Science.gov

Sample records for genetic alterations affecting

  1. Genetically Altered Plant Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Researchers in Robert Ferl's lab at the University of Florida in Gainesville, genetically altered this Arabdopsis Thaliana (a brassica species) plant to learn how extreme environments, such as the low atmospheric pressure on Mars, affect plant genes. They inserted green fluorescent protein (GFP) near the on/off switches for anoxia and drought genes. When those genes were turned on after exposure to reduced atmospheric pressure, GFP was turned on as well, causing cells expressing those genes to glow green under a blue light. The natural fluorescence of chlorophyll accounts for the red glow.

  2. Human genetic variation altering anthrax toxin sensitivity

    E-print Network

    Tang, Hua

    Human genetic variation altering anthrax toxin sensitivity Mikhail Martchenkoa , Sophie I affecting capillary morphogenesis gene 2 (CMG2), which encodes a host membrane protein exploited by anthrax in sensitivity me- diated by the protective antigen (PA) moiety of anthrax toxin by more than four orders

  3. Altering milk composition through genetic selection.

    PubMed

    Gibson, J P

    1989-10-01

    The genetic relationships among carrier, fat, protein, and lactose will allow genetic alteration in any direction desired, although some changes would be much easier than others. Genetic parameters may vary somewhat between different populations, thus affecting the rates of different directions of change. In general, however, selection for an alteration in the fat:protein ratio would proceed rapidly, principally through alteration of fat concentration. Genetic alteration of composition is likely only if economic incentives for such change exist. Economic values, and therefore selection pressure, should be applied to amounts of components rather than concentrations. Recent developments in the theory of deriving economic weights for animal breeding indicate that selection indexes need to be reassessed. Although optimum breeding goals will vary somewhat, in most circumstances fat and protein yields and concentrations and the fat:protein ratio are likely to increase due to genetic selection. Only in the unlikely situation that fat has a very small or negative economic weight are other changes indicated. Lactose concentrations are unlikely to change much in any situation. Genetic variation in the composition of fat and protein, while of biological interest, is unlikely to be of more than minor importance in genetic improvement. PMID:2600237

  4. Ethnicity affects EGFR and KRAS gene alterations of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    SOH, JUNICHI; TOYOOKA, SHINICHI; MATSUO, KEITARO; YAMAMOTO, HIROMASA; WISTUBA, IGNACIO I.; LAM, STEPHEN; FONG, KWUN M.; GAZDAR, ADI F.; MIYOSHI, SHINICHIRO

    2015-01-01

    Mutations or copy number gains (CNGs) of the EGFR and KRAS genes are representative alterations in lung adenocarcinomas that are individually associated with patient characteristics such as ethnicity, smoking status and gender. However, the effects of combinations of these genetic alterations have not been statistically examined. The present study analyzed previously examined lung adenocarcinoma cases in Asian (n=166) and non-Asian (n=136) individuals in whom all four EGFR and KRAS alterations had been studied. The polynomial logistic regression models were used following adjustment for gender and smoking status, and using patients without any type of EGFR/KRAS alterations as a reference. Between the two ethnic groups, EGFR CNGs (gEGFR) occurred more frequently than EGFR mutations (mEGFR) (46 vs. 38% in Asians; 21 vs. 10% in non-Asians), whereas KRAS mutations (mKRAS) were more frequent than KRAS CNGs (gKRAS) (13 vs. 7% and 35 vs. 4%, respectively). Additionally, gEGFR and gKRAS occurred significantly more frequently in respective mutant cases, and all EGFR alterations were almost exclusive of all KRAS alterations. The polynomial logistic regression models confirmed that all types of EGFR alterations were significantly more frequent among Asian individuals than among non-Asian individuals, independent of gender and smoking status (odds ratios, 2.36–6.67). KRAS alterations occurred less frequently among Asian individuals than among non-Asian individuals, although a significant difference was not detected. The present study results indicated that the EGFR and KRAS profiles, including mutations and CNGs, differ between Asian and non-Asian individuals with lung adenocarcinoma, suggesting that ethnicity strongly affects the molecular characteristics of lung adenocarcinoma.

  5. Insights into genetic alterations of liver metastases from uveal melanoma.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Conni; Kalirai, Helen; Lake, Sarah L; Dodson, Andrew; Damato, Bertil E; Coupland, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    The liver is the organ usually affected by metastatic uveal melanoma (MUM). Current treatments are almost always ineffective and mortality remains high. In this study, copy number variations (CNVs) were identified in 12 metastatic and five matched primary UMs (PUMs). Our data revealed a wide spectrum of genetic alterations in MUM. Most common were amplifications of chromosome (chr.) 8q; alterations on chr. 3 included monosomy, isodisomy, and large regions of homozygosity (ROH). Genomic profiles of PUM-MUM pairs varied in their degree of similarity and complexity. However, within the pairs, 135 genes were consistently altered. Protein expression of C-MYC and BAP1 was examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC); a positive association between IHC and CNVs was seen for C-MYC. This comprehensive catalogue of CNVs associated with MUM should facilitate the identification of key alterations that drive tumor growth. This would have the potential to select urgently needed novel, targeted, therapeutic regimens. PMID:26523470

  6. Molecular and genetic analyses of the Caenorhabditis elegans dpy-2 and dpy-10 collagen genes: a variety of molecular alterations affect organismal morphology.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, A D; Yang, J; Kramer, J M

    1993-01-01

    We have identified and cloned the Caenorhabditis elegans dpy-2 and dpy-10 genes and determined that they encode collagens. Genetic data suggested that these genes are important in morphogenesis and possibly other developmental events. These data include the morphologic phenotypes exhibited by mutants, unusual genetic interactions with the sqt-1 collagen gene, and suppression of mutations in the glp-1 and mup-1 genes. The proximity of the dpy-2 and dpy-10 genes (3.5 kilobase) and the structural similarity of their encoded proteins (41% amino acid identity) indicate that dpy-2 and dpy-10 are the result of a gene duplication event. The genes do not, however, appear to be functionally redundant, because a dpy-10 null mutant is not rescued by the dpy-2 gene. In addition, full complementation between dpy-2 and dpy-10 can be demonstrated with all recessive alleles tested in trans. Sequence analysis of several mutant alleles of each gene was performed to determine the nature of the molecular defects that can cause the morphologic phenotypes. Glycine substitutions within the Gly-X-Y portion of the collagens can result in dumpy (Dpy), dumpy, left roller (DLRol), or temperature-sensitive DLRol phenotypes. dpy-10(cn64), a dominant temperature-sensitive DLRol allele, creates an Arg-to-Cys substitution in the amino non-Gly-X-Y portion of the protein. Three dpy-10 alleles contain Tc1 insertions in the coding region of the gene. dpy-10(cg36) (DRLol) creates a nonsense codon near the end of the Gly-X-Y region. The nature of this mutation, combined with genetic data, indicates that DLRol is the null phenotype of dpy-10. The Dpy phenotype results from reduced function of the dpy-10 collagen gene. Our results indicate that a variety of molecular defects in these collagens can result in severe morphologic changes in C. elegans. Images PMID:8241567

  7. Genetic alterations and signaling pathways in the evolution of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Ohgaki, Hiroko; Kleihues, Paul

    2009-12-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. They account for more than 70% of all neoplasms of the central nervous system and vary considerably in morphology, location, genetic alterations, and response to therapy. Most frequent and malignant are glioblastomas. The vast majority (>90%) develops rapidly after a short clinical history and without evidence of a less malignant precursor lesion (primary or de novo glioblastoma). Secondary glioblastomas develop more slowly through progression from low-grade or anaplastic astrocytoma. These glioblastoma subtypes constitute distinct disease entities that affect patients of different age, develop through distinct genetic pathways, show different RNA and protein expression profiles, and may differ in their response to radio- and chemotherapy. Recently, isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations have been identified as a very early and frequent genetic alteration in the pathway to secondary glioblastomas as well as that in oligodendroglial tumors, providing the first evidence that low-grade astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas may share common cells of origin. In contrast, primary glioblastomas very rarely contain IDH1 mutations, suggesting that primary and secondary glioblastomas may originate from different progenitor cells, despite the fact that they are histologically largely indistinguishable. In this review, we summarize the current status of genetic alterations and signaling pathways operative in the evolution of astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors. PMID:19737147

  8. PRODUCTION OF EXTRACELLULAR NUCLEIC ACIDS BY GENETICALLY ALTERED BACTERIA IN AQUATIC-ENVIRONMENT MICROCOSMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Factors which affect the production of extracellular DNA by genetically altered strains of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, pseudomonas cepacia, and Bradyrhizobium japonicum in aquatic environments were investigated. he presence or absence of the ambient microbial commun...

  9. Genetic Programming: Parametric Analysis of Structure Altering Mutation Techniques

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Genetic Programming: Parametric Analysis of Structure Altering Mutation Techniques Alan Piszcz;cally parameters controlling mutation, and performance is non-linear in genetic programs. Genetic pro problems. In this pa- per we study three structure altering mutation techniques using parametric analysis

  10. Characterization of the activity of the PI3K/mTOR inhibitor XL765 (SAR245409) in tumor models with diverse genetic alterations affecting the PI3K pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peiwen; Laird, A Douglas; Du, Xiangnan; Wu, Jianming; Won, Kwang-Ai; Yamaguchi, Kyoko; Hsu, Pin Pin; Qian, Fawn; Jaeger, Christopher T; Zhang, Wentao; Buhr, Chris A; Shen, Paula; Abulafia, Wendy; Chen, Jason; Young, Jenny; Plonowski, Arthur; Yakes, F Michael; Chu, Felix; Lee, Michelle; Bentzien, Frauke; Lam, Sanh Tan; Dale, Stephanie; Matthews, David J; Lamb, Peter; Foster, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Activation of the PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) pathway is a frequent occurrence in human tumors and is thought to promote growth, survival, and resistance to diverse therapies. Here, we report pharmacologic characterization of the pyridopyrimidinone derivative XL765 (SAR245409), a potent and highly selective pan inhibitor of class I PI3Ks (?, ?, ?, and ?) with activity against mTOR. Broad kinase selectivity profiling of >130 protein kinases revealed that XL765 is highly selective for class I PI3Ks and mTOR over other kinases. In cellular assays, XL765 inhibits the formation of PIP(3) in the membrane, and inhibits phosphorylation of AKT, p70S6K, and S6 phosphorylation in multiple tumor cell lines with different genetic alterations affecting the PI3K pathway. In a panel of tumor cell lines, XL765 inhibits proliferation with a wide range of potencies, with evidence of an impact of genotype on sensitivity. In mouse xenograft models, oral administration of XL765 results in dose-dependent inhibition of phosphorylation of AKT, p70S6K, and S6 with a duration of action of approximately 24 hours. Repeat dose administration of XL765 results in significant tumor growth inhibition in multiple human xenograft models in nude mice that is associated with antiproliferative, antiangiogenic, and proapoptotic effects. PMID:24634413

  11. Low temperature alteration processes affecting ultramafic bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nesbitt, H.W.; Bricker, O.P.

    1978-01-01

    At low temperatures, in the presence of an aqueous solution, olivine and orthopyroxene are not stable relative to the hydrous phases brucite, serpentine and talc. Alteration of dunite and peridotite to serpentine or steatite bodies must therefore proceed via non-equilibrium processes. The compositions of natural solutions emanating from dunites and peridotites demonstrate that the dissolution of forsterite and/or enstatite is rapid compared with the precipitation of the hydrous phases; consequently, dissolution of anhydrous minerals controls the chemistry of such solutions. In the presence of an aqueous phase, precipitation of hydrous minerals is the rate-controlling step. Brucite-bearing and -deficient serpentinites alter at low temperature by non-equilibrium processes, as evidenced by the composition of natural solutions from these bodies. The solutions approach equilibrium with the least stable hydrous phase and, as a consequence, are supersaturated with other hydrous phases. Dissolution of the least stable phase is rapid compared to precipitation of other phases, so that the dissolving mineral controls the solution chemistry. Non-equilibrium alteration of anhydrous ultramafic bodies continues until at least one anhydrous phase equilibrates with brucite, chrysotile or talc. The lowest temperature (at a given pressure) at which this happens is defined by the reaction: 3H2O + 2Mg2SiO4 ??? Mg3Si2O5(OH)4 + Mg(OH)2 (Johannes, 1968, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 19, 309-315) so that non-equilibrium alteration may occur well into greenschist facies metamorphic conditions. ?? 1978.

  12. Do alterations in mesofauna community affect earthworms?

    PubMed

    Uvarov, Alexei V; Karaban, Kamil

    2015-11-01

    Interactions between the saprotrophic animal groups that strongly control soil microbial activities and the functioning of detrital food webs, such as earthworms and mesofauna, are not well understood. Earthworm trophic and engineering activities strongly affect mesofauna abundance and diversity through various direct and indirect pathways. In contrast, mesofauna effects on earthworm populations are less evident; however, their importance may be high, considering the keystone significance of earthworms for the functioning of the soil system. We studied effects of a diverse mesofauna community of a deciduous forest on two earthworm species representing epigeic (Lumbricus rubellus) and endogeic (Aporrectodea caliginosa) ecological groups. In microcosms, the density of total mesofauna or its separate groups (enchytraeids, collembolans, gamasid mites) was manipulated (increased) and responses of earthworms and soil systems were recorded. A rise in mesofauna density resulted in a decrease of biomass and an increased mortality in L. rubellus, presumably due to competition with mesofauna for litter resources. In contrast, similar mesofauna manipulations promoted reproduction of A. caliginosa, suggesting a facilitated exploitation of litter resources due to increased mesofauna activities. Changes of microcosm respiration rates, litter organic matter content and microbial activities across the manipulation treatments indicate that mesofauna modify responses of soil systems in the presence of earthworms. However, similar mesofauna manipulations could induce different responses in soil systems with either epigeic or endogeic lumbricids, which suggests that earthworm/mesofauna interactions are species-specific. Thus, mesofauna impacts should be treated as a factor affecting the engineering activities of epigeic and endogeic earthworms in the soil. PMID:26188519

  13. Molecular genetics in affective illness

    SciTech Connect

    Mendlewicz, J.; Sevy, S.; Mendelbaum, K. )

    1993-01-01

    Genetic transmission in manic depressive illness (MDI) has been explored in twins, adoption, association, and linkage studies. The X-linked transmission hypothesis has been tested by using several markers on chromosome X: Xg blood group, color blindness, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), factor IX (hemophilia B), and DNA probes such as DXS15, DXS52, F8C, ST14. The hypothesis of autosomal transmission has been tested by association studies with the O blood group located on chromosome 9, as well as linkage studies on chromosome 6 with the Human Leucocyte Antigens (HLA) haplotypes and on Chromosome 11 with DNA markers for the following genes: D2 dopamine receptor, tyrosinase, C-Harvey-Ras-A (HRAS) oncogene, insuline (ins), and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Although linkage studies support the hypothesis of a major locus for the transmission of MDI in the Xq27-28 region, several factors are limiting the results, and are discussed in the present review. 105 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. Altered Fire Regimes Affect Landscape Patterns of Plant

    E-print Network

    Mladenoff, David

    Altered Fire Regimes Affect Landscape Patterns of Plant Succession in the Foothills and Mountains In the southern California foothills and mountains, pronounced and complex topographic gradients support fire regimes represented nat- ural, current and very long FRIs for the foothill shrublands less than 1,400 m

  15. Genetic alterations in syndromes with oral manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Anuthama, Krishnamurthy; Prasad, Harikrishnan; Ramani, Pratibha; Premkumar, Priya; Natesan, Anuja; Sherlin, Herald J.

    2013-01-01

    Ever since Gregor Johan Mendel proposed the law of inheritance, genetics has transcended the field of health and has entered all walks of life in its application. Thus, the gene is the pivoting factor for all happenings revolving around it. Knowledge of gene mapping in various diseases would be a valuable tool in prenatally diagnosing the condition and averting the future disability and stigma for the posterity. This article includes an array of genetically determined conditions in patients seen at our college out-patient department with complete manifestation, partial manifestation and array of manifestations not fitting into a particular syndrome. PMID:24379857

  16. Distinct Genetic Alterations in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ashktorab, Hassan; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Daremipouran, Mohammad; Smoot, Duane T.; Lee, Edward; Brim, Hassan

    2010-01-01

    Background Colon cancer (CRC) development often includes chromosomal instability (CIN) leading to amplifications and deletions of large DNA segments. Epidemiological, clinical, and cytogenetic studies showed that there are considerable differences between CRC tumors from African Americans (AAs) and Caucasian patients. In this study, we determined genomic copy number aberrations in sporadic CRC tumors from AAs, in order to investigate possible explanations for the observed disparities. Methodology/Principal Findings We applied genome-wide array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) using a 105k chip to identify copy number aberrations in samples from 15 AAs. In addition, we did a population comparative analysis with aCGH data in Caucasians as well as with a widely publicized list of colon cancer genes (CAN genes). There was an average of 20 aberrations per patient with more amplifications than deletions. Analysis of DNA copy number of frequently altered chromosomes revealed that deletions occurred primarily in chromosomes 4, 8 and 18. Chromosomal duplications occurred in more than 50% of cases on chromosomes 7, 8, 13, 20 and X. The CIN profile showed some differences when compared to Caucasian alterations. Conclusions/Significance Chromosome X amplification in male patients and chromosomes 4, 8 and 18 deletions were prominent aberrations in AAs. Some CAN genes were altered at high frequencies in AAs with EXOC4, EPHB6, GNAS, MLL3 and TBX22 as the most frequently deleted genes and HAPLN1, ADAM29, SMAD2 and SMAD4 as the most frequently amplified genes. The observed CIN may play a distinctive role in CRC in AAs. PMID:20126641

  17. Clinicopathological and prognostic implications of genetic alterations in oral cancers

    PubMed Central

    PATHARE, SWAPNALI M.; GERSTUNG, MORITZ; BEERENWINKEL, NIKO; SCHÄFFER, ALEJANDRO A.; KANNAN, SADHANA; PAI, PRATHAMESH; PATHAK, K. ALOK; BORGES, ANITA M.; MAHIMKAR, MANOJ B.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the clinicopathological and prognostic implications of genetic alterations characterizing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Comparative genomic hybridization was used to identify chromosomal alterations present in primary OSCCs obtained from 97 patients. In this population, tobacco use was a significant risk factor for OSCC. By contrast, the 97 samples were negative for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA integration, another known risk factor for OSCC in certain populations. Results of the Fisher’s exact test, followed by the Benjamini-Hochberg correction for multiple testing, showed a correlation of 7p gain and 8p loss with node-positive OSCC (p?0.04 for both genetic alterations) and an association of 11q13 gain with high-grade OSCC (p?0.05). Univariate Cox-proportional hazard models, also corrected for multiple testing, showed a significant association of 11q13 gain and 18q loss with decreased survival (p?0.05). The findings were supported by multivariate analysis, which revealed that 11q13 gain and 18q loss together serve as a strong bivariate predictor of poor prognosis. In conclusion, our study identified genetic alterations that correlate significantly with nodal status, grade and the poor survival status of OSCC. These potential biomarkers may aid the current tumor node metastasis system for better prediction of clinical outcome. PMID:21546976

  18. Genetic alteration of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate-dependent protein kinase subunit expression affects calcium currents and beta-endorphin release in AtT-20 clonal pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Gross, R A; Huggenvik, J; Massa, E; Allen, R G; Uhler, M D

    1994-08-01

    The role of the cAMP-dependent kinase (AK) in neurotransmission was investigated by genetic alteration of AK subunit expression in AtT-20 clonal pituitary cells. We characterized and compared wild-type [AK(wt)] cells and two clones with different AK activities. The first stably expresses a gene for a mutant AK regulatory subunit (RI) that does not bind cAMP [AK(-)]; the second stably expresses a gene for the catalytic subunit (C) of AK [AK(+)]. Western blot analysis of RI and C subunit expression showed increased expression of both subunits in AK(+) and AK(-) cells relative to AK(wt), with the transfection-induced expression of one subunit producing a compensatory increase in the expression of the other. The basal AK activities varied among the cell types, with AK(+) cells possessing 3-fold higher basal AK activity than AK(wt) cells, and AK(-) cells possessing half the AK activity of AK(wt) cells. Preincubation of cultures with 300 microM 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP increased AK activity approximately 4-fold in AK(wt) and AK(+) cells, but was without effect in AK(-) cells. Subsequent addition of 1 microM cAMP in vitro increased AK activity an additional 2- to 3-fold in all cell types. The higher basal AK activity found in AK(wt) and AK(+) cells was associated with larger whole cell calcium currents (approximately 43% and approximately 75% larger than in AK(-) cells, respectively) and faster rates of current rundown. The currents from each cell line had similar voltage-dependent and pharmacological properties, however, and [3H]PN200-110 binding was similar among the cell types. Maximal currents were evoked at clamp potentials of 0-10 mV; currents were inactivated approximately 30% in the steady state at holding potentials of -40 mV compared to -80 mV, and currents were reduced approximately 45% in the presence of nifedipine at -40 mV, but were insensitive to omega-conotoxin GVIA. AK(wt) and AK(+) cells also had higher basal and cAMP-stimulated release of beta-endorphin; control rates were approximately 50% greater, but stimulated rates were approximately 400% greater compared to those in AK(-) cells. We conclude that a greater number of calcium channels were activated by depolarization in the phosphorylated state, that current rundown was largely due to dephosphorylation, and that activation of calcium channels was coupled to the release of beta-endorphin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7997238

  19. Genetic alterations activating kinase and cytokine receptor signaling in high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    Activated kinase-like B-ALL does not harbor the BCR-ABL translocation, but it exhibits a very similar gene expression profile. The genetic alterations discovered in this study, which were validated by recurrence testing in a larger cohort, specifically affect cytokine receptors and regulators of kinase signaling. Moreover, several of the novel or rare alterations identified in this study induced cancerous phenotypes in cell lines and mouse xenograft models, and demonstrated sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors that are already used in the clinic.

  20. Genetic Alterations in Poorly Differentiated and Undifferentiated Thyroid Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Paula; Lima, Jorge; Preto, Ana; Castro, Patricia; Vinagre, João; Celestino, Ricardo; Couto, Joana P; Prazeres, Hugo; Eloy, Catarina; Máximo, Valdemar; Sobrinho-Simões, M

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid gland presents a wide spectrum of tumours derived from follicular cells that range from well differentiated, papillary and follicular carcinoma (PTC and FTC, respectively), usually carrying a good prognosis, to the clinically aggressive, poorly differentiated (PDTC) and undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma (UTC). It is usually accepted that PDTC and UTC occur either de novo or progress from a pre-existing well differentiated carcinoma through a multistep process of genetic and epigenetic changes that lead to clonal expansion and neoplastic development. Mutations and epigenetic alterations in PDTC and UTC are far from being totally clarified. Assuming that PDTC and UTC may derive from well differentiated thyroid carcinomas (WDTC), it is expected that some PDTC and UTC would harbour genetic alterations that are typical of PTC and FTC. This is the case for some molecular markers (BRAF and NRAS) that are present in WDTC, PDTC and UTC. Other genes, namely P53, are almost exclusively detected in less differentiated and undifferentiated thyroid tumours, supporting a diagnosis of PDTC or, much more often, UTC. Thyroid-specific rearrangements RET/PTC and PAX8/PPAR?, on the other hand, are rarely found in PDTC and UTC, suggesting that these genetic alterations do not predispose cells to dedifferentiation. In the present review we have summarized the molecular changes associated with the two most aggressive types of thyroid cancer. PMID:22654560

  1. Molecular genetic alterations in glioblastomas with oligodendroglial component.

    PubMed

    Kraus, J A; Lamszus, K; Glesmann, N; Beck, M; Wolter, M; Sabel, M; Krex, D; Klockgether, T; Reifenberger, G; Schlegel, U

    2001-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most malignant astrocytic glioma and usually resistant to chemotherapy. A small fraction of glioblastomas may contain areas with histological features of oligodendroglial differentiation. To determine the molecular genetic alterations in such "glioblastomas with oligodendroglial component", we investigated 13 of these tumors for genetic alterations and/or expression of the TP53, CDKN2A, PTEN, and EGFR genes. In addition, we performed microsatellite analyses for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome arms 1p, 19q and 10q. None of tumors showed evidence for LOH on 10q. LOH on 1p was detected in 3 tumors, 1 of which additionally showed LOH on 19q. The 3 tumors with LOH on 1p showed neither TP53 mutations nor nuclear p53 accumulation. In contrast, 9 of 10 tumors without demonstrated losses on 1p showed nuclear p53 accumulation. TP53 mutations were identified in 3 of these cases. Further aberrations detected were epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression (3 of 13 tumors), homozygous CDKN2A deletion (2 of 11 tumors), and PTEN mutation (1 of 13 tumors). Taken together, our results indicate that "glioblastomas with oligodendroglial component" carry heterogeneous genetic alterations. LOH on 10q, PTEN mutation, and homozygous CDKN2A deletion appear to be less common in these tumors as compared to ordinary glioblastomas. Furthermore, a subset of these tumors demonstrates LOH on 1p, i.e., an alteration that has recently been linked to chemosensitivity and good prognosis in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. PMID:11355302

  2. Selected genetic disorders affecting Ashkenazi Jewish families.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Lenore B

    2007-01-01

    Ashkenazi Jews of Central and Eastern European ancestry have a disproportionately high prevalence of several autosomal recessive genetic disorders. This article describes these 9 disorders and their genetic inheritance patterns: Bloom syndrome; Canavan disease; cystic fibrosis; familial dysautonomia; Fanconi anemia; Gaucher disease; Mucolipidosis IV; Niemann-Pick disease; and Tay-Sachs disease. Genetic testing, counseling, and family planning options for the at-risk population are described. The role of the community health nurse is addressed. PMID:17149032

  3. Genetic Alterations in Hungarian Patients with Papillary Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tobiás, Bálint; Halászlaki, Csaba; Balla, Bernadett; Kósa, János P; Árvai, Kristóf; Horváth, Péter; Takács, István; Nagy, Zsolt; Horváth, Evelin; Horányi, János; Járay, Balázs; Székely, Eszter; Székely, Tamás; Gy?ri, Gabriella; Putz, Zsuzsanna; Dank, Magdolna; Valkusz, Zsuzsanna; Vasas, Béla; Iványi, Béla; Lakatos, Péter

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancers is increasing worldwide. Some somatic oncogene mutations (BRAF, NRAS, HRAS, KRAS) as well as gene translocations (RET/PTC, PAX8/PPAR-gamma) have been associated with the development of thyroid cancer. In our study, we analyzed these genetic alterations in 394 thyroid tissue samples (197 papillary carcinomas and 197 healthy). The somatic mutations and translocations were detected by Light Cycler melting method and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction techniques, respectively. In tumorous samples, 86 BRAF (44.2 %), 5 NRAS (3.1 %), 2 HRAS (1.0 %) and 1 KRAS (0.5 %) mutations were found, as well as 9 RET/PTC1 (4.6 %) and 1 RET/PTC3 (0.5 %) translocations. No genetic alteration was seen in the non tumorous control thyroid tissues. No correlation was detected between the genetic variants and the pathological subtypes of papillary cancer as well as the severity of the disease. Our results are only partly concordant with the data found in the literature. PMID:26259532

  4. Safety assessment of genetically modified plants with deliberately altered composition

    PubMed Central

    Halford, Nigel G; Hudson, Elizabeth; Gimson, Amy; Weightman, Richard; Shewry, Peter R; Tompkins, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The development and marketing of ‘novel’ genetically modified (GM) crops in which composition has been deliberately altered poses a challenge to the European Union (EU)'s risk assessment processes, which are based on the concept of substantial equivalence with a non-GM comparator. This article gives some examples of these novel GM crops and summarizes the conclusions of a report that was commissioned by the European Food Safety Authority on how the EU's risk assessment processes could be adapted to enable their safety to be assessed. PMID:24735114

  5. Identification of Genetic Alterations, as Causative Genetic Defects in Long QT Syndrome, Using Next Generation Sequencing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Mademont-Soler, Irene; Allegue, Catarina; Cesar, Sergi; Ferrer-Costa, Carles; Coll, Monica; Mates, Jesus; Iglesias, Anna; Brugada, Josep; Brugada, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Background Long QT Syndrome is an inherited channelopathy leading to sudden cardiac death due to ventricular arrhythmias. Despite that several genes have been associated with the disease, nearly 20% of cases remain without an identified genetic cause. Other genetic alterations such as copy number variations have been recently related to Long QT Syndrome. Our aim was to take advantage of current genetic technologies in a family affected by Long QT Syndrome in order to identify the cause of the disease. Methods Complete clinical evaluation was performed in all family members. In the index case, a Next Generation Sequencing custom-built panel, including 55 sudden cardiac death-related genes, was used both for detection of sequence and copy number variants. Next Generation Sequencing variants were confirmed by Sanger method. Copy number variations variants were confirmed by Multiplex Ligation dependent Probe Amplification method and at the mRNA level. Confirmed variants and copy number variations identified in the index case were also analyzed in relatives. Results In the index case, Next Generation Sequencing revealed a novel variant in TTN and a large deletion in KCNQ1, involving exons 7 and 8. Both variants were confirmed by alternative techniques. The mother and the brother of the index case were also affected by Long QT Syndrome, and family cosegregation was observed for the KCNQ1 deletion, but not for the TTN variant. Conclusions Next Generation Sequencing technology allows a comprehensive genetic analysis of arrhythmogenic diseases. We report a copy number variation identified using Next Generation Sequencing analysis in Long QT Syndrome. Clinical and familiar correlation is crucial to elucidate the role of genetic variants identified to distinguish the pathogenic ones from genetic noise. PMID:25494010

  6. Imaging genetics in obsessive-compulsive disorder: linking genetic variations to alterations in neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Grünblatt, Edna; Hauser, Tobias U; Walitza, Susanne

    2014-10-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) occurs in ?1-3% of the general population, and its often rather early onset causes major disabilities in the everyday lives of patients. Although the heritability of OCD is between 35 and 65%, many linkage, association, and genome-wide association studies have failed to identify single genes that exhibit high effect sizes. Several neuroimaging studies have revealed structural and functional alterations mainly in cortico-striato-thalamic loops. However, there is also marked heterogeneity across studies. These inconsistencies in genetic and neuroimaging studies may be due to the heterogeneous and complex phenotypes of OCD. Under the consideration that genetic variants may also influence neuroimaging in OCD, researchers have started to combine both domains in the field of imaging genetics. Here, we conducted a systematic search of PubMed and Google Scholar literature for articles that address genetic imaging in OCD and related disorders (published through March 2014). We selected 8 publications that describe the combination of imaging genetics with OCD, and extended it with 43 publications of comorbid psychiatric disorders. The most promising findings of this systematic review point to the involvement of variants in genes involved in the serotonergic (5-HTTLPR, HTR2A), dopaminergic (COMT, DAT), and glutamatergic (SLC1A1, SAPAP) systems. However, the field of imaging genetics must be further explored, best through investigations that combine multimodal imaging techniques with genetic profiling, particularly profiling techniques that employ polygenetic approaches, with much larger sample sizes than have been used up to now. PMID:25046835

  7. Can Leaf Litter from Genetically Modified Trees Affect Aquatic

    E-print Network

    LeRoy, Carri J.

    Can Leaf Litter from Genetically Modified Trees Affect Aquatic Ecosystems? E. Petter Axelsson,1) in Populus sp. affected leaf litter quality, the decomposition of leaf litter, and the assemblages of aquatic insects colonizing the litter in three natural streams. The decomposition of leaf litter from one

  8. Transcriptional Programs following Genetic Alterations in p53, INK4A, and H-Ras Genes along Defined Stages

    E-print Network

    Domany, Eytan

    Transcriptional Programs following Genetic Alterations in p53, INK4A, and H-Ras Genes along Defined the genetic alterations in p53, Ras, INK4A locus, and telomerase, introduced in a stepwise manner into primary and coupled with genetic signatures assigned for the genetic alterations in the p53, INK4A locus, and H

  9. Multiple genetic alterations in hamster pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chang, K W; Laconi, S; Mangold, K A; Hubchak, S; Scarpelli, D G

    1995-06-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas induced in the Syrian golden hamster (SGH) by N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine share many similarities with the human disease, including mutations of the K-ras oncogene. In vitro carcinogenesis studies with immortal SGH pancreatic duct cells indicate that neoplastic transformation in this system can occur without mutational inactivation of p53 suppressor gene. In this study we extend the genetic analysis of the in vivo SGH model to increase the number of cases analyzed for the status of K-ras and to determine further the spectrum of alterations involved; we have studied the status of the p53, DCC, and Rb-1 suppressor genes and the status of the mdm2 oncogene, which can involve p53 indirectly. The partial SGH-coding sequence of mdm2 and DCC was determined. K-ras mutation in the second position of codon 12 was present in 17 of 19 (90%) of tumors. Immunohistochemistry and single strand conformation polymorphism analysis showed no evidence of p53 mutation in 21 tumors. RNase protection assays showed overexpression of mdm2 in 5 of 19 (26%) tumors. Semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed a complete or partial loss of DCC expression in 10 of 19 (53%) neoplasms and of Rb-1 (42%) expression in 8 of 19 tumors when compared to matched controls. Deregulation of these genes appears to be significant in SGH pancreatic carcinogenesis as indicated by their frequencies. However, the fact that 6 tumors showed either only a K-ras mutation or the absence of alterations of the 5 genes analyzed indicates that additional as yet unstudied or unknown genes are also involved in SGH pancreatic duct carcinogenesis. PMID:7780969

  10. Alteration of oligosaccharide biosynthesis by genetic manipulation of glycosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Youakim, A; Shur, B D

    1994-11-30

    The alteration of oligosaccharide structures through genetic manipulation of glycosyltransferase activities is now a reality. It is apparent that this technique has greater consequences on oligosaccharide structure when an exogenous enzyme is introduced into cells, and in particular when this enzyme is responsible for a terminal glycosylation step. By contrast, only one study has examined the effects of overexpressing an endogenous glycosyltransferase, in which there was no detectable effect on glycosylation. However, there are still other key regulatory biosynthetic enzymes, such as GlcNAc transferase V and beta 1,3 GlcNAc transferase, whose overexpression may alter glycosylation. Both of these enzymes are required for the biosynthesis of polylactosaminoglycans (polymers of N-acetyllactosamine disaccharides), and their elevation in tumor cells correlates with increased expression of polylactosaminoglycans. Recently, the gene encoding GlcNAc transferase V has been isolated, but its transfection into cells and characterization of the resulting oligosaccharides awaits further study. Alternate strategies for modifying oligosaccharide structures could involve the introduction of more than one glycosyltransferase into cells to ensure the availability of biosynthetic intermediates. Alternatively, the disruption of specific glycosyltransferase genes by homologous recombination could be used to eliminate competing glycosyltransferases that act on a common substrate. Although oligosaccharide biosynthesis is directly dependent upon the presence or absence of specific glycosyltransferases, other factors also contribute to glycosylation. For example, the transport rate of a glycoprotein through the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex, the levels of processing glycosidases, the availability of substrates, the host cell, and ultimately, the peptide backbone of the particular glycoprotein of interest are important contributors to the final outcome of oligosaccharide structure. Despite these complications, further study into the manipulation of glycosyltransferase genes may ultimately allow the controlled and predictable biosynthesis of glycoprotein sugar chains. PMID:7832520

  11. The afterlife of interspecific indirect genetic effects: genotype interactions alter litter quality with consequences for decomposition and nutrient dynamics.

    PubMed

    Genung, Mark A; Bailey, Joseph K; Schweitzer, Jennifer A

    2013-01-01

    Aboveground-belowground linkages are recognized as divers of community dynamics and ecosystem processes, but the impacts of plant-neighbor interactions on these linkages are virtually unknown. Plant-neighbor interactions are a type of interspecific indirect genetic effect (IIGE) if the focal plant's phenotype is altered by the expression of genes in a neighboring heterospecific plant, and IIGEs could persist after plant senescence to affect ecosystem processes. This perspective can provide insight into how plant-neighbor interactions affect evolution, as IIGEs are capable of altering species interactions and community composition over time. Utilizing genotypes of Solidago altissima and Solidago gigantea, we experimentally tested whether IIGEs that had affected living focal plants would affect litter decomposition rate, as well as nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) dynamics after the focal plant senesced. We found that species interactions affected N release and genotype interactions affected P immobilization. From a previous study we knew that neighbor genotype influenced patterns of biomass allocation for focal plants. Here we extend those previous results to show that these changes in biomass allocation altered litter quality, that then altered rates of decomposition and nutrient cycling. Our results provide insights into above- and belowground linkages by showing that, through their effects on plant litter quality (e.g., litter lignin:N), IIGEs can have afterlife effects, tying plant-neighbor interactions to ecosystem processes. This holistic approach advances our understanding of decomposition and nutrient cycling by showing that evolutionary processes (i.e., IIGEs) can influence ecosystem functioning after plant senescence. Because plant traits are determined by the combined effects of genetic and environmental influences, and because these traits are known to affect decomposition and nutrient cycling, we suggest that ecosystem processes can be described as gene-less products of genetic interactions among the species comprising ecological communities. PMID:23349735

  12. Alterations in psychosocial health of people affected by asbestos poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Miguel; Reig-Botella, Adela; Prados, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the state of psychosocial and mental health of professionals affected by asbestos. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted with 110 professionals working in the Ferrolterra region of Spain, who were affected by asbestos poisoning. This group was compared with a group of 70 shipyard workers with no manifestation of work-related diseases. All the participants were male with a mean age of 67 years. This study was conducted in 2013, between January and June, and used the SCL-90 questionnaire by Derogatis as its primary measure for research. This questionnaire consists of 9 variables that measure psychosomatic symptoms. In addition, an overall index of psychosomatic gravity was calculated. The participants were also asked two questions concerning their overall perception of feeling good. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and logistic regression. RESULTS Participants affected by asbestos poisoning showed high occurrence rates of psychological health variables such as somatization, obsessive-compulsive, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, psychoticism, and global severity index. CONCLUSIONS Social interaction as a differentiating factor between workers affected by work-related chronic syndromes as compared to healthy participants will possibly aid in the development of intervention programs by improving the social network of affected individuals. PMID:25902564

  13. How spatio-temporal habitat connectivity affects amphibian genetic structure

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Alexander G.; Schlichting, Peter E.; Billerman, Shawn M.; Jesmer, Brett R.; Micheletti, Steven; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Funk, W. Chris; Hapeman, Paul; Muths, Erin; Murphy, Melanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous landscapes and fluctuating environmental conditions can affect species dispersal, population genetics, and genetic structure, yet understanding how biotic and abiotic factors affect population dynamics in a fluctuating environment is critical for species management. We evaluated how spatio-temporal habitat connectivity influences dispersal and genetic structure in a population of boreal chorus frogs (Pseudacris maculata) using a landscape genetics approach. We developed gravity models to assess the contribution of various factors to the observed genetic distance as a measure of functional connectivity. We selected (a) wetland (within-site) and (b) landscape matrix (between-site) characteristics; and (c) wetland connectivity metrics using a unique methodology. Specifically, we developed three networks that quantify wetland connectivity based on: (i) P. maculata dispersal ability, (ii) temporal variation in wetland quality, and (iii) contribution of wetland stepping-stones to frog dispersal. We examined 18 wetlands in Colorado, and quantified 12 microsatellite loci from 322 individual frogs. We found that genetic connectivity was related to topographic complexity, within- and between-wetland differences in moisture, and wetland functional connectivity as contributed by stepping-stone wetlands. Our results highlight the role that dynamic environmental factors have on dispersal-limited species and illustrate how complex asynchronous interactions contribute to the structure of spatially-explicit metapopulations. PMID:26442094

  14. Genetic and environmental factors that affect gestation length

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic and environmental factors that might affect gestation length (GL) were investigated so that more accurate predictions of calving dates could be provided to dairy producers. Data from >8 million calvings from 1999 through 2005 for 5 dairy breeds were assembled from lactation, reproduction, an...

  15. ORIGINAL PAPER Genetic diversity affects colony survivorship in commercial

    E-print Network

    Tarpy, David R.

    honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) are the predominant insect pollinator for many crops and are, hence, the majority of the active pollination by honey bees is done by large-scale, migratory beekeeping opera- tionsORIGINAL PAPER Genetic diversity affects colony survivorship in commercial honey bee colonies David

  16. Cancer type-dependent genetic interactions between cancer driver alterations indicate plasticity of epistasis across cell types

    PubMed Central

    Park, Solip; Lehner, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Cancers, like many diseases, are normally caused by combinations of genetic alterations rather than by changes affecting single genes. It is well established that the genetic alterations that drive cancer often interact epistatically, having greater or weaker consequences in combination than expected from their individual effects. In a stringent statistical analysis of data from > 3,000 tumors, we find that the co-occurrence and mutual exclusivity relationships between cancer driver alterations change quite extensively in different types of cancer. This cannot be accounted for by variation in tumor heterogeneity or unrecognized cancer subtypes. Rather, it suggests that how genomic alterations interact cooperatively or partially redundantly to driver cancer changes in different types of cancers. This re-wiring of epistasis across cell types is likely to be a basic feature of genetic architecture, with important implications for understanding the evolution of multicellularity and human genetic diseases. In addition, if this plasticity of epistasis across cell types is also true for synthetic lethal interactions, a synthetic lethal strategy to kill cancer cells may frequently work in one type of cancer but prove ineffective in another. PMID:26227665

  17. Altered corticosteroid metabolism differentially affects pituitary corticotropin response.

    PubMed

    Hanafusa, Junko; Mune, Tomoatsu; Tanahashi, Tetsuya; Isomura, Yukinori; Suwa, Tetsuya; Isaji, Mako; Daido, Hisashi; Morita, Hiroyuki; Murayama, Masanori; Yasuda, Keigo

    2002-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of altered corticosteroid metabolism on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, we examined rats treated with glycyrrhizic acid (G rats) or rifampicin (R rats) for 7 days. The half-life of exogenously administered hydrocortisone as a substitute for corticosterone was longer in G rats and shorter in R rats, with no differences in basal plasma levels of ACTH or corticosterone. The ACTH responses to human corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) or insulin-induced hypoglycemia were greater in G rats and tended to be smaller in R rats compared with those in the control rats, whereas the corticosterone response was similar. No difference was observed in the content and mRNA level of hypothalamic CRF among the groups. The number and mRNA level of CRF receptor and type 1 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11-HSD1) mRNA level in the pituitary were increased in G rats but not changed in R rats, suggesting that chronically increased intrapituitary corticosterone upregulates pituitary CRF receptor expression. In contrast, CRF mRNA levels in the pituitary were increased in R rats. Our data indicate novel mechanisms of corticosteroid metabolic modulation and the involvement of pituitary 11-HSD1 and CRF in glucocorticoid feedback physiology. PMID:11788380

  18. 33 CFR 149.15 - What is the process for submitting alterations and modifications affecting the design and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...alterations and modifications affecting the design and construction of a deepwater port... DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND EQUIPMENT General...alterations and modifications affecting the design and construction of a deepwater...

  19. Augmented genetic decoding: global, local and temporal alterations of decoding processes and codon meaning.

    PubMed

    Baranov, Pavel V; Atkins, John F; Yordanova, Martina M

    2015-09-01

    The non-universality of the genetic code is now widely appreciated. Codes differ between organisms, and certain genes are known to alter the decoding rules in a site-specific manner. Recently discovered examples of decoding plasticity are particularly spectacular. These examples include organisms and organelles with disruptions of triplet continuity during the translation of many genes, viruses that alter the entire genetic code of their hosts and organisms that adjust their genetic code in response to changing environments. In this Review, we outline various modes of alternative genetic decoding and expand existing terminology to accommodate recently discovered manifestations of this seemingly sophisticated phenomenon. PMID:26260261

  20. Basal Metabolic Rate of Aged Mice Is Affected by Random Genetic Drift But Not by Selective Breeding for High Early-Age

    E-print Network

    Saltzman, Wendy

    288 Basal Metabolic Rate of Aged Mice Is Affected by Random Genetic Drift But Not by Selective activity levels and basal metabolic rate are genetically correlated in 90-wk-old mice (Mus domesticus) from rate, indicating that lifetime training does not alter basal metabolism in these mice. However, strong

  1. Embryonic PCB exposure alters phenotypic, genetic, and epigenetic profiles in turtle sex determination, a

    E-print Network

    Crews, David

    Embryonic PCB exposure alters phenotypic, genetic, and epigenetic profiles in turtle sex biphenyls (PCBs) on gonad differentiation in red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta). Some PCB of two potent PCB congeners alter the physiological processes of gonad development normally dictated

  2. Genetically altered mice for evaluation of mode-of-action (MOA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genetically altered mice for evaluation of mode-of-action (MOA). Barbara D. Abbott, Cynthia J. Wolf, Kaberi P. Das, Christopher S. Lau. (Presented by B. Abbott). This presentation provides an example of the use of genetically modified mice to determine the mode-of-action of r...

  3. Evidence that disease-induced population decline changes genetic structure and alters dispersal patterns in the Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Lachish, S; Miller, K J; Storfer, A; Goldizen, A W; Jones, M E

    2011-01-01

    Infectious disease has been shown to be a major cause of population declines in wild animals. However, there remains little empirical evidence on the genetic consequences of disease-mediated population declines, or how such perturbations might affect demographic processes such as dispersal. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) has resulted in the rapid decline of the Tasmanian devil, Sarcophilus harrisii, and threatens to cause extinction. Using 10 microsatellite DNA markers, we compared genetic diversity and structure before and after DFTD outbreaks in three Tasmanian devil populations to assess the genetic consequences of disease-induced population decline. We also used both genetic and demographic data to investigate dispersal patterns in Tasmanian devils along the east coast of Tasmania. We observed a significant increase in inbreeding (F(IS) pre/post-disease -0.030/0.012, P<0.05; relatedness pre/post-disease 0.011/0.038, P=0.06) in devil populations after just 2-3 generations of disease arrival, but no detectable change in genetic diversity. Furthermore, although there was no subdivision apparent among pre-disease populations (?=0.005, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.003 to 0.017), we found significant genetic differentiation among populations post-disease (?=0.020, 0.010-0.027), apparently driven by a combination of selection and altered dispersal patterns of females in disease-affected populations. We also show that dispersal is male-biased in devils and that dispersal distances follow a typical leptokurtic distribution. Our results show that disease can result in genetic and demographic changes in host populations over few generations and short time scales. Ongoing management of Tasmanian devils must now attempt to maintain genetic variability in this species through actions designed to reverse the detrimental effects of inbreeding and subdivision in disease-affected populations. PMID:20216571

  4. Evidence that disease-induced population decline changes genetic structure and alters dispersal patterns in the Tasmanian devil

    PubMed Central

    Lachish, S; Miller, K J; Storfer, A; Goldizen, A W; Jones, M E

    2011-01-01

    Infectious disease has been shown to be a major cause of population declines in wild animals. However, there remains little empirical evidence on the genetic consequences of disease-mediated population declines, or how such perturbations might affect demographic processes such as dispersal. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) has resulted in the rapid decline of the Tasmanian devil, Sarcophilus harrisii, and threatens to cause extinction. Using 10 microsatellite DNA markers, we compared genetic diversity and structure before and after DFTD outbreaks in three Tasmanian devil populations to assess the genetic consequences of disease-induced population decline. We also used both genetic and demographic data to investigate dispersal patterns in Tasmanian devils along the east coast of Tasmania. We observed a significant increase in inbreeding (FIS pre/post-disease ?0.030/0.012, P<0.05; relatedness pre/post-disease 0.011/0.038, P=0.06) in devil populations after just 2–3 generations of disease arrival, but no detectable change in genetic diversity. Furthermore, although there was no subdivision apparent among pre-disease populations (?=0.005, 95% confidence interval (CI) ?0.003 to 0.017), we found significant genetic differentiation among populations post-disease (?=0.020, 0.010–0.027), apparently driven by a combination of selection and altered dispersal patterns of females in disease-affected populations. We also show that dispersal is male-biased in devils and that dispersal distances follow a typical leptokurtic distribution. Our results show that disease can result in genetic and demographic changes in host populations over few generations and short time scales. Ongoing management of Tasmanian devils must now attempt to maintain genetic variability in this species through actions designed to reverse the detrimental effects of inbreeding and subdivision in disease-affected populations. PMID:20216571

  5. Tooth dentin defects reflect genetic disorders affecting bone mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Vital, S. Opsahl; Gaucher, C.; Bardet, C.; Rowe, P.S.; George, A.; Linglart, A.; Chaussain, C.

    2012-01-01

    Several genetic disorders affecting bone mineralization may manifest during dentin mineralization. Dentin and bone are similar in several aspects, especially pertaining to the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) which is secreted by well-differentiated odontoblasts and osteoblasts, respectively. However, unlike bone, dentin is not remodelled and is not involved in the regulation of calcium and phosphate metabolism. In contrast to bone, teeth are accessible tissues with the shedding of deciduous teeth and the extractions of premolars and third molars for orthodontic treatment. The feasibility of obtaining dentin makes this a good model to study biomineralization in physiological and pathological conditions. In this review, we focus on two genetic diseases that disrupt both bone and dentin mineralization. Hypophosphatemic rickets is related to abnormal secretory proteins involved in the ECM organization of both bone and dentin, as well as in the calcium and phosphate metabolism. Osteogenesis imperfecta affects proteins involved in the local organization of the ECM. In addition, dentin examination permits evaluation of the effects of the systemic treatment prescribed to hypophosphatemic patients during growth. In conclusion, dentin constitutes a valuable tool for better understanding of the pathological processes affecting biomineralization. PMID:22296718

  6. Genetic Evolution of Shape-Altering Programs for Supersonic Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Bencze, Daniel P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Two constrained shape optimization problems relevant to aerodynamics are solved by genetic programming, in which a population of computer programs evolves automatically under pressure of fitness-driven reproduction and genetic crossover. Known optimal solutions are recovered using a small, naive set of elementary operations. Effectiveness is improved through use of automatically defined functions, especially when one of them is capable of a variable number of iterations, even though the test problems lack obvious exploitable regularities. An attempt at evolving new elementary operations was only partially successful.

  7. Gene flow in genetically altered crops helps progress transgenic turfgrass.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous useful traits are being imparted into transgenic and non-transgenic plants. Gene flow as indicated in a recent publication from the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST 2007) is the successful transfer of genetic information between different individuals, populations, and g...

  8. GM1 gangliosidosis and Morquio B disease: an update on genetic alterations and clinical findings

    PubMed Central

    Caciotti, Anna; Garman, Scott C; Rivera-Colón, Yadilette; Procopio, Elena; Catarzi, Serena; Ferri, Lorenzo; Guido, Carmen; Martelli, Paola; Parini, Rossella; Antuzzi, Daniela; Battini, Roberta; Sibilio, Michela; Simonati, Alessandro; Fontana, Elena; Salviati, Alessandro; Akinci, Gulcin; Cereda, Cristina; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Deodato, Francesca; d’Amico, Adele; d’Azzo, Alessandra; Bertini, Enrico; Filocamo, Mirella; Scarpa, Maurizio; di Rocco, Maja; Tifft, Cynthia J; Ciani, Federica; Gasperini, Serena; Pasquini, Elisabetta; Guerrini, Renzo; Donati, Maria Alice; Morrone, Amelia

    2011-01-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis and Morquio B syndrome, both arising from beta-galactosidase (GLB1) deficiency, are very rare lysosomal storage diseases with an incidence of about 1:100,000– 1:200,000 live births worldwide. Here we report the beta-galactosidase gene (GLB1) mutation analysis of 21 unrelated GM1 gangliosidosis patients, and of 4 Morquio B patients, of whom two are brothers. Clinical features of the patients were collected and compared with those in literature. In silico analyses were performed by standard alignments tools and by an improved version of GLB1 three-dimensional models. The analysed cohort includes remarkable cases. One patient with GM1 gangliosidosis had a triple X syndrome. One patient with juvenile GM1 gangliosidosis was homozygous for a mutation previously identified in Morquio type B. A patient with infantile GM1 gangliosidosis carried a complex GLB1 allele harbouring two genetic variants leading to p.R68W and p.R109W amino acid changes, in trans with the known p.R148C mutation. Molecular analysis showed 27 mutations, 9 of which are new: 5 missense, 3 microdeletions and a nonsense mutation. We also identified four new genetic variants with a predicted polymorphic nature that was further investigated by in silico analyses. Three-dimensional structural analysis of GLB1 homology models including the new missense mutations and the p.R68W and p.R109W amino acid changes, showed that all the amino acids replacements affected the resulting protein structures in different ways, from changes in polarity to folding alterations. Genetic and clinical associations led us to undertake a critical review of the classifications of late-onset GM1 gangliosidosis and Morquio B disease. PMID:21497194

  9. How Obstacles Perturb Population Fronts and Alter Their Genetic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Möbius, Wolfram; Murray, Andrew W.; Nelson, David R.

    2015-01-01

    As populations spread into new territory, environmental heterogeneities can shape the population front and genetic composition. We focus here on the effects of an important building block of heterogeneous environments, isolated obstacles. With a combination of experiments, theory, and simulation, we show how isolated obstacles both create long-lived distortions of the front shape and amplify the effect of genetic drift. A system of bacteriophage T7 spreading on a spatially heterogeneous Escherichia coli lawn serves as an experimental model system to study population expansions. Using an inkjet printer, we create well-defined replicates of the lawn and quantitatively study the population expansion of phage T7. The transient perturbations of the population front found in the experiments are well described by a model in which the front moves with constant speed. Independent of the precise details of the expansion, we show that obstacles create a kink in the front that persists over large distances and is insensitive to the details of the obstacle’s shape. The small deviations between experimental findings and the predictions of the constant speed model can be understood with a more general reaction-diffusion model, which reduces to the constant speed model when the obstacle size is large compared to the front width. Using this framework, we demonstrate that frontier genotypes just grazing the side of an isolated obstacle increase in abundance, a phenomenon we call ‘geometry-enhanced genetic drift’, complementary to the founder effect associated with spatial bottlenecks. Bacterial range expansions around nutrient-poor barriers and stochastic simulations confirm this prediction. The effect of the obstacle on the genealogy of individuals at the front is characterized by simulations and rationalized using the constant speed model. Lastly, we consider the effect of two obstacles on front shape and genetic composition of the population illuminating the effects expected from complex environments with many obstacles. PMID:26696601

  10. How Obstacles Perturb Population Fronts and Alter Their Genetic Structure.

    PubMed

    Möbius, Wolfram; Murray, Andrew W; Nelson, David R

    2015-12-01

    As populations spread into new territory, environmental heterogeneities can shape the population front and genetic composition. We focus here on the effects of an important building block of heterogeneous environments, isolated obstacles. With a combination of experiments, theory, and simulation, we show how isolated obstacles both create long-lived distortions of the front shape and amplify the effect of genetic drift. A system of bacteriophage T7 spreading on a spatially heterogeneous Escherichia coli lawn serves as an experimental model system to study population expansions. Using an inkjet printer, we create well-defined replicates of the lawn and quantitatively study the population expansion of phage T7. The transient perturbations of the population front found in the experiments are well described by a model in which the front moves with constant speed. Independent of the precise details of the expansion, we show that obstacles create a kink in the front that persists over large distances and is insensitive to the details of the obstacle's shape. The small deviations between experimental findings and the predictions of the constant speed model can be understood with a more general reaction-diffusion model, which reduces to the constant speed model when the obstacle size is large compared to the front width. Using this framework, we demonstrate that frontier genotypes just grazing the side of an isolated obstacle increase in abundance, a phenomenon we call 'geometry-enhanced genetic drift', complementary to the founder effect associated with spatial bottlenecks. Bacterial range expansions around nutrient-poor barriers and stochastic simulations confirm this prediction. The effect of the obstacle on the genealogy of individuals at the front is characterized by simulations and rationalized using the constant speed model. Lastly, we consider the effect of two obstacles on front shape and genetic composition of the population illuminating the effects expected from complex environments with many obstacles. PMID:26696601

  11. Genetic alteration of Zymomonas mobilis for ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Skotnicki, M.L.; Lee, K.J.; Tribe, D.E.; Rogers, P.L.

    1982-01-01

    Strain improvement by mutagenesis with UV resulted in Zymomonas mobilis strains which were highly EtOH and temperature tolerant and which were able to produce more than 100 g EtOH /h at EtOH concentrations of 80-90 g/L. Genetic engineering has the potential of producing strains with the ability to ferment starch and cellulose directly to EtOH.

  12. Genetic alterations in periprosthetic soft-tissue masses from patients with metal-on-metal hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Sarhadi, Virinder Kaur; Parkkinen, Jyrki; Reito, Aleksi; Nieminen, Jyrki; Porkka, Noora; Wirtanen, Tiina; Laitinen, Minna; Eskelinen, Antti; Knuutila, Sakari

    2015-11-01

    Adverse soft tissue reactions in patients with metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacement are associated with cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr) particles released from the implant. Exposing the patients to long periods of increased metal ions concentrations resulting from the wear of these implants poses an increased risk of genotoxicity/mutagenicity. A variable proportion of patients develop periprosthetic soft-tissue masses or pseudotumors at the site of the implant. There is a concern that exposure to increased metal ions could increase the risk of cancer. In order to investigate whether the periprosthetic soft-tissue mass harbours any cancer- related genetic alterations, we studied DNA isolated from periprosthetic tissues of 20 patients with MoM hip replacement, for copy number alterations and mutations in hotspot regions of 50 cancer genes using aCGH and amplicon-based next generation sequencing. Our results showed copy number gains at 12q14.3 and 21q21.1in tumour from patient diagnosed with liposarcoma. Copy number alterations in periprosthetic tissues were seen in three other patients, one had a region of gain at 9q24.1 affecting JAK2 and INSL6, and two patients had region of gain at 6p21.1, affecting RUNX2. Mutation analysis showed V1578del mutation in NOTCH1 in two patients. The copy number alterations and mutations seen in periprosthetic soft-tissue masses are earlier reported in either haematological malignancies or in osteoblast related bone dysplasia. The presence of genetic anomalies was associated with longer in-situ time of the implant. Our findings warrant the need of similar studies in larger patient cohorts to evaluate the risk of development of neoplastic alterations in periprosthetic tissues of patients with MoM hip replacement. PMID:26355908

  13. Genetic/molecular alterations of meningiomas and the signaling pathways targeted

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Patrícia; González-Tablas, María; Otero, Álvaro; Pascual, Daniel; Ruiz, Laura; Miranda, David; Sousa, Pablo; Gonçalves, Jesús María; Lopes, María Celeste; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, María Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Meningiomas are usually considered to be benign central nervous system tumors; however, they show heterogenous clinical, histolopathological and cytogenetic features associated with a variable outcome. In recent years important advances have been achieved in the identification of the genetic/molecular alterations of meningiomas and the signaling pathways involved. Thus, monosomy 22, which is often associated with mutations of the NF2 gene, has emerged as the most frequent alteration of meningiomas; in addition, several other genes (e.g. AKT1, KLF4, TRAF7, SMO) and chromosomes have been found to be recurrently altered often in association with more complex karyotypes and involvement of multiple signaling pathways. Here we review the current knowledge about the most relevant genes involved and the signaling pathways targeted by such alterations. In addition, we summarize those proposals that have been made so far for classification and prognostic stratification of meningiomas based on their genetic/genomic features. PMID:25965831

  14. Neonatal handling alters the structure of maternal behavior and affects mother-pup bonding.

    PubMed

    Reis, A R; de Azevedo, M S; de Souza, M A; Lutz, M L; Alves, M B; Izquierdo, I; Cammarota, M; Silveira, P P; Lucion, A B

    2014-05-15

    During early life, a mother and her pups establish a very close relationship, and the olfactory learning of the nest odor is very important for the bond formation. The olfactory bulb (OB) is a structure that plays a fundamental role in the olfactory learning (OL) mechanism that also involves maternal behavior (licking and contact). We hypothesized that handling the pups would alter the structure of the maternal behavior, affect OL, and alter mother-pup relationships. Moreover, changes in the cyclic AMP-response element binding protein phosphorylation (CREB) and neurotrophic factors could be a part of the mechanism of these changes. This study aimed to analyze the effects of neonatal handling, 1 min per day from postpartum day 1 to 10 (PPD 1 to PPD 10), on the maternal behavior and pups' preference for the nest odor in a Y maze (PPD 11). We also tested CREB's phosphorylation and BDNF signaling in the OB of the pups (PPD 7) by Western blot analysis. The results showed that handling alters mother-pups interaction by decreasing mother-pups contact and changing the temporal pattern of all components of the maternal behavior especially the daily licking and nest-building. We found sex-dependent changes in the nest odor preference, CREB and BDNF levels in pups OB. Male pups were more affected by alterations in the licking pattern, and female pups were more affected by changes in the mother-pup contact (the time spent outside the nest and nursing). PMID:24598277

  15. Altered gene dosage confirms the genetic interaction between FIAT and ?NAC.

    PubMed

    Hekmatnejad, Bahareh; Mandic, Vice; Yu, Vionnie W C; Akhouayri, Omar; Arabian, Alice; St-Arnaud, René

    2014-04-01

    Factor inhibiting ATF4-mediated transcription (FIAT) interacts with Nascent polypeptide associated complex and coregulator alpha (?NAC). In cultured osteoblastic cells, this interaction contributes to maximal FIAT-mediated inhibition of Osteocalcin (Ocn) gene transcription. We set out to demonstrate the physiological relevance of this interaction by altering gene dosage in compound Fiat and Naca (encoding ?NAC) heterozygous mice. Compound Naca(+/-); Fiat(+/-) heterozygous animals were viable, developed normally, and exhibited no significant difference in body weight compared with control littermate genotypes. Animals with a single Fiat allele had reduced Fiat mRNA expression without changes in the expression of related family members. Expression of the osteocyte differentiation marker Dmp1 was elevated in compound heterozygotes. Static histomorphometry parameters were assessed at 8weeks of age using microcomputed tomography (?CT). Trabecular measurements were not different between genotypes. Cortical thickness and area were not affected by gene dosage, but we measured a significant increase in cortical porosity in compound heterozygous mice, without changes in biomechanical parameters. The bone phenotype of compound Naca(+/-); Fiat(+/-) heterozygotes confirms that FIAT and ?NAC are part of a common genetic pathway and support a role for the FIAT/?NAC interaction in normal bone physiology. PMID:24440290

  16. Genetic alterations of chromosome 8 genes in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Yong, Zachary Wei Ern; Zaini, Zuraiza Mohamad; Kallarakkal, Thomas George; Karen-Ng, Lee Peng; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Ismail, Siti Mazlipah; Sharifah, Noor Akmal; Mustafa, Wan Mahadzir Wan; Abraham, Mannil Thomas; Tay, Keng Kiong; Zain, Rosnah Binti

    2014-01-01

    The clinical relevance of DNA copy number alterations in chromosome 8 were investigated in oral cancers. The copy numbers of 30 selected genes in 33 OSCC patients were detected using the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique. Amplifications of the EIF3E gene were found in 27.3% of the patients, MYC in 18.2%, RECQL4 in 15.2% and MYBL1 in 12.1% of patients. The most frequent gene losses found were the GATA4 gene (24.2%), FGFR1 gene (24.2%), MSRA (21.2) and CSGALNACT1 (12.1%). The co-amplification of EIF3E and RECQL4 was found in 9% of patients and showed significant association with alcohol drinkers. There was a significant association between the amplification of EIF3E gene with non-betel quid chewers and the negative lymph node status. EIF3E amplifications did not show prognostic significance on survival. Our results suggest that EIF3E may have a role in the carcinogenesis of OSCC in non-betel quid chewers. PMID:25123227

  17. The Potential for Genetically Altered Microglia to Influence Glioma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, W.; Holsinger, R.M.D.; Kruse, C.A.; Flügel, A.; Graeber, M.B.

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse and unstoppable infiltration of brain and spinal cord tissue by neoplastic glial cells is the single most important therapeutic problem posed by the common glioma group of tumors: astrocytoma, oligoastrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, their malignant variants and glioblastoma. These neoplasms account for more than two thirds of all malignant central nervous system tumors. However, most glioma research focuses on an examination of the tumor cells rather than on host-specific, tumor micro-environmental cells and factors. This can explain why existing diffuse glioma therapies fail and why these tumors have remained incurable. Thus, there is a great need for innovation. We describe a novel strategy for the development of a more effective treatment of diffuse glioma. Our approach centers on gaining control over the behavior of the microglia, the defense cells of the CNS, which are manipulated by malignant glioma and support its growth. Armoring microglia against the influences from glioma is one of our research goals. We further discuss how microglia precursors may be genetically enhanced to track down infiltrating glioma cells. PMID:24047526

  18. Toward altering milk composition by genetic manipulation: current status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Karatzas, C N; Turner, J D

    1997-09-01

    The implementation of large-scale genome mapping and sequencing has improved the understanding of animal genetics. A large number of gene sequences are now available to serve as regulatory elements or genes of interest. Although the central thrust of this work is focused on understanding disease states, the manipulation of normal metabolic processes is feasible. To date, the genetic manipulation of livestock has been limited to the permanent addition of genes of clinical interest. This study explores the utility of genetically engineered cattle as a means of altering milk composition to improve the functional properties of milk, increasing marketability. Improvements would include increasing the concentration of valuable components in milk (e.g., casein), removing undesirable components (e.g., lactose), or altering composition to resemble that of human milk as a means of improving human neonatal nutrition. The protracted time lines of genetically modifying dairy cattle has prompted the development of animal models. A model for dwarf goats is discussed in terms of circumventing the lengthy time lines involved in generating transgenic cattle and allowing for an accelerated expansion of research in molecular genetics of dairy animals. Thus, the genetic manipulation of dairy cattle is feasible and could have significant impacts on milk quality, attributes of novel dairy products, and human health. PMID:9313168

  19. Dim light at night interacts with intermittent hypoxia to alter cognitive and affective responses

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Zachary M.; Magalang, Ulysses J.; Nelson, Randy J.

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and dim light at night (dLAN) have both been independently associated with alterations in mood and cognition. We aimed to determine whether dLAN would interact with intermittent hypoxia (IH), a condition characteristic of OSA, to alter the behavioral, cognitive, and affective responses. Adult male mice were housed in either standard lighting conditions (14:10-h light-dark cycle; 150 lux:0 lux) or dLAN (150 lux:5 lux). Mice were then exposed to IH (15 cycles/h, 8 h/day, FiO2 nadir of 5%) for 3 wk, then tested in assays of affective and cognitive responses; brains were collected for dendritic morphology and PCR analysis. Exposure to dLAN and IH increased anxiety-like behaviors, as assessed in the open field, elevated plus maze, and the light/dark box. dLAN and IH increased depressive-like behaviors in the forced swim test. IH impaired learning and memory performance in the passive avoidance task; however, no differences were observed in spatial working memory, as assessed by y-maze or object recognition. IH combined with dLAN decreased cell body area in the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. Overall, IH decreased apical spine density in the CA3, whereas dLAN decreased spine density in the CA1 of the hippocampus. TNF-? gene expression was not altered by IH or lighting condition, whereas VEGF expression was increased by dLAN. The combination of IH and dLAN provokes negative effects on hippocampal dendritic morphology, affect, and cognition, suggesting that limiting nighttime exposure to light in combination with other established treatments may be of benefit to patients with OSA. PMID:23657638

  20. Progress in detecting genetic alterations and their association with human disease.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Charles E; Chen, Chin-Fu

    2013-11-01

    The completion of the Human Genome Project provided a reference sequence to which researchers could compare sequences from individual patients in the hope of identifying disease-causing mutations. However, this still necessitated candidate gene testing or a very limited screen of multiple genes using Sanger sequencing. With the advent of high-throughput Sanger sequencing, it became possible to screen hundreds of patients for alterations in hundreds of genes. This process was time consuming and limited to a few locations/institutions that had the space to house tens of sequencing equipment. The development of next generation sequencing revolutionized the process. It is now feasible to sequence the entire exome of multiple individuals in about 10 days. However, this meant that a massive amount of data needed to be filtered to identify the relevant alteration. This is presently the rate-limiting step in providing a convincing association between a genetic alteration and a human disorder. PMID:23876707

  1. Genetic alterations activating kinase and cytokine receptor signaling in high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kathryn G.; Morin, Ryan D.; Zhang, Jinghui; Hirst, Martin; Zhao, Yongjun; Su, Xiaoping; Chen, Shann-Ching; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Churchman, Michelle; Harvey, Richard C.; Chen, Xiang; Kasap, Corynn; Yan, Chunhua; Becksfort, Jared; Finney, Richard P.; Teachey, David T.; Maude, Shannon L.; Tse, Kane; Moore, Richard; Jones, Steven; Mungall, Karen; Birol, Inanc; Edmonson, Michael N.; Hu, Ying; Buetow, Kenneth E.; Chen, I-Ming; Carroll, William L.; Wei, Lei; Ma, Jing; Kleppe, Maria; Levine, Ross L.; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Larsen, Eric; Shah, Neil P.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Reaman, Gregory; Smith, Malcolm; Paugh, Steven W.; Evans, William E.; Grupp, Stephan A.; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Downing, James R.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Loh, Mignon; Hunger, Stephen P.; Marra, Marco; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Genomic profiling has identified a subtype of high-risk B-progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) with alteration of IKZF1, a gene expression profile similar to BCR-ABL1-positive ALL and poor outcome (Ph-like ALL). The genetic alterations that activate kinase signaling in Ph-like ALL are poorly understood. We performed transcriptome and whole genome sequencing on 15 cases of Ph-like ALL, and identified rearrangements involving ABL1, JAK2, PDGFRB, CRLF2 and EPOR, activating mutations of IL7R and FLT3, and deletion of SH2B3, which encodes the JAK2 negative regulator LNK. Importantly, several of these alterations induce transformation that is attenuated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, suggesting the treatment outcome of these patients may be improved with targeted therapy. PMID:22897847

  2. Distinct responses of xenografted gliomas to different alkylating agents are related to histology and genetic alterations.

    PubMed

    Leuraud, Pascal; Taillandier, Luc; Medioni, Jacques; Aguirre-Cruz, Lucinda; Crinière, Emmanuelle; Marie, Yannick; Kujas, Michèle; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Duprez, Adrien; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Sanson, Marc; Poupon, Marie-France

    2004-07-01

    A series of 12 human gliomas was established as xenografts in nude mice and used to evaluate the relationship between histology, genetic parameters, and response to alkylating agents. Eight were high-grade oligodendroglial tumors, and four were glioblastoma. They were characterized for their genetic alterations, including those considered as "early" alterations, namely loss of chromosome 1 +/- loss of chromosome 19q, TP53 mutation, and those considered as "late" alterations, namely loss of chromosome 10, loss of chromosome 9p, EGFR genomic amplification, PTEN mutation, CDKN2A homozygous deletion, and telomerase reactivation. Chemosensitivity of xenografts to four alkylating agents, temozolomide (42 mg/kg, days 1-5, p.o.), 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (5 mg/kg, day 1, i.p.), Ifosfamide (90 mg/kg, days 1-3, i.p.), and carboplatin (66 mg/kg, day 1, i.p.) was tested by administration of drugs to tumor-bearing mice. Although each tumor presented an individual response pattern, glioblastoma had a lower chemosensitivity than oligodendrogliomas, and temozolomide was the most effective drug. Deletion of 1p +/- 19q was associated with higher chemosensitivity, whereas late molecular alterations, particularly EGFR amplification, were associated with chemoresistance. These results suggest that the combined use of histology and molecular markers should eventually be helpful selecting the most appropriate agents for treatment of malignant oligodendrogliomas and astrocytomas. PMID:15231677

  3. Identification of novel genetic alterations in samples of malignant glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Milinkovic, Vedrana; Bankovic, Jasna; Rakic, Miodrag; Stankovic, Tijana; Skender-Gazibara, Milica; Ruzdijic, Sabera; Tanic, Nikola

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most frequent and malignant human brain tumor. High level of genomic instability detected in glioma cells implies that numerous genetic alterations accumulate during glioma pathogenesis. We investigated alterations in AP-PCR DNA profiles of 30 glioma patients, and detected specific changes in 11 genes not previously associated with this disease: LHFPL3, SGCG, HTR4, ITGB1, CPS1, PROS1, GP2, KCNG2, PDE4D, KIR3DL3, and INPP5A. Further correlations revealed that 8 genes might play important role in pathogenesis of glial tumors, while changes in GP2, KCNG2 and KIR3DL3 should be considered as passenger mutations, consequence of high level of genomic instability. Identified genes have a significant role in signal transduction or cell adhesion, which are important processes for cancer development and progression. According to our results, LHFPL3 might be characteristic of primary glioblastoma, SGCG, HTR4, ITGB1, CPS1, PROS1 and INPP5A were detected predominantly in anaplastic astrocytoma, suggesting their role in progression of secondary glioblastoma, while alterations of PDE4D seem to have important role in development of both glioblastoma subtypes. Some of the identified genes showed significant association with p53, p16, and EGFR, but there was no significant correlation between loss of PTEN and any of identified genes. In conclusion our study revealed genetic alterations that were not previously associated with glioma pathogenesis and could be potentially used as molecular markers of different glioblastoma subtypes. PMID:24358143

  4. Do Knowledge Arrangements Affect Student Reading Comprehension of Genetics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Jen-Yi; Tung, Yu-Neng; Hwang, Bi-Chi; Lin, Chen-Yung; Che-Di, Lee; Chang, Yung-Ta

    2014-01-01

    Various sequences for teaching genetics have been proposed. Three seventh-grade biology textbooks in Taiwan share similar key knowledge assemblages but have different knowledge arrangements. To investigate the influence of knowledge arrangements on student understanding of genetics, we compared students' reading comprehension of the three…

  5. Campylobacter jejuni pdxA Affects Flagellum-Mediated Motility to Alter Host Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Hiroshi; Hashii, Noritaka; Uema, Masashi; Kawasaki, Nana; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Igimi, Shizunobu; Yamamoto, Shigeki

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B6 (pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, PLP) is linked to a variety of biological functions in prokaryotes. Here, we report that the pdxA (putative 4-hydroxy-L-threonine phosphate dehydrogenase) gene plays a pivotal role in the PLP-dependent regulation of flagellar motility, thereby altering host colonization in a leading foodborne pathogen, Campylobacter jejuni. A C. jejuni pdxA mutant failed to produce PLP and exhibited a coincident loss of flagellar motility. Mass spectrometric analyses showed a 3-fold reduction in the main flagellar glycan pseudaminic acid (Pse) associated with the disruption of pdxA. The pdxA mutant also exhibited reduced growth rates compared with the WT strain. Comparative metabolomic analyses revealed differences in respiratory/energy metabolism between WT C. jejuni and the pdxA mutant, providing a possible explanation for the differential growth fitness between the two strains. Consistent with the lack of flagellar motility, the pdxA mutant showed impaired motility-mediated responses (bacterial adhesion, ERK1/2 activation, and IL-8 production) in INT407 cells and reduced colonization of chickens compared with the WT strain. Overall, this study demonstrated that the pdxA gene affects the PLP-mediated flagellar motility function, mainly through alteration of Pse modification, and the disruption of this gene also alters the respiratory/energy metabolisms to potentially affect host colonization. Our data therefore present novel implications regarding the utility of PLP and its dependent enzymes as potent target(s) for the control of this pathogen in the poultry host. PMID:23936426

  6. Population genetic dynamics of three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) in anthropogenic altered habitats

    PubMed Central

    Scharsack, Joern P; Schweyen, Hannah; Schmidt, Alexander M; Dittmar, Janine; Reusch, Thorsten BH; Kurtz, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    In industrialized and/or agriculturally used landscapes, inhabiting species are exposed to a variety of anthropogenic changes in their environments. Genetic diversity may be reduced if populations encounter founder events, bottlenecks, or isolation. Conversely, genetic diversity may increase if populations adapt to changes in selective regimes in newly created habitats. With the present study, genetic variability of 918 sticklebacks from 43 samplings (21.3 ± 3.8 per sample) at 36 locations from cultivated landscapes in Northwest Germany was analyzed at nine neutral microsatellite loci. To test if differentiation is influenced by habitat alterations, sticklebacks were collected from ancient running waters and adjacent artificial stagnant waters, from brooks with salt water inflow of anthropogenic and natural origin and adjacent freshwater sites. Overall population structure was dominated by isolation by distance (IBD), which was significant across all populations, and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that 10.6% of the variation was explained by river catchment area. Populations in anthropogenic modified habitats deviated from the general IBD structure and in the AMOVA, grouping by habitat type running/stagnant water explained 4.9% of variation and 1.4% of the variation was explained by salt-/freshwater habitat. Sticklebacks in salt-polluted water systems seem to exhibit elevated migratory activity between fresh- and saltwater habitats, reducing IBD. In other situations, populations showed distinct signs of genetic isolation, which in some locations was attributed to mechanical migration barriers, but in others to potential anthropogenic induced bottleneck or founder effects. The present study shows that anthropogenic habitat alterations may have diverse effects on the population genetic structure of inhabiting species. Depending on the type of habitat change, increased genetic differentiation, diversification, or isolation are possible consequences. PMID:22833789

  7. Population genetic dynamics of three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) in anthropogenic altered habitats.

    PubMed

    Scharsack, Joern P; Schweyen, Hannah; Schmidt, Alexander M; Dittmar, Janine; Reusch, Thorsten Bh; Kurtz, Joachim

    2012-06-01

    In industrialized and/or agriculturally used landscapes, inhabiting species are exposed to a variety of anthropogenic changes in their environments. Genetic diversity may be reduced if populations encounter founder events, bottlenecks, or isolation. Conversely, genetic diversity may increase if populations adapt to changes in selective regimes in newly created habitats. With the present study, genetic variability of 918 sticklebacks from 43 samplings (21.3 ± 3.8 per sample) at 36 locations from cultivated landscapes in Northwest Germany was analyzed at nine neutral microsatellite loci. To test if differentiation is influenced by habitat alterations, sticklebacks were collected from ancient running waters and adjacent artificial stagnant waters, from brooks with salt water inflow of anthropogenic and natural origin and adjacent freshwater sites. Overall population structure was dominated by isolation by distance (IBD), which was significant across all populations, and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that 10.6% of the variation was explained by river catchment area. Populations in anthropogenic modified habitats deviated from the general IBD structure and in the AMOVA, grouping by habitat type running/stagnant water explained 4.9% of variation and 1.4% of the variation was explained by salt-/freshwater habitat. Sticklebacks in salt-polluted water systems seem to exhibit elevated migratory activity between fresh- and saltwater habitats, reducing IBD. In other situations, populations showed distinct signs of genetic isolation, which in some locations was attributed to mechanical migration barriers, but in others to potential anthropogenic induced bottleneck or founder effects. The present study shows that anthropogenic habitat alterations may have diverse effects on the population genetic structure of inhabiting species. Depending on the type of habitat change, increased genetic differentiation, diversification, or isolation are possible consequences. PMID:22833789

  8. Genetic reduction of group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors alters select behaviors in a mouse model for fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alexia M.; Bui, Nghiem; Graham, Deanna; Perkins, Jennifer R.; Yuva-Paylor, Lisa A.; Paylor, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Genetic heterogeneity likely contributes to variability in the symptoms among individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS). Studies in the Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse model for FXS suggest that excessive signaling through group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (Gp1 mGluRs), comprised of subtypes mGluR1 and mGluR5, may play a role. Hence, Gp1 mGluRs may act as modifiers of FXS. Currently no studies have addressed whether manipulation of mGluR1 activity may alter Fmr1 KO behavioral responses, and only a few have reported the effects of mGluR5 manipulation. Therefore, the goals for this study were to extend our understanding of the effects of modulating Gp1 mGluR activity on Fmr1 KO behavioral responses. Methods The present study determined if genetically reducing mGluR1 or mGluR5 by 50% affects an extensive array of behaviors in the Fmr1 KO. Results Reduction of mGluR1 moderately decreased Fmr1 KO activity. Reduction of mGluR5 caused an analgesic response in the Fmr1 KO and decreased active social behavior. Modulation of either mGluR1 or mGluR5 did not significantly alter audiogenic seizures, anxiety- and perseverative-related responses, sensorimotor gating, memory, or motor responses. Conclusions Genetic reduction of mGluR1 or mGluR5 modified a few select Fmr1 KO behaviors, although these modifications appeared to be subtle in nature and/or limited to select behaviors. This may indicate that 50% reduction of either mGluR1 or mGluR5 is insufficient to produce behavioral changes, and therefore, these receptors may not be dominant modifiers of a number of Fmr1 KO behavioral phenotypes. PMID:21571007

  9. Predictors of uptake of obesity genetic testing among affected adults.

    PubMed

    Segal, Mary E; Polansky, Marcia; Sankar, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    Given that a large number of candidate genes coding for a tendency toward obesity have been identified and some findings have been replicated, we explored characteristics of those who would be most likely to obtain future genetic testing for this tendency. During a series of focus groups, obese respondents rated their likelihood of obtaining testing under conditions in which either genetically-targeted drug treatment would be available, a positive test would be associated with a prognosis for developing diabetes, or neither of these. Interest in testing was greater given the first two scenarios than the third. Older age and belief that genetics were an important cause of obesity were associated with greater interest. For the first two scenarios, higher educational status was associated with greater interest, while for the third, respondents who said emotional issues caused overweight and those who crash-dieted intermittently were more likely to want genetic testing. Although further research is required to validate these findings, this study is the first published report of respondents' ratings of likelihood to obtain genetic testing for propensity to obesity, and suggests strong interest in genetic testing among some people, even in the absence of further treatment implications of the test. PMID:17024370

  10. Warming and altered precipitation affect litter decomposition and nitrogen dynamics in a mixed-grass prairie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Luo, Y.; Xu, X.; Li, D.; Niu, S.

    2013-12-01

    Litter decomposition and nitrogen dynamics are important processes in ecosystems and how they respond to climate changes is a global concern. In order to explore the effects of warming and altered precipitation on litter decomposition and nitrogen dynamics, we conducted a field decomposition experiment with warming (+3°C) and altered precipitation (half and double) in a mixed-grass prairie in Oklahoma, USA, using litter bags with dominant C3 and C4 grasses since June, 2012. Litter bags were collected every month in the first six months and subsequently every three month thereafter. Remaining litter biomass as well as element concentration were measured in the lab. Warming significantly decreased the litter decomposition rate (k) by 25.4% for C3 grasses and 25.0% for C4 grasses. Doubled precipitation significantly increased the litter decomposition rate by 23.3% for C3 grasses and 30.1% for C4 grasses while half precipitation showed no significant effects. Soil temperature and soil moisture, controlled by warming and altered precipitation, are found to be the most important factors in regulating litter decomposition rate. Warming also decreased N concentration in C3 grasses while doubled precipitation increased N concentration in C4 grasses after one year of field decomposition. During that time, N concentration showed an average increase of 99.6% in C3 grass while only 68.1% in C4 grass. Other elements such as P and K were not much affected by these treatments although there were significant differences between C3 and C4 grasses. Our results suggest that climate change has significant impact on litter decomposition rate, which could influence the carbon balance of the ecosystem. Nutrient dynamics, especially nitrogen, were shown to be specific to plant types under altered climatic conditions. Our results show that conclusion derived from single-factor climate change experiments should be treated with caution due to interactive effects of warming with altered precipitation and differential responses of C3 and C4 plants.

  11. Genetic alterations of histone lysine methyltransferases and their significance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Holowatyj, Andreana; Yang, Zeng-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Histone lysine methyltransferases (HMTs), a large class of enzymes that catalyze site-specific methylation of lysine residues on histones and other proteins, play critical roles in controlling transcription, chromatin architecture, and cellular differentiation. However, the genomic landscape and clinical significance of HMTs in breast cancer remain poorly characterized. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis of approximately 50 HMTs in breast cancer and identified associations among recurrent copy number alterations, mutations, gene expression, and clinical outcome. We identified 12 HMTs with the highest frequency of genetic alterations, including 8 with high-level amplification, 2 with putative homozygous deletion, and 2 with somatic mutation. Different subtypes of breast cancer have different patterns of copy number and expression for each HMT gene. In addition, chromosome 1q contains four HMTs that are concurrently or independently amplified or overexpressed in breast cancer. Copy number or mRNA expression of several HMTs was significantly associated with basal-like breast cancer and shorter patient survival. Integrative analysis identified 8 HMTs (SETDB1, SMYD3, ASH1L, SMYD2, WHSC1L1, SUV420H1, SETDB2, and KMT2C) that are dysregulated by genetic alterations, classifying them as candidate therapeutic targets. Together, our findings provide a strong foundation for further mechanistic research and therapeutic options using HMTs to treat breast cancer. PMID:25537518

  12. Whole-genome sequencing identifies genetic alterations in pediatric low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinghui; Wu, Gang; Miller, Claudia P; Tatevossian, Ruth G; Dalton, James D; Tang, Bo; Orisme, Wilda; Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Parker, Matthew; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Boop, Fredrick A; Lu, Charles; Kandoth, Cyriac; Ding, Li; Lee, Ryan; Huether, Robert; Chen, Xiang; Hedlund, Erin; Nagahawatte, Panduka; Rusch, Michael; Boggs, Kristy; Cheng, Jinjun; Becksfort, Jared; Ma, Jing; Song, Guangchun; Li, Yongjin; Wei, Lei; Wang, Jianmin; Shurtleff, Sheila; Easton, John; Zhao, David; Fulton, Robert S; Fulton, Lucinda L; Dooling, David J; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Mulder, Heather L; Tang, Chunlao; Ochoa, Kerri; Mullighan, Charles G; Gajjar, Amar; Kriwacki, Richard; Sheer, Denise; Gilbertson, Richard J; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Downing, James R; Baker, Suzanne J; Ellison, David W

    2013-06-01

    The most common pediatric brain tumors are low-grade gliomas (LGGs). We used whole-genome sequencing to identify multiple new genetic alterations involving BRAF, RAF1, FGFR1, MYB, MYBL1 and genes with histone-related functions, including H3F3A and ATRX, in 39 LGGs and low-grade glioneuronal tumors (LGGNTs). Only a single non-silent somatic alteration was detected in 24 of 39 (62%) tumors. Intragenic duplications of the portion of FGFR1 encoding the tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) and rearrangements of MYB were recurrent and mutually exclusive in 53% of grade II diffuse LGGs. Transplantation of Trp53-null neonatal astrocytes expressing FGFR1 with the duplication involving the TKD into the brains of nude mice generated high-grade astrocytomas with short latency and 100% penetrance. FGFR1 with the duplication induced FGFR1 autophosphorylation and upregulation of the MAPK/ERK and PI3K pathways, which could be blocked by specific inhibitors. Focusing on the therapeutically challenging diffuse LGGs, our study of 151 tumors has discovered genetic alterations and potential therapeutic targets across the entire range of pediatric LGGs and LGGNTs. PMID:23583981

  13. A genetic algorithms approach for altering the membership functions in fuzzy logic controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shehadeh, Hana; Lea, Robert N.

    1992-01-01

    Through previous work, a fuzzy control system was developed to perform translational and rotational control of a space vehicle. This problem was then re-examined to determine the effectiveness of genetic algorithms on fine tuning the controller. This paper explains the problems associated with the design of this fuzzy controller and offers a technique for tuning fuzzy logic controllers. A fuzzy logic controller is a rule-based system that uses fuzzy linguistic variables to model human rule-of-thumb approaches to control actions within a given system. This 'fuzzy expert system' features rules that direct the decision process and membership functions that convert the linguistic variables into the precise numeric values used for system control. Defining the fuzzy membership functions is the most time consuming aspect of the controller design. One single change in the membership functions could significantly alter the performance of the controller. This membership function definition can be accomplished by using a trial and error technique to alter the membership functions creating a highly tuned controller. This approach can be time consuming and requires a great deal of knowledge from human experts. In order to shorten development time, an iterative procedure for altering the membership functions to create a tuned set that used a minimal amount of fuel for velocity vector approach and station-keep maneuvers was developed. Genetic algorithms, search techniques used for optimization, were utilized to solve this problem.

  14. Alteration of Soil Rhizosphere Communities following Genetic Transformation of White Spruce?

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Philippe M.; Hamelin, Richard C.; Filion, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The application of plant genetic manipulations to agriculture and forestry with the aim of alleviating insect damage through Bacillus thuringiensis transformation could lead to a significant reduction in the release of pesticides into the environment. However, many groups have come forward with very valid and important questions related to potentially adverse effects, and it is crucial to assess and better understand the impact that this technology might have on ecosystems. In this study, we analyzed rhizosphere soil samples collected from the first B. thuringiensis-transformed trees [with insertion of the CryIA(b) toxin-encoding gene] grown in Canada (Val-Cartier, QC, Canada) as part of an ecological impact assessment project. Using a robust amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis approach coupled with 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the rhizosphere-inhabiting microbial communities of white spruce (Picea glauca) genetically modified by biolistic insertion of the cryIA(b), uidA (beta-glucuronidase), and nptII genes were compared with the microbial communities associated with non-genetically modified counterparts and with trees in which only the genetic marker genes uidA and nptII have been inserted. Analysis of 1,728 rhizosphere bacterial clones (576 clones per treatment) using a Cramér-von Mises statistic analysis combined with a Monte Carlo comparison clearly indicated that there was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) between the microbial communities inhabiting the rhizospheres of trees carrying the cryIA(b), uidA, and nptII transgenes, trees carrying only the uidA and nptII transgenes, and control trees. Clear rhizosphere microbial community alterations due to B. thuringiensis tree genetic modification have to our knowledge never been described previously and open the door to interesting questions related to B. thuringiensis genetic transformation and also to the impact of commonly used uidA and nptII genetic marker genes. PMID:17468272

  15. Altered precipitation regime affects the function and composition of soil microbial communities on multiple time scales.

    PubMed

    Zeglin, L H; Bottomley, P J; Jumpponen, A; Rice, C W; Arango, M; Lindsley, A; McGowan, A; Mfombep, P; Myrold, D D

    2013-10-01

    Climate change models predict that future precipitation patterns will entail lower-frequency but larger rainfall events, increasing the duration of dry soil conditions. Resulting shifts in microbial C cycling activity could affect soil C storage. Further, microbial response to rainfall events may be constrained by the physiological or nutrient limitation stress of extended drought periods; thus seasonal or multiannual precipitation regimes may influence microbial activity following soil wet-up. We quantified rainfall-driven dynamics of microbial processes that affect soil C loss and retention, and microbial community composition, in soils from a long-term (14-year) field experiment contrasting "Ambient" and "Altered" (extended intervals between rainfalls) precipitation regimes. We collected soil before, the day following, and five days following 2.5-cm rainfall events during both moist and dry periods (June and September 2011; soil water potential = -0.01 and -0.83 MPa, respectively), and measured microbial respiration, microbial biomass, organic matter decomposition potential (extracellular enzyme activities), and microbial community composition (phospholipid fatty acids). The equivalent rainfall events caused equivalent microbial respiration responses in both treatments. In contrast, microbial biomass was higher and increased after rainfall in the Altered treatment soils only, thus microbial C use efficiency (CUE) was higher in Altered than Ambient treatments (0.70 +/- 0.03 > 0.46 +/- 0.10). CUE was also higher in dry (September) soils. C-acquiring enzyme activities (beta-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, and phenol oxidase) increased after rainfall in moist (June), but not dry (September) soils. Both microbial biomass C:N ratios and fungal:bacterial ratios were higher at lower soil water contents, suggesting a functional and/or population-level shift in the microbiota at low soil water contents, and microbial community composition also differed following wet-up and between seasons and treatments. Overall, microbial activity may directly (C respiration) and indirectly (enzyme potential) reduce soil organic matter pools less in drier soils, and soil C sequestration potential (CUE) may be higher in soils with a history of extended dry periods between rainfall events. The implications include that soil C loss may be reduced or compensated for via different mechanisms at varying time scales, and that microbial taxa with better stress tolerance or growth efficiency may be associated with these functional shifts. PMID:24358718

  16. Aeromonas proteolyrica bacteria in aerospace environments. [possible genetic alterations and effects on man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. G.

    1974-01-01

    Preflight studies on Aeromonas proteolytica are reported to investigate the possibility of genetic alterations resulting in increased proteolysis in spacecraft environments. This organism may be present on human tissue and could pose medical problems if its endopeptidase and a hemolysin were to be produced in ususually high quantities or altered in such a way as to be more effective in their activities. Considered are: (1) Development of a nutrative holding medium for suspension of organisms; (2) the establishment of baseline information for the standardization of the assay for endopeptidase levels and hemolytic titers; (3) formulation of a method by which intracutaneous hemorrhage could be quantitated in guinea pig tissue; and (4) the responses of these organisms to parameters of spaceflight and experimentation.

  17. Genetic alterations of phosphoinositide 3-kinase subunit genes in human glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Nutt, Catherine L; Mohapatra, Gayatry; Louis, David N

    2004-10-01

    Genetic alterations of PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) subunits have been documented in a number of tumor types, with increased PI3K activity linked to gene amplification and mutation of catalytic subunits, as well as mutations of regulatory subunits. Among high grade gliomas, activation of the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway through loss of PTEN function is common. We therefore investigated whether genetic alteration of class IA PI3Ks might provide a mechanism for deregulation of this pathway in glioblastomas. We studied a series of glioblastomas with FISH to assess copy number of catalytic subunits (PIK3CA and PIK3CD) and with PCR-SSCP to screen for somatic mutations of conserved regions of both catalytic and regulatory subunits. FISH revealed frequent balanced copy number increases of both PIK3CA and PIK3CD, and one case showed an extra copy limited to PIK3CA. One glioblastoma exhibited a 9-bp deletion that encompassed the exon-intron junction of exon 12 of PIK3R1, documenting for the first time a mutation within a PI3K regulatory subunit in human glioblastoma. This deletion would be predicted to yield a truncated protein that lacks the inhibitory domain, resulting in increased PI3K activity. Furthermore, the case with selected PIK3CA copy number gain and the case with a truncating PIK3R1 mutation both featured AKT activation without PTEN mutation. These results suggest that genetic alterations of class IA PI3K subunit genes can occasionally play a role in human glioblastoma by activating the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway independently of PTEN mutation. PMID:15605984

  18. Epigenetic and genetic alterations-based molecular classification of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhien; Xu, Qin; Chen, Wantao

    2012-04-01

    The long-term survival rates for patients diagnosed with advanced head and neck cancer (HNC) remain poor. Many perplexing factors, including etiology and comorbidity, lead to different molecular malfunctions of HNC cells and determine the prognosis of the disease. Traditional diagnostic methods are limited in that they fail to provide an effective classification diagnosis, such as a more precise prediction of prognosis and decisions for personalized treatment regimens. Recently, molecular biology techniques, especially epigenetic and genetic techniques, have been developed that have enabled us to gain a greater insight into the molecular pathways underlying the cancers. Translating the research into a format that will facilitate effective molecular classification, support personalized treatment and determine prognosis remains a challenge. In this review, the authors provide an overview of cancer epigenetic and genetic alterations, tissue banks, and several promising biomarkers or candidates that may ultimately prove to be beneficial in a clinical setting for patients with HNC. PMID:22468818

  19. Phytoplasmal infection derails genetically preprogrammed meristem fate and alters plant architecture

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Davis, Robert Edward; Nuss, Donald L.; Zhao, Yan

    2013-01-01

    In the life cycle of higher plants, it is the fate of meristem cells that determines the pattern of growth and development, and therefore plant morphotype and fertility. Floral transition, the turning point from vegetative growth to reproductive development, is achieved via genetically programmed sequential changes in meristem fate from vegetative to inflorescence, and to floral, leading to flower formation and eventual seed production. The transition is rarely reversible once initiated. In this communication, we report that a bacterial infection can derail the genetically programmed fate of meristem cells, thereby drastically altering the growth pattern of the host plant. We identified four characteristic symptoms in tomato plants infected with a cell wall-less bacterium, phytoplasma. The symptoms are a manifestation of the pathogen-induced alterations of growth pattern, whereas each symptom corresponds to a distinct phase in the derailment of shoot apical meristem fate. The phases include premature floral meristem termination, suppressed floral meristem initiation, delayed conversion of vegetative meristem to inflorescence meristem, and repetitive initiation and outgrowth of lateral vegetative meristems. We further found that the pathogen-induced alterations of growth pattern were correlated with transcriptional reprogramming of key meristem switching genes. Our findings open an avenue toward understanding pathological alterations in patterns of plant growth and development, thus aiding identification of molecular targets for disease control and symptom alleviation. The findings also provide insights for understanding stem cell pluripotency and raise a tantalizing possibility for using phytoplasma as a tool to dissect the course of normal plant development and to modify plant morphogenesis by manipulating meristem fate. PMID:24191032

  20. Genetic diversity affects colony survivorship in commercial honey bee colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarpy, David R.; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Pettis, Jeffrey S.

    2013-08-01

    Honey bee ( Apis mellifera) queens mate with unusually high numbers of males (average of approximately 12 drones), although there is much variation among queens. One main consequence of such extreme polyandry is an increased diversity of worker genotypes within a colony, which has been shown empirically to confer significant adaptive advantages that result in higher colony productivity and survival. Moreover, honey bees are the primary insect pollinators used in modern commercial production agriculture, and their populations have been in decline worldwide. Here, we compare the mating frequencies of queens, and therefore, intracolony genetic diversity, in three commercial beekeeping operations to determine how they correlate with various measures of colony health and productivity, particularly the likelihood of queen supersedure and colony survival in functional, intensively managed beehives. We found the average effective paternity frequency ( m e ) of this population of honey bee queens to be 13.6 ± 6.76, which was not significantly different between colonies that superseded their queen and those that did not. However, colonies that were less genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e ? 7.0) were 2.86 times more likely to die by the end of the study when compared to colonies that were more genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e > 7.0). The stark contrast in colony survival based on increased genetic diversity suggests that there are important tangible benefits of increased queen mating number in managed honey bees, although the exact mechanism(s) that govern these benefits have not been fully elucidated.

  1. Genetic diversity affects colony survivorship in commercial honey bee colonies.

    PubMed

    Tarpy, David R; Vanengelsdorp, Dennis; Pettis, Jeffrey S

    2013-08-01

    Honey bee (Apis mellifera) queens mate with unusually high numbers of males (average of approximately 12 drones), although there is much variation among queens. One main consequence of such extreme polyandry is an increased diversity of worker genotypes within a colony, which has been shown empirically to confer significant adaptive advantages that result in higher colony productivity and survival. Moreover, honey bees are the primary insect pollinators used in modern commercial production agriculture, and their populations have been in decline worldwide. Here, we compare the mating frequencies of queens, and therefore, intracolony genetic diversity, in three commercial beekeeping operations to determine how they correlate with various measures of colony health and productivity, particularly the likelihood of queen supersedure and colony survival in functional, intensively managed beehives. We found the average effective paternity frequency (m e ) of this population of honey bee queens to be 13.6?±?6.76, which was not significantly different between colonies that superseded their queen and those that did not. However, colonies that were less genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e ???7.0) were 2.86 times more likely to die by the end of the study when compared to colonies that were more genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e ?>?7.0). The stark contrast in colony survival based on increased genetic diversity suggests that there are important tangible benefits of increased queen mating number in managed honey bees, although the exact mechanism(s) that govern these benefits have not been fully elucidated. PMID:23728203

  2. Genetic Mapping of Novel Loci Affecting Canine Blood Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    White, Michelle E.; Hayward, Jessica J.; Stokol, Tracy; Boyko, Adam R.

    2015-01-01

    Since the publication of the dog genome and the construction of high-quality genome-wide SNP arrays, thousands of dogs have been genotyped for disease studies. For many of these dogs, additional clinical phenotypes are available, such as hematological and clinical chemistry results collected during routine veterinary care. Little is known about the genetic basis of variation in blood phenotypes, but this variation may play an important role in the etiology and progression of many diseases. From a cohort of dogs that had been previously genotyped on a semi-custom Illumina CanineHD array for various genome-wide association studies (GWAS) at Cornell University Hospital for Animals, we chose 353 clinically healthy, adult dogs for our analysis of clinical pathologic test results (14 hematological tests and 25 clinical chemistry tests). After correcting for age, body weight and sex, genetic associations were identified for amylase, segmented neutrophils, urea nitrogen, glucose, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin. Additionally, a strong genetic association (P = 8.1×10?13) was evident between a region of canine chromosome 13 (CFA13) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), explaining 23% of the variation in ALT levels. This region of CFA13 encompasses the GPT gene that encodes the transferase. Dogs homozygous for the derived allele exhibit lower ALT activity, making increased ALT activity a less useful marker of hepatic injury in these individuals. Overall, these associations provide a roadmap for identifying causal variants that could improve interpretation of clinical blood tests and understanding of genetic risk factors associated with diseases such as canine diabetes and anemia, and demonstrate the utility of holistic phenotyping of dogs genotyped for disease mapping studies. PMID:26683458

  3. Process-induced extracellular matrix alterations affect the mechanisms of soft tissue repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wendell Q; Xu, Hui; Sandor, Maryellen; Lombardi, Jared

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrices derived from animal tissues for human tissue repairs are processed by various methods of physical, chemical, or enzymatic decellularization, viral inactivation, and terminal sterilization. The mechanisms of action in tissue repair vary among bioscaffolds and are suggested to be associated with process-induced extracellular matrix modifications. We compared three non-cross-linked, commercially available extracellular matrix scaffolds (Strattice, Veritas, and XenMatrix), and correlated extracellular matrix alterations to in vivo biological responses upon implantation in non-human primates. Structural evaluation showed significant differences in retaining native tissue extracellular matrix histology and ultrastructural features among bioscaffolds. Tissue processing may cause both the condensation of collagen fibers and fragmentation or separation of collagen bundles. Calorimetric analysis showed significant differences in the stability of bioscaffolds. The intrinsic denaturation temperature was measured to be 51°C, 38°C, and 44°C for Strattice, Veritas, and XenMatrix, respectively, demonstrating more extracellular matrix modifications in the Veritas and XenMatrix scaffolds. Consequently, the susceptibility to collagenase degradation was increased in Veritas and XenMatrix when compared to their respective source tissues. Using a non-human primate model, three bioscaffolds were found to elicit different biological responses, have distinct mechanisms of action, and yield various outcomes of tissue repair. Strattice permitted cell repopulation and was remodeled over 6 months. Veritas was unstable at body temperature, resulting in rapid absorption with moderate inflammation. XenMatrix caused severe inflammation and sustained immune reactions. This study demonstrates that extracellular matrix alterations significantly affect biological responses in soft tissue repair and regeneration. The data offer useful insights into the rational design of extracellular matrix products and bioscaffolds of tissue engineering. PMID:24555005

  4. Altered visual experience and acute visual deprivation affect predatory targeting by infrared-imaging Boid snakes.

    PubMed

    Grace, M S; Woodward, O M

    2001-11-23

    Boid and Crotaline snakes use both their eyes and infrared-imaging facial pit organs to target homeothermic prey. These snakes can target in complete darkness, but the eyes can also effectively direct predatory strikes. We investigated the behavioral correlates of boid snakes' simultaneous use of two imaging systems by testing whether congenital unilateral visual deprivation affects targeting performance. Normally sighted Burmese pythons exhibited average targeting angle of zero (on the midline axis of the head), but three unilaterally anophthalmic Burmese pythons targeted preferentially on the sighted side. A unilaterally anophthalmic amethystine python also targeted on the sighted side, and a unilaterally anophthalmic Brazilian rainbow boa tended to target on the sighted side, though its mean targeting angle was not significantly different from zero. When unilaterally anophthalmic Burmese pythons were temporarily blinded, mean strike angle changed to that of normally sighted snakes. These results show that while infrared-imaging snakes can shift between visual and infrared information under acute experimental conditions, loss of part of the visual field during development results in abnormal predatory targeting behavior. In contrast, normally sighted snakes subjected to temporary unilateral blinding do not target preferentially on the sighted side. Therefore, while loss of part of the visual field may be compensated for by infrared input in normal snakes, partial absence of visual input during development may alter central organization of visual information. Conversely, absence of half the visual field during development does not alter targeting performance based upon infrared input alone, suggesting that organization of the central infrared map does not depend upon normal organization of visual input. PMID:11701137

  5. Genetic alteration regulated by microRNAs in biliary tract cancers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Xia, Shihai; Chen, Kai; Xiang, Xiaohui; Zhu, Aijun

    2015-11-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) constitute a relatively rare but highly malignant class of tumors with poor prognosis including gallbladder cancer, intra- and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Recently, accumulated evidences have demonstrated that deregulated expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is closely associated with the development, invasion, metastasis and prognosis of different cancers including BTCs. MiRNAs comprise an endogenously expressed and highly evolutionarily conserved group of small, non-coding, single-stranded RNAs which negatively regulate target genes expression by means of combining with 3' untranslated region (UTR) of corresponding mRNAs at the post-transcriptional level with significant roles in various fundamental cellular procedures including cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, cell cycle control and apoptosis. Recent studies have indicated that miRNAs could function as novel tumor-promoting genes or tumor suppressor genes to act as potential therapeutic targets in anticancer treatment because the genetic alteration regulated by miRNAs could result in tumorigenesis and tumor inhibition. Anomalous miRNAs expression patterns, acting as phenotypic signatures of distinct cancers, are promising to be used as diagnostic, prognostic, predictive biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the current findings from the studies about potential genetic alteration regulated by miRNAs and their roles in BTCs. PMID:26095617

  6. Genetic and histopathological alterations induced by cypermethrin in rat kidney and liver: Protection by sesame oil.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Mohamed Mohamed; Attia, Hossam F; El-Ella, Ghada A Abou

    2015-12-01

    Pesticides are widespread synthesized substances used for public health protection and agricultural programs. However, they cause environmental pollution and health hazards. This study aimed to examine the protective effects of sesame oil (SO) on the genetic alterations induced by cypermethrin (CYP) in the liver and kidney of Wistar rats. Male rats were divided into four groups, each containing 10 rats: the control group received vehicle, SO group (5 mL/kg b.w), CYP group (12 mg/kg b.w), and protective group received SO (5 mL/kg b.w) plus CYP (12 mg/kg b.w). Biochemical analysis showed an increase in albumin, urea, creatinine, GPT, GOT, and lipid profiles in the CYP group. Co-administration of SO with CYP normalized such biochemical changes. CYP administration decreased both the activity and mRNA expression of the examined antioxidants. SO co-administration recovered CYP, downregulating the expression of glutathione-S-transferase (GST), catalase, and superoxide dismutase. Additionally, SO co-administration with CYP counteracted the CYP- altering the expression of renal interleukins (IL-1 and IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), anigotensinogen (AGT), AGT receptors (AT1), and genes of hepatic glucose and fatty acids metabolism. CYP induced degenerative changes in the kidney and liver histology which are ameliorated by SO. In conclusion, SO has a protective effect against alterations and pathological changes induced by CYP in the liver and kidney at genetic and histological levels. PMID:25816392

  7. Alteration of Genetic Make-up in Karnal Bunt Pathogen (Tilletia indica) of Wheat in Presence of Host Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Atul K.; Seneviratne, J. M.; Bala, Ritu; Jaiswal, J. P.; Kumar, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Alteration of genetic make-up of the isolates and monosporidial strains of Tilletia indica causing Karnal bunt (KB) disease in wheat was analyzed using DNA markers and SDS-PAGE. The generation of new variation with different growth characteristics is not a generalized feature and is not only dependant on the original genetic make up of the base isolate/monosporidial strains but also on interaction with host. Host determinant(s) plays a significant role in the generation of variability and the effect is much pronounced in monosporidial strains with narrow genetic base as compared to broad genetic base. The most plausible explanation of genetic variation in presence of host determinant(s) are the recombination of genetic material from two different mycelial/sporidia through sexual mating as well as through para-sexual means. The morphological and development dependent variability further suggests that the variation in T. indica strains predominantly derived through the genetic rearrangements. PMID:26060428

  8. Altering the axial light gradient affects photomorphogenesis in emerging seedlings of Zea mays L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, B. M.; Poff, K. L.

    1986-01-01

    The axial (longitudinal) red light gradient (632 nanometers) of 4 day old dark-grown maize seedlings is increased by staining the peripheral cells of the coleoptile. The magnitude of increase in the light gradient is dependent solely on the light-absorbing qualities of the stain used. Metanil yellow has no effect on the axial red-light gradient, while methylene blue causes a large increase in this light gradient. These stains did not affect growth in darkness or the sensitivity of mesocotyl elongation to red light. However, mesocotyl elongation was altered for the dark-grown seedlings stained with methylene blue when these seedlings were transplanted, covered with soil, and permitted to emerge under natural lighting conditions. These observations are consistent with the idea that there is a single perceptive site below the coleoptilar node, and suggest that this perceptive site gives the actinic light which has traveled downward through the length of the shoot from an entry point in the plant tip region.

  9. Genetic and Clinical Factors Affecting Plasma Clozapine Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Edman, Gunnar; Bertilsson, Leif; Hukic, Dzana Sudic; Lavebratt, Catharina; Eriksson, Sven V.; Ösby, Urban

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess (1) the variance of plasma clozapine levels; (2) the relative importance of sex, smoking habits, weight, age, and specific genetic variants of cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2), uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A4 (UGT1A4), and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1) on plasma levels of clozapine; and (3) the relation between plasma clozapine levels, fasting glucose levels, and waist circumference. Method: There were 113 patients on clozapine treatment recruited from psychosis outpatient clinics in Stockholm County, Sweden. Patients had genotype testing for single nucleotide polymorphisms: 2 in MDR1, 3 in CYP1A2, and 1 in UGT1A4. Multiple and logistic regression were used to analyze the relations. Results: There was a wide variation in plasma concentrations of clozapine (mean = 1,615 nmol/L, SD = 1,354 nmol/L), with 37% of the samples within therapeutic range (1,100–2,100 nmol/L). Smokers had significantly lower plasma clozapine concentrations than nonsmokers (P ? .03). There was a significant association between the rs762551 A allele of CYP1A2 and lower plasma clozapine concentration (P ? .05). Increased fasting glucose level was 3.7-fold more frequent in CC and CA genotypes than AA genotype (odds ratio = 0.27; 95% confidence interval, 0.10–0.72). There was no significant relation between higher fasting glucose levels, larger waist circumference, and higher clozapine levels. Conclusions: It is difficult to predict plasma clozapine concentration, even when known individual and genetic factors are considered. Therefore, therapeutic drug monitoring is recommended in patients who are treated with clozapine. PMID:26137357

  10. Genetic and expression alterations in association with the sarcomatous change of cholangiocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hee-Jung; Yun, Bo-Ra; Kwon, Jung-Hee; Ahn, Hyuk-Soo; Seol, Min-A; Lee, Mi-Jin; Yu, Goung-Ran; Yu, Hee-Chul; Hong, BeeHak; Choi, KwanYong

    2009-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is an intrahepatic bile duct carcinoma with a high mortality rate and a poor prognosis. Sarcomatous change/epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) of CC frequently leads to aggressive intrahepatic spread and metastasis. The aim of this study was to identify the genetic alterations and gene expression pattern that might be associated with the sarcomatous change in CC. Previously, we established 4 human CC cell lines (SCK, JCK1, Cho-CK, and Choi-CK). In the present study, we characterized a typical sarcomatoid phenotype of SCK, and classified the other cell lines according to tumor cell differentiation (a poorly differentiated JCK, a moderately differentiated Cho-CK, and a well differentiated Choi-CK cells), both morphologically and immunocytologically. We further analyzed the genetic alterations of two tumor suppressor genes (p53 and FHIT) and the expression of Fas/FasL gene, well known CC-related receptor and its ligand, in these four CC cell lines. The deletion mutation of p53 was found in the sarcomatoid SCK cells. These cells expressed much less Fas/FasL mRNAs than did the other ordinary CC cells. We further characterize the gene expression pattern that is involved in the sarcomatous progression of CC, using cDNA microarrays that contained 18,688 genes. Comparison of the expression patterns between the sarcomatoid SCK cells and the differentiated Choi-CK cells enabled us to identify 260 genes and 247 genes that were significantly over-expressed and under-expressed, respectively. Northern blotting of the 14 randomly selected genes verified the microarray data, including the differential expressions of the LGALS1, TGFBI, CES1, LDHB, UCHL1, ASPH, VDAC1, VIL2, CCND2, S100P, CALB1, MAL2, GPX1, and ANXA8 mRNAs. Immunohistochemistry also revealed in part the differential expressions of these gene proteins. These results suggest that those genetic and gene expression alterations may be relevant to the sarcomatous change/EMT in CC cells. PMID:19287191

  11. Comparative genomic hybridization reveals population-based genetic alterations in hepatoblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Gray, S G; Kytölä, S; Matsunaga, T; Larsson, C; Ekström, T J

    2000-01-01

    Hepatoblastoma is a malignant paediatric liver tumour. In order to approach the genetic background of this malignancy we have screened a panel of eighteen cases from Europe and Japan for chromosomal imbalances using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). The most frequent losses included chromosomal regions 13q21–q22 (28%) and 9p22-pter (22%), while the most frequent gains occurred on 2q23–q24 (33%), 20q (28%) and 1q24–q25 (28%). A significant difference in CGH alterations between the tumours from patients of Caucasian and Japanese was revealed where loss of 13q was found only in the Japanese samples. In conclusion, the findings indicate several candidate regions for suppressor genes and oncogenes potentially involved in the hepatoblastomas of different ethnic origin. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10993649

  12. Unique genetic alterations and clinicopathological features of hepatocellular adenoma in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Ping; Zhao, Qian; Jin, Guang-Zhi; Qian, You-Wen; Gu, Yi-Jin; Dong, Hui; Lu, Xin-Yuan; Cong, Wen-Ming; Wu, Meng-Chao

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular adenoma (HCA) is a benign hepatocyte-derived tumor commonly seen in reproductive-aged women with long-term use of oral contraceptives (OCs) in European and North American countries. Accordingly, HCA is currently classified into four molecular subtypes as adopted by the World Health Organization. The present study was firstly to characterize and determine the genetic alterations and clinicopathological features of the largest series of HCAs in China. We reviewed 189 patients with HCA who underwent hepatectomies at our liver center from January 1984 to January 2012, among which 36 HCAs were randomly selected for the sequencing of HNF1?, ?-catenin and gp130 genes, and 60 HCAs were randomly selected for detecting microsatellite instability (MSI). Compared with Western studies, our data showed distinctive findings including male (69.8%) and overweight/obese (50.3%) predominance. Only 3.5% of female patients had a documented history of OCs use for 2-4 years. All 36 sequenced HCAs showed HNF1? mutations (72% missense, 28% synonymous), 2 hotspot polymorphisms of HNF1? (I27L: rs1169288 and S487N: rs2464196) were seen in 17 (47%) and 10 (27.8%) cases, respectively, and a novel single nucleotide polymorphism site (rs1169304) in intron 9 of HNF1? was detected in 32 (88%) cases, but no ?-catenin or gp130 gene mutation was detected, and no nuclear ?-catenin staining was detected by immunohistochemistry. The frequency of MSI was 75% for D12S1398 (HNF1? inactivated pathway) and 78.5% for D6S1064 (HIPPO signaling pathway) in 34 overweight/obese patients with HCA. Our results firstly indicate that patients with HCA in China frequently occur in male overweigh and obese adult population, lack an association with OCs use and exhibit unique genetic alterations. Taken together, these observations suggest that alternative pathogenetic pathways involve in HCA tumorigenesis in Chinese patients. PMID:26608415

  13. Cell type of origin as well as genetic alterations contribute to breast cancer phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    West, William W.; Qiu, Fang; Band, Hamid; Band, Vimla

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is classified into different subtypes that are associated with different patient survival outcomes, underscoring the importance of understanding the role of precursor cell and genetic alterations in determining tumor subtypes. In this study, we evaluated the oncogenic phenotype of two distinct mammary stem/progenitor cell types designated as K5+/K19? or K5+/K19+ upon introduction of identical combinations of oncogenes-mutant H-Ras (mRas) and mutant p53 (mp53), together with either wild-type ErbB2(wtErbB2) or wild-type EGFR (wtEGFR). We examined their tumor forming and metastasis potential, using both in-vitro and in-vivo assays. Both the combinations efficiently transformed K5+/K19? or K5+/K19+ cells. Xenograft tumors formed by these cells were histologically heterogeneous, with variable proportions of luminal, basal-like and claudin-low type components depending on the cell types and oncogene combinations. Notably, K5+/K19? cells transformed with mRas/mp53/wtEGFR combination had a significantly longer latency for primary tumor development than other cell lines but more lung metastasis incidence than same cells expressing mRas/mp53/wtErbB2. K5+/K19+ cells exhibit shorter overall tumor latency, and high metastatic potential than K5+/K19? cells, suggesting that these K19+ progenitors are more susceptible to oncogenesis and metastasis. Our results suggest that both genetic alterations and cell type of origin contribute to oncogenic phenotype of breast tumors. PMID:25940703

  14. Genetic alterations and epithelial dysplasia in juvenile polyposis syndrome and sporadic juvenile polyps.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, T. T.; Rezai, B.; Rashid, A.; Luce, M. C.; Cayouette, M. C.; Kim, C.; Sani, N.; Mishra, L.; Moskaluk, C. A.; Yardley, J. H.; Hamilton, S. R.

    1997-01-01

    Juvenile polyps are regarded as hamartomatous polyps and occur in sporadic and familial syndromic settings. There is increased risk of gastrointestinal neoplasia in patients with juvenile polyposis syndrome, but the molecular mechanisms are not known. We therefore studied 78 colorectal juvenile polyposis from 12 patients with juvenile polyps syndrome and 34 sporadic juvenile polyps for epithelial dysplasia and genetic changes associated with colorectal neoplasia. Dysplasia occurred in 31% of syndromic juvenile polyps but not in sporadic juvenile polyps (P < 0.0001). Topographic control of proliferation and expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAFI/CIP1) seen in native colorectal epithelium was lost in 79% of dysplastic juvenile polyps and in 8% of nondysplastic juvenile polyps (P < 0.000001). Somatic mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene were demonstrated in 50% of dysplastic juvenile polyps (3 of 6) but not in any of 16 juvenile polyps without dysplasia (P = 0.01). Both sporadic and syndromic juvenile polyps had K-ras mutations (14%) and there was no relationship to dysplasia. p53 gene product overexpression identified by immunohistochemical staining occurred rarely in dysplastic juvenile polyps (2 of 24, 8%). Our results indicate that the multiple genetic alterations involved in usual colorectal neoplasia also play a role in neoplastic transformation of juvenile polyps, predominantly in juvenile polyposis syndrome. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9060832

  15. Epigenetic and genetic alterations of the imprinting disorder Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Hidenobu; Higashimoto, Ken

    2013-07-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon that leads to parent-specific differential expression of a subset of genes. Most imprinted genes form clusters, or imprinting domains, and are regulated by imprinting control regions. As imprinted genes have an important role in growth and development, aberrant expression of imprinted genes due to genetic or epigenetic abnormalities is involved in the pathogenesis of human disorders, or imprinting disorders. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a representative imprinting disorder characterized by macrosomia, macroglossia and abdominal wall defects, and exhibits a predisposition to tumorigenesis. The relevant imprinted chromosomal region in BWS is 11p15.5, which consists of two imprinting domains, IGF2/H19 and CDKN1C/KCNQ1OT1. BWS has five known causative epigenetic and genetic alterations: loss of methylation (LOM) at KvDMR1, gain of methylation (GOM) at H19DMR, paternal uniparental disomy, CDKN1C mutations and chromosomal rearrangements. Opposite methylation defects, GOM and LOM, at H19DMR are known to cause clinically opposite disorders: BWS and Silver-Russell syndrome, respectively. Interestingly, a recent study discovered that loss of function or gain of function of CDKN1C also causes clinically opposite disorders, BWS and IMAGe (intrauterine growth restriction, metaphyseal dysplasia, adrenal hypoplasia congenita, and genital anomalies) syndrome, respectively. Furthermore, several clinical studies have suggested a relationship between assisted reproductive technology (ART) and the risk of imprinting disorders, along with the existence of trans-acting factors that regulate multiple imprinted differentially methylated regions. In this review, we describe the latest knowledge surrounding the imprinting mechanism of 11p15.5, in addition to epigenetic and genetic etiologies of BWS, associated childhood tumors, the effects of ART and multilocus hypomethylation disorders. PMID:23719190

  16. May genetic factors in fibromyalgia help to identify patients with differentially altered frequencies of immune cells?

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, L S C; Correa, H; Silva, G C; Campos, F S; Baião, F R; Ribeiro, L S; Faria, A M; d'Avila Reis, D

    2008-01-01

    There is common agreement that fibromyalgia (FM) is an extremely heterogeneous entity. Patients differ in their clinical symptoms, endocrine and immune parameters. In this study we evaluated endocrine and immunological features of distinct subsets of FM patients. In contrast to previous attempts to identify subsets of FM patients, based solely on their psychological and cognitive features, herein we propose to separate FM patients by genetic features. Allelic expression of the polymorphic promoter region of the serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) was analysed as a relevant genetic factor for FM. Seventy-five patients meeting the American College of Rheumatology criteria and 27 healthy age-matched controls participated in this study. All controls and FM patients were submitted to genotyping of 5-HTTLPR. Twenty-seven FM patients, who were able to discontinue hypnotic, sedative or psychotropic prescription medications for at least 2 weeks, were then subdivided into L (homozygote LL) or S groups (genotypes LS and SS). They were evaluated for salivary cortisol levels, absolute number of leucocyte subpopulations, including natural killer (NK) cells and activated T and B lymphocytes. Both groups presented decreased cortisol levels, more intense in the L group, increased all B lymphocytes subsets and reduced CD4+CD25high T lymphocytes. The L group had increased CD4+CD25low activated T lymphocytes, while the S group displayed elevated CD4+human leucocyte antigen D-related (HLA-DR)+ activated T lymphocytes and decreased NK cells. We demonstrate that genetic factors may help to identify FM individuals with differentially altered frequencies of immune cells. PMID:19037919

  17. Defining population structure and genetic signatures of decline in the giant garter snake (Thamnophis gigas): implications for conserving threatened species within highly altered landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Dustin A.; Halstead, Brian J.; Casazza, Michael L.; Hansen, Eric C.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Vandergast, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic habitat fragmentation can disrupt the ability of species to disperse across landscapes, which can alter the levels and distribution of genetic diversity within populations and negatively impact long-term viability. The giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) is a state and federally threatened species that historically occurred in the wetland habitats of California’s Great Central Valley. Despite the loss of 93 % of historic wetlands throughout the Central Valley, giant gartersnakes continue to persist in relatively small, isolated patches of highly modified agricultural wetlands. Gathering information regarding genetic diversity and effective population size represents an essential component for conservation management programs aimed at this species. Previous mitochondrial sequence studies have revealed historical patterns of differentiation, yet little is known about contemporary population structure and diversity. On the basis of 15 microsatellite loci, we estimate population structure and compare indices of genetic diversity among populations spanning seven drainage basins within the Central Valley. We sought to understand how habitat loss may have affected genetic differentiation, genetic diversity and effective population size, and what these patterns suggest in terms of management and restoration actions. We recovered five genetic clusters that were consistent with regional drainage basins, although three northern basins within the Sacramento Valley formed a single genetic cluster. Our results show that northern drainage basin populations have higher connectivity than among central and southern basins populations, and that greater differentiation exists among the more geographically isolated populations in the central and southern portion of the species’ range. Genetic diversity measures among basins were significantly different, and were generally lower in southern basin populations. Levels of inbreeding and evidence of population bottlenecks were detected in about half the populations we sampled, and effective population size estimates were well below recommended minimum thresholds to avoid inbreeding. Efforts focused on maintaining and enhancing existing wetlands to facilitate dispersal between basins and increase local effective population sizes may be critical for these otherwise isolated populations.

  18. Human genetics. The genetics of Mexico recapitulates Native American substructure and affects biomedical traits.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Gignoux, Christopher R; Fernández-López, Juan Carlos; Zakharia, Fouad; Sikora, Martin; Contreras, Alejandra V; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Sandoval, Karla; Eng, Celeste; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Ortiz-Tello, Patricia; Robles, Victoria; Kenny, Eimear E; Nuño-Arana, Ismael; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín-Pérez, Gastón; Granados-Arriola, Julio; Huntsman, Scott; Galanter, Joshua M; Via, Marc; Ford, Jean G; Chapela, Rocío; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodríguez-Santana, Jose R; Romieu, Isabelle; Sienra-Monge, Juan José; del Rio Navarro, Blanca; London, Stephanie J; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Garcia-Herrera, Rodrigo; Estrada, Karol; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Carnevale, Alessandra; Soberón, Xavier; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Burchard, Esteban Gonzalez; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2014-06-13

    Mexico harbors great cultural and ethnic diversity, yet fine-scale patterns of human genome-wide variation from this region remain largely uncharacterized. We studied genomic variation within Mexico from over 1000 individuals representing 20 indigenous and 11 mestizo populations. We found striking genetic stratification among indigenous populations within Mexico at varying degrees of geographic isolation. Some groups were as differentiated as Europeans are from East Asians. Pre-Columbian genetic substructure is recapitulated in the indigenous ancestry of admixed mestizo individuals across the country. Furthermore, two independently phenotyped cohorts of Mexicans and Mexican Americans showed a significant association between subcontinental ancestry and lung function. Thus, accounting for fine-scale ancestry patterns is critical for medical and population genetic studies within Mexico, in Mexican-descent populations, and likely in many other populations worldwide. PMID:24926019

  19. Behavioral Studies and Genetic Alterations in Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone (CRH) Neurocircuitry: Insights into Human Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Laryea, Gloria; Arnett, Melinda G.; Muglia, Louis J.

    2012-01-01

    To maintain well-being, all organisms require the ability to re-establish homeostasis in the presence of adverse physiological or psychological experiences. The regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis during stress is important in preventing maladaptive responses that may increase susceptibility to affective disorders. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a central stress hormone in the HPA axis pathway and has been implicated in stress-induced psychiatric disorders, reproductive and cardiac function, as well as energy metabolism. In the context of psychiatric disorders, CRH dysfunction is associated with the occurrence of post-traumatic stress disorder, major depression, anorexia nervosa, and anxiety disorders. Here, we review the synthesis, molecular signaling and regulation, as well as synaptic activity of CRH. We go on to summarize studies of altered CRH signaling in mutant animal models. This assembled data demonstrate an important role for CRH in neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral correlates of adaptation and maladaptation. Next, we present findings regarding human genetic polymorphisms in CRH pathway genes that are associated with stress and psychiatric disorders. Finally, we discuss a role for regulators of CRH activity as potential sites for therapeutic intervention aimed at treating maladaptive behaviors associated with stress. PMID:23077729

  20. Recognition memory is associated with altered resting-state functional connectivity in people at genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Matura, Silke; Prvulovic, David; Butz, Marius; Hartmann, Daniel; Sepanski, Beate; Linnemann, Katja; Oertel-Knöchel, Viola; Karakaya, Tarik; Fußer, Fabian; Pantel, Johannes; van de Ven, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    The apolipoprotein E ?4 (ApoE ?4) allele not only represents the strongest single genetic risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer's disease, but also imposes independent effects on brain function in healthy individuals where it has been shown to promote subtle memory deficits and altered intrinsic functional brain network connectivity. Based on previous work showing a potential relevance of the default mode network (DMN) functional connectivity for episodic memory function, we hypothesized that the ApoE ?4 genotype would affect memory performance via modulation of the DMN. We assessed 63 healthy individuals (50-80 years old), of which 20 carried the ?4 allele. All participants underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), high-resolution 3D anatomical MRI imaging and neuropsychological assessment. Functional connectivity analysis of resting-state activity was performed with a predefined seed region located in the left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), a core region of the DMN. ApoE ?4 carriers performed significantly poorer than non-carriers in wordlist recognition and cued recall. Furthermore, ?4 carriers showed increased connectivity relative to ?4 non-carriers between the PCC seed region and left-hemispheric middle temporal gyrus (MTG). There was a positive correlation between recognition memory scores and resting-state connectivity in the left MTG in ?4 carriers. These results can be interpreted as compensatory mechanisms strengthening the cross-links between DMN core areas and cortical areas involved in memory processing. PMID:24989884

  1. Copyright 0 1994 by the Genetics Society of America Altered Regulatory Responses to Glucose Are AssociatedWith a Glucose

    E-print Network

    Vallier, Laura

    Copyright 0 1994 by the Genetics Society of America Altered Regulatory Responses to Glucose Are AssociatedWith a Glucose Transport Defect in grl Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Laura G. Vallier.We presenta kineticanalysisshowingthat thegrrl mutant is also defective in high affinity glucose transport

  2. Ramaswamy Govindan, M.D., Talks About Novel Genetic Alterations Found in the TCGA Analysis of Lung Cancer at AACR 2014

    Cancer.gov

    Home News and Events Multimedia Library Videos Novel Genetic Alterations Found in the TCGA Analysis of Lung Cancer Ramaswamy Govindan, M.D., Talks About Novel Genetic Alterations Found in the TCGA Analysis of Lung Cancer at AACR 2014 You will need

  3. A Novel Statistical Model to Estimate Host Genetic Effects Affecting Disease Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Anacleto, Osvaldo; Garcia-Cortés, Luis Alberto; Lipschutz-Powell, Debby; Woolliams, John A.; Doeschl-Wilson, Andrea B.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that genetic diversity can affect the spread of diseases, potentially affecting plant and livestock disease control as well as the emergence of human disease outbreaks. Nevertheless, even though computational tools can guide the control of infectious diseases, few epidemiological models can simultaneously accommodate the inherent individual heterogeneity in multiple infectious disease traits influencing disease transmission, such as the frequently modeled propensity to become infected and infectivity, which describes the host ability to transmit the infection to susceptible individuals. Furthermore, current quantitative genetic models fail to fully capture the heritable variation in host infectivity, mainly because they cannot accommodate the nonlinear infection dynamics underlying epidemiological data. We present in this article a novel statistical model and an inference method to estimate genetic parameters associated with both host susceptibility and infectivity. Our methodology combines quantitative genetic models of social interactions with stochastic processes to model the random, nonlinear, and dynamic nature of infections and uses adaptive Bayesian computational techniques to estimate the model parameters. Results using simulated epidemic data show that our model can accurately estimate heritabilities and genetic risks not only of susceptibility but also of infectivity, therefore exploring a trait whose heritable variation is currently ignored in disease genetics and can greatly influence the spread of infectious diseases. Our proposed methodology offers potential impacts in areas such as livestock disease control through selective breeding and also in predicting and controlling the emergence of disease outbreaks in human populations. PMID:26405030

  4. Specific Secondary Genetic Alterations in Mantle Cell Lymphoma Provide Prognostic Information Independent of the Gene Expression–Based Proliferation Signature

    PubMed Central

    Salaverria, Itziar; Zettl, Andreas; Beà, Sílvia; Moreno, Victor; Valls, Joan; Hartmann, Elena; Ott, German; Wright, George; Lopez-Guillermo, Armando; Chan, Wing C.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Grogan, Thomas M.; Delabie, Jan; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Montserrat, Emili; Muller-Hermelink, Hans-Konrad; Staudt, Louis M.; Rosenwald, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To compare the genetic relationship between cyclin D1–positive and cyclin D1–negative mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs) and to determine whether specific genetic alterations may add prognostic information to survival prediction based on the proliferation signature of MCLs. Patients and Methods Seventy-one cyclin D1–positive and six cyclin D1–negative MCLs previously characterized by gene expression profiling were examined by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Results Cyclin D1–negative MCLs were genetically characterized by gains of 3q, 8q, and 15q, and losses of 1p, 8p23-pter, 9p21-pter, 11q21–q23, and 13q that were also the most common alterations in conventional MCLs. Parallel analysis of CGH aberrations and locus-specific gene expression profiles in cyclin D1–positive patients showed that chromosomal imbalances had a substantial impact on the expression levels of the genes located in the altered regions. The analysis of prognostic factors revealed that the proliferation signature, the number of chromosomal aberrations, gains of 3q, and losses of 8p, 9p, and 9q predicted survival of MCL patients. A multivariate analysis showed that the gene expression-based proliferation signature was the strongest predictor for shorter survival. However, 3q gains and 9q losses provided prognostic information that was independent of the proliferative activity. Conclusion Cyclin D1–positive and –negative MCLs share the same secondary genetic aberrations, supporting the concept that they correspond to the same genetic entity. The integration of genetic information on chromosome 3q and 9q alterations into a proliferation signature-based model may improve the ability to predict survival in patients with MCL. PMID:17296973

  5. The experience of altered states of consciousness in shamanic ritual: the role of pre-existing beliefs and affective factors.

    PubMed

    Polito, Vince; Langdon, Robyn; Brown, Jac

    2010-12-01

    Much attention has been paid recently to the role of anomalous experiences in the aetiology of certain types of psychopathology, e.g. in the formation of delusions. We examine, instead, the top-down influence of pre-existing beliefs and affective factors in shaping an individual's characterisation of anomalous sensory experiences. Specifically we investigated the effects of paranormal beliefs and alexithymia in determining the intensity and quality of an altered state of consciousness (ASC). Fifty five participants took part in a sweat lodge ceremony, a traditional shamanic ritual which was unfamiliar to them. Participants reported significant alterations in their state of consciousness, quantified using the 'APZ' questionnaire, a standardized measure of ASC experience. Participants endorsing paranormal beliefs compatible with shamanic mythology, and those showing difficulty identifying feelings scored higher on positive dimensions of ASC experience. Our findings demonstrate that variation in an individual's characterisation of anomalous experiences is nuanced by pre-existing beliefs and affective factors. PMID:20558090

  6. Brief Genetics Report Variation in the Calpain-10 Gene Affects Blood Glucose

    E-print Network

    Cox, Nancy J.

    Brief Genetics Report Variation in the Calpain-10 Gene Affects Blood Glucose Levels in the British resistance, and individuals with the G/G-genotype had significantly higher fasting plasma glucose and 2-h insulin concentrations after a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). We have ex- amined the effect

  7. Delineation of Behavioral Phenotypes in Genetic Syndromes: Characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder, Affect and Hyperactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Chris; Berg, Katy; Moss, Jo; Arron, Kate; Burbidge, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    We investigated autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptomatology, hyperactivity and affect in seven genetic syndromes; Angelman (AS; n = 104), Cri du Chat (CdCS; 58), Cornelia de Lange (CdLS; 101), Fragile X (FXS; 191), Prader-Willi (PWS; 189), Smith-Magenis (SMS; 42) and Lowe (LS; 56) syndromes (age range 4-51). ASD symptomatology was heightened in…

  8. Oxytocin and Vasopressin Are Dysregulated in Williams Syndrome, a Genetic Disorder Affecting Social Behavior

    E-print Network

    Bellugi, Ursula

    Oxytocin and Vasopressin Are Dysregulated in Williams Syndrome, a Genetic Disorder Affecting Social, Utah, United States of America, 2 Brain-Body Center, University of Illinois, Illinois, Chicago, United biological basis for amygdalar involvement, for increased anxiety, and for the paradox of increased approach

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL, GENETIC AND SOCIAL FACTORS AFFECTING THE EXPRESSION OF ESTRUS IN BEEF COWS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic, social and environmental factors affecting behavioral estrus were evaluated in Angus (n = 10), Brahman (n = 10) and Senepol (n = 10) cows during a synchronized estrus and subsequent spontaneous estrus. Cows were equally stratified by breed to two groups of 15. Both groups were pre-synchro...

  10. Comparative evolutionary genetics of spontaneous mutations affecting fitness in rhabditid nematodes

    E-print Network

    Lynch, Michael

    Comparative evolutionary genetics of spontaneous mutations affecting fitness in rhabditid nematodes-wide rate of mutation and the effects of new mutations on fitness, but the degree to which genomic variation in the rate of decay of fitness because of new mutations between strains and between species

  11. Intracolonial genetic variation affects reproductive skew and colony productivity during colony foundation in a parthenogenetic termite

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In insect societies, intracolonial genetic variation is predicted to affect both colony efficiency and reproductive skew. However, because the effects of genetic variation on these two colony characteristics have been tested independently, it remains unclear whether they are affected by genetic variation independently or in a related manner. Here we test the effect of genetic variation on colony efficiency and reproductive skew in a rhinotermitid termite, Reticulitermes speratus, a species in which female-female pairs can facultatively found colonies. We established colonies using two types of female-female pairs: colonies founded by sisters (i.e., sister-pair colonies) and those founded by females from different colonies (i.e., unrelated-pair colonies). Colony growth and reproductive skew were then compared between the two types of incipient colonies. Results At 15 months after colony foundation, unrelated-pair colonies were larger than sister-pair colonies, although the caste ratio between workers and nymphs, which were alternatively differentiated from young larvae, did not differ significantly. Microsatellite DNA analyses of both founders and their parthenogenetically produced offspring indicated that, in both sister-pair and unrelated-pair colonies, there was no significant skew in the production of eggs, larvae, workers and soldiers. Nymph production, however, was significantly more skewed in the sister-pair colonies than in unrelated-pair colonies. Because nymphs can develop into winged adults (alates) or nymphoid reproductives, they have a higher chance of direct reproduction than workers in this species. Conclusions Our results support the idea that higher genetic variation among colony members could provide an increase in colony productivity, as shown in hymenopteran social insects. Moreover, this study suggests that low genetic variation (high relatedness) between founding females increases reproductive skew via one female preferentially channeling her relatives along the reproductive track. This study thus demonstrated that, in social insects, intracolonial genetic variation can simultaneously affect both colony efficiency and reproductive skew. PMID:25123355

  12. Constructing the toolbox: Patient-specific genetic factors of altered fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Drissi, Hicham; Paglia, David N.; Alaee, Farhang; Yoshida, Ryu

    2014-01-01

    The multifaceted sequence of events that follow fracture repair can be further complicated when considering risk factors for impaired union, present in a large and growing percentage of the population. Risk factors such as diabetes, substance abuse, and poor nutrition affect both the young and old alike, and have been shown to dramatically impair the body’s natural healing processes. To this end, biotherapeudic interventions such as ultrasound, electrical simulation, growth factor treatment (BMP-2, BMP-7, PDGF-BB, FGF-2) have been evaluated in preclinical models and in some cases are used widely for patients with established non-union or risk/indication or impaired healing (ie. ultrasound, BMP-2, etc.). Despite the promise of these interventions, they have been shown to be reliant on patient compliance and can produce adverse side-effects such as heterotopic ossification. Gene and cell therapy approaches have attempted to apply controlled regimens of these factors and have produced promising results. However, there are safety and efficacy concerns that may limit the translation of these approaches. In addition, none of the above mentioned approaches consider genetic variation between individual patients. Several clinical and preclinical studies have demonstrated a genetic component to fracture repair and that SNPs and genetic background variation play major roles in the determination of healing outcomes. Despite this, there is a need for preclinical data to dissect the mechanism underlying the influence of specific gene loci on the processes of fracture healing, which will be paramount in the future of patient-centered interventions for fracture repair. PMID:25558470

  13. Supertasting, earaches and head injury: genetics and pathology alter our taste worlds.

    PubMed

    Bartoshuk, L M; Duffy, V B; Reed, D; Williams, A

    1996-01-01

    Family studies using thresholds showed that PROP (6-n-propylthiouracil) tasting is produced by a dominant allele, T. Nontasters have two recessive alleles and tasters have one or two dominant alleles. The bitterness of suprathreshold PROP and anatomical criteria subdivide tasters into medium and supertasters. Supertasters may be TT tasters, but this has yet to be demonstrated. Supertasters preceive the greatest bitterness and sweetness from many stimuli as well as the greatest oral burn from alcohol and capsaicin. Women are more likely than men to be supertasters. Otitis media and head trauma can alter taste and thus PROP classifications, complicating studies on PROP genetics. Some subjects with a history of otitis media show taste reductions, but others show enhanced tastes and appear to have more taste buds per fungiform papilla. Subjects with head trauma show reduced tastes on some oral loci, but there is evidence that severe reductions on the front of the tongue ameliorate reductions at the circumvallate papillae on the back of the tongue by a release of inhibition mechanism. PMID:8622833

  14. New ideas in epilepsy genetics: novel epilepsy genes, copy number alterations, and gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Gurnett, Christina A; Hedera, Peter

    2007-03-01

    The majority of genes associated with epilepsy syndromes to date are ion channel genes. Selection bias may have allowed us to establish their role in epilepsy based on a priori knowledge of the significance of these proteins in regulating neuronal excitability. There are, however, more than 3000 genes expressed at the synapse, as well as many other genes expressed nearby in supporting cells and glia that can likewise regulate excitability. Identification of new genes involved in epilepsy may arise from studying the targets of anticonvulsant medications, ascertainment of an epileptic phenotype in mice, or as a result of positional cloning efforts. There are several loci for idiopathic focal and generalized epilepsies that lie in chromosomal regions that are devoid of known ion channels; therefore, the number of novel genes involved in epilepsy is likely to increase. Establishing the role of these novel genes in the pathogenesis of epilepsy has not been an easy task compared with the relative ease with which ion channel mutations can be studied. This review will describe several novel epilepsy genes and will then discuss other genetic causes of epilepsy, including alterations of chromosomal copy number and gene regulatory elements. PMID:17353374

  15. Defects in Tendon, Ligament, and Enthesis in Response to Genetic Alterations in Key Proteoglycans and Glycoproteins: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Juneja, Subhash C.

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes the genetic alterations and knockdown approaches published in the literature to assess the role of key proteoglycans and glycoproteins in the structural development, function, and repair of tendon, ligament, and enthesis. The information was collected from (i) genetically altered mice, (ii) in vitro knockdown studies, (iii) genetic variants predisposition to injury, and (iv) human genetic diseases. The genes reviewed are for small leucine-rich proteoglycans (lumican, fibromodulin, biglycan, decorin, and asporin); dermatan sulfate epimerase (Dse) that alters structure of glycosaminoglycan and hence the function of small leucine-rich proteoglycans by converting glucuronic to iduronic acid; matricellular proteins (thrombospondin 2, secreted phosphoprotein 1 (Spp1), secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (Sparc), periostin, and tenascin X) including human tenascin C variants; and others, such as tenomodulin, leukocyte cell derived chemotaxin 1 (chondromodulin-I, ChM-I), CD44 antigen (Cd44), lubricin (Prg4), and aggrecan degrading gene, a disintegrin-like and metallopeptidase (reprolysin type) with thrombospondin type 1 motif, 5 (Adamts5). Understanding these genes represents drug targets for disrupting pathological mechanisms that lead to tendinopathy, ligamentopathy, enthesopathy, enthesitis and tendon/ligament injury, that is, osteoarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:24324885

  16. Alteration of poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism affects murine sperm nuclear architecture by impairing pericentric heterochromatin condensation

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Ficca, Mirella L.; Lonchar, Julia D; Ihara, Motomasa; Bader, Jessica J; Meyer, Ralph G.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian sperm nucleus is characterized by unique properties that are important for fertilization. Sperm DNA retains only small numbers of histones in distinct positions and the majority of the genome is protamine associated, which allows for extreme condensation and protection of the genetic material. Furthermore, sperm nuclei display a highly ordered architecture that is characterized by a centrally located chromocenter comprising the pericentromeric chromosome regions and peripherally positioned telomeres. Establishment of this unique and well conserved nuclear organization during spermiogenesis is not well understood. Utilizing fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we show that a large fraction of the histone associated sperm genome is repetitive in nature, while a smaller fraction is associated with unique DNA sequences. Coordinated activity of Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase (PARP) and topoisomerase II beta (TOP2B) has been shown to facilitate DNA relaxation and histone to protamine transition during spermatid condensation, and altered PAR metabolism is associated with an increase in sperm histone content. Combining FISH with 3D laser scanning microscopy technology, we further show that altered PAR metabolism by genetic or pharmacological intervention leads to a disturbance of the overall sperm nuclear architecture with a lower degree of organization and condensation of the chromocenters formed by chromosomal pericentromeric heterochromatin. PMID:23729169

  17. Mutations that affect flightin expression in Drosophila alter the viscoelastic properties of flight muscle fibers

    E-print Network

    Vigoreaux, Jim O.

    in Drosophila alter the viscoelastic properties of flight muscle fibers. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 286: C65­C72-frequency contraction, en- durance, and high-power output. These muscles have evolved an enhanced delayed force response muscle fibers Josh A. Henkin,1,2,3 David W. Maughan,2,3 and Jim O. Vigoreaux1,2,3 1 Department of Biology

  18. Facial affect recognition deficit as a marker of genetic vulnerability to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Alfimova, Margarita V; Abramova, Lilia I; Barhatova, Aleksandra I; Yumatova, Polina E; Lyachenko, Galina L; Golimbet, Vera E

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility that affect recognition impairments are associated with genetic liability to schizophrenia. In a group of 55 unaffected relatives of schizophrenia patients (parents and siblings) we examined the capacity to detect facially expressed emotions and its relationship to schizotypal personality, neurocognitive functioning, and the subject's actual emotional state. The relatives were compared with 103 schizophrenia patients and 99 healthy subjects without any family history of psychoses. Emotional stimuli were nine black-and-white photos of actors, who portrayed six basic emotions as well as interest, contempt, and shame. The results evidenced the affect recognition deficit in relatives, though milder than that in patients themselves. No correlation between the deficit and schizotypal personality measured with SPQ was detected in the group of relatives. Neither cognitive functioning, including attention, verbal memory and linguistic ability, nor actual emotional states accounted for their affect recognition impairments. The results suggest that the facial affect recognition deficit in schizophrenia may be related to genetic predisposition to the disorder and may serve as an endophenotype in molecular-genetic studies. PMID:19476218

  19. Examination of Genetic Alterations in Preneoplastic and Neoplastic Lesions of the Lung From Uranium Miners. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Marshall

    2000-07-12

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of death in the United States and in Western Europe. The incidence of lung cancer in developing countries is rising as their cigarette smoking habits increase. The objectives of this proposed research are to analyze genetic alterations associated with the development and progression on non-small cell lung carcinoma (MSCLC). Endpoints that may be realized from this proposed research are: (1) detection of early genetic and/or cellular alterations which ultimately could lead to diagnostic modalities for the early detection of lung cancer; and (2) detection of novel tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 9p. This proposal will analyze both tumor specimens and sputum samples.

  20. Altered sleep composition after traumatic brain injury does not affect declarative sleep-dependent memory consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Mantua, Janna; Mahan, Keenan M.; Henry, Owen S.; Spencer, Rebecca M. C.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) often report sleep disturbances, which may be caused by changes in sleep architecture or reduced sleep quality (greater time awake after sleep onset, poorer sleep efficiency, and sleep stage proportion alterations). Sleep is beneficial for memory formation, and herein we examine whether altered sleep physiology following TBI has deleterious effects on sleep-dependent declarative memory consolidation. Participants learned a list of word pairs in the morning or evening, and recall was assessed 12-h later, following an interval awake or with overnight sleep. Young adult participants (18–22 years) were assigned to one of four experimental groups: TBI Sleep (n = 14), TBI Wake (n = 12), non-TBI Sleep (n = 15), non-TBI Wake (n = 15). Each TBI participant was >1 year post-injury. Sleep physiology was measured with polysomnography. Memory consolidation was assessed by comparing change in word-pair recall over 12-h intersession intervals. The TBI group spent a significantly greater proportion of the night in SWS than the non-TBI group at the expense of NREM1. The TBI group also had marginally lower EEG delta power during SWS in the central region. Intersession changes in recall were greater for intervals with sleep than without sleep in both groups. However, despite abnormal sleep stage proportions for individuals with a TBI history, there was no difference in the intersession change in recall following sleep for the TBI and non-TBI groups. In both Sleep groups combined, there was a positive correlation between Intersession Change and the proportion of the night in NREM2 + SWS. Overall, sleep composition is altered following TBI but such deficits do not yield insufficiencies in sleep-dependent memory consolidation. PMID:26097451

  1. How reactive fluids alter fracture walls and affect shale-matrix accessibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitts, J. P.; Deng, H.; Peters, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Predictions of mass transfer across fracture boundaries and fluid flow in fracture networks provide fundamental inputs into risk and life cycle assessments of geologic energy technologies including oil and gas extraction, geothermal energy systems and geologic CO2 storage. However, major knowledge gaps exist due to the lack of experimental observations of how reactive fluids alter the pore structures and accessible surface area within fracture boundaries that control the mass transfer of organics, metals and salts, and influence fluid flow within the fracture. To investigate the fracture and rock matrix properties governing fracture boundary alteration, we developed a new flow-through cell that enables time-dependent 2D x-ray imaging of mineral dissolution and/or precipitation at a fracture surface. The parallel plate design provides an idealized fracture geometry to investigate the relationship between flow rate, reaction rate, and mineral spatial heterogeneity and variation. In the flow-cell, a carbonate-rich sample of Eagle Ford shale was reacted with acidified brine. The extent and rate of mineral dissolution were correlated with calcite abundance relative to less soluble silicate minerals. Three-dimensional x-ray tomography of the reacted fracture wall shows how calcite dissolution left behind a porous network of silicate minerals. And while this silicate network essentially preserved the location of the initial fracture wall, the pore network structures within the fracture boundary were dramatically altered, such that the accessible surface area of matrix components increased significantly. In a second set of experiments with a limestone specimen, however, the extent of dissolution and retreat of the fracture wall was not strictly correlated with the occurrence of calcite. Instead, the pattern and extent of dissolution suggested secondary causes such as calcite morphology, the presence of argillaceous minerals and other diagenetic features. Our experiments show that while calcite dissolution is the primary geochemical driver of fracture wall alterations, hydrodynamic properties and matrix accessibility within fracture boundaries evolve based on a complex relationship between mineral spatial heterogeneity and variation, fluid chemistry and flow rate.

  2. Altered functional interaction hub between affective network and cognitive control network in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Li; Yang, Shu-Zhen; Sun, Wei-Li; Shi, Yu-Zhong; Duan, Hui-Feng

    2016-02-01

    Emotional and cognitive dysregulation in major depressive disorder (MDD) have been consistently considered to be attributed to structural and functional abnormalities in affective network (AN) and cognitive control network (CCN). This study was to investigate the functional connectivity (FC) patterns and altered functional interactions between both networks in MDD. We investigated resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging in the AN and the CCN in 25 MDD and 35 healthy controls (HC). The seeds were from voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis results. Then FC within the AN was assessed from a seed placed in the left amygdala (AMG) and FC within CCN was determined by placing seeds in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Compared with HC, MDD showed reduced FC between left AMG and bilateral precuneus and right anterior cingulated cortex (ACC) within AN and reduced FC between right DLPFC and left cuneus, left lingual gyrus, and right ACC within CCN. An interaction hub of altered FC in MDD between AN and CCN located in the right ACC. Interestingly, the altered FC between right ACC and left AMG was negatively correlated with depressive symptom score while the altered FC between right ACC and DLPFC was positively correlated the executive function in MDD. The right ACC not only supports the cognitive and emotional processes, but also is an altered functional interaction hub between AN and CCN in MDD. It further suggest multiple sources of dysregulation in AN and CCN implicate both top-down cognitive control and bottom-up emotional expression dysfunction in MDD. PMID:26519557

  3. Altering adsorbed proteins or cellular gene expression in bone-metastatic cancer cells affects PTHrP and Gli2 without altering cell growth.

    PubMed

    Page, Jonathan M; Merkel, Alyssa R; Ruppender, Nazanin S; Guo, Ruijing; Dadwal, Ushashi C; Cannonier, Shellese; Basu, Sandip; Guelcher, Scott A; Sterling, Julie A

    2015-09-01

    The contents of this data in brief are related to the article titled "Matrix Rigidity Regulates the Transition of Tumor Cells to a Bone-Destructive Phenotype through Integrin ?3 and TGF-? Receptor Type II". In this DIB we will present our supplemental data investigating Integrin expression, attachment of cells to various adhesion molecules, and changes in gene expression in multiple cancer cell lines. Since the interactions of Integrins with adsorbed matrix proteins are thought to affect the ability of cancer cells to interact with their underlying substrates, we examined the expression of Integrin ?1, ?3, and ?5 in response to matrix rigidity. We found that only I?3 increased with increasing substrate modulus. While it was shown that fibronectin greatly affects the expression of tumor-produced factors associated with bone destruction (parathyroid hormone-related protein, PTHrP, and Gli2), poly-l-lysine, vitronectin and type I collagen were also analyzed as potential matrix proteins. Each of the proteins was independently adsorbed on both rigid and compliant polyurethane films which were subsequently used to culture cancer cells. Poly-l-lysine, vitronectin and type I collagen all had negligible effects on PTHrP or Gli2 expression, but fibronectin was shown to have a dose dependent effect. Finally, altering the expression of I?3 demonstrated that it is required for tumor cells to respond to the rigidity of the matrix, but does not affect other cell growth or viability. Together these data support the data presented in our manuscript to show that the rigidity of bone drives Integrin?3/TGF-? crosstalk, leading to increased expression of Gli2 and PTHrP. PMID:26306316

  4. Early Experiences Can Alter Gene Expression and Affect Long-Term Development. Working Paper #10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2010

    2010-01-01

    New scientific research shows that environmental influences can actually affect whether and how genes are expressed. Thus, the old ideas that genes are "set in stone" or that they alone determine development have been disproven. In fact, scientists have discovered that early experiences can determine how genes are turned on and off and even…

  5. Handing the pen to the patient: reflective writing for children and families affected by genetic conditions.

    PubMed

    Murali, Chaya; Fernbach, Susan D; Potocki, Lorraine

    2014-12-01

    Genetic diagnoses impact the Quality of Life (QoL) of patients and their families. While some patients and families report a positive impact on QoL, others are affected negatively by a genetic diagnosis. No matter the impact, it is clear that social support is needed for this population. Genetic healthcare providers should be aware of the need for psychosocial support and be equipped to provide or direct patients and families to the appropriate resources. Reflective writing offers a unique opportunity for families and health care providers to engage in self-reflection and expression, activities which have the potential to enhance QoL in a positive manner. The therapeutic potential of writing has been studied in many populations, from caregivers of elderly individuals with dementia, to cancer survivors, to survivors of traumatic experiences. Some of these interventions have shown promise for improving participants' QoL. However, reflective writing has never been studied in patients and families affected by genetic conditions. We propose that reflective writing therapy is a feasible, reproducible, and enjoyable approach to providing psychosocial support for our patients. Get it Write is a reflective writing workshop pilot project for those who have a personal or family history of a genetic diagnosis. Our hypothesis is that reflective writing will help engender acceptance and alleviate feelings of isolation. Get it Write does not focus on the stressful factors in the participants' lives, rather it serves to facilitate interactions with peers facing the same struggles, and with medical students in a non-medical context. PMID:25256956

  6. Altered plasma pharmacokinetics of ceftiofur hydrochloride in cows affected with severe clinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Gorden, P J; Kleinhenz, M D; Wulf, L W; KuKanich, B; Lee, C J; Wang, C; Coetzee, J F

    2016-01-01

    Mastitis is a frequent problem among dairy cows, reducing milk yield and increasing cull rates. Systemic therapy with the cephalosporin antimicrobial ceftiofur hydrochloride (CEF) may improve therapeutic outcomes, but the incidence of CEF violative residues has increased annually since 2011. One potential explanation is that disease status may alter the pharmacokinetics (PK) of CEF. To test this hypothesis, we compared the plasma PK of CEF in healthy cows with those with severe endotoxic mastitis. Eight cows with naturally occurring mastitis and 8 clinically healthy cows were treated with 2.2 mg of CEF per kilogram of body weight once daily for 5d via the intramuscular route. Blood was collected at 0, 0.33, 0.67, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 8, 16, and 24h after the first CEF administration and every 8h thereafter until 120h after the final dose. Plasma samples were analyzed for CEF concentrations using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. With the exception of time 0, CEF was detected at all time points. The disease group had a significantly higher plasma CEF concentration at t=3h after the first injection and a significantly lower plasma concentration from 40 to 152h following the first injection, with the exception of the t=64h time point. Data following the first injection (time 0-24 h) were fit to a single-dose, noncompartmental PK model. This model indicated that the disease group had a shorter plasma half-life. A multidose, noncompartmental model was used to determine steady-state PK. Compared with control cows, the disease group had an initially higher peak concentration and a higher volume of distribution and drug clearance rates. The disease group also had a lower area under the curve per dosing interval, steady-state concentration maximum, and dose-adjusted peak steady-state concentration. All other PK parameters were not different between the 2 groups. Altered PK, as suggested by this trial, may contribute to an increased risk for the development of a violative residue in meat. Further research is needed to more completely characterize drug distribution in diseased cattle and to study the effect of coadministration of other drugs on drug distribution. PMID:26601579

  7. Transcription of Interleukin-8: How Altered Regulation Can Affect Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jundi, Karim; Greene, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a neutrophil chemokine that is encoded on the CXCL8 gene. Normally CXCL8 expression is repressed due to histone deacetylation, octamer-1 binding to the promoter and the inhibitory effect of nuclear factor-?B repressing factor (NRF). However, in response to a suitable stimulus, the human CXCL8 gene undergoes transcription due to its inducible promoter that is regulated by the transcription factors nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B), activating protein (AP-1), CAAT/enhancer-binding protein ? (C/EBP?, also known as NF-IL-6), C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). CXCL8 mRNA is then stabilised by the activity of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterised by a neutrophil-dominated airway inflammatory response. A major factor contributing to the large number of neutrophils is the higher than normal levels of IL-8 that are present within the CF lung. Infection and inflammation, together with intrinsic alterations in CF airway cells are responsible for the abnormally high intrapulmonary levels of IL-8. Strategies to inhibit aberrantly high CXCL8 expression hold therapeutic potential for CF lung disease. PMID:26140537

  8. Aniracetam Does Not Alter Cognitive and Affective Behavior in Adult C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Elston, Thomas W.; Pandian, Ashvini; Smith, Gregory D.; Holley, Andrew J.; Gao, Nanjing; Lugo, Joaquin N.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing community of individuals who self-administer the nootropic aniracetam for its purported cognitive enhancing effects. Aniracetam is believed to be therapeutically useful for enhancing cognition, alleviating anxiety, and treating various neurodegenerative conditions. Physiologically, aniracetam enhances both glutamatergic neurotransmission and long-term potentiation. Previous studies of aniracetam have demonstrated the cognition-restoring effects of acute administration in different models of disease. No previous studies have explored the effects of aniracetam in healthy subjects. We investigated whether daily 50 mg/kg oral administration improves cognitive performance in naïve C57BL/6J mice in a variety of aspects of cognitive behavior. We measured spatial learning in the Morris water maze test; associative learning in the fear conditioning test; motor learning in the accelerating rotarod test; and odor discrimination. We also measured locomotion in the open field test, anxiety through the elevated plus maze test and by measuring time in the center of the open field test. We measured repetitive behavior through the marble burying test. We detected no significant differences between the naive, placebo, and experimental groups across all measures. Despite several studies demonstrating efficacy in impaired subjects, our findings suggest that aniracetam does not alter behavior in normal healthy mice. This study is timely in light of the growing community of healthy humans self-administering nootropic drugs. PMID:25099639

  9. Aniracetam does not alter cognitive and affective behavior in adult C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Elston, Thomas W; Pandian, Ashvini; Smith, Gregory D; Holley, Andrew J; Gao, Nanjing; Lugo, Joaquin N

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing community of individuals who self-administer the nootropic aniracetam for its purported cognitive enhancing effects. Aniracetam is believed to be therapeutically useful for enhancing cognition, alleviating anxiety, and treating various neurodegenerative conditions. Physiologically, aniracetam enhances both glutamatergic neurotransmission and long-term potentiation. Previous studies of aniracetam have demonstrated the cognition-restoring effects of acute administration in different models of disease. No previous studies have explored the effects of aniracetam in healthy subjects. We investigated whether daily 50 mg/kg oral administration improves cognitive performance in naïve C57BL/6J mice in a variety of aspects of cognitive behavior. We measured spatial learning in the Morris water maze test; associative learning in the fear conditioning test; motor learning in the accelerating rotarod test; and odor discrimination. We also measured locomotion in the open field test, anxiety through the elevated plus maze test and by measuring time in the center of the open field test. We measured repetitive behavior through the marble burying test. We detected no significant differences between the naive, placebo, and experimental groups across all measures. Despite several studies demonstrating efficacy in impaired subjects, our findings suggest that aniracetam does not alter behavior in normal healthy mice. This study is timely in light of the growing community of healthy humans self-administering nootropic drugs. PMID:25099639

  10. Alterations in affective behavior during the time course of alcohol hangover.

    PubMed

    Karadayian, Analía G; Busso, María J; Feleder, Carlos; Cutrera, Rodolfo A

    2013-09-15

    Alcohol hangover is a temporary state described as the unpleasant next-day effects after binge-like drinking. Hangover begins when ethanol is absent in plasma and is characterized by physical and psychological symptoms. Affective behavior is impaired during the acute phase of alcohol intoxication; however, no reports indicate if similar effects are observed during withdrawal. The aim of this work was to study the time-extension and possible fluctuations in affective behavior during a hangover episode. Male Swiss mice were injected i.p. either with saline (control group) or with ethanol (3.8g/kg BW) (hangover group). Anxiety, fear-related behavior and despair phenotype were evaluated at a basal point (ZT0) and every 2h up to 20h after blood alcohol levels were close to zero (hangover onset). Also, anhedonia signs and pain perception disabilities were studied. Mice exhibited an increase in anxiety-like behavior during 4h and 14h after hangover onset when evaluated by the elevated-plus maze and open field test respectively (p<0.05). Fear-related behavior was detected in hangover animals by the increase of freezing and decrease of line crossings and rearing frequency during 16h after hangover onset (p<0.001). Depression signs were found in hangover mice during 14h (p<0.05). Hangover mice showed a significant decrease in pain perception when tested by tail immersion test at the beginning of hangover (p<0.05). Our findings demonstrate a time-extension between 14 and 16h for hangover affective impairments. This study shows the long lasting effects of hangover over the phase of ethanol intoxication. PMID:23850352

  11. Does vegetation complexity affect host plant chemistry, and thus multitrophic interactions, in a human-altered landscape?

    PubMed

    Wäschke, Nicole; Hancock, Christine; Hilker, Monika; Obermaier, Elisabeth; Meiners, Torsten

    2015-09-01

    Anthropogenic land use may shape vegetation composition and affect trophic interactions by altering concentrations of host plant metabolites. Here, we investigated the hypotheses that: (1) plant N and defensive secondary metabolite contents of the herb Plantago lanceolata are affected by land use intensity (LUI) and the surrounding vegetation composition (=plant species richness and P. lanceolata density), and that (2) changes in plant chemistry affect abundances of the herbivorous weevils Mecinus pascuorum and Mecinus labilis, as well as their larval parasitoid Mesopolobus incultus, in the field. We determined plant species richness, P. lanceolata density, and abundances of the herbivores and the parasitoid in 77 grassland plots differing in LUI index in three regions across Germany. We also measured the N and secondary metabolite [the iridoid glycosides (IGs) aucubin and catalpol] contents of P. lanceolata leaves. Mixed-model analysis revealed that: (1) concentrations of leaf IGs were positively correlated with plant species richness; leaf N content was positively correlated with the LUI index. Furthermore: (2) herbivore abundance was not related to IG concentrations, but correlated negatively with leaf N content. Parasitoid abundance correlated positively only with host abundance over the three regions. Structural equation models revealed a positive impact of IG concentrations on parasitoid abundance in one region. We conclude that changes in plant chemistry due to land use and/or vegetation composition may affect higher trophic levels and that the manifestation of these effects may depend on local biotic or abiotic features of the landscape. PMID:25986560

  12. Revealing genetic relationships between compounds affecting boar taint and reproduction in pigs.

    PubMed

    Grindflek, E; Meuwissen, T H E; Aasmundstad, T; Hamland, H; Hansen, M H S; Nome, T; Kent, M; Torjesen, P; Lien, S

    2011-03-01

    Boar taint is characterized by an unpleasant taste or odor in intact male pigs and is primarily attributed to increased concentrations of androstenone and skatole and to a lesser extent by increased indole. The boar taint compounds skatole and indole are produced by gut bacteria, metabolized in the liver, and stored in the fat tissue. Androstenone, on the other hand, is synthesized in the testis along with testosterone and estrogens, which are known to be important factors affecting fertility. The main goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between genetic factors involved in the primary boar taint compounds in an attempt to discover ways to reduce boar taint without decreasing fertility-related compounds. Heritabilities and genetic correlations between traits were estimated for compounds related to boar taint (androstenone, skatole, indole) and reproduction (testosterone, 17?-estradiol, and estrone sulfate). Heritabilities in the range of 0.47 to 0.67 were detected for androstenone concentrations in both fat and plasma, whereas those for skatole and indole were slightly less (0.27 to 0.41). The genetic correlations between androstenone in plasma and fat were extremely high (0.91 to 0.98) in Duroc and Landrace. In addition, genetic correlations between androstenone (both plasma and fat) and the other sex steroids (estrone sulfate, 17?-estradiol, and testosterone) were very high, in the range of 0.80 to 0.95. Furthermore, a genome-wide association study (GWA) and a combined linkage disequilibrium and linkage analysis (LDLA) were conducted on 1,533 purebred Landrace and 1,027 purebred Duroc to find genome regions involved in genetic control of the boar taint compounds androstenone, skatole, and indole, and sex hormones related to fertility traits. Up to 3,297 informative SNP markers were included for both breeds, including SNP from several boar taint candidate genes. From the GWA study, we found that altogether 27 regions were significant at a genome-wide level (P < 0.05) and an additional 7 regions were significant at a chromosomal level. From the LDLA study, 7 regions were significant on a genome-wide level and an additional 7 regions were significant at a chromosomal level. The most convincing associations were obtained in 6 regions affecting skatole and indole in fat on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 7, 13, and 14, 1 region on chromosome 6 affecting androstenone in plasma only, and 5 regions on chromosomes 3, 4, 13, and 15 affecting androstenone, testosterone, and estrogens. PMID:21346135

  13. Maternal environment affects the genetic basis of seed dormancy in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Postma, Froukje M; Ågren, Jon

    2015-02-01

    The genetic basis of seed dormancy, a key life history trait important for adaptive evolution in plant populations, has yet been studied only using seeds produced under controlled conditions in greenhouse environments. However, dormancy is strongly affected by maternal environmental conditions, and interactions between seed genotype and maternal environment have been reported. Consequently, the genetic basis of dormancy of seeds produced under natural field conditions remains unclear. We examined the effect of maternal environment on the genetic architecture of seed dormancy using a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between two locally adapted populations of Arabidopsis thaliana from Italy and Sweden. We mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) for dormancy of seeds produced in the greenhouse and at the native field sites of the parental genotypes. The Italian genotype produced seeds with stronger dormancy at fruit maturation than did the Swedish genotype in all three environments, and the maternal field environments induced higher dormancy levels compared to the greenhouse environment in both genotypes. Across the three maternal environments, a total of nine dormancy QTL were detected, three of which were only detected among seeds matured in the field, and six of which showed significant QTL × maternal environment interactions. One QTL had a large effect on dormancy across all three environments and colocalized with the candidate gene DOG1. Our results demonstrate the importance of studying the genetic basis of putatively adaptive traits under relevant conditions. PMID:25640699

  14. In Utero Cigarette Smoke Affects Allergic Airway Disease But Does Not Alter the Lung Methylome

    PubMed Central

    Eyring, Kenneth R.; Pedersen, Brent S.; Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal and postnatal cigarette smoke exposure enhances the risk of developing asthma. Despite this as well as other smoking related risks, 11% of women still smoke during pregnancy. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke exposure during prenatal development generates long lasting differential methylation altering transcriptional activity that correlates with disease. In a house dust mite (HDM) model of allergic airway disease, we measured airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway inflammation between mice exposed prenatally to cigarette smoke (CS) or filtered air (FA). DNA methylation and gene expression were then measured in lung tissue. We demonstrate that HDM-treated CS mice develop a more severe allergic airway disease compared to HDM-treated FA mice including increased AHR and airway inflammation. While DNA methylation changes between the two HDM-treated groups failed to reach genome-wide significance, 99 DMRs had an uncorrected p-value < 0.001. 6 of these 99 DMRs were selected for validation, based on the immune function of adjacent genes, and only 2 of the 6 DMRs confirmed the bisulfite sequencing data. Additionally, genes near these 6 DMRs (Lif, Il27ra, Tle4, Ptk7, Nfatc2, and Runx3) are differentially expressed between HDM-treated CS mice and HDM-treated FA mice. Our findings confirm that prenatal exposure to cigarette smoke is sufficient to modify allergic airway disease; however, it is unlikely that specific methylation changes account for the exposure-response relationship. These findings highlight the important role in utero cigarette smoke exposure plays in the development of allergic airway disease. PMID:26642056

  15. Nuclear DNA content affects the productivity of conifer forests by altering hydraulic architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alday, Josu; Resco de Dios, Víctor

    2014-05-01

    Predictions of future global climate rely on feedbacks between terrestrial vegetation and the global carbon cycle, but the exact mechanisms underlying this relationship are still being discussed. One of the key knowledge gaps lies on the scaling of cellular processes to the ecosystem level. Here we examine whether an under-explored plant trait, inter-specific variation in the bulk amount of DNA in unreplicated somatic cells (2C DNA content), can explain inter-specific variation in the maximum productivity of conifer forests. We expected 2C DNA content to be negatively related to conifer productivity because: 1) it is positively correlated with cell volume (which, in turn, potentially affects structural features such as leaf mass area, a strong predictor of photosynthetic capacity); 2) it is positively correlated with stomatal size (with larger stomata leading to lower overall stomatal conductance and, by extension, lower CO2 uptake); and 3) larger genome sizes may reduce P availability in RNA (which has been hypothesized to slow growth). We present the results of regression and independent contrasts in different monospecific forests encompassing a 52º latitudinal gradient, each being dominated by 1 of 35 different conifer species. Contrary to expectations, we observed a positive correlation between genome size and maximum Gross Primary Productivity (R2 = 0.47) and also between genome size maximum tree height (R2 = 0.27). This correlation was apparently driven by the effects of genome size on stem hydraulics, since 2C DNA was positively correlated with wood density (R2 = 0.40) and also with resistance to cavitation (P50, R2 = 0.28). That is, increased genome sizes have a positive effect on the productivity of conifer forests by affecting the vascular tissues to increase their capacity for water transport. Our results shed a new light on the evolution of the vascular system of conifer forests and how they affect ecosystem productivity, and indicate the potential to further explore the trait of genome size for understanding global patterns of forest productivity.

  16. Altering the primacy bias--how does a prior task affect mismatch negativity?

    PubMed

    Mullens, Daniel; Woodley, Jessica; Whitson, Lisa; Provost, Alexander; Heathcote, Andrew; Winkler, István; Todd, Juanita

    2014-05-01

    The role in which two tones are first encountered in an unattended oddball sequence affects how deviance detection, reflected by mismatch negativity, treats them later when the roles reverse: a "primacy bias." We tested whether this effect is modulated by previous behavioral relevance assigned to the two tones. To this end, sequences in which the roles of the two tones alternated were preceded by a go/no-go task in which tones were presented with equal probability. Half of the participants were asked to respond to the short sounds, the other half to long sounds. Primacy bias was initially abolished but returned dependent upon the go-stimulus that the participant was assigned. Results demonstrate a long-term impact of prior learning on deviance detection, and that even when prior importance/equivalence is learned, the bias ultimately returns. Results are discussed in terms of persistent go-stimulus specific changes in responsiveness to sound. PMID:24611446

  17. Non-conscious visual cues related to affect and action alter perception of effort and endurance performance

    PubMed Central

    Blanchfield, Anthony; Hardy, James; Marcora, Samuele

    2014-01-01

    The psychobiological model of endurance performance proposes that endurance performance is determined by a decision-making process based on perception of effort and potential motivation. Recent research has reported that effort-based decision-making during cognitive tasks can be altered by non-conscious visual cues relating to affect and action. The effects of these non-conscious visual cues on effort and performance during physical tasks are however unknown. We report two experiments investigating the effects of subliminal priming with visual cues related to affect and action on perception of effort and endurance performance. In Experiment 1 thirteen individuals were subliminally primed with happy or sad faces as they cycled to exhaustion in a counterbalanced and randomized crossover design. A paired t-test (happy vs. sad faces) revealed that individuals cycled significantly longer (178 s, p = 0.04) when subliminally primed with happy faces. A 2 × 5 (condition × iso-time) ANOVA also revealed a significant main effect of condition on rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during the time to exhaustion (TTE) test with lower RPE when subjects were subliminally primed with happy faces (p = 0.04). In Experiment 2, a single-subject randomization tests design found that subliminal priming with action words facilitated a significantly longer TTE (399 s, p = 0.04) in comparison to inaction words. Like Experiment 1, this greater TTE was accompanied by a significantly lower RPE (p = 0.03). These experiments are the first to show that subliminal visual cues relating to affect and action can alter perception of effort and endurance performance. Non-conscious visual cues may therefore influence the effort-based decision-making process that is proposed to determine endurance performance. Accordingly, the findings raise notable implications for individuals who may encounter such visual cues during endurance competitions, training, or health related exercise. PMID:25566014

  18. Motion and emotion: depression reduces psychomotor performance and alters affective movements in caregiving interactions

    PubMed Central

    Young, Katherine S.; Parsons, Christine E.; Stein, Alan; Kringelbach, Morten L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Impaired social functioning is a well-established feature of depression. Evidence to date suggests that disrupted processing of emotional cues may constitute part of this impairment. Beyond processing of emotional cues, fluent social interactions require that people physically move in synchronized, contingent ways. Disruptions to physical movements are a diagnostic feature of depression (psychomotor disturbance) but have not previously been assessed in the context of social functioning. Here we investigated the impact of psychomotor disturbance in depression on physical responsive behavior in both an experimental and observational setting. Methods: In Experiment 1, we examined motor disturbance in depression in response to salient emotional sounds, using a laboratory-based effortful motor task. In Experiment 2, we explored whether psychomotor disturbance was apparent in real-life social interactions. Using mother-infant interactions as a model affective social situation, we compared physical behaviors of mothers with and without postnatal depression (PND). Results: We found impairments in precise, controlled psychomotor performance in adults with depression relative to healthy adults (Experiment 1). Despite this disruption, all adults showed enhanced performance following exposure to highly salient emotional cues (infant cries). Examining real-life interactions, we found differences in physical movements, namely reduced affective touching, in mothers with PND responding to their infants, compared to healthy mothers (Experiment 2). Conclusions: Together, these findings suggest that psychomotor disturbance may be an important feature of depression that can impair social functioning. Future work investigating whether improvements in physical movement in depression could have a positive impact on social interactions would be of much interest. PMID:25741255

  19. Plant hybrid zones affect biodiversity: Tools for a genetic-based understanding of community structure

    SciTech Connect

    Whitham, T.G.; Martinsen, G.D.; Keim, P.; Floate, K.D.; Dungey, H.S. |; Potts, B.M.

    1999-03-01

    Plant hybrid zones are dynamic centers of ecological and evolutionary processes for plants and their associated communities. Studies in the wild and in gardens with synthetic crosses showed that hybrid eucalypts supports the greatest species richness and abundances of insect and fungal taxa. In an updated review of 152 case studies of taxa associated with diverse hybridizing systems, there were 43 (28%) cases of hybrids being more susceptible than their parent species, 7 (5%) resistant, 35 (23%) additive, 35 (23%) dominant, and 32 (21%) showed no response to hybridization. Thus, most taxa respond to hybrids in ways that result in equal or greater abundance, and hybrids tend to accumulate the taxa of their parent species. These studies suggest that genetic-based plant traits affect the distribution of many species and that the variation in hybrids can be used as tools to examine the genetic components of community structure and biodiversity.

  20. Copyright 2001 by the Genetics Society of America Genes Affecting the Activity of Nicotinic Receptors Involved in

    E-print Network

    Schafer, William R.

    Copyright © 2001 by the Genetics Society of America Genes Affecting the Activity of Nicotinic of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors such as nicotine and levamisole stimulate egg laying; however, the genetic of levamisole-sensitive nicotinic receptors in nematodes. Seven of these genes, including the nicotinic receptor

  1. A genetic variant in a PP2A regulatory subunit encoded by the PPP2R2B gene associates with altered breast

    E-print Network

    Vazquez, Alexei

    and response to chemotherapy in patients with soft tissue sarcomas,16 thus validating the NCI60 candidate geneA genetic variant in a PP2A regulatory subunit encoded by the PPP2R2B gene associates with altered and division. Given the tumor suppressor activities of PP2A, here we evaluate whether this genetic variant

  2. How does altered precipitation and annual grass invasion affect plant N uptake in a native semi-arid shrub community?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauritz, M.; Lipson, D.; Cleland, E. E.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change is expected to alter precipitation patterns, which will change the timing and amount of plant resources. Precipitation patterns determine water and nitrogen (N) availability, because water stimulates microbial N turnover and N transport. In order for plants to utilize water and N, they must coincide with the phenology and meet physiological requirements of the plant. As resource supply shifts, differences in species' ability to acquire resources will affect plant community composition. Semiarid ecosystems, such as shrublands in Southern California, are particularly sensitive to shifts in precipitation because they are severely water limited. This study takes advantage of the altered phenology and resource demands presented by invasive annual grasses in a native semiarid shrubland. The goal is to understand how altered precipitation patterns affect plant N uptake. Rainfall levels were manipulated to 50% and 150% of ambient levels. It is expected that higher rainfall levels promote annual grass invasion because grasses have higher water and N requirements and begin to grow earlier in the season than shrubs. A 15N tracer was added with the first rain event and plant samples were collected regularly to track the movement of N into the plants. Net soil N accumulation was determined using resin bags. Invasive grasses altered the timing and amount of N uptake but amount of rainfall had less effect on N distribution. 15N was detected sooner and at higher level in grasses than shrubs. 24hours after the first rain event 15N was detectable in grasses, 15N accumulated rapidly and peaked 2 months earlier than shrubs. Shrub 15N levels remained at pre-rain event levels for the first 2 months and began to increase at the beginning of spring, peak mid-spring and decline as the shrubs entered summer dormancy. One year later 15N levels in annual grass litter remained high, while 15N levels in shrubs returned to initial background levels as a result of resorption. 15N concentrations are more variable in grasses which could indicate higher plasticity in grass N uptake compared to shrubs. Resin N supports the 15N patterns. Resin N declined more rapidly under grasses and was lower than under shrubs, presumably due to high grass N uptake. Resin N was particularly high under shrubs in wetter conditions indicating that shrubs could not take advantage of high N supply. Together the 15N and resin N patterns indicate that grasses accumulate more N and begin N uptake earlier in the season than shrubs. Although 15N did not differ in response to rainfall, invasion alters the distribution of N in the system. Rain was only manipulated for one growing season; multiple years of altered precipitation may yield significant differences. Early season N uptake by grasses, the low variability in shrub 15N and low shrub 15N in wetter conditions, despite high resin N, indicates that N competition between invasive grasses and native shrubs is weak. If N supply is sufficient for shrub demands, invasive grasses and shrubs could coexist. This study contributes to a broader understanding of how changes in resource supply, plant phenology and functional type interact and respond to climate change.

  3. Seismic properties of rocks affected by hydrothermal alteration: a case study from the Lalor Lake VMS mining camp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miah, K.; Bellefleur, G.; Schetselaar, E.

    2013-12-01

    Global demand of base metals, uranium, diamonds, and precious metals has been pushing technological barrier to find and extract minerals at higher depth, which was not feasible in just a few decades ago. Seismic properties of rocks containing and surrounding ore bodies have been useful in characterizing and modeling geologic structures, and mapping high-resolution images of ore bodies. Although seismic surveys and drill hole sonic and density logs are essential for mineral exploration at depth, limited availability of seismic logs to link rock properties of different ore forming geologic structure is a hindrance to seismic interpretations. Volcanogenic Massive Sulphides (VMS) are rich in minerals and of primary interests among geologists and mining industries alike. VMS deposits occur due to focused discharge of metal-enriched fluids associated in the hydrothermal alteration process, and are rich in Zn, Cu, Pb, Ag, Au, etc. Alteration halos surrounding ore deposits can be widespread, and their locations are easier to determine than the deposits within them. Physical rock properties affected by alteration can provide clues on type and potentially size of ore deposits in the surrounding area. In this context, variations in seismic properties of rocks due to hydrothermal alteration near the deposits can help in improving modeling accuracy, and better interpretation of seismic data for economic mineral exploration. While reflection seismic techniques can resolve ore bodies at higher depths than other conventional geophysical techniques, they are relatively expensive both in terms of field data acquisition and post-processing, especially for high-resolution 3D surveys. Acoustic impedance contrasts of ore lenses with their hosting rock environment; geometry, size and spatial location relative to the surface affect their detection with seismic data. Therefore, apriori knowledge of seismic rock properties from drill hole logs and core samples in the potential survey area are essential to determine whether any 2D/3D active survey would be worth conducting. In situ density and velocity logs, and thus, acoustic impedance provide first order control on reflectivity of various lithologies. In this abstract, we analyzed well logs from 12 drill holes geographically located in the northern Manitoba, Canada, in an attempt to characterize lithologies based on their seismic properties. Velocities, density, acoustic impedance and Poisson's ratio of major lithologies were compared among each other. Massive sulphide and Diorite have higher average acoustic impedance than the others. Our quantitative analysis suggests that alteration has considerable effect on overall acoustic impedance of Argillite, Felsic Volcanic and Stringer Sulphide rocks. This can be useful in selecting values of model parameters for seismic wave propagation simulation, which can be used to compare with seismic survey data. In addition, core sample analysis from the same drill holes aided our understanding of mineralization, alteration, and overall composition of different rocks under consideration.

  4. Stem and progenitor cells in myelodysplastic syndromes show aberrant stage-specific expansion and harbor genetic and epigenetic alterations.

    PubMed

    Will, Britta; Zhou, Li; Vogler, Thomas O; Ben-Neriah, Susanna; Schinke, Carolina; Tamari, Roni; Yu, Yiting; Bhagat, Tushar D; Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Barreyro, Laura; Heuck, Christoph; Mo, Yonkai; Parekh, Samir; McMahon, Christine; Pellagatti, Andrea; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Montagna, Cristina; Silverman, Lewis; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; Greally, John M; Ye, B Hilda; List, Alan F; Steidl, Christian; Steidl, Ulrich; Verma, Amit

    2012-09-01

    Even though hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) dysfunction is presumed in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), the exact nature of quantitative and qualitative alterations is unknown. We conducted a study of phenotypic and molecular alterations in highly fractionated stem and progenitor populations in a variety of MDS subtypes. We observed an expansion of the phenotypically primitive long-term HSCs (lineage(-)/CD34(+)/CD38(-)/CD90(+)) in MDS, which was most pronounced in higher-risk cases. These MDS HSCs demonstrated dysplastic clonogenic activity. Examination of progenitors revealed that lower-risk MDS is characterized by expansion of phenotypic common myeloid progenitors, whereas higher-risk cases revealed expansion of granulocyte-monocyte progenitors. Genome-wide analysis of sorted MDS HSCs revealed widespread methylomic and transcriptomic alterations. STAT3 was an aberrantly hypomethylated and overexpressed target that was validated in an independent cohort and found to be functionally relevant in MDS HSCs. FISH analysis demonstrated that a very high percentage of MDS HSC (92% ± 4%) carry cytogenetic abnormalities. Longitudinal analysis in a patient treated with 5-azacytidine revealed that karyotypically abnormal HSCs persist even during complete morphologic remission and that expansion of clonotypic HSCs precedes clinical relapse. This study demonstrates that stem and progenitor cells in MDS are characterized by stage-specific expansions and contain epigenetic and genetic alterations. PMID:22753872

  5. Fc Engineering of Human IgG1 for Altered Binding to the Neonatal Fc Receptor Affects Fc Effector Functions

    PubMed Central

    Grevys, Algirdas; Bern, Malin; Foss, Stian; Bratlie, Diane Bryant; Moen, Anders; Gunnarsen, Kristin Støen; Aase, Audun; Michaelsen, Terje Einar; Sandlie, Inger

    2015-01-01

    Engineering of the constant Fc part of monoclonal human IgG1 (hIgG1) Abs is an approach to improve effector functions and clinical efficacy of next-generation IgG1-based therapeutics. A main focus in such development is tailoring of in vivo half-life and transport properties by engineering the pH-dependent interaction between IgG and the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), as FcRn is the main homeostatic regulator of hIgG1 half-life. However, whether such engineering affects binding to other Fc-binding molecules, such as the classical Fc?Rs and complement factor C1q, has not been studied in detail. These effector molecules bind to IgG1 in the lower hinge–CH2 region, structurally distant from the binding site for FcRn at the CH2–CH3 elbow region. However, alterations of the structural composition of the Fc may have long-distance effects. Indeed, in this study we show that Fc engineering of hIgG1 for altered binding to FcRn also influences binding to both the classical Fc?Rs and complement factor C1q, which ultimately results in alterations of cellular mechanisms such as Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis, and Ab-dependent complement-mediated cell lysis. Thus, engineering of the FcRn–IgG1 interaction may greatly influence effector functions, which has implications for the therapeutic efficacy and use of Fc-engineered hIgG1 variants. PMID:25904551

  6. The Problem. Genetic Pest Management (GPM) offers the potential to alter and control

    E-print Network

    Ishida, Yuko

    America. In addition to full fellowships, funds are available for international internships. For details_GPM@ncsu.edu Policy Social Issues Ethics Population Genetics & Ecology Molecular Biology GES http

  7. Genetic loci that affect aristolochic acid-induced nephrotoxicity in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aristolochic acids (AA) are plant-derived nephrotoxins and carcinogens found in traditional medicines and herbal remedies. AA causes aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN) and is a suspected environmental agent in Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) and its associated upper urothelial cancer. Approximately 5–10% of individuals exposed to AA develop renal insufficiency and/or cancer; thus a genetic predisposition to AA sensitivity has been proposed. The mouse is an established animal model of AAN, and inbred murine strains vary in AA sensitivity, confirming the genetic predisposition. We mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) correlated with proximal tubule dysfunction after exposure to AA in an F2 population of mice, derived from breeding an AA-resistant strain (C57BL/6J) and an AA-sensitive strain (DBA/2J). A single main QTL was identified on chromosome 4 (Aanq1); three other interacting QTLs, (Aanq2–4) also were detected. The Aanq1 region was also detected in untreated mice, raising the possibility that preexisting differences in proximal tubule function may affect the severity of AA-elicited toxicity. This study lays the groundwork for identifying the genetic pathways contributing to AA sensitivity in the mouse and will further our understanding of human susceptibility to AA found widely in traditional medicines. PMID:21429970

  8. Genetic and hypoxic alterations of the microRNA-210-ISCU1/2 axis promote iron–sulfur deficiency and pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    White, Kevin; Lu, Yu; Annis, Sofia; Hale, Andrew E; Chau, B Nelson; Dahlman, James E; Hemann, Craig; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Vargas, Sara O; Rosas, Ivan; Perrella, Mark A; Osorio, Juan C; Haley, Kathleen J; Graham, Brian B; Kumar, Rahul; Saggar, Rajan; Saggar, Rajeev; Wallace, W Dean; Ross, David J; Khan, Omar F; Bader, Andrew; Gochuico, Bernadette R; Matar, Majed; Polach, Kevin; Johannessen, Nicolai M; Prosser, Haydn M; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert; Zweier, Jay L; Bindoff, Laurence A; Systrom, David; Waxman, Aaron B; Jin, Richard C; Chan, Stephen Y

    2015-01-01

    Iron–sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are essential for mitochondrial metabolism, but their regulation in pulmonary hypertension (PH) remains enigmatic. We demonstrate that alterations of the miR-210-ISCU1/2 axis cause Fe-S deficiencies in vivo and promote PH. In pulmonary vascular cells and particularly endothelium, hypoxic induction of miR-210 and repression of the miR-210 targets ISCU1/2 down-regulated Fe-S levels. In mouse and human vascular and endothelial tissue affected by PH, miR-210 was elevated accompanied by decreased ISCU1/2 and Fe-S integrity. In mice, miR-210 repressed ISCU1/2 and promoted PH. Mice deficient in miR-210, via genetic/pharmacologic means or via an endothelial-specific manner, displayed increased ISCU1/2 and were resistant to Fe-S-dependent pathophenotypes and PH. Similar to hypoxia or miR-210 overexpression, ISCU1/2 knockdown also promoted PH. Finally, cardiopulmonary exercise testing of a woman with homozygous ISCU mutations revealed exercise-induced pulmonary vascular dysfunction. Thus, driven by acquired (hypoxia) or genetic causes, the miR-210-ISCU1/2 regulatory axis is a pathogenic lynchpin causing Fe-S deficiency and PH. These findings carry broad translational implications for defining the metabolic origins of PH and potentially other metabolic diseases sharing similar underpinnings. PMID:25825391

  9. Specific Serotonergic Denervation Affects tau Pathology and Cognition without Altering Senile Plaques Deposition in APP/PS1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Rodriguez, Juan Jose; Molina-Gil, Sara; Rey-Brea, Raquel; Berrocoso, Esther; Garcia-Alloza, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are major neuropathological features of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), however neuronal loss is the alteration that best correlates with cognitive impairment in AD patients. Underlying neurotoxic mechanisms are not completely understood although specific neurotransmission deficiencies have been observed in AD patients and, in animal models, cholinergic and noradrenergic denervation may increase amyloid-beta deposition and tau phosphorylation in denervated areas. On the other hand brainstem neurodegeneration has been suggested as an initial event in AD, and serotonergic dysfunction, as well as reductions in raphe neurones density, have been reported in AD patients. In this study we addressed whether specific serotonergic denervation, by administering 5,7-dihydroxitriptamine (5,7-DHT) in the raphe nuclei, could also worsen central pathology in APPswe/PS1dE9 mice or interfere with learning and memory activities. In our hands specific serotonergic denervation increased tau phosphorylation in denervated cortex, without affecting amyloid-beta (A?) pathology. We also observed that APPswe/PS1dE9 mice lesioned with 5,7-DHT were impaired in the Morris water maze test, supporting a synergistic effect of the serotonergic denervation and the presence of APP/PS1 transgenes on learning and memory impairment. Altogether our data suggest that serotonergic denervation may interfere with some pathological aspects observed in AD, including tau phosphorylation or cognitive impairment, without affecting A? pathology, supporting a differential role of specific neurotransmitter systems in AD. PMID:24278223

  10. Rare Mutations of CACNB2 Found in Autism Spectrum Disease-Affected Families Alter Calcium Channel Function

    PubMed Central

    Breitenkamp, Alexandra F. S.; Matthes, Jan; Nass, Robert Daniel; Sinzig, Judith; Lehmkuhl, Gerd; Nürnberg, Peter; Herzig, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are complex neurodevelopmental diseases clinically defined by dysfunction of social interaction. Dysregulation of cellular calcium homeostasis might be involved in ASD pathogenesis, and genes coding for the L-type calcium channel subunits CaV1.2 (CACNA1C) and CaV?2 (CACNB2) were recently identified as risk loci for psychiatric diseases. Here, we present three rare missense mutations of CACNB2 (G167S, S197F, and F240L) found in ASD-affected families, two of them described here for the first time (G167S and F240L). All these mutations affect highly conserved regions while being absent in a sample of ethnically matched controls. We suggest the mutations to be of physiological relevance since they modulate whole-cell Ba2+ currents through calcium channels when expressed in a recombinant system (HEK-293 cells). Two mutations displayed significantly decelerated time-dependent inactivation as well as increased sensitivity of voltage-dependent inactivation. In contrast, the third mutation (F240L) showed significantly accelerated time-dependent inactivation. By altering the kinetic parameters, the mutations are reminiscent of the CACNA1C mutation causing Timothy Syndrome, a Mendelian disease presenting with ASD. In conclusion, the results of our first-time biophysical characterization of these three rare CACNB2 missense mutations identified in ASD patients support the hypothesis that calcium channel dysfunction may contribute to autism. PMID:24752249

  11. A genetic study of the anesthetic response: mutants of Drosophila melanogaster altered in sensitivity to halothane.

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, K S; Nash, H A

    1990-01-01

    In an attempt to identify genes that control or encode the targets of general anesthetics, we have chemically mutagenized fruit flies and selected four lines that show an abnormal response to the volatile anesthetic halothane. Specifically, about 2-fold higher concentrations of halothane are required to induce the loss of motor control in the mutant flies. Fine mapping of two isolates indicates that they alter a previously uncharacterized gene of Drosophila. In the absence of anesthetics, these mutants display alterations of behavior that imply changes in the adult and the larval neuromuscular system. Images PMID:2122464

  12. Genetic alterations and cancer formation in a European flatfish at sites of different contaminant burdens.

    PubMed

    Lerebours, Adélaïde; Stentiford, Grant D; Lyons, Brett P; Bignell, John P; Derocles, Stéphane A P; Rotchell, Jeanette M

    2014-09-01

    Fish diseases are an indicator for marine ecosystem health since they provide a biological end-point of historical exposure to stressors. Liver cancer has been used to monitor the effects of exposure to anthropogenic pollution in flatfish for many years. The prevalence of liver cancer can exceed 20%. Despite the high prevalence and the opportunity of using flatfish to study environmentally induced cancer, the genetic and environmental factors driving tumor prevalence across sites are poorly understood. This study aims to define the link between genetic deterioration, liver disease progression, and anthropogenic contaminant exposures in the flatfish dab (Limanda limanda). We assessed genetic changes in a conserved cancer gene, Retinoblastoma (Rb), in association with histological diagnosis of normal, pretumor, and tumor pathologies in the livers of 165 fish from six sites in the North Sea and English Channel. The highest concentrations of metals (especially cadmium) and organic chemicals correlated with the presence of tumor pathology and with defined genetic profiles of the Rb gene, from these sites. Different Rb genetic profiles were found in liver tissue near each tumor phenotype, giving insight into the mechanistic molecular-level cause of the liver pathologies. Different Rb profiles were also found at sampling sites of differing contaminant burdens. Additionally, profiles indicated that histological "normal" fish from Dogger sampling locations possessed Rb profiles associated with pretumor disease. This study highlights an association between Rb and specific contaminants (especially cadmium) in the molecular etiology of dab liver tumorigenesis. PMID:25102285

  13. Spatial memory alterations in children with epilepsy of genetic origin or unknown cause.

    PubMed

    Cimadevilla, José Manuel; Lizana, Julio Ramos; Roldán, Maria Dolores; Cánovas, Rosa; Rodríguez, Eva

    2014-06-01

    Genetic generalised epilepsy or epilepsy of unknown cause can remit before adolescence. In many children, the disease does not interfere with their academic achievement. Although there are neuropsychological studies characterising the cognitive profile, there are no studies in this population focused on spatial orientation abilities. In this study, we compared children with genetic generalised epilepsy or epilepsy of unknown cause with a control group using a virtual spatial learning task. Children with epilepsy showed worse performance on the spatial orientation task, although their visuo-spatial memory, attention, and working memory were normal. These results confirm that genetic generalised epilepsy or epilepsy of unknown cause is associated with more cognitive deficits. Virtual reality technologies can complement clinical assessment. PMID:24913814

  14. Array comparative genomic hybridization-based characterization of genetic alterations in pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Voortman, Johannes; Lee, Jih-Hsiang; Killian, Jonathan Keith; Suuriniemi, Miia; Wang, Yonghong; Lucchi, Marco; Smith, William I.; Meltzer, Paul; Wang, Yisong; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize and classify pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors based on array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Using aCGH, we performed karyotype analysis of 33 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) tumors, 13 SCLC cell lines, 19 bronchial carcinoids, and 9 gastrointestinal carcinoids. In contrast to the relatively conserved karyotypes of carcinoid tumors, the karyotypes of SCLC tumors and cell lines were highly aberrant. High copy number (CN) gains were detected in SCLC tumors and cell lines in cytogenetic bands encoding JAK2, FGFR1, and MYC family members. In some of those samples, the CN of these genes exceeded 100, suggesting that they could represent driver alterations and potential drug targets in subgroups of SCLC patients. In SCLC tumors, as well as bronchial carcinoids and carcinoids of gastrointestinal origin, recurrent CN alterations were observed in 203 genes, including the RB1 gene and 59 microRNAs of which 51 locate in the DLK1-DIO3 domain. These findings suggest the existence of partially shared CN alterations in these tumor types. In contrast, CN alterations of the TP53 gene and the MYC family members were predominantly observed in SCLC. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the aCGH profile of SCLC cell lines highly resembles that of clinical SCLC specimens. Finally, by analyzing potential drug targets, we provide a genomics-based rationale for targeting the AKT-mTOR and apoptosis pathways in SCLC. PMID:20615970

  15. Physical characteristics of genetically-altered wheat related to technological protein separation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat protein is a technologically challenging substrate for food and non-food applications because of its compositional diversity and susceptibility to denaturation. Genetic modification could be used to create cultivars capable of producing more uniform or focused and novel protein compositions t...

  16. Heterogeneity of genetic alterations in prostate cancer: evidence of the complex nature of the disease.

    PubMed

    Nwosu, V; Carpten, J; Trent, J M; Sheridan, R

    2001-10-01

    Prostate cancer is a complex, multifactorial disease with genetic and environmental factors involved in its etiology. The search for genetic determinants involved in the disease has proven to be challenging, in part because such complex diseases are often not amenable to characterization by linkage analysis and positional cloning as is the case for diseases with simple Mendelian genetic inheritance. Prostate cancer susceptibility loci that have been reported so far include HPC1 (1q24-q25), PCAP (1q42-q43), HPCX (Xq27-q28), CAPB (1p36), HPC20 (20q13), HPC2/ELAC2 (17p11) and 16q23. Prostate cancer aggressiveness loci have also been reported (5q31-q33, 7q32 and 19q12). Further complicating the process is the existence of polymorphisms in several genes associated with prostate cancer including, AR, PSA, SRD5A2, VDR and CYP isoforms. These polymorphisms, however, are not thought to be highly penetrant alleles in families at high risk for prostate cancer. It is clear that prostate cancer etiology involves several genetic loci with no major gene accounting for a large proportion of susceptibility to the disease. PMID:11673416

  17. Phytoplasmal infection derails genetically preprogrammed meristem fate and alters plant architecture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the life cycle of higher plants, it is the fate of meristem cells that determines the pattern of growth and development, and therefore plant morphotype and fertility. Floral transition, the turning point from vegetative growth to reproductive development, is achieved via genetically-programmed s...

  18. Alterations of uromodulin biology: A common denominator of the genetically heterogeneous

    E-print Network

    Majewski, Jacek

    and medullary cystic kidney diseases type 1 and type 2. In some families the disease is associated in kidney tissues. We proved genetic heterogeneity of the disease. Uromodulin mutations were identified with the observations in the patient's kidney tissue. We found a reduction in urinary uromodulin excretion as a common

  19. Genetic Polymorphisms in Organic Cation Transporter 1 (OCT1) in Chinese and Japanese Populations Exhibit Altered

    E-print Network

    Sali, Andrej

    .Sa., K.M.G.) and Neurology (J.S.), University of California, San Francisco, California; Diabetes Center- betic drug metformin. Genetic variants in OCT1 have been identified largely in European populations. Metformin is in- creasingly being used in Asian populations where the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D

  20. DNA ALTERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The exposure of an organism to genotoxic chemicals may induce a cascade of genetic events. nitially, structural alterations to DNA are formed. ext, the DNA damage is processed and subsequently expressed in mutant gene products. inally, diseases result from the genetic damage. he ...

  1. Genetic aspects of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in a family with multiple affected members: a research article

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The etiology of idiopathic scoliosis remains unknown and different factors have been suggested as causal. Hereditary factors can also determine the etiology of the disease; however, the pattern of inheritance remains unknown. Autosomal dominant, X-linked and multifactorial patterns of inheritances have been reported. Other studies have suggested possible chromosome regions related to the etiology of idiopathic scoliosis. We report the genetic aspects of and investigate chromosome regions for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in a Brazilian family. Methods Evaluation of 57 family members, distributed over 4 generations of a Brazilian family, with 9 carriers of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. The proband presented a scoliotic curve of 75 degrees, as determined by the Cobb method. Genomic DNA from family members was genotyped. Results Locating a chromosome region linked to adolescent idiopathic scoliosis was not possible in the family studied. Conclusion While it was not possible to determine a chromosome region responsible for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis by investigation of genetic linkage using microsatellites markers during analysis of four generations of a Brazilian family with multiple affected members, analysis including other types of genomic variations, like single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could contribute to the continuity of this study. PMID:20374654

  2. In vitro shoot organogenesis and hormone response are affected by the altered levels of Brassica napus meristem genes.

    PubMed

    Elhiti, Mohamed; Stasolla, Claudio

    2012-07-01

    Arabidopsis shoot meristem activity is regulated by a molecular network involving the participation of several components, including SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM), CLAVATA1 (CLV1), and ZWILLE (ZLL). In an effort to identify the role of these genes during in vitro shoot formation Brassica and Arabidopsis plants were transformed with the Brassica napus (Bn) STM, CLV1, ZLL1 and ZLL2 identified in previous work [1]. In both systems shoot organogenesis was promoted by the over-expression of BnSTM, BnZLL1, and BnZLL2, and repressed by the over-expression of BnCLV1. This distinct regulation, analogous to that occurring during in vivo meristem formation where STM and ZLL encourage stem cell formation while CLV1 accelerates transition to differentiation, suggests similar regulatory mechanisms governing shoot formation in vivo and in vitro. While the BnZLL1 and BnZLL2 induction of shoot organogenesis correlated only to changes in auxin signaling, BnSTM and BnCLV1 evoked major transcriptional alterations in cytokinin response. Besides increasing the transcript levels of two cytokinin receptors, ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE KINASE4 (AHK4) and CYTOKININ INDEPENDENT KINASE (CKI1), ectopic expression of BnSTM induced Type-B ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATORS (ARRs) and repressed Type-A ARRs. Opposite transcriptional patterns occurred in explants over-expressing BnCLV1, characterized by a decreased ability to produce shoots. The role played by Type-A and Type-B ARRs during shoot organogenesis was further examined using a genetic approach which revealed the requirement of ARR12 for the BnSTM positive regulation of shoot organogenesis. Collectively these results expand our knowledge on the function of meristem genes, and provide new tools for enhancing in vitro propagation systems. PMID:22608518

  3. Quantitative Chemical-Genetic Interaction Map Connects Gene Alterations to Drug Responses | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    In a recent Cancer Discovery report, CTD2 researchers at the University of California in San Francisco developed a new quantitative chemical-genetic interaction mapping approach to evaluate drug sensitivity or resistance in isogenic cell lines. Performing a high-throughput screen with isogenic cell lines allowed the researchers to explore the impact of a panel of emerging and established drugs on cells overexpressing a single cancer-associated gene in isolation.

  4. Pathophysiology of Corneal Dystrophies: From Cellular Genetic Alteration to Clinical Findings.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Marta; Macchi, Ilaria; Tiezzi, Alessandro; La Cava, Maurizio; Massaro-Giordano, Giacomina; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2016-02-01

    Corneal dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of bilateral, inherited, rare diseases characterized by slowly progressive corneal opacities, that lead to visual impairment. Most of them have an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with variable expressivity, but new mutations have been described. Many corneal dystrophies have been genetically characterized and the specific gene mutations identified, such as for the epithelial-stromal TGFBI dystrophies. Current classification systems identified four main groups of corneal dystrophies based on clinical, histologic, and genetic information. Diagnosis is performed during a routine ophthalmic examination that shows typical cellular abnormalities of the corneal epithelium, stroma, or endothelium. Disease progression should be carefully monitored to decide the proper clinical management. The treatment of corneal dystrophies is variable, depending on symptoms, clinical course, severity, and type of dystrophy. Management aimed to reduce symptoms and to improve vision, includes different surgical approaches. Novel cellular and genetic therapeutic approaches are under evaluation. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 261-269, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26104822

  5. Genetic alterations of chromosomes, p53 and p16 genes in low- and high-grade bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    ABAT, DENIZ; DEMIRHAN, OSMAN; INANDIKLIOGLU, NIHAL; TUNC, ERDAL; ERDOGAN, SEYDA; TASTEMIR, DENIZ; USLU, INAYET NUR; TANSUG, ZUHTU

    2014-01-01

    A majority of patients with bladder cancer present with superficial disease and subsequently, some patients show progression to muscle invasive or metastatic disease. Bladder cancer has a complex genetic process and identification of the genetic alterations which occur during progression may lead to the understanding of the nature of the disease and provide the possibility of early treatment. The aim of the present study was to compare the structural and numerical chromosomal differences and changes in the p16 and p53 genes between low-grade (LG) and high-grade (HG) bladder cancer (BC) using cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic methods. Between March 2009 and March 2010, cytogenetic analyses were carried out on tumor and blood samples in 34 patients with transitional cell type BC, and on blood samples of 34 healthy patients as a control group. Fluorescence in situ hybridization probes for the p16 and p53 genes were also used to screen the alterations in these genes in 32 patients with BC. The patients were divided into two groups (LG and HG) and the findings were compared. A total of 11 (32.3%) patients exhibited LGBC, 22 (64.7%) exhibited HGBC and one (3%) patient exhibited carcinoma in situ. There were no differences between the LGBC and HGBC groups according to the number of chromosomal aberrations (P=0.714); however, differences between alterations of the p16 and p53 genes were significant (P=0.002 and P=0.039). Almost all structural abnormalities were found to be located to the 1q21, 1q32, 3p21 and 5q31 regions in patients with HG tumors. In conclusion, the p16 and p53 genes were altered more prominently in patients with HG tumors compared with LG tumors. The structural abnormalities in the 1q21, 1q32, 3p21 and 5q31 regions were observed more frequently in patients with HG tumors. These regions may play significant roles in the progression of BC, but further studies are required to find candidate genes for a panel of BC. PMID:24959214

  6. Is the Genetic Landscape of the Deep Subsurface Biosphere Affected by Viruses?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Rika E.; Brazelton, William J.; Baross, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Viruses are powerful manipulators of microbial diversity, biogeochemistry, and evolution in the marine environment. Viruses can directly influence the genetic capabilities and the fitness of their hosts through the use of fitness factors and through horizontal gene transfer. However, the impact of viruses on microbial ecology and evolution is often overlooked in studies of the deep subsurface biosphere. Subsurface habitats connected to hydrothermal vent systems are characterized by constant fluid flux, dynamic environmental variability, and high microbial diversity. In such conditions, high adaptability would be an evolutionary asset, and the potential for frequent host–virus interactions would be high, increasing the likelihood that cellular hosts could acquire novel functions. Here, we review evidence supporting this hypothesis, including data indicating that microbial communities in subsurface hydrothermal fluids are exposed to a high rate of viral infection, as well as viral metagenomic data suggesting that the vent viral assemblage is particularly enriched in genes that facilitate horizontal gene transfer and host adaptability. Therefore, viruses are likely to play a crucial role in facilitating adaptability to the extreme conditions of these regions of the deep subsurface biosphere. We also discuss how these results might apply to other regions of the deep subsurface, where the nature of virus–host interactions would be altered, but possibly no less important, compared to more energetic hydrothermal systems. PMID:22084639

  7. Altered sucrose synthase and invertase expression affects the local and systemic sugar metabolism of nematode-infected Arabidopsis thaliana plants

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Sedentary endoparasitic nematodes of plants induce highly specific feeding cells in the root central cylinder. From these, the obligate parasites withdraw all required nutrients. The feeding cells were described as sink tissues in the plant’s circulation system that are supplied with phloem-derived solutes such as sugars. Currently, there are several publications describing mechanisms of sugar import into the feeding cells. However, sugar processing has not been studied so far. Thus, in the present work, the roles of the sucrose-cleaving enzymes sucrose synthases (SUS) and invertases (INV) in the development of Heterodera schachtii were studied. Gene expression analyses indicate that both enzymes are regulated transcriptionally. Nematode development was enhanced on multiple INV and SUS mutants. Syncytia of these mutants were characterized by altered enzyme activity and changing sugar pool sizes. Further, the analyses revealed systemically affected sugar levels and enzyme activities in the shoots of the tested mutants, suggesting changes in the source–sink relationship. Finally, the development of the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica was studied in different INV and SUS mutants and wild-type Arabidopsis plants. Similar effects on the development of both sedentary endoparasitic nematode species (root-knot and cyst nematode) were observed, suggesting a more general role of sucrose-degrading enzymes during plant–nematode interactions. PMID:24187419

  8. Altered gravity affects ventral root activity during fictive swimming and the static vestibuloocular reflex in young tadpoles (Xenopus laevis).

    PubMed

    Böser, S; Dournon, C; Gualandris-Parisot, L; Horn, E

    2008-03-01

    During early periods of life, modifications of the gravitational environment affect the development of sensory, neuronal and motor systems. The vestibular system exerts significant effects on motor networks that control eye and body posture as well as swimming. The objective of the present study was to study whether altered gravity (AG) affects vestibuloocular and spinal motor systems in a correlated manner. During the French Soyuz taxi flight Andromède to the International Space Station ISS (launch: October 21, 2001; landing: October 31, 2001) Xenopus laevis embryos were exposed for 10 days to microgravity (microg). In addition, a similar experiment with 3g-hypergravity (3g) was performed in the laboratory. At onset of AG, embryos had reached developmental stages 24 to 27. After exposure to AG, each tadpole was tested for its roll-induced vestibuloocular reflex (rVOR) and 3 hours later it was tested for the neuronal activity recorded from the ventral roots (VR) during fictive swimming. During the post-AG recording periods tadpoles had reached developmental stages 45 to 47. It was observed that microgravity affected VR activity during fictive swimming and rVOR. In particular, VR activity changes included a significant decrease of the rostrocaudal delay and a significant increase of episode duration. The rVOR-amplitude was transiently depressed. Hypergravity was less effective on the locomotor pattern; occurring effects on fictive swimming were the opposite of microg effects. As after microgravity, the rVOR was depressed after 3g-exposure. All modifications of the rVOR and VR-activity recovered to normal levels within 4 to 7 days after termination of AG. Significant correlations between the rVOR amplitude and VR activity of respective tadpoles during the recording period have been observed in both tadpoles with or without AG experience. The data are consistent with the assumptions that during this period of life which is characterized by a progressive development of vestibuloocular and vestibulospinal projections (i) microgravity retards the development of VR activity while hypergravity weakly accelerates it; (ii) that microgravity retards the rVOR development while hypergravity caused a sensitization, and that (iii) AG-induced changes of VR activity during fictive swimming have a vestibular origin. PMID:18666444

  9. Environmental and genetic factors affecting the response of laboratory animals to drugs.

    PubMed

    Vesell, E S; Lang, C M; White, W J; Passananti, G T; Hill, R N; Clemens, T L; Liu, D K; Johnson, W D

    1976-04-01

    Only some of the diverse factors that can affect drug disposition and response in laboratory animals have been identified at the present time. These numerous factors contribute to large day-to-day variations that have become a major problem impeding investigation of drug disposition and response in laboratory animals. Although these variations render many experiments difficult to interpret and produce large discrepancies in the literature, few published investigations using laboratory animals provide sufficient details to permit replication of the studies under similar conditions with respect to these variables. Thus, the importance of these variables in affecting results is apparently insufficiently recognized at present. Two commonly overlooked variables affecting the activity of hepatic microsomal enzymes (HME) in rodents and hence the rate at which rodents eliminate from their bodies many foreign compounds are the bedding under the wire mesh cage and the relative cleanliness of the environment. Numerous chemicals present in relatively low concentrations in the environment of the animal room can significantly alter HME activity. Representative of these chemicals are aromatic hydrocarbons in cedarwood bedding, eucalyptol from aerosol sprays, and chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides, each of which induces HME activity, whereas ammonia generated from feces and urine accumulated in unchanged pans under cages may inhibit HME activity. Chloroform, identified as an environmental contaminant of the water and air of certain cities, exhibits sex and strain differences with respect to toxicity (LD50) in mice. After intraperitoneal injection, twice as much chloroform accumulated in the kidneys of males from the sensitive strain (DBA/2J) as from the resistant (C57BL/6J) strain. First generation offspring were midway between parental strains both with respect to LD50 and renal accumulation of chloroform. PMID:1261707

  10. Quantitative Chemical-Genetic Interaction Map Connects Gene Alterations to Drug Responses | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    In a recent Cancer Discovery report, CTD2 researchers at the University of California in San Francisco developed a new quantitative chemical-genetic interaction mapping approach to evaluate drug sensitivity or resistance in isogenic cell lines. Performing a high-throughput screen with isogenic cell lines allowed the researchers to explore the impact of a panel of emerging and established drugs on cells overexpressing a single cancer-associated gene in isolation. The use of isogenic cell lines also helped identify synthetic lethal relationships, or tumor gene dependencies.

  11. Genetically altered fields in head and neck cancer and second field tumor.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Robin; Mahendra, Ashish; Moon, Ninad J; Gupta, Parul; Jain, Ashish; Gupta, Shivangi

    2014-07-01

    The concept of field cancerization has been ever changing since its first description by Slaughter et al in 1953. Field cancerization explains the mechanisms by which second primary tumors (SPTs) develop. SPTs are the tumors, which develop in the oral cavity in succession to the primary malignant tumors, which might vary in duration ranging from few months to years. Conceivably, a population of daughter cells with early genetic changes (without histopathology) remains in the organ, demonstrating the concept of field cancerization. This review explains the concept of field cancerization and various field theories along with molecular basis of field formation. PMID:25136520

  12. Quantitative Chemical-Genetic Interaction Map Connects Gene Alterations to Drug Responses

    Cancer.gov

    In a recent Cancer Discovery report, CTD2 researchers at the University of California in San Francisco developed a new quantitative chemical-genetic interaction mapping approach to evaluate drug sensitivity or resistance in isogenic cell lines. Performing a high-throughput screen with isogenic cell lines allowed the researchers to explore the impact of a panel of emerging and established drugs on cells overexpressing a single cancer-associated gene in isolation. The use of isogenic cell lines also helped identify synthetic lethal relationships, or tumor gene dependencies.

  13. Evaluation of molecular genetic alterations associated with tumor progression in a case of gliomatosis cerebri.

    PubMed

    Braeuninger, Stefan; Schneider-Stock, Regine; Kirches, Elmar; Powers, James M; Korones, David N; Mawrin, Christian

    2007-03-01

    Gliomatosis cerebri (GC) is a rare tumor characterized by widespread infiltration of the brain and spinal cord. Although GC usually demonstrates histomorphological features of a low-grade tumor, the formation of secondary highly malignant tumor regions may occur. In order to reveal molecular genetic changes associated with tumor progression in GC, we analyzed factors known to be associated with malignant progression in common astocytomas in an unusual GC case of an 18-year-old patient suffering from this disease for almost 7 years. We detected allelic losses in the Rb gene and in exon 4 of the TP53 gene in a tumor region corresponding to a glioblastoma multiforme. EGFR or MDM2 gene amplifications were absent, and no PTEN mutation or allelic loss on chromosome 10 could be detected. Moreover, compared to tumor-free brain tissue of this patient, tumor regions showed increased EGFR expression. These findings show that malignant progression in GC might be associated with the acquisition of molecular genetic changes also found in low-grade astrocytomas with progression to secondary glioblastoma. These data support the notion that GC can be regarded as a subtype of a common astrocytoma. PMID:16955219

  14. Genetic variants in ABCA1 promoter affect transcription activity and plasma HDL level in pigs.

    PubMed

    Dang, Xiao-yong; Chu, Wei-wei; Shi, Heng-chuan; Yu, Shi-gang; Han, Hai-yin; Gu, Shu-Hua; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-25

    Excess accumulation of cholesterol in plasma may result in coronary artery disease. Numerous studies have demonstrated that ATP-binding cassette protein A1 (ABCA1) mediates the efflux of cholesterol and phospholipids to apolipoproteins, a process necessary for plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL) formation. Higher plasma levels of HDL are associated with lower risk for cardiovascular disease. Studies of human disease and animal models had shown that an increased hepatic ABCA1 activity relates to an enhanced plasma HDL level. In this study, we hypothesized that functional mutations in the ABCA1 promoter in pigs may affect gene transcription activity, and consequently the HDL level in plasma. The promoter region of ABCA1 was comparatively scanned by direct sequencing with pool DNA of high- and low-HDL groups (n=30 for each group). Two polymorphisms, c. - 608A>G and c. - 418T>A, were revealed with reverse allele distribution in the two groups. The two polymorphisms were completely linked and formed only G-A or A-T haplotypes when genotyped in a larger population (n=526). Furthermore, we found that the G-A/G-A genotype was associated with higher HDL and ABCA1 mRNA level than A-T/A-T genotype. Luciferase assay also revealed that G-A haplotype promoter had higher activity than A-T haplotype. Single-nucleotide mutant assay showed that c.-418T>A was the causal mutation for ABCA1 transcription activity alteration. Conclusively, we identified two completely linked SNPs in porcine ABCA1 promoter region which have influence on the plasma HDL level by altering ABCA1 gene transcriptional activity. PMID:25445391

  15. Genetic alterations in fatty acid transport and metabolism genes are associated with metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers.

    PubMed

    Nath, Aritro; Chan, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of cellular metabolism is a hallmark feature of cancer cells. While a distinct set of processes drive metastasis when compared to tumorigenesis, it is yet unclear if genetic alterations in metabolic pathways are associated with metastatic progression of human cancers. Here, we analyzed the mutation, copy number variation and gene expression patterns of a literature-derived model of metabolic genes associated with glycolysis (Warburg effect), fatty acid metabolism (lipogenesis, oxidation, lipolysis, esterification) and fatty acid uptake in >9000 primary or metastatic tumor samples from the multi-cancer TCGA datasets. Our association analysis revealed a uniform pattern of Warburg effect mutations influencing prognosis across all tumor types, while copy number alterations in the electron transport chain gene SCO2, fatty acid uptake (CAV1, CD36) and lipogenesis (PPARA, PPARD, MLXIPL) genes were enriched in metastatic tumors. Using gene expression profiles, we established a gene-signature (CAV1, CD36, MLXIPL, CPT1C, CYP2E1) that strongly associated with epithelial-mesenchymal program across multiple cancers. Moreover, stratification of samples based on the copy number or expression profiles of the genes identified in our analysis revealed a significant effect on patient survival rates, thus confirming prominent roles of fatty acid uptake and metabolism in metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers. PMID:26725848

  16. THE ESTROGENIC AND ANTIANDROGENIC PESTICIDE METHOXYCHLOR ALTERS THE REPRODUCTIVE TRACT AND BEHAVIOR WITHOUT AFFECTING PITUITARY SIZE OR LH AND PROLACTIN SECRETION IN MALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The estrogenic and antiandrogenic pesticide methoxychlor alters the reproductive tract and behavior without affecting pituitary size or LH and prolactin secretion in male rats.

    Gray LE Jr, Ostby J, Cooper RL, Kelce WR.

    Endocrinology Branch, United States Environment...

  17. Genetic and molecular alterations in pancreatic cancer: Implications for personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yantian; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Zongyou; Xiang, Jianbin; William, Fisher E.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Chen, Changyi

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in human genomics and biotechnologies have profound impacts on medical research and clinical practice. Individual genomic information, including DNA sequences and gene expression profiles, can be used for prediction, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment for many complex diseases. Personalized medicine attempts to tailor medical care to individual patients by incorporating their genomic information. In a case of pancreatic cancer, the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States, alteration in many genes as well as molecular profiles in blood, pancreas tissue, and pancreas juice has recently been discovered to be closely associated with tumorigenesis or prognosis of the cancer. This review aims to summarize recent advances of important genes, proteins, and microRNAs that play a critical role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer, and to provide implications for personalized medicine in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24172537

  18. Alteration of Box-Jenkins methodology by implementing genetic algorithm method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Zuhaimy; Maarof, Mohd Zulariffin Md; Fadzli, Mohammad

    2015-02-01

    A time series is a set of values sequentially observed through time. The Box-Jenkins methodology is a systematic method of identifying, fitting, checking and using integrated autoregressive moving average time series model for forecasting. Box-Jenkins method is an appropriate for a medium to a long length (at least 50) time series data observation. When modeling a medium to a long length (at least 50), the difficulty arose in choosing the accurate order of model identification level and to discover the right parameter estimation. This presents the development of Genetic Algorithm heuristic method in solving the identification and estimation models problems in Box-Jenkins. Data on International Tourist arrivals to Malaysia were used to illustrate the effectiveness of this proposed method. The forecast results that generated from this proposed model outperformed single traditional Box-Jenkins model.

  19. The role of genetic and epigenetic alterations in neuroblastoma disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Domingo-Fernandez, Raquel; Watters, Karen; Piskareva, Olga; Bray, Isabella

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a highly heterogeneous tumor accounting for 15 % of all pediatric cancer deaths. Clinical behavior ranges from the spontaneous regression of localized, asymptomatic tumors, as well as metastasized tumors in infants, to rapid progression and resistance to therapy. Genomic amplification of the MYCN oncogene has been used to predict outcome in neuroblastoma for over 30 years, however, recent methodological advances including miR-NA and mRNA profiling, comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH), and whole-genome sequencing have enabled the detailed analysis of the neuroblastoma genome, leading to the identification of new prognostic markers and better patient stratification. In this review, we will describe the main genetic factors responsible for these diverse clinical phenotypes in neuroblastoma, the chronology of their discovery, and the impact on patient prognosis. PMID:23274701

  20. Developmental, transcriptome, and genetic alterations associated with parthenocarpy in the grapevine seedless somatic variant Corinto bianco.

    PubMed

    Royo, Carolina; Carbonell-Bejerano, Pablo; Torres-Pérez, Rafael; Nebish, Anna; Martínez, Óscar; Rey, Manuel; Aroutiounian, Rouben; Ibáñez, Javier; Martínez-Zapater, José M

    2016-01-01

    Seedlessness is a relevant trait in grapevine cultivars intended for fresh consumption or raisin production. Previous DNA marker analysis indicated that Corinto bianco (CB) is a parthenocarpic somatic variant of the seeded cultivar Pedro Ximenes (PX). This study compared both variant lines to determine the basis of this parthenocarpic phenotype. At maturity, CB seedless berries were 6-fold smaller than PX berries. The macrogametophyte was absent from CB ovules, and CB was also pollen sterile. Occasionally, one seed developed in 1.6% of CB berries. Microsatellite genotyping and flow cytometry analyses of seedlings generated from these seeds showed that most CB viable seeds were formed by fertilization of unreduced gametes generated by meiotic diplospory, a process that has not been described previously in grapevine. Microarray and RNA-sequencing analyses identified 1958 genes that were differentially expressed between CB and PX developing flowers. Genes downregulated in CB were enriched in gametophyte-preferentially expressed transcripts, indicating the absence of regular post-meiotic germline development in CB. RNA-sequencing was also used for genetic variant calling and 14 single-nucleotide polymorphisms distinguishing the CB and PX variant lines were detected. Among these, CB-specific polymorphisms were considered as candidate parthenocarpy-responsible mutations, including a putative deleterious substitution in a HAL2-like protein. Collectively, these results revealed that the absence of a mature macrogametophyte, probably due to meiosis arrest, coupled with a process of fertilization-independent fruit growth, caused parthenocarpy in CB. This study provides a number of grapevine parthenocarpy-responsible candidate genes and shows how genomic approaches can shed light on the genetic origin of woody crop somatic variants. PMID:26454283

  1. Does Wheat Genetically Modified for Disease Resistance Affect Root-Colonizing Pseudomonads and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi?

    PubMed Central

    Foetzki, Andrea; Luginbühl, Carolin; Winzeler, Michael; Kneubühler, Yvan; Matasci, Caterina; Mascher-Frutschi, Fabio; Kalinina, Olena; Boller, Thomas; Keel, Christoph; Maurhofer, Monika

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of genetically modified (GM) wheat with introduced pm3b mildew resistance transgene, on two types of root-colonizing microorganisms, namely pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Our investigations were carried out in field trials over three field seasons and at two locations. Serial dilution in selective King's B medium and microscopy were used to assess the abundance of cultivable pseudomonads and AMF, respectively. We developed a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method to characterize the diversity of the pqqC gene, which is involved in Pseudomonas phosphate solubilization. A major result was that in the first field season Pseudomonas abundances and diversity on roots of GM pm3b lines, but also on non-GM sister lines were different from those of the parental lines and conventional wheat cultivars. This indicates a strong effect of the procedures by which these plants were created, as GM and sister lines were generated via tissue cultures and propagated in the greenhouse. Moreover, Pseudomonas population sizes and DGGE profiles varied considerably between individual GM lines with different genomic locations of the pm3b transgene. At individual time points, differences in Pseudomonas and AMF accumulation between GM and control lines were detected, but they were not consistent and much less pronounced than differences detected between young and old plants, different conventional wheat cultivars or at different locations and field seasons. Thus, we conclude that impacts of GM wheat on plant-beneficial root-colonizing microorganisms are minor and not of ecological importance. The cultivation-independent pqqC-DGGE approach proved to be a useful tool for monitoring the dynamics of Pseudomonas populations in a wheat field and even sensitive enough for detecting population responses to altered plant physiology. PMID:23372672

  2. Common genetic variants in the CLDN2 and PRSS1-PRSS2 loci alter risk for alcohol-related and sporadic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Whitcomb, David C.; LaRusch, Jessica; Krasinskas, Alyssa M.; Klei, Lambertus; Smith, Jill P.; Brand, Randall E.; Neoptolemos, John P.; Lerch, Markus M.; Tector, Matt; Sandhu, Bimaljit S.; Guda, Nalini M.; Orlichenko, Lidiya; Alkaade, Samer; Amann, Stephen T.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Baillie, John; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin; Coté, Gregory A.; Cotton, Peter B.; DiSario, James; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Forsmark, Chris E.; Johnstone, Marianne; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Greenhalf, William; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hartman, Douglas J.; Hawes, Robert A.; Lawrence, Christopher; Lewis, Michele; Mayerle, Julia; Mayeux, Richard; Melhem, Nadine M.; Money, Mary E.; Muniraj, Thiruvengadam; Papachristou, Georgios I.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Sherman, Stuart; Simon, Peter; Singh, Vijay K.; Slivka, Adam; Stolz, Donna; Sutton, Robert; Weiss, Frank Ulrich; Wilcox, C. Mel; Zarnescu, Narcis Octavian; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Kienholz, Michelle L.; Roeder, Kathryn; Barmada, M. Michael; Yadav, Dhiraj; Devlin, Bernie; Albert, Marilyn S.; Albin, Roger L.; Apostolova, Liana G.; Arnold, Steven E.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Barber, Robert; Barnes, Lisa L.; Beach, Thomas G.; Beecham, Gary W.; Beekly, Duane; Bennett, David A.; Bigio, Eileen H.; Bird, Thomas D.; Blacker, Deborah; Boxer, Adam; Burke, James R.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Cantwell, Laura B.; Cao, Chuanhai; Carney, Regina M.; Carroll, Steven L.; Chui, Helena C.; Clark, David G.; Cribbs, David H.; Crocco, Elizabeth A.; Cruchaga, Carlos; DeCarli, Charles; Demirci, F. Yesim; Dick, Malcolm; Dickson, Dennis W.; Duara, Ranjan; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Faber, Kelley M.; Fallon, Kenneth B.; Farlow, Martin R.; Ferris, Steven; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Ganguli, Mary; Gearing, Marla; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Gilbert, John R.; Gilman, Sid; Glass, Jonathan D.; Goate, Alison M.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Green, Robert C.; Growdon, John H.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Harrell, Lindy E.; Head, Elizabeth; Honig, Lawrence S.; Hulette, Christine M.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Jin, Lee-Way; Jun, Gyungah; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Karydas, Anna; Kaye, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Ronald; Koo, Edward H.; Kowall, Neil W.; Kramer, Joel H.; Kramer, Patricia; Kukull, Walter A.; LaFerla, Frank M.; Lah, James J.; Leverenz, James B.; Levey, Allan I.; Li, Ge; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Mack, Wendy J.; Marson, Daniel C.; Martin, Eden R.; Martiniuk, Frank; Mash, Deborah C.; Masliah, Eliezer; McKee, Ann C.; Mesulam, Marsel; Miller, Bruce L.; Miller, Carol A.; Miller, Joshua W.; Montine, Thomas J.; Morris, John C.; Murrell, Jill R.; Naj, Adam C.; Olichney, John M.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Peskind, Elaine; Petersen, Ronald C.; Pierce, Aimee; Poon, Wayne W.; Potter, Huntington; Quinn, Joseph F.; Raj, Ashok; Raskind, Murray; Reiman, Eric M.; Reisberg, Barry; Reitz, Christiane; Ringman, John M.; Roberson, Erik D.; Rosen, Howard J.; Rosenberg, Roger N.; Sano, Mary; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schneider, Julie A.; Schneider, Lon S.; Seeley, William W.; Smith, Amanda G.; Sonnen, Joshua A.; Spina, Salvatore; Stern, Robert A.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Valladares, Otto; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Vinters, Harry V.; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Wang, Li-San; Weintraub, Sandra; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.; Williamson, Jennifer; Woltjer, Randall L.; Wright, Clinton B.; Younkin, Steven G.; Yu, Chang-En; Yu, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatitis is a complex, progressively destructive inflammatory disorder. Alcohol was long thought to be the primary causative agent, but genetic contributions have been of interest since the discovery that rare PRSS1, CFTR, and SPINK1 variants were associated with pancreatitis risk. We now report two significant genome-wide associations identified and replicated at PRSS1-PRSS2 (1×10-12) and x-linked CLDN2 (p < 1×10-21) through a two-stage genome-wide study (Stage 1, 676 cases and 4507 controls; Stage 2, 910 cases and 4170 controls). The PRSS1 variant affects susceptibility by altering expression of the primary trypsinogen gene. The CLDN2 risk allele is associated with atypical localization of claudin-2 in pancreatic acinar cells. The homozygous (or hemizygous male) CLDN2 genotype confers the greatest risk, and its alleles interact with alcohol consumption to amplify risk. These results could partially explain the high frequency of alcohol-related pancreatitis in men – male hemizygous frequency is 0.26, female homozygote is 0.07. PMID:23143602

  3. Copyright 0 1991 by the GeneticsSocietyof America New SNF Genes, GAL11 and GRRl Affect SUC2 Expressionin

    E-print Network

    Vallier, Laura

    Copyright 0 1991 by the GeneticsSocietyof America New SNF Genes, GAL11 and GRRl Affect SUC2 in raffinose utilization.In addition to mutations in SUCP and previously identified SNF genes, we recovered in previous mutant searches (CARLSON,OSMONDand BOTSTEIN1981;NEIGEBORNand CARLSON1984).The SNF (sucrose

  4. ALTERED SENSITIVITY OF THE MOUSE FETUS TO IMPAIRED PROSTATIC BUD FORMATION BY DIOXIN: INFLUENCE OF GENETIC BACKGROUND AND NULL EXPRESSION OF TGF-ALFA AND EGF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Altered sensitivity of the mouse fetus to impaired prostatic bud formation by dioxin: Influence of genetic background and null expression of TGF and EGF.
    Rasmussen, N.T., Lin T-M., Fenton, S.E., Abbott, B.D. and R.E. Peterson.
    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)...

  5. Search and insights into novel genetic alterations leading to classical and atypical Werner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Junko; Hisama, Fuki M

    2014-01-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are a group of disorders with multiple features resembling accelerated aging. Adult-onset Werner syndrome (WS) and childhood-onset Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome are the best known examples. The discovery of genes responsible for such syndromes has facilitated our understanding of the basic mechanisms of aging as well as the pathogenesis of other common, age-related diseases. Our International Registry of Werner Syndrome accesses progeroid pedigrees from all over the world, including those for whom we have ruled out a mutation at the WRN locus. Cases without WRN mutations are operationally categorized as 'atypical WS' (AWS). In 2003, we identified LMNA mutations among a subset of AWS cases using a candidate gene approach. As of 2013, the Registry has 142 WS patients with WRN mutations, 11 AWS patients with LMNA mutations, and 49 AWS patients that have neither WRN nor LMNA mutations. Efforts are underway to identify the responsible genes for AWS with unknown genetic causes. While WS and AWS are rare disorders, the causative genes have been shown to have much wider implications for cancer, cardiovascular disease and the biology of aging. Remarkably, centenarian studies revealed WRN and LMNA polymorphic variants among those who have escaped various geriatric disorders. PMID:24401204

  6. Indirect genetic effects for growth rate in domestic pigs alter aggressive and manipulative biting behaviour.

    PubMed

    Camerlink, Irene; Ursinus, Winanda W; Bijma, Piter; Kemp, Bas; Bolhuis, J Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Indirect genetic effects (IGEs) are heritable effects of an individual on phenotypic values of others, and may result from social interactions. We determined the behavioural consequences of selection for IGEs for growth (IGEg) in pigs in a G × E treatment design. Pigs (n = 480) were selected for high versus low IGEg with a contrast of 14 g average daily gain and were housed in either barren or straw-enriched pens (n = 80). High IGEg pigs showed from 8 to 23 weeks age 40% less aggressive biting (P = 0.006), 27% less ear biting (P = 0.03), and 40% less biting on enrichment material (P = 0.005). High IGEg pigs had a lower tail damage score (high 2.0; low 2.2; P = 0.004), and consumed 30 % less jute sacks (P = 0.002). Selection on high IGEg reduced biting behaviours additive to the, generally much larger, effects of straw-bedding (P < 0.01), with no G × E interactions. These results show opportunities to reduce harmful biting behaviours in pigs. PMID:25227986

  7. Diet- and Genetically-Induced Obesity Differentially Affect the Fecal Microbiome and Metabolome in Apc1638N Mice

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Laurence D.; Iyer, Lakshmanan K.; Liu, Zhenhua; Kane, Anne V.; Chen, C-Y. Oliver; Tai, Albert K.; Bowman, Thomas A.; Obin, Martin S.; Mason, Joel B.; Greenberg, Andrew S.; Choi, Sang-Woon; Selhub, Jacob; Paul, Ligi; Crott, Jimmy W.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC), and alterations in the colonic microbiome and metabolome may be mechanistically involved in this relationship. The relative contribution of diet and obesity per se are unclear. We compared the effect of diet- and genetically-induced obesity on the intestinal microbiome and metabolome in a mouse model of CRC. Apc1638N mice were made obese by either high fat (HF) feeding or the presence of the Leprdb/db (DbDb) mutation. Intestinal tumors were quantified and stool microbiome and metabolome were profiled. Genetic obesity, and to a lesser extent HF feeding, promoted intestinal tumorigenesis. Each induced distinct microbial patterns: taxa enriched in HF were mostly Firmicutes (6 of 8) while those enriched in DbDb were split between Firmicutes (7 of 12) and Proteobacteria (5 of 12). Parabecteroides distasonis was lower in tumor-bearing mice and its abundance was inversely associated with colonic Il1b production (p<0.05). HF and genetic obesity altered the abundance of 49 and 40 fecal metabolites respectively, with 5 in common. Of these 5, adenosine was also lower in obese and in tumor-bearing mice (p<0.05) and its concentration was inversely associated with colonic Il1b and Tnf production (p<0.05). HF and genetic obesity differentially alter the intestinal microbiome and metabolome. A depletion of adenosine and P.distasonis in tumor-bearing mice could play a mechanistic role in tumor formation. Adenosine and P. distasonis have previously been shown to be anti-inflammatory in the colon and we postulate their reduction could promote tumorigenesis by de-repressing inflammation. PMID:26284788

  8. Citrus Leaf Volatiles as Affected by Developmental Stage and Genetic Type

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Muhammad; Jiang, Qian; Zhang, Bo; Xu, Changjie; Chen, Kunsong

    2013-01-01

    Major volatiles from young and mature leaves of different citrus types were analyzed by headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME)-GC-MS. A total of 123 components were identified form nine citrus cultivars, including nine aldehydes, 19 monoterpene hydrocarbons, 27 oxygenated monoterpenes, 43 sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, eight oxygenated sesquiterpenes, two ketones, six esters and nine miscellaneous. Young leaves produced higher amounts of volatiles than mature leaves in most cultivars. The percentage of aldehyde and monoterpene hydrocarbons increased, whilst oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes compounds decreased during leaf development. Linalool was the most abundant compound in young leaves, whereas limonene was the chief component in mature ones. Notably, linalool content decreased, while limonene increased, during leaf development in most cultivars. Leaf volatiles were also affected by genetic types. A most abundant volatile in one or several genotypes can be absent in another one(s), such as limonene in young leaves of lemon vs. Satsuma mandarin and ?-terpinene in mature leaves of three genotypes vs. the other four. Compositional data was subjected to multivariate statistical analysis, and variations in leaf volatiles were identified and clustered into six groups. This research determining the relationship between production of major volatiles from different citrus varieties and leaf stages could be of use for industrial and culinary purposes. PMID:23994837

  9. Altered Intrathalamic GABAA Neurotransmission in a Mouse Model of a Human Genetic Absence Epilepsy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chengwen; Ding, Li; Deel, M. Elizabeth; Ferrick, Elizabeth A.; Emeson, Ronald B.; Gallagher, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that heterozygous deletion of Gabra1, the mouse homolog of the human absence epilepsy gene that encodes the GABAA receptor (GABAAR) ?1 subunit, causes absence seizures. We showed that cortex partially compensates for this deletion by increasing the cell surface expression of residual ?1 subunit and by increasing ?3 subunit expression. Absence seizures also involve two thalamic nuclei: the ventrobasal (VB) nucleus, which expresses only the ?1 and ?4 subtypes of GABAAR ? subunits, and the reticular (nRT) nucleus, which expresses only the ?3 subunit subtype. Here, we found that, unlike cortex, VB exhibited significantly reduced total and synaptic ?1 subunit expression. In addition, heterozygous ?1 subunit deletion substantially reduced miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current (mIPSC) peak amplitudes and frequency in VB. However, there was no change in expression of the extrasynaptic ?4 or ? subunits in VB and, unlike other models of absence epilepsy, no change in tonic GABAAR currents. Although heterozygous ?1 subunit knockout increased ?3 subunit expression in medial thalamic nuclei, it did not alter ?3 subunit expression in nRT. However, it did enlarge the presynaptic vesicular inhibitory amino acid transporter puncta and lengthen the time constant of mIPSC decay in nRT. We conclude that increased tonic GABAA currents are not necessary for absence seizures. In addition, heterozygous loss of ?1 subunit disinhibits VB by substantially reducing phasic GABAergic currents and surprisingly, it also increases nRT inhibition by prolonging phasic currents. The increased inhibition in nRT likely represents a partial compensation that helps reduce absence seizures. PMID:25447232

  10. The Double-Edged Sword of Genetic Accounts of Criminality: Causal Attributions From Genetic Ascriptions Affect Legal Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Benjamin Y; Heine, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    Much debate exists surrounding the applicability of genetic information in the courtroom, making the psychological processes underlying how people consider this information important to explore. This article addresses how people think about different kinds of causal explanations in legal decision-making contexts. Three studies involving a total of 600 Mechanical Turk and university participants found that genetic, versus environmental, explanations of criminal behavior lead people to view the applicability of various defense claims differently, perceive the perpetrator's mental state differently, and draw different causal attributions. Moreover, mediation and path analyses highlight the double-edged nature of genetic attributions-they simultaneously reduce people's perception of the perpetrator's sense of control while increasing people's tendencies to attribute the cause to internal factors and to expect the perpetrator to reoffend. These countervailing relations, in turn, predict sentencing in opposite directions, although no overall differences in sentencing or ultimate verdicts were found. PMID:26498975

  11. Altering Trehalose-6-Phosphate Content in Transgenic Potato Tubers Affects Tuber Growth and Alters Responsiveness to Hormones during Sprouting1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Debast, Stefan; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Hajirezaei, Mohammad R.; Hofmann, Jörg; Sonnewald, Uwe; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Börnke, Frederik

    2011-01-01

    Trehalose-6-phosphate (T6P) is a signaling metabolite that regulates carbon metabolism, developmental processes, and growth in plants. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), T6P signaling is, at least in part, mediated through inhibition of the SNF1-related protein kinase SnRK1. To investigate the role of T6P signaling in a heterotrophic, starch-accumulating storage organ, transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants with altered T6P levels specifically in their tubers were generated. Transgenic lines with elevated T6P levels (B33-TPS, expressing Escherichia coli osmoregulatory trehalose synthesis A [OtsA], which encodes a T6P synthase) displayed reduced starch content, decreased ATP contents, and increased respiration rate diagnostic for high metabolic activity. On the other hand, lines with significantly reduced T6P (B33-TPP, expressing E. coli OtsB, which encodes a T6P phosphatase) showed accumulation of soluble carbohydrates, hexose phosphates, and ATP, no change in starch when calculated on a fresh weight basis, and a strongly reduced tuber yield. [14C]Glucose feeding to transgenic tubers indicated that carbon partitioning between starch and soluble carbohydrates was not altered. Transcriptional profiling of B33-TPP tubers revealed that target genes of SnRK1 were strongly up-regulated and that T6P inhibited potato tuber SnRK1 activity in vitro. Among the SnRK1 target genes in B33-TPP tubers, those involved in the promotion of cell proliferation and growth were down-regulated, while an inhibitor of cell cycle progression was up-regulated. T6P-accumulating tubers were strongly delayed in sprouting, while those with reduced T6P sprouted earlier than the wild type. Early sprouting of B33-TPP tubers correlated with a reduced abscisic acid content. Collectively, our data indicate that T6P plays an important role for potato tuber growth. PMID:21670224

  12. Anxiety and affective disorder comorbidity related to serotonin and other neurotransmitter systems: obsessive–compulsive disorder as an example of overlapping clinical and genetic heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Dennis L.; Moya, Pablo R.; Fox, Meredith A.; Rubenstein, Liza M.; Wendland, Jens R.; Timpano, Kiara R.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) have also been shown to have comorbid lifetime diagnoses of major depressive disorder (MDD; rates greater than 70%), bipolar disorder (rates greater than 10%) and other anxiety disorders (e.g. panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)). In addition, overlap exists in some common genetic variants (e.g. the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4), the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene), and rare variants in genes/chromosomal abnormalities (e.g. the 22q11 microdeletion syndrome) found across the affective/anxiety disorder spectrums. OCD has been proposed as a possible independent entity for DSM-5, but by others thought best retained as an anxiety disorder subtype (its current designation in DSM-IV), and yet by others considered best in the affective disorder spectrum. This review focuses on OCD, a well-studied but still puzzling heterogeneous disorder, regarding alterations in serotonergic, dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in addition to other systems involved, and how related genes may be involved in the comorbidity of anxiety and affective disorders. OCD resembles disorders such as depression, in which gene × gene interactions, gene × environment interactions and stress elements coalesce to yield OC symptoms and, in some individuals, full-blown OCD with multiple comorbid disorders. PMID:23440468

  13. Anxiety and affective disorder comorbidity related to serotonin and other neurotransmitter systems: obsessive-compulsive disorder as an example of overlapping clinical and genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Dennis L; Moya, Pablo R; Fox, Meredith A; Rubenstein, Liza M; Wendland, Jens R; Timpano, Kiara R

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have also been shown to have comorbid lifetime diagnoses of major depressive disorder (MDD; rates greater than 70%), bipolar disorder (rates greater than 10%) and other anxiety disorders (e.g. panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)). In addition, overlap exists in some common genetic variants (e.g. the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4), the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene), and rare variants in genes/chromosomal abnormalities (e.g. the 22q11 microdeletion syndrome) found across the affective/anxiety disorder spectrums. OCD has been proposed as a possible independent entity for DSM-5, but by others thought best retained as an anxiety disorder subtype (its current designation in DSM-IV), and yet by others considered best in the affective disorder spectrum. This review focuses on OCD, a well-studied but still puzzling heterogeneous disorder, regarding alterations in serotonergic, dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in addition to other systems involved, and how related genes may be involved in the comorbidity of anxiety and affective disorders. OCD resembles disorders such as depression, in which gene × gene interactions, gene × environment interactions and stress elements coalesce to yield OC symptoms and, in some individuals, full-blown OCD with multiple comorbid disorders. PMID:23440468

  14. A pilot study evaluating genetic alterations that drive tobacco- and betel quid-associated oral cancer in Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Dhirendra Singh; Chattopadhyay, Indranil; Verma, Anand; Devi, Thoudam Regina; Singh, L C; Sharma, Jagannath Dev; Kataki, Amal Ch; Saxena, Sunita; Kapur, Sujala

    2014-09-01

    The susceptibility of an individual to oral cancer is mediated by genetic factors and carcinogen-exposure behaviors such as betel quid chewing, tobacco use, and alcohol consumption. This pilot study was aimed to identify the genetic alteration in 100 bp upstream and downstream flanking regions in addition to the exonic regions of 169 cancer-associated genes by using Next Generation sequencing with aim to elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of tobacco- and betel quid-associated oral cancer of Northeast India. To understand the role of chemical compounds present in tobacco and betel quid associated with the progression of oral cancer, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion and deletion (Indels) found in this study were analyzed for their association with chemical compounds found in tobacco and betel quid using Comparative Toxogenomic Database. Genes (AR, BRCA1, IL8, and TP53) with novel SNP were found to be associated with arecoline which is the major component of areca nut. Genes (BARD1, BRCA2, CCND2, IGF1R, MSH6, and RASSF1) with novel deletion and genes (APC, BRMS1, CDK2AP1, CDKN2B, GAS1, IGF1R, and RB1) with novel insertion were found to be associated with aflatoxin B1 which is produced by fermented areca nut. Genes (ADH6, APC, AR, BARD1, BRMS1, CDKN1A, E2F1, FGFR4, FLNC, HRAS, IGF1R, IL12B, IL8, NBL1, STAT5B, and TP53) with novel SNP were found to be associated with aflatoxin B1. Genes (ATM, BRCA1, CDKN1A, EGFR, IL8, and TP53) with novel SNP were found to be associated with tobacco specific nitrosamines. PMID:24943687

  15. Prozac affects stickleback nest quality without altering androgen, spiggin or aggression levels during a 21-day breeding test.

    PubMed

    Sebire, Marion; Elphinstone Davis, Jessica; Hatfield, Robert; Winberg, Svante; Katsiadaki, Ioanna

    2015-11-01

    Pharmaceuticals are increasingly being used in human and veterinary medicine, and their presence in the aquatic environment may present a threat to non-target aquatic organisms. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (Prozac) has been reported to affect diverse behaviours (feeding, aggression, and reproduction) and also the endocrine system (steroid biosynthesis pathway) in fish. To investigate these claims further, and in particular effects on androgen synthesis, male three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) were exposed to fluoxetine at 0, 3.2, 10 and 32?g/L in a flow-through system for 21 days. Their sex was determined prior to exposure using a non-invasive method to collect DNA for determining the genetic sex, reported here for the first time. This was necessary as the exposure required males of a non-breeding status which had not developed secondary characteristics. Post exposure a number of biochemical (serotonin, steroid and spiggin levels) and apical (aggressive behaviour) endpoints were measured. No effects were detected on morphometric parameters, spiggin or androgen (11-ketotestosterone) levels. However, all fluoxetine-exposed male fish had higher cortisol levels in comparison to the control fish, although this effect only persisted throughout the whole exposure duration at the highest concentration (32?g/L). In addition, the ratio of 5-HIAA/5-HT (serotonin metabolite/serotonin) was significantly lower in the brains of males exposed to fluoxetine at all concentrations tested. Although we found no differences in the number of nests built by the males, the quality of the nests produced by the fluoxetine-exposed males was generally inferior consisting only of a basic, rudimentary structure. Males exposed to 32?g/L of fluoxetine displayed a delayed response to a simulated threat (rival male via own mirror image) and were less aggressive (number of bites and attacks) toward their mirror image, but these differences were not statistically significant. In summary, fluoxetine exposure resulted in reduced serotonergic activity in the male three-spined stickleback brain suggesting that the mechanism of action between humans and fish is at least partially conserved. Furthermore, this study provided additional evidence of cross-talk between the serotonergic and stress axes as demonstrated by the perturbations in cortisol levels. This potentially complex interaction at brain level may be responsible for the effects observed on nest quality, an endpoint with serious ecological consequences for this species. Finally, despite our hypothesis (an effect on steroid biosynthesis, based on limited literature evidence), we observed no effects of fluoxetine exposure (at the concentrations and duration employed) on male stickleback androgen levels. PMID:26453812

  16. Titanium Mass-balance Analysis of Paso Robles Soils: Elemental Gains and Losses as Affected by Acid Alteration Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, Brad; Ming, Douglas W.

    2010-01-01

    The Columbia Hills soils have been exposed to aqueous alteration in alkaline [1] as well as acid conditions [2,3]. The Paso Robles class soils are bright soils that possess the highest S concentration of any soil measured on Mars [2]. Ferric-sulfate detection by Moessbauer analysis indicated that acid solutions were involved in forming these soils [4]. These soils are proposed to have formed by alteration of nearby rock by volcanic hydrothermal or fumarolic activity. The Paso Robles soils consist of the original Paso Robles-disturbed-Pasadena (PR-dist), Paso Robles- PasoLight (PR-PL), Arad-Samra, Arad-Hula, Tyrone- Berker Island1 and Tyrone-MountDarwin [2 ,3. ]Chemical characteristics indicate that the PR-dist and PR-PL soils could be derived from acid weathering of local Wishstone rocks while the Samra and Hula soils are likely derived from local Algonquin-Iroquet rock [3]. The Paso Robles soils were exposed to acidic sulfur bearing fluids; however, little else is known about the chemistry of the alteration fluid and its effects on the alteration of the proposed parent materials. The objectives of this work are to conduct titanium normalized mass-balance analysis to1) assess elemental gains and losses from the parent materials in the formation of the Paso Robles soils and 2) utilize this information to indicate the chemical nature of the alteration fluids.

  17. Genetic background, and not ontogenetic effects, affects avian seasonal timing of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Gienapp, P; van Noordwijk, A J; Visser, M E

    2013-10-01

    Avian seasonal timing is a life-history trait with important fitness consequences and which is currently under directional selection due to climate change. To predict micro-evolution in this trait, it is crucial to properly estimate its heritability. Heritabilities are often estimated from pedigreed wild populations. As these are observational data, it leaves the possibility that the resemblance between related individuals is not due to shared genes but to ontogenetic effects; when the environment for the offspring provided by early laying pairs differs from that by late pairs and the laying dates of these offspring when they reproduce themselves is affected by this environment, this may lead to inflated heritability estimates. Using simulation studies, we first tested whether and how much such an early environmental effect can inflate heritability estimates from animal models, and we showed that pedigree structure determines by how much early environmental effects inflate heritability estimates. We then used data from a wild population of great tits (Parus major) to compare laying dates of females born early in the season in first broods and from sisters born much later, in second broods. These birds are raised under very different environmental conditions but have the same genetic background. The laying dates of first and second brood offspring do not differ when they reproduce themselves, clearly showing that ontogenetic effects are very small and hence, family resemblance in timing is due to genes. This finding is essential for the interpretation of the heritabilities reported from wild populations and for predicting micro-evolution in response to climate change. PMID:23837446

  18. Loss of heterozygosity and microsatellite instability in breast hyperplasia. No obligate correlation of these genetic alterations with subsequent malignancy.

    PubMed Central

    Kasami, M.; Vnencak-Jones, C. L.; Manning, S.; Dupont, W. D.; Page, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity and microsatellite instability have been often reported in breast cancer and seldom in proliferative breast disease (PBD). DNA samples from microdissected PBD lesions, including papillomas (25 lesions), from 8 women were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction for loss of heterozygosity and microsatellite instability at 10 loci including INT-2 oncogene locus, D17S796 (the p53 gene region), and D17S579 (in the region of the BRCA-1 gene). In a patient, five loci with microsatellite instability and two loci with loss of heterozygosity were identified in one papilloma with florid hyperplasia and atypia, and 10 other PBD lesions were negative for genetic alteration (GA) and atypia. Three loci with microsatellite instability were identified in another PBD lesion without atypia, whereas another lesion from this second patient had minimal atypia without GAs. These two patients have been well for more than 20 years. No other patient, including a woman developing cancer, had GAs. We detected GAs in PBD (25% of women, 8% of lesions). Incomplete correlation between GAs and anatomic atypia was suggested. It seems evident that several GAs in PBD lesions may not indicate clinically meaningful premalignancy for remaining breast. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9176386

  19. Analysis of protein gene products in cells with altered chromosome sets for the purpose of genetic mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Shishkin, S.S.; Zakharov, S.F.; Gromov, P.S.; Shcheglova, M.V.; Kukharenko, V.I.; Shilov, A.G.; Matveeva, N.M.; Zhdanova, N.S.; Efimochkin, A.S.; Krokhina, T.B. |

    1994-12-01

    Two-dimensional electrophoresis was used for analyzing proteins in hybrid cells that contained single human chromosomes (chromosome 5, chromosome 21, or chromosomes 5 and 21) against the background of the mouse genome. By comparing the protein patterns of hybrid and parent cells (about 1000 protein fractions for each kind of cell), five fractions among proteins of hybrid cells were supposedly identified as human proteins. The genes of two of them are probably located on chromosome 5, and those of the other three on chromosome 21. Moreover, analysis of proteins in fibroblasts of patients with the cri-du-chat syndrome (5p-) revealed a decrease in the content of two proteins as compared with those in preparations of diploid fibroblasts. This fact was regarded as evidence that two corresponding genes are located on the short arm of chromosome 5. Methodological problems associated with the use of protein pattern analysis in cells with altered chromosome sets for the purposes of genetic mapping are discussed.

  20. Response to Dietary Phosphate Deficiency is Affected by Genetic Background in Growing Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concern over the environmental impact of phosphate (P) excretion from pig production has led to reduced dietary P supplementation. To examine how genetics influence P utilization, 94 gilts sired by 2 genetic lines (PIC337 and PIC280) were fed either a P adequate diet (PA) or a 20% P deficient diet ...

  1. Prenatal genetic testing: an investigation of determining factors affecting the decision-making process.

    PubMed

    Pivetti, Monica; Melotti, Giannino

    2013-02-01

    Despite the increase in popularity of prenatal genetic testing, relatively little is known about the role psychological factors play in the decision-making process. In this analogue study, a sample of Italian female university students was used to investigate determining factors that predict the intention of undergoing prenatal genetic testing. Structural Equation Modelling was used to describe the dynamic interplay between knowledge, beliefs, attitudes and health-related behaviour such as prenatal genetic testing. Following the Theory of Reasoned Action, three dimensions predicted the intention to undergo prenatal genetic testing: the need for more scientific information, a positive attitude towards genetic testing, and the inclination to terminate pregnancy after receiving a positive test result. Results showed that less religious women tended to be more in favour of prenatal tests and in undertaking such tests. This preliminary study provides genetic counsellors and policy makers with a clearer picture of their clients' motives and attitudes behind the decision-making process of prenatal genetic testing, contributing to improving both the communication process between counsellors and their clients and the organization of genetic services. PMID:22477148

  2. Does population size affect genetic diversity? A test with sympatric lizard species.

    PubMed

    Hague, M T J; Routman, E J

    2016-01-01

    Genetic diversity is a fundamental requirement for evolution and adaptation. Nonetheless, the forces that maintain patterns of genetic variation in wild populations are not completely understood. Neutral theory posits that genetic diversity will increase with a larger effective population size and the decreasing effects of drift. However, the lack of compelling evidence for a relationship between genetic diversity and population size in comparative studies has generated some skepticism over the degree that neutral sequence evolution drives overall patterns of diversity. The goal of this study was to measure genetic diversity among sympatric populations of related lizard species that differ in population size and other ecological factors. By sampling related species from a single geographic location, we aimed to reduce nuisance variance in genetic diversity owing to species differences, for example, in mutation rates or historical biogeography. We compared populations of zebra-tailed lizards and western banded geckos, which are abundant and short-lived, to chuckwallas and desert iguanas, which are less common and long-lived. We assessed population genetic diversity at three protein-coding loci for each species. Our results were consistent with the predictions of neutral theory, as the abundant species almost always had higher levels of haplotype diversity than the less common species. Higher population genetic diversity in the abundant species is likely due to a combination of demographic factors, including larger local population sizes (and presumably effective population sizes), faster generation times and high rates of gene flow with other populations. PMID:26306730

  3. 33 CFR 149.15 - What is the process for submitting alterations and modifications affecting the design and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...), during the review and approval process of a proposed alteration or modification, may consult with the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the process for...) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND EQUIPMENT General § 149.15 What is the...

  4. 33 CFR 149.15 - What is the process for submitting alterations and modifications affecting the design and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...), during the review and approval process of a proposed alteration or modification, may consult with the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is the process for...) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND EQUIPMENT General § 149.15 What is the...

  5. Highthroughput soybean gene expression analysis The changes in the atmosphere are altering gene expression and affecting the interaction

    E-print Network

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    High­throughput soybean gene expression analysis The changes in the atmosphere are altering gene soybean oligoarrays to analyze changes in the gene expression profile. Affymetrix GeneChip® Soybean Genome with Virus Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) VIGS is used to suppress genes at transcript level by using a viral

  6. Vocal production and playback of altered song do not affect ZENK expression in black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus).

    PubMed

    Roach, Sean P; Lockyer, Ashley C; Yousef, Tareq; Mennill, Daniel J; Phillmore, Leslie S

    2016-02-01

    The two-note fee bee song of the black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) is sung at many different absolute frequencies, but the relative frequencies between the start and end of the fee note (the glissando) and between the fee and the bee notes (the inter-note ratio) are preserved regardless of absolute frequency. If these relative frequencies are experimentally manipulated, birds exhibit reduced behavioural responses to playback of altered songs both in field studies and laboratory studies. Interestingly, males appear to be sensitive to alterations in the glissando, while females appear to be sensitive to alterations in both the glissando and the inter-note ratio. In this study, we sought to determine whether the behaviour of male and female chickadees corresponds to differences in zenk protein immunoreactivity (ZENK-ir) in auditory perceptual regions following playback of fee bee songs with typical and altered pitch ratios. Overall, there was a small but significant sex difference in ZENK-ir (females>males), but altering relative frequencies did not reduce ZENK-ir compared to typical song. Birds did vocalize less in response to playback of songs that lacked an inter-note interval, but amount of singing fee bee song, chick-a-dee calls, or gargles was not correlated with ZENK-ir in perceptual regions (caudomedial nidopallium, NCM and caudomedial mesopallium, CMM) or in HVC, which is part of the song system. Our results confirm that ZENK-ir in NCM and CMM is not involved in fine-grain perceptual discrimination, however it did not support the idea that increased vocalizing increases ZENK-ir in HVC. PMID:26523856

  7. Spinocerebellar Ataxia: Patient and Health Professional Perspectives on Whether and How Patents Affect Access to Clinical Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Ashton; Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Genetic testing for spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) is used in diagnosis of rare movement disorders. Such testing generally does not affect treatment, but confirmation of mutations in a known gene can confirm diagnosis and end an often years-long quest for the cause of distressing and disabling symptoms. Through interviews and a web forum hosted by the National Ataxia Foundation, patients and health professionals related their experiences with patents’ impact on access to genetic testing for SCA. In the United States, Athena Diagnostics holds either a patent or an exclusive license to a patent in the case of 6 SCA variants (SCA1-3 & 6-8) and two other hereditary ataxias (Friedreich’s Ataxia and Early Onset Ataxia). Athena has enforced its exclusive rights to SCA-related patents by sending cease and desist letters to multiple laboratories offering genetic testing for inherited neurological conditions, including SCA. Roughly half of web forum respondents had decided not to get genetic tests. Price, coverage and reimbursement by insurers and health plans, and fear of genetic discrimination were the main reasons cited for deciding not to get tested. Price was cited as an access concern by the physicians, and as sole US provider, coverage and reimbursement depend on having payment agreements between Athena and payers. In cases where payers do not reimburse, the patient is responsible for payment, although some patients can apply to the voluntary Athena Access and Patient Protection Programs offered by the company. PMID:20393313

  8. Genetic factors affecting gene transcription and catalytic activity of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases in human liver

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wanqing; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Gamazon, Eric R.; Mirkov, Snezana; Chen, Peixian; Wu, Kehua; Sun, Chang; Cox, Nancy J.; Cook, Edwin; Das, Soma; Ratain, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to discover cis- and trans-acting factors significantly affecting mRNA expression and catalytic activity of human hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). Transcription levels of five major hepatic UGT1A (UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A6 and UGT1A9) and five UGT2B (UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B10, UGT2B15 and UGT2B17) genes were quantified in human liver tissue samples (n = 125) using real-time PCR. Glucuronidation activities of 14 substrates were measured in 47 livers. We genotyped 167 tagSNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) in UGT1A (n = 43) and UGT2B (n = 124), as well as the known functional UGT1A1*28 and UGT2B17 CNV (copy number variation) polymorphisms. Transcription levels of 15 transcription factors (TFs) known to regulate these UGTs were quantified. We found that UGT expression and activity were highly variable among the livers (median and range of coefficient of variations: 135%, 74–217% and 52%, 39–105%, respectively). CAR, PXR and ESR1 were found to be the most important trans-regulators of UGT transcription (median and range of correlation coefficients: 46%, 6–58%; 47%, 9–58%; and 52%, 24–75%, respectively). Hepatic UGT activities were mainly determined by UGT gene transcription levels. Twenty-one polymorphisms were significantly (FDR-adjusted P < 0.05) associated with mRNA expression and/or activities of UGT1A1, UGT1A3 and UGT2B17. We found novel SNPs in the UGT2B17 CNV region accounting for variability in UGT2B17 gene transcription and testosterone glucuronidation rate, in addition to that attributable to the UGT2B17 CNV. Our study discovered novel pharmacogenetic markers and provided detailed insight into the genetic network regulating hepatic UGTs. PMID:24879639

  9. Alterations in lignin content and phenylpropanoids pathway in date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) tissues affected by brittle leaf disease.

    PubMed

    Saidi, Mohammed Najib; Bouaziz, Donia; Hammami, Ines; Namsi, Ahmed; Drira, Noureddine; Gargouri-Bouzid, Radhia

    2013-10-01

    Brittle leaf disease or Maladie de la Feuille Cassante (MFC) is a lethal disorder of date palm that has assumed epidemic proportions in the oases of Tunisia and Algeria. No pathogen could ever be associated with the disease, while leaflets of affected palms have been previously shown to be deficient in manganese. The work reported here aims to understand the biochemical basis of the date palm response to this disorder. Since the typical disease symptom is the leaf fragility, we have investigated lignin content in leaves and roots. Strong decrease in total lignin content was observed in affected leaves, while lignin content increased in affected roots. Histochemical analyses showed hyperlignification thicker suberin layer in roots cortical cells. The phenylpropanoids pathway was also disrupted in leaves and roots, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase and cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase gene expression was affected by the disease which severely affects the cell wall integrity. PMID:23987806

  10. Genetic variation responsible for mouse strain differences in integrin {alpha}{sub 2} expression is associated with altered platelet responses to collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tong-Tong; Larrucea, Susana; Souza, Shiloe; Leal, Suzanne M.; Lopez, Jose A.; Rubin, Edward M.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Bray, Paul F.

    2003-11-01

    Formation of a thrombus at the site of an injured vessel requires the coordinated action of critical platelet plasma membrane adhesion molecules. The most important initial contact of platelets with the exposed endothelial collagen and von Willebrand factor (VWF) involves the binding of glycoprotein (GP) Ib{alpha} to immobilized VWF. The VWF-GPIb{alpha} interaction is ''fast-on'' and relatively ''fast-off,'' and results in a rolling of platelets along the exposed subendothelium. This slowing of the platelets allows binding of the activating collagen-receptor, GPVI, to its ligand, resulting in activation of platelet integrins and subsequent firm adhesion, where the reactions between receptor and ligand are relatively ''slow-on'' but irreversible. The binding of integrin {alpha}{sub 2} {beta}{sub 1} underlying firm adhesion. Intracellular signaling between and through these adhesive receptors plays a crucial role in platelet adhesion and aggregation. The importance of the GPIb-IX-V and {alpha}{sub IIb} {beta}{sub 3} in normal hemostasis is under scored by the bleeding diatheses that have been reported in patients with quantitative or qualitative deficiencies of the genes that encode them. Mouse models are now commonplace for studying hemostasis and thrombosis, and important insights pertaining to the major platelet adhesive receptors have been gleaned from mouse studies involving targeted disruptions of the genes for GPIb{alpha}, GPVI, and integrin chains 2,9,10 1,4 IIb 11 and 3.12 A variety of different mouse strains have been used to assess hemostasis. For example, the FVB strain is typically used for transgenic experiments, the 129/Sv strain is used to derive embryonic stem (ES) cells, and the C57 strain is used for uniform background breeding studies. Different strains may exhibit different levels of gene expression, a feature that has been used to elucidate crucial gene regions regulating transcription. We and others have previously studied how genetic changes exert quantitative and qualitative alterations in human platelet adhesive receptors. Polymorphisms of both integrin {alpha}{sub 2} and GPIb have been associated with quantitative differences in receptor levels in healthy individuals. The variation of integrin {alpha}{sub 2} in the normal population is 5-fold, and some portion of this variability has been associated with a C/T polymorphism at nucleotide 807. Individuals homozygous for the 807C or 807T alleles have an average 2-fold difference in platelet {alpha}{sub 2} {beta}{sub 1} levels, and this difference has been linked to increased adhesion to collagen and clinical thrombotic events. Comparable alterations in platelet adhesion receptor expression have not been assessed in different mouse strains. Assessing the functional consequences of subtle genetic variations in humans is challenged by numerous gene-gene and gene environment interactions, and studies in mice can greatly minimize these confounding variables. In addition, comparative sequence analyses between species and between nonhuman primates have proved useful for identifying sequences that affect function and expression. Thus, in the case of platelet adhesion receptors, knowing mouse strain differences in expression levels might be valuable for defining the responsible quantitative trait loci as well as affecting strain choice for particular functional experiments.

  11. Genomic alterations on 8p21-p23 are the most frequent genetic events in stage I squamous cell carcinoma of the lung

    PubMed Central

    KANG, JIUN

    2015-01-01

    Genetic alterations in the early stages of cancer have a close correlation with tumor initiation and potentially activate downstream pathways implicated in tumor progression; however, the method of initiation in sporadic neoplasias is largely unknown. In this study, whole-genome microarray-comparative genomic hybridization was performed to identify the early genetic alterations that define the prognosis of patients with stage I squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung. The most striking finding was the high frequency of copy number losses and hemizygous deletions on chromosome 8p, which occurred in 94.7% (18/19) and 63.2% (12/19) of the cases, respectively, with a delineated minimal common region of 8p21.1-p23.3. More specifically, three loci of homozygous deletions at 8p23.1 were noted in 21.1% (4/19) of the cases. This region contains the following possible target genes, which have previously not been implicated to play a pathogenic role in stage I SCCs: MSRA, MFHAS1, CLDN23, DEFB106A, DEFB105A, LOC441316, FAM90A7P and LOC441318. These findings indicate that genetic alterations on chromosome 8p may be the first step in the initiation of genomic instability in early SCCs, and the newly identified genes in the 8p23.1 chromosomal region might be of interest for the study of the pathophysiology of stage I SCC, as potential targets for therapeutic measures. PMID:25574196

  12. NLRP7 affects trophoblast lineage differentiation, binds to overexpressed YY1 and alters CpG methylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maternal-effect mutations in NLRP7 cause rare biparentally inherited hydatidiform moles (BiHMs), abnormal pregnancies containing hypertrophic vesicular trophoblast but no embryo. BiHM trophoblasts display abnormal DNA methylation patterns affecting maternally methylated germline differentially methy...

  13. Alteration of the alkaloid profile in genetically modified tobacco reveals a role of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in nicotine N-demethylation.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chiu-Yueh; Fan, Longjiang; Kittur, Farooqahmed S; Sun, Kehan; Qiu, Jie; Tang, She; Holliday, Bronwyn M; Xiao, Bingguang; Burkey, Kent O; Bush, Lowell P; Conkling, Mark A; Roje, Sanja; Xie, Jiahua

    2013-02-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme of the tetrahydrofolate (THF)-mediated one-carbon (C1) metabolic network. This enzyme catalyzes the reduction of 5,10-methylene-THF to 5-methyl-THF. The latter donates its methyl group to homocysteine, forming methionine, which is then used for the synthesis of S-adenosyl-methionine, a universal methyl donor for numerous methylation reactions, to produce primary and secondary metabolites. Here, we demonstrate that manipulating tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) MTHFR gene (NtMTHFR1) expression dramatically alters the alkaloid profile in transgenic tobacco plants by negatively regulating the expression of a secondary metabolic pathway nicotine N-demethylase gene, CYP82E4. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and alkaloid analyses revealed that reducing NtMTHFR expression by RNA interference dramatically induced CYP82E4 expression, resulting in higher nicotine-to-nornicotine conversion rates. Conversely, overexpressing NtMTHFR1 suppressed CYP82E4 expression, leading to lower nicotine-to-nornicotine conversion rates. However, the reduced expression of NtMTHFR did not affect the methionine and S-adenosyl-methionine levels in the knockdown lines. Our finding reveals a new regulatory role of NtMTHFR1 in nicotine N-demethylation and suggests that the negative regulation of CYP82E4 expression may serve to recruit methyl groups from nicotine into the C1 pool under C1-deficient conditions. PMID:23221678

  14. Statistics of Scientific Procedures on Living Animals 2013: Experimentation continues to rise - the reliance on genetically-altered animals must be addressed.

    PubMed

    Hudson-Shore, Michelle

    2014-09-01

    The 2013 Statistics of Scientific Procedures on Living Animals reveal that the level of animal experimentation in Great Britain continues to rise, with 4.12 million procedures being conducted. The figures indicate that this is almost exclusively a result of the breeding and use of genetically-altered (GA) animals (i.e. genetically-modified animals, plus those with harmful genetic defects). The breeding of GA animals increased to over half (51%) of all the procedures, and GA animals were involved in 61% of all the procedures. Indeed, if these animals were removed from the statistics, the number of procedures would actually have declined by 4%. It is argued that the Coalition Government has failed to address this issue, and, as a consequence, will not be able to deliver its pledge to reduce animal use in science. Recent publications supporting the need to reassess the dominance of genetic alteration are also discussed, as well as the need to move away from the use of dogs as the default second species in safety testing. The general trends in the species used, and the numbers and types of procedures, are also reviewed. Finally, forthcoming changes to the statistics are discussed. PMID:25290946

  15. Genetics

    MedlinePLUS

    Homozygous; Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  16. The Genetics of Mexico Recapitulates Native American Substructure and Affects Biomedical Traits

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Gignoux, Christopher R.; Fernández-López, Juan Carlos; Zakharia, Fouad; Sikora, Martin; Contreras, Alejandra V.; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Sandoval, Karla; Eng, Celeste; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Ortiz-Tello, Patricia; Robles, Victoria; Kenny, Eimear E.; Nuño-Arana, Ismael; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín-Pérez, Gastón; Granados-Arriola, Julio; Huntsman, Scott; Galanter, Joshua M.; Via, Marc; Ford, Jean G.; Chapela, Rocío; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodríguez-Santana, Jose R.; Romieu, Isabelle; Sienra-Monge, Juan José; Navarro, Blanca del Rio; London, Stephanie J.; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Garcia-Herrera, Rodrigo; Estrada, Karol; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Carnevale, Alessandra; Soberón, Xavier; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Burchard, Esteban Gonzalez; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2014-01-01

    Mexico harbors great cultural and ethnic diversity, yet fine-scale patterns of human genome-wide variation from this region remain largely uncharacterized. We studied genomic variation within Mexico from over 1,000 individuals representing 20 indigenous and 11 mestizo populations. We found striking genetic stratification among indigenous populations within Mexico at varying degrees of geographic isolation. Some groups were as differentiated as Europeans are from East Asians. Pre-Columbian genetic substructure is recapitulated in the indigenous ancestry of admixed mestizo individuals across the country. Furthermore, two independently phenotyped cohorts of Mexicans and Mexican Americans showed a significant association between sub-continental ancestry and lung function. Thus, accounting for fine-scale ancestry patterns is critical for medical and population genetic studies within Mexico, in Mexican-descent populations, and likely in many other populations worldwide. PMID:24926019

  17. Pubertal Onset in Girls is Strongly Influenced by Genetic Variation Affecting FSH Action

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Casper P.; Sørensen, Kaspar; Aksglaede, Lise; Mouritsen, Annette; Mieritz, Mikkel G.; Tinggaard, Jeanette; Wohlfart-Veje, Christine; Petersen, Jørgen Holm; Main, Katharina M.; Meyts, Ewa Rajpert-De; Almstrup, Kristian; Juul, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Age at pubertal onset varies substantially in healthy girls. Although genetic factors are responsible for more than half of the phenotypic variation, only a small part has been attributed to specific genetic polymorphisms identified so far. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) stimulates ovarian follicle maturation and estradiol synthesis which is responsible for breast development. We assessed the effect of three polymorphisms influencing FSH action on age at breast deveopment in a population-based cohort of 964 healthy girls. Girls homozygous for FSHR -29AA (reduced FSH receptor expression) entered puberty 7.4 (2.5–12.4) months later than carriers of the common variants FSHR -29GG+GA, p = 0.003. To our knowledge, this is the strongest genetic effect on age at pubertal onset in girls published to date. PMID:25231187

  18. Pubertal onset in girls is strongly influenced by genetic variation affecting FSH action.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Casper P; Sørensen, Kaspar; Aksglaede, Lise; Mouritsen, Annette; Mieritz, Mikkel G; Tinggaard, Jeanette; Wohlfart-Veje, Christine; Petersen, Jørgen Holm; Main, Katharina M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Almstrup, Kristian; Juul, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Age at pubertal onset varies substantially in healthy girls. Although genetic factors are responsible for more than half of the phenotypic variation, only a small part has been attributed to specific genetic polymorphisms identified so far. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) stimulates ovarian follicle maturation and estradiol synthesis which is responsible for breast development. We assessed the effect of three polymorphisms influencing FSH action on age at breast deveopment in a population-based cohort of 964 healthy girls. Girls homozygous for FSHR -29AA (reduced FSH receptor expression) entered puberty 7.4 (2.5-12.4) months later than carriers of the common variants FSHR -29GG+GA, p = 0.003. To our knowledge, this is the strongest genetic effect on age at pubertal onset in girls published to date. PMID:25231187

  19. Sex differences in the adult HPA axis and affective behaviors are altered by perinatal exposure to a low dose of bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Zhou, Libin; Bai, Yinyang; Zhou, Rong; Chen, Ling

    2014-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogen-mimicking endocrine disrupter, when administered perinatally can affect affective behaviors in adult rodents, however the underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. Postnatal day (PND) 80 vehicle-injected control female rats showed more obvious depression- and anxiety-like behaviors than males, indicative of sexually dimorphic affective behaviors. When female breeders were subcutaneously injected with BPA (2µg/kg) from gestation day 10 to lactation day 7, sex difference of affective behaviors was impaired in their offspring (PND80 BPA-rats), as results that female BPA-rats showed a visible "antianxiety-like" behavior, and male BPA-rats increased depression-like behavior compared to vehicle-injected controls. Notably, basal levels of serum corticosterone and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), and corticotropin-releasing hormone mRNA were increased in male BPA-rats, but not in female BPA-rats, in comparison with vehicle-injected controls. Following mild-stressor the elevation of corticosterone or ACTH levels was higher in male BPA-rats, whereas it was lower in female BPA-rats than vehicle-injected controls. In comparison with vehicle-injected controls, the level of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA in hippocampus or hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was increased in female BPA-rats, while decreased in male BPA-rats. In addition, the levels of hippocampal mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mRNA, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and phospho-cAMP response element binding protein (p-CREB) were increased in female BPA-rats, but were decreased in male BPA-rats. Furthermore, the testosterone level was reduced in male BPA-rats. The results indicate that the perinatal exposure to BPA through altering the GR and MR expression disrupts the GR-mediated feedback of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and MR-induced nNOS-CREB signaling, which alters sex difference in affective behaviors. PMID:24857958

  20. Copyright 1998 by the Genetics Society of America Quantitative Trait Loci Affecting Differences in Floral Morphology

    E-print Network

    Bradshaw, Toby

    . cardinalis flowers are visited mostly by hummingbirds. The genetic control of 12 morphological differences between the flowers of M. lewisii and M. cardinalis was explored in a large linkage mapping population pollination, but they of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling adaptive are exserted in M. cardinalis

  1. Genetic markers that influence feed efficiency phenotypes also affect cattle temperament as measured by flight speed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The measure of flight speed for cattle has been shown to be a predictive indicator of temperament and has also been associated with feed efficiency phenotypes, thus, genetic markers associated with both traits may assist with the selection of animals with calmer disposition and economic value. Chrom...

  2. ISOLATION AND GENETIC CHARACTERIZATION OF A MUTATION AFFECTING RIBOSOMAL RESISTANCE TO CYCLOHEXIMIDE

    E-print Network

    Ares Jr., Manny

    TO CYCLOHEXIMIDE IN TETRAHYMENA MANUEL ARES, JR.l AND PETER J. BRUNS2 Section of Botany, Genetics and Development for cycloheximideresistance in Tetrahymena. The new muta- tion (ChxB) was induced in a line homozygous for Chz/ml. HE biosynthesis and fate of various components of ribosomes in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena

  3. Lathyrism-induced alterations in collagen cross-links influence the mechanical properties of bone material without affecting the mineral.

    PubMed

    Paschalis, E P; Tatakis, D N; Robins, S; Fratzl, P; Manjubala, I; Zoehrer, R; Gamsjaeger, S; Buchinger, B; Roschger, A; Phipps, R; Boskey, A L; Dall'Ara, E; Varga, P; Zysset, P; Klaushofer, K; Roschger, P

    2011-12-01

    In the present study a rat animal model of lathyrism was employed to decipher whether anatomically confined alterations in collagen cross-links are sufficient to influence the mechanical properties of whole bone. Animal experiments were performed under an ethics committee approved protocol. Sixty-four female (47 day old) rats of equivalent weights were divided into four groups (16 per group): Controls were fed a semi-synthetic diet containing 0.6% calcium and 0.6% phosphorus for 2 or 4 weeks and ?-APN treated animals were fed additionally with ?-aminopropionitrile (0.1% dry weight). At the end of this period the rats in the four groups were sacrificed, and L2-L6 vertebra were collected. Collagen cross-links were determined by both biochemical and spectroscopic (Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI)) analyses. Mineral content and distribution (BMDD) were determined by quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI), and mineral maturity/crystallinity by FTIRI techniques. Micro-CT was used to describe the architectural properties. Mechanical performance of whole bone as well as of bone matrix material was tested by vertebral compression tests and by nano-indentation, respectively. The data of the present study indicate that ?-APN treatment changed whole vertebra properties compared to non-treated rats, including collagen cross-links pattern, trabecular bone volume to tissue ratio and trabecular thickness, which were all decreased (p<0.05). Further, compression tests revealed a significant negative impact of ?-APN treatment on maximal force to failure and energy to failure, while stiffness was not influenced. Bone mineral density distribution (BMDD) was not altered either. At the material level, ?-APN treated rats exhibited increased Pyd/Divalent cross-link ratios in areas confined to a newly formed bone. Moreover, nano-indentation experiments showed that the E-modulus and hardness were reduced only in newly formed bone areas under the influence of ?-APN, despite a similar mineral content. In conclusion the results emphasize the pivotal role of collagen cross-links in the determination of bone quality and mechanical integrity. However, in this rat animal model of lathyrism, the coupled alterations of tissue structural properties make it difficult to weigh the contribution of the anatomically confined material changes to the overall mechanical performance of whole bone. Interestingly, the collagen cross-link ratio in bone forming areas had the same profile as seen in actively bone forming trabecular surfaces in human iliac crest biopsies of osteoporotic patients. PMID:21920485

  4. Lathyrism-induced alterations in collagen cross-links influence the mechanical properties of bone material without affecting the mineral

    PubMed Central

    Paschalis, E.P.; Tatakis, D.N.; Robins, S.; Fratzl, P.; Manjubala, I.; Zoehrer, R.; Gamsjaeger, S.; Buchinger, B.; Roschger, A.; Phipps, R.; Boskey, A.L.; Dall'Ara, E.; Varga, P.; Zysset, P.; Klaushofer, K.; Roschger, P.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study a rat animal model of lathyrism was employed to decipher whether anatomically confined alterations in collagen cross-links are sufficient to influence the mechanical properties of whole bone. Animal experiments were performed under an ethics committee approved protocol. Sixty-four female (47 day old) rats of equivalent weights were divided into four groups (16 per group): Controls were fed a semi-synthetic diet containing 0.6% calcium and 0.6% phosphorus for 2 or 4 weeks and ?-APN treated animals were fed additionally with ?-aminopropionitrile (0.1% dry weight). At the end of this period the rats in the four groups were sacrificed, and L2–L6 vertebra were collected. Collagen cross-links were determined by both biochemical and spectroscopic (Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI)) analyses. Mineral content and distribution (BMDD) were determined by quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI), and mineral maturity/crystallinity by FTIRI techniques. Micro-CT was used to describe the architectural properties. Mechanical performance of whole bone as well as of bone matrix material was tested by vertebral compression tests and by nano-indentation, respectively. The data of the present study indicate that ?-APN treatment changed whole vertebra properties compared to non-treated rats, including collagen cross-links pattern, trabecular bone volume to tissue ratio and trabecular thickness, which were all decreased (p < 0.05). Further, compression tests revealed a significant negative impact of ?-APN treatment on maximal force to failure and energy to failure, while stiffness was not influenced. Bone mineral density distribution (BMDD) was not altered either. At the material level, ?-APN treated rats exhibited increased Pyd/Divalent cross-link ratios in areas confined to a newly formed bone. Moreover, nano-indentation experiments showed that the E-modulus and hardness were reduced only in newly formed bone areas under the influence of ?-APN, despite a similar mineral content. In conclusion the results emphasize the pivotal role of collagen cross-links in the determination of bone quality and mechanical integrity. However, in this rat animal model of lathyrism, the coupled alterations of tissue structural properties make it difficult to weigh the contribution of the anatomically confined material changes to the overall mechanical performance of whole bone. Interestingly, the collagen cross-link ratio in bone forming areas had the same profile as seen in actively bone forming trabecular surfaces in human iliac crest biopsies of osteoporotic patients. PMID:21920485

  5. Negative Affect Shares Genetic and Environmental Influences with Symptoms of Childhood Internalizing and Externalizing Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikolajewski, Amy J.; Allan, Nicholas P.; Hart, Sara A.; Lonigan, Christopher J.; Taylor, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    The co-occurrence of internalizing and externalizing disorders suggests that they may have common underlying vulnerability factors. Research has shown that negative affect is moderately positively correlated with both internalizing and externalizing disorders in children. The present study is the first to provide an examination of negative affect

  6. Specific Alterations in Complement Protein Activity of Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus) Hibernating in White-Nose Syndrome Affected Sites

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Marianne S.; Reichard, Jonathan D.; Murtha, Timothy D.; Zahedi, Bita; Fallier, Renee M.; Kunz, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is the most devastating condition ever reported for hibernating bats, causing widespread mortality in the northeastern United States. The syndrome is characterized by cutaneous lesions caused by a recently identified psychrophilic and keratinophylic fungus (Geomyces destructans), depleted fat reserves, atypical behavior, and damage to wings; however, the proximate cause of mortality is still uncertain. To assess relative levels of immunocompetence in bats hibernating in WNS-affected sites compared with levels in unaffected bats, we describe blood plasma complement protein activity in hibernating little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) based on microbicidal competence assays using Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Blood plasma from bats collected during mid-hibernation at WNS-affected sites had higher bactericidal ability against E. coli and S. aureus, but lower fungicidal ability against C. albicans when compared with blood plasma from bats collected at unaffected sites. Within affected sites during mid-hibernation, we observed no difference in microbicidal ability between bats displaying obvious fungal infections compared to those without. Bactericidal ability against E. coli decreased significantly as hibernation progressed in bats collected from an affected site. Bactericidal ability against E. coli and fungicidal ability against C. albicans were positively correlated with body mass index (BMI) during late hibernation. We also compared complement activity against the three microbes within individuals and found that the ability of blood plasma from hibernating M. lucifugus to lyse microbial cells differed as follows: E. coli>S. aureus>C. albicans. Overall, bats affected by WNS experience both relatively elevated and reduced innate immune responses depending on the microbe tested, although the cause of observed immunological changes remains unknown. Additionally, considerable trade-offs may exist between energy conservation and immunological responses. Relationships between immune activity and torpor, including associated energy expenditure, are likely critical components in the development of WNS. PMID:22140440

  7. Altered Sleep Regulation in a Mouse Model of SCN1A-Derived Genetic Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus (GEFS+)

    PubMed Central

    Papale, Ligia A.; Makinson, Christopher D.; Ehlen, J. Christopher; Tufik, Sergio; Decker, Michael J.; Paul, Ketema N.; Escayg, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Summary Purpose Mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel SCN1A are responsible for a number of epilepsy disorders, including genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) and Dravet syndrome. In addition to seizures, patients with SCN1A mutations often experience sleep abnormalities, suggesting that SCN1A may also play a role in the neuronal pathways involved in the regulation of sleep. However, to date, a role for SCN1A in the regulation of sleep architecture has not been directly examined. To fill this gap, we tested the hypothesis that SCN1A contributes to the regulation of sleep architecture, and by extension, that SCN1A dysfunction contributes to the sleep abnormalities observed in patients with SCN1A mutations. Methods Using immunohistochemistry we first examined the expression of Scn1a in regions of the mouse brain that are known to be involved in seizure generation and sleep regulation. Next, we performed detailed analysis of sleep and wake electroencephalographic (EEG) patterns during 48 continuous hours of baseline recordings in a knock-in mouse line that expresses the human SCN1A GEFS+ mutation R1648H (RH mutants). We also characterized the sleep-wake pattern following 6 hours of sleep deprivation. Key Findings Immunohistochemistry revealed broad expression of Scn1a in the neocortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, thalamic reticular nuclei, dorsal raphe nuclei, pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei. Co-localization between Scn1a immunoreactivity and critical cell types within these regions was also observed. EEG analysis under baseline conditions revealed increased wakefulness and reduced non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep amounts during the dark phase in the RH mutants, suggesting a sleep deficit. Nevertheless, the mutants exhibited levels of NREM and REM sleep that were generally similar to WT littermates during the recovery period following 6-hours of sleep deprivation. Significance These results establish a direct role for SCN1A in the regulation of sleep and suggest that patients with SCN1A mutations may experience chronic alterations in sleep, potentially leading to negative outcomes over time. In addition, the expression of Scn1a in specific cells types/brain regions that are known to play critical roles in seizure generation and sleep now provides a mechanistic basis for the clinical features (seizures and sleep abnormalities) associated with human SCN1A mutations. PMID:23311867

  8. Genetic and epigenetic screening for gene alterations of the chromatin-remodeling factor, SMARCA4/BRG1, in lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Medina, Pedro P; Carretero, Julian; Fraga, Mario F; Esteller, Manel; Sidransky, David; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat

    2004-10-01

    The SMARCA4/BRG1 gene product is a component of the SWI-SNF chromatin-remodeling complex and regulates gene expression by disrupting histone-DNA contacts in an ATP-dependent manner. Inactivating mutations of the SMARCA4 gene, on chromosome arm 19p, are present in several human cancer cell lines, including cell lines derived from lung cancers. Interestingly, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 19p and absence of the SMARCA4 protein have been reported in lung tumors. To evaluate further the possible contribution of SMARCA4 gene inactivation to lung carcinogenesis, we performed a complete analysis of the SMARCA4 gene to search for (a) point mutations in all 35 coding exons, including an existing splicing variant and the intron-exon boundaries, and (b) abrogation of gene expression through promoter hypermethylation by using the methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) assay. We selected genomic DNA from 20 lung primary tumors with LOH on 19p for the screening of point mutations and 10 lung cancer cell lines and 52 lung primary tumors for the MSP analysis. Through our mutational screening, we identified an in-frame and germ-line insertion of 24 bp in exon 4 whose biological relevance is unknown. This variant was not detected in the germ line of the 62 additional individuals analyzed, indicating it is not a common polymorphism. Moreover, two missense alterations were identified in the tumors of 2 patients, a somatic Gly1160Arg mutation and a Ser1176Cys mutation. Neither was present in the germ line of the 51 additional lung cancer individuals tested. Because these mutations lead to substitution of highly conserved amino acids, they may affect the ATPase function of the protein. Finally, no promoter hypermethylation was observed in any lung primary tumor or cancer cell line, indicating that this is not a major mechanism for SMARCA4 inactivation during lung carcinogenesis. In conclusion, our data revealed that somatic point mutations of the SMARCA4 gene are present in a small subset of lung tumors, although mutations affecting the ATPase domain may be a hot-spot for SMARCA4 gene inactivation. We cannot rule out that other mechanisms, such as complete or partial deletions of the SMARCA4 gene, are contributing to the loss of the SMARCA4 protein in lung cancer. PMID:15287030

  9. Classroom norms of bullying alter the degree to which children defend in response to their affective empathy and power.

    PubMed

    Peets, Kätlin; Pöyhönen, Virpi; Juvonen, Jaana; Salmivalli, Christina

    2015-07-01

    This study examined whether the degree to which bullying is normative in the classroom would moderate associations between intra- (cognitive and affective empathy, self-efficacy beliefs) and interpersonal (popularity) factors and defending behavior. Participants were 6,708 third- to fifth-grade children (49% boys; Mage = 11 years) from 383 classrooms. Multilevel modeling analyses revealed that children were more likely to defend in response to their affective empathy in classrooms with high levels of bullying. In addition, popular students were more likely to support victims in classrooms where bullying was associated with social costs. These findings highlight the importance of considering interactions among individual and contextual influences when trying to understand which factors facilitate versus inhibit children's inclinations to defend others. PMID:25961871

  10. Altered Subcellular Localization of Tumor-Specific Cyclin E Isoforms Affects Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 Complex Formation and Proteasomal Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Delk, Nikki A.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2009-01-01

    In tumors, alternative translation and posttranslational proteolytic cleavage of full-length cyclin E (EL) produces tumorigenic low molecular weight cyclin E (LMW-E) isoforms that lack a portion of the EL amino-terminus containing a nuclear localization sequence. Therefore, we hypothesized that LMW-E isoforms have altered subcellular localization. To explore our hypothesis, we compared EL versus LMW-E localization in cell lysates and in vivo using fractionation and protein complementation assays. Our results reveal that LMW-E isoforms preferentially accumulate in the cytoplasm where they bind the cyclin E kinase partner, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2), and have associated kinase activity. The nuclear ubiquitin ligase Fbw7 targets Cdk2-bound cyclin E for degradation; thus, we examined if altered subcellular localization affected LMW-E degradation. We found that cytoplasmic LMW-E/Cdk2 was less susceptible to Fbw7-mediated degradation. One implication of our findings is that altered LMW-E and LMW-E/Cdk2 subcellular localization may lead to aberrant LMW-E protein interactions, regulation, and activity, ultimately contributing to LMW-E tumorigenicity. PMID:19318554

  11. Genetic changes from artificial propagation of Pacific salmon affect the productivity and viability of supplemented populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reisenbichler, R.R.; Rubin, S.P.

    1999-01-01

    Although several studies have shown genetic differences between hatchery and wild anadromous Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), none has provided compelling evidence that artificial propagation poses a genetic threat to conservation of naturally spawning populations. When the published studies and three studies in progress are considered collectively, however, they provide strong evidence that the fitness for natural spawning and rearing can be rapidly and substantially reduced by artificial propagation. This issue takes on great importance in the Pacific Northwest where supplementation of wild salmon populations with hatchery fish has been identified as an important tool for restoring these populations. Recognition of negative aspects may lead to restricted use of supplementation, and better conservation, better evaluation, and greater benefits when supplementation is used.

  12. The major genetic determinants of HIV-1 control affect HLA class I peptide presentation.

    PubMed

    Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I W; Walker, Bruce D; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J; Pulit, Sara L; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M; Carlson, Jonathan M; Heckerman, David; Graham, Robert R; Plenge, Robert M; Deeks, Steven G; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noël P; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L; Lemay, Paul; O'Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M; Allen, Todd M; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Haas, David W; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Robbins, Gregory K; Shafer, Robert W; Gulick, Roy M; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E; Daar, Eric S; Ribaudo, Heather J; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L; Allen, Brady L; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C; Benson, Anne M; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F; Bernard, Annette M; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J; Bolan, Robert K; Boudreaux, Emilie T; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F; Brndjar, Jon E; Brown, Stephen J; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H; Carmichael, J Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M; Cimoch, Paul J; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T; Cristofano, Michael V; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L; Dahman, Joseph M; Daly, Jennifer S; Davis, Benjamin T; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E; Ellerin, Todd B; Eron, Joseph J; Fangman, John J W; Farel, Claire E; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A; French, Neel K; Fuchs, Jonathan D; Fuller, Jon D; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C; Gaultier, Cyril R; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A; Gottlieb, Michael S; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K; Gurley, T Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W David; Harrigan, P Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M; Henry, W Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P; Horton, James M; Hsu, Ricky K; Huhn, Gregory D; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J; Illeman, Mark L; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A; Johnson, Kristin L; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C; Kauffman, Carol A; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K; Kim, Arthur Y; Kim, David D; Kinder, Clifford A; Kirchner, Jeffrey T; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M; Lee, David M; Lee, Jean M L; Lee, Marah J; Lee, Edward T Y; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A; Llibre, Josep M; Liguori, Michael A; Little, Susan J; Liu, Anne Y; Lopez, Alvaro J; Loutfy, Mono R; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K; Marconi, Vincent C; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N; Martin, Harold L; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A; McGovern, Barbara H; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C; Nagami, Ellen H; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G; Nelson, Margret O; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L; O'Connor, David H; Ojikutu, Bisola O; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O; Oldfield, Edward C; Olender, Susan A; Ostrowski, Mario; Owen, William F; Pae, Eunice; Parsonnet, Jeffrey; Pavlatos, Andrew M; Perlmutter, Aaron M; Pierce, Michael N; Pincus, Jonathan M; Pisani, Leandro; Price, Lawrence Jay; Proia, Laurie; Prokesch, Richard C; Pujet, Heather Calderon; Ramgopal, Moti; Rathod, Almas; Rausch, Michael; Ravishankar, J; Rhame, Frank S

    2010-12-10

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. We identified >300 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC and none elsewhere. Specific amino acids in the HLA-B peptide binding groove, as well as an independent HLA-C effect, explain the SNP associations and reconcile both protective and risk HLA alleles. These results implicate the nature of the HLA-viral peptide interaction as the major factor modulating durable control of HIV infection. PMID:21051598

  13. How genetics affects the brain to produce higher-level dysfunctions in myotonic dystrophy type 1

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Laura; Petrucci, Antonio; Spanò, Barbara; Torso, Mario; Olivito, Giusy; Lispi, Ludovico; Costanzi-Porrini, Sandro; Giulietti, Giovanni; Koch, Giacomo; Giacanelli, Manlio; Caltagirone, Carlo; Cercignani, Mara; Bozzali, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Summary Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a multisystemic disorder dominated by muscular impairment and brain dysfunctions. Although brain damage has previously been demonstrated in DM1, its associations with the genetics and clinical/neuropsychological features of the disease are controversial. This study assessed the differential role of gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) damage in determining higher-level dysfunctions in DM1. Ten patients with genetically confirmed DM1 and 16 healthy matched controls entered the study. The patients underwent a neuropsychological assessment and quantification of CTG triplet expansion. All the subjects underwent MR scanning at 3T, with studies including T1-weighted volumes and diffusion-weighted images. Voxel-based morphometry and tract-based spatial statistics were used for unbiased quantification of regional GM atrophy and WM integrity. The DM1 patients showed widespread involvement of both tissues. The extent of the damage correlated with CTG triplet expansion and cognition. This study supports the idea that genetic abnormalities in DM1 mainly target the WM, but GM involvement is also crucial in determining the clinical characteristics of DM1. PMID:26214024

  14. Why Control Activity? Evolutionary Selection Pressures Affecting the Development of Physical Activity Genetic and Biological Regulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The literature strongly suggests that daily physical activity is genetically and biologically regulated. Potential identities of the responsible mechanisms are unclear, but little has been written concerning the possible evolutionary selection pressures leading to the development of genetic/biological controls of physical activity. Given the weak relationship between exercise endurance and activity levels and the differential genomic locations associated with the regulation of endurance and activity, it is probable that regulation of endurance and activity evolved separately. This hypothesis paper considers energy expenditures and duration of activity in hunter/gatherers, pretechnology farmers, and modern Western societies and considers the potential of each to selectively influence the development of activity regulation. Food availability is also considered given the known linkage of caloric restriction on physical activity as well as early data relating food oversupply to physical inactivity. Elucidating the selection pressures responsible for the genetic/biological control of activity will allow further consideration of these pressures on activity in today's society, especially the linkages between food and activity. Further, current food abundance is removing the cues for activity that were present for the first 40,000 years of human evolution, and thus future research should investigate the effects of this abundance upon the mechanisms regulating activity. PMID:24455728

  15. The minimal set of genetic alterations required for conversion of primary human fibroblasts to cancer cells in the subrenal capsule assay.

    PubMed

    Sun, Beicheng; Chen, Meizhen; Hawks, Christina L; Pereira-Smith, Olivia M; Hornsby, Peter J

    2005-06-01

    Based on previous studies, a minimal set of genetic alterations that is required to convert normal human fibroblasts into cancer cells has been defined. Essential roles for telomere maintenance and alterations in phosphatase 2A activity were inferred from experiments in which tumorigenicity was tested by injecting cells under the skin of immunodeficient mice. However, in the present experiments, the combination of SV40 large T antigen and activated Ras, without hTERT or SV40 small t antigen, was sufficient to convert nine different primary human fibroblast cell strains to a fully malignant state. The malignant behavior of the cells was demonstrated by growth of the cells into invasive tumors when the cells were injected beneath the kidney capsule of immunodeficient mice. Lung metastases and circulating tumor cells were also detected. These tumors were not immortal; cells entered crisis, from which they could be rescued by expression of hTERT. However, the same cell populations were not tumorigenic when they were injected under the skin. In this site, tumorigenicity required the expression of hTERT and SV40 small t antigen as well as SV40 large T antigen and Ras. The cellular pathways targeted by SV40 large T antigen (p53 and pRb) and those targeted by activated Ras represent a minimal set of genetic alterations required for the conversion of normal human fibroblasts into cancer cells. PMID:16036109

  16. The Role of Genetic Sex in Affect Regulation and Expression of GABA-Related Genes Across Species

    PubMed Central

    Seney, Marianne L.; Chang, Lun-Ching; Oh, Hyunjung; Wang, Xingbin; Tseng, George C.; Lewis, David A.; Sibille, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    Although circulating hormones and inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-related factors are known to affect mood, considerable knowledge gaps persist for biological mechanisms underlying the female bias in mood disorders. Here, we combine human and mouse studies to investigate sexual dimorphism in the GABA system in the context of major depressive disorder (MDD) and then use a genetic model to dissect the role of sex-related factors in GABA-related gene expression and anxiety-/depressive-like behaviors in mice. First, using meta-analysis of gene array data in human postmortem brain (N?=?51 MDD subjects, 50 controls), we show that the previously reported down-regulation in MDD of somatostatin (SST), a marker of a GABA neuron subtype, is significantly greater in women with MDD. Second, using gene co-expression network analysis in control human subjects (N?=?214; two frontal cortex regions) and expression quantitative trait loci mapping (N?=?170 subjects), we show that expression of SST and the GABA-synthesizing enzymes glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) and GAD65 are tightly co-regulated and influenced by X-chromosome genetic polymorphisms. Third, using a rodent genetic model [Four Core Genotypes (FCG) mice], in which genetic and gonadal sex are artificially dissociated (N???12/group), we show that genetic sex (i.e., X/Y-chromosome) influences both gene expression (lower Sst, Gad67, Gad65 in XY mice) and anxiety-like behaviors (higher in XY mice). This suggests that in an intact male animal, the observed behavior represents the outcomes of male genetic sex increasing and male-like testosterone decreasing anxiety-like behaviors. Gonadal sex was the only factor influencing depressive-like behavior (gonadal males?genetic sex) on GABA-related genes and anxiety-like behaviors. PMID:24062698

  17. The inhibition of aromatase alters the mechanical and rheological properties of non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines affecting cell migration.

    PubMed

    Giannopoulou, E; Siatis, K E; Metsiou, D; Kritikou, I; Papachristou, D J; Kalofonou, M; Koutras, A; Athanassiou, G; Kalofonos, H P

    2015-02-01

    Tumor invasion and metastasis are key aspects of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). During migration, cells undergo mechanical alterations. The mechanical phenotype of breast cancer cells is correlated with aromatase gene expression. We have previously shown that targeting aromatase is a promising strategy for NSCLC. The aim of this study was to examine morphological and mechanical changes of NSCLC cells, upon treatment with aromatase inhibitor and correlate their ability to migrate and invade. In vitro experiments were performed using H23 and A549 NSCLC cell lines and exemestane was used for aromatase inhibition. We demonstrated that exemestane reduced H23 cell migration and invasion and caused changes in cell morphology including increased vacuolar structures and greater pleomorphism. In addition, exemestane changed the distribution of ?-tubulin in H23 and A549 cells in a way that might destabilize microtubules polymerization. These effects were associated with increased cell viscosity and decreased elastic shear modulus. Although exemestane caused similar effects in A549 cells regarding viscosity and elastic shear modulus, it did not affect A549 cell migration and caused an increase in invasion. The increased invasion was in line with vimentin perinuclear localization. Our data show that the treatment of NSCLC cells with an aromatase inhibitor not only affects cell migration and invasion but also alters the mechanical properties of the cells. It suggests that the different origin of cancer cells is associated with different morphological characteristics and mechanical behavior. PMID:25450981

  18. VHL Genetic Alteration in CCRCC Does Not Determine De-Regulation of HIF, CAIX, hnRNP A2/B1 and Osteopontin

    PubMed Central

    Nyhan, Michelle J.; El Mashad, Shereen M.; O’Donovan, Tracey R.; Ahmad, Sarfraz; Collins, Chris; Sweeney, Paul; Rogers, Eamonn; O’Sullivan, Gerald C.; McKenna, Sharon L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) tumour suppressor gene inactivation is associated with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) development. The VHL protein (pVHL) has been proposed to regulate the expression of several proteins including Hypoxia Inducible Factor-? (HIF-?), carbonic anhydrase (CA)IX, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A2/B1 and osteopontin. pVHL has been characterized in vitro, however, clinical studies are limited. We evaluated the impact of VHL genetic alterations on the expression of several pVHL protein targets in paired normal and tumor tissue. Methods: The VHL gene was sequenced in 23 CCRCC patients and VHL transcript levels were evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Expression of pVHL’s protein targets were determined by Western blotting in 17 paired patient samples. Results: VHL genetic alterations were identified in 43.5% (10/23) of CCRCCs. HIF-1?, HIF-2? and CAIX were up-regulated in 88.2% (15/17), 100% (17/17) and 88.2% (15/17) of tumors respectively and their expression is independent of VHL status. hnRNP A2/B1 and osteopontin expression was variable in CCRCCs and had no association with VHL genetic status. Conclusion: As expression of these proposed pVHL targets can be achieved independently of VHL mutation (and possibly by hypoxia alone), these data suggests that other pVHL targets may be more crucial in renal carcinogenesis. PMID:20978319

  19. Early maternal separation affects ethanol-induced conditioning in a nor-BNI insensitive manner, but does not alter ethanol-induced locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Fabio, Ma Carolina; Spear, Norman E

    2012-01-01

    Early environmental stress significantly affects the development of offspring. This stress has been modeled in rats through the maternal separation (MS) paradigm, which alters the functioning of the HPA axis and can enhance ethanol intake at adulthood. Infant rats are sensitive to ethanol's reinforcing effects, which modulate ethanol seeking and intake. Little is known about the impact of MS on sensitivity to ethanol's appetitive and aversive effects during infancy. The present study assessed ethanol-induced conditioned place preference established through second-order conditioning (SOC), spontaneous or ethanol-induced locomotor activity and ethanol intake in preweanling rats that experienced normal animal facility rearing (AFR) or daily episodes of maternal separation (MS) during postnatal days 1-13 (PDs 1-13). Low-ethanol dose (0.5 g/kg) induced appetitive conditioned place preference (via SOC) in control rats given conventional rearing but not in rats given maternal separation in early infancy, whereas 2.0 g/kg ethanol induced aversive conditioned place preference in the former but not the latter. The administration of a kappa antagonist at PD 1 or immediately before testing did not alter ethanol-induced reinforcement. High (i.e., 2.5 and 2.0 g/kg) but not low (i.e., 0.5 g/kg) ethanol dose induced reliable motor stimulation, which was independent of early maternal separation. Ethanol intake and blood alcohol levels during conditioning were unaffected by rearing conditions. Pups given early maternal separation had lower body weights than controls and showed an altered pattern of exploration when placed in an open field. These results indicate that, when assessed in infant rats, earlier maternal separation alters the balance between the appetitive and aversive motivational effects of ethanol but has no effect on the motor activating effects of the drug. PMID:22108648

  20. Water deficit alters differentially metabolic pathways affecting important flavor and quality traits in grape berries of Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay

    PubMed Central

    Deluc, Laurent G; Quilici, David R; Decendit, Alain; Grimplet, Jérôme; Wheatley, Matthew D; Schlauch, Karen A; Mérillon, Jean-Michel; Cushman, John C; Cramer, Grant R

    2009-01-01

    Background Water deficit has significant effects on grape berry composition resulting in improved wine quality by the enhancement of color, flavors, or aromas. While some pathways or enzymes affected by water deficit have been identified, little is known about the global effects of water deficit on grape berry metabolism. Results The effects of long-term, seasonal water deficit on berries of Cabernet Sauvignon, a red-wine grape, and Chardonnay, a white-wine grape were analyzed by integrated transcript and metabolite profiling. Over the course of berry development, the steady-state transcript abundance of approximately 6,000 Unigenes differed significantly between the cultivars and the irrigation treatments. Water deficit most affected the phenylpropanoid, ABA, isoprenoid, carotenoid, amino acid and fatty acid metabolic pathways. Targeted metabolites were profiled to confirm putative changes in specific metabolic pathways. Water deficit activated the expression of numerous transcripts associated with glutamate and proline biosynthesis and some committed steps of the phenylpropanoid pathway that increased anthocyanin concentrations in Cabernet Sauvignon. In Chardonnay, water deficit activated parts of the phenylpropanoid, energy, carotenoid and isoprenoid metabolic pathways that contribute to increased concentrations of antheraxanthin, flavonols and aroma volatiles. Water deficit affected the ABA metabolic pathway in both cultivars. Berry ABA concentrations were highly correlated with 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED1) transcript abundance, whereas the mRNA expression of other NCED genes and ABA catabolic and glycosylation processes were largely unaffected. Water deficit nearly doubled ABA concentrations within berries of Cabernet Sauvignon, whereas it decreased ABA in Chardonnay at véraison and shortly thereafter. Conclusion The metabolic responses of grapes to water deficit varied with the cultivar and fruit pigmentation. Chardonnay berries, which lack any significant anthocyanin content, exhibited increased photoprotection mechanisms under water deficit conditions. Water deficit increased ABA, proline, sugar and anthocyanin concentrations in Cabernet Sauvignon, but not Chardonnay berries, consistent with the hypothesis that ABA enhanced accumulation of these compounds. Water deficit increased the transcript abundance of lipoxygenase and hydroperoxide lyase in fatty metabolism, a pathway known to affect berry and wine aromas. These changes in metabolism have important impacts on berry flavor and quality characteristics. Several of these metabolites are known to contribute to increased human-health benefits. PMID:19426499

  1. A mutation affecting expression of a major outer membrane protein of Moraxella catarrhalis alters serum resistance and survival in vivo.

    PubMed

    Helminen, M E; Maciver, I; Paris, M; Latimer, J L; Lumbley, S L; Cope, L D; McCracken, G H; Hansen, E J

    1993-11-01

    A major outer membrane protein (CopB) of Moraxella catarrhalis is a target for antibodies that enhance clearance of this organism from the lungs of mice. A mini-Tn10kan transposon was inserted into the cloned copB gene from M. catarrhalis O35E, and an isogenic mutant unable to express the CopB protein was constructed by transforming this mutated gene into the wild-type strain. The mutant grew at the same rate as the wild-type parent strain in broth. Unlike the serum-resistant parent strain, this mutant was sensitive to killing by normal human serum, and its ability to survive and grow in the lungs of animals was impaired. Genetic restoration of CopB protein expression resulted in the simultaneous acquisition of wild-type levels of serum resistance and the ability to resist pulmonary clearance in vivo. Thus, the CopB protein of M. catarrhalis may be important in the interaction between this organism and the defense mechanisms of the respiratory tract. PMID:8228353

  2. Diet-Induced Alterations of Host Cholesterol Metabolism Are Likely To Affect the Gut Microbiota Composition in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Inés; Perdicaro, Diahann J.; Brown, Andrew W.; Hammons, Susan; Carden, Trevor J.; Carr, Timothy P.; Eskridge, Kent M.

    2013-01-01

    The gastrointestinal microbiota affects the metabolism of the mammalian host and has consequences for health. However, the complexity of gut microbial communities and host metabolic pathways make functional connections difficult to unravel, especially in terms of causation. In this study, we have characterized the fecal microbiota of hamsters whose cholesterol metabolism was extensively modulated by the dietary addition of plant sterol esters (PSE). PSE intake induced dramatic shifts in the fecal microbiota, reducing several bacterial taxa within the families Coriobacteriaceae and Erysipelotrichaceae. The abundance of these taxa displayed remarkably high correlations with host cholesterol metabolites. Most importantly, the associations between several bacterial taxa with fecal and biliary cholesterol excretion showed an almost perfect fit to a sigmoidal nonlinear model of bacterial inhibition, suggesting that host cholesterol excretion can shape microbiota structure through the antibacterial action of cholesterol. In vitro experiments suggested a modest antibacterial effect of cholesterol, and especially of cholesteryl-linoleate, but not plant sterols when included in model bile micelles. The findings obtained in this study are relevant to our understanding of gut microbiota-host lipid metabolism interactions, as they provide the first evidence for a role of cholesterol excreted with the bile as a relevant host factor that modulates the gut microbiota. The findings further suggest that the connections between Coriobacteriaceae and Erysipelotrichaceae and host lipid metabolism, which have been observed in several studies, could be caused by a metabolic phenotype of the host (cholesterol excretion) affecting the gut microbiota. PMID:23124234

  3. Alterations in the adenine-plus-thymine-rich region of CEN3 affect centromere function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Gaudet, A; Fitzgerald-Hayes, M

    1987-01-01

    Centromere DNA from 11 of the 16 chromosomes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been analyzed and reveal three sequence elements common to each centromere, referred to as conserved centromere DNA elements (CDE). The adenine-plus-thymine (A + T)-rich central core element, CDE II, is flanked by two short conserved sequences, CDE I (8 base pairs [bp]) and CDE III (25 bp). Although no consensus sequence exists among the different CDE II regions, they do have three common features of sequence organization. First, the CDE II regions are similar in length, ranging from 78 to 86 bp measured from CDE I to the left boundary of CDE III. Second, the base composition is always greater than 90% A + T. Finally, the A and T residues in these segments are often arranged in runs of A and runs of T residues, sometimes with six or seven bases in a stretch. We constructed insertion, deletion, and replacement mutations in the CDE II region of the centromere from chromosome III, CEN3, designed to investigate the length and sequence requirements for function of the CDE II region of the centromere. We analyzed the effect of these altered centromeres on plasmid and chromosome segregation in S. cerevisiae. Our results show that increasing the length of CDE II from 84 to 154 bp causes a 100-fold increase in chromosome nondisjunction. Deletion mutations removing segments of the A + T-rich CDE II DNA also cause aberrant segregation. In some cases partial function could be restored by replacing the deleted DNA with fragments whose primary sequence or base composition is very different from that of the wild-type CDE II DNA. In addition, we found that identical mutations introduced into different positions in CDE II have very similar effects. Images PMID:3550426

  4. Affected sib-pair interval mapping and exclusion for complex genetic traits: Inferring identity by descent status from relatives

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, E.R.; Boehnke, M.; Guo, S.W.

    1994-09-01

    Affected sib-pair (ASP) methods provide a useful approach for the initial genetic mapping of complex diseases for which mode of inheritance is uncertain. Risch described a method for interval mapping and exclusion based on the ratio lambda comparing disease risk in the first degree relatives of affected individuals to disease risk in the general population. He assumed marker identity by descent (IBD) status for the ASP could be deduced from parental genotypes. For late onset diseases such as type 2 diabetes, parents may be dead or otherwise unavailable, so that marker IBD status generally cannot be inferred with certainty. Guo has developed efficient methods for probabilistic determination of marker IBD sharing for two or more loci. We have combined and extended the methods of Risch and Guo to carry out interval mapping and exclusion when parents are missing but other relatives such as additional siblings are available. Our method is based on calculating the likelihood of marker data of the ASP and their relatives conditional on the disease status of the ASP, as a function of lambda and the position of the disease locus within the genetic map. We currently are using this method to compare the information to detect or exclude linkage provided by various types of ASP nuclear families -- zero, one, or two typed parents and zero, one, two, or more additional siblings -- as a function of sample size, marker density and informativity, and risk ratio lambda.

  5. The infrequent simultaneous genetic alterations in glioblastoma multiforme (LOH 10, 17, 19q, TP53 mutation and EGFR amplification) with short clinical course.

    PubMed

    Jesionek-Kupnicka, D; Kulczycka, D; Rieske, P; Szybka, M; Jab?o?ska, J; Potemski, P; Kolasa, P; Liberski, P P; Kordek, R

    2007-01-01

    We described the case of an unusual, complex genetic alteration in 57 year-old male patient with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with short survival (6 and half months). Alterations consisted of p53 mutation, LOH 10, LOH 17, LOH 19q and EGFR amplification. LOH1p, LOH 9 and LOH 13 were negative. Immunohistochemical study did not correlate with molecular results. The overexpression of TP53 protein and RB protein was detected only in small percentage of cells and interestingly the overexpression of EGFR was present only focally. Immnunostainings for PTEN, P16, PI3-K were negative. Additionally, we observed an overexpression of IGFB2 protein. This case indicates the accumulation of molecular changes in glioblastoma multiforme in patient with short survival. PMID:17715673

  6. Altered membrane lipid composition and functional parameters of circulating cells in cockles (Cerastoderma edule) affected by disseminated neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Le Grand, Fabienne; Soudant, Philippe; Marty, Yanic; Le Goïc, Nelly; Kraffe, Edouard

    2013-01-01

    Membrane lipid composition and morpho-functional parameters were investigated in circulating cells of the edible cockle (Cerastoderma edule) affected by disseminated neoplasia (neoplastic cells) and compared to those from healthy cockles (hemocytes). Membrane sterol levels, phospholipid (PL) class and subclass proportions and their respective fatty acid (FA) compositions were determined. Morpho-functional parameters were evaluated through total hemocyte count (THC), mortality rate, phagocytosis ability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Both morpho-functional parameters and lipid composition were profoundly affected in neoplastic cells. These dedifferentiated cells displayed higher THC (5×), mortality rate (3×) and ROS production with addition of carbonyl cyanide m-chloro phenylhydrazone (1.7×) but lower phagocytosis ability (½×), than unaffected hemocytes. Total PL amounts were higher in neoplastic cells than in hemocytes (12.3 and 5.1 nmol×10(-6) cells, respectively). However, sterols and a particular subclass of PL (plasmalogens; 1-alkenyl-2-acyl PL) were present in similar amounts in both cell type membranes. This led to a two times lower proportion of these membrane lipid constituents in neoplastic cells when compared to hemocytes (20.5% vs. 42.1% of sterols in total membrane lipids and 21.7% vs. 44.2% of plasmalogens among total PL, respectively). Proportions of non-methylene interrupted FA- and 20:1n-11-plasmalogen molecular species were the most impacted in neoplastic cells when compared to hemocytes (?× and ¼×, respectively). These changes in response to this leukemia-like disease in bivalves highlight the specific imbalance of plasmalogens and sterols in neoplastic cells, in comparison to the greater stability of other membrane lipid components. PMID:23333874

  7. Your emotion or mine: labeling feelings alters emotional face perception-an ERP study on automatic and intentional affect labeling.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Cornelia; Sfärlea, Anca; Blumenthal, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Empirical evidence suggests that words are powerful regulators of emotion processing. Although a number of studies have used words as contextual cues for emotion processing, the role of what is being labeled by the words (i.e., one's own emotion as compared to the emotion expressed by the sender) is poorly understood. The present study reports results from two experiments which used ERP methodology to evaluate the impact of emotional faces and self- vs. sender-related emotional pronoun-noun pairs (e.g., my fear vs. his fear) as cues for emotional face processing. The influence of self- and sender-related cues on the processing of fearful, angry and happy faces was investigated in two contexts: an automatic (experiment 1) and intentional affect labeling task (experiment 2), along with control conditions of passive face processing. ERP patterns varied as a function of the label's reference (self vs. sender) and the intentionality of the labeling task (experiment 1 vs. experiment 2). In experiment 1, self-related labels increased the motivational relevance of the emotional faces in the time-window of the EPN component. Processing of sender-related labels improved emotion recognition specifically for fearful faces in the N170 time-window. Spontaneous processing of affective labels modulated later stages of face processing as well. Amplitudes of the late positive potential (LPP) were reduced for fearful, happy, and angry faces relative to the control condition of passive viewing. During intentional regulation (experiment 2) amplitudes of the LPP were enhanced for emotional faces when subjects used the self-related emotion labels to label their own emotion during face processing, and they rated the faces as higher in arousal than the emotional faces that had been presented in the "label sender's emotion" condition or the passive viewing condition. The present results argue in favor of a differentiated view of language-as-context for emotion processing. PMID:23888134

  8. Genetic variation in SIRT1 affects susceptibility of lung squamous cell carcinomas in former uranium miners from the Colorado plateau.

    PubMed

    Leng, Shuguang; Picchi, Maria A; Liu, Yushi; Thomas, Cynthia L; Willis, Derall G; Bernauer, Amanda M; Carr, Teara G; Mabel, Padilla T; Han, Younghun; Amos, Christopher I; Lin, Yong; Stidley, Christine A; Gilliland, Frank D; Jacobson, Marty R; Belinsky, Steven A

    2013-05-01

    Epidemiological studies of underground miners suggested that occupational exposure to radon causes lung cancer with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) as the predominant histological type. However, the genetic determinants for susceptibility of radon-induced SCC in miners are unclear. Double-strand breaks induced by radioactive radon daughters are repaired primarily by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) that is accompanied by the dynamic changes in surrounding chromatin, including nucleosome repositioning and histone modifications. Thus, a molecular epidemiological study was conducted to assess whether genetic variation in 16 genes involved in NHEJ and related histone modification affected susceptibility for SCC in radon-exposed former miners (267 SCC cases and 383 controls) from the Colorado plateau. A global association between genetic variation in the haplotype block where SIRT1 resides and the risk for SCC in miners (P = 0.003) was identified. Haplotype alleles tagged by the A allele of SIRT1 rs7097008 were associated with increased risk for SCC (odds ratio = 1.69, P = 8.2 × 10(-5)) and greater survival in SCC cases (hazard ratio = 0.79, P = 0.03) in miners. Functional validation of rs7097008 demonstrated that the A allele was associated with reduced gene expression in bronchial epithelial cells and compromised DNA repair capacity in peripheral lymphocytes. Together, these findings substantiate genetic variation in SIRT1 as a risk modifier for developing SCC in miners and suggest that SIRT1 may also play a tumor suppressor role in radon-induced cancer in miners. PMID:23354305

  9. Genetic variation in SIRT1 affects susceptibility of lung squamous cell carcinomas in former uranium miners from the Colorado plateau

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Shuguang; Picchi, Maria A.; Liu, Yushi; Thomas, Cynthia L.; Willis, Derall G.; Bernauer, Amanda M.; Carr, Teara G.; Mabel, Padilla T.; Han, Younghun; Amos, Christopher I.; Lin, Yong; Stidley, Christine A.; Gilliland, Frank D.; Jacobson, Marty R.; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of underground miners suggested that occupational exposure to radon causes lung cancer with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) as the predominant histological type. However, the genetic determinants for susceptibility of radon-induced SCC in miners are unclear. Double-strand breaks induced by radioactive radon daughters are repaired primarily by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) that is accompanied by the dynamic changes in surrounding chromatin, including nucleosome repositioning and histone modifications. Thus, a molecular epidemiological study was conducted to assess whether genetic variation in 16 genes involved in NHEJ and related histone modification affected susceptibility for SCC in radon-exposed former miners (267 SCC cases and 383 controls) from the Colorado plateau. A global association between genetic variation in the haplotype block where SIRT1 resides and the risk for SCC in miners (P = 0.003) was identified. Haplotype alleles tagged by the A allele of SIRT1 rs7097008 were associated with increased risk for SCC (odds ratio = 1.69, P = 8.2×10?5) and greater survival in SCC cases (hazard ratio = 0.79, P = 0.03) in miners. Functional validation of rs7097008 demonstrated that the A allele was associated with reduced gene expression in bronchial epithelial cells and compromised DNA repair capacity in peripheral lymphocytes. Together, these findings substantiate genetic variation in SIRT1 as a risk modifier for developing SCC in miners and suggest that SIRT1 may also play a tumor suppressor role in radon-induced cancer in miners. PMID:23354305

  10. The genetic and molecular bases of monogenic disorders affecting proteolytic systems

    PubMed Central

    Richard, I

    2005-01-01

    Complete and limited proteolysis represents key events that regulate many biological processes. At least 5% of the human genome codes for components of proteolytic processes if proteases, inhibitors, and cofactors are taken into account. Accordingly, disruption of proteolysis is involved in numerous pathological conditions. In particular, molecular genetic studies have identified a growing number of monogenic disorders caused by mutations in protease coding genes, highlighting the importance of this class of enzymes in development, organogenesis, immunity, and brain function. This review provides insights into the current knowledge about the molecular genetic causes of these disorders. It should be noted that most are due to loss of function mutations, indicating absolute requirement of proteolytic activities for normal cellular functions. Recent progress in understanding the function of the implicated proteins and the disease pathogenesis is detailed. In addition to providing important clues to the diagnosis, treatment, and pathophysiology of disease, functional characterisation of mutations in proteolytic systems emphasises the pleiotropic functions of proteases in the body homeostasis. PMID:15994873

  11. Sampling issues affecting accuracy of likelihood-based classification using genetical data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guinand, B.; Scribner, K.T.; Topchy, A.; Page, K.S.; Punch, W.; Burnham-Curtis, M. K.

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of a genetic algorithm for discovering multi-locus combinations that provide accurate individual assignment decisions and estimates of mixture composition based on likelihood classification. Using simulated data representing different levels of inter-population differentiation (Fst ~ 0.01 and 0.10), genetic diversities (four or eight alleles per locus), and population sizes (20, 40, 100 individuals in baseline populations), we show that subsets of loci can be identified that provide comparable levels of accuracy in classification decisions relative to entire multi-locus data sets, where 5, 10, or 20 loci were considered. Microsatellite data sets from hatchery strains of lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush, representing a comparable range of inter-population levels of differentiation in allele frequencies confirmed simulation results. For both simulated and empirical data sets, assignment accuracy was achieved using fewer loci (e.g., three or four loci out of eight for empirical lake trout studies). Simulation results were used to investigate properties of the 'leave-one-out' (L1O) method for estimating assignment error rates. Accuracy of population assignments based on L1O methods should be viewed with caution under certain conditions, particularly when baseline population sample sizes are low (<50).

  12. Genome-wide discovery of genetic variants affecting tamoxifen sensitivity and their clinical and functional validation

    PubMed Central

    Weng, L.; Ziliak, D.; Im, H. K.; Gamazon, E. R.; Philips, S.; Nguyen, A. T.; Desta, Z.; Skaar, T. C.; Flockhart, D. A.; Huang, R. S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Beyond estrogen receptor (ER), there are no validated predictors for tamoxifen (TAM) efficacy and toxicity. We utilized a genome-wide cell-based model to comprehensively evaluate genetic variants for their contribution to cellular sensitivity to TAM. Design Our discovery model incorporates multidimensional datasets, including genome-wide genotype, gene expression, and endoxifen-induced cellular growth inhibition in the International HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Genome-wide findings were further evaluated in NCI60 cancer cell lines. Gene knock-down experiments were performed in four breast cancer cell lines. Genetic variants identified in the cell-based model were examined in 245 Caucasian breast cancer patients who underwent TAM treatment. Results We identified seven novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with endoxifen sensitivity through the expression of 10 genes using the genome-wide integrative analysis. All 10 genes identified in LCLs were associated with TAM sensitivity in NCI60 cancer cell lines, including USP7. USP7 knock-down resulted in increasing resistance to TAM in four breast cancer cell lines tested, which is consistent with the finding in LCLs and in the NCI60 cells. Furthermore, we identified SNPs that were associated with TAM-induced toxicities in breast cancer patients, after adjusting for other clinical factors. Conclusion Our work demonstrates the utility of a cell-based model in genome-wide identification of pharmacogenomic markers. PMID:23508821

  13. Glucose concentration alters dissolved oxygen levels in liquid cultures of Beauveria bassiana and affects formation and bioefficacy of blastospores.

    PubMed

    Mascarin, Gabriel Moura; Jackson, Mark A; Kobori, Nilce Naomi; Behle, Robert W; Dunlap, Christopher A; Delalibera Júnior, Ítalo

    2015-08-01

    The filamentous fungus Beauveria bassiana is an economically important pathogen of numerous arthropod pests and is able to grow in submerged culture as filaments (mycelia) or as budding yeast-like blastospores. In this study, we evaluated the effect of dissolved oxygen and high glucose concentrations on blastospore production by submerged cultures of two isolates of B. bassiana, ESALQ1432 and GHA. Results showed that maintaining adequate dissolved oxygen levels coupled with high glucose concentrations enhanced blastospore yields by both isolates. High glucose concentrations increased the osmotic pressure of the media and coincided with higher dissolved oxygen levels and increased production of significantly smaller blastospores compared with blastospores produced in media with lower concentrations of glucose. The desiccation tolerance of blastospores dried to less than 2.6 % moisture was not affected by the glucose concentration of the medium but was isolate dependent. Blastospores of isolate ESALQ1432 produced in media containing 140 g glucose L(-1) showed greater virulence toward whitefly nymphs (Bemisia tabaci) as compared with blastospores produced in media containing 40 g glucose L(-1). These results suggest a synergistic effect between glucose concentration and oxygen availability on changing morphology and enhancing the yield and efficacy of blastospores of B. bassiana, thereby facilitating the development of a cost-effective production method for this blastospore-based bioinsecticide. PMID:25947245

  14. Human CLP1 mutations alter tRNA biogenesis affecting both peripheral and central nervous system function

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Ender; Weitzer, Stefan; Pehlivan, Davut; Shiraishi, Hiroshi; Gogakos, Tasos; Hanada, Toshikatsu; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Withers, Marjorie; Campbell, Ian M.; Erdin, Serkan; Isikay, Sedat; Franco, Luis M.; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Gambin, Tomasz; Gelowani, Violet; Hunter, Jill V.; Yesil, Gozde; Koparir, Erkan; Yilmaz, Sarenur; Brown, Miguel; Briskin, Daniel; Hafner, Markus; Morozov, Pavel; Farazi, Thalia A.; Bernreuther, Christian; Glatzel, Markus; Trattnig, Siegfried; Friske, Joachim; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Bainbridge, Matthew N.; Gezdirici, Alper; Seven, Mehmet; Muzny, Donna M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Ozen, Mustafa; Clausen, Tim; Tuschl, Thomas; Yuksel, Adnan; Hess, Andreas; Gibbs, Richard A.; Martinez, Javier; Penninger, Josef M.; Lupski, James R.

    2014-01-01

    CLP1 is a RNA kinase involved in tRNA splicing. Recently, CLP1 kinase-dead mice were shown to display a neuromuscular disorder with loss of motor neurons and muscle paralysis. Human genome analyses now identified a CLP1 homozygous missense mutation (p.R140H) in five unrelated families, leading to a loss of CLP1 interaction with the tRNA splicing endonuclease (TSEN) complex, largely reduced pre-tRNA cleavage activity, and accumulation of linear tRNA introns. The affected individuals develop severe motor-sensory defects, cortical dysgenesis and microcephaly. Mice carrying kinase-dead CLP1 also displayed microcephaly and reduced cortical brain volume due to the enhanced cell death of neuronal progenitors that is associated with reduced numbers of cortical neurons. Our data elucidate a novel neurological syndrome defined by CLP1 mutations that impair tRNA splicing. Reduction of a founder mutation to homozygosity illustrates the importance of rare variations in disease and supports the clan genomics hypothesis. PMID:24766809

  15. Rapid Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations under Intergeneric Genomic Shock in Newly Synthesized Chrysanthemum morifolium × Leucanthemum paludosum Hybrids (Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibin; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Qi, Xiangyu; Fang, Weimin; Guan, Zhiyong; Teng, Nianjun; Liao, Yuan; Chen, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    The Asteraceae family is at the forefront of the evolution due to frequent hybridization. Hybridization is associated with the induction of widespread genetic and epigenetic changes and has played an important role in the evolution of many plant taxa. We attempted the intergeneric cross Chrysanthemum morifolium × Leucanthemum paludosum. To obtain the success in cross, we have to turn to ovule rescue. DNA profiling of the amphihaploid and amphidiploid was investigated using amplified fragment length polymorphism, sequence-related amplified polymorphism, start codon targeted polymorphism, and methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP). Hybridization induced rapid changes at the genetic and the epigenetic levels. The genetic changes mainly involved loss of parental fragments and gaining of novel fragments, and some eliminated sequences possibly from the noncoding region of L. paludosum. The MSAP analysis indicated that the level of DNA methylation was lower in the amphiploid (?45%) than in the parental lines (51.5–50.6%), whereas it increased after amphidiploid formation. Events associated with intergeneric genomic shock were a feature of C. morifolium × L. paludosum hybrid, given that the genetic relationship between the parental species is relatively distant. Our results provide genetic and epigenetic evidence for understanding genomic shock in wide crosses between species in Asteraceae and suggest a need to expand our current evolutionary framework to encompass a genetic/epigenetic dimension when seeking to understand wide crosses. PMID:24407856

  16. Evidence for a genetic association between alleles of monoamine oxidase A gene and bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, L.C.C.; Sham, P.; Castle, D.

    1995-08-14

    We present evidence of a genetic association between bipolar disorder and alleles at 3 monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) markers, but not with alleles of a monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) polymorphism. The 3 MAOA markers, including one associated with low MAOA activity, show strong allelic association with each other but surprisingly not with MAOB. Our results are significantly only for females, though the number of males in our sample is too small to draw any definite conclusions. Our data is consistent with recent reports of reduced MAOA activity in patients with abnormal behavioral phenotypes. The strength of the association is weak, but significant, which suggests that alleles at the MAOA locus contribute to susceptibility to bipolar disorder rather than being a major determinant. 58 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  17. Modelling genetic reorganization in the mouse spinal cord affecting left–right coordination during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Rybak, Ilya A; Shevtsova, Natalia A; Kiehn, Ole

    2013-01-01

    The spinal neural circuit contains inhibitory (CINi) and excitatory (CINe) commissural interneurons with axons crossing the mid-line. Direction of these axons to the other side of the cord is controlled by axon guidance molecules, such as Netrin-1 and DCC. The cord also contains glutamatergic interneurons, whose axon guidance involves the EphA4 receptor. In EphA4 knockout (KO) and Netrin-1 KO mice, the normal left–right alternating pattern is replaced with a synchronized hopping gait, and the cord of DCC KO mice exhibits uncoordinated left and right oscillations. To investigate the effects of these genetic transformations, we used a computational model of the spinal circuits containing left and right rhythm-generating neuron populations (RGs), each with a subpopulation of EphA4-positive neurons, and CINi and CINe populations mediating mutual inhibition and excitation between the left and right RGs. In the EphA4 KO circuits, half of the EphA4-positive axons crossed the mid-line and excited the contralateral RG neurons. In the Netrin-1 KO model, the number of contralateral CINi projections was significantly reduced, while in the DCC KO model, the numbers of both CINi and CINe connections were reduced. In our simulations, the EphA4 and Netrin-1 KO circuits switched from the left–right alternating pattern to a synchronized hopping pattern, and the DCC KO network exhibited uncoordinated left–right activity. The amplification of inhibitory interactions re-established an alternating pattern in the EphA4 and DCC KO circuits, but not in the Netrin-1 KO network. The model reproduces the genetic transformations and provides insights into the organization of the spinal locomotor network. PMID:24081162

  18. Genetics, Synergists, and Age Affect Insecticide Sensitivity of the Honey Bee, Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Rinkevich, Frank D.; Margotta, Joseph W.; Pittman, Jean M.; Danka, Robert G.; Tarver, Matthew R.; Ottea, James A.; Healy, Kristen B.

    2015-01-01

    The number of honey bee colonies in the United States has declined to half of its peak level in the 1940s, and colonies lost over the winter have reached levels that are becoming economically unstable. While the causes of these losses are numerous and the interaction between them is very complex, the role of insecticides has garnered much attention. As a result, there is a need to better understand the risk of insecticides to bees, leading to more studies on both toxicity and exposure. While much research has been conducted on insecticides and bees, there have been very limited studies to elucidate the role that bee genotype and age has on the toxicity of these insecticides. The goal of this study was to determine if there are differences in insecticide sensitivity between honey bees of different genetic backgrounds (Carniolan, Italian, and Russian stocks) and assess if insecticide sensitivity varies with age. We found that Italian bees were the most sensitive of these stocks to insecticides, but variation was largely dependent on the class of insecticide tested. There were almost no differences in organophosphate bioassays between honey bee stocks (<1-fold), moderate differences in pyrethroid bioassays (1.5 to 3-fold), and dramatic differences in neonicotinoid bioassays (3.4 to 33.3-fold). Synergism bioassays with piperonyl butoxide, amitraz, and coumaphos showed increased phenothrin sensitivity in all stocks and also demonstrated further physiological differences between stocks. In addition, as bees aged, the sensitivity to phenothrin significantly decreased, but the sensitivity to naled significantly increased. These results demonstrate the variation arising from the genetic background and physiological transitions in honey bees as they age. This information can be used to determine risk assessment, as well as establishing baseline data for future comparisons to explain the variation in toxicity differences for honey bees reported in the literature. PMID:26431171

  19. A Genetic Variant in the Distal Enhancer Region of the Human Renin Gene Affects Renin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Yasukazu; Konoshita, Tadashi; Omori, Atsuhito; Maegawa, Nobuhiro; Nakaya, Takahiro; Ichikawa, Mai; Yamamoto, Katsushi; Wakahara, Shigeyuki; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Onoe, Tamehito; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background The high heritability of plasma renin activity was confirmed in recent investigations. A variation located near the strong enhancer of the human renin gene (REN), C-5312T, has been shown to have different transcription activity levels depending on its allele: the 5312T allele shows transcription levels that are 45% greater than those of the 5312C allele. The purpose of this study was to confirm the hypothesis that variations in the enhancer region of the REN gene are involved in regulating renal expression of renin. Methods Sixty-four subjects with biopsy-proven renal diseases were included in this study (male/female: 35/29, age 41.9 ± 20.9 years, SBP/DBP 123.1 ± 23.7/73.4 ± 14.8 mmHg, s-Cr 0.93 ± 0.63 mg/dl). A genetic variant of REN, C-5312T, was assayed by PCR-RFLP and the TaqMan method. Total RNAs from a small part of the renal cortex were reverse-transcribed and amplified for REN and GAPDH with a real-time PCR system. Results Logarithmically transformed expression values of the relative ratio of REN to GAPDH (10?3) were as follows (mean ± SE): CC (26 cases), 0.016 ± 0.005; CT (33 cases), 0.047 ± 0.021 (p = 0.41 vs. CC); TT (5 cases), 0.198 ± 0.194 (p = 0.011 vs. CC, p < 0.031 vs. CT). Thus, significant differences in REN expression were observed among the genetic variants. Conclusion The results suggest that variants in the enhancer region of the human renin gene have an effect on the expression levels of renin in renal tissue; this observation is in good accordance with the results of the transcriptional assay. PMID:26366736

  20. Altering the rest interval during high-intensity interval training does not affect muscle or performance adaptations.

    PubMed

    Edge, Johann; Eynon, Nir; McKenna, Michael J; Goodman, Craig A; Harris, Roger C; Bishop, David J

    2013-02-01

    It has been hypothesized that exercise-induced changes in metabolites and ions are crucial in the adaptation of contracting muscle. We tested this hypothesis by comparing adaptations to two different interval-training protocols (differing only in the rest duration between intervals), which provoked different perturbations in muscle metabolites and acid-base status. Prior to and immediately after training, 12 women performed the following tests: (1) a graded exercise test to determine peak oxygen uptake (V(O2)); (2) a high-intensity exercise bout (followed 60 s later by a repeated-sprint-ability test; and (3) a repeat of the high-intensity exercise bout alone with muscle biopsies pre-exercise, immediately postexercise and after 60 s of recovery. Subjects performed 5 weeks (3 days per week) of training, with either a short (1 min; HIT-1) or a long rest period (3 min; HIT-3) between intervals; training intensity and volume were matched. Muscle [H(+)] (155 ± 15 versus 125 ± 8 nmol l(-1); P < 0.05) and muscle lactate content (84.2 ± 7.9 versus 46.9 ± 3.1 mmol (g wet weight)(-1)) were both higher after HIT-1, while muscle phosphocreatine (PCr) content (52.8 ± 8.3 versus 63.4 ± 9.8 mmol (g wet weight)(-1)) was lower. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding the increases in , repeated-sprint performance or muscle Na(+),K(+)-ATPase content. Following training, both groups had a significant decrease in postexercise muscle [H(+)] and lactate content, but not postexercise ATP or PCr. Postexercise PCr resynthesis increased following both training methods. In conclusion, intense interval training results in marked improvements in muscle Na(+),K(+)-ATPase content, PCr resynthesis and . However, manipulation of the rest period during intense interval training did not affect these changes. PMID:22923232

  1. Xenobiotics that affect oxidative phosphorylation alter differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells at concentrations that are found in human blood

    PubMed Central

    Llobet, Laura; Toivonen, Janne M.; Montoya, Julio; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; López-Gallardo, Ester

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adipogenesis is accompanied by differentiation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells to adipocytes. As part of this differentiation, biogenesis of the oxidative phosphorylation system occurs. Many chemical compounds used in medicine, agriculture or other human activities affect oxidative phosphorylation function. Therefore, these xenobiotics could alter adipogenesis. We have analyzed the effects on adipocyte differentiation of some xenobiotics that act on the oxidative phosphorylation system. The tested concentrations have been previously reported in human blood. Our results show that pharmaceutical drugs that decrease mitochondrial DNA replication, such as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, or inhibitors of mitochondrial protein synthesis, such as ribosomal antibiotics, diminish adipocyte differentiation and leptin secretion. By contrast, the environmental chemical pollutant tributyltin chloride, which inhibits the ATP synthase of the oxidative phosphorylation system, can promote adipocyte differentiation and leptin secretion, leading to obesity and metabolic syndrome as postulated by the obesogen hypothesis. PMID:26398948

  2. Alterations in the Cerebral White Matter of Genetic High Risk Offspring of Patients with Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Alan N; Bhojraj, Tejas S; Prasad, Konasale M.; Montrose, Debra; Eack, Shaun M; Rajarethinam, Rajaprabhakaran; van Elst, Ludger T; Keshavan, Matcheri S

    2012-01-01

    Alterations in White Matter (WM) may be seen in young relatives at risk and may underlie vulnerability to Schizophrenia. We were interested in exploring which of the WM regions were altered in adolescent offspring at familial risk for Schizophrenia. We examined structural alterations in the offspring of subjects with Schizophrenia or Schizoaffective disorder (HR; n=65; 36 males) and healthy controls (HC; n=80: 37 males) matched for age and education. MRI images were collected using a GE 1.5T scanner at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Image processing was done using FreeSurfer (MGH) by an experienced rater blind to clinical data. We used multivariate analysis of covariance, with intracranial volume (p> 0.05) and age as covariates. High Risk offspring had significant reductions in total WM, hemispheric WM and WM within left parietal and left cingulate cortices. Male offspring had more pronounced right hemisphere WM reductions than females. PMID:22910323

  3. Fetal Exposure to Maternal Inflammation Does Not Affect Postnatal Development of Genetically-Driven Ileitis and Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hemmerling, Jana; Heller, Katharina; Hörmannsperger, Gabriele; Bazanella, Monika; Clavel, Thomas; Kollias, George; Haller, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic inflammatory disorders have been increasing in incidence over the past decades following geographical patterns of industrialization. Fetal exposure to maternal inflammation may alter organ functions and the offspring's disease risk. We studied the development of genetically-driven ileitis and colitis in response to maternal inflammation using mouse models. Methods: Disease susceptible (Tnf?ARE/+ and IL10?/?) and disease-free (Tnf+/+ and IL10?/+) offspring were raised in inflamed and non-inflamed dams. Ileal, caecal and colonic pathology was evaluated in the offspring at 8 or 12 weeks of age. Ly6G-positive cells in inflamed sections from the distal ileum and distal colon were analysed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines was measured in whole tissue specimens by quantitative PCR. Microarray analyses were performed on laser microdissected intestinal epithelium. Caecal bacterial communities were assessed by Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons. Results: Disease severity, the number of infiltrated neutrophils as well as Tnf and Il12p40 mRNA expression were independent of maternal inflammation in the offspring of mouse models for ileitis (Tnf?ARE/+) and colitis (IL10?/?). Although TNF-driven maternal inflammation regulated 2,174 (wild type) and 3,345 (Tnf?ARE/+) genes in the fetal epithelium, prenatal gene expression patterns were completely overwritten after birth. In addition, co-housing experiments revealed no change in phylogenetic diversity of the offspring's caecal microbiota in response to maternal inflammation. This is independent of the offspring's genotype before and after the onset of tissue pathology. Conclusions: Disease risk and activity in mouse models of chronic ileitis and colitis was independent of the fetal exposure to maternal inflammation. Likewise, maternal inflammation did not alter the diversity and composition of offspring's caecal microbiota, clearly demonstrating that changes of the gene expression program in the fetal gut epithelium were not relevant for the development of chronic inflammatory disorders in the gut. PMID:24849654

  4. Genetic alteration and expression of the phosphoinositol-3-kinase/Akt pathway genes PIK3CA and PIKE in human glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Knobbe, C B; Trampe-Kieslich, A; Reifenberger, G

    2005-10-01

    Glioblastomas frequently carry genetic alterations resulting in an aberrant activation of the phosphoinositol-3-kinase (Pi3k)/protein kinase B (Akt) signalling pathway, including most notably phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) mutation, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification and rearrangement, as well as carboxyl-terminal modulator protein (CTMP) hypermethylation [Knobbe et al., (2004) Hypermethylation and transcriptional downregulation of the carboxyl-terminal modulator protein gene in glioblastomas. J Natl Cancer Institute, 96, 483-486]. Here, we investigated two further Pi3k/Akt pathway genes, namely PIK3CA (3q26.3) and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase enhancer (PIKE) (CENTG1, 12q14), for genetic alteration and aberrant expression in a series of 97 primary glioblastomas. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of PIK3CA revealed somatic mutations in five tumours (5%). Twelve glioblastomas (12%) showed amplification of PIKE with invariable co-amplification of the adjacent CDK4 gene. All tumours with PIKE amplification as well as the vast majority of glioblastomas without amplification demonstrated increased expression of PIKE-A but not PIKE-S/L transcripts as compared with non-neoplastic brain tissue. Taken together, our data support an important role of PIK3CA and PIKE gene aberrations in the molecular pathogenesis of primary glioblastomas. PMID:16150119

  5. Strain-specific nuclear genetic background differentially affects mitochondria-related phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Arianna; Francisci, Silvia; Fazzi D'Orsi, Mario; Bianchi, Michele Maria

    2014-06-01

    In the course of our studies on mitochondrial defects, we have observed important phenotypic variations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains suggesting that a better characterization of the genetic variability will be essential to define the relationship between the mitochondrial efficiency and the presence of different nuclear backgrounds. In this manuscript, we have extended the study of such relations by comparing phenotypic assays related to mitochondrial functions of three wild-type laboratory strains. In addition to the phenotypic variability among the wild-type strains, important differences have been observed among strains bearing identical mitochondrial tRNA mutations that could be related only to the different nuclear background of the cells. Results showed that strains exhibited an intrinsic variability in the severity of the effects of the mitochondrial mutations and that specific strains might be used preferentially to evaluate the phenotypic effect of mitochondrial mutations on carbon metabolism, stress responses, and mitochondrial DNA stability. In particular, while W303-1B and MCC123 strains should be used to study the effect of severe mitochondrial tRNA mutations, D273-10B/A1 strain is rather suitable for studying the effects of milder mutations. PMID:24700775

  6. Characterization and genetic mapping of a mutation affecting apurinic endonuclease activity in Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, J.E.; Pattee, P.A.

    1986-11-01

    Protoplast fusion between the Rec- mutant RN981 (L. Wyman, R. V. Goering, and R. P. Novick, Genetics 76:681-702, 1974) of Staphylococcus aureus NCTC 8325 and a Rec+ NCTC 8325 derivative yielded Rec+ recombinants that exhibited the increased sensitivity to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine characteristic of RN981. Transformation analyses identified a specific mutation, designated ngr-374, that was responsible not only for N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine sensitivity, but also sensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, nitrous acid, and UV irradiation. However, ngr-374-carrying recombinants showed no significant increase in their sensitivity to mitomycin C or 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide and were unaffected in recombination proficiency. In vitro assays showed that ngr-374-carrying strains had lower apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activities than the wild type. The chromosomal locus occupied by ngr-374 was shown to exist in the gene order omega(Chr::Tn551)40-ngr-374-thrB106.

  7. Genetic and environmental factors affecting mating type frequency in natural isolates of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Arslanyolu, M; Doerder, F P

    2000-01-01

    In Tetrahymena thermophila mating type alleles specify temperature sensitive frequency distributions of multiple mating types. A-like alleles specify mating types I, II, III, V and VI, whereas B-like alleles specify mating types II through VII. We have characterized the mating type distributions specified by several A- and B-like genotypes segregated by genomic exclusion from cells isolated from a pond in northwestern Pennsylvania. The B-like genotypes are alike in specifying very low frequencies of mating type III, but differ with respect to the frequencies of other mating types, particularly II and VII. An A-like genotype specifies a high frequency of mating type III and is unstable in successive generations for the expression of mating type II, suggesting a possible modifier. Inter se crosses performed at 18 degrees C, 28 degrees C and 34 degrees C showed that each genotype specifies a frequency distribution that is uniquely affected by temperature. No mating type was affected the same way by temperature in all genotypes. In A/B heterozygotes, the B-like genotype exhibited partial dominance. The genotypes described here differ significantly from previously described genotypes from the same pond, indicating that there are numerous mating type alleles. For frequency-dependent selection to equalize mating type frequencies, it must act not only on complex multiple alleles but also on the response of mating type alleles to temperature. PMID:11140456

  8. Parent-of-origin genetic background affects the transcriptional levels of circadian and neuronal plasticity genes following sleep loss

    PubMed Central

    Tinarelli, Federico; Garcia-Garcia, Celina; Nicassio, Francesco; Tucci, Valter

    2014-01-01

    Sleep homoeostasis refers to a process in which the propensity to sleep increases as wakefulness progresses and decreases as sleep progresses. Sleep is tightly organized around the circadian clock and is regulated by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The homoeostatic response of sleep, which is classically triggered by sleep deprivation, is generally measured as a rebound effect of electrophysiological measures, for example delta sleep. However, more recently, gene expression changes following sleep loss have been investigated as biomarkers of sleep homoeostasis. The genetic background of an individual may affect this sleep-dependent gene expression phenotype. In this study, we investigated whether parental genetic background differentially modulates the expression of genes following sleep loss. We tested the progeny of reciprocal crosses of AKR/J and DBA/2J mouse strains and we show a parent-of-origin effect on the expression of circadian, sleep and neuronal plasticity genes following sleep deprivation. Thus, we further explored, by in silico, specific functions or upstream mechanisms of regulation and we observed that several upstream mechanisms involving signalling pathways (i.e. DICER1, PKA), growth factors (CSF3 and BDNF) and transcriptional regulators (EGR2 and ELK4) may be differentially modulated by parental effects. This is the first report showing that a behavioural manipulation (e.g. sleep deprivation) in adult animals triggers specific gene expression responses according to parent-of-origin genomic mechanisms. Our study suggests that the same mechanism may be extended to other behavioural domains and that the investigation of gene expression following experimental manipulations should take seriously into account parent-of-origin effects. PMID:24446504

  9. Psychosocial and cultural factors affecting the perceived risk of genetically modified food: an overview of the literature.

    PubMed

    Finucane, Melissa L; Holup, Joan L

    2005-04-01

    The rapid globalization of the world economy has increased the need for an astute understanding of cultural differences in perceptions, values, and ways of thinking about new food technologies. In this paper, we describe how socio-psychological and cultural factors may affect public perceptions of the risk of genetically modified (GM) food. We present psychological, sociological, and anthropological research on risk perception as a framework for understanding cross-national differences in reactions to GM food. Differences in the cultural values and circumstances of people in the US, European countries, and the developing world are examined. The implications of cultural theory for risk communication and decision making about GM food are discussed and directions for future research highlighted. PMID:15652691

  10. A genetic screen for mutations affecting gonad formation in Drosophila reveals a role for the slit/robo pathway

    PubMed Central

    Weyers, Jill J.; Milutinovich, Allison B.; Takeda, Yasuko; Jemc, Jennifer C.; Doren, Mark Van

    2013-01-01

    Organogenesis is a complex process requiring multiple cell types to associate with one another through correct cell contacts and in the correct location to achieve proper organ morphology and function. To better understand the mechanisms underlying gonad formation, we performed a mutagenesis screen in Drosophila and identified twenty-four genes required for gonadogenesis. These genes affect all different aspects of gonad formation and provide a framework for understanding the molecular mechanisms that control these processes. We find that gonad formation is regulated by multiple, independent pathways; some of these regulate the key cell adhesion molecule DE-cadherin, while others act through distinct mechanisms. In addition, we discover that the Slit/Roundabout pathway, best known for its role in regulating axonal guidance, is essential for proper gonad formation. Our findings shed light on the complexities of gonadogenesis and the genetic regulation required for proper organ formation. PMID:21377458

  11. Identification of new genetic polymorphisms that alter the dietary requirement for choline and vary in their distribution across ethnic and racial groups

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Corbin, Karen D.; Niculescu, Mihai D.; Galanko, Joseph A.; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Effect alleles (alleles with a polymorphism that is associated with the effect being measured) in a small number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are known to influence the dietary requirement for choline. In this study, we examined a much larger number of SNPs (n=200) in 10 genes related to choline metabolism for associations with development of organ dysfunction (liver or muscle) when 79 humans were fed a low-choline diet. We confirmed that effect alleles in SNPs such as the C allele of PEMT rs12325817 increase the risk of developing organ dysfunction in women when they consume a diet low in choline, and we identified novel effect alleles, such as the C allele of CHKA SNP rs7928739, that alter dietary choline requirements. When fed a low-choline diet, some people presented with muscle damage rather than liver damage; several effect alleles in SLC44A1 (rs7873937, G allele; rs2771040, G; rs6479313, G; rs16924529, A; and rs3199966, C) and one in CHKB (rs1557502, A) were more common in these individuals. This suggests that pathways related to choline metabolism are more important for normal muscle function than previously thought. In European, Mexican, and Asian Americans, and in individuals of African descent, we examined the prevalence of the effect alleles in SNPs that alter choline requirement and found that they are differentially distributed among people of different ethnic and racial backgrounds. Overall, our study has identified novel genetic variants that modulate choline requirements and suggests that the dietary requirement for choline may be different across racial and ethnic groups.—Da Costa, K.-A., Corbin, K. D., Niculescu, M. D., Galanko, J. A., Zeisel, S. H. Identification of new genetic polymorphisms that alter the dietary requirement for choline and vary in their distribution across ethnic and racial groups. PMID:24671709

  12. Identification of new genetic polymorphisms that alter the dietary requirement for choline and vary in their distribution across ethnic and racial groups.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Corbin, Karen D; Niculescu, Mihai D; Galanko, Joseph A; Zeisel, Steven H

    2014-07-01

    Effect alleles (alleles with a polymorphism that is associated with the effect being measured) in a small number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are known to influence the dietary requirement for choline. In this study, we examined a much larger number of SNPs (n=200) in 10 genes related to choline metabolism for associations with development of organ dysfunction (liver or muscle) when 79 humans were fed a low-choline diet. We confirmed that effect alleles in SNPs such as the C allele of PEMT rs12325817 increase the risk of developing organ dysfunction in women when they consume a diet low in choline, and we identified novel effect alleles, such as the C allele of CHKA SNP rs7928739, that alter dietary choline requirements. When fed a low-choline diet, some people presented with muscle damage rather than liver damage; several effect alleles in SLC44A1 (rs7873937, G allele; rs2771040, G; rs6479313, G; rs16924529, A; and rs3199966, C) and one in CHKB (rs1557502, A) were more common in these individuals. This suggests that pathways related to choline metabolism are more important for normal muscle function than previously thought. In European, Mexican, and Asian Americans, and in individuals of African descent, we examined the prevalence of the effect alleles in SNPs that alter choline requirement and found that they are differentially distributed among people of different ethnic and racial backgrounds. Overall, our study has identified novel genetic variants that modulate choline requirements and suggests that the dietary requirement for choline may be different across racial and ethnic groups.-Da Costa, K.-A., Corbin, K. D., Niculescu, M. D., Galanko, J. A., Zeisel, S. H. Identification of new genetic polymorphisms that alter the dietary requirement for choline and vary in their distribution across ethnic and racial groups. PMID:24671709

  13. Phenotypic and genetic diversity in Sinorhizobium meliloti and S. medicae from drought and salt affected regions of Morocco

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sinorhizobium meliloti and S. medicae are symbiotic nitrogen fixing bacteria in root nodules of forage legume alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). In Morocco, alfalfa is usually grown in marginal soils of arid and semi-arid regions frequently affected by drought, extremes of temperature and soil pH, soil salinity and heavy metals, which affect biological nitrogen fixing ability of rhizobia and productivity of the host. This study examines phenotypic diversity for tolerance to the above stresses and genotypic diversity at Repetitive Extragenic Pallindromic DNA regions of Sinorhizobium nodulating alfalfa, sampled from marginal soils of arid and semi-arid regions of Morocco. Results RsaI digestion of PCR amplified 16S rDNA of the 157 sampled isolates, assigned 136 isolates as S. meliloti and the rest as S. medicae. Further phenotyping of these alfalfa rhizobia for tolerance to the environmental stresses revealed a large degree of variation: 55.41%, 82.16%, 57.96% and 3.18% of the total isolates were tolerant to NaCl (>513 mM), water stress (-1.5 MPa), high temperature (40°C) and low pH (3.5), respectively. Sixty-seven isolates of S. meliloti and thirteen isolates of S. medicae that were tolerant to salinity were also tolerant to water stress. Most of the isolates of the two species showed tolerance to heavy metals (Cd, Mn and Zn) and antibiotics (chloramphenicol, spectinomycin, streptomycin and tetracycline). The phenotypic clusters observed by the cluster analysis clearly showed adaptations of the S. meliloti and S. medicae strains to the multiple stresses. Genotyping with rep-PCR revealed higher genetic diversity within these phenotypic clusters and classified all the 157 isolates into 148 genotypes. No relationship between genotypic profiles and the phenotypes was observed. The Analysis of Molecular Variance revealed that largest proportion of significant (P < 0.01) genetic variation was distributed within regions (89%) than among regions (11%). Conclusion High degree of phenotypic and genotypic diversity is present in S. meliloti and S. medicae populations from marginal soils affected by salt and drought, in arid and semi-arid regions of Morocco. Some of the tolerant strains have a potential for exploitation in salt and drought affected areas for biological nitrogen fixation in alfalfa. PMID:20089174

  14. Genetic variation of the RASGRF1 regulatory region affects human hippocampus-dependent memory.

    PubMed

    Barman, Adriana; Assmann, Anne; Richter, Sylvia; Soch, Joram; Schütze, Hartmut; Wüstenberg, Torsten; Deibele, Anna; Klein, Marieke; Richter, Anni; Behnisch, Gusalija; Düzel, Emrah; Zenker, Martin; Seidenbecher, Constanze I; Schott, Björn H

    2014-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide exchange factor RASGRF1 is an important regulator of intracellular signaling and neural plasticity in the brain. RASGRF1-deficient mice exhibit a complex phenotype with learning deficits and ocular abnormalities. Also in humans, a genome-wide association study has identified the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs8027411 in the putative transcription regulatory region of RASGRF1 as a risk variant of myopia. Here we aimed to assess whether, in line with the RASGRF1 knockout mouse phenotype, rs8027411 might also be associated with human memory function. We performed computer-based neuropsychological learning experiments in two independent cohorts of young, healthy participants. Tests included the Verbal Learning and Memory Test (VLMT) and the logical memory section of the Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS). Two sub-cohorts additionally participated in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of hippocampus function. 119 participants performed a novelty encoding task that had previously been shown to engage the hippocampus, and 63 subjects participated in a reward-related memory encoding study. RASGRF1 rs8027411 genotype was indeed associated with memory performance in an allele dosage-dependent manner, with carriers of the T allele (i.e., the myopia risk allele) showing better memory performance in the early encoding phase of the VLMT and in the recall phase of the WMS logical memory section. In fMRI, T allele carriers exhibited increased hippocampal activation during presentation of novel images and during encoding of pictures associated with monetary reward. Taken together, our results provide evidence for a role of the RASGRF1 gene locus in hippocampus-dependent memory and, along with the previous association with myopia, point toward pleitropic effects of RASGRF1 genetic variations on complex neural function in humans. PMID:24808846

  15. How Different Genetically Manipulated Brassica Genotypes Affect Life Table Parameters of Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae).

    PubMed

    Nikooei, Mehrnoosh; Fathipour, Yaghoub; Jalali Javaran, Mokhtar; Soufbaf, Mahmoud

    2015-04-01

    The fitness of Plutella xylostella L. on different genetically manipulated Brassica plants, including canola's progenitor (Brassica rapa L.), two cultivated canola cultivars (Opera and RGS003), one hybrid (Hyula401), one gamma-ray mutant-RGS003, and one transgenic (PF) genotype was compared using two-sex and female-based life table parameters. All experiments were conducted in a growth chamber at 25±1°C, 65±5% relative humidity, and a photoperiod of 16:8 (L:D) h. There were significant differences in duration of different life stages of P. xylostella on different plant genotypes. The shortest (13.92?d) and longest (24.61?d) total developmental time were on Opera and PF, respectively. The intrinsic rate of increase of P. xylostella ranged between 0.236 (Opera) and 0.071 day(-1) (PF). The highest (60.79 offspring) and lowest (7.88 offspring) net reproductive rates were observed on Opera and PF, respectively. Comparison of intrinsic rate of increase, net reproductive rates, finite rate of increase, mean generation time, fecundity, and survivorship of P. xylostella on the plant genotypes suggested that this pest performed well on cultivars (RGS003 and Opera) and performed poorly on the other manipulated genotypes especially on mutant-RGS003 and PF. Glucosinolate levels were significantly higher in damaged plants than undamaged ones and the lowest and highest concentrations of glucosinolates were found in transgenic genotype and canola's progenitor, respectively. Interestingly, our results showed that performance and fitness of this pest was better on canola's progenitor and cultivated plants, which had high levels of glucosinolate. PMID:26470162

  16. The new CRISPR-Cas system: RNA-guided genome engineering to efficiently produce any desired genetic alteration in animals.

    PubMed

    Seruggia, Davide; Montoliu, Lluis

    2014-10-01

    The CRISPR-Cas system is the newest targeted nuclease for genome engineering. In less than 1 year, the ease, robustness and efficiency of this method have facilitated an immense range of genetic modifications in most model organisms. Full and conditional gene knock-outs, knock-ins, large chromosomal deletions and subtle mutations can be obtained using combinations of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and DNA donors. In addition, with CRISPR-Cas compounds, multiple genetic modifications can be introduced seamlessly in a single step. CRISPR-Cas not only brings genome engineering capacities to species such as rodents and livestock in which the existing toolbox was already large, but has also enabled precise genetic engineering of organisms with difficult-to-edit genomes such as zebrafish, and of technically challenging species such as non-human primates. The CRISPR-Cas system allows generation of targeted mutations in mice, even in laboratories with limited or no access to the complex, time-consuming standard technology using mouse embryonic stem cells. Here we summarize the distinct applications of CRISPR-Cas technology for obtaining a variety of genetic modifications in different model organisms, underlining their advantages and limitations relative to other genome editing nucleases. We will guide the reader through the many publications that have seen the light in the first year of CRISPR-Cas technology. PMID:25092533

  17. DNMT1 genetic polymorphisms affect breast cancer risk in the central European Caucasian population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction DNA methylation of CpG islands within the promoter region of genes is an epigenetic modification with an important role in the development of cancer and it is typically mediated by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). In cancer cells, global hypomethylation of the genome as a whole and regional hypermethylation of CpG islands have been reported. Four groups of DNMTs have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 (TRDMT1), DNMT3A and DNMT3B. DNMT2 uses the catalytic mechanism of DNMTs, but does in fact methylate RNA. Little is known about the significance of these genes in human breast cancer. In the study presented herein, we analyzed five distinct DNMT single SNPs with regard to potential associations with breast cancer risk. Case description In this study, we genotyped 221 female Caucasian breast cancer patients and 221 female Caucasian healthy controls, and we used five allele-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. We selected one locus within the DNMT1 gene and two loci within the DNMT3A and DNMT3B genes, respectively. Statistics were calculated using the chi-squared and Fisher’s exact tests, and correlated with clinical parameters such as age, diagnosis, histology, TNM stage, hormonal receptor status, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status, response to treatment and survival. Statistically significant results were obtained for correlations with the DNMT1 gene. Discussion and Evaluation Five genomic loci within the DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B genes were assessed. Statistical significance (P = 0.030) was identified for DNMT1 SNP (A201G, rs2228612): six women within the control group were GG homozygous (variant), while this mutation was absent in the breast cancer group. Conclusions We conclude that women with the DNMT1 SNP (A201G, rs2228612) GG homozygous genotype (variant) have a lower risk of developing breast cancer compared to heterozygous or wildtype genotypes. To date, alterations within the DNMT1 gene have not been reported to be associated with cancer in the Caucasian population. PMID:23638630

  18. Alteration of sexual reproduction and genetic diversity in the kelp species Laminaria digitata at the southern limit of its range.

    PubMed

    Oppliger, Luz Valeria; von Dassow, Peter; Bouchemousse, Sarah; Robuchon, Marine; Valero, Myriam; Correa, Juan A; Mauger, Stéphane; Destombe, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation to marginal habitats at species range-limits has often been associated with parthenogenetic reproduction in terrestrial animals and plants. Laboratory observations have shown that brown algae exhibit a high propensity for parthenogenesis by various mechanisms. The kelp Laminaria digitata is an important component of the ecosystem in Northern European rocky intertidal habitats. We studied four L. digitata populations for the effects of marginality on genetic diversity and sexual reproduction. Two populations were marginal: One (Locquirec, in Northern Brittany) was well within the geographic range, but was genetically isolated from other populations by large stretches of sandy beaches. Another population was at the range limits of the species (Quiberon, in Southern Brittany) and was exposed to much higher seasonal temperature changes. Microsatellite analyses confirmed that these populations showed decreased genetic and allelic diversity, consistent with marginality and genetic isolation. Sporophytes from both marginal populations showed greatly diminished spore-production compared to central populations, but only the southern-limit population (Quiberon) showed a high propensity for producing unreduced (2N) spores. Unreduced 2N spores formed phenotypically normal gametophytes with nuclear area consistent with ?2N DNA contents, and microsatellite studies suggested these were produced at least in part by automixis. However, despite this being the dominant path of spore production in Quiberon sporophyte individuals, the genetic evidence indicated the population was maintained mostly by sexual reproduction. Thus, although spore production and development showed the expected tendency of geographical parthenogenesis in marginal populations, this appeared to be a consequence of maladaptation, rather than an adaptation to, life in a marginal habitat. PMID:25019953

  19. Alteration of Sexual Reproduction and Genetic Diversity in the Kelp Species Laminaria digitata at the Southern Limit of Its Range

    PubMed Central

    Oppliger, Luz Valeria; von Dassow, Peter; Bouchemousse, Sarah; Robuchon, Marine; Valero, Myriam; Correa, Juan A.; Mauger, Stéphane; Destombe, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation to marginal habitats at species range-limits has often been associated with parthenogenetic reproduction in terrestrial animals and plants. Laboratory observations have shown that brown algae exhibit a high propensity for parthenogenesis by various mechanisms. The kelp Laminaria digitata is an important component of the ecosystem in Northern European rocky intertidal habitats. We studied four L. digitata populations for the effects of marginality on genetic diversity and sexual reproduction. Two populations were marginal: One (Locquirec, in Northern Brittany) was well within the geographic range, but was genetically isolated from other populations by large stretches of sandy beaches. Another population was at the range limits of the species (Quiberon, in Southern Brittany) and was exposed to much higher seasonal temperature changes. Microsatellite analyses confirmed that these populations showed decreased genetic and allelic diversity, consistent with marginality and genetic isolation. Sporophytes from both marginal populations showed greatly diminished spore-production compared to central populations, but only the southern-limit population (Quiberon) showed a high propensity for producing unreduced (2N) spores. Unreduced 2N spores formed phenotypically normal gametophytes with nuclear area consistent with ?2N DNA contents, and microsatellite studies suggested these were produced at least in part by automixis. However, despite this being the dominant path of spore production in Quiberon sporophyte individuals, the genetic evidence indicated the population was maintained mostly by sexual reproduction. Thus, although spore production and development showed the expected tendency of geographical parthenogenesis in marginal populations, this appeared to be a consequence of maladaptation, rather than an adaptation to, life in a marginal habitat. PMID:25019953

  20. Genetic and dietary factors affecting human metabolism of 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J; Lin, Y S; Mezzetti, M; Bois, F Y; Kelsey, K; Ibrahim, J

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this project was to determine the factors associated with differences in butadiene (BD) inhalation uptake and the rate of metabolism for BD to epoxy butene by monitoring exhaled breath during and after a brief exposure to BD in human volunteers. A total of 133 subjects (equal males and females; four racial groups) provided final data. Volunteers gave informed consent and completed a questionnaire including diet and alcohol use. A venous blood sample was collected for genotyping CYP2E1. Subjects received a 20 min exposure to 2.0 ppm of BD, followed by a 40 min washout period. The total administered dose was 0.6 ppm*h, which is in the range of everyday exposures. Ten, 1 or 2 min exhaled breath samples (five during and five after exposure) were collected using an optimized strategy. BD was determined by GC-FID analysis. Breathing activity (minute ventilation, breath frequency and tidal volume) was measured to estimate alveolar ventilation. After the washout period, 250 mg of chlorzoxazone were administered and urine samples collected for 6 h to measure 2E1 phenotype. The total BD uptake during exposure (inhaled BD minus exhaled) was estimated. A three-compartment PBPK model was fitted to each subject's breath measurements to estimate personal and population model parameters, including in-vivo BD metabolic rate. A hierarchical Bayesian PBPK model was fit by Monte Carlo simulations to estimate model parameters. Regression and ANOVA analyses were performed. Earlier data analysis showed wide ranges for both total uptake BD and metabolic rate. Both varied significantly by sex and age, and showed suggestive differences by race, with Asians having the highest rates. The analyses reported here found no correlation between total BD uptake and metabolic rate. No significant differences were found for oxidation rates by 2E1 genotype or phenotype, but the rates showed trends consistent with reported differences by genotype and phenotype for chlorzoxazone metabolism. No effects on metabolic rate were observed for long-term alcohol consumption, or consumption in the past 24 h. Overall, neither dietary factors nor genetic differences explained much of the wide variability in metabolic rates. Population characteristics, age, sex, and race, were the most important explanatory variables, but a large fraction of the total variability in metabolism remains to be explained. PMID:11397404

  1. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low Dose & Low Dose-Rate Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, Joel

    2014-04-18

    Our laboratory has, among other things, developed and used the gamma H2AX focus assay and other chromosomal and cell killing assays to show that differences in this DNA double strand break (dsb) related response can be clearly and distinctly demonstrated for cells which are mildly hyper-radiosensitive such as those associated with A-T heterozygosity. We have found this level of mild hypersensitivity for cells from some 20 to 30 % of apparently normal individuals and from apparently normal parents of Retinoblastoma patients. We found significant differences in gene expression in somatic cells from unaffected parents of Rb patients as compared with normal controls, suggesting that these parents may harbor some as yet unidentified genetic abnormality. In other experiments we sought to determine the extent of differences in normal human cellular reaponses to radiation depending on their irradiation in 2D monolayer vs 3D organized acinar growth conditions. We exmined cell reproductive death, chromosomal aberration induction, and the levels of ?-H2AX foci in cells after single acute gamma-ray doses and immediately after 20 hours of irradiation at a dose rate of 0.0017 Gy/min. We found no significant differences in the dose-responses of these cells under the 2D or 3D growth conditions. While this does not mean such differences cannot occur in other situations, it does mean that they do not generally or necessarily occur. In another series of studies in collaboration with Dr Chuan Li, with supprt from this current grant. We reported a role for apoptotic cell death in promoting wound healing and tissue regeneration in mice. Apoptotic cells released growth signals that stimulated the proliferation of progenitor or stem cells. In yet another collaboration with Dr, B. Chen with funds from this grant, the relative radiosensitivity to cell killing as well as chromosomal instability of 13 DNA-PKcs site-directed mutant cell lines (defective at phosphorylation sites or kinase activity) were examined after exposure of synchronized G1 cells to 137Cs c rays. DNA-PKcs mutant cells defective in phosphorylation at multiple sites withinthe T2609 cluster or within the PI3K domain displayed extreme radiosensitivity. Cells defective at the S2056 cluster or T2609 single site alone were only mildly radiosensitive, but cells defective at even one site in both the S2056 and T2609 clusters were maximally radiosensitive. Thus a synergism between the capacity for phosphorylation at the S2056 and T2609 clusterswas found to be critical for induction of radiosensitivity.

  2. PTX3 genetic variations affect the risk of Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway colonization in cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Chiarini, M; Sabelli, C; Melotti, P; Garlanda, C; Savoldi, G; Mazza, C; Padoan, R; Plebani, A; Mantovani, A; Notarangelo, L D; Assael, B M; Badolato, R

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common life-threatening autosomal recessive disorder in the Caucasian population, and the gene responsible is the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Patients with CF have repeated bacterial infection of the airways caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), which is one of the predominant pathogen, and endobronchial chronic infection represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a gene that encodes the antimicrobial protein, PTX3, which is believed to have an important role in innate immunity of lung. To address the role of PTX3 in the risk of PA lung colonization, we investigated five single nucleotide polymorphisms of PTX3 gene in 172 Caucasian CF patients who were homozygous for the F508del mutation. We observed that PTX3 haplotype frequencies were significantly different between patients with PA colonization, as compared with noncolonized patients. Moreover, a protective effect was found in association with a specific haplotype (odds ratio 0.524). Our data suggest that variations within PTX3 affect lung colonization of Pseudomonas in patients with CF. PMID:20927127

  3. Lessons Learned from Whole Exome Sequencing in Multiplex Families Affected by a Complex Genetic Disorder, Intracranial Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Farlow, Janice L.; Lin, Hai; Sauerbeck, Laura; Lai, Dongbing; Koller, Daniel L.; Pugh, Elizabeth; Hetrick, Kurt; Ling, Hua; Kleinloog, Rachel; van der Vlies, Pieter; Deelen, Patrick; Swertz, Morris A.; Verweij, Bon H.; Regli, Luca; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Ruigrok, Ynte M.; Doheny, Kimberly; Liu, Yunlong; Broderick, Joseph; Foroud, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Genetic risk factors for intracranial aneurysm (IA) are not yet fully understood. Genomewide association studies have been successful at identifying common variants; however, the role of rare variation in IA susceptibility has not been fully explored. In this study, we report the use of whole exome sequencing (WES) in seven densely-affected families (45 individuals) recruited as part of the Familial Intracranial Aneurysm study. WES variants were prioritized by functional prediction, frequency, predicted pathogenicity, and segregation within families. Using these criteria, 68 variants in 68 genes were prioritized across the seven families. Of the genes that were expressed in IA tissue, one gene (TMEM132B) was differentially expressed in aneurysmal samples (n=44) as compared to control samples (n=16) (false discovery rate adjusted p-value=0.023). We demonstrate that sequencing of densely affected families permits exploration of the role of rare variants in a relatively common disease such as IA, although there are important study design considerations for applying sequencing to complex disorders. In this study, we explore methods of WES variant prioritization, including the incorporation of unaffected individuals, multipoint linkage analysis, biological pathway information, and transcriptome profiling. Further studies are needed to validate and characterize the set of variants and genes identified in this study. PMID:25803036

  4. ANGPT2 Genetic Variant Is Associated with Trauma-associated Acute Lung Injury and Altered Plasma Angiopoietin-2 Isoform Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Nuala J.; Li, Mingyao; Feng, Rui; Bradfield, Jonathan; Gallop, Robert; Bellamy, Scarlett; Fuchs, Barry D.; Lanken, Paul N.; Albelda, Steven M.; Rushefski, Melanie; Aplenc, Richard; Abramova, Helen; Atochina-Vasserman, Elena N.; Beers, Michael F.; Calfee, Carolyn S.; Cohen, Mitchell J.; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Christiani, David C.; O'Keefe, Grant E.; Ware, Lorraine B.; May, Addison K.; Wurfel, Mark M.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Christie, Jason D.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Acute lung injury (ALI) acts as a complex genetic trait, yet its genetic risk factors remain incompletely understood. Large-scale genotyping has not previously been reported for ALI. Objectives: To identify ALI risk variants after major trauma using a large-scale candidate gene approach. Methods: We performed a two-stage genetic association study. We derived findings in an African American cohort (n = 222) using a cardiopulmonary disease–centric 50K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. Genotype and haplotype distributions were compared between subjects with ALI and without ALI, with adjustment for clinical factors. Top performing SNPs (P < 10?4) were tested in a multicenter European American trauma-associated ALI case-control population (n = 600 ALI; n = 2,266 population-based control subjects) for replication. The ALI-associated genomic region was sequenced, analyzed for in silico prediction of function, and plasma was assayed by ELISA and immunoblot. Measurements and Main Results: Five SNPs demonstrated a significant association with ALI after adjustment for covariates in Stage I. Two SNPs in ANGPT2 (rs1868554 and rs2442598) replicated their significant association with ALI in Stage II. rs1868554 was robust to multiple comparison correction: odds ratio 1.22 (1.06–1.40), P = 0.0047. Resequencing identified predicted novel splice sites in linkage disequilibrium with rs1868554, and immunoblots showed higher proportion of variant angiopoietin-2 (ANG2) isoform associated with rs1868554T (0.81 vs. 0.48; P = 0.038). Conclusions: An ANGPT2 region is associated with both ALI and variation in plasma angiopoietin-2 isoforms. Characterization of the variant isoform and its genetic regulation may yield important insights about ALI pathogenesis and susceptibility. PMID:21257790

  5. Do recent US Supreme Court rulings on patenting of genes and genetic diagnostics affect the practice of genetic screening and diagnosis in prenatal and reproductive care?

    PubMed

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; McGuire, Amy L; Van den Veyver, Ignatia B

    2014-10-01

    Thousands of patents have been awarded that claim human gene sequences and their uses, and some have been challenged in court. In a recent high-profile case, Association for Molecular Pathology, et al. v. Myriad Genetics, Inc., et al., the US Supreme Court ruled that genes are natural occurring substances and therefore not patentable through 'composition of matter' claims. The consequences of this ruling will extend well beyond ending Myriad's monopoly over BRCA testing and may affect similar monopolies of other commercial laboratories for tests involving other genes. It could also simplify intellectual property issues surrounding genome-wide clinical sequencing, which can generate results for genes covered by intellectual property. Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for common aneuploidies using cell-free fetal (cff) DNA in maternal blood is currently offered through commercial laboratories and is also the subject of ongoing patent litigation. The recent Supreme Court decision in the Myriad case has already been invoked by a lower district court in NIPT litigation and resulted in invalidation of primary claims in a patent on currently marketed cffDNA-based testing for chromosomal aneuploidies. PMID:24989832

  6. Do recent US Supreme Court rulings on patenting of genes and genetic diagnostics affect the practice of genetic screening and diagnosis in prenatal and reproductive care?

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; McGuire, Amy L.; Van den Veyver, Ignatia B.

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of patents have been awarded that claim human gene sequences and their uses, and some have been challenged in court. In a recent high-profile case, Association for Molecular Pathology, et al. vs. Myriad Genetics, Inc., et al., the United States Supreme Court ruled that genes are natural occurring substances and therefore not patentable through “composition of matter” claims. The consequences of this ruling will extend well beyond ending Myriad's monopoly over BRCA testing, and may affect similar monopolies of other commercial laboratories for tests involving other genes. It could also simplify intellectual property issues surrounding genome-wide clinical sequencing, which can generate results for genes covered by intellectual property. Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for common aneuploidies using cell-free fetal (cff) DNA in maternal blood is currently offered through commercial laboratories and is also the subject of ongoing patent litigation. The recent Supreme Court decision in the Myriad case has already been invoked by a lower district court in NIPT litigation and resulted in invalidation of primary claims in a patent on currently marketed cffDNA-based testing for chromosomal aneuploidies. PMID:24989832

  7. Does mating behaviour affect connectivity in marine fishes? Comparative population genetics of two protogynous groupers (Family Serranidae).

    PubMed

    Portnoy, D S; Hollenbeck, C M; Renshaw, M A; Cummings, N J; Gold, J R

    2013-01-01

    Pelagic larval duration (PLD) has been hypothesized to be the primary predictor of connectivity in marine fishes; however, few studies have examined the effects that adult reproductive behaviour may have on realized dispersal. We assessed gene flow (connectivity) by documenting variation in microsatellites and mitochondrial DNA sequences in two protogynous species of groupers, the aggregate spawning red hind, Epinephelus guttatus, and the single-male, harem-spawning coney, Cephalopholis fulva, to ask whether reproductive strategy affects connectivity. Samples of both species were obtained from waters off three islands (Puerto Rico, St. Thomas and St. Croix) in the Caribbean Sea. Despite the notion that aggregate spawning of red hind may facilitate larval retention, stronger signals of population structure were detected in the harem-spawning coney. Heterogeneity and/or inferred barriers, based on microsatellites, involved St. Croix (red hind and coney) and the west coast of Puerto Rico (coney). Heterogeneity and/or inferred barriers, based on mitochondrial DNA, involved St. Croix (coney only). Genetic divergence in both species was stronger for microsatellites than for mitochondrial DNA, suggesting sex-biased dispersal in both species. Long-term migration rates, based on microsatellites, indicated asymmetric gene flow for both species in the same direction as mean surface currents in the region. Red hind had higher levels of variation in microsatellites and lower levels of variation in mitochondrial DNA. Long-term effective size and effective number of breeders were greater for red hind; estimates of ?(f) , a proxy for long-term effective female size, were the same in both species. Patterns of gene flow in both species appear to stem in part from shared aspects of larval and adult biology, local bathymetry and surface current patterns. Differences in connectivity and levels of genetic variation between the species, however, likely stem from differences in behaviour related to reproductive strategy. PMID:23189927

  8. Selection Based on Indirect Genetic Effects for Growth, Environmental Enrichment and Coping Style Affect the Immune Status of Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Reimert, Inonge; Rodenburg, T. Bas; Ursinus, Winanda W.; Kemp, Bas; Bolhuis, J. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Pigs living in intensive husbandry systems may experience both acute and chronic stress through standard management procedures and limitations in their physical and social environment, which may have implications for their immune status. Here, the effect of a new breeding method where pigs were selected on their heritable influence on their pen mates' growth, and environmental enrichment on the immune status of pigs was investigated. Hereto, 240 pigs with a relatively positive genetic effect on the growth of their pen mates (+SBV) and 240 pigs with a relatively negative genetic effect on the growth of their pen mates (?SBV) were housed in barren or straw-enriched pens from 4 to 23 weeks of age (n ?=? 80 pens in total). A blood sample was taken from the pigs before, three days after a 24 h regrouping test, and at week 22. In addition, effects of coping style, as assessed in a backtest, and gender were also investigated. Mainly, +SBV were found to have lower leukocyte, lymphocyte and haptoglobin concentrations than -SBV pigs. Enriched housed pigs had a lower neutrophil to lymphocyte (N:L) ratio and lower haptoglobin concentrations, but had higher antibody titers specific for Keyhole Limpet Hemocyanin (KLH) than barren housed pigs. No interactions were found between SBV class and housing. Furthermore, pigs with a proactive coping style had higher alternative complement activity and, in the enriched pens, higher antibody titers specific for KLH than pigs with a reactive coping style. Lastly, females tended to have lower leukocyte, but higher haptoglobin concentrations than castrated males. Overall, these results suggest that +SBV pigs and enriched housed pigs were less affected by stress than -SBV and barren housed pigs, respectively. Moreover, immune activation might be differently organized in individuals with different coping styles and to a lesser extent in individuals of opposite genders. PMID:25275507

  9. The Legal Past, Present and Future of Prenatal Genetic Testing: Professional Liability and Other Legal Challenges Affecting Patient Access to Services.

    PubMed

    Pergament, Deborah; Ilijic, Katie

    2014-01-01

    This chapter is an overview of the current status of the law in the United States regarding prenatal genetic testing with an emphasis on issues related to professional liability and other challenges affecting patient access to prenatal genetic testing. The chapter discusses the roles that federal regulations, promulgated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), play in the regulation of prenatal genetic tests. The chapter discusses tort litigation based on allegations of malpractice in the provision of prenatal genetic testing and how courts have analyzed issues related to causation, damages and mitigation of damages. The chapter provides reference information regarding how individual states address causes of action under the tort theories of wrongful birth and wrongful life. The chapter concludes with a discussion of future legal issues that may affect clinical prenatal genetic testing services arising from the continued expansion of prenatal genetic testing, legal restrictions on access to abortion and the potential development of embryonic treatments. PMID:26237611

  10. The Legal Past, Present and Future of Prenatal Genetic Testing: Professional Liability and Other Legal Challenges Affecting Patient Access to Services

    PubMed Central

    Pergament, Deborah; Ilijic, Katie

    2014-01-01

    This chapter is an overview of the current status of the law in the United States regarding prenatal genetic testing with an emphasis on issues related to professional liability and other challenges affecting patient access to prenatal genetic testing. The chapter discusses the roles that federal regulations, promulgated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), play in the regulation of prenatal genetic tests. The chapter discusses tort litigation based on allegations of malpractice in the provision of prenatal genetic testing and how courts have analyzed issues related to causation, damages and mitigation of damages. The chapter provides reference information regarding how individual states address causes of action under the tort theories of wrongful birth and wrongful life. The chapter concludes with a discussion of future legal issues that may affect clinical prenatal genetic testing services arising from the continued expansion of prenatal genetic testing, legal restrictions on access to abortion and the potential development of embryonic treatments. PMID:26237611

  11. The role of current affect, anticipated affect and spontaneous self-affirmation in decisions to receive self-threatening genetic risk information.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Rebecca A; Taber, Jennifer M; Klein, William M P; Harris, Peter R; Lewis, Katie L; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2015-12-01

    One reason for not seeking personally threatening information may be negative current and anticipated affective responses. We examined whether current (e.g., worry) and anticipated negative affect predicted intentions to seek sequencing results in the context of an actual genomic sequencing trial (ClinSeq®; n = 545) and whether spontaneous self-affirmation mitigated any (negative) association between affect and intentions. Anticipated affective response negatively predicted intentions to obtain and share results pertaining to both medically actionable and non-actionable disease, whereas current affect was only a marginal predictor. The negative association between anticipated affect and intentions to obtain results pertaining to non-actionable disease was weaker in individuals who were higher in spontaneous self-affirmation. These results have implications for the understanding of current and anticipated affect, self-affirmation and consequential decision-making and contribute to a growing body of evidence on the role of affect in medical decisions. PMID:25482843

  12. Interleukin 1B genetic polymorphisms interact with polyunsaturated fatty acids to affect risk of the metabolic syndrome in the GOLDN Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic inflammation has been identified as an important component of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Therefore, environmental and genetic factors contributing to the variation of inflammatory responses could affect individuals’ susceptibility to the MetS. We investigated the association between comm...

  13. nature genetics | volume 47 | NumBeR 3 | mARCH 2015 187 affect the traditional single-blind peer review, and they have con-

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    nature genetics | volume 47 | NumBeR 3 | mARCH 2015 187 Editorial affect the traditional single-blind. Naturejournalseditorshavetraditionallynotembraceddouble- blind peer review, for several reasons. Some were skeptical of its efficacy, some were concerned and Nature Climate Change have allowed authors to choosebetweendouble-blind and single-blind peer reviewatsub

  14. Altered expression of surface protein WI-1 in genetically related strains of Blastomyces dermatitidis that differ in virulence regulates recognition of yeasts by human macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, B S; Chaturvedi, S; Hogan, L H; Jones, J M; Newman, S L

    1994-01-01

    The molecular basis for pathogenicity and virulence of the dimorphic fungus Blastomyces dermatitidis remains unknown. WI-1 is a major cell wall protein of B. dermatitidis yeasts and is a recognition target of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. As an initial study to determine if WI-1 might be linked to virulence of B. dermatitidis, we quantified WI-1 expression on three genetically related strains that differ in their virulence for mice: wild-type virulent ATCC strain 26199, mutant ATCC strain 60915 (which is 10,000-fold reduced in virulence), and mutant ATCC strain 60916 (which is avirulent). Two principal alterations in WI-1 expression were observed in the mutants. First, the mutants express more WI-1 on their surface, as quantified by flow cytometry with monoclonal antibody to WI-1 and by radioimmunoassay, but the WI-1 on their cell wall is less extractable than that on the wild-type strain. Second, the mutants shed less WI-1 during culture and demonstrate impaired processing of shed WI-1. Surface alterations in WI-1 were accompanied by significant differences in the binding of the virulent and mutant strains to human monocyte-derived macrophages. Attachment of yeasts to macrophages paralleled and was proportional to the expression of WI-1. Compared with wild-type yeasts, both mutants bound to macrophages more rapidly and in two- to threefold-greater magnitude. Furthermore, about 75% of yeast binding to macrophages was inhibited by a Fab anti-WI-1 monoclonal antibody. These results suggest that altered WI-1 expression on attenuated and avirulent mutant B. dermatitidis yeasts greatly facilitates macrophage recognition and binding of yeasts and, in turn, may contribute to more rapid ingestion and killing in the host. Images PMID:8039924

  15. Altered cortical GABAA receptor composition, physiology, and endocytosis in a mouse model of a human genetic absence epilepsy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chengwen; Huang, Zhiling; Ding, Li; Deel, M Elizabeth; Arain, Fazal M; Murray, Clark R; Patel, Ronak S; Flanagan, Christopher D; Gallagher, Martin J

    2013-07-19

    Patients with generalized epilepsy exhibit cerebral cortical disinhibition. Likewise, mutations in the inhibitory ligand-gated ion channels, GABAA receptors (GABAARs), cause generalized epilepsy syndromes in humans. Recently, we demonstrated that heterozygous knock-out (Het?1KO) of the human epilepsy gene, the GABAAR ?1 subunit, produced absence epilepsy in mice. Here, we determined the effects of Het?1KO on the expression and physiology of GABAARs in the mouse cortex. We found that Het?1KO caused modest reductions in the total and surface expression of the ?2 subunit but did not alter ?1 or ?3 subunit expression, results consistent with a small reduction of GABAARs. Cortices partially compensated for Het?1KO by increasing the fraction of residual ?1 subunit on the cell surface and by increasing total and surface expression of ?3, but not ?2, subunits. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that Het?1KO increased the fraction of ?1 subunits, and decreased the fraction of ?3 subunits, that associated in hybrid ?1?3?? receptors. Patch clamp electrophysiology studies showed that Het?1KO layer VI cortical neurons exhibited reduced inhibitory postsynaptic current peak amplitudes, prolonged current rise and decay times, and altered responses to benzodiazepine agonists. Finally, application of inhibitors of dynamin-mediated endocytosis revealed that Het?1KO reduced base-line GABAAR endocytosis, an effect that probably contributes to the observed changes in GABAAR expression. These findings demonstrate that Het?1KO exerts two principle disinhibitory effects on cortical GABAAR-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission: 1) a modest reduction of GABAAR number and 2) a partial compensation with GABAAR isoforms that possess physiological properties different from those of the otherwise predominant ?1?? GABAARs. PMID:23744069

  16. Genetic Deletion of MT1 Melatonin Receptors Alters Spontaneous Behavioral Rhythms in Male and Female C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Adamah-Biassi, E.B.; Hudson, R.L.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    Behaviors vary over the 24 hr. light/dark cycle and these temporal patterns reflect in part modulation by circadian neural circuits and hormones, such as melatonin. The goal of this study was to investigate if MT1 melatonin receptors are involved in behavioral regulation by comparing male and female C57 wild type (WT) mice with C57 mice that had a genetic deletion of the MT1 receptor (MT1KO). A comprehensive array of fifteen distinct spontaneous behaviors was recorded continuously in the homecage over multiple days using the HomeCageScan system. Behaviors assessed were activity-like (i.e. come down, hang, jump, walk), exploration-like (i.e. dig, groom, rear up, sniff, stretch), resting-like (i.e. awake, remain low, rest, twitch) and ingestion-like (i.e. drink, eat). Phenotypic array and temporal distribution analysis revealed distinct behavioral rhythms that differed between WT and MT1KO mice. The rhythms were consistent from day to day in males and varied with the estrous cycle in females. We also studied the role of MT1 receptors on depressive and anxiety-like behaviors. Genetic deletion of MT1 receptors increased immobility time in the forced swim test and decreased the number of marbles buried in the marble burying test in both male and female C57 mice. We conclude that MT1 melatonin receptors are involved in neural pathways modulating diurnal rhythms of spontaneous behavior in the homecage as well as pathways regulating depressive and anxiolytic-like behaviors. PMID:25200199

  17. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Capsicum represents one of several well characterized Solanaceous genera. A wealth of classical and molecular genetics research is available for the genus. Information gleaned from its cultivated relatives, tomato and potato, provide further insight for basic and applied studies. Early ...

  18. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining genetic variation in wild populations of Arctic organisms is fundamental to the long-term persistence of high latitude biodiversity. Variability is important because it provides options for species to respond to changing environmental conditions and novel challenges such as emerging path...

  19. Abstract. The climate exerts the dominant control on the spatial distribution of the major vegetation types on a global scale. In turn, vegetation cover affects climate via alteration of the physical characteristics of the land surface

    E-print Network

    Brovkin, Victor

    vegetation types on a global scale. In turn, vegetation cover affects climate via alteration of the physical of temperate and boreal deforestation. In general, the climate models agree that tropical deforestation exerts a net regional warming while an effect on extratropical regions is more uncertain. In the Sahel

  20. Reactive biomolecular divergence in genetically altered yeast cells and isolated mitochondria as measured by biocavity laser spectroscopy : a rapid diagnostic method for studying cellular responses to stress and disease.

    SciTech Connect

    Yaffe, Michael P.; Gourley, Paul Lee; Copeland, Robert Guild; McDonald, Anthony Eugene; Hendricks, Judy K.; Naviaux, Robert K.

    2006-12-01

    We report an analysis of four strains of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) using biocavity laser spectroscopy. The four strains are grouped in two pairs (wild type and altered), in which one strain differs genetically at a single locus, affecting mitochondrial function. In one pair, the wild-type rho+ and a rho0 strain differ by complete removal of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In the second pair, the wild-type rho+ and a rho- strain differ by knock-out of the nuclear gene encoding Cox4, an essential subunit of cytochrome c oxidase. The biocavity laser is used to measure the biophysical optic parameter Deltalambda, a laser wavelength shift relating to the optical density of cell or mitochondria that uniquely reflects its size and biomolecular composition. As such, Deltalambda is a powerful parameter that rapidly interrogates the biomolecular state of single cells and mitochondria. Wild-type cells and mitochondria produce Gaussian-like distributions with a single peak. In contrast, mutant cells and mitochondria produce leptokurtotic distributions that are asymmetric and highly skewed to the right. These distribution changes could be self-consistently modeled with a single, log-normal distribution undergoing a thousand-fold increase in variance of biomolecular composition. These features reflect a new state of stressed or diseased cells that we call a reactive biomolecular divergence (RBD) that reflects the vital interdependence of mitochondria and the nucleus.

  1. JAK kinase targeting in hematologic malignancies: a sinuous pathway from identification of genetic alterations towards clinical indications

    PubMed Central

    Springuel, Lorraine; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Knoops, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive JAK-STAT pathway activation occurs in most myeloproliferative neoplasms as well as in a significant proportion of other hematologic malignancies, and is frequently a marker of poor prognosis. The underlying molecular alterations are heterogeneous as they include activating mutations in distinct components (cytokine receptor, JAK, STAT), overexpression (cytokine receptor, JAK) or rare JAK2 fusion proteins. In some cases, concomitant loss of negative regulators contributes to pathogenesis by further boosting the activation of the cascade. Exploiting the signaling bottleneck provided by the limited number of JAK kinases is an attractive therapeutic strategy for hematologic neoplasms driven by constitutive JAK-STAT pathway activation. However, given the conserved nature of the kinase domain among family members and the interrelated roles of JAK kinases in many physiological processes, including hematopoiesis and immunity, broad usage of JAK inhibitors in hematology is challenged by their narrow therapeutic window. Novel therapies are, therefore, needed. The development of more selective inhibitors is a questionable strategy as such inhibitors might abrogate the beneficial contribution of alleviating the cancer-related pro-inflammatory microenvironment and raise selective pressure to a threshold that allows the emergence of malignant subclones harboring drug-resistant mutations. In contrast, synergistic combinations of JAK inhibitors with drugs targeting cascades that work in concert with JAK-STAT pathway appear to be promising therapeutic alternatives to JAK inhibitors as monotherapies. PMID:26432382

  2. Genetic and chemical reductions in protein phosphatase activity alter auxin transport, gravity response, and lateral root growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashotte, A. M.; DeLong, A.; Muday, G. K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Auxin transport is required for important growth and developmental processes in plants, including gravity response and lateral root growth. Several lines of evidence suggest that reversible protein phosphorylation regulates auxin transport. Arabidopsis rcn1 mutant seedlings exhibit reduced protein phosphatase 2A activity and defects in differential cell elongation. Here we report that reduced phosphatase activity alters auxin transport and dependent physiological processes in the seedling root. Root basipetal transport was increased in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings but showed normal sensitivity to the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Phosphatase inhibition reduced root gravity response and delayed the establishment of differential auxin-induced gene expression across a gravity-stimulated root tip. An NPA treatment that reduced basipetal transport in rcn1 and cantharidin-treated wild-type plants also restored a normal gravity response and asymmetric auxin-induced gene expression, indicating that increased basipetal auxin transport impedes gravitropism. Increased auxin transport in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings did not require the AGR1/EIR1/PIN2/WAV6 or AUX1 gene products. In contrast to basipetal transport, root acropetal transport was normal in phosphatase-inhibited seedlings in the absence of NPA, although it showed reduced NPA sensitivity. Lateral root growth also exhibited reduced NPA sensitivity in rcn1 seedlings, consistent with acropetal transport controlling lateral root growth. These results support the role of protein phosphorylation in regulating auxin transport and suggest that the acropetal and basipetal auxin transport streams are differentially regulated.

  3. Fluorescence in situ analysis of soft tissue tumor associated genetic alterations in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Horn, Heike; Allmanritter, Jan; Doglioni, Claudio; Marx, Alexander; Müller, Justus; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Staiger, Annette M; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Ott, M Michaela

    2014-12-01

    No prospective studies are available to date evaluating the combined analysis of chromosomal alterations via interphase FISH in different soft tissue sarcoma (STS) subtypes. We tested 64 consecutive sarcoma specimens with FISH probes to detect aberrations specific for a given STS subtype. We first determined the translocation frequency in the specific STS subtypes in 48 tumors, with the primary pathological diagnosis as the gold standard. Subsequently, to evaluate sensitivity and specificity, all FISH probes were hybridized to 16 STS of hitherto unknown diagnosis. DDIT3 translocations occurred in 8/10 (80%) of myxoid liposarcomas. FOXO1 translocations were noted in 4/4 (100%) of alveolar but in none of 7 embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas. All 15 (100%) Ewing sarcomas/PNET and 4 clear cell sarcomas (4/4) harbored EWSR1 translocations. SS18 rearrangements were demonstrated in 8/9 (89%) synovial sarcomas. MDM2 amplification was noted in 7/8 (88%) atypical lipomatous tumors/well-differentiated and 3/3 (100%) dedifferentiated liposarcomas, respectively, but not in four pleomorphic liposarcomas. Sensitivities and specificities ranged from 80% to 100% and from 93% to 100%, respectively, with the highest values observed for FOXO1 (100% each). We conclude, therefore, that is possible to accurately predict the STS subtype using a panel of different subtype-specific FISH probes, thereby greatly facilitating the differential diagnosis of these tumors. PMID:25446247

  4. Brittle stalk 2 encodes a putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein that affects mechanical strength of maize tissues by altering the composition and structure of secondary cell walls.

    PubMed

    Ching, Ada; Dhugga, Kanwarpal S; Appenzeller, Laura; Meeley, Robert; Bourett, Timothy M; Howard, Richard J; Rafalski, Antoni

    2006-10-01

    A spontaneous maize mutant, brittle stalk-2 (bk2-ref), exhibits dramatically reduced tissue mechanical strength. Reduction in mechanical strength in the stalk tissue was highly correlated with a reduction in the amount of cellulose and an uneven deposition of secondary cell wall material in the subepidermal and perivascular sclerenchyma fibers. Cell wall accounted for two-thirds of the observed reduction in dry matter content per unit length of the mutant stalk in comparison to the wildtype stalk. Although the cell wall composition was significantly altered in the mutant in comparison to the wildtype stalks, no compensation by lignin and cell wall matrix for reduced cellulose amount was observed. We demonstrate that Bk2 encodes a Cobra-like protein that is homologous to the rice Bc1 protein. In the bk2-ref gene, a 1 kb transposon-like element is inserted in the beginning of the second exon, disrupting the open reading frame. The Bk2 gene was expressed in the stalk, husk, root, and leaf tissues, but not in the embryo, endosperm, pollen, silk, or other tissues with comparatively few or no secondary cell wall containing cells. The highest expression was in the isolated vascular bundles. In agreement with its role in secondary wall formation, the expression pattern of the Bk2 gene was very similar to that of the ZmCesA10, ZmCesA11, and ZmCesA12 genes, which are known to be involved in secondary wall formation. We have isolated an independent Mutator-tagged allele of bk2, referred to as bk2-Mu7, the phenotype of which is similar to that of the spontaneous mutant. Our results demonstrate that mutations in the Bk2 gene affect stalk strength in maize by interfering with the deposition of cellulose in the secondary cell wall in fiber cells. PMID:16752131

  5. Ascorbic Acid Differentially Affects Stress Response and Resistance to Colibacillosis in Turkeys from Genetic Lines Differing in Growth Rate.

    PubMed

    Huff, G R; Huff, W E; Rath, N C; Anthony, N B; Nestor, K E

    2015-06-01

    Genetic selection for fast growth can affect the ability of male turkeys to cope with stressors, resulting in decreased immunity to opportunistic bacterial infection. The purpose of the current study was to compare the effects of ascorbic acid (AA) on the stress response and resistance to Escherichia coli challenge of birds selected for increased 16-wk body weight (BW; F-line) with their random-bred parent line (RBC2). Male turkeys were raised in duplicate floor pens in a two line×two AA treatment×two stress challenge (SC) design. At 5 wk of age, AA (1200 ppm) was provided in drinking water for a 24-hr period, during which all birds were weighed. After AA treatment, the SC group was subjected to a transport stress protocol. Six hours after the start of transport, SC birds were also inoculated in the thoracic air sac with 1×10(4) colony-forming units of E. coli. The following morning four birds from each pen were bled, and all birds were weighed and necropsied 2 days later. BW and gain after SC were decreased in the F-line but not the RBC2 line, and there were no AA effects on BW. The weight of the bursa of Fabricius relative to BW was higher in the RBC2 line than in the F-line, was decreased by SC, and was not affected by AA. The heterophil?lymphocyte ratio was higher in the SC F-line as compared to the SC RBC2 and was decreased by AA only in the SC F-line. Corticosterone (C) levels were increased by SC only in the F-line, and AA decreased C levels only in the RBC2 line. Airsacculitis scores were increased in the F-line SC birds. The challenge strain of E. coli was only detected in the air sac and liver of the AA-treated F-line SC birds and in the liver of the no-AA F-line birds. These results suggest that SC at 5 wk of age had a more deleterious effect on the fast-growing F-line than on its parent line and that AA may have increased susceptibility to colibacillosis in the SC F-line birds. PMID:26473685

  6. Direct genetic selection of two classes of R17/MS2 coat proteins with altered capsid assembly properties and expanded RNA-binding activities.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S; True, H L; Seitz, E M; Bennett, K A; Fouts, D E; Gardner, J F; Celander, D W

    1997-01-01

    RNA challenge phages are derivatives of bacteriophage P22 that enable direct genetic selection for a specific RNA-protein interaction. The bacteriophage P22 R17 encodes a wild-type R17 operator site and undergoes lysogenic development following infection of susceptible bacterial strains that express the R17/MS2 coat protein. A P22 R17 derivative with an OcRNA site (P22 R17 [A(-10)U]) develops lytically following infection of these strains. RNA challenge phages can be used to isolate second-site coat protein suppressors that recognize an OcRNA sequence by selecting for lysogens with a P22 R17 [Oc] phage derivative. The bacteriophage derivative P22 R17 [A(-10)U] was used in one such scheme to isolate two classes of genes that encode R17 coat proteins with altered capsid assembly properties and expanded RNA-binding characteristics. These mutations map outside the RNA-binding surface and include amino acid substitutions that interfere with interactions between coat protein dimers in the formation of the stable phage capsid. One class of mutants encodes substitutions at the highly conserved first and second positions of the mature coat protein. N-terminal sequence analysis of these mutants reveals that coat proteins with substitutions only at position 1 are defective in post-translational processing of the initiator methionine. All selected proteins possess expanded RNA-binding properties since they direct efficient lysogen formation for P22 R17 and P22 R17 [A(-10)U]; however, bacterial strains that express the protein mutants remain sensitive to lytic infection by other P22 R17 [Oc] bacteriophages. The described selection strategy provides a novel genetic approach to dissecting protein structure within RNA-binding proteins. PMID:9092675

  7. Exploring Genetic Susceptibility to Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong-Jin; Kang, Ji-Hyoun; Yim, Yi-Rang; Kim, Ji-Eun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Wen, Lihui; Kim, Tae-Jong; Park, Yong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) affects 1% to 5% of the population, and approximately 90% of the affected individuals are women. FM patients experience impaired quality of life and the disorder places a considerable economic burden on the medical care system. With the recognition of FM as a major health problem, many recent studies have evaluated the pathophysiology of FM. Although the etiology of FM remains unknown, it is thought to involve some combination of genetic susceptibility and environmental exposure that triggers further alterations in gene expression. Because FM shows marked familial aggregation, most previous research has focused on genetic predisposition to FM and has revealed associations between genetic factors and the development of FM, including specific gene polymorphisms involved in the serotonergic, dopaminergic, and catecholaminergic pathways. The aim of this review was to discuss the current evidence regarding genetic factors that may play a role in the development and symptom severity of FM. PMID:26306300

  8. Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  9. Disruption of the arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase gene in the mouse alters the phenotype for methylation of arsenic and affects distribution and retention of orally administered arsenate

    PubMed Central

    Drobna, Zuzana; Narenmandura, Hua; Kubachka, Kevin M.; Edwards, Brenda C.; Herbin-Davis, Karen; Styblo, Miroslav; Le, X. Chris; Creed, John T.; Maeda, Noboyu; Hughes, Michael F.; Thomas, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) gene encodes a 43 kDa protein that catalyzes methylation of inorganic arsenic. Altered expression of AS3MT in cultured human cells controls arsenic methylation phenotypes, suggesting a critical role in arsenic metabolism. Because methylated arsenicals mediate some toxic or carcinogenic effects linked to inorganic arsenic exposure, studies of the fate and effects of arsenicals in mice which cannot methylate arsenic could be instructive. This study compared retention and distribution of arsenic in As3mt knockout mice and in wild-type C57BL/6 mice in which expression of the As3mt gene is normal. Male and female mice of either genotype received an oral dose of 0.5 mg of arsenic as arsenate per kg containing [73As]-arsenate. Mice were radioassayed for up to 96 hours after dosing; tissues were collected at 2 and 24 hours after dosing. At 2 and 24 hours after dosing, livers of As3mt knockouts contained a greater proportion of inorganic and monomethylated arsenic than did livers of C57BL/6 mice. A similar predominance of inorganic and monomethylated arsenic was found in the urine of As3mt knockouts. At 24 hours after dosing, As3mt knockouts retained significantly higher percentages of arsenic dose in liver, kidneys, urinary bladder, lungs, heart, and carcass than did C57BL/6 mice. Whole body clearance of [73As] in As3mt knockouts was substantially slower than in C57BL/6 mice. At 24 hours after dosing, As3mt knockouts retained about 50% and C57BL/6 mice about 6% of the dose. After 96 hours, As3mt knockouts retained about 20% and C57BL/6 mice retained less than 2% of the dose. These data confirm a central role for As3mt in metabolism of inorganic arsenic and indicate that phenotypes for arsenic retention and distribution are markedly affected by the null genotype for arsenic methylation, indicating a close linkage between the metabolism and retention of arsenicals. PMID:19691357

  10. In vivo detection of exercised-induced ultrastructural changes in genetically-altered murine skeletal muscle using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boppart, Stephen

    2006-02-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers are a known source of form birefringence in biological tissue. The birefringence present in skeletal muscle is associated with the ultrastructure of individual sarcomeres, specifically the arrangement of A-bands corresponding to the thick myosin filaments. Certain structural proteins that prevent damage and maintain the structural and functional health of the muscle fiber preserve the organization of the Abands in skeletal muscle. Therefore, the level of birefringence detected can estimate the health of the muscle as well as the damage incurred during exercise. Murine skeletal muscle from both genetically-altered (mdx) and normal (wild-type) specimens were imaged in vivo with a fiber-based PSOCT imaging system to quantitatively determine the level of birefringence present in the tissue before and after exercise. The mdx muscle lacks dystrophin, a structural protein that is mutated in Duchenne muscular dystrophy in humans. Muscle from these mdx mice exhibited a marked decrease in birefringence after exercise, whereas the wild-type muscle was highly birefringent before and after exercise. The quantitative results from this tissue optics study suggest for the first time that there is a distinct relationship between the degree of birefringence detected using PS-OCT and the sarcomeric ultrastructure present within skeletal muscle.

  11. Host Genetic Background Influences the Response to the Opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection Altering Cell-Mediated Immunity and Bacterial Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Rossi, Giacomo; Cigana, Cristina; De Fino, Ida; Iraqi, Fuad A.; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s) may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in the control of P. aeruginosa infection. These results now provide a basis for mapping genomic regions underlying host susceptibility to P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:25268734

  12. Melanoma genetics.

    PubMed

    Read, Jazlyn; Wadt, Karin A W; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 10% of melanoma cases report a relative affected with melanoma, and a positive family history is associated with an increased risk of developing melanoma. Although the majority of genetic alterations associated with melanoma development are somatic, the underlying presence of heritable melanoma risk genes is an important component of disease occurrence. Susceptibility for some families is due to mutation in one of the known high penetrance melanoma predisposition genes: CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, POT1, ACD, TERF2IP and TERT. However, despite such mutations being implicated in a combined total of approximately 50% of familial melanoma cases, the underlying genetic basis is unexplained for the remainder of high-density melanoma families. Aside from the possibility of extremely rare mutations in a few additional high penetrance genes yet to be discovered, this suggests a likely polygenic component to susceptibility, and a unique level of personal melanoma risk influenced by multiple low-risk alleles and genetic modifiers. In addition to conferring a risk of cutaneous melanoma, some 'melanoma' predisposition genes have been linked to other cancers, with cancer clustering observed in melanoma families at rates greater than expected by chance. The most extensively documented association is between CDKN2A germ line mutations and pancreatic cancer, and a cancer syndrome including cutaneous melanoma, uveal melanoma and mesothelioma has been proposed for BAP1 germ line mutations. Other medium to high penetrance melanoma predisposition genes have been associated with renal cell carcinoma (MITF, BAP1) and glioma (POT1). These associations between melanoma and other cancers hint at the possibility of common pathways for oncogenesis, and better knowledge of these pathways may improve understanding of the genetic basis underpinning familial melanoma. It is likely that 'melanoma' risk genes will impact on mutation screening and genetic counselling not only for melanoma but also a range of other cancers. PMID:26337759

  13. Construction of an Interspecific Genetic Map Based on InDel and SSR for Mapping the QTLs Affecting the Initiation of Flower Primordia in Pepper (Capsicum spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Cheng; Nong, Ding-Guo; Li, Wei-Peng; Tang, Xin; Wu, Zhi-Ming; Hu, Kai-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Re-sequencing permits the mining of genome-wide variations on a large scale and provides excellent resources for the research community. To accelerate the development and application of molecular markers and identify the QTLs affecting the flowering time-related trait in pepper, a total of 1,038 pairs of InDel and 674 SSR primers from different sources were used for genetic mapping using the F2 population (n = 154) derived from a cross between BA3 (C. annuum) and YNXML (C. frutescens). Of these, a total of 224 simple PCR-based markers, including 129 InDels and 95 SSRs, were validated and integrated into a map, which was designated as the BY map. The BY map consisted of 13 linkage groups (LGs) and spanned a total genetic distance of 1,249.77 cM with an average marker distance of 5.60 cM. Comparative analysis of the genetic and physical map based on the anchored markers showed that the BY map covered nearly the whole pepper genome. Based on the BY map, one major and five minor QTLs affecting the number of leaves on the primary axis (Nle) were detected on chromosomes P2, P7, P10 and P11 in 2012. The major QTL on P2 was confirmed based on another subset of the same F2 population (n = 147) in 2014 with selective genotyping of markers from the BY map. With the accomplishment of pepper whole genome sequencing and annotations (release 2.0), 153 candidate genes were predicted to embed in the Nle2.2 region, of which 12 important flowering related genes were obtained. The InDel/SSR-based interspecific genetic map, QTLs and candidate genes obtained by the present study will be useful for the downstream isolation of flowering time-related gene and other genetic applications for pepper. PMID:25781878

  14. Genetic diversity of Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains isolated from farmed Pacific white shrimp and ambient pond water affected by acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease outbreak in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chonsin, Kaknokrat; Matsuda, Shigeaki; Theethakaew, Chonchanok; Kodama, Toshio; Junjhon, Jiraphan; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Suthienkul, Orasa; Iida, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) is an emerging shrimp disease that causes massive die-offs in farmed shrimps. Recent outbreaks of AHPND in Asia have been causing great losses for shrimp culture and have become a serious socioeconomic problem. The causative agent of AHPND is Vibrio parahaemolyticus, which is typically known to cause food-borne gastroenteritis in humans. However, there have been few reports of the epidemiology of V. parahaemolyticus AHPND strains, and the genetic relationship among AHPND strains is unclear. Here, we report the genetic characterization of V. parahaemolyticus strains isolated from AHPND outbreaks in Thailand. We found eight isolates from AHPND-suspected shrimps and pond water that were positive for AHPND markers AP1 and AP2. PCR analysis confirmed that none of these eight AP-positive AHPND strains possesses the genes for the conventional virulence factors affecting to humans, such as thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) and type III secretion system 2. Phylogenetic analysis by multilocus sequence typing showed that the AHPND strains are genetically diverse, suggesting that AHPND strains were not derived from a single genetic lineage. Our study represents the first report of molecular epidemiology of AHPND-causing V. parahaemolyticus strains using multilocus sequence typing, and provides an insight into their evolutionary mechanisms. PMID:26590959

  15. The Order of Exercise during Concurrent Training for Rehabilitation Does Not Alter Acute Genetic Expression, Mitochondrial Enzyme Activity or Improvements in Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, Lauren G.; Glover, Elisa; Bergstra, T. Graham; Safdar, Adeel; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Concurrent exercise combines different modes of exercise (e.g., aerobic and resistance) into one training protocol, providing stimuli meant to increase muscle strength, aerobic capacity and mass. As disuse is associated with decrements in strength, aerobic capacity and muscle size concurrent training is an attractive modality for rehabilitation. However, interference between the signaling pathways may result in preferential improvements for one of the exercise modes. We recruited 18 young adults (10 ?, 8 ?) to determine if order of exercise mode during concurrent training would differentially affect gene expression, protein content and measures of strength and aerobic capacity after 2 weeks of knee-brace induced disuse. Concurrent exercise sessions were performed 3x/week for 6 weeks at gradually increasing intensities either with endurance exercise preceding (END>RES) or following (RES>END) resistance exercise. Biopsies were collected from the vastus lateralis before, 3 h after the first exercise bout and 48 h after the end of training. Concurrent exercise altered the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1?, PRC, PPAR?), hypertrophy (PGC-1?4, REDD2, Rheb) and atrophy (MuRF-1, Runx1), increased electron transport chain complex protein content, citrate synthase and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase enzyme activity, muscle mass, maximum isometric strength and VO2peak. However, the order in which exercise was completed (END>RES or RES>END) only affected the protein content of mitochondrial complex II subunit. In conclusion, concurrent exercise training is an effective modality for the rehabilitation of the loss of skeletal muscle mass, maximum strength, and peak aerobic capacity resulting from disuse, regardless of the order in which the modes of exercise are performed. PMID:25289940

  16. The order of exercise during concurrent training for rehabilitation does not alter acute genetic expression, mitochondrial enzyme activity or improvements in muscle function.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, Lauren G; Glover, Elisa; Bergstra, T Graham; Safdar, Adeel; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Concurrent exercise combines different modes of exercise (e.g., aerobic and resistance) into one training protocol, providing stimuli meant to increase muscle strength, aerobic capacity and mass. As disuse is associated with decrements in strength, aerobic capacity and muscle size concurrent training is an attractive modality for rehabilitation. However, interference between the signaling pathways may result in preferential improvements for one of the exercise modes. We recruited 18 young adults (10 ?, 8 ?) to determine if order of exercise mode during concurrent training would differentially affect gene expression, protein content and measures of strength and aerobic capacity after 2 weeks of knee-brace induced disuse. Concurrent exercise sessions were performed 3x/week for 6 weeks at gradually increasing intensities either with endurance exercise preceding (END>RES) or following (RES>END) resistance exercise. Biopsies were collected from the vastus lateralis before, 3 h after the first exercise bout and 48 h after the end of training. Concurrent exercise altered the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1?, PRC, PPAR?), hypertrophy (PGC-1?4, REDD2, Rheb) and atrophy (MuRF-1, Runx1), increased electron transport chain complex protein content, citrate synthase and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase enzyme activity, muscle mass, maximum isometric strength and VO 2peak. However, the order in which exercise was completed (END>RES or RES>END) only affected the protein content of mitochondrial complex II subunit. In conclusion, concurrent exercise training is an effective modality for the rehabilitation of the loss of skeletal muscle mass, maximum strength, and peak aerobic capacity resulting from disuse, regardless of the order in which the modes of exercise are performed. PMID:25289940

  17. Interactions between genetic variants of folate metabolism genes and lifestyle affect plasma homocysteine concentrations in the Boston Puerto Rican Population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Results of studies investigating relationships between lifestyle factors and elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy), an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, are conflicting. The objective of this study was to investigate genetic and lifestyle factors and their interactions on plasma Hcy c...

  18. Identification of Genetic Loci Affecting the Severity of Symptoms of Hirschsprung Disease in Rats Carrying Ednrbsl Mutations by Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Torigoe, Daisuke; Lei, Chuzhao; Lan, Xianyong; Chen, Hong; Sasaki, Nobuya; Wang, Jinxi; Agui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR) is a congenital disease in neonates characterized by the absence of the enteric ganglia in a variable length of the distal colon. This disease results from multiple genetic interactions that modulate the ability of enteric neural crest cells to populate developing gut. We previously reported that three rat strains with different backgrounds (susceptible AGH-Ednrbsl/sl, resistant F344-Ednrbsl/sl, and LEH-Ednrbsl/sl) but the same null mutation of Ednrb show varying severity degrees of aganglionosis. This finding suggests that strain-specific genetic factors affect the severity of HSCR. Consistent with this finding, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for the severity of HSCR on chromosome (Chr) 2 was identified using an F2 intercross between AGH and F344 strains. In the present study, we performed QTL analysis using an F2 intercross between the susceptible AGH and resistant LEH strains to identify the modifier/resistant loci for HSCR in Ednrb-deficient rats. A significant locus affecting the severity of HSCR was also detected within the Chr 2 region. These findings strongly suggest that a modifier gene of aganglionosis exists on Chr 2. In addition, two potentially causative SNPs (or mutations) were detected upstream of a known HSCR susceptibility gene, Gdnf. These SNPs were possibly responsible for the varied length of gut affected by aganglionosis. PMID:25790447

  19. The Ketogenic Diet Alters the Hypoxic Response and Affects Expression of Proteins Associated with Angiogenesis, Invasive Potential and Vascular Permeability in a Mouse Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, Eric C.; Curley, Kara L.; Liu, Qingwei; Turner, Gregory H.; Charlton, Julie A.; Preul, Mark C.; Scheck, Adrienne C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The successful treatment of malignant gliomas remains a challenge despite the current standard of care, which consists of surgery, radiation and temozolomide. Advances in the survival of brain cancer patients require the design of new therapeutic approaches that take advantage of common phenotypes such as the altered metabolism found in cancer cells. It has therefore been postulated that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate, adequate protein ketogenic diet (KD) may be useful in the treatment of brain tumors. We have demonstrated that the KD enhances survival and potentiates standard therapy in a mouse model of malignant glioma, yet the mechanisms are not fully understood. Methods To explore the effects of the KD on various aspects of tumor growth and progression, we used the immunocompetent, syngeneic GL261-Luc2 mouse model of malignant glioma. Results Tumors from animals maintained on KD showed reduced expression of the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9, hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha, and decreased activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Additionally, tumors from animals maintained on KD had reduced tumor microvasculature and decreased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and vimentin. Peritumoral edema was significantly reduced in animals fed the KD and protein analyses showed altered expression of zona occludens-1 and aquaporin-4. Conclusions The KD directly or indirectly alters the expression of several proteins involved in malignant progression and may be a useful tool for the treatment of gliomas. PMID:26083629

  20. Genetic mapping of hph2, a mutation affecting amino acid transport in D.J. Symula,1,2

    E-print Network

    Dove, William

    Several recessive, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutations in the mouse affecting phenylalanine catabolism than phenyl- alanine catabolism. The mutant phenotype (Symula et al. 1996) resembles Hartnup Disorder

  1. Naturally occurring genetic mutations in the 5'-upstream regulatory region of bovine FSHB generate a novel cis-regulatory element that affects its expression.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lisheng; Xu, Yanli; Yu, Wangyang; Liu, Siyuan; Gao, Yan; Zhang, Lianjiang; Yuan, Bao; Chen, Jian; Ma, Tenghe; Zhang, Jiabao

    2015-12-01

    We previously reported that numerous naturally occurring genetic mutations in the 5'-upstream regulatory region (5'-URR) of the bovine follicle-stimulating hormone beta-subunit gene (FSHB) were associated with reduced serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels, poor-quality semen and low fertility in bulls. In addition, two different FSHB mRNA transcripts resulting from the linked mutations of genomic DNA were discovered in mutation-bearing bull pituitaries. Here, using electrophoretic mobility shift assay, we identified c.-1539_-1538delGGinsTTAACT mutations in the 5'-URR that generated a novel cis-regulatory element in bovine FSHB. Moreover, this novel element seemed to play a role in repressing FSHB transcription based on a promoter activity analysis in L?T2 gonadotrope cells. Quantitative assays of FSHB mRNA in the bovine pituitaries suggested that the levels of FSHB wild-type transcripts in the mutation-bearing bulls were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than in those of bulls without FSHB genetic mutations and that the levels of FSHB-mutated transcripts were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than that of wild-type transcripts in the mutation-bearing bulls. Altogether, our results suggest that decreased serum FSH levels and male fertility in bulls with the c.-1539_-1538delGGinsTTAACT mutation likely result from the alteration of cis-regulatory elements and induction of FSHB transcription. PMID:26478576

  2. Interplay between Genetic and Clinical Variables Affecting Platelet Reactivity and Cardiac Adverse Events in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Siller-Matula, Jolanta M.; Lang, Irene M.; Neunteufl, Thomas; Kozinski, Marek; Maurer, Gerald; Linkowska, Katarzyna; Grzybowski, Tomasz; Kubica, Jacek; Jilma, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Several clinical and genetic variables are associated with influencing high on treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR). The aim of the study was to propose a path model explaining a concurrent impact among variables influencing HTPR and ischemic events. In this prospective cohort study polymorphisms of CYP2C19*2, CYP2C19*17, ABCB1, PON1 alleles and platelet function assessed by Multiple Electrode Aggregometry were assessed in 416 patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention treated with clopidogrel and aspirin. The rates of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) were recorded during a 12-month follow up. The path model was calculated by a structural equation modelling. Paths from two clinical characteristics (diabetes mellitus and acute coronary syndrome (ACS)) and two genetic variants (CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*17) independently predicted HTPR (path coefficients: 0.11 0.10, 0.17, and -0.10, respectively; p<0.05 for all). By use of those four variables a novel score for prediction of HTPR was built: in a factor-weighted model the risk for HTPR was calculated with an OR of 3.8 (95%CI: 3.1–6.8, p<0.001) for a score level of ?1 compared with a score of <1. While MACE was independently predicted by HTPR and age in the multivariate model (path coefficient: 0.14 and 0.13, respectively; p<0.05), the coexistence of HTPR and age ?75 years emerged as the strongest predictor of MACE. Our study suggests a pathway, which might explain indirect and direct impact of variables on clinical outcome: ACS, diabetes mellitus, CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*17 genetic variants independently predicted HTPR. In turn, age ?75 years and HTPR were the strongest predictors of MACE. PMID:25051347

  3. The ability of genetically lean or fat slow-growing chickens to synthesize and store lipids is not altered by the dietary energy source.

    PubMed

    Baéza, E; Gondret, F; Chartrin, P; Le Bihan-Duval, E; Berri, C; Gabriel, I; Narcy, A; Lessire, M; Métayer-Coustard, S; Collin, A; Jégou, M; Lagarrigue, S; Duclos, M J

    2015-10-01

    The increasing use of unconventional feedstuffs in chicken's diets results in the substitution of starch by lipids as the main dietary energy source. To evaluate the responses of genetically fat or lean chickens to these diets, males of two experimental lines divergently selected for abdominal fat content were fed isocaloric, isonitrogenous diets with either high lipid (80 g/kg), high fiber (64 g/kg) contents (HL), or low lipid (20 g/kg), low fiber (21 g/kg) contents (LL) from 22 to 63 days of age. The diet had no effect on growth performance and did not affect body composition evaluated at 63 days of age. Glycolytic and oxidative energy metabolisms in the liver and glycogen storage in liver and Sartorius muscle at 63 days of age were greater in chicken fed LL diet compared with chicken fed HL diet. In Pectoralis major (PM) muscle, energy metabolisms and glycogen content were not different between diets. There were no dietary-associated differences in lipid contents of the liver, muscles and abdominal fat. However, the percentages of saturated (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in tissue lipids were generally higher, whereas percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were lower for diet LL than for diet HL. The fat line had a greater feed intake and average daily gain, but gain to feed ratio was lower in that line compared with the lean line. Fat chickens were heavier than lean chickens at 63 days of age. Their carcass fatness was higher and their muscle yield was lower than those of lean chickens. The oxidative enzyme activities in the liver were lower in the fat line than in the lean line, but line did not affect energy metabolism in muscles. The hepatic glycogen content was not different between lines, whereas glycogen content and glycolytic potential were higher in the PM muscle of fat chickens compared with lean chickens. Lipid contents in the liver, muscles and abdominal fat did not differ between lines, but fat chickens stored less MUFA and more PUFA in abdominal fat and muscles than lean chickens. Except for the fatty acid composition of liver and abdominal fat, no interaction between line and diet was observed. In conclusion, the amount of lipids stored in muscles and fatty tissues by lean or fat chickens did not depend on the dietary energy source. PMID:25959107

  4. REM sleep alteration and depression.

    PubMed

    Kimura, M; Curzi, M L; Romanowsi, C P N

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in sleep patterns are often recognized as a premorbid symptom accompanied by affective disorders, particularly by major depression. However, the mechanism is rather complex, and differentiating its causalities from those of depression undergoes hardships. Indeed, depression is a complex disease. It has been clearly demonstrated that depressed patients display very characteristic changes in sleep architecture. Previous animal studies also demonstrated that several depression models, which had targeted elevated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis, showed increased rapid eye movement (REM) sleep while insomniac sleep phenotype did not evidently appear. However, all stress hormones seem to be elevated in those models. Therefore, it has been difficult to determine which particular hormone in the HPA axis is primarily responsible for altered sleep in depression. In recent years, we have widely analyzed sleep characteristics of conditional transgenic mouse lines focusing on corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), the initial mediator of the HPA system, in which the levels of peripheral stress hormones are normal. Conditional CRH-overexpressing (COE) mice, especially those overexpress CRH limitedly within the forebrain including limbic structures (CRH-COE-Cam), dis- play enhanced REM sleep. Further, the higher occurrence of REM sleep in CRH-COE-Cam mice could be due to their hyper-cholinergic activity. REM sleep disinhibition observed in depressed patients similarly appears in animals which are genetically stress-vulnerable strain or chronically stressed, possibly due to enhanced action of limbic CRH. Indeed, REM sleep is a fragile vigilance state and closely connected with emotional control. Thus, depressive episodes may affect REM sleep earlier than nonREM sleep, and such altered REM sleep can be a state marker of depression. PMID:25828683

  5. Genetically Altered Mutant Mouse Models of Guanylyl Cyclase/Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A Exhibit the Cardiac Expression of Proinflammatory Mediators in a Gene-Dose-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Vellaichamy, Elangovan; Das, Subhankar; Subramanian, Umadevi; Maeda, Nobuyo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether genetically determined differences in the guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A gene (Npr1) affect cardiac expression of proinflammatory cytokines, hypertrophic markers, nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B), and activating protein-1 (AP-1) in am Npr1 gene-dose–dependent manner. In the present studies, adult male Npr1 gene-disrupted (Npr1?/?), wild-type (Npr1+/+), and gene-duplicated (Npr1++/++) mice were used. The Npr1?/? mice showed 41 mm Hg higher systolic blood pressure and 60% greater heart weight to body weight (HW/BW) ratio; however, Npr1++/++ mice exhibited 15 mm Hg lower systolic blood pressure and 12% reduced HW/BW ratio compared with Npr1+/+ mice. Significant upregulation of gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines and hypertrophic markers along with enhanced NF-?B/AP-1 binding activities were observed in the Npr1?/? mouse hearts. Conversely, hypertrophic markers and proinflammatory cytokines gene expression as well as NF-?B/AP-1 binding activities were markedly decreased in Npr1++/++ mouse hearts compared with wild-type mice. The ventricular guanylyl cyclase activity and cGMP levels were reduced by 96% and 87%, respectively, in Npr1?/? mice; however, these parameters were amplified by 2.8-fold and 3.8-fold, respectively, in Npr1++/++ mice. Echocardiographic analysis revealed significantly increased fractional shortening in Npr1++/++ mice (P < .05) but greatly decreased in Npr1?/? mice (P < .01) hearts compared with Npr1+/+ mice. The present findings suggest that Npr1 represses the expression of cardiac proinflammatory mediators, hypertrophic markers, and NF-?B/AP-1–mediated mechanisms, which seem to be associated in an Npr1 gene-dose–dependent manner. PMID:24424043

  6. Am. J. Hum. Genet. 77:365376, 2005 Genomewide Linkage Study in 1,176 Affected Sister Pair Families

    E-print Network

    Nyholt, Dale R.

    Families Identifies a Significant Susceptibility Locus for Endometriosis on Chromosome 10q26 Susan A of Medical Research and 5 Queensland Endometriosis Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia; 6 Oxagen, United Kingdom Endometriosis is a common gynecological disease that affects up to 10% of women

  7. CHRONIC CIGARETTE SMOKING IS ASSOCIATED WITH DIMINISHED FOLATE STATUS, ALTERED FOLATE FORM DISTRIBUTION, AND INCREASED GENETIC DAMAGE IN THE BUCCAL MUCOSA OF HEALTHY ADULTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Smoking causes genetic damage in buccal cells and increases the risk of oral cancer. Since folate is instrumental in DNA synthesis and repair, it is a determinant of genetic stability and therefore might attenuate the genotoxic effects of smoking. Objective: To compare folate metabolites...

  8. Chlorophyll Synthase under Epigenetic Surveillance Is Critical for Vitamin E Synthesis, and Altered Expression Affects Tocopherol Levels in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Wei; Ren, Guodong; Li, Delin; Cahoon, Rebecca E.; Chen, Ming; Zhou, Yongming; Yu, Bin; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2015-01-01

    Chlorophyll synthase catalyzes the final step in chlorophyll biosynthesis: the esterification of chlorophyllide with either geranylgeranyl diphosphate or phytyl diphosphate (PDP). Recent studies have pointed to the involvement of chlorophyll-linked reduction of geranylgeranyl by geranylgeranyl reductase as a major pathway for the synthesis of the PDP precursor of tocopherols. This indirect pathway of PDP synthesis suggests a key role of chlorophyll synthase in tocopherol production to generate the geranylgeranyl-chlorophyll substrate for geranylgeranyl reductase. In this study, contributions of chlorophyll synthase to tocopherol formation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) were explored by disrupting and altering expression of the corresponding gene CHLOROPHYLL SYNTHASE (CHLSYN; At3g51820). Leaves from the homozygous chlysyn1-1 null mutant were nearly devoid of tocopherols, whereas seeds contained only approximately 25% of wild-type tocopherol levels. Leaves of RNA interference lines with partial suppression of CHLSYN displayed marked reductions in chlorophyll but up to a 2-fold increase in tocopherol concentrations. Cauliflower mosaic virus35S-mediated overexpression of CHLSYN unexpectedly caused a cosuppression phenotype at high frequencies accompanied by strongly reduced chlorophyll content and increased tocopherol levels. This phenotype and the associated detection of CHLSYN-derived small interfering RNAs were reversed with CHLSYN overexpression in rna-directed rna polymerase6 (rdr6), which is defective in RNA-dependent RNA polymerase6, a key enzyme in sense transgene-induced small interfering RNA production. CHLSYN overexpression in rdr6 had little effect on chlorophyll content but resulted in up to a 30% reduction in tocopherol levels in leaves. These findings show that altered CHLSYN expression impacts tocopherol levels and also, show a strong epigenetic surveillance of CHLSYN to control chlorophyll and tocopherol synthesis. PMID:26048882

  9. Long-term obesity promotes alterations in diastolic function induced by reduction of phospholamban phosphorylation at serine-16 without affecting calcium handling.

    PubMed

    Lima-Leopoldo, Ana Paula; Leopoldo, André S; da Silva, Danielle C T; do Nascimento, André F; de Campos, Dijon H S; Luvizotto, Renata A M; de Deus, Adriana F; Freire, Paula P; Medeiros, Alessandra; Okoshi, Katashi; Cicogna, Antonio C

    2014-09-15

    Few studies have evaluated the relationship between the duration of obesity, cardiac function, and the proteins involved in myocardial calcium (Ca(2+)) handling. We hypothesized that long-term obesity promotes cardiac dysfunction due to a reduction of expression and/or phosphorylation of myocardial Ca(2+)-handling proteins. Thirty-day-old male Wistar rats were distributed into two groups (n = 10 each): control (C; standard diet) and obese (Ob; high-fat diet) for 30 wk. Morphological and histological analyses were assessed. Left ventricular cardiac function was assessed in vivo by echocardiographic evaluation and in vitro by papillary muscle. Cardiac protein expression of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA2a), calsequestrin, L-type Ca(2+) channel, and phospholamban (PLB), as well as PLB serine-16 phosphorylation (pPLB Ser(16)) and PLB threonine-17 phosphorylation (pPLB Thr(17)) were determined by Western blot. The adiposity index was higher (82%) in Ob rats than in C rats. Obesity promoted cardiac hypertrophy without alterations in interstitial collagen levels. Ob rats had increased endocardial and midwall fractional shortening, posterior wall shortening velocity, and A-wave compared with C rats. Cardiac index, early-to-late diastolic mitral inflow ratio, and isovolumetric relaxation time were lower in Ob than in C. The Ob muscles developed similar baseline data and myocardial responsiveness to increased extracellular Ca(2+). Obesity caused a reduction in cardiac pPLB Ser(16) and the pPLB Ser(16)/PLB ratio in Ob rats. Long-term obesity promotes alterations in diastolic function, most likely due to the reduction of pPLB Ser(16), but does not impair the myocardial Ca(2+) entry and recapture to SR. PMID:24970855

  10. Genetic linkage of autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma to 1q21-q31 in three affected pedigrees

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.L.; Paglinauan, C.; Fine, A.; Sporn, C.; Lou, D. ); Haines, J.L. )

    1994-05-15

    Glaucoma is a common disorder that results in irreversible damage to the optic nerve, causing absolute blindness. In most cases, the optic nerve is damaged by an elevation of the intraocular pressure that is the result of an abnormality in the normal drainage function of the trabecular meshwork. A family history of glaucoma is an important risk factor for the disease, suggesting that genetic defects predisposing to this condition are likely. Three pedigrees segregating an autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma demonstrated significant linkage to a group of closely spaced markers on chromosome 1. These results confirm the initial mapping of this disease and suggest that this region on chromosome 1 contains an important locus for juvenile glaucoma. The authors describe recombination events that improve the localization of the responsible gene, reducing the size of the candidate region from 30 to 12 cM. 27 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Plastidial Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Leads to Altered Root Development and Affects the Sugar and Amino Acid Balance in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Cascales-Miñana, Borja; Mulet, Jose Miguel; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Pozueta-Romero, Javier; Kuhn, Josef M.; Segura, Juan; Ros, Roc

    2009-01-01

    Glycolysis is a central metabolic pathway that, in plants, occurs in both the cytosol and the plastids. The glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the conversion of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate to 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate with concomitant reduction of NAD+ to NADH. Both cytosolic (GAPCs) and plastidial (GAPCps) GAPDH activities have been described. However, the in vivo functions of the plastidial isoforms remain unresolved. In this work, we have identified two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) chloroplast/plastid-localized GAPDH isoforms (GAPCp1 and GAPCp2). gapcp double mutants display a drastic phenotype of arrested root development, dwarfism, and sterility. In spite of their low gene expression level as compared with other GAPDHs, GAPCp down-regulation leads to altered gene expression and to drastic changes in the sugar and amino acid balance of the plant. We demonstrate that GAPCps are important for the synthesis of serine in roots. Serine supplementation to the growth medium rescues root developmental arrest and restores normal levels of carbohydrates and sugar biosynthetic activities in gapcp double mutants. We provide evidence that the phosphorylated pathway of Ser biosynthesis plays an important role in supplying serine to roots. Overall, these studies provide insights into the in vivo functions of the GAPCps in plants. Our results emphasize the importance of the plastidial glycolytic pathway, and specifically of GAPCps, in plant primary metabolism. PMID:19675149

  12. Bovine viral diarrhea viruses differentially alter the expression of the protein kinases and related proteins affecting the development of infection and anti-viral mechanisms in bovine monocytes.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, George V; Lee, Sang-Ryul; Nanduri, Bindu; Honsinger, Kelly L; Stokes, John V; Pinchuk, Lesya M

    2008-09-01

    Using a proteomics approach, we evaluated the effect of cytopathic (cp), and non-cytopathic (ncp) bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) on the expression of protein kinases and related proteins in bovine monocytes. Proteins were isolated from membrane and cytosolic fractions with the differential detergent fractionation (DDF) method and identified with 2D-LC ESI MS2. Of approximately 10,000 proteins identified, 378 proteins had homology with known protein kinases or related proteins. Eighteen proteins involved in cell differentiation and activation, migration, anti-viral mechanisms (interferon/apoptosis), biosynthesis, sugar metabolism and oncogenic transformation were significantly altered in BVDV-infected monocytes compared to the uninfected controls. Six proteins, mostly related to cell migration, anti-viral mechanisms, sugar metabolism and possibly tumor resistance were differentially expressed between the ncp and cp BVDV-infected monocytes. Particularly, the expression of the receptor of activated C kinase (RACK), of pyridoxal kinase (PK), diacyglycerol kinase (DGK) and Brutons tyrosine kinase (BTK) was decreased in monocytes infected with cp BVDV compared to ncp BVDV, possibly contributing to the cytopathic effect of the virus. This and other findings are discussed in view of the possible role the identified proteins play in the development of viral infection and oncogenic transformation of cells. PMID:18570900

  13. Exposure to altered gravity during specific developmental periods differentially affects growth, development, the cerebellum and motor functions in male and female rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguon, K.; Ladd, B.; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported that perinatal exposure to hypergravity affects cerebellar structure and motor coordination in rat neonates. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that neonatal cerebellar structure and motor coordination may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of hypergravity during specific developmental stages. To test this hypothesis, we compared neurodevelopment, motor behavior and cerebellar structure in rat neonates exposed to 1.65 G on a 24-ft centrifuge during discrete periods of time: the 2nd week of pregnancy [gestational day (G) 8 through G15; group A], the 3rd week of pregnancy (G15 through birth on G22/G23; group B), the 1st week of nursing [birth through postnatal day (P) 6; group C], the 2nd and 3rd weeks of nursing (P6 through P21; group D), the combined 2nd and 3rd weeks of pregnancy and nursing (G8 through P21; group E) and stationary control (SC) neonates (group F). Prenatal exposure to hypergravity resulted in intrauterine growth retardation as reflected by a decrease in the number of pups in a litter and lower average mass at birth. Exposure to hypergravity immediately after birth impaired the righting response on P3, while the startle response in both males and females was most affected by exposure during the 2nd and 3rd weeks after birth. Hypergravity exposure also impaired motor functions, as evidenced by poorer performance on a rotarod; while both males and females exposed to hypergravity during the 2nd and 3rd weeks after birth performed poorly on P21, male neonates were most dramatically affected by exposure to hypergravity during the second week of gestation, when the duration of their recorded stay on the rotarod was one half that of SC males. Cerebellar mass was most reduced by later postnatal exposure. Thus, for the developing rat cerebellum, the postnatal period that overlaps the brain growth spurt is the most vulnerable to hypergravity. However, male motor behavior is also affected by midpregnancy exposure to hypergravity, suggesting discrete and sexually dimorphic windows of vulnerability of the developing central nervous system to environmental perturbations.

  14. "Liking" and "wanting" of sweet and oily food stimuli as affected by high-fat diet-induced obesity, weight loss, leptin, and genetic predisposition.

    PubMed

    Shin, Andrew C; Townsend, R Leigh; Patterson, Laurel M; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf

    2011-11-01

    Cross-sectional studies in both humans and animals have demonstrated associations between obesity and altered reward functions at the behavioral and neural level, but it is unclear whether these alterations are cause or consequence of the obese state. Reward behaviors were quantified in male, outbred Sprague-Dawley (SD) and selected line obesity-prone (OP) and obesity-resistant (OR) rats after induction of obesity by high-fat diet feeding and after subsequent loss of excess body weight by chronic calorie restriction. As measured by the brief access lick and taste-reactivity paradigms, both obese SD and OP rats "liked" low concentrations of sucrose and corn oil less, but "liked" the highest concentrations more, compared with lean rats, and this effect was fully reversed by weight loss in SD rats. Acute food deprivation was unable to change decreased responsiveness to low concentrations but eliminated increased responsiveness to high concentrations in obese SD rats, and leptin administration in weight-reduced SD rats shifted concentration-response curves toward that seen in the obese state in the brief access lick test. "Wanting" and reinforcement learning as assessed in the incentive runway and progressive ratio lever-pressing paradigms was paradoxically decreased in both obese (compared with lean SD rats) and OP (compared with OR rats). Thus, reversible, obesity-associated, reduced "liking" and "wanting" of low-calorie foods in SD rats suggest a role for secondary effects of the obese state on reward functions, while similar differences between select lines of OP and OR rats before induction of obesity indicate a genetic component. PMID:21849633

  15. High-density lipoprotein deficiency in genetically modified mice deeply affects skin morphology: A structural and ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Arnaboldi, Francesca; Busnelli, Marco; Cornaghi, Laura; Manzini, Stefano; Parolini, Cinzia; Dellera, Federica; Ganzetti, Giulia Sara; Sirtori, Cesare Riccardo; Donetti, Elena; Chiesa, Giulia

    2015-10-15

    Cutaneous lipids, endogenously synthetized and transported by lipoproteins, play a pivotal role in maintaining skin barrier. An impairment of extracutaneous lipid trafficking leads to the development of xanthomas, mostly arising in hyperlipidemic patients, but also in subjects with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) deficiency. The aim of this work was to evaluate, in a genetically modified mouse model, lacking two protein components of HDL particles, apolipoprotein(apo)E and apoA-I, the effect of HDL deficiency on skin morphology. Control mice (C57BL/6), apoE deficient mice (EKO), apoA-I deficient mice (A-IKO) and apoA-I/apoE double knockout mice (A-IKO/EKO) were maintained on a low-fat/low-cholesterol diet up to 30 weeks of age. At sacrifice, skin biopsies were processed for light (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Whereas the skin of EKO, A-IKO, and C57BL/6 mice was comparable, LM analysis in A-IKO/EKO mice showed an increase in dermal thickness and the presence of foam cells and T lymphocytes in reticular dermis. TEM analysis revealed the accumulation of cholesterol clefts in the papillary dermis and of cholesterol crystals within foam cells. In conclusion, A-IKO/EKO mice represent an experimental model for investigating the cutaneous phenotype of human HDL deficiency, thus mimicking a condition in which human xanthomatous lesions can develop. PMID:26241937

  16. Melatonin administration differentially affects age-induced alterations in daily rhythms of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes in male rat liver.

    PubMed

    Manikonda, Pavan Kumar; Jagota, Anita

    2012-10-01

    A central clock/pacemaker, suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus coordinates and entrains circadian oscillations in the peripheral tissues such as the liver, kidney, heart, lungs etc. called peripheral clocks. These also have endogenous circadian oscillations. The circadian rhythms of antioxidants present in cytosol signify redox state of the cell during day/night cycle. The liver has a major impact on homeostasis through its control on serum protein composition and plays a pivotal role in the metabolism of nutrients, drugs, hormones, and metabolic waste products and undergoes substantial changes in structure and function upon aging. In present study, the temporal patterns of oxidative stress indicators in liver were studied. Daily rhythms of lipid peroxidation end products, reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were studied in liver at variable time points (Zeitgeber Time (ZT) 0, 6, 12 and 18) in three age groups: 3 (adult), 12 and 24 months old male Wistar rats. There was increase in oxidative stress in 12 and 24 months old rats indicated through a significant increase in lipid peroxidation, decrease in GSH/GSSG ratio and antioxidant enzyme activities. In 3 months old rats, lipid peroxidation was maximum at ZT-12 whereas GSH, SOD and CAT activities were minimum at ZT-12. The maximum level in 24 h i.e., acrophases of lipid peroxidation, GPx, SOD and CAT activities in liver cell free extracts altered upon aging. As melatonin, messenger of darkness, an endogenous synchronizer of rhythm, an antioxidant and an antiaging drug, declines with aging we studied the effects of melatonin on activities of these antioxidant enzymes in aging rats. Melatonin administration resulted in differential restoration of acrophases, amplitude, mean as well as daily rhythms of lipid peroxidation and antioxidants in liver of 12 and 24 months old rats. PMID:22960749

  17. Down regulation of StGA3ox genes in potato results in altered GA content and affect plant and tuber growth characteristics.

    PubMed

    Roumeliotis, Efstathios; Kloosterman, Bjorn; Oortwijn, Marian; Lange, Theo; Visser, Richard G F; Bachem, Christian W B

    2013-09-15

    GA biosynthesis and catabolism has been shown to play an important role in regulating tuberization in potato. Active GAs are inactivated in the stolon tips shortly after induction to tuberization. Overexpression of a GA inactivation gene results in an earlier tuberization phenotype, while reducing expression of the same gene results in delayed tuberization. In addition, overexpression of genes involved in GA biosynthesis results in delayed tuberization, while decreased expression of those genes results in earlied tuberization. The final step in GA biosynthesis is catalysed by StGA3ox1 and StGA3ox2 activity, that convert inactive forms of GA into active GA1 and GA4. In this study we cloned StGA3ox2 gene in an RNAi construct and used this construct to transform potato plants. The StGA3ox2 silenced plants were smaller and had shorter internodes. In addition, we assayed the concentrations of various GAs in the transgenic plants and showed an altered GA content. No difference was observed on the time point of tuber initiation. However, the transgenic clones had increased number of tubers with the same yield, resulting in smaller average tuber weight. In addition, we cloned the promoter of StGA3ox2 to direct expression of the GUS reporter gene to visualize the sites of GA biosynthesis in the potato plant. Finally, we discuss how changes of several GA levels can have an impact on shoot, stolon and tuber development, as well as the possible mechanisms that mediate feed-forward and feed-back regulation loops in the GA biosynthetic pathway in potato. PMID:23683509

  18. Altered gravitational experience during early periods of life affects the static vestibulo-ocular reflex of tadpoles of the southern clawed toad, Xenopus laevis Daudin.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, C; Esseling, K; Horn, E

    1996-11-01

    The effects of altered gravitational forces (AGF) on the development of the static vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) were investigated in Xenopus laevis tadpoles exposed to hypergravity (1.4g; 3g) or microgravity conditions (German spacelab mission D-2) for 9-10 days. The effects of light conditions during development were also tested by exposing tadpoles to either complete darkness (DD) or 12:12 h light-dark conditions (LD). The static VOR was induced by lateral roll. The efficacy of the VOR circuit after termination of AGF conditions was described by the peak-to-peak amplitude of the sinusoidal VOR characteristics (i.e. amplitude). The static VOR was first observed at stage 41 for both LD and DD tadpoles. Its further development was retarded in the DD tadpoles compared with the LD tadpoles up to stage 48. Microgravity as well as hypergravity exposure caused a significant (P < 0.05, at least) decrease in the static VOR amplitude during the first week after termination of the AGF period. The decreases were 39.4% in the microgravity group, 16.2% in the 1.4g group and 24.9-42.9% in the 3g group compared with the 1g ground-reared siblings at the same developmental stages. The response deficits usually disappeared but persisted for at least 2 weeks in animals whose development was retarded by hypergravity exposure. It is postulated (i) that gravity exerts an important influence on the normal development of the roll-induced static VOR; (ii) that hypergravity exposure decreases the sensitivity of the gravity-sensitive system so that recordings under 1g conditions cause a weaker static VOR; and (iii) that the vestibulo-spinal pathway possesses a higher degree of plasticity than the vestibulo-ocular pathway. PMID:8951390

  19. Loss of Citron Kinase Affects a Subset of Progenitor Cells That Alters Late but Not Early Neurogenesis in the Developing Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Devi Krishna Priya; Chhaya, Nisarg; Lemoine, Christopher; Congdon, Sean; Black, Amye; Kanadia, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To understand how loss of citron kinase (CitK) affects retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) in the developing rat retina. Methods. We compared knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) retinae by immunohistochemistry. The TdT-mediated dUTP terminal nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay was performed to determine cell death. Pulse-chase experiments using 5-ethynyl-2’-deoxyuridine (EdU) were carried out to interrogate RPC behavior and in turn neurogenesis. Results. Reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that CitK was expressed at embryonic day (E)12 and was turned off at approximately postnatal day (P)4. Immunohistochemistry showed CitK being localized as puncta at the apical end of the outer neuroblastic layer (ONBL). Analyses during embryonic development showed that the KO retina was of comparable size to that of WT until E13. However, by E14, there was a reduction in the number of S-phase RPCs with a concomitant increase in TUNEL+ cells in the KO retina. Moreover, early neurogenesis, as reflected by retinal ganglion cell production, was not affected. Postnatal analysis of the retina showed that ONBL in the KO retina was reduced to half the size of that in WT and showed further degeneration. Immunohistochemistry revealed absence of Islet1+ bipolar cells at P2, which was further confirmed by EdU pulse-chase experiments. The CitK KO retinae underwent complete degeneration by P14. Conclusions. Our study showed that CitK is not required for a subset of RPCs before E14, but is necessary for RPC survival post E14. This in turn results in normal early embryonic neurogenesis, but severely compromised later embryonic and postnatal neurogenesis. PMID:25593024

  20. Glycans Instructing Immunity: The Emerging Role of Altered Glycosylation in Clinical Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Jonathan J.; Milner, Joshua D.; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.

    2015-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is an important epigenetic modifying process affecting expression, localization, and function of numerous proteins required for normal immune function. Recessive germline mutations in genes responsible for protein glycosylation processes result in congenital disorders of glycosylation and can have profound immunologic consequences. Genetic mutations in immune signaling pathways that affect glycosylation sites have also been shown to cause disease. Sugar supplementation and in vivo alteration of glycans by medication holds therapeutic promise for some of these disorders. Further understanding of how changes in glycosylation alter immunity may provide novel treatment approaches for allergic disease, immune dysregulation, and immunodeficiency in the future. PMID:26125015

  1. Intrabreed Stratification Related to Divergent Selection Regimes in Purebred Dogs May Affect the Interpretation of Genetic Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Melanie L.; Yokoyama, Jennifer S.; Branson, Nick; Dyer, Donna J.; Hitte, Christophe; Overall, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    Until recently, canine genetic research has not focused on population structure within breeds, which may confound the results of case–control studies by introducing spurious correlations between phenotype and genotype that reflect population history. Intrabreed structure may exist when geographical origin or divergent selection regimes influence the choices of potential mates for breeding dogs. We present evidence for intrabreed stratification from a genome-wide marker survey in a sample of unrelated dogs. We genotyped 76 Border Collies, 49 Australian Shepherds, 17 German Shepherd Dogs, and 17 Portuguese Water Dogs for our primary analyses using Affymetrix Canine v2.0 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. Subsets of autosomal markers were examined using clustering algorithms to facilitate assignment of individuals to populations and estimation of the number of populations represented in the sample. SNPs passing stringent quality control filters were employed for explicitly phylogenetic analyses reconstructing relationships between individuals using maximum parsimony and Bayesian methods. We used simulation studies to explore the possible effects of intrabreed stratification on genome-wide association studies. These analyses demonstrate significant stratification in at least one of our primary breeds of interest, the Border Collie. Demographic and pedigree data suggest that this population substructure may result from geographic isolation or divergent selection regimes practiced by breeders with different breeding program goals. Simulation studies indicate that such stratification could result in false discovery rates significant enough to confound genome-wide association analyses. Intrabreed stratification should be accounted for when designing and interpreting the results of case–control association studies using purebred dogs.

  2. Genetic polymorphisms regulating dopamine signaling in the frontal cortex interact to affect target detection under high working memory load

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christopher T.; Swift-Scanlan, Theresa; Boettiger, Charlotte A.

    2013-01-01

    Frontal-dependent task performance is typically modulated by dopamine (DA) according to an inverted-U pattern, whereby intermediate levels of DA signaling optimizes performance. Numerous studies implicate trait differences in DA signaling based on differences in the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene in executive function task performance. However, little work has investigated genetic variations in DA signaling downstream from COMT. One candidate is the dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of molecular weight 32 kDa (DARPP-32), which mediates signaling through the DA D1-type receptor, the dominant DA receptor in the frontal cortex. Using an n-back task, we used signal detection theory to measure performance in a healthy adult population (n=97) genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms in the COMT (rs4680) and DARPP-32 (rs907094) genes. Correct target detection (hits), and false alarms were used to calculate d' measures for each working memory load (0-, 2-, and 3-back). At the highest load (3-back) only, we observed a significant COMT×DARPP-32 interaction, such that the DARPP-32 T/T genotype enhanced target detection in COMTValVal individuals, but impaired target detection in COMTMet carriers. These findings suggest that enhanced dopaminergic signaling via the DARPP-32 T allele aids target detection in individuals with presumed low frontal DA (COMTValVal) but impairs target detection in those with putatively higher frontal DA levels (COMTMet carriers). Moreover, these data support an inverted-U model with intermediate levels of DA signaling optimizing performance on tasks requiring maintenance of mental representations in working memory. PMID:24144248

  3. Sodium fluoride affects zebrafish behaviour and alters mRNA expressions of biomarker genes in the brain: Role of Nrf2/Keap1.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Debdip; Priya, Pooja; Chattopadhyay, Ansuman

    2015-09-01

    Sodium fluoride (NaF), used as pesticides and for industrial purposes are deposited in the water bodies and therefore affects its biota. Zebrafish exposed to NaF in laboratory condition showed hyperactivity and frequent surfacing activity, somersaulting and vertical swimming pattern as compared to the control group. Reactive oxygen species level was elevated and glutathione level was depleted along with increased malondialdehyde content in the brain. Levels of glutathione-s-transferase (GST), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase were also elevated in the treatment groups. Expression of mRNA of nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its inhibitor Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) during stress condition were observed along with Gst, Cat, NADPH: quinone oxidoreductase 1(Nqo1) and p38. Except Keap1, all other genes exhibited elevated expression. Nrf2/Keap1 proteins had similar expression pattern as their corresponding mRNA. The findings in this study might help to understand the molecular mechanism of fluoride induced neurotoxicity in fish. PMID:26245810

  4. Preventive brain radio-chemotherapy alters plasticity associated metabolite profile in the hippocampus but seems to not affect spatial memory in young leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Moritz D; Brandt, Kalina; Werner, Annett; Schönfeld, Robby; Loewenbrück, Kai; Donix, Markus; Schaich, Markus; Bornhäuser, Martin; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Leplow, Bernd; Storch, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuronal plasticity leading to evolving reorganization of the neuronal network during entire lifespan plays an important role for brain function especially memory performance. Adult neurogenesis occurring in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus represents the maximal way of network reorganization. Brain radio-chemotherapy strongly inhibits adult hippocampal neurogenesis in mice leading to impaired spatial memory. Methods To elucidate the effects of CNS radio-chemotherapy on hippocampal plasticity and function in humans, we performed a longitudinal pilot study using 3T proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) and virtual water-maze-tests in 10 de-novo patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia undergoing preventive whole brain radio-chemotherapy. Patients were examined before, during and after treatment. Results CNS radio-chemotherapy did neither affect recall performance in probe trails nor flexible (reversal) relearning of a new target position over a time frame of 10 weeks measured by longitudinal virtual water-maze-testing, but provoked hippocampus-specific decrease in choline as a metabolite associated with cellular plasticity in 1H-MRS. Conclusion Albeit this pilot study needs to be followed up to definitely resolve the question about the functional role of adult human neurogenesis, the presented data suggest that 1H-MRS allows the detection of neurogenesis-associated plasticity in the human brain. PMID:26442754

  5. Genetic perturbation of key central metabolic genes extends lifespan in Drosophila and affects response to dietary restriction.

    PubMed

    Talbert, Matthew E; Barnett, Brittany; Hoff, Robert; Amella, Maria; Kuczynski, Kate; Lavington, Erik; Koury, Spencer; Brud, Evgeny; Eanes, Walter F

    2015-09-22

    There is a connection between nutrient inputs, energy-sensing pathways, lifespan variation and aging. Despite the role of metabolic enzymes in energy homeostasis and their metabolites as nutrient signals, little is known about how their gene expression impacts lifespan. In this report, we use P-element mutagenesis in Drosophila to study the effect on lifespan of reductions in expression of seven central metabolic enzymes, and contrast the effects on normal diet and dietary restriction. The major observation is that for five of seven genes, the reduction of gene expression extends lifespan on one or both diets. Two genes are involved in redox balance, and we observe that lower activity genotypes significantly extend lifespan. The hexokinases also show extension of lifespan with reduced gene activity. Since both affect the ATP/ADP ratio, this connects with the role of AMP-activated protein kinase as an energy sensor in regulating lifespan and mediating caloric restriction. These genes possess significant expression variation in natural populations, and our experimental genotypes span this level of natural activity variation. Our studies link the readout of energy state with the perturbation of the genes of central metabolism and demonstrate their effect on lifespan. PMID:26378219

  6. Alterations in seawater pH and CO 2 affect calcification and photosynthesis in the tropical coralline alga, Hydrolithon sp. (Rhodophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semesi, I. Sware; Kangwe, Juma; Björk, Mats

    2009-09-01

    Calcification in the marine environment is the basis for the accretion of carbonate in structures such as coral reefs, algal ridges and carbonate sands. Among the organisms responsible for such calcification are the Corallinaceae (Rhodophyta), recognised as major contributors to the process world-wide. Hydrolithon sp. is a coralline alga that often forms rhodoliths in the Western Indian Ocean. In Zanzibar, it is commonly found in shallow lagoons, where it often grows within seagrass beds and/or surrounded by green algae such as Ulva sp. Since seagrasses in Zanzibar have recently been shown to raise the pH of the surrounding seawater during the day, and since calcification rates are sensitive to pH, which changes the saturation state of calcium carbonate, we measured the effects of pH on photosynthetic and calcification rates of this alga. It was found that pH had significant effects on both calcification and photosynthesis. While increased pH enhanced calcification rates both in the light and in the dark at pH >8.6, photosynthetic rates decreased. On the other hand, an increase in dissolved CO 2 concentration to ˜26 ?mol kg -1 (by bubbling with air containing 0.9 mbar CO 2) caused a decrease in seawater pH which resulted in 20% less calcification after 5 days of exposure, while enhancing photosynthetic rates by 13%. The ecological implications of these findings is that photosynthetically driven changes in water chemistry by surrounding plants can affect calcification rates of coralline algae, as may future ocean acidification resulting from elevated atmospheric CO 2.

  7. Elongated phytoglycogen chain length in transgenic rice endosperm expressing active starch synthase IIa affects the altered solubility and crystallinity of the storage ?-glucan

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Naoko; Toyosawa, Yoshiko; Utsumi, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between the solubility, crystallinity, and length of the unit chains of plant storage ?-glucan was investigated by manipulating the chain length of ?-glucans accumulated in a rice mutant. Transgenic lines were produced by introducing a cDNA for starch synthase IIa (SSIIa) from an indica cultivar (SSIIa I, coding for active SSIIa) into an isoamylase1 (ISA1)-deficient mutant (isa1) that was derived from a japonica cultivar (bearing inactive SSIIa proteins). The water-soluble fraction accounted for >95% of the total ?-glucan in the isa1 mutant, whereas it was only 35–70% in the transgenic SSIIa I /isa1 lines. Thus, the ?-glucans from the SSIIa I /isa1 lines were fractionated into soluble and insoluble fractions prior to the following characterizations. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed a weak B-type crystallinity for the ?-glucans of the insoluble fraction, while no crystallinity was confirmed for ?-glucans in isa1. Concerning the degree of polymerization (DP) ?30, the chain lengths of these ?-glucans differed significantly in the order of SSIIa I /isa1 insoluble > SSIIa I /isa1 soluble > ?-glucans in isa1. The amount of long chains with DP ?33 was higher in the insoluble fraction ?-glucans than in the other two ?-glucans. No difference was observed in the chain length distributions of the ?-amylase limit dextrins among these ?-glucans. These results suggest that in the SSIIa I /isa1 transgenic lines, the unit chains of ?-glucans were elongated by SSIIaI, whereas the expression of SSIIaI did not affect the branch positions. Thus, the observed insolubility and crystallinity of the insoluble fraction can be attributed to the elongated length of the outer chains due to SSIIaI. PMID:23048127

  8. 5-HTT Deficiency Affects Neuroplasticity and Increases Stress Sensitivity Resulting in Altered Spatial Learning Performance in the Morris Water Maze but Not in the Barnes Maze

    PubMed Central

    Karabeg, Margherita M.; Grauthoff, Sandra; Kollert, Sina Y.; Weidner, Magdalena; Heiming, Rebecca S.; Jansen, Friederike; Popp, Sandy; Kaiser, Sylvia; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Sachser, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether spatial hippocampus-dependent learning is affected by the serotonergic system and stress. Therefore, 5-HTT knockout (-/-), heterozygous (+/-) and wildtype (+/+) mice were subjected to the Barnes maze (BM) and the Morris water maze (WM), the latter being discussed as more aversive. Additionally, immediate early gene (IEG) expression, hippocampal adult neurogenesis (aN), and blood plasma corticosterone were analyzed. While the performance of 5-HTT-/- mice in the BM was undistinguishable from both other genotypes, they performed worse in the WM. However, in the course of the repeated WM trials 5-HTT-/- mice advanced to wildtype level. The experience of a single trial of either the WM or the BM resulted in increased plasma corticosterone levels in all genotypes. After several trials 5-HTT-/- mice exhibited higher corticosterone concentrations compared with both other genotypes in both tests. Corticosterone levels were highest in 5-HTT-/- mice tested in the WM indicating greater aversiveness of the WM and a greater stress sensitivity of 5-HTT deficient mice. Quantitative immunohistochemistry in the hippocampus revealed increased cell counts positive for the IEG products cFos and Arc as well as for proliferation marker Ki67 and immature neuron marker NeuroD in 5-HTT-/- mice compared to 5-HTT+/+ mice, irrespective of the test. Most differences were found in the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus of the septal hippocampus. Ki67-immunohistochemistry revealed a genotype x environment interaction with 5-HTT genotype differences in naïve controls and WM experience exclusively yielding more Ki67-positive cells in 5-HTT+/+ mice. Moreover, in 5-HTT-/- mice we demonstrate that learning performance correlates with the extent of aN. Overall, higher baseline IEG expression and increased an in the hippocampus of 5-HTT-/- mice together with increased stress sensitivity may constitute the neurobiological correlate of raised alertness, possibly impeding optimal learning performance in the more stressful WM. PMID:24167611

  9. Genetic and hypoxic alterations of the microRNA-210-ISCU1/2 axis promote iron-sulfur deficiency and pulmonary hypertension

    E-print Network

    Dahlman, James E.

    Iron–sulfur (Fe?S) clusters are essential for mitochondrial metabolism, but their regulation in pulmonary hypertension (PH) remains enigmatic. We demonstrate that alterations of the miR?210?ISCU1/2 axis cause Fe?S deficiencies ...

  10. Low-density lipoprotein receptor genetic polymorphism in chronic hepatitis C virus Egyptian patients affects treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Naga, Mazen; Amin, Mona; Algendy, Dina; Elbadry, Ahmed; Fawzi, May; Foda, Ayman; Esmat, Serag; Sabry, Dina; Rashed, Laila; Gabal, Samia; Kamal, Manal

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To correlate a genetic polymorphism of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor with antiviral responses in Egyptian chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients. METHODS: Our study included 657 HCV-infected patients with genotype 4 who received interferon-based combination therapy. Patients were divided into two groups based on their response to therapy: 356 were responders, and 301 were non-responders. Patients were compared to 160 healthy controls. All patients and controls underwent a thorough physical examination, measurement of body mass index (BMI) and the following laboratory tests: serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, albumin, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, prothrombin time, prothrombin concentration, INR, complete blood count, serum creatinine, fasting blood sugar, HCV antibody, and hepatitis B surface antigen. All HCV patients were further subjected to the following laboratory tests: HCV-RNA using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), antinuclear antibodies, thyroid-stimulating hormone, an LDL receptor (LDLR) genotype study of LDLR exon8c.1171G>A and exon10c.1413G>A using real-time PCR-based assays, abdominal ultrasonography, ultrasonographic-guided liver biopsy, and histopathological examination of liver biopsies. Correlations of LDL receptor polymorphisms with HAI, METAVIR score, presence of steatosis, and BMI were performed in all cases. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences in response rates between the different types of interferon used or LDLR exon10c.1413G>A. However, there was a significant difference in the frequency of the LDL receptor exon8c.1171G>A genotype between cases (AA: 25.9%, GA: 22.2%, GG: 51.9%) and controls (AA: 3.8%, GA: 53.1% and GG: 43.1%) (P < 0.001). There was a statistically significant difference in the frequency of the LDLR exon 8C:1171 G>A polymorphism between responders (AA: 3.6%, GA: 15.2%, GG: 81.2%) and non-responders (AA: 52.2%, GA: 30.6%, GG: 17.2%) (P < 0.001). The G allele of LDL receptor exon8c.1171G>A predominated in cases and controls over the A allele, and a statistically significant association with response to interferon was observed. The frequency of the LDLR exon8c.1171G>A allele in non-responders was: A: 67.4% and G: 32.6 vs A: 11.2% and G: 88.8% in responders (P < 0.001). Therefore, carriers of the A allele exhibited a 16.4 times greater risk for non-response. There was a significant association between LDL receptors exon8 c.1171G>A and HAI (P < 0.011). There was a significant association between LDL receptors exon8c.1171G>A and BMI. The mean BMI level was highest in patients carrying the AA genotype (28.7 ± 4.7 kg/m2) followed by the GA genotype (28.1 ± 4.8 kg/m2). The lowest BMI was the GG genotype (26.6 ± 4.3 kg/m2) (P < 0.001). The only significant associations were found between LDL receptors exon8 c.1171G>A and METAVIR score or steatosis (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: LDL receptor gene polymorphisms play a role in the treatment response of HCV and the modulation of disease progression in Egyptians infected with chronic HCV. PMID:26494968

  11. Obesity genetics: a monopoly game of genes.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Joselyn; Aguirre, Miguel; Velasco, Manuel; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a complex disease that affects all ethnic populations worldwide. The etiology of this disease is based on the interaction of genetic factors, environment and lifestyles indicators. Genetic contribution to the epidemic has gained attention from 2 sources: monogenic syndromes that display severe obesity, and the polygenic model of common obesity. Single mutations can render a syndrome with severe obesity resulting from alteration in central o peripheral appetite control mechanisms. The interaction of several polymorphisms and epigenetic modifications constitute the basic plot for common obesity, molecular ingredients that should not confuse the investigator-they make this riddle even harder to decipher. PMID:23011164

  12. Chemical and genetic blockade of HDACs enhances osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells by oppositely affecting osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Maroni, Paola; Brini, Anna Teresa; Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Chirurgiche ed Odontoiatriche, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milano ; Arrigoni, Elena; Girolamo, Laura de; Niada, Stefania; Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Chirurgiche ed Odontoiatriche, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milano ; Matteucci, Emanuela; Bendinelli, Paola; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylation affected hASCs osteodifferentiation through Runx2-PPAR{gamma}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HDACs silencing early activated Runx2 and ALP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} reduction and calcium/collagen deposition occurred later. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Runx2/PPAR{gamma} target genes were modulated in line with HDACs role in osteo-commitment. -- Abstract: The human adipose-tissue derived stem/stromal cells (hASCs) are an interesting source for bone-tissue engineering applications. Our aim was to clarify in hASCs the role of acetylation in the control of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) {gamma}. These key osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors are oppositely involved in osteo-differentiation. The hASCs, committed or not towards bone lineage with osteoinductive medium, were exposed to HDACs chemical blockade with Trichostatin A (TSA) or were genetically silenced for HDACs. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and collagen/calcium deposition, considered as early and late osteogenic markers, were evaluated concomitantly as index of osteo-differentiation. TSA pretreatment, useful experimental protocol to analyse pan-HDAC-chemical inhibition, and switch to osteogenic medium induced early-osteoblast maturation gene Runx2, while transiently decreased PPAR{gamma} and scarcely affected late-differentiation markers. Time-dependent effects were observed after knocking-down of HDAC1 and 3: Runx2 and ALP underwent early activation, followed by late-osteogenic markers increase and by PPAR{gamma}/ALP activity diminutions mostly after HDAC3 silencing. HDAC1 and 3 genetic blockade increased and decreased Runx2 and PPAR{gamma} target genes, respectively. Noteworthy, HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Our results reveal a role for HDACs in orchestrating osteo-differentiation of hASCs at transcriptional level, and might provide new insights into the modulation of hASCs-based regenerative therapy.

  13. Genetic Variation in the Patterns of Skeletal Progenitor Cell Differentiation and Progression During Endochondral Bone Formation Affects the Rate of Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Jepsen, Karl J; Price, Christopher; Silkman, Lee J; Nicholls, Fred H; Nasser, Phillip; Hu, Bin; Hadi, Nicole; Alapatt, Michael; Stapleton, Stephanie N; Kakar, Sanjeev; Einhorn, Thomas A; Gerstenfeld, Louis C

    2008-01-01

    These studies examined how genetic differences that regulate architectural and bone material properties would be expressed during fracture healing and determine whether any of these features would affect rates of healing as defined by regain of strength. Controlled fractures were generated in three inbred strains of mice: A/J, C57Bl/6J (B6), and C3H/HeJ (C3H). Both the A/J and B6 strains showed faster healing than the C3H strain based on regains in strength and stiffness. Strain-specific architectural features such as moment of inertia, cross-sectional area, and cortical thickness were all recapitulated during the development of the callus tissues. None of these traits were directly relatable to rates of fracture healing. However, rates of healing were related to variations in the temporal patterns of chondrogenic and osteogenic lineage development. The B6 strain expressed the highest percentage of cartilage gene products and had the longest period of chondrocyte maturation and hypertrophy. The slowest healing strain (C3H) had the shortest period of chondrogenic development and earliest initiation of osteogenic development. Although the A/J strain showed an almost identical pattern of chondrogenic development as the C3H strain, A/J initiated osteogenic development several days later than C3H during fracture healing. Long bone growth plates at 28 days after birth showed similar strain-specific variation in cartilage tissue development as seen in fracture healing. Thus, the B6 strain had the largest growth plate heights, cell numbers per column, and the largest cell size, whereas the C3H columns were the shortest, had the smallest number of cells per column, and showed the smallest cell sizes. These results show that (1) different strains of mice express variations of skeletal stem cell lineage differentiation and (2) that these variations affect the rate of fracture healing. PMID:18348700

  14. Human genetics shape the gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Julia K; Waters, Jillian L; Poole, Angela C; Sutter, Jessica L; Koren, Omry; Blekhman, Ran; Beaumont, Michelle; Van Treuren, William; Knight, Rob; Bell, Jordana T; Spector, Timothy D; Clark, Andrew G; Ley, Ruth E

    2014-11-01

    Host genetics and the gut microbiome can both influence metabolic phenotypes. However, whether host genetic variation shapes the gut microbiome and interacts with it to affect host phenotype is unclear. Here, we compared microbiotas across >1,000 fecal samples obtained from the TwinsUK population, including 416 twin pairs. We identified many microbial taxa whose abundances were influenced by host genetics. The most heritable taxon, the family Christensenellaceae, formed a co-occurrence network with other heritable Bacteria and with methanogenic Archaea. Furthermore, Christensenellaceae and its partners were enriched in individuals with low body mass index (BMI). An obese-associated microbiome was amended with Christensenella minuta, a cultured member of the Christensenellaceae, and transplanted to germ-free mice. C. minuta amendment reduced weight gain and altered the microbiome of recipient mice. Our findings indicate that host genetics influence the composition of the human gut microbiome and can do so in ways that impact host metabolism. PMID:25417156

  15. Human genetics shape the gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Goodrich, Julia K.; Waters, Jillian L.; Poole, Angela C.; Sutter, Jessica L.; Koren, Omry; Blekhman, Ran; Beaumont, Michelle; Van Treuren, William; Knight, Rob; Bell, Jordana T.; Spector, Timothy D.; Clark, Andrew G.; Ley, Ruth E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Host genetics and the gut microbiome can both influence metabolic phenotypes. However, whether host genetic variation shapes the gut microbiome and interacts with it to affect host phenotype is unclear. Here, we compared microbiotas across > 1,000 fecal samples obtained from the TwinsUK population, including 416 twin-pairs. We identified many microbial taxa whose abundances were influenced by host genetics. The most heritable taxon, the family Christensenellaceae, formed a cooccurrence network with other heritable Bacteria and with methanogenic Archaea. Furthermore, Christensenellaceae and its partners were enriched in individuals with low body mass index (BMI). An obese-associated microbiome was amended with Christensenella minuta, a cultured member of the Christensenellaceae, and transplanted to germfree mice. C. minuta amendment reduced weight gain and altered the microbiome of recipient mice. Our findings indicate that host genetics influence the composition of the human gut microbiome and can do so in ways that impact host metabolism. PMID:25417156

  16. My Retina Tracker(™): An On-line International Registry for People Affected with Inherited Orphan Retinal Degenerative Diseases and their Genetic Relatives - A New Resource.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Joan K; Bromley, Russell L; Mansfield, Brian C

    2016-01-01

    My Retina Tracker™ is a new on-line registry for people affected with inherited orphan retinal degenerative diseases, and their unaffected, genetic relatives. Created and supported by the Foundation Fighting Blindness, it is an international resource designed to capture the disease from the perspective of the registry participant and their retinal health care providers. The registry operates under an Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved protocol and allows sharing of de-identified data with participants, researchers and clinicians. All participants sign an informed consent that includes selecting which data they wish to share. There is no minimum age of participation. Guardians must sign on behalf of minors, and children between the ages of 12 to 17 also sign an informed assent. Participants may compare their disease to others in the registry using graphical interpretations of the aggregate registry data. Researchers and clinicians have two levels of access. The first provides an interface to interrogate all data fields registrants have agreed to share based on their answers in the IRB informed consent. The second provides a route to contact people in the registry who may be eligible for studies or trials, through the Foundation. PMID:26427418

  17. Genetic variants affecting human TRPA1 or TRPM8 structure can be classified in vitro as ‘well expressed’, ‘poorly expressed’ or ‘salvageable’

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Kevin; Sadofsky, Laura Rachel; Morice, Alyn Hugh

    2015-01-01

    Multiple mis-sense variants of TRPA1 (transient receptor potential A1) and TRPM8 (transient receptor potential M8) are recorded in the human genome single nt polymorphism (SNP) database, but their potential impact on channel signalling in patho-physiology is not fully explored. Variants, mostly quite rare in the general human population, alter sites in different structural domains of these homo-tetrameric ion channel proteins. The effects of individual SNPs affecting the large cytoplasmic N-terminal domain have not been completely documented for TRPM8 or TRPA1. We examined the Ca2+ signalling properties of a short-list of eight variants affecting the N-terminal domain by individual expression in human embryonic kidney HEK293 or neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cell lines (four SNP variants for TRPM8: G150R, K423N, R475C, R485W and four for TRPA1: Y69C, A366D, E477K, D573A). These were compared with TRPA1 SNP variants affecting intracellular loops located beyond the N-terminal domain and associated with gain of function (such as increased sensitivity to agonists: TRPA1 R797T and N855S). A substitution in TRPA1 (Y69C) exhibited high expression/sensitivity to agonists (high iCa2+max (maximum level of intracellular calcium ion), similar to R797T, but less sensitive than N855S), whereas each of the other non-conservative substitutions exhibited poor signalling response (low iCa2+max). Responses from these poorly expressed variants could be salvaged, to different extents, by pre-treating cells with the Src (Src protein) family inhibitor protein kinase inhibitor PP2 (PP2: 4-Amino-3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(t-butyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine, 4-Amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine), or with micromolar Zn2+. The TRPA1 variants and several experimental mutants (TRPA1 Y97F, Y226F and YY654–655FF) expressed poorly in SH-SY5Y compared with HEK293 cells. More in-depth studies are needed to identify SNP variants eliciting gain of function in these TRP (transient receptor potential) channels and to assess their roles in medical conditions. PMID:26330615

  18. 14 CFR 26.45 - Holders of type certificates-Alterations and repairs to alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... category airplanes subject to § 26.43. (b) Fatigue critical alteration structure. For existing and future... alteration data and identify all alterations that affect fatigue critical baseline structure identified under... fatigue critical alteration structure; (3) Develop and submit to the FAA Oversight Office for review...

  19. Characterization of Genetically Matched Isolates of Campylobacter jejuni Reveals that Mutations in Genes Involved in Flagellar Biosynthesis Alter the Organism's Virulence Potential?

    PubMed Central

    Malik-Kale, Preeti; Raphael, Brian H.; Parker, Craig T.; Joens, Lynn A.; Klena, John D.; Quiñones, Beatriz; Keech, Amy M.; Konkel, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    Phenotypic and genotypic evidence suggests that not all Campylobacter jejuni isolates are pathogenic for humans. We hypothesized that differences in gene content or gene expression alter the degree of pathogenicity of C. jejuni isolates. A C. jejuni isolate (Turkey) recovered from a turkey and a second C. jejuni isolate (CS) recovered from a chicken differed in their degrees of in vitro and in vivo virulence. The C. jejuni Turkey isolate invaded INT 407 human epithelial cells and secreted the Cia (Campylobacter invasion antigen) proteins, while the C. jejuni CS isolate was noninvasive for human epithelial cells and did not secrete the Cia proteins. Newborn piglets inoculated with the C. jejuni Turkey isolate developed more severe clinical signs of campylobacteriosis than piglets inoculated with the C. jejuni CS isolate. Additional work revealed that flagellin was not expressed in the C. jejuni CS isolate. Microarray and real-time reverse transcription-PCR analyses revealed that all flagellar class II genes were significantly downregulated in the C. jejuni CS isolate compared to the C. jejuni Turkey isolate. Finally, nucleotide sequencing of the flgR gene revealed the presence of a single residue that was different in the FlgR proteins of the C. jejuni Turkey and CS isolates. Complementation of the C. jejuni CS isolate with a wild-type copy of the flgR gene restored the isolate's motility. Collectively, these findings support the hypothesis that critical differences in gene content or gene expression can alter the pathogenic potential of C. jejuni isolates. PMID:17369342

  20. 76 FR 60447 - Florigene Pty., Ltd.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Altered Color Roses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  1. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and alters sex steroid hormone secretion without affecting growth of mouse antral follicles in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Karman, Bethany N. Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S. Craig, Zelieann R. Flaws, Jodi A.

    2012-05-15

    The persistent environmental contaminant, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an ovarian toxicant. These studies were designed to characterize the actions of TCDD on steroidogenesis and growth of intact mouse antral follicles in vitro. Specifically, these studies tested the hypothesis that TCDD exposure leads to decreased sex hormone production/secretion by antral follicles as well as decreased growth of antral follicles in vitro. Since TCDD acts through binding to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), and the AHR has been identified as an important factor in ovarian function, we also conducted experiments to confirm the presence and activation of the AHR in our tissue culture system. To do so, we exposed mouse antral follicles for 96 h to a series of TCDD doses previously shown to have effects on ovarian tissues and cells in culture, which also encompass environmentally relevant and pharmacological exposures (0.1–100 nM), to determine a dose response for TCDD in our culture system for growth, hormone production, and expression of the Ahr and Cyp1b1. The results indicate that TCDD decreases progesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol levels in a non-monotonic dose response manner without altering growth of antral follicles. The addition of pregnenolone substrate (10 ?M) restores hormone levels to control levels. Additionally, Cyp1b1 levels were increased by 3–4 fold regardless of the dose of TCDD exposure, evidence of AHR activation. Overall, these data indicate that TCDD may act prior to pregnenolone formation and through AHR transcriptional control of Cyp1b1, leading to decreased hormone levels without affecting growth of antral follicles. -- Highlights: ?TCDD disrupts sex steroid hormone levels, but not growth of antral follicles. ?Pregnenolone co-treatment by-passes TCDD-induced steroid hormone disruption. ?TCDD affects steroid hormone levels through an AHR pathway in antral follicles.

  2. [Molecular alterations in melanoma and targeted therapies].

    PubMed

    Mourah, Samia; Lebbé, Céleste

    2014-12-01

    Melanoma is a skin cancer whose incidence is increasing steadily. The recent discovery of frequent and recurrent genetic alterations in cutaneous melanoma allowed a molecular classification of tumors into distinct subgroups, and paved the way for targeted therapy. Several signaling pathways are involved in the progression of this disease with oncogenic mutations affecting signaling pathways: MAPK, PI3K, cAMP and cyclin D1/CDK4. In each of these pathways, several potential therapeutic targets have been identified and specific inhibitors have already been developed and have shown clinical efficacy. The use of these inhibitors is often conditioned by tumors genotyping. In France, melanomas genotyping is supported by the platforms of the National Cancer Institute (INCA), which implemented a national program ensuring access to innovation for personalized medicine. The identification of new targets in melanoma supplies a very active dynamic development of innovative molecules contributing to changing the therapeutic landscape of this pathology. PMID:25776766

  3. Assessment of first and second degree relatives of individuals with bipolar disorder shows increased genetic risk scores in both affected relatives and young At-Risk Individuals.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Janice M; Koller, Daniel L; Edenberg, Howard J; Foroud, Tatiana; Liu, Hai; Glowinski, Anne L; McInnis, Melvin G; Wilcox, Holly C; Frankland, Andrew; Roberts, Gloria; Schofield, Peter R; Mitchell, Philip B; Nurnberger, John I

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have revealed the polygenic nature of bipolar disorder (BP), and identified common risk variants associated with illness. However, the role of common polygenic risk in multiplex families has not previously been examined. The present study examined 249 European-ancestry families from the NIMH Genetics Initiative sample, comparing subjects with narrowly defined BP (excluding bipolar II and recurrent unipolar depression; n = 601) and their adult relatives without BP (n = 695). Unrelated adult controls (n = 266) were from the NIMH TGEN control dataset. We also examined a prospective cohort of young (12-30 years) offspring and siblings of individuals with BPI and BPII disorder (at risk; n = 367) and psychiatrically screened controls (n = 229), ascertained from five sites in the US and Australia and assessed with standardized clinical protocols. Thirty-two disease-associated SNPs from the PGC-BP Working Group report (2011) were genotyped and additive polygenic risk scores (PRS) derived. We show increased PRS in adult cases compared to unrelated controls (P = 3.4 × 10(-5) , AUC = 0.60). In families with a high-polygenic load (PRS score ?32 in two or more subjects), PRS distinguished cases with BPI/SAB from other relatives (P = 0.014, RR = 1.32). Secondly, a higher PRS was observed in at-risk youth, regardless of affected status, compared to unrelated controls (GEE-?(2) = 5.15, P = 0.012). This report is the first to explore common polygenic risk in multiplex families, albeit using only a small number of robustly associated risk variants. We show that individuals with BP have a higher load of common disease-associated variants than unrelated controls and first-degree relatives, and illustrate the potential utility of PRS assessment in a family context. PMID:26178159

  4. Genetic Brain Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    A genetic brain disorder is caused by a variation or a mutation in a gene. A variation is a different form ... mutation is a change in a gene. Genetic brain disorders affect the development and function of the ...

  5. Radiosensitivity profiles from a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines exhibiting genetic alterations in p53 and disparate DNA-dependent protein kinase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Langland, Gregory T.; Yannone, Steven M.; Langland, Rachel A.; Nakao, Aki; Guan, Yinghui; Long, Sydney B.T.; Vonguyen, Lien; Chen, David J.; Gray, Joe W; Chen, Fanqing

    2009-09-07

    The variability of radiation responses in ovarian tumors and tumor-derived cell lines is poorly understood. Since both DNA repair capacity and p53 status can significantly alter radiation sensitivity, we evaluated these factors along with radiation sensitivity in a panel of sporadic human ovarian carcinoma cell lines. We observed a gradation of radiation sensitivity among these sixteen lines, with a five-fold difference in the LD50 between the most radiosensitive and the most radioresistant cells. The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is essential for the repair of radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks in human somatic cells. Therefore, we measured gene copy number, expression levels, protein abundance, genomic copy and kinase activity for DNA-PK in all of our cell lines. While there were detectable differences in DNA-PK between the cell lines, there was no clear correlation with any of these differences and radiation sensitivity. In contrast, p53 function as determined by two independent methods, correlated well with radiation sensitivity, indicating p53 mutant ovarian cancer cells are typically radioresistant relative to p53 wild-type lines. These data suggest that the activity of regulatory molecules such as p53 may be better indicators of radiation sensitivity than DNA repair enzymes such as DNAPK in ovarian cancer.

  6. Genetic variants associated with altered plasma levels of C-reactive protein are not associated with late-life cognitive ability in four Scottish samples.

    PubMed

    Marioni, Riccardo E; Deary, Ian J; Murray, Gordon D; Lowe, Gordon D O; Rafnsson, Snorri B; Strachan, Mark W J; Luciano, Michelle; Houlihan, Lorna M; Gow, Alan J; Harris, Sarah E; Stewart, Marlene C; Rumley, Ann; Fowkes, F Gerry R; Price, Jackie F

    2010-01-01

    It is unknown whether the relationship between raised inflammatory biomarker levels and late-life cognitive ability is causal. We explored this issue by testing the association between genetic regulators of plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) and cognition. Data were analysed from four cohorts based in central Scotland (Total N = 4,782). Associations were tested between variants in the CRP gene and both plasma CRP levels and a battery of neuropsychological tests, including a vocabulary-based estimate of peak prior cognitive ability and a general (summary) cognitive factor score, or 'g'. CRP levels were associated with a number of variants in the CRP gene (SNPs), including rs1205, rs1130864, rs1800947, and rs1417938 (P range 4.2e-06 to 0.041). Higher CRP levels were also associated with vocabulary-adjusted cognitive ability, used here to estimate lifetime cognitive change (P range 1.7e-04 to 0.038). After correction for multiple testing and adjustment for age and sex, no statistically significant associations were found between the SNPs and cognition. CRP is unlikely to be a causal determinant of late-life cognitive ability. PMID:19821022

  7. Recurrent alterations of TNFAIP3 (A20) in T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Patricia; Bergmann, Anke; Rahmann, Sven; Wohlers, Inken; Scholtysik, René; Przekopowitz, Martina; Seifert, Marc; Tschurtschenthaler, Gertraud; Webersinke, Gerald; Jäger, Ulrich; Siebert, Reiner; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Dührsen, Ulrich; Dürig, Jan; Küppers, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia (T-LGL) is poorly understood, as STAT3 mutations are the only known frequent genetic lesions. Here, we identified non-synonymous alterations in the TNFAIP3 tumor suppressor gene in 3 of 39 T-LGL. In two cases these were somatic mutations, in one case the somatic origin was likely. A further case harbored a SNP that is a known risk allele for autoimmune diseases and B cell lymphomas. Thus, TNFAIP3 mutations represent recurrent genetic lesions in T-LGL that affect about 8% of cases, likely contributing to deregulated NF-?B activity in this leukemia. PMID:26199174

  8. Ineffectiveness of parenteral fluoxetine or RU-486 to alter long-term food intake, body weight or body composition of genetically obese mice.

    PubMed

    Dubuc, P U; Peterson, C M

    1990-12-01

    The effects of 3 weeks of daily subcutaneous injections of a serotonin agonist (fluoxetine, 20 mg/kg) or agent having antiglucocorticoid properties (RU-486, 20 mg/kg) on food intake and body growth were examined in C57BL/6 ob/ob and lean mice. Fluoxetine injections during ad libitum feeding led to depressed food intake and body weight in both obese and lean mice over the initial 10 days of treatment with full recovery of both intake and weight by the end of the study. Fluoxetine treatment of mice restricted to 3.2 g of laboratory diet per day caused small but persistent depressions of body weight in both phenotypes. RU-486 did not affect food intake weight or weight gain in either phenotype or feeding condition and neither drug affected carcass composition. Insulin levels were also unaffected by treatment but final corticosterone concentrations were consistently higher in fluoxetine-treated mice and lower in RU-486-treated mice. Although transient benefits on feeding and weight gain were observed with fluoxetine administration, the present results show that neither fluoxetine nor RU-486 administered parenterally provides significant long-term improvement in the metabolic, growth or behavioral disturbances that characterize ob/ob mice. PMID:2124625

  9. Genetic Pathways to Primary and Secondary Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Ohgaki, Hiroko; Kleihues, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most frequent and most malignant human brain tumor. The prognosis remains very poor, with most patients dying within 1 year after diagnosis. Primary and secondary glioblastoma constitute distinct disease subtypes, affecting patients of different age and developing through different genetic pathways. The majority of cases (>90%) are primary glioblastomas that develop rapidly de novo, without clinical or histological evidence of a less malignant precursor lesion. They affect mainly the elderly and are genetically characterized by loss of heterozygosity 10q (70% of cases), EGFR amplification (36%), p16INK4a deletion (31%), and PTEN mutations (25%). Secondary glioblastomas develop through progression from low-grade diffuse astrocytoma or anaplastic astrocytoma and manifest in younger patients. In the pathway to secondary glioblastoma, TP53 mutations are the most frequent and earliest detectable genetic alteration, already present in 60% of precursor low-grade astrocytomas. The mutation pattern is characterized by frequent G:C?A:T mutations at CpG sites. During progression to glioblastoma, additional mutations accumulate, including loss of heterozygosity 10q25-qter (?70%), which is the most frequent genetic alteration in both primary and secondary glioblastomas. Primary and secondary glioblastomas also differ significantly in their pattern of promoter methylation and in expression profiles at RNA and protein levels. This has significant implications, particularly for the development of novel, targeted therapies, as discussed in this review. PMID:17456751

  10. The ability of plasma cotinine to predict nicotine and carcinogen exposure is altered by differences in CYP2A6: the influence of genetics, race and sex

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Andy Z.X.; Renner, Caroline C.; Hatsukami, Dorothy K.; Swan, Gary E.; Lerman, Caryn; Benowitz, Neal L.; Tyndale, Rachel F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cotinine, a nicotine metabolite, is a biomarker of tobacco, nicotine and carcinogen exposure. However a given cotinine level may not represent the same tobacco exposure; for example, African Americans have higher cotinine levels than Caucasians after controlling for exposure. Methods Cotinine levels are determined by the amount of cotinine formation and the rate of cotinine removal which are both mediated by the enzyme CYP2A6. Since CYP2A6 activity differs by sex (estrogen induces CYP2A6) and genotype, their effect on cotinine formation and removal were measured in non-smoking Caucasians (Study 1, n=181) infused with labeled nicotine and cotinine. The findings were then extended to ad libitum smokers (Study 2, n=163). Results Study 1: Reduced CYP2A6 activity altered cotinine formation less than cotinine removal resulting in ratios of formation to removal of 1.31 and 1.12 in CYP2A6 reduced and normal metabolizers (P=0.01), or 1.39 and 1.12 in males and females (P=0.001), suggesting an overestimation of tobacco exposure in slower metabolizers. Study 2: Cotinine again overestimated tobacco and carcinogen exposure by ?25% in CYP2A6 reduced metabolizers (?2 fold between some genotypes) and in males. Conclusions In people with slower, relative to faster, CYP2A6 activity cotinine accumulates resulting in substantial differences in cotinine levels for a given tobacco exposure. Impact Cotinine levels may be misleading when comparing those with differing CYP2A6 genotypes within a race, between races with differing frequencies of CYP2A6 gene variants (i.e. African Americans have higher frequencies of reduced function variants contributing to their higher cotinine levels) or between the sexes. PMID:23371292

  11. Genetically engineered foods

    MedlinePLUS

    ... corn, and soybeans have been genetically altered through biotechnology. Many more foods contain engineered ingredients and more ... FDA.gov. http://www.fda.gov/food/foodscienceresearch/biotechnology/ucm346030.htm. Last updated July 22, 2014. Accessed ...

  12. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Genetics, Epigenetics, and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Loddo, Italia; Romano, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are complex, multifactorial disorders characterized by chronic relapsing intestinal inflammation. Although etiology remains largely unknown, recent research has suggested that genetic factors, environment, microbiota, and immune response are involved in the pathogenesis. Epidemiological evidence for a genetic contribution is defined: 15% of patients with Crohn’s Disease (CD) have an affected family member with IBD, and twin studies for CD have shown 50% concordance in monozygotic twins compared to <10% in dizygotics. The most recent and largest genetic association studies, which employed genome-wide association data for over 75,000 patients and controls, identified 163 susceptibility loci for IBD. More recently, a trans-ethnic analysis, including over 20,000 individuals, identified an additional 38 new IBD loci. Although most cases are correlated with polygenic contribution toward genetic susceptibility, there is a spectrum of rare genetic disorders that can contribute to early-onset IBD (before 5?years) or very early onset IBD (before 2?years). Genetic variants that cause these disorders have a wide effect on gene function. These variants are so rare in allele frequency that the genetic signals are not detected in genome-wide association studies of patients with IBD. With recent advances in sequencing techniques, ~50 genetic disorders have been identified and associated with IBD-like immunopathology. Monogenic defects have been found to alter intestinal immune homeostasis through many mechanisms. Candidate gene resequencing should be carried out in early-onset patients in clinical practice. The evidence that genetic factors contribute in small part to disease pathogenesis confirms the important role of microbial and environmental factors. Epigenetic factors can mediate interactions between environment and genome. Epigenetic mechanisms could affect development and progression of IBD. Epigenomics is an emerging field, and future studies could provide new insight into the pathogenesis of IBD. PMID:26579126

  13. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and alters sex steroid hormone secretion without affecting growth of mouse antral follicles in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Karman, Bethany N.; Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S.; Craig, Zelieann R.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2012-01-01

    The persistent environmental contaminant, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an ovarian toxicant. These studies were designed to characterize the actions of TCDD on steroidogenesis and growth of intact mouse antral follicles in vitro. Specifically, these studies tested the hypothesis that TCDD exposure leads to decreased sex hormone production/secretion by antral follicles as well as decreased growth of antral follicles in vitro. Since TCDD acts through binding to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), and the AHR has been identified as an important factor in ovarian function, we also conducted experiments to confirm the presence and activation of the AHR in our tissue culture system. To do so, we exposed mouse antral follicles for 96 hours to a series of TCDD doses previously shown to have effects on ovarian tissues and cells in culture, which also encompass environmentally relevant and pharmacological exposures (0.1-100nM), to determine a dose response for TCDD in our culture system for growth, hormone production, expression of the Ahr and Cyp1b1. The results indicate that TCDD decreases progesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol levels in a non-monotonic dose response manner without altering growth of antral follicles. The addition of pregnenolone substrate (10?M) restores hormone levels to control levels. Additionally, Cyp1b1 levels were increased by 3-4 fold regardless of the dose of TCDD exposure, evidence of AHR activation. Overall, these data indicate that TCDD may act prior to pregnenolone formation and through AHR transcriptional control of Cyp1b1, leading to decreased hormone levels without affecting growth of antral follicles. PMID:22483799

  14. 78 FR 13286 - Sharing Certain Business Information Regarding the Introduction of Genetically Engineered...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ...altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that...Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or...procedure, Biotechnology, Genetic engineering, Imports, Packaging...

  15. Genetic Variation in Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor val66met Allele is Associated with Altered Serotonin-1A Receptor Binding in Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Martin J.; Ogden, R Todd; Huang, Yung-yu; Oquendo, Maria A.; Sullivan, Gregory M; Miller, Jeffrey; Milak, Matthew; Mann, J John; Parsey, Ramin V

    2014-01-01

    Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) regulates brain synaptic plasticity. BDNF affects serotonin signaling, increases serotonin levels in brain tissue and prevents degeneration of serotonin neurons. These effects have hardly been studied in human brain. We examined the relationship of the functional val66met polymorphism of the BDNF gene to serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) receptor binding in vivo. 50 healthy volunteers (HV) and 50 acutely depressed, unmedicated patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) underwent PET scanning with the 5-HT1A receptor ligand, [11C]WAY-100635 and a metabolite corrected arterial input function. A linear mixed effects model compared 5-HT1A receptor binding potential (BPF, proportional to the number of available receptors) in 13 brain regions of interest between met allele carriers (met/met and val/met) and noncarriers (val/val) using sex and C-1019G genotype of the 5-HT1A receptor promoter functional polymorphism as covariates. There was an interaction between diagnosis and allele (F=4.23, df=1, 94, p=0.042), such that met allele carriers had 17.4% lower BPF than non-met carriers in the HV group (t=2.6, df=96, p=0.010), but not in the MDD group (t=?0.4, df=96, p=0.58). These data are consistent with a model where the met allele of the val66met polymorphism causes less proliferation of serotonin synapses, and consequently fewer 5-HT1A receptors. In MDD, however, the effect of the val66met polymorphism is not detectable, possibly due to a ceiling effect of over-expression of 5-HT1A receptors in mood disorders. PMID:24607934

  16. Population differentiation in Daphnia alters community assembly in experimental ponds.

    PubMed

    Pantel, Jelena H; Leibold, Mathew A; Juenger, Thomas E

    2011-03-01

    Most studies of community assembly ignore how genetic differentiation within species affects their colonization and extinction. However, genetic differentiation in ecologically relevant traits may be substantial enough to alter the colonization and extinction processes that drive community assembly. We measured significant molecular genetic and quantitative trait differentiation among three Daphnia pulex × pulicaria populations in southwestern Michigan ponds and investigated whether this differentiation could alter the assembly of pond zooplankton communities in experimental mesocosms. In this study, we monitored the invasion success of different D. pulex × pulicaria populations after their introduction into an established zooplankton community. We also monitored the invasion success of a diverse array of zooplankton species into different D. pulex × pulicaria populations. Zooplankton community composition depended on the D. pulex × pulicaria source population. Daphnia pulex × pulicaria from one population failed to invade zooplankton communities, while those from other populations successfully invaded similar communities. If population differentiation in other species plays a role in community assembly similar to that demonstrated in our study, assembly may be more sensitive to evolutionary processes than has been previously generally considered. PMID:21460540

  17. Genetics/genomics advances to influence care for patients with chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Beery, Theresa Alice; Smith, Carolyn R

    2011-01-01

    Rapid changes in the field of genetics/genomics are affecting the way we practice nursing. Staying current on this dynamic field is a challenge for all healthcare professionals. This article discusses genetics/genomics issues that are likely to have a strong influence on nurses who care for patients with chronic disease. Complex diseases involving the actions of genes and environment are the most common causes of morbidity and mortality. Pharmacogenetics/pharmacogenomics has the potential to alter the way we choose both medications and appropriate doses. Nutrigenomics promises to help us understand how diet affects gene expression and how genetic variants affect the way we use nutrients. Genetic testing can be purchased through the Internet and currently is being marketed directly to consumers. Each of these topics has present and future implications for all healthcare professionals, especially those caring for people with chronic disease. PMID:21473561

  18. The Rules of Aggression: How Genetic, Chemical and Spatial Factors Affect Intercolony Fights in a Dominant Species, the Mediterranean Acrobat Ant Crematogaster scutellaris

    PubMed Central

    Frizzi, Filippo; Ciofi, Claudio; Dapporto, Leonardo; Natali, Chiara; Chelazzi, Guido; Turillazzi, Stefano; Santini, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Nest-mate recognition plays a key role in the biology of ants. Although individuals coming from a foreign nest are, in most cases, promptly rejected, the degree of aggressiveness towards non nest-mates may be highly variable among species and relies on genetic, chemical and environmental factors. We analyzed intraspecific relationships among neighboring colonies of the dominant Mediterranean acrobat ant Crematogaster scutellaris integrating genetic, chemical and behavioral analyses. Colony structure, parental relationships between nests, cuticular hydrocarbons profiles (CHCs) and aggressive behavior against non nest-mates were studied in 34 nests located in olive tree trunks. Bayesian clustering analysis of allelic variation at nine species-specific microsatellite DNA markers pooled nests into 14 distinct clusters, each representing a single colony, confirming a polydomous arrangement of nests in this species. A marked genetic separation among colonies was also detected, probably due to long distance dispersion of queens and males during nuptial flights. CHCs profiles varied significantly among colonies and between nests of the same colony. No relationship between CHCs profiles and genetic distances was detected. The level of aggressiveness between colonies was inversely related to chemical and spatial distance, suggesting a ‘nasty neighbor’ effect. Our findings also suggest that CHCs profiles in C. scutellaris may be linked to external environmental factors rather than genetic relationships. PMID:26445245

  19. Genetic Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  20. Heritability and molecular genetic basis of acoustic startle eye blink and affectively modulated startle response: A genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    VAIDYANATHAN, UMA; MALONE, STEPHEN M.; MILLER, MICHAEL B.; McGUE, MATT; IACONO, WILLIAM G.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic startle responses have been studied extensively in relation to individual differences and psychopathology. We examined three indices of the blink response in a picture-viewing paradigm—overall startle magnitude across all picture types, and aversive and pleasant modulation scores—in 3,323 twins and parents. Biometric models and molecular genetic analyses showed that half the variance in overall startle was due to additive genetic effects. No single nucleotide polymorphism was genome-wide significant, but GRIK3 did produce a significant effect when examined as part of a candidate gene set. In contrast, emotion modulation scores showed little evidence of heritability in either biometric or molecular genetic analyses. However, in a genome-wide scan, PARP14 did produce a significant effect for aversive modulation. We conclude that, although overall startle retains potential as an endophenotype, emotion-modulated startle does not. PMID:25387708

  1. Drug Disposition Alterations in Liver Disease: Extra-hepatic Effects in Cholestasis and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Canet, Mark J; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The pharmacokinetics of drugs and xenobiotics, namely pharmaceuticals, is influenced by a host of factors that include genetics, physiological factors, and environmental stressors. The importance of disease on the disposition of xenobiotics has been increasingly recognized among medical professionals for alterations in key enzymes and membrane transporters that influence drug disposition and contribute to the development of adverse drug reactions. Areas Covered This review will survey pertinent literature of how liver disease alters the pharmacokinetics of drugs and other xenobiotics. The focus will be on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis as well as cholestatic liver diseases. A review of basic pharmacokinetic principles, with a special emphasis on xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and membrane transporters will be provided. Specifically, examples of how genetic alterations affect metabolism and excretion, respectively, will be highlighted. Lastly, the idea of “extra-hepatic” regulation will be explored, citing examples of how disease manifestation in the liver may affect drug disposition in distal sites, such as the kidney. Expert Opinion An expert opinion will be provided highlighting the definite need for data in understanding extra-hepatic regulation of membrane transporters in the presence of liver disease and its potential to dramatically alter the pharmacokinetic and toxicokinetic profile of numerous drugs and xenobiotics. PMID:24989624

  2. MECHANISMS OF AGRESSION AND PRODUCTION IN CHICKENS: GENETIC VARIATIONS IN THE FUNCTIONS OF SEROTONIN, CATECHOLAMINE, AND CORTICOSTERONE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study demonstrates that genetic selection for high and low group productivity and longevity with alterations in cannibalism and flightiness affected the regulations of the neuroendocrine system of selected birds, and that CORT and monoamines, such as 5-HT, DA, EP and NE, were differently regula...

  3. The genomics and genetics of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Andrea J; Bell, Daphne W

    2012-01-01

    Most sporadic endometrial cancers (ECs) can be histologically classified as endometrioid, serous, or clear cell. Each histotype has a distinct natural history, clinical behavior, and genetic etiology. Endometrioid ECs have an overall favorable prognosis. They are typified by high frequency genomic alterations affecting PIK3CA, PIK3R1, PTEN, KRAS, FGFR2, ARID1A (BAF250a), and CTNNB1 (?-catenin), as well as epigenetic silencing of MLH1 resulting in microsatellite instability. Serous and clear cell ECs are clinically aggressive tumors that are rare at presentation but account for a disproportionate fraction of all endometrial cancer deaths. Serous ECs tend to be aneuploid and are typified by frequent genomic alterations affecting TP53 (p53), PPP2R1A, HER-2/ERBB2, PIK3CA, and PTEN; additionally, they display dysregulation of E-cadherin, p16, cyclin E, and BAF250a. The genetic etiology of clear cell ECs resembles that of serous ECs, but it remains relatively poorly defined. A detailed discussion of the characteristic patterns of genomic alterations that distinguish the three major histotypes of endometrial cancer is reviewed herein. PMID:22888282

  4. Insulin-like growth factor-I treatment and genetic variation affect changes in indices of protein degradation in response to food deprivation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study determined the effect of genetic variation, feed deprivation and IGF-I treatment on weight loss, plasma IGF-I and GH, and indices of protein degradation in eight full-sibling families of rainbow trout. After two weeks of feed deprivation, fish treated with IGF-I lost 16% less (P<0.05) wet...

  5. [Molecular genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Xue, Kai-Xian

    2005-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major type of primary liver cancer and one of the most frequent human malignant neoplasms. Common risk factors of human HCC include chronic hepatitis virus (HBV and HCV) infection, dietary aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) ingestion, chronic alcohol abuse, and cirrhosis associated with genetic liver diseases. Hepatocarcinogenesis is the result of interaction between hereditary and environmental factors. Inheritance determines individual susceptibility to cancer; environment determines which susceptible individuals express cancer. Studies of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis showed that HCC development is a complex polygene and multipathway process; the activation of proto-oncogenes and the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes induced by genetic and epigenetic alterations are core biological processes of hepatocarcinogenesis; RB1, p53, and Wnt pathways are commonly affected in HCCs of different etiologies, which may reflect common pathologic sequence of HCC: chronic liver injury, cirrhosis, atypical hyperplastic nodules, and HCC of early stages. Hepatitis virus infection-associated HCCs have frequent alterations in RB1 pathway, including methylation of p16INK4a and RB1 genes and amplification of Cyclin D1. AFB1 exposure-associated HCCs have frequent alterations in p53 pathway; the G-->T mutation of p53 gene at codon 249 has been identified as a genetic hallmark of HCC caused by AFB1. Alcoholism-associated HCCs have frequent alterations in both RB1 and p53 pathways. The roles of some important genes related to cell apoptosis, DNA repair, drug metabolism, and tumor metastasis in hepatocarcinogenesis had been discussed. PMID:15946497

  6. SNPping away at the genetic basis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Giampietro, Philip F

    2015-05-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a genetically complex disorder of spine development, defined by a lateral curvature of the spine of 10º or greater which affects children during their pubertal growth spurt. Prior linkage and candidate gene approaches to elucidating the genetic basis of AIS have been of limited use for identification of candidate genes for this condition. Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have recently identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in LBX1 and G protein-coupled receptor 126 (GPR126) that contribute to AIS occurrence. These discoveries support prior etiologic hypotheses regarding altered somatosensory function and skeletal growth in AIS. However, these loci account for a small percentage of the phenotypic variance associated with AIS, indicating the vast majority of the genetic causes of AIS remain to be delineated. A major translational application regarding understanding the genetic contributions to AIS relates to bracing efficacy. PMID:26046072

  7. SNPping away at the genetic basis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a genetically complex disorder of spine development, defined by a lateral curvature of the spine of 10º or greater which affects children during their pubertal growth spurt. Prior linkage and candidate gene approaches to elucidating the genetic basis of AIS have been of limited use for identification of candidate genes for this condition. Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have recently identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in LBX1 and G protein-coupled receptor 126 (GPR126) that contribute to AIS occurrence. These discoveries support prior etiologic hypotheses regarding altered somatosensory function and skeletal growth in AIS. However, these loci account for a small percentage of the phenotypic variance associated with AIS, indicating the vast majority of the genetic causes of AIS remain to be delineated. A major translational application regarding understanding the genetic contributions to AIS relates to bracing efficacy. PMID:26046072

  8. Familial gastric cancer: genetic susceptibility, pathology, and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Carla; Pinheiro, Hugo; Figueiredo, Joana; Seruca, Raquel; Carneiro, Fátima

    2015-02-01

    Familial gastric cancer comprises at least three major syndromes: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer, gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach, and familial intestinal gastric cancer. The risk of development of gastric cancer is high in families affected b-y these syndromes, but only hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is genetically explained (caused by germline alterations of CDH1, which encodes E-cadherin). Gastric cancer is also associated with a range of several cancer-associated syndromes with known genetic causes, such as Lynch, Li-Fraumeni, Peutz-Jeghers, hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndromes, familial adenomatous polyposis, and juvenile polyposis. We present contemporary knowledge on the genetics, pathogenesis, and clinical features of familial gastric cancer, and discuss research and technological developments, which together are expected to open avenues for new genetic testing approaches and novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:25638682

  9. Altered Vision Near the Hands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Richard A.; Davoli, Christopher C.; Du, Feng; Knapp, William H., III; Paull, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The present study explored the manner in which hand position may affect visual processing. We studied three classic visual attention tasks (visual search, inhibition of return, and attentional blink) during which the participants held their hands either near the stimulus display, or far from the display. Remarkably, the hands altered visual…

  10. Biotic interactions and sunlight affect persistence of fecal indicator bacteria and microbial source tracking genetic markers in the upper Mississippi river.

    PubMed

    Korajkic, Asja; McMinn, Brian R; Shanks, Orin C; Sivaganesan, Mano; Fout, G Shay; Ashbolt, Nicholas J

    2014-07-01

    The sanitary quality of recreational waters that may be impacted by sewage is assessed by enumerating fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (Escherichia coli and enterococci); these organisms are found in the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and many other animals, and hence their presence provides no information about the pollution source. Microbial source tracking (MST) methods can discriminate between different pollution sources, providing critical information to water quality managers, but relatively little is known about factors influencing the decay of FIB and MST genetic markers following release into aquatic environments. An in situ mesocosm was deployed at a temperate recreational beach in the Mississippi River to evaluate the effects of ambient sunlight and biotic interactions (predation, competition, and viral lysis) on the decay of culture-based FIB, as well as molecularly based FIB (Entero1a and GenBac3) and human-associated MST genetic markers (HF183 and HumM2) measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). In general, culturable FIB decayed the fastest, while molecularly based FIB and human-associated genetic markers decayed more slowly. There was a strong correlation between the decay of molecularly based FIB and that of human-associated genetic markers (r(2), 0.96 to 0.98; P < 0.0001) but not between culturable FIB and any qPCR measurement. Overall, exposure to ambient sunlight may be an important factor in the early-stage decay dynamics but generally was not after continued exposure (i.e., after 120 h), when biotic interactions tended to be the only/major influential determinant of persistence. PMID:24747902

  11. Past climate change and recent anthropogenic activities affect genetic structure and population demography of the greater long-tailed hamster in northern China.

    PubMed

    Ye, Junbin; Xiao, Zhenlong; Li, Chuanhai; Wang, Fusheng; Liao, Jicheng; Fu, Jinzhong; Zhang, Zhibin

    2015-09-01

    The genetic diversity and the spatial structure of a species are likely consequences of both past and recent evolutionary processes, but relevant studies are still rare in East Asia where the Pleistocene climate has unique influences. In this study, we examined the impact of past climate change and recent anthropogenic activities on the genetic structure and population size of the greater long-tailed hamster (Tscherskia triton), an agricultural rodent pest species in northern China. DNA sequence data of 2 mitochondrial genes and genotypic data of 11 microsatellite DNA loci from 41 populations (545 individuals) were gathered. Phylogenetic and population genetic analyses, as well as species distribution modeling and coalescent simulations, were conducted to infer its historical and demographic patterns and processes. Two deeply diverged mitochondrial clades were recovered. A small one was restricted to the Shandong Peninsula while the main clade was further divided into 3 geographic clusters by their microsatellite DNA genotypes: Northwest, North-center and Northeast. Divergence dating indicated a Middle-to-Late Pleistocene divergence between the 2 clades. Demographic analysis indicated that all 3 and pooled populations showed consistent long-period expansions during last glacial period; but not during the Holocene, probably due to the impact of climate warming and human disturbances. Conflicting patterns between mtDNA and microsatellite markers imply an anthropogenic impact on North-center populations due to intensified agricultural cultivation in this region. Our study demonstrated that the impact of past glaciation on organisms in East Asia significantly differs from that of Europe and North America, and human activity is an important factor in determining the genetic diversity of a species, as well as its spatial structure. PMID:26202859

  12. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia: Genetics and Clinical Management.

    PubMed

    Norton, Jeffrey A; Krampitz, Geoffrey; Jensen, Robert T

    2015-10-01

    Early diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) syndromes is critical for optimal clinical outcomes; before the MEN syndromes can be diagnosed, they must be suspected. Genetic testing for germline alterations in both the MEN type 1 (MEN1) gene and RET proto-oncogene is crucial to identifying those at risk in affected kindreds and directing timely surveillance and surgical therapy to those at greatest risk of potentially life-threatening neoplasia. Pancreatic, thymic, and bronchial neuroendocrine tumors are the leading cause of death in patients with MEN1 and should be aggressively considered by at least biannual computed tomography imaging. PMID:26363542

  13. Genotyping-by-sequencing approach indicates geographic distance as the main factor affecting genetic structure and gene flow in Brazilian populations of Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae).

    PubMed

    Silva-Brandão, Karina Lucas; Silva, Oscar Arnaldo Batista Neto E; Brandão, Marcelo Mendes; Omoto, Celso; Sperling, Felix A H

    2015-06-01

    The oriental fruit moth Grapholita molesta is one of the major pests of stone and pome fruit species in Brazil. Here, we applied 1226 SNPs obtained by genotyping-by-sequencing to test whether host species associations or other factors such as geographic distance structured populations of this pest. Populations from the main areas of occurrence of G. molesta were sampled principally from peach and apple orchards. Three main clusters were recovered by neighbor-joining analysis, all defined by geographic proximity between sampling localities. Overall genetic structure inferred by a nonhierarchical amova resulted in a significant ?ST value = 0.19109. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that SNPs gathered by genotyping-by-sequencing can be used to infer genetic structure of a pest insect in Brazil; moreover, our results indicate that those markers are very informative even over a restricted geographic scale. We also demonstrate that host plant association has little effect on genetic structure among Brazilian populations of G. molesta; on the other hand, reduced gene flow promoted by geographic isolation has a stronger impact on population differentiation. PMID:26029261

  14. Genotyping-by-sequencing approach indicates geographic distance as the main factor affecting genetic structure and gene flow in Brazilian populations of Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae)

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Brandão, Karina Lucas; Silva, Oscar Arnaldo Batista Neto e; Brandão, Marcelo Mendes; Omoto, Celso; Sperling, Felix A H

    2015-01-01

    The oriental fruit moth Grapholita molesta is one of the major pests of stone and pome fruit species in Brazil. Here, we applied 1226 SNPs obtained by genotyping-by-sequencing to test whether host species associations or other factors such as geographic distance structured populations of this pest. Populations from the main areas of occurrence of G. molesta were sampled principally from peach and apple orchards. Three main clusters were recovered by neighbor-joining analysis, all defined by geographic proximity between sampling localities. Overall genetic structure inferred by a nonhierarchical amova resulted in a significant ?ST value = 0.19109. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that SNPs gathered by genotyping-by-sequencing can be used to infer genetic structure of a pest insect in Brazil; moreover, our results indicate that those markers are very informative even over a restricted geographic scale. We also demonstrate that host plant association has little effect on genetic structure among Brazilian populations of G. molesta; on the other hand, reduced gene flow promoted by geographic isolation has a stronger impact on population differentiation. PMID:26029261

  15. Hepatitis C Virus Genetic Variability and the Presence of NS5B Resistance-Associated Mutations as Natural Polymorphisms in Selected Genotypes Could Affect the Response to NS5B Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Di Maio, V. C.; Cento, V.; Mirabelli, C.; Artese, A.; Costa, G.; Alcaro, S.; Perno, C. F.

    2014-01-01

    Because of the extreme genetic variability of hepatitis C virus (HCV), we analyzed the NS5B polymerase genetic variability in circulating HCV genotypes/subtypes and its impact on the genetic barrier for the development of resistance to clinically relevant nucleoside inhibitors (NIs)/nonnucleoside inhibitors (NNIs). The study included 1,145 NS5B polymerase sequences retrieved from the Los Alamos HCV database and GenBank. The genetic barrier was calculated for drug resistance emergence. Prevalence and genetic barrier were calculated for 1 major NI and 32 NNI resistance variants (13 major and 19 minor) at 21 total NS5B positions. Docking calculations were used to analyze sofosbuvir affinity toward the diverse HCV genotypes. Overall, NS5B polymerase was moderately conserved among all HCV genotypes, with 313/591 amino acid residues (53.0%) showing ?1% variability and 83/591 residues (14.0%) showing high variability (?25.1%). Nine NNI resistance variants (2 major variants, 414L and 423I; 7 minor variants, 316N, 421V, 445F, 482L, 494A, 499A, and 556G) were found as natural polymorphisms in selected genotypes. In particular, 414L and 423I were found in HCV genotype 4 (HCV-4) (n = 14/38, 36.8%) and in all HCV-5 sequences (n = 17, 100%), respectively. Regardless of HCV genotype, the 282T major NI resistance variant and 10 major NNI resistance variants (316Y, 414L, 423I/T/V, 448H, 486V, 495L, 554D, and 559G) always required a single nucleotide substitution to be generated. Conversely, the other 3 major NNI resistance variants (414T, 419S, and 422K) were associated with a different genetic barrier score development among the six HCV genotypes. Sofosbuvir docking analysis highlighted a better ligand affinity toward HCV-2 than toward HCV-3, in agreement with the experimental observations. The genetic variability among HCV genotypes, particularly with the presence of polymorphisms at NNI resistance positions, could affect their responsiveness to NS5B inhibitors. A pretherapy HCV NS5B sequencing could help to provide patients with the full efficacy of NNI-containing regimens. PMID:24590484

  16. Genetic basis of thrombosis in cancer.

    PubMed

    D'Asti, Esterina; Magnus, Nathalie; Meehan, Brian; Garnier, Delphine; Rak, Janusz

    2014-04-01

    Genetically altered cancer cells both provoke and respond to changes in their microenvironment, stroma, and vasculature. This includes local and systemic activation of the coagulation system, which is a part of the functional continuum involving inflammation, angiogenesis, and tissue repair programs, often reactivated in cancer. These responses coevolve with, and contribute to, the malignant process. Cancer coagulopathy is not only a source of comorbidity and mortality in cancer patients, but it also affects the disease biology including processes of tumor growth, initiation, dormancy, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, and therapeutic responsiveness. Notably, genetic and cellular differences between different cancer types are paralleled by a degree of diversity in the related coagulation system perturbations. Although some of these differences may be unspecific, iatrogenic, or indirect in nature, others are affected by oncogenic pathways (RAS, EGFR, HER2, MET, PTEN, and TP53) activated in cancer cells due to driver mutations of critical genes. Such mutations cooperate with hypoxia, cellular differentiation, and other influences to alter the expression of tissue factor, protease-activated receptors (e.g., PAR-1 and PAR-2), coagulation factors (FII and FVII), and other molecules related to the hemostatic system. Oncogenic pathways also control secretion of some of these entities from cancer cells, either as soluble proteins, or as cargo of extracellular vesicles/microparticles. Moreover, emerging evidence suggests that the expression profiles of coagulation-related genes differ between molecularly and genetically distinct subgroups of specific malignancies such as glioblastoma multiforme and medulloblastoma. Certain hereditary thrombophilias may also affect cancer pathogenesis. We suggest that mechanisms of cancer coagulopathy may be more diverse and genetically modulated than hitherto realized. If so, a possibility may exist to deliver more personalized, biologically based, anticoagulation, and thereby improve patient survival. PMID:24599437

  17. Genetic Mapping

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fact Sheets Genetic Mapping En Español: Mapeo Genético Genetic Mapping What is genetic mapping? How do researchers ... genetic map? What are genetic markers? What is genetic mapping? Among the main goals of the Human ...

  18. 46 CFR 176.700 - Permission for repairs and alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...replacement in kind, of electrical wiring, fuel lines, tanks, boilers and other pressure vessels, and steering, propulsion and power supply systems; alterations affecting stability; and repair or alteration of lifesaving, fire...

  19. 46 CFR 115.700 - Permission for repairs and alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...replacement in kind, of electrical wiring, fuel lines, tanks, boilers and other pressure vessels, and steering, propulsion and power supply systems; alterations affecting stability; and repair or alteration of livesaving, fire...

  20. 46 CFR 115.700 - Permission for repairs and alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...replacement in kind, of electrical wiring, fuel lines, tanks, boilers and other pressure vessels, and steering, propulsion and power supply systems; alterations affecting stability; and repair or alteration of livesaving, fire...

  1. 46 CFR 176.700 - Permission for repairs and alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...replacement in kind, of electrical wiring, fuel lines, tanks, boilers and other pressure vessels, and steering, propulsion and power supply systems; alterations affecting stability; and repair or alteration of lifesaving, fire...

  2. The devil is in the details: genetic variation in introduced populations and its contributions to invasion.

    PubMed

    Dlugosch, Katrina M; Anderson, Samantha R; Braasch, Joseph; Cang, F Alice; Gillette, Heather D

    2015-05-01

    The influence of genetic variation on invasion success has captivated researchers since the start of the field of invasion genetics 50 years ago. We review the history of work on this question and conclude that genetic variation-as surveyed with molecular markers-appears to shape invasion rarely. Instead, there is a significant disconnect between marker assays and ecologically relevant genetic variation in introductions. We argue that the potential for adaptation to facilitate invasion will be shaped by the details of genotypes affecting phenotypes, and we highlight three areas in which we see opportunities to make powerful new insights. (i) The genetic architecture of adaptive variation. Traits shaped by large-effect alleles may be strongly impacted by founder events yet more likely to respond to selection when genetic drift is strong. Large-effect loci may be especially relevant for traits involved in biotic interactions. (ii) Cryptic genetic variation exposed during invasion. Introductions have strong potential to uncover masked variation due to alterations in genetic and ecological environments. (iii) Genetic interactions during admixture of multiple source populations. As divergence among sources increases, positive followed by increasingly negative effects of admixture should be expected. Although generally hypothesized to be beneficial during invasion, admixture is most often reported among sources of intermediate divergence, supporting the possibility that incompatibilities among divergent source populations might be limiting their introgression. Finally, we note that these details of invasion genetics can be coupled with comparative demographic analyses to link genetic changes to the evolution of invasiveness itself. PMID:25846825

  3. Genetics Home Reference: 15q24 microdeletion

    MedlinePLUS

    ... affected individuals have been identified. What are the genetic changes related to 15q24 microdeletion? People with a ... Center . Where can I find general information about genetic conditions? The Handbook provides basic information about genetics ...

  4. Pattern Alteration: Shoulder Slope 

    E-print Network

    2006-05-05

    Development and Resource Management Specialists B Pattern Alteration E-381 05-06 efore attempting this alteration, review Extension publications E-372, Principles of Pattern Alteration, and E-373, Personal Measurement Chart, for basic instructions...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: VACTERL association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > VACTERL association On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... Glossary definitions Reviewed December 2011 What is VACTERL association? VACTERL association is a disorder that affects many ...

  6. An Analysis of Factors Affecting Genotyping Success from Museum Specimens Reveals an Increase of Genetic and Morphological Variation during a Historical Range Expansion of a European Spider

    PubMed Central

    Krehenwinkel, Henrik; Pekar, Stano

    2015-01-01

    Natural history collections house an enormous amount of plant and animal specimens, which constitute a promising source for molecular analyses. Storage conditions differ among taxa and can have a dramatic effect on the success of DNA work. Here, we analyze the feasibility of DNA extraction from ethanol preserved spiders (Araneae). We tested genotyping success using several hundred specimens of the wasp spider, Argiope bruennichi, deposited in two large German natural history collections. We tested the influence of different factors on the utility of specimens for genotyping. Our results show that not the specimen’s age, but the museum collection is a major predictor of genotyping success. These results indicate that long term storage conditions should be optimized in natural history museums to assure the utility of collections for DNA work. Using historical material, we also traced historical genetic and morphological variation in the course of a poleward range expansion of A. bruennichi by comparing contemporary and historical specimens from a native and an invasive population in Germany. We show that the invasion of A. bruennichi is tightly correlated with an historical increase of genetic and phenotypic variation in the invasive population. PMID:26309219

  7. Epigenetic Alterations in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Mut, Jose V.; Gräff, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the major cause of dementia in Western societies. It progresses asymptomatically during decades before being belatedly diagnosed when therapeutic strategies have become unviable. Although several genetic alterations have been associated with AD, the vast majority of AD cases do not show strong genetic underpinnings and are thus considered a consequence of non-genetic factors. Epigenetic mechanisms allow for the integration of long-lasting non-genetic inputs on specific genetic backgrounds, and recently, a growing number of epigenetic alterations in AD have been described. For instance, an accumulation of dysregulated epigenetic mechanisms in aging, the predominant risk factor of AD, might facilitate the onset of the disease. Likewise, mutations in several enzymes of the epigenetic machinery have been associated with neurodegenerative processes that are altered in AD such as impaired learning and memory formation. Genome-wide and locus-specific epigenetic alterations have also been reported, and several epigenetically dysregulated genes validated by independent groups. From these studies, a picture emerges of AD as being associated with DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation, suggesting a general repressed chromatin state and epigenetically reduced plasticity in AD. Here we review these recent findings and discuss several technical and methodological considerations that are imperative for their correct interpretation. We also pay particular focus on potential implementations and theoretical frameworks that we expect will help to better direct future studies aimed to unravel the epigenetic participation in AD.

  8. Microsatellite alterations as clonal markers for the detection of human cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Mao, L; Lee, D J; Tockman, M S; Erozan, Y S; Askin, F; Sidransky, D

    1994-01-01

    Microsatellite instability has been reported to be an important feature of tumors from hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC) patients. The recent discovery of genetic instability in small cell lung carcinoma, a neoplasm not associated with HNPCC, led us to investigate the possible presence of microsatellite alterations in other tumor types. We examined 52 microsatellite repeat sequences in the DNA of normal and tumor pairs from 100 head and neck, bladder, and lung cancer patients by the polymerase chain reaction. Although alterations were rare in dinucleotide repeats, larger (tri- or tetranucleotide) repeats were found to be more prone to expansion or deletion. We screened 100 tumors with a panel of nine tri- and tetranucleotide repeat markers and identified 26 (26%) that displayed alterations in at least one locus. This observation prompted us to examine the possibility of using microsatellite alterations as markers to detect clonal tumor-derived cell populations in pathologic samples. The identical microsatellite alterations detected in the primary tumors were successfully identified in corresponding urine, sputum, and surgical margins from affected patients. This study demonstrates that appropriately selected microsatellite loci are commonly altered in many cancers and can serve as clonal markers for their detection. Images PMID:7937908

  9. Genetic selection and preservation of genetic diversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For 100’s of years livestock producers have employed various types of selection to alter livestock populations. Current selection strategies are little different except our technologies for selection have become more powerful. Genetic resources at the breed level have risen and fallen out of favor o...

  10. Genetic basis for recurrent vulvo-vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Martin; Plantinga, Theo S; Joosten, Leo A B; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; Netea, Mihai G

    2013-04-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is a frequent disease affecting more than 75% of all women at least once in their lifetime. Up to 8% of them suffer from recurrent VVC (RVVC) characterized by at least three episodes each year. Several risk factors, such as antibiotic use, diabetes, or pregnancy, are known, but the vast majority of women with RVVC develop the infection without having any risk factor, implying that a genetic component most likely plays an important role in the susceptibility to RVVC. This review summarizes the immunogenetic alterations that lead to an increased susceptibility to vaginal infections with Candida albicans. Different mutations and polymorphisms in innate immune genes alter the mucosal immune response against fungi and are likely to have an important role in susceptibility to RVVC. A better understanding of the genetic and immunological mechanisms leading to RVVC is important for both the understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and the design of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:23354953

  11. Genetic aspects of intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hanaei, Sara; Abdollahzade, Sina; Khoshnevisan, Alireza; Kepler, Christopher K; Rezaei, Nima

    2015-10-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD) is one of the common causes of low back pain. Similar to many other multifactorial diseases, it is affected by environmental and genetic factors. Although not completely understood, genetic factors include a wide spectrum of variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, which could play a significant role in the etiology of this disease. Besides, the interactions with environmental factors could make the role of genetic factors more complicated. Genetic variations in disc components could participate in developing degenerative disc disease through altering the normal homeostasis of discs. Gene polymorphisms in disc proteins (collagens I, II, III, IX, and XI), proteoglycans (aggrecan), cytokines (interleukins I, VI, and X), enzymes (matrix metalloproteinases II, III, and IX), and vitamin D receptor seem to play considerable roles in the pathology of this disease. There are also many other investigated genes that could somehow take part in the process. However, it seems that more studies are needed to clarify the exact role of genetics in IVDD. PMID:25996483

  12. A historical comparison of the development of specialist genetic nursing in the United Kingdom and Japan.

    PubMed

    Skirton, Heather; Arimori, Naoko; Aoki, Mikiko

    2006-12-01

    This paper reports the development of specialist genetic nursing in the UK and Japan. Between 1970 and 1990, significant technical advances in genetic testing occurred. These advances offered many families affected by genetic conditions more choices in diagnostic, predictive, and prenatal testing. It was recognized that genetic testing could significantly alter the life of the family and that supportive health services were required to accompany such testing. Nurses began to offer specialist services in this setting, but considerable professional development was required to ensure practitioners were competent. In the UK, the profession grew slowly over several decades. Concern to establish minimum standards of practice in this new professional setting culminated in the establishment of a set of competencies and a formal registration process. By comparison, in Japan, developments in genetic nursing have occurred over a shorter period of time, but minimum standards of competence already have been agreed upon. PMID:17081149

  13. Stromswold, Evolution & Genetics of Language 1 Genetics and the Evolution of Language: What genetic studies reveal about the evolution

    E-print Network

    Stromswold, Karin

    Stromswold, Evolution & Genetics of Language 1 Genetics and the Evolution of Language: What genetic Abstract. In this paper I argue that genetic studies of language provide insights about the evolution of language. The finding that genetic factors affect all aspects of language is consistent with theories

  14. [Genetically predetermined limitation in the use of HaCaT cells that affects their ability to serve as an experimental model of psoriasis].

    PubMed

    Soboleva, A G; Zolotarenko, A D; Sobolev, V V; Bruskin, S A; Piruzian, E S; Mezentsev, A V

    2014-10-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines TNF, IFNG and ILl7 play an important role in eruption of psoriasis. The activation of epidermal keratinocytes with the named cytokines alters their terminal differentiation program and causes their hyperproliferation in the diseased skin. HaCaT cells, which are immortalized human keratinocytes, are often used as a cellular model of psoriasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in gene expression and the proliferation rates in cultured HaCaT cells treated with TNF, IFNG and IL17. We found that HaCaT cells decrease their proliferation rate in response to either IL17 or a combination TNF and IF-NG. The analysis of microarray data discovered a group of 12 genes, which were downregulated in HaCaT after treatments with the named cytokines and upregulated in psoriatic lesional skin. Eight genes were important for DNA replication and they also contributed to two larger networks that regulated cell progression through the cell cycle. We conclude that HaCaT cells have a sufficient limitation as a cellular model of psoriasis due to their treatment with proinflammatory cytokines, namely TNF, IFNG and IL17 does not increase their proliferation rate. Thus, the studies of psoriasis based on HaCaT cells as an experimental model shall take in account this important phenomenon. PMID:25720254

  15. Genes affecting novel seed constituents in Limnanthes alba Benth: transcriptome analysis of developing embryos and a new genetic map of meadowfoam.

    PubMed

    Slabaugh, Mary B; Cooper, Laurel D; Kishore, Venkata K; Knapp, Steven J; Kling, Jennifer G

    2015-01-01

    The seed oil of meadowfoam, a new crop in the Limnanthaceae family, is highly enriched in very long chain fatty acids that are desaturated at the ?5 position. The unusual oil is desirable for cosmetics and innovative industrial applications and the seed meal remaining after oil extraction contains glucolimnanthin, a methoxylated benzylglucosinolate whose degradation products are herbicidal and anti-microbial. Here we describe EST analysis of the developing seed transcriptome that identified major genes involved in biosynthesis and assembly of the seed oil and in glucosinolate metabolic pathways. mRNAs encoding acyl-CoA ?5 desaturase were notably abundant. The library was searched for simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Fifty-four new SSR markers and eight candidate gene markers were developed and combined with previously developed SSRs to construct a new genetic map for Limnanthes alba. Mapped genes in the lipid biosynthetic pathway encode 3-ketoacyl-CoA synthase (KCS), ?5 desaturase (?5DS), lysophosphatidylacyl-acyl transferase (LPAT), and acyl-CoA diacylglycerol acyl transferase (DGAT). Mapped genes in glucosinolate biosynthetic and degradation pathways encode CYP79A, myrosinase (TGG), and epithiospecifier modifier protein (ESM). The resources developed in this study will further the domestication and improvement of meadowfoam as an oilseed crop. PMID:26038713

  16. Genes affecting novel seed constituents in Limnanthes alba Benth: transcriptome analysis of developing embryos and a new genetic map of meadowfoam

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Laurel D.; Kishore, Venkata K.; Knapp, Steven J.; Kling, Jennifer G.

    2015-01-01

    The seed oil of meadowfoam, a new crop in the Limnanthaceae family, is highly enriched in very long chain fatty acids that are desaturated at the ?5 position. The unusual oil is desirable for cosmetics and innovative industrial applications and the seed meal remaining after oil extraction contains glucolimnanthin, a methoxylated benzylglucosinolate whose degradation products are herbicidal and anti-microbial. Here we describe EST analysis of the developing seed transcriptome that identified major genes involved in biosynthesis and assembly of the seed oil and in glucosinolate metabolic pathways. mRNAs encoding acyl-CoA ?5 desaturase were notably abundant. The library was searched for simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Fifty-four new SSR markers and eight candidate gene markers were developed and combined with previously developed SSRs to construct a new genetic map for Limnanthes alba. Mapped genes in the lipid biosynthetic pathway encode 3-ketoacyl-CoA synthase (KCS), ?5 desaturase (?5DS), lysophosphatidylacyl-acyl transferase (LPAT), and acyl-CoA diacylglycerol acyl transferase (DGAT). Mapped genes in glucosinolate biosynthetic and degradation pathways encode CYP79A, myrosinase (TGG), and epithiospecifier modifier protein (ESM). The resources developed in this study will further the domestication and improvement of meadowfoam as an oilseed crop. PMID:26038713

  17. Genetic variation in the GDNF promoter affects its expression and modifies the severity of Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) in rats carrying Ednrb(sl) mutations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jieping; Dang, Ruihua; Torigoe, Daisuke; Li, Anqi; Lei, Chuzhao; Sasaki, Nobuya; Wang, Jinxi; Agui, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is necessary for the migration of neural crest stem cells in the gut. However, mutations in GDNF per se are deemed neither necessary nor sufficient to cause Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR). In a previous study, a modifier locus on chromosome 2 in rats carrying Ednrb(sl) mutations was identified, and several mutations in the putative regulatory region of the Gdnf gene in AGH-Ednrb(sl) rats were detected. Specifically, the mutation -232C>T has been shown to be strongly associated with the severity of HSCR. In the present study, the influence of genetic variations on the transcription of the Gdnf gene was tested using dual-luciferase assay. Results showed that the mutation -613C>T, located near the mutation -232C>T in AGH-Ednrb(sl) rats, decreased Gdnf transcription in an in vitro dual-luciferase expression assay. These data suggested an important role of -613C in Gdnf transcription. Expression levels of the Gdnf gene may modify the severity of HSCR in rats carrying Ednrb(sl) mutations. PMID:26318480

  18. A bottle of beer, a glass of wine or a shot of whiskey? Can the rate of alcohol-induced harm be affected by altering the population's beverage choices?

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Pia; Hellman, Matilda; Kerr, William; Room, Robin

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes and puts into context the findings from the five articles contained in this thematic issue. The question of interest has been the connection between different beverage types and alcohol-induced harm. The key question is whether policy makers can affect rates of harm by affecting beverage choice. In the discussion, four different potential pathways for such an effect are differentiated. The first is the direct effect of the beverage over and above the effect of the ethanol it contains. The review of results suggests that the size of this effect may be modest, and it is clearly overmatched by cultural factors relating to who chooses to drink which beverage and how. However, even more relevant than the direct effect may be the other three mechanisms, which potentially affect the amounts of alcohol drunk or allow the influencing of drinker groups of interest. PMID:24431477

  19. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 7 Controls mRNA Synthesis by Affecting Stability of Preinitiation Complexes, Leading to Altered Gene Expression, Cell Cycle Progression, and Survival of Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kelso, Timothy W. R.; Baumgart, Karen; Eickhoff, Jan; Albert, Thomas; Antrecht, Claudia; Lemcke, Sarah; Klebl, Bert

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7) activates cell cycle CDKs and is a member of the general transcription factor TFIIH. Although there is substantial evidence for an active role of CDK7 in mRNA synthesis and associated processes, the degree of its influence on global and gene-specific transcription in mammalian species is unclear. In the current study, we utilize two novel inhibitors with high specificity for CDK7 to demonstrate a restricted but robust impact of CDK7 on gene transcription in vivo and in in vitro-reconstituted reactions. We distinguish between relative low- and high-dose responses and relate them to distinct molecular mechanisms and altered physiological responses. Low inhibitor doses cause rapid clearance of paused RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules and sufficed to cause genome-wide alterations in gene expression, delays in cell cycle progression at both the G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, and diminished survival of human tumor cells. Higher doses and prolonged inhibition led to strong reductions in RNAPII carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) phosphorylation, eventual activation of the p53 program, and increased cell death. Together, our data reason for a quantitative contribution of CDK7 to mRNA synthesis, which is critical for cellular homeostasis. PMID:25047832

  20. Temperature Alters Host Genotype-Specific Susceptibility to Chytrid Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gsell, Alena S.; de Senerpont Domis, Lisette N.; van Donk, Ellen; Ibelings, Bas W.

    2013-01-01

    The cost of parasitism often depends on environmental conditions and host identity. Therefore, variation in the biotic and abiotic environment can have repercussions on both, species-level host-parasite interaction patterns but also on host genotype-specific susceptibility to disease. We exposed seven genetically different but concurrent strains of the diatom Asterionella formosa to one genotype of its naturally co-occurring chytrid parasite Zygorhizidium planktonicum across five environmentally relevant temperatures. We found that the thermal tolerance range of the tested parasite genotype was narrower than that of its host, providing the host with a “cold” and “hot” thermal refuge of very low or no infection. Susceptibility to disease was host genotype-specific and varied with temperature level so that no genotype was most or least resistant across all temperatures. This suggests a role of thermal variation in the maintenance of diversity in disease related traits in this phytoplankton host. The duration and intensity of chytrid parasite pressure on host populations is likely to be affected by the projected changes in temperature patterns due to climate warming both through altering temperature dependent disease susceptibility of the host and, potentially, through en- or disabling thermal host refugia. This, in turn may affect the selective strength of the parasite on the genetic architecture of the host population. PMID:23990982

  1. Exclusion of PAX9 and MSX1 mutation in six families affected by tooth agenesis. A genetic study and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Manzanares-Céspedes, Maria C.; Carvalho-Lobato, Patricia; Valdivia-Gandur, Ivan; Arte, Sirpa; Nieminen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: In the present study, it is described the phenotypical analysis and the mutational screening, for genes PAX9 and MSX1, of six families affected by severe forms of tooth agenesis associated with other dental anomalies and systemic entities. Study Design: Six families affected by severe tooth agenesis associated with other dental anomalies and systemic entities were included. Oral exploration, radiological examination, medical antecedents consideration and mutational screening for PAX9 and MSX1 were carried out. Results: No mutations were discovered despite the fact that numerous teeth were missing. An important phenotypical variability was observed within the probands, not being possible to establish a parallelism with the patterns associated to previously described PAX9 and MSX1 mutations. Conclusions: These results bring us to conclude that probably other genes can determine phenotypical patterns of dental agenesis in the families studied, different than the ones described in the mutations of PAX9 and MSX1. Moreover, epigenetic factors can be involved, as those that can reduce gene dosage and other post-transcriptional modulation agents, causing dental agenesis associated or not with systemic anomalies. Key words:Maxillofacial development, tooth agenesis, PAX9 gene, MSX1 gene, gene mutation. PMID:24316698

  2. Cancer Genetics and Prevention: 08/2013 CANCER GENETICS & PREVENTION

    E-print Network

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    . Recessive means that both copies of the MUTYH gene must be altered in order to cause MAP. In other words of the two copies of the MUTYH gene, one inherited from each parent. Most individuals with MAP will develop Genetics and Prevention: 08/2013 Carriers of one altered copy of the MUTYH gene About 1-2% of individuals

  3. Key Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms in Chemical Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ravegnini, Gloria; Sammarini, Gulia; Hrelia, Patrizia; Angelini, Sabrina

    2015-11-01

    DNA sequence and genetic factors alone cannot fully explain the many processes implicated in diseases initiation and development. It is now well understood that additional factors are involved in a final resulting phenotype. Epigenetic modifications, heritable changes not affecting the DNA sequence, are a key phenomenon at the basis of normal growth and differentiation. However, these can be defective leading to diseases, such as cancer. An increasing body of literature reports the environmental and occupational exposure to a mixture of natural and man-produced substances leading to epigenetic alterations. The identification of key genetic and/or epigenetic events involved in chemical carcinogenesis is an important step towards the discovery of biomarkers that can be used to evaluate the exposure, predict biological effects, and prevent adverse health consequences. Here, we focus on epidemiological studies to review the most recent advances in understanding genetic and epigenetic factors in relation to particulate matter, benzene and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposure. PMID:26500287

  4. 78 FR 66891 - Monsanto Co.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Soybean Genetically Engineered for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  5. 76 FR 78232 - Monsanto Co.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Soybean Genetically Engineered To Have a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  6. 78 FR 13302 - Syngenta Biotechnology, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Corn Genetically Engineered...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  7. 75 FR 29969 - Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Sugar Beet Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  8. 76 FR 63279 - Monsanto Co.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Soybean Genetically Engineered for Insect...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  9. 77 FR 41350 - Monsanto Co.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Soybean Genetically Engineered To Produce...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  10. 76 FR 80869 - Monsanto Co.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Corn Genetically Engineered for Drought...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  11. 75 FR 1585 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-12

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  12. 78 FR 37201 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Maize Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  13. 76 FR 39812 - Scotts Miracle-Gro Co.; Regulatory Status of Kentucky Bluegrass Genetically Engineered for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  14. 75 FR 68321 - Forage Genetics International; Supplemental Request for Partial Deregulation of Roundup Ready...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  15. 75 FR 32356 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  16. 76 FR 5780 - Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically Engineered for Tolerance to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  17. 75 FR 20560 - Syngenta Biotechnology, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Corn Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  18. 76 FR 37767 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Corn Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  19. 78 FR 23738 - Monsanto Company and Forage Genetics International (FGI); Availability of Petition for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  20. A functional variant that affects exon-skipping and protein expression of SP140 as genetic mechanism predisposing to multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Matesanz, Fuencisla; Potenciano, Victor; Fedetz, Maria; Ramos-Mozo, Priscila; Abad-Grau, María del Mar; Karaky, Mohamad; Barrionuevo, Cristina; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Ruiz-Peña, Juan Luis; García-Sánchez, María Isabel; Lucas, Miguel; Fernández, Óscar; Leyva, Laura; Otaegui, David; Muñoz-Culla, Maider; Olascoaga, Javier; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Alloza, Iraide; Astobiza, Ianire; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Villar, Luisa María; Álvarez-Cermeño, José Carlos; Malhotra, Sunny; Comabella, Manuel; Montalban, Xavier; Saiz, Albert; Blanco, Yolanda; Arroyo, Rafael; Varadé, Jezabel; Urcelay, Elena; Alcina, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Several variants in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) at the SP140 locus have been associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), Crohn's disease (CD) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). To determine the causal polymorphism, we have integrated high-density data sets of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL), using GEUVADIS RNA sequences and 1000 Genomes genotypes, with MS-risk variants of the high-density Immunochip array performed by the International Multiple Sclerosis Genetic Consortium (IMSGC). The variants most associated with MS were also correlated with a decreased expression of the full-length RNA isoform of SP140 and an increase of an isoform lacking exon 7. By exon splicing assay, we have demonstrated that the rs28445040 variant was the causal factor for skipping of exon 7. Western blots of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from MS patients showed a significant allele-dependent reduction of the SP140 protein expression. To confirm the association of this functional variant with MS and to compare it with the best-associated variant previously reported by GWAS (rs10201872), a case-control study including 4384 MS patients and 3197 controls was performed. Both variants, in strong LD (r(2) = 0.93), were found similarly associated with MS [P-values, odds ratios: 1.9E-9, OR = 1.35 (1.22-1.49) and 4.9E-10, OR = 1.37 (1.24-1.51), respectively]. In conclusion, our data uncover the causal variant for the SP140 locus and the molecular mechanism associated with MS risk. In addition, this study and others previously reported strongly suggest that this functional variant may be shared with other immune-mediated diseases as CD and CLL. PMID:26152201

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Cherubism

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with cherubism have few, if any, signs and symptoms affecting other parts of the body. Rarely, however, this condition occurs as part of another genetic disorder. For example, cherubism can occur with Ramon syndrome, ...

  2. MPA-capped CdTe quantum dots exposure causes neurotoxic effects in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans by affecting the transporters and receptors of glutamate, serotonin and dopamine at the genetic level, or by increasing ROS, or both.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tianshu; He, Keyu; Zhan, Qinglin; Ang, Shengjun; Ying, Jiali; Zhang, Shihan; Zhang, Ting; Xue, Yuying; Tang, Meng

    2015-12-28

    As quantum dots (QDs) are widely used in biomedical applications, the number of studies focusing on their biological properties is increasing. While several studies have attempted to evaluate the toxicity of QDs towards neural cells, the in vivo toxic effects on the nervous system and the molecular mechanisms are unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neurotoxic effects and the underlying mechanisms of water-soluble cadmium telluride (CdTe) QDs capped with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). Our results showed that exposure to MPA-capped CdTe QDs induced behavioral defects, including alterations to body bending, head thrashing, pharyngeal pumping and defecation intervals, as well as impaired learning and memory behavior plasticity, based on chemotaxis or thermotaxis, in a dose-, time- and size-dependent manner. Further investigations suggested that MPA-capped CdTe QDs exposure inhibited the transporters and receptors of glutamate, serotonin and dopamine in C. elegans at the genetic level within 24 h, while opposite results were observed after 72 h. Additionally, excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was observed in the CdTe QD-treated worms, which confirmed the common nanotoxicity mechanism of oxidative stress damage, and might overcome the increased gene expression of neurotransmitter transporters and receptors in C. elegans induced by long-term QD exposure, resulting in more severe behavioral impairments. PMID:26583374

  3. Epigenetics and Epigenetic Alterations in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Omura, Noriyuki; Goggins, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a major therapeutic challenge. In 2008, there will be approximately 37,680 new cases and 34,290 deaths attributable to pancreatic cancer in the United States (U.S.), making it the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death. Recent comprehensive pancreatic cancer genome project found that pancreatic adenocarcinomas harbored 63 intragenic mutations or amplifications/homozygous deletions and these alterations clustered in 12 signaling pathways. In addition to widespread genetic alterations, it is now apparent that epigenetic mechanisms are also central to the evolution and progression of human cancers. Since epigenetic silencing processes are mitotically heritable, they can drive neoplastic progression and undergo the same selective pressure as genetic alterations. This review will describe recent developments in cancer epigenetics and their importance in our understanding of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. PMID:19158989

  4. A genetic study of autism in Costa Rica: multiple variables affecting IQ scores observed in a preliminary sample of autistic cases

    PubMed Central

    McInnes, L Alison; González, Patricia Jiménez; Manghi, Elina R; Esquivel, Marcela; Monge, Silvia; Delgado, Marietha Fallas; Fournier, Eduardo; Bondy, Pamela; Castelle, Kathryn

    2005-01-01

    Background Autism is a heritable developmental disorder of communication and socialization that has not been well studied in Hispanic populations. Therefore, we are collecting and evaluating all possible cases of autism from a population isolate in the Central Valley of Costa Rica (CVCR) for a clinical and genetic study. Methods We are assessing all subjects and parents, as appropriate, using the newly translated Spanish versions of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) as well as tests of intelligence and adaptive behavior. Detailed obstetric and family medical/psychiatric histories are taken. All cases are tested for Fragile X and will be extensively evaluated for cytogenetic abnormalities. Results To date we have obtained clinical evaluations on over 76 cases of possible autism referred to our study and report data for the initial 35 complete cases. The mean age of the probands is 6.7 years, and 31 of the 35 cases are male. Twenty-one of the cases have IQs <50 and only 6 cases have IQs ? 70. Over half of the mothers had complications during pregnancy and/or delivery. No cases have tested positively for Fragile X or PKU. Chromosomal G-banding is not yet complete for all cases. Conclusion Diagnostic data gathered on cases of autism in the CVCR using Spanish versions of the ADI-R and ADOS look similar to that generated by studies of English-speaking cases. However, only 17% of our cases have IQs within the normal range, compared to the figure of 25% seen in most studies. This result reflects an ascertainment bias in that only severe cases of autism come to treatment in the CVCR because there are no government-sponsored support programs or early intervention programs providing an incentive to diagnose autism. The severity of mental retardation seen in most of our cases may also be exaggerated by the lack of early intervention programs and the use of IQ tests without Costa Rican norms. Still, we must formally train healthcare providers and teachers to recognize and refer autistic cases with normal or near normal IQs that are not seen in treatment. PMID:15780135

  5. Genetics of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Wangari-Talbot, Janet; Chen, Suzie

    2013-01-01

    Genomic variation is a trend observed in various human diseases including cancer. Genetic studies have set out to understand how and why these variations result in cancer, why some populations are pre-disposed to the disease, and also how genetics affect drug responses. The melanoma incidence has been increasing at an alarming rate worldwide. The burden posed by melanoma has made it a necessity to understand the fundamental signaling pathways involved in this deadly disease. Signaling cascades such as mitogen-activated protein kinase and PI3K/AKT have been shown to be crucial in the regulation of processes that are commonly dysregulated during cancer development such as aberrant proliferation, loss of cell cycle control, impaired apoptosis, and altered drug metabolism. Understanding how these and other oncogenic pathways are regulated has been integral in our challenge to develop potent anti-melanoma drugs. With advances in technology and especially in next generation sequencing, we have been able to explore melanoma genomes and exomes leading to the identification of previously unknown genes with functions in melanomagenesis such as GRIN2A and PREX2. The therapeutic potential of these novel candidate genes is actively being pursued with some presenting as druggable targets while others serve as indicators of therapeutic responses. In addition, the analysis of the mutational signatures of melanoma tumors continues to cement the causative role of UV exposure in melanoma pathogenesis. It has become distinctly clear that melanomas from sun-exposed skin areas have distinct mutational signatures including C to T transitions indicative of UV-induced damage. It is thus necessary to continue spreading awareness on how to decrease the risk factors of developing the disease while at the same time working for a cure. Given the large amount of information gained from these sequencing studies, it is likely that in the future, treatment of melanoma will follow a highly personalized route that takes into account the differential mutational signatures of each individual’s cancer. PMID:23372575

  6. Genetic relatedness and netB prevalence among environmental Clostridium perfringens strains associated with a broiler flock affected by mild necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Engström, Björn E; Johansson, Anders; Aspan, Anna; Kaldhusdal, Magne

    2012-09-14

    In a previous study we investigated pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) genotype diversity and prevalence of the netB toxin gene in Clostridium perfringens (CP) isolates recovered from a broiler flock (flock 1) affected by necrotic enteritis (NE). In this follow-up work, we examined samples collected before placement of flock 1, to see if NE during rearing could be traced back to the cleaned and empty building or the day-old chicks. Litter from the next flock in the same building (flock 2) was also examined. We detected 25 different PFGE genotypes, five of which were found only in litter from flock 2. Six genotypes which had been found in flock 1 during rearing were detected in samples collected before placement. NetB positive isolates belonging to two of these genotypes had been recovered from NE lesions during rearing, suggesting that virulent strains were transmitted from the cleaned and disinfected broiler house. NetB frequency among isolates from the empty building was 45%, indicating that netB positive strains were prevalent in a building that previously had housed a healthy flock offered in-feed narasin (flock 0). NetB frequency among isolates from litter used by flock 2 was 22%, indicating that netB positive strains were present in the environment of a 14-days-old healthy flock offered in-feed narasin. Two prevalent genotypes were consistently either netB negative or netB positive. However, the presence of genotypes represented by both negative and positive isolates may suggest that the gene can spread horizontally among different CP strains. PMID:22516191

  7. Genetic interaction analysis of point mutations enables interrogation of gene function at a residue-level resolution: exploring the applications of high-resolution genetic interaction mapping of point mutations.

    PubMed

    Braberg, Hannes; Moehle, Erica A; Shales, Michael; Guthrie, Christine; Krogan, Nevan J

    2014-07-01

    We have achieved a residue-level resolution of genetic interaction mapping - a technique that measures how the function of one gene is affected by the alteration of a second gene - by analyzing point mutations. Here, we describe how to interpret point mutant genetic interactions, and outline key applications for the approach, including interrogation of protein interaction interfaces and active sites, and examination of post-translational modifications. Genetic interaction analysis has proven effective for characterizing cellular processes; however, to date, systematic high-throughput genetic interaction screens have relied on gene deletions or knockdowns, which limits the resolution of gene function analysis and poses problems for multifunctional genes. Our point mutant approach addresses these issues, and further provides a tool for in vivo structure-function analysis that complements traditional biophysical methods. We also discuss the potential for genetic interaction mapping of point mutations in human cells and its application to personalized medicine. PMID:24842270

  8. Copyright 2008 by the Genetics Society of America DOI: 10.1534/genetics.107.085449

    E-print Network

    Jiggins, Francis

    Copyright Ó 2008 by the Genetics Society of America DOI: 10.1534/genetics.107.085449 Genetic February 11, 2008 ABSTRACT In natural populations, genetic variation affects resistance to disease. Knowing how much variation exists, and understanding the genetic architecture of this variation, is important

  9. Genetic interaction analysis of point mutations enables interrogation of gene function at a residue-level resolution

    PubMed Central

    Braberg, Hannes; Moehle, Erica A.; Shales, Michael; Guthrie, Christine; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2014-01-01

    We have achieved a residue-level resolution of genetic interaction mapping – a technique that measures how the function of one gene is affected by the alteration of a second gene – by analyzing point mutations. Here, we describe how to interpret point mutant genetic interactions, and outline key applications for the approach, including interrogation of protein interaction interfaces and active sites, and examination of post-translational modifications. Genetic interaction analysis has proven effective for characterizing cellular processes; however, to date, systematic high-throughput genetic interaction screens have relied on gene deletions or knockdowns, which limits the resolution of gene function analysis and poses problems for multifunctional genes. Our point mutant approach addresses these issues, and further provides a tool for in vivo structure-function analysis that complements traditional biophysical methods. We also discuss the potential for genetic interaction mapping of point mutations in human cells and its application to personalized medicine. PMID:24842270

  10. QTL mapping of genetic determinants of lipoprotein metabolism in mice: Mutations of the apolipoprotein A-II gene affecting lipoprotein turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Weinreb, A.; Purcell-Huynh, D.A.; Castellani, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    Cholesterol and lipoproteins represent important risk factors for atherosclerosis. In order to better understand the genes involved in determining lipoprotein levels, quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed using a cross between NZB and SM/J mice. Significant LOD scores for loci determining total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL and VLDL cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, and apolipoprotein A-II (apoA-II) were obtained. NZB mice have a 7-10 fold higher apoA-II level SM/J. LOD scores of 19.6 (chow) and 10.3 (high fat) were obtained at the apoA-II gene locus. Comparison of apoA-II levels by apoA-II genotype reveals that {approximately}30% of the variance in apoA-II levels can be accounted for by differences within the apoA-II gene. Northern analysis of mRNA from NZB and SM/J mice fed a high fat diet failed to show any significant differences in mRNA levels. The rates of apoA-II protein synthesis relative to total protein synthesis between the two strains were similar, with a rate of 0.16% for NZB and 0.18% for SM/J. Sequencing of NZB and SM/J apoA-II cDNAs revealed a pro5 to gln5 substitution in SM/J. Therefore, differences in the apoA-II levels between NZB and SM/J may be partly due to a structural difference in apoA-II resulting in an increased rate of apoA-II clearance in SM/J. A coincident QTL for HDL at the same chromosome 1 locus suggests that a structural difference in apoA-II may be affecting the rate of HDL clearance. It is of interest to note that the pro5 to gln5 substitution leads to apoA-II amyloid deposition in the SAM mouse.

  11. New Genetics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NIGMS Home > Science Education > The New Genetics The New Genetics Living Laboratories Classroom Poster Order a Free ... Different Computing Genetics Model Organisms RNA Interference The New Genetics is a science education booklet explains the ...

  12. Genetic Counseling

    MedlinePLUS

    Genetic counseling provides information and support to people who have, or may be at risk for, genetic disorders. ... genetic testing. There are many reasons to seek genetic counseling. You may consider it if you Have a ...

  13. Alterations of Neocortical Pyramidal Neurons: Turning Points in the Genesis of Mental Retardation

    PubMed Central

    Granato, Alberto; De Giorgio, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons (PNs) represent the majority of neocortical cells and their involvement in cognitive functions is decisive. Therefore, they are the most obvious target of developmental disorders characterized by mental retardation. Genetic and non-genetic forms of intellectual disability share a few basic pathogenetic signatures that result in the anomalous function of PNs. Here, we review the key mechanisms impairing these neurons and their participation in the cortical network, with special focus on experimental models of fetal exposure to alcohol. Due to the heterogeneity of PNs, some alterations affect selectively a given cell population, which may also differ depending on the considered pathology. These specific features open new possibilities for the interpretation of cognitive defects observed in mental retardation syndromes, as well as for novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:25157343

  14. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy

    2015-04-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08?×?10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  15. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    PubMed Central

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; van ’t Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Jönsson, Erik G.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10?33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  16. Naloxone treatment alters gene expression in the mesolimbic reward system in 'junk food' exposed offspring in a sex-specific manner but does not affect food preferences in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Gugusheff, J R; Ong, Z Y; Muhlhausler, B S

    2014-06-22

    We have previously reported that the opioid receptor blocker, naloxone, is less effective in reducing palatable food intake in offspring exposed to a maternal cafeteria diet during the perinatal period, implicating a desensitization of the central opioid pathway in the programming of food preferences. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of a maternal cafeteria diet and naloxone treatment on the development of the mesolimbic reward pathway and food choices in adulthood. We measured mRNA expression of key components of the reward pathway (mu-opioid receptor, proenkephalin, tyrosine hydroxylase, D1 and D2 receptors and the dopamine active transporter (DAT)) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) of the offspring of control and cafeteria fed (JF) dams at weaning and after a 10-day naloxone treatment post-weaning and determined food preferences in adulthood in the remaining offspring. Naloxone treatment decreased the expression of DAT by 8.2 fold in female control offspring but increased it by 4.3 fold in female offspring of JF dams relative to the saline-injected reference groups. Proenkephalin mRNA expression was higher in the NAc of female JF offspring compared to controls, independent of naloxone treatment (P<0.05). There was no effect of naloxone treatment on food preferences in adulthood in either control or JF offspring. These data indicate that prenatal exposure to a cafeteria diet alters the impact of opioid signaling blockade in the early post-weaning period on gene expression in the central reward pathway in a sex specific manner, but that these changes in gene expression do not appear to have any persistent impact on food preferences in adulthood. PMID:24727340

  17. Genetic diversity in the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis: molecular mechanisms and biological consequences

    PubMed Central

    Tribble, Gena D; Kerr, Jennifer E; Wang, Bing-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium that colonizes the human oral cavity. It is implicated in the development of periodontitis, a chronic periodontal disease affecting half of the adult population in the USA. To survive in the oral cavity, these bacteria must colonize dental plaque biofilms in competition with other bacterial species. Long-term survival requires P. gingivalis to evade host immune responses, while simultaneously adapting to the changing physiology of the host and to alterations in the plaque biofilm. In reflection of this highly variable niche, P. gingivalis is a genetically diverse species and in this review the authors summarize genetic diversity as it relates to pathogenicity in P. gingivalis. Recent studies revealing a variety of mechanisms by which adaptive changes in genetic content can occur are also reviewed. Understanding the genetic plasticity of P. gingivalis will provide a better framework for understanding the host–microbe interactions associated with periodontal disease. PMID:23642116

  18. Evaluating affective interactions: Alternatives to asking what users feel

    E-print Network

    Evaluating affective interactions: Alternatives to asking what users feel Rosalind W. Picard in research directed towards adding an affective component to human computer interaction. The ability believable interactions or alter internal behavior based on the user's affect. Evaluating and interpreting

  19. Mesenchymal-like pancreatic cancer cells harbor specific genomic alterations more frequently than their epithelial-like counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Arkadeep; Cherba, David; Bartlam, Heather; Lenkiewicz, Elizabeth; Evers, Lisa; Barrett, Michael T.; Haab, Brian B.

    2014-01-01

    The aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer is associated with the acquisition of mesenchymal characteristics by a subset of pancreatic cancer cells. The factors driving the development of this subset are not well understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that acquisition of a mesenchymal phenotype occurs selectively in tumor cells that harbor specific enabling genetic alterations. We obtained whole-genome comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) measurements on pancreatic cancer cell lines that have either an epithelial-like (17 cell lines) or a mesenchymal-like (9 cell lines) phenotype in vitro. The total amounts of amplifications and deletions were equivalent between the epithelial and mesenchymal groups, but 20 genes showed a major difference between the groups in prevalence of alterations. All 20 alterations (18 deletions and 2 amplifications) were more prevalent in the mesenchymal group, confirming the advanced nature of this cellular subtype. CDKN2A was altered in more than 50% of both groups, but co-deletions in neighboring genes, and concomitant loss of gene expression, were more prevalent in the mesenchymal group, suggesting that the size of the loss around CDKN2A affects cell phenotype. Whole-genome CGH on 11 primary cancer tissues revealed that the 20 genes were altered at a higher prevalence (up to 55% of the cases for certain genes) than randomly-selected sets of 20 genes, with the same direction of alteration as in the cell lines. These findings support the concept that specific genetic alterations enable phenotype plasticity and provide promising candidate genes for further research. PMID:24837184

  20. Monitoring adaptive genetic responses to environmental change.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Michael M; Olivieri, Isabelle; Waller, Donald M; Nielsen, Einar E

    2012-03-01

    Widespread environmental changes including climate change, selective harvesting and landscape alterations now greatly affect selection regimes for most organisms. How animals and plants can adapt to these altered environments via contemporary evolution is thus of strong interest. We discuss how to use genetic monitoring to study adaptive responses via repeated analysis of the same populations over time, distinguishing between phenotypic and molecular genetics approaches. After describing monitoring designs, we develop explicit criteria for demonstrating adaptive responses, which include testing for selection and establishing clear links between genetic and environmental change. We then review a few exemplary studies that explore adaptive responses to climate change in Drosophila, selective responses to hunting and fishing, and contemporary evolution in Daphnia using resurrected resting eggs. We further review a broader set of 44 studies to assess how well they meet the proposed criteria, and conclude that only 23% fulfill all criteria. Approximately half (43%) of these studies failed to rule out the alternative hypothesis of replacement by a different, better-adapted population. Likewise, 34% of the studies based on phenotypic variation did not test for selection as opposed to drift. These shortcomings can be addressed via improved experimental designs and statistical testing. We foresee monitoring of adaptive responses as a future valuable tool in conservation biology, for identifying populations unable to evolve at sufficiently high rates and for identifying possible donor populations for genetic rescue. Technological advances will further augment the realization of this potential, especially next-generation sequencing technologies that allow for monitoring at the level of whole genomes. PMID:22269082

  1. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Nora, J.J.; Fraser, F.C.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a discussion of medical genetics for the practitioner treating or counseling patients with genetic disease. It includes a discussion of the relationship of heredity and diseases, the chromosomal basis for heredity, gene frequencies, and genetics of development and maldevelopment. The authors also focus on teratology, somatic cell genetics, genetics and cancer, genetics of behavior.

  2. Understanding GINA and How GINA Affects Nurses.

    PubMed

    Delk, Kayla L

    2015-11-01

    The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) is a federal law that became fully effective in 2009 and is intended to prevent employers and health insurers from discriminating against individuals based on their genetic or family history. The article discusses the sections of GINA, what information constitutes genetic information, who enforces GINA, and scenarios in which GINA does not apply. Also discussed are the instances in which an employer may request genetic information from employees, including wellness or genetic monitoring programs. Finally, the article offers a look at how GINA affects nurses who are administering wellness or genetic monitoring programs on behalf of employers. PMID:26089113

  3. Chemosensory alterations and cancer therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoshuk, L.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Taste and olfaction provide sensory information and sensory pleasure. Cancer therapies affect both. Chemotherapy has not been shown to produce dramatic losses of taste or smell, but systematic studies on various chemotherapeutic agents and types of cancer are lacking. Radiation therapy does produce clear losses of both taste and smell. Both chemotherapy and radiation therapy alter the pleasure produced by taste and smell through the formation of conditioned aversions. That is, foods consumed in proximity with the nausea of therapy come to be unpleasant. The impact of conditioned aversions can be diminished by providing a scapegoat food just before therapy. Alterations in foods may be beneficial to the cancer patient. Increasing the concentrations of flavor ingredients can compensate for sensory losses, and providing pureed foods that retain the cognitive integrity of a meal can benefit the patient who has chewing or swallowing problems.

  4. During the long way to Mars: effects of 520 days of confinement (Mars500) on the assessment of affective stimuli and stage alteration in mood and plasma hormone levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Jing, Xiaolu; Lv, Ke; Wu, Bin; Bai, Yanqiang; Luo, Yuejia; Chen, Shanguang; Li, Yinghui

    2014-01-01

    For future interplanetary manned spaceflight, mental issues, as well as physiological problems, must inevitably be considered and solved. Mars500 is a high-fidelity ground simulation experiment that involved 520 days of confined isolation for six multinational crewmembers. This experiment provided a good opportunity to perform psycho-physiological and psycho-social researches on such missions. To investigate emotional responses and psychological adaptation over long-term confinement, the International Affective Pictures System (IAPS) was selected as the visual emotional stimuli in this study. Additional data collected and analyzed included the Profile of Mood States (POMS) questionnaire and the levels of four types of plasma hormones: cortisol, 5-hydroxy tryptamine, dopamine, and norepinephrine. The results demonstrated an obvious bias on valence rating for unpleasant stimuli with time (p<0.05), and the correlation between psychological and biochemical data was identified (p<0.05). Overall, we concluded that the confined crew tended to assign positive ratings to negative pictures with time, which might be driven by a defensive system. There was a stage-changing pattern of psychological adaptation of the Mars500 crew, which is similar to the third-quarter phenomenon. PMID:24695321

  5. During the Long Way to Mars: Effects of 520 Days of Confinement (Mars500) on the Assessment of Affective Stimuli and Stage Alteration in Mood and Plasma Hormone Levels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Jing, Xiaolu; Lv, Ke; Wu, Bin; Bai, Yanqiang; Luo, Yuejia; Chen, Shanguang; Li, Yinghui

    2014-01-01

    For future interplanetary manned spaceflight, mental issues, as well as physiological problems, must inevitably be considered and solved. Mars500 is a high-fidelity ground simulation experiment that involved 520 days of confined isolation for six multinational crewmembers. This experiment provided a good opportunity to perform psycho-physiological and psycho-social researches on such missions. To investigate emotional responses and psychological adaptation over long-term confinement, the International Affective Pictures System (IAPS) was selected as the visual emotional stimuli in this study. Additional data collected and analyzed included the Profile of Mood States (POMS) questionnaire and the levels of four types of plasma hormones: cortisol, 5-hydroxy tryptamine, dopamine, and norepinephrine. The results demonstrated an obvious bias on valence rating for unpleasant stimuli with time (p<0.05), and the correlation between psychological and biochemical data was identified (p<0.05). Overall, we concluded that the confined crew tended to assign positive ratings to negative pictures with time, which might be driven by a defensive system. There was a stage-changing pattern of psychological adaptation of the Mars500 crew, which is similar to the third-quarter phenomenon. PMID:24695321

  6. Nosology, epidemiology and genetics of schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuang, M.T.; Simpson, J.C. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 25 selections. Some of the titles are: The genetics of schizophrenia: An overview; The genetics of schizo-affective disorder and the schizophrenia spectrum; Mathematical models of genetic transmission; and Genetic studies of biochemical, pathophysiological and pharmacological factors in schizophrenia.

  7. REGION-WIDE GENETIC STRUCTURE OF THE CENTRAL STONEROLLER (CAMPOSTOMA ANOMALUM) AND THE RELATIONSHIP OF GENETIC DIVERSITY TO ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic stressors that reduce population size, alter migration corridors or modify mutational and selective forces on populations are expected to leave a lasting genetic footprint on the distribution of intraspecific genetic variation. Thus, the pattern of intraspecific gen...

  8. Inhibition of oxidative metabolism leads to p53 genetic inactivation and transformation in neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bartesaghi, Stefano; Graziano, Vincenzo; Galavotti, Sara; Henriquez, Nick V.; Betts, Joanne; Saxena, Jayeta; Minieri, Valentina; A, Deli; Karlsson, Anna; Martins, L. Miguel; Capasso, Melania; Nicotera, Pierluigi; Brandner, Sebastian; De Laurenzi, Vincenzo; Salomoni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Alterations of mitochondrial metabolism and genomic instability have been implicated in tumorigenesis in multiple tissues. High-grade glioma (HGG), one of the most lethal human neoplasms, displays genetic modifications of Krebs cycle components as well as electron transport chain (ETC) alterations. Furthermore, the p53 tumor suppressor, which has emerged as a key regulator of mitochondrial respiration at the expense of glycolysis, is genetically inactivated in a large proportion of HGG cases. Therefore, it is becoming evident that genetic modifications can affect cell metabolism in HGG; however, it is currently unclear whether mitochondrial metabolism alterations could vice versa promote genomic instability as a mechanism for neoplastic transformation. Here, we show that, in neural progenitor/stem cells (NPCs), which can act as HGG cell of origin, inhibition of mitochondrial metabolism leads to p53 genetic inactivation. Impairment of respiration via inhibition of complex I or decreased mitochondrial DNA copy number leads to p53 genetic loss and a glycolytic switch. p53 genetic inactivation in ETC-impaired neural stem cells is caused by increased reactive oxygen species and associated oxidative DNA damage. ETC-impaired cells display a marked growth advantage in the presence or absence of oncogenic RAS, and form undifferentiated tumors when transplanted into the mouse brain. Finally, p53 mutations correlated with alterations in ETC subunit composition and activity in primary glioma-initiating neural stem cells. Together, these findings provide previously unidentified insights into the relationship between mitochondria, genomic stability, and tumor suppressive control, with implications for our understanding of brain cancer pathogenesis. PMID:25583481

  9. 78 FR 25941 - Stine Seed Farm, Inc.; Extension of a Determination of Nonregulated Status of Corn Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  10. 78 FR 51706 - Bayer CropScience LP; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Soybean Genetically Engineered for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  11. 76 FR 63278 - Bayer CropScience LP; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Cotton Genetically Engineered for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  12. 77 FR 42693 - Monsanto Company and KWS SAAT AG; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Sugar Beet Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  13. Systems Genetics Reveals the Functional Context of PCOS Loci and Identifies Genetic and Molecular Mechanisms of Disease Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ning; Cui, Jinrui; Mengesha, Emebet; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Taylor, Kent D.; Azziz, Ricardo; Goodarzi, Mark O.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed 11 independent risk loci for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common disorder in young women characterized by androgen excess and oligomenorrhea. To put these risk loci and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) therein into functional context, we measured DNA methylation and gene expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies to identify PCOS-specific alterations. Two genes from the LHCGR region, STON1-GTF2A1L and LHCGR, were overexpressed in PCOS. In analysis stratified by obesity, LHCGR was overexpressed only in non-obese PCOS women. Although not differentially expressed in the entire PCOS group, INSR was underexpressed in obese PCOS subjects only. Alterations in gene expression in the LHCGR, RAB5B and INSR regions suggest that SNPs in these loci may be functional and could affect gene expression directly or indirectly via epigenetic alterations. We identified reduced methylation in the LHCGR locus and increased methylation in the INSR locus, changes that are concordant with the altered gene expression profiles. Complex patterns of meQTL and eQTL were identified in these loci, suggesting that local genetic variation plays an important role in gene regulation. We propose that non-obese PCOS women possess significant alterations in LH receptor expression, which drives excess androgen secretion from the ovary. Alternatively, obese women with PCOS possess alterations in insulin receptor expression, with underexpression in metabolic tissues and overexpression in the ovary, resulting in peripheral insulin resistance and excess ovarian androgen production. These studies provide a genetic and molecular basis for the reported clinical heterogeneity of PCOS. PMID:26305227

  14. Genetic Insights on Sleep Schedules: This Time, It’s PERsonal

    PubMed Central

    Chong, S.Y. Christin; Ptá?ek, Louis J.; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2012-01-01

    The study of circadian rhythms is emerging as a fruitful opportunity for understanding cellular mechanisms that govern human physiology and behavior, as fueled by evidence directly linking sleep disorders and genetic mutations affecting circadian molecular pathways. Familial Advanced Sleep Phase Disorder (FASPD) is the first recognized Mendelian circadian rhythm trait, and affected individuals exhibit exceptionally early sleep-wake onset due to altered post-translational regulation of period homolog 2 (PER2). Behavioral and cellular circadian rhythms are analogously affected, as the circadian period length of behavior is reduced in the absence of environmental time cues, and cycle duration of the molecular clock is likewise shortened. In light of these findings, we review the PER2 dynamics in the context of circadian regulation to reveal the mechanism of sleep schedule modulation. Understanding PER2 regulation and functionality may shed new light on how our genetic composition can influence our sleep-wake behaviors. PMID:22939700

  15. Genetics of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, Perry G.; Ebbert, Mark T. W.; Kauwe, John S. K.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia and is the only top 10 cause of death in the United States that lacks disease-altering treatments. It is a complex disorder with environmental and genetic components. There are two major types of Alzheimer's disease, early onset and the more common late onset. The genetics of early-onset Alzheimer's disease are largely understood with variants in three different genes leading to disease. In contrast, while several common alleles associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease, including APOE, have been identified using association studies, the genetics of late-onset Alzheimer's disease are not fully understood. Here we review the known genetics of early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23984328

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... affected individuals have been identified. What are the genetic changes related to microphthalmia with linear skin defects ... Center . Where can I find general information about genetic conditions? The Handbook provides basic information about genetics ...

  17. CpG Methylation Modifies the Genetic Stability of Cloned Repeat Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Nichol, Kerrie; Pearson, and Christopher E.

    2002-01-01

    The genetic stability of tandemly repeated DNAs is affected by repeat sequence, tract length, tract purity, and replication direction. Alterations in DNA methylation status are thought to influence many processes of mutagenesis. By use of bacterial and primate cell systems, we have determined the effect of CpG methylation on the genetic stability of cloned di-, tri-, penta- and minisatellite repeated DNA sequences. Depending on the repeat sequence, methylation can significantly enhance or reduce its genetic stability. This effect was evident when repeat tracts were replicated from either direction. Unexpectedly, methylation of adjacent sequences altered the stability of contiguous repeat sequences void of methylatable sites. Of the seven repeat sequences investigated, methylation stabilized five, destabilized one, and had no effect on another. Thus, although methylation generally stabilized repeat tracts, its influence depended on the sequence of the repeat. The current results lend support to the notion that the biological consequences of CpG methylation may be affected through local alterations of DNA structure as well as through direct protein–DNA interactions. In vivo CpG methylation in bacteria may have technical applications for the isolation and stable propagation of DNA sequences that have been recalcitrant to isolation and/or analyses because of their extreme instability. [Supplementary material available online at http://www.genome.org.] PMID:12176932

  18. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jorde, L.B.; Carey, J.C.; White, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    This book on the subject of medical genetics is a textbook aimed at a very broad audience: principally, medical students, nursing students, graduate, and undergraduate students. The book is actually a primer of general genetics as applied to humans and provides a well-balanced introduction to the scientific and clinical basis of human genetics. The twelve chapters include: Introduction, Basic Cell Biology, Genetic Variation, Autosomal Dominant and Recessive Inheritance, Sex-linked and Mitochondrial Inheritance, Clinical Cytogenetics, Gene Mapping, Immunogenetics, Cancer Genetics, Multifactorial Inheritance and Common Disease, Genetic Screening, Genetic Diagnosis and Gene Therapy, and Clinical Genetics and Genetic Counseling.

  19. Genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical, highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Basic genetic algorithms concepts are introduced, genetic algorithm applications are introduced, and results are presented from a project to develop a software tool that will enable the widespread use of genetic algorithm technology.

  20. Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Research Matters January 13, 2014 Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery An international research team identified 42 ... Distracted Driving Raises Crash Risk Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery Oxytocin Affects Facial Recognition Connect with ...

  1. Transgenerational genetic effects

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Vicki R; Nadeau, Joseph H

    2012-01-01

    Since Mendel, studies of phenotypic variation and disease risk have emphasized associations between genotype and phenotype among affected individuals in families and populations. Although this paradigm has led to important insights into the molecular basis for many traits and diseases, most of the genetic variants that control the inheritance of these conditions continue to elude detection. Recent studies suggest an alternative mode of inheritance where genetic variants that are present in one generation affect phenotypes in subsequent generations, thereby decoupling the conventional relations between genotype and phenotype, and perhaps, contributing to ‘missing heritability’. Under so