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Sample records for genes recombinant antibody

  1. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D’Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew RM

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products. PMID:25530082

  2. Selection of Recombinant Human Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tomszak, Florian; Weber, Susanne; Zantow, Jonas; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André

    2016-01-01

    Since the development of therapeutic antibodies the demand of recombinant human antibodies is steadily increasing. Traditionally, therapeutic antibodies were generated by immunization of rat or mice, the generation of hybridoma clones, cloning of the antibody genes and subsequent humanization and engineering of the lead candidates. In the last few years, techniques were developed that use transgenic animals with a human antibody gene repertoire. Here, modern recombinant DNA technologies can be combined with well established immunization and hybridoma technologies to generate already affinity maturated human antibodies. An alternative are in vitro technologies which enabled the generation of fully human antibodies from antibody gene libraries that even exceed the human antibody repertoire. Specific antibodies can be isolated from these libraries in a very short time and therefore reduce the development time of an antibody drug at a very early stage.In this review, we describe different technologies that are currently used for the in vitro and in vivo generation of human antibodies. PMID:27236551

  3. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  4. [Recombinant antibodies against bioweapons].

    PubMed

    Thullier, Philippe; Pelat, Thibaut; Vidal, Dominique

    2009-12-01

    The threat posed by bioweapons (BW) could lead to the re-emergence of such deadly diseases as plague or smallpox, now eradicated from industrialized countries. The development of recombinant antibodies allows tackling this risk because these recombinant molecules are generally well tolerated in human medicine, may be utilized for prophylaxis and treatment, and because antibodies neutralize many BW. Recombinant antibodies neutralizing the lethal toxin of anthrax, botulinum toxins and the smallpox virus have in particular been isolated recently, with different technologies. Our approach, which uses phage-displayed immune libraries built from non-human primates (M. fascicularis) to obtain recombinant antibodies, which may later be super-humanized (germlinized), has allowed us to obtain such BWs-neutralizing antibodies. PMID:20035695

  5. The Interaction between AID and CIB1 Is Nonessential for Antibody Gene Diversification by Gene Conversion or Class Switch Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Demorest, Zachary L.; MacDuff, Donna A.; Brown, William L.; Morham, Scott G.; Parise, Leslie V.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2010-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation, gene conversion and class switch recombination by deaminating variable and switch region DNA cytidines to uridines. AID is predominantly cytoplasmic and must enter the nuclear compartment to initiate these distinct antibody gene diversification reactions. Nuclear AID is relatively short-lived, as it is efficiently exported by a CRM1-dependent mechanism and it is susceptible to proteasome-dependent degradation. To help shed light on mechanisms of post-translational regulation, a yeast-based screen was performed to identify AID-interacting proteins. The calcium and integrin binding protein CIB1 was identified by sequencing and the interaction was confirmed by immunoprecipitation experiments. The AID/CIB1 resisted DNase and RNase treatment, and it is therefore unlikely to be mediated by nucleic acid. The requirement for CIB1 in AID-mediated antibody gene diversification reactions was assessed in CIB1-deficient DT40 cells and in knockout mice, but immunoglobulin gene conversion and class switch recombination appeared normal. The DT40 system was also used to show that CIB1 over-expression has no effect on gene conversion and that AID-EGFP subcellular localization is normal. These combined data demonstrate that CIB1 is not required for AID to mediate antibody gene diversification processes. It remains possible that CIB1 has an alternative, a redundant or a subtle non-limiting regulatory role in AID biology. PMID:20652029

  6. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  7. Cloning murine antibody V-genes with non-degenerate primers and conversion to a recombinant antibody format.

    PubMed

    Bialon, Magdalena; Schellenberg, Ludmila; Herzog, Nicolas; Kraus, Stefan; Jörißen, Hannah; Fischer, Rainer; Stein, Christoph; Nähring, Jörg; Barth, Stefan; Püttmann, Christiane

    2014-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are produced in cultured hybridoma cell lines, but these cells tend to be unstable; it is therefore necessary to rescue the corresponding genetic information. Here we describe an improved method for the amplification of antibody variable gene (V-gene) information from murine hybridoma cells using a panel of specific, non-degenerate primers. This primer set allows sequences to be rescued from all murine V-genes, except the lambda light chain genes, which rarely contribute to murine immune diversity. We tested the primers against a range of antibodies and recovered specific amplification products in all cases. The heavy and light chain variable regions were subsequently joined by a two-step cloning strategy or by splice overlap extension PCR. PMID:25545205

  8. [Antithrombotic recombinant antibodies].

    PubMed

    Muzard, Julien; Loyau, Stéphane; Ajzenberg, Nadine; Billiald, Philippe; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine

    2006-01-01

    Coronary syndromes, stroke and other ischaemic arterial diseases are the leading cause of death in the world and will probably remain it at least until 2020. Cardiovascular diseases kill 17 million people each year with an expected increase to 20 million in 2020 and 24 million in 2030. The global impact of recurrence and death during the 6 months following an acute coronary syndrome remains at 8-15% in the present state of medical practice. Acute ischaemic syndromes have a common aetiology that is the formation of a platelet-rich clot at the site of severe coronary stenosis and of eroded atherosclerotic plaques. Therapy consists of medical treatments associating thrombolysis, antiplatelet drugs, and the re-opening of the coronary artery by angioplasty. But these treatments do not prevent morbidity and mortality reaching 15% at 6 months. Finally the treatment of stroke is very limited. There is thus a real clinical need to improve existing treatments and to discover new molecules. Platelet activation is a critical step in ischaemic cardiovascular diseases. This is the reason why antiplatelet drugs are most often prescribed in these cases. Currently, only one recombinant antithrombotic antibody is used in therapy. This is a chimeric Fab, c7E3 or abciximab, which inhibits the final phase of platelet aggregation. Abciximab is prescribed in acute coronary syndromes treated by angioplasty. However, treatment by abciximab can induce severe complications, principally, hemorrages and thrombopenia. Other platelet receptors involved in the earlier steps of platelet activation, such as the phases of contact with and of activation by the subendothelium matrix, have been identified as potential targets for the development of antithrombotic antibodies and are described in this revue. PMID:17652972

  9. Developing recombinant antibodies for biomarker detection

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Miller, Keith D.; Kagen, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.

    2010-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have an essential role in biomarker validation and diagnostic assays. A barrier to pursuing these applications is the reliance on immunization and hybridomas to produce mAbs, which is time-consuming and may not yield the desired mAb. We recommend a process flow for affinity reagent production that utilizes combinatorial protein display systems (eg, yeast surface display or phage display) rather than hybridomas. These systems link a selectable phenotype-binding conferred by an antibody fragment-with a means for recovering the encoding gene. Recombinant libraries obtained from immunizations can produce high-affinity antibodies (<10 nM) more quickly than other methods. Non-immune libraries provide an alternate route when immunizations are not possible, or when suitable mAbs are not recovered from an immune library. Directed molecular evolution (DME) is an integral part of optimizing mAbs obtained from combinatorial protein display, but can also be used on hybridoma-derived mAbs. Variants can easily be obtained and screened to increase the affinity of the parent mAb (affinity maturation). We discuss examples where DME has been used to tailor affinity reagents to specific applications. Combinatorial protein display also provides an accessible method for identifying antibody pairs, which are necessary for sandwich-type diagnostic assays.

  10. Advances in recombinant antibody manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Kunert, Renate; Reinhart, David

    2016-04-01

    Since the first use of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for recombinant protein expression, production processes have steadily improved through numerous advances. In this review, we have highlighted several key milestones that have contributed to the success of CHO cells from the beginning of their use for monoclonal antibody (mAb) expression until today. The main factors influencing the yield of a production process are the time to accumulate a desired amount of biomass, the process duration, and the specific productivity. By comparing maximum cell densities and specific growth rates of various expression systems, we have emphasized the limiting parameters of different cellular systems and comprehensively described scientific approaches and techniques to improve host cell lines. Besides the quantitative evaluation of current systems, the quality-determining properties of a host cell line, namely post-translational modifications, were analyzed and compared to naturally occurring polyclonal immunoglobulin fractions from human plasma. In summary, numerous different expression systems for mAbs are available and also under scientific investigation. However, CHO cells are the most frequently investigated cell lines and remain the workhorse for mAb production until today. PMID:26936774

  11. Production of recombinant antibody fragments in Bacillus megaterium

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Eva; Hust, Michael; Roth, Andreas; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Schirrmann, Thomas; Jahn, Dieter; Dübel, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Background Recombinant antibodies are essential reagents for research, diagnostics and therapy. The well established production host Escherichia coli relies on the secretion into the periplasmic space for antibody synthesis. Due to the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, only a fraction of this material reaches the medium. Recently, the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus megaterium was shown to efficiently secrete recombinant proteins into the growth medium. Here we evaluated B. megaterium for the recombinant production of antibody fragments. Results The lysozyme specific single chain Fv (scFv) fragment D1.3 was succesfully produced using B. megaterium. The impact of culture medium composition, gene expression time and culture temperatures on the production of functional scFv protein was systematically analyzed. A production and secretion at 41°C for 24 h using TB medium was optimal for this individual scFv. Interestingly, these parameters were very different to the optimal conditions for the expression of other proteins in B. megaterium. Per L culture supernatant, more than 400 μg of recombinant His6-tagged antibody fragment were purified by one step affinity chromatography. The material produced by B. megaterium showed an increased specific activity compared to material produced in E. coli. Conclusion High yields of functional scFv antibody fragments can be produced and secreted into the culture medium by B. megaterium, making this production system a reasonable alternative to E. coli. PMID:17224052

  12. The antibody paradox: trying on a pair of genes.

    PubMed

    Fleischman, J B

    1985-01-01

    Rodney Porter's separation of antibody molecules into Fab and Fc fragments engendered the notion that a single antibody polypeptide chain might be coded by two or more genes. This concept profoundly influenced the development of molecular immunology over the past 25 years. Our current knowledge of antibody gene organization has enabled investigators to recombine antibody genes to create 'chimeric' antibodies with a number of potentially useful applications. PMID:3938300

  13. Ethanol precipitation for purification of recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tscheliessnig, Anne; Satzer, Peter; Hammerschmidt, Nikolaus; Schulz, Henk; Helk, Bernhard; Jungbauer, Alois

    2014-10-20

    Currently, the golden standard for the purification of recombinant humanized antibodies (rhAbs) from CHO cell culture is protein A chromatography. However, due to increasing rhAbs titers alternative methods have come into focus. A new strategy for purification of recombinant human antibodies from CHO cell culture supernatant based on cold ethanol precipitation (CEP) and CaCl2 precipitation has been developed. This method is based on the cold ethanol precipitation, the process used for purification of antibodies and other components from blood plasma. We proof the applicability of the developed process for four different antibodies resulting in similar yield and purity as a protein A chromatography based process. This process can be further improved using an anion-exchange chromatography in flowthrough mode e.g. a monolith as last step so that residual host cell protein is reduced to a minimum. Beside the ethanol based process, our data also suggest that ethanol could be replaced with methanol or isopropanol. The process is suited for continuous operation. PMID:25087738

  14. Experimental and In Silico Modelling Analyses of the Gene Expression Pathway for Recombinant Antibody and By-Product Production in NS0 Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Emma J.; Chiverton, Lesley M.; Spurgeon, Sarah K.; Martin, Elaine B.; Montague, Gary A.; Smales, C. Mark; von der Haar, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are commercially important, high value biotherapeutic drugs used in the treatment of a variety of diseases. These complex molecules consist of two heavy chain and two light chain polypeptides covalently linked by disulphide bonds. They are usually expressed as recombinant proteins from cultured mammalian cells, which are capable of correctly modifying, folding and assembling the polypeptide chains into the native quaternary structure. Such recombinant cell lines often vary in the amounts of product produced and in the heterogeneity of the secreted products. The biological mechanisms of this variation are not fully defined. Here we have utilised experimental and modelling strategies to characterise and define the biology underpinning product heterogeneity in cell lines exhibiting varying antibody expression levels, and then experimentally validated these models. In undertaking these studies we applied and validated biochemical (rate-constant based) and engineering (nonlinear) models of antibody expression to experimental data from four NS0 cell lines with different IgG4 secretion rates. The models predict that export of the full antibody and its fragments are intrinsically linked, and cannot therefore be manipulated individually at the level of the secretory machinery. Instead, the models highlight strategies for the manipulation at the precursor species level to increase recombinant protein yields in both high and low producing cell lines. The models also highlight cell line specific limitations in the antibody expression pathway. PMID:23071804

  15. Experimental and in silico modelling analyses of the gene expression pathway for recombinant antibody and by-product production in NS0 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mead, Emma J; Chiverton, Lesley M; Spurgeon, Sarah K; Martin, Elaine B; Montague, Gary A; Smales, C Mark; von der Haar, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are commercially important, high value biotherapeutic drugs used in the treatment of a variety of diseases. These complex molecules consist of two heavy chain and two light chain polypeptides covalently linked by disulphide bonds. They are usually expressed as recombinant proteins from cultured mammalian cells, which are capable of correctly modifying, folding and assembling the polypeptide chains into the native quaternary structure. Such recombinant cell lines often vary in the amounts of product produced and in the heterogeneity of the secreted products. The biological mechanisms of this variation are not fully defined. Here we have utilised experimental and modelling strategies to characterise and define the biology underpinning product heterogeneity in cell lines exhibiting varying antibody expression levels, and then experimentally validated these models. In undertaking these studies we applied and validated biochemical (rate-constant based) and engineering (nonlinear) models of antibody expression to experimental data from four NS0 cell lines with different IgG4 secretion rates. The models predict that export of the full antibody and its fragments are intrinsically linked, and cannot therefore be manipulated individually at the level of the secretory machinery. Instead, the models highlight strategies for the manipulation at the precursor species level to increase recombinant protein yields in both high and low producing cell lines. The models also highlight cell line specific limitations in the antibody expression pathway. PMID:23071804

  16. A multi-Fc-species system for recombinant antibody production

    PubMed Central

    Moutel, Sandrine; El Marjou, Ahmed; Vielemeyer, Ole; Nizak, Clément; Benaroch, Philippe; Dübel, Stefan; Perez, Franck

    2009-01-01

    Background Genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic projects often suffer from a lack of functional validation creating a strong demand for specific and versatile antibodies. Antibody phage display represents an attractive approach to select rapidly in vitro the equivalent of monoclonal antibodies, like single chain Fv antibodies, in an inexpensive and animal free way. However, so far, recombinant antibodies have not managed to impose themselves as efficient alternatives to natural antibodies. Results We developed a series of vectors that allow one to easily fuse single chain Fv antibodies to Fc domains of immunoglobulins, improving their sensitivity and facilitating their use. This series enables the fusion of single chain Fv antibodies with human, mouse or rabbit Fc so that a given antibody is no longer restricted to a particular species. This opens up unlimited multiplexing possibilities and gives additional value to recombinant antibodies. We also show that this multi-Fc species production system can be applied to natural monoclonal antibodies cloned as single chain Fv antibodies and we converted the widely used 9E10 mouse anti-Myc-tag antibody into a human and a rabbit antibody. Conclusion Altogether, this new expression system, that brings constant quality, sensitivity and unique versatility, will be important to broaden the use of recombinant and natural monoclonal antibodies both for laboratory and diagnosis use. PMID:19245715

  17. Generation of monoclonal antibodies to recombinant vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Shein, S A; Gurina, O I; Leopol'd, A V; Baklaushev, V P; Korchagina, A A; Grinenko, N F; Ivanova, N V; Volgina, N E; Ryabukhin, I A; Chekhonin, V P

    2012-05-01

    Female BALB/c mice were subcutaneously immunized with recombinant VEGF-164. After 3 immunization cycles, splenic B cells from immunized mouse were fused with immortalized myeloma culture SP2/0-Ag14 cells. Screening of hybrid cells producing anti-VEGF antibodies was performed by ELISA and immunocytochemical analysis on cultured C6 glioma cells. Subsequent cloning yielded hybridoma stably expressing monoclonal anti-VEGF antibodies recognizing recombinant and native VEGF. PMID:22808513

  18. Back to the future: recombinant polyclonal antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Zhe; Coljee, Vincent W; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2013-11-01

    Antibody therapeutics are one of the fastest growing classes of pharmaceuticals, with an annual US market over $20 billion, developed to treat a variety of diseases including cancer, auto-immune and infectious diseases. Most are currently administered as a single molecule to treat a single disease, however there is mounting evidence that cocktails of multiple antibodies, each with a unique binding specificity and protective mechanism, may improve clinical efficacy. Here, we review progress in the development of oligoclonal combinations of antibodies to treat disease, focusing on identification of synergistic antibodies. We then discuss the application of modern antibody engineering technologies to produce highly potent antibody preparations, including oligoclonal antibody cocktails and truly recombinant polyclonal antibodies. Specific examples illustrating the synergy conferred by multiple antibodies will be provided for diseases caused by botulinum toxin, cancer and immune thrombocytopenia. The bioprocessing and regulatory options for these preparations will be discussed. PMID:24443710

  19. Back to the future: recombinant polyclonal antibody therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian-zhe; Coljee, Vincent W.; Maynard, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Antibody therapeutics are one of the fastest growing classes of pharmaceuticals, with an annual US market over $20 billion, developed to treat a variety of diseases including cancer, auto-immune and infectious diseases. Most are currently administered as a single molecule to treat a single disease, however there is mounting evidence that cocktails of multiple antibodies, each with a unique binding specificity and protective mechanism, may improve clinical efficacy. Here, we review progress in the development of oligoclonal combinations of antibodies to treat disease, focusing on identification of synergistic antibodies. We then discuss the application of modern antibody engineering technologies to produce highly potent antibody preparations, including oligoclonal antibody cocktails and truly recombinant polyclonal antibodies. Specific examples illustrating the synergy conferred by multiple antibodies will be provided for diseases caused by botulinum toxin, cancer and immune thrombocytopenia. The bioprocessing and regulatory options for these preparations will be discussed. PMID:24443710

  20. Related Mechanisms of Antibody Somatic Hypermutation and Class Switch Recombination

    PubMed Central

    HWANG, JOYCE K.; ALT, FREDERICK W.; YEAP, LENG-SIEW

    2015-01-01

    The primary antibody repertoire is generated by mechanisms involving the assembly of the exons that encode the antigen-binding variable regions of immunoglobulin heavy (IgH) and light (IgL) chains during the early development of B lymphocytes. After antigen-dependent activation, mature B lymphocytes can further alter their IgH and IgL variable region exons by the process of somatic hypermutation (SHM), which allows the selection of B cells in which SHMs resulted in the production of antibodies with increased antigen affinity. In addition, during antigen-dependent activation, B cells can also change the constant region of their IgH chain through a DNA double-strand-break (DSB) dependent process referred to as IgH class switch recombination (CSR), which generates B cell progeny that produce antibodies with different IgH constant region effector functions that are best suited for a elimination of a particular pathogen or in a particular setting. Both the mutations that underlie SHM and the DSBs that underlie CSR are initiated in target genes by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). This review describes in depth the processes of SHM and CSR with a focus on mechanisms that direct AID cytidine deamination in activated B cells and mechanisms that promote the differential outcomes of such cytidine deamination. PMID:26104555

  1. Recombinant bovine herpesvirus-1 expressing p23 protein of Cryptosporidium parvum induces neutralizing antibodies in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Yasuhiro; Xuan, Xuenan; Kimata, Isao; Iseki, Motohiro; Kodama, Yoshikatsu; Nagane, Noriko; Nagasawa, Hideyuki; Matsumoto, Yasunobu; Mikami, Takeshi; Otsuka, Haruki

    2003-04-01

    In order to develop a vaccine against cryptosporidiosis in cattle, we constructed a recombinant bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) expressing an immunodominant surface protein, p23, of Cryptosporidium parvum sporozoites. In the recombinant virus, the p23 gene under the control of a CAG promoter and a gene coding for an enhanced green fluorescent protein were integrated into the gG gene of BHV-1. Despite a low frequency of homologous recombination, cloning of the recombinants was easy because of the specific fluorescence of the plaques formed by recombinants. These plaques were among the plaques of the nonfluorescent parental virus. All clones selected for fluorescence also contained the p23 gene. In MDBK cells infected with the recombinant BHV-1, the antibody against the p23 protein recognized the p23 protein as an approximately 23-kDa specific band in Western blotting analysis. Rabbits immunized with the recombinant produced IgG against the p23 protein. It was also demonstrated that the sera of immunized rabbits reduced infection of C. parvum sporozoites in HCT-8 cells. The serum of an immunized rabbit reduced infection compared with the normal rabbit serum control. These results indicate that the recombinant BHV-1 induces neutralizing antibodies in rabbits. PMID:12760641

  2. Bortezomib Reduces Preexisting Antibodies to Recombinant Immunotoxins in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Michael L.; Mason-Osann, Emily; Onda, Masanori; Pastan, Ira

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant immunotoxin (RIT) therapy is limited in patients by neutralizing antibody responses. Ninety percent of patients with normal immune systems make neutralizing antibodies after one cycle of RIT, preventing repeated dosing. Furthermore, some patients have preexisting antibodies from environmental exposure to Pseudomonas exotoxin, the component of the RIT that elicits the neutralizing antibody response. Bortezomib (B) is an FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor which selectively targets and kills plasma cells which are necessary for the neutralizing antibody response. We hypothesized B may abrogate neutralizing antibody levels, making dosing of RIT possible in mice already immune to RIT. We immunized BALB/c mice with multiple doses of SS1P, a RIT whose antibody portion targets mesothelin. Mice with elevated antibody levels were separated into groups to receive saline, B, the pentostatin/cyclophosphamide (PC) regimen, or the bortezomib/pentostatin/cyclophosphamide (BPC) combination regimen. Four weeks after finishing therapy plasma antibody levels were assayed and bone marrow was harvested. The B and PC regimens both significantly reduced antibody levels, and we observed fewer plasma cells in the bone marrow of B treated mice, but not in PC treated mice. The BPC combination regimen nearly eliminated antibodies and further reduced plasma cells in the bone marrow. The BPC combination regimen is more effective than individual regimens and may reduce antibody levels in patients with preexisting neutralizing antibodies to Pseudomonas exotoxin allowing RIT treatment. PMID:25560410

  3. The optimized capsid gene of porcine circovirus type 2 expressed in yeast forms virus-like particles and elicits antibody responses in mice fed with recombinant yeast extracts.

    PubMed

    Bucarey, Sergio A; Noriega, Jorge; Reyes, Paulina; Tapia, Cecilia; Sáenz, Leonardo; Zuñiga, Alejandro; Tobar, Jaime A

    2009-09-25

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2)-associated diseases are considered to be the biggest problem for the worldwide swine industry. The PCV2 capsid protein (Cap) is an important antigen for development of vaccines. At present, most anti-PCV2 vaccines are produced as injectable formulations. Although effective, these vaccines have certain drawbacks, including stress with concomitant immunosuppresion, and involve laborious and time-consuming procedures. In this study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used as a vehicle to deliver PCV2 antigen in a preliminary attempt to develop an oral vaccine, and its immunogenic potential in mice was tested after oral gavage-mediated delivery. The cap gene with a yeast-optimized codon usage sequence (opt-cap) was chemically synthesized and cloned into Escherichia coli/Saccharomyces cerevisiae shuttle vector, pYES2, under the control of the Gal1 promoter. Intracellular expression of the Cap protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis and its antigenic properties were compared with those of baculovirus/insect cell-produced Cap protein derived from the native PCV2 cap gene. It was further demonstrated by electron micrography that the yeast-derived PCV2 Cap protein self-assembles into virus-like particles (VLPs) that are morphologically and antigenically similar to insect cell-derived VLPs. Feeding raw yeast extract containing Cap protein to mice elicited both serum- and fecal-specific antibodies against the antigen. These results show that it is feasible to use S. cerevisiae as a safe and simple system to produce PCV2 virus-like particles, and that oral yeast-mediated antigen delivery is an alternative strategy to efficiently induce anti-PCV2 antibodies in a mouse model, which is worthy of further investigation in swine. PMID:19664739

  4. Latex agglutination test based on single-chain Fv recombinant antibody fragment.

    PubMed

    Golchin, M; Khalili-Yazdi, A; Karamouzian, M; Abareghi, A

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies have been proposed as invaluable tools for various therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. Here, we describe the development of a novel latex agglutination test (LAT) using single-chain Fv recombinant antibody fragment for the detection of K99(+) enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains. For the production of a single-chain Fv antibody fragment (scFv) against the major colonization factor (FanC) of K99 antigen, the scFv gene was integrated into a bacterial expression vector under the control of T7 promoter. After high-level expression of soluble scFv (approximately 50 mg/l) in flask cultivation of E. coli DE3 and purification, scFv was immobilized on different latex particles, and then, these sensitized beads were used in LAT. Results obtained with our latex reagents revealed that the recombinant antibody-coated particles were able to give a good agglutination signal with purified antigen, intact cells displaying this protein and clinical specimens. The strength of agglutination of scFv-coated beads for antigen was comparable to that of polyclonal anti-K99-coated particles. However, the assay proved to be simple and rapid, similar to conventional LATs, and owing to more convenient and economical production of recombinant antibodies, they can be considered as a useful reagent for replacing monoclonal antibodies in LATs. PMID:21916915

  5. Development of recombinant human IgA for anticardiolipin antibodies assay standardization.

    PubMed

    Knappik, Achim; Capuano, Francesco; Frisch, Christian; Ylera, Francisco; Bonelli, Fabrizio

    2009-09-01

    Controls and calibrators in autoimmune assays are typically developed from patient sera. However, the use of sera is accompanied by a number of disadvantages, such as lack of monospecificity, lack of assay comparability, and supply limitations. Ideally, the control reagent would be an antigen-specific human monoclonal antibody preparation that is defined and pure, easy to produce without any supply limitations, and of defined isotype (IgG, IgM, or IgA). The generation of antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies has been complicated, but recent advances in development of fully human antibodies by means of in vitro antibody gene library selection has opened a way for the isolation of human antibodies to virtually any antigen, including self-antigens. Such antibodies can be converted to any isotype by gene cloning. Here we developed a set of human monoclonal IgA antibodies specific for the cardiolipin-beta2-glycoprotein 1 complex, using the HuCAL technology. We evaluated the IgA variants of those antibodies for their use as standards in IgA anticardiolipin antibody assays and compared these reagents with serum controls. Such recombinant antibodies may ultimately replace patient sera as assay control and calibration reagents. PMID:19758150

  6. Three Recombinant Engineered Antibodies against Recombinant Tags with High Affinity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongyu; Shen, Ao; Xiang, Yang K.; Corey, David P.

    2016-01-01

    We describe three recombinant engineered antibodies against three recombinant epitope tags, constructed with divalent binding arms to recognize divalent epitopes and so achieve high affinity and specificity. In two versions, an epitope is inserted in tandem into a protein of interest, and a homodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing a high-affinity epitope-binding domain to a human or mouse Fc domain. In a third, a heterodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing two different epitope-binding domains which target two different binding sites in GFP, to polarized Fc fragments. These antibody/epitope pairs have affinities in the low picomolar range and are useful tools for many antibody-based applications. PMID:26943906

  7. Human recombinant neutralizing antibodies against hantaan virus G2 protein.

    PubMed

    Koch, Joachim; Liang, Mifang; Queitsch, Iris; Kraus, Annette A; Bautz, Ekkehard K F

    2003-03-30

    Old world hantaviruses, causing hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), still present a public health problem in Asia and Eastern Europe. The majority of cases has been recorded in China. The aim of our study was to generate human recombinant neutralizing antibodies to a hantavirus by phage display technology. To preserve the structural identity of viral protein, the panning procedure was performed on native Hantaan (HTN) (76-118) virus propagated in Vero-E6 cells. In total, five complete human recombinant IgG antibodies were produced in a baculovirus expression system. All of them were able to completely neutralize HTN, and Seoul (SEO) virus in a plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). Three of these antibodies could also completely neutralize Dobrava (DOB) virus but not Puumala (PUU) virus. All antibodies bind to Hantaan virus G2 protein localized in the virus envelope. The sequence areas within the HTN (76-118)-G2 protein detected by five selected antibodies were mapped using peptide scans. Two partial epitopes, 916-KVMATIDSF-924 and 954-LVTKDIDFD-963, were recognized, which presumably are of paramount importance for docking of the virus to host cell receptors. A consensus motif 916-KVXATIXSF-924 could be identified by mutational analysis. The neutralizing antibodies to the most widely distributed hantaviruses causing HFRS might be promising candidates for the development of an agent for prevention and treatment of HFRS in patients. PMID:12706090

  8. A Polyclonal Antibody Against Recombinant Bovine Haptoglobin Expressed in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Donghua; Zhang, Hong; Li, Chunqiu

    2013-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the predicted immunodominant region of bovine haptoglobin (pirBoHp), without the signal peptide sequence, was synthesized based on the codon usage bias of Escherichia coli. The synthesized pirBoHp gene was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET-32a (+), which contains a His-tag. The recombinant pirBoHp protein was successfully expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells. Western blot analysis showed that the purified recombinant pirBoHp protein could be recognized by an anti-His-tag monoclonal antibody. Further investigations indicated that a polyclonal antibody against the recombinant pirBoHp protein could recognize the α and β chains of native bovine haptoglobin in a pooled plasma sample from dairy cattle suffering from foot rot. PMID:24328747

  9. Lentiviral Vectors for the Engineering of Implantable Cells Secreting Recombinant Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lathuilière, Aurélien; Schneider, Bernard L

    2016-01-01

    The implantation of genetically modified cells is considered for the chronic delivery of therapeutic recombinant proteins in vivo. In the context of gene therapy, the genetic engineering of cells faces two main challenges. First, it is critical to generate expandable cell sources, which can maintain stable high productivity of the recombinant protein of interest over time, both in culture and after transplantation. In addition, gene transfer techniques need to be developed to engineer cells synthetizing complex polypeptides, such as recombinant monoclonal antibodies, to broaden the range of potential therapeutic applications. Here, we provide a workflow for the use of lentiviral vectors as a flexible tool to generate antibody-producing cells. In particular, lentiviral vectors can be used to genetically engineer the cell types compatible with encapsulation devices protecting the implanted cells from the host immune system. Detailed methods are provided for the design and production of lentiviral vectors, optimization of cell transduction, as well as for the quantification and quality control of the produced recombinant antibody. PMID:27317179

  10. Recombinant Antibody Production in Arabidopsis Seeds Triggers an Unfolded Protein Response1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    De Wilde, Kirsten; De Buck, Sylvie; Vanneste, Kevin; Depicker, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Among the many plant-based production systems that are being tested for molecular farming, seeds are very attractive, as they provide a stable environment in which the accumulating recombinant proteins can be stored. However, it is not known exactly how high production levels of recombinant antibodies influence the endogenous transcriptome and proteome of the developing seed. To address this question, we studied the transcriptomic status in developing Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds 13 d post anthesis of three transgenic lines, producing varying levels of recombinant VHH or single-chain Fv antibody fragments fused to the human immunoglobulin G1-derived Fc fragment under the control of the β-PHASEOLIN seed-specific promoter. Using genome-wide Tiling arrays, we demonstrated that only a small proportion of the transcriptome was significantly changed in each of the lines compared with the wild type. Strikingly, in all three lines, we found a large overlap of up-regulated genes corresponding to protein folding, glycosylation/modification, translocation, vesicle transport, and protein degradation, suggestive of a state of cellular stress called the unfolded protein response. Moreover, the gene up-regulation amplitude was similar in all three lines. We hypothesize that the production of recombinant antibodies in the endoplasmic reticulum triggers endoplasmic reticulum stress, causing a disturbance of the normal cellular homeostasis. PMID:23188806

  11. Expression and purification of recombinant antibody formats and antibody fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Siegemund, Martin; Richter, Fabian; Seifert, Oliver; Unverdorben, Felix; Kontermann, Roland E

    2014-01-01

    In the laboratory-scale production of antibody fragments or antibody fusion proteins, it is often difficult to keep track on the most suitable affinity tags for protein purification from either prokaryotic or eukaryotic host systems. Here, we describe how such recombinant proteins derived from Escherichia coli lysates as well as HEK293 cell culture supernatants are purified by IMAC and by different affinity chromatography methods based on fusions to FLAG-tag, Strep-tag, and Fc domains. PMID:24515473

  12. Expression of Recombinant Vaccines and Antibodies in Plants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Plants are able to perform post-translational maturations of therapeutic proteins required for their functional biological activity and suitable in vivo pharmacokinetics. Plants can be a low-cost, large-scale production platform of recombinant biopharmaceutical proteins such as vaccines and antibodies. Plants, however, lack mechanisms of processing authentic human N-glycosylation, which imposes a major limitation in their use as an expression system for therapeutic glycoproducts. Efforts have been made to circumvent plant-specific N-glycosylation, as well as to supplement the plant's endogenous system with human glycosyltransferases for non-immunogenic and humanized N-glycan production. Herein we review studies on the potential of plants to serve as production systems for therapeutic and prophylactic biopharmaceuticals. We have especially focused on recombinant vaccines and antibodies and new expression strategies to overcome the existing problems associated with their production in plants. PMID:24937251

  13. Western Blot Detection of Human Anti-Chikungunya Virus Antibody with Recombinant Envelope 2 Protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoshou; Lee, Jihoo; Ahn, Hye-Jin; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Dias, Ronaldo F; Nam, Ho-Woo

    2016-04-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a tropical pathogen, has re-emerged and has massive outbreaks abruptly all over the world. Containing many dominant epitopes, the envelope E2 protein of CHIKV has been explored for the vaccination or diagnosis. In the present study, the antigenicity of a recombinant expressed intrinsically disorder domain (IUD) of E2 was tested for the detection of the antibody against CHIKV through western blot method. The gene of the IUD of E2 was inserted into 2 different vectors and expressed as recombinant GST-E2 and recombinant MBP-E2 fusion protein, respectively. Two kinds of fusion proteins were tested with 30 CHIKV patient sera and 30 normal sera, respectively. Both proteins were detected by 25 patients sera (83.3%) and 1 normal serum (3.3%). This test showed a relatively high sensitivity and very high specificity of the recombinant E2 proteins to be used as diagnostic antigens against CHIKV infection. PMID:27180586

  14. Western Blot Detection of Human Anti-Chikungunya Virus Antibody with Recombinant Envelope 2 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhaoshou; Lee, Jihoo; Ahn, Hye-Jin; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Dias, Ronaldo F.; Nam, Ho-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a tropical pathogen, has re-emerged and has massive outbreaks abruptly all over the world. Containing many dominant epitopes, the envelope E2 protein of CHIKV has been explored for the vaccination or diagnosis. In the present study, the antigenicity of a recombinant expressed intrinsically disorder domain (IUD) of E2 was tested for the detection of the antibody against CHIKV through western blot method. The gene of the IUD of E2 was inserted into 2 different vectors and expressed as recombinant GST-E2 and recombinant MBP-E2 fusion protein, respectively. Two kinds of fusion proteins were tested with 30 CHIKV patient sera and 30 normal sera, respectively. Both proteins were detected by 25 patients sera (83.3%) and 1 normal serum (3.3%). This test showed a relatively high sensitivity and very high specificity of the recombinant E2 proteins to be used as diagnostic antigens against CHIKV infection. PMID:27180586

  15. Recombinant anti-tenascin antibody constructs

    SciTech Connect

    ZALUTSKY, MICHAEL R

    2006-08-29

    The general objective of this research is to combine genetically derived molecular constructs reactive with tenascin, with appropriate radionuclides and labeling methods in order to generate more effective diagnostic and therapeutic reagents for oncologic nuclear medicine. Tenascin, a polymorphic extracellular matrix glycoprotein, is of interest because of its high expression on glioma, melanoma, as well as prostate and breast carcinoma. Recently, we have also documented high levels of tenascin in lymphomas, particularly those of higher grade, making the potential clinical impact of tenascin-specific radiodiagnostics and therapeutics even greater. An essential feature of our work plan is the ability to exploit our extensive clinical experience in order to design second-generation constructs with properties which could improve clinical efficacy. To date, we have treated over 150 brain tumor patients with 131I-labeled murine 81C6, an antibody which binds specifically to the alternatively spliced fibronectin type III repeats CD of the tenascin molecule. During the current grant period, we have made several observations which form the basis for our proposed specific aims. First, tissue distribution and catabolism experiments in animal models have demonstrated enhanced stability for a chimeric construct composed of murine variable regions and human IgG2 constant domains. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic studies in patients with 131I-labeled chimeric 81C6 have shown significantly longer retention in glioma tumor resection cavities compared with its murine parent. Second, we have initiated the first clinical trial of an endoradiotherapeutic labeled with the 7.2-hr -particle emitter 211At. Twelve glioma patients have received 211At-labeled chimeric 81C6 directly into their brain tumor resection cavity, and very encouraging results have been obtained. Now that the feasibility of human studies with 211At, has been demonstrated, the development and evaluation of anti

  16. Pathogen-specific recombinant human polyclonal antibodies: biodefence applications.

    PubMed

    Bregenholt, Søren; Haurum, John

    2004-03-01

    The potential use of biological agents such as viruses, bacteria or bacterial toxins as weapons of mass destruction has fuelled significant national and international research and development in novel prophylactic or therapeutic countermeasures. Such measures need to be fast-acting and broadly specific, a hallmark of target-specific polyclonal antibodies (pAbs). As reviewed here, pathogen-specific antibodies in the form of human or animal serum have long been recognised as effective therapies in a number of infectious diseases. This review focuses in particular on the potential biowarfare agents prioritised by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), referred to as the category A organisms. Furthermore, it is propose that the last decade of development in recombinant antibody technologies offers the possibility for developing highly specific human monoclonal or polyclonal pathogen-specific antibodies. In particular, pathogen-specific polyclonal human antibodies offer certain advantages over existing hyperimmune serum products, monoclonal antibodies, small molecule drugs and vaccines. Here, the rationale for designing pAb-based therapeutics against the CDC category A microbial agents causing anthrax, botulism, plague, smallpox, tularaemia and viral haemorrhagic fevers, as well as the overall design of such therapeutics, are discussed. PMID:15006732

  17. Selection of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) Specific Recombinant Monoclonal Phage Display Antibodies for Prey Detection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Monzó, César; Urbaneja, Alberto; Ximénez-Embún, Miguel; García-Fernández, Julia; García, José Luis; Castañera, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Several recombinant antibodies against the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most important pests in agriculture worldwide, were selected for the first time from a commercial phage display library of human scFv antibodies. The specificity and sensitivity of the selected recombinant antibodies were compared with that of a rabbit polyclonal serum raised in parallel using a wide range of arthropod species as controls. The selected recombinant monoclonal antibodies had a similar or greater specificity when compared with classical monoclonal antibodies. The selected recombinant antibodies were successfully used to detect the target antigen in the gut of predators and the scFv antibodies were sequenced and compared. These results demonstrate the potential for recombinant scFv antibodies to be used as an alternative to the classical monoclonal antibodies or even molecular probes in the post-mortem analysis studies of generalist predators. PMID:23272105

  18. Development of a Recombinant Antibody with Specificity for Chelated Uranyl Ions

    SciTech Connect

    X. Li; A.M. Kriegel; T.C. Bishop; R.C. Blake; E. Figueiredo; H. Yu; D.A. Blake

    2005-04-18

    The goal of our project is to continue the development of new techniques for rapid, automated identification of radionuclides, metals, and chelators that may contaminant sur face and groundwater at DOE sites. One of the four specific aims of the present project is to develop new technologies in antibody engineering that will enhance our immunosensor program. Recombinant antibodies have potential advantages over monoclonal antibodies produced by standard hybridoma technology. The cloned genes represent a stable, recoverable source for antibody production. In addition, the recombinant format offers opportunities for protein engineering that enhances antibody performance and for studies that relate antibody sequence to binding activity. In this study, a hybridoma that synthesized an antibody (12F6) that recognized a 1:1 complex between 2,9-dicarboxyl-1,10- phenanthroline (DCP) and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} was used as a source of RNA for the development of a recombinant (Fab){sub 2} fragment. RNA was isolated from the 12F6 hybridoma and the cDNA encoding the entire {kappa} light chain and the linked VH and C1 portions of the heavy chain were amplified from total RNA. cDNA sequences were verified by comparison with the N-terminal amino acid sequences of the light and heavy chains of the native 12F6 monoclonal antibody. A leader sequence and appropriate restriction sites were added to each chain, and the fragments were ligated into a commercial dicistronic vector (pBudCE4.1, Invitrogen, Inc.). COS-1 cells were transfected with this vector and the culture supernatant was assayed for activity and the (Fab){sub 2} protein. Cells transfected with vector containing 12F6 cDNA synthesized and secreted recombinant (Fab){sub 2} fragments that bound to the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-DCP complex with an affinity indistinguishable from that of a (Fab){sub 2} fragment prepared from the native antibody. Molecular models of the heavy and light chain variable domains were constructed according to the

  19. Generation of novel recombinant antibodies against nitrotyrosine by antibody phage display.

    PubMed

    Hof, Danielle; Cooksley-Decasper, Seraina; Moergeli, Sandra; von Eckardstein, Arnold

    2011-01-01

    Nitrotyrosine is a posttranslational protein modification that occurs under oxidative and nitrosative stress, and plays an important role in numerous pathological conditions. To analyse nitrotyrosine formation several commercial monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies reacting with 3-nitrotyrosine have been developed which however do not work properly in all required assays. Here, antibody phage display was used to select recombinant antibodies that specifically react with nitrotyrosine in various protein contexts. Nine initial selections were carried out, using synthetic peptides, peroxynitrite-modified proteins and conjugated proteins as antigens. Four antibodies were isolated that each exhibited a characteristic binding reactivity that greatly depended on the antigens that were used for their selections. In general, the selections using small, synthetic and biotinylated peptides were the most successful approach. Subsequently, antibody 11B1 was affinity matured by error prone mutagenesis, resulting in the isolation of two antibodies, designated 47A7 and 47B1. Competition ELISA and immunoblotting after treatment with sodium dithionite further demonstrated the specificity of antibody 47B1 for nitrotyrosine. The results presented here demonstrate that antibody phage display is a useful method to isolate antibodies against posttranslational modifications, which are powerful tools in the proteomic era. PMID:21558620

  20. Generating Recombinant Antibodies against Putative Biomarkers of Retinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kierny, Michael R.; Cunningham, Thomas D.; Bouhenni, Rachida A.; Edward, Deepak P.; Kay, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Candidate biomarkers, indicative of disease or injury, are beginning to overwhelm the process of validation through immunological means. Recombinant antibodies developed through phage-display offer an alternative means of generating monoclonal antibodies faster than traditional immunization of animals. Peptide segments of putative biomarkers of laser induced injury in the rabbit, discovered through mass spectrometry, were used as targets for a selection against a library of phage-displayed human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies. Highly specific antibodies were isolated to four of these unique peptide sequences. One antibody against the retinal protein, Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Protein Beta 5 (GBB5), had a dissociation constant ~300 nM and recognized the full-length endogenous protein in retinal homogenates of three different animal species by western blot. Alanine scanning of the peptide target identified three charged and one hydrophobic amino acid as the critical binding residues for two different scFvs. To enhance the utility of the reagent, one scFv was dimerized through a Fragment-crystallizable hinge region (i.e., Fc) and expressed in HEK-293 cells. This dimeric reagent yielded a 25-fold lower detection limit in western blots. PMID:25902199

  1. Detection of biomarkers using recombinant antibodies coupled to nanostructured platforms

    PubMed Central

    Kierny, Michael R.; Cunningham, Thomas D.; Kay, Brian K.

    2012-01-01

    The utility of biomarker detection in tomorrow's personalized health care field will mean early and accurate diagnosis of many types of human physiological conditions and diseases. In the search for biomarkers, recombinant affinity reagents can be generated to candidate proteins or post-translational modifications that differ qualitatively or quantitatively between normal and diseased tissues. The use of display technologies, such as phage-display, allows for manageable selection and optimization of affinity reagents for use in biomarker detection. Here we review the use of recombinant antibody fragments, such as scFvs and Fabs, which can be affinity-selected from phage-display libraries, to bind with both high specificity and affinity to biomarkers of cancer, such as Human Epidermal growth factor Receptor 2 (HER2) and Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). We discuss how these recombinant antibodies can be fabricated into nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes, nanowires, and quantum dots, for the purpose of enhancing detection of biomarkers at low concentrations (pg/mL) within complex mixtures such as serum or tissue extracts. Other sensing technologies, which take advantage of ‘Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering’ (gold nanoshells), frequency changes in piezoelectric crystals (quartz crystal microbalance), or electrical current generation and sensing during electrochemical reactions (electrochemical detection), can effectively provide multiplexed platforms for detection of cancer and injury biomarkers. Such devices may soon replace the traditional time consuming ELISAs and Western blots, and deliver rapid, point-of-care diagnostics to market. PMID:22833780

  2. Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 glycoprotein B: recombinant expression and antibody recognition.

    PubMed

    Dry, Inga; Todd, Helen; Deane, David; Percival, Ann; Mclean, Kevin; Inglis, Neil F; Manson, Erin D T; Haig, David M; Nayuni, Shilpa; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M; Grant, Dawn M; Bartley, Kathryn; Stewart, James P; Russell, George C

    2016-03-01

    The gammaherpesvirus alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1) causes fatal malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) in susceptible species including cattle, but infects its reservoir host, wildebeest, without causing disease. Pathology in cattle may be influenced by virus-host cell interactions mediated by the virus glycoproteins. Cloning and expression of a haemagglutinin-tagged version of the AlHV-1 glycoprotein B (gB) was used to demonstrate that the AlHV-1-specific monoclonal antibody 12B5 recognised gB and that gB was the main component of the gp115 complex of AlHV-1, a glycoprotein complex of five components identified on the surface of AlHV-1 by immunoprecipitation and radiolabelling. Analysis of AlHV-1 virus particles showed that the native form of gB was detected by mAb 12B5 as a band of about 70 kDa, whilst recombinant gB expressed by transfected HEK293T cells appeared to be subject to additional cleavage and incomplete post-translational processing. Antibody 12B5 recognised an epitope on the N-terminal furin-cleaved fragment of gB on AlHV-1 virus particles. It could be used to detect recombinant and virus-expressed gB on western blots and on the surface of infected cells by flow cytometry, whilst recombinant gB was detected on the surface of transfected cells by immunofluorescence. Recombinant gB has potential as an antigen for ELISA detection of MCF virus infection and as a candidate vaccine antigen. PMID:26650040

  3. Discovery and characterization of hydroxylysine in recombinant monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qing; Moore, Benjamin; Beardsley, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Tryptic peptide mapping analysis of a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-expressed, recombinant IgG1 monoclonal antibody revealed a previously unreported +16 Da modification. Through a combination of MS(n) experiments, and preparation and analysis of known synthetic peptides, the possibility of a sequence variant (Ala to Ser) was ruled out and the presence of hydroxylysine was confirmed. Post-translational hydroxylation of lysine was found in a consensus sequence (XKG) known to be the site of modification in other proteins such as collagen, and was therefore presumed to result from the activity of the CHO homolog of the lysyl hydroxylase complex. Although this consensus sequence was present in several locations in the antibody sequence, only a single site on the heavy-chain Fab was found to be modified. PMID:26651858

  4. Lepidopteran cells, an alternative for the production of recombinant antibodies?

    PubMed Central

    Cérutti, Martine; Golay, Josée

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are used with great success in many different therapeutic domains. In order to satisfy the growing demand and to lower the production cost of these molecules, many alternative systems have been explored. Among them, the baculovirus/insect cells system is a good candidate. This system is very safe, given that the baculoviruses have a highly restricted host range and they are not pathogenic to vertebrates or plants. But the major asset is the speed with which it is possible to obtain very stable recombinant viruses capable of producing fully active proteins whose glycosylation pattern can be modulated to make it similar to the human one. These features could ultimately make the difference by enabling the production of antibodies with very low costs. However, efforts are still needed, in particular to increase production rates and thus make this system commercially viable for the production of these therapeutic agents. PMID:22531440

  5. Identifying bottlenecks in transient and stable production of recombinant monoclonal-antibody sequence variants in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Megan; Sweeney, Bernadette; Cain, Katharine; Stephens, Paul; Sharfstein, Susan T.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing demand for antibody-based therapeutics has emphasized the need for technologies to improve recombinant antibody titers from mammalian cell lines. Moreover, as antibody therapeutics address an increasing spectrum of indications, interest has increased in antibody engineering to improve affinity and biological activity. However, the cellular mechanisms that dictate expression and the relationships between antibody sequence and expression level remain poorly understood. Fundamental understanding of how mammalian cells handle high levels of transgene expression and of the relationship between sequence and expression are vital to the development of new antibodies and for increasing recombinant antibody titers. In this work, we analyzed a pair of mutants that vary by a single amino acid at Kabat position 49 (heavy chain framework), resulting in differential transient and stable titers with no apparent loss of antigen affinity. Through analysis of mRNA, gene copy number, intracellular antibody content, and secreted antibody, we found that while translational/post-translational mechanisms are limiting in transient systems, it appears that the amount of available transgenic mRNA becomes the limiting event upon stable integration of the recombinant genes. We also show that amino acid substitution at residue 49 results in production of a non-secreted HC variant and postulate that stable antibody expression is maintained at a level which prevents toxic accumulation of this HC-related protein. This study highlights the need for proper sequence engineering strategies when developing therapeutic antibodies and alludes to the early analysis of transient expression systems to identify the potential for aberrant stable expression behavior. PMID:22467228

  6. Production of a recombinant antibody specific for i blood group antigen, a mesenchymal stem cell marker.

    PubMed

    Hirvonen, Tia; Suila, Heli; Tiitinen, Sari; Natunen, Suvi; Laukkanen, Marja-Leena; Kotovuori, Annika; Reinman, Mirka; Satomaa, Tero; Alfthan, Kaija; Laitinen, Saara; Takkinen, Kristiina; Räbinä, Jarkko; Valmu, Leena

    2013-10-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) offer great promise for future regenerative and anti-inflammatory therapies. Panels of functional and phenotypical markers are currently used in characterization of different therapeutic stem cell populations from various sources. The i antigen (linear poly-N-acetyllactosamine) from the Ii blood group system has been suggested as a marker for MSCs derived from umbilical cord blood (UCB). However, there are currently no commercially available antibodies recognizing the i antigen. In the present study, we describe the use of antibody phage display technology to produce recombinant antibodies recognizing a structure from the surface of mesenchymal stem cells. We constructed IgM phage display libraries from the lymphocytes of a donor with an elevated serum anti-i titer. Antibody phage display technology is not dependent on immunization and thus allows the generation of antibodies against poorly immunogenic molecules, such as carbohydrates. Agglutination assays utilizing i antigen-positive red blood cells (RBCs) from UCB revealed six promising single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies, three of which recognized epitopes from the surface of UCB-MSCs in flow cytometric assays. The amino acid sequence of the VH gene segment of B12.2 scFv was highly similar to the VH4.21 gene segment required to encode anti-i specificities. Further characterization of binding properties revealed that the binding of B12.2 hyperphage was inhibited by soluble linear lactosamine oligosaccharide. Based on these findings, we suggest that the B12.2 scFv we have generated is a prominent anti-i antibody that recognizes i antigen on the surface of both UCB-MSCs and RBCs. This binder can thus be utilized in UCB-MSC detection and isolation as well as in blood group serology. PMID:24083089

  7. Purification process of recombinant monoclonal antibodies with mixed mode chromatography.

    PubMed

    Maria, Sophie; Joucla, Gilles; Garbay, Bertrand; Dieryck, Wilfrid; Lomenech, Anne-Marie; Santarelli, Xavier; Cabanne, Charlotte

    2015-05-01

    An innovative process to purify mAb from CHO cell culture supernatant was developed. This three-step process involved two mixed mode resins and an anion exchange membrane. We used a human IgG mixture to determine the optimal conditions for each purification step. Thereafter, the whole process was evaluated and improved for the purification of a recombinant mAb produced in the supernatant of CHO cells. Once optimized, yield and purity of 88% and 99.9%, respectively were comparable to those obtained in a conventional process based on a capture step using protein A. In addition, aggregates, HCPs and DNA levels in the purified fraction were below regulatory specifications. Then we used mass spectrometry to identify contaminating proteins in the antibody fraction in order to highlight the behavior of HCPs. PMID:25805720

  8. Preparation of Recombinant Human Monoclonal Antibody Fab Fragments Specific for Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Hiroshi; Cheng, Xun-Jia; Watanabe, Katsuomi; Takekoshi, Masataka; Maeda, Fumiko; Aotsuka, Satoshi; Kaneda, Yoshimasa; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Ihara, Seiji

    1999-01-01

    Genes coding for human antibody Fab fragments specific for Entamoeba histolytica were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Lymphocytes were separated from the peripheral blood of a patient with an amebic liver abscess. Poly(A)+ RNA was isolated from the lymphocytes, and then genes coding for the light chain and Fd region of the heavy chain were amplified by a reverse transcriptase PCR. The amplified DNA fragments were ligated with a plasmid vector and were introduced into Escherichia coli. Three thousand colonies were screened for the production of antibodies to E. histolytica HM-1:IMSS by an indirect fluorescence-antibody (IFA) test. Lysates from five Escherichia coli clones were positive. Analysis of the DNA sequences of the five clones showed that three of the five heavy-chain sequences and four of the five light-chain sequences differed from each other. When the reactivities of the Escherichia coli lysates to nine reference strains of E. histolytica were examined by the IFA test, three Fab fragments with different DNA sequences were found to react with all nine strains and another Fab fragment was found to react with seven strains. None of the four human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments reacted with Entamoeba dispar reference strains or with other enteric protozoan parasites. These results indicate that the bacterial expression system reported here is effective for the production of human monoclonal antibodies specific for E. histolytica. The recombinant human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments may be applicable for distinguishing E. histolytica from E. dispar and for use in the serodiagnosis of amebiasis. PMID:10225840

  9. Characterization and biodistribution of recombinant and recombinant/chimeric constructs of monoclonal antibody B72. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Colcher, D.; Milenic, D.; Roselli, M.; Raubitschek, A.; Yarranton, G.; King, D.; Adair, J.; Whittle, N.; Bodmer, M.; Schlom, J.

    1989-04-01

    Radiolabeled B72.3 has been administered both i.v. and i.p. in patients with colorectal and ovarian cancer as well as other carcinomas and has been shown to selectively bind to approximately 70-80% of metastatic lesions. Greater than 50% of the patients that have been treated with B72.3 have developed an immunological response to murine IgG after a single injection. In an attempt to minimize the immune response of these patients to the administered murine monoclonal antibody, we developed a recombinant form of the murine B72.3 as well as a recombinant/chimeric antibody, using the variable regions of the murine B72.3 and human heavy chain (gamma 4) and light chain (kappa) constant regions. We report here that both the recombinant B72.3 (rB72.3) and the recombinant/chimeric B72.3 (cB72.3(gamma 4)) IgGs maintain the tissue binding and idiotypic specificity of the native murine IgG. The native B72.3, rB72.3, and cB72.3(gamma 4) IgGs were radiolabeled and the biodistribution of these IgGs was studied in athymic mice bearing human colon carcinoma xenografts (LS-174T). Differences were observed between the cB72.3(gamma 4) and the native B72.3 in the percentage of injected dose/g that localized in the tumor. The somewhat lower absolute amounts of the cB72.3(gamma 4) in the tumor are mostly likely due to the observed more rapid clearance from the blood and body of the mouse as compared to the native B72.3 and rB72.3. All three forms (native B72.3, rB72.3, and cB72.3(gamma 4)) of the IgG, however, were able to localize the colon tumor with similar radiolocalization indices (percentage of injected dose/g in tumor divided by the percentage of injected dose/g in normal tissue).

  10. Phylogenetic diversification of immunoglobulin genes and the antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Litman, G W; Rast, J P; Shamblott, M J; Haire, R N; Hulst, M; Roess, W; Litman, R T; Hinds-Frey, K R; Zilch, A; Amemiya, C T

    1993-01-01

    Immunoglobulins are encoded by a large multigene system that undergoes somatic rearrangement and additional genetic change during the development of immunoglobulin-producing cells. Inducible antibody and antibody-like responses are found in all vertebrates. However, immunoglobulin possessing disulfide-bonded heavy and light chains and domain-type organization has been described only in representatives of the jawed vertebrates. High degrees of nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequence identity are evident when the segmental elements that constitute the immunoglobulin gene loci in phylogenetically divergent vertebrates are compared. However, the organization of gene loci and the manner in which the independent elements recombine (and diversify) vary markedly among different taxa. One striking pattern of gene organization is the "cluster type" that appears to be restricted to the chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fishes) and limits segmental rearrangement to closely linked elements. This type of gene organization is associated with both heavy- and light-chain gene loci. In some cases, the clusters are "joined" or "partially joined" in the germ line, in effect predetermining or partially predetermining, respectively, the encoded specificities (the assumption being that these are expressed) of the individual loci. By relating the sequences of transcribed gene products to their respective germ-line genes, it is evident that, in some cases, joined-type genes are expressed. This raises a question about the existence and/or nature of allelic exclusion in these species. The extensive variation in gene organization found throughout the vertebrate species may relate directly to the role of intersegmental (V<==>D<==>J) distances in the commitment of the individual antibody-producing cell to a particular genetic specificity. Thus, the evolution of this locus, perhaps more so than that of others, may reflect the interrelationships between genetic organization and function. PMID

  11. Construction of Recombinant Single Chain Variable Fragment (ScFv) Antibody Against Superantigen for Immunodetection Using Antibody Phage Display Technology.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pawan Kumar; Agrawal, Ranu; Kamboj, D V; Singh, Lokendra

    2016-01-01

    Superantigens are a class of antigens that bind to the major histocompatibility complex class (MHC) II and T-cell receptor (TCR) and cause the nonspecific activation of T cells, resulting in a massive release of pro-inflammatory mediators. They are produced by the gram-positive organisms Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, and by a variety of other microbes such as viruses and mycoplasma, and cause toxic shock syndrome (TSS) and even death in some cases. The immunodetection of superantigens is difficult due to the polyclonal activation of T-cells leading to nonspecific antibody production. The production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies against superantigens can solve this problem and are far better than polyclonal antibodies in terms of detection. Here, we describe the construction of recombinant single chain variable fragments (ScFv) antibodies against superantigens with specific reference to SEB (staphylococcal enterotoxin B) using antibody phage display technology. PMID:26676049

  12. Efficient isolation of genes by using antibody probes.

    PubMed Central

    Young, R A; Davis, R W

    1983-01-01

    A sensitive and general technique has been devised for the dual purposes of cloning genes by using antibodies as probes and isolating unknown proteins encoded by cloned DNA. The method uses an expression vector, lambda gt11 (lac5 nin5 cI857 S100), that permits insertion of foreign DNA into the beta-galactosidase structural gene lacZ and promotes synthesis of hybrid proteins. Efficient screening of antigen-producing clones in lambda gt11 recombinant cDNA libraries is achieved through lysogeny of the phage library in hflA (high-frequency lysogeny) mutant cells of Escherichia coli; lysogens produce detectable quantities of antigen on induction, even when plated at high cell densities. The vector is also designed to facilitate the isolation of proteins specified by previously cloned gene sequences. Hybrid proteins encoded by recombinant phage accumulate in strains defective in protein degradation (lon mutants) in amounts amenable to large-scale purification. Antibodies produced against the portion of the hybrid encoded by foreign DNA could in turn be used to isolate the native polypeptide from eukaryotic cells. Images PMID:6219389

  13. Regioselective covalent immobilization of recombinant antibody-binding proteins A, G, and L for construction of antibody arrays.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jin-soo; Lee, Sungwon; Poulter, C Dale

    2013-06-19

    Immobilized antibodies are useful for the detection of antigens in highly sensitive microarray diagnostic applications. Arrays with the antibodies attached regioselectively in a uniform orientation are typically more sensitive than those with random orientations. Direct regioselective immobilization of antibodies on a solid support typically requires a modified form of the protein. We now report a general approach for the regioselective attachment of antibodies to a surface using truncated forms of antibody-binding proteins A, G, and L that retain the structural motifs required for antibody binding. The recombinant proteins have a C-terminal CVIX protein farnesyltransferase recognition motif that allows us to append a bioorthogonal azide or alkyne moiety and use the Cu(I)-catalyzed Huisgen cycloaddition to attach the binding proteins to a suitably modified glass surface. This approach offers several advantages. The recombinant antibody-binding proteins are produced in Escherichia coli, chemoselectively modified posttranslationally in the cell-free homogenate, and directly attached to the glass surface without the need for purification at any stage of the process. Complexes between immobilized recombinant proteins A, G, and L and their respective strongly bound antibodies were stable to repeated washing with PBST buffer at pH 7.2. However, the antibodies could be stripped from the slides by treatment with 0.1 M glycine·HCl buffer, pH 2.6, for 30 min and regenerated by shaking with PBS buffer, pH 7.2, at 4 °C overnight. The recombinant forms of proteins A, G, and L can be used separately or in combination to give glass surfaces capable of binding a wide variety of antibodies. PMID:23746333

  14. Avian influenza in ovo vaccination with replication defective recombinant adenovirus in chickens: vaccine potency, antibody persistence, and maternal antibody transfer.

    PubMed

    Mesonero, Alexander; Suarez, David L; van Santen, Edzard; Tang, De-Chu C; Toro, Haroldo

    2011-06-01

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) can be elicited in chickens in a single-dose regimen by in ovo vaccination with a replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad)-vector encoding the AI virus (AIV) hemagglutinin (HA). We evaluated vaccine potency, antibody persistence, transfer of maternal antibodies (MtAb), and interference between MtAb and active in ovo or mucosal immunization with RCA-free recombinant Ad expressing a codon-optimized AIV H5 HA gene from A/turkey/WI/68 (AdTW68.H5(ck)). Vaccine coverage and intrapotency test repeatability were based on anti-H5 hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody levels detected in in ovo vaccinated chickens. Even though egg inoculation of each replicate was performed by individuals with varying expertise and with different vaccine batches, the average vaccine coverage of three replicates was 85%. The intrapotency test repeatability, which considers both positive as well as negative values, varied between 0.69 and 0.71, indicating effective vaccination. Highly pathogenic (HP) AIV challenge of chicken groups vaccinated with increasing vaccine doses showed 90% protection in chickens receiving > or = 10(8) ifu (infectious units)/bird. The protective dose 50% (PD50) was determined to be 10(6.5) ifu. Even vaccinated chickens that did not develop detectable antibody levels were effectively protected against HP AIV challenge. This result is consistent with previous findings ofAd-vector eliciting T lymphocyte responses. Higher vaccine doses significantly reduced viral shedding as determined by AIV RNA concentration in oropharyngeal swabs. Assessment of antibody persistence showed that antibody levels of in ovo immunized chickens continued to increase until 12 wk and started to decline after 18 wk of age. Intramuscular (IM) booster vaccination with the same vaccine at 16 wk of age significantly increased the antibody responses in breeder hens, and these responses were maintained at high

  15. Recombinant Encephalomyocarditis Viruses Elicit Neutralizing Antibodies against PRRSV and CSFV in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shu; Guo, Xin; Keyes, Lisa R.; Yang, Hanchun; Ge, Xinna

    2015-01-01

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) is capable of infecting a wide range of species and the infection can cause myocarditis and reproductive failure in pigs as well as febrile illness in human beings. In this study, we introduced the entire ORF5 of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) or the neutralization epitope regions in the E2 gene of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV), into the genome of a stably attenuated EMCV strain, T1100I. The resultant viable recombinant viruses, CvBJC3m/I-ΔGP5 and CvBJC3m/I-E2, respectively expressed partial PRRSV envelope protein GP5 or CSFV neutralization epitope A1A2 along with EMCV proteins. These heterologous proteins fused to the N-terminal of the nonstructural leader protein could be recognized by anti-GP5 or anti-E2 antibody. We also tested the immunogenicity of these fusion proteins by immunizing BALB/c mice with the recombinant viruses. The immunized animals elicited neutralizing antibodies against PRRSV and CSFV. Our results suggest that EMCV can be engineered as an expression vector and serve as a tool in the development of novel live vaccines in various animal species. PMID:26076449

  16. In vitro and in vivo modifications of recombinant and human IgG antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongcheng; Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Zhang, Hui-Min; Nowak, Christine; Neill, Alyssa; Gonzalez-Lopez, Nidia; Patel, Rekha; Cheng, Guilong; Kita, Adriana Z; Andrien, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Tremendous knowledge has been gained in the understanding of various modifications of IgG antibodies, driven mainly by the fact that antibodies are one of the most important groups of therapeutic molecules and because of the development of advanced analytical techniques. Recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics expressed in mammalian cell lines and endogenous IgG molecules secreted by B cells in the human body share some modifications, but each have some unique modifications. Modifications that are common to recombinant mAb and endogenous IgG molecules are considered to pose a lower risk of immunogenicity. On the other hand, modifications that are unique to recombinant mAbs could potentially pose higher risk. The focus of this review is the comparison of frequently observed modifications of recombinant monoclonal antibodies to those of endogenous IgG molecules. PMID:25517300

  17. HSV Recombinant Vectors for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manservigi, Roberto; Argnani, Rafaela; Marconi, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    The very deep knowledge acquired on the genetics and molecular biology of herpes simplex virus (HSV), has allowed the development of potential replication-competent and replication-defective vectors for several applications in human healthcare. These include delivery and expression of human genes to cells of the nervous systems, selective destruction of cancer cells, prophylaxis against infection with HSV or other infectious diseases, and targeted infection to specific tissues or organs. Replication-defective recombinant vectors are non-toxic gene transfer tools that preserve most of the neurotropic features of wild type HSV-1, particularly the ability to express genes after having established latent infections, and are thus proficient candidates for therapeutic gene transfer settings in neurons. A replication-defective HSV vector for the treatment of pain has recently entered in phase 1 clinical trial. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are becoming a suitable and powerful tool to eradicate brain tumours due to their ability to replicate and spread only within the tumour mass, and have reached phase II/III clinical trials in some cases. The progress in understanding the host immune response induced by the vector is also improving the use of HSV as a vaccine vector against both HSV infection and other pathogens. This review briefly summarizes the obstacle encountered in the delivery of HSV vectors and examines the various strategies developed or proposed to overcome such challenges. PMID:20835362

  18. The relationship between mTOR signalling pathway and recombinant antibody productivity in CHO cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High recombinant protein productivity in mammalian cell lines is often associated with phenotypic changes in protein content, energy metabolism, and cell growth, but the key determinants that regulate productivity are still not clearly understood. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway has emerged as a central regulator for many cellular processes including cell growth, apoptosis, metabolism, and protein synthesis. This role of this pathway changes in response to diverse environmental cues and allows the upstream proteins that respond directly to extracellular signals (such as nutrient availability, energy status, and physical stresses) to communicate with downstream effectors which, in turn, regulate various essential cellular processes. Results In this study, we have performed a transcriptomic analysis using a pathway-focused polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array to compare the expression of 84 target genes related to the mTOR signalling in two recombinant CHO cell lines with a 17.4-fold difference in specific monoclonal antibody productivity (q p ). Eight differentially expressed genes that exhibited more than a 1.5-fold change were identified. Pik3cd (encoding the Class 1A catalytic subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase [PI3K]) was the most differentially expressed gene having a 71.3-fold higher level of expression in the high producer cell line than in the low producer. The difference in the gene’s transcription levels was confirmed at the protein level by examining expression of p110δ. Conclusion Expression of p110δ correlated with specific productivity (q p ) across six different CHO cell lines, with a range of expression levels from 3 to 51 pg/cell/day, suggesting that p110δ may be a key factor in regulating productivity in recombinant cell lines. PMID:24533650

  19. Recombinant Outer Capsid Glycoprotein (VP7) of Rotavirus Expressed in Insect Cells Induces Neutralizing Antibodies in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Khodabandehloo, M; Shahrabadi, M Shamsi; Keyvani, H; Bambai, B; Sadigh, ZA

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rotaviruses cause diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. Rotavirus outer capsid protein, VP7 is major neutralizing antigen that is important component of subunit vaccine to prevent rotavirus infection. Many efforts have been done to produce recombinant VP7 that maintain native characteristics. We used baculovirus expression system to produce rotavirus VP7 protein and to study its immunogenicity. Methods: Simian rotavirus SA11 full-length VP7 ORF was cloned into a cloning plasmid and then the cloned gene was inserted into the linear DNA of baculovirus Autographa californica Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus (AcNPV) downstream of the polyhedrin promoter by in vitro recombination reactions. The expressed VP7 in the insect cells was recognized by rabbit hyperimmune serum raised against SA11 rotavirus by Immunofluorescence and western blotting assays. Rabbits were immunized subcutaneously by cell extracts expressing VP7 protein. Results: Reactivity with anti-rotavirus antibody suggested that expressed VP7 protein had native antigenic determinants. Injection of recombinant VP7 in rabbits elicited the production of serum antibodies, which were able to recognize VP7 protein from SA11 rotavirus by Western blotting test and neutralized SA11 rotavirus in cell culture. Conclusion: Recombinant outer capsid glycoprotein (VP7) of rotavirus expressed in insect cells induces neutralizing antibodies in rabbits and may be a candidate of rotavirus vaccine. PMID:23113180

  20. Directed Selection of Recombinant Human Monoclonal Antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoproteins from Phage Display Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Williamson, R. Anthony; de Logu, Alessandro; Bloom, Floyd E.; Burton, Dennis R.

    1995-07-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies have considerable potential in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral disease. However, only a few such antibodies suitable for clinical use have been produced to date. We have previously shown that large panels of human recombinant monoclonal antibodies against a plethora of infectious agents, including herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, can be established from phage display libraries. Here we demonstrate that facile cloning of recombinant Fab fragments against specific viral proteins in their native conformation can be accomplished by panning phage display libraries against viral glycoproteins "captured" from infected cell extracts by specific monoclonal antibodies immobilized on ELISA plates. We have tested this strategy by isolating six neutralizing recombinant antibodies specific for herpes simplex glycoprotein gD or gB, some of which are against conformationally sensitive epitopes. By using defined monoclonal antibodies for the antigen-capture step, this method can be used for the isolation of antibodies to specific regions and epitopes within the target viral protein. For instance, monoclonal antibodies to a nonneutralizing epitope can be used in the capture step to clone antibodies to neutralizing epitopes, or antibodies to a neutralizing epitope can be used to clone antibodies to a different neutralizing epitope. Furthermore, by using capturing antibodies to more immunodominant epitopes, one can direct the cloning to less immunogenic ones. This method should be of value in generating antibodies to be used both in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral infections and in the characterization of the mechanisms of antibody protective actions at the molecular level.

  1. Construction of Recombinant Mouse IgG1 Antibody Directed Against Varicella Zoster Virus Immediate Early Protein 63

    PubMed Central

    MUELLER, NIKLAUS H.; GRAF, LAURIE L.; SHEARER, ANDREW J.; OWENS, GREGORY P.; GILDEN, DONALD H.; COHRS, RANDALL J.

    2010-01-01

    Five varicella zoster virus (VZV) genes are known to be transcribed in latently infected human ganglia. Transcripts from VZV gene 63, which encodes an immediate early (IE) protein, are the most prevalent and abundant. To obtain a reagent that might facilitate studies of the role of the IE63 protein in latency and reactivation, we selected an IE63-specific Fab fragment from a phage library and used it to prepare a recombinant mouse IgG1 antibody that detects IE63 and functions in Western blot, immunoprecipitation, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and immunofluorescence assays. PMID:18294070

  2. Recombinant nucleocapsid protein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibody to turkey coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Mohamed; Loa, Chien Chang; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2015-06-01

    Nucleocapsid (N) protein gene of turkey coronavirus (TCoV) was expressed in a prokaryotic system and used to develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of antibody to TCoV. Anti-TCoV hyperimmune turkey serum and normal turkey serum were used as positive or negative controls for optimization of the ELISA. Goat anti-turkey IgG (H+L) conjugated with horseradish peroxidase was used as detector antibody. Three hundred and twenty two turkey sera from the field were used to evaluate the performance of ELISA and determine the cut-off point of ELISA. The established ELISA was also examined with serum samples obtained from turkeys experimentally infected with TCoV. Those serum samples were collected at various time intervals from 1 to 63 days post-infection. The optimum conditions for differentiation between anti-TCoV hyperimmune serum and normal turkey serum were recombinant TCoV N protein concentration at 20 μg/ml, serum dilution at 1:800, and conjugate dilution at 1:10,000. Of the 322 sera from the field, 101 were positive for TCoV by immunofluorescent antibody assay (IFA). The sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA relative to IFA test were 86.0% and 96.8%, respectively, using the optimum cut-off point of 0.2 as determined by logistic regression method. Reactivity of anti-rotavirus, anti-reovirus, anti-adenovirus, or anti-enterovirus antibodies with the recombinant N protein coated on the ELISA plates was not detected. These results indicated that the established antibody-capture ELISA in conjunction with recombinant TCoV N protein as the coating protein can be utilized for detection of antibodies to TCoV in turkey flocks. PMID:25745958

  3. Human recombinant Puumala virus antibodies: cross-reaction with other hantaviruses and use in diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Salonen, E M; Parren, P W; Graus, Y F; Lundkvist, A; Fisicaro, P; Vapalahti, O; Kallio-Kokko, H; Vaheri, A; Burton, D R

    1998-04-01

    A panel of seven human monoclonal Fabs against Puumala virus (PUU) nucleocapsid protein (N) was obtained by panning an antibody phage-display library prepared from the spleen of a PUU-immune individual. Three antibodies reacted in immunoblotting and cross-reacted strongly with Tula and Sin Nombre virus recombinant N proteins. These antibodies mapped to the amino terminus of the N protein. One PUU glycoprotein 2 (G2)-specific Fab obtained against a novel epitope (G2c) cross-reacted with Khabarovsk virus but not with the other hantavirus serotypes. An N protein-specific Fab was successfully used as capture antibody to detect PUU-specific serum IgG and IgM antibodies in an enzyme immunoassay. The result demonstrates the usefulness of recombinant human Fabs as potential diagnostic tools. PMID:9568958

  4. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants.

    PubMed

    Hehle, Verena K; Paul, Matthew J; Roberts, Victoria A; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Ma, Julian K-C

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the degradation pattern of a murine IgG1κ monoclonal antibody expressed in and extracted from transformedNicotiana tabacum Gel electrophoresis of leaf extracts revealed a consistent pattern of recombinant immunoglobulin bands, including intact and full-length antibody, as well as smaller antibody fragments. N-terminal sequencing revealed these smaller fragments to be proteolytic cleavage products and identified a limited number of protease-sensitive sites in the antibody light and heavy chain sequences. No strictly conserved target sequence was evident, although the peptide bonds that were susceptible to proteolysis were predominantly and consistently located within or near to the interdomain or solvent-exposed regions in the antibody structure. Amino acids surrounding identified cleavage sites were mutated in an attempt to increase resistance. Different Guy's 13 antibody heavy and light chain mutant combinations were expressed transiently inN. tabacumand demonstrated intensity shifts in the fragmentation pattern, resulting in alterations to the full-length antibody-to-fragment ratio. The work strengthens the understanding of proteolytic cleavage of antibodies expressed in plants and presents a novel approach to stabilize full-length antibody by site-directed mutagenesis.-Hehle, V. K., Paul, M. J., Roberts, V. A., van Dolleweerd, C. J., Ma, J. K.-C. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. PMID:26712217

  5. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants

    PubMed Central

    Hehle, Verena K.; Paul, Matthew J.; Roberts, Victoria A.; van Dolleweerd, Craig J.; Ma, Julian K.-C.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the degradation pattern of a murine IgG1κ monoclonal antibody expressed in and extracted from transformed Nicotiana tabacum. Gel electrophoresis of leaf extracts revealed a consistent pattern of recombinant immunoglobulin bands, including intact and full-length antibody, as well as smaller antibody fragments. N-terminal sequencing revealed these smaller fragments to be proteolytic cleavage products and identified a limited number of protease-sensitive sites in the antibody light and heavy chain sequences. No strictly conserved target sequence was evident, although the peptide bonds that were susceptible to proteolysis were predominantly and consistently located within or near to the interdomain or solvent-exposed regions in the antibody structure. Amino acids surrounding identified cleavage sites were mutated in an attempt to increase resistance. Different Guy’s 13 antibody heavy and light chain mutant combinations were expressed transiently in N. tabacum and demonstrated intensity shifts in the fragmentation pattern, resulting in alterations to the full-length antibody-to-fragment ratio. The work strengthens the understanding of proteolytic cleavage of antibodies expressed in plants and presents a novel approach to stabilize full-length antibody by site-directed mutagenesis.—Hehle, V. K., Paul, M. J., Roberts, V. A., van Dolleweerd, C. J., Ma, J. K.-C. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. PMID:26712217

  6. Functional divergence of gene duplicates through ectopic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Christiaens, Joaquin F; Van Mulders, Sebastiaan E; Duitama, Jorge; Brown, Chris A; Ghequire, Maarten G; De Meester, Luc; Michiels, Jan; Wenseleers, Tom; Voordeckers, Karin; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    Gene duplication stimulates evolutionary innovation as the resulting paralogs acquire mutations that lead to sub- or neofunctionalization. A comprehensive in silico analysis of paralogs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals that duplicates of cell-surface and subtelomeric genes also undergo ectopic recombination, which leads to new chimaeric alleles. Mimicking such intergenic recombination events in the FLO (flocculation) family of cell-surface genes shows that chimaeric FLO alleles confer different adhesion phenotypes than the parental genes. Our results indicate that intergenic recombination between paralogs can generate a large set of new alleles, thereby providing the raw material for evolutionary adaptation and innovation. PMID:23070367

  7. Nucleocapsid protein N of Lelystad virus: expression by recombinant baculovirus, immunological properties, and suitability for detection of serum antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Meulenberg, J J; Bende, R J; Pol, J M; Wensvoort, G; Moormann, R J

    1995-01-01

    The ORF7 gene, encoding the nucleocapsid protein N of Lelystad virus (LV), was inserted downstream of the P10 promoter into Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (baculovirus). The resulting recombinant baculovirus, designated bac-ORF7, expressed a 15-kDa protein in insect cells. This protein was similar in size to the N protein expressed by LV in CL2621 cells when it was analyzed on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. The N protein expressed by bac-ORF7 was immunoprecipitated with anti-ORF7 was immunoprecipitated with anti-ORF7 peptide serum, porcine convalescent-phase anti-LV serum, and N protein-specific monoclonal antibodies, indicating that this N protein had retained its native antigenic structure. The recombinant N protein was immunogenic in pigs, and the porcine antibodies raised against this protein recognized LV in an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay. However, pigs vaccinated twice with approximately 20 micrograms of N protein were not protected against a challenge with 10(5) 50% tissue culture infective doses of LV. Experimental and field sera directed against various European and North American isolates reacted with the N protein expressed by bac-ORF7 in a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Therefore, the recombinant N protein may be useful for developing diagnostic assays for the detection of serum antibodies directed against different isolates of LV. PMID:8574824

  8. Target-selective joint polymerase chain reaction: A robust and rapid method for high-throughput production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During the development of a therapeutic antibody, large numbers of monoclonal antibodies are required to screen for those that are best suited for the desired activity. Although the single cell-based immunoglobulin variable gene cloning technique is a powerful tool, the current methods remain an obstacle to the rapid production of large numbers of recombinant antibodies. Results We have developed a novel overlap extension polymerase chain reaction, the target-selective joint polymerase chain reaction (TS-jPCR), and applied it to the generation of linear immunoglobulin gene expression constructs. TS-jPCR is conducted using a PCR-amplified immunoglobulin variable gene and an immunoglobulin gene-selective cassette (Ig-cassette) that contains all essential elements for antibody expression and overlapping areas of immunoglobulin gene-specific homology. The TS-jPCR technique is simple and specific; the 3'-random nucleotide-tailed immunoglobulin variable gene fragment and the Ig-cassette are assembled into a linear immunoglobulin expression construct, even in the presence of nonspecifically amplified DNA. We also developed a robotic magnetic beads handling instrument for single cell-based cDNA synthesis to amplify immunoglobulin variable genes by rapid amplification of 5' cDNA ends PCR. Using these methods, we were able to produce recombinant monoclonal antibodies from large numbers of single plasma cells within four days. Conclusion Our system reduces the burden of antibody discovery and engineering by rapidly producing large numbers of recombinant monoclonal antibodies in a short period of time. PMID:21774833

  9. Biotechnological applications of recombinant single-domain antibody fragments

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Single-domain antibody fragments possess structural features, such as a small dimension, an elevated stability, and the singularity of recognizing epitopes non-accessible for conventional antibodies that make them interesting for several research and biotechnological applications. Results The discovery of the single-domain antibody's potentials has stimulated their use in an increasing variety of fields. The rapid accumulation of articles describing new applications and further developments of established approaches has made it, therefore, necessary to update the previous reviews with a new and more complete summary of the topic. Conclusions Beside the necessary task of updating, this work analyses in detail some applicative aspects of the single-domain antibodies that have been overseen in the past, such as their efficacy in affinity chromatography, as co-crystallization chaperones, protein aggregation controllers, enzyme activity tuners, and the specificities of the unconventional single-domain fragments. PMID:21658216

  10. Utilisation of antibody microarrays for the selection of specific and informative antibodies from recombinant library binders of unknown quality.

    PubMed

    Kibat, Janek; Schirrmann, Thomas; Knape, Matthias J; Helmsing, Saskia; Meier, Doris; Hust, Michael; Schröder, Christoph; Bertinetti, Daniela; Winter, Gerhard; Pardes, Khalid; Funk, Mia; Vala, Andrea; Giese, Nathalia; Herberg, Friedrich W; Dübel, Stefan; Hoheisel, Jörg D

    2016-09-25

    Many diagnostic and therapeutic concepts require antibodies of high specificity. Recombinant binder libraries and related selection approaches allow the efficient isolation of antibodies against almost every target of interest. Nevertheless, it cannot be guaranteed that selected antibodies perform well and interact specifically enough with analytes unless an elaborate characterisation is performed. Here, we present an approach to shorten this process by combining the selection of suitable antibodies with the identification of informative target molecules by means of antibody microarrays, thereby reducing the effort of antibody characterisation by concentrating on relevant molecules. In a pilot scheme, a library of 456 single-chain variable fragment (scFv) binders to 134 antigens was used. They were arranged in a microarray format and incubated with the protein content of clinical tissue samples isolated from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and healthy pancreas, as well as recurrent and non-recurrent bladder tumours. We observed significant variation in the expression of the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase (CHFR) as well as the glutamate receptor interacting protein 2 (GRIP2), for example, always with more than one of the scFvs binding to these targets. Only the relevant antibodies were then characterised further on antigen microarrays and by surface plasmon resonance experiments so as to select the most specific and highest affinity antibodies. These binders were in turn used to confirm a microarray result by immunohistochemistry analysis. PMID:26709003

  11. Generation of Recombinant Porcine Parvovirus Virus-Like Particles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Development of Virus-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Tamošiūnas, Paulius Lukas; Petraitytė-Burneikienė, Rasa; Lasickienė, Rita; Sereika, Vilimas; Lelešius, Raimundas; Žvirblienė, Aurelija; Sasnauskas, Kęstutis

    2014-01-01

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV) is a widespread infectious virus that causes serious reproductive diseases of swine and death of piglets. The gene coding for the major capsid protein VP2 of PPV was amplified using viral nucleic acid extract from swine serum and inserted into yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expression plasmid. Recombinant PPV VP2 protein was efficiently expressed in yeast and purified using density gradient centrifugation. Electron microscopy analysis of purified PPV VP2 protein revealed the self-assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs). Nine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the recombinant PPV VP2 protein were generated. The specificity of the newly generated MAbs was proven by immunofluorescence analysis of PPV-infected cells. Indirect IgG ELISA based on the recombinant VLPs for detection of PPV-specific antibodies in swine sera was developed and evaluated. The sensitivity and specificity of the new assay were found to be 93.4% and 97.4%, respectively. In conclusion, yeast S. cerevisiae represents a promising expression system for generating recombinant PPV VP2 protein VLPs of diagnostic relevance. PMID:25045718

  12. Generation of recombinant porcine parvovirus virus-like particles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and development of virus-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tamošiūnas, Paulius Lukas; Petraitytė-Burneikienė, Rasa; Lasickienė, Rita; Akatov, Artiomas; Kundrotas, Gabrielis; Sereika, Vilimas; Lelešius, Raimundas; Žvirblienė, Aurelija; Sasnauskas, Kęstutis

    2014-01-01

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV) is a widespread infectious virus that causes serious reproductive diseases of swine and death of piglets. The gene coding for the major capsid protein VP2 of PPV was amplified using viral nucleic acid extract from swine serum and inserted into yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expression plasmid. Recombinant PPV VP2 protein was efficiently expressed in yeast and purified using density gradient centrifugation. Electron microscopy analysis of purified PPV VP2 protein revealed the self-assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs). Nine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the recombinant PPV VP2 protein were generated. The specificity of the newly generated MAbs was proven by immunofluorescence analysis of PPV-infected cells. Indirect IgG ELISA based on the recombinant VLPs for detection of PPV-specific antibodies in swine sera was developed and evaluated. The sensitivity and specificity of the new assay were found to be 93.4% and 97.4%, respectively. In conclusion, yeast S. cerevisiae represents a promising expression system for generating recombinant PPV VP2 protein VLPs of diagnostic relevance. PMID:25045718

  13. Recombinant Rp1 genes confer necrotic or nonspecific resistance phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shavannor M; Steinau, Martin; Trick, Harold N; Hulbert, Scot H

    2010-06-01

    Genes at the Rp1 rust resistance locus of maize confer race-specific resistance to the common rust fungus Puccinia sorghi. Three variant genes with nonspecific effects (HRp1 -Kr1N, -D*21 and -MD*19) were found to be generated by intragenic crossing over within the LRR region. The LRR region of most NBS-LRR encoding genes is quite variable and codes for one of the regions in resistance gene proteins that controls specificity. Sequence comparisons demonstrated that the Rp1-Kr1N recombinant gene was identical to the N-terminus of the rp1-kp2 gene and C-terminus of another gene from its HRp1-K grandparent. The Rp1-D*21 recombinant gene consists of the N-terminus of the rp1-dp2 gene and C-terminus of the Rp1-D gene from the parental haplotype. Similarly, a recombinant gene from the Rp1-MD*19 haplotype has the N-terminus of an rp1 gene from the HRp1-M parent and C-terminus of the rp1-D19 gene from the HRp1-D parent. The recombinant Rp1 -Kr1N, -D*21 and -MD*19 genes activated defense responses in the absence of their AVR proteins triggering HR (hypersensitive response) in the absence of the pathogen. The results indicate that the frequent intragenic recombination events that occur in the Rp1 gene cluster not only recombine the genes into novel haplotypes, but also create genes with nonspecific effects. Some of these may contribute to nonspecific quantitative resistance but others have severe consequences for the fitness of the plant. PMID:20443026

  14. Recombinant human antibodies: linkage of an Fab fragment from a combinatorial library to an Fc fragment for expression in mammalian cell culture.

    PubMed

    Bender, E; Woof, J M; Atkin, J D; Barker, M D; Bebbington, C R; Burton, D R

    1993-04-01

    The combinatorial phage library approach to immunoglobulin repertoire cloning recently made it possible to isolate gene fragments encoding human immunoglobulin G1 Fabs binding with high affinity to specific antigens. Here we describe the construction of genes encoding whole human anti-tetanus toxoid antibodies based on one of these gene fragments and the efficient expression of these constructs by co-transfection of separate heavy and light chain vectors into a Chinese hamster ovary cell line constitutively expressing a viral transactivator protein. This system will be generally useful for the rapid analysis of recombinant antibodies derived from combinatorial libraries. PMID:8518367

  15. Phage Display on the Base of Filamentous Bacteriophages: Application for Recombinant Antibodies Selection

    PubMed Central

    Morozova, V.V.

    2009-01-01

    The display of peptides and proteins on the surface of filamentous bacteriophage is a powerful methodology for selection of peptides and protein domains, including antibodies. An advantage of this methodology is the direct physical link between the phenotype and the genotype, as an analyzed polypeptide and its encoding DNA fragment exist in one phage particle. Development of phage display antibody libraries provides repertoires of phage particles exposing antibody fragments of great diversity. The biopanning procedure facilitates selection of antibodies with high affinity and specificity for almost any target. This review is an introduction to phage display methodology. It presents recombinant antibodies display in more details:, construction of phage libraries of antibody fragments and different strategies for the biopanning procedure. PMID:22649612

  16. A tool kit for rapid cloning and expression of recombinant antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Dodev, Tihomir S.; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Gilbert, Amy E.; Josephs, Debra H.; Bowen, Holly; James, Louisa K.; Bax, Heather J.; Beavil, Rebecca; Pang, Marie O.; Gould, Hannah J.; Karagiannis, Sophia N.; Beavil, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last four decades, molecular cloning has evolved tremendously. Efficient products allowing assembly of multiple DNA fragments have become available. However, cost-effective tools for engineering antibodies of different specificities, isotypes and species are still needed for many research and clinical applications in academia. Here, we report a method for one-step assembly of antibody heavy- and light-chain DNAs into a single mammalian expression vector, starting from DNAs encoding the desired variable and constant regions, which allows antibodies of different isotypes and specificity to be rapidly generated. As a proof of principle we have cloned, expressed and characterized functional recombinant tumor-associated antigen-specific chimeric IgE/κ and IgG1/κ, as well as recombinant grass pollen allergen Phl p 7 specific fully human IgE/λ and IgG4/λ antibodies. This method utilizing the antibody expression vectors, available at Addgene, has many applications, including the potential to support simultaneous processing of antibody panels, to facilitate mechanistic studies of antigen-antibody interactions and to conduct early evaluations of antibody functions. PMID:25073855

  17. Role of recombination activating genes in the generation of antigen receptor diversity and beyond.

    PubMed

    Nishana, Mayilaadumveettil; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2012-12-01

    V(D)J recombination is the process by which antibody and T-cell receptor diversity is attained. During this process, antigen receptor gene segments are cleaved and rejoined by non-homologous DNA end joining for the generation of combinatorial diversity. The major players of the initial process of cleavage are the proteins known as RAG1 (recombination activating gene 1) and RAG2. In this review, we discuss the physiological function of RAGs as a sequence-specific nuclease and its pathological role as a structure-specific nuclease. The first part of the review discusses the basic mechanism of V(D)J recombination, and the last part focuses on how the RAG complex functions as a sequence-specific and structure-specific nuclease. It also deals with the off-target cleavage of RAGs and its implications in genomic instability. PMID:23039142

  18. A High Through-put Platform for Recombinant Antibodies to Folded Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Hornsby, Michael; Paduch, Marcin; Miersch, Shane; Sääf, Annika; Matsuguchi, Tet; Lee, Brian; Wypisniak, Karolina; Doak, Allison; King, Daniel; Usatyuk, Svitlana; Perry, Kimberly; Lu, Vince; Thomas, William; Luke, Judy; Goodman, Jay; Hoey, Robert J.; Lai, Darson; Griffin, Carly; Li, Zhijian; Vizeacoumar, Franco J.; Dong, Debbie; Campbell, Elliot; Anderson, Stephen; Zhong, Nan; Gräslund, Susanne; Koide, Shohei; Moffat, Jason; Sidhu, Sachdev; Kossiakoff, Anthony; Wells, James

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are key reagents in biology and medicine, but commercial sources are rarely recombinant and thus do not provide a permanent and renewable resource. Here, we describe an industrialized platform to generate antigens and validated recombinant antibodies for 346 transcription factors (TFs) and 211 epigenetic antigens. We describe an optimized automated phage display and antigen expression pipeline that in aggregate produced about 3000 sequenced Fragment antigen-binding domain that had high affinity (typically EC50<20 nm), high stability (Tm∼80 °C), good expression in E. coli (∼5 mg/L), and ability to bind antigen in complex cell lysates. We evaluated a subset of Fabs generated to homologous SCAN domains for binding specificities. These Fragment antigen-binding domains were monospecific to their target SCAN antigen except in rare cases where they cross-reacted with a few highly related antigens. Remarkably, immunofluorescence experiments in six cell lines for 270 of the TF antigens, each having multiple antibodies, show that ∼70% stain predominantly in the cytosol and ∼20% stain in the nucleus which reinforces the dominant role that translocation plays in TF biology. These cloned antibody reagents are being made available to the academic community through our web site recombinant-antibodies.org to allow a more system-wide analysis of TF and chromatin biology. We believe these platforms, infrastructure, and automated approaches will facilitate the next generation of renewable antibody reagents to the human proteome in the coming decade. PMID:26290498

  19. A Recombinant Secondary Antibody Mimic as a Target-specific Signal Amplifier and an Antibody Immobilizer in Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Min, Junseon; Song, Eun Kyung; Kim, Hansol; Kim, Kyoung Taek; Park, Tae Joo; Kang, Sebyung

    2016-01-01

    We construct a novel recombinant secondary antibody mimic, GST-ABD, which can bind to the Fc regions of target-bound primary antibodies and acquire multiple HRPs simultaneously. We produce it in tenth of mg quantities with a bacterial overexpression system and simple purification procedures, significantly reducing the manufacturing cost and time without the use of animals. GST-ABD is effectively conjugated with 3 HRPs per molecule on an average and selectively bind to the Fc region of primary antibodies derived from three different species (mouse, rabbit, and rat). HRP-conjugated GST-ABD (HRP-GST-ABD) is successfully used as an alternative to secondary antibodies to amplify target-specific signals in both ELISA and immunohistochemistry regardless of the target molecules and origin of primary antibodies used. GST-ABD also successfully serves as an anchoring adaptor on the surface of GSH-coated plates for immobilizing antigen-capturing antibodies in an orientation-controlled manner for sandwich-type indirect ELISA through simple molecular recognition without any complicated chemical modification. PMID:27063487

  20. A Recombinant Secondary Antibody Mimic as a Target-specific Signal Amplifier and an Antibody Immobilizer in Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Min, Junseon; Song, Eun Kyung; Kim, Hansol; Kim, Kyoung Taek; Park, Tae Joo; Kang, Sebyung

    2016-01-01

    We construct a novel recombinant secondary antibody mimic, GST-ABD, which can bind to the Fc regions of target-bound primary antibodies and acquire multiple HRPs simultaneously. We produce it in tenth of mg quantities with a bacterial overexpression system and simple purification procedures, significantly reducing the manufacturing cost and time without the use of animals. GST-ABD is effectively conjugated with 3 HRPs per molecule on an average and selectively bind to the Fc region of primary antibodies derived from three different species (mouse, rabbit, and rat). HRP-conjugated GST-ABD (HRP-GST-ABD) is successfully used as an alternative to secondary antibodies to amplify target-specific signals in both ELISA and immunohistochemistry regardless of the target molecules and origin of primary antibodies used. GST-ABD also successfully serves as an anchoring adaptor on the surface of GSH-coated plates for immobilizing antigen-capturing antibodies in an orientation-controlled manner for sandwich-type indirect ELISA through simple molecular recognition without any complicated chemical modification. PMID:27063487

  1. A novel recombinant pseudorabies virus expressing parvovirus VP2 gene: Immunogenicity and protective efficacy in swine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Porcine parvovirus (PPV) VP2 gene has been successfully expressed in many expression systems resulting in self-assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs) with similar morphology to the native capsid. Here, a pseudorabies virus (PRV) system was adopted to express the PPV VP2 gene. Methods A recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 was obtained by homologous recombination between the vector PRV viral DNA and a transfer plasmid. Then recombinant virus was purified with plaque purification, and its identity confirmed by PCR amplification, Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) analyses. Electronic microscopy of PRV SA215/VP2 confirmed self-assembly of both pseudorabies virus and VLPs from VP2 protein. Results Immunization of piglets with recombinant virus elicited PRV-specific and PPV-specific humoral immune responses and provided complete protection against a lethal dose of PRV challenges. Gilts immunized with recombinant viruses induced PPV-specific antibodies, and significantly reduced the mortality rate of (1 of 28) following virulent PPV challenge compared with the control (7 of 31). Furthermore, PPV virus DNA was not detected in the fetuses of recombinant virus immunized gilts. Conclusions In this study, a recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 virus expressing PPV VP2 protein was constructed using PRV SA215 vector. The safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of the recombinant virus were demonstrated in piglets and primiparous gilts. This recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 represents a suitable candidate for the development of a bivalent vaccine against both PRV and PPV infection. PMID:21679423

  2. Possible therapeutic potential of a recombinant group 2 grass pollen allergen-specific antibody fragment.

    PubMed

    Gadermaier, E; Flicker, S; Blatt, K; Valent, P; Valenta, R

    2014-02-01

    The induction of blocking IgG antibodies that compete with IgE for allergen binding is one important mechanism of allergen-specific immunotherapy. The application of blocking antibodies may be an alternative treatment strategy. A synthetic gene coding for a single-chain fragment (ScFv) specific for the major timothy grass pollen allergen Phl p 2 was inserted into plasmid pCANTAB 5 E, and the recombinant ScFv was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. The ScFv was tested for allergen binding by ELISA, and its association and dissociation were measured by surface plasmon resonance (Biacore) technology. The ability of the ScFv to inhibit allergic patients' IgE binding to Phl p 2 and Phl p 2-induced basophil degranulation was studied by ELISA competition and basophil activation (CD203c) assays. We report the expression, purification, biochemical and immunological characterization of a monomeric single-chain fragment (ScFv) of human origin specific for the major timothy grass pollen allergen, Phl p 2. The Phl p 2-ScFv showed high affinity binding to the allergen and blocked the binding of allergic patients' polyclonal IgE to Phl p 2 up to 98%. Furthermore, it inhibited allergen-induced basophil activation. The Phl p 2-ScFv inhibited allergic patients' IgE binding to Phl p 2 as well as Phl p 2-induced basophil activation and might be useful for passive immunotherapy of grass pollen allergy. PMID:24251384

  3. A Replicating Adenovirus Capsid Display Recombinant Elicits Antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites in Aotus nancymaae Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Karen, Kasey A.; Deal, Cailin; Adams, Robert J.; Nielsen, Carolyn; Ward, Cameron; Espinosa, Diego A.; Xie, Jane; Zavala, Fidel

    2014-01-01

    Decades of success with live adenovirus vaccines suggest that replication-competent recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) could serve as effective vectors for immunization against other pathogens. To explore the potential of a live rAd vaccine against malaria, we prepared a viable adenovirus 5 (Ad5) recombinant that displays a B-cell epitope from the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium falciparum on the virion surface. The recombinant induced P. falciparum sporozoite-neutralizing antibodies in mice. Human adenoviruses do not replicate in mice. Therefore, to examine immunogenicity in a system in which, as in humans, the recombinant replicates, we constructed a similar recombinant in an adenovirus mutant that replicates in monkey cells and immunized four Aotus nancymaae monkeys. The recombinant replicated in the monkeys after intratracheal instillation, the first demonstration of replication of human adenoviruses in New World monkeys. Immunization elicited antibodies both to the Plasmodium epitope and the Ad5 vector. Antibodies from all four monkeys recognized CSP on intact parasites, and plasma from one monkey neutralized sporozoites in vitro and conferred partial protection against P. falciparum sporozoite infection after passive transfer to mice. Prior enteric inoculation of two animals with antigenically wild-type adenovirus primed a response to the subsequent intratracheal inoculation, suggesting a route to optimizing performance. A vaccine is not yet available against P. falciparum, which induces the deadliest form of malaria and kills approximately one million children each year. The live capsid display recombinant described here may constitute an early step in a critically needed novel approach to malaria immunization. PMID:25368113

  4. Development of a recombinant antibody to target peptides and proteins to sialoadhesin-expressing macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sialoadhesin (Sn)-expressing monocytes/macrophages have been associated with several diseases like inflammatory and autoimmune disorders as well as viral infections, and they also appear to play a role in the initiation of an adaptive immune response. This makes Sn-expressing cells not only attractive targets for cell-directed therapies, but also an appealing target for vaccination. Furthermore, since Sn was shown to be an endocytic receptor, the conjugation of effector molecules to an Sn-specific ligand should allow intracellular delivery of these conjugates. Previously, we developed functional Sn-specific immunoconjugates that were generated via chemical coupling. Although successful, the system requires significant optimization for each immunoconjugate to be made. To generate a more flexible and controlled system, we developed a recombinant antibody vector allowing the creation of genetic antibody fusion constructs. This paper reports on the characterization of the recombinant antibody and the evaluation of its use for Sn-directed targeting. Results The variable domains of the porcine Sn-specific monoclonal antibody 41D3 were sequenced and cloned in frame with a mouse IgG1 backbone. Transfection of HEK293T cells with the resulting plasmid led to the secretion of fully assembled IgG into the culture medium. This recombinant antibody rec41D3 was shown to specifically bind to porcine Sn with a comparable affinity as the native monoclonal antibody. In addition, rec41D3 also induced Sn endocytosis in primary macrophages and resided for prolonged times in early/late endosomes. To allow the generation of antibody fusion constructs, a multiple cloning site was introduced at the C-terminus of the heavy chain. Two fusion constructs were generated, one containing a V5 peptide tag and one containing an eGFP molecule. Both constructs were shown to be efficiently produced in HEK293T cells and easily purified using standard protein G chromatography. In addition

  5. Evaluation of Solid Supports for Slide- and Well-Based Recombinant Antibody Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Gerdtsson, Anna S; Dexlin-Mellby, Linda; Delfani, Payam; Berglund, Erica; Borrebaeck, Carl A K; Wingren, Christer

    2016-01-01

    Antibody microarrays have emerged as an important tool within proteomics, enabling multiplexed protein expression profiling in both health and disease. The design and performance of antibody microarrays and how they are processed are dependent on several factors, of which the interplay between the antibodies and the solid surfaces plays a central role. In this study, we have taken on the first comprehensive view and evaluated the overall impact of solid surfaces on the recombinant antibody microarray design. The results clearly demonstrated the importance of the surface-antibody interaction and showed the effect of the solid supports on the printing process, the array format of planar arrays (slide- and well-based), the assay performance (spot features, reproducibility, specificity and sensitivity) and assay processing (degree of automation). In the end, two high-end recombinant antibody microarray technology platforms were designed, based on slide-based (black polymer) and well-based (clear polymer) arrays, paving the way for future large-scale protein expression profiling efforts. PMID:27600082

  6. Evaluation of Solid Supports for Slide- and Well-Based Recombinant Antibody Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Gerdtsson, Anna S.; Dexlin-Mellby, Linda; Delfani, Payam; Berglund, Erica; Borrebaeck, Carl A. K.; Wingren, Christer

    2016-01-01

    Antibody microarrays have emerged as an important tool within proteomics, enabling multiplexed protein expression profiling in both health and disease. The design and performance of antibody microarrays and how they are processed are dependent on several factors, of which the interplay between the antibodies and the solid surfaces plays a central role. In this study, we have taken on the first comprehensive view and evaluated the overall impact of solid surfaces on the recombinant antibody microarray design. The results clearly demonstrated the importance of the surface-antibody interaction and showed the effect of the solid supports on the printing process, the array format of planar arrays (slide- and well-based), the assay performance (spot features, reproducibility, specificity and sensitivity) and assay processing (degree of automation). In the end, two high-end recombinant antibody microarray technology platforms were designed, based on slide-based (black polymer) and well-based (clear polymer) arrays, paving the way for future large-scale protein expression profiling efforts. PMID:27600082

  7. A recombinant varicella vaccine harboring a respiratory syncytial virus gene induces humoral immunity.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kouki; Matsuura, Masaaki; Ota, Megumi; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2015-11-01

    The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) Oka vaccine strain (vOka) is highly efficient and causes few adverse events; therefore, it is used worldwide. We previously constructed recombinant vOka (rvOka) harboring the mumps virus gene. Immunizing guinea pigs with rvOka induced the production of neutralizing antibodies against the mumps virus and VZV. Here, we constructed recombinant vOka viruses containing either the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) subgroup A fusion glycoprotein (RSV A-F) gene or RSV subgroup B fusion glycoprotein (RSV B-F) gene (rvOka-RSV A-F or rvOka-RSV B-F). Indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses confirmed the expression of each recombinant RSV protein in virus-infected cells. Immunizing guinea pigs with rvOka-RSV A-F or rvOka-RSV B-F led to the induction of antibodies against RSV proteins. These results suggest that the current varicella vaccine genome can be used to generate custom-made vaccine vectors to develop the next generation of live vaccines. PMID:26116253

  8. Development and application of recombinant antibody-based immunoassays to tetraconazole residue analysis in fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Plana, Emma; Moreno, Maria-José; Montoya, Ángel; Manclús, Juan J

    2014-01-15

    Tetraconazole is currently used as a fungicide in fruit and vegetables. The aim of this work was the development of immunochemical techniques based on recombinant antibodies for the screening of tetraconazole residues in fruit juices. Recombinant antibodies were produced from a hybridoma cell line secreting a monoclonal antibody specific for tetraconazole and from lymphocytes of mice hyperimmunised with tetraconazole haptens conjugated to bovine serum albumin. From these antibodies, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in the conjugate-coated format were developed, which were able to detect tetraconazole standards down to 1ng/mL. From recovery studies with spiked samples, these immunoassays determined tetraconazole in orange and apple juices with acceptable reproducibility (coefficients of variation below 25%) and recoveries (ranging from 78% to 145%) for a screening technique. The analytical performance of RAb-based immunoassays was fairly similar to that of the MAb-based immunoassays. Due to their simplicity and high sample throughput, the developed recombinant-based immunoassays can be valuable analytical tools for the screening of tetraconazole residues in fruit juices at regulatory levels. PMID:24054232

  9. [Recombinant antibodies for medical protection against bioterrorism agents: the example of anthrax].

    PubMed

    Thullier, Philippe; Pelat, Thibault; Paucod, Jean-Charles; Vidal, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are a highly successful class of therapeutic molecules, they are well adapted for use against bio-weapons (BW) as they act immediately, are often synergistic with other therapeutic molecules, have a long half-life and are well tolerated. Anthrax is regarded at high risk of being used as BW, and its pathogenic properties depend on toxins, which might be neutralized by antibodies. These toxins are made of three different types of sub-units (PA, LF, EF). Several anti-PA have been developed, including an original approach by our team. We have developed an anti-LF, as recommended by experts. Our anti-PA antibody, and to a lesser extend our anti-LF antibody, will be presented here. PMID:20950579

  10. Neutralizing antibodies respond to a bivalent dengue DNA vaccine or/and a recombinant bivalent antigen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Shan; Weng, Yu-Wei; Huang, Hai-Long; Zhang, Jian-Ming; Yan, Yan-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    There is currently no effective vaccine to prevent dengue infection, despite the existence of multiple studies on potential methods of immunization. The aim of the present study was to explore the effect of DNA and/or recombinant protein on levels of neutralizing antibodies. For this purpose, envelope domain IIIs of dengue serotypes 1 and 2 (DEN-1/2)were spliced by a linker (Gly‑Gly‑Ser‑Gly‑Ser)3 and cloned into the prokaryotic expression plasmid pET30a (+) and eukaryotic vector pcDNA3.1 (+). The chimeric bivalent protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, and one‑step purification by high‑performance liquid chromatography was conducted. Protein expression levels of the DNA plasmid were tested in BHK‑21 cells by indirect immunofluorescent assay. In order to explore a more effective immunization strategy and to develop neutralizing antibodies against the two serotypes, mice were inoculated with recombinant bivalent protein, the DNA vaccine, or the two given simultaneously. Presence of the specific antibodies was tested by ELISA and the presence of the neutralizing antibodies was determined by plaque reduction neutralization test. Results of the analysis indicated that the use of a combination of DNA and protein induced significantly higher titers of neutralizing antibodies against either DEN‑1 or DEN‑2 (1:64.0 and 1:76.1, respectively) compared with the DNA (1:24.7 and 1:26.9, DEN‑1 and DEN‑2, respectively) or the recombinant protein (1:34.9 and 1:45.3 in DEN‑1 and DEN‑2, respectively). The present study demonstrated that the combination of recombinant protein and DNA as an immunization strategy may be an effective method for the development of a vaccine to prevent dengue virus infection. PMID:25371092

  11. Construction and characterization of recombinant flaviviruses bearing insertions between E and NS1 genes

    PubMed Central

    Bonaldo, Myrna C; Mello, Samanta M; Trindade, Gisela F; Rangel, Aymara A; Duarte, Adriana S; Oliveira, Prisciliana J; Freire, Marcos S; Kubelka, Claire F; Galler, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    Background The yellow fever virus, a member of the genus Flavivirus, is an arthropod-borne pathogen causing severe disease in humans. The attenuated yellow fever 17D virus strain has been used for human vaccination for 70 years and has several characteristics that are desirable for the development of new, live attenuated vaccines. We described here a methodology to construct a viable, and immunogenic recombinant yellow fever 17D virus expressing a green fluorescent protein variant (EGFP). This approach took into account the presence of functional motifs and amino acid sequence conservation flanking the E and NS1 intergenic region to duplicate and fuse them to the exogenous gene and thereby allow the correct processing of the viral polyprotein precursor. Results YF 17D EGFP recombinant virus was grew in Vero cells and reached a peak titer of approximately 6.45 ± 0.4 log10 PFU/mL at 96 hours post-infection. Immunoprecipitation and confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated the expression of the EGFP, which was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and not secreted from infected cells. The association with the ER compartment did not interfere with YF assembly, since the recombinant virus was fully competent to replicate and exit the cell. This virus was genetically stable up to the tenth serial passage in Vero cells. The recombinant virus was capable to elicit a neutralizing antibody response to YF and antibodies to EGFP as evidenced by an ELISA test. The applicability of this cloning strategy to clone gene foreign sequences in other flavivirus genomes was demonstrated by the construction of a chimeric recombinant YF 17D/DEN4 virus. Conclusion This system is likely to be useful for a broader live attenuated YF 17D virus-based vaccine development for human diseases. Moreover, insertion of foreign genes into the flavivirus genome may also allow in vivo studies on flavivirus cell and tissue tropism as well as cellular processes related to flavivirus infection. PMID

  12. Intensive Pharmacological Immunosuppression Allows for Repetitive Liver Gene Transfer With Recombinant Adenovirus in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Fontanellas, Antonio; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Mauleón, Itsaso; Dubrot, Juan; Mancheño, Uxua; Collantes, María; Sampedro, Ana; Unzu, Carmen; Alfaro, Carlos; Palazón, Asis; Smerdou, Cristian; Benito, Alberto; Prieto, Jesús; Peñuelas, Iván; Melero, Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    Repeated administration of gene therapies is hampered by host immunity toward vectors and transgenes. Attempts to circumvent antivector immunity include pharmacological immunosuppression or alternating different vectors and vector serotypes with the same transgene. Our studies show that B-cell depletion with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody and concomitant T-cell inhibition with clinically available drugs permits repeated liver gene transfer to a limited number of nonhuman primates with recombinant adenovirus. Adenoviral vector–mediated transfer of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene was visualized in vivo with a semiquantitative transgene-specific positron emission tomography (PET) technique, liver immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot for the reporter transgene in needle biopsies. Neutralizing antibody and T cell–mediated responses toward the viral capsids were sequentially monitored and found to be repressed by the drug combinations tested. Repeated liver transfer of the HSV1-tk reporter gene with the same recombinant adenoviral vector was achieved in macaques undergoing a clinically feasible immunosuppressive treatment that ablated humoral and cellular immune responses. This strategy allows measurable gene retransfer to the liver as late as 15 months following the first adenoviral exposure in a macaque, which has undergone a total of four treatments with the same adenoviral vector. PMID:20087317

  13. Development of Recombinant Antigen Array for Simultaneous Detection of Viral Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Yu, Fengling; Huang, Haiyan; Han, Jinxiang

    2013-01-01

    Protein microarrays have been developed to study antibody reactivity against a large number of antigens, demonstrating extensive perspective for clinical application. We developed a viral antigen array by spotting four recombinant antigens and synthetic peptide, including glycoprotein G of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and 2, phosphoprotein 150 of cytomegalovirus (CMV), Rubella virus (RV) core plus glycoprotein E1 and E2 as well as a E1 peptide with the optimal concentrations on activated glass slides to simultaneously detect IgG and IgM against HSV1, HSV2, CMV and RV in clinical specimens of sera and cerebrospinal fluids (CSFs). The positive reference sera were initially used to measure the sensitivity and specificity of the array with the optimal conditions. Then clinical specimens of 144 sera and 93 CSFs were tested for IgG and IgM antibodies directed against HSV1, HSV2, CMV and RV by the antigen array. Specificity of the antigen array for viral antibodies detection was satisfying compared to commercial ELISA kits but sensitivity of the array varied relying on quality and antigenic epitopes of the spotting antigens. In short, the recombinant antigen array has potential to simultaneous detect multiple viral antibodies using minute amount (3 µl) of samples, which holds the particularly advantage to detect viral antibodies in clinical CSFs being suspicious of neonatal meningitis and encephalitis. PMID:24058498

  14. Probing the soybean Bowman-Birk inhibitor using recombinant antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Muzard, Julien; Fields, Conor; O'Mahony, James John; Lee, Gil U

    2012-06-20

    The nutritional and health benefits of soy protein have been extensively studied over recent decades. The Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI), derived from soybeans, is a double-headed inhibitor of chymotrypsin and trypsin with anticarcinogenic and anti-inflammatory properties, which have been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. However, the lack of analytical and purification methodologies complicates its potential for further functional and clinical investigations. This paper reports the construction of anti-BBI antibody fragments based on the principle of protein design. Recombinant antibody (scFv and diabody) molecules targeting soybean BBI were produced and characterized in vitro (K(D)~1.10(-9) M), and the antibody-binding site (epitope) was identified as part of the trypsin-specific reactive loop. Finally, an extremely fast purification strategy for BBI from soybean extracts, based on superparamagnetic particles coated with antibody fragments, was developed. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on the design and characterization of recombinant anti-BBI antibodies and their potential application in soybean processing. PMID:22642722

  15. Technical Advances of the Recombinant Antibody Microarray Technology Platform for Clinical Immunoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Delfani, Payam; Dexlin Mellby, Linda; Nordström, Malin; Holmér, Andreas; Ohlsson, Mattias; Borrebaeck, Carl A. K.; Wingren, Christer

    2016-01-01

    In the quest for deciphering disease-associated biomarkers, high-performing tools for multiplexed protein expression profiling of crude clinical samples will be crucial. Affinity proteomics, mainly represented by antibody-based microarrays, have during recent years been established as a proteomic tool providing unique opportunities for parallelized protein expression profiling. But despite the progress, several main technical features and assay procedures remains to be (fully) resolved. Among these issues, the handling of protein microarray data, i.e. the biostatistics parts, is one of the key features to solve. In this study, we have therefore further optimized, validated, and standardized our in-house designed recombinant antibody microarray technology platform. To this end, we addressed the main remaining technical issues (e.g. antibody quality, array production, sample labelling, and selected assay conditions) and most importantly key biostatistics subjects (e.g. array data pre-processing and biomarker panel condensation). This represents one of the first antibody array studies in which these key biostatistics subjects have been studied in detail. Here, we thus present the next generation of the recombinant antibody microarray technology platform designed for clinical immunoproteomics. PMID:27414037

  16. Plant Cell-Based Recombinant Antibody Manufacturing with a 200 L Orbitally Shaken Disposable Bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Raven, Nicole; Schillberg, Stefan; Rasche, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco BY-2 cells are an attractive platform for the manufacture of a variety of biopharmaceutical proteins, including antibodies. Here, we describe the scaled-up cultivation of human IgG-secreting BY-2 cells in a 200 L orbitally shaken disposable bioreactor, resulting in cell growth and recombinant protein yields that are proportionately comparable with those obtained from cultivations in 500 mL shake flasks. Furthermore, we present an efficient downstream process for antibody recovery from the viscous spent culture medium using expanded bed adsorption (EBA) chromatography. PMID:26614289

  17. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyuha; Reinhard, Carsten; Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A; Underwood, Charles J; Zhao, Xiaohui; Hardcastle, Thomas J; Yelina, Nataliya E; Griffin, Catherine; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Henderson, Ian R

    2016-07-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity. PMID:27415776

  18. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A.; Yelina, Nataliya E.; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Henderson, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity. PMID:27415776

  19. Human DNA repair and recombination genes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Jones, N.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several genes involved in mammalian DNA repair pathways were identified by complementation analysis and chromosomal mapping based on hybrid cells. Eight complementation groups of rodent mutants defective in the repair of uv radiation damage are now identified. At least seven of these genes are probably essential for repair and at least six of them control the incision step. The many genes required for repair of DNA cross-linking damage show overlap with those involved in the repair of uv damage, but some of these genes appear to be unique for cross-link repair. Two genes residing on human chromosome 19 were cloned from genomic transformants using a cosmid vector, and near full-length cDNA clones of each gene were isolated and sequenced. Gene ERCC2 efficiently corrects the defect in CHO UV5, a nucleotide excision repair mutant. Gene XRCC1 normalizes repair of strand breaks and the excessive sister chromatid exchange in CHO mutant EM9. ERCC2 shows a remarkable /approximately/52% overall homology at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels with the yeast RAD3 gene. Evidence based on mutation induction frequencies suggests that ERCC2, like RAD3, might also be an essential gene for viability. 100 refs., 4 tabs.

  20. A recombineering-based gene tagging system for Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Jose M; Stepanova, Anna N

    2015-01-01

    Many of the experimental approaches aimed at studying gene function heavily rely on the ability to make precise modifications in the gene's DNA sequence. Homologous recombination (HR)-based strategies provide a convenient way to create such types of modifications. HR-based DNA sequence manipulations can be enormously facilitated by expressing in E. coli a small set of bacteriophage proteins that make the exchange of DNA between a linear donor and the target DNA molecules extremely efficient. These in vivo recombineering techniques have been incorporated as essential components of the molecular toolbox in many model organisms. In this chapter, we describe the experimental procedures involved in recombineering-based tagging of an Arabidopsis gene contained in a plant transformation-ready bacterial artificial chromosome (TAC). PMID:25239749

  1. Production and characterization of egg yolk antibody (IgY) against recombinant VP8-S2 antigen.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, K; Nassiri, M R; Tahmoorespur, M; Haghparast, A; Zibaee, S

    2016-01-01

    Bovine Rotavirus and Bovine Coronavirus are the most important causes of diarrhea in newborn calves and in some other species such as pigs and sheep. VP8 subunit of rotavirus is the major determinant of the viral infectivity and neutralization. Spike glycoprotein of coronavirus is responsible for induction of neutralizing antibody response. Studies showed that immunoglobulin of egg yolk (IgY) from immunized hens has been identified to be a convenient source for specific antibodies for using in immunotherapy and immunodiagnostic to limit the infections. In this study, chimeric VP8-S2 gene was designed using by computational techniques. The chimeric VP8-S2 gene was cloned and sub-cloned into pGH and pET32a (+) vectors. Then, recombinant pET32a-VP8-S2 vector was transferred into E. coli BL21 CodonPlus (DE3). The expressed protein was purified by Ni-NTA chromatography column. Hens were immunized with the purified VP8-S2 protein three times. IgY was purified from egg yolks using polyethylene glycol precipitation method. Activity and specificity of anti-VP8-S2 IgY were detected by dot-blotting, Western-blotting and indirect ELISA. We obtained anti-VP8-S2 IgY by immunizing hens with the recombinant VP8-S2 protein. The anti-VP8-S2 IgY was showed to bind specifically to the chimeric VP8-S2 protein by dot-blotting, Western-blotting analyses and indirect ELISA. The result of this study indicated that such construction can be useful to investigate as candidates for development of detection methods for simultaneous diagnosis of both infections. Specific IgY against the recombinant VP8-S2 could be recommended as a candidate for passive immunization against bovine rotavirus and bovine coronavirus. PMID:27487500

  2. Generation of recombinant antibody fragments with toxin-neutralizing potential in loxoscelism.

    PubMed

    Karim-Silva, Sabrina; Moura, Juliana de; Noiray, Magali; Minozzo, Joao Carlos; Aubrey, Nicolas; Alvarenga, Larissa M; Billiald, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Loxosceles spider bites often lead to serious envenomings and no definite therapy has yet been established. In such a context, it is of interest to consider an antibody-based targeted therapy. We have previously prepared a murine monoclonal IgG (LiMab7) that binds to 32-35kDa components of Loxosceles intermedia venom and neutralizes the dermonecrotic activity of the venom. Here, we re-engineered LiMab7 into a recombinant diabody. The protein was produced in bacteria and then it was functionally characterized. It proved to be efficient at neutralizing sphingomyelinase and hemolytic activities of the crude venom despite the slightly altered binding kinetic constants and the limited stability of the dimeric configuration. This is the first report of a specific recombinant antibody for a next-generation of Loxosceles antivenoms. PMID:27288291

  3. A Network Approach to Analyzing Highly Recombinant Malaria Parasite Genes

    PubMed Central

    Larremore, Daniel B.; Clauset, Aaron; Buckee, Caroline O.

    2013-01-01

    The var genes of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum present a challenge to population geneticists due to their extreme diversity, which is generated by high rates of recombination. These genes encode a primary antigen protein called PfEMP1, which is expressed on the surface of infected red blood cells and elicits protective immune responses. Var gene sequences are characterized by pronounced mosaicism, precluding the use of traditional phylogenetic tools that require bifurcating tree-like evolutionary relationships. We present a new method that identifies highly variable regions (HVRs), and then maps each HVR to a complex network in which each sequence is a node and two nodes are linked if they share an exact match of significant length. Here, networks of var genes that recombine freely are expected to have a uniformly random structure, but constraints on recombination will produce network communities that we identify using a stochastic block model. We validate this method on synthetic data, showing that it correctly recovers populations of constrained recombination, before applying it to the Duffy Binding Like-α (DBLα) domain of var genes. We find nine HVRs whose network communities map in distinctive ways to known DBLα classifications and clinical phenotypes. We show that the recombinational constraints of some HVRs are correlated, while others are independent. These findings suggest that this micromodular structuring facilitates independent evolutionary trajectories of neighboring mosaic regions, allowing the parasite to retain protein function while generating enormous sequence diversity. Our approach therefore offers a rigorous method for analyzing evolutionary constraints in var genes, and is also flexible enough to be easily applied more generally to any highly recombinant sequences. PMID:24130474

  4. Detection and quantitation of low abundance oligosaccharides in recombinant monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Nowak, Christine; Gonzalez, Nidia; Miano, Dino; Liu, Hongcheng

    2015-03-01

    Oligosaccharides are critical for structural integrity, stability, and biological functions of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. It is relatively easy to characterize, quantify, and determine the impact of major glycoforms. While challenging to detect and quantify, certain low abundance oligosaccharides are highly relevant to the stability and functions of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. Methods were established in this study based on enzymatic digestion to consolidate peaks of the same type of oligosaccharides by removing heterogeneity and thus increase detectability of low abundance peaks. Endo H was used to collapse high mannose oligosaccharides to a single peak of GlcNAc for ease of detection and quantitation. β-Galactosidase and β-N-acetylhexosaminidase were used to convert complex oligosaccharides into two peaks containing either GlcNAc2Man3Fuc or GlcNAc2Man3, which simplified the chromatograms and data analysis. More importantly, low abundance hybrid oligosaccharides can only be detected and qualified after β-galactosidase and β-N-acetylhexosaminidase digestion. Detection and quantitation of low abundance oligosaccharides can also be achieved using a combination of all three enzymes. These methods can be applied to the development of recombinant monoclonal antibody therapeutics. PMID:25647617

  5. Hapten mediated display and pairing of recombinant antibodies accelerates assay assembly for biothreat countermeasures.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Laura J; Hayhurst, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    A bottle-neck in recombinant antibody sandwich immunoassay development is pairing, demanding protein purification and modification to distinguish captor from tracer. We developed a simple pairing scheme using microliter amounts of E. coli osmotic shockates bearing site-specific biotinylated antibodies and demonstrated proof of principle with a single domain antibody (sdAb) that is both captor and tracer for polyvalent Marburgvirus nucleoprotein. The system could also host pairs of different sdAb specific for the 7 botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes, enabling recognition of the cognate serotype. Inducible supE co-expression enabled sdAb populations to be propagated as either phage for more panning from repertoires or expressed as soluble sdAb for screening within a single host strain. When combined with streptavidin-g3p fusions, a novel transdisplay system was formulated to retrofit a semi-synthetic sdAb library which was mined for an anti-Ebolavirus sdAb which was immediately immunoassay ready, thereby speeding up the recombinant antibody discovery and utilization processes. PMID:23150778

  6. Hapten Mediated Display and Pairing of Recombinant Antibodies Accelerates Assay Assembly for Biothreat Countermeasures

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Laura J.; Hayhurst, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    A bottle-neck in recombinant antibody sandwich immunoassay development is pairing, demanding protein purification and modification to distinguish captor from tracer. We developed a simple pairing scheme using microliter amounts of E. coli osmotic shockates bearing site-specific biotinylated antibodies and demonstrated proof of principle with a single domain antibody (sdAb) that is both captor and tracer for polyvalent Marburgvirus nucleoprotein. The system could also host pairs of different sdAb specific for the 7 botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes, enabling recognition of the cognate serotype. Inducible supE co-expression enabled sdAb populations to be propagated as either phage for more panning from repertoires or expressed as soluble sdAb for screening within a single host strain. When combined with streptavidin-g3p fusions, a novel transdisplay system was formulated to retrofit a semi-synthetic sdAb library which was mined for an anti-Ebolavirus sdAb which was immediately immunoassay ready, thereby speeding up the recombinant antibody discovery and utilization processes. PMID:23150778

  7. Effect of recombinant canine distemper vaccine on antibody titers in previously vaccinated dogs.

    PubMed

    Larson, L J; Hageny, T L; Haase, C J; Schultz, R D

    2006-01-01

    Two canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine types are currently commercially available: modified-live virus (MLV) vaccines and a canarypox recombinant CDV (rCDV) vaccine (Recombitek, Merial). This study compared the ability of the rCDV vaccine and MLV vaccines to significantly enhance (boost) the antibody response of previously immunized adult and juvenile dogs. A significant (fourfold or greater) increase in titer occurred in significantly more dogs revaccinated with Recombitek C-4 or Recombitek C-6 than with the MLV-CDV vaccines. This study demonstrates that Recombitek, the only vaccine for dogs containing rCDV, is more likely to significantly boost the CDV antibody response in previously vaccinated dogs than are the MLV-CDV vaccines. Because rCDV vaccine can boost the antibody titer of dogs previously vaccinated with an MLV vaccine, it can and should be used when core vaccines are readministered. PMID:16871492

  8. Multi-isotype antibody responses against the multimeric Salmonella Typhi recombinant hemolysin E antigen.

    PubMed

    Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Ignatius, Joshua; Anthony, Amy Amilda; Aziah, Ismail; Ismail, Asma; Lim, Theam Soon

    2015-01-01

    The detection and measurement of different antibody isotypes in the serum provide valuable indicators of the different stages of typhoid infection. Here, the ability of S. Typhi recombinant hemolysin E (HlyE) to detect multi-isotype antibody responses in sera of patients with typhoid and paratyphoid A was investigated using an indirect antibody immunoassay. Nanogram amounts of HlyE were found to be sufficient for detection of IgG and IgA isotypes and, in a study of individuals' sera (n = 100), the immunoassay was able to distinguish between typhoid and non-typhoid sera. The overall sensitivity, specificity and efficiency of the ELISA were 70% (39/56), 100% (44/44) and 83% respectively. PMID:25399538

  9. Sensitive radioimmunoassay for detection of antibodies to recombinant human interferon-alpha A

    SciTech Connect

    Palleroni, A.V.; Trown, P.W.

    1986-12-01

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the detection of antibodies to recombinant human leukocyte interferon A (rHuIFN-alpha A) in human serum has been developed and validated against the standard antiviral neutralization bioassay (ANB). The assay measures the binding of /sup 125/I-labeled rHuIFN-alpha A to immunoglobulins in serum. Aliquots of patients' sera are incubated with /sup 125/I-rHuIFN-alpha A and the complexes formed between antibodies in the sera and the /sup 125/I-rHuIFN-alpha A are precipitated with goat anti-human IgG serum. The radioactivity in the immune precipitate is a measure of the quantity of antibody (if present) in the serum. The sensitivity of this RIA is 5 ng of IgG/ml of serum.

  10. Serum antibodies to whole-cell and recombinant antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi in cottontail rabbits.

    PubMed

    Magnarelli, Louis A; Norris, Steven J; Fikrig, Erol

    2012-01-01

    Archived serum samples, from 95 eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) captured in New York, New York, USA and Millbrook, New York, USA, during 1985-86, were analyzed in solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for total and class-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibodies to whole-cell or recombinant antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto. Using a polyvalent conjugate, rabbit sera contained antibodies to whole-cell and recombinant antigens (protein [p]35, p37, or VlsE) during different seasons, but there was no reactivity to outer surface protein (Osp)A or OspB. Seventy-six of the 102 sera (75%) analyzed were reactive with one or more of the antigens; 61 of the positive samples (80%) reacted to whole-cell antigens, followed by results for the p35 (58%, 44/76), VlsE (43%, 33/76), and p37 (29%, 22/ 76) antigens. Fifty-eight sera (76%) contained antibodies to the VlsE or p35 antigens with or without reactivity to whole-cell antigens. High antibody titers (≥1:2,560) recorded for 52 sera indicate robust antibody production. In analyses for IgM antibodies in an ELISA containing whole-cell antigens, there were 30 positive sera; titers ranged from 1:160 to 1:640. There was minimal cross-reactivity when rabbit antisera to Treponema pallidum or four serovars of Leptospira interrogans were screened against B. burgdorferi antigens. Based on more-specific results, VlsE and p35 antigens appear to be useful markers for detecting possible B. burgdorferi infections. PMID:22247369

  11. SERUM ANTIBODIES TO WHOLE-CELL AND RECOMBINANT ANTIGENS OF BORRELIA BURGDORFERI IN COTTONTAIL RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Magnarelli, Louis A.; Norris, Steven J.; Fikrig, Erol

    2011-01-01

    Archived serum samples, from 95 eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) captured in New York, New York, USA and Millbrook, New York, USA, during 1985–86, were analyzed in solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for total and class-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibodies to whole-cell or recombinant antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto. Using a polyvalent conjugate, rabbit sera contained antibodies to whole-cell and recombinant antigens (protein [p]35, p37, or VlsE) during different seasons, but there was no reactivity to outer surface protein (Osp)A or OspB. Seventy-six of the 102 sera (75%) analyzed were reactive with one or more of the antigens; 61 of the positive samples (80%) reacted to whole-cell antigens, followed by results for the p35 (58%, 44/76), VlsE (43%, 33/76), and p37 (29%, 22/76) antigens. Fifty-eight sera (76%) contained antibodies to the VlsE or p35 antigens with or without reactivity to whole-cell antigens. High antibody titers (≥1:2,560) recorded for 52 sera indicate robust antibody production. In analyses for IgM antibodies in an ELISA containing whole-cell antigens, there were 30 positive sera; titers ranged from 1:160 to 1:640. There was minimal cross-reactivity when rabbit antisera to Treponema pallidum or four serovars of Leptospira interrogans were screened against B. burgdorferi antigens. Based on more-specific results, VlsE and p35 antigens appear to be useful markers for detecting possible B. burgdorferi infections. PMID:22247369

  12. Redirected cellular cytotoxicity by infection of effector cells with a recombinant vaccinia virus encoding a tumor-specific monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Paul, S; Bizouarne, N; Dott, K; Ruet, L; Dufour, P; Acres, R B; Kieny, M P

    2000-04-01

    Cytotoxicity is an important function of the immune system that results in the destruction of cellular targets by humoral and/or cellular mechanisms. We wanted to assess the possibility of targeting the lytic function of immune cells toward cancer cells, which express the gene coding for a known tumor antigen (Ag) (GA733-2/epithelial cell adhesion molecule), using a viral vector encoding a monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific for said tumor Ag (CO17-1A). To this end, we have constructed recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing the sequences corresponding to mAb CO17-1A, which recognizes a specific Ag (GA733-2) that is present on the surface of most gastrointestinal carcinomas. The recombinant vectors encoding either a secreted or membrane-anchored form of CO17-1A mAb were used to infect effector cells, which were subsequently assessed for their cytotoxic activity. The recombinant viruses were able to infect both granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human macrophages and Ag-stimulated murine cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Infected granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated macrophages were found to be able to kill GA733-2-expressing tumor cells. Likewise, infected cytotoxic T lymphocytes, although conserving their original alloreactivity, gained the capability of killing GA733-2-expressing cancer cells. PMID:10811480

  13. Recombinant outer membrane protein C of Aeromonas hydrophila elicits mixed immune response and generates agglutinating antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sunita Kumari; Meena, Jitendra Kumar; Sharma, Mahima; Dixit, Aparna

    2016-08-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is a gram-negative fish pathogenic bacterium, also responsible for causing opportunistic pathological conditions in humans. It causes a number of diseases in fish due to which the fish industry incurs huge economic losses annually. Due to problems of antibiotic resistance, and the rapidity with which the infection spreads among fishes, vaccination remains the most effective strategy to combat this infection in fish populations. Among various virulence factors associated with bacterial virulence, outer membrane proteins have been widely evaluated for their vaccine potential owing to their surface exposure and related role in pathogenicity. In the present study, we have investigated the immunogenic potential of a non-specific porin, outer membrane protein C (OmpC) whose expression is regulated by the two-component regulatory system and plays a major role in the survival of A. hydrophila under different osmolaric conditions. The full-length gene (~1 kb) encoding OmpC of A. hydrophila was cloned, characterized and expressed in E. coli. High yield (~112 mg/L at shake flask level) of the recombinant OmpC (rOmpC) (~40 kDa) of A. hydrophila was obtained upon purification from inclusion bodies using Ni(2+)-NTA affinity chromatography. Immunization with purified rOmpC in murine model generated high endpoint (>1:40,000) titers. IgG isotyping, ELISA and ELISPOT assay indicated mixed immune response with a TH2 bias. Also, the anti-rOmpC antibodies were able to agglutinate A. hydrophila in vitro and exhibited specific cross-reactivity with different Aeromonas strains, which will facilitate easy detection of different Aeromonas isolates in infected samples. Taken together, these data clearly indicate that rOmpC could serve as an effective vaccine against different strains of Aeromonas, a highly heterogenous group of bacteria. PMID:27328672

  14. Assigning and visualizing germline genes in antibody repertoires.

    PubMed

    Frost, Simon D W; Murrell, Ben; Hossain, A S Md Mukarram; Silverman, Gregg J; Pond, Sergei L Kosakovsky

    2015-09-01

    Identifying the germline genes involved in immunoglobulin rearrangements is an essential first step in the analysis of antibody repertoires. Based on our prior work in analysing diverse recombinant viruses, we present IgSCUEAL (Immunoglobulin Subtype Classification Using Evolutionary ALgorithms), a phylogenetic approach to assign V and J regions of immunoglobulin sequences to their corresponding germline alleles, with D regions assigned using a simple pairwise alignment algorithm. We also develop an interactive web application for viewing the results, allowing the user to explore the frequency distribution of sequence assignments and CDR3 region length statistics, which is useful for summarizing repertoires, as well as a detailed viewer of rearrangements and region alignments for individual query sequences. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of our method compared with sequence similarity-based approaches and other non-phylogenetic model-based approaches, using both simulated data and a set of evaluation datasets of human immunoglobulin heavy chain sequences. IgSCUEAL demonstrates the highest accuracy of V and J assignment amongst existing approaches, even when the reassorted sequence is highly mutated, and can successfully cluster sequences on the basis of shared V/J germline alleles. PMID:26194754

  15. Assigning and visualizing germline genes in antibody repertoires

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Simon D. W.; Murrell, Ben; Hossain, A. S. Md. Mukarram; Silverman, Gregg J.; Pond, Sergei L. Kosakovsky

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the germline genes involved in immunoglobulin rearrangements is an essential first step in the analysis of antibody repertoires. Based on our prior work in analysing diverse recombinant viruses, we present IgSCUEAL (Immunoglobulin Subtype Classification Using Evolutionary ALgorithms), a phylogenetic approach to assign V and J regions of immunoglobulin sequences to their corresponding germline alleles, with D regions assigned using a simple pairwise alignment algorithm. We also develop an interactive web application for viewing the results, allowing the user to explore the frequency distribution of sequence assignments and CDR3 region length statistics, which is useful for summarizing repertoires, as well as a detailed viewer of rearrangements and region alignments for individual query sequences. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of our method compared with sequence similarity-based approaches and other non-phylogenetic model-based approaches, using both simulated data and a set of evaluation datasets of human immunoglobulin heavy chain sequences. IgSCUEAL demonstrates the highest accuracy of V and J assignment amongst existing approaches, even when the reassorted sequence is highly mutated, and can successfully cluster sequences on the basis of shared V/J germline alleles. PMID:26194754

  16. Differential regulation of interleukin 4 and interleukin 5 gene expression: a comparison of T-cell gene induction by anti-CD3 antibody or by exogenous lymphokines.

    PubMed Central

    Bohjanen, P R; Okajima, M; Hodes, R J

    1990-01-01

    Murine T helper type 2 clones were stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3 antibody or with recombinant lymphokines to compare the expression of T-cell activation genes induced by these stimuli. Immobilized anti-CD3 antibody, recombinant interleukin 2 (IL-2), and recombinant interleukin 4 (IL-4) all induced proliferation of the T helper type 2 clones 10-5-17 and D10. Proliferation of these clones induced by anti-CD3 antibody was completely inhibited by cyclosporine A, whereas cyclosporine A had little effect on proliferation induced by recombinant IL-2 or recombinant IL-4. Both immobilized anti-CD3 antibody, and recombinant IL-2 induced the expression of the protooncogenes c-myc and c-myb. Immobilized anti-CD3 antibody also induced expression of the lymphokine genes IL-4, interleukin 5 (IL-5), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. In contrast, recombinant IL-2 induced IL-5 mRNA expression but did not induce detectable expression of IL-4 or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor mRNA. Likewise, recombinant IL-4 induced expression of IL-5 but not IL-4 mRNA. Thus, the IL-4 and IL-5 genes appear to be differentially regulated after stimulation with recombinant lymphokines. Effects of cyclosporine A and the protein synthesis inhibitors cycloheximide and anisomycin on IL-4 and IL-5 gene expression suggest that these genes are activated by different pathways after anti-CD3 stimulation. Cyclosporine A completely inhibited anti-CD3-induced expression of IL-4 mRNA but not of IL-5 mRNA, and protein-synthesis inhibitors completely inhibited induction of IL-5 mRNA but not of IL-4 mRNA. Together, our data show that T-cell receptor-mediated and lymphokine receptor-mediated signals induce different patterns of lymphokine gene expression and provide strong evidence that the IL-4 and IL-5 genes are differently regulated. Images PMID:2142529

  17. A pilot study comparing the development of EIAV Env-specific antibodies induced by DNA/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccines and an attenuated Chinese EIAV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qinglai; Lin, Yuezhi; Ma, Jian; Ma, Yan; Zhao, Liping; Li, Shenwei; Yang, Kai; Zhou, Jianhua; Shen, Rongxian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Shao, Yiming

    2012-12-01

    Data from successful attenuated lentiviral vaccine studies indicate that fully mature Env-specific antibodies characterized by high titer, high avidity, and the predominant recognition of conformational epitopes are associated with protective efficacy. Although vaccination with a DNA prime/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccine boost strategy has been found to be effective in some trials with non-human primate/simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) models, it remains unclear whether this vaccination strategy could elicit mature equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) Env-specific antibodies, thus protecting vaccinated horses against EIAV infection. Therefore, in this pilot study we vaccinated horses using a strategy based on DNA prime/recombinant Tiantan vaccinia (rTTV)-vectored vaccines encoding EIAV env and gag genes, and observed the development of Env-specific antibodies, neutralizing antibodies, and p26-specific antibodies. Vaccination with DNA induced low titer, low avidity, and the predominant recognition of linear epitopes by Env-specific antibodies, which was enhanced by boosting vaccinations with rTTV vaccines. However, the maturation levels of Env-specific antibodies induced by the DNA/rTTV vaccines were significantly lower than those induced by the attenuated vaccine EIAV(FDDV). Additionally, DNA/rTTV vaccines did not elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies. After challenge with a virulent EIAV strain, all of the vaccinees and control horses died from EIAV disease. These data indicate that the regimen of DNA prime/rTTV vaccine boost did not induce mature Env-specific antibodies, which might have contributed to immune protection failure. PMID:23171359

  18. Generation of Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies from Immunised Mice and Rabbits via Flow Cytometry and Sorting of Antigen-Specific IgG+ Memory B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Starkie, Dale. O; Compson, Joanne E.; Rapecki, Stephen; Lightwood, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Single B cell screening strategies, which avoid both hybridoma fusion and combinatorial display, have emerged as important technologies for efficiently sampling the natural antibody repertoire of immunized animals and humans. Having access to a range of methods to interrogate different B cell subsets provides an attractive option to ensure large and diverse panels of high quality antibody are produced. The generation of multiple antibodies and having the ability to find rare B cell clones producing IgG with unique and desirable characteristics facilitates the identification of fit-for-purpose molecules that can be developed into therapeutic agents or research reagents. Here, we describe a multi-parameter flow cytometry single-cell sorting technique for the generation of antigen-specific recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single IgG+ memory B cells. Both mouse splenocytes and rabbit PBMC from immunised animals were used as a source of B cells. Reagents staining both B cells and other unwanted cell types enabled efficient identification of class-switched IgG+ memory B cells. Concurrent staining with antigen labelled separately with two spectrally-distinct fluorophores enabled antigen-specific B cells to be identified, i.e. those which bind to both antigen conjugates (double-positive). These cells were then typically sorted at one cell per well using FACS directly into a 96-well plate containing reverse transcriptase reaction mix. Following production of cDNA, PCR was performed to amplify cognate heavy and light chain variable region genes and generate transcriptionally-active PCR (TAP) fragments. These linear expression cassettes were then used directly in a mammalian cell transfection to generate recombinant antibody for further testing. We were able to successfully generate antigen-specific recombinant antibodies from both the rabbit and mouse IgG+ memory B cell subset within one week. This included the generation of an anti-TNFR2 blocking antibody from mice

  19. Generation of Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies from Immunised Mice and Rabbits via Flow Cytometry and Sorting of Antigen-Specific IgG+ Memory B Cells.

    PubMed

    Starkie, Dale O; Compson, Joanne E; Rapecki, Stephen; Lightwood, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Single B cell screening strategies, which avoid both hybridoma fusion and combinatorial display, have emerged as important technologies for efficiently sampling the natural antibody repertoire of immunized animals and humans. Having access to a range of methods to interrogate different B cell subsets provides an attractive option to ensure large and diverse panels of high quality antibody are produced. The generation of multiple antibodies and having the ability to find rare B cell clones producing IgG with unique and desirable characteristics facilitates the identification of fit-for-purpose molecules that can be developed into therapeutic agents or research reagents. Here, we describe a multi-parameter flow cytometry single-cell sorting technique for the generation of antigen-specific recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single IgG+ memory B cells. Both mouse splenocytes and rabbit PBMC from immunised animals were used as a source of B cells. Reagents staining both B cells and other unwanted cell types enabled efficient identification of class-switched IgG+ memory B cells. Concurrent staining with antigen labelled separately with two spectrally-distinct fluorophores enabled antigen-specific B cells to be identified, i.e. those which bind to both antigen conjugates (double-positive). These cells were then typically sorted at one cell per well using FACS directly into a 96-well plate containing reverse transcriptase reaction mix. Following production of cDNA, PCR was performed to amplify cognate heavy and light chain variable region genes and generate transcriptionally-active PCR (TAP) fragments. These linear expression cassettes were then used directly in a mammalian cell transfection to generate recombinant antibody for further testing. We were able to successfully generate antigen-specific recombinant antibodies from both the rabbit and mouse IgG+ memory B cell subset within one week. This included the generation of an anti-TNFR2 blocking antibody from mice

  20. Recombination facilitates neofunctionalization of duplicate genes via originalization

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently originalization was proposed to be an effective way of duplicate-gene preservation, in which recombination provokes the high frequency of original (or wild-type) allele on both duplicated loci. Because the high frequency of wild-type allele might drive the arising and accumulating of advantageous mutation, it is hypothesized that recombination might enlarge the probability of neofunctionalization (Pneo) of duplicate genes. In this article this hypothesis has been tested theoretically. Results Results show that through originalization recombination might not only shorten mean time to neofunctionalizaiton, but also enlarge Pneo. Conclusions Therefore, recombination might facilitate neofunctionalization via originalization. Several extensive applications of these results on genomic evolution have been discussed: 1. Time to nonfunctionalization can be much longer than a few million generations expected before; 2. Homogenization on duplicated loci results from not only gene conversion, but also originalization; 3. Although the rate of advantageous mutation is much small compared with that of degenerative mutation, Pneo cannot be expected to be small. PMID:20534125

  1. Identification of Recombination and Positively Selected Genes in Brucella.

    PubMed

    Vishnu, Udayakumar S; Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Sridhar, Jayavel; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2015-12-01

    Brucella is a facultative intracellular bacterium belongs to the class alpha proteobacteria. It causes zoonotic disease brucellosis to wide range of animals. Brucella species are highly conserved in nucleotide level. Here, we employed a comparative genomics approach to examine the role of homologous recombination and positive selection in the evolution of Brucella. For the analysis, we have selected 19 complete genomes from 8 species of Brucella. Among the 1599 core genome predicted, 24 genes were showing signals of recombination but no significant breakpoint was found. The analysis revealed that recombination events are less frequent and the impact of recombination occurred is negligible on the evolution of Brucella. This leads to the view that Brucella is clonally evolved. On other hand, 56 genes (3.5 % of core genome) were showing signals of positive selection. Results suggest that natural selection plays an important role in the evolution of Brucella. Some of the genes that are responsible for the pathogenesis of Brucella were found positively selected, presumably due to their role in avoidance of the host immune system. PMID:26543263

  2. Optimizing Production of Antigens and Fabs in the Context of Generating Recombinant Antibodies to Human Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Nan; Loppnau, Peter; Seitova, Alma; Ravichandran, Mani; Fenner, Maria; Jain, Harshika; Bhattacharya, Anandi; Hutchinson, Ashley; Paduch, Marcin; Lu, Vincent; Olszewski, Michal; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.; Dowdell, Evan; Koide, Akiko; Koide, Shohei; Huang, Haiming; Nadeem, Vincent; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Marcon, Edyta; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Edwards, Aled M.; Gräslund, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    We developed and optimized a high-throughput project workflow to generate renewable recombinant antibodies to human proteins involved in epigenetic signalling. Three different strategies to produce phage display compatible protein antigens in bacterial systems were compared, and we found that in vivo biotinylation through the use of an Avi tag was the most productive method. Phage display selections were performed on 265 in vivo biotinylated antigen domains. High-affinity Fabs (<20nM) were obtained for 196. We constructed and optimized a new expression vector to produce in vivo biotinylated Fabs in E. coli. This increased average yields up to 10-fold, with an average yield of 4 mg/L. For 118 antigens, we identified Fabs that could immunoprecipitate their full-length endogenous targets from mammalian cell lysates. One Fab for each antigen was converted to a recombinant IgG and produced in mammalian cells, with an average yield of 15 mg/L. In summary, we have optimized each step of the pipeline to produce recombinant antibodies, significantly increasing both efficiency and yield, and also showed that these Fabs and IgGs can be generally useful for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocols. PMID:26437229

  3. Proteomic differences in recombinant CHO cells producing two similar antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Sommeregger, Wolfgang; Mayrhofer, Patrick; Steinfellner, Willibald; Reinhart, David; Henry, Michael; Clynes, Martin; Meleady, Paula; Kunert, Renate

    2016-09-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most commonly used mammalian hosts for the production of biopharmaceuticals. To overcome unfavorable features of CHO cells, a lot of effort is put into cell engineering to improve phenotype. "Omics" studies investigating elevated growth rate and specific productivities as well as extracellular stimulus have already revealed many interesting engineering targets. However, it remains largely unknown how physicochemical properties of the recombinant product itself influence the host cell. In this study, we used quantitative label-free LC-MS proteomic analyses to investigate product-specific proteome differences in CHO cells producing two similar antibody fragments. We established recombinant CHO cells producing the two antibodies, 3D6 and 2F5, both as single-chain Fv-Fc homodimeric antibody fragments (scFv-Fc). We applied three different vector strategies for transgene delivery (i.e., plasmid, bacterial artificial chromosome, recombinase-mediated cassette exchange), selected two best performing clones from transgene variants and transgene delivery methods and investigated three consecutively passaged cell samples by label-free proteomic analysis. LC-MS-MS profiles were compared in several sample combinations to gain insights into different aspects of proteomic changes caused by overexpression of two different heterologous proteins. This study suggests that not only the levels of specific product secretion but the product itself has a large impact on the proteome of the cell. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1902-1912. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26913574

  4. [Production of a recombinant CagA protein for the detection of Helicobacter pylori CagA antibodies].

    PubMed

    Akgüç, Miray; Karatayli, Ersin; Çelik, Esra; Koyuncu, Duygu; Çelik, İnci; Karatayli, Senem Ceren; Özden, Ali; Bozdayi, A Mithat

    2014-07-01

    At present, Helicobacter pylori infections affect approximately 50% of the world population. It is known that H.pylori is related with several gastric diseases including chronic atrophic gastritis, peptic and gastric ulcers as well as gastric carcinomas. CagA (Cytotoxin-associated gene A) protein which is one of the most important virulence factors of H.pylori, is thought to be responsible for the development of gastric cancer. CagA is a 128 kDa hydrophilic protein which binds to the epitelial stomach cells and is known to be phosphorylated on its EPIYA regions. The EPIYA regions are highly variable and carry a higher risk of developing gastric cancer than CagA negative strains. The aim of this study was to construct a prokaryotic expression system expressing a recombinant CagA protein, which can be used for the detection of anti-CagA antibodies. For the isolation of H.pylori genomic DNA, a total of 112 gastric biopsy samples obtained from patients who were previously found positive for rapid urease (CLO) test, were used. H.pylori DNAs were amplified from 57 of those samples by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and of them 35 were found positive in terms of cagA gene. Different EPIYA motifs were detected in 25 out of 35 cagA positive samples, and one of those samples that contained the highest number of EPIYA motif, was chosen for the cloning procedure. Molecular cloning and expression of the recombinant fragment were performed with Champion Pet151/D expression vector (Invitrogen, USA), the expression of which was induced by the addition of IPTG (Isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside) into the E.coli culture medium. Expression was observed with anti-histidin HRP (Horse Radish Peroxidase) antibodies by SDS-PAGE and Western Blot (WB) analysis. In our study, two clones possessing different fragments from the same H.pylori strain with three different EPIYA motifs were succesfully expressed. Since CagA antigen plays a signicant role in the pathogenesis of H

  5. Serum and colostral antibody production in cows immunized with recombinant human tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Burton, Randall; Kim, Skaison; Patel, Rutvij; Scola, Michele; Hartman, Deborah; Tracey, Daniel; Fox, Barbara S

    2016-06-01

    The use of hyper-immune bovine colostrum as a human therapeutic platform is an emerging technology with potential to deliver the efficacy of antibody therapeutics with the convenience and safety of oral or topical application. It is necessary to understand how the bovine immune system responds to immunization with foreign proteins, both in terms of the serum antibody response and the transfer of antigen-specific antibodies into the colostrum to enable efficient large-scale production of therapeutic antibodies. We have immunized 25 cows with recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rhTNF) and measured the levels of rhTNF-specific antibodies in the serum and colostrum of these animals. We observed a decline of 84±9% in serum IgG1 concentrations in the final weeks of pregnancy that presumably reflects rapid transport of IgG1 into colostrum. The serum IgG2 levels remained constant, such that the serum IgG1 to IgG2 ratio was 1:20 at parturition. We observed substantial animal-to-animal variability in the levels of anti-rhTNF antibodies in both serum and colostrum samples. In particular, a subset of 4 cows had extraordinarily high colostral anti-rhTNF antibody production. Only a weak correlation was found between the peak serum anti-rhTNF activity and the colostral anti-rhTNF activity in these animals. The 4 cows with high colostral anti-rhTNF activities trended toward higher serum IgG1 loss relative to average colostral anti-rhTNF producers, but this difference was not statistically significant in this small sample. The high-anti-rhTNF-producing cows also exhibited a greater proportion of rhTNF-specific antibodies that bound to bovine IgG1- and IgG2-specific detection antibodies relative to the total anti-rhTNF immunoglobulin population. This finding suggests that the isotype distribution of the anti-rhTNF response is varied between individuals and genetic or environmental factors may increase the yield of antigen-specific colostral antibodies. PMID:27040787

  6. Selection and recombination in populations containing tandem multiplet genes.

    PubMed

    Koch, A L

    1979-12-01

    Computer simulation for selective conditions that may apply in nature yielded three generalizations for prokaryotic organisms with recombinant mechanisms. (1) Selective forces can suffice to maintain a tandem gene family with the nearly optimum number of genes with little variance within the population. (2) Tandem genes will occur within the population unless the population is frequently cloned or unless the function due to a single copy is capable of over-providing the needs of the organism. (3) Even when there is no selective advantage or disadvantage due to extra gene copies, the population distribution becomes more skewed with time; and organisms with only single copies of the gene comprise a progressively larger fraction of the total. This may be the case with genes that function under strong cellular regulation. Evolutionary implications of these calculations are that the occurrence of unequal recombination of tandem genes would greatly slow evolution via duplication of genetic material. This difficulty and its possible resolutions are discussed. PMID:537107

  7. Polyclonal hyper-IgE mouse model reveals mechanistic insights into antibody class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Misaghi, Shahram; Senger, Kate; Sai, Tao; Qu, Yan; Sun, Yonglian; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Nguyen, Allen; Jin, Zhaoyu; Zhou, Meijuan; Yan, Donghong; Lin, Wei Yu; Lin, Zhonghua; Lorenzo, Maria N.; Sebrell, Andrew; Ding, Jiabing; Xu, Min; Caplazi, Patrick; Austin, Cary D.; Balazs, Mercedesz; Roose-Girma, Merone; DeForge, Laura; Warming, Søren; Lee, Wyne P.; Dixit, Vishva M.; Zarrin, Ali A.

    2013-01-01

    Preceding antibody constant regions are switch (S) regions varying in length and repeat density that are targets of activation-induced cytidine deaminase. We asked how participating S regions influence each other to orchestrate rearrangements at the IgH locus by engineering mice in which the weakest S region, Sε, is replaced with prominent recombination hotspot Sμ. These mice produce copious polyclonal IgE upon challenge, providing a platform to study IgE biology and therapeutic interventions. The insertion enhances ε germ-line transcript levels, shows a preference for direct vs. sequential switching, and reduces intraswitch recombination events at native Sμ. These results suggest that the sufficiency of Sμ to mediate IgH rearrangements may be influenced by context-dependent cues. PMID:24019479

  8. Polyclonal hyper-IgE mouse model reveals mechanistic insights into antibody class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Misaghi, Shahram; Senger, Kate; Sai, Tao; Qu, Yan; Sun, Yonglian; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Nguyen, Allen; Jin, Zhaoyu; Zhou, Meijuan; Yan, Donghong; Lin, Wei Yu; Lin, Zhonghua; Lorenzo, Maria N; Sebrell, Andrew; Ding, Jiabing; Xu, Min; Caplazi, Patrick; Austin, Cary D; Balazs, Mercedesz; Roose-Girma, Merone; DeForge, Laura; Warming, Søren; Lee, Wyne P; Dixit, Vishva M; Zarrin, Ali A

    2013-09-24

    Preceding antibody constant regions are switch (S) regions varying in length and repeat density that are targets of activation-induced cytidine deaminase. We asked how participating S regions influence each other to orchestrate rearrangements at the IgH locus by engineering mice in which the weakest S region, Sε, is replaced with prominent recombination hotspot Sμ. These mice produce copious polyclonal IgE upon challenge, providing a platform to study IgE biology and therapeutic interventions. The insertion enhances ε germ-line transcript levels, shows a preference for direct vs. sequential switching, and reduces intraswitch recombination events at native Sμ. These results suggest that the sufficiency of Sμ to mediate IgH rearrangements may be influenced by context-dependent cues. PMID:24019479

  9. Mycobacterium bovis BCG priming induces a strong potentiation of the antibody response induced by recombinant BCG expressing a foreign antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghiu, M; Lagranderie, M R; Gicquel, B M; Leclerc, C D

    1994-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that strong cellular or humoral immune responses can be induced against foreign antigens expressed by recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG. It has therefore been suggested that BCG could represent one of the best candidate vectors for live recombinant vaccines. However, a large percentage of the human population has been immunized by BCG, and this priming could modify the immune response to future recombinant BCG vaccines. In the present study, we have therefore compared the immune responses induced in naive and BCG-primed mice by two recombinant BCG vaccines expressing either beta-galactosidase or human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef antigens. Our results demonstrated that BCG priming limits the growth of recombinant BCG in mouse spleen or lymph nodes. This reduction in BCG growth was associated with decreased proliferative responses against Nef or beta-galactosidase antigens. This suppression, however, never exceeded 50%. Interestingly, in contrast to these reduced T-cell responses, BCG-primed mice developed high levels of anti-beta-galactosidase antibodies after immunization with recombinant BCG expressing this antigen. This stimulation of antibody responses was not due to polyclonal stimulation or to a nonspecific adjuvant effect of BCG. The isotypic patterns of anti-beta-galactosidase antibody responses induced by the recombinant BCG were similar in naive and BCG-primed mice. These results indicate that priming with BCG will not be a limitation for the use of recombinant BCG vaccines in humans. PMID:7927686

  10. The Development of a Recombinant scFv Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Canine CD20 for Use in Comparative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Saurabh; Aresu, Luca; Comazzi, Stefano; Shi, Jianguo; Worrall, Erin; Clayton, John; Humphries, William; Hemmington, Sandra; Davis, Paul; Murray, Euan; Limeneh, Asmare A.; Ball, Kathryn; Ruckova, Eva; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borek; Fahraeus, Robin; Argyle, David; Hupp, Ted R.

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are leading agents for therapeutic treatment of human diseases, but are limited in use by the paucity of clinically relevant models for validation. Sporadic canine tumours mimic the features of some human equivalents. Developing canine immunotherapeutics can be an approach for modeling human disease responses. Rituximab is a pioneering agent used to treat human hematological malignancies. Biologic mimics that target canine CD20 are just being developed by the biotechnology industry. Towards a comparative canine-human model system, we have developed a novel anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (NCD1.2) that binds both human and canine CD20. NCD1.2 has a sub-nanomolar Kd as defined by an octet red binding assay. Using FACS, NCD1.2 binds to clinically derived canine cells including B-cells in peripheral blood and in different histotypes of B-cell lymphoma. Immunohistochemical staining of canine tissues indicates that the NCD1.2 binds to membrane localized cells in Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma, Marginal Zone Lymphoma, and other canine B-cell lymphomas. We cloned the heavy and light chains of NCD1.2 from hybridomas to determine whether active scaffolds can be acquired as future biologics tools. The VH and VL genes from the hybridomas were cloned using degenerate primers and packaged as single chains (scFv) into a phage-display library. Surprisingly, we identified two scFv (scFv-3 and scFv-7) isolated from the hybridoma with bioactivity towards CD20. The two scFv had identical VH genes but different VL genes and identical CDR3s, indicating that at least two light chain mRNAs are encoded by NCD1.2 hybridoma cells. Both scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into mammalian vectors for secretion in CHO cells and the antibodies were bioactive towards recombinant CD20 protein or peptide. The scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into an ADEPT-CPG2 bioconjugate vector where bioactivity was retained when expressed in bacterial systems. These data identify a recombinant anti-CD20

  11. The Development of a Recombinant scFv Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Canine CD20 for Use in Comparative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Jain, Saurabh; Aresu, Luca; Comazzi, Stefano; Shi, Jianguo; Worrall, Erin; Clayton, John; Humphries, William; Hemmington, Sandra; Davis, Paul; Murray, Euan; Limeneh, Asmare A; Ball, Kathryn; Ruckova, Eva; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borek; Fahraeus, Robin; Argyle, David; Hupp, Ted R

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are leading agents for therapeutic treatment of human diseases, but are limited in use by the paucity of clinically relevant models for validation. Sporadic canine tumours mimic the features of some human equivalents. Developing canine immunotherapeutics can be an approach for modeling human disease responses. Rituximab is a pioneering agent used to treat human hematological malignancies. Biologic mimics that target canine CD20 are just being developed by the biotechnology industry. Towards a comparative canine-human model system, we have developed a novel anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (NCD1.2) that binds both human and canine CD20. NCD1.2 has a sub-nanomolar Kd as defined by an octet red binding assay. Using FACS, NCD1.2 binds to clinically derived canine cells including B-cells in peripheral blood and in different histotypes of B-cell lymphoma. Immunohistochemical staining of canine tissues indicates that the NCD1.2 binds to membrane localized cells in Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma, Marginal Zone Lymphoma, and other canine B-cell lymphomas. We cloned the heavy and light chains of NCD1.2 from hybridomas to determine whether active scaffolds can be acquired as future biologics tools. The VH and VL genes from the hybridomas were cloned using degenerate primers and packaged as single chains (scFv) into a phage-display library. Surprisingly, we identified two scFv (scFv-3 and scFv-7) isolated from the hybridoma with bioactivity towards CD20. The two scFv had identical VH genes but different VL genes and identical CDR3s, indicating that at least two light chain mRNAs are encoded by NCD1.2 hybridoma cells. Both scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into mammalian vectors for secretion in CHO cells and the antibodies were bioactive towards recombinant CD20 protein or peptide. The scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into an ADEPT-CPG2 bioconjugate vector where bioactivity was retained when expressed in bacterial systems. These data identify a recombinant anti-CD20

  12. Genetically Engineered Poxviruses for Recombinant Gene Expression, Vaccination, and Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Bernard

    1996-10-01

    Vaccinia virus, no longer required for immunization against smallpox, now serves as a unique vector for expressing genes within the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. As a research tool, recombinant vaccinia viruses are used to synthesize and analyze the structure--function relationships of proteins, determine the targets of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and investigate the types of immune response needed for protection against specific infectious diseases and cancer. The vaccine potential of recombinant vaccinia virus has been realized in the form of an effective oral wild-life rabies vaccine, although no product for humans has been licensed. A genetically altered vaccinia virus that is unable to replicate in mammalian cells and produces diminished cytopathic effects retains the capacity for high-level gene expression and immunogenicity while promising exceptional safety for laboratory workers and potential vaccine recipients.

  13. Immune Response to Recombinant Capsid Proteins of Adenovirus in Humans: Antifiber and Anti-Penton Base Antibodies Have a Synergistic Effect on Neutralizing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gahéry-Ségard, Hanne; Farace, Françoise; Godfrin, Dominique; Gaston, Jesintha; Lengagne, Renée; Tursz, Thomas; Boulanger, Pierre; Guillet, Jean-Gérard

    1998-01-01

    Replication-deficient adenovirus used in humans for gene therapy induces a strong immune response to the vector, resulting in transient recombinant protein expression and the blocking of gene transfer upon a second administration. Therefore, in this study we examined in detail the capsid-specific humoral immune response in sera of patients with lung cancer who had been given one dose of a replication-defective adenovirus. We analyzed the immune response to the three major components of the viral capsid, hexon (Hx), penton base (Pb), and fiber (Fi). A longitudinal study of the humoral response assayed on adenovirus particle-coated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates showed that patients had preexisting immunity to adenovirus prior to the administration of adenovirus–β-gal. The level of the response increased in three patients after adenovirus administration and remained at a maximum after three months. One patient had a strong immune response to adenovirus prior to treatment, and this response was unaffected by adenovirus administration. Sera collected from the patients were assayed for recognition of each individual viral capsid protein to determine more precisely the molecular basis of the humoral immune response. Clear differences existed in the humoral response to the three major components of the viral capsid in serum from humans. Sequential appearance of these antibodies was observed: anti-Fi antibodies appeared first, followed by anti-Pb antibodies and then by anti-Hx antibodies. Moreover, anti-Fi antibodies preferentially recognized the native trimeric form of Fi protein, suggesting that they recognized conformational epitopes. Our results showed that sera with no neutralizing activity contained only anti-Fi antibodies. In contrast, neutralizing activity was only obtained with sera containing anti-Fi and anti-Pb antibodies. More importantly, we showed that anti-native Fi and anti-Pb antibodies had a synergistic effect on neutralization. The

  14. High-Affinity Recombinant Antibody Fragments (Fabs) Can Be Applied in Peptide Enrichment Immuno-MRM Assays

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    High-affinity antibodies binding to linear peptides in solution are a prerequisite for performing immuno-MRM, an emerging technology for protein quantitation with high precision and specificity using peptide immunoaffinity enrichment coupled to stable isotope dilution and targeted mass spectrometry. Recombinant antibodies can be generated from appropriate libraries in high-throughput in an automated laboratory and thus may offer advantages over conventional monoclonal antibodies. However, recombinant antibodies are typically obtained as fragments (Fab or scFv) expressed from E. coli, and it is not known whether these antibody formats are compatible with the established protocols and whether the affinities necessary for immunocapture of small linear peptides can be achieved with this technology. Hence, we performed a feasibility study to ask: (a) whether it is feasible to isolate high-affinity Fabs to small linear antigens and (b) whether it is feasible to incorporate antibody fragments into robust, quantitative immuno-MRM assays. We describe successful isolation of high-affinity Fab fragments against short (tryptic) peptides from a human combinatorial Fab library. We analytically characterize three immuno-MRM assays using recombinant Fabs, full-length IgGs constructed from these Fabs, or traditional monoclonals. We show that the antibody fragments show similar performance compared with traditional mouse- or rabbit-derived monoclonal antibodies. The data establish feasibility of isolating and incorporating high-affinity Fabs into peptide immuno-MRM assays. PMID:24568200

  15. Detecting Key Structural Features within Highly Recombined Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wertz, John E; McGregor, Karen F; Bessen, Debra E

    2007-01-01

    Many microorganisms exhibit high levels of intragenic recombination following horizontal gene transfer events. Furthermore, many microbial genes are subject to strong diversifying selection as part of the pathogenic process. A multiple sequence alignment is an essential starting point for many of the tools that provide fundamental insights on gene structure and evolution, such as phylogenetics; however, an accurate alignment is not always possible to attain. In this study, a new analytic approach was developed in order to better quantify the genetic organization of highly diversified genes whose alleles do not align. This BLAST-based method, denoted BLAST Miner, employs an iterative process that places short segments of highly similar sequence into discrete datasets that are designated “modules.” The relative positions of modules along the length of the genes, and their frequency of occurrence, are used to identify sequence duplications, insertions, and rearrangements. Partial alleles of sof from Streptococcus pyogenes, encoding a surface protein under host immune selection, were analyzed for module content. High-frequency Modules 6 and 13 were identified and examined in depth. Nucleotide sequences corresponding to both modules contain numerous duplications and inverted repeats, whereby many codons form palindromic pairs. Combined with evidence for a strong codon usage bias, data suggest that Module 6 and 13 sequences are under selection to preserve their nucleic acid secondary structure. The concentration of overlapping tandem and inverted repeats within a small region of DNA is highly suggestive of a mechanistic role for Module 6 and 13 sequences in promoting aberrant recombination. Analysis of pbp2X alleles from Streptococcus pneumoniae, encoding cell wall enzymes that confer antibiotic resistance, supports the broad applicability of this tool in deciphering the genetic organization of highly recombined genes. BLAST Miner shares with phylogenetics the

  16. Insulin antibodies in patients with type 2 diabetic receiving recombinant human insulin injection: A report of 12 cases.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaolei; Ma, Xiaowen; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Xiuli; Xu, Xuling; Gong, Hui; Chen, Fengling; Sun, Junjie

    2015-12-01

    We report 12 cases of patients with type 2 diabetic receiving recombinant human insulin injection, who had uncontrolled hyperglycemia or frequent episodes of hypoglycemia, high levels of serum insulin and positive insulin antibodies. The clinical characteristics and insulin antibodies pharmacokinetics parameters were analyzed. After administration of glucocorticoids, changing insulin formulations or discontinuing the insulin and switching to oral antidiabetic agents, the level of insulin antibodies decreased and the plasma glucose restored. Thus, we recommend to identify the presence of high insulin antibodies in patients with type 2 diabetes who experience unexplained high plasma glucose or frequent reoccurrence of hypoglycemia. PMID:26607016

  17. Clinical development of plant-produced recombinant pharmaceuticals: vaccines, antibodies and beyond.

    PubMed

    Yusibov, Vidadi; Streatfield, Stephen J; Kushnir, Natasha

    2011-03-01

    In the last few years, plants have become an increasingly attractive platform for recombinant protein production. This builds on two decades of research, starting with transgenic approaches to develop oral vaccines in which antigens or therapeutics can be delivered in processed plant biomass, and progressing to transient expression approaches whereby high yields of purified targets are administered parenterally. The advantages of plant-based expression systems include high scalability, low upstream costs, biocontainment, lack of human or animal pathogens, and ability to produce target proteins with desired structures and biological functions. Using transgenic and transient expression in whole plants or plant cell culture, a variety of recombinant subunit vaccine candidates, therapeutic proteins, including monoclonal antibodies, and dietary proteins have been produced. Some of these products have been tested in early phase clinical trials, and show safety and efficacy. Among those are mucosal vaccines for diarrheal diseases, hepatitis B and rabies; injectable vaccines for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, H1N1 and H5N1 strains of influenza A virus, and Newcastle disease in poultry; and topical antibodies for the treatment of dental caries and HIV. As lead plant-based products have entered clinical trials, there has been increased emphasis on manufacturing under current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) guidelines, and the preparation and presentation to the relevant government agencies of regulatory packages. PMID:21346417

  18. Recombinant antigen-based enzyme immunoassay for screening of Treponema pallidum antibodies in blood bank routine.

    PubMed Central

    Zrein, M; Maure, I; Boursier, F; Soufflet, L

    1995-01-01

    This work reports a comparison of an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) using two major Treponema pallidum recombinant antigens with a T. pallidum hemagglutination (TPHA) assay and a nontreponemal Venereal Disease Reference Laboratory (VDRL) test. A total of 1,822 normal donor serum samples was tested for cardiolipin and T. pallidum antibodies, respectively, by the VDRL assay and EIA. Among these samples, 440 were further tested by TPHA technology. Four samples were found positive by EIA, while all were reported to be negative by both TPHA and VDRL routine assays. Subsequent testing of EIA-positive samples confirmed 100% (four of four samples) and 25% (one of four samples) positive results, respectively, by immunofluorescence assay and a Western blot (immunoblot) syphilis kit. The sensitivity of the recombinant EIA was estimated at virtually 100% with a reference panel of 50 syphilitic samples. According to this study, the newly developed EIA kit shows 100% sensitivity combined to a specificity greater than 99.8% for detecting treponemal immunoglobulin G antibodies in blood bank syphilis screening. PMID:7751351

  19. Detection of Q Fever Specific Antibodies Using Recombinant Antigen in ELISA with Peroxidase Based Signal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Wei; Zhang, Zhiwen; Glennon, Erin; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the accepted method for Q fever serodiagnosis is indirect immunofluorescent antibody assay (IFA) using the whole cell antigen. In this study, we prepared the recombinant antigen of the 27-kDa outer membrane protein (Com1) which has been shown to be recognized by Q fever patient sera. The performance of recombinant Com1 was evaluated in ELISA by IFA confirmed serum samples. Due to the low titers of IgG and IgM in Q fever patients, the standard ELISA signals were further amplified by using biotinylated anti-human IgG or IgM plus streptavidin-HRP polymer. The modified ELISA can detect 88% (29 out of 33) of Q fever patient sera collected from Marines deployed to Iraq. Less than 5% (5 out of 156) of the sera from patients with other febrile diseases reacted with the Com1. These results suggest that the modified ELISA using Com1 may have the potential to improve the detection of Q fever specific antibodies. PMID:26904739

  20. Construction and bacterial expression of a recombinant single-chain antibody fragment against Wuchereria bancrofti SXP-1 antigen for the diagnosis of lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Kamatchi, R; Charumathi, J; Ravishankaran, R; Kaliraj, P; Meenakshisundaram, S

    2016-01-01

    Global programmes to eliminate lymphatic filariasis (GPELF) require mapping, monitoring and evaluation using filarial antigen diagnostic kits. To meet this objective, a functional single-chain fragment variable (ScFv) specific for filarial Wuchereria bancrofti SXP-1 (Wb-SXP-1) antigen was constructed for the diagnosis of active filarial infection, an alternative to the production of complete antibodies using hybridomas. The variable heavy chain (VH) and the variable light chain (kappa) (Vκ) genes were amplified from the mouse hybridoma cell line and were linked together with a flexible linker by overlap extension polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The ScFv construct (Vκ-Linker-VH) was expressed as a fusion protein with N-terminal His tag in Escherichia coli and purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) without the addition of reducing agents. Immunoblotting and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to analyse the antigen binding affinity of purified ScFv. The purified ScFv was found to recognize recombinant and native Wb-SXP-1 antigen in microfilariae (Mf)-positive patient sera. The affinity of ScFv was comparable with that of the monoclonal antibody. The development of recombinant ScFv to replace monoclonal antibody for detection of filarial antigen was achieved. The recombinant ScFv was purified, on-column refolded and its detection ability validated using field samples. PMID:26693887

  1. Sensitive and specific detection of enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli using recombinant anti-intimin antibody by immunofluorescence assay.

    PubMed

    Caravelli, Andressa; Luz, Daniela E; Andrade, Fernanda B; Moraes, Claudia T P; Maranhão, Andrea Q; Piazza, Roxane M F

    2013-12-01

    The main and common virulence factor expressed by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) is intimin, a 94-kDa outer membrane protein, which is a product of the eae gene, and, thus, an excellent target for the detection of these pathogens. Among the methods for detection of virulence factor expression, immunoassays can be considered the first alternative to either animal use or in vitro culture cells assays, for which polyclonal and/or monoclonal antibodies are raised. In the present work, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of an intimin recombinant antibody (scFv-intimin) using immunofluorescence assay. The scFv-intimin detected typical EPEC, atypical EPEC, and EHEC isolates (100% sensitivity) with no detection of eae- isolates (100% specificity). Thus, immunofluorescence is an effective and rapid method, and scFv-intimin, an excellent tool for the diagnosis of diarrhea caused by EPEC and EHEC and also can be employed in case-control epidemiological surveys. PMID:24095642

  2. Progress in the development of immunoanalytical methods incorporating recombinant antibodies to small molecular weight biotoxins.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Owen; Elliott, Christopher T; Campbell, Katrina

    2015-04-01

    Rapid immunoanalytical screening of food and environmental samples for small molecular weight (hapten) biotoxin contaminations requires the production of antibody reagents that possess the requisite sensitivity and specificity. To date animal-derived polyclonal (pAb) and monoclonal (mAb) antibodies have provided the binding element of the majority of these assays but recombinant antibodies (rAb) isolated from in vitro combinatorial phage display libraries are an exciting alternative due to (1) circumventing the need for experimental animals, (2) speed of production in commonly used in vitro expression systems and (3) subsequent molecular enhancement of binder performance. Short chain variable fragments (scFv) have been the most commonly employed rAb reagents for hapten biotoxin detection over the last two decades but antibody binding fragments (Fab) and single domain antibodies (sdAb) are increasing in popularity due to increased expression efficiency of functional binders and superior resistance to solvents. rAb-based immunochromatographic assays and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors have been reported to detect sub-regulatory levels of fungal (mycotoxins), marine (phycotoxins) and aquatic biotoxins in a wide range of food and environmental matrices, however this technology has yet to surpass the performances of the equivalent mAb- and pAb-based formats. As such the full potential of rAb technology in hapten biotoxin detection has yet to be achieved, but in time the inherent advantages of engineered rAb are set to provide the next generation of ultra-high performing binder reagents for the rapid and specific detection of hapten biotoxins. PMID:25716465

  3. Characterization of a recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody and its Fab fragment.

    PubMed

    Kirley, Terence L; Norman, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    Variations of post-translational modifications are important for stability and in vivo behavior of therapeutic antibodies. A recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody (h2E2) was characterized for heterogeneity of N-linked glycosylation and disulfide bonds. In addition, charge heterogeneity, which is partially due to the presence or absence of C-terminal lysine on the heavy chains, was examined. For cocaine overdose therapy, Fab fragments may be therapeutic, and thus, a simplified method of generation, purification, and characterization of the Fab fragment generated by Endoproteinase Lys-C digestion was devised. Both the intact h2E2 antibody and purified Fab fragments were analyzed for their affinities for cocaine and 2 of its metabolites, benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene, by fluorescence quenching of intrinsic antibody tyrosine and tryptophan fluorescence resulting from binding of these drugs. Binding constants obtained from fluorescence quenching measurements are in agreement with recently published radioligand and ELISA binding assays. The dissociation constants determined for the h2E2 monoclonal and its Fab fragment are approximately 1, 5, and 20 nM for cocaethylene, cocaine, and benzoylecgonine, respectively. Tryptophan fluorescence quenching (emission at 330 nm) was measured after either excitation of tyrosine and tryptophan (280 nm) or selective excitation of tryptophan alone (295 nm). More accurate binding constants are obtained using tryptophan selective excitation at 295 nm, likely due to interfering absorption of cocaine and metabolites at 280 nm. These quenching results are consistent with multiple tryptophan and tyrosine residues in or near the predicted binding location of cocaine in a previously published 3-D model of this antibody's variable region. PMID:25692880

  4. Characterization of a recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody and its Fab fragment

    PubMed Central

    Kirley, Terence L; Norman, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    Variations of post-translational modifications are important for stability and in vivo behavior of therapeutic antibodies. A recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody (h2E2) was characterized for heterogeneity of N-linked glycosylation and disulfide bonds. In addition, charge heterogeneity, which is partially due to the presence or absence of C-terminal lysine on the heavy chains, was examined. For cocaine overdose therapy, Fab fragments may be therapeutic, and thus, a simplified method of generation, purification, and characterization of the Fab fragment generated by Endoproteinase Lys-C digestion was devised. Both the intact h2E2 antibody and purified Fab fragments were analyzed for their affinities for cocaine and 2 of its metabolites, benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene, by fluorescence quenching of intrinsic antibody tyrosine and tryptophan fluorescence resulting from binding of these drugs. Binding constants obtained from fluorescence quenching measurements are in agreement with recently published radioligand and ELISA binding assays. The dissociation constants determined for the h2E2 monoclonal and its Fab fragment are approximately 1, 5, and 20 nM for cocaethylene, cocaine, and benzoylecgonine, respectively. Tryptophan fluorescence quenching (emission at 330 nm) was measured after either excitation of tyrosine and tryptophan (280 nm) or selective excitation of tryptophan alone (295 nm). More accurate binding constants are obtained using tryptophan selective excitation at 295 nm, likely due to interfering absorption of cocaine and metabolites at 280 nm. These quenching results are consistent with multiple tryptophan and tyrosine residues in or near the predicted binding location of cocaine in a previously published 3-D model of this antibody's variable region. PMID:25692880

  5. Diagnostic Potential of Recombinant scFv Antibodies Generated Against Hemagglutinin Protein of Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Roopali; Sharma, Gaurav; Rawat, Varsha; Gautam, Anju; Kumar, Binod; Pattnaik, B.; Pradhan, H. K.; Khanna, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Human influenza A viruses have been the cause of enormous socio-economic losses worldwide. In order to combat such a notorious pathogen, hemagglutinin protein (HA) has been a preferred target for generation of neutralizing-antibodies as potent therapeutic/diagnostic agents. In the present study, recombinant anti-HA single chain variable fragment antibodies were constructed using the phage-display technology to aid in diagnosis and treatment of human influenza A virus infections. Spleen cells of mice hyper-immunized with A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1) virus were used as the source for recombinant antibody (rAb) production. The antigen-binding phages were quantified after six rounds of bio-panning against A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1), A/California/07/2009 (H1N1)-like, or A/Udorn/307/72(H3N2) viruses. The maximum phage yield was for the A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1), however, considerable cross-reactivity was observed for the other virus strains as well. The HA-specific polyclonal rAb preparation was subjected to selection of single clones for identification of high reactive relatively conserved epitopes. The high-affinity rAbs were tested against certain known conserved HA epitopes by peptide ELISA. Three recombinant mAbs showed reactivity with both the H1N1 strains and one (C5) showed binding with all the three viral strains. The C5 antibody was thus used for development of an ELISA test for diagnosis of influenza virus infection. Based on the sample size in the current analysis, the ELISA test demonstrated 83.9% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Thus, the ELISA, developed in our study, may prove as a cheaper alternative to the presently used real time RT–PCR test for detection of human influenza A viruses in clinical specimens, which will be beneficial, especially in the developing countries. PMID:26388868

  6. Homologous recombination is required for AAV-mediated gene targeting

    PubMed Central

    Vasileva, Ana; Linden, R. Michael; Jessberger, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    High frequencies of gene targeting can be achieved by infection of mammalian cells with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors [D. W. Russell and R. K. Hirata (1998) Nature Genet., 18, 325–330; D. W. Russell and R. K. Hirata (2000) J. Virol., 74, 4612–4620; R. Hirata et al. (2002) Nat. Biotechnol., 20, 735–738], but the mechanism of targeting is unclear and random integration often occurs in parallel. We assessed the role of specific DNA repair and recombination pathways in rAAV gene targeting by measuring correction of a mutated enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene in cells where homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) had been suppressed by RNAi. EGFP-negative cells were transduced with rAAV vectors carrying a different inactivating deletion in the EGFP, and in parallel with rAAV vectors carrying red fluorescent protein (RFP). Expression of RFP accounted for viral transduction efficiency and long-term random integration. Approximately 0.02% of the infected GFP-negative cells were stably converted to GFP positive cells. Silencing of the essential NHEJ component DNA-PK had no significant effect on the frequency of targeting at any time point examined. Silencing of the SNF2/SWI2 family members RAD54L or RAD54B, which are important for HR, reduced the rate of stable rAAV gene targeting ∼5-fold. Further, partial silencing of the Rad51 paralogue XRCC3 completely abolished stable long-term EGFP expression. These results show that rAAV gene targeting requires the Rad51/Rad54 pathway of HR. PMID:16822856

  7. Gene delivery into plant cells for recombinant protein production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Lai, Huafang

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications. PMID:26075275

  8. Gene Delivery into Plant Cells for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications. PMID:26075275

  9. Recombinant HIV envelope trimer selects for quaternary-dependent antibodies targeting the trimer apex

    PubMed Central

    Sok, Devin; van Gils, Marit J.; Pauthner, Matthias; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Saye-Francisco, Karen L.; Hsueh, Jessica; Briney, Bryan; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Le, Khoa M.; Lee, Peter S.; Hua, Yuanzi; Seaman, Michael S.; Moore, John P.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Burton, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) targeting the trimer apex of HIV envelope are favored candidates for vaccine design and immunotherapy because of their great neutralization breadth and potency. However, methods of isolating bnAbs against this site have been limited by the quaternary nature of the epitope region. Here we report the use of a recombinant HIV envelope trimer, BG505 SOSIP.664 gp140, as an affinity reagent to isolate quaternary-dependent bnAbs from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a chronically infected donor. The newly isolated bnAbs, named “PGDM1400–1412,” show a wide range of neutralization breadth and potency. One of these variants, PGDM1400, is exceptionally broad and potent with cross-clade neutralization coverage of 83% at a median IC50 of 0.003 µg/mL. Overall, our results highlight the utility of BG505 SOSIP.664 gp140 as a tool for the isolation of quaternary-dependent antibodies and reveal a mosaic of antibody responses against the trimer apex within a clonal family. PMID:25422458

  10. Epitope-specificity of recombinant antibodies reveals promiscuous peptide-binding properties

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Niclas; Wallin, Stefan; James, Peter; Borrebaeck, Carl A K; Wingren, Christer

    2012-01-01

    Protein–peptide interactions are a common occurrence and essential for numerous cellular processes, and frequently explored in broad applications within biology, medicine, and proteomics. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanism(s) of protein–peptide recognition, specificity, and binding interactions will be essential. In this study, we report the first detailed analysis of antibody–peptide interaction characteristics, by combining large-scale experimental peptide binding data with the structural analysis of eight human recombinant antibodies and numerous peptides, targeting tryptic mammalian and eukaryote proteomes. The results consistently revealed that promiscuous peptide-binding interactions, that is, both specific and degenerate binding, were exhibited by all antibodies, and the discovery was corroborated by orthogonal data, indicating that this might be a general phenomenon for low-affinity antibody–peptide interactions. The molecular mechanism for the degenerate peptide-binding specificity appeared to be executed through the use of 2–3 semi-conserved anchor residues in the C-terminal part of the peptides, in analogue to the mechanism utilized by the major histocompatibility complex–peptide complexes. In the long-term, this knowledge will be instrumental for advancing our fundamental understanding of protein–peptide interactions, as well as for designing, generating, and applying peptide specific antibodies, or peptide-binding proteins in general, in various biotechnical and medical applications. PMID:23034898

  11. Control of culture environment for improved polyethylenimine-mediated transient production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies by CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, Douglas J; Tait, Andrew S; Racher, Andrew J; Birch, John R; James, David C

    2006-01-01

    In this study we describe optimization of polyethylenimine (PEI)-mediated transient production of recombinant protein by CHO cells by facile manipulation of a chemically defined culture environment to limit accumulation of nonproductive cell biomass, increase the duration of recombinant protein production from transfected plasmid DNA, and increase cell-specific production. The optimal conditions for transient transfection of suspension-adapted CHO cells using branched, 25 kDa PEI as a gene delivery vehicle were experimentally determined by production of secreted alkaline phosphatase reporter in static cultures and recombinant IgG4 monoclonal antibody (Mab) production in agitated shake flask cultures to be a DNA concentration of 1.25 microg 10(6) cells(-1) mL(-1) at a PEI nitrogen:DNA phosphate ratio of 20:1. These conditions represented the optimal compromise between PEI cytotoxicity and product yield with most efficient recombinant DNA utilization. Separately, both addition of recombinant insulin-like growth factor (LR3-IGF) and a reduction in culture temperature to 32 degrees C were found to increase product titer 2- and 3-fold, respectively. However, mild hypothermia and LR3-IGF acted synergistically to increase product titer 11-fold. Although increased product titer in the presence of LR3-IGF alone was solely a consequence of increased culture duration, a reduction in culture temperature post-transfection increased both the integral of viable cell concentration (IVC) and cell-specific Mab production rate. For cultures maintained at 32 degrees C in the presence of LR3-IGF, IVC and qMab were increased 4- and 2.5-fold, respectively. To further increase product yield from transfected DNA, the duration of transgene expression in cell populations maintained at 32 degrees C in the presence of LR3-IGF was doubled by periodic resuspension of transfected cells in fresh media, leading to a 3-fold increase in accumulated Mab titer from approximately 13 to approximately 39

  12. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, L.O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, B.E.

    1998-10-13

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol. 13 figs.

  13. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous gene

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2007-03-20

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  14. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  15. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2000-08-22

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  16. A Recombinant Bispecific CD20×CD95 Antibody With Superior Activity Against Normal and Malignant B-cells.

    PubMed

    Nalivaiko, Kristina; Hofmann, Martin; Kober, Karina; Teichweyde, Nadine; Krammer, Peter H; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Jung, Gundram

    2016-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed to the B-cell-specific CD20-antigen are successfully used for the treatment of lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. Here, we compare the anti-B-cell activity of three different antibodies directed to CD20: (i) a chimeric, monospecific antibody, (ii) an Fc-optimized variant thereof, and (iii) a bispecific CD20×CD95-antibody in a newly developed recombinant format, termed Fabsc. The bispecific antibody specifically triggers the CD95 death receptor on malignant, as well as activated, normal B-cells. We found that the capability of this antibody to suppress the growth of malignant B-cells in vitro and in vivo and to specifically deplete normal, activated B-cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures was superior to that of the Fc-optimized monospecific antibody. This antibody in turn was more effective than its nonoptimized variant. Moreover, the bispecific antibody was the only reagent capable of significantly suppressing antibody production in vitro. Our findings imply that the bispecific CD20×CD95-antibody might become a new, prototypical reagent for the treatment of B-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. PMID:26581163

  17. Detection of IgG antibody against Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus using ELISA with recombinant nucleoprotein antigens from genetically diverse strains.

    PubMed

    Rangunwala, A; Samudzi, R R; Burt, F J

    2014-10-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) has the propensity to cause nosocomial infections with a high fatality rate. Handling the virus requires biosafety level-4 facilities, limiting accessibility for many laboratories. Advances in molecular techniques have allowed preparation of safe recombinant antigens that have application in diagnosis and serosurveillance of CCHFV. The aim of this study was to determine genetic diversity in CCHFV based on all available complete sequence data for the S gene encoding CCHFV nucleoprotein (NP) and antibody cross-reactivity between the NP of a South African isolate and the NP of a Greek isolate (AP92), the most genetically diverse CCHFV strain. The nucleotide sequence diversity and amino-acid diversity between genotypes, within genotypes and the pairwise distances were calculated for a dataset of 45 CCHFV isolates retrieved from GenBank. The most diverse virus, AP92, isolated from a tick in Greece, displayed the highest amino-acid difference (8·7%) with SPU415/85, isolated from a human infection in South Africa. Recombinant NP encoded for by codon-optimized S genes of SPU415/85 and AP92 were expressed in a bacterial host system and used to develop an in-house ELISA to detect IgG antibody against CCHFV in South African patients who survived infection. A total of 14/14 sera reacted with the South African recombinant NP and 13/14 reacted with the Greek recombinant NP. The serological cross-reactivity of the two NP antigens suggests that recombinant antigens prepared from geographically distinct CCHFV will have diagnostic and epidemiological applications worldwide. PMID:24330947

  18. Salivary binding antibodies induced by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 recombinant gp120 vaccine. The NIAID AIDS Vaccine Evaluation Group.

    PubMed Central

    Gorse, G J; Yang, E Y; Belshe, R B; Berman, P W

    1996-01-01

    Salivary binding antibodies induced by candidate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccines in healthy, HIV-1 uninfected volunteers were assessed in a clinical trial evaluating intramuscularly injected HIV-1MN recombinant gp120 (rgp120) vaccine alone or with HIV-1IIIB rgp120 vaccine. The two rgp120 vaccines induced envelope glycoprotein-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibodies in whole saliva and serum. PMID:8914773

  19. Construction of a recombinant-BCG containing the LMP2A and BZLF1 genes and its significance in the Epstein-Barr virus positive gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qing-Jie; Dai, Jun; Li, Xiu-Zhen; Zhu, Wei; Si, Chuan-Ping; Chen, Ting

    2014-10-01

    The signal peptide Ag85B of Bacillus Chalmette-Guerin (BCG) was used to construct a recombinant plasmid of BCG. The BCG-Ag85B gene and fused EBV LMP2A and BZLF1 genes were amplified and successively inserted into the Escherichia coli-BCG shuttle-vector pMV261. The recombinant plasmids were then amplified in E. coli DH5α and transformed into competent BCG. The expression of BZLF1 and LMP2A fusion proteins in recombinant-BCG (rBCG) was shown by Western blot. After the injection of recombinant-BCG into mice, antibodies against the fusion protein BZLF1 and LMP2A were measured by ELISA, and the cellular immune effects were determined by the lactate dehydrogenate (LDH) release assays. The results confirmed that the cloned genes of BCG-Ag85B and Z2A were correctly inserted into the vector pMV261. The recombinant plasmid pMVZ2A expressed Z2A in BCG effectively after transformation. The rBCG proteins were recognized by the BZLF1 (LMP2A) antibody. An ELISA demonstrated that rBCG could stimulate the generation of antibody against the fusion protein. The fusion gene was constructed successfully, and the rBCG induced humoral and cellular immune response in mice. PMID:24699993

  20. A recombinant rabies virus encoding two copies of the glycoprotein gene confers protection in dogs against a virulent challenge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohui; Yang, Youtian; Sun, Zhaojin; Chen, Jing; Ai, Jun; Dun, Can; Fu, Zhen F; Niu, Xuefeng; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    The rabies virus (RABV) glycoprotein (G) is the principal antigen responsible for the induction of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA) and is the major modality of protective immunity in animals. A recombinant RABV HEP-Flury strain was generated by reverse genetics to encode two copies of the G-gene (referred to as HEP-dG). The biological properties of HEP-dG were compared to those of the parental virus (HEP-Flury strain). The HEP-dG recombinant virus grew 100 times more efficiently in BHK-21 cell than the parental virus, yet the virulence of the dG recombinant virus in suckling mice was lower than the parental virus. The HEP-dG virus can improve the expression of G-gene mRNA and the G protein and produce more offspring viruses in cells. The amount of G protein revealed a positive relationship with immunogenicity in mice and dogs. The inactivated HEP-dG recombinant virus induced higher levels of VNA and conferred better protection against virulent RABV in mice and dogs than the inactivated parental virus and a commercial vaccine. The protective antibody persisted for at least 12 months. These data demonstrate that the HEP-dG is stable, induces a strong VNA response and confers protective immunity more effectively than the RABV HEP-Flury strain. HEP-dG could be a potential candidate in the development of novel inactivated rabies vaccines. PMID:24498294

  1. Detection and Quantitation of Afucosylated N-Linked Oligosaccharides in Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies Using Enzymatic Digestion and LC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yi; May, Kimberly; Xu, Wei; Liu, Hongcheng

    2012-07-01

    The presence of N-linked oligosaccharides in the CH2 domain has a significant impact on the structure, stability, and biological functions of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. The impact is also highly dependent on the specific oligosaccharide structures. The absence of core-fucose has been demonstrated to result in increased binding affinity to Fcγ receptors and, thus, enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Therefore, a method that can specifically determine the level of oligosaccharides without the core-fucose (afucosylation) is highly desired. In the current study, recombinant monoclonal antibodies and tryptic peptides from the antibodies were digested using endoglycosidases F2 and H, which cleaves the glycosidic bond between the two primary GlcNAc residues. As a result, various oligosaccharides of either complex type or high mannose type that are commonly observed for recombinant monoclonal antibodies are converted to either GlcNAc residue only or GlcNAc with the core-fucose. The level of GlcNAc represents the sum of all afucosylated oligosaccharides, whereas the level of GlcNAc with the core-fucose represents the sum of all fucosylated oligosaccharides. LC-MS analysis of the enzymatically digested antibodies after reduction provided a quick estimate of the levels of afucosylation. An accurate determination of the level of afucosylation was obtained by LC-MS analysis of glycopeptides after trypsin digestion.

  2. Immunogenicity of recombinant BCGs expressing predicted antigenic epitopes of bovine viral diarrhea virus E2 gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongxu; Lu, Huijun; Shi, Kun; Su, Fengyan; Li, Jianming; Du, Rui

    2014-10-01

    To develop a vaccine to prevent diseases caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) simultaneously, recombinant Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (rBCG) vaccines expressing different regions of the BVDV E2 gene were constructed. Using DNASTAR 6.0 software, potential antigenic epitopes were predicted, and six regions were chosen to generate recombinant plasmids with the pMV361 vector (pMV361-E2-1, pMV361-E2-2, pMV361-E2-3, pMV361-E2-4, pMV361-E2-5 and pMV361-E2-6, respectively). The recombinant plasmids were transformed into BCG, and protein expression was thermally induced at 45 °C. Mice were immunized with 5 × 10(6) CFU/200 µL of each rBCG strain. Compared with other groups, BVDV E2 specific antibody titers were higher in mice immunized with rBCG-E2-6. Ratios and numbers of CD4+, CD8+ and IL-12 expressing spleen lymphocytes of the rBCG-E2-6 group also were higher than those of other groups. Thus, the rBCG-E2-6 vaccine showed the highest immunogenicity of all groups based on the humoral and cellular responses to vaccination. PMID:25135492

  3. Isolation and characterization of human neutralizing antibodies to rabies virus derived from a recombinant immune antibody library.

    PubMed

    Houimel, Mehdi; Dellagi, Koussay

    2009-11-01

    A human immune Fab library was constructed using RNAs from peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from rabies virus hyperimmune volunteers on phagemid vector. The size of the constructed Fab library was 2 x 10(7) Escherichia coli transformants. After four rounds of panning on whole inactivated rabies virus (PV-11), phage clones displaying rabies virus-specific human Fab were selected. The specificity of soluble Fab antibody fragments, derived from positive phage clones was verified by ELISA. Among 20 specific Fab clones, the genetic sequence of 6 of them (FabRV01, FabRV02, FabRV03, FabRV04, FabRV05, and FabRV06) was analyzed. The variable heavy (VH) and variable light (VL) domains were found to share 90% and 93% homology with sequences encoded by the corresponding human germline genes, respectively. The soluble Fab fragments, expressed in Escherichia coli were purified by a single step Nickel-NTA affinity chromatography via a hexa-histidine tag and their binding specificities to rabies virus were confirmed. Three of the Fab antibodies, FabRV01, FabRV02 and FabRV03, showed binding characteristics to rabies virus glycoprotein antigenic site III with affinities in the K(D) range 7 x 10(-9) to 5 x 10(-8)M. The Fab fragments showed dose-dependent neutralization properties for the challenge virus standard (CVS-11). PMID:19559727

  4. Effect of inhibin gene immunization on antibody production and reproductive performance in Partridge Shank hens.

    PubMed

    Mao, Dagan; Bai, Wujiao; Hui, Fengming; Yang, Liguo; Cao, Shaoxian; Xu, Yinxue

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the effect of inhibin gene immunization on antibody production and reproductive performance in broiler breeder females, Partridge Shank hens aged 380 days were immunized with inhibin recombinant plasmid pcISI. One hundred and twenty hens were randomly assigned to four groups and treated intramuscularly with 25, 75, or 125 μg/300-μL inhibin recombinant plasmid pcISI (T1∼T3) or 300-μL saline as control (C), respectively. Booster immunization was given with the same dosage 20 days later. Blood and egg samples were collected to detect the antibody against inhibin by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and to evaluate egg performance. The ovaries were collected to classify the follicles and detect the FSH receptor (FSHR) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression by reverse transcription-PCR. The results showed that immunization against pcISI could elicit antibody against inhibin in both plasma and egg yolk compared with the control (P < 0.05), whereas booster immunization did not increase the antibody level in plasma. Vaccination promoted egg lay during the first 30 days after primary vaccination (P < 0.05) with no effect on egg quality and hatching rate. Immunization increased the amounts of dominant, small yellow and large white follicles in the ovary (P < 0.05). Reverse transcription-PCR results showed that immunization increased the FSHR mRNA in the large white follicles, whereas decreased the FSHR mRNA in the small yellow follicles (P < 0.05). In conclusion, inhibin vaccine pcISI can stimulate the production of antibody against inhibin as well as the follicle development and egg laying performance in Partridge Shank hens, which provides a good foundation for the application of inhibin DNA vaccine in avian production. PMID:26739531

  5. Targeted Multiplex Imaging Mass Spectrometry with Single Chain Fragment Variable (scfv) Recombinant Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiery, Gwendoline; Mernaugh, Ray L.; Yan, Heping; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Junhai; Parl, Fritz F.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2012-10-01

    Recombinant scfv antibodies specific for CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 P450 enzymes were combined with targeted imaging mass spectrometry to simultaneously detect the P450 enzymes present in archived, paraffin-embedded, human breast cancer tissue sections. By using CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 specific scfv, each coupled to a unique reporter molecule (i.e., a mass tag) it was possible to simultaneously detect multiple antigens within a single tissue sample with high sensitivity and specificity using mass spectrometry. The capability of imaging multiple antigens at the same time is a significant advance that overcomes technical barriers encountered when using present day approaches to develop assays that can simultaneously detect more than a single antigen in the same tissue sample.

  6. Gene knockout of the intracellular amylase gene by homologous recombination in Streptococcus bovis.

    PubMed

    Brooker, J D; McCarthy, J M

    1997-09-01

    Streptococcus bovis expresses two different amylases, one intracellular and the other secreted. A suicide vector containing part of the intracellular alpha-amylase gene from Streptococcus bovis WI-1 was recombined into the S. bovis WI-1 chromosome to disrupt the endogenous gene. Recombination was demonstrated by Southern blot, and zymogram analysis confirmed the loss of the intracellular amylase. Amylase activity in cell-free extracts of the recombinant grown in the presence of 1% starch was only 7% of wild type. The rate of logarithmic growth of the recombinant was 15-20% of the wild type in medium containing either 1% glucose, starch, or cellobiose. Revertants and non-amylase control recombinants had logarithmic growth rates that were the same as wild type. Plasmid transformants containing multiple copies of the cloned gene expressed up to threefold higher levels of intracellular amylase activity than wild type but did not demonstrate elevated growth rates. These results suggest that a critical level of expression of the intracellular amylase gene may be important for rapid growth of the bacterium. PMID:9236293

  7. Immunoblot assays using recombinant antigens for the detection of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antibodies.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, S; Frey, J; Huang, B; Djordjevic, S; Kwang, J

    2000-07-01

    The 36kDa L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and a 29kDa partial fragment of an ABC transporter ATP-binding protein analogue/multidrug resistance protein homologue (PR2) of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae were tested for their potential as diagnostic antigens. Recombinant LDH was genetically engineered to contain six histidine residues at its C-terminal end, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to a high degree using Ni(2+)-chelate affinity chromatography. A partial 262 amino acid segment representing the C-terminal end of the PR2 protein was cloned as a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein, expressed in E. coli and purified by urea extraction. Purified recombinant LDH-6xHis and PR2-GST were then reacted with pig sera in immunoblot assays. Our immunoblots showed that both proteins detected anti-M. hyopneumoniae antibodies in field and experimentally infected pig sera but not in any of the SPF control sera. The two proteins were specific for M. hyopneumoniae as they did not react with sera of pigs infected with the closely related Mycoplasma flocculare and Mycoplasma hyorhinis which are frequently isolated in pigs but are not of particular concern. PMID:10865156

  8. Antibodies induced with recombinant VP1 from human rhinovirus exhibit cross-neutralisation.

    PubMed

    Edlmayr, J; Niespodziana, K; Popow-Kraupp, T; Krzyzanek, V; Focke-Tejkl, M; Blaas, D; Grote, M; Valenta, R

    2011-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are the major cause of the common cold and account for 30-50% of all acute respiratory illnesses. Although HRV infections are usually harmless and invade only the upper respiratory tract, several studies demonstrate that HRV is involved in the exacerbation of asthma. VP1 is one of the surface-exposed proteins of the viral capsid that is important for the binding of rhinoviruses to the corresponding receptors on human cells. Here we investigated its potential usefulness for vaccination against the common cold. We expressed VP1 proteins from two distantly related HRV strains, HRV89 and HRV14, in Escherichia coli. Mice and rabbits were immunised with the purified recombinant proteins. The induced antibodies reacted with natural VP1 and with whole virus particles as shown by immunoblotting and immunogold electron microscopy. They exhibited strong cross-neutralising activity for different HRV strains. Therefore, recombinant VP1 may be considered a candidate HRV vaccine to prevent HRV-induced asthma exacerbations. PMID:20530036

  9. Analysis of nonhuman N-glycans as the minor constituents in recombinant monoclonal antibody pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Eiki; Kita, Soichiro; Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Urakami, Koji; Hayakawa, Takao; Kakehi, Kazuaki

    2012-03-01

    Minor N-linked glycans containing N-glycolylneuraminic acid residues and/or α-Gal epitopes (i.e., galactose-α1,3-galactose residues) have been reported to be present in recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics. These contaminations are due to their production processes using nonhuman mammalian cell lines in culture media containing animal-derived materials. In case of the treatment of tumors, we inevitably use such mAbs by careful risk-benefit considerations to prolong patients' lives. However, expanding their clinical applications such as for rheumatism, asthma, and analgesia demands more careful evaluation of the product characteristics. The present work for detailed evaluations of N-glycans demonstrates the methods using capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) and a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The CE-LIF method provides excellent separation of both major and minor N-glycans from six commercial mAb pharmaceuticals within 30 min and clearly indicates that a possible trigger of immunogenicity in humans due to the presence of nonhuman N-glycans is present. We strongly believe that the proposed method will be a powerful tool for the analysis of N-glycans of recombinant mAb products in various development stages, such as clone selection, process control, and routine release testing to ensure safety and efficacy of the products. PMID:22394092

  10. Alpaca (Lama pacos) as a convenient source of recombinant camelid heavy chain antibodies (VHHs).

    PubMed

    Maass, David R; Sepulveda, Jorge; Pernthaner, Anton; Shoemaker, Charles B

    2007-07-31

    Recombinant single domain antibody fragments (VHHs) that derive from the unusual camelid heavy chain only IgG class (HCAbs) have many favourable properties compared with single-chain antibodies prepared from conventional IgG. As a result, VHHs have become widely used as binding reagents and are beginning to show potential as therapeutic agents. To date, the source of VHH genetic material has been camels and llamas despite their large size and limited availability. Here we demonstrate that the smaller, more tractable and widely available alpaca is an excellent source of VHH coding DNA. Alpaca sera IgG consists of about 50% HCAbs, mostly of the short-hinge variety. Sequencing of DNA encoding more than 50 random VHH and hinge domains permitted the design of PCR primers that will amplify virtually all alpaca VHH coding DNAs for phage display library construction. Alpacas were immunized with ovine tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and a VHH phage display library was prepared from a lymph node that drains the sites of immunizations and successfully employed in the isolation of VHHs that bind and neutralize ovine TNFalpha. PMID:17568607

  11. Characterization of recombinant bacteriophages containing mosquito ribosomal RNA genes

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.J.

    1988-01-01

    A family of nine recombinant bacteriophages containing rRNA genes from cultured cells of the mosquito, Aedes albopictus, has been isolated by screening two different genomic DNA libraries - Charon 30 and EMBL 3 using {sup 32}P-labeled 18S and 28S rRNA as probes. These nine recombinant bacteriophages were characterized by restriction mapping, Southern blotting, and S1 nuclease analysis. The 18S rRNA coding region contains an evolutionarily conserved EcoRI site near the 3{prime}-end, and measures 1800 bp. The 28S rRNA genes were divided into {alpha} and {beta} coding regions measuring 1750 bp and 2000 bp, respectively. The gap between these two regions measures about 340 bp. No insertion sequences were found in the rRNA coding regions. The entire rDNA repeat unit had a minimum length of 15.6 kb, including a nontranscribed spacer region. The non-transcribed spacer region of cloned A. albopictus rDNA contained a common series of seven PvuI sites within a 1250 bp region upstream of the 18S rRNA coding region, and a proportion of this region also showed heterogeneity both in the length and in the restriction sites.

  12. Three faces of recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1) mutations.

    PubMed

    Patiroglu, Turkan; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Van Der Burg, Mirjam

    2015-12-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) is a group of genetic disorder associated with development of T- and/or B-lymphocytes. Recombination-activating genes (RAG1/2) play a critical role on VDJ recombination process that leads to the production of a broad T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor (BCR) repertoire in the development of T and B cells. RAG1/2 genes mutations result in various forms of primary immunodeficiency, ranging from classic SCID to Omenn syndrome (OS) to atypical SCID with such as granuloma formation and autoimmunity. Herein, we reported 4 patients with RAG1 deficiency: classic SCID was seen in two patients who presented with recurrent pneumonia and chronic diarrhoea, and failure to thrive. OS was observed in one patient who presented with chronic diarrhoea, skin rash, recurrent lower respiratory infections, and atypical SCID was seen in one patient who presented with Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and had novel RAG1 mutation. PMID:26689875

  13. Immunomodulatory gene therapy prevents antibody formation and lethal hypersensitivity reactions in murine pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Kulis, Michael D; Young, Sarah P; Hobeika, Amy C; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Zhang, Haoyue; Li, Yifan; Clay, Timothy M; Burks, Wesley; Kishnani, Priya S; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2010-02-01

    Infantile Pompe disease progresses to a lethal cardiomyopathy in absence of effective treatment. Enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid alpha-glucosidase (rhGAA) has been effective in most patients with Pompe disease, but efficacy was reduced by high-titer antibody responses. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a low dose adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector (2 x 10(10) particles) containing a liver-specific regulatory cassette significantly lowered immunoglobin G (IgG), IgG1, and IgE antibodies to GAA in Pompe disease mice, when compared with mock-treated mice (P < 0.05). AAV-LSPhGAApA had the same effect on GAA-antibody production whether it was given prior to, following, or simultaneously with the initial GAA injection. Mice given AAV-LSPhGAApA had significantly less decrease in body temperature (P < 0.001) and lower anaphylactic scores (P < 0.01) following the GAA challenge. Mouse mast cell protease-1 (MMCP-1) followed the pattern associated with hypersensitivity reactions (P < 0.05). Regulatory T cells (Treg) were demonstrated to play a role in the tolerance induced by gene therapy as depletion of Treg led to an increase in GAA-specific IgG (P < 0.001). Treg depleted mice were challenged with GAA and had significantly stronger allergic reactions than mice given gene therapy without subsequent Treg depletion (temperature: P < 0.01; symptoms: P < 0.05). Ubiquitous GAA expression failed to prevent antibody formation. Thus, immunomodulatory gene therapy could provide adjunctive therapy in lysosomal storage disorders treated by enzyme replacement. PMID:19690517

  14. Immunomodulatory Gene Therapy Prevents Antibody Formation and Lethal Hypersensitivity Reactions in Murine Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong; Kulis, Michael D; Young, Sarah P; Hobeika, Amy C; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Zhang, Haoyue; Li, Yifan; Clay, Timothy M; Burks, Wesley; Kishnani, Priya S; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2009-01-01

    Infantile Pompe disease progresses to a lethal cardiomyopathy in absence of effective treatment. Enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA) has been effective in most patients with Pompe disease, but efficacy was reduced by high-titer antibody responses. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a low dose adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector (2 × 1010 particles) containing a liver-specific regulatory cassette significantly lowered immunoglobin G (IgG), IgG1, and IgE antibodies to GAA in Pompe disease mice, when compared with mock-treated mice (P < 0.05). AAV-LSPhGAApA had the same effect on GAA-antibody production whether it was given prior to, following, or simultaneously with the initial GAA injection. Mice given AAV-LSPhGAApA had significantly less decrease in body temperature (P < 0.001) and lower anaphylactic scores (P < 0.01) following the GAA challenge. Mouse mast cell protease-1 (MMCP-1) followed the pattern associated with hypersensitivity reactions (P < 0.05). Regulatory T cells (Treg) were demonstrated to play a role in the tolerance induced by gene therapy as depletion of Treg led to an increase in GAA-specific IgG (P < 0.001). Treg depleted mice were challenged with GAA and had significantly stronger allergic reactions than mice given gene therapy without subsequent Treg depletion (temperature: P < 0.01; symptoms: P < 0.05). Ubiquitous GAA expression failed to prevent antibody formation. Thus, immunomodulatory gene therapy could provide adjunctive therapy in lysosomal storage disorders treated by enzyme replacement. PMID:19690517

  15. Refinement of the canine CD1 locus topology and investigation of antibody binding to recombinant canine CD1 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Schjaerff, Mette; Keller, Stefan M; Fass, Joseph; Froenicke, Lutz; Grahn, Robert A; Lyons, Leslie; Affolter, Verena K; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Moore, Peter F

    2016-03-01

    CD1 molecules are antigen-presenting glycoproteins primarily found on dendritic cells (DCs) responsible for lipid antigen presentation to CD1-restricted T cells. Despite their pivotal role in immunity, little is known about CD1 protein expression in dogs, notably due to lack of isoform-specific antibodies. The canine (Canis familiaris) CD1 locus was previously found to contain three functional CD1A genes: canCD1A2, canCD1A6, and canCD1A8, where two variants of canCD1A8, canCD1A8.1 and canCD1A8.2, were assumed to be allelic variants. However, we hypothesized that these rather represented two separate genes. Sequencing of three overlapping bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) spanning the entire canine CD1 locus revealed canCD1A8.2 and canCD1A8.1 to be located in tandem between canCD1A7 and canCD1C, and canCD1A8.1 was consequently renamed canCD1A9. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused canine CD1 transcripts were recombinantly expressed in 293T cells. All proteins showed a highly positive GFP expression except for canine CD1d and a splice variant of canine CD1a8 lacking exon 3. Probing with a panel of anti-CD1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) showed that Ca13.9H11 and Ca9.AG5 only recognized canine CD1a8 and CD1a9 isoforms, and Fe1.5F4 mAb solely recognized canine CD1a6. Anti-CD1b mAbs recognized the canine CD1b protein, but also bound CD1a2, CD1a8, and CD1a9. Interestingly, Ca9.AG5 showed allele specificity based on a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located at position 321. Our findings have refined the structure of the canine CD1 locus and available antibody specificity against canine CD1 proteins. These are important fundamentals for future investigation of the role of canine CD1 in lipid immunity. PMID:26687789

  16. Detection of African Swine Fever Virus Antibodies in Serum and Oral Fluid Specimens Using a Recombinant Protein 30 (p30) Dual Matrix Indirect ELISA.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Lirola, Luis G; Mur, Lina; Rivera, Belen; Mogler, Mark; Sun, Yaxuan; Lizano, Sergio; Goodell, Christa; Harris, D L Hank; Rowland, Raymond R R; Gallardo, Carmina; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel; Zimmerman, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    In the absence of effective vaccine(s), control of African swine fever caused by African swine fever virus (ASFV) must be based on early, efficient, cost-effective detection and strict control and elimination strategies. For this purpose, we developed an indirect ELISA capable of detecting ASFV antibodies in either serum or oral fluid specimens. The recombinant protein used in the ELISA was selected by comparing the early serum antibody response of ASFV-infected pigs (NHV-p68 isolate) to three major recombinant polypeptides (p30, p54, p72) using a multiplex fluorescent microbead-based immunoassay (FMIA). Non-hazardous (non-infectious) antibody-positive serum for use as plate positive controls and for the calculation of sample-to-positive (S:P) ratios was produced by inoculating pigs with a replicon particle (RP) vaccine expressing the ASFV p30 gene. The optimized ELISA detected anti-p30 antibodies in serum and/or oral fluid samples from pigs inoculated with ASFV under experimental conditions beginning 8 to 12 days post inoculation. Tests on serum (n = 200) and oral fluid (n = 200) field samples from an ASFV-free population demonstrated that the assay was highly diagnostically specific. The convenience and diagnostic utility of oral fluid sampling combined with the flexibility to test either serum or oral fluid on the same platform suggests that this assay will be highly useful under the conditions for which OIE recommends ASFV antibody surveillance, i.e., in ASFV-endemic areas and for the detection of infections with ASFV isolates of low virulence. PMID:27611939

  17. Production of Monoclonal Antibody Against Recombinant Polypeptide From the Erns Coding Region of the Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus

    PubMed Central

    Seyfi Abad Shapouri, Masood Reza; Ekhtelat, Maryam; Ghorbanpoor Najaf Abadi, Masood; Mahmoodi Koohi, Pezhman; Lotfi, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) is an economically important cattle disease with a worldwide distribution. Detection and elimination of animals persistently infected (PI) with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is essential for the control of BVD and eradication of BVDV. There are usually no pathognomonic clinical signs of BVDV infection. Diagnostic investigations therefore rely on laboratory-based detection of the virus, or virus-induced antigens or antibodies. Objectives: Erns as an immunogenic protein of BVDV, is genetically and antigenically conserved among different isolates and therefore, is a candidate antigen for development of the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for serological studies or identification of PI animals. The aim of this study was to produce a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against recombinant Erns. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, recombinant maltose-binding protein (MBP)-Erns protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using amylose resin chromatography column and used as an antigen in MAb production. Spleen cells of the immunized mice with the recombinant antigen were fused with SP2/0 myeloma cells. Next, culture supernatants of primary clones of fused cells were screened by indirect ELISA. After three rounds of cloning, the reactivity of the MAbs with recombinant and natural antigen was established by Western blotting. Results: Based on our results, MAb against recombinant Erns was produced and reacted successfully with recombinant and natural antigens. Conclusions: With regards to the role of Erns in the identification of PI animals, it appears that Erns recombinant antigen and the specific monoclonal antibodies produced against it may be suitable for developing BVDV laboratory diagnostic assays. PMID:26870309

  18. Species-specific antibody responses to the recombinant 53-kilodalton excretory and secretory proteins in mice infected with Trichinella spp.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Isao; Wu, Zhiliang; Takahashi, Yuzo

    2008-03-01

    The 53-kDa proteins in larval excretory and secretory (E-S) products were expressed from five Trichinella species (T. spiralis, T. britovi, T. nativa, T. pseudospiralis, and T. papuae), using the Escherichia coli expression system, and the antibody responses to the 53-kDa recombinant proteins in mice infected with Trichinella spp. were analyzed by Western blotting. The 53-kDa protein is conserved among the five Trichinella species, with >60% similarity in amino acid sequences. The 53-kDa recombinant proteins of T. spiralis and T. pseudospiralis reacted to sera from mice infected with T. spiralis and T. pseudospiralis at 8 days postinfection (p.i.), respectively. An antibody against the 53-kDa recombinant protein of T. spiralis recognized the 53-kDa protein in the crude extracts from adult worms and 30-day p.i. muscle larvae and E-S products from muscle larvae of T. spiralis but did not recognize any proteins from T. pseudospiralis. The sera from the mice infected with T. spiralis strongly reacted with the 53-kDa recombinant protein of T. spiralis but did not react with the 53-kDa recombinant proteins of T. britovi, T. nativa, T. pseudospiralis, and T. papuae. Similarly, the sera from mice infected with T. britovi, T. nativa, T. pseudospiralis, or T. papuae strongly reacted with the 53-kDa recombinant proteins of T. britovi, T. nativa, T. pseudospiralis, or T. papuae, respectively. These results showed that the 53-kDa recombinant proteins provide early and species-specific antibody responses in mice infected with Trichinella spp. PMID:18184826

  19. SITE-SPECIFIC RECOMBINATION FOR PLANT GENETIC ENGINEERING: STRATEGY FOR AGRO-MEDIATED GENE STACKING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The precise rearrangement of DNA in planta can be achieved through site-specific recombination. For the past decade and a half, laboratory experiments have shown that site-specific recombination can delete genomic DNA, regulate gene expression, recombine chromosomes, and target new DNA into designat...

  20. Targeting TARP, a novel breast and prostate tumor-associated antigen, with T-cell receptor- like human recombinant antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Epel, Malka; Carmi, Irit; Soueid- Baumgarten, Sharon; Oh, SangKon; Bera, Tapan; Pastan, Ira; Berzofsky, Jay; Reiter, Yoram

    2009-01-01

    MHC class I molecules are important components of immune surveillance. There are no available methods to directly visualize and determine the quantity and distribution of MHC/peptide complexes on individual cells or to detect such complexes on antigen presenting cells in tissues. MHC-restricted recombinant antibodies with the same specificity of T-cell receptors may become a valuable tool to address these questions. They may also serve as valuable targeting molecules that mimic the specificity of cytotoxic T cells. We isolated by phage display a panel of human recombinant Fab antibodies with peptide-specific, MHC-restricted TCR-like reactivity directed toward HLA-A2-restricted T-cell epitope derived from a novel antigen termed TCRγ Alternative Reading frame Protein (TARP) which is expressed on prostate and breast cancer cells. We have characterized one of these recombinant antibodies and demonstrated its capacity to directly detect specific HLA-A2/TARP T-cell epitopes on antigen presenting cells that have complexes formed by naturally occurring active intracellular processing of the antigen as well as on the surface of tumor cells. Moreover, by genetic fusion we armed the TCR-like antibody with a potent toxin and demonstrated that it can serve as a targeting moiety killing tumor cells in a peptide-specific, MHC-restricted manner similar to cytotoxic T-cell Lymphocytes. PMID:18446790

  1. Recombinant antibody mediated delivery of organelle-specific DNA pH sensors along endocytic pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Souvik; Halder, Saheli; Nizak, Clément; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2013-12-01

    DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing the sequence of the pH sensitive domain of the DNA sensor, we have been able to tune their pH sensitive regimes and create a family of DNA sensors spanning ranges from pH 4 to 7.6. To enable a generalizable targeting methodology, this new sensor design also incorporates a `handle' domain. We have identified, using a phage display screen, a set of three recombinant antibodies (scFv) that bind sequence specifically to the handle domain. Sequence analysis of these antibodies revealed several conserved residues that mediate specific interactions with the cognate DNA duplex. We also found that all three scFvs clustered into different branches indicating that their specificity arises from mutations in key residues. When one of these scFvs is fused to a membrane protein (furin) that traffics via the cell surface, the scFv-furin chimera binds the `handle' and ferries a family of DNA pH sensors along the furin endocytic pathway. Post endocytosis, all DNA nanodevices retain their functionality in cellulo and provide spatiotemporal pH maps of retrogradely trafficking furin inside living cells. This new molecular technology of DNA-scFv-protein chimeras can be used to site-specifically complex DNA nanostructures for bioanalytical applications.DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing

  2. Development of a multi-product leached protein A assay for bioprocess samples containing recombinant human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ren, Diya; Darlucio, Maria R; Chou, Judy H

    2011-03-01

    The detection of low level of protein A leached from monoclonal antibody downstream purification process is often interfered by the presence of excess amount of product antibody. In order to prevent this interference, we developed a new multi-product leached protein A assay that used acidification to completely dissociate the IgG-ProteinA complex, followed by neutralization under selected condition to prevent re-formation of the IgG-ProteinA complex. The amount of protein A was then determined by a sandwich immunoassay using Meso Scale Discovery technology. The assay takes approximately 3h to complete for one 96-well plate of samples, and this has been successfully applied to samples containing different monoclonal antibody products examined so far. The data demonstrates that this assay is robust and efficient in determining leached protein A contamination during purification of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. PMID:21315722

  3. Vaccination against canine distemper virus infection in infant ferrets with and without maternal antibody protection, using recombinant attenuated poxvirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Welter, J; Taylor, J; Tartaglia, J; Paoletti, E; Stephensen, C B

    2000-07-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets is clinically and immunologically similar to measles, making this a useful model for the human disease. The model was used to determine if parenteral or mucosal immunization of infant ferrets at 3 and 6 weeks of age with attenuated vaccinia virus (NYVAC) or canarypox virus (ALVAC) vaccine strains expressing the CDV hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) protein genes (NYVAC-HF and ALVAC-HF) would induce serum neutralizing antibody and protect against challenge infection at 12 weeks of age. Ferrets without maternal antibody that were vaccinated parenterally with NYVAC-HF (n = 5) or ALVAC-HF (n = 4) developed significant neutralizing titers (log(10) inverse mean titer +/- standard deviation of 2.30 +/- 0.12 and 2.20 +/- 0.34, respectively) by the day of challenge, and all survived with no clinical or virologic evidence of infection. Ferrets without maternal antibody that were vaccinated intranasally (i.n.) developed lower neutralizing titers, with NYVAC-HF producing higher titers at challenge (1.11 +/- 0.57 versus 0.40 +/- 0.37, P = 0.02) and a better survival rate (6/7 versus 0/5, P = 0.008) than ALVAC-HF. Ferrets with maternal antibody that were vaccinated parenterally with NYVAC-HF (n = 7) and ALVAC-HF (n = 7) developed significantly higher antibody titers (1.64 +/- 0. 54 and 1.28 +/- 0.40, respectively) than did ferrets immunized with an attenuated CDV vaccine (0.46 +/- 0.59; n = 7) or the recombinant vectors expressing rabies glycoprotein (RG) (0.19 +/- 0.32; n = 8, P = 7 x 10(-6)). The NYVAC vaccine also protected against weight loss, and both the NYVAC and attenuated CDV vaccines protected against the development of some clinical signs of infection, although survival in each of the three vaccine groups was low (one of seven) and not significantly different from the RG controls (none of eight). Combined i.n.-parenteral immunization of ferrets with maternal antibody using NYVAC-HF (n = 9) produced higher titers (1

  4. Vaccination against Canine Distemper Virus Infection in Infant Ferrets with and without Maternal Antibody Protection, Using Recombinant Attenuated Poxvirus Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Welter, Janet; Taylor, Jill; Tartaglia, James; Paoletti, Enzo; Stephensen, Charles B.

    2000-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets is clinically and immunologically similar to measles, making this a useful model for the human disease. The model was used to determine if parenteral or mucosal immunization of infant ferrets at 3 and 6 weeks of age with attenuated vaccinia virus (NYVAC) or canarypox virus (ALVAC) vaccine strains expressing the CDV hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) protein genes (NYVAC-HF and ALVAC-HF) would induce serum neutralizing antibody and protect against challenge infection at 12 weeks of age. Ferrets without maternal antibody that were vaccinated parenterally with NYVAC-HF (n = 5) or ALVAC-HF (n = 4) developed significant neutralizing titers (log10 inverse mean titer ± standard deviation of 2.30 ± 0.12 and 2.20 ± 0.34, respectively) by the day of challenge, and all survived with no clinical or virologic evidence of infection. Ferrets without maternal antibody that were vaccinated intranasally (i.n.) developed lower neutralizing titers, with NYVAC-HF producing higher titers at challenge (1.11 ± 0.57 versus 0.40 ± 0.37, P = 0.02) and a better survival rate (6/7 versus 0/5, P = 0.008) than ALVAC-HF. Ferrets with maternal antibody that were vaccinated parenterally with NYVAC-HF (n = 7) and ALVAC-HF (n = 7) developed significantly higher antibody titers (1.64 ± 0.54 and 1.28 ± 0.40, respectively) than did ferrets immunized with an attenuated CDV vaccine (0.46 ± 0.59; n = 7) or the recombinant vectors expressing rabies glycoprotein (RG) (0.19 ± 0.32; n = 8, P = 7 × 10−6). The NYVAC vaccine also protected against weight loss, and both the NYVAC and attenuated CDV vaccines protected against the development of some clinical signs of infection, although survival in each of the three vaccine groups was low (one of seven) and not significantly different from the RG controls (none of eight). Combined i.n.-parenteral immunization of ferrets with maternal antibody using NYVAC-HF (n = 9) produced higher titers (1.63 ± 0

  5. Delineation of BmSXP antibody V-gene usage from a lymphatic filariasis based immune scFv antibody library.

    PubMed

    Rahumatullah, Anizah; Ahmad, Azimah; Noordin, Rahmah; Lim, Theam Soon

    2015-10-01

    Phage display technology is an important tool for antibody generation or selection. This study describes the development of a scFv library and the subsequent analysis of identified monoclonal antibodies against BmSXP, a recombinant antigen for lymphatic filariasis. The immune library was generated from blood of lymphatic filariasis infected individuals. A TA based intermediary cloning approach was used to increase cloning efficiency for the library construction process. A diverse immune scFv library of 10(8) was generated. Six unique monoclonal antibodies were identified from the 50 isolated clones against BmSXP. Analysis of the clones showed a bias for the IgHV3 and Vκ1 (45.5%) and IgHV2 and Vκ3 (27.3%) gene family. The most favored J segment for light chain is IgKJ1 (45.5%). The most favored D and J segment for heavy chain are IgHD6-13 (75%) and IgHJ3 (47.7%). The information may suggest a predisposition of certain V genes in antibody responses against lymphatic filariasis. PMID:26277276

  6. Recombinant antibodies encoded by IGHV1-69 react with pUL32, a phosphoprotein of cytomegalovirus and B-cell superantigen

    PubMed Central

    Steininger, Christoph; Widhopf, George F.; Ghia, Emanuela M.; Morello, Christopher S.; Vanura, Katrina; Sanders, Rebecca; Spector, Deborah; Guiney, Don; Jäger, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Leukemia cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) express a highly restricted immunoglobulin heavy variable chain (IGHV) repertoire, suggesting that a limited set of antigens reacts with leukemic cells. Here, we evaluated the reactivity of a panel of different CLL recombinant antibodies (rAbs) encoded by the most commonly expressed IGHV genes with a panel of selected viral and bacterial pathogens. Six different CLL rAbs encoded by IGHV1-69 or IGHV3-21, but not a CLL rAb encoded by IGHV4-39 genes, reacted with a single protein of human cytomegalovirus (CMV). The CMV protein was identified as the large structural phosphoprotein pUL32. In contrast, none of the CLL rAbs bound to any other structure of CMV, adenovirus serotype 2, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, or of cells used for propagation of these microorganisms. Monoclonal antibodies or humanized rAbs of irrelevant specificity to pUL32 did not react with any of the proteins present in the different lysates. Still, rAbs encoded by a germ line IGHV1-69 51p1 allele from CMV-seropositive and -negative adults also reacted with pUL32. The observed reactivity of multiple different CLL rAbs and natural antibodies from CMV-seronegative adults with pUL32 is consistent with the properties of a superantigen. PMID:22234695

  7. Isolation of Camelid Single-Domain Antibodies Against Native Proteins Using Recombinant Multivalent Peptide Ligands.

    PubMed

    Alturki, Norah A; Henry, Kevin A; MacKenzie, C Roger; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Generation of antibodies against desired epitopes on folded proteins may be hampered by various characteristics of the target protein, including antigenic and immunogenic dominance of irrelevant epitopes and/or steric occlusion of the desired epitope. In such cases, peptides encompassing linear epitopes of the native protein represent attractive alternative reagents for immunization and screening. Peptide antigens are typically prepared by fusing or conjugating the peptide of interest to a carrier protein. The utility of such antigens depends on many factors including the peptide's amino acid sequence, display valency, display format (synthetic conjugate vs. recombinant fusion) and characteristics of the carrier. Here we provide detailed protocols for: (1) preparation of DNA constructs encoding peptides fused to verotoxin (VT) multimerization domain; (2) expression, purification, and characterization of the multivalent peptide-VT ligands; (3) concurrent panning of a non-immune phage-displayed camelid VHH library against the peptide-VT ligands and native protein; and (4) identification of VHHs enriched via panning using next-generation sequencing techniques. These methods are simple, rapid and can be easily adapted to yield custom peptide-VT ligands that appear to maintain the antigenic structures of the peptide. However, we caution that peptide sequences should be chosen with great care, taking into account structural, immunological, and biophysical information on the protein of interest. PMID:26424272

  8. The haemagglutinin gene, but not the neuraminidase gene, of 'Spanish flu' was a recombinant.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, M J; Armstrong, J S; Gibbs, A J

    2001-01-01

    Published analyses of the sequences of three genes from the 1918 Spanish influenza virus have cast doubt on the theory that it came from birds immediately before the pandemic. They showed that the virus was of the H1N1 subtype lineage but more closely related to mammal-infecting strains than any known bird-infecting strain. They provided no evidence that the virus originated by gene reassortment nor that the virus was the direct ancestor of the two lineages of H1N1 viruses currently found in mammals; one that mostly infects human beings, the other pigs. The unusual virulence of the virus and why it produced a pandemic have remained unsolved. We have reanalysed the sequences of the three 1918 genes and found conflicting patterns of relatedness in all three. Various tests showed that the patterns in its haemagglutinin (HA) gene were produced by true recombination between two different parental HA H1 subtype genes, but that the conflicting patterns in its neuraminidase and non-structural-nuclear export proteins genes resulted from selection. The recombination event that produced the 1918 HA gene probably coincided with the start of the pandemic, and may have triggered it. PMID:11779383

  9. Divergence of human [alpha]-chain constant region gene sequences: A novel recombinant [alpha]2 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Chintalacharuvu, K. R.; Morrison, S.L. ); Raines, M. )

    1994-06-01

    IgA is the major Ig synthesized in humans and provides the first line of defense at the mucosal surfaces. The constant region of IgA heavy chain is encoded by the [alpha] gene on chromosome 14. Previous studies have indicated the presence of two [alpha] genes, [alpha]1 and [alpha]2 existing in two allotypic forms, [alpha]2 m(1) and [alpha]2 m(2). Here the authors report the cloning and complete nucleotide sequence determination of a novel human [alpha] gene. Nucleotide sequence comparison with the published [alpha] sequences suggests that the gene arose as a consequence of recombination or gene conversion between the two [alpha]2 alleles. The authors have expressed the gene as a chimeric protein in myeloma cells indicating that it encodes a functional protein. The novel IgA resembles IgA2 m(2) in that disulfide bonds link H and L chains. This novel recombinant gene provides insights into the mechanisms of generation of different constant regions and suggests that within human populations, multiple alleles of [alpha] may be present providing IgAs of different structures.

  10. Identification of recombination in the NS1 and VPs genes of parvovirus B19.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hongxing; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Hua; Shao, Shihe

    2016-08-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V), a member of the genus Erythrovirus of the family Parvoviridae, is a pathogenic virus distributed worldwide in the human population. In this study, we performed phylogenetic and recombination analysis of B19V based on the available nonstructural gene (NS1) and capsid proteins (VPs) genes in GenBank. Results indicated that recombination occurred between genotypes 3 and 1, leading to the recombinant cluster genotype 2. Other three inter-genotype recombination events were also discovered. Moreover, our results showed that among the four recombinant events in the present study, all of the major parents belonged to genotype 1, the minor parents were from genotypes 3 or 2, and all of the recombinants belonged to genotype 2. These recombinant events were confirmed by SimPlot Program and phylogenetic analysis. J. Med. Virol. 88:1457-1461, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26756922

  11. Pangenome Analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei: Genome Evolution Preserves Gene Order despite High Recombination Rates

    PubMed Central

    Spring-Pearson, Senanu M.; Stone, Joshua K.; Doyle, Adina; Allender, Christopher J.; Okinaka, Richard T.; Mayo, Mark; Broomall, Stacey M.; Hill, Jessica M.; Karavis, Mark A.; Hubbard, Kyle S.; Insalaco, Joseph M.; McNew, Lauren A.; Rosenzweig, C. Nicole; Gibbons, Henry S.; Currie, Bart J.; Wagner, David M.; Keim, Paul; Tuanyok, Apichai

    2015-01-01

    The pangenomic diversity in Burkholderia pseudomallei is high, with approximately 5.8% of the genome consisting of genomic islands. Genomic islands are known hotspots for recombination driven primarily by site-specific recombination associated with tRNAs. However, recombination rates in other portions of the genome are also high, a feature we expected to disrupt gene order. We analyzed the pangenome of 37 isolates of B. pseudomallei and demonstrate that the pangenome is ‘open’, with approximately 136 new genes identified with each new genome sequenced, and that the global core genome consists of 4568±16 homologs. Genes associated with metabolism were statistically overrepresented in the core genome, and genes associated with mobile elements, disease, and motility were primarily associated with accessory portions of the pangenome. The frequency distribution of genes present in between 1 and 37 of the genomes analyzed matches well with a model of genome evolution in which 96% of the genome has very low recombination rates but 4% of the genome recombines readily. Using homologous genes among pairs of genomes, we found that gene order was highly conserved among strains, despite the high recombination rates previously observed. High rates of gene transfer and recombination are incompatible with retaining gene order unless these processes are either highly localized to specific sites within the genome, or are characterized by symmetrical gene gain and loss. Our results demonstrate that both processes occur: localized recombination introduces many new genes at relatively few sites, and recombination throughout the genome generates the novel multi-locus sequence types previously observed while preserving gene order. PMID:26484663

  12. Inhibition of preS1-hepatocyte interaction by an array of recombinant human antibodies from naturally recovered individuals

    PubMed Central

    Sankhyan, Anurag; Sharma, Chandresh; Dutta, Durgashree; Sharma, Tarang; Chosdol, Kunzang; Wakita, Takaji; Watashi, Koichi; Awasthi, Amit; Acharya, Subrat K.; Khanna, Navin; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Sinha, Subrata

    2016-01-01

    Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies are being found to be increasingly useful in viral infections. In hepatitis B infection, antibodies are proven to be useful for passive prophylaxis. The preS1 region (21–47a.a.) of HBV contains the viral hepatocyte-binding domain crucial for its attachment and infection of hepatocytes. Antibodies against this region are neutralizing and are best suited for immune-based neutralization of HBV, especially in view of their not recognizing decoy particles. Anti-preS1 (21–47a.a.) antibodies are present in serum of spontaneously recovered individuals. We generated a phage-displayed scFv library using circulating lymphocytes from these individuals and selected four preS1-peptide specific scFvs with markedly distinct sequences from this library. All the antibodies recognized the blood-derived and recombinant preS1 containing antigens. Each scFv showed a discrete binding signature, interacting with different amino acids within the preS1-peptide region. Ability to prevent binding of the preS1 protein (N-terminus 60a.a.) to HepG2 cells stably expressing hNTCP (HepG2-hNTCP-C4 cells), the HBV receptor on human hepatocytes was taken as a surrogate marker for neutralizing capacity. These antibodies inhibited preS1-hepatocyte interaction individually and even better in combination. Such a combination of potentially neutralizing recombinant antibodies with defined specificities could be used for preventing/managing HBV infections, including those by possible escape mutants. PMID:26888694

  13. Passive Immunization against HIV/AIDS by Antibody Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lili; Wang, Pin

    2014-01-01

    Despite tremendous efforts over the course of many years, the quest for an effective HIV vaccine by the classical method of active immunization remains largely elusive. However, two recent studies in mice and macaques have now demonstrated a new strategy designated as Vectored ImmunoProphylaxis (VIP), which involves passive immunization by viral vector-mediated delivery of genes encoding broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) for in vivo expression. Robust protection against virus infection was observed in preclinical settings when animals were given VIP to express monoclonal neutralizing antibodies. This unorthodox approach raises new promise for combating the ongoing global HIV pandemic. In this article, we survey the status of antibody gene transfer, review the revolutionary progress on isolation of extremely bnAbs, detail VIP experiments against HIV and its related virus conduced in humanized mice and macaque monkeys, and discuss the pros and cons of VIP and its opportunities and challenges towards clinical applications to control HIV/AIDS endemics. PMID:24473340

  14. Passive immunization against HIV/AIDS by antibody gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Wang, Pin

    2014-02-01

    Despite tremendous efforts over the course of many years, the quest for an effective HIV vaccine by the classical method of active immunization remains largely elusive. However, two recent studies in mice and macaques have now demonstrated a new strategy designated as Vectored ImmunoProphylaxis (VIP), which involves passive immunization by viral vector-mediated delivery of genes encoding broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) for in vivo expression. Robust protection against virus infection was observed in preclinical settings when animals were given VIP to express monoclonal neutralizing antibodies. This unorthodox approach raises new promise for combating the ongoing global HIV pandemic. In this article, we survey the status of antibody gene transfer, review the revolutionary progress on isolation of extremely bnAbs, detail VIP experiments against HIV and its related virus conduced in humanized mice and macaque monkeys, and discuss the pros and cons of VIP and its opportunities and challenges towards clinical applications to control HIV/AIDS endemics. PMID:24473340

  15. In vivo gene targeting of IL-3 into immature hematopoietic cells through CD117 receptor mediated antibody gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chapel, Alain; Deas, Olivier; Bensidhoum, Morad; François, Sabine; Mouiseddine, Moubarak; Poncet, Pascal; Dürrbach, Antoine; Aigueperse, Jocelyne; Gourmelon, Patrick; Gorin, Norbert C; Hirsch, François; Thierry, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Background Targeted gene transfection remains a crucial issue to permit the real development of genetic therapy. As such, in vivo targeted transfection of specific subsets of hematopoietic stem cells might help to sustain hematopoietic recovery from bone marrow aplasia by providing local production of growth factors. Methods Balb/C mice were injected intravenously, with an anti-mouse c-kit (CD117) monoclonal antibody chemically coupled to a human IL-3 gene-containing plasmid DNA. Mice were sacrificed for tissue analyses at various days after injection of the conjugates. Results By ELISA, the production of human IL-3 was evidenced in the sera of animals 5 days after treatment. Cytofluorometric analysis after in vivo transfection of a reporter gene eGFP demonstrated transfection of CD117+/Sca1+ hematopoietic immature cells. By PCR analysis of genomic DNA and RNA using primer specific pIL3 sequences, presence and expression of the human IL-3-transgene were detected in the bone marrow up to 10 days in transfected mice but not in control animals. Conclusions These data clearly indicate that antibody-mediated endocytosis gene transfer allows the expression of the IL-3 transgene into hematopoietic immature cells, in vivo. While availability of marketed recombinant growth factors is restricted, this targeting strategy should permit delivery of therapeutic genes to tissues of interest through systemic delivery. In particular, the ability to specifically target growth factor expression into repopulating hematopoietic stem cells may create new opportunities for the treatment of primary or radiation-induced marrow failures. PMID:15509303

  16. Canine Antibodies against Salivary Recombinant Proteins of Phlebotomus perniciosus: A Longitudinal Study in an Endemic Focus of Canine Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Kostalova, Tatiana; Lestinova, Tereza; Sumova, Petra; Vlkova, Michaela; Rohousova, Iva; Berriatua, Eduardo; Oliva, Gaetano; Fiorentino, Eleonora; Scalone, Aldo; Gramiccia, Marina; Gradoni, Luigi; Volf, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Background Phlebotomine sand flies are vectors of Leishmania parasites. During blood feeding, sand flies deposit into the host skin immunogenic salivary proteins which elicit specific antibody responses. These anti-saliva antibodies enable an estimate of the host exposure to sand flies and, in leishmaniasis endemic areas, also the risk for Leishmania infections. However, the use of whole salivary gland homogenates as antigen has several limitations, and therefore, recombinant salivary proteins have been tested to replace them in antibody detection assays. In this study, we have used for the first time sand fly salivary recombinant proteins in a longitudinal field study on dogs. Methodology/Principal Findings Sera from dogs naturally exposed to P. perniciosus bites over two consecutive transmission seasons in a site endemic for canine leishmaniasis (CanL) were tested at different time points by ELISA for the antibodies recognizing whole saliva, single salivary 43 kDa yellow-related recombinant protein (rSP03B), and a combination of two salivary recombinant proteins, 43 kDa yellow-related protein and 35.5 kDa apyrase (rSP01). Dogs were also tested for Leishmania infantum positivity by serology, culture, and PCR and the infection status was evaluated prospectively. We found a significant association between active CanL infection and the amount of anti-P. perniciosus saliva antibodies. Importantly, we detected a high correlation between IgG antibodies recognizing rSP03B protein and the whole salivary antigen. The kinetics of antibody response showed for both a whole saliva and rSP03B a similar pattern that was clearly related to the seasonal abundance of P. perniciosus. Conclusions These results suggest that P. perniciosus rSP03B protein is a valid alternative to whole saliva and could be used in large-scale serological studies. This novel method could be a practical and economically-sound tool to detect the host exposure to sand fly bites in CanL endemic areas. PMID

  17. Antibodies against recombinant catalytic domain of lethal toxin of Clostridium sordellii neutralize lethal toxin toxicity in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Arya, Preetika; Ponmariappan, S; Singh, Lokendra; Prasad, G B K S

    2013-02-01

    Lethal toxin of Clostridium sordellii (MLD 150 ng/kg) is one of the most potent Clostridial toxins and is responsible for most of the diseases including sudden death syndrome in cattle, sheep and toxic shock syndrome, necrotizing faciitis, neonatal omphalitis and gangrene in humans. Lethal toxin (TcsL) is a single chain protein of about 270 kDa. In the present study, 1.6 kb DNA fragment encoding for the catalytic domain of TcsL was PCR amplified, cloned in pQE30 UA vector and expressed in E. coli SG 13009. The expression of recombinant lethal toxin protein (rTcsL) was optimized and it was purified under native conditions using a single step Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The purified recombinant protein was used for the production of polyclonal antibodies in mice and rabbit. The raised antibodies reacted specifically with the purified rTcsL and intact native lethal toxin on Western blot. The biological activity of the recombinant protein was tested in HeLa cells where it showed the cytotoxicity. Further, the polyclonal antibodies were used for in-vitro neutralization of purified rTcsL, acid precipitated C. sordellii and C. difficile native toxins in HeLa cells. Mice and rabbit anti-rTcsL sera effectively neutralized the cytotoxicity of rTcsL and C. sordellii native toxin but it did not neutralize the cytotoxicity of C. difficile toxin in HeLa cells. PMID:22894159

  18. Recombinant varicella vaccines induce neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses to SIV and reduce viral loads in immunized rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Traina-Dorge, V.; Pahar, B.; Marx, P.; Kissinger, P.; Montefiori, D.; Ou, Y.; Gray, W.L.

    2010-01-01

    The development of an effective AIDS vaccine remains one of the highest priorities in HIV research. The live, attenuated varicella-zoster virus (VZV) Oka vaccine, safe and effective for prevention of chickenpox and zoster, also has potential as a recombinant vaccine against other pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The simian varicella model, utilizing simian varicella virus (SVV), offers an approach to evaluate recombinant varicella vaccine candidates. Recombinant SVV (rSVV) vaccine viruses expressing simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) env and gag antigens were constructed. The hypothesis tested was that a live, attenuated rSVV-SIV vaccine will induce immune responses against SIV in the rhesus macaques and provide protection against SIV challenge. The results demonstrated that rSVV-SIV vaccination induced low levels of neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses to SIV in immunized rhesus macaques and significantly reduced viral loads following intravenous challenge with pathogenic SIVmac251-CX-1. PMID:20654666

  19. Saturation mapping of a gene-rich recombination hot spot region in wheat.

    PubMed Central

    Faris, J D; Haen, K M; Gill, B S

    2000-01-01

    Physical mapping of wheat chromosomes has revealed small chromosome segments of high gene density and frequent recombination interspersed with relatively large regions of low gene density and infrequent recombination. We constructed a detailed genetic and physical map of one highly recombinant region on the long arm of chromosome 5B. This distally located region accounts for 4% of the physical size of the long arm and at least 30% of the recombination along the entire chromosome. Multiple crossovers occurred within this region, and the degree of recombination is at least 11-fold greater than the genomic average. Characteristics of the region such as gene order and frequency of recombination appear to be conserved throughout the evolution of the Triticeae. The region is more prone to chromosome breakage by gametocidal gene action than gene-poor regions, and evidence for genomic instability was implied by loss of gene collinearity for six loci among the homeologous regions. These data suggest that a unique level of chromatin organization exists within gene-rich recombination hot spots. The many agronomically important genes in this region should be accessible by positional cloning. PMID:10655233

  20. Vaccinia Virus Recombinants: Expression of VSV Genes and Protective Immunization of Mice and Cattle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackett, M.; Yilma, T.; Rose, J. K.; Moss, B.

    1985-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) causes a contagious disease of horses, cattle, and pigs. When DNA copies of messenger RNA's for the G or N proteins of VSV were linked to a vaccinia virus promoter and inserted into the vaccinia genome, the recombinants retained infectivity and synthesized VSV polypeptides. After intradermal vaccination with live recombinant virus expressing the G protein, mice produced VSV-neutralizing antibodies and were protected against lethal encephalitis upon intravenous challenge with VSV. In cattle, the degree of protection against intradermalingually injected VSV was correlated with the level of neutralizing antibody produced following vaccination.

  1. Targeted DNA recombination in vivo using an adenovirus carrying the cre recombinase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Krushel, L A; Edelman, G M

    1996-01-01

    Conditional gene expression and gene deletion are important experimental approaches for examining the functions of particular gene products in development and disease. The cre-loxP system from bacteriophage P1 has been used in transgenic animals to induce site-specific DNA recombination leading to gene activation or deletion. To regulate the recombination in a spatiotemporally controlled manner, we constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector, Adv/cre, that contained the cre recombinase gene under regulation of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter. The efficacy and target specificity of this vector in mediating loxP-dependent recombination were analyzed in mice that had been genetically engineered to contain loxP sites in their genome. After intravenous injection of the Adv/cre vector into adult animals, the liver and spleen showed the highest infectivity of the adenovirus as well as the highest levels of recombination, whereas other tissues such as kidney, lung, and heart had lower levels of infection and recombination. Only trace levels of recombination were detected in the brain. However, when the Adv/cre vector was injected directly into specific regions of the adult brain, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum, recombination was detectable at the injection site. Furthermore, when the Adv/cre vector was injected into the forebrains of neonatal mice, the rearranged toxP locus from recombination could be detected in the injected regions for at least 8 weeks. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the Adv/cre vector expressing a functional cre protein is capable of mediating loxP-dependent recombination in various tissues and the recombined gene locus may in some cases be maintained for an extended period. The use of the adenovirus vector expressing cre combined with localized delivery to specific tissues may provide an efficient means to achieve conditional gene expression or knockout with precise spatiotemporal control

  2. Positive genetic selection for gene disruption in mammalian cells by homologous recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Sedivy, J M; Sharp, P A

    1989-01-01

    Efficient modification of genes in mammalian cells by homologous recombination has not been possible because of the high frequency of nonhomologous recombination. An efficient method for targeted gene disruption has been developed. Cells with substitution of exogenous sequences into a chromosomal locus were enriched, by a factor of 100, using a positive genetic selection that specifically selects for homologous recombination at the targeted site. The selection is based on the conditional expression of a dominant selectable marker by virtue of in-frame gene fusion with the target gene. The dominant selectable marker was derived by modification of the Escherichia coli neo gene so that it retains significant activity in mammalian cells after in-frame fusion with heterologous coding sequences. In the example presented here, homologous recombinants were efficiently recovered from a pool in which the targeted gene was disrupted in 1 per 10,000 cells incorporating exogenous DNA. Images PMID:2536156

  3. Recombinant Pvs48/45 Antigen Expressed in E. coli Generates Antibodies that Block Malaria Transmission in Anopheles albimanus Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Vallejo, Andrés F.; Rubiano, Kelly; Solarte, Yezid; Marin, Catherin; Castellanos, Angélica; Céspedes, Nora; Herrera, Sócrates

    2015-01-01

    Transmission of malaria parasites from humans to Anopheles mosquitoes can be inhibited by specific antibodies elicited during malaria infection, which target surface Plasmodium gametocyte/gamete proteins. Some of these proteins may have potential for vaccine development. Pvs48/45 is a P. vivax gametocyte surface antigen orthologous to Pfs48/45, which may play a role during parasite fertilization and thus has potential for transmission blocking (TB) activity. Here we describe the expression of a recombinant Pvs48/45 protein expressed in Escherichia coli as a ∼60kDa construct which we tested for antigenicity using human sera and for its immunogenicity and transmission blocking activity of specific anti-mouse and anti-monkey Pvs48/45 antibodies. The protein reacted with sera of individuals from malaria-endemic areas and in addition induced specific IgG antibody responses in BALB/c mice and Aotus l. griseimembra monkeys. Sera from both immunized animal species recognized native P. vivax protein in Western blot (WB) and immunofluorescence assays. Moreover, sera from immunized mice and monkeys produced significant inhibition of parasite transmission to An. Albimanus mosquitoes as shown by membrane feeding assays. Results indicate the presence of reactive epitopes in the Pvs48/45 recombinant product that induce antibodies with TB activity. Further testing of this protein is ongoing to determine its vaccine potential. PMID:25775466

  4. Use of antibody gene library for the isolation of specific single chain antibodies by ampicillin-antigen conjugates.

    PubMed

    Neumann-Schaal, Meina; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Grenz, Nicole; Heilmann, Katja

    2013-03-01

    Isolation of recombinant antibodies from antibody libraries is commonly performed by different molecular display formats including phage display and ribosome display or different cell-surface display formats. We describe a new method which allows the selection of Escherichia coli cells producing the required single chain antibody by cultivation in presence of ampicillin conjugated to the antigen of interest. The method utilizes the neutralization of the conjugate by the produced single chain antibody which is secreted to the periplasm. Therefore, a new expression system based on the pET26b vector was designed and a library was constructed. The method was successfully established first for the selection of E. coli BL21 Star (DE3) cells expressing a model single chain antibody (anti-fluorescein) by a simple selection assay on LB-agar plates. Using this selection assay, we could identify a new single chain antibody binding biotin by growing E. coli BL21 Star (DE3) containing the library in presence of a biotin-ampicillin conjugate. In contrast to methods as molecular or cell surface display our selection system applies the soluble single chain antibody molecule and thereby avoids undesired effects, e.g. by the phage particle or the yeast fusion protein. By selecting directly in an expression strain, production and characterization of the selected single chain antibody is possible without any further cloning or transformation steps. PMID:23453960

  5. Affinity Chromatography of Native and Recombinant Proteins from Receptors for Insulin and IGF-I to Recombinant Single Chain Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is an efficient method to isolate proteins by taking advantage of their affinities for specific molecules such as substrates, inhibitors, antigens, ligands, antibodies, and other interacting molecules, including subunits. Nowadays, we take the effectiveness and excellence of this technology for granted. This essay will mainly cover the use of affinity chromatography based on my experience. PMID:26579073

  6. Affinity Chromatography of Native and Recombinant Proteins from Receptors for Insulin and IGF-I to Recombinant Single Chain Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is an efficient method to isolate proteins by taking advantage of their affinities for specific molecules such as substrates, inhibitors, antigens, ligands, antibodies, and other interacting molecules, including subunits. Nowadays, we take the effectiveness and excellence of this technology for granted. This essay will mainly cover the use of affinity chromatography based on my experience. PMID:26579073

  7. Multiplexed, targeted gene editing in Nicotiana benthamiana for glyco-engineering and monoclonal antibody production.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Stoddard, Thomas J; Demorest, Zachary L; Lavoie, Pierre-Olivier; Luo, Song; Clasen, Benjamin M; Cedrone, Frederic; Ray, Erin E; Coffman, Andrew P; Daulhac, Aurelie; Yabandith, Ann; Retterath, Adam J; Mathis, Luc; Voytas, Daniel F; D'Aoust, Marc-André; Zhang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    Biopharmaceutical glycoproteins produced in plants carry N-glycans with plant-specific residues core α(1,3)-fucose and β(1,2)-xylose, which can significantly impact the activity, stability and immunogenicity of biopharmaceuticals. In this study, we have employed sequence-specific transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to knock out two α(1,3)-fucosyltransferase (FucT) and the two β(1,2)-xylosyltransferase (XylT) genes within Nicotiana benthamiana to generate plants with improved capacity to produce glycoproteins devoid of plant-specific residues. Among plants regenerated from N. benthamiana protoplasts transformed with TALENs targeting either the FucT or XylT genes, 50% (80 of 160) and 73% (94 of 129) had mutations in at least one FucT or XylT allele, respectively. Among plants regenerated from protoplasts transformed with both TALEN pairs, 17% (18 of 105) had mutations in all four gene targets, and 3% (3 of 105) plants had mutations in all eight alleles comprising both gene families; these mutations were transmitted to the next generation. Endogenous proteins expressed in the complete knockout line had N-glycans that lacked β(1,2)-xylose and had a significant reduction in core α(1,3)-fucose levels (40% of wild type). A similar phenotype was observed in the N-glycans of a recombinant rituximab antibody transiently expressed in the homozygous mutant plants. More importantly, the most desirable glycoform, one lacking both core α(1,3)-fucose and β(1,2)-xylose residues, increased in the antibody from 2% when produced in the wild-type line to 55% in the mutant line. These results demonstrate the power of TALENs for multiplexed gene editing. Furthermore, the mutant N. benthamiana lines provide a valuable platform for producing highly potent biopharmaceutical products. PMID:26011187

  8. Antibody responses induced by recombinant ALV-A gp85 protein vaccine combining with CpG-ODN adjuvant in breeder hens and the protection for their offspring against early infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dandan; Li, Hongmei; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Sun, Shuhong; Cheng, Ziqiang; Liu, Jianzhu; Zhao, Peng; Ren, Qingya; Guo, Huijun

    2015-04-01

    To observe the antibody responses induced by recombinant A subgroup avian leukosis virus (ALV-A) gp85 protein vaccine plus CpG-ODN adjuvant and the protection of maternal antibodies (MAbs) for the hatched chickens against early infection, the gp85 gene was amplified from the proviral cDNA of ALV-A-SDAU09C1 strain using PCR and the recombinant plasmid containing target gene was constructed and expressed in EscherichiaColi. The expressed product was confirmed using SDS-PAGE and western blot that it is about 46KD of recombinant protein. The purified recombinant proteins combining with CpG-ODN adjuvant or Freund's adjuvant were inoculated into the breeder hens, the ALV-A antibodies in serum and in egg-yolk were detected; the fertilized eggs from the vaccinated hens with different titers of egg-yolk antibody were hatched and then challenged with 10(4.2)/0.1mL TCID50 of ALV-A-SDAU09C1 strain, all the hatched chickens were weekly detected for the viremias and the cloacal swab P27 antigen and pathological lesions; the neutralizing test of antisera in vitro was conducted. The results showed that the recombinant gp85 proteins combining with CpG-ODN adjuvant could induce the breeder hens to produce better antibody responses than gp85 protein with Freund's adjuvant or without adjuvant; the MAbs with higher titers induced by CpG-ODN+gp85 proteins could obviously decrease the ratios of viremias (13% vs 33%), cloacal detoxification (20% vs 67%) and death (0% vs 22%) caused by ALV-A infection than those by gp85 protein without adjuvant. The results of the neutralizing test indicated that the antisera from the hatched chickens could neutralize the ALV-A-SDAU09C1 strain in vitro, but which depends on the antibody titers. The results of IFA confirmed that the serum antibody could combine with the ALV in DF1 cells. It can be concluded that the prepared ALV-A gp85 subunit vaccine combining with CpG-ODN adjuvant could induce the breeder hens to produce better neutralizing antibody

  9. Enhancing the selective extracellular location of a recombinant E. coli domain antibody by management of fermentation conditions.

    PubMed

    Voulgaris, Ioannis; Finka, Gary; Uden, Mark; Hoare, Mike

    2015-10-01

    The preparation of a recombinant protein using Escherichia coli often involves a challenging primary recovery sequence. This is due to the inability to secrete the protein to the extracellular space without a significant degree of cell lysis. This results in the release of nucleic acids, leading to a high viscosity, difficulty to clarify, broth and also to contamination with cell materials such as lipopolysaccharides and host cell proteins. In this paper, we present different fermentation strategies to facilitate the recovery of a V H domain antibody (13.1 kDa) by directing it selectively to the extracellular space and changing the balance between domain antibody to nucleic acid release. The manipulation of the cell growth rate in order to increase the outer cell membrane permeability gave a small ~1.5-fold improvement in released domain antibody to nucleic acid ratio without overall loss of yield. The introduction during fermentation of release agents such as EDTA gave no improvement in the ratio of released domain antibody to nucleic acid and a loss of overall productivity. The use of polyethyleneimine (PEI) during fermentation was with the aim to (a) permeabilise the outer bacterial membrane to release selectively domain antibody and (b) remove selectively by precipitation nucleic acids released during cell lysis. This strategy resulted in up to ~4-fold increase in the ratio of domain antibody to soluble nucleic acid with no reduction in domain antibody overall titre. In addition, a reduction in host cell protein contamination was achieved and there was no increase in endotoxin levels. Similar results were demonstrated with a range of other antibody products prepared in E. coli. PMID:26184976

  10. High throughput ranking of recombinant avian scFv antibody fragments from crude lysates using the Biacore A100.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Paul; Säfsten, Pär; Hearty, Stephen; McDonnell, Barry; Finlay, William; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2007-06-30

    Advances in molecular evolution strategies have made it possible to identify antibodies with exquisite specificities and also to fine-tune their biophysical properties for practically any specified application. Depending on the desired function, antibody/antigen interactions can be long-lived or short-lived and, therefore, particular attention is needed when seeking to identify antibodies with specific reaction-rate and affinity properties. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors routinely generate sensitive and reliable kinetic data from antibody/antigen interactions for both therapeutic and diagnostic applications. However, many kinetic-based screening assays require rigorous sample preparation and purification prior to analysis. To ameliorate this problem, we developed a rapid and reliable assay for characterising recombinant scFv antibody fragments, directly from crude bacterial lysates. Ninety-six scFv antibodies derived from chickens immunised with C-reactive protein (CRP) were selected by phage display and evaluated using the Biacore A100 protein interaction array system. Antibodies were captured from crude bacterial extracts on the sensor chip surface and ranked based on the percentage of the complex left (% left) after dissociation in buffer. Kinetic rate constants (k(a) and k(d)) and affinity (K(D)) data were obtained for six clones that bound monomeric CRP across a broad affinity range (2.54 x 10(-8) to 3.53 x 10(-10) M). Using this assay format the A100 biosensor yielded high quality kinetic data, permitting the screening of nearly 400 antibody clones per day. PMID:17532001

  11. Recombinant HT.sub.m4 gene, protein and assays

    DOEpatents

    Lim, Bing; Adra, Chaker N.; Lelias, Jean-Michel

    1996-01-01

    The invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule which encodes a HT.sub.m4 protein, a transformed host cell which has been stably transfected with a DNA molecule which encodes a HT.sub.m4 protein and a recombinant HT.sub.m4 protein. The invention also relates to a method for detecting the presence of a hereditary atopy.

  12. Recombinative events of the T cell antigen receptor delta gene in peripheral T cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kanavaros, P; Farcet, J P; Gaulard, P; Haioun, C; Divine, M; Le Couedic, J P; Lefranc, M P; Reyes, F

    1991-01-01

    Recombinative events of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) delta-chain gene were studied in 37 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL) and related to their clinical presentation and the expression of the alpha beta or gamma delta heterodimers as determined by immunostaining of frozen tissue samples. There were 22 cases of alpha beta, 5 cases of gamma delta, and 10 cases of silent TCR expressing neither the alpha beta nor gamma delta TCR. 5 different probes were used to examine the delta locus. The 22 cases of alpha beta PTCL displayed biallelic and monoallelic deletions; a monoallelic V delta 1 J delta 1 rearrangement was observed in 1 case and a monoallelic germ line configuration in 7 cases. The 5 cases of gamma delta PTCL displayed biallelic rearrangements: the productive rearrangements could be ascribed to V delta 1J delta 1 joining in 3 cases and VJ delta 1 joining in 2 cases according to the combined pattern of DNA hybridization with the appropriate probes and of cell reactivity with the TCR delta-1, delta TCS-1, and anti-V delta 2 monoclonal antibodies. In the VJ delta 1 joining, the rearranged V segments were located between V delta 1 and V delta 2. Interestingly, in the third group of 10 cases of silent PTCL, 5 cases were found to have a TCR gene configuration identical to that in the TCR alpha beta PTCL, as demonstrated by biallelic delta gene deletion. These 5 cases were CD3 positive. The 5 remaining cases showed a monoallelic delta gene rearrangement with a monoallelic germ line configuration in 4 and a monoallelic deletion in 1. Four of these cases were CD3 negative, which was consistent with an immature genotype the TCR commitent of which could not be ascertained. Finally, TCR gamma delta PTCL consisted of a distinct clinical morphological and molecular entity whereas TCR alpha beta and silent PTCL had a similar presentation. Images PMID:1991851

  13. Generation of Recombinant Capripoxvirus Vectors for Vaccines and Gene Knockout Function Studies.

    PubMed

    Boshra, Hani; Cao, Jingxin; Babiuk, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    The ability to manipulate capripoxvirus through gene knockouts and gene insertions has become an increasingly valuable research tool in elucidating the function of individual genes of capripoxvirus, as well as in the development of capripoxvirus-based recombinant vaccines. The homologous recombination technique is used to generate capripoxvirus knockout viruses (KO), and is based on the targeting a particular viral gene of interest. This technique can also be used to insert a gene of interest. A protocol for the generation of a viral gene knockout is described. This technique involves the use of a plasmid which encodes the flanking sequences of the regions where the homologous recombination will occur, and will result in the insertion of an EGFP reporter gene for visualization of recombinant virus, as well as the E. coli gpt gene as a positive selection marker. If an additional gene is to be incorporated, this can be achieved by inserting a gene of interest for expression under a poxvirus promoter into the plasmid between the flanking regions for insertion. This chapter describes a protocol for generating such recombinant capripoxviruses. PMID:26458835

  14. A systematic analysis of recombination activity and genotype-phenotype correlation in human recombination-activating gene 1 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu Nee; Frugoni, Francesco; Dobbs, Kerry; Walter, Jolan E.; Giliani, Silvia; Gennery, Andrew R.; Al-Herz, Waleed; Haddad, Elie; LeDeist, Francoise; Bleesing, Jack H.; Henderson, Lauren A.; Pai, Sung-Yun; Nelson, Robert P.; El-Ghoneimy, Dalia H.; El-Feky, Reem A.; Reda, Shereen M.; Hossny, Elham; Soler-Palacin, Pere; Fuleihan, Ramsay L.; Patel, Niraj C.; Massaad, Michel J.; Geha, Raif S.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Palma, Paolo; Cancrini, Caterina; Chen, Karin; Vihinen, Mauno; Alt, Frederick W.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The recombination-activating gene (RAG) 1/2 proteins play a critical role in the development of T and B cells by initiating the VDJ recombination process that leads to generation of a broad T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor repertoire. Pathogenic mutations in the RAG1/2 genes result in various forms of primary immunodeficiency, ranging from T−B− severe combined immune deficiency to delayed-onset disease with granuloma formation, autoimmunity, or both. It is not clear what contributes to such heterogeneity of phenotypes. Objective We sought to investigate the molecular basis for phenotypic diversity presented in patients with various RAG1 mutations. Methods We have developed a flow cytometry–based assay that allows analysis of RAG recombination activity based on green fluorescent protein expression and have assessed the induction of the Ighc locus rearrangements in mouse Rag1−/− pro-B cells reconstituted with wild-type or mutant human RAG1 (hRAG1) using deep sequencing technology. Results Here we demonstrate correlation between defective recombination activity of hRAG1 mutant proteins and severity of the clinical and immunologic phenotype and provide insights on the molecular mechanisms accounting for such phenotypic diversity. Conclusions Using a sensitive assay to measure the RAG1 activity level of 79 mutations in a physiologic setting, we demonstrate correlation between recombination activity of RAG1 mutants and the severity of clinical presentation and show that RAG1 mutants can induce specific abnormalities of the VDJ recombination process. PMID:24290284

  15. A multicenter evaluation of a new antibody test kit for lymphatic filariasis employing recombinant Brugia malayi antigen Bm-14.

    PubMed

    Weil, Gary J; Curtis, Kurt C; Fischer, Peter U; Won, Kimberly Y; Lammie, Patrick J; Joseph, Hayley; Melrose, Wayne D; Brattig, Norbert W

    2011-09-01

    Antibody tests are useful for mapping the distribution of lymphatic filariasis (LF) in countries and regions and for monitoring progress in elimination programs based on mass drug administration (MDA). Prior antibody tests have suffered from poor sensitivity and/or specificity or from a lack of standardization. We conducted a multicenter evaluation of a new commercial ELISA that detects IgG4 antibodies to the recombinant filarial antigen Bm14. Four laboratories tested a shared panel of coded serum or plasma samples that included 55 samples from people with microfilaremic Wuchereria bancrofti or Brugia infections and 26 control samples. Qualitative results were identical in all four test sites. In addition, each laboratory tested samples from their own serum banks. The test detected antibodies in 32 of 36 samples (91%) from people with Brugian filariasis and in 96 of 98 samples (98%) from people with Bancroftian filariasis. Specificity testing showed that many serum or plasma samples from patients with other filarial infections such as onchocerciasis had positive antibody tests. Specificity was otherwise excellent, although 3 of 30 samples from patients with ascariasis and 4 of 51 with strongyloidiasis had positive antibody tests; it is likely that some or all of these people had previously lived in filariasis-endemic areas. Antibody test results obtained with eluates from blood dried on filter paper were similar to those obtained with plasma tested at the same dilution. This test may be helpful for diagnosing LF in patients with clinical signs of filariasis. It may also be a useful tool for use in LF endemic countries to monitor the progress of filariasis elimination programs and for post-MDA surveillance. PMID:20430004

  16. Production of Polyclonal Antibodies to the Recombinant Coat Protein of Citrus tristeza virus and Their Effectiveness for Virus Detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The p25 coat protein gene of three Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates, two from Mexico and one from India, was amplified by RT-PCR and further cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli cells. The recombinant coat protein (rCP) of the three CTV isolates was injected into rabbits and goats for antibo...

  17. Reduction of enterotoxin induced fluid accumulation in ileal loops of neonatal calves with anti-F5 fimbriae recombinant antibody.

    PubMed

    Sahagun-Ruiz, Alfredo; Velazquez, Leticia V; Bhaskaran, Shoba; Jay, Chris M; Morales-Salinas, E; Rathore, Keerti; Wagner, Gale G; Waghela, Suryakant D

    2015-12-01

    Neonatal calf colibacillosis caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an economically significant problem in most parts of the world. The most common ETEC found in calves express the F5 (K99) fimbriae, which are necessary for the attachment of the bacteria to the ganglioside receptors on enterocytes. It is known that prevention of ETEC F5(+) adhesion to its ganglioside receptors with specific antibodies protects calves from colibacillosis. Previously we have described the development and characterization of a mouse recombinant antibody fragment (moRAb) that prevents F5 fimbrial protein induced agglutination of horse red blood cells (HRBC), which exhibit the same gangloside receptor for F5 fimbriae. Here we demonstrate that this recombinant antibody fragment inhibits in vitro the attachment of ETEC F5(+) bacteria to HRBC as well as isolated calf enterocytes, and in vivo it decreases fluid accumulation in intestinal loops of calves. Thus, correct oral administration of this anti-F5 moRAb may serve as an immunoprophylactic for cost effective control of colibacillosis in calves. PMID:26521056

  18. Expression and Characterization of the Extracellular Domain of Human HER2 from Escherichia Coli, and Production of Polyclonal Antibodies Against the Recombinant Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong; Feng, Xue; Qu, Jiao; Han, Wenqi; Liu, Zi; Li, Xu; Zou, Ming; Zhen, Yuhong; Zhu, Jie

    2015-06-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family. In this study, the whole extracellular domain gene of HER2 was amplified by RT-PCR from human breast cancer cell line SK-BR-3. The genes of membrane-distal region (A) and membrane proximal region (B) of HER2 extracellular domain were amplified from the cloned template, and then inserted into the expression vector pET-28a and pET-30a, respectively. The recombinant expression vectors were transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells and induced by isopropyl-b-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) for expression of proteins His-A and His-B. The expressed proteins were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and western blot. The optimization of culture conditions led us to accomplish the recombinant protein induction with 1.0 mM IPTG at 37 °C for 8 h, and both proteins were expressed in the insoluble form. Both proteins were purified under the denaturing condition using Ni-NTA sepharose column. Balb/c mice were immunized with the purified proteins and then effectively produced polyclonal antibodies, which reached to a relatively high titer by ELISA testing and had good specificity by western blot detection. The HER2 ECD proteins His-A and His-B could be expressed in E. coli and were suitable for production of high titer antibodies against HER2 ECD. PMID:25906688

  19. Recombination within and between the human insulin and beta-globin gene loci.

    PubMed Central

    Lebo, R V; Chakravarti, A; Buetow, K H; Cheung, M C; Cann, H; Cordell, B; Goodman, H

    1983-01-01

    We detected a large number of polymorphic insulin restriction fragments in black Americans. These different size fragments were probably generated by unequal recombination on both sides of the human insulin gene. Population genetic analysis indicates that recombination occurred 33 times more frequently than expected to generate this large number of polymorphic fragments. Specific properties of the unique repeated 14- to 16-base-pair sequences 5' to the insulin gene suggest that this sequence would promote increased unequal recombination. Additional pedigree analysis showed that the recombination rate between the structural insulin and beta-globin gene loci was 14% with strong evidence for linkage. Since both insulin and beta-globin have been mapped to the short arm of human chromosome 11, this study establishes that the genetic map distance between these genes is 14.2 centimorgans. PMID:6348773

  20. Production and characterization of a monoclonal antibody against recombinant cathepsin L1 of Fasciola gigantica.

    PubMed

    Anuracpreeda, Panat; Srirakam, Thippawan; Pandonlan, Sudarat; Changklungmoa, Narin; Chotwiwatthanakun, Charoonroj; Tinikul, Yotsawan; Poljaroen, Jaruwan; Meemon, Krai; Sobhon, Prasert

    2014-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against a recombinant cathepsin L1 of Fasciola gigantica (rFgCatL1) were produced in vitro by fusion of BALB/c mice spleen cells immunized with rFgCatL1 and mouse myeloma cells. Reactivity and specificity of these MoAbs were evaluated by indirect ELISA and immunoblotting techniques. Seven MoAb clones were selected from the stable hybridoma clones, namely 1E10, 1F5, 3D11, 4B10, 4D3, 4E3 and 5E7. Clones 1E10, 1F5 and 3D11 were IgM, whereas clones 4B10, 4D3, 4E3 and 5E7 were IgG1. All MoAbs had kappa light chain isotypes. All MoAbs reacted with rCatL1 at molecular weight (MW) 30kDa and with the native CatL1 at MW 27kDa in whole body (WB) extracts of metacercariae (Met), newly excysted juveniles (NEJ), 1, 3, 5-week-old juveniles (Ju), adult WB and adult excretory-secretory (ES) fractions, but not with adult tegumental antigens (TA). All of these MoAbs showed no cross-reactions with antigens of other parasites commonly found in ruminants and human, including Paramphistomum cervi, Eurytrema pancreaticum, Gigantocotyle explanatum, Schistosoma spindale, Schistosoma mansoni, Moniezia benedeni, Avitellina centripunctata, Trichuris sp., Haemonchus placei and Setaria labiato-papillosa. Localization of CatL1 in each developmental stages of F. gigantica by immunoperoxidase technique, using these MoAbs as probes, indicated that CatL1 was present at high concentration in the caecal epithelium and caecal lumen of metacercariae, NEJ, 1, 3, 5-week-old juveniles and adult fluke. This finding indicated that CatL1 is a copiously expressed parasite protein that is released into the ES, thus CatL1 and its MoAb could be a good candidate for immunodiagnosis of fasciolosis in ruminant and human. PMID:24736227

  1. Antibody study in canine distemper virus nucleocapsid protein gene-immunized mice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, B; Li, X Y; Zhu, T; Yuan, L; Hu, J P; Chen, J; Gao, W; Ren, W Z

    2015-01-01

    The gene for the nucleocapsid (N) protein of canine distemper virus was cloned into the pMD-18T vector, and positive recombinant plasmids were obtained by enzyme digestion and sequencing. After digestion by both EcoRI and KpnI, the plasmid was directionally cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA; the positive clone pcDNA-N was screened by electrophoresis and then transfected into COS-7 cells. Immunofluorescence analysis results showed that the canine distemper virus N protein was expressed in the cytoplasm of transfected COS-7 cells. After emulsification in Freund's adjuvant, the recombinant plasmid pcDNA-N was injected into the abdominal cavity of 8-week-old BABL/c mice, with the pcDNA original vector used as a negative control. Mice were immunized 3 times every 2 weeks. The blood of immunized mice was drawn 2 weeks after completing the immunizations to measure titer levels. The antibody titer in the pcDNA-N test was 10(1.62 ± 0.164), while in the control group this value was 10(0.52 ± 0.56), indicating that specific humoral immunity was induced in canine distemper virus nucleocapsid protein-immunized mice. PMID:25966074

  2. Fusion of the Dhfr/Mtx and IR/MAR Gene Amplification Methods Produces a Rapid and Efficient Method for Stable Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Daisuke; Shimizu, Noriaki

    2012-01-01

    Amplification of the dihydrofolate reductase gene (Dhfr) by methotrexate (Mtx) exposure is commonly used for recombinant protein expression in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. However, this method is both time- and labor-intensive, and the high-producing cells that are generated are frequently unstable in culture. Another gene amplification method is based on using a plasmid bearing a mammalian replication initiation region (IR) and a matrix attachment region (MAR), which result in the spontaneous initiation of gene amplification in transfected cells. The IR/MAR and Dhfr/Mtx methods of gene amplification are based on entirely different principles. In this study, we combine these two methods to yield a novel method, termed the IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion method, which was used to express three proteins, the Fc receptor, GFP, and recombinant antibody. The fusion method resulted in a dramatic increase in expression of all three proteins in two CHO sub-lines, DXB-11, and DG44. The IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion amplified the genes rapidly and efficiently, and produced larger amounts of antibody than the Dhfr/Mtx or IR/MAR methods alone. While the amplified structure produced by the Dhfr/Mtx method was highly unstable, and the antibody production rate rapidly decreased with the culture time of the cells, the IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion method resulted in stable amplification and generated clonal cells that produced large amounts of antibody protein over a long period of time. In summary, the novel IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion method enables isolation of stable cells that produce larger amounts of a target recombinant protein more rapidly and easily than either the Dhfr/Mtx or IR/MAR methods alone. PMID:23300841

  3. Effects of the rad52 gene on recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, S.; Prakash, L.; Burke, W.; Montelone, B.A.

    1980-01-01

    Effects of the rad 52 mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae on meiotic, ..gamma..-ray-induced, uv-induced and spontaneous mitotic recombination were studied. The rad52/rad52 diploids undergo premeiotic DNA synthesis; sporulation occurs but inviable spores are produced. Both intra and intergenic recombination during meiosis were examined in cells transferred from sporulation medium to vegetative medium at different time intervals. No intragenic recombination was observed at the his1-1/his1-315 and trp-5-2/trp5-48 heteroalleles. Gene-centromere recombination also was not observed in rad/52/rad52 diploids. No ..gamma..-ray- or uv-induced intragenic mitotic recombination is seen in rad52/rad52 diploids. The rate of spontaneous mitotic recombination is lowered five-fold at the his1-1/his1-315 and leu1-c/leu1-12 heteroalleles. Spontaneous reversion rates of both his1-1 and his1-315 were elevated 10 to 20 fold in rad52/rad52 diploids. The RAD52 gene function is required for spontaneous mitotic recombination, uv- and ..gamma..-ray-induced mitotic recombination and mitotic recombination.

  4. Recombinant HT{sub m4} gene, protein and assays

    DOEpatents

    Lim, B.; Adra, C.N.; Lelias, J.M.

    1996-09-03

    The invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule which encodes a HT{sub m4} protein, a transformed host cell which has been stably transfected with a DNA molecule which encodes a HT{sub m4} protein and a recombinant HT{sub m4} protein. The invention also relates to a method for detecting the presence of a hereditary atopy. 2 figs.

  5. Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis by angiostatin: from recombinant protein to gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Dell'Eva, Raffaella; Pfeffer, Ulrich; Indraccolo, S; Albini, Adriana; Noonan, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Tumor growth, local invasion, and metastatic dissemination are dependent on the formation of new microvessels. The process of angiogenesis is regulated by a balance between pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors, and the shift to an angiogenic phenotype (the "angiogenic switch") is a key event in tumor progression. The use of anti-angiogenic agents to restore this balance represents a promising approach to cancer treatment. Known physiological inhibitors include trombospondin, several interleukins, and the proteolytic break-down products of several proteins. Angiostatin, an internal fragment of plasminogen, is one of the more potent of this latter class of angiogenesis inhibitors. Like endostatin, another anti-angiogenic peptide derived from collagen XVIII, angiostatin can induce tumor vasculature regression, leading to a complete cessation of tumor growth. Inhibitors of angiogenesis target normal endothelial cells, therefore the development of resistance to these drugs is unlikely. The efficacy of angiostatin has been demonstrated in animal models for many different types of solid tumors. Anti-angiogenic cancer therapy with angiostatin requires prolonged administration of the peptide. The production of the functional polypeptides is expensive and technical problems related to physical properties and purity are frequently encountered. Gene transfer represents an alternative method to deliver angiostatin. Gene therapy has the potential to produce the therapeutic agent in high concentrations in a local area for a sustained period, thereby avoiding the problems encountered with long-term administration of recombinant proteins, monoclonal antibodies, or anti-angiogenic drugs. In this review we compare the different gene therapy strategies that have been applied to angiostatin, with special regard to their ability to provide sufficient angiostatin at the target site. PMID:12901356

  6. Generation and Characterization of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Anthrax Protective Antigen following Vaccination with a Recombinant Protective Antigen Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chi, Xiangyang; Li, Jianmin; Liu, Weicen; Wang, Xiaolin; Yin, Kexin; Liu, Ju; Zai, Xiaodong; Li, Liangliang; Song, Xiaohong; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yin, Ying; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is the central component of the three-part anthrax toxin, and it is the primary immunogenic component in the approved AVA anthrax vaccine and the "next-generation" recombinant PA (rPA) anthrax vaccines. Animal models have indicated that PA-specific antibodies (AB) are sufficient to protect against infection with Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we investigated the PA domain specificity, affinity, mechanisms of neutralization, and synergistic effects of PA-specific antibodies from a single donor following vaccination with the rPA vaccine. Antibody-secreting cells were isolated 7 days after the donor received a boost vaccination, and 34 fully human monoclonal antibodies (hMAb) were identified. Clones 8H6, 4A3, and 22F1 were able to neutralize lethal toxin (LeTx) both in vitro and in vivo. Clone 8H6 neutralized LeTx by preventing furin cleavage of PA in a dose-dependent manner. Clone 4A3 enhanced degradation of nicked PA, thereby interfering with PA oligomerization. The mechanism of 22F1 is still unclear. A fourth clone, 2A6, that was protective only in vitro was found to be neutralizing in vivo in combination with a toxin-enhancing antibody, 8A7, which binds to domain 3 of PA and PA oligomers. These results provide novel insights into the antibody response elicited by the rPA vaccine and may be useful for PA-based vaccine and immunotherapeutic cocktail design. PMID:25787135

  7. Generation and Characterization of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Anthrax Protective Antigen following Vaccination with a Recombinant Protective Antigen Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Xiangyang; Li, Jianmin; Liu, Weicen; Wang, Xiaolin; Yin, Kexin; Liu, Ju; Zai, Xiaodong; Li, Liangliang; Song, Xiaohong; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yin, Ying; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is the central component of the three-part anthrax toxin, and it is the primary immunogenic component in the approved AVA anthrax vaccine and the “next-generation” recombinant PA (rPA) anthrax vaccines. Animal models have indicated that PA-specific antibodies (AB) are sufficient to protect against infection with Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we investigated the PA domain specificity, affinity, mechanisms of neutralization, and synergistic effects of PA-specific antibodies from a single donor following vaccination with the rPA vaccine. Antibody-secreting cells were isolated 7 days after the donor received a boost vaccination, and 34 fully human monoclonal antibodies (hMAb) were identified. Clones 8H6, 4A3, and 22F1 were able to neutralize lethal toxin (LeTx) both in vitro and in vivo. Clone 8H6 neutralized LeTx by preventing furin cleavage of PA in a dose-dependent manner. Clone 4A3 enhanced degradation of nicked PA, thereby interfering with PA oligomerization. The mechanism of 22F1 is still unclear. A fourth clone, 2A6, that was protective only in vitro was found to be neutralizing in vivo in combination with a toxin-enhancing antibody, 8A7, which binds to domain 3 of PA and PA oligomers. These results provide novel insights into the antibody response elicited by the rPA vaccine and may be useful for PA-based vaccine and immunotherapeutic cocktail design. PMID:25787135

  8. Regeneration of Recombinant Antigen Microarrays for the Automated Monitoring of Antibodies against Zoonotic Pathogens in Swine Sera

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Verena K.; Kober, Catharina; Niessner, Reinhard; Seidel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The ability to regenerate immobilized proteins like recombinant antigens (rAgs) on surfaces is an unsolved problem for flow-based immunoassays on microarray analysis systems. The regeneration on microarray chip surfaces is achieved by changing the protein structures and desorption of antibodies. Afterwards, reactivation of immobilized protein antigens is necessary for reconstitution processes. Any backfolding should be managed in a way that antibodies are able to detect the protein antigens in the next measurement cycle. The regeneration of rAg microarrays was examined for the first time on the MCR3 flow-based chemiluminescence (CL) microarray analysis platform. The aim was to reuse rAg microarray chips in order to reduce the screening effort and costs. An antibody capturing format was used to detect antibodies against zoonotic pathogens in sera of slaughtered pigs. Different denaturation and reactivation buffers were tested. Acidic glycine-SDS buffer (pH 2.5) and 8 M guanidinium hydrochloride showed the best results in respect of denaturation efficiencies. The highest CL signals after regeneration were achieved with a carbonate buffer containing 10 mM DTT and 0.1% BSA for reactivation. Antibodies against Yersinia spp. and hepatitis E virus (HEV) were detected in swine sera on one immunochip over 4 days and 25 measurement cycles. Each cycle took 10 min for detection and regeneration. By using the rAg microarray chip, a fast and automated screening of antibodies against pathogens in sera of slaughtered pigs would be possible for zoonosis monitoring. PMID:25625908

  9. Immunogenic response to a recombinant pseudorabies virus carrying bp26 gene of Brucella melitensis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lan; Wu, Chang-Xian; Zheng, Ke; Xu, Xian-Jin; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Chuang-Fu; Liu, Zheng-Fei

    2015-06-01

    Brucellae are facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens of a zoonotic disease called brucellosis. Live attenuated vaccines are utilized for prophylaxis of brucellosis; however, they retain residual virulence to human and/or animals, as well as interfere with diagnosis. In this study, recombinant virus PRV ΔTK/ΔgE/bp26 was screened and purified. One-step growth curve assay showed that the titer of recombinant virus was comparable to the parent strain. Mice experiments showed the recombinant virus elicited high titer of humoral antibodies against Brucella detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and against PRV by serum neutralization test. The recombinant virus induced high level of Brucella-specific lymphocyte proliferation response and production of interferon gamma. Collectively, these data suggest that the bivalent virus was capable of inducing both humoral and cellular immunity, and had the potential to be a vaccine candidate to prevent Brucella and/or pseudorabies virus infections. PMID:25890577

  10. Immunization with recombinantly expressed glycan antigens from Schistosoma mansoni induces glycan-specific antibodies against the parasite

    PubMed Central

    Prasanphanich, Nina Salinger; Luyai, Anthony E; Song, Xuezheng; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Mandalasi, Msano; Mickum, Megan; Smith, David F; Nyame, A Kwame; Cummings, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis caused by infection with parasitic helminths of Schistosoma spp. is a major global health problem due to inadequate treatment and lack of a vaccine. The immune response to schistosomes includes glycan antigens, which could be valuable diagnostic markers and vaccine targets. However, no precedent exists for how to design vaccines targeting eukaryotic glycoconjugates. The di- and tri-saccharide motifs LacdiNAc (GalNAcβ1,4GlcNAc; LDN) and fucosylated LacdiNAc (GalNAcβ1,4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc; LDNF) are the basis for several important schistosome glycan antigens. They occur in monomeric form or as repeating units (poly-LDNF) and as part of a variety of different glycoconjugates. Because chemical synthesis and conjugation of such antigens is exceedingly difficult, we sought to develop a recombinant expression system for parasite glycans. We hypothesized that presentation of parasite glycans on the cell surface would induce glycan-specific antibodies. We generated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) Lec8 cell lines expressing poly-LDN (L8-GT) and poly-LDNF (L8-GTFT) abundantly on their membrane glycoproteins. Sera from Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice were highly cross-reactive with the cells and with cell-surface N-glycans. Immunizing mice with L8-GT and L8-GTFT cells induced glycan-specific antibodies. The L8-GTFT cells induced a sustained booster response, with antibodies that bound to S. mansoni lysates and recapitulated the exquisite specificity of the anti-parasite response for particular presentations of LDNF antigen. In summary, this recombinant expression system promotes successful generation of antibodies to the glycans of S. mansoni, and it can be adapted to study the role of glycan antigens and anti-glycan immune responses in many other infections and pathologies. PMID:24727440

  11. Safe and easy monitoring of anti-rabies antibody in dogs using his-tagged recombinant N-protein.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Satoshi; Motoi, Yurie; Kashimura, Tomoko; Ono, Kenichiro; Yamada, Akio

    2003-08-01

    The virus neutralization (VN) test is a reliable indicator of adequate vaccination in animals. However, the VN test is tedious and complicated to perform. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), though rapid and simple compared to the VN test, is complicated and hazardous during preparation of the viral antigen. In an effort to overcome the disadvantage of ELISA, the recombinant His-tagged nucleoprotein (His-rNP) expressed in Escherichia coli was used as a safe antigen for ELISA (i.e., live virus was not used). Anti-rabies antibody levels were determined by fluorescent ELISA (FELISA) using His-rNP as an antigen. The presence of anti-rabies VN antibody was determined by the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). The VN titers by RFFIT were found to correlate well with the FITC-signal determined by the FELISA (r = 0.616). The sensitivity and specificity of the FELISA were 91.7 and 100%, respectively. This study showed that the His-rNP could be useful as an antigen of ELISA to test for anti-rabies antibody in vaccinated dogs. Several studies in Japan have investigated the antibody level in the sera of vaccinated dogs. A safe and convenient test using His-rNP would contribute to our understanding of the status of herd immunity among not only domestic dogs but also stray dogs in Japan. PMID:14583639

  12. Probing the human antibody repertoire to exogenous antigens: Characterization of the H and L chain V region gene segments from anti-hepatitis B virus antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Andris, J.S.; Capra, J.D. ); Ehrlich, P.H.; Oestberg, L. )

    1992-12-15

    Structural studies of human antibody V regions have been largely limited to those involving the fetal repertoire, autoantibodies, and malignant cell rearrangements, leaving the normal' repertoire relatively unexplored. In this study the authors describe the nucleotide sequences of the H and L chain V regions of four antibodies specific for the surface Ag of the hepatitis B virus. Monoclonal cell lines were derived from healthy individuals who received standard immunizations with the serum-derived or recombinant hepatitis B virus vaccines by fusion of PBL to a heterohybridoma cell line, SPAZ-4. They utilized the polymerase chain reaction to aimplify the H and L chain V regions for cloning and sequencing. The four antibodies express the following V region combinations: V[sub H]III/V[lambda]V, V[sub H]III/V[kappa]II, V[sub H]IV/V[kappa]I, V[sub H]V/V[lambda]III. When compared to germline genes with the closest sequence homology, all of the V regions appear to have undergone somatic mutation, ranging from 3.4 to 11.3% for the H chain, and 5.1 to 9.2% for the L chain. Analysis of the mutations shows them to be typical for an Ag-driven immune response. 50 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Promises and pitfalls for recombinant oligoclonal antibodies-based therapeutics in cancer and infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Corti, Davide; Kearns, Jeffrey D

    2016-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of many human diseases and the application of combinations of mAbs has demonstrated improved therapeutic activity in both preclinical and clinical testing. Combinations of antibodies have several advantages such as the capacities to target multiple and mutating antigens in complex pathogens and to engage varied epitopes on multiple disease-related antigens (e.g. receptors) to overcome heterogeneity and plasticity. Oligoclonal antibodies are an emerging therapeutic format in which a novel antibody combination is developed as a single drug product. Here, we will provide historical context on the use of oligoclonal antibodies in oncology and infectious diseases and will highlight practical considerations related to their preclinical and clinical development programs. PMID:26995095

  14. Chimpanzees Immunized with Recombinant Soluble CD4 Develop Anti-Self CD4 Antibody Responses with Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Mamoru; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Lord, Carol I.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1992-06-01

    In view of the efficiency with which human immunodeficiency virus replication can be blocked in vitro with anti-CD4 antibodies, the elicitation of an anti-CD4 antibody response through active immunization might represent a useful therapeutic strategy for AIDS. Here we demonstrate that immunization of chimpanzees with recombinant soluble human CD4 elicited an anti-CD4 antibody response. The elicited antibody bound self CD4 on digitonin-treated but not freshly isolated lymphocytes. Nevertheless, this antibody blocked human immunodeficiency virus replication in chimpanzee and human lymphocytes. These observations suggest that immunization with recombinant soluble CD4 from human immunodeficiency virus-infected humans may be feasible and therapeutically beneficial.

  15. Recombineering, transfection, Western, IP and ChIP methods for protein tagging via gene targeting or BAC transgenesis.

    PubMed

    Hofemeister, Helmut; Ciotta, Giovanni; Fu, Jun; Seibert, Philipp Martin; Schulz, Alexander; Maresca, Marcello; Sarov, Mihail; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Stewart, A Francis

    2011-04-01

    Protein tagging offers many advantages for proteomic and regulomic research. Ideally, protein tagging is equivalent to having a high affinity antibody for every chosen protein. However, these advantages are compromised if the tagged protein is overexpressed, which is usually the case from cDNA expression vectors. Physiological expression of tagged proteins can be achieved by gene targeting to knock-in the protein tag or by BAC transgenesis. BAC transgenes usually retain the native gene architecture including all cis-regulatory elements as well as the exon-intron configurations. Consequently most BAC transgenes are authentically regulated (e.g. by transcription factors, cell cycle, miRNA) and can be alternatively spliced. Recombineering has become the method of choice for generating targeting constructs or modifying BACs. Here we present methods with detailed protocols for protein tagging by recombineering for BAC transgenesis and/or gene targeting, including the evaluation of tagged protein expression, the retrieval of associated protein complexes for mass spectrometry and the use of the tags in ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation). PMID:21195765

  16. A method to generate recombinant Salmonella typhi Ty21a strains expressing multiple heterologous genes using an improved recombineering strategy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bin; Yang, Mei; Wong, Ho Yin Bosco; Watt, Rory M; Song, Erwei; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Huang, Jian-Dong

    2011-07-01

    Live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi Ty21a (Ty21a) is an important vaccine strain used in clinical studies for typhoid fever and as a vaccine vector for the expression of heterologous antigens. To facilitate the use of Ty21a in such studies, it is desirable to develop improved strategies that enable the stable chromosomal integration and expression of multiple heterologous antigens. The phage λ Red homologous recombination system has previously been used in various gram-negative bacteria species to mediate the accurate replacement of regions of chromosomal DNA with PCR-generated 'targeting cassettes' that contain flanking regions of shared homologous DNA sequence. However, the efficiency of λ Red-mediated recombineering in Ty21a is far lower than in Escherichia coli and other Salmonella typhimurium strains. Here, we describe an improved strategy for recombineering-based methods in Ty21a. Our reliable and efficient method involves the use of linear DNA-targeting cassettes that contain relatively long flanking 'arms' of sequence (ca. 1,000 bp) homologous to the chromosomal target. This enables multiple gene-targeting procedures to be performed on a single Ty21a chromosome in a straightforward, sequential manner. Using this strategy, we inserted three different influenza antigen expression cassettes as well as a green fluorescent protein gene reporter into four different loci on the Ty21a chromosome, with high efficiency and accuracy. Fluorescent microscopy and Western blotting analysis confirmed that strong inducible expression of all four heterologous genes could be achieved. In summary, we have developed an efficient, robust, and versatile method that may be used to construct recombinant Ty21a antigen-expressing strains. PMID:21611798

  17. Construction and Characterization of an Infectious Vaccinia Virus Recombinant That Expresses the Influenza Hemagglutinin Gene and Induces Resistance to Influenza Virus Infection in Hamsters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoffrey L.; Murphy, Brian R.; Moss, Bernard

    1983-12-01

    A DNA copy of the influenza virus hemagglutinin gene, derived from influenza virus A/Jap/305/57 (H2N2) was inserted into the genome of vaccinia virus under the control of an early vaccinia virus promoter. Tissue culture cells infected with the purified recombinant virus synthesized influenza hemagglutinin, which was glycosylated and transported to the cell surface where it could be cleaved with trypsin into HA1 and HA2 subunits. Rabbits and hamsters inoculated intradermally with recombinant virus produced circulating antibodies that inhibited hemagglutination by influenza virus. Furthermore, vaccinated hamsters achieved levels of antibody similar to those obtained upon primary infection with influenza virus and were protected against respiratory infection with the A/Jap/305/57 influenza virus.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies specific for elongation factor Tu and complete nucleotide sequence of the tuf gene in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, N I; Löfdahl, S; Magnusson, M

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against mycobacterial antigens were produced by immunizing LOU/C rats with live Mycobacterium bovis BCG. The antibodies were characterized by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by Western blotting (immunoblotting). One antibody, MAMB 2, reactive with a 47-kDa protein was used to screen a lambda gt11 M. tuberculosis gene library (R. A. Young, B. R. Bloom, C. M. Grosskinsky, J. Ivanji, D. Thomas, and R. W. Davis, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82:2583-2587, 1985). Three recombinant phages reactive with MAMB 2 in plaque lysates were isolated, and part of the insert was sequenced. The mycobacterial inserts were all expressed as proteins fused with beta-galactosidase when the phages were induced as lysogens in Escherichia coli. The entire M. tuberculosis tuf gene was obtained by screening the lambda gt11 library with a DNA probe specific for the primary clones. A phage isolated from this screening was able to express the native protein in E. coli when introduced as a lysogen. A comparison of the entire gene sequence and the deduced protein sequence with the EMBL DNA and Swiss-Prot protein data libraries revealed strong homologies with elongation factors of bacteria, yeast mitochondria, and a plant chloroplast. Images PMID:1639483

  19. Targeting Three Distinct HER2 Domains with a Recombinant Antibody Mixture Overcomes Trastuzumab Resistance.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Mikkel W; Jacobsen, Helle J; Koefoed, Klaus; Dahlman, Anna; Kjær, Ida; Poulsen, Thomas T; Meijer, Per-Johan; Nielsen, Lars S; Horak, Ivan D; Lantto, Johan; Kragh, Michael

    2015-03-01

    HER2 plays an important role in the development and maintenance of the malignant phenotype of several human cancers. As such, it is a frequently pursued therapeutic target and two antibodies targeting HER2 have been clinically approved, trastuzumab and pertuzumab. It has been suggested that optimal inhibition of HER2 is achieved when utilizing two or more antibodies targeting nonoverlapping epitopes. Superior clinical activity of the trastuzumab plus pertuzumab combination in metastatic breast cancer supports this hypothesis. Because trastuzumab and pertuzumab were not codeveloped, there may be potential for further optimizing HER2 targeting. The study herein evaluated functional activity of anti-HER2 antibody combinations identifying optimal epitope combinations that provide efficacious HER2 inhibition. High-affinity antibodies to all four extracellular domains on HER2 were identified and tested for ability to inhibit growth of different HER2-dependent tumor cell lines. An antibody mixture targeting three HER2 subdomains proved to be superior to trastuzumab, pertuzumab, or a combination in vitro and to trastuzumab in two in vivo models. Specifically, the tripartite antibody mixture induced efficient HER2 internalization and degradation demonstrating increased sensitivity in cell lines with HER2 amplification and high EGFR levels. When compared with individual and clinically approved mAbs, the synergistic tripartite antibody targeting HER2 subdomains I, II, and IV demonstrates superior anticancer activity. PMID:25612619

  20. Quantitative analysis of recombination between YFP and CFP genes of FRET biosensors introduced by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Komatsubara, Akira T; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors based on the principle of Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed to visualize spatio-temporal dynamics of signalling molecules in living cells. Many of them adopt a backbone of intramolecular FRET biosensor with a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) as donor and acceptor, respectively. However, there remains the difficulty of establishing cells stably expressing FRET biosensors with a YFP and CFP pair by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, due to the high incidence of recombination between YFP and CFP genes. To address this, we examined the effects of codon-diversification of YFP on the recombination of FRET biosensors introduced by lentivirus or retrovirus. The YFP gene that was fully codon-optimized to E.coli evaded the recombination in lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, but the partially codon-diversified YFP did not. Further, the length of spacer between YFP and CFP genes clearly affected recombination efficiency, suggesting that the intramolecular template switching occurred in the reverse-transcription process. The simple mathematical model reproduced the experimental data sufficiently, yielding a recombination rate of 0.002-0.005 per base. Together, these results show that the codon-diversified YFP is a useful tool for expressing FRET biosensors by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer. PMID:26290434

  1. Oral Administration of Recombinant Lactococcus lactis Expressing the Cellulase Gene Increases Digestibility of Fiber in Geese.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haizhu; Gao, Yunhang; Gao, Guang; Lou, Yujie

    2015-12-01

    Enhancing cellulose digestibility in animals is important for improving the utilization of forage, which can decrease the amount of food used in animal production. The aim of the present study was to achieve recombinant expression of the cellulase gene in Lactococcus lactis and evaluate the effects of oral administration of the recombinant L. lactis on fiber digestibility in geese. Cellulase (Cell) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes were cloned into a L. lactis expression vector (pNZ8149) to construct the recombinant expression plasmid (pNZ8149-GFP-Cell). Then, the recombinant expression plasmid was transformed into L. lactis (NZ3900) competent cells by electroporation to obtain recombinant L. lactis (pNZ8149-GFP-Cell/NZ3900) in which protein expression was induced by Nisin. Expression of GFP and Cell by the recombinant L. lactis was confirmed using SDS-PAGE, fluorescence detection, and Congo red assays. A feeding experiment showed that oral administration of pNZ8149-GFP-Cell/NZ3900 significantly increased the digestibility of dietary fiber in geese fed either a maize stalk diet or a rice chaff diet. Therefore, oral administration of recombinant L. lactis cells expressing the cellulase gene increases fiber digestibility in geese, offering a way to increase the utilization of dietary fiber in geese. PMID:26341925

  2. DNA secondary structures are associated with recombination in major Plasmodium falciparum variable surface antigen gene families

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Adam F.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Rask, Thomas S.; Lisby, Michael; Salanti, Ali; Fordyce, Sarah L.; Jespersen, Jakob S.; Carter, Richard; Deitsch, Kirk W.; Theander, Thor G.; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Arnot, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens undergo antigenic variation to counter host immune defense mechanisms. In Plasmodium falciparum, the most lethal of human malaria parasites, switching of var gene expression results in alternating expression of the adhesion proteins of the Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 class on the infected erythrocyte surface. Recombination clearly generates var diversity, but the nature and control of the genetic exchanges involved remain unclear. By experimental and bioinformatic identification of recombination events and genome-wide recombination hotspots in var genes, we show that during the parasite’s sexual stages, ectopic recombination between isogenous var paralogs occurs near low folding free energy DNA 50-mers and that these sequences are heavily concentrated at the boundaries of regions encoding individual Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 structural domains. The recombinogenic potential of these 50-mers is not parasite-specific because these sequences also induce recombination when transferred to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic cross data suggest that DNA secondary structures (DSS) act as inducers of recombination during DNA replication in P. falciparum sexual stages, and that these DSS-regulated genetic exchanges generate functional and diverse P. falciparum adhesion antigens. DSS-induced recombination may represent a common mechanism for optimizing the evolvability of virulence gene families in pathogens. PMID:24253306

  3. Conformational changes of recombinant monoclonal antibodies by limited proteolytic digestion, stable isotope labeling, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Nowak, Christine; Kita, Adriana; Cheng, Guilong; Kori, Yekaterina; Liu, Hongcheng

    2016-03-15

    Limited proteolytic digestion is a method with a long history that has been used to study protein domain structures and conformational changes. A method of combining limited proteolytic digestion, stable isotope labeling, and mass spectrometry was established in the current study to investigate protein conformational changes. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies with or without the conserved oligosaccharides, and with or without oxidation of the conserved methionine residues, were used to test the newly proposed method. All of the samples were digested in ammonium bicarbonate buffer prepared in normal water. The oxidized deglycosylated sample was also digested in ammonium bicarbonate buffer prepared in (18)O-labeled water. The sample from the digestion in (18)O-water was spiked into each sample digested in normal water. Each mixed sample was subsequently analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The molecular weight differences between the peptides digested in normal water versus (18)O-water were used to differentiate peaks from the samples. The relative peak intensities of peptides with or without the C-terminal incorporation of (18)O atoms were used to determine susceptibility of different samples to trypsin and chymotrypsin. The results demonstrated that the method was capable of detecting local conformational changes of the recombinant monoclonal antibodies caused by deglycosylation and oxidation. PMID:26747642

  4. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Theileria parva antibodies in cattle using a recombinant polymorphic immunodominant molecule.

    PubMed

    Katende, J; Morzaria, S; Toye, P; Skilton, R; Nene, V; Nkonge, C; Musoke, A

    1998-05-01

    Field and experimental bovine infection sera were used in immunoblots of sporozoite and schizont lysates of Theileria parva to identify candidate diagnostic antigens. Four parasite antigens of Mr 67,000 (p67), 85,000 (the polymorphic immunodominant molecule, PIM), 104,000 (p104), and 150,000 (p150) were selected for a more detailed analysis. The p67 and p104 antigens were present only in the sporozoite lysates, whereas PIM and p150 were found in both sporozoite and schizont lysates. The four antigens were expressed as recombinant fusion proteins and were compared with each other in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and in the whole-schizont-based indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) in terms of their ability to detect antibodies in sera of experimentally infected cattle. The PIM-based ELISA provided a higher degree of sensitivity and specificity than did the ELISA using the other three recombinant antigens or the IFAT. Further evaluation of the PIM-ELISA using experimental sera derived from cattle infected with different hemoparasites and field sera from endemic and nonendemic T. parva areas showed that the assay had a sensitivity of > 99% and a specificity of between 94% and 98%. PMID:9610640

  5. Intranasal Delivery of Recombinant Parvovirus-Like Particles Elicits Cytotoxic T-Cell and Neutralizing Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Sedlik, C.; Dridi, A.; Deriaud, E.; Saron, M. F.; Rueda, P.; Sarraseca, J.; Casal, J. I.; Leclerc, C.

    1999-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that chimeric porcine parvovirus-like particles (PPV:VLP) carrying heterologous epitopes, when injected intraperitoneally into mice without adjuvant, activate strong CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses specific for the foreign epitopes. In the present study, we investigated the immunogenicity of PPV:VLP carrying a CD8+ T-cell epitope from the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) administered by mucosal routes. Mice immunized intranasally with recombinant PPV:VLP, in the absence of adjuvant, developed high levels of PPV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and/or IgA in their serum, as well as in mucosal sites such as the bronchoalveolar and intestinal fluids. Antibodies in sera from mice immunized parenterally or intranasally with PPV:VLP were strongly neutralizing in vitro. Intranasal immunization with PPV:VLP carrying the LCMV CD8+ T-cell epitope also elicited a strong peptide-specific cytotoxic-T-cell (CTL) response. In contrast, mice orally immunized with recombinant PPV:VLP did not develop any antibody or CTL responses. We also showed that mice primed with PPV:VLP are still able to develop strong CTL responses after subsequent immunization with chimeric PPV:VLP carrying a foreign CD8+ T-cell epitope. These results highlight the attractive potential of PPV:VLP as a safe, nonreplicating antigen carrier to stimulate systemic and mucosal immunity after nasal administration. PMID:10074120

  6. Intranasal delivery of recombinant parvovirus-like particles elicits cytotoxic T-cell and neutralizing antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Sedlik, C; Dridi, A; Deriaud, E; Saron, M F; Rueda, P; Sarraseca, J; Casal, J I; Leclerc, C

    1999-04-01

    We previously demonstrated that chimeric porcine parvovirus-like particles (PPV:VLP) carrying heterologous epitopes, when injected intraperitoneally into mice without adjuvant, activate strong CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses specific for the foreign epitopes. In the present study, we investigated the immunogenicity of PPV:VLP carrying a CD8(+) T-cell epitope from the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) administered by mucosal routes. Mice immunized intranasally with recombinant PPV:VLP, in the absence of adjuvant, developed high levels of PPV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and/or IgA in their serum, as well as in mucosal sites such as the bronchoalveolar and intestinal fluids. Antibodies in sera from mice immunized parenterally or intranasally with PPV:VLP were strongly neutralizing in vitro. Intranasal immunization with PPV:VLP carrying the LCMV CD8(+) T-cell epitope also elicited a strong peptide-specific cytotoxic-T-cell (CTL) response. In contrast, mice orally immunized with recombinant PPV:VLP did not develop any antibody or CTL responses. We also showed that mice primed with PPV:VLP are still able to develop strong CTL responses after subsequent immunization with chimeric PPV:VLP carrying a foreign CD8(+) T-cell epitope. These results highlight the attractive potential of PPV:VLP as a safe, nonreplicating antigen carrier to stimulate systemic and mucosal immunity after nasal administration. PMID:10074120

  7. Production of monoclonal antibodies to porcine interleukin-18 and their use for immunoaffinity purification of recombinant porcine interleukin-18.

    PubMed

    Muneta, Y; Shimoji, Y; Yokomizo, Y; Mori, Y

    2000-03-01

    We have recently reported the cloning and expression of porcine interleukin-18 (IL-18). In this study, we describe the production of anti-porcine IL-18 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) and their use in the purification of a large amount of recombinant porcine IL-18 by immunoaffinity column chromatography. Five monoclonal antibodies (2-2-B, 2-5-B, 2-13-C, 3-1-C and 5-3-B) were established and characterized. Three (2-2-B, 3-1-C and 5-3-B) of them were of IgG1 subclass, and the other two were IgMs. Epitope analysis of the three IgG1 mAbs showed that they recognized the same epitope. All five mAbs demonstrated reactivity with baculovirus generated porcine IL-18 by immunoblot analysis. Biologically active porcine IL-18 was obtained by immunoaffinity chromatography using anti-porcine IL-18 mAb at more than 85% purity from culture supernatants of Trichoplusia ni (Tn5) derived cells infected with recombinant baculovirus containing the coding sequence of porcine mature IL-18. These results suggest that the anti-porcine IL-18 mAbs established in this study are useful for one-step purification of porcine mature IL-18 as well as the detection of porcine IL-18 by immunoblotting. PMID:10699583

  8. Molecular requirements for immunoglobulin heavy chain constant region gene switch-recombination revealed with switch-substrate retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Ott, D E; Marcu, K B

    1989-01-01

    We have employed a retroviral vector, ZN(Smu/S gamma 2b)tk1, as a means of introducing immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) switch (S) region sequences into B cell lines to directly measure their switch-recombinase activities. In an earlier study, we demonstrated that retrovector Smu-S gamma 2b recombination events occurred in two thymidine kinase (tk)-negative murine pre-B cell lines (18-8 and 38B9) upon selection in bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) media for the loss of an Htk gene inserted in between the vector's Smu and S gamma 2b sequences. Here we have used this assay system to show that the 300-18 murine pre-B cell line possesses a very high level of switch-recombinase activity (greater than 1 event in 2500 cells/generation) while a terminally differentiated, antibody-secreting hybridoma line (A39R 1.1) has no detectable recombinase activity. Both S mu and S gamma 2b segments are required for switch region-mediated deletions. Retrovectors harboring only an Smu segment or an Smu segment and a portion of the murine c-myc gene in place of S gamma 2b sequences were both non-recombinagenic in this assay system. Nucleotide sequence analysis of six retrovector S segment recombinants, recovered from ZN(Smu/S gamma 2b) tk1-infected 18-8 and 39B9 pre-B lines, did not reveal homology at their sites of recombination. We conclude that: (1) S segment repetitive sequences play an essential but indirect role in IgCH gene switch-recombination, which occurs by an illegitimate, non-homologous mechanism; (2) the c-myc gene is not a significant target for switch-recombination; and (3) since endogenous Smu and S gamma 2b rearrangements were not observed in populations and clones of pre-B cells expressing a high level of switch-recombinase activity, multiple factors (presumably contributed in part by the degree of S segment accessibility) in addition to S recombinase activity are required for CH class switching. PMID:2489045

  9. A protocol for construction of gene targeting vectors and generation of homologous recombinant ES cells

    PubMed Central

    Bouabe, Hicham; Okkenhaug, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Summary The completion of human and mouse genome sequencing has confronted us with huge amount of data sequences that certainly need decades and many generations of scientists to be reasonably interpreted and assigned to physiological functions, and subsequently fruitfully translated into medical application. A means to assess the function of genes provides gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells that enables to introduce site-specific modifications in the mouse genome, and analyze their physiological consequences. Gene targeting enables almost any type of genetic modifications of interest, ranging from gene insertion (e.g. insertion of human-specific genes or reporter genes), gene disruption, point mutations, short and long range deletions, inversions. Site-specific modification into the genome of ES cells can be reached by homologous recombination using targeting vectors. Here, we describe a protocol to generate targeting constructs and homologous recombinant ES cells. PMID:23996269

  10. Fusogenics: a recombinant immunotoxin-based screening platform to select internalizing tumor-specific antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Cizeau, Jeannick; Torres, Marianne G P; Cowling, Sharla G; Stibbard, Stacy; Premsukh, Arjune; Entwistle, Joycelyn; MacDonald, Glen C

    2011-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics play a vital role in the treatment of certain cancers; however, despite commercial success, various strategies are being pursued to increase their potency and hence improve patient outcomes. The use of antibodies to deliver a cytotoxic payload offers a promising alternative for more efficacious therapies. Immunotoxins are composed of an internalizing antibody fragment linked to a bacterial or plant toxin. Once internalized, the payload, such as Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE), blocks protein synthesis and induces apoptosis. Typically, immunotoxins are developed by first isolating a tumor-specific antibody, which is then either chemically linked to a toxin or reengineered as a fusion protein. Here, the authors describe the development of Fusogenics, an immunotoxin-based screening method that selects internalizing tumor-specific antibodies using a functional assay. Selected immune library clones were characterized and shown to be selective against normal tissues and specific to tumor tissues. In summary, the Fusogenics immunotoxin platform represents a unique, single-step selection approach combining specificity and functionality to isolate novel internalizing tumor-specific antibody fragments with potential for direct clinical application in the treatment of cancer. PMID:21131595