefficients of index models, through the estimation of the density-weighted average derivative of a general regression function. A normalized version of the density-weighted average derivative can be estimated by certain linear instrumental variables coefficients. The estimators, based on sample analogies of the product moment representation of the average derivative, are

James L. Powell; James H. Stock; Thomas M. Stoker

1989-01-01

117

Calculation of the lateral control of swept and unswept flexible wings of arbitrary stiffness  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method similar to that of NACA rep. 1000 is presented for calculating the effectiveness and the reversal speed of lateral-control devices on swept and unswept wings of arbitrary stiffness. Provision is made for using either stiffness curves and root-rotation constants or structural influence coefficients in the analysis. Computing forms and an illustrative example are included to facilitate calculations by means of the method. The effectiveness of conventional aileron configurations and the margin against aileron reversal are shown to be relatively low for swept wings at all speeds and for all wing plan forms at supersonic speeds.

Diederich, Franklin W

1951-01-01

118

Macroscopic Stiffness of Breast Tumors Predicts Metastasis  

PubMed Central

Mechanical properties of tumors differ substantially from normal cells and tissues. Changes in stiffness or elasticity regulate pro-metastatic behaviors of cancer cells, but effects have been documented predominantly in isolated cells or in vitro cell culture systems. To directly link relative stiffness of tumors to cancer progression, we combined a mouse model of metastatic breast cancer with ex vivo measurements of bulk moduli of freshly excised, intact tumors. We found a high, inverse correlation between bulk modulus of resected tumors and subsequent local recurrence and metastasis. More compliant tumors were associated with more frequent, larger local recurrences and more extensive metastases than mice with relatively stiff tumors. We found that collagen content of resected tumors correlated with bulk modulus values. These data establish that relative differences in tumor stiffness correspond with tumor progression and metastasis, supporting further testing and development of tumor compliance as a prognostic biomarker in breast cancer. PMID:24981707

Fenner, Joseph; Stacer, Amanda C.; Winterroth, Frank; Johnson, Timothy D.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

2014-01-01

119

Determination of ball bearing dynamic stiffness  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The dynamic radial stiffness characteristics of rolling element bearings are currently determined by analytical methods that have not been experimentally verified. These bearing data are vital to rotating machinery design integrity because accurate critical speeds and rotor stability predictions are highly dependent on the bearing stiffness. A tester was designed capable of controlling the bearing axial preload, speed, and rotor unbalance. The rotor and support structures were constructed to permit critical speeds that are predominantly determined by a 57 mm test bearing. A curve of calculated critical speed versus stiffness was used to determine the actual bearing stiffness from the empirical data. The results of extensive testing are used to verify analytical predictions, increase confidence in existing bearing computer programs, and to serve as a data base for efforts to correct these programs.

Beatty, R. F.; Rowan, B. F.

1982-01-01

120

Programmable variable stiffness 2D surface design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Variable stiffness features can contribute to many engineering applications ranging from robotic joints to shock and vibration mitigation. In addition, variable stiffness can be used in the tactile feedback to provide the sense of touch to the user. A key component in the proposed device is the Biased Magnetorheological Elastomer (B-MRE) where iron particles within the elastomer compound develop a dipole interaction energy. A novel feature of this device is to introduce a field induced shear modulus bias via a permanent magnet which provides an offset with a current input to the electromagnetic control coil to change the compliance or modulus of a base elastomer in both directions (softer or harder). The B-MRE units can lead to the design of a variable stiffness surface. In this preliminary work, both computational and experimental results of the B-MRE are presented along with a preliminary design of the programmable variable stiffness surface design.

Trabia, Sarah; Hwang, Taeseon; Yim, Woosoon

2014-03-01

121

Exercise, Vascular Stiffness, and Tissue Transglutaminase  

PubMed Central

Background Vascular aging is closely associated with increased vascular stiffness. It has recently been demonstrated that decreased nitric oxide (NO)?induced S?nitrosylation of tissue transglutaminase (TG2) contributes to age?related vascular stiffness. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that exercise restores NO signaling and attenuates vascular stiffness by decreasing TG2 activity and cross?linking in an aging rat model. Methods and Results Rats were subjected to 12 weeks of moderate aerobic exercise. Aging was associated with diminished phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase and phosphorylated vasodilator?stimulated phosphoprotein abundance, suggesting reduced NO signaling. TG2 cross?linking activity was significantly increased in old animals, whereas TG2 abundance remained unchanged. These alterations were attenuated in the exercise cohort. Simultaneous measurement of blood pressure and pulse wave velocity (PWV) demonstrated increased aortic stiffness in old rats, compared to young, at all values of mean arterial pressure (MAP). The PWV?MAP correlation in the old sedentary and old exercise cohorts was similar. Tensile testing of the vessels showed increased stiffness of the aorta in the old phenotype with a modest restoration of mechanical properties toward the young phenotype with exercise. Conclusions Increased vascular stiffness during aging is associated with decreased TG2 S?nitrosylation, increased TG2 cross?linking activity, and increased vascular stiffness likely the result of decreased NO bioavailability. In this study, a brief period of moderate aerobic exercise enhanced NO signaling, attenuated TG cross?linking activity, and reduced ex vivo tensile properties, but failed to reverse functional vascular stiffness in vivo, as measured by PWV. PMID:24721796

Steppan, Jochen; Sikka, Gautam; Jandu, Simran; Barodka, Viachaslau; Halushka, Marc K.; Flavahan, Nicholas A.; Belkin, Alexey M.; Nyhan, Daniel; Butlin, Mark; Avolio, Alberto; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Santhanam, Lakshmi

2014-01-01

122

OroSTIFF: Face-referenced measurement of perioral stiffness in health and disease  

PubMed Central

A new device and automated measurement technology known as OroSTIFF is described to characterize non-participatory perioral stiffness in healthy adults for eventual application to patients with orofacial movement disorders associated with neuromotor disease, traumatic injury, or congenital clefts of the upper lip. Previous studies of perioral biomechanics required head stabilization for extended periods of time during measurement which precluded sampling patients with involuntary body/head movements (dyskinesias), or pediatric subjects. The OroSTIFF device is face-referenced and avoids the complications associated with head-restraint. Supporting data of non-participatory perioral tissue stiffness using OroSTIFF are included from 10 male and 10 female healthy subjects. The OroSTIFF device incorporates a pneumatic glass air cylinder actuator instrumented for pressure, and an integrated subminiature displacement sensor to encode lip aperture. Perioral electromyograms were simultaneously sampled to confirm passive muscle state for the superior and inferior divisions of the orbicularis oris muscles. Perioral stiffness, derived as a quotient from resultant force (?F) and interangle span (?X), was modeled with multilevel regression techniques. Real-time calculation of the perioral stiffness function demonstrated a significant quadratic relation between imposed interangle stretch and resultant force. This stiffness growth function also differed significantly between males and females. This study demonstrates the OroSTIFF ‘proof-of-concept’ for cost-effective non-invasive stimulus generation and derivation of perioral stiffness in a group of healthy unrestrained adults, and a case study to illustrate the dose-dependent effects of Levodopa on perioral stiffness in an individual with advanced Parkinson’s disease who exhibited marked dyskinesia and rigidity. PMID:20185131

Chu, Shin-Ying; Kieweg, Douglas; Lee, Jaehoon

2010-01-01

123

Stiffness transition in anisotropic fiber nets.  

PubMed

We demonstrate the existence of a percolationlike stiffness transition in fiber networks with a bidisperse orientation distribution and with fiber densities clearly above the geometrical and the ordinary stiffness transition. The fibers are oriented parallel and perpendicular to a strain direction and they have a large fiber aspect ratio. The stiffness K of the fiber nets can be described by a scaling relation, K [proportionally] ?(?) g[(? - ?(c))/?(-?)], where ? is the fraction of fibers parallel to strain. g is a scaling function that is roughly described by a power law g(x) [proportionally ] x(?) for stiffness above the transition and by a constant below the transition. The transition point is characterized by qualitative changes in the distribution of the elastic deformation energy of the fibers, the deformation mode of the fibers, the effective Poisson ratio of the nets, the distribution of elastic energy on fibers and cross links, and the ratio of elastic and viscous dissipation energy. This transition opens the possibility of extreme stiffness variations with minimal mesh manipulations in the vicinity of the transition (i.e., a stiffness gate). It is possible that this transition affects the mechanical behavior of the cytoskeleton in cells. PMID:23005800

Åström, J A; Sunil Kumar, P B; Karttunen, Mikko

2012-08-01

124

Arterial stiffness is increased in asthmatic children.  

PubMed

Altered arterial stiffness is a recognized risk factor of poor cardiovascular health. Chronic inflammation may increase arterial stiffness. We tested whether arterial stiffness is increased children with asthma, a chronic disease characterized by fluctuating airway and systemic inflammation. Arterial stiffness, expressed as carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWVcf), was measured in 37 mild-to-moderate asthmatic children: 11 girls, median (range) age 11.1 years (6-15). PWVcf in asthma was compared to PWVcf in 65 healthy controls matched for age, height, and gender previously studied in Germany and was correlated with airway inflammation and obstruction. PWVcf was higher in asthmatic children compared to controls: PWVcf median (interquartile range) was 4.7 m/s (4.5-4.9) vs. 4.3 m/s (4.1-4.7), p?stiffness is increased in children with mild-to-moderate asthma. The association between impaired lung function and increased arterial stiffness suggests that severity of disease translates into detrimental effects on the cardiovascular system. PMID:25248341

Steinmann, Markus; Abbas, Chiara; Singer, Florian; Casaulta, Carmen; Regamey, Nicolas; Haffner, Dieter; Fischer, Dagmar-Christiane; Simonetti, Giacomo D

2014-09-25

125

Conformational Analysis of Stiff Chiral Polymers with End-Constraints  

PubMed Central

We present a Lie-group-theoretic method for the kinematic and dynamic analysis of chiral semi-flexible polymers with end constraints. The first is to determine the minimum energy conformations of semi-flexible polymers with end constraints, and the second is to perform normal mode analysis based on the determined minimum energy conformations. In this paper, we use concepts from the theory of Lie groups and principles of variational calculus to model such polymers as inextensible or extensible chiral elastic rods with coupling between twisting and bending stiffnesses, and/or between twisting and extension stiffnesses. This method is general enough to include any stiffness and chirality parameters in the context of elastic filament models with the quadratic elastic potential energy function. As an application of this formulation, the analysis of DNA conformations is discussed. We demonstrate our method with examples of DNA conformations in which topological properties such as writhe, twist, and linking number are calculated from the results of the proposed method. Given these minimum energy conformations, we describe how to perform the normal mode analysis. The results presented here build both on recent experimental work in which DNA mechanical properties have been measured, and theoretical work in which the mechanics of non-chiral elastic rods has been studied. PMID:20198114

Kim, Jin Seob; Chirikjian, Gregory S.

2010-01-01

126

Design of a variable-stiffness robotic hand using pneumatic soft rubber actuators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years, Japanese society has been ageing, engendering a labor shortage of young workers. Robots are therefore expected to be useful in performing tasks such as day-to-day support for elderly people. In particular, robots that are intended for use in the field of medical care and welfare are expected to be safe when operating in a human environment because they often come into contact with people. Furthermore, robots must perform various tasks such as regrasping, grasping of soft objects, and tasks using frictional force. Given these demands and circumstances, a tendon-driven robot hand with a stiffness changing finger has been developed. The finger surface stiffness can be altered by adjusting the input pressure depending on the task. Additionally, the coefficient of static friction can be altered by changing the surface stiffness merely by adjusting the input air pressure. This report describes the basic structure, driving mechanism, and basic properties of the proposed robot hand.

Nagase, Jun-ya; Wakimoto, Shuichi; Satoh, Toshiyuki; Saga, Norihiko; Suzumori, Koichi

2011-10-01

127

A parameter optimization method to determine ski stiffness properties from ski deformation data.  

PubMed

The deformation of skis and the contact pressure between skis and snow are crucial factors for carved turns in alpine skiing. The purpose of the current study was to develop and to evaluate an optimization method to determine the bending and torsional stiffness that lead to a given bending and torsional deflection of the ski. Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and classical torsion theory were applied to model the deformation of the ski. Bending and torsional stiffness were approximated as linear combinations of B-splines. To compute the unknown coefficients, a parameter optimization problem was formulated and successfully solved by multiple shooting and least squares data fitting. The proposed optimization method was evaluated based on ski stiffness data and ski deformation data taken from a recently published simulation study. The ski deformation data were used as input data to the optimization method. The optimization method was capable of successfully reproducing the shape of the original bending and torsional stiffness data of the ski with a root mean square error below 1 N m2. In conclusion, the proposed computational method offers the possibility to calculate ski stiffness properties with respect to a given ski deformation. PMID:21451186

Heinrich, Dieter; Mössner, Martin; Kaps, Peter; Nachbauer, Werner

2011-02-01

128

Damping properties of stay cable-passive damper system with effects of cable sag and damper stiffness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The present paper derivate the asymptotic solution of modal damping of one taut stay cable attached with one passive damper including damper stiffness and viscous damping. The effect of the damper stiffness on the modal damping of the stay cable-passive system was analytical investigated. On the basis of the asymptotic solution of modal damping of one stay cable attached with one passive damper with the effect of cable stiffness and by using the decay factor of damper stiffness and the decay factor of cable sag, maximum modal damping ratio and corresponding optimal damping coefficient, which indicates the relationships of the characteristics of the damper and the cable sag was theoretically analyzed. Numerical analysis of parameters on the effect of dynamic performance of the controlled stay cable was conducted.

Liu, Min; Zhang, Guangqiao

2013-04-01

129

Stiffness and strength of hierarchical polycrystalline materials with imperfect interfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study we investigate the effect of imperfect (not perfectly bonded) interfaces on the stiffness and strength of hierarchical polycrystalline materials. As a case study we consider a honeycomb cellular polycrystal used for drilling and cutting tools. The conclusions of the analysis are, however, general and applicable to any material with structural hierarchy. Regarding the stiffness, generalized expressions for the Voigt and Reuss estimates of the bounds to the effective elastic modulus of heterogeneous materials are derived. The generalizations regard two aspects that are not included in the standard Reuss and Voigt estimates. The first novelty consists in considering finite thickness interfaces between the constituents undergoing damage up to final debonding. The second generalization consists of interfaces not perpendicular or parallel to the loading direction, i.e., when isostress or isostrain conditions are not satisfied. In this case, approximate expressions for the effective elastic modulus are obtained by performing a computational homogenization approach. In the second part of the paper, the homogenized response of a representative volume element (RVE) of the honeycomb cellular polycrystalline material with one or two levels of hierarchy is numerically investigated. This is put forward by using the cohesive zone model (CZM) for finite thickness interfaces recently proposed by the authors and implemented in the finite element program FEAP. From tensile tests we find that the interface nonlinearity significantly contributes to the deformability of the material. Increasing the number of hierarchical levels, the deformability increases. The RVE is tested in two different directions and, due to different orientations of the interfaces and Mixed Mode deformation, anisotropy in stiffness and strength is observed. Stiffness anisotropy is amplified by increasing the number of hierarchical levels. Finally, the interaction between interfaces at different hierarchical levels is numerically characterized. A condition for scale separation, which corresponds to the independence of the material tensile strength from the properties of the interfaces in the second level, is established. When this condition is fulfilled, the material microstructure at the second level can be efficiently replaced by an effective homogeneous continuum with a homogenized stress-strain response. From the engineering point of view, the proposed criterion of scale separation suggests how to design the optimal microstructure of a hierarchical level to maximize the material tensile strength. An interpretation of this phenomenon according to the concept of flaw tolerance is finally presented.

Paggi, Marco; Wriggers, Peter

2012-04-01

130

Nanoscale Directional Motion towards Regions of Stiffness.  

PubMed

How to induce nanoscale directional motion via some intrinsic mechanisms pertaining to a nanosystem remains a challenge in nanotechnology. Here we show via molecular dynamics simulations that there exists a fundamental driving force for a nanoscale object to move from a region of lower stiffness toward one of higher stiffness on a substrate. Such nanoscale directional motion is induced by the difference in effective van der Waals potential energy due to the variation in stiffness of the substrate; i.e., all other conditions being equal, a nanoscale object on a stiffer substrate has lower van der Waals potential energy. This fundamental law of nanoscale directional motion could lead to promising routes for nanoscale actuation and energy conversion. PMID:25615480

Chang, Tienchong; Zhang, Hongwei; Guo, Zhengrong; Guo, Xingming; Gao, Huajian

2015-01-01

131

Nanoscale Directional Motion towards Regions of Stiffness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

How to induce nanoscale directional motion via some intrinsic mechanisms pertaining to a nanosystem remains a challenge in nanotechnology. Here we show via molecular dynamics simulations that there exists a fundamental driving force for a nanoscale object to move from a region of lower stiffness toward one of higher stiffness on a substrate. Such nanoscale directional motion is induced by the difference in effective van der Waals potential energy due to the variation in stiffness of the substrate; i.e., all other conditions being equal, a nanoscale object on a stiffer substrate has lower van der Waals potential energy. This fundamental law of nanoscale directional motion could lead to promising routes for nanoscale actuation and energy conversion.

Chang, Tienchong; Zhang, Hongwei; Guo, Zhengrong; Guo, Xingming; Gao, Huajian

2015-01-01

132

A novel magnetorheological elastomer isolator with negative changing stiffness for vibration reduction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magneto-rheological elastomers (MREs) have attracted notable credits in the development of smart isolators and absorbers due to their controllable stiffness and damping properties. For the purpose of mitigating unwanted structural and/or machinery vibrations, the traditional MRE-based isolators have been generally proven effective because the MR effect can increase the stiffness when the magnetic field is strengthened. This study presents a novel MRE isolator that experienced reduced stiffness when the applied current was increased. This innovative work was accomplished by applying a hybrid magnet (electromagnet and permanent magnets) onto a multilayered MRE structure. To characterise this negative changing stiffness concept, a multilayered MRE isolator with a hybrid magnet was first designed, fabricated and then tested to measure its properties. An obvious reduction of the effective stiffness and natural frequency of the proposed MRE isolator occurred when the current was continuously adjusted. This device could also work as a conventional MRE isolator as its effective stiffness and natural frequency also increased when a negative current was applied. Further testing was carried out on a one-degree-of-freedom system to assess how effectively this device could isolate vibration. In this experiment, two cases were considered; in each case, the vibration of the primary system was obviously attenuated under ON-OFF control logic, thus demonstrating the feasibility of this novel design as an alternative adaptive vibration isolator.

Yang, J.; Sun, S. S.; Du, H.; Li, W. H.; Alici, G.; Deng, H. X.

2014-10-01

133

Arterial Stiffness, Pulse Pressure, and the Kidney.  

PubMed

Classical studies indicate that the contribution of kidneys to hypertension is almost exclusively related to the association between mean arterial pressure (MAP) and vascular resistance. Recent reports including estimates of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) have shown that pulse pressure (PP) and pulse wave velocity, 2 major indices of arterial stiffness, now emerge as significant predictors of cardiovascular risk and age-associated decline in GFR. Such findings are mainly observed in patients with hypertension and renal failure and in atherosclerotic subjects undergoing coronary angiography. In such patients, amplification of PP between ascending and terminal aorta at the renal site is constantly increased over 10mm Hg (P < 0.001), whereas MAP level remains continuously unmodified. This PP amplification is significantly associated with presence of proteinuria. Furthermore, increases in plasma creatinine and aortic stiffness are independently and positively correlated (P < 0.001) both in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. All these relationships associating PP, arterial stiffness, and renal function are mainly observed in patients 60 years of age or older. Furthermore, in renal transplant patients and their donors, subjects have been recruited for evaluations of arterial stiffness and posttransplant decline in GFR. Determinants of GFR decline were evaluated 1 and 9 years after transplantation. The first year GFR decline was related to smoking and acute rejection, whereas the later was significantly and exclusively associated with donor age and aortic stiffness. Thus, in hypertensive humans, the observed association between PP and GFR suggests that the 2 parameters are substantially mediated by arterial stiffness, not exclusively by vascular resistance. PMID:25480804

Safar, Michel E; Plante, Gérard E; Mimran, Albert

2014-12-01

134

Turtle utricle dynamic behavior using a combined anatomically accurate model and experimentally measured hair bundle stiffness.  

PubMed

Anatomically correct turtle utricle geometry was incorporated into two finite element models. The geometrically accurate model included appropriately shaped macular surface and otoconial layer, compact gel and column filament (or shear) layer thicknesses and thickness distributions. The first model included a shear layer where the effects of hair bundle stiffness was included as part of the shear layer modulus. This solid model's undamped natural frequency was matched to an experimentally measured value. This frequency match established a realistic value of the effective shear layer Young's modulus of 16 Pa. We feel this is the most accurate prediction of this shear layer modulus and fits with other estimates (Kondrachuk, 2001b). The second model incorporated only beam elements in the shear layer to represent hair cell bundle stiffness. The beam element stiffness's were further distributed to represent their location on the neuroepithelial surface. Experimentally measured striola hair cell bundles mean stiffness values were used in the striolar region and the mean extrastriola hair cell bundles stiffness values were used in this region. The results from this second model indicated that hair cell bundle stiffness contributes approximately 40% to the overall stiffness of the shear layer-hair cell bundle complex. This analysis shows that high mass saccules, in general, achieve high gain at the sacrifice of frequency bandwidth. We propose the mechanism by which this can be achieved is through increase the otoconial layer mass. The theoretical difference in gain (deflection per acceleration) is shown for saccules with large otoconial layer mass relative to saccules and utricles with small otoconial layer mass. Also discussed is the necessity of these high mass saccules to increase their overall system shear layer stiffness. Undamped natural frequencies and mode shapes for these sensors are shown. PMID:25445820

Davis, J L; Grant, J W

2014-12-01

135

Elastic Stiffness of a Skyrmion Crystal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We observe the elastic stiffness and ultrasonic absorption of a Skyrmion crystal in the chiral-lattice magnet MnSi. The Skyrmion crystal lattice exhibits a stiffness 3 orders of magnitude smaller than that of the atomic lattice of MnSi, being as soft as the flux line lattice in type-II superconductors. The observed anisotropic elastic responses are consistent with the cylindrical shape of the Skyrmion spin texture. Phenomenological analysis reveals that the spin-orbit coupling is responsible for the emergence of anisotropic elasticity in the Skyrmion lattice.

Nii, Y.; Kikkawa, A.; Taguchi, Y.; Tokura, Y.; Iwasa, Y.

2014-12-01

136

Elastic stiffness of a skyrmion crystal.  

PubMed

We observe the elastic stiffness and ultrasonic absorption of a Skyrmion crystal in the chiral-lattice magnet MnSi. The Skyrmion crystal lattice exhibits a stiffness 3 orders of magnitude smaller than that of the atomic lattice of MnSi, being as soft as the flux line lattice in type-II superconductors. The observed anisotropic elastic responses are consistent with the cylindrical shape of the Skyrmion spin texture. Phenomenological analysis reveals that the spin-orbit coupling is responsible for the emergence of anisotropic elasticity in the Skyrmion lattice. PMID:25615379

Nii, Y; Kikkawa, A; Taguchi, Y; Tokura, Y; Iwasa, Y

2014-12-31

137

Stiffness Ellipse Control of Tendon Mechanisms with Nonlinear Springs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Versatile and safe manipulators are required for use in human environments. A tendon mechanism with nonlinear springs that can mechanically adjust joint stiffness is one candidate that can satisfy the requirements of versatility and safety. In this paper, a hybrid stiffness ellipse control for controlling both mechanical and control stiffness at the end of the manipulator is proposed for the tendon mechanisms. This study shows the transformation of the stiffness ellipse at the ends of arms to joint stiffness. The transformation is applied to both mechanical joint stiffness and controller gain of joint angle controller. Simulation results verify the validity of the proposed method.

Okumura, Fumihiro; Komada, Satoshi; Hirai, Junji

138

Stiff aqueous explosive composition containing gilsonite  

Microsoft Academic Search

A stiff or highly viscous explosive composition of high sensitivity to detonation is made up of a mixture of: (1) 40 to 60 Pt. by wt, based on total composition, of ammonium nitrate and 15 to 35 Pt. of sodium nitrate at least partly dissolved in 8 to 15 Pt. of water\\/ (2) it preferably includes 1.5 to 5 Pt.

M. A. Cook; D. T. Bailey

1973-01-01

139

Numerical Methods for Stiff Ordinary Differential  

E-print Network

order differential equation y (x) = f(x, y (x)). Substituting y (x) = z(x), one obtains a first order. The notation of stiffness comes from the consideration of first order systems of ordinary differential equations. There are some connections of such systems to ordinary differential equations of higher order, e

John, Volker

140

Biaxial strain and variable stiffness in aponeuroses.  

PubMed

The elastic structures of many muscles include both an extramuscular free tendon as well as a sheet-like aponeurosis. An important distinguishing feature of aponeuroses is that these tendinous structures function as the attachment and insertion surfaces of muscle fascicles and therefore surround a substantial portion of the muscle belly. As a result, aponeuroses must expand both parallel (longitudinal) and perpendicular (transverse) to a muscle's line of action when contracting muscles bulge to maintain a constant volume. In this study, we use biplanar high-speed fluoroscopy to track the strain patterns of the turkey lateral gastrocnemius aponeurosis during active and passive force production in situ. We find that the behaviour of the aponeurosis during passive force production is consistent with uniaxial loading, as aponeuroses stretch only in the longitudinal direction. By contrast, our results show that aponeuroses are stretched in both longitudinal and transverse directions during active force production and that transverse strains are on average 4 times greater than longitudinal strains. Biaxial loading of aponeuroses appears to effectively modulate longitudinal stiffness, as we find the measured stiffness in the longitudinal direction varies in proportion to transverse strain. We conclude that biaxial strain during active force production distinguishes aponeuroses from free tendons and may function to dynamically modulate stiffness along the axis of muscle force production. It is likely that consideration of strains measured only in the longitudinal direction result in an underestimation of aponeurosis stiffness as well as its capacity for elastic energy storage. PMID:19596897

Azizi, Emanuel; Roberts, Thomas J

2009-09-01

141

Elastin in large artery stiffness and hypertension  

PubMed Central

Large artery stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), is correlated with high blood pressure and may be a causative factor in essential hypertension. The extracellular matrix components, specifically the mix of elastin and collagen in the vessel wall, determine the passive mechanical properties of the large arteries. Elastin is organized into elastic fibers in the wall during arterial development in a complex process that requires spatial and temporal coordination of numerous proteins. The elastic fibers last the lifetime of the organism, but are subject to proteolytic degradation and chemical alterations that change their mechanical properties. This review discusses how alterations in the amount, assembly, organization or chemical properties of the elastic fibers affect arterial stiffness and blood pressure. Strategies for encouraging or reversing alterations to the elastic fibers are addressed. Methods for determining the efficacy of these strategies, by measuring elastin amounts and arterial stiffness, are summarized. Therapies that have a direct effect on arterial stiffness through alterations to the elastic fibers in the wall may be an effective treatment for essential hypertension. PMID:22290157

Wagenseil, Jessica E.; Mecham, Robert P.

2012-01-01

142

Vibrating Beam With Spatially Periodic Stiffness  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Report presents theoretical analysis of vibrations of simply supported beam, bending stiffness varying about steady value, sinusoidally with position along length. Problem of practical importance because related to vibrations of twisted-pair electric-power transmission lines. Twists promote nonuniform shedding of vortexes and prevents resonant accumulation of vibrational energy from wind.

Townsend, John S.

1989-01-01

143

Nonlinear stiffness characteristics of the annular ligament.  

PubMed

The annular ligament provides a compliant connection of the stapes to the oval window. To estimate the stiffness characteristics of the annular ligament, human temporal bone measurements were conducted. A force was applied sequentially at several points on the stapes footplate leading to different patterns of displacement with different amounts of translational and rotational components. The spatial displacement of the stapes footplate was measured using a laser vibrometer. The experiments were performed on several stapes with dissected chain and the force was increased stepwise, resulting in load-deflection curves for each force application point. The annular ligament exhibited a progressive stiffening characteristic in combination with an inhomogeneous stiffness distribution. When a centric force, orientated in the lateral direction, was applied to the stapes footplate, the stapes head moved laterally and in the posterior-inferior direction. Based on the load-deflection curves, a mechanical model of the annular ligament was derived. The mathematical representation of the compliance of the annular ligament results in a stiffness matrix with a nonlinear dependence on stapes displacement. This description of the nonlinear stiffness allows simulations of the sound transfer behavior of the middle ear for different preloads. PMID:25324078

Lauxmann, M; Eiber, A; Haag, F; Ihrle, S

2014-10-01

144

Arterial stiffness is inversely associated with a better running record in a full course marathon race  

PubMed Central

[Purpose] Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk and may contribute to reduced running capacity in humans. This study investigated the relationship between course record and arterial stiffness in marathoners who participated in the Seoul International Marathon in 2012. [Methods] A total of 30 amateur marathoners (Males n = 28, Females n = 2, mean age = 51.6 ± 8.3 years) were assessed before and after the marathon race. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV) was assessed by VP-1000 plus (Omron Healthcare Co., Ltd., Kyoto, Japan) before and immediately after the marathon race. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to determine the relationship between race record and ba-PWV. In addition, Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to determine the difference in ba-PWV between before and after the race. [Results] There was no significant change in the ba-PWV of marathoners before and after the race (1271.1 ± 185 vs. 1268.8 ± 200 cm/s, P=0.579). Both the full course record (Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.416, P = 0.022) and the record of half line (Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.482, P = 0.007) were positively related with the difference in ba-PWV, suggesting that reduced arterial stiffness is associated with a better running record in the marathon. [Conclusion] These results may suggest that good vascular function contributes to a better running record in the marathon race. PMID:25671202

Jung, Su-Jeen; Park, Jae-Hyoung; Lee, Sewon

2014-01-01

145

Frequency-Dependent Fracture Specific Stiffness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Monitoring the hydraulic properties of fractures remotely through their seismic signatures is an important goal for field hydrology. Empirical studies have shown that the hydraulic properties of a fracture are implicitly related to the fracture specific stiffness through the amount and distribution of contact area and apertures that arise from two rough surfaces in contact. Complicating this simple picture are seismic measurements that indicate frequency-dependent stiffness, i.e., a scale-dependent fracture stiffness where the scale is set by the wavelength. Thus relating the hydraulic properties of fractures to seismic measurements becomes a scale dependent problem. We have performed laboratory experiments to examine the phenomenon of frequency dependent fracture specific stiffness to aid in the assessment of the hydraulic properties of a fracture using seismic techniques. To this end, we have developed a photolithographic technique with which we can construct synthetic fractures of known fracture geometry with feature sizes controlled over several orders of magnitude. The synthetic fracture (and the control non-fractured samples) are made from acrylic cylinders that measure 15.0 cm in diameter by 7.7 cm in height. The diameter of the samples enables us to sample the acoustic properties of the fracture using acoustic lens over regions that range in scale from 10 mm to 60 mm. A confinement cell controls the normal stress on the fracture. Seismic measurements were made with broadband compressional-mode piezoelectric transducers enabling one-order of magnitude in frequency. We found that when the wavelength is smaller than the asperity size, a linear dependence of fracture specific stiffness on frequency occurs. In this geometric ray regime the asymptotic value of the transmission function provides a direct measure of the contact area of the fracture. On the other hand, when the asperity spacing is less than an eighth of a wavelength, the fracture behaves as a displacement discontinuity and exhibits a frequency-independent fracture specific stiffness. For intermediate asperity spacings, mixed behavior (that may include resonant scattering) was observed. By understanding how to interpret fracture specific stiffness as a function of frequency, we seek to develop a better interpretation of the hydraulic properties of fractures based on seismic measurements. Acknowledgments: The Authors acknowledge support of this research by the Geosciences Research Program, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy. LJPN wishes to acknowledge Purdue University Faculty Scholar

Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Folz, M. A.; Acosta-Colon, A.

2003-12-01

146

Airfoil design: Finding the balance between design lift and structural stiffness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When upscaling wind turbine blades there is an increasing need for high levels of structural efficiency. In this paper the relationships between the aerodynamic characteristics; design lift and lift-drag ratio; and the structural characteristics were investigated. Using a unified optimization setup, airfoils were designed with relative thicknesses between 18% and 36%, a structural box height of 85% of the relative thickness, and varying box widths in chordwise direction between 20% and 40% of the chord length. The results from these airfoil designs showed that for a given flapwise stiffness, the design lift coefficient increases if the box length reduces and at the same time the relative thickness increases. Even though the conclusions are specific to the airfoil design approach used, the study indicated that an increased design lift required slightly higher relative thickness compared to airfoils with lower design lift to maintain the flapwise stiffness. Also, the study indicated that the lift-drag ratio as a function of flapwise stiffness was relatively independent of the airfoil design with a tendency that the lift-drag ratio decreased for large box lengths. The above conclusions were supported by an analysis of the three airfoil families Riso-C2, DU and FFA, where the lift-drag ratio as a function of flapwise stiffness was decreasing, but relatively independent of the airfoil design, and the design lift coefficient was varying depending on the design philosophy. To make the analysis complete also design lift and lift- drag ratio as a function of edgewise and torsional stiffness were shown.

Bak, Christian; Gaudern, Nicholas; Zahle, Frederik; Vronsky, Tomas

2014-06-01

147

Lamb Wave Stiffness Characterization of Composites Undergoing Thermal-Mechanical Aging  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The introduction of new, advanced composite materials into aviation systems requires a thorough understanding of the long term effects of combined thermal and mechanical loading upon those materials. Analytical methods investigating the effects of intense thermal heating combined with mechanical loading have been investigated. The damage mechanisms and fatigue lives were dependent on test parameters as well as stress levels. Castelli, et al. identified matrix dominated failure modes for out-of-phase cycling and fiber dominated damage modes for in-phase cycling. In recent years, ultrasonic methods have been developed that can measure the mechanical stiffness of composites. To help evaluate the effect of aging, a suitably designed Lamb wave measurement system is being used to obtain bending and out-of-plane stiffness coefficients of composite laminates undergoing thermal-mechanical loading. The system works by exciting an antisymmetric Lamb wave and calculating the velocity at each frequency from the known transducer separation and the measured time-of-flight. The same peak in the waveforms received at various distances is used to measure the time difference between the signals. The velocity measurements are accurate and repeatable to within 1% resulting in reconstructed stiffness values repeatable to within 4%. Given the material density and plate thickness, the bending and out-of-plane shear stiffnesses are calculated from a reconstruction of the dispersion curve. A mechanical scanner is used to move the sensors over the surface to map the time-of-flight, velocity, or stiffnesses of the entire specimen. Access to only one side of the material is required and no immersion or couplants are required because the sensors are dry coupled to the surface of the plate. In this study, the elastic stiffnesses D(sub 11), D(sub 22), A(sub 44), and A(sub 55) as well as time-of-flight measurements for composite samples that have undergone combined thermal and mechanical aging for a duration of 10,000 hours are reported.

Seale, Michael D.; Madaras, Eric I.

2004-01-01

148

Assessment of impact factors on shear wave based liver stiffness measurement.  

PubMed

Shear wave based ultrasound elastographies have been implemented as non-invasive methods for quantitative assessment of liver stiffness. Nonetheless, there are only a few studies that have investigated impact factors on liver stiffness measurement (LSM). Moreover, standard examination protocols for LSM are still lacking in clinical practice. Our study aimed to assess the impact factors on LSM to establish its standard examination protocols in clinical practice. We applied shear wave based elastography point quantification (ElastPQ) in 21 healthy individuals to determine the impact of liver location (segments I-VIII), breathing phase (end-inspiration and end-expiration), probe position (sub-costal and inter-costal position) and examiner on LSM. Additional studies in 175 healthy individuals were also performed to determine the influence of gender and age on liver stiffness. We found significant impact of liver location on LSM, while the liver segment V displayed the lowest coefficient of variation (CV 21%). The liver stiffness at the end-expiration was significantly higher than that at the end-inspiration (P=2.1E-05). The liver stiffness was 8% higher in men than in women (3.8 ± 0.7 kPa vs. 3.5 ± 0.4 kPa, P=0.0168). In contrast, the liver stiffness was comparable in the different probe positions, examiners and age groups (P>0.05). In conclusion, this study reveals significant impact from liver location, breathing phase and gender on LSM, while furthermore strengthening the necessity for the development of standard examination protocols on LSM. PMID:23116805

Ling, Wenwu; Lu, Qiang; Quan, Jierong; Ma, Lin; Luo, Yan

2013-02-01

149

Effective Elastic Stiffness for Periodic Masonry Structures via Eigenstrain Homogenization  

E-print Network

Effective Elastic Stiffness for Periodic Masonry Structures via Eigenstrain Homogenization Gang eigenstrain method is used to evaluate the effective elastic stiffness of periodic masonry structure. An Eshelby tensor, for a unit cell of the periodic masonry structure, is derived analytically

Li, Shaofan

150

Aortic stiffness: pathophysiology, clinical implications, and approach to treatment  

PubMed Central

Aortic stiffness is a hallmark of aging, and classic cardiovascular risk factors play a role in accelerating this process. Current changes in medicine, which focus on preventive care, have led to a growing interest in noninvasive evaluation of aortic stiffness. Aortic stiffness has emerged as a good tool for further risk stratification because it has been linked to increased risk of atherosclerotic heart disease, myocardial infarction, heart failure, and stroke. This has led to the invention and validation of multiple methods to measure aortic stiffness. Pulse wave velocity is emerging as the gold standard for evaluation of aortic stiffness. This review focuses on the pathophysiology involved in aortic stiffness, methods available for evaluation of aortic stiffness, the importance of central pressure as a predictor of future cardiovascular events, and therapies that affect aortic stiffness. PMID:24910511

Sethi, Salil; Rivera, Oscar; Oliveros, Rene; Chilton, Robert

2014-01-01

151

A Variable Stiffness PZT Actuator Having Tunable Resonant Frequencies  

E-print Network

A new approach to a variable stiffness actuator with tunable resonant frequencies is presented in this paper. Variable stiffness actuators have become increasingly important to meet safety requirements and achieve adaptive ...

Secord, Thomas William

152

The passive stiffness of the wrist and forearm  

PubMed Central

Because wrist rotation dynamics are dominated by stiffness (Charles SK, Hogan N. J Biomech 44: 614–621, 2011), understanding how humans plan and execute coordinated wrist rotations requires knowledge of the stiffness characteristics of the wrist joint. In the past, the passive stiffness of the wrist joint has been measured in 1 degree of freedom (DOF). Although these 1-DOF measurements inform us of the dynamics the neuromuscular system must overcome to rotate the wrist in pure flexion-extension (FE) or pure radial-ulnar deviation (RUD), the wrist rarely rotates in pure FE or RUD. Instead, understanding natural wrist rotations requires knowledge of wrist stiffness in combinations of FE and RUD. The purpose of this report is to present measurements of passive wrist stiffness throughout the space spanned by FE and RUD. Using a rehabilitation robot designed for the wrist and forearm, we measured the passive stiffness of the wrist joint in 10 subjects in FE, RUD, and combinations. For comparison, we measured the passive stiffness of the forearm (in pronation-supination), as well. Our measurements in pure FE and RUD agreed well with previous 1-DOF measurements. We have linearized the 2-DOF stiffness measurements and present them in the form of stiffness ellipses and as stiffness matrices useful for modeling wrist rotation dynamics. We found that passive wrist stiffness was anisotropic, with greater stiffness in RUD than in FE. We also found that passive wrist stiffness did not align with the anatomical axes of the wrist; the major and minor axes of the stiffness ellipse were rotated with respect to the FE and RUD axes by ?20°. The direction of least stiffness was between ulnar flexion and radial extension, a direction used in many natural movements (known as the “dart-thrower's motion”), suggesting that the nervous system may take advantage of the direction of least stiffness for common wrist rotations. PMID:22649208

Charles, Steven K.; Zollo, Loredana; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Hogan, Neville; Krebs, Hermano I.

2012-01-01

153

Meta-Analysis of Coefficient Alpha  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The meta-analysis of coefficient alpha across many studies is becoming more common in psychology by a methodology labeled reliability generalization. Existing reliability generalization studies have not used the sampling distribution of coefficient alpha for precision weighting and other common meta-analytic procedures. A framework is provided for…

Rodriguez, Michael C.; Maeda, Yukiko

2006-01-01

154

Assessing Muscle Stiffness from Quiet Stance in Parkinson's Disease  

E-print Network

Assessing Muscle Stiffness from Quiet Stance in Parkinson's Disease Michael Lauk 1;2;4 , MSc Stiffness from Quiet Stance: Applicability to Parkinson's Disease Abstract In previous studies, we developed this measure to patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We correlated the postural stiffness measure

155

Active stiffness control of a manipulator in cartesian coordinates  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method of actively controlling the apparent stiffness of a manipulator end effecter is presented. The approach allows the programmer to specify the three transnational and three rotational stiffness of a frame located arbitrarily in hand coordinates. Control of the nominal position of the hand then permits simultaneous position and force control. Stiffness may be changed under program control to

J. Kenneth Salisbury

1980-01-01

156

Accuracy of an approximate static structural analysis technique based on stiffness matrix eigenmodes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Use of the stiffness matrix eigenmodes, instead of the vibration eigenmodes, as generalized coordinates is proposed for condensation of static load deflection equations in finite element stiffness method. The modes are selected by strain energy criteria and the resulting fast, approximate analysis technique is evaluated by applications to idealized built-up wings and a fuselage segment. The best results obtained are a two-order of magnitude reduction of the number of degrees of freedom in a high aspect ratio wing associated with less than one percent error in prediction of the largest displacement.

Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.; Hajela, P.

1979-01-01

157

Light weight high-stiffness stage platen  

DOEpatents

An improved light weight, stiff stage platen for photolithography is provided. The high stiffness of the stage platen is exemplified by a relatively high first resonant vibrational mode as determined, for instance, by finite element modal analysis. The stage platen can be employed to support a chuck that is designed to secure a mask or wafer. The stage platen includes a frame that has interior walls that define an interior region and that has exterior walls wherein the outer surfaces of at least two adjacent walls are reflective mirror surfaces; and a matrix of ribs within the interior region that is connected to the interior walls wherein the stage platen exhibits a first vibrational mode at a frequency of greater than about 1000 Hz.

Spence, Paul A. (Pleasanton, CA)

2001-01-01

158

Damage detection on sudden stiffness reduction based on discrete wavelet transform.  

PubMed

The sudden stiffness reduction in a structure may cause the signal discontinuity in the acceleration responses close to the damage location at the damage time instant. To this end, the damage detection on sudden stiffness reduction of building structures has been actively investigated in this study. The signal discontinuity of the structural acceleration responses of an example building is extracted based on the discrete wavelet transform. It is proved that the variation of the first level detail coefficients of the wavelet transform at damage instant is linearly proportional to the magnitude of the stiffness reduction. A new damage index is proposed and implemented to detect the damage time instant, location, and severity of a structure due to a sudden change of structural stiffness. Numerical simulation using a five-story shear building under different types of excitation is carried out to assess the effectiveness and reliability of the proposed damage index for the building at different damage levels. The sensitivity of the damage index to the intensity and frequency range of measurement noise is also investigated. The made observations demonstrate that the proposed damage index can accurately identify the sudden damage events if the noise intensity is limited. PMID:24991647

Chen, Bo; Chen, Zhi-wei; Wang, Gan-jun; Xie, Wei-ping

2014-01-01

159

Damage Detection on Sudden Stiffness Reduction Based on Discrete Wavelet Transform  

PubMed Central

The sudden stiffness reduction in a structure may cause the signal discontinuity in the acceleration responses close to the damage location at the damage time instant. To this end, the damage detection on sudden stiffness reduction of building structures has been actively investigated in this study. The signal discontinuity of the structural acceleration responses of an example building is extracted based on the discrete wavelet transform. It is proved that the variation of the first level detail coefficients of the wavelet transform at damage instant is linearly proportional to the magnitude of the stiffness reduction. A new damage index is proposed and implemented to detect the damage time instant, location, and severity of a structure due to a sudden change of structural stiffness. Numerical simulation using a five-story shear building under different types of excitation is carried out to assess the effectiveness and reliability of the proposed damage index for the building at different damage levels. The sensitivity of the damage index to the intensity and frequency range of measurement noise is also investigated. The made observations demonstrate that the proposed damage index can accurately identify the sudden damage events if the noise intensity is limited. PMID:24991647

Chen, Bo; Chen, Zhi-wei; Wang, Gan-jun; Xie, Wei-ping

2014-01-01

160

Stiff-Person Syndrome: Case Series  

PubMed Central

Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) is a rare disorder, characterized by progressive fluctuating muscular rigidity and spasms. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody is primarily involved in the pathogenesis of SPS and SPS is strongly associated with other autoimmune disease. Here we report three cases of patients with classical SPS finally confirmed by high serum level of GAD antibodies. All of our patients respond favorably to gamma amino butyric acid-enhancing drugs and immunotherapies. PMID:24926406

Jung, Yu Jin; Jeong, Han G.; Kim, Ryul; Kim, Han-Joon; Jeon, Beom S.

2014-01-01

161

Aortic stiffness, kidney disease, and renal transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD), treatment of high systolic blood pressure is a key element in preventing disease\\u000a progression and the occurrence of cardiovascular (CV) events. This relationship between the large arterial system and kidney\\u000a function was demonstrated in different renal populations. In subjects with mild to severe renal insufficiency, increased aortic\\u000a stiffness and reduced creatinine clearance are

Sola Aoun Bahous; Jacques Blacher; Michel E. Safar

2009-01-01

162

Aortic Stiffness, Kidney Disease, and Renal Transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD), treatment of elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) is a key element in\\u000a preventing disease progression and occurrence of cardiovascular events. For a given stroke volume, increased arterial stiffness\\u000a is a key determinant of SBP. Therefore, the relationships between large conduit arteries and kidney function have been extensively\\u000a studied in different CKD populations. In

Sola A. Bahous; Michael Delahousse; Michel E. Safar

163

Cell stiffness is a biomarker of the metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The metastatic potential of cells is an important parameter in the design of optimal strategies for the personalized treatment of cancer. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we show that ovarian cancer cells are generally softer and display lower intrinsic variability in cell stiffness than non-malignant ovarian epithelial cells. A detailed study of highly invasive ovarian cancer cells (HEY A8) and their less invasive parental cells (HEY), demonstrates that deformability can serve as an accurate biomarker of metastatic potential. Comparative gene expression profiling indicate that the reduced stiffness of highly metastatic HEY A8 cells is associated with actin cytoskeleton remodeling, microscopic examination of actin fiber structure in these cell lines is consistent with this prediction. Our results indicate that cell stiffness not only distinguishes ovarian cancer cells from non-malignant cells, but may also be a useful biomarker to evaluate the relative metastatic potential of ovarian and perhaps other types of cancer cells.

Xu, Wenwei; Mezencev, Roman; Kim, Byungkyu; Wang, Lijuan; McDonald, John; Sulchek, Todd

2013-03-01

164

Factor Scores, Structure Coefficients, and Communality Coefficients  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents heuristic explanations of factor scores, structure coefficients, and communality coefficients. Common misconceptions regarding these topics are clarified. In addition, (a) the regression (b) Bartlett, (c) Anderson-Rubin, and (d) Thompson methods for calculating factor scores are reviewed. Syntax necessary to execute all four…

Goodwyn, Fara

2012-01-01

165

Muscle short-range stiffness can be used to estimate the endpoint stiffness of the human arm  

PubMed Central

The mechanical properties of the human arm are regulated to maintain stability across many tasks. The static mechanics of the arm can be characterized by estimates of endpoint stiffness, considered especially relevant for the maintenance of posture. At a fixed posture, endpoint stiffness can be regulated by changes in muscle activation, but which activation-dependent muscle properties contribute to this global measure of limb mechanics remains unclear. We evaluated the role of muscle properties in the regulation of endpoint stiffness by incorporating scalable models of muscle stiffness into a three-dimensional musculoskeletal model of the human arm. Two classes of muscle models were tested: one characterizing short-range stiffness and two estimating stiffness from the slope of the force-length curve. All models were compared with previously collected experimental data describing how endpoint stiffness varies with changes in voluntary force. Importantly, muscle properties were not fit to the experimental data but scaled only by the geometry of individual muscles in the model. We found that force-dependent variations in endpoint stiffness were accurately described by the short-range stiffness of active arm muscles. Over the wide range of evaluated arm postures and voluntary forces, the musculoskeletal model incorporating short-range stiffness accounted for 98 ± 2, 91 ± 4, and 82 ± 12% of the variance in stiffness orientation, shape, and area, respectively, across all simulated subjects. In contrast, estimates based on muscle force-length curves were less accurate in all measures, especially stiffness area. These results suggest that muscle short-range stiffness is a major contributor to endpoint stiffness of the human arm. Furthermore, the developed model provides an important tool for assessing how the nervous system may regulate endpoint stiffness via changes in muscle activation. PMID:21289133

Hu, Xiao; Murray, Wendy M.

2011-01-01

166

Nonstrict inequality for Schmidt coefficients of three-qubit states  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Generalized Schmidt decomposition of pure three-qubit states has four positive and one complex coefficients. In contrast to the bipartite case, they are not arbitrary and the largest Schmidt coefficient restricts severely other coefficients. We derive a nonstrict inequality between three-qubit Schmidt coefficients, where the largest coefficient defines the least upper bound for the three nondiagonal coefficients or, equivalently, the three nondiagonal coefficients together define the greatest lower bound for the largest coefficient. In addition, we show the existence of another inequality which should establish an upper bound for the remaining Schmidt coefficient.

Tamaryan, Levon

2013-10-01

167

In vivo tibial stiffness is maintained by whole bone morphology and cross-sectional geometry in growing female mice  

PubMed Central

Whole bone morphology, cortical geometry, and tissue material properties modulate skeletal stresses and strains that in turn influence skeletal physiology and remodeling. Understanding how bone stiffness, the relationship between applied load and tissue strain, is regulated by developmental changes in bone structure and tissue material properties is important in implementing biophysical strategies for promoting healthy bone growth and preventing bone loss. The goal of this study was to relate developmental patterns of in vivo whole bone stiffness to whole bone morphology, cross-sectional geometry, and tissue properties using a mouse axial loading model. We measured in vivo tibial stiffness in three age groups (6wks, 10wks, 16wks old) of female C57Bl/6 mice during cyclic tibial compression. Tibial stiffness was then related to cortical geometry, longitudinal bone curvature, and tissue mineral density using microcomputed tomography (microCT). Tibial stiffness and the stresses induced by axial compression were generally maintained from 6 to 16wks of age. Growth-related increases in cortical cross-sectional geometry and longitudinal bone curvature had counteracting effects on induced bone stresses and, therefore, maintained tibial stiffness similarly with growth. Tissue mineral density increased slightly from 6 to 16wks of age, and although the effects of this increase on tibial stiffness were not directly measured, its role in the modulation of whole bone stiffness was likely minor over the age range examined. Thus, whole bone morphology, as characterized by longitudinal curvature, along with cortical geometry, plays an important role in modulating bone stiffness during development and should be considered when evaluating and designing in vivo loading studies and biophysical skeletal therapies. PMID:20673665

Main, Russell P.; Lynch, Maureen E.; van der Meulen, Marjolein C.H.

2010-01-01

168

Friction and stem stiffness affect dynamic interface motion in total hip replacement.  

PubMed

Large cyclic movements between the femoral stem and bone during the first weeks after total hip arthroplasty may hamper bone ingrowth and adversely affect the eventual success of the arthroplasty. Little is known, however, about the magnitude of the motions and its relationship to design and surgical factors. A two-dimensional finite element model of a cementless prosthesis inserted into the proximal femur was constructed to study the effects of two mechanical variables--the stiffness of the implant and the coefficient of friction between bone and implant--on the magnitude of the motions. We investigated the influences of these variables on the subsidence of the prosthesis, the magnitudes of the cyclic motions, and the level of the interface stresses. The presence of friction reduced cyclic motions by about 85% compared with a frictionless interface. Once friction was assumed, varying the coefficient of friction had little effect. The effect of friction on the interface stress state and gross subsidence of the prosthesis was not as great as on cyclic motion. Implant stiffness also affected the magnitudes and distributions of the cyclic motions along the interface. A flexible stem generated motions about three to four times larger proximally than those of a stiff stem, which generated larger motions distally. The influence of stem stiffness on interface stresses and prosthetic subsidence was less than on cyclic motion. The location of the peak shear stresses at the interface around a bonded prosthesis corresponded to the location where cyclic interface motion was maximal for an unbonded prosthesis. However, no direct relationship was found between the magnitudes of peak stresses and the amplitudes of cyclic motions. PMID:8618164

Kuiper, J H; Huiskes, R

1996-01-01

169

The relationship between lower-body stiffness and dynamic performance.  

PubMed

Greater levels of lower-body stiffness have been associated with improved outcomes for a number of physical performance variables involving rapid stretch-shorten cycles. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between several measures of lower-body stiffness and physical performance variables typically evident during team sports in female athletes. Eighteen female athletes were assessed for quasi-static stiffness (myometry) for several isolated muscles in lying and standing positions. The muscles included the medial gastrocnemius (MedGast), lateral gastrocnemius, soleus, and Achilles tendon. Dynamic stiffness during unilateral hopping was also assessed. Participants were separated into relatively stiff and compliant groups for each variable. A number of significant differences in performance were evident between stiff and compliant subjects. When considering the quasi-static stiffness of the MedGast in lying and standing positions, relatively stiff participants recorded significantly superior results during agility, bounding, sprinting, and jumping activities. Stiffness as assessed by hopping did not discriminate between performance ability in any test. Relationships highlighted by MedGast results were supported by further significant differences in eccentric utilisation ratio and drop jump results between stiff and compliant groups for the lateral gastrocnemius and soleus in lying and standing positions. Higher levels of lower-body stiffness appear to be advantageous for females when performing rapid and (or) repeated stretch-shorten cycle movements, including sprinting, bounding, and jumping. Further, the stiffness of the MedGast is of particular importance during the performance of these activities. It is important for practitioners working with athletes in sports that rely upon these activities for success to consider stiffness assessment and modification. PMID:25007238

Pruyn, Elizabeth C; Watsford, Mark; Murphy, Aron

2014-10-01

170

Discontinuous Galerkin for Stiff Hyperbolic Systems  

SciTech Connect

A Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is applied to hyperbolic systems that contain stiff relaxation terms. We demonstrate that when the relaxation time is under-resolved, DG is accurate in the sense that the method accurately represents the system's Chapman-Enskog (or ''diffusion'') approximation. Moreover, we demonstrate that a high-resolution, finite-volume method using the same time-integration method as DG is very inaccurate in the diffusion limit. Results for DG are presented for the hyperbolic heat equation, the Broadwell model of gas kinetics, and coupled radiation-hydrodynamics.

Lowrie, R.B.; Morel, J.E.

1999-06-27

171

Apparatus for measurement of coefficient of friction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An apparatus designed to measure the coefficient of friction in certain controlled atmospheres is described. The coefficient of friction observed during high-load tests was nearly constant, with an average value of 0.56. This value is in general agreement with that found in the literature and also with the initial friction coefficient value of 0.67 measured during self-mated friction of 440C steel in an oxygen environment.

Slifka, A. J.; Siegwarth, J. D.; Sparks, L. L.; Chaudhuri, Dilip K.

1990-01-01

172

Contact stiffness of randomly rough surfaces  

PubMed Central

We investigate the contact stiffness of an elastic half-space and a rigid indenter with randomly rough surface having a power spectrum , where q is the wave vector. The range of is studied covering a wide range of roughness types from white noise to smooth single asperities. At low forces, the contact stiffness is in all cases a power law function of the normal force with an exponent ?. For H > 2, the simple Hertzian behavior is observed . In the range of 0 < H < 2, the Pohrt-Popov behavior is valid (). For H < 0, a power law with a constant power of approximately 0.9 is observed, while the exact value depends on the number of modes used to produce the rough surface. Interpretation of the three regions is given both in the frame of the three dimensional contact mechanics and the method of dimensionality reduction (MDR). The influence of the long wavelength roll-off is investigated and discussed. PMID:24257034

Pohrt, Roman; Popov, Valentin L.

2013-01-01

173

Substrate stiffness regulates solubility of cellular vimentin  

PubMed Central

The intermediate filament protein vimentin is involved in the regulation of cell behavior, morphology, and mechanical properties. Previous studies using cells cultured on glass or plastic substrates showed that vimentin is largely insoluble. Although substrate stiffness was shown to alter many aspects of cell behavior, changes in vimentin organization were not reported. Our results show for the first time that mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), endothelial cells, and fibroblasts cultured on different-stiffness substrates exhibit biphasic changes in vimentin detergent solubility, which increases from nearly 0 to 67% in hMSCs coincident with increases in cell spreading and membrane ruffling. When imaged, the detergent-soluble vimentin appears to consist of small fragments the length of one or several unit-length filaments. Vimentin detergent solubility decreases when these cells are subjected to serum starvation, allowed to form cell–cell contacts, after microtubule disruption, or inhibition of Rac1, Rho-activated kinase, or p21-activated kinase. Inhibiting myosin or actin assembly increases vimentin solubility on rigid substrates. These data suggest that in the mechanical environment in vivo, vimentin is more dynamic than previously reported and its assembly state is sensitive to stimuli that alter cellular tension and morphology. PMID:24173714

Murray, Maria E.; Mendez, Melissa G.; Janmey, Paul A.

2014-01-01

174

Serum Osteoprotegerin is Associated with Arterial Stiffness Assessed According to the Cardio-ankle Vascular Index in Hypertensive Patients.  

PubMed

Aim: Arterial stiffness is recognized to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent studies have found that osteoprotegerin (OPG) is associated with increased pulse wave velocity and may reflect endothelial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the serum OPG level and arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients using the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI). Methods: Fasting blood samples were obtained from 115 hypertensive patients and 52 healthy participants. The CAVI value was derived using the waveform device (CAVI-VaSera VS-1000). The serum OPG levels were measured using a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A CAVI value of ?9 defined the high arterial stiffness group. Results: Sixty-five hypertensive patients (56.5%) were included in the high arterial stiffness group. Diabetes (p=0.032), smoking (p=0.044), age (p?0.001), systolic blood pressure (p=0.001), diastolic blood pressure (p=0.024), pulse pressure (p=0.046) and the creatinine (p=0.013) and serum OPG (p?0.001) levels were higher in the high arterial stiffness group than in the low arterial stiffness group, while the glomerular filtration rate (p=0.003) was lower in the high arterial stiffness group than in the low arterial stiffness group among the hypertensive patients. The results of the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient test also indicated a strong positive correlation between the OPG and CAVI values (r=0.484, p?0.001) in the hypertensive patients. In addition, a multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that age (odds ratio: 1.136, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.053-1.225, p=0.001), diastolic blood pressure (odds ratio: 1.108, 95% CI: 1.035-1.187, p=0.003) and the logarithmically transformed OPG level (log-OPG; odds ratio: 3.740, 95% CI: 1.136-12.318, p=0.030) were independent predictors of arterial stiffness in the hypertensive patients. Conclusions: The serum OPG level is positively associated with arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients. PMID:25318352

Lee, Chung-Jen; Wang, Ji-Hung; Chen, Mei-Ling; Yang, Chiu-Fen; Chen, Yu-Chih; Hsu, Bang-Gee

2014-10-15

175

Human arm stiffness characteristics during the maintenance of posture.  

PubMed

When the hand is displaced from an equilibrium position, the muscles generate elastic forces to restore the original posture. In a previous study, Mussa-Ivaldi et al. (1985) have measured and characterized the field of elastic forces associated with hand posture in the horizontal plane. Hand stiffness which describes the relation between force and displacement vectors in the vicinity of equilibrium position was measured and graphically represented by an ellipse, characterized by its size, shape and orientation. The results indicated that the shape and orientation of the stiffness ellipse are strongly dependent on arm configuration. At any given hand position, however, the values of these parameters were found to remain invariant among subjects and over time. In this study we investigate the underlying causes for the observed spatial pattern of variation of the hand stiffness ellipse. Mathematically analyzing the relation between hand and joint stiffness matrices, we found that in order to produce the observed spatial variations of the stiffness ellipse, the shoulder stiffness must covary in the workspace with the stiffness component provided by the two-joint muscles. This condition was found to be satisfied by the measured joint stiffness components. Using anatomical data and considering the effects that muscle cross-sections and changes in muscle moment arms have on the joint stiffness matrix, we found that these anatomical factors are not sufficient to account for the observed pattern of variation of joint stiffness in the workspace. To examine whether the coupling between shoulder and two-joint stiffnesses results from the coactivation of muscles contributing to these stiffnesses, EMG signals were recorded from shoulder, elbow and two-joint muscles. Our results indicated that, while some muscle coactivation may indeed exist, it can be found for only some of the muscles and in only part of the workspace. PMID:2286234

Flash, T; Mussa-Ivaldi, F

1990-01-01

176

Arterial Stiffness and Functional Outcome in Acute Ischemic Stroke  

PubMed Central

Objective Arterial stiffness is a common change associated with aging and can be evaluated by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV) between sites in the arterial tree, with the stiffer artery having the higher PWV. Arterial stiffness is associated with the risk of stroke in the general population and of fatal stroke in hypertensive patients. This study is to clarify whether PWV value predicts functional outcome of acute ischemic stroke. Methods One hundred patients were enrolled with a diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke and categorized into two groups: large-artery atherosclerosis (LAAS) or small vessel disease (SVD) subtype of Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) classification. Each group was divided into two sub-groups based on the functional outcome of acute ischemic stroke, indicated by modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at discharge. Poor functional outcome group was defined as a mRS ? 3 at discharge. Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney U-test were used to compare maximal brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) values. Results Twenty-four patients whose state was inadequate to assess baPWV or mRS were excluded. There were 38 patients with good functional outcome (mRS < 3) and 38 patients with poor functional outcome (mRS ? 3). The baPWV values were significantly higher in patients with poor outcome (2,070.05 ± 518.37 cm/s) compared with those with good outcome (1,838.63 ± 436.65) (p = 0.039). In patients with SVD subtype, there was a significant difference of baPWV values between groups (2,163.18 ± 412.71 vs. 1,789.80 ± 421.91, p = 0.022), while there was no significant difference of baPWV among patients with LAAS subtype (2,071.76 ± 618.42 vs. 1,878.00 ± 365.35, p = 0.579). Conclusions Arterial stiffness indicated by baPWV is associated with the functional outcome of acute ischemic stroke. This finding suggests that measurement of baPWV predicts functional outcome in patients with stroke especially those whose TOAST classification was confirmed as SVD subtype. PMID:24765608

Lee, Yeong-Bae; Park, Joo-Hwan; Kim, Eunja; Kang, Chang-Ki

2014-01-01

177

Noninvasive assessment of arterial stiffness should discriminate between systolic and diastolic pressure ranges.  

PubMed

Arterial stiffening plays an important role in the development of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. The intrinsically nonlinear (ie, pressure-dependent) elastic behavior of arteries may have serious consequences for the accuracy and interpretation of arterial stiffness measurements and, ultimately, for individual patient management. We determined aortic pressure and common carotid artery diameter waveforms in 21 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. The individual pressure-area curves were described using a dual exponential analytic model facilitating noise-free calculation of incremental pulse wave velocity. In addition, compliance coefficients were calculated separately in the diastolic and systolic pressure ranges, only using diastolic, dicrotic notch, and systolic data points, which can be determined noninvasively. Pulse wave velocity at systolic pressure exhibited a much stronger positive correlation with pulse pressure (P<0.001) and age (P=0.012) than pulse wave velocity at diastolic pressure. Patients with an elevated systolic blood pressure (>140 mm Hg) had a 2.5-times lower compliance coefficient in the systolic pressure range than patients with systolic blood pressures <140 mm Hg (P=0.002). Most importantly, some individuals, with comparable age or pulse pressure, had similar diastolic but discriminately different systolic pulse wave velocities and compliance coefficients. We conclude that noninvasive assessment of arterial stiffness could and should discriminate between systolic and diastolic pressure ranges to more precisely characterize arterial function in individual patients. PMID:19933922

Hermeling, Evelien; Hoeks, Arnold P G; Winkens, Mark H M; Waltenberger, Johannes L; Reneman, Robert S; Kroon, Abraham A; Reesink, Koen D

2010-01-01

178

Leg stiffness changes in athletes with Achilles tendinopathy.  

PubMed

Overuse injuries of the Achilles tendon cause impairment in lower leg muscle-tendon function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate leg stiffness in patients suffering unilateral Achilles tendinopathy. 51 athletes with unilateral Achilles tendinopathy underwent leg stiffness testing by modeling the vertical ground reaction force in a contact mat, measuring flight and contact time during hopping. Clinical status was estimated with a pain VAS and a validated questionnaire (VISA-A). The 'leg stiffness ratio' (LSR=stiffness of injured leg/stiffness of healthy leg) was calculated to determine the relative patient affectation and for intra-group comparison. 84 percent of subjects showed lower leg stiffness in the affected side during hopping. Leg stiffness was significantly lower in the limb affected by Achilles tendinopathy than in the healthy side (14.07±3.74 kN/m vs. 15.61±4.01 kN/m, p=0.047); overall LSR was 0.90±0.09. Intra-group comparison did not show significant differences related to patients' age, gender, sport level, and site of tendon injury (midportion or insertional). Leg stiffness was significantly reduced in patients with unilateral Achilles tendinopathy probably related to increasing ankle compliance. Regular leg stiffness assessment would be beneficial for athletes suffering Achilles tendon problems in terms of quantifying performance capabilities and providing objective data for a safer return to sport activity. PMID:22499572

Maquirriain, J

2012-07-01

179

Friction Coefficient for Quarks in Supergravity Duals  

E-print Network

We study quarks moving in strongly-coupled plasmas that have supergravity duals. We compute the friction coefficient of strings dual to such quarks for general static supergravity backgrounds near the horizon. Our results also show that a previous conjecture on the bound has to be modified and higher friction coefficients can be achieved.

E. Antonyan

2006-11-22

180

Commentary on Coefficient Alpha: A Cautionary Tale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The general use of coefficient alpha to assess reliability should be discouraged on a number of grounds. The assumptions underlying coefficient alpha are unlikely to hold in practice, and violation of these assumptions can result in nontrivial negative or positive bias. Structural equation modeling was discussed as an informative process both to…

Green, Samuel B.; Yang, Yanyun

2009-01-01

181

The relationship between renal resistive index, arterial stiffness, and atherosclerotic burden: the link between macrocirculation and microcirculation.  

PubMed

The renal resistive index (RRI) measured by Doppler sonography is a marker of microvascular status that can be generalized to the whole of the arterial tree. Its association with large-vessel dysfunction, such as arterial stiffness or the atherosclerotic burden, can help to establish physiopathological associations between macrocirculation and microcirculation. The authors conducted a cross-sectional study of hypertensive patients (n=202) and a healthy control group (n=16). Stiffness parameters, atherosclerotic burden, and determination of the RRI in both kidneys were performed. The average RRI was 0.69±0.08 and was significantly greater in patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Renal resistive index positively correlated with age, creatinine, and albuminuria. Positive correlations were found with arterial stiffness parameters (pulse wave velocity, ambulatory arterial stiffness index, and 24-hour pulse pressure), as well as atherosclerotic burden and endothelial dysfunction measured as asymmetric dimethylarginine in serum. In the multivariate analysis, independent factors for increased RRI were age, renal function, 24-hour diastolic blood pressure, and arterial stiffness. The authors concluded that there is an independent association between renal hemodynamics and arterial stiffness. This, together with the atherosclerotic burden and endothelial dysfunction, suggests that there is a physiopathologic relationship between macrovascular and microvascular impairment. PMID:24548343

Calabia, Jordi; Torguet, Pere; Garcia, Isabel; Martin, Nadia; Mate, Gerard; Marin, Adriana; Molina, Carolina; Valles, Marti

2014-03-01

182

Metabolic syndrome is associated with change in subclinical arterial stiffness - A community-based Taichung Community Health Study  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of MetS on arterial stiffness in a longitudinal study. Methods Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), a measurement interpreted as arterial stiffness, was measured in 1518 community-dwelling persons at baseline and re-examined within a mean follow-up period of 3 years. Multivariate linear regression with generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to examine the longitudinal relationship between MetS and its individual components and baPWV, while multivariate logistic regression with GEE was used to examine the longitudinal relationship between MetS and its individual components and the high risk group with arterial stiffness. Results Subjects with MetS showed significantly greater baPWV at the end point than those without MetS, after adjusting for age, gender, education, hypertension medication and mean arterial pressure (MAP). MetS was associated with the top quartile of baPWV (the high-risk group of arterial stiffness, adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval] 1.52 [1.21-1.90]), and a significant linear trend of risk for the number of components of MetS was found (p for trend < 0.05). In further considering the individual MetS component, elevated blood pressure and fasting glucose significantly predicted a high risk of arterial stiffness (adjusted OR [95% CI] 3.72 [2.81-4.93] and 1.35 [1.08-1.68], respectively). Conclusions MetS affects the subject's progression to arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness increased as the number of MetS components increased. Management of MetS is important for preventing the progression to advanced arterial stiffness. PMID:21999611

2011-01-01

183

Nanoindentation and contact stiffness measurement using force modulation with a capacitive load-displacement transducer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have implemented a force modulation technique for nanoindentation using a three-plate capacitive load-displacement transducer. The stiffness sensitivity of the instrument is ˜0.1 N/m. We show that the sensitivity of this instrument is sufficient to detect long-range surface forces and to locate the surface of a specimen. The low spring mass (236 mg), spring constant (116 N/m), and damping coefficient (0.008 Ns/m) of the transducer allows measurement of the damping losses for nanoscale contacts. We present the experimental technique, important specimen mounting information, and system calibration for nanomechanical property measurement.

Asif, S. A. Syed; Wahl, K. J.; Colton, R. J.

1999-05-01

184

Cellular mechanoadaptation to substrate mechanical properties: contributions of substrate stiffness and thickness to cell stiffness measurements using AFM.  

PubMed

Mechanosensing by adherent cells is usually studied by quantifying cell responses on hydrogels that are covalently linked to a rigid substrate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) represents a convenient way of characterizing the mechanoadaptation response of adherent cells on hydrogels of varying stiffness and thickness. Since AFM measurements reflect the effective cell stiffness, therefore, in addition to measuring real cytoskeletal alterations across different conditions, these measurements might also be influenced by the geometry and physical properties of the substrate itself. To better understand how the physical attributes of the gel influence AFM stiffness measurements of cells, we have used finite element analysis to simulate the indentation of cells of various spreads resting on hydrogels of varying stiffness and thickness. Consistent with experimental results, our simulation results indicate that for well spread cells, stiffness values are significantly over-estimated when experiments are performed on cells cultured on soft and thin gels. Using parametric studies, we have developed scaling relationships between the effective stiffness probed by AFM and the bulk cell stiffness, taking cell and tip geometry, hydrogel properties, nuclear stiffness and cell contractility into account. Finally, using simulated mechanoadaptation responses, we have demonstrated that a cell stiffening response may arise purely due to the substrate properties. Collectively, our results demonstrate the need to take hydrogel properties into account while estimating cell stiffness using AFM indentation. PMID:24651595

Vichare, Shirish; Sen, Shamik; Inamdar, Mandar M

2014-02-28

185

Study of ultrasound stiffness imaging methods using tissue mimicking phantoms.  

PubMed

A pilot study was carried out to investigate the performance of ultrasound stiffness imaging methods namely Ultrasound Elastography Imaging (UEI) and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Imaging. Specifically their potential for characterizing different classes of solid mass lesions was analyzed using agar based tissue mimicking phantoms. Composite tissue mimicking phantom was prepared with embedded inclusions of varying stiffness from 50 kPa to 450 kPa to represent different stages of cancer. Acoustic properties such as sound speed, attenuation coefficient and acoustic impedance were characterized by pulse echo ultrasound test at 5 MHz frequency and they are ranged from (1564 ± 88 to 1671 ± 124 m/s), (0.6915 ± 0.123 to 0.8268 ± 0.755 db cm(-1)MHz(-1)) and (1.61 × 10(6) ± 0.127 to 1.76 × 10(6) ± 0.045 kg m(-2)s(-1)) respectively. The elastic property Young's Modulus of the prepared samples was measured by conducting quasi static uni axial compression test under a strain rate of 0.5mm/min upto 10 % strain, and the values are from 50 kPa to 450 kPa for a variation of agar concentration from 1.7% to 6.6% by weight. The composite phantoms were imaged by Siemens Acuson S2000 (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) machine using linear array transducer 9L4 at 8 MHz frequency; strain and displacement images were collected by UEI and ARFI. Shear wave velocity 4.43 ± 0.35 m/s was also measured for high modulus contrast (18 dB) inclusion and X.XX m/s was found for all other inclusions. The images were pre processed and parameters such as Contrast Transfer Efficiency and lateral image profile were computed and reported. The results indicate that both ARFI and UEI represent the abnormalities better than conventional US B mode imaging whereas UEI enhances the underlying modulus contrast into improved strain contrast. The results are corroborated with literature and also with clinical patient images. PMID:24083832

Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Seshadri, Suresh

2014-02-01

186

Evaluation of Compressive Strength and Stiffness of Grouted Soils by Using Elastic Waves  

PubMed Central

Cement grouted soils, which consist of particulate soil media and cementation agents, have been widely used for the improvement of the strength and stiffness of weak ground and for the prevention of the leakage of ground water. The strength, elastic modulus, and Poisson's ratio of grouted soils have been determined by classical destructive methods. However, the performance of grouted soils depends on several parameters such as the distribution of particle size of the particulate soil media, grouting pressure, curing time, curing method, and ground water flow. In this study, elastic wave velocities are used to estimate the strength and elastic modulus, which are generally obtained by classical strength tests. Nondestructive tests by using elastic waves at small strain are conducted before and during classical strength tests at large strain. The test results are compared to identify correlations between the elastic wave velocity measured at small strain and strength and stiffness measured at large strain. The test results show that the strength and stiffness have exponential relationship with elastic wave velocities. This study demonstrates that nondestructive methods by using elastic waves may significantly improve the strength and stiffness evaluation processes of grouted soils. PMID:25025082

Lee, In-Mo; Kim, Jong-Sun; Yoon, Hyung-Koo; Lee, Jong-Sub

2014-01-01

187

Stiffness control of balance in quiet standing.  

PubMed

Our goal was to provide some insights into how the CNS controls and maintains an upright standing posture, which is an integral part of activities of daily living. Although researchers have used simple performance measures of maintenance of this posture quite effectively in clinical decision making, the mechanisms and control principles involved have not been clear. We propose a relatively simple control scheme for regulation of upright posture that provides almost instantaneous corrective response and reduces the operating demands on the CNS. The analytic model is derived and experimentally validated. A stiffness model was developed for quiet standing. The model assumes that muscles act as springs to cause the center-of-pressure (COP) to move in phase with the center-of-mass (COM) as the body sways about some desired position. In the sagittal plane this stiffness control exists at the ankle plantarflexors, in the frontal plane by the hip abductors/adductors. On the basis of observations that the COP-COM error signal continuously oscillates, it is evident that the inverted pendulum model is severely underdamped, approaching the undamped condition. The spectrum of this error signal is seen to match that of a tuned mass, spring, damper system, and a curve fit of this "tuned circuit" yields omega n the undamped natural frequency of the system. The effective stiffness of the system, Ke, is then estimated from Ke = I omega n2, and the damping B is estimated from B = BW X I, where BW is the bandwidth of the tuned response (in rad/s), and I is the moment of inertia of the body about the ankle joint. Ten adult subjects were assessed while standing quietly at three stance widths: 50% hip-to-hip distance, 100 and 150%. Subjects stood for 2 min in each position with eyes open; the 100% stance width was repeated with eyes closed. In all trials and in both planes, the COP oscillated virtually in phase (within 6 ms) with COM, which was predicted by a simple 0th order spring model. Sway amplitude decreased as stance width increased, and Ke increased with stance width. A stiffness model would predict sway to vary as Ke-0.5. The experimental results were close to this prediction: sway was proportional to Ke(-0.55). Reactive control of balance was not evident for several reasons. The visual system does not appear to contribute because no significant difference between eyes open and eyes closed results was found at 100% stance width. Vestibular (otolith) and joint proprioceptive reactive control were discounted because the necessary head accelerations, joint displacements, and velocities were well below reported thresholds. Besides, any reactive control would predict that COP would considerably lag (150-250 ms) behind the COM. Because the average COP was only 4 ms delayed behind the COM, reactive control was not evident; this small delay was accounted for by the damping in the tuned mechanical system. PMID:9744933

Winter, D A; Patla, A E; Prince, F; Ishac, M; Gielo-Perczak, K

1998-09-01

188

Identifying Bearing Rotodynamic Coefficients Using an Extended Kalman Filter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An Extended Kalman Filter is developed to estimate the linearized direct and indirect stiffness and damping force coefficients for bearings in rotor dynamic applications from noisy measurements of the shaft displacement in response to imbalance and impact excitation. The bearing properties are modeled as stochastic random variables using a Gauss-Markov model. Noise terms are introduced into the system model to account for all of the estimation error, including modeling errors and uncertainties and the propagation of measurement errors into the parameter estimates. The system model contains two user-defined parameters that can be tuned to improve the filter's performance; these parameters correspond to the covariance of the system and measurement noise variables. The filter is also strongly influenced by the initial values of the states and the error covariance matrix. The filter is demonstrated using numerically simulated data for a rotor bearing system with two identical bearings, which reduces the number of unknown linear dynamic coefficients to eight. The filter estimates for the direct damping coefficients and all four stiffness coefficients correlated well with actual values, whereas the estimates for the cross-coupled damping coefficients were the least accurate.

Miller, Brad A.; Howard, Samuel A.

2008-01-01

189

Identifying Bearing Rotordynamic Coefficients using an Extended Kalman Filter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An Extended Kalman Filter is developed to estimate the linearized direct and indirect stiffness and damping force coefficients for bearings in rotor-dynamic applications from noisy measurements of the shaft displacement in response to imbalance and impact excitation. The bearing properties are modeled as stochastic random variables using a Gauss-Markov model. Noise terms are introduced into the system model to account for all of the estimation error, including modeling errors and uncertainties and the propagation of measurement errors into the parameter estimates. The system model contains two user-defined parameters that can be tuned to improve the filter s performance; these parameters correspond to the covariance of the system and measurement noise variables. The filter is also strongly influenced by the initial values of the states and the error covariance matrix. The filter is demonstrated using numerically simulated data for a rotor-bearing system with two identical bearings, which reduces the number of unknown linear dynamic coefficients to eight. The filter estimates for the direct damping coefficients and all four stiffness coefficients correlated well with actual values, whereas the estimates for the cross-coupled damping coefficients were the least accurate.

Miller, Bard A.; Howard, Samuel A.

2008-01-01

190

Pulmonary vascular wall stiffness: An important contributor to the increased right ventricular afterload with pulmonary hypertension  

PubMed Central

Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with structural and mechanical changes in the pulmonary vascular bed that increase right ventricular (RV) afterload. These changes, characterized by narrowing and stiffening, occur in both proximal and distal pulmonary arteries (PAs). An important consequence of arterial narrowing is increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Arterial stiffening, which can occur in both the proximal and distal pulmonary arteries, is an important index of disease progression and is a significant contributor to increased RV afterload in PH. In particular, arterial narrowing and stiffening increase the RV afterload by increasing steady and oscillatory RV work, respectively. Here we review the current state of knowledge of the causes and consequences of pulmonary arterial stiffening in PH and its impact on RV function. We review direct and indirect techniques for measuring proximal and distal pulmonary arterial stiffness, measures of arterial stiffness including elastic modulus, incremental elastic modulus, stiffness coefficient ? and others, the changes in cellular function and the extracellular matrix proteins that contribute to pulmonary arterial stiffening, the consequences of PA stiffening for RV function and the clinical implications of pulmonary vascular stiffening for PH progression. Future investigation of the relationship between PA stiffening and RV dysfunction may facilitate new therapies aimed at improving RV function and thus ultimately reducing mortality in PH. PMID:22034607

Wang, Zhijie; Chesler, Naomi C.

2011-01-01

191

Effects of varying machine stiffness and contact area in UltraForm Finishing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

UltraForm Finishing (UFF) is a deterministic, subaperture, computer numerically controlled, grinding and polishing platform designed by OptiPro Systems. UFF is used to grind and polish a variety optics from simple spherical to fully freeform, and numerous materials from glasses to optical ceramics. The UFF system consists of an abrasive belt around a compliant wheel that rotates and contacts the part to remove material. This work aims to measure the stiffness variations in the system and how it can affect material removal rates. The stiffness of the entire system is evaluated using a triaxial load cell to measure forces and a capacitance sensor to measure deviations in height. Because the wheel is conformal and elastic, the shapes of contact areas are also of interest. For the scope of this work, the shape of the contact area is estimated via removal spot. The measured forces and removal spot area are directly related to material removal rate through Preston's equation. Using our current testing apparatus, we will demonstrate stiffness measurements and contact areas for a single UFF belt during different states of its lifecycle and assess the material removal function from spot diagrams as a function of wear. This investigation will ultimately allow us to make better estimates of Preston's coefficient and develop spot-morphing models in an effort to more accurately predict instantaneous material removal functions throughout the lifetime of a belt.

Briggs, Dennis E.; Echaves, Samantha; Pidgeon, Brendan; Travis, Nathan; Ellis, Jonathan D.

2013-09-01

192

Quantitative assessment of sample stiffness and sliding friction from force curves in atomic force microscopy  

SciTech Connect

It has long been recognized that the angular deflection of an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever under ''normal'' loading conditions can be profoundly influenced by the friction between the tip and the surface. It is shown here that a remarkably quantifiable hysteresis occurs in the slope of loading curves whenever the normal flexural stiffness of the AFM cantilever is greater than that of the sample. This situation arises naturally in cantilever-on-cantilever calibration, but also when trying to measure the stiffness of nanomechanical devices or test structures, or when probing any type of surface or structure that is much more compliant along the surface normal than in transverse directions. Expressions and techniques for evaluating the coefficient of sliding friction between the cantilever tip and sample from normal force curves, as well as relations for determining the stiffness of a mechanically compliant specimen are presented. The model is experimentally supported by the results of cantilever-on-cantilever spring constant calibrations. The cantilever spring constants determined here agree with the values determined using the NIST electrostatic force balance within the limits of the largest uncertainty component, which had a relative value of less than 2.5%. This points the way for quantitative testing of micromechanical and nanomechanical components, more accurate calibration of AFM force, and provides nanotribologists access to information about contact friction from normal force curves.

Pratt, Jon R.; Shaw, Gordon A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Kumanchik, Lee [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Burnham, Nancy A. [Department of Physics, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609-2280 (United States)

2010-02-15

193

Quantitative assessment of sample stiffness and sliding friction from force curves in atomic force microscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has long been recognized that the angular deflection of an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever under "normal" loading conditions can be profoundly influenced by the friction between the tip and the surface. It is shown here that a remarkably quantifiable hysteresis occurs in the slope of loading curves whenever the normal flexural stiffness of the AFM cantilever is greater than that of the sample. This situation arises naturally in cantilever-on-cantilever calibration, but also when trying to measure the stiffness of nanomechanical devices or test structures, or when probing any type of surface or structure that is much more compliant along the surface normal than in transverse directions. Expressions and techniques for evaluating the coefficient of sliding friction between the cantilever tip and sample from normal force curves, as well as relations for determining the stiffness of a mechanically compliant specimen are presented. The model is experimentally supported by the results of cantilever-on-cantilever spring constant calibrations. The cantilever spring constants determined here agree with the values determined using the NIST electrostatic force balance within the limits of the largest uncertainty component, which had a relative value of less than 2.5%. This points the way for quantitative testing of micromechanical and nanomechanical components, more accurate calibration of AFM force, and provides nanotribologists access to information about contact friction from normal force curves.

Pratt, Jon R.; Shaw, Gordon A.; Kumanchik, Lee; Burnham, Nancy A.

2010-02-01

194

ESTIMATING COTTON EVAPOTRANSPIRATION CROP COEFFICIENTS WITH A MULTISPECTRAL VEGETATION INDEX  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Crop coefficients are a widely used and universally accepted method for estimating the crop evapotranspiration (ETc) component in irrigation scheduling programs. However, uncertainties of generalized basal crop coefficient (Kcb) curves can contribute to ETc estimates that are substantially different...

195

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, Stiffness and grip force measurement using  

E-print Network

basic elements: eccentric mass dc motor, skin mechanical impedance, system mass and muscle stiffness level 100%, we have a muscle stiffness of 816.1 N/m. Graph taken from [4], Fig. 4, subject B. ............................................................................................................................13 Figure 6: scheme showing skin mechanical impedance. Composed of a mass component (M), a damper

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

196

Real-time single-cell response to stiffness  

PubMed Central

Living cells adapt to the stiffness of their environment. However, cell response to stiffness is mainly thought to be initiated by the deformation of adhesion complexes under applied force. In order to determine whether cell response was triggered by stiffness or force, we have developed a unique method allowing us to tune, in real time, the effective stiffness experienced by a single living cell in a uniaxial traction geometry. In these conditions, the rate of traction force buildup dF/dt was adapted to stiffness in less than 0.1 s. This integrated fast response was unambiguously triggered by stiffness, and not by force. It suggests that early cell response could be mechanical in nature. In fact, local force-dependent signaling through adhesion complexes could be triggered and coordinated by the instantaneous cell-scale adaptation of dF/dt to stiffness. Remarkably, the effective stiffness method presented here can be implemented on any mechanical setup. Thus, beyond single-cell mechanosensing, this method should be useful to determine the role of rigidity in many fundamental phenomena such as morphogenesis and development. PMID:20823257

Mitrossilis, Démosthène; Fouchard, Jonathan; Pereira, David; Postic, François; Richert, Alain; Saint-Jean, Michel; Asnacios, Atef

2010-01-01

197

Theoretical and experimental determination of capstan drive stiffness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cable or metal band capstan drives are used as rotary transmission elements for their very low (nominally zero) backlash and high stiffness properties. Cable drives, in particular, are found in many types of equipment, and to obtain high stiffness, the cable is typically wrapped around the input and output drum in a figure-eight pattern. This paper develops analytical methods for

Jaime Werkmeister; Alexander Slocum

2007-01-01

198

Ankle Strength and Stiffness Predict Range of Motion During  

E-print Network

Ankle Strength and Stiffness Predict Range of Motion During Walking in Older Adults Erica D Persons, 2001) · Studies focusing on lower extremity vulnerability show weakness in the ankle dorsiflexors and lack of flexibility of ankle plantarflexors increase risk of falling. (Hylton, 2003) · Ankle stiffness

New Hampshire, University of

199

Assessing muscle stiffness from quiet stance in Parkinson's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

In previous studies, we developed a postural stiffness mea- sure that is extracted from foot center-of-pressure (COP) trajectories from quietly standing individuals and is based on an analytical mechanical model of posture control. Here we apply this measure to patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We correlated the postural stiffness measure with different clinical rating scales, obtained from patients. Kendall's rank

Michael Lauk; Carson C. Chow; Lewis A. Lipsitz; Susan L. Mitchell; James J. Collins

1999-01-01

200

Measuring Interfacial Stiffness of Adhesively-Bonded Wood  

E-print Network

1 Measuring Interfacial Stiffness of Adhesively-Bonded Wood Edward A. Le FPInnovations - Engineered Interfacial Stiffness of Adhesively-Bonded Wood Abstract Future Abstract (100 to 150 words) 1. Introduction Adhesive bonds in wood composites have two roles. The first is to hold elements of the composite together

Nairn, John A.

201

SelfScaling Fast Rotations for Stiff and Equality Constrained  

E-print Network

Self­Scaling Fast Rotations for Stiff and Equality Constrained Linear Least Squares Problems Andrew rotations to the QR decomposition for stiff least squares problems. We show that both fast and standard with extremely large weights when equality constrained least squares problems are solved by the weighting method

Park, Haesun

202

Boundary Stiffness Regulates Fibroblast Behavior in Collagen Gels  

PubMed Central

Recent studies have illustrated the profound dependence of cellular behavior on the stiffness of 2D culture substrates. The goal of this study was to develop a method to alter the stiffness cells experience in a standard 3D collagen gel model without affecting the physiochemical properties of the extracellular matrix. A device was developed utilizing compliant anchors (0.048–0.64 N m?1) to tune the boundary stiffness of suspended collagen gels in between the commonly utilized free and fixed conditions (zero and infinite stiffness boundary stiffness). We demonstrate the principle of operation with finite element analyses and a wide range of experimental studies. In all cases, boundary stiffness has a strong influence on cell behavior, most notably eliciting higher basal tension and activated force (in response to KCl) and more pronounced remodeling of the collagen matrix at higher boundary stiffness levels. Measured equibiaxial forces for gels seeded with 3 million human foreskin fibroblasts range from 0.05 to 1 mN increasing monotonically with boundary stiffness. Estimated force per cell ranges from 17 to 100 nN utilizing representative volume element analysis. This device provides a valuable tool to independently study the effect of the mechanical environment of the cell in a 3D collagen matrix. PMID:20012205

John, Jeffrey; Quinlan, Angela Throm; Silvestri, Chiara; Billiar, Kristen

2010-01-01

203

Tunable stiffness of electrorheological elastomers by designing mesostructures  

E-print Network

Tunable stiffness of electrorheological elastomers by designing mesostructures Changyong Cao://apl.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Tunable stiffness of electrorheological elastomers by designing mesostructures Changyong Cao1 online 22 July 2013) Electrorheological elastomers have broad and important applications. While existing

Zhao, Xuanhe

204

Kinematic optimization for isotropic stiffness of redundantly actuated parallel manipulators  

Microsoft Academic Search

? Abstract— A kinematic optimization procedure for redundantly actuated parallel manipulator is developed to ensure the isotropic antagonistic stiffness in a workspace. The kinematic parameters of the mechanism are optimized to maximize and equal out antagonistic stiffness of the redundantly actuated manipulator when size and shape of the usable workspace are given but position in the entire workspace is not.

Hyunpyo Shin; SungCheul Lee; Jay I. Jeong; Jongwon Kim

2011-01-01

205

Stiffness coupling application to modal synthesis program, users guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A FORTRAN IV computer program used to perform modal synthesis of structures by stiffness coupling, using the dynamic transformation method is described. The program was named SCAMP (Stiffness Coupling Approach Modal-Synthesis Program). The program begins with the entry of a substructure's physical mode shapes and eigenvalues or a substructure's mass and stiffness matrix. If the mass and stiffness matrices are entered, the eigen problem for the individual substructure is solved. Provisions are included for a maximum of 20 substructures which are coupled by stiffness matrix springs. Each substructure has a number degrees of freedom (DOF), except that for DOF greater than 100; vector sets having maximum row and column size of 100 were generated prior to entering SCAMP. The substructures are then coupled together via coupling springs, and the dynamic transformation is used to reduce the size of the eigen problem.

Kuhar, E. J.

1976-01-01

206

A Treatise on Equivalent-Plate Stiffnesses for Stiffened Laminated-Composite Plates and Plate-Like Lattices  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A survey of studies conducted since 1914 on the use of equivalent-plate stiffnesses in modeling the overall, stiffness-critical response of stiffened plates and shells is presented. Two detailed, comprehensive derivations of first-approximation equivalent-plate stiffnesses are also presented that are based on the Reissner-Mindlin-type, first-order transverse-shear deformation theory for anisotropic plates. Equivalent-plate stiffness expressions, and a corresponding symbolic manipulation computer program, are also presented for several different stiffener configurations. These expressions are very general and exhibit the full range of anisotropies permitted by the Reissner-Mindlin-type, first-order transverse-shear deformation theory for anisotropic plates. The expressions presented in the present study were also compared with available, previously published results. For the most part, the previously published results are for special cases of the general expressions presented herein and are almost in complete agreement. Analysis is also presented that extends the use of the equivalent-plate stiffness expressions to sandwich plates.

Nemeth, Michael P.

2011-01-01

207

Identification of intrinsic and reflexive contributions to low-back stiffness: medium-term reliability and construct validity.  

PubMed

This study aimed at testing the reliability and construct validity of a trunk perturbation protocol (TPP) that estimates the intrinsic and reflexive contributions to low-back stiffness. The TPP consists of a series of pseudorandom position-controlled trunk perturbations in an apparatus measuring forces and displacements at the harness surrounding the thorax. Intrinsic and reflexive contributions to low-back stiffness were estimated using a system identification procedure, leading to 12 parameters. Study 1 methods (reliability): 30 subjects performed five 75-s trials, on each of two separate days (eight weeks apart). Reliability was assessed using the generalizability theory, which allowed computing indexes of dependability (?, analogous to intraclass correlation coefficient) and standard errors of measurement (SEM). Study 2 methods (validity): 20 healthy subjects performed three 75-s trials for each of five experimental conditions assumed to provide different lumbar stiffness; testing the construct validity of the TPP using four conditions with different lumbar belt designs and one control condition without. Study 1 results (reliability): Learning was seen between the first and following trials. Consequently, reliability analyses were performed without the first trial. Simulations showed that averaging the scores of three trials can lead to acceptable reliability results for some TPP parameters. Study 2 results (validity): All lumbar belt designs increased low-back intrinsic stiffness, while only some of them decreased reflex stiffness, which support the construct validity of the TPP. Overall, these findings support the use of the TPP to test the effect of rehabilitation or between-groups differences with regards to trunk stiffness. PMID:25529140

Larivière, Christian; Ludvig, Daniel; Kearney, Robert; Mecheri, Hakim; Caron, Jean-Maxime; Preuss, Richard

2015-01-21

208

Determination of loose spline coupling coefficients of rotor bearing systems in turbomachinery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Analytical and experimental studies have been carried out to determine the stiffness and damping coefficients of loose spline couplings used in high speed rotating machinery from which a realistic assessment of rotor stability can be made at the turbomachinery design stage. This is believed to be the first attempt ever to determine these coefficients experimentally. Experimental modal parameters of the rotor bearing system with a spline coupling are found using modal testing for given spline geometry, misalignment, lubrication condition, torque, and rotational speeds. A dual rotor computer algorithm which contains a spline coupling model is developed in order to calculate the analytical modal parameters. Support bearing coefficients are obtained using a pressure dam bearing computer code which employs lubrication theory. Spline coupling coefficients are determined by adjusting the model until the analytical modal parameters match the experimental modal parameters. Both computer simulations and impact testing show that shaft speed and torque are the most important parameters which affect the system natural frequency and logarithmic decrement. However, the modal parameters are not very sensitive to the spine coupling coefficients. Only the second natural frequency shows any sensitivity to the spline angular stiffness. The lateral stiffness coefficient of the spline coupling decreases as rotational speed increases. Lateral and angular damping do not influence the modal parameter until unreasonably large values are considered. This is due to the large value of damping in the pressure dam bearings. Since the modal parameters are insensitive to the spline coefficients, a set of error bounds for the experimental values are chosen to determine the ranges of the loose spline coupling coefficients. The results show that the value of the spline lateral stiffness is between 2.0 x10(exp 7) and 8.0 x 10(exp 8) N/m and the spline angular stiffness is between 2.0 x 10(exp 5) and 8.0 x 10(exp 8) N/m, and the spline angular stiffness is between 2.0 x 10(exp 6) Nm/rad. However, it is impossible to identify the spline damping coefficients because the effect of the support bearing damping coefficients suppress the nonsynchronous whirling motion due to the spline friction even at speeds above the first critical speed.

Park, Sang Kyu

209

The SSME HPFTP interstage seals: Analysis and experiments for leakage and reaction-force coefficients  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An improved theory for the prediction of the rotordynamic coefficients of turbulent annular seals was developed. Predictions from the theory are compared to the experimental results and an approach for the direct calculation of empirical turbulent coefficients from test data are introduced. An improved short seal solution is shown to do a better job of calculating effective stiffness and damping coefficients than either the original short seal solution or a finite length solution. However, the original short seal solution does a much better job of predicting equivalent added mass coefficient.

Childs, D. W.

1983-01-01

210

Sources of Variability in Musculo-Articular Stiffness Measurement  

PubMed Central

The assessment of musculo-articular stiffness (MAS) with the free-oscillation technique is a popular method with a variety of applications. This study examined the sources of variability (load applied and frequency of oscillation) when MAS is assessed. Over two testing occasions, 14 healthy men (27.7±5.2 yr, 1.82±0.04 m, 79.5±8.4 kg) were measured for isometric maximum voluntary contraction and MAS of the knee flexors using submaximal loads relative to the individual's maximum voluntary contraction (MAS%MVC) and a single absolute load (MASABS). As assessment load increased, MAS%MVC (coefficient of variation (CV) ?=? 8.1–12.1%; standard error of measurement (SEM) ?=? 51.6–98.8 Nm?1) and frequency (CV ?=? 4.8–7.0%; SEM ?=? 0.060–0.075 s?1) variability increased consequently. Further, similar levels of variability arising from load (CV ?=? 6.7%) and frequency (CV ?=? 4.8–7.0%) contributed to the overall MAS%MVC variability. The single absolute load condition yielded better reliability scores for MASABS (CV ?=? 6.5%; SEM ?=? 40.2 Nm?1) and frequency (CV ?=? 3.3%; SEM ?=? 0.039 s?1). Low and constant loads for MAS assessment, which are particularly relevant in the clinical setting, exhibited superior reliability compared to higher loads expressed as a percentage of maximum voluntary contraction, which are more suitable for sporting situations. Appropriate sample size and minimum detectable change can therefore be determined when prospective studies are carried out. PMID:23667662

Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Watsford, Mark; Murphy, Aron; De Vito, Giuseppe

2013-01-01

211

Antibody biodistribution coefficients  

PubMed Central

Tissue vs. plasma concentration profiles have been generated from a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of monoclonal antibody (mAb). Based on the profiles, we hypothesized that a linear relationship between the plasma and tissue concentrations of non-binding mAbs could exist; and that the relationship may be generally constant irrespective of the absolute mAb concentration, time, and animal species being analyzed. The hypothesis was verified for various tissues in mice, rat, monkey, and human using mAb or antibody-drug conjugate tissue distribution data collected from diverse literature. The relationship between the plasma and various tissue concentrations was mathematically characterized using the antibody biodistribution coefficient (ABC). Estimated ABC values suggest that typically the concentration of mAb in lung is 14.9%, heart 10.2%, kidney 13.7%, muscle 3.97%, skin 15.7%, small intestine 5.22%, large intestine 5.03%, spleen 12.8%, liver 12.1%, bone 7.27%, stomach 4.98%, lymph node 8.46%, adipose 4.78%, brain 0.351%, pancreas 6.4%, testes 5.88%, thyroid 67.5% and thymus is 6.62% of the plasma concentration. The validity of using the ABC to predict mAb concentrations in different tissues of mouse, rat, monkey, and human species was evaluated by generating validation data sets, which demonstrated that predicted concentrations were within 2-fold of the observed concentrations. The use of ABC to infer tissue concentrations of mAbs and related molecules provides a valuable tool for investigating preclinical or clinical disposition of these molecules. It can also help eliminate or optimize biodistribution studies, and interpret efficacy or toxicity of the drug in a particular tissue. PMID:23406896

Shah, Dhaval K.; Betts, Alison M.

2013-01-01

212

Stiffness nanotomography of human epithelial cancer cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mechanical stiffness of individual cells is important in both cancer initiation and metastasis. We present atomic force microscopy (AFM) based nanoindentation experiments on various human mammary and esophagus cell lines covering the spectrum from normal immortalized cells to highly metastatic ones. The combination of an AFM with a confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (FLIM) in conjunction with the ability to move the sample and objective independently allow for precise alignment of AFM probe and laser focus with an accuracy down to a few nanometers. This enables us to correlate the mechanical properties with the point of indentation in the FLIM image. We are using force-volume measurements as well as force indentation curves on distinct points on the cells to compare the elastic moduli of the nuclei, nucleoli, and the cytoplasm, and how they vary within and between individual cells and cell lines. Further, a detailed analysis of the force-indentation curves allows study of the cells' mechanical properties at different indentation depths and to generate 3D elasticity maps.

Staunton, Jack R.; Doss, Bryant L.; Gilbert, C. Michael; Kasas, Sandor; Ros, Robert

2012-02-01

213

Arterial stiffness and cognitive function in the elderly  

PubMed Central

Cognitive decline and dementia are a major cause of disability and mortality among older adults. Cross-sectional evidence from observational studies suggests that greater arterial stiffness is associated with worse cognitive performance. These associations have been observed on measures of global cognition and across multiple domains of cognition. Epidemiologic evidence on the association between arterial stiffness and rate of cognitive decline has been less definitive, and very few studies have investigated the risk of developing dementia. This review summarizes the current research on arterial stiffness and cognition, issues around measurement and the effect that potential intervention might have on the course of cognitive aging. The evidence on pharmacological and non-pharmacological (exercise, nutrition, etc) interventions in older adults with arterial stiffness is promising. Yet there are no studies or trials that directly evaluate how interventions of arterial stiffness reduce or prevent cognitive impairment and risk of developing dementia. More research is needed to elucidate the causal link between arterial stiffness and cognitive decline and dementia, and to identify whether potential interventions to prevent or reduce arterial stiffness may benefit cognitive health of the elderly. PMID:25351110

Hazzouri, Adina Zeki Al; Yaffe, Kristine

2015-01-01

214

Experimental and theoretical rotordynamic coefficients and leakage of straight smooth annular gas seals  

E-print Network

of straight smooth annular gas seals are assumed to be frequency independent, experimental results suggest a frequency dependent nature at high back-pressures and high excitation frequencies. Experimental results for rotordynamic coefficients and leakage.... Excitation Frequency, C r = 0.2mm .............................................................................................................20 8 Non-Dimensional Direct Stiffness vs. Excitation Frequency, Zero Preswirl, Cr = 0.1mm...

Kerr, Bradley Gray

2005-02-17

215

Use of Guided Acoustic Waves to Assess the Effects of Thermal-Mechanical Cycling on Composite Stiffness  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The introduction of new, advanced composite materials into aviation systems requires it thorough understanding of the long-term effects of combined thermal and mechanical loading. As part of a study to evaluate the effects of thermal-mechanical cycling, it guided acoustic (Lamb) wave measurement system was used to measure the bending and out-of-plane stiffness coefficients of composite laminates undergoing thermal-mechanical loading. The system uses a pulse/receive technique that excites an antisymmetric Lamb mode and measures the time-of-flight over a wide frequency range. Given the material density and plate thickness, the bending and out-of-plane shear stiffnesses are calculated from a reconstruction of the velocity dispersion curve. A series of 16 and 32-ply composite laminates were subjected to it thermal-mechanical loading profile in load frames equipped with special environmental chambers. The composite systems studied were it graphite fiber reinforced amorphous thermoplastic polyimide and it graphite fiber reinforced bismaleimide thermoset. The samples were exposed to both high and low temperature extremes its well as high and low strain profiles. The bending and out-of-plane stiffnesses for composite sample that have undergone over 6,000 cycles of thermal-mechanical loading are reported. The Lamb wave generated elastic stiffness results have shown decreases of up to 20% at 4,936 loading cycles for the graphite/thermoplastic samples and up to 64% at 4,706 loading cycles for the graphite/thermoset samples.

Seale, Michael D.; Madaras, Eric I.

2000-01-01

216

Charts relating the compressive buckling stress of longitudinally supported plates to the effective deflectional and rotational stiffness of the supports  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A stability analysis is made of a long flat rectangular plate subjected to a uniform longitudinal compressive stress and supported along its longitudinal edges and along one or more longitudinal lines by elastic line supports. The elastic supports possess deflectional and rotational stiffness. Such configuration is an idealization of the compression cover skin and internal structure of a wing and tail surfaces. The results of the analysis are presented in the form of charts in which the buckling-stress coefficient is plotted against the buckle length of the plate for a wide range of support stiffnesses. The charts make possible the determination of the compressive buckling stress of plates supported by members whose stiffness may or may not be defined by elementary beam bending and twisting theory but yet whose effective restraint is amenable to evaluation. The deflectional and rotational stiffness provided by longitudinal stiffeners and full-depth webs is discussed and numerical examples are given to illustrate the application of the charts to the design of wing structures.

Anderson, Roger A; Semonian, Joseph W

1954-01-01

217

Pressure element of constant logarithmic stiffness for temperature compensated altimeter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The usual type of altimeter contains a pressure element, the deflections of which are approximately proportional to pressure changes. An evenly divided altitude scale is secured by using a mechanism between the pressure element and pointer which gives the required motion of the pointer. A temperature-compensated altimeter was constructed at the Bureau of Standards for the Bureau of Aeronautics of the Navy Department which contained a manually operated device for controlling the multiplication of the mechanism to the extent necessary for temperature compensation. The introduction of this device made it difficult to adjust the multiplying mechanism to fit an evenly divided altitude scale. To meet this difficulty a pressure element was designed and constructed which gave deflections which were proportional to altitude; that is, to the logarithm of the pressure. The element consisted of a metal bellows of the sylphon type coupled to an internal helical spring which was designed so as to have a variable number of active coils. This report presents a description of and laboratory data relating to the special pressure element for the altimeter. In addition equations which apply generally to springs and pressure elements of constant logarithmic stiffness are developed, including the deflection and the spacing between the coils in terms of the constants of the helical spring and pressure elements. (author)

Brombacher, W G; Cordero, F

1930-01-01

218

Modulating polymer chemistry to enhance non-viral gene delivery inside hydrogels with tunable matrix stiffness.  

PubMed

Non-viral gene delivery holds great promise for promoting tissue regeneration, and offers a potentially safer alternative than viral vectors. Great progress has been made to develop biodegradable polymeric vectors for non-viral gene delivery in 2D culture, which generally involves isolating and modifying cells in vitro, followed by subsequent transplantation in vivo. Scaffold-mediated gene delivery may eliminate the need for the multiple-step process in vitro, and allows sustained release of nucleic acids in situ. Hydrogels are widely used tissue engineering scaffolds given their tissue-like water content, injectability and tunable biochemical and biophysical properties. However, previous attempts on developing hydrogel-mediated non-viral gene delivery have generally resulted in low levels of transgene expression inside 3D hydrogels, and increasing hydrogel stiffness further decreased such transfection efficiency. Here we report the development of biodegradable polymeric vectors that led to efficient gene delivery inside poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels with tunable matrix stiffness. Photocrosslinkable gelatin was maintained constant in the hydrogel network to allow cell adhesion. We identified a lead biodegradable polymeric vector, E6, which resulted in increased polyplex stability, DNA protection and achieved sustained high levels of transgene expression inside 3D PEG-DMA hydrogels for at least 12 days. Furthermore, we demonstrated that E6-based polyplexes allowed efficient gene delivery inside hydrogels with tunable stiffness ranging from 2 to 175 kPa, with the peak transfection efficiency observed in hydrogels with intermediate stiffness (28 kPa). The reported hydrogel-mediated gene delivery platform using biodegradable polyplexes may serve as a local depot for sustained transgene expression in situ to enhance tissue engineering across broad tissue types. PMID:24011715

Keeney, Michael; Onyiah, Sheila; Zhang, Zhe; Tong, Xinming; Han, Li-Hsin; Yang, Fan

2013-12-01

219

Modeling, Modal Properties, and Mesh Stiffness Variation Instabilities of Planetary Gears  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Planetary gear noise and vibration are primary concerns in their applications in helicopters, automobiles, aircraft engines, heavy machinery and marine vehicles. Dynamic analysis is essential to the noise and vibration reduction. This work analytically investigates some critical issues and advances the understanding of planetary gear dynamics. A lumped-parameter model is built for the dynamic analysis of general planetary gears. The unique properties of the natural frequency spectra and vibration modes are rigorously characterized. These special structures apply for general planetary gears with cyclic symmetry and, in practically important case, systems with diametrically opposed planets. The special vibration properties are useful for subsequent research. Taking advantage of the derived modal properties, the natural frequency and vibration mode sensitivities to design parameters are investigated. The key parameters include mesh stiffnesses, support/bearing stiffnesses, component masses, moments of inertia, and operating speed. The eigen-sensitivities are expressed in simple, closed-form formulae associated with modal strain and kinetic energies. As disorders (e.g., mesh stiffness variation. manufacturing and assembling errors) disturb the cyclic symmetry of planetary gears, their effects on the free vibration properties are quantitatively examined. Well-defined veering rules are derived to identify dramatic changes of natural frequencies and vibration modes under parameter variations. The knowledge of free vibration properties, eigen-sensitivities, and veering rules provide important information to effectively tune the natural frequencies and optimize structural design to minimize noise and vibration. Parametric instabilities excited by mesh stiffness variations are analytically studied for multi-mesh gear systems. The discrepancies of previous studies on parametric instability of two-stage gear chains are clarified using perturbation and numerical methods. The operating conditions causing parametric instabilities are expressed in closed-form suitable for design guidance. Using the well-defined modal properties of planetary gears, the effects of mesh parameters on parametric instability are analytically identified. Simple formulae are obtained to suppress particular instabilities by adjusting contact ratios and mesh phasing.

Parker, Robert G.; Lin, Jian; Krantz, Timothy L. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

220

Influence of training background on the relationships between plantarflexor intrinsic stiffness and overall musculoskeletal stiffness during hopping  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of intrinsic musculotendinous and musculoarticular stiffness of plantarflexor\\u000a muscles on (1) the overall musculoskeletal stiffness and (2) the performance during stretch-shortening cycles-type exercise.\\u000a The influence of plyometric training background on these relationships was also analyzed. Musculotendinous (SIMT), passive (K\\u000a \\u000a P\\u000a ) and active (SIMA) musculoarticular stiffnesses were quantified, using quick-release

Giuseppe Rabita; Antoine Couturier; Daniel Lambertz

2008-01-01

221

An experimental and theoretical comparison of rotordynamic coefficients for sawtooth-pattern damper seals. M.S. Thesis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A brief review of the annular seal theory as related to rotordynamics for liquid seals is presented. Also included is an overview of Childs and Kim's current theory for calculating empirical turbulence coefficients and predicting stiffness and damping coefficients for surface roughened damper seals. The designation sawtooth-pattern refers to a seal stator with a roughness pattern whose cross section normal to the seal axis resembles a sawtooth with the teeth directed against the flow. The net stiffness and damping coefficients for the eleven seals are compared to each other, a smooth seal, and the optimum-configuration damper seal previously tested. The experimental force coefficients, the net damping, and the net stiffness coefficients for four of the sawtooth seals are compared to the predictions of Childs and Kim's analysis. The sawtooth-pattern seal had less net damping than the hole-pattern seal but more than the smooth seal. The stiffness was comparable to the hole-pattern. Both the sawtooth and hole-pattern seals leaked less than the smooth seal, while the sawtooth-pattern seal with maximum damping leaked more than the hole-pattern seal. The theoretical predictions compared relatively poorly to the experimental results obtained for the rotordynamic coefficients of the seals investigation.

Nolan, Steven Anthony

1987-01-01

222

The measurement of plain weft-knitted fabric stiffness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new instrument and a test method are presented in this paper that can evaluate the stiffness of plain weft-knitted fabrics. The WIRA Instrumentation Tester can measure torsion data for various flexible fibre assemblies whilst they are being twisted. The torsional properties of two types of fabrics, namely nonwoven and knitted fabrics, were analyzed. Then, comparisons between bending rigidity and torsional rigidity have been conducted using FAST-2, Shirley, Heart Loop and the new WIRA method for the assessment of fabric stiffness. The results show high correlation between bending rigidity and torsional rigidity in assessment of nonwoven fabric stiffness; they also reveal that the WIRA tester and torsional rigidity are more suitable for characterizing the stiffness of plain weft-knitted fabrics than the other test methods.

Haji Mohamad, Ayhan; Cassidy, Thomas; Brydon, Alan; Halley, Dave

2012-05-01

223

[Impact of aortic stiffness on central hemodynamics and cardiovascular system].  

PubMed

Arterial stiffness increases as a result of degenerative processes accelerated by aging and many risk factors, namely arterial hypertension. Basic clinical examination reveals increased pulse pressure as its hemodynamic manifestation. The most serious consequence of increased vascular stiffness, which cannot be revealed by clinical examination, is a change of central hemodynamics leading to increased load of left ventricle, left ventricular hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction and to overall increase of cardiovascular risk. This review aimed to point at some patophysiological mechanisms taking part in the development of vascular stiffness, vascular remodeling and hemodynamic consequences of these changes. This work also gives an overview of noninvasive examination methods and their characteristics enabling to evaluate the local, regional and systemic arterial stiffness and central pulse wave analysis and their meaning for central hemodynamics and heart workload. PMID:23808736

Bulas, J; Poto?árová, M; Filková, M; Simková, A; Murín, J

2013-06-01

224

HETEROGENEOUS MULTISCALE METHODS FOR STIFF ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS  

E-print Network

HETEROGENEOUS MULTISCALE METHODS FOR STIFF ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS BJORN ENGQUIST- ical approximation of multiscale problems. It is here developed for ordinary differential equations are presented together with numerical tests. The analysis covers some existing methods and the new algorithms

Soatto, Stefano

225

STIFFNESS MAPPING OF PLANAR COMPLIANT PARALLEL MECHANISMS IN A  

E-print Network

, Carl D. Crane III University of Florida Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering hyunkwon.jungSTIFFNESS MAPPING OF PLANAR COMPLIANT PARALLEL MECHANISMS IN A SERIAL ARRANGEMENT Hyun K. Jung

Florida, University of

226

Stiffness mapping of compliant parallel mechanisms in a serial arrangement  

E-print Network

Stiffness mapping of compliant parallel mechanisms in a serial arrangement Hyun K. Jung a , Carl D.: +1 352 392 9461; fax: +1 352 392 1071. E-mail addresses: hyunkwon.jung@gmail.com (H.K. Jung), ccrane

Florida, University of

227

Effects of bonding stiffness on thermal stresses in sandwich panels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sandwich panels made of thin skins and a lightweight core expand and/or bow when subjected to temperature changes. The significance of induced thermal stresses in the panels depends on material properties. The effects of bonding layers on these stresses were not investigated in available works on the structural analysis of sandwich panels. This paper presents elasticity solutions for thermal stresses in sandwich panels with interlayer slip. The effects of finite bonding stiffnesses on the structural behavior of the panels are investigated. The numerical results show that the bonding stiffness, up to a certain level, has a strong effect on panel structural response. The answer to what constitutes perfect bonding is best answered in terms of the ratio of the core stiffness to the bonding stiffness. A heat chamber is designed and used to test sandwich specimens under different temperature changes. The experimental values for normal stresses in the skins are in good agreement with the present theory.

Hussein, R.; Fazio, P.; Ha, K.

1992-10-01

228

Operator-Based Preconditioning of Stiff Hyperbolic Systems  

SciTech Connect

We introduce an operator-based scheme for preconditioning stiff components encoun- tered in implicit methods for hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations posed on regular grids. The method is based on a directional splitting of the implicit operator, followed by a char- acteristic decomposition of the resulting directional parts. This approach allows for solution to any number of characteristic components, from the entire system to only the fastest, stiffness-inducing waves. We apply the preconditioning method to stiff hyperbolic systems arising in magnetohydro- dynamics and gas dynamics. We then present numerical results showing that this preconditioning scheme works well on problems where the underlying stiffness results from the interaction of fast transient waves with slowly-evolving dynamics, scales well to large problem sizes and numbers of processors, and allows for additional customization based on the specific problems under study.

Daniel R. Reynolds, Ravi Samtaney, and Carol S. Woodward

2009-02-09

229

Knee joint stiffness and function following total knee arthroplasty   

E-print Network

Introduction: Studies show that Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) is successful for the majority of patients however some continue to experience some functional limitations and anecdotal evidence indicates that stiffness is ...

Lane, Judith

2010-01-01

230

Stiffness Corrections for the Vibration Frequency of a Stretched Wire  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the need of introducing corrections due to wire stiffness arising from end constraints and wire axis distribution curvature in the measurement of ac electrical frequency by exciting transverse standing waves in a stretched steel wire. (SL)

Hornung, H. G.; Durie, M. J.

1977-01-01

231

Simultaneous measurement of real contact area and fault normal stiffness during frictional sliding  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The tectonic stresses that lead to earthquake slip are concentrated in small regions of solid contact between asperities or gouge particles within the fault. Fault strength is proportional to the contact area within the shearing portion of the fault zone and many fault properties of interest to earthquake hazard research, e.g., occurrence time, recurrence interval, precursory slip, triggered earthquake slip, are controlled by processes acting at the highly stressed contact regions. Unfortunately the contact-scale physical processes controlling earthquake occurrence cannot be easily observed or measured directly. In this pilot study we simultaneously directly measure contact area using transmitted light intensity (LI) [Dieterich and Kilgore, 1994; 1996] and continuously monitor the normal stiffness of the fault using acoustic wave transmission (AT) [Nagata et al., 2008]. The objective of our study is to determine relations amongst contacting area, stiffness, strength, normal stress, shear displacement, and time of contact during sliding. Interface stiffness is monitored using acoustic compressive waves transmitted across the fault. Because the fault is more compliant in compression than the surrounding rock, the fault has an elastic wave transmission coefficient that depends on the fault normal stiffness. Contact area is measured by LI: regions in contact transmit light efficiently while light is scattered elsewhere; therefore transmitted light intensity is presumed proportional to contact area. LI and AT are expected to be correlated; e.g., an elastic contact model suggests that stiffness goes as the square root of contact area. We observe LI and AT for sliding at slip speeds between 0.01 and 10 microns/s and normal stresses between 1 and 2.5 MPa while conducting standard velocity-step, normal stress-step and slide-hold-slide tests. AT and LI correlate during all tests, at all conditions. If the physical relationship, or even an empirical calibration between AT and LI can be established for rough fault surfaces, contact area could be measured with AT for non-transparent materials and at higher normal stresses than in the present experiments.

Beeler, N. M.; Nagata, K.; Kilgore, B. D.; Nakatani, M.

2010-12-01

232

Micropipette Aspiration of Substrate-attached Cells to Estimate Cell Stiffness  

PubMed Central

Growing number of studies show that biomechanical properties of individual cells play major roles in multiple cellular functions, including cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and cell-cell interactions. The two key parameters of cellular biomechanics are cellular deformability or stiffness and the ability of the cells to contract and generate force. Here we describe a quick and simple method to estimate cell stiffness by measuring the degree of membrane deformation in response to negative pressure applied by a glass micropipette to the cell surface, a technique that is called Micropipette Aspiration or Microaspiration. Microaspiration is performed by pulling a glass capillary to create a micropipette with a very small tip (2-50 ?m diameter depending on the size of a cell or a tissue sample), which is then connected to a pneumatic pressure transducer and brought to a close vicinity of a cell under a microscope. When the tip of the pipette touches a cell, a step of negative pressure is applied to the pipette by the pneumatic pressure transducer generating well-defined pressure on the cell membrane. In response to pressure, the membrane is aspirated into the pipette and progressive membrane deformation or "membrane projection" into the pipette is measured as a function of time. The basic principle of this experimental approach is that the degree of membrane deformation in response to a defined mechanical force is a function of membrane stiffness. The stiffer the membrane is, the slower the rate of membrane deformation and the shorter the steady-state aspiration length.The technique can be performed on isolated cells, both in suspension and substrate-attached, large organelles, and liposomes. Analysis is performed by comparing maximal membrane deformations achieved under a given pressure for different cell populations or experimental conditions. A "stiffness coefficient" is estimated by plotting the aspirated length of membrane deformation as a function of the applied pressure. Furthermore, the data can be further analyzed to estimate the Young's modulus of the cells (E), the most common parameter to characterize stiffness of materials. It is important to note that plasma membranes of eukaryotic cells can be viewed as a bi-component system where membrane lipid bilayer is underlied by the sub-membrane cytoskeleton and that it is the cytoskeleton that constitutes the mechanical scaffold of the membrane and dominates the deformability of the cellular envelope. This approach, therefore, allows probing the biomechanical properties of the sub-membrane cytoskeleton. PMID:23051713

Oh, Myung-Jin; Kuhr, Frank; Byfield, Fitzroy; Levitan, Irena

2012-01-01

233

Young modulus dependence of nanoscopic friction coefficient in hard coatings  

E-print Network

Young modulus dependence of nanoscopic friction coefficient in hard coatings Elisa Riedoa in the friction coefficient can be traced back to variations of the Young modulus. More generally, we show for all samples investigated and in wearless regime, that the nanoscopic friction coefficient is directly linked

Brune, Harald

234

Investigation of strained deformed state of variable stiffness rod.  

PubMed

An equation for bending of a weighable rod with variable transversal stiffness was proposed. On the basis of this analyses the conclusions were drawn about the influence of parameters of construction on values of maximum sag and maximum bending moment. The recommendations for the usage of the simplified model were done. The example of the construction with given parameters for calculation of stiffness and strength according to the represented mathematical models was considered. PMID:25133087

Tsarenko, Sergey; Ulitin, Gennady

2014-01-01

235

Transverse Cracking and Stiffness Reduction in Composite Laminates  

Microsoft Academic Search

A systematic classification of the effects of transverse cracking on the stress-strain response of composite laminates is presented. Stiffness reductions resulting from transverse cracking in glass\\/epoxy and graphite\\/epoxy laminates from crack initiation to crack saturation are predicted using the stiffness-damage relationships developed by the author in a previous work. Good agreement with the experimental results is found. An assessment of

Ramesh Talreja

1985-01-01

236

The initial torsional stiffness of shells with interior webs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method of calculating the stresses and torsional stiffness of thin shells with interior webs is summarized. Comparisons between experimental and calculated results are given for 3 duralumin beams, 5 stainless steel beams and 2 duralumin wings. It is concluded that if the theoretical stiffness is multiplied by a correction factor of 0.9, experimental values may be expected to check calculated values within about 10 percent.

Kuhn, Paul

1935-01-01

237

Leg stiffness of sprinters using running-specific prostheses.  

PubMed

Running-specific prostheses (RSF) are designed to replicate the spring-like nature of biological legs (bioL) during running. However, it is not clear how these devices affect whole leg stiffness characteristics or running dynamics over a range of speeds. We used a simple spring-mass model to examine running mechanics across a range of speeds, in unilateral and bilateral transtibial amputees and performance-matched controls. We found significant differences between the affected leg (AL) of unilateral amputees and both ALs of bilateral amputees compared with the bioL of non-amputees for nearly every variable measured. Leg stiffness remained constant or increased with speed in bioL, but decreased with speed in legs with RSPs. The decrease in leg stiffness in legs with RSPs was mainly owing to a combination of lower peak ground reaction forces and increased leg compression with increasing speeds. Leg stiffness is an important parameter affecting contact time and the force exerted on the ground. It is likely that the fixed stiffness of the prosthesis coupled with differences in the limb posture required to run with the prosthesis limits the ability to modulate whole leg stiffness and the ability to apply high vertical ground reaction forces during sprinting. PMID:22337629

McGowan, Craig P; Grabowski, Alena M; McDermott, William J; Herr, Hugh M; Kram, Rodger

2012-08-01

238

Mesenchymal Stem Cell Durotaxis Depends on Substrate Stiffness Gradient Strength  

PubMed Central

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) respond to niche elasticity, which varies between and within tissues. Stiffness gradients result from pathological conditions but also occur through normal variation, e.g. muscle. MSCs undergo directed migration even in response to shallow stiffness gradients before differentiating. More refined gradients of both stiffness range and strength are needed to better understand mechanical regulation of migration in normal and disease pathologies. We describe polyacrylamide stiffness gradient fabrication using three distinct systems that generate stiffness gradients of physiological (1 Pa/µm), pathological (10 Pa/µm), and step (? 100Pa/um) strength spanning physiologically relevant stiffness for most soft tissue, i.e. 1–12 kPa. MSCs migrated to the stiffest region for each gradient. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that migration velocity scaled directly with gradient strength. Directed migration was reduced in the presence of the contractile agonist lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and cytoskeletal-perturbing drugs nocodazole and cytochalasin; LPA- and nocodazole-treated cells remained spread and protrusive, while cytochalasin-treated cells did not. Untreated and nocodazole-treated cells spread in a similar manner, but nocodazole-treated cells had greatly diminished traction forces. These data suggest that actin is required for migration whereas microtubules are required for directed migration. The data also imply that in vivo, MSCs may have a more significant contribution to repairs in stiffer regions where they may preferentially accumulate. PMID:23390141

Vincent, Ludovic G.; Choi, Yu Suk; Alonso-Latorre, Baldomero; del Álamo, Juan C.; Engler, Adam J.

2013-01-01

239

Stiffness Dependent Separation of Cells in a Microfluidic Device  

PubMed Central

Abnormal cell mechanical stiffness can point to the development of various diseases including cancers and infections. We report a new microfluidic technique for continuous cell separation utilizing variation in cell stiffness. We use a microfluidic channel decorated by periodic diagonal ridges that compress the flowing cells in rapid succession. The compression in combination with secondary flows in the ridged microfluidic channel translates each cell perpendicular to the channel axis in proportion to its stiffness. We demonstrate the physical principle of the cell sorting mechanism and show that our microfluidic approach can be effectively used to separate a variety of cell types which are similar in size but of different stiffnesses, spanning a range from 210 Pa to 23 kPa. Atomic force microscopy is used to directly measure the stiffness of the separated cells and we found that the trajectories in the microchannel correlated to stiffness. We have demonstrated that the current processing throughput is 250 cells per second. This microfluidic separation technique opens new ways for conducting rapid and low-cost cell analysis and disease diagnostics through biophysical markers. PMID:24146787

Wang, Gonghao; Mao, Wenbin; Byler, Rebecca; Patel, Krishna; Henegar, Caitlin; Alexeev, Alexander; Sulchek, Todd

2013-01-01

240

Point shear wave elastography method for assessing liver stiffness  

PubMed Central

AIM: To estimate the validity of the point shear-wave elastography method by evaluating its reproducibility and accuracy for assessing liver stiffness. METHODS: This was a single-center, cross-sectional study. Consecutive patients with chronic viral hepatitis scheduled for liver biopsy (LB) (Group 1) and healthy volunteers (Group 2) were studied. In each subject 10 consecutive point shear-wave elastography (PSWE) measurements were performed using the iU22 ultrasound system (Philips Medical Systems, Bothell, WA, United States). Patients in Group 1 underwent PSWE, transient elastography (TE) using FibroScan (Echosens, Paris, France) and ultrasound-assisted LB. For the assessment of PSWE reproducibility two expert raters (rater 1 and rater 2) independently performed the examinations. The performance of PSWE was compared to that of TE using LB as a reference standard. Fibrosis was staged according to the METAVIR scoring system. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were performed to calculate the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for F ? 2, F ? 3 and F = 4. The intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility of PSWE were assessed by calculating Lin’s concordance correlation coefficient. RESULTS: To assess the performance of PSWE, 134 consecutive patients in Group 1 were studied. The median values of PSWE and TE (in kilopascals) were 4.7 (IQR = 3.8-5.4) and 5.5 (IQR = 4.7-6.5), respectively, in patients at the F0-F1 stage and 3.5 (IQR = 3.2-4.0) and 4.4 (IQR = 3.5-4.9), respectively, in the healthy volunteers in Group 2 (P < 10-5). In the univariate analysis, the PSWE and TE values showed a high correlation with the fibrosis stage; low correlations with the degree of necroinflammation, aspartate aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT); and a moderate negative correlation with the platelet count. A multiple regression analysis confirmed the correlations of both PSWE and TE with fibrosis stage and GGT but not with any other variables. The following AUC values were found: 0.80 (0.71-0.87) for PSWE and 0.82 (0.73-0.89) for TE (P = 0.42); 0.88 (0.80-0.94) for PSWE and 0.95 (0.88-0.98) for TE (P = 0.06); and 0.95 (0.89-0.99) for PSWE and 0.92 (0.85-0.97) for TE (P = 0.30) for F ? 2, F ? 3 and F = 4, respectively. To assess PSWE reproducibility, 116 subjects were studied, including 47 consecutive patients scheduled for LB (Group 1) and 69 consecutive healthy volunteers (Group 2). The intraobserver agreement ranged from 0.83 (95%CI: 0.79-0.88) to 0.96 (95%CI: 0.95-0.97) for rater 1 and from 0.84 (95%CI: 0.79-0.88) to 0.96 (95%CI: 0.95-0.97) for rater 2. The interobserver agreement yielded values from 0.83 (95%CI: 0.78-0.88) to 0.93 (95%CI: 0.91-0.95). CONCLUSION: PSWE is a reproducible method for assessing liver stiffness, and it compares with TE. Compared with patients with nonsignificant fibrosis, healthy volunteers showed significantly lower values. PMID:24782633

Ferraioli, Giovanna; Tinelli, Carmine; Lissandrin, Raffaella; Zicchetti, Mabel; Dal Bello, Barbara; Filice, Gaetano; Filice, Carlo

2014-01-01

241

Direct measurement of human ankle stiffness during quiet standing: the intrinsic mechanical stiffness is insufficient for stability  

PubMed Central

During quiet standing the human ‘inverted pendulum’ sways irregularly. In previous work where subjects balanced a real inverted pendulum, we investigated what contribution the intrinsic mechanical ankle stiffness makes to achieve stability. Using the results of a plausible model, we suggested that intrinsic ankle stiffness is inadequate for providing stability. Here, using a piezo-electric translator we applied small, unobtrusive mechanical perturbations to the foot while the subject was standing freely. These short duration perturbations had a similar size and velocity to movements which occur naturally during quiet standing, and they produced no evidence of any stretch reflex response in soleus, or gastrocnemius. Direct measurement confirms our earlier conclusion; intrinsic ankle stiffness is not quite sufficient to stabilise the body or pendulum. On average the directly determined intrinsic stiffness is 91 ± 23 % (mean ± s.d.) of that necessary to provide minimal stabilisation. The stiffness was substantially constant, increasing only slightly with ankle torque. This stiffness cannot be neurally regulated in quiet standing. Thus we attribute this stiffness to the foot, Achilles’ tendon and aponeurosis rather than the activated calf muscle fibres. Our measurements suggest that the triceps surae muscles maintain balance via a spring-like element which is itself too compliant to guarantee stability. The implication is that the brain cannot set ankle stiffness and then ignore the control task because additional modulation of torque is required to maintain balance. We suggest that the triceps surae muscles maintain balance by predictively controlling the proximal offset of the spring-like element in a ballistic-like manner. PMID:12482906

Loram, Ian D; Lakie, Martin

2002-01-01

242

Explicit Integration of Extremely Stiff Reaction Networks: Quasi-Steady-State Methods  

SciTech Connect

A preceding paper [1] demonstrated that explicit asymptotic methods generally work much better for extremely stiff reaction networks than has previously been shown in the literature. There we showed that for systems well removed from equilibrium explicit asymptotic methods can rival standard implicit codes in speed and accuracy for solving extremely stiff differential equations. In this paper we continue the investigation of systems well removed from equilibrium by examining quasi-steady-state (QSS) methods as an alternative to asymptotic methods. We show that for systems well removed from equilibrium, QSS methods also can compete with, or even exceed, standard implicit methods, even for extremely stiff networks, and in many cases give somewhat better integration speed than for asymptotic methods. As for asymptotic methods, we will find that QSS methods give correct results, but with non-competitive integration speed as equilibrium is approached. Thus, we shall find that both asymptotic and QSS methods must be supplemented with partial equilibrium methods as equilibrium is approached to remain competitive with implicit methods.

Guidry, Mike W [ORNL; Harris, James A [ORNL

2013-01-01

243

Piezoelectric actuator based on stiffness control and stroke amplification for large lateral actuation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a piezoelectric actuator using stiffness control and stroke amplification mechanism in order to make large lateral displacement. In this work, we suggest stiffness control approach that generates lateral displacement by increasing the vertical stiffness and reducing the lateral stiffness using additional structure. In addition, an additional structure of a serpentine spring amplifies the lateral displacement like leverage structure.

Young Ho Seo; Doo-Sun Choi; Joon-Hyung Lee; Taik-Min Lee; Tae-Jin Je; Kyung-Hyun Whang

2005-01-01

244

Longitudinal perspective on the conundrum of central arterial stiffness, blood pressure, and aging.  

PubMed

The age-associated increase in arterial stiffness has long been considered to parallel or to cause the age-associated increase in blood pressure (BP). Yet, the rates at which pulse wave velocity (PWV), a measure of arterial stiffness, and BP trajectories change over time within individuals who differ by age and sex have not been assessed and compared. This study determined the evolution of BP and aortic PWV trajectories during a 9.4-year follow-up in >4000 community-dwelling men and women of 20 to 100 years of age at entry into the SardiNIA Study. Linear mixed effects model analyses revealed that PWV accelerates with time during the observation period, at about the same rate over the entire age range in both men and women. In men, the longitudinal rate at which BP changed over time, however, did not generally parallel that of PWV acceleration: at ages>40 years the rates of change in systolic BP (SBP) and pulse pressure (PP) increase plateaued and then declined so that SBP, itself, also declined at older ages, whereas PP plateaued. In women, SBP, diastolic BP, and mean BP increased at constant rates across all ages, producing an increasing rate of increase in PP. Therefore, increased aortic stiffness is implicated in the age-associated increase in SBP and PP. These findings indicate that PWV is not a surrogate for BP and that arterial properties other than arterial wall stiffness that vary by age and sex also modulate the BP trajectories during aging and lead to the dissociation of PWV, PP, and SBP trajectories in men. PMID:25225210

Scuteri, Angelo; Morrell, Christopher H; Orrù, Marco; Strait, James B; Tarasov, Kirill V; Ferreli, Liana Anna Pina; Loi, Francesco; Pilia, Maria Grazia; Delitala, Alessandro; Spurgeon, Harold; Najjar, Samer S; AlGhatrif, Majd; Lakatta, Edward G

2014-12-01

245

Gender Differences in Leg Stiffness and Stiffness Recruitment Strategy During Two-Legged Hopping  

PubMed Central

The authors compared leg stiffness (KVERT), muscle activation, and joint movement patterns between 11 men and 10 women during hopping. Physically active and healthy men and women performed continuous 2-legged hopping at their preferred rate and at 3.0 Hz. Compared with men, women demonstrated decreased KVERT; however, after the authors normalized for body mass, gender differences in KVERT were eliminated. In comparison with men, women also demonstrated increased quadriceps and soleus activity, as well as greater quadriceps-to-hamstrings coactivation ratios. There were no significant gender differences for joint movement patterns (p > .05). The relationship between the observed gender differences in muscle recruitment and the increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury in women requires further study. PMID:15730945

Padua, Darin A.; Arnold, Brent L.; Carcia, Christopher R.; Granata, Kevin P.

2006-01-01

246

Collagen crosslinking does not dictate stiffness in a transgenic mouse model of skeletal muscle fibrosis.  

PubMed

Skeletal muscle fibrosis is characterized by increases in tissue stiffness and collagen content. However, a very weak correlation exists between collagen content and stiffness in skeletal muscle. Recently, it has been hypothesized that collagen crosslinking explains tissue stiffness in fibrotic skeletal muscle. Therefore, we addressed this hypothesis by correlating tissue stiffness with lysyl-pyridinoline, hydroxylysyl-pyridinoline, and pentosidine collagen crosslinks. Stepwise regression revealed that, separate or together, collagen crosslinks did not correlate with tissue stiffness. Our result demonstrates that increased tissue stiffness in skeletal muscle fibrosis is not simply explained by increased collagen crosslinks and/or collagen crosslink density. We suggest that collagen organization may affect tissue stiffness. PMID:25529136

Chapman, Mark A; Pichika, Rajeswari; Lieber, Richard L

2015-01-21

247

Pearson's Correlation Coefficient  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This tutorial on Pearson's Correlation Coefficient includes the definition, assumptions, and characteristics of r as well as related statistics and hypothesis test procedures. One section instructs users to find correlation in the WINKS software, but those without the software can still use the tutorial. An exercise is given at the end that can be done with any statistical software package.

2009-01-09

248

Zero-Coefficient Cuts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many cuts used in practice to solve mixed integer programs are derived from a basis of the linear relaxation. Every such cut is of the form ? T x ? 1, where x ? 0 is the vector of non-basic variables and ? ? 0. For a point bar{x} of the linear relaxation, we call ? T x ? 1 a zero-coefficient cut wrt. bar{x} if ?^T bar{x} = 0, since this implies ? j = 0 when bar{x}_j > 0. We consider the following problem: Given a point bar{x} of the linear relaxation, find a basis, and a zero-coefficient cut wrt. bar{x} derived from this basis, or provide a certificate that shows no such cut exists. We show that this problem can be solved in polynomial time. We also test the performance of zero-coefficient cuts on a number of test problems. For several instances zero-coefficient cuts provide a substantial strengthening of the linear relaxation.

Andersen, Kent; Weismantel, Robert

249

Analysis and design of variable stiffness composite cylinders  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An investigation of the possible performance improvements of thin circular cylindrical shells through the use of the variable stiffness concept is presented. The variable stiffness concept implies that the stiffness parameters change spatially throughout the structure. This situation is achieved mainly through the use of curvilinear fibers within a fiber-reinforced composite laminate. The governing static equilibrium equations include sufficient detail to correctly model several types of nonlinearity, including the formation of a nonlinear shell boundary layer as well as the Brazier effect due to nonlinear bending of long cylinders. Four distinct cases of loading and stiffness variation are chosen to investigate. The initial investigation deals cylindrical shells in which all quantities are constant around the circumference of the cylinder. This axisymmetric case includes a stiffness variation exclusively in the axial direction, and the only pertinent loading scenarios include constant loads of axial compression, pressure, and torsion. The results for these cases indicate that little improvement over traditional laminates exists through the use of curvilinear fibers. The second problem involves arbitrary loading of a cylinder with a stiffness variation only in the circumferential direction. The problem takes the form of an analysis of a cross-section for a short cylinder segment. It is found that the most significant improvements in load-carrying capability exist for loads that also vary around the circumference of the shell, namely bending and shear forces. The stiffness variation of the optimal designs contribute to the increased performance in two ways: lowering the stresses in the critical areas through redistribution; and providing a relatively stiff region that alters the buckling behavior of the structure. These results led to an in-depth optimization study involving weight optimization of a fuselage structure subjected to typical design constraints. It is found that standard variable stiffness designs a offer the added advantage of tailorability of distinct regions of the structure that experience drastically different loading conditions. The last two problems work involve the nonlinear phenomenon of long tubes under bending. The dominating influence for long cylinders under bending is the ovalization of the cross-section. Possible improvement of the critical buckling moments for these structures is investigated using either a circumferential or axial stiffness variation. For the circumferential case involving infinite length cylinders, slight improvements can be observed by designing structures that resist the cross-sectional deformation yet do not detract from the buckling resistance at the critical location. The results also indicate that buckling behavior is extremely dependent on cylinder length. For finite length cylinders contain an axial stiffness variation, the only mechanism that exhibits improved response are those that effectively shorten the length of the cylinder. The use of curvilinear fibers was not able to achieve this effect in sufficient degree to resist the deformation, but ring stiffeners produced the desired response. Thus the variable stiffness concept is most effective at improving the bending response of long cylinders through the use of a circumferential stiffness variation. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

Tatting, Brian Frederick

250

Extended graphynes: simple scaling laws for stiffness, strength and fracture.  

PubMed

The mono-atomistic structure and chemical stability of graphene provides a promising platform to design a host of novel graphene-like materials. Using full atomistic first-principles based ReaxFF molecular dynamics, here we perform a systematic comparative study of the stability, structural and mechanical properties of graphynes - a variation of the sp(2) carbon motif wherein the characteristic hexagons of graphene are linked by sp(1) acetylene (single- and triple-bond) carbyne-like chains. The introduction of acetylene links introduces an effective penalty in terms of stability, elastic modulus (i.e., stiffness), and failure strength, which can be predicted as a function of acetylene repeats, or, equivalently, lattice spacing. We quantify the mechanical properties of experimental accessible graphdiyne, with a modulus on the order of 470 to 580 GPa and a ultimate strength on the order of 36 GPa to 46 GPa (direction dependent). We derive general scaling laws for the cumulative effects of additional acetylene repeats, formulated through a simple discrete spring-network framework, allowing extrapolation of mechanical performance to highly extended graphyne structures. Onset of local tensile buckling results in a transitional regime characterized by a severe reduction of strength (ultimate stress), providing a new basis for scaling extended structures. Simple fracture simulations support the scaling functions, while uncovering a "two-tier" failure mode for extended graphynes, wherein structural realignment facilitates stress transfer beyond initial failure. Finally, the specific modulus and strength (normalized by areal density) is found to be near-constant, suggesting applications for light-weight, yet structurally robust molecular components. PMID:23142928

Cranford, Steven W; Brommer, Dieter B; Buehler, Markus J

2012-12-21

251

Extended graphynes: simple scaling laws for stiffness, strength and fracture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mono-atomistic structure and chemical stability of graphene provides a promising platform to design a host of novel graphene-like materials. Using full atomistic first-principles based ReaxFF molecular dynamics, here we perform a systematic comparative study of the stability, structural and mechanical properties of graphynes - a variation of the sp2 carbon motif wherein the characteristic hexagons of graphene are linked by sp1 acetylene (single- and triple-bond) carbyne-like chains. The introduction of acetylene links introduces an effective penalty in terms of stability, elastic modulus (i.e., stiffness), and failure strength, which can be predicted as a function of acetylene repeats, or, equivalently, lattice spacing. We quantify the mechanical properties of experimental accessible graphdiyne, with a modulus on the order of 470 to 580 GPa and a ultimate strength on the order of 36 GPa to 46 GPa (direction dependent). We derive general scaling laws for the cumulative effects of additional acetylene repeats, formulated through a simple discrete spring-network framework, allowing extrapolation of mechanical performance to highly extended graphyne structures. Onset of local tensile buckling results in a transitional regime characterized by a severe reduction of strength (ultimate stress), providing a new basis for scaling extended structures. Simple fracture simulations support the scaling functions, while uncovering a ``two-tier'' failure mode for extended graphynes, wherein structural realignment facilitates stress transfer beyond initial failure. Finally, the specific modulus and strength (normalized by areal density) is found to be near-constant, suggesting applications for light-weight, yet structurally robust molecular components.

Cranford, Steven W.; Brommer, Dieter B.; Buehler, Markus J.

2012-11-01

252

LSENS, a general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for gas-phase reactions: User's guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for complex, homogeneous, gas-phase reactions is described. The main features of the code, LSENS, are its flexibility, efficiency and convenience in treating many different chemical reaction models. The models include static system, steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow, shock initiated reaction, and a perfectly stirred reactor. In addition, equilibrium computations can be performed for several assigned states. An implicit numerical integration method, which works efficiently for the extremes of very fast and very slow reaction, is used for solving the 'stiff' differential equation systems that arise in chemical kinetics. For static reactions, sensitivity coefficients of all dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of dependent variables and/or the rate coefficient parameters can be computed. This paper presents descriptions of the code and its usage, and includes several illustrative example problems.

Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Bittker, David A.

1993-01-01

253

Enhancing the pulse contour analysis-based arterial stiffness estimation using a novel photoplethysmographic parameter.  

PubMed

In this paper, we propose a novel method for enhancing pulse contour analysis-based arterial stiffness estimation using a simple and low-complexity photoplethysmographic parameter (P2Ocd). The method first eliminates baseline wanders in the digital volume pulse (DVP) by applying a simple morphological filter. The filtered DVP signal is then transformed into a slope sum function signal to simplify the pulse peak detection process by enhancing the upslope of the DVP signal while suppressing its downslope. An adaptive thresholding scheme is applied to detect pulse peaks from the transformed signal. Pulse onsets are then identified as the minimum values between consecutive pulse peaks. The P2Ocd is finally calculated by dividing the time interval between the pulse peak and the pulse onset by the pulse length. In order to assess the agreement of the P2Ocd with an established technique, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity, we performed Bland-Altman and correlation analyses. Furthermore, we evaluated the P2Ocd-based arterial stiffness estimation in terms of prediction accuracy (% error rate) and repeatability (coefficient of variation). The results show that the proposed measurement agrees well with the established technique and shows a high repeatability; it also has a better predictive accuracy than that of conventional methods. In addition, we show that the proposed parameter further improves the predictive accuracy by combining it with age. The proposed method is therefore highly applicable to small ubiquitous healthcare applications. PMID:25561448

Jang, Dae-Geun; Park, Seung-Hun; Hahn, Minsoo

2015-01-01

254

Evaluation of Fatigue Life of CRM-Reinforced SMA and Its Relationship to Dynamic Stiffness  

PubMed Central

Fatigue cracking is an essential problem of asphalt concrete that contributes to pavement damage. Although stone matrix asphalt (SMA) has significantly provided resistance to rutting failure, its resistance to fatigue failure is yet to be fully addressed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of crumb rubber modifier (CRM) on stiffness and fatigue properties of SMA mixtures at optimum binder content, using four different modification levels, namely, 6%, 8%, 10%, and 12% CRM by weight of the bitumen. The testing undertaken on the asphalt mix comprises the dynamic stiffness (indirect tensile test), dynamic creep (repeated load creep), and fatigue test (indirect tensile fatigue test) at temperature of 25°C. The indirect tensile fatigue test was conducted at three different stress levels (200, 300, and 400?kPa). Experimental results indicate that CRM-reinforced SMA mixtures exhibit significantly higher fatigue life compared to the mixtures without CRM. Further, higher correlation coefficient was obtained between the fatigue life and resilient modulus as compared to permanent strain; thus resilient modulus might be a more reliable indicator in evaluating the fatigue life of asphalt mixture. PMID:25050406

Mashaan, Nuha Salim; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Abdel Aziz, Mahrez; Ibrahim, Mohd Rasdan; Katman, Herda Yati

2014-01-01

255

Evaluation of fatigue life of CRM-reinforced SMA and its relationship to dynamic stiffness.  

PubMed

Fatigue cracking is an essential problem of asphalt concrete that contributes to pavement damage. Although stone matrix asphalt (SMA) has significantly provided resistance to rutting failure, its resistance to fatigue failure is yet to be fully addressed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of crumb rubber modifier (CRM) on stiffness and fatigue properties of SMA mixtures at optimum binder content, using four different modification levels, namely, 6%, 8%, 10%, and 12% CRM by weight of the bitumen. The testing undertaken on the asphalt mix comprises the dynamic stiffness (indirect tensile test), dynamic creep (repeated load creep), and fatigue test (indirect tensile fatigue test) at temperature of 25°C. The indirect tensile fatigue test was conducted at three different stress levels (200, 300, and 400 kPa). Experimental results indicate that CRM-reinforced SMA mixtures exhibit significantly higher fatigue life compared to the mixtures without CRM. Further, higher correlation coefficient was obtained between the fatigue life and resilient modulus as compared to permanent strain; thus resilient modulus might be a more reliable indicator in evaluating the fatigue life of asphalt mixture. PMID:25050406

Mashaan, Nuha Salim; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Abdel Aziz, Mahrez; Ibrahim, Mohd Rasdan; Katman, Herda Yati; Koting, Suhana

2014-01-01

256

Elastic stiffness and filler size effect of covalently grafted nanosilica polyimide composites: molecular dynamics study.  

PubMed

The filler size-dependent elastic stiffness of nanosilica (?-quartz)-reinforced polyimide(s-BPDA/1,3,4-APB) composites under the same volume fraction and grafting ratio conditions was investigated via molecular dynamics(MD) simulations. To enhance the interfacial load transfer efficiency, we treated the surface oxygen atoms of the silica nanoparticle with additional silicon atoms attached by a propyl group to which the aromatic hydrocarbon in the polyimide is directly grafted. As the radius of the embedded nanoparticle increases, the Young's and shear moduli gradually decrease, showing a prominent filler size effect. At the same time, the moduli of the nanocomposites increase as the grafting ratio increases. The contribution of different nanoparticles to the filler size dependency in elastic stiffness of the nanocomposites can be elucidated by comparing the normalized adhesive interaction energy between the particle and matrix which exhibits prominent filler size dependency. Because of the immobilization of the matrix polymer in the vicinity of the nanoparticles, which was confirmed by the self-diffusion coefficient, the highly grafted interface is found to bring about a greater reinforcing effect than the ungrafted interface. PMID:22931169

Yang, Seunghwa; Choi, Joonmyung; Cho, Maenghyo

2012-09-26

257

FIDAP capabilities for solving problems with stiff chemistry  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Motorola CRADA, the capabilities of the computational fluid dynamics code FIDAP (Fluid Dynamics International) for simulating problems involving fluid flow, heat transport, and chemical reactions have been assessed and enhanced as needed for semiconductor-processing applications (e.g. chemical vapor deposition). A novel method of treating surface chemical species that uses only pre-existing FIDAP commands is described and illustrated with test problems. A full-Jacobian treatment of the chemical reaction rate expressions during formation of the stiffness matrix has been implemented in FIDAP for both the Arrhenius-parameter and user-subroutine methods of specifying chemical reactions, where the Jacobian terms can be calculated analytically or numerically. This formulation is needed to obtain convergence when reaction rates become large compared to transport rates (stiff chemistry). Several test problems are analyzed, and in all cases this approach yields good convergence behavior, even for extremely stiff fluid-phase and surface reactions. A stiff segregated algorithm has been developed and implemented in FIDAP. Analysis of test problems indicates that this algorithm yields improved convergence behavior compared with the original segregated algorithm. This improved behavior enables segregated techniques to be applied to problems with stiff chemistry, as required for large three-dimensional multi-species problems.

Torczynski, J.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Energetic and Multiphase Processes Dept.; Baer, T.A. [Gram, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-09-01

258

Control of the stiffness of robotic appendages using dielectric elastomers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new robotic leg design is presented that utilizes dielectric elastomers (3M VHB 4910) to rapidly control stiffness changes for enhanced mobility and agility of a field demonstrated hexapod robot. It has been shown that stiffness changes of electro-active membranes made of dielectric elastomers can overcome challenges with other polymer materials that use heat to create modulus and stiffness changes. Applied electric fields eliminate issues with thermal transport rates and thermo-mechanical delaminatation. The dielectric elastomer is characterized uniaxially to understand its hyperelastic and viscoelastic properties. The uniaxial data is fit to a hyperelastic and viscoelastic finite deformation model. The material is then pre-stretched biaxially to stretch ratios ranging from 200%, 300% and 400%. A set of electro-mechanical transverse load experiments are then utilized to obtain up to 92% reduction in stiffness that is controlled by an electric field. The results are compared to a finite deformation membrane finite element model to understand and improve field driven stiffness changes for real-time robotic applications.

Morton, Jeffrey

259

Acute Achilles tendinopathy: effect of pain control on leg stiffness.  

PubMed

Tendinopathies are a major cause of disability in the athletic population; the main purpose of the treatment of these injuries is to reduce pain and improve function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of NSAIDs on leg stiffness of patients suffering acute unilateral Achilles tendinopathy. Twenty-eight eligible male athletes (aged 39.1 ± 10.3 y) suffering acute Achilles tendinopathy were treated with etoricoxib (120 mg oral once daily) during 7 days. Pain (100-mm visual analogue scale-VAS), analgesic effect (percentage of 100-mm VAS reduction), and leg stiffness were evaluated pre- and post- anti-inflammatory treatment. Results of this study showed that over the 7-day treatment period, etoricoxib provided significant relief of Achilles tendon pain (VAS) compared to that experienced at baseline: 54.5 ± 21.6 and 24.5 ± 24.8, respectively (p<0.001). Leg stiffness showed a significant improvement after one-week NSAID therapy: LSR 0.89 ± 0.1 vs. 0.97 ± 0.1; (p=0.02). In conclusion, findings of this study demonstrated that patients suffering acute unilateral Achilles tendinopathy increased their leg stiffness of the affected side after oral anti-inflammatory therapy. Effective control of tendon pain in the acute phase of such sports-related injuries may contribute to improve capabilities associated with high performance like leg stiffness. PMID:24583548

Maquirriain, J; Kokalj, A

2014-03-01

260

Stiffness characterisation of microcantilevers based on conducting polymers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The object of this paper is to characterise the stiffness of microfabricated cantilevers consisting of two electroactive polymer (polypyrrole (PPy)) layers, and two gold layers with a negligible thickness and a layer of porous polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), which serves as a backing layer and electrolyte storage tank. This composite cantilever structure is used as polymer actuators or famously known as artificial muscles when tailored appropriately. The polymer microactuators considered in this study, which were fabricated using a laser ablation technique, could operate both in aqueous and non-aqueous media. The stiffness characterization of the microactuators is critical to assess their suitability to numerous applications including the micromanipulation of living cells, bio-analytical nanosystems, datastorage, labon- chip, microvalve, microswitch, microshutter, cantilever light modulators, micro-optical instrumentation, artificial muscles for micro and macro robotic sytems and similar. The stiffness measurement method followed in this study is a static deflection measurement method, using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The stiffness constants of the microactuators while they were in passive (no electrochemical activation) and active (electrochemically activated) states were measured separately, and their statistical comparison was provided. The possible error sources for the stiffness measurement method are elaborated.

Alici, Gursel; Higgins, Michael J.

2008-12-01

261

Nanomechanical measurement of astrocyte stiffness correlated with cytoskeletal maturation.  

PubMed

Astrocytes are known to serve as scaffolding cells that shape the brain. The physical properties of astrocytes, such as stiffness, are important for their scaffolding function. These properties may be altered in certain pathological conditions, such as in brain cancer. However, actual stiffness of astrocytes is not yet well understood. Here, we report that the astrocyte stiffness is positively correlated with the density of cytoskeletal proteins, such as actin filaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments. The value of the stiffness of astrocytes as measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) increases 38-fold in five-week-old rats compared to postnatal-day zero pups. Using multicolor confocal microscopy, we found that the complexity of cytoskeletal proteins, such as actin filaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments, increase as the animal gets older. Our findings indicate that the change of stiffness positively correlates with the maturation of cytoskeletal proteins, and suggest that AFM can be useful as an analytical and diagnostic tool for neuroscience. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 103A: 365-370, 2015. PMID:24665040

Lee, Sang-Myung; Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Na, Kyounghwan; Cho, Il-Joo; Woo, Dong Ho; Oh, Jae-Eung; Lee, C Justin; Yoon, Eui-Sung

2015-01-01

262

Effects of Age, Gender and Level of Co-contraction on Elbow and Shoulder Rotational Stiffness and Damping in the Impulsively End-Loaded Upper Extremity.  

PubMed

Whether an arm will buckle under an impulsive end-load should partly depend on the elastic and viscous properties of the pretensed arm muscles. In measuring these properties we hypothesized that neither age, gender, nor muscle pre-contraction level would affect the bilinear elbow or shoulder lumped rotational stiffness or damping parameters in the impulsively end-loaded upper extremity of 38 healthy men and women. Subjects were instructed to preactivate triceps to either 25, 50 or 75% of maximum myoelectric activity levels. Then a standardized impulsive end-load was applied via a 6-axis load cell to the wrist of the slightly flexed arm in the prone posture. Arm kinematic responses were acquired at 280 Hz and an inverse dynamics analysis was used to estimate the bilinear rotational stiffnesses and damping parameters at the elbow and shoulder. The results show that pre-contraction level affected normalized joint rotational stiffness and damping coefficients (p < 0.02). Age affected the initial stiffness for the elbow (p < 0.05), and gender affected that of the shoulder in the sagittal plane (p < 0.006). Arm muscle strength was positively related to normalized stiffness at the elbow, but not the shoulder. We conclude that age, gender and pre-contraction level each affect the viscoelastic behavior of the end-loaded upper extremity in healthy adults. PMID:25395216

Lee, Yunju; Ashton-Miller, James A

2014-11-14

263

Time-varying torsional stiffness identification on a vertical beam using Chebyshev polynomials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper investigates the performance of the Chebyshev polynomial basis to identify the time-varying mechanical impedance of a vertical beam in torsion. The projection, derivation and product properties of Chebyshev polynomials were used to linearize the differential equation of 1-DOF mechanical systems having multiple time-varying parameters. This allowed the identification of a reduced set of projection coefficients without prior knowledge of initial system states conditions. The method was then applied to experimental data obtained from an equilateral beam excited in torsion while one beam support location was changed over time. Results showed 6.62×10-2% error in stiffness predictions compared to theoretical estimates. Signal filtering was critical to avoid contamination by bending modes of the beam and prior knowledge of inertia led to better results.

Martel, François; Rancourt, Denis; Chochol, Catherine; St-Amant, Yves; Chesne, Simon; Rémond, Didier

2015-03-01

264

Dynamic structure factor of a stiff polymer in a glassy solution  

E-print Network

We provide a comprehensive overview of the current theoretical understanding of the dynamic structure factor of stiff polymers in semidilute solution based on the wormlike chain (WLC) model. We extend previous work by computing exact numerical coefficients and an expression for the dynamic mean square displacement (MSD) of a free polymer and compare various common approximations for the hydrodynamic interactions, which need to be treated accurately if one wants to extract quantitative estimates for model parameters from experimental data. A recent controversy about the initial slope of the dynamic structure factor is thereby resolved. To account for the interactions of the polymer with a surrounding (sticky) polymer solution, we analyze an extension of the WLC model, the glassy wormlike chain (GWLC), which predicts near power-law and logarithmic long-time tails in the dynamic structure factor.

J. Glaser; O. Hallatschek; K. Kroy

2008-05-29

265

First-principles elastic stiffness of LaPO4 monazite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this letter, the full set of elastic coefficients of LaPO4 monazite is presented based on the first-principles plane-wave pseudopotential total energy method. Mechanical parameters (bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's moduli, and Poisson's ratio) are also presented and compared with experimental results for polycrystalline monazite. The responses of electronic structure and chemical bonds to a series of {010}?001? shear strains are examined in order to study the mechanism of low shear strain resistance. The results show that small shear moduli originate from the inhomogeneous strengths of atomic bonds. For example, the weak La-O bonds accommodate the shear strain locally, while the PO4 tetrahedra are almost rigid. The theoretical elastic stiffness may be useful to understand the deformation mechanisms of LaPO4 monazite.

Wang, Jingyang; Zhou, Yanchun; Lin, Zhijun

2005-08-01

266

Development of continuous stiffness measurement technique for composite magnetic tapes  

SciTech Connect

Studying mechanical properties of materials on the nanoscale has received much attention in recent years as the properties are size dependent. Continuous measurements of mechanical properties of these materials during indentation are greatly needed. A continuous stiffness measurement (CSM) technique allows the contact stiffness to be measured at any point along the loading curve and not just at the point of unloading. In the present investigation, an analytical methodology of CSM technique used for characterizing nonuniform materials is developed and applied to nanocomposite magnetic tapes. The contact stiffness, elastic modulus and hardness of fused silica, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and metal-particle (MP) tapes were measured as a function of indentation depth using the CSM technique. For the first time, the graded material characteristics of MP tapes are reported.

Li, X.; Bhushan, B.

2000-05-10

267

Quantifying molecular stiffness and interaction with lateral force microscopy.  

PubMed

The spatial resolution of atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be drastically increased by terminating the tip with a single carbon monoxide (CO) molecule. However, the CO molecule is not stiff, and lateral forces, such as those around the sides of molecules, distort images. This issue begs a larger question of how AFM can probe structures that are laterally weak. Lateral force microscopy (LFM) can probe lateral stiffnesses that are not accessible to normal-force AFM, resulting in higher spatial resolution. With LFM, we determined the torsional spring constant of a CO-terminated tip molecule to be 0.24 newtons per meter. This value is less than that of a surface molecule and an example of a system whose stiffness is a product not only of bonding partners but also local environment. PMID:24505131

Weymouth, Alfred John; Hofmann, Thomas; Giessibl, Franz J

2014-03-01

268

Estimation of Stiffness Parameter on the Common Carotid Artery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The arteriosclerosis is on the increase with an aging or change of our living environment. For that reason, diagnosis of the common carotid artery using echocardiogram is doing to take precautions carebropathy. Up to the present, several methods to measure stiffness parameter of the carotid artery have been proposed. However, they have analyzed at the only one point of common carotid artery. In this paper, we propose the method of analysis extended over a wide area of common carotid artery. In order to measure stiffness parameter of common carotid artery from echocardiogram, it is required to detect two border curves which are boundaries between vessel wall and blood. The method is composed of two steps. The first step is the detection of border curves, and the second step is the calculation of stiffness parameter using diameter of common carotid artery. Experimental results show the validity of the proposed method.

Koya, Yoshiharu; Mizoshiri, Isao; Matsui, Kiyoaki; Nakamura, Takashi

269

Aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch and mortality in dialysis population.  

PubMed

We hypothesized that increased aortic stiffness (central elastic artery) combined with a decrease in brachial stiffness (peripheral muscular artery) leads to the reversal of the physiological stiffness gradient (ie, mismatch), promoting end-organ damages through increased forward pressure wave transmission into the microcirculation. We, therefore, examined the effect of aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch on mortality in patients in need of dialysis. In a prospective observational study, aortic-brachial arterial stiffness mismatch (pulse wave velocity ratio) was assessed using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity divided by carotid-radial pulse wave velocity in 310 adult patients on dialysis. After a median follow-up of 29 months, 146 (47%) deaths occurred. The hazard ratio (HR) for mortality related to PWV ratio in a Cox regression analysis was 1.43 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-1.64; P<0.001 per 1 SD) and was still significant after adjustments for confounding factors, such as age, dialysis vintage, sex, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, smoking status, and weight (HR, 1.23; 95% CI: 1.02-1.49). The HRs for changes in 1 SD of augmentation index (HR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.12-1.63), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.11-1.50), and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.67-0.95) were statistically significant in univariate analysis, but were no longer statistically significant after adjustment for age. In conclusion, aortic-brachial arterial stiffness mismatch was strongly and independently associated with increased mortality in this dialysis population. Further studies are required to confirm these finding in lower-risk groups. PMID:25452473

Fortier, Catherine; Mac-Way, Fabrice; Desmeules, Simon; Marquis, Karine; De Serres, Sacha A; Lebel, Marcel; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Agharazii, Mohsen

2015-02-01

270

Perception of Stiffness in Laparoscopy – the Fulcrum Effect  

PubMed Central

We explored how the perception of stiffness can be distorted in Minimally Invasive Surgery. We combined a mechanical simulator with a haptic device, and implemented linear springs at the tip of the simulated laparoscopic device. To explore the influence of mechanical advantage on perception, we set different values of the ratio between internal and external length of the tool. We found that a nonsymmetrical ratio causes bias in the perceived stiffness when novice tangential probing is compared to radial probing. In contrast, haptic experts did not show similar perceptual bias. PMID:22357009

Nisky, Ilana; Huang, Felix; Milstein, Amit; Pugh, Carla M.; Mussa-ivaldi, Ferdinando A.; Karniel, Amir

2014-01-01

271

Arthroscopic lysis of adhesions for the stiff total knee arthroplasty.  

PubMed

The management of the stiff knee after total knee arthroplasty is controversial. Manipulation under anesthesia and open lysis of adhesions are techniques that can theoretically address the fibrous scar tissue, but their efficacy has been shown to be variable. We describe the technique of arthroscopic lysis of adhesions for the stiff knee after total knee arthroplasty. The advantages of this technique include minimally invasive debridement of scar tissue within defined compartments of the knee and evaluation for the presence and treatment of focal lesions (e.g., loose bodies or impinging synovial or soft tissue). The total arc of motion can be improved with a systematic arthroscopic approach. PMID:25473616

Enad, Jerome G

2014-10-01

272

Thermal Testing of Tow-Placed, Variable Stiffness Panels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Commercial systems for precise placement of pre-preg composite tows are enabling technology that allows fabrication of advanced composite structures in which the tows may be precisely laid down along curvilinear paths within a given ply. For laminates with curvilinear tow paths, the fiber orientation angle varies continuously throughout the laminate, and is not required to be straight and parallel in each ply as in conventional composite laminates. Hence, the stiffness properties vary as a function of location in the laminate, and the associated composite structure is called a "variable stiffness" composite structure.

Wu, K. Chauncey; Guerdal, Zafer

2001-01-01

273

Estimation of deformation and stiffness of fractures close to tunnels using data from single-hole hydraulic testing and grouting  

SciTech Connect

Sealing of tunnels in fractured rocks is commonly performed by pre- or post-excavation grouting. The grouting boreholes are frequently drilled close to the tunnel wall, an area where rock stresses can be low and fractures can more easily open up during grout pressurization. In this paper we suggest that data from hydraulic testing and grouting can be used to identify grout-induced fracture opening, to estimate fracture stiffness of such fractures, and to evaluate its impact on the grout performance. A conceptual model and a method are presented for estimating fracture stiffness. The method is demonstrated using grouting data from four pre-excavation grouting boreholes at a shallow tunnel (50 m) in Nygard, Sweden, and two post-excavation grouting boreholes at a deep tunnel (450 m) in Aespoe HRL, Sweden. The estimated stiffness of intersecting fractures for the boreholes at the shallow Nygard tunnel are low (2-5 GPa/m) and in agreement with literature data from field experiments at other fractured rock sites. Higher stiffness was obtained for the deeper tunnel boreholes at Aespoe which is reasonable considering that generally higher rock stresses are expected at greater depths. Our method of identifying and evaluating the properties and impact of deforming fractures might be most applicable when grouting takes place in boreholes adjacent to the tunnel wall, where local stresses might be low and where deforming (opening) fractures may take most of the grout.

Fransson, A.; Tsang, C.-F.; Rutqvist, J.; Gustafson, G.

2010-05-01

274

Actions of selected cardiovascular hormones on arterial stiffness and wave reflections.  

PubMed

The large conduit arteries of the thorax and abdomen are elastic while those in the arms and legs are muscular. Alterations in wall properties of elastic arteries occur over time and are usually permanent in nature; acute changes can, however, occur is response to a change in transmural pressure. Chronic alterations in properties of muscular arteries are minimal but changes (e.g vasoconstriction, vasodilation or tone) do occur in response to smooth muscle cell (SMC) stimulation. In general an increase in arterial stiffness (and wave reflection) increases systolic blood pressure (BP) and is detrimental while a decrease is beneficial. The augmentation in systolic BP increases left ventricular (LV) mass, wasted energy, tension-time index (TTI) and myocardial oxygen demand while the fall in diastolic BP decreases coronary artery perfusion causing a mismatch in ventricular/vascular coupling and an imbalance in the myocardial oxygen supply/demand ratio. Cardiovascular hormones such as renin, angiotensin, aldosterone, parathormone, sympathomimetic amines and endothelin induce vasoconstriction and increase arterial stiffness while insulin, thyroxine, testosterone, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), estrogen and nitric oxide (NO) have the opposite effect. The undesirable effects can be reversed with selected blocking agents. Vasodilator drugs have little direct active effect on large elastic arteries and unaugmented BP but can markedly reduce wave reflection amplitude and duration and augmentation index by decreasing stiffness of the muscular arteries and reducing transmission velocity of the reflected wave from the periphery to the heart. This decrease in amplitude and increase in travel time (or delay) of the reflected wave causes a generalized decrease in systolic BP, arterial wall stress, wasted LV energy and TTI. PMID:19149620

Nichols, Wilmer W; Epstein, Benjamin J

2009-01-01

275

Calculation of combined diffusion coefficients in SF6-Cu mixtures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Diffusion coefficients play an important role in the description of the transport of metal vapours in gas mixtures. This paper is devoted to the calculation of four combined diffusion coefficients, namely, the combined ordinary diffusion coefficient, combined electric field diffusion coefficient, combined temperature diffusion coefficient, and combined pressure diffusion coefficient in SF6-Cu mixtures at temperatures up to 30 000 K. These four coefficients describe diffusion due to composition gradients, applied electric fields, temperature gradients, and pressure gradients, respectively. The influence of copper fluoride and sulfide species on the diffusion coefficients is shown to be negligible. The effect of copper proportion and gas pressures on these diffusion coefficients is investigated. It is shown that increasing the proportion of copper generally increases the magnitude of the four diffusion coefficients, except for copper mole fractions of 90% or more. It is further found that increasing the pressure reduces the magnitude of the coefficients, except for the combined temperature diffusion coefficient, and shifts the maximum of all four coefficients towards higher temperatures. The results presented in this paper can be applied to the simulation of high-voltage circuit breaker arcs.

Zhong, Linlin; Wang, Xiaohua; Rong, Mingzhe; Wu, Yi; Murphy, Anthony B.

2014-10-01

276

Initial post-buckling of variable-stiffness curved panels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Variable-stiffness shells are curved composite structures in which the fibre-reinforcement follow curvilinear paths in space. Having a wider design space than traditional composite shells, they have the potential to improve a wide variety of weight-critical structures. In this paper, a new method for computing the initial post-buckling response of variable-stiffness cylindrical panels is presented, based on the differential quadrature method. Integro-differential governing and boundary equations governing the problem, derived with Koiter's theory (Koiter, 1945), are solved using a mixed generalised differential quadrature (GDQ) and integral quadrature (GIQ) approach. The post-buckling behaviour is determined on the basis of a quadratic expansion of the displacement fields. Orthogonality of the mode-shapes in the expansion series is ensured by a novel use of the Moore-Penrose generalised matrix inverse for solving the GDQ-GIQ equations. The new formulation is validated against benchmark analytical post-buckling results for constant stiffness plates and shells, and compared with non-linear finite-element (FE) analysis for variable-stiffness shells. Stability estimates are found to be in good agreement with incremental FE results in the vicinity of the buckling load, requiring only a fraction of the number of variables used by the current method.

White, S. C.; Raju, G.; Weaver, P. M.

2014-11-01

277

On implicit Taylor series methods for stiff ODEs  

SciTech Connect

Several versions of implicit Taylor series methods (ITSM) are presented and evaluated. Criteria for the approximate solution of ODEs via ITSM are given. Some ideas, motivations, and remarks on the inclusion of the solution of stiff ODEs are outlined. 25 refs., 3 figs.

Kirlinger, G. (Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte und Numerische Mathematik); Corliss, G.F. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1991-01-01

278

On implicit Taylor series methods for stiff ODEs  

SciTech Connect

Several versions of implicit Taylor series methods (ITSM) are presented and evaluated. Criteria for the approximate solution of ODEs via ITSM are given. Some ideas, motivations, and remarks on the inclusion of the solution of stiff ODEs are outlined. 25 refs., 3 figs.

Kirlinger, G. [Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte und Numerische Mathematik; Corliss, G.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1991-12-31

279

INTRODUCTION Stiffness properties of the human motor system depend on  

E-print Network

in motor control mainly for two reasons: increasing stiffness has an impact on movement speed and duration models and adjustable starting length models [2]. In biomechanics the reference muscle model is the Hill of the 11 th International Symposium, Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering April 3

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

280

Simultaneously high stiffness and damping in nanoengineered microtruss composites.  

PubMed

Materials combining high stiffness and mechanical energy dissipation are needed in automotive, aviation, construction, and other technologies where structural elements are exposed to dynamic loads. In this paper we demonstrate that a judicious combination of carbon nanotube engineered trusses held in a dissipative polymer can lead to a composite material that simultaneously exhibits both high stiffness and damping. Indeed, the combination of stiffness and damping that is reported is quite high in any single monolithic material. Carbon nanotube (CNT) microstructures grown in a novel 3D truss topology form the backbone of these nanocomposites. The CNT trusses are coated by ceramics and by a nanostructured polymer film assembled using the layer-by-layer technique. The crevices of the trusses are then filled with soft polyurethane. Each constituent of the composite is accurately modeled, and these models are used to guide the manufacturing process, in particular the choice of the backbone topology and the optimization of the mechanical properties of the constituent materials. The resulting composite exhibits much higher stiffness (80 times) and similar damping (specific damping capacity of 0.8) compared to the polymer. Our work is a step forward in implementing the concept of materials by design across multiple length scales. PMID:24620996

Meaud, Julien; Sain, Trisha; Yeom, Bongjun; Park, Sei Jin; Shoultz, Anna Brieland; Hulbert, Gregory; Ma, Zheng-Dong; Kotov, Nicholas A; Hart, A John; Arruda, Ellen M; Waas, Anthony M

2014-04-22

281

The stiffness of prestressed frameworks: a unifying Simon Guest  

E-print Network

is used to understand whether unconventional structures such as tensegrities are `prestress stable derivation of the tangent stiffness matrix for a prestressed pin-jointed structure is given, and is used to compare the diverse formulations that can be found in the literature for finding the structural response

Guest, Simon

282

Arterial stiffness in chronic kidney disease: causes and consequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic kidney disease is associated with elevated cardiovascular risk, and heart failure and arrhythmias are the biggest causes of cardiovascular death in this population. Increased arterial stiffness is a hallmark of chronic kidney disease and is associated with adverse alterations in cardiac structure and function that may predispose to an increased risk of cardiovascular death. These changes are already apparent

Colin D Chue; Jonathan N Townend; Richard P Steeds; Charles J Ferro

2010-01-01

283

Riparian Sediment Delivery Ratio: Stiff Diagrams and Artifical Neural Networks  

EPA Science Inventory

Various methods are used to estimate sediment transport through riparian buffers and grass jilters with the sediment delivery ratio having been the most widely applied. The U.S. Forest Service developed a sediment delivery ratio using the stiff diagram and a logistic curve to int...

284

Hydrogen-bond reinforced vanadia nanofiber paper of high stiffness.  

PubMed

Low-temperature, solution-based self-assembly of vanadia nanofibers yields a free-standing, ceramic paper with an outstanding combination of high strength, stiffness, and macroscopic flexibility. Its excellent mechanical performance results from a brick-and-mortar like architecture, which combines strong covalent bonding within the single-crystalline nanofibers with an intricate hydrogen bonding network between them. PMID:23468458

Burghard, Zaklina; Leineweber, Andreas; van Aken, Peter A; Dufaux, Thomas; Burghard, Marko; Bill, Joachim

2013-05-01

285

Nondestrutive damage detection by simultaneous identification of stiffness and damping  

E-print Network

is developed on the basis of the conservation of total energy; second, the other method utilizes the acceleration-structural parameters (stiffness and damping) sensitivities. The total energy in a system consists of the sum of the kinetic energy, the potential...

Hyung, Sang Su

2009-05-15

286

Stiffness gradients in vascular bundles of the palm Washingtonia robusta  

PubMed Central

Palms can grow at sites exposed to high winds experiencing large dynamic wind and gust loads. Their stems represent a system of stiff fibrous elements embedded in the soft parenchymatous tissue. The proper design of the interface of the stiffening elements and the parenchyma is crucial for the functioning of the stem. The strategy of the palm to compromise between stiff fibre caps and the soft parenchymatous tissue may serve as a model system for avoiding stress discontinuities in inhomogeneous and anisotropic fibre-reinforced composite materials. We investigated the mechanical, structural and biochemical properties of the fibre caps of the palm Washingtonia robusta at different levels of hierarchy with high spatial resolution. A gradual decrease in stiffness across the fibre cap towards the surrounding parenchymatous tissue was observed. Structural adaptations at the tissue level were found in terms of changes in cell cross sections and cell wall thickness. At the cell wall level, gradients across the fibre cap were found in the degree of orientation of the microfibrils and in the lignin level and composition. The impact of these structural variations in the local material stiffness distribution is discussed. PMID:18595839

Rüggeberg, Markus; Speck, Thomas; Paris, Oskar; Lapierre, Catherine; Pollet, Brigitte; Koch, Gerald; Burgert, Ingo

2008-01-01

287

Substrata Mechanical Stiffness Can Regulate Adhesion of Viable Bacteria  

E-print Network

Substrata Mechanical Stiffness Can Regulate Adhesion of Viable Bacteria Jenny A. Lichter,, M. Todd, 2008 The competing mechanisms that regulate adhesion of bacteria to surfaces and subsequent biofilm and hospital-acquired infections due to bacteria, there is considerable interest in better understanding

Van Vliet, Krystyn J.

288

GEOMETRIC STIFFNESS AND STABILITY OF RIGID BODY MODES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study is to examine the effect of geometric stiffness forces on the stability of elastic and rigid body modes. A simple rotating beam model is used to demonstrate the effect of axial forces and dynamic coupling between the modes of displacement on the rigid body motion. The effect of longitudinal deformation due to bending is systematically

H. El-Absy; A. A. Shabana

1997-01-01

289

Variable stiffness and damping suspension system for train  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As the vibration of high speed train becomes fierce when the train runs at high speed, it is crucial to develop a novel suspension system to negotiate train's vibration. This paper presents a novel suspension based on Magnetorheological fluid (MRF) damper and MRF based smart air spring. The MRF damper is used to generate variable damping while the smart air spring is used to generate field-dependent stiffness. In this paper, the two kind smart devices, MRF dampers and smart air spring, are developed firstly. Then the dynamic performances of these two devices are tested by MTS. Based on the testing results, the two devices are equipped to a high speed train which is built in ADAMS. The skyhook control algorithm is employed to control the novel suspension. In order to compare the vibration suppression capability of the novel suspension with other kind suspensions, three other different suspension systems are also considered and simulated in this paper. The other three kind suspensions are variable damping with fixed stiffness suspension, variable stiffness with fixed damping suspension and passive suspension. The simulation results indicate that the variable damping and stiffness suspension suppresses the vibration of high speed train better than the other three suspension systems.

Sun, Shuaishuai; Deng, Huaxia; Li, Weihua

2014-03-01

290

Design optimization of a twist compliant mechanism with nonlinear stiffness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A contact-aided compliant mechanism called a twist compliant mechanism (TCM) is presented in this paper. This mechanism has nonlinear stiffness when it is twisted in both directions along its axis. The inner core of the mechanism is primarily responsible for its flexibility in one twisting direction. The contact surfaces of the cross-members and compliant sectors are primarily responsible for its high stiffness in the opposite direction. A desired twist angle in a given direction can be achieved by tailoring the stiffness of a TCM. The stiffness of a compliant twist mechanism can be tailored by varying thickness of its cross-members, thickness of the core and thickness of its sectors. A multi-objective optimization problem with three objective functions is proposed in this paper, and used to design an optimal TCM with desired twist angle. The objective functions are to minimize the mass and maximum von-Mises stress observed, while minimizing or maximizing the twist angles under specific loading conditions. The multi-objective optimization problem proposed in this paper is solved for an ornithopter flight research platform as a case study, with the goal of using the TCM to achieve passive twisting of the wing during upstroke, while keeping the wing fully extended and rigid during the downstroke. Prototype TCMs have been fabricated using 3D printing and tested. Testing results are also presented in this paper.

Tummala, Y.; Frecker, M. I.; Wissa, A. A.; Hubbard, J. E., Jr.

2014-10-01

291

Substrate stiffness affects skeletal myoblast differentiation in vitro  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To maximize the therapeutic efficacy of cardiac muscle constructs produced by stem cells and tissue engineering protocols, suitable scaffolds should be designed to recapitulate all the characteristics of native muscle and mimic the microenvironment encountered by cells in vivo. Moreover, so not to interfere with cardiac contractility, the scaffold should be deformable enough to withstand muscle contraction. Recently, it was suggested that the mechanical properties of scaffolds can interfere with stem/progenitor cell functions, and thus careful consideration is required when choosing polymers for targeted applications. In this study, cross-linked poly-?-caprolactone membranes having similar chemical composition and controlled stiffness in a supra-physiological range were challenged with two sources of myoblasts to evaluate the suitability of substrates with different stiffness for cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, muscle-specific and non-related feeder layers were prepared on stiff surfaces to reveal the contribution of biological and mechanical cues to skeletal muscle progenitor differentiation. We demonstrated that substrate stiffness does affect myogenic differentiation, meaning that softer substrates can promote differentiation and that a muscle-specific feeder layer can improve the degree of maturation in skeletal muscle stem cells.

Romanazzo, Sara; Forte, Giancarlo; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Uto, Koichiro; Pagliari, Stefania; Aoyagi, Takao; Traversa, Enrico; Taniguchi, Akiyoshi

2012-12-01

292

Lower limbs power and stiffness after whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

The interest in whole-body vibration (WBV) for the enhancement of neuromuscular performance has received considerable attention. However, scientific evidence supporting the optimal prescription of WBV settings is lacking. This study investigated the acute effect of WBV combining high frequency/high peak-to-peak displacement (HH) or low frequency/low peak-to-peak displacement (LL) vs. sham intervention (SHAM) on lower limb muscle power and stiffness. A total of 223 volunteers were randomly assigned to either the HH, LL or SHAM group. Countermovement jump (CMJ) height, maximal and average power, maximal and average lower limbs stiffness obtained during a hopping test were recorded before and after the respective intervention. After the intervention, the HH group showed an increase of 4.64% in CMJ height (p<0.001) whereas the values of both the LL and SHAM groups did not change. In addition, maximal and average power of the lower limbs were significantly increased in all groups (p<0.001; 10.89% and 12.82%, respectively) while no effect on lower limbs stiffness was observed. Our data show that high frequency combined with high peak-to-peak displacement is the most optimal WBV setting for CMJ height enhancement. Further investigation should be undertaken to ascertain the effectiveness of WBV on lower limbs stiffness. PMID:23143701

Colson, S S; Petit, P-D

2013-04-01

293

Design of a Stiff Steerable Grasper for Sinus Surgery  

E-print Network

Design of a Stiff Steerable Grasper for Sinus Surgery Andria A. Remirez, Ray A. Lathrop, Paul T Background With the advent of endoscopic sinus surgery in the late 1980's [1], a completely new surgical of the sinuses. Today, functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) is commonly used to improve the sinuses

Webster III, Robert James

294

Adipocyte stiffness increases with accumulation of lipid droplets.  

PubMed

Adipogenesis and increase in fat tissue mass are mechanosensitive processes and hence should be influenced by the mechanical properties of adipocytes. We evaluated subcellular effective stiffnesses of adipocytes using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and interferometric phase microscopy (IPM), and we verified the empirical results using finite element (FE) simulations. In the AFM studies, we found that the mean ratio of stiffnesses of the lipid droplets (LDs) over the nucleus was 0.83 ± 0.14, from which we further evaluated the ratios of LDs over cytoplasm stiffness, as being in the range of 2.5 to 8.3. These stiffness ratios, indicating that LDs are stiffer than cytoplasm, were verified by means of FE modeling, which simulated the AFM experiments, and provided good agreement between empirical and model-predicted structural behavior. In the IPM studies, we found that LDs mechanically distort their intracellular environment, which again indicated that LDs are mechanically stiffer than the surrounding cytoplasm. Combining these empirical and simulation data together, we provide in this study evidence that adipocytes stiffen with differentiation as a result of accumulation of LDs. Our results are relevant to research of adipose-related diseases, particularly overweight and obesity, from a mechanobiology and cellular mechanics perspectives. PMID:24655518

Shoham, Naama; Girshovitz, Pinhas; Katzengold, Rona; Shaked, Natan T; Benayahu, Dafna; Gefen, Amit

2014-03-18

295

Controllable-stiffness components based on magnetorheological elastomers  

Microsoft Academic Search

So-called magnetorheological (MR) elastomers, comprising rubbery polymers loaded with magnetizable particles that are aligned in a magnetic field, possess dynamic stiffness and damping that can subsequently be controlled by applied fields. Tunable automotive bushings and mounts incorporating these materials and an embedded magnetic field source have been constructed. In this article, the response of these components to dynamic mechanical loading

John M. Ginder; Mark E. Nichols; Larry D. Elie; Seamus M. Clark

2000-01-01

296

Cardiovascular Health and Arterial Stiffness: The Maine Syracuse Longitudinal Study  

PubMed Central

Ideal cardiovascular health is a recently defined construct by the American Heart Association (AHA) to promote cardiovascular disease reduction. Arterial stiffness is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The extent to which the presence of multiple prevalent cardiovascular risk factors and health behaviors is associated with arterial stiffness is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the AHA construct of cardiovascular health and arterial stiffness, as indexed by pulse wave velocity and pulse pressure. The AHA health metrics, comprising of four health behaviors (smoking, body mass index, physical activity, and diet) and three health factors (total cholesterol, blood pressure, and fasting plasma glucose) were evaluated among 505 participants in the Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study. Outcome measures were carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse pressure measured at 4 to 5-year follow-up. Better cardiovascular health, comprising both health factors and behaviors, was associated with lower arterial stiffness, as indexed by pulse wave velocity and pulse pressure. Those with at least five health metrics at ideal levels had significantly lower PWV (9.8 m/s) than those with two or less ideal health metrics (11.7 m/s) (P<0.001). This finding remained with the addition of demographic and PWV-related variables (P=0.004). PMID:24384629

Crichton, Georgina E; Elias, Merrill F; Robbins, Michael A

2014-01-01

297

A Novel Tactile Force Probe for Tissue Stiffness Classification  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we have proposed a new type of tactile sensor that is capable of detecting the stiffness of soft objects. The sensor consists of a brass cylinder with an axial bore. An iron core can easily move inside the bore. Three peripheral bobbins were machined in the cylinder around which three coils have been wound. One of the

Behafarid Darvish; Siamak Najarian; Elham Shirzad; Roozbeh Khodambashi

2009-01-01

298

Ultrahigh Torsional Stiffness and Strength of Boron Nitride Jonathan Garel,  

E-print Network

Ultrahigh Torsional Stiffness and Strength of Boron Nitride Nanotubes Jonathan Garel, Itai Leven of boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) torsional mechanics. We show that BNNTs exhibit a much stronger mechanical in nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), fibers, and nanocomposites. KEYWORDS: Nanotube, boron nitride (BN), atomic force

Hod, Oded

299

Influence of running velocity on vertical, leg and joint stiffness : modelling and recommendations for future research.  

PubMed

Human running can be modelled as either a spring-mass model or multiple springs in series. A force is required to stretch or compress the spring, and thus stiffness, the variable of interest in this paper, can be calculated from the ratio of this force to the change in spring length. Given the link between force and length change, muscle stiffness and mechanical stiffness have been areas of interest to researchers, clinicians, and strength and conditioning practitioners for many years. This review focuses on mechanical stiffness, and in particular, vertical, leg and joint stiffness, since these are the only stiffness types that have been directly calculated during human running. It has been established that as running velocity increases from slow-to-moderate values, leg stiffness remains constant while both vertical stiffness and joint stiffness increase. However, no studies have calculated vertical, leg or joint stiffness over a range of slow-to-moderate values to maximum values in an athletic population. Therefore, the effects of faster running velocities on stiffness are relatively unexplored. Furthermore, no experimental research has examined the effects of training on vertical, leg or joint stiffness and the subsequent effects on running performance. Various methods of training (Olympic style weightlifting, heavy resistance training, plyometrics, eccentric strength training) have shown to be effective at improving running performance. However, the effects of these training methods on vertical, leg and joint stiffness are unknown. As a result, the true importance of stiffness to running performance remains unexplored, and the best practice for changing stiffness to optimize running performance is speculative at best. It is our hope that a better understanding of stiffness, and the influence of running speed on stiffness, will lead to greater interest and an increase in experimental research in this area. PMID:18620465

Brughelli, Matt; Cronin, John

2008-01-01

300

Optimum loading mode for axial stiffness testing in limb lengthening.  

PubMed

The axial stiffness of the regenerate is an indicator of bone healing after fracture or distraction osteogenesis. The axial stiffness may be assessed clinically by measuring the sharing of load between fixator and limb during loading. The aim of this study was to find out how to perform the stiffness test in order to minimize the influence of confounding factors to the test result. We investigated whether the test score was influenced by two factors: 1) the magnitude of the external load applied to the limb during the test; and 2) the patient's position during the test. The problem was approached by both a clinical study and by theoretical calculations. Thirty-three patients undergoing leg lengthening were tested regularly during the consolidation period. The stiffness test was executed with both high and low load, and in a standing and sitting position. There were significant differences in results between both the tests with high and low load, and between the standing and sitting tests. This indicated that both the magnitude of force and patient position during the test influenced the test result. Accordingly, these factors represent sources of error and must be taken into consideration when performing an axial stiffness test. The result of the theoretical calculations confirmed the result. We recommend performing the test while the patient is sitting, and to apply no more than 20% of the individual's body weight. It is also recommended that the same load be used in every test, when testing a patient several times during the treatment period. PMID:16479567

Aarnes, Gudrun T; Steen, Harald; Kristiansen, Leif Pål; Festø, Ellinor; Ludvigsen, Per

2006-03-01

301

Matrices of Physiologic Stiffness Potently Inactivate Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Fibroblasts  

PubMed Central

Fibroblasts from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) have been shown to differ from normal lung fibroblasts in functional behaviors that contribute to the pathogenesis of IPF, including the expression of contractile proteins and proliferation, but how such behaviors vary in matrices with stiffness matched to normal and fibrotic lung tissue remains unknown. Here, we tested whether pathologic changes in matrix stiffness control IPF and normal lung tissue–derived fibroblast functions, and compared the relative efficacy of mechanical cues to an antifibrotic lipid mediator, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Fibroblasts were grown on collagen I–coated glass or hydrogel substrates of discrete stiffnesses, spanning the range of normal and fibrotic lung tissue. Traction microscopy was used to quantify contractile function. The CyQuant Cell Proliferation Assay (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA) was used to assess changes in cell number, and PGE2 concentrations were measured by ELISA. We confirmed differences in proliferation and PGE2 synthesis between IPF and normal tissue–derived fibroblasts on rigid substrates. However, IPF fibroblasts remained highly responsive to changes in matrix stiffness, and both proliferative and contractile differences between IPF and normal fibroblasts were ablated on physiologically soft matrices. We also confirmed the relative resistance of IPF fibroblasts to PGE2, while demonstrating that decreases in matrix stiffness and the inhibition of Rho kinase both potently attenuate contractile function in IPF-derived fibroblasts. We conclude that pathologic changes in the mechanical environment control important IPF fibroblast functions. Understanding how mechanical cues control fibroblast function may offer new opportunities for targeting these cells, even when they are resistant to antifibrotic pharmacological agents or biological mediators. PMID:23258227

Marinkovi?, Aleksandar; Liu, Fei

2013-01-01

302

An acoustic startle alters knee joint stiffness and neuromuscular control.  

PubMed

Growing evidence suggests that the nervous system contributes to non-contact knee ligament injury, but limited evidence has measured the effect of extrinsic events on joint stability. Following unanticipated events, the startle reflex leads to universal stiffening of the limbs, but no studies have investigated how an acoustic startle influences knee stiffness and muscle activation during a dynamic knee perturbation. Thirty-six individuals were tested for knee stiffness and muscle activation of the quadriceps and hamstrings. Subjects were seated and instructed to resist a 40-degree knee flexion perturbation from a relaxed state. During some trials, an acoustic startle (50?ms, 1000?Hz, 100?dB) was applied 100?ms prior to the perturbation. Knee stiffness, muscle amplitude, and timing were quantified across time, muscle, and startle conditions. The acoustic startle increased short-range (no startle: 0.044?±?0.011?N·m/deg/kg; average startle: 0.047?±?0.01?N·m/deg/kg) and total knee stiffness (no startle: 0.036?±?0.01?N·m/deg/kg; first startle 0.027?±?0.02?N·m/deg/kg). Additionally, the startle contributed to decreased [vastus medialis (VM): 13.76?±?33.6%; vastus lateralis (VL): 6.72?±?37.4%] but earlier (VM: 0.133?±?0.17?s; VL: 0.124?±?0.17?s) activation of the quadriceps muscles. The results of this study indicate that the startle response can significantly disrupt knee stiffness regulation required to maintain joint stability. Further studies should explore the role of unanticipated events on unintentional injury. PMID:25212407

DeAngelis, A I; Needle, A R; Kaminski, T W; Royer, T R; Knight, C A; Swanik, C B

2014-09-11

303

Transport coefficients of soft repulsive particle fluids.  

PubMed

Molecular dynamics computer simulation has been used to compute the self-diffusion coefficient, D, and shear viscosity, ?(s), of soft-sphere fluids, in which the particles interact through the soft-sphere pair potential, ?(r) = ?(?/r)(n), where n measures the steepness or stiffness of the potential, ? and ? are a characteristic energy and distance, respectively. The simulations were carried out on monodisperse systems for a range of n values from the hard-sphere ([Formula: see text]) limit down to n = 4 over a range of densities. An ideal glass transition value was estimated from the limit where D and [Formula: see text] for each value of n. Nucleation of the crystalline phase was found to intervene prior to the formation of the glass itself, as has been found previously for hard spheres (i.e. [Formula: see text]). With increasing softness the glass transition moves further within the solid part of the phase diagram, as predicted by Cardenas and Tosi (2005 Phys. Lett. A 336 423), although the volume fractions at the glass transition estimated by the current procedure here are systematically lower than the predictions of that study. PMID:21694216

Heyes, D M; Bra?ka, A C

2008-03-19

304

Dependence of elbow joint stiffness measurements on speed, angle, and muscle contraction level.  

PubMed

Elbow joint stiffness is critical to positioning the hand. Abnormal elbow joint stiffness may affect a person's ability to participate in activities of daily living. In this work, elbow joint stiffness was measured in ten healthy young adults with a device adapted from one previously used to measure stiffness in other joints. Measurements of elbow stiffness involved applying a constant-velocity rotational movement to the elbow and measuring the resultant displacement, torque, and acceleration. Elbow stiffness was then computed using a previously-established model for joint stiffness. Measurements were made at two unique elbow joint angles, two speeds, and two forearm muscle contraction levels. The results indicate that the elbow joint stiffness is significantly affected by both rotational speed and forearm muscle contraction level. PMID:24433667

Kuxhaus, Laurel; Zeng, Sisi; Robinson, Charles J

2014-03-21

305

Double-smoothing for Varying Coefficient Models  

PubMed Central

Moderation analyses are widely used in biomedical and psychosocial research to investigate differential treatment effects, with moderators frequently identified through testing the significance of the interaction between the predictor and the potential moderator under strong parametric assumptions. Without imposing any parametric forms on how the moderators may affect the relationship between predictors and responses, varying coefficient models address this fundamental problem of strong parametric assumptions with current practice of moderation analysis and provide a much broader class of models for complex moderation relationships. Local polynomial, especially local linear, methods are commonly used in estimating the varying coefficient models. Recently, a double-smoothing (DS) local linear method has been proposed for nonparametric regression models, with nice properties compared to local linear and local cubic methods. In this paper, we generalize DS to varying coefficient models, and show that it holds similar advantages over local linear and local cubic methods. PMID:22121327

Tang, Wan; Zuo, Guoxin; He, Hua

2011-01-01

306

Diffusion coefficients in leaflets of bilayer membranes  

E-print Network

We study diffusion coefficients of liquid domains by explicitly taking into account the two-layered structure called leaflets of the bilayer membrane. In general, the velocity fields associated with each leaflet are different and the layers sliding past each other cause frictional coupling. We obtain analytical results of diffusion coefficients for a circular liquid domain in a leaflet, and quantitatively study their dependence on the inter-leaflet friction. We also show that the diffusion coefficients diverge in the absence of coupling between the bilayer and solvents, even when the inter-leaflet friction is taken into account. In order to corroborate our theory, the effect of the inter-leaflet friction on the correlated diffusion is examined.

Kazuhiko Seki; Saurabh Mogre; Shigeyuki Komura

2014-02-05

307

Use of Structure Coefficients in Published Multiple Regression Articles: &bgr; is not Enough  

Microsoft Academic Search

The importance of interpreting structure coefficients throughout the General Linear Model (GLM) is widely accepted. However, regression researchers too infrequently consult regression structure coefficients to augment their interpretations. The authors reviewed articles published in the Journal of Applied Psychology to determine how interpretations might have differed if standardized regression coefficients and structure coefficients (or else bivariate rs of predictors with

Troy Courville; Bruce Thompson

2001-01-01

308

Fatigue, Vertical Leg Stiffness, and Stiffness Control Strategies in Males and Females  

PubMed Central

Context: Fatigue appears to influence musculoskeletal injury rates during athletic activities, but whether males and females respond differently to fatigue is unknown. Objective: To determine the influence of fatigue on vertical leg stiffness (K VERT) and muscle activation and joint movement strategies and whether healthy males and females respond similarly to fatigue. Design: Repeated-measures design with all data collected during a single laboratory session. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Physically active males (n = 11) and females (n = 10). Intervention(s): Subjects performed hopping protocols at 2 frequencies before and after fatigue, which was induced by repeated squatting at submaximal loads. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured K VERT with a forceplate and peak muscle activity of the quadriceps, hamstrings, gastrocnemius, soleus, and anterior tibialis muscles with surface electromyography. Sagittal-plane kinematics at the knee and ankle were recorded with an electrogoniometer. Results: After fatigue, K VERT was unchanged for all subjects. However, both males and females demonstrated reduced peak hamstrings ( P = .002) and anterior tibialis ( P = .001) activation, coupled with increased gastrocnemius ( P = .005) and soleus ( P = .001) peak activity, as well as increased quadriceps-hamstrings ( P = .005) and gastrocnemius/soleus-anterior tibialis coactivation ratios ( P = .03) after fatigue. Overall, females demonstrated greater quadriceps-hamstrings coactivation ratios than males, regardless of the fatigue condition ( P = .026). Only females showed increased knee flexion at initial contact after fatigue during hopping ( P = .03). Conclusions: Although K VERT was unaffected, the peak muscle activation and joint movement strategies used to modulate K VERT were affected after fatigue. Once fatigued, both males and females used an ankle-dominant strategy, with greater reliance on the ankle musculature and less on the knee musculature. Also, once fatigued, all subjects used an antagonist inhibition strategy by minimizing antagonist coactivation. Overall, females used a more quadriceps-dominant strategy than males, showing greater quadriceps activity and a larger quadriceps-hamstrings coactivation ratio. Changes in muscle activation and coactivation ratios because of fatigue and sex are suggested to alter knee joint stability and increase anterior cruciate ligament injury risk. PMID:17043698

Padua, Darin A; Arnold, Brent L; Perrin, David H; Gansneder, Bruce M; Carcia, Christopher R; Granata, Kevin P

2006-01-01

309

Contributions of single and double joint stiffness of human arm during force control  

Microsoft Academic Search

To investigate the motion control mechanism of human arm during force control, shoulder, elbow, and double-joint stiffness were measured by applying a small perturbation, and their contributions to joint torques were estimated. Each joint stiffness greatly altered for the different force direction at hand, and shoulder and elbow single joint stiffness were linearly correlated to each joint torques. By assuming

Hiroaki GOMI; Rieko OSU

1996-01-01

310

Theoretical and Experimental Determination of the Stiffness Properties of a Capstan Drive  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wire capstan drives are used as rotary transmission elements for their very low (nominally zero) backlash and high stiffness properties. To obtain high stiffness, the cable is typically wrapped around the input and output drum in a figure-eight pattern multiple times. This stiffness can be determined by analyzing the amount of deformation between the cable and the drums and the

Jaime Werkmeister; Alexander Slocum

311

Measurement of sacroiliac joint stiffness in peripartum pelvic pain patients with Doppler imaging of vibrations (DIV)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. The research question of the present study was: are sacroiliac joint stiffness levels of peripartum pelvic pain patients different from those of healthy subjects?Study design. A cross-sectional comparative sacroiliac joint stiffness analysis of peripartum pelvic pain patients with healthy subjects. In previous studies we introduced a new technique, Doppler imaging of vibrations (DIV), to assess sacroiliac joint stiffness using

H. Muzaffer Buyruk; Hendrik J. Stam; Christian J. Snijders; Johan S. Laméris; Wim P. J. Holland; Theo H. Stijnen

1999-01-01

312

Relationship Between Arterial Stiffness and Athletic Training Programs in Young Adult Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: We examined the relationships of endurance and strength exercise training and the adolescent duration of training to arterial stiffness in young adult men. We hypothesized that young adults participating in endurance sports would have decreased arterial stiffness, whereas those in strength-based sports would have increased arterial stiffness. In addition, we predicted that these trends would be more pronounced with

Takeshi Otsuki; Seiji Maeda; Motoyuki Iemitsu; Yoko Saito; Yuko Tanimura; Ryuichi Ajisaka; Takashi Miyauchi

2007-01-01

313

Assessment of a portable device for the quantitative measurement of ankle joint stiffness in spastic individuals  

E-print Network

Assessment of a portable device for the quantitative measurement of ankle joint stiffness-rater reliability. The device could easily distinguish between stiff and control ankle joints. A portable device can be a useful diagnostic tool to obtain reliable information of stiffness for the ankle joint. a b

Gorassini, Monica

314

Joint Stiffness Identification of Six-revolute Industrial Serial Robots Claire Dumas  

E-print Network

Joint Stiffness Identification of Six-revolute Industrial Serial Robots Claire Dumas , St the stiffness of industrial robots from robot manufacturers. As a consequence, this paper introduces a robust and fast procedure that can be used to identify the joint stiffness values of any six-revolute serial robot

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

315

Arterial stiffness identification of the human carotid artery using the stressstrain relationship in vivo  

E-print Network

Arterial stiffness identification of the human carotid artery using the stress­strain relationship in revised form 20 September 2011 Accepted 20 September 2011 Available online xxxx Keywords: Arterial stiffness Carotid artery Collagen Elastin Stress­strain relationship a b s t r a c t Arterial stiffness

Konofagou, Elisa E.

316

Coefficient Change in Input–Output Models: Theory and Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

A general theory of coefficient change in input–output and social accounting models is proposed. The major contribution is the introduction of the notion of a ‘field of influence’ as the basis for interpreting the effects of coefficient change. This basis is elaborated through a set of propositions. In Section 3, the implications are explored; first, the first-order changes in one

Michael Sonis; Geoffrey J. D. Hewings

1992-01-01

317

Factor Scores, Structure and Communality Coefficients: A Primer  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

(Purpose) The purpose of this paper is to present an easy-to-understand primer on three important concepts of factor analysis: Factor scores, structure coefficients, and communality coefficients. Given that statistical analyses are a part of a global general linear model (GLM), and utilize weights as an integral part of analyses (Thompson, 2006;…

Odum, Mary

2011-01-01

318

Spurious Behavior of Shock-Capturing Methods: Problems Containing Stiff Source Terms and Discontinuities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The goal of this paper is to relate numerical dissipations that are inherited in high order shock-capturing schemes with the onset of wrong propagation speed of discontinuities. For pointwise evaluation of the source term, previous studies indicated that the phenomenon of wrong propagation speed of discontinuities is connected with the smearing of the discontinuity caused by the discretization of the advection term. The smearing introduces a nonequilibrium state into the calculation. Thus as soon as a nonequilibrium value is introduced in this manner, the source term turns on and immediately restores equilibrium, while at the same time shifting the discontinuity to a cell boundary. The present study is to show that the degree of wrong propagation speed of discontinuities is highly dependent on the accuracy of the numerical method. The manner in which the smearing of discontinuities is contained by the numerical method and the overall amount of numerical dissipation being employed play major roles. Moreover, employing finite time steps and grid spacings that are below the standard Courant-Friedrich-Levy (CFL) limit on shockcapturing methods for compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations containing stiff reacting source terms and discontinuities reveals surprising counter-intuitive results. Unlike non-reacting flows, for stiff reactions with discontinuities, employing a time step and grid spacing that are below the CFL limit (based on the homogeneous part or non-reacting part of the governing equations) does not guarantee a correct solution of the chosen governing equations. Instead, depending on the numerical method, time step and grid spacing, the numerical simulation may lead to (a) the correct solution (within the truncation error of the scheme), (b) a divergent solution, (c) a wrong propagation speed of discontinuities solution or (d) other spurious solutions that are solutions of the discretized counterparts but are not solutions of the governing equations. The present investigation for three very different stiff system cases confirms some of the findings of Lafon & Yee (1996) and LeVeque & Yee (1990) for a model scalar PDE. The findings might shed some light on the reported difficulties in numerical combustion and problems with stiff nonlinear (homogeneous) source terms and discontinuities in general.

Yee, Helen M. C.; Kotov, D. V.; Wang, Wei; Shu, Chi-Wang

2013-01-01

319

Management of acute Achilles tendinopathy: effect of etoricoxib on pain control and leg stiffness.  

PubMed

Tendinopathies are a major cause of disability in the athletic population; the main purpose of the treatment of these injuries is to reduce pain and improve function promptly. The objective of this randomized, active comparator controlled, blinded study was to evaluate etoricoxib efficacy in pain control and leg stiffness in athletes suffering acute unilateral Achilles tendinopathy. Fifty-six eligible male athletes (mean age 37.5 ± 11.0 y) suffering acute Achilles tendinopathy were randomized to receive either etoricoxib 120 mg oral once daily (n=28) or diclofenac 100 mg oral once daily (n=28). Pain (100-mm visual analogue scale-VAS), analgesic effect (percentage of 100-mm VAS reduction), satisfaction with pain management (PGART), and leg stiffness (LSR) were evaluated after one week of anti-inflammatory treatment. Over the 7-day treatment period, both etoricoxib and diclofenac provided significantly relief of Achilles tendon pain compared to that experienced at baseline (mean VAS 26.7 ± 2.2 and 56.4 ± 1.8, respectively; p<.001). Analgesic effect averaged 53.7 ± 38.1% (etoricoxib= 56.4% and diclofenac 50.6%, p=0.64). Patients referred high level of satisfaction with anti-inflammatory treatment (PGART = 2.0 ± 1.3), while leg stiffness showed a significant improvement after one-week therapy (LSR 0.89 ± 0.1 vs. 0.95 ± 0.1; p=0.038). PGART and LSR values within etoricoxib and diclofenac groups were not significant (p=0.46, and p=0.37, respectively). Both drugs were generally well tolerated; patients receiving etoricoxib reported significantly less side effects than those in the diclofenac group (0% and 14,2%, respectively, p=0.037). Etoricoxib is clinically effective in treatment of acute Achilles tendinopathy providing a magnitude of effect comparable to that of diclofenac with fewer side effects. Effective control of tendon pain in the acute phase of such sports-related injuries may be helpful to reduce morbidity and improve capabilities associated with high performance like leg stiffness. PMID:24099813

Maquirriain, Javier; Kokalj, Antonio

2013-09-01

320

Force, Torque and Stiffness: Interactions in Perceptual Discrimination  

PubMed Central

Three experiments investigated whether force and torque cues interact in haptic discrimination of force, torque and stiffness, and if so, how. The statistical relation between force and torque was manipulated across four experimental conditions: Either one type of cue varied while the other was constant, or both varied so as to be positively correlated, negatively correlated, or uncorrelated. Experiment 1 showed that the subjects’ ability to discriminate force was improved by positively correlated torque but impaired with uncorrelated torque, as compared to the constant torque condition. Corresponding effects were found in Experiment 2 for the influence of force on torque discrimination. These findings indicate that force and torque are integrated in perception, rather than being processed as separate dimensions. A further experiment demonstrated facilitation of stiffness discrimination by correlated force and torque, whether the correlation was positive or negative. The findings suggest new means of augmenting haptic feedback to facilitate perception of the properties of soft objects. PMID:21359137

Wu, Bing; Klatzky, Roberta L.; Hollis, Ralph L.

2011-01-01

321

Depinning of stiff directed lines in random media  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Driven elastic manifolds in random media exhibit a depinning transition to a state with nonvanishing velocity at a critical driving force. We study the depinning of stiff directed lines, which are governed by a bending rigidity rather than line tension. Their equation of motion is the (quenched) Herring-Mullins equation, which also describes surface growth governed by surface diffusion. Stiff directed lines are particularly interesting as there is a localization transition in the static problem at a finite temperature and the commonly exploited time ordering of states by means of Middleton's theorems [Phys. Rev. Lett. 68, 670 (1992), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.68.670] is not applicable. We employ analytical arguments and numerical simulations to determine the critical exponents and compare our findings with previous works and functional renormalization group results, which we extend to the different line elasticity. We see evidence for two distinct correlation length exponents.

Boltz, Horst-Holger; Kierfeld, Jan

2014-07-01

322

Arterial Stiffness in Patients with Deep and Lobar Intracerebral Hemorrhage  

PubMed Central

Background and Purpose Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) accounts for approximately 10% of stroke cases. Hypertension may play a role in the pathogenesis of ICH that occurs in the basal ganglia, thalamus, pons, and cerebellum, but not in that of lobar ICH. Hypertension contributes to decreased elasticity of arteries, thereby increasing the likelihood of rupture in response to acute elevation in intravascular pressure. This study aimed to evaluate arterial stiffness (using the arterial stiffness index [ASI]) in patients with deep (putaminal and thalamic) ICH in comparison with patients with lobar ICH. Methods We enrolled 64 patients (mean±SD age: 69.3±10.7 years; 47 men and 17 women) among 73 who referred consecutively to our department for intraparenchymal hemorrhage and underwent brain computed tomography (CT) and cerebral angio-CT. In all the subjects, 24-hour heart rates and blood pressures were monitored. The linear regression slope of diastolic on systolic blood pressure was assumed as a global measure of arterial compliance, and its complement (1 minus the slope), ASI, has been considered as a measure of arterial stiffness. Results In the patients with deep ICH, ASI was significantly higher than in the patients with lobar ICH (0.64±0.19 vs. 0.53±0.17, P=0.04). Conclusions Our results suggest that in deep ICH, arterial stiffening represents a possible pathogenetic factor that modifies arterial wall properties and contributes to vascular rupture in response to intravascular pressure acute elevation. Therapeutic strategies that reduce arterial stiffness may potentially lower the incidence of deep hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:25328877

Guideri, Francesca; Di Donato, Ilaria; Tassi, Rossana; Marotta, Giovanna; Lo Giudice, Giuseppe; D'Andrea, Paolo; Martini, Giuseppe

2014-01-01

323

Differential-algebraic equations as stiff ordinary differential equations  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we show that differential-algebraic systems of index-1 can always be viewed as reduced problems from singular perturbed ODEs. Applying implicit Runge-Kutta methods to the singular perturbed system, we gain new insight into the relationship of order-reduction phenomena observed for stiff ODEs to that for differential-algebraic equations. We show that the order of convergence achieved for index-1-differential\\/algebraic equations

Knorrenschild

1989-01-01

324

High stiffness seals for rotor critical speed control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An annular seal is analyzed in which the inlet clearance is larger than the outlet clearance; the flow path may be either stepped or tapered. This design produces radial stiffnesses 1.7 to 14 times that of a constant-clearance seal having the same minimum clearance. When sealing high-pressure fluids, such as a seal can improve rotor stability and can be used to shift troublesome critical speeds to a more suitable location.

Fleming, D. P.

1977-01-01

325

High stiffness seals for rotor critical speed control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An annular seal is analyzed in which the inlet clearance is larger than the outlet clearance; the flow path may be either stepped or tapered. This design produces radial stiffness 1.7 to 14 times that of a constant clearance seal having the same minimum clearance. When sealing high pressure fluids, such a seal improves rotor stability and can be used to shift troublesome critical speeds to a more suitable location.

Fleming, D. P.

1977-01-01

326

Joint stiffness of the ankle and the knee in running.  

PubMed

The spring-mass model is a valid fundament to understand global dynamics of fast legged locomotion under gravity. The underlying concept of elasticity, implying leg stiffness as a crucial parameter, is also found on lower motor control levels, i.e. in muscle-reflex and muscle-tendon systems. Therefore, it seems reasonable that global leg stiffness emerges from local elasticity established by appropriate joint torques. A recently published model of an elastically operating, segmented leg predicts that proper adjustment of joint elasticities to the leg geometry and initial conditions of ground contact provides internal leg stability. Another recent study suggests that in turn the leg segmentation and the initial conditions may be a consequence of metabolic and bone stress constraints. In this study, the theoretical predictions were verified experimentally with respect to initial conditions and elastic joint characteristics in human running. Kinematics and kinetics were measured and the joint torques were estimated by inverse dynamics. Stiffnesses and elastic nonlinearities describing the resulting joint characteristics were extracted from parameter fits. Our results clearly support the theoretical predictions: the knee joint is always stiffer and more extended than the ankle joint. Moreover, the knee torque characteristic on the average shows the higher nonlinearity. According to literature, the leg geometry is a consequence of metabolic and material stress limitations. Adapted to this given geometry, the initial joint angle conditions in fast locomotion are a compromise between metabolic and control effort minimisation. Based on this adaptation, an appropriate joint stiffness ratio between ankle and knee passively safeguards the internal leg stability. The identified joint nonlinearities contribute to the linearisation of the leg spring. PMID:12413965

Günther, Michael; Blickhan, Reinhard

2002-11-01

327

A new strategy for stiffness evaluation of sheet metal parts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the automotive industry, surfaces of styling models are shaped very often in physical models. For example, in the styling process of a car body important design work is realized by clay models and the resulting geometry information typically comes from optical scans. The scanned data is given in the form of point clouds which is then utilized in the virtual planning process for engineering work, e.g. to evaluate the load-carrying capacity. This is an important measure for the stiffness of the car body panels. In this contribution, the following two issues are discussed: what is the suitable geometric representation of the stiffness of the car body and how it is computed if only discrete point clouds exist. In the first part, the suitable geometric representation is identified by constructing continuous CAD models with different geometric parameters, e.g. Gaussian curvature and mean curvature. The stiffness of models is then computed in LS-DYNA and the influence of different geometric parameters is presented based on the simulation result. In the second part, the point clouds from scanned data, rather than continuous CAD models, are directly utilized to estimate the Gaussian curvature, which is normally derived from continuous surfaces. The discrete Gauss-Bonnet algorithm is applied to estimate the Gaussian curvature of the point clouds and the sensitivity of the algorithm with respect to the mesh quality is analyzed. In this way, the stiffness evaluation process in an early stage can be accelerated since the transformation from discrete data to continuous CAD data is labor-intensive. The discrete Gauss-Bonnet algorithm is finally applied to a sheet metal model of the BMW 3 series.

Cai, Q.; Volk, W.; Düster, A.; Rank, E.

2011-08-01

328

Calculation and measurement of the influence of flow parameters on rotordynamic coefficients in labyrinth seals  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

First experimental investigations performed on a new test rig are presented. For a staggered labyrinth seal with fourteen cavities the stiffness coefficient and the leakage flow are measured. The experimental results are compared to calculated results which are obtained by a one-volume bulk-flow theory. A perturbation analysis is made for seven terms. It is found out that the friction factors have great impact on the dynamic coefficients. They are obtained by turbulent flow computation by a finite-volume model with the Reynolds equations used as basic equations.

Kwanka, K.; Ortinger, W.; Steckel, J.

1994-01-01

329

Influence of Cohesive Energy and Chain Stiffness on Polymer Glass Formation  

E-print Network

The generalized entropy theory is applied to assess the joint influence of the microscopic cohesive energy and chain stiffness on glass formation in polymer melts using a minimal model containing a single bending energy and a single (monomer averaged) nearest neighbor van der Waals energy. The analysis focuses on the combined impact of the microscopic cohesive energy and chain stiffness on the magnitudes of the isobaric fragility parameter $m_P$ and the glass transition temperature $T_g$. The computations imply that polymers with rigid structures and weak nearest neighbor interactions are the most fragile, while $T_g$ becomes larger when the chains are stiffer and/or nearest neighbor interactions are stronger. Two simple fitting formulas summarize the computations describing the dependence of $m_P$ and $T_g$ on the microscopic cohesive and bending energies. The consideration of the combined influence of the microscopic cohesive and bending energies leads to the identification of some important design concepts, such as iso-fragility and iso-$T_g$ lines, where, for instance, iso-fragility lines are contours with constant $m_P$ but variable $T_g$. Several thermodynamic properties are found to remain invariant along the iso-fragility lines, while no special characteristics are detected along the iso-$T_g$ lines. Our analysis supports the widely held view that fragility provides more fundamental insight for the description of glass formation than $T_g$.

Wen-Sheng Xu; Karl F. Freed

2014-09-24

330

Testing biomimetic structures in bioinspired robots: how vertebrae control the stiffness of the body and the behavior of fish-like swimmers.  

PubMed

Our goal is to describe a specific case of a general process gaining traction amongst biologists: testing biological hypotheses with biomimetic structures that operate in bioinspired robots. As an example, we present MARMT (mobile autonomous robot for mechanical testing), a surface-swimmer that undulates a submerged biomimetic tail to power cruising and accelerations. Our goal was to test the hypothesis that stiffness of the body controls swimming behavior and that both stiffness and behavior can be altered by changes in the morphology of the vertebral column. To test this hypothesis, we built biomimetic vertebral columns (BVC) outfitted with variable numbers of rigid ring centra; as the number of centra increased the axial length of the intervertebral joints decreased. Each kind of BVC was tested in dynamic bending to measure the structure's apparent stiffness as the storage and loss moduli. In addition, each kind of BVC was used as the axial skeleton in a tail that propelled MARMT. We varied MARMT's tail-beat frequency, lateral amplitude of the tail, and swimming behavior. MARMT's locomotor performance was measured using an on-board accelerometer and external video. As the number of vertebrae in the BVC of fixed length increased, so, too, did the BVC's storage modulus, the BVC's loss modulus, MARMT's mean speed during cruising, and MARMT's peak acceleration during a startle response. These results support the hypothesis that stiffness of the body controls swimming behavior and that both stiffness and behavior can be altered by changes in the morphology of the vertebral column. PMID:21576117

Long, John H; Krenitsky, Nicole M; Roberts, Sonia F; Hirokawa, Jonathan; de Leeuw, Josh; Porter, Marianne E

2011-07-01

331

Arterial Stiffness in the Young: Assessment, Determinants, and Implications  

PubMed Central

Arterial stiffness describes the rigidity of the arterial wall. Its significance owes to its relationship with the pulsatile afterload presented to the left ventricle and its implications on ventricular-arterial coupling. In adults, the contention that arterial stiffness as a marker and risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is gaining support. Noninvasive methods have increasingly been adopted in both the research and clinical arena to determine local, segmental, and systemic arterial stiffness in the young. With adoption of these noninvasive techniques for use in children and adolescents, the phenomenon and significance of arterial stiffening in the young is beginning to be unveiled. The list of childhood factors and conditions found to be associated with arterial stiffening has expanded rapidly over the last decade; these include traditional cardiovascular risk factors, prenatal growth restriction, vasculitides, vasculopathies associated with various syndromes, congenital heart disease, and several systemic diseases. The findings of arterial stiffening have functional implications on energetic efficiency, structure, and function of the left ventricle. Early identification of arterial dysfunction in childhood may provide a window for early intervention, although longitudinal studies are required to determine whether improvement of arterial function in normal and at-risk paediatric populations will be translated into clinical benefits. PMID:20421954

2010-01-01

332

Photoplethysmographic signal waveform index for detection of increased arterial stiffness.  

PubMed

The aim of this research was to assess the validity of the photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveform index PPGAI for the estimation of increased arterial stiffness. For this purpose, PPG signals were recorded from 24 healthy subjects and from 20 type II diabetes patients. The recorded PPG signals were processed with the analysis algorithm developed and the waveform index PPGAI similar to the augmentation index (AIx) was calculated. As a reference, the aortic AIx was assessed and normalized for a heart rate of 75?bpm (AIx@75) by a SphygmoCor device. A strong correlation (r = 0.85) between the PPGAI and the aortic AIx@75 and a positive correlation of both indices with age were found. Age corrections for the indices PPGAI and AIx@75 as regression models from the signals of healthy subjects were constructed. Both indices revealed a significant difference between the groups of diabetes patients and healthy controls. However, the PPGAI provided the best statistical discrimination for the group of subjects with increased arterial stiffness. The waveform index PPGAI based on the inexpensive PPG technology can be considered as a perspective measure of increased arterial stiffness estimation in clinical screenings. PMID:25238409

Pilt, K; Meigas, K; Ferenets, R; Temitski, K; Viigimaa, M

2014-10-01

333

Explicit Integration of Extremely Stiff Reaction Networks: Asymptotic Methods  

SciTech Connect

We show that, even for extremely stiff systems, explicit integration may compete in both accuracy and speed with implicit methods if algebraic methods are used to stabilize the numerical integration. The stabilizing algebra differs for systems well removed from equilibrium and those near equilibrium. This paper introduces a quantitative distinction between these two regimes and addresses the former case in depth, presenting explicit asymptotic methods appropriate when the system is extremely stiff but only weakly equilibrated. A second paper [1] examines quasi-steady-state methods as an alternative to asymptotic methods in systems well away from equilibrium and a third paper [2] extends these methods to equilibrium conditions in extremely stiff systems using partial equilibrium methods. All three papers present systematic evidence for timesteps competitive with implicit methods. Because explicit methods can execute a timestep faster than an implicit method, our results imply that algebraically stabilized explicit algorithms may offer a means to integration of larger networks than have been feasible previously in various disciplines.

Guidry, Mike W [ORNL; Budiardja, R. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Feger, E. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Billings, J. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Hix, William Raphael [ORNL; Messer, O.E.B. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Roche, K. J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); McMahon, E. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); He, M. [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai

2013-01-01

334

Ontogeny of material stiffness heterogeneity in the macaque mandibular corpus.  

PubMed

Evidence is accumulating that bone material stiffness increases during ontogeny, and the role of elastic modulus in conditioning attributes of strength and toughness is therefore a focus of ongoing investigation. Developmental changes in structural properties of the primate mandible have been documented, but comparatively little is known about changes in material heterogeneity and their impact on biomechanical behavior. We examine a cross-sectional sample of Macaca fascicularis (N?=?14) to investigate a series of hypotheses that collectively evaluate whether the patterning of material stiffness (elastic modulus) heterogeneity in the mandible differs among juvenile, subadult and adult individuals. Because differences in age-related activity patterns are known to influence bone stiffness and strength, these data are potentially useful for understanding the relationship between feeding behavior on the one hand and material and structural properties of the mandible on the other. Elastic modulus is shown to be spatially dependent regardless of age, with this dependence being explicable primarily by differences in alveolar versus basal cortical bone. Elastic modulus does not differ consistently between buccal and lingual cortical plates, despite likely differences in the biomechanical milieu of these regions. Since we found only weak support for the hypothesis that the spatial patterning of heterogeneity becomes more predictable with age, accumulated load history may not account for regional differences in bone material properties in mature individuals with respect to the mandibular corpus. PMID:24282152

Daegling, David J; Granatosky, Michael C; McGraw, W Scott

2014-02-01

335

Strength and stiffness reduction factors for infilled frames with openings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Framed structures are usually infilled with masonry walls. They may cause a significant increase in both stiffness and strength, reducing the deformation demand and increasing the energy dissipation capacity of the system. On the other hand, irregular arrangements of the masonry panels may lead to the concentration of damage in some regions, with negative effects; for example soft story mechanisms and shear failures in short columns. Therefore, the presence of infill walls should not be neglected, especially in regions of moderate and high seismicity. To this aim, simple models are available for solid infills walls, such as the diagonal no-tension strut model, while infilled frames with openings have not been adequately investigated. In this study, the effect of openings on the strength and stiffness of infilled frames is investigated by means of about 150 experimental and numerical tests. The main parameters involved are identified and a simple model to take into account the openings in the infills is developed and compared with other models proposed by different researchers. The model, which is based on the use of strength and stiffness reduction factors, takes into account the opening dimensions and presence of reinforcing elements around the opening. An example of an application of the proposed reduction factors is also presented.

Decanini, Luis D.; Liberatore, Laura; Mollaioli, Fabrizio

2014-09-01

336

Kinetic theory of the interdiffusion coefficient in dense plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Naive applications of Spitzer's theory to very dense plasmas can lead to negative diffusion coefficients. The interdiffusion coefficients in Binary Ionic Mixtures (two species of point ions in a uniform neutralizing background) have been calculated recently using molecular dynamics techniques. These calculations can provide useful benchmarks for theoretical evaluations of the diffusion coefficient in dense plasma mixtures. This paper gives a brief description of a kinetic theoretic approximation to the diffusion coefficient which generalizes Spitzer to high density and is in excellent agreement with the computer simulations. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Boercker, D.B.

1986-08-01

337

Extracellular matrix stiffness and composition jointly regulate the induction of malignant phenotypes in mammary epithelium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In vitro models of normal mammary epithelium have correlated increased extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness with malignant phenotypes. However, the role of increased stiffness in this transformation remains unclear because of difficulties in controlling ECM stiffness, composition and architecture independently. Here we demonstrate that interpenetrating networks of reconstituted basement membrane matrix and alginate can be used to modulate ECM stiffness independently of composition and architecture. We find that, in normal mammary epithelial cells, increasing ECM stiffness alone induces malignant phenotypes but that the effect is completely abrogated when accompanied by an increase in basement-membrane ligands. We also find that the combination of stiffness and composition is sensed through ?4 integrin, Rac1, and the PI3K pathway, and suggest a mechanism in which an increase in ECM stiffness, without an increase in basement membrane ligands, prevents normal ?6?4 integrin clustering into hemidesmosomes.

Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Koshy, Sandeep T.; Branco da Cunha, Cristiana; Shin, Jae-Won; Verbeke, Catia S.; Allison, Kimberly H.; Mooney, David J.

2014-10-01

338

STP Second Virial Coefficient Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The STP SecondVirialCoefficient program numerically evaluates the second virial coefficient for the Lennard-Jones potential at various temperatures. The default is temperature range is 0.5 to 5. STP SecondVirialCoefficient is part of a suite of Open Source Physics programs that model aspects of Statistical and Thermal Physics (STP). The program is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the stp_SecondVirialCoefficient.jar file will run the program if Java is installed on your computer. Additional programs can be found by searching ComPADRE for Open Source Physics, STP, or Statistical and Thermal Physics.

Gould, Harvey; Tobochnik, Jan; Christian, Wolfgang; Cox, Anne

2009-02-18

339

Annular honeycomb seals: Test results for leakage and rotordynamic coefficients; comparisons to labyrinth and smooth configurations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test results are presented for leakage and rotordynamic coefficients for seven honeycomb seals. All seals have the same radius, length, and clearance; however, the cell depths and diameters are varied. Rotordynamic data, which are presented, consist of the direct and cross-coupled stiffness coefficients and the direct damping coefficients. The rotordynamic-coefficient data show a considerable sensitivity to changes in cell dimensions; however, no clear trends are identifiable. Comparisons of test data for the honeycomb seals with labyrinth and smooth annular seals show the honeycomb seal had the best sealing (minimum leakage) performance, followed in order by the labyrinth and smooth seals. For prerotated fluid entering the seal, in the direction of shaft rotation, the honeycomb seal has the best rotordynamic stability followed in order by the labyrinth and smooth. For no prerotation, or fluid prerotation against shaft rotation, the labyrinth seal has the best rotordynamic stability followed in order by the smooth and honeycomb seals.

Childs, Dara W.; Elrod, David; Hale, Keith

1989-01-01

340

Annular honeycomb seals: Test results for leakage and rotordynamic coefficients - Comparisons to labyrinth and smooth configurations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test results are presented for leakage and rotordynamic coefficients for seven honeycomb seals. All seals have the same radius, length, and clearance; however, the cell depths and diameters are varied. Rotordynamic data, which are presented, consist of the direct and cross-coupled stiffness coefficients and the direct damping coefficients. The rotordynamic-coefficient data show a considerable sensitivity to changes in cell dimensions; however, no clear trends are identifiable. Comparisons of test data for the honeycomb seals with labyrinth and smooth annular seals shows the honeycomb seal had the best sealing (minimum leakage) performance, followed in order by the labyrinth and smooth seals. For prerotated fluids entering the seal, in the direction of shaft rotation, the honeycomb seal has the best rotordynamic stability followed in order by the labyrinth and smooth. For no prerotation, or fluid prerotation against shaft rotation, the labyrinth seal has the best rotordynamic stability followed in order by the smooth and honeycomb seals.

Childs, D.; Elrod, D.; Hale, K.

1989-01-01

341

Coefficient Alpha: A Reliability Coefficient for the 21st Century?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Coefficient alpha is almost universally applied to assess reliability of scales in psychology. We argue that researchers should consider alternatives to coefficient alpha. Our preference is for structural equation modeling (SEM) estimates of reliability because they are informative and allow for an empirical evaluation of the assumptions…

Yang, Yanyun; Green, Samuel B.

2011-01-01

342

Study of DCT coefficient distributions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many image and video compression schemes perform the discrete cosine transform (DCT) to represent image data in frequency space. An analysis of a broad suite of images confirms previous finding that a Laplacian distribution can be used to model the luminance AC coefficients. This model is expanded and applied to color space (Cr\\/Cb) coefficients. In MPEG, the DCT is used

Stephen Smoot

1996-01-01

343

The role of body stiffness in wake production for anguilliform swimmers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We compare wake structures shed by the undulatory motion of physical and computational models of an anguilliform swimmer, the lamprey. The physical model is a robotic lamprey-like swimmer with an actively flexing tail, and with passively flexible tails of different stiffnesses. The computational model is a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model that captures fluid-structure interaction using the immersed boundary framework. The CFD model included both actively flexing and passively flexible tail regions. Both models produced wakes with two or more same-sign vortices shed each time the tail changed direction (a ``2P'' or higher- order wake). In general, wakes became less coherent as tail flexibility increased. We compare the pressure distribution near the tail tip and the timing of vortex formation in both cases and find good agreement. Differences between self-propelled and tethered cases are detailed. Finally, we examine the effects of material resonance on force production.

Tytell, Eric; Leftwich, Megan; Hsu, Chia-Yu; Cohen, Aves; Fauci, Lisa; Smits, Alexander

2011-11-01

344

Breaking the Meyer-Overton rule: predicted effects of varying stiffness and interfacial activity on the intrinsic potency of anesthetics.  

PubMed Central

Exceptions to the Meyer-Overton rule are commonly cited as evidence against indirect, membrane-mediated mechanisms of general anesthesia. However, another interpretation is possible within the context of an indirect mechanism in which solubilization of an anesthetic in the membrane causes a redistribution of lateral pressures in the membrane, which in turn shifts the conformational equilibrium of membrane proteins such as ligand-gated ion channels. It is suggested that compounds of different stiffness and interfacial activity have different intrinsic potencies, i.e., they cause widely different redistributions of the pressure profile (and thus different effects on protein conformational equilibria) per unit concentration of the compound in the membrane. Calculations incorporating the greater stiffness of perfluoromethylenic chains and the large interfacial attraction of hydroxyl groups predict the higher intrinsic potency of short alkanols than alkanes, the cutoffs in potency of alkanes and alkanols and the much shorter cutoffs for their perfluorinated analogues. Both effects, increased stiffness and interfacial activity, are present in unsaturated hydrocarbon solutes, and the intrinsic potencies are predicted to depend on the magnitude of both effects and on the number and locations of multiple bonds within the molecule. Most importantly, the intrinsic potencies of polymeric alkanols with regularly spaced hydroxyl groups are predicted to rise with increasing chain length, without cutoff; such molecules should serve to distinguish unambiguously between indirect mechanisms and direct binding mechanisms of anesthesia. PMID:11325730

Cantor, R S

2001-01-01

345

On the Emulation of Stiff Walls and Static Friction with a Magnetically Levitated Input\\/Output Device  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses issues of mechanical emulation of stiff walls and stick-slip friction with a 6-DOF magnetically levitated joystick. In the case of stiff wall emulation, it is shown that the PD control implementation commonly used severely limits achievable wall damping and stiffness. It is also shown that the perceived surface stiffness can be increased without loss of stability by

S. e. Salcudean; T. d. Vlaar

1996-01-01

346

Diastolic Stiffness of the Failing Diabetic Heart Importance of Fibrosis, Advanced Glycation End Products, and Myocyte Resting Tension  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background—Excessive diastolic left ventricular stiffness is an important contributor to heart failure in patients with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes is presumed to increase stiffness through myocardial deposition of collagen and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Cardiomyocyte resting tension also elevates stiffness, especially in heart failure with normal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). The contribution to diastolic stiffness of fibrosis, AGEs, and

Loek van Heerebeek; Nazha Hamdani; M. Louis Handoko; Ines Falcao-Pires; René J. Musters; Koba Kupreishvili; Alexander J. J. Ijsselmuiden; Casper G. Schalkwijk; Jean G. F. Bronzwaer; Michaela Diamant; Attila Borbély; Jolanda van der Velden; Ger J. M. Stienen; Gerrit J. Laarman; Hans W. M. Niessen; Walter J. Paulus

2010-01-01

347

Task Dependency of Grip Stiffness—A Study of Human Grip Force and Grip Stiffness Dependency during Two Different Tasks with Same Grip Forces  

PubMed Central

It is widely known that the pinch-grip forces of the human hand are linearly related to the weight of the grasped object. Less is known about the relationship between grip force and grip stiffness. We set out to determine variations to these dependencies in different tasks with and without visual feedback. In two different settings, subjects were asked to (a) grasp and hold a stiffness-measuring manipulandum with a predefined grip force, differing from experiment to experiment, or (b) grasp and hold this manipulandum of which we varied the weight between trials in a more natural task. Both situations led to grip forces in comparable ranges. As the measured grip stiffness is the result of muscle and tendon properties, and since muscle/tendon stiffness increases more-or-less linearly as a function of muscle force, we found, as might be predicted, a linear relationship between grip force and grip stiffness. However, the measured stiffness ranges and the increase of stiffness with grip force varied significantly between the two tasks. Furthermore, we found a strong correlation between regression slope and mean stiffness for the force task which we ascribe to a force stiffness curve going through the origin. Based on a biomechanical model, we attributed the difference between both tasks to changes in wrist configuration, rather than to changes in cocontraction. In a new set of experiments where we prevent the wrist from moving by fixing it and resting it on a pedestal, we found subjects exhibiting similar stiffness/force characteristics in both tasks. PMID:24324643

Höppner, Hannes; McIntyre, Joseph; van der Smagt, Patrick

2013-01-01

348

Control of Equilibrium Position and Stiffness Through Postural Modules.  

PubMed

If muscles are viewed as spring-like torque generators, then the integral of torque with respect to joint angle is the potential energy of that muscle. An energy function for the musculoskeletal system can be defined by summing the energy contribution of each muscle and the potential energy stored in the limb. Any local minimum in this energy landscape is a possible equilibrium position for the limb. The gradient of this function with respect to joint angles is a torque field, and the task of postural control is to find a set of muscle activations to produce a desired field. We consider one technique by which this approximation may be achieved: A postural module is defined as a synergy of muscles that produce a class of torque functions that converge at a constant equilibrium position, but whose stiffness at this position varies as a function of activation of the postural module. For a single-joint system, we show that through control of two such modules it is possible to produce any stiffness at any desired equilibrium position. To extend this scheme to a multijoint system, we initially derive the mechanical constraints on the shape of the restoring force field when a multijoint limb is displaced from equilibrium. Next, we consider voluntary control of the force field when the human arm is displaced from equilibrium: Mussa-Ivaldi, Hogan, and Bizzi (1985) have suggested that subjects are unable to voluntarily change the shape and orientation of the field, although they can readily scale it. This suggests existence of a limitation on the independent recruitment of arm muscles. We show, through simulation, that the inability to voluntarily control the shape and orientation of the restoring force field can be attributed to an organization of postural modules that act as local stiffness controllers. We propose that through coactivation, postural modules coarsely encode the work space and serve as an intermediate control system in the motor control hierarchy. PMID:12581992

Shadmehr, R.

1993-09-01

349

Material stiffness effects on neurite alignment to photopolymerized micropatterns.  

PubMed

The ability to direct neurite growth into a close proximity of stimulating elements of a neural prosthesis, such as a retinal or cochlear implant (CI), may enhance device performance and overcome current spatial signal resolution barriers. In this work, spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), which are the target neurons to be stimulated by CIs, were cultured on photopolymerized micropatterns with varied matrix stiffnesses to determine the effect of rigidity on neurite alignment to physical cues. Micropatterns were generated on methacrylate thin film surfaces in a simple, rapid photopolymerization step by photomasking the prepolymer formulation with parallel line-space gratings. Two methacrylate series, a nonpolar HMA-co-HDDMA series and a polar PEGDMA-co-EGDMA series, with significantly different surface wetting properties were evaluated. Equivalent pattern periodicity was maintained across each methacrylate series based on photomask band spacing, and the feature amplitude was tuned to a depth of 2 ?m amplitude for all compositions using the temporal control afforded by the UV curing methodology. The surface morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and white light interferometry. All micropatterned films adsorb similar amounts of laminin from solution, and no significant difference in SGN survival was observed when the substrate compositions were compared. SGN neurite alignment significantly increases with increasing material modulus for both methacrylate series. Interestingly, SGN neurites respond to material stiffness cues that are orders of magnitude higher (GPa) than what is typically ascribed to neural environments (kPa). The ability to understand neurite response to engineered physical cues and mechanical properties such as matrix stiffness will allow the development of advanced biomaterials that direct de novo neurite growth to address the spatial signal resolution limitations of current neural prosthetics. PMID:25211120

Tuft, Bradley W; Zhang, Lichun; Xu, Linjing; Hangartner, Austin; Leigh, Braden; Hansen, Marlan R; Guymon, C Allan

2014-10-13

350

Wave reflections, arterial stiffness, heart rate variability and orthostatic hypotension.  

PubMed

Increased arterial stiffness and wave reflections are independently associated with orthostatic hypotension (OH). This study investigated whether heart rate variability (HRV) is also involved in the modulation of orthostatic blood pressure (BP) change. A total of 429 subjects (65.1±16.4 years, 77.4% men) were enrolled in this study. OH was defined as a ?20?mm?Hg decrease in brachial systolic blood pressure (SBP) or a ?10?mm?Hg diastolic blood pressure (DBP) decrease upon standing. Measurements of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) and the amplitude of the reflected pressure wave from a decomposed carotid pressure wave (Pb) were obtained by carotid tonometry in the supine position. The power spectrum from a 5-min recording of an electrocardiogram at rest was analyzed to provide components in the high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) ranges. Subjects with OH (n=59, 13.8%) had significantly higher cf-PWV and Pb and significantly lower LogHF and LogLF than those without OH (n=370). The cf-PWV, Pb, LogHF and LogLF were significantly associated with postural SBP and DBP changes. Furthermore, cf-PWV but not Pb was significantly associated with LogHF and LogLF. Multivariate analysis showed that Pb (odds ratio (OR) per 1 s.d. 1.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.282-2.137; P=0.003) and LogHF (OR 0.628, 95% CI 0.459-0.860, P=0.004), but not cf-PWV (OR 1.279, 95% CI 0.932-1.755, P=0.128), were significant independent determinants of OH. Increased wave reflections may predispose OH independently of arterial stiffness and HRV. In contrast, increased arterial stiffness may cause OH through the modulation of HRV. PMID:25142223

Lu, Dai-Yin; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Yu, Wen-Chung; Cheng, Hao-Min; Chuang, Shao-Yuan; Chen, Chen-Huan

2014-12-01

351

Structural dynamics and resonance in plants with nonlinear stiffness.  

PubMed

Although most biomaterials are characterized by strong stiffness nonlinearities, the majority of studies of plant biomechanics and structural dynamics focus on the linear elastic range of their behavior. In this paper, the effects of hardening (elastic modulus increases with strain) and softening (elastic modulus decreases with strain) nonlinearities on the structural dynamics of plant stems are investigated. A number of recent studies suggest that trees, crops, and other plants often uproot or snap when they are forced by gusting winds or waves at their natural frequency. This can be attributed to the fact that the deflections of the plant, and hence mechanical stresses along the stem and root system, are greatest during resonance. To better understand the effect of nonlinear stiffness on the resonant behavior of plants, plant stems have been modeled here as forced Duffing oscillators with softening or hardening nonlinearities. The results of this study suggest that the resonant behavior of plants with nonlinear stiffness is substantially different from that predicted by linear models of plant structural dynamics. Parameter values were considered over a range relevant to most plants. The maximum amplitudes of deflection of the plant stem were calculated numerically for forcing frequencies ranging from zero to twice the natural frequency. For hardening nonlinearities, the resonant behavior was 'pushed' to higher frequencies, and the maximum deflection amplitudes were lower than for the linear case. For softening nonlinearities, the resonant behavior was pushed to lower frequencies, and the maximum deflection amplitudes were higher than for the linear case. These nonlinearities could be beneficial or detrimental to the stability of the plant, depending on the environment. Damping had the effect of drastically decreasing deflection amplitudes and reducing the effect of the nonlinearities. PMID:15808872

Miller, Laura A

2005-06-21

352

Multi-fingered haptic palpation utilizing granular jamming stiffness feedback actuators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes a multi-fingered haptic palpation method using stiffness feedback actuators for simulating tissue palpation procedures in traditional and in robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery. Soft tissue stiffness is simulated by changing the stiffness property of the actuator during palpation. For the first time, granular jamming and pneumatic air actuation are combined to realize stiffness modulation. The stiffness feedback actuator is validated by stiffness measurements in indentation tests and through stiffness discrimination based on a user study. According to the indentation test results, the introduction of a pneumatic chamber to granular jamming can amplify the stiffness variation range and reduce hysteresis of the actuator. The advantage of multi-fingered palpation using the proposed actuators is proven by the comparison of the results of the stiffness discrimination performance using two-fingered (sensitivity: 82.2%, specificity: 88.9%, positive predicative value: 80.0%, accuracy: 85.4%, time: 4.84 s) and single-fingered (sensitivity: 76.4%, specificity: 85.7%, positive predicative value: 75.3%, accuracy: 81.8%, time: 7.48 s) stiffness feedback.

Li, Min; Ranzani, Tommaso; Sareh, Sina; Seneviratne, Lakmal D.; Dasgupta, Prokar; Wurdemann, Helge A.; Althoefer, Kaspar

2014-09-01

353

Decreased passive stiffness of cardiac myocytes and cardiac tissue from copper-deficient rat hearts.  

PubMed

Passive stiffness characteristics of isolated cardiac myocytes, papillary muscles, and aortic strips from male Holtzman rats fed a copper-deficient diet for approximately 5 wk were compared with those of rats fed a copper-adequate diet to determine whether alterations in these characteristics might accompany the well-documented cardiac hypertrophy and high incidence of ventricular rupture characteristic of copper deficiency. Stiffness of isolated cardiac myocytes was assessed from measurements of cellular dimensional changes to varied osmotic conditions. Stiffness of papillary muscles and aortic strips was determined from resting length-tension analyses and included steady-state characteristics, dynamic viscoelastic stiffness properties, and maximum tensile strength. The primary findings were that copper deficiency resulted in cardiac hypertrophy with increased cardiac myocyte size and fragility, decreased cardiac myocyte stiffness, and decreased papillary muscle passive stiffness, dynamic stiffness, and tensile strength and no alteration in aortic connective tissue passive stiffness or tensile strength. These findings suggest that a reduction of cardiac myocyte stiffness and increased cellular fragility could contribute to the reduced overall cardiac tissue stiffness and the high incidence of ventricular aneurysm observed in copper-deficient rats. PMID:10843880

Heller, L J; Mohrman, D E; Prohaska, J R

2000-06-01

354

Effect of Meal Ingestion on Liver Stiffness in Patients with Cirrhosis and Portal Hypertension  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims Liver stiffness is increasingly used in the non-invasive evaluation of chronic liver diseases. Liver stiffness correlates with hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) in patients with cirrhosis and holds prognostic value in this population. Hence, accuracy in its measurement is needed. Several factors independent of fibrosis influence liver stiffness, but there is insufficient information on whether meal ingestion modifies liver stiffness in cirrhosis. We investigated the changes in liver stiffness occurring after the ingestion of a liquid standard test meal in this population. Methods In 19 patients with cirrhosis and esophageal varices (9 alcoholic, 9 HCV-related, 1 NASH; Child score 6.9±1.8), liver stiffness (transient elastography), portal blood flow (PBF) and hepatic artery blood flow (HABF) (Doppler-Ultrasound) were measured before and 30 minutes after receiving a standard mixed liquid meal. In 10 the HVPG changes were also measured. Results Post-prandial hyperemia was accompanied by a marked increase in liver stiffness (+27±33%; p<0.0001). Changes in liver stiffness did not correlate with PBF changes, but directly correlated with HABF changes (r?=?0.658; p?=?0.002). After the meal, those patients showing a decrease in HABF (n?=?13) had a less marked increase of liver stiffness as compared to patients in whom HABF increased (n?=?6; +12±21% vs. +62±29%,p<0.0001). As expected, post-prandial hyperemia was associated with an increase in HVPG (n?=?10; +26±13%, p?=?0.003), but changes in liver stiffness did not correlate with HVPG changes. Conclusions Liver stiffness increases markedly after a liquid test meal in patients with cirrhosis, suggesting that its measurement should be performed in standardized fasting conditions. The hepatic artery buffer response appears an important factor modulating postprandial changes of liver stiffness. The post-prandial increase in HVPG cannot be predicted by changes in liver stiffness. PMID:23520531

Berzigotti, Annalisa; De Gottardi, Andrea; Vukotic, Ranka; Siramolpiwat, Sith; Abraldes, Juan G.; García-Pagan, Juan Carlos; Bosch, Jaime

2013-01-01

355

Arterial stiffness in adult patients after Fontan procedure  

PubMed Central

Objectives Increased arterial stiffness is a risk factor of atherosclerosis and cardio-vascular complications. The aim of the study was to determine whether peripheral vascular function might be an early marker of impaired health status in patients with a single ventricle after Fontan procedure. Methods and results Twenty five consecutive adults (11 women and 14 men) aged 24.7?±?6.2 years after the Fontan procedure and 25 sex, age and BMI match healthy volunteers underwent physical examination, blood analysis, transthoracic echocardiography and noninvasive assessment of aortic stiffness. Augmented pressure and Augmentation Index (AIx) were both significantly elevated in Fontan when compared to the controls (6,08?±?0,7 vs. 2,0?±?3,7; p?=?0.002 and 17,01?±?3,3 vs. 6,05?±?11; p?stiffness assessed by a noninvasive technique. Low arterial oxygen saturation postoperative time, age at surgery, white blood cells, TNF? and bilirubin level are associated with arterial stiffening in these patients. The combination of blood parameters of the hepatic function and noninvasive measurements of arterial stiffness could be helpful in comprehensive care of patients with Fontan circulation. PMID:24716671

2014-01-01

356

Photoinduced variable stiffness of spiropyran-based composites  

SciTech Connect

A quantitative demonstration of reversible stiffness upon appropriate light stimulus in a spiropyran-polymeric composite is presented. The polymeric films containing 3% wt. of the photochromic spiropyran were irradiated with alternating ultraviolet and visible light and the storage modulus was measured. A reversible change in modulus of about 7% was observed. The modulus change was attributed to an interaction of the polar merocyanine with the polymeric chains and/or to a variation of effective free volume induced by merocyanine aggregates formed in the polymer upon ultraviolet irradiation. The effect is fully reversed when the merocyanine isomers turn back to the spiropyran state after visible irradiation.

Samoylova, E.; Ceseracciu, L.; Allione, M.; Diaspro, A.; Barone, A. C. [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, Genova I-16163 (Italy); Athanassiou, A. [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, Genova I-16163 (Italy); Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies-Unile, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Barsanti, Arnesano (Lecce) I-73010 (Italy)

2011-11-14

357

Superfluid Stiffness of a Driven Dissipative Condensate with Disorder  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Observations of macroscopic quantum coherence in driven systems, e.g. polariton condensates, have strongly stimulated experimental as well as theoretical efforts during the last decade. We address the question of whether a driven quantum condensate is a superfluid, allowing for the effects of disorder and its nonequilibrium nature. We predict that for spatial dimensions d<4 the superfluid stiffness vanishes once the condensate exceeds a critical size, and treat in detail the case d=2. Thus a nonequilibrium condensate is not a superfluid in the thermodynamic limit, even for weak disorder, although superfluid behavior would persist in small systems.

Janot, Alexander; Hyart, Timo; Eastham, Paul R.; Rosenow, Bernd

2013-12-01

358

Biomechanical model of the human cornea: Considering shear stiffness and regional variation of collagen anisotropy and density.  

PubMed

A numerical model based on continuum mechanics theory has been developed which represents the 3D anisotropic behaviour of the corneal stroma. Experimental data has been gathered from a number of previous studies to provide the basis and calibration parameters for the numerical modelling. The resulting model introduces numerical representation of collagen fibril density and its related regional variation, interlamellar cohesion and age-related stiffening in an anisotropic model of the human cornea. Further, the model incorporates previous modelling developments including representation of lamellae anisotropy and stiffness of the underlying matrix. Wide angle X-ray scattering has provided measured data which quantifies relative fibril anisotropy in the 2D domain. Accurate numerical description of material response to deformation is essential to providing representative simulations of corneal behaviour. Representing experimentally obtained 2D anisotropy and regional density variation in the 3D domain is an essential component of this accuracy. The constitutive model was incorporated into finite element analysis. Combining with inverse analysis, the model was calibrated to an extensive experimental database of ex vivo corneal inflation tests and ex vivo corneal shear tests. This model represents stiffness of the underlying matrix which is 2-3 orders of magnitude than the mechanical response representing the collagen fibrils in the lamellae. The presented model, along with its age dependent material coefficients, allows finite element modelling for an individual patient with material stiffness approximated based on their age. This has great potential to be used in both daily clinical practice for the planning and optimisation of corrective procedures and in pre-clinical optimisation of diagnostic procedures. PMID:25460928

Whitford, Charles; Studer, Harald; Boote, Craig; Meek, Keith M; Elsheikh, Ahmed

2015-02-01

359

Beta 1 integrin binding plays a role in the constant traction force generation in response to varying stiffness for cells grown on mature cardiac extracellular matrix.  

PubMed

We have previously reported a unique response of traction force generation for cells grown on mature cardiac ECM, where traction force was constant over a range of stiffnesses. In this study we sought to further investigate the role of the complex mixture of ECM on this response and assess the potential mechanism behind it. Using traction force microscopy, we measured cellular traction forces and stresses for mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) grown on polyacrylamide gels at a range of stiffnesses (9, 25, or 48kPa) containing either adult rat heart ECM, different singular ECM proteins including collagen I, fibronectin, and laminin, or ECM mimics comprised of varying amounts of collagen I, fibronectin, and laminin. We also measured the expression of integrins on these different substrates as well as probed for ?1 integrin binding. There was no significant change in traction force generation for cells grown on the adult ECM, as previously reported, whereas cells grown on singular ECM protein substrates had increased traction force generation with an increase in substrate stiffness. Cells grown on ECM mimics containing collagen I, fibronectin and laminin were found to be reminiscent of the traction forces generated by cells grown on native ECM. Integrin expression generally increased with increasing stiffness except for the ?1 integrin, potentially implicating it as playing a role in the response to adult cardiac ECM. We inhibited binding through the ?1 integrin on cells grown on the adult ECM and found that the inhibition of ?1 binding led to a return to the typical response of increasing traction force generation with increasing stiffness. Our data demonstrates that cells grown on the mature cardiac ECM are able to circumvent typical stiffness related cellular behaviors, likely through ?1 integrin binding to the complex composition. PMID:25220424

Gershlak, Joshua R; Black, Lauren D

2015-01-15

360

A Comparison of Total and Intrinsic Muscle Stiffness Among Flexors and Extensors of the Ankle, Knee and Elbow  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This study examined 3 methods that assessed muscle stiffness. Muscle stiffness has been quantified by tissue reactive force (transverse stiffness), vibration, and force (or torque) over displacement. Muscle stiffness also has two components: reflex (due to muscle sensor activity) and intrinsic (tonic firing of motor units, elastic nature of actin and myosin cross bridges, and connective tissue). This study compared three methods of measuring muscle stiffness of agonist-antagonist muscle pairs of the ankle, knee and elbow.

Lemoine, Sandra M.

1997-01-01

361

Ritz method for transient response in systems having unsymmetric stiffness  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The DMAP coding was automated to such an extent by using the device of bubble vectors, that it is useable for analyses in its present form. This feasibility study demonstrates that the Ritz Method is so compelling as to warrant coding its modules in FORTRAN and organizing the resulting coding into a new Rigid Format. Even though this Ritz technique was developed for unsymmetric stiffness matrices, it offers advantages to problems with symmetric stiffnesses. If used for the symmetric case the solution would be simplified to one set of modes, because the adjoint would be the same as the primary. Its advantage in either type of symmetry over a classical eigenvalue modal expansion is that information density per Ritz mode is far richer than per eigenvalue mode; thus far fewer modes would be needed for the same accuracy and every mode would actively participate in the response. Considerable economy can be realized in adapting Ritz vectors for modal solutions. This new Ritz capability now makes NASTRAN even more powerful than before.

Butler, Thomas G.

1989-01-01

362

Mechanosensitive kinases regulate stiffness-induced cardiomyocyte maturation.  

PubMed

Cells secrete and assemble extracellular matrix throughout development, giving rise to time-dependent, tissue-specific stiffness. Mimicking myocardial matrix stiffening, i.e. ~10-fold increase over 1 week, with a hydrogel system enhances myofibrillar organization of embryonic cardiomyocytes compared to static hydrogels, and thus we sought to identify specific mechanosensitive proteins involved. Expression and/or phosphorylation state of 309 unique protein kinases were examined in embryonic cardiomyocytes plated on either dynamically stiffening or static mature myocardial stiffness hydrogels. Gene ontology analysis of these kinases identified cardiogenic pathways that exhibited time-dependent up-regulation on dynamic versus static matrices, including PI3K/AKT and p38 MAPK, while GSK3?, a known antagonist of cardiomyocyte maturation, was down-regulated. Additionally, inhibiting GSK3? on static matrices improved spontaneous contraction and myofibril organization, while inhibiting agonist AKT on dynamic matrices reduced myofibril organization and spontaneous contraction, confirming its role in mechanically-driven maturation. Together, these data indicate that mechanically-driven maturation is at least partially achieved via active mechanosensing at focal adhesions, affecting expression and phosphorylation of a variety of protein kinases important to cardiomyogenesis. PMID:25236849

Young, Jennifer L; Kretchmer, Kyle; Ondeck, Matthew G; Zambon, Alexander C; Engler, Adam J

2014-01-01

363

IRKC: An IMEX solver for stiff diffusion-reaction PDEs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Fortran 90 code IRKC is intended for the time integration of systems of partial differential equations (PDEs) of diffusion-reaction type for which the reaction Jacobian has real (negative) eigenvalues. It is based on a family of implicit-explicit Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev methods which are unconditionally stable for reaction terms and which impose a stability constraint associated with the diffusion terms that is quadratic in the number of stages. Special properties of the family make it possible for the code to select at each step the most efficient stable method as well as the most efficient step size. Moreover, they make it possible to apply the methods using just a few vectors of storage. A further step towards minimal storage requirements and optimal efficiency is achieved by exploiting the fact that the implicit terms, originating from the stiff reactions, are not coupled over the spatial grid points. Hence, the systems to be solved have a small dimension (viz., equal to the number of PDEs). These characteristics of the code make it especially attractive for problems in several spatial variables. IRKC is a successor to the RKC code [B.P. Sommeijer, L.F. Shampine, J.G. Verwer, RKC: an explicit solver for parabolic PDEs, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 88 (1997) 315-326] that solves similar problems without stiff reaction terms.

Shampine, L. F.; Sommeijer, B. P.; Verwer, J. G.

2006-11-01

364

Mechanosensitive Kinases Regulate Stiffness-Induced Cardiomyocyte Maturation  

PubMed Central

Cells secrete and assemble extracellular matrix throughout development, giving rise to time-dependent, tissue-specific stiffness. Mimicking myocardial matrix stiffening, i.e. ~10-fold increase over 1 week, with a hydrogel system enhances myofibrillar organization of embryonic cardiomyocytes compared to static hydrogels, and thus we sought to identify specific mechanosensitive proteins involved. Expression and/or phosphorylation state of 309 unique protein kinases were examined in embryonic cardiomyocytes plated on either dynamically stiffening or static mature myocardial stiffness hydrogels. Gene ontology analysis of these kinases identified cardiogenic pathways that exhibited time-dependent up-regulation on dynamic versus static matrices, including PI3K/AKT and p38 MAPK, while GSK3?, a known antagonist of cardiomyocyte maturation, was down-regulated. Additionally, inhibiting GSK3? on static matrices improved spontaneous contraction and myofibril organization, while inhibiting agonist AKT on dynamic matrices reduced myofibril organization and spontaneous contraction, confirming its role in mechanically-driven maturation. Together, these data indicate that mechanically-driven maturation is at least partially achieved via active mechanosensing at focal adhesions, affecting expression and phosphorylation of a variety of protein kinases important to cardiomyogenesis. PMID:25236849

Young, Jennifer L.; Kretchmer, Kyle; Ondeck, Matthew G.; Zambon, Alexander C.; Engler, Adam J.

2014-01-01

365

Influence of Polyelectrolyte Film Stiffness on Bacterial Growth  

PubMed Central

Photo-crosslinkable polyelectrolyte films whose nanomechanical properties can be varied under UV light illumination, were prepared from poly(L-lysine) (PLL) and a hyaluronan derivative modified with photoreactive vinylbenzyl groups (HAVB). The adhesion and the growth of two model bacteria, namely Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis, were studied on non-crosslinked and crosslinked films to investigate how the film stiffness influences the bacterial behavior. While the Gram positive L. lactis was shown to grow slowly on both films, independently of their rigidity, the Gram negative E. coli exhibited a more rapid growth on non-crosslinked softer films compared to the stiffer ones. Experiments performed on photo-patterned films showing both soft and stiff regions, confirmed a faster development of E. coli colonies on softer regions. Interestingly, this behavior is opposite to the one reported before for mammalian cells. Therefore, the photo-crosslinked (PLL/HAVB) films are interesting coatings for tissue engineering since they promote the growth of mammalian cells while limiting the bacterial colonization. PMID:23289403

Saha, Naresh; Monge, Claire; Dulong, Virginie; Picart, Catherine; Glinel, Karine

2015-01-01

366

Ethnic Differences in Bending Stiffness of the Ulna and Tibia  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There is considerable information about the variations in bone mass associated with different opportunity to compare a mechanical property of bone in young college women of Caucasian, Hispanic and Asian descent who gave informed consent to participate in an exercise study. The subjects were sedentary, in good health, eumenorrheic, non-smokers and had body mass indices (BMI) less than 30. Measurements acquired were body weight, kg, and height, cm, calcaneal and wrist bone density, g/square cm (PIXI, Lunar GE) and bending stiffness (EI, Nm(exp 2)) in the ulna and tibia. E1 was determined non-invasively with an instrument called the Mechanical Response Tissue Analyzer (MRTA) that delivers a vibratory stimulus to the center of the ulna or tibia and analyzes the response curve based on the equation E1 = k(sub b) L(exp 3)/48 where k, is lateral bending stiffness, L is the length of the bone, E is Young's modulus of elasticity and I, the bending moment of inertia. The error of the test (CV) based on measurements of an aluminum rod with a known E1 was 4.8%, of calcaneal BMD, 0.54%, and of wrist bone density, 3.45%.

Arnaud, S. B.; Liang, M. T. C.; Bassin, S.; Braun, W.; Dutto, D.; Plesums, K.; Huvnh, H. T.; Cooper, D.; Wong, N.

2004-01-01

367

Explicit Integration of Extremely Stiff Reaction Networks: Partial Equilibrium Methods  

SciTech Connect

In two preceding papers [1,2] we have shown that, when reaction networks are well removed from equilibrium, explicit asymptotic and quasi-steady-state approximations can give algebraically stabilized integration schemes that rival standard implicit methods in accuracy and speed for extremely stiff systems. However, we also showed that these explicit methods remain accurate but are no longer competitive in speed as the network approaches equilibrium. In this paper we analyze this failure and show that it is associated with the presence of fast equilibration timescales that neither asymptotic nor quasi-steady-state approximations are able to remove efficiently from the numerical integration. Based on this understanding, we develop a partial equilibrium method to deal effectively with the new partial equilibrium methods, give an integration scheme that plausibly can deal with the stiffest networks, even in the approach to equilibrium, with accuracy and speed competitive with that of implicit methods. Thus we demonstrate that algebraically stabilized explicit methods may offer alternatives to implicit integration of even extremely stiff systems, and that these methods may permit integration of much larger networks than have been feasible previously in a variety of fields.

Guidry, Mike W [ORNL; Billings, J. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Hix, William Raphael [ORNL

2013-01-01

368

New Photoplethysmographic Signal Analysis Algorithm for Arterial Stiffness Estimation  

PubMed Central

The ability to identify premature arterial stiffening is of considerable value in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. The “ageing index” (AGI), which is calculated from the second derivative photoplethysmographic (SDPPG) waveform, has been used as one method for arterial stiffness estimation and the evaluation of cardiovascular ageing. In this study, the new SDPPG analysis algorithm is proposed with optimal filtering and signal normalization in time. The filter parameters were optimized in order to achieve the minimal standard deviation of AGI, which gives more effective differentiation between the levels of arterial stiffness. As a result, the optimal low-pass filter edge frequency of 6?Hz and transitionband of 1?Hz were found, which facilitates AGI calculation with a standard deviation of 0.06. The study was carried out on 21 healthy subjects and 20 diabetes patients. The linear relationship (r = 0.91) between each subject's age and AGI was found, and a linear model with regression line was constructed. For diabetes patients, the mean AGI value difference from the proposed model yAGI was found to be 0.359. The difference was found between healthy and diabetes patients groups with significance level of P < 0.0005. PMID:23983620

Lindberg, Lars-Göran; Temitski, Kristina; Viigimaa, Margus

2013-01-01

369

??? Cross-Links Increase Fibrin Fiber Elasticity and Stiffness  

PubMed Central

Fibrin fibers, which are ?100 nm in diameter, are the major structural component of a blood clot. The mechanical properties of single fibrin fibers determine the behavior of a blood clot and, thus, have a critical influence on heart attacks, strokes, and embolisms. Cross-linking is thought to fortify blood clots; though, the role of ?–? cross-links in fibrin fiber assembly and their effect on the mechanical properties of single fibrin fibers are poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, we used a combined fluorescence and atomic force microscope technique to determine the stiffness (modulus), extensibility, and elasticity of individual, uncross-linked, exclusively ?–? cross-linked (?Q398N/Q399N/K406R fibrinogen variant), and completely cross-linked fibrin fibers. Exclusive ?–? cross-linking results in 2.5× stiffer and 1.5× more elastic fibers, whereas full cross-linking results in 3.75× stiffer, 1.2× more elastic, but 1.2× less extensible fibers, as compared to uncross-linked fibers. On the basis of these results and data from the literature, we propose a model in which the ?-C region plays a significant role in inter- and intralinking of fibrin molecules and protofibrils, endowing fibrin fibers with increased stiffness and elasticity. PMID:22225811

Helms, Christine C.; Ariëns, Robert A.S.; Uitte de Willige, S.; Standeven, Kristina F.; Guthold, Martin

2012-01-01

370

Effect of probe contact pressure on the photoplethysmographic assessment of conduit artery stiffness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Currently, photoplethysmography (PPG) is a frequently studied optical blood pulsation detection technique among biophotonic and biomedical researchers due to the fact that it shows high potential for estimating the arterial stiffness (AS). The extraction of diagnostically useful information requires standardized measurement procedure with good repeatability. However, the effects of a crucially important factor-the optimal contact pressure (CP) of the probe-are often ignored. Also, CP values are not reported to evaluate those effects. It is hypothesized that AS estimated from PPG pulse wave 2nd derivative parameter b/a is strongly inconsistent when recorded at nonoptimal probe CP. Our pilot study confirmed this during in vivo PPG recordings from conduit artery sites on five healthy subjects at variable probe CP (0 to 15 kPa) by using 880 nm reflectance type sensor, force transducer, and PPG alternating current (AC) signal pulse area derived optimal CP criterion. The b/a values, calculated from PPG with variable CP, showed variation >300 percent. In contrast, at the optimal CP, the b/a showed high repeatability (coefficient of variability <5 percent). The effect has been explained with exponential pulse pressure-volume relationship model which indicates the optimal CP range.

Grabovskis, Andris; Marcinkevics, Zbignevs; Rubins, Uldis; Kviesis-Kipge, Edgars

2013-02-01

371

Steady state likelihood ratio sensitivity analysis for stiff kinetic Monte Carlo simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation is an integral tool in the study of complex physical phenomena present in applications ranging from heterogeneous catalysis to biological systems to crystal growth and atmospheric sciences. Sensitivity analysis is useful for identifying important parameters and rate-determining steps, but the finite-difference application of sensitivity analysis is computationally demanding. Techniques based on the likelihood ratio method reduce the computational cost of sensitivity analysis by obtaining all gradient information in a single run. However, we show that disparity in time scales of microscopic events, which is ubiquitous in real systems, introduces drastic statistical noise into derivative estimates for parameters affecting the fast events. In this work, the steady-state likelihood ratio sensitivity analysis is extended to singularly perturbed systems by invoking partial equilibration for fast reactions, that is, by working on the fast and slow manifolds of the chemistry. Derivatives on each time scale are computed independently and combined to the desired sensitivity coefficients to considerably reduce the noise in derivative estimates for stiff systems. The approach is demonstrated in an analytically solvable linear system.

Núñez, M.; Vlachos, D. G.

2015-01-01

372

Experimental determination of the complex stiffness tensor and Euler angles in anisotropic media using ultrasonic waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this work is to measure the complex elastic tensor and Euler angles in very complex anisotropic media like austenitic steel welds, by inverse problem resolution from experimental data. The obtained experimental characteristics of the anisotropic material will be injected in a FE code developed by EDF enabling the simulation of an actual ultrasonic NDE of welds. The present work aims to provide reliable input data to the 3D future development of the code. In particular, this complex elastic tensor will allow to predict by modeling beam skewing ant attenuation in an austenitic weld. The investigation of such anisotropic media is very complex because of the directional dependency of the elastic stiffness tensor. Then we will discuss the use of a hybrid genetic algorithm to overcome this difficulty. The identification method is based on waveforms spectra reconstruction associated to a physical model describing wave propagation in plates, during underwater measurements. The entire procedure is qualified and validated using simulated data. Moreover, a comparison of the estimated elastic coefficients with literature values and ultrasonic measurements obtained in transmission is also given, at the end of the paper.

Alaoui-Ismaili, N.; Guy, P.; Chassignole, B.

2014-02-01

373

Steady state likelihood ratio sensitivity analysis for stiff kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.  

PubMed

Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation is an integral tool in the study of complex physical phenomena present in applications ranging from heterogeneous catalysis to biological systems to crystal growth and atmospheric sciences. Sensitivity analysis is useful for identifying important parameters and rate-determining steps, but the finite-difference application of sensitivity analysis is computationally demanding. Techniques based on the likelihood ratio method reduce the computational cost of sensitivity analysis by obtaining all gradient information in a single run. However, we show that disparity in time scales of microscopic events, which is ubiquitous in real systems, introduces drastic statistical noise into derivative estimates for parameters affecting the fast events. In this work, the steady-state likelihood ratio sensitivity analysis is extended to singularly perturbed systems by invoking partial equilibration for fast reactions, that is, by working on the fast and slow manifolds of the chemistry. Derivatives on each time scale are computed independently and combined to the desired sensitivity coefficients to considerably reduce the noise in derivative estimates for stiff systems. The approach is demonstrated in an analytically solvable linear system. PMID:25637970

Núñez, M; Vlachos, D G

2015-01-28

374

Transient micro-elastography: A novel non-invasive approach to measure liver stiffness in mice  

PubMed Central

AIM: To develop and validate a transient micro-elastography device to measure liver stiffness (LS) in mice. METHODS: A novel transient micro-elastography (TME) device, dedicated to LS measurements in mice with a range of measurement from 1-170 kPa, was developed using an optimized vibration frequency of 300 Hz and a 2 mm piston. The novel probe was validated in a classical fibrosis model (CCl4) and in a transgenic murine model of systemic amyloidosis. RESULTS: TME could be successfully performed in control mice below the xiphoid cartilage, with a mean LS of 4.4 ± 1.3 kPa, a mean success rate of 88%, and an excellent intra-observer agreement (0.98). Treatment with CCl4 over seven weeks drastically increased LS as compared to controls (18.2 ± 3.7 kPa vs 3.6 ± 1.2 kPa). Moreover, fibrosis stage was highly correlated with LS (Spearman coefficient = 0.88, P < 0.01). In the amyloidosis model, much higher LS values were obtained, reaching maximum values of > 150 kPa. LS significantly correlated with the amyloidosis index (0.93, P < 0.0001) and the plasma concentration of mutant hapoA-II (0.62, P < 0.005). CONCLUSION: Here, we have established the first non-invasive approach to measure LS in mice, and have successfully validated it in two murine models of high LS. PMID:21448348

Bastard, Cécile; Bosisio, Matteo R; Chabert, Michèle; Kalopissis, Athina D; Mahrouf-Yorgov, Meriem; Gilgenkrantz, Hélène; Mueller, Sebastian; Sandrin, Laurent

2011-01-01

375

Experimental determination of the complex stiffness tensor and Euler angles in anisotropic media using ultrasonic waves  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this work is to measure the complex elastic tensor and Euler angles in very complex anisotropic media like austenitic steel welds, by inverse problem resolution from experimental data. The obtained experimental characteristics of the anisotropic material will be injected in a FE code developed by EDF enabling the simulation of an actual ultrasonic NDE of welds. The present work aims to provide reliable input data to the 3D future development of the code. In particular, this complex elastic tensor will allow to predict by modeling beam skewing ant attenuation in an austenitic weld. The investigation of such anisotropic media is very complex because of the directional dependency of the elastic stiffness tensor. Then we will discuss the use of a hybrid genetic algorithm to overcome this difficulty. The identification method is based on waveforms spectra reconstruction associated to a physical model describing wave propagation in plates, during underwater measurements. The entire procedure is qualified and validated using simulated data. Moreover, a comparison of the estimated elastic coefficients with literature values and ultrasonic measurements obtained in transmission is also given, at the end of the paper.

Alaoui-Ismaili, N. [INSA-Lyon, MATEIS, UMR5510 Villeurbanne, F-69621 (France); Guy, P. [INSA-Lyon, LVA, EA677 Villeurbanne, F-69621 (France); Chassignole, B. [EDF R and D, Moret sur Loing, F77818 (France)

2014-02-18

376

Modeling and characterization of stiffness controlled robotic legs using dielectric elastomers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new robotic leg design is presented that utilizes dielectric elastomers (3M VHB 4910) to rapidly control stiffness changes for enhanced mobility and agility of a field demonstrated hexapod robot. A set of electromechanical test are utilized to obtain up to 92% reduction in stiffness that is controlled by an electric field. The results are compared to a finite deformation membrane finite element model to understand and improve field driven stiffness changes for real-time robotic applications.

Newton, Jason; Morton, Jeffrey; Clark, Jonathan; Oates, William S.

2012-04-01

377

Fatigue Damage Evaluation through Stiffness Measurements in Boron-Epoxy Laminates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stiffness reductions, resulting from fatigue damage, were measured for unnotched [±45]s, [0\\/90] s, and [0\\/90\\/ ±45 ] s boron\\/epoxy laminates. Deg radation in the various in-plane stiffnesses (Exx, Byy, Gxy) were measured using a combination of uniaxial tension, rail shear, and flexure tests. An attempt was made to predict stiffness loss at failure from a secant modulus criterion. Damage growth

T. Kevin OBrien; Kenneth L. Reifsnider

1981-01-01

378

Comparison of Hirs' equation of Moody's equation for determining rotordynamic coefficients of annular pressure seals  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rotordynamic coefficients of an incompressible-flow annular pressure seal were determined using a bulk-flow model in conjunction with two different friction factor relationships. The first, Hirs' equation, assumes the friction factor is a function of Reynolds number only. The second, Moody's equation, approximates Moody's diagram and assumes the friction factor is a function of both Reynolds number and relative roughness. For each value of relative roughness, Hirs' constants were determined so that both equations gave the same magnitude and slope of the friction factor. For smooth seals, both relationships give the same results. For rough seals (e/2 H sub 0 = 0.05) Moody's equation predicts 44% greater direct stiffness, 35% greater cross-coupled stiffness, 19% smaller cross-coupled damping, 59% smaller cross-coupled inertia, and nominally the same direct damping and direct inertia.

Nelson, Clayton C.; Nguyen, Dung T.

1987-01-01

379

A new correlation coefficient for bivariate time-series data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The correlation in time series has received considerable attention in the literature. Its use has attained an important role in the social sciences and finance. For example, pair trading in finance is concerned with the correlation between stock prices, returns, etc. In general, Pearson’s correlation coefficient is employed in these areas although it has many underlying assumptions which restrict its use. Here, we introduce a new correlation coefficient which takes into account the lag difference of data points. We investigate the properties of this new correlation coefficient. We demonstrate that it is more appropriate for showing the direction of the covariation of the two variables over time. We also compare the performance of the new correlation coefficient with Pearson’s correlation coefficient and Detrended Cross-Correlation Analysis (DCCA) via simulated examples.

Erdem, Orhan; Ceyhan, Elvan; Varli, Yusuf

2014-11-01

380

Direct Extraction of One-loop Integral Coefficients  

SciTech Connect

We present a general procedure for obtaining the coefficients of the scalar bubble and triangle integral functions of one-loop amplitudes. Coefficients are extracted by considering two-particle and triple unitarity cuts of the corresponding bubble and triangle integral functions. After choosing a specific parameterization of the cut loop momentum we can uniquely identify the coefficients of the desired integral functions simply by examining the behavior of the cut integrand as the unconstrained parameters of the cut loop momentum approach infinity. In this way we can produce compact forms for scalar integral coefficients. Applications of this method are presented for both QCD and electroweak processes, including an alternative form for the recently computed three-mass triangle coefficient in the six-photon amplitude A{sub 6}(1{sup -}, 2{sup +}, 3{sup -}, 4{sup +}, 5{sup -}, 6{sup +}). The direct nature of this extraction procedure allows for a very straightforward automation of the procedure.

Forde, Darren

2007-04-16

381

Critical appraisal of the differential effects of antihypertensive agents on arterial stiffness  

PubMed Central

Increased central arterial stiffness, involving accelerated vascular ageing of the aorta, is a powerful and independent risk factor for early mortality and provides prognostic information above and beyond traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Central arterial stiffness is an important determinant of pulse pressure; therefore, any pathological increase may result in left ventricular hypertrophy and impaired coronary perfusion. Central artery stiffness can be assessed noninvasively by measurement of aortic pulse wave velocity, which is the gold standard for measurement of arterial stiffness. Earlier, it was believed that changes in arterial stiffness, which are primarily influenced by long-term pressure-dependent structural changes, may be slowed but not reversed by pharmacotherapy. Recent studies with drugs that inhibit the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system, advanced glycation end products crosslink breakers, and endothelin antagonists suggest that blood pressure (BP)-independent reduction and reversal of arterial stiffness are feasible. We review the recent literature on the differential effect of antihypertensive agents either as monotherapy or combination therapy on arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness is an emerging therapeutic target for CVD risk reduction; however, further clinical trials are required to confirm whether BP-independent changes in arterial stiffness directly translate to a reduction in CVD events. PMID:21949622

Kum, Francesca; Karalliedde, Janaka

2010-01-01

382

Contractile equilibration of single cells to step changes in extracellular stiffness.  

PubMed

Extracellular stiffness has been shown to alter long timescale cell behaviors such as growth and differentiation, but the cellular response to changes in stiffness on short timescales is poorly understood. By studying the contractile response of cells to dynamic stiffness conditions using an atomic force microscope, we observe a seconds-timescale response to a step change in extracellular stiffness. Specifically, we observe acceleration in contraction velocity (?m/min) and force rate (nN/min) upon a step decrease in stiffness and deceleration upon a step increase in stiffness. Interestingly, this seconds-timescale response to a change in extracellular stiffness is not altered by inhibiting focal adhesion signaling or stretch-activated ion channels and is independent of cell height and contraction force. Rather, the response timescale is altered only by disrupting cytoskeletal mechanics and is well described by a simple mechanical model of a constant velocity actuator pulling against an internal cellular viscoelastic network. Consistent with the predictions of this model, we find that an osmotically expanding hydrogel responds to step changes in extracellular stiffness in a similar manner to cells. We therefore propose that an initial event in stiffness sensing is establishment of a mechanical equilibrium that balances contraction of the viscoelastic cytoskeleton with deformation of the extracellular matrix. PMID:22325266

Crow, Ailey; Webster, Kevin D; Hohlfeld, Evan; Ng, Win Pin; Geissler, Phillip; Fletcher, Daniel A

2012-02-01

383

Critical appraisal of the differential effects of antihypertensive agents on arterial stiffness.  

PubMed

Increased central arterial stiffness, involving accelerated vascular ageing of the aorta, is a powerful and independent risk factor for early mortality and provides prognostic information above and beyond traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Central arterial stiffness is an important determinant of pulse pressure; therefore, any pathological increase may result in left ventricular hypertrophy and impaired coronary perfusion. Central artery stiffness can be assessed noninvasively by measurement of aortic pulse wave velocity, which is the gold standard for measurement of arterial stiffness. Earlier, it was believed that changes in arterial stiffness, which are primarily influenced by long-term pressure-dependent structural changes, may be slowed but not reversed by pharmacotherapy. Recent studies with drugs that inhibit the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, advanced glycation end products crosslink breakers, and endothelin antagonists suggest that blood pressure (BP)-independent reduction and reversal of arterial stiffness are feasible. We review the recent literature on the differential effect of antihypertensive agents either as monotherapy or combination therapy on arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness is an emerging therapeutic target for CVD risk reduction; however, further clinical trials are required to confirm whether BP-independent changes in arterial stiffness directly translate to a reduction in CVD events. PMID:21949622

Kum, Francesca; Karalliedde, Janaka

2010-01-01

384

Characterization of bending stiffness and spontaneous buckling of alpha-helices and coiled coils  

E-print Network

, glycine, leucine and of sequences from a single helical chain in a two stranded tropomyosin molecule in RDIE. (b) Hydrogen bonding controls the stiffness of an ?-helix. Even with a zero electrostatic force be- tween the O? & H+ atoms, K(n)b is about 1... Page 4 Bending stiffness of coiled coils. (a) K(n)b is the bending stiff- ness at mode n. lzp stands for coiled coils with leucine zip- per periodicity, S2 represents the stiffness of myosin S2 rod do- main, built as a straight rod using sequence...

Lakkaraju, Sirish Kaushik

2009-05-15

385

Stiffness Properties for Dynamic Modeling of Composite Graphite-Epoxy Cylindrical Orthotropic Shells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Traditional composite lamination theory was used to predict composite graphite-epoxy laminate stiffnesses for comparison to quasi-experimental stiffnesses developed from cylindrical bottle pressure testing. Stiffness sensitivities were examined for variations in constituent materials and geometric properties. The material component interactions examined were the fiber longitudinal and transverse Young's modulus, the fiber shear modulus and primary Poisson's ratio, the resin Young's modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson's ratio. The geometric variation of the helical winding angle was also examined. Two computer programs were written to generate the data used to demonstrate the stiffness variations.

Tolbert, R. N.

1983-01-01

386

Stiff man syndrome: a diagnostic dilemma in a young female with diabetes mellitus and thyroiditis.  

PubMed

Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS), is a very rare neuroimmunologic disorder characterized by progressive muscle pain, rigidity, stiffness, and spasms. It can be very debilitating if misdiagnosed or not recognized in time. Herein we discuss a case of a female in her 20s who presented with an unsteady gait, lower extremity weakness, persistent leg pain, and stiffness few weeks after uncomplicated childbirth. She has type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) and was diagnosed with thyroiditis in the course of her illness. The triad of thyroiditis, DM, and stiffness with normal neuroimaging in a young female patient is an unusual occurrence. PMID:25525403

Enuh, Hilary; Park, Michael; Ghodasara, Arjun; Arsura, Edward; Nfonoyim, Jay

2014-01-01

387

Stiff Man Syndrome: A Diagnostic Dilemma in a Young Female with Diabetes Mellitus and Thyroiditis  

PubMed Central

Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS), is a very rare neuroimmunologic disorder characterized by progressive muscle pain, rigidity, stiffness, and spasms. It can be very debilitating if misdiagnosed or not recognized in time. Herein we discuss a case of a female in her 20s who presented with an unsteady gait, lower extremity weakness, persistent leg pain, and stiffness few weeks after uncomplicated childbirth. She has type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) and was diagnosed with thyroiditis in the course of her illness. The triad of thyroiditis, DM, and stiffness with normal neuroimaging in a young female patient is an unusual occurrence. PMID:25525403

Enuh, Hilary; Park, Michael; Ghodasara, Arjun; Arsura, Edward; Nfonoyim, Jay

2014-01-01

388

Composite sizing and ply orientation for stiffness requirements using a large finite element structural model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A NASTRAN bulk dataset preprocessor was developed to facilitate the integration of filamentary composite laminate properties into composite structural resizing for stiffness requirements. The NASCOMP system generates delta stiffness and delta mass matrices for input to the flutter derivative program. The flutter baseline analysis, derivative calculations, and stiffness and mass matrix updates are controlled by engineer defined processes under an operating system called CBUS. A multi-layered design variable grid system permits high fidelity resizing without excessive computer cost. The NASCOMP system uses ply layup drawings for basic input. The aeroelastic resizing for stiffness capability was used during an actual design exercise.

Radovcich, N. A.; Gentile, D. P.

1989-01-01

389

Converting Sabine absorption coefficients to random incidence absorption coefficients.  

PubMed

Absorption coefficients measured by the chamber method are referred to as Sabine absorption coefficients, which sometimes exceed unity due to the finite size of a sample and non-uniform intensity in the reverberation chambers under test. In this study, conversion methods from Sabine absorption coefficients to random incidence absorption coefficients are proposed. The overestimations of the Sabine absorption coefficient are investigated theoretically based on Miki's model for porous absorbers backed by a rigid wall or an air cavity, resulting in conversion factors. Additionally, three optimizations are suggested: An optimization method for the surface impedances for locally reacting absorbers, the flow resistivity for extendedly reacting absorbers, and the flow resistance for fabrics. With four porous type absorbers, the conversion methods are validated. For absorbers backed by a rigid wall, the surface impedance optimization produces the best results, while the flow resistivity optimization also yields reasonable results. The flow resistivity and flow resistance optimization for extendedly reacting absorbers are also found to be successful. However, the theoretical conversion factors based on Miki's model do not guarantee reliable estimations, particularly at frequencies below 250 Hz and beyond 2500?Hz. PMID:23742349

Jeong, Cheol-Ho

2013-06-01

390

Evaluation of the stiffnesses of the Achilles tendon and soleus from the apparent stiffness of the triceps surae.  

PubMed

The triceps surae plays an important role in the performance of many sports. Although the apparent average mechanical properties of the triceps surae may be a satisfactory parameter for estimating the training level of an athlete, a knowledge of the mechanical properties of the individual constituents of the triceps surae (in particular the Achilles tendon and soleus) permits a more detailed and in-depth control of the effects of training from more physically based parameters. The objective of this work is therefore the estimation of the individual viscoelastic properties (stiffness and viscosity) of soleus and Achilles tendon from the apparent properties of the triceps surae obtained by free vibration techniques. Different procedures have been developed and discussed, showing a high degree of robustness in the predictions. The results obtained for a non-oriented set of subjects present a high level of variability, depending on the training conditions and anthropometric features, although the corresponding average values compare well with data previously reported in the literature, particularly those associated with the tendon stiffness. PMID:25655953

París-García, Federico; Barroso, Alberto; Doblaré, Manuel; Cañas, José; París, Federico

2015-01-01

391

SATI algorithm — the calculation of stress aligned HTI stiffness tensor for sandstone reservoir from wireline data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I present an algorithm that uses cross-dipole wireline data only in order to estimate the HTI stiffness tensor for sandstone formations under in-situ asymmetric lateral (azimuthal) stress conditions. The algorithm is based on the generalization of terms "excess compliance" and "fracture weakness" developed within the linear slip interface theory for fractured rocks and is applied here to describe the effect of grain contacts in loose sandstones. I introduce the term "plane of weakness" being oriented (aligned) orthogonal to the minimal horizontal principal stress direction in order to describe the overall effective weakness of sandstone caused by the different principal stresses. For the quantification of this phenomenon I use the anisotropic Gassmann model. As a result I am able to calculate a HTI stiffness tensor for the interval length of a saturated sandstone formation and the respective Thomsen's parameters. The input data required for these calculations have to be provided by wireline logging and will consist of porosity, density, P-wave velocity, fast and slow shear wave velocities and oil-water saturation ratio. The algorithm in its current form is applicable to sandstone reservoirs only. Its limitation is based on two assumptions, which state that all the measured anisotropy is induced by the present stress in sandstone and that the unstressed sandstone would be nearly isotropic. From a technical viewpoint this algorithm can be implemented fairly easily in data acquisition and interpretation software relying on correct estimation of anisotropy parameters. It is also cheap because it does not require any additional measurements apart from the cross-dipole logging.

Brajanovski, Miroslav

2011-11-01

392

Stiff Temperature Profiles in JT-60U ELMy H-mode Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The 'stiffness' of thermal transport in ELMy H-modes [edge localized high-confinement modes] is examined in a series of carefully chosen JT-60U plasmas, and measured temperatures are compared with the predictions of several transport models. A heating power scan with constant T(subscript ''ped''), a scan of pedestal temperature, T(subscript ''ped''), with constant heating power, and an on-axis/off-axis heating comparison are presented. In the power scan a 45% increase in heating (and a 12% density rise) produces an approximately fixed core temperature profile in a group of five plasmas with the same pedestal temperature. With fixed heating power, we find that a 30-40% increase in T(subscript ''ped'') is associated with similar increases in core temperature. Heating in the deep core is varied by employing different groups of neutral beams that deposit their power near the magnetic axis and farther from the axis. In these plasmas, on-axis heating produces slightly more peaked temperature profiles, although they have 60% more heating power inside r = a/2. Transport models are tested by solving the power balance equations to predict temperatures, which are then compared to the measurements. Predictions of the RLWB and IFS/PPPL models generally agree with the measured temperatures outside r approximately 0.3a, but the multimode model uniformly predicts temperatures that are too high except in the central region. Tests based on these discharges are not able to discriminate between the transport models of varying stiffness, so we conclude that larger changes are needed in the P(subscript ''heat'') and T(subscript ''ped'') scans.

D.R. Mikkelsen; H. Urano; H. Shirai; T. Takizuka; Y. Kamada; T. Hatae; Y. Koide; N. Asakura; T. Fujita; T. Fukuda; S. Ide; A. Isayama; Y. Kawano; O. Naito; Y. Sakamoto

2001-10-16

393

Genetic parameters of egg quality traits on different pedigree layers with special focus on dynamic stiffness.  

PubMed

Egg quality traits are of utmost importance in layer breeding programs due to their effect on profitability in the egg production industry and on the production of quality chicks. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze and estimate genetic parameters of different quality traits: egg weight, breaking strength, dynamic stiffness (Kdyn), egg shape index, eggshell thickness, and albumen height. Eggs were obtained from 4 pure lines of birds. Two different tests were performed: a white breeding program, with eggs from a male and female line of a white egg layer program that were analyzed at 67 to 70 wk of age, and a brown breeding program, with eggs from a male and female line of a brown egg layer program that were analyzed at 32 to 36 wk of age. In general, heritabilities were moderate to high for all traits (h(2) = 0.23 to 0.71). A high genetic correlation was estimated in both tests between breaking strength and Kdyn (rg = +0.40 to +0.61). Shell thickness was also positively correlated with breaking strength (rg = +0.50 to +0.63) and Kdyn (rg = +0.28 to +0.69). These moderate relationships demonstrate that the strength of an egg not only relies on the shell thickness but also on the quality and uniformity of eggshell construction. Dynamic stiffness might be preferred for breeding purposes due to its lower negative genetic correlation with egg weight and its higher heritability (h(2) = 0.35 to 0.70) compared with breaking strength (h(2) = 0.23 to 0.35). Breaking strength and Kdyn were positively correlated with shape index, which confirms that round eggs will show higher shell stability. Therefore, it is necessary to monitor egg shape to maintain an optimal form. PMID:25104763

Blanco, A E; Icken, W; Ould-Ali, D; Cavero, D; Schmutz, M

2014-10-01

394

Collective friction coefficients in the relaxation time approximation F. A. Ivanyuk  

E-print Network

Collective friction coefficients in the relaxation time approximation F. A. Ivanyuk Institute components of the friction coefficient for various single-particle potentials and have found that the nondiagonal component of the friction coefficient depends generally on the diffuseness of the potential

Pomorski, Krzysztof

395

Special functions associated with SU(3) Wigner-Clebsch-Gordan coefficients  

SciTech Connect

The Wigner-Clebsch-Gordan (WCG) coefficients of the unitary groups are a rich source of multivariable special functions. The general algebraic setting of these coefficients is reviewed and several special functions associated with the SU(3) WCG coefficients defined and their properties presented. 29 refs.

Louck, J.D.; Biedenharn, L.C.

1990-01-01

396

PURE WATER ABSORPTION COEFFICIENT AROUND 400NM: LAB MEASURED VERSUS FIELD OBSERVED  

E-print Network

PURE WATER ABSORPTION COEFFICIENT AROUND 400NM: LAB MEASURED VERSUS FIELD OBSERVED Zhongping Lee of the ratio of the backscattering coefficient to the absorption coefficient (or the sum of absorption]. In general, it has been found that reflectance can be well explained (or modeled) using known absorption

Lee, Zhongping

397

Theory and measurements of labyrinth seal coefficients for rotor stability of turbocompressors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The prediction of rotordynamic coefficients for gas seals is achieved with the aid of a two-volume bulk flow model based on turbulent rotationally symmetric 3D flow calculations including swirl flow. Comparison of cross-coupling and damping coefficients with measurements confirm this approach. In particular the theoretically predicted phenomenon that labyrinth damping is retained without inlet swirl is confirmed. This is important for the design of high pressure compressors, where labyrinth damping is a major contribution improving rotor stability. Discrepancies are found when comparing theory with measured direct stiffness and the cross-coupling damping coefficients. First measurements of labyrinth seals on a recently installed test rig operated with water are presented. Since forces are larger than on test stands operated with air and since individual chamber forces are obtained phenomena like inlet effects may be studied.

Syssmann, H. R.

1987-01-01

398

Absorption coefficient of zinc selenide grown from the melt  

SciTech Connect

The authors study the absorption coefficient in a series of non-transparent set-ups, which closely resemble the schematic diagram presented. The measurement cells were in air. Temperature was measured by thermocouple sensors, whose contacts with the zinc selenide crystals were screened from the light scattered from the volume of the sample. A continuous CO laser was used as the light source. The absorption coefficient (beta) of zinc selenide single crystals grown from the melt increases with contamination by metallic impurities, among which copper appears to have the greatest effect on beta. The magnitude of absorption coefficient is, generally, not related to the measured transmission and must be determined independently.

Kulakov, M.P.; Fadeev, A.V.; Ivanenko, S.G.; Khasanov, I.S.; Ryazanova, N.D.

1986-02-01

399

Generalized error coefficients for the multivariable servomechanism problem  

Microsoft Academic Search

The steady-state tracking and regulation errors are considered for a controlled linear time-invariant system which includes either a feedforward compensator [1] or a robust servo-compensator [2]. The controlled system is subjected to classes of reference and disturbance inputs larger than and including the class of inputs for which the compensator was designed, and the resulting steady-state error is parameterized in

B. M. Scherzinger; E. J. Davison

1981-01-01

400

Combining Dynamic Stretch and Tunable Stiffness to Probe Cell Mechanobiology In Vitro  

PubMed Central

Cells have the ability to actively sense their mechanical environment and respond to both substrate stiffness and stretch by altering their adhesion, proliferation, locomotion, morphology, and synthetic profile. In order to elucidate the interrelated effects of different mechanical stimuli on cell phenotype in vitro, we have developed a method for culturing mammalian cells in a two-dimensional environment at a wide range of combined levels of substrate stiffness and dynamic stretch. Polyacrylamide gels were covalently bonded to flexible silicone culture plates and coated with monomeric collagen for cell adhesion. Substrate stiffness was adjusted from relatively soft (G??=?0.3 kPa) to stiff (G??=?50 kPa) by altering the ratio of acrylamide to bis-acrylamide, and the silicone membranes were stretched over circular loading posts by applying vacuum pressure to impart near-uniform stretch, as confirmed by strain field analysis. As a demonstration of the system, porcine aortic valve interstitial cells (VIC) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) were plated on soft and stiff substrates either statically cultured or exposed to 10% equibiaxial or pure uniaxial stretch at 1Hz for 6 hours. In all cases, cell attachment and cell viability were high. On soft substrates, VICs cultured statically exhibit a small rounded morphology, significantly smaller than on stiff substrates (p<0.05). Following equibiaxial cyclic stretch, VICs spread to the extent of cells cultured on stiff substrates, but did not reorient in response to uniaxial stretch to the extent of cells stretched on stiff substrates. hMSCs exhibited a less pronounced response than VICs, likely due to a lower stiffness threshold for spreading on static gels. These preliminary data demonstrate that inhibition of spreading due to a lack of matrix stiffness surrounding a cell may be overcome by externally applied stretch suggesting similar mechanotransduction mechanisms for sensing stiffness and stretch. PMID:21858051

Throm Quinlan, Angela M.; Sierad, Leslie N.; Capulli, Andrew K.; Firstenberg, Laura E.; Billiar, Kristen L.

2011-01-01

401

Stiff monatomic gold wires with a spinning zigzag geometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have recently studied( D. Sánchez-Portal, E. Artacho, J. Junquera, P. Ordejón, A. Garcí)a, J. Soler, Phys. Rev. Lett 83, 3884 (1999). the structure and elastical properties of gold monatomic wires by means of first principles density functional calculations. The wires are found to exhibit a zigzag shape which remains under tension, becoming linear just before breaking. At room temperature they are found to spin, what explains the extremely long apparent interatomic distances shown by electron microscopy. The zigzag structure is stable if the tension is relieved, the wire holding its chainlike shape even as a free-standing cluster. This unexpected metallic-wire stiffness stems from the transverse quantization in the wire, as shown in a simple free electron model.

Soler, José M.; Sánchez-Portal, Daniel; Artacho, Emilio; Junquera, Javier; Ordejón, García, Alberto

2000-03-01

402

Mutations in Fibrillin-1 Cause Congenital Scleroderma: Stiff Skin Syndrome  

PubMed Central

The predisposition for scleroderma, defined as fibrosis and hardening of the skin, is poorly understood. We report that stiff skin syndrome (SSS), an autosomal dominant congenital form of scleroderma, is caused by mutations in the sole Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence-encoding domain of fibrillin-1 that mediates integrin binding. Ordered polymers of fibrillin-1 (termed microfibrils) initiate elastic fiber assembly and bind to and regulate the activation of the pro-fibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor ? (TGF?). Altered cell-matrix interactions in SSS accompany excessive microfibrillar deposition, impaired elastogenesis, and increased TGF? concentration and signaling in the dermis. The observation of similar findings in systemic sclerosis (SSc), a more common acquired form of scleroderma, suggests broad pathogenic relevance. PMID:20375004

Loeys, B.L.; Gerber, E.E.; Riegert-Johnson, D.; Iqbal, S.; Whiteman, P.; McConnell, V.; Chillakuri, C.R.; Macaya, D.; Coucke, P.J.; De Paepe, A.; Judge, D.P.; Wigley, F.; Davis, E.C.; Mardon, H.J.; Handford, P.; Keene, D.R.; Sakai, L.Y.; Dietz, H.C.

2010-01-01

403

AFM-based indentation stiffness tomography-An asymptotic model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The so-called indentation stiffness tomography technique for detecting the interior mechanical properties of an elastic sample with an inhomogeneity is analyzed in the framework of the asymptotic modeling approach under the assumption of small size of the inhomogeneity. In particular, it is assumed that the inhomogeneity size and the size of contact area under the indenter are small compared with the distance between them. By the method of matched asymptotic expansions, the first-order asymptotic solution to the corresponding frictionless unilateral contact problem is obtained. The case of an elastic half-space containing a small spherical inhomogeneity has been studied in detail. Based on the grid indentation technique, a procedure for solving the inverse problem of extracting the inhomogeneity parameters is proposed.

Argatov, I. I.

2014-10-01

404

Cell stiffness, contractile stress and the role of extracellular matrix  

SciTech Connect

Here we have assessed the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and rigidity on mechanical properties of the human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. Cell stiffness and contractile stress showed appreciable changes from the most relaxed state to the most contracted state: we refer to the maximal range of these changes as the cell contractile scope. The contractile scope was least when the cell was adherent upon collagen V, followed by collagen IV, laminin, and collagen I, and greatest for fibronectin. Regardless of ECM composition, upon adherence to increasingly rigid substrates, the ASM cell positively regulated expression of antioxidant genes in the glutathione pathway and heme oxygenase, and disruption of a redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor (Nrf2), culminated in greater contractile scope. These findings provide biophysical evidence that ECM differentially modulates muscle contractility and, for the first time, demonstrate a link between muscle contractility and Nrf2-directed responses.

An, Steven S., E-mail: san@jhsph.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Kim, Jina [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)] [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Ahn, Kwangmi [Division of Biostatistics, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States)] [Division of Biostatistics, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Trepat, Xavier [CIBER, Enfermedades Respiratorias, 07110 Bunyola (Spain)] [CIBER, Enfermedades Respiratorias, 07110 Bunyola (Spain); Drake, Kenneth J. [Division of Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)] [Division of Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kumar, Sarvesh; Ling, Guoyu; Purington, Carolyn; Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Kensler, Thomas W.; Mitzner, Wayne [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)] [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Fredberg, Jeffrey J. [Division of Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)] [Division of Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Biswal, Shyam [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States) [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

2009-05-15

405

Effect of Bearing Dynamic Stiffness on Gear Vibration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Noise is a major consideration in the design of high performance geared transmissions, such as for helicopters. Transmission error, that is, the accuracy with which the driven gear follows the driver gear, is a common indicator of noise generation. It is well known that bearing properties have a strong influence on shaft dynamics. However, up to now the contribution of bearings to transmission error has received little attention. In this paper, a torsional-axial-lateral geared rotor analysis is used to determine dynamic transmission error as a function of bearing stiffness and damping. Bearings have a similar effect as found in shaft dynamics; transmission error can be reduced more than 10 decibels by appropriate selection of bearing properties.

Fleming, David P.

2002-01-01

406

VAGINAL DEGENERATION FOLLOWING IMPLANTATION OF SYNTHETIC MESH WITH INCREASED STIFFNESS  

PubMed Central

Objective To compare the impact of the prototype prolapse mesh Gynemesh PS to that of two new generation lower stiffness meshes, UltraPro and SmartMesh, on vaginal morphology and structural composition. Design A mechanistic study employing a non-human primate (NHP) model. Setting Magee-Womens Research Institute at the University of Pittsburgh. Population Parous rhesus macaques, with similar age, weight, parity and POP-Q scores. Methods Following IACUC approval, 50 rhesus macaques were implanted with Gynemesh PS (n=12), UltraPro with its blue line perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of vagina (n=10), UltraPro with its blue line parallel to the longitudinal axis of vagina (n=8) and SmartMesh (n=8) via sacrocolpopexy following hysterectomy. Sham operated animals (n=12) served as controls. Main Outcome Measures The mesh-vagina complex (MVC) was removed after 12 weeks and analyzed for histomorphology, in situ cell apoptosis, total collagen, elastin, glycosaminoglycan content and total collagenase activity. Appropriate statistics and correlation analyses were performed accordingly. Results Relative to sham and the two lower stiffness meshes, Gynemesh PS had the greatest negative impact on vaginal histomorphology and composition. Compared to sham, implantation with Gynemesh PS caused substantial thinning of the smooth muscle layer (1557 ± 499?m vs 866 ± 210 ?m, P=0.02), increased apoptosis particularly in the area of the mesh fibers (P=0.01), decreased collagen and elastin content (20% (P=0.03) and 43% (P=0.02), respectively) and increased total collagenase activity (135% (P=0.01)). GAG (glycosaminoglycan), a marker of tissue injury, was the highest with Gynemesh PS compared to sham and other meshes (P=0.01). Conclusion Mesh implantation with the stiffer mesh Gynemesh PS induced a maladaptive remodeling response consistent with vaginal degeneration. PMID:23240802

Liang, Rui; Abramowitch, Steven; Knight, Katrina; Palcsey, Stacy; Nolfi, Alexis; Feola, Andrew; Stein, Susan; Moalli, Pamela A.

2012-01-01

407

Pore pressure evolution in deforming granular material: A general formulation and the infinitely stiff approximation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The physics of deformation of fluid-filled granular media controls many geophysical systems, ranging from shear on geological faults to landslides and soil liquefaction. Its great complexity is rooted in the mechanical coupling between two deforming phases: the solid granular network and the fluid-filled pore network. Often deformation of the granular network leads to pore fluid pressure (PP) changes. If the

L. Goren; E. Aharonov; D. Sparks; R. Toussaint

2010-01-01

408

Reliability Generalization: "Lapsus Linguae"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the proposed Reliability Generalization (RG) method for studying reliability. RG employs the application of meta-analytic techniques similar to those used in validity generalization studies to examine reliability coefficients. This study explains why RG does not provide a proper research method for the study of reliability,…

Smith, Julie M.

2011-01-01

409

A comparison of experimental and theoretical results for leakage, pressure gradients, and rotordynamic coefficients for tapered annular gas seal  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A brief review of current annular seal theory and a discussion of the predicted effect on stiffness of tapering the seal stator are presented. An outline of Nelson's analytical-computational method for determining rotordynamic coefficients for annular compressible-flow seals is included. Modifications to increase the maximum rotor speed of an existing air-seal test apparatus at Texas A&M University are described. Experimental results, including leakage, entrance-loss coefficients, pressure distributions, and normalized rotordynamic coefficients, are presented for four convergent-tapered, smooth-rotor, smooth-stator seals. A comparison of the test results shows that an inlet-to-exit clearance ratio of 1.5 to 2.0 provides the maximum direct stiffness, a clearance ratio of 2.5 provides the greatest stability, and a clearance ratio of 1.0 provides the least stability. The experimental results are compared to theoretical results from Nelson's analysis with good agreement. Test results for cross-coupled stiffness show less sensitivity of fluid prerotation than predicted.

Elrod, D. A.; Childs, D. W.

1986-01-01

410

Variable permeability and stiffness inside mature fault zones and their influence on seismic rupture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The juxtaposition of rocks with dissimilar properties is a general feature of fault zones in a variety of contexts and scales; especially, at the scale of the internal structure of a fault zone, where heterogeneity of properties associated with rock damage is significant and can affect all the stage of the seismic rupture. Here, we compared the spatial distribution of the permeability and stiffness of two mature fault zones in low-porosity rocks of contrasted geological histories and under different states-of-stress (?0.1 to 42 MPa). Our measurements show an inverse power law relationship between permeability and normal stiffness in the damage zone. The scaling relationship found between equivalent hydraulic aperture and stiffness is consistent with a self-affine fracture geometry and a roughness exponent of about 0.85. However, the scaling relationship between aperture and shear displacement on individual fractures has a low exponent (about 0.3) compared to that expected for rigid sliding of self-affine surfaces. This suggests other processes such as asperity crushing/abrasion and cementation contribute to the evolution of shear fracture properties with slip. Eventually, a continuous layer of gouge material forms, and this core layer determines the normal stiffness of mature fault zones. Depending on the amount of clay material, the permeability is lower by several orders of magnitude or it can fit the relation. Our data also showed that this variability in poroelastic properties implies that different coupling between fluid pressure and strain exists in the fault. A pressurization of the fault indicated significant strain in the damage zone that is a factor-of-5 to 10 greater than that in the core whose strain is highly influenced by poroelastic stressing in the damage zone. We also show, using hydromechanical models at crustal scale, that effective stress changes induced by a transient pulse of fluid pressure along a fault zone with spatially variable material properties—conditions that are representative of natural faults—can be sufficient to produce large slip in the fault core, and fracturing in the surrounding damage volume. Rupture properties outside the limited source region are examined for ranges of values of the degree of material contrast across the fault. Our results indicate that the slip dimension is highly influenced by the contrasts of permeability and rigidity across the fault zone components, from the fault core through the various subzones of the fractured damage zone and to the less fractured host rock. Moreover, high fluid pressures may also develop locally off the narrow fault core, preferentially into the more permeable and less rigid parts of the damage zone, where the deformation is plastic, highlighting a possible mechanism for off-fault rupture. Finally, on faults with hydromechanical heterogeneities at the scale of the internal structure, the fluid pressure and rupture are highly asymmetric with propagation in a preferred direction, that is the more permeable and compliant material of the fault zones.

Cappa, F.; guglielmi, Y.; Henry, P.; Jeanne, P.

2012-12-01

411

Transport coefficients of gluonic fluid  

SciTech Connect

The shear ({eta}) and bulk ({zeta}) viscous coefficients have been evaluated for a gluonic fluid. The elastic, gg{yields}gg and the inelastic, number nonconserving, gg{yields}ggg processes have been considered as the dominant perturbative processes in evaluating the viscous coefficients to entropy density (s) ratios. Recently the processes: gg{yields}ggg has been revisited and a correction to the widely used Gunion-Bertsch (GB) formula has been obtained. The {eta} and {zeta} have been evaluated for gluonic fluid with the formula recently derived. At large {alpha}{sub s} the value of {eta}/s approaches its lower bound, {approx}1/4{pi}.

Das, Santosh K.; Alam, Jan-e [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata-700064 (India)

2011-06-01

412

Seebeck coefficient of one electron  

SciTech Connect

The Seebeck coefficient of one electron, driven thermally into a semiconductor single-electron box, is investigated theoretically. With a finite temperature difference ?T between the source and charging island, a single electron can charge the island in equilibrium, directly generating a Seebeck effect. Seebeck coefficients for small and finite ?T are calculated and a thermally driven Coulomb staircase is predicted. Single-electron Seebeck oscillations occur with increasing ?T, as one electron at a time charges the box. A method is proposed for experimental verification of these effects.

Durrani, Zahid A. K., E-mail: z.durrani@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2014-03-07

413

INTEGRACI ´ ON POR CUANTIFICACI ´ ON DE SISTEMAS STIFF. PARTE I: TEORIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Este art´ iculo presenta un nuevo metodo de integracion numerica de ecuaciones diferenciales ordinarias basado en la cuantificacion de las variables de estado. Utilizando conceptos de integracion impl´ icita, el nuevo metodo denominado BQSS (Backward Quantized State Systems) permite integrar sistemas stiff de manera eficiente. Siendo el primer metodo de cuantificacion para sistemas stiff, BQSS es en s´ iu n

Ernesto Kofman; Gustavo Migoni

414

Influence of leg stiffness and its effect on myodynamic jumping performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purposes of this study are: a) to examine the possibility of influencing the leg stiffness through instructions given to the subjects and b) to determine the effect of the leg stiffness on the mechanical power and take-off velocity during the drop jumps. A total of 15 athletes performed a series of drop jumps from heights of 20, 40 and

Adamantios Arampatzis; Falk Schade; Mark Walsh; Gert-Peter Brüggemann

2001-01-01

415

Whole Body Stiffness as a Function of Developmental Level in Children's Hopping.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigates whole body stiffness as a function of developmental level in the hopping of seven children of four-eight years. Proposes that stiffness may be a key parameter that is controlled by the central nervous system when children hop. (RJC)

Getchell, Nancy; Roberton, Mary Ann

1989-01-01

416

Accuracy Improvement for Stiffness Modeling of Parallel Manipulators A. Pashkevich1,2  

E-print Network

Accuracy Improvement for Stiffness Modeling of Parallel Manipulators A. Pashkevich1,2 , A. Klimchik 44307, France Abstract The paper focuses on the accuracy improvement of stiffness models for parallel translational/rotational compliance and the coupling between them. There is presented detailed accuracy analysis

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

417

PolyMUMPs MEMS device to measure mechanical stiffness of single cells in aqueous media  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A method of experimentally determining the mechanical stiffness of single cells by using differential displacement measurements in a two stage spring system is presented. The spring system consists of a known MEMS reference spring and an unknown cellular stiffness: the ratio of displacements is related to the ratio of stiffness. A polyMUMPs implementation for aqueous media is presented and displacement measurements made from optical microphotographs using a FFT based displacement method with a repeatability of ~20?nm. The approach was first validated on a MEMS two stage spring system of known stiffness. The measured stiffness ratios of control structures (i) MEMS spring systems and (ii) polystyrene microspheres were found to agree with theoretical values. Mechanical tests were then performed on Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker’s yeast) in aqueous media. Cells were placed (using a micropipette) inside MEMS measuring structures and compressed between two jaws using an electrostatic actuator and displacements measured. Tested cells showed stiffness values between 5.4 and 8.4?N?m?1 with an uncertainty of 11%. In addition, non-viable cells were tested by exposing viable cells to methanol. The resultant mean cell stiffness dropped by factor of 3 × and an explicit discrimination between viable and non-viable cells based on mechanical stiffness was seen.

Warnat, S.; King, H.; Forbrigger, C.; Hubbard, T.

2015-02-01

418

Impact of an Exercise Program on Arterial Stiffness and Insulin Resistance in Hemodialysis Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiovascular disease remains the primary cause of mortality in patients who are maintained on hemodialysis. Arterial stiffness and insulin resistance are independent risk factors for cardiovascular mortality in this population. In healthy individuals, higher physical conditioning is associated with reduced arterial stiffness. Exercise reduces insulin resis- tance and glucose intolerance in sedentary, overweight indi- viduals and diabetic patients. The purpose

STEFAN MUSTATA; CHRISTOPHER CHAN; VESTA LAI; JUDITH A. MILLER

2004-01-01

419

Collagen type-I degradation is related to arterial stiffness in hypertensive and normotensive subjects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although arterial stiffness is an independent cardiovascular risk factor associated with both aging and hypertension, relatively little is known regarding the structural changes in the vessel wall that occur with vessel stiffening. We determined if collagen type-I metabolism is related to arterial stiffening in both hypertensive and normotensive subjects. Arterial stiffness was assessed by aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) and

M McNulty; A Mahmud; P Spiers; J Feely

2006-01-01

420

Development of a real-time tunable stiffness and damping vibration isolator based on magnetorheological elastomer  

Microsoft Academic Search

A tunable stiffness and damping vibration isolator based on magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) is developed. In this isolator, four MRE elements are used as the tunable springs, whose stiffness can be controlled by varying the magnetic field. A voice coil motor, which is controlled by the relative velocity feedback of the payload, is used as the tunable damper of the isolator.

G. J. Liao; X-L Gong; S. H. Xuan; C. J. Kang; L. H. Zong

2012-01-01