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Sample records for genetic diagnosis pgd

  1. On the relation between moral, legal and evaluative justifications of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD).

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Georg

    2003-01-01

    In Germany the question whether to uphold or repeal the judicial prohibition on Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) is being debated from quite different standpoints. This paper differentiates the major arguments according to their reasons as a) moral, b) evaluative (i.e. cultural/religious), and c) legal. The arguments for and against PGD can be divided by content into three groups: arguments relating to the status of the embryo, focusing on individual actions in the implementation of PGD, and relating to the foreseeable or probable consequences of PGD. In Germany, from a legal perspective, the status of the embryo does not permit the intervention of PGD; from a purely moral perspective, a prohibition on PGD does not appear defensible. It remains an open question, however, whether the moral argument permitting PGD should be restricted for evaluative (cultural) reasons. The paper discusses the species-ethical reasons, for which Jurgen Habermas sees worrisome consequences in the wake of PGD to the extent that we comprehend it as the forerunner of a 'positive eugenics'. It would so disrupt the natural preconditions of our universal morality. The question of whether to prohibit or allow PGD is not merely a question of simple moral and/or legal arguments, but demands a choice between evaluative, moral and (still to be specified) species-ethical arguments, and the question remains open. PMID:16206459

  2. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for Huntington's disease: the experience of three European centres

    PubMed Central

    Van Rij, Maartje C; De Rademaeker, Marjan; Moutou, Céline; Dreesen, Jos CFM; De Rycke, Martine; Liebaers, Inge; Geraedts, Joep PM; De Die-Smulders, Christine EM; Viville, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    This study provides an overview of 13 years of experience of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for Huntington's disease (HD) at three European PGD centres in Brussels, Maastricht and Strasbourg. Information on all 331 PGD intakes for HD, couples' reproductive history, PGD approach, treatment cycles and outcomes between 1995 and 2008 were collected prospectively. Of 331 couples for intake, 68% requested direct testing and 32% exclusion testing (with a preponderance of French couples). At the time of PGD intake, 39% of women had experienced one or more pregnancies. A history of pregnancy termination after prenatal diagnosis was observed more frequently in the direct testing group (25%) than in the exclusion group (10% P=0.0027). PGD workup was based on two approaches: (1) direct testing of the CAG-triplet repeat and (2) linkage analysis using intragenic or flanking microsatellite markers of the HTT gene. In total, 257 couples had started workup and 174 couples (70% direct testing, 30% exclusion testing) completed at least one PGD cycle. In total, 389 cycles continued to oocyte retrieval (OR). The delivery rates per OR were 19.8%, and per embryo transfer 24.8%, resulting in 77 deliveries and the birth of 90 children. We conclude that PGD is a valuable and safe reproductive option for HD carriers and couples at risk of transmitting HD. PMID:22071896

  3. Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) on In-Vitro Fertilization (IVF) Websites: Presentations of Risks, Benefits and Other Information

    PubMed Central

    Klitzman, Robert; Zolovska, Beata; Folberth, William; Sauer, Mark V.; Chung, Wendy; Appelbaum, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine information on Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) presented on In-Vitro Fertilization (IVF) clinic websites. Design We systematically sampled every third IVF clinic on the 2004 CDC provider list. Setting The Internet. Patients None. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measures Benefits, risks and other types of information mentioned regarding PGD. Results Of 135 sites examined, 88.1% had websites, and 70% mentioned PGD, of which 27% were university/hospital-based and 63% were private clinics. Sites mentioning PGD listed uses/benefits of PGD far more than the risks involved. Of these sites, 76% described testing for single gene diseases, but fewer mentioned risks of missing target diagnoses (35%), or risks for loss of embryo (18%); and 14% described PGD as new or controversial. Private clinics were more likely than other programs to: be on either the East or West Coasts; list certain PGD risks (e.g., diagnostic error); note that PGD was new or controversial; reference source of PGD information; provide accuracy rates of genetic testing of embryos; and offer gender selection for social reasons. Conclusions Most IVF clinics advertise PGD on-line, but the scope and quality of information about it varies widely, emphasizing benefits while minimizing risks. Clinics and patients may benefit from more thorough and consistent presentation of PGD, drawing on available evidence to best provide a realistic portrayal of PGD. PMID:18829009

  4. Accuracy of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of single gene and chromosomal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Verlinsky, Y.; Strom, C.; Rechitsky, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have developed a polar body inferred approach for preconception diagnosis of single gene and chromosomal disorders. Preconception PCR or FISH analysis was performed in a total of 310 first polar bodies for the following genetic conditions: cystic fibrosis, hemophilia A, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, Tay Sachs disease, retinitis pigmentosa and common chromosomal trisomies. An important advantage of this approach is the avoidance of sperm (DNA) contamination, which is the major problem of PGD. We are currently applying FISH analysis of biopsied blastomeres, in combination with PCR or separately, and have demonstrated a significant improvement of the accuracy of PGD of X-linked disorders at this stage. Our data have also demonstrated feasibility of the application of FISH technique for PGD of chromosomal disorders. It was possible to detect chromosomal non-disjunctions and chromatid malsegregations in the first meiotic division, as well as to evaluate chromosomal mutations originating from the second meiotic nondisjunction.

  5. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) according to medical ethics and medical law.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Emine Elif Vatanoğlu

    2012-01-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques not only nourish great and sometimes illusive hopes of couples who yearn for babies, but also spark new debates by reversing opinions, beliefs and values. Applications made to infertility clinics are increasing due to the influences such as broadcasts made by the media concerning assisted reproductive techniques and other infertility treatments, increase in the knowledge that people have about these problems, late marriages and postponement of childbearing age owing to sociological changes. Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is a technique applied to couples who are known to carry genetic diseases or who have children with genetic diseases. This technique is conducted by doctors in Turkey for its important contribution to decreasing the risk of genetic diseases and in order to raise healthy generations. In this paper, the general ethical debates and the legal situation in Turkey will be discussed. PMID:24627675

  6. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) according to medical ethics and medical law

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Emine Elif Vatanoğlu

    2012-01-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques not only nourish great and sometimes illusive hopes of couples who yearn for babies, but also spark new debates by reversing opinions, beliefs and values. Applications made to infertility clinics are increasing due to the influences such as broadcasts made by the media concerning assisted reproductive techniques and other infertility treatments, increase in the knowledge that people have about these problems, late marriages and postponement of childbearing age owing to sociological changes. Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is a technique applied to couples who are known to carry genetic diseases or who have children with genetic diseases. This technique is conducted by doctors in Turkey for its important contribution to decreasing the risk of genetic diseases and in order to raise healthy generations. In this paper, the general ethical debates and the legal situation in Turkey will be discussed. PMID:24627675

  7. Reproductive Endocrinologists' Utilization of Genetic Counselors for Oncofertility and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) Treatment of BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Goetsch, Allison L; Wicklund, Catherine; Clayman, Marla L; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2016-06-01

    Genetic counselors believe fertility preservation and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) discussions to be a part of their role when counseling BRCA1/2 mutation-positive patients. This study is the first to explore reproductive endocrinologists' (REI) practices and attitudes regarding involvement of genetic counselors in the care of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers seeking fertility preservation and PGD. A survey was mailed to 1000 REIs from Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility (SREI), an American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) affiliate group. A 14.5 % response rate was achieved; data was analyzed using SPSS software. The majority of participating REIs were found to recommend genetic counseling to cancer patients considering fertility preservation (82 %) and consult with a genetic counselor regarding PGD for hereditary cancer syndromes (92 %). Additionally, REIs consult genetic counselors regarding PGD patient counseling (88 %), genetic testing (78 %), and general genetics questions (66 %). Two areas genetic counselors may further aid REIs are: elicitation of family history, which is useful to determine fertility preservation and PGD intervention timing (32 % of REIs utilize a cancer family history to determine intervention timing); and, interpretation of variants of uncertain significance (VOUS) as cancer panel genetic testing becomes more common (36 % of REIs are unfamiliar with VOUS). Given our findings, the Oncofertility Consortium® created an online resource for genetic counselors focused on fertility preservation education and communication strategies. PMID:26567039

  8. Media debates and 'ethical publicity' on social sex selection through preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) technology in Australia.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a critical discourse analysis of media debate over social sex selection in the Australian media from 2008 to 2014. This period coincides with a review of the National Health and Medical Research Council's Ethical Guidelines on the Use of Assisted Reproductive Technology in Clinical Practice and Research (2007), which underlie the regulation of assisted reproductive clinics and practice in Australia. I examine the discussion of the ethics of pre-implatation genetic diagnosis (PGD) within the media as 'ethical publicity' to the lay public. Sex selection through PGD is both exemplary of and interconnected with a range of debates in Australia about the legitimacy of certain reproductive choices and the extent to which procreative liberties should be restricted. Major themes emerging from media reports on PGD sex selection in Australia are described. These include: the spectre of science out of control; ramifications for the contestation over the public funding of abortion in Australia; private choices versus public authorities regulating reproduction; and the ethics of travelling overseas for the technology. It is concluded that within Australia, the issue of PGD sex selection is framed in terms of questions of individual freedom against the principle of sex discrimination - a principle enshrined in legislation - and a commitment to publically-funded medical care. PMID:25803702

  9. Developmental neuropsychological assessment of 4- to 5-year-old children born following Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD): A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Gilat Chaya; Altarescu, Gheona; Guedalia, Judith; Varshaver, Irit; Gilboa, Tal; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Eldar-Geva, Talia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate developmental neuropsychological profiles of 4- to 5-year-old children born after Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD). Twenty-seven participants received a neurological examination and a battery of neuropsychological assessments including Wechsler Preschool & Primary Scale of Intelligence - Third Edition (WPPSI-III; cognitive development), Preschool Language Scale, Fourth Edition (PLS-4; language development), Wide Range Assessment of Visual Motor Abilities (visual motor abilities), Childhood Autism Rating Scales II (a screening test for autistic spectrum disorders), and the Miles ABC Test (ocular dominance). Parental questionnaires included the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function Preschool Version (BRIEF-P; executive function), Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and the Carey Temperament Scales Behavioral Style Questionnaire (socioemotional development and temperament), and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Interview Edition, Second Edition (general adaptive behavior). Subjects' tests results were compared to each test's norms. Children born after PGD demonstrated scores within the normal or above-normal ranges for all developmental outcomes (mean ± SD): WPPSI-III-VIQ 107.4 ± 14.4 (p = .013), PLS-4-Total 113.2 ± 12.4, p < .001), CBCL-Total 41.1 ± 8.6 (p < .001), BRIEF-P-Global Executive Composite 44.8 ± 9.5 (p = .009). Twelve (44%) of the PGD children had a significant difference between their VIQ and PIQ scores (compared to 27% in the general population). One subject was found to show possible signs of autistic spectrum disorder, although a family history of autism was noted. In conclusion, in this pilot study, children assessed at age 4-5 years and conceived after PGD displayed developmental neuropsychological outcomes within normal limits as compared to their chronologic peers. A larger study is needed to evaluate and follow the neuropsychological development of children born after PGD. PMID

  10. Derivation of HVR1, HVR2 and HVR3 human embryonic stem cell lines from IVF embryos after preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for monogenic disorder.

    PubMed

    Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Aguilera, Yolanda; Lozano-Arana, Maria Dolores; Mellado, Nuria; Sánchez, Javier; Moya, Cristina; Sánchez-Palazón, Luis; Palacios, Jose; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Soria, Bernat

    2016-05-01

    From 106 human blastocyts donate for research after in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for monogenetic disorder, 3 human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) HVR1, HVR2 and HVR3 were successfully derived. HVR1 was assumed to be genetically normal, HVR2 carrying Becker muscular dystrophy and HVR3 Hemophilia B. Despite the translocation t(9;15)(q34.3;q14) detected in HVR2, all the 3 cell lines were characterised in vitro and in vivo as normal hESCs lines and were registered in the Spanish Stem Cell Bank. PMID:27346196

  11. Reprogenetics: Preimplantational genetics diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Coco, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Preimplantational Genetics Diagnosis (PGD) is requested by geneticists and reproductive specialists. Usually geneticists ask for PGD because one or both members of the couple have an increased genetic risk for having an affected offspring. On the other hand, reproductive specialists ask for embryo aneuploidy screening (PGS) to assures an euploid embryo transfer, with the purpose to achieve an ongoing pregnancy, although the couple have normal karyotypes. As embryonic aneuploidies are responsible for pre and post implantation abortions, it is logical to considerer that the screening of the embryonic aneuploidies prior to embryo transfer could improve the efficiency of the in vitro fertilization procedures. Nevertheless, it is still premature to affirm this until well-designed clinical trials were done, especially in women of advanced age where the rate of embryos with aneuploidies is much greater. Although the indications of PGD are similar to conventional prenatal diagnosis (PND), PGD has less ethical objections than the PND. As with the PGD/PGS results only unaffected embryos are transferred, both methods can avoid the decision to interrupt the pregnancy due to a genetic problem; this makes an important difference when compared to conventional prenatal diagnosis. PMID:24764761

  12. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for inherited neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Tur-Kaspa, Ilan; Jeelani, Roohi; Doraiswamy, P Murali

    2014-07-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is an option for couples at risk of having offspring with an inherited debilitating or fatal neurological disorder who wish to conceive a healthy child. PGD has been carried out for conditions with various modes of inheritance, including spinal muscular atrophy, Huntington disease, fragile X syndrome, and chromosomal or mitochondrial disorders, and for susceptibility genes for cancers with nervous system involvement. Most couples at risk of transmitting a genetic mutation would opt for PGD over prenatal testing and possible termination of a pregnancy. The aim of this Perspectives article is to assist neurologists in counselling and treating patients who wish to explore the option of PGD to enable conception of an unaffected child. PGD can be accomplished for most disorders in which the genetic basis is known, and we argue that it is time for clinicians and neurological societies to consider the evidence and to formulate guidelines for the responsible integration of PGD into modern preventative neurology. PMID:24866878

  13. [Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis: indications, techniques, and results].

    PubMed

    Veiga, A; Boada, M; Barri, P N

    1998-01-01

    The combination of the technique of In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) and molecular genetics has led to the development of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD). Oocyte and embryo biopsy, Fluorescent in situ Hybridization (FISH) and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) allow diagnostic procedures in couples with high risk and also certain IVF couples. We present a review of PGD indications, techniques and results. PMID:9810133

  14. Reproductive management through integration of PGD and MPS-based noninvasive prenatal screening/diagnosis for a family with GJB2-associated hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Xiong, WenPing; Wang, DaYong; Gao, Yuan; Gao, Ya; Wang, HongYang; Guan, Jing; Lan, Lan; Yan, JunHao; Zong, Liang; Yuan, Yuan; Dong, Wei; Huang, SeXin; Wu, KeLiang; Wang, YaoShen; Wang, ZhiLi; Peng, HongMei; Lu, YanPing; Xie, LinYi; Zhao, Cui; Wang, Li; Zhang, QiuJing; Gao, Yun; Li, Na; Yang, Ju; Yin, ZiFang; Han, Bing; Wang, Wei; Chen, Zi-Jiang; Wang, QiuJu

    2015-09-01

    A couple with a proband child of GJB2 (encoding the gap junction protein connexin 26)-associated hearing impairment and a previous pregnancy miscarriage sought for a reproductive solution to bear a healthy child. Our study aimed to develop a customized preconception-to-neonate care trajectory to fulfill this clinical demand by integrating preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT), and noninvasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) into the strategy. Auditory and genetic diagnosis of the proband child was carried out to identify the disease causative mutations. The couple then received in-vitro-fertilization treatment, and eight embryos were obtained for day 5 biopsy. PGD was performed by short-tandem-repeat linkage analysis and Sanger sequencing of GJB2 gene. Transfer of a GJB2c.235delC heterozygous embryo resulted in a singleton pregnancy. At the 13th week of gestation, genomic DNA (gDNA) from the trio family and cell-free DNA (cfDNA) from maternal plasma were obtained for assessment of fetal chromosomal aneuploidy and GJB2 mutations. NIPT and NIPD showed the absence of chromosomal aneuploidy and GJB2-associated disease in the fetus, which was later confirmed by invasive procedures and postnatal genetic/auditory diagnosis. This strategy successfully prevented the transmission of hearing impairment in the newborn, thus providing a valuable experience in reproductive management of similar cases and potentially other monogenic disorders. PMID:26432548

  15. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for hemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Kuliev, Anver; Pakhalchuk, Tatiana; Verlinsky, Oleg; Rechitsky, Svetlana

    2011-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies are the most frequent indications for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), allowing couples at-risk of bearing offspring with thalassemia and sickle cell disease to reproduce without fear of having an affected child. The present experience includes PGD for sickle cell disease, α- and β-thalassemia (α- and β-thal). We present here the results of the world's largest experience of over 395 PGD cycles for hemoglobin (Hb) disorders, resulting in the birth of 98 healthy, hemoglobinopathy-free children, with seven pregnancies still ongoing. One-third of these cases were performed in combination with HLA typing, allowing the birth of unaffected children who were also HLA identical to the affected siblings with hemoglobinopathies in these families, with successful or pending stem cell transplantation in a dozen of them. The results show that PGD is presently a practical approach for prevention of hemoglobinopathies, gradually also becoming a useful approach to improving access to HLA-compatible stem cell transplantation for this group of diseases. PMID:21910603

  16. Vitrified/warmed single blastocyst transfer in preimplantation genetic diagnosis/preimplantation genetic screening cycles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jin; Li, Rong; Lian, Ying; Chen, Lixue; Shi, Xiaodan; Qiao, Jie; Liu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the single blastocyst transfer in preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD)/preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) cycles. Methods: 80 PGD/PGS cycles undergoing blastocyst biopsy were studied. There were 88 warming cycles during the study period. Only one warmed blastocyst was transferred per cycle. The outcomes were followed up to the infants were born. Results: The embryo implantation rate was 54.55% (48/88). The clinical pregnancy rate was 54.55% (48/88) per transfer cycle and 60% (48/80) per initial PGD/PGS cycle. There was no multi-pregnant in this study. The live birth rate was 42.05% (37/88) per transfer cycle and 46.25% (37/80) per initial PGD/PGS cycle. Conclusion: In PGD/PGS cycles, single blastocyst transfer reduces the multiple pregnancy rate without affecting the clinical outcomes. PMID:26885112

  17. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis--an overview.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, Caroline Mackie; Braude, Peter R; Scriven, Paul N

    2005-03-01

    Since the early 1990s, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) has been expanding in scope and applications. Selection of female embryos to avoid X-linked disease was carried out first by polymerase chain reaction, then by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and an ever-increasing number of tests for monogenic diseases have been developed. Couples with chromosome rearrangements such as Robertsonian and reciprocal translocations form a large referral group for most PGD centers and present a special challenge, due to the large number of genetically unbalanced embryos generated by meiotic segregation. Early protocols used blastomeres biopsied from cleavage-stage embryos; testing of first and second polar bodies is now a routine alternative, and blastocyst biopsy can also be used. More recently, the technology has been harnessed to provide PGD-AS, or aneuploidy screening. FISH probes specific for chromosomes commonly found to be aneuploid in early pregnancy loss are used to test blastomeres for aneuploidy, with the aim of replacing euploid embryos and increasing pregnancy rates in groups of women who have poor IVF success rates. More recent application of PGD to areas such as HLA typing and social sex selection have stoked public controversy and concern, while provoking interesting ethical debates and keeping PGD firmly in the public eye. PMID:15749997

  18. Non-Invasive Prenatal Diagnosis in the Management of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante-Aragones †, Ana; Perlado-Marina †, Sara; Trujillo-Tiebas, Maria José; Gallego-Merlo, Jesús; Lorda-Sanchez, Isabel; Rodríguez-Ramirez, Luz; Linares, Concepcion; Hernandez, Corazón; Rodriguez de Alba, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis (PD) is recommended in pregnancies after a Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD). However, conventional PD entails a risk of fetal loss which makes PGD patients reluctant to undergo obstetric invasive procedures. The presence of circulating fetal DNA in maternal blood allows performing a non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) without risk for the pregnancy outcome. This work shows the introduction of NIPD for confirmation of PGD results in eight pregnancies. In those pregnancies referred to PGD for an X-linked disorder (six out of eight), fetal sex determination in maternal blood was performed to confirm fetal sex. One pregnancy referred to PGD for Marfan syndrome and one referred for Huntington disease (HD) were also analyzed. In seven out of eight cases, PGD results were confirmed by NIPD in maternal blood. No results were obtained in the HD pregnancy. NIPD in PGD pregnancies can be a reliable alternative for couples that after a long process feel reluctant to undergo PD due to the risk of pregnancy loss. PMID:26237485

  19. Non-Invasive Prenatal Diagnosis in the Management of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis Pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Bustamante-Aragones, Ana; Perlado-Marina, Sara; Trujillo-Tiebas, Maria José; Gallego-Merlo, Jesús; Lorda-Sanchez, Isabel; Rodríguez-Ramirez, Luz; Linares, Concepcion; Hernandez, Corazón; de Alba, Marta Rodriguez

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis (PD) is recommended in pregnancies after a Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD). However, conventional PD entails a risk of fetal loss which makes PGD patients reluctant to undergo obstetric invasive procedures. The presence of circulating fetal DNA in maternal blood allows performing a non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) without risk for the pregnancy outcome. This work shows the introduction of NIPD for confirmation of PGD results in eight pregnancies. In those pregnancies referred to PGD for an X-linked disorder (six out of eight), fetal sex determination in maternal blood was performed to confirm fetal sex. One pregnancy referred to PGD for Marfan syndrome and one referred for Huntington disease (HD) were also analyzed. In seven out of eight cases, PGD results were confirmed by NIPD in maternal blood. No results were obtained in the HD pregnancy. NIPD in PGD pregnancies can be a reliable alternative for couples that after a long process feel reluctant to undergo PD due to the risk of pregnancy loss. PMID:26237485

  20. Recent advances in preimplantation genetic diagnosis and screening.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lina; Lv, Bo; Huang, Kevin; Xue, Zhigang; Zhu, Xianmin; Fan, Guoping

    2016-09-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis/screening (PGD/PGS) aims to help couples lower the risks of transmitting genetic defects to their offspring, implantation failure, and/or miscarriage during in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles. However, it is still being debated with regard to the practicality and diagnostic accuracy of PGD/PGS due to the concern of invasive biopsy and the potential mosaicism of embryos. Recently, several non-invasive and high-throughput assays have been developed to help overcome the challenges encountered in the conventional invasive biopsy and low-throughput analysis in PGD/PGS. In this mini-review, we will summarize the recent progresses of these new methods for PGD/PGS and discuss their potential applications in IVF clinics. PMID:27272212

  1. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Abotalib, Zeinab

    2013-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) testing is the practice of obtaining a cellular biopsy sample from a developing human oocyte or embryo, acquired via a cycle of in vitro fertilization (IVF); evaluating the genetic composition of this sample; and using this information to determine which embryos will be optimal for subsequent uterine transfer. PGD has become an increasingly useful adjunct to IVF procedures. The ability to provide couples who are known carriers of genetic abnormalities the opportunity to deliver healthy babies has opened a new frontier in reproductive medicine. The purpose of the PGD is enables us to choose which embryos will be implanted into the mother. In the present study 137 families who had undergone IVF at Habib Medical Centre, were enrolled for the PGD analysis. The couple visited the clinic for the sex selection, recurrent fetal loss and with the recurrent IVF failure. 802 embryos were tested by the biopsy method and 512 are found to be normal and 290 were abnormal embryos. In this study only 24% of the embryos were transferred and the remaining was not transferred because of the abnormalities or undesired sex of the embryos. The structural and numerical abnormalities were found to be 16.8%. PMID:23750087

  2. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abotalib, Zeinab

    2013-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) testing is the practice of obtaining a cellular biopsy sample from a developing human oocyte or embryo, acquired via a cycle of in vitro fertilization (IVF); evaluating the genetic composition of this sample; and using this information to determine which embryos will be optimal for subsequent uterine transfer. PGD has become an increasingly useful adjunct to IVF procedures. The ability to provide couples who are known carriers of genetic abnormalities the opportunity to deliver healthy babies has opened a new frontier in reproductive medicine. The purpose of the PGD is enables us to choose which embryos will be implanted into the mother. In the present study 137 families who had undergone IVF at Habib Medical Centre, were enrolled for the PGD analysis. The couple visited the clinic for the sex selection, recurrent fetal loss and with the recurrent IVF failure. 802 embryos were tested by the biopsy method and 512 are found to be normal and 290 were abnormal embryos. In this study only 24% of the embryos were transferred and the remaining was not transferred because of the abnormalities or undesired sex of the embryos. The structural and numerical abnormalities were found to be 16.8%. PMID:23750087

  3. New multiplex PCR-based protocol allowing indirect diagnosis of FSHD on single cells: can PGD be offered despite high risk of recombination?

    PubMed Central

    Barat-Houari, Mouna; Nguyen, Karine; Bernard, Rafaëlle; Fernandez, Céline; Vovan, Catherine; Bareil, Corinne; Van Kien, Philippe Khau; Thorel, Delphine; Tuffery-Giraud, Sylvie; Vasseur, Francis; Attarian, Shahram; Pouget, Jean; Girardet, Anne; Lévy, Nicolas; Claustres, Mireille

    2010-01-01

    Molecular pathophysiology of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) involves the heterozygous contraction of the number of tandemly repeated D4Z4 units at chromosome 4q35.2. FSHD is associated with a range of 1–10 D4Z4 units instead of 11–150 in normal controls. Several factors complicate FSHD molecular diagnosis, especially the cis-segregation of D4Z4 contraction with a 4qA allele, whereas D4Z4 shortening is silent both on alleles 4qB and 10q. Discrimination of pathogenic 4q-D4Z4 alleles from highly homologous 10q-D4Z4 arrays requires the use of the conventional Southern blot, which is not suitable at the single-cell level. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is a frequent request from FSHD families with several affected relatives. We aimed to develop a rapid and sensitive PCR-based multiplex approach on single cells to perform an indirect familial segregation study of pathogenic alleles. Among several available polymorphic markers at 4q35.2, the four most proximal (D4S2390, D4S1652, D4S2930 and D4S1523, <1.23 Mb) showing the highest heterozygote frequencies (67–91%) were selected. Five recombination events in the D4S2390-D4S1523 interval were observed among 144 meioses. In the D4S2390-D4Z4 interval, no recombination event occurred among 28 FSHD meioses. Instead, a particular haplotype segregated with both clinical and molecular status, allowing the characterization of an at-risk allele in each tested FSHD family (maximal LOD score 2.98 for θ=0.0). This indirect protocol can easily complement conventional techniques in prenatal diagnosis. Although our multiplex PCR-based approach technically fulfils guidelines for single-cell analysis, the relatively high recombination risk hampers its application to PGD. PMID:19935833

  4. Gender eugenics? The ethics of PGD for intersex conditions.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the ethics of the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to prevent the birth of children with intersex conditions/disorders of sex development (DSDs), such as congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) and androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). While pediatric surgeries performed on children with ambiguous genitalia have been the topic of intense bioethical controversy, there has been almost no discussion to date of the ethics of the use of PGD to reduce the prevalence of these conditions. I suggest that PGD for those conditions that involve serious medical risks for those born with them is morally permissible and that PGD for other "cosmetic" variations in sexual anatomy is more defensible than might first appear. However, importantly, the arguments that establish the latter claim have radical and disturbing implications for our attitude toward diversity more generally. PMID:24024804

  5. Anticipating issues related to increasing preimplantation genetic diagnosis use: a research agenda.

    PubMed

    Klitzman, Robert; Appelbaum, Paul S; Chung, Wendy; Sauer, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Increasing use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) poses numerous clinical, social, psychological, ethical, legal and policy dilemmas, many of which have received little attention. Patients and providers are now considering and using PGD for a widening array of genetic disorders, and patients may increasingly seek 'designer babies.' In the USA, although governmental oversight policies have been discussed, few specific guidelines exist. Hence, increasingly, patients and providers will face challenging ethical and policy questions of when and for whom to use PGD, and how it should be financed. These issues should be better clarified and addressed through collection of data concerning the current use of PGD in the USA, including factors involved in decision making about PGD use, as well as the education of the various communities that are, and should be, involved in its implementation. Improved understanding of these issues will ultimately enhance the development and implementation of future clinical guidelines and policies. PMID:18644221

  6. Practices and ethical concerns regarding preimplantation diagnosis. Who regulates preimplantation genetic diagnosis in Brazil?

    PubMed Central

    Damian, B.B.; Bonetti, T.C.S.; Horovitz, D.D.G.

    2014-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) was originally developed to diagnose embryo-related genetic abnormalities for couples who present a high risk of a specific inherited disorder. Because this technology involves embryo selection, the medical, bioethical, and legal implications of the technique have been debated, particularly when it is used to select features that are not related to serious diseases. Although several initiatives have attempted to achieve regulatory harmonization, the diversity of healthcare services available and the presence of cultural differences have hampered attempts to achieve this goal. Thus, in different countries, the provision of PGD and regulatory frameworks reflect the perceptions of scientific groups, legislators, and society regarding this technology. In Brazil, several texts have been analyzed by the National Congress to regulate the use of assisted reproduction technologies. Legislative debates, however, are not conclusive, and limited information has been published on how PGD is specifically regulated. The country requires the development of new regulatory standards to ensure adequate access to this technology and to guarantee its safe practice. This study examined official documents published on PGD regulation in Brazil and demonstrated how little direct oversight of PGD currently exists. It provides relevant information to encourage reflection on a particular regulation model in a Brazilian context, and should serve as part of the basis to enable further reform of the clinical practice of PGD in the country. PMID:25493379

  7. Quality control standards in PGD and PGS.

    PubMed

    SenGupta, S B; Dhanjal, S; Harper, J C

    2016-03-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) aims to test the embryo for specific conditions before implantation in couples at risk of transmitting genetic abnormality to their offspring. The couple must undergo IVF procedures to generate embryos in vitro. The embryos can be biopsied at either the zygote, cleavage or blastocyst stage. Preimplantation genetic screening uses the same technology to screen for chromosome abnormalities in embryos from patients undergoing IVF procedures as a method of embryo selection. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization was originally used for chromosome analysis, but has now been replaced by array comparative genomic hybridization or next generation sequencing. For the diagnosis of single gene defects, polymerase chain reaction is used and has become highly developed; however, single nucleotide polymorphism arrays for karyomapping have recently been introduced. A partnership between IVF laboratories and diagnostic centres is required to carry out PGD and preimplantation genetic screening. Accreditation of PGD diagnostic laboratories is important. Accreditation gives IVF centres an assurance that the diagnostic tests conform to specified standards. ISO 15189 is an international laboratory standard specific for medical laboratories. A requirement for accreditation is to participate in external quality assessment schemes. PMID:26776824

  8. Choosing between possible lives: legal and ethical issues in preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Scott, Rosamund

    2006-01-01

    This article critically appraises the current legal scope of the principal applications of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). This relatively new technique, which is available to some parents undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment, aims to ensure that a child is not born with a seemingly undesirable genetic condition. The question addressed here is whether there should be serious reasons to test for genetic conditions in embryos in order to be able to select between them. The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority and the Human Genetics Commission have decided that there should be such reasons by broadly aligning the criteria for PGD with those for selective abortion. This stance is critically explored, as are its implications for the possible use of PGD to select either against or for marginal features or for significant traits. The government is currently reviewing the legal scope and regulation of PGD. PMID:17340769

  9. Outcomes of in vitro fertilization with preimplantation genetic diagnosis: an analysis of the United States Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance Data, 2011–2012

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jeani; Boulet, Sheree L.; Jeng, Gary; Flowers, Lisa; Kissin, Dmitry M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the characteristics of IVF cycles for which preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) was used and to evaluate indications for PGD and treatment outcomes associated with this procedure as compared with cycles without PGD with the data from the U.S. National ART Surveillance System. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting None. Patient(s) Fresh autologous cycles that involved transfer of at least one embryo at blastocyst when available. Intervention(s) None. Main Outcome Measure(s) PGD indications and age-specific reproductive outcomes. Result(s) There were a total of 97,069 non-PGD cycles and 9,833 PGD cycles: 55.6% were performed for aneuploidy screening (PGD Aneuploidy), 29.1% for other reasons (PGD Other), and 15.3% for genetic testing (PGD Genetic). In comparison to non-PGD cycles, PGD Aneuploidy cycles showed a decreased odds of miscarriage among women 35–37 years (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.62; 95% CI, 0.45–0.87) and women >37 years (aOR 0.55; 95% CI, 0.43–0.70); and an increased odds of clinical pregnancy (aOR 1.18; 95% CI, 1.05–1.34), live-birth delivery (aOR 1.43; 95% CI, 1.26–1.62), and multiple-birth delivery (aOR 1.98; 95% CI, 1.52–2.57) among women >37 years. Conclusion(s) Aneuploidy screening was the most common indication for PGD. Use of PGD was not observed to be associated with an increased odds of clinical pregnancy or live birth for women <35 years. PGD for aneuploidy was associated with a decreased odds of miscarriage for women >35 years, but an increased odds of a live-birth and a multiple live-birth delivery among women >37 years. PMID:26551441

  10. 'The BRCA clock is ticking!': negotiating medical concerns and reproductive goals in preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Lisa R; Werner-Lin, Allison; Sagi, Michal; Cholst, Ina; Stern, Rikki; Lilienthal, Debra; Hurley, Karen

    2014-09-01

    Despite research on BRCA1/2 mutation carriers attitudes towards preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), considerably less is known about individuals' experience with its use. Through case reports of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers' thoughts on, and use of, PGD, this paper highlights how the option of PGD is experienced and negotiated in the context of reproductive and life-course goals. Drawing on qualitative interviews with 38 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, this article focuses on a subsample of 10 interviewees who sought consultation for, and/or attempted, PGD, with in-depth reports of 3 cases and summary decisions of the remaining 7. Three couples decided against PGD, and one was deciding at the time of the interview. Interviewees discuss key aspects of their experience prior to, and going through, PGD for BRCA1/2, including potential challenges of becoming pregnant through PGD and of heightened pressure to achieve their reproductive goals more quickly. Despite considerable focus on ethical issues in screening embryos for mutations associated with adult-onset cancer risk, less attention has been paid to the technical, logistical, and related psychosocial issues. Narrative case reports may help individuals develop appropriate expectations of PGD for BRCA prepare for possibly challenging decisions and outcomes, and ultimately determine whether it is compatible with their reproductive goals. PMID:25105219

  11. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis and rational choice under risk or uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Zuradzki, Tomasz

    2014-11-01

    In this paper I present an argument in favour of a parental duty to use preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). I argue that if embryos created in vitro were able to decide for themselves in a rational manner, they would sometimes choose PGD as a method of selection. Couples, therefore, should respect their hypothetical choices on a principle similar to that of patient autonomy. My thesis shows that no matter which moral doctrine couples subscribe to, they ought to conduct the PGD procedure in the situations when it is impossible to implant all of the created embryos and if there is a significant risk for giving birth to a child with a serious condition. PMID:24835332

  12. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis: development and regulation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C

    2006-06-01

    Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is used to biopsy and analyse embryos created through in vitro fertilisation (IVF) to avoid implanting an embryo affected by a mutation or chromosomal abnormality associated with serious illness. It reduces the chance that the parents will be faced with a difficult decision of whether to terminate the pregnancy, if the disorder is detected during the course of gestation. PGD is widely accepted for this purpose although there have been suggestions that such procedures have the effect of de-valuing persons in the community with disabilities. PGD potentially has other more controversial purposes, including the selection of the sex of the baby for personal preferences such as balancing the family, rather than to avoid a sex-linked disorder. Recently PGD has become available to create a donor child who is Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) matched with a sibling in need of stem cell transplant. In most cases the intention is to utilise the cord blood. However, an HLA-matched child could potentially be required to be a donor of tissues and organs throughout life. This may arise should the initial cord blood donation fail for any one of several reasons, such as inadequate cord blood cell dose, graft failure after cord blood transplant, or the recipient child experiencing a recurrence of the original illness after transplant. However, such on-going demands could also arise if a HLA-matched child was fortuitously conceived by natural means. As such, the issue is not PGD, but rather whether to harvest bone marrow or a solid organ from a child. This raises the question of whether there should be limits and procedures to protect such children from exploitation until they achieve sufficient competence to be able to make mature and autonomous decisions about whether to donate, even if the consequence may in some cases be that it is too late to save the sibling. Additionally, the parents may not be able to make a dispassionate decision, when

  13. Incorporating information about pre-implantation genetic diagnosis into discussions about testing and risk-management for BRCA1/2 mutations: A qualitative study of patient preferences

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Karen; Rubin, Lisa; Werner-Lin, Allison; Sagi, Michal; Kemel, Yelena; Stern, Rikki; Phillips, Aliza; Cholst, Ina; Kauff, Noah; Offit, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies show that BRCA1/2 mutation carriers are interested in learning about reproductive options such as pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to prevent passing their risk onto their children. However, attitudes vary widely, and the procedure raises complex ethical and psychosocial issues. This complexity, plus the highly technical nature of PGD, makes it difficult to integrate PGD information into genetic counseling sessions that already cover probabilistic, emotionally-charged risk information. Method Thirty-three reproductive age BRCA1/2 mutation carriers who had previously undergone genetic counseling viewed a tutorial about PGD and were interviewed about attitudes towards PGD, and preferences about how to include PGD information in genetic counseling. Results Most participants preferred to be briefly informed of availability of PGD information, and to receive written materials about PGD, but with the option of deferring detailed discussion if they already feel overloaded or perceive that PGD is not immediately relevant to their risk management and/or childbearing plans. For some, the stress of testing temporarily interfered with information processing, producing states of cognitive avoidance (“in a fog,” “tuning out”). Some preferred to discuss PGD with a physician with whom they had an ongoing relationship (e.g., OB/GYN, primary care provider, oncologist). Conclusions Providers offering cancer genetic testing can consider indicating availability of PGD information, while attending to patients’ level of interest and ability to absorb information. Research is needed to link patient responses to information overload to psychosocial outcomes (e.g., distress, decision quality). Continuing medical education is needed to support providers in facilitating informed decisions about PGD. PMID:22736296

  14. [Extending preimplantation genetic diagnosis to HLA typing: the French exception].

    PubMed

    Steffann, Julie; Frydman, Nelly; Burlet, Philippe; Gigarel, Nadine; Hesters, Laetitia; Kerbrat, Violaine; Lamazou, Frédéric; Munnich, Arnold; Frydman, René

    2011-01-01

    Umut-Talha, a "sibling savior", was born on 26 January 2011 at Beclère Hospital after embryo selection at the Paris preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) center. His birth revived the controversy over "double PGD". This procedure, authorized in France since 2006, allows couples who already have a child with a serious, incurable genetic disease, to opt for PGD in order to select a healthy embryo that is HLA-matched to the affected sibling and who may thus serve as an ombilical cord blood donor. The procedure is particularly complex and the baby take-home rate is still very low. Double PGD is strictly regulated in France, and candidate couples must first receive individual authorization from the Biomedicine Agency. In our experience, these couples have a strong desire to have children, as reflected by the large number of prior spontaneous pregnancies (25% of couples). Likewise, most of these couples request embryo transfer even when there is no HLA-matched embryo, which accounts for more than half of embryo transfers. The controversy surrounding this practice has flared up again in recent weeks, over the concepts of "designer babies" and "double savior siblings" (the baby is selected to be free of the hereditary disease, and may also serve as a stem cell donor for the affected sibling). PMID:22375367

  15. Evaluation of exclusion prenatal and exclusion preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Huntington's disease in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Rij, M C; de Die-Smulders, C E M; Bijlsma, E K; de Wert, G M W R; Geraedts, J P; Roos, R A C; Tibben, A

    2013-02-01

    Individuals at 50% risk of Huntington's disease (HD) who prefer not to know their carrier status, might opt for exclusion prenatal diagnosis (ePND) or exclusion preimplantation genetic diagnosis (ePGD). This study aims to provide a better understanding of couples' motives for choosing ePND or ePND, and surveys couples' experiences in order to make recommendations for the improvement of counselling for exclusion testing. This qualitative retrospective interview study focussed on couples who underwent ePND or ePGD for HD in the period 1996-2010. Seventeen couples were included of which 13 had experienced ePND and 6 ePGD. Mean time-interval since exclusion-testing was 3.9 years. Couples' moral reservations regarding termination of pregnancy (TOP) or discarding healthy embryos were counterbalanced by the wish to protect their future child against HD. Seven couples had terminated a total of 11 pregnancies with a 50% HD risk, none showed regret. ePGD was used by couples who wanted to avoid (another) TOP. ePND and ePGD are acceptable reproductive options for a specific group of counsellees. To guarantee sound standards of care, it is imperative that candidate couples be given in-depth non-directive counselling about all possible scenarios, and adequate professional and psychological support prior to, during and after ePND/ePGD. PMID:23137131

  16. ESHRE task force on ethics and Law22: preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    De Wert, G; Dondorp, W; Shenfield, F; Devroey, P; Tarlatzis, B; Barri, P; Diedrich, K; Provoost, V; Pennings, G

    2014-08-01

    This Task Force document discusses some relatively unexplored ethical issues involved in preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). The document starts from the wide consensus that PGD is ethically acceptable if aimed at helping at-risk couples to avoid having a child with a serious disorder. However, if understood as a limit to acceptable indications for PGD, this 'medical model' may turn out too restrictive. The document discusses a range of possible requests for PGD that for different reasons fall outwith the accepted model and argues that instead of rejecting those requests out of hand, they need to be independently assessed in the light of ethical criteria. Whereas, for instance, there is no good reason for rejecting PGD in order to avoid health problems in a third generation (where the second generation would be healthy but faced with burdensome reproductive choices if wanting to have children), using PGD to make sure that one's child will have the same disorder or handicap as its parents, is ethically unacceptable. PMID:24927929

  17. Breast Cancer, BRCA Mutations, and Attitudes Regarding Pregnancy and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Woodson, Ashley H.; Muse, Kimberly I.; Lin, Heather; Jackson, Michelle; Mattair, Danielle N.; Schover, Leslie; Woodard, Terri; McKenzie, Laurie; Theriault, Richard L.; Hortobágyi, Gabriel N.; Arun, Banu; Peterson, Susan K.; Profato, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Background. Women with premenopausal breast cancer may face treatment-related infertility and have a higher likelihood of a BRCA mutation, which may affect their attitudes toward future childbearing. Methods. Premenopausal women were invited to participate in a questionnaire study administered before and after BRCA genetic testing. We used the Impact of Event Scale (IES) to evaluate the pre- and post-testing impact of cancer or carrying a BRCA mutation on attitudes toward future childbearing. The likelihood of pursuing prenatal diagnosis (PND) or preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) was also assessed in this setting. Univariate analyses determined factors contributing to attitudes toward future childbearing and likelihood of PND or PGD. Results. One hundred forty-eight pretesting and 114 post-testing questionnaires were completed. Women with a personal history of breast cancer had less change in IES than those with no history of breast cancer (p = .003). The 18 BRCA-positive women had a greater change in IES than the BRCA-negative women (p = .005). After testing, 31% and 24% of women would use PND and PGD, respectively. BRCA results did not significantly affect attitudes toward PND/PGD. Conclusion. BRCA results and history of breast cancer affect the psychological impact on future childbearing. Intentions to undergo PND or PGD do not appear to change after disclosure of BRCA results. Additional counseling for patients who have undergone BRCA testing may be warranted to educate patients about available fertility preservation options. PMID:24951607

  18. [The Cagliari (Italy) Court authorizes the preimplantation genetic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Jorqui Azofra, María

    2007-01-01

    Today, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) has been greatly accepted within the framework of positive law of many European countries. Nevertheless, in other countries, such as Italy, it is forbidden by law. The ruling of the Civil Court of Cagliari which has authorized its use to a Sardinian couple, has opened, in this way, a small crack to be able to asses possible modifications to the Italian regulation on this matter. This article analyses the ruling of the Civil Court of Cagliari (Italy) from an ethical and legal perspective. The criteria which is used to analyse the legitimacy or illegitimacy of the practice of PGD is analysed. That is, on reasons which could justify or not the transfer of embryos in vitro to the woman. With this objective in mind, the Italian and Spanish normative models which regulates this controversial subject are looked at. As a conclusion, a critical evaluation of the arguments presented is made. PMID:18330104

  19. Conceptualizing Couples’ Decision Making in PGD: Emerging Cognitive, Emotional, and Moral Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Hershberger, Patricia E.; Pierce, Penny F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To illuminate and synthesize what is known about the underlying decision making processes surrounding couples’ preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) use or disuse and to formulate an initial conceptual framework that can guide future research and practice. Methods This systematic review targeted empirical studies published in English from 1990 to 2008 that examined the decision making process of couples or individual partners that had used, were eligible for, or had contemplated PGD. Sixteen studies met the eligibility requirements. To provide a more comprehensive review, empirical studies that examined healthcare professionals’ perceptions of couples’ decision making surrounding PGD use and key publications from a variety of disciplines supplemented the analysis. Results The conceptual framework formulated from the review demonstrates that couples’ PGD decision making is composed of three iterative and dynamic dimensions: cognitive appraisals, emotional responses, and moral judgments. Conclusion Couples think critically about uncertain and probabilistic information, grapple with conflicting emotions and incorporate moral perspectives into their decision making about whether or not to use PGD. Practice Implications The quality of care and decisional support for couples who are contemplating PGD use can be improved by incorporating focused questions and discussion from each of the dimensions into counseling sessions. PMID:20060677

  20. A clinical perspective on ethical arguments around prenatal diagnosis and preimplantation genetic diagnosis for later onset inherited cancer predispositions.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Tara

    2010-03-01

    Prenatal diagnosis (PND) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for later onset and/or reduced penetrance inherited cancer predispositions, e.g. familial adenomatous polyposis, hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer/Lynch syndrome and hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, raise a number of ethical issues. Some of these are the same as for conditions which present early in childhood, are fully penetrant and for which no/limited treatment options are possible; others relate to whether reduced penetrance and/or the availability of treatment mean that these are not serious (enough) conditions to warrant tests prior to/during pregnancy or to justify termination of pregnancy. However, attempts to reach a consensus on what counts as a serious (enough) condition in the context of PND and PGD have been unsuccessful. Such a definition may anyway be unhelpful if it cannot also take into account, for example, the woman's/couple's awareness and experience of the condition and the impact of the condition on affected individuals and their families. Individuals affected by, or at high risk of, later onset and/or reduced penetrance inherited cancer predispositions are generally supportive of access to PND and PGD for their own conditions, even if they would not consider using it themselves. Professionals working in clinical cancer genetics need to be prepared to discuss PND and PGD with this group of patients. PMID:19644768

  1. Simultaneous preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Tay-Sachs and Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Altarescu, Gheona; Brooks, Barry; Margalioth, Ehud; Eldar Geva, Talia; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Renbaum, Paul

    2007-07-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for single gene defects is described for a family in which each parent is a carrier of both Tay-Sachs (TS) and Gaucher disease (GD). A multiplex fluorescent polymerase chain reaction protocol was developed that simultaneously amplified all four familial mutations and 10 informative microsatellite markers. In one PGD cycle, seven blastomeres were analysed, reaching a conclusive diagnosis in six out of seven embryos for TS and in five out of seven embryos for GD. Of the six diagnosed embryos, one was wild type for both TS and GD, and three were wild type for GD and carriers of TS. Two remaining embryos were compound heterozygotes for TS. Two transferable embryos developed into blastocysts (wt/wt and wt GD/carrier TS) and both were transferred on day 5. This single cycle of PGD resulted in a healthy live child. Allele drop-out (ADO) was observed in three of 34 reactions, yielding an 8% ADO rate. The occurrence of ADO in single cell analysis and undetected recombination events are primary causes of misdiagnosis in PGD and emphasize the need to use multiple polymorphic markers. So far as is known, this is the first report of concomitant PGD for two frequent Ashkenazi Jewish recessive disorders. PMID:17623543

  2. Queerin' the PGD clinic : human enhancement and the future of bodily diversity.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Robert

    2013-06-01

    Disability activists influenced by queer theory and advocates of "human enhancement" have each disputed the idea that what is "normal" is normatively significant, which currently plays a key role in the regulation of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Previously, I have argued that the only way to avoid the implication that parents have strong reasons to select children of one sex (most plausibly, female) over the other is to affirm the moral significance of sexually dimorphic human biological norms. After outlining the logic that generates this conclusion, I investigate the extent to which it might also facilitate an alternative, progressive, opening up of the notion of the normal and of the criteria against which we should evaluate the relative merits of different forms of embodiment. This paper therefore investigates the implications of ideas derived from queer theory for the future of PGD and of PGD for the future of queerness. PMID:23468396

  3. Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis and Natural Conception: A Comparison of Live Birth Rates in Patients with Recurrent Pregnancy Loss Associated with Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura-Ogasawara, Mayumi; Nagayoshi, Motoi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Takeda, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Background Established causes of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) include antiphospholipid syndrome, uterine anomalies, parental chromosomal abnormalities, particularly translocations, and abnormal embryonic karyotypes. The number of centers performing preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for patients with translocations has steadily increased worldwide. The live birth rate with PGD was reported to be 27-54%. The live birth rate with natural conception was reported to be 37-63% on the first trial and 65-83% cumulatively. To date, however, there has been no cohort study comparing age and the number of previous miscarriages in matched patients undergoing or not undergoing PGD. Thus, we compared the live birth rate of patients with RPL associated with a translocation undergoing PGD with that of patients who chose natural conception. Methods and Findings After genetic counseling, 52 patients who desired natural conception and 37 patients who chose PGD were matched for age and number of previous miscarriages and these comprised the subjects of our study. PGD was performed by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The live birth rates on the first PGD trial and the first natural pregnancy after ascertainment of the carrier status were 37.8% and 53.8%, respectively (odds ratio 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.22-1.23). Cumulative live birth rates were 67.6% and 65.4%, respectively, in the groups undergoing and not undergoing PGD. The time required to become pregnancy was similar in both groups. PGD was found to reduce the miscarriage rate significantly. The prevalence of twin pregnancies was significantly higher in the PGD group. The cost of PGD was $7,956 U.S. per patient. Conclusions While PGD significantly prevented further miscarriages, there was no difference in the live birth rate. Couples should be fully informed of the similarity in the live birth rate, the similarity in time to become pregnancy, the advantages of PGD, such as the reduction in the

  4. PGD management scheme for older females with balanced translocations: Do older females have less chance of balanced embryo transfer?

    PubMed Central

    Tulay, Pinar; Gültomruk, Meral; Fındıklı, Necati; Bahçeci, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Objective Carriers of reciprocal and Robertsonian translocations have a higher risk of experiencing infertility and repeated miscarriages. It is well established that with advancing maternal age, the risk of aneuploidies in embryos increases. In this study, the chance of developing balanced embryos in translocation carriers with advanced maternal age was analyzed to establish a management scheme for couples seeking fertility treatment and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Material and Methods Biopsy was performed on cleavage-stage embryos. Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization was used for PGD. The translocation carriers underwent a total of 55 cycles of PGD. Genetics diagnosis and cycle outcomes of PGD cases were examined. Results This study showed that the chance of obtaining a balanced embryo from the Robertsonian translocation carriers was significantly less when the maternal age is advanced. Similar rates for balanced embryos were obtained from the reciprocal translocation carriers. Conclusion The results of this study show that maternal age plays an important role and that genetic counselling and planning for a PGD cycle in translocation carriers, particularly for Robertsonian carriers, must be accordingly adapted. PMID:27403075

  5. The improvement of the best practice guidelines for preimplantation genetic diagnosis of cystic fibrosis: toward an international consensus

    PubMed Central

    Girardet, Anne; Viart, Victoria; Plaza, Stéphanie; Daina, Gemma; De Rycke, Martine; Des Georges, Marie; Fiorentino, Francesco; Harton, Gary; Ishmukhametova, Aliya; Navarro, Joaquima; Raynal, Caroline; Renwick, Pamela; Saguet, Florielle; Schwarz, Martin; SenGupta, Sioban; Tzetis, Maria; Roux, Anne-Françoise; Claustres, Mireille

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common indications for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for single gene disorders, giving couples the opportunity to conceive unaffected children without having to consider termination of pregnancy. However, there are no available standardized protocols, so that each center has to develop its own diagnostic strategies and procedures. Furthermore, reproductive decisions are complicated by the diversity of disease-causing variants in the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene and the complexity of correlations between genotypes and associated phenotypes, so that attitudes and practices toward the risks for future offspring can vary greatly between countries. On behalf of the EuroGentest Network, eighteen experts in PGD and/or molecular diagnosis of CF from seven countries attended a workshop held in Montpellier, France, on 14 December 2011. Building on the best practice guidelines for amplification-based PGD established by ESHRE (European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology), the goal of this meeting was to formulate specific guidelines for CF-PGD in order to contribute to a better harmonization of practices across Europe. Different topics were covered including variant nomenclature, inclusion criteria, genetic counseling, PGD strategy and reporting of results. The recommendations are summarized here, and updated information on the clinical significance of CFTR variants and associated phenotypes is presented. PMID:26014425

  6. The improvement of the best practice guidelines for preimplantation genetic diagnosis of cystic fibrosis: toward an international consensus.

    PubMed

    Girardet, Anne; Viart, Victoria; Plaza, Stéphanie; Daina, Gemma; De Rycke, Martine; Des Georges, Marie; Fiorentino, Francesco; Harton, Gary; Ishmukhametova, Aliya; Navarro, Joaquima; Raynal, Caroline; Renwick, Pamela; Saguet, Florielle; Schwarz, Martin; SenGupta, Sioban; Tzetis, Maria; Roux, Anne-Françoise; Claustres, Mireille

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common indications for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for single gene disorders, giving couples the opportunity to conceive unaffected children without having to consider termination of pregnancy. However, there are no available standardized protocols, so that each center has to develop its own diagnostic strategies and procedures. Furthermore, reproductive decisions are complicated by the diversity of disease-causing variants in the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene and the complexity of correlations between genotypes and associated phenotypes, so that attitudes and practices toward the risks for future offspring can vary greatly between countries. On behalf of the EuroGentest Network, eighteen experts in PGD and/or molecular diagnosis of CF from seven countries attended a workshop held in Montpellier, France, on 14 December 2011. Building on the best practice guidelines for amplification-based PGD established by ESHRE (European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology), the goal of this meeting was to formulate specific guidelines for CF-PGD in order to contribute to a better harmonization of practices across Europe. Different topics were covered including variant nomenclature, inclusion criteria, genetic counseling, PGD strategy and reporting of results. The recommendations are summarized here, and updated information on the clinical significance of CFTR variants and associated phenotypes is presented. PMID:26014425

  7. Prevention of lysosomal storage diseases and derivation of mutant stem cell lines by preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Altarescu, Gheona; Beeri, Rachel; Eiges, Rachel; Epsztejn-Litman, Silvina; Eldar-Geva, Talia; Elstein, Deborah; Zimran, Ari; Margalioth, Ehud J; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Renbaum, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) allows birth of unaffected children for couples at risk for a genetic disorder. We present the strategy and outcome of PGD for four lysosomal storage disorders (LSD): Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), Gaucher disease (GD), Fabry disease (FD), and Hunter syndrome (HS), and subsequent development of stem cell lines. For each disease, we developed a family-specific fluorescent multiplex single-cell PCR protocol that included the familial mutation and informative markers surrounding the mutation. Embryo biopsy and PGD analysis were performed on either oocytes (polar bodies one and two) or on single blastomeres from a six-cell embryo. We treated twenty families carrying mutations in these lysosomal storage disorders, including 3 couples requiring simultaneous analysis for two disorders (TSD/GD, TSD/balanced Robertsonian translocation 45XYder(21;14), and HS/oculocutaneus albinism). These analyses led to an overall pregnancy rate/embryo transfer of 38% and the birth of 20 unaffected children from 17 families. We have found that PGD for lysosomal disorders is a safe and effective method to prevent birth of affected children. In addition, by using mutant embryos for the derivation of stem cell lines, we have successfully established GD and HS hESC lines for use as valuable models in LSD research. PMID:23320174

  8. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for mitochondrial DNA disorders: ethical guidance for clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Bredenoord, Annelien; Dondorp, Wybo; Pennings, Guido; de Die-Smulders, Christine; Smeets, Bert; de Wert, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Although morally acceptable in theory, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) disorders raises several ethical questions in clinical practice. This paper discusses the major conditions for good clinical practice. Our starting point is that PGD for mtDNA mutations should as far as possible be embedded in a scientific research protocol. For every clinical application of PGD for mtDNA disorders, it is not only important to avoid a ‘high risk of serious harm' to the future child, but also to consider to what extent it would be possible, desirable and proportional to try to reduce the health risks and minimize harm. The first issue we discuss is oocyte sampling, which may point out whether PGD is feasible for a specific couple. The second issue is whether one blastomere represents the genetic composition of the embryo as a whole – and how this could (or should) be investigated. The third issue regards the cutoff points below which embryos are considered to be eligible for transfer. We scrutinize how to determine these cutoff points and how to use these cutoff points in clinical practice – for example, when parents ask to take more or less risks. The fourth issue regards the number of cycles that can (or should) justifiably be carried out to find the best possible embryo. Fifth, we discuss whether follow-up studies should be conducted, particularly the genetic testing of children born after IVF/PGD. Finally, we offer the main information that is required to obtain a truly informed consent. PMID:19471315

  9. The first successful live birth following preimplantation genetic diagnosis using PCR for type 1 citrullinemia

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Hee; Jeon, Il-Kyung; Kim, Jae-Min; Kang, Byung-Moon

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 citrullinemia (CTLN1) is an autosomal recessive inherited metabolic disorder caused by anargininosuccinicnate synthetase deficiency. The patient was a 38-year-old Korean woman who is a carrier for CTLN1 and her first baby was diagnosed with CTLN1. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for CTLN1 in day 3 embryos using polymerase chain reaction was performed for live birth of healthy baby who is no affected with CTLN1. One unaffected blastocyst was transferred. This resulted in a clinical pregnancy and the live birth of healthy male twin. They were confirmed to be unaffected with CTNL1 by post natal diagnosis. This is the first case report of the use of PGD for CTNL1. PMID:24883299

  10. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for inherited breast cancer: first clinical application and live birth in Spain.

    PubMed

    Ramón Y Cajal, Teresa; Polo, Ana; Martínez, Olga; Giménez, Carles; Arjona, César; Llort, Gemma; Bassas, Lluís; Viscasillas, Pere; Calaf, Joaquin

    2012-06-01

    Carriers of a mutation in BRCA1/2 genes confront a high lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer and fifty percent probability of passing the mutation to their offspring. Current options for risk management influence childbearing decisions. The indications for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) have now been expanded to include predisposition for single-gene, late-onset cancer but few cases have been reported to date despite the favorable opinion among professionals and carriers. A 28-year-old BRCA1 mutation carrier (5273G>A in exon 19) with a strong maternal history of breast cancer and 2 years of infertility decided to pursue PGD to have a healthy descendent after an accurate assessment of her reproductive options. The procedure was approved by the national regulation authority and a PGD cycle was initiated. Four out of 6 embryos harbored the mutation. The two unaffected embryos were implanted in the uterus. A singleton pregnancy was achieved and a male baby was delivered at term. Consented umbilical cord blood testing confirmed the accuracy of the technique. Individualized PGD for inherited breast predisposition is feasible in the context of a multidisciplinary team. PMID:22179695

  11. The decision-making process of genetically at-risk couples considering preimplantation genetic diagnosis: initial findings from a grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Hershberger, Patricia E; Gallo, Agatha M; Kavanaugh, Karen; Olshansky, Ellen; Schwartz, Alan; Tur-Kaspa, Ilan

    2012-05-01

    Exponential growth in genomics has led to public and private initiatives worldwide that have dramatically increased the number of procreative couples who are aware of their ability to transmit genetic disorders to their future children. Understanding how couples process the meaning of being genetically at-risk for their procreative life lags far behind the advances in genomic and reproductive sciences. Moreover, society, policy makers, and clinicians are not aware of the experiences and nuances involved when modern couples are faced with using Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD). The purpose of this study was to discover the decision-making process of genetically at-risk couples as they decide whether to use PGD to prevent the transmission of known single-gene or sex-linked genetic disorders to their children. A qualitative, grounded theory design guided the study in which 22 couples (44 individual partners) from the USA, who were actively considering PGD, participated. Couples were recruited from June 2009 to May 2010 from the Internet and from a large PGD center and a patient newsletter. In-depth semi-structured interviews were completed with each individual partner within the couple dyad, separate from their respective partner. We discovered that couples move through four phases (Identify, Contemplate, Resolve, Engage) of a complex, dynamic, and iterative decision-making process where multiple, sequential decisions are made. In the Identify phase, couples acknowledge the meaning of their at-risk status. Parenthood and reproductive options are explored in the Contemplate phase, where 41% of couples remained for up to 36 months before moving into the Resolve phase. In Resolve, one of three decisions about PGD use is reached, including: Accepting, Declining, or Oscillating. Actualizing decisions occur in the Engage phase. Awareness of the decision-making process among genetically at-risk couples provides foundational work for understanding critical processes

  12. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for gender selection in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Colls, P.; Silver, L.; Olivera, G.; Weier, J.; Escudero, T.; Goodall, N.; Tomkin, G.; Munne, S.

    2009-08-20

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of gender selection for non medical reasons has been considered an unethical procedure by several authors and agencies in the Western society on the basis of disrupting the sex ratio, being discriminatory againsts women and disposal of normal embryos of the non desired gender. In this study, the analysis of a large series of PGD procedures for gender selection from a wide geographical area in the United States, shows that in general there is no deviation in preference towards any specific gender except for a preference of males in some ethnic populations of Chinese, Indian and Middle Eastern origin that represent a small percentage of the US population. In cases where only normal embryos of the non-desired gender are available, 45.5% of the couples elect to cancel the transfer, while 54.5% of them are open to have transferred embryos of the non-desired gender, this fact being strongly linked to cultural and ethnical background of the parents. In addition this study adds some evidence to the proposition that in couples with previous children of a given gender there is no biological predisposition towards producing embryos of that same gender. Based on these facts, it seems that objections to gender selection formulated by ethics committees and scientific societies are not well-founded.

  13. Live birth after PGD with confirmation by a comprehensive approach (karyomapping) for simultaneous detection of monogenic and chromosomal disorders.

    PubMed

    Natesan, Senthilkumar A; Handyside, Alan H; Thornhill, Alan R; Ottolini, Christian S; Sage, Karen; Summers, Michael C; Konstantinidis, Michalis; Wells, Dagan; Griffin, Darren K

    2014-11-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for monogenic disorders has the drawback of time and cost associated with tailoring a specific test for each couple, disorder, or both. The inability of any single assay to detect the monogenic disorder in question and simultaneously the chromosomal complement of the embryo also limits its application as separate tests may need to be carried out on the amplified material. The first clinical use of a novel approach ('karyomapping') was designed to circumvent this problem. In this example, karyomapping was used to confirm the results of an existing PGD case detecting both chromosomal abnormalities and a monogenic disorder (Smith-Lemli-Opitz [SLO] syndrome) simultaneously. The family underwent IVF, ICSI and PGD, and both polar body and cleavage stage biopsy were carried out. Following whole genome amplification, array comparative genomic hybridisation of the polar bodies and minisequencing and STR analysis of single blastomeres were used to diagnose maternal aneuploidies and SLO status, respectively. This was confirmed, by karyomapping. Unlike standard PGD, karyomapping required no a-priori test development. A singleton pregnancy and live birth, unaffected with SLO syndrome and with no chromosome abnormality, ensued. Karyomapping is potentially capable of detecting a wide spectrum of monogenic and chromosome disorders and, in this context, can be considered a comprehensive approach to PGD. PMID:25154779

  14. The use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis in sex selection for family balancing in India.

    PubMed

    Malpani, A; Malpani, A; Modi, D

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in sexing embryos for family balancing in a private IVF clinic in India from April 1999 to April 2001. Embryos were biopsied and analysed on day 3, cultured in sequential media and then transferred on day 4 or day 5 after morphological selection of the best embryos. From a total of 42 cycles started, 14 clinical pregnancies and nine live births have been achieved so far, with five ongoing pregnancies. The benefits of delayed transfer 24-48 h after the embryo biopsy are that PGD centres could use the extra time available to confirm the diagnosis or introduce additional diagnostic tests for the same embryo. The selection of blastocysts for transfer should also permit the transfer of fewer embryos, thus reducing the risk of multiple gestations and increasing the pregnancy rate as a consequence of the expected higher implantation rate. This is the first report of the use of PGD in sex selection for family balancing in India, where couples place a premium on having baby boys, and the social and ethical aspects of the use of this technology in this setting are briefly discussed. PMID:12470347

  15. Evaluation of 1100 couples with recurrent pregnancy loss using conventional cytogenetic, PGD, and PGS: hype or hope.

    PubMed

    Farahmand, Kamelia; Kalantari, Hamid; Fakhri, Mostafa; Fazeli, Abolhasan Shahzadeh; Moradi, Shabnam Zari; Almadani, Navid; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Gourabi, Hamid; Mohseni-Meybodi, Anahita

    2016-06-01

    Recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) is an important clinical problem, mostly resulting from chromosomal or genetic defects, while in 30-60% of cases, it is idiopathic. The aim of this study is to evaluate the frequency and types of chromosomal abnormalities, also pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) and pre-implantation genetic screening (PGS) outcomes among Iranian couples with RPL. This retrospective study was conducted on 1100 Iranian couples (2200 individuals) with RPL referred to Royan Institute between 2008 and 2014. Karyotyping had been performed using standard cytogenetic techniques. PGD results of RPL patients with abnormal karyotypes and PGS results of RPL patients with normal karyotypes were also analyzed. The frequency of chromosomal abnormalities in these patients was 4.95%. Women demonstrated more abnormalities (6.82%) in comparison to men (3.09%). The successful rate of pregnancy after PGD and PGS was 52 and 18.64%, respectively. The observation of 4.95% chromosomal abnormalities among the patients with RPL could support this hypothesis that there is a direct relationship between chromosomal abnormalities and RPL. More than half of the patients who underwent PGD had successful pregnancy; therefore, this approach can improve the success rate of pregnancy in them. The results of PGS cycles showed that this technique could increase the live birth rate in RPL patients. PMID:26854690

  16. Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis: Prenatal Testing for Embryos Finally Achieving Its Potential

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Harvey J.

    2014-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis was developed nearly a quarter-century ago as an alternative form of prenatal diagnosis that is carried out on embryos. Initially offered for diagnosis in couples at-risk for single gene genetic disorders, such as cystic fibrosis, spinal muscular atrophy and Huntington disease, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) has most frequently been employed in assisted reproduction for detection of chromosome aneuploidy from advancing maternal age or structural chromosome rearrangements. Major improvements have been seen in PGD analysis with movement away from older, less effective technologies, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), to newer molecular tools, such as DNA microarrays and next generation sequencing. Improved results have also started to be seen with decreasing use of Day 3 blastomere biopsy in favor of polar body or Day 5 trophectoderm biopsy. Discussions regarding the scientific, ethical, legal and social issues surrounding the use of sequence data from embryo biopsy have begun and must continue to avoid concern regarding eugenic or inappropriate use of this technology. PMID:26237262

  17. Choosing embryos: ethical complexity and relational autonomy in staff accounts of PGD

    PubMed Central

    Ehrich, Kathryn; Williams, Clare; Farsides, Bobbie; Sandall, Jane; Scott, Rosamund

    2007-01-01

    The technique of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is commonly explained as a way of checking the genes of embryos produced by IVF for serious genetic diseases. However, complex accounts of this technique emerged during ethics discussion groups held for PGD staff. These form part of a study exploring the social processes, meanings and institutions that frame and produce ‘ethical problems’ for practitioners, scientists and others working in the specialty of PGD in the UK. Two ‘grey areas’ raised by staff are discussed in terms of how far staff are, or in the future may be, able to support autonomous choices of women/couples: accepting ‘carrier’ embryos within the goal of creating a ‘healthy’ child; and sex selection of embryos for social reasons. These grey areas challenged the staff's resolve to offer individual informed choice, in the face of their awareness of possible collective social effects that might ensue from individual choices. We therefore argue that these new forms of choice pose a challenge to conventional models of individual autonomy used in UK genetic and reproductive counselling, and that ‘relational autonomy’ may be a more suitable ethical model to describe the ethical principles being drawn on by staff working in this area. PMID:18092985

  18. Complex preimplantation genetic diagnosis for beta-thalassaemia, sideroblastic anaemia, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typing.

    PubMed

    Kakourou, Georgia; Vrettou, Christina; Kattamis, Antonis; Destouni, Aspasia; Poulou, Myrto; Moutafi, Maria; Kokkali, Georgia; Pantos, Konstantinos; Davies, Stephen; Kitsiou-Tzeli, Sophia; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Traeger-Synodinos, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to select histocompatible siblings to facilitate curative haematopoeitic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is now an acceptable option in the absence of an available human leukocyte antigen (HLA) compatible donor. We describe a case where the couple who requested HLA-PGD, were both carriers of two serious haematological diseases, beta-thalassaemia and sideroblastic anaemia. Their daughter, affected with sideroblastic anaemia, was programmed to have HSCT. A multiplex-fluorescent-touchdown-PCR protocol was optimized for the simultaneous amplification of: the two HBB-gene mutated regions (c.118C> T, c.25-26delAA), four short tandem repeats (STRs) in chr11p15.5 linked to the HBB gene, the SLC25A38 gene mutation (c.726C > T), two STRs in chr3p22.1 linked to the SLC25A38 gene, plus eleven informative STRs for HLA-haplotyping (chr6p22.1-21.3). This was followed by real-time nested PCR and high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) for the detection of HBB and SLC25A38 gene mutations, as well as the analysis of all STRs on an automatic genetic analyzer (sequencer). The couple completed four clinical in vitro fertilization (IVF)/PGD cycles. At least one matched unaffected embryo was identified and transferred in each cycle. A twin pregnancy was established in the fourth PGD cycle and genotyping results at all loci were confirmed by prenatal diagnosis. Two healthy baby girls were delivered at week 38 of pregnancy. The need to exclude two familial disorders for HLA-PGD is rarely encountered. The methodological approach described here is fast, accurate, clinically-validated, and of relatively low cost. PMID:26636621

  19. PGD for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: the route to universal tests for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Drüsedau, Marion; Dreesen, Jos C; Derks-Smeets, Inge; Coonen, Edith; van Golde, Ron; van Echten-Arends, Jannie; Kastrop, Peter M M; Blok, Marinus J; Gómez-García, Encarna; Geraedts, Joep P; Smeets, Hubert J; de Die-Smulders, Christine E; Paulussen, Aimée D

    2013-01-01

    Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) is a method of testing in vitro embryos as an alternative to prenatal diagnosis with possible termination of pregnancy in case of an affected child. Recently, PGD for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer caused by BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations has found its way in specialized labs. We describe the route to universal single-cell PGD tests for carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations. Originally, mutation-specific protocols with one or two markers were set up and changed when new couples were not informative. This route of changing protocols was finalized after 2 years with universal tests for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers based on haplotyping of, respectively, 6 (BRCA1) and 8 (BRCA2) microsatellite markers in a multiplex PCR. Using all protocols, 30 couples had a total of 47 PGD cycles performed. Eight cycles were cancelled upon IVF treatment due to hypostimulation. Of the remaining 39 cycles, a total of 261 embryos were biopsied and a genetic diagnosis was obtained in 244 (93%). In 34 of the 39 cycles (84.6%), an embryo transfer was possible and resulted in 8 pregnancies leading to a fetal heart beat per oocyte retrieval of 20.5% and a fetal heart beat per embryonic transfer of 23.5%. The preparation time and costs for set-up and validation of tests are minimized. The informativity of microsatellite markers used in the universal PGD-PCR tests is based on CEPH and deCODE pedigrees, making the tests applicable in 90% of couples coming from these populations. PMID:23531862

  20. Failure mode and effects analysis of witnessing protocols for ensuring traceability during PGD/PGS cycles.

    PubMed

    Cimadomo, Danilo; Ubaldi, Filippo Maria; Capalbo, Antonio; Maggiulli, Roberta; Scarica, Catello; Romano, Stefania; Poggiana, Cristina; Zuccarello, Daniela; Giancani, Adriano; Vaiarelli, Alberto; Rienzi, Laura

    2016-09-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis and aneuploidy testing (PGD/PGS) use is constantly growing in IVF, and embryo/biopsy traceability during the additional laboratory procedures needed is pivotal. An electronic witnessing system (EWS), which showed a significant value in decreasing mismatch occurrence and increasing detection possibilities during standard care IVF, still does not guarantee the same level of efficiency during PGD/PGS cycles. Specifically, EWS cannot follow single embryos throughout the procedure. This is however critical when an unambiguous diagnosis corresponds to each embryo. Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a proactive method generally adopted to define tools ensuring safety along a procedure. Due to the implementation of a large quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based blastocyst stage PGD/PGS programme in our centre, and to evaluate the potential procedural risks, a FMEA was performed in September 2014. Forty-four failure modes were identified, among which six were given a moderate risk priority number (>15) (RPN; product of estimated occurrence, severity and detection). Specific corrective measures were then introduced and implemented, and a second evaluation performed six months later. The meticulous and careful application of such measures allowed the risks to be decreased along the whole protocol, by reducing their estimated occurrence and/or increasing detection possibilities. PMID:27372783

  1. Anesthetic management for oocyte retrieval: An exploratory analysis comparing outcome in in vitro fertilization cycles with and without pre-implantation genetic diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ioscovich, Alexander; Eldar-Geva, Talia; Weitman, Marina; Altarescu, Gheona; Rivilis, Alina; Elstein, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To date, there has been no comparison of outcomes in women undergoing anesthesia for in vitro fertilization (IVF) oocyte retrieval for the purpose of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) because of their or their partner's genetic disease relative to the outcome in women requiring IVF because of fertility issues. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective observational study, wherein all demographic and anesthetic management data were collected from IVF and PGD units' records for a 6-month period. Descriptive analyses and parametric tests were employed. RESULTS: There were 307 cases IVF and 76 cases PGD: most (97.4% and 99.7%, respectively) received general anesthesia with propofol and fentanyl ± dipyrone (90.5% and 93.3%, respectively) with no adverse effects. The only statistically significant difference between IVF and PGD groups that was potentially clinically significant was post-procedure recovery time (23.0 ± 20.4 vs. 29.4 ± 35.8 min, respectively; P < 0.0001), but is explainable as greater caution by Anesthesiologists for higher-risk PGD cases having autosomal dominant diseases that may impact anesthesia management (myotonic dystrophy, neurofibromatosis, Marfan's); two of these cases also recovered in the general post-anesthesia care unit, as a precaution for early diagnosis and treatment of potential post-procedural complication. CONCLUSIONS: Results of this first-ever survey of anesthesia for PGD compared with IVF cases imply that propofol-and-fentanyl-based anesthesia is safe and can be recommended, bearing in mind that with patients who have autosomal dominant diseases impacting anesthetic management it is prudent to be more cautious post-recovery. PMID:24672167

  2. Ethics of PGD: thoughts on the consequences of typing HLA in embryos.

    PubMed

    Edwards, R G

    2004-08-01

    As with so many fields of study associated with assisted human reproduction, many ethical issues are raised by the practice of preimplantation diagnosis of inherited disease (PGD). Some are part and parcel of assisted conception, e.g.the rights of human embryos in vitro and of embryologists to establish them, carry out research and discard them. Others unique to clinical PGD were discussed at an earlier meeting on PGD (Edwards et al., 2003). Recent developments in PGD are discussed briefly in this Commentary, especially the ethics of designer babies. PMID:15333255

  3. Experience of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Hemophilia at the University Hospital Virgen Del Rocío in Spain: Technical and Clinical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Raquel M.; Peciña, Ana; Sánchez, Beatriz; Lozano-Arana, Maria Dolores; García-Lozano, Juan Carlos; Pérez-Garrido, Rosario; Núñez, Ramiro; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are the most common hereditary hemorrhagic disorders, with an X-linked mode of inheritance. Reproductive options for the families affected with hemophilia, aiming at the prevention of the birth of children with severe coagulation disorders, include preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Here we present the results of our PGD Program applied to hemophilia, at the Department of Genetics, Reproduction and Fetal Medicine of the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Seville. A total of 34 couples have been included in our program since 2005 (30 for hemophilia A and 4 for hemophilia B). Overall, 60 cycles were performed, providing a total of 508 embryos. The overall percentage of transfers per cycle was 81.7% and the live birth rate per cycle ranged from 10.3 to 24.1% depending on the methodological approach applied. Although PGD for hemophilia can be focused on gender selection of female embryos, our results demonstrate that methodological approaches that allow the diagnosis of the hemophilia status of every embryo have notorious advantages. Our PGD Program resulted in the birth of 12 healthy babies for 10 out of the 34 couples (29.4%), constituting a relevant achievement for the Spanish Public Health System within the field of haematological disorders. PMID:26258137

  4. A comparison of different lysis buffers to assess allele dropout from single cells for preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, A R; McGrath, J A; Eady, R A; Braude, P R; Handyside, A H

    2001-06-01

    Single cell polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) requires high efficiency and accuracy. Allele dropout (ADO), the random amplification failure of one of the two parental alleles, remains the most significant problem in PCR-based PGD testing since it can result in serious misdiagnosis for compound heterozygous or autosomal dominant conditions. A number of different strategies (including the use of lysis buffers to break down the cell and make the DNA accessible) have been employed to combat ADO with varying degrees of success, yet there is still no consensus among PGD centres over which lysis buffer should be used (ESHRE PGD Consortium, 1999). To address this issue, PCR amplification of three genes (CFTR, LAMA3 and PKP1) at different chromosomal loci was investigated. Single lymphocytes from individuals heterozygous for mutations within each of the three genes were collected and lysed in either alkaline lysis buffer (ALB) or proteinase K/SDS lysis buffer (PK). PCR amplification efficiencies were comparable between alkaline lysis and proteinase K lysis for PCR products spanning each of the three mutated loci (DeltaF508 in CFTR 90% vs 88%; R650X in LAMA3 82% vs 78%; and Y71X in PKP1 91% vs 87%). While there was no appreciable difference between ADO rates between the two lysis buffers for the LAMA3 PCR product (25% vs 26%), there were significant differences in ADO rates between ALB and PK for the CFTR PCR product (0% vs 23%) and the PKP1 PCR product (8% vs 56%). Based on these results, we are currently using ALB in preference to PK/SDS buffer for the lysis of cells in clinical PGD. PMID:11438956

  5. The results of pregnancies after gender selection by pre implantation genetic diagnosis and its relation with couple's age

    PubMed Central

    Panahi, Sorayya; Fahami, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Background: Non-medical utilization of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), like sex selection, is increasing, therefore it is necessary to follow-up the health and outcome of fertilization and newborn's birth followed PGD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of fertilization after sex selection by PGD and the relation between the age of parents and the outcome of fertilization. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective descriptive correlative study conducted on 218 couples in Isfahan. Samples were selected through convenience sampling. The rate of chemical and clinical pregnancy and abortion, the frequency of success in achieving the desired sex, and the mean of gestational age and weight of newborns were gathered through reviewing medical files and phone interviews. Data was analyzed using independent t test and Pearson correlation test. Results: The rate of chemical and clinical pregnancy was 30.7% and 30.3% respectively, the rate of abortion was 26.9%, the frequency of success in achieving the desired sex was 100%, and the mean of gestational age and weight of newborns was 3260 (616) kg and 37.7 (2.07) weeks respectively. There was no significant relation between the age of parents and the rate of abortion, the rate of chemical and clinical pregnancy and newborn's gestational weight. But there was a significant relation between the age of men and gestational age of newborns (P = 0.04). Conclusions: PGD method was 100% successful in achieving the desired sex, but relatively high rate of abortion could indicate the effect of PGD on the embryo development process. PMID:26793251

  6. Medium-Based Noninvasive Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Human α-Thalassemias-SEA

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haitao; Ding, Chenhui; Shen, Xiaoting; Wang, Jing; Li, Rong; Cai, Bing; Xu, Yanwen; Zhong, Yiping; Zhou, Canquan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To develop a noninvasive medium-based preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) test for α-thalassemias-SEA. The embryos of α-thalassemia-SEA carriers undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) were cultured. Single cells were biopsied from blastomeres and subjected to fluorescent gap polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis; the spent culture media that contained embryo genomic DNA and corresponding blastocysts as verification were subjected to quantitative-PCR (Q-PCR) detection of α-thalassemia-SEA. The diagnosis efficiency and allele dropout (ADO) ratio were calculated, and the cell-free DNA concentration was quantitatively assessed in the culture medium. The diagnosis efficiency of medium-based α-thalassemias–SEA detection significantly increased compared with that of biopsy-based fluorescent gap PCR analysis (88.6% vs 82.1%, P < 0.05). There is no significant difference regarding ADO ratio between them. The optimal time for medium-based α-thalassemias–SEA detection is Day 5 (D5) following IVF. Medium-based α-thalassemias–SEA detection could represent a novel, quick, and noninvasive approach for carriers to undergo IVF and PGD. PMID:25816038

  7. Accreditation of the PGD laboratory.

    PubMed

    Harper, J C; Sengupta, S; Vesela, K; Thornhill, A; Dequeker, E; Coonen, E; Morris, M A

    2010-04-01

    Accreditation according to an internationally recognized standard is increasingly acknowledged as the single most effective route to comprehensive laboratory quality assurance, and many countries are progressively moving towards compulsory accreditation of medical testing laboratories. The ESHRE PGD Consortium and some regulatory bodies recommend that all PGD laboratories should be accredited or working actively towards accreditation, according to the internationally recognized standard ISO 15189, 'Medical laboratories-Particular requirements for quality and competence'. ISO 15189 requires comprehensive quality assurance. Detailed management and technical requirements are defined in the two major chapters. The management requirements address quality management including the quality policy and manual, document control, non-conformities and corrective actions, continual improvement, auditing, management review, contracts, referrals and resolution of complaints. Technical requirements include personnel competence (both technical and medical), equipment, accommodation and environment, and pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical processes. Emphasis is placed on the particular requirements of patient care: notably sample identification and traceability, test validation and interpretation and reporting of results. Quality indicators must be developed to monitor contributions to patient care and continual improvement. We discuss the implementation of ISO 15189 with a specific emphasis on the PGD laboratory, highlight elements of particular importance or difficulty and provide suggestions of effective and efficient ways to obtain accreditation. The focus is on the European environment although the principles are globally applicable. PMID:20097923

  8. The embryo as moral work object: PGD/IVF staff views and experiences

    PubMed Central

    Ehrich, Kathryn; Williams, Clare; Farsides, Bobbie

    2008-01-01

    We report on one aspect of a study that explored the views and experiences of practitioners and scientists on social, ethical and clinical dilemmas encountered when working in the field of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for serious genetic disorders. The study produced an ethnography based on observation, interviews and ethics discussion groups with staff from two PGD/IVF Units in the UK. We focus here on staff perceptions of work with embryos that entails disposing of ‘affected’ or ‘spare’ embryos or using them for research. A variety of views were expressed on the ‘embryo question’ in contrast to polarised media debates. We argue that the prevailing policy acceptance of destroying affected embryos, and allowing research on embryos up to 14 days leaves some staff with rarely reported, ambivalent feelings. Staff views are under-researched in this area and we focus on how they may reconcile their personal moral views with the ethical framework in their field. Staff construct embryos in a variety of ways as ‘moral work objects’. This allows them to shift attention between micro-level and overarching institutional work goals, building on Casper's concept of ‘work objects’ and focusing on negotiation of the social order in a morally contested field. PMID:18444955

  9. Genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Genetic counseling (and prenatal diagnosis) provides parents with the knowledge to make intelligent, informed decisions regarding possible pregnancy and its outcome. If a pregnancy occurs the couple may want to evaluate the ...

  10. Alport Syndrome Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... PGD can be performed on embryos created through in vitro fertilization. PGD refers to testing an embryo to determine whether it has the same genetic abnormality as the parent. Families interested in such an option should seek the counsel of ...

  11. [Genetic kidney diseases: new perspectives on diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Bouatou, Yassine; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane; Parvex, Paloma; De Seigneux, Sophie

    2016-02-24

    Suspected renal inherited disorders are regularly evaluated in nephrology consultations both in adults and children. A positive family history and/or a typical phenotype should lead to genetic investigations. A confirmatory diagnosis integrated in a multidisciplinary genetic counseling approach gives patient guidance for further pregnancy. It also allows physician to better stratify disease risk and indicates treatment in some cases. The time to diagnosis and costs have been dramatically reduced thanks to next generation sequencing in several cases of complex inherited nephrologic syndromes. PMID:27039603

  12. [Bioethics in genetic diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Takebe, H

    2000-06-01

    Human genetics, or medical genetics have been rarely taught in most of the medical schools in Japan, as there are only several medical schools with genetics departments among 80 medical schools in Japan. Bioethics has just been becoming an important issue in the medical community in Japan. People hate to be told of hereditary diseases, possibly due to the traditional concept of hereditary diseases as punishment for the evil acts of the ancestors. Recent rapid progress in genetic diagnosis and therapy, however, requires the medical community in Japan to consider the bioethical aspects related to human genetics. We need proper guidelines, and the efforts have been made by the government as well as by the Society for Familial Tumor to propose practical guidelines for human genetics. They may considerably be different from those in the Western countries. PMID:10879054

  13. Genetic Issues in the Diagnosis of Dystonias

    PubMed Central

    Petrucci, Simona; Valente, Enza Maria

    2013-01-01

    Dystonias are heterogeneous hyperkinetic movement disorders characterized by involuntary muscle contractions which result in twisting and repetitive movements and abnormal postures. Several causative genes have been identified, but their genetic bases still remain elusive. Primary Torsion Dystonias (PTDs), in which dystonia is the only clinical sign, can be inherited in a monogenic fashion, and many genes and loci have been identified for autosomal dominant (DYT1/TOR1A; DYT6/THAP1; DYT4/TUBB4a; DYT7; DYT13; DYT21; DYT23/CIZ1; DYT24/ANO3; DYT25/GNAL) and recessive (DYT2; DYT17) forms. However most sporadic cases, especially those with late-onset, are likely multifactorial, with genetic and environmental factors interplaying to reach a threshold of disease. At present, genetic counseling of dystonia patients remains a difficult task. Recently non-motor clinical findings in dystonias, new highlights in the pathophysiology of the disease, and the availability of high-throughput genome-wide techniques are proving useful tools to better understand the complexity of PTD genetics. We briefly review the genetic basis of the most common forms of hereditary PTDs, and discuss relevant issues related to molecular diagnosis and genetic counseling. PMID:23596437

  14. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis and the 'new' eugenics.

    PubMed

    King, D S

    1999-04-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PID) is often seen as an improvement upon prenatal testing. I argue that PID may exacerbate the eugenic features of prenatal testing and make possible an expanded form of free-market eugenics. The current practice of prenatal testing is eugenic in that its aim is to reduce the numbers of people with genetic disorders. Due to social pressures and eugenic attitudes held by clinical geneticists in most countries, it results in eugenic outcomes even though no state coercion is involved. I argue that technological advances may soon make PID widely accessible. Because abortion is not involved, and multiple embryos are available, PID is radically more effective as a tool of genetic selection. It will also make possible selection on the basis of non-pathological characteristics, leading, potentially, to a full-blown free-market eugenics. For these reasons, I argue that PID should be strictly regulated. PMID:10226925

  15. Normal birth following PGD for reciprocal translocation after serial vitrification of oocytes from a poor responder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jin Tae; Son, Weon-Young; Zhang, Xiao Yun; Ao, Asangla; Tan, Seang Lin; Holzer, Hananel

    2012-11-01

    This case study reports the first successful birth outcome following preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for a chromosome translocation in embryos generated by serial vitrification of oocytes. A couple presented to the fertility clinic with 2 years of primary infertility. The woman was diagnosed with poor ovarian reserve and her partner was diagnosed with severe oligoteratozoospermia and the reciprocal translocation 46,XY,t(1;7)(p36.1;q11.23). Following counselling, the couple opted for serial vitrification of oocytes followed by PGD. A total of 31 oocytes were obtained in five egg collection cycles over a period of 12 months and 27 metaphase-II oocytes were vitrified. Nineteen of the 27 vitrified oocytes survived warming: 14 oocytes from the vitrified group and three oocytes from the fresh cycle were fertilized by intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Eleven embryos, including three from the fresh cycle, were biopsied on day 3 post insemination. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization was performed for the specific chromosomes involved in translocation. Only two embryos from the cryopreservation cycles were diagnosed as normal/balanced, one of which was transferred on day 5 post insemination. A normal healthy female infant was born at week 42 of gestation. PMID:22995749

  16. DNA diagnosis of human genetic individuality.

    PubMed

    Pena, S D; Prado, V F; Epplen, J T

    1995-11-01

    DNA studies of the human genome have shown polymorphic variation at thousands of sites, defining an absolute genetic uniqueness for each individual. There are many circumstances in which it may be desirable to diagnose this molecular individuality, as for instance, in criminal investigations or paternity testing. Several techniques can be used for this DNA diagnosis and we can choose among them the one that best suits the specific problem at hand. In this review we describe the main methodologies in current use to investigate human DNA polymorphisms, discussing the best application of each option, as well as their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:8751139

  17. The Impact of Biopsy on Human Embryo Developmental Potential during Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cimadomo, Danilo; Capalbo, Antonio; Ubaldi, Filippo Maria; Scarica, Catello; Palagiano, Antonio; Canipari, Rita; Rienzi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis and Screening (PGD/PGS) for monogenic diseases and/or numerical/structural chromosomal abnormalities is a tool for embryo testing aimed at identifying nonaffected and/or euploid embryos in a cohort produced during an IVF cycle. A critical aspect of this technology is the potential detrimental effect that the biopsy itself can have upon the embryo. Different embryo biopsy strategies have been proposed. Cleavage stage blastomere biopsy still represents the most commonly used method in Europe nowadays, although this approach has been shown to have a negative impact on embryo viability and implantation potential. Polar body biopsy has been proposed as an alternative to embryo biopsy especially for aneuploidy testing. However, to date no sufficiently powered study has clarified the impact of this procedure on embryo reproductive competence. Blastocyst stage biopsy represents nowadays the safest approach not to impact embryo implantation potential. For this reason, as well as for the evidences of a higher consistency of the molecular analysis when performed on trophectoderm cells, blastocyst biopsy implementation is gradually increasing worldwide. The aim of this review is to present the evidences published to date on the impact of the biopsy at different stages of preimplantation development upon human embryos reproductive potential. PMID:26942198

  18. The Impact of Biopsy on Human Embryo Developmental Potential during Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Cimadomo, Danilo; Capalbo, Antonio; Ubaldi, Filippo Maria; Scarica, Catello; Palagiano, Antonio; Canipari, Rita; Rienzi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis and Screening (PGD/PGS) for monogenic diseases and/or numerical/structural chromosomal abnormalities is a tool for embryo testing aimed at identifying nonaffected and/or euploid embryos in a cohort produced during an IVF cycle. A critical aspect of this technology is the potential detrimental effect that the biopsy itself can have upon the embryo. Different embryo biopsy strategies have been proposed. Cleavage stage blastomere biopsy still represents the most commonly used method in Europe nowadays, although this approach has been shown to have a negative impact on embryo viability and implantation potential. Polar body biopsy has been proposed as an alternative to embryo biopsy especially for aneuploidy testing. However, to date no sufficiently powered study has clarified the impact of this procedure on embryo reproductive competence. Blastocyst stage biopsy represents nowadays the safest approach not to impact embryo implantation potential. For this reason, as well as for the evidences of a higher consistency of the molecular analysis when performed on trophectoderm cells, blastocyst biopsy implementation is gradually increasing worldwide. The aim of this review is to present the evidences published to date on the impact of the biopsy at different stages of preimplantation development upon human embryos reproductive potential. PMID:26942198

  19. [Having a child and PND/PGD access in women with a BRCA1/2 mutation? Different approach whether ill or healthy].

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Isabelle; Prodromou, Niki; Coupier, Isabelle; Huiart, Laetitia; Moretta, Jessica; Noguès, Catherine; Julian-Reynier, Claire

    2014-11-01

    Genetic tests in families with a mutation related to breast and ovarian cancers (BRCA1/2) are now offered to the persons before completion of their reproductive project. The aim of this qualitative study was to descriptively explore how the issues of reproduction are faced in women belonging to these families, and how the possible use of prenatal diagnostic (PND) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) would be faced in a theoretical context. We conducted in-depth interviews, face to face, according to the so-called Grounded Theory approach. Twenty women with a BRCA genetic mutation participated in the study (age range: 31-57 years); 12 have had a breast and/or ovarian cancer. The knowledge of having the mutation did not modify the parental project; however prophylactic anexectomy was likely to alter it in some women. If the majority of women were in favor of PGD (n = 14), medical termination of pregnancy was a constraint towards the position in relation to PND. Besides ethical and moral arguments, the women's attitudes were constructed differently according to their own personal or familial experience of the disease. The women's perceptions of the cancer severity, risk and cure were organized according to this experience. PMID:25418592

  20. Genetic analysis for early diagnosis of otorhinolaryngeal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Propping, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Familiarity with the concepts and methods of human genetics is important in order to be able to perform genetic analysis. The grade of predictability of a genetic disease is partly given by formal genetics but also depends on the importance of the mutated gene for the phenotype. Possibilities for genetic analysis range from differential diagnosis to predictive diagnosis to prenatal diagnosis. After initial consultation in which the physician fully explains the procedure to the patient, it is mandatory that the patient give his full consent. This article summarises and evaluates current knowledge about genetic analysis of important otorhinolaryngeal diseases, including hereditary hearing disabilities, olfactory malfunction, hereditary tumorous diseases, hereditary syndromes and dysplasias. In addition, this article discusses genetic diseases that affect voice and speech, highlights the relevance of human genetic consultation and discusses the importance of embedding genetic analysis in medicine in general. PMID:22073089

  1. The Performance of Whole Genome Amplification Methods and Next-Generation Sequencing for Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis of Chromosomal Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Wang, Li; Wang, Hui; Ma, Minyue; Wang, Xiaohong; Li, Yi; Zhang, Wenke; Zhang, Jianguang; Cram, David S; Yao, Yuanqing

    2015-04-20

    Reliable and accurate pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of patient's embryos by next-generation sequencing (NGS) is dependent on efficient whole genome amplification (WGA) of a representative biopsy sample. However, the performance of the current state of the art WGA methods has not been evaluated for sequencing. Using low template DNA (15 pg) and single cells, we showed that the two PCR-based WGA systems SurePlex and MALBAC are superior to the REPLI-g WGA multiple displacement amplification (MDA) system in terms of consistent and reproducible genome coverage and sequence bias across the 24 chromosomes, allowing better normalization of test to reference sequencing data. When copy number variation sequencing (CNV-Seq) was applied to single cell WGA products derived by either SurePlex or MALBAC amplification, we showed that known disease CNVs in the range of 3-15 Mb could be reliably and accurately detected at the correct genomic positions. These findings indicate that our CNV-Seq pipeline incorporating either SurePlex or MALBAC as the key initial WGA step is a powerful methodology for clinical PGD to identify euploid embryos in a patient's cohort for uterine transplantation. PMID:25953353

  2. Successful hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for Fanconi anemia from an unaffected HLA-genotype-identical sibling selected using preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Satkiran S; Kahn, Jeffrey P; MacMillan, Margaret L; Ramsay, Norma K C; Wagner, John E

    2004-02-01

    The only proven cure for Fanconi anemia (FA)-associated bone marrow failure is successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, HSCT with donors other than HLA-identical siblings is associated with high morbidity and poor survival. Therefore, we used preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to select an embryo produced by in vitro fertilization (IVF) that was unaffected by FA and was HLA-identical to the proband. The patient was a 6-year-old girl with FA and myelodysplasia previously treated with oxymetholone and prednisone. After her parents underwent 5 cycles of IVF with intrauterine transfer of 7 embryos over a span of 4 years, successful pregnancy ensued. Twenty-eight days after delivery, the patient underwent transplantation with her newborn sibling donor's HLA-identical umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Neutrophil recovery occurred on day 17 without subsequent acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease. Currently, 2.5 years after transplantation, the patient is well and hematopoiesis is normal. In summary, we have described the first successful transplantation, using IVF and PGD, of HSCs from a donor selected on the basis of specific, desirable disease and HLA characteristics. The medical, legal, and ethical issues involved with this approach are discussed. PMID:14504102

  3. Meiotic outcomes of three-way translocations ascertained in cleavage-stage embryos: refinement of reproductive risks and implications for PGD

    PubMed Central

    Scriven, Paul N; Bint, Susan M; Davies, Angela F; Ogilvie, Caroline Mackie

    2014-01-01

    Our study provides an analysis of the outcome of meiotic segregation of three-way translocations in cleavage-stage embryos and the accuracy and limitations of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) using the fluorescence in situ hybridization technique. We propose a general model for estimating reproductive risks for carriers of this class of complex chromosome rearrangement. The data presented describe six cycles for four couples where one partner has a three-way translocation. For male heterozygotes, 27.6% of embryos were consistent with 3:3 alternate segregation resulting in a normal or balanced translocation chromosome complement; 41.4% were consistent with 3:3 adjacent segregation of the translocations, comprising 6.9% reflecting adjacent-1 and 34.5% adjacent-2 segregation; 24.1% were consistent with 4:2 nondisjunction; none showed 5:1 or 6:0 segregation; the probable mode could not be ascertained for 6.9% of embryos due to complex mosaicism or nucleus fragmentation. The test accuracy for male heterozygotes was estimated to be 93.1% with 100% sensitivity and 75% specificity. With 72.4% prevalence, the predictive value was estimated to be 91.3% for an abnormal test result and 100% for a normal test result. Two of four couples had a healthy baby following PGD. The proportion of normal/balanced embryo could be significantly less for female heterozygotes, and our model indicates that this could be detrimental to the effectiveness of PGD. A 20% risk of live-born offspring with an unbalanced translocation is generally accepted, largely based on the obstetric history of female heterozygotes; we suggest that a 3% risk may be more appropriate for male carriers. PMID:24129433

  4. Prenatal screening and prenatal diagnosis: contemporary practices in light of the past.

    PubMed

    Iltis, Ana S

    2016-06-01

    The 20th century eugenics movement in the USA and contemporary practices involving prenatal screening (PNS), prenatal diagnosis (PND), abortion and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) share important morally relevant similarities. I summarise some features of the 20th century eugenics movement; describe the contemporary standard of care in the USA regarding PNS, PND, abortion and PGD; and demonstrate that the 'old eugenics' the contemporary standard of care share the underlying view that social resources should be invested to prevent the birth of people with certain characteristics. This comparison makes evident the difficulty of crafting moral arguments that treat some uses of PNS, PND, abortion and PGD as licit and others as illicit. PMID:27161556

  5. The importance of genetic diagnosis for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Ginjaar, Ieke B; Bushby, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy are caused by mutations in the dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. Large deletions and duplications are most common, but small mutations have been found as well. Having a correct diagnosis is important for family planning and providing proper care to patients according to published guidelines. With mutation-specific therapies under development for DMD, a correct diagnosis is now also important for assessing whether patients are eligible for treatments. This review discusses different mutations causing DMD, diagnostic techniques available for making a genetic diagnosis for children suspected of DMD and the importance of having a specific genetic diagnosis in the context of emerging genetic therapies for DMD. PMID:26754139

  6. The importance of genetic diagnosis for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Ginjaar, Ieke B; Bushby, Kate

    2016-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy are caused by mutations in the dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. Large deletions and duplications are most common, but small mutations have been found as well. Having a correct diagnosis is important for family planning and providing proper care to patients according to published guidelines. With mutation-specific therapies under development for DMD, a correct diagnosis is now also important for assessing whether patients are eligible for treatments. This review discusses different mutations causing DMD, diagnostic techniques available for making a genetic diagnosis for children suspected of DMD and the importance of having a specific genetic diagnosis in the context of emerging genetic therapies for DMD. PMID:26754139

  7. Probabilistic Modeling of Imaging, Genetics and Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Batmanghelich, Nematollah K; Dalca, Adrian; Quon, Gerald; Sabuncu, Mert; Golland, Polina

    2016-07-01

    We propose a unified Bayesian framework for detecting genetic variants associated with disease by exploiting image-based features as an intermediate phenotype. The use of imaging data for examining genetic associations promises new directions of analysis, but currently the most widely used methods make sub-optimal use of the richness that these data types can offer. Currently, image features are most commonly selected based on their relevance to the disease phenotype. Then, in a separate step, a set of genetic variants is identified to explain the selected features. In contrast, our method performs these tasks simultaneously in order to jointly exploit information in both data types. The analysis yields probabilistic measures of clinical relevance for both imaging and genetic markers. We derive an efficient approximate inference algorithm that handles the high dimensionality of image and genetic data. We evaluate the algorithm on synthetic data and demonstrate that it outperforms traditional models. We also illustrate our method on Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative data. PMID:26886973

  8. Lactose intolerance: diagnosis, genetic, and clinical factors.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Rejane; de Campos Mazo, Daniel Ferraz; Carrilho, Flair José

    2012-01-01

    Most people are born with the ability to digest lactose, the major carbohydrate in milk and the main source of nutrition until weaning. Approximately 75% of the world's population loses this ability at some point, while others can digest lactose into adulthood. This review discusses the lactase-persistence alleles that have arisen in different populations around the world, diagnosis of lactose intolerance, and its symptomatology and management. PMID:22826639

  9. Lactose intolerance: diagnosis, genetic, and clinical factors

    PubMed Central

    Mattar, Rejane; de Campos Mazo, Daniel Ferraz; Carrilho, Flair José

    2012-01-01

    Most people are born with the ability to digest lactose, the major carbohydrate in milk and the main source of nutrition until weaning. Approximately 75% of the world’s population loses this ability at some point, while others can digest lactose into adulthood. This review discusses the lactase-persistence alleles that have arisen in different populations around the world, diagnosis of lactose intolerance, and its symptomatology and management. PMID:22826639

  10. Defects in Peroxisomal 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase Isoform PGD2 Prevent Gametophytic Interaction in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hölscher, Christian; Lutterbey, Marie-Christin; Lansing, Hannes; Meyer, Tanja; Fischer, Kerstin; von Schaewen, Antje

    2016-05-01

    We studied the localization of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD) isoforms of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Similar polypeptide lengths of PGD1, PGD2, and PGD3 obscured which isoform may represent the cytosolic and/or plastidic enzyme plus whether PGD2 with a peroxisomal targeting motif also might target plastids. Reporter-fusion analyses in protoplasts revealed that, with a free N terminus, PGD1 and PGD3 accumulate in the cytosol and chloroplasts, whereas PGD2 remains in the cytosol. Mutagenesis of a conserved second ATG enhanced the plastidic localization of PGD1 and PGD3 but not PGD2. Amino-terminal deletions of PGD2 fusions with a free C terminus resulted in peroxisomal import after dimerization, and PGD2 could be immunodetected in purified peroxisomes. Repeated selfing of pgd2 transfer (T-)DNA alleles yielded no homozygous mutants, although siliques and seeds of heterozygous plants developed normally. Detailed analyses of the C-terminally truncated PGD2-1 protein showed that peroxisomal import and catalytic activity are abolished. Reciprocal backcrosses of pgd2-1 suggested that missing PGD activity in peroxisomes primarily affects the male gametophyte. Tetrad analyses in the quartet1-2 background revealed that pgd2-1 pollen is vital and in vitro germination normal, but pollen tube growth inside stylar tissues appeared less directed. Mutual gametophytic sterility was overcome by complementation with a genomic construct but not with a version lacking the first ATG. These analyses showed that peroxisomal PGD2 activity is required for guided growth of the male gametophytes and pollen tube-ovule interaction. Our report finally demonstrates an essential role of oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway reactions in peroxisomes, likely needed to sustain critical levels of nitric oxide and/or jasmonic acid, whose biosynthesis both depend on NADPH provision. PMID:26941195

  11. [Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis by Blastocentesis: Problems and Perspectives].

    PubMed

    Zhigalina, D I; Skryabin, N A; Artyukhova, V G; Svetlakov, A V; Lebedev, I N

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of cell-free DNA in blastocoele fluid opens new perspectives for the development of preimplantation genetic diagnosis of human chromosomal and genetic diseases. In this review we analyzed the results of the first studies, which made it possible to evaluate the effectiveness of the application of a new source of biological material and showed a high degree of agreement between the results of molecular karyotyping with cell-free DNA and blastocyst cells. The results suggest the possibility of developing a noninvasive method of preimplantation genetic diagnosis, which may open a new round of progress in the field of assisted reproductive technologies and the genetics of early stages of human ontogenesis. PMID:27183788

  12. PGD training and its impact on general dentist practice patterns.

    PubMed

    Atchison, Kathryn A; Mito, Ronald S; Rosenberg, Dara Jean; Lefever, Karen H; Lin, Sylvia; Engelhardt, Rita

    2002-12-01

    This study compares the practice patterns of general dentists with and without formal advanced training in AGED or GPR programs. The UCLA School of Dentistry surveyed a random selection of dentists from graduating years 1989, 1993, and 1997 as part of a Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA)-supported evaluation of the impact of federal funding on postgraduate general dentistry (PGD) programs. Using a sample drawn by the American Dental Association (ADA), 6,725 dentists were surveyed about their practice, advanced training, patients served, and services provided. Of the 2,029 dentists (30 percent) who responded, 49 percent were practicing dentists with no formal advanced training in general dentistry or one of the eight ADA specialties; 7 percent had Advanced Education in General Dentistry (AEGD) experience; 20 percent trained in a General Practice Residency (GPR); and 24 percent were specialists. Additionally, 7 percent of respondents had PGD training and a clinical specialty. GPR-trained dentists were significantly more likely to be on a hospital staff and to treat medically compromised patients even after ten years of practice. PGD dentists were less likely to seek specialty training. Major reasons for seeking PGD training were increasing treatment speed, learning to treat medically compromised patients, and wanting hospital experience. Primary reasons for not selecting training were starting a practice and having a great practice opportunity. Our conclusion is that PGD training has an enduring impact on practice patterns and improves access to dental care for underserved populations. PMID:12521061

  13. Genetics and diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Bichet, Daniel G

    2012-04-01

    Most of the central diabetes insipidus cases seen in general practice are acquired but the rare cases of hereditary autosomal dominant or recessive neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus have provided further cellular understanding of the mechanisms responsible for pre-hormone folding, maturation and release. Autosomal dominant central diabetes insipidus is secondary to the toxic accumulation of vasopressin mutants as fibrillar aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum of hypothalamic magnocellular neurons producing vasopressin. As well, Trpv1(-/-) and Trpv4(-/-) mice have shed new light on the perception of tonicity through the stretch receptors TRPVs expressed both in central and peripheral neurons. The genomic information provided by sequencing the AVP gene is key to the routine care of these patients and, as in other genetic diseases, reduces health costs and provides psychological benefits to patients and families. In addition, simple, inexpensive blood and urine measurements together with clinical characteristics and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could distinguish between central, nephrogenic and polydipsic cases. PMID:22520736

  14. Genetic testing and early diagnosis and intervention: boon or burden?

    PubMed Central

    Hepburn, E R

    1996-01-01

    The possibility of early diagnosis and intervention is radically changed by the advent of genetic testing. The recent report of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics is timely and helpful. I have suggested, that not only the severity of the disability indicated by genetic information, and the accuracy of the data, ought to govern the approach to the implementation of screening for genetic disorders. In addition, assessment of the value of the information to those involved should be considered. The efficacy of the available therapeutic measures, combined with the prognostic data are important indices of the value of the information. These measures fall into three categories and thus indicate that three different courses of intervention may be appropriate. Three approaches to diagnosis and intervention are then outlined, drawing on the experience of various clinical initiatives. PMID:8731537

  15. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for cystic fibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Biazotti, Maria Cristina Santoro; Pinto, Walter; de Albuquerque, Maria Cecília Romano Maciel; Fujihara, Litsuko Shimabukuro; Suganuma, Cláudia Haru; Reigota, Renata Bednar; Bertuzzo, Carmen Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. This disorder produces a variable phenotype including lung disease, pancreatic insufficiency, and meconium ileus plus bilateral agenesis of the vas deferens causing obstructive azoospermia and male infertility. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis is an alternative that allows identification of embryos affected by this or other genetic diseases. We report a case of couple with cystic fibrosis; the woman had the I148 T mutation and the man had the Delta F508 gene mutation. The couple underwent in vitro fertilization, associated with preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and with subsequent selection of healthy embryos for uterine transfer. The result was an uneventful pregnancy and delivery of a healthy male baby. PMID:25993078

  16. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for cystic fibrosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Biazotti, Maria Cristina Santoro; Pinto Junior, Walter; Albuquerque, Maria Cecília Romano Maciel de; Fujihara, Litsuko Shimabukuro; Suganuma, Cláudia Haru; Reigota, Renata Bednar; Bertuzzo, Carmen Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. This disorder produces a variable phenotype including lung disease, pancreatic insufficiency, and meconium ileus plus bilateral agenesis of the vas deferens causing obstructive azoospermia and male infertility. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis is an alternative that allows identification of embryos affected by this or other genetic diseases. We report a case of couple with cystic fibrosis; the woman had the I148 T mutation and the man had the Delta F508 gene mutation. The couple underwent in vitro fertilization, associated with preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and with subsequent selection of healthy embryos for uterine transfer. The result was an uneventful pregnancy and delivery of a healthy male baby. PMID:25993078

  17. Hyperinsulinaemic Hypoglycaemia: Genetic Mechanisms, Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Zainaba; Arya, Ved Bhushan; Hussain, Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia (HH) is characterized by unregulated insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells. Untreated hypoglycaemia in infants can lead to seizures, developmental delay, and subsequent permanent brain injury. Early identification and meticulous managementof these patients is vital to prevent neurological insult. Mutations in eight different genes (ABCC8, KCNJ11, GLUD1, CGK, HADH, SLC16A1, HNF4A and UCP2) have been identified to date in patients with congenital forms of hyperinsulinism (CHI). The most severe forms of CHI are due to mutations in ABCC8 and KCJN11, which encode the two components of pancreatic β-cell ATP-sensitive potassium channel. Recent advancement in understanding the genetic aetiology, histological characterisation into focal and diffuse variety combined with improved imaging (such as fluorine 18 L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine positron emission tomography 18F-DOPA-PET scanning) and laparoscopic surgical techniques have greatly improved management. In adults, HH can be due to an insulinoma, pancreatogenous hypoglycaemic syndrome, post gastric-bypass surgery for morbid obesity as well as to mutations in insulin receptor gene. This review provides an overview of the molecular basis of CHI and outlines the clinical presentation, diagnostic criteria, and management of these patients. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23032149

  18. Workshop on molecular methods for genetic diagnosis. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Rinchik, E.M.

    1997-07-01

    The Sarah Lawrence College Human Genetics Program received Department of Energy funding to offer a continuing medical education workshop for genetic counselors in the New York metropolitan area. According to statistics from the National Society of Genetic Counselors, there are approximately 160 genetic counselors working in the tri-state area (New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut), and many of them had been working in the field for more than 10 years. Thus, there was a real need to offer these counselors an in-depth opportunity to learn the specifics of the major advances in molecular genetics, and, in particular, the new approaches to diagnostic testing for genetic disease. As a result of the DOE Award DE-FG02-95ER62048 ($20,583), in July 1995 we offered the {open_quotes}Workshop on Molecular Methods for Genetic Diagnosis{close_quotes} for 24 genetic counselors in the New York metropolitan area. The workshop included an initial review session on the basics of molecular biology, lectures and discussions on past and current topics in molecular genetics and diagnostic procedures, and, importantly, daily laboratory exercises. Each counselor gained not only background, but also firsthand experience, in the major techniques of biochemical and molecular methods for diagnosing genetic diseases as well as in mathematical and computational techniques involved in human genetics analyses. Our goal in offering this workshop was not to make genetic counselors experts in these laboratory diagnostic techniques, but to acquaint them, by hands-on experience, about some of the techniques currently in use. We also wanted to provide them a technical foundation upon which they can understand and appreciate new technical developments arising in the near future.

  19. PGD2-CRTH2 pathway promotes tubulointerstitial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hideyuki; Yan, Xiaoxiang; Nagata, Nanae; Aritake, Kosuke; Katsumata, Yoshinori; Matsuhashi, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Masataka; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Urade, Yoshihiro; Asano, Koichiro; Kubo, Masato; Utsunomiya, Yasunori; Hosoya, Tatsuo; Fukuda, Keiichi; Sano, Motoaki

    2012-11-01

    Urinary excretion of lipocalin-type PGD(2) synthase (L-PGDS), which converts PG H(2) to PGD(2), increases in early diabetic nephropathy. In addition, L-PGDS expression in the tubular epithelium increases in adriamycin-induced nephropathy, suggesting that locally produced L-PGDS may promote the development of CKD. In this study, we found that L-PGDS-derived PGD(2) contributes to the progression of renal fibrosis via CRTH2-mediated activation of Th2 lymphocytes. In a mouse model, the tubular epithelium synthesized L-PGDS de novo after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). L-PGDS-knockout mice and CRTH2-knockout mice both exhibited less renal fibrosis, reduced infiltration of Th2 lymphocytes into the cortex, and decreased production of the Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13. Furthermore, oral administration of a CRTH2 antagonist, beginning 3 days after UUO, suppressed the progression of renal fibrosis. Ablation of IL-4 and IL-13 also ameliorated renal fibrosis in the UUO kidney. Taken together, these data suggest that blocking the activation of CRTH2 by PGD(2) might be a strategy to slow the progression of renal fibrosis in CKD. PMID:22997255

  20. Critical Issues for Dentistry: PGD Program Directors Respond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atchison, Kathryn A.; Cheffetz, Susan E.

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed directors of programs in postgraduate education in general dentistry (PGD) about critical issues facing their programs. Identified 12 themes: lack of postdoctoral applicants; student quality; professionalism and attitudes; number of postdoctoral positions; lack of funding; quality of facilities; special patient care; program curriculum;…

  1. Genetic diagnosis and acetazolamide treatment of familial hemiplegic migraine.

    PubMed

    Omata, Taku; Takanashi, Jun-ichi; Wada, Takahito; Arai, Hidee; Tanabe, Yuzo

    2011-04-01

    A female patient presented with horizontal gaze nystagmus, mild cerebellar ataxia, recurrent headache and hemiplegia since childhood with cerebellar atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging. Genetic analysis revealed a CACNA1A gene mutation, leading to a diagnosis of familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM1). FHM is very rare, but should be considered as a differential diagnosis for childhood cerebellar symptoms and/or cerebellar atrophy. To avoid missing FHM1, a detailed clinical history including headache or hemiplegia is essential. Oral acetazolamide during the aura phase, comprising mild headache and abnormal leg sensation, relieved these symptoms in this patient, suggesting that acetazolamide could represent a first line of treatment. PMID:20542393

  2. Genetic imprecision: Diagnosis of possible defects often cannot predict prognosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, R.

    1991-05-01

    The author discusses the difficulties in using current genetic information for the detection of hereditary diseases. Although there have been many advances in cytogenetic and molecular testing, the diagnosis of defects does not necessarily predict prognosis. Detection of mutant alleles, mosaicism, familial chromosomal rearrangements and de novo chromosomal rearrangements lends uncertainties to genetic counselling. The problems have been compounded by a lack of follow-up to determine if a defect actually exists in a fetus aborted as a result of counselling; nor has there been long-term follow-up of fetuses carried to term that appear healthy at birth. Disappointments after the discovery of the cystic fibrosis gene were due to discovery of many mutations of the gene, making screening for the disease difficult. Some genetic counselors question the benefits of screening for this disease since with advances in treatment, life span has been lengthened and quality of life has been improved.

  3. The first family with Tay-Sachs disease in Cyprus: Genetic analysis reveals a nonsense (c.78G>A) and a silent (c.1305C>T) mutation and allows preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Theodoros; Christopoulos, George; Anastasiadou, Violetta; Hadjiloizou, Stavros; Cregeen, David; Jackson, Marie; Mavrikiou, Gavriella; Kleanthous, Marina; Drousiotou, Anthi

    2014-12-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the HEXA gene resulting in β-hexosaminidase A (HEX A) deficiency and neuronal accumulation of GM2 ganglioside. We describe the first patient with Tay-Sachs disease in the Cypriot population, a juvenile case which presented with developmental regression at the age of five. The diagnosis was confirmed by measurement of HEXA activity in plasma, peripheral leucocytes and fibroblasts. Sequencing the HEXA gene resulted in the identification of two previously described mutations: the nonsense mutation c.78G>A (p.Trp26X) and the silent mutation c.1305C>T (p.=). The silent mutation was reported once before in a juvenile TSD patient of West Indian origin with an unusually mild phenotype. The presence of this mutation in another juvenile TSD patient provides further evidence that it is a disease-causing mutation. Successful preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) and prenatal follow-up were provided to the couple. PMID:25606403

  4. High volume molecular genetic identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms using Genetic Bit Analysis Application to human genetic diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce-Jacino, M.T.; Reynolds, J.; Nikiforov, T.

    1994-09-01

    The most common type of genetic disease-associated mutation is the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Because most genetic diseases can be caused by multiple SNPs in the same gene, effective routine diagnosis of complex genetic diseases is dependent on a simple and reliable method of interrogating SNP sites. Molecular Tool`s solid phase assay capable of direct genotyping (single base sequencing) of SNP sites, Genetic Bit Analysis (GBA), involves hybridization-capture of a single-stranded PCR product to a sequence-specific, microtiter plate-bound oligonucleotide primer. The captured PCR product then acts as template for single-base extension of the capture primer across the polymorphic site, enabling direct determination of the base composition of the polymorphism through a simple colormetric assay. Genotyping in a high volume, semi-automated, processing system with a current capacity of 100 SNP interrogations per technician per day enables the screening of candidate mutations rapidly and cost-effectively, critically important to comprehensive genetic diagnosis. Using this gel-free technology, we have developed prototype diagnostic tests for CFTR and ApoE polymorphisms which enable direct sequencing of the polymorphic base at each site of interest. Routine clinical diagnosis of genetically complex diseases such as cystic fibrosis is dependent on this combination of robust biochemistry and simple format. Additionally, the ability to transfer the format and biochemistry to any disease gene of interest enables the broad application of this technology to clinical diagnostics, especially for genetically complex diseases.

  5. PGD: a pangolin genome hub for the research community

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tze King; Tan, Ka Yun; Hari, Ranjeev; Mohamed Yusoff, Aini; Wong, Guat Jah; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Mutha, Naresh V.R.; Rayko, Mike; Komissarov, Aleksey; Dobrynin, Pavel; Krasheninnikova, Ksenia; Tamazian, Gaik; Paterson, Ian C.; Warren, Wesley C.; Johnson, Warren E.; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Choo, Siew Woh

    2016-01-01

    Pangolins (order Pholidota) are the only mammals covered by scales. We have recently sequenced and analyzed the genomes of two critically endangered Asian pangolin species, namely the Malayan pangolin (Manis javanica) and the Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla). These complete genome sequences will serve as reference sequences for future research to address issues of species conservation and to advance knowledge in mammalian biology and evolution. To further facilitate the global research effort in pangolin biology, we developed the Pangolin Genome Database (PGD), as a future hub for hosting pangolin genomic and transcriptomic data and annotations, and with useful analysis tools for the research community. Currently, the PGD provides the reference pangolin genome and transcriptome data, gene sequences and functional information, expressed transcripts, pseudogenes, genomic variations, organ-specific expression data and other useful annotations. We anticipate that the PGD will be an invaluable platform for researchers who are interested in pangolin and mammalian research. We will continue updating this hub by including more data, annotation and analysis tools particularly from our research consortium. Database URL: http://pangolin-genome.um.edu.my PMID:27616775

  6. PGD: a pangolin genome hub for the research community.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tze King; Tan, Ka Yun; Hari, Ranjeev; Mohamed Yusoff, Aini; Wong, Guat Jah; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Mutha, Naresh V R; Rayko, Mike; Komissarov, Aleksey; Dobrynin, Pavel; Krasheninnikova, Ksenia; Tamazian, Gaik; Paterson, Ian C; Warren, Wesley C; Johnson, Warren E; O'Brien, Stephen J; Choo, Siew Woh

    2016-01-01

    Pangolins (order Pholidota) are the only mammals covered by scales. We have recently sequenced and analyzed the genomes of two critically endangered Asian pangolin species, namely the Malayan pangolin (Manis javanica) and the Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla). These complete genome sequences will serve as reference sequences for future research to address issues of species conservation and to advance knowledge in mammalian biology and evolution. To further facilitate the global research effort in pangolin biology, we developed the Pangolin Genome Database (PGD), as a future hub for hosting pangolin genomic and transcriptomic data and annotations, and with useful analysis tools for the research community. Currently, the PGD provides the reference pangolin genome and transcriptome data, gene sequences and functional information, expressed transcripts, pseudogenes, genomic variations, organ-specific expression data and other useful annotations. We anticipate that the PGD will be an invaluable platform for researchers who are interested in pangolin and mammalian research. We will continue updating this hub by including more data, annotation and analysis tools particularly from our research consortium.Database URL: http://pangolin-genome.um.edu.my. PMID:27616775

  7. Multimodal genetic diagnosis of solid variant alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Cerveira, Nuno; Torres, Lurdes; Ribeiro, Franclim R; Henrique, Rui; Pinto, Armando; Bizarro, Susana; Ferreira, Ana M; Lopes, Carlos; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2005-12-01

    The most common types of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) are alveolar RMS (ARMS), which are characterized by the specific translocation t(2;13)(q35;q14) or its rarer variant, t(1;13)(p36;q14), producing the fusion genes PAX3-FKHR and PAX7-FKHR, respectively, and embryonal RMS (ERMS), which is characterized by multiple numeric chromosome changes. A solid variant of ARMS that is morphologically indistinguishable from ERMS has been described recently. We present two cases with an initial histopathologic diagnosis of ERMS in which the combined findings by cytogenetic, reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analyses demonstrate that both tumors were in fact the solid variant of ARMS. The cytogenetic analysis of patient 1 revealed a t(2;13)(q35;q14) and the RT-PCR study detected the corresponding PAX3-FKHR chimeric transcript. In patient 2, the cytogenetic finding of multiple trisomies was compatible with the initial histopathologic diagnosis of ERMS, but the finding of a PAX7-FKHR fusion transcript by RT-PCR pointed to the diagnosis of ARMS. Interestingly, the CGH findings of this case reconciled the molecular and cytogenetic data by detecting, in addition to the trisomies, amplification of chromosomal bands 1p36 and 13q14, where the PAX7 and FKHR genes are located, respectively. Our data indicate that this multimodal genetic analysis could be important for the differential diagnosis of these tumors. Furthermore, our findings and previous studies indicate that there are no apparent genetic differences between solid variant and typical ARMS. PMID:16337856

  8. Genetic diagnosis of factor V Leiden using heteroduplex technology.

    PubMed

    Bowen, D J; Standen, G R; Granville, S; Bowley, S; Wood, N A; Bidwell, J

    1997-01-01

    A new genetic test has been developed for detection of the mutation known as factor V Leiden. The test employs heteroduplex technology and comprises a single PCR reaction followed immediately by PCR product analysis. It therefore represents the minimum practical route from blood/tissue sample to genetic result. A cohort of 100 patients with a history of thrombosis have been screened using both the new heteroduplex test and a previously described PCR-restriction endonuclease test. Results gave 100% correlation: normals 75 (75%), heterozygotes 24 (24%) and homozygotes 1 (1%). The heteroduplex test has been shown to give straightforward diagnosis in three different analytical systems: standard polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), mini-gel PAGE and capillary electrophoresis. The latter system is semiautomated, therefore rapid through-put of large sample numbers is now possible. PMID:9031460

  9. Genetics, diagnosis and management of colorectal cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    DE ROSA, MARINA; PACE, UGO; REGA, DANIELA; COSTABILE, VALERIA; DURATURO, FRANCESCA; IZZO, PAOLA; DELRIO, PAOLO

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer worldwide and a leading cause of cancer death. Surgery represents the mainstay of treatment in early cases but often patients are primarily diagnosed in an advanced stage of disease and sometimes also distant metastases are present. Neoadjuvant therapy is therefore needed but drug resistance may influence response and concur to recurrent disease. At molecular level, it is a very heterogeneous group of diseases with about 30% of hereditary or familial cases. During colorectal adenocarcinomas development, epithelial cells from gastrointestinal trait acquire sequential genetic and epigenetic mutations in specific oncogenes and/or tumour suppressor genes, causing CRC onset, progression and metastasis. Molecular characterization of cancer associated mutations gives valuable information about disease prognosis and response to the therapy. Very early diagnosis and personalized care, as well as a better knowledge of molecular basis of its onset and progression, are therefore crucial to obtain a cure of CRC. In this review, we describe updated genetics, current diagnosis and management of CRC pointing out the extreme need for a multidisciplinary approach to achieve the best results in patient outcomes. PMID:26151224

  10. Defects in Peroxisomal 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase Isoform PGD2 Prevent Gametophytic Interaction in Arabidopsis thaliana1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hölscher, Christian; Meyer, Tanja; Fischer, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    We studied the localization of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD) isoforms of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Similar polypeptide lengths of PGD1, PGD2, and PGD3 obscured which isoform may represent the cytosolic and/or plastidic enzyme plus whether PGD2 with a peroxisomal targeting motif also might target plastids. Reporter-fusion analyses in protoplasts revealed that, with a free N terminus, PGD1 and PGD3 accumulate in the cytosol and chloroplasts, whereas PGD2 remains in the cytosol. Mutagenesis of a conserved second ATG enhanced the plastidic localization of PGD1 and PGD3 but not PGD2. Amino-terminal deletions of PGD2 fusions with a free C terminus resulted in peroxisomal import after dimerization, and PGD2 could be immunodetected in purified peroxisomes. Repeated selfing of pgd2 transfer (T-)DNA alleles yielded no homozygous mutants, although siliques and seeds of heterozygous plants developed normally. Detailed analyses of the C-terminally truncated PGD2-1 protein showed that peroxisomal import and catalytic activity are abolished. Reciprocal backcrosses of pgd2-1 suggested that missing PGD activity in peroxisomes primarily affects the male gametophyte. Tetrad analyses in the quartet1-2 background revealed that pgd2-1 pollen is vital and in vitro germination normal, but pollen tube growth inside stylar tissues appeared less directed. Mutual gametophytic sterility was overcome by complementation with a genomic construct but not with a version lacking the first ATG. These analyses showed that peroxisomal PGD2 activity is required for guided growth of the male gametophytes and pollen tube-ovule interaction. Our report finally demonstrates an essential role of oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway reactions in peroxisomes, likely needed to sustain critical levels of nitric oxide and/or jasmonic acid, whose biosynthesis both depend on NADPH provision. PMID:26941195

  11. Legislation on Genetic Diagnosis: Comparison of South Korea and Germany

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the questions regarding PND and PID, especially the concrete legal conditions for the justification of PND and PID. As such, the German law stipulating PND and PID in a very concrete and detailed manner is introduced and explained in comparison with the corresponding South Korean law. The South Korean Bioethics and Biosafety Act (BBA) stipulates various types of gene testing and does not demonstrate a delicate sense of each type of gene testing. In contrast to the South Korean regulation, in Germany, there exist specific regulations for genetic counseling. Especially in the case of PND, GEKO stipulates the process of genetic counseling very concretely, based on GenDG. In the case of PND and PID, it is important that the people concerned understand the meaning of testing in various angles, and restructuralize it by combining it with their own values as the diagnosis is directly combined with pregnancy/abortion, which influences the whole life of a woman (and her partner). In this context, the South Korean BBA needs to be amended as soon as possible. The sections on informed consent also need to be amended to make them more concrete. Furthermore, guidelines for concretizing the regulation of BBA need to be continuously formulated and developed. PMID:27004267

  12. Imposing genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The idea that a world in which everyone was born "perfect" would be a world in which something valuable was missing often comes up in debates about the ethics of technologies of prenatal testing and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). This thought plays an important role in the "disability critique" of prenatal testing. However, the idea that human genetic variation is an important good with significant benefits for society at large is also embraced by a wide range of figures writing in the bioethics literature, including some who are notoriously hostile to the idea that we should not select against disability. By developing a number of thought experiments wherein we are to contemplate increasing genetic diversity from a lower baseline in order to secure this value, I argue that this powerful intuition is more problematic than is generally recognized, especially where the price of diversity is the well-being of particular individuals. PMID:26030484

  13. Microchip-based Devices for Molecular Diagnosis of Genetic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Cheng; Fortina; Surrey; Kricka; Wilding

    1996-09-01

    Microchips, constructed with a variety of microfabrication technologies (photolithography, micropatterning, microjet printing, light-directed chemical synthesis, laser stereochemical etching, and microcontact printing) are being applied to molecular biology. The new microchip-based analytical devices promise to solve the analytical problems faced by many molecular biologists (eg, contamination, low throughput, and high cost). They may revolutionize molecular biology and its application in clinical medicine, forensic science, and environmental monitoring. A typical biochemical analysis involves three main steps: (1) sample preparation, (2) biochemical reaction, and (3) detection (either separation or hybridization may be involved) accompanied by data acquisition and interpretation. The construction of a miniturized analyzer will therefore necessarily entail the miniaturization and integration of all three of these processes. The literature related to the miniaturization of these three processes indicates that the greatest emphasis so far is on the investigation and development of methods for the detection of nucleic acid, followed by the optimization of a biochemical reaction, such as the polymerase chain reaction. The first step involving sample preparation has received little attention. In this review the state of the art of, microchip-based, miniaturized analytical processes (eg, sample preparation, biochemical reaction, and detection of products) are outlined and the applications of microchip-based devices in the molecular diagnosis of genetic diseases are discussed. PMID:10462559

  14. Genetics, diagnosis, and future treatment strategies for primary ciliary dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, M. Leigh Anne; Noone, Peadar G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically heterogeneous recessive disorder resulting in chronic oto-sino-pulmonary disease. While PCD is estimated to occur in 1 in 20,000 individuals, fewer than 1,000 patients in the US have a well-established diagnosis. Areas Covered We provide an overview of the clinical manifestations of PCD, describe the evolution of diagnostic methods, and critique the literature on management of PCD. Expert Opinion Although interest in clinical studies in non-CF bronchiectasis has increased in recent years, some of whom enroll patients with PCD, the literature regarding therapy for PCD as a distinct entity is lacking, as the numbers are small, and there have been no sub-analyses published. However, with improved screening and diagnostic methods, the development of clinical and research consortiums, and actively enrolling registries of PCD patients, the environment is conducive to perform longitudinal studies of disease course and therapeutic studies to alter that course. PMID:26998415

  15. Parents’ experiences of receiving their child’s genetic diagnosis: A qualitative study to inform clinical genetics practice

    PubMed Central

    Ashtiani, Setareh; Makela, Nancy; Carrion, Prescilla; Austin, Jehannine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Little is currently known about how parents experience the medical genetics appointment at which their child receives a genetic diagnosis. Methods We conducted semi-structured in-person interviews with 13 parents of 10 index children to explore their experience in the medical genetics appointment in which they received their child’s genetic diagnosis. Guided by grounded theory, we used a constant comparative approach to data analysis, and the transcribed interviews were coded and sorted, and thematic categories identified. Results 61.5% of parents experienced the diagnosis session as negative, 23% felt the experience was positive, and 15.5% were ambivalent. Receiving emotional support, an outline of the follow-up plans, and messages of hope and perspective during the session seemed to positively influence parents’ experience, while feeling that their role was as a passive receiver of information and using difficult medical terminology negatively influenced parents’ overall experience. Parental preparedness for the information, and the parents’ emotional reaction to the diagnosis were also factors that influenced the parental experience. Few participants understood the role of the genetic counselor. Conclusion Our results provide in-depth insight into the parental experience of the pediatric medical genetics diagnosis session. We propose a mechanism through which parental experience shapes their perception of the medical genetics session. PMID:24706543

  16. Genetic Analysis of Human Preimplantation Embryos.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Herrero, S; Cervero, A; Mateu, E; Mir, P; Póo, M E; Rodrigo, L; Vera, M; Rubio, C

    2016-01-01

    Preimplantation development comprises the initial stages of mammalian development, before the embryo implants into the mother's uterus. In normal conditions, after fertilization the embryo grows until reaching blastocyst stage. The blastocyst grows as the cells divide and the cavity expands, until it arrives at the uterus, where it "hatches" from the zona pellucida to implant into the uterine wall. Nevertheless, embryo quality and viability can be affected by chromosomal abnormalities, most of which occur during gametogenesis and early embryo development; human embryos produced in vitro are especially vulnerable. Therefore, the selection of chromosomally normal embryos for transfer in assisted reproduction can improve outcomes in poor-prognosis patients. Additionally, in couples with an inherited disorder, early diagnosis could prevent pregnancy with an affected child and would, thereby, avoid the therapeutic interruption of pregnancy. These concerns have prompted advancements in the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Genetic testing is applied in two different scenarios: in couples with an inherited genetic disorder or carriers of a structural chromosomal abnormality, it is termed PGD; in infertile couples with increased risk of generating embryos with de novo chromosome abnormalities, it is termed preimplantation genetic screening, or PGS. PMID:27475859

  17. "My funky genetics": BRCA1/2 mutation carriers' understanding of genetic inheritance and reproductive merger in the context of new reprogenetic technologies.

    PubMed

    Werner-Lin, Allison; Rubin, Lisa R; Doyle, Maya; Stern, Rikki; Savin, Katie; Hurley, Karen; Sagi, Michal

    2012-06-01

    Deleterious mutations in the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes elevate lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Each child of a mutation-positive parent has a 50% chance of inheriting it. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) permits prospective parents to avoid the birth of a BRCA-mutation-positive child, introducing predictability into a process historically defined by chance. This investigation explored how BRCA1/2 mutation carriers understand genetic inheritance and consider a child's inheritance of a BRCA1/2 mutation, given the opportunities that exist to pursue PGD. Thirty-nine female and male BRCA1/2 mutation carriers of reproductive age were recruited from urban cancer and reproductive medical centers. Participants completed a standardized educational presentation on PGD and prenatal diagnosis, with pre- and posttest assessments. An interdisciplinary team of qualitative researchers analyzed data using grounded theory techniques. Participants expressed the belief that reproduction yields children with unique genetic strengths and challenges, including the BRCA1/2 mutation, family traits for which predictive tests do not exist, and hypothetical genetic risks. Participants expressed preference for biologically related children, yet stated their genetically "well" partner's lineage would be marred through reproductive merger, requiring the well partner to assume the burden of the BRCA1/2 mutation via their children. Participants expressed diverse views of genetically "well" partners' participation in family planning and risk management decisions. Pressure to use reprogenetic technology may grow as genetic susceptibility testing becomes more widely available. Work with individuals and couples across the disease spectrum must be attuned to the ways beliefs about genetic inheritance play into reproductive decision-making. PMID:22709328

  18. ‘My funky genetics’: BRCA1/2 mutation carriers’ understanding of genetic inheritance and reproductive merger in the context of new repro-genetic technologies

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Lisa R.; Doyle, Maya; Stern, Rikki; Savin, Katie; Hurley, Karen; Sagi, Michal

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Deleterious mutations in the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes elevate lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Each child of a mutation-positive parent has a 50% chance of inheriting it. Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) permits prospective parents to avoid transmitting a BRCA1/2 mutation to a child, introducing predictability into a process historically defined by chance. This investigation explored how BRCA1/2 mutation carriers understand genetic inheritance and consider a child’s inheritance of a BRCA1/2 mutation, given the opportunities that exist to pursue PGD. METHOD 39 female and male BRCA1/2 mutation carriers of reproductive age were recruited from urban cancer and reproductive medical centers. Participants completed a standardized educational presentation on PGD and prenatal diagnosis, with pre- and post-test assessments. An interdisciplinary team of qualitative researchers analyzed data using grounded theory techniques. FINDINGS Participants expressed the belief that reproduction yields children with unique genetic strengths and challenges, including the BRCA1/2 mutation, family traits for which predictive tests do not exist, and hypothetical genetic risks. Participants expressed preference for biologically-related children, yet stated their genetically ‘well’ partner’s lineage would be marred through reproductive merger, requiring the well partner to assume the burden of the BRCA1/2 mutation via their children. Participants expressed diverse views of genetically ‘well’ partners’ participation in family planning and risk management decisions. DISCUSSION Pressure to use reprogenetic technology may grow as genetic susceptibility testing becomes more widely available. Work with individuals and couples across the disease spectrum must be attuned to they ways beliefs about genetic inheritance play into reproductive decision making. PMID:22709328

  19. Present status of amniocentesis in intrauterine diagnosis of genetic defects.

    PubMed

    Nadler, H L; Gerbie, A

    1971-11-01

    Practical and scientific aspects of prenatal detection of genetic disorders is discussed. The indications for intrauterine detection of familial biochemical and particular chromosomal disorders require assessment of the risks of transabdominal amniocentesis and of the reliability of diagnosis. A high degree of experience in cultivating amniotic fluid cells and in performing diagnostic tests is required. The obstetrician performing the amniocentesis should be responsible for referring the family to a physician who will perform the abortion. A high-risk group for which amniocentesis may be especially important includes families in which 1 parent is a carrier of a chromosomal rearrangement and in which the woman is a known carrier of an X-linked recessive disorder so that sex determination is important. A moderate-risk group includes women who become pregnant after age 40 in which the risk of having a child with a chromosomal aberration is greater than 1%. A low-risk group includes women over 35 and women who have previously borne a child with trisomic Down's syndrome. The experience gained in over 300 patients suggests that transabdominal aminocentesis carries minimal risks to mother and fetus. Analyses of amniotic fluid obtained by amniocentesis have resulted in antenatal diagnoses of Pompe's disease (deficient alpha-1, 4-glucosidase), Tay-Sachs disease (deficient hexosaminidase A), mucopolysaccharidosis (quantitative and qualitative changes in mucopolysaccharides), methylmalonic aciduria (increased methylamlonate), and adrenogenital syndrome (increase 17-ketosteroids and pregnanetriol). There is a lack of consensus on the reliability of several of these diagnoses resulting from the direct analysis of amniotic fluid. Analyses of uncultured amniotic fluid cells have resulted in diagnoses of Pompe's disease (ultrastructural changes) and Tay-Sachs disease. Analyses of cultivated amniotic fluid cells have enabled diagnoses of galactosemia (deficient galactose-1

  20. [Introduction in Switzerland of preimplantation genetic testing: progress or downward spiral?].

    PubMed

    Irion, Nicole Fournet; Irion, Olivier

    2016-01-13

    The Swiss law on Assisted Reproductive Techniques (LPMA) has been modified in order to authorize preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). PGD has been performed for 20 years. Switzerland is one of the last european countries where it is still prohibited. As a result, couples carrying a severe inherited disease and infertile couples with recurrent implantation failure or miscarriage have to cross the borders in order to have access to the appropriate treatments. Despite the recent popular approval to change the Constitution, the new LPMA cannot be implemented as the opponants have launched a referendum in order to obtain a more restrictive law. If they succeed, the affected couples will be left with a scientifically obsolete law that will not allow them to have access to an effective and compassionate treatment. PMID:26946702

  1. Preimplantation genetic testing in the 21st century: uncharted territory.

    PubMed

    Brezina, Paul R

    2013-02-10

    The past hundred years have given birth to arguably the most profound changes in society, medicine, and technology the world has ever witnessed. Genetics is one such field that has enjoyed a meteoric rise during this time. Progressing from Mendelian genetics to the discovery of DNA to the ability to sequence the human genome, perhaps no other discipline holds more promise to affect future change than genetics. Technology currently exists to evaluate some of the genetic information held by developing embryos in the context of an in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle. This information is then used to determine which embryos are selected for uterine transfer. Many societies have enacted legislation to protect against possible abuses utilizing this technology. However, it is incumbent upon society to continue ensuring that preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD)-and genetic testing in general-is applied in a way that utilizes its potential in a responsible manner to improve health care. PMID:24453515

  2. Preimplantation Genetic Testing in the 21st Century: Uncharted Territory

    PubMed Central

    Brezina, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    The past hundred years have given birth to arguably the most profound changes in society, medicine, and technology the world has ever witnessed. Genetics is one such field that has enjoyed a meteoric rise during this time. Progressing from Mendelian genetics to the discovery of DNA to the ability to sequence the human genome, perhaps no other discipline holds more promise to affect future change than genetics. Technology currently exists to evaluate some of the genetic information held by developing embryos in the context of an in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle. This information is then used to determine which embryos are selected for uterine transfer. Many societies have enacted legislation to protect against possible abuses utilizing this technology. However, it is incumbent upon society to continue ensuring that preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD)—and genetic testing in general—is applied in a way that utilizes its potential in a responsible manner to improve health care. PMID:24453515

  3. [First in the world application of next generation sequencing in preimplantation genetic diagnostics in clinical practice - a case report].

    PubMed

    Łukaszuk, Krzysztof; Kuczyńska, Agnieszka; Pukszta, Sebastian; Kuć, Paweł; Kuczyński, Waldemar; Łukaszuk, Jakub; Liss, Joanna; Wocławek-Potocka, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is a well established method for detecting genetic abnormalities during the course of infertility treatment, resulting in thousands of healthy newborns delivered worldwide. PGD with next generation sequencing (NGS) provides new possibilities for diagnosis and new parameters for evaluation. The use of next-generation DNA sequencing technique has lead to great progress in the human genome analysis. The aim of this study was molecular analysis using next generation sequencing technique of embryos from a couple suffering from recurrent pregnancy losses. As a result of in vitro fertilization procedure, seven embryos were created. Seven blastomeres, one from each embryo, were analyzed. Transfer of two blastocysts in a fresh cycle resulted in the singleton pregnancy. Healthy baby girl was delivered via caesarean section after 28 weeks of gestation (weight: 1250g, Apgar score: 8/9). The reason for the premature labor was likely caused by mother's pneumonia. This is the first case of clinical use of the NGS in PGD in fresh cycle after blastomere biopsy. PMID:27164286

  4. Clinical Application of Antenatal Genetic Diagnosis of Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type IV

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Li, Song; Xu, YeYe; Cong, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical analysis and genetic testing of a family with osteogenesis imperfecta type IV were conducted, aiming to discuss antenatal genetic diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta type IV. Material/Methods Preliminary genotyping was performed based on clinical characteristics of the family members and then high-throughput sequencing was applied to rapidly and accurately detect the changes in candidate genes. Results Genetic testing of the III5 fetus and other family members revealed missense mutation in c.2746G>A, pGly916Arg in COL1A2 gene coding region and missense and synonymous mutation in COL1A1 gene coding region. Conclusions Application of antenatal genetic diagnosis provides fast and accurate genetic counseling and eugenics suggestions for patients with osteogenesis imperfecta type IV and their families. PMID:25835785

  5. CRTH2 is not involved in the anti-enteropooling effect of PGD2 in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Prenn, C; Heinemann, A; Schuligoi, R; Peskar, B A

    2008-01-01

    The majority of prostaglandins (PGs) are known to induce intestinal fluid secretion (enteropooling). In contrast, PGD(2) has been demonstrated to inhibit fluid secretion induced by other PGs. This study was aimed to investigate, by the use of selective agonists/antagonists, which type of PGD(2) receptor mediates this inhibitory effect. The DP1 agonist BW245C dose-dependently inhibited the enteropooling effect of 16,16-dimethyl-PGE(2). This inhibition was counteracted by the DP1 antagonist BWA868C. In contrast, the CRTH2 receptor does not seem to be involved in the anti-enteropooling effect of PGD(2), since the selective agonists 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGD(2) and 15(R)-15-methyl-PGD(2) were without effect. Therefore, our results suggest that the inhibitory effect of PGD(2) in the small intestine is mediated via activation of the DP1 receptor. PMID:18212515

  6. Targeted massively parallel sequencing provides comprehensive genetic diagnosis for patients with disorders of sex development

    PubMed Central

    Arboleda, VA; Lee, H; Sánchez, FJ; Délot, EC; Sandberg, DE; Grody, WW; Nelson, SF; Vilain, E

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSD) are rare disorders in which there is discordance between chromosomal, gonadal, and phenotypic sex. Only a minority of patients clinically diagnosed with DSD obtains a molecular diagnosis, leaving a large gap in our understanding of the prevalence, management, and outcomes in affected patients. We created a novel DSD-genetic diagnostic tool, in which sex development genes are captured using RNA probes and undergo massively parallel sequencing. In the pilot group of 14 patients, we determined sex chromosome dosage, copy number variation, and gene mutations. In the patients with a known genetic diagnosis (obtained either on a clinical or research basis), this test identified the molecular cause in 100% (7/7) of patients. In patients in whom no molecular diagnosis had been made, this tool identified a genetic diagnosis in two of seven patients. Targeted sequencing of genes representing a specific spectrum of disorders can result in a higher rate of genetic diagnoses than current diagnostic approaches. Our DSD diagnostic tool provides for first time, in a single blood test, a comprehensive genetic diagnosis in patients presenting with a wide range of urogenital anomalies. PMID:22435390

  7. Some Aids in the Diagnosis of Genetic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chute, A. L.

    1965-01-01

    Disorders of genetic origin may cause morphological or metabolic disturbances. A number of recognized screening procedures, e.g. palm printing, buccal smears and paper chromatography, are useful in the recognition of these disorders. Additional procedures for more detailed analysis of the genetic defects, e.g. aminoacid analysis, gas chromatography and chromosome analysis, have been developed and are employed in specialized centres. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5aFig. 5bFig. 6aFig. 6bFig. 7aFig. 7b PMID:14328042

  8. Recent advances in prenatal screening and diagnosis of genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Bozzette, Maryann

    2002-11-01

    In any pregnancy, there is an approximate 3% to 5% chance that a fetal complication will occur. The most familiar prenatal diagnostics cannot be performed until the fetus is well into gestation, and most involve invasive procedures along with their inherent risks. In light of these facts, many noninvasive prenatal screening and diagnostic tests have been developed, the newest using recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) technology in the examination of fetal cells. Through these procedures, genetic coding errors and chromosomal disruptions may be detected. This article discusses the currently available prenatal and screening diagnostic tests for genetic disorders with a focus on the latest technology. PMID:12473913

  9. Regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase by PGD(2) in the developing choroid.

    PubMed

    Dumont, I; Hardy, P; Peri, K G; Hou, X; Molotchnikoff, S; Varma, D R; Chemtob, S

    2000-01-01

    We investigated if prostaglandins might regulate the increased choroidal endothelial (e) nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression in the perinate. Prostaglandins, eNOS mRNA, immunoreactive protein and activity, and nitrite [stable metabolite of nitric oxide (NO)] production were markedly higher in newborn (1 day old) than juvenile (6-8 wk old) pig choroid. Treatment of isolated newborn choroids with the prostaglandin synthase inhibitor ibuprofen for 24 h reduced eNOS mRNA and nitrite production to values in juveniles. This effect was equally observed with the PGD(2) receptor (DP) blocker BW A868C and was prevented by cotreatment with PGD(2) but not other prostaglandins; similar observations were made on NOS activity in vivo. PGD(2) also increased eNOS expression on choroids of juveniles, and this effect was blocked by BW A868C. The manifestation of this upregulation of eNOS by PGD(2) on the control of choroidal vasomotor response was tested by using NO-dependent vasorelaxants, ACh, bradykinin (Bk), and substance P (SP). ACh-, Bk-, and SP-elicited choroidal vasorelaxation was greater in saline-treated newborn than juvenile pigs. Ibuprofen (24 h) decreased ACh-, Bk-, and SP-evoked vasorelaxation in newborns, whereas PGD(2) increased that in juveniles and prevented the ibuprofen-induced attenuated relaxation in newborns; infusion of N(omega)-monomethyl-L-arginine in choroids of those animals treated with PGD(2) reversed the augmented vasorelaxation to ACh, Bk, and SP. Finally, PGD(2)-induced upregulation of NOS in the perinate was also reflected by curtailed choroidal blood flow autoregulatory response to increased perfusion pressure. In conclusion, PGD(2) exhibits a major role in upregulating eNOS expression and activity in the choroid, which in turn results in greater NO-mediated vasorelaxation; a new mechanism for eNOS regulation via DP is hereby disclosed. The relationship between PGD(2) and eNOS in the developing subject provides an explanation for the interactive

  10. Targeted exome sequencing resolves allelic and the genetic heterogeneity in the genetic diagnosis of nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee Gyung; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Ahn, Yo Han; Joung, Je-Gun; Nam, Jaeyong; Kim, Nayoung K D; Ko, Jung Min; Cho, Min Hyun; Shin, Jae Il; Kim, Joon; Park, Hye Won; Park, Young Seo; Ha, Il-Soo; Chung, Woo Yeong; Lee, Dae-Yeol; Kim, Su Young; Park, Woong Yang; Cheong, Hae Il

    2016-01-01

    Nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy (NPHP-RC) is a common genetic cause of end-stage renal failure during childhood and adolescence and exhibits an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. Genetic diagnosis is quite limited owing to genetic heterogeneity in NPHP-RC. We designed a novel approach involving the step-wise screening of Sanger sequencing and targeted exome sequencing for the genetic diagnosis of 55 patients with NPHP-RC. First, five NPHP-RC genes were analyzed by Sanger sequencing in phenotypically classified patients. Known pathogenic mutations were identified in 12 patients (21.8%); homozygous deletions of NPHP1 in 4 juvenile nephronophthisis patients, IQCB1/NPHP5 mutations in 3 Senior–Løken syndrome patients, a CEP290/NPHP6 mutation in 1 Joubert syndrome patient, and TMEM67/MKS3 mutations in 4 Joubert syndrome patients with liver involvement. In the remaining undiagnosed patients, we applied targeted exome sequencing of 34 ciliopathy-related genes to detect known pathogenic mutations in 7 (16.3%) of 43 patients. Another 18 likely damaging heterozygous variants were identified in 13 NPHP-RC genes in 18 patients. In this study, we report a variety of pathogenic and candidate mutations identified in 55 patients with NPHP-RC in Korea using a step-wise application of two genetic tests. These results support the clinical utility of targeted exome sequencing to resolve the issue of allelic and genetic heterogeneity in NPHP-RC. PMID:27491411

  11. Targeted exome sequencing resolves allelic and the genetic heterogeneity in the genetic diagnosis of nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hee Gyung; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Ahn, Yo Han; Joung, Je-Gun; Nam, Jaeyong; Kim, Nayoung K D; Ko, Jung Min; Cho, Min Hyun; Shin, Jae Il; Kim, Joon; Park, Hye Won; Park, Young Seo; Ha, Il-Soo; Chung, Woo Yeong; Lee, Dae-Yeol; Kim, Su Young; Park, Woong Yang; Cheong, Hae Il

    2016-01-01

    Nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy (NPHP-RC) is a common genetic cause of end-stage renal failure during childhood and adolescence and exhibits an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. Genetic diagnosis is quite limited owing to genetic heterogeneity in NPHP-RC. We designed a novel approach involving the step-wise screening of Sanger sequencing and targeted exome sequencing for the genetic diagnosis of 55 patients with NPHP-RC. First, five NPHP-RC genes were analyzed by Sanger sequencing in phenotypically classified patients. Known pathogenic mutations were identified in 12 patients (21.8%); homozygous deletions of NPHP1 in 4 juvenile nephronophthisis patients, IQCB1/NPHP5 mutations in 3 Senior-Løken syndrome patients, a CEP290/NPHP6 mutation in 1 Joubert syndrome patient, and TMEM67/MKS3 mutations in 4 Joubert syndrome patients with liver involvement. In the remaining undiagnosed patients, we applied targeted exome sequencing of 34 ciliopathy-related genes to detect known pathogenic mutations in 7 (16.3%) of 43 patients. Another 18 likely damaging heterozygous variants were identified in 13 NPHP-RC genes in 18 patients. In this study, we report a variety of pathogenic and candidate mutations identified in 55 patients with NPHP-RC in Korea using a step-wise application of two genetic tests. These results support the clinical utility of targeted exome sequencing to resolve the issue of allelic and genetic heterogeneity in NPHP-RC. PMID:27491411

  12. A tale worth telling: The impact of the diagnosis experience on disclosure of genetic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Jane; Schoch, Kelly; Shashi, Vandana; Hooper, Stephen R.; Gothelf, Doron; Zalevsky, Moran; Morad, Ola; Campbell, Linda E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Research suggests children with genetic disorders exhibit greater coping skills when they are aware of their condition and its heritability. While the experiences parents have at diagnosis may influence their decision to disclose the diagnosis to their children, there is little research into this communication. The aim of the current study was to examine the relationship between the diagnosis experience and the disclosure experience for parents of children with intellectual disabilities; with a child affected by 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) compared to a group of parents with children affected with other genetic diagnoses, with a similar age of diagnosis (e.g., Fragile X syndrome) and a group where diagnosis generally occurs early (i.e., Down syndrome). Method The sample comprised 559 parents and caregivers of children with genetic developmental disorders, and an online survey was utilised. Items from the questionnaire were combined to create variables for diagnosis experience, parental disclosure experience, child’s disclosure experience, and parental coping and self-efficacy. Results Across all groups parents reported that the diagnosis experience was negative and often accompanied by lack of support and appropriate information. Sixty-eight percent of those in the 22q11DS and 58.3% in the Similar Conditions groups had disclosed the diagnosis to their child, whereas only 32.7% of the Down syndrome group had. Eighty-six percent of the Down syndrome group felt they had sufficient information to talk to their child compared to 44.1% of the Similar Conditions group and 32.6% of the 22q11DS group. Parents reported disclosing the diagnosis to their child because they did not want to create secrets; and that they considered the child’s age when disclosing. In the 22q11DS and Similar Conditions groups, a poor diagnosis experience was significantly associated with negative parental disclosure experiences. In the Similar Conditions group, a poor

  13. Hereditary palmoplantar keratoderma "clinical and genetic differential diagnosis".

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Tomo; Kubo, Akiharu

    2016-03-01

    Hereditary palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by hyperkeratosis of the palm and the sole skin. Hereditary PPK are divided into four groups--diffuse, focal, striate and punctate PPK--according to the clinical patterns of the hyperkeratotic lesions. Each group includes simple PPK, without associated features, and PPK with associated features, such as involvement of nails, teeth and other organs. PPK have been classified by a clinically based descriptive system. In recent years, many causative genes of PPK have been identified, which has confirmed and/or rearranged the traditional classifications. It is now important to diagnose PPK by a combination of the traditional morphological classification and genetic testing. In this review, we focus on PPK without associated features and introduce their morphological features, genetic backgrounds and new findings from the last decade. PMID:26945534

  14. [Molecular genetic and bacteriological methods for the diagnosis of multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Agaev, F F; Aliev, K A; Salimova, N A; Abuzarov, R M; Gasymov, I A; Griadunov, D A

    2009-01-01

    For the early diagnosis of multidrug resistant tuberculosis, 67 sputum samples obtained from primary patients with different clinical forms of pulmonary tuberculosis were examined by the molecular genetic test using the TB-Biochip test system. Having a high sensitivity and specificity, the molecular genetic test for determining the drug sensitivity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis substantially accelerates its diagnosis (2-3 days) before the real-time mode of a patient's admission to the clinic. The method allows identification of mutations in the rpoB (resistance to R), katG, inhG, and ahpC (resistance to H) genes, which permits timely correction of performed specific treatment. PMID:19886013

  15. Quick diagnosis of human brain meningitis using omp85 gene amplicon as a genetic marker.

    PubMed

    Dash, Sandip K; Sharma, Minakshi; Khare, Shashi; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-06-01

    The usual diagnosis of life-threatening human brain bacterial meningitis are expensive, time consuming or non-confirmatory. A quick PCR based diagnosis of meningitis in cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) using specific primers of virulent Omp85 gene of Neisseria meningitidis can detect as low as 1.0 ng of genomic DNA (G-DNA) in 80 min for confirmation of bacterial meningitis caused by N. meningitidis infection. The 257 bp amplicon of Omp85 gene does not show homology with other suspected pathogens in CSF and can be used as a specific genetic marker for diagnosis of the disease. PMID:24426115

  16. Genetic Diagnosis Using Whole Exome Sequencing in Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Maffucci, Patrick; Filion, Charles A; Boisson, Bertrand; Itan, Yuval; Shang, Lei; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) has proven an effective tool for the discovery of genetic defects in patients with primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). However, success in dissecting the genetic etiology of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) has been limited. We outline a practical framework for using WES to identify causative genetic defects in these subjects. WES was performed on 50 subjects diagnosed with CVID who had at least one of the following criteria: early onset, autoimmune/inflammatory manifestations, low B lymphocytes, and/or familial history of hypogammaglobulinemia. Following alignment and variant calling, exomes were screened for mutations in 269 PID-causing genes. Variants were filtered based on the mode of inheritance and reported frequency in the general population. Each variant was assessed by study of familial segregation and computational predictions of deleteriousness. Out of 433 variations in PID-associated genes, we identified 17 probable disease-causing mutations in 15 patients (30%). These variations were rare or private and included monoallelic mutations in NFKB1, STAT3, CTLA4, PIK3CD, and IKZF1, and biallelic mutations in LRBA and STXBP2. Forty-two other damaging variants were found but were not considered likely disease-causing based on the mode of inheritance and/or patient phenotype. WES combined with analysis of PID-associated genes is a cost-effective approach to identify disease-causing mutations in CVID patients with severe phenotypes and was successful in 30% of our cohort. As targeted therapeutics are becoming the mainstay of treatment for non-infectious manifestations in CVID, this approach will improve management of patients with more severe phenotypes. PMID:27379089

  17. Genetic Diagnosis Using Whole Exome Sequencing in Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Maffucci, Patrick; Filion, Charles A.; Boisson, Bertrand; Itan, Yuval; Shang, Lei; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) has proven an effective tool for the discovery of genetic defects in patients with primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). However, success in dissecting the genetic etiology of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) has been limited. We outline a practical framework for using WES to identify causative genetic defects in these subjects. WES was performed on 50 subjects diagnosed with CVID who had at least one of the following criteria: early onset, autoimmune/inflammatory manifestations, low B lymphocytes, and/or familial history of hypogammaglobulinemia. Following alignment and variant calling, exomes were screened for mutations in 269 PID-causing genes. Variants were filtered based on the mode of inheritance and reported frequency in the general population. Each variant was assessed by study of familial segregation and computational predictions of deleteriousness. Out of 433 variations in PID-associated genes, we identified 17 probable disease-causing mutations in 15 patients (30%). These variations were rare or private and included monoallelic mutations in NFKB1, STAT3, CTLA4, PIK3CD, and IKZF1, and biallelic mutations in LRBA and STXBP2. Forty-two other damaging variants were found but were not considered likely disease-causing based on the mode of inheritance and/or patient phenotype. WES combined with analysis of PID-associated genes is a cost-effective approach to identify disease-causing mutations in CVID patients with severe phenotypes and was successful in 30% of our cohort. As targeted therapeutics are becoming the mainstay of treatment for non-infectious manifestations in CVID, this approach will improve management of patients with more severe phenotypes. PMID:27379089

  18. Small Ruminant Lentiviruses: Genetic Variability, Tropism and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Hugo; Reina, Ramsés; Amorena, Beatriz; de Andrés, Damián; Martínez, Humberto A.

    2013-01-01

    Small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV) cause a multisystemic chronic disease affecting animal production and welfare. SRLV infections are spread across the world with the exception of Iceland. Success in controlling SRLV spread depends largely on the use of appropriate diagnostic tools, but the existence of a high genetic/antigenic variability among these viruses, the fluctuant levels of antibody against them and the low viral loads found in infected individuals hamper the diagnostic efficacy. SRLV have a marked in vivo tropism towards the monocyte/macrophage lineage and attempts have been made to identify the genome regions involved in tropism, with two main candidates, the LTR and env gene, since LTR contains primer binding sites for viral replication and the env-encoded protein (SU ENV), which mediates the binding of the virus to the host’s cell and has hypervariable regions to escape the humoral immune response. Once inside the host cell, innate immunity may interfere with SRLV replication, but the virus develops counteraction mechanisms to escape, multiply and survive, creating a quasi-species and undergoing compartmentalization events. So far, the mechanisms of organ tropism involved in the development of different disease forms (neurological, arthritic, pulmonary and mammary) are unknown, but different alternatives are proposed. This is an overview of the current state of knowledge on SRLV genetic variability and its implications in tropism as well as in the development of alternative diagnostic assays. PMID:23611847

  19. Automated Test Assembly for Cognitive Diagnosis Models Using a Genetic Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelman, Matthew; Kim, Wonsuk; Roussos, Louis A.

    2009-01-01

    Much recent psychometric literature has focused on cognitive diagnosis models (CDMs), a promising class of instruments used to measure the strengths and weaknesses of examinees. This article introduces a genetic algorithm to perform automated test assembly alongside CDMs. The algorithm is flexible in that it can be applied whether the goal is to…

  20. Ethical challenges in assisted reproduction: the place of preimplantation genetic diagnosis in a just society.

    PubMed

    Whetstine, Leslie M

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of preimplantation genetic diagnosis and identify the relevant moral questions it raises. In the course of this discussion, the scope of parental rights and the inherent difficulty in defining disease/disability will be considered. PMID:24334349

  1. [Genetic Aberration and Pathological Diagnosis in Bone and Soft-Tissue Tumors].

    PubMed

    Iura, Kunio; Oda, Yoshinao

    2016-03-01

    Bone and soft-tissue sarcomas comprise a rare, complex, and heterogeneous group of tumors for which it is difficult for even experienced pathologists to provide a conclusive diagnosis. The number of diagnoses made using genetic analysis has increased since the detection of fusion genes in several soft-tissue tumors in the 1990s. Moreover, other specific genetic aberrations have been reported in various bone and soft-tissue tumors. In addition, molecular therapeutic targets have been sought in advanced cases of soft-tissue and bone tumors similar to other organ malignancies. To enable the pathological diagnosis of bone and soft-tissue tumors, it is necessary to combine histological diagnosis with immunohistochemistry and gene analysis findings including fusion gene or other genetic aberrations. In this review, we describe the fusion genes recently reported in bone and soft-tissue tumors such as solitary fibrous tumor, aneurysmal bone cyst, nodular fasciitis, CIC-DUX4 fusion gene-positive small round cell tumors, or BCOR-CCNB3-positive sarcoma as well as other genetic aberrations in dedifferentiated liposarcoma, malignant rhabdoid tumor, cartilaginous tumor, Langerhans cell histiocytosis chondroblastoma, or giant cell tumor of the bone. We also demonstrate their association with pathological diagnosis. PMID:27067846

  2. [Application of next-generation semiconductor sequencing technologies in genetic diagnosis of inherited cardiomyopathies].

    PubMed

    Yue, Zhao; Hong, Zhang; Xueshan, Xia

    2015-07-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathy is the most common hereditary cardiac disease. It also causes a significant proportion of sudden cardiac deaths in young adults and athletes. So far, approximately one hundred genes have been reported to be involved in cardiomyopathies through different mechanisms. Therefore, the identification of the genetic basis and disease mechanisms of cardiomyopathies are important for establishing a clinical diagnosis and genetic testing. Next-generation semiconductor sequencing (NGSS) technology platform is a high-throughput sequencer capable of analyzing clinically derived genomes with high productivity, sensitivity and specificity. It was launched in 2010 by Life Technologies of USA, and it is based on a high density semiconductor chip, which was covered with tens of thousands of wells. NGSS has been successfully used in candidate gene mutation screening to identify hereditary disease. In this review, we summarize these genetic variations, challenge and application of NGSS in inherited cardiomyopathy, and its value in disease diagnosis, prevention and treatment. PMID:26351163

  3. [Diagnosis of MDS: morphology, chromosome abnormalities and genetic mutations].

    PubMed

    Hata, Tomoko

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of hematological neoplasms associated with ineffective hematopoiesis and that can transform into acute leukemia. The clinical classification of MDS which is defined by cytopenia, the rate of blasts in peripheral blood and bone marrow, dysplasia, and chromosomal abnormalities, has undergone continuous revision. To increase the accuracy of dysplastic evaluation, IWGM-MDS and the Research Committee for Idiopathic Hematopoietic Disorders, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan have proposed a quantitative and qualitative definition of dysplasia. Recently, refining the definition of dysgranulopoiesis was proposed by IWGM-MDS. Neutrophils with abnormal clumping of chromatin, and harboring more than 4 nuclear projections, were recognized as dysplastic features. At present, karyotypic abnormalities are detected in approximately 50% of de novo MDS and these remain the most critical prognostic factor. In the new cytogenetic scoring system, cytogenetic abnormalities were classified into five prognostic subgroups. This new classification was adopted by the revised IPSS. Approximately 80% to 90% of MDS patients have detectable mutations by whole-exon sequencing or whole genome sequencing. Many genetic mutations had biological and prognostic significance. It is important to further understand the utility of this factor in determining prognosis and in selecting among therapeutic options. PMID:26458436

  4. Next generation sequencing and the future of genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Katja; Klein, Christine

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of next generation sequencing (NGS) has led to an exponential increase of elucidated genetic causes in both extremely rare diseases and common but heterogeneous disorders. It can be applied to the whole or to selected parts of the genome (genome or exome sequencing, gene panels). NGS is not only useful in large extended families with linkage information, but may also be applied to detect de novo mutations or mosaicism in sporadic patients without a prior hypothesis about the mutated gene. Currently, NGS is applied in both research and clinical settings, and there is a rapid transition of research findings to diagnostic applications. These developments may greatly help to minimize the "diagnostic odyssey" for patients as whole-genome analysis can be performed in a few days at reasonable costs compared with gene-by-gene analysis based on Sanger sequencing following diverse clinical tests. Despite the enthusiasm about NGS, one has to keep in mind its limitations, such as a coverage and accuracy of < 100%, resulting in missing variants and false positive findings. In addition, variant interpretation is challenging as there is usually more than one candidate variant found. Therefore, there is an urgent need to define standards for NGS with respect to run quality and variant interpretation, as well as mechanisms of quality control. Further, there are ethical challenges including incidental findings and how to guide unaffected probands seeking direct-to-customer testing. However, taken together, the application of NGS in research and diagnostics provides a tremendous opportunity to better serve our patients. PMID:25052068

  5. BLOCKADE OF PGE2, PGD2 RECEPTORS CONFERS PROTECTION AGAINST PREPATENT SCHISTOSOMIASIS MANSONI IN MICE.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Ghany, Rasha; Rabia, Ibrahim; El-Ahwany, Eman; Saber, Sameh; Gamal, Rasha; Nagy, Faten; Mahmoud, Olaa; Hamad, Rabab Salem; Barakat, Walled

    2015-12-01

    Schistosomiasis is a chronic disease with considerable social impact. Despite the availability of affordable chemotherapy, drug treatment has not significantly reduced the overall number of disease cases. Among other mechanisms, the parasite produces PGE2 and PGD2 to evade host immune defenses. To investigate the role of PGE2 and PGD2 in schistosomiasis, we evaluated the effects of L-161,982, Ah6809 (PGE2 receptor antagonists alone of combined with each other) and MK-0524 (PGD2 receptor antagonist) during prepatent Schistosoma mansoni infection. Drugs were administered intraperitoneally an hour before and 24 hours after infection of C57BL/6 mice with 100 Schistosoma mansoni cercariae. L-161,982, Ah6809, their combination and MK-0524 caused partial protection against pre-patent S. mansoni infection which was mediated by biasing the immune response towards Th1 phenotype. These results showed that blockade of PGE2 and PGD2 receptors confers partial protection against pre-patent S. mansoni infection in mice and that they may be useful as adjunctive therapy to current anti-schistosomal drugs or vaccines. PMID:26939228

  6. Current issues in medically assisted reproduction and genetics in Europe: research, clinical practice, ethics, legal issues and policy. European Society of Human Genetics and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.

    PubMed

    Harper, Joyce C; Geraedts, Joep; Borry, Pascal; Cornel, Martina C; Dondorp, Wybo; Gianaroli, Luca; Harton, Gary; Milachich, Tanya; Kääriäinen, Helena; Liebaers, Inge; Morris, Michael; Sequeiros, Jorge; Sermon, Karen; Shenfield, Françoise; Skirton, Heather; Soini, Sirpa; Spits, Claudia; Veiga, Anna; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Viville, Stéphane; de Wert, Guido; Macek, Milan

    2013-11-01

    In March 2005, a group of experts from the European Society of Human Genetics and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology met to discuss the interface between genetics and assisted reproductive technology (ART), and published an extended background paper, recommendations and two Editorials. Seven years later, in March 2012, a follow-up interdisciplinary workshop was held, involving representatives of both professional societies, including experts from the European Union Eurogentest2 Coordination Action Project. The main goal of this meeting was to discuss developments at the interface between clinical genetics and ARTs. As more genetic causes of reproductive failure are now recognised and an increasing number of patients undergo testing of their genome before conception, either in regular health care or in the context of direct-to-consumer testing, the need for genetic counselling and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) may increase. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) thus far does not have evidence from randomised clinical trials to substantiate that the technique is both effective and efficient. Whole-genome sequencing may create greater challenges both in the technological and interpretational domains, and requires further reflection about the ethics of genetic testing in ART and PGD/PGS. Diagnostic laboratories should be reporting their results according to internationally accepted accreditation standards (International Standards Organisation - ISO 15189). Further studies are needed in order to address issues related to the impact of ART on epigenetic reprogramming of the early embryo. The legal landscape regarding assisted reproduction is evolving but still remains very heterogeneous and often contradictory. The lack of legal harmonisation and uneven access to infertility treatment and PGD/PGS fosters considerable cross-border reproductive care in Europe and beyond. The aim of this paper is to complement previous publications and provide

  7. Current issues in medically assisted reproduction and genetics in Europe: research, clinical practice, ethics, legal issues and policy

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Joyce C; Geraedts, Joep; Borry, Pascal; Cornel, Martina C; Dondorp, Wybo; Gianaroli, Luca; Harton, Gary; Milachich, Tanya; Kääriäinen, Helena; Liebaers, Inge; Morris, Michael; Sequeiros, Jorge; Sermon, Karen; Shenfield, Françoise; Skirton, Heather; Soini, Sirpa; Spits, Claudia; Veiga, Anna; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Viville, Stéphane; de Wert, Guido; Macek, Milan

    2013-01-01

    In March 2005, a group of experts from the European Society of Human Genetics and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology met to discuss the interface between genetics and assisted reproductive technology (ART), and published an extended background paper, recommendations and two Editorials. Seven years later, in March 2012, a follow-up interdisciplinary workshop was held, involving representatives of both professional societies, including experts from the European Union Eurogentest2 Coordination Action Project. The main goal of this meeting was to discuss developments at the interface between clinical genetics and ARTs. As more genetic causes of reproductive failure are now recognised and an increasing number of patients undergo testing of their genome before conception, either in regular health care or in the context of direct-to-consumer testing, the need for genetic counselling and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) may increase. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) thus far does not have evidence from randomised clinical trials to substantiate that the technique is both effective and efficient. Whole-genome sequencing may create greater challenges both in the technological and interpretational domains, and requires further reflection about the ethics of genetic testing in ART and PGD/PGS. Diagnostic laboratories should be reporting their results according to internationally accepted accreditation standards (International Standards Organisation – ISO 15189). Further studies are needed in order to address issues related to the impact of ART on epigenetic reprogramming of the early embryo. The legal landscape regarding assisted reproduction is evolving but still remains very heterogeneous and often contradictory. The lack of legal harmonisation and uneven access to infertility treatment and PGD/PGS fosters considerable cross-border reproductive care in Europe and beyond. The aim of this paper is to complement previous publications and

  8. Rapid Whole-Genome Sequencing for Genetic Disease Diagnosis in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Carol Jean; Miller, Neil Andrew; Soden, Sarah Elizabeth; Dinwiddie, Darrell Lee; Noll, Aaron; Alnadi, Noor Abu; Andraws, Nevene; Patterson, Melanie LeAnn; Krivohlavek, Lisa Ann; Fellis, Joel; Humphray, Sean; Saffrey, Peter; Kingsbury, Zoya; Weir, Jacqueline Claire; Betley, Jason; Grocock, Russell James; Margulies, Elliott Harrison; Farrow, Emily Gwendolyn; Artman, Michael; Safina, Nicole Pauline; Petrikin, Joshua Erin; Hall, Kevin Peter; Kingsmore, Stephen Francis

    2014-01-01

    Monogenic diseases are frequent causes of neonatal morbidity and mortality, and disease presentations are often undifferentiated at birth. More than 3500 monogenic diseases have been characterized, but clinical testing is available for only some of them and many feature clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Hence, an immense unmet need exists for improved molecular diagnosis in infants. Because disease progression is extremely rapid, albeit heterogeneous, in newborns, molecular diagnoses must occur quickly to be relevant for clinical decision-making. We describe 50-hour differential diagnosis of genetic disorders by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) that features automated bioinformatic analysis and is intended to be a prototype for use in neonatal intensive care units. Retrospective 50-hour WGS identified known molecular diagnoses in two children. Prospective WGS disclosed potential molecular diagnosis of a severe GJB2-related skin disease in one neonate; BRAT1-related lethal neonatal rigidity and multifocal seizure syndrome in another infant; identified BCL9L as a novel, recessive visceral heterotaxy gene (HTX6) in a pedigree; and ruled out known candidate genes in one infant. Sequencing of parents or affected siblings expedited the identification of disease genes in prospective cases. Thus, rapid WGS can potentially broaden and foreshorten differential diagnosis, resulting in fewer empirical treatments and faster progression to genetic and prognostic counseling. PMID:23035047

  9. A clinical approach to the diagnosis of patients with leukodystrophies and genetic leukoencephelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Leventer, Richard J.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; van Hove, Johan; Pizzino, Amy; McNeill, Nathan H.; Helman, Guy; Simons, Cas; Schmidt, Johanna L.; Rizzo, William B.

    2015-01-01

    Leukodystrophies (LD) and genetic leukoencephalopathies (gLE) are disorders that result in white matter abnormalities in the central nervous system (CNS). Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) has dramatically improved and systematized the diagnosis of LDs and gLEs, and in combination with specific clinical features, such as Addison's disease in Adrenoleukodystrophy or hypodontia in Pol-III related or 4H leukodystrophy, can often resolve a case with a minimum of testing. The diagnostic odyssey for the majority LD and gLE patients, however, remains extensive – many patients will wait nearly a decade for a definitive diagnosis and at least half will remain unresolved. The combination of MRI, careful clinical evaluation and next generation genetic sequencing holds promise for both expediting the diagnostic process and dramatically reducing the number of unresolved cases. Here we present a workflow detailing the Global Leukodystrophy Initiative (GLIA) consensus recommendations for an approach to clinical diagnosis, including salient clinical features suggesting a specific diagnosis, neuroim-aging features and molecular genetic testing. We also discuss recommendations on the use of broad-spectrum next-generation sequencing in instances of ambiguous MRI or clinical findings. We conclude with a proposal for systematic trials of genome-wide agnostic testing as a first line diagnostic in LDs and gLEs given the increasing number of genes associated with these disorders. PMID:25655951

  10. Genetic testing and counseling in the case of an autism diagnosis: A caregivers perspective.

    PubMed

    Hens, Kristien; Peeters, Hilde; Dierickx, Kris

    2016-09-01

    The search for genes that can explain the development of autism is ongoing. At the same time, genetic counselling and genetic testing can be offered to families with a child diagnosed with autism. However, given the complexity of autism, both with respect to its aetiology as well as with respect to its heterogeneity, such genetic counselling and testing raises specific ethical questions regarding the aim and scope. In order to map these questions and opinions we interviewed 15 Belgian autism professionals. We found that they believed that genetic counselling and genetic testing have certain benefits for families confronted with an autism diagnosis, but also that direct benefit to the child is limited to those cases where a genetic finding offers a certain prognosis and intervention plan. In cases where autism is the result of a syndrome or a known genetic variant that is associated with other health problems, detection can also enable prevention of these health issues. Benefits of genetic testing, such as relief of guilt and reproductive choice, are primarily benefits to the parents, although indirectly they may affect the wellbeing of the person diagnosed. These benefits are associated with ethical questions. PMID:27544064

  11. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic diagnosis of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH).

    PubMed

    Porto, Graça; Brissot, Pierre; Swinkels, Dorine W; Zoller, Heinz; Kamarainen, Outi; Patton, Simon; Alonso, Isabel; Morris, Michael; Keeney, Steve

    2016-04-01

    Molecular genetic testing for hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is recognized as a reference test to confirm the diagnosis of suspected HH or to predict its risk. The vast majority (typically >90%) of patients with clinically characterized HH are homozygous for the p.C282Y variant in the HFE gene, referred to as HFE-related HH. Since 1996, HFE genotyping was implemented in diagnostic algorithms for suspected HH, allowing its early diagnosis and prevention. However, the penetrance of disease in p.C282Y homozygotes is incomplete. Hence, homozygosity for p.C282Y is not sufficient to diagnose HH. Neither is p.C282Y homozygosity required for diagnosis as other rare forms of HH exist, generally referred to as non-HFE-related HH. These pose significant challenges when defining criteria for referral, testing protocols, interpretation of test results and reporting practices. We present best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic diagnosis of HH where recommendations are classified, as far as possible, according to the level and strength of evidence. For clarification, the guidelines' recommendations are preceded by a detailed description of the methodology and results obtained with a series of actions taken in order to achieve a wide expert consensus, namely: (i) a survey on the current practices followed by laboratories offering molecular diagnosis of HH; (ii) a systematic literature search focused on some identified controversial topics; (iii) an expert Best Practice Workshop convened to achieve consensus on the practical recommendations included in the guidelines. PMID:26153218

  12. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic diagnosis of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH)

    PubMed Central

    Porto, Graça; Brissot, Pierre; Swinkels, Dorine W; Zoller, Heinz; Kamarainen, Outi; Patton, Simon; Alonso, Isabel; Morris, Michael; Keeney, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Molecular genetic testing for hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is recognized as a reference test to confirm the diagnosis of suspected HH or to predict its risk. The vast majority (typically >90%) of patients with clinically characterized HH are homozygous for the p.C282Y variant in the HFE gene, referred to as HFE-related HH. Since 1996, HFE genotyping was implemented in diagnostic algorithms for suspected HH, allowing its early diagnosis and prevention. However, the penetrance of disease in p.C282Y homozygotes is incomplete. Hence, homozygosity for p.C282Y is not sufficient to diagnose HH. Neither is p.C282Y homozygosity required for diagnosis as other rare forms of HH exist, generally referred to as non-HFE-related HH. These pose significant challenges when defining criteria for referral, testing protocols, interpretation of test results and reporting practices. We present best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic diagnosis of HH where recommendations are classified, as far as possible, according to the level and strength of evidence. For clarification, the guidelines' recommendations are preceded by a detailed description of the methodology and results obtained with a series of actions taken in order to achieve a wide expert consensus, namely: (i) a survey on the current practices followed by laboratories offering molecular diagnosis of HH; (ii) a systematic literature search focused on some identified controversial topics; (iii) an expert Best Practice Workshop convened to achieve consensus on the practical recommendations included in the guidelines. PMID:26153218

  13. New Advances of Preimplantation and Prenatal Genetic Screening and Noninvasive Testing as a Potential Predictor of Health Status of Babies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The current morphologically based selection of human embryos for transfer cannot detect chromosome aneuploidies. So far, only biopsy techniques have been able to screen for chromosomal aneuploidies in the in vitro fertilization (IVF) embryos. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) or screening (PGS) involves the biopsy of oocyte polar bodies or embryonic cells and has become a routine clinical procedure in many IVF clinics worldwide, including recent development of comprehensive chromosome screening of all 23 pairs of chromosomes by microarrays for aneuploidy screening. The routine preimplantation and prenatal genetic diagnosis (PND) require testing in an aggressive manner. These procedures may be invasive to the growing embryo and fetus and potentially could compromise the clinical outcome. Therefore the aim of this review is to summarize not only the new knowledge on preimplantation and prenatal genetic diagnosis in humans, but also on the development of potential noninvasive embryo and fetal testing that might play an important role in the future. PMID:24783200

  14. Gene scene: Earlier, eventually more specific, prenatal genetic diagnosis in realm of possibility

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, T.

    1990-12-26

    A new genetic technique that can amplify the DNA of a single cell has flung open the window of opportunity for prenatal genetic diagnosis to just 3 days after conception, and even to the unfertilized egg. In vitro fertilization (IVF) specialists at the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynecology at London's Postgraduate medical School, Hammersmith Hospital have determined the sex of human embryos at the eight-cell stage of development from five couples at risk for X chromosome-linked diseases. The female embryos, which do not risk inheriting the disease, were then successfully implanted in the uterus and carried to full term.

  15. Beyond the Genetic Diagnosis: Providing Parents What They Want to Know.

    PubMed

    Saul, Robert A; Meredith, Stephanie Hall

    2016-07-01

    Clinicians need to provide accurate, up-to-date, and balanced information to parents following a prenatal or postnatal diagnosis of Down syndrome and other genetic conditions. Families want information about the genomic outcomes and medical issues, but they also want information about life outcomes and social supports. Because the anticipated outcomes of a condition can change significantly based on available social support, health care, and services, it is important for clinicians to stay up-to-date about new developments and credible, medically reviewed information about Down syndrome and other genetic conditions to access resources for clinical care. PMID:27368358

  16. Prenatal diagnosis of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease by molecular genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dong Gyu; Chae, Hyojin; Shin, Jong Chul; Park, In Yang; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Yonggoo

    2011-11-01

    A 27-year-old primigravida was referred for evaluation of severe oligohydramnios at 22 weeks of gestation. For a more accurate diagnosis and detection of other fetal anomalies, complementary fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed. Findings of fetal MRI evaluation were consistent with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD). Parental mutation analysis in the PKHD1 gene was performed. By PKHD1 mutation analysis, we were able to identify a heterozygous missense mutation in exon 20 (K626R) in the father. Molecular genetic analysis can be helpful for an early and reliable prenatal diagnosis of ARPKD. Herein, we present a case of ARPKD that was diagnosed at 22 weeks of gestation by ultrasonographic examination and MRI and verified by PKHD1 mutation analysis and array-based genetic deletion analysis. PMID:21790888

  17. High resolution melting: improvements in the genetic diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Portuguese cohort

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a complex myocardial disorder with a recognized genetic heterogeneity. The elevated number of genes and mutations involved in HCM limits a gene-based diagnosis that should be considered of most importance for basic research and clinical medicine. Methodology In this report, we evaluated High Resolution Melting (HRM) robustness, regarding HCM genetic testing, by means of analyzing 28 HCM-associated genes, including the most frequent 4 HCM-associated sarcomere genes, as well as 24 genes with lower reported HCM-phenotype association. We analyzed 80 Portuguese individuals with clinical phenotype of HCM allowing simultaneously a better characterization of this disease in the Portuguese population. Results HRM technology allowed us to identify 60 mutated alleles in 72 HCM patients: 49 missense mutations, 3 nonsense mutations, one 1-bp deletion, one 5-bp deletion, one in frame 3-bp deletion, one insertion/deletion, 3 splice mutations, one 5'UTR mutation in MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2, TNNI3, CSRP3, MYH6 and MYL2 genes. Significantly 22 are novel gene mutations. Conclusions HRM was proven to be a technique with high sensitivity and a low false positive ratio allowing a rapid, innovative and low cost genotyping of HCM. In a short return, HRM as a gene scanning technique could be a cost-effective gene-based diagnosis for an accurate HCM genetic diagnosis and hopefully providing new insights into genotype/phenotype correlations. PMID:22429680

  18. Genetic Testing as a New Standard for Clinical Diagnosis of Color Vision Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Davidoff, Candice; Neitz, Maureen; Neitz, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The genetics underlying inherited color vision deficiencies is well understood: causative mutations change the copy number or sequence of the long (L), middle (M), or short (S) wavelength sensitive cone opsin genes. This study evaluated the potential of opsin gene analyses for use in clinical diagnosis of color vision defects. Methods We tested 1872 human subjects using direct sequencing of opsin genes and a novel genetic assay that characterizes single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using the MassArray system. Of the subjects, 1074 also were given standard psychophysical color vision tests for a direct comparison with current clinical methods. Results Protan and deutan deficiencies were classified correctly in all subjects identified by MassArray as having red–green defects. Estimates of defect severity based on SNPs that control photopigment spectral tuning correlated with estimates derived from Nagel anomaloscopy. Conclusions The MassArray assay provides genetic information that can be useful in the diagnosis of inherited color vision deficiency including presence versus absence, type, and severity, and it provides information to patients about the underlying pathobiology of their disease. Translational Relevance The MassArray assay provides a method that directly analyzes the molecular substrates of color vision that could be used in combination with, or as an alternative to current clinical diagnosis of color defects. PMID:27622081

  19. Genetic Diagnosis of Two Dopa-Responsive Dystonia Families by Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhan-fang; Zhang, Yu-han; Guo, Ji-feng; Sun, Qi-ying; Mei, Jun-pu; Zhou, Han-lin; Guan, Li-ping; Tian, Jin-yong; Hu, Zheng-mao; Li, Jia-da; Xia, Kun; Yan, Xin-xiang; Tang, Bei-sha

    2014-01-01

    Dopa-responsive dystonia, a rare disorder typically presenting in early childhood with lower limb dystonia and gait abnormality, responds well to levodopa. However, it is often misdiagnosed with the wide spectrum of phenotypes. By exome sequencing, we make a rapid genetic diagnosis for two atypical dopa-responsive dystonia pedigrees. One pedigree, presented with prominent parkinsonism, was misdiagnosed as Parkinson's disease until a known mutation in GCH1 (GTP cyclohydrolase 1) gene (NM_000161.2: c.631_632delAT, p.Met211ValfsX38) was found. The other pedigree was detected with a new compound heterozygous mutation in TH (tyrosine hydroxylase) gene [(NM_000360.3: c.911C>T, p.Ala304Val) and (NM_000360.3: c.1358G>A, p.Arg453His)], whose proband, a pregnant woman, required a rapid and less-biased genetic diagnosis. In conclusion, we demonstrated that exome sequencing could provide a precise and rapid genetic testing in the diagnosis of Mendelian diseases, especially for diseases with wide phenotypes. PMID:25181484

  20. Pitfalls in the molecular genetic diagnosis of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON).

    PubMed Central

    Johns, D R; Neufeld, M J

    1993-01-01

    Pathogenetic mutations in mtDNA are found in the majority of patients with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), and molecular genetic techniques to detect them are important for the diagnosis. A false-positive molecular genetic error has adverse consequences for the diagnosis of this maternally inherited disease. We found a number of mtDNA polymorphisms that occur adjacent to known LHON-associated mutations and that confound their molecular genetic detection. These transition mutations occur at mtDNA nt 11779 (SfaNI site loss, 11778 mutation), nt 3459 (BsaHI site loss, 3460 mutation), nt 15258 (AccI site loss, 15257 mutation), nt 14485 (mismatch primer Sau3AI site loss, 14484 mutation), and nt 13707 (BstNI site loss, 13708 mutation). Molecular genetic detection of the most common pathogenetic mtDNA mutations in LHON, using a single restriction enzyme, may be confounded by adjacent polymorphisms that occur with a false-positive rate of 2%-7%. PMID:8213820

  1. Pitfalls in the molecular genetic diagnosis of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON)

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, D.R. ); Neufeld, M.J. )

    1993-10-01

    Pathogenetic mutations in mtDNA are found in the majority of patients with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), and molecular genetic techniques to detect them are important for diagnosis. A false-positive molecular genetic error has adverse consequences for the diagnosis of this maternally inherited disease. The authors found a number of mtDNA polymorphisms that occur adjacent to known LHON-associated mutations and that confound their molecular genetic detection. These transition mutations occur at mtDNA nt 11779 (SfaNI site loss, 11778 mutation), nt 3459 (BsaHI site loss, 3460 mutation), nt 15258 (AccI site loss, 15257 mutation), nt 14485 (mismatch primer Sau3AI site loss, 14484 mutation), and nt 13707 (BstNI site loss, 13708 mutation). Molecular genetic detection of the most common pathogenetic mtDNA mutations in LHON, using a single restriction enzyme, may be confounded by adjacent polymorphisms that occur with a false-positive rate of 2%-7%. 19 refs.

  2. Massively Parallel Sequencing for Genetic Diagnosis of Hearing Loss: The New Standard of Care

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, A. Eliot; Smith, Richard J.H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the use of new genetic sequencing techniques for comprehensive genetic testing for hearing loss. Data Sources Articles were identified from PubMed and Google Scholar databases using pertinent search terms. Review Methods Literature search identified 30 studies as candidates that met search criteria. Three studies were excluded and eight studies were found to be case reports. 20 studies were included for review analysis including seven studies that evaluated controls and 16 studies that evaluated patients with unknown causes of hearing loss; three studies evaluated both controls and patients. Conclusions In the 20 studies included in review analysis, 426 control samples and 603 patients with unknown causes of hearing loss underwent comprehensive genetic diagnosis for hearing loss using massively parallel sequencing. Control analysis showed a sensitivity and specificity > 99%, sufficient for clinical use of these tests. The overall diagnostic rate was 41% (range 10% to 83%) and varied based on several factors including inheritance and pre-screening prior to comprehensive testing. There were significant differences in platforms available in regards to number and type of genes included and whether copy number variations were examined. Based on these results, comprehensive genetic testing should form the cornerstone of a tiered approach to clinical evaluation of patients with hearing loss along with history, physical exam, and audiometry and can determine further testing that may be required, if any. Implications for Practice Comprehensive genetic testing has become the new standard of care for genetic testing for patients with sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:26084827

  3. Integration of PGD-virtual charts into an engineering design process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courard, Amaury; Néron, David; Ladevèze, Pierre; Ballere, Ludovic

    2016-04-01

    This article deals with the efficient construction of approximations of fields and quantities of interest used in geometric optimisation of complex shapes that can be encountered in engineering structures. The strategy, which is developed herein, is based on the construction of virtual charts that allow, once computed offline, to optimise the structure for a negligible online CPU cost. These virtual charts can be used as a powerful numerical decision support tool during the design of industrial structures. They are built using the proper generalized decomposition (PGD) that offers a very convenient framework to solve parametrised problems. In this paper, particular attention has been paid to the integration of the procedure into a genuine engineering design process. In particular, a dedicated methodology is proposed to interface the PGD approach with commercial software.

  4. [Markers for non-invasive molecular genetic diagnosis of oncourological diseases].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlenko, D S; Perepechin, D V; Apolikhin, O I; Efremov, G D; Sivkov, A V

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is accumulated mass of data on the molecular-genetic disorders in prostate cancer (PCa), bladder cancer (BC) and renal cancer (RC). Tumor cells in these diseases are present in the urine sediment; their number is sufficient for molecular genetic analysis that makes possible the development of noninvasive diagnosis of oncourological diseases. A characteristic feature of PCa includes the overexpression of the PCA3 gene; assay kit Progensa™ to quantify such overexpression has been developed; approximately 50% of tumors express a TMPRSS2-ERG chimeric oncogene. Combined analysis of PCA3 and TMPRSS2-ERG allows to detect PCa with a diagnostic accuracy of 84%, which is significantly higher than that of prostate specific antigen test. As a potential markers of BC, there are somatic mutations in FGFR3, PIK3CA, TERT genes in urine sediment, which are found in this disease with a frequency of about 60, 30 and 50%, respectively. The basis of the test system for DNA diagnosis of BC in urine sediment may include a definition of a combination of mutations in these genes with microsatellite instability. Aberrant methylation of the 5'-regulatory regions of tumor suppressor genes, integrated in the panel, also is considered as a tool in the diagnosis of RC (VHL, RASSF1, RARB2, CDH1), PCa (GSTP1, PTGS2, LGALS3) and BC (RASSF1, APC, SFRP2) after standardization of panels of loci investigated, sample preparation methods, bisulfite conversion, and the design of primers and probes. Thus, a test systems for molecular genetic diagnosis of oncourological diseases in urine sediment are currently available or may be developed in the near future. PMID:25807773

  5. Improved inherited peripheral neuropathy genetic diagnosis by whole-exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Alexander P; Zhu, Danqing; Kidambi, Aditi; Ly, Carolyn; Tey, Shelisa; Brewer, Megan H; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Nicholson, Garth A; Kennerson, Marina L

    2015-01-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPNs) are a group of related diseases primarily affecting the peripheral motor and sensory neurons. They include the hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN), hereditary motor neuropathies (HMN), and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). Using whole-exome sequencing (WES) to achieve a genetic diagnosis is particularly suited to IPNs, where over 80 genes are involved with weak genotype–phenotype correlations beyond the most common genes. We performed WES for 110 index patients with IPN where the genetic cause was undetermined after previous screening for mutations in common genes selected by phenotype and mode of inheritance. We identified 41 missense sequence variants in the known IPN genes in our cohort of 110 index patients. Nine variants (8%), identified in the genes MFN2, GJB1, BSCL2, and SETX, are previously reported mutations and considered to be pathogenic in these families. Twelve novel variants (11%) in the genes NEFL, TRPV4, KIF1B, BICD2, and SETX are implicated in the disease but require further evidence of pathogenicity. The remaining 20 variants were confirmed as polymorphisms (not causing the disease) and are detailed here to help interpret sequence variants identified in other family studies. Validation using segregation, normal controls, and bioinformatics tools was valuable as supporting evidence for sequence variants implicated in disease. In addition, we identified one SETX sequence variant (c.7640T>C), previously reported as a putative mutation, which we have confirmed as a nonpathogenic rare polymorphism. This study highlights the advantage of using WES for genetic diagnosis in highly heterogeneous diseases such as IPNs and has been particularly powerful in this cohort where genetic diagnosis could not be achieved due to phenotype and mode of inheritance not being previously obvious. However, first tier testing for common genes in clinically well-defined cases remains important and will account for most positive

  6. Role of genetics in the diagnosis and prognosis of Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsianos, Epameinondas V; Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Tsianos, Vasileios E

    2011-01-01

    Considering the epidemiological, genetic and immunological data, we can conclude that the inflammatory bowel diseases are heterogeneous disorders of multifactorial etiology in which hereditability and environment interact to produce the disease. It is probable that patients have a genetic predisposition for the development of the disease coupled with disturbances in immunoregulation. Several genes have so far been related to the diagnosis of Crohn’s disease. These genes are related to innate pattern recognition receptors, to epithelial barrier homeostasis and maintenance of epithelial barrier integrity, to autophagy and to lymphocyte differentiation. So far, the strongest and most replicated associations with Crohn’s disease have been demonstrated with NOD2, IL23R and ATG16L1 genes. Many genes have so far been implicated in the prognosis of Crohn’s disease and many attempts have been made for classification of genetic profiles in Crohn’s disease. CARD15 seems to be not only a susceptibility gene, but also a disease-modifier gene for Crohn’s disease. Enriching our understanding of Crohn’s disease genetics is of value, but when combining genetic data with functional data the outcome could be of major importance to clinicians. PMID:22219593

  7. Role of genetics in the diagnosis and prognosis of Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsianos, Epameinondas V; Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Tsianos, Vasileios E

    2012-01-01

    Considering epidemiological, genetic and immunological data, we can conclude that the inflammatory bowel diseases are heterogeneous disorders of multifactorial etiology in which hereditability and environment interact to produce the disease. It is probable that patients have a genetic predisposition for the development of the disease coupled with disturbances in immunoregulation. Several genes have been so far related to the diagnosis of Crohn’s disease. Those genes are related to innate pattern recognition receptors, to epithelial barrier homeostasis and maintenance of epithelial barrier integrity, to autophagy and to lymphocyte differentiation. So far, the most strong and replicated associations with Crohn’s disease have been done with NOD2, IL23R and ATG16L1 genes. Many genes have so far been implicated in prognosis of Crohn’s disease and many attempts have been made to classify genetic profiles in Crohn’s disease. CARD15 seems not only a susceptibility gene, but also a disease-modifier gene for Crohn’s disease. Enriching our understanding on Crohn’s disease genetics is important but when combining genetic data with functional data the outcome could be of major importance to clinicians. PMID:22253516

  8. Effective diagnosis of genetic disease by computational phenotype analysis of the disease-associated genome

    PubMed Central

    Zemojtel, Tomasz; Köhler, Sebastian; Mackenroth, Luisa; Jäger, Marten; Hecht, Jochen; Krawitz, Peter; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard; Doelken, Sandra; Ehmke, Nadja; Spielmann, Malte; Øien, Nancy Christine; Schweiger, Michal R.; Krüger, Ulrike; Frommer, Götz; Fischer, Björn; Kornak, Uwe; Flöttmann, Ricarda; Ardeshirdavani, Amin; Moreau, Yves; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Haendel, Melissa; Smedley, Damian; Horn, Denise; Mundlos, Stefan; Robinson, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    Less than half of patients with suspected genetic disease receive a molecular diagnosis. We have therefore integrated next-generation sequencing (NGS), bioinformatics, and clinical data into an effective diagnostic workflow. We used variants in the 2741 established Mendelian disease genes [the disease-associated genome (DAG)] to develop a targeted enrichment DAG panel (7.1 Mb), which achieves a coverage of 20-fold or better for 98% of bases. Furthermore, we established a computational method [Phenotypic Interpretation of eXomes (PhenIX)] that evaluated and ranked variants based on pathogenicity and semantic similarity of patients’ phenotype described by Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) terms to those of 3991 Mendelian diseases. In computer simulations, ranking genes based on the variant score put the true gene in first place less than 5% of the time; PhenIX placed the correct gene in first place more than 86% of the time. In a retrospective test of PhenIX on 52 patients with previously identified mutations and known diagnoses, the correct gene achieved a mean rank of 2.1. In a prospective study on 40 individuals without a diagnosis, PhenIX analysis enabled a diagnosis in 11 cases (28%, at a mean rank of 2.4). Thus, the NGS of the DAG followed by phenotype-driven bioinformatic analysis allows quick and effective differential diagnostics in medical genetics. PMID:25186178

  9. Effect of the PGD2-DP signaling pathway on primary cultured rat hippocampal neuron injury caused by aluminum overload

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Yang, Qunfang; Wei, Yuling; Yang, Yang; Ji, Chaonan; Hu, Xinyue; Mai, Shaoshan; Kuang, Shengnan; Tian, Xiaoyan; Luo, Ying; Liang, Guojuan; Yang, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the agonists and antagonists of DP receptor were used to examine whether the PGD2-DP signaling pathway affects neuronal function. Primary cultured hippocampal neuron was prepared and treated with aluminum maltolate (100 μM) to establish the neuronal damage model. PGD2 and cAMP content was detected by ELISA. L-PGDS and DPs mRNA and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The aluminium-load neuron was treated with the DP1 agonist BW245C, the DP1 antagonist BWA868C, the DP2 agonist DK-PGD2, and the DP2 antagonist CAY10471, respectively. Neuronal pathomorphology was observed using H-E staining. The cell viability and the lactate dehydrogenase leakage rates of neurons were measured with MTT and LDH kit, respectively. Ca2+ level was detected by Fluo-3/AM. In the model group, the MTT values obviously decreased; LDH leakage rates and PGD2 content increased significantly; L-PGDS, DP1 mRNA and protein expressions increased, and DP2 level decreased. BW245C reduced the Ca2+ fluorescence intensity and protected the neurons. DK-PGD2 increased the intensity of Ca2+ fluorescence, while CAY10471 had the opposite effect. In conclusion, contrary to the effect of DP2, the PGD2-DP1 signaling pathway protects against the primary cultured rat hippocampal neuronal injury caused by aluminum overload. PMID:27089935

  10. Current molecular genetics strategies for the diagnosis of lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Giugliani, Roberto; Brusius-Facchin, Ana-Carolina; Pasqualim, Gabriela; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Riegel, Mariluce; Matte, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a group of almost 50 monogenic diseases characterized by mutations causing deficiency of lysosomal enzymes or non-enzyme proteins involved in transport across the lysosomal membrane, protein maturation or lysosomal biogenesis. Usually, affected patients are normal at birth and have a progressive and severe disease with high morbidity and reduced life expectancy. The overall incidence of LSDs is usually estimated as 1:5000, but newborn screening studies are indicating that it could be much higher. Specific therapies were already developed for selected LSDs, making the timely and correct diagnosis very important for successful treatment and also for genetic counseling. In most LSD cases the biochemical techniques provide a reliable diagnosis. However, the identification of pathogenic mutations by genetic analysis is being increasingly recommended to provide additional information. In this paper we discuss the conventional methods for genetic analysis used in the LSDs [restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS), single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC), real-time polymerase chain reaction, high resolution melting (HRM), multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), Sanger sequencing] and also the newer approaches [massive parallel sequencing, array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH)]. PMID:26567866

  11. Differential Diagnosis of Genetic Disorders Associated with Moderate to Severe Refractory Eczema and Elevated Immunoglobulin E.

    PubMed

    Arjona Aguilera, C; Albarrán Planelles, C; Tercedor Sánchez, J

    2016-03-01

    The association of moderate to severe eczema and elevated plasma levels of immunoglobulin E is a characteristic not only of atopic dermatitis but also of various genodermatoses: hyperimmunoglobulin E syndromes, Omenn syndrome, Netherton syndrome, peeling skin syndrome type B, severe dermatitis, multiple allergies, and metabolic wasting syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, prolidase deficiency, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, IPEX syndrome, STAT5B deficiency, and pentasomy X. The clinical presentation of these genodermatoses -typically in children- is consistent with severe atopic dermatitis. Immunoglobulin E is elevated from birth and response to conventional treatments is poor. Diagnosis is further complicated by the fact that these genodermatoses often share other clinical manifestations and laboratory findings. We present practical guidelines for differentiating among these various entities, with the aim of helping physicians decide what type of genetic test should be carried out -and when- in order to establish a definitive diagnosis. PMID:26593686

  12. Application of Massively Parallel Sequencing to Genetic Diagnosis in Multiplex Families with Idiopathic Sensorineural Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chen-Chi; Lin, Yin-Hung; Lu, Ying-Chang; Chen, Pei-Jer; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Hsu, Chuan-Jen; Chen, Pei-Lung

    2013-01-01

    Despite the clinical utility of genetic diagnosis to address idiopathic sensorineural hearing impairment (SNHI), the current strategy for screening mutations via Sanger sequencing suffers from the limitation that only a limited number of DNA fragments associated with common deafness mutations can be genotyped. Consequently, a definitive genetic diagnosis cannot be achieved in many families with discernible family history. To investigate the diagnostic utility of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), we applied the MPS technique to 12 multiplex families with idiopathic SNHI in which common deafness mutations had previously been ruled out. NimbleGen sequence capture array was designed to target all protein coding sequences (CDSs) and 100 bp of the flanking sequence of 80 common deafness genes. We performed MPS on the Illumina HiSeq2000, and applied BWA, SAMtools, Picard, GATK, Variant Tools, ANNOVAR, and IGV for bioinformatics analyses. Initial data filtering with allele frequencies (<5% in the 1000 Genomes Project and 5400 NHLBI exomes) and PolyPhen2/SIFT scores (>0.95) prioritized 5 indels (insertions/deletions) and 36 missense variants in the 12 multiplex families. After further validation by Sanger sequencing, segregation pattern, and evolutionary conservation of amino acid residues, we identified 4 variants in 4 different genes, which might lead to SNHI in 4 families compatible with autosomal dominant inheritance. These included GJB2 p.R75Q, MYO7A p.T381M, KCNQ4 p.S680F, and MYH9 p.E1256K. Among them, KCNQ4 p.S680F and MYH9 p.E1256K were novel. In conclusion, MPS allows genetic diagnosis in multiplex families with idiopathic SNHI by detecting mutations in relatively uncommon deafness genes. PMID:23451214

  13. Comorbidity of intellectual disability confounds ascertainment of autism: implications for genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Polyak, Andrew; Kubina, Richard M; Girirajan, Santhosh

    2015-10-01

    While recent studies suggest a converging role for genetic factors towards risk for nosologically distinct disorders including autism, intellectual disability (ID), and epilepsy, current estimates of autism prevalence fail to take into account the impact of comorbidity of these disorders on autism diagnosis. We aimed to assess the effect of comorbidity on the diagnosis and prevalence of autism by analyzing 11 years (2000-2010) of special education enrollment data on approximately 6.2 million children per year. We found a 331% increase in the prevalence of autism from 2000 to 2010 within special education, potentially due to a diagnostic recategorization from frequently comorbid features such as ID. The decrease in ID prevalence equaled an average of 64.2% of the increase of autism prevalence for children aged 3-18 years. The proportion of ID cases potentially undergoing recategorization to autism was higher (P = 0.007) among older children (75%) than younger children (48%). Some US states showed significant negative correlations between the prevalence of autism compared to that of ID while others did not, suggesting state-specific health policy to be a major factor in categorizing autism. Further, a high frequency of autistic features was observed when individuals with classically defined genetic syndromes were evaluated for autism using standardized instruments. Our results suggest that current ascertainment practices are based on a single facet of autism-specific clinical features and do not consider associated comorbidities that may confound diagnosis. Longitudinal studies with detailed phenotyping and deep molecular genetic analyses are necessary to completely understand the cause of this complex disorder. PMID:26198689

  14. Drug Induced Liver Injury: Review with a Focus on Genetic Factors, Tissue Diagnosis, and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Tawfik; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Yosha, Liron; Benson, Ariel A.; Daher, Saleh; Mizrahi, Meir

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a rare but potentially life threatening adverse drug reaction. DILI may mimic any morphologic characteristic of acute or chronic liver disease, and the histopathologic features of DILI may be indistinguishable from those of other causes of liver injury, such as acute viral hepatitis. In this review article, we provide an update on causative agents, clinical features, pathogenesis, diagnosis modalities, and outcomes of DILI. In addition, we review results of recently reported genetic studies and updates on pharmacological and invasive treatments. PMID:26356634

  15. Bach to the future: response to: Extending preimplantation genetic diagnosis: medical and non-medical uses.

    PubMed

    Ashcroft, R

    2003-08-01

    Professor Robertson sketches an elegant framework for policy evaluation and regulation of the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis for various medical, medical related, and non-medical purposes. In criticism of his position, I argue that the distinction between policy and ethics upon which his argument relies is highly unstable, and the approach taken to ethical evaluation of particular parental interests leaves open many issues which the policy approach would hope to exclude. In conclusion I argue that while his position ultimately fails, the onus is on his critics to come up with a viable and satisfying alternative. PMID:12930853

  16. Selecting barrenness: the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis by congenitally infertile women to select for infertility.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kavita R

    2010-01-01

    Congenitally infertile women such as those with Turner syndrome or Mayer Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome have available the technologies of oocyte harvesting, cryropreservation, in-vitro fertilization, and gestational surrogacy in order to have genetically related offspring. Since congenital infertility results in a variety of experiences that impacts on nearly every aspect of a person's life, in the future it is possible that these women might desire a congenitally infertile child through the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis so as to share this common bond. While infertility results in a relatively normal quality of life, it is morally wrong to necessitate the future use of infertility services with its variable success rate on a child. Also, whereas the woman has fundamental reproductive autonomy, she lacks the substantive autonomy regarding the specific characteristics of her child. Finally, the infertile community does exhibit a strong presence, but it lacks characteristics that define it as a culture. PMID:21644427

  17. Use of genetic algorithms for computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancers from image features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floyd, Carey E., Jr.; Tourassi, Georgia D.; Baker, Jay A.

    1996-04-01

    In this investigation we explore genetic algorithms as a technique to train the weights in a feed forward neural network designed to predict breast cancer based on mammographic findings and patient history. Mammograms were obtained from 206 patients who obtained breast biopsies. Mammographic findings were recorded by radiologists for each patient. In addition, the outcome of the biopsy was recorded. Of the 206 cases, 73 were malignant while 133 were benign at the time of biopsy. A genetic algorithm (GA) was developed to adjust the weights of an artificial neural network (ANN) so that the ANN would output the outcome of the biopsy when the mammographic findings were given as inputs. The GA is a technique for function optimization that reflects biological genetic evolution. The ANN was a fully connected feed- forward network using a sigmoid activation with 11 inputs, one hidden layer with 10 nodes, and one output node (benign/malignant). The GA approach allows much flexibility in selecting the function to be optimized. In this work both mean-squared error (MSE) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve area (Az) were explored as optimization criteria. The system was trained using a bootstrap sampling. Optimizing for the two criteria result in different solutions. The 'best' solution was obtained by minimizing a linear combination of MSE and (1-Az). ROC areas were 0.82 plus or minus 0.07, somewhat less than those obtained using backpropagation for ANN training: 0.90 plus or minus 0.05. This is the first description of a genetic algorithm for breast cancer diagnosis. The novel advantage of this technique is the ability to optimize the system for maximizing ROC area rather than minimizing mean squared error. A new technique for computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancer has been explored. The flexibility of the GA approach allows optimization of cost functions that have relevance to breast cancer prediction.

  18. [Announcing the diagnosis of a genetic disease and psychological care of the patient and family].

    PubMed

    Lacombe, Didier; Toussaint, Eva

    2007-03-01

    Announcing a diagnostic of genetic disease to a child is for parents such a pain, also brutal and destructive. Even if the physician chooses the best moment, the right words, it's a sign of a rupture, a real disaster combined with physical feeling of bascule and temporo-spacial confusion. It's a beach in their flesh, a lost of identity, a profound norcissic failure. In addition this feature is associated with a high feeling of guilt failure with sometimes non logical imaginary structures. All those testimonies confirm that the identification of a genetic disease is a key in the family history. Announcing a diagnostic almost stay in mind as a bad new enduring a period of life when disease was absent or undiagnosed. Even if previews complementary investigations were done, the revelation still stays a mess. Also the diagnosis could be a relief the beginning of a new life with possibility of rebuilding. Regarding genetic diseases, it's the whole family that is concerned. The patients will deal with the diseases daily sometimes invisible by the circle. After the announcement of the diagnosis, the parents will have to structure that life according to the changes that the diseases rags in the family Brothers and sisters will have to find their place compared to this affetted brother or sister. In the some time as finding answers too many questions. The grand parents may feel guilty and wonder how to help the parents. The main part to this psychological approach in genetic diseases is to give each member of the family his role. PMID:17546763

  19. Collaborative Crowdsourcing for the Diagnosis of Rare Genetic Syndromes: The DYSCERNE Experience.

    PubMed

    Douzgou, Sofia; Pollalis, Yiannis A; Vozikis, Athanassios; Patrinos, George P; Clayton-Smith, Jill

    2016-01-01

    The big-data revolution is creating a challenge for the provision of services in the health sector to keep pace with the expectations of the general population. Utilization of crowdsourcing can impact positively on the quality, cost and speed of healthcare by involving large sections of professionals and the public and creating novel science within an ethical framework. In 2007, the DYSCERNE project was funded by the European Commission Public Health Executive Agency (EU DG Sanco) aimed at setting up a network of expertise for rare dysmorphic disorders. As part of DYSCERNE, a Dysmorphology Diagnostic System was set up to enable clinicians throughout the EU to submit cases electronically for diagnosis using a secure, web-based interface, hosted at specified access points (submitting nodes), in 26 different European countries. DYSCERNE utilized the process of crowdsourcing international expertise for the clinical diagnosis of very rare genetic syndromes of multiple congenital anomalies. This is the first reported account of collaborative crowd sourcing in dysmorphology, as part of a clinical genetics service. PMID:26447648

  20. A 26-Year Experience in Chorionic Villus Sampling Prenatal Genetic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Paula; Mota-Freitas, Maria Manuela; Santos, Rosário; Silva, Maria Luz; Soares, Gabriela; Fortuna, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the trends of chorionic villus sampling (CVS) referred for prenatal genetic diagnosis in the past two and a half decades in a Portuguese Center. Our cohort of 491 CVS was mostly performed by the transcervical method at the 12th gestational week. Data collected within the framework of this study relate to the following: sampling method, referral reason versus abnormality and incidence of procedure-related pregnancy loss, that declined to about 0.5% over the last 15 years. The year 2000 represented a change in referral reasons for chorionic tissue collection, shifting from almost exclusively for cytogenetic testing to an increasing number of molecular tests for monogenic disorders. Herein, success rates as well as cytogenetic and/or molecular DNA results are presented. These latter include not only tests for several monogenic disorders, but also aneuploidy and maternal cell contamination screening. This retrospective analysis reiterates that CVS is a safe and reliable first trimester technique for prenatal diagnosis in high genetic risk pregnancies. PMID:26237480

  1. Fault diagnosis in spur gears based on genetic algorithm and random forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerrada, Mariela; Zurita, Grover; Cabrera, Diego; Sánchez, René-Vinicio; Artés, Mariano; Li, Chuan

    2016-03-01

    There are growing demands for condition-based monitoring of gearboxes, and therefore new methods to improve the reliability, effectiveness, accuracy of the gear fault detection ought to be evaluated. Feature selection is still an important aspect in machine learning-based diagnosis in order to reach good performance of the diagnostic models. On the other hand, random forest classifiers are suitable models in industrial environments where large data-samples are not usually available for training such diagnostic models. The main aim of this research is to build up a robust system for the multi-class fault diagnosis in spur gears, by selecting the best set of condition parameters on time, frequency and time-frequency domains, which are extracted from vibration signals. The diagnostic system is performed by using genetic algorithms and a classifier based on random forest, in a supervised environment. The original set of condition parameters is reduced around 66% regarding the initial size by using genetic algorithms, and still get an acceptable classification precision over 97%. The approach is tested on real vibration signals by considering several fault classes, one of them being an incipient fault, under different running conditions of load and velocity.

  2. Immunohistochemical Markers of Soft Tissue Tumors: Pathologic Diagnosis, Genetic Contributions, and Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    Parham, David M

    2015-01-01

    After ~30 years of widespread usage, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has become a standard method of diagnosis for surgical pathology. Because of the plethora of diagnoses and often subtle nature of diagnostic criteria, IHC finds particular utility in soft tissue tumors. The use of progressively small amounts of tissue for diagnosis highlights the importance of this method. The sensitivity and crispness of IHC stains have progressively improved with the advent of new techniques. Traditionally, IHC detects cell-typic markers that characterize cell phenotypes, such as chromogranin for neuroectodermal tissue, myogenin for skeletal muscle, and cytokeratin for epithelium. However, the advent of genetic discoveries have led to IHC testing for detection of fusion gene products or overexpressed oncogenes associated with deletions and mutations. Proliferation-based markers such as Ki-67 can also be used for prognosis and grading, but more standardization is needed. Development of monoclonal antibody-based pharmaceuticals, such as imatinib or crizotinib, holds the promise of tailored anticancer therapy. IHC thus has assumed importance not only for diagnosis but also for guidance of personalized medicine. PMID:26549970

  3. Impact of genetics on the diagnosis and clinical management of syndromic craniosynostoses

    PubMed Central

    Agochukwu, Nneamaka B.; Solomon, Benjamin D.; Muenke, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose More than 60 different mutations have been identified to be causal in syndromic forms of craniosynostosis. The majority of these mutations occur in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2). The clinical management of syndromic craniosynostosis varies based on the particular causal mutation. Additionally, the diagnosis of a patient with syndromic craniosynostosis is based on the clinical presentation, signs, and symptoms. The understanding of the hallmark features of particular syndromic forms of craniosynostosis leads to efficient diagnosis, management, and long-term prognosis of patients with syndromic craniosynostoses. Methods A comprehensive literature review was done with respect to the major forms of syndromic craniosynostosis and additional less common FGFR-related forms of syndromic craniosynostosis. Additionally, information and data gathered from studies performed in our own investigative lab (lab of Dr. Muenke) were further analyzed and reviewed. A literature review was also performed with regard to the genetic workup and diagnosis of patients with craniosynostosis. Results Patients with Apert syndrome (craniosynostosis syndrome due to mutations in FGFR2) are most severely affected in terms of intellectual disability, developmental delay, central nervous system anomalies, and limb anomalies. All patients with FGFR-related syndromic craniosynostosis have some degree of hearing loss that requires thorough initial evaluations and subsequent follow-up. Conclusions Patients with syndromic craniosynostosis require management and treatment of issues involving multiple organ systems which span beyond craniosynostosis. Thus, effective care of these patients requires a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:22872262

  4. Genetic analysis of Tunisian families with Usher syndrome type 1: toward improving early molecular diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Rebeh, Imen; Bonnet, Crystel; Bouassida, Walid; Hadjamor, Imen; Ayadi, Hammadi; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Petit, Christine; Masmoudi, Saber

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Usher syndrome accounts for about 50% of all hereditary deaf-blindness cases. The most severe form of this syndrome, Usher syndrome type I (USH1), is characterized by profound congenital sensorineural deafness, vestibular dysfunction, and retinitis pigmentosa. Six USH1 genes have been identified, MYO7A, CDH23, PCDH15, USH1C, SANS, and CIB2, encoding myosin VIIA, cadherin-23, protocadherin-15, harmonin, scaffold protein containing ankyrin repeats and a sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain, and calcium- and integrin-binding member 2, respectively. Methods In the present study, we recruited four Tunisian families with a diagnosis of USH1, together with healthy unrelated controls. Affected members underwent detailed audiologic and ocular examinations. We used the North African Deafness (NADf) chip to search for known North African mutations associated with USH. Then, we selected microsatellite markers covering USH1 known loci to genotype the DNA samples. Finally, we performed DNA sequencing of three known USH1 genes: MYO7A, PCDH15, and USH1C. Results Four biallelic mutations, all single base changes, were found in the MYO7A, USH1C, and PCDH15 genes. These mutations consist of a previously reported splicing defect c.470+1G>A in MYO7A, three novel variants, including two nonsense (p.Arg3X and p.Arg134X) in USH1C and PCDH15, respectively, and one frameshift (p.Lys615Asnfs*6) in MYO7A. Conclusions We found a remarkable genetic heterogeneity in the studied families with USH1 with a variety of mutations, among which three were novel. These novel mutations will be included in the NADf mutation screening chip that will allow a higher diagnosis efficiency of this extremely genetically heterogeneous disease. Ultimately, efficient molecular diagnosis of USH in a patient’s early childhood is of utmost importance, allowing better educational and therapeutic management. PMID:27440999

  5. Lethal autonomy: the malfunction of the informed consent mechanism within the context of prenatal diagnosis of genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Dunne, C; Warren, C

    1998-01-01

    In this article, Cara Dunne and Catherine Warren challenge the current role of genetic counselors in advising expectant mothers about potential genetic defects of their fetuses. They show that genetic counselors sometimes provide one-sided negative information to women undergoing prenatal diagnosis of genetic variants. This biased information promotes abortion of what are considered "defective" fetuses. The misleading information provided by the genetic counselors and the termination of the pregnancies is akin to the eugenics movement. The authors describe the early 20th century eugenics movement, explore the origin and development of the Human Genome Project, analyze the current role of genetic counseling, and explain the importance of the informed consent process to the exercise of autonomy. Dunne and Warren conclude by offering methods by which to restructure the informed consent mechanism to offer a more balanced assessment of the risks and benefits associated with genetic disability. PMID:9807244

  6. Genetics of primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia: a model for early diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome?

    PubMed

    Drougat, Ludivine; Espiard, Stéphanie; Bertherat, Jerôme

    2015-10-01

    Long-term consequences of cortisol excess are frequent despite appropriate treatment after cure of Cushing's syndrome. This might be due to diagnostic delay, often difficult to reduce in rare diseases. The identification of a genetic predisposing factor might help to improve early diagnosis by familial screening. Primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (PBMAH) is a rare cause of Cushing's syndrome. Hypercortisolism in PBMAH is most often diagnosed between the fifth and sixth decades of life. The bilateral nature of the adrenocortical tumors and the occurrence of rare clear familial forms suggest a genetic origin. Indeed, a limited subset of PBMAH can be observed as part of multiple tumors syndromes due to alterations of the APC, Menin or Fumarate Hydratase genes. Rare variants of the phosphodiesterases PDE11A have been associated with PBMAH. The recent identification of ARMC5 germline alterations in 25-50% of PBMAH patients without obvious familial history or associated tumors opens new perspectives. ARMC5 alterations follow the model of a tumor suppressor gene: a first germline inactivating mutation of this 16p located gene is followed by a somatic secondary hit on the other allele (inactivating mutation or allelic loss). Functional studies demonstrate that ARMC5 controls apoptosis and steroid synthesis. The phenotype of index cases patients with the mutation seems more severe than the one of WT index cases. However, phenotype variability within a family is often observed. This review summarizes the genetics of PBMAH, focusing on ARMC5, which offer new perspectives for early diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome. PMID:26264719

  7. The Italian haemophilia B mutation database: a tool for genetic counselling, carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Tagariello, Giuseppe; Belvini, Donata; Salviato, Roberta; Di Gaetano, Rosanna; Zanotto, Daniela; Radossi, Paolo; Risato, Renzo; Sartori, Roberto; Tassinari, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Italian database of factor IX gene (F9) mutations has been built since 2001 and is, so far, the most practical instrument for comprehensive genetic counselling, carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis. Over time the haemophilia B database has been enriched by entries on a larger number of patients and molecular genetic data identifying heterogeneous mutations spanning the entire F9. Methods Conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis is a variant of heteroduplex analysis, which has been applied for screening F9 for mutations, which are further fully characterised by direct sequencing of the amplified mutated regions. This project has involved 29 Italian haemophilia centres and provides data concerning the analysis of a cohort of 306 unrelated patients with haemophilia B (191 with severe, 67 with moderate and 48 with mild disease, including 8 patients with severe haemophilia B with inhibitors). The recorded data include levels of factor IX clotting activity, inhibitor status and clinical severity. Results Detailed analysis of the mutations revealed 164 different mutations, that are considered as unique molecular events (8 large deletions, 11 small deletions, 1 combined deletion/ insertion, 2 insertions, 104 missense, 20 nonsense, 14 mutations in a splicing site, 3 in the promoter and 1 silent). The data recorded in the Italian F9 mutation database provided the basis to study 85 families with haemophilia B, involving 180 females (20 obligate carriers, 106 carriers and 54 non-carriers) and enabled 14 prenatal diagnoses to be made in 12 females. Conclusions Genetic analysis is required to determine female carrier status reliably. Female relatives may request carrier analysis, when a male relative is first diagnosed as having haemophilia or when they are pregnant. At present, the data collected in the Italian national register of mutations in haemophilia B provide the opportunity to perform prompt and precise determination of carrier status and prenatal

  8. Comparing targeted exome and whole exome approaches for genetic diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gorokhova, Svetlana; Cerino, Mathieu; Mathieu, Yves; Courrier, Sébastien; Desvignes, Jean-Pierre; Salgado, David; Béroud, Christophe; Krahn, Martin; Bartoli, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing is rapidly becoming a widely used method in genetic diagnostics. However, there is still no clear consensus as to which approach can most efficiently identify the pathogenic mutations carried by a given patient, while avoiding false negative and false positive results. We developed a targeted exome approach (MyoPanel2) in order to optimize genetic diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders. Using this approach, we were able to analyse 306 genes known to be mutated in myopathies as well as in related disorders, obtaining 98.8% target sequence coverage at 20 ×. Moreover, MyoPanel2 was able to detect 99.7% of 11,467 known mutations responsible for neuromuscular disorders. We have then used several quality control parameters to compare performance of the targeted exome approach with that of whole exome sequencing. The results of this pilot study of 140 DNA samples suggest that targeted exome sequencing approach is an efficient genetic diagnostic test for most neuromuscular diseases. PMID:27054082

  9. Genetics of frontotemporal lobar degeneration: an up-date and diagnosis algorithm.

    PubMed

    Le Ber, I

    2013-10-01

    The last decade marked a turning point in the knowledge of frontotemporal lobar degenerations (FTLD). Major discoveries were made with the identification of TDP-43 and FUS, two novel key players in FTLD. The growing number of FTLD genes has considerably changed our clinical practice. The high intrafamilial variability of phenotypes underlines the necessity of a careful interview concerning the family history, regarding FTLD diseases, but also other neurodegenerative and extra-neurological disorders. Knowledge of the different genetic forms of FTLD and their associated phenotypes become essential to propose appropriate genetic diagnosis to the patients, and deliver accurate genetic counseling to their families. We propose an algorithm based on four criteria to help to pinpoint the genetic cause of FTLD: Presence of ALS in the patient or family; age at onset of FTLD; progranulin plasma level; and other disorders present in the patient or family. Presence of ALS is strongly indicative of a C9ORF72 expansion; a very early age at onset (<50 years), parkinsonism and oculomotor dysfunction are indicative of MAPT mutations; whereas hallucinations, CBDS and PNFA are indicative of PGRN mutations. A C9ORF72 repeat expansion should be searched for therefore in patients with FTLD-ALS, followed by sequencing of exon 6 of TARDBP gene in negative cases. Since C9ORF72 expansions are as frequent as PGRN mutations in patients with pure FTLD, both should be investigated, except in early familial FTLD (<50) where MAPT mutations should be searched for first. VCP, SQSTM1 and hnRNPA2B1 gene-sequencing could be proposed in patients or families presenting 'multisystem proteinopathy'. The genes currently identified explain 50-60% of familial forms of FTLD. The identification of new FTLD genes involved remains a major challenge to gain further insight into the pathology and even better clarify the classification of FTLD in the future. PMID:24011980

  10. Peyronie’s disease: a literature review on epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology, diagnosis and work-up

    PubMed Central

    Al-Thakafi, Sultan

    2016-01-01

    Peyronie’s disease (PD), a fibromatous disorder of the tunica albuginea of the penile corpus cavernosum, named after the French physician Francois de la Peyronie, is characterized by pain, plaque formation, penile curvature, and plaque calcification. The epidemiological data on PD is inconsistent, with recent reports stating a prevalence of up to 9%, and the condition affecting men of all ages, from teenagers to septuagenarians. We are just beginning to elucidate the role of genetics as a causative factor for PD. Chromosomal abnormalities and single-nucleotide polymorphisms have been shown to be associated with fibrotic diatheses. Tunical mechanical stress and microvascular trauma are major contributory factors to the pathophysiology of PD. The diagnosis of PD can be made using a combination of clinical history, physical examination and, sometimes, imaging modalities. A better understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of this condition remains paramount for the development of newer and more effective disease-targeted interventions. PMID:27298774

  11. Genetic diagnosis and prognosis of Alzheimer’s disease: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common form of dementia in western societies, is a pathologically and clinically heterogeneous disease with a strong genetic component. The recent advances in high-throughput genome technologies allowing for the rapid analysis of millions of polymorphisms in thousands of subjects has significantly advanced our understanding of the genomic underpinnings of AD susceptibility. During the last 5 years, genome-wide association and whole-exome- and whole-genome sequencing studies have mapped more than 20 disease-associated loci, providing insights into the molecular pathways involved in AD pathogenesis and hinting at potential novel therapeutic targets. This review article summarizes the challenges and opportunities of when using genomic information for diagnosis and prognosis of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25634383

  12. Angelman-Like Syndrome: A Genetic Approach to Diagnosis with Illustrative Cases

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Ho-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic abnormalities in 15q11-13 imprinted region and UBE3A mutation are the two major mechanisms for molecularly confirmed Angelman Syndrome. However, there is 10% of clinically diagnosed Angelman Syndrome remaining test negative. With the advancement of genomic technology like array comparative genomic hybridization and next generation sequencing methods, it is found that some patients of these test negative Angelman-like Syndromes actually have alternative diagnoses. Accurate molecular diagnosis is paramount for genetic counseling and subsequent management. Despite overlapping phenotypes between Angelman and Angelman-like Syndrome, there are some subtle but distinct features which could differentiate them clinically. It would provide important clue during the diagnostic process for clinicians. PMID:26942024

  13. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (CLAH) by molecular genetic testing in Korean siblings.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hyun Sun; Lee, Seungok; Chae, Hyojin; Choi, Sae Kyung; Kim, Myungshin; Park, In Yang; Suh, Byung Kyu; Shin, Jong Chul

    2011-11-01

    Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (CLAH) is caused by mutations to the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene associated with the inability to synthesize all adrenal and gonadal steroids. Inadequate treatment in an infant with this condition may result in sudden death from an adrenal crisis. We report a case in which CLAH developed in Korean siblings; the second child was prenatally diagnosed because the first child was affected and low maternal serum estriol was detected in a prenatal screening test. To our knowledge, this is the first prenatal diagnosis of the Q258X StAR mutation, which is the only consistent genetic cluster identified to date in Japanese and Korean populations. PMID:22028173

  14. Molecular diagnosis reveals genetic heterogeneity for the overlapping MKKS and BBS phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Elise; Durand, Myriam; Stoetzel, Corinne; Doray, Bérénice; Viville, Brigitte; Hellé, Sophie; Danse, Jean-Marc; Hamel, Christian; Bitoun, Pierre; Goldenberg, Alice; Finck, Sonia; Faivre, Laurence; Sigaudy, Sabine; Holder, Muriel; Vincent, Marie-Claire; Marion, Vincent; Bonneau, Dominique; Verloes, Alain; Nisand, Israël; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Dollfus, Hélène

    2011-01-01

    Hydrometrocolpos and polydactyly diagnosed in the prenatal period or early childhood may raise diagnostic dilemmas especially in distinguishing McKusick-Kaufman syndrome (MKKS) and the Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS). These two conditions can initially overlap. With time, the additional features of BBS appearing in childhood, such as retinitis pigmentosa, obesity, learning disabilities and progressive renal dysfunction allow clear differentiation between BBS and MKKS. Genotype overlap also exists, as mutations in the MKKS-BBS6 gene are found in both syndromes. We report 7 patients diagnosed in the neonatal period with hydrometrocolpos and polydactyly who carry mutations in various BBS genes (BBS6, BBS2, BBS10, BBS8 and BBS12), stressing the importance of wide BBS genotyping in patients with this clinical association for diagnosis, prognosis and genetic counselling. PMID:21044901

  15. Prenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Lipoid Adrenal Hyperplasia (CLAH) by Molecular Genetic Testing in Korean Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Hyun Sun; Lee, Seungok; Chae, Hyojin; Choi, Sae Kyung; Kim, Myungshin; Park, In Yang; Suh, Byung Kyu

    2011-01-01

    Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (CLAH) is caused by mutations to the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene associated with the inability to synthesize all adrenal and gonadal steroids. Inadequate treatment in an infant with this condition may result in sudden death from an adrenal crisis. We report a case in which CLAH developed in Korean siblings; the second child was prenatally diagnosed because the first child was affected and low maternal serum estriol was detected in a prenatal screening test. To our knowledge, this is the first prenatal diagnosis of the Q258X StAR mutation, which is the only consistent genetic cluster identified to date in Japanese and Korean populations. PMID:22028173

  16. Access to medical-assisted reproduction and pgd in Italian law: a deadly blow to an illiberal statute? commentary to the European Court on Human Rights's decision Costa and Pavan v Italy (ECtHR, 28 August 2012, App. 54270/2010).

    PubMed

    Biondi, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an account of the European Court on Human Rights' Second Section decision in the case Costa and Pavan v Italy. The judgment found that the Italian Statute on Assisted Reproduction (Law 40/2004), and particularly its prohibition to use in vitro fertilisation and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to prevent the birth of children affected by genetically transmissible conditions, breached Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). In fact, the statute in question permits only infertile people to access medically assisted reproduction techniques and forbids PGD and embryo selection. The Court regarded that the rationale of these prohibitions-identified by the Italian Government with the need to prevent eugenic practices as well as to protect the health of the unborn and of the woman-was at odds with the fact that Italian law allows pre-natal screening and therapeutic abortions in case foetal abnormalities are diagnosed. In order to clarify the decision's significance, the paper goes on to analyse the rationale of Law 40/2004 in the Italian legal and political context. Emphasis is placed on the fact that this statute is extremely controversial at domestic level, because many of its provisions-including those considered by the Strasbourg Court-are inherently contradictory and contrast with the settled constitutional principles on abortion, as many domestic authorities highlighted. In this context, should the commented decision be confirmed by the Grand Chamber, it may provide a basis to bring consistency back to the Italian regulation of assisted reproduction. Finally, the paper considers the appeal lodged by the Italian Government to the Grand Chamber, and in particular the contention that the European Court had failed to respect Italy's margin of appreciation. In this regard, it is argued that, under Law 40/2004, individuals face illogical and discriminatory restrictions to their right to private and family life and that

  17. Common genetic variation and survival after colorectal cancer diagnosis: a genome-wide analysis.

    PubMed

    Phipps, Amanda I; Passarelli, Michael N; Chan, Andrew T; Harrison, Tabitha A; Jeon, Jihyoun; Hutter, Carolyn M; Berndt, Sonja I; Brenner, Hermann; Caan, Bette J; Campbell, Peter T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Cheadle, Jeremy P; Curtis, Keith R; Duggan, David; Fisher, David; Fuchs, Charles S; Gala, Manish; Giovannucci, Edward L; Hayes, Richard B; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hsu, Li; Jacobs, Eric J; Jansen, Lina; Kaplan, Richard; Kap, Elisabeth J; Maughan, Timothy S; Potter, John D; Schoen, Robert E; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L; West, Hannah; White, Emily; Peters, Ulrike; Newcomb, Polly A

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence. Common germline genetic variation may also be related to CRC survival. We used a discovery-based approach to identify SNPs related to survival outcomes after CRC diagnosis. Genome-wide genotyping arrays were conducted for 3494 individuals with invasive CRC enrolled in six prospective cohort studies (median study-specific follow-up = 4.2-8.1 years). In pooled analyses, we used Cox regression to assess SNP-specific associations with CRC-specific and overall survival, with additional analyses stratified by stage at diagnosis. Top findings were followed-up in independent studies. A P value threshold of P < 5×10(-8) in analyses combining discovery and follow-up studies was required for genome-wide significance. Among individuals with distant-metastatic CRC, several SNPs at 6p12.1, nearest the ELOVL5 gene, were statistically significantly associated with poorer survival, with the strongest associations noted for rs209489 [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.8, P = 7.6×10(-10) and HR = 1.8, P = 3.7×10(-9) for CRC-specific and overall survival, respectively). No SNPs were statistically significantly associated with survival among all cases combined or in cases without distant-metastases. SNPs in 6p12.1/ELOVL5 were associated with survival outcomes in individuals with distant-metastatic CRC, and merit further follow-up for functional significance. Findings from this genome-wide association study highlight the potential importance of genetic variation in CRC prognosis and provide clues to genomic regions of potential interest. PMID:26586795

  18. Feature selection using genetic algorithm for breast cancer diagnosis: experiment on three different datasets

    PubMed Central

    Aalaei, Shokoufeh; Shahraki, Hadi; Rowhanimanesh, Alireza; Eslami, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): This study addresses feature selection for breast cancer diagnosis. The present process uses a wrapper approach using GA-based on feature selection and PS-classifier. The results of experiment show that the proposed model is comparable to the other models on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets. Materials and Methods: To evaluate effectiveness of proposed feature selection method, we employed three different classifiers artificial neural network (ANN) and PS-classifier and genetic algorithm based classifier (GA-classifier) on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets include Wisconsin breast cancer dataset (WBC), Wisconsin diagnosis breast cancer (WDBC), and Wisconsin prognosis breast cancer (WPBC). Results: For WBC dataset, it is observed that feature selection improved the accuracy of all classifiers expect of ANN and the best accuracy with feature selection achieved by PS-classifier. For WDBC and WPBC, results show feature selection improved accuracy of all three classifiers and the best accuracy with feature selection achieved by ANN. Also specificity and sensitivity improved after feature selection. Conclusion: The results show that feature selection can improve accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of classifiers. Result of this study is comparable with the other studies on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets. PMID:27403253

  19. Evidence-based recommendations for genetic diagnosis of familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Giancane, Gabriella; Ter Haar, Nienke M; Wulffraat, Nico; Vastert, Sebastiaan J; Barron, Karyl; Hentgen, Veronique; Kallinich, Tilmann; Ozdogan, Huri; Anton, Jordi; Brogan, Paul; Cantarini, Luca; Frenkel, Joost; Galeotti, Caroline; Gattorno, Marco; Grateau, Gilles; Hofer, Michael; Kone-Paut, Isabelle; Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin; Lachmann, Helen J; Simon, Anna; Demirkaya, Erkan; Feldman, Brian; Uziel, Yosef; Ozen, Seza

    2015-04-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a disease of early onset which can lead to significant morbidity. In 2012, Single Hub and Access point for pediatric Rheumatology in Europe (SHARE) was launched with the aim of optimising and disseminating diagnostic and management regimens for children and young adults with rheumatic diseases. The objective was to establish recommendations for FMF focusing on provision of diagnostic tools for inexperienced clinicians particularly regarding interpretation of MEFV mutations. Evidence-based recommendations were developed using the European League against Rheumatism standard operating procedure. An expert committee of paediatric rheumatologists defined search terms for the systematic literature review. Two independent experts scored articles for validity and level of evidence. Recommendations derived from the literature were evaluated by an online survey and statements with less than 80% agreement were reformulated. Subsequently, all recommendations were discussed at a consensus meeting using the nominal group technique and were accepted if more than 80% agreement was reached. The literature search yielded 3386 articles, of which 25 were considered relevant and scored for validity and level of evidence. In total, 17 articles were scored valid and used to formulate the recommendations. Eight recommendations were accepted with 100% agreement after the consensus meeting. Topics covered were clinical versus genetic diagnosis of FMF, genotype-phenotype correlation, genotype-age at onset correlation, silent carriers and risk of amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis, and role of the specialist in FMF diagnosis. The SHARE initiative provides recommendations for diagnosing FMF aimed at facilitating improved and uniform care throughout Europe. PMID:25628446

  20. Genetically engineered colorimetric single-chain antibody fusion protein for rapid diagnosis of rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Mousli, M; Turki, I; Kharmachi, H; Dellagi, K

    2008-01-01

    The most widely used test for rabies diagnostics is the fluorescent antibody test, which is recommended by both the World Health Organization and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). This test may be used directly on a smear, and can also be used to confirm the presence of rabies antigen in cell culture or in brain tissue for diagnosis. The colorimetric enzymes are usually coupled to an antibody by chemical means using cross-linking reagents. However, such non-specific procedures lead to heterogeneous conjugates, sometimes with reduced activity and specificity. To bypass these problems, genetic engineering has provided a way to create chimeric bifunctional molecules in which the variable domains of an antibody are genetically linked to unrelated protein tracers. In this study, we describe the successful production of a bifunctional chimeric protein based on alkaline phosphatase-fused anti-rabies virus glycoprotein scFv antibody fragment. We also report the antigen binding properties and the alkaline phosphatase activity of the recombinant conjugate protein. We established its value as a novel in vitro tool for detecting the rabies virus in brain smear in a one-step procedure; it presents a similar sensitivity and specificity to that obtained using standard reagents. PMID:18634511

  1. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis in Welsh pony embryos after biopsy and cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Guignot, F; Reigner, F; Perreau, C; Tartarin, P; Babilliot, J M; Bed'hom, B; Vidament, M; Mermillod, P; Duchamp, G

    2015-11-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis and embryo cryopreservation are important tools to improve genetic management in equine species with marked consequences on the economic value, health, biodiversity, and preservation of the animals. This study aimed to develop a biopsy method at the blastocyst stage that provides viable genotyped cryopreserved Welsh pony embryos. Embryos were collected at d 6.75 to 7 after ovulation. Biopsies were performed with either a microblade or a micropipette. After biopsy, embryos were cryopreserved. The survival rate of biopsied embryos was evaluated on fresh and cryopreserved embryos either 24 h after in vitro culture or after transfer to recipients. Fresh and nonbiopsied embryos were used as controls. Sex, coat color genes, myotony (neuromuscular disorder) diagnosis, and markers of parentage were investigated using PCR on biopsied cells after whole-genome amplification and on remaining embryos. The embryo survival rate after transfer was not affected by the micropipette biopsy (50%, = 8; 43%, = 7; and 50%, = 12, at d 30 for fresh biopsied embryos, vitrified biopsied embryos, and control embryos, respectively) but was significantly reduced by the use of microblade biopsy: 9 ( = 11) vs. 67% ( = 12) for control embryos. Successful sex determination was achieved for 82% ( = 28) of the micropipette biopsies and 100% ( = 50) of the microblade biopsies. Sex determined on biopsied cells was found to correspond completely (100%) with that determined on the remaining embryo ( = 37). More than 90% of the parentage checking markers, coat color, and myotony diagnosis were successfully determined on biopsies obtained with either a micropipette or a microblade. Mendelian incompatibility (7.5 and 5.5%) and embryo genotyping errors (6.6 and 8.6%) were low and not significantly different between the 2 methods. In conclusion, for the first time, pregnancy at Day 30 was obtained after transfer of Welsh pony biopsied and vitrified embryos >300 μm in

  2. Use of the MLPA Assay in the Molecular Diagnosis of Gene Copy Number Alterations in Human Genetic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Stuppia, Liborio; Antonucci, Ivana; Palka, Giandomenico; Gatta, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) assay is a recently developed technique able to evidence variations in the copy number of several human genes. Due to this ability, MLPA can be used in the molecular diagnosis of several genetic diseases whose pathogenesis is related to the presence of deletions or duplications of specific genes. Moreover, MLPA assay can also be used in the molecular diagnosis of genetic diseases characterized by the presence of abnormal DNA methylation. Due to the large number of genes that can be analyzed by a single technique, MLPA assay represents the gold standard for molecular analysis of all pathologies derived from the presence of gene copy number variation. In this review, the main applications of the MLPA technique for the molecular diagnosis of human diseases are described. PMID:22489151

  3. PGD and separated space variables representation for linear elasticity in 3D representation of plate domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bognet, B.; Leygue, A.; Chinesta, F.; Poitou, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the simulation of linear elastic behaviour of plates using a 3D approach which numerical cost only scales like a 2D one. In the case of plates, the kinematic hypothesis introduced in plate theories to go from 3D to 2D is usually unsatisfactory where one cannot rely on St Venant's principle (usually close to the plate edges). We propose to apply the PGD (Proper Generalized Decomposition) method [1] to the simulation of the linear elastic behavior of plates. This method allows us to separately search for the in-plane and the out-of plane contributions to the 3D solution, yielding significant savings in computational cost. The method is validated on a simple case and its full potential is then presented for the simulation of the behavior of laminated composite plates.

  4. Low utilization of prenatal and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis in Huntington disease - risk discounting in preventive genetics.

    PubMed

    Schulman, J D; Stern, H J

    2015-09-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a late-onset, fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a (CAG) triplet repeat expansion in the Huntingtin gene that enlarges during male meiosis. In 1996 in this journal, one of us (J. D. S.) presented a methodology to perform pre-implantation genetic diagnosis in families at-risk for HD without revealing the genetic status of the at-risk parent. Despite the introduction of accurate prenatal and pre-implantation genetic testing which can prevent transmission of the abnormal HD gene in the family permanently, utilization of these options is extremely low. In this article, we examine the decision-making process regarding genetic testing in families with HD and discuss the possible reasons for the low uptake among this group. PMID:25307798

  5. Prenatal diagnosis as a tool and support for eugenics: myth or reality in contemporary French society?

    PubMed

    Gaille, Marie; Viot, Géraldine

    2013-02-01

    Today, French public debate and bioethics research reflect an ongoing controversy about eugenics. The field of reproductive medicine is often targeted as pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), prenatal diagnosis, and prenatal detection are accused of drifting towards eugenics or being driven by eugenics considerations. This article aims at understanding why the charge against eugenics came at the forefront of the ethical debate. Above all, it aims at showing that the charge against prenatal diagnosis is groundless. The point of view presented in this article has been elaborated jointly by a geneticist and a philosopher. Besides a survey of the medical, bioethical, philosophical and social sciences literature on the topic, the methodology is founded on a joint analysis of geneticist's various consults. Evidence from office visits demonstrated that prenatal diagnosis leads to case-by-case decisions. As we have suggested, this conclusion does not mean that prenatal diagnosis is devoid of ethical issues, and we have identified at least two. The first is related to the evaluation of a decision to abort. The second line of ethical questions arises from the fact that the claim for "normality" hardly hides normative and ambiguous views about disability. As a conclusion, ethical dilemmas keep being noticeable in the field of reproductive medicine and genetic counselling, but an enquiry about eugenic tendencies probably does not allow us to understand them in the proper way. PMID:22814726

  6. DIAGNOSIS-GUIDED METHOD FOR IDENTIFYING MULTI-MODALITY NEUROIMAGING BIOMARKERS ASSOCIATED WITH GENETIC RISK FACTORS IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaoke; Yan, Jingwen; Yao, Xiaohui; Risacher, Shannon L; Saykin, Andrew J; Zhang, Daoqiang; Shen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Many recent imaging genetic studies focus on detecting the associations between genetic markers such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and quantitative traits (QTs). Although there exist a large number of generalized multivariate regression analysis methods, few of them have used diagnosis information in subjects to enhance the analysis performance. In addition, few of models have investigated the identification of multi-modality phenotypic patterns associated with interesting genotype groups in traditional methods. To reveal disease-relevant imaging genetic associations, we propose a novel diagnosis-guided multi-modality (DGMM) framework to discover multi-modality imaging QTs that are associated with both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its top genetic risk factor (i.e., APOE SNP rs429358). The strength of our proposed method is that it explicitly models the priori diagnosis information among subjects in the objective function for selecting the disease-relevant and robust multi-modality QTs associated with the SNP. We evaluate our method on two modalities of imaging phenotypes, i.e., those extracted from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method not only achieves better performances under the metrics of root mean squared error and correlation coefficient but also can identify common informative regions of interests (ROIs) across multiple modalities to guide the disease-induced biological interpretation, compared with other reference methods. PMID:26776178

  7. Diagnosis-Guided Method For Identifying Multi-Modality Neuroimaging Biomarkers Associated With Genetic Risk Factors In Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiaoke; Yan, Jingwen; Yao, Xiaohui; Risacher, Shannon L.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Zhang, Daoqiang; Shen, Li

    2015-01-01

    Many recent imaging genetic studies focus on detecting the associations between genetic markers such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and quantitative traits (QTs). Although there exist a large number of generalized multivariate regression analysis methods, few of them have used diagnosis information in subjects to enhance the analysis performance. In addition, few of models have investigated the identification of multi-modality phenotypic patterns associated with interesting genotype groups in traditional methods. To reveal disease-relevant imaging genetic associations, we propose a novel diagnosis-guided multi-modality (DGMM) framework to discover multi-modality imaging QTs that are associated with both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its top genetic risk factor (i.e., APOE SNP rs429358). The strength of our proposed method is that it explicitly models the priori diagnosis information among subjects in the objective function for selecting the disease-relevant and robust multi-modality QTs associated with the SNP. We evaluate our method on two modalities of imaging phenotypes, i.e., those extracted from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method not only achieves better performances under the metrics of root mean squared error and correlation coefficient but also can identify common informative regions of interests (ROIs) across multiple modalities to guide the disease-induced biological interpretation, compared with other reference methods. PMID:26776178

  8. Genetic Diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease in a Population by Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Høyer, Helle; Braathen, Geir J.; Busk, Øyvind L.; Holla, Øystein L.; Svendsen, Marit; Hilmarsen, Hilde T.; Strand, Linda; Skjelbred, Camilla F.; Russell, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most prevalent inherited neuropathy. Today more than 40 CMT genes have been identified. Diagnosing heterogeneous diseases by conventional Sanger sequencing is time consuming and expensive. Thus, more efficient and less costly methods are needed in clinical diagnostics. We included a population based sample of 81 CMT families. Gene mutations had previously been identified in 22 families; the remaining 59 families were analysed by next-generation sequencing. Thirty-two CMT genes and 19 genes causing other inherited neuropathies were included in a custom panel. Variants were classified into five pathogenicity classes by genotype-phenotype correlations and bioinformatics tools. Gene mutations, classified certainly or likely pathogenic, were identified in 37 (46%) of the 81 families. Point mutations in known CMT genes were identified in 21 families (26%), whereas four families (5%) had point mutations in other neuropathy genes, ARHGEF10, POLG, SETX, and SOD1. Eleven families (14%) carried the PMP22 duplication and one family carried a MPZ duplication (1%). Most mutations were identified not only in known CMT genes but also in other neuropathy genes, emphasising that genetic analysis should not be restricted to CMT genes only. Next-generation sequencing is a cost-effective tool in diagnosis of CMT improving diagnostic precision and time efficiency. PMID:25025039

  9. Targeted next-generation sequencing for the genetic diagnosis of dysferlinopathy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ha Young; Jang, Hoon; Han, Joo Hyung; Park, Hyung Jun; Lee, Jung Hwan; Kim, So Won; Kim, Seung Min; Park, Young-Eun; Kim, Dae-Seong; Bang, Duhee; Lee, Min Goo; Lee, Ji Hyun; Choi, Young-Chul

    2015-06-01

    Dysferlinopathy comprises a group of autosomal recessive muscular dystrophies caused by mutations in the DYSF gene. Due to the large size of the gene and its lack of mutational hot spots, analysis of the DYSF gene is time-consuming and laborious using conventional sequencing methods. By next-generation sequencing (NGS), DYSF gene analysis has previously been validated through its incorporation in multi-gene panels or exome analyses. However, individual validation of NGS approaches for DYSF gene has not been performed. Here, we established and validated a hybridization capture-based target-enrichment followed by next-generation sequencing to detect mutations in patients with dysferlinopathy. With this approach, mean depth of coverage was approximately 450 fold and almost all (99.3%) of the targeted region had sequence coverage greater than 20 fold. When this approach was tested on samples from patients with known DYSF mutations, all known mutations were correctly retrieved. Using this method on 32 consecutive patient samples with dysferlinopathy, at least two pathogenic variants were detected in 28 (87.5%) samples and at least one pathogenic variant was identified in all samples. Our results suggested that the NGS-based screening method could facilitate efficient and accurate genetic diagnosis of dysferlinopathy. PMID:25868377

  10. The genetic landscape of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: inheritance, mutations, modifier genes, and diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wiesinger, Christoph; Eichler, Florian S; Berger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene encoding a peroxisomal ABC transporter. In this review, we compare estimates of incidence derived from different populations in order to provide an overview of the worldwide incidence of X-ALD. X-ALD presents with heterogeneous phenotypes ranging from adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) to inflammatory demyelinating cerebral ALD (CALD). A large number of different mutations has been described, providing a unique opportunity for analysis of functional domains within ABC transporters. Yet the molecular basis for the heterogeneity of clinical symptoms is still largely unresolved, as no correlation between genotype and phenotype exists in X-ALD. Beyond ABCD1, environmental triggers and other genetic factors have been suggested as modifiers of the disease course. Here, we summarize the findings of numerous reports that aimed at identifying modifier genes in X-ALD and discuss potential problems and future approaches to address this issue. Different options for prenatal diagnosis are summarized, and potential pitfalls when applying next-generation sequencing approaches are discussed. Recently, the measurement of very long-chain fatty acids in lysophosphatidylcholine for the identification of peroxisomal disorders was included in newborn screening programs. PMID:25999754

  11. The molecular genetic basis and diagnosis of familial hypercholesterolemia in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Henrik Kjoerulf

    2002-11-01

    pathogenicity should not be ascribed to missense mutations and small in-frame deletions, e.g. the N543H and 2393del9 mutations, unless in vitro gene expression in eukaryotic cells have been studied, or to splice-site mutations, e.g. the 1592 + 5G-->A mutation, before mRNA studies in patient cells have been performed. The cumulated LDL cholesterol exposure, mainly determined by the defect LDL receptor, plays a crucial role for the clinical manifestation of FH. The phenotypic expression of homozygous FH appears to be dominated by the consequences of the LDL receptor gene mutations. In heterozygous FH, however, the underlying mutational LDL receptor type determines only to a much lesser extent, if any, the variable phenotypic expression as seen in Danish patients. Extreme low fat dietary habits or major gene interactions may influence the lipid profile and the excess cardiovascular mortality observed in heterozygous FH, whereas minor gene determinants do not seem to play any significant role. The clinical diagnosis of heterozygous FH should be based on an elevated plasma LDL cholesterol concentration above the 95th percentiles for the general population together with either the presence of tendon xanthomas or an autosomal dominant transmission of hypercholesterolemia in the family or a child with hypercholesterolemia. Our studies illustrate clearly that molecular genetics can strengthen an equivocal clinical diagnosis and assist decision-making in diagnosis and tracing family members. If demonstration of a pathogenic mutation in the LDL receptor gene fails, other causes of autosomal dominant inherited hypercholesterolemia should be sought. Familial defective apolipoprotein B (FDB) caused by the R3500Q apolipoprotein B gene mutation may mimic FH but the clinical course, however, is often milder than that seen in patients with LDL receptor gene mutations. A newly discovered third major locus at chromosome 1 may also be of future diagnostic importance although the exact gene remains

  12. Multi-Stage Feature Selection by Using Genetic Algorithms for Fault Diagnosis in Gearboxes Based on Vibration Signal

    PubMed Central

    Cerrada, Mariela; Sánchez, René Vinicio; Cabrera, Diego; Zurita, Grover; Li, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    There are growing demands for condition-based monitoring of gearboxes, and techniques to improve the reliability, effectiveness and accuracy for fault diagnosis are considered valuable contributions. Feature selection is still an important aspect in machine learning-based diagnosis in order to reach good performance in the diagnosis system. The main aim of this research is to propose a multi-stage feature selection mechanism for selecting the best set of condition parameters on the time, frequency and time-frequency domains, which are extracted from vibration signals for fault diagnosis purposes in gearboxes. The selection is based on genetic algorithms, proposing in each stage a new subset of the best features regarding the classifier performance in a supervised environment. The selected features are augmented at each stage and used as input for a neural network classifier in the next step, while a new subset of feature candidates is treated by the selection process. As a result, the inherent exploration and exploitation of the genetic algorithms for finding the best solutions of the selection problem are locally focused. The approach is tested on a dataset from a real test bed with several fault classes under different running conditions of load and velocity. The model performance for diagnosis is over 98%. PMID:26393603

  13. Multi-Stage Feature Selection by Using Genetic Algorithms for Fault Diagnosis in Gearboxes Based on Vibration Signal.

    PubMed

    Cerrada, Mariela; Vinicio Sánchez, René; Cabrera, Diego; Zurita, Grover; Li, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    There are growing demands for condition-based monitoring of gearboxes, and techniques to improve the reliability, effectiveness and accuracy for fault diagnosis are considered valuable contributions. Feature selection is still an important aspect in machine learning-based diagnosis in order to reach good performance in the diagnosis system. The main aim of this research is to propose a multi-stage feature selection mechanism for selecting the best set of condition parameters on the time, frequency and time-frequency domains, which are extracted from vibration signals for fault diagnosis purposes in gearboxes. The selection is based on genetic algorithms, proposing in each stage a new subset of the best features regarding the classifier performance in a supervised environment. The selected features are augmented at each stage and used as input for a neural network classifier in the next step, while a new subset of feature candidates is treated by the selection process. As a result, the inherent exploration and exploitation of the genetic algorithms for finding the best solutions of the selection problem are locally focused. The Sensors 2015, 15 23904 approach is tested on a dataset from a real test bed with several fault classes under different running conditions of load and velocity. The model performance for diagnosis is over 98%. PMID:26393603

  14. Perinatal differential diagnosis of cystic kidney disease and urinary tract obstruction: anatomic pathologic, ultrasonographic and genetic findings.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, W; Vogel, M; Dimer, J S; Luttkus, A; Büscher, U; Dudenhausen, J W

    2000-04-01

    According to the classification of Osathanondh and Potter of cystic kidney diseases an antenatal differential diagnosis is presented, which is based on the anatomic pathologic, ultrasonographic and genetic findings. Since the ultrasound evaluation influences the obstetric and neonatal management, each second and third trimester sonography should consider the most common malformations in pediatric autopsies. The autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPK), autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPK), multicystic renal dysplasia, obstructive multicystic kidneys and cystic renal malformations found in other syndromes with genetic linkage are discussed in this review. PMID:10725570

  15. An Efficient Trio-Based Mini-Haplotyping Method for Genetic Diagnosis of Phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Saeed; Entezam, Mona; Mohajer, Neda; Kazemi-sefat, Golnaz-Ensieh; Razipour, Masoumeh; Ahmadloo, Somayeh; Setoodeh, Aria; Keramatipour, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective The phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) locus has high linkage disequilibrium. Haplotypes related to this locus may thus be considered sufficiently informative for genetic diagnosis and carrier screening using multi-allelic markers. In this study, we present an efficient method for haplotype analysis of PAH locus using multiplexing dyes. In addition, we explain how to resolve the dye shift challenge in multiplex short tandem repeat (STR) genotyping. Materials and Methods One hundred family trios were included in this descriptive study. The forward primer of a tetra-nucleotide STR and the reverse primer of a variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) were labeled with three different non-overlapping dyes 5-carboxyfluorescein (FAM), 6-carboxy-N,N,N’,N’-tetramethylrhodamine (HEX) and 6-carboxy-N,N,N’,N’-tetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA). The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products from each family trio were multiplexed for capillary electrophoresis and results were analyzed using Peak Scanner software. Results Multiplexing trio products decreased the cost significantly. The TAMRA labeled products had a significant predictable shift (migrated at a slower electrophoretic rate) relative to the HEX and FAM labeled products. Through our methodology we achieve, the less inter-dye shift than intra-dye shift variance. Correcting the dye shift in the labeled products, according to the reference allele size, significantly decreased the inter-dye variability (P<0.001). Conclusion Multiplexing trio products helps to detect and resolve the dye shift accurately in each family, which otherwise would result in diagnostic error. The dye system of FAM, HEX and TAMRA is more feasible and cheaper than other dye systems. PMID:27540528

  16. X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and autosomal 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) polymorphisms in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    VandeBerg, J.L.; Aivaliotis, M.J.; Samollow, P.B. )

    1992-12-01

    Electrophoretic polymorphisms of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) were examined in captive colonies of five subspecies of baboons (Papio hamadryas). Phenotype frequencies and family data verified the X-linked inheritance of the G6PD polymorphism. Insufficient family data were available to confirm autosomal inheritance of the 6PGD polymorphism, but the electrophoretic patterns of variant types (putative heterozygotes) suggested the codominant expression of alleles at an autosomal locus. Implications of the G6PD polymorphism are discussed with regard to its utility as a marker system for research on X-chromosome inactivation during baboon development and for studies of clonal cell proliferation and/or cell selection during the development of atherosclerotic lesions in the baboon model. 61 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  17. Applicability of genetic polymorphism analysis for the diagnosis of Angelman syndrome and the correlation between language difficulties and disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Wang, K; Li, Y T; Hou, M

    2016-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurogenetic disorder caused by a defect in the expression of the maternally inherited ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) gene in chromosome 15. The most common genetic defects include maternal deletions in chromosome 15q11-13; however, paternal uniparental disomy and imprinting defects allow for the identification of mutations in UBE3A in 10% of patients with AS. The aim of this study was to validate the clinical features and genetic polymorphisms of AS, and to discuss the relationship between functional language lateralization and the arcuate fasciculus in the Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Six children with AS (mean age = 32.57 months) presenting characteristic behavioral patterns of AS (frequent laughter and happy demeanor, hand flapping, and hypermotor behavior) were recruited to this study. The patients underwent a clinical evaluation (clinical history, dysmorphological and neurological examinations, and psychological evaluations) and paraclinical investigations [genetic tests (fluorescence in situ hybridization and methylation polymerase chain reaction), electroencephalogram, and magnetic resonance imaging]. We conclude that AS diagnosis cannot rely solely on genetic testing for polymorphisms in UBE3A and must consider its clinical characteristics. Moreover, functional language lateralization and the arcuate fasciculus in the Broca's and Wernicke's areas were found to be closely correlated. Therefore, UBE3A gene mutation analysis combined with comprehensive clinical evaluations may be suitable for the diagnosis of AS. PMID:27323188

  18. Update on autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis: mRNA analysis using hair samples is a powerful tool for genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Kazumitsu; Akiyama, Masashi

    2015-07-01

    Research on the molecular genetics and pathomechanisms of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) has advanced considerably and several causative genes and molecules underlying the disease have been identified. Three major ARCI phenotypes are harlequin ichthyosis (HI), lamellar ichthyosis (LI), and congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (CIE). Skin barrier defects are involved in the pathogenesis of ARCI. In this review, the causative genes of ARCI and its phenotypes as well as recent advances in the field are summarized. The known causative molecules underlying ARCI include ABCA12, TGM1, ALOXE3, ALOX12B, NIPAL4, CYP4F22, PNPLA1, CERS3, and LIPN. It is important to examine genetic associations and to elucidate the pathomechanisms of ARCI to establish effective therapies and beneficial genetic counseling. Next-generation sequencing is a promising method that enables the detection of causative disease mutations, even in cases of unexpected concomitant genetic diseases. For genetic diagnosis, obtaining mRNA from hair follicle epithelial cells, which are analogous to keratinocytes in the interfollicular epidermis, is convenient and minimally invasive in patients with ARCI. We confirmed that our mRNA analysis method using hair follicle samples can be applied not only to keratinization disorders, but also to other genetic diseases in the dermatology field. Studies that suggest potential next-generation therapies using ARCI model mice are also reviewed. PMID:25982146

  19. Protein and genetic diagnosis of limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A: The yield and the pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Fanin, Marina; Angelini, Corrado

    2015-08-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is the most frequent form of LGMD worldwide. Comprehensive clinical assessment and laboratory testing is essential for diagnosis of LGMD2A. Muscle immunoblot analysis of calpain-3 is the most useful tool to direct genetic testing, as detection of calpain-3 deficiency has high diagnostic value. However, calpain-3 immunoblot testing lacks sensitivity in about 30% of cases due to gene mutations that inactivate the enzyme. The best diagnostic strategy should be determined on a case-by-case basis, depending on which tissues are available, and which molecular and/or genetic methods are adopted. In this work we survey the current knowledge, advantages, limitations, and pitfalls of protein testing and mutation detection in LGMD2A and provide an update of genetic epidemiology. PMID:25900067

  20. Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL)

    MedlinePlus

    ... your family has a known history of NCL. Prenatal tests, or a test called preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), may be available, depending on the specific type of disease. In PGD, an embryo is tested for abnormalities ...

  1. Dominant feature selection for the fault diagnosis of rotary machines using modified genetic algorithm and empirical mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lei; Yan, Jihong; de Silva, Clarence W.

    2015-05-01

    This paper develops a novel dominant feature selection method using a genetic algorithm with a dynamic searching strategy. It is applied in the search for the most representative features in rotary mechanical fault diagnosis, and is shown to improve the classification performance with fewer features. First, empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is employed to decompose a vibration signal into intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) which represent the signal characteristic with sample oscillatory modes. Then, a modified genetic algorithm with variable-range encoding and dynamic searching strategy is used to establish relationships between optimized feature subsets and the classification performance. Next, a statistical model that uses receiver operating characteristic (ROC) is developed to select dominant features. Finally, support vector machine (SVM) is used to classify different fault patterns. Two real-world problems, rotor-unbalance vibration and bearing corrosion, are employed to evaluate the proposed feature selection scheme and fault diagnosis system. Statistical results obtained by analyzing the two problems, and comparative studies with five well-known feature selection techniques, demonstrate that the method developed in this paper can achieve improvements in identification accuracy with lower feature dimensionality. In addition, the results indicate that the proposed method is a promising tool to select dominant features in rotary machinery fault diagnosis.

  2. Genetic Testing Confirmed the Early Diagnosis of X-Linked Hypophosphatemic Rickets in a 7-Month-Old Infant

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Kok Siong; Sng, Andrew Anjian; Ho, Cindy Weili; Koay, Evelyn Siew-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the phosphate regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X-chromosome (PHEX) have been causally associated with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLHR). The early diagnosis of XLHR in infants is challenging when it is based solely on clinical features and biochemical findings. We report a 7-month-old boy with a family history of hypophosphatemic rickets., who demonstrated early clinical evidence of rickets, although serial biochemical findings could not definitively confirm rickets. A sequencing assay targeting the PHEX gene was first performed on the mother’s DNA to screen for mutations in the 5′UTR, 22 coding exons, and the exon-intron junctions. Targeted mutation analysis and mRNA studies were subsequently performed on the boys’ DNA to investigate the pathogenicity of the identified mutation. Genetic screening of the PHEX gene revealed a novel mutation, c.1080-2A>C, at the splice acceptor site in intron 9. The detection of an aberrant mRNA transcript with skipped (loss of) exon 10 establishes its pathogenicity and confirms the diagnosis of XLHR in this infant. Genetic testing of the PHEX gene resulted in early diagnosis of XLHR, thus enabling initiation of therapy and prevention of progressive rachitic changes in the infant. PMID:26904698

  3. The intersection of relational autonomy and narrative ethics for the patient unwilling to disclose genetic diagnosis information.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The rare case of the patient unwilling to disclose genetic data to his or her family provides an opportunity to expand the atomistic conception of the autonomous individual in medical decision-making. Medical practitioners naturally avoid violating patient autonomy and privacy. However, unwilling disclosure can damage the health of people other than the patient. In this situation, professionals must weigh the principle of autonomy against the nature of relationships, duties, and confidentialities between patient, professional, and family. The paradigm case studied is that of a patient with a potentially dangerous heart condition, Long QT Syndrome 3. Patients with Long QT 3 are at high risk for dying of ventricular tachycardia during rest, especially from ages 40-60. Once familial genetic testing was completed, the proband's mother, who was positive for the mutation, chose not to inform her estranged sister of the diagnosis.This paper examines the ethical duties of the physician to inform a patient's extended family of a serious genetic diagnosis, with a focus on the emotional and psychological effects of genetic testing. The need to adapt the process of violating confidentiality around considerations for the patient's emotional state and narrative will be addressed. This approach considers the patient's narrative, standpoint, and relationships as a way to develop a support plan and will present a guideline for cases where the probability of significant harm to others supersedes the patient's preference of non-disclosure as well as the physician's respect of confidentiality. The paper seeks to expand the conversation on genetic testing and autonomy beyond principles by considering all parties involved and emphasizes the use of the varied resources available to medical practitioners, especially to provide the best help possible without overburdening physicians with duties. PMID:26085443

  4. [THE GENETIC EXAMINATION OF BRONCHIAL LAVAGE ENABLES THE PROMPT DIAGNOSIS OF PULMONARY MYCOBACTERIUM KANSASII--A CASE REPORT].

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahide; Ageshio, Fumitaka; Kagawa, Hiroyuki; Oshitani, Yohei; Fujikawa, Takeya; Saito, Haruko; Sako, Hajime; Yano, Yukihiro; Kitada, Seigo; Maekura, Ryoji

    2015-08-01

    A 59-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchial asthma presented at our hospital with an abnormal shadow on the chest radiograph, which was obtained as part of a routine medical examination. Computed tomography of the chest revealed two nodules in the right upper lung with the longest diameter measuring 29 mm and 10 mm, respectively. A granulomatous disease was strongly suspected based on the histological features of the transbronchial lung biopsy specimen. Results of smear examination for mycobacteria and genetic examination of the bronchial lavage aspirate by the transcription reverse transcription concerted (TRC) reaction method for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium complex (MAC), were both negative. However, three days after the bronchoscopic examination, an additional genetic examination by the TRC method confirmed the diagnosis of M. kansasii infection. About two weeks later, the culture results were positive and M. kansasii infection was re-confirmed with the DNA probe method. The patient responded well to treatment with a combination of isoniazid, rifampicin, and ethambutol. In Japan, among the nontuberculous mycobacterial infections, the prevalence of pulmonary M.kansasii disease is second only to infection with MAC. However, it is often difficult to distinguish this disease from pulmonary tuberculosis. In this patient, a genetic examination with the TRC method enabled a prompt diagnosis of M. kansasii infection. The TRC method appears to be a useful tool for diagnosing nontubercular mycobacterial infections. PMID:26665518

  5. DNA Meets DSM: The Growing Importance of Genetic Syndromes in Dual Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    1996-01-01

    This article notes a current de-emphasis on genetic syndromes in published articles concerning mental retardation despite major deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) advances in determining mental retardation causes. The article calls for incorporation of these genetic advances into behavioral research of mental retardation, especially as reflected in the…

  6. Distal hereditary motor neuropathy with vocal cord paresis: from difficulty in choral singing to a molecular genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Gillian; Barwick, Katy E S; Hartley, Louise; McEntagart, Meriel; Crosby, Andrew H; Llewelyn, Gareth; Morris, Huw R

    2016-06-01

    Patients presenting with distal weakness can be a diagnostic challenge; the eventual diagnosis often depends upon accurate clinical phenotyping. We present a mother and daughter with a rare form of distal hereditary motor neuropathy type 7 in whom the diagnosis became apparent by initial difficulty in singing, from early vocal cord dysfunction. This rare neuropathy has now been identified in two apparently unrelated families in Wales. This family's clinical presentation is typical of distal hereditary motor neuropathy type 7, and they have the common truncating mutation in the SLC5A7 gene. Advances in genetic analysis of these rare conditions broaden our understanding of their potential molecular mechanisms and may allow more directed therapy. PMID:26786006

  7. A targeted next-generation sequencing assay for the molecular diagnosis of genetic disorders with orodental involvement

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Megana K; Geoffroy, Véronique; Vicaire, Serge; Jost, Bernard; Dumas, Michael; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Switala, Marzena; Gasse, Barbara; Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Paschaki, Marie; Leheup, Bruno; Droz, Dominique; Dalstein, Amelie; Loing, Adeline; Grollemund, Bruno; Muller-Bolla, Michèle; Lopez-Cazaux, Séréna; Minoux, Maryline; Jung, Sophie; Obry, Frédéric; Vogt, Vincent; Davideau, Jean-Luc; Davit-Beal, Tiphaine; Kaiser, Anne-Sophie; Moog, Ute; Richard, Béatrice; Morrier, Jean-Jacques; Duprez, Jean-Pierre; Odent, Sylvie; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Rousset, Monique Marie; Merametdijan, Laure; Toutain, Annick; Joseph, Clara; Giuliano, Fabienne; Dahlet, Jean-Christophe; Courval, Aymeric; El Alloussi, Mustapha; Laouina, Samir; Soskin, Sylvie; Guffon, Nathalie; Dieux, Anne; Doray, Bérénice; Feierabend, Stephanie; Ginglinger, Emmanuelle; Fournier, Benjamin; de la Dure Molla, Muriel; Alembik, Yves; Tardieu, Corinne; Clauss, François; Berdal, Ariane; Stoetzel, Corinne; Manière, Marie Cécile; Dollfus, Hélène; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    Background Orodental diseases include several clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders that can present in isolation or as part of a genetic syndrome. Due to the vast number of genes implicated in these disorders, establishing a molecular diagnosis can be challenging. We aimed to develop a targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) assay to diagnose mutations and potentially identify novel genes mutated in this group of disorders. Methods We designed an NGS gene panel that targets 585 known and candidate genes in orodental disease. We screened a cohort of 101 unrelated patients without a molecular diagnosis referred to the Reference Centre for Oro-Dental Manifestations of Rare Diseases, Strasbourg, France, for a variety of orodental disorders including isolated and syndromic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), isolated and syndromic selective tooth agenesis (STHAG), isolated and syndromic dentinogenesis imperfecta, isolated dentin dysplasia, otodental dysplasia and primary failure of tooth eruption. Results We discovered 21 novel pathogenic variants and identified the causative mutation in 39 unrelated patients in known genes (overall diagnostic rate: 39%). Among the largest subcohorts of patients with isolated AI (50 unrelated patients) and isolated STHAG (21 unrelated patients), we had a definitive diagnosis in 14 (27%) and 15 cases (71%), respectively. Surprisingly, COL17A1 mutations accounted for the majority of autosomal-dominant AI cases. Conclusions We have developed a novel targeted NGS assay for the efficient molecular diagnosis of a wide variety of orodental diseases. Furthermore, our panel will contribute to better understanding the contribution of these genes to orodental disease. Trial registration numbers NCT01746121 and NCT02397824. PMID:26502894

  8. Permissibility of prenatal diagnosis and abortion for fetuses with severe genetic disorder: type 1 spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sasongko, Teguh H.; Salmi, Abd Razak; Zilfalil, Bin Alwi; Albar, Mohammed Ali; Mohd Hussin, Zabidi Azhar

    2010-01-01

    Abortion has been largely avoided in Muslim communities. However, Islamic jurists have established rigorous parameters enabling abortion of fetuses with severe congenital abnormalities. This decision-making process has been hindered by an inability to predict the severity of such prenatally-diagnosed conditions, especially in genetic disorders with clinical heterogeneity, such as spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Heterogeneous phenotypes of SMA range from extremely severe type 1 to very mild type 4. Advances in molecular genetics have made it possible to perform prenatal diagnosis and to predict the types of SMA with its potential subsequent severity. Such techniques will make it possible for clinicians working in predominantly Muslim countries to counsel their patients accurately and in harmony with their religious beliefs. In this paper, we discuss and postulate that with our current knowledge of determining SMA types and severity with great accuracy, abortion is legally applicable for type 1 SMA. PMID:21060155

  9. Permissibility of prenatal diagnosis and abortion for fetuses with severe genetic disorder: type 1 spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Sasongko, Teguh H; Salmi, Abd Razak; Zilfalil, Bin Alwi; Albar, Mohammed Ali; Mohd Hussin, Zabidi Azhar

    2010-01-01

    Abortion has been largely avoided in Muslim communities. However, Islamic jurists have established rigorous parameters enabling abortion of fetuses with severe congenital abnormalities. This decision-making process has been hindered by an inability to predict the severity of such prenatally-diagnosed conditions, especially in genetic disorders with clinical heterogeneity, such as spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Heterogeneous phenotypes of SMA range from extremely severe type 1 to very mild type 4. Advances in molecular genetics have made it possible to perform prenatal diagnosis and to predict the types of SMA with its potential subsequent severity. Such techniques will make it possible for clinicians working in predominantly Muslim countries to counsel their patients accurately and in harmony with their religious beliefs. In this paper, we discuss and postulate that with our current knowledge of determining SMA types and severity with great accuracy, abortion is legally applicable for type 1 SMA. PMID:21060155

  10. Pre-implantation diagnosis of aneuploidy by polar body and blastomere FISH analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Munne, S.; Cohen, J.; Grifo, J.

    1994-09-01

    For preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of aneuploidy in human in-vitro fertilization (IVF), two blastomeres per embryo should be analyzed to minimize errors caused by FISH and mosaicism. But the biopsy of two cells from an 8-cell embryo can be detrimental. This can be substituted by initial FISH analysis of the first polar body (PB) and subsequent single blastomere analysis. Simultaneous FISH analysis of chromosomes X, Y, 18, 13/21 was used for first polar body aneuploidy analysis. Normal divalents appeared as single-dotted signals corresponding to their two chromatids. We found that pre-division of chromatids increased dramatically with time in culture. All but three pre-division events involved separation of chromatids within the PB or the egg, with a total of two chromatids in each. We concluded that PB aneuploidy analysis is safe when performed within 6 hours after egg retrieval. For our first clinical case we chose a 39 year-old female carrier of an X-linked disease already selected for FISH pre-implantation diagnosis. Eight polar bodies from 12 eggs were analyzed: six showed a normal X181321 complement of divalents; one had an extra chromatid for 13/21 (egg {number_sign}8); and one had a missing chromatid for 13/21 (egg {number_sign}10). After insemination, six fertilized eggs developed into embryos, including egg {number_sign}10 but not egg {number_sign}8. At day 3 of development, a single blastomere per embryo was analyzed by FISH. According to the blastomere analysis, one embryo was haploid, one tetraploid. The two normal female embryos were replaced and pregnancy and CFS results are pending. These results suggest that this technique can be successfully applied for PGD of major aneuploidies in IVF patients over 35. In addition, it indicates that studies on pre-division should be performed on eggs within six hours of retrieval.

  11. Genetics of Tinnitus: An Emerging Area for Molecular Diagnosis and Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Escamez, Jose A; Bibas, Thanos; Cima, Rilana F F; Van de Heyning, Paul; Knipper, Marlies; Mazurek, Birgit; Szczepek, Agnieszka J; Cederroth, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    Subjective tinnitus is the perception of sound in the absence of external or bodily-generated sounds. Chronic tinnitus is a highly prevalent condition affecting over 70 million people in Europe. A wide variety of comorbidities, including hearing loss, psychiatric disorders, neurodegenerative disorders, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction, have been suggested to contribute to the onset or progression of tinnitus; however, the precise molecular mechanisms of tinnitus are not well understood and the contribution of genetic and epigenetic factors remains unknown. Human genetic studies could enable the identification of novel molecular therapeutic targets, possibly leading to the development of novel pharmaceutical therapeutics. In this article, we briefly discuss the available evidence for a role of genetics in tinnitus and consider potential hurdles in designing genetic studies for tinnitus. Since multiple diseases have tinnitus as a symptom and the supporting genetic evidence is sparse, we propose various strategies to investigate the genetic underpinnings of tinnitus, first by showing evidence of heritability using concordance studies in twins, and second by improving patient selection according to phenotype and/or etiology in order to control potential biases and optimize genetic data output. The increased knowledge resulting from this endeavor could ultimately improve the drug development process and lead to the preventive or curative treatment of tinnitus. PMID:27594824

  12. Genetics of Tinnitus: An Emerging Area for Molecular Diagnosis and Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Escamez, Jose A.; Bibas, Thanos; Cima, Rilana F. F.; Van de Heyning, Paul; Knipper, Marlies; Mazurek, Birgit; Szczepek, Agnieszka J.; Cederroth, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Subjective tinnitus is the perception of sound in the absence of external or bodily-generated sounds. Chronic tinnitus is a highly prevalent condition affecting over 70 million people in Europe. A wide variety of comorbidities, including hearing loss, psychiatric disorders, neurodegenerative disorders, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction, have been suggested to contribute to the onset or progression of tinnitus; however, the precise molecular mechanisms of tinnitus are not well understood and the contribution of genetic and epigenetic factors remains unknown. Human genetic studies could enable the identification of novel molecular therapeutic targets, possibly leading to the development of novel pharmaceutical therapeutics. In this article, we briefly discuss the available evidence for a role of genetics in tinnitus and consider potential hurdles in designing genetic studies for tinnitus. Since multiple diseases have tinnitus as a symptom and the supporting genetic evidence is sparse, we propose various strategies to investigate the genetic underpinnings of tinnitus, first by showing evidence of heritability using concordance studies in twins, and second by improving patient selection according to phenotype and/or etiology in order to control potential biases and optimize genetic data output. The increased knowledge resulting from this endeavor could ultimately improve the drug development process and lead to the preventive or curative treatment of tinnitus. PMID:27594824

  13. Oxidant stress regulatory genetic variation in recipients and donors contributes to risk of primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cantu, Edward; Shah, Rupal J.; Lin, Wei; Daye, Zhongyin J.; Diamond, Joshua M.; Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Ellis, John H.; Borders, Catherine F.; Andah, Gerald A.; Beduhn, Ben; Meyer, Nuala J.; Ruschefski, Melanie; Aplenc, Richard; Feng, Rui; Christie, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Oxidant stress pathway activation during ischemia reperfusion injury may contribute to the development of primary graft dysfunction (PGD) after lung transplantation. We hypothesized oxidant stress gene variation in recipients and donors is associated with PGD. Methods Donors and recipients from the Lung Transplant Outcomes Group (LTOG) cohort were genotyped using the Illumina IBC chip filtered for oxidant stress pathway genes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) grouped into SNP-sets based on haplotype blocks within 49 oxidant stress genes selected from gene ontology pathways and literature review were tested for PGD association using a sequencing kernel association test. Analyses were adjusted for clinical confounding variables and population stratification. Results 392 donors and 1038 recipients met genetic quality control standards. 30% of subjects developed grade 3 PGD within 72 hours. Donor NADPH Oxidase 3 (NOX3) was associated with PGD (p=0.01) with 5 individual significant loci (p-values between 0.006 and 0.03). In recipients, variation in glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) and NRF-2 (NFE2L2) was significantly associated with PGD (p=0.01 for both). The GPX1 association included 3 individual loci (p-values between 0.006 and 0.049) and the NFE2L2 association included 2 loci (p=0.03 and 0.05). Significant epistatic effects influencing PGD susceptibility were evident between three different donor blocks of NOX3 and recipient NFE2L2 (p=0.026, p=0.017 and p=0.031). Conclusions Our study prioritizes GPX1, NOX3, and NFE2L2 genes for future research in PGD pathogenesis, and highlights a donor-recipient interaction of NOX3 and NFE2L2 that increases PGD risk. PMID:25439478

  14. Inactivation of the wall-associated de-N-acetylase (PgdA) of Listeria monocytogenes results in greater susceptibility of the cells to induced autolysis.

    PubMed

    Popowska, Magdalena; Kusio, Monika; Szymanska, Paulina; Markiewicz, Zdzislaw

    2009-09-01

    Several species of Gram-positive bacteria have cell wall peptidoglycan (syn. murein) in which not all of the sugar moieties are N-acetylated. This has recently been shown to be a secondary effect, caused by the action of a peptidoglycan N-acetylglucosamine deacetylase. We have found that the opportunistic pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is unusual in having three enzymes with such activity, two of which remain in the cytoplasm. Here, we examine the enzyme (PgdA) that crosses the cytoplasmic membrane and is localized in the cell wall. We purified a hexa-His-tagged form of PgdA to study its activity and constructed a mutant devoid of functional Lmo0415 (PgdA) protein. L. monocytogenes PgdA protein exhibited peptidoglycan N-acetylglucosamine deacetylase activity with natural substrates (peptidoglycan) from both L. monocytogenes and Escherichia coli as well as the peptidoglycan sugar chain component N-acetylglucosamine, but not with N-acetylmuramic acid. As was reported recently [6], inactivation of the structural gene was not lethal for L. monocytogenes nor did it affect growth rate or morphology of the cells. However, the pgdA mutant was more prone to autolysis induced by such agents as Triton X-100 and EDTA, and is more susceptible to the cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMP) lysozyme and mutanolysin, using either peptidoglycan muramidases or autolysis-inducing agents. The pgdA mutant was also slightly more susceptible than the wild-type strain to the action of certain beta-lactam antibiotics. Our results indicate that protein PgdA plays a protective physiological role for listerial cells. PMID:19809250

  15. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for couples at high risk of Down syndrome pregnancy owing to parental translocation or mosaicism

    PubMed Central

    Conn, C.; Cozzi, J.; Harper, J.; Winston, R.; Delhanty, J.

    1999-01-01

    The population risk for trisomy 21 is 1 in 700 births but some couples are at a much higher risk owing to parental translocation or mosaicism. We report on the first attempt to carry out preimplantation genetic diagnosis for two such couples using cleavage stage embryo biopsy and dual colour FISH analysis. Each couple underwent two treatment cycles. Couple 1 (suspected gonadal mosaicism for trisomy 21) had two embryos normal for chromosome 21 transferred, but no pregnancy resulted; 64% (7/11) unfertilised oocytes/embryos showed chromosome 21 aneuploidy. Couple 2 (46,XX,t(6;21)(q13;q22.3)) had a single embryo transferred resulting in a biochemical pregnancy; 91% (10/11) oocytes/embryos showed chromosome 21 imbalance, most resulting from 3:1 segregation of this translocation at gametogenesis. The opportunity to test embryos before implantation enables the outcome of female meiosis to be studied for the first time and the recurrence risk for a Down syndrome pregnancy to be assessed.


Keywords: preimplantation genetic diagnosis; Down syndrome; reciprocal translocation; gonadal mosaicism PMID:9950365

  16. Advanced Genetic Testing Comes to the Pain Clinic to Make a Diagnosis of Paroxysmal Extreme Pain Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Ashley; Guthrie, Kimberly J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To describe the use of an advanced genetic testing technique, whole exome sequencing, to diagnose a patient and their family with a SCN9A channelopathy. Setting. Academic tertiary care center. Design. Case report. Case Report. A 61-year-old female with a history of acute facial pain, chronic pain, fibromyalgia, and constipation was found to have a gain of function SCN9A mutation by whole exome sequencing. This mutation resulted in an SCN9A channelopathy that is most consistent with a diagnosis of paroxysmal extreme pain disorder. In addition to the patient being diagnosed, four siblings have a clinical diagnosis of SCN9A channelopathy as they have consistent symptoms and a sister with a known mutation. For treatment, gabapentin was ineffective and carbamazepine was not tolerated. Nontraditional therapies improved symptoms and constipation resolved with pelvic floor retraining with biofeedback. Conclusion. Patients with a personal and family history of chronic pain may benefit from a referral to Medical Genetics. Pelvic floor retraining with biofeedback should be considered for patients with a SCN9A channelopathy and constipation. PMID:27525141

  17. Genetic diagnosis of Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy using next-generation sequencing: validation analysis of DMD mutations

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Mariko; Minami, Narihiro; Goto, Kanako; Goto, Yuichi; Noguchi, Satoru; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD) are the most common inherited neuromuscular disease. The genetic diagnosis is not easily made because of the large size of the dystrophin gene, complex mutational spectrum and high number of tests patients undergo for diagnosis. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) has been used as the initial diagnostic test of choice. Although MLPA can diagnose 70% of DMD/BMD patients having deletions/duplications, the remaining 30% of patients with small mutations require further analysis, such as Sanger sequencing. We applied a high-throughput method using Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing technology and diagnosed 92% of patients with DMD/BMD in a single analysis. We designed a multiplex primer pool for DMD and sequenced 67 cases having different mutations: 37 with deletions/duplications and 30 with small mutations or short insertions/deletions in DMD, using an Ion PGM sequencer. The results were compared with those from MLPA or Sanger sequencing. All deletions were detected. In contrast, 50% of duplications were correctly identified compared with the MLPA method. Small insertions in consecutive bases could not be detected. We estimated that Ion Torrent sequencing could diagnose ~92% of DMD/BMD patients according to the mutational spectrum of our cohort. Our results clearly indicate that this method is suitable for routine clinical practice providing novel insights into comprehensive genetic information for future molecular therapy. PMID:26911353

  18. Genetic diagnosis of Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy using next-generation sequencing: validation analysis of DMD mutations.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Mariko; Minami, Narihiro; Goto, Kanako; Goto, Yuichi; Noguchi, Satoru; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo

    2016-06-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD) are the most common inherited neuromuscular disease. The genetic diagnosis is not easily made because of the large size of the dystrophin gene, complex mutational spectrum and high number of tests patients undergo for diagnosis. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) has been used as the initial diagnostic test of choice. Although MLPA can diagnose 70% of DMD/BMD patients having deletions/duplications, the remaining 30% of patients with small mutations require further analysis, such as Sanger sequencing. We applied a high-throughput method using Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing technology and diagnosed 92% of patients with DMD/BMD in a single analysis. We designed a multiplex primer pool for DMD and sequenced 67 cases having different mutations: 37 with deletions/duplications and 30 with small mutations or short insertions/deletions in DMD, using an Ion PGM sequencer. The results were compared with those from MLPA or Sanger sequencing. All deletions were detected. In contrast, 50% of duplications were correctly identified compared with the MLPA method. Small insertions in consecutive bases could not be detected. We estimated that Ion Torrent sequencing could diagnose ~92% of DMD/BMD patients according to the mutational spectrum of our cohort. Our results clearly indicate that this method is suitable for routine clinical practice providing novel insights into comprehensive genetic information for future molecular therapy. PMID:26911353

  19. The genetics of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease: current trends and future implications for diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Hoyle, J Chad; Isfort, Michael C; Roggenbuck, Jennifer; Arnold, W David

    2015-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common hereditary polyneuropathy and is classically associated with an insidious onset of distal predominant motor and sensory loss, muscle wasting, and pes cavus. Other forms of hereditary neuropathy, including sensory predominant or motor predominant forms, are sometimes included in the general classification of CMT, but for the purpose of this review, we will focus primarily on the forms associated with both sensory and motor deficits. CMT has a great deal of genetic heterogeneity, leading to diagnostic considerations that are still rapidly evolving for this disorder. Clinical features, inheritance pattern, gene mutation frequencies, and electrodiagnostic features all are helpful in formulating targeted testing algorithms in practical clinical settings, but these still have shortcomings. Next-generation sequencing (NGS), combined with multigene testing panels, is increasing the sensitivity and efficiency of genetic testing and is quickly overtaking targeted testing strategies. Currently, multigene panel testing and NGS can be considered first-line in many circumstances, although obtaining initial targeted testing for the PMP22 duplication in CMT patients with demyelinating conduction velocities is still a reasonable strategy. As technology improves and cost continues to fall, targeted testing will be completely replaced by multigene NGS panels that can detect the full spectrum of CMT mutations. Nevertheless, clinical acumen is still necessary given the variants of uncertain significance encountered with NGS. Despite the current limitations, the genetic diagnosis of CMT is critical for accurate prognostication, genetic counseling, and in the future, specific targeted therapies. Although whole exome and whole genome sequencing strategies have the power to further elucidate the genetics of CMT, continued technological advances are needed. PMID:26527893

  20. Discriminatory power of common genetic variants in personalized breast cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Liu, Jie; Ong, Irene; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    Technology advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has engendered optimism that we have entered a new age of precision medicine, in which the risk of breast cancer can be predicted on the basis of a person’s genetic variants. The goal of this study is to evaluate the discriminatory power of common genetic variants in breast cancer risk estimation. We conducted a retrospective case-control study drawing from an existing personalized medicine data repository. We collected variables that predict breast cancer risk: 153 high-frequency/low-penetrance genetic variants, reflecting the state-of-the-art GWAS on breast cancer, mammography descriptors and BI-RADS assessment categories in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We trained and tested naïve Bayes models by using these predictive variables. We generated ROC curves and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to quantify predictive performance. We found that genetic variants achieved comparable predictive performance to BI-RADS assessment categories in terms of AUC (0.650 vs. 0.659, p-value = 0.742), but significantly lower predictive performance than the combination of BI-RADS assessment categories and mammography descriptors (0.650 vs. 0.751, p-value < 0.001). A better understanding of relative predictive capability of genetic variants and mammography data may benefit clinicians and patients to make appropriate decisions about breast cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in the era of precision medicine.

  1. Discriminatory power of common genetic variants in personalized breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Liu, Jie; Ong, Irene; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2016-03-01

    Technology advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has engendered optimism that we have entered a new age of precision medicine, in which the risk of breast cancer can be predicted on the basis of a person's genetic variants. The goal of this study is to evaluate the discriminatory power of common genetic variants in breast cancer risk estimation. We conducted a retrospective case-control study drawing from an existing personalized medicine data repository. We collected variables that predict breast cancer risk: 153 high-frequency/low-penetrance genetic variants, reflecting the state-of-the-art GWAS on breast cancer, mammography descriptors and BI-RADS assessment categories in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We trained and tested naïve Bayes models by using these predictive variables. We generated ROC curves and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to quantify predictive performance. We found that genetic variants achieved comparable predictive performance to BI-RADS assessment categories in terms of AUC (0.650 vs. 0.659, p-value = 0.742), but significantly lower predictive performance than the combination of BI-RADS assessment categories and mammography descriptors (0.650 vs. 0.751, p-value < 0.001). A better understanding of relative predictive capability of genetic variants and mammography data may benefit clinicians and patients to make appropriate decisions about breast cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in the era of precision medicine.

  2. Genetic Identification Is Critical for the Diagnosis of Parkinsonism: A Chinese Pedigree with Early Onset of Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Tang, Bei-sha; Weng, Ling; Li, Nan; Shen, Lu; Wang, Jian; Zuo, Chuan-tao; Yan, Xin-xiang; Xia, Kun; Guo, Ji-feng

    2015-01-01

    Background A number of hereditary neurological diseases display indistinguishable features at the early disease stage. Parkinsonian symptoms can be found in numerous diseases, making it difficult to get a definitive early diagnosis of primary causes for patients with onset of parkinsonism. The accurate and early diagnosis of the causes of parkinsonian patients is important for effective treatments of these patients. Methods We have identified a Chinese family (82 family members over four generations with 21 affected individuals) that manifested the characterized symptoms of parkinsonism and was initially diagnosed as Parkinson’s disease. We followed up with the family for two years, during which we carried out clinical observations, Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography neuroimaging analysis, and exome sequencing to correctly diagnose the case. Results During the two-year follow-up period, we performed comprehensive medical history collection, physical examination, and structural and functional neuroimaging studies of this Chinese family. We found that the patient exhibited progressive deteriorated parkinsonism with Parkinson disease-like neuropathology and also had a good response to the initial levodopa treatment. However, exome sequencing identified a missense mutation, N279K, in exon 10 of MAPT gene, verifying that the early parkinsonian symptoms in this family are caused by the genetic mutation for hereditary frontotemporal lobar dementia. Conclusions For the inherited parkinsonian patients who even show the neuropathology similar to that in Parkinson’s disease and have initial response to levodopa treatment, genetic identification of the molecular basis for the disease is still required for defining the early diagnosis and correct treatment. PMID:26295349

  3. Dexamethasone Protects Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury via L-PGDS-Dependent PGD2-DP1-pERK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Pablo J.; Li, Yong; Martinez, Fabian; Zhang, Lubo

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Glucocorticoids pretreatment confers protection against neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury. However, the molecular mechanism remains poorly elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that glucocorticoids protect against HI brain injury in neonatal rat by stimulation of lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS)-induced prostaglandin D2 (PGD2)-DP1-pERK mediated signaling pathway. Methods Dexamethasone and inhibitors were administered via intracerebroventricular (i.c.v) injections into 10-day-old rat brains. Levels of L-PGD2, D prostanoid (DP1) receptor, pERK1/2 and PGD2 were determined by Western immunoblotting and ELISA, respectively. Brain injury was evaluated 48 hours after conduction of HI in 10-day-old rat pups. Results Dexamethasone pretreatment significantly upregulated L-PGDS expression and the biosynthesis of PGD2. Dexamethasone also selectively increased isoform pERK-44 level in the neonatal rat brains. Inhibitors of L-PGDS (SeCl4), DP1 (MK-0524) and MAPK (PD98059) abrogated dexamethasone-induced increases in pERK-44 level, respectively. Of importance, these inhibitors also blocked dexamethasone-mediated neuroprotective effects against HI brain injury in neonatal rat brains. Conclusion Interaction of glucocorticoids-GR signaling and L-PGDS-PGD2-DP1-pERK mediated pathway underlies the neuroprotective effects of dexamethasone pretreatment in neonatal HI brain injury. PMID:25474649

  4. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production triggered by prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) regulates lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) expression/activity in TM4 Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Soledad P; Windschüttl, Stefanie; Matzkin, María E; Rey-Ares, Verónica; Terradas, Claudio; Ponzio, Roberto; Puigdomenech, Elisa; Levalle, Oscar; Calandra, Ricardo S; Mayerhofer, Artur; Frungieri, Mónica B

    2016-10-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate testicular function in health and disease. We previously described a prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) system in Sertoli cells. Now, we found that PGD2 increases ROS and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation in murine TM4 Sertoli cells, and also induces antioxidant enzymes expression suggesting that defense systems are triggered as an adaptive stress mechanism that guarantees cell survival. ROS and specially H2O2 may act as second messengers regulating signal transduction pathways and gene expression. We describe a stimulatory effect of PGD2 on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) expression via DP1/DP2 receptors, which is prevented by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine and the PI3K/Akt pathway inhibitor LY 294002. PGD2 also enhances Akt and CREB/ATF-1 phosphorylation. Our results provide evidence for a role of PGD2 in the regulation of the oxidant/antioxidant status in Sertoli cells and, more importantly, in the modulation of LDH expression which takes place through ROS generation and the Akt-CREB/ATF-1 pathway. PMID:27329155

  5. Are There Cultural Differences in Parental Interest in Early Diagnosis and Genetic Risk Assessment for Autism Spectrum Disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Amiet, Claire; Couchon, Elizabeth; Carr, Kelly; Carayol, Jerôme; Cohen, David

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are many societal and cultural differences between healthcare systems and the use of genetic testing in the US and France. These differences may affect the diagnostic process for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in each country and influence parental opinions regarding the use of genetic screening tools for ASD. Methods: Using an internet-based tool, a survey of parents with at least one child with ASD was conducted. A total of 162 participants from the US completed an English version of the survey and 469 participants from France completed a French version of the survey. Respondents were mainly females (90%) and biological parents (94.3% in the US and 97.2% in France). Results: The mean age of ASD diagnosis reported was not significantly different between France (57.5 ± 38.4 months) and the US (56.5 ± 52.7 months) (p = 0.82) despite significant difference in the average age at which a difference in development was first suspected [29.7 months (±28.4) vs. 21.4 months (±18.1), respectively, p = 7 × 10−4]. Only 27.8% of US participants indicated that their child diagnosed with ASD had undergone diagnostic genetic testing, whereas 61.7% of the French participants indicated this was the case (p = 2.7 × 10−12). In both countries, the majority of respondents (69.3% and 80% from France and the US, respectively) indicated high interest in the use of a genetic screening test for autism. Conclusion: Parents from France and the US report a persistent delay between the initial suspicion of a difference in development and the diagnosis of ASD. Significantly fewer US participants underwent genetic testing although this result should be regarded as exploratory given the limitations. The significance of these between country differences will be discussed. PMID:24795872

  6. Recent advances in molecular genetics of melanoma progression: implications for diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Iwei

    2016-01-01

    According to the multi-step carcinogenesis model of cancer, initiation results in a benign tumor and subsequent genetic alterations lead to tumor progression and the acquisition of the hallmarks of cancer. This article will review recent discoveries in our understanding of initiation and progression in melanocytic neoplasia and the impact on diagnostic dermatopathology. PMID:27408703

  7. Abdomen disease diagnosis in CT images using flexiscale curvelet transform and improved genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Gaurav; Saini, B S

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an abdomen disease diagnostic system based on the flexi-scale curvelet transform, which uses different optimal scales for extracting features from computed tomography (CT) images. To optimize the scale of the flexi-scale curvelet transform, we propose an improved genetic algorithm. The conventional genetic algorithm assumes that fit parents will likely produce the healthiest offspring that leads to the least fit parents accumulating at the bottom of the population, reducing the fitness of subsequent populations and delaying the optimal solution search. In our improved genetic algorithm, combining the chromosomes of a low-fitness and a high-fitness individual increases the probability of producing high-fitness offspring. Thereby, all of the least fit parent chromosomes are combined with high fit parent to produce offspring for the next population. In this way, the leftover weak chromosomes cannot damage the fitness of subsequent populations. To further facilitate the search for the optimal solution, our improved genetic algorithm adopts modified elitism. The proposed method was applied to 120 CT abdominal images; 30 images each of normal subjects, cysts, tumors and stones. The features extracted by the flexi-scale curvelet transform were more discriminative than conventional methods, demonstrating the potential of our method as a diagnostic tool for abdomen diseases. PMID:26499377

  8. Recent advances in molecular genetics of melanoma progression: implications for diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Iwei

    2016-01-01

    According to the multi-step carcinogenesis model of cancer, initiation results in a benign tumor and subsequent genetic alterations lead to tumor progression and the acquisition of the hallmarks of cancer. This article will review recent discoveries in our understanding of initiation and progression in melanocytic neoplasia and the impact on diagnostic dermatopathology. PMID:27408703

  9. Tentative clinical diagnosis of Lujan-Fryns syndrome--A conglomeration of different genetic entities?

    PubMed

    Hackmann, Karl; Rump, Andreas; Haas, Stefan A; Lemke, Johannes R; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Tzschach, Andreas; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Albrecht, Beate; Kuechler, Alma; Ripperger, Tim; Kobelt, Albrecht; Oexle, Konrad; Tinschert, Sigrid; Schrock, Evelin; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Di Donato, Nataliya

    2016-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of Lujan-Fryns syndrome (LFS) comprises X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) with marfanoid habitus, distinct combination of minor facial anomalies and nasal speech. However the definition of syndrome was significantly broadened since the original report and implies ID with marfanoid habitus. Mutations of three genes (MED12, UPF3B, and ZDHHC9) have been reported in "broadly defined" LFS. We examined these genes in 28 individuals with a tentative clinical diagnosis of LFS but we did not identify any causative mutation. By molecular karyotyping we detected other disorders, i.e., Phelan-McDermid syndrome and 16p11.2 microduplication, each in one patient. One affected individual was carrier of a different recurrent duplication on 16p11.2 that has been reported several times to the DECIPHER and ISCA databases in individuals with autism, intellectual disability (ID), and developmental delay. It may represent a new duplication syndrome. We also identified previously unreported de novo duplication on chromosome 12p13.31 which we considered to be disease-causing. X-exome sequencing of four individuals revealed private or non-recurrent mutations in NKAP and LAS1L in one patient each. While LFS is defined as a form of XLID, there seem to be various conditions that have rather similar phenotypes. Therefore, the combination of ID and marfanoid habitus in a male patient is not sufficient for the diagnosis of LFS. We suggest that the diagnosis of LFS in patients with ID and marfanoid habitus should be made only in presence of specific facial features, nasal speech and obvious X-linked segregation of the disorder or an unambiguously pathogenic mutation in the MED12. PMID:26358559

  10. Mosaic small supernumerary marker chromosome 1 at amniocentesis: prenatal diagnosis, molecular genetic analysis and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Chen, Ming; Su, Yi-Ning; Huang, Jian-Pei; Chern, Schu-Rern; Wu, Peih-Shan; Su, Jun-Wei; Chang, Shun-Ping; Chen, Yu-Ting; Lee, Chen-Chi; Chen, Li-Feng; Pan, Chen-Wen; Wang, Wayseen

    2013-10-15

    We present prenatal diagnosis and molecular cytogenetic analysis of mosaic small supernumerary marker chromosome 1 [sSMC(1)]. We review the literature of sSMC(1) at amniocentesis and chromosome 1p21.1-p12 duplication syndrome. We discuss the genotype-phenotype correlation of the involved genes of ALX3, RBM15, NTNG1, SLC25A24, GPSM2, TBX15 and NOTCH2 in this case. PMID:23933412