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Sample records for generator heat source

  1. Safe radioisotope thermoelectric generators and heat sources for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, R. C.; Ambrosi, R. M.; Bannister, N. P.; Howe, S. D.; Atkinson, H. V.

    2008-07-01

    Several isotopes are examined as alternatives to 238Pu that is traditionally used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and heating units (RHUs). The radioisotopes discussed include 241Am, 208Po, 210Po, and 90Sr. The aim of this study is to facilitate the design of an RTG with a minimal radiation dose rate and mass including any required shielding. Applications of interest are primarily space and planetary exploration. In order to evaluate the properties of the alternative radioisotopes a Monte Carlo model was developed to examine the radiation protection aspect of the study. The thermodynamics of the power generation process is examined and possible materials for the housing and encapsulation of the radioisotopes are proposed. In this study we also present a historical review of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and the thermoelectric conversion mechanism in order to provide a direct comparison with the performance of our proposed alternative isotope systems.

  2. HEAT GENERATION

    DOEpatents

    Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

    1963-12-01

    Heat is generated by the utilization of high energy neutrons produced as by nuclear reactions between hydrogen isotopes in a blanket zone containing lithium, a neutron moderator, and uranium and/or thorium effective to achieve multtplicatton of the high energy neutron. The rnultiplied and moderated neutrons produced react further with lithium-6 to produce tritium in the blanket. Thermal neutron fissionable materials are also produced and consumed in situ in the blanket zone. The heat produced by the aggregate of the various nuclear reactions is then withdrawn from the blanket zone to be used or otherwise disposed externally. (AEC)

  3. Parametric design study of ``mini-generator`` with 6-watt heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, A.; Or, C.T.

    1995-01-20

    The Fairchild study showed that generator designs based on a single 1-watt RHU had very poor thermal efficiencies. At their optimum operating point, more than half of the generated heat was lost through the thermal insulation. This resulted in system efficiency of only 2.2%, compared to 7.2% for current Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). Moreover, there were serious doubts about the fabricability of the required multicouples, particularly of the series/parallel connections between the large number (900) of thermoelectric legs of very small cross-section (0.21 mm square). All in all, the preceding paper showed that neither JPL`s Power Stick design nor the Fairchild-generated derivatives based on the 1-watt heat source looked promising. The present paper describes a similar parametric study of a mini-generator based on a 6-watt heat source, and compares its performance and fabricability to that of the optimum Power Stick derivative and of the current RTG design for the same mission. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  4. Parametric design study of ``mini-generator'' with 6-watt heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schock, Alfred; Or, Chuen T.

    1995-01-01

    The Fairchild study showed that generator designs based on a single 1-watt RHU had very poor thermal efficiencies. At their optimum operating point, more than half of the generated heat was lost through the thermal insulation. This resulted in system efficiency of only 2.2%, compared to 7.2% for current Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). Moreover, there were serious doubts about the fabricability of the required multicouples, particularly of the series/parallel connections between the large number (900) of thermoelectric legs of very small cross-section (0.21 mm square). All in all, the preceding paper showed that neither JPL's Power Stick design nor the Fairchild-generated derivatives based on the 1-watt heat source looked promising. The present paper describes a similar parametric study of a mini-generator based on a 6-watt heat source, and compares its performance and fabricability to that of the optimum Power Stick derivative and of the current RTG design for the same mission.

  5. Micro- and Nanoscale Energetic Materials as Effective Heat Energy Sources for Enhanced Gas Generators.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Beom; Kim, Kyung Ju; Cho, Myung Hoon; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Kyung Tae; Kim, Soo Hyung

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we systematically investigated the effect of micro- and nanoscale energetic materials in formulations of aluminum microparticles (Al MPs; heat source)/aluminum nanoparticles (Al NPs; heat source)/copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs; oxidizer) on the combustion and gas-generating properties of sodium azide microparticles (NaN3 MPs; gas-generating agent) for potential applications in gas generators. The burn rate of the NaN3 MP/CuO NP composite powder was only ∼0.3 m/s. However, the addition of Al MPs and Al NPs to the NaN3 MP/CuO NP matrix caused the rates to reach ∼1.5 and ∼5.3 m/s, respectively. In addition, the N2 gas volume flow rate generated by the ignition of the NaN3 MP/CuO NP composite powder was only ∼0.6 L/s, which was significantly increased to ∼1.4 and ∼3.9 L/s by adding Al MPs and Al NPs, respectively, to the NaN3 MP/CuO NP composite powder. This suggested that the highly reactive Al MPs and NPs, with the assistance of CuO NPs, were effective heat-generating sources enabling the complete thermal decomposition of NaN3 MPs upon ignition. Al NPs were more effective than Al MPs in the gas generators because of the increased reactivity induced by the reduced particle size. Finally, we successfully demonstrated that a homemade airbag with a specific volume of ∼140 mL could be rapidly and fully inflated by the thermal activation of nanoscale energetic material-added gas-generating agents (i.e., NaN3 MP/Al NP/CuO NP composites) within the standard time of ∼50 ms for airbag inflation. PMID:27007287

  6. Radioisotopic heat source

    DOEpatents

    Jones, G.J.; Selle, J.E.; Teaney, P.E.

    1975-09-30

    Disclosed is a radioisotopic heat source and method for a long life electrical generator. The source includes plutonium dioxide shards and yttrium or hafnium in a container of tantalum-tungsten-hafnium alloy, all being in a nickel alloy outer container, and subjected to heat treatment of from about 1570$sup 0$F to about 1720$sup 0$F for about one h. (auth)

  7. Generation of Acoustic-Gravity Waves in Ionospheric HF Heating Experiments: Simulating Large-Scale Natural Heat Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradipta, Rezy

    In this thesis, we investigate the potential role played by large-scale anomalous heat sources (e.g. prolonged heat wave events) in generating acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) that might trigger widespread plasma turbulence in the ionospheric layer. The main hypothesis is that, the thermal gradients associated with the heat wave fronts could act as a source of powerful AGW capable of triggering ionospheric plasma turbulence over extensive areas. In our investigations, first we are going to examine a case study of the summer 2006 North American heat wave event. Our examination of GPS-derived total electron content (TEC) data over the North American sector reveals a quite noticeable increase in the level of daily plasma density fluctuations during the summer 2006 heat wave period. Comparison with the summer 2005 and summer 2007 data further confirms that the observed increase of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) during the summer 2006 heat wave period was not simply a regular seasonal phenomenon. Furthermore, a series of field experiments had been carried out at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in order to physically simulate the process of AGW/TID generation by large-scale thermal gradients in the ionosphere. In these ionospheric HF heating experiments, we create some time-varying artificial thermal gradients at an altitude of 200--300 km above the Earth's surface using vertically-transmitted amplitude-modulated 0-mode HF heater waves. For our experiments, a number of radio diagnostic instruments had been utilized to detect the characteristic signatures of heater-generated AGW/TID. So far, we have been able to obtain several affirmative indications that some artificial AGW/TID are indeed being radiated out from the heated plasma volume during the HAARP-AGW experiments. Based on the experimental evidence, we may conclude that it is certainly quite plausible for large-scale thermal gradients associated with severe heat wave

  8. ELF/VLF wave generation from the beating of two HF ionospheric heating sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. B.; Moore, R. C.; Golkowski, M.; Lehtinen, N. G.

    2012-12-01

    It is well established that Extremely Low Frequency (ELF, 0.3-3 kHz) and Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio waves can be generated via modulated High Frequency (HF, 3-10 MHz) heating of the lower ionosphere (60-100 km). The ionospheric absorption of HF power modifies the conductivity of the lower ionosphere, which in the presence of natural currents such as the auroral electrojet, creates an `antenna in the sky.' We utilize a theoretical model of the HF to ELF/VLF conversion and the ELF/VLF propagation, and calculate the amplitudes of the generated ELF/VLF waves when two HF heating waves, separated by the ELF/VLF frequency, are transmitted from two adjacent locations. The resulting ELF/VLF radiation pattern exhibits a strong directional dependence (as much as 15 dB) that depends on the physical spacing of the two HF sources. This beat wave source can produce signals 10-20 dB stronger than those generated using amplitude modulation, particularly for frequencies greater than 5-10 kHz. We evaluate recent suggestions that beating two HF waves generates ELF/VLF waves in the F-region (>150 km), and conclude that those experimental results may have misinterpreted, and can be explained strictly by the much more well established D region mechanism.

  9. Development of a radioisotope heat source for the two-watt radioisotope thermoelectric generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Edwin I.; McNeil, Dennis C.; Amos, Wayne R.

    1992-01-01

    Described is a radioisotope heat source for the Two-Watt Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) which is being considered for possible application by the U.S. Navy and for other Department of Defense applications. The heat source thermal energy (75 Wt) is produced from the alpha decay of plutonium-238 which is in the form of high-fired plutonium dioxide. The capsule is non-vented and consists of three domed cylindrical components each closed with a corresponding sealed end cap. Surrounding the fuel is the liner component, which is fabricated from a tantalum-based alloy, T-111. Also fabricated from T-111 is the next component, the strength member, which serves to meet pressure and impact criteria. The outermost component, or clad, is the oxidation- and corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy, Hastelloy S. This paper defines the design considerations, details the hardware fabrication and welding processes, discusses the addition of yttrium to the fuel to reduce liner embrittlement, and describes the testing that has been conducted or is planned to assure that there is fuel containment not only during the heat source operational life, but also in case of an accident environment.

  10. Neutron generator for BNCT based on high current ECR ion source with gyrotron plasma heating.

    PubMed

    Skalyga, V; Izotov, I; Golubev, S; Razin, S; Sidorov, A; Maslennikova, A; Volovecky, A; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H; Tarvainen, O

    2015-12-01

    BNCT development nowadays is constrained by a progress in neutron sources design. Creation of a cheap and compact intense neutron source would significantly simplify trial treatments avoiding use of expensive and complicated nuclear reactors and accelerators. D-D or D-T neutron generator is one of alternative types of such sources for. A so-called high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source with plasma heating by millimeter wave gyrotron radiation is suggested to be used in a scheme of D-D neutron generator in the present work. Ion source of that type was developed in the Institute of Applied Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia). It can produce deuteron ion beams with current density up to 700-800 mA/cm(2). Generation of the neutron flux with density at the level of 7-8·10(10) s(-1) cm(-2) at the target surface could be obtained in case of TiD2 target bombardment with deuteron beam accelerated to 100 keV. Estimations show that it is enough for formation of epithermal neutron flux with density higher than 10(9) s(-1) cm(-2) suitable for BNCT. Important advantage of described approach is absence of Tritium in the scheme. First experiments performed in pulsed regime with 300 mA, 45 kV deuteron beam directed to D2O target demonstrated 10(9) s(-1) neutron flux. This value corresponds to theoretical estimations and proofs prospects of neutron generator development based on high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source. PMID:26302662

  11. Quality Assurance Plan for Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, D. M.; Miller, G. D.; Bohne, W. A.

    1995-03-16

    The purpose of this document is to serve as the Quality Assurance Plan for Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (HS/RTG) programs performed at EG&G Mound Applied Technologies. As such, it identifies and describes the systems and activities in place to support the requirements contained in DOE Order 5700.6C as reflected in MD-10334, Mound Quality Policy and Responsibilities and the DOE/RPSD supplement, OSA/PQAR-1, Programmatic Quality Assurance Requirements for Space and Terrestrial Nuclear Power Systems. Unique program requirements, including additions, modifications, and exceptions to these quality requirements, are contained in the appendices of this plan. Additional appendices will be added as new programs and activities are added to Mound's HS/RTG mission assignment.

  12. The General-Purpose Heat Source Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator: A Truly General-Purpose Space RTG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Gary L.; Lombardo, James J.; Hemler, Richard J.; Silverman, Gil; Whitmore, C. W.; Amos, Wayne R.; Johnson, E. W.; Zocher, Roy W.; Hagan, James C.; Englehart, Richard W.

    2008-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG) was developed for the originally planned International Solar Polar Mission (ISPM). [ISPM would later, with the elimination of the NASA spacecraft, become the Ulysses mission.] At 300 We beginning-of-life (BOL) power, the GPHS-RTG was the most powerful RTG with the highest specific power (5.3 We/kg) of any space RTG. These improved performance attributes of the GPHS-RTG made it attractive for use on the Galileo mission. Subsequently, the GPHS-RTG was selected to power the Cassini spacecraft, which is currently orbiting Saturn, and the New Horizons spacecraft which is on its way to Pluto. Truly, the GPHS-RTG is a ``general-purpose'' space RTG.

  13. Structural testing of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Heat Source/Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator shipping container

    SciTech Connect

    Bronowski, D.R.; Madsen, M.M.

    1991-06-01

    The Heat Source/Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator shipping container is a Type B packaging design currently under development by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Type B packaging for transporting radioactive material is required to maintain containment and shielding after being exposed to the normal and hypothetical accident environments defined in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 71. A combination of testing and analysis is used to verify the adequacy of this package design. This report documents the test program portion of the design verification, using several prototype packages. Four types of testing were performed: 30-foot hypothetical accident condition drop tests in three orientations, 40-inch hypothetical accident condition puncture tests in five orientations, a 21 psi external overpressure test, and a normal conditions of transport test consisting of a water spray and a 4 foot drop test. 18 refs., 104 figs., 13 tabs.

  14. Certification testing of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Heat Source/Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator shipping container

    SciTech Connect

    Bronowski, D.R.; Madsen, M.M.

    1991-09-01

    The Heat Source/Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator shipping counter is a Type B packaging currently under development by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Type B packaging for transporting radioactive material is required to maintain containment and shielding after being exposed to normal and hypothetical accident environments defined in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 71. A combination of testing and analysis is used to verify the adequacy of this packaging design. This report documents the testing portion of the design verification. Six tests were conducted on a prototype package: a water spray test, a 4-foot normal conditions drop test, a 30-foot drop test, a 40-inch puncture test, a 30-minute thermal test, and an 8-hour immersion test.

  15. A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrell, Dennis L.

    1993-01-01

    A shielded storage rack has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE's Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which processes and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGs. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford's MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford's calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

  16. Milliwatt generator heat source shelf-life-related pressure-burst capsule evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchey, B.D.; Eckelmeyer, K.H.; Kilgo, A.C.; McKenzie, B.B.

    1997-10-01

    Three Milliwatt Generator Heat Source (MWGHS) shelf-life-related capsules were pressure-burst tested after thermal aging. Shelf-life capsules PB-08-03 (MC2893) and MPT-11-33 (MC3599) were tested at 1,010 C and capsule PB-07-13 (MC2893) was tested at 1,100 C. Subsequent to pressure-burst testing, each capsule was bubble-leak tested then metallographically examined. Post-mortem evaluation consisted of metallography, microhardness, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and oxygen and nitrogen analysis. Capsules PB-08-03 and PB-07-13 failed by elevated temperature stress-rupture in the coarse-grained cap to body welds, as has been documented for previous capsules. Pressure-burst testing of capsule MPT-11-33 was terminated prior to failure after 739 hours on test at 1,010 C, however, microscopic examination of the weld indicated that similar failure had began to occur in the interior portion of the capsule to body weld. Evidence was obtained indicating that metallurgical changes occurred during the pressure-burst test performed at 1,100 C. The metallurgical observations of a preferred site for elevated temperature deformation and fracture (the coarse-grained weld region) and structural instability (the property changes during testing at 1,100 C) need to be considered in component lifetime prediction and modeling efforts.

  17. A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrell, D.L.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE's Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford's MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford's calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

  18. A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrell, D.L.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE`s Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford`s MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford`s calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

  19. Dual source heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.; Pietsch, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

  20. New concept of power generation analysis for chemical gas turbine in thermodynamic process with heat sources or cooling devices

    SciTech Connect

    Yokogawa, M.; Taniguchi, H.; Yang, W.J.; Nakahara, T.; Arai, N.

    1998-07-01

    Many years ago, a thermodynamic process of power generation was developed for gas turbines, supported by adiabatic expansion and compression. Recently, the possible inlet temperature of gas turbines has increased to 1,500 C, so its blades on the high temperature side have to be cooled by some fluid. If the authors use the actual adiabatic expansion, it is necessary to check the fluid-dynamic friction caused by fluid flow between the blades. In this case, the gas turbine blades have a cooling effect and frictional heat-generating effect, as well. If the authors introduce a new concept, the chemical gas turbine, which creates a reheating effect by heat sources in the expansion process, the outlet temperature of the gas turbine will be increased by this continuous reheating effect. Therefore, when they estimate the performance of a chemical gas turbine, these cooling, frictional and reheating effects have to be checked by theoretical and experimental procedures. The authors here analyze the thermodynamic process with heat sources or cooling devices to illustrate their theoretical approach to estimating these effects. In this study, the definition of the heat-exchange rate is introduced to analyze each heating or cooling process. If the authors introduce this heat-exchange rate into their analysis of the thermodynamic process, it is possible to differentiate between adiabatic, cooling and heating processes in gas turbines and other machines.

  1. Generation of Large-scale Thermospheric Disturbances and Thermosphere Heating by Infrasonic Waves Propagated from Tropospheric Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kshevetskii, Sergey; Gavrilov, Nikolay; Karpov, Ivan; Kurdyaeva, Yuliya

    2015-04-01

    Meteorological processes in the lower atmosphere are the sources of excitation of acoustic gravity waves (AGWs). Fluctuations of atmospheric pressure within a wide range of frequencies, including infrasonic frequencies are evidence of these tropospheric wave sources. We simulate numerically the propagation of waves from tropospheric infrasound sources, and our study concerns the influences of these waves on the atmosphere. Numerical experiments have shown that the small-amplitude infrasound waves can propagate without striking manifestations up to the heights of about 100 km. Only waves propagating with a rather small angle to the vertical, penetrate the thermosphere and heat the thermosphere and generate internal gravity waves. Numerical experiments have revealed that tropospheric sources with spatial scales of several kilometers, are able to create wave disturbances in the thermosphere with spatial scales from tens to one thousand kilometers. The heating effect and generation of gravity waves is significant due to the fact that it accumulates. During one hour, the thermospheric temperature may change due to heating by infrasonic waves more than by 10 degrees. The simulations have shown that the infrasonic waves propagated upward may be a significant source of thermosphere heating.

  2. The Effects of Initial Conditions on Photoacoustic Waveforms Generated by a Gaussian Heating Source Moving in One Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Wenyu; Diebold, Gerald J.

    2016-05-01

    Although the photoacoustic effect is almost universally generated by radiation whose intensity is varied in time either by amplitude modulation of a continuous optical source or through the use of pulsed irradiation, it is possible to produce sound by movement of a continuous source in space. Here, the characteristics of sound production by movement of a light source in one dimension are discussed by solution to the wave equation for pressure. Solutions to the wave equation for the velocity potential, from which the acoustic pressure can be determined, are found using the D'Alembert integral and by Fourier transformation of the wave equation. The characteristics of the waveform generated by a Gaussian heat source moving uniformly in space are found to depend on the initial conditions for movement of the source.

  3. Thulium-170 heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, C.E.; Van Konynenburg, R.; Van Sant, J.H.

    1992-01-21

    This patent describes an isotopic heat source. It comprises; at least one isotopic fuel stack, comprising alternating layers of: thulium oxide; and a low atomic weight diluent for thulium oxide; a heat block defining holes into which the fuel stacks can be placed; at least one heat pipe for heat removal, with the heat pipe being positioned in the heat block in thermal connection with the fuel stack; and a structural container surrounding the heat block.

  4. Advanced Soldier Thermoelectric Power System for Power Generation from Battlefield Heat Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, Terry J.; Hogan, Tim; Case, Eldon D.; Cauchy, Charles J.

    2010-09-01

    The U.S. military uses large amounts of fuel during deployments and battlefield operations. This project sought to develop a lightweight, small form-factor, soldier-portable advanced thermoelectric (TE) system prototype to recover and convert waste heat from various deployed military equipment (i.e., diesel generators/engines, incinerators, vehicles, and potentially mobile kitchens), with the ultimate purpose of producing power for soldier battery charging, advanced capacitor charging, and other battlefield power applications. The technical approach employed microchannel technology, a unique “power panel” approach to heat exchange/TE system integration, and newly-characterized LAST (lead-antimony-silver-telluride) and LASTT (lead-antimony-silver-tin-telluride) TE materials segmented with bismuth telluride TE materials in designing a segmented-element TE power module and system. This project researched never-before-addressed system integration challenges (thermal expansion, thermal diffusion, electrical interconnection, thermal and electrical interfaces) of designing thin “power panels” consisting of alternating layers of thin, microchannel heat exchangers (hot and cold) sandwiching thin, segmented-element TE power generators. The TE properties, structurally properties, and thermal fatigue behavior of LAST and LASTT materials were developed and characterized such that the first segmented-element TE modules using LAST / LASTT materials were fabricated and tested at hot-side temperatures = 400 °C and cold-side temperatures = 40 °C. LAST / LASTT materials were successfully segmented with bismuth telluride and electrically interconnected with diffusion barrier materials and copper strapping within the module electrical circuit. A TE system design was developed to produce 1.5-1.6 kW of electrical energy using these new TE modules from the exhaust waste heat of 60-kW Tactical Quiet Generators as demonstration vehicles.

  5. Micro thrust and heat generator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, E.J.

    1998-11-17

    A micro thrust and heat generator have a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator`s ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA). 30 figs.

  6. General-purpose heat source: Research and development program. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator impact tests: RTG-1 and RTG-2

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Hinckley, J.E.; George, T.G.

    1996-07-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. The first two RTG Impact Tests were designed to provide information on the response of a fully loaded RTG to end-on impact against a concrete target. The results of these tests indicated that at impact velocities up to 57 m/s the converter shell and internal components protect the GPHS capsules from excessive deformation. At higher velocities, some of the internal components of the RTG interact with the GPHS capsules to cause excessive localized deformation and failure.

  7. General-purpose heat source: Research and development program, radioisotope thermoelectric generator/thin fragment impact test

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Hinckley, J.E.

    1996-11-01

    The general-purpose heat source provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. This test was designed to provide information on the response of a loaded RTG to impact by a fragment similar to the type of fragment produced by breakup of the spacecraft propulsion module system. The results of this test indicated that impact by a thin aluminum fragment traveling at 306 m/s may result in significant damage to the converter housing, failure of one fueled clad, and release of a small quantity of fuel.

  8. Micro thrust and heat generator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    1998-01-01

    A micro thrust and heat generator has a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator's ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA).

  9. GPHS-RTG system explosion test direct course experiment 5000. [General Purpose Heat Source-Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    The General Purpose Heat Source-Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG) has been designed and is being built to provide electrical power for spacecrafts to be launched on the Space Shuttle. The objective of the RTG System Explosion Test was to expose a mock-up of the GPHS-RTG with a simulated heat source to the overpressure and impulse representative of a potential upper magnitude explosion of the Space Shuttle. The test was designed so that the heat source module would experience an overpressure at which the survival of the fuel element cladding would be expected to be marginal. Thus, the mock-up was placed where the predicted incident overpressure would be 1300 psi. The mock-up was mounted in an orientation representative of the launch configuration on the spacecraft to be used on the NASA Galileo Mission. The incident overpressure measured was in the range of 1400 to 2100 psi. The mock-up and simulated heat source were destroyed and only very small fragments were recovered. This damage is believed to have resulted from a combination of the overpressure and impact by very high velocity fragments from the ANFO sphere. Post-test analysis indicated that extreme working of the iridium clad material occurred, indicative of intensive impulsive loading on the metal.

  10. Multiple source heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    A heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating a fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid, at least three refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid, a second for effecting heat exchange with a heat exchange fluid, and a third for effecting heat exchange with ambient air; a compressor for compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve connected at the inlet side of a heat exchanger in which liquid refrigerant is vaporized; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circuit and pump for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and directional flow of refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. Also disclosed are a variety of embodiments, modes of operation, and schematics therefor.

  11. Radioisotopic heat source

    DOEpatents

    Sayell, E.H.

    1973-10-23

    A radioisotopic heat source is described which includes a core of heat productive, radioisotopic material, an impact resistant layer of graphite surrounding said core, and a shell of iridium metal intermediate the core and the impact layer. The source may also include a compliant mat of iridium between the core and the iridium shell, as well as an outer covering of iridium metal about the entire heat source. (Official Gazette)

  12. Impact of the High Flux Isotope Reactor HEU to LEU Fuel Conversion on Cold Source Nuclear Heat Generation Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, David

    2014-03-01

    Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration, staff members at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been conducting studies to determine whether the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) can be converted from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. As part of these ongoing studies, an assessment of the impact that the HEU to LEU fuel conversion has on the nuclear heat generation rates in regions of the HFIR cold source system and its moderator vessel was performed and is documented in this report. Silicon production rates in the cold source aluminum regions and few-group neutron fluxes in the cold source moderator were also estimated. Neutronics calculations were performed with the Monte Carlo N-Particle code to determine the nuclear heat generation rates in regions of the HFIR cold source and its vessel for the HEU core operating at a full reactor power (FP) of 85 MW(t) and the reference LEU core operating at an FP of 100 MW(t). Calculations were performed with beginning-of-cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) conditions to bound typical irradiation conditions. Average specific BOC heat generation rates of 12.76 and 12.92 W/g, respectively, were calculated for the hemispherical region of the cold source liquid hydrogen (LH2) for the HEU and LEU cores, and EOC heat generation rates of 13.25 and 12.86 W/g, respectively, were calculated for the HEU and LEU cores. Thus, the greatest heat generation rates were calculated for the EOC HEU core, and it is concluded that the conversion from HEU to LEU fuel and the resulting increase of FP from 85 MW to 100 MW will not impact the ability of the heat removal equipment to remove the heat deposited in the cold source system. Silicon production rates in the cold source aluminum regions are estimated to be about 12.0% greater at BOC and 2.7% greater at EOC for the LEU core in comparison to the HEU core. Silicon is aluminum s major transmutation product and

  13. Organic Fluids and Passive Cooling in a Supercritical Rankine Cycle for Power Generation from Low Grade Heat Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidhi, Rachana

    Low grade heat sources have a large amount of thermal energy content. Due to low temperature, the conventional power generation technologies result in lower efficiency and hence cannot be used. In order to efficiently generate power, alternate methods need to be used. In this study, a supercritical organic Rankine cycle was used for heat source temperatures varying from 125°C to 200°C. Organic refrigerants with zero ozone depletion potential and their mixtures were selected as working fluid for this study while the cooling water temperature was changed from 10-25°C. Operating pressure of the cycle has been optimized for each fluid at every heat source temperature to obtain the highest thermal efficiency. Energy and exergy efficiencies of the thermodynamic cycle have been obtained as a function of heat source temperature. Efficiency of a thermodynamic cycle depends significantly on the sink temperature. At areas where water cooling is not available and ambient air temperature is high, efficient power generation from low grade heat sources may be a challenge. Use of passive cooling systems coupled with the condenser was studied, so that lower sink temperatures could be obtained. Underground tunnels, buried at a depth of few meters, were used as earth-air-heat-exchanger (EAHE) through which hot ambient air was passed. It was observed that the air temperature could be lowered by 5-10°C in the EAHE. Vertical pipes were used to lower the temperature of water by 5°C by passing it underground. Nocturnal cooling of stored water has been studied that can be used to cool the working fluid in the thermodynamic cycle. It was observed that the water temperature can be lowered by 10-20°C during the night when it is allowed to cool. The amount of water lost was calculated and was found to be approximately 0.1% over 10 days. The different passive cooling systems were studied separately and their effects on the efficiency of the thermodynamic cycle were investigated. They were

  14. The potential of high heat generating granites as EGS source to generate power and reduce CO2 emissions, western Arabian shield, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekharam, D.; Lashin, A.; Al Arifi, N.; Al Bassam, A.; El Alfy, M.; Ranjith, P. G.; Varun, C.; Singh, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    Saudi Arabia's dependence on oil and gas to generate electricity and to desalinate sea water is widely perceived to be economically and politically unsustainable. A recent business as usual simulation concluded that the Kingdom would become an oil importer by 2038. There is an opportunity for the country to over come this problem by using its geothermal energy resources. The heat flow and heat generation values of the granites spread over a cumulative area of 161,467 sq. km and the regional stress regime over the western Saudi Arabian shield strongly suggest that this entire area is potential source of energy to support 1) electricity generation, 2) fresh water generation through desalination and 3) extensive agricultural activity for the next two decades. The country can adopt a policy to harness this vast untapped enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) to mitigate climate and fresh water related issues and increase the quantity of oil for export. The country has inherent expertise to develop this resource.

  15. Thulium-170 heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, C.E.; Van Konynenburg, R.; VanSant, J.H.

    1990-09-06

    An isotopic heat source is formed using stacks of thin individual layers of a refractory isotopic fuel, preferably thulium oxide, alternating with layers of a low atomic weight diluent, preferably graphite. The graphite serves several functions: to act as a moderator during neutron irradiation, to minimize bremsstrahlung radiation, and to facilitate heat transfer. The fuel stacks are inserted into a heat block, which is encased in a sealed, insulated and shielded structural container. Heat pipes are inserted in the heat block and contain a working fluid. The heat pipe working fluid transfers heat from the heat block to a heat exchanger for power conversion. Single phase gas pressure controls the flow of the working fluid for maximum heat exchange and to provide passive cooling.

  16. Thulium-170 heat source

    DOEpatents

    Walter, Carl E.; Van Konynenburg, Richard; VanSant, James H.

    1992-01-01

    An isotopic heat source is formed using stacks of thin individual layers of a refractory isotopic fuel, preferably thulium oxide, alternating with layers of a low atomic weight diluent, preferably graphite. The graphite serves several functions: to act as a moderator during neutron irradiation, to minimize bremsstrahlung radiation, and to facilitate heat transfer. The fuel stacks are inserted into a heat block, which is encased in a sealed, insulated and shielded structural container. Heat pipes are inserted in the heat block and contain a working fluid. The heat pipe working fluid transfers heat from the heat block to a heat exchanger for power conversion. Single phase gas pressure controls the flow of the working fluid for maximum heat exchange and to provide passive cooling.

  17. Micro thrust and heat generator

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    The present invention relates generally to micromachines such as microengines or micromotors. More specifically, the invention is directed to a micro rocket which functions as a source of heat and thrust, and utilizes chemical energy to drive or power micromechanical apparatuses. The invention is adaptable to applications involving defense, bio-medical, manufacturing, consumer product, aviation, automotive, computer, inspection, and safety systems. A micro thrust and heat generator has a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator`s ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachine techniques (LIGA).

  18. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  19. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, John P.; Larson, Ronald A.; Goodrich, Lorenzo D.; Hall, Harold J.; Stoddard, Billy D.; Davis, Sean G.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Conrad, Frank J.

    1995-01-01

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

  20. Cryogenic monochromator as a solution to undulator heat loads at third generation synchrotron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, G.S.; Rogers, C.S.; Beno, M.A.; Jennings, G.; Cowan, P.L.

    1994-10-01

    We have developed a new design for a cryogenically cooled monochromator employing a thin-crystal strategy which is capable of handling the central-cone power of the Advanced Photon Source`s Undulator A at closed gap and at the full design current of 300 mA. We have designed and fabricated a Si (111) crystal which has a thin section where the x-rays hit and has internal cooling channels. A invar manifold has also been designed and it will be attached to the Si via In gaskets. We have done detailed modeling, both with approximate analytical and with finite element calculations. The results shown that our design has negligible thermal strain even for closed gap operation.

  1. General Purpose Heat Source Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    The General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) project seeks to combine the development of an electrically heated, single GPHS module simulator with the evaluation of potential nuclear surface power systems. The simulator is designed to match the form, fit, and function of actual GPHS modules which normally generate heat through the radioactive decay of Pu238. The use of electrically heated modules rather than modules containing Pu238 facilitates the testing of the subsystems and systems without sacrificing the quantity and quality of the test data gathered. Current GPHS activities are centered on developing robust heater designs with sizes and weights which closely match those of actual Pu238 fueled GPHS blocks. Designs are being pursued which will allow operation up to 1100 C.

  2. Creep properties of forged 2219 T6 aluminum alloy shell of general-purpose heat source-radioisotope thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, J.P.

    1981-12-01

    The shell (2219 T6 aluminum forging) of the General Purpose Heat Source-Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator was designed to retain the generator under sufficient elastic stress to secure it during space flight. A major concern was the extent to which the elastic stress would relax by creep. To determine acceptability of the shell construction material, the following proof tests simulating service were performed: 600 h of testing at 270/sup 0/C under 24.1 MPa stress followed by 10,000 h of storage at 177/sup 0/C under 55.1 MPa, both on the ground; and 10,000 h of flight in space at 270/sup 0/C under 34.4 MPa stress. Additionally, systematic creep testing was performed at 177 and 260/sup 0/C to establish creep design curves. The creep tests performed at 177/sup 0/C revealed comparatively large amounts of primary creep followed by small amounts of secondary creep. The early creep is believed to be abetted by unstable substructures that are annealed out during testing at this temperature. The creep tests performed at 270/sup 0/C showed normal primary creep followed by large amounts of secondary creep. Duplicate proof tests simulating the ground exposure conditions gave results that were in good agreement. The proof test simulating space flight at 270/sup 0/C gave 0.11% primary creep followed by 0.59% secondary creep. About 10% of the second-stage creep was caused by four or five instantaneous strains, which began at the 4500-h mark. One or two of these strain bursts, occurred in each of several other tests at 177 and 260/sup 0/C but were assessed as very moderate in magnitude. The effect is attributable to a slightly microsegregated condition remaining from the original cast structure.

  3. Engineering development testing of the GPHS-RTG converter. [General Purpose Heat Source-Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Cockfield, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    The GPHS-RTG will provide electrical power for the Galileo orbiter and for the two spacecraft of the International Solar Polar Mission. The GPHS-RTG consists of two primary assemblies: the General Purpose Heat Source, and the converter. This paper deals only with the converter, and highlights engineering tests that provide support for its design development.

  4. Thulium heat sources for space power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alderman, C.J.

    1992-05-01

    Reliable power supplies for use in transportation and remote systems will be an important part of space exploration terrestrial activities. A potential power source is available in the rare earth metal, thulium. Fuel sources can be produced by activating Tm-169 targets in the space station reactor. The resulting Tm-170 heat sources can be used in thermoelectric generators to power instrumentation and telecommunications located at remote sites such as weather stations. As the heat source in a dynamic Sterling or Brayton cycle system, the heat source can provide a lightweight power source for rovers or other terrestrial transportation systems.

  5. Numerical study of plasma generation process and internal antenna heat loadings in J-PARC RF negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Shibata, T; Nishida, K; Mochizuki, S; Mattei, S; Lettry, J; Hatayama, A; Ueno, A; Oguri, H; Ohkoshi, K; Ikegami, K; Takagi, A; Asano, H; Naito, F

    2016-02-01

    A numerical model of plasma transport and electromagnetic field in the J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex) radio frequency ion source has been developed to understand the relation between antenna coil heat loadings and plasma production/transport processes. From the calculation, the local plasma density increase is observed in the region close to the antenna coil. Electrons are magnetized by the magnetic field line with absolute magnetic flux density 30-120 Gauss which leads to high local ionization rate. The results suggest that modification of magnetic configuration can be made to reduce plasma heat flux onto the antenna. PMID:26932010

  6. General Purpose Heat Source Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, Bill

    2008-01-01

    The General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) simulator project is designed to replicate through the use of electrical heaters, the form, fit, and function of actual GPHS modules which generate heat through the radioactive decay of Pu238. The use of electrically heated modules rather than modules containing Pu238 facilitates the testing of spacecraft subsystems and systems without sacrificing the quantity and quality of the test data gathered. Previous GPHS activities are centered around developing robust heater designs with sizes and weights that closely matched those of actual Pu238 fueled GPHS blocks. These efforts were successful, although their maximum temperature capabilities were limited to around 850 C. New designs are being pursued which also replicate the sizes and weights of actual Pu238 fueled GPHS blocks but will allow operation up to 1100 C.

  7. Aerodynamic heated steam generating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.

    1986-08-12

    An aerodynamic heated steam generating apparatus is described which consists of: an aerodynamic heat immersion coil steam generator adapted to be located on the leading edge of an airframe of a hypersonic aircraft and being responsive to aerodynamic heating of water by a compression shock airstream to produce steam pressure; an expansion shock air-cooled condensor adapted to be located in the airframe rearward of and operatively coupled to the aerodynamic heat immersion coil steam generator to receive and condense the steam pressure; and an aerodynamic heated steam injector manifold adapted to distribute heated steam into the airstream flowing through an exterior generating channel of an air-breathing, ducted power plant.

  8. Mini-Brayton heat source assembly development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wein, D.; Zimmerman, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    The work accomplished on the Mini-Brayton Heat Source Assembly program is summarized. Required technologies to design, fabricate and assemble components for a high temperature Heat Source Assembly (HSA) which would generate and transfer the thermal energy for a spaceborne Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) were developed.

  9. Thulium heat sources for space power application

    SciTech Connect

    Alderman, C.J. )

    1993-01-15

    Reliable electrical power supplies for use in transportation and remote systems will be an important part of space exploration activities on planet surfaces. A potential power source is available through the use of thulium, a rare earth metal. Heat sources can be produced by neutron activation of naturally occurring thulium (Tm-169) targets in the base station nuclear power reactor. The resulting Tm-170 heat sources can be used in thermoelectric generators to power instrumentation and telecommunications systems located at remote sites. Combined with a dynamic Sterling or Brayton cycle conversion system, the heat source can power a lightweight electrical source for rovers or other surface transportation systems.

  10. Disperse generation; use waste heat

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Utility manager and American Public Power Association (APPA) president William H. Corkran, Jr. answers questions about the Easton (Maryland) Utilities Commission, which currently has a capacity nearly double its peak load. Power sales through interconnections are made by day, and low-cost purchases are made by night from a variety of widespread sources using different fuels. Easton's fuel mix and conservation strategy is aimed at oil substitution and efficiency measures, such as waste-heat recovery from diesel engines. Wind, photovoltaics, solar water heating, cogeneration, and small nuclear units are also under study. Although he anticipates an OPEC move to discourage new technologies, dispersed technologies will still offer more potential for efficient and secure power generation and transmission. Utilities, he feels, should lead the decentralization more rather than resist it in order to expand their service capability into cable television. The APPA can help by motivating young people to pursue these opportunities. (DCK)

  11. Fourth generation light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, H.

    1997-05-01

    Concepts and designs are now being developed at laboratories around the world for light sources with performance levels that exceed present sources, including the very powerful and successful third generation synchrotron radiation sources that have come on line in the past few years. Workshops, have been held to review directions for future sources. A main thrust is to increase the brightness and coherence of the radiation using storage rings with lower electron-beam emittance or free-electron lasers (FELs). In the infra-red part of the spectrum very high brightness and coherence is already provided by FEL user facilities driven by linacs and storage rings. It now appears possible to extend FEL operation to the VUV, soft X-ray and even hard X-ray spectral range, to wavelengths down to the angstrom range, using high energy linacs equipped with high-brightness rf photoinjectors and bunch-length compressors. R&D to develop such sources is in progress at BNL, DESY, KEK, SLAC and other laboratories. In the absence of mirrors to form optical cavities, short wavelengths are reached in FEL systems in which a high peak current, low-emittance electron beam becomes bunch-density modulated at the optical wavelength in a single pass through a long undulator by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE); i.e.; startup from noise. A proposal to use the last kilometer of the 3 kilometer SLAC linac (the first 2 kilometers will be used for injection to the PEP II B-Factory) to provide 15 GeV electron beams to reach 1.5 {angstrom} by SASE in a 100 m long undulator is in preparation.

  12. Heat operated cryogenic electrical generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Saffren, M. M.; Elleman, D. D. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An electrical generator useful for providing electrical power in deep space, is disclosed. The electrical generator utilizes the unusual hydrodynamic property exhibited by liquid helium as it is converted to and from a superfluid state to cause opposite directions of rotary motion for a rotor cell thereof. The physical motion of the rotor cell was employed to move a magnetic field provided by a charged superconductive coil mounted on the exterior of the cell. An electrical conductor was placed in surrounding proximity to the cell to interact with the moving magnetic field provided by the superconductive coil and thereby generate electrical energy. A heat control arrangement was provided for the purpose of causing the liquid helium to be partially converted to and from a superfluid state by being cooled and heated, respectively.

  13. Update to the safety program for the general-purpose heat source radioisotope thermoelectric generators for the Galileo and Ulysses missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Gary L.; Bradshaw, C. T.; Englehart, Richard W.; Bartram, Bart W.; Cull, Theresa A.; Zocher, Roy W.; Eck, Marshall B.; Mukunda, Meera; Brenza, Peter T.; Chan, Chris C.

    1992-01-01

    With the rescheduling of the Galileo and Ulysses launches and the use of new upper stages following the Challenger accident, the aerospace nuclear safety program for the general-purpose heat source radioisotope thermoelectric generators (GPHS-RTGs) was extended to accommodate the new mission scenarios. As in the original safety program, the objectives were to determine the response of the GPHS-RTG to the various postulated accident environments and to determine the risk (if any) associated with these postulated accidents. The extended GPHS-RTG safety program was successfully completed in sufficient time to prepare an updated Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) with revisions for the October 1989 launch of the Galileo spacecraft.

  14. Heat generation in aircraft tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, S. K.; Dodge, R. N.

    1985-01-01

    A method was developed for calculating the internal temperature distribution in an aircraft tire while free rolling under load. The method uses an approximate stress analysis of each point in the tire as it rolls through the contact patch, and from this stress change the mechanical work done on each volume element may be obtained and converted into a heat release rate through a knowledge of material characteristics. The tire cross-section is then considered as a body with internal heat generation, and the diffusion equation is solved numerically with appropriate boundary conditions of the wheel and runway surface. Comparison with data obtained with buried thermocouples in tires shows good agreement.

  15. Performance characteristic of thermosyphon heat pipe at radiant heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrabovský, Peter; Papučík, Štefan; Kaduchová, Katarína

    2016-06-01

    This article discusses about device, which is called heat pipe. This device is with heat source with radiant heat source. Heat pipe is device with high efficiency of heat transfer. The heat pipe, which is describe in this article is termosyphon heat pipe. The experiment with termosyphon heat pipe get a result. On the base of result, it will be in future to create mathematical model in Ansys. Thermosyphon heat pipe is made of copper and distilled water is working fluid. The significance of this experiment consists in getting of the heat transfer and performance characteristic. On the basis of measured and calculated data can be constructed the plots.

  16. Generation of a pulsed high-current low-energy beam in a plasma electron source with a self-heated cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, N. V.; Men'shakov, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    The transition of a low-current discharge with a self-heated hollow cathode to a high-current discharge is studied, and stability conditions for the latter in the pulsed-periodic mode with a current of 0.1-1.0 kA, pulse width of 0.1-1.0 ms, and a pulse repetition rate of 0.1-1.0 kHz are determined. The thermal conditions of the hollow cathode are analyzed, and the conclusion is drawn that the emission current high density is due to pulsed self-heating of the cathode's surface layer. Conditions for stable emission from a plasma cathode with a grid acting as a plasma boundary using such a discharge are found at low accelerating voltage (100-200 eV) and a gas pressure of 0.1-0.4 Pa. The density of the ion current from a plasma generated by a pulsed beam with a current of 100 A is found to reach 0.1 A/cm2. Probe diagnostics data for the emitting and beam plasmas in the electron source are presented, and a mechanism behind the instability of electron emission from the plasma is suggested on their basis.

  17. Ion plating with an induction heating source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.; Brainard, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    Induction heating is introduced as an evaporation heat source in ion plating. A bare induction coil without shielding can be directly used in the glow discharge region with no arcing. The only requirement is to utilize an rf inductive generator with low operating frequency of 75 kHz. Mechanical simplicity of the ion plating apparatus and ease of operation is a great asset for industrial applications; practically any metal such as nickel, iron, and the high temperature refractories can be evaporated and ion plated.

  18. Helicity Generation by Heat Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    1996-11-01

    In a large laboratory plasma (ne ~= 10^12 cm-3, k Te ~= 2 eV, B0 ~= 30 G, 1 m ⊥ B_0, 2.5 m allel B_0), the electrons are heated locally by a short intense current pulse (100 A, 0.2 μs) using a magnetic loop antenna or a biased electrode. The heat transport along the field establishes a flux tube with strong radial and weak axial temperature gradients. The time scale of temperature relaxation (Δ t ~= 50 μs) is much longer than that of the transient whistler wave pulse excited by the initial current pulse (Δ t < 2 μs). The temperature gradients drive linked field-aligned and diamagnetic currents which, due to their linkage, exhibit helicity and form a flux rope with J × B ~= 0.(R. L. Stenzel and J. M. Urrutia, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76), 1469 (1996). Alternatively, the helicity generation can be understood by the twisting of magnetic field lines which, in the parameter regime of electron MHD, are frozen into the electron fluid. The electron heating at one end of the flux tube causes a nonuniform diamagnetic rotation, hence the helicity. The heat transport by helical convection and conduction is investigated. The slowly time-varying magnetic field may excite Alfvénic perturbations.

  19. Role of radiogenic heat generation in surface heat flow formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutorskoi, M. D.; Polyak, B. G.

    2016-03-01

    Heat generation due to decay of long-lived radioactive isotopes is considered in the Earth's crust of the Archean-Proterozoic and Paleozoic provinces of Eurasia and North America. The heat flow that forms in the mantle is calculated as the difference between the heat flow observed at the boundary of the solid Earth and radiogenic heat flow produced in the crust. The heat regime in regions with anomalously high radiogenic heat generation is discussed. The relationship between various heat flow components in the Precambrian and Phanerozoic provinces has been comparatively analyzed, and the role of erosion of the surfaceheat- generating layer has been estimated.

  20. 30 CFR 56.4500 - Heat sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Heat sources. 56.4500 Section 56.4500 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Installation/construction/maintenance § 56.4500 Heat sources. Heat sources capable of producing...

  1. 30 CFR 56.4500 - Heat sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Heat sources. 56.4500 Section 56.4500 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Installation/construction/maintenance § 56.4500 Heat sources. Heat sources capable of producing...

  2. 30 CFR 57.4500 - Heat sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Heat sources. 57.4500 Section 57.4500 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4500 Heat sources. Heat sources capable of producing...

  3. 30 CFR 57.4500 - Heat sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Heat sources. 57.4500 Section 57.4500 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4500 Heat sources. Heat sources capable of producing...

  4. 30 CFR 56.4500 - Heat sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Heat sources. 56.4500 Section 56.4500 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Installation/construction/maintenance § 56.4500 Heat sources. Heat sources capable of producing...

  5. 30 CFR 57.4500 - Heat sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Heat sources. 57.4500 Section 57.4500 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4500 Heat sources. Heat sources capable of producing...

  6. 30 CFR 56.4500 - Heat sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Heat sources. 56.4500 Section 56.4500 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Installation/construction/maintenance § 56.4500 Heat sources. Heat sources capable of producing...

  7. 30 CFR 57.4500 - Heat sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Heat sources. 57.4500 Section 57.4500 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4500 Heat sources. Heat sources capable of producing...

  8. 30 CFR 57.4500 - Heat sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Heat sources. 57.4500 Section 57.4500 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4500 Heat sources. Heat sources capable of producing...

  9. 30 CFR 56.4500 - Heat sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Heat sources. 56.4500 Section 56.4500 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Installation/construction/maintenance § 56.4500 Heat sources. Heat sources capable of producing...

  10. Heat-source specification 500 watt(e) RTG

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-02-01

    This specification establishes the requirements for a /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ heat source and its fuel capsule for application in a 500 W(e) thermoelectric generator. The specification covers: fuel composition and quantity; the Hastelloy S fuel capsule material and fabrication; and the quality assurance requirements for the assembled heat source. (LCL)

  11. Multiple source navigation signal generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojda, Petr

    2010-09-01

    The paper presents a FPGA based digital VOR/LOC signal generator. It provides the composite signal, which consists of the particular signals of several predefined navigation sources - VOR beacons. Design of the generator is implemented into the two different FPGA DSP platforms.

  12. Stress state of a plate heated by a heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Motovilovets, I.A.

    1995-11-01

    THis article presents the solution to a thermoelastic problem concerning the stress-strain of an infinite plate heated by a heat source. It is assumed that the temperature and the source of heat change linearly through the thickness of the plate. Errors made in [2,5,6] in the derivation of the thermoelastic equations of state are explained.

  13. Heat engine generator control system

    DOEpatents

    Rajashekara, K.; Gorti, B.V.; McMullen, S.R.; Raibert, R.J.

    1998-05-12

    An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power. 8 figs.

  14. Heat engine generator control system

    DOEpatents

    Rajashekara, Kaushik; Gorti, Bhanuprasad Venkata; McMullen, Steven Robert; Raibert, Robert Joseph

    1998-01-01

    An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power.

  15. ULF Generation by Modulated Ionospheric Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Labenski, J.; Wallace, T.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2013-12-01

    Modulated ionospheric heating experiments designed to generate ULF waves using the HAARP heater have been conducted since 2007. Artificial ULF waves in the Pc1 frequency range were observed from space and by ground induction magnetometers located in the vicinity of the heater as well as at long distances. Two distinct generation mechanisms of artificial ULF waves were identified. The first was electroject modulation under geomagnetically disturbed conditions. The second was pressure modulation in the E and F regions of the ionosphere under quiet conditions. Ground detections of ULF waves near the heater included both Shear Alfven waves and Magnetosonic waves generated by electrojet and/or pressure modulations. Distant ULF detections involved Magnetosonic wave propagation in the Alfvenic duct with pressure modulation as the most likely source. Summary of our observations and theoretical interpretations will be presented at the meeting. We would like to acknowledge the support provided by the staff at the HAARP facility during our ULF experiments.

  16. Carbothermic reduction with parallel heat sources

    DOEpatents

    Troup, Robert L.; Stevenson, David T.

    1984-12-04

    Disclosed are apparatus and method of carbothermic direct reduction for producing an aluminum alloy from a raw material mix including aluminum oxide, silicon oxide, and carbon wherein parallel heat sources are provided by a combustion heat source and by an electrical heat source at essentially the same position in the reactor, e.g., such as at the same horizontal level in the path of a gravity-fed moving bed in a vertical reactor. The present invention includes providing at least 79% of the heat energy required in the process by the electrical heat source.

  17. Fourth generation electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Lyneis, Claude M; Leitner, D; Todd, D S; Sabbi, G; Prestemon, S; Caspi, S; Ferracin, P

    2008-02-01

    The concepts and technical challenges related to developing a fourth generation electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source with a rf frequency greater than 40 GHz and magnetic confinement fields greater than twice B(ECR) will be explored in this article. Based on the semiempirical frequency scaling of ECR plasma density with the square of operating frequency, there should be significant gains in performance over current third generation ECR ion sources, which operate at rf frequencies between 20 and 30 GHz. While the third generation ECR ion sources use NbTi superconducting solenoid and sextupole coils, the new sources will need to use different superconducting materials, such as Nb(3)Sn, to reach the required magnetic confinement, which scales linearly with rf frequency. Additional technical challenges include increased bremsstrahlung production, which may increase faster than the plasma density, bremsstrahlung heating of the cold mass, and the availability of high power continuous wave microwave sources at these frequencies. With each generation of ECR ion sources, there are new challenges to be mastered, but the potential for higher performance and reduced cost of the associated accelerator continues to make this a promising avenue for development. PMID:18315111

  18. DUAL HEATED ION SOURCE STRUCTURE HAVING ARC SHIFTING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, E.O.

    1959-04-14

    An ion source is presented for calutrons, particularly an electrode arrangement for the ion generator of a calutron ion source. The ion source arc chamber is heated and an exit opening with thermally conductive plates defines the margins of the opening. These plates are electrically insulated from the body of the ion source and are connected to a suitable source of voltage to serve as electrodes for shaping the ion beam egressing from the arc chamber.

  19. Heat-Pipe-Associated Localized Thermoelectric Power Generation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pan-Jo; Rhi, Seok-Ho; Lee, Kye-Bock; Hwang, Hyun-Chang; Lee, Ji-Su; Jang, Ju-Chan; Lee, Wook-Hyun; Lee, Ki-Woo

    2014-06-01

    The present study focused on how to improve the maximum power output of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) system and move heat to any suitable space using a TEG associated with a loop thermosyphon (loop-type heat pipe). An experimental study was carried out to investigate the power output, the temperature difference of the thermoelectric module (TEM), and the heat transfer performance associated with the characteristic of the researched heat pipe. Currently, internal combustion engines lose more than 35% of their fuel energy as recyclable heat in the exhaust gas, but it is not easy to recycle waste heat using TEGs because of the limited space in vehicles. There are various advantages to use of TEGs over other power sources, such as the absence of moving parts, a long lifetime, and a compact system configuration. The present study presents a novel TEG concept to transfer heat from the heat source to the sink. This technology can transfer waste heat to any location. This simple and novel design for a TEG can be applied to future hybrid cars. The present TEG system with a heat pipe can transfer heat and generate power of around 1.8 V with T TEM = 58°C. The heat transfer performance of a loop-type heat pipe with various working fluids was investigated, with water at high heat flux (90 W) and 0.05% TiO2 nanofluid at low heat flux (30 W to 70 W) showing the best performance in terms of power generation. The heat pipe can transfer the heat to any location where the TEM is installed.

  20. Heat source reentry vehicle design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    The design details are presented of a flight-type heat source reentry vehicle and heat exchanger compatible with the isotope Brayton power conversion system. The reference reentry vehicle and heat exchanger were modified, orbital and superorbital capability was assessed, and a complete set of detail design layout drawings were provided.

  1. High temperature heat source generation with quasi-continuous wave semiconductor lasers at power levels of 6 W for medical use.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Imai, Yusuke; Tei, Kazuyoku; Ito, Shinobu; Kanazawa, Hideko; Yamaguchi, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    We investigate a technology to create a high temperature heat source on the tip surface of the glass fiber proposed for medical surgery applications. Using 4 to 6 W power level semiconductor lasers at a wavelength of 980 nm, a laser coupled fiber tip was preprocessed to contain a certain amount of titanium oxide powder with a depth of 100 μm from the tip surface so that the irradiated low laser energy could be perfectly absorbed to be transferred to thermal energy. Thus, the laser treatment can be performed without suffering from any optical characteristic of the material. A semiconductor laser was operated quasi-continuous wave mode pulse time duration of 180 ms and >95% of the laser energy was converted to thermal energy in the fiber tip. Based on two-color thermometry, by using a gated optical multichannel analyzer with a 0.25 m spectrometer in visible wavelength region, the temperature of the fiber tip was analyzed. The temperature of the heat source was measured to be in excess 3100 K. PMID:24853040

  2. Control system for fluid heated steam generator

    DOEpatents

    Boland, James F.; Koenig, John F.

    1985-01-01

    A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

  3. Control system for fluid heated steam generator

    DOEpatents

    Boland, J.F.; Koenig, J.F.

    1984-05-29

    A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

  4. Waste heat generation: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Yeşiller, Nazli; Hanson, James L; Yee, Emma H

    2015-08-01

    A comprehensive review of heat generation in various types of wastes and of the thermal regime of waste containment facilities is provided in this paper. Municipal solid waste (MSW), MSW incineration ash, and mining wastes were included in the analysis. Spatial and temporal variations of waste temperatures, thermal gradients, thermal properties of wastes, average temperature differentials, and heat generation values are provided. Heat generation was influenced by climatic conditions, mean annual earth temperatures, waste temperatures at the time of placement, cover conditions, and inherent heat generation potential of the specific wastes. Time to onset of heat generation varied between months and years, whereas timelines for overall duration of heat generation varied between years and decades. For MSW, measured waste temperatures were as high as 60-90°C and as low as -6°C. MSW incinerator ash temperatures varied between 5 and 87°C. Mining waste temperatures were in the range of -25 to 65°C. In the wastes analyzed, upward heat flow toward the surface was more prominent than downward heat flow toward the subsurface. Thermal gradients generally were higher for MSW and incinerator ash and lower for mining waste. Based on thermal properties, MSW had insulative qualities (low thermal conductivity), while mining wastes typically were relatively conductive (high thermal conductivity) with ash having intermediate qualities. Heat generation values ranged from -8.6 to 83.1MJ/m(3) and from 0.6 to 72.6MJ/m(3) for MSW and mining waste, respectively and was 72.6MJ/m(3) for ash waste. Conductive thermal losses were determined to range from 13 to 1111MJ/m(3)yr. The data and analysis provided in this review paper can be used in the investigation of heat generation and thermal regime of a wide range of wastes and waste containment facilities located in different climatic regions. PMID:25962825

  5. Compact ion source neutron generator

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, Thomas; Persaud, Arun; Kapadia, Rehan; Javey, Ali; Chang-Hasnain, Constance; Rangelow, Ivo; Kwan, Joe

    2015-10-13

    A neutron generator includes a conductive substrate comprising a plurality of conductive nanostructures with free-standing tips and a source of an atomic species to introduce the atomic species in proximity to the free-standing tips. A target placed apart from the substrate is voltage biased relative to the substrate to ionize and accelerate the ionized atomic species toward the target. The target includes an element capable of a nuclear fusion reaction with the ionized atomic species to produce a one or more neutrons as a reaction by-product.

  6. The heat treating source book

    SciTech Connect

    Gupton, P.S.

    1986-01-01

    The first section of this book reviews current trends and is followed by an article describing how to design for lower cost and high-quality heat treatment. Two separate sections deal with ferrous materials and non-ferrous metals. Coverage includes stress-relief heat treating, normalizing and cold treating of steel; ultrahigh-strength steels; tool steels; maraging steels; austenitic stainless steels and cast irons, as well as aluminum alloys, titanium and its alloys, nickel-base superalloys, special purpose alloys and lead and its alloys. Other topics discussed are carburizing, carbonitriding and nitriding; vacuum methods; salt bath processing; methods of measuring case depth; and atmosphere control and nitrogen as all-purpose atmosphere. Also, information is provided on energy-efficient operations, production systems, selecting and handling quenching fluids, furnace control instrumentation, and guidelines for heat treating powdered metal parts.

  7. Alternative Radioisotopes for Heat and Power Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsley, T.; Sarsfield, M.; Rice, T.

    Production of 238Pu requires considerable facilities including a nuclear reactor and reprocessing plants that are very expensive to build and operate. Thus, a more economical alternative is very attractive to the industry. There are many alternative radioisotopes that exist but few that satisfy the criteria of performance, availability and cost to produce. Any alternative to 238Pu must exist in a chemical form that is compatible with the materials required to safely encapsulate the heat source at the high temperatures of operation and potential launch failure scenarios. The chemical form must also have suitable thermal properties to ensure maximum energy conversion efficiencies when integrated into radioisotope thermoelectric generators over the required mission durations. In addition, the radiation dose must be low enough for operators during production and not so prohibitive that excessive shielding mass is required on the space craft. This paper will focus on the preferred European alternative of 241Am, and the issues that will need to be addressed.

  8. Heat-generating nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, G.; Fajeau, M.; Labrousse, M.; Lerouge, B.; Minguet, J.

    1981-01-20

    A reactor vessel filled with coolant fluid is divided by a wall into an upper region and a lower region which contains the reactor core, part of the coolant fluid in the upper region being injected into the lower region. The injection flow rate is regulated as a function of the variations in pressure in the lower region by means of a baffle-plate container which communicates with a leak-tight chamber and with a storage reservoir, a flow of fluid from the chamber to the reservoir being established only at the time of a reduction in the rate of injection into the container. The reactor can be employed for the production of hot water which is passed through a heat exchanger and supplied to a heating installation.

  9. MEMS CLOSED CHAMBER HEAT ENGINE AND ELECTRIC GENERATOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A heat engine, preferably combined with an electric generator, and advantageously implemented using micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) technologies as an array of one or more individual heat engine/generators. The heat engine is based on a closed chamber containing a motive medium, preferably a gas; means for alternately enabling and disabling transfer of thermal energy from a heat source to the motive medium; and at least one movable side of the chamber that moves in response to thermally-induced expansion and contraction of the motive medium, thereby converting thermal energy to oscillating movement. The electrical generator is combined with the heat engine to utilize movement of the movable side to convert mechanical work to electrical energy, preferably using electrostatic interaction in a generator capacitor. Preferably at least one heat transfer side of the chamber is placed alternately into and out of contact with the heat source by a motion capacitor, thereby alternately enabling and disabling conductive transfer of heat to the motive medium.

  10. Heat Management in Thermoelectric Power Generators.

    PubMed

    Zebarjadi, M

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric power generators are used to convert heat into electricity. Like any other heat engine, the performance of a thermoelectric generator increases as the temperature difference on the sides increases. It is generally assumed that as more heat is forced through the thermoelectric legs, their performance increases. Therefore, insulations are typically used to minimize the heat losses and to confine the heat transport through the thermoelectric legs. In this paper we show that to some extend it is beneficial to purposely open heat loss channels in order to establish a larger temperature gradient and therefore to increase the overall efficiency and achieve larger electric power output. We define a modified Biot number (Bi) as an indicator of requirements for sidewall insulation. We show cooling from sidewalls increases the efficiency for Bi values less than one, and decreases the efficiency for Bi values larger than one. PMID:27033717

  11. Heat Management in Thermoelectric Power Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebarjadi, M.

    2016-04-01

    Thermoelectric power generators are used to convert heat into electricity. Like any other heat engine, the performance of a thermoelectric generator increases as the temperature difference on the sides increases. It is generally assumed that as more heat is forced through the thermoelectric legs, their performance increases. Therefore, insulations are typically used to minimize the heat losses and to confine the heat transport through the thermoelectric legs. In this paper we show that to some extend it is beneficial to purposely open heat loss channels in order to establish a larger temperature gradient and therefore to increase the overall efficiency and achieve larger electric power output. We define a modified Biot number (Bi) as an indicator of requirements for sidewall insulation. We show cooling from sidewalls increases the efficiency for Bi values less than one, and decreases the efficiency for Bi values larger than one.

  12. Heat Management in Thermoelectric Power Generators

    PubMed Central

    Zebarjadi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric power generators are used to convert heat into electricity. Like any other heat engine, the performance of a thermoelectric generator increases as the temperature difference on the sides increases. It is generally assumed that as more heat is forced through the thermoelectric legs, their performance increases. Therefore, insulations are typically used to minimize the heat losses and to confine the heat transport through the thermoelectric legs. In this paper we show that to some extend it is beneficial to purposely open heat loss channels in order to establish a larger temperature gradient and therefore to increase the overall efficiency and achieve larger electric power output. We define a modified Biot number (Bi) as an indicator of requirements for sidewall insulation. We show cooling from sidewalls increases the efficiency for Bi values less than one, and decreases the efficiency for Bi values larger than one. PMID:27033717

  13. Advanced radioisotope heat source for Stirling Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobry, T. J.; Walberg, G.

    2001-02-01

    The heat exchanger on a Stirling Engine requires a thermal energy transfer from a heat source to the engine through a very limited area on the heater head circumference. Designing an effective means to assure maximum transfer efficiency is challenging. A single General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS), which has been qualified for space operations, would satisfy thermal requirements for a single Stirling Engine that would produce 55 electrical watts. However, it is not efficient to transfer its thermal energy to the engine heat exchanger from its rectangular geometry. This paper describes a conceptual design of a heat source to improve energy transfer for Stirling Engines that may be deployed to power instrumentation on space missions. .

  14. Heat generation and transport in the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beek, Johannes H. G. M.

    1996-05-01

    During contraction of the heart, a large part of the energy in energy metabolism is converted to heat. The article presents the results of measurements of mechanical stresses in the myocardium and blood vessels, temperatures and rate of heat generation. Experimental data correlate well with the numerical solutions of the biothermal problem.

  15. New geothermal heat extraction process to deliver clean power generation

    ScienceCinema

    Pete McGrail

    2012-12-31

    A new method for capturing significantly more heat from low-temperature geothermal resources holds promise for generating virtually pollution-free electrical energy. Scientists at the Department of Energys Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will determine if their innovative approach can safely and economically extract and convert heat from vast untapped geothermal resources. The goal is to enable power generation from low-temperature geothermal resources at an economical cost. In addition to being a clean energy source without any greenhouse gas emissions, geothermal is also a steady and dependable source of power.

  16. Generator powered electrically heated diesel particulate filter

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore, Jr., Michael J

    2014-03-18

    A control circuit for a vehicle powertrain includes a switch that selectivity interrupts current flow between a first terminal and a second terminal. A first power source provides power to the first terminal and a second power source provides power to the second terminal and to a heater of a heated diesel particulate filter (DPF). The switch is opened during a DPF regeneration cycle to prevent the first power source from being loaded by the heater while the heater is energized.

  17. Characterization and modeling of the heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Glickstein, S.S.; Friedman, E.

    1993-10-01

    A description of the input energy source is basic to any numerical modeling formulation designed to predict the outcome of the welding process. The source is fundamental and unique to each joining process. The resultant output of any numerical model will be affected by the initial description of both the magnitude and distribution of the input energy of the heat source. Thus, calculated weld shape, residual stresses, weld distortion, cooling rates, metallurgical structure, material changes due to excessive temperatures and potential weld defects are all influenced by the initial characterization of the heat source. Understandings of both the physics and the mathematical formulation of these sources are essential for describing the input energy distribution. This section provides a brief review of the physical phenomena that influence the input energy distributions and discusses several different models of heat sources that have been used in simulating arc welding, high energy density welding and resistance welding processes. Both simplified and detailed models of the heat source are discussed.

  18. Heat flow and heat generation in greenstone belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drury, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Heat flow has been measured in Precambrian shields in both greenstone belts and crystalline terrains. Values are generally low, reflecting the great age and tectonic stability of the shields; they range typically between 30 and 50 mW/sq m, although extreme values of 18 and 79 mW/sq m have been reported. For large areas of the Earth's surface that are assumed to have been subjected to a common thermotectonic event, plots of heat flow against heat generation appear to be linear, although there may be considerable scatter in the data. The relationship is expressed as: Q = Q sub o + D A sub o in which Q is the observed heat flow, A sub o is the measured heat generation at the surface, Q sub o is the reduced heat flow from the lower crust and mantle, and D, which has the dimension of length, represents a scale depth for the distribution of radiogenic elements. Most authors have not used data from greenstone belts in attempting to define the relationship within shields, considering them unrepresentative and preferring to use data from relatively homogeneous crystalline rocks. A discussion follows.

  19. Life cycle assessment of base-load heat sources for district heating system options

    SciTech Connect

    Ghafghazi, Saeed; Sowlati, T.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Melin, Staffan

    2011-03-01

    Purpose There has been an increased interest in utilizing renewable energy sources in district heating systems. District heating systems are centralized systems that provide heat for residential and commercial buildings in a community. While various renewable and conventional energy sources can be used in such systems, many stakeholders are interested in choosing the feasible option with the least environmental impacts. This paper evaluates and compares environmental burdens of alternative energy source options for the base load of a district heating center in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC) using the life cycle assessment method. The considered energy sources include natural gas, wood pellet, sewer heat, and ground heat. Methods The life cycle stages considered in the LCA model cover all stages from fuel production, fuel transmission/transportation, construction, operation, and finally demolition of the district heating system. The impact categories were analyzed based on the IMPACT 2002+ method. Results and discussion On a life-cycle basis, the global warming effect of renewable energy options were at least 200 kgeqCO2 less than that of the natural gas option per MWh of heat produced by the base load system. It was concluded that less than 25% of the upstream global warming impact associated with the wood pellet energy source option was due to transportation activities and about 50% of that was resulted from wood pellet production processes. In comparison with other energy options, the wood pellets option has higher impacts on respiratory of inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, acidification, and nutrification categories. Among renewable options, the global warming impact of heat pump options in the studied case in Vancouver, BC, were lower than the wood pellet option due to BC's low carbon electricity generation profile. Ozone layer depletion and mineral extraction were the highest for the heat pump options due to extensive construction required for these

  20. TEM Pump With External Heat Source And Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesmith, Bill J.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed thermoelectric/electromagnetic (TEM) pump driven by external source of heat and by two or more heat pipe radiator heat sink(s). Thermoelectrics generate electrical current to circulate liquid metal in secondary loop of two-fluid-loop system. Intended for use with space and terrestrial dual loop liquid metal nuclear reactors. Applications include spacecraft on long missions or terrestrial beacons or scientific instruments having to operate in remote areas for long times. Design modified to include multiple radiators, converters, and ducts, as dictated by particular application.

  1. Solar steam generation by heat localization.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Hadi; Ni, George; Marconnet, Amy Marie; Loomis, James; Yerci, Selcuk; Miljkovic, Nenad; Chen, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Currently, steam generation using solar energy is based on heating bulk liquid to high temperatures. This approach requires either costly high optical concentrations leading to heat loss by the hot bulk liquid and heated surfaces or vacuum. New solar receiver concepts such as porous volumetric receivers or nanofluids have been proposed to decrease these losses. Here we report development of an approach and corresponding material structure for solar steam generation while maintaining low optical concentration and keeping the bulk liquid at low temperature with no vacuum. We achieve solar thermal efficiency up to 85% at only 10 kW m(-2). This high performance results from four structure characteristics: absorbing in the solar spectrum, thermally insulating, hydrophilic and interconnected pores. The structure concentrates thermal energy and fluid flow where needed for phase change and minimizes dissipated energy. This new structure provides a novel approach to harvesting solar energy for a broad range of phase-change applications. PMID:25043613

  2. RF Heating in Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, D.; Gammino, S.; Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.

    2011-12-01

    ECRIS—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources are able to feed accelerators with intense currents of highly charged ions. In ECRIS a high density—high temperature plasma is generated by means of the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating inside a B-min, MHD stable trap. The state of the art about the principal heating mechanisms will be given. The paper will specially discuss the most critical and still open issues concerning the influence of the magnetic field and of the RF frequency on the plasma heating, as well as the impact of possible non-linear pumping wave—to—plasma interactions. The contribution of INFN-LNS will be specifically underlined. A short review on the future perspectives for the design of new generation ion sources will be given in conclusion.

  3. Light bulb heat exchanger for magnetohydrodynamic generator applications - Preliminary evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.; Hwang, C. C.; Seikel, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    The light-bulb heat-exchanger concept is investigated as a possible means of using a combustion heat source to supply energy to an inert gas MHD power generator system. In this concept, combustion gases flow through a central passage which consists of a duct with transparent walls through which heat is transferred by radiation to a radiation receiver which in turn heats the inert gas by convection. The effects of combustion-gas emissivity, transparent-wall-transmissivity, radiation-receiver emissivity, and the use of fins in the inert gas coolant passage are studied. The results indicate that inert gas outlet temperatures of 2500 K are possible for combustion temperatures of 3200 K and that sufficient energy can be transferred from the combustion gas to reduce its temperature to approximately 2000 K. At this temperature more conventional heat exchangers can be used.

  4. Heat Pipe-Assisted Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology for Waste Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Ju-Chan; Chi, Ri-Guang; Rhi, Seok-Ho; Lee, Kye-Bock; Hwang, Hyun-Chang; Lee, Ji-Su; Lee, Wook-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    Currently, large amounts of thermal energy dissipated from automobiles are emitted through hot exhaust pipes. This has resulted in the need for a new efficient recycling method to recover energy from waste hot exhaust gas. The present experimental study investigated how to improve the power output of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) system assisted by a wickless loop heat pipe (loop thermosyphon) under the limited space of the exhaust gas pipeline. The present study shows a novel loop-type heat pipe-assisted TEG concept to be applied to hybrid vehicles. The operating temperature of a TEG's hot side surface should be as high as possible to maximize the Seebeck effect. The present study shows a novel TEG concept of transferring heat from the source to the sink. This technology can transfer waste heat to any local place with a loop-type heat pipe. The present TEG system with a heat pipe can transfer heat and generate an electromotive force power of around 1.3 V in the case of 170°C hot exhaust gas. Two thermoelectric modules (TEMs) for a conductive block model and four Bi2Te3 TEMs with a heat pipe-assisted model were installed in the condenser section. Heat flows to the condenser section from the evaporator section connected to the exhaust pipe. This novel TEG system with a heat pipe can be placed in any location on an automobile.

  5. Thermoelectricity without absorbing energy from the heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Robert S.; Sánchez, Rafael; Haupt, Federica; Splettstoesser, Janine

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the power output of a quantum dot machine coupled to two electronic reservoirs via thermoelectric contacts, and to two thermal reservoirs - one hot and one cold. This machine is a nanoscale analogue of a conventional thermocouple heat-engine, in which the active region being heated is unavoidably also exchanging heat with its cold environment. Heat exchange between the dot and the thermal reservoirs is treated as a capacitive coupling to electronic fluctuations in localized levels, modeled as two additional quantum dots. The resulting multiple-dot setup is described using a master equation approach. We observe an "exotic" power generation, which remains finite even when the heat absorbed from the thermal reservoirs is zero (in other words the heat coming from the hot reservoir all escapes into the cold environment). This effect can be understood in terms of a non-local effect in which the heat flow from heat source to the cold environment generates power via a mechanism which we refer to as Coulomb heat drag. It relies on the fact that there is no relaxation in the quantum dot system, so electrons within it have a non-thermal energy distribution. More poetically, one can say that we find a spatial separation of the first-law of thermodynamics (heat to work conversion) from the second-law of thermodynamics (generation of entropy). We present circumstances in which this non-thermal system can generate more power than any conventional macroscopic thermocouple (with local thermalization), even when the latter works with Carnot efficiency.

  6. Reprint of : Thermoelectricity without absorbing energy from the heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Robert S.; Sánchez, Rafael; Haupt, Federica; Splettstoesser, Janine

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the power output of a quantum dot machine coupled to two electronic reservoirs via thermoelectric contacts, and to two thermal reservoirs - one hot and one cold. This machine is a nanoscale analogue of a conventional thermocouple heat-engine, in which the active region being heated is unavoidably also exchanging heat with its cold environment. Heat exchange between the dot and the thermal reservoirs is treated as a capacitive coupling to electronic fluctuations in localized levels, modeled as two additional quantum dots. The resulting multiple-dot setup is described using a master equation approach. We observe an "exotic" power generation, which remains finite even when the heat absorbed from the thermal reservoirs is zero (in other words the heat coming from the hot reservoir all escapes into the cold environment). This effect can be understood in terms of a non-local effect in which the heat flow from heat source to the cold environment generates power via a mechanism which we refer to as Coulomb heat drag. It relies on the fact that there is no relaxation in the quantum dot system, so electrons within it have a non-thermal energy distribution. More poetically, one can say that we find a spatial separation of the first-law of thermodynamics (heat to work conversion) from the second-law of thermodynamics (generation of entropy). We present circumstances in which this non-thermal system can generate more power than any conventional macroscopic thermocouple (with local thermalization), even when the latter works with Carnot efficiency.

  7. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2005-07-29

    Electricity generated by distributed energy resources (DER) located close to end-use loads has the potential to meet consumer requirements more efficiently than the existing centralized grid. Installation of DER allows consumers to circumvent the costs associated with transmission congestion and other non-energy costs of electricity delivery and potentially to take advantage of market opportunities to purchase energy when attractive. On-site thermal power generation is typically less efficient than central station generation, but by avoiding non-fuel costs of grid power and utilizing combined heat and power (CHP) applications, i.e., recovering heat from small-scale on-site generation to displace fuel purchases, then DER can become attractive to a strictly cost-minimizing consumer. In previous efforts, the decisions facing typical commercial consumers have been addressed using a mixed-integer linear programme, the DER Customer Adoption Model(DER-CAM). Given the site s energy loads, utility tariff structure, and information (both technical and financial) on candidate DER technologies, DER-CAM minimizes the overall energy cost for a test year by selecting the units to install and determining their hourly operating schedules. In this paper, the capabilities of DER-CAM are enhanced by the inclusion of the option to store recovered low-grade heat. By being able to keep an inventory of heat for use in subsequent periods, sites are able to lower costs even further by reducing off-peak generation and relying on storage. This and other effects of storages are demonstrated by analysis of five typical commercial buildings in San Francisco, California, and an estimate of the cost per unit capacity of heat storage is calculated.

  8. Prandtl Number Dependent Natural Convection with Internal Heat Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kang Hee Lee; Seung Dong Lee; Kune Y. Suh; Joy L. Rempe; Fan-Bill Cheung; Sang B. Kim

    2004-06-01

    Natural convection plays an important role in determining the thermal load from debris accumulated in the reactor vessel lower head during a severe accident. Recently, attention is being paid to the feasibility of external vessel flooding as a severe accident management strategy and to the phenomena affecting the success path for retaining the molten core material inside the vessel. The heat transfer inside the molten core material can be characterized by the strong buoyancy-induced flows resulting from internal heating due to decay of fission products. The thermo-fluid dynamic characteristics of such flow depend strongly on the thermal boundary conditions. The spatial and temporal variation of heat flux on the pool wall boundaries and the pool superheat are mainly characterized by the natural convection flow inside the molten pool. In general, the natural convection heat transfer phenomena involving the internal heat generation are represented by the modified Rayleigh number (Ra’), which quantifies the internal heat source and hence the strength of the buoyancy force. In this study, tests were conducted in a rectangular section 250 mm high, 500 mm long and 160 mm wide. Twenty-four T-type thermocouples were installed in the test section to measure temperatures. Four T-type thermocouples were used to measure the boundary temperatures. The thermocouples were placed in designated locations after calibration. A direct heating method was adopted in this test to simulate the uniform heat generation. The experiments covered a range of Ra' between 1.5x106 and 7.42x1015 and the Prandtl number (Pr) between 0.7 and 6.5. Tests were conducted with water and air as simulant. The upper and lower boundary conditions were maintained uniform. The results demonstrated feasibility of the direct heating method to simulate uniform volumetric heat generation. Particular attentions were paid to the effect of Pr on natural convection heat transfer within the rectangular pool.

  9. BWR Source Term Generation and Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. Ryman

    2003-07-31

    This calculation is a revision of a previous calculation (Ref. 7.5) that bears the same title and has the document identifier BBAC00000-01717-0210-00006 REV 01. The purpose of this revision is to remove TBV (to-be-verified) -41 10 associated with the output files of the previous version (Ref. 7.30). The purpose of this and the previous calculation is to generate source terms for a representative boiling water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assembly for the first one million years after the SNF is discharged from the reactors. This calculation includes an examination of several ways to represent BWR assemblies and operating conditions in SAS2H in order to quantify the effects these representations may have on source terms. These source terms provide information characterizing the neutron and gamma spectra in particles per second, the decay heat in watts, and radionuclide inventories in curies. Source terms are generated for a range of burnups and enrichments (see Table 2) that are representative of the waste stream and stainless steel (SS) clad assemblies. During this revision, it was determined that the burnups used for the computer runs of the previous revision were actually about 1.7% less than the stated, or nominal, burnups. See Section 6.6 for a discussion of how to account for this effect before using any source terms from this calculation. The source term due to the activation of corrosion products deposited on the surfaces of the assembly from the coolant is also calculated. The results of this calculation support many areas of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR), which include thermal evaluation, radiation dose determination, radiological safety analyses, surface and subsurface facility designs, and total system performance assessment. This includes MGR items classified as Quality Level 1, for example, the Uncanistered Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container (Ref. 7.27, page 7). Therefore, this calculation is subject to the requirements of the

  10. Circulatory heat sources for canine respiratory heat exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Solway, J; Leff, A R; Dreshaj, I; Munoz, N M; Ingenito, E P; Michaels, D; Ingram, R H; Drazen, J M

    1986-01-01

    We assessed the roles of the pulmonary and bronchial circulations as potential heat sources to the pulmonary airways during respiratory heat loss, by observing the changes in airstream temperature that accompanied temporary occlusion of the pulmonary or bronchial circulations. Baseline end-expiratory and end-inspiratory airstream temperatures were 35.4 +/- 0.2 degrees C (SEM) and 30.9 +/- 0.3 degrees C, respectively, among all trials. With occlusion of the lower lobe pulmonary arteries for 3 min ipsilateral end-expiratory and end-inspiratory airstream temperatures fell by 2.8 +/- 0.2 and 1.1 +/- 0.2 degrees C, respectively, during hyperpnea with room temperature air, and by 3.5 +/- 0.5 and 1.8 +/- 0.2 degrees C, respectively, during hyperpnea with frigid air. In marked contrast, interruption of the bronchial circulation for 3 min had no effect on airstream temperatures. These data indicate that under these conditions, the pulmonary circulation, but not the bronchial circulation, serves as an important local heat source for respiratory heat exchange within the pulmonary airways. Images PMID:3760181

  11. Assessment of dynamic energy conversion systems for radioisotope heat sources

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, G.R.; Mangeng, C.A.

    1985-06-01

    The use of dynamic conversion systems to convert the heat generated in a 7500 W(t) 90 Sr radioisotopic heat source to electricity is examined. The systems studies were Stirling; Brayton Cycle; three organic Rankines (ORCs) (Barber-Nichols/ORMAT, Sundstrand, and TRW); and an organic Rankine plus thermoelectrics. The systems were ranked for a North Warning System mission using a Los Alamos Multiattribute Decision Theory code. Three different heat source designs were used: case I with a beginning of life (BOL) source temperature of 640 C, case II with a BOL source temperature of 745/sup 0/C, and case III with a BOL source temperature of 945/sup 0/C. The Stirling engine system was the top-ranked system of cases I and II, closely followed by the ORC systems in case I and ORC plus thermoelectrics in case II. The Brayton cycle system was top-ranked for case III, with the Stirling engine system a close second. The use of /sup 238/Pu in heat source sizes of 7500 W(t) was examined and found to be questionable because of cost and material availability and because of additional requirements for analysis of safeguards and critical mass.

  12. Assessment of dynamic energy conversion systems for radioisotope heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, G. R.; Mangeng, C. A.

    1985-06-01

    The use of dynamic conversion systems to convert the heat generated in a 7500 W(t) 90 Sr radioisotopic heat source to electricity is examined. The systems studies were: Stirling; Brayton cycle; three organic Rankines (ORCs) (Barber-Nichols/ORMAT, Sundstrand, and TRW); and an organic Rankine plus thermoelectrics. The systems were ranked for a North Warning System mission using a Los Alamos multiattribute decision theory code. Three different heat source designs were used: case 1 with a beginning of life (BOL) source temperature of 640 C, case 2 with a BOL source temperature of 745 C, and case 3 with a BOL source temperature of 945 C. The Stirling engine system was the top-ranked system of case 1 and 2, closely followed by the ORC systems in case 1 and ORC plus thermoelectrics in case 2. The Brayton cycle system was top-ranked for case 3, with the Stirling engine system a close second. The use of (238) Pu in heat source sizes of 7500 W(t) is examined and it is found to be questionable because of cost and material availability and because of additional requirements for anlaysis of safeguards and critical mass.

  13. Thermoelectric power generator for variable thermal power source

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Lon E; Crane, Douglas Todd

    2015-04-14

    Traditional power generation systems using thermoelectric power generators are designed to operate most efficiently for a single operating condition. The present invention provides a power generation system in which the characteristics of the thermoelectrics, the flow of the thermal power, and the operational characteristics of the power generator are monitored and controlled such that higher operation efficiencies and/or higher output powers can be maintained with variably thermal power input. Such a system is particularly beneficial in variable thermal power source systems, such as recovering power from the waste heat generated in the exhaust of combustion engines.

  14. 60-watt isotopic heat source for terrestrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brittain, W.M.

    1995-01-20

    A sealed isotopic heat source (IHS) with a nominal thermal inventory of 60 watts is being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for use in remote terrestrial applications that require isotopic power for electrical power generation. Emphasis is on use in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and dynamic cycle power units. The selected IHS design incorporates technologies developed for prior space and terrestrial IHSs to minimize development cost and span time. A General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) Fueled Clad (FC), comprised of a plutonium-238 enriched pressed-plutonia pellet contained within a vented iridium clad, is the source for thermal energy. The GPHS FC technology was developed by DOE for use in space RTGs. The GPHS FC is, in turn, enclosed within a three-layer cladding system similar to that developed by DOE for earlier terrestrial heat sources. The cladding system provides for retention of the helium gas generated by the decay of the isotopic fuel and containment of the isotopic fuel under normal operating and accident conditions. Test hardware is currently being fabricated and safety demonstration testing is scheduled to be completed in early 1995. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  15. 46 CFR 111.10-4 - Power requirements, generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Power requirements, generating sources. 111.10-4 Section 111.10-4 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING... services include cooking, heating, air conditioning (where installed), domestic refrigeration,...

  16. 46 CFR 111.10-4 - Power requirements, generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Power requirements, generating sources. 111.10-4 Section 111.10-4 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING... services include cooking, heating, air conditioning (where installed), domestic refrigeration,...

  17. 46 CFR 111.10-4 - Power requirements, generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Power requirements, generating sources. 111.10-4 Section 111.10-4 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING... services include cooking, heating, air conditioning (where installed), domestic refrigeration,...

  18. 46 CFR 111.10-4 - Power requirements, generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power requirements, generating sources. 111.10-4 Section 111.10-4 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING... services include cooking, heating, air conditioning (where installed), domestic refrigeration,...

  19. 46 CFR 111.10-4 - Power requirements, generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Power requirements, generating sources. 111.10-4 Section 111.10-4 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING... services include cooking, heating, air conditioning (where installed), domestic refrigeration,...

  20. Desiccant Humidity Control System Using Waste Heat of Water Source Heat Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Kazuki; Mashimo, Kouichi; Takahashi, Mikio; Tanaka, Kitoshi; Toya, Saburo; Tateyama, Ryotaro; Miyamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    The authors hope to develop an air-conditioning system that processes the latent heat load and the sensible heat load separately. This would enable the efficiency of the chilling unit to be improved because the temperature of the chilled water used for cooling would be higher than normal. However, if lukewarm water is used, there is insufficient cooling and dehumidification. Therefore, a dehumidifier such as a desiccant air-conditioning system is needed. Using the waste heat generated when the desiccant air-conditioning system is in operation increases efficiency. The authors are developing a prototype desiccant humidity control system that makes use of the waste heat generated by a water source heat pump. This paper describes the results of an experiment that was conducted for this prototype based on the assumption that it would be installed in an office building. The dehumidification performance achieved was sufficient to process the indoor latent heat load. The prototype was able to adjust the indoor relative humidity from 40% to 60% under conditions in which the indoor latent heat load varied. Humidification without the use of water was possible even in the absence of an indoor latent heat load when the outdoor absolute humidity was 3.5 g/kg' or more.

  1. Generation difficulty and memory for source.

    PubMed

    Nieznański, Marek

    2011-08-01

    The role of the word predictability from sentence context for reality monitoring and external source monitoring was examined in two experiments. In a reality-monitoring task, discrimination of an internal source was better in the hard than in the easy condition. It is probable that extra cognitive operations engaged during word generation in the hard condition were effective cues for reality-monitoring judgements. In contrast, in an external source-monitoring task (recognition memory of item's colour), the hard condition resulted in worse source memory for generated words than did the easy condition. This result is consistent both with an item-context trade-off hypothesis and a processing hypothesis. Greater effort involved at the time of generation might limit resources available for encoding of an external source. It is also possible that for generated words, the hard condition promoted conceptual processing instead of perceptual processing; therefore the item's colour was not effectively encoded. PMID:21553355

  2. Electricity generation by intermittent sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, F.

    2015-08-01

    This paper deals with the production of electricity by wind and photovoltaic (PV) power mostly in Germany. The German data of 2012 are scaled to a 100% supply of the electricity consumption by renewable sources. Wind and PV power are mixed in a ratio which minimises back-up energy. The 100%, optimal mix data are used to identify the powers to be installed, the accumulating backup and surplus energies, the size of storage to replace thermal back-up power, the possibilities of demand-side-management, and the specific CO2 production. The benefits of using an EU-wide field of renewable energies (RES) instead of the national one are quantified and the interconnection capacities specified. Finally, the costs of installing RES are discussed. The conclusion is that a 100% supply by RES may not be meaningful. Large-scale supply by RES alone has deficiencies and it will remain a major task for science and technology to either improve such a system or find a suitable replacement.

  3. HTGR nuclear heat source component design and experience

    SciTech Connect

    Peinado, C.O.; Wunderlich, R.G.; Simon, W.A.

    1982-05-01

    The high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) nuclear heat source components have been under design and development since the mid-1950's. Two power plants have been designed, constructed, and operated: the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station and the Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station. Recently, development has focused on the primary system components for a 2240-MW(t) steam cycle HTGR capable of generating about 900 MW(e) electric power or alternately producing high-grade steam and cogenerating electric power. These components include the steam generators, core auxiliary heat exchangers, primary and auxiliary circulators, reactor internals, and thermal barrier system. A discussion of the design and operating experience of these components is included.

  4. Detailed study of heat generation in porous LiCoO2 electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heubner, C.; Schneider, M.; Michaelis, A.

    2016-03-01

    In this work the heat generation in porous LiCoO2 based electrodes for lithium ion batteries is studied in detail. Irreversible heat generation rates due to ohmic resistance, charge transfer and mass transport limitations as well as the reversible heat of the electrode reaction are determined from electrochemical measurements as a function of the C-rate, the temperature and the lithium concentration in the active material. The results show that all the individual heat sources contribute significantly to the total heat generation in the electrode. The heat sources are functions of the C-rate and the temperature as well as the lithium concentration in the active material. The reversible heat contribution was found to be most significant at higher temperatures und lower C-rates, which tend to reduce kinetic limitations and irreversible heats, respectively. The heat generation rate due to mass transport limitations is most influential among the irreversible heats, whereas the ohmic contribution shows a minor impact. The total heat generation was found to increase with increasing C-rate and decreasing temperature. Furthermore, the heat generation is significantly reduced for charging compared to discharging due to the intrinsic asymmetry of the reversible heat and larger kinetic limitations for lithiation compared to delithiation of LiCoO2.

  5. Modeling a Thermoelectric Generator Applied to Diesel Automotive Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, N.; Lazard, M.; Aixala, L.; Scherrer, H.

    2010-09-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are outstanding devices for automotive waste heat recovery. Their packaging, lack of moving parts, and direct heat to electrical conversion are the main benefits. Usually, TEGs are modeled with a constant hot-source temperature. However, energy in exhaust gases is limited, thus leading to a temperature decrease as heat is recovered. Therefore thermoelectric properties change along the TEG, affecting performance. A thermoelectric generator composed of Mg2Si/Zn4Sb3 for high temperatures followed by Bi2Te3 for low temperatures has been modeled using engineering equation solver (EES) software. The model uses the finite-difference method with a strip-fins convective heat transfer coefficient. It has been validated on a commercial module with well-known properties. The thermoelectric connection and the number of thermoelements have been addressed as well as the optimum proportion of high-temperature material for a given thermoelectric heat exchanger. TEG output power has been estimated for a typical commercial vehicle at 90°C coolant temperature.

  6. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of...

  7. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of...

  8. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of...

  9. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of...

  10. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of...

  11. Optimal Ground Source Heat Pump System Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ozbek, Metin; Yavuzturk, Cy; Pinder, George

    2015-04-15

    Despite the facts that GSHPs first gained popularity as early as the 1940’s and they can achieve 30 to 60 percent in energy savings and carbon emission reductions relative to conventional HVAC systems, the use of geothermal energy in the U.S. has been less than 1 percent of the total energy consumption. The key barriers preventing this technically-mature technology from reaching its full commercial potential have been its high installation cost and limited consumer knowledge and trust in GSHP systems to deliver the technology in a cost-effective manner in the market place. Led by ENVIRON, with support from University Hartford and University of Vermont, the team developed and tested a software-based a decision making tool (‘OptGSHP’) for the least-cost design of ground-source heat pump (‘GSHP’) systems. OptGSHP combines state of the art optimization algorithms with GSHP-specific HVAC and groundwater flow and heat transport simulation. The particular strength of OptGSHP is in integrating heat transport due to groundwater flow into the design, which most of the GSHP designs do not get credit for and therefore are overdesigned.

  12. Source-Independent Quantum Random Number Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhu; Zhou, Hongyi; Yuan, Xiao; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Quantum random number generators can provide genuine randomness by appealing to the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics. In general, a physical generator contains two parts—a randomness source and its readout. The source is essential to the quality of the resulting random numbers; hence, it needs to be carefully calibrated and modeled to achieve information-theoretical provable randomness. However, in practice, the source is a complicated physical system, such as a light source or an atomic ensemble, and any deviations in the real-life implementation from the theoretical model may affect the randomness of the output. To close this gap, we propose a source-independent scheme for quantum random number generation in which output randomness can be certified, even when the source is uncharacterized and untrusted. In our randomness analysis, we make no assumptions about the dimension of the source. For instance, multiphoton emissions are allowed in optical implementations. Our analysis takes into account the finite-key effect with the composable security definition. In the limit of large data size, the length of the input random seed is exponentially small compared to that of the output random bit. In addition, by modifying a quantum key distribution system, we experimentally demonstrate our scheme and achieve a randomness generation rate of over 5 ×103 bit /s .

  13. Lunar Surface Stirling Power Systems Using Isotope Heat Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Paul C.; Penswick, L. Barry; Shaltens, Richard K.

    2010-01-01

    For many years, NASA has used the decay of plutonium-238 (Pu-238) (in the form of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS)) as a heat source for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs), which have provided electrical power for many NASA missions. While RTGs have an impressive reliability record for the missions in which they have been used, their relatively low thermal to electric conversion efficiency and the scarcity of plutonium-238 (Pu-238) has led NASA to consider other power conversion technologies. NASA is considering returning both robotic and human missions to the lunar surface and, because of the long lunar nights (14.75 Earth days), isotope power systems are an attractive candidate to generate electrical power. NASA is currently developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) as a candidate higher efficiency power system that produces greater than 160 W with two GPHS modules at the beginning of life (BOL) (32% efficiency). The ASRG uses the same Pu-238 GPHS modules, which are used in RTG, but by coupling them to a Stirling convertor provides a four-fold reduction in the number of GPHS modules. This study considers the use of americium-241 (Am-241) as a substitute for the Pu-238 in Stirling- convertor-based Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for power levels from tens of watts to 5 kWe. The Am-241 is used as a substitute for the Pu-238 in GPHS modules. Depending on power level, different Stirling heat input and removal systems are modeled. It was found that substituting Am-241 GPHS modules into the ASRG reduces power output by about one-fifth while maintaining approximately the same system mass. In order to obtain the nominal 160 W of electrical output of the Pu-238 ASRG requires 10 Am-241 GPHS modules. Higher power systems require changing from conductive coupling heat input and removal from the Stirling convertor to either pumped loops or heat pipes. Liquid metal pumped loops are considered as the primary heat transportation on the hot

  14. Testing and Troubleshooting Automatically Generated Source Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Joel

    1998-01-01

    Tools allowing engineers to model the real-time behavior of systems that control many types of NASA systems have become widespread. These tools automatically generate source code that is compiled, linked, then downloaded into computers controlling everything from wind tunnels to space flight systems. These tools save hundreds of hours of software development time and allow engineers with thorough application area knowledge but little software development experience to generate software to control the systems they use daily. These systems are verified and validated by simulating the real-time models, and by other techniques that focus on the model or the hardware. The automatically generated source code is typically not subjected to rigorous testing using conventional software testing techniques. Given the criticality and safety issues surrounding these systems, the application of conventional and new software testing and troubleshooting techniques to the automatically generated will improve the reliability of the resulting systems.

  15. Synchronization System for Next Generation Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zavriyev, Anton

    2014-03-27

    An alternative synchronization technique – one that would allow explicit control of the pulse train including its repetition rate and delay is clearly desired. We propose such a scheme. Our method is based on optical interferometry and permits synchronization of the pulse trains generated by two independent mode-locked lasers. As the next generation x-ray sources will be driven by a clock signal derived from a mode-locked optical source, our technique will provide a way to synchronize x-ray probe with the optical pump pulses.

  16. Generator-absorber-heat exchange heat transfer apparatus and method and use thereof in a heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Zawacki, Thomas S.; Marsala, Joseph

    1994-11-29

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use the working solution of the absorption system for the heat transfer medium.

  17. Desalination using low grade heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    A new, low temperature, energy-efficient and sustainable desalination system has been developed in this research. This system operates under near-vacuum conditions created by exploiting natural means of gravity and barometric pressure head. The system can be driven by low grade heat sources such as solar energy or waste heat streams. Both theoretical and experimental studies were conducted under this research to evaluate and demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed process. Theoretical studies included thermodynamic analysis and process modeling to evaluate the performance of the process using the following alternate energy sources for driving the process: solar thermal energy, solar photovoltaic/thermal energy, geothermal energy, and process waste heat emissions. Experimental studies included prototype scale demonstration of the process using grid power as well as solar photovoltaic/thermal sources. Finally, the feasibility of the process in reclaiming potable-quality water from the effluent of the city wastewater treatment plant was studied. The following results have been obtained from theoretical analysis and modeling: (1) The proposed process can produce up to 8 L/d of freshwater for 1 m2 area of solar collector and evaporation chamber respectively with a specific energy requirement of 3122 kJ for 1 kg of freshwater production. (2) Photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) energy can produce up to 200 L/d of freshwater with a 25 m2 PV/T module which meets the electricity needs of 21 kWh/d of a typical household as well. This configuration requires a specific energy of 3122 kJ for 1 kg of freshwater production. (3) 100 kg/hr of geothermal water at 60°C as heat source can produce up to 60 L/d of freshwater with a specific energy requirement of 3078 kJ for 1 kg of freshwater production. (4) Waste heat released from an air conditioning system rated at 3.25 kW cooling, can produce up to 125 L/d of freshwater. This configuration requires an additional energy of 208 kJ/kg of

  18. Development of a Residential Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, C Keith; Baxter, Van D; Hern, Shawn; McDowell, Tim; Munk, Jeffrey D; Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    A residential-size ground-source integrated heat pump (GSIHP) system has been developed and is currently being field tested. The system is a nominal 2-ton (7 kW) cooling capacity, variable-speed unit, which is multi-functional, e.g. space cooling, space heating, dedicated water heating, and simultaneous space cooling and water heating. High-efficiency brushless permanent-magnet (BPM) motors are used for the compressor, indoor blower, and pumps to obtain the highest component performance and system control flexibility. Laboratory test data were used to calibrate a vapor-compression simulation model (HPDM) for each of the four primary modes of operation. The model was used to optimize the internal control options and to simulate the selected internal control strategies, such as controlling to a constant air supply temperature in the space heating mode and a fixed water temperature rise in water heating modes. Equipment performance maps were generated for each operation mode as functions of all independent variables for use in TRNSYS annual energy simulations. These were performed for the GSIHP installed in a well-insulated 2600 ft2(242 m2) house and connected to a vertical ground loop heat exchanger(GLHE). We selected a 13 SEER (3.8 CSPF )/7.7 HSPF (2.3 HSPF, W/W) ASHP unit with 0.90 Energy Factor (EF) resistance water heater as the baseline for energy savings comparisons. The annual energy simulations were conducted over five US climate zones. In addition, appropriate ground loop sizes were determined for each location to meet 10-year minimum and maximum design entering water temperatures (EWTs) to the equipment. The prototype GSIHP system was predicted to use 52 to 59% less energy than the baseline system while meeting total annual space conditioning and water heating loads.

  19. Investigation of Vapour Chamber Performance with a Concentrated Heat Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravache, E.; Siedel, S.; Kempers, R.; Robinson, A. J.

    2014-07-01

    This work aims to characterize the performance of a commercially available solid heat sink (SHS) and a vapour chamber heat sink (VCHS) with a small localized heat source. The heat sinks were tested under forced convection conditions in a dedicated wind tunnel. Heat transfer and temperature measurements facilitated the estimation of the source-to-sink thermal resistance whilst thermal imaging on the air side of the heat sink was used to gauge the level of heat spreading. The results indicate that the VCHS was capable of spreading the heat from the localized source over a greater surface area of the heat sink compared with the SHS. However, the improved spreading resistance of the VCHS was offset by the additional contact resistance and/or the thermal resistance of the internal wick structure resulting in a source-to-sink thermal resistance and heater temperature which was commensurate with the SHS. As a result there was no thermal benefit of the VCHS.

  20. Welding Isotopic Heat Sources for the Cassini Mission to Saturn (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Ferreira, E.A.; George, T.G.

    1995-02-28

    In 1997 NASA will launch the Cassini scientific probe to the planet Saturn. Electric power for this probe will be provided by Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators thermally driven by General Purpose Heat Source modules.

  1. Infrasound Generation from the Source Physics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, L. A.; Schramm, K. A.; Jones, K. R.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the acoustic and infrasound source generation mechanisms from underground explosions is of great importance for usage of this unique data type in non-proliferation activities. One of the purposes of the Source Physics Experiments (SPE), a series of underground explosive shots at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), is to gain an improved understanding of the generation and propagation of physical signals, such as seismic and infrasound, from the near to far field. Two of the SPE shots (SPE-1 and SPE-4') were designed to be small "Green's Function" sources with minimal spall or permanent surface deformation. We analyze infrasound data collected from these two shots at distances from ~300 m to ~1 km and frequencies up to 20 Hz. Using weather models based upon actual observations at the times of these sources, including 3-D variations in topography, temperatures, pressures, and winds, we synthesized full waveforms using Sandia's moving media acoustic propagation simulation suite. Several source mechanisms were simulated and compared and contrasted with observed waveforms using full waveform source inversion. We will discuss results of these source inversions including the relative roll of spall from these small explosions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Environmental Assessment of Ground Source Heat Pump Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, P.; Saner, D.; Juraske, R.; Kübert, M.

    2009-12-01

    Ground source heat pump systems (GSHPs) represent the most frequent geothermal application. Because of the economic and environmental benefits of GSHPs in comparison with other technologies for space-heating, cooling, and warm-water provision, an exponential growth rate for these systems is predicted for the coming decades. GSHPs are considered to have a low environmental impact. However, they are not fully renewable. Devices such as borehole heat exchangers have to be installed and maintained, and during operation a heat pump continuously consumes electricity from the grid. In order to assess the environmental benefits of such technologies, the complete life-cycle of all technological elements has to be examined. This life-cycle includes drilling, installation, operation and disposal phase of GSHP application, and all background process for device production, transport and power generation. This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of a GSHP life cycle. The environmental relevance of individual technological elements is rated for a number of environmental indicators, including CO2 savings potential, ozone layer depletion, soil ecotoxicological potential, and impacts on the local aquifer. The role of primary energy used for heat pump operation is discussed, and comparison is made with alternative conventional space-conditioning systems.

  3. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  4. Secondary electron ion source neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Brainard, John P.; McCollister, Daryl R.

    1998-01-01

    A neutron generator employing an electron emitter, an ion source bombarded by the electrons from the electron emitter, a plasma containment zone, and a target situated between the plasma containment zone and the electron emitter. The target contains occluded deuterium, tritium, or a mixture thereof

  5. Secondary electron ion source neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Brainard, J.P.; McCollister, D.R.

    1998-04-28

    A neutron generator employing an electron emitter, an ion source bombarded by the electrons from the electron emitter, a plasma containment zone, and a target situated between the plasma containment zone and the electron emitter is disclosed. The target contains occluded deuterium, tritium, or a mixture thereof. 4 figs.

  6. Modelling hot electron generation in short pulse target heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircombe, N. J.; Hughes, S. J.

    2013-11-01

    Target heating experiments planned for the Orion laser facility, and electron beam driven fast ignition schemes, rely on the interaction of a short pulse high intensity laser with dense material to generate a flux of energetic electrons. It is essential that the characteristics of this electron source are well known in order to inform transport models in radiation hydrodynamics codes and allow effective evaluation of experimental results and forward modelling of future campaigns. We present results obtained with the particle in cell (PIC) code EPOCH for realistic target and laser parameters, including first and second harmonic light. The hot electron distributions are characterised and their implications for onward transport and target heating are considered with the aid of the Monte-Carlo transport code THOR.

  7. Thermoelectric generators as self-oscillating heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicki, Robert

    2016-02-01

    In a previous paper [1] a model of a solar cell was proposed in which the non-periodic source of energy—photon flux—drives the collective periodic motion of electrons in a form of plasma oscillation. Subsequently, plasma oscillations are rectified by the p-n junction diode into dc (work). This approach makes a solar cell similar to standard macroscopic heat motors or turbines which always contain two heat baths, the working medium and the periodically moving piston or rotor. Here, a very similar model is proposed in order to describe the operation principles of thermoelectric generators based either on bimetallic or semiconductor p-n junctions. Again plasma oscillation corresponds to a piston and sunlight is replaced by a hot bath. The mathematical formalism is based on the Markovian master equations which can be derived in a rigorous way from the underlying Hamiltonian models and are consistent with the laws of thermodynamics.

  8. Ground-source Heat Pumps Applied to Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Steven A.; Hadley, Donald L.

    2009-07-14

    Ground-source heat pumps can provide an energy-efficient, cost-effective way to heat and cool commercial facilities. While ground-source heat pumps are well established in the residential sector, their application in larger, commercial-style, facilities is lagging, in part because of a lack of experience with the technology by those in decision-making positions. Through the use of a ground-coupling system, a conventional water-source heat pump design is transformed to a unique means of utilizing thermodynamic properties of earth and groundwater for efficient operation throughout the year in most climates. In essence, the ground (or groundwater) serves as a heat source during winter operation and a heat sink for summer cooling. Many varieties in design are available, so the technology can be adapted to almost any site. Ground-source heat pump systems can be used widely in commercial-building applications and, with proper installation, offer great potential for the commercial sector, where increased efficiency and reduced heating and cooling costs are important. Ground-source heat pump systems require less refrigerant than conventional air-source heat pumps or air-conditioning systems, with the exception of direct-expansion-type ground-source heat pump systems. This chapter provides information and procedures that an energy manager can use to evaluate most ground-source heat pump applications. Ground-source heat pump operation, system types, design variations, energy savings, and other benefits are explained. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application and installation. Two case studies are presented to give the reader a sense of the actual costs and energy savings. A list of manufacturers and references for further reading are included for prospective users who have specific or highly technical questions not fully addressed in this chapter. Sample case spreadsheets are provided in Appendix A. Additional appendixes provide other information on the ground-source

  9. Heat exchanger for power generation equipment

    DOEpatents

    Nirmalan, Nirm Velumylm; Bowman, Michael John

    2005-06-14

    A heat exchanger for a turbine is provided wherein the heat exchanger comprises a heat transfer cell comprising a sheet of material having two opposed ends and two opposed sides. In addition, a plurality of concavities are disposed on a surface portion of the sheet of material so as to cause hydrodynamic interactions and affect a heat transfer rate of the turbine between a fluid and the concavities when the fluid is disposed over the concavities.

  10. PBMR as an Ideal Heat Source for High-Temperature Process Heat Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Correia, Michael; Greyvenstein, Renee; Silady, Fred; Penfield, Scott

    2006-07-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is an advanced helium-cooled, graphite-moderated High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR). A 400 MWt PBMR Demonstration Power Plant (DPP) for the production of electricity is being developed in South Africa. This PBMR technology is also an ideal heat source for process heat applications, including Steam Methane Reforming, steam for Oil Sands bitumen recovery, Hydrogen Production and co-generation (process heat and/or electricity and/or process steam) for petrochemical industries. The cycle configuration used to transport the heat of the reactor to the process plant or to convert the reactor's heat into electricity or steam directly influences the cycle efficiency and plant economics. The choice of cycle configuration depends on the process requirements and is influenced by practical considerations, component and material limitations, maintenance, controllability, safety, performance, risk and cost. This paper provides an overview of the use of a PBMR reactor for process applications and possible cycle configurations are presented for applications which require high temperature process heat and/or electricity. (authors)

  11. Low Temperature Heat Source Utilization Current and Advanced Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, James H. Jr.; Dambly, Benjamin W.

    1992-06-01

    Once a geothermal heat source has been identified as having the potential for development, and its thermal, physical, and chemical characteristics have been determined, a method of utilization must be decided upon. This compendium will touch upon some of these concerns, and hopefully will provide the reader with a better understanding of technologies being developed that will be applicable to geothermal development in East Africa, as well as other parts of the world. The appendices contain detailed reports on Down-the-Well Turbo Pump, The Vapor-Turbine Cycle for Geothermal Power Generation, Heat Exchanger Design for Geothermal Power Plants, and a Feasibility Study of Combined Power and Water Desalting Plant Using Hot Geothermal Water. [DJE-2005

  12. Irregular spacing of heat sources for treating hydrocarbon containing formations

    DOEpatents

    Miller, David Scott; Uwechue, Uzo Philip

    2012-06-12

    A method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes providing heat input to a first section of the formation from one or more heat sources located in the first section. Fluids are produced from the first section through a production well located at or near the center of the first section. The heat sources are configured such that the average heat input per volume of formation in the first section increases with distance from the production well.

  13. Generation and Sustainment of Plasma Rotation by ICRF Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, F. W.

    2000-10-01

    When tokamak plasmas are heated by the fundamental minority ion-cyclotron process, they are observed to rotate toroidally, even though this heating process introduces negligable angular momentum. This work proposes and evaluates a physics mechanism which resolves this apparent conflict. The argument has two elements. First, it is assumed that angular momentum transport is governed by a diffusion equation with a v_tor = 0 boundary condition at the plasma surface and a torque-density source. When the source consists of separated regions of positive and negative torque density, a finite central rotation velocity results, even though the volume integrated torque density - the angular momentum input - vanishes. Secondly, ions energized by the ICRF process can generate separated regions of positive and negative torque density. Heating increases their banana widths which leads to radial energetic-particle transport that must be balanced by neutralizing radial currents and a j_rB_pR torque density in the bulk plasma. Additional, comparable torque density results from collisional transfer of mechanical angular momentum from energetic particles to the bulk plasma and particle loss through banana particles impacting the wall. Monte-Carlo calculations utilizing the ORBIT code evaluate all sources of torque density and rigorously assure that no net angular momentum is introduced. Two models of ICRF heating, diffusive and instantaneous, give similar results. When the resonance location is on the LFS, the calculated rotation has the magnitude, profile, and co-current sense of Alcator C-Mod observations. For HFS resonance locations, the model predicts counter-current rotation. Scans of rotational profiles vs. resonance location, initial energy, particle loss, pitch, and qm will be presented as will the location of the velocity shear layer its scaling to a reactor.

  14. Probing and controlling photothermal heat generation in plasmonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Coppens, Zachary J; Li, Wei; Walker, D Greg; Valentine, Jason G

    2013-03-13

    In the emerging field of thermoplasmonics, Joule heating associated with optically resonant plasmonic structures is exploited to generate nanoscale thermal hotspots. In the present study, new methods for designing and thermally probing thermoplasmonic structures are reported. A general design rationale, based on Babinet's principle, is developed for understanding how the complementary version of ideal electromagnetic antennae can yield efficient nanoscale heat sources with maximized current density. Using this methodology, we show that the diabolo antenna is more suitable for heat generation compared with its more well-known complementary structure, the bow-tie antenna. We also demonstrate that highly localized and enhanced thermal hot spots can be realized by incorporating the diabolo antenna into a plasmonic lens. Using a newly developed thermal microscopy method based on the temperature-dependent photoluminescence lifetime of thin-film thermographic phosphors, we experimentally characterize the thermal response of various antenna and superstructure designs. Data from FDTD simulations and the experimental temperature measurements confirm the validity of the design rationale. The thermal microscopy technique, with its robust sensing method, could overcome some of the drawbacks of current micro/nanoscale temperature measurement schemes. PMID:23437919

  15. Entropy and heat generation of lithium cells/batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songrui, Wang

    2016-01-01

    The methods and techniques commonly used in investigating the change of entropy and heat generation in Li cells/batteries are introduced, as are the measurements, calculations and purposes. The changes of entropy and heat generation are concomitant with the use of Li cells/batteries. In order to improve the management and the application of Li cells/batteries, especially for large scale power batteries, the quantitative investigations of the change of entropy and heat generating are necessary.

  16. Biogas as a fuel source for SOFC co-generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van herle, Jan; Membrez, Yves; Bucheli, Olivier

    This study reports on the combination of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) generators fueled with biogas as renewable energy source, recoverable from wastes but at present underexploited. From a mobilisable near-future potential in the European Union (EU-15) of 17 million tonnes oil equivalent (Mtoe), under 15% appears to be converted today into useful heat and power (2 Mtoe). SOFCs could improve and promote the exploitation of biogas on manifold generation sites as small combined heat and power (5-50 kW el), especially for farm and sewage installations, raising the electrical conversion efficiency on such reduced and variable power level. Larger module packs of the high temperature ceramic converter would also be capable of operating on contaminated fuel of low heating value (less than 40% that of natural gas) which can emanate from landfill sites (MW-size). Landfill gas delivers 80% of current world biogas production. This document compiles and estimates biogas data on actual production and future potential and presents the thermodynamics of the biogas reforming and electrochemical conversion processes. A case study is reported of the energy balance of a small SOFC co-generator operated with agricultural biogas, the largest potential source.

  17. Thulium heat source: IR D project 91-031

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, C.E.; Kammeraad, J.E.; Newman, J.G.; Van Konynenburg, R.; VanSant, J.H.

    1991-04-10

    The goal of the Thulium Heat Source study is to determine the performance capability and evaluate the safety and environmental aspects of a thulium-170 heat source. Our approach is to study parametrically the performance of thulium-170 heat source designs in the power range of 5--50 kW{sub th}. At least three heat source designs will be characterized in this power range and integrated with various power conversion subsystems to assess their performance, mass, and volume. We will determine shielding requirements, and consider the safety and environmental aspects of their use.

  18. Hollow-Cathode Source Generates Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deininger, W. D.; Aston, G.; Pless, L. C.

    1989-01-01

    Device generates argon, krypton, or xenon plasma via thermionic emission and electrical discharge within hollow cathode and ejects plasma into surrounding vacuum. Goes from cold start up to full operation in less than 5 s after initial application of power. Exposed to moist air between operations without significant degradation of starting and running characteristics. Plasma generated by electrical discharge in cathode barrel sustained and aided by thermionic emission from emitter tube. Emitter tube does not depend on rare-earth oxides, making it vulnerable to contamination by exposure to atmosphere. Device modified for use as source of plasma in laboratory experiments or industrial processes.

  19. Passive rejection of heat from an isotope heat source through an open door

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. K.

    1971-01-01

    The isotope heat-source design for a Brayton power system includes a door in the thermal insulation through which the heat can be passively rejected to space when the power system is not operating. The results of an analysis to predict the heat-source surface temperature and the heat-source heat-exchanger temperature during passive heat rejection as a function of insulation door opening angle are presented. They show that for a door opening angle greater than 20 deg, the temperatures are less than the steady-state temperatures during power system operation.

  20. The Source of Alfven Waves That Heat the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruzmaikin, A.; Berger, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    We suggest a source for high-frequency Alfven waves invoked in coronal heating and acceleration of the solar wind. The source is associated with small-scale magnetic loops in the chromospheric network.

  1. Laser Sources for Generation of Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, James W.

    1996-01-01

    Two laser systems have been built and used to demonstrate enhancements beyond current technology used for laser-based generation and detection of ultrasound. The first system consisted of ten Nd:YAG laser cavities coupled electronically and optically to permit sequential bursts of up to ten laser pulses directed either at a single point or configured into a phased array of sources. Significant enhancements in overall signal-to-noise ratio for laser ultrasound incorporating this new source system was demonstrated, using it first as a source of narrowband ultrasound and secondly as a phased array source producing large enhanced signal displacements. A second laser system was implemented using ultra fast optical pulses from a Ti:Sapphire laser to study a new method for making laser generated ultrasonic measurements of thin films with thicknesses on the order of hundreds of angstroms. Work by prior investigators showed that such measurements could be made based upon fluctuations in the reflectivity of thin films when they are stressed by an arriving elastic pulse. Research performed using equipment purchased under this program showed that a pulsed interferometric system could be used as well as a piezoreflective detection system to measure pulse arrivals even in thin films with very low piezoreflective coefficients.

  2. Generator-absorber-heat exchange heat transfer apparatus and method and use thereof in a heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Zawacki, Thomas S.

    1998-07-21

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use, as the heat transfer medium, the working fluid of the absorption system taken from the generator at a location where the working fluid has a rich liquor concentration.

  3. Generator-absorber-heat exchange heat transfer apparatus and method and use thereof in a heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, B.A.; Zawacki, T.S.

    1998-07-21

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use, as the heat transfer medium, the working fluid of the absorption system taken from the generator at a location where the working fluid has a rich liquor concentration. 5 figs.

  4. Radiant heat source, vacuum bag, provide portable bonding oven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholls, A. H.

    1967-01-01

    Portable bonding oven is formed to any desired size or configuration to attach doublers and brackets to the surfaces of large structures. A radiant heat source is used in combination with a heat resistant transport vacuum bag and a black heat absorbing cloth.

  5. Generator-absorber-heat exchange heat transfer apparatus and method and use thereof in a heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Zawacki, Thomas S.

    1996-12-03

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use the working solution of the absorption system for the heat transfer medium. A combination of weak and rich liquor working solution is used as the heat transfer medium.

  6. Loop Heat Pipe Operation Using Heat Source Temperature for Set Point Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Paiva, Kleber; Mantelli, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    The LHP operating temperature is governed by the saturation temperature of its reservoir. Controlling the reservoir saturation temperature is commonly accomplished by cold biasing the reservoir and using electrical heaters to provide the required control power. Using this method, the loop operating temperature can be controlled within +/- 0.5K. However, because of the thermal resistance that exists between the heat source and the LHP evaporator, the heat source temperature will vary with its heat output even if LHP operating temperature is kept constant. Since maintaining a constant heat source temperature is of most interest, a question often raised is whether the heat source temperature can be used for LHP set point temperature control. A test program with a miniature LHP has been carried out to investigate the effects on the LHP operation when the control temperature sensor is placed on the heat source instead of the reservoir. In these tests, the LHP reservoir is cold-biased and is heated by a control heater. Tests results show that it is feasible to use the heat source temperature for feedback control of the LHP operation. Using this method, the heat source temperature can be maintained within a tight range for moderate and high powers. At low powers, however, temperature oscillations may occur due to interactions among the reservoir control heater power, the heat source mass, and the heat output from the heat source. In addition, the heat source temperature could temporarily deviate from its set point during fast thermal transients. The implication is that more sophisticated feedback control algorithms need to be implemented for LHP transient operation when the heat source temperature is used for feedback control.

  7. Design and optimization of geothermal power generation, heating, and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanoglu, Mehmet

    Most of the world's geothermal power plants have been built in 1970s and 1980s following 1973 oil crisis. Urgency to generate electricity from alternative energy sources and the fact that geothermal energy was essentially free adversely affected careful designs of plants which would maximize their performance for a given geothermal resource. There are, however, tremendous potentials to improve performance of many existing geothermal power plants by retrofitting, optimizing the operating conditions, re-selecting the most appropriate binary fluid in binary plants, and considering cogeneration such as a district heating and/or cooling system or a system to preheat water entering boilers in industrial facilities. In this dissertation, some representative geothermal resources and existing geothermal power plants in Nevada are investigated to show these potentials. Economic analysis of a typical geothermal resource shows that geothermal heating and cooling may generate up to 3 times as much revenue as power generation alone. A district heating/cooling system is designed for its incorporation into an existing 27 MW air-cooled binary geothermal power plant. The system as designed has the capability to meet the entire heating needs of an industrial park as well as 40% of its cooling needs, generating potential revenues of $14,040,000 per year. A study of the power plant shows that evaporative cooling can increase the power output by up to 29% in summer by decreasing the condenser temperature. The power output of the plant can be increased by 2.8 percent by optimizing the maximum pressure in the cycle. Also, replacing the existing working fluid isobutane by butane, R-114, isopentane, and pentane can increase the power output by up to 2.5 percent. Investigation of some well-known geothermal power generation technologies as alternatives to an existing 12.8 MW single-flash geothermal power plant shows that double-flash, binary, and combined flash/binary designs can increase the

  8. Loop Heat Pipe Operation Using Heat Source Temperature for Set Point Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Paiva, Kleber; Mantelli, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHPs) have been used for thermal control of several NASA and commercial orbiting spacecraft. The LHP operating temperature is governed by the saturation temperature of its compensation chamber (CC). Most LHPs use the CC temperature for feedback control of its operating temperature. There exists a thermal resistance between the heat source to be cooled by the LHP and the LHP's CC. Even if the CC set point temperature is controlled precisely, the heat source temperature will still vary with its heat output. For most applications, controlling the heat source temperature is of most interest. A logical question to ask is: "Can the heat source temperature be used for feedback control of the LHP operation?" A test program has been implemented to answer the above question. Objective is to investigate the LHP performance using the CC temperature and the heat source temperature for feedback control

  9. SCALE ANALYSIS OF CONVECTIVE MELTING WITH INTERNAL HEAT GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    John Crepeau

    2011-03-01

    Using a scale analysis approach, we model phase change (melting) for pure materials which generate internal heat for small Stefan numbers (approximately one). The analysis considers conduction in the solid phase and natural convection, driven by internal heat generation, in the liquid regime. The model is applied for a constant surface temperature boundary condition where the melting temperature is greater than the surface temperature in a cylindrical geometry. We show the time scales in which conduction and convection heat transfer dominate.

  10. Consideration of Thermoelectric Power Generation by Using Hot Spring Thermal Energy or Industrial Waste Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Keiichi; Horikawa, Daisuke; Goto, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Today, we face some significant environmental and energy problems such as global warming, urban heat island, and the precarious balance of world oil supply and demand. However, we have not yet found a satisfactory solution to these problems. Waste heat recovery is considered to be one of the best solutions because it can improve energy efficiency by converting heat exhausted from plants and machinery to electric power. This technology would also prevent atmospheric temperature increases caused by waste heat, and decrease fossil fuel consumption by recovering heat energy, thus also reducing CO2 emissions. The system proposed in this research generates electric power by providing waste heat or unharnessed thermal energy to built-in thermoelectric modules that can convert heat into electric power. Waste heat can be recovered from many places, including machinery in industrial plants, piping in electric power plants, waste incineration plants, and so on. Some natural heat sources such as hot springs and solar heat can also be used for this thermoelectric generation system. The generated power is expected to be supplied to auxiliary machinery around the heat source, stored as an emergency power supply, and so on. The attributes of this system are (1) direct power generation using hot springs or waste heat; (2) 24-h stable power generation; (3) stand-alone power system with no noise and no vibration; and (4) easy maintenance attributed to its simple structure with no moving parts. In order to maximize energy use efficiency, the temperature difference between both sides of the thermoelectric (TE) modules built into the system need to be kept as large as possible. This means it is important to reduce thermal resistance between TE modules and heat source. Moreover, the system's efficiency greatly depends on the base temperature of the heat sources and the material of the system's TE modules. Therefore, in order to make this system practical and efficient, it is necessary to

  11. External Pressure Testing of the 60-Watt Isotopic Heat Source

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, T. A.; Christenbury, S. T.

    1995-03-15

    The purpose of this manual is to establish the capability of the IHS generator system to contain its radioisotopic source under an accident scenario in which the generator is deposited in the ocean at great depth. This procedure is to be used on assemblies designated to demonstrate the capability of the 60-watt IHS in external pressure environments. A qualified helium leak technician (NDE) performs evaluations during post test activities. Quality Engineering (QE) is present during testing to monitor activities. Testing involves a 60-watt IHS/Heater Head Assembly with the simulant yttria in place of the isotopic fuel. The standard length 0.094 inch diameter SST dowel pin is replaced with a longer pin to facilitate disassembly. The assembly is tested to 1000 atmospheres (-15,000 psi). It is then evaluated. If it shows no evidence of collapse, an additional test is conducted for information only. The Source Document is "Safety Test Program Plan for the 60-Watt Isotopic Heat Source (IHS)", TBE-32156-IHS-008 Issue

  12. Documentation generator application for VHDL source codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niton, B.; Pozniak, K. T.; Romaniuk, R. S.

    2011-06-01

    The UML, which is a complex system modeling and description technology, has recently been expanding its uses in the field of formalization and algorithmic approach to such systems like multiprocessor photonic, optoelectronic and advanced electronics carriers; distributed, multichannel measurement systems; optical networks, industrial electronics, novel R&D solutions. The paper describes a realization of an application for documenting VHDL source codes. There are presented own novel solution based on Doxygen program which is available on the free license, with accessible source code. The used supporting tools for parser building were Bison and Flex. There are presented the practical results of the documentation generator. The program was applied for exemplary VHDL codes. The documentation generator application is used for design of large optoelectronic and electronic measurement and control systems. The paper consists of three parts which describe the following components of the documentation generator for photonic and electronic systems: concept, MatLab application and VHDL application. This is part three which describes the VHDL application. VHDL is used for behavioral description of the Optoelectronic system.

  13. The Next Generation Heated Halo for Blackbody Emissivity Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gero, P.; Taylor, J. K.; Best, F. A.; Revercomb, H. E.; Knuteson, R. O.; Tobin, D. C.; Adler, D. P.; Ciganovich, N. N.; Dutcher, S. T.; Garcia, R. K.

    2011-12-01

    The accuracy of radiance measurements from space-based infrared spectrometers is contingent on the quality of the calibration subsystem, as well as knowledge of its uncertainty. Future climate benchmarking missions call for measurement uncertainties better than 0.1 K (k=3) in radiance temperature for the detection of spectral climate signatures. Blackbody cavities impart the most accurate calibration for spaceborne infrared sensors, provided that their temperature and emissivity is traceably determined on-orbit. The On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard (OARS) has been developed at the University of Wisconsin to meet the stringent requirements of the next generation of infrared remote sensing instruments. It provides on-orbit determination of both traceable temperature and emissivity for calibration blackbodies. The Heated Halo is the component of the OARS that provides a robust and compact method to measure the spectral emissivity of a blackbody in situ. A carefully baffled thermal source is placed in front of a blackbody in an infrared spectrometer system, and the combined radiance of the blackbody and Heated Halo reflection is observed. Knowledge of key temperatures and the viewing geometry allow the blackbody cavity spectral emissivity to be calculated. We present the results from the Heated Halo methodology implemented with a new Absolute Radiance Interferometer (ARI), which is a prototype space-based infrared spectrometer designed for climate benchmarking that was developed under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). We compare our findings to models and other experimental methods of emissivity determination.

  14. General-Purpose Heat Source safety verification test series: SVT-1 through SVT-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavone, D.; George, T. G.; Frantz, C. E.

    1985-06-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular heat source that will supply energy for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) in space missions. The Safety Verification Tests (SVTs) are performed to assess the plutonium containment capability of heat source modules subjected to certain accident environments. This interim report described the GPHS module configuration, the test environment, and the response of the module components following simulated reentry and solid Earth impact. The specific test environment of these initial six tests results from failure of the booster rocket to place the spacecraft in a proper trajectory and subsequent reentry of the GPHS modules from Earth orbit.

  15. An Empirical Temperature Variance Source Model in Heated Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Bridges, James

    2012-01-01

    An acoustic analogy approach is implemented that models the sources of jet noise in heated jets. The equivalent sources of turbulent mixing noise are recognized as the differences between the fluctuating and Favre-averaged Reynolds stresses and enthalpy fluxes. While in a conventional acoustic analogy only Reynolds stress components are scrutinized for their noise generation properties, it is now accepted that a comprehensive source model should include the additional entropy source term. Following Goldstein s generalized acoustic analogy, the set of Euler equations are divided into two sets of equations that govern a non-radiating base flow plus its residual components. When the base flow is considered as a locally parallel mean flow, the residual equations may be rearranged to form an inhomogeneous third-order wave equation. A general solution is written subsequently using a Green s function method while all non-linear terms are treated as the equivalent sources of aerodynamic sound and are modeled accordingly. In a previous study, a specialized Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver was implemented to compute the variance of thermal fluctuations that determine the enthalpy flux source strength. The main objective here is to present an empirical model capable of providing a reasonable estimate of the stagnation temperature variance in a jet. Such a model is parameterized as a function of the mean stagnation temperature gradient in the jet, and is evaluated using commonly available RANS solvers. The ensuing thermal source distribution is compared with measurements as well as computational result from a dedicated RANS solver that employs an enthalpy variance and dissipation rate model. Turbulent mixing noise predictions are presented for a wide range of jet temperature ratios from 1.0 to 3.20.

  16. Ground Source Heat Pump Computational Results

    DOE Data Explorer

    James Menart

    2013-07-31

    This data submission includes simulation results for ground loop heat pump systems located in 6 different cities across the United States. The cities are Boston, MA, Dayton, OH, Omaha, NE, Orlando, FL, Sacramento, CA, and St. Paul, MN. These results were obtained from the two-dimensional geothermal computer code called GEO2D. GEO2D was written as part of this DOE funded grant. The results included in this submission for each of the 6 cities listed above are: 1) specific information on the building being heated or cooled by the ground loop geothermal system, 2) some extreme values for the building heating and cooling loads during the year, 3) the inputs required to carry out the simulation, 4) a plot of the hourly building heating and cooling loads throughout the year, 5) a plot of the fluid temperature exiting the ground loop for a 20 year period, 6) a plot of the heat exchange between the ground loop and the ground for a 20 year period, and 7) ground and ground loop temperature contour plots at different times of the year for the 20 year period.

  17. HeatWave: the next generation of thermography devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman; Vidas, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    Energy sustainability is a major challenge of the 21st century. To reduce environmental impact, changes are required not only on the supply side of the energy chain by introducing renewable energy sources, but also on the demand side by reducing energy usage and improving energy efficiency. Currently, 2D thermal imaging is used for energy auditing, which measures the thermal radiation from the surfaces of objects and represents it as a set of color-mapped images that can be analysed for the purpose of energy efficiency monitoring. A limitation of such a method for energy auditing is that it lacks information on the geometry and location of objects with reference to each other, particularly across separate images. Such a limitation prevents any quantitative analysis to be done, for example, detecting any energy performance changes before and after retrofitting. To address these limitations, we have developed a next generation thermography device called Heat Wave. Heat Wave is a hand-held 3D thermography device that consists of a thermal camera, a range sensor and color camera, and can be used to generate precise 3D model of objects with augmented temperature and visible information. As an operator holding the device smoothly waves it around the objects of interest, Heat Wave can continuously track its own pose in space and integrate new information from the range and thermal and color cameras into a single, and precise 3D multi-modal model. Information from multiple viewpoints can be incorporated together to improve the accuracy, reliability and robustness of the global model. The approach also makes it possible to reduce any systematic errors associated with the estimation of surface temperature from the thermal images.

  18. Electron cyclotron resonance heating by magnetic filter field in a negative hydrogen ion source.

    PubMed

    Kim, June Young; Cho, Won-Hwi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y S

    2016-02-01

    The influence of magnetic filter field on plasma properties in the heating region has been investigated in a planar-type inductively coupled radio-frequency (RF) H(-) ion source. Besides filtering high energy electrons near the extraction region, the magnetic filter field is clearly observed to increase the electron temperature in the heating region at low pressure discharge. With increasing the operating pressure, enhancement of electron temperature in the heating region is reduced. The possibility of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating in the heating region due to stray magnetic field generated by a filter magnet located at the extraction region is examined. It is found that ECR heating by RF wave field in the discharge region, where the strength of an axial magnetic field is approximately ∼4.8 G, can effectively heat low energy electrons. Depletion of low energy electrons in the electron energy distribution function measured at the heating region supports the occurrence of ECR heating. The present study suggests that addition of axial magnetic field as small as several G by an external electromagnet or permanent magnets can greatly increase the generation of highly ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in the heating region, thus improving the performance of H(-) ion generation in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion sources. PMID:26931999

  19. Electron cyclotron resonance heating by magnetic filter field in a negative hydrogen ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, June Young; Cho, Won-Hwi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-02-01

    The influence of magnetic filter field on plasma properties in the heating region has been investigated in a planar-type inductively coupled radio-frequency (RF) H- ion source. Besides filtering high energy electrons near the extraction region, the magnetic filter field is clearly observed to increase the electron temperature in the heating region at low pressure discharge. With increasing the operating pressure, enhancement of electron temperature in the heating region is reduced. The possibility of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating in the heating region due to stray magnetic field generated by a filter magnet located at the extraction region is examined. It is found that ECR heating by RF wave field in the discharge region, where the strength of an axial magnetic field is approximately ˜4.8 G, can effectively heat low energy electrons. Depletion of low energy electrons in the electron energy distribution function measured at the heating region supports the occurrence of ECR heating. The present study suggests that addition of axial magnetic field as small as several G by an external electromagnet or permanent magnets can greatly increase the generation of highly ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in the heating region, thus improving the performance of H- ion generation in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion sources.

  20. Monitoring and evaluating ground-source heat pump. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stoltz, S.V.; Cade, D.; Mason, G.

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the measured performance of four advanced residential ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems. The GSHP systems were developed by WaterFurnace International to minimize the need for electric resistance backup heating and featured multiple speed compressors, supplemental water heating, and at most sites, multiple-speed fans. Detailed data collected for a complete year starting in June 1994 shows that the advanced design is capable of maintaining comfort without the use of electric resistance backup heating. In comparison with a conventional air-source heat pump, the advanced-design GSHP reduced peak heating demand by more than 12 kilowatts (kW) per residence and provided energy savings. The report describes the cooling and heating season operation of the systems, including estimated seasonal efficiency, hours of operation, and load profiles for average days and peak days. The electrical energy input, cooling output, and efficiency are presented as a function of return air temperature and ground loop temperature.

  1. Studies of heat source driven natural convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulacki, F. A.; Nagle, M. E.; Cassen, P.

    1974-01-01

    Natural convection energy transport in a horizontal layer of internally heated fluid with a zero heat flux lower boundary, and an isothermal upper boundary, has been studied. Quantitative information on the time-mean temperature distribution and the fluctuating component of temperature about the mean temperature in steady turbulent convection are obtained from a small thermocouple inserted into the layer through the upper bounding plate. Data are also presented on the development of temperature at several vertical positions when the layer is subject to both a sudden increase and to a sudden decrease in power input. For changes of power input from zero to a value corresponding to a Rayleigh number much greater than the critical linear stability theory value, a slight hysteresis in temperature profiles near the upper boundary is observed between the heat-up and cool-down modes.

  2. Ground Source Integrated Heat Pump (GS-IHP) Development

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, V. D.; Rice, K.; Murphy, R.; Munk, J.; Ally, Moonis; Shen, Bo; Craddick, William; Hearn, Shawn A.

    2013-05-24

    Between October 2008 and May 2013 ORNL and ClimateMaster, Inc. (CM) engaged in a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop a groundsource integrated heat pump (GS-IHP) system for the US residential market. A initial prototype was designed and fabricated, lab-tested, and modeled in TRNSYS (SOLAR Energy Laboratory, et al, 2010) to predict annual performance relative to 1) a baseline suite of equipment meeting minimum efficiency standards in effect in 2006 (combination of air-source heat pump (ASHP) and resistance water heater) and 2) a state-of-the-art (SOA) two-capacity ground-source heat pump with desuperheater water heater (WH) option (GSHPwDS). Predicted total annual energy savings, while providing space conditioning and water heating for a 2600 ft{sup 2} (242 m{sup 2}) house at 5 U.S. locations, ranged from 52 to 59%, averaging 55%, relative to the minimum efficiency suite. Predicted energy use for water heating was reduced 68 to 78% relative to resistance WH. Predicted total annual savings for the GSHPwDS relative to the same baseline averaged 22.6% with water heating energy use reduced by 10 to 30% from desuperheater contributions. The 1st generation (or alpha) prototype design for the GS-IHP was finalized in 2010 and field test samples were fabricated for testing by CM and by ORNL. Two of the alpha units were installed in 3700 ft{sup 2} (345 m{sup 2}) houses at the ZEBRAlliance site in Oak Ridge and field tested during 2011. Based on the steady-state performance demonstrated by the GS-IHPs it was projected that it would achieve >52% energy savings relative to the minimum efficiency suite at this specific site. A number of operational issues with the alpha units were identified indicating design changes needed to the system before market introduction could be accomplished. These were communicated to CM throughout the field test period. Based on the alpha unit test results and the diagnostic information coming from the field test

  3. Environmental assessment for radioisotope heat source fuel processing and fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for radioisotope heat source fuel processing and fabrication involving existing facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) near Los Alamos, New Mexico. The proposed action is needed to provide Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) to support the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) CRAF and Cassini Missions. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Tabulation of Fundamental Assembly Heat and Radiation Source Files

    SciTech Connect

    T. deBues; J.C. Ryman

    2006-10-25

    The purpose of this calculation is to tabulate a set of computer files for use as input to the WPLOAD thermal loading software. These files contain details regarding heat and radiation from pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies and boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies. The scope of this calculation is limited to rearranging and reducing the existing file information into a more streamlined set of tables for use as input to WPLOAD. The electronic source term files used as input to this calculation were generated from the output files of the SAS2H/ORIGIN-S sequence of the SCALE Version 4.3 modular code system, as documented in References 2.1.1 and 2.1.2, and are included in Attachment II.

  5. 10 CFR 39.55 - Tritium neutron generator target sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tritium neutron generator target sources. 39.55 Section 39... Equipment § 39.55 Tritium neutron generator target sources. (a) Use of a tritium neutron generator target...) Use of a tritium neutron generator target source, containing quantities exceeding 1,110 GBg or in...

  6. 10 CFR 39.55 - Tritium neutron generator target sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tritium neutron generator target sources. 39.55 Section 39... Equipment § 39.55 Tritium neutron generator target sources. (a) Use of a tritium neutron generator target...) Use of a tritium neutron generator target source, containing quantities exceeding 1,110 GBg or in...

  7. 10 CFR 39.55 - Tritium neutron generator target sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tritium neutron generator target sources. 39.55 Section 39... Equipment § 39.55 Tritium neutron generator target sources. (a) Use of a tritium neutron generator target...) Use of a tritium neutron generator target source, containing quantities exceeding 1,110 GBg or in...

  8. 10 CFR 39.55 - Tritium neutron generator target sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tritium neutron generator target sources. 39.55 Section 39... Equipment § 39.55 Tritium neutron generator target sources. (a) Use of a tritium neutron generator target...) Use of a tritium neutron generator target source, containing quantities exceeding 1,110 GBg or in...

  9. 10 CFR 39.55 - Tritium neutron generator target sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tritium neutron generator target sources. 39.55 Section 39... Equipment § 39.55 Tritium neutron generator target sources. (a) Use of a tritium neutron generator target...) Use of a tritium neutron generator target source, containing quantities exceeding 1,110 GBg or in...

  10. Residential Solar Combined Heat and Power Generation using Solar Thermoelectric Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, B.; Wagner, M.; Kunkle, C.; Watson, P.; Williams, R.; Donohoe, R.; Ugarte, K.; Wilmoth, R.; Chong, M. Zachary; Lee, H.

    2015-06-01

    Recent reports on improved efficiencies of solar thermoelectric generation (STEG) systems have generated interest in STEGs as a competitive power generation system. In this paper, the design of a combined cooling and power utilizing concentrated solar power is discussed. Solar radiation is concentrated into a receiver connected to thermoelectric modules, which are used as a topping cycle to generate power and high grade heat necessary to run an absorption chiller. Modeling of the overall system is discussed with experimental data to validate modeling results. A numerical modeling approach is presented which considers temperature variation of the source and sink temperatures and is used to maximize combined efficiency. A system is built with a demonstrated combined efficiency of 32% in actual working conditions with power generation of 3.1 W. Modeling results fell within 3% of the experimental results verifying the approach. An optimization study is performed on the mirror concentration ration and number of modules for thermal load matching and is shown to improve power generation to 26.8 W.

  11. Constructal design for a rectangular body with nonuniform heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Huijun; Chen, Lingen; Xie, Zhihui; Sun, Fengrui

    2016-08-01

    Nonuniform heat generation models with constant and variable cross-section high-conductivity channels (HCCs) are built in this paper. The minimum dimensionless peak temperature (DPT) is taken as the optimization objective. Different from the models with uniform heat generation and constant cross-section HCCs built by Bejan (1997) and Ledezma et al. (1997), the model with nonuniform heat generation and variable cross-section HCC is more practical and can help to improve the heat conduction performance of a thermal system. The results show that for the rectangular first-order assembly (RFOA) with nonuniform heat generation, there exist both the optimal shape of the RFOA and the optimal HCCs width ratio, which lead to the minimum DPT. They are different from those with uniform heat generation. When the heat is nonuniformly generated in the RFOA, the minimum DPT of the RFOA with variable cross-section HCC is reduced by 12.11% compared with that with constant cross-section HCC. Moreover, the numerical results are also verified by the analytical method.

  12. A new absorption chiller to establish combined cold, heat, and power generation utilizing low-temperature heat

    SciTech Connect

    Schweigler, C.J.; Riesch, P.; Demmel, S.; Alefeld, G.

    1996-11-01

    Presently available absorption machines for air conditioning are driven with heat of a minimum of 80 C (176 F). A combination of the standard single-effect and a double-lift process has been identified as a new cycle that can use driving heat down to return temperatures of about 55 C (131 F) and permits temperature glides in generation of more than 30 K (54 F). Thus a larger cooling capacity can be produced from the same heat source compared to a single-effect chiller run with the same heat carrier supply temperature and mass flow. According to the estimated heat exchanger area, competitive machine costs for this new chiller can be expected. This single-effect/double-lift absorption chiller can be operated with waste heat from industrial processes, as well as with low-temperature heat (e.g., heat from solar collectors) as driving heat for air conditioning. The large temperature glide and the low return temperature especially fit the operating conditions in district heating networks during the summer. The cycle will be presented, followed by a discussion of suitable operating conditions.

  13. Arena retrofit includes ground-source heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, S.F.

    1996-01-01

    The venue for Sacramento`s first professional basketball games was the {open_quotes}old Arco Arena,{close_quotes} built in 1985 just north of the downtown area and converted to offices after a large, permanent arena was constructed. In 1994, the {open_quotes}old arena{close_quotes} was acquired by a California general partnership called Del Paso Venture. To heat and cool the 3-story, 211,000-square foot structure, Del Paso has installed a ground-source heat pump system. The project is significant for the ground-source heat pump industry, because this is the first ground-source heat pump site ever designed specifically for the energy load of the building it will serve. Other projects have been calculated by rule-of-thumb. The installation and cost of the heat pump system are discussed.

  14. Interfacing primary heat sources and cycles for thermochemical hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    Advantages cited for hydrogen production from water by coupling thermochemical cycles with primary heat include the possibility of high efficiencies. These can be realized only if the cycle approximates the criteria required to match the characteristics of the heat source. Different types of cycles may be necessary for fission reactors, for fusion reactors or for solar furnaces. Very high temperature processes based on decomposition of gaseous H/sub 2/O or CO/sub 2/ appear impractical even for projected solar technology. Cycles based on CdO decomposition are potentially quite efficient and require isothermal heat at temperatures that may be available from solar furnaces of fusion reactors. Sulfuric acid and solid sulfate cycles are potentially useful at temperatures available from each heat source. Solid sulfate cycles offer advantages for isothermal heat sources. All cycles under development include concentration and drying steps. Novel methods for improving such operations would be beneficial.

  15. Feasibility of a free-standing insertable heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munger, A. C.; Mohler, J. H.; Kelly, M. D.

    The feasibility of a free-standing insertable heat source to replace an existing heat powder charge has been demonstrated. Successful development of this design eliminates the need for three laser weld joints, a high pressure interface and various manufacturing processes in the next assembly. Previous work yielded a component consisting of a stainless steel tube loaded with Fe/KC104 heat powder and a pyrotechnic ignitor. Although this design is adequate for the function, the advantages of an insertable heat source prompted the present development. The initial concept was to load a heat powder into a thin-walled container that could be inserted later. Varying air gaps prevented proper heat transmission. A freestanding thermite compact pressed to the inside contour of the stainless steel tube was then developed. This compact was attached to an ignitor which could then be threaded into the next assembly. Various thermite materials were evaluated.

  16. Thulium heat source IR D Project 91-031

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, C.E.; Kammeraad, J.E.; Newman, J.G.; Van Konynenburg, R.; VanSant, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of the Thulium Heat Source study is to determine the performance capability and evaluate the safety and environmental aspects of a thulium-170 heat source. Thulium-170 has several attractive features, including the fact that it decays to a stable, chemically innocuous isotope in a relatively short time. A longer-range goal is to attract government funding for the development, fabrication, and demonstration testing in an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) of one or more thulium isotope power (TIP) prototype systems. The approach is to study parametrically the performance of thulium-170 heat source designs in the power range of 5-50 kW{sub th}. At least three heat source designs will be characterized in this power range to assess their performance, mass, and volume. The authors will determine shielding requirements, and consider the safety and environmental aspects of their use.

  17. Solid–Liquid Phase Change Driven by Internal Heat Generation

    SciTech Connect

    John Crepeau; Ali s. Siahpush

    2012-07-01

    This article presents results of solid-liquid phase change, the Stefan Problem, where melting is driven internal heat generation, in a cylindrical geometry. The comparison between a quasi-static analytical solution for Stefan numbers less than one and numerical solutions shows good agreement. The computational results of phase change with internal heat generation show how convection cells form in the liquid region. A scale analysis of the same problem shows four distinct regions of the melting process.

  18. Rankine vortex evolution in a gas with heat release source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavershinskii, I. P.; Klimov, A. I.; Molevich, N. E.; Porfir'ev, D. P.

    2009-04-01

    The influence of a heat release source with temperature-dependent power on the stability of a Rankine vortex has been studied. A condition for the formation of a radially convergent swirling flow with increasing vorticity is found for a medium with a positive feedback between nonequilibrium heat release perturbations and the pressure at the vortex core.

  19. Pyrotechnic device provides one-shot heat source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, H. C.; Lalli, V. R.

    1968-01-01

    Pyrotechnic heater provides a one-shot heat source capable of creating a predetermined temperature around sealed packages. It is composed of a blend of an active chemical element and another compound which reacts exothermically when ignited and produces fixed quantities of heat.

  20. Prospects for using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, R.A.; Farrell, W.; Ma, Q.

    1997-09-01

    Third-generation, high-intensity, x-ray synchrotron radiation sources are capable of producing high heat-flux x-ray beams. In many applications finding ways to handle these powers is viewed as a burden. However, there are some technological applications where the deep penetration length of the x-rays may find beneficial uses as a volumetric heat source. In this paper the authors discuss the prospects for using high power x-rays for volumetric heating and report some recent experimental results. The particular applications they focus on are welding and surface heat treatment. The radiation source is an undulator at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Results of preliminary tests on aluminum, aluminum metal matrix composites, and steel will be presented.

  1. Tests confirm gas heat as monoxide source

    SciTech Connect

    Besch, E.

    1984-03-01

    Six tests were conducted to demonstrate the potential for natural gas or oil-fired forced warm air heating equipment to produce carbon monoxide emission when the combustion process is impeded by typical causes found in households. In the case of the gas-fired units, impeded combustion produced a smell of aldehyde and various levels of carbon monoxide emission; all within the level dangerous to health. It was concluded that oil-fired warm air systems do not pose a carbon monoxide danger but that natural gas warm air systems do pose a real danger and should be so identified.

  2. Nuclear heat source component design considerations for HTGR process heat reactor plant concept

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, C.F.; Kapich, D.; King, J.H.; Venkatesh, M.C.

    1982-05-01

    The coupling of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and a chemical process facility has the potential for long-term synthetic fuel production (i.e., oil, gasoline, aviation fuel, hydrogen, etc) using coal as the carbon source. Studies are in progress to exploit the high-temperature capability of an advanced HTGR variant for nuclear process heat. The process heat plant discussed in this paper has a 1170-MW(t) reactor as the heat source and the concept is based on indirect reforming, i.e., the high-temperature nuclear thermal energy is transported (via an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX)) to the externally located process plant by a secondary helium transport loop. Emphasis is placed on design considerations for the major nuclear heat source (NHS) components, and discussions are presented for the reactor core, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), rotating machinery, and heat exchangers.

  3. Feasibility analysis of a vortex generator for absorption heat pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Fineblum, S.S.

    1996-12-31

    Significant thermal resources in the form of low temperature industrial waste heat, between 211 to 528 trillion kJ (200 and 500 trillion BTU`s) per annum, have the potential to drive absorption heat pumps. The proposed vortex generator permits a practical heat pump to operate efficiently with as much as 20 to 30 C below the boiling temperature of water (70--80 C (158--176 F)). Energy flows and auxiliary power requirements are computed. The system is shown to operate with relatively low temperature waste heat with higher specific capacity than conventional systems.

  4. 46 CFR 111.10-3 - Two generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Two generating sources. 111.10-3 Section 111.10-3...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply § 111.10-3 Two generating sources. In addition to the emergency power... drilling unit must have at least two electric generating sources....

  5. Characterization of Pu-238 heat source granule containment

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson Ii, P D; Thronas, D L; Romero, J P; Sandoval, F E; Neuman, A D; Duncan, W S

    2008-01-01

    The Milliwatt Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) provides power for permissive-action links. These nuclear batteries convert thermal energy to electrical energy using a doped silicon-germanium thermopile. The thermal energy is provided by a heat source made of {sup 238}Pu, in the form of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} granules. The granules are contained in 3 layers of encapsulation. A thin T-111 liner surrounds the {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} granules and protects the second layer (strength member) from exposure to the fuel granules. The T-111 strength member contains the fuel under impact condition. An outer clad of Hastelloy-C protects the T-111 from oxygen embrittlement. The T-111 strength member is considered the critical component in this {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} containment system. Any compromise in the strength member is something that needs to be characterized. Consequently, the T-111 strength member is characterized upon it's decommissioning through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Metallography. SEM is used in Secondary Electron mode to reveal possible grain boundary deformation and/or cracking in the region of the strength member weld. Deformation and cracking uncovered by SEM are further characterized by Metallography. Metallography sections are mounted and polished, observed using optical microscopy, then documented in the form of photomicrographs. SEM may further be used to examine polished Metallography mounts to characterize elements using the SEM mode of Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). This paper describes the characterization of the metallurgical condition of decommissioned RTG heat sources.

  6. INDUCTION HEATING OF CARBON-FIBER COMPOSITES: THERMAL GENERATION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A theory of local and global mechanisms of heat generation and distribution in carbon-fiber-based composites subjected to an alternating magnetic field has been proposed. A model that predicts the strength and distribution of thermal generation through the thickness of carbon-fib...

  7. Finned Tube With Vortex Generators For A Heat Exchanger.

    DOEpatents

    Sohal, Monohar S.; O'Brien, James E.

    2004-09-14

    A system for and method of manufacturing a finned tube for a heat exchanger is disclosed herein. A continuous fin strip is provided with at least one pair of vortex generators. A tube is rotated and linearly displaced while the continuous fin strip with vortex generators is spirally wrapped around the tube.

  8. Finned Tube With Vortex Generators For A Heat Exchanger.

    DOEpatents

    Sohal, Manohar S.; O'Brien, James E.

    2005-12-20

    A system for and method of manufacturing a finned tube for a heat exchanger is disclosed herein. A continuous fin strip is provided with at one pair of vortex generators. A tube is rotated and linearly displaced while the continuous fin strip with vortex generators is spirally wrapped around the tube.

  9. Simulation studies on multi-mode heat transfer from an open cavity with a flush-mounted discrete heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gururaja Rao, C.; Nagabhushana Rao, V.; Krishna Das, C.

    2008-04-01

    Prominent results of a simulation study on conjugate convection with surface radiation from an open cavity with a traversable flush mounted discrete heat source in the left wall are presented in this paper. The open cavity is considered to be of fixed height but with varying spacing between the legs. The position of the heat source is varied along the left leg of the cavity. The governing equations for temperature distribution along the cavity are obtained by making energy balance between heat generated, conducted, convected and radiated. Radiation terms are tackled using radiosity-irradiation formulation, while the view factors, therein, are evaluated using the crossed-string method of Hottel. The resulting non-linear partial differential equations are converted into algebraic form using finite difference formulation and are subsequently solved by Gauss Seidel iterative technique. An optimum grid system comprising 111 grids along the legs of the cavity, with 30 grids in the heat source and 31 grids across the cavity has been used. The effects of various parameters, such as surface emissivity, convection heat transfer coefficient, aspect ratio and thermal conductivity on the important results, including local temperature distribution along the cavity, peak temperature in the left and right legs of the cavity and relative contributions of convection and radiation to heat dissipation in the cavity, are studied in great detail.

  10. Analysis and performance evaluation of heat pipes with multiple heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gernert, N. J.

    1986-06-01

    A mathematical model was developed and experimentally verified for predicting the performance of cylindrical heat pipes which have multiple evaporators in series along the heat flow path, separated by finite distances. This model is an extension of the existing equations that calculate the performance of single evaporator heat pipes. The treatment of the several evaporators separated by adiabatic zones was handled by inserting the mathematical model into a user interactive heat pipe computer program. The computer model was then verified using a 1.5 meter long copper/water heat pipe system operating in the 90 to 120 C temperature range. This heat pipe was equipped with five independent evaporators. Accordingly, any combination of the five evaporators could be used to investigate multiple evaporator effects including heat flux density and heat source location.

  11. Modeling Heat Flow for a Distributed Moving Heat Source in Micro-Laser Welding of Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewell, David; Benatar, Avraham

    2004-06-01

    Polymer use in micro-devices, especially in the medical industry has been rapidly increasing. During assembly of micro-devices it is desirable to produce weld joints that are about 100 μm in width. This paper reviews the modeling of heat flow during through transmission infrared micro-welding of plastic using fiber coupled laser diodes. Two models were used to predict the temperature distributions within welded samples. Both models were based on a moving heat source and moving coordinate system. For the simpler model a moving point heat source was used and for the more complex model a Gaussian distributed heat source was used. It was found that the distributed model can accurately predict temperature fields in plastic laser welds for all ranges of the parameters evaluated. However, the point heat source model was only able to accurately predict temperature fields with a relatively small laser focal spot (25 μm). In addition it was found that for micro-welding of plastics, when the dimensionless distribution parameter is less than two, a point heat source model predicts similar widths to those predicted by a distributed heat source model.

  12. Numerical and Experimental Investigation for Heat Transfer Enhancement by Dimpled Surface Heat Exchanger in Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiping; Li, Shuai; Yang, Xue; Deng, Yadong; Su, Chuqi

    2016-03-01

    For vehicle thermoelectric exhaust energy recovery, the temperature difference between the heat exchanger and the coolant has a strong influence on the electric power generation, and ribs are often employed to enhance the heat transfer of the heat exchanger. However, the introduction of ribs will result in a large unwanted pressure drop in the exhaust system which is unfavorable for the engine's efficiency. Therefore, how to enhance the heat transfer and control the pressure drop in the exhaust system is quite important for thermoelectric generators (TEG). In the current study, a symmetrical arrangement of dimpled surfaces staggered in the upper and lower surfaces of the heat exchanger was proposed to augment heat transfer rates with minimal pressure drop penalties. The turbulent flow characteristics and heat transfer performance of turbulent flow over the dimpled surface in a flat heat exchanger was investigated by numerical simulation and temperature measurements. The heat transfer capacity in terms of Nusselt number and the pressure loss in terms of Fanning friction factors of the exchanger were compared with those of the flat plate. The pressure loss and heat transfer characteristics of dimples with a depth-to-diameter ratio ( h/D) at 0.2 were investigated. Finally, a quite good heat transfer performance with minimal pressure drop heat exchanger in a vehicle TEG was obtained. And based on the area-averaged surface temperature of the heat exchanger and the Seeback effect, the power generation can be improved by about 15% at Re = 25,000 compared to a heat exchanger with a flat surface.

  13. Effectiveness of an ammonia-water mixture turbine system to hot water heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Takashi; Noguchi, Hideki; Amano, Yoshiharu; Hashizume, Takumi; Akiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Yoshiaki; Usui, Akira

    1999-07-01

    An ammonia-water mixture (AWM) turbine system is proposed in the paper. The authors call this Waseda ammonia-water Mixture Turbine System (W-MTS). The paper presents some results of the investigation for design of a bottoming cycle that is supplied steam as heat source. The results of the cycle simulation show that the W-MTS is superior to the other simple Kalina cycles (KCS1 and KCS34) to pressurized hot water and steam as a latent and a sensible heat source at a temperature of 160 C. The main components of the W-MTS are a heat recovery vapor generator, two condensers, an AWM turbine and two separators. The W-MTS features two simple Kalina cycles, KCS-1 and KCS-34. The W-MTS behaves like KCS-1 at low ammonia mass fraction region, and like KCS-34 at high ammonia mass fraction region. The W-MTS shows the higher output power rather than the two simple Kalina cycles at all over the ammonia mass fraction. The W-MTS is expected to be effective with the heat recovery of two preheaters in a AWM-vapor generation not only to sensible heat sources, such as exhaust gas that comes from gas turbine, hot water from a waste heat recovery system, etc., but also latent heat source e.g. steam. The results of the simulation show that the ammonia mass fraction at the inlet of the heat recovery vapor generator, turbine inlet pressure and temperature in the separator are the key parameters for optimizing the operating conditions of the cycles. In the temperature rage between 120 C and 200 C, the W-MTS generates more power rather than two simple Kaline cycles.

  14. local alternative sources for cogeneration combined heat and power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agll, Abdulhakim Amer

    Global demand for energy continues to grow while countries around the globe race to reduce their reliance on fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions by implementing policy measures and advancing technology. Sustainability has become an important issue in transportation and infrastructure development projects. While several agencies are trying to incorporate a range of sustainability measures in their goals and missions, only a few planning agencies have been able to implement these policies and they are far from perfect. The low rate of success in implementing sustainable policies is primarily due to incomplete understanding of the system and the interaction between various elements of the system. The conventional planning efforts focuses mainly on performance measures pertaining to the system and its impact on the environment but seldom on the social and economic impacts. The objective of this study is to use clean and alternative energy can be produced from many sources, and even use existing materials for energy generation. One such pathway is using wastewater, animal and organic waste, or landfills to create biogas for energy production. There are three tasks for this study. In topic one evaluated the energy saving that produced from combined hydrogen, heat, and power and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions by using local sustainable energy at the Missouri S&T campus to reduce energy consumption and fossil fuel usage. Second topic aimed to estimate energy recovery and power generation from alternative energy source by using Rankin steam cycle from municipal solid waste at Benghazi-Libya. And the last task is in progress. The results for topics one and two have been presented.

  15. Radiogenic heat generation in the Darling Range, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Mike F.

    2013-07-01

    New heat generation measurements for radiogenic granites were made for thirteen localities in the Darling Range, Western Australia. These are integrated with published data to estimate temperatures at depth within radiogenic-granite bodies for this region of the south-western Yilgarn Craton. The heat generation in the radiogenic granites is calculated from the concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium measured in the field. A reliable relationship between total counts from a commercial portable spectrometer and Geiger Müller counter was found for the various granites measured. The relationship Ao = 0.34 + 2.16 CU, with a correlation coefficient of 0.98, was found between uranium (CU in ppm) content and heat generation (Ao in units of µW/m3) for those radiogenic granites measured in the Darling Range, and also for two granites in the Pilbara Craton. Measured heat generation in the Darling Range was found to vary between 4 and 10μW/m3, the maximum of which is higher than previously known heat generation in granites for the Yilgarn Craton. Based on these new data, temperatures between depths of 3000 and 4000 m are modelled to fall between 60 and 110°C, depending on the thickness of the granitic bodies. These results are encouraging for potential low-temperature geothermal developments in this region, which is adjacent to the Perth metropolitan area.

  16. Effect on Non-Uniform Heat Generation on Thermionic Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    2012-01-19

    The penalty resulting from non-uniform heat generation in a thermionic reactor is examined. Operation at sub-optimum cesium pressure is shown to reduce this penalty, but at the risk of a condition analogous to burnout. For high pressure diodes, a simple empirical correlation between current, voltage and heat flux is developed and used to analyze the performance penalty associated with two different heat flux profiles, for series-and parallel-connected converters. The results demonstrate that series-connected converters require much finer power flattening than parallel converters. For example, a ±10% variation in heat generation across a series array can result in a 25 to 50% power penalty.

  17. Recuperator with microjet technology as a proposal for heat recovery from low-temperature sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wajs, Jan; Mikielewicz, Dariusz; Fornalik-Wajs, Elżbieta; Bajor, Michał

    2015-12-01

    A tendency to increase the importance of so-called dispersed generation, based on the local energy sources and the working systems utilizing both the fossil fuels and the renewable energy resources is observed nowadays. Generation of electricity on industrial or domestic scale together with production of heat can be obtained for example through employment of the ORC systems. It is mentioned in the EU directive 2012/27/EU for cogenerative production of heat and electricity. For such systems the crucial points are connected with the heat exchangers, which should be small in size but be able to transfer high heat fluxes. In presented paper the prototype microjet heat exchanger dedicated for heat recovery systems is introduced. Its novel construction is described together with the systematical experimental analysis of heat transfer and flow characteristics. Reported results showed high values of the overall heat transfer coefficient and slight increase in the pressure drop. The results of microjet heat exchanger were compared with the results of commercially available compact plate heat exchanger.

  18. Modeling of non-uniform heat generation in LDMOS transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, J.; Flores, D.; Urresti, J.; Hidalgo, S.; Rebollo, J.

    2005-01-01

    This work is devoted to the heat dissipation analysis in LDMOS transistors operating at high current conditions. Hence, a new expression for the Joule heat generated by electron current is provided to simplify the LDMOS electro-thermal modeling, thus giving physical insight and predicting hot spots. The model is based on the semiconductor physics and the required input data are the device geometrical and technological parameters as well as the applied bias.

  19. Heat transfer simulation in a helically coiled tube steam generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh, Bazargan; Keshavarz, Ali; Ebrahimi, Masood

    2014-01-01

    A symmetric helically coiled tube steam generator that operates by methane has been simulated analytically and numerically. In the analytical method, the furnace has been divided into five zones. The numerical method computes the total heat absorbed in the furnace, while the existing analytical methods compute only the radiation heat transfer. In addition, according to the numerical results, a correlation is proposed for the Nusselt number in the furnace.

  20. Diffusion of Heat from a Line Source in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uberoi, Mahinder S; Corrsin, Stanley

    1953-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study has been made of some features of the turbulent heat diffusion behind a line heated wire stretched perpendicular to a flowing isotropic turbulence. The mean temperature distributions have been measured with systematic variations in wind speed, size of turbulence-producing grid, and downstream location of heat source. The nature of the temperature fluctuation field has been studied. A comparison of Lagrangian and Eulerian analyses for diffusion in a nondecaying turbulence yields an expression for turbulent-heat-transfer coefficient in terms of turbulence velocity and a Lagrangian "scale." the ratio of Eulerian to Lagrangian microscale has been determined theoretically by generalization of a result of Heisenberg and with arbitrary constants taken from independent sources, shows rough agreement with experimental results. A convenient form has been deduced for the criterion of interchangeability of instantaneous space and time derivatives in a flowing turbulence.

  1. Hydrous mineral dehydration around heat-generating nuclear waste in bedded salt formations.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Amy B; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Caporuscio, Florie A; Robinson, Bruce A; Stauffer, Philip H

    2015-06-01

    Heat-generating nuclear waste disposal in bedded salt during the first two years after waste emplacement is explored using numerical simulations tied to experiments of hydrous mineral dehydration. Heating impure salt samples to temperatures of 265 °C can release over 20% by mass of hydrous minerals as water. Three steps in a series of dehydration reactions are measured (65, 110, and 265 °C), and water loss associated with each step is averaged from experimental data into a water source model. Simulations using this dehydration model are used to predict temperature, moisture, and porosity after heating by 750-W waste canisters, assuming hydrous mineral mass fractions from 0 to 10%. The formation of a three-phase heat pipe (with counter-circulation of vapor and brine) occurs as water vapor is driven away from the heat source, condenses, and flows back toward the heat source, leading to changes in porosity, permeability, temperature, saturation, and thermal conductivity of the backfill salt surrounding the waste canisters. Heat pipe formation depends on temperature, moisture availability, and mobility. In certain cases, dehydration of hydrous minerals provides sufficient extra moisture to push the system into a sustained heat pipe, where simulations neglecting this process do not. PMID:25965632

  2. Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

    2009-03-01

    The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

  3. Heat generation during overcharge of Ni/H2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Hari; Kelly, W. H.; Earl, M. W.

    1992-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form on the heat generation during overcharge of nickel hydrogen cells. The heat dissipated during various rates of charge and overcharge was measured, using a radiative type calorimeter. Measurements made during the charging of the cell indicated that the total heat was greatest for C/10 charge, compared with C/2 or C/4. The endothermic to exothermic transition occurred at 1.43 V for C/10 charge, and increased to 1.467 V at C/2 charge. The magnitude of the endothermic heat was only 3.7 percent of the total heat generated during charging. Experimentally measured values were compared against those calculated using a thermoneutral potential of 1.51 V. Although there was general agreement between the calculated and measured values, a significant difference existed in the instantaneous heat values for the initial stages of cell discharge. Heat dissipated during self-discharge appears to depend on the charge rate preceding open circuit stand.

  4. Localizing heat-generating defects using fluorescent microthermal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tangyunyong, P.; Liang, A.Y.; Righter, A.W.; Barton, D.L.; Soden, J.M.

    1996-10-01

    Fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI) involves coating a sample surface with a thin fluorescent film that, upon exposure to UV light source, emits temperature-dependent fluorescence. The principle behind FMI was thoroughly reviewed at the ISTFA in 1994. In two recent publications, we identified several factors in film preparation and data processing that dramatically improved the thermal resolution and sensitivity of FMI. These factors include signal averaging, the use of base mixture films, film stabilization and film curing. These findings significantly enhance the capability of FMI as a failure analysis tool. In this paper, we show several examples that use FMI to quickly localize heat-generating defects (``hot spots``). When used with other failure analysis techniques such as focused ion beam (FIB) cross sectioning and scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, we demonstrate that FMI is a powerful tool to efficiently identify the root cause of failures in complex ICs. In addition to defect localization, we use a failing IC to I determine the sensitivity of FMI (i.e., the lowest power that can be detected) in an ideal situation where the defects are very localized and near the surface.

  5. Corner heating in rectangular solid oxide electrochemical cell generators

    DOEpatents

    Reichner, Philip

    1989-01-01

    Disclosed is an improvement in a solid oxide electrochemical cell generator 1 having a rectangular design with four sides that meet at corners, and containing multiplicity of electrically connected fuel cells 11, where a fuel gas is passed over one side of said cells and an oxygen containing gas is passed into said cells, and said fuel is burned to form heat, electricity, and an exhaust gas. The improvement comprises passing the exhaust gases over the multiplicity of cells 11 in such a way that more of the heat in said exhaust gases flows at the corners of the generator, such as through channels 19.

  6. Alternative biomass sources for thermal energy generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steensen, Torge; Müller, Sönke; Dresen, Boris; Büscher, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    Traditionally, renewable biomass energy sources comprise forests, agriculture and other large vegetation units. With the increasing demand on those landscape elements, including conflicts of interest to nature conservation and food production, the research focus should also incorporate smaller vegetation entities. In this study, we highlight the availability of small-scale features like roadside vegetation or hedges, which are rarely featured in maps. Roadside vegetation, however, is well known and regularly trimmed to allow the passing of traffic but the cut material is rarely harvested. Here, we combine a remote-sensing-based approach to quantify the seasonal biomass harvests with a GIS-based method to outline optimal transportation routes to, and the location of, storage units and power plants. Our main data source will be ESA's upcoming Sentinel-2 optical satellite. Spatial resolution of 10 meters in the visible and near infrared requires the use of spectral unmixing to derive end member spectra of the targeted biomass objects. Additional stereo-matching and LIDAR measurements allow the accompanying height estimate to derive the biomass volume and its changes over time. GIS data bases from the target areas allow the discrimination between traditional, large features (e.g. forests and agriculture) as well as previously unaccounted for, smaller vegetation units. With the mapped biomass occurrence and additional, GIS-based infrastructure information, we can outline transport routes that take into account local restrictions like nature reserve areas, height or weight limitations as well as transport costs in relation to potential gains. This information can then be processed to outline optimal places for power plants. To simulate the upcoming Sentinel-2 data sets, we use airborne data from the AISA Eagle, spatially and spectrally down-sampled to match Sentinel 2's resolution. Our test scenario is an area in western Germany, the Kirchheller Heide, close to the city

  7. Step - wise transient method - Influence of heat source inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinarič, Svetozár; Dieška, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Step-wise transient (SWT) method is an experimental technique for measuring the thermal diffusivity and conductivity of materials. Theoretical models and experimental apparatus are presented and the influence of the heat source capacity are investigated using the experiment simulation. The specimens from low density polyethylene (LDPE) were measured yielding the thermal diffusivity 0.165 mm2/s and thermal conductivity 0.351 W/mK with the coefficient of variation less than 1.4 %. The heat source capacity caused the systematic error of the results smaller than 1 %.

  8. Heat-Transfer Enhancement by Artificially Generated Streamwise Vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanem, Akram; Habchi, Charbel; Lemenand, Thierry; Della Valle, Dominique; Peerhossaini, Hassan

    2012-11-01

    Vortex-induced heat transfer enhancement exploits longitudinal and transverse pressure-driven vortices through the deliberate artificial generation of large-scale vortical flow structures. Thermal-hydraulic performance, Nusselt number and friction factor are experimentally investigated in a HEV (high-efficiency vortex) mixer, which is a tubular heat exchanger and static mixer equipped with trapezoidal vortex generators. Pressure gradients are generated on the trapezoidal tab initiating a streamwise swirling motion in the form of two longitudinal counter-rotating vortex pairs (CVP). Due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, the shear layer generated at the tab edges, which is a production site of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), becomes unstable further downstream from the tabs and gives rise to periodic hairpin vortices. The aim of the study is to quantify the effects of hydrodynamics on the heat- and masstransfer phenomena accompanying such flows for comparison with the results of numerical studies and validate the high efficiency of the intensification process implementing such vortex generators. The experimental results reflect the enhancement expected from the numerical studies and confirm the high status of the HEV heat exchanger and static mixer.

  9. Regularities pertinent to heat transfer between torch gas layers and steam boiler firebox waterwalls. Part I. Geometrical and physical torch model as a source of heat radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, A. N.

    2014-09-01

    The progress seen in the 19th-21st centuries in the development of methods for calculating heat transfer in torch furnaces, fireboxes, and combustion chambers is analyzed. Throughout the 20th century, calculations of heat transfer were carried out based on the law for radiation from solid bodies deduced by Y. Stefan and L. Boltzmann. It is shown that the use of this law for calculating heat transfer of a torch (a gaseous source of radiation) in heating furnaces and power-generating installations leads to incorrect results. It is substantiated that there is crisis of methods for calculating heat transfer in torch furnaces and power-generating installations. Geometrical and physical torch models in the form of radiating cylindrical gas volumes as sources of heat radiation are proposed for overcoming this crisis.

  10. Inductively generated streaming plasma ion source

    DOEpatents

    Glidden, Steven C.; Sanders, Howard D.; Greenly, John B.

    2006-07-25

    A novel pulsed, neutralized ion beam source is provided. The source uses pulsed inductive breakdown of neutral gas, and magnetic acceleration and control of the resulting plasma, to form a beam. The beam supplies ions for applications requiring excellent control of ion species, low remittance, high current density, and spatial uniformity.

  11. Welding isotopic heat sources for the cassini mission to Saturn

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Ferreira, E.A.; George, T.G.

    1994-12-31

    In 1997 NASA will launch the Cassini scientific probe to the planet Saturn. Electric power for this probe will be provided by radioisotope thermoelecric generators thermally driven by general-purpose heat source modules. Each module contains four, 150-g pellets of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}, individually encapsulated within a thin wall iridium-alloy shell. For the Galileo/Ulysses missions, assembly and welding took an average of 90 min per capsule. the work was done in a hot cell and the potential for personnel radiation exposure was not unduly high. The iridium alloy, from which the clad cups are made, contains a small amount of thorium to improve ductility and minimize grain growth. It has been shown that the thorium contributes to hot shortness which caused significant weld cracking during Galileo/Ulysses production. program requirements dictated that all operations provide high levels of process quality assurance. As a result, the welding system was configured to acquire copious amounts of digitized QA information. Early production operation of the welding systems has proven the ability to meet all program goals. For example, in the course of making approximately 60 girth welds during procedure qualification and safety impact testing, no rejectable weld defects have been found.

  12. Characterization of Pu-238 Heat Source Granule Containment

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Paul Dean II; Sanchez, Joey Leo; Wall, Angelique Dinorah; Chavarria, Rene

    2015-02-11

    The Milliwatt Radioisotopic Themoelectric Generator (RTG) provides power for permissive-action links. Essentially these are nuclear batteries that convert thermal energy to electrical energy using a doped silicon-germanium thermopile. The thermal energy is provided by a heat source made of 238Pu, in the form of 238PuO2 granules. The granules are contained by 3 layers of encapsulation. A thin T-111 liner surrounds the 238PuO2 granules and protects the second layer (strength member) from exposure to the fuel granules. An outer layer of Hastalloy-C protects the T-111 from oxygen embrittlement. The T-111 strength member is considered the critical component in this 238PuO2 containment system. Any compromise in the strength member seen during destructive testing required by the RTG surveillance program is characterized. The T-111 strength member is characterized through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Metallography. SEM is used in the Secondary Electron mode to reveal possible grain boundary deformation and/or cracking in the region of the strength member weld. Deformation and cracking uncovered by SEM are further characterized by Metallography. Metallography sections are mounted and polished, observed using optical microscopy, then documented in the form of microphotographs. SEM mat further be used to examine polished Metallography mounts to characterize elements using the SEM mode of Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS).

  13. Waste-heat steam generation is economically viable in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    McMann, F.C.; Marshall, R.W.

    1984-03-01

    Generation of electric power by turbine-driven generators serviced by waste heat boilers is not a blue sky dream. It is time-proven technology, employing time-proven equipment-equipment that is expected to run uninterrupted in fouryear cycles. This equipment and its control are made right here in the U.S. The equipment is very simple to operate and maintain. This article describes the applications of ceramics in this industry.

  14. Conjugate Heat Transfer in a Closed Volume with the Local Heat Sources and Non-Uniform Heat Dissipation on the Boundaries of Heat Conducting Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, Vyacheslav I.; Nagornova, Tatiana A.; Glazyrin, Viktor P.

    2016-02-01

    Is solved the problem of heat transfer in the closed volume, limited by heat-conducting walls, with the local source of heat emission and the heterogeneous conditions of heat sink on the outer boundaries of solution area. The problem of convective heat transfer is solved with using a system of differential Navier-Stokes equations in the Boussinesq approximation. The simulation of turbulent flow conditions of heated air is carried out within the framework to k-ɛ model. On the basis the analysis of the obtained temperature field and the contour lines of stream functions is made conclusion about the essential transiency of the process in question. The obtained values of temperatures and speeds in different sections of region illustrate turbulence of the process. Are investigated laws governing the formation of temperature fields in closed areas with a local heat emission source under the conditions of intensive local heat sink into environment and accumulation of heat in the enclosing constructions.

  15. Heat generated during seating of dental implant fixtures.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Dennis

    2014-04-01

    Frictional heat can be generated during seating of dental implants into a drill-prepared osteotomy. This in vitro study tested the heat generated by implant seating in dense bovine mandible ramus. A thermocouple was placed approximately 0.5 mm from the rim of the osteotomy during seating of each dental implant. Four diameters of implants were tested. The average temperature increases were 0.075°C for the 5.7-mm-diameter implant, 0.97°C for the 4.7-mm-diameter implant, 1.4°C for the 3.7-mm-diameter implant, and 8.6°C for the 2.5-mm-diameter implant. The results showed that heat was indeed generated and a small temperature rise occurred, apparently by the friction of the implant surface against the fresh-cut bone surface. Bone is a poor thermal conductor. The titanium of the implant and the steel of the handpiece are much better heat conductors. Titanium may be 70 times more heat conductive than bone. The larger diameter and displacement implant may act as a heat sink to draw away any heat produced from the friction of seating the implant at the bone-implant interface. The peak temperature duration was momentary, and not measured, but this was approximately less than 1 second. Except for the 2.5-mm-diameter implants, the temperature rises and durations were found to be below those previously deemed to be detrimental, so no clinically significant osseous damage would be expected during dental implant fixture seating of standard and large-diameter-sized implants. A 2.5-mm implant may generate detrimental heat during seating in nonvital bone, but this may be clinically insignificant in vital bone. The surface area and thermal conductivity are important factors in removing generated heat transfer at the bone-implant interface. The F value as determined by analysis of variance was 69.22, and the P value was less than .0001, demonstrating significant differences between the groups considered as a whole. PMID:24400840

  16. Development and fabrication of a diffusion welded Columbium alloy heat exchanger. [for space power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.; Duderstadt, E. C.; Wein, D.; Titran, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    A Mini Brayton space power generation system required the development of a Columbium alloy heat exchanger to transfer heat from a radioisotope heat source to a He/Xe working fluid. A light-weight design featured the simultaneous diffusion welding of 148 longitudinal fins in an annular heat exchanger about 9-1/2 in. in diameter, 13-1/2 in. in length and 1/4 in. in radial thickness. To complete the heat exchanger, additional gas ducting elements and attachment supports were added by GTA welding in a vacuum-purged inert atmosphere welding chamber. The development required the modification of an existing large size hot isostatic press to achieve HIP capabilities of 2800 F and 10,000 psi for at least 3 hr. Excellent diffusion welds were achieved in a high-quality component which met all system requirements.

  17. Role of Internal Heat Source for Eruptive Plumes on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, N. S.; Brown, R. H.

    1996-01-01

    For the first time the role of the internal heat source, due to radioactive decay in Triton's core, is investigate with respect to geyser-like plumes...A new mechanism of energy supply to the Tritonian eruptive plumes is proposed...We present the critical values of these parameters for Triton. A possible origin of the subsurface vents on Triton is also suggested.

  18. Spallation neutron source cryomodule heat loads and thermal design

    SciTech Connect

    E. F. Daly; V. Ganni; C. H. Rode; W. J. Schneider; K. M. Wilson; M. A. Wiseman

    2002-05-10

    When complete, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will provide a 1 GeV, 2 MW beam for experiments. One portion of the machine's linac consists of over 80 Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) 805 MHz cavities housed in a minimum of 23 cryomodules operating at a saturation temperature of 2.1 K. Minimization of the total heat load is critical to machine performance and for efficient operation of the system. The total heat load of the cryomodules consists of the fixed static load and the dynamic load, which is proportional to the cavity performance. The helium refrigerator supports mainly the cryomodule loads and to a lesser extent the distribution system loads. The estimated heat loads and calculated thermal performance are discussed along with two unique features of this design: the helium heat exchanger housed in the cryomodule return end can and the helium gas cooled fundamental power coupler.

  19. An evaluation of alternate production methods for Pu-238 general purpose heat source pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Borland; Steve Frank

    2009-06-01

    For the past half century, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) to power deep space satellites. Fabricating heat sources for RTGs, specifically General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHSs), has remained essentially unchanged since their development in the 1970s. Meanwhile, 30 years of technological advancements have been made in the applicable fields of chemistry, manufacturing and control systems. This paper evaluates alternative processes that could be used to produce Pu 238 fueled heat sources. Specifically, this paper discusses the production of the plutonium-oxide granules, which are the input stream to the ceramic pressing and sintering processes. Alternate chemical processes are compared to current methods to determine if alternative fabrication processes could reduce the hazards, especially the production of respirable fines, while producing an equivalent GPHS product.

  20. Variable Conductance Heat Pipe Cooling of Stirling Convertor and General Purpose Heat Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarau, Calin; Schwendeman, Carl; Anderson, William G.; Cornell, Peggy A.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    In a Stirling Radioisotope Power System (RPS), heat must be continuously removed from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules to maintain the modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. The Stirling convertor normally provides this cooling. If the Stirling convertor stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS at the cost of an early termination of the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) can be used to passively allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor. In a previous NASA SBIR Program, Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) developed a series of sodium VCHPs as backup cooling systems for Stirling RPS. The operation of these VCHPs was demonstrated using Stirling heater head simulators and GPHS simulators. In the most recent effort, a sodium VCHP with a stainless steel envelope was designed, fabricated and tested at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) with a Stirling convertor for two concepts; one for the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) back up cooling system and one for the Long-lived Venus Lander thermal management system. The VCHP is designed to activate and remove heat from the stopped convertor at a 19 degC temperature increase from the nominal vapor temperature. The 19 degC temperature increase from nominal is low enough to avoid risking standard ASRG operation and spoiling of the Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI). In addition, the same backup cooling system can be applied to the Stirling convertor used for the refrigeration system of the Long-lived Venus Lander. The VCHP will allow the refrigeration system to: 1) rest during transit at a lower temperature than nominal; 2) pre-cool the modules to an even lower temperature before the entry in Venus atmosphere; 3) work at nominal temperature on Venus surface; 4) briefly stop multiple times on the Venus surface to allow scientific measurements. This paper presents the experimental

  1. Titanium-boron mixtures as variable heat sources

    SciTech Connect

    Begeal, D.R. ); Munger, A.C. )

    1990-01-01

    The reaction between titanium and boron to form titanium diboride is one of the hottest pyrotechnic reactions in common usage and offers the advantage of being a solid state gasless reaction. Based on the work of Hart, a heat source with a variable output has been developed that utilizes this pyrotechnic. The device was designed to deliver the heat across a 0.26 inch inner diameter hemispherical bulkhead of a material and thickness that can be specified by the user. For evaluation purposes, the bulkhead was 0.036 inches thick stainless steel. The maximum temperature on the tip of the bulkhead was 950{degree}C for the pure reactants and 680{degree}C for blends diluted with 30 weight percent of alumina. Further, the temperature was uniform within {plus minus}20{degree}C across a 2 millimeter diameter on the tip of the bulkhead, and the temperature rise characteristics were repeatable. Ignition of the titanium/boron heat powder was accomplished by first igniting an adjacent charge of titanium subhydride/potassium perchlorate with a one ohm bridge wire. The header was constructed of inconel, a glass ceramic insulator, and hastelloy pins. The ignition and subsequent burn of the titanium/boron was nearly instantaneous, thus the thermal output was dependent only on the heat transfer properties of the materials and geometry involved. Therefore, the user can tailor the blend dilution and the bulkhead characteristics to provide a large range of precise heat outputs. Typical uses of this heat source include timely ignition of other materials, or heating confined gas to perform useful mechanical work. Achievement of the precise heat output required special attention to the purity of the titanium and boron and to the blending process. These aspects, as well as those described above will be described. 6 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Internal heating of lithium-ion batteries using alternating current based on the heat generation model in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianbo; Ge, Hao; Li, Zhe; Ding, Zhanming

    2015-01-01

    This study develops a method to internally preheat lithium-ion batteries at low temperatures with sinusoidal alternating current (AC). A heat generation rate model in frequency domain is developed based on the equivalent electrical circuit. Using this model as the source term, a lumped energy conservation model is adopted to predict the temperature rise. These models are validated against the experimental results of preheating an 18650 cell at different thermal insulation conditions. The effects of current amplitude and frequency on the heating rate are illustrated with a series of simulated contours of heating time. These contours indicate that the heating rate increases with higher amplitude, lower frequency and better thermal insulation. The cell subjected to an alternating current with an amplitude of 7 A (2.25 C) and a frequency of 1 Hz, under a calibrated heat transfer coefficient of 15.9 W m-2 K-1, can be heated from -20 °C to 5 °C within 15 min and the temperature distribution remains essentially uniform. No capacity loss is found after repeated AC preheating tests, indicating this method incurs little damage to the battery health. These models are computationally-efficient and can be used in real time to control the preheating devices in electric vehicles.

  3. Ground Source Heat Pump Sub-Slab Heat Exchange Loop Performance in a Cold Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Mittereder, N.; Poerschke, A.

    2013-11-01

    This report presents a cold-climate project that examines an alternative approach to ground source heat pump (GSHP) ground loop design. The innovative ground loop design is an attempt to reduce the installed cost of the ground loop heat exchange portion of the system by containing the entire ground loop within the excavated location beneath the basement slab. Prior to the installation and operation of the sub-slab heat exchanger, energy modeling using TRNSYS software and concurrent design efforts were performed to determine the size and orientation of the system. One key parameter in the design is the installation of the GSHP in a low-load home, which considerably reduces the needed capacity of the ground loop heat exchanger. This report analyzes data from two cooling seasons and one heating season. Upon completion of the monitoring phase, measurements revealed that the initial TRNSYS simulated horizontal sub-slab ground loop heat exchanger fluid temperatures and heat transfer rates differed from the measured values. To determine the cause of this discrepancy, an updated model was developed utilizing a new TRNSYS subroutine for simulating sub-slab heat exchangers. Measurements of fluid temperature, soil temperature, and heat transfer were used to validate the updated model.

  4. Heat generation in aircraft tires under free rolling conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, S. K.; Dodge, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    A method was developed for calculating the internal temperature distribution in an aircraft tire while free rolling under load. The method uses an approximate stress analysis of each point in the tire as it rolls through the contact patch, and from this stress change the mechanical work done on each volume element may be obtained and converted into a heat release rate through a knowledge of material characteristics. The tire cross-section is then considered as a body with internal heat generation, and the diffusion equation is solved numerically with appropriate boundary conditions of the wheel and runway surface. Comparison with data obtained with buried thermocouples in tires shows good agreement.

  5. Self-Heating Effects In Polysilicon Source Gated Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Sporea, R. A.; Burridge, T.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2015-01-01

    Source-gated transistors (SGTs) are thin-film devices which rely on a potential barrier at the source to achieve high gain, tolerance to fabrication variability, and low series voltage drop, relevant to a multitude of energy-efficient, large-area, cost effective applications. The current through the reverse-biased source barrier has a potentially high positive temperature coefficient, which may lead to undesirable thermal runaway effects and even device failure through self-heating. Using numerical simulations we show that, even in highly thermally-confined scenarios and at high current levels, self-heating is insufficient to compromise device integrity. Performance is minimally affected through a modest increase in output conductance, which may limit the maximum attainable gain. Measurements on polysilicon devices confirm the simulated results, with even smaller penalties in performance, largely due to improved heat dissipation through metal contacts. We conclude that SGTs can be reliably used for high gain, power efficient analog and digital circuits without significant performance impact due to self-heating. This further demonstrates the robustness of SGTs. PMID:26351099

  6. Self-Heating Effects In Polysilicon Source Gated Transistors.

    PubMed

    Sporea, R A; Burridge, T; Silva, S R P

    2015-01-01

    Source-gated transistors (SGTs) are thin-film devices which rely on a potential barrier at the source to achieve high gain, tolerance to fabrication variability, and low series voltage drop, relevant to a multitude of energy-efficient, large-area, cost effective applications. The current through the reverse-biased source barrier has a potentially high positive temperature coefficient, which may lead to undesirable thermal runaway effects and even device failure through self-heating. Using numerical simulations we show that, even in highly thermally-confined scenarios and at high current levels, self-heating is insufficient to compromise device integrity. Performance is minimally affected through a modest increase in output conductance, which may limit the maximum attainable gain. Measurements on polysilicon devices confirm the simulated results, with even smaller penalties in performance, largely due to improved heat dissipation through metal contacts. We conclude that SGTs can be reliably used for high gain, power efficient analog and digital circuits without significant performance impact due to self-heating. This further demonstrates the robustness of SGTs. PMID:26351099

  7. Self-Heating Effects In Polysilicon Source Gated Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sporea, R. A.; Burridge, T.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2015-09-01

    Source-gated transistors (SGTs) are thin-film devices which rely on a potential barrier at the source to achieve high gain, tolerance to fabrication variability, and low series voltage drop, relevant to a multitude of energy-efficient, large-area, cost effective applications. The current through the reverse-biased source barrier has a potentially high positive temperature coefficient, which may lead to undesirable thermal runaway effects and even device failure through self-heating. Using numerical simulations we show that, even in highly thermally-confined scenarios and at high current levels, self-heating is insufficient to compromise device integrity. Performance is minimally affected through a modest increase in output conductance, which may limit the maximum attainable gain. Measurements on polysilicon devices confirm the simulated results, with even smaller penalties in performance, largely due to improved heat dissipation through metal contacts. We conclude that SGTs can be reliably used for high gain, power efficient analog and digital circuits without significant performance impact due to self-heating. This further demonstrates the robustness of SGTs.

  8. Parametric Optimization of Thermoelectric Generators for Waste Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shouyuan; Xu, Xianfan

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a methodology for design optimization of thermoelectric-based waste heat recovery systems called thermoelectric generators (TEGs). The aim is to maximize the power output from thermoelectrics which are used as add-on modules to an existing gas-phase heat exchanger, without negative impacts, e.g., maintaining a minimum heat dissipation rate from the hot side. A numerical model is proposed for TEG coupled heat transfer and electrical power output. This finite-volume-based model simulates different types of heat exchangers, i.e., counter-flow and cross-flow, for TEGs. Multiple-filled skutterudites and bismuth-telluride-based thermoelectric modules (TEMs) are applied, respectively, in higher and lower temperature regions. The response surface methodology is implemented to determine the optimized TEG size along and across the flow direction and the height of thermoelectric couple legs, and to analyze their covariance and relative sensitivity. A genetic algorithm is employed to verify the globality of the optimum. The presented method will be generally useful for optimizing heat-exchanger-based TEG performance.

  9. Increased use of reject heat from electric generation

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, R.W.; Piraino, M.

    1994-02-01

    This study aims to determine existing barriers to greater use of reject heat by electric power producers, including utilities and cogenerators. It includes analytical studies of the technical and economic issues and a survey of several electric power producers. The core analytic findings of the study are that although electric utility- based, cogenerated district heating is sometimes cost competitive with currently common furnaces and boilers, it is not clearly less expensive, and is often more expensive. Since market penetration by a new technology depends on strong perceived advantages, district heating will remain at a disadvantage unless its benefits, such as lowered emissions and decreased reliance on foreign oil, are given overt financial form through subsidies or tax incentives. The central finding from the survey was that electric utilities have arrived at the same conclusion by their own routes; we present a substantial list of their reasons for not engaging in district heating or for not pursuing it more vigorously, and many of them can be summarized as the lack of a clear cost advantage for district heat. We also note that small-scale district heating systems, based on diesel generators and located near the thermal load center, show very clear cost advantages over individual furnaces. This cost advantage is consistent with the explosive growth currently observed in private cogeneration systems.

  10. 46 CFR 111.10-3 - Two generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Two generating sources. 111.10-3 Section 111.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... drilling unit must have at least two electric generating sources....

  11. 46 CFR 111.10-3 - Two generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Two generating sources. 111.10-3 Section 111.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... drilling unit must have at least two electric generating sources....

  12. 46 CFR 111.10-3 - Two generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Two generating sources. 111.10-3 Section 111.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... drilling unit must have at least two electric generating sources....

  13. 46 CFR 111.10-3 - Two generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Two generating sources. 111.10-3 Section 111.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... drilling unit must have at least two electric generating sources....

  14. Ground Source Heat Pump Sub-Slab Heat Exchange Loop Performance in a Cold Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Mittereder, Nick; Poerschke, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    This report presents a cold-climate project that examines an alternative approach to ground source heat pump (GSHP) ground loop design. The innovative ground loop design is an attempt to reduce the installed cost of the ground loop heat exchange portion of the system by containing the entire ground loop within the excavated location beneath the basement slab. Prior to the installation and operation of the sub-slab heat exchanger, energy modeling using TRNSYS software and concurrent design efforts were performed to determine the size and orientation of the system. One key parameter in the design is the installation of the GSHP in a low-load home, which considerably reduces the needed capacity of the ground loop heat exchanger. This report analyzes data from two cooling seasons and one heating season.

  15. The rotating heat pipe - Implementation as a uniform-temperature heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limoges, R. F.

    1981-11-01

    A wickless rotating heat pipe, if properly controlled, is a uniform heat source. The data presented are based on work done with 12.7 cm diameter x 76 cm long rotating heat pipes operating between 120 and 140 C. The major areas reviewed are: materials of fabrication, working fluids, sealing, temperature control, heaters, and safety. The optimum rotating heat pipe defined by these studies is fabricated of type 304 stainless steel, uses water as the working fluid, is sealed with welded joints, and utilizes a pressure switch and a fast-response quartz lamp for temperature control. Surface-temperature control of + or - 0.15 C and temperature uniformity within 0.8 C are obtained. Results of experiments designed to study the effects of hydrogen in the enclosed volume of the heat pipe are presented.

  16. Crustal heat transfer in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (New Zealand): comparison with other volcanic arcs and explanatory heat source models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochstein, M. P.

    1995-10-01

    "anomalous" crustal heat component of the TVZ. Heat generation by focussed plastic deformation within the ductile lithosphere is an alternative mechanism to explain "endogenous crustal heating" which yields heating rates that are also too low by a factor of two, although important parameters (average yield strength of lithosphere and opening rate of the TVZ) are not well known. A further search for a suitable combination of heat source models is required.

  17. Design with constructal theory: Steam generators, turbines and heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong Sung

    This dissertation shows that the architecture of steam generators, steam turbines and heat exchangers for power plants can be predicted on the basis of the constructal law. According to constructal theory, the flow architecture emerges such that it provides progressively greater access to its currents. Each chapter shows how constructal theory guides the generation of designs in pursuit of higher performance. Chapter two shows the tube diameters, the number of riser tubes, the water circulation rate and the rate of steam production are determined by maximizing the heat transfer rate from hot gases to riser tubes and minimizing the global flow resistance under the fixed volume constraint. Chapter three shows how the optimal spacing between adjacent tubes, the number of tubes for the downcomer and the riser and the location of the flow reversal for the continuous steam generator are determined by the intersection of asymptotes method, and by minimizing the flow resistance under the fixed volume constraints. Chapter four shows that the mass inventory for steam turbines can be distributed between high pressure and low pressure turbines such that the global performance of the power plant is maximal under the total mass constraint. Chapter five presents the more general configuration of a two-stream heat exchanger with forced convection of the hot side and natural circulation on the cold side. Chapter six demonstrates that segmenting a tube with condensation on the outer surface leads to a smaller thermal resistance, and generates design criteria for the performance of multi-tube designs.

  18. Assessment of next generation nuclear plant intermediate heat exchanger design.

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Moisseytsev, A.; Natesan, K.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-17

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is an advanced high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) concept with emphasis on production of both electricity and hydrogen, involves helium as the coolant and a closed-cycle gas turbine for power generation with a core outlet/gas turbine inlet temperature of 900-1000 C. In the indirect cycle system, an intermediate heat exchanger is used to transfer the heat from primary helium from the core to the secondary fluid, which can be helium, nitrogen/helium mixture, or a molten salt. The system concept for the vary high temperature reactor (VHTR) can be a reactor based on the prismatic block of the GT-MHR developed by a consortium led by General Atomics in the U.S. or based on the PBMR design developed by ESKOM of South Africa and British Nuclear Fuels of U.K. This report has made an assessment on the issues pertaining to the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP. A detailed thermal hydraulic analysis, using models developed at ANL, was performed to calculate heat transfer, temperature distribution, and pressure drop. Two IHX designs namely, shell and straight tube and compact heat exchangers were considered in an earlier assessment. Helical coil heat exchangers were analyzed in the current report and the results were compared with the performance features of designs from industry. In addition, a comparative analysis is presented between the shell and straight tube, helical, and printed circuit heat exchangers from the standpoint of heat exchanger volume, primary and secondary sides pressure drop, and number of tubes. The IHX being a high temperature component, probably needs to be designed using ASME Code Section III, Subsection NH, assuming that the IHX will be classified as a class 1 component. With input from thermal hydraulic calculations performed at ANL, thermal conduction and stress analyses were performed for the helical heat exchanger design and the results were compared with earlier-developed results on

  19. Thermoelectric Power Generation Utilizing the Waste Heat from a Biomass Boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazdil, Marian; Pospisil, Jiri

    2013-07-01

    The objective of the presented work is to test the possibility of using thermoelectric power to convert flue gas waste heat from a small-scale domestic pellet boiler, and to assess the influence of a thermoelectric generator on its function. A prototype of the generator, able to be connected to an existing device, was designed, constructed, and tested. The performance of the generator as well as the impact of the generator on the operation of the boiler was investigated under various operating conditions. The boiler gained auxiliary power and could become a combined heat and power unit allowing self-sufficient operation. The created unit represents an independent source of electricity with effective use of fuel.

  20. An MHD heat source based on intermetallic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sadjian, H.; Zavitsanos, P. ); Marston, C.H. )

    1991-05-06

    The main objective of this program was the development of an MHD heat source of potential use in Space - Based Multi Megawatt, MHD Power Systems. The approach is based on extension of high temperature chemical/ion release technology developed by the General Sciences, Incorporated (GSI) team and successfully applied in other Space Applications. Solid state reactions have been identified which can deliver energy densities and electrons in excess of those from high energy explosives as well as other conventional fuels. The use of intermetallic reactions can be used to generate hot hydrogen plasma from the reaction, to create a high level of seedant ionization, can be packaged as a cartridge type fuels for discrete pulses. The estimated weight for energizing a (100 MW - 1000 sec) Pulsed MHD Power System can range from 12 to 25 {times} 10{sup 3} kg depending on reaction system and strength of the magnetic field. The program consisted of two major tasks with eight subtasks designed to systematically evaluate these concepts in order to reduce fuel weight requirements. Laboratory measurements on energy release, reaction product identification and levels of ionization were conducted in the first task to screen candidate fuels. The second task addressed the development of a reaction chamber in which conductivity, temperature and pressure were measured. Instrumentation was developed to measure these parameters under high temperature pulsed conditions in addition to computer programs to reduce the raw data. Measurements were conducted at GSI laboratories for fuel weights of up to 120 grams and at the Franklin Research Center* for fuel weights up to 1 kilogram. The results indicate that fuel weight can be scaled using modular packaging. Estimates are presented for fuel weight requirements. 15 refs.

  1. Particle beam generator using a radioactive source

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, David G.

    1993-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention selects from particles emitted by a radioactive source those particles having momentum within a desired range and focuses the selected particles in a beam having at least one narrow cross-dimension, and at the same time attenuates potentially disruptive gamma rays and low energy particles. Two major components of the present invention are an achromatic bending and focusing system, which includes sector magnets and quadrupole, and a quadrupole doublet final focus system. Permanent magnets utilized in the apparatus are constructed of a ceramic (ferrite) material which is inexpensive and easily machined.

  2. Particle beam generator using a radioactive source

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, D.G.

    1993-03-30

    The apparatus of the present invention selects from particles emitted by a radioactive source those particles having momentum within a desired range and focuses the selected particles in a beam having at least one narrow cross-dimension, and at the same time attenuates potentially disruptive gamma rays and low energy particles. Two major components of the present invention are an achromatic bending and focusing system, which includes sector magnets and quadrupole, and a quadrupole doublet final focus system. Permanent magnets utilized in the apparatus are constructed of a ceramic (ferrite) material which is inexpensive and easily machined.

  3. High electric field deuterium ion sources for neutron generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Birk

    Active interrogation systems for highly enriched uranium require improved fieldable neutron sources. The target technology for deuterium-tritium neutron generators is well understood and the most significant improvement can be achieved by improving the deuterium ion source through increased output and, in some cases, lifetime of the ion source. We are developing a new approach to a deuterium ion sources based upon the field desorption/evaporation of deuterium from the surfaces of metal tips. Electrostatic field desorption (EFD) desorbs previously adsorbed deuterium as ions under the influence of high electric fields (several V/A), without removing tip material. Single etched wire tip experiments have been performed and have shown that this is difficult but can be achieved with molybdenum and tungsten tips. Electrostatic field evaporation (EFE) evaporates ultra thin deuterated titanium films as ions. It has been shown that several 10s of atomic layers can be removed within a few nanoseconds from etched tungsten tips. In the course of these studies titanium deposition and deuteration methods were studied and new detection methods developed. Space charge effects resulting from the large ion currents were identified to be the most likely cause of some unusual ion emission characteristics. In addition, on W < 110 > oriented substrates a surprising body-centered cubic crystal structure of the titanium film was found and studied. The ion currents required for neutron generator applications can be achieved by microfabrication of metal tip arrays. Field desorption studies of microfabricated field emitter tip arrays have been conducted for the first time. Maximum fields of 3 V/A have been applied to the array tip surfaces to date, although fields of ˜ 2 V/A to ˜ 2.5 V/A are more typical. Desorption of atomic deuterium ions has been observed at fields of roughly 2 V/A at room temperature. The desorption of common surface adsorbates, such as hydrogen, carbon, water, and

  4. Turbulence generation through intense kinetic energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqui, Agustin F.; Donzis, Diego A.

    2016-06-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to systematically study the development and establishment of turbulence when the flow is initialized with concentrated regions of intense kinetic energy. This resembles both active and passive grids which have been extensively used to generate and study turbulence in laboratories at different Reynolds numbers and with different characteristics, such as the degree of isotropy and homogeneity. A large DNS database was generated covering a wide range of initial conditions with a focus on perturbations with some directional preference, a condition found in active jet grids and passive grids passed through a contraction as well as a new type of active grid inspired by the experimental use of lasers to photo-excite the molecules that comprise the fluid. The DNS database is used to assert under what conditions the flow becomes turbulent and if so, the time required for this to occur. We identify a natural time scale of the problem which indicates the onset of turbulence and a single Reynolds number based exclusively on initial conditions which controls the evolution of the flow. It is found that a minimum Reynolds number is needed for the flow to evolve towards fully developed turbulence. An extensive analysis of single and two point statistics, velocity as well as spectral dynamics and anisotropy measures is presented to characterize the evolution of the flow towards realistic turbulence.

  5. The impact of municipal waste combustion in small heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantúch, Martin; Kaduchová, Katarína; Lenhard, Richard

    2016-06-01

    At present there is a tendency to make greater use for heating houses for burning solid fuel, such as pieces of wood, coal, coke, local sources of heat to burn natural gas. This tendency is given both the high price of natural gas as well as the availability of cheaper solid fuel. In many cases, in the context saving heating costs, respectively in the context of the disposal of waste is co-incinerated with municipal solid fuels and wastes of different composition. This co entails increased production emissions such as CO (carbon monoxide), NOx (nitrogen oxides), particulate matter (particulate matter), PM10, HCl (hydrogen chloride), PCDD/F (polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans), PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) and others. The experiment was focused on the emission factors from the combustion of fossil fuels in combination with municipal waste in conventional boilers designed to burn solid fuel.

  6. Intracerebral source generators characterizing concentrative meditation.

    PubMed

    Lavallee, Christina F; Hunter, Mathew D; Persinger, Michael A

    2011-05-01

    Previous researchers have studied meditation practices as a means to understand consciousness as well as altered states of consciousness. Various meditation techniques, such as Transcendental Meditation (TM) and Qigong, have been explored with source localization tools; however, the concentrative meditation technique has yet to be fully studied in this manner. The current study demonstrates findings, which outline differential activation in a self-referential default network during meditation in participants who espouse themselves as regular concentrative meditation practitioners, as well as comparisons with a control group practicing a modified version of the relaxation response. The results are compared with other putative experimental findings employing other meditation techniques, and the findings outlined in the current study are discussed with respect to changes in perceptual awareness often reported by meditators. PMID:21350845

  7. Car companies look to generate power from waste heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirber, Michael

    2008-04-01

    You might think that the steam engine is an outdated technology that had its heyday centuries ago, but in fact steam is once again a hot topic with vehicle manufacturers. Indeed, the next generation of hybrid cars and trucks may incorporate some form of steam power. Honda, for example, has just released details of a new prototype hybrid car that recharges its battery using a steam engine that exploits waste heat from the exhaust pipe.

  8. Microwave heating for the rapid generation of glycosylhydrazides.

    PubMed

    Mallevre, F; Roget, A; Minon, T; Kervella, Y; Ropartz, D; Ralet, M C; Canut, H; Livache, T

    2013-07-17

    Conditions for simple derivatization of reducing carbohydrates via adipic acid dihydrazide microwave-assisted condensation are described. We demonstrate with a diverse set of oligo- and polysaccharides how to improve a restrictive and labor intensive conventional conjugation protocol by using microwave-assisted chemistry. We show that 5 min of microwave heating in basic or acidic conditions are adequate to generate, in increased yields, intact and functional glycosylhydrazides, whereas hours to days and acidic conditions are generally required under conventional methods. PMID:23731134

  9. Sound generated by vortex ring impingement on a heated wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsari, E. Giannos; Howe, M. S.

    2009-11-01

    An analysis is made of the sound generated when a vortex ring impinges normally on a heated section of a plane wall. The unsteady convective diffusion occurring when the vortex is close to the wall causes a rapid increase in heat transfer and the emission of sound of monopole type. The approximate dependence on vortex Reynolds number of the enhancement of heat transfer is deduced from recent experiments reported by Arévalo et al. [Vortex ring head-on collision with a heated vertical plate, Physics of Fluids 19 (2007) 083603-1-083603-9], and is used to derive a scaling law for the acoustic pressure. The sound pressure signature is dominated by a large amplitude pulse associated with an explosive, but brief increase in the rate of heat transfer at the start of the vortex-wall interaction. The quadrupole sound pressure also produced during impingement on the wall is found to be smaller than the thermally induced sound by a factor proportional to M2T0/(Tw-T0) where M, Tw, T0 respectively denote the Mach number of the vortex motion, the mean wall temperature and the fluid temperature at large distances from the wall.

  10. Miniature, low-power X-ray tube using a microchannel electron generator electron source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Wm. Timothy (Inventor); Kelliher, Warren C. (Inventor); Hershyn, William (Inventor); DeLong, David P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of the invention provide a novel, low-power X-ray tube and X-ray generating system. Embodiments of the invention use a multichannel electron generator as the electron source, thereby increasing reliability and decreasing power consumption of the X-ray tube. Unlike tubes using a conventional filament that must be heated by a current power source, embodiments of the invention require only a voltage power source, use very little current, and have no cooling requirements. The microchannel electron generator comprises one or more microchannel plates (MCPs), Each MCP comprises a honeycomb assembly of a plurality of annular components, which may be stacked to increase electron intensity. The multichannel electron generator used enables directional control of electron flow. In addition, the multichannel electron generator used is more robust than conventional filaments, making the resulting X-ray tube very shock and vibration resistant.

  11. Thermoelectric Generation Using Waste Heat in Steel Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroki, Takashi; Kabeya, Kazuhisa; Makino, Kazuya; Kajihara, Takeshi; Kaibe, Hiromasa; Hachiuma, Hirokuni; Matsuno, Hidetoshi; Fujibayashi, Akio

    2014-06-01

    The steelmaking industry in Japan has significantly reduced its energy use for the past several decades and has kept the highest energy efficiency in the world. However, the steelmaking industry is strongly required to develop new technologies for further energy conservation in view of energy security, high and volatile energy prices, and climate change. One of the key technologies to achieve the requirement is waste heat recovery. This paper describes the thermoelectric generation (TEG) system using the waste heat in the steelmaking process. In this system, the TEG unit, which consists of 16 thermoelectric modules made of Bi-Te thermoelectric materials, generates the electrical power directly by converting the radiant heat released from hot steel products. Each thermoelectric module, whose size is 50 mm × 50 mm × 4.2 mm, generates 18 W when the hot-side temperature is 523 K and the cold-side is 303 K. Therefore, the output of the TEG unit is over 250 W. The performance and the durability of the system have been investigated under various operating conditions in steel works. The results of the verification tests in the JFE steel Corporation's continuous casting line will be discussed.

  12. North Village Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Redderson, Jeff

    2015-08-03

    This project demonstrated the feasibility of converting from a traditional direct exchange system to a ground source heat pump system on a large scale, multiple building apartment complex on a university campus. A total of ten apartment buildings were converted using vertical well fields and a ground source loop that connected the 24 apartments in each building into a common system. The system has yielded significant operational savings in both energy and maintenance and transformed the living environments of these residential buildings for our students.

  13. Heat Transfer Enhancement for Finned-Tube Heat Exchangers with Vortex Generators: Experimental and Numerical Results

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh; Huff, George Albert

    2002-08-01

    A combined experimental and numerical investigation is under way to investigate heat transfer enhancement techniques that may be applicable to large-scale air-cooled condensers such as those used in geothermal power applications. The research is focused on whether air-side heat transfer can be improved through the use of finsurface vortex generators (winglets,) while maintaining low heat exchanger pressure drop. A transient heat transfer visualization and measurement technique has been employed in order to obtain detailed distributions of local heat transfer coefficients on model fin surfaces. Pressure drop measurements have also been acquired in a separate multiple-tube row apparatus. In addition, numerical modeling techniques have been developed to allow prediction of local and average heat transfer for these low-Reynolds-number flows with and without winglets. Representative experimental and numerical results presented in this paper reveal quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer in the vicinity of a circular tube with a single delta winglet pair downstream of the cylinder. The winglets were triangular (delta) with a 1:2 height/length aspect ratio and a height equal to 90% of the channel height. Overall mean fin-surface Nusselt-number results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement (average enhancement ratio 35%) associated with the deployment of the winglets with oval tubes. Pressure drop measurements have also been obtained for a variety of tube and winglet configurations using a single-channel flow apparatus that includes four tube rows in a staggered array. Comparisons of heat transfer and pressure drop results for the elliptical tube versus a circular tube with and without winglets are provided. Heat transfer and pressure-drop results have been obtained for flow Reynolds numbers based on channel height and mean flow velocity ranging from 700 to 6500.

  14. Nanofluid flow and forced convection heat transfer over a stretching surface considering heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, M.; Valipour, P.; Shambooli, M.; Ayani, M.; Mirparizi, M.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, magnetic field effects on the forced convection flow of a nanofluid over a stretching surface in the presence of heat generation/absorption are studied. The equations of continuity, momentum and energy are transformed into ordinary differential equations and solved numerically using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration scheme featuring the shooting technique. Different types of nanoparticles as copper (Cu), silver (Ag), alumina (Al2O3) and titania (TiO2) with water as their base fluid has been considered. The influence of significant parameters, such as magnetic parameter, volume fraction of the nanoparticles, heat generation/absorption parameter, velocity ratio parameter and temperature index parameter on the flow and heat transfer characteristics are discussed. The results show that the values of temperature profiles increase with increasing heat generation/absorption and volume fraction of the nanoparticles but they decrease with increasing velocity ratio parameter and temperature index parameter. Also, it can be found that selecting silver as nanoparticle leads to the highest heat transfer enhancement.

  15. General-Purpose Heat Source Safety Verification Test series: SVT-7 through SVT-10

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.G.; Pavone, D.

    1985-09-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular component of the radioisotope thermoelectric generator that will supply power for the Galileo and Ulysses (formerly ISPM) space missions. The GPHS provides power by transmitting the heat of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ ..cap alpha..-decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. Because the possibility of an orbital abort always exists, the heat source was designed and constructed to minimize plutonia release in any accident environment. The Safety Verification Test (SVT) series was formulated to evaluate the effectiveness of GPHS plutonia containment after atmospheric reentry and Earth impact. The first report (covering SVT-1 through SVT-6) described the results of flat and side-on module impacts. This report describes module impacts at angles of 15/sup 0/ and 30/sup 0/.

  16. Engineering Scoping Study of Thermoelectric Generator Systems for Industrial Waste Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, Terry; Choate, William T.

    2006-11-01

    This report evaluates thermoelectric generator (TEG) systems with the intent to: 1) examine industrial processes in order to identify and quantify industrial waste heat sources that could potentially use TEGs; 2) describe the operating environment that a TEG would encounter in selected industrial processes and quantify the anticipated TEG system performance; 3) identify cost, design and/or engineering performance requirements that will be needed for TEGs to operate in the selected industrial processes; and 4) identify the research, development and deployment needed to overcome the limitations that discourage the development and use of TEGs for recovery of industrial waste heat.

  17. The 4th Generation Light Source at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; David Douglas; H. Dylla; Richard Evans; Pavel Evtushenko; Albert Grippo; Christopher Gould; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; Kevin Jordan; John Klopf; Steven Moore; George Neil; Thomas Powers; Joseph Preble; Daniel Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Shukui Zhang; Gwyn Williams

    2007-04-25

    A number of "Grand Challenges" in Science have recently been identified in reports from The National Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Many of these require a new generation of linac-based light source to study dynamical and non-linear phenomena in nanoscale samples. In this paper we present a summary of the properties of such light sources, comparing them with existing sources, and then describing in more detail a specific source at Jefferson Lab. Importantly, the JLab light source has developed some novel technology which is a critical enabler for other new light sources.

  18. The 4th generation light source at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, S.; Biallas, G.; Boyce, J.; Bullard, D.; Coleman, J.; Douglas, D.; Dylla, F.; Evans, R.; Evtushenko, P.; Grippo, A.; Gould, C.; Gubeli, J.; Hardy, D.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Jordan, K.; Klopf, J. M.; Moore, W.; Neil, G.; Powers, T.; Preble, J.; Sexton, D.; Shinn, M.; Tennant, C.; Walker, R.; Zhang, S.; Williams, G. P.

    2007-11-01

    A number of "Grand Challenges" in Science have recently been identified in reports from The National Academy of Sciences, and the US Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Many of these require a new generation of linac-based light source to study dynamical and non-linear phenomena in nanoscale samples. In this paper we present a summary of the properties of such light sources, comparing them with existing sources, and then describing in more detail a specific source at Jefferson Lab (JLab). Importantly, the JLab light source has developed some novel technology which is a critical enabler for other new light sources.

  19. Thermoelectric energy converter for generation of electricity from low-grade heat

    DOEpatents

    Jayadev, T.S.; Benson, D.K.

    1980-05-27

    A thermoelectric energy conversion device which includes a plurality of thermoelectric elements is described. A hot liquid is supplied to one side of each element and a cold liquid is supplied to the other side of each element. The thermoelectric generator may be utilized to produce power from low-grade heat sources such as ocean thermal gradients, solar ponds, and low-grade geothermal resources. (WHK)

  20. The role of heat source for spatio-temporal variations of mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, I.; Yamagishi, Y.; Davaille, A.

    2014-12-01

    Hot mantle plumes ascending from the core-mantle boundary experience a filtering effect by the endothermic phase change at the 660-km discontinuity. Fluid dynamics predicts that some hot mantle plumes stagnate at the phase boundary and locally heat the bottom of the upper mantle. This generates the secondary plumes in the upper mantle originating hotspots volcanic activities on the Earth's surface. Recently, seismic tomographic images around the upper-lower mantle boundary showed that the horizontal scale of the low velocity regions, which corresponds to that of the thermally buoyant heat sources, is the order of 100-1000 km. Although most of the fluid dynamic theories on the thermal plumes have been developed using an assumption that the heat source effect is negligible, the behaviors of the starting plumes in the upper mantle should depend on the size of heat source, which is generated by the hotter plume from the CMB. In order to understand the effects of heater size on the starting plume generation, we have experimentally investigated the behaviors of thermally buoyant plumes using a localized heat source (circular plate heater). The combination of quantitative visualization techniques of temperature (Thermochromic Liquid Crystals) and velocity (Particle Image Velocimetry) fields reveals the transient nature of the plume evolution: a variety of the spatio-tempotal distribution of plumes. Simple scaling laws for their ascent velocity and spacing of the plumes are experimentally determined. We also estimate the onset time of the secondary plumes in the upper mantle which depends on the local characteristics of the thermal boundary layer developing at the upper-lower mantle boundary.

  1. Compact continuum source finding for next generation radio surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, P. J.; Murphy, T.; Gaensler, B. M.; Hopkins, A.; Curran, J. R.

    2012-05-01

    We present a detailed analysis of four of the most widely used radio source-finding packages in radio astronomy, and a program being developed for the Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder telescope. The four packages: SEXTRACTOR, SFIND, IMSAD and SELAVY are shown to produce source catalogues with high completeness and reliability. In this paper we analyse the small fraction (˜1 per cent) of cases in which these packages do not perform well. This small fraction of sources will be of concern for the next generation of radio surveys which will produce many thousands of sources on a daily basis, in particular for blind radio transients surveys. From our analysis we identify the ways in which the underlying source-finding algorithms fail. We demonstrate a new source-finding algorithm AEGEAN, based on the application of a Laplacian kernel, which can avoid these problems and can produce complete and reliable source catalogues for the next generation of radio surveys.

  2. Heat Transfer of Viscoelastic Fluid Flow due to Nonlinear Stretching Sheet with Internal Heat Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandeppanavar, M. M.; Siddalingappa, M. N.; Jyoti, H.

    2013-08-01

    In the present paper, a viscoelastic boundary layer flow and heat transfer over an exponentially stretching continuous sheet in the presence of a heat source/sink has been examined. Loss of energy due to viscous dissipation of the non-Newtonian fluid has been taken into account in this study. Approximate analytical local similar solutions of the highly non-linear momentum equation are obtained for velocity distribution by transforming the equation into Riccati-type and then solving this sequentially. Accuracy of the zero-order analytical solutions for the stream function and velocity are verified by numerical solutions obtained by employing the Runge-Kutta fourth order method involving shooting. Similarity solutions of the temperature equation for non-isothermal boundary conditions are obtained in the form of confluent hypergeometric functions. The effect of various physical parameters on the local skin-friction coefficient and heat transfer characteristics are discussed in detail. It is seen that the rate of heat transfer from the stretching sheet to the fluid can be controlled by suitably choosing the values of the Prandtl number Pr and local Eckert number E, local viscioelastic parameter k*1 and local heat source/ sink parameter β*

  3. Source Term Model for an Array of Vortex Generator Vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P. G. (Technical Monitor); Waithe, Kenrick A.

    2003-01-01

    A source term model was developed for numerical simulations of an array of vortex generators. The source term models the side force created by a vortex generator being modeled. The model is obtained by introducing a side force to the momentum and energy equations that can adjust its strength automatically based on a local flow. The model was tested and calibrated by comparing data from numerical simulations and experiments of a single low-profile vortex generator vane, which is only a fraction of the boundary layer thickness, over a flat plate. The source term model allowed a grid reduction of about seventy percent when compared with the numerical simulations performed on a fully gridded vortex generator without adversely affecting the development and capture of the vortex created. The source term model was able to predict the shape and size of the stream wise vorticity and velocity contours very well when compared with both numerical simulations and experimental data.

  4. A power conditioning system for radioisotope thermoelectric generator energy sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The use of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) as the primary source of energy in unmanned spacecraft is discussed. RTG output control, power conditioning system requirements, the electrical design, and circuit performance are also discussed.

  5. Vortex generator induced heat transfer augmentation past a rib in a heated duct air flow

    SciTech Connect

    Myrum, T.A.; Acharya, S.; Inamdar, S.; Mehrotra, A. )

    1992-02-01

    The present investigation represents the initial phase of a comprehensive experimental program designed to study the potential for increasing the heat transfer per unit pressure drop in a ribbed duct by positioning vortex generators at key locations in the flow. In particular, the present investigation consists of a rib positioned at the inlet to a rectangular test section with uniform heating at its bottom wall. Local and average Nusselt number results are obtained for a circular rod positioned either immediately above or just downstream of the rib.

  6. Heated birthing pools as a source of Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed

    Collins, S L; Afshar, B; Walker, J T; Aird, H; Naik, F; Parry-Ford, F; Phin, N; Harrison, T G; Chalker, V J; Sorrell, S; Cresswell, T

    2016-03-01

    In June 2014 Public Health England confirmed a case of Legionnaires' disease (LD) in a neonate following birth at home in a hired birthing pool incorporating a heater and a recirculation pump which had been filled in advance of labour. The case triggered a public health investigation and a microbiological survey of an additional ten heated birthing pools hired or recently hired to the general public across England. The birthing pool used by the parent of the confirmed case was identified as the source of the neonate's infection following detection of Legionella pneumophila ST48 in both patient and environmental samples. Legionella species were detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction but not culture in a further three pools together with other opportunistic pathogens identified by culture and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-ToF) mass spectrometry. A Patient Safety Alert from NHS England and Public Health England was issued stating that heated birthing pools filled in advance of labour should not be used for home births. This recommendation remains in place. This investigation in conjunction with other recent reports has highlighted a lack of awareness regarding the microbiological safety of heated birthing pools and their potential to be a source of LD and other opportunistic infections. Furthermore, the investigation raised important considerations with regards to microbiological sampling and testing in such incidents. Public health authorities and clinicians should consider LD in the differential diagnosis of severe respiratory infection in neonates within 14 days of a water birth. PMID:26289365

  7. Nondestructive inspection of General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) girth welds

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.H.; George, T.G.; Lynch, C.

    1998-12-31

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. The GPHS is fabricated using iridium capsules, TIG welded, to contain the {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel pellet. GPHS capsules will be utilized in the upcoming Cassini mission to explore Saturn and its moons. The physical integrity of the girth weld is important to mission safety and performance. Since experience in the past had revealed a potential for initiation of small cracks in the girth weld overlap zone, a nondestructive inspection of the capsule weld is required. A ultrasonic method was used to inspect the welds of capsules fabricated for the Galileo mission. The instrument, transducer, and method used were state of the art at the time (early 1980s). The ultrasonic instrumentation and methods used to inspect the Cassini GPHSs was significantly upgraded from those used for the Galileo mission. GPHSs that had ultrasonic reflectors that exceeded the reject specification level were subsequently inspected with radiography to provide additional engineering data used to accept/reject the heat source. This paper describes the Galileo-era ultrasonic instrumentation and methods and the subsequent upgrades made to support testing of Cassini GPHSs. Also discussed is the data obtained from radiographic examination and correlation to ultrasonic examination results.

  8. Ground-source heat pump case studies and utility programs

    SciTech Connect

    Lienau, P.J.; Boyd, T.L.; Rogers, R.L.

    1995-04-01

    Ground-source heat pump systems are one of the promising new energy technologies that has shown rapid increase in usage over the past ten years in the United States. These systems offer substantial benefits to consumers and utilities in energy (kWh) and demand (kW) savings. The purpose of this study was to determine what existing monitored data was available mainly from electric utilities on heat pump performance, energy savings and demand reduction for residential, school and commercial building applications. In order to verify the performance, information was collected for 253 case studies from mainly utilities throughout the United States. The case studies were compiled into a database. The database was organized into general information, system information, ground system information, system performance, and additional information. Information was developed on the status of demand-side management of ground-source heat pump programs for about 60 electric utility and rural electric cooperatives on marketing, incentive programs, barriers to market penetration, number units installed in service area, and benefits.

  9. Acoustic Optimization of Automotive Exhaust Heat Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C. Q.; Ye, B. Q.; Guo, X.; Hui, P.

    2012-06-01

    The potential for thermoelectric exhaust heat recovery in vehicles has been increasing with recent advances in the efficiency of thermoelectric generators (TEGs). This study analyzes the acoustic attenuation performance of exhaust-based TEGs. The acoustic characteristics of two different thermal designs of exhaust gas heat exchanger in TEGs are discussed in terms of transmission loss and acoustic insertion loss. GT-Power simulations and bench tests on a dynamometer with a high-performance production engine are carried out. Results indicate that the acoustic attenuation of TEGs could be determined and optimized. In addition, the feasibility of integration of exhaust-based TEGs and engine mufflers into the exhaust line is tested, which can help to reduce space and improve vehicle integration.

  10. Heat generation in aircraft tires under braked rolling conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, S. K.; Dodge, R. N.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical model was developed to approximate the internal temperature distribution in an aircraft tire operating under conditions of unyawed braked rolling. The model employs an array of elements to represent the tire cross section and considers the heat generated within the tire to be caused by the change in strain energy associated with cyclic tire deflection. The additional heating due to tire slip and stresses induced by braking are superimposed on the previously developed free rolling model. An extensive experimental program was conducted to verify temperatures predicted from the analytical model. Data from these tests were compared with calculations over a range of operating conditions. The model results were in reasonably good agreement with measured values.

  11. Evaluation and characterization of General Purpose Heat Source girth welds for the Cassini mission

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, C.M.; Moniz, P.F.; Reimus, M.A.H.

    1998-12-31

    General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHSs) are components of Radioisotopic thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) which provide electric power for deep space missions. Each GPHS consists of a {sup 238}Pu oxide ceramic pellet encapsulated in a welded iridium alloy shell which forms a protective barrier against the release of plutonia in the unlikely event of a launch-pad failure or reentry incident. GPHS fueled clad girth weld flaw detection was paramount to ensuring this safety function, and was accomplished using both destructive and non-destructive evaluation techniques. The first girth weld produced from each welding campaign was metallographically examined for flaws such as incomplete weld penetration, cracks, or porosity which would render a GPHS unacceptable for flight applications. After an acceptable example weld was produced, the subsequently welded heat sources were evaluated non-destructively for flaws using ultrasonic immersion testing. Selected heat sources which failed ultrasonic testing would be radiographed, and/or, destructively evaluated to further characterize and document anomalous indications. Metallography was also performed on impacted heat sources to determine the condition of the welds.

  12. COMMIX analysis of the sodium heated helical coil steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Kakarala, C.R.; Burge, S.W.; Sha, W.T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the COMMIX-HCSG computer program and compares predictions to data obtained from performance tests on a 76 MWt Helical Coil Steam Generator (HCSG) test unit. COMMIX-HCSG is a multi-dimensional thermal/hydraulic code that models both steady state and transient operation of an HCSG. The code solves a system of Navier-Stokes continuum equations that have been modified with a combination of volume and directional surface porosities and distributed resistances. This formulation properly accounts for the presence of tube bundle, supports, and baffles on the shell side of the steam generator. Turbulence models and heat transfer and pressure drop equations are used as applicable for the different regions including the upper plenum, the tube bundle, and the lower plenum of the HCSG. The data was obtained from performance tests conducted in early 1987 on the 76 MWt HCSG test unit at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC). The test unit contains over 700 instruments. HCSG development and tests are carried out as part of the Department of Energy program to develop reliable and economical liquid metal heated steam generators.

  13. Conjugate Convection with Surface Radiation from a Square-Shaped Electronic Device with Multiple Identical Discrete Heat Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, A. P.; Krishna, Y. M.; Rao, C. G.

    2013-04-01

    Numerical simulation studies on combined conduction-convection-radiation from a square-shaped electronic device with multiple identical flush-mounted discrete heat sources have been performed and the prominent results are reported here. The problem geometry comprises a square shaped slab with four symmetrically located flush mounted identical discrete heat sources. The heat generated in the heat sources gets conducted through the slab and subsequently gets dissipated from its boundaries by the combined modes of convection and radiation. Air, a radiatively transparent medium is considered to be the cooling agent. The governing equations for temperature distribution in the entire computational domain are obtained by appropriate energy balance between the heat generated, conducted, convected and radiated. The resulting partial differential equations are solved using finite difference method in conjunction with Gauss-Seidel iterative technique. A computer code is prepared for the purpose. Exhaustive numerical studies are performed to elucidate the effects of parameters like volumetric heat generation, thermal conductivity, surface emissivity and convection heat transfer coefficient on local temperature distribution, peak device temperature and relative contributions of convection and radiation in heat dissipation.

  14. Sources and potential application of waste heat utilization at a gas processing facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshehhi, Alyas Ali

    Waste heat recovery (WHR) has the potential to significantly improve the efficiency of oil and gas plants, chemical and other processing facilities, and reduce their environmental impact. In this Thesis a comprehensive energy audit at Abu Dhabi Gas Industries Ltd. (GASCO) ASAB gas processing facilities is undertaken to identify sources of waste heat and evaluate their potential for on-site recovery. Two plants are considered, namely ASAB0 and ASAB1. Waste heat evaluation criteria include waste heat grade (i.e., temperature), rate, accessibility (i.e., proximity) to potential on-site waste heat recovery applications, and potential impact of recovery on installation performance and safety. The operating parameters of key waste heat source producing equipment are compiled, as well as characteristics of the waste heat streams. In addition, potential waste heat recovery applications and strategies are proposed, focusing on utilities, i.e., enhancement of process cooling/heating, electrical/mechanical power generation, and steam production. The sources of waste heat identified at ASAB facilities consist of gas turbine and gas generator exhaust gases, flared gases, excess propane cooling capacity, excess process steam, process gas air-cooler heat dissipation, furnace exhaust gases and steam turbine outlet steam. Of the above waste heat sources, exhaust gases from five gas turbines and one gas generator at ASAB0 plant, as well as from four gas turbines at ASAB1 plant, were found to meet the rate (i.e., > 1 MW), grade (i.e., > 180°C), accessibility (i.e., < 50 m from potential on-site WHR applications) and minimal impact criteria on the performance and safety of existing installations, for potential waste heat recovery. The total amount of waste heat meeting these criteria were estimated at 256 MW and 289 MW at ASAB0 and ASAB1 plants, respectively, both of which are substantial. Of the 289 MW waste generated at ASAB1, approximately 173 MW are recovered by waste heat

  15. Environmental and radiological safety studies. Interaction of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ heat sources with terrestrial and aquatic environments. Progress report, July 1-September 25, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Matlack, G.M.; Patterson, J.H.

    1981-11-01

    Although existing radioisotope thermoelectric generator designs have proved more than adequately safe, more information is continually sought about the heat sources to improve their safety. The work here includes studies of the effects on the heat sources of terrestrial and aquatic environments and also of the effects of the heat sources on various simulated environments. This progress report presents recent data from environmental chamber and aquatic experiments and gives the present status of the experiments.

  16. Environmental and radiological safety studies: interaction of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ heat sources with terrestrial and aquatic environments. Progress report, April 1- June 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Matlack, G.M.; Patterson, J.H.; Stalnaker, N.D.

    1982-09-01

    Although existing radioisotope thermoelectric generator designs have proved more than adequately safe, more information is continually sought about the heat sources to improve their safety. The work here includes studies of the effects on the heat sources on terrestrial and aquatic environments and also of the effects of the heat sources on various simulated environments. This progress report presents recent data from environmental chamber and aquatic experiments and gives the present status of the experiments.

  17. Environmental and radiological safety studies: Interaction of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ heat sources with terrestrial and aquatic environments. Progress report, September 26-December 25, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Matlack, G.M.; Patterson, J.H.

    1982-02-01

    Although existing radioisotope thermoelectric generator designs have proved more than adequately safe, more information is continually sought about the heat sources to improve their safety. The work here includes studies of the effects on the heat sources of terrestrial and aquatic environments and also of the effect of the heat sources on various simulated environments. This progress report presents recent data from environmental chamber and aquatic experiments and gives the present status of the experiments.

  18. Environmental and radiological safety studies: interaction of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ heat sources with terrestrial and aquatic environments. Progress report, July 1-September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Matlack, G.M.; Patterson, J.H.; Stalnaker, N.D.

    1982-12-01

    Although existing radioisotope thermoelectric generator designs have proved more than adequately safe, more information is continually sought about the heat sources to improve their safety. The work here includes studies of the effects on the heat sources of terrestrial and aquatic environments and also of the effects of the heat sources on various simulated environments. This progress report presents recent data from environmental chamber and aquatic experiments and gives the present status of the experiments.

  19. Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, Christi D.; Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from United

  20. Cloud-generated radiative heating and its generation of available potential energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhlmann, R.; Smith, G. L.

    1989-01-01

    The generation of zonal available potential energy (APE) by cloud radiative heating is discussed. The APE concept was mathematically formulated by Lorenz (1955) as a measure of the maximum amount of total potential energy that is available for conversion by adiabatic processes to kinetic energy. The rate of change of APE is the rate of the generation of APE minus the rate of conversion between potential and kinetic energy. By radiative transfer calculations, a mean cloud-generated radiative heating for a well defined set of cloud classes is derived as a function of cloud optical thickness. The formulation is suitable for using a general cloud parameter data set and has the advantage of taking into account nonlinearities between the microphysical and macrophysical cloud properties and the related radiation field.

  1. Dynamic stability experiments in sodium-heated steam generators. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    France, D.M.; Roy, R.; Carlson, R.D.; Chiang, T.

    1984-01-01

    Seventy-two dynamic stability tests were performed in the sodium-heated boiling-water test facility at Argonne National Laboratory. A full-scale LMFBR steam generator tube was employed as the test section operating over the water parameter ranges of 6.9 to 15.9 MPa pressure and 170 to 800 kg/m/sup 2/.s mass flux. The stability thresholds from the test compared well to the predictions of a modified version of a correlation equation recently published by other investigators. Typical experimental data and the modified correlation equation are presented.

  2. Work output and efficiency at maximum power of linear irreversible heat engines operating with a finite-sized heat source.

    PubMed

    Izumida, Yuki; Okuda, Koji

    2014-05-01

    We formulate the work output and efficiency for linear irreversible heat engines working between a finite-sized hot heat source and an infinite-sized cold heat reservoir until the total system reaches the final thermal equilibrium state with a uniform temperature. We prove that when the heat engines operate at the maximum power under the tight-coupling condition without heat leakage the work output is just half of the exergy, which is known as the maximum available work extracted from a heat source. As a consequence, the corresponding efficiency is also half of its quasistatic counterpart. PMID:24856684

  3. Work Output and Efficiency at Maximum Power of Linear Irreversible Heat Engines Operating with a Finite-Sized Heat Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumida, Yuki; Okuda, Koji

    2014-05-01

    We formulate the work output and efficiency for linear irreversible heat engines working between a finite-sized hot heat source and an infinite-sized cold heat reservoir until the total system reaches the final thermal equilibrium state with a uniform temperature. We prove that when the heat engines operate at the maximum power under the tight-coupling condition without heat leakage the work output is just half of the exergy, which is known as the maximum available work extracted from a heat source. As a consequence, the corresponding efficiency is also half of its quasistatic counterpart.

  4. Acoustic focusing by an array of heat sources in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yong; Sun, Hong-xiang; Liu, Chen; Qian, Jiao; Yuan, Shou-qi; Xia, Jian-ping; Guan, Yi-jun; Zhang, Shu-yi

    2016-06-01

    We report on a broadband acoustic focusing lens comprising 20 heat sources of different temperatures, 10 on each side of the array, in air. This focusing phenomenon is attributed to temperature gradients inducing the desired refractive index in one medium (air) and to the continuously changing acoustic impedance, which avoids any acoustic impedance difference that would occur between a lens and air. The results indicate that this focusing lens has a broader bandwidth (>3.5 kHz), higher intensity amplification (about 5.0 times), and a simpler structure. This focusing lens has great potential for applications in ultrasonic devices.

  5. Ballistic heat transport in laser generated nano-bubbles.

    PubMed

    Lombard, Julien; Biben, Thierry; Merabia, Samy

    2016-08-01

    Nanobubbles generated by laser heated plasmonic nanoparticles are of interest for biomedical and energy harvesting applications. Of utmost importance is the maximal size of these transient bubbles. Here, we report hydrodynamic phase field simulations of the dynamics of laser induced nanobubbles, with the aim to understand which physical processes govern their maximal size. We show that the nanobubble maximal size and lifetime are to a large extent controlled by the ballistic thermal flux which is present inside the bubble. Taking into account this thermal flux, we can reproduce the fluence dependence of the maximal nanobubble radius as reported experimentally. We also discuss the influence of the laser pulse duration on the number of nanobubbles generated and their maximal size. These studies represent a significant step toward the optimization of the nanobubble size, which is of crucial importance for photothermal cancer therapy applications. PMID:27461058

  6. A review on the generation, determination and mitigation of urban heat island.

    PubMed

    Memon, Rizwan Ahmed; Leung, Dennis Y C; Chunho, Liu

    2008-01-01

    Urban Heat Island (UHI) is considered as one of the major problems in the 21st century posed to human beings as a result of urbanization and industrialization of human civilization. The large amount of heat generated from urban structures, as they consume and re-radiate solar radiations, and from the anthropogenic heat sources are the main causes of UHI. The two heat sources increase the temperatures of an urban area as compared to its surroundings, which is known as Urban Heat Island Intensity (UHII). The problem is even worse in cities or metropolises with large population and extensive economic activities. The estimated three billion people living in the urban areas in the world are directly exposed to the problem, which will be increased significantly in the near future. Due to the severity of the problem, vast research effort has been dedicated and a wide range of literature is available for the subject. The literature available in this area includes the latest research approaches, concepts, methodologies, latest investigation tools and mitigation measures. This study was carried out to review and summarize this research area through an investigation of the most important feature of UHI. It was concluded that the heat re-radiated by the urban structures plays the most important role which should be investigated in details to study urban heating especially the UHI. It was also concluded that the future research should be focused on design and planning parameters for reducing the effects of urban heat island and ultimately living in a better environment. PMID:18572534

  7. Ballistic heat transport in laser generated nano-bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombard, Julien; Biben, Thierry; Merabia, Samy

    2016-08-01

    Nanobubbles generated by laser heated plasmonic nanoparticles are of interest for biomedical and energy harvesting applications. Of utmost importance is the maximal size of these transient bubbles. Here, we report hydrodynamic phase field simulations of the dynamics of laser induced nanobubbles, with the aim to understand which physical processes govern their maximal size. We show that the nanobubble maximal size and lifetime are to a large extent controlled by the ballistic thermal flux which is present inside the bubble. Taking into account this thermal flux, we can reproduce the fluence dependence of the maximal nanobubble radius as reported experimentally. We also discuss the influence of the laser pulse duration on the number of nanobubbles generated and their maximal size. These studies represent a significant step toward the optimization of the nanobubble size, which is of crucial importance for photothermal cancer therapy applications.Nanobubbles generated by laser heated plasmonic nanoparticles are of interest for biomedical and energy harvesting applications. Of utmost importance is the maximal size of these transient bubbles. Here, we report hydrodynamic phase field simulations of the dynamics of laser induced nanobubbles, with the aim to understand which physical processes govern their maximal size. We show that the nanobubble maximal size and lifetime are to a large extent controlled by the ballistic thermal flux which is present inside the bubble. Taking into account this thermal flux, we can reproduce the fluence dependence of the maximal nanobubble radius as reported experimentally. We also discuss the influence of the laser pulse duration on the number of nanobubbles generated and their maximal size. These studies represent a significant step toward the optimization of the nanobubble size, which is of crucial importance for photothermal cancer therapy applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR02144A

  8. Effects of aqueous humor hydrodynamics on human eye heat transfer under external heat sources.

    PubMed

    Tiang, Kor L; Ooi, Ean H

    2016-08-01

    The majority of the eye models developed in the late 90s and early 00s considers only heat conduction inside the eye. This assumption is not entirely correct, since the anterior and posterior chambers are filled aqueous humor (AH) that is constantly in motion due to thermally-induced buoyancy. In this paper, a three-dimensional model of the human eye is developed to investigate the effects AH hydrodynamics have on the human eye temperature under exposure to external heat sources. If the effects of AH flow are negligible, then future models can be developed without taking them into account, thus simplifying the modeling process. Two types of external thermal loads are considered; volumetric and surface irradiation. Results showed that heat convection due to AH flow contributes to nearly 95% of the total heat flow inside the anterior chamber. Moreover, the circulation inside the anterior chamber can cause an upward shift of the location of hotspot. This can have significant consequences to our understanding of heat-induced cataractogenesis. PMID:27340100

  9. Characterization of the Inductively Heated Plasma Source IPG6-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2014-10-01

    In close collaboration between the Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER) at Baylor University, Texas, and the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, two plasma facilities have been established using the Inductively heated Plasma Generator 6 (IPG6). The facility at Baylor University (IPG6-B) works at a frequency of 13.56 MHz and a maximum power of 15 kW. A vacuum pump of 160 m3/h in combination with a butterfly valve allows pressure control over a wide range. Intended fields of research include basic investigation into thermo-chemistry and plasma radiation, space plasma environments and high heat fluxes e.g. those found in fusion devices or during atmospheric re-entry of spacecraft. After moving the IPG6-B facility to the Baylor Research and Innovation Collaborative (BRIC) it was placed back into operation during the summer of 2014. Initial characterization in the new lab, using a heat flux probe, Pitot probe and cavity calorimeter, has been conducted for Air, Argon and Helium. The results of this characterization are presented.

  10. Ionic Liquids for Utilization of Waste Heat from Distributed Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Joan F. Brennecke; Mihir Sen; Edward J. Maginn; Samuel Paolucci; Mark A. Stadtherr; Peter T. Disser; Mike Zdyb

    2009-01-11

    The objective of this research project was the development of ionic liquids to capture and utilize waste heat from distributed power generation systems. Ionic Liquids (ILs) are organic salts that are liquid at room temperature and they have the potential to make fundamental and far-reaching changes in the way we use energy. In particular, the focus of this project was fundamental research on the potential use of IL/CO2 mixtures in absorption-refrigeration systems. Such systems can provide cooling by utilizing waste heat from various sources, including distributed power generation. The basic objectives of the research were to design and synthesize ILs appropriate for the task, to measure and model thermophysical properties and phase behavior of ILs and IL/CO2 mixtures, and to model the performance of IL/CO2 absorption-refrigeration systems.

  11. Computational Analysis of the Thermal-Hydraulic Characteristics of the Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nishi, Yoshihisa; Ueda, Nobuyuki; Kinoshita, Izumi; Greenspan, Ehud

    2005-12-15

    The encapsulated nuclear heat source (ENHS) is a modular reactor that was selected by the 1999 U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Research Initiative program as a candidate Generation IV reactor concept. It is a fast neutron spectrum reactor cooled by lead-bismuth eutectic using natural circulation. One of the unique features of the ENHS is that the fission-generated heat is transferred from the primary coolant to the secondary coolant through rectangular intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) channels. The decay heat is removed by the reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS).Events of protected loss of heat sink (PLOHS) and unprotected transient overpower (UTOP) have been analyzed for the ENHS using the CERES transient simulation code for liquid-metal-cooled reactors.It is found that the ENHS core is sufficiently cooled by the RVACS under the PLOHS condition. The core flow rate is affected by the growth and disappearance of temperature stratification in the primary plenum. It is also found that even under the inconceivable UTOP event considered, the ENHS reactor core is not catastrophically damaged. This is due to negative reactivity feedback from the radial expansion of the core, the grid plate, and the Doppler effect. The use of high-performance ferritic steel instead of HT-9 and proper design of the reactor control system could provide large safety margins against cladding damage.

  12. Mantle convection with continental drift and heat source around the mantle transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, H.; Kameyama, M.; Kawai, K.

    2012-12-01

    Geological studies have suggested that significant amount of granitic crustal materials have been lost from the surface by the delamination (~1.1 km^3/yr) [1], continental collision (~0.4-0.7 km^3/yr) [1, 2], and subduction at ocean-margin (~2.5-3 km^3/yr) [1, 2]. At ocean-margin subduction zones, most of the granitic materials subducted from the surface are expected to be conveyed through subduction channels by viscous drag to 270km depth [Ichikawa el al., in revision]. If so, then the subducted crustal materials might be expected to be trapped in the mid-mantle owing to the density difference from peridotitic materials induced by the phase transition from coesite to stishovite at 270km depth. In other words, strong heat source materials are most likely to be accumulated around the mantle transition zone, at least, near the plate subduction zones. In this study, we conducted two-dimensional numerical experiments of mantle convection with continental drift and a heat source placed around the mantle transition zone, in order to study the effect of the subducted granitic materials drifting around the mantle transition zone. The simulations deal with a time-dependent convection of fluid under the extended Boussinesq approximation in a model of a two-dimensional rectangular box of 2900km height and 11600km width, where a continent and heat source is imposed. We found that the addition of the heat source considerably reduces the time scale of continental drift. In the absence of the heat source, the resulting time scale is too long compared with that of the so-called supercontinent cycle, where the breakup is induced from a plume generated by an insulating effect of the continent. The heat source also causes massive mechanical mixing especially on the upper mantle. The result suggests that the heat source drifting around mantle transition zone can be a possible candidate inducing the supercontinent cycle in an appropriate time scale. [1] Clift, P. D., P. Vannucchi, and

  13. Effects of a Ground Source Heat Pump in Discontinuous Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, R.; Garber-Slaght, R.; Daanen, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    A ground source heat pump (GSHP) was installed in a discontinuous permafrost region of Fairbanks Alaska in 2013 with the primary aim of determining the effect of different ground cover options on the long-term subterranean temperature regime. Three different surface treatments were applied to separate loops of the GSHP; grass, sand, and gravel, and temperature monitoring was established at several depths above and below the heat sink loops. The GSHP has been actively utilized to supplement the heat in a hydronic heating system of a neighboring 5000 ft2 research facility. The ground immediately surrounding the GSHP was not permafrost when initially installed. Numerical modeling simulations were used to predict the long-term ground temperature regime surrounding the GSHP loops, and results indicate that permafrost would begin to form after the first year. A pseudo-steady state temperature regime would establish in approximately 8 years with a yearly fluctuation of -14°C to -2°C. Simulations also indicate that permafrost could be prevented with a 15 W/m recharge during the summer, such as from a solar thermal system. The ground surface treatments have negligible effect on the ground temperature below 1 meter and therefore have no long-term effect on the active region the GSHP. Data collected from thermistors in the two years since installation indicate that permafrost has not yet been established, although the ground is now becoming seasonally frozen due to the GSHP energy removal. Yearly average temperatures are declining, and extrapolation indicates that permafrost will establish in future years. The GSHP coefficient of performance (COP) was initially 3.6 and is declining with the decreasing ground temperatures. Economic modeling indicates that the system may become uneconomical in future years, although volatile energy costs have a substantial effect of the prediction.

  14. A capital cost comparison of commercial ground-source heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rafferty, K.

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of the report is to compare capital costs associated with the three designs of ground source heat pumps. Specifically, the costs considered are those associated with the heat source/heat sink or ground source portion of the system. In order to standardize the heat rejection over the three designs, it was assumed that the heat pump loop would operate at a temperature range of 85{degree} (to the heat pumps) to 95{degree} (from the heat pumps) under peak conditions. The assumption of constant loop temperature conditions for all three permits an apples-to-apples comparison of the alternatives.

  15. Performance tests of air source heat pumps under frosting conditions. Quality of results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlen, P.

    This report focuses on the analysis of uncertainties in research regarding air-source heat pumps. The principles recommended by the Western European Calibration Conference (WECC) are applied and the generated information is condensed in the form of uncertainty budgets. The ensuring discussion, and the Measurement Assurance Program that was applied during the research work are also relevant to general testing of cooling coils, e.g. for air source heat pumps. The general conclusion of the analysis is that the method of determining frost mass by continuous weighing and frost density by inference from pressure drop considerations, which is presented in the report, has the potential to produce results with an accuracy on a par with the best previously used techniques to investigate frosting and defrosting phenomena. Furthermore, the methodology has the distinct advantage of yielding online measuring possibilities and being much less time consuming than traditional techniques.

  16. The Physical Basis of Lg Generation by Explosion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, J. L.; Baker, G. E.; Xu, H.; Bennett, T. J.; Rimer, N.; Day, S. M.

    2003-12-01

    We use observations of explosion-generated Lg together with numerical modeling to determine how underground nuclear explosions generate shear wave phases. This question is fundamental to how Lg phases are interpreted for use in explosion yield estimation and earthquake/explosion discrimination. We analyze several explosion data sets: 1) Degelen Mountain explosions recorded at distances less than 100 km and corresponding recordings at Borovoye (BOR) at a distance of approximately 650 km; 2) recordings from Russian deep seismic sounding experiments; 3) Nevada Test Site (NTS) explosion sources including the Nonproliferation Experiment (NPE) and nuclear tests covering a range of source depths and media properties. Observations that constrain possible models include: 1) Small Sg phases are observed at distances from less than a km to 10s of km; 2) a strong Rg phase can persist to 100s of km; 3) at 10s to 100s of km, Sg or Lg remain distinct from Rg, with no indication of scattered energy preceding Rg; 4) Sn is impulsive and large for Degelen explosions recorded at BOR; 5) Shear wave phases are larger on horizontal than vertical seismograms. We model the overburied NPE, and an underburied Degelen explosion, using point sources and two-dimensional nonlinear finite difference calculations. A small Sg distinct from large Rg near the Degelen explosion and large Lg and Sn at regional distance are consistent with the signals from a shallow, axisymmetric CLVD source. This source has an S node in the horizontal direction, and therefore makes only a small direct S wave at the near regional stations, however it is a strong generator of S at takeoff angles corresponding to the crustal phases Lg and Sn. Large Lg from the NPE can be generated from just a point explosion due to the low velocity of the source medium. We are considering three candidate mechanisms for explosion-generated Lg: 1) Direct generation by the explosion source, where the explosion is modeled as a point

  17. Generating Apparatus for Gas Heat Pump System using Sensorless-Controlled Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toba, Akio; Fujita, Kouetsu; Maeda, Toshihiro; Kato, Tomohiko

    A unique generating system for Gas heat pump system (GHP) is presented. The GHP is an air-conditioning system, in which the compressors are driven by a gas engine. The proposed system is applied to the outside unit of GHP to feed the electrical equipments inside. The system utilizes a permanent magnet synchronous generator, which is connected to the gas engine, to realize high-efficiency and small-size. The generator is controlled by a converter with sensorless control technology to eliminate the position sensor. Another major topic is the “free-run startup" technique to start the converter when the generator is rotating. The system configuration and principles of the techniques are set forth, followed by experimental results which show that the system works properly and successfully.

  18. Heat flow and heat generation estimates for the Churchill basement of the Western Canadian Basin in Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.D.W.; Jones, F.W.; Majorowicz, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Heat flow through the sediments and temperatures of the Churchill province basement under the sedimentary cover are determined for 24 locations in the central part of the Prairies basin in Alberta where the vertical heat flux is approximately constant from the base of the sediments to the surface. The contribution to heat flow from heat generation in the sediments is also considered. The average heat flow through the sediments is found to be 71 mWm/sup -2/ +- 12mWm/sup -2/ which is about 30 mWm/sup -2/ higher than in the neighbouring shield area of the Churchill province, and the contribution from heat generation in the sediments to the surface heat flow is only approximately 2.5 mWm/sup -2/. The relationship between basement heat generation and heat flow is investigated, and it is found that the platform heat flow/heat generation values are in general higher than those from the Churchill province of the shield found by Drury (1985). Although for the platform and shield data, the reduced heat flow is about 40 mWm/sup -2/ and the slope is about 8km, it is apparent that the platform data alone are not good enough to establish a precise relationship.

  19. Recovery Act: Cedarville School District Retrofit of Heating and Cooling Systems with Geothermal Heat Pumps and Ground Source Water Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrell, Mark

    2013-09-30

    Cedarville School District retrofitted the heating and cooling systems in three campus areas (High School, Middle School, and Upper Elementary School) with geothermal heat pumps and ground source water loops, as a demonstration project for the effective implementation of geothermal heat pump systems and other energy efficiency and air quality improvements.

  20. Analysis and numerical optimization of gas turbine space power systems with nuclear fission reactor heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2005-07-01

    A new three objective optimization technique is developed and applied to find the operating conditions for fission reactor heated Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) space power systems at which maximum efficiency, minimum radiator area, and minimum total system mass is achieved. Such CCGT space power systems incorporate a nuclear reactor heat source with its radiation shield; the rotating turbo-alternator, consisting of the compressor, turbine and the electric generator (three phase AC alternator); and the heat rejection subsystem, principally the space radiator, which enables the hot gas working fluid, emanating from either the turbine or a regenerative heat exchanger, to be cooled to compressor inlet conditions. Numerical mass models for all major subsystems and components developed during the course of this work are included in this report. The power systems modeled are applicable to future interplanetary missions within the Solar System and planetary surface power plants at mission destinations, such as our Moon, Mars, the Galilean moons (Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto), or Saturn's moon Titan. The detailed governing equations for the thermodynamic processes of the Brayton cycle have been derived and successfully programmed along with the heat transfer processes associated with cycle heat exchangers and the space radiator. System performance and mass results have been validated against a commercially available non-linear optimization code and also against data from existing ground based power plants.

  1. Free convection flow past an impulsively started infinite vertical porous plate with Newtonian heating in the presence of heat generation and viscous dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamran, M.; Narahari, M.; Jaafar, A.

    2014-10-01

    The effects of heat generation and viscous dissipation on free convective flow past an impulsively started infinite vertical porous plate with Newtonian heating have been investigated. The governing boundary layer equations are solved by using an analytical technique known as Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM). The effects of heat source parameter (Q), suction parameter (s), Eckert number (Ec) and Grashof number (Gr) on the velocity and temperature fields are determined. The study revealed that the fluid temperature increases by increasing heat generation and Eckert number whereas it decreases with increasing suction velocity. The present results are compared with the exact solution results in the absence of viscous dissipation and it is found that the HAM results coincide with the exact solution results.

  2. On the efficient use of a lowtemperature heat source by the organic Rankine cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikielewicz, Dariusz; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2013-09-01

    The evaporation temperature is regarded as one of the major parameters influencing the organic Rankine cycle (ORC) efficiency. Majority of contributions in literature for ORC cycle analyses treat the heat source as if it had an infinite heat capacity. Such analyses are not valuable as the resulting temperature drops of the heat source needs to be small. That leads to the fact that the heat source is not well explored and in the case of waste heat utilization it can prove the poor economics of the ORC. In the present study cooperation of the ORC cycle with the heat source available as a single phase or phase changing fluids is considered. The analytical heat balance models have been developed, which enable in a simple way calculation of heating fluid temperature variation as well as the ratio of flow rates of heating and working fluids in ORC cycle. The developed analytical expressions enable also calculation of the outlet temperature of the heating fluid.

  3. Fifth-Generation Free-Electron Laser Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, Claudio

    2011-03-02

    During the past few years, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) have demonstrated the outstanding capability of free-electron lasers (FELs) as sources of coherent radiation in the soft and hard x-ray region. The high intensity, tens of GW, short pulses (few to less than 100 femtoseconds, and the unique transverse coherence properties are opening a new window to study the structure and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. The LCLS, FLASH, and the other FELs now under construction are only the beginning of the development of these light sources. The next generations will reach new levels of performance: terawatt, atto-second, ultra-small line-width, high repetition rate, full longitudinal and transverse coherence. These future developments and the R&D needed to successfully build and operate the next generation of FEL light sources will be discussed.

  4. Flow of a non-linear (density-gradient-dependent) viscous fluid with heat generation, viscous dissipation and radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad; Tran, P.X.

    2008-09-22

    In this paper, we study the flow of a compressible (density-gradient-dependent) non-linear fluid down an inclined plane, subject to radiation boundary condition. The convective heat transfer is also considered where a source term, similar to the Arrhenius type reaction, is included. The non-dimensional forms of the equations are solved numerically and the competing effects of conduction, dissipation, heat generation and radiation are discussed

  5. Flow of a non-linear (density-gradient-dependent) viscous fluid with heat generation, viscous dissipation and radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad; Phuoc, Tran X.

    2008-09-25

    In this paper, we study the flow of a compressible (density-gradient-dependent) non-linear fluid down an inclined plane, subject to radiation boundary condition. The convective heat transfer is also considered where a source team, similar to the Arrhenius type reaction, is included. The non-dimensional forms of the equations are solved numerically and the competing effects of conduction, dissipation, heat generation and radiation are discussed.

  6. Heat transport by phonons and the generation of heat by fast phonon processes in ferroelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, X.; Salje, E. K. H.

    2015-05-01

    Thermal conductivity of ferroelastic device materials can be reversibly controlled by strain. The nucleation and growth of twin boundaries reduces thermal conductivity if the heat flow is perpendicular to the twin wall. The twin walls act as phonon barriers whereby the thermal conductivity decreases linearly with the number of such phonon barriers. Ferroelastic materials also show elasto-caloric properties with a high frequency dynamics. The upper frequency limit is determined by heat generation on a time scale, which is some 5 orders of magnitude below the typical bulk phonon times. Some of these nano-structural processes are irreversible under stress release (but remain reversible under temperature cycling), in particular the annihilation of needle domains that are a key indicator for ferroelastic behaviour in multiferroic materials.

  7. Performance analysis of ORC power generation system with low-temperature waste heat of aluminum reduction cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiqi; Zhou, Naijun; Jing, Guo

    Performance of organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system to recover low-temperature waste heat from aluminum reduction cell was analyzed. The temperature of waste heat is 80°C-200°C and the flow rate is 3×105m3/h. The pinch temperature difference between waste heat and working fluids is 10°C. The results show that there is optimal evaporating temperature for maximum net power under the same pinch point. For heat source temperature range of 80°C-140°C and 150°C-170°C, the working fluid given biggest net power is R227ea and R236fa, respectively. When the temperature is higher than 180°C, R236ea generates the biggest net power. The variation of heat source temperature has important effect on net power. When the temperature decreases 10%, the net power will deviate 30% from the maximum value.

  8. The planetary distribution of heat sources and sinks during FGGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. R.; Wei, M. Y.

    1985-01-01

    Heating distributions from analysis of the National Meteorological Center and European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts data sets; methods used and problems involved in the inference of diabatic heating; the relationship between differential heating and energy transport; and recommendations on the inference of heat soruces and heat sinks for the planetary show are discussed.

  9. A novel pyroelectric generator utilising naturally driven temperature fluctuations from oscillating heat pipes for waste heat recovery and thermal energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabek, D.; Taylor, J.; Ayel, V.; Bertin, Y.; Romestant, C.; Bowen, C. R.

    2016-07-01

    Low temperature thermal to electrical energy converters have the potential to provide a route for recovering waste energy. In this paper, we propose a new configuration of a thermal harvester that uses a naturally driven thermal oscillator free of mechanical motion and operates between a hot heat source and a cold heat sink. The system exploits a heat induced liquid-vapour transition of a working fluid as a primary driver for a pyroelectric generator. The two-phase instability of a fluid in a closed looped capillary channel of an oscillating heat pipe (OHP) creates pressure differences which lead to local high frequency temperature oscillations in the range of 0.1-5 K. Such temperature changes are suitable for pyroelectric thermal to electrical energy conversion, where the pyroelectric generator is attached to the adiabatic wall of the OHP, thereby absorbing thermal energy from the passing fluid. This new pyroelectric-oscillating heat pipe (POHP) assembly of a low temperature generator continuously operates across a spatial heat source temperature of 55 °C and a heat sink temperature of 25 °C, and enables waste heat recovery and thermal energy harvesting from small temperature gradients at low temperatures. Our electrical measurements with lead zirconate titanate (PZT) show an open circuit voltage of 0.4 V (AC) and with lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) an open circuit voltage of 0.8 V (AC) at a frequency of 0.45 Hz, with an energy density of 95 pJ cm-3 for PMN-PT. Our novel POHP device therefore has the capability to convert small quantities of thermal energy into more desirable electricity in the nW to mW range and provides an alternative to currently used batteries or centralised energy generation.

  10. Generation of mirage effect by heated carbon nanotube thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, L. H.; Lim, C. W.; Li, Y. C.; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Quoc Bui, Tinh

    2014-06-01

    Mirage effect, a common phenomenon in nature, is a naturally occurring optical phenomenon in which lights are bent due to the gradient variation of refraction in the temperature gradient medium. The theoretical analysis of mirage effect generated by heated carbon nanotube thin film is presented both for gas and liquid. Excellent agreement is demonstrated through comparing the theoretical prediction with published experimental results. It is concluded from the theoretical prediction and experimental observation that the mirage effect is more likely to happen in liquid. The phase of deflected optical beam is also discussed and the method for measurement of thermal diffusivity of medium is theoretically verified. Furthermore, a method for measuring the refractive index of gas by detecting optical beam deflection is also presented in this paper.

  11. Some aspects of materials development for sodium heated steam generators

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, P.; Spalaris, C.N.

    1980-10-01

    A development program was undertaken to support the materials selection for steam generator piping and IHX which are to be used in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR). Four major topics were reviewed, describing the results obtained as well as the direction of future tests. These topics are: carbon transport in sodium, effect of carbon loss/gain upon materials in the reactor Intermediate Heat Transport System (IHTS), corrosion fatigue and aqueous corrosion. The results support the initial assumptions made in specifying the use of 2-1/4Cr-1Mo as the construction material for the evaporator and superheater and Type 316 piping of the IHT system. Future direction of the experimental programs is to further verify the materials choice and to also obtain information which will be essential during the plant installation, operation and reliability of the components.

  12. Heat generation in Aircraft tires under yawed rolling conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, Richard N.; Clark, Samuel K.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical model was developed for approximating the internal temperature distribution in an aircraft tire operating under conditions of yawed rolling. The model employs an assembly of elements to represent the tire cross section and treats the heat generated within the tire as a function of the change in strain energy associated with predicted tire flexure. Special contact scrubbing terms are superimposed on the symmetrical free rolling model to account for the slip during yawed rolling. An extensive experimental program was conducted to verify temperatures predicted from the analytical model. Data from this program were compared with calculation over a range of operating conditions, namely, vertical deflection, inflation pressure, yaw angle, and direction of yaw. Generally the analytical model predicted overall trends well and correlated reasonably well with individual measurements at locations throughout the cross section.

  13. Generation of mirage effect by heated carbon nanotube thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, L. H.; Lim, C. W.; Li, Y. C.; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Quoc Bui, Tinh

    2014-06-28

    Mirage effect, a common phenomenon in nature, is a naturally occurring optical phenomenon in which lights are bent due to the gradient variation of refraction in the temperature gradient medium. The theoretical analysis of mirage effect generated by heated carbon nanotube thin film is presented both for gas and liquid. Excellent agreement is demonstrated through comparing the theoretical prediction with published experimental results. It is concluded from the theoretical prediction and experimental observation that the mirage effect is more likely to happen in liquid. The phase of deflected optical beam is also discussed and the method for measurement of thermal diffusivity of medium is theoretically verified. Furthermore, a method for measuring the refractive index of gas by detecting optical beam deflection is also presented in this paper.

  14. Investigation of acoustic gravity waves created by anomalous heat sources: experiments and theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradipta, R.; Lee, M. C.

    2013-07-01

    We have been investigating high-power radio wave-induced acoustic gravity waves (AGWs) at Gakona, Alaska, using the High-frequency Active Aurora Research Program (HAARP) heating facility (i.e. HF heater) and extensive diagnostic instruments. This work was aimed at performing a controlled study of the space plasma turbulence triggered by the AGWs originating from anomalous heat sources, as observed in our earlier experiments at Arecibo, Puerto Rico (Pradipta 2007 MS Thesis MIT Press, Cambridge, MA). The HF heater operated in continuous wave (CW) O-mode can heat ionospheric plasmas effectively to yield a depleted magnetic flux tube as rising plasma bubbles (Lee et al 1998 Geophys. Res. Lett. 25 579). Two processes are responsible for the depletion of the magnetic flux tube: (i) thermal expansion and (ii) chemical reactions caused by heated ions. The depleted plasmas create large density gradients that can augment spread F processes via generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (Lee et al 1999 Geophys. Res. Lett. 26 37). It is thus expected that the temperature of neutral particles in the heated ionospheric region can be increased. Such a heat source in the neutral atmosphere may potentially generate AGWs in the form of traveling ionospheric plasma disturbances (TIPDs). We should point out that these TIPDs have features distinctively different from electric and magnetic field (ExB) drifts of HF wave-induced large-scale non-propagating plasma structures. Moreover, it was noted in our recent study of naturally occurring AGW-induced TIDs that only large-scale AGWs can propagate upward to reach higher altitudes. Thus, in our Gakona experiments we select optimum heating schemes for HF wave-induced AGWs that can be distinguished from the naturally occurring ones. The generation and propagation of AGWs are monitored by MUIR (Modular Ultra high-frequency Ionospheric Radar), Digisonde and GPS/low-earth-orbit satellites. Our theoretical and experimental studies have shown that

  15. Dynamic conversion of solar generated heat to electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. C.; Fourakis, E.; Hammer, J. M.; Smith, G. A.; Grosskreutz, J. C.; Mcbride, E.

    1974-01-01

    The effort undertaken during this program led to the selection of the water-superheated steam (850 psig/900 F) crescent central receiver as the preferred concept from among 11 candidate systems across the technological spectrum of the dynamic conversion of solar generated heat to electricity. The solar power plant designs were investigated in the range of plant capacities from 100 to 1000 Mw(e). The investigations considered the impacts of plant size, collector design, feed-water temperature ratio, heat rejection equipment, ground cover, and location on solar power technical and economic feasibility. For the distributed receiver systems, the optimization studies showed that plant capacities less than 100 Mw(e) may be best. Although the size of central receiver concepts was not parametrically investigated, all indications are that the optimal plant capacity for central receiver systems will be in the range from 50 to 200 Mw(e). Solar thermal power plant site selection criteria and methodology were also established and used to evaluate potentially suitable sites. The result of this effort was to identify a site south of Inyokern, California, as typically suitable for a solar thermal power plant. The criteria used in the selection process included insolation and climatological characteristics, topography, and seismic history as well as water availability.

  16. Role of heat generation and thermal diffusion during frontal photopolymerization.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, Matthew G; Vitale, Alessandra; Cabral, João T; Matar, Omar K

    2015-08-01

    Frontal photopolymerization (FPP) is a rapid and versatile solidification process that can be used to fabricate complex three-dimensional structures by selectively exposing a photosensitive monomer-rich bath to light. A characteristic feature of FPP is the appearance of a sharp polymerization front that propagates into the bath as a planar traveling wave. In this paper, we introduce a theoretical model to determine how heat generation during photopolymerization influences the kinetics of wave propagation as well as the monomer-to-polymer conversion profile, both of which are relevant for FPP applications and experimentally measurable. When thermal diffusion is sufficiently fast relative to the rate of polymerization, the system evolves as if it were isothermal. However, when thermal diffusion is slow, a thermal wavefront develops and propagates at the same rate as the polymerization front. This leads to an accumulation of heat behind the polymerization front which can result in a significant sharpening of the conversion profile and acceleration of the growth of the solid. Our results also suggest that a novel way to tailor the dynamics of FPP is by imposing a temperature gradient along the growth direction. PMID:26382412

  17. Role of heat generation and thermal diffusion during frontal photopolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, Matthew G.; Vitale, Alessandra; Cabral, João T.; Matar, Omar K.

    2015-08-01

    Frontal photopolymerization (FPP) is a rapid and versatile solidification process that can be used to fabricate complex three-dimensional structures by selectively exposing a photosensitive monomer-rich bath to light. A characteristic feature of FPP is the appearance of a sharp polymerization front that propagates into the bath as a planar traveling wave. In this paper, we introduce a theoretical model to determine how heat generation during photopolymerization influences the kinetics of wave propagation as well as the monomer-to-polymer conversion profile, both of which are relevant for FPP applications and experimentally measurable. When thermal diffusion is sufficiently fast relative to the rate of polymerization, the system evolves as if it were isothermal. However, when thermal diffusion is slow, a thermal wavefront develops and propagates at the same rate as the polymerization front. This leads to an accumulation of heat behind the polymerization front which can result in a significant sharpening of the conversion profile and acceleration of the growth of the solid. Our results also suggest that a novel way to tailor the dynamics of FPP is by imposing a temperature gradient along the growth direction.

  18. Resistively Heated SiC Nozzle for Generating Molecular Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagiano, Steven; Abell, Robert; Patrick, Edward; Bendt, Miri; Gundersen, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    An improved nozzle has been developed to replace nozzles used previously in an apparatus that generates a substantially unidirectional beam of molecules passing through a vacuum at speeds of several kilometers per second. The basic principle of operation of the apparatus is the same for both the previous and the present nozzle designs. The main working part of the nozzle is essentially a cylinder that is closed except that there is an inlet for a pressurized gas and, at one end, the cylinder is closed by a disk that contains a narrow central hole that serves as an outlet. The cylinder is heated to increase the thermal speeds of the gas molecules into the desired high-speed range. Heated, pressurized gas escapes through the outlet into a portion of the vacuum chamber that is separated, by a wall, from the rest of the vacuum chamber. In this portion of the vacuum chamber, the gas undergoes a free jet expansion. Most of the expanded gas is evacuated and thus does not become part of the molecular beam. A small fraction of the expanded beam passes through a narrow central orifice in the wall and thereby becomes a needle- thin molecular beam in the portion of the vacuum on the downstream side of the wall.

  19. Design of Isotope Heat Source for Automatic Modular Dispersal During Reentry, and Its Integration with Heat Exchangers of 6-kWe Dynamic Isotope Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    1989-01-01

    In late 1986 the Air Force Space Division (AF / SD) had expressed an interest in using a Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS) of approximately 6-kWe to power the Boost Surveillance and Tacking System (BSTS) satellites. In support of that objective, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requested Fairchild Space Company to perform a conceptual design study of the DIPS heat source and of its integration with the dynamic power conversion system, with particular emphasis on system safety. This paper describes the results of that study. The study resulted in a design for a single heat source of ~30-kWt, employing the standard 250-W General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules which DOE had previously developed and safety-tested for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTS's)

  20. Space factor of "excess" heat generation in the Earth and planetary interiors. Article 2. Space-time patterns of distribution of the heat generating zones in the Earth interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarenko, O. M.

    Besides radiogenic energy, the "supplementary" energy source occurs in the Earth interior. This source is of cosmic origin and modulated by position and direction of the Solar system motion in the Galaxy. It can be called as "cosmic furnace", which works in the Earth internal and outer cores as well as in mantle. The specific thermal generation per unit of volume is about 10 W/km3 in the Earth mantle and some 50 W/km3 in the Earth core. Excess heat generation occurs mainly in the latitudinal zone between 650 of northern latitude and 650 of southern latitude. More active heat generation occurs in the northern and southern hemispheres alternately with intervals about 200 million years that is equal to the period of revolution about the Galaxy center. The latitudinal zone of maximal heat generation moves in time along the sinusoidal curve in accordance with displacement of projection of the Solar system apex on the Earth surface. Maximal intensity of heat generation occurs when projection of the Earth motion in the Galaxy achieves the Earth equator (every 100 million years). At this particular time the direction of the Solar system motion in the Galaxy is in the plane of ecliptic and heat generation - of maximal intensity. This results in existence of equatorial hot belt in the Earth interior, distinctly exhibited in the core and mantle. The fact of alternate heating of the Earth semi-spheres allows us to assume that heat-generating factor influencing our planet from galactic space is absorbed largely while passing through the planetary interior.

  1. A field evaporation deuterium ion source for neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, Birk; Solano, I.; Schwoebel, P. R.

    2008-05-01

    Proof-of-principle experiments have demonstrated an electrostatic field evaporation based deuterium ion source for use in compact, high-output deuterium-tritium neutron generators. The ion source produces principally atomic deuterium and titanium ions. More than 100 ML of deuterated titanium thin film can be removed and ionized from a single tip in less than 20 ns. The measurements indicate that with the use of microfabricated tip arrays the deuterium ion source could provide sufficient ion current to produce 10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} n/cm{sup 2} of tip array area.

  2. A field evaporation deuterium ion source for neutron generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Birk; Solano, I.; Schwoebel, P. R.

    2008-05-01

    Proof-of-principle experiments have demonstrated an electrostatic field evaporation based deuterium ion source for use in compact, high-output deuterium-tritium neutron generators. The ion source produces principally atomic deuterium and titanium ions. More than 100 ML of deuterated titanium thin film can be removed and ionized from a single tip in less than 20 ns. The measurements indicate that with the use of microfabricated tip arrays the deuterium ion source could provide sufficient ion current to produce 109-1010 n/cm2 of tip array area.

  3. Irreversibilities and efficiency at maximum power of heat engines: the illustrative case of a thermoelectric generator.

    PubMed

    Apertet, Y; Ouerdane, H; Goupil, C; Lecoeur, Ph

    2012-03-01

    Energy conversion efficiency at maximum output power, which embodies the essential characteristics of heat engines, is the main focus of the present work. The so-called Curzon and Ahlborn efficiency η(CA) is commonly believed to be an absolute reference for real heat engines; however, a different but general expression for the case of stochastic heat engines, η(SS), was recently found and then extended to low-dissipation engines. The discrepancy between η(CA) and η(SS) is here analyzed considering different irreversibility sources of heat engines, of both internal and external types. To this end, we choose a thermoelectric generator operating in the strong-coupling regime as a physical system to qualitatively and quantitatively study the impact of the nature of irreversibility on the efficiency at maximum output power. In the limit of pure external dissipation, we obtain η(CA), while η(SS) corresponds to the case of pure internal dissipation. A continuous transition between from one extreme to the other, which may be operated by tuning the different sources of irreversibility, also is evidenced. PMID:22587047

  4. Hydrogen production from coal using a nuclear heat source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quade, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    A strong candidate for hydrogen production in the intermediate time frame of 1985 to 1995 is a coal-based process using a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as a heat source. Expected process efficiencies in the range of 60 to 70% are considerably higher than all other hydrogen production processes except steam reforming of a natural gas. The process involves the preparation of a coal liquid, hydrogasification of that liquid, and steam reforming of the resulting gaseous or light liquid product. A study showing process efficiency and cost of hydrogen vs nuclear reactor core outlet temperature has been completed, and shows diminishing returns at process temperatures above about 1500 F. A possible scenario combining the relatively abundant and low-cost Western coal deposits with the Gulf Coast hydrogen users is presented which provides high-energy density transportation utilizing coal liquids and uranium.

  5. Technology and fabrication of plutonium-238 radionuclide heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malikh, Y. A.; Aldoshin, A. I.; Danilkin, E. A.

    1996-03-01

    This paper outlines a brief technical description of the facility for production of plutonium-238 and fabrication of Radionuclide Heat Sources (RHS) containing Pu-238. Technical capabilities of the RHS fabrication facility are presented. The results of development of the RHS design for sea application are discussed. RHS fuel pellet comprises the tantalum shell with an annular slot intended for release of radiogenic helium and the Pu-238 dioxide core with reinforcing elements inside which contact with the shell. RHS is a double encapsulation consisting of the inner ``power'' capsule and the outer corrosion-resistant capsule. The chromium-nickel-molybdenum XH65MB alloy which is equivalent to Hastelloy-C alloy has been selected as a material for both capsules. Upon expiration of working life, RHS design is capable of withstanding the internal pressure of radiogenic helium at 1073 K within 30 minutes and the external hydrostatic pressure of 100 MPa at normal temperature.

  6. Microresonator-based comb generation without an external laser source.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Adrea R; Okawachi, Yoshitomo; Lamont, Michael R E; Levy, Jacob S; Lipson, Michal; Gaeta, Alexander L

    2014-01-27

    We demonstrate a fiber-microresonator dual-cavity architecture with which we generate 880 nm of comb bandwidth without the need for a continuous-wave pump laser. Comb generation with this pumping scheme is greatly simplified as compared to pumping with a single frequency laser, and the generated combs are inherently robust due to the intrinsic feedback mechanism. Temporal and radio frequency (RF) characterization show a regime of steady comb formation that operates with reduced RF amplitude noise. The dual-cavity design is capable of being integrated on-chip and offers the potential of a turn-key broadband multiple wavelength source. PMID:24515147

  7. Model of Heat Exchangers for Waste Heat Recovery from Diesel Engine Exhaust for Thermoelectric Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Chad; Vuppuluri, Prem; Shi, Li; Hall, Matthew

    2012-06-01

    The performance and operating characteristics of a hypothetical thermoelectric generator system designed to extract waste heat from the exhaust of a medium-duty turbocharged diesel engine were modeled. The finite-difference model consisted of two integrated submodels: a heat exchanger model and a thermoelectric device model. The heat exchanger model specified a rectangular cross-sectional geometry with liquid coolant on the cold side, and accounted for the difference between the heat transfer rate from the exhaust and that to the coolant. With the spatial variation of the thermoelectric properties accounted for, the thermoelectric device model calculated the hot-side and cold-side heat flux for the temperature boundary conditions given for the thermoelectric elements, iterating until temperature and heat flux boundary conditions satisfied the convection conditions for both exhaust and coolant, and heat transfer in the thermoelectric device. A downhill simplex method was used to optimize the parameters that affected the electrical power output, including the thermoelectric leg height, thermoelectric n-type to p-type leg area ratio, thermoelectric leg area to void area ratio, load electrical resistance, exhaust duct height, coolant duct height, fin spacing in the exhaust duct, location in the engine exhaust system, and number of flow paths within the constrained package volume. The calculation results showed that the configuration with 32 straight fins was optimal across the 30-cm-wide duct for the case of a single duct with total height of 5.5 cm. In addition, three counterflow parallel ducts or flow paths were found to be an optimum number for the given size constraint of 5.5 cm total height, and parallel ducts with counterflow were a better configuration than serpentine flow. Based on the reported thermoelectric properties of MnSi1.75 and Mg2Si0.5Sn0.5, the maximum net electrical power achieved for the three parallel flow paths in a counterflow arrangement was 1

  8. High-efficiency target-ion sources for RIB generation

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.

    1993-12-31

    A brief review is given of high-efficiency ion sources which have been developed or are under development at ISOL facilities which show particular promise for use at existing, future, or radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities now under construction. Emphasis will be placed on those sources which have demonstrated high ionization efficiency, species versatility, and operational reliability and which have been carefully designed for safe handling in the high level radioactivity radiation fields incumbent at such facilities. Brief discussions will also be made of the fundamental processes which affect the realizable beam intensities in target-ion sources. Among the sources which will be reviewed will be selected examples of state-of-the-art electron-beam plasma-type ion sources, thermal-ionization, surface-ionization, ECR, and selectively chosen ion source concepts which show promise for radioactive ion beam generation. A few advanced, chemically selective target-ion sources will be described, such as sources based on the use of laser-resonance ionization, which, in principle, offer a more satisfactory solution to isobaric contamination problems than conventional electromagnetic techniques. Particular attention will be given to the sources which have been selected for initial or future use at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  9. Turbulent diffusion from a heated line source in non-equilibrium grid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedic, Jovan; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2015-11-01

    We have investigated turbulent diffusion of heat injected passively from a line source in equilibrium and non-equilibrium grid-generated turbulence, which are, respectively, flows in which the value of the non-dimensional rate of kinetic energy dissipation is constant or changes with streamwise distance from the grid. We used three grids with uniform square meshes and one fractal square grid (FSG), all of the same solidity, to generate non-equilibrium and equilibrium turbulence in a wind-tunnel. The regular grids have mesh sizes that are comparable to the first (RG160), second (RG80) and fourth (RG18) iterations of the fractal grid. The heated line source was inserted on the centre-plane of the grids at either of two downstream locations or an upstream one and it spanned the entire width of the wind-tunnel. We found that RG160 produced the greatest heat diffusion, followed by FSG, RG80 and RG18, in this order. The apparent turbulent diffusivity produced by the four grids also decreased in the same order. These findings conform with Taylor's theory of diffusion by continuous movements. Moreover, the present study demonstrates that the fractal space-scale unfolding (SSU) mechanism does not apply to grids with the same solidity but different effective mesh sizes. Supported by NSERC.

  10. Strategic GHG reduction through the use of ground source heat pump technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanova, J.; Dowlatabadi, H.

    2007-10-01

    Higher energy prices and concern about climate change is drawing increasing attention to ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems. Their clear advantage lies in being able to provide heating using 25 to 30% of the energy consumed by even the most efficient conventional alternatives. Their drawback has been high capital costs and uncertainty about whether the emissions associated with the electric power used to energise the system has higher system-wide emissions than the highest-efficiency furnaces. This study delineates circumstances under which GSHP systems achieve net emission reductions, for different electricity generation methods, heat pump efficiencies, and heating loads. We illustrate the effect of relative fuel prices on annual operating savings using fuel prices in multiple countries. Annual operating savings determine how rapidly the technology achieves payback and then generates return on the initial capital investment. Finally, we highlight the least cost supply curve for using GSHP to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Using the United States as a base reference case, this study explores the potential of GSHP in cold-climate countries worldwide.

  11. The Physical Basis of Lg Generation by Explosion Sources

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Stevens; G. E. Baker; H. Xu; T. J. Bennett; N. Rimer; S. D. Day

    2004-12-20

    The goal of this project has been to develop a quantitative predictive capability for explosion-generated Lg phases with a sound and unambiguous physical basis. The research program consisted of a theoretical investigation of explosion-generated Lg combined with an observational study. The specific question addressed by this research program is how the Lg phase is generated by underground nuclear explosions. This question is fundamental to how Lg phases are interpreted for use in explosion yield estimation and earthquake/explosion discrimination. To constrain modeling, we have extensively reviewed the existing literature and complemented that work with an examination of several explosion data sets, most notably: (1) Degelen Mountain explosions recorded between 7 and 57 km, with corresponding recordings at Borovoye, at approximately 650 km; (2) recordings from Russian deep seismic sounding experiments; (3) NTS explosion sources including the NPE and nuclear tests covering a range of source depths and media properties. A simple point explosion in an infinite medium generates no shear waves, so the Lg phase is generated entirely by non-spherical components of the source and conversions through reflections and scattering. We find that the most important contributors to the Lg phase are: (1) P to S conversion at the free surface and other near source interfaces, (2) S waves generated directly by a realistically distributed explosion source including nonlinear effects due to the free surface and gravity, and (3) Rg scattering to Lg. Additional effects that contribute significantly to Lg are scattering of converted S phases that traps more of the converted P-to-S in the crust, and randomization of the components of Lg. The pS phase from a spherically symmetric explosion source in media with P-wave velocity less than upper mantle S-wave velocity is trapped in the crust and can explain the observed radial and vertical Lg. The free surface pS converted phase from the same

  12. The analysis of a reactive hydromagnetic internal heat generating poiseuille fluid flow through a channel.

    PubMed

    Hassan, A R; Maritz, R

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the analysis of a reactive hydromagnetic Poiseuille fluid flow under different chemical kinetics through a channel in the presence of a heat source is carried out. An exothermic reaction is assumed while the concentration of the material is neglected. The Adomian decomposition method together with Pade approximation technique are used to obtain the solutions of the governing nonlinear non-dimensional differential equations. Effects of various physical parameters on the velocity and temperature fields of the fluid flow are investigated. The entropy generation analysis, irreversibility distribution ratio, Bejan number and the conditions for thermal criticality for different chemical kinetics are also presented. PMID:27563527

  13. General-purpose heat source development: Safety verification test program. Titanium bullet/fragment test series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, T. G.

    1986-06-01

    The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will provide power for the Galileo and Ulysses space missions contains 18 General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. Each module contains four 238PuO2-fueled clads and generates 250 W(t). Because the possibility of launch-pad or postlaunch explosion exists and because any explosion would generate a field of high-energy fragments, the fueled clads within each GPHS module must be able to survive fragment impact. In this test series we investigated the response of bare, simulant-fueled (UO2) clads to the impact of high-energy titanium alloy fragments. We determined that 425m/s is the threshold impact velocity of a 3.25-g titanium bullet that will cause direct mechanical failure of a bare fueled clad.

  14. General-purpose heat source development: Safety Verification Test Program. Titanium bullet/fragment test series

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.G.

    1986-06-01

    The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will provide power for the Galileo and Ulysses space missions contains 18 General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. Each module contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled clads and generates 250 W(t). Because the possibility of launch-pad or postlaunch explosion exists and because any explosion would generate a field of high-energy fragments, the fueled clads within each GPHS module must be able to survive fragment impact. In this test series we investigated the response of bare, simulant-fueled (UO/sub 2/) clads to the impact of high-energy titanium alloy fragments. We determined that 425m/s is the threshold impact velocity of a 3.25-g titanium bullet that will cause direct mechanical failure of a bare fueled clad. 40 figs.

  15. DOS-HEATING6: A general conduction code with nuclear heat generation derived from DOT-IV transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.L.; Yuecel, A.; Nadkarny, S.

    1988-05-01

    The HEATING6 heat conduction code is modified to (a) read the multigroup particle fluxes from a two-dimensional DOT-IV neutron- photon transport calculation, (b) interpolate the fluxes from the DOT-IV variable (optional) mesh to the HEATING6 control volume mesh, and (c) fold the interpolated fluxes with kerma factors to obtain a nuclear heating source for the heat conduction equation. The modified HEATING6 is placed as a module in the ORNL discrete ordinates system (DOS), and has been renamed DOS-HEATING6. DOS-HEATING6 provides the capability for determining temperature distributions due to nuclear heating in complex, multi-dimensional systems. All of the original capabilities of HEATING6 are retained for the nuclear heating calculation; e.g., generalized boundary conditions (convective, radiative, finned, fixed temperature or heat flux), temperature and space dependent thermal properties, steady-state or transient analysis, general geometry description, etc. The numerical techniques used in the code are reviewed and the user input instructions and JCL to perform DOS-HEATING6 calculations are presented. Finally a sample problem involving coupled DOT-IV and DOS-HEATING6 calculations of a complex space-reactor configurations described, and the input and output of the calculations are listed. 10 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Measured Performance of a Low Temperature Air Source Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    R.K. Johnson

    2013-09-01

    A 4-ton Low Temperature Heat Pump (LTHP) manufactured by Hallowell International was installed in a residence near New Haven, Connecticut and monitored over two winters of operation. After attending to some significant service issues, the heat pump operated as designed. This report should be considered a review of the dual compressor “boosted heat pump” technology. The Low Temperature Heat Pump system operates with four increasing levels of capacity (heat output) as the outdoor temperature drops.

  17. Improved heating efficiency with High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound using a new ultrasound source excitation.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Timothy A

    2009-01-01

    High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) is quickly becoming one of the best methods to thermally ablate tissue noninvasively. Unlike RF or Laser ablation, the tissue can be destroyed without inserting any probes into the body minimizing the risk of secondary complications such as infections. In this study, the heating efficiency of HIFU sources is improved by altering the excitation of the ultrasound source to take advantage of nonlinear propagation. For ultrasound, the phase velocity of the ultrasound wave depends on the amplitude of the wave resulting in the generation of higher harmonics. These higher harmonics are more efficiently converted into heat in the body due to the frequency dependence of the ultrasound absorption in tissue. In our study, the generation of the higher harmonics by nonlinear propagation is enhanced by transmitting an ultrasound wave with both the fundamental and a higher harmonic component included. Computer simulations demonstrated up to a 300% increase in temperature increase compared to transmitting at only the fundamental for the same acoustic power transmitted by the source. PMID:19963801

  18. Surface plasma source with saddle antenna radio frequency plasma generator.

    PubMed

    Dudnikov, V; Johnson, R P; Murray, S; Pennisi, T; Piller, C; Santana, M; Stockli, M; Welton, R

    2012-02-01

    A prototype RF H(-) surface plasma source (SPS) with saddle (SA) RF antenna is developed which will provide better power efficiency for high pulsed and average current, higher brightness with longer lifetime and higher reliability. Several versions of new plasma generators with small AlN discharge chambers and different antennas and magnetic field configurations were tested in the plasma source test stand. A prototype SA SPS was installed in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ion source test stand with a larger, normal-sized SNS AlN chamber that achieved unanalyzed peak currents of up to 67 mA with an apparent efficiency up to 1.6 mA∕kW. Control experiments with H(-) beam produced by SNS SPS with internal and external antennas were conducted. A new version of the RF triggering plasma gun has been designed. A saddle antenna SPS with water cooling is fabricated for high duty factor testing. PMID:22380221

  19. Surface plasma source with saddle antenna radio frequency plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V.; Johnson, R. P.; Murray, S.; Pennisi, T.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.

    2012-02-15

    A prototype RF H{sup -} surface plasma source (SPS) with saddle (SA) RF antenna is developed which will provide better power efficiency for high pulsed and average current, higher brightness with longer lifetime and higher reliability. Several versions of new plasma generators with small AlN discharge chambers and different antennas and magnetic field configurations were tested in the plasma source test stand. A prototype SA SPS was installed in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ion source test stand with a larger, normal-sized SNS AlN chamber that achieved unanalyzed peak currents of up to 67 mA with an apparent efficiency up to 1.6 mA/kW. Control experiments with H{sup -} beam produced by SNS SPS with internal and external antennas were conducted. A new version of the RF triggering plasma gun has been designed. A saddle antenna SPS with water cooling is fabricated for high duty factor testing.

  20. Toward the Automated Generation of Components from Existing Source Code

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D; Yi, Q; Kumfert, G; Epperly, T; Dahlgren, T; Schordan, M; White, B

    2004-12-02

    A major challenge to achieving widespread use of software component technology in scientific computing is an effective migration strategy for existing, or legacy, source code. This paper describes initial work and challenges in automating the identification and generation of components using the ROSE compiler infrastructure and the Babel language interoperability tool. Babel enables calling interfaces expressed in the Scientific Interface Definition Language (SIDL) to be implemented in, and called from, an arbitrary combination of supported languages. ROSE is used to build specialized source-to-source translators that (1) extract a SIDL interface specification from information implicit in existing C++ source code and (2) transform Babel's output to include dispatches to the legacy code.

  1. Ground source heat pumps (GSHP) for heating and cooling in Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimera, Nikoletta

    This report presents the results of a theoretical study about the feasibility of closed loop Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHP) for heating and cooling in Greece in terms of their impact on the capital and running costs of the building services systems of the buildings. The main aim of carrying out this study was to investigate if the heating and cooling potential of the ground could be utilized cost efficiently to serve the buildings energy demand in the Greek region. At first, an existing implementation of a closed loop GSHP system in Greece is presented and its efficiency is discussed. The aim of doing so was to understand the way of sizing such systems and the efficiency of this technology in Greek climatic and ground conditions. In a separate part of this report, the impact of different user behaviour and of various ways of sizing a GSHP system is investigated in terms of the cost impact of the examined different options as well as of their effect on the internal health and comfort conditions. After the building simulation under different scenarios, it was concluded that the user behavior - the operation of windows mostly - can result in great savings on the annual energy bills. The conclusions of this first part of the report about the user behaviour and the way of sizing GSHP systems were utilized in the next part of it, where a GSHP system is proposed for a building currently under construction in central Greece. A simple 30-year cost analysis was used in order to estimate the performance of the proposed GSHP system in economic terms and to compare it with the conventional HVAC system commonly used in Greece. According to the results of the analysis, the capital cost of installing a GSHP system for heating and cooling in buildings in Greece appears higher than the cost of conventional HVAC systems. More specifically, the capital cost of an installation for heating including gas boilers and a cooling system based on air conditioning split units is about the

  2. Perpendicular heating of electrons by upper hybrid waves generated by a ring distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. S.; Menietti, J. D.; Wong, H. K.

    1990-01-01

    Satellite observations of electron conical distributions with enhanced fluxes just outside the loss cone suggest that telectrons have been heated perpendicularly to the magnetic field in the mid-altitude polar magnetosphere. To understand electron conical distributions, plasma simulations are conducted to examine an upper hybrid wave instability of a ring electron distribution perpendicular to the magnetic field in a cold electron background. The simulations indicate that both the cold and ring distributions are heated perpendicularly during the saturation stage. From the plasma data, a ring distribution can be identified as a trapped distribution function with an enhancement near 90-deg pitch angle in the phase space density plot. It is suggested that the ring distribution might provide an additional free energy source for generating upper hybrid waves associated with electron conical events.

  3. Effects of Heat Generation on Nuclear Waste Disposal in Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    Disposal of nuclear waste in salt is an established technology, as evidenced by the successful operations of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) since 1999. The WIPP is located in bedded salt in southeastern New Mexico and is a deep underground facility for transuranic (TRU) nuclear waste disposal. There are many advantages for placing radioactive wastes in a geologic bedded-salt environment. One desirable mechanical characteristic of salt is that it flows plastically with time ("creeps"). The rate of salt creep is a strong function of temperature and stress differences. Higher temperatures and deviatoric stresses increase the creep rate. As the salt creeps, induced fractures may be closed and eventually healed, which then effectively seals the waste in place. With a backfill of crushed salt emplaced around the waste, the salt creep can cause the crushed salt to reconsolidate and heal to a state similar to intact salt, serving as an efficient seal. Experiments in the WIPP were conducted to investigate the effects of heat generation on the important phenomena and processes in and around the repository (Munson et al. 1987; 1990; 1992a; 1992b). Brine migration towards the heaters was induced from the thermal gradient, while salt creep rates showed an exponential dependence on temperature. The project "Backfill and Material Behavior in Underground Salt Repositories, Phase II" (BAMBUS II) studied the crushed salt backfill and material behavior with heat generation at the Asse mine located near Remlingen, Germany (Bechthold et al. 2004). Increased salt creep rates and significant reconsolidation of the crushed salt were observed at the termination of the experiment. Using the data provided from both projects, exploratory modeling of the thermal-mechanical response of salt has been conducted with varying thermal loading and waste spacing. Increased thermal loading and decreased waste spacing drive the system to higher temperatures, while both factors are desired to

  4. Cogeneration technology alternatives study. Volume 4: Heat Sources, balance of plant and auxiliary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Data and information established for heat sources balance of plant items, thermal energy storage, and heat pumps are presented. Design case descriptions are given along with projected performance values. Capital cost estimates for representative cogeneration plants are also presented.

  5. Loop Heat Pipe Transient Behavior Using Heat Source Temperature for Set Point Control with Thermoelectric Converter on Reservoir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Paiva, Kleber; Mantelli, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    The LHP operating temperature is governed by the saturation temperature of its reservoir. Controlling the reservoir saturation temperature is commonly done by cold biasing the reservoir and using electrical heaters to provide the required control power. With this method, the loop operating temperature can be controlled within 0.5K or better. However, because the thermal resistance that exists between the heat source and the LHP evaporator, the heat source temperature will vary with its heat output even if the LHP operating temperature is kept constant. Since maintaining a constant heat source temperature is of most interest, a question often raised is whether the heat source temperature can be used for LHP set point temperature control. A test program with a miniature LHP was carried out to investigate the effects on the LHP operation when the control temperature sensor was placed on the heat source instead of the reservoir. In these tests, the LHP reservoir was cold-biased and was heated by a control heater. Test results show that it was feasible to use the heat source temperature for feedback control of the LHP operation. In particular, when a thermoelectric converter was used as the reservoir control heater, the heat source temperature could be maintained within a tight range using a proportional-integral-derivative or on/off control algorithm. Moreover, because the TEC could provide both heating and cooling to the reservoir, temperature oscillations during fast transients such as loop startup could be eliminated or substantially reduced when compared to using an electrical heater as the control heater.

  6. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion in shale Vs. carbonate source rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Leythaeuser, D. ); Krooss, B.; Hillebrand, T.; Primio, R. di )

    1993-09-01

    For a number of commercially important source rocks of shale and of carbonate lithologies, which were studied by geochemical, microscopical, and petrophysical techniques, a systematic comparison was made of the processes on how hydrocarbon generation and migration proceed with maturity progress. In this way, several fundamental differences between both types of source rocks were recognized, which are related to differences of sedimentary facies and, more importantly, of diagenetic processes responsible for lithification. Whereas siliciclastic sediments lithify mainly by mechanical compaction, carbonate muds get converted into lithified rocks predominantly by chemical diagenesis. With respect to their role as hydrocarbon source rocks, pressure solution processes appear to be key elements. During modest burial stages and prior to the onset of hydrocarbon generation reactions by thermal decomposition of kerogen, pressure solution seams and stylolites. These offer favorable conditions for hydrocarbon generation and expulsion-a three-dimensional kerogen network and high organic-matter concentrations that lead to effective saturation of the internal pore fluid system once hydrocarbon generation has started. As a consequence, within such zones pore fluids get overpressured, leading ultimately to fracturing. Petroleum expulsion can then occur at high efficiencies and in an explosive fashion, whereby clay minerals and residual kerogen particles are squeezed in a toothpaste-like fashion into newly created fractures. In order to elucidate several of the above outlined steps of hydrocarbon generation and migration processes, open-system hydrous pyrolysis experiments were performed. This approach permits one to monitor changes in yield and composition of hydrocarbon products generated and expelled at 10[degrees]C temperature increments over temperature range, which mimics in the laboratory the conditions prevailing in nature over the entire liquid window interval.

  7. Open Source Next Generation Visualization Software for Interplanetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, Jay; Rinker, George

    2016-01-01

    Mission control is evolving quickly, driven by the requirements of new missions, and enabled by modern computing capabilities. Distributed operations, access to data anywhere, data visualization for spacecraft analysis that spans multiple data sources, flexible reconfiguration to support multiple missions, and operator use cases, are driving the need for new capabilities. NASA's Advanced Multi-Mission Operations System (AMMOS), Ames Research Center (ARC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) are collaborating to build a new generation of mission operations software for visualization, to enable mission control anywhere, on the desktop, tablet and phone. The software is built on an open source platform that is open for contributions (http://nasa.github.io/openmct).

  8. Atmosphere-entry behavior of a modular, disk-shaped, isotope heat source.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorreiter, J. W.; Pitts, W. C.; Stine, H. A.; Burns, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    The authors have studied the entry and impact behavior of an isotope heat source for space nuclear power that disassembles into a number of modules which would enter the earth's atmosphere separately if a flight aborted. These modules are disk-shaped units, each with its own reentry heat shield and protective impact container. In normal operation, the disk modules are stacked inside the generator, but during a reentry abort they separate and fly as individual units of low ballistic coefficient. Flight tests at hypersonic speeds have confirmed that a stack of disks will separate and assume a flat-forward mode of flight. Free-fall tests of single disks have demonstrated a nominal impact velocity of 30 m/sec at sea level for a practical range of ballistic coefficients.

  9. Application of sorption heat pumps for increasing of new power sources efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, L.; Filatova, O.; Tsitovich, A.

    2010-07-01

    In the 21st century the way to increase the efficiency of new sources of energy is directly related with extended exploration of renewable energy. This modern tendency ensures the fuel economy needs to be realized with nature protection. The increasing of new power sources efficiency (cogeneration, trigeneration systems, fuel cells, photovoltaic systems) can be performed by application of solid sorption heat pumps, regrigerators, heat and cold accumulators, heat transformers, natural gas and hydrogen storage systems and efficient heat exchangers.

  10. Heat generation and stability of a plasmonic nanogold system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yuan; Kan, Caixia; Gao, Qi; Wei, Jingjing; Xu, Haiying; Wang, Changshun

    2016-02-01

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Au nanostructures can be precisely tuned in the visible to near-infrared (vis-NIR) region with the size and morphology. The photothermal effect induced by the SPR can raise the temperature of Au nanostructures and the surrounding matrix under external illumination. In this work, hollow Au nanostructures such as nanoboxes and nanorings with a tunable SPR in the region of 650-1100 nm were obtained by a replacement reaction between HAuCl4 and the as-prepared Ag nanostructures as the sacrificed templates. Compared with the solid Au nanorods, studies on the photothermal conversion and stability of hollow Au nanostructures were systematically carried out with the assistance of the near-infrared (NIR) lasers available. Under NIR laser irradiation, the temperatures of the colloidal Au nanostructures increased rapidly from ~30 °C to ~65 °C. Combining the experimental results with a finite-different time-domain (FDTD) numerical simulation, the heat generation of different Au nanostructures was investigated. With the consideration of the concentration of the Au nanostructures, it is indicated that hollow Au nanostructures are superior to solid Au nanorods in photothermal conversion. On increasing the NIR laser power (3 W), Au nanorods undergo a shape deformation from nanorods to spherical nanoparticles, while the SPR and morphology of hollow Au nanoboxes and nanorings maintain high stability, promising to be candidates for nanoheaters. This work provides a standard to design optimized plasmonic nanoheaters.

  11. Field Test of High Efficiency Residential Buildings with Ground-source and Air-source Heat Pump Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Munk, Jeffrey D; Baxter, Van D

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the field performance of space conditioning and water heating equipment in four single-family residential structures with advanced thermal envelopes. Each structure features a different, advanced thermal envelope design: structural insulated panel (SIP); optimum value framing (OVF); insulation with embedded phase change materials (PCM) for thermal storage; and exterior insulation finish system (EIFS). Three of the homes feature ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and water heating while the fourth has a two-capacity air-source heat pump (ASHP) and a heat pump water heater (HPWH). Two of the GCHP-equipped homes feature horizontal ground heat exchange (GHX) loops that utillize the existing foundation and utility service trenches while the third features a vertical borehole with vertical u-tube GHX. All of the houses were operated under the same simulated occupancy conditions. Operational data on the house HVAC/Water heating (WH) systems are presented and factors influencing overall performance are summarized.

  12. Heat source for an amagmatic hydrothermal system, Noto Peninsula, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Koji; Ninomiya, Atusi; Negi, Tateyuki

    2009-01-01

    Although there is no evidence of volcanism in the Noto Peninsula since the late Miocene, the peninsula has long been known to be unusual and atypical of non-volcanic regions, as indicated by high-temperature hot springs and a geothermal gradient greater than 50 K/km. In order to provide geochemical constraints on the heat source for amagmatic hydrothermal activity, the chemical and isotopic compositions of 14 gas and water samples from hot springs were measured. The observed 3He/4He ratios of most hot spring gases range from 0.03 to 1.2 RA (RA denotes the atmospheric 3He/4He ratio of 1.4 × 10-6). In these samples, mantle helium composes less than 10% of the total helium, indicating an insignificant contribution of mantle-derived volatiles from, for example, newly ascending magma and/or aqueous fluid generated by dehydration of the subducting slab. The Noto Peninsula mainly consists of Neogene volcaniclastic and sedimentary rocks overlying Paleozoic to Mesozoic basement rocks associated with uranium-bearing granite pegmatite containing elevated concentrations of heat generating elements such as uranium, thorium, and potassium. A plausible heat source for the amagmatic hydrothermal activity can be attributed to this distinctive geological environment where high heat producing granitic rocks are buried under Neogene sedimentary rocks with low thermal conductivities that act as thermal blankets. Most Noto Peninsula hot springs are found in areas of active faulting, where stress concentrations since the late Miocene could open an existing fault pathway because the fluid pressure is close to the lithostatic pressure. Meteoric waters circulating through hot basement rock come to the surface along these permeable conduits with minimal mixing with shallow groundwater, resulting in emanation of high-temperature hot springs with low 3He/4He ratio gases along active fault zones.

  13. Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator for Electrical Power Generation from Automotive Waste Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisner, Gregory

    2012-02-01

    Filled skutterudites are state-of-the- art thermoelectric (TE) materials for electrical power generation from waste heat. They have suitable intrinsic transport properties as measured by the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT = S^2σT/κ (S = Seebeck coefficient, σ = electrical conductivity, T = temperature, and κ = thermal conductivity) and good mechanical strength for operation at vehicle exhaust gas temperatures of >550 C. We have demonstrated TE electrical power generation on a production test vehicle equipped with a fully functional prototype TE generator (TEG). It was assembled with TE modules fabricated from filled skutterudites synthesized at GM. Our results and analysis show that improvement in total power generated can be achieved by enhanced thermal and electrical interfaces and contacts. A substantial T decrease along the exhaust gas flow results in a large variation of voltage, current, and power output for each TE module depending on its position in the module array. Total TEG output power depends directly on the position-dependent T profile via the temperature dependence of both ZT and Carnot efficiency. Total TEG power output also depends on how the modules are connected in parallel or series combinations because mismatch in output voltage and/or internal resistance among the modules degrades the performance of the entire array. Uniform T profiles and consistent TE module internal resistances improve overall TEG performance.

  14. A Negative Hydrogen-Ion Source for SNS Using a Helicon Plasma Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, R. H.; Welton, R. F.; Baity, F. W.; Crisp, D. W.; Fadnek, A.; Kang, Y.; Murray, S. N.; Sparks, D. O.; Stockli, M. P.

    2007-09-28

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a world-class facility for materials research based on neutron scattering. It consists of a negative hydrogen (H-) ion source, linear accelerator, proton accumulator ring, and liquid Hg target. A power upgrade is planned for the device, which will require significant improvements in the negative ion source, including the production of H-beam currents of 70-95 mA ({approx}2xthe present SNS source value), with a pulse length of 1 ms and duty factor of {approx}7%. No H-sources currently in existence meet these combined requirements. A proof-of-principle experiment is being constructed in which the rf inductive plasma generator in the present source is replaced by a helicon plasma generator. This is expected to produce a factor of three or better increase in the maximum source plasma density at a reduced rf power level, resulting in significantly increased negative ion current with reduced heat removal requirements.

  15. A Negative Hydrogen-Ion Source for SNS Using a Helicon Plasma Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, Richard Howell; Welton, Robert F; Baity Jr, F Wallace; Crisp, Danny W; Fadnek, Andy; Kang, Yoon W; Murray Jr, S N; Sparks, Dennis O; Stockli, Martin P

    2007-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Labo ratory is a world-class facility for materials research based on neutron scattering. It consists of a negative hydrogen (H-) ion source, linear accelerator, proton accumulator ring, and liquid Hg target. A power up grade is planned for the device, which will require significant improvements in the negative ion source, including the production of H- beam currents of 70-95 mA (~2 the present SNS source value), with a pulse length of 1 ms and duty factor of ~ 7%. No H- sources currently in existence meet these combined requirements. A proof-of-principle experiment is being constructed in which the rf inductive plasma generator in the present source is replaced by a helicon plasma generator. This is expected to produce a factor of three or better in crease in the maximum source plasma density at a reduced rf power level, resulting in significantly increased negative ion current with reduced heat removal requirements.

  16. Environmental assessment for the relocation and storage of isotopic heat sources, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    As part of a bilateral agreement between the Federal Minister for Research and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and the DOE, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed processes for the treatment and immobilization of high-level radioactive waste. One element of this bilateral agreement was the production of sealed isotopic heat sources. During the mid-1980s, 30 sealed isotopic heat sources were manufactured. The sources contain a total of approximately 8.3 million curies consisting predominantly of cesium-137 and strontium-90 with trace amounts of transuranic contamination. Currently, the sources are stored in A-Cell of the 324 Building. Intense radiation fields from the sources are causing the cell windows and equipment to deteriorate. Originally, it was not intended to store the isotopic heat sources for this length of time in A-cell. The 34 isotopic heat sources are classified as remote handled transuranic wastes. Thirty-one of the isotopic heat sources are sealed, and seals on the three remaining isotopic heat sources have not been verified. However, a decision has been made to place the remaining three isotopic heat sources in the CASTOR cask(s). The Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) has concurred that isotopic heat sources with verified seals or those placed into CASTOR cask(s) can be considered sealed (no potential to emit radioactive air emissions) and are exempt from WAC Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions.

  17. Electron Beam Collimation for the Next Generation Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Steier, C.; Emma, P.; Nishimura, H.; Papadopoulos, C.; Sannibale, F.

    2013-05-20

    The Next Generation Light Source will deliver high (MHz) repetition rate electron beams to an array of free electron lasers. Because of the significant average current in such a facility, effective beam collimation is extremely important to minimize radiation damage to undulators, prevent quenches of superconducting cavities, limit dose rates outside of the accelerator tunnel and prevent equipment damage. This paper describes the early conceptual design of a collimation system, as well as initial results of simulations to test its effectiveness.

  18. A proposal for a novel H ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance heating and surface ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, Ollie A; Kurennoy, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    A design for a novel H{sup -} ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating and surface ionization is presented. The plasma chamber of the source is an rf-cavity designed for TE{sub 111} eigenmode at 2.45 GHz. The desired mode is excited with a loop antenna. The ionization process takes place on a cesiated surface of a biased converter electrode. The H{sup -} ion beam is further 'self-extracted' through the plasma region. The magnetic field of the source is optimized for plasma generation by electron cyclotron resonance heating, and beam extraction. The design features of the source are discussed in detail and the attainable H{sup -} ion current, beam emittance and duty factor of the novel source are estimated.

  19. JLab CW Cryomodules for 4th Generation Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, Robert; Bundy, Richard; Cheng, Guangfeng; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Clemens, William; Daly, Edward; Henry, James; Hicks, William; Kneisel, Peter; Manning, Stephen; Manus, Robert; Marhauser, Frank; Preble, Joseph; Reece, Charles; Smith, Karl; Stirbet, Mircea; Turlington, Larry; Wang, Haipeng; Wilson, Katherine

    2008-01-23

    Fourth generation light sources hold the prospect of unprecedented brightness and optical beam quality for a wide range of scientific applications. Many of the proposed new facilities will rely on large superconducting radio frequency (SRF) based linacs to provide high energy, low emittance CW electron beams. For high average power applications there is a growing acceptance of energy recovery linac (ERL) technology as the way to support large recirculating currents with modest RF power requirements. CW SRF and high current ERLs are two core competencies at Jefferson Lab. JLab has designed and built a number of CW cryomodules of several different types starting with the original CEBAF design, with variations for higher current in the two generations of JLab’s free-electron laser (FEL), through two intermediate prototypes to the final high-performance module for the 12 GeV upgrade. Each of these represent fully engineered and tested configurations with a variety of specifications that could be considered for possible use in fourth generation light sources. Furthermore JLab has been actively pursuing advanced concepts for highcurrent high-efficiency cryomodules for next generation ERL based FEL’s. These existing and proposed designs span the range from about 1mA single-pass to over 100 mA energy recovered current capability. Specialized configurations also exist for high-current non-energy recovered sections such as the injector region where very high RF power is required. We discuss the performance parameters of these existing and proposed designs and their suitability to different classes of fourth generation light sources.

  20. The MHD disk generator as a multimegawatt power supply operating with chemical and nuclear sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, J. F.

    The characteristics, performance and status of the MHD disk generator are reviewed as a potential multimegawatt power supply working with both chemical and nuclear sources. The disk generator is found to be a compact high interaction power unit with simple construction simple power conditioning and using a circular superconducting coil. The radial flow of the disk assures zero thrust in open loop operation and its construction simplicity may provide significant reliability and weight advantages. The disk generator can be operated as a high voltage, low current power supply. Experiments have shown the disk generator as high power (900 kW), high power density (500 MW/cu cm), high enthalpy extraction (15%) device which has been operated with electrical fields up to 37 kV/m. The disk generator can be operated in an open loop with either chemical or nuclear heat sources. In a closed cycle system, the disk generator can be used in a Braylon cycle using He working fluid and in a Rankin cycle using either potassium or lithium vapors as working fluid. In both cases, the generator operates in the non-equilibrium mode.

  1. Fiber-integrated 780 nm source for visible parametric generation.

    PubMed

    Hu, D J J; Murray, R T; Legg, T; Runcorn, T H; Zhang, M; Woodward, R I; Lim, J L; Wang, Y; Luan, F; Gu, B; Shum, P P; Kelleher, E J R; Popov, S V; Taylor, J R

    2014-12-01

    We report the development of a fully fiber-integrated pulsed master oscillator power fibre amplifier (MOPFA) source at 780 nm, producing 3.5 W of average power with 410 ps pulses at a repetition rate of 50 MHz. The source consists of an intensity modulated 1560 nm laser diode amplified in an erbium fiber amplifier chain, followed by a fiber coupled periodically poled lithium niobate crystal module for frequency doubling. The source is then used for generating visible light through four-wave mixing in a length of highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber: 105 mW at 668 nm and 95 mW at 662 nm are obtained, with pump to anti-Stokes conversion slope efficiencies exceeding 6% in both cases. PMID:25606903

  2. ELECTRON INJECTORS FOR NEXT GENERATION X-RAY SOURCES.

    SciTech Connect

    BLUEM,H.; BEN-ZVI,I.; SRINIVASAN-RAO,T.; ET AL.

    2004-08-02

    Next generation x-ray sources require very high-brightness electron beams that are typically at or beyond the present state-of-the-art, and thus place stringent and demanding requirements upon the electron injector parameters. No one electron source concept is suitable for all the diverse applications envisaged, which have operating characteristics ranging from high-average-current, quasi-CW, to high-peak-current, single-pulse electron beams. Advanced Energy Systems, in collaboration with various partners, is developing several electron injector concepts for these x-ray source applications. The performance and design characteristics of five specific RF injectors, spanning ''L'' to ''X''-band, normal-conducting to superconducting, and low repetition rate to CW, which are presently in various stages of design, construction or testing, is described. We also discuss the status and schedule of each with respect to testing.

  3. Prospects for Next-Generation Storage Ring Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borland, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Storage ring light sources are among the most productive large-scale scientific user facilities in existence, owing to a combination of broad tunability, mature technology, high capacity, remarkable reliability, and high performance. The most commonly-used performance measure is the photon beam brightness, which is proportional to the flux per unit volume in six-dimensional phase space. The brightness is generally maximized by minimizing the transverse phase space area, or emittance, of the electron beam that generates the photons. Since the 1990's, most storage ring light sources have used a variant of the Chasman-Green, or double-bend-achromat (DBA), lattice, which produces transverse emittances of several nanometers. Presently, several light sources are under construction based on more challenging multi-bend-achromat (MBA) concepts, which promise an order of magnitude reduction in the emittance. Somewhat larger reductions are contemplated for upgrades of the largest facilities. This talk briefly surveys the relevant concepts in light source design, then explains both the mechanism and challenge of achieving next-generation emittances. Other factors, such as improved radiation-emitting devices, are also described. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  4. Hydrodynamic performance and heat generation by centrifugal pumps.

    PubMed

    Ganushchak, Y; van Marken Lichtenbelt, W; van der Nagel, T; de Jong, D S

    2006-11-01

    For over a century, centrifugal pumps (CP) have been used in various applications, from large industrial pumps to flow pumps for aquariums. However, the use of CP as blood pumps has a rather short history. Consequently, the hydraulic performance data for a blood CP are limited. The aim of our investigation was to study the hydraulic performance and the heat generation of three commercially available CP: Bio-Medicus Bio-Pump BP80 (Medtronic), Rotaflow (Jostra Medizintechnik), and DeltaStream DP2 (MEDOS Medizintechnik AQ). The study was performed using a circuit primed with a water-glycerin mixture with a dynamic viscosity of 0.00272 pa/s. Pressure-flow curves were obtained by a stepwise stagnation of the pump outlet or inlet. The temperature changes were observed using ThermaCAM SC2000 (Flir Systems). The pumps' performance in close to clinical conditions ('operating region') was analysed in this report. The 'operating region' in the case of the BP80 is positioned around the pressure-flow curve at a pump speed of 3000 rpm. In the case of the Rotaflow, the 'operating region' was between the pump pressure-flow curves at a speed of 3000 and 4000 rpm, and the DP2 was found between 7000 and 8000 rpm. The standard deviation of mean pressure through the pump was used to characterise the stability of the pump. In experiments with outlet stagnation, the BP80 demonstrated high negative association between flow and pressure variability (r = -0.68, p < 0.001). In experiments with the DP2, this association was positive (r = 0.68, p < 0.001). All pumps demonstrated significantly higher variability of pressure in experiments with inlet stagnation in comparison to the experiments with outlet stagnation. The rise of relative temperature in the inlet of a pump was closely related to the flow rate. The heating of fluid was more pronounced in the 'zero-flow' mode, especially in experiments with inlet stagnation. In summary, (1) the 'zero-flow' regime, which is described in the manuals

  5. Ambit-Tautomer: An Open Source Tool for Tautomer Generation.

    PubMed

    Kochev, Nikolay T; Paskaleva, Vesselina H; Jeliazkova, Nina

    2013-06-01

    We present a new open source tool for automatic generation of all tautomeric forms of a given organic compound. Ambit-Tautomer is a part of the open source software package Ambit2. It implements three tautomer generation algorithms: combinatorial method, improved combinatorial method and incremental depth-first search algorithm. All algorithms utilize a set of fully customizable rules for tautomeric transformations. The predefined knowledge base covers 1-3, 1-5 and 1-7 proton tautomeric shifts. Some typical supported tautomerism rules are keto-enol, imin-amin, nitroso-oxime, azo-hydrazone, thioketo-thioenol, thionitroso-thiooxime, amidine-imidine, diazoamino-diazoamino, thioamide-iminothiol and nitrosamine-diazohydroxide. Ambit-Tautomer uses a simple energy based system for tautomer ranking implemented by a set of empirically derived rules. A fine-grained output control is achieved by a set of post-generation filters. We performed an exhaustive comparison of the Ambit-Tautomer Incremental algorithm against several other software packages which offer tautomer generation: ChemAxon Marvin, Molecular Networks MN.TAUTOMER, ACDLabs, CACTVS and the CDK implementation of the algorithm, based on the mobile H atoms listed in the InChI. According to the presented test results, Ambit-Tautomer's performance is either comparable to or better than the competing algorithms. Ambit-Tautomer module is available for download as a Java library, a command line application, a demo web page or OpenTox API compatible Web service. PMID:27481667

  6. Explosion overpressure test series: General-Purpose Heat Source development: Safety Verification Test program

    SciTech Connect

    Cull, T.A.; George, T.G.; Pavone, D.

    1986-09-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular, radioisotope heat source that will be used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) to supply electric power for space missions. The first two uses will be the NASA Galileo and the ESA Ulysses missions. The RTG for these missions will contain 18 GPHS modules, each of which contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled clads and generates 250 W/sub (t)/. A series of Safety Verification Tests (SVTs) was conducted to assess the ability of the GPHS modules to contain the plutonia in accident environments. Because a launch pad or postlaunch explosion of the Space Transportation System vehicle (space shuttle) is a conceivable accident, the SVT plan included a series of tests that simulated the overpressure exposure the RTG and GPHS modules could experience in such an event. Results of these tests, in which we used depleted UO/sub 2/ as a fuel simulant, suggest that exposure to overpressures as high as 15.2 MPa (2200 psi), without subsequent impact, does not result in a release of fuel.

  7. High efficiency, quasi-instantaneous steam expansion device utilizing fossil or nuclear fuel as the heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Claudio Filippone, Ph.D.

    1999-06-01

    Thermal-hydraulic analysis of a specially designed steam expansion device (heat cavity) was performed to prove the feasibility of steam expansions at elevated rates for power generation with higher efficiency. The steam expansion process inside the heat cavity greatly depends on the gap within which the steam expands and accelerates. This system can be seen as a miniaturized boiler integrated inside the expander where steam (or the proper fluid) is generated almost instantaneously prior to its expansion in the work-producing unit. Relatively cold water is pulsed inside the heat cavity, where the heat transferred causes the water to flash to steam, thereby increasing its specific volume by a large factor. The gap inside the heat cavity forms a special nozzle-shaped system in which the fluid expands rapidly, accelerating toward the system outlet. The expansion phenomenon is the cause of ever-increasing fluid speed inside the cavity system, eliminating the need for moving parts (pumps, valves, etc.). In fact, the subsequent velocity induced by the sudden fluid expansion causes turbulent conditions, forcing accelerating Reynolds and Nusselt numbers which, in turn, increase the convective heat transfer coefficient. When the combustion of fossil fuels constitutes the heat source, the heat cavity concept can be applied directly inside the stator of conventional turbines, thereby greatly increasing the overall system efficiency.

  8. HIGH EFFICIENCY, QUASI-INSTANTANEOUS STEAM EXPANSION DEVICE UTILIZING FOSSIL OR NUCLEAR FUEL AS THE HEAT SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Claudio Filippone, Ph.D.

    1999-06-01

    Thermal-hydraulic analysis of a specially designed steam expansion device (heat cavity) was performed to prove the feasibility of steam expansions at elevated rates for power generation with higher efficiency. The steam expansion process inside the heat cavity greatly depends on the gap within which the steam expands and accelerates. This system can be seen as a miniaturized boiler integrated inside the expander where steam (or the proper fluid) is generated almost instantaneously prior to its expansion in the work-producing unit. Relatively cold water is pulsed inside the heat cavity, where the heat transferred causes the water to flash to steam, thereby increasing its specific volume by a large factor. The gap inside the heat cavity forms a special nozzle-shaped system in which the fluid expands rapidly, accelerating toward the system outlet. The expansion phenomenon is the cause of ever-increasing fluid speed inside the cavity system, eliminating the need for moving parts (pumps, valves, etc.). In fact, the subsequent velocity induced by the sudden fluid expansion causes turbulent conditions, forcing accelerating Reynolds and Nusselt numbers which, in turn, increase the convective heat transfer coefficient. When the combustion of fossil fuels constitutes the heat source, the heat cavity concept can be applied directly inside the stator of conventional turbines, thereby greatly increasing the overall system efficiency.

  9. Multifunctional Porous Graphene for High-Efficiency Steam Generation by Heat Localization.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshikazu; Tanabe, Yoichi; Han, Jiuhui; Fujita, Takeshi; Tanigaki, Katsumi; Chen, Mingwei

    2015-08-01

    Multifunctional nanoporous graphene is realized as a heat generator to convert solar illumination into high-energy steam. The novel 3D nanoporous graphene demonstrates a highly energy-effective steam generation with an energy conversation of 80%. PMID:26079440

  10. From Modules to a Generator: An Integrated Heat Exchanger Concept for Car Applications of a Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Henry

    2016-03-01

    A heat exchanger concept for a thermoelectric generator with integrated planar modules for passenger car applications is introduced. The module housings, made of deep drawn stainless steel sheet metal, are brazed onto the exhaust gas channel to achieve an optimal heat transfer on the hot side of the modules. The cooling side consists of winding fluid channels, which are mounted directly onto the cold side of the modules. Only a thin foil separates the cooling media from the modules for an almost direct heat contact on the cooling side. Thermoelectric generators with up to 20 modules made of PbTe and Bi2Te3, respectively, are manufactured and tested on a hot gas generator to investigate electrical power output and performance of the thermoelectric generator. The proof of concept of the light weight heat exchanger design made of sheet metal with integrated modules is positively accomplished.

  11. Harvesting Nanocatalytic Heat Localized in Nanoalloy Catalyst as a Heat Source in a Nanocomposite Thin Film Thermoelectric Device.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Shan, Shiyao; Luo, Jin; Mott, Derrick M; Maenosono, Shinya; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-10-20

    This report describes findings of an investigation of harvesting nanocatalytic heat localized in a nanoalloy catalyst layer as a heat source in a nanocomposite thin film thermoelectric device for thermoelectric energy conversion. This device couples a heterostructured copper-zinc sulfide nanocomposite for thermoelectrics and low-temperature combustion of methanol fuels over a platinum-cobalt nanoalloy catalyst for producing heat localized in the nanocatalyst layer. The possibility of tuning nanocatalytic heat in the nanocatalyst and thin film thermoelectric properties by compositions points to a promising pathway in thermoelectric energy conversion. PMID:26444621

  12. Constraining high-redshift X-ray sources with next generation 21-cm power spectrum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Hewitt, Jacqueline; Mesinger, Andrei; Dillon, Joshua S.; Liu, Adrian; Pober, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    We use the Fisher matrix formalism and seminumerical simulations to derive quantitative predictions of the constraints that power spectrum measurements on next-generation interferometers, such as the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) and the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will place on the characteristics of the X-ray sources that heated the high-redshift intergalactic medium. Incorporating observations between z = 5 and 25, we find that the proposed 331 element HERA and SKA phase 1 will be capable of placing ≲ 10 per cent constraints on the spectral properties of these first X-ray sources, even if one is unable to perform measurements within the foreground contaminated `wedge' or the FM band. When accounting for the enhancement in power spectrum amplitude from spin temperature fluctuations, we find that the observable signatures of reionization extend well beyond the peak in the power spectrum usually associated with it. We also find that lower redshift degeneracies between the signatures of heating and reionization physics lead to errors on reionization parameters that are significantly greater than previously predicted. Observations over the heating epoch are able to break these degeneracies and improve our constraints considerably. For these two reasons, 21-cm observations during the heating epoch significantly enhance our understanding of reionization as well.

  13. General-Purpose Heat Source Safety Verification Test program: Edge-on flyer plate tests

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.G.

    1987-03-01

    The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will supply power for the Galileo and Ulysses space missions contains 18 General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. The GPHS modules provide power by transmitting the heat of STYPu -decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. Each module contains four STYPuO2-fueled clads and generates 250 W(t). Because the possibility of a launch vehicle explosion always exists, and because such an explosion could generate a field of high-energy fragments, the fueled clads within each GPHS module must survive fragment impact. The edge-on flyer plate tests were included in the Safety Verification Test series to provide information on the module/clad response to the impact of high-energy plate fragments. The test results indicate that the edge-on impact of a 3.2-mm-thick, aluminum-alloy (2219-T87) plate traveling at 915 m/s causes the complete release of fuel from capsules contained within a bare GPHS module, and that the threshold velocity sufficient to cause the breach of a bare, simulant-fueled clad impacted by a 3.5-mm-thick, aluminum-alloy (5052-T0) plate is approximately 140 m/s.

  14. General-Purpose Heat Source Safety Verification Test Program: Edge-on flyer plate tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, T. G.

    1987-03-01

    The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will supply power for the Galileo and Ulysses space missions contains 18 General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. The GPHS modules provide power by transmitting the heat of Pu-238 alpha-decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. Each module contains four Pu-238O2-fueled clads and generates 250 W(t). Because the possibility of a launch vehicle explosion always exists, and because such an explosion could generate a field of high-energy fragments, the fueled clads within each GPHS module must survive fragment impact. The edge-on flyer plate tests were included in the Safety Verification Test series to provide information on the module/clad response to the impact of high-energy plate fragments. The test results indicate that the edge-on impact of a 3.2-mm-thick, aluminum-alloy (2219-T87) plate traveling at 915 m/s causes the complete release of fuel from capsules contained within a bare GPHS module, and that the threshold velocity sufficient to cause the breach of a bare, simulant-fueled clad impacted by a 3.5-mm-thick, aluminum-alloy (5052-TO) plate is approximately 140 m/s.

  15. Investigation of direct expansion in ground source heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalman, M. D.

    A fully instrumented subscale ground coupled heat pump system was developed, and built, and used to test and obtain data on three different earth heat exchanger configurations under heating conditions (ground cooling). Various refrigerant flow control and compressor protection devices were tested for their applicability to the direct expansion system. Undistributed Earth temperature data were acquired at various depths. The problem of oil return at low evaporator temperatures and low refrigerant velocities was addressed. An analysis was performed to theoretically determine what evaporator temperature can be expected with an isolated ground pipe configuration with given length, pipe size, soil conditions and constant heat load. Technical accomplishments to data are summarized.

  16. POWER GENERATION USING MEGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC GENERATOR WITH A CIRCULATION FLOW DRIVEN BY SOLAR-HEAT-INDUCED NATURAL CONVECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project team has theoretically studied the mechanism of magnetohydrodynamic generator, the coupling of heat transfer and buoyancy-driven free convection, and radiation heat transfer. A number of ideas for the projects have been brainstormed in the team. The underline physi...

  17. Documentation generator application for MatLab source codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niton, B.; Pozniak, K. T.; Romaniuk, R. S.

    2011-06-01

    The UML, which is a complex system modeling and description technology, has recently been expanding its uses in the field of formalization and algorithmic approach to such systems like multiprocessor photonic, optoelectronic and advanced electronics carriers; distributed, multichannel measurement systems; optical networks, industrial electronics, novel R&D solutions. The paper describes a realization of an application for documenting MatLab source codes. There are presented own novel solution based on Doxygen program which is available on the free license, with accessible source code. The used supporting tools for parser building were Bison and Flex. There are presented the practical results of the documentation generator. The program was applied for exemplary MatLab codes. The documentation generator application is used for design of large optoelectronic and electronic measurement and control systems. The paper consists of three parts which describe the following components of the documentation generator for photonic and electronic systems: concept, MatLab application and VHDL application. This is part two which describes the MatLab application. MatLab is used for description of the measured phenomena.

  18. Electricity-producing heating apparatus utilizing a turbine generator in a semi-closed brayton cycle

    DOEpatents

    Labinov, Solomon D.; Christian, Jeffrey E.

    2003-10-07

    The present invention provides apparatus and methods for producing both heat and electrical energy by burning fuels in a stove or boiler using a novel arrangement of a surface heat exchanger and microturbine-powered generator and novel surface heat exchanger. The equipment is particularly suited for use in rural and relatively undeveloped areas, especially in cold regions and highlands.

  19. Generator-Absorber heat exchange transfer apparatus and method using an intermediate liquor

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Zawacki, Thomas S.

    1996-11-05

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use the working solution of the absorption system for the heat transfer medium where the working solution has an intermediate liquor concentration.

  20. A multilevel voltage-source inverter with separate dc sources for static var generation

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Fang Zheng |; Lai, Jih-Sheng; McKeever, J.; VanCoevering, J.

    1995-09-01

    A new multilevel voltage-source inverter with a separate dc sources is proposed for high-voltage, high-power applications, such as flexible ac transmission systems (FACTS) including static var generation (SVG), power line conditioning, series compensation, phase shifting, voltage balancing, fuel cell and photovoltaic utility systems interfacing, etc. The new M-level inverter consists of (M-1)/2 single phase full bridges in which each bridge has its own separate dc source. This inverter can generate almost sinusoidal waveform voltage with only one time switching per cycle as the number of levels increases. It can solve the problems of conventional transformer-based multipulse inverters and the problems of the multilevel diode-clamped inverter and the multilevel flying capacitor inverter. To demonstrate the superiority of the new inverter, a SVG system using the new inverter topology is discussed through analysis, simulation and experiment.

  1. Steady temperature and density distributions in a gas containing heat sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davison, H. W.

    1971-01-01

    Computer program, STADDIG, is based on steady state, one dimensional heat transfer calculation using cylindrical coordinates. Program allows for conduction across gas and container walls. Heat is dissipated from walls by forced convection cooling with incompressible coolant. Heat sources are included in coolant, gas, and walls.

  2. Measured Performance of a Low Temperature Air Source Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R. K.

    2013-09-01

    A 4-ton Low Temperature Heat Pump (LTHP) manufactured by Hallowell International was installed in a residence near New Haven, Connecticut and monitored over two winters of operation. After attending to some significant service issues, the heat pump operated as designed. This report should be considered a review of the dual compressor 'boosted heat pump' technology. The Low Temperature Heat Pumpsystem operates with four increasing levels of capacity (heat output) as the outdoor temperature drops. The system was shown to select capacity correctly, supplying the appropriate amount of heat to the house across the full range of outdoor temperatures. The system's Coefficient of Performance (Seasonal COP, or SCOP) over two entire winters was calculated, based on measured data, to be 3.29over the first winter and 2.68 over the second winter. A second seasonal efficiency calculation by a different method yielded a SCOP of 2.78 for the first winter and 2.83 for the second winter. This second seasonal efficiency calculation was determined by comparing measured heat pump energy use to the in situ energy use with resistance heat alone. This method is the ratio of the slopes of thedaily energy use load lines.

  3. Towards detectors for next generation spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebauer, B.

    2004-12-01

    Neutron scattering and diffraction methods are of utmost importance for probing the structure and dynamics of condensed matter at an atomic, molecular and mesoscopic level. However, today's experiments, using either wavelength-selected cw beams from steady-state reactor or spallation sources or, on the other hand, comparatively weak pulsed spallation source beams (with the exception of the pulsed IBR-2 reactor in Dubna), suffer from relatively low source strengths, e.g. compared to synchrotron-radiation investigations. Therefore, neutron scattering methods can greatly benefit from next generation pulsed spallation neutron sources with 1-10 MW average proton beam power, which will allow analyzing wavelengths by time-of-flight (TOF) and thus utilizing in an experiment simultaneously a large fraction of the full wavelength band. However, the improved instantaneous flux will pose great challenges on the detection systems, since for instance for ESS, the strongest of the projected sources, the peak thermal neutron flux will be higher by nearly two orders of magnitude than at the presently strongest sources. Owing to current improvements in neutron optics and spectrometer design, the fluxes impinging on the samples will be further enhanced by another factor 5-10; however, this will be compensated for by the tendency to investigate smaller samples becoming accessible due to smaller foci and higher beam fluxes. Hence, thermal neutron detectors with up to two orders of magnitude higher peak count rate capacity in conjunction with microsecond TOF and for some applications sub-millimeter position resolutions are required, in addition to other characteristics like e.g. high long-term stability and low sensitivity to photon background. In this review article an overview will be given on the current state-of-the-art and on currently investigated novel solutions for thermal neutron detectors for very high rate and resolution time-resolved experiments, comprising silicon

  4. Designing, selecting and installing a residential ground-source heat pump system

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Patrick; Liu, Xiaobing; Munk, Jeffrey D

    2010-01-01

    It's a compelling proposition: Use the near-constant-temperature heat underground to heat and cool your home and heat domestic water, slashing your energy bills. Yet despite studies demonstrating significant energy savings from ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems, their adoption has been hindered by high upfront costs. Fewer than 1% of US homes use a GSHP system. However, compared to a minimum-code-compliant conventional space-conditioning system, when properly designed and installed, a GSHP retrofit at current market prices offers simple payback of 4.3 years on national average, considering existing federal tax credits. Most people understand how air-source heat pumps work: they move heat from indoor air to outdoor air when cooling and from outdoor air to indoor air when heating. The ground-source heat pump operates on the same principle, except that it moves heat to or from the ground source instead of outdoor air. The ground source is usually a vertical or horiontal ground heat exchanger. Because the ground usually has a more favorable temperature than ambient air for the heating and cooling operation of the vapor-compression refrigeration cycle, GSHP sysems can operate with much higher energy efficiencies than air-source heat pump systems when properly designed and installed. A GSHP system used in a residual building typically provides space conditioning and hot water and comprises three major components: a water-source heat pump unit designed to operate at a wider range of entering fluid temperatures (typically from 30 F to 110 F, or 1 C to 43 C) than a conventional water-source heat pump unit; a ground heat exchanger (GHX); and distribution systems to deliver hot water to the storage tank and heating or cooling to the conditioned rooms. In most residual GSHP systems, the circulation pumps and associated valves are integrated with the heat pump to circulate the heat-carrier fluid (water or aqueous antifreeze solution) through the heat pump and the GHX. A

  5. Analysis of the heat transfer at the tool-workpiece interface in machining: determination of heat generation and heat transfer coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddag, B.; Atlati, S.; Nouari, M.; Zenasni, M.

    2015-10-01

    This paper deals with the modelling and identification of the heat exchange at the tool-workpiece interface in machining. A thermomechanical modelling has been established including heat balance equations of the tool-workpiece interface which take into account the heat generated by friction and the heat transfer by conduction due to the thermal contact resistance. The interface heat balance equations involve two coefficients: heat generation coefficient (HGC) of the frictional heat and heat transfer coefficient (HTC) of the heat conduction (inverse of the thermal contact resistance coefficient). Using experimental average heat flux in the tool, estimated for several cutting speeds, an identification procedure of the HGC-HTC couple, involved in the established thermomechanical FE-based modelling of the cutting process, has been proposed, which gives the numerical heat flux equal the measured one for each cutting speed. Using identified values of the HGC-HTC couple, evolution laws are proposed for the HGC as function of cutting speed, and then as function of sliding velocity at the tool-workpiece interface. Such laws can be implemented for instance in a Finite Element code for machining simulations.

  6. Zirconium diboride nanofiber generation via microwave arc heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldridge, Tyson; Gupta, Mool C.

    2008-07-01

    Ultrahigh temperature zirconium diboride nanofibers were produced by microwave arc heating using micron-sized raw powder. While microwave heating the ZrB2 powder, the development of local arcing led to rapid heating and solidification of the samples, along with the creation of nanofibers. The morphology of these high aspect ratio nanofibers was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction showed the composition to contain zirconium, boron, nitrogen, aluminum and oxygen as well as the crystallographic orientation. ZrB2 nanofiber applications include aerospace and other harsh environments.

  7. Multilayers for next generation x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bajt, S; Chapman, H N; Spiller, E; Hau-Riege, S; Alameda, J; Nelson, A J; Walton, C C; Kjornrattanawanich, B; Aquila, A; Dollar, F; Gullikson, E; Tarrio, C

    2007-05-04

    Multilayers are artificially layered structures that can be used to create optics and optical elements for a broad range of x-ray wavelengths, or can be optimized for other applications. The development of next generation x-ray sources (synchrotrons and x-ray free electron lasers) requires advances in x-ray optics. Newly developed multilayer-based mirrors and optical elements enabled efficient band-pass filtering, focusing and time resolved measurements in recent FLASH (Free Electron LASer in Hamburg) experiments. These experiments are providing invaluable feedback on the response of the multilayer structures to high intensity, short pulsed x-ray sources. This information is crucial to design optics for future x-ray free electron lasers and to benchmark computer codes that simulate damage processes.

  8. Scale/Analytical Analyses of Freezing and Convective Melting with Internal Heat Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ali S. Siahpush; John Crepeau; Piyush Sabharwall

    2013-07-01

    Using a scale/analytical analysis approach, we model phase change (melting) for pure materials which generate constant internal heat generation for small Stefan numbers (approximately one). The analysis considers conduction in the solid phase and natural convection, driven by internal heat generation, in the liquid regime. The model is applied for a constant surface temperature boundary condition where the melting temperature is greater than the surface temperature in a cylindrical geometry. The analysis also consider constant heat flux (in a cylindrical geometry).We show the time scales in which conduction and convection heat transfer dominate.

  9. Handling radiation generated during an ion source commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, H. T.; Zhao, J. Peng, S. X.; Lu, P. N.; Zhou, Q. F.; Xu, Y.; Chen, J.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, A. L.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2014-02-15

    Radiation is an important issue, which should be carefully treated during the design and commissioning of an ion source. Measurements show that X-rays are generated around the ceramics column of an extraction system when the source is powered up to 30 kV. The X-ray dose increases greatly when a beam is extracted. Inserting the ceramic column into a metal vacuum box is a good way to block X-ray emission for those cases. Moreover, this makes the online test of an intense H{sup +} ion beam with energy up to 100 keV possible. However, for deuteron ion source commissioning, neutron and gamma-ray radiation become a serious topic. In this paper, we will describe the design of the extraction system and the radiation doses of neutrons and gamma-rays measured at different D{sup +} beam energy during our 2.45 GHz deuteron electron cyclotron resonance ion source commissioning for PKUNIFTY (PeKing University Neutron Imaging FaciliTY) project at Peking University.

  10. Possibilities of utilizing alternative energy sources for combined heat supply systems in the Baltic

    SciTech Connect

    Shipkovs, P.; Grislis, V.; Zebergs, V. )

    1991-01-01

    The problem of alternative energy sources is an issue of major importance for the Baltic republics because of the limited supply of conventional energy resources. One of the ways to solve this problem could be the introduction of combined heat supply systems (CHSS). The combined heat supply systems are such systems where various energy sources in different regimes are made use of to ensure the optimum temperature on residential and industrial premises. The influence of climatic conditions on the selection of heat supply systems has been studied at large. In the present paper the use of alternative energy sources (AES) in combined heat supply systems (CHSS) is described.

  11. A capital cost comparison of commercial ground-source heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rafferty, K.

    1995-02-01

    In the March 1994 issue of the Quarterly Bulletin, a Geo-Heat Center Research Project involving ground-source heat pumps (GSHP) systems for commercial buildings was introduced. This project which evaluated the capital costs associated with three different ground-source designs was completed in June 1994. As a result of this work, a final report {open_quotes}A Capital Cost Comparison of Commercial Ground-Source Heat Pump Systems{close_quotes} was issued. This article is a summary of that report. The full report is available from the Geo-Heat Center.

  12. Temperature and Humidity Independent Control Research on Ground Source Heat Pump Air Conditioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Wang, L. L.

    Taking green demonstration center building air conditioning system as an example, this paper presents the temperature and humidity independent control system combined with ground source heat pump system, emphasis on the design of dry terminal device system, fresh air system and ground source heat pump system.

  13. Metrology laboratory requirements for third-generation synchrotron radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Quian, Shinan

    1997-11-01

    New third-generation synchrotron radiation sources that are now, or will soon, come on line will need to decide how to handle the testing of optical components delivered for use in their beam lines. In many cases it is desirable to establish an in-house metrology laboratory to do the work. We review the history behind the formation of the Optical Metrology Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the rationale for its continued existence. We offer suggestions to those who may be contemplating setting up similar facilities, based on our experiences over the past two decades.

  14. High harmonic generation by novel fiber amplifier based sources.

    PubMed

    Hädrich, S; Rothhardt, J; Krebs, M; Tavella, F; Willner, A; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2010-09-13

    Significant progress in high repetition rate ultrashort pulse sources based on fiber technology is presented. These systems enable operation at a high repetition rate of up to 500 kHz and high average power in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength range via high harmonic generation in a gas jet. High average power few-cycle pulses of a fiber amplifier pumped optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier are used to produce µW level average power for the strongest harmonic at 42.9 nm at a repetition rate of 96 kHz. PMID:20940915

  15. Toward a fourth-generation x-ray source.

    SciTech Connect

    Monction, D. E.

    1999-05-19

    The field of synchrotron radiation research has grown rapidly over the last 25 years due to both the push of the accelerator and magnet technology that produces the x-ray beams and the pull of the extraordinary scientific research that is possible with them. Three successive generations of synchrotrons radiation facilities have resulted in beam brilliances 11 to 12 orders of magnitude greater than the standard laboratory x-ray tube. However, greater advances can be easily imagined given the fact that x-ray beams from present-day facilities do not exhibit the coherence or time structure so familiar with the optical laser. Theoretical work over the last ten years or so has pointed to the possibility of generating hard x-ray beams with laser-like characteristics. The concept is based on self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) in flee-electron lasers. A major facility of this type based upon a superconducting linac could produce a cost-effective facility that spans wave-lengths from the ultraviolet to the hard x-ray regime, simultaneously servicing large numbers experimenters from a wide range of disciplines. As with each past generation of synchrotrons facilities, immense new scientific opportunities would result from fourth-generation sources.

  16. Carbon Nanotube Based Deuterium Ion Source for Improved Neutron Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, R. L.; Jiang, N.; Thuesen, L.; Leung, K. N.; Antolak, A. J.

    2009-03-10

    Field ionization uses high electric fields to cause the ionization and emission of ions from the surface of a sharp electrode. We are developing a novel field ionization neutron generator using carbon nanotubes (CNT) to produce the deuterium ion current. The generator consists of three major components: a deuterium ion source made of carbon nanotubes, a smooth negatively-biased target electrode, and a secondary electron suppression system. When a negative high voltage is applied on the target electrode, a high gradient electric field is formed at the tips of the carbon nanotubes. This field is sufficiently strong to create deuterium (D) ions at or near the nanotubes which are accelerated to the target causing D-D reactions to occur and the production of neutrons. A cross magnetic field is used to suppress secondary emission electrons generated on the target surface. We have demonstrated field ionization currents of 70 nA (1 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}) at hydrogen gas pressure of 10 mTorr. We have found that the current scales proportionally with CNT area and also with the gas pressure in the range of 1 mTorr to 10 mTorr. We have demonstrated pulse cut-off times as short as 2 {mu}sec. Finally, we have shown the feasibility of generating neutrons using deuterium gas.

  17. Influence of water grid on combustion process in small dendromass heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papučík, Štefan; Pilát, Peter; Hrabovský, Peter; Patsch, Marek

    2016-06-01

    For achieving of low emission in compliance of required performance parameters of small heat source affects a number of factors. It's not just about redistribution and intensity of combustion air or flue gas temperature in the chimney. An important role in the combustion process also have a combustion chamber shape, size of embers, placing of the fuel in the chamber, positioning, distribution and temperature of combustion air entering into the combustion process, the tightness of the measured heat source or temperature of the combustion chamber. The bigger problem with the achievement of low emission limits occurs at the operation of gasification heat source in lower performance. The article discusses about the effects on the combustion process is simple structural adjustment of heat source - removal of water grate during operation at reduced performance. On measuring were used identical small heat sources (with and without lambda probe oxygen sensor, with water and without water grate), which uses principle of biomass gasification.

  18. Optimum load distribution between heat sources based on the Cournot model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penkovskii, A. V.; Stennikov, V. A.; Khamisov, O. V.

    2015-08-01

    One of the widespread models of the heat supply of consumers, which is represented in the "Single buyer" format, is considered. The methodological base proposed for its description and investigation presents the use of principles of the theory of games, basic propositions of microeconomics, and models and methods of the theory of hydraulic circuits. The original mathematical model of the heat supply system operating under conditions of the "Single buyer" organizational structure provides the derivation of a solution satisfying the market Nash equilibrium. The distinctive feature of the developed mathematical model is that, along with problems solved traditionally within the bounds of bilateral relations of heat energy sources-heat consumer, it considers a network component with its inherent physicotechnical properties of the heat network and business factors connected with costs of the production and transportation of heat energy. This approach gives the possibility to determine optimum levels of load of heat energy sources. These levels provide the given heat energy demand of consumers subject to the maximum profit earning of heat energy sources and the fulfillment of conditions for formation of minimum heat network costs for a specified time. The practical realization of the search of market equilibrium is considered by the example of a heat supply system with two heat energy sources operating on integrated heat networks. The mathematical approach to the solution search is represented in the graphical form and illustrates computations based on the stepwise iteration procedure for optimization of levels of loading of heat energy sources (groping procedure by Cournot) with the corresponding computation of the heat energy price for consumers.

  19. An analytical model for the heat generation in friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, H.; Hattel, J.; Wert, J.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work is to establish an analytical model for heat generation by friction stir welding (FSW), based on different assumptions of the contact condition between the rotating tool surface and the weld piece. The material flow and heat generation are characterized by the contact conditions at the interface, and are described as sliding, sticking or partial sliding/sticking. Different mechanisms of heat generation are behind each contact condition, making this study important for further understanding of the real FSW process. The analytical expression for the heat generation is a modification of previous analytical models known from the literature and accounts for both conical surfaces and different contact conditions. Experimental results on plunge force and torque are used to determine the contact condition. The sliding condition yields a proportional relationship between the plunge force and heat generation. This is not demonstrated in the experiment, which suggests that the sticking contact condition is present at the tool/matrix interface.

  20. District heating from electric-generating plants and municipal incinerators: local planner's assessment guide

    SciTech Connect

    Pferdehirt, W.; Kron, N. Jr.

    1980-11-01

    This guide is designed to aid local government planners in the preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of district heating using heat recovered from electric generating plants and municipal incinerators. System feasibility is indicated by: (1) the existence of an adequate supply of nearby waste heat, (2) the presence of a sufficiently dense and large thermal load, and (3) a favorable cost comparison with conventional heating methods. 34 references.

  1. Regional trends in radiogenic heat generation in the Precambrian basement of the Western Canadian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, F. W.; Majorowicz, J. A.

    Radiogenic heat generation values for 381 basement samples from 229 sites in the western Canadian basin exhibit a lognormal frequency distribution. The mean value = 2.06 (S.D. = 1.22) µWm-3 is larger than the radiogenic heat generation values reported for the shield in the Superior (ca. 1.2 µWm-3, Jessop and Lewis, 1978) and Churchill (ca. 0.7 µWm-3, Drury, 1985) provinces. When equal Log A contour intervals are used to map the basement heat generation, three large zones of relatively high heat generation are found. One coincides with the Peace River Arch basement structure and one with the Athabasca axis (Darnley, 1981). There is no apparent indication of increased heat flow through the Paleozoic formations associated with these two zones. The third zone, in southwestern Saskatchewan, coincides with a high heat flow zone in the Swift Current area. The lack of correlation between heat flow and heat generation in Alberta may be due to the disturbance to the heat flow in the Paleozoic formations by water motion, or may indicate that the heat is from uranium, thorium and potassium isotope enrichment near the basement surface rather than enrichment throughout the entire upper crust.

  2. Thermally assisted electroluminescence: a viable means to generate electricity from solar or waste heat?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeg, Bauke; Wang, Jiang-Bo; Johnson, Shane R.; Buckner, Benjamin D.; Zhang, Yong-Hang

    2007-02-01

    It has been proposed recently that thermally assisted electroluminescence may in principle provide a means to convert solar or waste heat into electricity. The basic concept is to use an intermediate active emitter between a heat source and a photovoltaic (PV) cell. The active emitter would be a forward biased light emitting diode (LED) with a bias voltage, V b, below bandgap, E g (i.e., qV b < E g), such that the average emitted photon energy is larger than the average energy that is required to create charge carriers. The basic requirement for this conversion mechanism is that the emitter can act as an optical refrigerator. For this process to work and be efficient, however, several materials challenges will need to be addressed and overcome. Here, we outline a preliminary analysis of the efficiency and conversion power density as a function of temperature, bandgap energy and bias voltage, by considering realistic high temperature radiative and non-radiative rates as well as radiative heat loss in the absorber/emitter. From this analysis, it appears that both the overall efficiency and net generated power increase with increasing bandgap energy and increasing temperature, at least for temperatures up to 1000 K, despite the fact that the internal quantum yield for radiative recombination decreases with increasing temperature. On the other hand, the escape efficiency is a crucial design parameter which needs to be optimized.

  3. Quantitative Comparison of Photothermal Heat Generation between Gold Nanospheres and Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhenpeng; Wang, Yiru; Randrianalisoa, Jaona; Raeesi, Vahid; Chan, Warren C. W.; Lipiński, Wojciech; Bischof, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are widely used for biomedical applications due to unique optical properties, established synthesis methods, and biological compatibility. Despite important applications of plasmonic heating in thermal therapy, imaging, and diagnostics, the lack of quantification in heat generation leads to difficulties in comparing the heating capability for new plasmonic nanostructures and predicting the therapeutic and diagnostic outcome. This study quantifies GNP heat generation by experimental measurements and theoretical predictions for gold nanospheres (GNS) and nanorods (GNR). Interestingly, the results show a GNP-type dependent agreement between experiment and theory. The measured heat generation of GNS matches well with theory, while the measured heat generation of GNR is only 30% of that predicted theoretically at peak absorption. This then leads to a surprising finding that the polydispersity, the deviation of nanoparticle size and shape from nominal value, significantly influences GNR heat generation (>70% reduction), while having a limited effect for GNS (<10% change). This work demonstrates that polydispersity is an important metric in quantitatively predicting plasmonic heat generation and provides a validated framework to quantitatively compare the heating capabilities between gold and other plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:27445172

  4. Quantitative Comparison of Photothermal Heat Generation between Gold Nanospheres and Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhenpeng; Wang, Yiru; Randrianalisoa, Jaona; Raeesi, Vahid; Chan, Warren C W; Lipiński, Wojciech; Bischof, John C

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are widely used for biomedical applications due to unique optical properties, established synthesis methods, and biological compatibility. Despite important applications of plasmonic heating in thermal therapy, imaging, and diagnostics, the lack of quantification in heat generation leads to difficulties in comparing the heating capability for new plasmonic nanostructures and predicting the therapeutic and diagnostic outcome. This study quantifies GNP heat generation by experimental measurements and theoretical predictions for gold nanospheres (GNS) and nanorods (GNR). Interestingly, the results show a GNP-type dependent agreement between experiment and theory. The measured heat generation of GNS matches well with theory, while the measured heat generation of GNR is only 30% of that predicted theoretically at peak absorption. This then leads to a surprising finding that the polydispersity, the deviation of nanoparticle size and shape from nominal value, significantly influences GNR heat generation (>70% reduction), while having a limited effect for GNS (<10% change). This work demonstrates that polydispersity is an important metric in quantitatively predicting plasmonic heat generation and provides a validated framework to quantitatively compare the heating capabilities between gold and other plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:27445172

  5. Quantitative Comparison of Photothermal Heat Generation between Gold Nanospheres and Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhenpeng; Wang, Yiru; Randrianalisoa, Jaona; Raeesi, Vahid; Chan, Warren C. W.; Lipiński, Wojciech; Bischof, John C.

    2016-07-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are widely used for biomedical applications due to unique optical properties, established synthesis methods, and biological compatibility. Despite important applications of plasmonic heating in thermal therapy, imaging, and diagnostics, the lack of quantification in heat generation leads to difficulties in comparing the heating capability for new plasmonic nanostructures and predicting the therapeutic and diagnostic outcome. This study quantifies GNP heat generation by experimental measurements and theoretical predictions for gold nanospheres (GNS) and nanorods (GNR). Interestingly, the results show a GNP-type dependent agreement between experiment and theory. The measured heat generation of GNS matches well with theory, while the measured heat generation of GNR is only 30% of that predicted theoretically at peak absorption. This then leads to a surprising finding that the polydispersity, the deviation of nanoparticle size and shape from nominal value, significantly influences GNR heat generation (>70% reduction), while having a limited effect for GNS (<10% change). This work demonstrates that polydispersity is an important metric in quantitatively predicting plasmonic heat generation and provides a validated framework to quantitatively compare the heating capabilities between gold and other plasmonic nanostructures.

  6. Development of Electricity Generation from Renewable Energy Sources in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kentel, E.

    2011-12-01

    Electricity is mainly produced from coal, natural gas and hydropower in Turkey. However, almost all the natural gas and high quality coal are imported. Thus, increasing the shares of both hydro and other renewables in energy supply is necessary to decrease dependency of the country on foreign sources. In 2008, the total installed capacity of Turkey was around 42000 MW and 66 % of this was from thermal sources. The remaining 33 % was from hydro, which leaves only one percent for the other renewable energy sources. The share of renewable energy in the energy budget of Turkey has increased in the last two decades; however, in 2008, only 17 % of the total electricity generation was realized from renewable sources most of which was hydro. According to State Hydraulic Works (SHW) which is the primary executive state agency responsible for the planning, operating and managing of Turkey's water resources, Turkey utilizes only around 35% of its economically viable hydro potential. The current situation clearly demonstrates the need for increasing the share of renewables in the energy budget. New laws, such as the Electricity Market Law, have been enacted and the following items were identified by the Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources of Turkey among primary energy policies and priorities: (i) decreasing dependency on foreign resources by prioritizing utilization of natural resources, (ii) increasing the share of renewable energy resources in the energy budget of Turkey; (iii) minimization of adverse environmental impacts of production and utilization of natural resources. The government's energy policy increased investments in renewable energy resources; however lack of a needed legal framework brought various environmental and social problems with this fast development. The development of the share of renewable resources in the energy budget, current government policy, and environmental concerns related with renewables, and ideas to improve the overall benefits of

  7. Recent Research in Compression Refrigeration Cycle Air Source Heat Pumps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Akira; Senshu, Takao

    The most important theme for heat pump air conditioners is the improvement of energy saving and comfort. Recently, cycle components, especially compressores and heat exchangers have been improved greatly in their performance and efficiency. As for compressors, large progress in their efficiencies have been made by detailed analysises such as mechanical losses and by the development of a new type compression mechanism. As for heat exchangers, various high heat transfer surfaces have been developed together with the improvement of the production technologies for them. Further, the effect of the capacity-modulated cycle is evaluated quantitatively through the improvements of static and transient cycle simulation technologies. And in order to realize this cffect, the electrically driven expansion valves heve been marketed. This review introduces the trends of these energy-saving technologies as well as comfort improvement studies.

  8. CONTAINMENT VESSEL TEMPERATURE FOR PU-238 HEAT SOURCE CONTAINER UNDER AMBIENT, FREE CONVECTION AND LOW EMISSIVITY COOLING CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.; Smith, A.

    2011-02-14

    The EP-61 primary containment vessel of the 5320 shipping package has been used for storage and transportation of Pu-238 plutonium oxide heat source material. For storage, the material in its convenience canister called EP-60 is placed in the EP-61 and sealed by two threaded caps with elastomer O-ring seals. When the package is shipped, the outer cap is seal welded to the body. While stored, the EP-61s are placed in a cooling water bath. In preparation for welding, several containers are removed from storage and staged to the welding booth. The significant heat generation of the contents, and resulting rapid rise in component temperature necessitates special handling practices. The test described here was performed to determine the temperature rise with time and peak temperature attained for an EP-61 with 203 watts of internal heat generation, upon its removal from the cooling water bath.

  9. Next Generation H{sup -} Ion Sources for the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, R. F.; Stockli, M. P.; Murray, S. N.; Crisp, D.; Carmichael, J.; Goulding, R. H.; Han, B.; Pennisi, T.; Santana, M.; Tarvainen, O.

    2009-03-12

    The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is the leading accelerator-based, pulsed neutron-scattering facility, currently in the process of ramping up neutron production. In order to insure meeting operational requirements as well as providing for future facility beam power upgrades, a multifaceted H- ion source development program is ongoing. This work discusses several aspects of this program, specifically the design and first beam measurements of an RF-driven, external antenna H- ion source based on an A1N ceramic plasma chamber, elemental and chromate Cs-systems, and plasma ignition gun. Unanalyzed beam currents of up to {approx}100 mA(60 Hz, 1 ms) have been observed and sustained currents >60 mA(60 Hz, 1 ms) have been demonstrated on the test stand. Accelerated beam currents of {approx}40 mA have also been demonstrated into the SNS front end. Data are also presented describing the first H- beam extraction experiments from a helicon plasma generator based on the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) engine design.

  10. Next Generation H- Ion Sources for the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, Robert F; Carmichael, Justin R; Carr, Jr, Jerry; Crisp, Danny W; Goulding, Richard Howell; Han, Baoxi; Pennisi, Terry R; Murray Jr, S N; Stockli, Martin P; Tarvainen, Olli A; Santana, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is the leading accelerator-based, pulsed neutron-scattering facility, currently in the process of ramping up neutron production. In order to insure meeting operational requirements as well as providing for future facility beam power upgrades, a multifaceted H{sup -} ion source development program is ongoing. This work discusses several aspects of this program, specifically the design and first beam measurements of an RF-driven, external antenna H{sup -} ion source based on an AlN ceramic plasma chamber, elemental and chromate Cs-systems, and plasma ignition gun. Unanalyzed beam currents of up to {approx}100 mA (60Hz, 1ms) have been observed and sustained currents >60 mA (60Hz, 1ms) have been demonstrated on the test stand. Accelerated beam currents of {approx}40 mA have also been demonstrated into the SNS front end. Data are also presented describing the first H{sup -} beam extraction experiments from a helicon plasma generator based on the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) engine design.

  11. Spectral decomposition of the aerodynamic noise generated by rotating sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongiovì, Alessandro; Cattanei, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    A method is posed for separating the noise emitted by an aerodynamic source from propagation effects using spectral decomposition. This technique is applied to the power spectra of a fan measured at several rotational speeds. Although it has been conceived for rotating sources as turbomachinery rotors, the method may be easily applied to low speed stationary sources such as jets and flows in stators and about isolated airfoils. Based on the similarity theory, a clear description of the structure of the power spectrum of the received noise is given and the effect of rotational speed variations is considered as a means to obtain a data set suitable to perform the spectral decomposition. The problem is analyzed in order to clarify possibilities and limitations of the method and then an algorithm is presented which is based on the solution of the derived equations. Particular care is devoted to both the numerical details and the operative aspects. The validation of the algorithm is performed by means of numerically generated input data. Next, in order to verify the ability of the method in separating scattered from emitted sound, an automotive cooling fan has been tested in the DIMSET hemi-anechoic room in a free-field configuration and with a shielded microphone. These two apparently distinct spectra collapse to within less than 2 dB after the spectral decomposition has been performed. The tests prove the ability of the method despite the modest quantity of input data.

  12. Environmental assessment of general-purpose heat source safety verification testing

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) was prepared to identify and evaluate potential environmental, safety, and health impacts associated with the Proposed Action to test General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) assemblies at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) 10,000-Foot Sled Track Facility, Albuquerque, New Mexico. RTGs are used to provide a reliable source of electrical power on board some spacecraft when solar power is inadequate during long duration space missions. These units are designed to convert heat from the natural decay of radioisotope fuel into electrical power. Impact test data are required to support DOE`s mission to provide radioisotope power systems to NASA and other user agencies. The proposed tests will expand the available safety database regarding RTG performance under postulated accident conditions. Direct observations and measurements of GPHS/RTG performance upon impact with hard, unyielding surfaces are required to verify model predictions and to ensure the continual evolution of the RTG designs that perform safely under varied accident environments. The Proposed Action is to conduct impact testing of RTG sections containing GPHS modules with simulated fuel. End-On and Side-On impact test series are planned.

  13. Self-generated stochastic heating in an rf discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberg, A.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the nonlinear dynamics of stochastic heating arising from the reflection of electrons from moving sheaths as an underlying mechanism for electron power deposition in r.f. discharges. We examined the dynamics of the electron collision with the sheaths in the regime in which the sheath motion is small compared to the average electron velocity to de rive a mop that describes the electron motion. We have shown that for high frequency, ({omega}/2{pi}{approx gt}50MHz), the electrons will strike the moving wall with random phase. At low pressures this stochasticity is an intrinsic property of the dynamics. The stochastic electron heating leads to a power law electron distribution. The stochastic heating was determined in both the slow sheath and fast sheath velocity regimes assuming an incident Maxwellian distribution.

  14. Harmonic Generation from Solid Targets - Optmization of Source Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepf, Matthew; Watts, I. F.; Dangor, A. E.; Norreys, P. A.; Chambers, D. M.; Machacek, A.; Wark, J. S.; Tsakiris, G. D.

    1998-11-01

    High harmonics from solid targets have received renewed interest over the last few years. Theoretical predictions using 1 1/2 D codes suggest that very high orders (>100 ) can be generated at conversion efficiencies in excess of 10-6 [1,2] at Iλ^2 > 10^19 W/cm^2. Experiments have since been performed with pulses varying from 100 fs to 2.5 ps in duration [3-6]. The steep density gradient necessary to generate the harmonics can be generated by either ponderomotive steepening or by using ultraclean pulses which preserve the initial solid vacuum boundary. The two regimes are compared in terms of their dependence on the laser parameters and the emitted harmonic radiation. Particular emphasis will be given to measurements of the holeboring velocity, the polarisation of the harmonics and the intensity scaling in the two regimes. This comparison enables us to find the ideal parameter range for the optimization of harmonic source. [1] R. Lichters et al., Physics of Plasmas 3, 3425, (1996). [2] P. Gibbon, IEEE J. of Q. Elec. 33, 1915 (1997). [3] S. Kohlweyer, et al., Optics Comm. 177, 431 (1995). [4] P. Norreys et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 76, 1832 (1995). [5] D. von der Linde et al., Phys. Rev. A, 52, R25 (1995) [6] M. Zepf, et al., submitted for publication in Phys. Rev. Lett.

  15. Magnetoresistance effect of heat generation in a single-molecular spin-valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Feng; Yan, Yonghong; Wang, Shikuan; Yan, Yijing

    2016-02-01

    Based on non-equilibrium Green's functions' theory and small polaron transformation's technology, we study the heat generation by current through a single-molecular spin-valve. Numerical results indicate that the variation of spin polarization degree can change heat generation effectively, the spin-valve effect happens not only in electrical current but also in heat generation when Coulomb repulsion in quantum dot is smaller than phonon frequency and interestingly, when Coulomb repulsion is larger than phonon frequency, the inverse spin-valve effect appears by sweeping gate voltage and is enlarged with bias increasing. The inverse spin-valve effect will induce the unique heat magnetoresistance effect, which can be modulated from heat-resistance to heat-gain by gate voltage easily.

  16. Voltage generation of piezoelectric cantilevers by laser heating

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Chun-Yi; Liu, Wei-Hung; Chen, Yang-Fang; Shih, Wan Y.; Gao, Xiaotong; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2012-01-01

    Converting ambient thermal energy into electricity is of great interest in harvesting energy from the environment. Piezoelectric cantilevers have previously been shown to be an effective biosensor and a tool for elasticity mapping. Here we show that a single piezoelectric (lead-zirconate titanate (PZT)) layer cantilever can be used to convert heat to electricity through pyroelectric effect. Furthermore, piezoelectric-metal (PZT-Ti) bi-layer cantilever showed an enhanced induced voltage over the single PZT layer alone due to the additional piezoelectric effect. This type of device can be a way for converting heat energy into electricity. PMID:23258941

  17. Voltage generation of piezoelectric cantilevers by laser heating.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chun-Yi; Liu, Wei-Hung; Chen, Yang-Fang; Shih, Wan Y; Gao, Xiaotong; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2012-11-15

    Converting ambient thermal energy into electricity is of great interest in harvesting energy from the environment. Piezoelectric cantilevers have previously been shown to be an effective biosensor and a tool for elasticity mapping. Here we show that a single piezoelectric (lead-zirconate titanate (PZT)) layer cantilever can be used to convert heat to electricity through pyroelectric effect. Furthermore, piezoelectric-metal (PZT-Ti) bi-layer cantilever showed an enhanced induced voltage over the single PZT layer alone due to the additional piezoelectric effect. This type of device can be a way for converting heat energy into electricity. PMID:23258941

  18. Voltage generation of piezoelectric cantilevers by laser heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chun-Yi; Liu, Wei-Hung; Chen, Yang-Fang; Shih, Wan Y.; Gao, Xiaotong; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2012-11-01

    Converting ambient thermal energy into electricity is of great interest in harvesting energy from the environment. Piezoelectric cantilevers have previously been shown to be an effective biosensor and a tool for elasticity mapping. Here we show that a single piezoelectric (lead-zirconate titanate (PZT)) layer cantilever can be used to convert heat to electricity through pyroelectric effect. Furthermore, piezoelectric-metal (PZT-Ti) bi-layer cantilever showed an enhanced induced voltage over the single PZT layer alone due to the additional piezoelectric effect. This type of device can be a way for converting heat energy into electricity.

  19. Heat line analysis for MHD mixed convection flow of nanofluid within a driven cavity containing heat generating block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvin, Salma; Siddiqua, Ayesha

    2016-07-01

    Mixed convective flow and heat transfer characteristics of nanofluid inside a double lid driven cavity with a square heat generating block is analyzed numerically based on heat line approach. The water- alumina nanofluid is chosen as the operational fluid through the enclosure. The governing partial differential equations with proper boundary conditions are solved by Finite Element Method using Galerkin's weighted residual scheme. Calculations are performed for different solid volume fraction (χ) of nanoparticles 0 ≤ χ ≤ 0.15. Results are shown in terms of stream lines, isothermal lines, heat lines, average Nusselt number, average velocity and average temperature. An enhancement in heat transfer rate is observed with the increase of nanoparticles volume fraction.

  20. An analysis of the vapor flow and the heat conduction through the liquid-wick and pipe wall in a heat pipe with single or multiple heat sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ming-Ming; Faghri, Amir

    1990-01-01

    A numerical analysis is presented for the overall performance of heat pipes with single or multiple heat sources. The analysis includes the heat conduction in the wall and liquid-wick regions as well as the compressibility effect of the vapor inside the heat pipe. The two-dimensional elliptic governing equations in conjunction with the thermodynamic equilibrium relation and appropriate boundary conditions are solved numerically. The solutions are in agreement with existing experimental data for the vapor and wall temperatures at both low and high operating temperatures.

  1. Millimeter waves as a source of selective heating of skin.

    PubMed

    Zhadobov, Maxim; Alekseev, Stanislav I; Le Dréan, Yves; Sauleau, Ronan; Fesenko, Evgeny E

    2015-09-01

    This study demonstrates that 20-100 GHz range can be used for spatially-accurate focusing of heating inside the skin achieved by varying frequency and exposure beam size, as well as by enforcing air convection. The latter is also used to reduce overheating of skin surface. Heating at different skin depths depending on these parameters is investigated in detail using the hybrid bio-heat equation. In particular, it is shown that decreasing frequency and/or increasing exposure beam size at forced airflow result in elevation of heating of deeper layers of tissue and decrease of skin surface temperature. Changes of water content within 15%, which exceed those due to aging and presence of tumors, only slightly affect heating. Exposure intensity necessary to reach a target temperature significantly increases in different areas of body with elevated blood flow. Dependence on exposure intensity and hyperthermia treatment duration is also investigated and discussed. Results of this study suggest that the lower part of the millimeter-wave range is an attractive alternative for non-invasive thermal treatment of skin cancer with a high spatial resolution. PMID:26179286

  2. Design of a nuclear isotope heat source assembly for a spaceborne mini-Brayton power module.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wein, D.; Gorland, S. H.

    1973-01-01

    Results of a study to develop a feasible design definition of a heat source assembly (HSA) for use in nominal 500-, 1200-, or 2000-W(e) mini-Brayton spacecraft power systems. The HSA is a modular design which is used either as a single unit to provide thermal energy to the 500-W(e) mini-Brayton power module or in parallel with one or two additional HSAs for the 1200- or 2000-W(e) power module systems. Principal components consist of a multihundred watt RTG isotope heat source, a heat source heat exchanger which transfers the thermal energy from the heat source to the mini-Brayton power conversion system, an auxiliary cooling system which provides requisite cooling during nonoperation of the power conversion module and an emergency cooling system which precludes accidental release of isotope fuel in the event of system failure.

  3. Evaluation of water source heat pumps for the Juneau, Alaska Area

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, J.J.; King, J.C.; Eisenhauer, J.L.; Gibson, C.I.

    1980-07-01

    The purposes of this project were to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of water source heat pumps (WSHP) for use in Juneau, Alaska and to identify potential demonstration projects to verify their feasibility. Information is included on the design, cost, and availability of heat pumps, possible use of seawater as a heat source, heating costs with WSHP and conventional space heating systems, and life cycle costs for WSHP-based heating systems. The results showed that WSHP's are technically viable in the Juneau area, proper installation and maintenance is imperative to prevent equipment failures, use of WSHP would save fuel oil but increase electric power consumption. Life cycle costs for WSHP's are about 8% above that for electric resistance heating systems, and a field demonstration program to verify these results should be conducted. (LCL)

  4. The partition of energy associated with tropical heat sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva-Dias, P. L.; Paegle, J. N.

    1985-01-01

    Data sets derived from observations during the First GARP Global Experiment (FGGE) have permitted the study of the behavior of the tropical atmosphere to an extent not possible before. The present summary discusses characteristics of the tropical atmosphere which may be a result of tropical heating. It is shown that the meridional component of the divergent wind is of the same order of magnitude an he rotational meridional wind for the planetary tropical scales. Furthermore, the first and second internal modes dominate over most of the tropics, and it is shown that gravity and Kelvin codes are the main contributors to the total tropical divergence. Comparison with averaged station precipitation data and heating estimates obtained from Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Science (GLAS)/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) show good correspondence between areas with maximum internal mode energy and regions with pronounced latent heat release.

  5. CONVERTING ENERGY FROM RECLAIMED HEAT: THERMAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of solar energy acquiring devices has been slow to gain acceptance due to their overall low power generation versus high cost of a solar system. The goal of this project is to construct a model which increases the overall power generation of a solar building system by...

  6. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Steam Generator and Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Wright

    2010-09-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for

  7. Gyrotron-driven high current ECR ion source for boron-neutron capture therapy neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S.; Sidorov, A.; Maslennikova, A.; Volovecky, A.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Tarvainen, O.

    2014-12-01

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a perspective treatment method for radiation resistant tumors. Unfortunately its development is strongly held back by a several physical and medical problems. Neutron sources for BNCT currently are limited to nuclear reactors and accelerators. For wide spread of BNCT investigations more compact and cheap neutron source would be much more preferable. In present paper an approach for compact D-D neutron generator creation based on a high current ECR ion source is suggested. Results on dense proton beams production are presented. A possibility of ion beams formation with current density up to 600 mA/cm2 is demonstrated. Estimations based on obtained experimental results show that neutron target bombarded by such deuteron beams would theoretically yield a neutron flux density up to 6·1010 cm-2/s. Thus, neutron generator based on a high-current deuteron ECR source with a powerful plasma heating by gyrotron radiation could fulfill the BNCT requirements significantly lower price, smaller size and ease of operation in comparison with existing reactors and accelerators.

  8. Transition to chaos in a square enclosure containing internal heat sources

    SciTech Connect

    Baytas, A.C.

    1995-09-01

    A numerical investigation is performed to study the transition from steady to chaotic flow of a fluid confined in a two-dimensional square cavity. The cavity has rigid walls of constant temperature containing uniformly distributed internal heat source. Effects of the Rayleigh number of flow and heat transfer rates are studied. In addition to, same problem is solved for sinusoidally changing internal heat source to show its effect on the flow model and heat transfer of the enclosures. Details of oscillatory solutions and flow bifurcations are presented.

  9. Pore-space alteration in source rock (shales) during hydrocarbons generation: laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giliazetdinova, D. R.; Korost, D. V.; Nadezhkin, D. V.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrocarbons (HC) are generated from solid organic matter (kerogen) due to thermocatalytic reactions. The rate of such reactions shows direct correlation with temperature and depends on the depth of source rock burial. Burial of sedimentary rock is also inevitably accompanied by its structural alteration owing to compaction, dehydration and re-crystallization. Processes of HC generation, primary migration and structural changes are inaccessible for direct observation in nature, but they can be studied in laboratory experiments. Experiment was carried out with a clayey-carbonate rock sample of the Domanik Horizon taken from boreholes drilled in the northeastern part of the south Tatar arch. The rock chosen fits the very essential requirements - high organic matter content and its low metamorphic grade. Our work aimed at laboratory modeling of HC generation in an undisturbed rock sample by its heating in nitrogen atmosphere based on a specified temperature regime and monitoring alterations in the pore space structure. Observations were carried out with a SkyScan-1172 X-ray microtomography scanner (resulting scan resolution of 1 μm). A cylinder, 44 mm in diameter, was prepared from the rock sample for the pyrolitic and microtomographic analyses. Scanning procedures were carried out in 5 runs. Temperature interval for each run had to match the most important stage of HC generation in the source rock, namely: (1) original structure; (2) 100-300°C - discharge of free and adsorbed HC and water; (3) 300-400°C - initial stage of HC formation owing to high-temperature pyrolysis of the solid organic matter and discharge of the chemically bound water; (4) 400-470°C - temperature interval fitting the most intense stage of HC formation; (5) 470-510°C - final stage of HC formation. Maximum sample heating in the experiment was determined as temperature of the onset of active decomposition of carbonates, i.e., in essence, irreversible metamorphism of the rock. Additional

  10. A combined power and ejector refrigeration cycle for low temperature heat sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, B.; Weng, Y.W.

    2010-05-15

    A combined power and ejector refrigeration cycle for low temperature heat sources is under investigation in this paper. The proposed cycle combines the organic Rankine cycle and the ejector refrigeration cycle. The ejector is driven by the exhausts from the turbine to produce power and refrigeration simultaneously. A simulation was carried out to analyze the cycle performance using R245fa as the working fluid. A thermal efficiency of 34.1%, an effective efficiency of 18.7% and an exergy efficiency of 56.8% can be obtained at a generating temperature of 395 K, a condensing temperature of 298 K and an evaporating temperature of 280 K. Simulation results show that the proposed cycle has a big potential to produce refrigeration and most exergy losses take place in the ejector. (author)

  11. Laser generated neutron source for neutron resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, D. P.; Bartal, T.; McNaney, J. M.; Swift, D. C.; Hey, D. S.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A.; Kodama, R.; Tanaka, K. A.; Mariscal, D.; Beg, F. N.; Nakamura, H.; Nakanii, N.

    2010-10-15

    A neutron source for neutron resonance spectroscopy has been developed using high-intensity, short-pulse lasers. This technique will allow robust measurement of interior ion temperature of laser-shocked materials and provide insight into material equation of state. The neutron generation technique uses laser-accelerated protons to create neutrons in LiF through (p,n) reactions. The incident proton beam has been diagnosed using radiochromic film. This distribution is used as the input for a (p,n) neutron prediction code which is validated with experimentally measured neutron yields. The calculation infers a total fluence of 1.8x10{sup 9} neutrons, which are expected to be sufficient for neutron resonance spectroscopy temperature measurements.

  12. A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, J.N.; Austin, B.; Baptiste, K.M.; Byrd, J.M.; Denes, P.; Donahue, R.; Doolittle, L.; Falcone, R.W.; Filippetto, D.; Fournier, S.; Li, D.; Padmore, H.A.; Papadopoulos, C.; Pappas, C.; Penn, G.; Placidi, M.; Prestemon, S.; Prosnitz, D.; Qiang, J.; Ratti, A.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Schlueter, R.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Staples, J.W.; Vecchione, T.; Venturini, M.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Wurtele, J.; Charman, A.; Kur, E.; Zholents, A.A.

    2011-03-23

    The Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) is a design concept, under development at LBNL, for a multibeamline soft x-ray FEL array powered by a ~;;2 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, operating with a 1 MHz bunch repetition rate. The CW superconducting linear accelerator is supplied by a high-brightness, highrepetition- rate photocathode electron gun. Electron bunches are distributed from the linac to the array of independently configurable FEL beamlines with nominal bunch rates up to 100 kHz in each FEL, and with even pulse spacing. Individual FELs may be configured for EEHG, HGHG, SASE, or oscillator mode of operation, and will produce high peak and average brightness x-rays with a flexible pulse format, with pulse durations ranging from sub-femtoseconds to hundreds of femtoseconds.

  13. Thermal Analysis of Step 2 GPHS for Next Generation Radioisotope Power Source Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantano, David R.; Hill, Dennis H.

    2005-02-01

    The Step 2 General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a slightly larger and more robust version of the heritage GPHS modules flown on previous Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) missions like Galileo, Ulysses, and Cassini. The Step 2 GPHS is to be used in future small radioisotope power sources, such as the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) and the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG). New features include an additional central web of Fine Weave Pierced Fabric (FWPF) graphite in the aeroshell between the two Graphite Impact Shells (GIS) to improve accidental reentry and impact survivability and an additional 0.1-inch of thickness to the aeroshell broad faces to improve ablation protection. This paper details the creation of the thermal model using Thermal Desktop and AutoCAD interfaces and provides comparisons of the model to results of previous thermal analysis models of the heritage GPHS. The results of the analysis show an anticipated decrease in total thermal gradient from the aeroshell to the iridium clads compared to the heritage results. In addition, the Step 2 thermal model is investigated under typical SRG110 boundary conditions, with cover gas and gravity environments included where applicable, to provide preliminary guidance for design of the generator. Results show that the temperatures of the components inside the GPHS remain within accepted design limits during all envisioned mission phases.

  14. Design of a Nb3Sn Magnet for a 4th Generation ECR Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Prestemon, S,; Trillaud, F.; Caspi, S.; Ferracin, P.; Sabbi, G. L.; Lyneis, C. M.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D. S.; Hafalia, R.

    2008-08-17

    The next generation of Electron Cyclotron Resonant (ECR) ion sources are expected to operate at a heating radio frequency greater than 40 GHz. The existing 3rd generation systems, exemplified by the state of the art system VENUS, operate in the 10-28 GHz range, and use NbTi superconductors for the confinement coils. The magnetic field needed to confine the plasma scales with the rf frequency, resulting in peak fields on the magnets of the 4th generation system in excess of 10 T. High field superconductors such as Nb{sub 3}Sn must therefore be considered. The magnetic design of a 4th. generation ECR ion source operating at an rf frequency of 56 GHz is considered. The analysis considers both internal and external sextupole configurations, assuming commercially available Nb{sub 3}Sn material properties. Preliminary structural design issues are discussed based on the forces and margins associated with the coils in the different configurations, leading to quantitative data for the determination of a final magnet design.

  15. Laboratory convection experiments with internal, noncontact, microwave generated heating, applied to Earth's mantle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limare, Angela; Surducan, Emanoil; di Giuseppe, Erika; Surducan, Vasile; Neamtu, Camelia; Vilella, Kenny; Fourel, Loic; Farnetani, Cinzia; Kaminski, Edouard; Jaupart, Claude

    2014-05-01

    The thermal evolution of terrestrial planets is controlled by secular cooling and internal heating due to the decay of radiogenic isotopes, two processes which are equivalent from the standpoint of convection dynamics. Few studies have been devoted to the intrinsic characteristics of this form of convection, which are dominated by instabilities of a single boundary layer and which involve a non-isentropic interior thermal structure. Laboratory studies of such convection have been plagued by considerable technical difficulties and have been mostly restricted to aqueous solutions with moderate values of the Prandtl number, contrary to planetary mantles. Here, we describe a new laboratory setup to generate internal heating in controlled conditions based on microwave (MW) absorption. The advantages of our technique include, but are not limited to: (1) a volumetric heat source that can be localized or distributed in space, (2) selectively heating part of the volume with time varying intensity and space distribution. Our tank prototype had horizontal dimensions of 30 cm × 30 cm and 5 cm height. A uniform and constant temperature was maintained at the upper boundary by an aluminium heat exchanger and adiabatic conditions were imposed at the tank base. Experimental fluids were hydroxyethylcellulose - water mixtures whose viscosities were varied within a wide range depending on concentration. Experimental Prandtl numbers were set at values larger than 100. Thermochromic Liquid Crystals (TLC) were used to visualize the temperature field, and the velocity field was determined using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The Rayleigh-Roberts number was varied from 105 to 107. We also conducted numerical simulations in 3D cartesian geometry using Stag-3D (Tackley 1993) to reproduce the experimental conditions, including the tank aspect ratio and the temperature dependence of physical properties. We observed that convection is driven by cold descending plumes generated at the upper

  16. Boiling Heat Transfer in High Temperature Generator of Absorption Chiller/Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Enomoto, Eiichi; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    The heat transfer performance of forced convective boiling was tested using a high temperature generator of absorption chiller/heater, the rear furnace wall of which was composed of two different surfaces; i. e., plain and sprayed heated surfaces. These two surfaces were bisymmetrically set. Wall surface temperatures of both the fire and fluid sides were measured at three locations along the upward flow direction in each heated surface for determining the heat flux and heat transfer coefficient. Nickel-chromium and alumina were employed as the spray materials. The test results show that the sprayed surface can yield a marked elevation in the heat transfer performance due to boiling on the plain surface. Therefore the level of heated surface temperature is largely reduced by means of the spraying surface treatment. This implies that the spraying would much improve a corrosive condition of the heated surface.

  17. Optimization of idealized ORC in domestic combined heat and power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybiński, Witold; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2013-09-01

    Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) is used, amongst the others, in geothermal facilities, in waste heat recovery or in domestic combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The paper presents optimization of an idealized ORC equivalent of the Carnot cycle with non-zero temperature difference in heat exchangers and with energy dissipation caused by the viscous fluid flow. In this analysis the amount of heat outgoing from the ORC is given. Such a case corresponds to the application of an ORC in domestic CHP. This assumption is different from the most of ORC models where the incoming amount of heat is given.

  18. Negative hydrogen ion beam extraction from an AC heated cathode driven Bernas-type ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Y.; Miyamoto, N.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2015-04-01

    A plasma grid structure was installed to a Bernas-type ion source used for ion implantation equipment. A negative hydrogen (H-) ion beam was extracted by an AC driven ion source by adjusting the bias to the plasma grid. The extracted electron current was reduced by positively biasing the plasma grid, while an optimum plasma grid bias voltage for negative ion beam extraction was found to be positive 3 V with respect to the arc chamber. Source operations with AC cathode heating show extraction characteristics almost identical to that with DC cathode heating, except a minute increase in H- current at higher frequency of cathode heating current.

  19. Heat sources for tertiary metamorphism and anatexis in the Annapurna-Manaslu region, central Nepal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, Philip; Le Fort, Patrick; Molnar, Peter; Pecher, Arnaud

    1992-01-01

    The metamorphic evolution of the rocks near the Main Central Thrust in the Annapurna-Manaslu region of central Nepal is examined. In this region, all three types of metamorphic features can be observed: regional metamorphism, anatectic granitoids, and inverted metamorphic isograds. In this work, each phase of metamorphism is treated separately to estimate the heat sources required for each process. This approach makes it possible to identify the important parameters for each process, to draw preliminary conclusions about the heat sources required for each of these phases, and to determine which parameters need to be measured more precisely in order to constrain these heat sources.

  20. Federal Technology Alert: Ground-Source Heat Pumps Applied to Federal Facilities--Second Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Donald L.

    2001-03-01

    This Federal Technology Alert, which was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs, provides the detailed information and procedures that a Federal energy manager needs to evaluate most ground-source heat pump applications. This report updates an earlier report on ground-source heat pumps that was published in September 1995. In the current report, general benefits of this technology to the Federal sector are described, as are ground-source heat pump operation, system types, design variations, energy savings, and other benefits. In addition, information on current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are provided.

  1. Quantity, Quality, and Availability of Waste Heat from United States Thermal Power Generation.

    PubMed

    Gingerich, Daniel B; Mauter, Meagan S

    2015-07-21

    Secondary application of unconverted heat produced during electric power generation has the potential to improve the life-cycle fuel efficiency of the electric power industry and the sectors it serves. This work quantifies the residual heat (also known as waste heat) generated by U.S. thermal power plants and assesses the intermittency and transport issues that must be considered when planning to utilize this heat. Combining Energy Information Administration plant-level data with literature-reported process efficiency data, we develop estimates of the unconverted heat flux from individual U.S. thermal power plants in 2012. Together these power plants discharged an estimated 18.9 billion GJ(th) of residual heat in 2012, 4% of which was discharged at temperatures greater than 90 °C. We also characterize the temperature, spatial distribution, and temporal availability of this residual heat at the plant level and model the implications for the technical and economic feasibility of its end use. Increased implementation of flue gas desulfurization technologies at coal-fired facilities and the higher quality heat generated in the exhaust of natural gas fuel cycles are expected to increase the availability of residual heat generated by 10.6% in 2040. PMID:26061407

  2. Timing and heat sources for the Barrovian metamorphism, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viete, Daniel R.; Oliver, Grahame J. H.; Fraser, Geoff L.; Forster, Marnie A.; Lister, Gordon S.

    2013-09-01

    New SHRIMP U/Pb zircon ages of 472.2 ± 5.8 Ma and 471.2 ± 5.9 Ma are presented for the age of peak metamorphism of Barrovian migmatites. 40Ar/39Ar ages for white mica from the Barrovian metamorphic series are presented, and are recalculated using recently-proposed revisions to the 40K decay constants to allow more precise and accurate comparison with U/Pb ages. The 40Ar/39Ar ages are found to vary systematically with increasing metamorphic grade, between c. 465 Ma for the biotite zone and c. 461 Ma for the sillimanite zone. There is no evidence for any significant metamorphic heating during the first 15 Myr of the Grampian Orogeny (before c. 473 Ma) or the final 4 Myr (after c. 465 Ma). The Barrovian metamorphism occurred over a period of ~ 8 Myr within the ~ 27-Myr Grampian Orogeny. The Barrovian metamorphism records punctuated heating, was temporally and spatially associated with large-scale bimodal magmatism, and developed within crust that was not overthickened. The temporally distinct nature of the Barrovian metamorphic episode within the Grampian Orogeny, and its heating pattern and tectonic context, are not consistent with significant heat contribution from thermal equilibration of overthickened crust. Rather, the Barrovian metamorphism records a transient phase of crustal thermal disequilibrium during the Grampian Orogeny. Temporal and spatial association with Grampian bimodal magmatism is consistent with production of the Barrovian metamorphic series within the middle crust as the result of advection of heat from the lower crust and/or mantle. The Barrovian metamorphic series - the classic example of ‘orogenic regional metamorphism’ - did not form in response to crustal thickening and thermal relaxation, but appears to record large-scale contact metamorphism.

  3. Advanced variable speed air source integrated heat pump (AS-IHP) development - CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Van D.; Rice, C. Keith; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Ally, Moonis Raza; Shen, Bo

    2015-09-30

    Between August 2011 and September 2015, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Nordyne, LLC (now Nortek Global HVAC LLC, NGHVAC) engaged in a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop an air-source integrated heat pump (AS-IHP) system for the US residential market. Two generations of laboratory prototype systems were designed, fabricated, and lab-tested during 2011-2013. Performance maps for the system were developed using the latest research version of the DOE/ORNL Heat Pump Design Model, or HPDM, (Rice 1991; Rice and Jackson 2005; Shen et al 2012) as calibrated against the lab test data. These maps were the input to the TRNSYS (SOLAR Energy Laboratory, et al, 2010) system to predict annual performance relative to a baseline suite of equipment meeting minimum efficiency standards in effect in 2006 (combination of 13 SEER air-source heat pump (ASHP) and resistance water heater with Energy Factor (EF) of 0.9). Predicted total annual energy savings, while providing space conditioning and water heating for a tight, well insulated 2600 ft2 (242 m2) house at 5 U.S. locations, ranged from 46 to 61%, averaging 52%, relative to the baseline system (lowest savings at the cold-climate Chicago location). Predicted energy use for water heating was reduced 62 to 76% relative to resistance WH. Based on these lab prototype test and analyses results a field test prototype was designed and fabricated by NGHVAC. The unit was installed in a 2400 ft2 (223 m2) research house in Knoxville, TN and field tested from May 2014 to April 2015. Based on the demonstrated field performance of the AS-IHP prototype and estimated performance of a baseline system operating under the same loads and weather conditions, it was estimated that the prototype would achieve ~40% energy savings relative to the minimum efficiency suite. The estimated WH savings were >60% and SC mode savings were >50%. But estimated SH savings were only about 20%. It is believed that had the test

  4. The structural design of the experimental equipment for unconventional heating water using heat transfer surfaces located in the heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaduchová, K.; Lenhard, R.; Gavlas, S.; Jandačka, J.

    2013-04-01

    Flue gas temperature at throat of most industrially produced fireplaces is around 250 to 350 °C. It's quite interesting thermal potential, which can be even before sucking up the chimney back utilize. One of the potential uses of this device to heat the hot water. Article refers to the structural design of such a device, which works with the transfer of heat through a substance changes phase from liquid to steam in a sealed tube (heat pipe). Benefits of heat pipes is their light weight, the thermal effect of a rapid and low maintenance costs.

  5. Environmental and radiological-safety studies: interaction of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ heat sources with terrestrial and aquatic environments. Progress report, January 1-March 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Matlack, G.M.; Patterson, J.H.

    1982-06-01

    Although existing radioisotope thermoelectric generator designs have proved more than adequately safe, more information is continually sought about the heat sources to improve their safety. The work here includes studies of the effects on the heat sources of terrestrial and aquatic environments and also of the effects of the heat sources on various simulated environments. This progress report presents recent data from environmental chamber and aquatic experiments and gives the present status of the experiments.

  6. Practical demonstration of heat pumps for utilization of animal-generated heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amberg, H. U.

    1980-09-01

    Airconditioning of pigpens to eliminate effects of temperature extremes is reported. A stall air conditioner was installed as heat pump in a pigpen for final fattening. The heat, recovered from the exhaust air, is supplied to the outside air so that heated fresh air is blown into the stall. The test was accomplished on a farm with intensive pig breeding with 120 preliminary fattening places and 240 final fattening places. The stall air conditioner offers the possibility to attenuate the extreme temperature variations during the year.

  7. Particulate generation during disruption simulation on the SIRENS high heat flux facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, John Phillip

    2000-12-01

    Successful implementation of advanced electrical power generation technology into the global marketplace requires at least two fundamental ideals: cost effectiveness and the guarantee of public safety. One general area of concern for fusion devices is the production of particulate, often referred to as dust or aerosol, from material exposed to high energy density fusion plasma. This dust may be radiologically activated and/or chemically toxic, and, if released to the environment, could become a hazard to the public. The goal of this investigation was to provide insight into the production and transport of particulate generated during the event of extreme heat loads to surfaces directly exposed to high energy density plasma. A step towards achieving this goal was an experiment campaign carried out with the S&barbelow;urface I&barbelow;nteṞaction E&barbelow;xperiment at Ṉorth Carolina S&barbelow;tate (SIRENS), a facility used for high heat flux experiments. These experiments involved exposing various materials, including copper, stainless steel 316, tungsten, aluminum, graphite (carbon), and mixtures of carbon and metals, to the high energy density plasma of the SIRENS source section. Comparison of simulation results with experiment observations provides an understanding of the physical mechanisms forming the particulate and indicates if mechanisms other than those in the model were present in the experiment. Key results from this comparison were: the predicted amount of mass mobilized from the source section was generally much lower than that measured, the calculated and measured particle count median diameters were similar at various locations in the expansion chamber, and the measured standard deviations were larger than those predicted by the model. These results implicate that other mechanisms (e.g., mobilization of melted material) in addition to ablation were responsible for mass removal in the source section, a large number of the measured particles were

  8. EMISSIONS ASSESSMENT OF CONVENTIONAL STATIONARY SYSTEMS: VOLUME III. EXTERNAL COMBUSTION SOURCES FOR ELECTRICITY GENERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report characterizes multimedia emissions from external combustion sources for electricity generation. Study results indicate that external combustion sources for electricity generation contribute significantly to the nationwide emissions burden. Flue gas emissions of NOx, SO...

  9. Alternate energy source usage for in situ heat treatment processes

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Jr., Francis Marion; Goodwin, Charles R.; Richard, Jr., James

    2011-03-22

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one system for providing power to one or more subsurface heaters is described herein. The system may include an intermittent power source; a transformer coupled to the intermittent power source, and a tap controller coupled to the transformer. The transformer may be configured to transform power from the intermittent power source to power with appropriate operating parameters for the heaters. The tap controller may be configured to monitor and control the transformer so that a constant voltage is provided to the heaters from the transformer regardless of the load of the heaters and the power output provided by the intermittent power source.

  10. Pelletization and encapsulation of general purpose heat source (GPHS) fueled clads for future space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklay, Chadwick D.; Miller, Roger G.; Malikh, Y.; Kalinovsky, A.; Aldoshin, A.

    1996-03-01

    Mankind must continue to explore the universe in order to gain a better understanding of how we relate to it and how we can best use its resources to our benefit. Because of the significant costs of this type of exploration, it can more effectively be accomplished through an international team effort. This unified effort must include the design, planning, and execution phases of future space missions, extending down to such activities as the processing, pelletization, and encapsulation of the fuel that will be used to support the spacecraft electrical power generation systems. Over the last 30 years, radioisotopes have provided heat from which electrical power is generated. For space missions, the isotope of choice has generally been 238PuO2, its long half-life making it ideal for supplying power to remote satellites and spacecraft like the Voyager, Pioneer, and Viking missions, as well as the recently launched Galileo and Ulysses missions, and the presently planned Cassini mission. Electric power for future space missions will be provided by either radioisotopic thermoelectric generators (RTG), radioisotope thermophotovoltaic systems (RTPV), radioisotope Stirling systems or a combination of these. However, all of the aforementioned systems will be thermally driven by General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) fueled clads in some configuration. Each GPHS fueled clad contains a 150-gram pellet of 238PuO2, and each pellet is encapsulated within an iridium-alloy shell. Historically, the fabrication of the iridium-alloy shells has been performed at EG&G Mound, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the girth welding of the GPHS capsules has been performed at Westinghouse Savannah River Corporation, and Los Alamos National Laboratory. This paper describes a cost effective alternative method for the production of GPHS capsules. Fundamental considerations such as the potential production options, the associated support activities, and the methodology to transport the welded

  11. Heat-transfer characteristics of dry porous particulate beds with internal heat generation. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J. E.; Hitchcock, J. T.; Schwarz, M. L.

    1982-08-01

    A combined experimental and analytical program has been undertaken to study the thermal characteristics of dry debris beds especially at high temperatures where radiative heat transfer contributes. Experiments have been conducted in-pile using intrinsic fission heating of UO/sub 2/ to simulate decay heat power levels. Both pure UO/sub 2/ and mixed UO/sub 2//steel beds in a helium atmosphere have been studied. Temperatures as high as 3100 K have been attained. Theremocouples and ultrasonic thermometers have been used to measure the bed temperatures. Also recent post-test metallographic examinations have revealed useful information on the materials interactions which can be correlated to changes in the thermal behavior of the bed. In addition to the experiments, a number of porous medium thermal conductivity models have been evaluated. From these, two models representing upper and lower bounds for the conductivity, in conjunction with a two-dimensional heat transfer analysis have been compared to the data.

  12. National Certification Standard for Ground Source Heat Pump Personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, John

    2013-07-31

    The National Certification Standard for the Geothermal Heat Pump Industry adds to the understanding of the barriers to rapid growth of the geothermal heat pump (GHP) industry by bringing together for the first time an analysis of the roles and responsibilities of each of the individual job tasks involved in the design and installation of GHP systems. The standard addresses applicable qualifications for all primary personnel involved in the design, installation, commissioning, operation and maintenance of GHP systems, including their knowledge, skills and abilities. The resulting standard serves as a foundation for subsequent development of curriculum, training and certification programs, which are not included in the scope of this project, but are briefly addressed in the standard to describe ways in which the standard developed in this project may form a foundation to support further progress in accomplishing those other efforts. Follow-on efforts may use the standard developed in this project to improve the technical effectiveness and economic feasibility of curriculum development and training programs for GHP industry personnel, by providing a more complete and objective assessment of the individual job tasks necessary for successful implementation of GHP systems. When incorporated into future certification programs for GHP personnel, the standard will facilitate increased consumer confidence in GHP technology, reduce the potential for improperly installed GHP systems, and assure GHP system quality and performance, all of which benefit the public through improved energy efficiency and mitigated environmental impacts of the heating and cooling of homes and businesses.

  13. Source component mixing in the regions of arc magma generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arculus, Richard J.; Powell, Roger

    1986-05-01

    Most recent workers attribute the main features of island arc basalt geochemistry to variable contributions of at least two source components. The major source appears to be the peridotitic wedge of upper mantle overlying the subducted slab, but the nature of the second component and the processes by which the sources become mixed during genesis of arc magmas are in dispute. A metasomatic addition to the wedge resulting from devolatilization in the slab is the simplest explanation of the marked enrichment of the alkali and alkaline earth elements with respect to the rare earths in island arc basalts, together with the variably developed trends in Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopic data toward sedimentary contaminants. However, lack of the correlations between relative degrees of trace element fractionation and radiogenic isotopic ratios expected of such processes requires a more complex explanation. Alternative models that suggest that all of the characteristics of island arc basalts can be accounted for by melting of an intraoceanic, hot spot type of mantle source also face specific difficulties, particularly with regard to the strong depletions of trace high-field-strength elements in arc compared with hot spot magmas. A possible resolution of these specific geochemical difficulties may lie in dynamic transport processes within the wedge linked with the slab through coupled drag, and the marked depression of mantle isotherms in subduction zones. Inefficient escape of melts and subsequent repeated freezing within the overturning wedge can lead to local mineralogic and geochemical heterogeneity of the peridotite overlying the slab. Fluids released from the slab may infiltrate the heterogeneous wedge and preferentially scavenge the alkalis and alkaline earths with respect to the rare earths and high field strength elements from locally enriched portions of the wedge. Incorporation of such metasomatic fluids in renewed melting at shallower but hotter levels within the wedge can

  14. The numerical simulation of heat transfer during a hybrid laser-MIG welding using equivalent heat source approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendaoud, Issam; Matteï, Simone; Cicala, Eugen; Tomashchuk, Iryna; Andrzejewski, Henri; Sallamand, Pierre; Mathieu, Alexandre; Bouchaud, Fréderic

    2014-03-01

    The present study is dedicated to the numerical simulation of an industrial case of hybrid laser-MIG welding of high thickness duplex steel UR2507Cu with Y-shaped chamfer geometry. It consists in simulation of heat transfer phenomena using heat equivalent source approach and implementing in finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics. A numerical exploratory designs method is used to identify the heat sources parameters in order to obtain a minimal required difference between the numerical results and the experiment which are the shape of the welded zone and the temperature evolution in different locations. The obtained results were found in good correspondence with experiment, both for melted zone shape and thermal history.

  15. Heat flow and brine generation following the Chesapeake Bay bolide impact

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, W.

    2003-01-01

    Calculations indicate that the impact of an asteroid or comet on the Atlantic Coastal Plain 35 million years ago created subsequent hydrothermal activity and conditions suitable for phase separation and the creation of the brine observed in the groundwater at the site today. A calculation of groundwater velocity using Darcy's law suggests flow rates are insufficient to have moved the water out of the crater within 35 million years. A similar calculation using Pick's law demonstrates that solutes cannot have escaped by molecular diffusion since the impact. Simulations from other investigators using shock-physics codes indicate that the crust would have been vaporized or melted down to at least 2 km at the time of impact. Based on these calculations, a simulation of heat conduction was made assuming a 1000 ??C initial crustal temperature. The hot crust acted as a heat source, with temperatures peaking in the overlying sediment about 10,000 years later. The pressure and temperature conditions within the sediment during that time would have been favorable for phase separation and generation of a residual brine, which may be found today in the inner crater. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Arc plasma generator of atomic driver for steady-state negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A A; Belchenko, Yu I; Davydenko, V I; Ivanov, I A; Kolmogorov, V V; Listopad, A A; Mishagin, V V; Putvinsky, S V; Shulzhenko, G I; Smirnov, A

    2014-02-01

    The paper reviews the results of development of steady-state arc-discharge plasma generator with directly heated LaB6 cathode. This arc-discharge plasma generator produces a plasma jet which is to be converted into an atomic one after recombination on a metallic plate. The plate is electrically biased relative to the plasma in order to control the atom energies. Such an intensive jet of hydrogen atoms can be used in negative ion sources for effective production of negative ions on a cesiated surface of plasma grid. All elements of the plasma generator have an augmented water cooling to operate in long pulse mode or in steady state. The thermo-mechanical stresses and deformations of the most critical elements of the plasma generator were determined by simulations. Magnetic field inside the discharge chamber was optimized to reduce the local power loads. The first tests of the steady-state arc plasma generator prototype have performed in long-pulse mode. PMID:24593569

  17. Arc plasma generator of atomic driver for steady-state negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. A.; Belchenko, Yu. I.; Davydenko, V. I.; Ivanov, I. A.; Kolmogorov, V. V.; Listopad, A. A. Mishagin, V. V.; Shulzhenko, G. I.; Putvinsky, S. V.; Smirnov, A.

    2014-02-15

    The paper reviews the results of development of steady-state arc-discharge plasma generator with directly heated LaB{sub 6} cathode. This arc-discharge plasma generator produces a plasma jet which is to be converted into an atomic one after recombination on a metallic plate. The plate is electrically biased relative to the plasma in order to control the atom energies. Such an intensive jet of hydrogen atoms can be used in negative ion sources for effective production of negative ions on a cesiated surface of plasma grid. All elements of the plasma generator have an augmented water cooling to operate in long pulse mode or in steady state. The thermo-mechanical stresses and deformations of the most critical elements of the plasma generator were determined by simulations. Magnetic field inside the discharge chamber was optimized to reduce the local power loads. The first tests of the steady-state arc plasma generator prototype have performed in long-pulse mode.

  18. An amplitude and phase control system for the TFTR rf heating sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cutsogeorge, G.

    1989-04-01

    Feedback loops that control the amplitude and phase of the rf heating sources on TFTR are described. The method for providing arc protection is also discussed. Block diagrams and Bode plots are included. 6 figs.

  19. Impact of various operating modes on performance and emission parameters of small heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vician, Peter; Holubčík, Michal; Palacka, Matej; Jandačka, Jozef

    2016-06-01

    Thesis deals with the measurement of performance and emission parameters of small heat source for combustion of biomass in each of its operating modes. As the heat source was used pellet boiler with an output of 18 kW. The work includes design of experimental device for measuring the impact of changes in air supply and method for controlling the power and emission parameters of heat sources for combustion of woody biomass. The work describes the main factors that affect the combustion process and analyze the measurements of emissions at the heat source. The results of experiment demonstrate the values of performance and emissions parameters for the different operating modes of the boiler, which serve as a decisive factor in choosing the appropriate mode.

  20. GEO3D - Three-Dimensional Computer Model of a Ground Source Heat Pump System

    SciTech Connect

    James Menart

    2013-06-07

    This file is the setup file for the computer program GEO3D. GEO3D is a computer program written by Jim Menart to simulate vertical wells in conjunction with a heat pump for ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems. This is a very detailed three-dimensional computer model. This program produces detailed heat transfer and temperature field information for a vertical GSHP system.

  1. Energy recovery during expansion of compressed gas using power plant low-quality heat sources

    DOEpatents

    Ochs, Thomas L.; O'Connor, William K.

    2006-03-07

    A method of recovering energy from a cool compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid is disclosed which includes incrementally expanding the compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid through a plurality of expansion engines and heating the gas, vapor, compressed liquid, or supercritical fluid entering at least one of the expansion engines with a low quality heat source. Expansion engines such as turbines and multiple expansions with heating are disclosed.

  2. Whole planet cooling and the radiogenic heat source contents of the earth and moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, G.; Stevenson, D. J.; Cassen, P.

    1980-05-01

    Thermal evolution models based on subsolidus whole mantle convection which indicate that the surface heat flows of the earth and the moon do not necessarily provide good measures of the total amounts of radioactives in these bodies have been constructed. These models assume an initially hot state, but with a wide variety of choices for the parameters characterizing the rheology and convective vigor. All models are constrained to be consistent with present-day surface heat fluxes, and many of the terrestrial models are consistent with the mantle viscosities indicated by postglacial rebound. In the lunar models, heat generation is typically only 70-80% of the surface heat flow, even with allowance for the strong near-surface enhancement of radioactives. Despite the simplicity of these models, the persistence of a significant difference between heat generation and heat output indicates that this difference is real and should be incorporated in geochemical modeling of planets.

  3. Physics of heat generation using magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Cindi L; Ivkov, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia and thermal ablation have been actively studied experimentally and theoretically. In this review, we provide a summary of the literature describing the properties of nanometer-scale magnetic materials suspended in biocompatible fluids and their interactions with external magnetic fields. Summarised are the properties and mechanisms understood to be responsible for magnetic heating, and the models developed to understand the behaviour of single-domain magnets exposed to alternating magnetic fields. Linear response theory and its assumptions have provided a useful beginning point; however, its limitations are apparent when nanoparticle heating is measured over a wide range of magnetic fields. Well-developed models (e.g. for magnetisation reversal mechanisms and pseudo-single domain formation) available from other fields of research are explored. Some of the methods described include effects of moment relaxation, anisotropy, nanoparticle and moment rotation mechanisms, interactions and collective behaviour, which have been experimentally identified to be important. Here, we will discuss the implicit assumptions underlying these analytical models and their relevance to experiments. Numerical simulations will be discussed as an alternative to these simple analytical models, including their applicability to experimental data. Finally, guidelines for the design of optimal magnetic nanoparticles will be presented. PMID:24131317

  4. Interactions of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ heat sources with terrestrial and aquatic environments. Interim summary

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.H.; Steinkruger, F.J.; Matlack, G.M.

    1980-09-01

    Observations and some conclusions made of the interactions of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ heat sources with terrestrial and aquatic environments may be used in predicting heat source behavior in the event of contact of these heat sources with land or ocean and in assessing the risk to the environment. These studies indicate that plutonium transport from the heat sources is mostly a physical process involving the movement of extremely fine particles rather than the chemical migration of plutonium ions.

  5. Numerical analysis of the heat source characteristics of a two-electrode TIG arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, Y.; Hirata, Y.; Nomura, K.

    2011-06-01

    Various kinds of multi-electrode welding processes are used to ensure high productivity in industrial fields such as shipbuilding, automotive manufacturing and pipe fabrication. However, it is difficult to obtain the optimum welding conditions for a specific product, because there are many operating parameters, and because welding phenomena are very complicated. In the present research, the heat source characteristics of a two-electrode TIG arc were numerically investigated using a 3D arc plasma model with a focus on the distance between the two electrodes. The arc plasma shape changed significantly, depending on the electrode spacing. The heat source characteristics, such as the heat input density and the arc pressure distribution, changed significantly when the electrode separation was varied. The maximum arc pressure of the two-electrode TIG arc was much lower than that of a single-electrode TIG. However, the total heat input of the two-electrode TIG arc was nearly constant and was independent of the electrode spacing. These heat source characteristics of the two-electrode TIG arc are useful for controlling the heat input distribution at a low arc pressure. Therefore, these results indicate the possibility of a heat source based on a two-electrode TIG arc that is capable of high heat input at low pressures.

  6. Technology Solutions Case Study: Ground Source Heat Pump Research, TaC Studios Residence, Atlanta, Georigia

    SciTech Connect

    2014-09-01

    This case study describes the construction of a new test home that demonstrates current best practices for the mixed-humid climate, including a high performance ground source heat pump for heating and cooling, a building envelope featuring advanced air sealing details and low-density spray foam insulation, and glazing that exceeds ENERGY STAR requirements.

  7. Foundation heat exchangers for residential ground source heat pump systems Numerical modeling and experimental validation

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Lu; Cullin, James; Spitler, Jeffery; Im, Piljae; Fisher, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    A new type of ground heat exchanger that utilizes the excavation often made for basements or foundations has been proposed as an alternative to conventional ground heat exchangers. This article describes a numerical model that can be used to size these foundation heat exchanger (FHX) systems. The numerical model is a two-dimensional finite-volume model that considers a wide variety of factors, such as soil freezing and evapotranspiration. The FHX numerical model is validated with one year of experimental data collected at an experimental house located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The model shows good agreement with the experimental data-heat pump entering fluid temperatures typically within 1 C (1.8 F) - with minor discrepancies due to approximations, such as constant moisture content throughout the year, uniform evapotranspiration over the seasons, and lack of ground shading in the model.

  8. Stability analysis of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a cylinder with internal heat generation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo-Fu; Zhou, Lin; Wan, Zhen-Hua; Ma, Dong-Jun; Sun, De-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The flow instabilities of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a cylinder with effect of uniform internal heat source are investigated numerically. The instabilities of the static state and of axisymmetric flows are investigated by linear stability analysis. The convection threshold depends on the strength of internal heat source q and the aspect ratio of the cylinder Γ. The stability of axisymmetric flows is strongly affected by these two parameters, as well as the Prandtl number Pr. Depending on the value of q, three regimes are identified: weak internal heating, moderate internal heating, and strong internal heating regime. In a weak internal heating regime, the instability characteristics are similar to Rayleigh-Bénard convection. In a moderate internal heating regime, intense interaction of buoyancy instability and hydrodynamic instability result in complex instability curves. When q is large enough, the internal heating effect overwhelms the boundary heating effect. Specifically, the influence of Pr on instability is studied at a moderate internal heat strength q=6.4. An extremely multivalued stability curve is observed. At most five critical Rayleigh numbers can be determined for the axisymmetry-breaking instability at a certain Prandtl number. An axisymmetric unsteady instability mode is observed as well. By nonlinear simulation, the oscillatory flow patterns are obtained, and the axisymmetry-breaking bifurcation of the unsteady toroidal flow is studied. PMID:27575218

  9. Stability analysis of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a cylinder with internal heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo-Fu; Zhou, Lin; Wan, Zhen-Hua; Ma, Dong-Jun; Sun, De-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The flow instabilities of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a cylinder with effect of uniform internal heat source are investigated numerically. The instabilities of the static state and of axisymmetric flows are investigated by linear stability analysis. The convection threshold depends on the strength of internal heat source q and the aspect ratio of the cylinder Γ . The stability of axisymmetric flows is strongly affected by these two parameters, as well as the Prandtl number Pr. Depending on the value of q , three regimes are identified: weak internal heating, moderate internal heating, and strong internal heating regime. In a weak internal heating regime, the instability characteristics are similar to Rayleigh-Bénard convection. In a moderate internal heating regime, intense interaction of buoyancy instability and hydrodynamic instability result in complex instability curves. When q is large enough, the internal heating effect overwhelms the boundary heating effect. Specifically, the influence of Pr on instability is studied at a moderate internal heat strength q =6.4 . An extremely multivalued stability curve is observed. At most five critical Rayleigh numbers can be determined for the axisymmetry-breaking instability at a certain Prandtl number. An axisymmetric unsteady instability mode is observed as well. By nonlinear simulation, the oscillatory flow patterns are obtained, and the axisymmetry-breaking bifurcation of the unsteady toroidal flow is studied.

  10. Multiscale modeling of electron beam and substrate interaction: a new heat source model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wentao; Smith, Jacob; Ge, Wenjun; Lin, Feng; Liu, Wing Kam

    2015-08-01

    An electron beam is a widely applied processing tool in welding and additive manufacturing applications. The heat source model of the electron beam acts as the basis of thermal simulations and predictions of the micro-structures and mechanical properties of the final products. While traditional volumetric and surface heat flux models were developed previously based on the observed shape of the molten pool produced by the beam, a new heat source model with a physically informed foundation has been established in this work. The new model was developed based on Monte Carlo simulations performed to obtain the distribution of absorbed energy through electron-atom collisions for an electron beam with a kinetic energy of 60 keV hitting a Ti-6Al-4V substrate. Thermal simulations of a moving electron beam heating a solid baseboard were conducted to compare the differences between the new heat source model, the traditional surface flux model and the volumetric flux model. Although the molten pool shapes with the three selected models were found to be similar, the predicted peak temperatures were noticeably different, which will influence the evaporation, recoil pressure and molten pool dynamics. The new heat source model was also used to investigate the influence of a static electron beam on a substrate. This investigation indicated that the new heat source model could scientifically explain phenomena that the surface and volumetric models cannot, such as eruption and explosion during electron beam processing.

  11. Numerical Prediction of Performance of Water Type Stirling Engine Considering Heat Exchange with Heat Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Higuchi, Tetsuya

    Two different analytical models were developed on water type Stirling engine. One is the resonance model which qualitatively clarifies the relationship between performance and resonance tube length, and the other is the heat transfer model considering heat transfer between working gas and the tube walls of heating and cooling units. These analyses and experiments were carried out changing the resonance tube length variously, then it was confirmed that the resonance tube length which maximizes the water column amplitude of the power piston agrees well and the oscillations of water columns at that resonance tube length also agrees. In addition, a series of analysis using the heat transfer model was carried out with changing cross sectional area of the resonance tube, loss factors of the elbows, heat transfer area of heating and cooling unit, and pressure of working gas. By this numerical investigation, the effect on the resonance tube length and the work at the length in which these parameters maximize the amplitude of power piston water column was clarified.

  12. Micro/Nano Fabricated Solid-State Thermoelectric Generator Devices for Integrated High Voltage Power Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleurial, J.-P.; Ryan, M. A.; Snyder, G. J.; Huang, C.-K.; Whitacre, J. F.; Patel, J.; Lim, J.; Borshchevsky, A.

    2002-01-01

    Deep space missions have a strong need for compact, high power density, reliable and long life electrical power generation and storage under extreme temperature conditions. Except for electrochemical batteries and solar cells, there are currently no available miniaturized power sources. Conventional power generators devices become inefficient in extreme environments (such as encountered in Mars, Venus or outer planet missions) and rechargeable energy storage devices can only be operated in a narrow temperature range thereby limiting mission duration. The planned development of much smaller spacecrafts incorporating a variety of micro/nanodevices and miniature vehicles will require novel, reliable power technologies. It is also expected that such micro power sources could have a wide range of terrestrial applications, in particular when the limited lifetime and environmental limitations of batteries are key factors. Advanced solid-state thermoelectric combined with radioisotope or waste heat sources and low profile energy storage devices are ideally suited for these applications. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been actively pursuing the development of thermoelectric micro/nanodevices that can be fabricated using a combination of electrochemical deposition and integrated circuit processing techniques. Some of the technical challenges associated with these micro/nanodevice concepts, their expected level of performance and experimental fabrication and testing results to date are presented and discussed.

  13. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trap

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Savkin, K. P.; Oks, E. M.; Vizir, A. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Vodopyanov, A. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.

    2012-02-15

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent ''minimum-B'' structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap - axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 {mu}s) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams.

  14. Solar Jets as Sources of Outflows, Heating and Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizuka, N.

    2013-05-01

    Recent space solar observations of the Sun, such as Hinode and SDO, have revealed that magnetic reconnection is ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere, ranging from small scale reconnection (observed as nanoflares) to large scale one (observed as long duration flares or giant arcades). Especially recent Hinode observations has found various types of tiny chromospheric jets, such as chromospheric anemone jets, penumbral microjets and light bridge jets from sunspot umbra. It was also found that the corona is full of tiny X-ray jets. Often they are seen as helical spinning jets with Alfvenic waves in the corona. Sometimes they are seen as chromospheric jets with slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves and sometimes as unresolved jet-like events at the footpoint of recurrent outflows and waves at the edge of the active region. There is increasing evidence of magnetic reconnection in these tiny jets and its association with waves. The origin of outflows and waves is one of the issues concerning coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. To answer this question, we had a challenge to reproduce solar jets with laboratory plasma experiment and directly measured outflows and waves. As a result, we could find a propagating wave excited by magnetic reconnection, whose energy flux is 10% of the released magnetic energy. That is enough for solar wind acceleration and locally enough for coronal heating, consistent with numerical MHD simulations of solar jets. Here we would discuss recent observations with Hinode, theories and experimental results related to jets and waves by magnetic reconnection, and discuss possible implication to reconnection physics, coronal heating and solar wind acceleration.

  15. Production of general purpose heat source (GPHS) using advanced manufacturing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Roger G.

    1996-03-01

    Mankind will continue to explore the stars through the use of unmanned space craft until the technology and costs are compatible with sending travelers to the outer planets of our solar system and beyond. Unmanned probes of the present and future will be necessary to develop the necessary technologies and obtain information that will make this travel possible. Because of the significant costs incurred, the use of modern manufacturing technologies must be used to lower the investment needed even when shared by international partnerships. For over the last 30 years, radioisotopes have provided the heat from which electrical power is extracted. Electric power for future spacecraft will be provided by either Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG), Radioisotopic Thermophotovoltaic systems (RTPV), radioisotope Stirling systems, or a combination of these. All of these systems will be thermally driven by General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) fueled clad in some configuration. The GPHS clad contains a 238PuO2 pellet encapsulated in an iridium alloy container. Historically, the fabrication of the iridium alloy shells has been performed at EG&G Mound and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and girth welding at Westinghouse Savannah River Corporation (WSRC) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This paper will describe the use of laser processing for welding, drilling, cutting, and machining with other manufacturing methods to reduce the costs of producing GPHS fueled clad components and compléted assemblies. Incorporation of new quality technologies will compliment these manufacturing methods to reduce cost.

  16. Heat generation by electronic current in a quantum dot spin-valve

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Feng; Sun, Lian-Liang; Guo, Yu

    2014-10-28

    Electric-current-induced heat generation in an interacting single-level quantum dot connected to ferromagnetic leads with noncollinear magnetizations is theoretically investigated. We find that when the two leads' spin polarization rates are identical and much smaller than unit, the magnitude of the heat generation is almost monotonously enhanced as the angle between the leads' magnetic moments is varied from zero to π, while the magnitude of the electric current is continuously suppressed. Moreover, the properties of the heat generation depend on the lead's spin polarization rate in different ways when the angle is varied. If at least one of the leads' spin polarization rate approaches to unit, the spin-valve effect of the heat generation is identical to that of the electric current. Now the previously found negative differential of the heat generation disappears when the angle approaches to π. As compared to the current, the heat generation is more sensitive to the system's asymmetry when one of the electrodes is half-metallic in noncollinear configurations.

  17. Paleo-heat flows, radioactive heat generation, and the cooling and deformation history of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Javier; López, Valle; Egea-González, Isabel

    2013-07-01

    Estimates of lithospheric strength for Mercury, based on the depth of thrust faults associated with large lobate scarps (which were most probably formed previously to ˜3 Ga) or on the effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere supporting a broad rise in the northern smooth plains (whose formation is poorly constrained, but posterior to 3.8 Ga), serve as a basis for the calculation of paleo-heat flows, referred to the time when these structures were formed. The so-obtained paleo-heat flows can give information on the Urey ratio (Ur), the ratio between the total radioactive heat production and the total surface heat loss. By imposing the condition Ur < 1 (corresponding to a cooling Mercury, consistent with the observed widespread contraction), we obtain an upper limit of 0.4 times the average surface value for the abundance of heat-producing elements in the outer solid shell of Mercury. We also find that if the formation of the northern rise occurred in a time posterior to ˜3 Ga, then in that time the Urey ratio was lower, and the cooling more intense, than when most of large lobate scarps were formed. Thus, because largest lobate scarps deform older terrains (suggesting more intense contraction early in the mercurian history), we conclude that the northern rise was formed previously to 3 Ga. If the age of other smooth plains large wavelength deformations is similar, then tectonic activity in Mercury would have been limited in the last 3 billion of years.

  18. Heat and mass transfer in a steam-generating tube

    SciTech Connect

    Doroshchuk, V.Y.

    1990-01-01

    Reliable data on the distribution of phases of steam-water flow in a channel cross-section, on steam and water velocities, and on void fractions are almost non-existent. This paper reports that by assuming that u{sub 1}/u{sub 3} = square root {rho}{prime}/{rho}{prime}{prime} (where u{sub 1} and u{sub 3} are the velocities of steam in the flow core and of a liquid film near a wall, {rho}{prime}{prime} and {rho}{prime} are the densities of corresponding phases) and by using the limiting void fractions x{sup o}{sub lim}, the above-mentioned flow parameters can be determined analytically for the instant of onset of a heat transfer crisis of the second kind.

  19. Investigation of runoff generation from anthropogenic sources with dissolved xenobiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krein, A.; Pailler, J.; Guignard, C.; Iffly, J.; Pfister, L.; Hoffmann, L.

    2009-04-01

    In the experimental Mess basin (35 km2, Luxembourg) dissolved xenobiotics in surface water are used to study the influences of anthropogenic sources like separated sewer systems on runoff generation. Emerging contaminants like pharmaceuticals are of growing interest because of their use in large quantities in human and veterinary medicine. The amounts reaching surface waters depend on rainfall patterns, hydraulic conditions, consumption, metabolism, degradation, and disposal. The behaviour of endocrine disruptors including pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment is widely unknown. The twelve molecules analyzed belong to three families: the estrogens, the antibiotics (sulfonamides, tetracyclines), and the painkillers (ibuprofen, diclofenac). Xenobiotics can be used as potential environmental tracers for untreated sewerage. Our results show that the concentrations are highly variable during flood events. The highest concentrations are reached in the first flush period, mainly during the rising limb of the flood hydrographs. As a result of the kinematic wave effect the concentration peak occurs in some cases a few hours after the discharge maximum. In floodwater (eleven floods, 66 samples) the highest concentrations were measured for ibuprofen (g/l range), estrone, and diclofenac (all ng/l range). From the tetracycline group, essentially tetracycline itself is of relevance, while the sulfonamides are mainly represented by sulfamethoxazole (all in ng/l range). In the Mess River the pharmaceuticals fluxes during flood events proved to be influenced by hydrological conditions. Different pharmaceuticals showed their concentration peaks during different times of a flood event. An example is the estrone peak that - during summer flash floods - often occurred one to two hours prior to the largest concentrations of the painkillers. This suggests for more sources than the sole storm drainage through the spillway of the single sewage water treatment plant, different

  20. Natural convective heat and mass transfer in a porous triangular enclosure filled with nanofluid in presence of heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Raju; Parvin, Salma; Khan, Md. Abdul Hakim

    2016-07-01

    The problem of natural convective heat and mass transfer in a triangular enclosure filled with nanofluid saturated porous medium in presence of heat generation has been studied in this paper. The bottom wall of the cavity is heated uniformly, the left inclined wall is heated linearly and the right inclined wall is considered to be cold. The concentration is higher at bottom wall, lower at right inclined wall and linearly concentrated at left inclined wall of the cavity. The governing equations are transformed to the dimensionless form and solved numerically using Galerkin weighted residual technique of finite element method. The results are obtained in terms of streamline, isotherms, isoconcentrations, Nusselt number (Nu) and Sherwood number (Sh) for the parameters thermal Rayleigh number (RaT), Heat generation parameter (λ) and Lewis number (Le) while Prandtl number (Pr), Buoyancy ratio (N) and Darcy number (Da) are considered to be fixed. It is observed that flow pattern, temperature fields and concentration fields are affected by the variation of above considered parameters.