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Sample records for genetic network controlling

  1. Optimizing the controllability of arbitrary networks with genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Feng; Lu, Zhe-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Recently, as the controllability of complex networks attracts much attention, how to optimize networks' controllability has become a common and urgent problem. In this paper, we develop an efficient genetic algorithm oriented optimization tool to optimize the controllability of arbitrary networks consisting of both state nodes and control nodes under Popov-Belevitch-Hautus rank condition. The experimental results on a number of benchmark networks show the effectiveness of this method and the evolution of network topology is captured. Furthermore, we explore how network structure affects its controllability and find that the sparser a network is, the more control nodes are needed to control it and the larger the differences between node degrees, the more control nodes are needed to achieve the full control. Our framework provides an alternative to controllability optimization and can be applied to arbitrary networks without any limitations.

  2. Identification of genetic networks.

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Momiao; Li, Jun; Fang, Xiangzhong

    2004-01-01

    In this report, we propose the use of structural equations as a tool for identifying and modeling genetic networks and genetic algorithms for searching the most likely genetic networks that best fit the data. After genetic networks are identified, it is fundamental to identify those networks influencing cell phenotypes. To accomplish this task we extend the concept of differential expression of the genes, widely used in gene expression data analysis, to genetic networks. We propose a definition for the differential expression of a genetic network and use the generalized T2 statistic to measure the ability of genetic networks to distinguish different phenotypes. However, describing the differential expression of genetic networks is not enough for understanding biological systems because differences in the expression of genetic networks do not directly reflect regulatory strength between gene activities. Therefore, in this report we also introduce the concept of differentially regulated genetic networks, which has the potential to assess changes of gene regulation in response to perturbation in the environment and may provide new insights into the mechanism of diseases and biological processes. We propose five novel statistics to measure the differences in regulation of genetic networks. To illustrate the concepts and methods for reconstruction of genetic networks and identification of association of genetic networks with function, we applied the proposed models and algorithms to three data sets. PMID:15020486

  3. Buying and Selling Stocks of Multi Brands Using Genetic Network Programming with Control Nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkawa, Etsushi; Chen, Yan; Bao, Zhiguo; Mabu, Shingo; Shimada, Kaoru; Hirasawa, Kotaro

    A new evolutionary method named “Genetic Network Programming with control nodes, GNPcn” has been applied to determine the timing of buying or selling stocks. GNPcn represents its solutions as directed graph structures which has some useful features inherently. For example, GNPcn has an implicit memory function which memorizes the past action sequences of agents and GNPcn can re-use nodes repeatedly in the network flow, so very compact graph structures can be made. GNPcn can determine the strategy of buying and selling stocks of multi issues. The effectiveness of the proposed method is confirmed by simulations.

  4. Intricate environment-modulated genetic networks control isoflavone accumulation in soybean seeds

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Soybean (Glycine max [L] Merr.) seed isoflavones have long been considered a desirable trait to target in selection programs for their contribution to human health and plant defense systems. However, attempts to modify seed isoflavone contents have not always produced the expected results because their genetic basis is polygenic and complex. Undoubtedly, the extreme variability that seed isoflavones display over environments has obscured our understanding of the genetics involved. Results In this study, a mapping population of RILs with three replicates was analyzed in four different environments (two locations over two years). We found a total of thirty-five main-effect genomic regions and many epistatic interactions controlling genistein, daidzein, glycitein and total isoflavone accumulation in seeds. The use of distinct environments permitted detection of a great number of environment-modulated and minor-effect QTL. Our findings suggest that isoflavone seed concentration is controlled by a complex network of multiple minor-effect loci interconnected by a dense epistatic map of interactions. The magnitude and significance of the effects of many of the nodes and connections in the network varied depending on the environmental conditions. In an attempt to unravel the genetic architecture underlying the traits studied, we searched on a genome-wide scale for genomic regions homologous to the most important identified isoflavone biosynthetic genes. We identified putative candidate genes for several of the main-effect and epistatic QTL and for QTL reported by other groups. Conclusions To better understand the underlying genetics of isoflavone accumulation, we performed a large scale analysis to identify genomic regions associated with isoflavone concentrations. We not only identified a number of such regions, but also found that they can interact with one another and with the environment to form a complex adaptable network controlling seed isoflavone levels

  5. Robust control of uncertain nonlinear switched genetic regulatory networks with time delays: A redesign approach.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Hojjatullah; Majd, Vahid Johari

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the problem of robust stability of nonlinear genetic regulatory networks (GRNs) is investigated. The developed method is an integral sliding mode control based redesign for a class of perturbed dissipative switched GRNs with time delays. The control law is redesigned by modifying the dissipativity-based control law that was designed for the unperturbed GRNs with time delays. The switched GRNs are switched from one mode to another based on time, state, etc. Although, the active subsystem is known in any instance, but the switching law and the transition probabilities are not known. The model for each mode is considered affine with matched and unmatched perturbations. The redesigned control law forces the GRN to always remain on the sliding surface and the dissipativity is maintained from the initial time in the presence of the norm-bounded perturbations. The global stability of the perturbed GRNs is maintained if the unperturbed model is globally dissipative. The designed control law for the perturbed GRNs guarantees robust exponential or asymptotic stability of the closed-loop network depending on the type of stability of the unperturbed model. The results are applied to a nonlinear switched GRN, and its convergence to the origin is verified by simulation. PMID:26924600

  6. Understanding genetic regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, Stuart

    2003-04-01

    Random Boolean networks (RBM) were introduced about 35 years ago as first crude models of genetic regulatory networks. RBNs are comprised of N on-off genes, connected by a randomly assigned regulatory wiring diagram where each gene has K inputs, and each gene is controlled by a randomly assigned Boolean function. This procedure samples at random from the ensemble of all possible NK Boolean networks. The central ideas are to study the typical, or generic properties of this ensemble, and see 1) whether characteristic differences appear as K and biases in Boolean functions are introducted, and 2) whether a subclass of this ensemble has properties matching real cells. Such networks behave in an ordered or a chaotic regime, with a phase transition, "the edge of chaos" between the two regimes. Networks with continuous variables exhibit the same two regimes. Substantial evidence suggests that real cells are in the ordered regime. A key concept is that of an attractor. This is a reentrant trajectory of states of the network, called a state cycle. The central biological interpretation is that cell types are attractors. A number of properties differentiate the ordered and chaotic regimes. These include the size and number of attractors, the existence in the ordered regime of a percolating "sea" of genes frozen in the on or off state, with a remainder of isolated twinkling islands of genes, a power law distribution of avalanches of gene activity changes following perturbation to a single gene in the ordered regime versus a similar power law distribution plus a spike of enormous avalanches of gene changes in the chaotic regime, and the existence of branching pathway of "differentiation" between attractors induced by perturbations in the ordered regime. Noise is serious issue, since noise disrupts attractors. But numerical evidence suggests that attractors can be made very stable to noise, and meanwhile, metaplasias may be a biological manifestation of noise. As we learn more

  7. Elevator Group Supervisory Control System Using Genetic Network Programming with Macro Nodes and Reinforcement Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin; Yu, Lu; Mabu, Shingo; Hirasawa, Kotaro; Hu, Jinglu; Markon, Sandor

    Elevator Group Supervisory Control System (EGSCS) is a very large scale stochastic dynamic optimization problem. Due to its vast state space, significant uncertainty and numerous resource constraints such as finite car capacities and registered hall/car calls, it is hard to manage EGSCS using conventional control methods. Recently, many solutions for EGSCS using Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies have been reported. Genetic Network Programming (GNP), which is proposed as a new evolutionary computation method several years ago, is also proved to be efficient when applied to EGSCS problem. In this paper, we propose an extended algorithm for EGSCS by introducing Reinforcement Learning (RL) into GNP framework, and an improvement of the EGSCS' performances is expected since the efficiency of GNP with RL has been clarified in some other studies like tile-world problem. Simulation tests using traffic flows in a typical office building have been made, and the results show an actual improvement of the EGSCS' performances comparing to the algorithms using original GNP and conventional control methods. Furthermore, as a further study, an importance weight optimization algorithm is employed based on GNP with RL and its efficiency is also verified with the better performances.

  8. Genetic Networks in Osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, I.

    2013-01-01

    Osseointegration-based dental implants have become a well-accepted treatment modality for complete and partial edentulism. The success of this treatment largely depends on the stable integration and maintenance of implant fixtures in alveolar bone; however, the molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating this unique tissue reaction have not yet been fully uncovered. Radiographic and histologic observations suggest the sustained retention of peri-implant bone without an apparent susceptibility to catabolic bone remodeling; therefore, implant-induced bone formation continues to be intensively investigated. Increasing numbers of whole-genome transcriptome studies suggest complex molecular pathways that may play putative roles in osseointegration. This review highlights genetic networks related to bone quality, the transient chondrogenic phase, the vitamin D axis, and the peripheral circadian rhythm to elute the regulatory mechanisms underlying the establishment and maintenance of osseointegration. PMID:24158334

  9. Control of Stochastic Master Equation Models of Genetic Regulatory Networks by Approximating Their Average Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umut Caglar, Mehmet; Pal, Ranadip

    2010-10-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology states that ``information cannot be transferred back from protein to either protein or nucleic acid.'' However, this assumption is not exactly correct in most of the cases. There are a lot of feedback loops and interactions between different levels of systems. These types of interactions are hard to analyze due to the lack of data in the cellular level and probabilistic nature of interactions. Probabilistic models like Stochastic Master Equation (SME) or deterministic models like differential equations (DE) can be used to analyze these types of interactions. SME models based on chemical master equation (CME) can provide detailed representation of genetic regulatory system, but their use is restricted by the large data requirements and computational costs of calculations. The differential equations models on the other hand, have low calculation costs and much more adequate to generate control procedures on the system; but they are not adequate to investigate the probabilistic nature of interactions. In this work the success of the mapping between SME and DE is analyzed, and the success of a control policy generated by DE model with respect to SME model is examined. Index Terms--- Stochastic Master Equation models, Differential Equation Models, Control Policy Design, Systems biology

  10. Peer Network Drinking Predicts Increased Alcohol Use From Adolescence to Early Adulthood After Controlling for Genetic and Shared Environmental Selection

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Jennifer E.; Emery, Robert E.; Turkheimer, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Research consistently links adolescents' and young adults' drinking with their peers' alcohol intake. In interpreting this correlation, 2 essential questions are often overlooked. First, which peers are more important, best friends or broader social networks? Second, do peers cause increased drinking, or do young people select friends whose drinking habits match their own? The present study combines social network analyses with family (twin and sibling) designs to answer these questions via data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Analysis of peer nomination data from 134 schools (n = 82,629) and 1,846 twin and sibling pairs shows that peer network substance use predicts changes in drinking from adolescence into young adult life even after controlling for genetic and shared environmental selection, as well as best friend substance use. This effect was particularly strong for high-intensity friendships. Although the peer-adolescent drinking correlation is partially explained by selection, the present finding offers powerful evidence that peers also cause increased drinking. PMID:22390657

  11. Variable Size Genetic Network Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katagiri, Hironobu; Hirasawa, Kotaro; Hu, Jinglu; Murata, Junichi

    Genetic Network Programming (GNP) is a kind of volutionary methods, which evolves arbitrary directed graph programs. Previously, the program size of GNP was fixed. In the paper, a new method is proposed, where the program size is adaptively changed depending on the frequency of the use of nodes. To control and to decide a program size are important and difficult problems in Evolutionary Computation, especially, a well-known crossover operator tends to cause bloat. We introduce two additional operators, add operator and delete operator, that can change the number of each kind of nodes based on whether a node function is important in the environment or not. Simulation results shows that the proposed method brings about extremely better results compared with ordinary fixed size GNP.

  12. Synchronization of electronic genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Wagemakers, Alexandre; Buldú, Javier M; García-Ojalvo, Jordi; Sanjuán, Miguel A F

    2006-03-01

    We describe a simple analog electronic circuit that mimics the behavior of a well-known synthetic gene oscillator, the repressilator, which represents a set of three genes repressing one another. Synchronization of a population of such units is thoroughly studied, with the aim to compare the role of global coupling with that of global forcing on the population. Our results show that coupling is much more efficient than forcing in leading the gene population to synchronized oscillations. Furthermore, a modification of the proposed analog circuit leads to a simple electronic version of a genetic toggle switch, which is a simple network of two mutual repressor genes, where control by external forcing is also analyzed. PMID:16599758

  13. A Double-Deck Elevator Group Supervisory Control System with Destination Floor Guidance System Using Genetic Network Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lu; Zhou, Jin; Mabu, Shingo; Hirasawa, Kotaro; Hu, Jinglu; Markon, Sandor

    The Elevator Group Supervisory Control Systems (EGSCS) are the control systems that systematically manage three or more elevators in order to efficiently transport the passengers in buildings. Double-deck elevators, where two elevators are connected with each other, serve passengers at two consecutive floors simultaneously. Double-deck Elevator systems (DDES) become more complex in their behavior than conventional single-deck elevator systems (SDES). Recently, Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology has been used in such complex systems. Genetic Network Programming (GNP), a graph-based evolutionary method, has been applied to EGSCS and its advantages are shown in some papers. GNP can obtain the strategy of a new hall call assignment to the optimal elevator when it performs crossover and mutation operations to judgment nodes and processing nodes. Meanwhile, Destination Floor Guidance System (DFGS) is installed in DDES, so that passengers can also input their destinations at elevator halls. In this paper, we have applied GNP to DDES and compared DFGS with normal systems. The waiting time and traveling time of DFGS are all improved because of getting more information from DFGS. The simulations showed the effectiveness of the double-deck elevators with DFGS in different building traffics.

  14. Comparison of Control Approaches in Genetic Regulatory Networks by Using Stochastic Master Equation Models, Probabilistic Boolean Network Models and Differential Equation Models and Estimated Error Analyzes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caglar, Mehmet Umut; Pal, Ranadip

    2011-03-01

    Central dogma of molecular biology states that ``information cannot be transferred back from protein to either protein or nucleic acid''. However, this assumption is not exactly correct in most of the cases. There are a lot of feedback loops and interactions between different levels of systems. These types of interactions are hard to analyze due to the lack of cell level data and probabilistic - nonlinear nature of interactions. Several models widely used to analyze and simulate these types of nonlinear interactions. Stochastic Master Equation (SME) models give probabilistic nature of the interactions in a detailed manner, with a high calculation cost. On the other hand Probabilistic Boolean Network (PBN) models give a coarse scale picture of the stochastic processes, with a less calculation cost. Differential Equation (DE) models give the time evolution of mean values of processes in a highly cost effective way. The understanding of the relations between the predictions of these models is important to understand the reliability of the simulations of genetic regulatory networks. In this work the success of the mapping between SME, PBN and DE models is analyzed and the accuracy and affectivity of the control policies generated by using PBN and DE models is compared.

  15. Genetic control of mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Alphey, Luke

    2014-01-01

    Genetics can potentially provide new, species-specific, environmentally friendly methods for mosquito control. Genetic control strategies aim either to suppress target populations or to introduce a harm-reducing novel trait. Different approaches differ considerably in their properties, especially between self-limiting strategies, where the modification has limited persistence, and self-sustaining strategies, which are intended to persist indefinitely in the target population and may invade other populations. Several methods with different molecular biology are under development and the first field trials have been completed successfully. PMID:24160434

  16. Control of Multilayer Networks

    PubMed Central

    Menichetti, Giulia; Dall’Asta, Luca; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2016-01-01

    The controllability of a network is a theoretical problem of relevance in a variety of contexts ranging from financial markets to the brain. Until now, network controllability has been characterized only on isolated networks, while the vast majority of complex systems are formed by multilayer networks. Here we build a theoretical framework for the linear controllability of multilayer networks by mapping the problem into a combinatorial matching problem. We found that correlating the external signals in the different layers can significantly reduce the multiplex network robustness to node removal, as it can be seen in conjunction with a hybrid phase transition occurring in interacting Poisson networks. Moreover we observe that multilayer networks can stabilize the fully controllable multiplex network configuration that can be stable also when the full controllability of the single network is not stable. PMID:26869210

  17. Adaptation by Plasticity of Genetic Regulatory Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Naama

    2007-03-01

    Genetic regulatory networks have an essential role in adaptation and evolution of cell populations. This role is strongly related to their dynamic properties over intermediate-to-long time scales. We have used the budding yeast as a model Eukaryote to study the long-term dynamics of the genetic regulatory system and its significance in evolution. A continuous cell growth technique (chemostat) allows us to monitor these systems over long times under controlled condition, enabling a quantitative characterization of dynamics: steady states and their stability, transients and relaxation. First, we have demonstrated adaptive dynamics in the GAL system, a classic model for a Eukaryotic genetic switch, induced and repressed by different carbon sources in the environment. We found that both induction and repression are only transient responses; over several generations, the system converges to a single robust steady state, independent of external conditions. Second, we explored the functional significance of such plasticity of the genetic regulatory network in evolution. We used genetic engineering to mimic the natural process of gene recruitment, placing the gene HIS3 under the regulation of the GAL system. Such genetic rewiring events are important in the evolution of gene regulation, but little is known about the physiological processes supporting them and the dynamics of their assimilation in a cell population. We have shown that cells carrying the rewired genome adapted to a demanding change of environment and stabilized a population, maintaining the adaptive state for hundreds of generations. Using genome-wide expression arrays we showed that underlying the observed adaptation is a global transcriptional programming that allowed tuning expression of the recruited gene to demands. Our results suggest that non-specific properties reflecting the natural plasticity of the regulatory network support adaptation of cells to novel challenges and enhance their evolvability.

  18. Temporal Genetic Modifications after Controlled Cortical Impact--Understanding Traumatic Brain Injury through a Systematic Network Approach.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yung-Hao; Wu, Chia-Chou; Wu, John Chung-Che; Lai, Hsien-Yong; Chen, Kai-Yun; Jheng, Bo-Ren; Chen, Mien-Cheng; Chang, Tzu-Hao; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a primary injury caused by external physical force and also a secondary injury caused by biological processes such as metabolic, cellular, and other molecular events that eventually lead to brain cell death, tissue and nerve damage, and atrophy. It is a common disease process (as opposed to an event) that causes disabilities and high death rates. In order to treat all the repercussions of this injury, treatment becomes increasingly complex and difficult throughout the evolution of a TBI. Using high-throughput microarray data, we developed a systems biology approach to explore potential molecular mechanisms at four time points post-TBI (4, 8, 24, and 72 h), using a controlled cortical impact (CCI) model. We identified 27, 50, 48, and 59 significant proteins as network biomarkers at these four time points, respectively. We present their network structures to illustrate the protein-protein interactions (PPIs). We also identified UBC (Ubiquitin C), SUMO1, CDKN1A (cyclindependent kinase inhibitor 1A), and MYC as the core network biomarkers at the four time points, respectively. Using the functional analytical tool MetaCore™, we explored regulatory mechanisms and biological processes and conducted a statistical analysis of the four networks. The analytical results support some recent findings regarding TBI and provide additional guidance and directions for future research. PMID:26861311

  19. Temporal Genetic Modifications after Controlled Cortical Impact—Understanding Traumatic Brain Injury through a Systematic Network Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yung-Hao; Wu, Chia-Chou; Wu, John Chung-Che; Lai, Hsien-Yong; Chen, Kai-Yun; Jheng, Bo-Ren; Chen, Mien-Cheng; Chang, Tzu-Hao; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a primary injury caused by external physical force and also a secondary injury caused by biological processes such as metabolic, cellular, and other molecular events that eventually lead to brain cell death, tissue and nerve damage, and atrophy. It is a common disease process (as opposed to an event) that causes disabilities and high death rates. In order to treat all the repercussions of this injury, treatment becomes increasingly complex and difficult throughout the evolution of a TBI. Using high-throughput microarray data, we developed a systems biology approach to explore potential molecular mechanisms at four time points post-TBI (4, 8, 24, and 72 h), using a controlled cortical impact (CCI) model. We identified 27, 50, 48, and 59 significant proteins as network biomarkers at these four time points, respectively. We present their network structures to illustrate the protein–protein interactions (PPIs). We also identified UBC (Ubiquitin C), SUMO1, CDKN1A (cyclindependent kinase inhibitor 1A), and MYC as the core network biomarkers at the four time points, respectively. Using the functional analytical tool MetaCore™, we explored regulatory mechanisms and biological processes and conducted a statistical analysis of the four networks. The analytical results support some recent findings regarding TBI and provide additional guidance and directions for future research. PMID:26861311

  20. Optimized intelligent control of a 2-degree of freedom robot for rehabilitation of lower limbs using neural network and genetic algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is an increasing trend in using robots for medical purposes. One specific area is rehabilitation. Rehabilitation is one of the non-drug treatments in community health which means the restoration of the abilities to maximize independence. It is a prolonged work and costly labor. On the other hand, by using the flexible and efficient robots in rehabilitation area, this process will be more useful for handicapped patients. Methods In this study, a rule-based intelligent control methodology is proposed to mimic the behavior of a healthy limb in a satisfactory way by a 2-DOF planar robot. Inverse kinematic of the planar robot will be solved by neural networks and control parameters will be optimized by genetic algorithm, as rehabilitation progress. Results The results of simulations are presented by defining a physiotherapy simple mode on desired trajectory. MATLAB/Simulink is used for simulations. The system is capable of learning the action of the physiotherapist for each patient and imitating this behaviour in the absence of a physiotherapist that can be called robotherapy. Conclusions In this study, a therapeutic exercise planar 2-DOF robot is designed and controlled for lower-limb rehabilitation. The robot manipulator is controlled by combination of hybrid and adaptive controls. Some safety factors and stability constraints are defined and obtained. The robot is stopped when the safety factors are not satisfied. Kinematics of robot is estimated by an MLP neural network and proper control parameters are achieved using GA optimization. PMID:23945420

  1. Introduction to Focus Issue: Quantitative Approaches to Genetic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Réka; Collins, James J.; Glass, Leon

    2013-06-01

    All cells of living organisms contain similar genetic instructions encoded in the organism's DNA. In any particular cell, the control of the expression of each different gene is regulated, in part, by binding of molecular complexes to specific regions of the DNA. The molecular complexes are composed of protein molecules, called transcription factors, combined with various other molecules such as hormones and drugs. Since transcription factors are coded by genes, cellular function is partially determined by genetic networks. Recent research is making large strides to understand both the structure and the function of these networks. Further, the emerging discipline of synthetic biology is engineering novel gene circuits with specific dynamic properties to advance both basic science and potential practical applications. Although there is not yet a universally accepted mathematical framework for studying the properties of genetic networks, the strong analogies between the activation and inhibition of gene expression and electric circuits suggest frameworks based on logical switching circuits. This focus issue provides a selection of papers reflecting current research directions in the quantitative analysis of genetic networks. The work extends from molecular models for the binding of proteins, to realistic detailed models of cellular metabolism. Between these extremes are simplified models in which genetic dynamics are modeled using classical methods of systems engineering, Boolean switching networks, differential equations that are continuous analogues of Boolean switching networks, and differential equations in which control is based on power law functions. The mathematical techniques are applied to study: (i) naturally occurring gene networks in living organisms including: cyanobacteria, Mycoplasma genitalium, fruit flies, immune cells in mammals; (ii) synthetic gene circuits in Escherichia coli and yeast; and (iii) electronic circuits modeling genetic networks

  2. Optimization of controlled release nanoparticle formulation of verapamil hydrochloride using artificial neural networks with genetic algorithm and response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqiang; Abbaspour, Mohammadreza R; Grootendorst, Paul V; Rauth, Andrew M; Wu, Xiao Yu

    2015-08-01

    This study was performed to optimize the formulation of polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticles (PLN) for the delivery of an ionic water-soluble drug, verapamil hydrochloride (VRP) and to investigate the roles of formulation factors. Modeling and optimization were conducted based on a spherical central composite design. Three formulation factors, i.e., weight ratio of drug to lipid (X1), and concentrations of Tween 80 (X2) and Pluronic F68 (X3), were chosen as independent variables. Drug loading efficiency (Y1) and mean particle size (Y2) of PLN were selected as dependent variables. The predictive performance of artificial neural networks (ANN) and the response surface methodology (RSM) were compared. As ANN was found to exhibit better recognition and generalization capability over RSM, multi-objective optimization of PLN was then conducted based upon the validated ANN models and continuous genetic algorithms (GA). The optimal PLN possess a high drug loading efficiency (92.4%, w/w) and a small mean particle size (∼100nm). The predicted response variables matched well with the observed results. The three formulation factors exhibited different effects on the properties of PLN. ANN in coordination with continuous GA represent an effective and efficient approach to optimize the PLN formulation of VRP with desired properties. PMID:25986587

  3. Genetic Network Inference Using Hierarchical Structure.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Shuhei; Tokuhisa, Masato; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    Many methods for inferring genetic networks have been proposed, but the regulations they infer often include false-positives. Several researchers have attempted to reduce these erroneous regulations by proposing the use of a priori knowledge about the properties of genetic networks such as their sparseness, scale-free structure, and so on. This study focuses on another piece of a priori knowledge, namely, that biochemical networks exhibit hierarchical structures. Based on this idea, we propose an inference approach that uses the hierarchical structure in a target genetic network. To obtain a reasonable hierarchical structure, the first step of the proposed approach is to infer multiple genetic networks from the observed gene expression data. We take this step using an existing method that combines a genetic network inference method with a bootstrap method. The next step is to extract a hierarchical structure from the inferred networks that is consistent with most of the networks. Third, we use the hierarchical structure obtained to assign confidence values to all candidate regulations. Numerical experiments are also performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of using the hierarchical structure in the genetic network inference. The improvement accomplished by the use of the hierarchical structure is small. However, the hierarchical structure could be used to improve the performances of many existing inference methods. PMID:26941653

  4. Network structure controls noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jayajit; Raychaudhuri, Subhadip

    2004-03-01

    Biochemical reactions often involve low copy number of reactant molecules. Bio-networks, however, control the intrinsic noise arising from the fluctuations of low copy number of reactant molecules quite efficiently to perform their job in a robust manner. Network structures may be very crucial in the effective modulation of fluctuation effects. We investigate the interplay between the network structure and the noise behavior in signal transduction networks using Stochastic simulations. Some of the recurrent modules in biological networks seem to be vital in noise control. We correlate the effect of those modules to the function of the global topology of the network. This may explain why certain class of modules are so ubiquitous in Bio-networks.

  5. Virtualized Network Control (VNC)

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, Thomas; Guok, Chin; Ghani, Nasir

    2013-01-31

    The focus of this project was on the development of a "Network Service Plane" as an abstraction model for the control and provisioning of multi-layer networks. The primary motivation for this work were the requirements of next generation networked applications which will need to access advanced networking as a first class resource at the same level as compute and storage resources. A new class of "Intelligent Network Services" were defined in order to facilitate the integration of advanced network services into application specific workflows. This new class of network services are intended to enable real-time interaction between the application co-scheduling algorithms and the network for the purposes of workflow planning, real-time resource availability identification, scheduling, and provisioning actions.

  6. Controllability of Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2011-03-01

    The ultimate proof of our understanding of natural or technological systems is reflected in our ability to control them. While control theory offers mathematical tools to steer engineered systems towards a desired state, we lack a general framework to control complex self-organized systems, like the regulatory network of a cell or the Internet. Here we develop analytical tools to study the controllability of an arbitrary complex directed network, identifying the set of driver nodes whose time-dependent control can guide the system's dynamics. We apply these tools to real and model networks, finding that sparse inhomogeneous networks, which emerge in many real complex systems, are the most difficult to control. In contrast, dense and homogeneous networks can be controlled via a few driver nodes. Counterintuitively, we find that in both model and real systems the driver nodes tend to avoid the hubs. We show that the robustness of control to link failure is determined by a core percolation problem, helping us understand why many complex systems are relatively insensitive to link deletion. The developed approach offers a framework to address the controllability of an arbitrary network, representing a key step towards the eventual control of complex systems.

  7. Inferring genetic networks from microarray data.

    SciTech Connect

    May, Elebeoba Eni; Davidson, George S.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Werner-Washburne, Margaret C.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel

    2004-06-01

    In theory, it should be possible to infer realistic genetic networks from time series microarray data. In practice, however, network discovery has proved problematic. The three major challenges are: (1) inferring the network; (2) estimating the stability of the inferred network; and (3) making the network visually accessible to the user. Here we describe a method, tested on publicly available time series microarray data, which addresses these concerns. The inference of genetic networks from genome-wide experimental data is an important biological problem which has received much attention. Approaches to this problem have typically included application of clustering algorithms [6]; the use of Boolean networks [12, 1, 10]; the use of Bayesian networks [8, 11]; and the use of continuous models [21, 14, 19]. Overviews of the problem and general approaches to network inference can be found in [4, 3]. Our approach to network inference is similar to earlier methods in that we use both clustering and Boolean network inference. However, we have attempted to extend the process to better serve the end-user, the biologist. In particular, we have incorporated a system to assess the reliability of our network, and we have developed tools which allow interactive visualization of the proposed network.

  8. Networks of spatial genetic variation across species

    PubMed Central

    Fortuna, Miguel A.; Albaladejo, Rafael G.; Fernández, Laura; Aparicio, Abelardo; Bascompte, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    Spatial patterns of genetic variation provide information central to many ecological, evolutionary, and conservation questions. This spatial variability has traditionally been analyzed through summary statistics between pairs of populations, therefore missing the simultaneous influence of all populations. More recently, a network approach has been advocated to overcome these limitations. This network approach has been applied to a few cases limited to a single species at a time. The question remains whether similar patterns of spatial genetic variation and similar functional roles for specific patches are obtained for different species. Here we study the networks of genetic variation of four Mediterranean woody plant species inhabiting the same habitat patches in a highly fragmented forest mosaic in Southern Spain. Three of the four species show a similar pattern of genetic variation with well-defined modules or groups of patches holding genetically similar populations. These modules can be thought of as the long-sought-after, evolutionarily significant units or management units. The importance of each patch for the cohesion of the entire network, though, is quite different across species. This variation creates a tremendous challenge for the prioritization of patches to conserve the genetic variation of multispecies assemblages. PMID:19861546

  9. Splitting strategy for simulating genetic regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    You, Xiong; Liu, Xueping; Musa, Ibrahim Hussein

    2014-01-01

    The splitting approach is developed for the numerical simulation of genetic regulatory networks with a stable steady-state structure. The numerical results of the simulation of a one-gene network, a two-gene network, and a p53-mdm2 network show that the new splitting methods constructed in this paper are remarkably more effective and more suitable for long-term computation with large steps than the traditional general-purpose Runge-Kutta methods. The new methods have no restriction on the choice of stepsize due to their infinitely large stability regions. PMID:24624223

  10. ACTS TDMA network control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inukai, T.; Campanella, S. J.

    This paper presents basic network control concepts for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) System. Two experimental systems, called the low-burst-rate and high-burst-rate systems, along with ACTS ground system features, are described. The network control issues addressed include frame structures, acquisition and synchronization procedures, coordinated station burst-time plan and satellite-time plan changes, on-board clock control based on ground drift measurements, rain fade control by means of adaptive forward-error-correction (FEC) coding and transmit power augmentation, and reassignment of channel capacities on demand. The NASA ground system, which includes a primary station, diversity station, and master control station, is also described.

  11. A Gene-Phenotype Network Based on Genetic Variability for Drought Responses Reveals Key Physiological Processes in Controlled and Natural Environments

    PubMed Central

    Rengel, David; Arribat, Sandrine; Maury, Pierre; Martin-Magniette, Marie-Laure; Hourlier, Thibaut; Laporte, Marion; Varès, Didier; Carrère, Sébastien; Grieu, Philippe; Balzergue, Sandrine; Gouzy, Jérôme

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the connections between molecular and physiological processes underlying the diversity of drought stress responses in plants is key for basic and applied science. Drought stress response involves a large number of molecular pathways and subsequent physiological processes. Therefore, it constitutes an archetypical systems biology model. We first inferred a gene-phenotype network exploiting differences in drought responses of eight sunflower (Helianthus annuus) genotypes to two drought stress scenarios. Large transcriptomic data were obtained with the sunflower Affymetrix microarray, comprising 32423 probesets, and were associated to nine morpho-physiological traits (integrated transpired water, leaf transpiration rate, osmotic potential, relative water content, leaf mass per area, carbon isotope discrimination, plant height, number of leaves and collar diameter) using sPLS regression. Overall, we could associate the expression patterns of 1263 probesets to six phenotypic traits and identify if correlations were due to treatment, genotype and/or their interaction. We also identified genes whose expression is affected at moderate and/or intense drought stress together with genes whose expression variation could explain phenotypic and drought tolerance variability among our genetic material. We then used the network model to study phenotypic changes in less tractable agronomical conditions, i.e. sunflower hybrids subjected to different watering regimes in field trials. Mapping this new dataset in the gene-phenotype network allowed us to identify genes whose expression was robustly affected by water deprivation in both controlled and field conditions. The enrichment in genes correlated to relative water content and osmotic potential provides evidence of the importance of these traits in agronomical conditions. PMID:23056196

  12. Characterization of Genetic Networks Associated with Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Tran, Linh; Emilsson, Valur; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    At the molecular level, the genetics of complex disease such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) manifests itself as series of alterations in the molecular interactions in pathways and networks that define biological processes underlying the pathophysiological states of disease. While large-scale genome-wide association (GWA) studies of late-onset alzheimer's disease (LOAD) have uncovered prominent genomic regions linked to the disease, the cause for the vast majority of LOAD cases still remains unknown. Increasingly available large-scale genomic and genetic data related to LOAD has made it possible to comprehensively uncover the mechanisms causally lined to LOAD in a completely data-driven manner. Here we review the various aspects of systems/network biology approaches and methodology in constructing genetic networks associated with AD from large sampling of postmortem brain tissues. We describe in detail a multiscale network modeling approach (MNMA) that integrates interaction and causal gene networks to analyze large-scale DNA, gene expression and pathophysiological data from multiple post-mortem brain regions of LOAD patients as well non-demented normal controls. MNMA first employs weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) to construct multi-tissue networks that simultaneously capture intra-tissue and inter-tissue gene-gene interactions and then quantifies the change in connectivity among highly co-expressed genes in LOAD with respect to the normal state. Co-expressed gene modules are then rank ordered by relevance to pathophysiological traits and enrichment of genes differentially expressed in LOAD. Causal regulatory relationships among the genes in each module are then determined by a Bayesian network inference framework that is used to formally integrate genetic and gene expression information. MNMA has uncovered a massive remodeling of network structures in LOAD and identified novel subnetworks and key regulators that are causally linked to LOAD. In the

  13. Neural networks for aircraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linse, Dennis

    1990-01-01

    Current research in Artificial Neural Networks indicates that networks offer some potential advantages in adaptation and fault tolerance. This research is directed at determining the possible applicability of neural networks to aircraft control. The first application will be to aircraft trim. Neural network node characteristics, network topology and operation, neural network learning and example histories using neighboring optimal control with a neural net are discussed.

  14. chaoptin, prominin, eyes shut and crumbs form a genetic network controlling the apical compartment of Drosophila photoreceptor cells

    PubMed Central

    Gurudev, Nagananda; Yuan, Michaela; Knust, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The apical surface of epithelial cells is often highly specialised to fulfil cell type-specific functions. Many epithelial cells expand their apical surface by forming microvilli, actin-based, finger-like membrane protrusions. The apical surface of Drosophila photoreceptor cells (PRCs) forms tightly packed microvilli, which are organised into the photosensitive rhabdomeres. As previously shown, the GPI-anchored adhesion protein Chaoptin is required for the stability of the microvilli, whereas the transmembrane protein Crumbs is essential for proper rhabdomere morphogenesis. Here we show that chaoptin synergises with crumbs to ensure optimal rhabdomere width. In addition, reduction of crumbs ameliorates morphogenetic defects observed in PRCs mutant for prominin and eyes shut, known antagonists of chaoptin. These results suggest that these four genes provide a balance of adhesion and anti-adhesion to maintain microvilli development and maintenance. Similar to crumbs mutant PRCs, PRCs devoid of prominin or eyes shut undergo light-dependent retinal degeneration. Given the observation that human orthologues of crumbs, prominin and eyes shut result in progressive retinal degeneration and blindness, the Drosophila eye is ideally suited to unravel the genetic and cellular mechanisms that ensure morphogenesis of PRCs and their maintenance under light-mediated stress. PMID:24705015

  15. Genetic networks influencing fruit ripening

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato is a model for ripening control and the basis of many characterized genes underlying this process. Cloning of the CNR, RIN and NOR genes defined the first ripening-specific transcription factors and provided insight into a ripening control system upstream of ethylene. RIN is a central player ...

  16. Genetic control of bone mass.

    PubMed

    Boudin, Eveline; Fijalkowski, Igor; Hendrickx, Gretl; Van Hul, Wim

    2016-09-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is a quantitative traits used as a surrogate phenotype for the diagnosis of osteoporosis, a common metabolic disorder characterized by increased fracture risk as a result of a decreased bone mass and deterioration of the microarchitecture of the bone. Normal variation in BMD is determined by both environmental and genetic factors. According to heritability studies, 50-85% of the variance in BMD is controlled by genetic factors which are mostly polygenic. In contrast to the complex etiology of osteoporosis, there are disorders with deviating BMD values caused by one mutation with a large impact. These mutations can result in monogenic bone disorders with either an extreme high (sclerosteosis, Van Buchem disease, osteopetrosis, high bone mass phenotype) or low BMD (osteogenesis imperfecta, juvenile osteoporosis, primary osteoporosis). Identification of the disease causing genes, increased the knowledge on the regulation of BMD and highlighted important signaling pathways and novel therapeutic targets such as sclerostin, RANKL and cathepsin K. Genetic variation in genes involved in these pathways are often also involved in the regulation of normal variation in BMD and osteoporosis susceptibility. In the last decades, identification of genetic factors regulating BMD has proven to be a challenge. Several approaches have been tested such as linkage studies and candidate and genome wide association studies. Although, throughout the years, technological developments made it possible to study increasing numbers of genetic variants in populations with increasing sample sizes at the same time, only a small fraction of the genetic impact can yet be explained. In order to elucidate the missing heritability, the focus shifted to studying the role of rare variants, copy number variations and epigenetic influences. This review summarizes the genetic cause of different monogenic bone disorders with deviating BMD and the knowledge on genetic factors

  17. Bridging genetic networks and queueing theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arazi, Arnon; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Yechiali, Uri

    2004-02-01

    One of the main challenges facing biology today is the understanding of the joint action of genes, proteins and RNA molecules, interwoven in intricate interdependencies commonly known as genetic networks. To this end, several mathematical approaches have been introduced to date. In addition to developing the analytical tools required for this task anew, one can utilize knowledge found in existing disciplines, specializing in the representation and analysis of systems featuring similar aspects. We suggest queueing theory as a possible source of such knowledge. This discipline, which focuses on the study of workloads forming in a variety of scenarios, offers an assortment of tools allowing for the derivation of the statistical properties of the inspected systems. We argue that a proper adaptation of modeling techniques and analytical methods used in queueing theory can contribute to the study of genetic regulatory networks. This is demonstrated by presenting a queueing-inspired model of a genetic network of arbitrary size and structure, for which the probability distribution function is derived. This model is further applied to the description of the lac operon regulation mechanism. In addition, we discuss the possible benefits stemming for queueing theory from the interdisciplinary dialogue with molecular biology-in particular, the incorporation of various dynamical behaviours into queueing networks.

  18. Genetic control of Aedes mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Alphey, Luke; McKemey, Andrew; Nimmo, Derric; Neira Oviedo, Marco; Lacroix, Renaud; Matzen, Kelly; Beech, Camilla

    2013-06-01

    Aedes mosquitoes include important vector species such as Aedes aegypti, the major vector of dengue. Genetic control methods are being developed for several of these species, stimulated by an urgent need owing to the poor effectiveness of current methods combined with an increase in chemical pesticide resistance. In this review we discuss the various genetic strategies that have been proposed, their present status, and future prospects. We focus particularly on those methods that are already being tested in the field, including RIDL and Wolbachia-based approaches. PMID:23816508

  19. Genetic control of Aedes mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Alphey, Luke; McKemey, Andrew; Nimmo, Derric; Neira Oviedo, Marco; Lacroix, Renaud; Matzen, Kelly; Beech, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Aedes mosquitoes include important vector species such as Aedes aegypti, the major vector of dengue. Genetic control methods are being developed for several of these species, stimulated by an urgent need owing to the poor effectiveness of current methods combined with an increase in chemical pesticide resistance. In this review we discuss the various genetic strategies that have been proposed, their present status, and future prospects. We focus particularly on those methods that are already being tested in the field, including RIDL and Wolbachia-based approaches. PMID:23816508

  20. Fluctuations and Slow Variables in Genetic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bundschuh, R.; Hayot, F.; Jayaprakash, C.

    2003-01-01

    Computer simulations of large genetic networks are often extremely time consuming because, in addition to the biologically interesting translation and transcription reactions, many less interesting reactions like DNA binding and dimerizations have to be simulated. It is desirable to use the fact that the latter occur on much faster timescales than the former to eliminate the fast and uninteresting reactions and to obtain effective models of the slow reactions only. We use three examples of self-regulatory networks to show that the usual reduction methods where one obtains a system of equations of the Hill type fail to capture the fluctuations that these networks exhibit due to the small number of molecules; moreover, they may even miss describing the behavior of the average number of proteins. We identify the inclusion of fast-varying variables in the effective description as the cause for the failure of the traditional schemes. We suggest a different effective description, which entails the introduction of an additional species, not present in the original networks, that is slowly varying. We show that this description allows for a very efficient simulation of the reduced system while retaining the correct fluctuations and behavior of the full system. This approach ought to be applicable to a wide range of genetic networks. PMID:12609864

  1. Exploring drug combinations in genetic interaction network

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Drug combination that consists of distinctive agents is an attractive strategy to combat complex diseases and has been widely used clinically with improved therapeutic effects. However, the identification of efficacious drug combinations remains a non-trivial and challenging task due to the huge number of possible combinations among the candidate drugs. As an important factor, the molecular context in which drugs exert their functions can provide crucial insights into the mechanism underlying drug combinations. Results In this work, we present a network biology approach to investigate drug combinations and their target proteins in the context of genetic interaction networks and the related human pathways, in order to better understand the underlying rules of effective drug combinations. Our results indicate that combinatorial drugs tend to have a smaller effect radius in the genetic interaction networks, which is an important parameter to describe the therapeutic effect of a drug combination from the network perspective. We also find that drug combinations are more likely to modulate functionally related pathways. Conclusions This study confirms that the molecular networks where drug combinations exert their functions can indeed provide important insights into the underlying rules of effective drug combinations. We hope that our findings can help shortcut the expedition of the future discovery of novel drug combinations. PMID:22595004

  2. From gene expressions to genetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2009-03-01

    A method based on the principle of entropy maximization is used to identify the gene interaction network with the highest probability of giving rise to experimentally observed transcript profiles [1]. In its simplest form, the method yields the pairwise gene interaction network, but it can also be extended to deduce higher order correlations. Analysis of microarray data from genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae chemostat cultures exhibiting energy metabollic oscillations identifies a gene interaction network that reflects the intracellular communication pathways. These pathways adjust cellular metabolic activity and cell division to the limiting nutrient conditions that trigger metabolic oscillations. The success of the present approach in extracting meaningful genetic connections suggests that the maximum entropy principle is a useful concept for understanding living systems, as it is for other complex, nonequilibrium systems. The time-dependent behavior of the genetic network is found to involve only a few fundamental modes [2,3]. [4pt] REFERENCES:[0pt] [1] T. R. Lezon, J. R. Banavar, M. Cieplak, A. Maritan, and N. Fedoroff, Using the principle of entropy maximization to infer genetic interaction networks from gene expression patterns, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. (USA) 103, 19033-19038 (2006) [0pt] [2] N. S. Holter, M. Mitra, A. Maritan, M. Cieplak, J. R. Banavar, and N. V. Fedoroff, Fundamental patterns underlying gene expression profiles: simplicity from complexity, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97, 8409-8414 (2000) [0pt] [3] N. S. Holter, A. Maritan, M. Cieplak, N. V. Fedoroff, and J. R. Banavar, Dynamic modeling of gene expression data, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 1693-1698 (2001)

  3. Controlling allosteric networks in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokholyan, Nikolay

    2013-03-01

    We present a novel methodology based on graph theory and discrete molecular dynamics simulations for delineating allosteric pathways in proteins. We use this methodology to uncover the structural mechanisms responsible for coupling of distal sites on proteins and utilize it for allosteric modulation of proteins. We will present examples where inference of allosteric networks and its rewiring allows us to ``rescue'' cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a protein associated with fatal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. We also use our methodology to control protein function allosterically. We design a novel protein domain that can be inserted into identified allosteric site of target protein. Using a drug that binds to our domain, we alter the function of the target protein. We successfully tested this methodology in vitro, in living cells and in zebrafish. We further demonstrate transferability of our allosteric modulation methodology to other systems and extend it to become ligh-activatable.

  4. Broadband accelerator control network

    SciTech Connect

    Skelly, J.; Clifford, T.; Frankel, R.

    1983-01-01

    A broadband data communications network has been implemented at BNL for control of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AG) proton accelerator, using commercial CATV hardware, dual coaxial cables as the communications medium, and spanning 2.0 km. A 4 MHz bandwidth Digital Control channel using CSMA-CA protocol is provided for digital data transmission, with 8 access nodes available over the length of the RELWAY. Each node consists of an rf modem and a microprocessor-based store-and-forward message handler which interfaces the RELWAY to a branch line implemented in GPIB. A gateway to the RELWAY control channel for the (preexisting) AGS Computerized Accelerator Operating system has been constructed using an LSI-11/23 microprocessor as a device in a GPIB branch line. A multilayer communications protocol has been defined for the Digital Control Channel, based on the ISO Open Systems Interconnect layered model, and a RELWAY Device Language defined as the required universal language for device control on this channel.

  5. Robust Multiobjective Controllability of Complex Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yang; Gao, Huijun; Du, Wei; Lu, Jianquan; Vasilakos, Athanasios V; Kurths, Jurgen

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses robust multiobjective identification of driver nodes in the neuronal network of a cat's brain, in which uncertainties in determination of driver nodes and control gains are considered. A framework for robust multiobjective controllability is proposed by introducing interval uncertainties and optimization algorithms. By appropriate definitions of robust multiobjective controllability, a robust nondominated sorting adaptive differential evolution (NSJaDE) is presented by means of the nondominated sorting mechanism and the adaptive differential evolution (JaDE). The simulation experimental results illustrate the satisfactory performance of NSJaDE for robust multiobjective controllability, in comparison with six statistical methods and two multiobjective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs): nondominated sorting genetic algorithms II (NSGA-II) and nondominated sorting composite differential evolution. It is revealed that the existence of uncertainties in choosing driver nodes and designing control gains heavily affects the controllability of neuronal networks. We also unveil that driver nodes play a more drastic role than control gains in robust controllability. The developed NSJaDE and obtained results will shed light on the understanding of robustness in controlling realistic complex networks such as transportation networks, power grid networks, biological networks, etc. PMID:26441452

  6. Effects of macromolecular crowding on genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Marco J; Allen, Rosalind J; Wolde, Pieter Rein ten

    2011-12-21

    The intracellular environment is crowded with proteins, DNA, and other macromolecules. Under physiological conditions, macromolecular crowding can alter both molecular diffusion and the equilibria of bimolecular reactions and therefore is likely to have a significant effect on the function of biochemical networks. We propose a simple way to model the effects of macromolecular crowding on biochemical networks via an appropriate scaling of bimolecular association and dissociation rates. We use this approach, in combination with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, to analyze the effects of crowding on a constitutively expressed gene, a repressed gene, and a model for the bacteriophage λ genetic switch, in the presence and absence of nonspecific binding of transcription factors to genomic DNA. Our results show that the effects of crowding are mainly caused by the shift of association-dissociation equilibria rather than the slowing down of protein diffusion, and that macromolecular crowding can have relevant and counterintuitive effects on biochemical network performance. PMID:22208186

  7. Effects of Macromolecular Crowding on Genetic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Morelli, Marco J.; Allen, Rosalind J.; Rein ten Wolde, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    The intracellular environment is crowded with proteins, DNA, and other macromolecules. Under physiological conditions, macromolecular crowding can alter both molecular diffusion and the equilibria of bimolecular reactions and therefore is likely to have a significant effect on the function of biochemical networks. We propose a simple way to model the effects of macromolecular crowding on biochemical networks via an appropriate scaling of bimolecular association and dissociation rates. We use this approach, in combination with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, to analyze the effects of crowding on a constitutively expressed gene, a repressed gene, and a model for the bacteriophage λ genetic switch, in the presence and absence of nonspecific binding of transcription factors to genomic DNA. Our results show that the effects of crowding are mainly caused by the shift of association-dissociation equilibria rather than the slowing down of protein diffusion, and that macromolecular crowding can have relevant and counterintuitive effects on biochemical network performance. PMID:22208186

  8. Enhanced energy transport in genetically engineered excitonic networks.

    PubMed

    Park, Heechul; Heldman, Nimrod; Rebentrost, Patrick; Abbondanza, Luigi; Iagatti, Alessandro; Alessi, Andrea; Patrizi, Barbara; Salvalaggio, Mario; Bussotti, Laura; Mohseni, Masoud; Caruso, Filippo; Johnsen, Hannah C; Fusco, Roberto; Foggi, Paolo; Scudo, Petra F; Lloyd, Seth; Belcher, Angela M

    2016-02-01

    One of the challenges for achieving efficient exciton transport in solar energy conversion systems is precise structural control of the light-harvesting building blocks. Here, we create a tunable material consisting of a connected chromophore network on an ordered biological virus template. Using genetic engineering, we establish a link between the inter-chromophoric distances and emerging transport properties. The combination of spectroscopy measurements and dynamic modelling enables us to elucidate quantum coherent and classical incoherent energy transport at room temperature. Through genetic modifications, we obtain a significant enhancement of exciton diffusion length of about 68% in an intermediate quantum-classical regime. PMID:26461447

  9. Enhanced energy transport in genetically engineered excitonic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Heechul; Heldman, Nimrod; Rebentrost, Patrick; Abbondanza, Luigi; Iagatti, Alessandro; Alessi, Andrea; Patrizi, Barbara; Salvalaggio, Mario; Bussotti, Laura; Mohseni, Masoud; Caruso, Filippo; Johnsen, Hannah C.; Fusco, Roberto; Foggi, Paolo; Scudo, Petra F.; Lloyd, Seth; Belcher, Angela M.

    2016-02-01

    One of the challenges for achieving efficient exciton transport in solar energy conversion systems is precise structural control of the light-harvesting building blocks. Here, we create a tunable material consisting of a connected chromophore network on an ordered biological virus template. Using genetic engineering, we establish a link between the inter-chromophoric distances and emerging transport properties. The combination of spectroscopy measurements and dynamic modelling enables us to elucidate quantum coherent and classical incoherent energy transport at room temperature. Through genetic modifications, we obtain a significant enhancement of exciton diffusion length of about 68% in an intermediate quantum-classical regime.

  10. Control efficacy of complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xin-Dong; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Controlling complex networks has become a forefront research area in network science and engineering. Recent efforts have led to theoretical frameworks of controllability to fully control a network through steering a minimum set of driver nodes. However, in realistic situations not every node is accessible or can be externally driven, raising the fundamental issue of control efficacy: if driving signals are applied to an arbitrary subset of nodes, how many other nodes can be controlled? We develop a framework to determine the control efficacy for undirected networks of arbitrary topology. Mathematically, based on non-singular transformation, we prove a theorem to determine rigorously the control efficacy of the network and to identify the nodes that can be controlled for any given driver nodes. Physically, we develop the picture of diffusion that views the control process as a signal diffused from input signals to the set of controllable nodes. The combination of mathematical theory and physical reasoning allows us not only to determine the control efficacy for model complex networks and a large number of empirical networks, but also to uncover phenomena in network control, e.g., hub nodes in general possess lower control centrality than an average node in undirected networks. PMID:27324438

  11. Control efficacy of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin-Dong; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Controlling complex networks has become a forefront research area in network science and engineering. Recent efforts have led to theoretical frameworks of controllability to fully control a network through steering a minimum set of driver nodes. However, in realistic situations not every node is accessible or can be externally driven, raising the fundamental issue of control efficacy: if driving signals are applied to an arbitrary subset of nodes, how many other nodes can be controlled? We develop a framework to determine the control efficacy for undirected networks of arbitrary topology. Mathematically, based on non-singular transformation, we prove a theorem to determine rigorously the control efficacy of the network and to identify the nodes that can be controlled for any given driver nodes. Physically, we develop the picture of diffusion that views the control process as a signal diffused from input signals to the set of controllable nodes. The combination of mathematical theory and physical reasoning allows us not only to determine the control efficacy for model complex networks and a large number of empirical networks, but also to uncover phenomena in network control, e.g., hub nodes in general possess lower control centrality than an average node in undirected networks.

  12. Control efficacy of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin-Dong; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Controlling complex networks has become a forefront research area in network science and engineering. Recent efforts have led to theoretical frameworks of controllability to fully control a network through steering a minimum set of driver nodes. However, in realistic situations not every node is accessible or can be externally driven, raising the fundamental issue of control efficacy: if driving signals are applied to an arbitrary subset of nodes, how many other nodes can be controlled? We develop a framework to determine the control efficacy for undirected networks of arbitrary topology. Mathematically, based on non-singular transformation, we prove a theorem to determine rigorously the control efficacy of the network and to identify the nodes that can be controlled for any given driver nodes. Physically, we develop the picture of diffusion that views the control process as a signal diffused from input signals to the set of controllable nodes. The combination of mathematical theory and physical reasoning allows us not only to determine the control efficacy for model complex networks and a large number of empirical networks, but also to uncover phenomena in network control, e.g., hub nodes in general possess lower control centrality than an average node in undirected networks. PMID:27324438

  13. Population Dynamics of Genetic Regulatory Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Erez

    2005-03-01

    Unlike common objects in physics, a biological cell processes information. The cell interprets its genome and transforms the genomic information content, through the action of genetic regulatory networks, into proteins which in turn dictate its metabolism, functionality and morphology. Understanding the dynamics of a population of biological cells presents a unique challenge. It requires to link the intracellular dynamics of gene regulation, through the mechanism of cell division, to the level of the population. We present experiments studying adaptive dynamics of populations of genetically homogeneous microorganisms (yeast), grown for long durations under steady conditions. We focus on population dynamics that do not involve random genetic mutations. Our experiments follow the long-term dynamics of the population distributions and allow to quantify the correlations among generations. We focus on three interconnected issues: adaptation of genetically homogeneous populations following environmental changes, selection processes on the population and population variability and expression distributions. We show that while the population exhibits specific short-term responses to environmental inputs, it eventually adapts to a robust steady-state, largely independent of external conditions. Cycles of medium-switch show that the adapted state is imprinted in the population and that this memory is maintained for many generations. To further study population adaptation, we utilize the process of gene recruitment whereby a gene naturally regulated by a specific promoter is placed under a different regulatory system. This naturally occurring process has been recognized as a major driving force in evolution. We have recruited an essential gene to a foreign regulatory network and followed the population long-term dynamics. Rewiring of the regulatory network allows us to expose their complex dynamics and phase space structure.

  14. Character Recognition Using Genetically Trained Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Diniz, C.; Stantz, K.M.; Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.

    1998-10-01

    Computationally intelligent recognition of characters and symbols addresses a wide range of applications including foreign language translation and chemical formula identification. The combination of intelligent learning and optimization algorithms with layered neural structures offers powerful techniques for character recognition. These techniques were originally developed by Sandia National Laboratories for pattern and spectral analysis; however, their ability to optimize vast amounts of data make them ideal for character recognition. An adaptation of the Neural Network Designer soflsvare allows the user to create a neural network (NN_) trained by a genetic algorithm (GA) that correctly identifies multiple distinct characters. The initial successfid recognition of standard capital letters can be expanded to include chemical and mathematical symbols and alphabets of foreign languages, especially Arabic and Chinese. The FIN model constructed for this project uses a three layer feed-forward architecture. To facilitate the input of characters and symbols, a graphic user interface (GUI) has been developed to convert the traditional representation of each character or symbol to a bitmap. The 8 x 8 bitmap representations used for these tests are mapped onto the input nodes of the feed-forward neural network (FFNN) in a one-to-one correspondence. The input nodes feed forward into a hidden layer, and the hidden layer feeds into five output nodes correlated to possible character outcomes. During the training period the GA optimizes the weights of the NN until it can successfully recognize distinct characters. Systematic deviations from the base design test the network's range of applicability. Increasing capacity, the number of letters to be recognized, requires a nonlinear increase in the number of hidden layer neurodes. Optimal character recognition performance necessitates a minimum threshold for the number of cases when genetically training the net. And, the amount of

  15. Controllability of structural brain networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Shi; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Cieslak, Matthew; Telesford, Qawi K.; Yu, Alfred B.; Kahn, Ari E.; Medaglia, John D.; Vettel, Jean M.; Miller, Michael B.; Grafton, Scott T.; Bassett, Danielle S.

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive function is driven by dynamic interactions between large-scale neural circuits or networks, enabling behaviour. However, fundamental principles constraining these dynamic network processes have remained elusive. Here we use tools from control and network theories to offer a mechanistic explanation for how the brain moves between cognitive states drawn from the network organization of white matter microstructure. Our results suggest that densely connected areas, particularly in the default mode system, facilitate the movement of the brain to many easily reachable states. Weakly connected areas, particularly in cognitive control systems, facilitate the movement of the brain to difficult-to-reach states. Areas located on the boundary between network communities, particularly in attentional control systems, facilitate the integration or segregation of diverse cognitive systems. Our results suggest that structural network differences between cognitive circuits dictate their distinct roles in controlling trajectories of brain network function.

  16. Controllability of structural brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shi; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Cieslak, Matthew; Telesford, Qawi K.; Yu, Alfred B.; Kahn, Ari E.; Medaglia, John D.; Vettel, Jean M.; Miller, Michael B.; Grafton, Scott T.; Bassett, Danielle S.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive function is driven by dynamic interactions between large-scale neural circuits or networks, enabling behaviour. However, fundamental principles constraining these dynamic network processes have remained elusive. Here we use tools from control and network theories to offer a mechanistic explanation for how the brain moves between cognitive states drawn from the network organization of white matter microstructure. Our results suggest that densely connected areas, particularly in the default mode system, facilitate the movement of the brain to many easily reachable states. Weakly connected areas, particularly in cognitive control systems, facilitate the movement of the brain to difficult-to-reach states. Areas located on the boundary between network communities, particularly in attentional control systems, facilitate the integration or segregation of diverse cognitive systems. Our results suggest that structural network differences between cognitive circuits dictate their distinct roles in controlling trajectories of brain network function. PMID:26423222

  17. Attack Vulnerability of Network Controllability.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhe-Ming; Li, Xin-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Controllability of complex networks has attracted much attention, and understanding the robustness of network controllability against potential attacks and failures is of practical significance. In this paper, we systematically investigate the attack vulnerability of network controllability for the canonical model networks as well as the real-world networks subject to attacks on nodes and edges. The attack strategies are selected based on degree and betweenness centralities calculated for either the initial network or the current network during the removal, among which random failure is as a comparison. It is found that the node-based strategies are often more harmful to the network controllability than the edge-based ones, and so are the recalculated strategies than their counterparts. The Barabási-Albert scale-free model, which has a highly biased structure, proves to be the most vulnerable of the tested model networks. In contrast, the Erdős-Rényi random model, which lacks structural bias, exhibits much better robustness to both node-based and edge-based attacks. We also survey the control robustness of 25 real-world networks, and the numerical results show that most real networks are control robust to random node failures, which has not been observed in the model networks. And the recalculated betweenness-based strategy is the most efficient way to harm the controllability of real-world networks. Besides, we find that the edge degree is not a good quantity to measure the importance of an edge in terms of network controllability. PMID:27588941

  18. Genetic Regulatory Networks in Embryogenesis and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The article introduces a series of papers that were originally presented at a workshop titled Genetic Regulatory Network in Embryogenesis and Evaluation. Contents include the following: evolution of cleavage programs in relationship to axial specification and body plan evolution, changes in cell lineage specification elucidate evolutionary relations in spiralia, axial patterning in the leech: developmental mechanisms and evolutionary implications, hox genes in arthropod development and evolution, heterochronic genes in development and evolution, a common theme for LIM homeobox gene function across phylogeny, and mechanisms of specification in ascidian embryos.

  19. Functional Localization of Genetic Network Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Shinji; Hirasawa, Kotaro; Hu, Jinglu

    According to the knowledge of brain science, it is suggested that there exists cerebral functional localization, which means that a specific part of the cerebrum is activated depending on various kinds of information human receives. The aim of this paper is to build an artificial model to realize functional localization based on Genetic Network Programming (GNP), a new evolutionary computation method recently developed. GNP has a directed graph structure suitable for realizing functional localization. We studied the basic characteristics of the proposed system by making GNP work in a functionally localized way.

  20. MAC protocol for ad hoc networks using a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Elizarraras, Omar; Panduro, Marco; Méndez, Aldo L; Reyna, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The problem of obtaining the transmission rate in an ad hoc network consists in adjusting the power of each node to ensure the signal to interference ratio (SIR) and the energy required to transmit from one node to another is obtained at the same time. Therefore, an optimal transmission rate for each node in a medium access control (MAC) protocol based on CSMA-CDMA (carrier sense multiple access-code division multiple access) for ad hoc networks can be obtained using evolutionary optimization. This work proposes a genetic algorithm for the transmission rate election considering a perfect power control, and our proposition achieves improvement of 10% compared with the scheme that handles the handshaking phase to adjust the transmission rate. Furthermore, this paper proposes a genetic algorithm that solves the problem of power combining, interference, data rate, and energy ensuring the signal to interference ratio in an ad hoc network. The result of the proposed genetic algorithm has a better performance (15%) compared to the CSMA-CDMA protocol without optimizing. Therefore, we show by simulation the effectiveness of the proposed protocol in terms of the throughput. PMID:25140339

  1. MAC Protocol for Ad Hoc Networks Using a Genetic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Elizarraras, Omar; Panduro, Marco; Méndez, Aldo L.

    2014-01-01

    The problem of obtaining the transmission rate in an ad hoc network consists in adjusting the power of each node to ensure the signal to interference ratio (SIR) and the energy required to transmit from one node to another is obtained at the same time. Therefore, an optimal transmission rate for each node in a medium access control (MAC) protocol based on CSMA-CDMA (carrier sense multiple access-code division multiple access) for ad hoc networks can be obtained using evolutionary optimization. This work proposes a genetic algorithm for the transmission rate election considering a perfect power control, and our proposition achieves improvement of 10% compared with the scheme that handles the handshaking phase to adjust the transmission rate. Furthermore, this paper proposes a genetic algorithm that solves the problem of power combining, interference, data rate, and energy ensuring the signal to interference ratio in an ad hoc network. The result of the proposed genetic algorithm has a better performance (15%) compared to the CSMA-CDMA protocol without optimizing. Therefore, we show by simulation the effectiveness of the proposed protocol in terms of the throughput. PMID:25140339

  2. Control of Neuronal Network in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Badhwar, Rahul; Bagler, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans, a soil dwelling nematode, is evolutionarily rudimentary and contains only ∼ 300 neurons which are connected to each other via chemical synapses and gap junctions. This structural connectivity can be perceived as nodes and edges of a graph. Controlling complex networked systems (such as nervous system) has been an area of excitement for mankind. Various methods have been developed to identify specific brain regions, which when controlled by external input can lead to achievement of control over the state of the system. But in case of neuronal connectivity network the properties of neurons identified as driver nodes is of much importance because nervous system can produce a variety of states (behaviour of the animal). Hence to gain insight on the type of control achieved in nervous system we implemented the notion of structural control from graph theory to C. elegans neuronal network. We identified ‘driver neurons’ which can provide full control over the network. We studied phenotypic properties of these neurons which are referred to as ‘phenoframe’ as well as the ‘genoframe’ which represents their genetic correlates. We find that the driver neurons are primarily motor neurons located in the ventral nerve cord and contribute to biological reproduction of the animal. Identification of driver neurons and its characterization adds a new dimension in controllability of C. elegans neuronal network. This study suggests the importance of driver neurons and their utility to control the behaviour of the organism. PMID:26413834

  3. Stability analysis of genetic regulatory networks with multiple time delays.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2007-01-01

    A genetic regulatory network is a dynamic system to describe interactions among genes (mRNA) and its products (proteins). From the statistic thermodynamics and biochemical reaction principle, a genetic regulatory network can be described by a group of nonlinear differential equations with time delays. Stability is one of interesting properties for genetic regulatory network. Previous studies have investigated stability of genetic regulatory networks with a single time delay. In this paper, we investigate properties of genetic regulatory networks with multiple time delays in the notion of delay-independent stability. We present necessary and sufficient condition for the local delay-independent stability of genetic regulatory network with multiple time delays which are independent or commensurate. PMID:18002223

  4. Genetic control of bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wolska, Krystyna I; Grudniak, Anna M; Rudnicka, Zofia; Markowska, Katarzyna

    2016-05-01

    Nearly all bacterial species, including pathogens, have the ability to form biofilms. Biofilms are defined as structured ecosystems in which microbes are attached to surfaces and embedded in a matrix composed of polysaccharides, eDNA, and proteins, and their development is a multistep process. Bacterial biofilms constitute a large medical problem due to their extremely high resistance to various types of therapeutics, including conventional antibiotics. Several environmental and genetic signals control every step of biofilm development and dispersal. From among the latter, quorum sensing, cyclic diguanosine-5'-monophosphate, and small RNAs are considered as the main regulators. The present review describes the control role of these three regulators in the life cycles of biofilms built by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Vibrio cholerae. The interconnections between their activities are shown. Compounds and strategies which target the activity of these regulators, mainly quorum sensing inhibitors, and their potential role in therapy are also assessed. PMID:26294280

  5. Training product unit neural networks with genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janson, D. J.; Frenzel, J. F.; Thelen, D. C.

    1991-01-01

    The training of product neural networks using genetic algorithms is discussed. Two unusual neural network techniques are combined; product units are employed instead of the traditional summing units and genetic algorithms train the network rather than backpropagation. As an example, a neural netork is trained to calculate the optimum width of transistors in a CMOS switch. It is shown how local minima affect the performance of a genetic algorithm, and one method of overcoming this is presented.

  6. Weight-Control Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for students, postdocs, and faculty Research at NIDDK Labs, faculty, and ... full list of resources . Alternate Language URL Weight-control Information Network (WIN) Page Content The Weight-control ...

  7. How social and genetic factors predict friendship networks

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, Jason D.; Domingue, Benjamin W.; Fletcher, Jason M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent research suggests that the genotype of one individual in a friendship pair is predictive of the genotype of his/her friend. These results provide tentative support for the genetic homophily perspective, which has important implications for social and genetic epidemiology because it substantiates a particular form of gene–environment correlation. This process may also have important implications for social scientists who study the social factors related to health and health-related behaviors. We extend this work by considering the ways in which school context shapes genetically similar friendships. Using the network, school, and genetic information from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we show that genetic homophily for the TaqI A polymorphism within the DRD2 gene is stronger in schools with greater levels of inequality. Our results suggest that individuals with similar genotypes may not actively select into friendships; rather, they may be placed into these contexts by institutional mechanisms outside of their control. Our work highlights the fundamental role played by broad social structures in the extent to which genetic factors explain complex behaviors, such as friendships. PMID:23045663

  8. Genetic control over the resting brain

    PubMed Central

    Glahn, D. C.; Winkler, A. M.; Kochunov, P.; Almasy, L.; Duggirala, R.; Carless, M. A.; Curran, J. C.; Olvera, R. L.; Laird, A. R.; Smith, S. M.; Beckmann, C. F.; Fox, P. T.; Blangero, J.

    2010-01-01

    The default-mode network, a coherent resting-state brain network, is thought to characterize basal neural activity. Aberrant default-mode connectivity has been reported in a host of neurological and psychiatric illnesses and in persons at genetic risk for such illnesses. Whereas the neurophysiologic mechanisms that regulate default-mode connectivity are unclear, there is growing evidence that genetic factors play a role. In this report, we estimate the importance of genetic effects on the default-mode network by examining covariation patterns in functional connectivity among 333 individuals from 29 randomly selected extended pedigrees. Heritability for default-mode functional connectivity was 0.424 ± 0.17 (P = 0.0046). Although neuroanatomic variation in this network was also heritable, the genetic factors that influence default-mode functional connectivity and gray-matter density seem to be distinct, suggesting that unique genes influence the structure and function of the network. In contrast, significant genetic correlations between regions within the network provide evidence that the same genetic factors contribute to variation in functional connectivity throughout the default mode. Specifically, the left parahippocampal region was genetically correlated with all other network regions. In addition, the posterior cingulate/precuneus region, medial prefrontal cortex, and right cerebellum seem to form a subnetwork. Default-mode functional connectivity is influenced by genetic factors that cannot be attributed to anatomic variation or a single region within the network. By establishing the heritability of default-mode functional connectivity, this experiment provides the obligatory evidence required before these measures can be considered as endophenotypes for psychiatric or neurological illnesses or to identify genes influencing intrinsic brain function. PMID:20133824

  9. Optimal Design of Geodetic Network Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajedian, Sanaz; Bagheri, Hosein

    2010-05-01

    A geodetic network is a network which is measured exactly by techniques of terrestrial surveying based on measurement of angles and distances and can control stability of dams, towers and their around lands and can monitor deformation of surfaces. The main goals of an optimal geodetic network design process include finding proper location of control station (First order Design) as well as proper weight of observations (second order observation) in a way that satisfy all the criteria considered for quality of the network with itself is evaluated by the network's accuracy, reliability (internal and external), sensitivity and cost. The first-order design problem, can be dealt with as a numeric optimization problem. In this designing finding unknown coordinates of network stations is an important issue. For finding these unknown values, network geodetic observations that are angle and distance measurements must be entered in an adjustment method. In this regard, using inverse problem algorithms is needed. Inverse problem algorithms are methods to find optimal solutions for given problems and include classical and evolutionary computations. The classical approaches are analytical methods and are useful in finding the optimum solution of a continuous and differentiable function. Least squares (LS) method is one of the classical techniques that derive estimates for stochastic variables and their distribution parameters from observed samples. The evolutionary algorithms are adaptive procedures of optimization and search that find solutions to problems inspired by the mechanisms of natural evolution. These methods generate new points in the search space by applying operators to current points and statistically moving toward more optimal places in the search space. Genetic algorithm (GA) is an evolutionary algorithm considered in this paper. This algorithm starts with definition of initial population, and then the operators of selection, replication and variation are applied

  10. Realistic Control of Network Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Sean P.; Kath, William L.; Motter, Adilson E.

    2014-01-01

    The control of complex networks is of paramount importance in areas as diverse as ecosystem management, emergency response, and cell reprogramming. A fundamental property of networks is that perturbations to one node can affect other nodes, potentially causing the entire system to change behavior or fail. Here, we show that it is possible to exploit the same principle to control network behavior. Our approach accounts for the nonlinear dynamics inherent to real systems, and allows bringing the system to a desired target state even when this state is not directly accessible due to constraints that limit the allowed interventions. Applications show that this framework permits reprogramming a network to a desired task as well as rescuing networks from the brink of failure—which we illustrate through the mitigation of cascading failures in a power-grid network and the identification of potential drug targets in a signaling network of human cancer. PMID:23803966

  11. The APS control system network

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorowicz, K.V.; McDowell, W.P.

    1995-12-31

    The APS accelerator control system is a distributed system consisting of operator interfaces, a network, and computer-controlled interfaces to hardware. This implementation of a control system has come to be called the {open_quotes}Standard Model.{close_quotes} The operator interface is a UNDC-based workstation with an X-windows graphical user interface. The workstation may be located at any point on the facility network and maintain full functionality. The function of the network is to provide a generalized communication path between the host computers, operator workstations, input/output crates, and other hardware that comprise the control system. The crate or input/output controller (IOC) provides direct control and input/output interfaces for each accelerator subsystem. The network is an integral part of all modem control systems and network performance will determine many characteristics of a control system. This paper will describe the overall APS network and examine the APS control system network in detail. Metrics are provided on the performance of the system under various conditions.

  12. Identification of Interventions to Control Network Crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Sahasrabudhe, Sagar; Motter, Adilson

    2012-02-01

    Large-scale crises in financial, social, infrastructure, genetic and ecological networks often result from the spread of disturbances that in isolation would only cause limited damage. Here we present a method to identify and schedule interventions that can mitigate cascading failures in general complex networks. When applied to competition networks, our method shows that the system can often be rescued from global failures through actions that satisfy restrictive constraints typical of real-world conditions. However, under such constraints, interventions that can rescue the system from a propagating cascade exist over specific periods of time that do not always include the early postperturbation period, suggesting that scheduling is critical in the control of network cascades.

  13. Control of collective network chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Wagemakers, Alexandre Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2014-06-01

    Under certain conditions, the collective behavior of a large globally-coupled heterogeneous network of coupled oscillators, as quantified by the macroscopic mean field or order parameter, can exhibit low-dimensional chaotic behavior. Recent advances describe how a small set of “reduced” ordinary differential equations can be derived that captures this mean field behavior. Here, we show that chaos control algorithms designed using the reduced equations can be successfully applied to imperfect realizations of the full network. To systematically study the effectiveness of this technique, we measure the quality of control as we relax conditions that are required for the strict accuracy of the reduced equations, and hence, the controller. Although the effects are network-dependent, we show that the method is effective for surprisingly small networks, for modest departures from global coupling, and even with mild inaccuracy in the estimate of network heterogeneity.

  14. Discovering Alzheimer Genetic Biomarkers Using Bayesian Networks.

    PubMed

    Sherif, Fayroz F; Zayed, Nourhan; Fakhr, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) contribute most of the genetic variation to the human genome. SNPs associate with many complex and common diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD). Discovering SNP biomarkers at different loci can improve early diagnosis and treatment of these diseases. Bayesian network provides a comprehensible and modular framework for representing interactions between genes or single SNPs. Here, different Bayesian network structure learning algorithms have been applied in whole genome sequencing (WGS) data for detecting the causal AD SNPs and gene-SNP interactions. We focused on polymorphisms in the top ten genes associated with AD and identified by genome-wide association (GWA) studies. New SNP biomarkers were observed to be significantly associated with Alzheimer's disease. These SNPs are rs7530069, rs113464261, rs114506298, rs73504429, rs7929589, rs76306710, and rs668134. The obtained results demonstrated the effectiveness of using BN for identifying AD causal SNPs with acceptable accuracy. The results guarantee that the SNP set detected by Markov blanket based methods has a strong association with AD disease and achieves better performance than both naïve Bayes and tree augmented naïve Bayes. Minimal augmented Markov blanket reaches accuracy of 66.13% and sensitivity of 88.87% versus 61.58% and 59.43% in naïve Bayes, respectively. PMID:26366461

  15. Discovering Alzheimer Genetic Biomarkers Using Bayesian Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Fayroz F.; Zayed, Nourhan; Fakhr, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) contribute most of the genetic variation to the human genome. SNPs associate with many complex and common diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD). Discovering SNP biomarkers at different loci can improve early diagnosis and treatment of these diseases. Bayesian network provides a comprehensible and modular framework for representing interactions between genes or single SNPs. Here, different Bayesian network structure learning algorithms have been applied in whole genome sequencing (WGS) data for detecting the causal AD SNPs and gene-SNP interactions. We focused on polymorphisms in the top ten genes associated with AD and identified by genome-wide association (GWA) studies. New SNP biomarkers were observed to be significantly associated with Alzheimer's disease. These SNPs are rs7530069, rs113464261, rs114506298, rs73504429, rs7929589, rs76306710, and rs668134. The obtained results demonstrated the effectiveness of using BN for identifying AD causal SNPs with acceptable accuracy. The results guarantee that the SNP set detected by Markov blanket based methods has a strong association with AD disease and achieves better performance than both naïve Bayes and tree augmented naïve Bayes. Minimal augmented Markov blanket reaches accuracy of 66.13% and sensitivity of 88.87% versus 61.58% and 59.43% in naïve Bayes, respectively. PMID:26366461

  16. Convergence behaviour and Control in Non-Linear Biological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Karl, Stefan; Dandekar, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Control of genetic regulatory networks is challenging to define and quantify. Previous control centrality metrics, which aim to capture the ability of individual nodes to control the system, have been found to suffer from plausibility and applicability problems. Here we present a new approach to control centrality based on network convergence behaviour, implemented as an extension of our genetic regulatory network simulation framework Jimena ( http://stefan-karl.de/jimena). We distinguish three types of network control, and show how these mathematical concepts correspond to experimentally verified node functions and signalling pathways in immunity and cell differentiation: Total control centrality quantifies the impact of node mutations and identifies potential pharmacological targets such as genes involved in oncogenesis (e.g. zinc finger protein GLI2 or bone morphogenetic proteins in chondrocytes). Dynamic control centrality describes relaying functions as observed in signalling cascades (e.g. src kinase or Jak/Stat pathways). Value control centrality measures the direct influence of the value of the node on the network (e.g. Indian hedgehog as an essential regulator of proliferation in chondrocytes). Surveying random scale-free networks and biological networks, we find that control of the network resides in few high degree driver nodes and networks can be controlled best if they are sparsely connected. PMID:26068060

  17. A Neuro-genetic Control Scheme Application for Industrial R 3 Workspaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irigoyen, E.; Larrea, M.; Valera, J.; Gómez, V.; Artaza, F.

    This work presents a neuro-genetic control scheme for a R 3 workspace application. The solution is based on a Multi Objective Genetic Algorithm reference generator and an Adaptive Predictive Neural Network Controller. Crane position control is presented as an application of the proposed control scheme.

  18. Controllability of asynchronous Boolean multiplex control networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chao; Wang, Xingyuan; Liu, Hong

    2014-09-01

    In this article, the controllability of asynchronous Boolean multiplex control networks (ABMCNs) is studied. First, the model of Boolean multiplex control networks under Harvey' asynchronous update is presented. By means of semi-tensor product approach, the logical dynamics is converted into linear representation, and a generalized formula of control-depending network transition matrices is achieved. Second, a necessary and sufficient condition is proposed to verify that only control-depending fixed points of ABMCNs can be controlled with probability one. Third, using two types of controls, the controllability of system is studied and formulae are given to show: (a) when an initial state is given, the reachable set at time s under a group of specified controls; (b) the reachable set at time s under arbitrary controls; (c) the specific probability values from a given initial state to destination states. Based on the above formulae, an algorithm to calculate overall reachable states from a specified initial state is presented. Moreover, we also discuss an approach to find the particular control sequence which steers the system between two states with maximum probability. Examples are shown to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  19. Genetic-algorithm-based tri-state neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uang, Chii-Maw; Chen, Wen-Gong; Horng, Ji-Bin

    2002-09-01

    A new method, using genetic algorithms, for constructing a tri-state neural network is presented. The global searching features of the genetic algorithms are adopted to help us easily find the interconnection weight matrix of a bipolar neural network. The construction method is based on the biological nervous systems, which evolve the parameters encoded in genes. Taking the advantages of conventional (binary) genetic algorithms, a two-level chromosome structure is proposed for training the tri-state neural network. A Matlab program is developed for simulating the network performances. The results show that the proposed genetic algorithms method not only has the features of accurate of constructing the interconnection weight matrix, but also has better network performance.

  20. Genetic control of glycolipid expression.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, T; Suzuki, A; Hashimoto, Y

    1986-12-15

    A polymorphic variation of sialic acid species of sialosyllactosylceramide was found in dog erythrocytes. The analysis of the glycolipids in the erythrocytes of the individual dogs in a family of a Japanese breed of dog, Shiba-Inu, showed that the expression of sialosyllactosylceramide containing N-glycolylneuraminic acid was an autosomal dominant trait over the expression of that containing N-acetylneuraminic acid. Polymorphic variations of major liver gangliosides were also found in various strains of inbred mice. The strains were classified into three groups; the first group possessed only II3 NeuGc-LacCer, the second group possessed II3NeuGc-GgOse3Cer in addition to II3NeuGc-LacCer and the third group possessed II3NeuGc-GgOse4Cer and II3NeuGc,IV3NeuGc-GgOse4Cer as well as the above two gangliosides. By subjecting mice of these three groups to genetic analysis, the strain of the first group (WHT/Ht mice) was demonstrated to be a recessive homozygote which had a single autosomal defective gene making it unable to express N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase activity to produce II3NeuGc-GgOse3Cer. The strains of the second group (BALB/c and C57BL/10 mice) were also demonstrated to be recessive homozygotes which had a single autosomal defective gene making them unable to express high enough level of galactosyltransferase activity to produce II3NeuGc-GgOse4Cer. By the analysis of gangliosides and the enzyme activity of H-2 congenic mice and mice produced by a mating, this defective gene controlling the expression of II3NeuGc-GgOse4-Cer through the regulation of the transferase activity was demonstrated to be linked to H-2 complex on chromosome 17. PMID:3103940

  1. Genetic Algorithm Based Neural Networks for Nonlinear Optimization

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-09-28

    This software develops a novel approach to nonlinear optimization using genetic algorithm based neural networks. To our best knowledge, this approach represents the first attempt at applying both neural network and genetic algorithm techniques to solve a nonlinear optimization problem. The approach constructs a neural network structure and an appropriately shaped energy surface whose minima correspond to optimal solutions of the problem. A genetic algorithm is employed to perform a parallel and powerful search ofmore » the energy surface.« less

  2. Controlling centrality in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Nicosia, V.; Criado, R.; Romance, M.; Russo, G.; Latora, V.

    2012-01-01

    Spectral centrality measures allow to identify influential individuals in social groups, to rank Web pages by popularity, and even to determine the impact of scientific researches. The centrality score of a node within a network crucially depends on the entire pattern of connections, so that the usual approach is to compute node centralities once the network structure is assigned. We face here with the inverse problem, that is, we study how to modify the centrality scores of the nodes by acting on the structure of a given network. We show that there exist particular subsets of nodes, called controlling sets, which can assign any prescribed set of centrality values to all the nodes of a graph, by cooperatively tuning the weights of their out-going links. We found that many large networks from the real world have surprisingly small controlling sets, containing even less than 5 – 10% of the nodes. PMID:22355732

  3. A control network of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Merton E.; Rogers, Patricia G.; Colvin, Tim R.

    1991-01-01

    A control network for Triton has been computed using a bundle-type analytical triangulation program. The network contains 105 points that were measured on 57 Voyager-2 pictures. The adjustment contained 1010 observation equations and 382 normal equations and resulted in a standard measurement error of 13.36 microns. The coordinates of the control points, the camera orientation angles at the times when the pictures were taken, and Triton's mean radius were determined. A separate statistical analysis confirmed Triton's radius to be 1352.6 + or - 2.4 km. Attempts to tie the control network around the satellite were unsuccessful because discontinuities exist in high-resolution coverage between 66 deg and 289 deg longitude, north of 38 deg latitude, and south of 78 deg latitude.

  4. A control network of Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Merton E.; Rogers, Patricia G.; Colvin, Tim R.

    1991-08-01

    A control network for Triton has been computed using a bundle-type analytical triangulation program. The network contains 105 points that were measured on 57 Voyager-2 pictures. The adjustment contained 1010 observation equations and 382 normal equations and resulted in a standard measurement error of 13.36 microns. The coordinates of the control points, the camera orientation angles at the times when the pictures were taken, and Triton's mean radius were determined. A separate statistical analysis confirmed Triton's radius to be 1352.6 + or - 2.4 km. Attempts to tie the control network around the satellite were unsuccessful because discontinuities exist in high-resolution coverage between 66 deg and 289 deg longitude, north of 38 deg latitude, and south of 78 deg latitude.

  5. Neural Networks for Flight Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    Neural networks are being developed at NASA Ames Research Center to permit real-time adaptive control of time varying nonlinear systems, enhance the fault-tolerance of mission hardware, and permit online system reconfiguration. In general, the problem of controlling time varying nonlinear systems with unknown structures has not been solved. Adaptive neural control techniques show considerable promise and are being applied to technical challenges including automated docking of spacecraft, dynamic balancing of the space station centrifuge, online reconfiguration of damaged aircraft, and reducing cost of new air and spacecraft designs. Our experiences have shown that neural network algorithms solved certain problems that conventional control methods have been unable to effectively address. These include damage mitigation in nonlinear reconfiguration flight control, early performance estimation of new aircraft designs, compensation for damaged planetary mission hardware by using redundant manipulator capability, and space sensor platform stabilization. This presentation explored these developments in the context of neural network control theory. The discussion began with an overview of why neural control has proven attractive for NASA application domains. The more important issues in control system development were then discussed with references to significant technical advances in the literature. Examples of how these methods have been applied were given, followed by projections of emerging application needs and directions.

  6. Propagation of genetic variation in gene regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plahte, Erik; Gjuvsland, Arne B.; Omholt, Stig W.

    2013-08-01

    A future quantitative genetics theory should link genetic variation to phenotypic variation in a causally cohesive way based on how genes actually work and interact. We provide a theoretical framework for predicting and understanding the manifestation of genetic variation in haploid and diploid regulatory networks with arbitrary feedback structures and intra-locus and inter-locus functional dependencies. Using results from network and graph theory, we define propagation functions describing how genetic variation in a locus is propagated through the network, and show how their derivatives are related to the network’s feedback structure. Similarly, feedback functions describe the effect of genotypic variation of a locus on itself, either directly or mediated by the network. A simple sign rule relates the sign of the derivative of the feedback function of any locus to the feedback loops involving that particular locus. We show that the sign of the phenotypically manifested interaction between alleles at a diploid locus is equal to the sign of the dominant feedback loop involving that particular locus, in accordance with recent results for a single locus system. Our results provide tools by which one can use observable equilibrium concentrations of gene products to disclose structural properties of the network architecture. Our work is a step towards a theory capable of explaining the pleiotropy and epistasis features of genetic variation in complex regulatory networks as functions of regulatory anatomy and functional location of the genetic variation.

  7. Gene networks controlling petal organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tengbo; Irish, Vivian F

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest unanswered questions in developmental biology is how growth is controlled. Petals are an excellent organ system for investigating growth control in plants: petals are dispensable, have a simple structure, and are largely refractory to environmental perturbations that can alter their size and shape. In recent studies, a number of genes controlling petal growth have been identified. The overall picture of how such genes function in petal organogenesis is beginning to be elucidated. This review will focus on studies using petals as a model system to explore the underlying gene networks that control organ initiation, growth, and final organ morphology. PMID:26428062

  8. Genetic noise control via protein oligomerization

    SciTech Connect

    Ghim, C; Almaas, E

    2008-06-12

    Gene expression in a cell entails random reaction events occurring over disparate time scales. Thus, molecular noise that often results in phenotypic and population-dynamic consequences sets a fundamental limit to biochemical signaling. While there have been numerous studies correlating the architecture of cellular reaction networks with noise tolerance, only a limited effort has been made to understand the dynamical role of protein-protein associations. We have developed a fully stochastic model for the positive feedback control of a single gene, as well as a pair of genes (toggle switch), integrating quantitative results from previous in vivo and in vitro studies. In particular, we explicitly account for the fast protein binding-unbinding kinetics, RNA polymerases, and the promoter/operator sequences of DNA. We find that the overall noise-level is reduced and the frequency content of the noise is dramatically shifted to the physiologically irrelevant high-frequency regime in the presence of protein dimerization. This is independent of the choice of monomer or dimer as transcription factor and persists throughout the multiple model topologies considered. For the toggle switch, we additionally find that the presence of a protein dimer, either homodimer or heterodimer, may significantly reduce its intrinsic switching rate. Hence, the dimer promotes the robust function of bistable switches by preventing the uninduced (induced) state from randomly being induced (uninduced). The specific binding between regulatory proteins provides a buffer that may prevent the propagation of fluctuations in genetic activity. The capacity of the buffer is a non-monotonic function of association-dissociation rates. Since the protein oligomerization per se does not require extra protein components to be expressed, it provides a basis for the rapid control of intrinsic or extrinsic noise. The stabilization of phenotypically important toggle switches, and nested positive feedback loops in

  9. Virtualized Network Control. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ghani, Nasir

    2013-02-01

    This document is the final report for the Virtualized Network Control (VNC) project, which was funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. This project was also informally referred to as Advanced Resource Computation for Hybrid Service and TOpology NEtworks (ARCHSTONE). This report provides a summary of the project's activities, tasks, deliverable, and accomplishments. It also provides a summary of the documents, software, and presentations generated as part of this projects activities. Namely, the Appendix contains an archive of the deliverables, documents, and presentations generated a part of this project.

  10. The AMSC network control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, William B.

    1990-01-01

    The American Mobile Satellite Corporation (AMSC) is going to construct, launch, and operate a satellite system in order to provide mobile satellite services to the United States. AMSC is going to build, own, and operate a Network Control System (NCS) for managing the communications usage of the satellites, and to control circuit switched access between mobile earth terminals and feeder-link earth stations. An overview of the major NCS functional and performance requirements, the control system physical architecture, and the logical architecture is provided.

  11. Controllability of the better chosen partial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xueming; Pan, Linqiang

    2016-08-01

    How to control large complex networks is a great challenge. Recent studies have proved that the whole network can be sufficiently steered by injecting control signals into a minimum set of driver nodes, and the minimum numbers of driver nodes for many real networks are high, indicating that it is difficult to control them. For some large natural and technological networks, it is impossible and not feasible to control the full network. For example, in biological networks like large-scale gene regulatory networks it is impossible to control all the genes. This prompts us to explore the question how to choose partial networks that are easy for controlling and important in networked systems. In this work, we propose a method to achieve this goal. By computing the minimum driver nodes densities of the partial networks of Erdös-Rényi (ER) networks, scale-free (SF) networks and 23 real networks, we find that our method performs better than random method that chooses nodes randomly. Moreover, we find that the nodes chosen by our method tend to be the essential elements of the whole systems, via studying the nodes chosen by our method of a real human signaling network and a human protein interaction network and discovering that the chosen nodes from these networks tend to be cancer-associated genes. The implementation of our method shows some interesting connections between the structure and the controllability of networks, improving our understanding of the control principles of complex systems.

  12. Question 9: Minority Control and Genetic Takeover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2007-10-01

    As an issue of constructive biology, we study how molecules carrying heredity appear in a reproduction system that consists of mutually catalytic reactions. Molecules that are minority in number are shown to be preserved over generations, and control the behavior of the system. Life-critical information is then expected to be packed into such molecules and transferred over generations, leading to kinetic origin of genetic information. Relevance of this minority control to genetic takeover from loose reproduction is discussed, as a general consequence of any reproducing system with evolvability. Appropriate cell size to achieve both for reproduction and evolvability is also estimated based on this minority control mechanism.

  13. Environmental and genetic perturbations reveal different networks of metabolic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Anthony J; Hackett, Sean R; Harshman, Lawrence G; Clark, Andrew G

    2011-01-01

    Progress in systems biology depends on accurate descriptions of biological networks. Connections in a regulatory network are identified as correlations of gene expression across a set of environmental or genetic perturbations. To use this information to predict system behavior, we must test how the nature of perturbations affects topologies of networks they reveal. To probe this question, we focused on metabolism of Drosophila melanogaster. Our source of perturbations is a set of crosses among 92 wild-derived lines from five populations, replicated in a manner permitting separate assessment of the effects of genetic variation and environmental fluctuation. We directly assayed activities of enzymes and levels of metabolites. Using a multivariate Bayesian model, we estimated covariance among metabolic parameters and built fine-grained probabilistic models of network topology. The environmental and genetic co-regulation networks are substantially the same among five populations. However, genetic and environmental perturbations reveal qualitative differences in metabolic regulation, suggesting that environmental shifts, such as diet modifications, produce different systemic effects than genetic changes, even if the primary targets are the same. PMID:22186737

  14. Molecular and genetic inflammation networks in major human diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongzhong; Forst, Christian V; Sayegh, Camil E; Wang, I-Ming; Yang, Xia; Zhang, Bin

    2016-07-19

    It has been well-recognized that inflammation alongside tissue repair and damage maintaining tissue homeostasis determines the initiation and progression of complex diseases. Albeit with the accomplishment of having captured the most critical inflammation-involved molecules, genetic susceptibilities, epigenetic factors, and environmental factors, our schemata on the role of inflammation in complex diseases remain largely patchy, in part due to the success of reductionism in terms of research methodology per se. Omics data alongside the advances in data integration technologies have enabled reconstruction of molecular and genetic inflammation networks which shed light on the underlying pathophysiology of complex diseases or clinical conditions. Given the proven beneficial role of anti-inflammation in coronary heart disease as well as other complex diseases and immunotherapy as a revolutionary transition in oncology, it becomes timely to review our current understanding of the molecular and genetic inflammation networks underlying major human diseases. In this review, we first briefly discuss the complexity of infectious diseases and then highlight recently uncovered molecular and genetic inflammation networks in other major human diseases including obesity, type II diabetes, coronary heart disease, late onset Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and sporadic cancer. The commonality and specificity of these molecular networks are addressed in the context of genetics based on genome-wide association study (GWAS). The double-sword role of inflammation, such as how the aberrant type 1 and/or type 2 immunity leads to chronic and severe clinical conditions, remains open in terms of the inflammasome and the core inflammatome network features. Increasingly available large Omics and clinical data in tandem with systems biology approaches have offered an exciting yet challenging opportunity toward reconstruction of more comprehensive and dynamic molecular and genetic

  15. Combination of uniform design with artificial neural network coupling genetic algorithm: an effective way to obtain high yield of biomass and algicidal compound of a novel HABs control actinomycete

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Controlling harmful algae blooms (HABs) using microbial algicides is cheap, efficient and environmental-friendly. However, obtaining high yield of algicidal microbes to meet the need of field test is still a big challenge since qualitative and quantitative analysis of algicidal compounds is difficult. In this study, we developed a protocol to increase the yield of both biomass and algicidal compound present in a novel algicidal actinomycete Streptomyces alboflavus RPS, which kills Phaeocystis globosa. To overcome the problem in algicidal compound quantification, we chose algicidal ratio as the index and used artificial neural network to fit the data, which was appropriate for this nonlinear situation. In this protocol, we firstly determined five main influencing factors through single factor experiments and generated the multifactorial experimental groups with a U15(155) uniform-design-table. Then, we used the traditional quadratic polynomial stepwise regression model and an accurate, fully optimized BP-neural network to simulate the fermentation. Optimized with genetic algorithm and verified using experiments, we successfully increased the algicidal ratio of the fermentation broth by 16.90% and the dry mycelial weight by 69.27%. These results suggested that this newly developed approach is a viable and easy way to optimize the fermentation conditions for algicidal microorganisms. PMID:24886410

  16. Genetic variants in Alzheimer disease - molecular and brain network approaches.

    PubMed

    Gaiteri, Chris; Mostafavi, Sara; Honey, Christopher J; De Jager, Philip L; Bennett, David A

    2016-07-01

    Genetic studies in late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) are aimed at identifying core disease mechanisms and providing potential biomarkers and drug candidates to improve clinical care of AD. However, owing to the complexity of LOAD, including pathological heterogeneity and disease polygenicity, extraction of actionable guidance from LOAD genetics has been challenging. Past attempts to summarize the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants have used pathway analysis and collections of small-scale experiments to hypothesize functional convergence across several variants. In this Review, we discuss how the study of molecular, cellular and brain networks provides additional information on the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants. We then discuss emerging combinations of these omic data sets into multiscale models, which provide a more comprehensive representation of the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants at multiple biophysical scales. Furthermore, we highlight the clinical potential of mechanistically coupling genetic variants and disease phenotypes with multiscale brain models. PMID:27282653

  17. Weight-Control Information Network (WIN)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feature: Reducing Childhood Obesity The Weight-control Information Network (WIN) Past Issues / Spring - Summer 2010 Table of ... here are tips from the Weight-control Information Network (WIN), an information service of the National Institute ...

  18. Opinion control in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Naoki

    2015-03-01

    In many political elections, the electorate appears to be a composite of partisan and independent voters. Given that partisans are not likely to convert to a different party, an important goal for a political party could be to mobilize independent voters toward the party with the help of strong leadership, mass media, partisans, and the effects of peer-to-peer influence. Based on the exact solution of classical voter model dynamics in the presence of perfectly partisan voters (i.e., zealots), we propose a computational method that uses pinning control strategy to maximize the share of a party in a social network of independent voters. The party, corresponding to the controller or zealots, optimizes the nodes to be controlled given the information about the connectivity of independent voters and the set of nodes that the opposing party controls. We show that controlling hubs is generally a good strategy, but the optimized strategy is even better. The superiority of the optimized strategy is particularly eminent when the independent voters are connected as directed (rather than undirected) networks.

  19. Genetic algorithms in adaptive fuzzy control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, C. Lucas; Harper, Tony R.

    1992-01-01

    Researchers at the U.S. Bureau of Mines have developed adaptive process control systems in which genetic algorithms (GA's) are used to augment fuzzy logic controllers (FLC's). GA's are search algorithms that rapidly locate near-optimum solutions to a wide spectrum of problems by modeling the search procedures of natural genetics. FLC's are rule based systems that efficiently manipulate a problem environment by modeling the 'rule-of-thumb' strategy used in human decision making. Together, GA's and FLC's possess the capabilities necessary to produce powerful, efficient, and robust adaptive control systems. To perform efficiently, such control systems require a control element to manipulate the problem environment, an analysis element to recognize changes in the problem environment, and a learning element to adjust fuzzy membership functions in response to the changes in the problem environment. Details of an overall adaptive control system are discussed. A specific computer-simulated chemical system is used to demonstrate the ideas presented.

  20. Accurate measurements of dynamics and reproducibility in small genetic networks

    PubMed Central

    Dubuis, Julien O; Samanta, Reba; Gregor, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Quantification of gene expression has become a central tool for understanding genetic networks. In many systems, the only viable way to measure protein levels is by immunofluorescence, which is notorious for its limited accuracy. Using the early Drosophila embryo as an example, we show that careful identification and control of experimental error allows for highly accurate gene expression measurements. We generated antibodies in different host species, allowing for simultaneous staining of four Drosophila gap genes in individual embryos. Careful error analysis of hundreds of expression profiles reveals that less than ∼20% of the observed embryo-to-embryo fluctuations stem from experimental error. These measurements make it possible to extract not only very accurate mean gene expression profiles but also their naturally occurring fluctuations of biological origin and corresponding cross-correlations. We use this analysis to extract gap gene profile dynamics with ∼1 min accuracy. The combination of these new measurements and analysis techniques reveals a twofold increase in profile reproducibility owing to a collective network dynamics that relays positional accuracy from the maternal gradients to the pair-rule genes. PMID:23340845

  1. Controlling synchronous patterns in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Weijie; Fan, Huawei; Wang, Ying; Ying, Heping; Wang, Xingang

    2016-04-01

    Although the set of permutation symmetries of a complex network could be very large, few of them give rise to stable synchronous patterns. Here we present a general framework and develop techniques for controlling synchronization patterns in complex network of coupled chaotic oscillators. Specifically, according to the network permutation symmetry, we design a small-size and weighted network, namely the control network, and use it to control the large-size complex network by means of pinning coupling. We argue mathematically that for any of the network symmetries, there always exists a critical pinning strength beyond which the unstable synchronous pattern associated to this symmetry can be stabilized. The feasibility of the control method is verified by numerical simulations of both artificial and real-world networks and demonstrated experimentally in systems of coupled chaotic circuits. Our studies show the controllability of synchronous patterns in complex networks of coupled chaotic oscillators.

  2. Topological constraints on network control profiles

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Colin; Ruths, Justin; Ruths, Derek; Shea, Katriona; Albert, Réka

    2015-01-01

    Network models are designed to capture properties of empirical networks and thereby provide insight into the processes that underlie the formation of complex systems. As new information concerning network structure becomes available, it becomes possible to design models that more fully capture the properties of empirical networks. A recent advance in our understanding of network structure is the control profile, which summarizes the structural controllability of a network in terms of source nodes, external dilations, and internal dilations. Here, we consider the topological properties–and their formation mechanisms—that constrain the control profile. We consider five representative empirical categories of internal-dilation dominated networks, and show that the number of source and sink nodes, the form of the in- and out-degree distributions, and local complexity (e.g., cycles) shape the control profile. We evaluate network models that are sufficient to produce realistic control profiles, and conclude that holistic network models should similarly consider these properties. PMID:26691951

  3. MicroRNA-dependent Genetic Networks During Neural Development

    PubMed Central

    Abernathy, Daniel G.; Yoo, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    The development of the structurally and functionally diverse mammalian nervous system requires the integration of numerous levels of gene regulation. Accumulating evidence suggests that microRNAs are key mediators of genetic networks during neural development. Importantly, microRNAs are found to regulate both feedback and feedforward loops during neural development leading to large changes in gene expression. These repressive interactions provide an additional mechanism that facilitates the establishment of complexity within the nervous system. Here, we review studies that have enabled the identification of brain-enriched microRNAs and discuss how genetic networks in neural development depend on microRNAs. PMID:24865244

  4. Network Adaptive Deadband: NCS Data Flow Control for Shared Networks

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Cacho, Miguel; Delgado, Emma; Prieto, José A. G.; López, Joaquín

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new middleware solution called Network Adaptive Deadband (NAD) for long time operation of Networked Control Systems (NCS) through the Internet or any shared network based on IP technology. The proposed middleware takes into account the network status and the NCS status, to improve the global system performance and to share more effectively the network by several NCS and sensor/actuator data flows. Relationship between network status and NCS status is solved with a TCP-friendly transport flow control protocol and the deadband concept, relating deadband value and transmission throughput. This creates a deadband-based flow control solution. Simulation and experiments in shared networks show that the implemented network adaptive deadband has better performance than an optimal constant deadband solution in the same circumstances. PMID:23208556

  5. Minimum structural controllability problems of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hongli; Zhang, Siying

    2016-02-01

    Controllability of complex networks has been one of the attractive research areas for both network and control community, and has yielded many promising and significant results in minimum inputs and minimum driver vertices. However, few studies have been devoted to studying the minimum controlled vertex set through which control over the network with arbitrary structure can be achieved. In this paper, we prove that the minimum driver vertices driven by different inputs are not sufficient to ensure the full control of the network when the associated graph contains the inaccessible strongly connected component which has perfect matching and propose an algorithm to identify a minimum controlled vertex set for network with arbitrary structure using convenient graph and mathematical tools. And the simulation results show that the controllability of network is correlated to the number of inaccessible strongly connected components which have perfect matching and these results promote us to better understand the relationship between the network's structural characteristics and its control.

  6. GENETIC CONTROL OF PLANT DEVELOPMENT GENETIC CONTROL OF PLANT DEVELOPMENT GENETIC CONTROL OF PLANT DEVELOPMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, several genes have been cloned that affect plant architecture: CLAVATA1, which controls the balance between maintenance and organogenesis in the meristem; CUC2, which separates organ primordia in the meristem; and teosinte branched 1 and cycloidea, which use growth suppression to cause mor...

  7. Networked Dynamic Systems: Identification, Controllability, and Randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi-Abdolyousefi, Marzieh

    The presented dissertation aims to develop a graph-centric framework for the analysis and synthesis of networked dynamic systems (NDS) consisting of multiple dynamic units that interact via an interconnection topology. We examined three categories of network problems, namely, identification, controllability, and randomness. In network identification, as a subclass of inverse problems, we made an explicit relation between the input-output behavior of an NDS and the underlying interacting network. In network controllability, we provided structural and algebraic insights into features of the network that enable external signal(s) to control the state of the nodes in the network for certain classes of interconnections, namely, path, circulant, and Cartesian networks. We also examined the relation between network controllability and the symmetry structure of the graph. Motivated by the analysis results for the controllability and observability of deterministic networks, a natural question is whether randomness in the network layer or in the layer of inputs and outputs generically leads to favorable system theoretic properties. In this direction, we examined system theoretic properties of random networks including controllability, observability, and performance of optimal feedback controllers and estimators. We explored some of the ramifications of such an analysis framework in opinion dynamics over social networks and sensor networks in estimating the real-time position of a Seaglider from experimental data.

  8. Genetic Network Programming with Intron-Like Nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabu, Shingo; Chen, Yan; Eto, Shinji; Shimada, Kaoru; Hirasawa, Kotaro

    Recently, Genetic Network Programming (GNP) has been proposed, which is an extension of Genetic Algorithm(GA) and Genetic Programming(GP). GNP can make compact programs and can memorize the past history in it implicitly, because it expresses the solution by directed graphs and therefore, it can reuse the nodes. In this research, intron-like nodes are introduced for improving the performance of GNP. The aim of introducing intron-like nodes is to use every node as much as possible. It is found from simulations that the intron-like nodes are useful for improving the training speed and generalization ability.

  9. Genetic Adaptive Control for PZT Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jeongwook; Stover, Shelley K.; Madisetti, Vijay K.

    1995-01-01

    A piezoelectric transducer (PZT) is capable of providing linear motion if controlled correctly and could provide a replacement for traditional heavy and large servo systems using motors. This paper focuses on a genetic model reference adaptive control technique (GMRAC) for a PZT which is moving a mirror where the goal is to keep the mirror velocity constant. Genetic Algorithms (GAs) are an integral part of the GMRAC technique acting as the search engine for an optimal PID controller. Two methods are suggested to control the actuator in this research. The first one is to change the PID parameters and the other is to add an additional reference input in the system. The simulation results of these two methods are compared. Simulated Annealing (SA) is also used to solve the problem. Simulation results of GAs and SA are compared after simulation. GAs show the best result according to the simulation results. The entire model is designed using the Mathworks' Simulink tool.

  10. Genetic Influences on Resting-state Functional Networks: A Twin Study

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yixiao; Ma, Zhiwei; Hamilton, Christina; Liang, Zhifeng; Hou, Xiao; Ma, Xingshun; Hu, Xiaomei; He, Qian; Deng, Wei; Wang, Yingcheng; Zhao, Liansheng; Meng, Huaqing; Li, Tao; Zhang, Nanyin

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in resting-state networks (RSNs) are often associated with psychiatric and neurologic disorders. Given this critical linkage, it has been hypothesized that RSNs can potentially be used as endophenotypes for brain diseases. To validate this notion, a critical step is to show that RSNs exhibit heritability. However, the investigation of the genetic basis of RSNs has only been attempted in the default-mode network at the region-of-interest level, while the genetic control on other RSNs has not been determined yet. Here we examined the genetic and environmental influences on eight well-characterized RSNs by using a twin design. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data in 56 pairs of twins were collected. The genetic and environmental effects on each RSN were estimated by fitting the functional connectivity covariance of each voxel in the RSN to the classic ACE twin model. The data showed that although environmental effects accounted for the majority of variance in widespread areas, there were specific brain sites that showed significant genetic control for individual RSNs. These results suggest that part of the human brain functional connectome is shaped by genomic constraints. Importantly, this information can be useful for bridging genetic analysis and network-level assessment of brain disorders. PMID:26147340

  11. Adaptive optimization and control using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, W.C.; Brown, S.K.; Jones, R.D.; Bowling, P.S.; Barnes, C.W.

    1993-10-22

    Recent work has demonstrated the ability of neural-network-based controllers to optimize and control machines with complex, non-linear, relatively unknown control spaces. We present a brief overview of neural networks via a taxonomy illustrating some capabilities of different kinds of neural networks. We present some successful control examples, particularly the optimization and control of a small-angle negative ion source.

  12. Network Access Control List Situation Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reifers, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Network security is a large and complex problem being addressed by multiple communities. Nevertheless, current theories in networking security appear to overestimate network administrators' ability to understand network access control lists (NACLs), providing few context specific user analyses. Consequently, the current research generally seems to…

  13. The control network of Iapetus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. E.; Katayama, F. Y.

    1984-01-01

    A control network of the Saturnian satellite Iapetus has been established photogrammetrically from pictures taken by the two Voyager spacecraft. Coordinates of 62 control points have been computed and listed; pixel measurements of these points were made on 14 Voyager 1 and 66 Voyager 2 pictures. Some of these points are identified on the preliminary U.S. Geological Survey map of Iapetus and many are identified by name. The Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 pictures covered limited regions of the satellite's surface and contained no overlapping areas. The longitude system on Iapetus is defined by the crater Almeric; the 276 deg meridian passes through the center of this crater. The obliquity of Iapetus has been measured as 0.4 deg + or - 1.6 deg. The mean radius of Iapetus has been determined at 718 + or - 8 km.

  14. Genetics and early disturbances of breathing control.

    PubMed

    Gaultier, Claude; Amiel, Jeanne; Dauger, Stéphane; Trang, Ha; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Gallego, Jorge; Simonneau, Michel

    2004-05-01

    Early disturbances in breathing control, including apneas of prematurity and apparently life-threatening events, account for some cases of sudden infant death syndrome and for a rare disorder called congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS). Data suggesting a genetic basis for CCHS have been obtained. Recently, we found heterozygous de novo mutations of the PHOX2B gene in 18 of 29 individuals with CCHS. Most mutations consisted of five to nine alanine expansions within a 20-residue polyalanine tract, probably resulting from nonhomologous recombination. Other mutations, generally inherited from one of the parents, in the coding regions of genes involved in the endothelin and RET signaling pathways and in the brain-derived-neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene have been found in a few CCHS patients. Interestingly, all these genes are involved in the development of neural crest cells. Targeted disruption of these genes in mice has provided information on the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying CCHS. Despite the identification of these genes involved in breathing control, none of the genetically engineered mice developed to date replicate the full human CCHS respiratory phenotype. Recent insights into the genetic basis for CCHS may shed light on the genetics of other early disturbances in breathing control, such as apnea of prematurity and sudden infant death syndrome. PMID:14739359

  15. Genetic control of inflorescence in common bean.

    PubMed

    Guilherme, S R; Ramalho, M A P; de F B Abreu, A; Pereira, L A

    2014-01-01

    The number of pods per common bean plant is a primary component of grain yield, which depends on the number of flowers produced and on the flower set. Thus, a larger number of flowers per plant would increase yield. Lines with inflorescences that had a large number of flowers compared to common bean plants now under cultivation were identified. We analyzed the genetic control of this trait and its association with grain yield. The cultivar BRSMG Talismã was crossed with 2 lines, L.59583 and L.59692, which have a large number of flowers. The F1, F2, and F3 generations were obtained. These generations were assessed together with the parents in a randomized block experimental design with 2 replications. The traits assessed included length of inflorescence, number of pods per inflorescence, number of pods per plant, number of grains per plant, 100-grain weight, and grain yield per plant. Mean genetic components and variance were estimated. The traits length of inflorescence and number of pods per inflorescence exhibited genetic control with predominance that showed an additive effect. In the 2 crosses, genetic control of grain yield and of its primary components showed that the allelic interaction of dominance was high. The wide variability in the traits assessed may be used to increase yield of the common bean plant by increasing the number of flowers on the plant. PMID:25501247

  16. Neural Networks in Nonlinear Aircraft Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linse, Dennis J.

    1990-01-01

    Recent research indicates that artificial neural networks offer interesting learning or adaptive capabilities. The current research focuses on the potential for application of neural networks in a nonlinear aircraft control law. The current work has been to determine which networks are suitable for such an application and how they will fit into a nonlinear control law.

  17. Genetic architecture and regulatory networks in oilseed development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic analysis of global gene expression level variation provides evidence for transcriptional regulators and gene network relationships. Plant seeds are an important source of oil and protein, and a genome-wide assessment of transcriptional regulation during seed development offers insight into t...

  18. Pinning impulsive control algorithms for complex network

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wen; Lü, Jinhu; Chen, Shihua; Yu, Xinghuo

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, we further investigate the synchronization of complex dynamical network via pinning control in which a selection of nodes are controlled at discrete times. Different from most existing work, the pinning control algorithms utilize only the impulsive signals at discrete time instants, which may greatly improve the communication channel efficiency and reduce control cost. Two classes of algorithms are designed, one for strongly connected complex network and another for non-strongly connected complex network. It is suggested that in the strongly connected network with suitable coupling strength, a single controller at any one of the network's nodes can always pin the network to its homogeneous solution. In the non-strongly connected case, the location and minimum number of nodes needed to pin the network are determined by the Frobenius normal form of the coupling matrix. In addition, the coupling matrix is not necessarily symmetric or irreducible. Illustrative examples are then given to validate the proposed pinning impulsive control algorithms.

  19. Controlling complex networks with conformity behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu-Wen; Nie, Sen; Wang, Wen-Xu; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2015-09-01

    Controlling complex networks accompanied by common conformity behavior is a fundamental problem in social and physical science. Conformity behavior that individuals tend to follow the majority in their neighborhood is common in human society and animal communities. Despite recent progress in understanding controllability of complex networks, the existent controllability theories cannot be directly applied to networks associated with conformity. Here we propose a simple model to incorporate conformity-based decision making into the evolution of a network system, which allows us to employ the exact controllability theory to explore the controllability of such systems. We offer rigorous theoretical results of controllability for representative regular networks. We also explore real networks in different fields and some typical model networks, finding some interesting results that are different from the predictions of structural and exact controllability theory in the absence of conformity. We finally present an example of steering a real social network to some target states to further validate our controllability theory and tools. Our work offers a more realistic understanding of network controllability with conformity behavior and can have potential applications in networked evolutionary games, opinion dynamics and many other complex networked systems.

  20. Using genetic algorithms to construct a network for financial prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Devesh

    1996-03-01

    Traditional forecasting models such as the Box-Jenkins ARIMA model are almost all based on models that assume a linear relationship amongst variables and cannot approximate the non- linear relationship that exists amongst variables in real-world data such as stock-price data. Artificial neural networks, on the other hand, consist of two or more levels of nonlinearity that have been successfully used to approximate the underlying relationships of time series data. Neural networks however, pose a design problem: their optimum topology and training rule parameters including learning rate and momentum, for the problem at hand need to be determined. In this paper, we use genetic algorithms to determine these design parameters. In general genetic algorithms are an optimization method that find solutions to a problem by an evolutionary process based on natural selection. The genetic algorithm searches through the network parameter space and the neural network learning algorithm evaluates the selected parameters. We then use the optimally configured network to predict the stock market price of a blue-chip company on the UK market.

  1. Genetic algorithm application in optimization of wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Norouzi, Ali; Zaim, A Halim

    2014-01-01

    There are several applications known for wireless sensor networks (WSN), and such variety demands improvement of the currently available protocols and the specific parameters. Some notable parameters are lifetime of network and energy consumption for routing which play key role in every application. Genetic algorithm is one of the nonlinear optimization methods and relatively better option thanks to its efficiency for large scale applications and that the final formula can be modified by operators. The present survey tries to exert a comprehensive improvement in all operational stages of a WSN including node placement, network coverage, clustering, and data aggregation and achieve an ideal set of parameters of routing and application based WSN. Using genetic algorithm and based on the results of simulations in NS, a specific fitness function was achieved, optimized, and customized for all the operational stages of WSNs. PMID:24693235

  2. Genetic Algorithm Application in Optimization of Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Norouzi, Ali; Zaim, A. Halim

    2014-01-01

    There are several applications known for wireless sensor networks (WSN), and such variety demands improvement of the currently available protocols and the specific parameters. Some notable parameters are lifetime of network and energy consumption for routing which play key role in every application. Genetic algorithm is one of the nonlinear optimization methods and relatively better option thanks to its efficiency for large scale applications and that the final formula can be modified by operators. The present survey tries to exert a comprehensive improvement in all operational stages of a WSN including node placement, network coverage, clustering, and data aggregation and achieve an ideal set of parameters of routing and application based WSN. Using genetic algorithm and based on the results of simulations in NS, a specific fitness function was achieved, optimized, and customized for all the operational stages of WSNs. PMID:24693235

  3. Information theory and the ethylene genetic network.

    PubMed

    González-García, José S; Díaz, José

    2011-10-01

    The original aim of the Information Theory (IT) was to solve a purely technical problem: to increase the performance of communication systems, which are constantly affected by interferences that diminish the quality of the transmitted information. That is, the theory deals only with the problem of transmitting with the maximal precision the symbols constituting a message. In Shannon's theory messages are characterized only by their probabilities, regardless of their value or meaning. As for its present day status, it is generally acknowledged that Information Theory has solid mathematical foundations and has fruitful strong links with Physics in both theoretical and experimental areas. However, many applications of Information Theory to Biology are limited to using it as a technical tool to analyze biopolymers, such as DNA, RNA or protein sequences. The main point of discussion about the applicability of IT to explain the information flow in biological systems is that in a classic communication channel, the symbols that conform the coded message are transmitted one by one in an independent form through a noisy communication channel, and noise can alter each of the symbols, distorting the message; in contrast, in a genetic communication channel the coded messages are not transmitted in the form of symbols but signaling cascades transmit them. Consequently, the information flow from the emitter to the effector is due to a series of coupled physicochemical processes that must ensure the accurate transmission of the message. In this review we discussed a novel proposal to overcome this difficulty, which consists of the modeling of gene expression with a stochastic approach that allows Shannon entropy (H) to be directly used to measure the amount of uncertainty that the genetic machinery has in relation to the correct decoding of a message transmitted into the nucleus by a signaling pathway. From the value of H we can define a function I that measures the amount of

  4. [The international network and Italian modernization. Ruggero Ceppellini, genetics, and HLA].

    PubMed

    Capocci, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The paper reconstructs the scientific career of Ruggero Ceppellini, focusing especially on his role in the discovery of the genetic system underlying the Human Leucocyte Antigen. From his earliest investigations in blood group genetics, Ceppellini quickly became an internationally acknowledged authority in the field of immunogenetics--the study of genetics by means of immunological tools--and participated to the endeavor that ultimately yelded a new meaning for the word: thanks to the pioneering research in the HLA field, immunogenetics became the study of the genetic control of immune system. The paper will also place Ceppellini's scientific work against the backdrop of the modernization of Italian genetics after WWII, resulting from the efforts of a handful of scientists to connect to international networks and adopting new methodologies in life sciences. PMID:26292523

  5. Structural controllability of unidirectional bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacher, Jose C.; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2013-04-01

    The interactions between fundamental life molecules, people and social organisations build complex architectures that often result in undesired behaviours. Despite all of the advances made in our understanding of network structures over the past decade, similar progress has not been achieved in the controllability of real-world networks. In particular, an analytical framework to address the controllability of bipartite networks is still absent. Here, we present a dominating set (DS)-based approach to bipartite network controllability that identifies the topologies that are relatively easy to control with the minimum number of driver nodes. Our theoretical calculations, assisted by computer simulations and an evaluation of real-world networks offer a promising framework to control unidirectional bipartite networks. Our analysis should open a new approach to reverting the undesired behaviours in unidirectional bipartite networks at will.

  6. Network Monitor and Control of Disruption-Tolerant Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgerson, J. Leigh

    2014-01-01

    For nearly a decade, NASA and many researchers in the international community have been developing Internet-like protocols that allow for automated network operations in networks where the individual links between nodes are only sporadically connected. A family of Disruption-Tolerant Networking (DTN) protocols has been developed, and many are reaching CCSDS Blue Book status. A NASA version of DTN known as the Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) has been flight-tested on the EPOXI spacecraft and ION is currently being tested on the International Space Station. Experience has shown that in order for a DTN service-provider to set up a large scale multi-node network, a number of network monitor and control technologies need to be fielded as well as the basic DTN protocols. The NASA DTN program is developing a standardized means of querying a DTN node to ascertain its operational status, known as the DTN Management Protocol (DTNMP), and the program has developed some prototypes of DTNMP software. While DTNMP is a necessary component, it is not sufficient to accomplish Network Monitor and Control of a DTN network. JPL is developing a suite of tools that provide for network visualization, performance monitoring and ION node control software. This suite of network monitor and control tools complements the GSFC and APL-developed DTN MP software, and the combined package can form the basis for flight operations using DTN.

  7. Neural network and genetic algorithm technology in data mining of manufacturing quality information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Limei; Qu, Xing-Hua; Ye, Shenghua

    2002-03-01

    Data Mining of Manufacturing Quality Information (MQI) is the key technology in Quality Lead Control. Of all the data mining methods, Neural Network and Genetic Algorithm is widely used for their strong advantages, such as non-linear, collateral, veracity etc. But if you singly use them, there will be some limitations preventing your research, such as convergence slowly, searching blindness etc. This paper combines their merits and use Genetic BP Algorithm in Data Mining of MQI. It has been successfully used in the key project of Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) - Quality Control and Zero-defect Engineering (Project No. 59735120).

  8. Predicting genetic interactions from Boolean models of biological networks.

    PubMed

    Calzone, Laurence; Barillot, Emmanuel; Zinovyev, Andrei

    2015-08-01

    Genetic interaction can be defined as a deviation of the phenotypic quantitative effect of a double gene mutation from the effect predicted from single mutations using a simple (e.g., multiplicative or linear additive) statistical model. Experimentally characterized genetic interaction networks in model organisms provide important insights into relationships between different biological functions. We describe a computational methodology allowing us to systematically and quantitatively characterize a Boolean mathematical model of a biological network in terms of genetic interactions between all loss of function and gain of function mutations with respect to all model phenotypes or outputs. We use the probabilistic framework defined in MaBoSS software, based on continuous time Markov chains and stochastic simulations. In addition, we suggest several computational tools for studying the distribution of double mutants in the space of model phenotype probabilities. We demonstrate this methodology on three published models for each of which we derive the genetic interaction networks and analyze their properties. We classify the obtained interactions according to their class of epistasis, dependence on the chosen initial conditions and the phenotype. The use of this methodology for validating mathematical models from experimental data and designing new experiments is discussed. PMID:25958956

  9. Minimum-cost control of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoqi; Hu, Wuhua; Xiao, Gaoxi; Deng, Lei; Tang, Pei; Pei, Jing; Shi, Luping

    2016-01-01

    Finding the solution for driving a complex network at the minimum energy cost with a given number of controllers, known as the minimum-cost control problem, is critically important but remains largely open. We propose a projected gradient method to tackle this problem, which works efficiently in both synthetic and real-life networks. The study is then extended to the case where each controller can only be connected to a single network node to have the lowest connection complexity. We obtain the interesting insight that such connections basically avoid high-degree nodes of the network, which is in resonance with recent observations on controllability of complex networks. Our results provide the first technical path to enabling minimum-cost control of complex networks, and contribute new insights to locating the key nodes from a minimum-cost control perspective.

  10. Node-based measures of connectivity in genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Koen, Erin L; Bowman, Jeff; Wilson, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    At-site environmental conditions can have strong influences on genetic connectivity, and in particular on the immigration and settlement phases of dispersal. However, at-site processes are rarely explored in landscape genetic analyses. Networks can facilitate the study of at-site processes, where network nodes are used to model site-level effects. We used simulated genetic networks to compare and contrast the performance of 7 node-based (as opposed to edge-based) genetic connectivity metrics. We simulated increasing node connectivity by varying migration in two ways: we increased the number of migrants moving between a focal node and a set number of recipient nodes, and we increased the number of recipient nodes receiving a set number of migrants. We found that two metrics in particular, the average edge weight and the average inverse edge weight, varied linearly with simulated connectivity. Conversely, node degree was not a good measure of connectivity. We demonstrated the use of average inverse edge weight to describe the influence of at-site habitat characteristics on genetic connectivity of 653 American martens (Martes americana) in Ontario, Canada. We found that highly connected nodes had high habitat quality for marten (deep snow and high proportions of coniferous and mature forest) and were farther from the range edge. We recommend the use of node-based genetic connectivity metrics, in particular, average edge weight or average inverse edge weight, to model the influences of at-site habitat conditions on the immigration and settlement phases of dispersal. PMID:25917123

  11. A Review of Modeling Techniques for Genetic Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Yaghoobi, Hanif; Haghipour, Siyamak; Hamzeiy, Hossein; Asadi-Khiavi, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the genetic regulatory networks, the discovery of interactions between genes and understanding regulatory processes in a cell at the gene level are the major goals of system biology and computational biology. Modeling gene regulatory networks and describing the actions of the cells at the molecular level are used in medicine and molecular biology applications such as metabolic pathways and drug discovery. Modeling these networks is also one of the important issues in genomic signal processing. After the advent of microarray technology, it is possible to model these networks using time–series data. In this paper, we provide an extensive review of methods that have been used on time–series data and represent the features, advantages and disadvantages of each. Also, we classify these methods according to their nature. A parallel study of these methods can lead to the discovery of new synthetic methods or improve previous methods. PMID:23493097

  12. Immune allied genetic algorithm for Bayesian network structure learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qin; Lin, Feng; Sun, Wei; Chang, KC

    2012-06-01

    Bayesian network (BN) structure learning is a NP-hard problem. In this paper, we present an improved approach to enhance efficiency of BN structure learning. To avoid premature convergence in traditional single-group genetic algorithm (GA), we propose an immune allied genetic algorithm (IAGA) in which the multiple-population and allied strategy are introduced. Moreover, in the algorithm, we apply prior knowledge by injecting immune operator to individuals which can effectively prevent degeneration. To illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique, we present some experimental results.

  13. Realizing actual feedback control of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chengyi; Cheng, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of feedbackability and how to identify the Minimum Feedbackability Set of an arbitrary complex directed network. Furthermore, we design an estimator and a feedback controller accessing one MFS to realize actual feedback control, i.e. control the system to our desired state according to the estimated system internal state from the output of estimator. Last but not least, we perform numerical simulations of a small linear time-invariant dynamics network and a real simple food network to verify the theoretical results. The framework presented here could make an arbitrary complex directed network realize actual feedback control and deepen our understanding of complex systems.

  14. Control of State Transitions in Complex and Biophysical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motter, Adilson; Wells, Daniel; Kath, William

    Noise is a fundamental part of intracellular processes. While the response of biological systems to noise has been studied extensively, there has been limited understanding of how to exploit it to induce a desired cell state. Here I will present a scalable, quantitative method based on the Freidlin-Wentzell action to predict and control noise-induced switching between different states in genetic networks that, conveniently, can also control transitions between stable states in the absence of noise. I will discuss applications of this methodology to predict control interventions that can induce lineage changes and to identify new candidate strategies for cancer therapy. This framework offers a systems approach to identifying the key factors for rationally manipulating network dynamics, and should also find use in controlling other classes of complex networks exhibiting multi-stability. Reference: D. K. Wells, W. L. Kath, and A. E. Motter, Phys. Rev. X 5, 031036 (2015). Work funded by CBC, NCI, NIGMS, and NSF.

  15. Multivariate analysis of noise in genetic regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Tomioka, Ryota; Kimura, Hidenori; J Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2004-08-21

    Stochasticity is an intrinsic property of genetic regulatory networks due to the low copy numbers of the major molecular species, such as, DNA, mRNA, and regulatory proteins. Therefore, investigation of the mechanisms that reduce the stochastic noise is essential in understanding the reproducible behaviors of real organisms and is also a key to design synthetic genetic regulatory networks that can reliably work. We use an analytical and systematic method, the linear noise approximation of the chemical master equation along with the decoupling of a stoichiometric matrix. In the analysis of fluctuations of multiple molecular species, the covariance is an important measure of noise. However, usually the representation of a covariance matrix in the natural coordinate system, i.e. the copy numbers of the molecular species, is intractably complicated because reactions change copy numbers of more than one molecular species simultaneously. Decoupling of a stoichiometric matrix, which is a transformation of variables, significantly simplifies the representation of a covariance matrix and elucidates the mechanisms behind the observed fluctuations in the copy numbers. We apply our method to three types of fundamental genetic regulatory networks, that is, a single-gene autoregulatory network, a two-gene autoregulatory network, and a mutually repressive network. We have found that there are multiple noise components differently originating. Each noise component produces fluctuation in the characteristic direction. The resulting fluctuations in the copy numbers of the molecular species are the sum of these fluctuations. In the examples, the limitation of the negative feedback in noise reduction and the trade-off of fluctuations in multiple molecular species are clearly explained. The analytical representations show the full parameter dependence. Additionally, the validity of our method is tested by stochastic simulations. PMID:15246787

  16. Genetic networks with canalyzing Boolean rules are always stable

    PubMed Central

    Kauffman, Stuart; Peterson, Carsten; Samuelsson, Björn; Troein, Carl

    2004-01-01

    We determine stability and attractor properties of random Boolean genetic network models with canalyzing rules for a variety of architectures. For all power law, exponential, and flat in-degree distributions, we find that the networks are dynamically stable. Furthermore, for architectures with few inputs per node, the dynamics of the networks is close to critical. In addition, the fraction of genes that are active decreases with the number of inputs per node. These results are based upon investigating ensembles of networks using analytical methods. Also, for different in-degree distributions, the numbers of fixed points and cycles are calculated, with results intuitively consistent with stability analysis; fewer inputs per node implies more cycles, and vice versa. There are hints that genetic networks acquire broader degree distributions with evolution, and hence our results indicate that for single cells, the dynamics should become more stable with evolution. However, such an effect is very likely compensated for by multicellular dynamics, because one expects less stability when interactions among cells are included. We verify this by simulations of a simple model for interactions among cells. PMID:15572453

  17. Magnetoencephalography Reveals a Widespread Increase in Network Connectivity in Idiopathic/Genetic Generalized Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Elshahabi, Adham; Klamer, Silke; Sahib, Ashish Kaul; Lerche, Holger; Braun, Christoph; Focke, Niels K.

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsy (IGE/GGE) is characterized by seizures, which start and rapidly engage widely distributed networks, and result in symptoms such as absences, generalized myoclonic and primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Although routine magnetic resonance imaging is apparently normal, many studies have reported structural alterations in IGE/GGE patients using diffusion tensor imaging and voxel-based morphometry. Changes have also been reported in functional networks during generalized spike wave discharges. However, network function in the resting-state without epileptiforme discharges has been less well studied. We hypothesize that resting-state networks are more representative of the underlying pathophysiology and abnormal network synchrony. We studied functional network connectivity derived from whole-brain magnetoencephalography recordings in thirteen IGE/GGE and nineteen healthy controls. Using graph theoretical network analysis, we found a widespread increase in connectivity in patients compared to controls. These changes were most pronounced in the motor network, the mesio-frontal and temporal cortex. We did not, however, find any significant difference between the normalized clustering coefficients, indicating preserved gross network architecture. Our findings suggest that increased resting state connectivity could be an important factor for seizure spread and/or generation in IGE/GGE, and could serve as a biomarker for the disease. PMID:26368933

  18. Magnetoencephalography Reveals a Widespread Increase in Network Connectivity in Idiopathic/Genetic Generalized Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Elshahabi, Adham; Klamer, Silke; Sahib, Ashish Kaul; Lerche, Holger; Braun, Christoph; Focke, Niels K

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsy (IGE/GGE) is characterized by seizures, which start and rapidly engage widely distributed networks, and result in symptoms such as absences, generalized myoclonic and primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Although routine magnetic resonance imaging is apparently normal, many studies have reported structural alterations in IGE/GGE patients using diffusion tensor imaging and voxel-based morphometry. Changes have also been reported in functional networks during generalized spike wave discharges. However, network function in the resting-state without epileptiforme discharges has been less well studied. We hypothesize that resting-state networks are more representative of the underlying pathophysiology and abnormal network synchrony. We studied functional network connectivity derived from whole-brain magnetoencephalography recordings in thirteen IGE/GGE and nineteen healthy controls. Using graph theoretical network analysis, we found a widespread increase in connectivity in patients compared to controls. These changes were most pronounced in the motor network, the mesio-frontal and temporal cortex. We did not, however, find any significant difference between the normalized clustering coefficients, indicating preserved gross network architecture. Our findings suggest that increased resting state connectivity could be an important factor for seizure spread and/or generation in IGE/GGE, and could serve as a biomarker for the disease. PMID:26368933

  19. Simulating and Synthesizing Substructures Using Neural Network and Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Youhua; Kapania, Rakesh K.; VanLandingham, Hugh F.

    1997-01-01

    The feasibility of simulating and synthesizing substructures by computational neural network models is illustrated by investigating a statically indeterminate beam, using both a 1-D and a 2-D plane stress modelling. The beam can be decomposed into two cantilevers with free-end loads. By training neural networks to simulate the cantilever responses to different loads, the original beam problem can be solved as a match-up between two subsystems under compatible interface conditions. The genetic algorithms are successfully used to solve the match-up problem. Simulated results are found in good agreement with the analytical or FEM solutions.

  20. Congestion control of high-speed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-06-01

    We report on four areas of activity in the past six months. These areas include the following: (1) work on the control of integrated video and image traffic, both at the access to a network and within a high-speed network; (2) more general/game theoretic models for flow control in networks; (3) work on fault management for high-speed heterogeneous networks to improve survivability; and (4) work on all-optical (lightwave) networks of the future, designed to take advantage of the enormous bandwidth capability available at optical frequencies.

  1. Genetic control of invasive plants species using selfish genetic elements

    PubMed Central

    Hodgins, Kathryn A; Rieseberg, Loren; Otto, Sarah P

    2009-01-01

    Invasive plants cause substantial environmental damage and economic loss. Here, we explore the possibility that a selfish genetic element found in plants called cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) could be exploited for weed control. CMS is caused by mutations in the mitochondrial genome that sterilize male reproductive organs. We developed an analytical model and a spatial simulation to assess the use of CMS alleles to manage weed populations. Specifically, we examined how fertility, selfing, pollen limitation and dispersal influenced extinction rate and time until extinction in populations where CMS arises. We found that the introduction of a CMS allele can cause rapid population extinction, but only under a restricted set of conditions. Both models suggest that the CMS strategy will be appropriate for species where pollen limitation is negligible, inbreeding depression is high and the fertility advantage of females over hermaphrodites is substantial. In general, spatial structure did not have a strong influence on the simulation outcome, although low pollen dispersal and intermediate levels of seed dispersal tended to reduce population extinction rates. Given these results, the introduction of CMS alleles into a population of invasive plants probably represents an effective control method for only a select number of species. PMID:25567898

  2. Bicriteria Network Optimization Problem using Priority-based Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gen, Mitsuo; Lin, Lin; Cheng, Runwei

    Network optimization is being an increasingly important and fundamental issue in the fields such as engineering, computer science, operations research, transportation, telecommunication, decision support systems, manufacturing, and airline scheduling. In many applications, however, there are several criteria associated with traversing each edge of a network. For example, cost and flow measures are both important in the networks. As a result, there has been recent interest in solving Bicriteria Network Optimization Problem. The Bicriteria Network Optimization Problem is known a NP-hard. The efficient set of paths may be very large, possibly exponential in size. Thus the computational effort required to solve it can increase exponentially with the problem size in the worst case. In this paper, we propose a genetic algorithm (GA) approach used a priority-based chromosome for solving the bicriteria network optimization problem including maximum flow (MXF) model and minimum cost flow (MCF) model. The objective is to find the set of Pareto optimal solutions that give possible maximum flow with minimum cost. This paper also combines Adaptive Weight Approach (AWA) that utilizes some useful information from the current population to readjust weights for obtaining a search pressure toward a positive ideal point. Computer simulations show the several numerical experiments by using some difficult-to-solve network design problems, and show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. GENETIC CONTROL OF CANDIDA ALBICANS BIOFILM DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Finkel, Jonathan S.; Mitchell, Aaron P.

    2014-01-01

    Preface Candida species cause frequent infections due to their ability to form biofilms – surface-associated microbial communities – primarily on implanted medical devices. Increasingly, mechanistic studies have identified the gene products that participate directly in Candida albicans biofilm formation, as well as the regulatory circuitry and networks that control their expression and activity. These studies have revealed new mechanisms and signals that govern C. albicans biofilm formation and associated drug resistance, thus providing biological insight and therapeutic foresight. PMID:21189476

  4. Genetic Algorithm based Decentralized PI Type Controller: Load Frequency Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Atul; Ray, Goshaidas; Sharma, Arun Kumar

    2016-05-01

    This work presents a design of decentralized PI type Linear Quadratic (LQ) controller based on genetic algorithm (GA). The proposed design technique allows considerable flexibility in defining the control objectives and it does not consider any knowledge of the system matrices and moreover it avoids the solution of algebraic Riccati equation. To illustrate the results of this work, a load-frequency control problem is considered. Simulation results reveal that the proposed scheme based on GA is an alternative and attractive approach to solve load-frequency control problem from both performance and design point of views.

  5. Controlling Contagion Processes in Activity Driven Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Suyu; Perra, Nicola; Karsai, Márton; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2014-03-01

    The vast majority of strategies aimed at controlling contagion processes on networks consider the connectivity pattern of the system either quenched or annealed. However, in the real world, many networks are highly dynamical and evolve, in time, concurrently with the contagion process. Here, we derive an analytical framework for the study of control strategies specifically devised for a class of time-varying networks, namely activity-driven networks. We develop a block variable mean-field approach that allows the derivation of the equations describing the coevolution of the contagion process and the network dynamic. We derive the critical immunization threshold and assess the effectiveness of three different control strategies. Finally, we validate the theoretical picture by simulating numerically the spreading process and control strategies in both synthetic networks and a large-scale, real-world, mobile telephone call data set.

  6. Interdependent networks: the fragility of control

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Richard G.; Barthelemy, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Recent work in the area of interdependent networks has focused on interactions between two systems of the same type. However, an important and ubiquitous class of systems are those involving monitoring and control, an example of interdependence between processes that are very different. In this Article, we introduce a framework for modelling ‘distributed supervisory control' in the guise of an electrical network supervised by a distributed system of control devices. The system is characterised by degrees of freedom salient to real-world systems— namely, the number of control devices, their inherent reliability, and the topology of the control network. Surprisingly, the behavior of the system depends crucially on the reliability of control devices. When devices are completely reliable, cascade sizes are percolation controlled; the number of devices being the relevant parameter. For unreliable devices, the topology of the control network is important and can dramatically reduce the resilience of the system. PMID:24067404

  7. Interdependent networks: the fragility of control.

    PubMed

    Morris, Richard G; Barthelemy, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Recent work in the area of interdependent networks has focused on interactions between two systems of the same type. However, an important and ubiquitous class of systems are those involving monitoring and control, an example of interdependence between processes that are very different. In this Article, we introduce a framework for modelling 'distributed supervisory control' in the guise of an electrical network supervised by a distributed system of control devices. The system is characterised by degrees of freedom salient to real-world systems- namely, the number of control devices, their inherent reliability, and the topology of the control network. Surprisingly, the behavior of the system depends crucially on the reliability of control devices. When devices are completely reliable, cascade sizes are percolation controlled; the number of devices being the relevant parameter. For unreliable devices, the topology of the control network is important and can dramatically reduce the resilience of the system. PMID:24067404

  8. Fuzzy controller design by parallel genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondelli, G.; Castellano, G.; Attolico, Giovanni; Distante, Arcangelo

    1998-03-01

    Designing a fuzzy system involves defining membership functions and constructing rules. Carrying out these two steps manually often results in a poorly performing system. Genetic Algorithms (GAs) has proved to be a useful tool for designing optimal fuzzy controller. In order to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of their application, parallel GAs (PAGs), evolving synchronously several populations with different balances between exploration and exploitation, have been implemented using a SIMD machine (APE100/Quadrics). The parameters to be identified are coded in such a way that the algorithm implicitly provides a compact fuzzy controller, by finding only necessary rules and removing useless inputs from them. Early results, working on a fuzzy controller implementing the wall-following task for a real vehicle as a test case, provided better fitness values in less generations with respect to previous experiments made using a sequential implementation of GAs.

  9. Towards a predictive theory for genetic regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkacik, Gasper

    When cells respond to changes in the environment by regulating the expression levels of their genes, we often draw parallels between these biological processes and engineered information processing systems. One can go beyond this qualitative analogy, however, by analyzing information transmission in biochemical ``hardware'' using Shannon's information theory. Here, gene regulation is viewed as a transmission channel operating under restrictive constraints set by the resource costs and intracellular noise. We present a series of results demonstrating that a theory of information transmission in genetic regulatory circuits feasibly yields non-trivial, testable predictions. These predictions concern strategies by which individual gene regulatory elements, e.g., promoters or enhancers, read out their signals; as well as strategies by which small networks of genes, independently or in spatially coupled settings, respond to their inputs. These predictions can be quantitatively compared to the known regulatory networks and their function, and can elucidate how reproducible biological processes, such as embryonic development, can be orchestrated by networks built out of noisy components. Preliminary successes in the gap gene network of the fruit fly Drosophila indicate that a full ab initio theoretical prediction of a regulatory network is possible, a feat that has not yet been achieved for any real regulatory network. We end by describing open challenges on the path towards such a prediction.

  10. Stress controls the mechanics of collagen networks

    PubMed Central

    Licup, Albert James; Münster, Stefan; Sharma, Abhinav; Sheinman, Michael; Jawerth, Louise M.; Fabry, Ben; Weitz, David A.; MacKintosh, Fred C.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen is the main structural and load-bearing element of various connective tissues, where it forms the extracellular matrix that supports cells. It has long been known that collagenous tissues exhibit a highly nonlinear stress–strain relationship, although the origins of this nonlinearity remain unknown. Here, we show that the nonlinear stiffening of reconstituted type I collagen networks is controlled by the applied stress and that the network stiffness becomes surprisingly insensitive to network concentration. We demonstrate how a simple model for networks of elastic fibers can quantitatively account for the mechanics of reconstituted collagen networks. Our model points to the important role of normal stresses in determining the nonlinear shear elastic response, which can explain the approximate exponential relationship between stress and strain reported for collagenous tissues. This further suggests principles for the design of synthetic fiber networks with collagen-like properties, as well as a mechanism for the control of the mechanics of such networks. PMID:26195769

  11. Controlling statistical moments of stochastic dynamical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielievtsov, Dmytro; Ladenbauer, Josef; Obermayer, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    We consider a general class of stochastic networks and ask which network nodes need to be controlled, and how, to stabilize and switch between desired metastable (target) states in terms of the first and second statistical moments of the system. We first show that it is sufficient to directly interfere with a subset of nodes which can be identified using information about the graph of the network only. Then we develop a suitable method for feedback control which acts on that subset of nodes and preserves the covariance structure of the desired target state. Finally, we demonstrate our theoretical results using a stochastic Hopfield network and a global brain model. Our results are applicable to a variety of (model) networks and further our understanding of the relationship between network structure and collective dynamics for the benefit of effective control.

  12. Controlling statistical moments of stochastic dynamical networks.

    PubMed

    Bielievtsov, Dmytro; Ladenbauer, Josef; Obermayer, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    We consider a general class of stochastic networks and ask which network nodes need to be controlled, and how, to stabilize and switch between desired metastable (target) states in terms of the first and second statistical moments of the system. We first show that it is sufficient to directly interfere with a subset of nodes which can be identified using information about the graph of the network only. Then we develop a suitable method for feedback control which acts on that subset of nodes and preserves the covariance structure of the desired target state. Finally, we demonstrate our theoretical results using a stochastic Hopfield network and a global brain model. Our results are applicable to a variety of (model) networks and further our understanding of the relationship between network structure and collective dynamics for the benefit of effective control. PMID:27575147

  13. Distributed intelligent control and status networking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortin, Andre; Patel, Manoj

    1993-01-01

    Over the past two years, the Network Control Systems Branch (Code 532) has been investigating control and status networking technologies. These emerging technologies use distributed processing over a network to accomplish a particular custom task. These networks consist of small intelligent 'nodes' that perform simple tasks. Containing simple, inexpensive hardware and software, these nodes can be easily developed and maintained. Once networked, the nodes can perform a complex operation without a central host. This type of system provides an alternative to more complex control and status systems which require a central computer. This paper will provide some background and discuss some applications of this technology. It will also demonstrate the suitability of one particular technology for the Space Network (SN) and discuss the prototyping activities of Code 532 utilizing this technology.

  14. Optimal Parameter for the Training of Multilayer Perceptron Neural Networks by Using Hierarchical Genetic Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Orozco-Monteagudo, Maykel; Taboada-Crispi, Alberto; Gutierrez-Hernandez, Liliana

    2008-11-06

    This paper deals with the controversial topic of the selection of the parameters of a genetic algorithm, in this case hierarchical, used for training of multilayer perceptron neural networks for the binary classification. The parameters to select are the crossover and mutation probabilities of the control and parametric genes and the permanency percent. The results can be considered as a guide for using this kind of algorithm.

  15. Molecular, metabolic, and genetic control: An introduction.

    PubMed

    Tyson, John J.; Mackey, Michael C.

    2001-03-01

    The living cell is a miniature, self-reproducing, biochemical machine. Like all machines, it has a power supply, a set of working components that carry out its necessary tasks, and control systems that ensure the proper coordination of these tasks. In this Special Issue, we focus on the molecular regulatory systems that control cell metabolism, gene expression, environmental responses, development, and reproduction. As for the control systems in human-engineered machines, these regulatory networks can be described by nonlinear dynamical equations, for example, ordinary differential equations, reaction-diffusion equations, stochastic differential equations, or cellular automata. The articles collected here illustrate (i) a range of theoretical problems presented by modern concepts of cellular regulation, (ii) some strategies for converting molecular mechanisms into dynamical systems, (iii) some useful mathematical tools for analyzing and simulating these systems, and (iv) the sort of results that derive from serious interplay between theory and experiment. (c) 2001 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779443

  16. Genetic network properties of the human cortex based on regional thickness and surface area measures

    PubMed Central

    Docherty, Anna R.; Sawyers, Chelsea K.; Panizzon, Matthew S.; Neale, Michael C.; Eyler, Lisa T.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Franz, Carol E.; Chen, Chi-Hua; McEvoy, Linda K.; Verhulst, Brad; Tsuang, Ming T.; Kremen, William S.

    2015-01-01

    We examined network properties of genetic covariance between average cortical thickness (CT) and surface area (SA) within genetically-identified cortical parcellations that we previously derived from human cortical genetic maps using vertex-wise fuzzy clustering analysis with high spatial resolution. There were 24 hierarchical parcellations based on vertex-wise CT and 24 based on vertex-wise SA expansion/contraction; in both cases the 12 parcellations per hemisphere were largely symmetrical. We utilized three techniques—biometrical genetic modeling, cluster analysis, and graph theory—to examine genetic relationships and network properties within and between the 48 parcellation measures. Biometrical modeling indicated significant shared genetic covariance between size of several of the genetic parcellations. Cluster analysis suggested small distinct groupings of genetic covariance; networks highlighted several significant negative and positive genetic correlations between bilateral parcellations. Graph theoretical analysis suggested that small world, but not rich club, network properties may characterize the genetic relationships between these regional size measures. These findings suggest that cortical genetic parcellations exhibit short characteristic path lengths across a broad network of connections. This property may be protective against network failure. In contrast, previous research with structural data has observed strong rich club properties with tightly interconnected hub networks. Future studies of these genetic networks might provide powerful phenotypes for genetic studies of normal and pathological brain development, aging, and function. PMID:26347632

  17. Selection Shapes Transcriptional Logic and Regulatory Specialization in Genetic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Fogelmark, Karl; Peterson, Carsten; Troein, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Background Living organisms need to regulate their gene expression in response to environmental signals and internal cues. This is a computational task where genes act as logic gates that connect to form transcriptional networks, which are shaped at all scales by evolution. Large-scale mutations such as gene duplications and deletions add and remove network components, whereas smaller mutations alter the connections between them. Selection determines what mutations are accepted, but its importance for shaping the resulting networks has been debated. Methodology To investigate the effects of selection in the shaping of transcriptional networks, we derive transcriptional logic from a combinatorially powerful yet tractable model of the binding between DNA and transcription factors. By evolving the resulting networks based on their ability to function as either a simple decision system or a circadian clock, we obtain information on the regulation and logic rules encoded in functional transcriptional networks. Comparisons are made between networks evolved for different functions, as well as with structurally equivalent but non-functional (neutrally evolved) networks, and predictions are validated against the transcriptional network of E. coli. Principal Findings We find that the logic rules governing gene expression depend on the function performed by the network. Unlike the decision systems, the circadian clocks show strong cooperative binding and negative regulation, which achieves tight temporal control of gene expression. Furthermore, we find that transcription factors act preferentially as either activators or repressors, both when binding multiple sites for a single target gene and globally in the transcriptional networks. This separation into positive and negative regulators requires gene duplications, which highlights the interplay between mutation and selection in shaping the transcriptional networks. PMID:26927540

  18. Modular genetic control of sexually dimorphic behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaohong; Coats, Jennifer K.; Yang, Cindy F.; Wang, Amy; Ahmed, Osama M.; Alvarado, Maricruz; Izumi, Tetsuro; Shah, Nirao M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Sex hormones such as estrogen and testosterone are essential for sexually dimorphic behaviors in vertebrates. However, the hormone-activated molecular mechanisms that control the development and function of the underlying neural circuits remain poorly defined. We have identified numerous sexually dimorphic gene expression patterns in the adult mouse hypothalamus and amygdala. We find that adult sex hormones regulate these expression patterns in a sex-specific, regionally-restricted manner, suggesting that these genes regulate sex typical behaviors. Indeed, we find that mice with targeted disruptions of each of four of these genes (Brs3, Cckar, Irs4, Sytl4) exhibit extremely specific deficits in sex specific behaviors, with single genes controlling the pattern or extent of male sexual behavior, male aggression, maternal behavior, or female sexual behavior. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that various components of sexually dimorphic behaviors are governed by separable genetic programs. PMID:22304924

  19. Genome-wide expression analysis of genetic networks in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Logan, David A; Koch, Allison L; Dong, Wubei; Griffith, James; Nilsen, Roger; Case, Mary E; Schüttler, Heinz-Bernd; Arnold, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    The products of five structural genes and two regulatory genes of the qa gene cluster of Neurospora crassa control the metabolism of quinic acid (QA) as a carbon source. A detailed genetic network model of this metabolic process has been reported. This investigation is designed to expand the current model of the QA reaction network. The ensemble method of network identification was used to model RNA profiling data on the qa gene cluster. Through microarray and cluster analysis, genome-wide identification of RNA transcripts associated with quinic acid metabolism in N. crassa is described and suggests a connection to other metabolic circuits. More than 100 genes whose products include carbon metabolism, protein degradation and modification, amino acid metabolism and ribosome synthesis appear to be connected to quinic acid metabolism. The core of the qa gene cluster network is validated with respect to RNA profiling data obtained from microarrays. PMID:17597928

  20. A candidate multimodal functional genetic network for thermal adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rachana; Prajapati, Indira; Bankston, Shannon; Thompson, Aprylle; Usher, Jaytriece; Isokpehi, Raphael D.

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrate ectotherms such as reptiles provide ideal organisms for the study of adaptation to environmental thermal change. Comparative genomic and exomic studies can recover markers that diverge between warm and cold adapted lineages, but the genes that are functionally related to thermal adaptation may be difficult to identify. We here used a bioinformatics genome-mining approach to predict and identify functions for suitable candidate markers for thermal adaptation in the chicken. We first established a framework of candidate functions for such markers, and then compiled the literature on genes known to adapt to the thermal environment in different lineages of vertebrates. We then identified them in the genomes of human, chicken, and the lizard Anolis carolinensis, and established a functional genetic interaction network in the chicken. Surprisingly, markers initially identified from diverse lineages of vertebrates such as human and fish were all in close functional relationship with each other and more associated than expected by chance. This indicates that the general genetic functional network for thermoregulation and/or thermal adaptation to the environment might be regulated via similar evolutionarily conserved pathways in different vertebrate lineages. We were able to identify seven functions that were statistically overrepresented in this network, corresponding to four of our originally predicted functions plus three unpredicted functions. We describe this network as multimodal: central regulator genes with the function of relaying thermal signal (1), affect genes with different cellular functions, namely (2) lipoprotein metabolism, (3) membrane channels, (4) stress response, (5) response to oxidative stress, (6) muscle contraction and relaxation, and (7) vasodilation, vasoconstriction and regulation of blood pressure. This network constitutes a novel resource for the study of thermal adaptation in the closely related nonavian reptiles and other

  1. A candidate multimodal functional genetic network for thermal adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wollenberg Valero, Katharina C; Pathak, Rachana; Prajapati, Indira; Bankston, Shannon; Thompson, Aprylle; Usher, Jaytriece; Isokpehi, Raphael D

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrate ectotherms such as reptiles provide ideal organisms for the study of adaptation to environmental thermal change. Comparative genomic and exomic studies can recover markers that diverge between warm and cold adapted lineages, but the genes that are functionally related to thermal adaptation may be difficult to identify. We here used a bioinformatics genome-mining approach to predict and identify functions for suitable candidate markers for thermal adaptation in the chicken. We first established a framework of candidate functions for such markers, and then compiled the literature on genes known to adapt to the thermal environment in different lineages of vertebrates. We then identified them in the genomes of human, chicken, and the lizard Anolis carolinensis, and established a functional genetic interaction network in the chicken. Surprisingly, markers initially identified from diverse lineages of vertebrates such as human and fish were all in close functional relationship with each other and more associated than expected by chance. This indicates that the general genetic functional network for thermoregulation and/or thermal adaptation to the environment might be regulated via similar evolutionarily conserved pathways in different vertebrate lineages. We were able to identify seven functions that were statistically overrepresented in this network, corresponding to four of our originally predicted functions plus three unpredicted functions. We describe this network as multimodal: central regulator genes with the function of relaying thermal signal (1), affect genes with different cellular functions, namely (2) lipoprotein metabolism, (3) membrane channels, (4) stress response, (5) response to oxidative stress, (6) muscle contraction and relaxation, and (7) vasodilation, vasoconstriction and regulation of blood pressure. This network constitutes a novel resource for the study of thermal adaptation in the closely related nonavian reptiles and other

  2. Advanced mobile networking, sensing, and controls.

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, John Todd; Kilman, Dominique Marie; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Young, Joseph G.; Lewis, Christopher L.; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.; Robinett, Rush D. III; Harrington, John J.

    2005-03-01

    This report describes an integrated approach for designing communication, sensing, and control systems for mobile distributed systems. Graph theoretic methods are used to analyze the input/output reachability and structural controllability and observability of a decentralized system. Embedded in each network node, this analysis will automatically reconfigure an ad hoc communication network for the sensing and control task at hand. The graph analysis can also be used to create the optimal communication flow control based upon the spatial distribution of the network nodes. Edge coloring algorithms tell us that the minimum number of time slots in a planar network is equal to either the maximum number of adjacent nodes (or degree) of the undirected graph plus some small number. Therefore, the more spread out that the nodes are, the fewer number of time slots are needed for communication, and the smaller the latency between nodes. In a coupled system, this results in a more responsive sensor network and control system. Network protocols are developed to propagate this information, and distributed algorithms are developed to automatically adjust the number of time slots available for communication. These protocols and algorithms must be extremely efficient and only updated as network nodes move. In addition, queuing theory is used to analyze the delay characteristics of Carrier Sense Multiple Access (CSMA) networks. This report documents the analysis, simulation, and implementation of these algorithms performed under this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort.

  3. Effect of correlations on controllability transition in network control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Sen; Wang, Xu-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong; Jiang, Luo-Luo

    2016-04-01

    The network control problem has recently attracted an increasing amount of attention, owing to concerns including the avoidance of cascading failures of power-grids and the management of ecological networks. It has been proven that numerical control can be achieved if the number of control inputs exceeds a certain transition point. In the present study, we investigate the effect of degree correlation on the numerical controllability in networks whose topological structures are reconstructed from both real and modeling systems, and we find that the transition point of the number of control inputs depends strongly on the degree correlation in both undirected and directed networks with moderately sparse links. More interestingly, the effect of the degree correlation on the transition point cannot be observed in dense networks for numerical controllability, which contrasts with the corresponding result for structural controllability. In particular, for directed random networks and scale-free networks, the influence of the degree correlation is determined by the types of correlations. Our approach provides an understanding of control problems in complex sparse networks.

  4. Effect of correlations on controllability transition in network control

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Sen; Wang, Xu-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong; Jiang, Luo-Luo

    2016-01-01

    The network control problem has recently attracted an increasing amount of attention, owing to concerns including the avoidance of cascading failures of power-grids and the management of ecological networks. It has been proven that numerical control can be achieved if the number of control inputs exceeds a certain transition point. In the present study, we investigate the effect of degree correlation on the numerical controllability in networks whose topological structures are reconstructed from both real and modeling systems, and we find that the transition point of the number of control inputs depends strongly on the degree correlation in both undirected and directed networks with moderately sparse links. More interestingly, the effect of the degree correlation on the transition point cannot be observed in dense networks for numerical controllability, which contrasts with the corresponding result for structural controllability. In particular, for directed random networks and scale-free networks, the influence of the degree correlation is determined by the types of correlations. Our approach provides an understanding of control problems in complex sparse networks. PMID:27063294

  5. Non-coding RNAs and complex distributed genetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2011-08-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the mRNA-protein interplay can be dramatically influenced by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Although this new paradigm is now widely accepted, an understanding of the effect of ncRNAs on complex genetic networks is lacking. To clarify what may happen in this case, we propose a mean-field kinetic model describing the influence of ncRNA on a complex genetic network with a distributed architecture including mutual protein-mediated regulation of many genes transcribed into mRNAs. ncRNA is considered to associate with mRNAs and inhibit their translation and/or facilitate degradation. Our results are indicative of the richness of the kinetics under consideration. The main complex features are found to be bistability and oscillations. One could expect to find kinetic chaos as well. The latter feature has however not been observed in our calculations. In addition, we illustrate the difference in the regulation of distributed networks by mRNA and ncRNA.

  6. Discovering Main Genetic Interactions with LABNet LAsso-Based Network Inference

    PubMed Central

    Gadaleta, Francesco; Van Steen, Kristel

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies can potentially unravel the mechanisms behind complex traits and common genetic diseases. Despite the valuable results produced thus far, many questions remain unanswered. For instance, which specific genetic compounds are linked to the risk of the disease under investigation; what biological mechanism do they act through; or how do they interact with environmental and other external factors? The driving force of computational biology is the constantly growing amount of big data generated by high-throughput technologies. A practical framework that can deal with this abundance of information and that consent to discovering genetic associations and interactions is provided by means of networks. Unfortunately, high dimensionality, the presence of noise and the geometry of data can make the aforementioned problem extremely challenging. We propose a penalised linear regression approach that can deal with the aforementioned issues that affect genetic data. We analyse the gene expression profiles of individuals with a common trait to infer the network structure of interactions among genes. The permutation-based approach leads to more stable and reliable networks inferred from synthetic microarray data. We show that a higher number of permutations determines the number of predicted edges, improves the overall sensitivity and controls the number of false positives. PMID:25369052

  7. Secure quantum network coding for controlled repeater networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Tao; Li, Jiao; Liu, Jian-wei

    2016-04-01

    To realize efficient quantum communication based on quantum repeater, we propose a secure quantum network coding scheme for controlled repeater networks, which adds a controller as a trusted party and is able to control the process of EPR-pair distribution. As the key operations of quantum repeater, local operations and quantum communication are designed to adopt quantum one-time pad to enhance the function of identity authentication instead of local operations and classical communication. Scheme analysis shows that the proposed scheme can defend against active attacks for quantum communication and realize long-distance quantum communication with minimal resource consumption.

  8. Secure quantum network coding for controlled repeater networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Tao; Li, Jiao; Liu, Jian-wei

    2016-07-01

    To realize efficient quantum communication based on quantum repeater, we propose a secure quantum network coding scheme for controlled repeater networks, which adds a controller as a trusted party and is able to control the process of EPR-pair distribution. As the key operations of quantum repeater, local operations and quantum communication are designed to adopt quantum one-time pad to enhance the function of identity authentication instead of local operations and classical communication. Scheme analysis shows that the proposed scheme can defend against active attacks for quantum communication and realize long-distance quantum communication with minimal resource consumption.

  9. Predictive Control of Large Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, Aleksandar; Motter, Adilson E.

    Networks of coupled dynamical subsystems are increasingly used to represent complex natural and engineered systems. While recent technological developments give us improved means to actively control the dynamics of individual subsystems in various domains, network control remains a challenging problem due to difficulties imposed by intrinsic nonlinearities, control constraints, and the large-scale nature of the systems. In this talk, we will present a model predictive control approach that is effective while accounting for these realistic properties of complex networks. Our method can systematically identify control interventions that steer the trajectory to a desired state, even in the presence of strong nonlinearities and constraints. Numerical tests show that the method is applicable to a variety of networks, ranging from power grids to chemical reaction systems.

  10. Modern control centers and computer networking

    SciTech Connect

    Dy-Liacco, T.E.

    1994-10-01

    The automation of power system operation is generally achieved with the implementation of two control centers, one for the operation of the generation-transmission system and the other for the operation of the distribution system. These control centers are referred to, respectively, as the energy management system (EMS) and the distribution management system (DMS). The EMS may consist of several control centers in a hierarchy. The DMS may be made up of several independent distribution control centers. This article features the fundamental design aspects of modern EMS and DMS control centers (computer networks, distributed processing, and distributed databases), the linking of computer networks, and the communications that support such internetworking. The extension of such networking beyond the confines of system operation to other corporate networks is now made practical by the maturing concepts of client-server architectures and by the availability of modern communication technologies.

  11. Neural networks and orbit control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Bozoki, E.; Friedman, A.

    1994-07-01

    An overview of the architecture, workings and training of Neural Networks is given. We stress the aspects which are important for the use of Neural Networks for orbit control in accelerators and storage rings, especially its ability to cope with the nonlinear behavior of the orbit response to `kicks` and the slow drift in the orbit response during long-term operation. Results obtained for the two NSLS storage rings with several network architectures and various training methods for each architecture are given.

  12. Congestion control and routing over satellite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jinhua

    Satellite networks and transmissions find their application in fields of computer communications, telephone communications, television broadcasting, transportation, space situational awareness systems and so on. This thesis mainly focuses on two networking issues affecting satellite networking: network congestion control and network routing optimization. Congestion, which leads to long queueing delays, packet losses or both, is a networking problem that has drawn the attention of many researchers. The goal of congestion control mechanisms is to ensure high bandwidth utilization while avoiding network congestion by regulating the rate at which traffic sources inject packets into a network. In this thesis, we propose a stable congestion controller using data-driven, safe switching control theory to improve the dynamic performance of satellite Transmission Control Protocol/Active Queue Management (TCP/AQM) networks. First, the stable region of the Proportional-Integral (PI) parameters for a nominal model is explored. Then, a PI controller, whose parameters are adaptively tuned by switching among members of a given candidate set, using observed plant data, is presented and compared with some classical AQM policy examples, such as Random Early Detection (RED) and fixed PI control. A new cost detectable switching law with an interval cost function switching algorithm, which improves the performance and also saves the computational cost, is developed and compared with a law commonly used in the switching control literature. Finite-gain stability of the system is proved. A fuzzy logic PI controller is incorporated as a special candidate to achieve good performance at all nominal points with the available set of candidate controllers. Simulations are presented to validate the theory. An effocient routing algorithm plays a key role in optimizing network resources. In this thesis, we briefly analyze Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite networks, review the Cross Entropy (CE

  13. Superiority of artificial neural networks for a genetic classification procedure.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, I C; Tomaz, R S; Silva, G N; Nascimento, M; Bhering, L L; Cruz, C D

    2015-01-01

    The correct classification of individuals is extremely important for the preservation of genetic variability and for maximization of yield in breeding programs using phenotypic traits and genetic markers. The Fisher and Anderson discriminant functions are commonly used multivariate statistical techniques for these situations, which allow for the allocation of an initially unknown individual to predefined groups. However, for higher levels of similarity, such as those found in backcrossed populations, these methods have proven to be inefficient. Recently, much research has been devoted to developing a new paradigm of computing known as artificial neural networks (ANNs), which can be used to solve many statistical problems, including classification problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of ANNs as an evaluation technique of genetic diversity by comparing their performance with that of traditional methods. The discriminant functions were equally ineffective in discriminating the populations, with error rates of 23-82%, thereby preventing the correct discrimination of individuals between populations. The ANN was effective in classifying populations with low and high differentiation, such as those derived from a genetic design established from backcrosses, even in cases of low differentiation of the data sets. The ANN appears to be a promising technique to solve classification problems, since the number of individuals classified incorrectly by the ANN was always lower than that of the discriminant functions. We envisage the potential relevant application of this improved procedure in the genomic classification of markers to distinguish between breeds and accessions. PMID:26345924

  14. Controlling Contagion Processes in Time Varying Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Suyu; Perra, Nicola; Karsai, Marton; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2013-03-01

    The vast majority of strategies aimed at controlling contagion and spreading processes on networks consider the connectivity pattern of the system as quenched. In this paper, we consider the class of activity driven networks to analytically evaluate how different control strategies perform in time-varying networks. We consider the limit in which the evolution of the structure of the network and the spreading process are simultaneous yet independent. We analyze three control strategies based on node's activity patterns to decide the removal/immunization of nodes. We find that targeted strategies aimed at the removal of active nodes outperform by orders of magnitude the widely used random strategies. In time-varying networks however any finite time observation of the network dynamics provides only incomplete information on the nodes' activity and does not allow the precise ranking of the most active nodes as needed to implement targeted strategies. Here we develop a control strategy that focuses on targeting the egocentric time-aggregated network of a small control group of nodes.The presented strategy allows the control of spreading processes by removing a fraction of nodes much smaller than the random strategy while at the same time limiting the observation time on the system.

  15. Modifier Genes and the Plasticity of Genetic Networks in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Bruce A.; Yu, Benjamin D.

    2012-01-01

    Modifier genes are an integral part of the genetic landscape in both humans and experimental organisms, but have been less well explored in mammals than other systems. A growing number of modifier genes in mouse models of disease nonetheless illustrate the potential for novel findings, while new technical advances promise many more to come. Modifier genes in mouse models include induced mutations and spontaneous or wild-derived variations captured in inbred strains. Identification of modifiers among wild-derived variants in particular should detect disease modifiers that have been shaped by selection and might therefore be compatible with high fitness and function. Here we review selected examples and argue that modifier genes derived from natural variation may provide a bias for nodes in genetic networks that have greater intrinsic plasticity and whose therapeutic manipulation may therefore be more resilient to side effects than conventional targets. PMID:22511884

  16. Self-Control in Sparsely Coded Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, D. R. C.; Bollé, D.

    1998-03-01

    A complete self-control mechanism is proposed in the dynamics of neural networks through the introduction of a time-dependent threshold, determined in function of both the noise and the pattern activity in the network. Especially for sparsely coded models this mechanism is shown to considerably improve the storage capacity, the basins of attraction, and the mutual information content.

  17. Control Networks and Neuromodulators of Early Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael I.; Rothbart, Mary K.; Sheese, Brad E.; Voelker, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    In adults, most cognitive and emotional self-regulation is carried out by a network of brain regions, including the anterior cingulate, insula, and areas of the basal ganglia, related to executive attention. We propose that during infancy, control systems depend primarily upon a brain network involved in orienting to sensory events that includes…

  18. Advanced telerobotic control using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, Robert M.; Atkins, Mark; Cox, Chadwick; Glover, Charles; Kissel, Ralph; Saeks, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Accurate Automation is designing and developing adaptive decentralized joint controllers using neural networks. We are then implementing these in hardware for the Marshall Space Flight Center PFMA as well as to be usable for the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robot arm. Our design is being realized in hardware after completion of the software simulation. This is implemented using a Functional-Link neural network.

  19. Combining neural networks and genetic algorithms for hydrological flow forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neruda, Roman; Srejber, Jan; Neruda, Martin; Pascenko, Petr

    2010-05-01

    We present a neural network approach to rainfall-runoff modeling for small size river basins based on several time series of hourly measured data. Different neural networks are considered for short time runoff predictions (from one to six hours lead time) based on runoff and rainfall data observed in previous time steps. Correlation analysis shows that runoff data, short time rainfall history, and aggregated API values are the most significant data for the prediction. Neural models of multilayer perceptron and radial basis function networks with different numbers of units are used and compared with more traditional linear time series predictors. Out of possible 48 hours of relevant history of all the input variables, the most important ones are selected by means of input filters created by a genetic algorithm. The genetic algorithm works with population of binary encoded vectors defining input selection patterns. Standard genetic operators of two-point crossover, random bit-flipping mutation, and tournament selection were used. The evaluation of objective function of each individual consists of several rounds of building and testing a particular neural network model. The whole procedure is rather computational exacting (taking hours to days on a desktop PC), thus a high-performance mainframe computer has been used for our experiments. Results based on two years worth data from the Ploucnice river in Northern Bohemia suggest that main problems connected with this approach to modeling are ovetraining that can lead to poor generalization, and relatively small number of extreme events which makes it difficult for a model to predict the amplitude of the event. Thus, experiments with both absolute and relative runoff predictions were carried out. In general it can be concluded that the neural models show about 5 per cent improvement in terms of efficiency coefficient over liner models. Multilayer perceptrons with one hidden layer trained by back propagation algorithm and

  20. Applications of genetic algorithms and neural networks to interatomic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobday, Steven; Smith, Roger; BelBruno, Joe

    1999-06-01

    Applications of two modern artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, genetic algorithms (GA) and neural networks (NN) to computer simulations are reported. It is shown that the GA are very useful tools for determining the minimum energy structures of clusters of atoms described by interatomic potential functions and generally outperform other optimisation methods for this task. A number of applications are given including covalent, and close packed structures of single or multi-component atomic species. It is also shown that (many body) interatomic potential functions for multi-component systems can be derived by training a specially constructed NN on a variety of structural data.

  1. Genetic control of Drosophila nerve cord development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skeath, James B.; Thor, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    The Drosophila ventral nerve cord has been a central model system for studying the molecular genetic mechanisms that control CNS development. Studies show that the generation of neural diversity is a multistep process initiated by the patterning and segmentation of the neuroectoderm. These events act together with the process of lateral inhibition to generate precursor cells (neuroblasts) with specific identities, distinguished by the expression of unique combinations of regulatory genes. The expression of these genes in a given neuroblast restricts the fate of its progeny, by activating specific combinations of downstream genes. These genes in turn specify the identity of any given postmitotic cell, which is evident by its cellular morphology and choice of neurotransmitter.

  2. Structurally robust control of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacher, Jose C.; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Robust control theory has been successfully applied to numerous real-world problems using a small set of devices called controllers. However, the real systems represented by networks contain unreliable components and modern robust control engineering has not addressed the problem of structural changes on complex networks including scale-free topologies. Here, we introduce the concept of structurally robust control of complex networks and provide a concrete example using an algorithmic framework that is widely applied in engineering. The developed analytical tools, computer simulations, and real network analyses lead herein to the discovery that robust control can be achieved in scale-free networks with exactly the same order of controllers required in a standard nonrobust configuration by adjusting only the minimum degree. The presented methodology also addresses the probabilistic failure of links in real systems, such as neural synaptic unreliability in Caenorhabditis elegans, and suggests a new direction to pursue in studies of complex networks in which control theory has a role.

  3. Structurally robust control of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Nacher, Jose C; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Robust control theory has been successfully applied to numerous real-world problems using a small set of devices called controllers. However, the real systems represented by networks contain unreliable components and modern robust control engineering has not addressed the problem of structural changes on complex networks including scale-free topologies. Here, we introduce the concept of structurally robust control of complex networks and provide a concrete example using an algorithmic framework that is widely applied in engineering. The developed analytical tools, computer simulations, and real network analyses lead herein to the discovery that robust control can be achieved in scale-free networks with exactly the same order of controllers required in a standard nonrobust configuration by adjusting only the minimum degree. The presented methodology also addresses the probabilistic failure of links in real systems, such as neural synaptic unreliability in Caenorhabditis elegans, and suggests a new direction to pursue in studies of complex networks in which control theory has a role. PMID:25679675

  4. Wireless Sensor Networks: Monitoring and Control

    SciTech Connect

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Ponoum, Ratcharit; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-05-31

    The article discusses wireless sensor technologies for building energy monitoring and control. This article, also, addresses wireless sensor networks as well as benefits and challenges of using wireless sensors. The energy savings and market potential of wireless sensors are reviewed.

  5. Multiobjective Genetic Algorithm applied to dengue control.

    PubMed

    Florentino, Helenice O; Cantane, Daniela R; Santos, Fernando L P; Bannwart, Bettina F

    2014-12-01

    Dengue fever is an infectious disease caused by a virus of the Flaviridae family and transmitted to the person by a mosquito of the genus Aedes aegypti. This disease has been a global public health problem because a single mosquito can infect up to 300 people and between 50 and 100 million people are infected annually on all continents. Thus, dengue fever is currently a subject of research, whether in the search for vaccines and treatments for the disease or efficient and economical forms of mosquito control. The current study aims to study techniques of multiobjective optimization to assist in solving problems involving the control of the mosquito that transmits dengue fever. The population dynamics of the mosquito is studied in order to understand the epidemic phenomenon and suggest strategies of multiobjective programming for mosquito control. A Multiobjective Genetic Algorithm (MGA_DENGUE) is proposed to solve the optimization model treated here and we discuss the computational results obtained from the application of this technique. PMID:25230238

  6. Portable control device for networked mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Feddema, John T.; Byrne, Raymond H.; Bryan, Jon R.; Harrington, John J.; Gladwell, T. Scott

    2002-01-01

    A handheld control device provides a way for controlling one or multiple mobile robotic vehicles by incorporating a handheld computer with a radio board. The device and software use a personal data organizer as the handheld computer with an additional microprocessor and communication device on a radio board for use in controlling one robot or multiple networked robots.

  7. Genetic control of mosquitoes: population suppression strategies.

    PubMed

    Wilke, André Barretto Bruno; Marrelli, Mauro Toledo

    2012-01-01

    Over the last two decades, morbidity and mortality from malaria and dengue fever among other pathogens are an increasing Public Health problem. The increase in the geographic distribution of vectors is accompanied by the emergence of viruses and diseases in new areas. There are insufficient specific therapeutic drugs available and there are no reliable vaccines for malaria or dengue, although some progress has been achieved, there is still a long way between its development and actual field use. Most mosquito control measures have failed to achieve their goals, mostly because of the mosquito's great reproductive capacity and genomic flexibility. Chemical control is increasingly restricted due to potential human toxicity, mortality in no target organisms, insecticide resistance, and other environmental impacts. Other strategies for mosquito control are desperately needed. The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) is a species-specific and environmentally benign method for insect population suppression, it is based on mass rearing, radiation mediated sterilization, and release of a large number of male insects. Releasing of Insects carrying a dominant lethal gene (RIDL) offers a solution to many of the drawbacks of traditional SIT that have limited its application in mosquitoes while maintaining its environmentally friendly and species-specific utility. The self-limiting nature of sterile mosquitoes tends to make the issues related to field use of these somewhat less challenging than for self-spreading systems characteristic of population replacement strategies. They also are closer to field use, so might be appropriate to consider first. The prospect of genetic control methods against mosquito vectored human diseases is rapidly becoming a reality, many decisions will need to be made on a national, regional and international level regarding the biosafety, social, cultural and ethical aspects of the use and deployment of these vector control methods. PMID:22983293

  8. Optimal Feedback Control of Thermal Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papalexandris, Miltiadis

    2003-01-01

    An improved approach to the mathematical modeling of feedback control of thermal networks has been devised. Heretofore software for feedback control of thermal networks has been developed by time-consuming trial-and-error methods that depend on engineers expertise. In contrast, the present approach is a systematic means of developing algorithms for feedback control that is optimal in the sense that it combines performance with low cost of implementation. An additional advantage of the present approach is that a thermal engineer need not be expert in control theory. Thermal networks are lumped-parameter approximations used to represent complex thermal systems. Thermal networks are closely related to electrical networks commonly represented by lumped-parameter circuit diagrams. Like such electrical circuits, thermal networks are mathematically modeled by systems of differential-algebraic equations (DAEs) that is, ordinary differential equations subject to a set of algebraic constraints. In the present approach, emphasis is placed on applications in which thermal networks are subject to constant disturbances and, therefore, integral control action is necessary to obtain steady-state responses. The mathematical development of the present approach begins with the derivation of optimal integral-control laws via minimization of an appropriate cost functional that involves augmented state vectors. Subsequently, classical variational arguments provide optimality conditions in the form of the Hamiltonian equations for the standard linear-quadratic-regulator (LQR) problem. These equations are reduced to an algebraic Riccati equation (ARE) with respect to the augmented state vector. The solution of the ARE leads to the direct computation of the optimal proportional- and integral-feedback control gains. In cases of very complex networks, large numbers of state variables make it difficult to implement optimal controllers in the manner described in the preceding paragraph.

  9. Neural-Network Controller For Vibration Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, Dhemetrios; Wang, Shyh Jong

    1995-01-01

    Neural-network-based adaptive-control system proposed for vibration suppression of flexible space structures. Controller features three-layer neural network and utilizes output feedback. Measurements generated by various sensors on structure. Feed forward path also included to speed up response in case plant exhibits predominantly linear dynamic behavior. System applicable to single-input single-output systems. Work extended to multiple-input multiple-output systems as well.

  10. Stochastic gene expression in single cells: exploring the importance of noise in genetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2003-03-01

    Cells are intrinsically noisy biochemical reactors. This leads to random cell to cell variation (noise) in gene expression levels. First, I will address the source of this noise at the level of transcription and translation of a single gene. Our experimental results demonstrate that the intrinsic noise of a single gene is predominantly controlled at the translational level, and that increased translational efficiency leads to increased noise strength. This observation is consistent with a theoretical model in which proteins are randomly produced in sharp bursts followed by periods of slow decay. Second, I will explore the importance of genetic noise for a naturally occuring network: the lac operon. The classic lactose utilization network of E. coli has been under investigation for several decades and, in its simplest form the network may be modeled as a single positive feedback module. However, this simplicity is deceptive, as even this basic network is capable of complex metabolic behavior, including adaptation, amplification, and graded-to-binary response conversion. I will present single cell measurements on the expression of key genes in lactose uptake network and explore the importance of genetic noise on the regulation of these genes.

  11. Controlling extreme events on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-08-01

    Extreme events, a type of collective behavior in complex networked dynamical systems, often can have catastrophic consequences. To develop effective strategies to control extreme events is of fundamental importance and practical interest. Utilizing transportation dynamics on complex networks as a prototypical setting, we find that making the network ``mobile'' can effectively suppress extreme events. A striking, resonance-like phenomenon is uncovered, where an optimal degree of mobility exists for which the probability of extreme events is minimized. We derive an analytic theory to understand the mechanism of control at a detailed and quantitative level, and validate the theory numerically. Implications of our finding to current areas such as cybersecurity are discussed.

  12. The control networks of Mimas and Enceladus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. E.; Katayama, F. Y.

    1983-01-01

    A bundle-type analytical triangulation program is employed to compute control networks for Mimas, whose network encircles the satellite with 110 points measured on 32 Voyager 1 pictures, and Enceladus, whose network does not completely encircle the satellite and contains 71 points measured on 22 Voyager 2 pictures. Many of the control points are identified on illustrations and by name, and their coordinates are presented in tabular form. The analytical triangulation program was used to solve for the mean radii and three principal axes of best-fit ellipsoids. The mean radius of Mimas is 197 + or - 3 km, while that of Enceladus is 251 + or - 5 km.

  13. Control of Stochastic and Induced Switching in Biophysical Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Daniel K.; Kath, William L.; Motter, Adilson E.

    2015-01-01

    Noise caused by fluctuations at the molecular level is a fundamental part of intracellular processes. While the response of biological systems to noise has been studied extensively, there has been limited understanding of how to exploit it to induce a desired cell state. Here we present a scalable, quantitative method based on the Freidlin-Wentzell action to predict and control noise-induced switching between different states in genetic networks that, conveniently, can also control transitions between stable states in the absence of noise. We apply this methodology to models of cell differentiation and show how predicted manipulations of tunable factors can induce lineage changes, and further utilize it to identify new candidate strategies for cancer therapy in a cell death pathway model. This framework offers a systems approach to identifying the key factors for rationally manipulating biophysical dynamics, and should also find use in controlling other classes of noisy complex networks. PMID:26451275

  14. Control of Stochastic and Induced Switching in Biophysical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Daniel K.; Kath, William L.; Motter, Adilson E.

    2015-07-01

    Noise caused by fluctuations at the molecular level is a fundamental part of intracellular processes. While the response of biological systems to noise has been studied extensively, there has been limited understanding of how to exploit it to induce a desired cell state. Here we present a scalable, quantitative method based on the Freidlin-Wentzell action to predict and control noise-induced switching between different states in genetic networks that, conveniently, can also control transitions between stable states in the absence of noise. We apply this methodology to models of cell differentiation and show how predicted manipulations of tunable factors can induce lineage changes, and further utilize it to identify new candidate strategies for cancer therapy in a cell death pathway model. This framework offers a systems approach to identifying the key factors for rationally manipulating biophysical dynamics, and should also find use in controlling other classes of noisy complex networks.

  15. The network of global corporate control.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Stefania; Glattfelder, James B; Battiston, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the control network of transnational corporations affects global market competition and financial stability. So far, only small national samples were studied and there was no appropriate methodology to assess control globally. We present the first investigation of the architecture of the international ownership network, along with the computation of the control held by each global player. We find that transnational corporations form a giant bow-tie structure and that a large portion of control flows to a small tightly-knit core of financial institutions. This core can be seen as an economic "super-entity" that raises new important issues both for researchers and policy makers. PMID:22046252

  16. Scaling up: human genetics as a Cold War network.

    PubMed

    Lindee, Susan

    2014-09-01

    In this commentary I explore how the papers here illuminate the processes of collection that have been so central to the history of human genetics since 1945. The development of human population genetics in the Cold War period produced databases and biobanks that have endured into the present, and that continue to be used and debated. In the decades after the bomb, scientists collected and transferred human biological materials and information from populations of interest, and as they moved these biological resources or biosocial resources acquired new meanings and uses. The papers here collate these practices and map their desires and ironies. They explore how a large international network of geneticists, biological anthropologists, virologists and other physicians and scientists interacted with local informants, research subjects and public officials. They also track the networks and standards that mobilized the transfer of information, genealogies, tissue and blood samples. As Joanna Radin suggests here, the massive collections of human biological materials and data were often understood to be resources for an "as-yet-unknown" future. The stories told here contain elements of surveillance, extraction, salvage and eschatology. PMID:24954362

  17. Genetic specificity of a plant-insect food web: Implications for linking genetic variation to network complexity.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Matthew A; Fortuna, Miguel A; Bascompte, Jordi; Nicholson, Joshua R; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Jules, Erik S; Crutsinger, Gregory M

    2016-02-23

    Theory predicts that intraspecific genetic variation can increase the complexity of an ecological network. To date, however, we are lacking empirical knowledge of the extent to which genetic variation determines the assembly of ecological networks, as well as how the gain or loss of genetic variation will affect network structure. To address this knowledge gap, we used a common garden experiment to quantify the extent to which heritable trait variation in a host plant determines the assembly of its associated insect food web (network of trophic interactions). We then used a resampling procedure to simulate the additive effects of genetic variation on overall food-web complexity. We found that trait variation among host-plant genotypes was associated with resistance to insect herbivores, which indirectly affected interactions between herbivores and their insect parasitoids. Direct and indirect genetic effects resulted in distinct compositions of trophic interactions associated with each host-plant genotype. Moreover, our simulations suggest that food-web complexity would increase by 20% over the range of genetic variation in the experimental population of host plants. Taken together, our results indicate that intraspecific genetic variation can play a key role in structuring ecological networks, which may in turn affect network persistence. PMID:26858398

  18. Genetic control of fruit vitamin C contents.

    PubMed

    Davey, Mark W; Kenis, Katrien; Keulemans, Johan

    2006-09-01

    An F(1) progeny derived from a cross between the apple (Malus x domestica) cultivars Telamon and Braeburn was used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) linked to the vitamin C (l-ascorbate [l-AA]) contents of fruit skin and flesh (cortex) tissues. We identified up to three highly significant QTLs for both the mean l-AA and the mean total l-AA contents of fruit flesh on both parental genetic linkage maps, confirming the quantitative nature of these traits. These QTLs account for up to a maximum of 60% of the total population variation observed in the progeny, and with a maximal individual contribution of 31% per QTL. QTLs common to both parents were identified on linkage groups (LGs) 6, 10, and 11 of the Malus reference map, while each parent also had additional unique QTLs on other LGs. Interestingly, one strong QTL on LG-17 of the Telamon linkage map colocalized with a highly significant QTL associated with flesh browning, and a minor QTL for dehydroascorbate content, supporting earlier work that links fruit l-AA contents with the susceptibility of hardfruit to postharvest browning. We also found significant minor QTLs for skin l-AA and total l-AA (l-AA + dehydroascorbate) contents in Telamon. Currently, little is known about the genetic determinants underlying tissue l-AA homeostasis, but the presence of major, highly significant QTL in both these apple genotypes under field conditions suggests the existence of common control mechanisms, allelic heterozygosity, and helps outline strategies and the potential for the molecular breeding of these traits. PMID:16844833

  19. Genetic control of epithelial tube fusion during Drosophila tracheal development.

    PubMed

    Samakovlis, C; Manning, G; Steneberg, P; Hacohen, N; Cantera, R; Krasnow, M A

    1996-11-01

    During development of tubular networks such as the mammalian vascular system, the kidney and the Drosophila tracheal system, epithelial tubes must fuse to each other to form a continuous network. Little is known of the cellular mechanisms or molecular control of epithelial tube fusion. We describe the cellular dynamics of a tracheal fusion event in Drosophila and identify a gene regulatory hierarchy that controls this extraordinary process. A tracheal cell located at the developing fusion point expresses a sequence of specific markers as it grows out and contacts a similar cell from another tube; the two cells adhere and form an intercellular junction, and they become doughnut-shaped cells with the lumen passing through them. The early fusion marker Fusion-1 is identified as the escargot gene. It lies near the top of the regulatory hierarchy, activating the expression of later fusion markers and repressing genes that promote branching. Ectopic expression of escargot activates the fusion process and suppresses branching throughout the tracheal system, leading to ectopic tracheal connections that resemble certain arteriovenous malformations in humans. This establishes a simple genetic system to study fusion of epithelial tubes. PMID:8951068

  20. Neural-network-biased genetic algorithms for materials design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Tarak; Meenakshisundaram, Venkatesh; Simmons, David

    Machine learning tools have been progressively adopted by the materials science community to accelerate design of materials with targeted properties. However, in the search for new materials exhibiting properties and performance beyond that previously achieved, machine learning approaches are frequently limited by two major shortcomings. First, they are intrinsically interpolative. They are therefore better suited to the optimization of properties within the known range of accessible behavior than to the discovery of new materials with extremal behavior. Second, they require the availability of large datasets, which in some fields are not available and would be prohibitively expensive to produce. Here we describe a new strategy for combining genetic algorithms, neural networks and other machine learning tools, and molecular simulation to discover materials with extremal properties in the absence of pre-existing data. Predictions from progressively constructed machine learning tools are employed to bias the evolution of a genetic algorithm, with fitness evaluations performed via direct molecular dynamics simulation. We survey several initial materials design problems we have addressed with this framework and compare its performance to that of standard genetic algorithm approaches. We acknowledge the W. M. Keck Foundation for support of this work.

  1. Engineering modular and tunable genetic amplifiers for scaling transcriptional signals in cascaded gene networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baojun; Barahona, Mauricio; Buck, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Synthetic biology aims to control and reprogram signal processing pathways within living cells so as to realize repurposed, beneficial applications. Here we report the design and construction of a set of modular and gain-tunable genetic amplifiers in Escherichia coli capable of amplifying a transcriptional signal with wide tunable-gain control in cascaded gene networks. The devices are engineered using orthogonal genetic components (hrpRS, hrpV and PhrpL) from the hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) gene regulatory network in Pseudomonas syringae. The amplifiers can linearly scale up to 21-fold the transcriptional input with a large output dynamic range, yet not introducing significant time delay or significant noise during signal amplification. The set of genetic amplifiers achieves different gains and input dynamic ranges by varying the expression levels of the underlying ligand-free activator proteins in the device. As their electronic counterparts, these engineered transcriptional amplifiers can act as fundamental building blocks in the design of biological systems by predictably and dynamically modulating transcriptional signal flows to implement advanced intra- and extra-cellular control functions. PMID:25030903

  2. General asymmetric neutral networks and structure design by genetic algorithms: A learning rule for temporal patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Bornholdt, S.; Graudenz, D.

    1993-07-01

    A learning algorithm based on genetic algorithms for asymmetric neural networks with an arbitrary structure is presented. It is suited for the learning of temporal patterns and leads to stable neural networks with feedback.

  3. NOVANET: communications network for a control system

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.R.; Severyn, J.R.; VanArsdall, P.J.

    1983-05-23

    NOVANET is a control system oriented fiber optic local area network that was designed to meet the unique and often conflicting requirements of the Nova laser control system which will begin operation in 1984. The computers and data acquisition devices that form the distributed control system for a large laser fusion research facility need reliable, high speed communications. Both control/status messages and experimental data must be handled. A subset of NOVANET is currently operating on the two beam Novette laser system.

  4. Cuba's Salgen: a provincial informatics network for genetic services to pregnant women and newborns.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Miguel; Pérez, Rubén; Valero, Damicel; Santiago, Darío G

    2014-01-01

    The Sancti Spíritus Provincial Medical Genetics Network has been using the Salgen IT platform since 2009 for health care, administrative and research activities concerning pregnant mothers and newborns. The network uses the national Infomed backbone to provide real-time connection between community-based polyclinics in primary health care and the Provincial Medical Genetics Reference Center. The platform has records for 23,025 pregnant women and sequential clinical data on genetic risk assessment in early pregnancy, first trimester ultrasound, sickle cell anemia screening, alpha-fetoprotein levels, cytogenetic antenatal diagnosis, second trimester ultrasound, delivery and newborn characteristics, neonatal metabolic screening, and infant clinical assessment. The system makes health care results immediately available and provides health alerts to enable timely preventive care for pregnant women. It also provides guidelines for processes and practices, and streamlines administrative and monitoring activities through statistical reports. The database generates indicators for assessing fetal growth and applies international standards for antenatal ultrasound quality control. Salgen provides a new source of information for medical research and knowledge management, and its use in this case fulfills Cuba's criteria for an integrated health services network. PMID:25208122

  5. Markov Logic Networks in the Analysis of Genetic Data

    PubMed Central

    Sakhanenko, Nikita A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Complex, non-additive genetic interactions are common and can be critical in determining phenotypes. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and similar statistical studies of linkage data, however, assume additive models of gene interactions in looking for genotype-phenotype associations. These statistical methods view the compound effects of multiple genes on a phenotype as a sum of influences of each gene and often miss a substantial part of the heritable effect. Such methods do not use any biological knowledge about underlying mechanisms. Modeling approaches from the artificial intelligence (AI) field that incorporate deterministic knowledge into models to perform statistical analysis can be applied to include prior knowledge in genetic analysis. We chose to use the most general such approach, Markov Logic Networks (MLNs), for combining deterministic knowledge with statistical analysis. Using simple, logistic regression-type MLNs we can replicate the results of traditional statistical methods, but we also show that we are able to go beyond finding independent markers linked to a phenotype by using joint inference without an independence assumption. The method is applied to genetic data on yeast sporulation, a complex phenotype with gene interactions. In addition to detecting all of the previously identified loci associated with sporulation, our method identifies four loci with smaller effects. Since their effect on sporulation is small, these four loci were not detected with methods that do not account for dependence between markers due to gene interactions. We show how gene interactions can be detected using more complex models, which can be used as a general framework for incorporating systems biology with genetics. PMID:20958249

  6. Controlling neural network responsiveness: tradeoffs and constraints

    PubMed Central

    Keren, Hanna; Marom, Shimon

    2014-01-01

    In recent years much effort is invested in means to control neural population responses at the whole brain level, within the context of developing advanced medical applications. The tradeoffs and constraints involved, however, remain elusive due to obvious complications entailed by studying whole brain dynamics. Here, we present effective control of response features (probability and latency) of cortical networks in vitro over many hours, and offer this approach as an experimental toy for studying controllability of neural networks in the wider context. Exercising this approach we show that enforcement of stable high activity rates by means of closed loop control may enhance alteration of underlying global input–output relations and activity dependent dispersion of neuronal pair-wise correlations across the network. PMID:24808860

  7. Control of fluxes in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Basler, Georg; Nikoloski, Zoran; Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Barabási, Albert-László; Liu, Yang-Yu

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the control of large-scale metabolic networks is central to biology and medicine. However, existing approaches either require specifying a cellular objective or can only be used for small networks. We introduce new coupling types describing the relations between reaction activities, and develop an efficient computational framework, which does not require any cellular objective for systematic studies of large-scale metabolism. We identify the driver reactions facilitating control of 23 metabolic networks from all kingdoms of life. We find that unicellular organisms require a smaller degree of control than multicellular organisms. Driver reactions are under complex cellular regulation in Escherichia coli, indicating their preeminent role in facilitating cellular control. In human cancer cells, driver reactions play pivotal roles in malignancy and represent potential therapeutic targets. The developed framework helps us gain insights into regulatory principles of diseases and facilitates design of engineering strategies at the interface of gene regulation, signaling, and metabolism. PMID:27197218

  8. Epidemic Extinction and Control in Heterogeneous Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindes, Jason; Schwartz, Ira B.

    2016-07-01

    We consider epidemic extinction in finite networks with a broad variation in local connectivity. Generalizing the theory of large fluctuations to random networks with a given degree distribution, we are able to predict the most probable, or optimal, paths to extinction in various configurations, including truncated power laws. We find that paths for heterogeneous networks follow a limiting form in which infection first decreases in low-degree nodes, which triggers a rapid extinction in high-degree nodes, and finishes with a residual low-degree extinction. The usefulness of our approach is further demonstrated through optimal control strategies that leverage the dependence of finite-size fluctuations on network topology. Interestingly, we find that the optimal control is a mix of treating both high- and low-degree nodes based on theoretical predictions, in contrast to methods that ignore dynamical fluctuations.

  9. Genetic control of seed proteins in wheat.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, H S

    1977-09-01

    Electrophoretic profiles of crude protein extracts from seed of F1 hybrids and reciprocal crosses among diploid, tetraploid and hexaploid wheats were compared with those of their respective parental species. The electrophoretic patterns within each of three pairs of reciprocal crosses, T.boeoticum X T.urartu, T.monococcun X T. urartu and T.dicoccum X T. araraticum, were different from one another but were identical with those of their respective maternal parents. Protein bands characteristic of the paternal parents were missing in F1 hybrid seed suggesting that the major seed proteins in wheat were presumably regulated by genotype of the maternal parent rather than by the seed genotype. However, in another three pairs of reciprocal crosses, T.boeoticum X T. durum, T.dicoccum X T.aestivum and T. zhukovskyi x T. aestivum, protein bands attributable to the paternal parents were present in the F1 hybrid seeds indicating that the seed proteins were not always exclusively regulated by the maternal genotype. The expression of paternal genomes is presumably determined by dosage and genetic affinity of the maternal and paternal genomes in the hybrid endosperm. The maternal regulation of seed protein content is probably accomplished through the maternal control over seed size. The seed protein quality may, however, depend upon the extent of expression of the paternal genome. PMID:24407840

  10. Molecular and genetic control of plant thermomorphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Quint, Marcel; Delker, Carolin; Franklin, Keara A; Wigge, Philip A; Halliday, Karen J; van Zanten, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Temperature is a major factor governing the distribution and seasonal behaviour of plants. Being sessile, plants are highly responsive to small differences in temperature and adjust their growth and development accordingly. The suite of morphological and architectural changes induced by high ambient temperatures, below the heat-stress range, is collectively called thermomorphogenesis. Understanding the molecular genetic circuitries underlying thermomorphogenesis is particularly relevant in the context of climate change, as this knowledge will be key to rational breeding for thermo-tolerant crop varieties. Until recently, the fundamental mechanisms of temperature perception and signalling remained unknown. Our understanding of temperature signalling is now progressing, mainly by exploiting the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The transcription factor PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) has emerged as a critical player in regulating phytohormone levels and their activity. To control thermomorphogenesis, multiple regulatory circuits are in place to modulate PIF4 levels, activity and downstream mechanisms. Thermomorphogenesis is integrally governed by various light signalling pathways, the circadian clock, epigenetic mechanisms and chromatin-level regulation. In this Review, we summarize recent progress in the field and discuss how the emerging knowledge in Arabidopsis may be transferred to relevant crop systems. PMID:27250752

  11. Genetic control of biennial bearing in apple

    PubMed Central

    Guitton, Baptiste; Kelner, Jean-Jacques; Velasco, Riccardo; Gardiner, Susan E.; Chagné, David; Costes, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    Although flowering in mature fruit trees is recurrent, floral induction can be strongly inhibited by concurrent fruiting, leading to a pattern of irregular fruiting across consecutive years referred to as biennial bearing. The genetic determinants of biennial bearing in apple were investigated using the 114 flowering individuals from an F1 population of 122 genotypes, from a ‘Starkrimson’ (strong biennial bearer)בGranny Smith’ (regular bearer) cross. The number of inflorescences, and the number and the mass of harvested fruit were recorded over 6 years and used to calculate 26 variables and indices quantifying yield, precocity of production, and biennial bearing. Inflorescence traits exhibited the highest genotypic effect, and three quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on linkage group (LG) 4, LG8, and LG10 explained 50% of the phenotypic variability for biennial bearing. Apple orthologues of flowering and hormone-related genes were retrieved from the whole-genome assembly of ‘Golden Delicious’ and their position was compared with QTLs. Four main genomic regions that contain floral integrator genes, meristem identity genes, and gibberellin oxidase genes co-located with QTLs. The results indicated that flowering genes are less likely to be responsible for biennial bearing than hormone-related genes. New hypotheses for the control of biennial bearing emerged from QTL and candidate gene co-locations and suggest the involvement of different physiological processes such as the regulation of flowering genes by hormones. The correlation between tree architecture and biennial bearing is also discussed. PMID:21963613

  12. Flexible brain network reconfiguration supporting inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Spielberg, Jeffrey M; Miller, Gregory A; Heller, Wendy; Banich, Marie T

    2015-08-11

    The ability to inhibit distracting stimuli from interfering with goal-directed behavior is crucial for success in most spheres of life. Despite an abundance of studies examining regional brain activation, knowledge of the brain networks involved in inhibitory control remains quite limited. To address this critical gap, we applied graph theory tools to functional magnetic resonance imaging data collected while a large sample of adults (n = 101) performed a color-word Stroop task. Higher demand for inhibitory control was associated with restructuring of the global network into a configuration that was more optimized for specialized processing (functional segregation), more efficient at communicating the output of such processing across the network (functional integration), and more resilient to potential interruption (resilience). In addition, there were regional changes with right inferior frontal sulcus and right anterior insula occupying more central positions as network hubs, and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex becoming more tightly coupled with its regional subnetwork. Given the crucial role of inhibitory control in goal-directed behavior, present findings identifying functional network organization supporting inhibitory control have the potential to provide additional insights into how inhibitory control may break down in a wide variety of individuals with neurological or psychiatric difficulties. PMID:26216985

  13. Color control of printers by neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Shoji

    1998-07-01

    A method is proposed for solving the mapping problem from the 3D color space to the 4D CMYK space of printer ink signals by means of a neural network. The CIE-L*a*b* color system is used as the device-independent color space. The color reproduction problem is considered as the problem of controlling an unknown static system with four inputs and three outputs. A controller determines the CMYK signals necessary to produce the desired L*a*b* values with a given printer. Our solution method for this control problem is based on a two-phase procedure which eliminates the need for UCR and GCR. The first phase determines a neural network as a model of the given printer, and the second phase determines the combined neural network system by combining the printer model and the controller in such a way that it represents an identity mapping in the L*a*b* color space. Then the network of the controller part realizes the mapping from the L*a*b* space to the CMYK space. Practical algorithms are presented in the form of multilayer feedforward networks. The feasibility of the proposed method is shown in experiments using a dye sublimation printer and an ink jet printer.

  14. Estimating the minimum control count of random network models

    PubMed Central

    Ruths, Derek; Ruths, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The study of controllability of complex networks has introduced the minimum number of controls required for full controllability as a new network measure of interest. This network measure, like many others, is non-trivial to compute. As a result, establishing the significance of minimum control counts (MCCs) in real networks using random network null models is expensive. Here we derive analytic estimates for the expected MCCs of networks drawn from three commonly-used random network models. Our estimates show good agreement with exact control counts. Furthermore, the analytic expressions we derive offer insights into the structures within each random network model that induce the need for controls. PMID:26817434

  15. The APS control system network upgrade.

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorowicz, K. v.; Leibfritz, D.; McDowell, W. P.

    1999-10-22

    When it was installed,the Advanced Photon Source (APS) control system network was at the state-of-the-art. Different aspects of the system have been reported at previous meetings [1,2]. As loads on the controls network have increased due to newer and faster workstations and front-end computers, we have found performance of the system declining and have implemented an upgraded network. There have been dramatic advances in networking hardware in the last several years. The upgraded APS controls network replaces the original FDDI backbone and shared Ethernet hubs with redundant gigabit uplinks and fully switched 10/100 Ethernet switches with backplane fabrics in excess of 20 Gbits/s (Gbps). The central collapsed backbone FDDI concentrator has been replaced with a Gigabit Ethernet switch with greater than 30 Gbps backplane fabric. Full redundancy of the system has been maintained. This paper will discuss this upgrade and include performance data and performance comparisons with the original network.

  16. Strawberry Maturity Neural Network Detectng System Based on Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liming

    The quick and non-detective detection of agriculture product is one of the measures to increase the precision and productivity of harvesting and grading. Having analyzed H frequency of different maturities in different light intensities, the results show that H frequency for the same maturity has little influence in different light intensities; Under the same light intensity, three strawberry maturities are changing in order. After having confirmed the H frequency section to distinguish the different strawberry maturity, the triplelayer feed-forward neural network system to detect strawberry maturity was designed by using genetic algorithm. The test results show that the detecting precision ratio is 91.7%, it takes 160ms to distinguish one strawberry. Therefore, the online non-detective detecting the strawberry maturity could be realized.

  17. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficient using Genetic Algorithm Optimized Neural Network for Sparse Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Wind tunnels use scale models to characterize aerodynamic coefficients, Wind tunnel testing can be slow and costly due to high personnel overhead and intensive power utilization. Although manual curve fitting can be done, it is highly efficient to use a neural network to define the complex relationship between variables. Numerical simulation of complex vehicles on the wide range of conditions required for flight simulation requires static and dynamic data. Static data at low Mach numbers and angles of attack may be obtained with simpler Euler codes. Static data of stalled vehicles where zones of flow separation are usually present at higher angles of attack require Navier-Stokes simulations which are costly due to the large processing time required to attain convergence. Preliminary dynamic data may be obtained with simpler methods based on correlations and vortex methods; however, accurate prediction of the dynamic coefficients requires complex and costly numerical simulations. A reliable and fast method of predicting complex aerodynamic coefficients for flight simulation I'S presented using a neural network. The training data for the neural network are derived from numerical simulations and wind-tunnel experiments. The aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of the flow characteristics and the control surfaces of the vehicle. The basic coefficients of lift, drag and pitching moment are expressed as functions of angles of attack and Mach number. The modeled and training aerodynamic coefficients show good agreement. This method shows excellent potential for rapid development of aerodynamic models for flight simulation. Genetic Algorithms (GA) are used to optimize a previously built Artificial Neural Network (ANN) that reliably predicts aerodynamic coefficients. Results indicate that the GA provided an efficient method of optimizing the ANN model to predict aerodynamic coefficients. The reliability of the ANN using the GA includes prediction of aerodynamic

  18. Cortical Control of Affective Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Black, Sherilynn J.; Hultman, Rainbo; Szabo, Steven T.; DeMaio, Kristine D.; Du, Jeanette; Katz, Brittany M.; Feng, Guoping; Covington, Herbert E.; Dzirasa, Kafui

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation and deep brain stimulation have emerged as therapeutic modalities for treatment refractory depression; however, little remains known regarding the circuitry that mediates the therapeutic effect of these approaches. Here we show that direct optogenetic stimulation of prefrontal cortex (PFC) descending projection neurons in mice engineered to express Chr2 in layer V pyramidal neurons (Thy1–Chr2 mice) models an antidepressant-like effect in mice subjected to a forced-swim test. Furthermore, we show that this PFC stimulation induces a long-lasting suppression of anxiety-like behavior (but not conditioned social avoidance) in socially stressed Thy1–Chr2 mice: an effect that is observed >10 d after the last stimulation. Finally, we use optogenetic stimulation and multicircuit recording techniques concurrently in Thy1–Chr2 mice to demonstrate that activation of cortical projection neurons entrains neural oscillatory activity and drives synchrony across limbic brain areas that regulate affect. Importantly, these neural oscillatory changes directly correlate with the temporally precise activation and suppression of limbic unit activity. Together, our findings show that the direct activation of cortical projection systems is sufficient to modulate activity across networks underlying affective regulation. They also suggest that optogenetic stimulation of cortical projection systems may serve as a viable therapeutic strategy for treating affective disorders. PMID:23325249

  19. Network dysfunction of emotional and cognitive processes in those at genetic risk of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Breakspear, Michael; Roberts, Gloria; Green, Melissa J; Nguyen, Vinh T; Frankland, Andrew; Levy, Florence; Lenroot, Rhoshel; Mitchell, Philip B

    2015-11-01

    The emotional and cognitive vulnerabilities that precede the development of bipolar disorder are poorly understood. The inferior frontal gyrus-a key cortical hub for the integration of cognitive and emotional processes-exhibits both structural and functional changes in bipolar disorder, and is also functionally impaired in unaffected first-degree relatives, showing diminished engagement during inhibition of threat-related emotional stimuli. We hypothesized that this functional impairment of the inferior frontal gyrus in those at genetic risk of bipolar disorder reflects the dysfunction of broader network dynamics underlying the coordination of emotion perception and cognitive control. To test this, we studied effective connectivity in functional magnetic resonance imaging data acquired from 41 first-degree relatives of patients with bipolar disorder, 45 matched healthy controls and 55 participants with established bipolar disorder. Dynamic causal modelling was used to model the neuronal interaction between key regions associated with fear perception (the anterior cingulate), inhibition (the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) and the region upon which these influences converge, namely the inferior frontal gyrus. Network models that embodied non-linear, hierarchical relationships were the most strongly supported by data from our healthy control and bipolar participants. We observed a marked difference in the hierarchical influence of the anterior cingulate on the effective connectivity from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to the inferior frontal gyrus that is unique to the at-risk cohort. Non-specific, non-hierarchical mechanisms appear to compensate for this network disturbance. We thus establish a specific network disturbance suggesting dysfunction in the processes that support hierarchical relationships between emotion and cognitive control in those at high genetic risk for bipolar disorder. PMID:26373604

  20. Echoed time series predictions, neural networks and genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, A.

    This work aims to illustrate a potentially serious and previously unrecognised problem in using Neural Networks (NNs), and possibly other techniques, to predict Time Series (TS). It also demonstrates how a new training scheme using a genetic algorithm can alleviate this problem. Although it is already established that NNs can predict TS such as Sunspot Number (SSN) with reasonable success, the accuracy of these predictions is often judged solely by an RMS or related error. The use of this type of error overlooks the presence of what we have termed echoing, where the NN outputs its most recent input as its prediction. Therefore, a method of detecting echoed predictions is introduced, called time-shifting. Reasons for the presence of echo are discussed and then related to the choice of TS sampling. Finally, a new specially designed training scheme is described, which is a hybrid of a genetic algorithm search and back propagation. With this method we have successfully trained NNs to predict without any echo.

  1. Cellular and network mechanisms of genetically-determined absence seizures.

    PubMed

    Pinault, Didier; O'Brien, Terence J

    2005-01-01

    network mechanisms responsible for the switch from physiological, wake-related, natural oscillations into pathological spike-and-wave discharges? We speculate on possible answers to this, building particularly on recent findings from genetic models in rats. PMID:21909233

  2. [The network of official medicines control laboratories].

    PubMed

    Buchheit, K-H; Wanko, R

    2014-10-01

    Licensing, control and surveillance by competent authorities is the basis for ensuring efficacy, safety and quality of medicines in Europe. The control of the quality of medicines by national control laboratories, known as Official Medicines Control Laboratories (OMCLs) is an essential step in this process; it encompasses controls before and after granting a marketing authorisation. For certain groups of biomedical medicines (vaccines for human and veterinary use, medicines derived from human plasma) even each batch is controlled before it can be placed on the market. As single OMCLs would not be able to cope with their task, given the large number and diversity of medicines, in 1994 the OMCL network was founded upon initiative of the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare, in close collaboration with the Commission of the European Union. Currently 68 OMCLs from 39 countries are part of the network. Prerequisite for the smooth operation of the OMCL network is the harmonisation of the quality management system of the individual OMCLs, based on the ISO 17025 standard, internal guidelines and the European Pharmacopoeia. Compliance with these standards is checked through regular audits, thus creating the basis for mutual recognition of test results. The collaboration in the OMCL network for the surveillance of the medicines market, the official control authority batch release and the fight against counterfeiting and illegal medicines enables OMCLs to keep pace with the developments in the field of medicines and to control the broad spectrum of medicines. In the 20 years since its start, the OMCL network has become a European success story. PMID:25192832

  3. Exhaustive search for conservation networks of populations representing genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Diniz-Filho, J A F; Diniz, J V B P L; Telles, M P C

    2016-01-01

    Conservation strategies routinely use optimization methods to identify the smallest number of units required to represent a set of features that need to be conserved, including biomes, species, and populations. In this study, we provide R scripts to facilitate exhaustive search for solutions that represent all of the alleles in networks with the smallest possible number of populations. The script also allows other variables to be added to describe the populations, thereby providing the basis for multi-objective optimization and the construction of Pareto curves by averaging the values in the solutions. We applied this algorithm to an empirical dataset that comprised 23 populations of Eugenia dysenterica, which is a tree species with a widespread distribution in the Cerrado biome. We observed that 15 populations would be necessary to represent all 249 alleles based on 11 microsatellite loci, and that the likelihood of representing all of the alleles with random networks is less than 0.0001. We selected the solution (from two with the smallest number of populations) obtained for the populations with a higher level of climatic stability as the best strategy for in situ conservation of genetic diversity of E. dysenterica. The scripts provided in this study are a simple and efficient alternative to more complex optimization methods, especially when the number of populations is relatively small (i.e., <25 populations). PMID:26909939

  4. Controlling extreme events on complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Extreme events, a type of collective behavior in complex networked dynamical systems, often can have catastrophic consequences. To develop effective strategies to control extreme events is of fundamental importance and practical interest. Utilizing transportation dynamics on complex networks as a prototypical setting, we find that making the network “mobile” can effectively suppress extreme events. A striking, resonance-like phenomenon is uncovered, where an optimal degree of mobility exists for which the probability of extreme events is minimized. We derive an analytic theory to understand the mechanism of control at a detailed and quantitative level, and validate the theory numerically. Implications of our finding to current areas such as cybersecurity are discussed. PMID:25131344

  5. Controlling extreme events on complex networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Extreme events, a type of collective behavior in complex networked dynamical systems, often can have catastrophic consequences. To develop effective strategies to control extreme events is of fundamental importance and practical interest. Utilizing transportation dynamics on complex networks as a prototypical setting, we find that making the network "mobile" can effectively suppress extreme events. A striking, resonance-like phenomenon is uncovered, where an optimal degree of mobility exists for which the probability of extreme events is minimized. We derive an analytic theory to understand the mechanism of control at a detailed and quantitative level, and validate the theory numerically. Implications of our finding to current areas such as cybersecurity are discussed. PMID:25131344

  6. The Network of Global Corporate Control

    PubMed Central

    Vitali, Stefania; Glattfelder, James B.; Battiston, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the control network of transnational corporations affects global market competition and financial stability. So far, only small national samples were studied and there was no appropriate methodology to assess control globally. We present the first investigation of the architecture of the international ownership network, along with the computation of the control held by each global player. We find that transnational corporations form a giant bow-tie structure and that a large portion of control flows to a small tightly-knit core of financial institutions. This core can be seen as an economic “super-entity” that raises new important issues both for researchers and policy makers. PMID:22046252

  7. Wireless Networking for Control: Technologies and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Mikael; Jäntti, Riku

    This chapter discusses technologies and models for low power wireless industrial communication. The aim of the text is to narrow the gap between the models used in the theoretical control literature with models that arise when tools from communication theory are used to model emerging standards for industrial wireless. The chapter provides a tutorial overview covering basic concepts and models for wireless propagation, medium access control, multi-hop networking, routing and transport protocols. Throughout, an effort is made to describe both key technologies and associated models of control-relevant characteristics such as latency and loss. Some existing and emerging specifications and standards, including Zigbee, WirelessHART and ISA100, are described in some detail, and links are made between the developed models and useful network abstractions for control design.

  8. Distributed control network for optogenetic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprowicz, G.; Juszczyk, B.; Mankiewicz, L.

    2014-11-01

    Nowadays optogenetic experiments are constructed to examine social behavioural relations in groups of animals. A novel concept of implantable device with distributed control network and advanced positioning capabilities is proposed. It is based on wireless energy transfer technology, micro-power radio interface and advanced signal processing.

  9. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control

    PubMed Central

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-01-01

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights. PMID:27067020

  10. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control.

    PubMed

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-01-01

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights. PMID:27067020

  11. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-04-01

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights.

  12. Deep networks for motor control functions

    PubMed Central

    Berniker, Max; Kording, Konrad P.

    2015-01-01

    The motor system generates time-varying commands to move our limbs and body. Conventional descriptions of motor control and learning rely on dynamical representations of our body's state (forward and inverse models), and control policies that must be integrated forward to generate feedforward time-varying commands; thus these are representations across space, but not time. Here we examine a new approach that directly represents both time-varying commands and the resulting state trajectories with a function; a representation across space and time. Since the output of this function includes time, it necessarily requires more parameters than a typical dynamical model. To avoid the problems of local minima these extra parameters introduce, we exploit recent advances in machine learning to build our function using a stacked autoencoder, or deep network. With initial and target states as inputs, this deep network can be trained to output an accurate temporal profile of the optimal command and state trajectory for a point-to-point reach of a non-linear limb model, even when influenced by varying force fields. In a manner that mirrors motor babble, the network can also teach itself to learn through trial and error. Lastly, we demonstrate how this network can learn to optimize a cost objective. This functional approach to motor control is a sharp departure from the standard dynamical approach, and may offer new insights into the neural implementation of motor control. PMID:25852530

  13. Inner structure of capital control networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, Stefano

    2004-07-01

    We study the topological structure of the network of shareholding relationships in the Italian stock market (MIB) and in two US stock markets (NYSE and NASDAQ). The portfolio diversification and the wealth invested on the market by economical agents have been shown in our previous work to have all a power law behavior. However, a further investigation shows that the inner structure of the capital control network are not at all the same across markets. The shareholding network is a weighted graph, therefore we introduce two quantities analogous to in-degree and out-degree for weighted graphs which measure, respectively: the number of effective shareholders of a stock and the number of companies effectively controlled by a single holder. Combining the information carried by the distributions of these two quantities we are able to extract the backbone of each market and we find that while the MIB splits into several separated groups of interest, the US markets is characterized by very large holders sharing control on overlapping subsets of stocks. This method seems promising for the analysis of the topology of capital control networks in general and not only in the stock market.

  14. REAL TIME CONTROL OF URBAN DRAINAGE NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time control (RTC) is a custom-designed, computer-assisted management technology for a specific sewerage network to meet the operational objectives of its collection/conveyance system. RTC can operate in several modes, including a mode that is activated during a wet weather ...

  15. Deep networks for motor control functions.

    PubMed

    Berniker, Max; Kording, Konrad P

    2015-01-01

    The motor system generates time-varying commands to move our limbs and body. Conventional descriptions of motor control and learning rely on dynamical representations of our body's state (forward and inverse models), and control policies that must be integrated forward to generate feedforward time-varying commands; thus these are representations across space, but not time. Here we examine a new approach that directly represents both time-varying commands and the resulting state trajectories with a function; a representation across space and time. Since the output of this function includes time, it necessarily requires more parameters than a typical dynamical model. To avoid the problems of local minima these extra parameters introduce, we exploit recent advances in machine learning to build our function using a stacked autoencoder, or deep network. With initial and target states as inputs, this deep network can be trained to output an accurate temporal profile of the optimal command and state trajectory for a point-to-point reach of a non-linear limb model, even when influenced by varying force fields. In a manner that mirrors motor babble, the network can also teach itself to learn through trial and error. Lastly, we demonstrate how this network can learn to optimize a cost objective. This functional approach to motor control is a sharp departure from the standard dynamical approach, and may offer new insights into the neural implementation of motor control. PMID:25852530

  16. Genomic and Network Patterns of Schizophrenia Genetic Variation in Human Evolutionary Accelerated Regions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ke; Schadt, Eric E.; Pollard, Katherine S.; Roussos, Panos; Dudley, Joel T.

    2015-01-01

    The population persistence of schizophrenia despite associated reductions in fitness and fecundity suggests that the genetic basis of schizophrenia has a complex evolutionary history. A recent meta-analysis of schizophrenia genome-wide association studies offers novel opportunities for assessment of the evolutionary trajectories of schizophrenia-associated loci. In this study, we hypothesize that components of the genetic architecture of schizophrenia are attributable to human lineage-specific evolution. Our results suggest that schizophrenia-associated loci enrich in genes near previously identified human accelerated regions (HARs). Specifically, we find that genes near HARs conserved in nonhuman primates (pHARs) are enriched for schizophrenia-associated loci, and that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes are under stronger selective pressure than other schizophrenia genes and other pHAR-associated genes. We further evaluate pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes in regulatory network contexts to investigate associated molecular functions and mechanisms. We find that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes significantly enrich in a GABA-related coexpression module that was previously found to be differentially regulated in schizophrenia affected individuals versus healthy controls. In another two independent networks constructed from gene expression profiles from prefrontal cortex samples, we find that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes are located in more central positions and their average path lengths to the other nodes are significantly shorter than those of other schizophrenia genes. Together, our results suggest that HARs are associated with potentially important functional roles in the genetic architecture of schizophrenia. PMID:25681384

  17. Temperature drift modeling of MEMS gyroscope based on genetic-Elman neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Shen; Rui, Song; Jie, Li; Xiaoming, Zhang; Jun, Tang; Yunbo, Shi; Jun, Liu; Huiliang, Cao

    2016-05-01

    In order to improve the temperature drift modeling precision of a tuning fork micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) gyroscope, a novel multiple inputs/single output model based on genetic algorithm (GA) and Elman neural network (Elman NN) is proposed. First, the temperature experiment of MEMS gyroscope is carried out and the outputs of MEMS gyroscope and temperature sensors are collected; then the temperature drift model based on temperature, temperature variation rate and the coupling term is proposed, and the Elman NN is employed to guarantee the generalization ability of the model; at last the genetic algorithm is used to tune the parameters of Elman NN in order to improve the modeling precision. The Allan analysis results validate that, compared to traditional single input/single output model, the novel multiple inputs/single output model can guarantee high accurate fitting ability because the proposed model can provide more plentiful controllable information. By the way, the generalization ability of the Elman neural network can be improved significantly due to the parameters are optimized by genetic algorithm.

  18. Genetic algorithm-based neural fuzzy decision tree for mixed scheduling in ATM networks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Teng; Chung, I-Fang; Pu, Her-Chang; Lee', Tsern-Huei; Chang, Jyh-Yeong

    2002-01-01

    Future broadband integrated services networks based on asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) technology are expected to support multiple types of multimedia information with diverse statistical characteristics and quality of service (QoS) requirements. To meet these requirements, efficient scheduling methods are important for traffic control in ATM networks. Among general scheduling schemes, the rate monotonic algorithm is simple enough to be used in high-speed networks, but does not attain the high system utilization of the deadline driven algorithm. However, the deadline driven scheme is computationally complex and hard to implement in hardware. The mixed scheduling algorithm is a combination of the rate monotonic algorithm and the deadline driven algorithm; thus it can provide most of the benefits of these two algorithms. In this paper, we use the mixed scheduling algorithm to achieve high system utilization under the hardware constraint. Because there is no analytic method for schedulability testing of mixed scheduling, we propose a genetic algorithm-based neural fuzzy decision tree (GANFDT) to realize it in a real-time environment. The GANFDT combines a GA and a neural fuzzy network into a binary classification tree. This approach also exploits the power of the classification tree. Simulation results show that the GANFDT provides an efficient way of carrying out mixed scheduling in ATM networks. PMID:18244889

  19. Controlled drug release from hydrogel nanoparticle networks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gang; Gao, Jun; Hu, Zhibing; St John, John V; Ponder, Bill C; Moro, Dan

    2004-02-10

    Monodisperse nanoparticles of poly-N-isopropylacrylamide-co-allylamine (PNIPAM-co-allylamine) and PNIPAM-co-acrylic acid (PNIPAM-co-AA) were synthesized. The close-packed PNIPAM-co-allylamine and PNIPAM-co-AA nanoparticles were converted to three-dimensional gel networks by covalently crosslinking neighboring particles at room temperature and neutral pH using glutaric dialdehyde and adipic acid dihydrazide, respectively. Controlled release studies were conducted using dextran markers of various molecular weights as model macromolecular drugs. Release was quantified under various physical conditions, including a range of temperatures and dextran molecular weights. Dextran, entrapped in cavities in the nanoparticle network, was released with a rate regulated by their molecular weights and cavity size. No release from a conventional bulk PNIPAM gel, with high crosslinking density, was observed. The rate of release from the PNIPAM-co-allylamine network was temperature-dependent, being much faster at room temperature than that at human body temperature. In contrast, release of low molecular weight dextrans from the PNIPAM-co-AA network showed a temperature-independent release profile. These nanoparticle networks have several advantages over conventional bulk gels for controlling the release of high molecular weight biomolecules. PMID:14744482

  20. Genome-level analysis of genetic regulation of liver gene expression networks

    SciTech Connect

    Gatti, Daniel; Maki, Akira; Chesler, Elissa J; Kirova, Roumyana; Kosyk, Oksana; Lu, Lu; Manly, Kenneth; Matthews, Douglas B.; Qu, Yanhua; Williams, Robert; Perkins, Andy; Langston, Michael A; Threadgill, David; Rusyn, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Liver is the primary site for metabolism of nutrients, drugs and chemical agents. While metabolic pathways are complex and tightly regulated, genetic variation among individuals, reflected in variation in gene expression levels, introduces complexity into research on liver disease. This study aimed to dissect genetic networks that control liver gene expression by combining largescale quantitative mRNA expression analysis with genetic mapping in a reference population of BXD recombinant inbred mouse strains for which extensive SNP, haplotype and phenotypic data is publicly available. We profiled gene expression in livers of naive mice of both sexes from C57BL/6J, DBA/2J, B6D2F1, and 37 BXD strains using Agilent oligonucleotide microarrays. This data was used to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) responsible for variation in expression of about 19,000 transcripts. We identified polymorphic cis- and trans-acting loci, including several loci that control expression of large numbers of genes in liver, by comparing the physical transcript position with the location of the controlling QTL. The data is available through a public web-based resource (www.genenetwork.org) that allows custom data mining, identification of co-regulated transcripts and correlated phenotypes, cross-tissue and -species comparisons, as well as testing of a broad array of hypotheses.

  1. Genetic "code": representations and dynamical models of genetic components and networks.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Alex; Arkin, Adam P

    2002-01-01

    Dynamical modeling of biological systems is becoming increasingly widespread as people attempt to grasp biological phenomena in their full complexity and make sense of an accelerating stream of experimental data. We review a number of recent modeling studies that focus on systems specifically involving gene expression and regulation. These systems include bacterial metabolic operons and phase-variable piliation, bacteriophages T7 and lambda, and interacting networks of eukaryotic developmental genes. A wide range of conceptual and mathematical representations of genetic components and phenomena appears in these works. We discuss these representations in depth and give an overview of the tools currently available for creating and exploring dynamical models. We argue that for modeling to realize its full potential as a mainstream biological research technique the tools must become more general and flexible, and formal, standardized representations of biological knowledge and data must be developed. PMID:12142360

  2. Flexible body control using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccullough, Claire L.

    1992-01-01

    Progress is reported on the control of Control Structures Interaction suitcase demonstrator (a flexible structure) using neural networks and fuzzy logic. It is concluded that while control by neural nets alone (i.e., allowing the net to design a controller with no human intervention) has yielded less than optimal results, the neural net trained to emulate the existing fuzzy logic controller does produce acceptible system responses for the initial conditions examined. Also, a neural net was found to be very successful in performing the emulation step necessary for the anticipatory fuzzy controller for the CSI suitcase demonstrator. The fuzzy neural hybrid, which exhibits good robustness and noise rejection properties, shows promise as a controller for practical flexible systems, and should be further evaluated.

  3. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Caenorhabditis elegans Genetic Interaction Network within Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Benjamin; Lee, Anna Y.; Hallett, Michael; Jenna, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    A genetic interaction (GI) is defined when the mutation of one gene modifies the phenotypic expression associated with the mutation of a second gene. Genome-wide efforts to map GIs in yeast revealed structural and functional properties of a GI network. This provided insights into the mechanisms underlying the robustness of yeast to genetic and environmental insults, and also into the link existing between genotype and phenotype. While a significant conservation of GIs and GI network structure has been reported between distant yeast species, such a conservation is not clear between unicellular and multicellular organisms. Structural and functional characterization of a GI network in these latter organisms is consequently of high interest. In this study, we present an in-depth characterization of ~1.5K GIs in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and characterize six distinct classes of GIs by examining a wide-range of structural and functional properties of genes and network, including co-expression, phenotypical manifestations, relationship with protein-protein interaction dense subnetworks (PDS) and pathways, molecular and biological functions, gene essentiality and pleiotropy. Our study shows that GI classes link genes within pathways and display distinctive properties, specifically towards PDS. It suggests a model in which pathways are composed of PDS-centric and PDS-independent GIs coordinating molecular machines through two specific classes of GIs involving pleiotropic and non-pleiotropic connectors. Our study provides the first in-depth characterization of a GI network within pathways of a multicellular organism. It also suggests a model to understand better how GIs control system robustness and evolution. PMID:26871911

  4. Studies on controllability of directed networks with extremal optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jin; Lu, Yong-Zai; Chu, Jian

    2013-12-01

    Almost all natural, social and man-made-engineered systems can be represented by a complex network to describe their dynamic behaviors. To make a real-world complex network controllable with its desired topology, the study on network controllability has been one of the most critical and attractive subjects for both network and control communities. In this paper, based on a given directed-weighted network with both state and control nodes, a novel optimization tool with extremal dynamics to generate an optimal network topology with minimum control nodes and complete controllability under Kalman’s rank condition has been developed. The experimental results on a number of popular benchmark networks show the proposed tool is effective to identify the minimum control nodes which are sufficient to guide the whole network’s dynamics and provide the evolution of network topology during the optimization process. We also find the conclusion: “the sparse networks need more control nodes than the dense, and the homogeneous networks need fewer control nodes compared to the heterogeneous” (Liu et al., 2011 [18]), is also applicable to network complete controllability. These findings help us to understand the network dynamics and make a real-world network under the desired control. Moreover, compared with the relevant research results on structural controllability with minimum driver nodes, the proposed solution methodology may also be applied to other constrained network optimization problems beyond complete controllability with minimum control nodes.

  5. Mathematical inference and control of molecular networks from perturbation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed-Rasheed, Mohammed

    in order to affect the time evolution of molecular activity in a desirable manner. In this proposal, we address both the inference and control problems of GRNs. In the first part of the thesis, we consider the control problem. We assume that we are given a general topology network structure, whose dynamics follow a discrete-time Markov chain model. We subsequently develop a comprehensive framework for optimal perturbation control of the network. The aim of the perturbation is to drive the network away from undesirable steady-states and to force it to converge to a unique desirable steady-state. The proposed framework does not make any assumptions about the topology of the initial network (e.g., ergodicity, weak and strong connectivity), and is thus applicable to general topology networks. We define the optimal perturbation as the minimum-energy perturbation measured in terms of the Frobenius norm between the initial and perturbed networks. We subsequently demonstrate that there exists at most one optimal perturbation that forces the network into the desirable steady-state. In the event where the optimal perturbation does not exist, we construct a family of sub-optimal perturbations that approximate the optimal solution arbitrarily closely. In the second part of the thesis, we address the inference problem of GRNs from time series data. We model the dynamics of the molecules using a system of ordinary differential equations corrupted by additive white noise. For large-scale networks, we formulate the inference problem as a constrained maximum likelihood estimation problem. We derive the molecular interactions that maximize the likelihood function while constraining the network to be sparse. We further propose a procedure to recover weak interactions based on the Bayesian information criterion. For small-size networks, we investigated the inference of a globally stable 7-gene melanoma genetic regulatory network from genetic perturbation experiments. We considered five

  6. Actor-network theory: a tool to support ethical analysis of commercial genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Williams-Jones, Bryn; Graham, Janice E

    2003-12-01

    Social, ethical and policy analysis of the issues arising from gene patenting and commercial genetic testing is enhanced by the application of science and technology studies, and Actor-Network Theory (ANT) in particular. We suggest the potential for transferring ANT's flexible nature to an applied heuristic methodology for gathering empirical information and for analysing the complex networks involved in the development of genetic technologies. Three concepts are explored in this paper--actor-networks, translation, and drift--and applied to the case of Myriad Genetics and their commercial BRACAnalysis genetic susceptibility test for hereditary breast cancer. Treating this test as an active participant in socio-technical networks clarifies the extent to which it interacts with, shapes and is shaped by people, other technologies, and institutions. Such an understanding enables more sophisticated and nuanced technology assessment, academic analysis, as well as public debate about the social, ethical and policy implications of the commercialization of new genetic technologies. PMID:15115034

  7. Seismic active control by neural networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y.

    1998-01-01

    A study on the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to activate structural control under seismic loads is carried out. The structure considered is a single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system with an active bracing device. The control force is computed by a trained neural network. The feed-forward neural network architecture and an adaptive back-propagation training algorithm is used in the study. The neural net is trained to reproduce the function that represents the response-excitation relationship of the SDF system under seismic loads. The input-output training patterns are generated randomly. In the back-propagation training algorithm, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each epoch. The computer program implemented is validated by solving the classification of the XOR problem. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control strategy. If the control force exceeds the actuator's capacity limit, it is set equal to that limit. The concept of the control strategy employed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to cancel the system velocity induced at the preceding time step so that the gradual rhythmic buildup of the response is destroyed. The ground motions considered in the numerical example are the 1940 El Centro earthquake and the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California. The system responses with and without the control are calculated and compared. The feasibility and potential of applying ANNs to seismic active control is asserted by the promising results obtained from the numerical examples studied.

  8. Seismic active control by neutral networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu

    1995-12-31

    A study on the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to active structural control under seismic loads is carried out. The structure considered is a single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system with an active bracing device. The control force is computed by a trained neural network. The feedforward neural network architecture and an adaptive backpropagation training algorithm is used in the study. The neural net is trained to reproduce the function that represents the response-excitation relationship of the SDF system under seismic loads. The input-output training patterns are generated randomly. In the backpropagation training algorithm, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each epoch. The computer program implemented is validated by solving the classification of the XOR problem. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control strategy. If the control force exceeds the actuator`s capacity limit, it is set equal to that limit. The concept of the control strategy employed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to cancel the system velocity induced at the preceding time step so that the gradual rhythmic buildup of the response is destroyed. The ground motions considered in the numerical example are the 1940 El Centro earthquake and the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California. The system responses with and without the control are calculated and compared. The feasibility and potential of applying ANNs to seismic active control is asserted by the promising results obtained from the numerical examples studied.

  9. Networked control of microgrid system of systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Magdi S.; Rahman, Mohamed Saif Ur; AL-Sunni, Fouad M.

    2016-08-01

    The microgrid has made its mark in distributed generation and has attracted widespread research. However, microgrid is a complex system which needs to be viewed from an intelligent system of systems perspective. In this paper, a network control system of systems is designed for the islanded microgrid system consisting of three distributed generation units as three subsystems supplying a load. The controller stabilises the microgrid system in the presence of communication infractions such as packet dropouts and delays. Simulation results are included to elucidate the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy.

  10. Genetic control of insects of public health importance

    PubMed Central

    Knipling, E. F.; Laven, H.; Craig, G. B.; Pal, R.; Kitzmiller, J. B.; Smith, C. N.; Brown, A. W. A.

    1968-01-01

    During recent years many advances have been made in the development of insect control by genetic manipulation. These methods include the sterile-male technique, now well known, which depends on ionizing radiation or chemosterilization. The recent field experiment carried out by WHO in Rangoon, Burma, on Culex fatigans has demonstrated that naturally occurring cytogenetic mechanisms such as cytoplasmic incompatibility can be used successfully without the use of radiations or chemosterilants. The paper not only describes the experiment on Culex fatigans but also discusses basic concepts and theoretical considerations involved in genetic control of insects of public health importance. The possibility of using genetic mechanisms for the control of other vector species is also discussed. There are a number of problems which require study before genetic control can be used on an operational scale. These problems and suggestions for future research in this field are also outlined. PMID:5302334

  11. Evolution of controllability in interbank networks.

    PubMed

    Delpini, Danilo; Battiston, Stefano; Riccaboni, Massimo; Gabbi, Giampaolo; Pammolli, Fabio; Caldarelli, Guido

    2013-01-01

    The Statistical Physics of Complex Networks has recently provided new theoretical tools for policy makers. Here we extend the notion of network controllability to detect the financial institutions, i.e. the drivers, that are most crucial to the functioning of an interbank market. The system we investigate is a paradigmatic case study for complex networks since it undergoes dramatic structural changes over time and links among nodes can be observed at several time scales. We find a scale-free decay of the fraction of drivers with increasing time resolution, implying that policies have to be adjusted to the time scales in order to be effective. Moreover, drivers are often not the most highly connected "hub" institutions, nor the largest lenders, contrary to the results of other studies. Our findings contribute quantitative indicators which can support regulators in developing more effective supervision and intervention policies. PMID:23568033

  12. Evolution of Controllability in Interbank Networks

    PubMed Central

    Delpini, Danilo; Battiston, Stefano; Riccaboni, Massimo; Gabbi, Giampaolo; Pammolli, Fabio; Caldarelli, Guido

    2013-01-01

    The Statistical Physics of Complex Networks has recently provided new theoretical tools for policy makers. Here we extend the notion of network controllability to detect the financial institutions, i.e. the drivers, that are most crucial to the functioning of an interbank market. The system we investigate is a paradigmatic case study for complex networks since it undergoes dramatic structural changes over time and links among nodes can be observed at several time scales. We find a scale-free decay of the fraction of drivers with increasing time resolution, implying that policies have to be adjusted to the time scales in order to be effective. Moreover, drivers are often not the most highly connected “hub” institutions, nor the largest lenders, contrary to the results of other studies. Our findings contribute quantitative indicators which can support regulators in developing more effective supervision and intervention policies. PMID:23568033

  13. Evolution of Controllability in Interbank Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpini, Danilo; Battiston, Stefano; Riccaboni, Massimo; Gabbi, Giampaolo; Pammolli, Fabio; Caldarelli, Guido

    2013-04-01

    The Statistical Physics of Complex Networks has recently provided new theoretical tools for policy makers. Here we extend the notion of network controllability to detect the financial institutions, i.e. the drivers, that are most crucial to the functioning of an interbank market. The system we investigate is a paradigmatic case study for complex networks since it undergoes dramatic structural changes over time and links among nodes can be observed at several time scales. We find a scale-free decay of the fraction of drivers with increasing time resolution, implying that policies have to be adjusted to the time scales in order to be effective. Moreover, drivers are often not the most highly connected ``hub'' institutions, nor the largest lenders, contrary to the results of other studies. Our findings contribute quantitative indicators which can support regulators in developing more effective supervision and intervention policies.

  14. Neural Networks for Signal Processing and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesselroth, Ted Daniel

    Neural networks are developed for controlling a robot-arm and camera system and for processing images. The networks are based upon computational schemes that may be found in the brain. In the first network, a neural map algorithm is employed to control a five-joint pneumatic robot arm and gripper through feedback from two video cameras. The pneumatically driven robot arm employed shares essential mechanical characteristics with skeletal muscle systems. To control the position of the arm, 200 neurons formed a network representing the three-dimensional workspace embedded in a four-dimensional system of coordinates from the two cameras, and learned a set of pressures corresponding to the end effector positions, as well as a set of Jacobian matrices for interpolating between these positions. Because of the properties of the rubber-tube actuators of the arm, the position as a function of supplied pressure is nonlinear, nonseparable, and exhibits hysteresis. Nevertheless, through the neural network learning algorithm the position could be controlled to an accuracy of about one pixel (~3 mm) after two hundred learning steps. Applications of repeated corrections in each step via the Jacobian matrices leads to a very robust control algorithm since the Jacobians learned by the network have to satisfy the weak requirement that they yield a reduction of the distance between gripper and target. The second network is proposed as a model for the mammalian vision system in which backward connections from the primary visual cortex (V1) to the lateral geniculate nucleus play a key role. The application of hebbian learning to the forward and backward connections causes the formation of receptive fields which are sensitive to edges, bars, and spatial frequencies of preferred orientations. The receptive fields are learned in such a way as to maximize the rate of transfer of information from the LGN to V1. Orientational preferences are organized into a feature map in the primary visual

  15. Data quality control in social surveys using genetic information.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Guo, Guang

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces a novel way of taking advantage of genetic data in social surveys for the purposes of data quality control. Genetic information could detect and repair data issues such as missing data, reporting errors, differences in measures of the same variable, and flawed data. Using data from two surveys, the College Roommate Study (ROOM) and the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), we show that proportion identical by descent score (a measure of genetic relationships) can identify "misreported" and unreported sibling type and detect misrepresented participants, bio-ancestry score (a measure of ancestral population memberships) can repair and recover missing race and discrepancies among different measures of self-reported race, and sex chromosomal information may help cross-check self-reported sex. This article represents an initial effort to utilize genetic data for the purposes of data quality control. As genetic data become increasingly available, researchers may explore more approaches to improving data quality. PMID:25343368

  16. Reverse Genetics Approaches to Control Arenavirus.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Cheng, Benson Yee Hin; de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Several arenavirus cause hemorrhagic fever disease in humans and pose a significant public health problem in their endemic regions. To date, no licensed vaccines are available to combat human arenavirus infections, and anti-arenaviral drug therapy is limited to an off-label use of ribavirin that is only partially effective. The development of arenavirus reverse genetics approaches provides investigators with a novel and powerful approach for the investigation of the arenavirus molecular and cell biology. The use of cell-based minigenome systems has allowed examining the cis- and trans-acting factors involved in arenavirus replication and transcription and the identification of novel anti-arenaviral drug targets without requiring the use of live forms of arenaviruses. Likewise, it is now feasible to rescue infectious arenaviruses entirely from cloned cDNAs containing predetermined mutations in their genomes to investigate virus-host interactions and mechanisms of pathogenesis, as well as to facilitate screens to identify anti-arenaviral drugs and development of novel live-attenuated arenavirus vaccines. Recently, reverse genetics have also allowed the generation of tri-segmented arenaviruses expressing foreign genes, facilitating virus detection and opening the possibility of implementing live-attenuated arenavirus-based vaccine vector approaches. Likewise, the development of single-cycle infectious, reporter-expressing, arenaviruses has provided a new experimental method to study some aspects of the biology of highly pathogenic arenaviruses without the requirement of high-security biocontainment required to study HF-causing arenaviruses. In this chapter we summarize the current knowledge on arenavirus reverse genetics and the implementation of plasmid-based reverse genetics techniques for the development of arenavirus vaccines and vaccine vectors. PMID:27076139

  17. Parallel processing data network of master and slave transputers controlled by a serial control network

    DOEpatents

    Crosetto, D.B.

    1996-12-31

    The present device provides for a dynamically configurable communication network having a multi-processor parallel processing system having a serial communication network and a high speed parallel communication network. The serial communication network is used to disseminate commands from a master processor to a plurality of slave processors to effect communication protocol, to control transmission of high density data among nodes and to monitor each slave processor`s status. The high speed parallel processing network is used to effect the transmission of high density data among nodes in the parallel processing system. Each node comprises a transputer, a digital signal processor, a parallel transfer controller, and two three-port memory devices. A communication switch within each node connects it to a fast parallel hardware channel through which all high density data arrives or leaves the node. 6 figs.

  18. Parallel processing data network of master and slave transputers controlled by a serial control network

    DOEpatents

    Crosetto, Dario B.

    1996-01-01

    The present device provides for a dynamically configurable communication network having a multi-processor parallel processing system having a serial communication network and a high speed parallel communication network. The serial communication network is used to disseminate commands from a master processor (100) to a plurality of slave processors (200) to effect communication protocol, to control transmission of high density data among nodes and to monitor each slave processor's status. The high speed parallel processing network is used to effect the transmission of high density data among nodes in the parallel processing system. Each node comprises a transputer (104), a digital signal processor (114), a parallel transfer controller (106), and two three-port memory devices. A communication switch (108) within each node (100) connects it to a fast parallel hardware channel (70) through which all high density data arrives or leaves the node.

  19. Synchrony and Control of Neuronal Networks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiff, Steven

    2001-03-01

    Cooperative behavior in the brain stems from the nature and strength of the interactions between neurons within a networked ensemble. Normal network activity takes place in a state of partial synchrony between neurons, and some pathological behaviors, such as epilepsy and tremor, appear to share a common feature of increased interaction strength. We have focused on the parallel paths of both detecting and characterizing the nonlinear synchronization present within neuronal networks, and employing feedback control methodology using electrical fields to modulate that neuronal activity. From a theoretical perspective, we see evidence for nonlinear generalized synchrony in networks of neurons that linear techniques are incapable of detecting (PRE 54: 6708, 1996), and we have described a decoherence transition between asymmetric nonlinear systems that is experimentally observable (PRL 84: 1689, 2000). In addition, we have seen evidence for unstable dimension variability in real neuronal systems that indicates certain physical limits of modelability when observing such systems (PRL 85, 2490, 2000). From an experimental perspective, we have achieved success in modulating epileptic seizures in neuronal networks using electrical fields. Extracellular neuronal activity is continuously recorded during field application through differential extracellular recording techniques, and the applied electric field strength is continuously updated using a computer controlled proportional feedback algorithm. This approach appears capable of sustained amelioration of seizure events when used with negative feedback. In negative feedback mode, such findings may offer a novel technology for seizure control. In positive feedback mode, adaptively applied electric fields may offer a more physiological means for neural modulation for prosthetic purposes than previously possible (J. Neuroscience, 2001).

  20. Dynamic congestion control mechanisms for MPLS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holness, Felicia; Phillips, Chris I.

    2001-02-01

    Considerable interest has arisen in congestion control through traffic engineering from the knowledge that although sensible provisioning of the network infrastructure is needed, together with sufficient underlying capacity, these are not sufficient to deliver the Quality of Service required for new applications. This is due to dynamic variations in load. In operational Internet Protocol (IP) networks, it has been difficult to incorporate effective traffic engineering due to the limited capabilities of the IP technology. In principle, Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS), which is a connection-oriented label swapping technology, offers new possibilities in addressing the limitations by allowing the operator to use sophisticated traffic control mechanisms. This paper presents a novel scheme to dynamically manage traffic flows through the network by re-balancing streams during periods of congestion. It proposes management-based algorithms that will allow label switched routers within the network to utilize mechanisms within MPLS to indicate when flows are starting to experience frame/packet loss and then to react accordingly. Based upon knowledge of the customer's Service Level Agreement, together with instantaneous flow information, the label edge routers can then instigate changes to the LSP route and circumvent congestion that would hitherto violate the customer contacts.

  1. Genetic Control of Weight Loss During Pneumonic Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Felicia D.; Parvathareddy, Jyothi; Pandey, Ashutosh K.; Cui, Yan; Williams, Robert W.; Miller, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) is the causal agent of a high morbidity/mortality disease syndrome known as melioidosis. This syndrome can range from acute fulminate disease to chronic, local, and disseminated infections that are often difficult to treat because Bp exhibits resistance to many antibiotics. Bp is a prime candidate for use in biological warfare/terrorism and is classified as a Tier-1 Select Agent by HHS and APHIS. It is known that inbred mouse strains display a range of susceptibility to Bp and that the murine infection model is ideal for studying acute melioidosis. Here we exploit a powerful mouse genetics resource that consists of a large family of BXD type recombinant inbred strains, to perform genome-wide linkage analysis of the weight loss phenotype following pneumonic infection with Bp. We infected parental mice and 32 BXD strains with 50-100 CFU of Bp (strain 1026b) and monitored weight retention each day over an eleven-day time course. Using the computational tools in GeneNetwork, we performed genome-wide linkage analysis to identify an interval on chromosome 12 that appears to control the weight retention trait. We then analysed and ranked positional candidate genes in this interval, several of which have intriguing connections with innate immunity, calcium homeostasis, lipid transport, host cell growth and development, and autophagy. PMID:24687986

  2. Reveal, A General Reverse Engineering Algorithm for Inference of Genetic Network Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Shoudan; Fuhrman, Stefanie; Somogyi, Roland

    1998-01-01

    Given the immanent gene expression mapping covering whole genomes during development, health and disease, we seek computational methods to maximize functional inference from such large data sets. Is it possible, in principle, to completely infer a complex regulatory network architecture from input/output patterns of its variables? We investigated this possibility using binary models of genetic networks. Trajectories, or state transition tables of Boolean nets, resemble time series of gene expression. By systematically analyzing the mutual information between input states and output states, one is able to infer the sets of input elements controlling each element or gene in the network. This process is unequivocal and exact for complete state transition tables. We implemented this REVerse Engineering ALgorithm (REVEAL) in a C program, and found the problem to be tractable within the conditions tested so far. For n = 50 (elements) and k = 3 (inputs per element), the analysis of incomplete state transition tables (100 state transition pairs out of a possible 10(exp 15)) reliably produced the original rule and wiring sets. While this study is limited to synchronous Boolean networks, the algorithm is generalizable to include multi-state models, essentially allowing direct application to realistic biological data sets. The ability to adequately solve the inverse problem may enable in-depth analysis of complex dynamic systems in biology and other fields.

  3. Digit and command interpretation for electronic book using neural network and genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lam, H K; Leung, Frank H F

    2004-12-01

    This paper presents the interpretation of digits and commands using a modified neural network and the genetic algorithm. The modified neural network exhibits a node-to-node relationship which enhances its learning and generalization abilities. A digit-and-command interpreter constructed by the modified neural networks is proposed to recognize handwritten digits and commands. A genetic algorithm is employed to train the parameters of the modified neural networks of the digit-and-command interpreter. The proposed digit-and-command interpreter is successfully realized in an electronic book. Simulation and experimental results will be presented to show the applicability and merits of the proposed approach. PMID:15619928

  4. Tuning of active vibration controllers for ACTEX by genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Moon K.; Denoyer, Keith K.

    1999-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the optimal tuning of digitally programmable analog controllers on the ACTEX-1 smart structures flight experiment. The programmable controllers for each channel include a third order Strain Rate Feedback (SRF) controller, a fifth order SRF controller, a second order Positive Position Feedback (PPF) controller, and a fourth order PPF controller. Optimal manual tuning of several control parameters can be a difficult task even though the closed-loop control characteristics of each controller are well known. Hence, the automatic tuning of individual control parameters using Genetic Algorithms is proposed in this paper. The optimal control parameters of each control law are obtained by imposing a constraint on the closed-loop frequency response functions using the ACTEX mathematical model. The tuned control parameters are then uploaded to the ACTEX electronic control electronics and experiments on the active vibration control are carried out in space. The experimental results on ACTEX will be presented.

  5. Crosstalk between pathways enhances the controllability of signalling networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dingjie; Jin, Suoqin; Zou, Xiufen

    2016-02-01

    The control of complex networks is one of the most challenging problems in the fields of biology and engineering. In this study, the authors explored the controllability and control energy of several signalling networks, which consisted of many interconnected pathways, including networks with a bow-tie architecture. On the basis of the theory of structure controllability, they revealed that biological mechanisms, such as cross-pathway interactions, compartmentalisation and so on make the networks easier to fully control. Furthermore, using numerical simulations for two realistic examples, they demonstrated that the control energy of normal networks with crosstalk is lower than in networks without crosstalk. These results indicate that the biological networks are optimally designed to achieve their normal functions from the viewpoint of the control theory. The authors' work provides a comprehensive understanding of the impact of network structures and properties on controllability. PMID:26816393

  6. Neural networks as a control methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccullough, Claire L.

    1990-01-01

    While conventional computers must be programmed in a logical fashion by a person who thoroughly understands the task to be performed, the motivation behind neural networks is to develop machines which can train themselves to perform tasks, using available information about desired system behavior and learning from experience. There are three goals of this fellowship program: (1) to evaluate various neural net methods and generate computer software to implement those deemed most promising on a personal computer equipped with Matlab; (2) to evaluate methods currently in the professional literature for system control using neural nets to choose those most applicable to control of flexible structures; and (3) to apply the control strategies chosen in (2) to a computer simulation of a test article, the Control Structures Interaction Suitcase Demonstrator, which is a portable system consisting of a small flexible beam driven by a torque motor and mounted on springs tuned to the first flexible mode of the beam. Results of each are discussed.

  7. Microturbine control based on fuzzy neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shijie; Bian, Chunyuan; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2006-11-01

    As microturbine generator (MTG) is a clean, efficient, low cost and reliable energy supply system. From outside characteristics of MTG, it is multi-variable, time-varying and coupling system, so it is difficult to be identified on-line and conventional control law adopted before cannot achieve desirable result. A novel fuzzy-neural networks (FNN) control algorithm was proposed in combining with the conventional PID control. In the paper, IF-THEN rules for tuning were applied by a first-order Sugeno fuzzy model with seven fuzzy rules and the membership function was given as the continuous GAUSSIAN function. Some sample data were utilized to train FNN. Through adjusting shape of membership function and weight continually, objective of auto-tuning fuzzy-rules can be achieved. The FNN algorithm had been applied to "100kW Microturbine control and power converter system". The results of simulation and experiment are shown that the algorithm can work very well.

  8. [Sporulation or competence development? A genetic regulatory network model of cell-fate determination in Bacillus subtilis].

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenghui; Zhou, Yuling; Zhang, Xiaozhou; Zhang, Guimin

    2015-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) strain that has been widely used in industries including fodder, food, and biological control. In addition, B. subtilis expression system also plays a significant role in the production of industrial enzymes. However, its application is limited by its low sporulation frequency and transformation efficiency. Immense studies have been done on interpreting the molecular mechanisms of sporulation and competence development, whereas only few of them were focused on improving sporulation frequency and transformation efficiency of B. subtilis by genetic modification. The main challenge is that sporulation and competence development, as the two major developmental events in the stationary phase of B. subtilis, are regulated by the complicated intracellular genetic regulatory systems. In addition, mutual regulatory mechanisms also exist in these two developmental events. With the development of genetic and metabolic engineering, constructing genetic regulatory networks is currently one of the most attractive research fields, together with the genetic information of cell growth, metabolism, and development, to guide the industrial application. In this review, the mechanisms of sporulation and competence development of B. subtilis, their interactions, and the genetic regulation of cell growth were interpreted. In addition, the roles of these regulatory networks in guiding basic and applied research of B. subtilis and its related species were discussed. PMID:26939438

  9. Geochemical, Genetic, and Community Controls on Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Judy D.

    2014-11-10

    The sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are soil bacteria that share two common characteristics, strict anaerobiosis and the ability to respire sulfate. The metabolic activities of these bacteria play significant roles in the global sulfur cycle, anaerobic degradation of biomass, biological metal corrosion in the environment and, recently, degradation of toxic compounds. The accumulation of evidence suggests these bacteria are also key to the production of the neurotoxin methylmercury in environmental settings. We propose to use our experience with the development of genetics in sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genus Desulfovibrio to create mutations that will eliminate the methylation of mercury, thereby identifying the genes essential for this process. This information may allow the environmental monitoring of the mercury methylation potential to learn the location and quantity of the production this toxin. From these data, more accurate predictive models of mercury cycling can be generated.

  10. Genetic Control of Meat Quality Traits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, John L.

    Meat was originally produced from non-specialized animals that were used for a variety of purposes, in addition to being a source of food. However, selective breeding has resulted in “improved” breeds of cattle that are now used to produce either milk or beef, and specialized chicken lines that produce eggs or meat. These improved breeds are very productive under appropriate management systems. The selection methods used to create these specialized breeds were based on easily measured phenotypic variations, such as growth rate or physical size. Improvement in the desired trait was achieved by breeding directly from animals displaying the desired phenotype. However, more recently sophisticated genetic models have been developed using statistical approaches that consider phenotypic information collected, not only from individual animals but also from their parents, sibs, and progeny.

  11. Comprehensive Control of Networked Control Systems with Multistep Delay

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    In networked control systems with multi-step delay, long time-delay causes vacant sampling and controller design difficulty. In order to solve the above problems, comprehensive control methods are proposed in this paper. Time-delay compensation control and linear-quadratic-Guassian (LQG) optimal control are adopted and the systems switch different controllers between two different states. LQG optimal controller is used with probability 1 − α in normal state, which is shown to render the systems mean square exponentially stable. Time-delay compensation controller is used with probability α in abnormal state to compensate vacant sampling and long time-delay. In addition, a buffer window is established at the actuator of the systems to store some history control inputs which are used to estimate the control state of present sampling period under the vacant sampling cases. The comprehensive control methods simplify control design which is easier to be implemented in engineering. The performance of the systems is also improved. Simulation results verify the validity of the proposed theory. PMID:25101322

  12. Neural networks for LED color control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashdown, Ian E.

    2004-01-01

    The design and implementation of an architectural dimming control for multicolor LED-based lighting fixtures is complicated by the need to maintain a consistent color balance under a wide variety of operating conditions. Factors to consider include nonlinear relationships between luminous flux intensity and drive current, junction temperature dependencies, LED manufacturing tolerances and binning parameters, device aging characteristics, variations in color sensor spectral responsitivities, and the approximations introduced by linear color space models. In this paper we formulate this problem as a nonlinear multidimensional function, where maintaining a consistent color balance is equivalent to determining the hyperplane representing constant chromaticity. To be useful for an architectural dimming control design, this determination must be made in real time as the lighting fixture intensity is adjusted. Further, the LED drive current must be continuously adjusted in response to color sensor inputs to maintain constant chromaticity for a given intensity setting. Neural networks are known to be universal approximators capable of representing any continuously differentiable bounded function. We therefore use a radial basis function neural network to represent the multidimensional function and provide the feedback signals needed to maintain constant chromaticity. The network can be trained on the factory floor using individual device measurements such as spectral radiant intensity and color sensor characteristics. This provides a flexible solution that is mostly independent of LED manufacturing tolerances and binning parameters.

  13. Telethon Network of Genetic Biobanks: a key service for diagnosis and research on rare diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Several examples have always illustrated how access to large numbers of biospecimens and associated data plays a pivotal role in the identification of disease genes and the development of pharmaceuticals. Hence, allowing researchers to access to significant numbers of quality samples and data, genetic biobanks are a powerful tool in basic, translational and clinical research into rare diseases. Recently demand for well-annotated and properly-preserved specimens is growing at a high rate, and is expected to grow for years to come. The best effective solution to this issue is to enhance the potentialities of well-managed biobanks by building a network. Here we report a 5-year experience of the Telethon Network of Genetic Biobanks (TNGB), a non-profit association of Italian repositories created in 2008 to form a virtually unique catalogue of biospecimens and associated data, which presently lists more than 750 rare genetic defects. The process of TNGB harmonisation has been mainly achieved through the adoption of a unique, centrally coordinated, IT infrastructure, which has enabled (i) standardisation of all the TNGB procedures and activities; (ii) creation of an updated TNGB online catalogue, based on minimal data set and controlled terminologies; (iii) sample access policy managed via a shared request control panel at web portal. TNGB has been engaged in disseminating information on its services into both scientific/biomedical - national and international - contexts, as well as associations of patients and families. Indeed, during the last 5-years national and international scientists extensively used the TNGB with different purposes resulting in more than 250 scientific publications. In addition, since its inception the TNGB is an associated member of the Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure and recently joined the EuroBioBank network. Moreover, the involvement of patients and families, leading to the formalization of various agreements

  14. Towards structural controllability of local-world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shiwen; Ma, Yilin; Wu, Yafang; Wang, Li; Xia, Chengyi

    2016-05-01

    Controlling complex networks is of vital importance in science and engineering. Meanwhile, local-world effect is an important ingredient which should be taken into consideration in the complete description of real-world complex systems. In this letter, structural controllability of a class of local-world networks is investigated. Through extensive numerical simulations, firstly, effects of local world size M and network size N on structural controllability are examined. For local-world networks with sparse topological configuration, compared to network size, local-world size can induce stronger influence on controllability, however, for dense networks, controllability is greatly affected by network size and local-world effect can be neglected. Secondly, relationships between controllability and topological properties are analyzed. Lastly, the robustness of local-world networks under targeted attacks regarding structural controllability is discussed. These results can help to deepen the understanding of structural complexity and connectivity patterns of complex systems.

  15. Efficient Access Control in Multimedia Social Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachan, Amit; Emmanuel, Sabu

    Multimedia social networks (MMSNs) have provided a convenient way to share multimedia contents such as images, videos, blogs, etc. Contents shared by a person can be easily accessed by anybody else over the Internet. However, due to various privacy, security, and legal concerns people often want to selectively share the contents only with their friends, family, colleagues, etc. Access control mechanisms play an important role in this situation. With access control mechanisms one can decide the persons who can access a shared content and who cannot. But continuously growing content uploads and accesses, fine grained access control requirements (e.g. different access control parameters for different parts in a picture), and specific access control requirements for multimedia contents can make the time complexity of access control to be very large. So, it is important to study an efficient access control mechanism suitable for MMSNs. In this chapter we present an efficient bit-vector transform based access control mechanism for MMSNs. The proposed approach is also compatible with other requirements of MMSNs, such as access rights modification, content deletion, etc. Mathematical analysis and experimental results show the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed approach.

  16. The 1982 control network of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. E.; Katayama, F. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Attention is given to a planet-wide control network of Mars that was computed in September 1982 using a large single-block analytical triangulation with 47,524 measurements of 6853 control points on 1054 Mariner 9 and 757 Viking pictures. In all, 19,139 normal equations were solved, with a resulting standard error of measurement of 18.06 microns. The control points identified by name and letter designation are given, as are the aerographic coordinates of the control points. In addition, the coordinates of the Viking I lander site are given: latitude, 22.480 deg; longitude, 47.962 deg (radius, 3389.32 km). This study expands and updates the previously published network (1978). It is noted that the computation differs in many respects from standard aerial mapping photogrammetric practice. In comparison with aerial mapping photography, the television formats are small and the focal lengths are long; stereo coverage is rare, the scale of the pictures varies greatly, and the residual camera distortions are large.

  17. Modeling the evolution of complex genetic systems: the gene network family tree.

    PubMed

    Fierst, Janna L; Phillips, Patrick C

    2015-01-01

    In 1994 and 1996, Andreas Wagner introduced a novel model in two papers addressing the evolution of genetic regulatory networks. This work, and a suite of papers that followed using similar models, helped integrate network thinking into biology and motivate research focused on the evolution of genetic networks. The Wagner network has its mathematical roots in the Ising model, a statistical physics model describing the activity of atoms on a lattice, and in neural networks. These models have given rise to two branches of applications, one in physics and biology and one in artificial intelligence and machine learning. Here, we review development along these branches, outline similarities and differences between biological models of genetic regulatory circuits and neural circuits models used in machine learning, and identify ways in which these models can provide novel insights into biological systems. PMID:25504926

  18. A comprehensive Network Security Risk Model for process control networks.

    PubMed

    Henry, Matthew H; Haimes, Yacov Y

    2009-02-01

    The risk of cyber attacks on process control networks (PCN) is receiving significant attention due to the potentially catastrophic extent to which PCN failures can damage the infrastructures and commodity flows that they support. Risk management addresses the coupled problems of (1) reducing the likelihood that cyber attacks would succeed in disrupting PCN operation and (2) reducing the severity of consequences in the event of PCN failure or manipulation. The Network Security Risk Model (NSRM) developed in this article provides a means of evaluating the efficacy of candidate risk management policies by modeling the baseline risk and assessing expectations of risk after the implementation of candidate measures. Where existing risk models fall short of providing adequate insight into the efficacy of candidate risk management policies due to shortcomings in their structure or formulation, the NSRM provides model structure and an associated modeling methodology that captures the relevant dynamics of cyber attacks on PCN for risk analysis. This article develops the NSRM in detail in the context of an illustrative example. PMID:19000078

  19. Does Childhood Anxiety Evoke Maternal Control? A Genetically Informed Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eley, Thalia C.; Napolitano, Maria; Lau, Jennifer Y. F.; Gregory, Alice M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Despite theoretical and empirical support for an association between maternal control and child anxiety, few studies have examined the origins of this association. Furthermore, none use observer-ratings of maternal control within a genetically informative design. This study addressed three questions: 1) do children who experience…

  20. Linking social and pathogen transmission networks using microbial genetics in giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis).

    PubMed

    VanderWaal, Kimberly L; Atwill, Edward R; Isbell, Lynne A; McCowan, Brenda

    2014-03-01

    Although network analysis has drawn considerable attention as a promising tool for disease ecology, empirical research has been hindered by limitations in detecting the occurrence of pathogen transmission (who transmitted to whom) within social networks. Using a novel approach, we utilize the genetics of a diverse microbe, Escherichia coli, to infer where direct or indirect transmission has occurred and use these data to construct transmission networks for a wild giraffe population (Giraffe camelopardalis). Individuals were considered to be a part of the same transmission chain and were interlinked in the transmission network if they shared genetic subtypes of E. coli. By using microbial genetics to quantify who transmits to whom independently from the behavioural data on who is in contact with whom, we were able to directly investigate how the structure of contact networks influences the structure of the transmission network. To distinguish between the effects of social and environmental contact on transmission dynamics, the transmission network was compared with two separate contact networks defined from the behavioural data: a social network based on association patterns, and a spatial network based on patterns of home-range overlap among individuals. We found that links in the transmission network were more likely to occur between individuals that were strongly linked in the social network. Furthermore, individuals that had more numerous connections or that occupied 'bottleneck' positions in the social network tended to occupy similar positions in the transmission network. No similar correlations were observed between the spatial and transmission networks. This indicates that an individual's social network position is predictive of transmission network position, which has implications for identifying individuals that function as super-spreaders or transmission bottlenecks in the population. These results emphasize the importance of association patterns in

  1. Genetic Control of Heterochrony in Eucalyptus globulus

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Corey J.; Freeman, Jules S.; Jones, Rebecca C.; Potts, Brad M.; Wong, Melissa M. L.; Weller, James L.; Hecht, Valérie F. G.; Poethig, R. Scott; Vaillancourt, René E.

    2014-01-01

    A change in the timing or rate of developmental events throughout ontogeny is referred to as heterochrony, and it is a major evolutionary process in plants and animals. We investigated the genetic basis for natural variation in the timing of vegetative phase change in the tree Eucalyptus globulus, which undergoes a dramatic change in vegetative morphology during the juvenile-to-adult transition. Quantitative trait loci analysis in an outcross F2 family derived from crosses between individuals from a coastal population of E. globulus with precocious vegetative phase change and individuals from populations in which vegetative phase change occurs several years later implicated the microRNA EglMIR156.5 as a potential contributor to this heterochronic difference. Additional evidence for the involvement of EglMIR156.5 was provided by its differential expression in trees with early and late phase change. Our findings suggest that changes in the expression of miR156 underlie natural variation in vegetative phase change in E. globulus, and may also explain interspecific differences in the timing of this developmental transition. PMID:24950963

  2. Genetic control of heterochrony in Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Corey J; Freeman, Jules S; Jones, Rebecca C; Potts, Brad M; Wong, Melissa M L; Weller, James L; Hecht, Valérie F G; Poethig, R Scott; Vaillancourt, René E

    2014-07-01

    A change in the timing or rate of developmental events throughout ontogeny is referred to as heterochrony, and it is a major evolutionary process in plants and animals. We investigated the genetic basis for natural variation in the timing of vegetative phase change in the tree Eucalyptus globulus, which undergoes a dramatic change in vegetative morphology during the juvenile-to-adult transition. Quantitative trait loci analysis in an outcross F2 family derived from crosses between individuals from a coastal population of E. globulus with precocious vegetative phase change and individuals from populations in which vegetative phase change occurs several years later implicated the microRNA EglMIR156.5 as a potential contributor to this heterochronic difference. Additional evidence for the involvement of EglMIR156.5 was provided by its differential expression in trees with early and late phase change. Our findings suggest that changes in the expression of miR156 underlie natural variation in vegetative phase change in E. globulus, and may also explain interspecific differences in the timing of this developmental transition. PMID:24950963

  3. Genetic architecture of sex determination in fish: applications to sex ratio control in aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Paulino; Viñas, Ana M.; Sánchez, Laura; Díaz, Noelia; Ribas, Laia; Piferrer, Francesc

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the sex ratio is essential in finfish farming. A balanced sex ratio is usually good for broodstock management, since it enables to develop appropriate breeding schemes. However, in some species the production of monosex populations is desirable because the existence of sexual dimorphism, primarily in growth or first time of sexual maturation, but also in color or shape, can render one sex more valuable. The knowledge of the genetic architecture of sex determination (SD) is convenient for controlling sex ratio and for the implementation of breeding programs. Unlike mammals and birds, which show highly conserved master genes that control a conserved genetic network responsible for gonad differentiation (GD), a huge diversity of SD mechanisms has been reported in fish. Despite theory predictions, more than one gene is in many cases involved in fish SD and genetic differences have been observed in the GD network. Environmental factors also play a relevant role and epigenetic mechanisms are becoming increasingly recognized for the establishment and maintenance of the GD pathways. Although major genetic factors are frequently involved in fish SD, these observations strongly suggest that SD in this group resembles a complex trait. Accordingly, the application of quantitative genetics combined with genomic tools is desirable to address its study and in fact, when applied, it has frequently demonstrated a multigene trait interacting with environmental factors in model and cultured fish species. This scenario has notable implications for aquaculture and, depending upon the species, from chromosome manipulation or environmental control techniques up to classical selection or marker assisted selection programs, are being applied. In this review, we selected four relevant species or fish groups to illustrate this diversity and hence the technologies that can be used by the industry for the control of sex ratio: turbot and European sea bass, two reference species of

  4. Practical synchronization on complex dynamical networks via optimal pinning control.

    PubMed

    Li, Kezan; Sun, Weigang; Small, Michael; Fu, Xinchu

    2015-07-01

    We consider practical synchronization on complex dynamical networks under linear feedback control designed by optimal control theory. The control goal is to minimize global synchronization error and control strength over a given finite time interval, and synchronization error at terminal time. By utilizing the Pontryagin's minimum principle, and based on a general complex dynamical network, we obtain an optimal system to achieve the control goal. The result is verified by performing some numerical simulations on Star networks, Watts-Strogatz networks, and Barabási-Albert networks. Moreover, by combining optimal control and traditional pinning control, we propose an optimal pinning control strategy which depends on the network's topological structure. Obtained results show that optimal pinning control is very effective for synchronization control in real applications. PMID:26274112

  5. Genetic architecture of wood properties based on association analysis and co-expression networks in white spruce.

    PubMed

    Lamara, Mebarek; Raherison, Elie; Lenz, Patrick; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean; MacKay, John

    2016-04-01

    Association studies are widely utilized to analyze complex traits but their ability to disclose genetic architectures is often limited by statistical constraints, and functional insights are usually minimal in nonmodel organisms like forest trees. We developed an approach to integrate association mapping results with co-expression networks. We tested single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 2652 candidate genes for statistical associations with wood density, stiffness, microfibril angle and ring width in a population of 1694 white spruce trees (Picea glauca). Associations mapping identified 229-292 genes per wood trait using a statistical significance level of P < 0.05 to maximize discovery. Over-representation of genes associated for nearly all traits was found in a xylem preferential co-expression group developed in independent experiments. A xylem co-expression network was reconstructed with 180 wood associated genes and several known MYB and NAC regulators were identified as network hubs. The network revealed a link between the gene PgNAC8, wood stiffness and microfibril angle, as well as considerable within-season variation for both genetic control of wood traits and gene expression. Trait associations were distributed throughout the network suggesting complex interactions and pleiotropic effects. Our findings indicate that integration of association mapping and co-expression networks enhances our understanding of complex wood traits. PMID:26619072

  6. Neural network-based finite horizon stochastic optimal control design for nonlinear networked control systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2015-03-01

    The stochastic optimal control of nonlinear networked control systems (NNCSs) using neuro-dynamic programming (NDP) over a finite time horizon is a challenging problem due to terminal constraints, system uncertainties, and unknown network imperfections, such as network-induced delays and packet losses. Since the traditional iteration or time-based infinite horizon NDP schemes are unsuitable for NNCS with terminal constraints, a novel time-based NDP scheme is developed to solve finite horizon optimal control of NNCS by mitigating the above-mentioned challenges. First, an online neural network (NN) identifier is introduced to approximate the control coefficient matrix that is subsequently utilized in conjunction with the critic and actor NNs to determine a time-based stochastic optimal control input over finite horizon in a forward-in-time and online manner. Eventually, Lyapunov theory is used to show that all closed-loop signals and NN weights are uniformly ultimately bounded with ultimate bounds being a function of initial conditions and final time. Moreover, the approximated control input converges close to optimal value within finite time. The simulation results are included to show the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:25720004

  7. Deep Space Network Antenna Logic Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlstrom, Harlow; Morgan, Scott; Hames, Peter; Strain, Martha; Owen, Christopher; Shimizu, Kenneth; Wilson, Karen; Shaller, David; Doktomomtaz, Said; Leung, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    The Antenna Logic Controller (ALC) software controls and monitors the motion control equipment of the 4,000-metric-ton structure of the Deep Space Network 70-meter antenna. This program coordinates the control of 42 hydraulic pumps, while monitoring several interlocks for personnel and equipment safety. Remote operation of the ALC runs via the Antenna Monitor & Control (AMC) computer, which orchestrates the tracking functions of the entire antenna. This software provides a graphical user interface for local control, monitoring, and identification of faults as well as, at a high level, providing for the digital control of the axis brakes so that the servo of the AMC may control the motion of the antenna. Specific functions of the ALC also include routines for startup in cold weather, controlled shutdown for both normal and fault situations, and pump switching on failure. The increased monitoring, the ability to trend key performance characteristics, the improved fault detection and recovery, the centralization of all control at a single panel, and the simplification of the user interface have all reduced the required workforce to run 70-meter antennas. The ALC also increases the antenna availability by reducing the time required to start up the antenna, to diagnose faults, and by providing additional insight into the performance of key parameters that aid in preventive maintenance to avoid key element failure. The ALC User Display (AUD) is a graphical user interface with hierarchical display structure, which provides high-level status information to the operation of the ALC, as well as detailed information for virtually all aspects of the ALC via drill-down displays. The operational status of an item, be it a function or assembly, is shown in the higher-level display. By pressing the item on the display screen, a new screen opens to show more detail of the function/assembly. Navigation tools and the map button allow immediate access to all screens.

  8. Adaptive process control using fuzzy logic and genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, C. L.

    1993-01-01

    Researchers at the U.S. Bureau of Mines have developed adaptive process control systems in which genetic algorithms (GA's) are used to augment fuzzy logic controllers (FLC's). GA's are search algorithms that rapidly locate near-optimum solutions to a wide spectrum of problems by modeling the search procedures of natural genetics. FLC's are rule based systems that efficiently manipulate a problem environment by modeling the 'rule-of-thumb' strategy used in human decision making. Together, GA's and FLC's possess the capabilities necessary to produce powerful, efficient, and robust adaptive control systems. To perform efficiently, such control systems require a control element to manipulate the problem environment, and a learning element to adjust to the changes in the problem environment. Details of an overall adaptive control system are discussed. A specific laboratory acid-base pH system is used to demonstrate the ideas presented.

  9. Adaptive Process Control with Fuzzy Logic and Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, C. L.

    1993-01-01

    Researchers at the U.S. Bureau of Mines have developed adaptive process control systems in which genetic algorithms (GA's) are used to augment fuzzy logic controllers (FLC's). GA's are search algorithms that rapidly locate near-optimum solutions to a wide spectrum of problems by modeling the search procedures of natural genetics. FLC's are rule based systems that efficiently manipulate a problem environment by modeling the 'rule-of-thumb' strategy used in human decision-making. Together, GA's and FLC's possess the capabilities necessary to produce powerful, efficient, and robust adaptive control systems. To perform efficiently, such control systems require a control element to manipulate the problem environment, an analysis element to recognize changes in the problem environment, and a learning element to adjust to the changes in the problem environment. Details of an overall adaptive control system are discussed. A specific laboratory acid-base pH system is used to demonstrate the ideas presented.

  10. Genetics of cognitive control: Implications for Nimh's research domain criteria initiative.

    PubMed

    Glahn, David C; Knowles, Emma E M; Pearlson, Godfrey D

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive control refers to a set of mental processes that modulate other cognitive and emotional systems in service of goal-directed adaptive behavior. There is growing support for the notion that cognitive control abnormalities are a central component of many of the neuropsychological deficits observed in individuals with mental illnesses, particularly those with psychotic disorders. NIMH's research domain criteria (RDoC) initiative, which is designed to develop biologically informed constructs to better understand psychopathology, designated cognitive control a construct within the cognitive systems domain. Identification of genes that influence cognitive control or its supportive brain systems will improve our understating of the RDoC construct and provide candidate genes for psychotic disorders. We examine evidence for cognitive control deficits in psychosis, determine if these measures could be useful endophenotypes, and explore work linking genetic variation to cognitive control performance. While there is a wealth of evidence to support the notion the cognitive control is a valid endophenotype for psychosis, its genetic underpinning remains ill characterized. However, existing work provides a promising foundation on which future endeavors might build. Confirming existing individual gene associations will go some way to expanding our understanding of the genetics of cognitive control, and by extension, psychotic disorders. Yet, to truly understand the molecular underpinnings of such complex traits, it may be necessary to evaluate genes in tandem, focusing not on single genes but rather on empirically derived gene sets or on functionally defined networks of genes. PMID:26768522

  11. Percolating plasmonic networks for light emission control.

    PubMed

    Gaio, Michele; Castro-Lopez, Marta; Renger, Jan; van Hulst, Niek; Sapienza, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Optical nanoantennas have revolutionised the way we manipulate single photons emitted by individual light sources in a nanostructured photonic environment. Complex plasmonic architectures allow for multiscale light control by shortening or stretching the light wavelength for a fixed operating frequency, meeting the size of the emitter and that of propagating modes. Here, we study self-assembled semi-continuous gold films and lithographic gold networks characterised by large local density of optical state (LDOS) fluctuations around the electrical percolation threshold, a regime where the surface is characterised by large metal clusters with fractal topology. We study the formation of plasmonic networks and their effect on light emission from embedded fluorescent probes in these systems. Through fluorescence dynamics experiments we discuss the role of global long-range interactions linked to the degree of percolation and to the network fractality, as well as the local near-field contributions coming from the local electro-magnetic fields and the topology. Our experiments indicate that local properties dominate the fluorescence modification. PMID:25711923

  12. Finding friends and enemies in an enemies-only network: A graph diffusion kernel for predicting novel genetic interactions and co-complex membership from yeast genetic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yan; Suhail, Yasir; Lin, Yu-yi; Boeke, Jef D.; Bader, Joel S.

    2008-01-01

    The yeast synthetic lethal genetic interaction network contains rich information about underlying pathways and protein complexes as well as new genetic interactions yet to be discovered. We have developed a graph diffusion kernel as a unified framework for inferring complex/pathway membership analogous to “friends” and genetic interactions analogous to “enemies” from the genetic interaction network. When applied to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae synthetic lethal genetic interaction network, we can achieve a precision around 50% with 20% to 50% recall in the genome-wide prediction of new genetic interactions, supported by experimental validation. The kernels show significant improvement over previous best methods for predicting genetic interactions and protein co-complex membership from genetic interaction data. PMID:18832443

  13. Finding friends and enemies in an enemies-only network: a graph diffusion kernel for predicting novel genetic interactions and co-complex membership from yeast genetic interactions.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yan; Suhail, Yasir; Lin, Yu-yi; Boeke, Jef D; Bader, Joel S

    2008-12-01

    The yeast synthetic lethal genetic interaction network contains rich information about underlying pathways and protein complexes as well as new genetic interactions yet to be discovered. We have developed a graph diffusion kernel as a unified framework for inferring complex/pathway membership analogous to "friends" and genetic interactions analogous to "enemies" from the genetic interaction network. When applied to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae synthetic lethal genetic interaction network, we can achieve a precision around 50% with 20% to 50% recall in the genome-wide prediction of new genetic interactions, supported by experimental validation. The kernels show significant improvement over previous best methods for predicting genetic interactions and protein co-complex membership from genetic interaction data. PMID:18832443

  14. Untangling genetic networks of panic, phobia, fear and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Villafuerte, Sandra; Burmeister, Margit

    2003-01-01

    As is the case for normal individual variation in anxiety levels, the conditions panic disorder, agoraphobia and other phobias have a significant genetic basis. Recent reports have started to untangle the genetic relationships between predispositions to anxiety and anxiety disorders. PMID:12914652

  15. Environmentally-Modulated Changes in Fluorescence Distribution in Cells with Oscillatory Genetic Network Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Portle, Stephanie; Iadevaia, Sergio; San, Ka-Yiu; Bennett, George N.; Mantzaris, Nikos

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression levels in a population of E. coli cells expressing an artificial genetic regulatory network, known as the “repressilator” (Elowitz and Leibler, 2000), which exhibits oscillations at the single-cell level. A series of shake flask experiments were performed and analyzed using flow cytometry to test how cell populations carrying this system could be controlled extracellularly using the inducers anhydrotetracycline (aTc) and isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). With variation of [aTc], it exhibits bi-threshold behavior, such that the entire culture reaches one of three steady states at a quasi-time invariant “reference state.” Also, there is significant hysteresis. Transiently, the middle state shows damping oscillations, while the low and high states show a stable steady state. The addition of IPTG serves to fine-tune the characteristics of the aTc-only expression, lowering the average and CV of the distributions, and possibly perturbing the network to a different state. However, in modeling this system, the multiplicity and bi-threshold behavior are not theoretically possible according to the designed interactions. In order to explain this discrepancy, we hypothesize that one or more of the repressors has a significant nonspecific interaction with a promoter that does not contain its operator site. The new modeling results incorporating these extra interactions qualitatively match our experimental findings. After constructing plasmids to test these hypotheses, we discover that at least four of these interactions exist, which can create the low and high states and multiplicity seen experimentally. This genetic architecture has flexibility in its behavior that has not been demonstrated before, and the combination of experiment and modeling enlightened our understanding of the molecular interactions driving the network's behavior, leading us to discover the significance of

  16. Criteria for stochastic pinning control of networks of chaotic maps

    SciTech Connect

    Mwaffo, Violet; Porfiri, Maurizio; DeLellis, Pietro

    2014-03-15

    This paper investigates the controllability of discrete-time networks of coupled chaotic maps through stochastic pinning. In this control scheme, the network dynamics are steered towards a desired trajectory through a feedback control input that is applied stochastically to the network nodes. The network controllability is studied by analyzing the local mean square stability of the error dynamics with respect to the desired trajectory. Through the analysis of the spectral properties of salient matrices, a toolbox of conditions for controllability are obtained, in terms of the dynamics of the individual maps, algebraic properties of the network, and the probability distribution of the pinning control. We demonstrate the use of these conditions in the design of a stochastic pinning control strategy for networks of Chirikov standard maps. To elucidate the applicability of the approach, we consider different network topologies and compare five different stochastic pinning strategies through extensive numerical simulations.

  17. An accelerator controls network designed for reliability and flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, W. P.; Sidorowicz, K. V.

    1997-12-02

    The APS accelerator control system is a typical modern system based on the standard control system model, which consists of operator interfaces to a network and computer-controlled interfaces to hardware. The network provides a generalized communication path between the host computers, operator workstations, input/output crates, and other hardware that comprise the control system. The network is an integral part of all modern control systems and network performance will determine many characteristics of a control system. This paper describes the methods used to provide redundancy for various network system components as well as methods used to provide comprehensive monitoring of this network. The effect of archiving tens of thousands of data points on a regular basis and the effect on the controls network will be discussed. Metrics are provided on the performance of the system under various conditions.

  18. Genetic control of cuticular wax compounds in Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Gosney, Benjamin J; Potts, Brad M; O'Reilly-Wapstra, Julianne M; Vaillancourt, René E; Fitzgerald, Hugh; Davies, Noel W; Freeman, Jules S

    2016-01-01

    Plant cuticular wax compounds perform functions that are essential for the survival of terrestrial plants. Despite their importance, the genetic control of these compounds is poorly understood outside of model taxa. Here we investigate the genetic basis of variation in cuticular compounds in Eucalyptus globulus using quantitative genetic and quantitative trait loci (QTL) analyses. Quantitative genetic analysis was conducted using 246 open-pollinated progeny from 13 native sub-races throughout the geographic range. QTL analysis was conducted using 112 clonally replicated progeny from an outcross F2 population. Nine compounds exhibited significant genetic variation among sub-races with three exhibiting signals of diversifying selection. Fifty-two QTL were found with co-location of QTL for related compounds commonly observed. Notable among these was the QTL for five wax esters, which co-located with a gene from the KCS family, previously implicated in the biosynthesis of cuticular waxes in Arabidopsis. In combination, the QTL and quantitative genetic analyses suggest the variation and differentiation in cuticular wax compounds within E. globulus has a complex genetic origin. Sub-races exhibited independent latitudinal and longitudinal differentiation in cuticular wax compounds, likely reflecting processes such as historic gene flow and diversifying selection acting upon genes that have diverse functions in distinct biochemical pathways. PMID:26262563

  19. Genetic dissection of cardiac growth control pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLellan, W. R.; Schneider, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac muscle cells exhibit two related but distinct modes of growth that are highly regulated during development and disease. Cardiac myocytes rapidly proliferate during fetal life but exit the cell cycle irreversibly soon after birth, following which the predominant form of growth shifts from hyperplastic to hypertrophic. Much research has focused on identifying the candidate mitogens, hypertrophic agonists, and signaling pathways that mediate these processes in isolated cells. What drives the proliferative growth of embryonic myocardium in vivo and the mechanisms by which adult cardiac myocytes hypertrophy in vivo are less clear. Efforts to answer these questions have benefited from rapid progress made in techniques to manipulate the murine genome. Complementary technologies for gain- and loss-of-function now permit a mutational analysis of these growth control pathways in vivo in the intact heart. These studies have confirmed the importance of suspected pathways, have implicated unexpected pathways as well, and have led to new paradigms for the control of cardiac growth.

  20. Speech recognition method based on genetic vector quantization and BP neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li'ai; Li, Lihua; Zhou, Jian; Zhao, Qiuxia

    2009-07-01

    Vector Quantization is one of popular codebook design methods for speech recognition at present. In the process of codebook design, traditional LBG algorithm owns the advantage of fast convergence, but it is easy to get the local optimal result and be influenced by initial codebook. According to the understanding that Genetic Algorithm has the capability of getting the global optimal result, this paper proposes a hybrid clustering method GA-L based on Genetic Algorithm and LBG algorithm to improve the codebook.. Then using genetic neural networks for speech recognition. consequently search a global optimization codebook of the training vector space. The experiments show that neural network identification method based on genetic algorithm can extricate from its local maximum value and the initial restrictions, it can show superior to the standard genetic algorithm and BP neural network algorithm from various sources, and the genetic BP neural networks has a higher recognition rate and the unique application advantages than the general BP neural network in the same GA-VQ codebook, it can achieve a win-win situation in the time and efficiency.

  1. Genetic regulatory network motifs constrain adaptation through curvature in the landscape of mutational (co)variance.

    PubMed

    Hether, Tyler D; Hohenlohe, Paul A

    2014-04-01

    Systems biology is accumulating a wealth of understanding about the structure of genetic regulatory networks, leading to a more complete picture of the complex genotype-phenotype relationship. However, models of multivariate phenotypic evolution based on quantitative genetics have largely not incorporated a network-based view of genetic variation. Here we model a set of two-node, two-phenotype genetic network motifs, covering a full range of regulatory interactions. We find that network interactions result in different patterns of mutational (co)variance at the phenotypic level (the M-matrix), not only across network motifs but also across phenotypic space within single motifs. This effect is due almost entirely to mutational input of additive genetic (co)variance. Variation in M has the effect of stretching and bending phenotypic space with respect to evolvability, analogous to the curvature of space-time under general relativity, and similar mathematical tools may apply in each case. We explored the consequences of curvature in mutational variation by simulating adaptation under divergent selection with gene flow. Both standing genetic variation (the G-matrix) and rate of adaptation are constrained by M, so that G and adaptive trajectories are curved across phenotypic space. Under weak selection the phenotypic mean at migration-selection balance also depends on M. PMID:24219635

  2. Specificity and robustness in transcription control networks.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Anirvan M; Djordjevic, Marko; Shraiman, Boris I

    2002-02-19

    Recognition by transcription factors of the regulatory DNA elements upstream of genes is the fundamental step in controlling gene expression. How does the necessity to provide stability with respect to mutation constrain the organization of transcription control networks? We examine the mutation load of a transcription factor interacting with a set of n regulatory response elements as a function of the factor/DNA binding specificity and conclude on theoretical grounds that the optimal specificity decreases with n. The predicted correlation between variability of binding sites (for a given transcription factor) and their number is supported by the genomic data for Escherichia coli. The analysis of E. coli genomic data was carried out using an algorithm suggested by the biophysical model of transcription factor/DNA binding. Complete results of the search for candidate transcription factor binding sites are available at http://www.physics.rockefeller.edu/~boris/public/search_ecoli. PMID:11854503

  3. Network-based production quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Yongjin; Tseng, Bill; Chiou, Richard

    2007-09-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of remote quality control using a host of advanced automation equipment with Internet accessibility. Recent emphasis on product quality and reduction of waste stems from the dynamic, globalized and customer-driven market, which brings opportunities and threats to companies, depending on the response speed and production strategies. The current trends in industry also include a wide spread of distributed manufacturing systems, where design, production, and management facilities are geographically dispersed. This situation mandates not only the accessibility to remotely located production equipment for monitoring and control, but efficient means of responding to changing environment to counter process variations and diverse customer demands. To compete under such an environment, companies are striving to achieve 100%, sensor-based, automated inspection for zero-defect manufacturing. In this study, the Internet-based quality control scheme is referred to as "E-Quality for Manufacturing" or "EQM" for short. By its definition, EQM refers to a holistic approach to design and to embed efficient quality control functions in the context of network integrated manufacturing systems. Such system let designers located far away from the production facility to monitor, control and adjust the quality inspection processes as production design evolves.

  4. Nonlinear Dynamics and Control in Microfluidic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Daniel; Angilella, Jean-Regis; Motter, Adilson

    2015-03-01

    Researchers currently use abundant external devices (e.g., pumps and computers) to achieve precise flow dynamics in microfluidic systems. Here, I show our use of network concepts and computational methods to design microfluidic systems that do not depend on external devices yet still exhibit a diverse range of flow dynamics. I present an example of a microfluidic channel described by a nonlinear pressure-flow relation and show that complex flow behavior can emerge in systems designed around this channel. By controlling the pressure at only a single terminal in such a system, I demonstrate the ability to switch the direction of fluid flow through intermediate channels not directly connected to the controlled terminal. I also show that adding (or removing) flow channels to a system can result in unexpected changes in the total mass flow rate, depending on the network structure of the system. We expect this work to both expand the applicability of microfluidics and promote scaling up of current experiments. This research was funded by the National Science Foundation.

  5. Design of PID-type controllers using multiobjective genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Herreros, Alberto; Baeyens, Enrique; Perán, José R

    2002-10-01

    The design of a PID controller is a multiobjective problem. A plant and a set of specifications to be satisfied are given. The designer has to adjust the parameters of the PID controller such that the feedback interconnection of the plant and the controller satisfies the specifications. These specifications are usually competitive and any acceptable solution requires a tradeoff among them. An approach for adjusting the parameters of a PID controller based on multiobjective optimization and genetic algorithms is presented in this paper. The MRCD (multiobjective robust control design) genetic algorithm has been employed. The approach can be easily generalized to design multivariable coupled and decentralized PID loops and has been successfully validated for a large number of experimental cases. PMID:12398277

  6. Integrating Genetic and Network Analysis to Characterize Genes Related to Mouse Weight

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Wang, Susanna; Plaisier, Christopher; Castellanos, Ruth; Brozell, Alec; Schadt, Eric E; Drake, Thomas A

    2006-01-01

    Systems biology approaches that are based on the genetics of gene expression have been fruitful in identifying genetic regulatory loci related to complex traits. We use microarray and genetic marker data from an F2 mouse intercross to examine the large-scale organization of the gene co-expression network in liver, and annotate several gene modules in terms of 22 physiological traits. We identify chromosomal loci (referred to as module quantitative trait loci, mQTL) that perturb the modules and describe a novel approach that integrates network properties with genetic marker information to model gene/trait relationships. Specifically, using the mQTL and the intramodular connectivity of a body weight–related module, we describe which factors determine the relationship between gene expression profiles and weight. Our approach results in the identification of genetic targets that influence gene modules (pathways) that are related to the clinical phenotypes of interest. PMID:16934000

  7. Integrating genetic and network analysis to characterize genes related to mouse weight.

    PubMed

    Ghazalpour, Anatole; Doss, Sudheer; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Susanna; Plaisier, Christopher; Castellanos, Ruth; Brozell, Alec; Schadt, Eric E; Drake, Thomas A; Lusis, Aldons J; Horvath, Steve

    2006-08-18

    Systems biology approaches that are based on the genetics of gene expression have been fruitful in identifying genetic regulatory loci related to complex traits. We use microarray and genetic marker data from an F2 mouse intercross to examine the large-scale organization of the gene co-expression network in liver, and annotate several gene modules in terms of 22 physiological traits. We identify chromosomal loci (referred to as module quantitative trait loci, mQTL) that perturb the modules and describe a novel approach that integrates network properties with genetic marker information to model gene/trait relationships. Specifically, using the mQTL and the intramodular connectivity of a body weight-related module, we describe which factors determine the relationship between gene expression profiles and weight. Our approach results in the identification of genetic targets that influence gene modules (pathways) that are related to the clinical phenotypes of interest. PMID:16934000

  8. Environmental Control Of A Genetic Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khosla, Chaitan; Bailey, James E.

    1991-01-01

    E. coli bacteria altered to contain DNA sequence encoding production of hemoglobin made to produce hemoglobin at rates decreasing with increases in concentration of oxygen in culture media. Represents amplification of part of method described in "Cloned Hemoglobin Genes Enhance Growth Of Cells" (NPO-17517). Manipulation of promoter/regulator DNA sequences opens promising new subfield of recombinant-DNA technology for environmental control of expression of selected DNA sequences. New recombinant-DNA fusion gene products, expression vectors, and nucleotide-base sequences will emerge. Likely applications include such aerobic processes as manufacture of cloned proteins and synthesis of metabolites, production of chemicals by fermentation, enzymatic degradation, treatment of wastes, brewing, and variety of oxidative chemical reactions.

  9. Systems genetics identifies Sestrin 3 as a regulator of a proconvulsant gene network in human epileptic hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Michael R.; Rossetti, Tiziana; Speed, Doug; Srivastava, Prashant K.; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Hajji, Nabil; Dabrowska, Aleksandra; Rotival, Maxime; Razzaghi, Banafsheh; Kovac, Stjepana; Wanisch, Klaus; Grillo, Federico W.; Slaviero, Anna; Langley, Sarah R.; Shkura, Kirill; Roncon, Paolo; De, Tisham; Mattheisen, Manuel; Niehusmann, Pitt; O’Brien, Terence J.; Petrovski, Slave; von Lehe, Marec; Hoffmann, Per; Eriksson, Johan; Coffey, Alison J.; Cichon, Sven; Walker, Matthew; Simonato, Michele; Danis, Bénédicte; Mazzuferi, Manuela; Foerch, Patrik; Schoch, Susanne; De Paola, Vincenzo; Kaminski, Rafal M.; Cunliffe, Vincent T.; Becker, Albert J.; Petretto, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Gene-regulatory network analysis is a powerful approach to elucidate the molecular processes and pathways underlying complex disease. Here we employ systems genetics approaches to characterize the genetic regulation of pathophysiological pathways in human temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Using surgically acquired hippocampi from 129 TLE patients, we identify a gene-regulatory network genetically associated with epilepsy that contains a specialized, highly expressed transcriptional module encoding proconvulsive cytokines and Toll-like receptor signalling genes. RNA sequencing analysis in a mouse model of TLE using 100 epileptic and 100 control hippocampi shows the proconvulsive module is preserved across-species, specific to the epileptic hippocampus and upregulated in chronic epilepsy. In the TLE patients, we map the trans-acting genetic control of this proconvulsive module to Sestrin 3 (SESN3), and demonstrate that SESN3 positively regulates the module in macrophages, microglia and neurons. Morpholino-mediated Sesn3 knockdown in zebrafish confirms the regulation of the transcriptional module, and attenuates chemically induced behavioural seizures in vivo. PMID:25615886

  10. Experimental results of a predictive neural network HVAC controller

    SciTech Connect

    Jeannette, E.; Assawamartbunlue, K.; Kreider, J.F.; Curtiss, P.S.

    1998-12-31

    Proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) control is widely used in many HVAC control processes and requires constant attention for optimal control. Artificial neural networks offer the potential for improved control of processes through predictive techniques. This paper introduces and shows experimental results of a predictive neural network (PNN) controller applied to an unstable hot water system in an air-handling unit. Actual laboratory testing of the PNN and PID controllers show favorable results for the PNN controller.

  11. Automatic analysis of the control of metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Bayram, M

    1996-09-01

    In this paper we apply computer algebra techniques to analyze the control of metabolic networks. For this purpose, a computer program based on metabolic control theory was developed. When a stoichiometry matrix of the metabolic networks is given, the program calculates all the control coefficients (flux and metabolic control coefficients, summation and connectivity relationships) using elasticity coefficients. The program can be applied to any metabolic network which includes unlimited steps and intermediate metabolites. PMID:8889337

  12. Systems genetics of obesity in an F2 pig model by genome-wide association, genetic network, and pathway analyses

    PubMed Central

    Kogelman, Lisette J. A.; Pant, Sameer D.; Fredholm, Merete; Kadarmideen, Haja N.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex condition with world-wide exponentially rising prevalence rates, linked with severe diseases like Type 2 Diabetes. Economic and welfare consequences have led to a raised interest in a better understanding of the biological and genetic background. To date, whole genome investigations focusing on single genetic variants have achieved limited success, and the importance of including genetic interactions is becoming evident. Here, the aim was to perform an integrative genomic analysis in an F2 pig resource population that was constructed with an aim to maximize genetic variation of obesity-related phenotypes and genotyped using the 60K SNP chip. Firstly, Genome Wide Association (GWA) analysis was performed on the Obesity Index to locate candidate genomic regions that were further validated using combined Linkage Disequilibrium Linkage Analysis and investigated by evaluation of haplotype blocks. We built Weighted Interaction SNP Hub (WISH) and differentially wired (DW) networks using genotypic correlations amongst obesity-associated SNPs resulting from GWA analysis. GWA results and SNP modules detected by WISH and DW analyses were further investigated by functional enrichment analyses. The functional annotation of SNPs revealed several genes associated with obesity, e.g., NPC2 and OR4D10. Moreover, gene enrichment analyses identified several significantly associated pathways, over and above the GWA study results, that may influence obesity and obesity related diseases, e.g., metabolic processes. WISH networks based on genotypic correlations allowed further identification of various gene ontology terms and pathways related to obesity and related traits, which were not identified by the GWA study. In conclusion, this is the first study to develop a (genetic) obesity index and employ systems genetics in a porcine model to provide important insights into the complex genetic architecture associated with obesity and many biological pathways that underlie

  13. Disclosing genetic risk for coronary heart disease: effects on perceived personal control and genetic counseling satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Robinson, C L; Jouni, H; Kruisselbrink, T M; Austin, E E; Christensen, K D; Green, R C; Kullo, I J

    2016-02-01

    We investigated whether disclosure of coronary heart disease (CHD) genetic risk influences perceived personal control (PPC) and genetic counseling satisfaction (GCS). Participants (n = 207, age: 45-65 years) were randomized to receive estimated 10-year risk of CHD based on a conventional risk score (CRS) with or without a genetic risk score (GRS). Risk estimates were disclosed by a genetic counselor who also reviewed how GRS altered risk in those randomized to CRS+GRS. Each participant subsequently met with a physician and then completed surveys to assess PPC and GCS. Participants who received CRS+GRS had higher PPC than those who received CRS alone although the absolute difference was small (25.2 ± 2.7 vs 24.1 ± 3.8, p = 0.04). A greater proportion of CRS+GRS participants had higher GCS scores (17.3 ± 5.3 vs 15.9 ± 6.3, p = 0.06). In the CRS+GRS group, PPC and GCS scores were not correlated with GRS. Within both groups, PPC and GCS scores were similar in patients with or without family history (p = NS). In conclusion, patients who received their genetic risk of CHD had higher PPC and tended to have higher GCS. Our findings suggest that disclosure of genetic risk of CHD together with conventional risk estimates is appreciated by patients. Whether this results in improved outcomes needs additional investigation. PMID:25708169

  14. Bihemispheric network dynamics coordinating vocal feedback control.

    PubMed

    Kort, Naomi S; Cuesta, Pablo; Houde, John F; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2016-04-01

    Modulation of vocal pitch is a key speech feature that conveys important linguistic and affective information. Auditory feedback is used to monitor and maintain pitch. We examined induced neural high gamma power (HGP) (65-150 Hz) using magnetoencephalography during pitch feedback control. Participants phonated into a microphone while hearing their auditory feedback through headphones. During each phonation, a single real-time 400 ms pitch shift was applied to the auditory feedback. Participants compensated by rapidly changing their pitch to oppose the pitch shifts. This behavioral change required coordination of the neural speech motor control network, including integration of auditory and somatosensory feedback to initiate change in motor plans. We found increases in HGP across both hemispheres within 200 ms of pitch shifts, covering left sensory and right premotor, parietal, temporal, and frontal regions, involved in sensory detection and processing of the pitch shift. Later responses to pitch shifts (200-300 ms) were right dominant, in parietal, frontal, and temporal regions. Timing of activity in these regions indicates their role in coordinating motor change and detecting and processing of the sensory consequences of this change. Subtracting out cortical responses during passive listening to recordings of the phonations isolated HGP increases specific to speech production, highlighting right parietal and premotor cortex, and left posterior temporal cortex involvement in the motor response. Correlation of HGP with behavioral compensation demonstrated right frontal region involvement in modulating participant's compensatory response. This study highlights the bihemispheric sensorimotor cortical network involvement in auditory feedback-based control of vocal pitch. PMID:26917046

  15. Physiology and genetics of metabolic flux control in Zymomonas mobilis

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T.

    1992-01-01

    This work seeks to understand the role of gene expression in regulating glycolytic enzyme synthesis in a balance that allows proper glycoltic flux control. The seven genes targeted for study in this laboratory have been cloned and sequenced, and molecular details of regulation have been investigated. Clear that glycolytic enzyme synthesis is coordinated to prevent the build up of toxic metabolic intermediates. The genetic mechanisms responsible for regulating balanced expression of the EntnerDoudoroff and glycolytic genes in Z. mobilis are beginning to be understood. Several layers of genetic control, perhaps in a hierarchal arrangement act in concert to determine the relative abundance of the glycolytic enzymes. These genetic controls involve differential translational efficiency, highly conserved promoter sequences, transcription factors, differential mRNA stabilities, and nucleolytic mRNA processing. The serendipitous cloning of the glucose facilitator, glf, as a result of linkage to several other genes of interest will have a significant impact on the study of Z. mobilis metabolism. The glucose facilitator is being characterized in a genetically reconstituted system in E. coli. Molecular genetic studies indicate that the ratio of glf expression to that of glk, zmf, and edd is carefully regulated, and suggests a critical role in metabolic control. Regulation of glycolytic gene expression is now sufficiently well understood to allow use of the glycolytic genes as tools to manipulate specified enzyme levels for the purpose of analyzing metabolic flux control. The critical genes have been subcloned for stable expression in Z. mobilis and placed under control of a regulated promoter system involving the tac promoter, the lacI repressor, and gene induction in by IPTG. HPLC methods have been developed that allow quantitation of virtually all of the metabolic intermediates in the cell pool.

  16. Actin Filament Elongation in Arp2/3-derived Networks is Controlled by Three Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Michelot, Alphée; Grassart, Alexandre; Okreglak, Voytek; Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charles; Drubin, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Spatial and temporal control of actin filament barbed end elongation is crucial for force generation by actin networks. In this study, genetics, cell biology, and biochemistry were used to reveal three complementary mechanisms that regulate actin filament barbed end elongation in Arp2/3-derived networks. Aip1 inhibits elongation of aged ADP-actin filaments decorated with cofilin, and together with capping protein (CP), maintains a high level of assembly-competent actin species. We identified Abp1 and Aim3 as two additional proteins that work together to inhibit barbed end elongation. Abp1/Aim3 collaborates with CP to control elongation of newly assembled ATP-actin filaments to organize filament polarity within actin networks. Thus, three distinct mechanisms control filament elongation in different regions of Arp2/3 networks, maintaining pools of assembly-competent actin species while ensuring proper filament polarity and facilitating force production. PMID:23333351

  17. Actin filament elongation in Arp2/3-derived networks is controlled by three distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Michelot, Alphée; Grassart, Alexandre; Okreglak, Voytek; Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charles; Drubin, David G

    2013-01-28

    Spatial and temporal control of actin filament barbed end elongation is crucial for force generation by actin networks. In this study, genetics, cell biology, and biochemistry were used to reveal three complementary mechanisms that regulate actin filament barbed end elongation in Arp2/3-derived networks. Aip1 inhibits elongation of aged ADP-actin filaments decorated with cofilin and, together with capping protein (CP), maintains a high level of assembly-competent actin species. We identified Abp1 and Aim3 as two additional proteins that work together to inhibit barbed end elongation. Abp1/Aim3 collaborates with CP to control elongation of newly assembled ATP-actin filaments to organize filament polarity within actin networks. Thus, three distinct mechanisms control filament elongation in different regions of Arp2/3 networks, maintaining pools of assembly-competent actin species while ensuring proper filament polarity and facilitating force production. PMID:23333351

  18. Using genetic markers to orient the edges in quantitative trait networks: The NEO software

    PubMed Central

    Aten, Jason E; Fuller, Tova F; Lusis, Aldons J; Horvath, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Background Systems genetic studies have been used to identify genetic loci that affect transcript abundances and clinical traits such as body weight. The pairwise correlations between gene expression traits and/or clinical traits can be used to define undirected trait networks. Several authors have argued that genetic markers (e.g expression quantitative trait loci, eQTLs) can serve as causal anchors for orienting the edges of a trait network. The availability of hundreds of thousands of genetic markers poses new challenges: how to relate (anchor) traits to multiple genetic markers, how to score the genetic evidence in favor of an edge orientation, and how to weigh the information from multiple markers. Results We develop and implement Network Edge Orienting (NEO) methods and software that address the challenges of inferring unconfounded and directed gene networks from microarray-derived gene expression data by integrating mRNA levels with genetic marker data and Structural Equation Model (SEM) comparisons. The NEO software implements several manual and automatic methods for incorporating genetic information to anchor traits. The networks are oriented by considering each edge separately, thus reducing error propagation. To summarize the genetic evidence in favor of a given edge orientation, we propose Local SEM-based Edge Orienting (LEO) scores that compare the fit of several competing causal graphs. SEM fitting indices allow the user to assess local and overall model fit. The NEO software allows the user to carry out a robustness analysis with regard to genetic marker selection. We demonstrate the utility of NEO by recovering known causal relationships in the sterol homeostasis pathway using liver gene expression data from an F2 mouse cross. Further, we use NEO to study the relationship between a disease gene and a biologically important gene co-expression module in liver tissue. Conclusion The NEO software can be used to orient the edges of gene co

  19. Prospects of chemosterilant and genetic control of rodents

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Rex E.; Howard, Walter E.

    1973-01-01

    This paper discusses some requirements of an ideal rodent chemosterilant, analyses the advantages of chemosterilants over other control methods, and compares the potential values of chemosterilants that affect females, males, and both sexes. Examples are given of specific situations where chemosterilants will be valuable in rodent control, together with suggested methods of applying them. The theory and practicability of using genetics in rodent control are also discussed. Neither the chemosterilant nor the genetic method is expected to become a panacea, but their eventual application will be a significant advance in rodent-control technology. Since both approaches are based on sound biological principles and are relatively safe, they should be helpful in regulating rodent populations in the future. PMID:4583051

  20. Structural permeability of complex networks to control signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Iudice, Francesco; Garofalo, Franco; Sorrentino, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    Many biological, social and technological systems can be described as complex networks. The goal of affecting their behaviour has motivated recent work focusing on the relationship between the network structure and its propensity to be controlled. While this work has provided insight into several relevant problems, a comprehensive approach to address partial and complete controllability of networks is still lacking. Here, we bridge this gap by developing a framework to maximize the diffusion of the control signals through a network, while taking into account physical and economic constraints that inevitably arise in applications. This approach allows us to introduce the network permeability, a unified metric of the propensity of a network to be controllable. The analysis of the permeability of several synthetic and real networks enables us to extract some structural features that deepen our quantitative understanding of the ease with which specific controllability requirements can be met.

  1. Structural permeability of complex networks to control signals

    PubMed Central

    Lo Iudice, Francesco; Garofalo, Franco; Sorrentino, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Many biological, social and technological systems can be described as complex networks. The goal of affecting their behaviour has motivated recent work focusing on the relationship between the network structure and its propensity to be controlled. While this work has provided insight into several relevant problems, a comprehensive approach to address partial and complete controllability of networks is still lacking. Here, we bridge this gap by developing a framework to maximize the diffusion of the control signals through a network, while taking into account physical and economic constraints that inevitably arise in applications. This approach allows us to introduce the network permeability, a unified metric of the propensity of a network to be controllable. The analysis of the permeability of several synthetic and real networks enables us to extract some structural features that deepen our quantitative understanding of the ease with which specific controllability requirements can be met. PMID:26391186

  2. Immunity factor contributes to altered brain functional networks in individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease: Neuroimaging-genetic evidence.

    PubMed

    Bai, Feng; Shi, Yongmei; Yuan, Yonggui; Xie, Chunming; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-08-01

    Clusterin (CLU) is recognized as a secreted protein that is related to the processes of inflammation and immunity in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The effects of the risk variant of the C allele at the rs11136000 locus of the CLU gene are associated with variations in the brain structure and function. However, the relationship of the CLU-C allele to architectural disruptions in resting-state networks in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) subjects (i.e., individuals with elevated risk of AD) remains relatively unknown. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and an imaging genetic approach, this study investigated whether individual brain functional networks, i.e., the default mode network (DMN) and the task-positive network, were modulated by the CLU-C allele (rs11136000) in 50 elderly participants, including 26 aMCI subjects and 24 healthy controls. CLU-by-aMCI interactions were associated with the information-bridging regions between resting-state networks rather than with the DMN itself, especially in cortical midline regions. Interestingly, the complex communications between resting-state networks were enhanced in aMCI subjects with the CLU rs11136000 CC genotype and were modulated by the degree of memory impairment, suggesting a reconstructed balance of the resting-state networks in these individuals with an elevated risk of AD. The neuroimaging-genetic evidence indicates that immunity factors may contribute to alterations in brain functional networks in aMCI. These findings add to the evidence that the CLU gene may represent a potential therapeutic target for slowing disease progression in AD. PMID:26899953

  3. Genetic improvement of tomato by targeted control of fruit softening.

    PubMed

    Uluisik, Selman; Chapman, Natalie H; Smith, Rebecca; Poole, Mervin; Adams, Gary; Gillis, Richard B; Besong, Tabot M D; Sheldon, Judith; Stiegelmeyer, Suzy; Perez, Laura; Samsulrizal, Nurul; Wang, Duoduo; Fisk, Ian D; Yang, Ni; Baxter, Charles; Rickett, Daniel; Fray, Rupert; Blanco-Ulate, Barbara; Powell, Ann L T; Harding, Stephen E; Craigon, Jim; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Fich, Eric A; Sun, Li; Domozych, David S; Fraser, Paul D; Tucker, Gregory A; Grierson, Don; Seymour, Graham B

    2016-09-01

    Controlling the rate of softening to extend shelf life was a key target for researchers engineering genetically modified (GM) tomatoes in the 1990s, but only modest improvements were achieved. Hybrids grown nowadays contain 'non-ripening mutations' that slow ripening and improve shelf life, but adversely affect flavor and color. We report substantial, targeted control of tomato softening, without affecting other aspects of ripening, by silencing a gene encoding a pectate lyase. PMID:27454737

  4. Edge orientation for optimizing controllability of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan-Dong; Lao, Song-Yang; Hou, Lv-Lin; Bai, Liang

    2014-10-01

    Recently, as the controllability of complex networks attracts much attention, how to design and optimize the controllability of networks has become a common and urgent problem in the field of controlling complex networks. Previous work focused on the structural perturbation and neglected the role of edge direction to optimize the network controllability. In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 228702 (2009)], the authors proposed a simple method to enhance the synchronizability of networks by assignment of link direction while keeping network topology unchanged. However, the controllability is fundamentally different from synchronization. In this work, we systematically propose the definition of assigning direction to optimize controllability, which is called the edge orientation for optimal controllability problem (EOOC). To solve the EOOC problem, we construct a switching network and transfer the EOOC problem to find the maximum independent set of the switching network. We prove that the principle of our optimization method meets the sense of unambiguity and optimum simultaneously. Furthermore, the relationship between the degree-degree correlations and EOOC are investigated by experiments. The results show that the disassortativity pattern could weaken the orientation for optimal controllability, while the assortativity pattern has no correlation with EOOC. All the experimental results of this work verify that the network structure determines the network controllability and the optimization effects. PMID:25375546

  5. Edge orientation for optimizing controllability of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yan-Dong; Lao, Song-Yang; Hou, Lv-Lin; Bai, Liang

    2014-10-01

    Recently, as the controllability of complex networks attracts much attention, how to design and optimize the controllability of networks has become a common and urgent problem in the field of controlling complex networks. Previous work focused on the structural perturbation and neglected the role of edge direction to optimize the network controllability. In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 228702 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.228702], the authors proposed a simple method to enhance the synchronizability of networks by assignment of link direction while keeping network topology unchanged. However, the controllability is fundamentally different from synchronization. In this work, we systematically propose the definition of assigning direction to optimize controllability, which is called the edge orientation for optimal controllability problem (EOOC). To solve the EOOC problem, we construct a switching network and transfer the EOOC problem to find the maximum independent set of the switching network. We prove that the principle of our optimization method meets the sense of unambiguity and optimum simultaneously. Furthermore, the relationship between the degree-degree correlations and EOOC are investigated by experiments. The results show that the disassortativity pattern could weaken the orientation for optimal controllability, while the assortativity pattern has no correlation with EOOC. All the experimental results of this work verify that the network structure determines the network controllability and the optimization effects.

  6. Observability and Controllability of Nonlinear Networks: The Role of Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiff, Steven; Whalen, Andrew; Brennan, Sean; Sauer, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Observability and controllability are essential concepts to the design of predictive observer models and feedback controllers of networked systems. For example, noncontrollable mathematical models of real systems may have subspaces that influence model behavior, but cannot be controlled by an input. Such subspaces are difficult to determine in complex nonlinear networks. Since most of the present theory was developed for linear networks without symmetries, here we present a numerical and group representational framework, to quantify the observability and controllability of nonlinear networks with explicit symmetries that shows the connection between symmetries and measures of observability and controllability. We numerically observe and theoretically predict that not all symmetries have the same effect on network observation and control. We find that the presence of symmetry in a network may decrease observability and controllability, although networks containing only rotational symmetries remain controllable and observable. These results alter our view of the nature of observability and controllability in complex networks, change our understanding of structural controllability, and affect the design of mathematical models to observe and control such networks. National Academies - Keck Futures Initiative, NSF grant DMS 1216568, and Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience NIH Grant 1R01EB014641.

  7. Solving deterministic non-linear programming problem using Hopfield artificial neural network and genetic programming techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasant, P.; Ganesan, T.; Elamvazuthi, I.

    2012-11-01

    A fairly reasonable result was obtained for non-linear engineering problems using the optimization techniques such as neural network, genetic algorithms, and fuzzy logic independently in the past. Increasingly, hybrid techniques are being used to solve the non-linear problems to obtain better output. This paper discusses the use of neuro-genetic hybrid technique to optimize the geological structure mapping which is known as seismic survey. It involves the minimization of objective function subject to the requirement of geophysical and operational constraints. In this work, the optimization was initially performed using genetic programming, and followed by hybrid neuro-genetic programming approaches. Comparative studies and analysis were then carried out on the optimized results. The results indicate that the hybrid neuro-genetic hybrid technique produced better results compared to the stand-alone genetic programming method.

  8. Energy-Saving Topology Control for Heterogeneous Ad Hoc Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Xuehui

    Topology control with per-node transmission power adjustment in wireless ad hoc networks has been shown to be effective with respect to prolonging network lifetime and increasing network capacity. In this paper, we propose a fully distributed, asynchronous and localized energy-saving topology control algorithm for heterogeneous ad hoc networks with non-uniform transmission ranges. We prove the topology derived from the algorithm preserves the network connectivity and bi-directionality. It need not the position system support and dramatically reduces the communication overhead compared to other topology control algorithms. Simulation results show the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm.

  9. Evaluation of the efficiency of artificial neural networks for genetic value prediction.

    PubMed

    Silva, G N; Tomaz, R S; Sant'Anna, I C; Carneiro, V Q; Cruz, C D; Nascimento, M

    2016-01-01

    Artificial neural networks have shown great potential when applied to breeding programs. In this study, we propose the use of artificial neural networks as a viable alternative to conventional prediction methods. We conduct a thorough evaluation of the efficiency of these networks with respect to the prediction of breeding values. Therefore, we considered eight simulated scenarios, and for the purpose of genetic value prediction, seven statistical parameters in addition to the phenotypic mean in a network designed as a multilayer perceptron. After an evaluation of different network configurations, the results demonstrated the superiority of neural networks compared to estimation procedures based on linear models, and indicated high predictive accuracy and network efficiency. PMID:27051007

  10. Kin in space: social viscosity in a spatially and genetically substructured network

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Jochen B.W; Trillmich, Fritz

    2008-01-01

    Population substructuring is a fundamental aspect of animal societies. A growing number of theoretical studies recognize that who-meets-whom is not random, but rather determined by spatial relationships or illustrated by social networks. Structural properties of large highly dynamic social systems are notoriously difficult to unravel. Network approaches provide powerful ways to analyse the intricate relationships between social behaviour, dispersal strategies and genetic structure. Applying network analytical tools to a colony of the highly gregarious Galápagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki), we find several genetic clusters that correspond to spatially determined ‘network communities’. Overall relatedness was low, and genetic structure in the network can be interpreted as an emergent property of philopatry and seems not to be primarily driven by targeted interactions among highly related individuals in family groups. Nevertheless, social relationships between directly adjacent individuals in the network were stronger among genetically more similar individuals. Taken together, these results suggest that even small differences in the degree of relatedness can influence behavioural decisions. This raises the fascinating prospect that kin selection may also apply to low levels of relatedness within densely packed animal groups where less obvious co-operative interactions such as increased tolerance and stress reduction are important. PMID:18522913

  11. The control networks of Tethys and Dione

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. E.; Katayama, F. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Control networks of the Saturnian satellites Tethys and Dione have been established photogrammetrically from pictures taken by the two Voyager spacecraft during their flybys. Coordinates of 110 points on Tethys and 126 points on Dione are listed; selected points are identified on U.S. Geological Survey maps of the satellites, and many are identified by name. Measurements of these points were made on six pictures from Voyager 1 and 21 from Voyager 2 for Tethys, and on 27 pictures from Voyager 1 and one from Voyager 2 for Dione. The longitude systems on the satellites have been defined by craters on their surfaces. The mean radii have been determined as 524 + or - 5 km for Tethys and 559 + or - 5 km for Dione.

  12. Application of BP Neural Network Based on Genetic Algorithm in Quantitative Analysis of Mixed GAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongyan; Liu, Wenzhen; Qu, Jian; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhibin

    Aiming at the problem of mixed gas detection in neural network and analysis on the principle of gas detection. Combining BP algorithm of genetic algorithm with hybrid gas sensors, a kind of quantitative analysis system of mixed gas is designed. The local minimum of network learning is the main reason which affects the precision of gas analysis. On the basis of the network study to improve the learning algorithms, the analyses and tests for CO, CO2 and HC compounds were tested. The results showed that the above measures effectively improve and enhance the accuracy of the neural network for gas analysis.

  13. Bayesian network reconstruction using systems genetics data: comparison of MCMC methods.

    PubMed

    Tasaki, Shinya; Sauerwine, Ben; Hoff, Bruce; Toyoshiba, Hiroyoshi; Gaiteri, Chris; Chaibub Neto, Elias

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructing biological networks using high-throughput technologies has the potential to produce condition-specific interactomes. But are these reconstructed networks a reliable source of biological interactions? Do some network inference methods offer dramatically improved performance on certain types of networks? To facilitate the use of network inference methods in systems biology, we report a large-scale simulation study comparing the ability of Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) samplers to reverse engineer Bayesian networks. The MCMC samplers we investigated included foundational and state-of-the-art Metropolis-Hastings and Gibbs sampling approaches, as well as novel samplers we have designed. To enable a comprehensive comparison, we simulated gene expression and genetics data from known network structures under a range of biologically plausible scenarios. We examine the overall quality of network inference via different methods, as well as how their performance is affected by network characteristics. Our simulations reveal that network size, edge density, and strength of gene-to-gene signaling are major parameters that differentiate the performance of various samplers. Specifically, more recent samplers including our novel methods outperform traditional samplers for highly interconnected large networks with strong gene-to-gene signaling. Our newly developed samplers show comparable or superior performance to the top existing methods. Moreover, this performance gain is strongest in networks with biologically oriented topology, which indicates that our novel samplers are suitable for inferring biological networks. The performance of MCMC samplers in this simulation framework can guide the choice of methods for network reconstruction using systems genetics data. PMID:25631319

  14. Bayesian Network Reconstruction Using Systems Genetics Data: Comparison of MCMC Methods

    PubMed Central

    Tasaki, Shinya; Sauerwine, Ben; Hoff, Bruce; Toyoshiba, Hiroyoshi; Gaiteri, Chris; Chaibub Neto, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Reconstructing biological networks using high-throughput technologies has the potential to produce condition-specific interactomes. But are these reconstructed networks a reliable source of biological interactions? Do some network inference methods offer dramatically improved performance on certain types of networks? To facilitate the use of network inference methods in systems biology, we report a large-scale simulation study comparing the ability of Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) samplers to reverse engineer Bayesian networks. The MCMC samplers we investigated included foundational and state-of-the-art Metropolis–Hastings and Gibbs sampling approaches, as well as novel samplers we have designed. To enable a comprehensive comparison, we simulated gene expression and genetics data from known network structures under a range of biologically plausible scenarios. We examine the overall quality of network inference via different methods, as well as how their performance is affected by network characteristics. Our simulations reveal that network size, edge density, and strength of gene-to-gene signaling are major parameters that differentiate the performance of various samplers. Specifically, more recent samplers including our novel methods outperform traditional samplers for highly interconnected large networks with strong gene-to-gene signaling. Our newly developed samplers show comparable or superior performance to the top existing methods. Moreover, this performance gain is strongest in networks with biologically oriented topology, which indicates that our novel samplers are suitable for inferring biological networks. The performance of MCMC samplers in this simulation framework can guide the choice of methods for network reconstruction using systems genetics data. PMID:25631319

  15. Maintain the structural controllability under malicious attacks on directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbo; Gao, Lin; Gao, Yong; Deng, Yue

    2013-03-01

    The directedness of the links in a network plays a critical role in determining many dynamical processes among which the controllability has received much recent attention. The control robustness of a network against malicious attack and random failure also becomes a significant issue. In this paper, we propose a novel control robustness index motivated by recent studies on the global connectivity and controllability. In its general form, the problem of optimizing the control robustness index is computationally infeasible for large-scale networks. By analysing the influences of several directed topological factors on the dynamical control process, we transform the control robustness problem into the problem of transitivity maximization for control routes, and propose an efficient greedy algorithm to make control routes transitive. A series of experiments on real-world and synthetic networks show that the global connectivity and controllability can be improved simultaneously and we can mitigate the destruction of malicious attack through backing up the control routes.

  16. Modeling, monitoring and control based on neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Chi Yung

    1995-04-14

    The cost of a fabrication line such as one in a semiconductor house has increased dramatically over the years and it is possibly already past the point that some new start-up company can have sufficient capital to build a new fabrication line. Such capital-intensive manufacturing needs better utilization of resources and management of equipment to maximize its productivity. In order to maximize the return from such a capital-intensive manufacturing line, we need to address the following: (1) increasing the yield, (2) enhancing the flexibility of the fabrication line, (3) improving quality, and finally (4) minimizing the down time of the processing equipment. Because of the significant advances now made in the fields of artificial neural networks, fuzzy logic, machine learning and genetic algorithms, we advocate the use of these new tools to in manufacturing. We term the applications of these and other tools that mimic human intelligence to manufacturing neural manufacturing. This paper will address the effort at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to use artificial neural networks to address certain semiconductor process modeling, monitoring and control questions.

  17. Noise Control in Gene Regulatory Networks with Negative Feedback.

    PubMed

    Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D

    2016-07-01

    Genes and proteins regulate cellular functions through complex circuits of biochemical reactions. Fluctuations in the components of these regulatory networks result in noise that invariably corrupts the signal, possibly compromising function. Here, we create a practical formalism based on ideas introduced by Wiener and Kolmogorov (WK) for filtering noise in engineered communications systems to quantitatively assess the extent to which noise can be controlled in biological processes involving negative feedback. Application of the theory, which reproduces the previously proven scaling of the lower bound for noise suppression in terms of the number of signaling events, shows that a tetracycline repressor-based negative-regulatory gene circuit behaves as a WK filter. For the class of Hill-like nonlinear regulatory functions, this type of filter provides the optimal reduction in noise. Our theoretical approach can be readily combined with experimental measurements of response functions in a wide variety of genetic circuits, to elucidate the general principles by which biological networks minimize noise. PMID:27095600

  18. Multivariate analysis reveals genetic associations of the resting default mode network in psychotic bipolar disorder and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Meda, Shashwath A.; Ruaño, Gualberto; Windemuth, Andreas; O’Neil, Kasey; Berwise, Clifton; Dunn, Sabra M.; Boccaccio, Leah E.; Narayanan, Balaji; Kocherla, Mohan; Sprooten, Emma; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Tamminga, Carol A.; Sweeney, John A.; Clementz, Brett A.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The brain’s default mode network (DMN) is highly heritable and is compromised in a variety of psychiatric disorders. However, genetic control over the DMN in schizophrenia (SZ) and psychotic bipolar disorder (PBP) is largely unknown. Study subjects (n = 1,305) underwent a resting-state functional MRI scan and were analyzed by a two-stage approach. The initial analysis used independent component analysis (ICA) in 324 healthy controls, 296 SZ probands, 300 PBP probands, 179 unaffected first-degree relatives of SZ probands (SZREL), and 206 unaffected first-degree relatives of PBP probands to identify DMNs and to test their biomarker and/or endophenotype status. A subset of controls and probands (n = 549) then was subjected to a parallel ICA (para-ICA) to identify imaging–genetic relationships. ICA identified three DMNs. Hypo-connectivity was observed in both patient groups in all DMNs. Similar patterns observed in SZREL were restricted to only one network. DMN connectivity also correlated with several symptom measures. Para-ICA identified five sub-DMNs that were significantly associated with five different genetic networks. Several top-ranking SNPs across these networks belonged to previously identified, well-known psychosis/mood disorder genes. Global enrichment analyses revealed processes including NMDA-related long-term potentiation, PKA, immune response signaling, axon guidance, and synaptogenesis that significantly influenced DMN modulation in psychoses. In summary, we observed both unique and shared impairments in functional connectivity across the SZ and PBP cohorts; these impairments were selectively familial only for SZREL. Genes regulating specific neurodevelopment/transmission processes primarily mediated DMN disconnectivity. The study thus identifies biological pathways related to a widely researched quantitative trait that might suggest novel, targeted drug treatments for these diseases. PMID:24778245

  19. PGTandMe: social networking-based genetic testing and the evolving research model.

    PubMed

    Koch, Valerie Gutmann

    2012-01-01

    The opportunity to use extensive genetic data, personal information, and family medical history for research purposes may be naturally appealing to the personal genetic testing (PGT) industry, which is already coupling direct-to-consumer (DTC) products with social networking technologies, as well as to potential industry or institutional partners. This article evaluates the transformation in research that the hybrid of PGT and social networking will bring about, and--highlighting the challenges associated with a new paradigm of "patient-driven" genomic research--focuses on the consequences of shifting the structure, locus, timing, and scope of research through genetic crowd-sourcing. This article also explores potential ethical, legal, and regulatory issues that arise from the hybrid between personal genomic research and online social networking, particularly regarding informed consent, institutional review board (IRB) oversight, and ownership/intellectual property (IP) considerations. PMID:22616542

  20. A Hybrid Neural Network-Genetic Algorithm Technique for Aircraft Engine Performance Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Takahisa; Simon, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a model-based diagnostic method, which utilizes Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms, is investigated. Neural networks are applied to estimate the engine internal health, and Genetic Algorithms are applied for sensor bias detection and estimation. This hybrid approach takes advantage of the nonlinear estimation capability provided by neural networks while improving the robustness to measurement uncertainty through the application of Genetic Algorithms. The hybrid diagnostic technique also has the ability to rank multiple potential solutions for a given set of anomalous sensor measurements in order to reduce false alarms and missed detections. The performance of the hybrid diagnostic technique is evaluated through some case studies derived from a turbofan engine simulation. The results show this approach is promising for reliable diagnostics of aircraft engines.

  1. Surfing a genetic association interaction network to identify modulators of antibody response to smallpox vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Davis, N A; Crowe, J E; Pajewski, N M; McKinney, B A

    2010-01-01

    The variation in antibody response to vaccination likely involves small contributions of numerous genetic variants, such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which interact in gene networks and pathways. To accumulate the bits of genetic information relevant to the phenotype that are distributed throughout the interaction network, we develop a network eigenvector centrality algorithm (SNPrank) that is sensitive to the weak main effects, gene–gene interactions and small higher-order interactions through hub effects. Analogous to Google PageRank, we interpret the algorithm as the simulation of a random SNP surfer (RSS) that accumulates bits of information in the network through a dynamic probabilistic Markov chain. The transition matrix for the RSS is based on a data-driven genetic association interaction network (GAIN), the nodes of which are SNPs weighted by the main-effect strength and edges weighted by the gene–gene interaction strength. We apply SNPrank to a GAIN analysis of a candidate-gene association study on human immune response to smallpox vaccine. SNPrank implicates a SNP in the retinoid X receptor α (RXRA) gene through a network interaction effect on antibody response. This vitamin A- and D-signaling mediator has been previously implicated in human immune responses, although it would be neglected in a standard analysis because its significance is unremarkable outside the context of its network centrality. This work suggests SNPrank to be a powerful method for identifying network effects in genetic association data and reveals a potential vitamin regulation network association with antibody response. PMID:20613780

  2. Interplay of population genetics and dynamics in the genetic control of mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Alphey, Nina; Bonsall, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Some proposed genetics-based vector control methods aim to suppress or eliminate a mosquito population in a similar manner to the sterile insect technique. One approach under development in Anopheles mosquitoes uses homing endonuclease genes (HEGs)—selfish genetic elements (inherited at greater than Mendelian rate) that can spread rapidly through a population even if they reduce fitness. HEGs have potential to drive introduced traits through a population without large-scale sustained releases. The population genetics of HEG-based systems has been established using discrete-time mathematical models. However, several ecologically important aspects remain unexplored. We formulate a new continuous-time (overlapping generations) combined population dynamic and genetic model and apply it to a HEG that targets and knocks out a gene that is important for survival. We explore the effects of density dependence ranging from undercompensating to overcompensating larval competition, occurring before or after HEG fitness effects, and consider differences in competitive effect between genotypes (wild-type, heterozygotes and HEG homozygotes). We show that population outcomes—elimination, suppression or loss of the HEG—depend crucially on the interaction between these ecological aspects and genetics, and explain how the HEG fitness properties, the homing rate (drive) and the insect's life-history parameters influence those outcomes. PMID:24522781

  3. A geometrical approach to control and controllability of nonlinear dynamical networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Le-Zhi; Su, Ri-Qi; Huang, Zi-Gang; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Wen-Xu; Grebogi, Celso; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the recent interest and advances in linear controllability of complex networks, controlling nonlinear network dynamics remains an outstanding problem. Here we develop an experimentally feasible control framework for nonlinear dynamical networks that exhibit multistability. The control objective is to apply parameter perturbation to drive the system from one attractor to another, assuming that the former is undesired and the latter is desired. To make our framework practically meaningful, we consider restricted parameter perturbation by imposing two constraints: it must be experimentally realizable and applied only temporarily. We introduce the concept of attractor network, which allows us to formulate a quantifiable controllability framework for nonlinear dynamical networks: a network is more controllable if the attractor network is more strongly connected. We test our control framework using examples from various models of experimental gene regulatory networks and demonstrate the beneficial role of noise in facilitating control. PMID:27076273

  4. A geometrical approach to control and controllability of nonlinear dynamical networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le-Zhi; Su, Ri-Qi; Huang, Zi-Gang; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Wen-Xu; Grebogi, Celso; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the recent interest and advances in linear controllability of complex networks, controlling nonlinear network dynamics remains an outstanding problem. Here we develop an experimentally feasible control framework for nonlinear dynamical networks that exhibit multistability. The control objective is to apply parameter perturbation to drive the system from one attractor to another, assuming that the former is undesired and the latter is desired. To make our framework practically meaningful, we consider restricted parameter perturbation by imposing two constraints: it must be experimentally realizable and applied only temporarily. We introduce the concept of attractor network, which allows us to formulate a quantifiable controllability framework for nonlinear dynamical networks: a network is more controllable if the attractor network is more strongly connected. We test our control framework using examples from various models of experimental gene regulatory networks and demonstrate the beneficial role of noise in facilitating control. PMID:27076273

  5. Nonlinear Adaptive PID Control for Greenhouse Environment Based on RBF Network

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Songwei; Hu, Haigen; Xu, Lihong; Li, Guanghui

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a hybrid control strategy, combining Radial Basis Function (RBF) network with conventional proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) controllers, for the greenhouse climate control. A model of nonlinear conservation laws of enthalpy and matter between numerous system variables affecting the greenhouse climate is formulated. RBF network is used to tune and identify all PID gain parameters online and adaptively. The presented Neuro-PID control scheme is validated through simulations of set-point tracking and disturbance rejection. We compare the proposed adaptive online tuning method with the offline tuning scheme that employs Genetic Algorithm (GA) to search the optimal gain parameters. The results show that the proposed strategy has good adaptability, strong robustness and real-time performance while achieving satisfactory control performance for the complex and nonlinear greenhouse climate control system, and it may provide a valuable reference to formulate environmental control strategies for actual application in greenhouse production. PMID:22778587

  6. Alternate wiring of a KNOXI genetic network underlies differences in leaf development of A. thaliana and C. hirsuta

    PubMed Central

    Rast-Somssich, Madlen I.; Broholm, Suvi; Jenkins, Huw; Canales, Claudia; Vlad, Daniela; Kwantes, Michiel; Bilsborough, Gemma; Dello Ioio, Raffaele; Ewing, Rob M.; Laufs, Patrick; Huijser, Peter; Ohno, Carolyn; Heisler, Marcus G.; Hay, Angela; Tsiantis, Miltos

    2015-01-01

    Two interrelated problems in biology are understanding the regulatory logic and predictability of morphological evolution. Here, we studied these problems by comparing Arabidopsis thaliana, which has simple leaves, and its relative, Cardamine hirsuta, which has dissected leaves comprising leaflets. By transferring genes between the two species, we provide evidence for an inverse relationship between the pleiotropy of SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM) and BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP) homeobox genes and their ability to modify leaf form. We further show that cis-regulatory divergence of BP results in two alternative configurations of the genetic networks controlling leaf development. In C. hirsuta, ChBP is repressed by the microRNA164A (MIR164A)/ChCUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON (ChCUC) module and ChASYMMETRIC LEAVES1 (ChAS1), thus creating cross-talk between MIR164A/CUC and AS1 that does not occur in A. thaliana. These different genetic architectures lead to divergent interactions of network components and growth regulation in each species. We suggest that certain regulatory genes with low pleiotropy are predisposed to readily integrate into or disengage from conserved genetic networks influencing organ geometry, thus rapidly altering their properties and contributing to morphological divergence. PMID:26588991

  7. An extended signal control strategy for urban network traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fei; Tian, Fuli; Shi, Zhongke

    2016-03-01

    Traffic flow patterns are in general repeated on a daily or weekly basis. To improve the traffic conditions by using the inherent repeatability of traffic flow, a novel signal control strategy for urban networks was developed via iterative learning control (ILC) approach. Rigorous analysis shows that the proposed learning control method can guarantee the asymptotic convergence. The impacts of the ILC-based signal control strategy on the macroscopic fundamental diagram (MFD) were analyzed by simulations on a test road network. The results show that the proposed ILC strategy can evenly distribute the accumulation in the network and improve the network mobility.

  8. Full design of fuzzy controllers using genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homaifar, Abdollah; Mccormick, ED

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the applicability of genetic algorithms (GA) in the complete design of fuzzy logic controllers. While GA has been used before in the development of rule sets or high performance membership functions, the interdependence between these two components dictates that they should be designed together simultaneously. GA is fully capable of creating complete fuzzy controllers given the equations of motion of the system, eliminating the need for human input in the design loop. We show the application of this new method to the development of a cart controller.

  9. Genetic Variation Shapes Protein Networks Mainly through Non-transcriptional Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Foss, Eric J.; Radulovic, Dragan; Shaffer, Scott A.; Goodlett, David R.; Kruglyak, Leonid; Bedalov, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Networks of co-regulated transcripts in genetically diverse populations have been studied extensively, but little is known about the degree to which these networks cause similar co-variation at the protein level. We quantified 354 proteins in a genetically diverse population of yeast segregants, which allowed for the first time construction of a coherent protein co-variation matrix. We identified tightly co-regulated groups of 36 and 93 proteins that were made up predominantly of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and amino acid metabolism, respectively. Even though the ribosomal genes were tightly co-regulated at both the protein and transcript levels, genetic regulation of proteins was entirely distinct from that of transcripts, and almost no genes in this network showed a significant correlation between protein and transcript levels. This result calls into question the widely held belief that in yeast, as opposed to higher eukaryotes, ribosomal protein levels are regulated primarily by regulating transcript levels. Furthermore, although genetic regulation of the amino acid network was more similar for proteins and transcripts, regression analysis demonstrated that even here, proteins vary predominantly as a result of non-transcriptional variation. We also found that cis regulation, which is common in the transcriptome, is rare at the level of the proteome. We conclude that most inter-individual variation in levels of these particular high abundance proteins in this genetically diverse population is not caused by variation of their underlying transcripts. PMID:21909241

  10. Functional and genetic analysis of the colon cancer network

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that has proven to be difficult to understand on the single-gene level. For this reason a functional elucidation needs to take interactions among genes on a systems-level into account. In this study, we infer a colon cancer network from a large-scale gene expression data set by using the method BC3Net. We provide a structural and a functional analysis of this network and also connect its molecular interaction structure with the chromosomal locations of the genes enabling the definition of cis- and trans-interactions. Furthermore, we investigate the interaction of genes that can be found in close neighborhoods on the chromosomes to gain insight into regulatory mechanisms. To our knowledge this is the first study analyzing the genome-scale colon cancer network. PMID:25079297

  11. Functional and genetic analysis of the colon cancer network.

    PubMed

    Emmert-Streib, Frank; de Matos Simoes, Ricardo; Glazko, Galina; McDade, Simon; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Holzinger, Andreas; Dehmer, Matthias; Campbell, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that has proven to be difficult to understand on the single-gene level. For this reason a functional elucidation needs to take interactions among genes on a systems-level into account. In this study, we infer a colon cancer network from a large-scale gene expression data set by using the method BC3Net. We provide a structural and a functional analysis of this network and also connect its molecular interaction structure with the chromosomal locations of the genes enabling the definition of cis- and trans-interactions. Furthermore, we investigate the interaction of genes that can be found in close neighborhoods on the chromosomes to gain insight into regulatory mechanisms. To our knowledge this is the first study analyzing the genome-scale colon cancer network. PMID:25079297

  12. A Method to Exploit the Structure of Genetic Ancestry Space to Enhance Case-Control Studies.

    PubMed

    Bodea, Corneliu A; Neale, Benjamin M; Ripke, Stephan; Daly, Mark J; Devlin, Bernie; Roeder, Kathryn

    2016-05-01

    One goal of human genetics is to understand the genetic basis of disease, a challenge for diseases of complex inheritance because risk alleles are few relative to the vast set of benign variants. Risk variants are often sought by association studies in which allele frequencies in case subjects are contrasted with those from population-based samples used as control subjects. In an ideal world we would know population-level allele frequencies, releasing researchers to focus on case subjects. We argue this ideal is possible, at least theoretically, and we outline a path to achieving it in reality. If such a resource were to exist, it would yield ample savings and would facilitate the effective use of data repositories by removing administrative and technical barriers. We call this concept the Universal Control Repository Network (UNICORN), a means to perform association analyses without necessitating direct access to individual-level control data. Our approach to UNICORN uses existing genetic resources and various statistical tools to analyze these data, including hierarchical clustering with spectral analysis of ancestry; and empirical Bayesian analysis along with Gaussian spatial processes to estimate ancestry-specific allele frequencies. We demonstrate our approach using tens of thousands of control subjects from studies of Crohn disease, showing how it controls false positives, provides power similar to that achieved when all control data are directly accessible, and enhances power when control data are limiting or even imperfectly matched ancestrally. These results highlight how UNICORN can enable reliable, powerful, and convenient genetic association analyses without access to the individual-level data. PMID:27087321

  13. Design and Implementation of the International Genetics and Translational Research in Transplantation Network

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic association studies of transplantation outcomes have been hampered by small samples and highly complex multifactorial phenotypes, hindering investigations of the genetic architecture of a range of comorbidities which significantly impact graft and recipient life expectancy. We describe here the rationale and design of the International Genetics & Translational Research in Transplantation Network. The network comprises 22 studies to date, including 16494 transplant recipients and 11669 donors, of whom more than 5000 are of non-European ancestry, all of whom have existing genomewide genotype data sets. Methods We describe the rich genetic and phenotypic information available in this consortium comprising heart, kidney, liver, and lung transplant cohorts. Results We demonstrate significant power in International Genetics & Translational Research in Transplantation Network to detect main effect association signals across regions such as the MHC region as well as genomewide for transplant outcomes that span all solid organs, such as graft survival, acute rejection, new onset of diabetes after transplantation, and for delayed graft function in kidney only. Conclusions This consortium is designed and statistically powered to deliver pioneering insights into the genetic architecture of transplant-related outcomes across a range of different solid-organ transplant studies. The study design allows a spectrum of analyses to be performed including recipient-only analyses, donor-recipient HLA mismatches with focus on loss-of-function variants and nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms. PMID:26479416

  14. Stochasticity, Bistability and the Wisdom of Crowds: A Model for Associative Learning in Genetic Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sorek, Matan; Balaban, Nathalie Q.; Loewenstein, Yonatan

    2013-01-01

    It is generally believed that associative memory in the brain depends on multistable synaptic dynamics, which enable the synapses to maintain their value for extended periods of time. However, multistable dynamics are not restricted to synapses. In particular, the dynamics of some genetic regulatory networks are multistable, raising the possibility that even single cells, in the absence of a nervous system, are capable of learning associations. Here we study a standard genetic regulatory network model with bistable elements and stochastic dynamics. We demonstrate that such a genetic regulatory network model is capable of learning multiple, general, overlapping associations. The capacity of the network, defined as the number of associations that can be simultaneously stored and retrieved, is proportional to the square root of the number of bistable elements in the genetic regulatory network. Moreover, we compute the capacity of a clonal population of cells, such as in a colony of bacteria or a tissue, to store associations. We show that even if the cells do not interact, the capacity of the population to store associations substantially exceeds that of a single cell and is proportional to the number of bistable elements. Thus, we show that even single cells are endowed with the computational power to learn associations, a power that is substantially enhanced when these cells form a population. PMID:23990765

  15. Hybrid Neural-Network: Genetic Algorithm Technique for Aircraft Engine Performance Diagnostics Developed and Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Takahisa; Simon, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    As part of the NASA Aviation Safety Program, a unique model-based diagnostics method that employs neural networks and genetic algorithms for aircraft engine performance diagnostics has been developed and demonstrated at the NASA Glenn Research Center against a nonlinear gas turbine engine model. Neural networks are applied to estimate the internal health condition of the engine, and genetic algorithms are used for sensor fault detection, isolation, and quantification. This hybrid architecture combines the excellent nonlinear estimation capabilities of neural networks with the capability to rank the likelihood of various faults given a specific sensor suite signature. The method requires a significantly smaller data training set than a neural network approach alone does, and it performs the combined engine health monitoring objectives of performance diagnostics and sensor fault detection and isolation in the presence of nominal and degraded engine health conditions.

  16. Design of artificial genetic regulatory networks with multiple delayed adaptive responses*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluza, Pablo; Inoue, Masayo

    2016-06-01

    Genetic regulatory networks with adaptive responses are widely studied in biology. Usually, models consisting only of a few nodes have been considered. They present one input receptor for activation and one output node where the adaptive response is computed. In this work, we design genetic regulatory networks with many receptors and many output nodes able to produce delayed adaptive responses. This design is performed by using an evolutionary algorithm of mutations and selections that minimizes an error function defined by the adaptive response in signal shapes. We present several examples of network constructions with a predefined required set of adaptive delayed responses. We show that an output node can have different kinds of responses as a function of the activated receptor. Additionally, complex network structures are presented since processing nodes can be involved in several input-output pathways.

  17. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficients for Wind Tunnel Data using a Genetic Algorithm Optimized Neural Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajkumar, T.; Aragon, Cecilia; Bardina, Jorge; Britten, Roy

    2002-01-01

    A fast, reliable way of predicting aerodynamic coefficients is produced using a neural network optimized by a genetic algorithm. Basic aerodynamic coefficients (e.g. lift, drag, pitching moment) are modelled as functions of angle of attack and Mach number. The neural network is first trained on a relatively rich set of data from wind tunnel tests of numerical simulations to learn an overall model. Most of the aerodynamic parameters can be well-fitted using polynomial functions. A new set of data, which can be relatively sparse, is then supplied to the network to produce a new model consistent with the previous model and the new data. Because the new model interpolates realistically between the sparse test data points, it is suitable for use in piloted simulations. The genetic algorithm is used to choose a neural network architecture to give best results, avoiding over-and under-fitting of the test data.

  18. Adaptive bridge control strategy for opinion evolution on social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Cheng; Cao, Jinde; Lu, Jianquan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we present an efficient opinion control strategy for complex networks, in particular, for social networks. The proposed adaptive bridge control (ABC) strategy calls for controlling a special kind of nodes named bridge and requires no knowledge of the node degrees or any other global or local knowledge, which are necessary for some other immunization strategies including targeted immunization and acquaintance immunization. We study the efficiency of the proposed ABC strategy on random networks, small-world networks, scale-free networks, and the random networks adjusted by the edge exchanging method. Our results show that the proposed ABC strategy is efficient for all of these four kinds of networks. Through an adjusting clustering coefficient by the edge exchanging method, it is found out that the efficiency of our ABC strategy is closely related with the clustering coefficient. The main contributions of this paper can be listed as follows: (1) A new high-order social network is proposed to describe opinion dynamic. (2) An algorithm, which does not require the knowledge of the nodes' degree and other global/local network structure information, is proposed to control the "bridges" more accurately and further control the opinion dynamics of the social networks. The efficiency of our ABC strategy is illustrated by numerical examples. (3) The numerical results indicate that our ABC strategy is more efficient for networks with higher clustering coefficient.

  19. Unified Lunar Control Network 2005 and Topographic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archinal, B. A.; Rosiek, M. R.; Redding, B. L.

    2005-01-01

    There are currently two generally accepted lunar control networks. These are the Unified Lunar Control Network (ULCN) and the Clementine Lunar Control Network (CLCN), both derived by M. Davies and T. Colvin at RAND. We address here our efforts to merge and improve these networks into a new ULCN. The ULCN was described in the last major publication about a lunar control network. The statistics on this and the other networks discussed here. Images for this network are from the Apollo, Mariner 10, and Galileo missions, and Earth-based photographs. The importance of this network is that its accuracy is relatively well quantified and published information on the network is available. The CLCN includes measurements on 43,871 Clementine 750-nm images - the largest planetary control network ever computed. This purpose of this network was to determine the geometry for the Clementine Basemap Mosiac (CBM). The geometry of that mosaic was used to produce the Clementine UVVIS digital image model and the Near-Infrared Global Multispectral Map of the Moon from Clementine. Through the extensive use of these products, they and the underlying CLCN in effect define the generally accepted current coordinate system for reporting and describing the location of lunar coordinates. However, no publication describes the CLCN itself.

  20. Genetic Algorithm Optimizes Q-LAW Control Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; von Allmen, Paul; Petropoulos, Anastassios; Terrile, Richard

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses a multi-objective, genetic algorithm designed to optimize Lyapunov feedback control law (Q-law) parameters in order to efficiently find Pareto-optimal solutions for low-thrust trajectories for electronic propulsion systems. These would be propellant-optimal solutions for a given flight time, or flight time optimal solutions for a given propellant requirement. The approximate solutions are used as good initial solutions for high-fidelity optimization tools. When the good initial solutions are used, the high-fidelity optimization tools quickly converge to a locally optimal solution near the initial solution. Q-law control parameters are represented as real-valued genes in the genetic algorithm. The performances of the Q-law control parameters are evaluated in the multi-objective space (flight time vs. propellant mass) and sorted by the non-dominated sorting method that assigns a better fitness value to the solutions that are dominated by a fewer number of other solutions. With the ranking result, the genetic algorithm encourages the solutions with higher fitness values to participate in the reproduction process, improving the solutions in the evolution process. The population of solutions converges to the Pareto front that is permitted within the Q-law control parameter space.

  1. Minimizing communication cost among distributed controllers in software defined networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlimatti, Shivaleela; Elbreiki, Walid; Hassan, Suhaidi; Habbal, Adib; Elshaikh, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    Software Defined Networking (SDN) is a new paradigm to increase the flexibility of today's network by promising for a programmable network. The fundamental idea behind this new architecture is to simplify network complexity by decoupling control plane and data plane of the network devices, and by making the control plane centralized. Recently controllers have distributed to solve the problem of single point of failure, and to increase scalability and flexibility during workload distribution. Even though, controllers are flexible and scalable to accommodate more number of network switches, yet the problem of intercommunication cost between distributed controllers is still challenging issue in the Software Defined Network environment. This paper, aims to fill the gap by proposing a new mechanism, which minimizes intercommunication cost with graph partitioning algorithm, an NP hard problem. The methodology proposed in this paper is, swapping of network elements between controller domains to minimize communication cost by calculating communication gain. The swapping of elements minimizes inter and intra communication cost among network domains. We validate our work with the OMNeT++ simulation environment tool. Simulation results show that the proposed mechanism minimizes the inter domain communication cost among controllers compared to traditional distributed controllers.

  2. Implementing controlled-unitary operations over the butterfly network

    SciTech Connect

    Soeda, Akihito; Kinjo, Yoshiyuki; Turner, Peter S.; Murao, Mio

    2014-12-04

    We introduce a multiparty quantum computation task over a network in a situation where the capacities of both the quantum and classical communication channels of the network are limited and a bottleneck occurs. Using a resource setting introduced by Hayashi [1], we present an efficient protocol for performing controlled-unitary operations between two input nodes and two output nodes over the butterfly network, one of the most fundamental networks exhibiting the bottleneck problem. This result opens the possibility of developing a theory of quantum network coding for multiparty quantum computation, whereas the conventional network coding only treats multiparty quantum communication.

  3. Hybrid algorithm for NARX network parameters' determination using differential evolution and genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salami, M. J. E.; Tijani, I. B.; Abdullateef, A. I.; Aibinu, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    A hybrid optimization algorithm using Differential Evolution (DE) and Genetic Algorithm (GA) is proposed in this study to address the problem of network parameters determination associated with the Nonlinear Autoregressive with eXogenous inputs Network (NARX-network). The proposed algorithm involves a two level optimization scheme to search for both optimal network architecture and weights. The DE at the upper level is formulated as combinatorial optimization to search for the network architecture while the associated network weights that minimize the prediction error is provided by the GA at the lower level. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated on identification of a laboratory rotary motion system. The system identification results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm for nonparametric model development.

  4. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller via a network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention provides a network device interface and method for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels, such as sensors, actuators, and subsystems, to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. Data retrieved from the sensor is then converted by the network device interface into digital signals and transmitted back to the controller. In one advantageous embodiment, the network device interface uses a specialized protocol for communicating across the network bus that uses a low-level instruction set and has low overhead for data communication.

  5. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller via a network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides a network device interface and method for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels, such as sensors, actuators, and subsystems, to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. Data retrieved from the sensor is then converted by the network device interface into digital signals and transmitted back to the controller. In one advantageous embodiment, the network device interface uses a specialized protocol for communicating across the network bus that uses a low-level instruction set and has low overhead for data communication.

  6. Optimal Robust Motion Controller Design Using Multiobjective Genetic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Svečko, Rajko

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a multiobjective genetic algorithm for robust motion controller design. Motion controller structure is based on a disturbance observer in an RIC framework. The RIC approach is presented in the form with internal and external feedback loops, in which an internal disturbance rejection controller and an external performance controller must be synthesised. This paper involves novel objectives for robustness and performance assessments for such an approach. Objective functions for the robustness property of RIC are based on simple even polynomials with nonnegativity conditions. Regional pole placement method is presented with the aims of controllers' structures simplification and their additional arbitrary selection. Regional pole placement involves arbitrary selection of central polynomials for both loops, with additional admissible region of the optimized pole location. Polynomial deviation between selected and optimized polynomials is measured with derived performance objective functions. A multiobjective function is composed of different unrelated criteria such as robust stability, controllers' stability, and time-performance indexes of closed loops. The design of controllers and multiobjective optimization procedure involve a set of the objectives, which are optimized simultaneously with a genetic algorithm—differential evolution. PMID:24987749

  7. Simulating Visual Learning and Optical Illusions via a Network-Based Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu, Theodore; Vivar, Miguel; Shinbrot, Troy

    We present a neural network model that uses a genetic algorithm to identify spatial patterns. We show that the model both learns and reproduces common visual patterns and optical illusions. Surprisingly, we find that the illusions generated are a direct consequence of the network architecture used. We discuss the implications of our results and the insights that we gain on how humans fall for optical illusions

  8. BisoGenet: a new tool for gene network building, visualization and analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The increasing availability and diversity of omics data in the post-genomic era offers new perspectives in most areas of biomedical research. Graph-based biological networks models capture the topology of the functional relationships between molecular entities such as gene, protein and small compounds and provide a suitable framework for integrating and analyzing omics-data. The development of software tools capable of integrating data from different sources and to provide flexible methods to reconstruct, represent and analyze topological networks is an active field of research in bioinformatics. Results BisoGenet is a multi-tier application for visualization and analysis of biomolecular relationships. The system consists of three tiers. In the data tier, an in-house database stores genomics information, protein-protein interactions, protein-DNA interactions, gene ontology and metabolic pathways. In the middle tier, a global network is created at server startup, representing the whole data on bioentities and their relationships retrieved from the database. The client tier is a Cytoscape plugin, which manages user input, communication with the Web Service, visualization and analysis of the resulting network. Conclusion BisoGenet is able to build and visualize biological networks in a fast and user-friendly manner. A feature of Bisogenet is the possibility to include coding relations to distinguish between genes and their products. This feature could be instrumental to achieve a finer grain representation of the bioentities and their relationships. The client application includes network analysis tools and interactive network expansion capabilities. In addition, an option is provided to allow other networks to be converted to BisoGenet. This feature facilitates the integration of our software with other tools available in the Cytoscape platform. BisoGenet is available at http://bio.cigb.edu.cu/bisogenet-cytoscape/. PMID:20163717

  9. Neural networks for self-learning control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Derrick H.; Widrow, Bernard

    1990-01-01

    It is shown how a neural network can learn of its own accord to control a nonlinear dynamic system. An emulator, a multilayered neural network, learns to identify the system's dynamic characteristics. The controller, another multilayered neural network, next learns to control the emulator. The self-trained controller is then used to control the actual dynamic system. The learning process continues as the emulator and controller improve and track the physical process. An example is given to illustrate these ideas. The 'truck backer-upper,' a neural network controller that steers a trailer truck while the truck is backing up to a loading dock, is demonstrated. The controller is able to guide the truck to the dock from almost any initial position. The technique explored should be applicable to a wide variety of nonlinear control problems.

  10. Network-based Prediction of Cancer under Genetic Storm

    PubMed Central

    Ay, Ahmet; Gong, Dihong; Kahveci, Tamer

    2014-01-01

    Classification of cancer patients using traditional methods is a challenging task in the medical practice. Owing to rapid advances in microarray technologies, currently expression levels of thousands of genes from individual cancer patients can be measured. The classification of cancer patients by supervised statistical learning algorithms using the gene expression datasets provides an alternative to the traditional methods. Here we present a new network-based supervised classification technique, namely the NBC method. We compare NBC to five traditional classification techniques (support vector machines (SVM), k-nearest neighbor (kNN), naïve Bayes (NB), C4.5, and random forest (RF)) using 50–300 genes selected by five feature selection methods. Our results on five large cancer datasets demonstrate that NBC method outperforms traditional classification techniques. Our analysis suggests that using symmetrical uncertainty (SU) feature selection method with NBC method provides the most accurate classification strategy. Finally, in-depth analysis of the correlation-based co-expression networks chosen by our network-based classifier in different cancer classes shows that there are drastic changes in the network models of different cancer types. PMID:25368507

  11. Optimum Actuator Selection with a Genetic Algorithm for Aircraft Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James L.

    2004-01-01

    The placement of actuators on a wing determines the control effectiveness of the airplane. One approach to placement maximizes the moments about the pitch, roll, and yaw axes, while minimizing the coupling. For example, the desired actuators produce a pure roll moment without at the same time causing much pitch or yaw. For a typical wing, there is a large set of candidate locations for placing actuators, resulting in a substantially larger number of combinations to examine in order to find an optimum placement satisfying the mission requirements and mission constraints. A genetic algorithm has been developed for finding the best placement for four actuators to produce an uncoupled pitch moment. The genetic algorithm has been extended to find the minimum number of actuators required to provide uncoupled pitch, roll, and yaw control. A simplified, untapered, unswept wing is the model for each application.

  12. Landscape attributes and life history variability shape genetic structure of trout populations in a stream network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neville, H.M.; Dunham, J.B.; Peacock, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Spatial and temporal landscape patterns have long been recognized to influence biological processes, but these processes often operate at scales that are difficult to study by conventional means. Inferences from genetic markers can overcome some of these limitations. We used a landscape genetics approach to test hypotheses concerning landscape processes influencing the demography of Lahontan cutthroat trout in a complex stream network in the Great Basin desert of the western US. Predictions were tested with population- and individual-based analyses of microsatellite DNA variation, reflecting patterns of dispersal, population stability, and local effective population sizes. Complementary genetic inferences suggested samples from migratory corridors housed a mixture of fish from tributaries, as predicted based on assumed migratory life histories in those habitats. Also as predicted, populations presumed to have greater proportions of migratory fish or from physically connected, large, or high quality habitats had higher genetic variability and reduced genetic differentiation from other populations. Populations thought to contain largely non-migratory individuals generally showed the opposite pattern, suggesting behavioral isolation. Estimated effective sizes were small, and we identified significant and severe genetic bottlenecks in several populations that were isolated, recently founded, or that inhabit streams that desiccate frequently. Overall, this work suggested that Lahontan cutthroat trout populations in stream networks are affected by a combination of landscape and metapopulation processes. Results also demonstrated that genetic patterns can reveal unexpected processes, even within a system that is well studied from a conventional ecological perspective. ?? Springer 2006.

  13. Genetics of gene expression responses to temperature stress in a sea urchin gene network.

    PubMed

    Runcie, Daniel E; Garfield, David A; Babbitt, Courtney C; Wygoda, Jennifer A; Mukherjee, Sayan; Wray, Gregory A

    2012-09-01

    Stress responses play an important role in shaping species distributions and robustness to climate change. We investigated how stress responses alter the contribution of additive genetic variation to gene expression during development of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, under increased temperatures that model realistic climate change scenarios. We first measured gene expression responses in the embryos by RNA-seq to characterize molecular signatures of mild, chronic temperature stress in an unbiased manner. We found that an increase from 12 to 18 °C caused widespread alterations in gene expression including in genes involved in protein folding, RNA processing and development. To understand the quantitative genetic architecture of this response, we then focused on a well-characterized gene network involved in endomesoderm and ectoderm specification. Using a breeding design with wild-caught individuals, we measured genetic and gene-environment interaction effects on 72 genes within this network. We found genetic or maternal effects in 33 of these genes and that the genetic effects were correlated in the network. Fourteen network genes also responded to higher temperatures, but we found no significant genotype-environment interactions in any of the genes. This absence may be owing to an effective buffering of the temperature perturbations within the network. In support of this hypothesis, perturbations to regulatory genes did not affect the expression of the genes that they regulate. Together, these results provide novel insights into the relationship between environmental change and developmental evolution and suggest that climate change may not expose large amounts of cryptic genetic variation to selection in this species. PMID:22856327

  14. Genetic interaction network of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae type 1 phosphatase Glc7

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Michael R; Nguyen, Thao; Szapiel, Nicolas; Knockleby, James; Por, Hanting; Zadworny, Megan; Neszt, Michael; Harrison, Paul; Bussey, Howard; Mandato, Craig A; Vogel, Jackie; Lesage, Guillaume

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein kinases and phosphatases regulate protein phosphorylation, a critical means of modulating protein function, stability and localization. The identification of functional networks for protein phosphatases has been slow due to their redundant nature and the lack of large-scale analyses. We hypothesized that a genome-scale analysis of genetic interactions using the Synthetic Genetic Array could reveal protein phosphatase functional networks. We apply this approach to the conserved type 1 protein phosphatase Glc7, which regulates numerous cellular processes in budding yeast. Results We created a novel glc7 catalytic mutant (glc7-E101Q). Phenotypic analysis indicates that this novel allele exhibits slow growth and defects in glucose metabolism but normal cell cycle progression and chromosome segregation. This suggests that glc7-E101Q is a hypomorphic glc7 mutant. Synthetic Genetic Array analysis of glc7-E101Q revealed a broad network of 245 synthetic sick/lethal interactions reflecting that many processes are required when Glc7 function is compromised such as histone modification, chromosome segregation and cytokinesis, nutrient sensing and DNA damage. In addition, mitochondrial activity and inheritance and lipid metabolism were identified as new processes involved in buffering Glc7 function. An interaction network among 95 genes genetically interacting with GLC7 was constructed by integration of genetic and physical interaction data. The obtained network has a modular architecture, and the interconnection among the modules reflects the cooperation of the processes buffering Glc7 function. Conclusion We found 245 genes required for the normal growth of the glc7-E101Q mutant. Functional grouping of these genes and analysis of their physical and genetic interaction patterns bring new information on Glc7-regulated processes. PMID:18627629

  15. Controlling Contagion Processes in Time-Varying Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perra, Nicola; Liu, Suyu; Karsai, Marton; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2014-03-01

    The vast majority of strategies aimed at controlling contagion processes on networks considers the connectivity pattern of the system as either quenched or annealed. However, in the real world many networks are highly dynamical and evolve in time concurrently to the contagion process. Here, we derive an analytical framework for the study of control strategies specifically devised for time-varying networks. We consider the removal/immunization of individual nodes according the their activity in the network and develop a block variable mean-field approach that allows the derivation of the equations describing the evolution of the contagion process concurrently to the network dynamic. We derive the critical immunization threshold and assess the effectiveness of the control strategies. Finally, we validate the theoretical picture by simulating numerically the information spreading process and control strategies in both synthetic networks and a large-scale, real-world mobile telephone call dataset.

  16. A Clementine Derived Control Network and Topographic Model - The Unified Lunar Control Network 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archinal, B. A.; Rosiek, M. R.; Kirk, R. L.; Redding, B. L.

    2006-08-01

    U. S. Geological Survey, Astrogeology Team, Flagstaff, AZ, United States Introduction: We have completed a new general unified lunar control network and lunar topographic model based on Clementine images. It includes the determination, in the lunar mean Earth/polar axis system, of the 3-D positions of 272,931 points on the lunar surface and the correction of the camera angles for 43,866 Clementine images, using 546,126 tie point measurements. The solution RMS is 0.9 pixels in the image plane, with the largest residual of 6.4 pixels. We are now documenting our solution and plan to release the solution results soon, initially as a USGS Open File report. ULCN 2005 Features: The new network is a combination of the Unified Lunar Control Network (ULCN), derived from the Apollo, Mariner 10, and Galileo missions, and Earth-based photographs, [1] and the Clementine Lunar Control Network (CLCN) [2], both derived from (mostly 750-nm) Clementine images, by M. Davies and T. Colvin at RAND. The primary difference between our new network and the previous ones is that we solve for the radii of the control points. This avoids (~7 km) distortion of horizontal positions present in the CLCN. The expected precision of such information is on the order of several hundred m, and compatible with Clementine LIDAR [3]. Thus, a by-product of this network is a global lunar topographic model that is denser than that provided by LIDAR and of similar accuracy, and denser than any other lunar topography information except that provided in limited areas ([4-7]). This is the only lunar topographic model positioning where both heights and horizontal positions are estimated in a globally-consistent system. Other features of the ULCN 2005 are that the camera angles to their values as measured during the mission, supposedly with an accuracy of 0.03º [8], and we have identified a majority of the original ULCN points on Clementine images. Future Work: The Lunar Orbiter (LO) digital mosaics now being

  17. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller a via network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention provides a network device interface and method for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. In one embodiment, the bus controller transmits messages to the network device interface containing a plurality of bits having a value defined by a transition between first and second states in the bits. The network device interface determines timing of the data sequence of the message and uses the determined timing to communicate with the bus controller.

  18. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller via a network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention provides a network device interface and method for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels, such as sensors, actuators, and subsystems, to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. Data retrieved from the sensor is then converted by the network device interface into digital signals and transmitted back to the controller. In one advantageous embodiment, the network device interface is a state machine, such as an ASIC, that operates independent of a processor in communicating with the bus controller and data channels.

  19. Diversified Control Paths: A Significant Way Disease Genes Perturb the Human Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bingbo; Gao, Lin; Zhang, Qingfang; Li, Aimin; Deng, Yue; Guo, Xingli

    2015-01-01

    Background The complexity of biological systems motivates us to use the underlying networks to provide deep understanding of disease etiology and the human diseases are viewed as perturbations of dynamic properties of networks. Control theory that deals with dynamic systems has been successfully used to capture systems-level knowledge in large amount of quantitative biological interactions. But from the perspective of system control, the ways by which multiple genetic factors jointly perturb a disease phenotype still remain. Results In this work, we combine tools from control theory and network science to address the diversified control paths in complex networks. Then the ways by which the disease genes perturb biological systems are identified and quantified by the control paths in a human regulatory network. Furthermore, as an application, prioritization of candidate genes is presented by use of control path analysis and gene ontology annotation for definition of similarities. We use leave-one-out cross-validation to evaluate the ability of finding the gene-disease relationship. Results have shown compatible performance with previous sophisticated works, especially in directed systems. Conclusions Our results inspire a deeper understanding of molecular mechanisms that drive pathological processes. Diversified control paths offer a basis for integrated intervention techniques which will ultimately lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26284649

  20. Application of genetic algorithms to tuning fuzzy control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espy, Todd; Vombrack, Endre; Aldridge, Jack

    1993-01-01

    Real number genetic algorithms (GA) were applied for tuning fuzzy membership functions of three controller applications. The first application is our 'Fuzzy Pong' demonstration, a controller that controls a very responsive system. The performance of the automatically tuned membership functions exceeded that of manually tuned membership functions both when the algorithm started with randomly generated functions and with the best manually-tuned functions. The second GA tunes input membership functions to achieve a specified control surface. The third application is a practical one, a motor controller for a printed circuit manufacturing system. The GA alters the positions and overlaps of the membership functions to accomplish the tuning. The applications, the real number GA approach, the fitness function and population parameters, and the performance improvements achieved are discussed. Directions for further research in tuning input and output membership functions and in tuning fuzzy rules are described.

  1. Genetic optimization of fuzzy fractional PD+I controllers.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Isabel S; Barbosa, Ramiro S

    2015-07-01

    Fractional order calculus is a powerful emerging mathematical tool in science and engineering. There is currently an increasing interest in generalizing classical control theories and developing novel control strategies. The genetic algorithms (GA) are a stochastic search and optimization methods based on the reproduction processes found in biological systems, used for solving engineering problems. In the context of process control, the fuzzy logic usually means variables that are described by imprecise terms, and represented by quantities that are qualitative and vague. In this article we consider the development of an optimal fuzzy fractional PD+I controller in which the parameters are tuned by a GA. The performance of the proposed fuzzy fractional control is illustrated through some application examples. PMID:25661162

  2. Temporal network structures controlling disease spreading.

    PubMed

    Holme, Petter

    2016-08-01

    We investigate disease spreading on eight empirical data sets of human contacts (mostly proximity networks recording who is close to whom, at what time). We compare three levels of representations of these data sets: temporal networks, static networks, and a fully connected topology. We notice that the difference between the static and fully connected networks-with respect to time to extinction and average outbreak size-is smaller than between the temporal and static topologies. This suggests that, for these data sets, temporal structures influence disease spreading more than static-network structures. To explain the details in the differences between the representations, we use 32 network measures. This study concurs that long-time temporal structures, like the turnover of nodes and links, are the most important for the spreading dynamics. PMID:27627315

  3. Encore: Genetic Association Interaction Network Centrality Pipeline and Application to SLE Exome Data

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Nicholas A.; Lareau, Caleb A.; White, Bill C.; Pandey, Ahwan; Wiley, Graham; Montgomery, Courtney G.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; McKinney, B.A.

    2014-01-01

    Open source tools are needed to facilitate the construction, analysis, and visualization of gene-gene interaction networks for sequencing data. To address this need, we present Encore, an open source network analysis pipeline for GWAS and rare variant data. Encore constructs Genetic Association Interaction Networks or Epistasis Networks using two optional approaches: our previous information-theory method or a generalized linear model approach. Additionally, Encore includes multiple data filtering options, including Random Forest/Random Jungle for main effect enrichment and Evaporative Cooling and Relief-F filters for enrichment of interaction effects. Encore implements SNPrank network centrality for identifying susceptibility hubs (nodes containing a large amount of disease susceptibility information through the combination of multivariate main effects and multiple gene-gene interactions in the network), and it provides appropriate files for interactive visualization of a network using tools from our online Galaxy instance. We implemented these algorithms in C++ using OpenMP for shared-memory parallel analysis on a server or desktop. To demonstrate Encore’s utility in analysis of genetic sequencing data, we present an analysis of exome resequencing data from healthy individuals and those with Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLE). Our results verify the importance of the previously associated SLE genes HLA-DRB and NCF2, and these two genes had the highest gene-gene interaction degrees among the susceptibility hubs. An additional 14 genes previously associated with SLE emerged in our epistasis network model of the exome data, and three novel candidate genes, ST8SIA4, CMTM4, and C2CD4B, were implicated in the model. In summary, we present a comprehensive tool for epistasis network analysis and the first such analysis of exome data from a genetic study of SLE. Software Availability: http://insilico.utulsa.edu/encore.php. PMID:23740754

  4. Connected Dominating Set Based Topology Control in Wireless Sensor Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are now widely used for monitoring and controlling of systems where human intervention is not desirable or possible. Connected Dominating Sets (CDSs) based topology control in WSNs is one kind of hierarchical method to ensure sufficient coverage while reducing redundant connections in a relatively crowded network.…

  5. Genetic algorithm based adaptive neural network ensemble and its application in predicting carbon flux

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xue, Y.; Liu, S.; Hu, Y.; Yang, J.; Chen, Q.

    2007-01-01

    To improve the accuracy in prediction, Genetic Algorithm based Adaptive Neural Network Ensemble (GA-ANNE) is presented. Intersections are allowed between different training sets based on the fuzzy clustering analysis, which ensures the diversity as well as the accuracy of individual Neural Networks (NNs). Moreover, to improve the accuracy of the adaptive weights of individual NNs, GA is used to optimize the cluster centers. Empirical results in predicting carbon flux of Duke Forest reveal that GA-ANNE can predict the carbon flux more accurately than Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN), Bagging NN ensemble, and ANNE. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  6. Discovery of novel genetic networks associated with 19 economically important traits in beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative or complex traits are determined by the combined effects of many loci, and are affected by gene-gene interactions, genetic networks or molecular pathways. In the present study, we genotyped a total of 138 mutations, mainly single nucleotide polymorphisms derived from 71 functional gene...

  7. Applying Monte Carlo Simulation to Biomedical Literature to Approximate Genetic Network.

    PubMed

    Al-Dalky, Rami; Taha, Kamal; Al Homouz, Dirar; Qasaimeh, Murad

    2016-01-01

    Biologists often need to know the set of genes associated with a given set of genes or a given disease. We propose in this paper a classifier system called Monte Carlo for Genetic Network (MCforGN) that can construct genetic networks, identify functionally related genes, and predict gene-disease associations. MCforGN identifies functionally related genes based on their co-occurrences in the abstracts of biomedical literature. For a given gene g , the system first extracts the set of genes found within the abstracts of biomedical literature associated with g. It then ranks these genes to determine the ones with high co-occurrences with g . It overcomes the limitations of current approaches that employ analytical deterministic algorithms by applying Monte Carlo Simulation to approximate genetic networks. It does so by conducting repeated random sampling to obtain numerical results and to optimize these results. Moreover, it analyzes results to obtain the probabilities of different genes' co-occurrences using series of statistical tests. MCforGN can detect gene-disease associations by employing a combination of centrality measures (to identify the central genes in disease-specific genetic networks) and Monte Carlo Simulation. MCforGN aims at enhancing state-of-the-art biological text mining by applying novel extraction techniques. We evaluated MCforGN by comparing it experimentally with nine approaches. Results showed marked improvement. PMID:26415184

  8. Machine Learning for Information Retrieval: Neural Networks, Symbolic Learning, and Genetic Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsinchun

    1995-01-01

    Presents an overview of artificial-intelligence-based inductive learning techniques and their use in information science research. Three methods are discussed: the connectionist Hopfield network; the symbolic ID3/ID5R; evolution-based genetic algorithms. The knowledge representations and algorithms of these methods are examined in the context of…

  9. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller via a network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention provides a network device interface and method for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels, such as sensors, actuators, and subsystems, to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. Data retrieved from the sensor is then converted into digital signals and transmitted back to the controller. In one embodiment, the bus controller sends commands and data a defined bit rate, and the network device interface senses this bit rate and sends data back to the bus controller using the defined bit rate.

  10. An alternative approach for neural network evolution with a genetic algorithm: crossover by combinatorial optimization.

    PubMed

    García-Pedrajas, Nicolás; Ortiz-Boyer, Domingo; Hervás-Martínez, César

    2006-05-01

    In this work we present a new approach to crossover operator in the genetic evolution of neural networks. The most widely used evolutionary computation paradigm for neural network evolution is evolutionary programming. This paradigm is usually preferred due to the problems caused by the application of crossover to neural network evolution. However, crossover is the most innovative operator within the field of evolutionary computation. One of the most notorious problems with the application of crossover to neural networks is known as the permutation problem. This problem occurs due to the fact that the same network can be represented in a genetic coding by many different codifications. Our approach modifies the standard crossover operator taking into account the special features of the individuals to be mated. We present a new model for mating individuals that considers the structure of the hidden layer and redefines the crossover operator. As each hidden node represents a non-linear projection of the input variables, we approach the crossover as a problem on combinatorial optimization. We can formulate the problem as the extraction of a subset of near-optimal projections to create the hidden layer of the new network. This new approach is compared to a classical crossover in 25 real-world problems with an excellent performance. Moreover, the networks obtained are much smaller than those obtained with classical crossover operator. PMID:16343847

  11. Potential Genetic Risk Factors for Chronic TMD: Genetic Associations from the OPPERA Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Shad B.; Maixner, Dylan; Greenspan, Joel; Dubner, Ron; Fillingim, Roger; Ohrbach, Richard; Knott, Charles; Slade, Gary; Bair, Eric; Gibson, Dustin G.; Zaykin, Dmitri V.; Weir, Bruce; Maixner, William; Diatchenko, Luda

    2011-01-01

    Genetic factors play a role in the etiology of persistent pain conditions, putatively by modulating underlying processes such as nociceptive sensitivity, psychological well-being, inflammation, and autonomic response. However, to date, only a few genes have been associated with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). This study evaluated 358 genes involved in pain processes, comparing allelic frequencies between 166 cases with chronic TMD and 1442 controls enrolled in the OPPERA (Orofacial Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment) study cooperative agreement. To enhance statistical power, 182 TMD cases and 170 controls from a similar study were included in the analysis. Genotyping was performed using the Pain Research Panel, an Affymetrix gene chip representing 3295 single nucleotide polymorphisms, including ancestry-informative markers that were used to adjust for population stratification. Adjusted associations between genetic markers and TMD case status were evaluated using logistic regression. The OPPERA findings provided evidence supporting previously-reported associations between TMD and two genes: HTR2A and COMT. Other genes were revealed as potential new genetic risk factors for TMD, including NR3C1, CAMK4, CHRM2, IFRD1, and GRK5. While these findings need to be replicated in independent cohorts, the genes potentially represent important markers of risk for TMD and they identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22074755

  12. Control chart pattern recognition using a back propagation neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoerre, Julie K.; Perry, Marcus B.

    2000-10-01

    In this paper, control chart pattern recognition using artificial neural networks is presented. An important motivation of this research is the growing interest in intelligent manufacturing systems, specifically in the area of Statistical Process Control (SPC). On-line automated process analysis is an important area of research since it allows the interfacing of process control with Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) techniques. A back propagation artificial neural network is used to model X-bar quality control charts and identify process instability situations as specified by the Western Electric Statistical Quality Control handbook. Results indicate that the performance of the back propagation neural network is very accurate in identifying these control chart patterns. This work is significant in that the neural network output can serve as a link to process parameters in a closed-loop control system. In this way, adjustments to the process can be made on-line and quality problems averted.

  13. Co-evolution of Hetero Multiagent Systems using Genetic Network Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirasawa, Kotaro; Okubo, Masafumi; Hu, Jinglu; Murata, Junichi; Matsuya, Yuko

    Recently, many methods of evolutionary computation such as Genetic Algorithm(GA) and Genetic Programming(GP) have been developed as a basic tool for modeling and optimizing complex systems. GA has the genome of string structure, while the genome in GP is of tree structure. In this paper, a new evolutionary method named Genetic Network Programming(GNP), whose genome has network structure is applied to multiagent sysytems. Hetero Multiagent Sysytems with GNP are studied, where each agent of the same group has its own GNP program in order to build the adaptive agents against changing environments. Specifically, the comparison between Hetero Multiagent Systems and conventional Homo Multiagent Sysytems is carried out in simulations on ants behaviors.

  14. Cell fate reprogramming by control of intracellular network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanudo, Jorge G. T.; Albert, Reka

    Identifying control strategies for biological networks is paramount for practical applications that involve reprogramming a cell's fate, such as disease therapeutics and stem cell reprogramming. Although the topic of controlling the dynamics of a system has a long history in control theory, most of this work is not directly applicable to intracellular networks. Here we present a network control method that integrates the structural and functional information available for intracellular networks to predict control targets. Formulated in a logical dynamic scheme, our control method takes advantage of certain function-dependent network components and their relation to steady states in order to identify control targets, which are guaranteed to drive any initial state to the target state with 100% effectiveness and need to be applied only transiently for the system to reach and stay in the desired state. We illustrate our method's potential to find intervention targets for cancer treatment and cell differentiation by applying it to a leukemia signaling network and to the network controlling the differentiation of T cells. We find that the predicted control targets are effective in a broad dynamic framework. Moreover, several of the predicted interventions are supported by experiments. This work was supported by NSF Grant PHY 1205840.

  15. Temporal network structures controlling disease spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter

    2016-08-01

    We investigate disease spreading on eight empirical data sets of human contacts (mostly proximity networks recording who is close to whom, at what time). We compare three levels of representations of these data sets: temporal networks, static networks, and a fully connected topology. We notice that the difference between the static and fully connected networks—with respect to time to extinction and average outbreak size—is smaller than between the temporal and static topologies. This suggests that, for these data sets, temporal structures influence disease spreading more than static-network structures. To explain the details in the differences between the representations, we use 32 network measures. This study concurs that long-time temporal structures, like the turnover of nodes and links, are the most important for the spreading dynamics.

  16. Epigenetics and Why Biological Networks are More Controllable than Expected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motter, Adilson

    2013-03-01

    A fundamental property of networks is that perturbations to one node can affect other nodes, potentially causing the entire system to change behavior or fail. In this talk, I will show that it is possible to exploit this same principle to control network behavior. This approach takes advantage of the nonlinear dynamics inherent to real networks, and allows bringing the system to a desired target state even when this state is not directly accessible or the linear counterpart is not controllable. Applications show that this framework permits both reprogramming a network to a desired task as well as rescuing networks from the brink of failure, which I will illustrate through various biological problems. I will also briefly review the progress our group has made over the past 5 years on related control of complex networks in non-biological domains.

  17. Improved Cost-Base Design of Water Distribution Networks using Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradzadeh Azar, Foad; Abghari, Hirad; Taghi Alami, Mohammad; Weijs, Steven

    2010-05-01

    Population growth and progressive extension of urbanization in different places of Iran cause an increasing demand for primary needs. The water, this vital liquid is the most important natural need for human life. Providing this natural need is requires the design and construction of water distribution networks, that incur enormous costs on the country's budget. Any reduction in these costs enable more people from society to access extreme profit least cost. Therefore, investment of Municipal councils need to maximize benefits or minimize expenditures. To achieve this purpose, the engineering design depends on the cost optimization techniques. This paper, presents optimization models based on genetic algorithm(GA) to find out the minimum design cost Mahabad City's (North West, Iran) water distribution network. By designing two models and comparing the resulting costs, the abilities of GA were determined. the GA based model could find optimum pipe diameters to reduce the design costs of network. Results show that the water distribution network design using Genetic Algorithm could lead to reduction of at least 7% in project costs in comparison to the classic model. Keywords: Genetic Algorithm, Optimum Design of Water Distribution Network, Mahabad City, Iran.

  18. Combining neural network and genetic algorithm for prediction of lung sounds.

    PubMed

    Güler, Inan; Polat, Hüseyin; Ergün, Uçman

    2005-06-01

    Recognition of lung sounds is an important goal in pulmonary medicine. In this work, we present a study for neural networks-genetic algorithm approach intended to aid in lung sound classification. Lung sound was captured from the chest wall of The subjects with different pulmonary diseases and also from the healthy subjects. Sound intervals with duration of 15-20 s were sampled from subjects. From each interval, full breath cycles were selected. Of each selected breath cycle, a 256-point Fourier Power Spectrum Density (PSD) was calculated. Total of 129 data values calculated by the spectral analysis are selected by genetic algorithm and applied to neural network. Multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network employing backpropagation training algorithm was used to predict the presence or absence of adventitious sounds (wheeze and crackle). We used genetic algorithms to search for optimal structure and training parameters of neural network for a better predicting of lung sounds. This application resulted in designing of optimum network structure and, hence reducing the processing load and time. PMID:16050077

  19. Genetic and Environmental Control of Neurodevelopmental Robustness in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mellert, David J.; Williamson, W. Ryan; Shirangi, Troy R.; Card, Gwyneth M.; Truman, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Interindividual differences in neuronal wiring may contribute to behavioral individuality and affect susceptibility to neurological disorders. To investigate the causes and potential consequences of wiring variation in Drosophila melanogaster, we focused on a hemilineage of ventral nerve cord interneurons that exhibits morphological variability. We find that late-born subclasses of the 12A hemilineage are highly sensitive to genetic and environmental variation. Neurons in the second thoracic segment are particularly variable with regard to two developmental decisions, whereas its segmental homologs are more robust. This variability “hotspot” depends on Ultrabithorax expression in the 12A neurons, indicating variability is cell-intrinsic and under genetic control. 12A development is more variable and sensitive to temperature in long-established laboratory strains than in strains recently derived from the wild. Strains with a high frequency of one of the 12A variants also showed a high frequency of animals with delayed spontaneous flight initiation, whereas other wing-related behaviors did not show such a correlation and were thus not overtly affected by 12A variation. These results show that neurodevelopmental robustness is variable and under genetic control in Drosophila and suggest that the fly may serve as a model for identifying conserved gene pathways that stabilize wiring in stressful developmental environments. Moreover, some neuronal lineages are variation hotspots and thus may be more amenable to evolutionary change. PMID:27223118

  20. Genetics and evolution of triatomines: from phylogeny to vector control

    PubMed Central

    Gourbière, S; Dorn, P; Tripet, F; Dumonteil, E

    2012-01-01

    Triatomines are hemipteran bugs acting as vectors of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. This parasite causes Chagas disease, one of the major parasitic diseases in the Americas. Studies of triatomine genetics and evolution have been particularly useful in the design of rational vector control strategies, and are reviewed here. The phylogeography of several triatomine species is now slowly emerging, and the struggle to reconcile the phenotypic, phylogenetic, ecological and epidemiological species concepts makes for a very dynamic field. Population genetic studies using different markers indicate a wide range of population structures, depending on the triatomine species, ranging from highly fragmented to mobile, interbreeding populations. Triatomines transmit T. cruzi in the context of complex interactions between the insect vectors, their bacterial symbionts and the parasites; however, an integrated view of the significance of these interactions in triatomine biology, evolution and in disease transmission is still lacking. The development of novel genetic markers, together with the ongoing sequencing of the Rhodnius prolixus genome and more integrative studies, will provide key tools to expanding our understanding of these important insect vectors and allow the design of improved vector control strategies. PMID:21897436

  1. Neural network based diagonal decoupling control of powered wheelchair systems.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan Nghia; Su, Steven; Nguyen, Hung T

    2014-03-01

    This paper proposes an advanced diagonal decoupling control method for powered wheelchair systems. This control method is based on a combination of the systematic diagonalization technique and the neural network control design. As such, this control method reduces coupling effects on a multivariable system, leading to independent control design procedures. Using an obtained dynamic model, the problem of the plant's Jacobian calculation is eliminated in a neural network control design. The effectiveness of the proposed control method is verified in a real-time implementation on a powered wheelchair system. The obtained results confirm that robustness and desired performance of the overall system are guaranteed, even under parameter uncertainty effects. PMID:23981543

  2. [An optimal predicting method based on improved genetic algorithm embedded in neural network and its application to peritoneal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Hu, Yueming; Wang, Tao; Zhu, Jinhui

    2009-12-01

    This paper addresses the predicting problem of peritoneal fluid absorption rate(PFAR). An innovative predicting model was developed, which employed the improved genetic algorithm embedded in neural network for predicting the important PFAR index in the peritoneal dialysis treatment process of renal failure. The significance of PFAR and the complexity of dialysis process were analyzed. The improved genetic algorithm was used for defining the initial weight and bias of neural network, and then the neural network was used for finding out the optimal predicting model of PFAR. This method utilizes the global search capability of genetic algorithm and the local search advantage of neural network completely. For the purpose of showing the validity of the model, the improved optimal predicting model is compared with the standard hybrid method of genetic algorithm and neural network. The simulation results show that the predicting accuracy of the improved optimal neural network is greatly improved and the learning process needs less time. PMID:20095466

  3. Protein interaction network of alternatively spliced isoforms from brain links genetic risk factors for autism

    PubMed Central

    Corominas, Roser; Yang, Xinping; Lin, Guan Ning; Kang, Shuli; Shen, Yun; Ghamsari, Lila; Broly, Martin; Rodriguez, Maria; Tam, Stanley; Trigg, Shelly A.; Fan, Changyu; Yi, Song; Tasan, Murat; Lemmens, Irma; Kuang, Xingyan; Zhao, Nan; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Michaelson, Jacob J.; Vacic, Vladimir; Calderwood, Michael A.; Roth, Frederick P.; Tavernier, Jan; Horvath, Steve; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Korkin, Dmitry; Sebat, Jonathan; Hill, David E.; Hao, Tong; Vidal, Marc; Iakoucheva, Lilia M.

    2014-01-01

    Increased risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is attributed to hundreds of genetic loci. The convergence of ASD variants have been investigated using various approaches, including protein interactions extracted from the published literature. However, these datasets are frequently incomplete, carry biases and are limited to interactions of a single splicing isoform, which may not be expressed in the disease-relevant tissue. Here we introduce a new interactome mapping approach by experimentally identifying interactions between brain-expressed alternatively spliced variants of ASD risk factors. The Autism Spliceform Interaction Network reveals that almost half of the detected interactions and about 30% of the newly identified interacting partners represent contribution from splicing variants, emphasizing the importance of isoform networks. Isoform interactions greatly contribute to establishing direct physical connections between proteins from the de novo autism CNVs. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of spliceform networks for translating genetic knowledge into a better understanding of human diseases. PMID:24722188

  4. Genetic control and estimation of genetic parameters for seed-coat darkening of carioca beans.

    PubMed

    Silva, F C; Melo, P G S; Pereira, H S; Melo, L C

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of the light color of the grains of carioca beans is a requirement for the development of new cultivars of common beans because it enables the storage of grains for long periods so that they may be traded at a proper opportunity. Crosses of cultivar BRSMG Madrepérola, which presents slow grain darkening, were made to 10 elite lines presenting normal darkening to obtain information about the genetic control of the trait and estimates of phenotypic and genotypic parameters. Progenies at the tegument generations F3 and F4 and their parents were evaluated at the locations of Santo Antônio de Goiás and Ponta Grossa at 71, 106, and 155 days of storage for seed-coat darkening using a rank of scores ranging from 1 (very light colored grains) to 5 (very dark colored grains). Genotypic and phenotypic variances and broad-sense heritabilities were estimated for each population. The segregation ratios were subjected to the chi-square test to establish the genetic control. Some populations did not present consistent patterns of genetic control, while others presented monogenic or double-recessive digenic segregation, indicating that the trait is controlled by few genes. Six segregant populations were identified with both low means for darkening and high expected gain under selection. Despite the strong environmental influence on the expression of the traits and the occurrence of the genotype by environment interaction, the estimates of genotypic and phenotypic parameters indicate the possibility of successful selection to develop lines with slow seed-coat darkening. PMID:25158267

  5. One Community’s Effort to Control Genetic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Puffenberger, Erik G.; Morton, D. Holmes

    2012-01-01

    In 1989, we established a small community health clinic to provide care for uninsured Amish and Mennonite children with genetic disorders. Over 20 years, we have used publicly available molecular data and sophisticated technologies to improve diagnostic efficiency, control laboratory costs, reduce hospitalizations, and prevent major neurological impairments within a rural underserved community. These actions allowed the clinic’s 2010 operating budget of $1.5 million to save local communities an estimated $20 to $25 million in aggregate medical costs. This exposes an unsettling fact: our failure to improve the lot of most people stricken with genetic disease is no longer a matter of scientific ignorance or prohibitive costs but of choices we make about how to implement existing knowledge and resources. PMID:22594747

  6. An approach for in vitro genetic networks assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noireaux, Vincent; Bar-Ziv, Roy; Libchaber, Albert

    2004-03-01

    A cell-free expression extract has been used to assemble genetic circuits in vitro. The extract, which does not contained endogenous DNA and RNA, is used as a battery to carry out transcription and translation of genes inserted into plasmids. We engineered transcriptional activation and repression cascades, in which the protein product of each stage is the input required to drive or block the following stage. Although we can find regions of linear response for single stages, cascading to subsequent stages requires working in non-linear regimes. Substantial time delays and dramatic decreases in output production are incurred with each additional stage, due to a bottleneck at the translation machinery. Faster turnover of RNA message can relieve competition between genes and stabilize output against variations in input and parameters.

  7. Mining functional modules in genetic networks with decomposable graphical models.

    PubMed

    Dejori, Mathäus; Schwaighofer, Anton; Tresp, Volker; Stetter, Martin

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, graphical models have become an increasingly important tool for the structural analysis of genome-wide expression profiles at the systems level. Here we present a new graphical modelling technique, which is based on decomposable graphical models, and apply it to a set of gene expression profiles from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The new method explains probabilistic dependencies of expression levels in terms of the concerted action of underlying genetic functional modules, which are represented as so-called "cliques" in the graph. In addition, the method uses continuous-valued (instead of discretized) expression levels, and makes no particular assumption about their probability distribution. We show that the method successfully groups members of known functional modules to cliques. Our method allows the evaluation of the importance of genes for global cellular functions based on both link count and the clique membership count. PMID:15268775

  8. Feed Forward Neural Network and Optimal Control Problem with Control and State Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Kmet', Tibor; Kmet'ova, Maria

    2009-09-09

    A feed forward neural network based optimal control synthesis is presented for solving optimal control problems with control and state constraints. The paper extends adaptive critic neural network architecture proposed by [5] to the optimal control problems with control and state constraints. The optimal control problem is transcribed into a nonlinear programming problem which is implemented with adaptive critic neural network. The proposed simulation method is illustrated by the optimal control problem of nitrogen transformation cycle model. Results show that adaptive critic based systematic approach holds promise for obtaining the optimal control with control and state constraints.

  9. Post-translational control of genetic circuits using Potyvirus proteases.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rodriguez, Jesus; Voigt, Christopher A

    2016-07-27

    Genetic engineering projects often require control over when a protein is degraded. To this end, we use a fusion between a degron and an inactivating peptide that can be added to the N-terminus of a protein. When the corresponding protease is expressed, it cleaves the peptide and the protein is degraded. Three protease:cleavage site pairs from Potyvirus are shown to be orthogonal and active in exposing degrons, releasing inhibitory domains and cleaving polyproteins. This toolbox is applied to the design of genetic circuits as a means to control regulator activity and degradation. First, we demonstrate that a gate can be constructed by constitutively expressing an inactivated repressor and having an input promoter drive the expression of the protease. It is also shown that the proteolytic release of an inhibitory domain can improve the dynamic range of a transcriptional gate (200-fold repression). Next, we design polyproteins containing multiple repressors and show that their cleavage can be used to control multiple outputs. Finally, we demonstrate that the dynamic range of an output can be improved (8-fold to 190-fold) with the addition of a protease-cleaved degron. Thus, controllable proteolysis offers a powerful tool for modulating and expanding the function of synthetic gene circuits. PMID:27298256

  10. A neural-network approach to robotic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, D. P. W.; Deleuterio, G. M. T.

    1993-01-01

    An artificial neural-network paradigm for the control of robotic systems is presented. The approach is based on the Cerebellar Model Articulation Controller created by James Albus and incorporates several extensions. First, recognizing the essential structure of multibody equations of motion, two parallel modules are used that directly reflect the dynamical characteristics of multibody systems. Second, the architecture of the proposed network is imbued with a self-organizational capability which improves efficiency and accuracy. Also, the networks can be arranged in hierarchical fashion with each subsequent network providing finer and finer resolution.

  11. A neural network controller for automated composite manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenwalner, Peter F.

    1994-01-01

    At McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA), an artificial neural network based control system has been developed and implemented to control laser heating for the fiber placement composite manufacturing process. This neurocontroller learns an approximate inverse model of the process on-line to provide performance that improves with experience and exceeds that of conventional feedback control techniques. When untrained, the control system behaves as a proportional plus integral (PI) controller. However after learning from experience, the neural network feedforward control module provides control signals that greatly improve temperature tracking performance. Faster convergence to new temperature set points and reduced temperature deviation due to changing feed rate have been demonstrated on the machine. A Cerebellar Model Articulation Controller (CMAC) network is used for inverse modeling because of its rapid learning performance. This control system is implemented in an IBM compatible 386 PC with an A/D board interface to the machine.

  12. Genetic Control of Lithium Sensitivity and Regulation of Inositol Biosynthetic Genes

    PubMed Central

    King, Jason; Keim, Melanie; Teo, Regina; Weening, Karin E.; Kapur, Mridu; McQuillan, Karina; Ryves, Jonathan; Rogers, Ben; Dalton, Emma; Williams, Robin S. B.; Harwood, Adrian J.

    2010-01-01

    Lithium (Li+) is a common treatment for bipolar mood disorder, a major psychiatric illness with a lifetime prevalence of more than 1%. Risk of bipolar disorder is heavily influenced by genetic predisposition, but is a complex genetic trait and, to date, genetic studies have provided little insight into its molecular origins. An alternative approach is to investigate the genetics of Li+ sensitivity. Using the social amoeba Dictyostelium, we previously identified prolyl oligopeptidase (PO) as a modulator of Li+ sensitivity. In a link to the clinic, PO enzyme activity is altered in bipolar disorder patients. Further studies demonstrated that PO is a negative regulator of inositol(1,4,5)trisphosphate (IP3) synthesis, a Li+ sensitive intracellular signal. However, it was unclear how PO could influence either Li+ sensitivity or risk of bipolar disorder. Here we show that in both Dictyostelium and cultured human cells PO acts via Multiple Inositol Polyphosphate Phosphatase (Mipp1) to control gene expression. This reveals a novel, gene regulatory network that modulates inositol metabolism and Li+ sensitivity. Among its targets is the inositol monophosphatase gene IMPA2, which has also been associated with risk of bipolar disorder in some family studies, and our observations offer a cellular signalling pathway in which PO activity and IMPA2 gene expression converge. PMID:20567601

  13. Cascade control and defense in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Motter, Adilson E

    2004-08-27

    Complex networks with a heterogeneous distribution of loads may undergo a global cascade of overload failures when highly loaded nodes or edges are removed due to attacks or failures. Since a small attack or failure has the potential to trigger a global cascade, a fundamental question regards the possible strategies of defense to prevent the cascade from propagating through the entire network. Here we introduce and investigate a costless strategy of defense based on a selective further removal of nodes and edges, right after the initial attack or failure. This intentional removal of network elements is shown to drastically reduce the size of the cascade. PMID:15447153

  14. VNEC - A Virtual Network Experiment Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, François; Dej, Tomas; Esfandiari, Babak

    This paper presents VNEC, a tool to specify and execute network experiments in a virtual environment. The user first formulates the network topology and then provides the tasks that should be performed by the computers together with their execution. Next, VNEC initializes the environment by powering up and configuring the virtual machines to match the desired network topology. Finally, commands are dispatched to the right virtual machines in the specified order. VNEC provides an environment for several types of research experiments such as virus propagation patterns and reactions of different targets against a given attack.

  15. Control of coupled oscillator networks with application to microgrid technologies

    PubMed Central

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Arenas, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The control of complex systems and network-coupled dynamical systems is a topic of vital theoretical importance in mathematics and physics with a wide range of applications in engineering and various other sciences. Motivated by recent research into smart grid technologies, we study the control of synchronization and consider the important case of networks of coupled phase oscillators with nonlinear interactions—a paradigmatic example that has guided our understanding of self-organization for decades. We develop a method for control based on identifying and stabilizing problematic oscillators, resulting in a stable spectrum of eigenvalues, and in turn a linearly stable synchronized state. The amount of control, that is, number of oscillators, required to stabilize the network is primarily dictated by the coupling strength, dynamical heterogeneity, and mean degree of the network, and depends little on the structural heterogeneity of the network itself. PMID:26601231

  16. Control of coupled oscillator networks with application to microgrid technologies.

    PubMed

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Arenas, Alex

    2015-08-01

    The control of complex systems and network-coupled dynamical systems is a topic of vital theoretical importance in mathematics and physics with a wide range of applications in engineering and various other sciences. Motivated by recent research into smart grid technologies, we study the control of synchronization and consider the important case of networks of coupled phase oscillators with nonlinear interactions-a paradigmatic example that has guided our understanding of self-organization for decades. We develop a method for control based on identifying and stabilizing problematic oscillators, resulting in a stable spectrum of eigenvalues, and in turn a linearly stable synchronized state. The amount of control, that is, number of oscillators, required to stabilize the network is primarily dictated by the coupling strength, dynamical heterogeneity, and mean degree of the network, and depends little on the structural heterogeneity of the network itself. PMID:26601231

  17. Performance evaluation of power control algorithms in wireless cellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temaneh-Nyah, C.; Iita, V.

    2014-10-01

    Power control in a mobile communication network intents to control the transmission power levels in such a way that the required quality of service (QoS) for the users is guaranteed with lowest possible transmission powers. Most of the studies of power control algorithms in the literature are based on some kind of simplified assumptions which leads to compromise in the validity of the results when applied in a real environment. In this paper, a CDMA network was simulated. The real environment was accounted for by defining the analysis area and the network base stations and mobile stations are defined by their geographical coordinates, the mobility of the mobile stations is accounted for. The simulation also allowed for a number of network parameters including the network traffic, and the wireless channel models to be modified. Finally, we present the simulation results of a convergence speed based comparative analysis of three uplink power control algorithms.

  18. Adaptive synchronization and pinning control of colored networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhaoyan; Xu, Xin-Jian; Chen, Guanrong; Fu, Xinchu

    2012-12-01

    A colored network model, corresponding to a colored graph in mathematics, is used for describing the complexity of some inter-connected physical systems. A colored network is consisted of colored nodes and edges. Colored nodes may have identical or nonidentical local dynamics. Colored edges between any pair of nodes denote not only the outer coupling topology but also the inner interactions. In this paper, first, synchronization of edge-colored networks is studied from adaptive control and pinning control approaches. Then, synchronization of general colored networks is considered. To achieve synchronization of a colored network to an arbitrarily given orbit, open-loop control, pinning control and adaptive coupling strength methods are proposed and tested, with some synchronization criteria derived. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate theoretical results.

  19. Connecting core percolation and controllability of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Jia, Tao; Pósfai, Márton

    2014-01-01

    Core percolation is a fundamental structural transition in complex networks related to a wide range of important problems. Recent advances have provided us an analytical framework of core percolation in uncorrelated random networks with arbitrary degree distributions. Here we apply the tools in analysis of network controllability. We confirm analytically that the emergence of the bifurcation in control coincides with the formation of the core and the structure of the core determines the control mode of the network. We also derive the analytical expression related to the controllability robustness by extending the deduction in core percolation. These findings help us better understand the interesting interplay between the structural and dynamical properties of complex networks. PMID:24946797

  20. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller via a network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention provides a network device interface and method for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels, such as sensors, actuators, and subsystems, to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. Data retrieved from the sensor is converted into digital signals and transmitted to the controller. In some embodiments, network device interfaces associated with different data channels coordinate communications with the other interfaces based on either a transition in a command message sent by the bus controller or a synchronous clock signal.

  1. Autonomous Congestion Control in Delay-Tolerant Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott; Jennings, Esther; Schoolcraft, Joshua

    2006-01-01

    Congestion control is an important feature that directly affects network performance. Network congestion may cause loss of data or long delays. Although this problem has been studied extensively in the Internet, the solutions for Internet congestion control do not apply readily to challenged network environments such as Delay Tolerant Networks (DTN) where end-to-end connectivity may not exist continuously and latency can be high. In DTN, end-to-end rate control is not feasible. This calls for congestion control mechanisms where the decisions can be made autonomously with local information only. We use an economic pricing model and propose a rule-based congestion control mechanism where each router can autonomously decide on whether to accept a bundle (data) based on local information such as available storage and the value and risk of accepting the bundle (derived from historical statistics). Preliminary experimental results show that this congestion control mechanism can protect routers from resource depletion without loss of data.

  2. Inhibition Controls Asynchronous States of Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Computations in cortical circuits require action potentials from excitatory and inhibitory neurons. In this mini-review, I first provide a quick overview of findings that indicate that GABAergic neurons play a fundamental role in coordinating spikes and generating synchronized network activity. Next, I argue that these observations helped popularize the notion that network oscillations require a high degree of spike correlations among interneurons which, in turn, produce synchronous inhibition of the local microcircuit. The aim of this text is to discuss some recent experimental and computational findings that support a complementary view: one in which interneurons participate actively in producing asynchronous states in cortical networks. This requires a proper mixture of shared excitation and inhibition leading to asynchronous activity between neighboring cells. Such contribution from interneurons would be extremely important because it would tend to reduce the spike correlation between neighboring pyramidal cells, a drop in redundancy that could enhance the information-processing capacity of neural networks. PMID:27274721

  3. On Path Attractors, Stochastic Bifurcation and Dephasing In Genetic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potoyan, Davit

    2015-03-01

    Gene regulatory networks are driven stochastic systems with the noise having two distinct components due to the to birth and death of metabolite molecules and dichotomous nature of gene state switching. Presence of dichotomous gene noise alone has the capacity to significantly perturb the optimal transition paths and steady state probability distributions compared to the macroscopic models and their weak noise approximations. Most importantly dichotomous gene noise can also lead to multimodal distributions due to stochastic bifurcation of the underlying nonlinear dynamical system, which underlies the mechanism of formation of population heterogeneity. In this note we derive approximate path based expression of the time dependent probability of gene circuits which enables deeper exploration of the role of gene noise in formation of epigenetic states and dephasing-like phenomena.

  4. Neural-Network Control Of Prosthetic And Robotic Hands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M.

    1991-01-01

    Electronic neural networks proposed for use in controlling robotic and prosthetic hands and exoskeletal or glovelike electromechanical devices aiding intact but nonfunctional hands. Specific to patient, who activates grasping motion by voice command, by mechanical switch, or by myoelectric impulse. Patient retains higher-level control, while lower-level control provided by neural network analogous to that of miniature brain. During training, patient teaches miniature brain to perform specialized, anthropomorphic movements unique to himself or herself.

  5. NASA Integrated Network Monitor and Control Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shames, Peter; Anderson, Michael; Kowal, Steve; Levesque, Michael; Sindiy, Oleg; Donahue, Kenneth; Barnes, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space Communications and Navigation office (SCaN) has commissioned a series of trade studies to define a new architecture intended to integrate the three existing networks that it operates, the Deep Space Network (DSN), Space Network (SN), and Near Earth Network (NEN), into one integrated network that offers users a set of common, standardized, services and interfaces. The integrated monitor and control architecture utilizes common software and common operator interfaces that can be deployed at all three network elements. This software uses state-of-the-art concepts such as a pool of re-programmable equipment that acts like a configurable software radio, distributed hierarchical control, and centralized management of the whole SCaN integrated network. For this trade space study a model-based approach using SysML was adopted to describe and analyze several possible options for the integrated network monitor and control architecture. This model was used to refine the design and to drive the costing of the four different software options. This trade study modeled the three existing self standing network elements at point of departure, and then described how to integrate them using variations of new and existing monitor and control system components for the different proposed deployments under consideration. This paper will describe the trade space explored, the selected system architecture, the modeling and trade study methods, and some observations on useful approaches to implementing such model based trade space representation and analysis.

  6. Flux Control in Networks of Diffusion Paths

    SciTech Connect

    A. I. Zhmoginov and N. J. Fisch

    2009-07-08

    A class of optimization problems in networks of intersecting diffusion domains of a special form of thin paths has been considered. The system of equations describing stationary solutions is equivalent to an electrical circuit built of intersecting conductors. The solution of an optimization problem has been obtained and extended to the analogous electrical circuit. The interest in this network arises from, among other applications, an application to wave-particle diffusion through resonant interactions in plasma.

  7. Modeling of CMM dynamic error based on optimization of neural network using genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Qu; Zai, Luo; Yi, Lu

    2010-08-01

    By analyzing the dynamic error of CMM, a model is established using BP neural network for CMM .The most important 5 input parameters which affect the dynamic error of CMM are approximate rate, length of rod, diameter of probe, coordinate values of X and coordinate values of Y. But the training of BP neural network can be easily trapped in local minimums and its training speed is slow. In order to overcome these disadvantages, genetic algorithm (GA) is introduced for optimization. So the model of GA-BP network is built up. In order to verify the model, experiments are done on the CMM of type 9158. Experimental results indicate that the entire optimizing capability of genetic algorithm is perfect. Compared with traditional BP network, the GA-BP network has better accuracy and adaptability and the training time is halved using GA-BP network. The average dynamic error can be reduced from 3.5μm to 0.7μm. So the precision is improved by 76%.

  8. Backstepping Control Augmented by Neural Networks For Robot Manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkheiri, Mohammed; Boudjema, Farès

    2008-06-01

    A new control approach is proposed to address the tracking problem of robot manipulators. In this approach, one relies first on a partially known model to the system to be controlled using a backstepping control strategy. The obtained controller is then augmented by an online neural network that serves as an approximator for the neglected dynamics and modeling errors. The proposed approach is systematic, and exploits the known nonlinear dynamics to derive the stepwise virtual stabilizing control laws. At the final step, an augmented Lyapunov function is introduced to derive the adaptation laws of the network weights. The effectiveness of the proposed controller is demonstrated through computer simulation on PUMA 560 robot.

  9. Neural network-based nonlinear model predictive control vs. linear quadratic gaussian control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cho, C.; Vance, R.; Mardi, N.; Qian, Z.; Prisbrey, K.

    1997-01-01

    One problem with the application of neural networks to the multivariable control of mineral and extractive processes is determining whether and how to use them. The objective of this investigation was to compare neural network control to more conventional strategies and to determine if there are any advantages in using neural network control in terms of set-point tracking, rise time, settling time, disturbance rejection and other criteria. The procedure involved developing neural network controllers using both historical plant data and simulation models. Various control patterns were tried, including both inverse and direct neural network plant models. These were compared to state space controllers that are, by nature, linear. For grinding and leaching circuits, a nonlinear neural network-based model predictive control strategy was superior to a state space-based linear quadratic gaussian controller. The investigation pointed out the importance of incorporating state space into neural networks by making them recurrent, i.e., feeding certain output state variables into input nodes in the neural network. It was concluded that neural network controllers can have better disturbance rejection, set-point tracking, rise time, settling time and lower set-point overshoot, and it was also concluded that neural network controllers can be more reliable and easy to implement in complex, multivariable plants.

  10. Prediction of Genetic Interactions Using Machine Learning and Network Properties

    PubMed Central

    Madhukar, Neel S.; Elemento, Olivier; Pandey, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    A genetic interaction (GI) is a type of interaction where the effect of one gene is modified by the effect of one or several other genes. These interactions are important for delineating functional relationships among genes and their corresponding proteins, as well as elucidating complex biological processes and diseases. An important type of GI – synthetic sickness or synthetic lethality – involves two or more genes, where the loss of either gene alone has little impact on cell viability, but the combined loss of all genes leads to a severe decrease in fitness (sickness) or cell death (lethality). The identification of GIs is an important problem for it can help delineate pathways, protein complexes, and regulatory dependencies. Synthetic lethal interactions have important clinical and biological significance, such as providing therapeutically exploitable weaknesses in tumors. While near systematic high-content screening for GIs is possible in single cell organisms such as yeast, the systematic discovery of GIs is extremely difficult in mammalian cells. Therefore, there is a great need for computational approaches to reliably predict GIs, including synthetic lethal interactions, in these organisms. Here, we review the state-of-the-art approaches, strategies, and rigorous evaluation methods for learning and predicting GIs, both under general (healthy/standard laboratory) conditions and under specific contexts, such as diseases. PMID:26579514

  11. Prediction of Genetic Interactions Using Machine Learning and Network Properties.

    PubMed

    Madhukar, Neel S; Elemento, Olivier; Pandey, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    A genetic interaction (GI) is a type of interaction where the effect of one gene is modified by the effect of one or several other genes. These interactions are important for delineating functional relationships among genes and their corresponding proteins, as well as elucidating complex biological processes and diseases. An important type of GI - synthetic sickness or synthetic lethality - involves two or more genes, where the loss of either gene alone has little impact on cell viability, but the combined loss of all genes leads to a severe decrease in fitness (sickness) or cell death (lethality). The identification of GIs is an important problem for it can help delineate pathways, protein complexes, and regulatory dependencies. Synthetic lethal interactions have important clinical and biological significance, such as providing therapeutically exploitable weaknesses in tumors. While near systematic high-content screening for GIs is possible in single cell organisms such as yeast, the systematic discovery of GIs is extremely difficult in mammalian cells. Therefore, there is a great need for computational approaches to reliably predict GIs, including synthetic lethal interactions, in these organisms. Here, we review the state-of-the-art approaches, strategies, and rigorous evaluation methods for learning and predicting GIs, both under general (healthy/standard laboratory) conditions and under specific contexts, such as diseases. PMID:26579514

  12. Integrative microRNA-gene expression network analysis in genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuchao; Qin, Baolong; Hu, Henglong; Zhang, Jiaqiao; Wang, Yufeng; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) influence a variety of biological functions by regulating gene expression post-transcriptionally. Aberrant miRNA expression has been associated with many human diseases. Urolithiasis is a common disease, and idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH) is an important risk factor for calcium urolithiasis. However, miRNA expression patterns and their biological functions in urolithiasis remain unknown. Methods and Results. A multi-step approach combining microarray miRNA and mRNA expression profile and bioinformatics analysis was adopted to analyze dysregulated miRNAs and genes in genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming (GHS) rat kidneys, using normal Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats as controls. We identified 2418 mRNAs and 19 miRNAs as significantly differentially expressed, over 700 gene ontology (GO) terms and 83 KEGG pathways that were significantly enriched in GHS rats. In addition, we constructed an miRNA-gene network that suggested that rno-miR-674-5p, rno-miR-672-5p, rno-miR-138-5p and rno-miR-21-3p may play important roles in the regulatory network. Furthermore, signal-net analysis suggested that NF-kappa B likely plays a crucial role in hypercalciuria urolithiasis. Conclusions. This study presents a global view of mRNA and miRNA expression in GHS rat kidneys, and suggests that miRNAs may be important in the regulation of hypercalciuria. The data provide valuable insights for future research, which should aim at validating the role of the genes featured here in the pathophysiology of hypercalciuria. PMID:27069814

  13. Muscle networks: Connectivity analysis of EMG activity during postural control.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Tjeerd W; Danna-Dos-Santos, Alessander; Xie, Hong-Bo; Roerdink, Melvyn; Stins, John F; Breakspear, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that reduce the many degrees of freedom in the musculoskeletal system remains an outstanding challenge. Muscle synergies reduce the dimensionality and hence simplify the control problem. How this is achieved is not yet known. Here we use network theory to assess the coordination between multiple muscles and to elucidate the neural implementation of muscle synergies. We performed connectivity analysis of surface EMG from ten leg muscles to extract the muscle networks while human participants were standing upright in four different conditions. We observed widespread connectivity between muscles at multiple distinct frequency bands. The network topology differed significantly between frequencies and between conditions. These findings demonstrate how muscle networks can be used to investigate the neural circuitry of motor coordination. The presence of disparate muscle networks across frequencies suggests that the neuromuscular system is organized into a multiplex network allowing for parallel and hierarchical control structures. PMID:26634293

  14. Adaptive neural network motion control of manipulators with experimental evaluations.

    PubMed

    Puga-Guzmán, S; Moreno-Valenzuela, J; Santibáñez, V

    2014-01-01

    A nonlinear proportional-derivative controller plus adaptive neuronal network compensation is proposed. With the aim of estimating the desired torque, a two-layer neural network is used. Then, adaptation laws for the neural network weights are derived. Asymptotic convergence of the position and velocity tracking errors is proven, while the neural network weights are shown to be uniformly bounded. The proposed scheme has been experimentally validated in real time. These experimental evaluations were carried in two different mechanical systems: a horizontal two degrees-of-freedom robot and a vertical one degree-of-freedom arm which is affected by the gravitational force. In each one of the two experimental set-ups, the proposed scheme was implemented without and with adaptive neural network compensation. Experimental results confirmed the tracking accuracy of the proposed adaptive neural network-based controller. PMID:24574910

  15. Muscle networks: Connectivity analysis of EMG activity during postural control

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Tjeerd W.; Danna-Dos-Santos, Alessander; Xie, Hong-Bo; Roerdink, Melvyn; Stins, John F.; Breakspear, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that reduce the many degrees of freedom in the musculoskeletal system remains an outstanding challenge. Muscle synergies reduce the dimensionality and hence simplify the control problem. How this is achieved is not yet known. Here we use network theory to assess the coordination between multiple muscles and to elucidate the neural implementation of muscle synergies. We performed connectivity analysis of surface EMG from ten leg muscles to extract the muscle networks while human participants were standing upright in four different conditions. We observed widespread connectivity between muscles at multiple distinct frequency bands. The network topology differed significantly between frequencies and between conditions. These findings demonstrate how muscle networks can be used to investigate the neural circuitry of motor coordination. The presence of disparate muscle networks across frequencies suggests that the neuromuscular system is organized into a multiplex network allowing for parallel and hierarchical control structures. PMID:26634293

  16. Muscle networks: Connectivity analysis of EMG activity during postural control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonstra, Tjeerd W.; Danna-Dos-Santos, Alessander; Xie, Hong-Bo; Roerdink, Melvyn; Stins, John F.; Breakspear, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that reduce the many degrees of freedom in the musculoskeletal system remains an outstanding challenge. Muscle synergies reduce the dimensionality and hence simplify the control problem. How this is achieved is not yet known. Here we use network theory to assess the coordination between multiple muscles and to elucidate the neural implementation of muscle synergies. We performed connectivity analysis of surface EMG from ten leg muscles to extract the muscle networks while human participants were standing upright in four different conditions. We observed widespread connectivity between muscles at multiple distinct frequency bands. The network topology differed significantly between frequencies and between conditions. These findings demonstrate how muscle networks can be used to investigate the neural circuitry of motor coordination. The presence of disparate muscle networks across frequencies suggests that the neuromuscular system is organized into a multiplex network allowing for parallel and hierarchical control structures.

  17. Genetic and epigenetic control of plant heat responses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junzhong; Feng, Lili; Li, Jianming; He, Zuhua

    2015-01-01

    Plants have evolved sophisticated genetic and epigenetic regulatory systems to respond quickly to unfavorable environmental conditions such as heat, cold, drought, and pathogen infections. In particular, heat greatly affects plant growth and development, immunity and circadian rhythm, and poses a serious threat to the global food supply. According to temperatures exposing, heat can be usually classified as warm ambient temperature (about 22–27°C), high temperature (27–30°C) and extremely high temperature (37–42°C, also known as heat stress) for the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The genetic mechanisms of plant responses to heat have been well studied, mainly focusing on elevated ambient temperature-mediated morphological acclimation and acceleration of flowering, modulation of circadian clock and plant immunity by high temperatures, and thermotolerance to heat stress. Recently, great progress has been achieved on epigenetic regulation of heat responses, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling, histone chaperones, small RNAs, long non-coding RNAs and other undefined epigenetic mechanisms. These epigenetic modifications regulate the expression of heat-responsive genes and function to prevent heat-related damages. This review focuses on recent progresses regarding the genetic and epigenetic control of heat responses in plants, and pays more attention to the role of the major epigenetic mechanisms in plant heat responses. Further research perspectives are also discussed. PMID:25964789

  18. Genetic control of asexual development in aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Alkhayyat, Fahad; Chang Kim, Sun; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is one of the most common fungi found in the environment. It is an opportunistic human pathogen causing invasive pulmonary aspergillosis with a high mortality rate in immunocompromised patients. Conidia, the asexual spores, serve as the main dispersal and infection agent allowing entrance of the fungus into the host through the respiratory tract. Therefore, understanding the asexual developmental process that gives rise to the conidia is of great interest to the scientific community and is currently the focus of an immense load of research being conducted. We have been studying the genetic basis that controls asexual development and gliotoxin biosynthesis in A. fumigatus. In this review, we discuss the genetic regulatory system that dictates conidiation in this important fungus by covering the roles of crucial genetic factors from the upstream heterotrimeric G-protein signaling components to the more specific downstream central activators of the conidiation pathway. In addition, other key asexual regulators including the velvet regulators, the Flb proteins and their associated regulatory factors are discussed. PMID:25596030

  19. A targeted controlled force injection of genetic material in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ahlén, Gustaf; Frelin, Lars; Holmström, Fredrik; Smetham, Grant; Augustyn, Steve; Sällberg, Matti

    2016-01-01

    A general limitation in gene delivery is the cellular uptake in lager animals including humans. Several approaches have been tested including liposomes, micro-needles, in vivo electro-transfer, ballistic delivery, and needle-free delivery. All these techniques have individual limitations. One approach reproducibly delivering genetic material in muscle tissue in nonhuman primates is hydrodynamic injection, a forced injection of a volume equaling the volume of the tissue to be transfected thereby causing an increased local pressure resulting in an improved uptake of genetic material. We transferred the principle of hydrodynamic injection to a device, where a small injection volume can be delivered to a targeted tissue volume, termed in vivo intracellular injection (IVIN). The device is based on needle(s) with apertures along the needle shafts, where multiple needles can fix the tissue volume to be transfected. The apertures direct the injection from a central needle outward or inward to the centroid of a geometric arrangement thereby targeting the tissue to be transfected. With a controlled force, this results in a targeted injection with increased transfection efficiency. We here show that the IVIN technology reproducibly improved plasmid uptake and expression and the immunogenicity. The IVIN technology can be generally applied to a targeted delivery of genetic materials. PMID:27069951

  20. Genetic control of quiescence in hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Takeshi; Park, Chun Shik; Lacorazza, H Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Cellular quiescence is a reversible cell cycle arrest that is poised to re-enter the cell cycle in response to a combination of cell-intrinsic factors and environmental cues. In hematopoietic stem cells, a coordinated balance between quiescence and differentiating proliferation ensures longevity and prevents both genetic damage and stem cell exhaustion. However, little is known about how all these processes are integrated at the molecular level. We will briefly review the environmental and intrinsic control of stem cell quiescence and discuss a new model that involves a protein-to-protein interaction between G0S2 and the phospho-nucleoprotein nucleolin in the cytosol. PMID:23839041

  1. Genetic control of quiescence in hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takeshi; Park, Chun Shik; Lacorazza, H Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Cellular quiescence is a reversible cell cycle arrest that is poised to re-enter the cell cycle in response to a combination of cell-intrinsic factors and environmental cues. In hematopoietic stem cells, a coordinated balance between quiescence and differentiating proliferation ensures longevity and prevents both genetic damage and stem cell exhaustion. However, little is known about how all these processes are integrated at the molecular level. We will briefly review the environmental and intrinsic control of stem cell quiescence and discuss a new model that involves a protein-to-protein interaction between G0S2 and the phospho-nucleoprotein nucleolin in the cytosol. PMID:23839041

  2. Autonomous Congestion Control in Delay-Tolerant Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.; Jennings, Esther H.

    2005-01-01

    Congestion control is an important feature that directly affects network performance. Network congestion may cause loss of data or long delays. Although this problem has been studied extensively in the Internet, the solutions for Internet congestion control do not apply readily to challenged network environments such as Delay Tolerant Networks (DTN) where end-to-end connectivity may not exist continuously and latency can be high. In DTN, end-to-end rate control is not feasible. This calls for congestion control mechanisms where the decisions can be made autonomously with local information only. We use an economic pricing model and propose a rule-based congestion control mechanism where each router can autonomously decide on whether to accept a bundle (data) based on local information such as available storage and the value and risk of accepting the bundle (derived from historical statistics).

  3. Direct Adaptive Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1997-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS) Neural Network was developed which learns topology representing networks (TRNS) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is integrated into a direct adaptive tracking controller. The combination produces a robust adaptive architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off- nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes the DCS network and modifications to the parameter estimation procedure. The work represents one step towards an integrated real-time reconfiguration control architecture for rapid prototyping of new aircraft designs. Performance was evaluated using three off-line benchmarks and on-line nonlinear Virtual Reality simulation. Flight control was evaluated under scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control and stability derivative variations, and air turbulence.

  4. Implementations of learning control systems using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sartori, Michael A.; Antsaklis, Panos J.

    1992-01-01

    The systematic storage in neural networks of prior information to be used in the design of various control subsystems is investigated. Assuming that the prior information is available in a certain form (namely, input/output data points and specifications between the data points), a particular neural network and a corresponding parameter design method are introduced. The proposed neural network addresses the issue of effectively using prior information in the areas of dynamical system (plant and controller) modeling, fault detection and identification, information extraction, and control law scheduling.

  5. Optimization of cocoa butter analog synthesis variables using neural networks and genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Shekarchizadeh, Hajar; Tikani, Reza; Kadivar, Mahdi

    2014-09-01

    Cocoa butter analog was prepared from camel hump fat and tristearin by enzymatic interesterification in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) using immobilized Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase (Lipozyme TL IM) as a biocatalyst. Optimal process conditions were determined using neural networks and genetic algorithm optimization. Response surfaces methodology was used to design the experiments to collect data for the neural network modelling. A general regression neural network model was developed to predict the response of triacylglycerol (TAG) distribution of cocoa butter analog from the process pressure, temperature, tristearin/camel hump fat ratio, water content, and incubation time. A genetic algorithm was used to search for a combination of the process variables for production of most similar cocoa butter analog to the corresponding cocoa butter. The combinations of the process variables during genetic algorithm optimization were evaluated using the neural network model. The pressure of 10 MPa; temperature of 40 °C; SSS/CHF ratio of 0.6:1; water content of 13 % (w/w); and incubation time of 4.5 h were found to be the optimum conditions to achieve the most similar cocoa butter analog to the corresponding cocoa butter. PMID:25190869

  6. A Genetic Algorithm for the Bi-Level Topological Design of Local Area Networks

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Vallejo, José-Fernando; Mar-Ortiz, Julio; López-Ramos, Francisco; Rodríguez, Ricardo Pedraza

    2015-01-01

    Local access networks (LAN) are commonly used as communication infrastructures which meet the demand of a set of users in the local environment. Usually these networks consist of several LAN segments connected by bridges. The topological LAN design bi-level problem consists on assigning users to clusters and the union of clusters by bridges in order to obtain a minimum response time network with minimum connection cost. Therefore, the decision of optimally assigning users to clusters will be made by the leader and the follower will make the decision of connecting all the clusters while forming a spanning tree. In this paper, we propose a genetic algorithm for solving the bi-level topological design of a Local Access Network. Our solution method considers the Stackelberg equilibrium to solve the bi-level problem. The Stackelberg-Genetic algorithm procedure deals with the fact that the follower’s problem cannot be optimally solved in a straightforward manner. The computational results obtained from two different sets of instances show that the performance of the developed algorithm is efficient and that it is more suitable for solving the bi-level problem than a previous Nash-Genetic approach. PMID:26102502

  7. The deep space network, volume 18. [Deep Space Instrumentation Facility, Ground Communication Facility, and Network Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the Deep Space Network are summarized. The Deep Space Instrumentation Facility, the Ground Communications Facility, and the Network Control System are described.

  8. Discordant patterns of genetic and phenotypic differentiation in five grasshopper species codistributed across a microreserve network.

    PubMed

    Ortego, Joaquín; García-Navas, Vicente; Noguerales, Víctor; Cordero, Pedro J

    2015-12-01

    Conservation plans can be greatly improved when information on the evolutionary and demographic consequences of habitat fragmentation is available for several codistributed species. Here, we study spatial patterns of phenotypic and genetic variation among five grasshopper species that are codistributed across a network of microreserves but show remarkable differences in dispersal-related morphology (body size and wing length), degree of habitat specialization and extent of fragmentation of their respective habitats in the study region. In particular, we tested the hypothesis that species with preferences for highly fragmented microhabitats show stronger genetic and phenotypic structure than codistributed generalist taxa inhabiting a continuous matrix of suitable habitat. We also hypothesized a higher resemblance of spatial patterns of genetic and phenotypic variability among species that have experienced a higher degree of habitat fragmentation due to their more similar responses to the parallel large-scale destruction of their natural habitats. In partial agreement with our first hypothesis, we found that genetic structure, but not phenotypic differentiation, was higher in species linked to highly fragmented habitats. We did not find support for congruent patterns of phenotypic and genetic variability among any studied species, indicating that they show idiosyncratic evolutionary trajectories and distinctive demographic responses to habitat fragmentation across a common landscape. This suggests that conservation practices in networks of protected areas require detailed ecological and evolutionary information on target species to focus management efforts on those taxa that are more sensitive to the effects of habitat fragmentation. PMID:26475782

  9. Thermoelastic steam turbine rotor control based on neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzadkowski, Romuald; Dominiczak, Krzysztof; Radulski, Wojciech; Szczepanik, R.

    2015-12-01

    Considered here are Nonlinear Auto-Regressive neural networks with eXogenous inputs (NARX) as a mathematical model of a steam turbine rotor for controlling steam turbine stress on-line. In order to obtain neural networks that locate critical stress and temperature points in the steam turbine during transient states, an FE rotor model was built. This model was used to train the neural networks on the basis of steam turbine transient operating data. The training included nonlinearity related to steam turbine expansion, heat exchange and rotor material properties during transients. Simultaneous neural networks are algorithms which can be implemented on PLC controllers. This allows for the application neural networks to control steam turbine stress in industrial power plants.

  10. Controllability and observability of Boolean networks arising from biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Yang, Meng; Chu, Tianguang

    2015-02-01

    Boolean networks are currently receiving considerable attention as a computational scheme for system level analysis and modeling of biological systems. Studying control-related problems in Boolean networks may reveal new insights into the intrinsic control in complex biological systems and enable us to develop strategies for manipulating biological systems using exogenous inputs. This paper considers controllability and observability of Boolean biological networks. We propose a new approach, which draws from the rich theory of symbolic computation, to solve the problems. Consequently, simple necessary and sufficient conditions for reachability, controllability, and observability are obtained, and algorithmic tests for controllability and observability which are based on the Gröbner basis method are presented. As practical applications, we apply the proposed approach to several different biological systems, namely, the mammalian cell-cycle network, the T-cell activation network, the large granular lymphocyte survival signaling network, and the Drosophila segment polarity network, gaining novel insights into the control and/or monitoring of the specific biological systems.

  11. Controllability and observability of Boolean networks arising from biology.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Yang, Meng; Chu, Tianguang

    2015-02-01

    Boolean networks are currently receiving considerable attention as a computational scheme for system level analysis and modeling of biological systems. Studying control-related problems in Boolean networks may reveal new insights into the intrinsic control in complex biological systems and enable us to develop strategies for manipulating biological systems using exogenous inputs. This paper considers controllability and observability of Boolean biological networks. We propose a new approach, which draws from the rich theory of symbolic computation, to solve the problems. Consequently, simple necessary and sufficient conditions for reachability, controllability, and observability are obtained, and algorithmic tests for controllability and observability which are based on the Gröbner basis method are presented. As practical applications, we apply the proposed approach to several different biological systems, namely, the mammalian cell-cycle network, the T-cell activation network, the large granular lymphocyte survival signaling network, and the Drosophila segment polarity network, gaining novel insights into the control and/or monitoring of the specific biological systems. PMID:25725640

  12. Discovery of novel genetic networks associated with 19 economically important traits in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhihua; Michal, Jennifer J; Chen, Jie; Daniels, Tyler F; Kunej, Tanja; Garcia, Matthew D; Gaskins, Charles T; Busboom, Jan R; Alexander, Leeson J; Wright, Raymond W; Macneil, Michael D

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative or complex traits are determined by the combined effects of many loci, and are affected by genetic networks or molecular pathways. In the present study, we genotyped a total of 138 mutations, mainly single nucleotide polymorphisms derived from 71 functional genes on a Wagyu x Limousin reference population. Two hundred forty six F(2) animals were measured for 5 carcass, 6 eating quality and 8 fatty acid composition traits. A total of 2,280 single marker-trait association runs with 120 tagged mutations selected based on the HAPLOVIEW analysis revealed 144 significant associations (P < 0.05), but 50 of them were removed from the analysis due to the small number of animals (< or = 9) in one genotype group or absence of one genotype among three genotypes. The remaining 94 single-trait associations were then placed into three groups of quantitative trait modes (QTMs) with additive, dominant and overdominant effects. All significant markers and their QTMs associated with each of these 19 traits were involved in a linear regression model analysis, which confirmed single-gene associations for 4 traits, but revealed two-gene networks for 8 traits and three-gene networks for 5 traits. Such genetic networks involving both genotypes and QTMs resulted in high correlations between predicted and actual values of performance, thus providing evidence that the classical Mendelian principles of inheritance can be applied in understanding genetic complexity of complex phenotypes. Our present study also indicated that carcass, eating quality and fatty acid composition traits rarely share genetic networks. Therefore, marker-assisted selection for improvement of one category of these traits would not interfere with improvement of another. PMID:19727437

  13. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Chase, B. E.; Edstrom, D.; Milton, S. V.; Stabile, P.

    2016-04-01

    Myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena are host to particle accelerators. They often involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruptions. Often times, traditional control techniques cannot fully meet these requirements. One promising avenue is to introduce machine learning and sophisticated control techniques inspired by artificial intelligence, particularly in light of recent theoretical and practical advances in these fields. Within machine learning and artificial intelligence, neural networks are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems,more » as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of neural network-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators. For the same reasons, particle accelerators are also ideal test-beds for these techniques. Moreover, many early attempts to apply neural networks to particle accelerators yielded mixed results due to the relative immaturity of the technology for such tasks. For the purpose of this paper is to re-introduce neural networks to the particle accelerator community and report on some work in neural network control that is being conducted as part of a dedicated collaboration between Fermilab and Colorado State University (CSU). We also describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.« less

  14. Fuzzy-Kohonen-clustering neural network trained by genetic algorithm and fuzzy competition learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Weixing; Li, Wenhua; Gao, Xinbo

    1995-08-01

    Kohonen networks are well known for clustering analysis. Classical Kohonen networks for hard c-means clustering (trained by winner-take-all learning) have some severe drawbacks. Fuzzy Kohonen networks (FKCNN) for fuzzy c-means clustering are trained by fuzzy competition learning, and can get better clustering results than the classical Kohonen networks. However, both winner-take-all and fuzzy competition learning algorithms are in essence local search techniques that search for the optimum by using a hill-climbing technique. Thus, they often fail in the search for the global optimum. In this paper we combine genetic algorithms (GAs) with fuzzy competition learning to train the FKCNN. Our experimental results show that the proposed GA/FC learning algorithm has much higher probabilities of finding the global optimal solutions than either the winner-take-all or the fuzzy competition learning.

  15. DC motor speed control using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Heng-Ming; Wang, Junli; Kaveh, Ashenayi

    1990-08-01

    This paper presents a scheme that uses a feedforward neural network for the learning and generalization of the dynamic characteristics for the starting of a dc motor. The goal is to build an intelligent motor starter which has a versatility equivalent to that possessed by a human operator. To attain a fast and safe starting from stall for a dc motor a maximum armature current should be maintained during the starting period. This can be achieved by properly adjusting the armature voltage. The network is trained to learn the inverse dynamics of the motor starting characteristics and outputs a proper armature voltage. Simulation was performed to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the model. This study also addresses the network performance as a function of the number of hidden units and the number of training samples. 1.

  16. Energy scaling and reduction in controlling complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Wang, Le-Zhi; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Recent works revealed that the energy required to control a complex network depends on the number of driving signals and the energy distribution follows an algebraic scaling law. If one implements control using a small number of drivers, e.g. as determined by the structural controllability theory, there is a high probability that the energy will diverge. We develop a physical theory to explain the scaling behaviour through identification of the fundamental structural elements, the longest control chains (LCCs), that dominate the control energy. Based on the LCCs, we articulate a strategy to drastically reduce the control energy (e.g. in a large number of real-world networks). Owing to their structural nature, the LCCs may shed light on energy issues associated with control of nonlinear dynamical networks. PMID:27152220

  17. Energy scaling and reduction in controlling complex networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Wang, Le-Zhi; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Recent works revealed that the energy required to control a complex network depends on the number of driving signals and the energy distribution follows an algebraic scaling law. If one implements control using a small number of drivers, e.g. as determined by the structural controllability theory, there is a high probability that the energy will diverge. We develop a physical theory to explain the scaling behaviour through identification of the fundamental structural elements, the longest control chains (LCCs), that dominate the control energy. Based on the LCCs, we articulate a strategy to drastically reduce the control energy (e.g. in a large number of real-world networks). Owing to their structural nature, the LCCs may shed light on energy issues associated with control of nonlinear dynamical networks. PMID:27152220

  18. The Life-Changing Magic of Nonlinearity in Network Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, Sean

    The proper functioning and reliability of many man-made and natural systems is fundamentally tied to our ability to control them. Indeed, applications as diverse as ecosystem management, emergency response and cell reprogramming all, at their heart, require us to drive a system to--or keep it in--a desired state. This process is complicated by the nonlinear dynamics inherent to most real systems, which has traditionally been viewed as the principle obstacle to their control. In this talk, I will discuss two ways in which nonlinearity turns this view on its head, in fact representing an asset to the control of complex systems. First, I will show how nonlinearity in the form of multistability allows one to systematically design control interventions that can deliberately induce ``reverse cascading failures'', in which a network spontaneously evolves to a desirable (rather than a failed) state. Second, I will show that nonlinearity in the form of time-varying dynamics unexpectedly makes temporal networks easier to control than their static counterparts, with the former enjoying dramatic and simultaneous reductions in all costs of control. This is true despite the fact that temporality tends to fragment a network's structure, disrupting the paths that allow the directly-controlled or ``driver'' nodes to communicate with the rest of the network. Taken together, these studies shed new light on the crucial role of nonlinearity in network control, and provide support to the idea we can control nonlinearity, rather than letting nonlinearity control us.

  19. Public authority control strategy for opinion evolution in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Xiong, Xi; Zhang, Minghong; Li, Wei

    2016-08-01

    This paper addresses the need to deal with and control public opinion and rumors. Existing strategies to control public opinion include degree, random, and adaptive bridge control strategies. In this paper, we use the HK model to present a public opinion control strategy based on public authority (PA). This means utilizing the influence of expert or high authority individuals whose opinions we control to obtain the optimum effect in the shortest time possible and thus reach a consensus of public opinion. Public authority (PA) is only influenced by individuals' attributes (age, economic status, and education level) and not their degree distribution; hence, in this paper, we assume that PA complies with two types of public authority distribution (normal and power-law). According to the proposed control strategy, our experiment is based on random, degree, and public authority control strategies in three different social networks (small-world, scale-free, and random) and we compare and analyze the strategies in terms of convergence time (T), final number of controlled agents (C), and comprehensive efficiency (E). We find that different network topologies and the distribution of the PA in the network can influence the final controlling effect. While the effect of PA strategy differs in different network topology structures, all structures achieve comprehensive efficiency with any kind of public authority distribution in any network. Our findings are consistent with several current sociological phenomena and show that in the process of public opinion/rumor control, considerable attention should be paid to high authority individuals.

  20. Public authority control strategy for opinion evolution in social networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Xiong, Xi; Zhang, Minghong; Li, Wei

    2016-08-01

    This paper addresses the need to deal with and control public opinion and rumors. Existing strategies to control public opinion include degree, random, and adaptive bridge control strategies. In this paper, we use the HK model to present a public opinion control strategy based on public authority (PA). This means utilizing the influence of expert or high authority individuals whose opinions we control to obtain the optimum effect in the shortest time possible and thus reach a consensus of public opinion. Public authority (PA) is only influenced by individuals' attributes (age, economic status, and education level) and not their degree distribution; hence, in this paper, we assume that PA complies with two types of public authority distribution (normal and power-law). According to the proposed control strategy, our experiment is based on random, degree, and public authority control strategies in three different social networks (small-world, scale-free, and random) and we compare and analyze the strategies in terms of convergence time (T), final number of controlled agents (C), and comprehensive efficiency (E). We find that different network topologies and the distribution of the PA in the network can influence the final controlling effect. While the effect of PA strategy differs in different network topology structures, all structures achieve comprehensive efficiency with any kind of public authority distribution in any network. Our findings are consistent with several current sociological phenomena and show that in the process of public opinion/rumor control, considerable attention should be paid to high authority individuals. PMID:27586601

  1. A proposal in relation to a genetic control of lifespan in mammals.

    PubMed

    Neill, David

    2010-10-01

    This article proposes that behavioural advancement during mammalian evolution had been in part mediated through extension of total developmental time. Such time extensions would have resulted in increased numbers of neuronal precursor cells, hence larger brains and a disproportionate increase in the neocortex. Larger neocortical areas enabled new connections to be formed during development and hence expansion of existing behavioural circuits. To have been positively selected such behavioural advances would have required enough postdevelopmental time to enable the behaviour to be fully manifest. It is therefore proposed that the success of mammalian evolution depended on initiating a genetic control of total postdevelopmental time. This could have been mediated through the redeployment of gene regulatory networks controlling total developmental time to additionally control total postdevelopmental time. The result would be that any extension of developmental time, leading to a behavioural advancement, would be accompanied by a proportional extension to postdevelopmental time. In effect it is proposed that mammalian lifespan as a whole is genetically controlled. PMID:20553971

  2. Genetic Co-Occurrence Network across Sequenced Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pan-Jun; Price, Nathan D.

    2011-01-01

    The phenotype of any organism on earth is, in large part, the consequence of interplay between numerous gene products encoded in the genome, and such interplay between gene products affects the evolutionary fate of the genome itself through the resulting phenotype. In this regard, contemporary genomes can be used as molecular records that reveal associations of various genes working in their natural lifestyles. By analyzing thousands of orthologs across ∼600 bacterial species, we constructed a map of gene-gene co-occurrence across much of the sequenced biome. If genes preferentially co-occur in the same organisms, they were called herein correlogs; in the opposite case, called anti-correlogs. To quantify correlogy and anti-correlogy, we alleviated the contribution of indirect correlations between genes by adapting ideas developed for reverse engineering of transcriptional regulatory networks. Resultant correlogous associations are highly enriched for physically interacting proteins and for co-expressed transcripts, clearly differentiating a subgroup of functionally-obligatory protein interactions from conditional or transient interactions. Other biochemical and phylogenetic properties were also found to be reflected in correlogous and anti-correlogous relationships. Additionally, our study elucidates the global organization of the gene association map, in which various modules of correlogous genes are strikingly interconnected by anti-correlogous crosstalk between the modules. We then demonstrate the effectiveness of such associations along different domains of life and environmental microbial communities. These phylogenetic profiling approaches infer functional coupling of genes regardless of mechanistic details, and may be useful to guide exogenous gene import in synthetic biology. PMID:22219725

  3. Adaptive Neural Network Based Control of Noncanonical Nonlinear Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Tao, Gang; Chen, Mou

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new study on the adaptive neural network-based control of a class of noncanonical nonlinear systems with large parametric uncertainties. Unlike commonly studied canonical form nonlinear systems whose neural network approximation system models have explicit relative degree structures, which can directly be used to derive parameterized controllers for adaptation, noncanonical form nonlinear systems usually do not have explicit relative degrees, and thus their approximation system models are also in noncanonical forms. It is well-known that the adaptive control of noncanonical form nonlinear systems involves the parameterization of system dynamics. As demonstrated in this paper, it is also the case for noncanonical neural network approximation system models. Effective control of such systems is an open research problem, especially in the presence of uncertain parameters. This paper shows that it is necessary to reparameterize such neural network system models for adaptive control design, and that such reparameterization can be realized using a relative degree formulation, a concept yet to be studied for general neural network system models. This paper then derives the parameterized controllers that guarantee closed-loop stability and asymptotic output tracking for noncanonical form neural network system models. An illustrative example is presented with the simulation results to demonstrate the control design procedure, and to verify the effectiveness of such a new design method. PMID:26285223

  4. A Target Coverage Scheduling Scheme Based on Genetic Algorithms in Directional Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Joon-Min; Han, Youn-Hee

    2011-01-01

    As a promising tool for monitoring the physical world, directional sensor networks (DSNs) consisting of a large number of directional sensors are attracting increasing attention. As directional sensors in DSNs have limited battery power and restricted angles of sensing range, maximizing the network lifetime while monitoring all the targets in a given area remains a challenge. A major technique to conserve the energy of directional sensors is to use a node wake-up scheduling protocol by which some sensors remain active to provide sensing services, while the others are inactive to conserve their energy. In this paper, we first address a Maximum Set Covers for DSNs (MSCD) problem, which is known to be NP-complete, and present a greedy algorithm-based target coverage scheduling scheme that can solve this problem by heuristics. This scheme is used as a baseline for comparison. We then propose a target coverage scheduling scheme based on a genetic algorithm that can find the optimal cover sets to extend the network lifetime while monitoring all targets by the evolutionary global search technique. To verify and evaluate these schemes, we conducted simulations and showed that the schemes can contribute to extending the network lifetime. Simulation results indicated that the genetic algorithm-based scheduling scheme had better performance than the greedy algorithm-based scheme in terms of maximizing network lifetime. PMID:22319387

  5. Using genetics to control cattle parasites-the Rockhampton experience.

    PubMed

    Frisch, J E; O'Neill, C J; Kelly, M J

    2000-03-01

    Ever since their accidental introduction, cattle ticks, gastrointestinal nematodes and buffalo flies have been major parasites of cattle in northern Australia. Enormous effort and resources have been directed at chemical control of these parasites but the problem persists in undiminished form. The principal control measure remains the use of breeds that have some degree of parasite resistance. No breed is completely resistant and all are at times adversely affected by parasites. Complete resistance is the ultimate solution but has been generally ignored as a commercial reality. Studies at Rockhampton have demonstrated that completely resistant lines can be developed by genetic means within a commercially acceptable timeframe from even the most parasite-susceptible breeds. Genetic changes in tick and worm resistance over 15 years in response to selection for increased tick resistance in the Belmont Adaptaur (Bos taurus) line are reported. Costs and benefits of achieving increased tick resistance are examined and the applicability of the results to other breeds is discussed. Breed differences in resistance to buffalo flies and their effects on live weight are also reported and the possibility of selecting for increased buffalo fly resistance is explored. PMID:10719118

  6. Evolutionary biology and genetic techniques for insect control.

    PubMed

    Leftwich, Philip T; Bolton, Michael; Chapman, Tracey

    2016-01-01

    The requirement to develop new techniques for insect control that minimize negative environmental impacts has never been more pressing. Here we discuss population suppression and population replacement technologies. These include sterile insect technique, genetic elimination methods such as the release of insects carrying a dominant lethal (RIDL), and gene driving mechanisms offered by intracellular bacteria and homing endonucleases. We also review the potential of newer or underutilized methods such as reproductive interference, CRISPR technology, RNA interference (RNAi), and genetic underdominance. We focus on understanding principles and potential effectiveness from the perspective of evolutionary biology. This offers useful insights into mechanisms through which potential problems may be minimized, in much the same way that an understanding of how resistance evolves is key to slowing the spread of antibiotic and insecticide resistance. We conclude that there is much to gain from applying principles from the study of resistance in these other scenarios - specifically, the adoption of combinatorial approaches to minimize the spread of resistance evolution. We conclude by discussing the focused use of GM for insect pest control in the context of modern conservation planning under land-sparing scenarios. PMID:27087849

  7. (Physiology and genetics of metabolic flux control in Zymomonas mobilis)

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T.

    1992-01-01

    The funded research deals with the physiology and genetics of glycolytic flux control in Zymomonas mobilis. Two fundamental biological questions are begin addressed: First, how do the enzymes of glycolytic pathways act in concert to regulate metabolic flux Second, what is the role of gene expression in regulating high level synthesis of the glycolytic enzymes in a balance that allows proper glycolytic flux control The specific objectives of the grant are as follows: 1. To clone the structural and regulatory regions of the Z. mobilis genes encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglucose isomerase, enolase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase, 2- keto-3-deoxy- 6-phosphogluconate aldolase, glucokinase and fructokinase. 2. To characterize the structure of these genes with respect to nucleotide sequence, transcriptional initiation sites promoter location, evolutionary relatedness to similar genes from other organisms, and organization of these genes on the genome. 3. To investigate the effects of genetically engineered alterations in the levels of the cloned enzymes on metabolic flux and cell growth. 4. To study transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the genes encoding the enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. The first two specific objectives have now been fully completed. Significant progress has been made on the fourth objective and work on the third objective is well underway.

  8. Modeling and controlling the two-phase dynamics of the p53 network: a Boolean network approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guo-Qiang; Ao, Bin; Chen, Jia-Wei; Wang, Wen-Xu; Di, Zeng-Ru

    2014-12-01

    Although much empirical evidence has demonstrated that p53 plays a key role in tumor suppression, the dynamics and function of the regulatory network centered on p53 have not yet been fully understood. Here, we develop a Boolean network model to reproduce the two-phase dynamics of the p53 network in response to DNA damage. In particular, we map the fates of cells into two types of Boolean attractors, and we find that the apoptosis attractor does not exist for minor DNA damage, reflecting that the cell is reparable. As the amount of DNA damage increases, the basin of the repair attractor shrinks, accompanied by the rising of the apoptosis attractor and the expansion of its basin, indicating that the cell becomes more irreparable with more DNA damage. For severe DNA damage, the repair attractor vanishes, and the apoptosis attractor dominates the state space, accounting for the exclusive fate of death. Based on the Boolean network model, we explore the significance of links, in terms of the sensitivity of the two-phase dynamics, to perturbing the weights of links and removing them. We find that the links are either critical or ordinary, rather than redundant. This implies that the p53 network is irreducible, but tolerant of small mutations at some ordinary links, and this can be interpreted with evolutionary theory. We further devised practical control schemes for steering the system into the apoptosis attractor in the presence of DNA damage by pinning the state of a single node or perturbing the weight of a single link. Our approach offers insights into understanding and controlling the p53 network, which is of paramount importance for medical treatment and genetic engineering.

  9. Adaptive artificial neural network for autonomous robot control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arras, Michael K.; Protzel, Peter W.; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: neural network controller for robot arm positioning with visual feedback; initial training of the arm; automatic recovery from cumulative fault scenarios; and error reduction by iterative fine movements.

  10. Recognition with self-control in neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewenstein, Maciej; Nowak, Andrzej

    1989-10-01

    We present a theory of fully connected neural networks that incorporates mechanisms of dynamical self-control of recognition process. Using a functional integral technique, we formulate mean-field dynamics for such systems.

  11. Lightweight simulation of air traffic control using simple temporal networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Russell

    2005-01-01

    We provide a formulation of the air traffic control problem and a solver for this problem that makes use of temporal constraint networks and simple geometric reasoning. We provide results showing that this approach is practical for realistic simulated problems.

  12. Delayed feedback control of synchronization in weakly coupled oscillator networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novičenko, Viktor

    2015-08-01

    We study control of synchronization in weakly coupled oscillator networks by using a phase-reduction approach. Starting from a general class of limit-cycle oscillators we derive a phase model, which shows that delayed feedback control changes effective coupling strengths and effective frequencies. We derive the analytical condition for critical control gain, where the phase dynamics of the oscillator becomes extremely sensitive to any perturbations. As a result the network can attain phase synchronization even if the natural interoscillatory couplings are small. In addition, we demonstrate that delayed feedback control can disrupt the coherent phase dynamic in synchronized networks. The validity of our results is illustrated on networks of diffusively coupled Stuart-Landau and FitzHugh-Nagumo models.

  13. Autonomous Congestion Control in Delay-Tolerant Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott; Jennings, Esther; Schoolcraft, Joshua

    2006-01-01

    This presentation highlights communication congestion control in delay-tolerant networks (DTNs). Large-scale future space exploration will offer complex communication challenges that may be best addressed by establishing a network infrastructure. However, current internet techniques for congestion control are not well suited for operation of a network over interplanetary distances. An alternative, delay-tolerant technique for congestion control in a delay-tolerant network is presented. A simple DTN was constructed and an experimental congestion control mechanism was applied. The mechanism appeared to be effective and each router was able to make its bundle acceptance decisions autonomously. Future research will examine more complex topologies and alternative bundle acceptance rules that might enhance performance.

  14. Optimization of robustness of network controllability against malicious attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yan-Dong; Lao, Song-Yang; Hou, Lv-Lin; Bai, Liang

    2014-11-01

    As the controllability of complex networks has attracted much attention recently, how to design and optimize the robustness of network controllability has become a common and urgent problem in the engineering field. In this work, we propose a method that modifies any given network with strict structural perturbation to effectively enhance its robustness against malicious attacks, called dynamic optimization of controllability. Unlike other structural perturbations, the strict perturbation only swaps the links and keeps the in- and out-degree unchanged. A series of extensive experiments show that the robustness of controllability and connectivity can be improved dramatically. Furthermore, the effectiveness of our method is explained from the views of underlying structure. The analysis results indicate that the optimization algorithm makes networks more homogenous and assortative.

  15. Enhancing complex network controllability by minimum link direction reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lvlin; Lao, Songyang; Small, Michael; Xiao, Yandong

    2015-07-01

    Controllability of complex networks has recently become one of the most popular research fields, but the importance of link direction for controllability has not been systematically considered. We propose a method to enhance controllability of a directed network by changing the direction of a small fraction of links while keeping the total number of links unchanged. The main idea of the method is to find candidate links based on the matching path. Extensive numerical simulation on many modeled networks demonstrates that this method is effective. Furthermore, we find that the nodes linked to candidate links have a distinct character, which provide us with a strategy to improve the controllability based on the local structure. Since the whole topology of many real networks is not visible and we only get some local structure information, this strategy is potentially more practical compared to those that demand complete topology information.

  16. On neural networks in identification and control of dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phan, Minh; Juang, Jer-Nan; Hyland, David C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of the applicability of neural networks in the identification and control of dynamic systems. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of how the neural networks handle linear systems and how the new approach is related to conventional system identification and control methods. Extensions of the approach to nonlinear systems are then made. The paper explains the fundamental concepts of neural networks in their simplest terms. Among the topics discussed are feed forward and recurrent networks in relation to the standard state-space and observer models, linear and nonlinear auto-regressive models, linear, predictors, one-step ahead control, and model reference adaptive control for linear and nonlinear systems. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the application of these important concepts.

  17. Extracting directed information flow networks: An application to genetics and semantics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masucci, A. P.; Kalampokis, A.; Eguíluz, V. M.; Hernández-García, E.

    2011-02-01

    We introduce a general method to infer the directional information flow between populations whose elements are described by n-dimensional vectors of symbolic attributes. The method is based on the Jensen-Shannon divergence and on the Shannon entropy and has a wide range of application. We show here the results of two applications: first we extract the network of genetic flow between meadows of the seagrass Poseidonia oceanica, where the meadow elements are specified by sets of microsatellite markers, and then we extract the semantic flow network from a set of Wikipedia pages, showing the semantic channels between different areas of knowledge.

  18. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller via a network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A communications system and method are provided for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels, such as sensors, actuators, and subsystems, to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. Data retrieved from the sensor is converted into digital signals and transmitted to the controller. Network device interfaces associated with different data channels can coordinate communications with the other interfaces based on either a transition in a command message sent by the bus controller or a synchronous clock signal.

  19. Multi-loop networked process control: a synchronized approach.

    PubMed

    Das, M; Ghosh, R; Goswami, B; Chandra, A K; Balasubramanian, R; Luksch, P; Gupta, A

    2009-01-01

    Modern day process control uses digital controllers which are based on the principle of distributed rather than centralized control. Distributing controllers, sensors and actuators across a plant entails considerable wiring which can be reduced substantially by integrating the components of a control loop over a network. The other advantages include greater flexibility and higher reliability with lower hardware redundancy. The controllers and sensors are on a network and can take over the function of a failed component automatically, without the need of manual reconfiguration, thus eliminating the need of having a redundant component for each and every component. Though elaborate techniques have been developed for Single Input Single Output (SISO) systems, the major challenge lies in extending these ideas to control a practical process plant where de-centralized control is actually achieved through control of individual SISO control loops derived through de-coupling of the original system. Multiple loops increase network load and hence the sampling times associated with the control loops and makes synchronization difficult. This paper presents a methodology by which network based process control can be applied to practical process plants, with a simple direct synchronization mechanism. PMID:19028386

  20. Control range: a controllability-based index for node significance in directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbo; Gao, Lin; Gao, Yong

    2012-04-01

    While a large number of methods for module detection have been developed for undirected networks, it is difficult to adapt them to handle directed networks due to the lack of consensus criteria for measuring the node significance in a directed network. In this paper, we propose a novel structural index, the control range, motivated by recent studies on the structural controllability of large-scale directed networks. The control range of a node quantifies the size of the subnetwork that the node can effectively control. A related index, called the control range similarity, is also introduced to measure the structural similarity between two nodes. When applying the index of control range to several real-world and synthetic directed networks, it is observed that the control range of the nodes is mainly influenced by the network's degree distribution and that nodes with a low degree may have a high control range. We use the index of control range similarity to detect and analyze functional modules in glossary networks and the enzyme-centric network of homo sapiens. Our results, as compared with other approaches to module detection such as modularity optimization algorithm, dynamic algorithm and clique percolation method, indicate that the proposed indices are effective and practical in depicting structural and modular characteristics of sparse directed networks.

  1. A multi-agent genetic algorithm for community detection in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhangtao; Liu, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Complex networks are popularly used to represent a lot of practical systems in the domains of biology and sociology, and the structure of community is one of the most important network attributes which has received an enormous amount of attention. Community detection is the process of discovering the community structure hidden in complex networks, and modularity Q is one of the best known quality functions measuring the quality of communities of networks. In this paper, a multi-agent genetic algorithm, named as MAGA-Net, is proposed to optimize modularity value for the community detection. An agent, coded by a division of a network, represents a candidate solution. All agents live in a lattice-like environment, with each agent fixed on a lattice point. A series of operators are designed, namely split and merging based neighborhood competition operator, hybrid neighborhood crossover, adaptive mutation and self-learning operator, to increase modularity value. In the experiments, the performance of MAGA-Net is validated on both well-known real-world benchmark networks and large-scale synthetic LFR networks with 5000 nodes. The systematic comparisons with GA-Net and Meme-Net show that MAGA-Net outperforms these two algorithms, and can detect communities with high speed, accuracy and stability.

  2. Computational, Integrative, and Comparative Methods for the Elucidation of Genetic Coexpression Networks

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Gene expression microarray data can be used for the assembly of genetic coexpression network graphs. Using mRNA samples obtained from recombinant inbred Mus musculus strains, it is possible to integrate allelic variation with molecular and higher-order phenotypes. The depth of quantitative genetic analysis of microarray data can be vastly enhanced utilizing this mouse resource in combination with powerful computational algorithms, platforms, and data repositories. The resulting network graphs transect many levels of biological scale. This approach is illustrated with the extraction of cliques of putatively coregulated genes and their annotation using gene ontology analysis and cis-regulatory element discovery. The causal basis for coregulation is detected through the use of quantitative trait locus mapping. PMID:16046823

  3. [Predicting genetic modification targets based on metabolic network analysis--a review].

    PubMed

    Li, Peishun; Ma, Hongwu; Zhao, Xueming; Chen, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Construction of artificial cell factory to produce specific compounds of interest needs wild strain to be genetically engineered. In recent years, with the reconstruction of many genome-scale metabolic networks, a number of methods have been proposed based on metabolic network analysis for predicting genetic modification targets that lead to overproduction of compounds of interest. These approaches use constraints of stoichiometry and reaction reversibility in genome-scale models of metabolism and adopt different mathematical algorithms to predict modification targets, and thus can discover new targets that are difficult to find through traditional intuitive methods. In this review, we introduce the principle, merit, demerit and application of various strain optimization methods in detail. The main problems in existing methods and perspectives on this emerging research field are also discussed, aiming to provide guidance to choose the appropriate methods according to different types of products and the reliability of the predicted results. PMID:27363195

  4. Computational, Integrative, and Comparative Methods for the Elucidation of Genetic Coexpression Networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baldwin, Nicole E.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Kirov, Stefan; Langston, Michael A.; Snoddy, Jay R.; Williams, Robert W.; Zhang, Bing

    2005-01-01

    Gene expression microarray data can be used for the assembly of genetic coexpression network graphs. Using mRNA samples obtained from recombinant inbred Mus musculus strains, it is possible to integrate allelic variation with molecular and higher-order phenotypes. The depth of quantitative genetic analysis of microarray data can be vastly enhanced utilizing this mouse resource in combination with powerful computational algorithms, platforms, and data repositories. The resulting network graphs transect many levels of biological scale. This approach is illustrated with the extraction of cliques of putatively co-regulated genes and their annotation using gene ontology analysis and cis -regulatory element discovery.more » The causal basis for co-regulation is detected through the use of quantitative trait locus mapping.« less

  5. Adaptive Quality of Transmission Control in Elastic Optical Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xinran

    Optical fiber communication is becoming increasingly important due to the burgeoning demand in the internet capacity. However, traditional wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) technique fails to address such demand because of its inefficient spectral utilization. As a result, elastic optical networking (EON) has been under extensive investigation recently. Such network allows sub-wavelength and super-wavelength channel accommodation, and mitigates the stranded bandwidth problem in the WDM network. In addition, elastic optical network is also able to dynamically allocate the spectral resources of the network based on channel conditions and impairments, and adaptively control the quality of transmission of a channel. This application requires two aspects to be investigated: an efficient optical performance monitoring scheme and networking control and management algorithms to reconfigure the network in a dynamic fashion. This thesis focuses on the two aspects discussed above about adaptive QoT control. We demonstrated a supervisory channel method for optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) and chromatic dispersion (CD) monitoring. In addition, our proof-of-principle testbed experiments show successful impairment aware reconfiguration of the network with modulation format switching (MFS) only and MFS combined with lightpath rerouting (LR) for hundred-GHz QPSK superchannels undergoing time-varying OSNR impairment.

  6. Wireless sensor network for streetlight monitoring and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xin-Ming; Ma, Jing; Leblanc, Lawrence E.

    2004-08-01

    Wireless sensor network has attracted considerable research attention as the world becomes more information oriented. This technology provides an opportunity of innovations in traditional industries. Management and control of streetlight system is a labor-intensive high-cost task for public facility operations. This paper applies wireless sensor network technology in streetlight monitoring and control. Wireless sensor networks are employed to replace traditional physical patrol maintenance and manual switching on every lamp in the street or along the highway at the aim of reducing the maintenance and management expense. Active control is used to preserve energy cost while ensuring public safety. A proof-of-concept network architecture operated at 900 MHz industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) band is designed for a two-way wireless telemetry system in streetlight remote control and monitoring. The radio architecture, multi-hop protocol and system interface are discussed in detail. MOTES sensor nodes are used in simulation and experimental tests. Simulation results show that the sensor network approach provides an efficient solution to monitor and control lighting infrastructures through wireless links. The unique application in this paper addresses an immediate need in streetlight control and monitoring, the architecture developed in this research could also serve as a platform for many other applications and researches in wireless sensor network.

  7. Quality of service policy control in virtual private networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yiqing; Wang, Hongbin; Zhou, Zhi; Zhou, Dongru

    2004-04-01

    This paper studies the QoS of VPN in an environment where the public network prices connection-oriented services based on source, destination and grade of service, and advertises these prices to its VPN customers (users). As different QoS technologies can produce different QoS, there are according different traffic classification rules and priority rules. The internet service provider (ISP) may need to build complex mechanisms separately for each node. In order to reduce the burden of network configuration, we need to design policy control technologies. We considers mainly directory server, policy server, policy manager and policy enforcers. Policy decision point (PDP) decide its control according to policy rules. In network, policy enforce point (PEP) decide its network controlled unit. For InterServ and DiffServ, we will adopt different policy control methods as following: (1) In InterServ, traffic uses resource reservation protocol (RSVP) to guarantee the network resource. (2) In DiffServ, policy server controls the DiffServ code points and per hop behavior (PHB), its PDP distributes information to each network node. Policy server will function as following: information searching; decision mechanism; decision delivering; auto-configuration. In order to prove the effectiveness of QoS policy control, we make the corrective simulation.

  8. Endogenous bioelectrical networks store non-genetic patterning information during development and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Pattern formation, as occurs during embryogenesis or regeneration, is the crucial link between genotype and the functions upon which selection operates. Even cancer and aging can be seen as challenges to the continuous physiological processes that orchestrate individual cell activities toward the anatomical needs of an organism. Thus, the origin and maintenance of complex biological shape is a fundamental question for cell, developmental, and evolutionary biology, as well as for biomedicine. It has long been recognized that slow bioelectrical gradients can control cell behaviors and morphogenesis. Here, I review recent molecular data that implicate endogenous spatio-temporal patterns of resting potentials among non-excitable cells as instructive cues in embryogenesis, regeneration, and cancer. Functional data have implicated gradients of resting potential in processes such as limb regeneration, eye induction, craniofacial patterning, and head-tail polarity, as well as in metastatic transformation and tumorigenesis. The genome is tightly linked to bioelectric signaling, via ion channel proteins that shape the gradients, downstream genes whose transcription is regulated by voltage, and transduction machinery that converts changes in bioelectric state to second-messenger cascades. However, the data clearly indicate that bioelectric signaling is an autonomous layer of control not reducible to a biochemical or genetic account of cell state. The real-time dynamics of bioelectric communication among cells are not fully captured by transcriptomic or proteomic analyses, and the necessary-and-sufficient triggers for specific changes in growth and form can be physiological states, while the underlying gene loci are free to diverge. The next steps in this exciting new field include the development of novel conceptual tools for understanding the anatomical semantics encoded in non-neural bioelectrical networks, and of improved biophysical tools for reading and writing

  9. STIMULUS: End-System Network Interface Controller for 100 Gb/s Wide Area Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkesh-Ha, Payman

    2014-09-12

    The main goal of this research grant is to develop a system-level solution leveraging novel technologies that enable network communications at 100 Gb/s or beyond. University of New Mexico in collaboration with Acadia Optronics LLC has been working on this project to develop the 100 Gb/s Network Interface Controller (NIC) under this Department of Energy (DOE) grant.

  10. Prediction and control of chaotic processes using nonlinear adaptive networks

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.D.; Barnes, C.W.; Flake, G.W.; Lee, K.; Lewis, P.S.; O'Rouke, M.K.; Qian, S.

    1990-01-01

    We present the theory of nonlinear adaptive networks and discuss a few applications. In particular, we review the theory of feedforward backpropagation networks. We then present the theory of the Connectionist Normalized Linear Spline network in both its feedforward and iterated modes. Also, we briefly discuss the theory of stochastic cellular automata. We then discuss applications to chaotic time series, tidal prediction in Venice lagoon, finite differencing, sonar transient detection, control of nonlinear processes, control of a negative ion source, balancing a double inverted pendulum and design advice for free electron lasers and laser fusion targets.

  11. Genetic variation among 82 pharmacogenes: The PGRNseq data from the eMERGE network.

    PubMed

    Bush, W S; Crosslin, D R; Owusu-Obeng, A; Wallace, J; Almoguera, B; Basford, M A; Bielinski, S J; Carrell, D S; Connolly, J J; Crawford, D; Doheny, K F; Gallego, C J; Gordon, A S; Keating, B; Kirby, J; Kitchner, T; Manzi, S; Mejia, A R; Pan, V; Perry, C L; Peterson, J F; Prows, C A; Ralston, J; Scott, S A; Scrol, A; Smith, M; Stallings, S C; Veldhuizen, T; Wolf, W; Volpi, S; Wiley, K; Li, R; Manolio, T; Bottinger, E; Brilliant, M H; Carey, D; Chisholm, R L; Chute, C G; Haines, J L; Hakonarson, H; Harley, J B; Holm, I A; Kullo, I J; Jarvik, G P; Larson, E B; McCarty, C A; Williams, M S; Denny, J C; Rasmussen-Torvik, L J; Roden, D M; Ritchie, M D

    2016-08-01

    Genetic variation can affect drug response in multiple ways, although it remains unclear how rare genetic variants affect drug response. The electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network, collaborating with the Pharmacogenomics Research Network, began eMERGE-PGx, a targeted sequencing study to assess genetic variation in 82 pharmacogenes critical for implementation of "precision medicine." The February 2015 eMERGE-PGx data release includes sequence-derived data from ∼5,000 clinical subjects. We present the variant frequency spectrum categorized by variant type, ancestry, and predicted function. We found 95.12% of genes have variants with a scaled Combined Annotation-Dependent Depletion score above 20, and 96.19% of all samples had one or more Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium Level A actionable variants. These data highlight the distribution and scope of genetic variation in relevant pharmacogenes, identifying challenges associated with implementing clinical sequencing for drug treatment at a broader level, underscoring the importance for multifaceted research in the execution of precision medicine. PMID:26857349

  12. Genetic networks specifying the functional architecture of orientation domains in V1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liedtke, Joscha; Wolf, Fred

    2015-03-01

    Although genetic information is critically important for brain development and structure, it is widely believed that neocortical functional architecture is largely shaped by activity dependent mechanisms. Here we show theoretically that mathematical models of genetic networks of principal neurons interacting by long range axonal morphogen transport can generate morphogen patterns that exactly prescribe the functional architecture of the primary visual cortex (V1) as experimentally observed. We analyze in detail an example genetic network that encodes the functional architecture of V1 by a dynamically generated morphogen pattern. We use analytical methods from weakly non-linear analysis [Cross & Hohenberg 1993] complemented by numerical simulations to obtain solutions of the model. In particular we find that the pinwheel statistics are in quantitative agreement with high precision experimental measurements [Kaschube et al. 2010]. This theory opens a novel perspective on the experimentally observed robustness of V1's architecture against radically abnormal developmental conditions such a dark rearing [White et al. 2001]. Furthermore, it provides for the first time a scheme how the pattern of a complex cortical architecture can be specified using only a small genetic bandwidth.

  13. Genetic Variation among 82 Pharmacogenes: the PGRN-Seq data from the eMERGE Network

    PubMed Central

    Obeng, Aniwaa Owusu; Wallace, John; Almoguera, Berta; Basford, Melissa A.; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Carrell, David S.; Connolly, John J.; Crawford, Dana; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Gallego, Carlos J.; Gordon, Adam S.; Keating, Brendan; Kirby, Jacqueline; Kitchner, Terrie; Manzi, Shannon; Mejia, Ana R.; Pan, Vivian; Perry, Cassandra L.; Peterson, Josh F.; Prows, Cynthia A.; Ralston, James; Scott, Stuart A.; Scrol, Aaron; Smith, Maureen; Stallings, Sarah C.; Veldhuizen, Tamra; Wolf, Wendy; Volpi, Simona; Wiley, Ken; Li, Rongling; Manolio, Teri; Bottinger, Erwin; Brilliant, Murray H.; Carey, David; Chisholm, Rex L.; Chute, Christopher G.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Harley, John B.; Holm, Ingrid A.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Larson, Eric B.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Williams, Marc S.; Denny, Joshua C.; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Roden, Dan M.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variation can affect drug response in multiple ways, though it remains unclear how rare genetic variants affect drug response. The electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network, collaborating with the Pharmacogenomics Research Network, began eMERGE-PGx, a targeted sequencing study to assess genetic variation in 82 pharmacogenes critical for implementation of “precision medicine.” The February 2015 eMERGE-PGx data release includes sequence-derived data from ~5000 clinical subjects. We present the variant frequency spectrum categorized by variant type, ancestry, and predicted function. We found 95.12% of genes have variants with a scaled CADD score above 20, and 96.19% of all samples had one or more Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium Level A actionable variants. These data highlight the distribution and scope of genetic variation in relevant pharmacogenes, identifying challenges associated with implementing clinical sequencing for drug treatment at a broader level, underscoring the importance for multifaceted research in the execution of precision medicine. PMID:26857349

  14. Software Defined Networking (SDN) controlled all optical switching networks with multi-dimensional switching architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongli; Ji, Yuefeng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Hui; Xiong, Qianjin; Qiu, Shaofeng

    2014-08-01

    Ultrahigh throughout capacity requirement is challenging the current optical switching nodes with the fast development of data center networks. Pbit/s level all optical switching networks need to be deployed soon, which will cause the high complexity of node architecture. How to control the future network and node equipment together will become a new problem. An enhanced Software Defined Networking (eSDN) control architecture is proposed in the paper, which consists of Provider NOX (P-NOX) and Node NOX (N-NOX). With the cooperation of P-NOX and N-NOX, the flexible control of the entire network can be achieved. All optical switching network testbed has been experimentally demonstrated with efficient control of enhanced Software Defined Networking (eSDN). Pbit/s level all optical switching nodes in the testbed are implemented based on multi-dimensional switching architecture, i.e. multi-level and multi-planar. Due to the space and cost limitation, each optical switching node is only equipped with four input line boxes and four output line boxes respectively. Experimental results are given to verify the performance of our proposed control and switching architecture.

  15. Migratory decisions in birds: extent of genetic versus environmental control.

    PubMed

    Ogonowski, Mark S; Conway, Courtney J

    2009-08-01

    Migration is one of the most spectacular of animal behaviors and is prevalent across a broad array of taxa. In birds, we know much about the physiological basis of how birds migrate, but less about the relative contribution of genetic versus environmental factors in controlling migratory tendency. To evaluate the extent to which migratory decisions are genetically determined, we examined whether individual western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea) change their migratory tendency from one year to the next at two sites in southern Arizona. We also evaluated the heritability of migratory decisions by using logistic regression to examine the association between the migratory tendency of burrowing owl parents and their offspring. The probability of migrating decreased with age in both sexes and adult males were less migratory than females. Individual owls sometimes changed their migratory tendency from one year to the next, but changes were one-directional: adults that were residents during winter 2004-2005 remained residents the following winter, but 47% of adults that were migrants in winter 2004-2005 became residents the following winter. We found no evidence for an association between the migratory tendency of hatch-year owls and their male or female parents. Migratory tendency of hatch-year owls did not differ between years, study sites or sexes or vary by hatching date. Experimental provision of supplemental food did not affect these relationships. All of our results suggest that heritability of migratory tendency in burrowing owls is low, and that intraspecific variation in migratory tendency is likely due to: (1) environmental factors, or (2) a combination of environmental factors and non-additive genetic variation. The fact that an individual's migratory tendency can change across years implies that widespread anthropogenic changes (i.e., climate change or changes in land use) could potentially cause widespread changes in the migratory tendency of

  16. Multiple loci and epistases control genetic variation for seed dormancy in weedy rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xing-You; Kianian, Shahryar F; Foley, Michael E

    2004-01-01

    Weedy rice has much stronger seed dormancy than cultivated rice. A wild-like weedy strain SS18-2 was selected to investigate the genetic architecture underlying seed dormancy, a critical adaptive trait in plants. A framework genetic map covering the rice genome was constructed on the basis of 156 BC(1) [EM93-1 (nondormant breeding line)//EM93-1/SS18-2] individuals. The mapping population was replicated using a split-tiller technique to control and better estimate the environmental variation. Dormancy was determined by germination of seeds after 1, 11, and 21 days of after-ripening (DAR). Six dormancy QTL, designated as qSD(S)-4, -6, -7-1, -7-2, -8, and -12, were identified. The locus qSD(S)-7-1 was tightly linked to the red pericarp color gene Rc. A QTL x DAR interaction was detected for qSD(S)-12, the locus with the largest main effect at 1, 11, and 21 DAR (R(2) = 0.14, 0.24, and 0.20, respectively). Two, three, and four orders of epistases were detected with four, six, and six QTL, respectively. The higher-order epistases strongly suggest the presence of genetically complex networks in the regulation of variation for seed dormancy in natural populations and make it critical to select for a favorable combination of alleles at multiple loci in positional cloning of a target dormancy gene. PMID:15082564

  17. Comparative analysis of two evolved neural networks used for the identification and control of a nonlinear plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erives, Hector; Thompson, Wiley E.

    1997-07-01

    This paper presents a comparative analysis of two evolved neural networks for control. Traditionally, the structure of Radial Basis Functions Networks (RBFNs) and Multilayer Feedforward Networks (MFNs) are found by a trial-and-error process. This process consists on finding an appropriate network structure such that the unknown nonlinearities of the plant can be estimated to some desired accuracy. In general, a neural network is composed of two elements: structural and learning parameters. The structural parameters are all those elements that determine the size of the network. The learning parameters are all those elements that determine learning and convergence of the network. The approach presented in this work uses a Genetic Algorithm (GA) to evolve the structure, and uses a gradient descent algorithm to adjust the weights in the network. An analysis of the evolution of RBFNs and MFNs by means of a GA is examined in detail. It is shown that the networks can be encoded in a chromosome for their evolution. Experimental results show the performance of Evolved Radial Basis Functions Networks and Evolved Multilayer Feedforward Networks in the identification and control of a nonlinear plant.

  18. Space Network Control Conference on Resource Allocation Concepts and Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, Karen L. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of the Space Network Control (SNC) Conference. In the late 1990s, when the Advanced Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System is operational, Space Network communication services will be supported and controlled by the SNC. The goals of the conference were to survey existing resource allocation concepts and approaches, to identify solutions applicable to the Space Network, and to identify avenues of study in support of the SNC development. The conference was divided into three sessions: (1) Concepts for Space Network Allocation; (2) SNC and User Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) Human-Computer Interface Concepts; and (3) Resource Allocation Tools, Technology, and Algorithms. Key recommendations addressed approaches to achieving higher levels of automation in the scheduling process.

  19. A global spacecraft control network for spacecraft autonomy research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitts, Christopher A.

    1996-01-01

    The development and implementation of the Automated Space System Experimental Testbed (ASSET) space operations and control network, is reported on. This network will serve as a command and control architecture for spacecraft operations and will offer a real testbed for the application and validation of advanced autonomous spacecraft operations strategies. The proposed network will initially consist of globally distributed amateur radio ground stations at locations throughout North America and Europe. These stations will be linked via Internet to various control centers. The Stanford (CA) control center will be capable of human and computer based decision making for the coordination of user experiments, resource scheduling and fault management. The project's system architecture is described together with its proposed use as a command and control system, its value as a testbed for spacecraft autonomy research, and its current implementation.

  20. On controlling networks of limit-cycle oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Arenas, Alex

    2016-09-01

    The control of network-coupled nonlinear dynamical systems is an active area of research in the nonlinear science community. Coupled oscillator networks represent a particularly important family of nonlinear systems, with applications ranging from the power grid to cardiac excitation. Here, we study the control of network-coupled limit cycle oscillators, extending the previous work that focused on phase oscillators. Based on stabilizing a target fixed point, our method aims to attain complete frequency synchronization, i.e., consensus, by applying control to as few oscillators as possible. We develop two types of controls. The first type directs oscillators towards larger amplitudes, while the second does not. We present numerical examples of both control types and comment on the potential failures of the method.