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Sample records for generic core scales

  1. Psychometric properties of the self-report Malay version of the Pediatric Quality of Life (PedsQLTM) 4.0 Generic Core Scales among multiethnic Malaysian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ainuddin, Husna A; Loh, Siew Yim; Chinna, Karuthan; Low, Wah Yun; Roslani, April Camilla

    2015-06-01

    Adolescence is the potential period for growth and optimal functioning, but developmental issues like time of transition from childhood to adulthood will create stress and affect the adolescent's quality of life (QOL). However, there is a lack of research tool for measuring adolescent's QOL in Malaysia. The aim of the study was to determine the validity and reliability of the self-report Malay version of the pediatric QOL (PedsQL™) 4.0 Generic Core Scales in assessing the QOL of Malaysian adolescents. A cross-sectional study design using the 23-item self-report Malay version of the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales was administered on a convenient cluster sampling (n = 297 adolescent) from a secondary school. The internal consistency reliability had Cronbach's α values ranging from .70 to .89. Factor analysis reported a six-factor structure via principal axis factor analysis. In conclusion, the self-report Malay version of the pediatric QOL 4.0 Generic Core Scales is a reliable and valid tool to measure the QOL of multiethnic Malaysian adolescents. PMID:24154841

  2. Health related quality of life in Dutch young adults: psychometric properties of the PedsQL generic core scales young adult version

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to provide Dutch norm data and to assess internal consistency and construct validity for the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Young Adult Generic Core Scales (PedsQL_YA) in Dutch young adults aged 18–30 years. Methods A sample of 649 young adults from the general Dutch population aged 18–30 years, stratified by age, sex, marital status and education, completed a socio-demographic questionnaire and the Dutch version of the PedsQL_YA online. Internal consistency of the PedsQL_YA scales was determined with Cronbach’s alphas. Norm scores were obtained by calculating the mean PedsQL scale scores by gender, age and health status. Differences in scale scores were analyzed for gender, age and health status (construct validity) using two-sample t-tests and effect sizes were calculated. Construct validity was determined by testing differences in PedsQL scores between healthy young adults and young adults with chronic health conditions. Results All scales of the PedsQL_YA showed satisfactory to excellent internal consistency, with Cronbach’s alphas between .77 and .94. Men reported higher scores (indicating better HRQOL) than women on all scales (p < .01), except for school/work functioning. No age differences were found. Young adults with chronic health conditions scored lower on all scales (p < .001) than healthy young adults, indicating good construct validity. Effect sizes varied from medium to large. Conclusions The Dutch version of the PedsQL_YA has adequate psychometric properties. With the availability of reliable norm data, the PedsQL_YA can be used as a tool in the evaluation of health related quality of life in healthy young adults and those with a chronic health condition. PMID:24438218

  3. Assessing lay beliefs about generic medicines: Development of the generic medicines scale.

    PubMed

    Figueiras, Maria J; Alves, Nuno C; Marcelino, Dália; Cortes, Maria A; Weinman, John; Horne, Rob

    2009-05-01

    The aims of this study were to develop a scale to assess lay beliefs about generic medicines, and to investigate whether these beliefs differ according to demographic factors in an opportunistic general public sample. In the pilot study, the participants were 92 men and 136 women, and in the main study there were 314 men and 505 women. At both stages, the participants completed a questionnaire measuring beliefs about generic medicines, preference for medicines and demographic information. The scale has good face validity, showing a satisfactory level of internal consistency. An exploratory principal component analysis revealed a two-factor structure concerning beliefs about generic medicines, comprising two core themes (efficacy and similarity to brand medicines), in two different samples. Older participants showed a stronger belief in similarity with brand names than the younger group. Higher educated participants showed a stronger belief in the efficacy of generics. The opportunity to assess beliefs about generic medicines may have implications for adherence, for the implementation of health policies and for decision making about medicines. PMID:19444709

  4. Impaired health-related quality of life in children and adolescents with chronic conditions: a comparative analysis of 10 disease clusters and 33 disease categories/severities utilizing the PedsQL™ 4.0 Generic Core Scales

    PubMed Central

    Varni, James W; Limbers, Christine A; Burwinkle, Tasha M

    2007-01-01

    Background Advances in biomedical science and technology have resulted in dramatic improvements in the healthcare of pediatric chronic conditions. With enhanced survival, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) issues have become more salient. The objectives of this study were to compare generic HRQOL across ten chronic disease clusters and 33 disease categories/severities from the perspectives of patients and parents. Comparisons were also benchmarked with healthy children data. Methods The analyses were based on over 2,500 pediatric patients from 10 physician-diagnosed disease clusters and 33 disease categories/severities and over 9,500 healthy children utilizing the PedsQL™ 4.0 Generic Core Scales. Patients were recruited from general pediatric clinics, subspecialty clinics, and hospitals. Results Pediatric patients with diabetes, gastrointestinal conditions, cardiac conditions, asthma, obesity, end stage renal disease, psychiatric disorders, cancer, rheumatologic conditions, and cerebral palsy self-reported progressively more impaired overall HRQOL than healthy children, respectively, with medium to large effect sizes. Patients with cerebral palsy self-reported the most impaired HRQOL, while patients with diabetes self-reported the best HRQOL. Parent proxy-reports generally paralleled patient self-report, with several notable differences. Conclusion The results demonstrate differential effects of pediatric chronic conditions on patient HRQOL across diseases clusters, categories, and severities utilizing the PedsQL™ 4.0 Generic Core Scales from the perspectives of pediatric patients and parents. The data contained within this study represents a larger and more diverse population of pediatric patients with chronic conditions than previously reported in the extant literature. The findings contribute important information on the differential effects of pediatric chronic conditions on generic HRQOL from the perspectives of children and parents utilizing the Peds

  5. Comparison between Utility of the Thai Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 Generic Core Scales and 3.0 Cerebral Palsy Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tantilipikorn, Pinailug; Watter, Pauline; Prasertsukdee, Saipin

    2013-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is increasingly being considered in the management of patients with various conditions. HRQOL instruments can be broadly classified as generic or disease-specific measures. Several generic HRQOL instruments in different languages have been developed for paediatric populations including the Pediatric Quality…

  6. Health-related quality of life in young adult patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Iran: reliability and validity of the Persian translation of the PedsQL™ 4.0 Generic Core Scales Young Adult Version.

    PubMed

    Pakpour, Amir H; Zeidi, Isa Mohammadi; Hashemi, Fariba; Saffari, Mohsen; Burri, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the reliability and validity of the Persian translation of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL™) 4.0 Generic Core Scales Young Adult Version in an Iranian sample of young adult patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). One hundred ninety-seven young adult patients with RA completed the 23-item PedsQL™ and the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Disease activity based on Disease Activity Score 28 was also measured. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability, as well as construct, discriminant, and convergent validity, were tested. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to verify the original factor structure of the PedsQL™. Also, responsiveness to change in PedsQL™ scores over time was assessed. Cronbach's alpha coefficients ranged from α = 0.82 to α = 0.91. Test-retest reproducibility was satisfactory for all scales and the total scale score. The PedsQL proved good convergent validity with the SF-36. The PedsQL distinguished well between young adult patients and healthy young adults and also RA groups with different comorbidities. The CFA did not confirm the original four-factor model, instead, analyses revealed a best-fitting five-factor model for the PedsQL™ Young Adult Version. Repeated measures analysis of variance indicated that the PedsQL scale scores for young adults increased significantly over time. The Persian translation of the PedsQL™ 4.0 Generic Core Scales Young Adult Version demonstrated good psychometric properties in young adult patients with RA and can be recommended for the use in RA research in Iran. PMID:22965776

  7. Initial validation of the Argentinean Spanish version of the PedsQL™ 4.0 Generic Core Scales in children and adolescents with chronic diseases: acceptability and comprehensibility in low-income settings

    PubMed Central

    Roizen, Mariana; Rodríguez, Susana; Bauer, Gabriela; Medin, Gabriela; Bevilacqua, Silvina; Varni, James W; Dussel, Veronica

    2008-01-01

    Background To validate the Argentinean Spanish version of the PedsQL™ 4.0 Generic Core Scales in Argentinean children and adolescents with chronic conditions and to assess the impact of socio-demographic characteristics on the instrument's comprehensibility and acceptability. Reliability, and known-groups, and convergent validity were tested. Methods Consecutive sample of 287 children with chronic conditions and 105 healthy children, ages 2–18, and their parents. Chronically ill children were: (1) attending outpatient clinics and (2) had one of the following diagnoses: stem cell transplant, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, HIV/AIDS, cancer, end stage renal disease, complex congenital cardiopathy. Patients and adult proxies completed the PedsQL™ 4.0 and an overall health status assessment. Physicians were asked to rate degree of health status impairment. Results The PedsQL™ 4.0 was feasible (only 9 children, all 5 to 7 year-olds, could not complete the instrument), easy to administer, completed without, or with minimal, help by most children and parents, and required a brief administration time (average 5–6 minutes). People living below the poverty line and/or low literacy needed more help to complete the instrument. Cronbach Alpha's internal consistency values for the total and subscale scores exceeded 0.70 for self-reports of children over 8 years-old and parent-reports of children over 5 years of age. Reliability of proxy-reports of 2–4 year-olds was low but improved when school items were excluded. Internal consistency for 5–7 year-olds was low (α range = 0.28–0.76). Construct validity was good. Child self-report and parent proxy-report PedsQL™ 4.0 scores were moderately but significantly correlated (ρ = 0.39, p < 0.0001) and both significantly correlated with physician's assessment of health impairment and with child self-reported overall health status. The PedsQL™ 4.0 discriminated between healthy and chronically ill children (72

  8. Measuring belief in conspiracy theories: the generic conspiracist beliefs scale.

    PubMed

    Brotherton, Robert; French, Christopher C; Pickering, Alan D

    2013-01-01

    The psychology of conspiracy theory beliefs is not yet well understood, although research indicates that there are stable individual differences in conspiracist ideation - individuals' general tendency to engage with conspiracy theories. Researchers have created several short self-report measures of conspiracist ideation. These measures largely consist of items referring to an assortment of prominent conspiracy theories regarding specific real-world events. However, these instruments have not been psychometrically validated, and this assessment approach suffers from practical and theoretical limitations. Therefore, we present the Generic Conspiracist Beliefs (GCB) scale: a novel measure of individual differences in generic conspiracist ideation. The scale was developed and validated across four studies. In Study 1, exploratory factor analysis of a novel 75-item measure of non-event-based conspiracist beliefs identified five conspiracist facets. The 15-item GCB scale was developed to sample from each of these themes. Studies 2, 3, and 4 examined the structure and validity of the GCB, demonstrating internal reliability, content, criterion-related, convergent and discriminant validity, and good test-retest reliability. In sum, this research indicates that the GCB is a psychometrically sound and practically useful measure of conspiracist ideation, and the findings add to our theoretical understanding of conspiracist ideation as a monological belief system unpinned by a relatively small number of generic assumptions about the typicality of conspiratorial activity in the world. PMID:23734136

  9. Measuring Belief in Conspiracy Theories: The Generic Conspiracist Beliefs Scale

    PubMed Central

    Brotherton, Robert; French, Christopher C.; Pickering, Alan D.

    2013-01-01

    The psychology of conspiracy theory beliefs is not yet well understood, although research indicates that there are stable individual differences in conspiracist ideation – individuals’ general tendency to engage with conspiracy theories. Researchers have created several short self-report measures of conspiracist ideation. These measures largely consist of items referring to an assortment of prominent conspiracy theories regarding specific real-world events. However, these instruments have not been psychometrically validated, and this assessment approach suffers from practical and theoretical limitations. Therefore, we present the Generic Conspiracist Beliefs (GCB) scale: a novel measure of individual differences in generic conspiracist ideation. The scale was developed and validated across four studies. In Study 1, exploratory factor analysis of a novel 75-item measure of non-event-based conspiracist beliefs identified five conspiracist facets. The 15-item GCB scale was developed to sample from each of these themes. Studies 2, 3, and 4 examined the structure and validity of the GCB, demonstrating internal reliability, content, criterion-related, convergent and discriminant validity, and good test-retest reliability. In sum, this research indicates that the GCB is a psychometrically sound and practically useful measure of conspiracist ideation, and the findings add to our theoretical understanding of conspiracist ideation as a monological belief system unpinned by a relatively small number of generic assumptions about the typicality of conspiratorial activity in the world. PMID:23734136

  10. Generic BWR-4 degraded core in-vessel study. Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-01

    Original intent of this project was to produce a phenomenological study of the in-vessel degradation which occurs during the TQUX and TQUV sequences for a generic BWR-4 from the initiation of the FSAR Chapter 15 operational transient through core debris bed formation to the failure of the primary pressure boundary. Bounding calculations were to be performed for the two high pressure and low pressure non-LOCA scenarios to assess the uncertainties in the current state of knowledge regarding the source terms for containment integrity studies. Source terms as such were defined in terms of hydrogen generation, unreacted metal, and coolant inventroy, and in terms of the form, sequencing and mode of dispersal through the primary vessel boundary. Fission product release was not to be considered as part of this study. Premature termination of the project, however, led to the dicontinuation of work on an as is basis. Work on the in-core phase from the point of scram to core debris bed formation was largely completed. A preliminary scoping calculation on the debris bed phase had been initiated. This report documents the status of the study at termination.

  11. Scaling-up the use of generic antiretrovirals in resource-limited countries: generic drugs for health.

    PubMed

    Beck, Eduard J; Passarelli, Carlos; Lui, Iris; Guichard, Anne-Claire; Simao, Mariangela; De Lay, Paul; Loures, Luiz

    2014-01-01

    The number of people living with HIV (PLHIV) continues to increase around the world because of the increasing number on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and their associated increase of life expectancy, in addition to the number of people newly infected with HIV each year. Unless a 'cure' can be found for HIV infection, PLHIV can anticipate the need to take antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) for the rest of their lives. Because ARVs are now being used for HIV prevention, as well as for therapeutic purposes, the need for effective, affordable ARVs with few adverse effects will continue to rise. It is important to note that the dramatic growth in treatment coverage of PLHIV seen during the past decade has been primarily due to the increased use of generic ARVs. Thus, there will be a need to scale-up the research and development, production, distribution and access to generic ARVs and ART regimens. However, these processes must occur within national and international regulated free-market economic systems and must deal with increasingly multifaceted patent issues affecting the price while ensuring the quality of the ARVs. National and international regulatory mechanisms will have to evolve, which will affect broader national and international economic and trade issues. Because of the complexity of these issues, the Editors of this Supplement conceived of asking experts in their fields to describe the various steps from relevant research and development, to production of generic ARVs, their delivery to countries and subsequently to PLHIV in low- and middle-income countries. A main objective was to highlight how these steps are interrelated, how the production and delivery of these drugs to PLHIV in resource-limited countries can be made more effective and efficient, and what the lessons are for the production and delivery of a broader set of drugs to people in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:25310477

  12. Methionine Oxidation Perturbs the Structural Core of the Prion Protein and Suggests a Generic Misfolding Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Younan, Nadine D.; Nadal, Rebecca C.; Davies, Paul; Brown, David R.; Viles, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress and misfolding of the prion protein (PrPC) are fundamental to prion diseases. We have therefore probed the effect of oxidation on the structure and stability of PrPC. Urea unfolding studies indicate that H2O2 oxidation reduces the thermodynamic stability of PrPC by as much as 9 kJ/mol. 1H-15N NMR studies indicate methionine oxidation perturbs key hydrophobic residues on one face of helix-C as follows: Met-205, Val-209, and Met-212 together with residues Val-160 and Tyr-156. These hydrophobic residues pack together and form the structured core of the protein, stabilizing its ternary structure. Copper-catalyzed oxidation of PrPC causes a more significant alteration of the structure, generating a monomeric molten globule species that retains its native helical content. Further copper-catalyzed oxidation promotes extended β-strand structures that lack a cooperative fold. This transition from the helical molten globule to β-conformation has striking similarities to a misfolding intermediate generated at low pH. PrP may therefore share a generic misfolding pathway to amyloid fibers, irrespective of the conditions promoting misfolding. Our observations support the hypothesis that oxidation of PrP destabilizes the native fold of PrPC, facilitating the transition to PrPSc. This study gives a structural and thermodynamic explanation for the high levels of oxidized methionine in scrapie isolates. PMID:22654104

  13. Classification as a generic tool for characterising status and changes of regional scale groundwater systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, Roland; Haaf, Ezra

    2016-04-01

    Regional hydrogeology is becoming increasingly important, but at the same time, scientifically sound, universal solutions for typical groundwater problems encountered on the regional scale are hard to find. While managers, decision-makers and state agencies operating on regional and national levels have always shown a strong interest in regional scale hydrogeology, researchers from academia tend to avoid the subject, focusing instead on local scales. Additionally, hydrogeology has always had a tendency to regard every problem as unique to its own site- and problem-specific context. Regional scale hydrogeology is therefore pragmatic rather than aiming at developing generic methodology (Barthel, 2014; Barthel and Banzhaf, 2016). One of the main challenges encountered on the regional scale in hydrogeology is the extreme heterogeneity that generally increases with the size of the studied area - paired with relative data scarcity. Even in well-monitored regions of the world, groundwater observations are usually clustered, leaving large areas without any direct data. However, there are many good reasons for assessing the status and predicting the behavior of groundwater systems under conditions of global change even for those areas and aquifers without observations. This is typically done by using rather coarsely discretized and / or poorly parameterized numerical models, or by using very simplistic conceptual hydrological models that do not take into account the complex three-dimensional geological setup. Numerical models heavily rely on local data and are resource-demanding. Conceptual hydrological models only deliver reliable information on groundwater if the geology is extremely simple. In this contribution, we present an approach to derive statistically relevant information for un-monitored areas, making use of existing information from similar localities that are or have been monitored. The approach combines site-specific knowledge with conceptual assumptions on

  14. Generic, Extensible, Configurable Push-Pull Framework for Large-Scale Science Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Brian M.; Chang, Albert Y.; Freeborn, Dana J.; Crichton, Daniel J.; Woollard, David M.; Mattmann, Chris A.

    2011-01-01

    The push-pull framework was developed in hopes that an infrastructure would be created that could literally connect to any given remote site, and (given a set of restrictions) download files from that remote site based on those restrictions. The Cataloging and Archiving Service (CAS) has recently been re-architected and re-factored in its canonical services, including file management, workflow management, and resource management. Additionally, a generic CAS Crawling Framework was built based on motivation from Apache s open-source search engine project called Nutch. Nutch is an Apache effort to provide search engine services (akin to Google), including crawling, parsing, content analysis, and indexing. It has produced several stable software releases, and is currently used in production services at companies such as Yahoo, and at NASA's Planetary Data System. The CAS Crawling Framework supports many of the Nutch Crawler's generic services, including metadata extraction, crawling, and ingestion. However, one service that was not ported over from Nutch is a generic protocol layer service that allows the Nutch crawler to obtain content using protocol plug-ins that download content using implementations of remote protocols, such as HTTP, FTP, WinNT file system, HTTPS, etc. Such a generic protocol layer would greatly aid in the CAS Crawling Framework, as the layer would allow the framework to generically obtain content (i.e., data products) from remote sites using protocols such as FTP and others. Augmented with this capability, the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) and NPP (NPOESS Preparatory Project) Sounder PEATE (Product Evaluation and Analysis Tools Elements) would be provided with an infrastructure to support generic FTP-based pull access to remote data products, obviating the need for any specialized software outside of the context of their existing process control systems. This extensible configurable framework was created in Java, and allows the use of

  15. The Core Self-Evaluation Scale: Further Construct Validation Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Donald G.; Pierce, Jon L.

    2010-01-01

    The authors empirically examined two operationalizations of the core self-evaluation construct: (a) the Judge, Erez, Bono, and Thoresen 12-item scale and (b) a composite measure of self-esteem, self-efficacy, locus of control, and neuroticism.The study found that the composite scale relates more strongly than the shorter scale to performance,…

  16. Development of a Dynamically Scaled Generic Transport Model Testbed for Flight Research Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Thomas; Langford, William; Belcastro, Christine; Foster, John; Shah, Gautam; Howland, Gregory; Kidd, Reggie

    2004-01-01

    This paper details the design and development of the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) test-bed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The aircraft is a 5.5% dynamically scaled, remotely piloted, twin-turbine, swept wing, Generic Transport Model (GTM) which will be used to provide an experimental flight test capability for research experiments pertaining to dynamics modeling and control beyond the normal flight envelope. The unique design challenges arising from the dimensional, weight, dynamic (inertial), and actuator scaling requirements necessitated by the research community are described along with the specific telemetry and control issues associated with a remotely piloted subscale research aircraft. Development of the necessary operational infrastructure, including operational and safety procedures, test site identification, and research pilots is also discussed. The GTM is a unique vehicle that provides significant research capacity due to its scaling, data gathering, and control characteristics. By combining data from this testbed with full-scale flight and accident data, wind tunnel data, and simulation results, NASA will advance and validate control upset prevention and recovery technologies for transport aircraft, thereby reducing vehicle loss-of-control accidents resulting from adverse and upset conditions.

  17. Simplicity of condensed matter at its core: Generic definition of a Roskilde-simple system

    SciTech Connect

    Schrøder, Thomas B. Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2014-11-28

    The isomorph theory is reformulated by defining Roskilde-simple systems by the property that the order of the potential energies of configurations at one density is maintained when these are scaled uniformly to a different density. If the potential energy as a function of all particle coordinates is denoted by U(R), this requirement translates into U(R{sub a}) < U(R{sub b}) ⇒ U(λR{sub a}) < U(λR{sub b}). Isomorphs remain curves in the thermodynamic phase diagram along which structure, dynamics, and excess entropy are invariant, implying that the phase diagram is effectively one-dimensional with respect to many reduced-unit properties. In contrast to the original formulation of the isomorph theory, however, the density-scaling exponent is not exclusively a function of density and the isochoric heat capacity is not an exact isomorph invariant. A prediction is given for the latter quantity's variation along the isomorphs. Molecular dynamics simulations of the Lennard-Jones and Lennard-Jones Gaussian systems validate the new approach.

  18. Fine-scale heterogeneity in the Earth's inner core

    PubMed

    Vidale; Earle

    2000-03-16

    The seismological properties of the Earth's inner core have become of particular interest as we understand more about its composition and thermal state. Observations of anisotropy and velocity heterogeneity in the inner core are beginning to reveal how it has grown and whether it convects. The attenuation of seismic waves in the inner core is strong, and studies of seismic body waves have found that this high attenuation is consistent with either scattering or intrinsic attenuation. The outermost portion of the inner core has been inferred to possess layering and to be less anisotropic than at greater depths. Here we present observations of seismic waves scattered in the inner core which follow the expected arrival time of the body-wave reflection from the inner-core boundary. The amplitude of these scattered waves can be explained by stiffness variations of 1.2% with a scale length of 2 kilometres across the outermost 300 km of the inner core. These variations might be caused by variations in composition, by pods of partial melt in a mostly solid matrix or by variations in the orientation or strength of seismic anisotropy. PMID:10749207

  19. Performance of four turbulence closure models implemented using a generic length scale method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, J.C.; Sherwood, C.R.; Arango, H.G.; Signell, R.P.

    2005-01-01

    A two-equation turbulence model (one equation for turbulence kinetic energy and a second for a generic turbulence length-scale quantity) proposed by Umlauf and Burchard [J. Marine Research 61 (2003) 235] is implemented in a three-dimensional oceanographic model (Regional Oceanographic Modeling System; ROMS v2.0). These two equations, along with several stability functions, can represent many popular turbulence closures, including the k-kl (Mellor-Yamada Level 2.5), k-??, and k-?? schemes. The implementation adds flexibility to the model by providing an unprecedented range of turbulence closure selections in a single 3D oceanographic model and allows comparison and evaluation of turbulence models in an otherwise identical numerical environment. This also allows evaluation of the effect of turbulence models on other processes such as suspended-sediment distribution or ecological processes. Performance of the turbulence models and sediment-transport schemes is investigated with three test cases for (1) steady barotropic flow in a rectangular channel, (2) wind-induced surface mixed-layer deepening in a stratified fluid, and (3) oscillatory stratified pressure-gradient driven flow (estuarine circulation) in a rectangular channel. Results from k-??, k-??, and gen (a new closure proposed by Umlauf and Burchard [J. Marine Research 61 (2003) 235]) are very similar for these cases, but the k-kl closure results depend on a wall-proximity function that must be chosen to suit the flow. Greater variations appear in simulations of suspended-sediment concentrations than in salinity simulations because the transport of suspended-sediment amplifies minor variations in the methods. The amplification is caused by the added physics of a vertical settling rate, bottom stress dependent resuspension, and diffusive transport of sediment in regions of well mixed salt and temperature. Despite the amplified sensitivity of sediment to turbulence models in the estuary test case, the four

  20. Small scale folding observed in the NEEM ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Daniela; Llorens, Maria-Gema; Westhoff, Julien; Steinbach, Florian; Bons, Paul D.; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Griera, Albert; Weikusat, Ilka

    2015-04-01

    Disturbances on the centimeter scale in the layering of the NEEM ice core (North Greenland) can be mapped by means of visual stratigraphy as long as the ice does have a visual layering, such as, for example, cloudy bands. Different focal depths of the visual stratigraphy method allow, to a certain extent, a three dimensional view of the structures. In this study we present a structural analysis of the visible folds, discuss characteristics and frequency and present examples of typical fold structures. With this study we aim to quantify the potential impact of small scale folding on the integrity of climate proxy data. We also analyze the structures with regard to the stress environment under which they formed. The structures evolve from gentle waves at about 1700 m to overturned z-folds with increasing depth. Occasionally, the folding causes significant thickening of layers. Their shape indicates that they are passive features and are probably not initiated by rheology differences between layers. Layering is heavily disturbed and tracing of single layers is no longer possible below a depth of 2160 m. Lattice orientation distributions for the corresponding core sections were analyzed where available in addition to visual stratigraphy. The data show axial-plane parallel strings of grains with c.axis orientations that deviate from that of the matrix, which has more or less a single-maximum fabric at the depth where the folding occurs. We conclude from these data that folding is a consequence of deformation along localized shear planes and kink bands. The findings are compared with results from other deep ice cores. The observations presented are supplemented by microstructural modeling using a crystal plasticity code that reproduces deformation, applying a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), coupled with ELLE to include dynamic recrystallization processes. The model results reproduce the development of bands of grains with a tilted orientation relative to the single maximum

  1. Validation Results for Core-Scale Oil Shale Pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Staten, Josh; Tiwari, Pankaj

    2015-03-01

    This report summarizes a study of oil shale pyrolysis at various scales and the subsequent development a model for in situ production of oil from oil shale. Oil shale from the Mahogany zone of the Green River formation was used in all experiments. Pyrolysis experiments were conducted at four scales, powdered samples (100 mesh) and core samples of 0.75”, 1” and 2.5” diameters. The batch, semibatch and continuous flow pyrolysis experiments were designed to study the effect of temperature (300°C to 500°C), heating rate (1°C/min to 10°C/min), pressure (ambient and 500 psig) and size of the sample on product formation. Comprehensive analyses were performed on reactants and products - liquid, gas and spent shale. These experimental studies were designed to understand the relevant coupled phenomena (reaction kinetics, heat transfer, mass transfer, thermodynamics) at multiple scales. A model for oil shale pyrolysis was developed in the COMSOL multiphysics platform. A general kinetic model was integrated with important physical and chemical phenomena that occur during pyrolysis. The secondary reactions of coking and cracking in the product phase were addressed. The multiscale experimental data generated and the models developed provide an understanding of the simultaneous effects of chemical kinetics, and heat and mass transfer on oil quality and yield. The comprehensive data collected in this study will help advance the move to large-scale in situ oil production from the pyrolysis of oil shale.

  2. Can key vegetation parameters be retrieved at the large-scale using LAI satellite products and a generic modelling approach ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewaele, Helene; Calvet, Jean-Christophe; Carrer, Dominique; Laanaia, Nabil

    2016-04-01

    In the context of climate change, the need to assess and predict the impact of droughts on vegetation and water resources increases. The generic approaches permitting the modelling of continental surfaces at large-scale has progressed in recent decades towards land surface models able to couple cycles of water, energy and carbon. A major source of uncertainty in these generic models is the maximum available water content of the soil (MaxAWC) usable by plants which is constrained by the rooting depth parameter and unobservable at the large-scale. In this study, vegetation products derived from the SPOT/VEGETATION satellite data available since 1999 are used to optimize the model rooting depth over rainfed croplands and permanent grasslands at 1 km x 1 km resolution. The inter-annual variability of the Leaf Area Index (LAI) is simulated over France using the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere and Atmosphere, CO2-reactive (ISBA-A-gs) generic land surface model and a two-layer force-restore (FR-2L) soil profile scheme. The leaf nitrogen concentration directly impacts the modelled value of the maximum annual LAI. In a first step this parameter is estimated for the last 15 years by using an iterative procedure that matches the maximum values of LAI modelled by ISBA-A-gs to the highest satellite-derived LAI values. The Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) is used as a cost function to be minimized. In a second step, the model rooting depth is optimized in order to reproduce the inter-annual variability resulting from the drought impact on the vegetation. The evaluation of the retrieved soil rooting depth is achieved using the French agricultural statistics of Agreste. Retrieved leaf nitrogen concentrations are compared with values from previous studies. The preliminary results show a good potential of this approach to estimate these two vegetation parameters (leaf nitrogen concentration, MaxAWC) at the large-scale over grassland areas. Besides, a marked impact of the

  3. The Chado Natural Diversity module: a new generic database schema for large-scale phenotyping and genotyping data.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sook; Menda, Naama; Redmond, Seth; Buels, Robert M; Friesen, Maren; Bendana, Yuri; Sanderson, Lacey-Anne; Lapp, Hilmar; Lee, Taein; MacCallum, Bob; Bett, Kirstin E; Cain, Scott; Clements, Dave; Mueller, Lukas A; Main, Dorrie

    2011-01-01

    Linking phenotypic with genotypic diversity has become a major requirement for basic and applied genome-centric biological research. To meet this need, a comprehensive database backend for efficiently storing, querying and analyzing large experimental data sets is necessary. Chado, a generic, modular, community-based database schema is widely used in the biological community to store information associated with genome sequence data. To meet the need to also accommodate large-scale phenotyping and genotyping projects, a new Chado module called Natural Diversity has been developed. The module strictly adheres to the Chado remit of being generic and ontology driven. The flexibility of the new module is demonstrated in its capacity to store any type of experiment that either uses or generates specimens or stock organisms. Experiments may be grouped or structured hierarchically, whereas any kind of biological entity can be stored as the observed unit, from a specimen to be used in genotyping or phenotyping experiments, to a group of species collected in the field that will undergo further lab analysis. We describe details of the Natural Diversity module, including the design approach, the relational schema and use cases implemented in several databases. PMID:22120662

  4. The Chado Natural Diversity module: a new generic database schema for large-scale phenotyping and genotyping data

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sook; Menda, Naama; Redmond, Seth; Buels, Robert M.; Friesen, Maren; Bendana, Yuri; Sanderson, Lacey-Anne; Lapp, Hilmar; Lee, Taein; MacCallum, Bob; Bett, Kirstin E.; Cain, Scott; Clements, Dave; Mueller, Lukas A.; Main, Dorrie

    2011-01-01

    Linking phenotypic with genotypic diversity has become a major requirement for basic and applied genome-centric biological research. To meet this need, a comprehensive database backend for efficiently storing, querying and analyzing large experimental data sets is necessary. Chado, a generic, modular, community-based database schema is widely used in the biological community to store information associated with genome sequence data. To meet the need to also accommodate large-scale phenotyping and genotyping projects, a new Chado module called Natural Diversity has been developed. The module strictly adheres to the Chado remit of being generic and ontology driven. The flexibility of the new module is demonstrated in its capacity to store any type of experiment that either uses or generates specimens or stock organisms. Experiments may be grouped or structured hierarchically, whereas any kind of biological entity can be stored as the observed unit, from a specimen to be used in genotyping or phenotyping experiments, to a group of species collected in the field that will undergo further lab analysis. We describe details of the Natural Diversity module, including the design approach, the relational schema and use cases implemented in several databases. PMID:22120662

  5. Development of the Transport Class Model (TCM) Aircraft Simulation From a Sub-Scale Generic Transport Model (GTM) Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueschen, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    A six degree-of-freedom, flat-earth dynamics, non-linear, and non-proprietary aircraft simulation was developed that is representative of a generic mid-sized twin-jet transport aircraft. The simulation was developed from a non-proprietary, publicly available, subscale twin-jet transport aircraft simulation using scaling relationships and a modified aerodynamic database. The simulation has an extended aerodynamics database with aero data outside the normal transport-operating envelope (large angle-of-attack and sideslip values). The simulation has representative transport aircraft surface actuator models with variable rate-limits and generally fixed position limits. The simulation contains a generic 40,000 lb sea level thrust engine model. The engine model is a first order dynamic model with a variable time constant that changes according to simulation conditions. The simulation provides a means for interfacing a flight control system to use the simulation sensor variables and to command the surface actuators and throttle position of the engine model.

  6. Generic finite size scaling for discontinuous nonequilibrium phase transitions into absorbing states.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, M M; da Luz, M G E; Fiore, C E

    2015-12-01

    Based on quasistationary distribution ideas, a general finite size scaling theory is proposed for discontinuous nonequilibrium phase transitions into absorbing states. Analogously to the equilibrium case, we show that quantities such as response functions, cumulants, and equal area probability distributions all scale with the volume, thus allowing proper estimates for the thermodynamic limit. To illustrate these results, five very distinct lattice models displaying nonequilibrium transitions-to single and infinitely many absorbing states-are investigated. The innate difficulties in analyzing absorbing phase transitions are circumvented through quasistationary simulation methods. Our findings (allied to numerical studies in the literature) strongly point to a unifying discontinuous phase transition scaling behavior for equilibrium and this important class of nonequilibrium systems. PMID:26764651

  7. Effect of wettability on scale-up of multiphase flow from core-scale to reservoir fine-grid-scale

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.C.; Mani, V.; Mohanty, K.K.

    1997-08-01

    Typical field simulation grid-blocks are internally heterogeneous. The objective of this work is to study how the wettability of the rock affects its scale-up of multiphase flow properties from core-scale to fine-grid reservoir simulation scale ({approximately} 10{prime} x 10{prime} x 5{prime}). Reservoir models need another level of upscaling to coarse-grid simulation scale, which is not addressed here. Heterogeneity is modeled here as a correlated random field parameterized in terms of its variance and two-point variogram. Variogram models of both finite (spherical) and infinite (fractal) correlation length are included as special cases. Local core-scale porosity, permeability, capillary pressure function, relative permeability functions, and initial water saturation are assumed to be correlated. Water injection is simulated and effective flow properties and flow equations are calculated. For strongly water-wet media, capillarity has a stabilizing/homogenizing effect on multiphase flow. For small variance in permeability, and for small correlation length, effective relative permeability can be described by capillary equilibrium models. At higher variance and moderate correlation length, the average flow can be described by a dynamic relative permeability. As the oil wettability increases, the capillary stabilizing effect decreases and the deviation from this average flow increases. For fractal fields with large variance in permeability, effective relative permeability is not adequate in describing the flow.

  8. Mode-Area Scaling of Helical-Core Dual-Clad Fiber Lasers and Amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Z.; Marciante, J.R.

    2005-09-30

    Helical-core, dual-clad fibers have been designed for single-mode operation with 60-um cores and 0.10 NA. Helical fibers are shown to perform where conventional coiled fibers cannot operate, with possible scaling to 200-um-diameter helical cores.

  9. How is kinematic structure connected to the core scale from filament scale?; Mopra mapping observations with multi-lines of dense cores in Lupus I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyokane, Kazuhiro; Saito, Masao; Tachihara, Kengo; Saigo, Kazuya; van Kempen, Tim; Cortes, Paulo; Hill, Tracey; Knee, Lewis; Kurono, Yasutaka; Takahashi, Satoko; Aya, Higuchi; Nyman, Lars-Ake

    2014-06-01

    Recently, high sensitivity mappings of nearby molecular clouds in far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths with Hershel and AzTEC/ASTE show ubiquitous existence of the filamentary structures with 0.1-pc uniform width. It is important to investigate dense core formation from large scale structure via fragmentation. We have conducted MOPRA multi-line mapping observations covered on 0.02 - 0.2 pc scales of 8 dense cores in a filamentary cloud of nearby Lupus I at 140 pc. A class 0/I protostellar core IRAS 15398-3359 is included as a sample, which has an adjacent prestellar core with the separation of 0.13pc in the west. The maps of N2H+, HNC, HC3N show well associated with each core. The velocity field of C18O shows 1.4 km/s/pc from north to south over the region containing two dense cores, which is consistent with past observation of NANTEN. In contrast to C18O results, the velocity field of HC3N shows different structures, which suggest counter rotation of two dense cores; 1.2 km/s/pc from north-west to south-east around a protostellar core and 0.8 km/s/pc from east to west around a presteller core. The filament will be fragmentized and collapsed to dense cores when the line density is over 2Cs/G (where Cs is sound speed and G is gravitational constant). If that velocity gradient was caused by such situation, it should be red-blue-red-blue across two dense cores but the observed kinematics is not consistent with this scenario, which requires that the filament structure would be extremely curved with a skew angle. Although we cannot reject the collapsing interruption, those results suggest the spin-up rotating picture separated from large-scale structure.

  10. From the pore scale to the core scale: How to model the spatial interactions in soils?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, Patricia; Pot, Valerie; Monga, Oivier; Chenu, Claire; Vieuble-Gonod, Laurent; Vogel, Laure; Nunan, Naoise; Otten, Wilfried; Baveye, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Recently, innovative modeling tools have been developed to describe the physico-chemical processes occurring in soil pores at scales directly relevant to microorganisms. Modelling efforts have attempted to understand how microbial processes such as decomposition or competition among species are affected by diffusion in 2-D or 3-D environments. Most of these models use a virtual representative pore network that can have the same features as soil pores with regular lattice grid. The most recent and innovative of these models use real images of soil structure from binarized 3D images. These models are able to simulate microbial degradation although microorganisms and organic matter are placed at different locations in the pore space. Then, the encounter of nutrients and microorganisms is achieved through the implementation of the diffusion process of the soluble substrates in the connected water-filled space. The high computational demand of this type of approach restricts its applicability to small-scale systems, typically in the order of micrometers or millimeters. The numerical techniques used to solve the equations include the lattice Boltzmann method, algorithmic methods and finite element methods. Most of these models have not yet been tested with experimental data because of the difficulties of investigating such small scales. On the other hand, many experimental results developed at the core scale have showed the importance of soil microbial habitat and especially how physical characteristics (pore sizes, connectivity) control the decomposition of organic substrates via their accessibility by microorganisms. The general question we have now to answer is whether information on the spatial heterogeneity of soils at the microscale can be used to predict the processes observed at the macroscale in soils

  11. Replication of the Adjustment Scales for Children and Adolescents Core Syndrome Factor Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canivez, Gary L.

    2004-01-01

    Independent examination and replication of the core syndrome factor structure of the Adjustment Scales for Children and Adolescents (ASCA; McDermott, Marston, & Stott, 1993) is reported. A sample of 1,020 children were randomly selected from their classroom and rated on the ASCA by their teacher. The six ASCA core syndromes produced a two-factor…

  12. Constraining Short Scale Core-Mantle Boundary Topography with Amplitudes of Core-Reflected ScP Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z.; Ni, S.

    2014-12-01

    The coupling mechanisms at core-mantle boundary (CMB) play critical roles in mantle convection and geomagnetic evolution. The topography of CMB provides fundamental information to understanding of the coupling processes. Previous observations with short period core-reflected phases PcP reported rapid amplitude variation and suggested small scale variation of core-mantle boundary topography. 3D synthetic seismograms based on the seismic ray theory have been adopted to constrain CMB topography beneath Alaska which features a few kilometers topography variation across horizontal length scale of a few hundred km. We developed a similar algorithm for computing short period synthetic ScP seismograms based on the representation theorem and ray theory. We then explore the quantitative relationships between the synthetic ScP seismograms' amplitude variation and CMB topography depression or jump, and compare the synthetics with array observations of ScP data. We will discuss the algorithm's limitation and possible extension so that it may work in more complicated mantle structures.

  13. Development of a Korean version of a core self-evaluations scale.

    PubMed

    Holt, Daniel T; Jung, Hee-Hyong

    2008-10-01

    The present study tested a scale which measures core self-evaluation and was applied to two samples of Korean military members (Sample 1 N=181; Sample 2 N=280). Analysis indicated that seven items of the original 12-item scale developed by Judge, Erez, Bono, and Thoresen loaded on one factor and were internally consistent. Moreover, scores were correlated, as expected, with the four core traits which have been used as indirect measures of core self-evaluations (viz., self-esteem, generalized self-efficacy, neuroticism, and locus of control), as well as affect and job satisfaction. In sum, results suggest that core self-evaluation can be measured validly in an Eastern culture, and the results should serve as a basis for extending this research in an international setting. PMID:19102465

  14. Generic safety documentation model

    SciTech Connect

    Mahn, J.A.

    1994-04-01

    This document is intended to be a resource for preparers of safety documentation for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico facilities. It provides standardized discussions of some topics that are generic to most, if not all, Sandia/NM facilities safety documents. The material provides a ``core`` upon which to develop facility-specific safety documentation. The use of the information in this document will reduce the cost of safety document preparation and improve consistency of information.

  15. Power scaling estimate of crystalline fiber waveguides with rare earth doped YAG cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da; Hong, Pengda; Meissner, Stephanie K.; Meissner, Helmuth E.

    2016-03-01

    Power scaling analysis based on the model by Dawson et al. [1,2] for circular core fibers has been applied to estimating power scaling of crystalline fiber waveguides (CFWs) with RE3+ doped single crystalline or ceramic YAG (RE=rare earth: Yb, Er, Tm and Ho). Power scaling limits include stimulated Brillouin scattering, thermal lensing effect, and limits to coupling of pump light into CFWs. The CFW designs we have considered consist, in general, of a square doped RE3+:YAG core, an inner cladding of either undoped or laser-inactive-ion-doped YAG and an outer cladding of sapphire. The presented data have been developed for the structures fabricated using the Adhesive-Free Bonding (AFB®) technique, but the results should be essentially independent of fabrication technique, assuming perfect core/inner cladding/outer cladding interfaces. Hard power scaling limits exist for a specific CFW design and are strongly based on the physical constants of the material and its spectroscopic specifics. For example, power scaling limit was determined as ~16 kW for 2.5% ceramic Yb:YAG/YAG (core material/inner cladding material) at fiber length of 1.7 m and core diameter of 69 μm. Considering the present manufacturing limit for CFW length to be, e.g., 0.5 m, the actual maximum output power will be limited to ~4.4 kW for a Yb:YAG/YAG CFW. Power limit estimates have also been computed for Er3+, Tm3+ and Ho3+doped core based CFWs.

  16. PWR core and spent fuel pool analysis using scale and nestle

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J. E.; Maldonado, G. I.; St Clair, R.; Orr, D.

    2012-07-01

    The SCALE nuclear analysis code system [SCALE, 2011], developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is widely recognized as high quality software for analyzing nuclear systems. The SCALE code system is composed of several validated computer codes and methods with standard control sequences, such as the TRITON/NEWT lattice physics sequence, which supplies dependable and accurate analyses for industry, regulators, and academia. Although TRITON generates energy-collapsed and space-homogenized few group cross sections, SCALE does not include a full-core nodal neutron diffusion simulation module within. However, in the past few years, the open-source NESTLE core simulator [NESTLE, 2003], originally developed at North Carolina State Univ. (NCSU), has been updated and upgraded via collaboration between ORNL and the Univ. of Tennessee (UT), so it now has a growingly seamless coupling to the TRITON/NEWT lattice physics [Galloway, 2010]. This study presents the methodology used to couple lattice physics data between TRITON and NESTLE in order to perform a three-dimensional full-core analysis employing a 'real-life' Duke Energy PWR as the test bed. The focus for this step was to compare the key parameters of core reactivity and radial power distribution versus plant data. Following the core analysis, following a three cycle burn, a spent fuel pool analysis was done using information generated from NESTLE for the discharged bundles and was compared to Duke Energy spent fuel pool models. The KENO control module from SCALE was employed for this latter stage of the project. (authors)

  17. Core polarization, Brown-Rho scaling and a memory of Gerry's Princeton Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, T. T. S.; Holt, J. W.

    2014-08-01

    Core-polarization (CP) and Brown-Rho (BR) scaling were among Gerry's most favorite topics. In this contribution, we will discuss some of the early history as well as more recent work associated with these two fascinating phenomena. I (TTSK) will begin with some recollections of Princeton, where I met Gerry for the first time in 1964 and worked as his postdoc. Core polarization was in fact the first topic he assigned to me. JWH started working with Gerry at Stony Brook from 2003 and was Gerry's last student in nuclear physics. We three had teamed up well, working closely and pleasantly on both CP and BR scaling, particularly on the latter's connection to the anomalously-long beta-decay lifetime of carbon-14. We shall here briefly review these topics, including a recently developed new Brown-Rho scaling based on a Skyrmion half-Skyrmion two-phase model.

  18. Improving measurement methods in rehabilitation: core concepts and recommendations for scale development.

    PubMed

    Velozo, Craig A; Seel, Ronald T; Magasi, Susan; Heinemann, Allen W; Romero, Sergio

    2012-08-01

    Validated measurement scales are essential to evaluating clinical outcomes and conducting meaningful and reliable research. The purpose of this article is to present the clinician and researcher with a contemporary 8-stage framework for measurement scale development based on a mixed-methods qualitative and quantitative approach. Core concepts related to item response theory are presented. Qualitative methods are described to conceptualize scale constructs; obtain patient, family, and other stakeholder perspectives; and develop item pools. Item response theory statistical methodologies are presented, including approaches for testing the assumptions of unidimensionality, local independence, monotonicity, and indices of model fit. Lastly, challenges faced by scale developers in implementing these methodologies are discussed. While rehabilitation research has recently started to apply mixed-methods qualitative and quantitative methodologies to scale development, these approaches show considerable promise in advancing rehabilitation measurement. PMID:22840881

  19. cm-scale variations of crystal orientation fabric in cold Alpine ice core from Colle Gnifetti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerch, Johanna; Weikusat, Ilka; Eisen, Olaf; Wagenbach, Dietmar; Erhardt, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of the microstructural parameters of ice has been an important part of ice core analyses so far mainly in polar cores in order to obtain information about physical processes (e.g. deformation, recrystallisation) on the micro- and macro-scale within an ice body. More recently the influence of impurities and climatic conditions during snow accumulation on these processes has come into focus. A deeper understanding of how palaeoclimate proxies interact with physical properties of the ice matrix bears relevance for palaeoclimatic interpretations, improved geophysical measurement techniques and the furthering of ice dynamical modeling. Variations in microstructural parameters e.g. crystal orientation fabric or grain size can be observed on a scale of hundreds and tens of metres but also on a centimetre scale. The underlying processes are not necessarily the same on all scales. Especially for the short-scale variations many questions remain unanswered. We present results from a study that aims to investigate following hypotheses: 1. Variations in grain size and fabric, i.e. strong changes of the orientation of ice crystals with respect to the vertical, occur on a centimetre scale and can be observed in all depths of an ice core. 2. Palaeoclimate proxies like dust and impurities have an impact on the microstructural processes and thus are inducing the observed short-scale variations in grain size and fabric. 3. The interaction of proxies with the ice matrix leads to depth intervals that show correlating behaviour as well as ranges with anticorrelation between microstructural parameters and palaeoclimatic proxies. The respective processes need to be identified. Fabric Analyser measurements were conducted on more than 80 samples (total of 8 m) from different depth ranges of a cold Alpine ice core (72 m length) drilled in 2013 at Colle Gnifetti, Switzerland/Italy. Results were obtained by automatic image processing, providing estimates for grain size distributions

  20. Accelerated gravity testing of aquitard core permeability and implications at formation and regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timms, W. A.; Crane, R.; Anderson, D. J.; Bouzalakos, S.; Whelan, M.; McGeeney, D.; Rahman, P. F.; Guinea, A.; Acworth, R. I.

    2015-03-01

    Evaluating the possibility of leakage through low permeability geological strata is critically important for sustainable water supplies, the extraction of fuels from strata such as coal beds, and the confinement of waste within the earth. The current work demonstrates that relatively rapid and reliable hydraulic conductivity (K) measurement of aquitard cores using accelerated gravity can inform and constrain larger scale assessments of hydraulic connectivity. Steady state fluid velocity through a low K porous sample is linearly related to accelerated gravity (g-level) in a centrifuge permeameter (CP) unless consolidation or geochemical reactions occur. The CP module was custom designed to fit a standard 2 m diameter geotechnical centrifuge (550 g maximum) with a capacity for sample dimensions of 30 to 100 mm diameter and 30 to 200 mm in length, and a maximum total stress of ~2 MPa at the base of the core. Formation fluids were used as influent to limit any shrink-swell phenomena which may alter the permeability. Vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv) results from CP testing of cores from three sites within the same regional clayey silt formation varied (10-7 to 10-9 m s-1, n = 14). Results at one of these sites (1.1 × 10-10 to 3.5 × 10-9 m s-1, n = 5) that were obtained in < 24 h were similar to in situ Kv values (3 × 10-9 m s-1) from pore pressure responses over several weeks within a 30 m clayey sequence. Core scale and in situ Kv results were compared with vertical connectivity within a regional flow model, and considered in the context of heterogeneity and preferential flow paths at site and formation scale. More reliable assessments of leakage and solute transport though aquitards over multi-decadal timescales can be achieved by accelerated core testing together with advanced geostatistical and numerical methods.

  1. The Destabilization of Protected Soil Organic Carbon Following Experimental Drought at the Pore and Core scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. P.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Tfaily, M. M.; Todd-Brown, K. E.; Bailey, V. L.

    2015-12-01

    The movement of water and solutes through the pore matrix controls the distribution and transformation of carbon (C) in soils. Thus, a change in the hydrologic connectivity, such as increased saturation, disturbance or drought, may alter C mineralization and greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes to the atmosphere. While these processes occur at the pore scale, they are often investigated at coarser scale. This project investigates pore- and core-scale soil C dynamics with varying hydrologic factors (simulated precipitation, groundwater-led saturation, and drought) to assess how climate-change induced shifts in hydrologic connectivity influences the destabilization of protected C in soils. Surface soil cores (0-15 cm depth) were collected from the Disney Wilderness Preserve, Florida, USA where water dynamics, particularly water table rise and fall, appear to exert a strong control on the emissions of GHGs and the persistence of soil organic matter in these soils. We measured CO2 and CH4 from soils allowed to freely imbibe water from below to a steady state starting from either field moist conditions or following experimental drought. Parallel treatments included the addition of similar quantities of water from above to simulate precipitation. Overall respiration increased in soil cores subjected to drought compared to field moist cores independent of wetting type. Cumulative CH4 production was higher in drought-induced soils, especially in the soils subjected to experimental groundwater-led saturation. Overall, the more C (from CO2 and CH4) was lost in drought-induced soils compared to field moist cores. Our results indicate that future drought events could have profound effects on the destabilization of protected C, especially in groundwater-fed soils. Our next steps focus on how to accurately capture drought-induced C destabilization mechanisms in earth system models.

  2. Harnessing Petaflop-Scale Multi-Core Supercomputing for Problems in Space Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, B. J.; Yin, L.; Bowers, K. J.; Daughton, W.; Bergen, B.; Kwan, T. J.

    2008-12-01

    The particle-in-cell kinetic plasma code VPIC has been migrated successfully to the world's fastest supercomputer, Roadrunner, a hybrid multi-core platform built by IBM for the Los Alamos National Laboratory. How this was achieved will be described and examples of state-of-the-art calculations in space science, in particular, the study of magnetic reconnection, will be presented. With VPIC on Roadrunner, we have performed, for the first time, plasma PIC calculations with over one trillion particles, >100× larger than calculations considered "heroic" by community standards. This allows examination of physics at unprecedented scale and fidelity. Roadrunner is an example of an emerging paradigm in supercomputing: the trend toward multi-core systems with deep hierarchies and where memory bandwidth optimization is vital to achieving high performance. Getting VPIC to perform well on such systems is a formidable challenge: the core algorithm is memory bandwidth limited with low compute-to-data ratio and requires random access to memory in its inner loop. That we were able to get VPIC to perform and scale well, achieving >0.374 Pflop/s and linear weak scaling on real physics problems on up to the full 12240-core Roadrunner machine, bodes well for harnessing these machines for our community's needs in the future. Many of the design considerations encountered commute to other multi-core and accelerated (e.g., via GPU) platforms and we modified VPIC with flexibility in mind. These will be summarized and strategies for how one might adapt a code for such platforms will be shared. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory. Dr. Bowers is a LANL Guest Scientist; he is presently at D. E. Shaw Research LLC, 120 W 45th Street, 39th Floor, New York, NY 10036.

  3. Generic phytosanitary irradiation treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallman, Guy J.

    2012-07-01

    The history of the development of generic phytosanitary irradiation (PI) treatments is discussed beginning with its initial proposal in 1986. Generic PI treatments in use today are 150 Gy for all hosts of Tephritidae, 250 Gy for all arthropods on mango and papaya shipped from Australia to New Zealand, 300 Gy for all arthropods on mango shipped from Australia to Malaysia, 350 Gy for all arthropods on lychee shipped from Australia to New Zealand and 400 Gy for all hosts of insects other than pupae and adult Lepidoptera shipped to the United States. Efforts to develop additional generic PI treatments and reduce the dose for the 400 Gy treatment are ongoing with a broad based 5-year, 12-nation cooperative research project coordinated by the joint Food and Agricultural Organization/International Atomic Energy Agency Program on Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. Key groups identified for further development of generic PI treatments are Lepidoptera (eggs and larvae), mealybugs and scale insects. A dose of 250 Gy may suffice for these three groups plus others, such as thrips, weevils and whiteflies.

  4. Pre-Stressing Micron-Scale Aluminum Core-Shell Particles to Improve Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitas, Valery I.; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The main direction in increasing reactivity of aluminum (Al) particles for energetic applications is reduction in their size down to nanoscale. However, Al nanoparticles are 30-50 times more expensive than micron scale particles and possess safety and environmental issues. Here, we improved reactivity of Al micron scale particles by synthesizing pre-stressed core-shell structures. Al particles were annealed and quenched to induce compressive stresses in the alumina passivation shell surrounding Al core. This thermal treatment was designed based on predictions of the melt-dispersion mechanism (MDM); a theory describing Al particle reaction under high heating rate. For all anneal treatment temperatures, experimental flame propagation rates for Al combined with nanoscale copper oxide (CuO) are in quantitative agreement with the theoretical predictions based on the MDM. The best treatment increases flame rate by 36% and achieves 68% of that for the best Al nanoparticles.

  5. Pre-Stressing Micron-Scale Aluminum Core-Shell Particles to Improve Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Levitas, Valery I.; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The main direction in increasing reactivity of aluminum (Al) particles for energetic applications is reduction in their size down to nanoscale. However, Al nanoparticles are 30–50 times more expensive than micron scale particles and possess safety and environmental issues. Here, we improved reactivity of Al micron scale particles by synthesizing pre-stressed core-shell structures. Al particles were annealed and quenched to induce compressive stresses in the alumina passivation shell surrounding Al core. This thermal treatment was designed based on predictions of the melt-dispersion mechanism (MDM); a theory describing Al particle reaction under high heating rate. For all anneal treatment temperatures, experimental flame propagation rates for Al combined with nanoscale copper oxide (CuO) are in quantitative agreement with the theoretical predictions based on the MDM. The best treatment increases flame rate by 36% and achieves 68% of that for the best Al nanoparticles. PMID:25597747

  6. Core and peripheral criteria of video game addiction in the game addiction scale for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Brunborg, Geir Scott; Hanss, Daniel; Mentzoni, Rune Aune; Pallesen, Ståle

    2015-05-01

    Assessment of video game addiction often involves measurement of peripheral criteria that indicate high engagement with games, and core criteria that indicate problematic use of games. A survey of the Norwegian population aged 16-74 years (N=10,081, response rate 43.6%) was carried out in 2013, which included the Gaming Addiction Scale for Adolescents (GAS). Confirmatory factor analysis showed that a two-factor structure, which separated peripheral criteria from core criteria, fitted the data better (CFI=0.963; RMSEA=0.058) compared to the original one-factor solution where all items are determined to load only on one factor (CFI=0.905, RMSEA=0.089). This was also found when we analyzed men aged ≤33 years, men aged >33 years, women aged ≤33 years, and women aged >33 years separately. This indicates that the GAS measures both engagement and problems related to video games. Multi-group measurement invariance testing showed that the factor structure was valid in all four groups (configural invariance) for the two-factor structure but not for the one-factor structure. A novel approach to categorization of problem gamers and addicted gamers where only the core criteria items are used (the CORE 4 approach) was compared to the approach where all items are included (the GAS 7 approach). The current results suggest that the CORE 4 approach might be more appropriate for classification of problem gamers and addicted gamers compared to the GAS 7 approach. PMID:25826043

  7. San Andreas fault zone velocity structure at SAFOD at core, log, and seismic scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeppson, Tamara N.; Tobin, Harold J.

    2015-07-01

    The San Andreas Fault (SAF), like other mature brittle faults, exhibits a zone of low seismic velocity hypothesized to result from fluid pressure effects and/or development of a damage zone. To address the relative contributions of these mechanisms in developing low-velocity zones, we measured P and S wave velocities ultrasonically at elevated confining and pore pressures on core samples from the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD). We compared those data to wireline and seismic-scale velocities to examine the scale dependence of acoustic properties of the fault core and damage zone. Average laboratory P and S wave velocities of the fault gouge at estimated in situ conditions are 3.1 and 1.5 km/s, respectively, consistent with the sonic log from the same intervals. These data show that fault core has intrinsically low velocity, even if no anomalous pore pressure is assumed, due to alteration and mechanical damage. In contrast, laboratory average P and S wave velocities for the damage zone are 4.7 and 2.5 km/s, up to 41% greater than the sonic log in the damage zone. This scale dependence indicates that stress conditions or macroscale features dominate the damage zone's acoustic properties, although velocity dispersion could play a role. Because no pressure anomaly was detected while drilling the SAFOD borehole, we infer that damage at a scale larger than core samples controls the elastic properties of the broader damage zone. This result bolsters other independent lines of evidence that the SAF does not contain major pore fluid overpressure at SAFOD.

  8. Crystallization of ion clouds in octupole traps: Structural transitions, core melting, and scaling laws

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, F.; Champenois, C.; Yurtsever, E.

    2009-12-15

    The stable structures and melting properties of ion clouds in isotropic octupole traps are investigated using a combination of semianalytical and numerical models, with a particular emphasis at finite-size scaling effects. Small-size clouds are found to be hollow and arranged in shells corresponding approximately to the solutions of the Thomson problem. The shell structure is lost in clusters containing more than a few thousands of ions, the inner parts of the cloud becoming soft and amorphous. While melting is triggered in the core shells, the melting temperature follows the rule expected for three-dimensional dense particles, with a depression scaling linearly with the inverse radius.

  9. Scaling of noise correlations in one-dimensional lattice hard-core boson systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Kai; Rigol, Marcos

    2011-03-01

    Noise correlations are studied for systems of hard-core bosons in one-dimensional lattices. We use an exact numerical approach based on the Bose-Fermi mapping and properties of Slater determinants. We focus on the scaling of the noise correlations with system size in superfluid and insulating phases, which are generated in the homogeneous lattice, with period-two superlattices, and with uniformly distributed random diagonal disorder. For the superfluid phases, the leading contribution is shown to exhibit a density independent scaling proportional to the system size, while the first subleading term exhibits a density dependent power-law exponent.

  10. Scaling of noise correlations in one-dimensional-lattice-hard-core-boson systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Kai; Rigol, Marcos

    2011-02-01

    Noise correlations are studied for systems of hard-core bosons in one-dimensional lattices. We use an exact numerical approach based on the Bose-Fermi mapping and properties of Slater determinants. We focus on the scaling of the noise correlations with system size in superfluid and insulating phases, which are generated in the homogeneous lattice, with period-two superlattices and with uniformly distributed random diagonal disorder. For the superfluid phases, the leading contribution is shown to exhibit a density-independent scaling proportional to the system size, while the first subleading term exhibits a density-dependent power-law exponent.

  11. Use of geology in the interpretation of core-scale relative permeability data

    SciTech Connect

    Ringrose, P.S.; Jensen, J.L.; Sorbie, K.S.

    1996-09-01

    A number of factors, such as wettability, pore-size distribution, and core-scale heterogeneity, are known to affect the measured relative permeability in core plug samples. This paper focuses on the influence of geological structure at the laminaset scale on water-oil imbibition relative permeability curves. The endpoint positions and curve shapes vary as a function of the type of internal heterogeneity, the flow rate, and the assumptions on the pore-scale petrophysics (e.g. wettability). Interaction between the capillary forces and heterogeneity can occur at the cm-dm scale, which results in widely varying two-phase flow behavior for rocks with the same single-phase permeability. The geometry of heterogeneity as expressed in standard geological descriptions (e.g., cross-laminated, ripple-laminated, plane-laminated) can be translated into features of the expected relative permeability behavior for each rock type, thus aiding the interpretation of relative permeability data. The authors illustrate how their findings can help to interpret sets of relative permeability data from the field, using some examples from the Admire sand, El Dorado Field, Kansas.

  12. Image-guided Coring for Large-scale Studies in Molecular Pathology.

    PubMed

    Montaser-Kouhsari, Laleh; Knoblauch, Nicholas W; Oh, Eun-Yeong; Baker, Gabrielle; Christensen, Stephen; Hazra, Aditi; Tamimi, Rulla M; Beck, Andrew H

    2016-07-01

    Sampling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue blocks is a critical initial step in molecular pathology. Image-guided coring (IGC) is a new method for using digital pathology images to guide tissue block coring for molecular analyses. The goal of our study is to evaluate the use of IGC for both tissue-based and nucleic acid-based projects in molecular pathology. First, we used IGC to construct a tissue microarray (TMA); second, we used IGC for FFPE block sampling followed by RNA extraction; and third, we assessed the correlation between nuclear counts quantitated from the IGC images and RNA yields. We used IGC to construct a TMA containing 198 normal and breast cancer cores. Histopathologic analysis showed high accuracy for obtaining tumor and normal breast tissue. Next, we used IGC to obtain normal and tumor breast samples before RNA extraction. We selected a random subset of tumor and normal samples to perform computational image analysis to quantify nuclear density, and we built regression models to estimate RNA yields from nuclear count, age of the block, and core diameter. Number of nuclei and core diameter were the strongest predictors of RNA yields in both normal and tumor tissue. IGC is an effective method for sampling FFPE tissue blocks for TMA construction and nucleic acid extraction. We identify significant associations between quantitative nuclear counts obtained from IGC images and RNA yields, suggesting that the integration of computational image analysis with IGC may be an effective approach for tumor sampling in large-scale molecular studies. PMID:26186251

  13. Image-guided Coring for Large-scale Studies in Molecular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Montaser-Kouhsari, Laleh; Knoblauch, Nicholas W.; Oh, Eun-Yeong; Baker, Gabrielle; Christensen, Stephen; Hazra, Aditi; Tamimi, Rulla M.

    2016-01-01

    Sampling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue blocks is a critical initial step in molecular pathology. Image-guided coring (IGC) is a new method for using digital pathology images to guide tissue block coring for molecular analyses. The goal of our study is to evaluate the use of IGC for both tissue-based and nucleic acid–based projects in molecular pathology. First, we used IGC to construct a tissue microarray (TMA); second, we used IGC for FFPE block sampling followed by RNA extraction; and third, we assessed the correlation between nuclear counts quantitated from the IGC images and RNA yields. We used IGC to construct a TMA containing 198 normal and breast cancer cores. Histopathologic analysis showed high accuracy for obtaining tumor and normal breast tissue. Next, we used IGC to obtain normal and tumor breast samples before RNA extraction. We selected a random subset of tumor and normal samples to perform computational image analysis to quantify nuclear density, and we built regression models to estimate RNA yields from nuclear count, age of the block, and core diameter. Number of nuclei and core diameter were the strongest predictors of RNA yields in both normal and tumor tissue. IGC is an effective method for sampling FFPE tissue blocks for TMA construction and nucleic acid extraction. We identify significant associations between quantitative nuclear counts obtained from IGC images and RNA yields, suggesting that the integration of computational image analysis with IGC may be an effective approach for tumor sampling in large-scale molecular studies. PMID:26186251

  14. Core and Peripheral Criteria of Video Game Addiction in the Game Addiction Scale for Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Hanss, Daniel; Mentzoni, Rune Aune; Pallesen, Ståle

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Assessment of video game addiction often involves measurement of peripheral criteria that indicate high engagement with games, and core criteria that indicate problematic use of games. A survey of the Norwegian population aged 16–74 years (N=10,081, response rate 43.6%) was carried out in 2013, which included the Gaming Addiction Scale for Adolescents (GAS). Confirmatory factor analysis showed that a two-factor structure, which separated peripheral criteria from core criteria, fitted the data better (CFI=0.963; RMSEA=0.058) compared to the original one-factor solution where all items are determined to load only on one factor (CFI=0.905, RMSEA=0.089). This was also found when we analyzed men aged ≤33 years, men aged >33 years, women aged ≤33 years, and women aged >33 years separately. This indicates that the GAS measures both engagement and problems related to video games. Multi-group measurement invariance testing showed that the factor structure was valid in all four groups (configural invariance) for the two-factor structure but not for the one-factor structure. A novel approach to categorization of problem gamers and addicted gamers where only the core criteria items are used (the CORE 4 approach) was compared to the approach where all items are included (the GAS 7 approach). The current results suggest that the CORE 4 approach might be more appropriate for classification of problem gamers and addicted gamers compared to the GAS 7 approach. PMID:25826043

  15. Comparison of Prestellar Core Elongations and Large-scale Molecular Cloud Structures in the Lupus I Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poidevin, Frédérick; Ade, Peter A. R.; Angile, Francesco E.; Benton, Steven J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Devlin, Mark J.; Fissel, Laura M.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Klein, Jeffrey; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Novak, Giles; Nutter, David; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil A.; Diego Soler, Juan; Tachihara, Kengo; Thomas, Nicholas E.; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Tucker, Carole E.; Tucker, Gregory S.; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2014-08-01

    Turbulence and magnetic fields are expected to be important for regulating molecular cloud formation and evolution. However, their effects on sub-parsec to 100 parsec scales, leading to the formation of starless cores, are not well understood. We investigate the prestellar core structure morphologies obtained from analysis of the Herschel-SPIRE 350 μm maps of the Lupus I cloud. This distribution is first compared on a statistical basis to the large-scale shape of the main filament. We find the distribution of the elongation position angle of the cores to be consistent with a random distribution, which means no specific orientation of the morphology of the cores is observed with respect to the mean orientation of the large-scale filament in Lupus I, nor relative to a large-scale bent filament model. This distribution is also compared to the mean orientation of the large-scale magnetic fields probed at 350 μm with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Telescope for Polarimetry during its 2010 campaign. Here again we do not find any correlation between the core morphology distribution and the average orientation of the magnetic fields on parsec scales. Our main conclusion is that the local filament dynamics—including secondary filaments that often run orthogonally to the primary filament—and possibly small-scale variations in the local magnetic field direction, could be the dominant factors for explaining the final orientation of each core.

  16. Comparison of prestellar core elongations and large-scale molecular cloud structures in the Lupus I region

    SciTech Connect

    Poidevin, Frédérick; Ade, Peter A. R.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Nutter, David; Angile, Francesco E.; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeffrey; Benton, Steven J.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Chapin, Edward L.; Fissel, Laura M.; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Novak, Giles; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K.; Olmi, Luca; and others

    2014-08-10

    Turbulence and magnetic fields are expected to be important for regulating molecular cloud formation and evolution. However, their effects on sub-parsec to 100 parsec scales, leading to the formation of starless cores, are not well understood. We investigate the prestellar core structure morphologies obtained from analysis of the Herschel-SPIRE 350 μm maps of the Lupus I cloud. This distribution is first compared on a statistical basis to the large-scale shape of the main filament. We find the distribution of the elongation position angle of the cores to be consistent with a random distribution, which means no specific orientation of the morphology of the cores is observed with respect to the mean orientation of the large-scale filament in Lupus I, nor relative to a large-scale bent filament model. This distribution is also compared to the mean orientation of the large-scale magnetic fields probed at 350 μm with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Telescope for Polarimetry during its 2010 campaign. Here again we do not find any correlation between the core morphology distribution and the average orientation of the magnetic fields on parsec scales. Our main conclusion is that the local filament dynamics—including secondary filaments that often run orthogonally to the primary filament—and possibly small-scale variations in the local magnetic field direction, could be the dominant factors for explaining the final orientation of each core.

  17. Implementation of a reference-scaled average bioequivalence approach for highly variable generic drug products of agomelatine in Chinese subjects.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fang; Zhou, Rui; Cheng, Zeneng; Yang, Guoping; Chen, Aiqiao; Liu, Zhi; Tan, Hongyi; Yang, Shuang; Li, Sanwang; Mu, Lingli; Yu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to apply the reference-scaled average bioequivalence (RSABE) approach to evaluate the bioequivalence of 2 formulations of agomelatine, and to investigate the pharmacokinetic properties of agomelatine in Chinese healthy male subjects. This was performed in a single-dose, randomized-sequence, open-label, four-way crossover study with a one-day washout period between doses. Healthy Chinese males were randomly assigned to receive 25 mg of either the test or reference formulation. The formulations were considered bioequivalent if 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the log-transformed ratios and ratio of geometric means (GMR) of AUC and C max of agomelatine were within the predetermined bioequivalence range based on RSABE method. Results showed that both of the 90% CIs for the log-transformed ratios of AUC and C max of 7-desmethyl-agomelatine and 3-hydroxy-agomelatine were within the predetermined bioequivalence range. The 90% CIs for natural log-transformed ratios of C max, AUC0-t and AUC0-∞ of agomelatine (104.42-139.86, 101.33-123.83 and 97.90-117.94) were within the RSABE acceptance limits, and 3-hydroxy-agomelatine (105.55-123.03, 101.95-109.10 and 101.72-108.70) and 7-desmethyl-agomelatine (104.50-125.23, 102.36-111.50 and 101.62-110.64) were within the FDA bioequivalence definition intervals (0.80-1.25 for AUC and 0.75-1.33 for C max). The RSABE approach was successful in evaluating the bioequivalence of these two formulations. PMID:26904401

  18. Implementation of a reference-scaled average bioequivalence approach for highly variable generic drug products of agomelatine in Chinese subjects

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Fang; Zhou, Rui; Cheng, Zeneng; Yang, Guoping; Chen, Aiqiao; Liu, Zhi; Tan, Hongyi; Yang, Shuang; Li, Sanwang; Mu, Lingli; Yu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to apply the reference-scaled average bioequivalence (RSABE) approach to evaluate the bioequivalence of 2 formulations of agomelatine, and to investigate the pharmacokinetic properties of agomelatine in Chinese healthy male subjects. This was performed in a single-dose, randomized-sequence, open-label, four-way crossover study with a one-day washout period between doses. Healthy Chinese males were randomly assigned to receive 25 mg of either the test or reference formulation. The formulations were considered bioequivalent if 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the log-transformed ratios and ratio of geometric means (GMR) of AUC and Cmax of agomelatine were within the predetermined bioequivalence range based on RSABE method. Results showed that both of the 90% CIs for the log-transformed ratios of AUC and Cmax of 7-desmethyl-agomelatine and 3-hydroxy-agomelatine were within the predetermined bioequivalence range. The 90% CIs for natural log-transformed ratios of Cmax, AUC0–t and AUC0–∞ of agomelatine (104.42–139.86, 101.33–123.83 and 97.90–117.94) were within the RSABE acceptance limits, and 3-hydroxy-agomelatine (105.55–123.03, 101.95–109.10 and 101.72–108.70) and 7-desmethyl-agomelatine (104.50–125.23, 102.36–111.50 and 101.62–110.64) were within the FDA bioequivalence definition intervals (0.80–1.25 for AUC and 0.75–1.33 for Cmax). The RSABE approach was successful in evaluating the bioequivalence of these two formulations. PMID:26904401

  19. Infrared length scale and extrapolations for the no-core shell model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wendt, K. A.; Forssén, C.; Papenbrock, T.; Sääf, D.

    2015-06-03

    In this paper, we precisely determine the infrared (IR) length scale of the no-core shell model (NCSM). In the NCSM, the A-body Hilbert space is truncated by the total energy, and the IR length can be determined by equating the intrinsic kinetic energy of A nucleons in the NCSM space to that of A nucleons in a 3(A-1)-dimensional hyper-radial well with a Dirichlet boundary condition for the hyper radius. We demonstrate that this procedure indeed yields a very precise IR length by performing large-scale NCSM calculations for 6Li. We apply our result and perform accurate IR extrapolations for bound statesmore » of 4He, 6He, 6Li, and 7Li. Finally, we also attempt to extrapolate NCSM results for 10B and 16O with bare interactions from chiral effective field theory over tens of MeV.« less

  20. Infrared length scale and extrapolations for the no-core shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, K. A.; Forssén, C.; Papenbrock, T.; Sääf, D.

    2015-06-01

    We precisely determine the infrared (IR) length scale of the no-core shell model (NCSM). In the NCSM, the A -body Hilbert space is truncated by the total energy, and the IR length can be determined by equating the intrinsic kinetic energy of A nucleons in the NCSM space to that of A nucleons in a 3 (A -1 ) -dimensional hyper-radial well with a Dirichlet boundary condition for the hyper radius. We demonstrate that this procedure indeed yields a very precise IR length by performing large-scale NCSM calculations for 6Li. We apply our result and perform accurate IR extrapolations for bound states of 4He,6He,6Li , and 7Li . We also attempt to extrapolate NCSM results for 10B and 16O with bare interactions from chiral effective field theory over tens of MeV.

  1. Accelerated gravity testing of aquitard core permeability and implications at formation and regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timms, W. A.; Crane, R.; Anderson, D. J.; Bouzalakos, S.; Whelan, M.; McGeeney, D.; Rahman, P. F.; Acworth, R. I.

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating the possibility of leakage through low-permeability geological strata is critically important for sustainable water supplies, the extraction of fuels from coal and other strata, and the confinement of waste within the earth. The current work demonstrates that relatively rapid and realistic vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv) measurements of aquitard cores using accelerated gravity can constrain and compliment larger-scale assessments of hydraulic connectivity. Steady-state fluid velocity through a low-K porous sample is linearly related to accelerated gravity (g level) in a centrifuge permeameter (CP) unless consolidation or geochemical reactions occur. A CP module was custom designed to fit a standard 2 m diameter geotechnical centrifuge (550 g maximum) with a capacity for sample dimensions up to 100 mm diameter and 200 mm length, and a total stress of ˜ 2 MPa at the base of the core. Formation fluids were used as influent to limit any shrink-swell phenomena, which may alter the permeability. Kv results from CP testing of minimally disturbed cores from three sites within a clayey-silt formation varied from 10-10 to 10-7 m s-1 (number of samples, n = 18). Additional tests were focussed on the Cattle Lane (CL) site, where Kv within the 99 % confidence interval (n = 9) was 1.1 × 10-9 to 2.0 × 10-9 m s-1. These Kv results were very similar to an independent in situ Kv method based on pore pressure propagation though the sequence. However, there was less certainty at two other core sites due to limited and variable Kv data. Blind standard 1 g column tests underestimated Kv compared to CP and in situ Kv data, possibly due to deionised water interactions with clay, and were more time-consuming than CP tests. Our Kv results were compared with the set-up of a flow model for the region, and considered in the context of heterogeneity and preferential flow paths at site and

  2. Acoustic Stimulation of Colloid Behavior at the Pore and Core Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, P. M.

    2006-12-01

    . New results of pore-scale and core-scale experiments will be presented.

  3. Skin rash during treatment with generic itraconazole

    PubMed Central

    De Vuono, Antonio; Palleria, Caterina; Scicchitano, Francesca; Squillace, Aida; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Gallelli, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Generic drugs have the same active substance, the same pharmaceutical form, the same therapeutic indications and a similar bioequivalence with the reference medicinal product (branded). Although a similar efficacy is postulated, some cases of clinical inefficacy during treatment with generic formulations have been reported. In this case, we describe a woman with onychomycosis that developed a skin rash during treatment with a generic formulation of itraconazole. Drug administration and its re-challenge confirmed the association between itraconazole and skin rash. Both Naranjo probability scale and World Health Organization causality assessment scale documented a probable association between generic-itraconazole and skin rash. The switch from generic formulation to brand one induced an improvement of symptoms. Since we are unable to evaluate the role of each excipient in the development of skin rash, we cannot rule out their involvement. However, more data are necessary to better define the similarities or differences between branded and generic formulations. PMID:24799820

  4. Reconceptualising Core Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canning, Roy

    2007-01-01

    The paper provides an analysis of Core Skill policy and practice in the UK. The author presents a conceptual basis for re-thinking generic Core Skills within educational approaches in teaching and learning. The discussion looks at whether universal notions of generic skills are appropriate when considering post-compulsory pedagogic approaches to…

  5. Exploring Hardware Support For Scaling Irregular Applications on Multi-node Multi-core Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Secchi, Simone; Ceriani, Marco; Tumeo, Antonino; Villa, Oreste; Palermo, Gianluca; Raffo, Luigi

    2013-06-05

    With the recent emergence of large-scale knowledge dis- covery, data mining and social network analysis, irregular applications have gained renewed interest. Classic cache-based high-performance architectures do not provide optimal performances with such kind of workloads, mainly due to the very low spatial and temporal locality of the irregular control and memory access patterns. In this paper, we present a multi-node, multi-core, fine-grained multi-threaded shared-memory system architecture specifically designed for the execution of large-scale irregular applications, and built on top of three pillars, that we believe are fundamental to support these workloads. First, we offer transparent hardware support for Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) to provide a large globally-shared address space with no software library overhead. Second, we employ multi-threaded multi-core processing nodes to achieve the necessary latency tolerance required by accessing global memory, which potentially resides in a remote node. Finally, we devise hardware support for inter-thread synchronization on the whole global address space. We first model the performances by using an analytical model that takes into account the main architecture and application characteristics. We describe the hardware design of the proposed cus- tom architectural building blocks that provide support for the above- mentioned three pillars. Finally, we present a limited-scale evaluation of the system on a multi-board FPGA prototype with typical irregular kernels and benchmarks. The experimental evaluation demonstrates the architecture performance scalability for different configurations of the whole system.

  6. From Cores to Envelopes to Disks: A Multi-scale View of Magnetized Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Charles L. H.

    2014-12-01

    Observations of polarization in star forming regions have been made across many wavelengths, many size scales, and many stages of stellar evolution. One of the overarching goals of these observations has been to determine the importance of magnetic fields -- which are the cause of the polarization -- in the star formation process. We begin by describing the commissioning and the calibration of the 1.3 mm dual-polarization receiver system we built for CARMA (the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy), a radio telescope in the eastern Sierra region of California. One of the primary science drivers behind the polarization system is to observe polarized thermal emission from dust grains in the dense clumps of dust and gas where the youngest, Class 0 protostars are forming. We go on to describe the CARMA TADPOL survey -- the largest high-resolution (~1000 AU scale) survey to date of dust polarization in low-mass protostellar cores -- and discuss our main findings: (1) Magnetic fields (B-fields) on scales of ~1000 AU are not tightly aligned with protostellar outflows. Rather, the data are consistent both with scenarios where outflows and magnetic fields are preferentially misaligned (perpendicular) and where they are randomly aligned. (2) Sources with high CARMA polarization fractions have consistent B-field orientations on large scales (~20'', measured using single-dish submillimeter telescopes) and small scales (~2.5'', measured by CARMA). We interpret this to mean that in at least some cases B-fields play a role in regulating the infall of material all the way down to the ~1000 AU scales of protostellar envelopes. Finally, (3) While on the whole outflows appear to be randomly aligned with B-fields, in sources with low polarization fractions there is a hint that outflows are preferentially perpendicular to small-scale B-fields, which suggests that in these sources the fields have been wrapped up by envelope rotation. This work shows that the ~1000 AU

  7. Patients’ beliefs about generic medicines in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Zhi Y.; Hassali, Mohamed A.; Alrasheedy, Alian A.; Saleem, Fahad; Yahaya, Abdul H.; Aljadhey, Hisham

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acceptance of generic medicines by patients is an essential factor given that they are the end users of these medicines. In fact, adequate knowledge and positive perceptions are prerequisite to patients’ acceptance and use of generic medicines. Objective: To assess the current belief and views of patients about generic medicines in Malaysia. Method: This was a self-administered questionnaire-based study. The study was conducted with patients visiting outpatient pharmacy department at a tertiary care hospital in Malaysia. The Malaysian version of Generic Medicines Scale (GMS) was used. The GMS consists of two subscales: efficacy and similarity of generic medicines to original brand medicines. The efficacy subscale consists of 10 items while the similarity subscale consists of 6 items. The responses to the items were framed as a five-point Likert scale (1=strongly disagree to 5=strongly agree). Results: A total of 202 out of 300 patients participated in the study, giving a response rate of 67.3%. In this study, only 49% of them (n=99) knew the term ‘generic medicine’. Moreover, only 53.5% of the respondents (n=108) believed that the efficacy of generic medicines was the same as original brand medicines. In terms of quality, only 44% of the respondents (n=89) disagreed that generic medicines were of a lower quality. About one third (n=65, 32.2%) believed that generic medicines were cheaper because they were less efficacious. In terms of side effects, 44.5% of the respondents (n=90) believed that generic medicines had the same side effect profile as original brand medicines. Conclusions: The study finding showed that almost half of the respondents had negative belief in generic medicines. Similarly, many patients were not aware of the similarities and differences between generic and original brand medicines. Therefore, there is a need to provide patients with adequate information about generic medicines. PMID:25580171

  8. Scaling the Pseudo-Spectral Mountain: Spherical Anelasticity at 10,000 Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Featherstone, N. A.

    2012-12-01

    The last decade has witnessed a blossoming in the use of numerical simulations to examine global-scale dynamo processes operating in stellar convection zones. Increasing availability of computational resources has allowed many insights into these phenomena to be gained through the wide application of the Anelastic Spherical Harmonic (ASH) code in particular. ASH has been applied extensively to the study of solar-like stars; most notably to the various dynamo states attainable within such stars and to the processes that drive and maintain the solar differential rotation. Its application has also provided a window into the inner workings of convection zones with a decidedly less shellular geometry, such as the fully convective, low-mass M stars, or the convective cores of high-mass A- and B-type stars. ASH solves the anelastic MHD equations within a pseudo-spectral framework, employing a spherical harmonic decomposition on spherical shells and either a Chebyshev polynomial or finite-difference formulation in the radial direction. The spectral transforms associated with the pseudo-spectral treatment, and the inherent Poisson solve arising from the anelastic formulation, imply that ASH suffers from the same communication drawbacks associated with many other pseudo-spectral methods. Historically, the efficient application of this code has been limited to the use of roughly 2000 cores for problems with 10243 gridpoints, but recently, a thorough restructuring of ASH has allowed for strong scaling of 10243 class problems out to 17,000 cores. These improvements in scalability arise primarily from a careful load balancing of the Poisson solve and its associated communication pathways, as well as from aggregation of the spectral transform communication. I will discuss in detail the current implementation of ASH, accomplished entirely with MPI, and then touch on why an OpenMP hybridization (recently successful in some pseudo-spectral applications) seems unlikely to yield

  9. Soil hydrophobicity - relating effects at atomic, molecular, core and national scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Peter; Doerr, Stefan; Van Keulen, Geertje; Dudley, Ed; Francis, Lewis; Whalley, Richard; Gazze, Andrea; Hallin, Ingrid; Quinn, Gerry; Sinclair, Kat; Ashton, Rhys

    2016-04-01

    The detrimental impacts of soil hydrophobicity include increased runoff, erosion and flooding, reduced biomass production, inefficient use of irrigation water and preferential leaching of pollutants. Its impacts may exacerbate flood risk associated with more extreme drought and precipitation events predicted with UK climate change scenarios. The UK's Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) has therefore funded a major research programme to investigate soil hydrophobicity over length scales ranging from atomic through molecular, core and landscape scale. This presentation gives an overview of the findings to date. The programme is predicated on the hypothesis that changes in soil protein abundance and localization, induced by variations in soil moisture and temperature, are crucial driving forces for transitions between hydrophobic and hydrophilic conditions at soil particle surfaces. Three soils were chosen based on the severity of hydrophobicity that can be achieved in the field: severe to extreme (Cefn Bryn, Gower, Wales), intermediate to severe (National Botanical Garden, Wales), and subcritical (Park Grass, Rothamsted Research near London). The latter is already highly characterised so was also used as a control. Hydrophobic/ hydrophilic transitions were measured from water droplet penetration times. Scientific advances in the following five areas will be described: (i) the identification of these soil proteins by proteomic methods, using a novel separation method which reduces interference by humic acids, and allows identification by ESI and MALDI TOF mass spectrometry and database searches, (ii) the examination of such proteins, which form ordered hydrophobic ridges, and measurement of their elasticity, stickiness and hydrophobicity at nano- to microscale using atomic force microscopy adapted for the rough surfaces of soil particles, (iii) the novel use of a picoliter goniometer to show hydrophobic effects at a 1 micron diameter droplet level, which

  10. Emerging Methods in Sub Core-Scale Imaging and Characterization of the Influence of Heterogeneity on Flow in Rocks (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, S. M.; Hingerl, F.; Pini, R.

    2013-12-01

    New imaging techniques and approaches are providing unparalleled insight into the influence of sub-core scale heterogeneities on single and multiphase flows. Quantification of sub core-scale porosity, permeability, and even capillary pressure curves at a spatial scale of about 1-10 cubic millimeters is now possible. This scale provides a critical link in the continuum of spatial scales needed to link pore-scale processes to core-scale and field scale flow and transport. Data from such studies can be used to directly test the veracity of models for flow and transport in heterogeneous rocks, provide data for multi-stage upscaling, and reveal insights about physical/chemical processes heretofore neglected. Here we present data from three emerging techniques capable of imaging and quantifying transport properties and phenomena at the sub-core scale: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); positron emission tomography (PET); and X-Ray CT scanning. Direct imaging of spatially resolved fluid velocities and porosity is possible with MRI (Romanenko et al., 2012). These data can be inverted to provide permeability and porosity maps at a spatial scale of ~10 cubic millimeter. PET imaging can be used to track movement of a radioactive tracer through a rock and simultaneously measure effluent tracer concentrations at a similar resolution (Boutchko et al., 2012). X-ray CT scanning of multiphase flow experiments can be used to measure capillary pressure curves and through scaling relationships, to calculate permeability at a scale of about 1 cubic millimeters(Krause et al., 2011; Pini et al., 2013). Strengths and shortcomings of these techniques are discussed--along with the benefits of combining them. Together these techniques provide a new platform from which to probe more deeply the ubiquitous influence of heterogeneity on subsurface flow and transport processes, and ultimately improve predictions of subsurface transport. Boutchk et al., 2012. Imaging and modeling of flow in porous

  11. A Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Predictor-Based Model Reference Adaptive Controller for a Generic Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Stefan F.; Kaneshige, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Presented here is a Predictor-Based Model Reference Adaptive Control (PMRAC) architecture for a generic transport aircraft. At its core, this architecture features a three-axis, non-linear, dynamic-inversion controller. Command inputs for this baseline controller are provided by pilot roll-rate, pitch-rate, and sideslip commands. This paper will first thoroughly present the baseline controller followed by a description of the PMRAC adaptive augmentation to this control system. Results are presented via a full-scale, nonlinear simulation of NASA s Generic Transport Model (GTM).

  12. Mode-converters for rectangular-core fiber amplifiers to achieve diffraction-limited power scaling.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Arun Kumar; Pax, Paul H; Heebner, John E; Drachenberg, Derrek R; Armstrong, J Paul; Dawson, Jay W

    2012-12-17

    A rectangular-core (ribbon) fiber that guides and amplifies a single higher-order-mode (HOM) can potentially scale to much higher average powers than what is possible in traditional circular-core large-mode-area fibers. Such an amplifier would require mode-conversion at the input to enable interfacing with seed sources that typically output TEM(00) mode radiation and at the output to generate diffraction-limited radiation for end-user applications. We present the first simulation and experimental results of a mode conversion technique that uses two diffractive-optic-elements in conjugate Fourier planes to convert a diffraction limited TEM(00) mode to the HOM of a ribbon fiber. Mode-conversion-efficiency is approximately 84% and can theoretically approach 100%. We also demonstrate a mode-converter system that converts a single HOM of a ribbon fiber back to a diffraction-limited TEM(00) mode. Conversion efficiency is a record 80.5%. PMID:23263119

  13. Relationship of core-scale heterogeneity with non-Darcy flow coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Rumhy, M.H.; Kalam, M.Z.

    1996-06-01

    An experimental research program to investigate the effects of liquid saturations upon non-Darcy flow coefficients is presented. the presence of a wetting phase fluid plays an important role in high velocity flow of a gas well, producing condensate or water, and in propped fractures containing liquid saturations. This study initially examines the errors commonly encountered but ignored in evaluating the permeabilities and the coefficient of inertial resistance during the flow of gases through porous media. Experimental techniques, such as constant overburden pressure, changing overburden pressure, forward flow, and backpressure flow, are applied to optimize and obtain accurate evaluations of Klinkenberg parameters and inertial resistance coefficients for a selection of Omani reservoir cores. Gas-slippage factor significantly influences the derived viscous and inertial coefficients from high-velocity gas flow data. An increasing wetting phase saturation increases the non-Darcy coefficient up to thirty-fold. Analysis of the experimental data revealed that unique relationships exist between the non-Darcy flow coefficients and the equivalent liquid permeability, porosity, and liquid saturation. Heterogeneity of the core as mapped by pore-scale measurements provide an insight into the mechanism for such a large increase in the non-Darcy coefficients.

  14. Small-scale cyclones on the periphery of a Gulf Stream warm-core ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennelly, M. A.; Evans, R. H.; Joyce, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    Small-scale cyclones found around Gulf Stream warm-core ring 82B are investigated by using infrared satellite images and current information obtained with an acoustic-Doppler velocimeter. Currents in these cyclones reveal speeds ranging from 20 to 80 cm/s. One small cyclone or 'ringlet' found in June 1982 was studied extensively by removing the basic rotational velocities of 82B. The azimuthal velocity field for this ringlet was used with the gradient current equation to calculate the absolute dynamic topography at 100 dbar. It was found that the ringlet was 13 dyn-cm lower than its surroundings. In addition, neglect of the centrifugal term would have changed the dynamic topography of the ringlet by 30 percent. From a comparison with CTD data the absolute reference level was determined, and a vertical profile of horizontal currents was calculated for the ringlet. Other cyclones were found throughout the slope water region around warm-core ring 82B with observable lifetimes of 1 to 2 weeks. The northeast quadrant of 82B was a favored generation site for ringlets. Two cyclones were observed to form in this region and were advected anticyclonically around 82B. Typically, at any one time, six cyclones with diameters of approximately 40 to 50 km can be detected north of the Gulf Stream by using satellite images.

  15. Core shell micron-scale composites of titanium oxide and carbide formed through controlled thermal-plasma oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ya-Li; Ishigaki, Takamasa

    2003-01-01

    Core-shell structured micron-scale spheres of titanium oxide and carbide were prepared by the controlled in-flight oxidation of a powder of irregularly shaped titanium-carbide particles in an argon-oxygen thermal plasma. Mono-dispersed core-shell particles with rutile shells and TiC cores were formed by an intermediate-rate input of oxygen to the plasma gas. The partial oxidation of the TiC particles in the liquid phase was accompanied by spheroidization of the surface oxide melt, thus giving rise to a core-shell composite under rapid quenching. TiO 2-TiC core-shell composites have potential as new materials for roles such as light-scattering media, photo-catalysts, and electro-rheorogical fluids.

  16. Development and validation of a generic high-performance liquid chromatography for the simultaneous separation and determination of six cough ingredients: Robustness study on core-shell particles.

    PubMed

    Yehia, Ali Mohamed; Essam, Hebatallah Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    A generally applicable high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the qualitative and quantitative determination of pharmaceutical preparations containing phenylephrine hydrochloride, paracetamol, ephedrine hydrochloride, guaifenesin, doxylamine succinate, and dextromethorphan hydrobromide is developed. Optimization of chromatographic conditions was performed for the gradient elution using different buffer pH values, flow rates and two C18 stationary phases. The method was developed using a Kinetex® C18 column as a core-shell stationary phase with a gradient profile using buffer pH 5.0 and acetonitrile at 2.0 mL/min flow rate. Detection was carried out at 220 nm and linear calibrations were obtained for all components within the studied ranges. The method was fully validated in agreement with ICH guidelines. The proposed method is specific, accurate and precise (RSD% < 3%). Limits of detection are lower than 2.0 μg/mL. Qualitative and quantitative responses were evaluated using experimental design to assist the method robustness. The method was proved to be highly robust against 10% change in buffer pH and flow rate (RSD% < 10%), however, the flow rate may significantly influence the quantitative responses of phenylephrine, paracetamol, and doxylamine (RSD% > 10%). Satisfactory results were obtained for commercial combinations analyses. Statistical comparison between the proposed chromatographic and official methods revealed no significant difference. PMID:27404374

  17. An ice core derived 1013-year catchment-scale annual rainfall reconstruction in subtropical eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozer, Carly R.; Vance, Tessa R.; Roberts, Jason L.; Kiem, Anthony S.; Curran, Mark A. J.; Moy, Andrew D.

    2016-05-01

    Paleoclimate research indicates that the Australian instrumental climate record (˜ 100 years) does not cover the full range of hydroclimatic variability that is possible. To better understand the implications of this on catchment-scale water resources management, a 1013-year (1000-2012 common era (CE)) annual rainfall reconstruction was produced for the Williams River catchment in coastal eastern Australia. No high-resolution paleoclimate proxies are located in the region and so a teleconnection between summer sea salt deposition recorded in ice cores from East Antarctica and rainfall variability in eastern Australia was exploited to reconstruct the catchment-scale rainfall record. The reconstruction shows that significantly longer and more frequent wet and dry periods were experienced in the preinstrumental compared to the instrumental period. This suggests that existing drought and flood risk assessments underestimate the true risks due to the reliance on data and statistics obtained from only the instrumental record. This raises questions about the robustness of existing water security and flood protection measures and has serious implications for water resources management, infrastructure design and catchment planning. The method used in this proof of concept study is transferable and enables similar insights into the true risk of flood/drought to be gained for other paleoclimate proxy poor regions for which suitable remote teleconnected proxies exist. This will lead to improved understanding and ability to deal with the impacts of multi-decadal to centennial hydroclimatic variability.

  18. WETTABILITY AND IMBIBITION: MICROSCOPIC DISTRIBUTION OF WETTING AND ITS CONSEQUENCES AT THE CORE AND FIELD SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow; Chris Palmer; Purnendu K. Dasgupta

    2003-02-01

    The questions of reservoir wettability have been approached in this project from three directions. First, we have studied the properties of crude oils that contribute to wetting alteration in a reservoir. A database of more than 150 different crude oil samples has been established to facilitate examination of the relationships between crude oil chemical and physical properties and their influence on reservoir wetting. In the course of this work an improved SARA analysis technique was developed and major advances were made in understanding asphaltene stability including development of a thermodynamic Asphaltene Solubility Model (ASM) and empirical methods for predicting the onset of instability. The CO-Wet database is a resource that will be used to guide wettability research in the future. The second approach is to study crude oil/brine/rock interactions on smooth surfaces. Contact angle measurements were made under controlled conditions on mica surfaces that had been exposed to many of the oils in the CO-Wet database. With this wealth of data, statistical tests can now be used to examine the relationships between crude oil properties and the tendencies of those oils to alter wetting. Traditionally, contact angles have been used as the primary wetting assessment tool on smooth surfaces. A new technique has been developed using an atomic forces microscope that adds a new dimension to the ability to characterize oil-treated surfaces. Ultimately we aim to understand wetting in porous media, the focus of the third approach taken in this project. Using oils from the CO-Wet database, experimental advances have been made in scaling the rate of imbibition, a sensitive measure of core wetting. Application of the scaling group to mixed-wet systems has been demonstrated for a range of core conditions. Investigations of imbibition in gas/liquid systems provided the motivation for theoretical advances as well. As a result of this project we have many new tools for studying

  19. Novel laboratory methods for determining the fine scale electrical resistivity structure of core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslam, E. P.; Gunn, D. A.; Jackson, P. D.; Lovell, M. A.; Aydin, A.; Prance, R. J.; Watson, P.

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution electrical resistivity measurements are made on saturated rocks using novel laboratory instrumentation and multiple electrical voltage measurements involving in principle a four-point electrode measurement but with a single, moving electrode. Flat, rectangular core samples are scanned by varying the electrode position over a range of hundreds of millimetres with an accuracy of a tenth of a millimetre. Two approaches are tested involving a contact electrode and a non-contact electrode arrangement. The first galvanic method uses balanced cycle switching of a floating direct current (DC) source to minimise charge polarisation effects masking the resistivity distribution related to fine scale structure. These contacting electrode measurements are made with high common mode noise rejection via differential amplification with respect to a reference point within the current flow path. A computer based multifunction data acquisition system logs the current through the sample and voltages along equipotentials from which the resistivity measurements are derived. Multiple measurements are combined to create images of the surface resistivity structure, with variable spatial resolution controlled by the electrode spacing. Fine scale sedimentary features and open fractures in saturated rocks are interpreted from the measurements with reference to established relationships between electrical resistivity and porosity. Our results successfully characterise grainfall lamination and sandflow cross-stratification in a brine saturated, dune bedded core sample representative of a southern North Sea reservoir sandstone, studied using the system in constant current, variable voltage mode. In contrast, in a low porosity marble, identification of open fracture porosity against a background very low matrix porosity is achieved using the constant voltage, variable current mode. This new system is limited by the diameter of the electrode that for practical reasons can only be

  20. Comparison of a NuScale SMR conceptual core design using CASMO5/simulate5 and MCNP5

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, B.; Mohamed, A.

    2012-07-01

    A key issue during the initial start-ups of new Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) is the lack of operational data for reactor model validation. To help better understand the accuracy of the reactor analysis codes CASMO5 and SIMULATE5, higher order comparisons to MCNP5 have been performed. These comparisons are for an initial core conceptual design of the NuScale reactor. The data have been evaluated at Hot Zero Power (HZP) conditions. Comparisons of core reactivity, fuel temperature coefficient (FTC), and moderator temperature coefficients (MTC) have been performed. Comparison results show good agreement between CASMO5/SIMULATE5 and MCNP5 for the conceptual initial core design. (authors)

  1. Generic prescribing of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Bruck, P; Antao, C A; Henry, J A

    1992-11-01

    Analysis of National Health Service prescription data for the antidepressants from 1980 to 1989 shows a consistent secular trend towards the increased use of generic names on prescriptions for this group of drugs. This apparently reflects national trends for all drugs, and was similar for most antidepressants. However, generic prescribing had by 1989 increased significantly more rapidly with fluvoxamine, which was introduced in 1987. The two drugs introduced in 1989, fluoxetine and amoxapine, also had a high generic prescribing rate in their year of introduction. Increased generic prescribing may become a feature with further new drugs. However, the use of the generic name on the prescription has relatively little influence on what is dispensed to the patient. Pharmacists may dispense a brand name when given a generic prescription. Moreover, pressures on doctors to write generic names on prescriptions may have limited relevance for some drugs; generic alternatives were available for only four out of 22 antidepressants. PMID:1474553

  2. Conceptual Distinctions amongst Generics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasada, Sandeep; Khemlani, Sangeet; Leslie, Sarah-Jane; Glucksberg, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Generic sentences (e.g., bare plural sentences such as "dogs have four legs" and "mosquitoes carry malaria") are used to talk about "kinds" of things. Three experiments investigated the conceptual foundations of generics as well as claims within the formal semantic approaches to generics concerning the roles of prevalence, cue validity and…

  3. Alteration of Caprock Fracture Geometries During Flow of CO2-acidified Brine: Informing Basin-scale Leakage Models From Pore-scale modeling and Core-scale Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, B. R.; Peters, C. A.; Fitts, J. P.; Nogues, J. P.; Celia, M. A.; Dobossy, M.; Janzen, A.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, geologic carbon sequestration leakage assessment models do not account for geochemical alteration of potential leakage pathways such as fractures in the caprock formation. Leakage of CO2-acidified brine may lead to geochemical alterations of the fracture geometry that may alter fracture permeability. Accurate prediction of CO2 leakage potential requires bridging the gap between small-scale models and laboratory experiments, which have limited scope in space and time, and basin-scale leakage models. Results from two CO2-acidified brine flow-through experiments performed on artificially-fractured carbonate caprock samples will be presented. Although the two experiments used core samples taken from the same formation only centimeters apart, they resulted in two very different outcomes with respect to fracture permeability evolution. One experiment exhibited extensive deterioration along the fracture due primarily to dissolution of calcite, while the other exhibited a net decrease in fracture permeability due to a combination of mineral precipitation and particle clogging. The stark difference observed in the two experiments, for rocks from the same formation, suggests caprock fracture evolution is highly sensitive to variations in mineral spatial heterogeneity, brine composition and flow conditions. In addition to the laboratory experiments, we have developed a reactive-transport pore-network model that is capable of simulating alterations in network permeability and porosity due to flow of a CO2-acidified brine phase through carbonate rocks. The pore-network model will help us identify the important flow and geochemical conditions in which precipitation and dissolution occur. These small-scale projects will be used to inform a basin-scale leakage model of the pertinent range of geochemical conditions that should be tested in order to determine 1-D permeability evolution of leakage pathways. Finally, simplified mathematical rules will be derived to describe

  4. Linking high resolution 14C records to ice core time scales by means of Bayesian wiggle-matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolphi, F.; Muscheler, R.; Friedrich, M.; Güttler, D.; Wacker, L.; Kromer, B.

    2014-12-01

    Radiocarbon dating is the key method for obtaining chronological information of paleoclimate records covering the last ~45,000 years. The wealth of paleoclimatic information reconstructed from Greenland and Antarctic ice cores are often used as blue-prints to place these radiocarbon dated records into a wider context. However, while layer counted ice core time scales from Greenland provide high precision on the duration of events, the absolute age uncertainty increases back in time. This poses limitations on the possible detail and robustness of comparisons between radiocarbon dated, and ice core records. Cosmogenic radionuclide records, i.e. based on 14C and 10Be, provide a unique tool for synchronizing different time scales from various archives. They carry the common production rate signal which is modulated by variations in the strength of the helio- and geo- magnetic fields, which are climate-independent processes and global. We will present a method for synchronizing radiocarbon and Greenland ice core time scales back to 16,000 years ago based on Bayesian wiggle matching of cosmogenic radionuclide records. The method utilizes the strength of the high relative precision of ice core time scales as well as the small absolute age uncertainty from tree-ring chronologies and U/Th dated speleothems. The method provides combined error estimates and allows testing i) the accuracy of ice core time scales, ii) the quality of 14C records underlying the radiocarbon calibration curve as well as iii) assumptions of synchronicity of rapid climate changes. Furthermore, we will illustrate how this method can be used for high-precision radiocarbon wiggle-match dating of floating tree ring chronologies beyond 14,000 years ago, and potentially improve the radiocarbon calibration curve.

  5. An ice core derived 1013-year catchment scale annual rainfall reconstruction in subtropical eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozer, C. R.; Vance, T. R.; Roberts, J.; Kiem, A. S.; Curran, M. A. J.; Moy, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Paleoclimate research indicates that the instrumental climate record (~100 years in Australia) does not cover the full range of hydroclimatic variability possible. To better understand the implications of this for catchment-scale water resources management, an annual rainfall reconstruction is produced for the Williams River catchment in coastal eastern Australia. No high resolution palaeoclimate proxies are located in the region and so a teleconnection between summer sea salt deposition recorded in ice cores from East Antarctica and rainfall variability in eastern Australia was exploited to reconstruct 1013 years of rainfall (AD 1000-2012). The reconstruction shows that significantly longer and more frequent wet and dry periods were experienced in the preinstrumental compared to the instrumental period. This suggests that existing drought and flood risk assessments underestimate the true risks due to the reliance on data and statistics obtained from only the instrumental record. This raises questions about the robustness of existing water security and flood protection measures and has serious implications for water resources management, infrastructure design, and catchment planning. The method used in this proof of concept study is transferable and enables similar insights into the true risk of flood/drought to be gained for other locations that are teleconnected to East Antarctica. This will lead to improved understanding and ability to deal with the impacts of multidecadal to centennial hydroclimatic variability.

  6. Direct pore-to-core up-scaling of displacement processes: Dynamic pore network modeling and experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghaei, Arash; Piri, Mohammad

    2015-03-01

    We present a new dynamic pore network model that is capable of up-scaling two-phase flow processes from pore to core. This dynamic model provides a platform to study various flow processes in porous media at the core scale using the pore-scale physics. The most critical features of this platform include (1) the incorporation of viscous, capillary, and gravity pressure drops in pore-scale displacement thresholds, (2) wetting-phase corner flow in capillary elements with angular cross-sections, (3) adjustments of corner interfaces between wetting and non-wetting phases based on changes in local capillary pressure, (4) simultaneous injection of wetting and non-wetting phases from the inlet of the medium at constant flow rates that makes the study of steady-state processes possible, (5) heavy parallelization using a three-dimensional domain decomposition scheme that enables the study of two-phase flow at the core scale, and (6) constant pressure boundary condition at the outlet. For the validation of the dynamic model, three two-phase miniature core-flooding experiments were performed in a state-of-the-art micro core-flooding system integrated with a high-resolution X-ray micro-CT scanner. The dynamic model was rigorously validated by comparing the predicted local saturation profiles, fractional flow curves, relative permeabilities, and residual oil saturations against their experimental counterparts. The validated dynamic model was then used to study low-IFT and high-viscosity two-phase flow processes and investigate the effect of high capillary number on relative permeabilities and residual oil saturation.

  7. X-Ray Scaling Relations of 'Core' and 'Coreless' E and S0 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Woo; Fabbiano, Giuseppina

    2015-10-01

    We have re-examined the two X-ray scaling relations of early-type galaxies (ETGs), LX,GAS-LK and LX,GAS-TGAS, using 61 ATLAS3D E and S0 galaxies observed with Chandra (including ROSAT results for a few X-ray bright galaxies with extended hot gas). With this sample, which doubles the number of ETGs available for study we confirm the strong, steep correlations reported by Boroson et al. Moreover, the larger sample allows us to investigate the effect of structural and dynamical properties of ETGs in these relations. Using the sub-sample of 11 “genuine” E galaxies with central surface brightness cores, slow stellar rotations and old stellar populations, we find that the scatter of the correlations is strongly reduced, yielding an extremely tight relation of the form LX,GAS ˜ {{T}{GAS}}4.5+/- 0.3. The rms deviation is only 0.13 dex. For the gas-rich galaxies in this sample (LX,GAS > 1040 erg s-1), this relation is consistent with recent simulations for velocity dispersion supported E galaxies. However, the tight LX,GAS-TGAS relation of genuine E galaxies extends down into the LX ˜ 1038 erg s-1 range, where simulations predict the gas to be in outflow/wind state, with resulting LX much lower than observed in our sample. The observed correlation may suggest the presence of small bound hot halos even in this low luminosity range. At the high luminosity end, the LX,GAS-TGAS correlation of core elliptical galaxies is similar to that found in samples of cD galaxies and groups, but shifted down toward relatively lower LX,GAS for a given TGAS. In particular cDs, central dominant galaxies sitting at the bottom of the potential well imposed by the group dark matter, have an order of magnitude higher LX,GAS than our sample core galaxies for the same LK and TGAS. We suggest that enhanced cooling in cDs, which have higher hot gas densities and lower entropies, could lower TGAS to the range observed in giant Es; this conclusion is supported by the presence of extended cold gas

  8. Development and scale-up of the low density core process for Ti-64

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, D.S.; Shih, D.S.; Lederich, R.J.; Martin, R.L.; Deuser, D.A.

    1998-12-31

    The Low Density Core (LDC) process is a method for making metallic structures with solid surfaces covering a porous core. The development of the LDC process for making Ti-64 sheet based structures is described. Sheets {approximately}2000 x 1200 x 4 mm{sup 3} have been made with {approximately}40 vol.% core porosity levels, and several forming techniques have been demonstrated. The LDC billet breakdown and forming behavior was found to be similar to conventional Ti-64 processes, so LDC Ti-64 sheet has the advantage that it can be fabricated into structures using well-established methods.

  9. Children Expect Generic Knowledge to Be Widely Shared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimpian, Andrei; Scott, Rose M.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to acquire and store generic information (that is, information about entire categories) is at the core of human cognition. Remarkably, even young children place special value on generic information, often inferring that it holds important insights about the world. Here, we tested whether children's assumptions about the nature of…

  10. Test plan: Laboratory-scale testing of the first core sample from Tank 102-AZ

    SciTech Connect

    Morrey, E.V.

    1996-03-01

    The overall objectives of the Radioactive Process/Product Laboratory Testing (RPPLT), WBS 1.2.2.05.05, are to confirm that simulated HWVP feed and glass are representative of actual radioactive HWVP feed and glass and to provide radioactive leaching and glass composition data to WFQ. This study will provide data from one additional NCAW core sample (102-AZ Core 1) for these purposes.

  11. Fuel cell performance of palladium-platinum core-shell electrocatalysts synthesized in gram-scale batches

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khateeb, Siddique; Su, Dong; Guerreo, Sandra; Darling, Robert M.; Protsailo, Lesia V.; Shao, Minhua

    2016-05-03

    This article presents the performance of palladium-platinum core-shell catalysts (Pt/Pd/C) for oxygen reduction synthesized in gram-scale batches in both liquid cells and polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Core-shell catalyst synthesis and characterization, ink fabrication, and cell assembly details are discussed. The Pt mass activity of the Pt/Pd core-shell catalyst was 0.95 A mg–1 at 0.9 V measured in liquid cells (0.1 M HClO4), which was 4.8 times higher than a commercial Pt/C catalyst. The performances of Pt/Pd/C and Pt/C in large single cells (315 cm2) were assessed under various operating conditions. The core-shell catalyst showed consistently higher performance than commercial Pt/Cmore » in fuel cell testing. A 20–60 mV improvement across the whole current density range was observed on air. Sensitivities to temperature, humidity, and gas composition were also investigated and the core-shell catalyst showed a consistent benefit over Pt under all conditions. However, the 4.8 times activity enhancement predicated by liquid cell measurements was not fully realized in fuel cells.« less

  12. Induced core formation time in subcritical magnetic clouds by large-scale trans-Alfvénic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kudoh, Takahiro; Basu, Shantanu E-mail: basu@uwo.ca

    2014-10-20

    We clarify the mechanism of accelerated core formation by large-scale nonlinear flows in subcritical magnetic clouds by finding a semi-analytical formula for the core formation time and describing the physical processes that lead to them. Recent numerical simulations show that nonlinear flows induce rapid ambipolar diffusion that leads to localized supercritical regions that can collapse. Here, we employ non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations including ambipolar diffusion for gravitationally stratified sheets threaded by vertical magnetic fields. One of the horizontal dimensions is eliminated, resulting in a simpler two-dimensional simulation that can clarify the basic process of accelerated core formation. A parameter study of simulations shows that the core formation time is inversely proportional to the square of the flow speed when the flow speed is greater than the Alfvén speed. We find a semi-analytical formula that explains this numerical result. The formula also predicts that the core formation time is about three times shorter than that with no turbulence, when the turbulent speed is comparable to the Alfvén speed.

  13. Generic phytosanitary irradiation treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The history of the development of generic phytosanitary irradiation (PI) treatments is discussed beginning with its initial proposal in 1986. Generic PI treatments in use today are 150 Gy for all hosts of Tephritidae, 250 Gy for all arthropods on mango and papaya shipped from Australia to New Zeala...

  14. INL Generic Robot Architecture

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-03-30

    The INL Generic Robot Architecture is a generic, extensible software framework that can be applied across a variety of different robot geometries, sensor suites and low-level proprietary control application programming interfaces (e.g. mobility, aria, aware, player, etc.).

  15. Reconstructing the 3D fracture distribution model from core (10 cm) to outcrop (10 m) and lineament (10 km) scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcel, C.; Davy, P.; Bour, O.; de Dreuzy, J.

    2006-12-01

    Considering the role of fractures in hydraulic flow, the knowledge of the 3D spatial distribution of fractures is a basic concern for any hydrogeology-related study (potential leakages in waste repository, aquifer management, ?). Unfortunately geophysical imagery is quite blind with regard to fractures, and only the largest ones are generally detected, if they are. Actually most of the information has to be derived from statistical models whose parameters are defined from a few sparse sampling areas, such as wells, outcrops, or lineament maps. How these observations obtained at different scales can be linked to each other is a critical point, which directly addresses the issue of fracture scaling. In this study, we use one of the most important datasets that have ever been collected for characterizing fracture networks. It was collected by the Swedish company SKB for their research program on deep repository for radioactive waste, and consists of large-scale lineament maps covering about 100 km2, several outcrops of several hundreds of m2 mapped with a fracture trace length resolution down to 0.50 m, and a series of 1000m-deep cored boreholes where both fracture orientations and fracture intensities were carefully recorded. Boreholes are an essential complement to surface outcrops as they allow the sampling of horizontal fracture planes that, generally, are severely undersampled in subhorizontal outcrops. Outcrops, on the other hand, provide information on fracture sizes which is not possible to address from core information alone. However linking outcrops and boreholes is not straightforward: the sampling scale is obviously different and some scaling rules have to be applied to relate both fracture distributions; outcrops are 2D planes while boreholes are mostly 1D records; outcrops can be affected by superficial fracturing processes that are not representative of the fracturing at depth. We present here the stereology methods for calculating the 3D distribution

  16. Core Heat Flow and Suppression of Mantle Plumes by Plate-Scale Mantle Flow: Results From Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, H. M.; Jellinek, A. M.; Richards, M. A.; Manga, M.

    2002-12-01

    Heat flow from the Earth's core to the mantle remains an unresolved quantity. Its value has implications for the core's thermal evolution and growth of the inner core, the geodynamo, and the relative abundance of radioactive elements in the core and mantle. Core heat flow is affected by dynamics of the lowermost mantle in three ways: (1) advection of heat by plume instabilities; (2) conductive heating of subducted material; and (3) suppression of plume instabilities, as well as advection of heat by plate-scale mantle flow. We present results from a boundary-layer analysis and laboratory experiments aimed at understanding the effects of an imposed large-scale circulation on thermal convection at high-Rayleigh number (106<=Ra<=109) in a fluid with a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity. The ultimate goal of this work is to better understand the effect of plate-scale mantle flow on heat flux across the CMB and on the dynamics of plume formation at the CMB. Our theoretical analysis is complemented by lab experiments, in which a layer of corn syrup is heated from below and a large-scale flow is induced in the fluid above the hot boundary. We identify 4 convective regions associated with high-Rayleigh number convection in the presence of a large-scale flow: (1) a subcritical TBL region (Domain I), where plume instabilities are suppressed by the advective thinning of the TBL and heat flux is increased relative to convection without large-scale flow; (2) a supercritical TBL region (Domain II), where plume instabilities are no longer suppressed and heat flux is equal to convection without large-scale flow; (3) a flow-dominated region (Domain III), which is free of plumes; and (4) a plume-dominated domain (Domain IV), where the interaction of hot buoyant plumes and imposed large-scale flow results in lateral advection and distortion of rising plumes. In addition, we present a boundary-layer analysis that predicts heat flux, Q, from a hot surface as a function of imposed

  17. Large-Scale Gene Relocations following an Ancient Genome Triplication Associated with the Diversification of Core Eudicots

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yupeng; Ficklin, Stephen P.; Wang, Xiyin; Feltus, F. Alex; Paterson, Andrew H.

    2016-01-01

    Different modes of gene duplication including whole-genome duplication (WGD), and tandem, proximal and dispersed duplications are widespread in angiosperm genomes. Small-scale, stochastic gene relocations and transposed gene duplications are widely accepted to be the primary mechanisms for the creation of dispersed duplicates. However, here we show that most surviving ancient dispersed duplicates in core eudicots originated from large-scale gene relocations within a narrow window of time following a genome triplication (γ) event that occurred in the stem lineage of core eudicots. We name these surviving ancient dispersed duplicates as relocated γ duplicates. In Arabidopsis thaliana, relocated γ, WGD and single-gene duplicates have distinct features with regard to gene functions, essentiality, and protein interactions. Relative to γ duplicates, relocated γ duplicates have higher non-synonymous substitution rates, but comparable levels of expression and regulation divergence. Thus, relocated γ duplicates should be distinguished from WGD and single-gene duplicates for evolutionary investigations. Our results suggest large-scale gene relocations following the γ event were associated with the diversification of core eudicots. PMID:27195960

  18. Short period ScP phase amplitude calculations for core-mantle boundary with intermediate scale topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhichao; Ni, Sidao; Wu, Wenbo; Sun, Daoyuan

    2016-04-01

    The core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography plays a key role in constraining geodynamic modeling and core-mantle coupling. It's effective to resolve the intermediate lateral scale topography (hundreds of km) with short period core reflected seismic phases (ScP) due to their small Fresnel-zones at short epicentral distances (<3336 km (30°)). We developed a method based on the ray theory and representation theorem to calculate short period ScP synthetics for intermediate lateral scale CMB topography. The CMB topography we introduced here is axisymmetric and specified with two parameters: H (height) and L (diameter, or lateral length scale). Our numerical computation shows that a bump (H > 0) and dip (H < 0) model would cause defocusing/weakening and focusing/amplifying effects on ScP amplitude. Moreover, the effect of frequency and combination of L and H are quantified with the amplification coefficients. Then we applied this method to estimate a possible CMB topography beneath northeastern Japan, and a CMB model with L = 140 km, H = 1.2 km overall matches the observed pattern of 2D PcP/ScP amplitude ratios. However, it is difficult to totally rule out other factors that may also affect PcP/ScP pattern because of limitation of ray-based algorithms we used here. A hybrid method combining ray theory and numerical method is promising for studying complicated 3D structure and CMB topography in the future.

  19. Bosonics: Phononics, Magnonics, Plasmonics in Nano-Scale Disorder(Nanonics), Metamaterials, Astro-Seismology (Meganonics): Brillouin-Siegel GENERIC: Generalized-Disorder Collective-Boson Mode-Softening Universality-Principle (G...P) With PIPUB Many-Body Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Edward

    Siegel and Matsubara[Statphys-13(`77) Intl.Conf.Lattice-Dyn.(`77)Scripta Met.13,913(`80)]JMMM:5, 1, 84 (`77)22,1:41,58(`80)Mag.Lett.(`80)Phys./Chem.Liquids:4,(4) (`75)5,(1)(76)] generalization to GENERIC Siegel[J.Non-Xline-Sol.40,453(`80)] G...P GENERIC Brillouin[Wave-Propagation in Periodic-Structures(`22)]-Landau[`41]-Feynman[`51]-de Boer[in Phonons/Phonon-Interactions(`64)]-Egelstaff[Intro.Liquid-State(`65)]-Hubbard-Beebe[J.Phys.C(`67)]-``Anderson''[1958]- Siegel [J.Non-Xl.-Sol. 40, 453(`80)] GENERIC many-body localization. GENERIC Hubbard-Beebe[J.Phys.C(`67)] static structure-factor S(k) modulated kinetic-energy ω(k) = ℏ ⌃(2)k⌃(2)/2mS(k) expressing G....P(``bass-ackwardly'') aka homogeneity and isotropy creates GENERIC G...P with GENERIC pseudo-isotropic pseudo-Umklapp backscattering (PIPUB) for GENERIC many-body localization of and/or by mutually interacting collective-bosons: phonons(phononics) with magnons(magnonics) with plasmons(plasmonics) with fermions (electros, holes)...etc. in nano-scale ``disorder'', metamaterials and on very-macro-scales (surprisingly) Bildsten et.al. astro-seismology(meganonics) of red-giant main-sequence stars(Mira, Betelguese)!

  20. Unlocking the Physiochemical Controls on Organic Carbon Dynamics from the Soil Pore- to Core-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. P.; Tfaily, M. M.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Todd-Brown, K. E.; Bailey, V. L.

    2015-12-01

    The physical organization of soil includes pore networks of varying size and connectivity. These networks control microbial access to soil organic carbon (C) by spatially separating microorganisms and C by both distance and size exclusion. The extent to which this spatially isolated C is vulnerable to microbial transformation under hydrologically dynamic conditions is unknown, and limits our ability to predict the source and sink capacity of soils. We investigated the effects of shifting hydrologic connectivity and soil structure on greenhouse gas C emissions from surface soils collected from the Disney Wilderness Preserve (Florida, USA). We subjected intact soil cores and re-packed homogenized soil cores to simulated groundwater rise or precipitation, monitoring their CO2 and CH4 emissions over 24 hours. Soil pore water was then extracted from each core using different suctions to sample water retained by pore throats of different sizes and then characterized by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. Greater respiration rates were observed from homogenized cores compared to intact cores, and from soils wet from below, in which the wetting front is driven by capillary forces, filling fine pores first. This suggests that C located in fine pores may turn over via diffusion processes that lead to the colocation of this C with other resources and microorganisms. Both the complexity and concentration of soluble-C increased with decreasing pore size domains. Pore water extracted from homogenized cores had greater C concentrations than from intact cores, with the greatest concentrations in pore waters sampled from very fine pores, highlighting the importance of soil structure in physically protecting C. These results suggest that the spatial separation of decomposers from C is a key mechanism stabilizing C in these soils. Further research is ongoing to accurately represent this protection mechanism, and the conditions under which it breaks

  1. The Scaling Rule and Fluxon Core Pinning in a High-Field Superconductor with Artificially Introduced Pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, Lance David

    Flux pinning affects virtually every aspect of high-field superconductivity. Its fundamental mechanism(s) are in principle derived from a complicated theory, but are in practice generally accessed through measuring the field dependence of the bulk flux pinning force (F _{p}(B)). The central piece of information is the shape of the F_{p }(B) curve: It is generally accepted that if, and only if, the curve's shape is constant while the temperature or pin dimension changes, one pinning mechanism is dominant (the 'scaling rule'). During the course of this thesis, we established that the shape of F_{p}(B) is affected by the statistical distribution of the elementary pinning forces (f_{p}). Contrary to prior beliefs, it was concluded that the shape of the bulk pinning force curve for fluxon core pinning is constant, when the distribution is broad, only if the microstructure is fractal. The peak of the F_ {p}(B) curve occurs at a lower field prior models predict, regardless of whether the shape of the curve is constant. When the distribution is narrow, a constant shape occurs, and has the shape predicted for core pinning and direct summation. Thus, the bulk pinning force curve and the elementary pinning mechanism are directly related by the scaling rule only when the f_ {p} distribution is narrow. Within this context, core pinning has been investigated with a specially fabricated Nb-Ti composite having artificially introduced pins, for which the f_{p } distribution is as narrow as can be made. By design, core pinning should be dominant; the shape of the F_{p}(B) curve does not, however, have the predicted form. The results can be explained by a new pinning mechanism, which incorporates the proximity effect and an anisotropic fluxon core, as proposed by Gurevich. It is concluded that the shape of the bulk pinning force curve is very sensitive to the proximity effect, and it can have a peak at a higher field than was previously thought possible for core pinning. The scaling

  2. Centimeter-scale secondary information on hydraulic conductivity using a hand-held air permeameter on borehole cores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogiers, B.; Winters, P.; Huysmans, M.; Beerten, K.; Mallants, D.; Gedeon, M.; Batelaan, O.; Dassargues, A.

    2012-04-01

    Saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) is one of the most important parameters determining groundwater flow and contaminant transport in both unsaturated and saturated porous media. Determining the small-scale variability of this parameter is key to evaluate implications on effective parameters at the larger scale. Moreover, for stochastic simulations of groundwater flow and contaminant transport, accurate models on the spatial variability of Ks are very much needed. While several well-established laboratory methods exist for determining Ks, investigating the small-scale variability remains a challenge. If several tens to hundreds of metres of borehole core has to be hydraulically characterised at the centimetre to decimetre scale, several hundreds to thousands of Ks measurements are required, which makes it very costly and time-consuming should traditional methods be used. With reliable air permeameters becoming increasingly available from the late 80's, a fast and effective indirect method exists to determine Ks. Therefore, the use of hand-held air permeameter measurements for determining very accurate small-scale heterogeneity about Ks is very appealing. Very little is known, however, on its applicability for borehole cores that typically carry a small sediment volume. Therefore, the method was tested on several borehole cores of different size, originating from the Campine basin, Northern Belgium. The studied sediments are of Miocene to Pleistocene age, with a marine to continental origin, and consist of sand to clayey sand with distinct clay lenses, resulting in a Ks range of 7 orders of magnitude. During previous studies, two samples were taken from borehole cores each two meters for performing constant head lab permeameter tests. This data is now used as a reference for the air permeameter measurements that are performed with a resolution of 5 centimetres. Preliminary results indicate a very good correlation between the previously gathered constant head Ks

  3. Scaling Graph Community Detection on the Tilera Many-core Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Kalyanaraman, Anantharaman

    2014-12-01

    In an era when power constraints and data movement are proving to be significant barriers for the application of high-end computing, the Tilera many-core architecture offers a low-power platform exhibiting many important characteristics of future systems, including a large number of simple cores, a sophisticated network-on-chip, and fine-grained control over memory and caching policies. While this emerging architecture has been previously studied for structured compute-intensive kernels, benchmarking the platform for data-bound, irregular applications present significant challenges that have remained unexplored. Community detection is an advanced prototypical graph-theoretic operation with applications in numerous scientific domains including life sciences, cyber security, and power systems. In this work, we explore multiple design strategies toward developing a scalable tool for community detection on the Tilera platform. Using several memory layout and work scheduling techniques we demonstrate speedups of up to 46x on 36 cores of the Tilera TileGX36 platform over the best serial implementation, and also show results that have comparable quality and performance to mainstream x86 platforms. To the best of our knowledge this is the first work addressing graph algorithms on the Tilera platform. This study demonstrates that through careful design space exploration, low-power many-core platforms like Tilera can be effectively exploited for graph algorithms that that embody all the essential characteristics of an irregular application.

  4. Generic antibiotics in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Shigeru; Watanabe, Akira

    2012-08-01

    Generic drugs have been used extensively in many developed countries, although their use in Japan has been limited. Generic drugs reduce drug expenses and thereby national medical expenditure. Because generic drugs provide advantages for both public administration and consumers, it is expected that they will be more widely used in the future. However, the diffusion rate of generic drugs in Japan is quite low compared with that of other developed countries. An investigation on generic drugs conducted by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan revealed that 17.2 % of doctors and 37.2 % of patients had not used generic drugs. The major reasons for this low use rate included distrust of off-patent products and lower drug price margin compared with the brand name drug. The generic drugs available in the market include external drugs such as wet packs, antihypertensive agents, analgesics, anticancer drugs, and antibiotics. Among them, antibiotics are frequently used in cases of acute infectious diseases. When the treatment of these infections is delayed, the infection might be aggravated rapidly. The pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics (PK-PD) theory has been adopted in recent chemotherapy, and in many cases, the most appropriate dosage and administration of antibiotics are determined for individual patients considering renal function; high-dosage antibiotics are used preferably for a short duration. Therefore, a highly detailed antimicrobial agent is necessary. However, some of the generic antibiotics have less antibacterial potency or solubility than the brand name products. We showed that the potency of the generic products of vancomycin and teicoplanin is lower than that of the branded drugs by 14.6 % and 17.3 %, respectively. Furthermore, we confirmed that a generic meropenem drug for injection required about 82 s to solubilize in saline, whereas the brand product required only about 21 s. It was thought that the cause may be the difference in size of bulk

  5. Microstructure-dependent mechanical properties of electrospun core-shell scaffolds at multi-scale levels.

    PubMed

    Horner, Christopher B; Ico, Gerardo; Johnson, Jed; Zhao, Yi; Nam, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Mechanical factors among many physiochemical properties of scaffolds for stem cell-based tissue engineering significantly affect tissue morphogenesis by controlling stem cell behaviors including proliferation and phenotype-specific differentiation. Core-shell electrospinning provides a unique opportunity to control mechanical properties of scaffolds independent of surface chemistry, rendering a greater freedom to tailor design for specific applications. In this study, we synthesized electrospun core-shell scaffolds having different core composition and/or core-to-shell dimensional ratios. Two independent biocompatible polymer systems, polyetherketoneketone (PEKK) and gelatin as the core materials while maintaining the shell polymer with polycaprolactone (PCL), were utilized. The mechanics of such scaffolds was analyzed at the microscale and macroscales to determine the potential implications it may hold for cell-material and tissue-material interactions. The mechanical properties of individual core-shell fibers were controlled by core-shell composition and structure. The individual fiber modulus correlated with the increase in percent core size ranging from 0.55±0.10GPa to 1.74±0.22GPa and 0.48±0.12GPa to 1.53±0.12GPa for the PEKK-PCL and gelatin-PCL fibers, respectively. More importantly, it was demonstrated that mechanical properties of the scaffolds at the macroscale were dominantly determined by porosity under compression. The increase of scaffold porosity from 70.2%±1.0% to 93.2%±0.5% by increasing the core size in the PEKK-PCL scaffold resulted in the decrease of the compressive elastic modulus from 227.67±20.39kPa to 14.55±1.43kPa while a greater changes in the porosity of gelatin-PCL scaffold from 54.5%±4.2% to 89.6%±0.4% resulted in the compressive elastic modulus change from 484.01±30.18kPa to 17.57±1.40kPa. On the other hand, the biphasic behaviors under tensile mechanical loading result in a range from a minimum of 5.42±1.05MPa to a maximum

  6. Product, generic, and random generic quantum satisfiability

    SciTech Connect

    Laumann, C. R.; Sondhi, S. L.; Laeuchli, A. M.; Moessner, R.; Scardicchio, A.

    2010-06-15

    We report a cluster of results on k-QSAT, the problem of quantum satisfiability for k-qubit projectors which generalizes classical satisfiability with k-bit clauses to the quantum setting. First we define the NP-complete problem of product satisfiability and give a geometrical criterion for deciding when a QSAT interaction graph is product satisfiable with positive probability. We show that the same criterion suffices to establish quantum satisfiability for all projectors. Second, we apply these results to the random graph ensemble with generic projectors and obtain improved lower bounds on the location of the SAT-unSAT transition. Third, we present numerical results on random, generic satisfiability which provide estimates for the location of the transition for k=3 and k=4 and mild evidence for the existence of a phase which is satisfiable by entangled states alone.

  7. Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA) standard specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, Richard B.; Stovall, John R.

    1994-01-01

    This standard establishes the Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA). The SGOAA includes a generic functional model, processing structural model, and an architecture interface model. This standard defines the requirements for applying these models to the development of spacecraft core avionics systems. The purpose of this standard is to provide an umbrella set of requirements for applying the generic architecture models to the design of a specific avionics hardware/software processing system. This standard defines a generic set of system interface points to facilitate identification of critical services and interfaces. It establishes the requirement for applying appropriate low level detailed implementation standards to those interfaces points. The generic core avionics functions and processing structural models provided herein are robustly tailorable to specific system applications and provide a platform upon which the interface model is to be applied.

  8. What makes a generic medication generic?

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2009-12-01

    By law, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) can approve generic versions of brand-name drugs without requiring that research be conducted to prove them safe and effective. However, compared with a brand-name drug, a generic drug must demonstrate that it (a) contains the same active ingredients; (b) is identical in strength, dosage form, and route of administration; (c) is bioequivalent; (d) has the same clinical use indications; (e) meets the same batch requirements for identity, strength, purity, and quality; and (f) is manufactured according to the same FDA regulations. The most important aspect of generic drug development are the concepts of bioavailability and bioequivalence. According to the concept of bioequivalence, if a drug product contains an active ingredient that is chemically identical and is delivered to the site of action at the same rate and extent as another drug product, then it is considered to be clinically equivalent and can be substituted for that drug product. PMID:20000278

  9. Tree ring and ice core time scales around the Santorini eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löfroth, Elin; Muscheler, Raimund; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran; Berggren, Ann-Marie

    2010-05-01

    When studying cosmogenic radionuclides in ice core and tree ring archives around the Santorini eruption a ~20 year discrepancy was found between the records (Muscheler 2009). In this study a new 10Be dataset from the NGRIP ice core is presented. It has a resolution of 7 years and spans the period 3752-3244 BP (1803-1295 BC). The NGRIP 10Be record and the previously published 10Be GRIP record were compared to the IntCal datasets to further investigate the discrepancy between the ice core and tree ring chronologies. By modelling the 14C production rate based on atmospheric 14C records a comparison could be made to the 10Be flux which is assumed to represent the 10Be production rate. This showed a time shift of ~23 years between the records. The sensitivity of the results to changes in important model parameters was evaluated. Uncertainties in the carbon cycle model cannot explain a substantial part of the timing differences. Potential influences of climate and atmospheric processes on the 10Be deposition were studied using δ18O from the respective cores and GISP2 ice core ion data. The comparison to δ18O revealed a small but significant correlation between 10Be flux and δ18O when the 14C-derived production signal was removed from the 10Be curves. The ion data, as proxies for atmospheric circulation changes, did not show any correlations to the 10Be record or the 10Be/14C difference. When including possible data uncertainties there is still a minimum discrepancy of ~10 years between the 10Be ice core and the 14C tree ring record. Due to lack of alternative explanations it is concluded that the ice core and/or the tree ring chronologies contains unaccounted errors in this range. This also reconciles the radiocarbon 1627-1600 BC (Friedrich et al., 2006) and ice core 1642±5 BC (Vinther et al., 2006) datings of the Santorini eruption. Friedrich, W.L., Kromer, B., Friedrich, M., Heinemeier, J., Pfeiffer, T., & Talamo, S., 2006: Santorini eruption radiocarbon dated to

  10. Assessing the differences between the IntCal and Greenland ice-core time scales for the last 14,000 years via the common cosmogenic radionuclide variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muscheler, Raimund; Adolphi, Florian; Knudsen, Mads F.

    2014-12-01

    Variations in galactic cosmic rays reaching the Earth's atmosphere produce globally synchronous variations in the production rates of cosmogenic radionuclides. In consequence, they leave their imprint in tree-ring 14C and ice-core 10Be records. By identifying this signal and correcting for the known geochemical influences on the radionuclides, it is possible to compare and synchronize the tree-ring chronology and the Greenland ice-core time scale. Here, we compare the IntCal13 and the GICC05 time scales for the last 14,000 years via identification and synchronization of the common short-term variations in the ice-core 10Be and tree-ring 14C records most likely induced by variations in the solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays. We conclude that systematic time-scale differences have to be accounted for if ice-core and 14C-dated records are compared on decadal time scales. These are mostly within the uncertainties of the time scales and the method proposed here. However, for large parts of the mid to late Holocene (i.e. after 7000 yrs BP) the best agreement between ice-core 10Be and tree-ring 14C records is obtained for time shifts outside the stated errors of the respective time scales. A transfer function is proposed that can be applied to synchronize the GICC05 ice-core time scale to the radiocarbon time scale.

  11. Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA) reference model technical guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, Richard B.; Stovall, John R.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents a full description of the Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA). The SGOAA consists of a generic system architecture for the entities in spacecraft avionics, a generic processing architecture, and a six class model of interfaces in a hardware/software system. The purpose of the SGOAA is to provide an umbrella set of requirements for applying the generic architecture interface model to the design of specific avionics hardware/software systems. The SGOAA defines a generic set of system interface points to facilitate identification of critical interfaces and establishes the requirements for applying appropriate low level detailed implementation standards to those interface points. The generic core avionics system and processing architecture models provided herein are robustly tailorable to specific system applications and provide a platform upon which the interface model is to be applied.

  12. Scaling to 150K cores: recent algorithm and performance engineering developments enabling XGC1 to run at scale

    SciTech Connect

    Mark F. Adams; Seung-Hoe Ku; Patrick Worley; Ed D'Azevedo; Julian C. Cummings; C.S. Chang

    2009-10-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) methods have proven to be eft#11;ective in discretizing the Vlasov-Maxwell system of equations describing the core of toroidal burning plasmas for many decades. Recent physical understanding of the importance of edge physics for stability and transport in tokamaks has lead to development of the fi#12;rst fully toroidal edge PIC code - XGC1. The edge region poses special problems in meshing for PIC methods due to the lack of closed flux surfaces, which makes fi#12;eld-line following meshes and coordinate systems problematic. We present a solution to this problem with a semi-#12;field line following mesh method in a cylindrical coordinate system. Additionally, modern supercomputers require highly concurrent algorithms and implementations, with all levels of the memory hierarchy being effe#14;ciently utilized to realize optimal code performance. This paper presents a mesh and particle partitioning method, suitable to our meshing strategy, for use on highly concurrent cache-based computing platforms.

  13. A scaling study of the natural circulation flow of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of EU-APR1400 for designing a scale-down test facility for design verification

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, B. W.; Ha, K. S.; Park, R. J.; Song, J. H.; Revankar, S. T.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper a scaling study on the steady state natural circulation flow along the flow path of the ex vessel core catcher cooling system of EU-APR1400 is described, and the scaling criteria for reproducing the same steady state thermalhydraulic characteristics of the natural circulation flow as a prototype core catcher cooling system in the scale-down test facility are derived in terms of the down-comer pipe diameter and orifice resistance. (authors)

  14. Acoustic Source Localization via Distributed Sensor Networks using Tera-scale Optical-Core Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob; Wardlaw, Michael

    2008-01-01

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. The complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot be met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on an optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. They investigate key concepts of threat-detection algorithms such as Time Difference Of Arrival (TDOA) estimation via sensor data correlation in the time domain with the purpose of implementation on the optical-core processor. they illustrate their results with the aid of numerical simulation and actual optical hardware runs. The major accomplishments of this research, in terms of computational speedup and numerical accurcy achieved via the deployment of optical processing technology, should be of substantial interest to the acoustic signal processing community.

  15. Mapping alteration minerals at prospect, outcrop and drill core scales using imaging spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Fred A.; L. Bedell, Richard; Taranik, James V.; Peppin, William A.; Weatherbee, Oliver; Calvin, Wendy M.

    2011-01-01

    Imaging spectrometer data (also known as ‘hyperspectral imagery’ or HSI) are well established for detailed mineral mapping from airborne and satellite systems. Overhead data, however, have substantial additional potential when used together with ground-based measurements. An imaging spectrometer system was used to acquire airborne measurements and to image in-place outcrops (mine walls) and boxed drill core and rock chips using modified sensor-mounting configurations. Data were acquired at 5 nm nominal spectral resolution in 360 channels from 0.4 to 2.45 μm. Analysis results using standardized hyperspectral methodologies demonstrate rapid extraction of representative mineral spectra and mapping of mineral distributions and abundances in map-plan, with core depth, and on the mine walls. The examples shown highlight the capabilities of these data for mineral mapping. Integration of these approaches promotes improved understanding of relations between geology, alteration and spectral signatures in three dimensions and should lead to improved efficiency of mine development, operations and ultimately effective mine closure. PMID:25937681

  16. A Strategy for Finding the Optimal Scale of Plant Core Collection Based on Monte Carlo Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiancheng; Guan, Yajing; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Liwei; Wang, Qitian; Hu, Qijuan; Hu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Core collection is an ideal resource for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). A subcore collection is a subset of a core collection. A strategy was proposed for finding the optimal sampling percentage on plant subcore collection based on Monte Carlo simulation. A cotton germplasm group of 168 accessions with 20 quantitative traits was used to construct subcore collections. Mixed linear model approach was used to eliminate environment effect and GE (genotype × environment) effect. Least distance stepwise sampling (LDSS) method combining 6 commonly used genetic distances and unweighted pair-group average (UPGMA) cluster method was adopted to construct subcore collections. Homogeneous population assessing method was adopted to assess the validity of 7 evaluating parameters of subcore collection. Monte Carlo simulation was conducted on the sampling percentage, the number of traits, and the evaluating parameters. A new method for “distilling free-form natural laws from experimental data” was adopted to find the best formula to determine the optimal sampling percentages. The results showed that coincidence rate of range (CR) was the most valid evaluating parameter and was suitable to serve as a threshold to find the optimal sampling percentage. The principal component analysis showed that subcore collections constructed by the optimal sampling percentages calculated by present strategy were well representative. PMID:24574893

  17. A strategy for finding the optimal scale of plant core collection based on Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiancheng; Guan, Yajing; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Liwei; Wang, Qitian; Hu, Qijuan; Hu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Core collection is an ideal resource for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). A subcore collection is a subset of a core collection. A strategy was proposed for finding the optimal sampling percentage on plant subcore collection based on Monte Carlo simulation. A cotton germplasm group of 168 accessions with 20 quantitative traits was used to construct subcore collections. Mixed linear model approach was used to eliminate environment effect and GE (genotype × environment) effect. Least distance stepwise sampling (LDSS) method combining 6 commonly used genetic distances and unweighted pair-group average (UPGMA) cluster method was adopted to construct subcore collections. Homogeneous population assessing method was adopted to assess the validity of 7 evaluating parameters of subcore collection. Monte Carlo simulation was conducted on the sampling percentage, the number of traits, and the evaluating parameters. A new method for "distilling free-form natural laws from experimental data" was adopted to find the best formula to determine the optimal sampling percentages. The results showed that coincidence rate of range (CR) was the most valid evaluating parameter and was suitable to serve as a threshold to find the optimal sampling percentage. The principal component analysis showed that subcore collections constructed by the optimal sampling percentages calculated by present strategy were well representative. PMID:24574893

  18. Verification of the CENTRM Module for Adaptation of the SCALE Code to NGNP Prismatic and PBR Core Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapol, Barry; Maldonado, Ivan

    2014-01-23

    The generation of multigroup cross sections lies at the heart of the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) core design, whether the prismatic (block) or pebble-bed type. The design process, generally performed in three steps, is quite involved and its execution is crucial to proper reactor physics analyses. The primary purpose of this project is to develop the CENTRM cross-section processing module of the SCALE code package for application to prismatic or pebble-bed core designs. The team will include a detailed outline of the entire processing procedure for application of CENTRM in a final report complete with demonstration. In addition, they will conduct a thorough verification of the CENTRM code, which has yet to be performed. The tasks for this project are to: Thoroughly test the panel algorithm for neutron slowing down; Develop the panel algorithm for multi-materials; Establish a multigroup convergence 1D transport acceleration algorithm in the panel formalism; Verify CENTRM in 1D plane geometry; Create and test the corresponding transport/panel algorithm in spherical and cylindrical geometries; and, Apply the verified CENTRM code to current VHTR core design configurations for an infinite lattice, including assessing effectiveness of Dancoff corrections to simulate TRISO particle heterogeneity.

  19. Generic POCC architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This document describes a generic POCC (Payload Operations Control Center) architecture based upon current POCC software practice, and several refinements to the architecture based upon object-oriented design principles and expected developments in teleoperations. The current-technology generic architecture is an abstraction based upon close analysis of the ERBS, COBE, and GRO POCC's. A series of three refinements is presented: these may be viewed as an approach to a phased transition to the recommended architecture. The third refinement constitutes the recommended architecture, which, together with associated rationales, will form the basis of the rapid synthesis environment to be developed in the remainder of this task. The document is organized into two parts. The first part describes the current generic architecture using several graphical as well as tabular representations or 'views.' The second part presents an analysis of the generic architecture in terms of object-oriented principles. On the basis of this discussion, refinements to the generic architecture are presented, again using a combination of graphical and tabular representations.

  20. Scale Stability of the NTE Core Battery Test of Professional Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David O.

    Various parallel forms of the NTE (National Teacher Examinations) Test of Professional Knowledge (NTETPK) have been administered to examinees aspiring to initial teacher certification since 1982. To confirm that recent reported scores are comparable to those from earlier forms, the stability of the score scale was studied using section…

  1. Scaled up low-mass star formation in massive star-forming cores in the G333 giant molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiles, B.; Lo, N.; Redman, M. P.; Cunningham, M. R.; Jones, P. A.; Burton, M. G.; Bronfman, L.

    2016-06-01

    Three bright molecular line sources in G333 have recently been shown to exhibit signatures of infall. We describe a molecular line radiative transfer (RT) modelling process which is required to extract the infall signature from Mopra and Nanten2 data. The observed line profiles differ greatly between individual sources but are reproduced well by variations upon a common unified model where the outflow viewing angle is the most significant difference between the sources. The models and data together suggest that the observed properties of the high-mass star-forming regions such as infall, turbulence and mass are consistent with scaled-up versions of the low-mass case with turbulent velocities that are supersonic and an order of magnitude larger than those found in low-mass star-forming regions. Using detailed RT modelling, we show that the G333 cores are essentially undergoing a scaled-up version of low-mass star formation. This is an extension of earlier work in that the degree of infall and the chemical abundances are constrained by the RT modelling in a way that is not practical with a standard analysis of observational data. We also find high velocity infall and high infall mass rates, possibly suggesting accelerated collapse due to external pressure. Molecular depletion due to freeze-out on to dust grains in central regions of the cores is suggested by low molecular abundances of several species. Strong evidence for a local enhancement of 13C-bearing species towards the outflow cloud cores is discussed, consistent with the presence of shocks caused by the supersonic motions within them.

  2. Generic Airspace Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogford, Richard H.; Bridges, Wayne; Gujarl, Vimmy; Lee, Paul U.; Preston, William

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on an extension of generic airspace research to explore the amount of memorization and specialized skills required to manage sectors with specific characteristics or factors. Fifty-five retired controllers were given an electronic survey where they rated the amount of memorization or specialized skills needed for sixteen generic airspace factors. The results suggested similarities in the pattern of ratings between different areas of the US (East, Central, and West). The average of the ratings for each area also showed some differences between regions, with ratings being generally higher in the East area. All sixteen factors were rated as moderately to highly important and may be useful for future research on generic airspace, air traffic controller workload, etc.

  3. Generic robot architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, David J; Few, Douglas A

    2010-09-21

    The present invention provides methods, computer readable media, and apparatuses for a generic robot architecture providing a framework that is easily portable to a variety of robot platforms and is configured to provide hardware abstractions, abstractions for generic robot attributes, environment abstractions, and robot behaviors. The generic robot architecture includes a hardware abstraction level and a robot abstraction level. The hardware abstraction level is configured for developing hardware abstractions that define, monitor, and control hardware modules available on a robot platform. The robot abstraction level is configured for defining robot attributes and provides a software framework for building robot behaviors from the robot attributes. Each of the robot attributes includes hardware information from at least one hardware abstraction. In addition, each robot attribute is configured to substantially isolate the robot behaviors from the at least one hardware abstraction.

  4. Generic Kalman Filter Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisano, Michael E., II; Crues, Edwin Z.

    2005-01-01

    The Generic Kalman Filter (GKF) software provides a standard basis for the development of application-specific Kalman-filter programs. Historically, Kalman filters have been implemented by customized programs that must be written, coded, and debugged anew for each unique application, then tested and tuned with simulated or actual measurement data. Total development times for typical Kalman-filter application programs have ranged from months to weeks. The GKF software can simplify the development process and reduce the development time by eliminating the need to re-create the fundamental implementation of the Kalman filter for each new application. The GKF software is written in the ANSI C programming language. It contains a generic Kalman-filter-development directory that, in turn, contains a code for a generic Kalman filter function; more specifically, it contains a generically designed and generically coded implementation of linear, linearized, and extended Kalman filtering algorithms, including algorithms for state- and covariance-update and -propagation functions. The mathematical theory that underlies the algorithms is well known and has been reported extensively in the open technical literature. Also contained in the directory are a header file that defines generic Kalman-filter data structures and prototype functions and template versions of application-specific subfunction and calling navigation/estimation routine code and headers. Once the user has provided a calling routine and the required application-specific subfunctions, the application-specific Kalman-filter software can be compiled and executed immediately. During execution, the generic Kalman-filter function is called from a higher-level navigation or estimation routine that preprocesses measurement data and post-processes output data. The generic Kalman-filter function uses the aforementioned data structures and five implementation- specific subfunctions, which have been developed by the user on

  5. Core-scale electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) monitoring of CO2-brine mixture in Fontainebleau sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, David; Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Bellmunt, Fabian; Luquot, Linda; Gouze, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    The main goal of the monitoring stage of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is to obtain an accurate estimation of the subsurface CO2 accumulation and to detect any possible leakage. Laboratory experiments are necessary to investigate the small scale processes governing the CO2-brine-rock interaction. They also provide a means to calibrate the results coming from field scale geophysical methods. In this work we set up an experimental system which is able to perform Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) measurements on centimeter-scale rock samples at various P-T conditions. We present the results of two new experiments related to CO2 monitoring, performed on a cylindrical (4 × 8 cm) Fontainebleau rock sample. In the first one, we have quantified the CO2 saturation at different volume fractions, representing zones from a deep saline aquifer with varying degrees of saturation. In the second one, we have monitored and quantified the effect of CO2 dissolution in the brine at a pressure of 40 bar during eight days, emulating the invasion of CO2 into a shallow aquifer. Results highlight the importance of accounting for the contribution of surface conductivity in highly CO2-saturated regions, even in clay-free rocks, and also for brine conductivity variation due to CO2 dissolution. Ignoring any of these effects will end up in a CO2 saturation underestimation. We present a modified CO2 saturation equation to account for these two influences.

  6. Interpreting DNAPL saturations in a laboratory-scale injection with GPR data and direct core measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Poeter, Eileen P.

    2003-01-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is used to track a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) injection in a laboratory sand tank. Before data reduction, GPR data provide a qualitative measure of DNAPL saturation and movement. One-dimensional (1D) GPR modeling provides a quantitative interpretation of DNAPL volume within a given thickness during and after the injection. This is confirmed qualitatively by visual inspection of cores and two-dimensional GPR modeling. DNAPL saturation in sub-layers of that thickness could not be quantified because calibration of the 1D GPR model is non-unique when both permittivity and depth of multiple layers are unknown. Accurate quantitative interpretation of DNAPL volumes using 1D GPR modeling requires: 1) identification of a suitable target that produces a strong reflection and is not subject to any multidimensional interference; 2) knowledge of the exact depth of that target; and 3) use of two-way radar-wave travel times through the medium to the target to determine the permittivity of the intervening material, which eliminates reliance upon reflection amplitude. With geologic conditions that are suitable for GPR surveys (i.e., shallow depths and low electrical conductivities), the procedures in this laboratory study can be adapted to a field site to identify DNAPL source zones after a release has occurred.

  7. Consistently dated records from three Greenland ice cores reveal regional millennial-scale isotope gradients with possible Heinrich Event imprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seierstad, Inger K.; Rasmussen, Sune O.

    2014-05-01

    We here present records from the NGRIP, GRIP and GISP2 ice cores tied to the same chronology for the past 104 ka at an unprecedented time resolution. The three ice cores have been linked by matching distinct peaks in volcanic proxy records and other impurity records from the three ice cores, assuming that these layers of elevated impurity content represent the same, instantaneous event in the past at all three sites. In total there are more than 900 identified marker horizons between the three cores including previously published match points, of which we introduce a minor revision. Our matching is independently confirmed by new and existing volcanic ash layers (tephra). The depth-depth relationship from the detailed matching is used to transfer the most recent and widely used Greenland ice core chronology, the GICC05modelext timescale, to the two Summit cores, GRIP and GISP2. Furthermore, we provide gas chronologies for the Summit cores that are consistent with the GICC05modelext timescale by utilizing both existing and new unpublished gas data. A comparison of the GICC05modelext and the former GISP2 timescale reveals major discrepancies in short time intervals during the glacial section. We detect a pronounced change in the relative annual layer thickness between the two Summit sites and NGRIP across the Last Glacial termination and early-to-mid Holocene, which can be explained by a relative accumulation increase at NGRIP compared to the Summit region as response to the onset of the Holocene and the climatic optimum. Between stadials and interstadials we infer that the accumulation contrast typically was nearly 10% greater at Summit compared to at NGRIP. The δ18O temperature-proxy records from NGRIP, GRIP and GISP2 are generally very similar and display a synchronous behavior at climate transitions, but the δ18O differences between Summit and NGRIP is slowly changing over the last glacial-interglacial cycle superimposed by abrupt millennial-to centennial scale

  8. Accurate age scale of the Dome Fuji ice core, Antarctica from O2/N2 ratio of trapped air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Aoki, S.; Nakazawa, T.; Suzuki, K.; Parrenin, F.

    2012-04-01

    Chronology of the first Dome Fuji deep ice core (core length: 2,500 m, ice thickness: 3,035 m) for the age range from 80 kyr to 340 kyr ago was established by orbital tuning of measured O2/N2 ratios in trapped air to local summer insolation, with precision better than about 2,000 years (Kawamura et al., 2007). The O2/N2 ratios found in polar ice cores are slightly lower than the atmospheric ratio because of size-dependent molecular fractionation during bubble close-off. The magnitude of this gas fractionation is believed to be governed by the magnitude of snow metamorphism when the layer was originally at the surface, which in turn is controlled by local summer insolation (Fujita et al., 2009). A strong advantage of the O2/N2 chronology is that there is no need to assume a lag between climatic records in the ice core and orbital forcings, becacuse O2/N2 ratios record local insolation through physical processes. Accuracy of the chronology was validated by comparing the O2/N2 chronology with U-Th radiometric chronology of speleothem records (Cheng et al., 2009) for the ends of Terminations II, III and IV, as well as several large climatic events, for which both ice-core CH4 and speleothem δ18O (a proxy for precipitation) show abrupt shifts as seen in the last glacial period. All ages from O2/N2 and U-Th chronology agreed with each other within ~2,000 yr. The O2/N2 chronology permits comparisons between Antarctic climate, greenhouse gases, astronomically calculated orbital parameters, and radiometrically-dated sea level and monsoon records. Here, we completed the measurements of O2/N2 ratios of the second Dome Fuji ice core, which reached bedrock, for the range from 2,400 to 3,028 m (320 - 700 kyr ago) at approximately 2,000-year time resolution. We made significant improvements in ice core storage practices and mass spectrometry. In particular, the ice core samples were stored at about -50 ° C until the air extraction, except during short periods of transportation

  9. Mid-Pleistocene Orbital and Millennial Scale Climate Change in a 200 ky lacustrine sediment core from SW North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawcett, P. J.; Werne, J. P.; Anderson, R. S.; Heikoop, J. M.; Brown, E. T.; Berke, M. A.; Smith, S.; Goff, F. E.; Hurley, L. L.; Cisneros Dozal, L. M.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Huang, Y.; Toney, J. L.; Fessenden, J. E.; Woldegabriel, G. W.; Geissman, J. W.; Allen, C. D.

    2009-12-01

    How anthropogenic climate change will affect hydroclimate of the arid regions of SW North America over the next century is a concern. Model projections suggest permanent “dust bowl-like” conditions; however, any anthropogenic change will be superimposed on long-term natural climate variability. We use the paleoclimatic record from an 82-m deep lacustrine sediment core (VC-3) from the Valles Caldera, New Mexico to examine continental climate variations spanning two glacial cycles through the middle Pleistocene from MIS 14 to MIS 10 (552 ka to ~360 ka). Both orbital and millennial-scale variations are evident in multiple proxies, and a strong relationship occurs between the warmest temperatures in the record and periods of extended aridity. We suggest that these periods of aridity are characterized by decreased winter as well as summer precipitation amounts. A new group of organic geochemical proxies (MBT and CBT) allow us to reconstruct the annual mean air temperature (MAT) of the Valles Caldera watershed as well as the watershed soil pH down the length of the core. We compare these proxies to climatically sensitive pollen taxa and other core properties. The MAT record of VC-3 shows considerable glacial-interglacial variation and significant variability within individual glacial and interglacial periods. The warmest interglacial MATs (5 to 7°C) compare favorably with modern MATs of ~5°C in the Valle Grande. MIS 11 has three warm substages, based on MAT estimates (2°C warmer than the cool substages), warm (Juniperus, Quercus, Rosaceae) vs. cool (Abies, Picea, Artemisia) pollen taxa and variation in aquatic productivity proxies (TOC, Si:Ti). The three warm substages of MIS 11 appear to correspond to the three precessional peaks that occur during this interval. Glacial MATs range from -5 to +2°C, with multiple millennial-scale temperature oscillations evident. Several of the interstadials show a distinct pattern of relatively slower temperature increases and

  10. The (mis)measurement of the Dark Triad Dirty Dozen: exploitation at the core of the scale.

    PubMed

    Kajonius, Petri J; Persson, Björn N; Rosenberg, Patricia; Garcia, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Background. The dark side of human character has been conceptualized in the Dark Triad Model: Machiavellianism, psychopathy, and narcissism. These three dark traits are often measured using single long instruments for each one of the traits. Nevertheless, there is a necessity of short and valid personality measures in psychological research. As an independent research group, we replicated the factor structure, convergent validity and item response for one of the most recent and widely used short measures to operationalize these malevolent traits, namely, Jonason's Dark Triad Dirty Dozen. We aimed to expand the understanding of what the Dirty Dozen really captures because the mixed results on construct validity in previous research. Method. We used the largest sample to date to respond to the Dirty Dozen (N = 3,698). We firstly investigated the factor structure using Confirmatory Factor Analysis and an exploratory distribution analysis of the items in the Dirty Dozen. Secondly, using a sub-sample (n = 500) and correlation analyses, we investigated the Dirty Dozen dark traits convergent validity to Machiavellianism measured by the Mach-IV, psychopathy measured by Eysenck's Personality Questionnaire Revised, narcissism using the Narcissism Personality Inventory, and both neuroticism and extraversion from the Eysenck's questionnaire. Finally, besides these Classic Test Theory analyses, we analyzed the responses for each Dirty Dozen item using Item Response Theory (IRT). Results. The results confirmed previous findings of a bi-factor model fit: one latent core dark trait and three dark traits. All three Dirty Dozen traits had a striking bi-modal distribution, which might indicate unconcealed social undesirability with the items. The three Dirty Dozen traits did converge too, although not strongly, with the contiguous single Dark Triad scales (r between .41 and .49). The probabilities of filling out steps on the Dirty Dozen narcissism-items were much higher than on the

  11. The (mis)measurement of the Dark Triad Dirty Dozen: exploitation at the core of the scale

    PubMed Central

    Kajonius, Petri J.; Persson, Björn N.; Rosenberg, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Background. The dark side of human character has been conceptualized in the Dark Triad Model: Machiavellianism, psychopathy, and narcissism. These three dark traits are often measured using single long instruments for each one of the traits. Nevertheless, there is a necessity of short and valid personality measures in psychological research. As an independent research group, we replicated the factor structure, convergent validity and item response for one of the most recent and widely used short measures to operationalize these malevolent traits, namely, Jonason’s Dark Triad Dirty Dozen. We aimed to expand the understanding of what the Dirty Dozen really captures because the mixed results on construct validity in previous research. Method. We used the largest sample to date to respond to the Dirty Dozen (N = 3,698). We firstly investigated the factor structure using Confirmatory Factor Analysis and an exploratory distribution analysis of the items in the Dirty Dozen. Secondly, using a sub-sample (n = 500) and correlation analyses, we investigated the Dirty Dozen dark traits convergent validity to Machiavellianism measured by the Mach-IV, psychopathy measured by Eysenck’s Personality Questionnaire Revised, narcissism using the Narcissism Personality Inventory, and both neuroticism and extraversion from the Eysenck’s questionnaire. Finally, besides these Classic Test Theory analyses, we analyzed the responses for each Dirty Dozen item using Item Response Theory (IRT). Results. The results confirmed previous findings of a bi-factor model fit: one latent core dark trait and three dark traits. All three Dirty Dozen traits had a striking bi-modal distribution, which might indicate unconcealed social undesirability with the items. The three Dirty Dozen traits did converge too, although not strongly, with the contiguous single Dark Triad scales (r between .41 and .49). The probabilities of filling out steps on the Dirty Dozen narcissism-items were much higher than on

  12. A large-scale dynamo and magnetoturbulence in rapidly rotating core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mösta, Philipp; Ott, Christian D.; Radice, David; Roberts, Luke F.; Schnetter, Erik; Haas, Roland

    2015-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is important in many high-energy astrophysical systems, where instabilities can amplify the local magnetic field over very short timescales. Specifically, the magnetorotational instability and dynamo action have been suggested as a mechanism for the growth of magnetar-strength magnetic fields (of 1015 gauss and above) and for powering the explosion of a rotating massive star. Such stars are candidate progenitors of type Ic-bl hypernovae, which make up all supernovae that are connected to long γ-ray bursts. The magnetorotational instability has been studied with local high-resolution shearing-box simulations in three dimensions, and with global two-dimensional simulations, but it is not known whether turbulence driven by this instability can result in the creation of a large-scale, ordered and dynamically relevant field. Here we report results from global, three-dimensional, general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence simulations. We show that hydromagnetic turbulence in rapidly rotating protoneutron stars produces an inverse cascade of energy. We find a large-scale, ordered toroidal field that is consistent with the formation of bipolar magnetorotationally driven outflows. Our results demonstrate that rapidly rotating massive stars are plausible progenitors for both type Ic-bl supernovae and long γ-ray bursts, and provide a viable mechanism for the formation of magnetars. Moreover, our findings suggest that rapidly rotating massive stars might lie behind potentially magnetar-powered superluminous supernovae.

  13. A large-scale dynamo and magnetoturbulence in rapidly rotating core-collapse supernovae.

    PubMed

    Mösta, Philipp; Ott, Christian D; Radice, David; Roberts, Luke F; Schnetter, Erik; Haas, Roland

    2015-12-17

    Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is important in many high-energy astrophysical systems, where instabilities can amplify the local magnetic field over very short timescales. Specifically, the magnetorotational instability and dynamo action have been suggested as a mechanism for the growth of magnetar-strength magnetic fields (of 10(15) gauss and above) and for powering the explosion of a rotating massive star. Such stars are candidate progenitors of type Ic-bl hypernovae, which make up all supernovae that are connected to long γ-ray bursts. The magnetorotational instability has been studied with local high-resolution shearing-box simulations in three dimensions, and with global two-dimensional simulations, but it is not known whether turbulence driven by this instability can result in the creation of a large-scale, ordered and dynamically relevant field. Here we report results from global, three-dimensional, general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence simulations. We show that hydromagnetic turbulence in rapidly rotating protoneutron stars produces an inverse cascade of energy. We find a large-scale, ordered toroidal field that is consistent with the formation of bipolar magnetorotationally driven outflows. Our results demonstrate that rapidly rotating massive stars are plausible progenitors for both type Ic-bl supernovae and long γ-ray bursts, and provide a viable mechanism for the formation of magnetars. Moreover, our findings suggest that rapidly rotating massive stars might lie behind potentially magnetar-powered superluminous supernovae. PMID:26618868

  14. Generic Sentences in English and French.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herschensohn, Julia

    Previous accounts of "generic" have been either too broad in including several sentence types as generic, or too narrow in limiting the definition of generic to the noun or verb alone. This research critically examines data and previous treatments of the generic verb, generic noun, and generic sentence. Because every generic sentence may also have…

  15. Narrow Scale Flow and a Weak Field by the Top of Earth's Core: Evidence from Orsted, Magsat and Secular Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2004-01-01

    As Earth's main magnetic field weakens, our magnetic shield against the onslaught of the solar wind thins. And the field strength needed to fend off battering by solar coronal mass ejections is decreasing, just when the delicate complexity of modem, vulnerable, electro-technological systems is increasing at an unprecedented rate. Recently, a working group of distinguished scientist from across the nation has asked NASA's Solid Earth and Natural Hazards program a key question: What are the dynamics of Earth s magnetic field and its interactions with the Earth system? Paleomagnetic studies of crustal rocks magnetized in the geologic past reveal that polarity reversals have occurred many times during Earth s history. Networked super-computer simulations of core field and flow, including effects of gravitational, pressure, rotational Coriolis, magnetic and viscous forces, suggest how this might happen in detail. And space-based measurements of the real, time-varying magnetic field help constrain estimates of the speed and direction of fluid iron flowing near the top of the core and enable tests of some hypotheses about such flow. Now scientists at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center have developed and applied methods to test the hypotheses of narrow scale flow and of a dynamically weak magnetic field near the top of Earth s core. Using two completely different methods, C. V. Voorhies has shown these hypotheses lead to specific theoretical forms for the "spectrum" of Earth s main magnetic field and the spectrum of its rate of change. Much as solar physicists use a prism to separate sunlight into its spectrum, from long wavelength red to short wavelength blue light, geophysicists use a digital prism, spherical harmonic analysis, to separate the measured geomagnetic field into its spectrum, from long to short wavelength fields. They do this for the rate of change of the field as well.

  16. Internal stresses in pre-stressed micron-scale aluminum core-shell particles and their improved reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Levitas, Valery I.; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Tamura, Nobumichi

    2015-09-07

    Dilatation of aluminum (Al) core for micron-scale particles covered by alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) shell was measured utilizing x-ray diffraction with synchrotron radiation for untreated particles and particles after annealing at 573 K and fast quenching at 0.46 K/s. Such a treatment led to the increase in flame rate for Al + CuO composite by 32% and is consistent with theoretical predictions based on the melt-dispersion mechanism of reaction for Al particles. Experimental results confirmed theoretical estimates and proved that the improvement of Al reactivity is due to internal stresses. This opens new ways of controlling particle reactivity through creating and monitoring internal stresses.

  17. Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA) standard specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, Richard B.; Stovall, John R.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this standard is to provide an umbrella set of requirements for applying the generic architecture interface model to the design of a specific avionics hardware/software system. This standard defines a generic set of system interface points to facilitate identification of critical interfaces and establishes the requirements for applying appropriate low level detailed implementation standards to those interface points. The generic core avionics system and processing architecture models provided herein are robustly tailorable to specific system applications and provide a platform upon which the interface model is to be applied.

  18. Large-scale boiling experiments of the flooded cavity concept for in-vessel core retention

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.Y.; Slezak, S.E.; Bentz, J.H.; Pasedag, W.F.

    1994-03-01

    This paper presents results of ex-vessel boiling experiments performed in the CYBL (CYlindrical BoiLing) facility. CYBL is a reactor-scale facility for confirmatory research of the flooded cavity concept for accident management. CYBL has a tank-within-a-tank design; the inner tank simulates the reactor vessel and the outer tank simulates the reactor cavity. Experiments with uniform and edge-peaked heat flux distributions up to 20 W/cm{sup 2} across the vessel bottom were performed. Boiling outside the reactor vessel was found to be subcooled nucleate boiling. The subcooling is mainly due to the gravity head which results from flooding the sides of the reactor vessel. The boiling process exhibits a cyclic pattern with four distinct phases: direct liquid/solid contact, bubble nucleation and growth, coalescence, and vapor mass dispersion (ejection). The results suggest that under prototypic heat load and heat flux distributions, the flooded cavity in a passive pressurized water reactor like the AP-600 should be capable of cooling the reactor pressure vessel in the central region of the lower head that is addressed by these tests.

  19. Crustal-scale degassing and igneous mush re-organisation: a generic concept applied to episodic volcanism at the Soufrière Hills Volcano Montserrat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    R Stephen J, S.; Cashman, K. V.

    2015-12-01

    A complete theory of episodic volcanism is lacking. Melt generation related to large scale tectonic processes is likely continuous but surface volcanic activity is typically episodic; for most volcanoes short-lived eruptions alternate with long periods of dormancy. Many models of volcanic activity and geophysical unrest are framed by a conceptual model of shallow magma chamber recharge, in which various phenomena are attributed to magma transport from deeper levels. While many aspects of volcanism are explained by this concept it has little explanatory power for key aspects of volcanism, including time scales of dormancy, eruption duration and eruption magnitude. Extensive trans-crustal igneous systems develop beneath active volcanoes in which much of the system is in a mushy state in which buoyancy-driven segregation of melt and magmatic fluid occurs to form layers, which are inherently unstable. We postulate that such systems are prone to destabilisation in which segregating layers amalgamate to form ephemeral magma chambers and in which melts and magmatic fluids decouple. Periods of dormancy relate to slow processes of segregation while short periods of volcanic unrest and eruption relate to episodic and rapid processes of destabilisation of the mush system. In this conceptual framework volatiles rather than magma recharge plays the key role in the dynamics of the shallow parts of the magmatic systems. Magma ascent during episodes of destabilisation does not itself cause pressurisation because melts and crystals are near incompressible, while volatile exsolution and decompression results in major pressure changes that can lead to unrest and eruption. These concepts are applied to the interpretation of stratigraphic, geochronological, geophysical, geochemical, petrological and volcanological data of volcanic activity at the Soufrière Hills Volcano (SHV), Montserrat.

  20. Model-data comparison of soil organic oatter cycling: soil core scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wutzler, Thomas; Reichstein, Markus

    2010-05-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) cycling is usually modeled as a donor controlled process, most often by first order kinetics. However, evidence of contradition of this donor-paradigm is appearing. One alternative hypothesis is that microbiological consumers of SOM play an important role and need to be taken into account more explicitely. Here we link SOM cycling to the modeling of microbial growth kinetics. We set up a suite of alternative models of microbial growth. Explicitly modelling the cycling of a label across carbon pools allowed to compare the model outputs to data of a soil priming experiment. The experimental data was taken from U. Hamer, & B. Marschner (2002 Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science 165(3)), who incubated several 14C labelled substrates at 20°C in a model system that consisted of sand mixed with lignin for 26 days. Data streams of time series total respiration, respiration from labelled amendment and prior information on model parameters were used to determine the posterior probability density function of the model parameters of each of the model variants and to calculate Bayes-Factors, the ratios of the likelihood of the different model variants. This kind of data and Bayesian analysis is usable to compare model structures adapted to processes that determine the dynamics at this scale: co-limitation of depolymerization of older soil organic matter by both substrate and decomposers, prefererrential substrate usage, activation and deactivation and predation of microbes, and usage of both assimilated carbon and carbon of internal pools for maintenance and growth respiration.

  1. Bioavailability and generic prescribing.

    PubMed

    Mindel, J S

    1976-01-01

    Although oral drug bioinequivalence has been attributed to a number of causes (excipients, dosage form, variation in dissolution time, and aging) less is known about bioavailability problems of topical medications in ophthalmology. Factors that can alter drug absorption from solutions (pH, partition coefficient, container impurities, contact time, etc.) are noted, and cases in which bioavailability problems should be considered as causes of therapeutic failure are discussed. Various attitudes representing pharmaceutical companies, the federal government, pharmacists, consumers and physicians toward the related problems of bioinequivalence and generic prescribing are examined. Techniques for in vivo and in vitro drug testing and for establishing uniform conditions of drug manufacture and storage can contribute to identification and minimization of bioavailability problems. A rational program based on a combination of such techniques could, ultimately, lead to establishment of the terms "generic equivalency" and "therapeutic equivalency" as synonymous. PMID:13505

  2. Simulating Fine-Scale Atmospheric Processes: A New Core Capability and its Application to Predicting Wildfire Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, M M; Leach, M J; Molenkamp, C R; Hall, C H; Wilder, L; Neher, L A

    2003-02-07

    This LDRD project consisted of the development, testing, and prototype application of a new capability to couple atmospheric models of different spatial and temporal scales with a state-of-the-science vegetation-fuel combustion model and a GIs-based analysis system. The research addressed the complex, multi-scale interactions of atmospheric processes, combustion, and vegetative fuel conditions, using a suite of models to simulate their impact on wildfire behavior in areas of complex terrain. During the course of the project, we made substantial progress toward the implementation of a world-class modeling system that could be used as a tool for wildfire risk assessment, wildfire consequence analysis, wildfire suppression planning, fuels management, firefighter training, and public fire-safety education. With one additional year of funding we would have been able conduct combined modeling and field experiments to evaluate the models capability to predict the behavior of prescribed burns before they are ignited. Because of its investment in this LDRD project, LLNL is very close to having a new core capability--likely the world's most generally applicable, most scientifically sound, and most respected wildfire simulation system.

  3. Generic Distributed Simulation Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, C.P.

    1999-05-14

    A Generic Distributed Simulation Architecture is described that allows a simulation to be automatically distributed over a heterogeneous network of computers and executed with very little human direction. A prototype Framework is presented that implements the elements of the Architecture and demonstrates the feasibility of the concepts. It provides a basis for a future, improved Framework that will support legacy models. Because the Framework is implemented in Java, it may be installed on almost any modern computer system.

  4. Generics: keep a balanced view.

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    Once the different kinds of commercial protection (patents, etc.) granted to the manufacturer of an "originator" drug have expired, the drug in question may be copied by other companies. These copies are known as generics. The characteristics and pharmaceutical quality of generics are governed by international standards. The marketing authorisation procedure for generic drugs dispenses with preclinical and clinical trials, which already exist for the originator drug. In contrast, proof of bioequivalence must be provided. In practice, this means demonstrating that the effects of the generic are similar (but not necessarily identical) to those of the originator drug. Slight differences between a generic and its brand-name counterpart are allowed, provided they do not markedly affect the efficacy or adverse effect profile in comparison to the originator drug. The accepted degree of difference between a generic and the original brand-name drug is the same as the acceptable difference between two batches of the originator drug. The rules governing generic manufacturing conditions are identical to those applying to originator drugs. And issues raised by drug production abroad, particularly to Asian countries, apply to originator just as much as to generic drugs. Generics represent a significant source of financial savings for society. In France, various measures have been introduced to encourage doctors, pharmacists and patients, respectively, to prescribe, dispense and use generics. Criticisms of the efficacy or quality of generics are often unfounded and sometimes deliberately orchestrated. Smear campaigns conducted by drug companies that market originator drugs, and also by some healthcare professionals, sow confusion, to the detriment of generic use. There is no tangible proof that generics are less safe than originator drugs, provided they are chosen wisely, taking into account factors such as their packaging quality. It is up to healthcare professionals to decide

  5. Small-scale disturbances in the stratigraphy of the NEEM ice core: observations and numerical model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, D.; Llorens, M.-G.; Westhoff, J.; Steinbach, F.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Bons, P. D.; Griera, A.; Weikusat, I.

    2016-02-01

    Disturbances on the centimetre scale in the stratigraphy of the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) ice core (North Greenland) can be mapped by an optical line scanner as long as the ice has visual layering, such as, for example, cloudy bands. Different focal depths allow, to a certain extent, a three-dimensional view of the structures. In this study we present a detailed analysis of the visible folds, discuss their characteristics and frequency, and present examples of typical fold structures. We also analyse the structures with regard to the deformation boundary conditions under which they formed. The structures evolve from gentle waves at about 1500 m to overturned z folds with increasing depth. Occasionally, the folding causes significant thickening of layers. Their similar fold shape indicates that they are passive features and are probably not initiated by rheology differences between alternating layers. Layering is heavily disturbed and tracing of single layers is no longer possible below a depth of 2160 m. C axes orientation distributions for the corresponding core sections were analysed, where available, in addition to visual stratigraphy. The data show axial-plane parallel strings of grains with c axis orientations that deviate from that of the matrix, which shows a single maximum fabric at the depth where the folding occurs. Numerical modelling of crystal viscoplastic deformation and dynamic recrystallisation was used to improve the understanding of the formation of the observed structures during deformation. The modelling reproduces the development of bands of grains with a tilted-lattice orientation relative to the single maximum fabric of the matrix, and also the associated local deformation. We conclude from these results that the observed folding can be explained by formation of these tilted-lattice bands.

  6. Higher fine-scale genetic structure in peripheral than in core populations of a long-lived and mixed-mating conifer - eastern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis L.)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fine-scale or spatial genetic structure (SGS) is one of the key genetic characteristics of plant populations. Several evolutionary and ecological processes and population characteristics influence the level of SGS within plant populations. Higher fine-scale genetic structure may be expected in peripheral than core populations of long-lived forest trees, owing to the differences in the magnitude of operating evolutionary and ecological forces such as gene flow, genetic drift, effective population size and founder effects. We addressed this question using eastern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis) as a model species for declining to endangered long-lived tree species with mixed-mating system. Results We determined the SGS in two core and two peripheral populations of eastern white cedar from its Maritime Canadian eastern range using six nuclear microsatellite DNA markers. Significant SGS ranging from 15 m to 75 m distance classes was observed in the four studied populations. An analysis of combined four populations revealed significant positive SGS up to the 45 m distance class. The mean positive significant SGS observed in the peripheral populations was up to six times (up to 90 m) of that observed in the core populations (15 m). Spatial autocorrelation coefficients and correlograms of single and sub-sets of populations were statistically significant. The extent of within-population SGS was significantly negatively correlated with all genetic diversity parameters. Significant heterogeneity of within-population SGS was observed for 0-15 m and 61-90 m between core and peripheral populations. Average Sp, and gene flow distances were higher in peripheral (Sp = 0.023, σg = 135 m) than in core (Sp = 0.014, σg = 109 m) populations. However, the mean neighborhood size was higher in the core (Nb = 82) than in the peripheral (Nb = 48) populations. Conclusion Eastern white cedar populations have significant fine-scale genetic structure at short distances. Peripheral

  7. Grain-scale imaging and compositional characterization of cryo-preserved India NGHP 01 gas-hydrate-bearing cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, Laura A.; Lorenson, T.D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on grain-scale characteristics and gas analyses of gas-hydrate-bearing samples retrieved by NGHP Expedition 01 as part of a large-scale effort to study gas hydrate occurrences off the eastern-Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin. Using cryogenic scanning electron microscopy, X-ray spectroscopy, and gas chromatography, we investigated gas hydrate grain morphology and distribution within sediments, gas hydrate composition, and methane isotopic composition of samples from Krishna–Godavari (KG) basin and Andaman back-arc basin borehole sites from depths ranging 26 to 525 mbsf. Gas hydrate in KG-basin samples commonly occurs as nodules or coarse veins with typical hydrate grain size of 30–80 μm, as small pods or thin veins 50 to several hundred microns in width, or disseminated in sediment. Nodules contain abundant and commonly isolated macropores, in some places suggesting the original presence of a free gas phase. Gas hydrate also occurs as faceted crystals lining the interiors of cavities. While these vug-like structures constitute a relatively minor mode of gas hydrate occurrence, they were observed in near-seafloor KG-basin samples as well as in those of deeper origin (>100 mbsf) and may be original formation features. Other samples exhibit gas hydrate grains rimmed by NaCl-bearing material, presumably produced by salt exclusion during original hydrate formation. Well-preserved microfossil and other biogenic detritus are also found within several samples, most abundantly in Andaman core material where gas hydrate fills microfossil crevices. The range of gas hydrate modes of occurrence observed in the full suite of samples suggests a range of formation processes were involved, as influenced by local in situconditions. The hydrate-forming gas is predominantly methane with trace quantities of higher molecular weight hydrocarbons of primarily microbial origin. The composition indicates the gas hydrate is Structure I.

  8. On a coupled evolution of Earth's mantle and core: Implications for magnetic evolution over the geologic time-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    According to the recent progress of numerical modeling of mantle convection with various realistic physical processes, we can look into possible scenarios on core-mantle evolution suggested from theoretical and experimental studies with developing a coupled core-mantle evolution model in fully dynamical mantle convection simulations. The core evolution theory that allows to generate the inner core can be treated with the thermal boundary condition at the core-mantle boundary of mantle convection simulations. Here we introduce our recent accomplishments in a coupled core-mantle evolution: 1. Influence of early Earth differentiation and 2. Importance of hydrous minerals in the deep mantle. In the presentation, we will give implications for history of heat flow across the core-mantle boundary from early to present Earth and magnetic evolution over geologic time suggested from paleomagnetism measurements.

  9. Leveraging the power of multi-core platforms for large-scale geospatial data processing: Exemplified by generating DEM from massive LiDAR point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xuefeng; Wu, Huayi

    2010-10-01

    In recent years improvements in spatial data acquisition technologies, such as LiDAR, resulted in an explosive increase in the volume of spatial data, presenting unprecedented challenges for computation capacity. At the same time, the kernel of computing platforms the CPU, also evolved from a single-core to multi-core architecture. This radical change significantly affected existing data processing algorithms. Exemplified by the problem of generating DEM from massive air-borne LiDAR point clouds, this paper studies how to leverage the power of multi-core platforms for large-scale geospatial data processing and demonstrates how multi-core technologies can improve performance. Pipelining is adopted to exploit the thread level parallelism of multi-core platforms. First, raw point clouds are partitioned into overlapped blocks. Second, these discrete blocks are interpolated concurrently on parallel pipelines. On the interpolation run, intermediate results are sorted and finally merged into an integrated DEM. This parallelization demonstrates the great potential of multi-core platforms with high data throughput and low memory footprint. This approach achieves excellent performance speedup with greatly reduced processing time. For example, on a 2.0 GHz Quad-Core Intel Xeon platform, the proposed parallel approach can process approximately one billion LiDAR points (16.4 GB) in about 12 min and produces a 27,500×30,500 raster DEM, using less than 800 MB main memory.

  10. Generic image matching system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhongjie T.

    1992-05-01

    The generic imaging matching system (GIMS) provides an optimal systematic solution to any problem of color image processing in printing and publishing that can be classified as or modeled to the generic image matching problem defined. Typical GIMS systems/processes include color matching from different output devices, color conversion, color correction, device calibration, colorimetric scanner, colorimetric printer, colorimetric color reproduction, and image interpolation from scattered data. GIMS makes color matching easy for the user and maximizes operational flexibility allowing the user to obtain the degree of match wanted while providing the capability to achieve the best balance with respect to the human perception of color, color fidelity, and preservation of image information and color contrast. Instead of controlling coefficients in a transformation formula, GIMS controls the mapping directly in a standard device-independent color space, so that color can be matched, conceptually, to the highest possible accuracy. An optimization algorithm called modified vector shading was developed to minimize the matching error and to perform a 'near-neighborhood' gamut compression. An automatic error correction algorithm with a multidirection searching procedure using correlated re-initialization was developed to avoid local minimum failures. Once the mapping for color matching is generated, it can be utilized by a multidimensional linear interpolator with a small look-up-table (LUT) implemented by either software, a hardware interpolator or a digital-signal-processor.

  11. Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    CGBA, a facility developed by BioServe Space Technologies, a NASA Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Space Center, allows a variety of sophisticated bioprocessing research to be performed using a common device. The Fluids Processing Apparatus is essentially a microgravity test tube that allows a variety of complex investigations to be performed in space. This is a glass barrel containing several chambers separated by rubber stoppers. Eight FPAs are placed together in a Group Activation Pack (GAP), which allows all of the research to be started simultaneously by turning a single crank. Eight GAPs, or similar-sized payloads, can be stored in a single CGBA temperature controlled locker, which now uses motor drives to automatically turn the cranks to start and stop experiments. On STS-95, research efforts cover eight major areas that will benefit Earth-based products ranging from the production of pharmaceuticals to fish hatcheries.

  12. A generic multibody simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopping, K. A.; Kohn, W.

    1986-01-01

    Described is a dynamic simulation package which can be configured for orbital test scenarios involving multiple bodies. The rotational and translational state integration methods are selectable for each individual body and may be changed during a run if necessary. Characteristics of the bodies are determined by assigning components consisting of mass properties, forces, and moments, which are the outputs of user-defined environmental models. Generic model implementation is facilitated by a transformation processor which performs coordinate frame inversions. Transformations are defined in the initialization file as part of the simulation configuration. The simulation package includes an initialization processor, which consists of a command line preprocessor, a general purpose grammar, and a syntax scanner. These permit specifications of the bodies, their interrelationships, and their initial states in a format that is not dependent on a particular test scenario.

  13. Generic names in Magnaporthales.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Luo, Jing; Rossman, Amy Y; Aoki, Takayuki; Chuma, Izumi; Crous, Pedro W; Dean, Ralph; de Vries, Ronald P; Donofrio, Nicole; Hyde, Kevin D; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; Talbot, Nicholas J; Tharreau, Didier; Tosa, Yukio; Valent, Barbara; Wang, Zonghua; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2016-06-01

    The order Magnaporthales comprises about 200 species and includes the economically and scientifically important rice blast fungus and the take-all pathogen of cereals, as well as saprotrophs and endophytes. Recent advances in phylogenetic analyses of these fungi resulted in taxonomic revisions. In this paper we list the 28 currently accepted genera in Magnaporthales with their type species and available gene and genome resources. The polyphyletic Magnaporthe 1972 is proposed for suppression, and Pyricularia 1880 and Nakataea 1939 are recommended for protection as the generic names for the rice blast fungus and the rice stem rot fungus, respectively. The rationale for the recommended names is also provided. These recommendations are made by the Pyricularia/Magnaporthe Working Group established under the auspices of the International Commission on the Taxonomy of Fungi (ICTF). PMID:27433445

  14. Generic concepts in Nectriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Lombard, L.; van der Merwe, N.A.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Crous, P.W.

    2015-01-01

    The ascomycete family Nectriaceae (Hypocreales) includes numerous important plant and human pathogens, as well as several species used extensively in industrial and commercial applications as biodegraders and biocontrol agents. Members of the family are unified by phenotypic characters such as uniloculate ascomata that are yellow, orange-red to purple, and with phialidic asexual morphs. The generic concepts in Nectriaceae are poorly defined, since DNA sequence data have not been available for many of these genera. To address this issue we performed a multi-gene phylogenetic analysis using partial sequences for the 28S large subunit (LSU) nrDNA, the internal transcribed spacer region and intervening 5.8S nrRNA gene (ITS), the large subunit of the ATP citrate lyase (acl1), the RNA polymerase II largest subunit (rpb1), RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (rpb2), α-actin (act), β-tubulin (tub2), calmodulin (cmdA), histone H3 (his3), and translation elongation factor 1-alpha (tef1) gene regions for available type and authentic strains representing known genera in Nectriaceae, including several genera for which no sequence data were previously available. Supported by morphological observations, the data resolved 47 genera in the Nectriaceae. We re-evaluated the status of several genera, which resulted in the introduction of six new genera to accommodate species that were initially classified based solely on morphological characters. Several generic names are proposed for synonymy based on the abolishment of dual nomenclature. Additionally, a new family is introduced for two genera that were previously accommodated in the Nectriaceae. PMID:26955195

  15. Generic concepts in Nectriaceae.

    PubMed

    Lombard, L; van der Merwe, N A; Groenewald, J Z; Crous, P W

    2015-03-01

    The ascomycete family Nectriaceae (Hypocreales) includes numerous important plant and human pathogens, as well as several species used extensively in industrial and commercial applications as biodegraders and biocontrol agents. Members of the family are unified by phenotypic characters such as uniloculate ascomata that are yellow, orange-red to purple, and with phialidic asexual morphs. The generic concepts in Nectriaceae are poorly defined, since DNA sequence data have not been available for many of these genera. To address this issue we performed a multi-gene phylogenetic analysis using partial sequences for the 28S large subunit (LSU) nrDNA, the internal transcribed spacer region and intervening 5.8S nrRNA gene (ITS), the large subunit of the ATP citrate lyase (acl1), the RNA polymerase II largest subunit (rpb1), RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (rpb2), α-actin (act), β-tubulin (tub2), calmodulin (cmdA), histone H3 (his3), and translation elongation factor 1-alpha (tef1) gene regions for available type and authentic strains representing known genera in Nectriaceae, including several genera for which no sequence data were previously available. Supported by morphological observations, the data resolved 47 genera in the Nectriaceae. We re-evaluated the status of several genera, which resulted in the introduction of six new genera to accommodate species that were initially classified based solely on morphological characters. Several generic names are proposed for synonymy based on the abolishment of dual nomenclature. Additionally, a new family is introduced for two genera that were previously accommodated in the Nectriaceae. PMID:26955195

  16. Large-scale fabrication and application of magnetite coated Ag NW-core water-dispersible hybrid nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baoyu; Zhang, Min; Li, Weizhen; Wang, Linlin; Zheng, Jing; Gan, Wenjun; Xu, Jingli

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we report a large scale synthetic procedure that allows attachment of magnetite nanoparticles onto Ag NWs in situ, which was conducted in a triethylene glycol (TREG) solution with iron acetylacetonate and Ag NWs as starting materials. The as-prepared Ag NW/Fe3O4 NP composites are well characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, XPS, FT-IR, and VSM techniques. It was found that the mass ratio of iron acetylacetonate to Ag NWs plays a crucial role in controlling the amount of magnetite nanoparticles decorated on the Ag NWs. The resulting Ag NW/Fe3O4 NP composites exhibit superparamagnetic properties at room temperature, and can be well dispersed in aqueous and organic solutions, which is greatly beneficial for their application and functionality. Thus, the as-prepared magnetic silver nanowires show good catalytic activity, using the catalytic reduction of methylene blue (MB) as a model reaction. Furthermore, the Ag NW/Fe3O4 NP composites can be functionalized with polydopamine (Pdop), resorcinol-formaldehyde resin (PFR), and SiO2, respectively, in aqueous/ethanol solution. Meanwhile they can also be coated with polyphosphazene (PZS) in organic solution, resulting in a unique nanocable with well-defined core shell structures. Besides, taking Ag NW/Fe3O4@SiO2 as an example, a hollow magnetic silica nanotube can be obtained with the use of Ag NWs as physical templates and a solution of ammonium and H2O2. These can greatly improve the application of the Ag NW/Fe3O4 NP composites. The as-synthesized above nanocomposites have high potential for applications in the fields of polymers, wastewater treatment, sensors, and biomaterials. PMID:25815705

  17. Hg Deposition to Lakes in Northern New England Inferred at Multiple Scales From 210Pb-Dated Sediment Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamman, N. C.; Engstrom, D.

    2004-05-01

    Mercury (Hg) contamination of aquatic systems is recognized to be a problem of global consequence, and Hg bioaccumulation poses significant risks to piscivorous animals and humans who consume gamefish. In order to quantify historical and current Hg deposition to the northern New England landscape, we dated and performed Hg analyses on sediments cores from various lakes at local and regional scales. In this presentation, we contrast results of three studies: a regional assessment of Hg deposition to the VT-NH landscape (10 lakes); a localized study of deposition to the Lye Brook Wilderness of southern VT (four lakes); and the first-ever dated assessment of sediment Hg deposition history for Lake Champlain (three sites + one adjacent inland lake). At the VT-NH scale, total Hg (HgT) fluxes to sediments ranged from 5 to 17 μ g.m-2.yr-1 during pre-industrial times, and from 21 to 83 μ g.m-2.yr-1 presently. Present-day HgT fluxes are between 2.1 to 6.9 times greater than pre-1850 fluxes, and atmospheric Hg deposition to the VT-NH region was estimated at 21 μ g.m-2.yr-1. This agrees well with measured HgT deposition, when re-evasion of Hg is accounted for. Hg fluxes to lake sediments have declined in recent decades, owing to reductions in atmospheric Hg deposition to the lake surfaces. In the high-elevation Lye Brook Wilderness landscape, baseline, peak, and present accumulations were higher than those estimated from the VT-NH dataset, a finding that highlights the roles of elevation, watershed size, and dissolved organic carbon export in mediating Hg transport. Available data from the Lake Champlain Basin show the influence of historical and current watershed sediment delivery due to land cultivation, and more recently to land-use conversion. These studies jointly indicate that watershed export of legacy Hg continues despite declines in present-day deposition rates, contributing to the impression that Hg retention by watershed soils has declined.

  18. Mode-Area Scaling of Helical-Core, Dual-Clad Fiber Lasers and Amplifiers Using an Improved Bend-Loss Model

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Z.; Marciante, J.R.

    2006-09-28

    For small-bend radii, the waveguide condition for total internal reflection is violated in a large angular spread of incident angles at the interface of the fiber core. To account for this, we derived an improved semi-analytic bend-loss model that allows for the propagation of radiated fields outside the plane of the fiber bend. This new model is applied to large-mode-area helical-core fibers (which require small-bend radii) for use as high-power fiber lasers and amplifiers. In particular, the limits of scaling the mode area while maintaining good beam quality are explored.

  19. Phase-matched waveguide four-wave mixing scaled to higher peak powers with large-core-area hollow photonic-crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Konorov, S O; Serebryannikov, E E; Fedotov, A B; Miles, R B; Zheltikov, A M

    2005-05-01

    Hollow photonic-crystal fibers with large core diameters are shown to allow waveguide nonlinear-optical interactions to be scaled to higher pulse peak powers. Phase-matched four-wave mixing is predicted theoretically and demonstrated experimentally for millijoule nanosecond pulses propagating in a hollow photonic-crystal fiber with a core diameter of about 50 microm , suggesting the way to substantially enhance the efficiency of nonlinear-optical spectral transformations and wave mixing of high-power laser pulses in the gas phase. PMID:16089705

  20. The effect of small- and core-scale heterogeneity on the multiphase flow properties of CO2 and water in sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, R.; Benson, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    Capillary pressure and relative permeability functions are characteristic curves that, when coupled to the continuum-scale equations of motion, allow for a description of multiphase displacement processes in porous media. Traditionally, these properties are measured in the laboratory and are implemented into reservoir simulations to predict the behavior at the field-scale. There is an increasing awareness that detailed investigations are required to understand the role of the inherent heterogeneity of the rock samples used in the experiments on the measured multiphase properties. In fact, although a significant amount of simulation work has explored the effect of heterogeneities on Pc-kr-S relationships, very few experimental studies report on displacements with well-characterized, naturally heterogeneous media. To extend the current data set and to support these numerical findings, more laboratory data are therefore required that have been obtained under a variety of conditions and on cores from different geological settings. A direct practical implication of these studies would be the definition of a minimum scale at which heterogeneities have to be resolved, so that mathematical models would adequately capture the observed displacement patterns. Moreover, the coupling of experiments and theory will serve as a firm starting point for testing scale-up methods. In this study, results from core-flooding experiments are presented that have been carried out at representative conditions on a variety of naturally heterogeneous core samples. Results are presented from a newly developed technique that allows measuring drainage capillary pressure curves during core-flooding experiments; data have been collected at different temperature (25 and 50C), at different pressures (2 and 9MPa) and with different fluid pairs (CO2/water, N2/water and CO2/brine), thus showing the applicability of the novel technique in a wide range of interfacial tension levels. Additionally, Pc

  1. Modulation of mantle plumes and heat flow at the core mantle boundary by plate-scale flow: results from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, Helge M.; Jellinek, A. Mark; Richards, Mark A.; Manga, Michael

    2004-09-01

    We report results from analog laboratory experiments, in which a large-scale flow is imposed upon natural convection from a hot boundary layer at the base of a large tank of corn syrup. The experiments show that the subdivision of the convective flow into four regions provides a reasonable conceptual framework for interpreting the effects of large-scale flow on plumes. Region I includes the area of the hot thermal boundary layer (TBL) that is thinned by the large-scale flow, thereby suppressing plumes. Region II encompasses the critically unstable boundary layer where plumes form. Region III is the area above the boundary layer that is devoid of plumes. Region IV comprises the area of hot upwelling and plume conduits. Quantitative analysis of our experiments results in a scaling law for heat flux from the hot boundary and for the spatial extent of plume suppression. When applied to the Earth's core-mantle boundary (CMB), our results suggest that large-scale mantle flow, due to sinking lithospheric plates, can locally thin the TBL and suppress plume formation over large fractions of the CMB. Approximately 30% of heat flow from the core may be due to increased heat flux from plate-scale flow. Furthermore, CMB heat flux is non-uniformly distributed along the CMB, with large areas where heat flux is increased on average by a factor of 2. As a consequence, the convective flow pattern in the outer core may be affected by CMB heat-flux heterogeneity and sensitive to changes in plate-scale mantle flow. Because of plume suppression and 'focusing' of hot mantle from the CMB into zones of upwelling flow, plume conduits (hotspots) are expected to be spatially associated with lower-mantle regions of low seismic velocities, inferred as hot upwelling mantle flow.

  2. Scale Model Test and Transient Analysis of Steam Injector Driven Passive Core Injection System for Innovative-Simplified Nuclear Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Shuichi; Narabayashi, Tadashi; Mori, Michitsugu

    A steam injector (SI) is a simple, compact and passive pump and also acts as a high-performance direct-contact compact heater. This provides SI with capability to serve also as a direct-contact feed-water heater that heats up feed-water by using extracted steam from turbine. Our technology development aims to significantly simplify equipment and reduce physical quantities by applying "high-efficiency SI", which are applicable to a wide range of operation regimes beyond the performance and applicable range of existing SIs and enables unprecedented multistage and parallel operation, to the low-pressure feed-water heaters and emergency core cooling system of nuclear power plants, as well as achieve high inherent safety to prevent severe accidents by keeping the core covered with water (a severe accident-free concept). This paper describes the results of the scale model test, and the transient analysis of SI-driven passive core injection system (PCIS).

  3. Generic astronomy mission planning and scheduling: The AXAF solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guffin, O. T.

    1994-01-01

    During SpaceOps 92 the idea of generic mission planning concepts for space astronomy missions, that could be applied to future missions in order to simplify software development, was introduced. It was proposed that mission planning systems could be decomposed into functional elements that could be standardized and then organized into optimal functional flows for each individual mission. In addition, it was further suggested that these flows themselves could be reduced to a small set of possibilities by describing them in terms of generic mission type, such as manned, unmanned, high orbit, low orbit, etc. The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), planned for launch in the latter part of 1998, represents the first application of this idea on an unmanned mission. This paper examines the AXAF Mission Planning and Scheduling concept in light of the generic system theory. Each functional element is evaluated according to AXAF characteristics and requirements and then compared to its generic counterpart. Functional flow considerations are then derived from the overall AXAF mission planning concept to determine the viability and sensitivity of the generic flow to actual requirements. The results of this analysis are then used to update the generic system concept and to define the level of commonality and core system components that are practical to achieve across multiple missions.

  4. Multi-Physics Feedback Simulations with Realistic Initial Conditions of the Formation of Star Clusters: From Large Scale Magnetized Clouds to Turbulent Clumps to Cores to Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, R. I.; Li, P.; McKee, C. F.

    2015-10-01

    Multi-physics zoom-in adaptive mesh refinement simulations with feedback and realistic initial conditions, starting from large scale turbulent molecular clouds through the formation of clumps and cores to the formation os stellar clusters are presented. I give a summary of results at the different scales undergoing gravitational collapse from cloud to core to cluster formation. Detailed comparisons with observations are made at each stage of the simulations. In particular, properties of the magnetized clumps are compared with recent observations of Crutcher et al. 2010 and Crutcher 2012 and the magnetic field orientation in cloud clumps relative to the global mean field of the inter-cloud medium (Li et al. 2009). The Initial Mass Function (IMF) obtained is compared with the Chabrier IMF and the protostellar mass function of the cluster is compared with different theories.

  5. New generic indexing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeston, Michael

    1996-01-01

    There has been no fundamental change in the dynamic indexing methods supporting database systems since the invention of the B-tree twenty-five years ago. And yet the whole classical approach to dynamic database indexing has long since become inappropriate and increasingly inadequate. We are moving rapidly from the conventional one-dimensional world of fixed-structure text and numbers to a multi-dimensional world of variable structures, objects and images, in space and time. But, even before leaving the confines of conventional database indexing, the situation is highly unsatisfactory. In fact, our research has led us to question the basic assumptions of conventional database indexing. We have spent the past ten years studying the properties of multi-dimensional indexing methods, and in this paper we draw the strands of a number of developments together - some quite old, some very new, to show how we now have the basis for a new generic indexing technology for the next generation of database systems.

  6. Generic Optimization Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-07-01

    GenOpt is a generic optimization program for nonlinear, constrained optimization. For evaluating the objective function, any simulation program that communicates over text files can be coupled to GenOpt without code modification. No analytic properties of the objective function are used by GenOpt. ptimization algorithms and numerical methods can be implemented in a library and shared among users. Gencpt offers an interlace between the optimization algorithm and its kernel to make the implementation of new algorithmsmore » fast and easy. Different algorithms of constrained and unconstrained minimization can be added to a library. Algorithms for approximation derivatives and performing line-search will be implemented. The objective function is evaluated as a black-box function by an external simulation program. The kernel of GenOpt deals with the data I/O, result sotrage and report, interlace to the external simulation program, and error handling. An abstract optimization class offers methods to interface the GenOpt kernel and the optimization algorithm library.« less

  7. Low-cost and gram-scale synthesis of water-soluble Cu-In-S/ZnS core/shell quantum dots in an electric pressure cooker.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanyan; Li, Shenjie; Huang, Lijian; Pan, Daocheng

    2014-01-01

    We report an electric pressure cooker for large-scale synthesis of water-soluble Cu-In-S/ZnS core/shell quantum dots. Low-cost thioglycolic acid and sodium citrate were used as the dual stabilizers. ∼3 grams of quantum dots with a tunable emission from 545 to 610 nm and quantum yield up to 40% were obtained in a batch. PMID:24337019

  8. Generic Substitution Issues: Brand-generic Substitution, Generic-generic Substitution, and Generic Substitution of Narrow Therapeutic Index (NTI)/Critical Dose Drugs

    PubMed Central

    PAVELIU, Marian Sorin; BENGEA, Simona; PAVELIU, Fraga Silvia

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Doctors accuse individual variability or lack of quality of generic drugs for adverse reactions or lack of efficacy. The variability of effect of generic substitution, although accepted by clinicians as possible, is little discussed or even understood by them. The situation is really serious in the case of generic substitution of drugs with narrow therapeutic index (NTI) or critical dose. In this paper we review the basic notions of variability and effectiveness of generic medication and change of attitude that would improve the use of these drugs. PMID:21977191

  9. Developing Generic Software for Spacecraft Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    A proposed approach to the development of software for spacecraft avionics is based partly on a concept of generic software that could be tailored to satisfy requirements for specific missions. The proposed approach would stand in contrast to the conventional approach of first defining avionics requirements for a specific mission, then developing software specific to those requirements. The proposed approach might also be adaptable to programming computers that control and monitor other complex equipment systems that range in scale from automobiles to factories. The concept of a spacecraft avionics functional model (SAFM) is a major element of the proposed approach. An SAFM would be, essentially, a systematic and hierarchical description of the functionality required of the avionics software (and hardware) for a given mission. Although the initial input information used to start the construction of an SAFM would typically amount to a high-level description, the SAFM would thereafter be decomposed to a low level. The resulting low-level version of the model would be used to develop a set of generic requirements that could be expected to include a large fraction of all requirements for a large fraction of all missions. The generic requirements would be used to develop software modules that could be included in, or excluded from, the final flight software to satisfy the requirements of a specific mission.

  10. The proprietary/generic debate

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Many of the different attitudes to the prescribing of drugs by proprietary or generic name are based on biased information from the pharmaceutical industry. A plea is made for a more scientific approach to the problem by doctors. PMID:19790798

  11. Hanford Generic Interim Safety Basis

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, J.C.

    1994-09-09

    The purpose of this document is to identify WHC programs and requirements that are an integral part of the authorization basis for nuclear facilities that are generic to all WHC-managed facilities. The purpose of these programs is to implement the DOE Orders, as WHC becomes contractually obligated to implement them. The Hanford Generic ISB focuses on the institutional controls and safety requirements identified in DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

  12. Primordial nucleosynthesis with generic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, T. P.; Kolb, E. W.; Turner, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    A revision of the standard model for Big Bang nucleosynthesis is discussed which allows for the presence of generic particle species. The primordial production of He-4 and D + He-3 is calculated as a function of the mass, spin degrees of freedom, and spin statistics of the generic particle for masses in the range 0.01-100 times the electron mass. The particular case of the Gelmini and Roncadelli majoron model for massive neutrinos is discussed.

  13. APEX/SABOCA observations of small-scale structure of infrared-dark clouds . I. Early evolutionary stages of star-forming cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragan, Sarah E.; Henning, Thomas; Beuther, Henrik

    2013-11-01

    Infrared-dark clouds (IRDCs) harbor the early phases of cluster and high-mass star formation and are comprised of cold (~20 K), dense (n > 104 cm-3) gas. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of IRDCs is dominated by the far-infrared and millimeter wavelength regime, and our initial Herschel study examined IRDCs at the peak of the SED with high angular resolution. Here we present a follow-up study using the SABOCA instrument on APEX which delivers 7.8″ angular resolution at 350 μm, matching the resolution we achieved with Herschel/PACS, and allowing us to characterize substructure on ~0.1 pc scales. Our sample of 11 nearby IRDCs are a mix of filamentary and clumpy morphologies, and the filamentary clouds show significant hierarchical structure, while the clumpy IRDCs exhibit little hierarchical structure. All IRDCs, regardless of morphology, have about 14% of their total mass in small scale core-like structures which roughly follow a trend of constant volume density over all size scales. Out of the 89 protostellar cores we identified in this sample with Herschel, we recover 40 of the brightest and re-fit their SEDs and find their properties agree fairly well with our previous estimates (⟨ T ⟩ ~ 19 K). We detect a new population of "cold cores" which have no 70 μm counterpart, but are 100 and 160 μm-bright, with colder temperatures (⟨ T ⟩ ~ 16 K). This latter population, along with SABOCA-only detections, are predominantly low-mass objects, but their evolutionary diagnostics are consistent with the earliest starless or prestellar phase of cores in IRDCs. Based on observations carried out with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX). APEX is a collaboration between Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie (MPIfR), Onsala Space Observatory (OSO), and the European Southern Observatory (ESO).Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Generic Example Proving Criteria for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yopp, David; Ely, Rob; Johnson­-Leung, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    We review literature that discusses generic example proving and highlight ambiguities that pervade our research community's discourse about generic example arguments. We distinguish between pedagogical advice for choosing good examples that can serve as generic examples when teaching and advice for developing generic example arguments. We provide…

  15. Verifying a Local Generic Solver in Coq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Martin; Karbyshev, Aleksandr; Seidl, Helmut

    Fixpoint engines are the core components of program analysis tools and compilers. If these tools are to be trusted, special attention should be paid also to the correctness of such solvers. In this paper we consider the local generic fixpoint solver RLD which can be applied to constraint systems {x}sqsupseteq fx,{x}in V, over some lattice {D} where the right-hand sides f x are given as arbitrary functions implemented in some specification language. The verification of this algorithm is challenging, because it uses higher-order functions and relies on side effects to track variable dependences as they are encountered dynamically during fixpoint iterations. Here, we present a correctness proof of this algorithm which has been formalized by means of the interactive proof assistant Coq.

  16. Scales

    MedlinePlus

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Eczema , ringworm , and psoriasis ...

  17. Generic rigidity percolation in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, D. J.; Thorpe, M. F.

    1996-04-01

    We study rigidity percolation for random central-force networks on the bondand site-diluted generic triangular lattice. Here, each site location is randomly displaced from the perfect lattice, removing any special symmetries. Using the pebble game algorithm, the total number of floppy modes are counted exactly, and exhibit a cusp singularity in the second derivative at the transition from a rigid to a floppy structure. The critical thresholds for bond and site dilution are found to be 0.66020+/-0.0003 and 0.69755+/-0.0003, respectively. The network is decomposed into unique rigid clusters, and we apply the usual percolation scaling theory. From finite size scaling, we find that the generic rigidity percolation transition is second order, but in a different universality class from connectivity percolation, with the exponents α=-0.48+/-0.05, β=0.175+/-0.02, and ν=1.21+/-0.06. The fractal dimension of the spanning rigid clusters and the spanning stressed regions at the critical threshold are found to be df=1.86+/-0.02 and dBB=1.80+/-0.03, respectively.

  18. Generic medications for hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Donald M; Sebhatu, Phoebe; Reau, Nancy S

    2016-07-01

    The recent development and approval of expensive but highly effective oral agents against hepatitis C has led to restrictions and access limitations in many countries with limited healthcare budgets. Generic formulations of many of these agents are available at a fraction of the retail price in several countries because of generic licensure agreements. The discounted alternatives are only accessible in developing countries and require manufacturing and distribution regulations to ensure the quality and bioequivalence of the new drug formulations. The continued medication access limitations have driven great interest in the practice of personal drug importation of the generic formulations. This review and debate will address the medical and legal issues involved in the purchase and importation of these medicines. PMID:27306302

  19. Modulation of Core Turbulent Density Fluctuations by Large-Scale Neoclassical Tearing Mode Islands in the DIII-D Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Bardóczi, L; Rhodes, T L; Carter, T A; Bañón Navarro, A; Peebles, W A; Jenko, F; McKee, G

    2016-05-27

    We report the first observation of localized modulation of turbulent density fluctuations n[over ˜] (via beam emission spectroscopy) by neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in the core of the DIII-D tokamak. NTMs are important as they often lead to severe degradation of plasma confinement and disruptions in high-confinement fusion experiments. Magnetic islands associated with NTMs significantly modify the profiles and turbulence drives. In this experiment n[over ˜] was found to be modulated by 14% across the island. Gyrokinetic simulations suggest that n[over ˜] could be dominantly driven by the ion temperature gradient instability. PMID:27284662

  20. Modulation of Core Turbulent Density Fluctuations by Large-Scale Neoclassical Tearing Mode Islands in the DIII-D Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardóczi, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; Bañón Navarro, A.; Peebles, W. A.; Jenko, F.; McKee, G.

    2016-05-01

    We report the first observation of localized modulation of turbulent density fluctuations n ˜ (via beam emission spectroscopy) by neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in the core of the DIII-D tokamak. NTMs are important as they often lead to severe degradation of plasma confinement and disruptions in high-confinement fusion experiments. Magnetic islands associated with NTMs significantly modify the profiles and turbulence drives. In this experiment n ˜ was found to be modulated by 14% across the island. Gyrokinetic simulations suggest that n ˜ could be dominantly driven by the ion temperature gradient instability.

  1. Software synthesis using generic architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhansali, Sanjay

    1993-01-01

    A framework for synthesizing software systems based on abstracting software system designs and the design process is described. The result of such an abstraction process is a generic architecture and the process knowledge for customizing the architecture. The customization process knowledge is used to assist a designer in customizing the architecture as opposed to completely automating the design of systems. Our approach using an implemented example of a generic tracking architecture which was customized in two different domains is illustrated. How the designs produced using KASE compare to the original designs of the two systems, and current work and plans for extending KASE to other application areas are described.

  2. Acoustic Source Localization via Time Difference of Arrival Estimation for Distributed Sensor Networks Using Tera-Scale Optical Core Devices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. These sensors rely heavily on battery-operated system components to achieve highly functional automation in signal and information processing. In order to keep communication requirements minimal, it is desirable to perform as much processing on the receiver platforms as possible. However, the complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot bemore » readily met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on the optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. This demonstration of considerably faster signal processing capability should be of substantial significance to the design and innovation of future generations of distributed sensor networks.« less

  3. TRAC code assessment using data from SCTF Core-III, a large-scale 2D/3D facility

    SciTech Connect

    Boyack, B.E.; Shire, P.R.; Harmony, S.C.; Rhee, G.

    1988-01-01

    Nine tests from the SCTF Core-III configuration have been analyzed using TRAC-PF1/MOD1. The objectives of these assessment activities were to obtain a better understanding of the phenomena occurring during the refill and reflood phases of a large-break loss-of-coolant accident, to determine the accuracy to which key parameters are calculated, and to identify deficiencies in key code correlations and models that provide closure for the differential equations defining thermal-hydraulic phenomena in pressurized water reactors. Overall, the agreement between calculated and measured values of peak cladding temperature is reasonable. In addition, TRAC adequately predicts many of the trends observed in both the integral effect and separate effect tests conducted in SCTF Core-III. The importance of assessment activities that consider potential contributors to discrepancies between the measured and calculated results arising from three sources are described as those related to (1) knowledge about the facility configuration and operation, (2) facility modeling for code input, and (3) deficiencies in code correlations and models. An example is provided. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Development of TDLAS sensor for diagnostics of CO, H2O and soot concentrations in reactor core of pilot-scale gasifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepman, A.; Ögren, Y.; Gullberg, M.; Wiinikka, H.

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports on the development of the tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy sensor near 4350 cm-1 (2298 nm) for measurements of CO and H2O mole fractions and soot volume fraction under gasification conditions. Due to careful selection of the molecular transitions [CO ( υ″ = 0 → υ' = 2) R34-R36 and H2O at 4349.337 cm-1], a very weak (negligible) sensitivity of the measured species mole fractions to the temperature distribution inside the high-temperature zone (1000 K < T < 1900 K) of the gasification process is achieved. The selected transitions are covered by the tuning range of single diode laser. The CO and H2O concentrations measured in flat flames generally agree better than 10 % with the results of 1-D flame simulations. Calibration-free absorption measurements of studied species in the reactor core of atmospheric pilot-scale entrained-flow gasifier operated at 0.1 MW power are reported. Soot concentration is determined from the measured broadband transmittance. The estimated uncertainties in the reactor core CO and H2O measurements are 15 and 20 %, respectively. The reactor core average path CO mole fractions are in quantitative agreement with the µGC CO concentrations sampled at the gasifier output.

  5. Multi-scale petrophysical and geomechanical characterization of full core from the Groningen Field to understand mechanical stratigraphy and compaction behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eijs, Rob; Hol, Sander; Marcelis, Fons; Ishmukhametova, Gulfiia; van der Linden, Arjan; Zuiderwijk, Pedro; Makurat, Axel

    2016-04-01

    The Groningen gas field in The Netherlands is one of the largest onshore gas reserves known. Advancing production from the field has resulted in field-scale deformation with surface subsidence and accompanied local seismicity. Part of the deformation is associated with compaction of the Permian reservoir. While depletion-induced reservoir compaction is expected to be controlled locally by grain-scale physical mechanisms such as sub-critical cracking or particle re-arrangement and intergranular pressure solution creep, understanding of the intra-reservoir variability of these mechanisms is still limited, though crucial for predicting the coupling between production, rock deformation, and surface effects. To aid an improved understanding of fundamental processes and scaling effects, approximately 200 meters of core over the reservoir section was taken from a well in the Groningen Field, drilled in July 2015 close to the village of Zeerijp. Using this material, we have performed detailed laboratory investigations and will continue to do so in significant numbers, to compare the results obtained with well- and field-scale observations. In this contribution, we present several exemplary mechanical data sets for the reservoir and caprock, and compare these data with well-scale petrophysical and mechanical information, notably sonic, scratch and visual geological details with the aim to arrive at a multi-scale description of petrophysical and geomechanical rock properties. Our first comparison reveals a strong contrast in compressibility and strength between the reservoir and caprock, as well as a contribution of inelastic strain to the total strain response of the tested rock samples. We will discuss the observed mechanical stratigraphy in considering regional and field scale deformation patterns.

  6. Characterization of reactive flow-induced evolution of carbonate rocks using digital core analysis- part 1: Assessment of pore-scale mineral dissolution and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qajar, Jafar; Arns, Christoph H.

    2016-09-01

    The application of X-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT) for quantitatively characterizing reactive-flow induced pore structure evolution including local particle detachment, displacement and deposition in carbonate rocks is investigated. In the studies conducted in this field of research, the experimental procedure has involved alternating steps of imaging and ex-situ core sample alteration. Practically, it is impossible to return the sample, with micron precision, to the same position and orientation. Furthermore, successive images of a sample in pre- and post-alteration states are usually taken at different conditions such as different scales, resolutions and signal-to-noise ratios. These conditions accompanying with subresolution features in the images make voxel-by-voxel comparisons of successive images problematic. In this paper, we first address the respective challenges in voxel-wise interpretation of successive images of carbonate rocks subject to reactive flow. Reactive coreflood in two carbonate cores with different rock types are considered. For the first rock, we used the experimental and imaging results published by Qajar et al. (2013) which showed a quasi-uniform dissolution regime. A similar reactive core flood was conducted in the second rock which resulted in wormhole-like dissolution regime. We particularly examine the major image processing operations such as transformation of images to the same grey-scale, noise filtering and segmentation thresholding and propose quantitative methods to evaluate the effectiveness of these operations in voxel-wise analysis of successive images of a sample. In the second part, we generalize the methodology based on the three-phase segmentation of normalized images, microporosity assignment and 2D histogram of image intensities to estimate grey-scale changes of individual image voxels for a general case where the greyscale images are segmented into arbitrary number of phases. The results show that local (voxel

  7. Characterization of reactive flow-induced evolution of carbonate rocks using digital core analysis- part 1: Assessment of pore-scale mineral dissolution and deposition.

    PubMed

    Qajar, Jafar; Arns, Christoph H

    2016-09-01

    The application of X-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT) for quantitatively characterizing reactive-flow induced pore structure evolution including local particle detachment, displacement and deposition in carbonate rocks is investigated. In the studies conducted in this field of research, the experimental procedure has involved alternating steps of imaging and ex-situ core sample alteration. Practically, it is impossible to return the sample, with micron precision, to the same position and orientation. Furthermore, successive images of a sample in pre- and post-alteration states are usually taken at different conditions such as different scales, resolutions and signal-to-noise ratios. These conditions accompanying with subresolution features in the images make voxel-by-voxel comparisons of successive images problematic. In this paper, we first address the respective challenges in voxel-wise interpretation of successive images of carbonate rocks subject to reactive flow. Reactive coreflood in two carbonate cores with different rock types are considered. For the first rock, we used the experimental and imaging results published by Qajar et al. (2013) which showed a quasi-uniform dissolution regime. A similar reactive core flood was conducted in the second rock which resulted in wormhole-like dissolution regime. We particularly examine the major image processing operations such as transformation of images to the same grey-scale, noise filtering and segmentation thresholding and propose quantitative methods to evaluate the effectiveness of these operations in voxel-wise analysis of successive images of a sample. In the second part, we generalize the methodology based on the three-phase segmentation of normalized images, microporosity assignment and 2D histogram of image intensities to estimate grey-scale changes of individual image voxels for a general case where the greyscale images are segmented into arbitrary number of phases. The results show that local (voxel

  8. Breakdown of Volume Scaling in Auger Recombination in CdSe/CdS Heteronanocrystals: The Role of the Core-Shell Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Santamaria, Florencio; Brovelli, Sergio; Viswanatha, Ranjani; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Htoon, Han; Crooker, Scott A.; Klimov, Victor I.

    2011-01-05

    Spatial confinement of electronic excitations in semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) results in a significant enhancement of nonradiative Auger recombination (AR), such that AR processes can easily dominate the decay of multiexcitons. AR is especially detrimental to lasing applications of NCs, as optical gain in these structures explicitly relies on emission from multiexciton states. In standard NCs, AR rates scale linearly with inverse NC volume. Here, we investigate multiexciton dynamics in hetero-NCs composed of CdSe cores and CdS shells of tunable thickness. We observe a dramatic decrease in the AR rates at the initial stage of shell growth, which cannot be explained by traditional volume scaling alone. Rather, fluorescence-line-narrowing studies indicate that the suppression of AR correlates with the formation of an alloy layer at the core-shell interface suggesting that this effect derives primarily from the “smoothing” of the confinement potential associated with interfacial alloying. These data highlight the importance of NC interfacial structure in the AR process and provide general guidelines for the development of new nanostructures with suppressed AR for future lasing applications.

  9. Large-scale volcaniclastic turbidites from subaerial caldera-forming eruptions at Dominica: insights from IODP site U1398 cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeno, F.; Ishizuka, O.; Kataoka, K.; Le Friant, A.; Boudon, G.; Villemant, B.

    2014-12-01

    Volcaniclastic turbidity currents can be caused by subaerial explosive eruptions. However, their flow and emplacement processes in oceanic environment are still ambiguous. Core data obtained by deep-ocean drilling give constraints on the origin of such turbidity currents and resultant deposits. In this presentation, stratigraphy and grain data of volcaniclastic deposits from IODP site U1398 cores are shown and the origin of the deposit is discussed. The site is located 120 km southwest of Dominica Island. The uppermost unit that we study extends 0-40 mbsf. The main part is composed of a series of thick massive volcaniclastic turbidites, and is divided into several subunits. Each subunit has a few to 10 m thick and is separated by thin layers of fine materials or hemipelagic mud. Most of the layers are massive, composed of sorted, medium to coarse sand, and poor in fines. Some are normally graded. The upper turbidite is thick and massive, and contains abundant pumice clasts. They tend to concentrate in middle or upper part of the layer. Components of matrix are represented by pumice, massive lava, crystals (pl, opx, cpx, qz, hbl, titanomagnetite), and sparse carbonates. Generally, in normally graded layers, upper finer part is rich in pumice and bioclasts, and lower part is richer in crystals. In some layers, crystal concentration in matrix vary in proportion up to 80 wt.%, and its variation is correlated with magnetic susceptibility data. Grain size and component characteristics and their variations are thought to reflect emplacement process of volcaniclastic turbidity currents. Importantly, the grain characteristics are almost identical to the previous description for subaerial deposits or piston core data of the Roseau Tuff (~30 ka B.P.) that originated from the largest eruption in the Lesser Antilles in the last 200,000 years. The eruption formed caldera(s) on land in Dominica, and the most of the materials were deposited beneath the sea. Also it has been

  10. Permeability Evolution During Reactive Flow Experiments on Cores Under CO2 Sequestration Conditions and Development of Fully Coupled Reactive Flow Simulations at the Reservoir Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar, M. O.; Kong, X. Z.; Luhmann, A. J.; Tutolo, B. M.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Physical, chemical, thermal, and mechanical processes can modify permeability and affect CO2 injectivity and reactive fluid flow during geologic CO2 sequestration. Here we report permeability evolutions observed in core-flood experiments using CO2-charged fluids under various formation conditions. Temperature-series experiments on consolidated dolomite cores show a permeability increase due to dissolution, followed by a two-step permeability decrease due to CO2 exsolution and secondary dolomite precipitation, as temperature is increased from 21 to 50°C and then to 100°C, respectively. CO2 mass balance calculations suggest that, under dynamic steady-state conditions, CO2 saturation and its relative permeability can only reach up to ~0.5 and ~0.0065, respectively. Permeability reductions of ~1/3 and mass losses of ~2% are observed both in a 52-day recycling and in two 3-day single-pass experiments with K-feldspar-rich sandstone (150°C, 200 bar). Water chemistry, SEM, and XRCT data suggest feldspar dissolution and precipitation of either boehmite (recycling) or kaolinite (single-pass) during the experiments. These observations indicate that permeability can decrease with increasing porosity due to mineral precipitation in critical pore throats. Single-pass experiments on nine dolomite cores (150°C and 150 bar with NaCl) reveal permeability enhancements and dissolution patterns at different flow rates. Permeability-porosity data indicate an increase in permeability enhancement rate per increase in porosity with reaction progress as dissolution channels lengthen along the core. These experimental observations provide the requisite data for informing up-scaled, fully-coupled reactive transport simulations of CO2 sequestration in interbedded siliclastic-carbonate sedimentary reservoirs, which we present.

  11. QUANTIFYING THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD FROM LARGE-SCALE CLOUD TO COLLAPSING CORE: SELF-SIMILARITY, MASS-TO-FLUX RATIO, AND STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Patrick M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Tang, Ya-Wen

    2012-03-01

    Dust polarization observational results are analyzed for the high-mass star formation region W51 from the largest parent cloud ({approx}2 pc, James Clerk Maxwell Telescope) to the large-scale envelope ({approx}0.5 pc, BIMA array) down to the collapsing core e2 ({approx}60 mpc, Submillimeter Array). Magnetic field and dust emission gradient orientations reveal a correlation which becomes increasingly more tight with higher resolution. The previously developed polarization-intensity-gradient method is applied in order to quantify the magnetic field significance. This technique provides a way to estimate the local magnetic field force compared to gravity without the need of any mass or field strength measurements, solely making use of measured angles which reflect the geometrical imprint of the various forces. All three data sets clearly show regions with distinct features in the field-to-gravity force ratio. Azimuthally averaged radial profiles of this force ratio reveal a transition from a field dominance at larger distances to a gravity dominance closer to the emission peaks. Normalizing these profiles to a characteristic core scale points toward self-similarity. Furthermore, the polarization-intensity-gradient method is linked to the mass-to-flux ratio, providing a new approach to estimate the latter one without mass and field strength inputs. A transition from a magnetically supercritical to a subcritical state as a function of distance from the emission peak is found for the e2 core. Finally, based on the measured radius-dependent field-to-gravity force ratio we derive a modified star formation efficiency with a diluted gravity force. Compared to a standard (free-fall) efficiency, the observed field is capable of reducing the efficiency down to 10% or less.

  12. CopperCore Service Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogten, Hubert; Martens, Harrie; Nadolski, Rob; Tattersall, Colin; van Rosmalen, Peter; Koper, Rob

    2007-01-01

    In an e-learning environment there is a need to integrate various e-learning services like assessment services, collaboration services, learning design services and communication services. In this article we present the design and implementation of a generic integrative service framework, called CopperCore Service Integration (CCSI). We will…

  13. Generic Software Architecture for Launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carre, Emilien; Gast, Philippe; Hiron, Emmanuel; Leblanc, Alain; Lesens, David; Mescam, Emmanuelle; Moro, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    The definition and reuse of generic software architecture for launchers is not so usual for several reasons: the number of European launcher families is very small (Ariane 5 and Vega for these last decades); the real time constraints (reactivity and determinism needs) are very hard; low levels of versatility are required (implying often an ad hoc development of the launcher mission). In comparison, satellites are often built on a generic platform made up of reusable hardware building blocks (processors, star-trackers, gyroscopes, etc.) and reusable software building blocks (middleware, TM/TC, On Board Control Procedure, etc.). If some of these reasons are still valid (e.g. the limited number of development), the increase of the available CPU power makes today an approach based on a generic time triggered middleware (ensuring the full determinism of the system) and a centralised mission and vehicle management (offering more flexibility in the design and facilitating the long term maintenance) achievable. This paper presents an example of generic software architecture which could be envisaged for future launchers, based on the previously described principles and supported by model driven engineering and automatic code generation.

  14. Structure, Mechanics and Flow Properties of Fractured Shale: Core-Scale Experimentation and In-situ Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmalek, B. F.; Karpyn, Z.; Liu, S.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last several years, hydrocarbon exploitation and development in North America has been heavily centered on shale gas plays. However, the physical attributes of shales and their manifestation on transport properties and storage capacity remain poorly understood. Therefore, more experimentally based data are needed to fill the gaps in understanding both transport and storage of fluids in shale. The proposed work includes installation and testing of an experimental system which is capable of monitoring the dynamic evolution of shale core permeability under variable loading conditions and in coordination with X-ray microCT imaging. The goal of this study is to better understand and quantify fluid flow patterns and associated transport dynamics of fractured shale samples. The independent variables considered in this study are: mechanical loading and pore pressure. The mechanical response of shale core is captured for different loading paths. To best replicate the in-situ production scenario, the pore pressure is progressively depleted to mimic pressure decline. During the course of experimentation, permeability is estimated using the pulse-decay method under tri-axial stress boundary conditions. Simultaneously, X-ray microCT imaging is used with a tracer gas that is allowed to flow through the sample as an illuminating agent. In the presence of an illuminating agent, either Xenon or Krypton, the X-ray CT scanner can image fractures, global pathways and diffusional fronts in the matrix, as well as sorption sites that reflect heterogeneities in the sample and localized deformation. Anticipated results from these experiments will help quantify permeability evolution as a function of different loading conditions and pore pressure depletion. Also, the X-ray images will help visualize the change of flow patterns and the intensity of sorption as a function of mechanical loading and pore pressure.

  15. Scaling To A Million Cores And Beyond: Using Light-Weight Simulation to Understand The Challenges Ahead On The Road To Exascale

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    As supercomputers scale to 1,000 PFlop/s over the next decade, investigating the performance of parallel applications at scale on future architectures and the performance impact of different architecture choices for high-performance computing (HPC) hardware/software co-design is crucial. This paper summarizes recent efforts in designing and implementing a novel HPC hardware/software co-design toolkit. The presented Extreme-scale Simulator (xSim) permits running an HPC application in a controlled environment with millions of concurrent execution threads while observing its performance in a simulated extreme-scale HPC system using architectural models and virtual timing. This paper demonstrates the capabilities and usefulness of the xSim performance investigation toolkit, such as its scalability to 2^27 simulated Message Passing Interface (MPI) ranks on 960 real processor cores, the capability to evaluate the performance of different MPI collective communication algorithms, and the ability to evaluate the performance of a basic Monte Carlo application with different architectural parameters.

  16. Toward the Cenozoic Megasplice - high-resolution XRF core scanning data and improved composite records from IODP Expedition 320: implications for fine scale paleoceanography (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhold, T.; Bown, P. R.; Dunkley Jones, T.; Lyle, M. W.; Moore, T. C.; Pälike, H.; Roehl, U.; Wilkens, R. H.; Expedition 320/321 Scientists

    2010-12-01

    A critical need to study past climate change is to sufficiently constrain the ages of past climate events so that global relationships can be discerned. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 320 recovered high-quality pelagic Cenozoic records with over 800 dated paleomagnetic reversals and decimeter-scale cyclic sediments. These new profiles provide an outstanding framework to inter-calibrate major microfossil groups and refine magnetic polarity chrons for the late Miocene, the entire Oligocene and the late Eocene Epochs. The compilation of a Cenozoic Megasplice which integrates all available bio-, chemo-, and magnetostratigraphic data including those from key records already recovered during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 199 is one of the major objectives of the Pacific Equatorial Age Transect (PEAT, IODP Exp. 320 & 321) and prerequisite for further reconstructing the climate history of the Equatorial Pacific in detail. Here we present extended post-cruise refinements of the shipboard composite records of IODP Exp. 320 Sites U1331, U1332, U1333, U1334 as well as ODP Leg 199 Sites 1218, 1219 and 1220. The revised composite records were used to perform a site-to-site correlation and integration of Leg 199 and Exp. 320 sites. Based on this decimeter scale correlation a high resolution integrated paleomagnetic and biostratigraphic framework for the Equatorial Pacific is established which covers the time interval from 20 to 40 Ma. This framework will be the key for further high-resolution paleoceanographic interpretations of the late Paleogene, e.g. the E/O transition. As part of our study we also present high resolution X-ray fluorescence (XRF) core scanning data acquired from more than 1200 meters of sediment cores from Exp. 320 and Leg 199 encompassing the middle Eocene to early Oligocene (magnetochrons C12n to C20n). These new, critical records enable us to improve the orbitally tuned time scale and to reconstruct variations in the carbonate

  17. 27 CFR 4.24 - Generic, semi-generic, and non-generic designations of geographic significance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Generic, semi-generic, and non-generic designations of geographic significance. 4.24 Section 4.24 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING...

  18. The generic danger and the idiosyncratic support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temme, Arnaud; Nijp, Jelmer; van der Meij, Marijn; Samia, Jalal; Masselink, Rens

    2016-04-01

    This contribution argues two main points. First, that generic landscapes used in some modelling studies sometimes have properties or cause simulation results that are unrealistic. Such initially flat or straight-sloped landscapes, sometimes with minor random perturbations, e.g. form the backdrop for ecological simulations of vegetation growth and competition that predict catastrophic shifts. Exploratory results for semi-arid systems suggest that the results based on these generic landscapes are end-members from a distribution of results, rather than an unbiased, typical outcome. Apparently, the desire to avoid idiosyncrasy has unintended consequences. Second, we argue and illustrate that in fact new insights often come from close inspection of idiosyncratic case studies. Our examples from landslide systems, connectivity and soil formation show how a central role for the case study - either in empirical work or to provide model targets - has advanced our understanding. Both points contribute to the conclusion that it is dangerous to forget about annoying, small-scale, idiosyncratic and, indeed, perhaps bad-ass case studies in Earth Sciences.

  19. Mylan to Offer Generic EpiPen

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_160669.html Mylan to Offer Generic EpiPen Manufacturer responds to mounting criticism about price hikes ... cheaper generic version of the emergency allergy treatment EpiPen will be made available within the next few ...

  20. CO2 Exsolution from CO2 Saturated Water: Core-Scale Experiments and Focus on Impacts of Pressure Variations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruina; Li, Rong; Ma, Jin; Jiang, Peixue

    2015-12-15

    For CO2 sequestration and utilization in the shallow reservoirs, reservoir pressure changes are due to the injection rate changing, a leakage event, and brine withdrawal for reservoir pressure balance. The amounts of exsolved CO2 which are influenced by the pressure reduction and the subsequent secondary imbibition process have a significant effect on the stability and capacity of CO2 sequestration and utilization. In this study, exsolution behavior of the CO2 has been studied experimentally using a core flooding system in combination with NMR/MRI equipment. Three series of pressure variation profiles, including depletion followed by imbibitions without or with repressurization and repetitive depletion and repressurization/imbibition cycles, were designed to investigate the exsolution responses for these complex pressure variation profiles. We found that the exsolved CO2 phase preferentially occupies the larger pores and exhibits a uniform spatial distribution. The mobility of CO2 is low during the imbibition process, and the residual trapping ratio is extraordinarily high. During the cyclic pressure variation process, the first cycle has the largest contribution to the amount of exsolved CO2. The low CO2 mobility implies a certain degree of self-sealing during a possible reservoir depletion. PMID:26509211

  1. Strike-slip linked core complexes: A new kinematic model of basement rock exhumation in a crustal-scale fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Sven Erik; Passchier, Cees; Abu-Alam, Tamer; Stüwe, Kurt

    2014-05-01

    Metamorphic core complexes usually develop as extensional features during continental crustal thinning, such as the Basin and Range and the Aegean Terrane. The Najd fault system in Saudi Arabia is a 2000 km-long and 400 km-wide complex network of crustal-scale strike-slip shear zones in a Neoproterozoic collision zone. Locally, the anastomosing shear zones lead to exhumation of lower crustal segments and represent a new kinematic model for the development of core complexes. We report on two such structures: the Qazaz complex in Saudi Arabia and the Hafafit complex in Egypt. The 15 km-wide Qazaz complex is a triangular dome of gently dipping mylonitic foliations within the 140 km-long sinistral strike-slip Qazaz mylonite zone. The gneissic dome consists of high-grade rocks, surrounded by low-grade metasediments and metavolcanics. The main SE-trending strike-slip Qazaz shear zone splits southwards into two branches around the gneiss dome: the western branch is continuous with the shallow dipping mylonites of the dome core, without overprinting, and changes by more than 90 degrees from a NS-trending strike-slip zone to an EW-trending 40 degree south-dipping detachment that bounds the gneiss dome to the south. The eastern SE-trending sinistral strike-slip shear zone branch is slightly younger and transects the central dome fabrics. The gneiss dome appears to have formed along a jog in the strike-slip shear zone during 40 km of horizontal strike-slip motion, which caused local exhumation of lower crustal rocks by 25 km along the detachment. The eastern shear zone branch formed later during exhumation, transacted the gneiss dome and offset the two parts by another 70 km. The Hafafit core complex in Egypt is of similar shape and size to the Qazaz structure, but forms the northern termination of a sinistral strike-slip zone that is at least 100 km in length. This zone may continue into Saudi Arabia as the Ajjaj shear zone for another 100 km. The NW trending strike slip

  2. Generic Competency Frameworks: A Brief Historical Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jolee; Chapman, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    Significant efforts have now been made to identify the generic competencies required to succeed across different workplace contexts. The aims of this paper were to: (i) outline factors that contributed to the increased demand for generic competencies seen over the last three decades; and (ii) review the early generic competency frameworks…

  3. The connection between chromatin motion on the 100 nm length scale and core histone dynamics in live XTC-2 cells and isolated nuclei.

    PubMed

    Davis, Sara K; Bardeen, Christopher J

    2004-01-01

    The diffusive motion of DNA-containing chromatin in live cells and isolated nuclei is investigated using a two-photon standing wave fluorescence photobleaching experiment with 100 nm spatial resolution. The chromatin is labeled using the minor groove binding dye Hoechst 33342. In live cells, the mean diffusion rate is 5 x 10(-4) micro m2/s, with considerable cell-to-cell variation. This diffusion is highly constrained and cannot be observed in a standard, single beam fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiment. To determine the chemical origin of the diffusion, we study motion in isolated nuclei and vary the strength of the histone-DNA interactions by changing the ionic strength and using chemical and photocross-linking experiments. At higher NaCl concentrations, we see increased chromatin diffusion as the histone-DNA interaction is weakened due to ionic screening, whereas photocross-linking the core histones to the DNA results in a complete absence of diffusive motion. These trends are consistent with the 100 nm scale motion being correlated with the interactions of histone proteins with the DNA. If chromatin diffusion is connected to the nucleosomal dynamics on much smaller length scales, this may provide a way to assay biochemical activity in vivo based on larger scale macromolecular dynamics observed via fluorescence microscopy. PMID:14695300

  4. Core and Large-Scale Structure of the 2000 November 24 X-Class Flare and Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Haimin; Gallagher, Peter; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Yang, Guo; Godde, Philip R.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present three important aspects of the XI .8 flare and the associated coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2000 November 24: (1) The source of the flare is clearly associated with a magnetic channel structure, as was noted in a study by Zirin & Wang , which is due to a combination of flux emergence inside the leading edge of the penumbra of the major leading sunspot and proper motion of the sunspot group. The channel structure provides evidence for twisted flux ropes that can erupt, forming the core of a CME, and may be a common property of several superactive regions that have produced multiple X-class flares in the past. (2) There are actually three flare ribbons visible. The first can be seen moving away from the flare site, while the second and third make up a stationary ribbon near the leader spot. The moving ribbons could be due to a shock associated with the erupting flux rope or due to the interaction of erupting rope and the surrounding magnetic fields. In either case, the ribbon motion does not fit the classical Kopp-Pneuman model, in which the separation of ribbons is due to magnetic reconnection at successively higher and higher coronal altitudes. (3) From the coronal dimming observed with the EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT), the CME involved a much larger region than the initial X-class flare. By comparing high-resolution full-disk Ha and EIT observations, we found that a remote dimming area is cospatial with the enhanced Ha emission. This result is consistent with the recent model of Yokoyama & Shibata that some dimming areas near footpoints may be due to chromospheric evaporation.

  5. Generic Language and Judgements about Category Membership: Can Generics Highlight Properties as Central?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollander, Michelle A.; Gelman, Susan A.; Raman, Lakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Many languages distinguish generic utterances (e.g., "Tigers are ferocious") from non-generic utterances (e.g., "Those tigers are ferocious"). Two studies examined how generic language specially links properties and categories. We used a novel-word extension task to ask if 4- to 5-year-old children and adults distinguish between generic and…

  6. Validation of a core outcome measure for palliative care in Africa: the APCA African Palliative Outcome Scale

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the burden of progressive incurable disease in Africa, there is almost no evidence on patient care or outcomes. A primary reason has been the lack of appropriate locally-validated outcome tools. This study aimed to validate a multidimensional scale (the APCA African Palliative Outcome Scale) in a multi-centred international study. Methods Validation was conducted across 5 African services and in 3 phases: Phase 1. Face validity: content analysis of qualitative interviews and cognitive interviewing of POS; Phase 2. Construct validity: correlation of POS with Missoula-Vitas Quality of Life Index (Spearman's rank tests); Phase 3. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha calculated twice using 2 datasets), test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients calculated for 2 time points) and time to complete (calculated twice using 2 datasets). Results The validation involved 682 patients and 437 family carers, interviewed in 8 different languages. Phase 1. Qualitative interviews (N = 90 patients; N = 38 carers) showed POS items mapped well onto identified needs; cognitive interviews (N = 73 patients; N = 29 carers) demonstrated good interpretation; Phase 2. POS-MVQoLI Spearman's rank correlations were low-moderate as expected (N = 285); Phase 3. (N = 307, 2nd assessment mean 21.2 hours after first, SD 7.2) Cronbach's Alpha was 0.6 on both datasets, indicating expected moderate internal consistency; test-retest found high intra-class correlation coefficients for all items (0.78-0.89); median time to complete 7 mins, reducing to 5 mins at second visit. Conclusions The APCA African POS has sound psychometric properties, is well comprehended and brief to use. Application of this tool offers the opportunity to at last address the omissions of palliative care research in Africa. PMID:20100332

  7. Broadband and Low-Loss Plasmonic Light Trapping in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Using Micrometer-Scale Rodlike and Spherical Core-Shell Plasmonic Particles.

    PubMed

    Malekshahi Byranvand, Mahdi; Nemati Kharat, Ali; Taghavinia, Nima; Dabirian, Ali

    2016-06-29

    Dielectric scattering particles have widely been used as embedded scattering elements in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) to improve the optical absorption of the device. Here we systematically study rodlike and spherical core-shell silica@Ag particles as more effective alternatives to the dielectric scattering particles. The wavelength-scale silica@Ag particles with sufficiently thin Ag shell support hybrid plasmonic-photonic resonance modes that have low parasitic absorption losses and a broadband optical response. Both of these features lead to their successful deployment in light trapping in high-efficiency DSCs. Optimized rodlike silica@Ag@silica particles improve the power conversion efficiency of a DSC from 6.33 to 8.91%. The dimension, surface morphology, and concentration of these particles are optimized to achieve maximal efficiency enhancement. The rodlike silica particles are prepared in a simple one-pot synthesis process and then are coated with Ag in a liquid-phase deposition process by reducing an Ag salt. The aspect ratio of silica rods is tuned by adjusting the temperature and duration of the growth process, whereas the morphology of Ag shell is tailored by controlling the reduction rate of Ag salt, where slower reduction in a polyol process gives a smoother Ag shell. Using optical calculations, the superior performance of the plasmonic core-shell particles is related to the large number of hybrid photonic-plasmonic resonance modes that they support. PMID:27300764

  8. Dynamics of metallic contaminants at a basin scale--Spatial and temporal reconstruction from four sediment cores (Loire fluvial system, France).

    PubMed

    Dhivert, E; Grosbois, C; Courtin-Nomade, A; Bourrain, X; Desmet, M

    2016-01-15

    From the 19th century, the Loire basin (France) presents potentially pollutant activities such as mining and heavy industries. This paper shows spatio-temporal distribution of trace elements in sediments at a basin-scale, based on a comparison of archived temporal signals recorded in four sedimentary cores. Anthropogenic sources contributing to sediment contamination are also characterized, using geochemical signatures recorded in river bank sediments of the most industrialized tributaries. This study highlights upstream-downstream differences concerning recorded contamination phases in terms of spatial influence and temporality of archiving processes. Such differences were related to (i) various spatial influences of contamination sources and (ii) polluted sediments dispersion controlled by transport capacity of metal-carrier phases and hydrosedimentary dynamics. PMID:26490530

  9. A single-step route for large-scale synthesis of core-shell palladium@platinum dendritic nanocrystals/reduced graphene oxide with enhanced electrocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi; Xu, Yan-Ru; Wang, Ai-Jun; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2016-01-01

    In this report, a facile, seed-less and single-step method is developed for large-scale synthesis of core-shell Pd@Pt dendritic nanocrystals anchored on reduced graphene oxide (Pd@Pt DNC/rGO) under mild conditions. Poly(ethylene oxide) is employed as a structure-directing and stabilizing agent. Compared with commercial Pt/C (20 wt%) and Pd/C (20 wt%) catalysts, the as-obtained nanocomposite has large electrochemically active surface area (114.15 m2gmetal-1), and shows superior catalytic activity and stability with the mass activities of 1210.0 and 1128.5 mAmg metal-1 for methanol and ethanol oxidation, respectively. The improved catalytic activity is mainly the consequence of the synergistic effects between Pd and Pt of the dendritic structures, as well as rGO as a support.

  10. Recent Advances in Platinum Monolayer Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction: Scale-up Synthesis Structure and Activity of Pt Shells on Pd Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki K.; Wang J.X.; Naohara H.; Marinkovic N.; More K.; Inada H.; Adzic R.R.

    2010-03-01

    We have established a scale-up synthesis method to produce gram-quantities of Pt monolayer electrocatalysts. The core-shell structure of the Pt/Pd/C electrocatalyst has been verified using the HAADF-STEM Z-contrast images, STEM/EELS, and STEM/EDS line profile analysis. The atomic structure of this electrocatalyst and formation of a Pt monolayer on Pd nanoparticle surfaces were examined using in situ EXAFS. The Pt mass activity of the Pt/Pd/C electrocatalyst for ORR is considerably higher than that of commercial Pt/C electrocatalysts. The results with Pt monolayer electrocatalysts may significantly impact science of electrocatalysis and fuel-cell technology, as they have demonstrated an exceptionally effective way of using Pt that can resolve problems of other approaches, including electrocatalysts inadequate activity and high Pt content.

  11. Automated analysis in generic groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagerholm, Edvard

    This thesis studies automated methods for analyzing hardness assumptions in generic group models, following ideas of symbolic cryptography. We define a broad class of generic and symbolic group models for different settings---symmetric or asymmetric (leveled) k-linear groups --- and prove ''computational soundness'' theorems for the symbolic models. Based on this result, we formulate a master theorem that relates the hardness of an assumption to solving problems in polynomial algebra. We systematically analyze these problems identifying different classes of assumptions and obtain decidability and undecidability results. Then, we develop automated procedures for verifying the conditions of our master theorems, and thus the validity of hardness assumptions in generic group models. The concrete outcome is an automated tool, the Generic Group Analyzer, which takes as input the statement of an assumption, and outputs either a proof of its generic hardness or shows an algebraic attack against the assumption. Structure-preserving signatures are signature schemes defined over bilinear groups in which messages, public keys and signatures are group elements, and the verification algorithm consists of evaluating ''pairing-product equations''. Recent work on structure-preserving signatures studies optimality of these schemes in terms of the number of group elements needed in the verification key and the signature, and the number of pairing-product equations in the verification algorithm. While the size of keys and signatures is crucial for many applications, another aspect of performance is the time it takes to verify a signature. The most expensive operation during verification is the computation of pairings. However, the concrete number of pairings is not captured by the number of pairing-product equations considered in earlier work. We consider the question of what is the minimal number of pairing computations needed to verify structure-preserving signatures. We build an

  12. The Impact of Century-Scale Changes in the Core Magnetic Field on External Magnetic Field Contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cnossen, Ingrid

    2016-08-01

    The Earth's internal magnetic field controls to a degree the strength, geographic positioning, and structure of currents flowing in the ionosphere and magnetosphere, which produce their own (external) magnetic fields. The secular variation of the Earth's internal magnetic field can therefore lead to long-term changes in the externally produced magnetic field as well. Here we will examine this more closely. First, we obtain scaling relations to describe how the strength of magnetic perturbations associated with various different current systems in the ionosphere and magnetosphere depends on the internal magnetic field intensity. Second, we discuss how changes in the orientation of a simple dipolar magnetic field will affect the current systems. Third, we use model simulations to study how actual changes in the Earth's internal magnetic field between 1908 and 2008 have affected some of the relevant current systems. The influence of the internal magnetic field on low- to mid-latitude currents in the ionosphere is relatively well understood, while the effects on high-latitude current systems and currents in the magnetosphere still pose considerable challenges.

  13. Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    The common approach to scaling, according to Christopher Dede, a professor of learning technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, is to jump in and say, "Let's go out and find more money, recruit more participants, hire more people. Let's just keep doing the same thing, bigger and bigger." That, he observes, "tends to fail, and fail…

  14. Children's interpretation of generic noun phrases.

    PubMed

    Hollander, Michelle A; Gelman, Susan A; Star, Jon

    2002-11-01

    Generic utterances (e.g., "Cows say 'moo'") have 2 distinctive semantic properties: (a) Generics are generally true, unlike indefinites (e.g., "Bears live in caves" is generic; "I saw some bears in the cave" is indefinite), and (b) generics need not be true of all category members, unlike universal quantifiers (e.g., all, every, each). This article examined whether preschool children and adults appreciate both these features, using a comprehension task (Study 1) and an elicited production task (Study 2). In both tasks, 4-year-old children--like adults--treated generics as distinct from both indefinites ("some") and universal quantifiers ("all"). In contrast, 3-year-olds did not differentiate among generics, "all," and "some." By 4 years of age, generics emerge as a distinct semantic device. PMID:12428701

  15. Generic Language in Parent-Child Conversations

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Susan A.; Goetz, Peggy J.; Sarnecka, Barbara W.; Flukes, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Generic knowledge concerns kinds of things (e.g., birds fly; a chair is for sitting; gold is a metal). Past research demonstrated that children spontaneously develop generic knowledge by preschool age. The present study examines when and how children learn to use the multiple devices provided by their language to express generic knowledge. We hypothesize that children assume, in the absence of specifying information or context, that nouns refer to generic kinds, as a default. Thus, we predict that (a) Children should talk about kinds from an early age. (b) Children should learn generic forms with only minimal parental scaffolding. (c) Children should recognize a variety of different linguistic forms as generic. Results from longitudinal samples of adult-child conversations support all three hypotheses. We also report individual differences in the use of generics, suggesting that children differ in their tendency to form the abstract generalizations so expressed. PMID:21765807

  16. Scalable Triadic Analysis of Large-Scale Graphs: Multi-Core vs. Multi-Processor vs. Multi-Threaded Shared Memory Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, George; Marquez, Andres; Choudhury, Sutanay; Feo, John T.

    2012-09-01

    Triadic analysis encompasses a useful set of graph mining methods that is centered on the concept of a triad, which is a subgraph of three nodes and the configuration of directed edges across the nodes. Such methods are often applied in the social sciences as well as many other diverse fields. Triadic methods commonly operate on a triad census that counts the number of triads of every possible edge configuration in a graph. Like other graph algorithms, triadic census algorithms do not scale well when graphs reach tens of millions to billions of nodes. To enable the triadic analysis of large-scale graphs, we developed and optimized a triad census algorithm to efficiently execute on shared memory architectures. We will retrace the development and evolution of a parallel triad census algorithm. Over the course of several versions, we continually adapted the code’s data structures and program logic to expose more opportunities to exploit parallelism on shared memory that would translate into improved computational performance. We will recall the critical steps and modifications that occurred during code development and optimization. Furthermore, we will compare the performances of triad census algorithm versions on three specific systems: Cray XMT, HP Superdome, and AMD multi-core NUMA machine. These three systems have shared memory architectures but with markedly different hardware capabilities to manage parallelism.

  17. Generic products of antiepileptic drugs: a perspective on bioequivalence and interchangeability.

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir; Midha, Kamal K

    2010-06-01

    Most antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are currently available as generic products, yet neurologists and patients are reluctant to switch to generics. Generic AEDs are regarded as bioequivalent to brand AEDs after meeting the average bioequivalence criteria; consequently, they are considered to be interchangeable with their respective brands without loss of efficacy and safety. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the present bioequivalence requirements are already so rigorous and constrained that there is little possibility that generics that meet regulatory bioequivalence criteria could lead to therapeutic problems. So is there a scientific rationale for the concerns about switching patients with epilepsy to bioequivalent generics? Herein we discuss the assessment of bioequivalence and propose a scaled-average bioequivalence approach where scaling of bioequivalence is carried out based on brand lot-to-lot variance as an alternative to the conventional bioequivalence test as a means to determine whether switching patients to generic formulations, or vice versa, is a safe and effective therapeutic option. Meeting the proposed scaled-average bioequivalence requirements will ensure that when an individual patient is switched, he or she has fluctuations in plasma levels similar to those from lot-to-lot of the brand reference levels and thus should make these generic products safely switchable without change in efficacy and safety outcomes. PMID:20384761

  18. Ash deposits - Initiating the change from empiricism to generic engineering. Part 1: The generic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wagoner, C.L.; Wessel, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Empiricism has traditionally been used to relate laboratory and pilot-scale measurements of fuel characteristics with the design, performance, and the slagging and fouling behavior of steam generators. Currently, a new engineering approach is being evaluated. The goal is to develop and use calculations and measurements from several engineering disciplines that exceed the demonstrated limitations of present empirical techniques for predicting slagging/fouling behavior. In Part I of this paper, the generic approach to deposits and boiler performance is defined and a matrix of engineering concepts is described. General relationships are presented for assessing the effects of deposits and sootblowing on the real-time performance of heat transfer surfaces in pilot- and commercial-scale steam generators.

  19. SC'11 Poster: A Highly Efficient MGPT Implementation for LAMMPS; with Strong Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Oppelstrup, T; Stukowski, A; Marian, J

    2011-12-07

    The MGPT potential has been implemented as a drop in package to the general molecular dynamics code LAMMPS. We implement an improved communication scheme that shrinks the communication layer thickness, and increases the load balancing. This results in unprecedented strong scaling, and speedup continuing beyond 1/8 atom/core. In addition, we have optimized the small matrix linear algebra with generic blocking (for all processors) and specific SIMD intrinsics for vectorization on Intel, AMD, and BlueGene CPUs.

  20. Generic trending and analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keehan, Lori; Reese, Jay

    1994-01-01

    The Generic Trending and Analysis System (GTAS) is a generic spacecraft performance monitoring tool developed by NASA Code 511 and Loral Aerosys. It is designed to facilitate quick anomaly resolution and trend analysis. Traditionally, the job of off-line analysis has been performed using hardware and software systems developed for real-time spacecraft contacts; then, the systems were supplemented with a collection of tools developed by Flight Operations Team (FOT) members. Since the number of upcoming missions is increasing, NASA can no longer afford to operate in this manner. GTAS improves control center productivity and effectiveness because it provides a generic solution across multiple missions. Thus, GTAS eliminates the need for each individual mission to develop duplicate capabilities. It also allows for more sophisticated tools to be developed because it draws resources from several projects. In addition, the GTAS software system incorporates commercial off-the-shelf tools software (COTS) packages and reuses components of other NASA-developed systems wherever possible. GTAS has incorporated lessons learned from previous missions by involving the users early in the development process. GTAS users took a proactive role in requirements analysis, design, development, and testing. Because of user involvement, several special tools were designed and are now being developed. GTAS users expressed considerable interest in facilitating data collection for long term trending and analysis. As a result, GTAS provides easy access to large volumes of processed telemetry data directly in the control center. The GTAS archival and retrieval capabilities are supported by the integration of optical disk technology and a COTS relational database management system.

  1. Descriptive Model of Generic WAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Hauer, John F.; DeSteese, John G.

    2007-06-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Transmission Reliability Program is supporting the research, deployment, and demonstration of various wide area measurement system (WAMS) technologies to enhance the reliability of the Nation’s electrical power grid. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by the DOE National SCADA Test Bed Program to conduct a study of WAMS security. This report represents achievement of the milestone to develop a generic WAMS model description that will provide a basis for the security analysis planned in the next phase of this study.

  2. Generic magnetic fusion rocket model

    SciTech Connect

    Santarius, J.F.; Logan, B.G.

    1993-06-01

    A generic magnetic fusion rocket model is developed and used to explore the limits of fusion propulsion systems. Two fusion fuels are examined, D-T and D-(He-3), and the D-(He-3) fuel cycle is found to give a higher specific power in almost all parameter regimes. The key findings are that (1) magnetic fusion should ultimately be able to deliver specific powers of about 10 kW/kg and (2) specific powers of 15 kW/kg could be achieved with only modest extrapolations of present technology. 9 refs.

  3. GLAD: A Generic LAttice Debugger

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.J.

    1991-11-01

    Today, numerous simulation and analysis codes exist for the design, commission, and operation of accelerator beam lines. There is a need to develop a common user interface and database link to run these codes interactively. This paper will describe a proposed system, GLAD (Generic LAttice Debugger), to fulfill this need. Specifically, GLAD can be used to find errors in beam lines during commissioning, control beam parameters during operation, and design beam line optics and error correction systems for the next generation of linear accelerators and storage rings.

  4. The Controversy over Generic Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Susan J.; Hartman, Adam L.

    2010-01-01

    As patent protection ends for the next generation of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), a complex debate continues over generic substitution of AEDs. On one hand, generic drug formulations provide cost savings for patients and society. On the other hand, patients with epilepsy and physicians are wary about the adequacy and efficacy of the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) standards for generics. This article reviews current and proposed bioequivalence test procedures, summarizes new generic AED formulations and their costs, and discusses potential pitfalls in the current standards. These shortcomings include certain pharmacokinetic factors and clinical pharmacologic factors that may affect bioequivalence of generic AEDs, and statistical limitations of the standards. While the drug concentration differences between the brand name drug and each generic formulation are unlikely to be substantial, the differences with generic-to-generic switches will be greater and potentially clinically significant. Conversely, owing to their more favorable pharmacokinetic profile, newer AEDs may be less prone to problems with generic substitution than older ones. Unfortunately, very few data are available to guide decisions regarding what is best for an individual patient. Based on new prediction methods, generic substitution should be safe for many patients but identifying them ultimately requires more rigorous study. PMID:22477799

  5. CO2 Reaction Induced Wettability Alteration and its Impacts on CO2 Storage: Pore to Core Scale Reservoir Condition Experimental Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Kim, Y.; Jung, J.; Kim, T.; Dong, W.

    2013-12-01

    Wettability of the mineral surfaces plays an important role in subsurface multiphase flow and transport. Wettability affects the capillary pressure-saturation (Pc- S) relations, relative permeability (kr) of each fluid phase, and relative phase occupancy in reservoir pores. Although wettability issues have been studied extensively in other fields, significant knowledge gaps remain when applying the existing understanding to geological carbon sequestration; due largely to the unique physical-chemical properties of supercritical (sc) CO2 relative to other common non-wetting fluids such as air and oil. Here, we report our recent progress on wettability alteration upon reaction with CO2 and the resulting differences in capillary trapping of CO2 versus air. (1) Pore Scale Studies. There are conflict predictions in the literature concerning the effect of wettability on capillary trapping; some find that larger contact angles lead to lower capillary trapping while others have found opposite behavior. We hypothesized that spontaneous imbibition becomes energetically unfavorable with decreased wettability, so that increased residual trapping of scCO2 should occur during the post-injection inbibition stage. We developed a laboratory high-pressure and elevated temperature microscopic-micromodel system that is capable of controlling fine scale capillary pressure of scCO2-brine, and enabled us to conduct imbibition under controlled capillary pressures at the pore scale. We found that the de-wetting enhanced scCO2 capillary trapping is significant. These results suggest that scCO2 reaction induced dewetting can result in higher degrees of CO2 residual trapping in the post-injection stage than previously predicted. (2) Core Scale Studies. Capillary scaling is used routinely to predict Pc(S) relations for scCO2-brine systems at field scale, based on relations measured with air-water or mercury porosimetry. However, scaling-based predictions for CO2-brine systems have not been

  6. Scales

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2010-01-08

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain ? a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  7. Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  8. Long-distance relationship between large-scale tropical SSTs and ice core-derived oxygen isotopic records in the Third Pole Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, L. G.; Yao, T.; Mosley-Thompson, E. S.; Lin, P.

    2012-12-01

    The tropical hydrological cycle is a key factor coupling isotopic records from ice core, speleothem and lake records with tropical SSTs and the vertical amplification of temperature in the Tropics. Stable isotopic ratios, particularly of oxygen, preserved in glacier ice provide high resolution records of climate changes over long time periods. In polar ice sheets the isotopic signal is driven primarily by temperature while in low-latitudes it depends on a variety of hydrologic and thermal influences in the broad geographic region that supplies moisture to the mountain glaciers. The strong correlation between ice core-derived isotopic records throughout the low- and mid-latitudes and tropical SSTs likely reflects the dominance of tropical evaporation in the flux of water vapor to the atmosphere and provides a possible explanation for the large-scale isotopic links among low- and mid-latitude paleoclimate records. Many low- to mid-latitude ice fields provide continuous, annually-resolved proxy records of climatic and environmental variability recorded by many preserved and measurable parameters including oxygen and hydrogen isotopic ratios and net mass balance (accumulation). These records present an opportunity to examine the nature of climate variability in these regions in greater detail and to extract new information about long-distance relationships in the climate system. Understanding these relationships is essential for proper interpretation of the isotopic records archived in glaciers, lakes, speleothems and other paleo-archives in the Third Pole (TP) Region. Here we compare high resolution records from Dasuopu Glacier in the Himalaya, a speleothem record from Wanxiang Cave in Gansu Province on the TP and the annually resolved ice core records from the Quelccaya Ice Cap in the tropical Andes of South America. The purpose is to explore the role of long-distance processes in determining the isotopic composition of paleo archives on the TP. Running correlations

  9. Generic Hypersonic Inlet Module Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, Chares E., Jr.; Huebner, Lawrence D.

    2004-01-01

    A computational study associated with an internal inlet drag analysis was performed for a generic hypersonic inlet module. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of computing the internal drag force for a generic scramjet engine module using computational methods. The computational study consisted of obtaining two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solutions using the Euler and parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) equations. The solution accuracy was assessed by comparisons with experimental pitot pressure data. The CFD analysis indicates that the 3D PNS solutions show the best agreement with experimental pitot pressure data. The internal inlet drag analysis consisted of obtaining drag force predictions based on experimental data and 3D CFD solutions. A comparative assessment of each of the drag prediction methods is made and the sensitivity of CFD drag values to computational procedures is documented. The analysis indicates that the CFD drag predictions are highly sensitive to the computational procedure used.

  10. Generic Airspace Concepts and Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogford, Richard H.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate methods for reducing the training and memorization required to manage air traffic in mid-term, Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) airspace. We contrasted the performance of controllers using a sector information display and NextGen automation tools while working with familiar and unfamiliar sectors. The airspace included five sectors from Oakland and Salt Lake City Centers configured as a "generic center" called "West High Center." The Controller Information Tool was used to present essential information for managing these sectors. The Multi Aircraft Control System air traffic control simulator provided data link and conflict detection and resolution. There were five experienced air traffic controller participants. Each was familiar with one or two of the five sectors, but not the others. The participants rotated through all five sectors during the ten data collection runs. The results addressing workload, traffic management, and safety, as well as controller and observer comments, supported the generic sector concept. The unfamiliar sectors were comparable to the familiar sectors on all relevant measures.

  11. The early Cretaceous orogen-scale Dabieshan metamorphic core complex: implications for extensional collapse of the Triassic HP-UHP orogenic belt in east-central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wenbin; Lin, Wei; Faure, Michel; Shi, Yonghong; Wang, Qingchen

    2016-03-01

    The Dabieshan massif is famous as a portion of the world's largest HP-UHP metamorphic belt in east-central China that was built by the Triassic North-South China collision. The central domain of the Dabieshan massif is occupied by a huge migmatite-cored dome [i.e., the central Dabieshan dome (CDD)]. Origin of this domal structure remains controversial. Synthesizing previous and our new structural and geochronological data, we define the Cretaceous Dabieshan as an orogen-scale metamorphic core complex (MCC) with a multistage history. Onset of lithospheric extension in the Dabieshan area occurred as early as the commencement of crustal anatexis at the earliest Cretaceous (ca. 145 Ma), which was followed by primary (early-stage) detachment during 142-130 Ma. The central Dabieshan complex in the footwall and surrounding detachment faults recorded a consistently top-to-the-NW shearing. It is thus inferred that the primary detachment was initiated from a flat-lying detachment zone at the middle crust level. Removal of the orogenic root by delamination at ca. 130 Ma came into the extensional climax, and subsequently isostatic rebound resulted in rapid doming. Along with exhumation of the footwall, the mid-crustal detachment zone had been warped as shear zones around the CDD. After 120 Ma, the detachment system probably experienced a migration accommodated to the crustal adjustment, which led to secondary (late-stage) detachment with localized ductile shearing at ca. 110 Ma. The migmatite-gneiss with HP/UHP relicts in the CDD (i.e., the central Dabieshan complex) was product of the Cretaceous crustal anatexis that consumed the deep-seated part of the HP-UHP slices and the underlying para-autochthonous basement. Compared with the contemporaneous MCCs widely developed along the eastern margin of the Eurasian continent, we proposed that occurrence of the Dabieshan MCC shares the same tectonic setting as the "destruction of the North China craton". However, geodynamic trigger

  12. The use of generic medications for hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Freeman, James A D; Hill, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C, hepatitis B, HIV, TB and malaria are the five major causes of infectious disease death worldwide. In a breakthrough that rivals the invention of penicillin, drugs that cure hepatitis C, with minimal side effects and high success rates, have reached the market, but, in what must be one of the greatest tragedies of modern times, these life-saving medications are not being deployed on a mass scale. Pharmaceutical patents are gifted to private corporations by governments for the dual purposes of protecting R&D expenditure and encouraging innovation. Unfortunately the monopoly pricing power these patents provision currently lacks adequate checks and balances, is open to abuse, and is quite clearly being abused. The sort of legislative changes required to deliver on the original goals of pharmaceutical patents will take years or even decades to eventuate. Parallel importation of generic medication offers hope to the millions of patients with HCV unable to afford access to vastly overpriced originator medications. Doctors prescribing and monitoring patients taking generics can take comfort from the fact that the REDEMPTION trial results show, like the HIV generics that came before them, that HCV generics deliver robust clinical results. PMID:27306303

  13. The global biopharma industry and the rise of Indian drug multinationals: implications for Australian generics policy

    PubMed Central

    Löfgren, Hans

    2007-01-01

    This article provides a synopsis of the new dynamics of the global biopharma industry. The emergence of global generics companies with capabilities approximating those of 'big pharma' has accelerated the blurring of boundaries between the innovator and generics sectors. Biotechnology-based products form a large and growing segment of prescription drug markets and regulatory pathways for biogenerics are imminent. Indian biopharma multinationals with large-scale efficient manufacturing plants and growing R&D capabilities are now major suppliers of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs) and generic drugs across both developed and developing countries. In response to generic competition, innovator companies employ a range of life cycle management techniques, including the launch of 'authorised generics'. The generics segment in Australia will see high growth rates in coming years but the prospect for local manufacturing is bleak. The availability of cheap generics in international markets has put pressure on Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) pricing arrangements, and a new policy direction was announced in November 2006. Lower generics prices will have a negative impact on some incumbent suppliers but industrial renewal policies for the medicines industry in Australia are better focused on higher value R&D activities and niche manufacturing of sophisticated products. PMID:17543115

  14. Generic domain models in software engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiden, Neil

    1992-01-01

    This paper outlines three research directions related to domain-specific software development: (1) reuse of generic models for domain-specific software development; (2) empirical evidence to determine these generic models, namely elicitation of mental knowledge schema possessed by expert software developers; and (3) exploitation of generic domain models to assist modelling of specific applications. It focuses on knowledge acquisition for domain-specific software development, with emphasis on tool support for the most important phases of software development.

  15. Comparison of safety parameters and transient behavior of a generic 10 MW reactor with HEU and LEU fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.; Woodruff, W.L.

    1983-01-01

    Key safety parameters are compared for equilibrium cores of the IAEA generic 10 MW reactor with HEU and LEU fuels. These parameters include kinetics parameters, reactivity feedback coefficients, control rod worths, power peaking factors, and shutdown margins. Reactivity insertion and loss-of-flow transients are compared. Results indicate that HEU and LEU cores will behave in a very similar manner.

  16. Seasonal climate information preserved within West Antarctic ice cores and its relation to large-scale atmospheric circulation and regional sea ice variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küttel, M.; Steig, E. J.; Ding, Q.; Battisti, D. S.

    2010-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that West Antarctica has been warming since at least the 1950s. With the instrumental record being limited to the mid-20th century, indirect information from stable isotopes (δ18O and δD, hereafter collectively δ) preserved within ice cores have commonly been used to place this warming into a long term context. Here, using a large number of δ records obtained during the International Trans-Antarctic Scientific Expedition (ITASE), past variations in West Antarctic δ are not only investigated over time but also in space. This study therefore provides an important complement to longer records from single locations as e.g. the currently being processed West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) Divide ice core. Although snow accumulation rates at the ITASE sites in West Antarctica are variable, they are generally high enough to allow studies on sub-annual scale over the last 50-100 years. Here, we show that variations in δ in this region are strongly related to the state of the large-scale atmospheric circulation as well as sea ice variations in the adjacent Southern Ocean, with important seasonal changes. While a strong relationship to sea ice changes in the Ross and Amundsen Sea as well as to the atmospheric circulation offshore is found during austral fall (MAM) and winter (JJA), only modest correlations are found during spring (SON) and summer (DJF). Interestingly, the correlations with the atmospheric circulation in the latter two seasons have the strongest signal over the Antarctic continent, but not offshore - an important difference to MAM and JJA. These seasonal changes are in good agreement with the seasonally varying predominant circulation: meridional with more frequent storms in the Amundsen Sea during MAM and JJA and more zonal and stable during SON and DJF. The relationship to regional temperature is similarly seasonally variable with highest correlations found during MAM and JJA. Notably, the circulation pattern found to be strongest

  17. Lower Limb Core Scale: A New Application to Evaluate and Compare the Outcomes of Bone and Soft-Tissue Tumours Resection and Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Monticelli, Andrea; Ciclamini, Davide; Boffano, Michele; Boux, Elena; Titolo, Paolo; Panero, Bernardino; Battiston, Bruno; Piana, Raimondo; Tos, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Several methods are used to evaluate the functional outcome of tumour resections and reconstructions in the lower limb. However, one of their most common limitations is that they are specifically developed to evaluate only oncological patients. We introduced the Lower Limb Core Scale (LLCS) to overcome this limitation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional and subjective results in the lower limb and to evaluate the use of the LLCS. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using various tools to investigate the outcomes. The results of the LLCS were correlated with the results of other functional tests. A total of 44 patients were included in the study. None of the demographic variables correlated with the functional or health-related quality of life (QoL) scores except for gender, whereby male patients had an increased functional score. The correlation between LLCS and other scores was positive (r2 = 0.77). The satisfactory QoL scores, and functional outcomes scores indicated the LLCS to be a reliable option for general and specific evaluation of lower limb reconstructions. We suggest using the LLCS for comparisons of oncological reconstructions with lower limb reconstructions in different disciplines. PMID:25162021

  18. Lower Limb Core Scale: a new application to evaluate and compare the outcomes of bone and soft-tissue tumours resection and reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Monticelli, Andrea; Ciclamini, Davide; Boffano, Michele; Boux, Elena; Titolo, Paolo; Panero, Bernardino; Battiston, Bruno; Piana, Raimondo; Tos, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Several methods are used to evaluate the functional outcome of tumour resections and reconstructions in the lower limb. However, one of their most common limitations is that they are specifically developed to evaluate only oncological patients. We introduced the Lower Limb Core Scale (LLCS) to overcome this limitation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional and subjective results in the lower limb and to evaluate the use of the LLCS. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using various tools to investigate the outcomes. The results of the LLCS were correlated with the results of other functional tests. A total of 44 patients were included in the study. None of the demographic variables correlated with the functional or health-related quality of life (QoL) scores except for gender, whereby male patients had an increased functional score. The correlation between LLCS and other scores was positive (r (2) = 0.77). The satisfactory QoL scores, and functional outcomes scores indicated the LLCS to be a reliable option for general and specific evaluation of lower limb reconstructions. We suggest using the LLCS for comparisons of oncological reconstructions with lower limb reconstructions in different disciplines. PMID:25162021

  19. The effect of clay minerals, pH, calcium and temperature on the adsorption of phosphonate scale inhibitor onto reservoir core and mineral separates

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, M.M.; Sorbie, K.S.; Jiang, P.; Yuan, M.D.; Todd, A.C.; Thiery, L.

    1994-12-31

    During a scale inhibitor squeeze treatment, the dynamics of the inhibitor return is governed by the inhibitor/rock interaction. In the case of adsorption/desorption inhibitor treatments, this interaction is described through the inhibitor/rock adsorption isotherm. The rock mineralogy plays an important role in determining the nature of the adsorption isotherm and clays in particular are known to strongly affect the adsorption process. However, no previous work has (a) presented a systematic study of the effects of various clays on inhibitor adsorption and (b) clearly demonstrated the significance of this behavior for the squeeze process. It is the central objective of the work in this paper to carry out these tasks. In this paper, an extensive series of results from static bulk adsorption tests using pure mineral separates (quartz, kaolinite, chlorite and muscovite) as adsorbent and using phosphonate (DETPMP) as model inhibitor is presented. From these results, the order of importance of factors governing the phosphonate inhibitor level onto clays appears to be Temperature > pH > [Ca{sup 2+}]. To support the findings from the bulk adsorption tests, results from reservoir condition core floods are presented for reservoir rock from a North Sea field which contains significant quantities of clay (principally kaolinite). The field significance of these results for the inhibitor squeeze performance is demonstrated by using the field and outcrop isotherms in some model squeeze return calculations.

  20. Large-scale fabrication of polymer/Ag core-shell nanorod array as flexible SERS substrate by combining direct nanoimprint and electroless deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sisi; Xu, Zhimou; Sun, Tangyou; Zhao, Wenning; Wu, Xinghui; Ma, Zhichao; Xu, Haifeng; He, Jian; Chen, Cunhua

    2014-06-01

    We demonstrate a highly sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate, which consists of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) assembled on the surface of a nanopatterned polymer film. The fabrication route of a polymer/Ag core-shell nanorod (PACSN) array employed a direct nanoimprint technique to create a high-resolution polymer nanorod array. The obtained nanopatterned polymer film was subjected to electroless deposition to form a sea-cucumber-like Ag shell over the surface of the polymer nanorod. The morphology and structures of PACSNs were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The as-synthesized PACSNs exhibited a remarkable SERS activity and Raman signal reproducibility to rhodamine 6G, and a concentration down to 10-12 M can be identified. The effect of electroless deposition time of Ag NPs onto the polymer nanorod surface was investigated. It was found that the electroless deposition time played an important role in SERS activity. Our results revealed that the combination of direct nanoimprint and electroless deposition provided a convenient and cost-effective way for large-scale fabrication of reliable SERS substrates without the requirement of expensive instruments.

  1. Generic Propellants Transfer Unit (GPTU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Christopher A.

    1992-01-01

    The Generic Propellants Transfer Unit (GPTU) is being designed to support spacecraft liquid propellant operations at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Eastern Test Range (ETR). The GPTU will have a 500 gallon capacity and be Department Of Transportation (DOT) approved for over-the-road transportation of hypergolic propellants. The use of these containers will allow the users to increase efficiency and reduce the following costs: design/construction, transportation (to/from the launch site), propellant transfer operations, and decontamination operations. The user also acquires the flexibility of transporting to an offsite location for processing or storage without obtaining special exemptions or permits. These containers will incorporate their own quantity gaging and temperature sensing systems, and be integrated onto a transport trailer which contains work platforms and a fluid transfer system.

  2. Children's generic interpretation of pretense.

    PubMed

    Baer, Carolyn; Friedman, Ori

    2016-10-01

    We report two experiments investigating how 3- to 5-year-olds learn general knowledge from pretend play-how they learn about kinds of things (e.g., information about dogs) from information about particular individuals in pretend play (a certain dog in a pretend scenario). Children watched pretend-play enactments in which animals showed certain behaviors or heard utterances conveying the same information. When children were subsequently asked about who shows the behavior, children who watched pretend play were more likely to give generic responses than were children who heard the utterances. These findings show that children generalize information from pretend play to kinds even without being prompted to think about kinds, that pretend play can be informative about familiar kinds, and also that pretend play is a more potent source for general knowledge than are utterances about individuals. PMID:27268159

  3. Pharmaceutical policy regarding generic drugs in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Simoens, Steven; De Bruyn, Kristien; Bogaert, Marc; Laekeman, Gert

    2005-01-01

    Pressure to control pharmaceutical expenditure and price competition among pharmaceutical companies are fuelling the development of generic drug markets in EU countries. However, in Belgium, the market for generic drugs is underdeveloped compared with other countries. To promote the use of generic drugs, the government introduced a reference pricing (RP) scheme in 2001. The aim of this paper is to discuss Belgian pharmaceutical policy regarding generic drugs and to analyse how the Belgian drug market has evolved following initiation of the RP scheme. The market share held by generic drugs increased following implementation of the RP scheme. Focusing on volume, average market share (by semester) for generic drugs amounted to 2.05% of the total pharmaceutical market from January 1998 to June 2001, compared with 6.11% from July 2001 to December 2003. As new generic drugs are introduced, their market share tends to increase in the first couple of months, after which it levels off. Faced with increasing generic competition, some manufacturers have launched new variants of their original drug, thereby effectively extending the period of patent protection. Strategies consisting of price reductions in return for the abolition of prescribing conditions and the launch of new dosages or formulations appear to have been successful in maintaining the market share of original drugs. Nevertheless, the introduction of the RP scheme was associated with savings amounting to 1.8% of pharmaceutical expenditure by the third-party payer in 2001 and 2.1% in 2002. The findings of this paper indicate that the RP scheme has stimulated the Belgian generic drug market. However, existing policy has largely failed to take into account the role that physicians and pharmacists can play in stimulating generic drug use. Therefore, further development of the Belgian generic drug market seems to hinge on the creation of appropriate incentives for physicians to prescribe, and for pharmacists to

  4. 76 FR 24925 - Solicitation for Public Comment on Potential Alternatives To Resolve Generic Safety Issue 191...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... informing the path forward to resolve Generic Safety Issue (GSI) 191, Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Sump... emergency core cooling system (ECCS) recirculation sump screens and associated flow paths to debris blockage... regulatory path forward options for closure. In a Staff Requirement Memorandum (SRM) dated December 23,...

  5. Performance Assessment Modeling and Sensitivity Analyses of Generic Disposal System Concepts.

    SciTech Connect

    Sevougian, S. David; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Gardner, William Payton; Hammond, Glenn Edward; Mariner, Paul

    2014-09-01

    directly, rather than through simplified abstractions. It also a llows for complex representations of the source term, e.g., the explicit representation of many individual waste packages (i.e., meter - scale detail of an entire waste emplacement drift). This report fulfills the Generic Disposal System Analysis Work Packa ge Level 3 Milestone - Performance Assessment Modeling and Sensitivity Analyses of Generic Disposal System Concepts (M 3 FT - 1 4 SN08080 3 2 ).

  6. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  7. Defining Generic Skills. At a Glance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research, Leabrook (Australia).

    Generic skills--skills that apply across a variety of jobs and life contexts--are taking on increased importance in Australia and internationally. There is a high demand for generic skills in the workplace because employers seek to ensure business success by recruiting and retaining employees who have a variety of skills and personal attributes as…

  8. Developmental Changes in the Understanding of Generics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelman, Susan A.; Bloom, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Generic sentences (such as "Birds lay eggs") are important in that they refer to kinds (e.g., birds as a group) rather than individuals (e.g., the birds in the henhouse). The present set of studies examined aspects of how generic nouns are understood by English speakers. Adults and children (4- and 5-year-olds) were presented with scenarios about…

  9. HTGR generic technology program plan (FY 80)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Purpose of the program is to develop base technology and to perform design and development common to the HTGR Steam Cycle, Gas Turbine, and Process Heat Plants. The generic technology program breaks into the base technology, generic component, pebble-bed study, technology transfer, and fresh fuel programs. (DLC)

  10. Children's Interpretation of Generic Noun Phrases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollander, Michelle A.; Gelman, Susan A.; Star, Jon

    2002-01-01

    Two studies used a comprehension task and an elicited production task to examine whether preschool children and adults appreciated the semantic properties of generic utterances. Findings indicated that in both tasks, 4-year-olds and adults treated generics ("bears live in caves") as distinct from both indefinites ("some") and universal quantifiers…

  11. Generic scalar potentials in geometric scalar gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Nahomi; Shiraishi, Kiyoshi

    2016-06-01

    We discuss a generic form of the scalar potential appearing in the geometric scalar theory of gravity. We find the conditions on the potential by considering weak and strong gravity. The modified black hole solutions are obtained for generic potentials and the inverse problems on a black hole and on a spherical body (`pseudo-gravastar') are investigated.

  12. Generic Language Facilitates Children's Cross-Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Simone P.; Gelman, A.

    2012-01-01

    Four studies examined the role of generic language in facilitating 4- and 5-year-old children's ability to cross-classify. Participants were asked to classify an item into a familiar (taxonomic or script) category, then cross-classify it into a novel (script or taxonomic) category with the help of a clue expressed in either generic or specific…

  13. 40 CFR 721.450 - Hydrofluorochloroalkene (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.450 Hydrofluorochloroalkene (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a hydrofluorochloroalkene...

  14. 40 CFR 721.450 - Hydrofluorochloroalkene (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.450 Hydrofluorochloroalkene (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a hydrofluorochloroalkene...

  15. Generic Skills. Keys to Job Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Arthur De W.

    The generic skills studies in Canada have as their objectives the formulation of generic skills, the identification of their uses for certain occupational groups, and the preparation of specifications for instructional modules in an attempt to provide greater flexibility to workers, employers, and vocational training programs. Another objective of…

  16. Mapping Generic Skills Curricula: A Recommended Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robley, Will; Whittle, Sue; Murdoch-Eaton, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    Since the 1997 Dearing Report, generic skills development has become an essential part of higher education in the UK. Generic skills programmes are, in the main, either run in parallel with existing curricula or "embedded" within them. In 1993 the General Medical Council introduced student selected components (SSCs) into the UK medical curriculum…

  17. Generic Quarantine Radiation Treatment; The Next Steps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2006, USDA-APHIS published a landmark rule providing generic radiation quarantine treatments. The rule approved irradiation doses of 150 Gy for any tephritid fruit fly and 400 Gy for all other insects except the pupa and adult stages of Lepidoptera. The generic radiation treatments apply to all f...

  18. [Should the ophthalmologist prescribe generic drugs?].

    PubMed

    Nordmann, J-P

    2003-10-01

    It seems obvious that an ophthalmologist should encourage the use of generic drugs. However, it is important to know the exact definition of a generic drug and the type of studies to be conducted before a generic drug is released on the market. A generic drug is a drug that has the same composition quantitatively as well as qualitatively of the active compound as the original drug. It also has the same pharmaceutical mode of action and the same bioavailability, as determined with bioavailability studies. Ophthalmic drops contain both an active compound and many adjuvants used to stabilize the drug. Globally speaking, the active compound corresponds to the efficacy of a topical drug and the adjuvant to its tolerance. It is likely that the efficacy of a generic drug is identical to that of the brand-name drug, even though only bioavailability studies in non-human models are required to evaluate tolerance which is less likely to be identical, as adjuvants can differ. A survey of 520 French ophthalmologists has recently been conducted. It shows that doctors rarely think of prescribing generic drugs, as they do not consider cost as a major issue in treating glaucoma. However, they see no reason not to prescribe generic drugs. This mixed perception is shared by patients who willingly accept that doctors prescribe a generic drug, but do not wish the pharmacist to take the initiative of filling a prescription with a generic drug, which sometimes gives patients the impression of being less well treated. The use of generic drugs should be encouraged, keeping in mind that good tolerance should be ensured. PMID:14646825

  19. A Generic Agent Organisation Framework for Autonomic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, Ramachandra; Gibbins, Nicholas; Jennings, Nicholas R.

    Autonomic computing is being advocated as a tool for managing large, complex computing systems. Specifically, self-organisation provides a suitable approach for developing such autonomic systems by incorporating self-management and adaptation properties into large-scale distributed systems. To aid in this development, this paper details a generic problem-solving agent organisation framework that can act as a modelling and simulation platform for autonomic systems. Our framework describes a set of service-providing agents accomplishing tasks through social interactions in dynamically changing organisations. We particularly focus on the organisational structure as it can be used as the basis for the design, development and evaluation of generic algorithms for self-organisation and other approaches towards autonomic systems.

  20. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  1. Generic statements require little evidence for acceptance but have powerful implications

    PubMed Central

    Cimpian, Andrei; Brandone, Amanda C.; Gelman, Susan A.

    2010-01-01

    Generic statements (e.g., “Birds lay eggs”) express generalizations about categories. In this paper, we hypothesized that there is a paradoxical asymmetry at the core of generic meaning, such that these sentences have extremely strong implications but require little evidence to be judged true. Four experiments confirmed the hypothesized asymmetry: Participants interpreted novel generics such as “Lorches have purple feathers” as referring to nearly all lorches, but they judged the same novel generics to be true given a wide range of prevalence levels (e.g., even when only 10% or 30% of lorches had purple feathers). A second hypothesis, also confirmed by the results, was that novel generic sentences about dangerous or distinctive properties would be more acceptable than generic sentences that were similar but did not have these connotations. In addition to clarifying important aspects of generics’ meaning, these findings are applicable to a range of real-world processes such as stereotyping and political discourse. PMID:21116475

  2. Generic theory for channel sinuosity.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Eli D; Constantine, José Antonio

    2013-05-21

    Sinuous patterns traced by fluid flows are a ubiquitous feature of physical landscapes on Earth, Mars, the volcanic floodplains of the Moon and Venus, and other planetary bodies. Typically discussed as a consequence of migration processes in meandering rivers, sinuosity is also expressed in channel types that show little or no indication of meandering. Sinuosity is sometimes described as "inherited" from a preexisting morphology, which still does not explain where the inherited sinuosity came from. For a phenomenon so universal as sinuosity, existing models of channelized flows do not explain the occurrence of sinuosity in the full variety of settings in which it manifests, or how sinuosity may originate. Here we present a generic theory for sinuous flow patterns in landscapes. Using observations from nature and a numerical model of flow routing, we propose that flow resistance (representing landscape roughness attributable to topography or vegetation density) relative to surface slope exerts a fundamental control on channel sinuosity that is effectively independent of internal flow dynamics. Resistance-dominated surfaces produce channels with higher sinuosity than those of slope-dominated surfaces because increased resistance impedes downslope flow. Not limited to rivers, the hypothesis we explore pertains to sinuosity as a geomorphic pattern. The explanation we propose is inclusive enough to account for a wide variety of sinuous channel types in nature, and can serve as an analytical tool for determining the sinuosity a landscape might support. PMID:23610390

  3. Generic OPC UA Server Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiel, Piotr P.; Farnham, Benjamin; Filimonov, Viatcheslav; Schlenker, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a new approach for generic design and efficient development of OPC UA servers. Development starts with creation of a design file, in XML format, describing an object-oriented information model of the target system or device. Using this model, the framework generates an executable OPC UA server application, which exposes the per-design OPC UA address space, without the developer writing a single line of code. Furthermore, the framework generates skeleton code into which the developer adds the necessary logic for integration to the target system or device. This approach allows both developers unfamiliar with the OPC UA standard, and advanced OPC UA developers, to create servers for the systems they are experts in while greatly reducing design and development effort as compared to developments based purely on COTS OPC UA toolkits. Higher level software may further benefit from the explicit OPC UA server model by using the XML design description as the basis for generating client connectivity configuration and server data representation. Moreover, having the XML design description at hand facilitates automatic generation of validation tools. In this contribution, the concept and implementation of this framework is detailed along with examples of actual production-level usage in the detector control system of the ATLAS experiment at CERN and beyond.

  4. Distinguishability of generic quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchała, Zbigniew; Pawela, Łukasz; Życzkowski, Karol

    2016-06-01

    Properties of random mixed states of dimension N distributed uniformly with respect to the Hilbert-Schmidt measure are investigated. We show that for large N , due to the concentration of measure, the trace distance between two random states tends to a fixed number D ˜=1 /4 +1 /π , which yields the Helstrom bound on their distinguishability. To arrive at this result, we apply free random calculus and derive the symmetrized Marchenko-Pastur distribution, which is shown to describe numerical data for the model of coupled quantum kicked tops. Asymptotic value for the root fidelity between two random states, √{F }=3/4 , can serve as a universal reference value for further theoretical and experimental studies. Analogous results for quantum relative entropy and Chernoff quantity provide other bounds on the distinguishablity of both states in a multiple measurement setup due to the quantum Sanov theorem. We study also mean entropy of coherence of random pure and mixed states and entanglement of a generic mixed state of a bipartite system.

  5. Generic theory for channel sinuosity

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, Eli D.; Constantine, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Sinuous patterns traced by fluid flows are a ubiquitous feature of physical landscapes on Earth, Mars, the volcanic floodplains of the Moon and Venus, and other planetary bodies. Typically discussed as a consequence of migration processes in meandering rivers, sinuosity is also expressed in channel types that show little or no indication of meandering. Sinuosity is sometimes described as “inherited” from a preexisting morphology, which still does not explain where the inherited sinuosity came from. For a phenomenon so universal as sinuosity, existing models of channelized flows do not explain the occurrence of sinuosity in the full variety of settings in which it manifests, or how sinuosity may originate. Here we present a generic theory for sinuous flow patterns in landscapes. Using observations from nature and a numerical model of flow routing, we propose that flow resistance (representing landscape roughness attributable to topography or vegetation density) relative to surface slope exerts a fundamental control on channel sinuosity that is effectively independent of internal flow dynamics. Resistance-dominated surfaces produce channels with higher sinuosity than those of slope-dominated surfaces because increased resistance impedes downslope flow. Not limited to rivers, the hypothesis we explore pertains to sinuosity as a geomorphic pattern. The explanation we propose is inclusive enough to account for a wide variety of sinuous channel types in nature, and can serve as an analytical tool for determining the sinuosity a landscape might support. PMID:23610390

  6. Generic physical protection logic trees

    SciTech Connect

    Paulus, W.K.

    1981-10-01

    Generic physical protection logic trees, designed for application to nuclear facilities and materials, are presented together with a method of qualitative evaluation of the trees for design and analysis of physical protection systems. One or more defense zones are defined where adversaries interact with the physical protection system. Logic trees that are needed to describe the possible scenarios within a defense zone are selected. Elements of a postulated or existing physical protection system are tagged to the primary events of the logic tree. The likelihood of adversary success in overcoming these elements is evaluated on a binary, yes/no basis. The effect of these evaluations is propagated through the logic of each tree to determine whether the adversary is likely to accomplish the end event of the tree. The physical protection system must be highly likely to overcome the adversary before he accomplishes his objective. The evaluation must be conducted for all significant states of the site. Deficiencies uncovered become inputs to redesign and further analysis, closing the loop on the design/analysis cycle.

  7. Generic Magnetic Fusion Reactor Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, John; Milora, Stanley

    2015-11-01

    The original Generic Magnetic Fusion Reactor paper was published in 1986. This update describes what has changed in 30 years. Notably, the construction of ITER is providing important benchmark numbers for technologies and costs. In addition, we use a more conservative neutron wall flux and fluence. But these cost-increasing factors are offset by greater optimism on the thermal-electric conversion efficiency and potential availability. The main examples show the cost of electricity (COE) as a function of aspect ratio and neutron flux to the first wall. The dependence of the COE on availability, thermo-electric efficiency, electrical power output, and the present day's low interest rates is also discussed. Interestingly, at fixed aspect ratio there is a shallow minimum in the COE at neutron flux around 2.5 MW/m2. The possibility of operating with only a small COE penalty at even lower wall loadings (to 1.0 MW/m2 at larger plant size) and the use of niobium-titanium coils are also investigated. J. Sheffield was supported by ORNL subcontract 4000088999 with the University of Tennessee.

  8. 78 FR 56621 - Draft Waste Confidence Generic Environmental Impact Statement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... Impact Statement AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft generic environmental impact... issuing for public comment the draft generic environmental impact statement (DGEIS), NUREG-2157, ``Waste Confidence Generic Environmental Impact Statement,'' that forms the regulatory basis for the...

  9. Generic antibiotic drugs: is effectiveness guaranteed?

    PubMed

    Gauzit, R; Lakdhari, M

    2012-04-01

    There are recently published arguments suggesting all generic antibiotic drugs do not present the full reliability needed to claim therapeutic equivalence with branded drugs. The problem is especially crucial for generic intravenous drugs, which do not need any bioequivalence study before they can be marketed. The evaluation of generic antibiotic drug effectiveness yields an important dispersion of results according to antibiotic agents and for the same antibiotic agent all generic drugs are not equivalent. There are differences at all levels: drug components, levels of impurity, pharmacokinetics, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship, in vitro effectiveness, therapeutic effectiveness in experimental models, etc. So that finally, the specifications approved in the initial submission file of a brand name drugs are not always respected by a generic drug. There is also a specific problem of taste and treatment acceptability for pediatric oral antibiotic drugs. Available data on clinical effectiveness is excessively rare. The marketing of a great number of generic drugs of the same specialty is followed by a sometimes very important increase of their use, even in countries where consumption is low. The corollary of this increase in consumption is an increase of resistance, and this is especially true for oral fluoroquinolones. Even if most of this information needs to be verified, it seems necessary to review regulations for marketing authorization of generic antibiotic drugs. PMID:22480963

  10. Generic Argillite/Shale Disposal Reference Case

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Liange; Colon, Carlos Jové; Bianchi, Marco; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-08-08

    Radioactive waste disposal in a deep subsurface repository hosted in clay/shale/argillite is a subject of widespread interest given the desirable isolation properties, geochemically reduced conditions, and widespread geologic occurrence of this rock type (Hansen 2010; Bianchi et al. 2013). Bianchi et al. (2013) provides a description of diffusion in a clay-hosted repository based on single-phase flow and full saturation using parametric data from documented studies in Europe (e.g., ANDRA 2005). The predominance of diffusive transport and sorption phenomena in this clay media are key attributes to impede radionuclide mobility making clay rock formations target sites for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The reports by Hansen et al. (2010) and those from numerous studies in clay-hosted underground research laboratories (URLs) in Belgium, France and Switzerland outline the extensive scientific knowledge obtained to assess long-term clay/shale/argillite repository isolation performance of nuclear waste. In the past several years under the UFDC, various kinds of models have been developed for argillite repository to demonstrate the model capability, understand the spatial and temporal alteration of the repository, and evaluate different scenarios. These models include the coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical (THM) and Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) models (e.g. Liu et al. 2013; Rutqvist et al. 2014a, Zheng et al. 2014a) that focus on THMC processes in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) bentonite and argillite host hock, the large scale hydrogeologic model (Bianchi et al. 2014) that investigates the hydraulic connection between an emplacement drift and surrounding hydrogeological units, and Disposal Systems Evaluation Framework (DSEF) models (Greenberg et al. 2013) that evaluate thermal evolution in the host rock approximated as a thermal conduction process to facilitate the analysis of design options. However, the assumptions and the

  11. Perception of Generic Prescription Drugs and Utilization of Generic Drug Discount Programs

    PubMed Central

    Omojasola, Anthony; Hernandez, Mike; Sansgiry, Sujit; Jones, Lovell

    2012-01-01

    Objective Our study aimed to assess patient’s perceptions of generic drugs and utilization of generic drug discount programs. Design, Setting and Participants A survey was administered to adult participants at community health centers and community-based organizations in Houston, Texas, USA (n=525). Main Outcome Measures Multivariate logistic regression was used to quantify the strength of association between generic drug perception and utilization of generic drug discount programs. Results Respondents who agreed that “Generic prescription drugs are as effective as brand name prescription drugs,” were 3 times as likely to utilize generic drug discount programs (AOR: 3.0, 95% CI: 1.8–4.8, P<.001). Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans (OR: 10.2; 95% CI: 1.4–76.4) and Hispanics (OR: 10.3; 95% CI: 1.3–79.4) were 10 times as likely to agree that generic drugs have more side effects than brand name drugs. Conclusion Race/ethnicity had no impact in utilization of generic drug discount programs, despite racial disparities in perception toward generic drugs’ side effects and generic drugs being inferior to brand name drugs. PMID:23140080

  12. A standardised, generic, validated approach to stratify the magnitude of clinical benefit that can be anticipated from anti-cancer therapies: the European Society for Medical Oncology Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO-MCBS).

    PubMed

    Cherny, N I; Sullivan, R; Dafni, U; Kerst, J M; Sobrero, A; Zielinski, C; de Vries, E G E; Piccart, M J

    2015-08-01

    The value of any new therapeutic strategy or treatment is determined by the magnitude of its clinical benefit balanced against its cost. Evidence for clinical benefit from new treatment options is derived from clinical research, in particular phase III randomised trials, which generate unbiased data regarding the efficacy, benefit and safety of new therapeutic approaches. To date, there is no standard tool for grading the magnitude of clinical benefit of cancer therapies, which may range from trivial (median progression-free survival advantage of only a few weeks) to substantial (improved long-term survival). Indeed, in the absence of a standardised approach for grading the magnitude of clinical benefit, conclusions and recommendations derived from studies are often hotly disputed and very modest incremental advances have often been presented, discussed and promoted as major advances or 'breakthroughs'. Recognising the importance of presenting clear and unbiased statements regarding the magnitude of the clinical benefit from new therapeutic approaches derived from high-quality clinical trials, the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) has developed a validated and reproducible tool to assess the magnitude of clinical benefit for cancer medicines, the ESMO Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO-MCBS). This tool uses a rational, structured and consistent approach to derive a relative ranking of the magnitude of clinically meaningful benefit that can be expected from a new anti-cancer treatment. The ESMO-MCBS is an important first step to the critical public policy issue of value in cancer care, helping to frame the appropriate use of limited public and personal resources to deliver cost-effective and affordable cancer care. The ESMO-MCBS will be a dynamic tool and its criteria will be revised on a regular basis. PMID:26026162

  13. Aerodynamic and acoustic effects of eliminating core swirl from a full scale 1.6 stage pressure ratio fan (QF-5A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, R. P.; Acker, L. W.; Stakolich, E. G.

    1978-01-01

    Fan QF-5A was a modification of fan QF-5 which had an additional core stator and adjusted support struts to turn the core exit flow from a 30 deg swirl to the axial direction. This modification was necessary to eliminate the impingement of the swirling core flow on the axial support pylon of the NASA-Lewis Quiet Fan Facility that caused aerodynamic, acoustic and structural problems with the original fan stage at fan speeds greater than 85 percent of design. The redesigned fan QF-5A did obtain the design bypass ratio with an increased core airflow suggesting that the flow problem was resolved. Acoustically, the redesigned stage showed a low frequency broadband noise reduction compared to the results for fan QF-5 at similar operating conditions.

  14. [Economy of generic drugs in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Tobar, Federico

    2008-01-01

    In terms of economics, implementing generic drug policy is nothing other than consolidating (or even, creating) drug markets that set competitive prices, the result of which favors public access to essential drugs. This article approaches the topic of generic drugs from the economic perspective by examining various regulatory models in order to evaluate and leverage generic drug policy implementation options as a mechanism for battling some of the markets' specific weaknesses. The conclusion is that there is no single unequivocal method for promoting the use of generic drugs, and that the most favorable way to integrate markets may be through a broad combination of alternatives. These alternatives are grouped and analyzed according to the market issues or challenges that must be overcome. Several options are then identified based on the degree of market consolidation to be obtained. PMID:18291074

  15. Generic substitution: issues for problematic drugs.

    PubMed

    Henderson, J D; Esham, R H

    2001-01-01

    The methodology and criteria for bioequivalence testing have been firmly established by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). For certain drugs with a narrow therapeutic index (e.g., digoxin, levothyroxine, warfarin), generic substitution may not be advisable or even allowable, depending on the substitution laws of individual states. Digoxin and levothyroxine tablets are examples of drugs for which no New Drug Applications (NDAs) currently exist. However, commercially available generic products for both of these drugs have not been determined by the FDA to be therapeutically equivalent to the innovator products. Generic versions of warfarin have been approved by the FDA as being therapeutically equivalent to the innovator products, as have generic versions of the rescue inhaler albuterol. Yet, misinformation and myths persist regarding the adequacy and proven reliability of the FDA's determination of bioequivalence for these products. PMID:11213935

  16. Hydrodynamic design of generic pump components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastland, A. H. J.; Dodson, H. C.

    1991-01-01

    Inducer and impellar base geometries were defined for a fuel pump for a generic generator cycle. Blade surface data and inlet flowfield definition are available in sufficient detail to allow computational fluid dynamic analysis of the two components.

  17. GEOS-CORE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-06-24

    GEOS-CORE is a code that integrates open source Libraries for linear algebra and I/O with two main LLNL-written components: (i) a set of standard finite, discrete, and discontinuous displacement element physics solvers for resolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of physical behaviors both implicitly and explicitly, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. The resultant code can be used alone formore » linearly elastic and quasistatic damage problems; problems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed; and general granular materials behavior. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GEOS-CORE also has interfaces to call external libraries for, e.g., material models and equations fo state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models, beyond the aforementioned linear elastic and quasi-static damage models, will not be part of the current release. GEOS-CORE's secondary applications include granular materials behavior under different load paths.« less

  18. GEOS-CORE

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-24

    GEOS-CORE is a code that integrates open source Libraries for linear algebra and I/O with two main LLNL-written components: (i) a set of standard finite, discrete, and discontinuous displacement element physics solvers for resolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of physical behaviors both implicitly and explicitly, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. The resultant code can be used alone for linearly elastic and quasistatic damage problems; problems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed; and general granular materials behavior. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GEOS-CORE also has interfaces to call external libraries for, e.g., material models and equations fo state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models, beyond the aforementioned linear elastic and quasi-static damage models, will not be part of the current release. GEOS-CORE's secondary applications include granular materials behavior under different load paths.

  19. Generic hypersonic vehicle performance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavez, Frank R.; Schmidt, David K.

    1993-01-01

    An integrated computational model of a generic hypersonic vehicle was developed for the purpose of determining the vehicle's performance characteristics, which include the lift, drag, thrust, and moment acting on the vehicle at specified altitude, flight condition, and vehicular configuration. The lift, drag, thrust, and moment are developed for the body fixed coordinate system. These forces and moments arise from both aerodynamic and propulsive sources. SCRAMjet engine performance characteristics, such as fuel flow rate, can also be determined. The vehicle is assumed to be a lifting body with a single aerodynamic control surface. The body shape and control surface location are arbitrary and must be defined. The aerodynamics are calculated using either 2-dimensional Newtonian or modified Newtonian theory and approximate high-Mach-number Prandtl-Meyer expansion theory. Skin-friction drag was also accounted for. The skin-friction drag coefficient is a function of the freestream Mach number. The data for the skin-friction drag coefficient values were taken from NASA Technical Memorandum 102610. The modeling of the vehicle's SCRAMjet engine is based on quasi 1-dimensional gas dynamics for the engine diffuser, nozzle, and the combustor with heat addition. The engine has three variable inputs for control: the engine inlet diffuser area ratio, the total temperature rise through the combustor due to combustion of the fuel, and the engine internal expansion nozzle area ratio. The pressure distribution over the vehicle's lower aft body surface, which acts as an external nozzle, is calculated using a combination of quasi 1-dimensional gas dynamic theory and Newtonian or modified Newtonian theory. The exhaust plume shape is determined by matching the pressure inside the plume, calculated from the gas dynamic equations, with the freestream pressure, calculated from Newtonian or Modified Newtonian theory. In this manner, the pressure distribution along the vehicle after body

  20. Genericness of a big bounce in isotropic loop quantum cosmology.

    PubMed

    Date, Ghanashyam; Hossain, Golam Mortuza

    2005-01-14

    The absence of isotropic singularity in loop quantum cosmology can be understood in an effective classical description as the Universe exhibiting a big bounce. We show that with a scalar matter field, the big bounce is generic in the sense that it is independent of quantization ambiguities and the details of scalar field dynamics. The volume of the Universe at the bounce point is parametrized by a single parameter. It provides a minimum length scale which serves as a cutoff for computations of density perturbations thereby influencing their amplitudes. PMID:15698060

  1. 42 CFR 447.506 - Authorized generic drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Authorized generic drugs. 447.506 Section 447.506... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PAYMENTS FOR SERVICES Payment for Drugs § 447.506 Authorized generic drugs. (a) Authorized generic drug defined. For the purposes of this subpart, an authorized generic...

  2. 42 CFR 447.506 - Authorized generic drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Authorized generic drugs. 447.506 Section 447.506... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PAYMENTS FOR SERVICES Payment for Drugs § 447.506 Authorized generic drugs. (a) Authorized generic drug defined. For the purposes of this subpart, an authorized generic...

  3. 42 CFR 447.506 - Authorized generic drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Authorized generic drugs. 447.506 Section 447.506... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PAYMENTS FOR SERVICES Payment for Drugs § 447.506 Authorized generic drugs. (a) Authorized generic drug defined. For the purposes of this subpart, an authorized generic...

  4. 42 CFR 447.506 - Authorized generic drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Authorized generic drugs. 447.506 Section 447.506... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PAYMENTS FOR SERVICES Payment for Drugs § 447.506 Authorized generic drugs. (a) Authorized generic drug defined. For the purposes of this subpart, an authorized generic...

  5. 42 CFR 447.506 - Authorized generic drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Authorized generic drugs. 447.506 Section 447.506... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PAYMENTS FOR SERVICES Payment for Drugs § 447.506 Authorized generic drugs. (a) Authorized generic drug defined. For the purposes of this subpart, an authorized generic...

  6. Generic medicines: issues and relevance for global health.

    PubMed

    Rana, Proteesh; Roy, Vandana

    2015-12-01

    Generic medicine is a pharmaceutical product which is bioequivalent to the innovator product in terms of dosage form, strength, route of administration, quality, safety, performance characteristics, and intended use. Generic medicines are a cornerstone for providing affordable medicines to patients. The major generic markets in the world include United States of America followed by European Union, Canada, Japan, and Australia. The major suppliers of generic medicines China and India are showing tremendous growth in the generic medicine sector. There are many legal and regulatory issues along with quality concerns associated with the use of the generic products. Lately, bilateral international agreements called free trade agreements, delaying tactics by originator companies like strategic patenting and litigations on generic manufacturers, have been a major setback for the generic medicine industry. These issues need to be addressed to optimize the use of generic medicines. The sustainability of generic medicine sector is crucial for improving access to essential medicines for the worldwide. PMID:26405851

  7. 77 FR 30560 - Proposed Generic Communication; Generic Letter on Seismic Risk Evaluations for Operating Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... Operating Reactors'' published on September 1, 2011 (76 FR 54507). The draft Generic Letter, ``Seismic Risk...: On September 1, 2011 (76 FR 54507), the NRC published for public comment Draft Generic Letter 2011-XX..., 2011 (76 FR 57767), the NRC issued a correction and extended the public comment period to November...

  8. A Generic Expert Scheduling System Architecture and Toolkit: GUESS (Generically Used Expert Scheduling System)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, Jay; Krishnamurthy, Vijaya; Rodens, Ira; Houston, Chapman; Liebowitz, Alisa; Baek, Seung; Radko, Joe; Zeide, Janet

    1996-01-01

    Scheduling has become an increasingly important element in today's society and workplace. Within the NASA environment, scheduling is one of the most frequently performed and challenging functions. Towards meeting NASA's scheduling needs, a research version of a generic expert scheduling system architecture and toolkit has been developed. This final report describes the development and testing of GUESS (Generically Used Expert Scheduling System).

  9. A generic probabilistic framework for structural health prognostics and uncertainty management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pingfeng; Youn, Byeng D.; Hu, Chao

    2012-04-01

    Structural health prognostics can be broadly applied to various engineered artifacts in an engineered system. However, techniques and methodologies for health prognostics become application-specific. This study thus aims at formulating a generic framework of structural health prognostics, which is composed of four core elements: (i) a generic health index system with synthesized health index (SHI), (ii) a generic offline learning scheme using the sparse Bayes learning (SBL) technique, (iii) a generic online prediction scheme using the similarity-based interpolation (SBI), and (iv) an uncertainty propagation map for the prognostic uncertainty management. The SHI enables the use of heterogeneous sensory signals; the sparseness feature employing only a few neighboring kernel functions enables the real-time prediction of remaining useful lives (RULs) regardless of data size; the SBI predicts the RULs with the background health knowledge obtained under uncertain manufacturing and operation conditions; and the uncertainty propagation map enables the predicted RULs to be loaded with their statistical characteristics. The proposed generic framework of structural health prognostics is thus applicable to different engineered systems and its effectiveness is demonstrated with two cases studies.

  10. Enacting Common Core Instruction: How Intermediate Unit 13 Leveraged Its Position as an Educational Service Agency to Implement and Scale the LDC Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research For Action, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Funded by The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC) and Math Design Collaborative (MDC) offer a set of instructional and formative assessment tools in literacy and math, which were developed to help educators better prepare all students to meet the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and succeed beyond high…

  11. Supersaturation-controlled surface structure evolution of Pd@Pt core-shell nanocrystals: enhancement of the ORR activity at a sub-10 nm scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Kun; Zheng, Weitao; Cui, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Here, we designed and implemented a facile strategy for controlling the surface evolution of Pd@Pt core-shell nanostructures by simply adjusting the volume of OH- to control the reducing ability of ascorbic acid and finally manipulating the supersaturation in the reaction system. The surface structure of the obtained Pd@Pt bimetallic nanocrystals transformed from a Pt {111} facet-exposed island shell to a conformal Pt {100} facet-exposed shell by increasing the pH value. The as-prepared well aligned Pd@Pt core-island shell nanocubes present both significantly enhanced electrocatalytic activity and favorable long-term stability toward the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media.Here, we designed and implemented a facile strategy for controlling the surface evolution of Pd@Pt core-shell nanostructures by simply adjusting the volume of OH- to control the reducing ability of ascorbic acid and finally manipulating the supersaturation in the reaction system. The surface structure of the obtained Pd@Pt bimetallic nanocrystals transformed from a Pt {111} facet-exposed island shell to a conformal Pt {100} facet-exposed shell by increasing the pH value. The as-prepared well aligned Pd@Pt core-island shell nanocubes present both significantly enhanced electrocatalytic activity and favorable long-term stability toward the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07940c

  12. DUBLIN CORE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dublin Core is a metadata element set intended to facilitate discovery of electronic resources. It was originally conceived for author-generated descriptions of Web resources, and the Dublin Core has attracted broad ranging international and interdisciplinary support. The cha...

  13. A lifeline to treatment: the role of Indian generic manufacturers in supplying antiretroviral medicines to developing countries

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Indian manufacturers of generic antiretroviral (ARV) medicines facilitated the rapid scale up of HIV/AIDS treatment in developing countries though provision of low-priced, quality-assured medicines. The legal framework in India that facilitated such production, however, is changing with implementation of the World Trade Organization Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, and intellectual property measures being discussed in regional and bilateral free trade agreement negotiations. Reliable quantitative estimates of the Indian role in generic global ARV supply are needed to understand potential impacts of such measures on HIV/AIDS treatment in developing countries. Methods We utilized transactional data containing 17,646 donor-funded purchases of ARV tablets made by 115 low- and middle-income countries from 2003 to 2008 to measure market share, purchase trends and prices of Indian-produced generic ARVs compared with those of non-Indian generic and brand ARVs. Results Indian generic manufacturers dominate the ARV market, accounting for more than 80% of annual purchase volumes. Among paediatric ARV and adult nucleoside and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor markets, Indian-produced generics accounted for 91% and 89% of 2008 global purchase volumes, respectively. From 2003 to 2008, the number of Indian generic manufactures supplying ARVs increased from four to 10 while the number of Indian-manufactured generic products increased from 14 to 53. Ninety-six of 100 countries purchased Indian generic ARVs in 2008, including high HIV-burden sub-Saharan African countries. Indian-produced generic ARVs used in first-line regimens were consistently and considerably less expensive than non-Indian generic and innovator ARVs. Key ARVs newly recommended by the World Health Organization are three to four times more expensive than older regimens. Conclusions Indian generic producers supply the majority of ARVs in developing countries

  14. Generic Rigidity for Circle Diffeomorphisms with Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocić, Saša

    2016-05-01

    We prove that C^r -smooth (r > 2 ) circle diffeomorphisms with a break, i.e., circle diffeomorphisms with a single singular point where the derivative has a jump discontinuity, are generically, i.e., for almost all irrational rotation numbers, not C^1+ɛ -rigid, for any ɛ > 0 . This result complements our recent proof, joint with Khanin (Geom Funct Anal 24:2002-2028, 2014), that such maps are generically C^1 -rigid. It stands in remarkable contrast to the result of Yoccoz (Ann Sci Ec Norm Sup 17:333-361, 1984) that C^r -smooth circle diffeomorphisms are generically C^r-1-κ -rigid, for any κ > 0.

  15. Generic Rigidity for Circle Diffeomorphisms with Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocić, Saša

    2016-06-01

    We prove that {C^r}-smooth ({r > 2}) circle diffeomorphisms with a break, i.e., circle diffeomorphisms with a single singular point where the derivative has a jump discontinuity, are generically, i.e., for almost all irrational rotation numbers, not {C^{1+\\varepsilon}}-rigid, for any {\\varepsilon > 0}. This result complements our recent proof, joint with Khanin (Geom Funct Anal 24:2002-2028, 2014), that such maps are generically {C^1}-rigid. It stands in remarkable contrast to the result of Yoccoz (Ann Sci Ec Norm Sup 17:333-361, 1984) that {C^r}-smooth circle diffeomorphisms are generically {C^{r-1-κ}}-rigid, for any {κ > 0}.

  16. Generic language facilitates children's cross-classification

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Simone P.; Gelman, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    Four studies examined the role of generic language in facilitating 4- and 5-year-old children's ability to cross-classify. Participants were asked to classify an item into a familiar (taxonomic or script) category, then cross-classify it into a novel (script or taxonomic) category with the help of a clue expressed in either generic or specific language. Experiment 1 showed that generics facilitate 5-year-olds' and adults' cross-classification when expressed at an appropriate level of generalization (e.g., “foods,” “birthday party things”), whereas Experiment 2 showed that such effects disappeared when labels were at an inappropriate level of generalization (e.g., “pizzas,” “balloons”). Experiments 3 and 4 offered additional controls. Taken together, the findings demonstrate that language can guide and direct children's multiple categorizations. PMID:22888182

  17. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  18. Objective evaluation of generic drug information.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Hisashi; Kamei, Miwako; Koshimizu, Toshimasa; Shiragami, Makoto

    2004-06-01

    Pharmacists active in health care venues need to be able to evaluate generic drugs in terms of effectiveness, safety, and economy to ensure that they are used appropriately. As part of the ongoing study of these factors, we carried out an objective evaluation of information provided for generics. A minimum of 20 commercially available products was considered for each pharmaceutical ingredient. The information subjected to evaluation consisted of the text of drug package inserts and information noted on interview forms. Using our own criteria for evaluating drug information, we attempted to quantify the amounts of information provided. Then, based on the numerical values obtained, we calculated information quantities with reference to drug prices to study the relationship between prices and available information for original drugs and their later-developed, generic equivalents. A total of 14 different pharmaceutical ingredients (327 product items) were considered, with the information quantity for generics amounting to 27.9+/-17.8-46.3+/-21.4% (Mean+/-S.D.) that for the original drugs. Examined on the basis of individual pharmaceutical companies, the corresponding ratio came to 15.1+/-7.8-62.4+/-6.4% (Mean+/-S.D.). For generics, the relationship between drug price (expressed against a value of 1.0 for original drugs) and information quantity (Qua(i)) came to 0.79+/-0.46-1.90+/-0.79% (Mean+/-S.D.). These results clearly point to the importance of evaluating information quantity for generic drugs on a maker-by-maker basis. PMID:15170069

  19. Generic health/safety/environment cases

    SciTech Connect

    Kelland, A.N.; Primrose, M.; Pickles, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    A desire to implement HSE Management Systems including HSE Cases in all Shell companies operations prompted the development of a relational data base software package (THESIS) to provide a structured way of preparing an HSE Case. The software includes features which facilitate the management of {open_quotes}Keeping the Case Alive{close_quotes}, enabling the dissemination of tasks and hazard information to the workplace. During the software development it was recognized that a significant reduction could be made in the resources which would be required to prepare an HSE Case for each and every operation by the building of {open_quotes}Generic HSE Cases{close_quotes} addressing specific activities which were repeated across the Company`s operations. This was recognized to be particularly valid for the smaller Single String Venture type of operations. The activities selected for the initial Generic HSE Case development include Land Drilling Operations, Land Seismic Acquisition, and Land Transport. To establish the Generic HSE Case, the THESIS data base is populated with data for a generic operation, identifying all the hazards and activities associated with that operation including all the associated controls, with established formats for the textual sections. In effect, the Generic Case defines the standards required for that type of operation. To generate an operation specific HSE Case, the Generic Case thereafter requires to be modified/adapted so that it represents the actual situation in the operation which it defines. This process includes itemization of all the operation specific details, and may involve the inclusion/deletion of any additional/existing activities or hazards together with their associated controls.

  20. The formal verification of generic interpreters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windley, P.; Levitt, K.; Cohen, G. C.

    1991-01-01

    The task assignment 3 of the design and validation of digital flight control systems suitable for fly-by-wire applications is studied. Task 3 is associated with formal verification of embedded systems. In particular, results are presented that provide a methodological approach to microprocessor verification. A hierarchical decomposition strategy for specifying microprocessors is also presented. A theory of generic interpreters is presented that can be used to model microprocessor behavior. The generic interpreter theory abstracts away the details of instruction functionality, leaving a general model of what an interpreter does.

  1. Benefits of Digital Equipment Generic Qualification Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, James E.; Steiman, Samuel C.

    2002-07-01

    As a result of nuclear power plant instrumentation and control obsolescence issues, there have been numerous activities during recent years relating to the qualification of digital equipment. Some of these activities have been 'generic' in nature in that the qualification was not limited to plant specific applications, but was intended to cover a broad base of potential applications of the digital equipment. These generic qualifications have been funded by equipment manufacturers and by utility groups and organizations. The generic activities sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have been pilot projects for an overall generic qualification approach. The primary benefit resulting from the generic qualification work to date is that a number of digital platforms and digital devices are now available for use in various nuclear safety-related applications. Many of the tests and evaluations necessary to support plant specific applications have been completed. The amount of data and documentation that each utility must develop on a case by case basis has been significantly reduced. There are also a number of additional benefits resulting from these industry efforts. The challenges and difficulties in qualifying digital equipment for safety-related applications are now more clearly understood. EPRI has published a lessons learned document (EPRI Report 1001452, Generic Qualification of Commercial Grade Digital Devices: Lessons Learned from Initial Pilots, which covers several different qualification areas, including device selection, project planning, vendor surveys and design reviews, and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) qualification. Application of the experience and lessons learned from the EPRI pilot activities should help reduce the effort and cost required for future qualification work. Most generic qualification activities for commercial equipment have been conducted using the approach of EPRI TR-106439, Guideline on Evaluation and Acceptance

  2. Quantum teleportation of a generic two-photon state with weak cross-Kerr nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meiyu; Yan, Fengli

    2016-05-01

    We present a scheme for teleporting a generic two-photon polarization state by using two EPR states as quantum channel based on weak cross-Kerr nonlinearities. As the core component of the present framework, the quantum nondemolition detector based on the weak cross-Kerr nonlinearity acts as an EPR entangler as well as the Bell-state analyzer. This makes the teleportation protocol be achieved near deterministically and be feasible in the current experimental technology.

  3. Quantum teleportation of a generic two-photon state with weak cross-Kerr nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meiyu; Yan, Fengli

    2016-08-01

    We present a scheme for teleporting a generic two-photon polarization state by using two EPR states as quantum channel based on weak cross-Kerr nonlinearities. As the core component of the present framework, the quantum nondemolition detector based on the weak cross-Kerr nonlinearity acts as an EPR entangler as well as the Bell-state analyzer. This makes the teleportation protocol be achieved near deterministically and be feasible in the current experimental technology.

  4. Supersaturation-controlled surface structure evolution of Pd@Pt core-shell nanocrystals: enhancement of the ORR activity at a sub-10 nm scale.

    PubMed

    Qi, Kun; Zheng, Weitao; Cui, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-21

    Here, we designed and implemented a facile strategy for controlling the surface evolution of Pd@Pt core-shell nanostructures by simply adjusting the volume of OH(-) to control the reducing ability of ascorbic acid and finally manipulating the supersaturation in the reaction system. The surface structure of the obtained Pd@Pt bimetallic nanocrystals transformed from a Pt {111} facet-exposed island shell to a conformal Pt {100} facet-exposed shell by increasing the pH value. The as-prepared well aligned Pd@Pt core-island shell nanocubes present both significantly enhanced electrocatalytic activity and favorable long-term stability toward the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media. PMID:26693587

  5. Genericness of inflation in isotropic loop quantum cosmology.

    PubMed

    Date, Ghanashyam; Hossain, Golam Mortuza

    2005-01-14

    Nonperturbative corrections from loop quantum cosmology (LQC) to the scalar matter sector are already known to imply inflation. We prove that the LQC modified scalar field generates exponential inflation in the small scale factor regime, for all positive definite potentials, independent of initial conditions and independent of ambiguity parameters. For positive semidefinite potentials it is always possible to choose, without fine-tuning, a value of one of the ambiguity parameters such that exponential inflation results, provided zeros of the potential are approached at most as a power law in the scale factor. In conjunction with the generic occurrence of bounce at small volumes, particle horizon is absent, thus eliminating the horizon problem of the standard big bang model. PMID:15698059

  6. GENERIC MODEL FOR MAGNETIC EXPLOSIONS APPLIED TO SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Melrose, D. B.

    2012-04-10

    An accepted model for magnetospheric substorms is proposed as the basis for a generic model for magnetic explosions and is applied to solar flares. The model involves widely separated energy-release and particle-acceleration regions, with energy transported Alfvenically between them. On a global scale, these regions are coupled by a large-scale current that is set up during the explosion by redirection of pre-existing current associated with the stored magnetic energy. The explosion-related current is driven by an electromotive force (EMF) due to the changing magnetic flux enclosed by this current. The current path and the EMF are identified for an idealized quadrupolar model for a flare.

  7. 75 FR 16737 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Generic Clearance for Questionnaire Pretesting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... Questionnaire Pretesting Research AGENCY: U.S. Census Bureau. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of...-scale questionnaire pretesting activities under this generic clearance. A block of hours will be... will be used by the Census Bureau and survey sponsors to improve questionnaires and procedures,...

  8. Developing core outcomes sets: methods for identifying and including patient-reported outcomes (PROs)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Synthesis of patient-reported outcome (PRO) data is hindered by the range of available PRO measures (PROMs) composed of multiple scales and single items with differing terminology and content. The use of core outcome sets, an agreed minimum set of outcomes to be measured and reported in all trials of a specific condition, may improve this issue but methods to select core PRO domains from the many available PROMs are lacking. This study examines existing PROMs and describes methods to identify health domains to inform the development of a core outcome set, illustrated with an example. Methods Systematic literature searches identified validated PROMs from studies evaluating radical treatment for oesophageal cancer. PROM scale/single item names were recorded verbatim and the frequency of similar names/scales documented. PROM contents (scale components/single items) were examined for conceptual meaning by an expert clinician and methodologist and categorised into health domains. A patient advocate independently checked this categorisation. Results Searches identified 21 generic and disease-specific PROMs containing 116 scales and 32 single items with 94 different verbatim names. Identical names for scales were repeatedly used (for example, ‘physical function’ in six different measures) and others were similar (overlapping face validity) although component items were not always comparable. Based on methodological, clinical and patient expertise, 606 individual items were categorised into 32 health domains. Conclusion This study outlines a methodology for identifying candidate PRO domains from existing PROMs to inform a core outcome set to use in clinical trials. PMID:24495582

  9. Gas hydrate characterization and grain-scale imaging of recovered cores from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, Laura A.; Lorenson, T.D.; Pinkston, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Using cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (CSEM), powder X-ray diffraction, and gas chromatography methods, we investigated the physical states, grain characteristics, gas composition, and methane isotopic composition of two gas-hydrate-bearing sections of core recovered from the BPXA–DOE–USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well situated on the Alaska North Slope. The well was continuously cored from 606.5 m to 760.1 m depth, and sections investigated here were retrieved from 619.9 m and 661.0 m depth. X-ray analysis and imaging of the sediment phase in both sections shows it consists of a predominantly fine-grained and well-sorted quartz sand with lesser amounts of feldspar, muscovite, and minor clays. Cryogenic SEM shows the gas-hydrate phase forming primarily as a pore-filling material between the sediment grains at approximately 70–75% saturation, and more sporadically as thin veins typically several tens of microns in diameter. Pore throat diameters vary, but commonly range 20–120 microns. Gas chromatography analyses of the hydrate-forming gas show that it is comprised of mainly methane (>99.9%), indicating that the gas hydrate is structure I. Here we report on the distribution and articulation of the gas-hydrate phase within the cores, the grain morphology of the hydrate, the composition of the sediment host, and the composition of the hydrate-forming gas.

  10. Gas hydrate characterization and grain-scale imaging of recovered cores from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Lorenson, T.D.; Pinkston, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Using cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (CSEM), powder X-ray diffraction, and gas chromatography methods, we investigated the physical states, grain characteristics, gas composition, and methane isotopic composition of two gas-hydrate-bearing sections of core recovered from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well situated on the Alaska North Slope. The well was continuously cored from 606.5. m to 760.1. m depth, and sections investigated here were retrieved from 619.9. m and 661.0. m depth. X-ray analysis and imaging of the sediment phase in both sections shows it consists of a predominantly fine-grained and well-sorted quartz sand with lesser amounts of feldspar, muscovite, and minor clays. Cryogenic SEM shows the gas-hydrate phase forming primarily as a pore-filling material between the sediment grains at approximately 70-75% saturation, and more sporadically as thin veins typically several tens of microns in diameter. Pore throat diameters vary, but commonly range 20-120 microns. Gas chromatography analyses of the hydrate-forming gas show that it is comprised of mainly methane (>99.9%), indicating that the gas hydrate is structure I. Here we report on the distribution and articulation of the gas-hydrate phase within the cores, the grain morphology of the hydrate, the composition of the sediment host, and the composition of the hydrate-forming gas. ?? 2009.

  11. Should Physicians be Encouraged to use Generic Names and to Prescribe Generic Drugs?

    PubMed

    Riaz, Haris; Krasuski, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    While using the brand names seems like a trivial issue at the outset, using these names is inherently problematic. Cardiovascular drugs remain the most commonly prescribed drugs by the physicians. The junior doctors are likely to introject practices of their seniors and consequently to reciprocate from the experiences learnt from their preceptors. Using the generic names may be one way to facilitate prescription of the generic drugs who have a better cost profile and similar efficacy than the more expensive branded drugs. In this editorial, we have outlined several arguments to suggest the importance of using the generic names in academic discussions and clinical documentation. PMID:27179932

  12. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  13. A Generic Biokinetic Model for C-14

    SciTech Connect

    Manger, Ryan P

    2011-01-01

    The generic biokinetic model currently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for the treatment of systemic radiocarbon assumes uniform distribution of activity in tissues and a biological half-time of 40 d. This model is intended to generate cautiously high estimates of dose per unit intake of C-14 and, in fact, generally predicts a much higher effective dose than systemic models that have been developed on the basis of biokinetic studies of specific carbon compounds. The simplistic model formulation precludes its application as a bioassay model or adjustment to fit case-specific bioassay data. This paper proposes a new generic biokinetic model for systemic radiocarbon that is less conservative than the current ICRP model but maintains sufficient conservatism to overestimate the effective dose coefficients generated by most radiocarbon-compound-specific models. The proposed model includes two systemic pools with different biological half-times representing an initial systemic form of absorbed radiocarbon, a submodel describing the behaviour of labelled carbon dioxide produced in vivo, and three excretion pathways: breath, urine and faeces. Generic excretion rates along each path are based on multi-phase excretion curves observed in experimental studies of radiocarbons. The generic model structure is designed so that the user may adjust the level of dosimetric conservatism to fit the information at hand and may adjust parameter values for consistency with subject-specific or site-specific bioassay data.

  14. Using a Generic Invasion Game for Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Tactical approaches to teaching are, arguably, still under-utilized in physical education settings, and this may be due to the lack of pertinent assessment materials. The purpose of this article is to present a generic invasion-game unit and to link it to a variety of assessment materials using three tactical components from the Game Performance…

  15. Australian Universities, Generic Skills and Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitman, Tim; Broomhall, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The concept of lifelong learning implies a cycle where the learner contributes prior learning into a new learning environment and sees that learning upgraded. In recent years, a range of internal and external pressures have encouraged Australian universities to identify the meta or generic skills embedded in tertiary study. Using a content…

  16. "Generic" Multiculturalism: Hybrid Texts, Cultural Contexts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behling, Laura L.

    2003-01-01

    Argues that issues of generic hybridity embody multicultural literature while promoting another kind of multiculturalism that reflects the current debates about literary canons in general and the field of American literature in particular. Considers how a reading of texts that relies on all of their component parts allows literature to perform a…

  17. Generic Irradiation Quarantine Treatments: The Next Steps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2006, USDA-APHIS published a landmark rule providing generic irradiation quarantine treatments. The rule approved irradiation doses of 150 Gy for any tephritid fruit fly and 400 Gy for all other insects except the pupa and adult stages of Lepidoptera. Therefore, if a pest risk assessment demonstr...

  18. [Generic drugs in psychopharmacology: pros and cons].

    PubMed

    Cuenca, E; Zaragozá, F

    1999-01-01

    Legislation to facilitate process for generic products has been enacted and generic drugs have entered the market soon after the patent for the brand-name agent have expired. In every instance, the rationale has been economic since it is generally assumed that the copies are not only therapeutically equivalent but also a great deal less expensive than the original. Sometimes this may be so. In this short review several comments are made in order to establish the variables that may influence bioequivalence between the brand-name drug and its generics. Among them emphasis is given to the particle sizes, pharmaceutical supply, choice of the right excipient, in order to avoid possible interactions with the drug, ingredient quality and purity, etc. All these variables must be carefully controlled. Even so a patient who is changed from a trade name product to a generic drug (or vice versa) may respond a little differently, which is important in Psychopharmacology. Two or more products should be considered biologically equivalent only when it can demonstrated that they fulfil three conditions: that they have the same pharmaceutical properties; that they are equally effective in therapeutic use and that they are tolerated equally by patients being treated for the indicated uses. Regulatory agencies could require subsequent versions of an original therapeutic product the type of data regarding pharmacology, toxicology and chemical assessment that was mandatory for the introduction of the original. PMID:10611558

  19. Generic queries for meeting clinical information needs.

    PubMed Central

    Cimino, J J; Aguirre, A; Johnson, S B; Peng, P

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a model for automated information retrieval in which questions posed by clinical users are analyzed to establish common syntactic and semantic patterns. The patterns are used to develop a set of general-purpose questions called generic queries. These generic queries are used in responding to specific clinical information needs. Users select generic queries in one of two ways. The user may type in questions, which are then analyzed, using natural language processing techniques, to identify the most relevant generic query; or the user may indicate patient data of interest and then pick one of several potentially relevant questions. Once the query and medical concepts have been determined, an information source is selected automatically, a retrieval strategy is composed and executed, and the results are sorted and filtered for presentation to the user. This work makes extensive use of the National Library of Medicine's Unified Medical Language System (UMLS): medical concepts are derived from the Metathesaurus, medical queries are based on semantic relations drawn from the UMLS Semantic Network, and automated source selection makes use of the Information Sources Map. The paper describes research currently under way to implement this model and reports on experience and results to date. PMID:8472005

  20. Generic Certificates. Agricultural Economic Report Number 594.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glauber, Joseph W.

    The Food Security Act of 1985 authorizes the U.S. Department of Agriculture to issue generic certificates in lieu of cash payments due to program participants and merchants of agricultural products under provisions of several programs. The certificates may be used to acquire stocks held as collateral on government loans or owned by the Commodity…

  1. Comparison of Generic Accelerated Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaddorura, Mahmood; Williams, Collette

    2012-01-01

    Case study pedagogy is a teaching strategy in which teachers hope to help students develop and use critical thinking (CT) abilities. This study compared CT skills of 75 second year generic accelerated baccalaureate nursing students during their Fundamentals of Nursing course before and after being educated using case study pedagogical method.…

  2. A Generic Archive Protocol and an Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, J. M.; Jennings, D. G.; McGlynn, T. A.; Ruggiero, N. G.; Serlemitsos, T. A.

    1993-01-01

    Archiving vast amounts of data has become a major part of every scientific space mission today. GRASP, the Generic Retrieval/Ar\\-chive Services Protocol, addresses the question of how to archive the data collected in an environment where the underlying hardware archives and computer hosts may be rapidly changing.

  3. Baldrige Theory into Practice: A Generic Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arif, Mohammed

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The education system globally has moved from a push-based or producer-centric system to a pull-based or customer centric system. Malcolm Baldrige Quality Award (MBQA) model happens to be one of the latest additions to the pull based models. The purpose of this paper is to develop a generic framework for MBQA that can be used by…

  4. Towards One Generic Name for Monophyletic Lineages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the integration of asexually reproducing fungi into meaningful phylogenies, the need to use the same generic name for a monophyletic lineage has become urgent. At present Article 59 of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (ICBN) requires the use of a sexual state name for sexually r...

  5. Does the Relationship Between Physical Activity and Quality of Life Differ Based on Generic Versus Disease-Targeted Instruments?

    PubMed Central

    Motl, Robert W.; McAuley, Edward; Snook, Erin M.; Gliottoni, Rachael C.

    2009-01-01

    Background There has been an increased interest in the study of physical activity and its relationship with quality of life (QOL) and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in chronic disease conditions. The investigations have used either generic or disease-targeted instruments for measuring QOL and HRQL, but have not examined differences in the associations as a function of the types of instruments. Purpose The present study examined the associations among physical activity, QOL, and HRQL using generic and disease-targeted instruments in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods Participants were 292 individuals with MS who wore an accelerometer for 7 days and then completed the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire (GLTEQ), Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale-29 (MSIS-29), Leeds Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life Scale (LMSQOL), Short Form-12 Health Survey (SF-12), and Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS). Results Accelerometer counts and GLTEQ scores had similarly sized correlations with scores from generic (SF-12) and the disease-specific (MSIS-29)measures of HRQL and generic (SWLS) and the disease-specific (LMSQOL) measures of QOL. Path analysis indicated a similar pattern of directional relationships between accelerometer counts and GLTEQ scores with physical and mental HRQL and, in turn, physical and mental HRQL with QOL using generic and disease-targeted instruments. Conclusions Our results suggest that in cross-sectional analysis, physical activity is similarly related with QOL and HRQL using generic and disease-targeted instruments in persons with MS. PMID:18719976

  6. Monitoring soil and vegetation fluxes of carbon and water at the global scale: the land carbon core information service of geoland2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvet, J.-C.; Balsamo, G.; Chevallier, F.; Kullmann, L.; Papale, D.; Seufert, G.; The, H.; Gibelin, A.-L.; Horanyi, A.; Lafont, S.

    2009-04-01

    The vegetation/land component of GMES is called "Land Monitoring Core service" (LMCS). The geoland2 European project (FP7, 2008-2012) is a demonstrator of the evolution of the LMCS, including the consolidation of prototype services and the test of their operational capacity. In particular, the perimeter of the LMCS is extended, with a global component (biogeophysical parameters), and thematic core information services. The main mission of the land carbon core information service (LC-CIS) of geoland2 is to assess the impact of weather and climate variability on terrestrial biospheric carbon fluxes, in the context of international conventions. The LC-CIS aims at monitoring the global terrestrial carbon fluxes (e.g. to support reporting obligations in the course of the Kyoto Protocol) and setting-up pre-operational infrastructures for providing global products, both in near real time and off-line mode. A multi-model carbon accounting system is developed, coupled with EO data assimilation schemes. Emphasis is put on validation (in-situ data), with downscaling on reference European countries (F, NL, HU). The C-TESSEL and SURFEX modelling platforms (of ECMWF and Météo-France, respectively) are used for production. The ORCHIDEE modelling platform (LSCE) is used for benchmarking and validation purposes. The ECWMF reanalysis (ERA-Interim) will be used to build a global 20-y climatology of carbon and water fluxes, LAI and vegetation biomass, in order to rank the near-real time simulations. Gradually, EO data will be integrated in the modelling platforms, in order to improve the atmospheric constraint on the model (e.g. downwelling solar radiation from the EUMETSAT's Land-SAF), analyse soil moisture and vegetation biomass (e.g. assimilate the EUMETSAT's ASCAT soil moisture product and MODIS and/or SPOT/VGT LAI estimates). Finally, EO data will be used for model verification (e.g. land surface temperature).

  7. Acoustic Source Localization via Time Difference of Arrival Estimation for Distributed Sensor Networks using Tera-scale Optical-Core Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. These sensors rely heavily on battery-operated system components to achieve highly functional automation in signal and information processing. In order to keep communication requirements minimal, it is desirable to perform as much processing on the receiver platforms as possible. However, the complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot be readily met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on the optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. This demonstration of considerably faster signal processing capability should be of substantial significance to the design and innovation of future generations of distributed sensor networks.

  8. The Large-Scale Plasmaspheric Density Trough Associated With the 24 May 2000 Geomagnetic Storm: IMAGE EUV Observations and Global Core Plasma Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adrian, M. L.; Gallagher, D. L.; Green, J. L.; Sandel, B. R.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The IMAGE EUV imager observed a plasmaspheric density, trough in association with a geomagnetically active period on 24 May 2000. In EUV, this density, trough appears as an Archimedes spiral extending from Earth's shadow to approximately 1900 MLT. We present an analysis of this density trough using simulated EUV images, Observational EUV images are subjected to edge analysis to establish the plasmapause L-shell and the location of the density trough in terms of L-shell, MLT extent, and radial width. The plasmaspheric density distribution is modeled using both static and dynamic models for the plasmasphere. The background plasmasphere is then numerically simulated using the 4-parameter plasmaspheric density model contained within the Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) and the Dynamic Global Core Plasma Model (DGCPM). Simulated EUV images of the model plasmasphere are produced once an artificial density, depletion, matching the observed MLT extent and width, has been removed. Once the azimuthal extent and width of the trough have been simulated, the depth of the artificial density depletion is iteratively adjusted to produce simulated EUV images that approximate observation. The results of this analysis and discussion of possible origins for this density trough will be presented.

  9. Large-scale growth of Cu2ZnSnSe4 and Cu2ZnSnSe4/Cu2ZnSnS4 core/shell nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Z Q; Shi, J H; Liu, Q Q; Chen, Y W; Sun, Z; Yang, Z; Huang, S M

    2011-07-01

    We present a fast and simple protocol for large-scale preparation of quaternary Cu(2)ZnSnSe(4) (CZTSe), as well as CZTSe/Cu(2)ZnSnS(4) (CZTS) core/shell nanowires using CuSe nanowire bundles as self-sacrificial templates. CuSe nanowire bundles were synthesized by reacting Cu(2 - x)Se nanowire bundles with sodium citrate solution. CZTSe nanowires were prepared by reacting CuSe nanowire bundles with Zn(CH(3)COO)(2) and SnCl(2) in triethylene glycol. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and selected area electron diffraction studies show that stannite CZTSe is formed. The formed CZTSe nanowire bundles have diameters of 200-400 nm and lengths of up to hundreds of micrometers. CZTSe/CZTS nanocable bundles with similar morphologies were grown by the addition of some elemental sulfur to the reaction system for growth of CZTSe bundles. The stannite CZTSe/kesterite CZTS core/shell structure of the grown nanocables was confirmed by XRD and high-resolution transmission electron microscope investigation. The influence of S/Se molar ratio in the reaction system on the crystallographic structures and optical properties of CZTSe/CZTS nanocables was studied. The obtained CZTSe/CZTS core/shell nanocable bundles show broad and enhanced optical absorption over the visible and near-infrared region, which is promising for use in photovoltaic applications. PMID:21586809

  10. Large-scale growth of Cu2ZnSnSe4 and Cu2ZnSnSe4/Cu2ZnSnS4 core/shell nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. Q.; Shi, J. H.; Liu, Q. Q.; Chen, Y. W.; Sun, Z.; Yang, Z.; Huang, S. M.

    2011-07-01

    We present a fast and simple protocol for large-scale preparation of quaternary Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe), as well as CZTSe/Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) core/shell nanowires using CuSe nanowire bundles as self-sacrificial templates. CuSe nanowire bundles were synthesized by reacting Cu2 - xSe nanowire bundles with sodium citrate solution. CZTSe nanowires were prepared by reacting CuSe nanowire bundles with Zn(CH3COO)2 and SnCl2 in triethylene glycol. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and selected area electron diffraction studies show that stannite CZTSe is formed. The formed CZTSe nanowire bundles have diameters of 200-400 nm and lengths of up to hundreds of micrometers. CZTSe/CZTS nanocable bundles with similar morphologies were grown by the addition of some elemental sulfur to the reaction system for growth of CZTSe bundles. The stannite CZTSe/kesterite CZTS core/shell structure of the grown nanocables was confirmed by XRD and high-resolution transmission electron microscope investigation. The influence of S/Se molar ratio in the reaction system on the crystallographic structures and optical properties of CZTSe/CZTS nanocables was studied. The obtained CZTSe/CZTS core/shell nanocable bundles show broad and enhanced optical absorption over the visible and near-infrared region, which is promising for use in photovoltaic applications.

  11. 100,000-year-long terrestrial record of millennial-scale linkage between eastern North American mid-latitude paleovegetation shifts and Greenland ice-core oxygen isotope trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litwin, Ronald J.; Smoot, Joseph P.; Pavich, Milan J.; Markewich, Helaine W.; Brook, George; Durika, Nancy J.

    2013-09-01

    We document frequent, rapid, strong, millennial-scale paleovegetation shifts throughout the late Pleistocene, within a 100,000+ yr interval (~ 115-15 ka) of terrestrial sediments from the mid-Atlantic Region (MAR) of North America. High-resolution analyses of fossil pollen from one core locality revealed a continuously shifting sequence of thermally dependent forest assemblages, ranging between two endmembers: subtropical oak-tupelo-bald cypress-gum forest and high boreal spruce-pine forest. Sedimentary textural evidence indicates fluvial, paludal, and loess deposition, and paleosol formation, representing sequential freshwater to subaerial environments in which this record was deposited. Its total age-depth model, based on radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminescence ages, ranges from terrestrial oxygen isotope stages (OIS) 6 to 1. The particular core sub-interval presented here is correlative in trend and timing to that portion of the oxygen isotope sequence common among several Greenland ice cores: interstades GI2 to GI24 (≈ OIS2-5 d). This site thus provides the first evidence for an essentially complete series of 'Dansgaard-Oeschger' climate events in the MAR. These data reveal that the ~ 100,000 yr preceding the Late Glacial and Holocene in the MAR of North America were characterized by frequently and dynamically changing climate states, and by vegetation shifts that closely tracked the Greenland paleoclimate sequence.

  12. Reduction of TEM/ETG-scale Density Fluctuations in the Core and Edge of H-mode DIII-D Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, L.

    2008-11-01

    Improved confinement during H-mode has been linked to ExB shear suppression of large-scale (kθρs<=0.3) turbulence within an edge transport barrier. While larger scale eddies are preferentially suppressed by increased shear flow in this paradigm, the effects on smaller scale (TEM/ETG-scale) turbulence are less certain. Recent results from DIII-D provide the first experimental evidence that intermediate-scale turbulence (1 < kθρs<=3) together with larger-scale electron temperature fluctuations [1] are also reduced promptly at the L-H transition. These reductions are not confined to the edge region. Intermediate-scale density fluctuations obtained via Doppler backscattering, are significantly reduced (30%-50%) over a range of normalized radii (0.5 <=r/a <=0.85) within a few ms of the L-H transition. A larger reduction (>=75%) is observed at the top of the pedestal (r/a ˜0.9) within 0.2 ms. In addition, low-k electron temperature fluctuations (kθρs<=0.3, from correlation ECE) are strongly reduced (>75%) at the L-H mode transition and during QH-mode (r/a ˜0.7). Gyrokinetic simulation results [2] predict that Te fluctuations contribute significantly to L-mode electron heat transport, hence, the observed reduction is likely an important factor in the observed improved H-mode electron heat confinement (χe^QH/χ3^L < 0.25). Doppler backscattering is also utilized to probe time-dependent shear flows (i.e. zonal flows). The results clearly indicate that zonal flow levels are anti-correlated with the amplitude of intermediate-scale density turbulence in L-mode, suggesting that zonal flows play an important role in turbulence/transport regulation. 3pt [1] L. Schmitz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 035002 (2008).[2] A.E. White et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 056116 (2008).

  13. Core percolation on complex networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang-Yu; Csóka, Endre; Zhou, Haijun; Pósfai, Márton

    2012-11-16

    We analytically solve the core percolation problem for complex networks with arbitrary degree distributions. We find that purely scale-free networks have no core for any degree exponents. We show that for undirected networks if core percolation occurs then it is continuous while for directed networks it is discontinuous (and hybrid) if the in- and out-degree distributions differ. We also find that core percolations on undirected and directed networks have completely different critical exponents associated with their critical singularities. PMID:23215509

  14. Core strengthening.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Elizabeth A

    2007-01-01

    Several recent studies have evaluated interventional techniques designed to reduce the risk of serious knee injuries, particularly noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes. Maintenance of rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis, especially in response to cutting and jumping activities, is a common goal in many training programs. Rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis is mediated by a complex set of factors including the strength of the trunk muscles and the relationship between the core muscles. It is important to examine the interrelationship between lower extremity function and core stability. PMID:17472321

  15. Mars' Inner Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This figure shows a cross-section of the planet Mars revealing an inner, high density core buried deep within the interior. Dipole magnetic field lines are drawn in blue, showing the global scale magnetic field that one associates with dynamo generation in the core. Mars must have one day had such a field, but today it is not evident. Perhaps the energy source that powered the early dynamo has shut down. The differentiation of the planet interior - heavy elements like iron sinking towards the center of the planet - can provide energy as can the formation of a solid core from the liquid.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  16. 40 CFR 721.10163 - Chloro fluoro alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chloro fluoro alkane (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10163 Chloro fluoro alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as chloro fluoro alkane (PMN...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10163 - Chloro fluoro alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chloro fluoro alkane (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10163 Chloro fluoro alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as chloro fluoro alkane (PMN...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10250 - Zirconium lysine complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Zirconium lysine complex (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10250 Zirconium lysine complex (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  19. 40 CFR 721.9973 - Zirconium dichlorides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Zirconium dichlorides (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9973 Zirconium dichlorides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as zirconium dichlorides (PMNs...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9973 - Zirconium dichlorides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Zirconium dichlorides (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9973 Zirconium dichlorides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as zirconium dichlorides (PMNs...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9973 - Zirconium dichlorides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Zirconium dichlorides (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9973 Zirconium dichlorides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as zirconium dichlorides (PMNs...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9973 - Zirconium dichlorides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Zirconium dichlorides (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9973 Zirconium dichlorides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as zirconium dichlorides (PMNs...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9973 - Zirconium dichlorides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Zirconium dichlorides (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9973 Zirconium dichlorides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as zirconium dichlorides (PMNs...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10250 - Zirconium lysine complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Zirconium lysine complex (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10250 Zirconium lysine complex (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10250 - Zirconium lysine complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Zirconium lysine complex (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10250 Zirconium lysine complex (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  6. Drug patent expirations and the speed of generic entry.

    PubMed Central

    Bae, J P

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Using recent data, to analyze the generic drug entry phenomenon to determine the factors that influence the speed and likelihood of generic drug entries. DATA SOURCES: Data for 81 drugs that have lost patent between 1987 and 1994. Patent and exclusive marketing rights expiration dates: Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Approved Drug Products with Therapeutic Equivalent Evaluations (1986-1989). Generic entry dates: FDA Drug and Device Product Approvals (Jan. 1987-Dec. 1994). Numbers of pending generic applications: FDA Office of Generic Drugs Quantitative Report-ANDAs and AADAs (Nov. 1990-Jan. 1993). Sales revenue: Pharmaceutical Data Services, Walsh-America. STUDY DESIGN: This study appropriately recognizes generic entry as a survival problem, and uses a proportional hazard method for analysis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: (1) There is a negative relationship between an innovative drug's sales revenue and the time to generic entry. (2) Entries of generics tend to be slower for drugs that have either very few or a very large number of competing brands in the marketplace. (3) The time to generic entry increased overall between 1987 and 1994. (4) Drugs that primarily treat chronic symptoms tend to enter faster than the types of drugs that primarily treat acute illnesses. CONCLUSIONS: The analysis shows that the generic industry is targeting large-revenue products and chronic drug markets. Entry of a generic drug is influenced by the existing branded substitutes in the marketplace. Surprisingly, the generic drug entry process has slowed despite many changes that would facilitate entry. PMID:9108806

  7. The Development of a Generic Pharmaceutical Training Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindeman, Lynn William; Boerner, Hank

    The manufacture of generic drugs is a growing industry, generally composed of small companies that are more dependent than brand-name companies on hiring entry-level workers. To provide standardized training for employees in the generic drug manufacturing field, the Generic Pharmaceutical Training Institute (GPTI) was established by a partnership…

  8. 40 CFR 721.6005 - Rare earth phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rare earth phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.6005 Rare earth phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as rare earth phophate (PMNs...

  9. 40 CFR 721.6005 - Rare earth phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rare earth phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.6005 Rare earth phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as rare earth phophate (PMNs...

  10. 40 CFR 721.6005 - Rare earth phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rare earth phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.6005 Rare earth phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as rare earth phophate (PMNs...

  11. 40 CFR 721.5548 - Mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mixed metal oxide (generic). 721.5548... Substances § 721.5548 Mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a mixed metal oxide (PMN P-97-956)...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10006 - Mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mixed metal oxide (generic). 721.10006... Substances § 721.10006 Mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as mixed metal oxide (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10006 - Mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mixed metal oxide (generic). 721.10006... Substances § 721.10006 Mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as mixed metal oxide (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.5548 - Mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mixed metal oxide (generic). 721.5548... Substances § 721.5548 Mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a mixed metal oxide (PMN P-97-956)...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10495 - Metal silicate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Metal silicate (generic). 721.10495... Substances § 721.10495 Metal silicate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as metal silicate (PMN P-05-634) is subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10628 - Mixed metal oxalate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mixed metal oxalate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10628 Mixed metal oxalate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as mixed metal oxalate (PMN...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10628 - Mixed metal oxalate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mixed metal oxalate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10628 Mixed metal oxalate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as mixed metal oxalate (PMN...

  18. 40 CFR 721.4610 - Mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.4610... Substances § 721.4610 Mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as mixed metal oxides (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10006 - Mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mixed metal oxide (generic). 721.10006... Substances § 721.10006 Mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as mixed metal oxide (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.4610 - Mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.4610... Substances § 721.4610 Mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as mixed metal oxides (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.4610 - Mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.4610... Substances § 721.4610 Mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as mixed metal oxides (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.5548 - Mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mixed metal oxide (generic). 721.5548... Substances § 721.5548 Mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a mixed metal oxide (PMN P-97-956)...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10006 - Mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mixed metal oxide (generic). 721.10006... Substances § 721.10006 Mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as mixed metal oxide (PMN...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4610 - Mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.4610... Substances § 721.4610 Mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as mixed metal oxides (PMN...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10495 - Metal silicate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Metal silicate (generic). 721.10495... Substances § 721.10495 Metal silicate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as metal silicate (PMN P-05-634) is subject...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10631 - Mixed metal borate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mixed metal borate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10631 Mixed metal borate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as mixed metal borate (PMN...

  7. 40 CFR 721.5548 - Mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mixed metal oxide (generic). 721.5548... Substances § 721.5548 Mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a mixed metal oxide (PMN P-97-956)...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10631 - Mixed metal borate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mixed metal borate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10631 Mixed metal borate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as mixed metal borate (PMN...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10258 - Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10258 Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aromatic hydrocarbon (PMN...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10258 - Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10258 Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aromatic hydrocarbon (PMN...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10258 - Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10258 Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aromatic hydrocarbon (PMN...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10689 - Organo zinc salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Organo zinc salts (generic). 721.10689... Substances § 721.10689 Organo zinc salts (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as organo zinc salts (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10302 - Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10302 Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as zinc ammonium phosphate (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10302 - Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10302 Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as zinc ammonium phosphate (PMN...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10302 - Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10302 Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as zinc ammonium phosphate (PMN...

  16. 40 CFR 721.555 - Alkyl amino nitriles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Substances § 721.555 Alkyl amino nitriles (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl amino nitriles (PMNs P-96... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl amino nitriles (generic)....

  17. 40 CFR 721.10035 - Alkylbenzene sulfonate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkylbenzene sulfonate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10035 Alkylbenzene sulfonate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkylbenzene sulfonate...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10035 - Alkylbenzene sulfonate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkylbenzene sulfonate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10035 Alkylbenzene sulfonate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkylbenzene sulfonate...

  19. 40 CFR 721.8660 - Propionic acid methyl ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Propionic acid methyl ester (generic... Substances § 721.8660 Propionic acid methyl ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a propionic acid methyl...

  20. 40 CFR 721.8660 - Propionic acid methyl ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Propionic acid methyl ester (generic... Substances § 721.8660 Propionic acid methyl ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a propionic acid methyl...

  1. 40 CFR 721.1680 - Substituted benzoic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted benzoic acid (generic... Substances § 721.1680 Substituted benzoic acid (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted benzoic acid (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4610 - Mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.4610... Substances § 721.4610 Mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as mixed metal oxides (PMN...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10551 - Bisphenol S mono ether (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bisphenol S mono ether (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10551 Bisphenol S mono ether (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as bisphenol S mono ether (PMN...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10551 - Bisphenol S mono ether (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bisphenol S mono ether (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10551 Bisphenol S mono ether (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as bisphenol S mono ether (PMN...

  5. Generic Skills in Vocational Education and Training: Research Readings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Jennifer, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Possessing generic or employability skills is vital in the current labour market. The vocational education and training (VET) sector, like other education sectors, must ensure its clients gain and develop generic skills. This volume of readings summarises NCVER managed research into generic skills undertaken in 2001 and 2002. The work covers four…

  6. 40 CFR 721.3080 - Substituted phosphate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted phosphate ester (generic... Substances § 721.3080 Substituted phosphate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted phosphate...

  7. 40 CFR 721.3080 - Substituted phosphate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted phosphate ester (generic... Substances § 721.3080 Substituted phosphate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted phosphate...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10431 - Phosphoric acid esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphoric acid esters (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10431 Phosphoric acid esters (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as phosphoric acid esters (PMNs...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10255 - Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10255 Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10255 - Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10255 Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10255 - Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10255 Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  12. 40 CFR 721.5546 - Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic... Substances § 721.5546 Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as halogen substituted...

  13. 40 CFR 721.5546 - Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic... Substances § 721.5546 Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as halogen substituted...

  14. 40 CFR 721.5546 - Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic... Substances § 721.5546 Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as halogen substituted...

  15. 40 CFR 721.5546 - Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic... Substances § 721.5546 Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as halogen substituted...

  16. 40 CFR 721.5546 - Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic... Substances § 721.5546 Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as halogen substituted...

  17. Genericization: A Theory of Semantic Broadening in the Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clankie, Shawn M.

    2000-01-01

    Genericization theory developed as a response to claims from outside of linguistics that generic use in brand names (for example, using Kleenex as a generic noun for all facial tissues, or Xerox for all photocopiers) is the result of marketing factors or misuse by consumers. This paper examines the linguistic factors that create an environment…

  18. 40 CFR 721.10069 - Ether amine phosphonate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ether amine phosphonate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10069 Ether amine phosphonate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as ether amine phosphonate (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10069 - Ether amine phosphonate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ether amine phosphonate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10069 Ether amine phosphonate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as ether amine phosphonate (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10262 - Oxime, Me vinyl silane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oxime, Me vinyl silane (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10262 Oxime, Me vinyl silane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as oxime, Me vinyl silane (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10053 - Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10053 Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkyl...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10053 - Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10053 Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkyl...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10262 - Oxime, Me vinyl silane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Oxime, Me vinyl silane (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10262 Oxime, Me vinyl silane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as oxime, Me vinyl silane (PMN...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10053 - Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10053 Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkyl...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10053 - Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10053 Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkyl...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10262 - Oxime, Me vinyl silane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Oxime, Me vinyl silane (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10262 Oxime, Me vinyl silane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as oxime, Me vinyl silane (PMN...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10053 - Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10053 Alkyl silane methacrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkyl...

  8. 40 CFR 721.555 - Alkyl amino nitriles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Substances § 721.555 Alkyl amino nitriles (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl amino nitriles (PMNs P-96... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl amino nitriles (generic)....

  9. 40 CFR 721.10332 - Lithium metal phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lithium metal phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10332 Lithium metal phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as lithium metal phosphate (PMN...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10332 - Lithium metal phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lithium metal phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10332 Lithium metal phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as lithium metal phosphate (PMN...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10332 - Lithium metal phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lithium metal phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10332 Lithium metal phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as lithium metal phosphate (PMN...

  12. Defining and Comparing Generic Competences in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kallioinen, Outi

    2010-01-01

    In this article the author discusses the importance of defining generic competences in alignment with the European definitions. As a case study the generic competences defined by Laurea University of Applied Sciences are compared with European definitions of generic competences. The purpose is to open up the various perspectives within this…

  13. 40 CFR 721.10128 - Modified imidazole (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified imidazole (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10128 Modified imidazole (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as modified imidazole (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10128 - Modified imidazole (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modified imidazole (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10128 Modified imidazole (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as modified imidazole (PMN...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10128 - Modified imidazole (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Modified imidazole (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10128 Modified imidazole (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as modified imidazole (PMN...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10128 - Modified imidazole (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Modified imidazole (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10128 Modified imidazole (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as modified imidazole (PMN...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10128 - Modified imidazole (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Modified imidazole (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10128 Modified imidazole (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as modified imidazole (PMN...

  18. 40 CFR 721.638 - Silyl amine, potassium salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Silyl amine, potassium salt (generic... Substances § 721.638 Silyl amine, potassium salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as silyl amine, potassium...

  19. 40 CFR 721.638 - Silyl amine, potassium salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Silyl amine, potassium salt (generic... Substances § 721.638 Silyl amine, potassium salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as silyl amine, potassium...

  20. 40 CFR 721.638 - Silyl amine, potassium salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Silyl amine, potassium salt (generic... Substances § 721.638 Silyl amine, potassium salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as silyl amine, potassium...

  1. 40 CFR 721.638 - Silyl amine, potassium salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Silyl amine, potassium salt (generic... Substances § 721.638 Silyl amine, potassium salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as silyl amine, potassium...

  2. 40 CFR 721.638 - Silyl amine, potassium salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Silyl amine, potassium salt (generic... Substances § 721.638 Silyl amine, potassium salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as silyl amine, potassium...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10320 - Fatty acid amide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acid amide (generic). 721.10320... Substances § 721.10320 Fatty acid amide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amide (PMN P-03-186) is...

  4. 40 CFR 721.1655 - Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic... Substances § 721.1655 Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkylbenzenesulfonic acid...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1680 - Substituted benzoic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted benzoic acid (generic... Substances § 721.1680 Substituted benzoic acid (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted benzoic acid (PMN...

  6. 40 CFR 721.1680 - Substituted benzoic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted benzoic acid (generic... Substances § 721.1680 Substituted benzoic acid (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted benzoic acid (PMN...

  7. 40 CFR 721.1680 - Substituted benzoic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted benzoic acid (generic... Substances § 721.1680 Substituted benzoic acid (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted benzoic acid (PMN...

  8. 40 CFR 721.1655 - Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic... Substances § 721.1655 Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkylbenzenesulfonic acid...

  9. 40 CFR 721.3110 - Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic... Substances § 721.3110 Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polycarboxylic acid...

  10. 40 CFR 721.1655 - Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic... Substances § 721.1655 Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkylbenzenesulfonic acid...

  11. 40 CFR 721.1655 - Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic... Substances § 721.1655 Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkylbenzenesulfonic acid...

  12. 40 CFR 721.1680 - Substituted benzoic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted benzoic acid (generic... Substances § 721.1680 Substituted benzoic acid (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted benzoic acid (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.3110 - Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic... Substances § 721.3110 Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polycarboxylic acid...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10431 - Phosphoric acid esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphoric acid esters (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10431 Phosphoric acid esters (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as phosphoric acid esters (PMNs...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10463 - Fatty acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acid amides (generic). 721.10463... Substances § 721.10463 Fatty acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amides (PMN...

  16. 40 CFR 721.1852 - Di-alkyl borane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Di-alkyl borane (generic). 721.1852... Substances § 721.1852 Di-alkyl borane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as di-alkyl borane (PMN P-00-1087) is...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10524 - Fluorinated alkylsulfonamidol urethane polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... polymer (generic). 721.10524 Section 721.10524 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10524 Fluorinated alkylsulfonamidol urethane polymer (generic). (a... generically as fluorinated alkylsulfonamidol urethane polymer (PMN P-11-384) is subject to reporting...

  18. 40 CFR 721.9959 - Polyurethane polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Polyurethane polymer (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9959 Polyurethane polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyurethane polymer (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.9959 - Polyurethane polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Polyurethane polymer (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9959 Polyurethane polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyurethane polymer (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9959 - Polyurethane polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polyurethane polymer (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9959 Polyurethane polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyurethane polymer (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.324 - Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic... Substances § 721.324 Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkoxylated acrylate...

  2. 40 CFR 721.324 - Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic... Substances § 721.324 Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkoxylated acrylate...

  3. 40 CFR 721.324 - Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic... Substances § 721.324 Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkoxylated acrylate...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10524 - Fluorinated alkylsulfonamidol urethane polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... polymer (generic). 721.10524 Section 721.10524 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10524 Fluorinated alkylsulfonamidol urethane polymer (generic). (a... generically as fluorinated alkylsulfonamidol urethane polymer (PMN P-11-384) is subject to reporting...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1747 - Substituted benzophenone (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted benzophenone (generic... Substances § 721.1747 Substituted benzophenone (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted benzophenone...

  6. 40 CFR 721.1747 - Substituted benzophenone (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted benzophenone (generic... Substances § 721.1747 Substituted benzophenone (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted benzophenone...

  7. 40 CFR 721.1747 - Substituted benzophenone (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted benzophenone (generic... Substances § 721.1747 Substituted benzophenone (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted benzophenone...

  8. 40 CFR 721.1747 - Substituted benzophenone (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted benzophenone (generic... Substances § 721.1747 Substituted benzophenone (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted benzophenone...

  9. 40 CFR 721.1747 - Substituted benzophenone (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted benzophenone (generic... Substances § 721.1747 Substituted benzophenone (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted benzophenone...

  10. 40 CFR 721.2155 - Alkoxyamino-alkyl-coumarin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkoxyamino-alkyl-coumarin (generic... Substances § 721.2155 Alkoxyamino-alkyl-coumarin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  11. 40 CFR 721.2155 - Alkoxyamino-alkyl-coumarin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkoxyamino-alkyl-coumarin (generic... Substances § 721.2155 Alkoxyamino-alkyl-coumarin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  12. 40 CFR 721.988 - Pyrazolone azomethine dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pyrazolone azomethine dye (generic... Substances § 721.988 Pyrazolone azomethine dye (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a pyrazolone azomethine...

  13. 40 CFR 721.5917 - Phenyl azo dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phenyl azo dye (generic). 721.5917... Substances § 721.5917 Phenyl azo dye (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a phenyl azo dye (PMN P-02-17) is subject...

  14. 40 CFR 721.988 - Pyrazolone azomethine dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pyrazolone azomethine dye (generic... Substances § 721.988 Pyrazolone azomethine dye (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a pyrazolone azomethine...

  15. 40 CFR 721.988 - Pyrazolone azomethine dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pyrazolone azomethine dye (generic... Substances § 721.988 Pyrazolone azomethine dye (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a pyrazolone azomethine...

  16. 40 CFR 721.988 - Pyrazolone azomethine dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pyrazolone azomethine dye (generic... Substances § 721.988 Pyrazolone azomethine dye (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a pyrazolone azomethine...

  17. 40 CFR 721.5917 - Phenyl azo dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phenyl azo dye (generic). 721.5917... Substances § 721.5917 Phenyl azo dye (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a phenyl azo dye (PMN P-02-17) is subject...

  18. 40 CFR 721.5917 - Phenyl azo dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phenyl azo dye (generic). 721.5917... Substances § 721.5917 Phenyl azo dye (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a phenyl azo dye (PMN P-02-17) is subject...

  19. 40 CFR 721.5917 - Phenyl azo dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phenyl azo dye (generic). 721.5917... Substances § 721.5917 Phenyl azo dye (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a phenyl azo dye (PMN P-02-17) is subject...

  20. 40 CFR 721.5917 - Phenyl azo dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phenyl azo dye (generic). 721.5917... Substances § 721.5917 Phenyl azo dye (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a phenyl azo dye (PMN P-02-17) is subject...

  1. 40 CFR 721.2527 - Substituted diphenylazo dye (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted diphenylazo dye (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2527 Substituted diphenylazo dye (generic name). Link to an amendment... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted diphenylazo dye (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.988 - Pyrazolone azomethine dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pyrazolone azomethine dye (generic... Substances § 721.988 Pyrazolone azomethine dye (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a pyrazolone azomethine...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9719 - Tris carbamoyl triazine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tris carbamoyl triazine (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9719 Tris carbamoyl triazine (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as tris carbamoyl triazine (PMN...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10330 - Pyrazolone derivative (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pyrazolone derivative (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10330 Pyrazolone derivative (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as pyrazolone derivative (PMN...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10330 - Pyrazolone derivative (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pyrazolone derivative (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10330 Pyrazolone derivative (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as pyrazolone derivative (PMN...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10330 - Pyrazolone derivative (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pyrazolone derivative (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10330 Pyrazolone derivative (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as pyrazolone derivative (PMN...

  7. 40 CFR 721.6005 - Rare earth phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rare earth phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.6005 Rare earth phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as rare earth phophate (PMNs...

  8. 40 CFR 721.6005 - Rare earth phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rare earth phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.6005 Rare earth phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as rare earth phophate (PMNs...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10036 - Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10036 Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10036 - Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10036 Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10036 - Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10036 Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10460 - Azo nickel complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Azo nickel complex (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10460 Azo nickel complex (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as azo nickel complex (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10460 - Azo nickel complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Azo nickel complex (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10460 Azo nickel complex (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as azo nickel complex (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.324 - Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic... Substances § 721.324 Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkoxylated acrylate...

  15. 40 CFR 721.9959 - Polyurethane polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polyurethane polymer (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9959 Polyurethane polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyurethane polymer (PMN...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10506 - Alkylated phenols (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkylated phenols (generic). 721.10506... Substances § 721.10506 Alkylated phenols (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkylated phenols (PMNs...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10249 - Disubstituted phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disubstituted phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10249 Disubstituted phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted phenol (PMN...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10249 - Disubstituted phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disubstituted phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10249 Disubstituted phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted phenol (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10387 - Substituted bis-phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted bis-phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10387 Substituted bis-phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted bis-phenol (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10386 - Substituted phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10386 Substituted phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted phenol (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10387 - Substituted bis-phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted bis-phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10387 Substituted bis-phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted bis-phenol (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10386 - Substituted phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10386 Substituted phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted phenol (PMN...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10249 - Disubstituted phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disubstituted phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10249 Disubstituted phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted phenol (PMN...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10561 - Substituted phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10561 Substituted phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted phenol (PMN...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10561 - Substituted phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10561 Substituted phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted phenol (PMN...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10386 - Substituted phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10386 Substituted phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted phenol (PMN...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10387 - Substituted bis-phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted bis-phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10387 Substituted bis-phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted bis-phenol (PMN...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10506 - Alkylated phenols (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkylated phenols (generic). 721.10506... Substances § 721.10506 Alkylated phenols (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkylated phenols (PMNs...

  9. 40 CFR 721.2585 - Sodium salts of dodecylphenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sodium salts of dodecylphenol (generic... Substances § 721.2585 Sodium salts of dodecylphenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as sodium salts...

  10. 40 CFR 721.333 - Dimethyl alkylamine salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dimethyl alkylamine salt (generic... Substances § 721.333 Dimethyl alkylamine salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as a Dimethyl alkylamine...

  11. 40 CFR 721.333 - Dimethyl alkylamine salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dimethyl alkylamine salt (generic... Substances § 721.333 Dimethyl alkylamine salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as a Dimethyl alkylamine...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10567 - Amidoamine salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Amidoamine salt (generic). 721.10567... Substances § 721.10567 Amidoamine salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as amidoamine salt (PMN P-08-300) is subject...

  13. 40 CFR 721.333 - Dimethyl alkylamine salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dimethyl alkylamine salt (generic... Substances § 721.333 Dimethyl alkylamine salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as a Dimethyl alkylamine...

  14. 40 CFR 721.2585 - Sodium salts of dodecylphenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sodium salts of dodecylphenol (generic... Substances § 721.2585 Sodium salts of dodecylphenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as sodium salts...

  15. 40 CFR 721.2585 - Sodium salts of dodecylphenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sodium salts of dodecylphenol (generic... Substances § 721.2585 Sodium salts of dodecylphenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as sodium salts...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10567 - Amidoamine salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Amidoamine salt (generic). 721.10567... Substances § 721.10567 Amidoamine salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as amidoamine salt (PMN P-08-300) is subject...

  17. 40 CFR 721.2585 - Sodium salts of dodecylphenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sodium salts of dodecylphenol (generic... Substances § 721.2585 Sodium salts of dodecylphenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as sodium salts...

  18. 40 CFR 721.2585 - Sodium salts of dodecylphenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sodium salts of dodecylphenol (generic... Substances § 721.2585 Sodium salts of dodecylphenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as sodium salts...

  19. 40 CFR 721.5905 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.5905 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified phenolic resin...

  20. 40 CFR 721.5908 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.5908 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as modified phenolic resin (PMN...