Science.gov

Sample records for generator condensation experiments

  1. Steam generators, turbines, and condensers. Volume six

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Volume six covers steam generators (How steam is generated, steam generation in a PWR, vertical U-tube steam generators, once-through steam generators, how much steam do steam generators make.), turbines (basic turbine principles, impulse turbines, reaction turbines, turbine stages, turbine arrangements, turbine steam flow, steam admission to turbines, turbine seals and supports, turbine oil system, generators), and condensers (need for condensers, basic condenser principles, condenser arrangements, heat transfer in condensers, air removal from condensers, circulating water system, heat loss to the circulating water system, factors affecting condenser performance, condenser auxiliaries).

  2. Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment is another investigation that examines the flow of a mixture of liquids and the vapors they produce when in contact with hot space system equipment. Coo...

  3. Reactive Transport Modeling of Acid Gas Generation and Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    G. Zhahg; N. Spycher; E. Sonnenthal; C. Steefel

    2005-01-25

    Pulvirenti et al. (2004) recently conducted a laboratory evaporation/condensation experiment on a synthetic solution of primarily calcium chloride. This solution represents one potential type of evaporated pore water at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a site proposed for geologic storage of high-level nuclear waste. These authors reported that boiling this solution to near dryness (a concentration factor >75,000 relative to actual pore waters) leads to the generation of acid condensate (pH 4.5) presumably due to volatilization of HCl (and minor HF and/or HNO{sub 3}). To investigate the various processes taking place, including boiling, gas transport, and condensation, their experiment was simulated by modifying an existing multicomponent and multiphase reactive transport code (TOUGHREACT). This code was extended with a Pitzer ion-interaction model to deal with high ionic strength. The model of the experiment was set-up to capture the observed increase in boiling temperature (143 C at {approx}1 bar) resulting from high concentrations of dissolved salts (up to 8 m CaCl{sub 2}). The computed HCI fugacity ({approx} 10{sup -4} bars) generated by boiling under these conditions is not sufficient to lower the pH of the condensate (cooled to 80 and 25 C) down to observed values unless the H{sub 2}O mass fraction in gas is reduced below {approx}10%. This is because the condensate becomes progressively diluted by H{sub 2}O gas condensation. However, when the system is modeled to remove water vapor, the computed pH of instantaneous condensates decreases to {approx}1.7, consistent with the experiment (Figure 1). The results also show that the HCl fugacity increases, and calcite, gypsum, sylvite, halite, MgCl{sub 2}4H{sub 2}O and CaCl{sub 2} precipitate sequentially with increasing concentration factors.

  4. 33. TURBINE HALL, ORIGINAL TURBO GENERATOR, INTACT CONDENSER Philadelphia ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. TURBINE HALL, ORIGINAL TURBO GENERATOR, INTACT CONDENSER - Philadelphia Electric Company, Richmond Power Station, Southeast end of Lewis Street along Delaware River, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  5. 2. VIEW NORTHEAST OF CONDENSER WATER INTAKE (LEFT), GENERATING PLANT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW NORTHEAST OF CONDENSER WATER INTAKE (LEFT), GENERATING PLANT AND STACK (CENTER), AND VIADUCT (EXTREME RIGHT) - Turners Falls Power & Electric Company, Hampden Station, East bank of Connecticut River, Chicopee, Hampden County, MA

  6. 32. TURBINE HALL, ORIGINAL TURBO GENERATOR, DETAILS AT CONDENSER, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. TURBINE HALL, ORIGINAL TURBO GENERATOR, DETAILS AT CONDENSER, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Philadelphia Electric Company, Richmond Power Station, Southeast end of Lewis Street along Delaware River, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  7. 31. TURBINE HALL, ORIGINAL TURBO GENERATOR, DETAILS AT CONDENSER, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. TURBINE HALL, ORIGINAL TURBO GENERATOR, DETAILS AT CONDENSER, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Philadelphia Electric Company, Richmond Power Station, Southeast end of Lewis Street along Delaware River, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. Next generation interatomic potentials for condensed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, Christopher Michael; Behler, Jörg

    2014-07-01

    The computer simulation of condensed systems is a challenging task. While electronic structure methods like density-functional theory (DFT) usually provide a good compromise between accuracy and efficiency, they are computationally very demanding and thus applicable only to systems containing up to a few hundred atoms. Unfortunately, many interesting problems require simulations to be performed on much larger systems involving thousands of atoms or more. Consequently, more efficient methods are urgently needed, and a lot of effort has been spent on the development of a large variety of potentials enabling simulations with significantly extended time and length scales. Most commonly, these potentials are based on physically motivated functional forms and thus perform very well for the applications they have been designed for. On the other hand, they are often highly system-specific and thus cannot easily be transferred from one system to another. Moreover, their numerical accuracy is restricted by the intrinsic limitations of the imposed functional forms. In recent years, several novel types of potentials have emerged, which are not based on physical considerations. Instead, they aim to reproduce a set of reference electronic structure data as accurately as possible by using very general and flexible functional forms. In this review we will survey a number of these methods. While they differ in the choice of the employed mathematical functions, they all have in common that they provide high-quality potential-energy surfaces, while the efficiency is comparable to conventional empirical potentials. It has been demonstrated that in many cases these potentials now offer a very interesting new approach to study complex systems with hitherto unreached accuracy.

  9. Oblique solitons generated by the flow of a polariton condensate past an obstacle

    SciTech Connect

    Kamchatnov, A. M. Korneev, S. V.

    2012-10-15

    The formation of oblique solitons in a polariton condensate flowing past an obstacle is considered. Because of the finite lifetime of polaritons, the condensate flow is inhomogeneous, which leads to a significant modification of the conditions necessary for the generation of oblique solitons as compared to the conditions established earlier for the flow of an atomic condensate. In particular, it is established that oblique solitons in the polariton case can be generated by a subsonic flow of the condensate in agreement with the results of recent experiments [9]. The geometric shape and other parameters of oblique solitons are analytically calculated using a model based on the nonlinear Schroedinger equation with damping, and the analytical results are confirmed by numerical simulations.

  10. Pion condensation and instabilities: current theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, M.

    1980-05-01

    Current calculations of pion condensation phenomena in symmetric nuclear matter are reviewed. The RPA and MFA methods are compared. Latest results (LBL-10572) with a relativistic MFA theory constrained by bulk nuclear properties are presented. The differences between equilibrium (condensation) and nonequilibrium (dynamic) instabilities are discussed. Finally, two-proton correlation experiments aimed at looking for critical scattering phenomena and two-pion correlation experiments aimed at looking for pion field coherence are analyzed. 10 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Experiments on condensation over in-line and staggered condenser tubes in the presence of non-condensable gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Abdulghani; Yamali, Cemil

    2013-12-01

    The problem of the forced film condensation heat transfer of pure steam and steam-air mixture flowing downward a tier of horizontal cylinders is investigated experimentally. An experimental setup was manufactured and mounted at Middle East Technical University workshop. A set of experiments were conducted to observe the condensation heat transfer phenomenon and to verify the theoretical results. The results of the experimental investigation are presented to show the effect of different parameters on the film condensation heat transfer phenomenon over bundle of tubes. These parameters include; free stream velocity, free stream non-condensable gas (air) mass fractions, free stream temperature to wall temperature difference, the angle of inclination. heat transfer coefficients are evaluated at different working conditions for both inline and staggered arrangements. Results show that; a remarked reduction in the vapor side heat transfer coefficient is noticed when very small amounts of air mass fractions present in the vapor. In addition, it decreases by increasing the temperature difference. On the other hand, it increases by increasing the free stream velocity (Reynolds number). Average heat transfer coefficient at the middle and the bottom cylinders increases by increasing the angle of inclination, whereas, no significant change is observed for that of the upper cylinder. Although some discrepancies are noticed, the present study results are inline and in a reasonable agreement with the theory and experiment in the literature.

  12. Experiments and Modeling of Evaporating/Condensing Menisci

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plawsky, Joel; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Discuss the Constrained Vapor Bubble (CVB) experiment and how it aims to achieve a better understanding of the physics of evaporation and condensation and how they affect cooling processes in microgravity using a remotely controlled microscope and a small cooling device.

  13. High gliding fluid power generation system with fluid component separation and multiple condensers

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoud, Ahmad M; Lee, Jaeseon; Radcliff, Thomas D

    2014-10-14

    An example power generation system includes a vapor generator, a turbine, a separator and a pump. In the separator, the multiple components of the working fluid are separated from each other and sent to separate condensers. Each of the separate condensers is configured for condensing a single component of the working fluid. Once each of the components condense back into a liquid form they are recombined and exhausted to a pump that in turn drives the working fluid back to the vapor generator.

  14. Bose-Einstein Condensation: A Platform for Quantum Simulation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of dilute atomic gases and dense exciton-polaritons provides unique experimental platforms for the simulation of quantum many-body systems in various trap and lattice structures. Atomic BEC is suitable for exploration of the thermal equilibrium and steady state properties of isolated many-body systems, while exciton-polariton BEC is suitable for study of the nonequilibrium and transient properties of open dissipative many-body systems. In this chapter, we will review the fundamental properties of these distinct Bose-Einstein condensates to provide a basis for later discussions of various quantum simulation experiments using cold atoms and exciton-polaritons.

  15. An experimental study of a VVER reactor's steam generator model operating in the condensing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A. V.; Remizov, O. V.

    2012-05-01

    Results obtained from an experimental study of a VVER reactor's steam generator model operating in the condensing mode are presented. The obtained empirical dependence for calculating the power of heat exchangers operating in the steam condensation mode is presented.

  16. Generation of the Higgs condensate and its decay after inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Kari; Meriniemi, Tuukka; Nurmi, Sami E-mail: tuukka.meriniemi@helsinki.fi

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the Standard Model higgs with a minimal coupling to gravity during and after inflation. In the regime where the Standard Model vacuum is stable, we find that the higgs becomes a light spectator field after about 30 efolds of inflation, irrespectively of its initial value. Once the higgs has become light, its root-mean-square value h{sub *} relaxes to equilibrium in about 85 efolds for the inflationary scale of H{sub *} = 10{sup 4} GeV and in 20 efolds for H{sub *} = 10{sup 10} GeV. The equilibrium value is given by h{sub *} ∼ 0.36λ{sub *}{sup −1/4}H{sub *}, where λ{sub *} = 0.09...0.0005 is the higgs self coupling at the scales H{sub *} = 10{sup 4}...10{sup 10} GeV. We show that the main decay channel of the higgs condensate after inflation is the resonant production of Standard Model gauge bosons. For a set of parameters we find that a significant part of the condensate has decayed in between 340 and 630 Hubble times after the onset of higgs oscillations, depending on H{sub *} in a non-trivial way. The higgs perturbations correspond to isocurvature modes during inflation but they could generate significant adiabatic perturbations at a later stage for example through a modulation of the reheating stage. However, this requires that the inflaton(s) decay no later than a few hundred Hubble times after the onset of higgs oscillations.

  17. Undoped GaAs bilayers for exciton condensation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilly, M. P.

    2005-03-01

    Experimental progress in transport studies of exciton condensation of in electron and hole bilayers at high magnetic fields [1,2] has shown this novel physics can be observed. Fabrication of the bipolar electron-hole bilayers for zero field studies of exciton condensation still remains elusive. We describe a series of experiments on undoped GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures with the motivation of making electron-hole bilayers. In these undoped devices, external electric fields induce carriers rather than the traditional doping techniques. Single layer electron (or hole) devices demonstrate a high mobility over a wide range of density. More recently, fully undoped bilayers have been made where the density in each layer is independently controlled with gates on the top and bottom of the bilayer. In this talk we present high field transport of undoped electron-electron bilayers, and describe recent progress towards extending the fabrication techniques to creating electron-hole bilayers for exciton condensation studies at zero magnetic field. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 1. M. Kellogg, J. P. Eisenstein, L. N. Pfeiffer, and K. W. West, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 036801 (2004). 2. E. Tutoc, M. Shayegan, and D. A. Huse, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 036802 (2004).

  18. Condensation during gravity driven ECC: Experiments with PACTEL

    SciTech Connect

    Munther, R.; Kalli, H.; Kouhia, J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper provides the results of the second series of gravity driven emergency core cooling (ECC) experiments with PACTEL (Parallel Channel Test Loop). The simulated accident was a small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) with a break in a cold leg. The ECC flow was provided from a core makeup tank (CMT) located at a higher elevation than the main part of the primary system. The CMT was pressurized with pipings from the pressurizer and a cold leg. The tests indicated that steam condensation in the CMT can prevent ECC and lead to core uncovery.

  19. Refractory residues, condensates and chondrules from solar furnace experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    Vertical access solar furnace experiments have produced refractory residues, condensates and chondrules that are similar to components of chondritic meteorites. In particular, Ca-Al-rich refractory residues similar in chemistry to inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites have been produced by partial evaporation of basaltic bulk rock samples. Fe-Mg-Si-rich condensates with distinctive microbotryoidal morphology have been collected from the same sample runs. Particle coatings and aggregates with virtually identical microbotryoidal morphology and major element chemistry have been identified in both the Allende and Murchison meteorites. Spattered drops from melt beads undergoing heating and partial evaporation resemble some meteoritic chondrules in their mineralogies, textures, grain size, and sorting. The spatter mechanism is highly efficient in the production of chondrules. If any of the refractory inclusions in chondrites are, in fact, partial evaporation residues, many meteoritic fluid drop chondrules must have been formed by this process. The hot central portion of the solar nebula, acting on a cloud of dust and gas, is the probable source of heat required to produce the fractionated chemistry and physical state of many of the components of chondritic meteorites.

  20. Development and Capabilities of ISS Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry; Hasan, Mohammad; Balasubramaniam, R.; Patania, Michelle; Hall, Nancy; Wagner, James; Mackey, Jeffrey; Frankenfield, Bruce; Hauser, Daniel; Harpster, George; Nawrocki, David; Clapper, Randy; Kolacz, John; Butcher, Robert; May, Rochelle; Chao, David; Mudawar, Issam; Kharangate, Chirag R.; O'Neill, Lucas E.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental facility to perform flow boiling and condensation experiments in long duration microgravity environment is being designed for operation on the International Space Station (ISS). This work describes the design of the subsystems of the FBCE including the Fluid subsystem modules, data acquisition, controls, and diagnostics. Subsystems and components are designed within the constraints of the ISS Fluid Integrated Rack in terms of power availability, cooling capability, mass and volume, and most importantly the safety requirements. In this work we present the results of ground-based performance testing of the FBCE subsystem modules and test module which consist of the two condensation modules and the flow boiling module. During this testing, we evaluated the pressure drop profile across different components of the fluid subsystem, heater performance, on-orbit degassing subsystem, heat loss from different modules and components, and performance of the test modules. These results will be used in the refinement of the flight system design and build-up of the FBCE which is manifested for flight in late 2017-early 2018.

  1. Recent experiments with ring Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckel, S.; Kumar, A.; Anderson, N. W.; Campbell, G. K.

    2016-05-01

    Here, we present three recent results of our experiments with ring-shaped 23 Na Bose-Einstein condensates. First, we present results of the effect of temperature on the decay of persistent currents in the presence of a local, stationary perturbation, or weak link. When the weak link rotates, it can drive transitions between quantized persistent current states in the ring, that form hysteresis loops whose size depends strongly on temperature. We find that our data does not fit with a simple model of thermal activation. Second, we present a new method to measure the quantized persistent current state of the ring in a minimally-destructive way. This technique uses phonons as probes of the background flow through the Doppler effect. Finally, we present a set of experiments designed to reproduce the horizon problem in the early universe. Supersonic expansion of the ring creates causally-disconnected regions of BEC whose phase evolves at different rates. When the expansion stops and these regions are allowed to recombine, they form topological excitations. These excitations can be predicted using a simple theory that shows excellent agreement with the data.

  2. Expressing death risk as condensed life experience and death intensity.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, John P A

    2013-08-01

    Some risk exposures, including many medical and surgical procedures, typically carry hazards of death that are difficult to convey and appreciate in absolute terms. I propose presenting the death risk as a condensed life experience (i.e., the equivalent amount of life T that would carry the same cumulative mortality hazard for a person of the same age and sex based on life tables). For example, if the risk of death during an elective 1-hour procedure is 0.01%, and same-age and same-sex people have a 0.01% death risk over 1 month, one can inform the patient that "this procedure carries the same death risk as living 1 month of normal life." Comparative standards from other risky activities or from a person with the same disease at the same stage and same predictive profile could also be used. A complementary metric that may be useful to consider is the death intensity. The death intensity λ is the hazard function that shows the fold-risk estimate of dying compared with the reference person. The death intensity can vary substantially for different phases of the event, operation, or procedure (e.g., intraoperative, early postoperative, late postoperative), and this variability may also be useful to convey. T will vary depending on the time window for which it is computed. I present examples for calculating T and λ using literature data on accidents, ascent to Mount Everest, and medical and surgical procedures. PMID:23579043

  3. The first experiments with Bose-Einstein condensation of rubidium-87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensher, Jason Remington

    1999-10-01

    Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) is the macroscopic occupation of the ground-state of a system of bosons that occurs when the extent of the wavefunctions of the particles is comparable to the interparticle spacing. Although predicted by Albert Einstein in 1924) BEC in a dilute system was observed only recently in an atomic vapor of 87Rb by our group in 1995. This thesis describes the first experiments to explore the properties of this new state of matter. In early experiments, we studied how interparticle interactions modify the ground-state wavefunction and mean energy. We observed phonon-like collective excitations of the condensate. We studied modes of different angular momenta and energies. Our observations of how the characteristics of the modes depend on interactions quantitatively supported the mean- field picture of the dilute BEC. Shortly thereafter, we developed thermometry and calorimetry to study the ground-state fraction and mean energy of the Bose gas as a function of temperature. The BEC transition temperature and the temperature dependence of the ground-state fraction are in good agreement with predictions for an ideal Bose gas. However, the measured mean energy is larger than that of the ideal gas below the transition. We observe a distinct change in the energy-temperature curve near the transition, which indicates a sharp feature in the specific heat. In an effort to produce larger condensates we constructed a double-MOT apparatus that became the third-generation machine at JILA to observe and study BEC. The new apparatus produces condensates five times more quickly than the original experiment, increasing the number of atoms in the condensate from several thousand to 1-2 million atoms. Using the improved apparatus, we studied the TOP (time-averaged orbiting potential) magnetic trap. An important, new observation is that the trap symmetry is affected by the sag due to gravity, an effect which can be exploited to create very harmonic, spherical

  4. Recent multiwave Cherenkov generator experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, R.; Richter-Sand, R.; Hacker, F.; Walsh, J.; Arman, M.

    1994-12-31

    The initial operating characteristics of the North Star Research Corporation (NSRC) multiwave generator experiment are discussed. The first radiation from the NSRC apparatus has now been observed and the immediate goal is to optimize the power output by providing a beam which is better matched to the field profile (a thinner beam propagating closer to the vanes). When this has been accomplished a detailed comparison of the performance of MWCG/MWDG (multiwave diffraction generator/multiwave Cherenkov generator) structures with BWO structures of the same interaction length will be undertaken.

  5. Oblique half-solitons and their generation in exciton-polariton condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Flayac, H.; Solnyshkov, D. D.; Malpuech, G.

    2011-05-15

    We describe oblique half-solitons, a new type of topological defects in a two-dimensional spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. A realistic protocol based on the optical spin Hall effect is proposed toward their generation within an exciton-polariton system.

  6. A DEMONSTRATION OF BENEFICIAL USES OF WARM WATER FROM CONDENSERS OF ELECTRIC GENERATING PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a project to demonstrate that warmed cooling water from condensers of electric generating plants can effectively and economically heat greenhouses. The 0.2-hectare demonstration greenhouse, at Northern States Power Co.'s Sherburne County (Sherco) Gener...

  7. The Next Generation BLAST Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galitzki, Nicholas; Ade, Peter A. R.; Angilè, Francesco E.; Ashton, Peter; Beall, James A.; Becker, Dan; Bradford, Kristi J.; Che, George; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Devlin, Mark J.; Dober, Bradley J.; Fissel, Laura M.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gao, Jiansong; Groppi, Christopher E.; Hillbrand, Seth; Hilton, Gene C.; Hubmayr, Johannes; Irwin, Kent D.; Klein, Jeffrey; van Lanen, Jeff; Li, Dale; Li, Zhi-Yun; Lourie, Nathan P.; Mani, Hamdi; Martin, Peter G.; Mauskopf, Philip; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Novak, Giles; Pappas, David P.; Pascale, Enzo; Pisano, Giampaolo; Santos, Fabio P.; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Stanchfield, Sara; Tucker, Carole; Ullom, Joel N.; Underhill, Matthew; Vissers, Michael R.; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was a suborbital experiment designed to map magnetic fields in order to study their role in star formation processes. BLASTPol made detailed polarization maps of a number of molecular clouds during its successful flights from Antarctica in 2010 and 2012. We present the next-generation BLASTPol instrument (BLAST-TNG) that will build off the success of the previous experiment and continue its role as a unique instrument and a test bed for new technologies. With a 16-fold increase in mapping speed, BLAST-TNG will make larger and deeper maps. Major improvements include a 2.5-m carbon fiber mirror that is 40% wider than the BLASTPol mirror and 3000 polarization sensitive detectors. BLAST-TNG will observe in three bands at 250, 350, and 500 μm. The telescope will serve as a pathfinder project for microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) technology, as applied to feedhorn-coupled submillimeter detector arrays. The liquid helium cooled cryostat will have a 28-day hold time and will utilize a closed-cycle 3He refrigerator to cool the detector arrays to 270 mK. This will enable a detailed mapping of more targets with higher polarization resolution than any other submillimeter experiment to date. BLAST-TNG will also be the first balloon-borne telescope to offer shared risk observing time to the community. This paper outlines the motivation for the project and the instrumental design.

  8. WIPP Gas-Generation Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Frank S. Felicione; Steven M. Frank; Dennis D. Keiser

    2007-05-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted for gas generation in contact-handled transuranic (CH TRU) wastes subjected for several years to conditions similar to those expected to occur at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) should the repository eventually become inundated with brine. Various types of actual CH TRU wastes were placed into 12 corrosion-resistant vessels. The vessels were loosely filled with the wastes, which were submerged in synthetic brine having the same chemical composition as that in the WIPP vicinity. The vessels were also inoculated with microbes found in the Salado Formation at WIPP. The vessels were sealed, purged, and the approximately 750 ml headspace in each vessel was pressurized with nitrogen gas to approximately 146 atmospheres to create anoxic conditions at the lithostatic pressure estimated in the repository were it to be inundated. The temperature was maintained at the expected 30°C. The test program objective was to measure the quantities and species of gases generated by metal corrosion, radiolysis, and microbial activity. These data will assist in the specification of the rates at which gases are produced under inundated repository conditions for use in the WIPP Performance Assessment computer models. These experiments were very carefully designed, constructed, instrumented, and performed. Approximately 6 1/2 years of continuous, undisturbed testing were accumulated. Several of the vessels showed significantly elevated levels of generated gases, virtually all of which was hydrogen. Up to 4.2% hydrogen, by volume, was measured. Only small quantities of other gases, principally carbon dioxide, were detected. Gas generation was found to depend strongly on the waste composition. The maximum hydrogen generation occurred in vessels containing carbon steel. Visual examination of carbon-steel coupons confirmed the correspondence between the extent of observable corrosion and hydrogen generation. Average corrosion penetration rates

  9. Investigations in the problem of pion condensation using generator co-ordinate methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, P.; Da Providencia, J.

    1981-11-01

    Pion condensation in neutron matter has been investigated using the generator coordinate method and a simple p-wave interaction. The assumption of a condensed mode corresponding to one pion momentum (determined variationally) helps evaluate all the necessary matrix elements exactly. The technique of charge projection from a coherent state of negative pions is discussed, and calculations have been carried out for the cases of average charge conservation, charge projection before variation and for a charge conserving trial function. The ground-state energies and the lowest excitations of the system are obtained from numerical solutions of the Hill-Wheeler equation.

  10. Generation of ultrafast optical fiducials for shock-wave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson, B. W.

    Recent advances in high time resolution optical diagnostic instrumentation for shock wave experiments in condensed media (especially timing resolved spectroscopy) have resulted in new challenges concerning the timing of such experiments. A technique for detecting the presence of a shock wave through the generation of an optical fiducial signal, which is detected and recorded directly by the optical recording device (typically a streak camera) is presented. This technique, which is based on Stress Induced Defeat of Total Internal Reflection (SIDTIR), requires only simple apparatus and set up, and offers fiducial transition times as short as 50 psec in a reasonable experimental configuration.

  11. Generation of massive entanglement through an adiabatic quantum phase transition in a spinor condensate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Duan, L-M

    2013-11-01

    We propose a method to generate massive entanglement in a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate from an initial product state through an adiabatic sweep of the magnetic field across a quantum phase transition induced by competition between the spin-dependent collision interaction and the quadratic Zeeman effect. The generated many-body entanglement is characterized by the experimentally measurable entanglement depth in the proximity of the Dicke state. We show that the scheme is robust to practical noise and experimental imperfection and under realistic conditions it is possible to generate genuine entanglement for hundreds of atoms. PMID:24237490

  12. Mesh generation and energy group condensation studies for the jaguar deterministic transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R. A.; Watson, A. M.; Iwueke, C. I.; Edwards, E. J.

    2012-07-01

    The deterministic transport code Jaguar is introduced, and the modeling process for Jaguar is demonstrated using a two-dimensional assembly model of the Hoogenboom-Martin Performance Benchmark Problem. This single assembly model is being used to test and analyze optimal modeling methodologies and techniques for Jaguar. This paper focuses on spatial mesh generation and energy condensation techniques. In this summary, the models and processes are defined as well as thermal flux solution comparisons with the Monte Carlo code MC21. (authors)

  13. Study to perform preliminary experiments to evaluate particle generation and characterization techniques for zero-gravity cloud physics experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, U.

    1982-01-01

    Methods of particle generation and characterization with regard to their applicability for experiments requiring cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) of specified properties were investigated. Since aerosol characterization is a prerequisite to assessing performance of particle generation equipment, techniques for characterizing aerosol were evaluated. Aerosol generation is discussed, and atomizer and photolytic generators including preparation of hydrosols (used with atomizers) and the evaluation of a flight version of an atomizer are studied.

  14. (X-ray diffraction experiments with condenser matter)

    SciTech Connect

    Coppens, P.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research on the following topics: high-{Tc} superconductors; The response of crystal to an applied electric field; quasicrystals; surface structure and kinetics of surface layer formation; EXAFS studies of superconductors and heterostructures; effect of iron on the crystal structure of perovskite; x-ray detector development; and SAXS experiments. (LSP)

  15. Experiment and analysis of ablation and condensation in NIF first wall materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, H.; Peterson, P.F.; Turner, R.E.; Anderson, A.T.

    1996-06-14

    Experiments were performed on Nova at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to study the ablation and condensation process of National Ignition Facility (NIF) first wall materials. Plates of candidate first wall materials (SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 4}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were exposed to x-rays from hohlraums in the Nova chamber. Ablated material was collected and measured on a receiving plate which was blocked form direct x-ray exposure. This article presents the results form these experiments and comparisons with predictions from numerical simulations The net condensation flux was calculated using the TSUNAMI code, which was modified to incorporate the feature of condensation boundaries.

  16. Bose-Einstein Condensates in Optical Lattices: Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsch, O.

    In the early days of laser cooling, which together with magnetic trapping techniques led to the first observation of BEC in 1995, it was realized that the optical interference between the cooling beams could lead to a spatially periodic density modulation of the trapped atoms. This notion of a "three-dimensional egg-carton" for cold atoms quickly led to a number of experiments confirming the existence of such a light-bound crystal and exploring its properties [1-3]. It was found that, indeed, cold atoms could be trapped in such periodic structures, and it was possible to measure, for example, the quantized motion of the atoms inside the potential wells. While early experiments were carried out in the dissipative regime using near-resonant lattices in which the atoms were continuously cooled through the Sisyphus mechanism involving light scattering [4], more sophisticated experimental techniques later enabled studies on far-detuned lattices in which atoms evolved coherently.

  17. Sculpting quasi-one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate to generate calibrated matter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akram, Javed; Pelster, Axel

    2016-02-01

    We explore theoretically how to tune the dynamics of a quasi-one-dimensional harmonically trapped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) due to an additional red- and blue-detuned Hermite-Gaussian dimple trap (HGdT). To this end we study a BEC in a highly nonequilibrium state, which is not possible in a traditional harmonically confined trap. Our system is modeled by a time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation, which is numerically solved by the Crank-Nicolson method in both imaginary and real time. For equilibrium, we obtain a condensate with two bumps or dips which are induced by the chosen TEM01 mode for the red- or blue-detuned HGdT, respectively. Afterward, in time-of-flight dynamics, we examine the adherence or decay of the two bumps or dips in the condensate, which are induced by the still present red- or blue-detuned HGdT, respectively. On the other hand, once the red or blue HGdT potential is switched off, shock waves or bi-trains of gray or dark pair-solitons are created. During this process it is found that the generation of gray or dark pair-soliton bi-trains are generic phenomena of collisions of moderately or fully fragmented BEC. Additionally, it turns out that the special shape of generated solitons in the harmonically trapped BEC firmly depends upon the geometry of the HGdT.

  18. Intermolecular forces between low generation PAMAM dendrimer condensed DNA helices: role of cation architecture.

    PubMed

    An, Min; Parkin, Sean R; DeRouchey, Jason E

    2014-01-28

    In recent years, dendriplexes, complexes of cationic dendrimers with DNA, have become attractive DNA delivery vehicles due to their well-defined chemistries. To better understand the nature of the forces condensing dendriplexes, we studied low generation poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer-DNA complexes and compared them to comparably charged linear arginine peptides. Using osmotic stress coupled with X-ray scattering, we have investigated the effect of molecular chain architecture on DNA-DNA intermolecular forces that determine the net attraction and equilibrium interhelical distance within these polycation condensed DNA arrays. In order to compact DNA, linear cations are believed to bind in DNA grooves and to interact with the phosphate backbone of apposing helices. We have previously shown a length dependent attraction resulting in higher packaging densities with increasing charge for linear cations. Hyperbranched polycations, such as polycationic dendrimers, presumably would not be able to bind to DNA and correlate their charges in the same manner as linear cations. We show that attractive and repulsive force amplitudes in PAMAM-DNA assemblies display significantly different trends than comparably charged linear arginines resulting in lower DNA packaging densities with increasing PAMAM generation. The salt and pH dependencies of packaging in PAMAM dendrimer-DNA and linear arginine-DNA complexes were also investigated. Significant differences in the force curve behaviour and salt and pH sensitivities suggest that different binding modes may be present in DNA condensed by dendrimers when compared to linear polycations. PMID:24651934

  19. MELCOR 1.8.1 assessment: PNL Ice Condenser Aerosol Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, R.J.

    1993-06-01

    The MELCOR code was used to simulate PNL`s Ice Condenser Experiments 11-6 and 16-11. In these experiments, ZnS was injected into a mixing chamber, and the combined steam/air/aerosol mixture flowed into an ice condenser which was l4.7m tall. Experiment 11-6 was a low flow test; Experiment l6-1l was a high flow test. Temperatures in the ice condenser region and particle retention were measured in these tests. MELCOR predictions compared very well to the experimental data. The MELCOR calculations were also compared to CONTAIN code calculations for the same tests. A number of sensitivity studies were performed. It as found that simulation time step, aerosol parameters such as the number of MAEROS components and sections used and the particle density, and ice condenser parameters such as the energy capacity of the ice, ice heat transfer coefficient multiplier, and ice heat structure characteristic length all could affect the results. Thermal/hydraulic parameters such as control volume equilibrium assumptions, flow loss coefficients, and the bubble rise model were found to affect the results less significantly. MELCOR results were not machine dependent for this problem.

  20. Generation of monodisperse droplets by spontaneous condensation of flow in nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Der-Shaiun; Kadambi, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    Submicron size monodisperse particles are of interest in many industrial and scientific applications. These include the manufacture of ceramic parts using fine ceramic particles, the production of thin films by deposition of ionized clusters, monodisperse seed particles for laser anemometry, and the study of size dependence of cluster chemical and physical properties. An inexpensive and relatively easy way to generate such particles is by utilizing the phenomenon of spontaneous condensation. The phenomenon occurs when the vapor or a mixture of a vapor and a noncondensing gas is expanded at a high expansion rate. The saturation line is crossed with the supercooled vapor behaving like a gas, until all of a sudden at the so called Wilson point, condensation occurs, resulting in a large number of relatively monodisperse droplets. The droplet size is a function of the expansion rate, inlet conditions, mass fraction of vapor, gas properties, etc. Spontaneous condensation of steam and water vapor and air mixture in a one dimensional nozzle was modeled and the resulting equations solved numerically. The droplet size distribution at the exit of various one dimensional nozzles and the flow characteristics such as pressure ratio, mean droplet radius, vapor and droplet temperatures, nucleation flux, supercooling, wetness, etc., along the axial distance were obtained. The numerical results compared very well with the available experimental data. The effect of inlet conditions, nozzle expansion rates, and vapor mass fractions on droplet mean radius, droplet size distribution, and pressure ratio were examined.

  1. Dynamical generation of phase-squeezed states in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, G. R.; An, Y.; Yan, T.; Lu, Z. S.

    2010-12-15

    As an ''input'' state of a linear (Mach-Zehnder or Ramsey) interferometer, the phase-squeezed state proposed by Berry and Wiseman exhibits the best sensitivity approaching to the Heisenberg limit [Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5098 (2000)]. Similar with the Berry and Wiseman's state, we find that two kinds of phase-squeezed states can be generated dynamically with atomic Bose-Einstein condensates confined in a symmetric double-well potential, which shows squeezing along spin operator S{sub y} and antisqueezing along S{sub z}, leading to subshot-noise phase estimation.

  2. Simple method for generating Bose-Einstein condensates in a weak hybrid trap

    SciTech Connect

    Zaiser, M.; Hartwig, J.; Schlippert, D.; Velte, U.; Winter, N.; Lebedev, V.; Ertmer, W.; Rasel, E. M.

    2011-03-15

    We report on a simple trapping scheme for the generation of Bose-Einstein condensates of {sup 87}Rb atoms. This scheme employs a near-infrared single-beam optical dipole trap combined with a weak magnetic quadrupole field as used for magneto-optical trapping to enhance the confinement in axial direction. Efficient forced evaporative cooling to the phase transition is achieved in this weak hybrid trap via reduction of the laser intensity of the optical dipole trap at constant magnetic field gradient.

  3. Controlled generation of nonlinear resonances through sinusoidal lattice modes in Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Priyam; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2015-12-01

    We study Bose-Einstein condensate in the combined presence of time modulated optical lattice and harmonic trap in the mean-field approach. Through the self-similar method, we show the existence of sinusoidal lattice modes in this inhomogeneous system, commensurate with the lattice potential. A significant advantage of this system is wide tunability of the parameters through chirp management. The combined effect of the interaction, harmonic trap and lattice potential leads to the generation of nonlinear resonances, exactly where the matter wave changes its direction. When the harmonic trap is switched off, the BEC undergoes a nonlinear compression for the static optical lattice potential. For better understanding of chirp management and the nature of the sinusoidal excitation, we investigate the energy spectrum of the condensate, which clearly reveals the generation of nonlinear resonances in the appropriate regime. We have also identified a classical dynamical phase transition occurring in the system, where loss of superfluidity takes the superfluid phase to an insulating state.

  4. Steam side droplet erosion in titanium tubed condensers -- Experiences and remedies

    SciTech Connect

    Tavast, J.O.

    1996-12-31

    In general, the experience of titanium tubed turbine condensers is more than satisfactory. Steam side droplet erosion attack is however a concern in for example many of the Swedish and Finnish nuclear power plants. In this paper, the author`s experiences of droplet erosion as well as of remedies against droplet erosion are discussed. Possible remedies include plugging and installation of protective shields. The currently most favored remedy is partial retubing with more resistant materials. A number of accelerated tests have been performed in order to qualify potential tube materials regarding resistance towards droplet erosion. Highly alloyed stainless steels seem to have the best resistance. Some hard titanium alloys as well as nitriding of conventional titanium also seem promising. In severe cases a combination of several remedies may be necessary, e.g., partial retubing in combination with installation of a local moisture separator. For a new condenser the risk for droplet erosion can be reduced in the design stage.

  5. Alcohol LOX Steam Generator Test Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, K.; Dommers, M.

    2004-10-01

    At the DLR test centre in Lampoldshausen there is a long experience in the development of rocket steam generators as a main subsystem for the altitude simulation. The rocket steam generators make it possible to supply the required quantities of steam at short notice with reduced investment and operating costs. The rocket steam generators are based on the combustion of liquid oxygen (LOX) and ethyl alcohol (ALC). The paper deals with the experience of the development of the steam generators and the operation at the altitude simulation P1.0 for satellite propulsion and P4.2 for altitude simulation of AESTUS upper stage engine.

  6. A new experiment for investigating evaporation and condensation of cryogenic propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellur, K.; Médici, E. F.; Kulshreshtha, M.; Konduru, V.; Tyrewala, D.; Tamilarasan, A.; McQuillen, J.; Leão, J. B.; Hussey, D. S.; Jacobson, D. L.; Scherschligt, J.; Hermanson, J. C.; Choi, C. K.; Allen, J. S.

    2016-03-01

    Passive and active technologies have been used to control propellant boil-off, but the current state of understanding of cryogenic evaporation and condensation in microgravity is insufficient for designing large cryogenic depots critical to the long-term space exploration missions. One of the key factors limiting the ability to design such systems is the uncertainty in the accommodation coefficients (evaporation and condensation), which are inputs for kinetic modeling of phase change. A novel, combined experimental and computational approach is being used to determine the accommodation coefficients for liquid hydrogen and liquid methane. The experimental effort utilizes the Neutron Imaging Facility located at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland to image evaporation and condensation of hydrogenated propellants inside of metallic containers. The computational effort includes numerical solution of a model for phase change in the contact line and thin film regions as well as an CFD effort for determining the appropriate thermal boundary conditions for the numerical solution of the evaporating and condensing liquid. Using all three methods, there is the possibility of extracting the accommodation coefficients from the experimental observations. The experiments are the first known observation of a liquid hydrogen menisci condensing and evaporating inside aluminum and stainless steel cylinders. The experimental technique, complimentary computational thermal model and meniscus shape determination are reported. The computational thermal model has been shown to accurately track the transient thermal response of the test cells. The meniscus shape determination suggests the presence of a finite contact angle, albeit very small, between liquid hydrogen and aluminum oxide.

  7. Observations of condensation nuclei in the 1987 airborne Antarctic ozone experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Smith, S. D.; Ferry, G. V.; Loewenstein, M.

    1988-01-01

    The condensation nucleus counter (CNC) flown of the NASA ER-2 in the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment provides a measurement of the number mixing ratio of particles which can be grown by exposure to supersaturated n-butyl alcohol vapor to diameters of a few microns. Such particles are referred to as condensation nuclei (CN). The ER-2 CNC was calibrated with aerosols of known size and concentration and was found to provide an accurate measure of the number concentration of particles larger than about 0.02 micron. Since the number distribution of stratospheric aerosols is usually dominated by particles less than a few tenths of micron in diameter, the upper cutoff of the ER-2 CNC has not been determined experimentally. However, theory suggests that the sampling and counting efficiency should remain near one for particles as large as 1 micron in diameter. Thus, the CN mixing ratio is usually a good measure of the mixing ratio of submicron particles.

  8. Generativity: Lived Experience as Curricular Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallin, Jason; Graham, Tanya

    2002-01-01

    Modern educational practice, inspired by the scientific rationalism of the 17th and 18th centuries, focuses on control, certainty, and order, thus rendering students' experiences superficial. Generativity "finds" the curriculum in students' life experiences, giving them relevance and the opportunity to be explored. Where life is not the source of…

  9. Quark masses and mixings in the RS1 model with a condensing 4th generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, A. E. Cárcamo; Dib, Claudio O.; Neill, Nicolás A.; Zerwekh, Alfonso R.

    2012-02-01

    We study the hierarchy of quark masses and mixings in a model based on a 5-dimensional spacetime with constant curvature of Randall-Sundrum type with two branes, where the Electroweak Symmetry Breaking is caused dynamically by the condensation of a 4th generation of quarks, due to underlying physics from the 5D bulk and the first KK gluons. We first study the hierarchy of quark masses and mixings that can be obtained from purely adjusting the profile localizations, finding that realistic masses are not reproduced unless non trivial hierarchies of underlying 4-fermion interactions from the bulk are included. Then we study global U(1) symmetries that can be imposed in order to obtain non-symmetric modified Fritzsch-like textures in the mass matrices that reproduce reasonably well quark masses and CKM mixings.

  10. Direct-contact condensers for open-cycle OTEC applications: Model validation with fresh water experiments for structured packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathan, D.; Parsons, B. K.; Althof, J. A.

    1988-10-01

    The objective of the reported work was to develop analytical methods for evaluating the design and performance of advanced high-performance heat exchangers for use in open-cycle thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems. This report describes the progress made on validating a one-dimensional, steady-state analytical computer of fresh water experiments. The condenser model represents the state of the art in direct-contact heat exchange for condensation for OC-OTEC applications. This is expected to provide a basis for optimizing OC-OTEC plant configurations. Using the model, we examined two condenser geometries, a cocurrent and a countercurrent configuration. This report provides detailed validation results for important condenser parameters for cocurrent and countercurrent flows. Based on the comparisons and uncertainty overlap between the experimental data and predictions, the model is shown to predict critical condenser performance parameters with an uncertainty acceptable for general engineering design and performance evaluations.

  11. Direct-contact condensers for open-cycle OTEC applications: Model validation with fresh water experiments for structured packings

    SciTech Connect

    Bharathan, D.; Parsons, B.K.; Althof, J.A.

    1988-10-01

    The objective of the reported work was to develop analytical methods for evaluating the design and performance of advanced high-performance heat exchangers for use in open-cycle thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems. This report describes the progress made on validating a one-dimensional, steady-state analytical computer of fresh water experiments. The condenser model represents the state of the art in direct-contact heat exchange for condensation for OC-OTEC applications. This is expected to provide a basis for optimizing OC-OTEC plant configurations. Using the model, we examined two condenser geometries, a cocurrent and a countercurrent configuration. This report provides detailed validation results for important condenser parameters for cocurrent and countercurrent flows. Based on the comparisons and uncertainty overlap between the experimental data and predictions, the model is shown to predict critical condenser performance parameters with an uncertainty acceptable for general engineering design and performance evaluations. 33 refs., 69 figs., 38 tabs.

  12. Demonstration of beneficial uses of warm water from condensers of electric-generating plants

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, L.L.; Ashley, G.C.; Hietala, J.S.; Stansfield, R.V.; Tonkinson, T.R.C.

    1980-05-01

    The report gives results of a project to demonstrate that warmed cooling water from condensers of electric generating plants can effectively and economically heat greenhouses. The 0.2-hectare demonstration greenhouse, at Northern States Power Co.'s Sherburne County (Sherco) Generating Plant, used 29.4 C water to heat both air and soil: finned-tube commercial heat exchangers were used to heat the air; and buried plastic pipes, the soil. Warm water from the Sherco 1 cooling tower was piped over 0.8 km to the greenhouse where it was cooled from 2.7 to 5.6 C before returning to the cooling tower basin. Roses and tomatoes were the principal crops in the 3-year test, although other flowers and vegetables, and conifer seedlings were also grown. The warm water heating system supplied all the greenhouse heating requirements, even at ambient temperatures as low as -40 C. Roses, snapdragons, geraniums, tomatoes, lettuce, and evergreen seedlings were grown successfully. The demonstration proved the concept to be both technically and economically feasible at Sherco, with an apparent saving of $4500/hectare in 1978 dollars over fuel oil heating, plus an annual oil savings of about 500 cu m/hectare. Privately financed commercial greenhouses heated with warm water were built at Sherco in 1977. The commercial greenhouses will expand from 0.48 to almost 1 hectare by late 1980.

  13. Steam condensation and liquid hold-up in steam generator U-tubes during oscillatory natural circulation

    SciTech Connect

    De Santi, G.F.; Mayinger, F.

    1990-01-01

    In many accident scenarios, natural circulation is an important heat transport mechanism for long-term cooling of light water reactors. In the event of a small pipe break, with subsequent loss of primary cooling fluid loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), or under abnormal operating conditions, early tripping of the main coolant pumps can be actuated. Primary fluid flow will then progress from forced to natural convection. Understanding of the flow regimes and heat-removal mechanisms in the steam generators during the entire transient is of primary importance to safety analysis. Flow oscillations during two-phase natural circulation experiments for pressurized water reactors (PWRs) with inverted U-tube steam generators occur at high pressure and at a primary inventory range between two-phase circulation and reflex heat removal. This paper deals with the oscillatory flow behavior that was observed in the LOBI-MOD2 facility during the transition period between two-phase natural circulation and reflex condensation.

  14. Pinch Experiments in a Table Top Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, Jose; Soto, Leopoldo; Tarifeno, Ariel

    2009-01-21

    The design and construction of a table top multipurpose capacitor bank of hundred of Joules and hundred of kiloAmperes conceived to be used in small scale Z-pinch experiments is reported. A recent result on a Z-pinch gas embedded discharge using hollow conical electrodes done in a similar table top generator is also presented.

  15. Condensates and quasiparticles in inflationary cosmology: Mass generation and decay widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyanovsky, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    During de Sitter inflation massless particles of minimally coupled scalar fields acquire a mass and a decay width thereby becoming quasiparticles. For bare massless particles nonperturbative infrared radiative corrections lead to a self-consistent generation of mass, for a quartic self-interaction M∝λ1/4H, and for a cubic self-interaction the mass is induced by the formation of a nonperturbative condensate leading to M∝λ1/3H2/3. These radiatively generated masses restore de Sitter invariance and result in anomalous scaling dimensions of superhorizon fluctuations. We introduce a generalization of the nonperturbative Wigner-Weisskopf method to obtain the time evolution of quantum states that include the self-consistent generation of mass and regulate the infrared behavior. The infrared divergences are manifest as poles in Δ=M2/3H2 in the single particle self-energies, leading to a rearrangement of the perturbative series nonanalytic in the couplings. A set of simple rules that yield the leading order infrared contributions to the decay width are obtained and implemented. The lack of kinematic thresholds entail that all particle states acquire a decay width, dominated by the emission and absorption of superhorizon quanta ∝(λ/H)4/3[H/kph(η)]6; λ[H/kph(η)]6 for cubic and quartic couplings respectively to leading order in M/H. The decay of single particle quantum states hastens as their wave vectors cross the Hubble radius and their width is related to the highly squeezed limit of the bi- or trispectrum of scalar fluctuations respectively.

  16. Bose-Einstein Condensation in a Dilute Gas; the First 70 Years and Some Recent Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornell, E. A.; Wieman, C. E.

    Bose-Einstein condensation, or BEC, has a long and rich history dating from the early 1920s. In this article we will trace briefly over this history and some of the developments in physics that made possible our successful pursuit of BEC in a gas. We will then discuss what was involved in this quest. In this discussion we will go beyond the usual technical description to try and address certain questions that we now hear frequently, but are not covered in our past research papers. These are questions along the lines of ``How did you get the idea and decide to pursue it? Did you know it was going to work? How long did it take you and why?'' We will review some of our favorites from among the experiments we have carried out with BEC. There will then be a brief encore on why we are optimistic that BEC can be created with nearly any species of magnetically trappable atom. Throughout this article we will try to explain what makes BEC in a dilute gas so interesting, unique, and experimentally challenging. This article is our ``Nobel Lecture'' and as such takes a relatively personal approach to the story of the development of experimental Bose-Einstein condensation. For a somewhat more scholarly treatment of the history, the interested reader is referred to E. A. Cornell, J. R. Ensher and C. E. Wieman, ``Experiments in dilute atomic Bose-Einstein condensation in Bose-Einstein Condensation in Atomic Gases, Proceedings of the International School of Physics ``Enrico Fermi'' Course CXL'' (M. Inguscio, S. Stringari and C. E. Wieman, Eds., Italian Physical Society, 1999), pp. 15-66, which is also available as cond-mat/9903109. For a reasonably complete technical review of the three years of explosive progress that immediately followed the first observation of BEC, we recommend reading the above article in combination with the corresponding review from Ketterle, cond-mat/9904034.

  17. Reduced gravity boiling and condensing experiments simulated with the COBRA/TRAC computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuta, Judith M.; Krotiuk, William

    1988-01-01

    A series of reduced-gravity two-phase flow experiments has been conducted with a boiler/condenser apparatus in the NASA KC-135 aircraft in order to obtain basic thermal-hydraulic data applicable to analytical design tools. Several test points from the KC-135 tests were selected for simulation by means of the COBRA/TRAC two-fluid, three-field thermal-hydraulic computer code; the points were chosen for a 25-90 percent void-fraction range. The possible causes for the lack of agreement noted between simulations and experiments are explored, with attention to the physical characteristics of two-phase flow in one-G and near-zero-G conditions.

  18. Interim Report: Air-Cooled Condensers for Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants Improved Binary Cycle Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel S. Wendt; Greg L. Mines

    2010-09-01

    As geothermal resources that are more expensive to develop are utilized for power generation, there will be increased incentive to use more efficient power plants. This is expected to be the case with Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) resources. These resources will likely require wells drilled to depths greater than encountered with hydrothermal resources, and will have the added costs for stimulation to create the subsurface reservoir. It is postulated that plants generating power from these resources will likely utilize the binary cycle technology where heat is rejected sensibly to the ambient. The consumptive use of a portion of the produced geothermal fluid for evaporative heat rejection in the conventional flash-steam conversion cycle is likely to preclude its use with EGS resources. This will be especially true in those areas where there is a high demand for finite supplies of water. Though they have no consumptive use of water, using air-cooling systems for heat rejection has disadvantages. These systems have higher capital costs, reduced power output (heat is rejected at the higher dry-bulb temperature), increased parasitics (fan power), and greater variability in power generation on both a diurnal and annual basis (larger variation in the dry-bulb temperature). This is an interim report for the task ‘Air-Cooled Condensers in Next- Generation Conversion Systems’. The work performed was specifically aimed at a plant that uses commercially available binary cycle technologies with an EGS resource. Concepts were evaluated that have the potential to increase performance, lower cost, or mitigate the adverse effects of off-design operation. The impact on both cost and performance were determined for the concepts considered, and the scenarios identified where a particular concept is best suited. Most, but not all, of the concepts evaluated are associated with the rejection of heat. This report specifically addresses three of the concepts evaluated: the use of

  19. Operational experiences of a downhole steam generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, B. W.

    The US Department of Energy supported the development of downhole steam generators for enhanced oil recovery as a part of Project DEEP STEAM. A final step in the development program was to deploy a downhole steam generator in the field to demonstrate its reliable operation and to evaluate the effect of the combined steam/exhaust products effluent on the reservoir. Sandia National Laboratories entered into an agreement with the City of Long Beach to place two direct contact, high pressure combustors in the Wilmington Field in Long Beach, California. These units one downhole and the other on the surface, have now been operated for a few months and gas communication with the production wells measured. The operational experience of this field experiment are discussed.

  20. Operational experiences of a downhole steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.W.

    1982-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has supported the development of downhole steam generators for enhanced oil recovery as a part of Project DEEP STEAM. A final step in the development program was to deploy a downhole steam generator (DHSG) in the field to demonstrate its reliable operation and to evaluate the effect of the combined steam/exhaust products effluent on the reservoir. Sandia National Laboratories entered into an agreement with the City of Long Beach to place two direct contact, high pressure combustors in the Wilmington Field in Long Beach, California. These units one downhole and the other on the surface, have now been operated for a few months and gas communication with the production wells measured. The operational experience of this field experiment are discussed.

  1. Yang-Baxter integrable models in experiments: from condensed matter to ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, Murray T.; Foerster, Angela

    2016-04-01

    The Yang-Baxter equation has long been recognised as the masterkey to integrability, providing the basis for exactly solved models which capture the fundamental physics of a number of realistic classical and quantum systems. In this article we provide an introductory survey of the impact of Yang-Baxter integrable models on experiments in condensed matter physics and ultracold atoms. A number of prominent examples are covered, including the hard-hexagon model, the Heisenberg spin chain, the transverse quantum Ising chain, a spin ladder model, the Lieb-Liniger Bose gas, the Gaudin-Yang Fermi gas and the two-site Bose-Hubbard model. The review concludes by pointing to some other recent developments with promise for further progress.

  2. Investigation and mitigation of condensation induced water hammer by stratified flow experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadakia, Hiral J.

    This research primarily focuses on the possibility of using stratified flow in preventing an occurrence of condensation induced water hammer (CIWH) in horizontal pipe involving steam and subcooled water. A two-phase flow loop simulating the passive safety systems of an advanced light water reactor was constructed and a series of stratified flow experiments were carried out involving a system of subcooled water, saturated water, and steam. Special instruments were designed to measure steam flow rate and subcooled liquid velocity. These experiments showed that when flow field conditions meet certain criteria CIWH does occur. Flow conditions used in experiments were typically observed in passive safety systems of an advanced light water cooled reactor. This research summarizes a) literature research and other experimental data that signify an occurrence of CIWH, b) experiments in an effort to show an occurrence of CIWH and the ability to prevent CIWH, c) qualitative and quantitative results to underline the mechanism of CIWH, d) experiments that show CIWH can be prevented under certain conditions, and e) guidelines for the safe operating conditions. Based on initial experiment results it was observed that Bernoulli's effect can play an important role in wave formation and instability. A separate effect table top experiment was constructed with plexi-glass. A series of entrance effect tests and stratified experiments were carried out with different fluids to study wave formation and wave bridging. Special test series experiments were carried out to investigate the presence of a saturated layer. The effect of subcooled water and steam flow on wedge length and depth were recorded. These experiments helped create a model which calculates wedge and depth of wedge for a given condition of steam and subcooled water. A very good comparison between the experiment results and the model was obtained. These experiments also showed that the presence of saturated layer can mitigate

  3. Interstellar silicate analogs for grain-surface reaction experiments: Gas-phase condensation and characterization of the silicate dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Sabri, T.; Jäger, C.; Gavilan, L.; Lemaire, J. L.; Vidali, G.; Henning, T.

    2014-01-10

    Amorphous, astrophysically relevant silicates were prepared by laser ablation of siliceous targets and subsequent quenching of the evaporated atoms and clusters in a helium/oxygen gas atmosphere. The described gas-phase condensation method can be used to synthesize homogeneous and astrophysically relevant silicates with different compositions ranging from nonstoichiometric magnesium iron silicates to pyroxene- and olivine-type stoichiometry. Analytical tools have been used to characterize the morphology, composition, and spectral properties of the condensates. The nanometer-sized silicate condensates represent a new family of cosmic dust analogs that can generally be used for laboratory studies of cosmic processes related to condensation, processing, and destruction of cosmic dust in different astrophysical environments. The well-characterized silicates comprising amorphous Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, as well as the corresponding crystalline silicates forsterite and fayalite, produced by thermal annealing of the amorphous condensates, have been used as real grain surfaces for H{sub 2} formation experiments. A specifically developed ultra-high vacuum apparatus has been used for the investigation of molecule formation experiments. The results of these molecular formation experiments on differently structured Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} described in this paper will be the topic of the next paper of this series.

  4. Laboratory Experiments of Rip Current Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, R.; Coco, G.; Lomonaco, P.; Dalrymple, R. A.; Alvarez, A.; Gonzalez, M.; Medina, R.

    2014-12-01

    The hypothesis of rip current generation from purely hydrodynamic processes is here investigated through laboratory experiments. The experiments have been performed at the Cantabria Coastal and Ocean Basin (CCOB) with a segmented wavemaker consisting of 64 waveboards. The basin measures 25m in the cross-shore and 32m in the alongshore direction and the water depth at the wavemaker is 1m. A concrete plane sloping (1:5) beach has been built in the opposite side of the wave machine, its toe is 15m from the waveboards. Reflective lateral walls covered the full length of the basin. The set of instruments consists of 33 wave gauges deployed along two longshore and two cross-shore transects, 7 acoustic Doppler velocimeters and 15 run-up wires. Furthermore a set of two cameras has been synchronized with the data acquisition system. Two types of experiments have been performed to specifically study the generation of rip currents under wave group forcing. First, similarly to the experiments of Fowler and Dalrymple (Proc. 22nd Int. Conf. Coast. Eng.,1990), two intersecting wave trains with opposite directions have been imposed. They give rise to the formation of a non-migrating rip current system with a wavelength that depends on wave frequency and direction. Second, single wave trains with alongshore periodic amplitude attenuation have been imposed. Although the attenuation has been set such that the incident wave field has the same envelope as in the first type of experiments, the rip current system differs due to diffraction and interference processes. The results for different wave conditions (maximum incident wave height from 0.2m to 0.4m, wave period from 1.4s to 2s) will be presented and the intensity of the rip currents will be compared to the alongshore variation in wave set-up. This research is part of the ANIMO project funded by the Spanish Government under contract BIA2012-36822.

  5. Advances in modelling of condensation phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.S.; Zaltsgendler, E.; Hanna, B.

    1997-07-01

    The physical parameters in the modelling of condensation phenomena in the CANDU reactor system codes are discussed. The experimental programs used for thermal-hydraulic code validation in the Canadian nuclear industry are briefly described. The modelling of vapour generation and in particular condensation plays a key role in modelling of postulated reactor transients. The condensation models adopted in the current state-of-the-art two-fluid CANDU reactor thermal-hydraulic system codes (CATHENA and TUF) are described. As examples of the modelling challenges faced, the simulation of a cold water injection experiment by CATHENA and the simulation of a condensation induced water hammer experiment by TUF are described.

  6. Apollo experience report: Power generation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, D., III; Plauche, F. M.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive review of the design philosophy and experience of the Apollo electrical power generation system is presented. The review of the system covers a period of 8 years, from conception through the Apollo 12 lunar-landing mission. The program progressed from the definition phase to hardware design, system development and qualification, and, ultimately, to the flight phase. Several problems were encountered; however, a technology evolved that enabled resolution of the problems and resulted in a fully manrated power generation system. These problems are defined and examined, and the corrective action taken is discussed. Several recommendations are made to preclude similar occurrences and to provide a more reliable fuel-cell power system.

  7. Development of Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment on the International Space Station- Normal and Low Gravity Flow Boiling Experiment Development and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Hall, Nancy R.; Hasan, Mohammad M.; Wagner, James D.; May, Rochelle L.; Mackey, Jeffrey R.; Kolacz, John S.; Butcher, Robert L.; Frankenfield, Bruce J.; Mudawar, Issam; Konichi, Chris; Hyounsoon, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Flow boiling and condensation have been identified as two key mechanisms for heat transport that are vital for achieving weight and volume reduction as well as performance enhancement in future space systems. Since inertia driven flows are demanding on power usage, lower flows are desirable. However, in microgravity, lower flows are dominated by forces other than inertia (like the capillary force). It is of paramount interest to investigate limits of low flows beyond which the flow is inertial enough to be gravity independent. One of the objectives of the Flow Boiling and Condensation Flight Experiment sets to investigate these limits for flow boiling and condensation. A two-phase flow loop consisting of a Flow Boiling Module and two Condensation Modules has been developed to experimentally study flow boiling condensation heat transfer in the reduced gravity environment provided by the reduced gravity platform. This effort supports the development of a flow boiling and condensation facility for the International Space Station (ISS). The closed loop test facility is designed to deliver the test fluid, FC-72 to the inlet of any one of the test modules at specified thermodynamic and flow conditions. The zero-g-aircraft tests will provide subcooled and saturated flow boiling critical heat flux and flow condensation heat transfer data over wide range of flow velocities. Additionally, these tests will verify the performance of all gravity sensitive components, such as evaporator, condenser and accumulator associated with the two-phase flow loop. We will present in this paper the breadboard development and testing results which consist of detailed performance evaluation of the heater and condenser combination in reduced and normal gravity. We will also present the design of the reduced gravity aircraft rack and the results of the ground flow boiling heat transfer testing performed with the Flow Boiling Module that is designed to investigate flow boiling heat transfer and

  8. Key points of condenser refurbishment illustrated by our experience on Russian technology nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Somville, C.

    1998-07-01

    In 1990, the refurbishment of the condensers of the VVER 440 MW LOVIISA 2 Finnish power station was the first reference of GEC ALSTHOM Delas on a Russian type nuclear power station, covering the optimization studies, technical and-economical choices, manufacture and site operations. The current contract for the condenser renovation of the 4 units of the VVER 440 MW PAKS Hungarian power station goes even further through an investment of this company in a local manufacturing installation and a significant participation of the local industry. Their expertise has helped reducing site operation times from 28 days for one condenser of one Loviisa unit, to 26 days for two condensers of one Paks unit. This paper describes the various aspects and the improvements brought for both operations and highlights the technical and economical key advantages of a condenser renovation (quick return on investment, better performances, reliability and life extension of the power station).

  9. Experiences in production and corrosion monitoring for a gas condensate field containing CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Oberndorfer, M.; Dornstauder, K.; Brunner, W.

    1998-12-31

    The field Hoflein is located 10 km NW of Vienna. Gas condensate is produced out of 9 wells at the dew point of 28.1 MPa and 78 C. The reservoir fluid is lean but contains more than 16% CO{sub 2}. Lab test preceded the selection of the inhibitor for the carbon steel. Critical parts of the installations had 13%Cr steel. This paper describes the inhibitor testing procedures and the monitoring of the corrosion process by OMV Austria. The produced reservoir fluids and the critical components in the water (Cl, Fe, pH, inhibitor concentration) have been recorded over the years in various locations. Fluid analysis, corrosion coupon data visual inspection and caliper measurements of field installation document a high degree of protection. Recently the reservoir underwent a reevaluation in which the reserves could be doubled. This gave the incentive to produce at higher rates (from 8 to probably 16 m/s). Inhibitors of the 3rd generation that work even under high velocities were applied. For this case a test loop in the laboratory is described which allows for emulating the high velocity flow conditions that are planned in the field and where the inhibitors can be tested and selected.

  10. Role of minerals in the thermal alteration of organic matter. I - Generation of gases and condensates under dry condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannenbaum, E.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1985-01-01

    Pyrolysis experiments conducted at 200 and 300 C on kerogen and bitumen from the Monterey formation and on the Green River Formation kerogen with montmorillonite, illite, and calcite added are described. The pyrolysis products are identified and gas and condensate analyses are performed. A catalytic effect is detected in the pyrolysis of kerogen with montmorillonite; however, illite and calcite display no catalytic activity. The increased production of C1-C6 hydrocarbons and the dominance of branched hydrocarbons in the C4-C6 range reveals a catalytic influence. It is observed that the catalysis of montmorillonite is greater during bitumen pyrolysis than for kerogen, and catalysis with minerals affects the production of CO2. It is concluded that a mineral matrix is important in determining the type and amount of gases and condensates forming from organic matter under thermal stress.

  11. Infrasound Generation from the Source Physics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, L. A.; Schramm, K. A.; Jones, K. R.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the acoustic and infrasound source generation mechanisms from underground explosions is of great importance for usage of this unique data type in non-proliferation activities. One of the purposes of the Source Physics Experiments (SPE), a series of underground explosive shots at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), is to gain an improved understanding of the generation and propagation of physical signals, such as seismic and infrasound, from the near to far field. Two of the SPE shots (SPE-1 and SPE-4') were designed to be small "Green's Function" sources with minimal spall or permanent surface deformation. We analyze infrasound data collected from these two shots at distances from ~300 m to ~1 km and frequencies up to 20 Hz. Using weather models based upon actual observations at the times of these sources, including 3-D variations in topography, temperatures, pressures, and winds, we synthesized full waveforms using Sandia's moving media acoustic propagation simulation suite. Several source mechanisms were simulated and compared and contrasted with observed waveforms using full waveform source inversion. We will discuss results of these source inversions including the relative roll of spall from these small explosions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. DETERMINATION OF TRACE AMOUNTS OF SELENIUM IN CORN, LETTUCE, POTATOES, SOYBEANS, AND WHEAT BY HYDRIDE GENERATION/CONDENSATION AND FLAME ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the nutritional and toxicological significance of low selenium concentrations in agricultural crops, a procedure utilizing wet digestion followed by hydride generation/condensation-flame atomic absorption was developed for the routine analysis of selenium in different ...

  13. Formation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Carbonaceous Solids in Gas-Phase Condensation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, C.; Huisken, F.; Mutschke, H.; Jansa, I. Llamas; Henning, Th.

    2009-05-01

    Carbonaceous grains represent a major component of cosmic dust. In order to understand their formation pathways, they have been prepared in the laboratory by gas-phase condensation reactions such as laser pyrolysis and laser ablation. Our studies demonstrate that the temperature in the condensation zone determines the formation pathway of carbonaceous particles. At temperatures lower than 1700 K, the condensation by-products are mainly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are also the precursors or building blocks for the condensing soot grains. The low-temperature condensates contain PAH mixtures that are mainly composed of volatile three to five ring systems. At condensation temperatures higher than 3500 K, fullerene-like carbon grains and fullerene compounds are formed. Fullerene fragments or complete fullerenes equip the nucleating particles. Fullerenes can be identified as soluble components. Consequently, condensation products in cool and hot astrophysical environments such as cool and hot asymptotic giant branch stars or Wolf-Rayet stars should be different and should have distinct spectral properties.

  14. The next-generation BLASTPol experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dober, Bradley J.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Ashton, Peter; Angilè, Francesco E.; Beall, James A.; Becker, Dan; Bradford, Kristi J.; Che, George; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Devlin, Mark J.; Fissel, Laura M.; Fukui, Yasuo; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gao, Jiansong; Groppi, Christopher E.; Hillbrand, Seth; Hilton, Gene C.; Hubmayr, Johannes; Irwin, Kent D.; Klein, Jeffrey; Van Lanen, Jeff; Li, Dale; Li, Zhi-Yun; Lourie, Nathan P.; Mani, Hamdi; Martin, Peter G.; Mauskopf, Philip; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Novak, Giles; Pappas, David P.; Pascale, Enzo; Santos, Fabio P.; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Stanchfield, Sara; Ullom, Joel N.; Underhill, Matthew; Vissers, Michael R.; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2014-07-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) is a suborbital mapping experiment designed to study the role magnetic fields play in star formation. BLASTPol has had two science flights from McMurdo Station, Antarctica in 2010 and 2012. These flights have produced thousands of polarization vectors at 250, 350 and 500 microns in several molecular cloud targets. We present the design, specifications, and progress towards the next-generation BLASTPol experiment (BLAST-TNG). BLAST-TNG will fly a 40% larger diameter primary mirror, with almost 8 times the number of polarization-sensitive detectors resulting in a factor of 16 increase in mapping speed. With a spatial resolution of 2200 and four times the field of view (340 arcmin2) of BLASTPol, BLAST-TNG will bridge the angular scales between Planck's all-sky maps with 50 resolution and ALMA's ultra-high resolution narrow (~ 2000) fields. The new receiver has a larger cryogenics volume, allowing for a 28 day hold time. BLAST-TNG employs three arrays of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) with 30% fractional bandwidth at 250, 350 and 500 microns. In this paper, we will present the new BLAST-TNG instrument and science objectives.

  15. A Next-Generation Apparatus for Lithium Optical Lattice Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshet, Aviv

    Quantum simulation is emerging as an ambitious and active subfield of atomic physics. This thesis describes progress towards the goal of simulating condensed matter systems, in particular the physics of the Fermi-Hubbard model, using ultracold Lithium atoms in an optical lattice. A major goal of the quantum simulation program is to observe phase transitions of the Hubbard model, into Neal antiferromagnetic phases and d-wave superfluid phases. Phase transitions are generally accompanied by a change in an underlying correlation in a physical system. Such correlations may be most amenable to probing by looking at fluctuations in the system. Experimental techniques for probing density and magnetization fluctuations in a variety of atomic Fermi systems are developed. The suppression of density fluctuations (or atom "shot noise") in an ideal degenerate Fermi gas is observed by absorption imaging of time-of-flight expanded clouds. In-trap measurements of density and magnetization fluctuations are not easy to probe with absorption imaging, due to their extremely high attenuation. A method to probe these fluctuations based on speckle patterns, caused by fluctuations in the index of refraction for a detuned illumination beam, is developed and applied first to weakly interacting and then to strongly interacting in-trap gases. Fluctuation probes such as these will be a crucial tool in future quantum simulation of condensed matter systems. The quantum simulation experiments that we want to perform require a complex sequence of precisely timed computer controlled events. A distributed GUI-based control system designed with such experiments in mind, The Cicero Word Generator, is described. The system makes use of a client-server separation between a user interface for sequence design and a set of output hardware servers. Output hardware servers are designed to use standard National Instruments output cards, but the client-server nature allows this to be extended to other output

  16. Calibration of an explosives vapor generator based on vapor diffusion from a condensed phase

    SciTech Connect

    Parmeter, J.E.; Rhykerd, L. Jr.; Conrad, F.J.; Tiano, G.S.; Preston, D.; Eiceman, G.A.; Arnold, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    Development of a vapor generator for consistently producing accurate amounts of vapor from low vapor pressure explosive materials is a pressing need within the explosives detection community. Of particular importance for reproducibility and widespread acceptance of results is the correlation of such a vapor generator to a National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) mass standard. This paper describes an explosives vapor generator recently developed at Varian in which a solid explosive sample in a precision bore glass tube is put in an oven at constant temperature, and vapor diff-using from the top of the tube is entrained in a carrier gas flow. The rate of vapor output is thus dependent on both the equilibrium vapor pressure of the solid at oven temperature and the rate of diffusion up the length of the tube. Correlation to a NIST mass standard is achieved by periodic weighing of the sample tube on a microbalance. We report results obtained with the explosives TNT and RDX. Results for TNT show that the mass output rate is constant over hundreds of hours of continuous use, with outputs of {approximately} 10--2000 pg/sec for oven temperatures in the range of 60--120{degrees}C. Both the mass loss experiments and calibration with an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) give a TNT mass output value of 85 pg/sec at 79{degrees}C, and this result is supported by transport theory calculations. Mass loss curves for RDX are also linear with time, and show the expected exponential increase of mass output with oven temperature.

  17. Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment (FBCE) for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudawar, Issam; Hasan, Mohammad M.; Kharangate, Chirag; O'Neill, Lucas; Konishi, Chris; Nahra, Henry; Hall, Nancy; Balasubramaniam, R.; Mackey, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The proposed research aims to develop an integrated two-phase flow boiling/condensation facility for the International Space Station (ISS) to serve as primary platform for obtaining two-phase flow and heat transfer data in microgravity.

  18. Spectral probing of impact-generated vapor in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Peter H.; Eberhardy, Clara A.

    2015-03-01

    High-speed spectra of hypervelocity impacts at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) captured the rapidly evolving conditions of impact-generated vapor as a function of impact angle, viewpoint, and time (within the first 50 μs). Impact speeds possible at the AVGR (<7 km/s) are insufficient to induce significant vaporization in silicates, other than the high-temperature (but low-mass) jetting component created at first contact. Consequently, this study used powdered dolomite as a proxy for surveying the evolution and distribution of chemical constituents within much longer lasting vapor. Seven separate telescopes focused on different portions of the impact vapor plume and were connected through quartz fibers to two 0.35 cm monochromaters. Quarter-space experiments reduced the thermal background and opaque phases due to condensing particles and heated projectile fragments while different exposure times isolated components passing through different the fields of view, both above and below the surface within the growing transient cavity. At early times (<5 μs), atomic emission lines dominate the spectra. At later times, molecular emission lines dominate the composition of the vapor plume along a given direction. Layered targets and target mixtures isolated the source and reveal that much of the vaporization comes from the uppermost surface. Collisions by projectile fragments downrange also make significant contributions for impacts below 60° (from the horizontal). Further, impacts into mixtures of silicates with powdered dolomite reveal that frictional heating must play a role in vapor production. Such results have implications for processes controlling vaporization on planetary surfaces including volatile release, atmospheric evolution (formation and erosion), vapor generated by the Deep Impact collision, and the possible consequences of the Chicxulub impact.

  19. Cloud condensation nucleus activity comparison of dry- and wet-generated mineral dust aerosol: the significance of soluble material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garimella, S.; Huang, Y.-w.; Seewald, J. S.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2013-11-01

    This study examines the interaction of clay mineral particles and water vapor to determine the conditions required for cloud droplet formation. Droplet formation conditions are investigated for three clay minerals: illite, sodium-rich montmorillonite, and Arizona Test Dust. Using wet and dry particle generation coupled to a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and cloud condensation nuclei counter, the critical activation of the clay mineral particles as cloud condensation nuclei is characterized. Electron microscopy (EM) is used to determine non-sphericity in particle shape. EM is also used to determine particle surface area and account for transmission of multiply charged particles by the DMA. Single particle mass spectrometry and ion chromatography are used to investigate soluble material in wet-generated samples and demonstrate that wet and dry generation yield compositionally different particles. Activation results are analyzed in the context of both κ-Köhler theory and Frenkel, Halsey, and Hill (FHH) adsorption activation theory. This study has two main results: (1) κ-Köhler is a suitable framework, less complex than FHH theory, to describe clay mineral nucleation activity despite apparent differences in κ with respect to size. For dry-generated particles the size dependence is likely an artifact of the shape of the size distribution: there is a sharp drop-off in particle concentration at ~300 nm, and a large fraction of particles classified with a mobility diameter less than ~300 nm are actually multiply charged, resulting in a much lower critical supersaturation for droplet activation than expected. For wet-generated particles, deviation from κ-Köhler theory is likely a result of the dissolution and redistribution of soluble material. (2) Wet-generation is found to be unsuitable for simulating the lofting of fresh dry dust because it changes the size-dependent critical supersaturations by fractionating and re-partitioning soluble material.

  20. Generating ring dark solitons in an evolving Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Shijie; Wu Quansheng; Zhang Shengnan; Feng Shiping; Guo Wenan; Wen Yuchuan; Yu Yue

    2007-12-15

    The successive dynamical evolution of a Bose-Einstein condensate confined in a cylindrical well is numerically studied in the framework of the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Interference in the nonlinear matter wave leads to concentric density rings. The phase distribution exhibits a discontinuous sequence of plateaulike belts. Abrupt jumps in the phase between adjacent belts imply large radial superfluid velocity at the borderline. This, however, does not mean large particle current because the corresponding superfluid density is nearly zero. The density zeros along with the large gradient are identified as ring dark solitons, which have a brief lifetime before evolving into other soliton states.

  1. Evaluation of condensation-induced water hammer in preheat steam generators

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, P.; Ginsberg, T.; Wu, B.J.C.; Jones, O.C. Jr.

    1980-09-01

    A review of Westinghouse 1/8-scale water hammer tests and data analysis was carried out. BNL has concluded that water hammers occurred in the feedwater line during many of the 1/8-scale tests. These events were probably caused by steam bubble entrapment and collapse in the partially-filled feedwater line. Recorded vessel pressure pulse activity under two-phase operating conditions was rare and, in those cases where pulses were recorded, the pressure pulse amplitudes were small. Either void collapse water hammers are unlikely events under these two-phase conditions, or events that did occur were attenuated in magnitude by the two-phase medium and internal structures before the pulse reached the pressure transducer. Pressure pulse attenuation in two-phase air-water media was studied experimentally at BNL. It was found that no significant attenuation could be detected in two-phase flows over distances of approximately 1 to 2 ft. The effects of internals, however, were not considered. The Westinghouse scaling laws have also been critically reviewed. An independent BNL analysis was carried out to verify the Westinghouse scaling laws. It has been found that the present state-of-the-art on the condensation heat transfer and the mechanism of vapor cavity formation precludes us from deriving any credible scaling criteria. However, it was found that under certain operating conditions the condensation-induced void collapse could be an oscillatory process. This may partially explain the apparent randomness of the water hammer phenomenon seen in most experimental studies.

  2. Elemental composition of aerosols in fourteen experiments of the Cloud Condensation Nuclei Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, W. H.; Hucek, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Aeosols were collected with two Ci impactors and analyzed with proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) for chemical composition and to detect if contamination was present. One of the impactors sampled the generated aerosols; the other impactor sampled droplets from a diffusion cloud chamber. The purpose of the experiments was to test the feasibility of a study of the transfer of chemical elements from the fine particle sizes to the coarse particle sizes, after CCN are activated and cloud droplets are formed. The data indicated that sulfur-containing aerosols did exhibit the expected transfer.

  3. Vapor Compression and Thermoelectric Heat Pump Heat Exchangers for a Condensate Distillation System: Design and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Lisa R.; Ungar, Eugene K.

    2013-01-01

    Maximizing the reuse of wastewater while minimizing the use of consumables is critical in long duration space exploration. One of the more promising methods of reclaiming urine is the distillation/condensation process used in the cascade distillation system (CDS). This system accepts a mixture of urine and toxic stabilizing agents, heats it to vaporize the water and condenses and cools the resulting water vapor. The CDS wastewater flow requires heating and its condensate flow requires cooling. Performing the heating and cooling processes separately requires two separate units, each of which would require large amounts of electrical power. By heating the wastewater and cooling the condensate in a single heat pump unit, mass, volume, and power efficiencies can be obtained. The present work describes and compares two competing heat pump methodologies that meet the needs of the CDS: 1) a series of mini compressor vapor compression cycles and 2) a thermoelectric heat exchanger. In the paper, the system level requirements are outlined, the designs of the two heat pumps are described in detail, and the results of heat pump performance tests are provided. A summary is provided of the heat pump mass, volume and power trades and a selection recommendation is made.

  4. Chemical Composition and Cloud Condensation Nuclei Properties of Marine Aerosols during the 2005 Marine Stratus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Hudson, J.; Daum, P.; Springston, S.; Wang, J.; Senum, G.; Alexander, L.; Jayne, J.; Hubbe, J.

    2006-12-01

    Marine aerosol chemical composition and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectrum were determined on board the DOE G1 aircraft during the Marine Stratus Experiment conducted over the coastal waters between Point Reyes National Seashore and Monterey Bay, California, in July 2005. Aerosol components, including sea-salt- (sodium, chloride, magnesium, methansulfonate) and terrestrial/pollution-derived (ammonium, sulfate, nitrate, organics, potassium, and calcium) were measured using the particle-into-liquid sampler-ion chromatography technique and an Aerodyne AMS at a time resolution of 4 min and 30 s, respectively, both covering the size range of ~0.08 to 1.5 micrometers. The CCN spectrum was determined at a 1-s time resolution covering a supersaturation range between 0.02% and 1%. The accumulation mode particle size- number distribution was measured using a passive cavity aerosol spectrometer probe; the cloud droplet size- number distribution was determined using a Cloud Aerosol Probe. During the campaign sulfate/organic aerosols were always present, sea-salt aerosols were observed on half of the flights, and no dust or biomass burning contribution was noted as calcium and potassium were always below their limits-of-detection. Based on CCN spectra and cloud droplet number concentrations, the typical supersaturation of the marine stratus clouds was ~0.06%, corresponding to a CCN critical diameter between 0.1 and 0.2 micrometer. This large critical diameter makes the aerosol chemical composition measured appropriate for investigating the CCN properties and marine stratus clouds. We note that while sea-salt aerosols and sulfate aerosols were most likely externally mixed, the ensemble exhibits similar CCN properties irrespective of the relative mass concentrations of these two types of aerosols, owing partly to the similar activation properties of NaCl and (NH4)2SO4 aerosols, and that sea-salt particles were larger but fewer, accounting for a small fraction of cloud

  5. Cloud condensation nucleus activity comparison of dry- and wet-generated mineral dust aerosol: the significance of soluble material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garimella, S.; Huang, Y.-W.; Seewald, J. S.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2014-06-01

    This study examines the interaction of clay mineral particles and water vapor for determining the conditions required for cloud droplet formation. Droplet formation conditions are investigated for two common clay minerals, illite and sodium-rich montmorillonite, and an industrially derived sample, Arizona Test Dust. Using wet and dry particle generation coupled to a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and cloud condensation nuclei counter, the critical activation of the clay mineral particles as cloud condensation nuclei is characterized. Electron microscopy (EM) is used in order to determine non-sphericity in particle shape. It is also used in order to determine particle surface area and account for transmission of multiply charged particles by the DMA. Single particle mass spectrometry and ion chromatography are used to investigate soluble material in wet-generated samples and demonstrate that wet and dry generation yield compositionally different particles. Activation results are analyzed in the context of both κ-Köhler theory (κ-KT) and Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH) adsorption activation theory. This study has two main results: (1) κ-KT is the suitable framework to describe clay mineral nucleation activity. Apparent differences in κ with respect to size arise from an artifact introduced by improper size-selection methodology. For dust particles with mobility sizes larger than ~300 nm, i.e., ones that are within an atmospherically relevant size range, both κ-KT and FHH theory yield similar critical supersaturations. However, the former requires a single hygroscopicity parameter instead of the two adjustable parameters required by the latter. For dry-generated particles, the size dependence of κ is likely an artifact of the shape of the size distribution: there is a sharp drop-off in particle concentration at ~300 nm, and a large fraction of particles classified with a mobility diameter less than ~300 nm are actually multiply charged, resulting in a much

  6. Second generation experiments in fault tolerant software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the Multi-Version Software (MVS) experiment is to obtain empirical measurements of the performance of multi-version systems. Twenty version of a program were prepared under reasonably realistic development conditions from the same specifications. The overall structure of the testing environment for the MVS experiment and its status are described. A preliminary version of the control system is described that was implemented for the MVS experiment to allow the experimenter to have control over the details of the testing. The results of an empirical study of error detection using self checks are also presented. The analysis of the checks revealed that there are great differences in the ability of individual programmers to design effective checks.

  7. Circulation control lift generation experiment: Hardware development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panontin, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    A circulation control airfoil and its accompanying hardware were developed to allow the investigation of lift generation that is independent of airfoil angle of attack and relative flow velocity. The test equipment, designed for use in a water tunnel, includes the blown airfoil, the support systems for both flow visualization and airfoil load measurement, and the fluid control system, which utilizes hydraulic technology. The primary design tasks, the selected solutions, and the unforseen problems involved in the development of these individual components of hardware are described.

  8. Condensate Mixtures and Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermans, E.

    1998-09-14

    The experimental study of condensate mixtures is a particularly exciting application of the recently developed atomic-trap Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) technology: such multiple condensates represent the first laboratory systems of distinguishable boson superfluid mixtures. In addition, as the authors point out in this paper, the possibility of inter-condensate tunneling greatly enhances the richness of the condensate mixture physics. Not only does tunneling give rise to the oscillating particle currents between condensates of different chemical potentials, such as those studied extensively in the condensed matter Josephson junction experiments, it also affects the near-equilibrium dynamics and stability of the condensate mixtures. In particular, the stabilizing influence of tunneling with respect to spatial separation (phase separation) could be of considerable practical importance to the atomic trap systems. Furthermore, the creation of mixtures of atomic and molecular condensates could introduce a novel type of tunneling process, involving the conversion of a pair of atomic condensate bosons into a single molecular condensate boson. The static description of condensate mixtures with such type of pair tunneling suggests the possibility of observing dilute condensates with the liquid-like property of a self-determined density.

  9. Increased Availability From Improved Condenser Design

    SciTech Connect

    Harpster, Joseph W.

    2002-07-01

    Performance parameters and flow characteristics on the shell side of surface condensers are becoming better understood. Contributing to this knowledge base is the recent ability to measure the physical properties as well as the quantity of gases being removed from the condenser by air removal equipment. Reviewed here are the commonality of these data from many operating condensers obtained over the past six years and other known condenser measurements, theory and laboratory experiments. These are combined to formulate global theoretical description of condenser dynamics describing the mechanism responsible for aeration and de-aeration, excess back pressure buildup due to air ingress or generation of other noncondensable gases, and the dissolubility of corrosive gases in condensate. The theoretical description supports a dynamic model useful for deciding condenser configuration design and design improvements. Features of design found in many operating condensers that promote aeration and resulting corrosion are presented. The benefits of the model and engineering design modifications to plant life cycle management, improved condenser performance, outage reduction and reliability improvements, lost load recovery and fuel savings are discussed. (author)

  10. Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) electrodynamic tether experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossi, Mario D.

    1995-01-01

    The Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) flight of June 26, 1993 has been the most sophisticated and most successful mission that has been carried out thus far with an electrodynamic tether. Three papers from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Washington, DC concerned with the PMG, submitted at the Fourth International Space Conference on Tethers in Space, in Washington, DC, in April 1995, are contained in this document. The three papers are (1) Electromagnetic interactions between the PMG tether and the magneto-ionic medium of the Ionosphere; (2) Tether-current-voltage characteristics, as determined by the Hollow Cathode Operation Modes; and (3) Hawaii-Hilo ground observations on the occasion for the PMG flight of June 23, 1993.

  11. Demonstration of beneficial uses of warm water from condensers of electric generating plants. Final report, May 1975-April 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, L.L.; Ashley, G.C.; Hietala, J.S.; Stansfield, R.V.; Tonkinson, T.R.C.

    1980-05-01

    The report gives results of a project to demonstrate that warmed cooling water from condensers of electric generating plants can effectively and economically heat greenhouses. The 0.2-hectare demonstration greenhouse, at Northern States Power Co.'s Sherburne County (Sherco) Generating Plant, used 29.4 C water to heat both air and soil: finned-tube commercial heat exchangers were used to heat the air; and buried plastic pipes, the soil. Warm water from the Sherco 1 cooling tower was piped over 0.8 km to the greenhouse where it was cooled from 2.7 to 5.6 C before returning to the cooling tower basin. Roses and tomatoes were the principal crops in the 3-year test, although other flowers and vegetables, and conifer seedlings were also grown. The warm water heating system supplied all the greenhouse heating requirements, even at ambient temperatures as low as -40 C. Roses, snapdragons, geraniums, tomatoes, lettuce, and evergreen seedlings were grown successfully.

  12. Generating and manipulating quantized vortices on-demand in a Bose-Einstein condensate: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertjerenken, B.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Carretero-González, R.; Anderson, B. P.

    2016-02-01

    We numerically investigate an experimentally viable method for generating and manipulating on-demand several vortices in a highly oblate atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in order to initialize complex vortex distributions for studies of vortex dynamics. The method utilizes moving laser beams to generate, capture, and transport vortices inside and outside the BEC. We examine in detail this methodology and show a wide parameter range of applicability for the prototypical two-vortex case, as well as case examples of producing and manipulating several vortices for which there is no net circulation, corresponding to equal numbers of positive and negative circulation vortices, and cases for which there is one net quantum of circulation. We find that the presence of dissipation can help stabilize the pinning of the vortices on their respective laser beam pinning sites. Finally, we illustrate how to utilize laser beams as repositories that hold large numbers of vortices and how to deposit individual vortices in a sequential fashion in the repositories in order to construct superfluid flows about the repository beams with several quanta of circulation.

  13. Generation of atom-photon entangled states in atomic Bose-Einstein condensate via electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang Leman; Zhou Lan

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, we present a method to generate continuous-variable-type entangled states between photons and atoms in atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). The proposed method involves an atomic BEC with three internal states, a weak quantized probe laser, and a strong classical coupling laser, which form a three-level {lambda}-shaped BEC system. We consider a situation where the BEC is in electromagnetically induced transparency with the coupling laser being much stronger than the probe laser. In this case, the upper and intermediate levels are unpopulated, so that their adiabatic elimination enables an effective two-mode model involving only the atomic field at the lowest internal level and the quantized probe laser field. Atom-photon quantum entanglement is created through laser-atom and interatomic interactions, and two-photon detuning. We show how to generate atom-photon entangled coherent states and entangled states between photon (atom) coherent states and atom-(photon-) macroscopic quantum superposition (MQS) states, and between photon-MQS and atom-MQS states.

  14. Generating and manipulating quantized vortices on-demand in a Bose-Einstein condensate: A numerical study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gertjerenken, B.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Carretero-González, R.; Anderson, B. P.

    2016-02-01

    Here, we numerically investigate an experimentally viable method for generating and manipulating on-demand several vortices in a highly oblate atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in order to initialize complex vortex distributions for studies of vortex dynamics. The method utilizes moving laser beams to generate, capture, and transport vortices inside and outside the BEC. This methodology is examined in detail and shows a wide parameter range of applicability for the prototypical two-vortex case, as well as case examples of producing and manipulating several vortices for which there is no net circulation, corresponding to equal numbers of positive and negative circulation vortices, andmore » cases for which there is one net quantum of circulation. We also find that the presence of dissipation can help stabilize the pinning of the vortices on their respective laser beam pinning sites. Finally, we illustrate how to utilize laser beams as repositories that hold large numbers of vortices and how to deposit individual vortices in a sequential fashion in the repositories in order to construct superfluid flows about the repository beams with several quanta of circulation.« less

  15. Vortices and turbulence in trapped atomic condensates

    PubMed Central

    White, Angela C.; Anderson, Brian P.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2014-01-01

    After more than a decade of experiments generating and studying the physics of quantized vortices in atomic gas Bose–Einstein condensates, research is beginning to focus on the roles of vortices in quantum turbulence, as well as other measures of quantum turbulence in atomic condensates. Such research directions have the potential to uncover new insights into quantum turbulence, vortices, and superfluidity and also explore the similarities and differences between quantum and classical turbulence in entirely new settings. Here we present a critical assessment of theoretical and experimental studies in this emerging field of quantum turbulence in atomic condensates. PMID:24704880

  16. Next Generation Muon g-2 Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzog, David W.

    2015-12-02

    I report on the progress of two new muon anomalous magnetic moment experiments, which are in advanced design and construction phases. The goal of Fermilab E989 is to reduce the experimental uncertainty of $a_\\mu$ from Brookhaven E821 by a factor of 4; that is, $\\delta a_\\mu \\sim 16 \\times 10^{-11}$, a relative uncertainty of 140~ppb. The method follows the same magic-momentum storage ring concept used at BNL, and pioneered previously at CERN, but muon beam preparation, storage ring internal hardware, field measuring equipment, and detector and electronics systems are all new or upgraded significantly. In contrast, J-PARC E34 will employ a novel approach based on injection of an ultra-cold, low-energy, muon beam injected into a small, but highly uniform magnet. Only a small magnetic focusing field is needed to maintain storage, which distinguishes it from CERN, BNL and Fermilab. E34 aims to roughly match the previous BNL precision in their Phase~1 installation.

  17. Next Generation Muon g - 2 Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzog, David W.

    2016-04-01

    I report on the progress of two new muon anomalous magnetic moment experiments, which are in advanced design and construction phases. The goal of Fermilab E989 is to reduce the experimental uncertainty of aμ from Brookhaven E821 by a factor of 4; that is, δaμ ˜ 16 × 10-11, a relative uncertainty of 140 ppb. The method follows the same magic-momentum storage ring concept used at BNL, and pioneered previously at CERN, but muon beam preparation, storage ring internal hardware, field measuring equipment, and detector and electronics systems are all new or upgraded significantly. In contrast, J-PARC E34 will employ a novel approach based on injection of an ultra-cold, low-energy, muon beam injected into a small, but highly uniform magnet. Only a small magnetic focusing field is needed to maintain storage, which distinguishes it from CERN, BNL and Fermilab. E34 aims to roughly match the previous BNL precision in their Phase 1 installation.

  18. One-Piece Faraday Generator: A Paradoxical Experiment from 1851

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crooks, M. J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment based on Faraday's one-piece generator, where the rotating disk is replaced by a cylindrical permanent magnet. Explains the apparent paradox that an observer in an inertial frame could measure his absolute velocity. (GA)

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Aldol Condensation Products from Unknown Aldehydes and Ketones: An Inquiry-Based Experiment in the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angelo, Nicholas G.; Henchey, Laura K.; Waxman, Adam J.; Canary, James W.; Arora, Paramjit S.; Wink, Donald

    2007-01-01

    An experiment for the undergraduate chemistry laboratory in which students perform the aldol condensation on an unknown aldehyde and an unknown ketone is described. The experiment involves the use of techniques such as TLC, column chromatography, and recrystallization, and compounds are characterized by [to the first power]H NMR, GC-MS, and FTIR.…

  20. Early utility experience with wind power generation. Volume 1. Summary report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, T.; Henry, G.; Tennis, M.; Goldenblatt, M.

    1984-01-01

    This report is one of three presenting the results of EPRI Research Project 1590-1, Evaluation of Electric Utility Experience with Wind Power Generation. The objective of this project was to develop an improved understanding of wind power generation, in particular the process a utility must undergo to initiate and carry out a wind turbine project. The primary tasks of RP1590-1 were to document and evaluate the experience of two utilities with megawatt-scale wind turbine installations from project inception to the first rotation of the wind turbine. This summary report presents in brief form the experiences of two utilities, the Pacific Gas and Electric Company and the Bonneville Power Administration, with wind turbine projects at Solano County, California and Goodnoe Hills, Washington, respectively. All documents and reports pertaining to the experiences with the wind turbine projects were reviewed and excerpts made of the highlights. Gaps in the documentation were filled by talking with appropriate people. Site visits were conducted to monitor current activity. The information obtained was evaluated for its generic relevance and benefit to other utilities. Condensed descriptions of the projects, a comparison of the projects, and highlights of the utilities' experiences are presented. Some of the insights which might benefit other utility wind programs are identified.

  1. Generation of maximally entangled states of a Bose-Einstein condensate and Heisenberg-limited phase resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Gerry, Christopher C.; Campos, R. A.

    2003-08-01

    We outline a procedure for Heisenberg-limited phase resolution between two Bose-Einstien condensates (BECs) defined as different hyperfine levels. The method involves first establishing a maximally entangled state using the ideas of nonlinear interferometry previously discussed in the optical domain [C. C. Gerry et al., Phys. Rev. A 66, 013804 (2002)]. In the case of the condensates, the nonlinear interactions are realized by the interatomic interactions within each condensate. Quarter cycle Raman pulses between hyperfine levels act as beam splitters. Parity measurements of one of the components of the BEC resolve the phase at the Heisenberg limit. We point out that parity measurements can be made by coupling the mode of interest with a third condensate where both components evolve under nonlinear interatomic interactions. After another Raman pulse, the components are populated according to parity. One need only determine which component is populated to determine the parity.

  2. Improving Vortex Generators to Enhance the Performance of Air-Cooled Condensers in a Geothermal Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar S. Sohal

    2005-09-01

    This report summarizes work at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop strategies to enhance air-side heat transfer in geothermal air-cooled condensers such that it should not significantly increase pressure drop and parasitic fan pumping power. The work was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization) of Japan, Yokohama National University, and the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India. A combined experimental and numerical investigation was performed to investigate heat transfer enhancement techniques that may be applicable to largescale air-cooled condensers such as those used in geothermal power applications. A transient heat transfer visualization and measurement technique was employed in order to obtain detailed distributions of local heat transfer coefficients on model fin surfaces. Pressure drop measurements were obtained for a variety of tube and winglet configurations using a single-channel flow apparatus that included four tube rows in a staggered array. Heat transfer and pressure drop measurements were also acquired in a separate multiple-tube row apparatus in the Single Blow Test Facility. In addition, a numerical modeling technique was developed to predict local and average heat transfer for these low-Reynolds number flows, with and without winglets. Representative experimental and numerical results were obtained that reveal quantitative details of local finsurface heat transfer in the vicinity of a circular tube with a single delta winglet pair downstream of the cylinder. Heat transfer and pressure-drop results were obtained for flow Reynolds numbers based on channel height and mean flow velocity ranging from 700 to 6500. The winglets were of triangular (delta) shape with a 1:2 or 1:3 height/length aspect ratio and a height equal to 90% of the channel height. Overall mean fin-surface heat transfer results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement (in terms of

  3. Tentative experiment for generating low-photon-energy quasi-x-ray lasers using a capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Toriyabe, Hiroyuki; Awaji, Wataru; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Ichimaru, Toshio; Usuki, Tatsumi; Sato, Koetsu; Ojima, Hidenori; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu

    2001-04-01

    The tentative experiment for producing low-photon-energy quasi-x-ray laser using a capillary is described. This flash x-ray generator was improved in order to increase the x-ray intensity and to produce high-intensity characteristic x-rays by forming the linear plasma x-ray source. The generator consists of a high-voltage power supply, a polarity-inversion ignitron pulse generator, a turbo-molecular pump, and a radiation tube with a capillary. A high-voltage condenser of 0.2 (mu) F in the pulse generator is charged up to 20 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser are discharged to the capillary in the tube after closing the ignitron. In the present work, the chamber is evacuated by the pump with a pressure of about 1 mPa, and the carbon anode and cathode electrodes are employed to produce K(alpha) characteristic x-rays. The diameter and the length of the ferrite capillary are 2.0 and 29 mm, respectively, and both the cathode voltage and the discharge current displayed damped oscillations. The peak values of the voltage and current increased when the charging voltage was increased, and their maximum values were -9.9 kV and 4.4 kA, respectively. The pulse durations of the x-rays were nearly equivalent to those of the damped oscillations in the voltage and current, and their values were less than 20 microseconds. In the spectrum measurement, we observed the carbon K(alpha) line.

  4. Non-condensable gas effects in ROSA/AP600 small-break LOCA experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Hideo; Kukita, Yutaka; Shaw, R.A.; Schultz, R.R.

    1996-06-01

    Integral experiments simulating the postulated accidents in the Westinghouse AP600 reactor have been conducted using the ROSA-V Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF). These experiments allowed the N{sub 2} gas for the pressurization of accumulator tanks to enter the primary system after the depletion of the tank water inventory. The gas migrated into the Passive Residual Heat Removal (PRHR) system heat exchanger tubes and into the Core Makeup Tanks (CMTs), and influenced the performance of these components which are unique to the AP600 reactor. Specifically, the PRHR was disabled soon after the N{sub 2} gas discharge in most of the experiments, although the core decay power was removed well by the steam discharge through the Automatic Depressurization System (ADS) after the PRHR was disabled. The N{sub 2} gas ingress into the CMTs occurred in the experiments with relatively large breaks ({ge} 2 inch in equivalent diameter), and contributed to a smooth draindown of the CMT inventory into the primary system.

  5. Reduced gravity boiling and condensing experiments simulated with the COBRA/TRAC computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Cuta, J.M.; Krotiuk, W.J.

    1988-02-01

    It is being recognized that there does not currently exist an adequate understanding of flow and heat transfer behavior in reduced- and zero-gravity. There is not a sufficient experimental fluid-thermal data base to develop design correlations for two-phase pressure losses, heat transfer coefficients, and critical heat flux limits in systems proposed for advanced power sources, propulsion, and other thermal management systems in space. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), is the lead laboratory for thermal hydraulics in the Department of Energy's Multimegawatt Space Power Program, and has the responsibility of developing microgravity thermal-hydraulic analysis capabilities for application to space nuclear power systems. In support of this program, PNL has performed a series of reduced-gravity two-phase flow experiments in the NASA KC-135 aircraft. The objective of the experiment was to supply basic thermal-hydraulic information that could be used in development of analytical design tools. 6 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Status of power generation experiments in the NASA Lewis closed cycle MHD facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovie, R. J.; Nichols, L. D.

    1971-01-01

    The design and operation of the closed cycle MHD facility is discussed and results obtained in recent experiments are presented. The main components of the facility are a compressor, recuperative heat exchanger, heater, nozzle, MHD channel with 28 pairs of thoriated tungsten electrodes, cesium condenser, and an argon cooler. The facility has been operated at temperatures up to 2100 K with a cesium-seeded argon working fluid. At low magnetic field strengths, the open circuit voltage, Hall voltage and short circuit current obtained are 90, 69, and 47 percent of the theoretical equilibrium values, respectively. Comparison of this data with a wall and boundary layer leakage theory indicates that the generator has shorting paths in the Hall direction.

  7. Geothermal steam condensate reinjection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chasteen, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Geothermal electric generating plants which use condensing turbines and generate and excess of condensed steam which must be disposed of are discussed. At the Geysers, California, the largest geothermal development in the world, this steam condensate has been reinjected into the steam reservoir since 1968. A total of 3,150,000,000 gallons of steam condensate has been reinjected since that time with no noticeable effect on the adjacent producing wells. Currently, 3,700,000 gallons/day from 412 MW of installed capacity are being injected into 5 wells. Reinjection has also proven to be a satisfactory method of disposing of geothermal condensate a Imperial Valley, California, and at the Valles Caldera, New Mexico.

  8. Quench dynamics in Bose-Einstein condensates in the presence of a bath: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rançon, A.; Hung, Chen-Lung; Chin, Cheng; Levin, K.

    2013-09-01

    In this Rapid Communication we study the transient dynamics of a Bose superfluid subsequent to an interaction quench. Essential for equilibration is a source of dissipation which we include following the approach of Caldeira and Leggett. Here we solve the equations of motion exactly by integrating out an environmental bath. We thereby derive precisely the time dependent density correlation functions with the appropriate analytic and asymptotic properties. The resulting structure factor exhibits the expected damping and thereby differs from that of strict Bogoliubov theory. These damped sound modes, which reflect the physics beyond mean-field approaches, are characterized and the structure factors are found to compare favorably with experiment.

  9. An exclusive event generator for e+e- scan experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Rong-Gang

    2014-08-01

    An exclusive event generator is designed for e+e- scan experiments, including initial state radiation effects up to the second order correction. The generator is coded within the framework of BesEvtGen. There are seventy hadronic decay modes available, with effective center-of-mass energy coverage from the two pion mass threshold up to about 6 GeV. The accuracy achieved for the initial state radiation correction reaches the level achieved by the KKMC generator. The uncertainty associated with the calculation of the correction factor to the initial state radiation is dominated by the measurements of the energy-dependent Born cross section.

  10. Sauna, sweat and science - quantifying the proportion of condensation water versus sweat using a stable water isotope ((2)H/(1)H and (18)O/(16)O) tracer experiment.

    PubMed

    Zech, Michael; Bösel, Stefanie; Tuthorn, Mario; Benesch, Marianne; Dubbert, Maren; Cuntz, Matthias; Glaser, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Most visitors of a sauna appreciate the heat pulse that is perceived when water is poured on the stones of a sauna stove. However, probably only few bathers are aware that this pleasant heat pulse is caused by latent heat being released onto our skin due to condensation of water vapour. In order to quantify the proportion of condensation water versus sweat to dripping water of test persons we conducted sauna experiments using isotopically labelled (δ(18)O and δ(2)H) thrown water as tracer. This allows differentiating between 'pure sweat' and 'condensation water'. Two ways of isotope mass balance calculations were applied and yielded similar results for both water isotopes. Accordingly, condensation contributed considerably to dripping water with mean proportions of 52 ± 12 and 54 ± 7% in a sauna experiment in winter semester 2011/12 and 30 ± 13 and 33 ± 6% in a sauna experiment in winter semester 2012/13, respectively, depending on the way of calculating the isotope mass balance. It can be concluded from the results of our dual isotope labelling sauna experiment that it is not all about sweat in the sauna. PMID:26110629

  11. Internal Energy Dependence of Molecular Condensation Coefficients Determined from Molecular Beam Surface Scattering Experiments

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sibener, S. J.; Lee, Y. T.

    1978-05-01

    An experiment was performed which confirms the existence of an internal mode dependence of molecular sticking probabilities for collisions of molecules with a cold surface. The scattering of a velocity selected effusive beam of CCl{sub 4} from a 90 K CC1{sub 4} ice surface has been studied at five translational velocities and for two different internal temperatures. At a surface temperature of 90 K (approx. 99% sticking probability) a four fold increase in reflected intensity was observed for the internally excited (560 K) CC1{sub 4} relative to the room temperature (298 K) CC1{sub 4} at a translational velocity of 2.5 X 10{sup 4} cm/sec. For a surface temperature of 90 K all angular distributions were found to peak 15{sup 0} superspecularly independent of incident velocity.

  12. Schooling Experiences of Central California Indian People across Generations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Tara

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory study took a post-colonialist lens to record, examine and document schooling experiences of California Indian people across several generations representing three Central Valley tribes: the Mono, the Tachi Yokuts of Santa Rosa Rancheria, and the Tule River Tribe. Past and present perceptions of Indian schooling were elicited…

  13. Multifunctional radio-frequency generator for cold atom experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chun-hua; Yan, Shu-hua

    2016-05-01

    We present a low cost radio-frequency (RF) generator suitable for experiments with cold atoms. The RF source achieves a sub-hertz frequency with tunable resolution from 0 MHz to 400 MHz and a maximum output power of 33 dBm. Based on a direct digital synthesizer (DDS) chip, we implement a ramping capability for frequency, amplitude and phase. The system can also operate as an arbitrary waveform generator. By measuring the stability in a duration of 600 s, we find the presented device performs comparably as Agilent33522A in terms of short-term stability. Due to its excellent performance, the RF generator has been already applied to cold atom trapping experiments.

  14. Experiments on H2-O2 MHD power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. M.

    1980-06-01

    MHD power generation experiments utilizing a cesium-seeded H2-O2 working fluid have been carried out using a diverging area Hall duct having an entrance Mach number of 2. The experiments are conducted in a high-field strength cryomagnet facility at field strengths up to 5 tesla. The effects of power takeoff location, axial duct location within the magnetic field, generator loading, B-field strength, and electrode breakdown voltage were investigated. For the operating conditions of these experiments it is found that the power output increases with the square of the B-field and can be limited by choking of the channel or interelectrode voltage breakdown which occurs at Hall fields greater than 50 volts/insulator.

  15. Modeling HEDLA magnetic field generation experiments on laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatenejad, M.; Bell, A. R.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Crowston, R.; Drake, R. P.; Flocke, N.; Gregori, G.; Koenig, M.; Krauland, C.; Lamb, D.; Lee, D.; Marques, J. R.; Meinecke, J.; Miniati, F.; Murphy, C. D.; Park, H.-S.; Pelka, A.; Ravasio, A.; Remington, B.; Reville, B.; Scopatz, A.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.; Woolsey, N.; Young, R.; Yurchak, R.

    2013-03-01

    The Flash Center is engaged in a collaboration to simulate laser driven experiments aimed at understanding the generation and amplification of cosmological magnetic fields using the FLASH code. In these experiments a laser illuminates a solid plastic or graphite target launching an asymmetric blast wave into a chamber which contains either Helium or Argon at millibar pressures. Induction coils placed several centimeters away from the target detect large scale magnetic fields on the order of tens to hundreds of Gauss. The time dependence of the magnetic field is consistent with generation via the Biermann battery mechanism near the blast wave. Attempts to perform simulations of these experiments using the FLASH code have uncovered previously unreported numerical difficulties in modeling the Biermann battery mechanism near shock waves which can lead to the production of large non-physical magnetic fields. We report on these difficulties and offer a potential solution.

  16. Experiments on H2-O2MHD power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic power generation experiments utilizing a cesium-seeded H2-O2 working fluid were carried out using a diverging area Hall duct having an entrance Mach number of 2. The experiments were conducted in a high-field strength cryomagnet facility at field strengths up to 5 tesla. The effects of power takeoff location, axial duct location within the magnetic field, generator loading, B-field strength, and electrode breakdown voltage were investigated. For the operating conditions of these experiments, it is found that the power output increases with the square of the B-field and can be limited by choking of the channel or interelectrode voltage breakdown which occurs at Hall fields greater than 50 volts/insulator. Peak power densities of greater than 100 MW/cu M were achieved.

  17. Resonant infrared laser-induced desorption of methane condensed on NaCl(100): isotope mixture experiments.

    PubMed

    Redlich, Britta; Zacharias, Helmut; Meijer, Gerard; von Helden, Gert

    2006-01-28

    Resonantly enhanced infrared laser-induced desorption of methane condensed on a single-crystal NaCl(100) surface is observed after excitation with the widely tunable infrared laser output of the free-electron laser at the free-electron laser for infrared experiments facility using mass spectroscopic detection and time-of-flight analysis. Desorption of methane is observed only when the exciting light is in resonance with an internal vibrational mode of the molecule. Different intramolecular modes of the three methane isotopologues under study--CH(4), CD(4), and CD(3)H--are excited; the degenerate deformation mode nu(4) is observed for CH(4) and CD(4) at 7.69 and 10.11 microm, respectively, as well as the nu(2) and nu(4) modes of CD(3)H at 7.79, 9.75, and 9.98 microm. The desorption signals for the pure layers of these different methane isotopologues as well as for different mixtures of two of these are investigated as a function of the infrared wavelength and the laser fluence. The desorption behavior for pure and mixed layers is compared and the underlying desorption mechanism is discussed. PMID:16460197

  18. Scanning beam switch experiment for intense rf power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, Stanley, Jr.; Babcock, Steven R.; Wilson, J. M.; Adler, Richard J.

    1991-04-01

    1407_57The SBS_1 experiment at Sandia National Laboratories is designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the Scanning Beam Switch for high-power rf generation. The primary application is to pulsed rf linacs and high-frequency induction accelerators. It is expected that the apparatus will generate rf output power exceeding 100 MW at 50 MHz over a 5 microsecond(s) pulse. The device can operate as an oscillator or high gain amplifier. To achieve the capability for long-macropulse and high-duty-cycle operation, SBS_1 uses a large dispenser cathode and vacuum triode input driver.

  19. Kibble-Zurek scaling and its breakdown for spontaneous generation of Josephson vortices in Bose-Einstein condensates.

    PubMed

    Su, Shih-Wei; Gou, Shih-Chuan; Bradley, Ashton; Fialko, Oleksandr; Brand, Joachim

    2013-05-24

    Atomic Bose-Einstein condensates confined to a dual-ring trap support Josephson vortices as topologically stable defects in the relative phase. We propose a test of the scaling laws for defect formation by quenching a Bose gas to degeneracy in this geometry. Stochastic Gross-Pitaevskii simulations reveal a -1/4 power-law scaling of defect number with quench time for fast quenches, consistent with the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. Slow quenches show stronger quench-time dependence that is explained by the stability properties of Josephson vortices, revealing the boundary of the Kibble-Zurek regime. Interference of the two atomic fields enables clear long-time measurement of stable defects and a direct test of the Kibble-Zurek mechanism in Bose-Einstein condensation. PMID:23745894

  20. Discovering the Majorana neutrino: The next generation of experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Winslow, L. A.

    2015-07-15

    The discovery of a Majorana neutrino would be revolutionary with far-reaching consequences in both particle physics and cosmology. The only feasible experiments to determine the Majorana nature of the neutrino are searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay. The next generation of double-beta decay experiments are being prepared. The general goal is to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay throughout the parameter space corresponding to the inverted hierarchy for neutrino mass. There are a several strong proposals for how to achieve this goal. The status of these efforts is reviewed.

  1. Automatic content recognition for the next-generation TV experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaofan

    2012-03-01

    Smart TVs has been introduced. Second, applications running on mobile devices (so called "second-screen apps") have significantly enriched TV watching experience. As an enabler of content-aware TVs and apps, automatic content recognition (ACR) is attracting a lot of attention recently. This paper presents an overview of ACR in this context. It attempts to answer a number of questions: Why do we need ACR for the next generation TV experience? What is the relationship between ACR and existing technologies? What are the unique requirements and challenges on ACR in those applications? What are the typical implementation architectures? It also describes the existing products in this space.

  2. Studies on pressure response of gas bubbles contributions of condensed droplets in bubbles generated by a uniform nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The response of a tiny gas bubble under reduced pressure is investigated in its relation to cavitation. Equations of motion are formulated for gas mixtures inside the bubble and numerical calculations performed for several examples. The conclusions are as follows: (1) at the onset of bubble growth, the gas mixture inside it adiabatically expands and the temperature decreases. Condensed droplets appear inside the gas mixture due to a uniform nucleation and the temperature recovers, thus the motion of the bubble is apparently isothermal; (2) the evaporation and condensation coefficient largely affects bubble motions (maximum radius, period and rate of attenuation of the bubble oscillation) including the uniform contraction; (3) the oscillation period of the bubble is longer as the equilibrium bubble radius is larger when the surrounding pressure decreases stepwise. In this circumstance the temperature inside the bubble is kept constant due to condensation evaporation phenomena and is nearly isothermal; and (4) when the surrounding pressure decreases in a stepwise fashion, the critical pressure bubble radius relation becomes closer to that for the isothermal process if the bubble radius is larger than 8 microns.

  3. Utility experience with two demonstration wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehrey, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    Edison has committed 360 MW of nameplate generating capacity to wind energy by year 1990 in its long-range generation plan. To reach this goal the Company's wind energy program focuses on three areas: the continuous evaluation of the wind resource, the hands-on demonstration of wind turbine generators (WTG) and an association with wind park developers. Two demonstration WTGs have been installed and operated at Edison's Wind Energy Center near Palm Springs, California: a 3 MW horizontal axis Bendix/Schachle WTG and a 500 kW vertical axis Alcoa WTG. They are part of a one to two year test program during which the performance of the WTGs will be evaluated, their system operation and environmental impact will be assessed and the design criteria of future WTGs will be identified. Edison's experience with these two WTGs is summarized and the problems encountered with the operation of the two machines are discussed.

  4. Experience in the repair of steam generator auxiliary feedwater nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, K.K.N.

    1996-12-01

    The auxiliary feedwater nozzle is quite often subjected to more thermal stress cycles and other loading mechanisms during their service life than the material was designed and fabricated for at the nozzle of the earlier steam generators in many nuclear plants. During plant operation, the auxiliary feedwater nozzle outlet is exposed to the hot steam from the generator side, while the auxiliary feedwater piping which contains subcooled water from the inlet often induces water hammer as a result of the steam-water mixing phenomena. The thermal cycles and the steam bubble collapse at the nozzle may cause cracking in the nozzle liner and interior surface of the nozzle, and subsequently results in structural damage to the steam generator. This presentation is intended to share the lessons learned from the evaluation of the nozzle condition and the subsequent modification and repair made to the auxiliary feedwater nozzle at the Palisades Nuclear Plant. Other nuclear plant owners may benefit from this experience.

  5. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biberian, Jean-Paul

    2006-02-01

    1. General. A tribute to gene Mallove - the "Genie" reactor / K. Wallace and R. Stringham. An update of LENR for ICCF-11 (short course, 10/31/04) / E. Storms. New physical effects in metal deuterides / P. L. Hagelstein ... [et al.]. Reproducibility, controllability, and optimization of LENR experiments / D. J. Nagel -- 2. Experiments. Electrochemistry. Evidence of electromagnetic radiation from Ni-H systems / S. Focardi ... [et al.]. Superwave reality / I. Dardik. Excess heat in electrolysis experiments at energetics technologies / I. Dardik ... [et al.]. "Excess heat" during electrolysis in platinum/K[symbol]CO[symbol]/nickel light water system / J. Tian ... [et al.]. Innovative procedure for the, in situ, measurement of the resistive thermal coefficient of H(D)/Pd during electrolysis; cross-comparison of new elements detected in the Th-Hg-Pd-D(H) electrolytic cells / F. Celani ... [et al.]. Emergence of a high-temperature superconductivity in hydrogen cycled Pd compounds as an evidence for superstoihiometric H/D sites / A. Lipson ... [et al.]. Plasma electrolysis. Calorimetry of energy-efficient glow discharge - apparatus design and calibration / T. B. Benson and T. O. Passell. Generation of heat and products during plasma electrolysis / T. Mizuno ... [et al.]. Glow discharge. Excess heat production in Pd/D during periodic pulse discharge current in various conditions / A. B. Karabut. Beam experiments. Accelerator experiments and theoretical models for the electron screening effect in metallic environments / A. Huke, K. Czerski, and P. Heide. Evidence for a target-material dependence of the neutron-proton branching ratio in d+d reactions for deuteron energies below 20keV / A. Huke ... [et al.]. Experiments on condensed matter nuclear events in Kobe University / T. Minari ... [et al.]. Electron screening constraints for the cold fusion / K. Czerski, P. Heide, and A. Huke. Cavitation. Low mass 1.6 MHz sonofusion reactor / R. Stringham. Particle detection. Research

  6. Options for a next-generation spheromak physics experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, E. B.; Cohen, B. I.; Hill, D. N.; McLean, H. S.; Romero-Talamás, C. A.; Wood, R. D.

    2006-10-01

    SSPX experiments and resistive MHD modeling suggest options for a next-generation experiment. Magnetic fluctuations are now <1% when the q-profile does not cross low-order rational surfaces in the spheromak core, yielding good energy confinement.^1 Plasma current and magnetic field decay slowly; initial experiments suggest that the they can be rebuilt periodically by high current pulses.^2 Modeling predicts that flux amplification, typically 2-3 in SSPX, can be increased to >50 by actively reducing the bias (``ABR'') after spheromak formation, reducing edge ohmic losses proportionally. ABR is also predicted to improve stability and energy confinement. Neutral-beam experiments planned for SSPX^3 may provide a path to hotter plasmas. Next-generation spheromak geometries and scenarios building on these results are described to improve plasma parameters, explore additional stability control, and examine other physics issues. Work supported by U.S. DOE under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48 at UC LLNL. ^1H. S. McLean, et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 056105 (2006). ^2S. Woodruff, et al., Phys. Rev. Letters 93, 205002 (2004). ^3D..N. Hill, et al., this meeting.

  7. CONDENSATION CAN

    DOEpatents

    Booth, E.T. Jr.; Pontius, R.B.; Jacobsohn, B.A.; Slade, C.B.

    1962-03-01

    An apparatus is designed for condensing a vapor to a solid at relatively low back pressures. The apparatus comprises a closed condensing chamber, a vapor inlet tube extending to the central region of the chamber, a co-axial tubular shield surrounding the inlet tube, means for heating the inlet tube at a point outside the condensing chamber, and means for refrigeratirg the said chamber. (AEC)

  8. FLASH magnetohydrodynamic simulations of shock-generated magnetic field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Gregori, G.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, D.; Meinecke, J.; Scopatz, A.; Weide, K.

    2012-12-01

    We report the results of benchmark FLASH magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of experiments conducted by the University of Oxford High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics group and its collaborators at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI). In these experiments, a long-pulse laser illuminates a target in a chamber filled with Argon gas, producing shock waves that generate magnetic fields via the Biermann battery mechanism. We first outline the implementation of 2D cylindrical geometry in the unsplit MHD solver in FLASH and present results of verification tests. We then describe the results of benchmark 2D cylindrical MHD simulations of the LULI experiments using FLASH that explore the impact of external fields along with the possibility of magnetic field amplification by turbulence that is associated with the shock waves and that is induced by a grid placed in the gas-filled chamber.

  9. Study of experiments on condensation of nitrogen by homogeneous nucleation at states modelling those on the national transonic facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegener, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    A cryogenic wind tunnel is based on the twofold idea of lowering drive power and increasing Reynolds number by operating with nitrogen near its boiling point. There are two possible types of condensation problems involved in this mode of wind tunnel operation. They concern the expansion from the nozzle supply to the test section at relatively low cooling rates, and secondly the expansion around models in the test section. This secondary expansion involves higher cooling rates and shorter time scales. In addition to these two condensation problems it is not certain what purity of nitrogen can be achieved in a large facility. Therefore, one cannot rule out condensation processes other than those of homogeneous nucleation.

  10. Bose-Einstein condensation in a dilute gas: the first 70 years and some recent experiments (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Cornell, Eric A; Wieman, Carl E

    2002-06-17

    Bose-Einstein condensates of dilute gases offer a rich field to study fundamental quantum-mechanical processes, manipulation of the speed at which light propogates, observation of atomic pair-formation and superfluidity, or even simulating white dwarf stars. Still more radical applications are on the horizon. However, their initial creation was a masterpiece of experimental physics. After an initial process of laser cooling (which itself won its developers the 1997 Nobel Prize), atoms in a magnetic-optical trap must be safely transferred into a purely magnetic trap, where the condensation process begins at 170 nK and 20 nK a pure condensate of 2000 atoms could be created. More astonishingly, Wieman and Cornell showed these low temperatures could be achieved in "bench scale" equipment rather than the massive pieces normally demanded by cryoscience. For their 1995 discovery of this new state of matter, they were awarded the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physics. PMID:12465486

  11. Experiments with Test Case Generation and Runtime Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artho, Cyrille; Drusinsky, Doron; Goldberg, Allen; Havelund, Klaus; Lowry, Mike; Pasareanu, Corina; Rosu, Grigore; Visser, Willem; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Software testing is typically an ad hoc process where human testers manually write many test inputs and expected test results, perhaps automating their execution in a regression suite. This process is cumbersome and costly. This paper reports preliminary results on an approach to further automate this process. The approach consists of combining automated test case generation based on systematically exploring the program's input domain, with runtime analysis, where execution traces are monitored and verified against temporal logic specifications, or analyzed using advanced algorithms for detecting concurrency errors such as data races and deadlocks. The approach suggests to generate specifications dynamically per input instance rather than statically once-and-for-all. The paper describes experiments with variants of this approach in the context of two examples, a planetary rover controller and a space craft fault protection system.

  12. Results of railgun experiments powered by magnetic flux compression generators

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Brooks, A.L.; Deadrick, F.J.; Scudder, J.K.; Fowler, C.M.; Caird, R.S.; Peterson, D.R.

    1980-10-24

    Researchers from LLNL and LANSL initiated a joint railgun research and development program to explore the potential of electromagnetic railguns to accelerate projectiles to hypervelocities. The effort was intended to determine experimentally the limits of railgun operation, to verify calculations of railgun performance, and to establish a data base at megampere currents. The program has led to the selection of a particular magnetic flux compression generator (MFCG) design for a set of initial experiments and to the design of small- and large-square bore railguns to match the expected MFCG power profile. The bore sizes are 12.7 and 50 mm, respectively. The design of the railguns and the diagnostic and data reduction techniques, followed by the results of eight experiments with the two railgun types are presented.

  13. Results of railgun experiments powered by magnetic flux compression generators

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Brooks, A.L.; Deadrick, J.; Scudder, J.K.; Fowler, C.M.; Caird, R.S.; Peterson, D.R.

    1981-03-16

    Researchers from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory initiated a joint railgun research and development program to explore the potential of electromagnetic railguns to accelerate projectiles to hypervelocities. The effort was intended to (1) determine experimentally the limits of railgun operation; (2) verify calculations of railgun performance; and (3) establish a data base at megampere currents. The program has led to the selection of a particular magnetic flux compression generator (MFCG) design for a set of initial experiments and the design of small- and large-square-bore railguns to match the expected MFCG power profile. The bore sizes are 12.7 and 50 mm, respectively. In this paper, the design of the railguns and the diagnostic and data reduction techniques, followed by the results of eight experiments with the two railgun types, are presented.

  14. Condensation of water vapor in rarefaction waves. I - Homogeneous nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sislian, J. P.; Glass, I. I.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed theoretical investigation has been made of the condensation of water vapor/carrier gas mixtures in the nonstationary rarefaction wave generated in a shock tube. It is assumed that condensation takes place by homogeneous nucleation. The equations of motion together with the nucleation rate and the droplet growth equations were solved numerically by the method of characteristics and Lax's method of implicit artificial viscosity. It is found that, for the case considered, the condensation wave formed by the collapse of the metastable nonequilibrium state is followed by a shock wave generated by the intersection of characteristics of the same family. The expansion is practically isentropic up to the onset of condensation. The condensation front accelerates in the x,t plane. The results of the computations for a chosen case of water vapor/nitrogen mixture are presented by plotting variations of pressure, nucleation rate, number density of critical clusters, and condensate mass-fraction along three particle paths. Some consideration is given to homogeneous condensation experiments conducted in a shock tube. Although a direct comparison of the present theoretical work and these experiments is not possible, several worthwhile interpretative features have resulted nevertheless.

  15. Reproducibility of Variant Calls in Replicate Next Generation Sequencing Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yuan; Liu, Xiuping; Liu, Chang-gong; Wang, Bailing; Hess, Kenneth R.; Symmans, W. Fraser; Shi, Weiwei; Pusztai, Lajos

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide alterations detected by next generation sequencing are not always true biological changes but could represent sequencing errors. Even highly accurate methods can yield substantial error rates when applied to millions of nucleotides. In this study, we examined the reproducibility of nucleotide variant calls in replicate sequencing experiments of the same genomic DNA. We performed targeted sequencing of all known human protein kinase genes (kinome) (~3.2 Mb) using the SOLiD v4 platform. Seventeen breast cancer samples were sequenced in duplicate (n=14) or triplicate (n=3) to assess concordance of all calls and single nucleotide variant (SNV) calls. The concordance rates over the entire sequenced region were >99.99%, while the concordance rates for SNVs were 54.3-75.5%. There was substantial variation in basic sequencing metrics from experiment to experiment. The type of nucleotide substitution and genomic location of the variant had little impact on concordance but concordance increased with coverage level, variant allele count (VAC), variant allele frequency (VAF), variant allele quality and p-value of SNV-call. The most important determinants of concordance were VAC and VAF. Even using the highest stringency of QC metrics the reproducibility of SNV calls was around 80% suggesting that erroneous variant calling can be as high as 20-40% in a single experiment. The sequence data have been deposited into the European Genome-phenome Archive (EGA) with accession number EGAS00001000826. PMID:26136146

  16. The generation of crystal defects in Ge-on-insulator (GOI) layers in the Ge-condensation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaharai, S.; Tezuka, T.; Hirashita, N.; Toyoda, E.; Moriyama, Y.; Sugiyama, N.; Takagi, S.

    2007-01-01

    The formation process of crystal defects in a Ge-on-insulator (GOI) layer fabricated by oxidizing a SiGe-on-insulator (SGOI) layer, known as the Ge-condensation technique, is studied systematically. It is found that the crystal defects in the GOI layer are threading dislocations and microtwins that are formed mainly in the Ge fraction range larger than ~0.5. Also, when the Ge fraction reaches ~1 and the GOI layer is formed, the density of microtwins significantly decreases and their width considerably increases. The relaxation of compressive strain, observed in SGOI and GOI layers, is not attributable to the formation of the microtwins, but to the perfect dislocations that cannot be detected as defects in the lattice image.

  17. UPTF-TRAM experiments for SBLOCA: Evaluation of condensation processes in TRAM tests A6 and A7

    SciTech Connect

    Sonneburg, H.G.; Tuunanen, J.; Palazov, V.V.

    1995-09-01

    The investigation of thermal-hydraulic phenomena related to reactor transients with accident management measures is the goal of the TRansient and accident Management (TRAM) experimental programme being carried out at the Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF) at Mannheim (Germany). These experimental investigations and test analyses are funded by the German Federal Minister for Research and Technology (BMFT). The UPTF simulates these phenomena in a 1:1 such relative to the dimension of a PWR. Condensation of steam during Emergency Core Cooling (ECC) water injection from accumulators into the primary system is one of the phenomena studied within the accumulators into the primary system is one of the phenomena studied within the TRAM programme. This phenomenon partly controls the efficiency of accumulator injection if the high pressure safety systems fail. Beside this, the condensation within the nitrogen inside the accumulator for a certain period controls the pressure development inside the accumulator. Thus, both condensation phenomena determine the ECC flow rate delivered to the primary system. Concerning the condensation inside the primary system, this is also of safety relevance in the case of Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) during cold leg injection.

  18. Recent operating experiences with steam generators in Japanese NPPs

    SciTech Connect

    Yashima, Seiji

    1997-02-01

    In 1994, the Genkai-3 of Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc. and the Ikata-3 of Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc. started commercial operation, and now 22 PWR plants are being operated in Japan. Since the first PWR plant now 22 PWR plants are being operated in was started to operate, Japanese PWR plants have had an operating experience of approx. 280 reactor-years. During that period, many tube degradations have been experienced in steam generators (SGs). And, in 1991, the steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) occurred in the Mihama-2 of Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. However, the occurrence of tube degradation of SGs has been decreased by the instructions of the MITI as regulatory authorities, efforts of Electric Utilities, and technical support from the SG manufacturers. Here the author describes the recent SGs in Japan about the following points. (1) Recent Operating Experiences (2) Lessons learned from Mihama-2 SGTR (3) SG replacement (4) Safety Regulations on SG (5) Research and development on SG.

  19. Final Report for Intravenous Fluid Generation (IVGEN) Spaceflight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John B.; McKay, Terri L.; Griffin, DeVon W.; Brown, Dan F.; Zoldak, John T.

    2011-01-01

    NASA designed and operated the Intravenous Fluid Generation (IVGEN) experiment onboard the International Space Station (ISS), Increment 23/24, during May 2010. This hardware was a demonstration experiment to generate intravenous (IV) fluid from ISS Water Processing Assembly (WPA) potable water using a water purification technique and pharmaceutical mixing system. The IVGEN experiment utilizes a deionizing resin bed to remove contaminants from feedstock water to a purity level that meets the standards of the United States Pharmacopeia (USP), the governing body for pharmaceuticals in the United States. The water was then introduced into an IV bag where the fluid was mixed with USP-grade crystalline salt to produce USP normal saline (NS). Inline conductivity sensors quantified the feedstock water quality, output water purity, and NS mixing uniformity. Six 1.5-L bags of purified water were produced. Two of these bags were mixed with sodium chloride to make 0.9 percent NS solution. These two bags were returned to Earth to test for compliance with USP requirements. On-orbit results indicated that all of the experimental success criteria were met with the exception of the salt concentration. Problems with a large air bubble in the first bag of purified water resulted in a slightly concentrated saline solution of 117 percent of the target value of 0.9 g/L. The second bag had an inadequate amount of salt premeasured into the mixing bag resulting in a slightly deficient salt concentration of 93.8 percent of the target value. The USP permits a range from 95 to 105 percent of the target value. The testing plans for improvements for an operational system are also presented.

  20. Computer-Generated Ovaries to Assist Follicle Counting Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Skodras, Angelos; Marcelli, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Precise estimation of the number of follicles in ovaries is of key importance in the field of reproductive biology, both from a developmental point of view, where follicle numbers are determined at specific time points, as well as from a therapeutic perspective, determining the adverse effects of environmental toxins and cancer chemotherapeutics on the reproductive system. The two main factors affecting follicle number estimates are the sampling method and the variation in follicle numbers within animals of the same strain, due to biological variability. This study aims at assessing the effect of these two factors, when estimating ovarian follicle numbers of neonatal mice. We developed computer algorithms, which generate models of neonatal mouse ovaries (simulated ovaries), with characteristics derived from experimental measurements already available in the published literature. The simulated ovaries are used to reproduce in-silico counting experiments based on unbiased stereological techniques; the proposed approach provides the necessary number of ovaries and sampling frequency to be used in the experiments given a specific biological variability and a desirable degree of accuracy. The simulated ovary is a novel, versatile tool which can be used in the planning phase of experiments to estimate the expected number of animals and workload, ensuring appropriate statistical power of the resulting measurements. Moreover, the idea of the simulated ovary can be applied to other organs made up of large numbers of individual functional units. PMID:25812007

  1. Compact submicrosecond, high current generator for wire explosion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranchuk, L. E.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Larour, J.

    2004-01-01

    The PIAF generator was designed for low total energy and high energy density experiments with liners, X-pinch or fiber Z-pinch loads. These studies are of interest for such applications as surface and material science, microscopy of biological specimens, lithography of x-ray sensitive resists, and x-ray backlighting of pulsed-power plasmas. The generator is based on an RLC circuit that includes six NWL 180 nF-50 kV capacitors that store up to 1.3 kJ. The capacitors are connected in parallel to a single multispark switch designed to operate at atmospheric pressure. The switch allows reaching a time delay between the trigger pulse and the current pulse of less than 80 ns and has jitter of 6 ns. The total inductance without a load compartment was optimized to be as low as 16 nH, which leads to extremely low impedance of ˜0.12 Ω. A 40 kV initial voltage provides 250 kA maximum current in a 6 nH inductive load with a 180 ns current rise time. PIAF has dimensions of 660×660×490 mm and weight of less than 100 kg, thus manifesting itself as robust, simple to operate, and cost effective. A description of the PIAF generator and the initial experimental results on PIAF with an X-pinch type load are reported. The generator was demonstrated to operate successfully with an X-pinch type load. The experiments first started with investigation of the previously unexplored X-pinch conduction time range, 100 ns-1 μs. A single short radiation pulse was obtained that came from a small, point-like plasma. The following x-ray source characteristics were achieved: typical hot spot size of 50-100 μm, radiation pulse duration of 1.5-2 ns, and radiation yield of about 250-500 mJ in the softer spectral range (hν⩾700 eV) and 50-100 mJ in the harder one (hν⩾1 keV). These results provide the potential for further application of this source, such as use as a backlight diagnostic tool.

  2. Free convective condensation in a vertical enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, R.J.; Peterson, P.F.; Corradini, M.L.; Pernsteiner, A.P.

    1995-09-01

    Free convective condensation in a vertical enclosure was studied numerically and the results were compared with experiments. In both the numerical and experimental investigations, mist formation was observed to occur near the cooling wall, with significant droplet concentrations in the bulk. Large recirculation cells near the end of the condensing section were generated as the heavy noncondensing gas collecting near the cooling wall was accelerated downward. Near the top of the enclosure the recirculation cells became weaker and smaller than those below, ultimately disappearing near the top of the condenser. In the experiment the mist density was seen to be highest near the wall and at the bottom of the condensing section, whereas the numerical model predicted a much more uniform distribution. The model used to describe the formation of mist was based on a Modified Critical Saturation Model (MCSM), which allows mist to be generated once the vapor pressure exceeds a critical value. Equilibrium, nonequilibrium, and MCSM calculations were preformed, showing the experimental results to lie somewhere in between the equilibrium and nonequilibrium predictions of the numerical model. A single adjustable constant (indicating the degree to which equilibrium is achieved) is used in the model in order to match the experimental results.

  3. Modelling hot electron generation in short pulse target heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircombe, N. J.; Hughes, S. J.

    2013-11-01

    Target heating experiments planned for the Orion laser facility, and electron beam driven fast ignition schemes, rely on the interaction of a short pulse high intensity laser with dense material to generate a flux of energetic electrons. It is essential that the characteristics of this electron source are well known in order to inform transport models in radiation hydrodynamics codes and allow effective evaluation of experimental results and forward modelling of future campaigns. We present results obtained with the particle in cell (PIC) code EPOCH for realistic target and laser parameters, including first and second harmonic light. The hot electron distributions are characterised and their implications for onward transport and target heating are considered with the aid of the Monte-Carlo transport code THOR.

  4. Jefferson Lab injector development for next generation parity violation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grames, J.; Hansknect, J.; Poelker, M.; Suleiman, R.

    2011-11-01

    To meet the challenging requirements of next generation parity violation experiments at Jefferson Lab, the Center for Injectors and Sources is working on improving the parity-quality of the electron beam. These improvements include new electron photogun design and fast helicity reversal of the Pockels Cell. We proposed and designed a new scheme for slow helicity reversal using a Wien Filter and two Solenoids. This slow reversal complements the insertable half-wave plate reversal of the laser-light polarization by reversing the electron beam polarization at the injector while maintaining a constant accelerator configuration. For position feedback, fast air-core magnets located in the injector were commissioned and a new scheme for charge feedback is planned.

  5. Solar wind-generated current in the Lunar Dust Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Lianghai; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zheng, Yongchun; Guo, Dawei

    2016-04-01

    Measurements from the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) show that the current associated with lofted lunar dust lacks an altitude dependence, implying that the current may come from other sources. Here we present some evidences for solar wind (SW)-generated current. Direct SW influx on the nightside can cause a large current, and the backscattered energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) on the dayside can bring a good correlation between the current and SW density. It is found that the current favors a lower SW speed and a smaller SW incident angle, but the dependences are also affected by the solar zenith angle (SZA) and the scattering function of ENAs. Picked-up ions can enhance the current when the angle between the convection electric field and LDEX's normal is larger than 90°. But when the angle is smaller than 90°, the enhancement is negligible.

  6. Generating a soliton splash through variational modelling and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogirou, Anna; Bokhove, Onno

    2015-11-01

    Mathematical modelling of water waves in tanks with wave generators is demonstrated by investigating variational methods asymptotically and numerically. A reduced potential flow water wave model is derived using variational techniques, which is based on the assumptions of waves with small amplitude and large wavelength. This model consists of a set of modified Benney-Luke equations describing the deviation from the still water surface η (x , y , t) and the bottom potential Φ (x , y , t) , and includes a time-dependent gravitional potential mimicking a removable ``sluice gate''. The asymptotic model is solved numerically using the automated system Firedrake. In particular, a (dis)continuous Galerkin finite element method is used, together with symplectic integrators for the time discretisation. As a validation, the numerical results are compared to a soliton splash experiment in a long water channel with a contraction at its end, resulting after a sluice gate is removed at a finite time.

  7. New generation of cryogen free advanced superconducting magnets for neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichek, O.; Brown, J.; Adroja, D. T.; Manuel, P.; Kouzmenko, G.; Bewley, R. I.; Wotherspoon, R.

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in superconducting technology and cryocooler refrigeration have resulted in a new generation of advanced superconducting magnets for neutron beam applications. These magnets have outstanding parameters such as high homogeneity and stability at highest magnetic fields possible, a reasonably small stray field, low neutron scattering background and larger exposure to neutron detectors. At the same time the pulse tube refrigeration technology provides a complete re-condensing regime which allows to minimise the requirements for cryogens without introducing additional noise and mechanical vibrations. The magnets can be used with dilution refrigerator insert which expands the temperature range from 20mK to 300K. Here we are going to present design, test results and the operational data of the 14T magnet for neutron diffraction and the 9T wide angle chopper magnet for neutron spectroscopy developed by Oxford Instruments in collaboration with ISIS neutron source. First scientific results obtained from the neutron scattering experiments with these magnets are also going to be discussed.

  8. Condensation polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.

    1989-01-01

    Polyimides belong to a class of polymers known as polyheterocyclics. Unlike most other high temperature polymers, polyimides can be prepared from a variety of inexpensive monomers by several synthetic routes. The glass transition and crystalline melt temperature, thermooxidative stability, toughness, dielectric constant, coefficient of thermal expansion, chemical stability, mechanical performance, etc. of polyimides can be controlled within certain boundaries. This versatility has permitted the development of various forms of polyimides. These include adhesives, composite matrices, coatings, films, moldings, fibers, foams and membranes. Polyimides are synthesized through both condensation (step-polymerization) and addition (chain growth polymerization) routes. The precursor materials used in addition polyimides or imide oligomers are prepared by condensation method. High molecular weight polyimide made via polycondensation or step-growth polymerization is studied. The various synthetic routes to condensation polyimides, structure/property relationships of condensation polyimides and composite properties of condensation polyimides are all studied. The focus is on the synthesis and chemical structure/property relationships of polyimides with particular emphasis on materials for composite application.

  9. Keeping condensers clean

    SciTech Connect

    Wicker, K.

    2006-04-15

    The humble condenser is among the biggest contributors to a steam power plant's efficiency. But although a clean condenser can provide great economic benefit, a dirty one can raise plant heat rate, resulting in large losses of generation revenue and/or unnecessarily high fuel bills. Conventional methods for cleaning fouled tubes range form chemicals to scrapers to brushes and hydro-blasters. This article compares the available options and describes how one power station, Omaha Public Power District's 600 MW North Omaha coal-fired power station, cleaned up its act. The makeup and cooling water of all its five units comes from the Missouri River. 6 figs.

  10. Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglieri, M.; Briscoe, B. J.; Celentano, A.; Chung, S.-U.; D'Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; Döring, M.; Dudek, J.; Eidelman, S.; Fegan, S.; Ferretti, J.; Filippi, A.; Fox, G.; Galata, G.; García-Tecocoatzi, H.; Glazier, D. I.; Grube, B.; Hanhart, C.; Hoferichter, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ireland, D. G.; Ketzer, B.; Klein, F. J.; Kubis, B.; Liu, B.; Masjuan, P.; Mathieu, V.; McKinnon, B.; Mitchel, R.; Nerling, F.; Paul, S.; Peláez, J. R.; Rademacker, J.; Rizzo, A.; Salgado, C.; Santopinto, E.; Sarantsev, A. V.; Sato, T.; Schlüter, T.; [Silva]da Silva, M. L. L.; Stankovic, I.; Strakovsky, I.; Szczepaniak, A.; Vassallo, A.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Zana, L.

    The series of workshops on New Partial-Wave Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments was initiated with the ATHOS 2012 meeting, which took place in Camogli, Italy, June 20-22, 2012. It was followed by ATHOS 2013 in Kloster Seeon near Munich, Germany, May 21-24, 2013. The third, ATHOS3, meeting is planned for April 13-17, 2015 at The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus, USA. The workshops focus on the development of amplitude analysis tools for meson and baryon spectroscopy, and complement other programs in hadron spectroscopy organized in the recent past including the INT-JLab Workshop on Hadron Spectroscopy in Seattle in 2009, the International Workshop on Amplitude Analysis in Hadron Spectroscopy at the ECT*-Trento in 2011, the School on Amplitude Analysis in Modern Physics in Bad Honnef in 2011, the Jefferson Lab Advanced Study Institute Summer School in 2012, and the School on Concepts of Modern Amplitude Analysis Techniques in Flecken-Zechlin near Berlin in September 2013. The aim of this document is to summarize the discussions that took place at the ATHOS 2012 and ATHOS 2013 meetings. We do not attempt a comprehensive review of the field of amplitude analysis, but offer a collection of thoughts that we hope may lay the ground for such a document.

  11. Evaluating vortex generator jet experiments for turbulent flow separation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Stillfried, F.; Kékesi, T.; Wallin, S.; Johansson, A. V.

    2011-12-01

    Separating turbulent boundary-layers can be energized by streamwise vortices from vortex generators (VG) that increase the near wall momentum as well as the overall mixing of the flow so that flow separation can be delayed or even prevented. In general, two different types of VGs exist: passive vane VGs (VVG) and active VG jets (VGJ). Even though VGs are already successfully used in engineering applications, it is still time-consuming and computationally expensive to include them in a numerical analysis. Fully resolved VGs in a computational mesh lead to a very high number of grid points and thus, computational costs. In addition, computational parameter studies for such flow control devices take much time to set-up. Therefore, much of the research work is still carried out experimentally. KTH Stockholm develops a novel VGJ model that makes it possible to only include the physical influence in terms of the additional stresses that originate from the VGJs without the need to locally refine the computational mesh. Such a modelling strategy enables fast VGJ parameter variations and optimization studies are easliy made possible. For that, VGJ experiments are evaluated in this contribution and results are used for developing a statistical VGJ model.

  12. Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Battaglieri, Marco; Briscoe, William; Celentano, Andrea; Chung, Suh-Urk; D'Angelo, Annalisa; De Vita, Rafaella; Döring, Michael; Dudek, Jozef; Eidelman, S.; Fegan, Stuart; et al

    2015-01-01

    The series of workshops on New Partial-Wave Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments was initiated with the ATHOS 2012 meeting, which took place in Camogli, Italy, June 20-22, 2012. It was followed by ATHOS 2013 in Kloster Seeon near Munich, Germany, May 21-24, 2013. The third, ATHOS3, meeting is planned for April 13-17, 2015 at The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus, USA. The workshops focus on the development of amplitude analysis tools for meson and baryon spectroscopy, and complement other programs in hadron spectroscopy organized in the recent past including the INT-JLab Workshop on Hadron Spectroscopymore » in Seattle in 2009, the International Workshop on Amplitude Analysis in Hadron Spectroscopy at the ECT*-Trento in 2011, the School on Amplitude Analysis in Modern Physics in Bad Honnef in 2011, the Jefferson Lab Advanced Study Institute Summer School in 2012, and the School on Concepts of Modern Amplitude Analysis Techniques in Flecken-Zechlin near Berlin in September 2013. The aim of this document is to summarize the discussions that took place at the ATHOS 2012 and ATHOS 2013 meetings. We do not attempt a comprehensive review of the field of amplitude analysis, but offer a collection of thoughts that we hope may lay the ground for such a document.« less

  13. Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglieri, Marco; Briscoe, William; Celentano, Andrea; Chung, Suh-Urk; D'Angelo, Annalisa; De Vita, Rafaella; Döring, Michael; Dudek, Jozef; Eidelman, S.; Fegan, Stuart; Ferretti, J.; Filippi, A.; Fox, G.; Galata, G.; García-Tecocoatzi, H.; Glazier, Derek; Grube, B.; Hanhart, C.; Hoferichter, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ireland, David G.; Ketzer, B.; Klein, Franz J.; Kubis, B.; Liu, B.; Masjuan, P.; Mathieu, Vincent; McKinnon, Brian; Mitchel, R.; Nerling, F.; Paul, S.; Peláez, J. R.; Rademacker, J.; Rizzo, Alessandro; Salgado, Carlos; Santopinto, E.; Sarantsev, Andrey V.; Sato, Toru; Schlüter, T.; da Silva, M. L.L.; Stankovic, I.; Strakovsky, Igor; Szczepaniak, Adam; Vassallo, A.; Walford, Natalie K.; Watts, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    The series of workshops on New Partial-Wave Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments was initiated with the ATHOS 2012 meeting, which took place in Camogli, Italy, June 20-22, 2012. It was followed by ATHOS 2013 in Kloster Seeon near Munich, Germany, May 21-24, 2013. The third, ATHOS3, meeting is planned for April 13-17, 2015 at The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus, USA. The workshops focus on the development of amplitude analysis tools for meson and baryon spectroscopy, and complement other programs in hadron spectroscopy organized in the recent past including the INT-JLab Workshop on Hadron Spectroscopy in Seattle in 2009, the International Workshop on Amplitude Analysis in Hadron Spectroscopy at the ECT*-Trento in 2011, the School on Amplitude Analysis in Modern Physics in Bad Honnef in 2011, the Jefferson Lab Advanced Study Institute Summer School in 2012, and the School on Concepts of Modern Amplitude Analysis Techniques in Flecken-Zechlin near Berlin in September 2013. The aim of this document is to summarize the discussions that took place at the ATHOS 2012 and ATHOS 2013 meetings. We do not attempt a comprehensive review of the field of amplitude analysis, but offer a collection of thoughts that we hope may lay the ground for such a document.

  14. Optimization of Extreme Ultraviolet Light Source from High Harmonic Generation for Condensed-Phase Core-Level Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ming-Fu; Verkamp, Max A.; Ryland, Elizabeth S.; Benke, Kristin; Zhang, Kaili; Carlson, Michaela; Vura-Weis, Josh

    2015-06-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light source from high-order harmonic generation has been shown to be a powerful tool for core-level spectroscopy. In addition, this light source provides very high temporal resolution (10-18 s to 10-15 s) for time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. Most applications of the light source have been limited to the studies of atomic and molecular systems, with technique development focused on optimizing for shorter pulses (i.e. tens of attoseconds) or higher XUV energy (i.e. ~keV range). For the application to general molecular systems in solid and liquid forms, however, the XUV photon flux and stability are highly demanded due to the strong absorption by substrates and solvents. In this case, the main limitation is due to the stability of the high order generation process and the limited bandwidth of the XUV source that gives only discrete even/odd order peaks. Consequently, this results in harmonic artifact noise that overlaps with the resonant signal. In our current study, we utilize a semi-infinite cell for high harmonic generation from two quantum trajectories (i.e. short and long) at over-driven NIR power. This condition, produces broad XUV spectrum without using complicated optics (e.g. hollow-core fibers and double optical gating). This light source allows us to measure the static absorption spectrum of the iron M-edge from a Fe(acac)3 molecular solid film, which shows a resonant feature of 0.01 OD (~2.3% absorption). Moreover, we also investigate how sample roughness affects the static absorption spectrum. We are able to make smooth solar cell precursor materials (i.e. PbI2 and PbBr2) by spin casting and observe iodine (50 eV) and bromine (70 eV) absorption edges in the order of 0.05 OD with minimal harmonic artifact noise.

  15. Condenser performance test and back-pressure improvement: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Piskorowski, J.; Beckett, G.; Bell, R.

    1988-04-01

    This document describes condenser performance test and analyses experiences. The testing was performed by Indianapolis Power and Light Company (IPL) on the Petersburg Unit 3 condenser. The initial testing revealed a performance deficiency. Modifications were made to the condenser, air in-leakage was reduced and the vacuum pumps were brought back to their original design capacity. Testing was reperformed after these activities and although a significant performance improvement was achieved deficiencies were still evident. Heat Exchanger Systems, Inc. (HES) was retained as consultants during this testing program. The Central Electricity Generating Board's (CEGB) Central Electricity Research Laboratory (CERL) acting as a subcontractor to HES were retained to perform an analysis of the Petersburg Unit 3 condenser using their EPOC computer code. The results of this analysis are also contained in this document. 3 refs., 48 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Generation and characterization of aerosols and vapors for inhalation experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Tillery, M I; Wood, G O; Ettinger, H J

    1976-01-01

    Control of aerosol and vapor characteristics that affect the toxicity of inhaled contaminants often determines the methods of generating exposure atmospheres. Generation methods for aerosols and vapors are presented. The characteristics of the resulting exposure atmosphere and the limitations of the various generation methods are discussed. Methods and instruments for measuring the airborne contaminant with respect to various charcteristics are also described. PMID:797565

  17. A spectroscopic study of intermediates in the condensation of refractory smokes: Matrix isolation experiments SiO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, R. K.; Stranz, D. D.; Donn, D.

    1980-01-01

    The infrared and Raman spectra of N2 matrix isolated silicon oxides are investigated. The vibrational frequencies of SiO, Si2O2, and Si3O3 were identified and assigned on the basis of normal coordinate analyses. Heating the solid to 50 K (evaporating the matrix) leaves a residue whose infrared spectrum is identical to that of a smoke condensed at ambient temperatures. Further heating of the sample to 500 K leads to significant changes in the band shapes. Investigations of the infrared spectra at several stages of the diffusion process result in the proposal of a mechanism for the transition from molecular properties to those of the residue (bulk) material, which is characterized as Si2O3.

  18. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biberian, Jean-Paul

    2006-02-01

    1. General. A tribute to gene Mallove - the "Genie" reactor / K. Wallace and R. Stringham. An update of LENR for ICCF-11 (short course, 10/31/04) / E. Storms. New physical effects in metal deuterides / P. L. Hagelstein ... [et al.]. Reproducibility, controllability, and optimization of LENR experiments / D. J. Nagel -- 2. Experiments. Electrochemistry. Evidence of electromagnetic radiation from Ni-H systems / S. Focardi ... [et al.]. Superwave reality / I. Dardik. Excess heat in electrolysis experiments at energetics technologies / I. Dardik ... [et al.]. "Excess heat" during electrolysis in platinum/K[symbol]CO[symbol]/nickel light water system / J. Tian ... [et al.]. Innovative procedure for the, in situ, measurement of the resistive thermal coefficient of H(D)/Pd during electrolysis; cross-comparison of new elements detected in the Th-Hg-Pd-D(H) electrolytic cells / F. Celani ... [et al.]. Emergence of a high-temperature superconductivity in hydrogen cycled Pd compounds as an evidence for superstoihiometric H/D sites / A. Lipson ... [et al.]. Plasma electrolysis. Calorimetry of energy-efficient glow discharge - apparatus design and calibration / T. B. Benson and T. O. Passell. Generation of heat and products during plasma electrolysis / T. Mizuno ... [et al.]. Glow discharge. Excess heat production in Pd/D during periodic pulse discharge current in various conditions / A. B. Karabut. Beam experiments. Accelerator experiments and theoretical models for the electron screening effect in metallic environments / A. Huke, K. Czerski, and P. Heide. Evidence for a target-material dependence of the neutron-proton branching ratio in d+d reactions for deuteron energies below 20keV / A. Huke ... [et al.]. Experiments on condensed matter nuclear events in Kobe University / T. Minari ... [et al.]. Electron screening constraints for the cold fusion / K. Czerski, P. Heide, and A. Huke. Cavitation. Low mass 1.6 MHz sonofusion reactor / R. Stringham. Particle detection. Research

  19. Enhancing the Academic Experiences of First-Generation Master's Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portnoi, Laura M.; Kwong, Tiffany M.

    2011-01-01

    Is being "first generation" significant for undergraduates only? The narratives of 25 first-generation master's students in this phenomenological study suggest not. Participants experienced challenges pursuing their master's degrees, yet these were counterbalanced by other factors. The authors identified five areas that educators may address to…

  20. Lived Experiences of Low Socioeconomic Millennial Generation College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thacker, Kelly L.

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics and needs of college students across the United States are ever-changing. As Millennial generation students, born between 1982 and 2003 (Howe & Strauss, 2000), attend college, unique characteristics are present. Commonalities within the Millennial generation have been identified; however, socioeconomic status can impact a…

  1. Gravity Effects in Condensing and Evaporating Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermanson, J. C.; Som, S. M.; Allen, J. S.; Pedersen, P. C.

    2004-01-01

    A general overview of gravity effects in condensing and evaporating films is presented. The topics include: 1) Research Overview; 2) NASA Recognizes Critical Need for Condensation & Evaporation Research to Enable Human Exploration of Space; 3) Condensation and Evaporation Research in Reduced Gravity is Enabling for AHST Technology Needs; 4) Differing Role of Surface Tension on Condensing/Evaporating Film Stability; 5) Fluid Mechanisms in Condensing and Evaporating Films in Reduced Gravity; 6) Research Plan; 7) Experimental Configurations for Condensing Films; 8) Laboratory Condensation Test Cell; 9) Aircraft Experiment; 10) Condensation Study Current Test Conditions; 11) Diagnostics; 12) Shadowgraph Images of Condensing n- pentane Film in Unstable (-1g) Configuration; 13) Condensing n-Pentane Film in Normal Gravity (-1g) at Constant Pressure; 14) Condensing n-Pentane Film in Normal Gravity (-1g) with Cyclic Pressure; 15) Non-condensing Pumped Film in Normal Gravity (-1g); 16) Heat Transfer Coefficient in Developing, Unstable Condensing Film in Normal Gravity; 17) Heat Transfer for Unsteady Condensing Film (-1g); 18) Ultrasound Measurement of Film Thickness N-pentane Film, Stable (+1g) Configuration; and 19) Ultrasound Measurement of Film Thickness N-pentane Film, Unstable (-1g) Configuration.

  2. Film condensation in a horizontal rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Qing; Suryanarayana, N. V.

    1992-01-01

    Condensation heat transfer in an annular flow regime with and without interfacial waves was experimentally investigated. The study included measurements of heat transfer rate with condensation of vapor flowing inside a horizontal rectangular duct and experiments on the initiation of interfacial waves in condensation, and adiabatic air-liquid flow. An analytical model for the condensation was developed to predict condensate film thickness and heat transfer coefficients. Some conclusions drawn from the study are that the condensate film thickness was very thin (less than 0.6 mm). The average heat transfer coefficient increased with increasing the inlet vapor velocity. The local heat transfer coefficient decreased with the axial distance of the condensing surface, with the largest change at the leading edge of the test section. The interfacial shear stress, which consisted of the momentum shear stress and the adiabatic shear stress, appeared to have a significant effect on the heat transfer coefficients. In the experiment, the condensate flow along the condensing surface experienced a smooth flow, a two-dimensional wavy flow, and a three-dimensional wavy flow. In the condensation experiment, the local wave length decreased with the axial distance of the condensing surface and the average wave length decreased with increasing inlet vapor velocity, while the wave speed increased with increasing vapor velocity. The heat transfer measurements are reliable. And, the ultrasonic technique was effective for measuring the condensate film thickness when the surface was smooth or had waves of small amplitude.

  3. Field Experiments Aimed To The Analysis of Flood Generation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carriero, D.; Iacobellis, V.; Oliveto, G.; Romano, N.; Telesca, V.; Fiorentino, M.

    The study of the soil moisture dynamics and of the climate-soil-vegetation interac- tion is essential for the comprehension of possible climatic change phenomena, as well as for the analysis of occurrence of extreme hydrological events. In this trend the theoretically-based distribution of floods recently derived by Fiorentino and Ia- cobellis, [ŞNew insights about the climatic and geologic control on the probability distribution of floodsT, Water Resources Research, 2001, 37: 721-730] demonstrated, by an application in some Southern Italy basins, that processes at the hillslope scale strongly influence the basin response by means of the different mechanisms of runoff generation produced by various distributions of partial area contributing. This area is considered as a stochastic variable whose pdf position parameter showed strong de- pendence on the climate as it can seen in the studied basins behavior: in dry zones, where there is the prevalence of the infiltration excess (Horton) mechanism, the basin water loss parameter decreases as basin area increases and the flood peak source area depends on the permeability of soils; in humid zones, with the prevalence of satu- ration excess (Dunne) process, the loss parameter seems independent from the basin area and very sensitive to simple climatic index while only small portion of the area invested by the storm contributes to floods. The purpose of this work is to investigate the consistency of those interpretations by means of field experiments at the hillslope scale to establish a parameterization accounting for soil physical and hydraulic prop- erties, vegetation characteristics and land-use. The research site is the catchment of River Fiumarella di Corleto, which is located in Basilicata Region, Italy, and has a drainage area of approximately 32 km2. The environment has a rather dynamic geo- morphology and very interesting features from the soil-landscape modeling viewpoint [Santini A., A. Coppola, N. Romano, and

  4. Excitonic condensation in bilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jung-Jung

    Among the many examples of Bose condensation considered in physics, electron-hole-pair (exciton) condensation has maintained special interest because it has been difficult to realize experimentally, and because of controversy about condensate properties. In this thesis, we studied the various aspects of spontaneous symmetry broken state of exciton in bilayer using mean field theory. We calculated the photoluminescence of excitonic condensation created by laser. We developed a one-dimensional toy model of excitonic supercurrent using mean field theory plus non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) which give qualitatively consistent results with experiments. We proposed graphene bilayer as a novel system for excitonic condensation to occur and estimate it to exist even at temperature as high as room temperature.

  5. Evolution and Next Generation of Large Cosmic-Ray Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olinto, Angela

    2016-03-01

    With collaborations involving as many as 32 countries, next generation astro-particle observatories are being built to understand the puzzling origin of the most energetic processes in the Universe. We will review some recent results and the effort behind next generation observatories, which include large arrays of detectors and space missions to study high to ultra-high energy cosmic-rays, neutrinos, and gamma-rays. The great opportunity of word-wide scientific productivity and funding motivates these large-scale efforts, which also face many challenges due to geopolitical events and differences in science funding cultures.

  6. Characterization of spacecraft humidity condensate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muckle, Susan; Schultz, John R.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    When construction of Space Station Freedom reaches the Permanent Manned Capability (PMC) stage, the Water Recovery and Management Subsystem will be fully operational such that (distilled) urine, spent hygiene water, and humidity condensate will be reclaimed to provide water of potable quality. The reclamation technologies currently baselined to process these waste waters include adsorption, ion exchange, catalytic oxidation, and disinfection. To ensure that the baseline technologies will be able to effectively remove those compounds presenting a health risk to the crew, the National Research Council has recommended that additional information be gathered on specific contaminants in waste waters representative of those to be encountered on the Space Station. With the application of new analytical methods and the analysis of waste water samples more representative of the Space Station environment, advances in the identification of the specific contaminants continue to be made. Efforts by the Water and Food Analytical Laboratory at JSC were successful in enlarging the database of contaminants in humidity condensate. These efforts have not only included the chemical characterization of condensate generated during ground-based studies, but most significantly the characterization of cabin and Spacelab condensate generated during Shuttle missions. The analytical results presented in this paper will be used to show how the composition of condensate varies amongst enclosed environments and thus the importance of collecting condensate from an environment close to that of the proposed Space Station. Although advances were made in the characterization of space condensate, complete characterization, particularly of the organics, requires further development of analytical methods.

  7. Few recent experiments on surface studies by second harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.R.

    1985-12-01

    Surface second harmonic generation (SHG) is used to monitor adsorption and desorption of molecules on metal and semiconductor surfaces in ultrahigh vacuum. Surface SHG has also been used to study monolayers of molecules at a liquid/air interface. 13 refs., 6 figs. (WRF)

  8. Bose-Einstein Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    2005-03-17

    This article gives a brief review of Bose-Einstein condensation. It is an exotic quantum phenomenon that was observed in dilute atomic gases for the first time in 1995. It exhibits a new state of matter in which a group of atoms behaves as a single particle. Experiments on this form of matter are relevant to many different areas of physics- from atomic clocks and quantum computing to super fluidity, superconductivity and quantum phase transition.

  9. Internally drained condenser for spacecraft thermal management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, Javier A.; Drew, Brian C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained to date in a program to develop a high heat flux condenser for use in two-phase spacecraft thermal management loops. The objective is to obtain a several fold increase in condensation heat transfer coefficient over those which can be achieved with shear-controlled or capillary-wick condensers. The internally drained condenser relies on shaped fins to develop a capillary pressure gradient over the surface of the fins and drive the condensate toward narrow drainage grooves separating the fins. The condensate then flows through a drainage network embedded in the condenser walls. Heat transfer coefficients of up to 8 W/sq cm C were measured in steam, providing a heat transfer enhancement ratio greater than a factor of 8. In the paper the proof-of-concept experiments are described and simplified models to predict the performance of the internally drained condenser are presented.

  10. Colorado's Millennial Generation: Youth Perceptions and Experiences of Nature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    This study uses survey and focus group methods to explore attitudes toward and experiences of nature among millennial-aged students in northern Colorado. First, results confirm that young people possess a strong interest in the outdoors yet time, transportation, and new technologies hamper their ability to visit public lands and outdoor spaces.…

  11. NOvA: Building a Next Generation Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Perko, John; Williams, Ron; Miller, Bill

    2013-12-05

    The NOvA neutrino experiment is searching for the answers to some of the most fundamental questions of the universe. This video documents how collaboration between government research institutions like Fermilab, academia and industry can create one of the largest neutrino detectors in the world.

  12. NOvA: Building a Next Generation Neutrino Experiment

    ScienceCinema

    Perko, John; Williams, Ron; Miller, Bill;

    2014-05-30

    The NOvA neutrino experiment is searching for the answers to some of the most fundamental questions of the universe. This video documents how collaboration between government research institutions like Fermilab, academia and industry can create one of the largest neutrino detectors in the world.

  13. Bose-Einstein Condensation in Extended Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharringhausen, Marco; Quantus Team; Rasel, Ernst Maria

    2012-07-01

    The setup and the envisaged experiment timeline of the QUANTUS-III experiment onboard a sounding rocket to be started in the near future are presented. The major intention of QUANTUS-III is the stable generation of a number of Bose-Einstein condensates as a source for atom interferometry during several minutes of microgravity onboard the sounding rocket. Later missions aim at the realization of atom interferoemeters as precursor satellite missions. These condesates will be generated serially, allowing a large number of repeatable tests. Within such Bose-Einstein condensates, millions of atoms lose their identity and can be described by a single macroscopic wave function. During the expansion over several seconds, the atoms form a giant coherent matter wave that is delocalized on a millimeter scale, which represents a promising source for matter-wave interferometry to test the universality of free fall with quantum matter. Cold quantum gases and, in particular, Bose-Einstein condensates represent a new state of matter which is nowadays established in many laboratories. They offer unique insights into a broad range of fundamental physics as well as prospects for novel quantum sensors. Microgravity will substantially extend the science of quantum gases towards nowadays inaccessible regimes at lowest temperatures, to macroscopic dimensions, and to unequalled durations of unperturbed evolution of these distinguished quantum objects. Right now, the QUANTUS-III experiment is in the development phase, taking heritage from QUANTUS-I and QUANTUS-II. Major components of the engineering model are available. Boundary conditions of the rocket, requirements of the experiment and interface considerations are presented. This include laser stabilization, vacuum technology and magnetic shielding. The planned trajectory of the rocket will have an apogee of 200 - 300 km and a total microgravity time of 4 - 7 minutes, both depending on the total experiment mass.

  14. Operating experience at the Shamokin Culm burning steam generation plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, P.A.; Laukaitis, J.F.; Lockman, H.W.; Samela, D.; Smith, W.G.; Tsoumpas, G.

    1983-06-01

    After 9200 hours of operation it can be concluded that low grade anthracite culm refuse fuel can be properly combusted in a fluidized-bed boiler. The Shamokin Culm Burning Steam Generation Plant has demonstrated environmental compliance while operating over a wide range of operational variables. As changes in equipment and materials are implemented and other fuels are combusted, it is expected that a further demonstration of the Plant's capabilities will be realized.

  15. Automatically generated acceptance test: A software reliability experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protzel, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    This study presents results of a software reliability experiment investigating the feasibility of a new error detection method. The method can be used as an acceptance test and is solely based on empirical data about the behavior of internal states of a program. The experimental design uses the existing environment of a multi-version experiment previously conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center, in which the launch interceptor problem is used as a model. This allows the controlled experimental investigation of versions with well-known single and multiple faults, and the availability of an oracle permits the determination of the error detection performance of the test. Fault interaction phenomena are observed that have an amplifying effect on the number of error occurrences. Preliminary results indicate that all faults examined so far are detected by the acceptance test. This shows promise for further investigations, and for the employment of this test method on other applications.

  16. External priors for the next generation of CMB experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzotti, Alessandro; Dodelson, Scott; Park, Youngsoo

    2016-03-01

    Planned cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments will improve what we know about neutrino physics, inflation, and dark energy. The low level of noise, together with improved angular resolution, will increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the CMB polarized data as well as the reconstructed lensing potential of large scale structure. Projected constraints on cosmological parameters are tight, but these can be improved even further with information from external experiments. Here, we examine quantitatively the extent to which external priors can lead to improvement in projected constraints from a CMB-Stage IV (S4) experiment on neutrino and dark energy properties. We find that CMB S4 constraints on neutrino mass could be strongly enhanced by external constraints on the cold dark matter density Ωch2 and the Hubble constant H0. If polarization on the largest scales (ℓ<50 ) will not be measured, an external prior on the primordial amplitude As or the optical depth τ will also be important. A CMB constraint on the number of relativistic degrees of freedom, Neff, will benefit from an external prior on the spectral index ns and the baryon energy density Ωbh2. Finally, an external prior on H0 will help constrain the dark energy equation of state (w ).

  17. Internal Gravity Waves: Generation and Breaking Mechanisms by Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    la Forgia, Giovanni; Adduce, Claudia; Falcini, Federico

    2016-04-01

    Internal gravity waves (IGWs), occurring within estuaries and the coastal oceans, are manifest as large amplitude undulations of the pycnocline. IGWs propagating horizontally in a two layer stratified fluid are studied. The breaking of an IGW of depression shoaling upon a uniformly sloping boundary is investigated experimentally. Breaking dynamics beneath the shoaling waves causes both mixing and wave-induced near-bottom vortices suspending and redistributing the bed material. Laboratory experiments are conducted in a Perspex tank through the standard lock-release method, following the technique described in Sutherland et al. (2013). Each experiment is analysed and the instantaneous pycnocline position is measured, in order to obtain both geometric and kinematic features of the IGW: amplitude, wavelength and celerity. IGWs main features depend on the geometrical parameters that define the initial experimental setting: the density difference between the layers, the total depth, the layers depth ratio, the aspect ratio, and the displacement between the pycnoclines. Relations between IGWs geometric and kinematic features and the initial setting parameters are analysed. The approach of the IGWs toward a uniform slope is investigated in the present experiments. Depending on wave and slope characteristics, different breaking and mixing processes are observed. Sediments are sprinkled on the slope to visualize boundary layer separation in order to analyze the suspension e redistribution mechanisms due to the wave breaking.

  18. External priors for the next generation of CMB experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Manzotti, Alessandro; Dodelson, Scott; Park, Youngsoo

    2015-12-08

    Planned cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments can dramatically improve what we know about neutrino physics, inflation, and dark energy. The low level of noise, together with improved angular resolution, will increase the signal to noise of the CMB polarized signal as well as the reconstructed lensing potential of high redshift large scale structure. Projected constraints on cosmological parameters are extremely tight, but these can be improved even further with information from external experiments. Here, we examine quantitatively the extent to which external priors can lead to improvement in projected constraints from a CMB-Stage IV (S4) experiment on neutrino and dark energy properties. We find that CMB S4 constraints on neutrino mass could be strongly enhanced by external constraints on the cold dark matter density $\\Omega_{c}h^{2}$ and the Hubble constant $H_{0}$. If polarization on the largest scales ($\\ell<50$) will not be measured, an external prior on the primordial amplitude $A_{s}$ or the optical depth $\\tau$ will also be important. A CMB constraint on the number of relativistic degrees of freedom, $N_{\\rm eff}$, will benefit from an external prior on the spectral index $n_{s}$ and the baryon energy density $\\Omega_{b}h^{2}$. Finally, an external prior on $H_{0}$ will help constrain the dark energy equation of state ($w$).

  19. Plant virology and next generation sequencing: experiences with a Potyvirus.

    PubMed

    Kehoe, Monica A; Coutts, Brenda A; Buirchell, Bevan J; Jones, Roger A C

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing is quickly emerging as the go-to tool for plant virologists when sequencing whole virus genomes, and undertaking plant metagenomic studies for new virus discoveries. This study aims to compare the genomic and biological properties of Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) (genus Potyvirus), isolates from Lupinus angustifolius plants with black pod syndrome (BPS), systemic necrosis or non-necrotic symptoms, and from two other plant species. When one Clover yellow vein virus (ClYVV) (genus Potyvirus) and 22 BYMV isolates were sequenced on the Illumina HiSeq2000, one new ClYVV and 23 new BYMV sequences were obtained. When the 23 new BYMV genomes were compared with 17 other BYMV genomes available on Genbank, phylogenetic analysis provided strong support for existence of nine phylogenetic groupings. Biological studies involving seven isolates of BYMV and one of ClYVV gave no symptoms or reactions that could be used to distinguish BYMV isolates from L. angustifolius plants with black pod syndrome from other isolates. Here, we propose that the current system of nomenclature based on biological properties be replaced by numbered groups (I-IX). This is because use of whole genomes revealed that the previous phylogenetic grouping system based on partial sequences of virus genomes and original isolation hosts was unsustainable. This study also demonstrated that, where next generation sequencing is used to obtain complete plant virus genomes, consideration needs to be given to issues regarding sample preparation, adequate levels of coverage across a genome and methods of assembly. It also provided important lessons that will be helpful to other plant virologists using next generation sequencing in the future. PMID:25102175

  20. Plant Virology and Next Generation Sequencing: Experiences with a Potyvirus

    PubMed Central

    Kehoe, Monica A.; Coutts, Brenda A.; Buirchell, Bevan J.; Jones, Roger A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing is quickly emerging as the go-to tool for plant virologists when sequencing whole virus genomes, and undertaking plant metagenomic studies for new virus discoveries. This study aims to compare the genomic and biological properties of Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) (genus Potyvirus), isolates from Lupinus angustifolius plants with black pod syndrome (BPS), systemic necrosis or non-necrotic symptoms, and from two other plant species. When one Clover yellow vein virus (ClYVV) (genus Potyvirus) and 22 BYMV isolates were sequenced on the Illumina HiSeq2000, one new ClYVV and 23 new BYMV sequences were obtained. When the 23 new BYMV genomes were compared with 17 other BYMV genomes available on Genbank, phylogenetic analysis provided strong support for existence of nine phylogenetic groupings. Biological studies involving seven isolates of BYMV and one of ClYVV gave no symptoms or reactions that could be used to distinguish BYMV isolates from L. angustifolius plants with black pod syndrome from other isolates. Here, we propose that the current system of nomenclature based on biological properties be replaced by numbered groups (I–IX). This is because use of whole genomes revealed that the previous phylogenetic grouping system based on partial sequences of virus genomes and original isolation hosts was unsustainable. This study also demonstrated that, where next generation sequencing is used to obtain complete plant virus genomes, consideration needs to be given to issues regarding sample preparation, adequate levels of coverage across a genome and methods of assembly. It also provided important lessons that will be helpful to other plant virologists using next generation sequencing in the future. PMID:25102175

  1. Experiments on sound generation in corrugated pipes with flow.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Ulf R; Wiik, Geir A

    2007-03-01

    The article reports acoustic measurements on short corrugated pipes with flow. Such pipes might generate high sound levels associated with length resonances. One of the main objectives of the study was to estimate the location of the effective sources by studying the energy flow through the pipes. It was found that a short section of corrugations will only produce sound effectively when placed at the inflow end, while for fully corrugated pipes, the sound-producing regions are located around the pressure maxima of the observed standing waves. It was further found that the net energy flow is in the upstream direction for nearly the complete length of pipe. PMID:17407869

  2. Dynamic stability experiments in sodium-heated steam generators. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    France, D.M.; Roy, R.; Carlson, R.D.; Chiang, T.

    1984-01-01

    Seventy-two dynamic stability tests were performed in the sodium-heated boiling-water test facility at Argonne National Laboratory. A full-scale LMFBR steam generator tube was employed as the test section operating over the water parameter ranges of 6.9 to 15.9 MPa pressure and 170 to 800 kg/m/sup 2/.s mass flux. The stability thresholds from the test compared well to the predictions of a modified version of a correlation equation recently published by other investigators. Typical experimental data and the modified correlation equation are presented.

  3. Control of a Bose-Einstein condensate on a chip by external optical and magnetic potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Maluckov, A.; Petrovic, J.; Gligoric, G.; Hadzievski, Lj.; Lombardi, P.; Schaefer, F.; Cataliotti, F.S.

    2012-09-15

    In this paper we explore the possibilities of control of a Bose-Einstein condensate on an atom chip by the use of potentials generated by photonic and magnetic components. We show that the fields produced by both types of components can be modelled by a generic exponential potential and derive analytic expressions that allow for an easy assessment of their impact on a trapped condensate. Using dynamical numerical simulations we study the transport of the condensate between the control structures on a chip. We study in detail different regimes of the condensate behaviour in an evanescent light potential generated by a photonic structure in the vicinity of the condensate and in magnetic potentials generated by a wire or a coil. The calculations are based on the reported parameters of atom chip setups and available photonic and magnetic components. Finally, the model is verified by an experiment with a condensate on an atom chip and a coil. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Generic potential used to describe both the optical evanescent and magnetic fields. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An analytic closed form solution found for the impact of a generic potential on a BEC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BEC dynamics calculated for potential time sequences attainable in experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditions for BEC transfer by an external field identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exponential-potential model validated by a BEC-on-chip experiment.

  4. Ballistic range experiments on superbooms generated by refraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanai, M.; Toong, T.-Y.; Pierce, A. D.

    1976-01-01

    The enhanced sonic boom or supersonic boom generated as a result of atmospheric refraction in threshold Mach number flights was recreated in a ballistic range by firing projectiles at low supersonic speeds into a stratified medium obtained by slowly injecting carbon dioxide into air. The range was equipped with a fast-response dynamic pressure transducer and schlieren photographic equipment, and the sound speed variation with height was controlled by regulating the flow rate of the CO2. The schlieren observations of the resulting flow field indicate that the generated shocks are reflected near the sonic cutoff altitude where local sound speed equals body speed, provided such an altitude exists. Maximum shock strength occurs very nearly at the point where the incident and reflected shocks join, indicating that the presence of the reflected shock may have an appreciable effect on the magnitude of the focus factor. The largest focus factor detected was 1.7 and leads to an estimate that the constant in the Guiraud-Thery scaling law should have a value of 1.30.

  5. Model Experiment on the Generation of the Korotkoff Sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Mieko

    1980-07-01

    The mechanism of the genesis of the Korotkoff sounds is investigated by model experiment using latex tubes and a segment of isolated blood vessel of dogs. The tube compliance is much reduced when the transmural (internal minus external) pressure is very high or very low, and increases radically for intermediate states. It can be concluded that there are two different mechanisms by which the sounds are emitted. One is durable sounds caused by self-excited vibration in the process of collapse of the tube, and the other is impulsive sounds emitted transiently when the tube compliance is abruptly decreased. It is possible to explain qualitatively the change of sound phases over a wide range from systole to diastole as an appropriate mixture of durable and impulsive sounds.

  6. Technology for the Next-Generation-Mobile User Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delagi, Greg

    The current mobile-handset market is a vital and growing one, being driven by technology advances, including increased bandwidth and processing performance, as well as reduced power consumption and improved screen technologies. The 3G/4G handsets of today are multimedia internet devices with increased screen size, HD video and gaming, interactive touch screens, HD camera and camcorders, as well as incredible social, entertainment, and productivity applications. While mobile-technology advancements to date have made us more social in many ways, new advancements over the next decade will bring us to the next level, allowing mobile users to experience new types of "virtual" social interactions with all the senses. The mobile handsets of the future will be smart autonomous-lifestyle devices with a multitude of incorporated sensors, applications and display options, all designed to make your life easier and more productive! With future display media, including 3D imaging, virtual interaction and conferencing will be possible, making every call feel like you are in the same room, providing an experience far beyond today's video conferencing technology. 3D touch-screen with integrated image-projection technologies will work in conjunction with gesturing to bring a new era of intuitive mobile device applications, interaction, and information sharing. Looking to the future, there are many challenges to be faced in delivering a smart mobile companion device that will meet the user demands. One demand will be for the availability of new and compelling services, and features on the "mobile companion". These mobile companions will be more than just Internet devices, and will function as on-the-go workstations, allowing users to function as if they were sitting in front of their computer in the office or at home. The massive amounts of data that will be transmitted through, to and from these mobile companions will require immense improvements in system performance, including

  7. Infrasound Generated by Strombolian Eruptions - Insights from Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowa, A.; Phillips, J. C.; Rust, A.; Green, D. N.

    2010-12-01

    In recent years infrasonic monitoring at volcanoes has become an increasingly common tool. Much of the current work on interpreting volcano infrasound has concentrated on Strombolian eruptions, and several mechanisms have been suggested for the sound produced at these eruptions. However, the precise mechanisms at the vent need to be identified and understood if infrasound recorded in the field is to be used to infer conditions in the volcanic system. In this work, laboratory experiments using audio recordings coupled with high speed video footage have been conducted to gain a deeper understanding of these sounds. A simplified analogue model is used as an analogy for a Strombolian eruption: an air bubble rises through a tank containing a viscous Newtonian liquid (golden syrup) and bursts at the surface. Although the experimental set-up is simple and idealized, it allows control of physical properties and measurement of the processes observed far more accurately than would be possible in the field. Physical parameters which may control the form of the acoustic wave produced, such as liquid viscosity (achieved by dilution of pure golden syrup with water) and bubble volume are investigated. Initial results show that the onset of the main part of the acoustic waveform occurs concurrently with the onset of bubble rupture. Trends in the amplitude and frequency of the acoustic waveform, as well as bubble rupture speed are seen as the liquid viscosity varied. A number of candidate mechanisms for the production of sound during the experiments have been investigated, and synthetic waveforms compared to experimental data. These include the flow of gas through a growing hole from a pressurised reservoir (the bubble), and the mass flux due to the collapse of the bubble film. Importantly it has been shown that even in this very simple case - the sound produced by the bursting of a hemispherical bubble formed at the surface of a viscous liquid - is not as simple as some theories

  8. Cylindrical Liner Z-pinch Experiments on the MAGPIE Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdiak, Guy; Lebedev, Sergey V.; Harvey-Thompson, Adam J.; Swadling, George F.; Suzuki-Vidal, Francisco; Skidmore, Jonathan; Suttle, Lee; Khoory, Essa; Pickworth, Louisa; de Grouchy, Philip; Hall, Gareth N.; Bland, Simon N.; Weinwurm, Marcus; Chittenden, Jeremy P.

    2012-10-01

    Experimental data from gas-filled cylindrical liner z-pinch experiments is presented. The MAGPIE current (1.4 MA, 240 ns) is applied to a thin walled (80um) Al tube with a static gas-fill inside. The system is diagnosed axially using interferometry, optical streak photography and optical spectroscopy. We observe a series of cylindrically converging shock waves driven into the gas-fill from the inside liner surface. No bulk motion of the liner occurs. The timing of the shocks and their trajectories provide information on the shock launching mechanisms. This in turn allows a study of the response of the liner to the current pulse. Shock wave timing is compared to measurements of the liner resistance and optical images of the liner's outside surface. The system provides a useful, essentially 1D problem for testing MagLIF relevant MHD codes, particularly with regards to EOS, strength and resistivity models. This work may also be relevant to the study of shocks in astrophysical plasmas. The shocks launched into the gas radiatiate strongly; spatially resolved optical spectroscopy data and radial electron density profiles from interferometry images provide evidence for a radiative precursor ahead of the first shock. Instabilities are seen to develop in the downstream regions.

  9. Preliminary experiments on surface flow visualization in the cryogenic wind tunnel by use of condensing or freezing gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    Cryogenic wind tunnel users must have available surface flow visualization techniques to satisfy a variety of needs. While the ideal from an aerodynamic stand would be non-intrusive, until an economical technique is developed there will be occasions when the user will be prepared to resort to an intrusive method. One such method is proposed, followed by preliminary evaluation experiments carried out in environments representative of the cryogenic nitrogen tunnel. The technique uses substances which are gases at normal temperature and pressure but liquid or solid at cryogenic temperatures. These are deposited on the model in localized regions, the patterns of the deposits and their subsequent melting or evaporation revealing details of the surface flow. The gases were chosen because of the likelihood that they will not permanently contaminate the model or tunnel. Twenty-four gases were identified as possibly suitable and four of these were tested from which it was concluded that surface flow direction can be shown by the method. Other flow details might also be detectable. The cryogenic wind tunnel used was insulated on the outside and did not show signs of contamination.

  10. Chondrules of the Very First Generation in Bencubbin/CH-like Meteorites QUE94411 and Hammadah Al Hamra 237: Condensation Origin at High Ambient Nebular Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krot, Alexander N.; Meibom, Anders; Russell, Sara S.; Young, Edward; Alexander, Conel M.; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Lofgren, Gary; Cuzzi, Jeff; Zipfel, Jutta; Keil, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    Chondrules in QUE94411 and HH 237 formed at high ambient T prior to condensation of Fe,Ni-metal following a large scale thermal event that resulted in complete vaporization of a solar nebula region. These chondrules escaped subsequent remelting.

  11. A NOVEL HIGH-SPEED METHOD FOR THE GENERATION OF 4-ARYLDIHYDROPYRIMIDINE COMPOUND LIBRARIES USING A MICROWAVE-ASSISTED BIGINELLI CONDENSATION PROTOCOL -

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this presentation we report the application of microwave assisted chemistry to the parallel synthesis of 4-aryl-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-ones employing a solventless Biginelli multicomponent condensation protocol. The novel method employs neat mixtures of B-ketoesters, aryl ...

  12. Confinement Contains Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Roberts, Craig D.; Shrock, Robert; Tandy, Peter C.

    2012-03-12

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and its connection to the generation of hadron masses has historically been viewed as a vacuum phenomenon. We argue that confinement makes such a position untenable. If quark-hadron duality is a reality in QCD, then condensates, those quantities that have commonly been viewed as constant empirical mass-scales that fill all spacetime, are instead wholly contained within hadrons; i.e., they are a property of hadrons themselves and expressed, e.g., in their Bethe-Salpeter or light-front wave functions. We explain that this paradigm is consistent with empirical evidence, and incidentally expose misconceptions in a recent Comment.

  13. Condensation model for the ESBWR passive condensers

    SciTech Connect

    Revankar, S. T.; Zhou, W.; Wolf, B.; Oh, S.

    2012-07-01

    In the General Electric's Economic simplified boiling water reactor (GE-ESBWR) the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) plays a major role in containment pressure control in case of an loss of coolant accident. The PCCS condenser must be able to remove sufficient energy from the reactor containment to prevent containment from exceeding its design pressure following a design basis accident. There are three PCCS condensation modes depending on the containment pressurization due to coolant discharge; complete condensation, cyclic venting and flow through mode. The present work reviews the models and presents model predictive capability along with comparison with existing data from separate effects test. The condensation models in thermal hydraulics code RELAP5 are also assessed to examine its application to various flow modes of condensation. The default model in the code predicts complete condensation well, and basically is Nusselt solution. The UCB model predicts through flow well. None of condensation model in RELAP5 predict complete condensation, cyclic venting, and through flow condensation consistently. New condensation correlations are given that accurately predict all three modes of PCCS condensation. (authors)

  14. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akito; Ota, Ken-Ichiro; Iwamura, Yashuhiro

    Preface -- 1. General. Progress in condensed matter nuclear science / A. Takahashi. Summary of ICCF-12 / X. Z. Li. Overview of light water/hydrogen-based low-energy nuclear reactions / G. H. Miley and P. J. Shrestha -- 2. Excess heat and He detection. Development of "DS-reactor" as the practical reactor of "cold fusion" based on the "DS-cell" with "DS-cathode" / Y. Arata and Y.-C. Zhang. Progress in excess of power experiments with electrochemical loading of deuterium in palladium / V. Violante ... [et al.]. Anomalous energy generation during conventional electrolysis / T. Mizuno and Y. Toriyabe. "Excess heat" induced by deuterium flux in palladium film / B. Liu ... [et al.]. Abnormal excess heat observed during Mizuno-type experiments / J.-F. Fauvarque, P. P. Clauzon and G. J.-M. Lallevé. Seebeck envelope calorimetry with a Pd|D[symbol]O + H[symbol]SO[symbol] electrolytic cell / W.-S. Zhang, J. Dash and Q. Wang. Observation and investigation of nuclear fusion and self-induced electric discharges in liquids / A. I. Koldamasov ... [et al.]. Description of a sensitive seebeck calorimeter used for cold fusion studies / E. Storms. Some recent results at ENEA / M. Apicella ... [et al.]. Heat measurement during plasma electrolysis / K. Iizumi ... [et al.]. Effect of an additive on thermal output during electrolysis of heavy water with a palladium cathode / Q. Wang and J. Dash. Thermal analysis of calorimetric systems / L. D'Aulerio ... [et al.]. Surface plasmons and low-energy nuclear reactions triggering / E. Castagna ... [et al.]. Production method for violent TCB jet plasma from cavity / F. Amini. New results and an ongoing excess heat controversy / L. Kowalski ... [et al.] -- 3. Transmutation. Observation of surface distribution of products by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry during D[symbol] gas permeation through Pd Complexes / Y. Iwamura ... [et al.]. Discharge experiment using Pd/CaO/Pd multi-layered cathode / S. Narita ... [et al.]. Producing transmutation

  15. In-Space technology experiments program. A high efficiency thermal interface (using condensation heat transfer) between a 2-phase fluid loop and heatpipe radiator: Experiment definition phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohner, John A.; Dempsey, Brian P.; Herold, Leroy M.

    1990-01-01

    Space Station elements and advanced military spacecraft will require rejection of tens of kilowatts of waste heat. Large space radiators and two-phase heat transport loops will be required. To minimize radiator size and weight, it is critical to minimize the temperature drop between the heat source and sink. Under an Air Force contract, a unique, high-performance heat exchanger is developed for coupling the radiator to the transport loop. Since fluid flow through the heat exchanger is driven by capillary forces which are easily dominated by gravity forces in ground testing, it is necessary to perform microgravity thermal testing to verify the design. This contract consists of an experiment definition phase leading to a preliminary design and cost estimate for a shuttle-based flight experiment of this heat exchanger design. This program will utilize modified hardware from a ground test program for the heat exchanger.

  16. In-Space technology experiments program. A high efficiency thermal interface (using condensation heat transfer) between a 2-phase fluid loop and heatpipe radiator: Experiment definition phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohner, John A.; Dempsey, Brian P.; Herold, Leroy M.

    1990-07-01

    Space Station elements and advanced military spacecraft will require rejection of tens of kilowatts of waste heat. Large space radiators and two-phase heat transport loops will be required. To minimize radiator size and weight, it is critical to minimize the temperature drop between the heat source and sink. Under an Air Force contract, a unique, high-performance heat exchanger is developed for coupling the radiator to the transport loop. Since fluid flow through the heat exchanger is driven by capillary forces which are easily dominated by gravity forces in ground testing, it is necessary to perform microgravity thermal testing to verify the design. This contract consists of an experiment definition phase leading to a preliminary design and cost estimate for a shuttle-based flight experiment of this heat exchanger design. This program will utilize modified hardware from a ground test program for the heat exchanger.

  17. Operational experience on the MP-200 series commercial wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, M. B.

    1982-01-01

    The MP-200 wind turbine generator is described. The mechanical system, microprocessor controller, and display devices, are described. Also discussed are modifications to the prototype, operational experience, and MP-600 systems development.

  18. Condensed Plasmas under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Thomas, H. M.; Konopka, U.; Rothermel, H.; Zuzic, M.; Ivlev, A.; Goree, J.; Rogers, Rick (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Experiments under microgravity conditions were carried out to study 'condensed' (liquid and crystalline) states of a colloidal plasma (ions, electrons, and charged microspheres). Systems with approximately 10(exp 6) microspheres were produced. The observed systems represent new forms of matter--quasineutral, self-organized plasmas--the properties of which are largely unexplored. In contrast to laboratory measurements, the systems under microgravity are clearly three dimensional (as expected); they exhibit stable vortex flows, sometimes adjacent to crystalline regions, and a central 'void,' free of microspheres.

  19. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession. PMID:16623137

  20. Principal component analysis of soft x-ray signals generated by the PF-1000 facility in experiments with solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalska-Strzęciwilk, Ewa; Skrzeczanowski, Wojciech; Czarnecka, Agata; Kubkowska, Monika; Paduch, Marian; Zielińska, Ewa

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents the analysis of soft x-ray signals generated in the PF-1000 facility equipped with a modified inner electrode with a central tungsten insert of 50 mm diameter in experiments with tungsten and carbon samples. The PF-1000 machine was operated with pure deuterium filling under the initial pressure of 1.3 hPa. The machine was powered using a condenser bank charged initially to 24 kV, corresponding to the stored energy of 380 kJ, with the maximum discharge current amounted to 1.8 MA. For investigation of plasma stream-sample interactions, we applied 16-frame laser interferometry, optical spectroscopy and soft x-ray measurements with the use of a system of four silicon pin-diodes. In this paper, we mainly focus on the principal component analysis (PCA) of the registered x-ray signals to find a corelation between the neutron yield and observed maxima in signals. X-ray signals collected by four pin-diodes covered a 9 cm range in front of the electrode ends. Each diode collected a signal from the circle of 3 cm diameter. The presented PCA analysis is based on 57 PF discharges and 16 parameters are taken into account in the analysis. The study of signals from the pin-diode system showed good correlation between the neutron yield and the maximum in the x-ray signal, which appeared about 1000-1300 ns after the maximum of plasma compression.

  1. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akito; Ota, Ken-Ichiro; Iwamura, Yashuhiro

    Preface -- 1. General. Progress in condensed matter nuclear science / A. Takahashi. Summary of ICCF-12 / X. Z. Li. Overview of light water/hydrogen-based low-energy nuclear reactions / G. H. Miley and P. J. Shrestha -- 2. Excess heat and He detection. Development of "DS-reactor" as the practical reactor of "cold fusion" based on the "DS-cell" with "DS-cathode" / Y. Arata and Y.-C. Zhang. Progress in excess of power experiments with electrochemical loading of deuterium in palladium / V. Violante ... [et al.]. Anomalous energy generation during conventional electrolysis / T. Mizuno and Y. Toriyabe. "Excess heat" induced by deuterium flux in palladium film / B. Liu ... [et al.]. Abnormal excess heat observed during Mizuno-type experiments / J.-F. Fauvarque, P. P. Clauzon and G. J.-M. Lallevé. Seebeck envelope calorimetry with a Pd|D[symbol]O + H[symbol]SO[symbol] electrolytic cell / W.-S. Zhang, J. Dash and Q. Wang. Observation and investigation of nuclear fusion and self-induced electric discharges in liquids / A. I. Koldamasov ... [et al.]. Description of a sensitive seebeck calorimeter used for cold fusion studies / E. Storms. Some recent results at ENEA / M. Apicella ... [et al.]. Heat measurement during plasma electrolysis / K. Iizumi ... [et al.]. Effect of an additive on thermal output during electrolysis of heavy water with a palladium cathode / Q. Wang and J. Dash. Thermal analysis of calorimetric systems / L. D'Aulerio ... [et al.]. Surface plasmons and low-energy nuclear reactions triggering / E. Castagna ... [et al.]. Production method for violent TCB jet plasma from cavity / F. Amini. New results and an ongoing excess heat controversy / L. Kowalski ... [et al.] -- 3. Transmutation. Observation of surface distribution of products by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry during D[symbol] gas permeation through Pd Complexes / Y. Iwamura ... [et al.]. Discharge experiment using Pd/CaO/Pd multi-layered cathode / S. Narita ... [et al.]. Producing transmutation

  2. Little Experience with ICT: Are They Really the Net Generation Student-Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, Hyo-Jeong; Choi, Hyungshin; Lim, Wei Ying; Xiong, Yao

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the complexity of past experiences with ICT, pedagogical beliefs, and attitude toward ICT in education that the Net Generation student teachers have about their intention to teach and learn with technology. This study has a particular focus on their lived experiences as school students where ICT related…

  3. The Role of Physical Education and Other Formative Experiences of Three Generations of Female Football Fans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Stacey; Kirk, David

    2014-01-01

    The experiences of female sports fans have been largely marginalised in academic research to date and little research has examined the formative sporting experiences of female spectators. This article draws on 51 semi-structured interviews with three generations of female fans of one (men's) professional football club (Leicester City), to…

  4. Expressions of Generativity through Family Leisure: Experiences of Grandparents and Adult Grandchildren

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebblethwaite, Shannon; Norris, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the expression of generativity among grandparents and their adult grandchildren through their experiences of family leisure. Fourteen dyads of grandparents and adult grandchildren were interviewed about their experience of family leisure. The findings illustrate the important role that family leisure…

  5. Using Phenomenology to Understand Experiences of Racism for Second-Generation South Asian Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beharry, Pauline; Crozier, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to describe the lived experiences of racism for second-generation Canadian women of South Asian descent and how this affected their identity. Six adult co-researchers shared their experiences of what occurred when faced with racism. A phenomenological approach was employed, out of which five categories…

  6. Participatory Reality Constitution: A Phenomenological Study of Generative Experiences in Higher Education Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saiter, Sean M. Avila

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological inquiry into the felt experience of participatory sense-making and collaborative presence in small groups explores where and when a common field of resonance is generated among individuals. The experience is named "participatory reality constitution" (PRC). Nine co-participants who met criteria of having experienced…

  7. Connection and Commitment: Exploring the Generation and Experience of Emotion in a Participatory Drama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Julie; Bundy, Penny; Stinson, Madonna

    2015-01-01

    Emotion is a complex and important aspect of participatory drama experience. This is because drama work of this kind provokes emotional responses to both actual and dramatic worlds. This paper identifies two key features of participatory drama that influence the generation and experience of emotion: commitment and connection. These features are…

  8. Optimizing process vacuum condensers

    SciTech Connect

    Lines, J.R.; Tice, D.W.

    1997-09-01

    Vacuum condensers play a critical role in supporting vacuum processing operations. Although they may appear similar to atmospheric units, vacuum condensers have their own special designs, considerations and installation needs. By adding vacuum condensers, precondensers and intercondensers, system cost efficiency can be optimized. Vacuum-condensing systems permit reclamation of high-value product by use of a precondenser, or reduce operating costs with intercondensers. A precondenser placed between the vacuum vessel and ejector system will recover valuable process vapors and reduce vapor load to an ejector system--minimizing the system`s capital and operating costs. Similarly, an intercondenser positioned between ejector stages can condense motive steam and process vapors and reduce vapor load to downstream ejectors as well as lower capital and operating costs. The paper describes vacuum condenser systems, types of vacuum condensers, shellside condensing, tubeside condensing, noncondensable gases, precondenser pressure drop, system interdependency, equipment installation, and equipment layout.

  9. STATegra EMS: an Experiment Management System for complex next-generation omics experiments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing assays are now routinely used to study different aspects of genome organization. As decreasing costs and widespread availability of sequencing enable more laboratories to use sequencing assays in their research projects, the number of samples and replicates in these experiments can quickly grow to several dozens of samples and thus require standardized annotation, storage and management of preprocessing steps. As a part of the STATegra project, we have developed an Experiment Management System (EMS) for high throughput omics data that supports different types of sequencing-based assays such as RNA-seq, ChIP-seq, Methyl-seq, etc, as well as proteomics and metabolomics data. The STATegra EMS provides metadata annotation of experimental design, samples and processing pipelines, as well as storage of different types of data files, from raw data to ready-to-use measurements. The system has been developed to provide research laboratories with a freely-available, integrated system that offers a simple and effective way for experiment annotation and tracking of analysis procedures. PMID:25033091

  10. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume II, reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986, to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators. The technical issues discussed most extensively were: man/machine interfaces, component interfaces, thermal gradients of startup and cooldown and the need for an accurate industry database for trend analysis of the diesel generator system.

  11. Simulation of Homogeneous Condensation of Ethanol in High Pressure Supersonic Nozzle Flows using BGK Condensation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Levin, D. A.

    2011-05-01

    In the present work, we have simulated the homogeneous condensation flow of ethanol using the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) based condensation model for the experimental conditions of Wegener et al. [1]. In an earlier work carried out by Gallagher-Rogers et al. [2], it was found not possible to simulate the experimental conditions using the direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) based condensation model. In this work we use a statistical-BGK approach to model condensation and compare our simulated predictions of the point of condensation onset and the distribution of mass fraction along the nozzle centerline with experiments. The experiments provide data for different cases corresponding to varying amounts of ethanol concentration, compared to air, for total mixture pressures which remains mostly constant for all cases. Our numerical results show good agreement with the experiments, thus validating our BGK based condensation model for high pressure flow applications.

  12. Vapor condensation on a turbulent liquid interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmick, M. R.; Khoo, B. C.; Sonin, A. A.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation which seeks the fundamental relationship between the interfacial condensation rate and the parameters which control it when the liquid side is turbulent is discussed. The scaling laws for free-surface condensation are discussed for this case. It is argued that the condensation of cryogenic liquids can, in principle, be simulated in experiments using steam and water. Data are presented for the condensation rate in terms of the dimensionless scaling parameters which involve the fluid properties and the liquid-side turbulence velocity and length scales.

  13. Research and Development Supporting a Next Generation Germanium Double Beta Decay Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rielage, Keith; Elliott, Steve; Chu, Pinghan; Goett, Johnny; Massarczyk, Ralph; Xu, Wenqin

    2015-10-01

    To improve the search for neutrinoless double beta decay, the next-generation experiments will increase in source mass and continue to reduce backgrounds in the region of interest. A promising technology for the next generation experiment is large arrays of Germanium p-type point contact detectors enriched in 76-Ge. The experience, expertise and lessons learned from the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and GERDA experiments naturally lead to a number of research and development activities that will be useful in guiding a future experiment utilizing Germanium. We will discuss some R&D activities including a hybrid cryostat design, background reduction in cabling, connectors and electronics, and modifications to reduce assembly time. We acknowledge the support of the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program.

  14. Report on the NASA Soft and Complex Condensed Matter Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Bhim (Technical Monitor); Chaikin, Paul; Nagel, Sidney

    2003-01-01

    During the past decade, NASA has been a leading U.S. supporter of soft and complex condensed matter research. Experiments in space shuttles, MIR, the International Space Station (ISS), as well as ground-based research have provided new insights into several areas including hard sphere colloids, crystal growth, phase ordering, and transport of complex fluids at the critical point. To help define the next generation of flight experiments needed to answer remaining important questions in the field of soft and complex condensed matter, NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Science sponsored a workshop on Soft and Complex Condensed Matter, March 6, 2003. This workshop asked leading members in the field of Soft and Complex Condensed Matter (at the APS March Meeting) to help identify exciting unanswered questions in the field, along with specific research topics for which the absence of gravity would enable significant results unobtainable by other means. The workshop was attended by 24 participants from universities across the U.S. and from five different countries (in addition to NASA GRC participants).

  15. Condensation in Titan's lower atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavvas, P.; Griffith, C. A.; Yelle, R. V.

    2011-10-01

    We present a self-consistent description of Titan's aerosols-clouds-gases system and compare our results with the optical properties retrieved from measurements made by the Descent Imager / Spectral Radiometer (DISR) experiment on the Huygens probe [4]. Our calculations include the condensation of methane, ethane and hydrogen cyanide on photochemical aerosols produced in the thermosphere. Our results suggest that the two distinct extinction layers observed by DISR below 80 km are produced by HCN and methane condensation, respectively, while for the Huygens' equatorial conditions simulated here, the contribution of ethane clouds to the total opacity is negligible

  16. Dual-monitor deterministic hardware for visual stimuli generation in neuroscience experiments.

    PubMed

    Gazziro, Mario; Almeida, Lirio

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the development of a dual-monitor visual stimulus generator that is used in neuroscience experiments with invertebrates such as flies. The experiment consists in the visualization of two fixed images that are displaced horizontally according to the stimulus data. The system was developed using off-the-shelf FPGA kits and it is capable of displaying 640x480 pixels with 256 intensity levels at 200 frames per second (FPS) on each monitor. A Raster plot of the experiment with the superimposed stimuli was generated as the result of this work. A novel architecture was developed, using the same DOT Clock for both monitors, and its implementation generates a perfect synchronism in both devices. PMID:21096378

  17. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.; Dingee, D.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators.

  18. Condensates in Jovian Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R.

    1999-01-01

    Thermochemical equilibrium theory which starts with temperature/pressure profiles, compositional information and thermodynamic data for condensable species in the jovian planet atmospheres predicts layers of condensate clouds in the upper troposphere.

  19. The Second Generation Hypernuclear Spectroscopy at JLab Hall C (E01-011 experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Akihiko

    2008-11-01

    The second generation Λ hypernuclear spectroscopy by (e,e’K{sup +}) reaction has been carried out successfully at JLab in 2005. New configurations, HKS and Tilt method, significantly improved both energy resolution and statistics. Systematic error depend on tuning procedure was estimated by the blind analysis. Analysis is in the final stage. Third generation experiment (JLab E05-115) will be performed in the summer of 2009 w/ new e’ spectrometer (HES).

  20. Film condensation in a horizontal rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Qing; Suryanarayana, N. V.

    1993-01-01

    Condensation heat transfer in a horizontal rectangular duct was experimentally and analytically investigated. To prevent the dripping of condensate on the film, the experiment was conducted inside a horizontal rectangular duct with vapor condensing only on the bottom cooled plate of the duct. R-113 and FC-72 (Fluorinert Electronic Fluid developed by the 3M Company) were used as the condensing fluids. The experimental program included measurements of film thickness, local and average heat transfer coefficients, wave length, wave speed, and a study of wave initiation. The measured film thickness was used to obtain the local heat transfer coefficient. The wave initiation was studied both with condensation and with an adiabatic air-liquid flow. The test sections used in both experiments were identical.

  1. Self-generated Magnetic Fields in Blast-wave Driven Rayleigh-Taylor Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaig, Markus; Plewa, Tomasz

    2014-10-01

    We study the generation of magnetic fields via the Biermann battery effect in blast-wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor experiments. Previous estimates have shown that in a typical experiment, one should expect fields in the MG range to be generated, with the potential to influence the Rayleigh-Taylor morphology. We perform two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations, where we solve the extended set of MHD equations known as the Braginskii equations. The simulation parameters reflect the physical conditions in past experiments performed on the OMEGA laser and potential future experiments on the NIF laser facility. When neglecting the friction force between electrons and ions in the simulations, magnetic fields of the order of a few 0.1 MG (with a plasma smaller than 1000) are generated, and are found to be dynamically significant. However, it turns out that once the friction force is included, the magnetic fields become much smaller (with a plasma beta greater than 100000) which have negligible influence on the dynamics of the system. Our results therefore indicate that, contrary to previous speculations, it is highly unlikely that self-generated magnetic fields can influence the morphology of a typical blast-wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor experiment. M.F. and T.P. were supported by the DOE Grant DE-FG52- 09NA29548 and the NSF Grant AST-1109113. This research used resources of the National Energy Re.

  2. Collisions of Dark Solitons in Elongated Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Stellmer, S.; Becker, C.; Soltan-Panahi, P.; Richter, E.-M.; Doerscher, S.; Baumert, M.; Kronjaeger, J.; Sengstock, K.; Bongs, K.

    2008-09-19

    We present experimental data showing the head-on collision of dark solitons generated in an elongated Bose-Einstein condensate. No discernable interaction can be recorded, in full agreement with the fundamental theoretical concepts of solitons as mutually transparent quasiparticles. Our soliton generation technique allows for the creation of solitons with different depths; hence, they can be distinguished and their trajectories be followed. Simulations of the 1D-Gross-Pitaevskii equation have been performed to compare the experiment with a mean-field description.

  3. 13_2_30: Experiences, Perceptions and Expectations of Retail Employment for Generation Y

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbridge, Adelina M.; Maxwell, Gillian A.; Ogden, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine Generation Y, potential graduate entrants to UK retailing, in respect of their job experiences, career perceptions and initial employment expectations. Design/methodology/approach: Utilising qualitative research methods, an exploratory study was undertaken with 33 students (all of whom fell into the…

  4. Four Generations of Women's Educational Experience in a Rural Chinese Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Haigen; Placier, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    Our study sought to understand changes in gender inequality in education across four generations of rural Chinese women's educational experiences in a small community in southern China. The 24 interviews and numerous informal conversations with 12 women showed that gender-based favouritism for men and against women undergirded family expectations,…

  5. A Phenomenological Investigation of the Lived Experiences of Successful First Generation Hispanic College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puente, Christina C.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological research study investigated the lived experiences of five successful first generation Hispanic college students. Participants' interviews were analyzed using Creswell's (2007) six steps for analyzing phenomenological studies. Findings from this study affirm the factors for student success in college regarding…

  6. An Exploration of First-Generation College Students' Career Development Beliefs and Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Kevin A.; Caperton, William; Kaiser, Dakota; Pruitt, Nathan T.; White, Heather; Hall, Eric

    2015-01-01

    First-generation college students (FGCS) represent a large proportion of individuals seeking higher education in the United States; yet this population does not perform as well academically as, and persist to graduation at lower rates than, their peers who have more familial context for the college-going experience. Completing a college degree is…

  7. Simulation of Experiments Generating Collisionless Shocks With Intense Lasers Using the CRASH Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosskopf, M. J.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Rutter, E. M.; Park, H. S.; Kugland, N. L.; Pollaine, S.; Ross, J. S.; Remington, B. A.; Ryutov, D.; Spitkovsky, A.; Gargate, L.; Gregori, G.; Bell, A.; Murphy, C.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Takabe, H.; Froula, D. H.; Fiksel, G.; Miniati, F.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Liang, E.; Woosley, N.

    2011-10-01

    Collisionless shocks, shocks generated by plasma wave interactions in regions where the collisional mean-free-path for particles is long compared to the length scale for shock interaction, are found ubiquitously in astrophysics. Experiments to investigate collisionless shocks in a laboratory-scale system are being carried out on intense lasers; measuring the density, temperature, magnetic field, and velocity of counter-streaming flows generated by laser ablation. This poster reports hydrodynamic simulations modeling the ablative flow of plasma generated in order to assess potential designs and infer properties of collected data from previous single foil experiments. This work is funded by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52-08NA28616.

  8. Investigation of Electric and Self-Generated Magnetic Fields in Implosion Experiments on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Nilson, P. M.; Goncharov, V. N.; Li, C. K.; Zylstra, A. B.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2013-10-01

    Electric and self-generated magnetic fields in direct-drive implosion experiments on the OMEGA laser were investigated using proton radiography. The experiments use plastic-shell targets with various surface defects (glue spot, wire, and stalk mount) to seed perturbations and generate localized electromagnetic fields at the ablation surface and in the plasma corona surrounding the targets. Proton radiographs show features from these perturbations and quasi-spherical multiple shell structures around the capsules at earlier times of implosions (up to ~700 ps for a 1-ns laser pulse) indicating the development of the fields. Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of these experiments predict the growth of magnetic fields up to several MG. The simulated distributions of electromagnetic fields were used to produce proton images, which show good agreement with experimental radiographs. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  9. Generation of Artificial Acoustic-Gravity Waves and Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances in HF Heating Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradipta, R.; Lee, M. C.; Cohen, J. A.; Watkins, B. J.

    2015-10-01

    We report the results of our ionospheric HF heating experiments to generate artificial acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) and traveling ionospheric disturbances (TID), which were conducted at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program facility in Gakona, Alaska. Based on the data from UHF radar, GPS total electron content, and ionosonde measurements, we found that artificial AGW/TID can be generated in ionospheric modification experiments by sinusoidally modulating the power envelope of the transmitted O-mode HF heater waves. In this case, the modulation frequency needs to be set below the characteristic Brunt-Vaisala frequency at the relevant altitudes. We avoided potential contamination from naturally-occurring AGW/TID of auroral origin by conducting the experiments during geomagnetically quiet time period. We determine that these artificial AGW/TID propagate away from the edge of the heated region with a horizontal speed of approximately 160 m/s.

  10. Preliminary design of condenser cleansing schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Warberg, J.; Foraker, E.K.; Civera, A.G.; Daley, M.L.

    1995-04-01

    Analysis of the operations of a fossil power plant for a 5-year period revealed a year-round trend of operating inefficiently due to elevated condenser back pressure, particularly during the summer months. A further 5-month longitudinal study between May and September of an individual condenser unit revealed a positive correlation between increasing inlet-circulating water temperature and above-design condenser back pressure. Moreover, condenser cleansing resulted in a return to approximately the design operating condition. A physical analysis of increased heat-rate and lost power generation from inefficient condenser back pressure was accomplished. Based on these observations and economic analysis, a preliminary cleansing schedule for periods of increasing circulating water temperature was derived. Further studies are planned to validate the proposed cleansing schedule.

  11. Bose-Einstein Condensate-Hidden Riches for New Forms of Technology and Energy Generation; Potential for Glimpse into Inner Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Don

    With the announcement of the recent successful production of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of photons, a circle has been completed which started in 1925 with the vision of Albert Einstein and Satyendra Nath Bose - a sustained macroscopic condensed state of matter where all atoms are in the same lowest quantum state. The creation of an all-optical BEC, involving a surprisingly straightforward "tabletop" method which bypasses the normally requisite laser/evaporative cooling equipment and ultra-high vacuum chambers necessary for production of the standard delicate atomic BEC, elevates this phenomenon to a new level well beyond its current perception as mere laboratory curiosity. Accordingly, this development certainly heralds eventual incorporation of atomic and photon BECs as standard operating components of energy-efficient mechanical, optical and electrical systems, implying novel ingenious engineering protocols amenable to all the tools of non-linear and quantum optics. Pointing towards such a promising technological future are the suggestion that a photon BEC could serve as a new high-energy ultra-violet (UV) laser photon source, as well as the recent unprecedented implementation of a closed-loop atom circuit (toroidal atomic BEC) demonstrating precise control of superfluid current flow, forecasting the coveted development of an atomic SQUID. Perhaps more significantly, the new highly robust and manageable optical BEC will allow heretofore unfathomable precise probing of the atomic and nano-levels of nature, affording novel high-quality testing procedures of the major foundations of quantum mechanics itself. Such a primary advancement, providing a clearer glimpse into the microscopic realms, may present us as never before with an unprecedented view of the quantum engine that underpins physical reality itself and help place the contextual nature of entanglement and quantum superposition on a firmer foundation. Thus, further progress in achieving mastery over

  12. Evaluation of stack criteria pollutant gas absorption in the new generation thermoelectric water condenser fitted with laminar impinger type heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, T.

    1995-12-31

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 authorized the Environmental Protection Agency to establish an Acid Rain Program to reduce the adverse effects of acidic deposition. The Act specifically stipulated that CEMS (continuous emissions monitoring systems) be used to measure the stack emissions under this program. Along with these rules, comes the task of the Stack Tester (Reference Method) to routinely perform RATA (Relative Accuracy Test Audit) tests on the installed CEMS. This paper presents a laboratory and field test sequence to evaluate the signal attenuation through the gas sample conditioning, water condensation removal process, using laminar flow impinger heat exchangers. This method is compared to the EPA CFR 40, Part 60, Appendix A, Method 6, glass impinger train, commonly used by RATA stack testers. CFR 40, Part 75 revisions as of the CAAA 1990, requires more stringent certification and CEMS performance standards. These standards are summarized and related to gas absorption in both the thermoelectric cooler heat exchanger and the Method 6 glass impinger train system. As an incentive to reduce the frequency of RATA tests required per year, emitters are encouraged to achieve relative accuracies of 7.5% or less compared to the reference method. This incentive requires better reference method test apparatus definition. This paper will explore these alternatives and provide test data for comparison to the currently available apparatus. Also discussed is the theory of Electronic Gas Sample Coolers and their practical application to the removal of water from stack gas.

  13. The Next Generation Ground-based CMB experiment, CMB-S4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlstrom, John E.; CMB-S4 Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    This talk will review the goals and status of the community planning for the next generation ground-based CMB experiment, CMB-S4. Following the detection of CMB polarization in 2002, the current generation of ground-based experiments each fielding of order 1000 superconducting detectors (Stage II experiments) have led to the first detection of the much fainter lensing B-mode polarization signal and the most stringent constraints on the level of the B-mode signal from inflationary gravitational waves. We can expect significant advances in the next few years as the ongoing ground-based experiments deploy of order 10,000 detectors (Stage III). The CMB community is now planning an ambitious next generation (Stage IV) ground-based program with order of 500,000 detectors, CMB-S4, to achieve critical threshold crossing goals of 1) detecting or ruling out large field inflationary models, 2) determining the effective number and masses of the neutrinos, and 3) providing precision constraints on dark energy through its impact on structure formation.

  14. Radiation-Hydrodynamic Simulation of Experiments With Intense Lasers Generating Collisionless Interpenetrating Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosskopf, Michael; Drake, R.; Kuranz, C.; Park, H.; Kugland, N.; Pollaine, S.; Ross, J.; Remington, B.; Spitkovsky, A.; Gargate, L.; Gregori, G.; Bell, A.; Murphy, C.; Meinecke, J.; Reville, B.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Takabe, H.; Froula, D.; Fiksel, G.; Miniati, F.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Liang, E.; Woolsey, N.

    2012-05-01

    Collisionless shocks, shocks generated by plasma wave interactions in regions where the collisional mean-free-path for ions is long compared to the length scale for instabilities that generate magnetic fields, are found in many astrophysical systems such as supernova remnants and planetary bow shocks. Generating conditions to investigate collisionless shock physics is difficult to achieve in a laboratory setting; however, high-energy-density physics facilities have made this a possibility. Experiments whose goal is to investigate the production and growth of magnetic fields in collisionless shocks in laboratory-scale systems are being carried out on intense lasers, several of which are measuring the plasma properties and magnetic field strength in counter-streaming, collisionless flows generated by laser ablation. This poster reports radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using the CRASH code to model the ablative flow of plasma generated in order to assess potential designs, as well as infer properties of collected data from previous experiments. This work is funded by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52- 08NA28616, by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-FG52-09NA29548, and by the National Laser User Facility Program, grant number DE-NA0000850.

  15. Generation of surface waves by an underwater moving bottom: experiments and application to tsunami modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo, Leonardo; Jamin, Timothée; Ruiz-Chavarría, Gerardo; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Most of the ocean waves that we observe in nature are generated by processes that take place near the ocean surface. This occurs mainly because fluid layers reduce significantly the transfer of motion between the source and the free surface as the depth increases. In any case, when the disturbances at a deep source are wide and fast enough, a wave can still be generated. The archetype of this kind of process is tsunami generation: during earthquakes, the seabed of the ocean experiences a sudden net vertical displacement that can yield waves capable of flooding entire coastlines. In this talk, we will focus on laboratory experiments concerning the generation of free surface waves in a three-dimensional uniform layer whose bottom uplifts suddenly. Based on simultaneous measurements of the free surface deformation and the velocity field, we analyze the wave generation dependence on the bottom kinematics. Our results display excellent agreement with a classical linear theory of gravity waves. In addition, we develop a new theoretical approach that can be applied to improve real-time numerical simulations used by the tsunami hazard mitigation programs. Supported by the AXA Research Fund.

  16. Condensation of the air-steam mixture in a vertical tube condenser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlík, Jan; Dlouhý, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with the condensation of water vapour in the presence of non-condensable air. Experimental and theoretical solutions of this problem are presented here. A heat exchanger for the condensation of industrial waste steam containing infiltrated air was designed. The condenser consists of a bundle of vertical tubes in which the steam condenses as it flows downwards with cooling water flowing outside the tubes in the opposite direction. Experiments with pure steam and with mixtures of steam with added air were carried out to find the dependence of the condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC) on the air concentration in the steam mixture. The experimental results were compared with the theoretical formulas describing the cases. The theoretical determination of the HTC is based on the Nusselt model of steam condensation on a vertical wall, where the analogy of heat and mass transfer is used to take into account the behaviour of air in a steam mixture during the condensation process. The resulting dependencies obtained from the experiments and obtained from the theoretical model have similar results. The significant decrease in the condensation HTC, which begins at very low air concentrations in a steam mixture, was confirmed.

  17. A qualitative study of adaptation experiences of 1.5-generation Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bryan S K; Brenner, Bradley R; Liang, Christopher T H; Asay, Penelope A

    2003-05-01

    Adaptation experiences of 1.5-generation Asian American college students (N = 10) were examined using the consensual qualitative research method. Results indicated 4 domains of adaptation experiences: preimmigration experiences, acculturation and enculturation experiences, intercultural relationships, and support systems. Participants reported that English proficiency played a significant role in their initial adjustment. Currently, most of the participants reported feeling identified with both the U.S. and Asian cultures. Some participants reported having experienced racism in the past. Many participants noted that they currently have no difficulty establishing friendships with culturally different persons. Participants reported currently feeling most close to friends of a similar background and that they usually seek support from friends, family, and religious organizations, but not from a psychologist or counselor. PMID:12760327

  18. Time-of-arrival analysis applied to ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. C.; Fujimaru, S.

    2012-12-01

    Time-of-arrival (TOA) analysis is applied to observations performed during ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) HF transmitter in Gakona, Alaska. In 2012, a variety of ELF/VLF wave generation techniques were employed to identify the dominant source altitude for each case. Observations were performed for beat-wave modulation, AM modulation, STF modulation, ICD modulation, and cubic frequency modulation, among others. For each of these cases, we identify the dominant ELF/VLF source altitude and compare the experimental results with theoretical HF heating predictions.

  19. Operating experience with California's first coal fired enhanced oil recovery steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, G.B.

    1983-11-01

    This article discusses the experiences of operating Pyropower Corporation's ''Pyroflow'' circulating fluidized bed steam generation plant in Bakersfield, California. The Pyroflow plant is shown to be demonstrating its ability to provide a reliable source of steam for enhanced oil recovery. Actual operating problems have been minimal, and those which have occurred have involved plant auxilliary equipment rather than the steam generator itself. Fluidized bed combustion is the only practical means of burning coal in environmentally sensitive areas such as California without the use of flue gas scrubbing for sulfur dioxide control. This plant operates on the circulating bed concept as distinct from conventional fluidized beds which have a fixed bed depth.

  20. Outdoor Science Experiment Classes; Raising the Next Generation for Researchers and Teachers of Natural Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shida, Masakazu; Danjo, Shinji; Takahashi, Noriaki

    The objectives of the outdoor science experiment classes are; for a few tens of young students and pupils as trainees to develop large-scale natural science experiments and to demonstrate them for the approximately 3,000 visitors in the venue of the EXPO park at Osaka. This method, though hardly realisable in the framework of school education, is proposed with recent successful examples, as a new means of active learning for the motivated next generation who wishes to enter the field of natural science as researchers and/or teachers.

  1. FLASH hydrodynamic simulations of experiments to explore the generation of cosmological magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopatz, A.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Gregori, G.; Koenig, M.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, D.; Meinecke, J.; Ravasio, A.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.; Yurchak, R.

    2013-03-01

    We report the results of FLASH hydrodynamic simulations of the experiments conducted by the University of Oxford High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics group and its collaborators at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation de Lasers Intenses (LULI). In these experiments, a long-pulse laser illuminates a target in a chamber filled with Argon gas, producing shock waves that generate magnetic fields via the Biermann battery mechanism. The simulations show that the result of the laser illuminating the target is a series of complex hydrodynamic phenomena.

  2. Characterisation of heat transfer and pressure drop in condensation processes within mini-channel tubes with last generation of refrigerant fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Belchi, D. Alejandro

    Heat exchanger developments are driven by energetic efficiency increase and emissionreduction. To reach the standards new system are required based on mini-channels. Mini-channels can be described as tubes with one or more ports extruded in aluminiumwith hydraulic diameter are in the range of 0.2 to 3 mm. Its use in refrigeration systemsfor some years ago is a reality thanks to the human ability to made micro-scale systems.Some heat exchanger enterprises have some models developed specially for their use inautomotive sector, cooling sector, and industrial refrigeration without having a deepknowledge of how these reduced geometries affect the most important parameters suchas pressure drop and the heat transfer coefficient. To respond to this objective, an exhaustive literature review of the last two decades hasbeen performed to determinate the state of the research. Between all the publications,several models have been selected to check the predicting capacities of them becausemost of them were developed for single port mini-channel tubes. Experimentalmeasurements of heat transfer coefficient and frictional pressure drop were recorded inan experimental installation built on purpose at the Technical University of Cartagena.Multiple variables are recorded in this installation in order to calculate local heattransfer coefficient in two-phase condensing flow within mini-channels. Both pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient experimental measurements arecompared to the previously mentioned models. Most of them capture the trend correctlybut others fail predicting experimental data. These differences can be explained by theexperimental parameters considered during the models development. In some cases themodels found in the literature were developed specific conditions, consequently theirpredicting capacities are restricted. As main contributions, this thesis provides new modelling tools for mini-channelscondensing pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient

  3. Anti-Reflective Coatings R&D for Next Generation Neutrinoless Double Beta Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leder, Alexander; Cuore Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Cyogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is a ton-scale cryogenic source=detector experiment designed to search for the Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (0 νββ) of 130Te. CUORE currently utilizes a single phonon readout channel per crystal; adding a second channel for scintillation or Cherenkov light would improve particle identification for actively rejecting background events. This light would be collected via semiconductor wafers covered with anti-reflective coatings. These coatings maximize light absorption. In this talk, I will discuss the coating optimization regarding material and structure, and its implications for designing the next generation CUORE-style experiment. In addition, I will discuss projections for possible sensitivities of next generation 0 νββ searches that use dual channel light-phonon readouts.

  4. Condensate polishers add operating reliability and flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Layman, C.M.; Bennett, L.L.

    2008-08-15

    Many of today's advanced steam generators favour either an all-volatile treatment or oxygenated treatment chemistry programme, both of which require strict maintenance of an ultra-pure boiler fedwater ro condensate system. Those requirements are many times at odds with the lower-quality water sources, such as greywater, available for plant makeup and cooling water. Adding a condensate polisher can be a simple, cost-effective solution. 4 figs.

  5. Operating experience with the 200 kW MOD-OA wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, A. G.; Saunders, A. L.; Nyland, T. W.; Shaltens, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    The machine configuration and its advantages and disadvantages, particularly as it affects reliability are discussed. The machine performance, both availability and power output characteristics are described. The Mod-OA operational experience is documented. The characteristics of the wind energy generated, the machine performance, and the subsystem strengths and weaknesses are discussed. An assessment of the project success in fulfilling its goals and objectives is also presented.

  6. Generation and reduction of the data for the Ulysses gravitational wave experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agresti, R.; Bonifazi, P.; Iess, L.; Trager, G. B.

    1987-01-01

    A procedure for the generation and reduction of the radiometric data known as REGRES is described. The software is implemented on a HP-1000F computer and was tested on REGRES data relative to the Voyager I spacecraft. The REGRES data are a current output of NASA's Orbit Determination Program. The software package was developed in view of the data analysis of the gravitational wave experiment planned for the European spacecraft Ulysses.

  7. A Proof-Of-Principle Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation Experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, Michael; Colby, Eric; Ding, Yuantao; Frederico, Joel; Gilevich, Sasha; Hast, Carsten; Jobe, R.; McCormick, Douglas; Nelson, Janice; Raubenheimer, Tor; Soong, Ken; Stupakov, Gennady; Szalata, Zenon; Walz, Dieter; Weathersby, Stephen; Woodley, Mark; Xiang, Dao; Corlett, John; Penn, Gregory; Prestemon, Soren; Qiang, Ji; /LBL, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley /LPHE, Lausanne

    2011-05-20

    In this paper we describe the technical design of an ongoing proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) experiment at the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC.We present the design considerations and the technical details of the experiment. Recently a new method, entitled echo-enabled harmonic generation, was proposed for generation of high harmonics using the beam echo effect. In an EEHG free electron laser (FEL), an electron beam is energy modulated in a modulator and then sent through a dispersive section with a high dispersion strength. After this first stage, the modulation obtained in the modulator is macroscopically washed out, while simultaneously introducing complicated fine structure (separated energy bands) into the phase space of the beam. A second laser is used to further modulate the beam energy in a second modulator. After passing through a second dispersive section, the separated energy bands will be converted into current modulation and the echo signal then occurs as a recoherence effect caused by the mixing of the correlations between the modulation in the second modulator and the fine structures in the beam. The EEHG scheme has a remarkable up-frequency conversion efficiency; it has been shown that the EEHG FEL scheme may allow generation of soft x-rays directly from a UV seed laser in a single stage. In order to confirm the physics behind the EEHG technique and benchmark the theory, a proof-of-principleEEHG experimentwas planned at SLAC. The experiment is now in a commissioning stage and the preliminary results are reported in a separate paper of these proceedings. In this paper we present the design considerations and the details of the experiment setup.

  8. Next Generation Endstation for Concurrent Measurements of Charged Products and Photons in LCLS FEL Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, T.; Rolles, D.; Bostedt, C.; Castagna, J.-C.; Hartmann, R.; Bozek, J. D.; Schlichting, I.; Strüder, L.; Ullrich, J.; Berrah, N.

    2012-11-01

    We are designing and building the next generation multi-purpose instrumentation especially adapted to accommodate unique large-area, single-photon counting pnCCD detectors together with advanced many-particle ion and electron imaging spectrometers (reaction microscope, REMI; velocity map imaging, VMI; magnetic bottle) for simultaneous detection of scattered and fluorescent photons and charged particles in experiments at the LCLS FEL.

  9. The generation and amplification of intergalactic magnetic fields in analogue laboratory experiments with high power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregori, G.; Reville, B.; Miniati, F.

    2015-11-01

    The advent of high-power laser facilities has, in the past two decades, opened a new field of research where astrophysical environments can be scaled down to laboratory dimensions, while preserving the essential physics. This is due to the invariance of the equations of magneto-hydrodynamics to a class of similarity transformations. Here we review the relevant scaling relations and their application in laboratory astrophysics experiments with a focus on the generation and amplification of magnetic fields in cosmic environment. The standard model for the origin of magnetic fields is a multi stage process whereby a vanishing magnetic seed is first generated by a rotational electric field and is then amplified by turbulent dynamo action to the characteristic values observed in astronomical bodies. We thus discuss the relevant seed generation mechanisms in cosmic environment including resistive mechanism, collision-less and fluid instabilities, as well as novel laboratory experiments using high power laser systems aimed at investigating the amplification of magnetic energy by magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Future directions, including efforts to model in the laboratory the process of diffusive shock acceleration are also discussed, with an emphasis on the potential of laboratory experiments to further our understanding of plasma physics on cosmic scales.

  10. Self-generated magnetic fields in direct-drive implosion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Nilson, P. M.; Goncharov, V. N.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2014-06-01

    Electric and self-generated magnetic fields in direct-drive implosion experiments on the OMEGA Laser Facility were investigated employing radiography with ˜10- to 60-MeV protons. The experiment used plastic-shell targets with imposed surface defects (glue spots, wires, and mount stalks), which enhance self-generated fields. The fields were measured during the 1-ns laser drive with an on-target intensity ˜1015 W/cm2. Proton radiographs show multiple ring-like structures produced by electric fields ˜107 V/cm and fine structures from surface defects, indicating self-generated fields up to ˜3 MG. These electric and magnetic fields show good agreement with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations when the latter include the ∇Te × ∇ne source, Nernst convection, and anisotropic resistivity. The simulations predict that self-generated fields affect heat fluxes in the conduction zone and, through this, affect the growth of local perturbations.