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Sample records for genetically epilepsy-prone rat

  1. Impairment of immunological functions in genetically epilepsy-prone rats.

    PubMed

    De Sarro, G; Liberto, M C; Berlinghieri, M C; Focà, A; Aragona, M; Cavaliere, R; Gulletta, E

    1996-06-01

    1. In genetically epilepsy-prone rats (GEPR-9s), which represent a natural genetic model of epilepsy, we observed that the number of peritoneal macrophages was significantly lower with respect to normal rats, and that some functional parameters (i.e. phagocytosis and intracellular killing) of these macrophages were impaired. 2. The count of lymphocyte populations showed a predominance of T-helper over T-cytotoxic/suppressor both in the spleen and lymph nodes. Moreover, an increased T-cell/B-cell ratio was observed in GEPR-9s. Flow cytometry revealed that GEPR-9s spleens possessed a large percentage of T-helper cells in comparison to normal rats. 3. By using concanavalin A-induced proliferation of GEPR-9s cultured lymphocytes, we have shown increased functional activation. 4. We suggest that the alterations in T-cell functions in GEPR-9s could be due to the involvement of the neuroendocrine system in the modulation of immunity, in the shift between Th1 and Th2, and in the activation of stress response. PMID:8853298

  2. Amiloride and SN-6 Suppress Audiogenic Seizure Susceptibility in Genetically Epilepsy-Prone Rats

    PubMed Central

    Quansah, Hillary; N’Gouemo, Prosper

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Aims We have recently reported that amiloride, a potent and nonselective blocker of acid-sensing ion channels, prevents the development of pilocarpine-induced seizures and status epilepticus. Amiloride is also known to suppress the activity of Na+/Ca2+ and Na+/H+ exchangers that have been implicated in the pathophysiology of seizures. Here, we evaluated the effects of amiloride, SN-6 (a potent blocker of Na+/Ca2+ exchangers) and zoniporide (a potent blocker of Na+/H+ exchangers) on acoustically evoked seizures (audiogenic seizures, AGS) in genetically epilepsy-prone rats (GEPR-3s), a model of inherited generalized epilepsy. Methods Male, six-week-old GEPR-3s were used. The GEPR-3s were tested for AGS susceptibility before and after treatment with various doses of amiloride, SN-6, and zoniporide (1, 3, 10, and 30 mg/kg; per os). Results We found that pretreatment with amiloride and SN-6 markedly reduced the incidence and severity of AGS in the GEPR-3s. In contrast, administration of zoniporide only minimally reduced the incidence and severity of AGS in the GEPR-3s. A combination of noneffective doses of SN-6 and zoniporide also suppressed AGS susceptibility in the GEPR-3s. Conclusions These findings suggest acid-sensing ion channels and the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger may play an important role in the pathophysiology of inherited AGS susceptibility in the GEPR-3s. PMID:24948133

  3. Decreased norepinephrine (NE) uptake in cerebral cortex and inferior colliculus of genetically epilepsy prone (GEP) rats

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, R.A.; Rigler-Daugherty, S.K.; Long, G.; Jobe, P.C.; Wade, D.R.

    1986-03-01

    GEP rats are characterized by an enhanced susceptibility to seizures caused by a variety of stimuli, most notably sound. Pharmacological treatments that reduce the synaptic concentration of NE increase seizure severity in GEP rats while elevations in NE have the opposite effect. GEP rats also display a widespread deficit in brain NE concentration suggesting that their increased seizure susceptibility is related to a deficit in noradrenergic transmission. The authors have compared the kinetics of /sup 3/H-NE uptake in the P/sub 2/ synaptosomal fraction isolated from the cerebral cortex of normal and GEP-rats. Although the apparent Kms were not significantly different (Normal +/- SEM:0.37 +/- 0.13..mu..M; GEP +/- SEM: 0.29 +/- 0.07..mu..M), the Vmax for GEP rats was 48% lower than that of normal rats (Normal +/- SEM: 474 +/- 45 fmole/mg/4min; GEP +/- SEM: 248 +/- 16 fmole/mg/4min). Because of the possible role of the inferior colliculus (IC) in the initiation of sound-induced seizures in GEP rats, the authors measured synaptosomal NE uptake in the IC using a NE concentration of 50 nM. The IC synaptosomal NE uptake was found to be 35% lower in GEP than in normal rats. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that a deficit in noradrenergic transmission is related to the increased seizure susceptibility of GEP rats.

  4. Reticular nucleus-specific changes in alpha3 subunit protein at GABA synapses in genetically epilepsy-prone rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Bo; Coble, Jeffrey; van Luijtelaar, Gilles; Jones, Edward G

    2007-07-24

    Differential composition of GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R) subunits underlies the variability of fast inhibitory synaptic transmission; alteration of specific GABA(A)R subunits in localized brain regions may contribute to abnormal brain states such as absence epilepsy. We combined immunocytochemistry and high-resolution ImmunoGold electron microscopy to study cellular and subcellular localization of GABA(A)R alpha1, alpha3, and beta2/beta3 subunits in ventral posterior nucleus (VP) and reticular nucleus (RTN) of control rats and WAG/Rij rats, a genetic model of absence epilepsy. In control rats, alpha1 subunits were prominent at inhibitory synapses in VP and much less prominent in RTN; in contrast, the alpha3 subunit was highly evident at inhibitory synapses in RTN. beta2/beta3 subunits were evenly distributed at inhibitory synapses in both VP and RTN. ImmunoGold particles representing all subunits were concentrated at postsynaptic densities with no extrasynaptic localization. Calculated mean number of particles for alpha1 subunit per postsynaptic density in nonepileptic VP was 6.1 +/- 3.7, for alpha3 subunit in RTN it was 6.6 +/- 3.4, and for beta2/beta3 subunits in VP and RTN the mean numbers were 3.7 +/- 1.3 and 3.5 +/- 1.2, respectively. In WAG/Rij rats, there was a specific loss of alpha3 subunit immunoreactivity at inhibitory synapses in RTN, without reduction in alpha3 subunit mRNA or significant change in immunostaining for other markers of RTN cell identity such as GABA or parvalbumin. alpha3 immunostaining in cortex was unchanged. Subtle, localized changes in GABA(A)R expression acting at highly specific points in the interconnected thalamocortical network lie at the heart of idiopathic generalized epilepsy. PMID:17630284

  5. Neurite extension of developing noradrenergic neurons is impaired in genetically epilepsy-prone rats (GEPR-3s): an in vitro study on the locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Clough, R W; Peterson, B R; Steenbergen, J L; Jobe, P C; Eells, J B; Browning, R A; Mishra, P K

    1998-01-01

    A primary determinant of seizure susceptibility and severity in genetically epilepsy-prone rats (GEPRs), is a generalized deficiency in the central noradrenergic system of these animals. In particular, this deficiency includes reduced numbers of norepinephrine (NE) synaptic terminals in several brain areas and distinctly fewer NE axons within the auditory tectum. Two strains of GEPRs have been developed: GEPR-3s that have moderately severe clonic seizures and GEPR-9s that have severe tonic seizures culminating in complete hindlimb extension. Seizures in animals of each substrain are preceded by a brief episode of wild running. The developmental profile of NE axonal growth in GEPRs compared to control rats is not known, but may be causally related to NE deficiencies in this seizure model. The present study compared developmental neurite extension of fetal NE neurons in vitro between GEPR-3s and Sprague-Dawley control rats, the strain from which GEPR-3s were originally derived. Neurite arborization of individual NE neurons was assessed by quantitative morphometry following immunocytochemical identification of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Preliminary studies using explant and dispersed-cell cultures of control-rat tissues showed that optimal culture parameters to support neuritogenesis of LC neurons included the use of dispersed-cell cultures, Pronectin-F substrate, day-14 gestation donor-tissue, no use of cytosine-arabinofuranoside (ARA-c, a glial mitotic inhibitor) and the presence of co-cultured tectal tissue. Compared to fetal control-rat NE neurons co-cultured with fetal control-rat tectum, NE neurons derived from fetal GEPR-3 LC in co-culture with GEPR-3 tectum exhibited only 30% of the neurite extension of control-rat LC neurons and GEPR-3 LC neurons had a similarly deficient amount of branching. This study suggests, but does not prove, that deficiency in tectal NE in GEPR-3s involves a developmental deficiency in neurite extension from GEPR-3 LC neurons

  6. Elevation of naloxone-sensitive /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine binding in hippocampal formation of genetically epilepsy-prone rats

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, D.D.; Mills, S.A.; Jobe, P.C.; Reigel, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    /sup 3/H-Dihydromorphine (DHM) binding sites were measured in the brain of non-epileptic control and GEPR rats using in vitro autoradiographic techniques. The number of naloxone-sensitive /sup 3/H-DHM binding sites was increased 38-57% in the pyramidal cell layer of ventral hippocampal CA/sub 3/ and CA/sub 1/ of GEPR-3 and GEPR-9 rats compared to non-epileptic controls. No significant differences in /sup 3/H-DHM binding were observed in dorsal hippocampal formation, lateral entorhinal cortex, lateral geniculate or cerebellum. The results suggest that an increase in the number of opioid receptors in ventral hippocampus of GEPR rats may be one factor contributing to the enhanced sensitivity of GEPR-9 rats to the proconvulsant effects of morphine.

  7. Advances on genetic rat models of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kuramoto, Takashi; Voigt, Birger; Ohno, Yukihiro; Sasa, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Considering the suitability of laboratory rats in epilepsy research, we and other groups have been developing genetic models of epilepsy in this species. After epileptic rats or seizure-susceptible rats were sporadically found in outbred stocks, the epileptic traits were usually genetically-fixed by selective breeding. So far, the absence seizure models GAERS and WAG/Rij, audiogenic seizure models GEPR-3 and GEPR-9, generalized tonic-clonic seizure models IER, NER and WER, and Canavan-disease related epileptic models TRM and SER have been established. Dissection of the genetic bases including causative genes in these epileptic rat models would be a significant step toward understanding epileptogenesis. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis provides a systematic approach which allowed us to develop two novel epileptic rat models: heat-induced seizure susceptible (Hiss) rats with an Scn1a missense mutation and autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) model rats with an Lgi1 missense mutation. In addition, we have established episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) model rats with a Kcna1 missense mutation derived from the ENU-induced rat mutant stock, and identified a Cacna1a missense mutation in a N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mutant rat strain GRY, resulting in the discovery of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) model rats. Thus, epileptic rat models have been established on the two paths: ‘phenotype to gene’ and ‘gene to phenotype’. In the near future, development of novel epileptic rat models will be extensively promoted by the use of sophisticated genome editing technologies. PMID:25312505

  8. Advances on genetic rat models of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kuramoro, Takashi; Voigt, Birger; Ohno, Yukihiro; Sasa, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Considering the suitability of laboratory rats in epilepsy research, we and other groups have been developing genetic models of epilepsy in this species. After epileptic rats or seizure-susceptible rats were sporadically found in outbred stocks, the epileptic traits were usually genetically-fixed by selective breeding. So far, the absence seizure models GAERS and WAG/Rij, audiogenic seizure models GEPR-3 and GEPR-9, generalized tonic-clonic seizure models IER, NER and WER, and Canavan-disease related epileptic models TRM and SER have been established. Dissection of the genetic bases including causative genes in these epileptic rat models would be a significant step toward understanding epileptogenesis. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis provides a systematic approach which allowed us to develop two novel epileptic rat models: heat-induced seizure susceptible (Hiss) rats with an Scn1a missense mutation and autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) model rats with an Lgi1 missense mutation. In addition, we have established episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) model rats with a Kcna1 missense mutation derived from the ENU-induced rat mutant stock, and identified a Cacna1a missense mutation in a N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mutant rat strain GRY, resulting in the discovery of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) model rats. Thus, epileptic rat models have been established on the two paths: 'phenotype to gene' and 'gene to phenotype'. In the near future, development of novel epileptic rat models will be extensively promoted by the use of sophisticated genome editing technologies. PMID:25312505

  9. Genetic influence on brain catecholamines: high brain norepinephrine in salt-sensitive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, J; Friedman, R; Tassinari, L

    1980-01-01

    Rats genetically sensitive to salt-induced hypertension evinced higher levels of plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine than rats genetically resistant to hypertension. The hypertension-sensitive rats showed higher hypothalamic norepinephrine and lower epinephrine than resistant rats. In response to a high salt diet, brain stem norepinephrine increased in sensitive rats while resistant rats exhibited a decrease on the same diet.

  10. SNP and haplotype mapping for genetic analysis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Saar, Kathrin; Beck, Alfred; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Birney, Ewan; Brocklebank, Denise; Chen, Yuan; Cuppen, Edwin; Demonchy, Stephanie; Dopazo, Joaquin; Flicek, Paul; Foglio, Mario; Fujiyama, Asao; Gut, Ivo G; Gauguier, Dominique; Guigo, Roderic; Guryev, Victor; Heinig, Matthias; Hummel, Oliver; Jahn, Niels; Klages, Sven; Kren, Vladimir; Kube, Michael; Kuhl, Heiner; Kuramoto, Takashi; Kuroki, Yoko; Lechner, Doris; Lee, Young-Ae; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Lathrop, G Mark; Mashimo, Tomoji; Medina, Ignacio; Mott, Richard; Patone, Giannino; Perrier-Cornet, Jeanne-Antide; Platzer, Matthias; Pravenec, Michal; Reinhardt, Richard; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Schilhabel, Markus; Schulz, Herbert; Serikawa, Tadao; Shikhagaie, Medya; Tatsumoto, Shouji; Taudien, Stefan; Toyoda, Atsushi; Voigt, Birger; Zelenika, Diana; Zimdahl, Heike; Hubner, Norbert

    2008-05-01

    The laboratory rat is one of the most extensively studied model organisms. Inbred laboratory rat strains originated from limited Rattus norvegicus founder populations, and the inherited genetic variation provides an excellent resource for the correlation of genotype to phenotype. Here, we report a survey of genetic variation based on almost 3 million newly identified SNPs. We obtained accurate and complete genotypes for a subset of 20,238 SNPs across 167 distinct inbred rat strains, two rat recombinant inbred panels and an F2 intercross. Using 81% of these SNPs, we constructed high-density genetic maps, creating a large dataset of fully characterized SNPs for disease gene mapping. Our data characterize the population structure and illustrate the degree of linkage disequilibrium. We provide a detailed SNP map and demonstrate its utility for mapping of quantitative trait loci. This community resource is openly available and augments the genetic tools for this workhorse of physiological studies. PMID:18443594

  11. Genetic analyses of fancy rat-derived mutations.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Takashi; Yokoe, Mayuko; Yagasaki, Kayoko; Kawaguchi, Tatsuya; Kumafuji, Kenta; Serikawa, Tadao

    2010-01-01

    To collect rat mutations and increase the value of the rat model system, we introduced fancy-derived mutations to the laboratory and carried out genetic analyses. Six fancy rats were shipped from a fancy rat colony in the USA and used as founders. After initial crosses with a laboratory strain, TM/Kyo or PVG/Seac, inbreeding started and 6 partially inbred lines, including 2 sublines, were produced as Kyoto Fancy Rat Stock (KFRS) strains. During inbreeding, we isolated 9 mutations: 5 coat colors, American mink (am), Black eye (Be), grey (g), Pearl (Pel), siamese (sia); 1 coat pattern, head spot (hs); 2 coat textures, Rex (Re), satin (sat); and an ear pinnae malformation, dumbo (dmbo). Genetic analyses mapped 7 mutations to particular regions of the rat chromosomes (Chr): am to Chr 1, sia to Chr 1, sat to Chr 3, Re to Chr 7, g to Chr 8, dmbo to Chr 14, and hs to Chr 15. Candidate gene analysis revealed that a missense mutation in the tyrosinase gene, Ser79Pro, was responsible for sia. From mutant phenotypes and mapping positions, it is likely that all mutations isolated in this study were unique to the fancy rat. These findings suggest that fancy rat colonies are a good source for collecting rat mutations. The fancy-derived mutations, made available to biomedical research in the current study, will increase the scientific value of laboratory rats. PMID:20484848

  12. Rats are the smart choice: Rationale for a renewed focus on rats in behavioral genetics

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Clarissa C.; Chen, Hao; Flagel, Shelly B.; Geurts, Aron M.; Richards, Jerry B.; Robinson, Terry E.; Solberg Woods, Leah C.; Palmer, Abraham A.

    2013-01-01

    Due in part to their rich behavioral repertoire rats have been widely used in behavioral studies of drug abuse-related traits for decades. However, the mouse became the model of choice for researchers exploring the genetic underpinnings of addiction after the first mouse study was published demonstrating the capability of engineering the mouse genome through embryonic stem cell technology. The sequencing of the mouse genome and more recent re-sequencing of numerous inbred mouse strains has further cemented the status of mice as the premier mammalian organism for genetic studies. As a result, many of the behavioral paradigms initially developed and optimized for rats have been adapted to mice. However, numerous complex and interesting drug abuse-related behaviors that can be studied in rats are very difficult or impossible to adapt for use in mice, impeding the genetic dissection of those traits. Now, technological advances have removed many of the historical limitations of genetic studies in rats. For instance, the rat genome has been sequenced and many inbred rat strains are now being re-sequenced and outbred rat stocks are being used to fine-map QTLs. In addition, it is now possible to create “knockout” rats using zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and related techniques. Thus, rats can now be used to perform quantitative genetic studies of sophisticated behaviors that have been difficult or impossible to study in mice. PMID:23791960

  13. Modeling Hypercalciuria in the Genetic Hypercalciuric Stone-Forming Rat

    PubMed Central

    Frick, Kevin K.; Krieger, Nancy S.; Bushinsky, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review In this review we discuss how the Genetic Hypercalciuric Stone-Forming (GHS) rats, which closely model idiopathic hypercalciuria and stone formation in humans, provide insights into the pathophysiology and consequences of clinical hypercalciuria. Recent Findings Hypercalciuria in the GHS rats is due to a systemic dysregulation of calcium transport, as manifest by increased intestinal calcium absorption, increased bone resorption and decreased renal tubule calcium reabsorption. Increased levels of vitamin D receptor in intestine, bone and kidney appear to mediate these changes. The excess receptors are biologically active and increase tissue sensitivity to exogenous vitamin D. Bones of GHS rats have decreased bone mineral density (BMD) as compared with Sprague Dawley rats, and exogenous 1,25(OH)2D3 exacerbates the loss of BMD. Thiazide diuretics improve the BMD in GHS rats. Summary Studying GHS rats allows direct investigation of the effects of alterations in diet and utilization of pharmacologic therapy on hypercalciuria, urine supersaturation, stone formation and bone quality in ways that are not possible in humans. PMID:26050120

  14. Genetical genomic determinants of alcohol consumption in rats and humans

    PubMed Central

    Tabakoff, Boris; Saba, Laura; Printz, Morton; Flodman, Pam; Hodgkinson, Colin; Goldman, David; Koob, George; Richardson, Heather N; Kechris, Katerina; Bell, Richard L; Hübner, Norbert; Heinig, Matthias; Pravenec, Michal; Mangion, Jonathan; Legault, Lucie; Dongier, Maurice; Conigrave, Katherine M; Whitfield, John B; Saunders, John; Grant, Bridget; Hoffman, Paula L

    2009-01-01

    Background We have used a genetical genomic approach, in conjunction with phenotypic analysis of alcohol consumption, to identify candidate genes that predispose to varying levels of alcohol intake by HXB/BXH recombinant inbred rat strains. In addition, in two populations of humans, we assessed genetic polymorphisms associated with alcohol consumption using a custom genotyping array for 1,350 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Our goal was to ascertain whether our approach, which relies on statistical and informatics techniques, and non-human animal models of alcohol drinking behavior, could inform interpretation of genetic association studies with human populations. Results In the HXB/BXH recombinant inbred (RI) rats, correlation analysis of brain gene expression levels with alcohol consumption in a two-bottle choice paradigm, and filtering based on behavioral and gene expression quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses, generated a list of candidate genes. A literature-based, functional analysis of the interactions of the products of these candidate genes defined pathways linked to presynaptic GABA release, activation of dopamine neurons, and postsynaptic GABA receptor trafficking, in brain regions including the hypothalamus, ventral tegmentum and amygdala. The analysis also implicated energy metabolism and caloric intake control as potential influences on alcohol consumption by the recombinant inbred rats. In the human populations, polymorphisms in genes associated with GABA synthesis and GABA receptors, as well as genes related to dopaminergic transmission, were associated with alcohol consumption. Conclusion Our results emphasize the importance of the signaling pathways identified using the non-human animal models, rather than single gene products, in identifying factors responsible for complex traits such as alcohol consumption. The results suggest cross-species similarities in pathways that influence predisposition to consume alcohol by rats and humans

  15. Are rats with genetic absence epilepsy behaviorally impaired?

    PubMed

    Vergnes, M; Marescaux, C; Boehrer, A; Depaulis, A

    1991-07-01

    Absence seizures in humans are characterized by unresponsiveness to external stimuli and inactivity. However, in typical generalized non-convulsive epilepsy in children, intellectual capacities are considered to be normal. Wistar rats from an inbred strain with spontaneous absence-like seizures were compared with rats from the outbred control strain in various behavioral tasks in order to detect possible impairments related either to the absence epilepsy or to occurrence of spike and wave discharges (SWD). Spontaneous circadian locomotion, exploratory activity in an open field, social interactions with an unfamiliar conspecific and mouse killing behavior were similar in both strains. Avoidance learning in a shuttle box or food reinforced learning in a Skinner test were unimpaired or even improved in epileptic rats. During performance of a learned task either in the Skinner box or in a conditioned sound-bar pressing task, SWD were suppressed in epileptic rats as long as they were working for reinforcement. SWD reappeared when the motivation to perform the task had declined: unresponsiveness to a conditioned stimulus was then observed during SWD. These data are in agreement with observations commonly described in children with typical genetic absence epilepsy. PMID:1794357

  16. Genetic damage in multiple organs of acutely exercised rats.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Renan; Rosa, Jose C; Eguchi, Ricardo; Oller do Nascimento, Claudia M; Oyama, Lila M; Aguiar, Odair; Chaves, Marcelo D; Ribeiro, Daniel A

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of acute exercise on genomic damage in an animal model. Male adult Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: control and acute exercised (experimental). For this purpose, 15 animals were accustomed to running on a rodent treadmill for 15 min per day for 5 days (10-20 m min(-1); 08 grade). After 4 days at rest, active animals ran on the treadmill (22 m min(-1), 58 grade) till exhaustion. Cells from peripheral blood, liver, heart, and brain were collected after 0, 2, and 6 h after exercise. The results showed that acute exercise was able to induce genetic damage in peripheral blood cells after 2 and 6 h of exercise, whereas liver pointed out genetic damage for all periods evaluated. No genetic damage was induced either in brain or in heart cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that acute exercise could contribute to the genetic damage in peripheral blood and liver cells. It seems that liver is a sensitive organ to the genotoxic insult after acute exercise. PMID:20979236

  17. Immunologic and genetic studies of diabetes in the BB rat.

    PubMed

    Parfrey, N A; Prud'homme, G J; Colle, E; Fuks, A; Seemayer, T A; Guttmann, R D; Ono, S J

    1989-01-01

    The spontaneous development of diabetes in the Bio-Breeding (BB) rat is an excellent model of human insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Disease expression is dependent on several genetically determined abnormalities, including specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. At least one MHC class II locus of the U haplotype is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for disease expression. The immune system of BB rats is markedly abnormal. There is a striking reduction in the number and function of mature cytotoxic/suppressor T cells, a poor proliferative response to mitogens and in mixed lymphocyte culture, poor interleukin-2 production, and a reduced ability to reject skin allografts. While these immune system abnormalities are closely related to the development of diabetes, the immune recognition and effector mechanisms resulting in islet cell destruction are still poorly understood. The hypothesis that MHC class II induction on pancreatic beta cells serves to target these lymphokines, natural killer (NK) cells, macrophages, etc.) have been implicated in islet cell killing. The incidence of IDDM is reduced by immunosuppressive therapy in both rats and humans, further supporting the role of immune mechanisms in this disease. PMID:2651002

  18. Genetic background of resistance to cadmium-induced testicular toxicity in inbred Wistar-Imamichi rats.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hideaki; Hata, Iori; Hashiguchi, Takashi; Imamura, Yorishige

    2011-10-01

    We have previously reported that inbred Wistar-Imamichi (WI) rats are highly resistant to cadmium (Cd)-induced testicular toxicity compared with inbred Fischer 344 (F344) rats. The present study was to elucidate the genetic background of resistance to Cd-induced testicular toxicity in WI rats. The genetic analysis of susceptibility to Cd-induced testicular toxicity was conducted by using Cd-resistant WI and Cd-sensitive F344 strains as the parental rats and by using the testicular hemoglobin level as the indicator. In the frequency distribution of testicular hemoglobin levels in parental, first filial (F(1)) and second filial (F(2)) rats treated with Cd at a dose of 2.0 mg/kg, F(1) rats had testicular hemoglobin levels intermediate to WI and F344 rats, and F(2) rats segregated into three groups of low, intermediate, and high phenotypes at the expected ratio. Furthermore, the backcross progeny between WI and F(1) or between F344 and F(1) segregated into two groups with the expected ratio. Based on a simple Mendelian genetic analysis, these segregation patterns lead us to conclude that two codominant alleles at a gene locus are responsible for the susceptibility to Cd-induced testicular toxicity in rats. This is the first report for the genetic analysis of susceptibility to Cd-induced testicular toxicity in inbred rat strains. PMID:21318357

  19. 2015 Guidelines for Establishing Genetically Modified Rat Models for Cardiovascular Research

    PubMed Central

    Flister, Michael J.; Prokop, Jeremy W.; Lazar, Jozef; Shimoyama, Mary; Dwinell, Melinda; Geurts, Aron

    2015-01-01

    The rat has long been a key physiological model for cardiovascular research; most of the inbred strains having been previously selected for susceptibility or resistance to various cardiovascular diseases (CVD). These CVD rat models offer a physiologically relevant background on which candidates of human CVD can be tested in a more clinically translatable experimental setting. However, a diverse toolbox for genetically modifying the rat genome to test molecular mechanisms has only recently become available. Here, we provide a high-level description of several strategies for developing genetically modified rat models of CVD. PMID:25920443

  20. Genetic modification and screening in rat using haploid embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Li, Xin; Li, Tianda; Jiang, Ming-Gui; Wan, Haifeng; Luo, Guan-Zheng; Feng, Chunjing; Cui, Xiaolong; Teng, Fei; Yuan, Yan; Zhou, Quan; Gu, Qi; Shuai, Ling; Sha, Jiahao; Xiao, Yamei; Wang, Liu; Liu, Zhonghua; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Zhao, Xiao-Yang; Zhou, Qi

    2014-03-01

    The rat is an important animal model in biomedical research, but practical limitations to genetic manipulation have restricted the application of genetic analysis. Here we report the derivation of rat androgenetic haploid embryonic stem cells (RahESCs) as a tool to facilitate such studies. Our approach is based on removal of the maternal pronucleus from zygotes to generate androgenetic embryos followed by derivation of ESCs. The resulting RahESCs have 21 chromosomes, express pluripotency markers, differentiate into three germ layer cells, and contribute to the germline. Homozygous mutations can be introduced by both large-scale gene trapping and precise gene targeting via homologous recombination or the CRISPR-Cas system. RahESCs can also produce fertile rats after intracytoplasmic injection into oocytes and are therefore able to transmit genetic modifications to offspring. Overall, RahESCs represent a practical tool for functional genetic studies and production of transgenic lines in rat. PMID:24360884

  1. Genetic factors influence level of proteinuria in cationic antigen-induced immune complex glomerulonephritis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, A; Thaiss, F; Oite, T; Günther, E; Batsford, S; Vogt, A

    1985-01-01

    The influence of genetic factors on the susceptibility of the rat to cationic antigen-induced in situ immune complex glomerulonephritis was investigated. The levels of proteinuria developing in 11 inbred strains of rats differing in MHC and in genetic background varied markedly. Susceptibility was not MHC associated but resided in the genetic background. PMID:3159528

  2. Hcn1 Is a Tremorgenic Genetic Component in a Rat Model of Essential Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yukihiro; Shimizu, Saki; Tatara, Ayaka; Imaoku, Takuji; Ishii, Takahiro; Sasa, Masashi; Serikawa, Tadao; Kuramoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Genetic factors are thought to play a major role in the etiology of essential tremor (ET); however, few genetic changes that induce ET have been identified to date. In the present study, to find genes responsible for the development of ET, we employed a rat model system consisting of a tremulous mutant strain, TRM/Kyo (TRM), and its substrain TRMR/Kyo (TRMR). The TRM rat is homozygous for the tremor (tm) mutation and shows spontaneous tremors resembling human ET. The TRMR rat also carries a homozygous tm mutation but shows no tremor, leading us to hypothesize that TRM rats carry one or more genes implicated in the development of ET in addition to the tm mutation. We used a positional cloning approach and found a missense mutation (c. 1061 C>T, p. A354V) in the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated 1 channel (Hcn1) gene. The A354V HCN1 failed to conduct hyperpolarization-activated currents in vitro, implicating it as a loss-of-function mutation. Blocking HCN1 channels with ZD7288 in vivo evoked kinetic tremors in nontremulous TRMR rats. We also found neuronal activation of the inferior olive (IO) in both ZD7288-treated TRMR and non-treated TRM rats and a reduced incidence of tremor in the IO-lesioned TRM rats, suggesting a critical role of the IO in tremorgenesis. A rat strain carrying the A354V mutation alone on a genetic background identical to that of the TRM rats showed no tremor. Together, these data indicate that body tremors emerge when the two mutant loci, tm and Hcn1A354V, are combined in a rat model of ET. In this model, HCN1 channels play an important role in the tremorgenesis of ET. We propose that oligogenic, most probably digenic, inheritance is responsible for the genetic heterogeneity of ET. PMID:25970616

  3. Pathophysiology of the Hypercalciuria in the Genetic Hypercalciuric Stone-Forming Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushinsky, David A.

    2007-04-01

    Given evidence for a genetic cause of hypercalciuria, we screened adult male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats for hypercalciuria and used those with the highest urinary calcium excretion to breed the next generation, followed by subsequent selection and inbreeding of their most hypercalciuric progeny. By the 30th generation, and continuing to the present, the GHS rats (for Genetic Hypercalciuric Stone-forming rats) excrete 8-10 times as much calcium as simultaneously studied control rats The GHS rats were found to have defects in calcium transport in the intestine, kidneys and bone, similar to abnormalities found in many patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria. The GHS rats also form kidney stones. By the conclusion of an 18 wk study, all of the GHS rats formed stones, while there was no stone formation in similarly treated SD controls. The GHS rats, when fed a standard 1.2% calcium diet, form only poorly crystalline apatite stones. However, when 5% hydroxyproline is added to the diet of the GHS rats, they form only calcium oxalate stones.

  4. Genetic bases of renal agenesis in the ACI rat: mapping of Renag1 to chromosome 14.

    PubMed

    Shull, James D; Lachel, Cynthia M; Strecker, Tracy E; Spady, Thomas J; Tochacek, Martin; Pennington, Karen L; Murrin, Clare R; Meza, Jane L; Schaffer, Beverly S; Flood, Lisa A; Gould, Karen A

    2006-07-01

    Unilateral renal agenesis (URA) is a common developmental defect in humans, occurring at a frequency of approximately 1 in 500-1,000 births. Several genetic syndromes include bilateral or unilateral renal agenesis as an associated phenotype. However, URA frequently occurs in individuals not afflicted by these syndromes and is often asymptomatic. Although it is clear that genetic factors contribute to the etiology of URA, the genetic bases of URA are poorly defined at this time. ACI rats, both males and females, exhibit URA at an incidence of 5%-15%. In this article we characterize the incidence of URA in female and male F(1), F(2), and backcross (BC) progeny from reciprocal genetic crosses between the ACI strain and the unaffected Brown Norway (BN) strain. Through interval mapping analyses of 353 phenotypically defined female F(2) progeny, we mapped to rat Chromosome 14 (RNO14) a genetic locus, designated Renag1 (Renal agenesis 1), that serves as the major determinant of URA in these crosses. Further genotypic analyses of URA-affected female and male F(2) and BC progeny localized Renag1 to a 14.4-Mb interval on RNO14 bounded by markers D14Rat50 and D14Rat12. The data from these genetic studies suggest that the ACI allele of Renag1 acts in an incompletely dominant and incompletely penetrant manner to confer URA. PMID:16845468

  5. Genetic and Dietary Effects on Dendrites in the Rat Hypothalamic Ventromedial Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    LaBelle, Denise R.; Cox, Julia M.; Dunn-Meynell, Ambrose A.; Levin, Barry E.; Flanagan-Cato, Loretta M.

    2009-01-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to individual differences in body weight regulation. The present study examined a possible role for the dendritic arbor of hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (VMH) neurons in a model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) in male rats. Rats were screened and selectively bred for being either susceptible, i.e., exhibiting DIO, or diet resistant (DR) when exposed to a 31% fat diet. A 2×2 experimental design was used, based on these two strains of rats and exposure to rat chow versus the 31% fat diet for seven weeks. Golgi-impregnated neurons were measured for soma size and dendrite parameters, including number, length, and direction. As previously observed, each VMH neuron had a single long primary dendrite. Genetic background and diet did not affect soma size or the number of dendrites of VMH neurons. However, genetic background exerted a main effect on the length of the long primary dendrites. In particular, the long primary dendrites were approximately 12.5% shorter on the VMH neurons in the DIO rats compared with DR rats regardless of diet. This effect was isolated to the long primary dendrites extending in the dorsolateral direction, with these long primary dendrites 19% shorter for the DIO group compared with the DR group. This finding implicates the connectivity of the long primary dendrites on VMH neurons in the control of energy balance. The functional significance of these shortened dendrites and their afferents warrants further study. PMID:19698729

  6. Neurodevelopmental malformations of the cerebellar vermis in genetically engineered rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformati...

  7. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats.

    PubMed

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H; Koller, Daniel L; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S; Aitman, Tim J; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-07-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We identify 35 causal genes involved in 31 phenotypes, implicating new genes in models of anxiety, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. The relationship between sequence and genetic variation is unexpectedly complex: at approximately 40% of quantitative trait loci, a single sequence variant cannot account for the phenotypic effect. Using comparable sequence and mapping data from mice, we show that the extent and spatial pattern of variation in inbred rats differ substantially from those of inbred mice and that the genetic variants in orthologous genes rarely contribute to the same phenotype in both species. PMID:23708188

  8. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats

    PubMed Central

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W.; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D.; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H.; Koller, Daniel L.; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J.; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S.; Aitman, Tim J.; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E. Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming our understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We identify 35 causal genes involved in 31 phenotypes, implicating novel genes in models of anxiety, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. The relation between sequence and genetic variation is unexpectedly complex: at approximately 40% of quantitative trait loci a single sequence variant cannot account for the phenotypic effect. Using comparable sequence and mapping data from mice, we show the extent and spatial pattern of variation in inbred rats differ significantly from those of inbred mice, and that the genetic variants in orthologous genes rarely contribute to the same phenotype in both species. PMID:23708188

  9. Urban population genetics of slum-dwelling rats (Rattus norvegicus) in Salvador, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Kajdacsi, Brittney; Costa, Federico; Hyseni, Chaz; Porter, Fleur; Brown, Julia; Rodrigues, Gorete; Farias, Helena; Reis, Mitermayer G; Childs, James E; Ko, Albert I; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2013-10-01

    Throughout the developing world, urban centres with sprawling slum settlements are rapidly expanding and invading previously forested ecosystems. Slum communities are characterized by untended refuse, open sewers and overgrown vegetation, which promote rodent infestation. Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) are reservoirs for epidemic transmission of many zoonotic pathogens of public health importance. Understanding the population ecology of R. norvegicus is essential to formulate effective rodent control strategies, as this knowledge aids estimation of the temporal stability and spatial connectivity of populations. We screened for genetic variation, characterized the population genetic structure and evaluated the extent and patterns of gene flow in the urban landscape using 17 microsatellite loci in 146 rats from nine sites in the city of Salvador, Brazil. These sites were divided between three neighbourhoods within the city spaced an average of 2.7 km apart. Surprisingly, we detected very little relatedness among animals trapped at the same site and found high levels of genetic diversity, as well as structuring across small geographical distances. Most F(ST) comparisons among sites were statistically significant, including sites <400 m apart. Bayesian analyses grouped the samples in three genetic clusters, each associated with distinct sampling sites from different neighbourhoods or valleys within neighbourhoods. These data indicate the existence of complex genetic structure in R. norvegicus in Salvador, linked to the heterogeneous urban landscape. Future rodent control measures need to take into account the spatial and temporal linkage of rat populations in Salvador, as revealed by genetic data, to develop informed eradication strategies. PMID:24118116

  10. A genetic rat model of cholinergic hypersensitivity: implications for chemical intolerance, chronic fatigue, and asthma.

    PubMed

    Overstreet, D H; Djuric, V

    2001-03-01

    The fact that only some individuals exposed to environmental chemicals develop chemical intolerance raises the possibility that genetic factors could be contributing factors. The present communication summarizes evidence from a genetic animal model of cholinergic supersensitivity that suggests that an abnormal cholinergic system could be one predisposing genetic factor. The Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats were established by selective breeding for increased responses to an organophosphate. It was subsequently found that these FSL rats were also more sensitive to direct-acting muscarinic agonists and had elevated muscarinic receptors compared to the selectively bred parallel group, the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) rats, or randomly bred control rats. Increased sensitivity to cholinergic agents has also been observed in several human populations, including individuals suffering from chemical intolerance. Indeed, the FSL rats exhibit certain behavioral characteristics such as abnormal sleep, activity, and appetite that are similar to those reported in these human populations. In addition, the FSL rats have been reported to exhibit increased sensitivity to a variety of other chemical agents. Peripheral tissues, such as intestinal and airway smooth muscle, appear to be more sensitive to both cholinergic agonists and an antigen, ovalbumin. Hypothermia, a centrally mediated response, is more pronounced in the FSL rats after nicotine and alcohol, as well as agents that are selective for the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems. In some cases, the increased sensitivity has been detected in the absence of any changes in the receptors with which the drugs interact (dopamine receptors), while receptor changes have been seen in other cases (nicotine receptors). Therefore, there may be multiple mechanisms underlying the multiple chemical sensitivity-chemical intolerance of the FSL rats. An elucidation of these mechanisms may provide useful clues to those involved in

  11. Strong genetic influences on measures of behavioral-regulation among inbred rat strains

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jerry B.; Lloyd, David R.; Kuehlewind, Brandon; Militello, Leah; Paredez, Marita; Solberg -Woods, Leah; Palmer, Abraham A.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental challenge for any complex nervous system is to regulate behavior in response to environmental challenges. Three measures of behavioral regulation were tested in a panel of 8 inbred rat strains. These measures were; 1) sensation seeking as assessed by locomotor response to novelty and the sensory reinforcing effects of light onset, 2) attention and impulsivity, as measured by a choice reaction time task, and 3) impulsivity as measured by a delay discounting task. Deficient behavioral regulation has been linked to a number of psychopathologies, including ADHD, Schizophrenia, Autism, drug abuse and eating disorders. Eight inbred rat strains (August Copenhagen Irish, Brown Norway, Buffalo, Fischer 344, Wistar Kyoto, Spontaneous Hypertensive Rat, Lewis, Dahl Salt Sensitive) were tested. With n=9 for each strain, we observed robust strain differences for all tasks; heritability was estimated between 0.43 and 0.66. Performance of the 8 inbred rat strains on the choice reaction time task was compared to the performance of out bred Sprague Dawley (n=28) and Heterogeneous strain rats (n=48). The results indicate a strong genetic influence on complex tasks related to behavioral regulation and indicate that some of measures tap common genetically-driven processes. Furthermore, our results establish the potential for future studies aimed at identifying specific alleles that influence variability for these traits. Identification of such alleles could contribute to our understanding of the molecular genetic basis of behavioral regulation, which is of fundamental importance and likely contributes to multiple psychiatric disorders. PMID:23710681

  12. A high-density integrated genetic linkage and radiation hybrid map of the laboratory rat.

    PubMed

    Steen, R G; Kwitek-Black, A E; Glenn, C; Gullings-Handley, J; Van Etten, W; Atkinson, O S; Appel, D; Twigger, S; Muir, M; Mull, T; Granados, M; Kissebah, M; Russo, K; Crane, R; Popp, M; Peden, M; Matise, T; Brown, D M; Lu, J; Kingsmore, S; Tonellato, P J; Rozen, S; Slonim, D; Young, P; Jacob, H J

    1999-06-01

    The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is a key animal model for biomedical research. However, the genetic infrastructure required for connecting phenotype and genotype in the rat is currently incomplete. Here, we report the construction and integration of two genomic maps: a dense genetic linkage map of the rat and the first radiation hybrid (RH) map of the rat. The genetic map was constructed in two F2 intercrosses (SHRSP x BN and FHH x ACI), containing a total of 4736 simple sequence length polymorphism (SSLP) markers. Allele sizes for 4328 of the genetic markers were characterized in 48 of the most commonly used inbred strains. The RH map is a lod >/= 3 framework map, including 983 SSLPs, thereby allowing integration with markers on various genetic maps and with markers mapped on the RH panel. Together, the maps provide an integrated reference to >3000 genes and ESTs and >8500 genetic markers (5211 of our SSLPs and >3500 SSLPs developed by other groups). [Bihoreau et al. (1997); James and Tanigami, RHdb (http:www.ebi.ac.uk/RHdb/index.html); Wilder (http://www.nih.gov/niams/scientific/ratgbase); Serikawa et al. (1992); RATMAP server (http://ratmap.gen.gu.se)] RH maps (v. 2.0) have been posted on our web sites at http://goliath.ifrc.mcw.edu/LGR/index.html or http://curatools.curagen.com/ratmap. Both web sites provide an RH mapping server where investigators can localize their own RH vectors relative to this map. The raw data have been deposited in the RHdb database. Taken together, these maps provide the basic tools for rat genomics. The RH map provides the means to rapidly localize genetic markers, genes, and ESTs within the rat genome. These maps provide the basic tools for rat genomics. They will facilitate studies of multifactorial disease and functional genomics, allow construction of physical maps, and provide a scaffold for both directed and large-scale sequencing efforts and comparative genomics in this important experimental organism. PMID:10400928

  13. Potassium channels and vascular reactivity in genetically hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Furspan, P B; Webb, R C

    1990-06-01

    In hypertension, membrane potassium permeability and vascular reactivity are increased. This study characterizes a potassium-selective channel and contractions to barium, a potassium channel inhibitor, in vascular smooth muscle (tail artery) from spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rats (SHRSP) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Smooth muscle cells were isolated by enzymatic digestion, and potassium channel activity was characterized by using patch-clamp technique (inside-out configuration). Isometric contractile activity was evaluated in helically cut arterial strips by using standard muscle bath methodology. In membrane patches, a voltage-gated, calcium-insensitive, potassium-selective channel of large conductance (200 picosiemens) was observed. The channel did not conduct sodium or rubidium. Barium (10(-6) to 10(-4) M) produced a dose-dependent blockade of channel activity. These channel characteristics did not differ in SHRSP and WKY rat cells. After treatment with 35 mM KCl, barium (10(-5) to 10(-3) M) caused greater contractions in SHRSP arteries compared with arteries in WKY rats. The contractions to barium were markedly attenuated in calcium-free solution, and nifedipine and verapamil abolished contractions induced by barium in depolarizing solution. We conclude that increased vascular reactivity to barium in SHRSP arteries is not due to an alteration in the biophysical properties of the potassium channel studied. PMID:2351424

  14. Urine-derived key volatiles may signal genetic relatedness in male rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Xu

    2011-01-01

    Olfactory cues play a vital role in kin recognition and mate choice of the rat. Here, using 2 inbred strains of rats, Brown Norway (BN) and Lewis, as models to simulate kinship via genetic distance, we examined whether urine-derived volatiles are genetically determined, and, if so, how they code for olfactory information and the degree of genetic relatedness in mate choice. Binary choice tests showed that BN females preferred the urine odor of Lewis males over that of BN males, suggesting that they avoided males genetically similar to themselves and were able to assess this olfactorily. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the composition of urine-derived volatiles was more similar within strains than between strains and suggests that odortypes may reflect genetic relatedness. Our data further show that BN males had lower ratios of 2-heptanone and 4-heptanone and higher ratios of dimethyl sulfone and 4-ethyl phenol than Lewis males. When we supplemented BN and Lewis male urine to make each similar, the preferences of BN females were reversed. We conclude that some urine-derived volatiles covary in relative abundance with degree of genetic relatedness, and this relationship may play a key role in chemical signaling and genetic identity in this species. PMID:20978136

  15. Marker-assisted dissection of genetic influences on motor and neuroendocrine sensitization to cocaine in rats.

    PubMed

    Vendruscolo, L F; Vendruscolo, J C M; Terenina, E; Ramos, A; Takahashi, R N; Mormède, P

    2009-04-01

    This study investigated genetic influences on behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to cocaine sensitization. We used male and female rats of the inbred strains Lewis (LEW) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), which display genetic differences in stress-related responses. The influence of two quantitative trait loci (QTL; Ofil1 and Ofil2 on chromosomes 4 and 7), which modulate stress reactivity in rats, on the effects of cocaine was also investigated through the use of recombinant lines (derived from a LEW x SHR intercross) selected by their genotype at Ofil1 and Ofil2. Animals were given repeated cocaine or saline injections and tested for locomotion (induction of sensitization). Two weeks later, all animals were challenged with cocaine, and locomotion and corticosterone levels were measured (expression of sensitization). Results indicated that male SHR rats showed more behavioral sensitization than LEW rats, whereas no strain differences in sensitization were seen among females. When challenged with cocaine, LEW and SHR rats of both sexes pretreated with cocaine showed behavioral sensitization compared with saline pretreated animals; however, only LEW rats displayed an increase in the corticosterone levels. Ofil1 was found to influence the induction of sensitization in males and Ofil2 modulated the locomotor effect of cocaine in females. This study provides evidence of a genotype-dependent relationship between the induction and expression of cocaine sensitization, and between the behavioral and neuroendocrine responses induced by cocaine. Moreover, the Ofil1 and Ofil2 loci may contain one or more genes that control the behavioral effects of cocaine in rats. PMID:19077120

  16. Whole-Genome Sequencing Reveals Genetic Variation in the Asian House Rat

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Huajing; Zhang, Yaohua; Shi, Chengmin; Mao, Fengbiao; Hou, Lingling; Guo, Hongling; Sun, Zhongsheng; Zhang, Jianxu

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing of wild-derived rat species can provide novel genomic resources, which may help decipher the genetics underlying complex phenotypes. As a notorious pest, reservoir of human pathogens, and colonizer, the Asian house rat, Rattus tanezumi, is successfully adapted to its habitat. However, little is known regarding genetic variation in this species. In this study, we identified over 41,000,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, plus insertions and deletions, through whole-genome sequencing and bioinformatics analyses. Moreover, we identified over 12,000 structural variants, including 143 chromosomal inversions. Further functional analyses revealed several fixed nonsense mutations associated with infection and immunity-related adaptations, and a number of fixed missense mutations that may be related to anticoagulant resistance. A genome-wide scan for loci under selection identified various genes related to neural activity. Our whole-genome sequencing data provide a genomic resource for future genetic studies of the Asian house rat species and have the potential to facilitate understanding of the molecular adaptations of rats to their ecological niches. PMID:27172215

  17. Whole-Genome Sequencing Reveals Genetic Variation in the Asian House Rat.

    PubMed

    Teng, Huajing; Zhang, Yaohua; Shi, Chengmin; Mao, Fengbiao; Hou, Lingling; Guo, Hongling; Sun, Zhongsheng; Zhang, Jianxu

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing of wild-derived rat species can provide novel genomic resources, which may help decipher the genetics underlying complex phenotypes. As a notorious pest, reservoir of human pathogens, and colonizer, the Asian house rat, Rattus tanezumi, is successfully adapted to its habitat. However, little is known regarding genetic variation in this species. In this study, we identified over 41,000,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, plus insertions and deletions, through whole-genome sequencing and bioinformatics analyses. Moreover, we identified over 12,000 structural variants, including 143 chromosomal inversions. Further functional analyses revealed several fixed nonsense mutations associated with infection and immunity-related adaptations, and a number of fixed missense mutations that may be related to anticoagulant resistance. A genome-wide scan for loci under selection identified various genes related to neural activity. Our whole-genome sequencing data provide a genomic resource for future genetic studies of the Asian house rat species and have the potential to facilitate understanding of the molecular adaptations of rats to their ecological niches. PMID:27172215

  18. Genetic mapping of a new heart rate QTL on chromosome 8 of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Gustavo JJ; Pereira, Alexandre C; Krieger, Eduardo M; Krieger, José E

    2007-01-01

    Background Tachycardia is commonly observed in hypertensive patients, predominantly mediated by regulatory mechanisms integrated within the autonomic nervous system. The genetic loci and genes associated with increased heart rate in hypertension, however, have not yet been identified. Methods An F2 intercross of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR) × Brown Norway (BN) linkage analysis of quantitative trait loci mapping was utilized to identify candidate genes associated with an increased heart rate in arterial hypertension. Results Basal heart rate in SHR was higher compared to that of normotensive BN rats (365 ± 3 vs. 314 ± 6 bpm, p < 0.05 for SHR and BN, respectively). A total genome scan identified one quantitative trait locus in a 6.78 cM interval on rat chromosome 8 (8q22–q24) that was responsible for elevated heart rate. This interval contained 241 genes, of which 65 are known genes. Conclusion Our data suggest that an influential genetic region located on the rat chromosome 8 contributes to the regulation of heart rate. Candidate genes that have previously been associated with tachycardia and/or hypertension were found within this QTL, strengthening our hypothesis that these genes are, potentially, associated with the increase in heart rate in a hypertension rat model. PMID:17419875

  19. Genetic influences on survival time after severe hemorrhage in inbred rat strains.

    PubMed

    Klemcke, Harold G; Joe, Bina; Calderon, Mariam L; Rose, Rajiv; Oh, Thomas; Aden, James; Ryan, Kathy L

    2011-06-28

    To find a genetic basis for differential ability to survive severe hemorrhage, we previously showed eightfold differences in survival times among inbred rat strains. We assumed that rat strains had similar normalized blood volumes (NBV; ml/100 g body wt). As NBV might vary among strains and constitute one genetic variable affecting survival time to hemorrhage, in experiment 1 of the current studies we first measured total blood volumes and calculated NBV in specific inbred rat strains (Brown Norway/Medical College of Wisconsin, BN; Dark Agouti, DA; Fawn Hooded Hypertensive, FHH; Lewis, LEW; and Dahl Salt-Sensitive, SS) previously found to be divergent in survival time. NBV differed by 20% (P < 0.01; BN > SS > FHH = LEW = DA) and had a heritability (h(2)) of 0.56. Hence, differential survival times in our previously published study might reflect strain-dependent differences in NBV. Then studies were conducted wherein rats were catheterized and, ∼24 h later, 47% of their blood volume was removed; these rats were observed for a maximum of 4 h. In experiment 2, blood volumes were measured the day prior to hemorrhage. Percent survival and survival time did not differ among strains. To obviate possible confounding effects of blood volume determination, in experiment 3 the average NBV for each strain was used to determine hemorrhage volumes. Percent survival (P < 0.01) and survival times (P < 0.001) were different with DA demonstrating the best (62.5%, 190 ± 29 min) and BN the worst (0%, 52 ± 5 min) survival responses. These data indicate that both blood volume and survival time after hemorrhage in rats are heritable quantitative traits, and continue to suggest that genetic assessment of these phenotypes might lead to novel therapeutics to improve survival to hemorrhage. PMID:21487033

  20. Genetic Response of Rat Supraspinatus Tendon and Muscle to Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Sarah Ilkhanipour; Tobias, John W.; Bhatt, Pankti R.; Kuntz, Andrew F.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex, biologic event that aims to protect and repair tissue. Previous studies suggest that inflammation is critical to induce a healing response following acute injury; however, whether similar inflammatory responses occur as a result of beneficial, non-injurious loading is unknown. The objective of this study was to screen for alterations in a subset of inflammatory and extracellular matrix genes to identify the responses of rat supraspinatus tendon and muscle to a known, non-injurious loading condition. We sought to define how a subset of genes representative of specific inflammation and matrix turnover pathways is altered in supraspinatus tendon and muscle 1) acutely following a single loading bout and 2) chronically following repeated loading bouts. In this study, Sprague-Dawley rats in the acute group ran a single bout of non-injurious exercise on a flat treadmill (10 m/min, 1 hour) and were sacrificed 12 or 24 hours after. Rats in the chronic group ran 5 days/wk for 1 or 8 weeks. A control group maintained normal cage activity. Supraspinatus muscle and tendon were harvested for RNA extractions, and a custom Panomics QuantiGene 2.0 multiplex assay was used to detect 48 target and 3 housekeeping genes. Muscle/tendon and acute/chronic groups had distinct gene expression. Components of the arachidonic acid cascade and matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors were altered with acute and chronic exercise. Collagen expression increased. Using a previously validated model of non-injurious exercise, we have shown that supraspinatus tendon and muscle respond to acute and chronic exercise by regulating inflammatory- and matrix turnover-related genes, suggesting that these pathways are involved in the beneficial adaptations to exercise. PMID:26447778

  1. Distinct genetic regulation of progression of diabetes and renal disease in the Goto-Kakizaki rat.

    PubMed

    Nobrega, Marcelo A; Solberg Woods, Leah C; Fleming, Stewart; Jacob, Howard J

    2009-09-01

    Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats develop early-onset type 2 diabetes (T2D) symptoms, with signs of diabetic nephropathy becoming apparent with aging. To determine whether T2D and renal disease share similar genetic architecture, we ran a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis in the F2 progeny of a GK x Brown Norway (BN) rat cross. Further, to determine whether genetic components change over time, we ran the QTL analysis on phenotypes collected longitudinally, at 3, 6, 9 and 12 mo, from the same animals. We confirmed three chromosomal regions that are linked to early diabetes phenotypes (chromosomes 1, 5, and 10) and a single region involved in the late progression of the disorder (chromosome 4). A single region was identified for the onset of the renal phenotype proteinuria (chromosome 5). This region overlaps the diabetic QTL, although it is not certain whether similar genes are involved in both phenotypes. A second QTL linked to the progression of the renal phenotype was found on chromosome 7. Linkage for triglyceride and cholesterol levels were also identified (chromosomes 7 and 8, respectively). These results demonstrate that, in general, different genetic components control diabetic and renal phenotypes in a diabetic nephropathy model. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that, over time, different genetic components are involved in progression of disease from those that were involved in disease onset. This observation would suggest that clinical studies collecting participants over a wide age distribution may be diluting genetic effects and reducing power to detect true effects. PMID:19584172

  2. Invasion genetics of the introduced black rat (Rattus rattus) in Senegal, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Konečný, Adam; Estoup, Arnaud; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Bryja, Josef; Bâ, Khalilou; Galan, Maxime; Tatard, Caroline; Cosson, Jean-Francois

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of the evolutionary history and dynamics of invasive species is required for the construction of predictive models of future spread and the design of biological management measures. The black rat (Rattus rattus) is a major vertebrate invader with a worldwide distribution. Despite the severe ecological, economic and health impacts of this species, its evolutionary history has been little studied. We carried out extensive specimen sampling in Senegal, West Africa, and used microsatellite markers to describe the pattern and processes of invasion in this large continental area. The genetic data obtained were combined with historical knowledge concerning the presence of this species in Senegal. Data were analysed by a combination of Bayesian clustering and approximate Bayesian computation methods. The invasion pathways closely paralleled the history of human trade routes in Senegal. In several places, we detected the occurrence of multiple introductions from genetically different sources. Long-distance migration between towns and villages was also observed. Our findings suggest that genetic bottlenecks and admixture have played a major role in shaping the genetics of invasive black rats. These two processes may generate genetic novelty and favour rapid evolution along the invasion pathways. PMID:23206272

  3. Oscillatory contractions in tail arteries from genetically hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Lamb, F S; Myers, J H; Hamlin, M N; Webb, R C

    1985-01-01

    This study characterizes a cellular mechanism for oscillatory contractions induced by norepinephrine in vascular smooth muscle from spontaneously hypertensive stroke prone rats (SHRSP). Helically cut strips of tail arteries from SHRSP and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) were mounted in a muscle bath for measurement of isometric force generation. Norepinephrine-induced responses of arteries from SHRSP were characterized by fluctuations in contractile activity, whereas those in arteries from WKY remained constant with time. The magnitude of the oscillatory contractile activity (frequency X mean amplitude) varied directly with norepinephrine concentration (5.9 X 10(-9) to 1.8 X 10(-7) M). The oscillatory contractile activity varied inversely with the potassium concentration (3-20 mM) of the buffer solution and directly with the calcium concentration (0.1-5.0 mM) of the buffer solution. The oscillatory activity was converted to maintained contraction by barium (10(-4) M), quinidine (3 X 10(-6) M), sparteine (10(-3) M), D-600 (10(-7) M), and nifedipine (10(-8) M). Tetraethylammonium and 3,4-diaminopyridine, inhibitors of voltage-dependent potassium channels, did not alter the oscillatory contractile activity induced by norepinephrine. These observations suggest that oscillatory contractile activity in tail arteries from SHRSP is caused by an abnormal variation in potassium efflux during stimulation with norepinephrine. The altered potassium efflux appears to be related to calcium entry, which is sensitive to inhibition by channel blockers. This altered membrane property may contribute to changes in vascular sensitivity in hypertension. PMID:3997233

  4. Genetic basis of the impaired renal myogenic response in FHH rats.

    PubMed

    Burke, Marilyn; Pabbidi, Malikarjuna; Fan, Fan; Ge, Ying; Liu, Ruisheng; Williams, Jan Michael; Sarkis, Allison; Lazar, Jozef; Jacob, Howard J; Roman, Richard J

    2013-03-01

    This study examined the effect of substitution of a 2.4-megabase pair (Mbp) region of Brown Norway (BN) rat chromosome 1 (RNO1) between 258.8 and 261.2 Mbp onto the genetic background of fawn-hooded hypertensive (FHH) rats on autoregulation of renal blood flow (RBF), myogenic response of renal afferent arterioles (AF-art), K(+) channel activity in renal vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and development of proteinuria and renal injury. FHH rats exhibited poor autoregulation of RBF, while FHH.1BN congenic strains with the 2.4-Mbp BN region exhibited nearly perfect autoregulation of RBF. The diameter of AF-art from FHH rats increased in response to pressure but decreased in congenic strains containing the 2.4-Mbp BN region. Protein excretion and glomerular and interstitial damage were significantly higher in FHH rats than in congenic strains containing the 2.4-Mbp BN region. K(+) channel current was fivefold greater in VSMCs from renal arterioles of FHH rats than cells obtained from congenic strains containing the 2.4-Mbp region. Sequence analysis of the known and predicted genes in the 2.4-Mbp region of FHH rats revealed amino acid-altering variants in the exons of three genes: Add3, Rbm20, and Soc-2. Quantitative PCR studies indicated that Mxi1 and Rbm20 were differentially expressed in the renal vasculature of FHH and FHH.1BN congenic strain F. These data indicate that transfer of this 2.4-Mbp region from BN to FHH rats restores the myogenic response of AF-art and autoregulation of RBF, decreases K(+) current, and slows the progression of proteinuria and renal injury. PMID:23220727

  5. EXPERIMENTAL INDUCTION OF CHRONIC PULMONARY DISEASE IN GENETICALLY SUSCEPTIBLE RAT MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory



    Experimental induction of chronic pulmonary disease in genetically susceptible rat model. M.C.Schladweiler, BS 1, A.D.Ledbetter 1, K.E.Pinkerton, PhD 2, K.R.Smith, PhD 2, P.S.Gilmour, PhD 1, P.A.Evansky 1, D.L.Costa, ScD 1, W.P.Watkinson, PhD 1, J.P.Nolan 1 and U.P.Kodava...

  6. Low-Anxiety Rat Phenotypes Can Be Further Reduced through Genetic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Granzotto, Natalli; Ramos, André

    2013-01-01

    Background A previous study using an intercross between the inbred rat strains Lewis (LEW) and Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR) identified a locus on chromosome 4, named Anxrr16, influencing an experimental index of anxiety and showing a transgressive effect, with alleles from the LEW strain (more anxious) decreasing rather than increasing anxiety. Objective To confirm the location and isolate the effect of a rat genome region named Anxrr16 through a planned genomic recombination strategy, where the target locus in SHR rats was replaced with LEW genetic material. Methods A new congenic strain, named SHR.LEW-Anxrr16 (SLA16), was developed from a cross between LEW (donor) and SHR (receptor) rats and then evaluated in several anxiety-related tests. The activity and attention levels of the new strain were also evaluated, since hyperactivity was observed during its construction and because SHR is a model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Results Significant effects of Anxrr16 were found for open field central locomotion, as well as for other indices of anxiety from the light/dark box, triple test and T-maze. In all cases, the low-anxiety levels of SHR rats were further reduced by the insertion of LEW alleles. Differences in locomotor activity were found only in unfamiliar (hence stressful) environments and no genetic effects were observed in indices of attention. Conclusion The SLA16 strain can help in the identification of the molecular pathways involved in experimental anxiety and it demonstrates how apparently extreme phenotypes sometimes hide major opposite-acting genes. PMID:24386249

  7. Locus-specific genetic differentiation at Rw among warfarin-resistant rat (Rattus norvegicus) populations.

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Michael H; Pelz, Hans-Joachim; Wayne, Robert K

    2003-01-01

    Populations may diverge at fitness-related genes as a result of adaptation to local conditions. The ability to detect this divergence by marker-based genomic scans depends on the relative magnitudes of selection, recombination, and migration. We survey rat (Rattus norvegicus) populations to assess the effect that local selection with anticoagulant rodenticides has had on microsatellite marker variation and differentiation at the warfarin resistance gene (Rw) relative to the effect on the genomic background. Initially, using a small sample of 16 rats, we demonstrate tight linkage of microsatellite D1Rat219 to Rw by association mapping of genotypes expressing an anticoagulant-rodenticide-insensitive vitamin K 2,3-epoxide reductase (VKOR). Then, using allele frequencies at D1Rat219, we show that predicted and observed resistance levels in 27 populations correspond, suggesting intense and recent selection for resistance. A contrast of F(ST) values between D1Rat219 and the genomic background revealed that rodenticide selection has overwhelmed drift-mediated population structure only at Rw. A case-controlled design distinguished these locus-specific effects of selection at Rw from background levels of differentiation more effectively than a population-controlled approach. Our results support the notion that an analysis of locus-specific population genetic structure may assist the discovery and mapping of novel candidate loci that are the object of selection or may provide supporting evidence for previously identified loci. PMID:12871915

  8. Genetic identification of multiple loci that control breast cancer susceptibility in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Shepel, L A; Lan, H; Haag, J D; Brasic, G M; Gheen, M E; Simon, J S; Hoff, P; Newton, M A; Gould, M N

    1998-01-01

    We have used a rat model of induced mammary carcinomas in an effort to identify breast cancer susceptibility genes. Using genetic crosses between the carcinoma-resistant Copenhagen (COP) and carcinoma-sensitive Wistar-Furth rats, we have confirmed the identification of the Mcs1 locus that modulates tumor number. We have now also identified two additional loci, Mcs2 and Mcs3. These three loci map to chromosomes 2, 7, and 1, respectively, and interact additively to suppress mammary carcinoma development in the COP strain. They are responsible for a major portion of the tumor-resistant phenotype of the COP rat. No loss of heterozygosity was observed surrounding the three loci. A fourth COP locus, Mcs4, has also been identified on chromosome 8 and acts in contrast to increase the number of carcinomas. These results show that mammary carcinoma susceptibility in the COP rat is a polygenic trait. Interestingly, a polymorphism in the human genomic region homologous to the rat Mcs4 region is associated with an increased breast cancer risk in African-American women. The isolation of the Mcs genes may help elucidate novel mechanisms of carcinogenesis, provide information important for human breast cancer risk estimation, and also provide unique drug discovery targets for breast cancer prevention. PMID:9584103

  9. Genetics of complex neurological disease: challenges and opportunities for modeling epilepsy in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Wayne N

    2009-08-01

    Currently, approximately 20 genetic variants are known to cause Mendelian forms of human epilepsy, leaving a vast heritability undefined. Rodent models for genetically complex epilepsy have been studied for many years, but only recently have strong candidate genes emerged, including Cacna1 g in the GAERS rat model of absence epilepsy and Kcnj10 in the low seizure threshold of DBA/2 mice. In parallel, a growing number of mouse mutations studied on multiple strain backgrounds reveal the impact of genetic modifiers on seizure severity, incidence or form--perhaps mimicking the complexity seen in humans. The field of experimental genetics in rodents is poised to study discrete epilepsy mutations on a diverse choice of strain backgrounds to develop better models and identify modifiers. But, it must find the right balance between embracing the strain diversity available, with the ability to detect and characterize genetic effects. Using alternative strain backgrounds when studying epilepsy mutations will enhance the modeling of epilepsy as a complex genetic disease. PMID:19665252

  10. Individual differences in drug dependence in rats: the role of genetic factors and life events.

    PubMed

    Ellenbroek, Bart A; van der Kam, Elizabeth L; van der Elst, Martine C J; Cools, Alexander R

    2005-12-01

    Drug dependence and addiction is a chronic mental illness that has far reaching consequences for society in terms of economic loss, health costs and judicial problems. A crucial question in drug addiction, is what factors are involved in its aetiology, and especially what mediates the shit from use to abuse. As in most other mental illnesses, addiction can best be described using the so-called three hit model, which states that a disease results from an interaction between genetic factors, early lie events and late environmental factors. However, the precise nature of these factors still remains to be elucidated. This present review discusses the results from an animal model in which these three different hit are currently being investigated. The apomorphine susceptible (APO-SUS) and apomorphine unsusceptible (APO-UNSUS) rats, originally selected on the basis of their behavioural response to the dopaminergic agonist apomorphine, were recently found to be genetically different in the number of gene copies of a component of the gamma-secretase complex called Aph-1b. Whereas APO-UNSUS rats have three copies of the gene, APO-SUS rats have either 1 or 2 copies. In addition we have shown that these rats show differences in cocaine and alcohol self-administration, and that both early life events and late environmental factors can alter this self-administration behaviour. Thus, the data so far support the hypothesis that the APO-SUS and APO-UNSUS rats offer an interesting animal model for drug dependence in which genes and environment interact. We finally propose a theoretical model which can explain this gene-environment interaction. PMID:16253227

  11. Fischer 344 and Lewis Rat Strains as a Model of Genetic Vulnerability to Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Cadoni, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Today it is well acknowledged that both nature and nurture play important roles in the genesis of psychopathologies, including drug addiction. Increasing evidence suggests that genetic factors contribute for at least 40-60% of the variation in liability to drug dependence. Human genetic studies suggest that multiple genes of small effect, rather than single genes, contribute to the genesis of behavioral psychopathologies. Therefore, the use of inbred rat strains might provide a valuable tool to identify differences, linked to genotype, important in liability to addiction and related disorders. In this regard, Lewis and Fischer 344 inbred rats have been proposed as a model of genetic vulnerability to drug addiction, given their innate differences in sensitivity to the reinforcing and rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, as well their different responsiveness to stressful stimuli. This review will provide evidence in support of this model for the study of the genetic influence on addiction vulnerability, with particular emphasis on differences in mesolimbic dopamine (DA) transmission, rewarding and emotional function. It will be highlighted that Lewis and Fischer 344 rats differ not only in several indices of DA transmission and adaptive changes following repeated drug exposure, but also in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responsiveness, influencing not only the ability of the individual to cope with stressful events, but also interfering with rewarding and motivational processes, given the influence of corticosteroids on dopamine neuron functionality. Further differences between the two strains, as impulsivity or anxiousness, might contribute to their different proneness to addiction, and likely these features might be linked to their different DA neurotransmission plasticity. Although differences in other neurotransmitter systems might deserve further investigation, results from the reviewed studies might open new vistas in understanding aberrant

  12. Fischer 344 and Lewis Rat Strains as a Model of Genetic Vulnerability to Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Cadoni, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Today it is well acknowledged that both nature and nurture play important roles in the genesis of psychopathologies, including drug addiction. Increasing evidence suggests that genetic factors contribute for at least 40–60% of the variation in liability to drug dependence. Human genetic studies suggest that multiple genes of small effect, rather than single genes, contribute to the genesis of behavioral psychopathologies. Therefore, the use of inbred rat strains might provide a valuable tool to identify differences, linked to genotype, important in liability to addiction and related disorders. In this regard, Lewis and Fischer 344 inbred rats have been proposed as a model of genetic vulnerability to drug addiction, given their innate differences in sensitivity to the reinforcing and rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, as well their different responsiveness to stressful stimuli. This review will provide evidence in support of this model for the study of the genetic influence on addiction vulnerability, with particular emphasis on differences in mesolimbic dopamine (DA) transmission, rewarding and emotional function. It will be highlighted that Lewis and Fischer 344 rats differ not only in several indices of DA transmission and adaptive changes following repeated drug exposure, but also in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responsiveness, influencing not only the ability of the individual to cope with stressful events, but also interfering with rewarding and motivational processes, given the influence of corticosteroids on dopamine neuron functionality. Further differences between the two strains, as impulsivity or anxiousness, might contribute to their different proneness to addiction, and likely these features might be linked to their different DA neurotransmission plasticity. Although differences in other neurotransmitter systems might deserve further investigation, results from the reviewed studies might open new vistas in understanding aberrant

  13. Acute crack cocaine exposure induces genetic damage in multiple organs of rats.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Eduardo Gregolin; Yujra, Veronica Quispe; Claudio, Samuel Rangel; Silva, Marcelo Jose Dias; Vilegas, Wagner; Pereira, Camilo Dias Seabra; de Oliveira, Flavia; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2016-04-01

    Crack cocaine is a very toxic product derived from cocaine. The aim of this study was to evaluate genetic damage in multiple organs of rats following acute exposure to crack cocaine. A total of 20 Wistar rats were distributed into four groups (n = 5), as follows: 0, 4.5, 9, and 18 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) of crack cocaine administered by intraperitoneal route (i.p.). All animals were killed 24 h after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. The results showed that crack cocaine increased the number of micronucleated cells in bone marrow cells exposed to 18 mg/kg crack cocaine (p < 0.05). Peripheral blood and liver cells presented genetic damage as depicted by single cell gel (comet) assay at 9 and 18 mg/kg doses (p < 0.05). Immunohistochemistry data revealed significant increase in 8-hydroxy-20-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) immunoexpression in hepatocytes of animals exposed to crack cocaine at 9 and 18 mg/kg (p < 0.05) when compared with negative controls. Taken together, our results demonstrate that crack cocaine is able to induce genomic damage in multiple organs of Wistar rats. PMID:26825523

  14. Role of genetic modifiers in an orthologous rat model of ARPKD

    PubMed Central

    O'Meara, Caitlin C.; Hoffman, Matthew; Sweeney, William E.; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern; Xiao, Bing; Jacob, Howard J.; Avner, Ellis D.

    2012-01-01

    Human data and animal models of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) suggest that genetic factors modulate the onset and severity of the disease. We report here for the first time that ARPKD susceptibility is attenuated by introgressing the mutated Pkhd1 disease allele from the polycystic kidney (PCK) rat onto the FHH (Fawn-Hooded Hypertensive) genetic background. Compared with PCK, the FHH.Pkhd1 strain had significantly decreased renal cyst formation that coincided with a threefold reduction in mean kidney weights. Further analysis revealed that the FHH. Pkhd1 is protected from increased blood pressure as well as elevated plasma creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels. On the other hand, liver weight and biliary cystogenesis revealed no differences between PCK and FHH.Pkdh1, indicating that genes within the FHH genetic background prevent the development of renal, but not hepatic, manifestations of ARPKD. Microarray expression analysis of kidneys from 30-day-old PCK rats revealed increased expression of genes previously identified in PKD renal expression profiles, such as inflammatory response, extracellular matrix synthesis, and cell proliferation genes among others, whereas the FHH.Pkhd1 did not show activation of these common markers of disease. This newly developed strain can serve as a tool to map modifier genes for renal disease in ARPKD and provides further insight into disease variability and pathophysiology. PMID:22669842

  15. Genetic Influences on Brain Gene Expression in Rats Selected for Tameness and Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Heyne, Henrike O.; Lautenschläger, Susann; Nelson, Ronald; Besnier, François; Rotival, Maxime; Cagan, Alexander; Kozhemyakina, Rimma; Plyusnina, Irina Z.; Trut, Lyudmila; Carlborg, Örjan; Petretto, Enrico; Kruglyak, Leonid; Pääbo, Svante; Schöneberg, Torsten; Albert, Frank W.

    2014-01-01

    Interindividual differences in many behaviors are partly due to genetic differences, but the identification of the genes and variants that influence behavior remains challenging. Here, we studied an F2 intercross of two outbred lines of rats selected for tame and aggressive behavior toward humans for >64 generations. By using a mapping approach that is able to identify genetic loci segregating within the lines, we identified four times more loci influencing tameness and aggression than by an approach that assumes fixation of causative alleles, suggesting that many causative loci were not driven to fixation by the selection. We used RNA sequencing in 150 F2 animals to identify hundreds of loci that influence brain gene expression. Several of these loci colocalize with tameness loci and may reflect the same genetic variants. Through analyses of correlations between allele effects on behavior and gene expression, differential expression between the tame and aggressive rat selection lines, and correlations between gene expression and tameness in F2 animals, we identify the genes Gltscr2, Lgi4, Zfp40, and Slc17a7 as candidate contributors to the strikingly different behavior of the tame and aggressive animals. PMID:25189874

  16. Multigeneration reproductive and developmental toxicity study of bar gene inserted into genetically modified potato on rats.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Gyu Seek; Cho, Dae Hyun; Won, Yong Hyuck; Seok, Ji Hyun; Kim, Soon Sun; Kwack, Seung Jun; Lee, Rhee Da; Chae, Soo Yeong; Kim, Jae Woo; Lee, Byung Mu; Park, Kui Lea; Choi, Kwang Sik

    2005-12-10

    Each specific protein has an individual gene encoding it, and a foreign gene introduced to a plant can be used to synthesize a new protein. The identification of potential reproductive and developmental toxicity from novel proteins produced by genetically modified (GM) crops is a difficult task. A science-based risk assessment is needed in order to use GM crops as a conventional foodstuff. In this study, the specific characteristics of GM food and low-level chronic exposure were examined using a five-generation animal study. In each generation, rats were fed a solid pellet containing 5% GM potato and non-GM potato for 10 wk prior to mating in order to assess the potential reproductive and developmental toxic effects. In the multigeneration animal study, there were no GM potato-related changes in body weight, food consumption, reproductive performance, and organ weight. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out using extracted genomic DNA to examine the possibility of gene persistence in the organ tissues after a long-term exposure to low levels of GM feed. In each generation, the gene responsible for bar was not found in any of the reproductive organs of the GM potato-treated male and female rats, and the litter-related indexes did not show any genetically modified organism (GMO)-related changes. The results suggest that genetically modified crops have no adverse effects on the multigeneration reproductive-developmental ability. PMID:16326439

  17. Effects of microgravity on vestibular development and function in rats: genetics and environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, A. E.; Fritzsch, B.; Alberts, J. R.; Bruce, L. L.

    2000-01-01

    Our anatomical and behavioral studies of embryonic rats that developed in microgravity suggest that the vestibular sensory system, like the visual system, has genetically mediated processes of development that establish crude connections between the periphery and the brain. Environmental stimuli also regulate connection formation including terminal branch formation and fine-tuning of synaptic contacts. Axons of vestibular sensory neurons from gravistatic as well as linear acceleration receptors reach their targets in both microgravity and normal gravity, suggesting that this is a genetically regulated component of development. However, microgravity exposure delays the development of terminal branches and synapses in gravistatic but not linear acceleration-sensitive neurons and also produces behavioral changes. These latter changes reflect environmentally controlled processes of development.

  18. Tissue somatostatin levels in three models of genetic obesity in rats.

    PubMed

    Voyles, N R; Bhathena, S J; Kennedy, B; Wilkins, S D; Michaelis, O E; Zalenski, C M; Timmers, K I; Recant, L

    1987-05-01

    A potential role for somatostatin (SRIF) in the pathogenesis of the hyperinsulinemia of obese rats was considered. SRIF like immunoreactivity (ng/mg protein) was therefore measured in hot 2 N acetic acid extracts of pancreas, stomach, pituitary, and hypothalamus in tissues obtained from three models of genetic obesity in rats. These models included the obese and lean controls of LA/N-cp, SHR/N-cp, and Zucker rats. To assess the effects of diet on SRIF levels, mixed diets were provided ad lib which contained a carbohydrate as either sucrose or starch. Some groups were fed chow diets. No significant dietary effects on tissue levels of SRIF were obtained. However, two of the three models (Zucker and SHR/N-cp) showed phenotypic effects on SRIF levels in pancreas; namely, obese rats showed a significantly greater concentration of SRIF (P less than 0.0005 and less than 0.0002, respectively) than did the lean littermates. These findings were confirmed by measurement of total pancreas SRIF content. Gastric levels were significantly altered only in the obese Zucker rats (P less than 0.005) where obese tissues had lower concentrations than those of lean animals. However similar directional changes in pancreas and stomach were observed in all models. It is concluded that the hyperinsulinemia of the obese animals studied is not due to absolute deficiency in pancreatic SRIF content. It is postulated however that decreased pancreatic SRIF secretion (paracrine or otherwise) relative to pancreatic insulin content could still play a role. PMID:2883660

  19. Changes in skeletal muscle and tendon structure and function following genetic inactivation of myostatin in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mendias, Christopher L; Lynch, Evan B; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Flood, Michael D; Rittman, Danielle S; Van Pelt, Douglas W; Roche, Stuart M; Davis, Carol S

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle and tendon mass. Myostatin deficiency has been well studied in mice, but limited data are available on how myostatin regulates the structure and function of muscles and tendons of larger animals. We hypothesized that, in comparison to wild-type (MSTN+/+) rats, rats in which zinc finger nucleases were used to genetically inactivate myostatin (MSTNΔ/Δ) would exhibit an increase in muscle mass and total force production, a reduction in specific force, an accumulation of type II fibres and a decrease and stiffening of connective tissue. Overall, the muscle and tendon phenotype of myostatin-deficient rats was markedly different from that of myostatin-deficient mice, which have impaired contractility and pathological changes to fibres and their extracellular matrix. Extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles of MSTNΔ/Δ rats demonstrated 20–33% increases in mass, 35–45% increases in fibre number, 20–57% increases in isometric force and no differences in specific force. The insulin-like growth factor-1 pathway was activated to a greater extent in MSTNΔ/Δ muscles, but no substantial differences in atrophy-related genes were observed. Tendons of MSTNΔ/Δ rats had a 20% reduction in peak strain, with no differences in mass, peak stress or stiffness. The general morphology and gene expression patterns were similar between tendons of both genotypes. This large rodent model of myostatin deficiency did not have the negative consequences to muscle fibres and extracellular matrix observed in mouse models, and suggests that the greatest impact of myostatin in the regulation of muscle mass may not be to induce atrophy directly, but rather to block hypertrophy signalling. PMID:25640143

  20. Maternal Style Selectively Shapes Amygdalar Development and Social Behavior in Rats Genetically Prone to High Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joshua L; Glover, Matthew E; Pugh, Phyllis C; Fant, Andrew D; Simmons, Rebecca K; Akil, Huda; Kerman, Ilan A; Clinton, Sarah M

    2015-01-01

    The early-life environment critically influences neurodevelopment and later psychological health. To elucidate neural and environmental elements that shape emotional behavior, we developed a rat model of individual differences in temperament and environmental reactivity. We selectively bred rats for high versus low behavioral response to novelty and found that high-reactive (bred high-responder, bHR) rats displayed greater risk-taking, impulsivity and aggression relative to low-reactive (bred low-responder, bLR) rats, which showed high levels of anxiety/depression-like behavior and certain stress vulnerability. The bHR/bLR traits are heritable, but prior work revealed bHR/bLR maternal style differences, with bLR dams showing more maternal attention than bHRs. The present study implemented a cross-fostering paradigm to examine the contribution of maternal behavior to the brain development and emotional behavior of bLR offspring. bLR offspring were reared by biological bLR mothers or fostered to a bLR or bHR mother and then evaluated to determine the effects on the following: (1) developmental gene expression in the hippocampus and amygdala and (2) adult anxiety/depression-like behavior. Genome-wide expression profiling showed that cross-fostering bLR rats to bHR mothers shifted developmental gene expression in the amygdala (but not hippocampus), reduced adult anxiety and enhanced social interaction. Our findings illustrate how an early-life manipulation such as cross-fostering changes the brain's developmental trajectory and ultimately impacts adult behavior. Moreover, while earlier studies highlighted hippocampal differences contributing to the bHR/bLR phenotypes, our results point to a role of the amygdala as well. Future work will pursue genetic and cellular mechanisms within the amygdala that contribute to bHR/bLR behavior either at baseline or following environmental manipulations. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel. PMID:25791846

  1. Maternal Style Selectively Shapes Amygdalar Development and Social Behavior in Rats Genetically Prone to High Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Joshua L.; Glover, Matthew E.; Pugh, Phyllis C.; Fant, Andrew D.; Simmons, Rebecca K.; Akil, Huda; Kerman, Ilan A.; Clinton, Sarah M.

    2015-01-01

    The early-life environment critically influences neurodevelopment and later psychological health. To elucidate neural and environmental elements that shape emotional behavior, we developed a rat model of individual differences in temperament and environmental reactivity. We selectively bred rats for high vs. low behavioral response to novelty and found that high reactive (bHR) rats display greater risk-taking, impulsivity, and aggression relative to low reactive (bLR) rats, which show high levels of anxiety/depression-like behavior and certain stress vulnerability. The bHR/bLR traits are heritable but prior work revealed bHR/bLR maternal style differences, with bLR dams showing more maternal attention than bHRs. The present study implemented a cross-fostering paradigm to examine the contribution of maternal behavior on bLR offspring’s brain development and emotional behavior. bLR offspring were reared by biological bLR mothers or fostered to a bLR or bHR mother and then evaluated to determine effects on: 1) developmental gene expression in the hippocampus and amygdala; and 2) adult anxiety/depression-like behavior. Genome-wide expression profiling showed that cross-fostering bLR rats to bHR mothers shifted developmental gene expression in the amygdala (but not hippocampus), reduced adult anxiety and enhanced social interaction. Our findings illustrate how an early-life manipulation such as cross-fostering changes the brain’s developmental trajectory and ultimately impacts adult behavior. Moreover, while earlier studies highlighted hippocampal differences contributing to the bHR/bLR phenotypes, our results point to a role of the amygdala as well. Future work will pursue genetic and cellular mechanisms within the amygdala that contribute to bHR/bLR behavior either at baseline or following environmental manipulations. PMID:25791846

  2. Local and Regional Scale Genetic Variation in the Cape Dune Mole-Rat, Bathyergus suillus

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Jacobus H.; Bennett, Nigel C.; Jansen van Vuuren, Bettine

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of genetic variation is determined through the interaction of life history, morphology and habitat specificity of a species in conjunction with landscape structure. While numerous studies have investigated this interplay of factors in species inhabiting aquatic, riverine, terrestrial, arboreal and saxicolous systems, the fossorial system has remained largely unexplored. In this study we attempt to elucidate the impacts of a subterranean lifestyle coupled with a heterogeneous landscape on genetic partitioning by using a subterranean mammal species, the Cape dune mole-rat (Bathyergus suillus), as our model. Bathyergus suillus is one of a few mammal species endemic to the Cape Floristic Region (CFR) of the Western Cape of South Africa. Its distribution is fragmented by rivers and mountains; both geographic phenomena that may act as geographical barriers to gene-flow. Using two mitochondrial fragments (cytochrome b and control region) as well as nine microsatellite loci, we determined the phylogeographic structure and gene-flow patterns at two different spatial scales (local and regional). Furthermore, we investigated genetic differentiation between populations and applied Bayesian clustering and assignment approaches to our data. Nearly every population formed a genetically unique entity with significant genetic structure evident across geographic barriers such as rivers (Berg, Verlorenvlei, Breede and Gourits Rivers), mountains (Piketberg and Hottentots Holland Mountains) and with geographic distance at both spatial scales. Surprisingly, B. suillus was found to be paraphyletic with respect to its sister species, B. janetta–a result largely overlooked by previous studies on these taxa. A systematic revision of the genus Bathyergus is therefore necessary. This study provides a valuable insight into how the biology, life-history and habitat specificity of animals inhabiting a fossorial system may act in concert with the structure of the surrounding

  3. Molecular Genetic Evidence for the Place of Origin of the Pacific Rat, Rattus exulans

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Vicki; Aplin, Ken P.; Cooper, Alan; Hisheh, Susan; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Maryanto, Ibnu; Yap, Grace; Donnellan, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Commensal plants and animals have long been used to track human migrations, with Rattus exulans (the Pacific rat) a common organism for reconstructing Polynesian dispersal in the Pacific. However, with no knowledge of the homeland of R. exulans, the place of origin of this human-commensal relationship is unknown. We conducted a mitochondrial DNA phylogeographic survey of R. exulans diversity across the potential natural range in mainland and Island Southeast Asia in order to establish the origin of this human-commensal dyad. We also conducted allozyme electrophoresis on samples from ISEA to obtain a perspective on patterns of genetic diversity in this critical region. Finally, we compared molecular genetic evidence with knowledge of prehistoric rodent faunas in mainland and ISEA. We find that ISEA populations of R. exulans contain the highest mtDNA lineage diversity including significant haplotype diversity not represented elsewhere in the species range. Within ISEA, the island of Flores in the Lesser Sunda group contains the highest diversity in ISEA (across all loci) and also has a deep fossil record of small mammals that appears to include R. exulans. Therefore, in addition to Flores harboring unusual diversity in the form of Homo floresiensis, dwarfed stegodons and giant rats, this island appears to be the homeland of R. exulans. PMID:24637896

  4. Molecular genetic evidence for the place of origin of the Pacific rat, Rattus exulans.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Vicki; Aplin, Ken P; Cooper, Alan; Hisheh, Susan; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Maryanto, Ibnu; Yap, Grace; Donnellan, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Commensal plants and animals have long been used to track human migrations, with Rattus exulans (the Pacific rat) a common organism for reconstructing Polynesian dispersal in the Pacific. However, with no knowledge of the homeland of R. exulans, the place of origin of this human-commensal relationship is unknown. We conducted a mitochondrial DNA phylogeographic survey of R. exulans diversity across the potential natural range in mainland and Island Southeast Asia in order to establish the origin of this human-commensal dyad. We also conducted allozyme electrophoresis on samples from ISEA to obtain a perspective on patterns of genetic diversity in this critical region. Finally, we compared molecular genetic evidence with knowledge of prehistoric rodent faunas in mainland and ISEA. We find that ISEA populations of R. exulans contain the highest mtDNA lineage diversity including significant haplotype diversity not represented elsewhere in the species range. Within ISEA, the island of Flores in the Lesser Sunda group contains the highest diversity in ISEA (across all loci) and also has a deep fossil record of small mammals that appears to include R. exulans. Therefore, in addition to Flores harboring unusual diversity in the form of Homo floresiensis, dwarfed stegodons and giant rats, this island appears to be the homeland of R. exulans. PMID:24637896

  5. Subchronic Immunotoxicity Assessment of Genetically Modified Virus-Resistant Papaya in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Tang; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Wu, Jhaol-Huei; Yen, Gow-Chin; Yeh, Shyi-Dong; Cheng, Ying-Huey; Chang, Shih-Chieh; Liao, Jiunn-Wang

    2016-07-27

    Papaya is an important fruit that provides a variety of vitamins with nutritional value and also holds some pharmacological properties, including immunomodulation. Genetically modified (GM) papaya plants resistant to Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) infection have been generated by cloning the coat protein gene of the PRSV which can be used as a valuable strategy to fight PRSV infection and to increase papaya production. In order to assess the safety of GM papaya as a food, this subchronic study was conducted to assess the immunomodulatory responses of the GM papaya line 823-2210, when compared with its parent plant of non-GM papaya, Tainung-2 (TN-2), in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Both non-GM and GM 823-2210 papaya fruits at low (1 g/kg bw) and high (2 g/kg bw) dosages were administered via daily oral gavage to male and female rats consecutively for 90 days. Immunophenotyping, mitogen-induced splenic cell proliferation, antigen-specific antibody response, and histopathology of the spleen and thymus were evaluated at the end of the experiment. Results of immunotoxicity assays revealed no consistent difference between rats fed for 90 days with GM 823-2210 papaya fruits, as opposed to those fed non-GM TN-2 papaya fruits, suggesting that with regard to immunomodulatory responses, GM 823-2210 papaya fruits maintain substantial equivalence to fruits of their non-GM TN-2 parent. PMID:27396727

  6. Cognitive deficits and brain myo-Inositol are early biomarkers of epileptogenesis in a rat model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pascente, Rosaria; Frigerio, Federica; Rizzi, Massimo; Porcu, Luca; Boido, Marina; Davids, Joe; Zaben, Malik; Tolomeo, Daniele; Filibian, Marta; Gray, William P; Vezzani, Annamaria; Ravizza, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    One major unmet clinical need in epilepsy is the identification of therapies to prevent or arrest epilepsy development in patients exposed to a potential epileptogenic insult. The development of such treatments has been hampered by the lack of non-invasive biomarkers that could be used to identify the patients at-risk, thereby allowing to design affordable clinical studies. Our goal was to test the predictive value of cognitive deficits and brain astrocyte activation for the development of epilepsy following a potential epileptogenic injury. We used a model of epilepsy induced by pilocarpine-evoked status epilepticus (SE) in 21-day old rats where 60-70% of animals develop spontaneous seizures after around 70days, although SE is similar in all rats. Learning was evaluated in the Morris water-maze at days 15 and 65 post-SE, each time followed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for measuring hippocampal myo-Inositol levels, a marker of astrocyte activation. Rats were video-EEG monitored for two weeks at seven months post-SE to detect spontaneous seizures, then brain histology was done. Behavioral and imaging data were retrospectively analysed in epileptic rats and compared with non-epileptic and control animals. Rats displayed spatial learning deficits within three weeks from SE. However, only epilepsy-prone rats showed accelerated forgetting and reduced learning rate compared to both rats not developing epilepsy and controls. These deficits were associated with reduced hippocampal neurogenesis. myo-Inositol levels increased transiently in the hippocampus of SE-rats not developing epilepsy while this increase persisted until spontaneous seizures onset in epilepsy-prone rats, being associated with a local increase in S100β-positive astrocytes. Neuronal cell loss was similar in all SE-rats. Our data show that behavioral deficits, together with a non-invasive marker of astrocyte activation, predict which rats develop epilepsy after an acute injury. These measures

  7. Transcriptome, genetic editing, and microRNA divergence substantiate sympatric speciation of blind mole rat, Spalax.

    PubMed

    Li, Kexin; Wang, Liuyang; Knisbacher, Binyamin A; Xu, Qinqin; Levanon, Erez Y; Wang, Huihua; Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Tagore, Satabdi; Fang, Xiaodong; Bazak, Lily; Buchumenski, Ilana; Zhao, Yang; Lövy, Matěj; Li, Xiangfeng; Han, Lijuan; Frenkel, Zeev; Beiles, Avigdor; Cao, Yi Bin; Wang, Zhen Long; Nevo, Eviatar

    2016-07-01

    Incipient sympatric speciation in blind mole rat, Spalax galili, in Israel, caused by sharp ecological divergence of abutting chalk-basalt ecologies, has been proposed previously based on mitochondrial and whole-genome nuclear DNA. Here, we present new evidence, including transcriptome, DNA editing, microRNA, and codon usage, substantiating earlier evidence for adaptive divergence in the abutting chalk and basalt populations. Genetic divergence, based on the previous and new evidence, is ongoing despite restricted gene flow between the two populations. The principal component analysis, neighbor-joining tree, and genetic structure analysis of the transcriptome clearly show the clustered divergent two mole rat populations. Gene-expression level analysis indicates that the population transcriptome divergence is displayed not only by soil divergence but also by sex. Gene ontology enrichment of the differentially expressed genes from the two abutting soil populations highlights reproductive isolation. Alternative splicing variation of the two abutting soil populations displays two distinct splicing patterns. L-shaped FST distribution indicates that the two populations have undergone divergence with gene flow. Transcriptome divergent genes highlight neurogenetics and nutrition characterizing the chalk population, and energetics, metabolism, musculature, and sensory perception characterizing the abutting basalt population. Remarkably, microRNAs also display divergence between the two populations. The GC content is significantly higher in chalk than in basalt, and stress-response genes mostly prefer nonoptimal codons. The multiple lines of evidence of ecological-genomic and genetic divergence highlight that natural selection overrules the gene flow between the two abutting populations, substantiating the sharp ecological chalk-basalt divergence driving sympatric speciation. PMID:27339131

  8. Cytarabine induced cerebellar neuronal damage in juvenile rat: correlating neurobehavioral performance with cellular and genetic alterations.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ronak S; Rachamalla, Mahesh; Chary, Namoju R; Shera, Firdos Y; Tikoo, Kulbhushan; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2012-03-11

    Cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), a pyrimidine analogue induces cerebellar dysfunction and behavioral abnormalities. Although many in vitro experiments have been conducted in the past demonstrating the lethal potential of Ara-C to cerebellar neurons, there is a paucity of literature available regarding the effects of Ara-C on the cellular and genetic material of cerebellum and its subsequent influence on the neurobehavioral performance in vivo. Rats were treated with Ara-C at the dose levels 50, 100 and 200mg/kg/day for 5 and 14 days by intraperitoneal (i.p.) route. Endpoints of the evaluation included food and water intake, body and organ weight, behavioral parameters, histopathology, oxidative stress, DNA damage, apoptosis, expression of p53, caspase-3 and calbindin D-28K (calbindin) as well as histone acetylation and methylation. Ara-C treatment for 14 days significantly decreased the food and water intake, body weight gain and brain weight in rat as compared to the control. Alterations in various behavioral parameters were observed, indicating the impaired cerebellar function. Further, cellular abnormalities in the cerebellum such as Purkinje cell misalignment and granule cell cytotoxicity were observed. Positive correlation was observed between Ara-C induced disturbance in the motor performance and the Purkinje cell loss in rat cerebellum. Moreover, Ara-C treatment significantly increased the oxidative stress, DNA damage, TUNEL positive cells, p53 and caspase-3 positive cells in the rat cerebellum. Unlike short-term treatment, long-term Ara-C treatment significantly reduced calbindin expression in the cerebellum. Apart from this, 14 days Ara-C treatment led to significant alterations in the histone acetylation and methylation in the cerebellum, while in 5 days treatment no such alterations were observed. Present results indicated that Ara-C, by inducing oxidative stress mediated DNA damage, executes neuronal apoptosis which is accompanied by an increase in the p53

  9. Integrative microRNA-gene expression network analysis in genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuchao; Qin, Baolong; Hu, Henglong; Zhang, Jiaqiao; Wang, Yufeng; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) influence a variety of biological functions by regulating gene expression post-transcriptionally. Aberrant miRNA expression has been associated with many human diseases. Urolithiasis is a common disease, and idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH) is an important risk factor for calcium urolithiasis. However, miRNA expression patterns and their biological functions in urolithiasis remain unknown. Methods and Results. A multi-step approach combining microarray miRNA and mRNA expression profile and bioinformatics analysis was adopted to analyze dysregulated miRNAs and genes in genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming (GHS) rat kidneys, using normal Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats as controls. We identified 2418 mRNAs and 19 miRNAs as significantly differentially expressed, over 700 gene ontology (GO) terms and 83 KEGG pathways that were significantly enriched in GHS rats. In addition, we constructed an miRNA-gene network that suggested that rno-miR-674-5p, rno-miR-672-5p, rno-miR-138-5p and rno-miR-21-3p may play important roles in the regulatory network. Furthermore, signal-net analysis suggested that NF-kappa B likely plays a crucial role in hypercalciuria urolithiasis. Conclusions. This study presents a global view of mRNA and miRNA expression in GHS rat kidneys, and suggests that miRNAs may be important in the regulation of hypercalciuria. The data provide valuable insights for future research, which should aim at validating the role of the genes featured here in the pathophysiology of hypercalciuria. PMID:27069814

  10. On-off intermittency in time series of spontaneous paroxysmal activity in rats with genetic absence epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Hramov, Alexander; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Midzyanovskaya, I.S.; Sitnikova, E.; Rijn, C.M. van

    2006-12-15

    In the present paper we consider the on-off intermittency phenomena observed in time series of spontaneous paroxysmal activity in rats with genetic absence epilepsy. The method to register and analyze the electroencephalogram with the help of continuous wavelet transform is also suggested.

  11. Dr. Lewis Kitchener Dahl, the Dahl Rats and the ‘Inconvenient truth’ abou the Genetics of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Joe, Bina

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Lewis K. Dahl is regarded as an iconic figure in the field of hypertension research. During the 1960s and 1970s he published several seminal articles in the field that shed light on the relationship between salt and hypertension. Further, the Dahl rat models of hypertension that he developed by a selective breeding strategy are among the most widely used models for hypertension research. To this day, genetic studies using this model are ongoing in our laboratory. While Dr. Dahl is known for his contributions to the field of hypertension, very little, if any, of his personal history is documented. This article details a short biography of Dr. Lewis Dahl, the history behind the development of the Dahl rats and presents an overview of the results obtained through the genetic analysis of the Dahl rat as an experimental model to study the inheritance of hypertension. PMID:25646295

  12. Maternal methyl-enriched diet in rat reduced the audiogenic seizure proneness in progeny.

    PubMed

    Poletaeva, I I; Surina, N M; Ashapkin, V V; Fedotova, I B; Merzalov, I B; Perepelkina, O V; Pavlova, G V

    2014-12-01

    Audiogenic epilepsy proneness was analyzed in the progeny of rats from two strains (audiogenic seizure prone-strain "4"-and audiogenic seizure non-prone, strain "0"). Females were fed by a diet which contained substances enriched with methyl-groups during 1week before mating (MED), during pregnancy period and 1week after the delivery. This MED treatment resulted in a decrease of audiogenic seizure fit intensity, which was more evident in rats of strain "0". Control rats of strain "4" displayed intense seizures (tonic seizure, 3.85 arbitrary units). Med "4" rats seizures were less intense (3.23, tonic seizure of lower intensity), control "0" strain rats demonstrated the seizure with mean 3.09 arbitrary units, "0" MED rats only 2.03 arbitrary unit intensity (only clonic seizures, significantly, p<0.05, different from controls). Methyl-enriched diet resulted in the significant changes in methylation status of several genes (Cpne6, Gtf2i, Sctr,1 Sfmbt, Phe2). These genes among others were chosen for analysis as their expression was analyzed in other methylation study. These genes were hypermethylated after "epileptic tolerance". Due to this procedure, the intensity of status epilepticus, produced by kainate in mice, decreased (Miller-Delaney et al., 2012). The modulation of audiogenic seizure intensity as the result of methyl-enriched diet during prenatal and early postnatal ontogeny was demonstrated for the first time. PMID:25285618

  13. Nature and nurture: environmental influences on a genetic rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Mehta-Raghavan, N S; Wert, S L; Morley, C; Graf, E N; Redei, E E

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we sought to learn whether adverse events such as chronic restraint stress (CRS), or 'nurture' in the form of environmental enrichment (EE), could modify depression-like behavior and blood biomarker transcript levels in a genetic rat model of depression. The Wistar Kyoto More Immobile (WMI) is a genetic model of depression that aided in the identification of blood transcriptomic markers, which successfully distinguished adolescent and adult subjects with major depressive disorders from their matched no-disorder controls. Here, we followed the effects of CRS and EE in adult male WMIs and their genetically similar control strain, the Wistar Kyoto Less Immobile (WLI), that does not show depression-like behavior, by measuring the levels of these transcripts in the blood and hippocampus. In WLIs, increased depression-like behavior and transcriptomic changes were present in response to CRS, but in WMIs no behavioral or additive transcriptomic changes occurred. Environmental enrichment decreased both the inherent depression-like behavior in the WMIs and the behavioral difference between WMIs and WLIs, but did not reverse basal transcript level differences between the strains. The inverse behavioral change induced by CRS and EE in the WLIs did not result in parallel inverse expression changes of the transcriptomic markers, suggesting that these behavioral responses to the environment work via separate molecular pathways. In contrast, 'trait' transcriptomic markers with expression differences inherent and unchanging between the strains regardless of the environment suggest that in our model, environmental and genetic etiologies of depression work through independent molecular mechanisms. PMID:27023176

  14. Nature and nurture: environmental influences on a genetic rat model of depression

    PubMed Central

    Mehta-Raghavan, N S; Wert, S L; Morley, C; Graf, E N; Redei, E E

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we sought to learn whether adverse events such as chronic restraint stress (CRS), or ‘nurture' in the form of environmental enrichment (EE), could modify depression-like behavior and blood biomarker transcript levels in a genetic rat model of depression. The Wistar Kyoto More Immobile (WMI) is a genetic model of depression that aided in the identification of blood transcriptomic markers, which successfully distinguished adolescent and adult subjects with major depressive disorders from their matched no-disorder controls. Here, we followed the effects of CRS and EE in adult male WMIs and their genetically similar control strain, the Wistar Kyoto Less Immobile (WLI), that does not show depression-like behavior, by measuring the levels of these transcripts in the blood and hippocampus. In WLIs, increased depression-like behavior and transcriptomic changes were present in response to CRS, but in WMIs no behavioral or additive transcriptomic changes occurred. Environmental enrichment decreased both the inherent depression-like behavior in the WMIs and the behavioral difference between WMIs and WLIs, but did not reverse basal transcript level differences between the strains. The inverse behavioral change induced by CRS and EE in the WLIs did not result in parallel inverse expression changes of the transcriptomic markers, suggesting that these behavioral responses to the environment work via separate molecular pathways. In contrast, ‘trait' transcriptomic markers with expression differences inherent and unchanging between the strains regardless of the environment suggest that in our model, environmental and genetic etiologies of depression work through independent molecular mechanisms. PMID:27023176

  15. Genetically determined differences in noradrenergic function: The spontaneously hypertensive rat model.

    PubMed

    Sterley, Toni-Lee; Howells, Fleur M; Russell, Vivienne A

    2016-06-15

    While genetic predisposition is a major factor, it is not known how development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is modulated by early life stress. The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) displays the behavioral characteristics of ADHD (poorly sustained attention, impulsivity, hyperactivity) and is the most widely studied genetic model of ADHD. We have previously shown that SHR have disturbances in the noradrenergic system and that the early life stress of maternal separation failed to produce anxiety-like behavior in SHR, contrary to control Sprague-Dawley and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) who showed typical anxiety-like behavior in later life. In the present study we investigated the effect of maternal separation on approach behavior (response to a novel object in a familiar environment) in preadolescent SHR and WKY. We also investigated whether maternal separation altered GABAA and NMDA receptor-mediated regulation of norepinephrine release in preadolescent SHR and WKY hippocampus. We found that female SHR, similar to male SHR, exhibited greater exploratory activity than WKY. Maternal separation significantly increased GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition of glutamate-stimulated release of norepinephrine in male and female SHR hippocampus but had no significant effect in WKY. Maternal separation had opposite effects on NMDA receptor-mediated inhibition of norepinephrine release in SHR and WKY hippocampus, as it increased inhibition of both glutamate-stimulated and depolarization-evoked release in SHR hippocampus but not in WKY. The results of the present study show that noradrenergic function is similarly altered by the early life stress of maternal separation in male and female SHR, while GABA- and glutamate-regulation of norepinephrine release remained unaffected by maternal separation in the control, WKY, rat strain. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Noradrenergic System. PMID:26612520

  16. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    Homozygous; Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  17. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  18. The effects of cocaine self-administration on dendritic spine density in the rat hippocampus are dependent on genetic background.

    PubMed

    Miguéns, Miguel; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Coria, Santiago M; Selvas, Abraham; Ballesteros-Yañez, Inmaculada; DeFelipe, Javier; Ambrosio, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exposure to cocaine induces modifications to neurons in the brain regions involved in addiction. Hence, we evaluated cocaine-induced changes in the hippocampal CA1 field in Fischer 344 (F344) and Lewis (LEW) rats, 2 strains that have been widely used to study genetic predisposition to drug addiction, by combining intracellular Lucifer yellow injection with confocal microscopy reconstruction of labeled neurons. Specifically, we examined the effects of cocaine self-administration on the structure, size, and branching complexity of the apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons. In addition, we quantified spine density in the collaterals of the apical dendritic arbors of these neurons. We found differences between these strains in several morphological parameters. For example, CA1 apical dendrites were more branched and complex in LEW than in F344 rats, while the spine density in the collateral dendrites of the apical dendritic arbors was greater in F344 rats. Interestingly, cocaine self-administration in LEW rats augmented the spine density, an effect that was not observed in the F344 strain. These results reveal significant structural differences in CA1 pyramidal cells between these strains and indicate that cocaine self-administration has a distinct effect on neuron morphology in the hippocampus of rats with different genetic backgrounds. PMID:23966583

  19. Safety and risk assessment of the genetically modified Lactococci on rats intestinal bacterial flora.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kai-Chien; Liu, Chin-Feng; Lin, Tzu-Hsing; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2010-08-15

    The interaction between Lactococcus lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK and intestinal microflora was evaluated as a method to assess safety of genetically modified microorganisms (GMMs). L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK is one kind of GMM and able to produce the intracellular subtilisin NAT (nattokinase) under induction with nisin. The host strain L. lactis NZ9000 was a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) microorganism. Six groups of Wistar rats were orally administered with L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK and L. lactis NZ9000 for 6 weeks. Fecal and cecal contents were collected to determine the number of L. lactis NZ9000, L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK, Lactobacillus, coliform bacteria, beneficial bacteria Bifidobacterium and harmful bacteria Clostridium perfringens. The liver, spleen, kidney and blood were evaluated for the bacterial translocation. After 6 weeks consumption with GM and non-GM Lactococcus, no adverse effects were observed on the rat's body weight, hematological or serum biochemical parameters, or intestinal microflora. The bacterial translocation test showed that L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK did not translocate to any organ or blood. Bifidobacterium was significantly increased in feces after administration of both Lactococcus strains (L. lactis NZ9000 and L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK), while C. perfringens remained undetectable during the experiment. These results suggested that L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK could be safe in animal experiments and monitoring of the interaction between test strains and intestinal microflora might be applied as a method for other GMM safety assessments. PMID:20619909

  20. Effects of genetic obesity on rat upper airway muscle and diaphragm contractile properties.

    PubMed

    van Lunteren, E

    1996-10-01

    The contractile properties of pharyngeal respiratory muscle are altered in sleep apnoea and in conditions associated with sleep apnoea, such as ageing. We hypothesized that the contractile properties of the pharyngeal musculature are also altered by obesity, another factor associated with sleep apnoea. Studies compared a pharyngeal muscle, the sternohyoid, with the diaphragm. These were chosen as representative muscles whose contraction has opposing effects on upper airway patency. Both muscles were removed from nine lean and nine obese male Zucker rats (a genetic model of obesity), and isometric contractile properties were studied in vitro at 37 degrees C. For the sternohyoid muscle, in obese compared to lean animals there were no significant differences in isometric contraction time (15.2 +/- 0.3 vs 14.2 +/- 0.6 ms, respectively), half-relaxation time (13.6 +/- 0.5 vs 12.6 +/- 0.9 ms, respectively), twitch-to-tetanic tension ratio (0.22 +/- 0.02 vs 0.24 +/- 0.02, respectively), force-frequency relationship, fatigue resistance (2 min fatigue index 0.20 +/- 0.03 vs 0.18 +/- 0.02, respectively), or maximal degree of force potentiation during repetitive stimulation (52 +/- 11 vs 74 +/- 20% increase, respectively). For the diaphragm, the only significant effect of obesity was a lowering of the twitch-to-tetanic tension ratio (0.25 +/- 0.01 vs 0.29 +/- 0.02, respectively). In obese, as in lean animals, the sternohyoid had faster isometric twitch kinetics, a larger degree of force potentiation, and lower resistance to fatigue, than the diaphragm. In lean, but not obese, animals the sternohyoid twitch-to-tetanic tension ratio was lower than and the force frequency relationship was located to the right of that of the diaphragm. In this study, genetic obesity in rats was not associated with any significant alterations in the contractile properties of the pharyngeal muscle, and only small changes in the relationship between the contractile properties of the sternohyoid and

  1. Challenging the inbreeding hypothesis in a eusocial mammal: population genetics of the naked mole-rat, Heterocephalus glaber.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Colleen M; Troendle, Nicholas J; Gill, Clare A; Braude, Stanton; Honeycutt, Rodney L

    2015-10-01

    The role of genetic relatedness in the evolution of eusociality has been the topic of much debate, especially when contrasting eusocial insects with vertebrates displaying reproductive altruism. The naked mole-rat, Heterocephalus glaber, was the first described eusocial mammal. Although this discovery was based on an ecological constraints model of eusocial evolution, early genetic studies reported high levels of relatedness in naked mole-rats, providing a compelling argument that low dispersal rates and consanguineous mating (inbreeding as a mating system) are the driving forces for the evolution of this eusocial species. One caveat to accepting this long-held view is that the original genetic studies were based on limited sampling from the species' geographic distribution. A growing body of evidence supports a contrary view, with the original samples not representative of the species-rather reflecting a single founder event, establishing a small population south of the Athi River. Our study is the first to address these competing hypotheses by examining patterns of molecular variation in colonies sampled from north and south of the Athi and Tana rivers, which based on our results, serve to isolate genetically distinct populations of naked mole-rats. Although colonies south of the Athi River share a single mtDNA haplotype and are fixed at most microsatellite loci, populations north of the Athi River are considerably more variable. Our findings support the position that the low variation observed in naked mole-rat populations south of the Athi River reflects a founder event, rather than a consequence of this species' unusual mating system. PMID:26407630

  2. Age and Microenvironment Outweigh Genetic Influence on the Zucker Rat Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Lees, Hannah; Swann, Jonathan; Poucher, Simon M.; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Holmes, Elaine; Wilson, Ian D.; Marchesi, Julian R.

    2014-01-01

    Animal models are invaluable tools which allow us to investigate the microbiome-host dialogue. However, experimental design introduces biases in the data that we collect, also potentially leading to biased conclusions. With obesity at pandemic levels animal models of this disease have been developed; we investigated the role of experimental design on one such rodent model. We used 454 pyrosequencing to profile the faecal bacteria of obese (n = 6) and lean (homozygous n = 6; heterozygous n = 6) Zucker rats over a 10 week period, maintained in mixed-genotype cages, to further understand the relationships between the composition of the intestinal bacteria and age, obesity progression, genetic background and cage environment. Phylogenetic and taxon-based univariate and multivariate analyses (non-metric multidimensional scaling, principal component analysis) showed that age was the most significant source of variation in the composition of the faecal microbiota. Second to this, cage environment was found to clearly impact the composition of the faecal microbiota, with samples from animals from within the same cage showing high community structure concordance, but large differences seen between cages. Importantly, the genetically induced obese phenotype was not found to impact the faecal bacterial profiles. These findings demonstrate that the age and local environmental cage variables were driving the composition of the faecal bacteria and were more deterministically important than the host genotype. These findings have major implications for understanding the significance of functional metagenomic data in experimental studies and beg the question; what is being measured in animal experiments in which different strains are housed separately, nature or nurture? PMID:25232735

  3. Age and microenvironment outweigh genetic influence on the Zucker rat microbiome.

    PubMed

    Lees, Hannah; Swann, Jonathan; Poucher, Simon M; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Holmes, Elaine; Wilson, Ian D; Marchesi, Julian R

    2014-01-01

    Animal models are invaluable tools which allow us to investigate the microbiome-host dialogue. However, experimental design introduces biases in the data that we collect, also potentially leading to biased conclusions. With obesity at pandemic levels animal models of this disease have been developed; we investigated the role of experimental design on one such rodent model. We used 454 pyrosequencing to profile the faecal bacteria of obese (n = 6) and lean (homozygous n = 6; heterozygous n = 6) Zucker rats over a 10 week period, maintained in mixed-genotype cages, to further understand the relationships between the composition of the intestinal bacteria and age, obesity progression, genetic background and cage environment. Phylogenetic and taxon-based univariate and multivariate analyses (non-metric multidimensional scaling, principal component analysis) showed that age was the most significant source of variation in the composition of the faecal microbiota. Second to this, cage environment was found to clearly impact the composition of the faecal microbiota, with samples from animals from within the same cage showing high community structure concordance, but large differences seen between cages. Importantly, the genetically induced obese phenotype was not found to impact the faecal bacterial profiles. These findings demonstrate that the age and local environmental cage variables were driving the composition of the faecal bacteria and were more deterministically important than the host genotype. These findings have major implications for understanding the significance of functional metagenomic data in experimental studies and beg the question; what is being measured in animal experiments in which different strains are housed separately, nature or nurture? PMID:25232735

  4. A rat genetic map constructed by representational difference analysis markers with suitability for large-scale typing.

    PubMed Central

    Toyota, M; Canzian, F; Ushijima, T; Hosoya, Y; Kuramoto, T; Serikawa, T; Imai, K; Sugimura, T; Nagao, M

    1996-01-01

    Representational difference analysis (RDA) was applied to isolate chromosomal markers in the rat. Four series of RDA [restriction enzymes, BamHI and HindIII; subtraction of ACI/N (ACI) amplicon from BUF/Nac (BUF) amplicon and vice versa] yielded 131 polymorphic markers; 125 of these markers were mapped to all chromosomes except for chromosome X. This was done by using a mapping panel of 105 ACI x BUF F2 rats. To complement the relative paucity of chromosomal markers in the rat, genetically directed RDA, which allows isolation of polymorphic markers in the specific chromosomal region, was performed. By changing the F2 driver-DNA allele frequency around the region, four markers were isolated from the D1Ncc1 locus. Twenty-five of 27 RDA markers were informative regarding the dot blot analysis of amplicons, hybridizing only with tester amplicons. Dot blot analysis at a high density per unit of area made it possible to process a large number of samples. Quantitative trait loci can now be mapped in the rat genome by processing a large number of samples with RDA markers and then by isolating markers close to the loci of interest by genetically directed RDA. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8632989

  5. A 90-Day Toxicology Study of Meat from Genetically Modified Sheep Overexpressing TLR4 in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rui; Kan, Tongtong; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Jinlong; Lian, Ling; Han, Hongbing; Lian, Zhengxing

    2015-01-01

    Genetic modification offers alternative strategies to traditional animal breeding. However, the food safety of genetically modified (GM) animals has attracted increasing levels of concern. In this study, we produced GM sheep overexpressing TLR4, and the transgene-positive offsprings (F1) were confirmed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot. The expression of TLR4 was 2.5-fold compared with that of the wild-type (WT) sheep samples. During the 90-day safety study, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with three different dietary concentrations (3.75%, 7.5%, and 15% wt/wt) of GM sheep meat, WT sheep meat or a commercial diet (CD). Blood samples from the rats were collected and analyzed for hematological and biochemical parameters, and then compared with hematological and biochemical reference ranges. Despite a few significant differences among the three groups in some parameters, all other values remained within the normal reference intervals and thus were not considered to be affected by the treatment. No adverse diet-related differences in body weights or relative organ weights were observed. Furthermore, no differences were observed in the gross necropsy findings or microscopic pathology of the rats whose diets contained the GM sheep meat compared with rats whose diets contained the WT sheep meat. Therefore, the present 90-day rat feeding study suggested that the meat of GM sheep overexpressing TLR4 had no adverse effect on Sprague-Dawley rats in comparison with WT sheep meat. These results provide valuable information regarding the safety assessment of meat derived from GM animals. PMID:25874566

  6. Genetic interaction between hyperglycemic QTLs is manifested under a high calorie diet in OLETF-derived congenic rats.

    PubMed

    Fukumura, Tomoe; Kose, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Chiyo; Kurita, Yuko; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Takahisa; Matsumoto, Kozo

    2011-01-01

    The condition of hyperglycemia results from multiple genetic and environmental factors. In recent years much progress has been made with regards to the search for candidate genes involved in the expression of various common diseases including type 2 diabetes. However less is known about the specific genetic and environmental connections that are important for the development of the disease. In the present study, we used hyperglycemic congenic rats to address this issue. When given a normal diet, two hyperglycemic QTLs (quantitative trait locus), Nidd2/of and Nidd10/of, showed mild obesity and/or increased blood glucose in the oral glucose tolerance test. In a double congenic strain possessing both loci, these indices were not significantly different from those of either single congenic strain. In contrast, the double congenic strain fed a high-calorie diet showed significantly greater body weight than the single congenic strains or normoglycemic control rats. Although postprandial glucose levels of the double congenic rat were not further aggravated even on the high fat diet, it was notable that the postprandial insulin levels were drastically elevated. From these results, we constructed a novel model animal especially for the study of prediabetic hyperinsulemia, in which two QTLs and an additional dietary condition are involved. This may help to shed light on the genetic basis and gene-to-diet interaction during the early stage of type 2 diabetes. PMID:21512267

  7. Establishing causes of eradication failure based on genetics: case study of ship rat eradication in Ste. Anne archipelago.

    PubMed

    Abdelkrim, Jawad; Pascal, Michel; Samadi, Sarah

    2007-06-01

    Determining the causes of a failed eradication of a pest species is important because it enables an argued adjustment of the methodologies used and the improvement of the protocols for future attempts. We examined how molecular monitoring can help distinguish between the two main reasons for an eradication failure (i.e., survival of some individuals vs. recolonization after eradication). We investigated genetic variation in seven microsatellite loci in ship rat (Rattus rattus) populations from four islets off the Martinique coast (French Caribbean). In 1999 an eradication attempt was conducted on the four islets. Three years later rats were observed again on two of them. We compared the genetic signatures of the populations before and after the eradication attempt. On one of the islands, the new rat population was likely a subset of the pre-eradication population. A weak genetic differentiation was found between them, with almost no new alleles observed in the new population and moderate F(ST) values (0.15). Moreover, assignment procedures clustered the two populations together. In contrast, on the other islet, many new alleles were observed after the eradication attempt, resulting in an increase in genetic diversity (from 2.57 to 3.57 mean number of alleles per locus) and strong F(ST) values (0.39). Moreover, genetic clustering clearly separated the two samples (i.e., before and after the eradication attempt) in two different populations. Thus, to achieve long-term eradication on these islets, it seems necessary to redevelop the eradication procedure to avoid individuals surviving and to prevent reinvasion, probably from the mainland, by installing permanent trapping and poisoning devices and conducting regular monitoring. We strongly encourage wildlife managers conducting eradication campaigns to integrate molecular biological tools in their protocols, which can be done easily for most common invasive species. PMID:17531050

  8. Genetic regulation of catecholamine synthesis, storage and secretion in the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    PubMed Central

    Jirout, M.L.; Friese, R.S.; Mahapatra, N.R.; Mahata, M.; Taupenot, L.; Mahata, S.K.; Křen, V.; Zídek, V.; Fischer, J.; Maatz, H.; Ziegler, M.G.; Pravenec, M.; Hubner, N.; Aitman, T.J.; Schork, N.J.; O'Connor, D.T.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding catecholamine metabolism is crucial for elucidating the pathogenesis of hereditary hypertension. Here we integrated transcriptional and biochemical profiling with physiologic quantitative trait locus (eQTL and pQTL) mapping in adrenal glands of the HXB/BXH recombinant inbred (RI) strains, derived from the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) and normotensive Brown Norway (BN.Lx). We found simultaneous down-regulation of five heritable transcripts in the catecholaminergic pathway in young (6 weeks) SHRs. We identified cis-acting eQTLs for Dbh, Pnmt (catecholamine biosynthesis) and Vamp1 (catecholamine secretion); enzymatic activities of Dbh and Pnmt paralleled transcripts, with pQTLs for activities mirroring eQTLs. We also detected trans-regulated expression of Vmat1 and Chga (both involved in catecholamine storage), with co-localization of these trans-eQTLs to the Pnmt locus. Pnmt re-sequencing revealed promoter polymorphisms that result in decreased response of the transfected SHR promoter to glucocorticoid, compared with BN.Lx. Of physiological pertinence, Dbh activity negatively correlated with systolic blood pressure in RI strains, whereas Pnmt activity was negatively correlated with heart rate. The finding of such cis- and trans-QTLs at an age before the onset of frank hypertension suggests that these heritable changes in biosynthetic enzyme expression represent primary genetic mechanisms for regulation of catecholamine action and blood pressure control in this widely studied model of hypertension. PMID:20378607

  9. The influence of biocomposites containing genetically modified flax fibers on gene expression in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Gredes, Tomasz; Kunert-Keil, Christiane; Dominiak, Marzena; Gedrange, Tomasz; Wróbel-Kwiatkowska, Magdalena; Szopa, Jan

    2010-12-01

    In many studies, natural flax fibers have been proven to be resistant and surgically suitable. Genetically modified flax fibers, derived from transgenic flax expressing three bacterial genes for the synthesis of poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB), have better mechanical properties than unmodified flax fibers. The aim of this study was to examine the biocompatibility of composites containing flax fibers from transgenic polyhydroxybutyrate producing (M50) and control (wt-NIKE) plants in a polylactide (PLA) matrix in rat Musculus latissimus dorsi. For this purpose, effects of biocomposites on the expression of growth factors and osteogenic differentiation, in particular the mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, insulin like growth factor 1, insulin like growth factor 2, collagen-1, collagen-2 and myostatin, were analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR. The biocomposites did not show any inflammation response after subcutaneous insertion. The results following subcutaneous insertion of PLA alone and PLA-M50 showed no significant changes on the gene expression of all tested genes, whereas PLA-wt-NIKE reduced the mRNA amount of myostatin, VEGFA and IGF2, respectively. It can be asserted that modified flax membranes with PHB and other organic substances have a good biocompatibility to the muscle and they do not disrupt the muscle function. Furthermore, composites from transgenic flax plants producing PHB did not differ from composites of non-transgenic flax plants. PMID:20973615

  10. Genetic regulation of catecholamine synthesis, storage and secretion in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Jirout, M L; Friese, R S; Mahapatra, N R; Mahata, M; Taupenot, L; Mahata, S K; Kren, V; Zídek, V; Fischer, J; Maatz, H; Ziegler, M G; Pravenec, M; Hubner, N; Aitman, T J; Schork, N J; O'Connor, D T

    2010-07-01

    Understanding catecholamine metabolism is crucial for elucidating the pathogenesis of hereditary hypertension. Here we integrated transcriptional and biochemical profiling with physiologic quantitative trait locus (eQTL and pQTL) mapping in adrenal glands of the HXB/BXH recombinant inbred (RI) strains, derived from the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) and normotensive Brown Norway (BN.Lx). We found simultaneous down-regulation of five heritable transcripts in the catecholaminergic pathway in young (6 weeks) SHRs. We identified cis-acting eQTLs for Dbh, Pnmt (catecholamine biosynthesis) and Vamp1 (catecholamine secretion); enzymatic activities of Dbh and Pnmt paralleled transcripts, with pQTLs for activities mirroring eQTLs. We also detected trans-regulated expression of Vmat1 and Chga (both involved in catecholamine storage), with co-localization of these trans-eQTLs to the Pnmt locus. Pnmt re-sequencing revealed promoter polymorphisms that result in decreased response of the transfected SHR promoter to glucocorticoid, compared with BN.Lx. Of physiological pertinence, Dbh activity negatively correlated with systolic blood pressure in RI strains, whereas Pnmt activity was negatively correlated with heart rate. The finding of such cis- and trans-QTLs at an age before the onset of frank hypertension suggests that these heritable changes in biosynthetic enzyme expression represent primary genetic mechanisms for regulation of catecholamine action and blood pressure control in this widely studied model of hypertension. PMID:20378607

  11. Gene expression in amygdala as a function of differential trait anxiety levels in genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rats.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Morán, Sira; Palència, Marta; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; Martínez-Membrives, Esther; López-Aumatell, Regina; Sabariego, Marta; Donaire, Rocío; Morón, Ignacio; Torres, Carmen; Martínez-Conejero, José Antonio; Tobeña, Adolf; Esteban, Francisco José; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    To identify genes involved in anxiety/fear traits, we analyzed the gene expression profile in the amygdala of genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rats. The NIH-HS rat stock has revealed to be a unique genetic resource for the fine mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) to very small genomic regions, due to the high amount of genetic recombinants accumulated along more than 50 breeding generations, and for the same reason it can be expected that those genetically heterogeneous rats should be especially useful for studying differential gene expression as a function of anxiety-(or other)-related traits. We selected high- and low-anxious NIH-HS rats differing in their number of avoidances in a single 50-trial session of the two-way active avoidance task. Rats were also tested in unconditioned anxiety tests (e.g., elevated zero-maze). Three weeks after behavioural testing, the amygdala was dissected and prepared for the microarray study. There appeared 6 significantly down-regulated and 28 up-regulated genes (fold-change >|2|, FDR<0.05) between the low- and high-anxious groups, with central nervous system-related functions. Regression analyses (stepwise) revealed that differential expression of some genes could be predictive of anxiety/fear responses. Among those genes for which the present results suggest a link with individual differences in trait anxiety, six relevant genes were examined with qRT-PCR, four of which (Ucn3, Tacr3, H2-M9 and Arr3) were validated. Remarkably, some of them are characterized by sharing known functions related with hormonal HPA-axis responses to (and/or modulation of) stress, anxiety or fear, and putative involvement in related neurobehavioural functions. The results confirm the usefulness of NIH-HS rats as a good animal model for research on the neurogenetic basis of anxiety and fear, while suggesting the involvement of some neuropeptide/neuroendocrine pathways on the development of differential anxiety profiles. PMID:23777796

  12. A 90-day subchronic feeding study of genetically modified rice expressing Cry1Ab protein in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Huan; He, Xiaoyun; Zou, Shiying; Zhang, Teng; Luo, Yunbo; Huang, Kunlun; Zhu, Zhen; Xu, Wentao

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgenic rice line (mfb-MH86) expressing a synthetic cry1Ab gene can be protected against feeding damage from Lepidopteran insects, including Sesamia inferens, Chilo suppressalis, Tryporyza incertulas and Cnaphalocrocis medinalis. Rice flour from mfb-MH86 and its near-isogenic control MH86 was separately formulated into rodent diets at concentrations of 17.5, 35 and 70 % (w/w) for a 90-day feeding test with rats, and all of the diets were nutritionally balanced. In this study, the responses of rats fed diets containing mfb-MH86 were compared to those of rats fed flour from MH86. Overall health, body weight and food consumption were comparable between groups fed diets containing mfb-MH86 and MH86. Blood samples were collected prior to sacrifice and a few significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed in haematological and biochemical parameters between rats fed genetically modified (GM) and non-GM diets. However, the values of these parameters were within the normal ranges of values for rats of this age and sex, thus not considered treatment related. In addition, upon sacrifice a large number of organs were weighed, macroscopic and histopathological examinations were performed with only minor changes to report. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that no toxic effect was observed in the conditions of the experiment, based on the different parameters assessed. GM rice mfb-MH86 is as safe and nutritious as non-GM rice. PMID:25367203

  13. Emotional memory impairments in a genetic rat model of depression: involvement of 5-HT/MEK/Arc signaling in restoration.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, T M; Delagrange, P; Spedding, M; Popoli, M; Mathé, A A; Ögren, S O; Svenningsson, P

    2012-02-01

    Cognitive dysfunctions are common in major depressive disorder, but have been difficult to recapitulate in animal models. This study shows that Flinders sensitive line (FSL) rats, a genetic rat model of depression, display a pronounced impairment of emotional memory function in the passive avoidance (PA) task, accompanied by reduced transcription of Arc in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. At the cellular level, FSL rats have selective reductions in levels of NMDA receptor subunits, serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptors and MEK activity. Treatment with chronic escitalopram, but not with an antidepressant regimen of nortriptyline, restored memory performance and increased Arc transcription in FSL rats. Multiple pharmacological manipulations demonstrated that procognitive effects could also be achieved by either disinhibition of 5-HT(1A)R/MEK/Arc or stimulation of 5-HT₄R/MEK/Arc signaling cascades. Taken together, studies of FSL rats in the PA task revealed reversible deficits in emotional memory processing, providing a potential model with predictive and construct validity for assessments of procognitive actions of antidepressant drug therapies. PMID:21242991

  14. Genetic mapping of Eutr1, a locus controlling E2-induced pyometritis in the Brown Norway rat, to RNO5.

    PubMed

    Gould, Karen A; Pandey, Jyotsna; Lachel, Cynthia M; Murrin, Clare R; Flood, Lisa A; Pennington, Karen L; Schaffer, Beverly S; Tochacek, Martin; McComb, Rodney D; Meza, Jane L; Wendell, Douglas L; Shull, James D

    2005-11-01

    In certain rat strains, chronic estrogen administration can lead to pyometritis, an inflammation of the uterus accompanied by infection and the accumulation of intraluminal pus. In this article, we report that the Brown Norway (BN) rat is highly susceptible to pyometritis induced by 17beta-estradiol (E2). The susceptibility of the BN rat to E2-induced pyometritis appears to segregate as a recessive trait in crosses to the resistant August x Copenhagen Irish (ACI) strain. In a (BN x ACI)F(2) population, we find strong evidence for a major genetic determinant of susceptibility to E2-induced pyometritis on rat chromosome 5 (RNO5). Our data are most consistent with a model in which the BN allele of this locus, designated Eutr1 (Estrogen-induced uterine response 1), acts in an incompletely dominant manner to control E2-induced pyometritis. Furthermore, we have confirmed the contribution of Eutr1 to E2-induced uterine pyometritis using an RNO5 congenic rat strain. In addition to Eutr1, we obtained evidence suggestive of linkage for five additional loci on RNO2, 4, 11, 17, and X that control susceptibility to E2-induced pyometritis in the (BN x ACI)F(2) population. PMID:16284801

  15. Ameliorating effect of olive oil on fertility of male rats fed on genetically modified soya bean

    PubMed Central

    El-Kholy, Thanaa A. F.; Al-Abbadi, Hatim A.; Qahwaji, Dina; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed K.; Shelat, Vishal G.; Sobhy, Hanan M.; Hilal, Mohammad Abu

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetically modified soya bean (GMSB) is a commercialized food. It has been shown to have adverse effects on fertility in animal trials. Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) has many beneficial effects including anti-oxidant properties. The aim of this study is to elucidate if addition of EVOO ameliorates the adverse effects on reproductive organs of rats fed on GMSB containing diet. Methods Forty adult male albino rats (150–180 g) of Sprague Dawley strain were separated into four groups of 10 rats each: Group 1 – control group fed on basal ration, Group 2 – fed on basal ration mixed with EVOO (30%), Group 3 – fed on basal ration mixed with GMSB (15%), and Group 4 – fed on basal ration mixed with GMSB (15%) and EVOO (30%). This feeding regimen was administered for 65 days. Blood samples were collected to analyze serum zinc, vitamin E, and testosterone levels. Histopathological and weight changes in sex organs were evaluated. Results GMSB diet reduced weight of testis (0.66±0.06 vs. 1.7±0.06, p<0.001), epididymis (0.489±0.03 vs. 0.7±0.03, p<0.001), prostate (0.04±0.009 vs. 0.68±0.04, p<0.001), and seminal vesicles (0.057±0.01 vs. 0.8±0.04, p<0.001). GMSB diet adversely affected sperm count (406±7.1 vs. 610±7.8, p<0.001), motility (p<0.001), and abnormality (p<0.001). GMSB diet also reduced serum zinc (p<0.05), vitamin E (p<0.05), and testosterone (p<0.05) concentrations. EVOO diet had no detrimental effect. Addition of EVOO to GMSB diet increased the serum zinc (p<0.05), vitamin E (p<0.05), and testosterone (p<0.05) levels and also restored the weights of testis (1.35±0.16 vs. 0.66±0.06, p<0.01), epididymis (0.614±0.13 vs. 0.489±0.03, p<0.001), prostate (0.291±0.09 vs. 0.04±0.009, p<0.001), seminal vesicle (0.516±0.18 vs. 0.057±0.01, p<0.001) along with sperm count (516±3.1 vs. 406±7.1, p<0.01), motility (p<0.01), and abnormality (p<0.05). Conclusion EVOO ameliorates the adverse effects of GMSB on reproductive organs in adult male

  16. Recent demographic bottlenecks are not accompanied by a genetic signature in banner-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis).

    PubMed

    Busch, Joseph D; Waser, Peter M; Dewoody, J Andrew

    2007-06-01

    Single-sample methods of bottleneck detection are now routine analyses in studies of wild populations and conservation genetics. Three common approaches to bottleneck detection are the heterozygosity excess, mode-shift, and M-ratio tests. Empirical groundtruthing of these methods is difficult, but their performances are critical for the accurate reconstruction of population demography. We use two banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis) populations from southeastern Arizona (USA) that are known to have experienced recent demographic reductions to search for genetic bottleneck signals with eight microsatellite loci. Over eight total sample-years, neither population showed a genetic bottleneck signature. M-ratios in both populations were large, stable, and never fell below a critical significance value (Mc). The mode shift test did not detect any distortion of allele frequencies, and tests of heterozygosity excess were not significant in postbottleneck samples when we used standard microsatellite mutation models. The genetic effects of bottlenecks like those experienced by our study populations should be strongly influenced by rates of mutation and migration. We used genetic parentage data to estimate a relatively high mutation rate in D. spectabilis (0.0081 mutants/generation/locus), but mutation alone is unlikely to explain the temporal distribution of rare alleles that we observed. Migration (gene flow) is a more likely explanation, despite prior mark-recapture analysis that estimated very low rates of interpopulation dispersal. We interpret our kangaroo rat data in light of the broader literature and conclude that in natural populations connected by dispersal, demographic bottlenecks may prove difficult to detect using molecular genetic data. PMID:17561905

  17. Prepulse inhibition predicts spatial working memory performance in the inbred Roman high- and low-avoidance rats and in genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rats: relevance for studying pre-attentive and cognitive anomalies in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Oliveras, Ignasi; Río-Álamos, Cristóbal; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; Martínez-Membrives, Esther; Giorgi, Osvaldo; Corda, Maria G; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of schizophrenia-relevant symptoms are increasingly important for progress in our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the disorder and for discovering novel and more specific treatments. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) and working memory, which are impaired in schizophrenic patients, are among the symptoms/processes modeled in those animal analogs. We have evaluated whether a genetically-selected rat model, the Roman high-avoidance inbred strain (RHA-I), displays PPI deficits as compared with its Roman low-avoidance (RLA-I) counterpart and the genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rat stock. We have investigated whether PPI deficits predict spatial working memory impairments (in the Morris water maze; MWM) in these three rat types (Experiment 1), as well as in a separate sample of NIH-HS rats stratified according to their extreme (High, Medium, Low) PPI scores (Experiment 2). The results from Experiment 1 show that RHA-I rats display PPI and spatial working memory deficits compared to both RLA-I and NIH-HS rats. Likewise, in Experiment 2, "Low-PPI" NIH-HS rats present significantly impaired working memory with respect to "Medium-PPI" and "High-PPI" NIH-HS subgroups. Further support to these results comes from correlational, factorial, and multiple regression analyses, which reveal that PPI is positively associated with spatial working memory performance. Conversely, cued learning in the MWM was not associated with PPI. Thus, using genetically-selected and genetically heterogeneous rats, the present study shows, for the first time, that PPI is a positive predictor of performance in a spatial working memory task. These results may have translational value for schizophrenia symptom research in humans, as they suggest that either by psychogenetic selection or by focusing on extreme PPI scores from a genetically heterogeneous rat stock, it is possible to detect a useful (perhaps "at risk") phenotype to study cognitive anomalies linked to schizophrenia. PMID

  18. Prepulse inhibition predicts spatial working memory performance in the inbred Roman high- and low-avoidance rats and in genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rats: relevance for studying pre-attentive and cognitive anomalies in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Oliveras, Ignasi; Río-Álamos, Cristóbal; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; Martínez-Membrives, Esther; Giorgi, Osvaldo; Corda, Maria G.; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of schizophrenia-relevant symptoms are increasingly important for progress in our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the disorder and for discovering novel and more specific treatments. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) and working memory, which are impaired in schizophrenic patients, are among the symptoms/processes modeled in those animal analogs. We have evaluated whether a genetically-selected rat model, the Roman high-avoidance inbred strain (RHA-I), displays PPI deficits as compared with its Roman low-avoidance (RLA-I) counterpart and the genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rat stock. We have investigated whether PPI deficits predict spatial working memory impairments (in the Morris water maze; MWM) in these three rat types (Experiment 1), as well as in a separate sample of NIH-HS rats stratified according to their extreme (High, Medium, Low) PPI scores (Experiment 2). The results from Experiment 1 show that RHA-I rats display PPI and spatial working memory deficits compared to both RLA-I and NIH-HS rats. Likewise, in Experiment 2, “Low-PPI” NIH-HS rats present significantly impaired working memory with respect to “Medium-PPI” and “High-PPI” NIH-HS subgroups. Further support to these results comes from correlational, factorial, and multiple regression analyses, which reveal that PPI is positively associated with spatial working memory performance. Conversely, cued learning in the MWM was not associated with PPI. Thus, using genetically-selected and genetically heterogeneous rats, the present study shows, for the first time, that PPI is a positive predictor of performance in a spatial working memory task. These results may have translational value for schizophrenia symptom research in humans, as they suggest that either by psychogenetic selection or by focusing on extreme PPI scores from a genetically heterogeneous rat stock, it is possible to detect a useful (perhaps “at risk”) phenotype to study cognitive anomalies linked to

  19. Genetic threshold hypothesis of neocortical spike-and-wave discharges in the rat: An animal model of petit mal epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Vadasz, C.; Fleischer, A.; Carpi, D.; Jando, G.

    1995-02-27

    Neocortical high-voltage spike-and-wave discharges (HVS) in the rat are an animal model of petit mal epilepsy. Genetic analysis of total duration of HVS (s/12 hr) in reciprocal F1 and F2 hybrids of F344 and BN rats indicated that the phenotypic variability of HVS cannot be explained by simple, monogenic Mendelian model. Biometrical analysis suggested the presence of additive, dominance, and sex-linked-epistatic effects, buffering maternal influence, and heterosis. High correlation was observed between average duration (s/episode) and frequency of occurrence of spike-and-wave episodes (n/12 hr) in parental and segregating generations, indicating that common genes affect both duration and frequency of the spike-and-wave pattern. We propose that both genetic and developmental - environmental factors control an underlying quantitative variable, which, above a certain threshold level, precipitates HVS discharges. These findings, together with the recent availability of rat DNA markers for total genome mapping, pave the way to the identification of genes that control the susceptibility of the brain to spike-and-wave discharges. 67 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Chiao-Ling; Liang, Tiebing; Liu, Yunlong; Lumeng, Lawrence; Zhou, Feng C.; Muir, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder) in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP). This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross) resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB) with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate) to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS), were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50%) of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284) and intronic regions (169) with the least in exon's (4), suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a), excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1), neurotransmitters (Pomc), and synapses (Snap29). This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits. PMID:27490364

  1. Differential immune and genetic responses in rat models of Crohn's colitis and ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xuan-Zheng; Winston, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are clinically, immunologically, and morphologically distinct forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, smooth muscle function is impaired similarly in both diseases, resulting in diarrhea. We tested the hypothesis that differential cellular, genetic, and immunological mechanisms mediate smooth muscle dysfunction in two animal models believed to represent the two diseases. We used the rat models of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)- and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colonic inflammations, which closely mimic the clinical and morphological features of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, respectively. DSS inflammation induced oxidative stress initially in mucosa/submucosa, which then propagated to the muscularis externa to impair smooth muscle function. The muscularis externa showed no increase of cytokines/chemokines. On the other hand, TNBS inflammation almost simultaneously induced oxidative stress, recruited or activated immune cells, and generated cytokines/chemokines in both mucosa/submucosa and muscularis externa. The generation of cytokines/chemokines did not correlate with the recruitment and activation of immune cells. Consequently, the impairment of smooth muscle function in DSS inflammation was primarily due to oxidative stress, whereas that in TNBS inflammation was due to both oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokines. The impairment of smooth muscle function in DSS inflammation was due to suppression of Gαq protein of the excitation-contraction coupling. In TNBS inflammation, it was due to suppression of the α1C1b subunit of Cav1.2b channels, CPI-17 and Gαq. TNBS inflammation increased IGF-1 and TGF-β time dependently in the muscularis externa. IGF-1 induced smooth muscle hyperplasia; both IGF-1 and TGF-β induced hypertrophy. In conclusion, both TNBS and DSS induce transmural inflammation, albeit with different types of inflammatory mediators. The recruitment or activation of

  2. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chiao-Ling; Lossie, Amy C; Liang, Tiebing; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Lumeng, Lawrence; Zhou, Feng C; Muir, William M

    2016-08-01

    Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder) in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP). This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross) resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB) with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate) to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS), were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50%) of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284) and intronic regions (169) with the least in exon's (4), suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a), excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1), neurotransmitters (Pomc), and synapses (Snap29). This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits. PMID:27490364

  3. Pathogenesis of hyperglycemia in genetically obese-hyperglycemic rats, Wistar fatty: presence of hepatic insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Y; Shimura, Y; Ikeda, H

    1989-02-01

    The present studies were designed to clarify the contribution of the liver to the development of hyperglycemia in Wistar fatty rats. The hepatic activities of insulin-inducible enzymes involved in glycolysis (glucokinase; GK and pyruvate kinase) and lipogenesis (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), were higher in fatty rats than in lean rats at 4 and 8 weeks of age because of the higher insulin levels in the former. Thereafter, the GK activities of fatty rats decreased slightly in spite of severe hyperinsulinemia, and did not differ from those of lean rats. In addition, fatty rats had higher levels of insulin-suppressible gluconeogenic enzymes, glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and fructose-1, 6-diphosphatase. These findings indicate that the hepatic enzymes of fatty rats are resistant to insulin. This postulation was supported by the fact that the hepatic enzyme activities of fatty rats showed a lower response to changes in plasma insulin levels produced by fasting and refeeding. The G6Pase/GK ratio, which indicates net glucose handling in the liver, increased in fatty rats and decreased in lean rats with advancing age, suggesting that hepatic glucose production in fatty rats becomes dominant with advancing age. The changes in hepatic glycolytic intermediates supported this suggestion; the glycolytic steps both from glucose to glucose-6-phosphate and from phospho-enolpyruvate to pyruvate in fatty rats were accelerated at 5 weeks of age, but suppressed at 12 weeks of age. These results indicate that insulin resistance in the hepatic enzyme regulation may contribute to the development of hyperglycemia in Wistar fatty rats. PMID:2543549

  4. Neuromolecular basis of parental behavior in laboratory mice and rats: with special emphasis on technical issues of using mouse genetics.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kumi O; Tachikawa, Kashiko; Yoshida, Sachine; Tsuneoka, Yousuke; Numan, Michael

    2011-07-01

    To support the well-being of the parent-infant relationship, the neuromolecular mechanisms of parental behaviors should be clarified. From neuroanatomical analyses in laboratory rats, the medial preoptic area (MPOA) has been shown to be of critical importance in parental retrieving behavior. More recently, various gene-targeted mouse strains have been found to be defective in different aspects of parental behaviors, contributing to the identification of molecules and signaling pathways required for the behavior. Therefore, the neuromolecular basis of "mother love" is now a fully approachable research field in modern molecular neuroscience. In this review, we will provide a summary of the required brain areas and gene for parental behavior in laboratory mice (Mus musculus) and rats (Rattus norvegicus). Basic protocols and technical considerations on studying the mechanism of parental behavior using genetically-engineered mouse strains will also be presented. PMID:21338647

  5. Genetic damage and the expression of behavioral abnormalities in the progeny of male rats exposed to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lowery, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    To determine the possible genetic nature of behavioral anomalies, an identifiable genetic endpoint, inherited chromosome translocations in the offspring, was selected to evaluate the relationship to behavior. Young adult male Fischer 344 rats were exposed to 50-300 rads of ionizing radiation. Two weeks following their irradiation, the males were mated with four virgin females for one week. During this time, fertilizing sperm were derived from post-meiotic spermatids, the stage of the spermatogenic cycle most sensitive to the mutagenic effects of radiation. Behavioral analyses of the resulting 390 offspring consisted of both motor reflex and motor coordination measurements as well as learning and retention parameters. Significant differences in performance were seen in several of the motor reflex measurements in progeny of males exposed to some of the higher doses of irradiation. A similar phenomenon was observed in the performance of a single learned behavior.

  6. Metabolic responses to fasting and refeeding in lean and genetically obese rats.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, N J; Saville, M E; Stock, M J

    1983-05-01

    Injection of norepinephrine (NE) (25 micrograms/100 g body wt) caused a similar rise in metabolic rate in lean and obese (fa/fa) Zucker rats, but 3-day fasting suppressed the response in lean rats and enhanced the rise in obese mutants. Triiodothyronine (T3) injection (10 micrograms/100 g body wt) caused a significantly greater rise in oxygen consumption (Vo2) in obese than lean rats, but the response was attenuated by fasting in all animals. The thermic response to a single meal of either mixed composition, carbohydrate, or protein (40 kJ) was much smaller in obese rats than lean, but the response to the mixed nutrient meal was similar for all rats after a 3-day fast. Refeeding 3-day fasted lean rats with a single carbohydrate meal (40 kJ) caused a rise in plasma T3 levels after 3 h and a delayed increase in metabolic rate 24 h later. Injection of NE instead of refeeding caused a similar delayed rise in metabolic rate. Carbohydrate refeeding had no effect on plasma T3 levels or oxygen consumption in 3-day fasted obese Zuckers, but injection of NE did produce a significant increase in metabolic rate after 24 h. Refeeding 3-day fasted rats with protein (40 kJ) caused a rise in oxygen consumption 24 h later in lean animals but had no effect in obese animals. The data from lean Zucker rats confirm previous findings in Sprague-Dawley rats and suggest that the thermic response to refeeding involves a complex interaction between the sympathetic nervous system and thyroid hormones. Obese Zuckers responded normally to NE and T3, indicating that their reduced thermogenesis after food may be due to insensitivity to nutrient availability or an inability to activate the sympathetic nervous system. PMID:6846570

  7. Antidepressant efficacy of high and low frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation in the FSL/FRL genetic rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Hesselberg, Marie Louise; Wegener, Gregers; Buchholtz, Poul Erik

    2016-11-01

    Repetitive Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) has appeared to be a potential non-invasive antidepressant method, which implies non-convulsive focal stimulation of the brain through a time varying magnetic field. The antidepressant potential of rTMS has been supported by animal studies showing a number of interesting similarities between magnetic stimulation and electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS). Despite these positive results, this method still contains many unknown issues. Importantly, there are fundamental uncertainties concerning the optimal combination of stimulus parameters (frequency, intensity, duration, and number of pulses) to obtain an antidepressant effect. Therefore, the present study aimed to qualify the choice of rTMS stimulus frequency in a well-validated genetic animal model of depression, the FSL/FRL rats. We compared the antidepressant effect of low frequency, high frequency rTMS and ECS to sham treatment in FRL and FSL rats using 6 parallel groups. We used the Forced Swim Test and the Open Field Test to screen the depression-like state in rats. We found that both the high frequency and the low frequency rTMS resulted in a significant antidepressant effect. However, this effect was inferior to the effect of ECS. The low frequency and high frequency groups, which received the same total impulse load and stimulus intensity, did not differ with respect to antidepressant efficacy in this study. In conclusion, this study provides robust evidence that both rTMS interventions are efficacious, although not as efficient as ECS. PMID:27473004

  8. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and demonstration of genetic variability among bifidobacteria isolated from rats fed with raw kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Fanedl, L; Nekrep, F V; Avgustin, G

    1998-11-01

    A rise in bifidobacterial numbers resembling the Escherichia coli overgrowth phenomenon was observed in the rat small intestine in a feeding experiment with kidney beans. Bifidobacterial colony counts increased from 7.6 x 10(6) to 1.7 x 10(8) cfu.g-1 of intestinal tissue in the anterior part and from less than 1 x 10(5) to 2.65 x 10(8) cfu.g-1 in posterior part of the intestine. Fifteen bifidobacterial strains were purified and further analysed. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assays were used to genetically differentiate bifidobacterial isolates from rat gut and compare them with type strains of 20 different species from the genus Bifidobacterium. A total of 80 arbitrary decamere primers were screened with 6 isolates, and 7 primers were chosen for the final analysis. The amplified DNA bands were scored and analysed by the unweighted pair-group method using arithmetic averages clustering. The isolates were not identical to each other nor to the screened type strains. Whereas it was possible to group 12 of the isolates into 2 separate clusters, 3 strains showed no significant relatedness to any strain. The results of the RAPD analysis indicated that there was a large degree variability among the bifidobacteria in the rat gut and demonstrated the potential applicability of such an approach in the investigation of microbial diversity in complex ecosystems. PMID:10030004

  9. Fatty acid composition of brown adipose tissue in genetically heat-tolerant FOK rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, T.; Furuyama, F.; Kuroshima, A.

    The phospholipid fatty acid composition of brown adipose tissue (BAT) was examined in inbred heat-tolerant FOK rats and compared with that in conventional Wistar rats not previously exposed to heat. The FOK rats showed higher unsaturation states, as indicated by higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and a higher unsaturation index and polyunsaturated fatty acids/saturated fatty acids ratio. This higher level of unsaturation was characterized by the higher amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid, arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. It may be concluded that the increased docosahexaenoic acid level in BAT phospholipids brings about the hyperplasia of BAT, causing an enhancement of its in vivo thermogernic activity as well as the systemic non-shivering thermogenesis observed in heat-tolerant FOK rats.

  10. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining genetic variation in wild populations of Arctic organisms is fundamental to the long-term persistence of high latitude biodiversity. Variability is important because it provides options for species to respond to changing environmental conditions and novel challenges such as emerging path...

  11. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Capsicum represents one of several well characterized Solanaceous genera. A wealth of classical and molecular genetics research is available for the genus. Information gleaned from its cultivated relatives, tomato and potato, provide further insight for basic and applied studies. Early ...

  12. Paternal Genetic Contribution Influences Fetal Vulnerability to Maternal Alcohol Consumption in a Rat Model of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, Laura J.; Redei, Eva E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Fetal alcohol exposure causes in the offspring a collection of permanent physiological and neuropsychological deficits collectively termed Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). The timing and amount of exposure cannot fully explain the substantial variability among affected individuals, pointing to genetic influences that mediate fetal vulnerability. However, the aspects of vulnerability that depend on the mother, the father, or both, are not known. Methodology/Principal Findings Using the outbred Sprague-Dawley (SD) and inbred Brown Norway (BN) rat strains as well as their reciprocal crosses, we administered ethanol (E), pair-fed (PF), or control (C) diets to the pregnant dams. The dams' plasma levels of free thyroxine (fT4), triiodothyronine (T3), free T3 (fT3), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were measured to elucidate potential differences in maternal thyroid hormonal environment, which affects specific aspects of FASD. We then compared alcohol-exposed, pair fed, and control offspring of each fetal strain on gestational day 21 (G21) to identify maternal and paternal genetic effects on bodyweight and placental weight of male and female fetuses. Conclusions SD and BN dams exhibited different baseline hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid function. Moreover, the thyroid function of SD dams was more severely affected by alcohol consumption while that of BN dams was relatively resistant. This novel finding suggests that genetic differences in maternal thyroid function are one source of maternal genetic effects on fetal vulnerability to FASD. The fetal vulnerability to decreased bodyweight after alcohol exposure depended on the genetic contribution of both parents, not only maternal contribution as previously thought. In contrast, the effect of maternal alcohol consumption on placental weight was consistent and not strain-dependent. Interestingly, placental weight in fetuses with different paternal genetic contributions exhibited opposite responses to

  13. Sex differences in the blood antioxidant defense system in juvenile rats with various genetic predispositions to hypertension.

    PubMed

    Horvathova, Martina; Zitnanova, Ingrid; Kralovicova, Zuzana; Balis, Peter; Puzserova, Angelika; Muchova, Jana; Kluknavsky, Michal; Durackova, Zdenka; Bernatova, Iveta

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the contribution of blood oxidative stress (OS) to the development of hypertension, as well as sex differences in the antioxidant defense system (ADS) in genetic models of hypertension. Nine-week-old normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, borderline hypertensive rats (BHR) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) of both sexes were used. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was determined by tail-cuff plethysmography, the trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and the concentration of lipid peroxides (LP) were determined in plasma. The activity of the antioxidant enzymes Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT) was determined in erythrocytes. SBP was significantly elevated in BHR and SHR in both sexes. BHR and SHR males had a higher SBP than the respective females. Sex-dependent differences in the ADS were found only in SHR, in which TEAC, SOD and CAT were significantly higher in males than in females. No differences in TEAC, SOD, CAT and GPx were observed between BHR (males and females) and WKY controls. LP levels were similar in all the groups investigated. Significant positive correlations were observed between SBP and both SOD and CAT. TEAC correlated positively with SOD and LP. As no signs of oxidative damage to lipids were found in young BHR and SHR of either sex, OS in the blood does not seem to be causatively related to the development of hypertension in these rats. However, despite activated antioxidant defenses, the positive correlation between plasma TEAC and LP suggests that oxidative damage is progressing slowly and therefore it seems to be a consequence rather than the cause of hypertension. PMID:26510784

  14. Genetic basis of transcriptome differences between the founder strains of the rat HXB/BXH recombinant inbred panel

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background With the advent of next generation sequencing it has become possible to detect genomic variation on a large scale. However, predicting which genomic variants are damaging to gene function remains a challenge, as knowledge of the effects of genomic variation on gene expression is still limited. Recombinant inbred panels are powerful tools to study the cis and trans effects of genetic variation on molecular phenotypes such as gene expression. Results We generated a comprehensive inventory of genomic differences between the two founder strains of the rat HXB/BXH recombinant inbred panel: SHR/OlaIpcv and BN-Lx/Cub. We identified 3.2 million single nucleotide variants, 425,924 small insertions and deletions, 907 copy number changes and 1,094 large structural genetic variants. RNA-sequencing analyses on liver tissue of the two strains identified 532 differentially expressed genes and 40 alterations in transcript structure. We identified both coding and non-coding variants that correlate with differential expression and alternative splicing. Furthermore, structural variants, in particular gene duplications, show a strong correlation with transcriptome alterations. Conclusions We show that the panel is a good model for assessing the genetic basis of phenotypic heterogeneity and for providing insights into possible underlying molecular mechanisms. Our results reveal a high diversity and complexity underlying quantitative and qualitative transcriptional differences. PMID:22541052

  15. [Features of the stress reaction in rats with genetically-determined emotionality (from EEG indicators)].

    PubMed

    Sviderskaia, N E; Seredenin, S B; Korol'kova, T A; Kozhechkin, S N; Kozhedub, R G; Koshtoiants, O Kh

    2001-01-01

    The features of the EEG spatial organization in two rat strains, i.e., with expressed emotional reactions (Maudsley reactive, MR) and less reactive (Maudsley nonreactive, MNR) were compared in two stress situations: during exposure to the action of pain (P) (i.p. injection of 0.9% NaCl solution) and during 24-hour water deprivation (D). Multichannel EEG recording (24 derivations) and their multiparametric estimation (840 signs) made it possible to differentiate characteristic features of the EEG spatial organization in rats with initially increased emotional reactions and passive behavioral strategy during exposure to stress. In both stress-inducing conditions, an increase in crosscorrelation and coherence between cortical potentials in parallel with rise of the spectral power in the range of high-frequency theta and its drop in the range of EEG high-frequency band was observed in the MR rats. The MNR rats showed the opposite changes. Different reactivity of the ratio between the coherence and spectral power of potentials was observed in two strains of rats. This index characterizes the level of the information-energy component of the spatial organization of cortical potentials. It is suggested that different character of the EEG changes reflects the features of interhemispheric relations, information-energy processes, and cortical regulation of autonomic processes in the system of adaptive stress reactions at different levels of emotionality and behavioral strategy. PMID:11764521

  16. Harvey Sarcoma Virus: A Second Murine Type C Sarcoma Virus with Rat Genetic Information

    PubMed Central

    Scolnick, Edward M.; Parks, Wade P.

    1974-01-01

    The nucleic acid sequences found in the Harvey strain of murine sarcoma virus have been analyzed by RNA·[3H]DNA and [3H]RNA·DNA hybridization techniques. The Harvey strain of murine sarcoma virus has been found to possess at least two sets of nucleic acid sequences. One set of sequences is contained in the Moloney strain of mouse type-C virus, and the other set is contained in DNA transcripts synthesized in endogenous reactions containing rat type-C virus(es). The nucleic acid sequences that are detected in the Harvey sarcoma virus with the DNA probes synthesized from the rat type-C virus(es) are related to the rat sequences detected in the Kirsten strain of murine sarcoma virus. The results support the model that both Kirsten and Harvey sarcoma viruses arose through a process of recombination or reassortment between mouse type-C viruses and sequences in rat cells and suggest that the information for transformation of fibroblasts may be contained in the rat type-C or cellular genome. PMID:4364897

  17. Grafting fibroblasts genetically modified to produce L-dopa in a rat model of Parkinson disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, J.A.; Fisher, L.J.; Xu, L.; Jinnah, H.A.; Rosenberg, M.B.; Shimohama, S.; Gage, F.H. ); Langlais, P.J. School of Medicine and Veterans Administration Medical Center, La Jolla San Diego State Univ., CA ); Iuvone, P.M. ); O'Malley, K.L. )

    1989-11-01

    Rat fibroblasts were infected with a retroviral vector containing the cDNA for rat tyrosine hydroxylase. A TH-positive clone was identified by biochemical assay and immunohistochemical staining. When supplemented in vitro with pterin cofactors required for TH activity, these cells produced L-dopa and released it into the cell cultured medium. Uninfected control cells and fibroblasts infected with the TH vector were grafted separately to the caudate of rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway. Only grafts containing TH-expressing fibroblasts were found to reduce rotational asymmetry. These results have general implications for the application of gene therapy to human neurological disease and specific implications for Parkinson disease.

  18. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF RISK FACTORS FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE (CVD) IN GENETICALLY PREDISPOSED RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rodent CVD models are increasingly used for understanding individual differences in susceptibility to environmental stressors such as air pollution. We characterized pathologies and a number of known human risk factors of CVD in genetically predisposed, male young adult Spontaneo...

  19. A systems genetic analysis of alcohol drinking by mice, rats and men: influence of brain GABAergic transmission.

    PubMed

    Saba, Laura M; Bennett, Beth; Hoffman, Paula L; Barcomb, Kelsey; Ishii, Takao; Kechris, Katerina; Tabakoff, Boris

    2011-06-01

    Genetic influences on the predisposition to complex behavioral or physiological traits can reflect genetic polymorphisms that lead to altered gene product function, and/or variations in gene expression levels. We have explored quantitative variations in an animal's alcohol consumption, using a genetical genomic/phenomic approach. In our studies, gene expression is correlated with amount of alcohol consumed, and genomic regions that regulate the alcohol consumption behavior and the quantitative levels of gene expression (behavioral and expression quantitative trait loci [QTL]) are determined and used as a filter to identify candidate genes predisposing the behavior. We determined QTLs for alcohol consumption using the LXS panel of recombinant inbred mice. We then identified genes that were: 1) differentially expressed between five high and five low alcohol-consuming lines or strains of mice; and 2) were physically located in, or had an expression QTL (eQTL) within the alcohol consumption QTLs. Comparison of mRNA and protein levels in brains of high and low alcohol consuming mice led us to a bioinformatic examination of potential regulation by microRNAs of an identified candidate transcript, Gnb1 (G protein beta subunit 1). We combined our current analysis with our earlier work identifying candidate genes for the alcohol consumption trait in mice, rats and humans. Our overall analysis leads us to postulate that the activity of the GABAergic system, and in particular GABA release and GABA receptor trafficking and signaling, which involves G protein function, contributes significantly to genetic variation in the predisposition to varying levels of alcohol consumption. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Trends in neuropharmacology: in memory of Erminio Costa'. PMID:21185315

  20. Subchronic and genetic safety evaluation of a calcium fructoborate in rats.

    PubMed

    Marone, Palma Ann; Heimbach, James T; Nemzer, Boris; Hunter, John M

    2016-09-01

    A branded calcium fructoborate product, a nature-identical calcium salt of bis (fructose) ester of boric acid found in plants and a natural source of boron in the human diet and sold under the trade name FruiteX-B(®) Brand Calcium Fructoborate ("FrxB"), was evaluated in a 90-day dietary toxicity study and two genotoxicity studies. In the 90-day study, four groups of 10 male and 10 female Crl:SD CD(®) IGS rats were fed diets with FrxB admixtures of 0.56, 1.12, and 1.68% dietary concentration, providing mean overall daily intakes of FrxB in male rats of 385.8, 774.9, and 1161.3 mg/kg bw/day, and 392.1, 784.4, and 1171.1 mg/kg bw/day in female rats. There were no mortalities, no clinical or ophthalmologic signs, body weight, body weight gain, food consumption, food efficiency, Functional Observational Battery (FOB), or Motor Activity (MA) findings associated with the administration of FrxB. There were no adverse changes in hematology, coagulation, clinical chemistry, or urinalysis parameters in male or female rats considered the result of test substance administration. At necropsy, there were no macroscopic, histopathological findings, or organ weight changes deemed related to administration of the test substance. Under the conditions of this study, based on the toxicological endpoints evaluated, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for FrxB in the diet was 1161.3 and 1171.1 mg/kg bw/day in male and female rats, respectively. Bacterial mutagenicity studies and a micronucleus test using Chinese hamster V79 cells demonstrated no mutagenic or genotoxic potential of the tested brand of calcium fructoborate. PMID:27350145

  1. New analysis of a rat feeding study with a genetically modified maize reveals signs of hepatorenal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Cellier, Dominique; de Vendomois, Joël Spiroux

    2007-05-01

    Health risk assessment of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) cultivated for food or feed is under debate throughout the world, and very little data have been published on mid- or long-term toxicological studies with mammals. One of these studies performed under the responsibility of Monsanto Company with a transgenic corn MON863 has been subjected to questions from regulatory reviewers in Europe, where it was finally approved in 2005. This necessitated a new assessment of kidney pathological findings, and the results remained controversial. An Appeal Court action in Germany (Münster) allowed public access in June 2005 to all the crude data from this 90-day rat-feeding study. We independently re-analyzed these data. Appropriate statistics were added, such as a multivariate analysis of the growth curves, and for biochemical parameters comparisons between GMO-treated rats and the controls fed with an equivalent normal diet, and separately with six reference diets with different compositions. We observed that after the consumption of MON863, rats showed slight but dose-related significant variations in growth for both sexes, resulting in 3.3% decrease in weight for males and 3.7% increase for females. Chemistry measurements reveal signs of hepatorenal toxicity, marked also by differential sensitivities in males and females. Triglycerides increased by 24-40% in females (either at week 14, dose 11% or at week 5, dose 33%, respectively); urine phosphorus and sodium excretions diminished in males by 31-35% (week 14, dose 33%) for the most important results significantly linked to the treatment in comparison to seven diets tested. Longer experiments are essential in order to indicate the real nature and extent of the possible pathology; with the present data it cannot be concluded that GM corn MON863 is a safe product. PMID:17356802

  2. A high-fat diet exacerbates depressive-like behavior in the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rat, a genetic model of depression.

    PubMed

    Abildgaard, Anders; Solskov, Lasse; Volke, Vallo; Harvey, Brian H; Lund, Sten; Wegener, Gregers

    2011-06-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) and diabetes mellitus type II (T2DM) are two of the major health challenges of our time. It has been shown that MDD and T2DM are highly co-morbid, and recent work has proposed a bi-directional connection between the diseases. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of a high-fat diet (HFD) on behavior and metabolism in a genetic rat model of depression, the Flinders Sensitive and Resistant Line (FSL/FRL) rats. Age and weight matched rats were fed a HFD or control diet for 10 weeks and subjected to behavioral testing and metabolic assessment. We found that HFD exacerbated the depressive-like behavior of the FSL rat in the Forced Swim Test (FST), a depression screening tool, although it did not affect the non-depressed FRL rat despite a higher caloric intake. Moreover, the depressive-like phenotype was associated with reduced anxiety and impairment in novel object recognition memory, while HFD consumption led to diminished object recognition memory as well. In both strains HFD increased insulin levels during an oral glucose tolerance test, although fasting blood glucose levels were only significantly increased by HFD in the FSL rat, suggesting a greater metabolic susceptibility in this rat strain. We conclude that compared with the FRL rat, the FSL rat is more susceptible to developing aberrant behaviors related to depression following metabolic stress induced by HFD. Further studies with a mechanistic focus could potentially lead to a better understanding of a possible pathophysiological link between T2DM and MDD. PMID:20888697

  3. Genetic Signatures for Enhanced Olfaction in the African Mole-Rats

    PubMed Central

    Stathopoulos, Sofia; Bishop, Jacqueline M.; O’Ryan, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    The Olfactory Receptor (OR) superfamily, the largest in the vertebrate genome, is responsible for vertebrate olfaction and is traditionally subdivided into 17 OR families. Recent studies characterising whole-OR subgenomes revealed a ‘birth and death’ model of evolution for a range of species, however little is known about fine-scale evolutionary dynamics within single-OR families. This study reports the first assessment of fine-scale OR evolution and variation in African mole-rats (Bathyergidae), a family of subterranean rodents endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. Because of the selective pressures of life underground, enhanced olfaction is proposed to be fundamental to the evolutionary success of the Bathyergidae, resulting in a highly diversified OR gene-repertoire. Using a PCR-sequencing approach, we analysed variation in the OR7 family across 14 extant bathyergid species, which revealed enhanced levels of functional polymorphisms concentrated across the receptors’ ligand-binding region. We propose that mole-rats are able to recognise a broad range of odorants and that this diversity is reflected throughout their OR7 gene repertoire. Using both classic tests and tree-based methods to test for signals of selection, we investigate evolutionary forces across the mole-rat OR7 gene tree. Four well-supported clades emerged in the OR phylogeny, with varying signals of selection; from neutrality to positive and purifying selection. Bathyergid life-history traits and environmental niche-specialisation are explored as possible drivers of adaptive OR evolution, emerging as non-exclusive contributors to the positive selection observed at OR7 genes. Our results reveal unexpected complexity of evolutionary mechanisms acting within a single OR family, providing insightful perspectives into OR evolutionary dynamics. PMID:24699281

  4. The long-term fate of fresh and frozen orthotopic bone allografts in genetically defined rats.

    PubMed

    Bos, G D; Goldberg, V M; Gordon, N H; Dollinger, B M; Zika, J M; Powell, A E; Heiple, K G

    1985-01-01

    Fresh and frozen orthotopic iliac crest bone grafts in rats were studied histologically for determination of the long-term effects of histocompatibility matching and the freezing process on orthotopic bone graft incorporation. Grafts exchanged between groups of inbred rats, syngeneic or differing with respect to major or minor histocompatibility loci, were studied histologically at 20, 30, 40, 50, and 150 days after bone transplantation. A numerical histologic scoring system was developed and used by three observers for evaluation of coded hematoxylin and eosin sections. All frozen graft groups had the same fate regardless of histocompatibility relations between donors and recipients, and all grafts were inferior to fresh syngeneic grafts. Both fresh allograft groups received similar scores and initially at 20 and 30 days had scores similar to those of the fresh syngeneic groups. In the later intervals, however, the fresh allografts were inferior to the fresh syngeneic grafts and similar to the frozen groups. This is consistent with an older model describing two distinct phases of osteogenesis. In the long term, frozen syngeneic and fresh and frozen allografts across major and minor histocompatibility barriers were comparable, but all were significantly inferior to fresh syngeneic bone grafts. PMID:3893828

  5. The Effect of Ciprofloxacin Injection on Genetically Absence Prone (Wag/Rij) Rat's Electroencephalogram Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Moghimi, Ali; Mollazadeh, Samaneh; Rassouli, Fatemeh Behnam; Shiee, Reza; Khalilzade, Mohammad Ali

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Ciprofloxacin which was used in this study is a Fluoroquinolone (FQ). This kind of drug may cause epileptic seizures probably because of the inhibition of GABA binding to its receptors. Wag/Rij rats (an animal model for generalized absence epilepsy), were used as experimental subjects. Methods For EEG study, electrodes were inserted into the cortex of animals according to paxinos coordinates. After and before ciprofloxacin injection, EEG was recorded and their SWDs were compared with each others. Results Findings showed a significant increase in the mean number of seizures during recording period. But the mean number of SWDs during seizures did not show any significant differences between groups. Discussion These results may be due to involvement of GABA antagonistic effects of FQs and/or Mg2+ linked blockade of NMDA receptors. More researches are going to determine physiopathology of SWDs and find new effective substance against this kind of epilepsy. PMID:25337325

  6. Potassium conductance and oscillatory contractions in tail arteries from genetically hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Lamb, F S; Webb, R C

    1989-06-01

    Tail arteries isolated from the stroke-prone substrain of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR-SP) exhibit oscillatory contractile responses to norepinephrine. Simultaneous recording of force generation and membrane potential (Em) has previously demonstrated that the contractile phase of these oscillations is associated with bursts of calcium-dependent action potentials. The smooth muscle cells are electrically quiescent during the relaxation phase of the oscillations. The present studies were designed to test the hypothesis that this quiescent period results from the stimulation of a calcium-activated potassium conductance (gKCa) in the cells responsible for triggering the bursting activity. Isolated tail artery strips from SHR-SP and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) were prepared for measurement of isometric force generation or for simultaneous recording of force and Em. The channel-specific toxins apamin (4 x 10(-7) mol/l) and charybdotoxin (4.7 x 10(-8) did not alter the oscillatory pattern of contraction in response to norepinephrine. Oscillations were converted to sustained contraction by barium (10(-4) mmol), quinidine (5.8 x 10(-5) mmol) and elevation of extracellular potassium (20 mmol/l). Em recordings show that both potassium and barium convert bursting activity into tonic firing. Only 20 mmol/k+ caused significant depolarization in addition to that produced by norepinephrine. In contrast, quinidine appears to alter oscillatory behavior by interfering with calcium-spike generation. Norepinephrine-induced electrical activity is diminished in the presence of quinidine. These results suggest that potassium conductance plays an important role in controlling Em, electrical spiking and therefore oscillatory contractile activity in response to norepinephrine in the tail arteries of SHR-SP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2778313

  7. Increasing oxidative stress with molsidomine increases blood pressure in genetically hypertensive rats but not normotensive controls.

    PubMed

    Fortepiani, Lourdes A; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2005-09-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) have a higher level of oxidative stress and exhibit a greater depressor response to a superoxide scavenger, tempol, than normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). This study determined whether an increase in oxidative stress with a superoxide/NO donor, molsidomine, would amplify the blood pressure in SHR. Male SHR and WKY were given molsidomine (30 mg.kg(-1).day(-1)) or vehicle (0.01% ethanol) for 1 wk, and blood pressure, renal hemodynamics, nitrate and nitrite excretion (NOx), renal superoxide production, and expression of renal antioxidant enzymes, Mn- and Cu,Zn-SOD, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), were measured. Renal superoxide and NOx were higher in control SHR than in WKY. Molsidomine increased superoxide by approximately 35% and NOx by 250% in both SHR and WKY. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was also higher in control SHR than WKY. Molsidomine increased MAP by 14% and caused renal vasoconstriction in SHR but reduced MAP by 16%, with no effect on renal hemodynamics, in WKY. Renal expression of Mn- and Cu,Zn-SOD was not different between SHR and WKY, but expression of catalase and GPx were approximately 30% lower in kidney of SHR than WKY. The levels of Mn- and Cu,Zn-SOD were not increased with molsidomine in either WKY or SHR. Renal catalase and GPx expression was increased by 300-400% with molsidomine in WKY, but there was no effect in SHR. Increasing oxidative stress elevated blood pressure further in SHR but not WKY. WKY are likely protected because of higher bioavailable levels of NO and the ability to upregulate catalase and GPx. PMID:15905221

  8. RBE and genetic susceptibility of mouse and rat spermatogonial stem cells to protons, heavy charged particles and 1.5 MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaglenov, A.; Fedorenko, B.; Kaltenboeck, B.

    The main purpose of the present study is to provide data on RBE and genetic susceptibility in the mouse and the rat when exposed to protons, HZE particles and neutrons. Genetic damage from exposure to 50 MeV and 9 GeV protons, 4 GeV/nucleon helium ions, 4 GeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1.5 MeV neutrons was studied in adult (CBA × C57Bl/6J) F1 mice. Damage from 9 GeV protons and 4 GeV helium ions was studied in adult Wistar rats. The incidence of reciprocal translocations (RT) induced in the spermatogonial stem cells of each species was recorded. RBE values were derived by comparing linear regression coefficients from dose-responses within the same dose-range for each of the radiation types tested and 60Co γ-rays or by means of a direct nonparametric method. RT yields measured after mouse and rat spermatogonial irradiation with protons, heavy charged particles and neutrons fit the linear model of the dose-response relationship. Relative to 60Co γ-rays, RBE values are as follows for mouse spermatogonia: 0.9 for 50 MeV protons; 1.3 for 9 GeV protons; 0.7 for 4 GeV helium ions; and 1.3 for 4 GeV carbon ions. For rat spermatogonia, values were: 1.7 for 9 GeV protons and 1.3 for helium ions. Compared to mice irradiated using the same experimental design, rats were more susceptible to high-LET radiations, with susceptibility assessed by genetic damage to their spermatogonial stem cells. The RBE of 1.5 MeV neutron is about 6.6.

  9. Resting Glutamate Levels and Rapid Glutamate Transients in the Prefrontal Cortex of the Flinders Sensitive Line Rat: A Genetic Rodent Model of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Hascup, Kevin N; Hascup, Erin R; Stephens, Michelle L; Glaser, Paul EA; Yoshitake, Takashi; Mathé, Aleksander A; Gerhardt, Greg A; Kehr, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Despite the numerous drugs targeting biogenic amines for major depressive disorder (depression), the search for novel therapeutics continues because of their poor response rates (∼30%) and slow onset of action (2–4 weeks). To better understand role of glutamate in depression, we used an enzyme-based microelectrode array (MEA) that was selective for glutamate measures with fast temporal (2 Hz) and high spatial (15 × 333 μm) resolution. These MEAs were chronically implanted into the prefrontal cortex of 3- to 6-month-old and 12- to 15-month-old Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) and control Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) rats, a validated genetic rodent model of depression. Although no changes in glutamate dynamics were observed between 3 and 6 months FRL and FSL rats, a significant increase in resting glutamate levels was observed in the 12- to 15-month-old FSL rats compared with the 3- to 6-month-old FSL and age-matched FRL rats on days 3–5 post-implantation. Our MEA also recorded, for the first time, a unique phenomenon in all the four rat groups of fluctuations in resting glutamate, which we have termed glutamate transients. Although these events lasted only for seconds, they did occur throughout the testing paradigm. The average concentration of these glutamate-burst events was significantly increased in the 12- to 15-month-old FSL rats compared with 3- to 6-month-old FSL and age-matched FRL rats. These studies lay the foundation for future studies of both tonic and phasic glutamate signaling in rat models of depression to better understand the potential role of glutamate signaling in depression. PMID:21525860

  10. Genetic determination of susceptibility to estrogen-induced mammary cancer in the ACI rat: mapping of Emca1 and Emca2 to chromosomes 5 and 18.

    PubMed

    Gould, Karen A; Tochacek, Martin; Schaffer, Beverly S; Reindl, Tanya M; Murrin, Clare R; Lachel, Cynthia M; VanderWoude, Eric A; Pennington, Karen L; Flood, Lisa A; Bynote, Kimberly K; Meza, Jane L; Newton, Michael A; Shull, James D

    2004-12-01

    Hormonal, genetic, and environmental factors play major roles in the complex etiology of breast cancer. When treated continuously with 17beta-estradiol (E2), the ACI rat exhibits a genetically conferred propensity to develop mammary cancer. The susceptibility of the ACI rat to E2-induced mammary cancer appears to segregate as an incompletely dominant trait in crosses to the resistant Copenhagen (COP) strain. In both (ACI x COP)F(2) and (COP x ACI)F(2) populations, we find strong evidence for a major genetic determinant of susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancer on distal rat chromosome 5. Our data are most consistent with a model in which the ACI allele of this locus, termed Emca1 (estrogen-induced mammary cancer 1), acts in an incompletely dominant manner to increase both tumor incidence and tumor multiplicity as well as to reduce tumor latency in these populations. We also find evidence suggestive of a second locus, Emca2, on chromosome 18 in the (ACI x COP)F(2) population. The ACI allele of Emca2 acts in a dominant manner to increase incidence and decrease latency. Together, Emca1 and Emca2 act independently to modify susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancer. PMID:15611180

  11. The effect of genetically modified Lactobacillus plantarum 590 on the gut health of Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Yan; Xu, Wen-Tao; Yuan, Yan-Fang; Cao, Si-Shuo; He, Xiao-Yun; Li, Shuang-Ying; Huang, Kun-Lun; Luo, Yun-Bo

    2012-07-01

    Lp was a generally recognized as safe microorganism. Lactobacillus plantarum 590 was obtained by inserting nisI gene into Lp genome to help it tolerate higher concentration nisin. As the unintended effects of the genetically modified microorganism (GMM) are the most important barriers to the progress of GMM, we have performed a useful exploration to establish a new in vivo evaluation model for GMM from the point of view of intestinal health. In this study, Sprague-Dawley rats were orally administered with Lp 590 and Lp for 4 weeks. Fecal samples were collected to determine the number of beneficial bacteria Bifidobacterium and harmful bacteria Clostridium perfringens. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to detect the bacterial profiles of every group. Fecal enzyme activities and short-chain fatty acids as main metabolites were also examined. Real time PCR (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry were used to analyze two proteins (ZO-1 and occludin) and secretory immunoglobulin A to detect intestinal permeability and mucosal immunity, gut permeability and gut mucosal immunity were analyzed to see whether GM Lp 590 can induce changes of the gut health when compared with non-GM Lp group, andeventually we concluded that there is no significant difference between GM Lp 590-fed group and non-GM Lp-fed group. The conclusion of gut health test was comparable withthat from traditional subchronic test. Evaluation of intestinal health will be a new approach of assessing the safety of GMM. PMID:22648689

  12. Photobiomodulation Suppresses Alpha-Synuclein-Induced Toxicity in an AAV-Based Rat Genetic Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oueslati, Abid; Lovisa, Blaise; Perrin, John; Wagnières, Georges; van den Bergh, Hubert; Tardy, Yanik; Lashuel, Hilal A.

    2015-01-01

    Converging lines of evidence indicate that near-infrared light treatment, also known as photobiomodulation (PBM), may exert beneficial effects and protect against cellular toxicity and degeneration in several animal models of human pathologies, including neurodegenerative disorders. In the present study, we report that chronic PMB treatment mitigates dopaminergic loss induced by unilateral overexpression of human α-synuclein (α-syn) in the substantia nigra of an AAV-based rat genetic model of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In this model, daily exposure of both sides of the rat’s head to 808-nm near-infrared light for 28 consecutive days alleviated α-syn-induced motor impairment, as assessed using the cylinder test. This treatment also significantly reduced dopaminergic neuronal loss in the injected substantia nigra and preserved dopaminergic fibers in the ipsilateral striatum. These beneficial effects were sustained for at least 6 weeks after discontinuing the treatment. Together, our data point to PBM as a possible therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PD and other related synucleinopathies. PMID:26484876

  13. Will Climate Change, Genetic and Demographic Variation or Rat Predation Pose the Greatest Risk for Persistence of an Altitudinally Distributed Island Endemic?

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Catherine Laura; Auld, Tony D.; Hutton, Ian; Baker, William J.; Shapcott, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Species endemic to mountains on oceanic islands are subject to a number of existing threats (in particular, invasive species) along with the impacts of a rapidly changing climate. The Lord Howe Island endemic palm Hedyscepe canterburyana is restricted to two mountains above 300 m altitude. Predation by the introduced Black Rat (Rattus rattus) is known to significantly reduce seedling recruitment. We examined the variation in Hedyscepe in terms of genetic variation, morphology, reproductive output and demographic structure, across an altitudinal gradient. We used demographic data to model population persistence under climate change predictions of upward range contraction incorporating long-term climatic records for Lord Howe Island. We also accounted for alternative levels of rat predation into the model to reflect management options for control. We found that Lord Howe Island is getting warmer and drier and quantified the degree of temperature change with altitude (0.9 °C per 100 m). For H. canterburyana, differences in development rates, population structure, reproductive output and population growth rate were identified between altitudes. In contrast, genetic variation was high and did not vary with altitude. There is no evidence of an upward range contraction as was predicted and recruitment was greatest at lower altitudes. Our models predicted slow population decline in the species and that the highest altitude populations are under greatest threat of extinction. Removal of rat predation would significantly enhance future persistence of this species. PMID:24832517

  14. BMP2 Genetically Engineered MSCs and EPCs Promote Vascularized Bone Regeneration in Rat Critical-Sized Calvarial Bone Defects

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaoning; Dziak, Rosemary; Yuan, Xue; Mao, Keya; Genco, Robert; Swihart, Mark; Sarkar, Debanjan; Li, Chunyi; Wang, Changdong; Lu, Li; Andreadis, Stelios; Yang, Shuying

    2013-01-01

    Current clinical therapies for critical-sized bone defects (CSBDs) remain far from ideal. Previous studies have demonstrated that engineering bone tissue using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is feasible. However, this approach is not effective for CSBDs due to inadequate vascularization. In our previous study, we have developed an injectable and porous nano calcium sulfate/alginate (nCS/A) scaffold and demonstrated that nCS/A composition is biocompatible and has proper biodegradability for bone regeneration. Here, we hypothesized that the combination of an injectable and porous nCS/A with bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) gene-modified MSCs and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) could significantly enhance vascularized bone regeneration. Our results demonstrated that delivery of MSCs and EPCs with the injectable nCS/A scaffold did not affect cell viability. Moreover, co-culture of BMP2 gene-modified MSCs and EPCs dramatically increased osteoblast differentiation of MSCs and endothelial differentiation of EPCs in vitro. We further tested the multifunctional bone reconstruction system consisting of an injectable and porous nCS/A scaffold (mimicking the nano-calcium matrix of bone) and BMP2 genetically-engineered MSCs and EPCs in a rat critical-sized (8 mm) caviarial bone defect model. Our in vivo results showed that, compared to the groups of nCS/A, nCS/A+MSCs, nCS/A+MSCs+EPCs and nCS/A+BMP2 gene-modified MSCs, the combination of BMP2 gene -modified MSCs and EPCs in nCS/A dramatically increased the new bone and vascular formation. These results demonstrated that EPCs increase new vascular growth, and that BMP2 gene modification for MSCs and EPCs dramatically promotes bone regeneration. This system could ultimately enable clinicians to better reconstruct the craniofacial bone and avoid donor site morbidity for CSBDs. PMID:23565253

  15. A 90-Day Dietary Toxicity Study of Genetically Modified Rice T1C-1 Expressing Cry1C Protein in Sprague Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xueming; Han, Fangting; Zhao, Kai; Xu, Yan; Wu, Xiao; Wang, Jinbin; Jiang, Lingxi; Shi, Wei

    2012-01-01

    In a 90-day study, Sprague Dawley rats were fed transgenic T1C-1 rice expressing Cry1C protein and were compared with rats fed non-transgenic parental rice Minghui 63 and rats fed a basal diet. No adverse effects on animal behavior or weight gain were observed during the study. Blood samples were collected and analyzed, and standard hematological and biochemical parameters were compared. A few of these parameters were found to be significantly different, but were within the normal reference intervals for rats of this breed and age, and were thus not considered to be treatment-related. Following sacrifice, a large number of organs were weighed, and macroscopic and histopathological examinations were performed with no changes reported. The aim of this study was to use a known animal model to determine the safety of the genetically modified (GM) rice T1C-1. The results showed no adverse or toxic effects due to T1C-1 rice when tested in this 90-day study. PMID:23300690

  16. Genetic variation in the GDNF promoter affects its expression and modifies the severity of Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) in rats carrying Ednrb(sl) mutations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jieping; Dang, Ruihua; Torigoe, Daisuke; Li, Anqi; Lei, Chuzhao; Sasaki, Nobuya; Wang, Jinxi; Agui, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is necessary for the migration of neural crest stem cells in the gut. However, mutations in GDNF per se are deemed neither necessary nor sufficient to cause Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR). In a previous study, a modifier locus on chromosome 2 in rats carrying Ednrb(sl) mutations was identified, and several mutations in the putative regulatory region of the Gdnf gene in AGH-Ednrb(sl) rats were detected. Specifically, the mutation -232C>T has been shown to be strongly associated with the severity of HSCR. In the present study, the influence of genetic variations on the transcription of the Gdnf gene was tested using dual-luciferase assay. Results showed that the mutation -613C>T, located near the mutation -232C>T in AGH-Ednrb(sl) rats, decreased Gdnf transcription in an in vitro dual-luciferase expression assay. These data suggested an important role of -613C in Gdnf transcription. Expression levels of the Gdnf gene may modify the severity of HSCR in rats carrying Ednrb(sl) mutations. PMID:26318480

  17. Positional cloning of the nude locus: Genetic, physical, and transcription maps of the region and mutations in the mouse and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Segre, J.A.; Lander, E.S. |; Taylor, B.A.

    1995-08-10

    Mutations in the nude locus in mice and rats produce the pleiotropic phenotype of hairlessness and athymia, resulting in severely compromised immune system. To identify the causative gene, we utilized modern tools and techniques of positional cloning. Specifically, spanning the region in which the nude locus resides, we constructed a genetic map of polymorphic markers, a physical map of yeast artificial chromosomes and bacteriophage P1 clones, and a transcription map of genes obtained by direct cDNA selection and exon trapping. We identified seven novel transcripts with similarity to genes from Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, rat or human and three previously identified mouse genes. Based on our transcription mapping results, we present a novel approach to estimate that the nude locus resides in a region approximately threefold enriched for genes. We confirm a recently published report that the nude phenotype is caused by mutations in a gene encoding a novel winged helix or fork head domain transcription factor, whn. We report as well as the mutations in the rat rnu allele and the complete coding sequence of the rat whn mRNA. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Fast Nongenomic Effect of Aldosterone on the Volume of Principal Cells in Collecting Tube and Genetic Heterogeneity of Epithelial Sodium Channel in the Postnatal Ontogenesis of Rat Kidney.

    PubMed

    Logvinenko, N S; Gerbek, Yu E; Solenov, E I; Ivanova, L N

    2016-03-01

    The effects of amiloride, epithelial sodium pump inhibitor, on the fast nongenomic effect of aldosterone in principal cells of an isolated segment of the distal portion of renal collecting tubes were studied in 10-day-old and adult rats. Fluorescent staining with Calcein AM showed various effects of amiloride (10(-5) M) on the stabilizing effect of aldosterone (10 nM) in hypotonic shock (280/140 mOsm/kg). Amiloride attenuated by 30% the effect of aldosterone on the amplitude of principal cell swelling in adult animals and almost completely abolished this effect in 10-day rats (p<0.05). These age-specific differences in the contribution of the distal portion of the collecting tube to the nongenomic effect of aldosterone did not depend on genetic heterogeneity of its α-subunit. PMID:27021081

  19. Systems-level approaches reveal conservation of trans-regulated genes in the rat and genetic determinants of blood pressure in humans

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Sarah R.; Bottolo, Leonardo; Kunes, Jaroslav; Zicha, Josef; Zidek, Vaclav; Hubner, Norbert; Cook, Stuart A.; Pravenec, Michal; Aitman, Timothy J.; Petretto, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Aims Human genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of hypertension identified only few susceptibility loci with large effect that were replicated across populations. The vast majority of genes detected by GWAS has small effect and the regulatory mechanisms through which these genetic variants cause disease remain mostly unclear. Here, we used comparative genomics between human and an established rat model of hypertension to explore the transcriptional mechanisms mediating the effect of genes identified in 15 hypertension GWAS. Methods and results Time series analysis of radiotelemetric blood pressure (BP) was performed to assess 11 parameters of BP variation in recombinant inbred strains derived from the spontaneously hypertensive rat. BP data were integrated with ∼27 000 expression quantative trait loci (eQTLs) mapped across seven tissues, detecting >8000 significant associations between eQTL genes and BP variation in the rat. We then compiled a large catalogue of human genes from GWAS of hypertension and identified a subset of 2292 rat–human orthologous genes. Expression levels for 795 (34%) of these genes correlated with BP variation across rat tissues: 51 genes were cis-regulated, whereas 459 were trans-regulated and enriched for ‘calcium signalling pathway’ (P = 9.6 × 10−6) and ‘ion channel’ genes (P = 3.5 × 10−7), which are important determinants of hypertension. We identified 158 clusters of trans-eQTLs, annotated the underlying ‘master regulator’ genes and found significant over-representation in the human hypertension gene set (enrichment P = 5 × 10−4). Conclusion We showed extensive conservation of trans-regulated genes and their master regulators between rat and human hypertension. These findings reveal that small-effect genes associated with hypertension by human GWAS are likely to exert their action through coordinate regulation of pathogenic pathways. PMID:23118132

  20. 1,25(OH)2D3-enhanced hypercalciuria in genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming rats fed a low-calcium diet

    PubMed Central

    Asplin, John R.; Krieger, Nancy S.; Culbertson, Christopher D.; Asplin, Daniel M.; Bushinsky, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The inbred genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming (GHS) rats exhibit many features of human idiopathic hypercalciuria and have elevated levels of vitamin D receptors (VDR) in calcium (Ca)-transporting organs. On a normal-Ca diet, 1,25(OH)2D3 (1,25D) increases urine (U) Ca to a greater extent in GHS than in controls [Sprague-Dawley (SD)]. The additional UCa may result from an increase in intestinal Ca absorption and/or bone resorption. To determine the source, we asked whether 1,25D would increase UCa in GHS fed a low-Ca (0.02%) diet (LCD). With 1,25D, UCa in SD increased from 1.2 ± 0.1 to 9.3 ± 0.9 mg/day and increased more in GHS from 4.7 ± 0.3 to 21.5 ± 0.9 mg/day (P < 0.001). In GHS rats on LCD with or without 1,25D, UCa far exceeded daily Ca intake (2.6 mg/day). While the greater excess in UCa in GHS rats must be derived from bone mineral, there may also be a 1,25D-mediated decrease in renal tubular Ca reabsorption. RNA expression of the components of renal Ca transport indicated that 1,25D administration results in a suppression of klotho, an activator of the renal Ca reabsorption channel TRPV5, in both SD and GHS rats. This fall in klotho would decrease tubular reabsorption of the 1,25D-induced bone Ca release. Thus, the greater increase in UCa with 1,25D in GHS fed LCD strongly suggests that the additional UCa results from an increase in bone resorption, likely due to the increased number of VDR in the GHS rat bone cells, with a possible component of decreased renal tubular calcium reabsorption. PMID:23926184

  1. In vivo L-DOPA production by genetically modified primary rat fibroblast or 9L gliosarcoma cell grafts via coexpression of GTPcyclohydrolase I with tyrosine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Leff, S E; Rendahl, K G; Spratt, S K; Kang, U J; Mandel, R J

    1998-06-01

    To investigate the biochemical requirements for in vivo L-DOPA production by cells genetically modified ex vivo in a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD), rat syngeneic 9L gliosarcoma and primary Fischer dermal fibroblasts (FDFs) were transduced with retroviral vectors encoding the human tyrosine hydroxylase 2 (hTH2) and human GTP cyclohydrolase I (hGTPCHI) cDNAs. As GTPCHI is a rate-limiting enzyme in the pathway for synthesis of the essential TH cofactor, tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), only hTH2 and GTPCHI cotransduced cultured cells produced L-DOPA in the absence of added BH4. As striatal BH4 levels in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats are minimal, the effects of cotransduction with hTH2 and hGTPCHI on L-DOPA synthesis by striatal grafts of either 9L cells or FDFs in unilateral 6-OHDA-lesioned rats were tested. Microdialysis experiments showed that those subjects that received cells cotransduced with hTH2 and hGTPCHI produced significantly higher levels of L-DOPA than animals that received either hTH2 or untransduced cells. However, animals that received transduced FDF grafts showed a progressive loss of transgene expression until expression was undetectable 5 weeks after engraftment. In FDF-engrafted animals, no differential effect of hTH2 vs hTH2 + hGTPCHI transgene expression on apomorphine-induced rotation was observed. The differences in L-DOPA production found with cells transduced with hTH2 alone and those cotransduced with hTH2 and hGTPCHI show that BH4 is critical to the restoration of the capacity for L-DOPA production and that GTPCHI expression is an effective means of supplying BH4 in this rat model of PD. PMID:9628761

  2. Degradation of endogenous bacterial cell wall polymers by the muralytic enzyme mutanolysin prevents hepatobiliary injury in genetically susceptible rats with experimental intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    PubMed Central

    Lichtman, S N; Okoruwa, E E; Keku, J; Schwab, J H; Sartor, R B

    1992-01-01

    Jejunal self-filling blind loops with subsequent small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SBBO) induce hepatobiliary injury in genetically susceptible Lewis rats. Lesions consist of portal tract inflammation, bile duct proliferation, and destruction. To determine the pathogenesis of SBBO-induced hepatobiliary injury, we treated Lewis rats with SBBO by using several agents with different mechanisms of activity. Buffer treatment, ursodeoxycholic acid, prednisone, methotrexate, and cyclosporin A failed to prevent SBBO-induced injury as demonstrated by increased plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and elevated histology scores. However, hepatic injury was prevented by mutanolysin, a muralytic enzyme whose only known activity is to split the beta 1-4 N-acetylmuramyl-N-acetylglucosamine linkage of peptidoglycan-polysaccharide (PG-PS), a bacterial cell wall polymer with potent inflammatory and immunoregulatory properties. Mutanolysin therapy started on the day blind loops were surgically created and continued for 8 wk significantly diminished AST (101 +/- 37 U/liter) and liver histology scores (2.2 +/- 2.7) compared to buffer-treated rats (228 +/- 146 U/liter, P < 0.05, 8.2 +/- 1.9, P < 0.001 respectively). Mutanolysin treatment started during the early phase of hepatic injury, 16-21 d after surgery, decreased AST in 7 of 11 rats from 142 +/- 80 to 103 +/- 24 U/liter contrasted to increased AST in 9 of 11 buffer-treated rats from 108 +/- 52 to 247 +/- 142 U/liter, P < 0.05. Mutanolysin did not change total bacterial numbers within the loop, eliminate Bacteroides sp., have in vitro antibiotic effects, or diminish mucosal PG-PS transport. However, mutanolysin treatment prevented elevation of plasma anti-PG antibodies and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) levels which occurred in buffer treated rats with SBBO and decreased TNF alpha production in isolated Kupffer cells stimulated in vitro with PG-PS. Based on the preventive and therapeutic activity of this highly specific

  3. Identification of Genetic Loci Affecting the Severity of Symptoms of Hirschsprung Disease in Rats Carrying Ednrbsl Mutations by Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Torigoe, Daisuke; Lei, Chuzhao; Lan, Xianyong; Chen, Hong; Sasaki, Nobuya; Wang, Jinxi; Agui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR) is a congenital disease in neonates characterized by the absence of the enteric ganglia in a variable length of the distal colon. This disease results from multiple genetic interactions that modulate the ability of enteric neural crest cells to populate developing gut. We previously reported that three rat strains with different backgrounds (susceptible AGH-Ednrbsl/sl, resistant F344-Ednrbsl/sl, and LEH-Ednrbsl/sl) but the same null mutation of Ednrb show varying severity degrees of aganglionosis. This finding suggests that strain-specific genetic factors affect the severity of HSCR. Consistent with this finding, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for the severity of HSCR on chromosome (Chr) 2 was identified using an F2 intercross between AGH and F344 strains. In the present study, we performed QTL analysis using an F2 intercross between the susceptible AGH and resistant LEH strains to identify the modifier/resistant loci for HSCR in Ednrb-deficient rats. A significant locus affecting the severity of HSCR was also detected within the Chr 2 region. These findings strongly suggest that a modifier gene of aganglionosis exists on Chr 2. In addition, two potentially causative SNPs (or mutations) were detected upstream of a known HSCR susceptibility gene, Gdnf. These SNPs were possibly responsible for the varied length of gut affected by aganglionosis. PMID:25790447

  4. Local and systemic responses following intravitreous injection of AAV2-encoded modified Volvox channelrhodopsin-1 in a genetically blind rat model.

    PubMed

    Sugano, E; Tabata, K; Takahashi, M; Nishiyama, F; Shimizu, H; Sato, M; Tamai, M; Tomita, H

    2016-02-01

    We previously designed a modified channelrhodopsin-1 (mVChR1) protein chimera with a broader action than that of Chlamydomonas channelrhodopsin-2 and reported that its transduction into retinal ganglion cells can restore visual function in genetically blind, dystrophic Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, with photostimuli ranging from 486 to 640 nm. In the current study, we sought to investigate the safety and influence of mVChR1 transgene expression. Adeno-associated virus type 2 encoding mVChR1 was administered by intravitreous injection into dystrophic RCS rats. Reverse-transcription PCR was used to monitor virus and transgene dissemination and the results demonstrated that their expression was restricted specifically within the eye tissues, and not in non-target organs. Moreover, examination of the blood, plasma and serum revealed that no excess immunoreactivity was present, as determined using standard clinical hematological parameters. Serum antibodies targeting the recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) capsid increased after the injection; however, no increase in mVChR1 antibody was detected during the observation period. In addition, retinal histological examination showed no signs of inflammation in rAAV-injected rats. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that mVChR1 can be exogenously expressed without harmful immunological reactions in vivo. These findings will aid in studies of AAV gene transfer to restore vision in late-stage retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:26440056

  5. Genetically-based behavioral traits influence the effects of Shuttle Box avoidance overtraining and extinction upon intertrial responding: a study with the Roman rat strains.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Raúl; Gil, Luis; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto; Tobeña, Adolf

    2004-04-30

    In the present study, we evaluated the effects of extended exposure procedures to contextual fear cues as a way of reducing intertrial responses (ITRs), a characteristic stereotyped behavior displayed in 2-way Shuttle Box avoidance overtraining. We used rat strains psychogenetically selected for efficient (Roman high-avoidance; RHA) versus poor 2-way Shuttle Box performance (Roman low-avoidance; RLA), the former being fearless/impulsive relative to the latter. Additionally, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were compared with RHAs to have a measure of the ITRs exhibited by another, non-selected group of animals. The main findings were that after extended exposure RHAs diminished their ITRs without affecting avoidance performance, although they emitted a pattern of ITRs somewhat excessive as compared with SDs. We concluded that three factors could influence the expression of ITRs in RHA rats: (1) the repetitive and stereotyped responding induced by 2-way Shuttle Box overtraining; (2) contextual fear conditioning; and (3) a genetic background associated with high impulsiveness. PMID:15062972

  6. Genetic variability in the rat Aplec C-type lectin gene cluster regulates lymphocyte trafficking and motor neuron survival after traumatic nerve root injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background C-type lectin (CLEC) receptors are important for initiating and shaping immune responses; however, their role in inflammatory reactions in the central nervous system after traumatic injuries is not known. The antigen-presenting lectin-like receptor gene complex (Aplec) contains a few CLEC genes, which differ genetically among inbred rat strains. It was originally thought to be a region that regulates susceptibility to autoimmune arthritis, autoimmune neuroinflammation and infection. Methods The inbred rat strains DA and PVG differ substantially in degree of spinal cord motor neuron death following ventral root avulsion (VRA), which is a reproducible model of localized nerve root injury. A large F2 (DAxPVG) intercross was bred and genotyped after which global expressional profiling was performed on spinal cords from F2 rats subjected to VRA. A congenic strain, Aplec, created by transferring a small PVG segment containing only seven genes, all C-type lectins, ontoDA background, was used for further experiments together with the parental strains. Results Global expressional profiling of F2 (DAxPVG) spinal cords after VRA and genome-wide eQTL mapping identified a strong cis-regulated difference in the expression of Clec4a3 (Dcir3), a C-type lectin gene that is a part of the Aplec cluster. Second, we demonstrate significantly improved motor neuron survival and also increased T-cell infiltration into the spinal cord of congenic rats carrying Aplec from PVG on DA background compared to the parental DA strain. In vitro studies demonstrate that the Aplec genes are expressed on microglia and upregulated upon inflammatory stimuli. However, there were no differences in expression of general microglial activation markers between Aplec and parental DA rats, suggesting that the Aplec genes are involved in the signaling events rather than the primary activation of microglia occurring upon nerve root injury. Conclusions In summary, we demonstrate that a genetic variation

  7. Genetic background strongly modifies the severity of symptoms of Hirschsprung disease, but not hearing loss in rats carrying Ednrb(sl) mutations.

    PubMed

    Dang, Ruihua; Torigoe, Daisuke; Suzuki, Sari; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki; Moritoh, Kanako; Sasaki, Nobuya; Agui, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is thought to result as a consequence of multiple gene interactions that modulate the ability of enteric neural crest cells to populate the developing gut. However, it remains unknown whether the single complete deletion of important HSCR-associated genes is sufficient to result in HSCR disease. In this study, we found that the null mutation of the Ednrb gene, thought indispensable for enteric neuron development, is insufficient to result in HSCR disease when bred onto a different genetic background in rats carrying Ednrb(sl) mutations. Moreover, we found that this mutation results in serious congenital sensorineural deafness, and these strains may be used as ideal models of Waardenburg Syndrome Type 4 (WS4). Furthermore, we evaluated how the same changed genetic background modifies three features of WS4 syndrome, aganglionosis, hearing loss, and pigment disorder in these congenic strains. We found that the same genetic background markedly changed the aganglionosis, but resulted in only slight changes to hearing loss and pigment disorder. This provided the important evidence, in support of previous studies, that different lineages of neural crest-derived cells migrating along with various pathways are regulated by different signal molecules. This study will help us to better understand complicated diseases such as HSCR and WS4 syndrome. PMID:21915282

  8. [Examination of genetic structures of sex cells of rats flown during their prenatal development on Cosmos-1514].

    PubMed

    Benova, D K

    1987-01-01

    Male rats that were flown on Cosmos-1514 during their prenatal days 13 through 18 were investigated. The animals were sacrificed when they reached sexual maturity. Preparations were made of their testes for cytogenetic analysis: spermatocytes were at the stages of diakinesis--metaphase 1. The flown rats had 0.9% reciprocal translocations while the ground-based synchronous controls showed 0.5%. Exposure to space flight factors in combination had a mutagenic effect on gonocytes. However, the adverse effect of microgravity per se was not demonstrated unambiguously. PMID:3437735

  9. Effects of genetically modified T2A-1 rice on the GI health of rats after 90-day supplement

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yanfang; Xu, Wentao; He, Xiaoyun; Liu, Haiyan; Cao, Sishuo; Qi, Xiaozhe; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal toxin (Bt) rice will be commercialized as a main food source. Traditional safety assessments on genetically modified products pay little attention on gastrointestinal (GI) health. More data about GI health of Bt rice must be provided to dispel public' doubts about the potential effects on human health. We constructed an improved safety assessment animal model using a basic subchronic toxicity experiment, measuring a range of parameters including microflora composition, intestinal permeability, epithelial structure, fecal enzymes, bacterial activity, and intestinal immunity. Significant differences were found between rice-fed groups and AIN93G-fed control groups in several parameters, whereas no differences were observed between genetically modified and non-genetically modified groups. No adverse effects were found on GI health resulting from genetically modified T2A-1 rice. In conclusion, this study may offer a systematic safety assessment model for GM material with respect to the effects on GI health. PMID:23752350

  10. Effects of genetically modified T2A-1 rice on the GI health of rats after 90-day supplement.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yanfang; Xu, Wentao; He, Xiaoyun; Liu, Haiyan; Cao, Sishuo; Qi, Xiaozhe; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal toxin (Bt) rice will be commercialized as a main food source. Traditional safety assessments on genetically modified products pay little attention on gastrointestinal (GI) health. More data about GI health of Bt rice must be provided to dispel public' doubts about the potential effects on human health. We constructed an improved safety assessment animal model using a basic subchronic toxicity experiment, measuring a range of parameters including microflora composition, intestinal permeability, epithelial structure, fecal enzymes, bacterial activity, and intestinal immunity. Significant differences were found between rice-fed groups and AIN93G-fed control groups in several parameters, whereas no differences were observed between genetically modified and non-genetically modified groups. No adverse effects were found on GI health resulting from genetically modified T2A-1 rice. In conclusion, this study may offer a systematic safety assessment model for GM material with respect to the effects on GI health. PMID:23752350

  11. Phenotyping of individual pancreatic islets locates genetic defects in stimulus secretion coupling to Niddm1i within the major diabetes locus in GK rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, J M; Ortsäter, H; Fakhrai-Rad, H; Galli, J; Luthman, H; Bergsten, P

    2001-12-01

    The major diabetes quantitative trait locus (Niddm1), which segregates in crosses between GK rats affected with spontaneous type 2-like diabetes and normoglycemic F344 rats, encodes at least two different diabetes susceptibility genes. Congenic strains for the two subloci (Niddm1f and Niddm1i) have been generated by transfer of GK alleles onto the genome of F344 rats. Whereas the Niddm1f phenotype implicated insulin resistance, the Niddm1i phenotype displayed diabetes related to insulin deficiency. Individual islets from 16-week-old congenic rats were characterized for insulin release and oxygen tension (pO(2)). In the presence of 3 mmol/l glucose, insulin release from Niddm1f and Niddm1i islets was approximately 5 pmol. g(-1). s(-1) and pO(2) was 120 mmHg. Similar recordings were obtained from GK and F344 islets. When glucose was raised to 11 mmol/l, insulin release increased significantly in Niddm1f and F344 islets but was essentially unchanged in islets from GK and Niddm1i. The high glucose concentration lowered pO(2) to the same extent in islets from all strains. Addition of 1 mmol/l tolbutamide to the perifusion medium further increased pulsatile insulin release threefold in all islets. The pulse frequency was approximately 0.4 min(-1). alpha-Ketoisocaproate (11 mmol/l) alone increased pulsatile insulin release eightfold in islets from Niddm1f, Niddm1i, and control F344 rats but had no effect on insulin release from GK islets. These secretory patterns in response to alpha-ketoisocaproate were paralleled by reduction of pO(2) in Niddm1f, Niddm1i, and control F344 islets and no change of pO(2) in GK islets. The results demonstrate that Niddm1i carries alleles of gene(s) that reduce glucose-induced insulin release and that are amenable to molecular identification by genetic fine mapping. PMID:11723056

  12. Effects of genetic strain on stress-induced weight and body fat loss in rats: Application to air pollution research

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to some air pollutants is suspected of contributing to obesity. Hazelton chambers are commonly used in air pollution studies but we found unexpected reductions in body weight and body fat of rats housed in Hazelton chambers under control conditions. We suspect that stres...

  13. Two-photon scanning microscopy of in vivo sensory responses of cortical neurons genetically encoded with a fluorescent voltage sensor in rat

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, Kurt F.; Heider, Barbara; Lee, Hanson; Isacoff, Ehud Y.; Siegel, Ralph M.

    2012-01-01

    A fluorescent voltage sensor protein “Flare” was created from a Kv1.4 potassium channel with YFP situated to report voltage-induced conformational changes in vivo. The RNA virus Sindbis introduced Flare into neurons in the binocular region of visual cortex in rat. Injection sites were selected based on intrinsic optical imaging. Expression of Flare occurred in the cell bodies and dendritic processes. Neurons imaged in vivo using two-photon scanning microscopy typically revealed the soma best, discernable against the background labeling of the neuropil. Somatic fluorescence changes were correlated with flashed visual stimuli; however, averaging was essential to observe these changes. This study demonstrates that the genetic modification of single neurons to express a fluorescent voltage sensor can be used to assess neuronal activity in vivo. PMID:22461770

  14. Effect of Dose and Administration Period of Seed Cake of Genetically Modified and Non-Modified Flax on Selected Antioxidative Activities in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matusiewicz, Magdalena; Kosieradzka, Iwona; Zuk, Magdalena; Szopa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Flaxseed cake containing antioxidants is a valuable dietary component. Its nutritional effect may be diminished by the presence of anti-nutrients. The work was aimed at determining the effect of different contents of flaxseed cake in diets and their administration period on the development of rats and selected parameters of their health status. Diets with 15% and 30% addition of genetically modified (GM) flax seed cake with enhanced synthesis of polyphenols, as well as Linola non-GM flax were administered in short-term (33 days) and long-term (90 days) experiments. The 30% addition of flaxseed cake reduced digestibility of dietary nutrients, GM flaxseed cake lowered body weight gains. The relative weight of selected organs, hematological blood markers and serum activities of aspartate and alanine aminotransferases (AST, ALT) were not affected. Flaxseed cake consumption reduced serum concentration of albumins and increased globulins. Administration of 30% flaxseed cake improved plasma total antioxidant status and 30% GM flaxseed cake lowered liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. The activities of superoxide dismutase in erythrocytes, glutathione peroxidase in plasma and the liver concentration of 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine were not changed. Most morphometric parameters of the small intestine did not differ between feeding groups. The administration of diets with 30% addition of flaxseed cake for 90 days improved the antioxidant status in rats. PMID:26110393

  15. A 90-day subchronic study of rats fed lean pork from genetically modified pigs with muscle-specific expression of recombinant follistatin.

    PubMed

    Zou, Shiying; Tang, Min; He, Xiaoyun; Cao, Yuan; Zhao, Jie; Xu, Wentao; Liang, Zhihong; Huang, Kunlun

    2015-11-01

    Because cardiovascular disease incidence has rapidly increased in recent years, people are choosing relatively healthier diets with low animal fat. A transgenic pig with low fat and a high percentage of lean meat was created in 2011; this pig overexpresses the follistatin (FST) gene. To evaluate the safety of lean pork derived from genetically modified (GM) pigs, a subchronic oral toxicity study was conducted using Sprague-Dawley rats. GM pork and non-GM pork were incorporated into the diet at levels of 3.75%, 7.5%, and 15% (w/w), and the main nutrients of the various diets were subsequently balanced. The safety of GM pork was assessed by comparison of the toxicology response variables in Sprague-Dawley rats consuming diets containing GM pork with those consuming non-GM pork. No treatment-related adverse or toxic effects were observed based on an examination of the daily clinical signs, body weight, food consumption, hematology, serum biochemistry, and organ weight or based on gross and histopathological examination. The results demonstrate that GM pork is as safe for consumption as conventional pork. PMID:26363208

  16. [Peripuberal development of genetic obesity in beta rats. Daily changes in food intake, body weight, deep body temperature, triglyceridemia and glycemia].

    PubMed

    Calderari, S; Gayol, M C; Elliff, M I; Labourdette, V; Troiano, M F; Romano, G

    1990-01-01

    The moderate quality of beta obesity and its relatively slow evolution make it potentially useful for defining the sequence of events that lead to the overt syndrome. Estimates of food intake, live body weight, deep body temperature, triglyceridemia and glycemia were obtained at several times during the day in beta genetically obese and alpha (alpha) control male rats at peripuberal age, in order to characterize the dynamic phase of this obesity and to attempt the definition of some previous proceedings that eventually produce the full obesity syndrome. Beta higher food intake in the light cycle preceded its whole day hyperphagia. Both genotypes showed the normal pattern of predominantly nocturnal feeding. A lower light phase's weight loss in beta preceded the overweight. Thus, beta rats were not significantly heavier than alpha until the end of the last period studied, when they were 75 days old. A defect in adaptive thermogenesis in beta genotype is suggested, as values on deep body temperature in relation to alpha were significantly lower at all times of day tested. Correlation coefficient value between daily net weight gain versus deep body temperature was: r = -0.601 (p less than 0.01), suggesting a diminished lipolytic stimulation in beta brown adipose tissue. A sustained hypertriglyceridemia in beta at every time of the day studied suggested its endogenous source. Differences in glycemia values were not statistically significant between genotypes, though apparently wider variations in beta could reflect a certain glycemic regulation lability in the obese genotype. PMID:2101545

  17. Effect of Dose and Administration Period of Seed Cake of Genetically Modified and Non-Modified Flax on Selected Antioxidative Activities in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matusiewicz, Magdalena; Kosieradzka, Iwona; Zuk, Magdalena; Szopa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Flaxseed cake containing antioxidants is a valuable dietary component. Its nutritional effect may be diminished by the presence of anti-nutrients. The work was aimed at determining the effect of different contents of flaxseed cake in diets and their administration period on the development of rats and selected parameters of their health status. Diets with 15% and 30% addition of genetically modified (GM) flax seed cake with enhanced synthesis of polyphenols, as well as Linola non-GM flax were administered in short-term (33 days) and long-term (90 days) experiments. The 30% addition of flaxseed cake reduced digestibility of dietary nutrients, GM flaxseed cake lowered body weight gains. The relative weight of selected organs, hematological blood markers and serum activities of aspartate and alanine aminotransferases (AST, ALT) were not affected. Flaxseed cake consumption reduced serum concentration of albumins and increased globulins. Administration of 30% flaxseed cake improved plasma total antioxidant status and 30% GM flaxseed cake lowered liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. The activities of superoxide dismutase in erythrocytes, glutathione peroxidase in plasma and the liver concentration of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine were not changed. Most morphometric parameters of the small intestine did not differ between feeding groups. The administration of diets with 30% addition of flaxseed cake for 90 days improved the antioxidant status in rats. PMID:26110393

  18. Genetic background and epigenetic modifications in the core of the nucleus accumbens predict addiction-like behavior in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Flagel, Shelly B; Chaudhury, Sraboni; Waselus, Maria; Kelly, Rebeca; Sewani, Salima; Clinton, Sarah M; Thompson, Robert C; Watson, Stanley J; Akil, Huda

    2016-05-17

    This study provides a demonstration in the rat of a clear genetic difference in the propensity for addiction-related behaviors following prolonged cocaine self-administration. It relies on the use of selectively bred high-responder (bHR) and low-responder (bLR) rat lines that differ in several characteristics associated with "temperament," including novelty-induced locomotion and impulsivity. We show that bHR rats exhibit behaviors reminiscent of human addiction, including persistent cocaine-seeking and increased reinstatement of cocaine seeking. To uncover potential underlying mechanisms of this differential vulnerability, we focused on the core of the nucleus accumbens and examined expression and epigenetic regulation of two transcripts previously implicated in bHR/bLR differences: fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) and the dopamine D2 receptor (D2). Relative to bHRs, bLRs had lower FGF2 mRNA levels and increased association of a repressive mark on histones (H3K9me3) at the FGF2 promoter. These differences were apparent under basal conditions and persisted even following prolonged cocaine self-administration. In contrast, bHRs had lower D2 mRNA under basal conditions, with greater association of H3K9me3 at the D2 promoter and these differences were no longer apparent following prolonged cocaine self-administration. Correlational analyses indicate that the association of H3K9me3 at D2 may be a critical substrate underlying the propensity to relapse. These findings suggest that low D2 mRNA levels in the nucleus accumbens core, likely mediated via epigenetic modifications, may render individuals more susceptible to cocaine addiction. In contrast, low FGF2 levels, which appear immutable even following prolonged cocaine exposure, may serve as a protective factor. PMID:27114539

  19. Genetic background and epigenetic modifications in the core of the nucleus accumbens predict addiction-like behavior in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Flagel, Shelly B.; Chaudhury, Sraboni; Waselus, Maria; Kelly, Rebeca; Sewani, Salima; Clinton, Sarah M.; Thompson, Robert C.; Watson, Stanley J.; Akil, Huda

    2016-01-01

    This study provides a demonstration in the rat of a clear genetic difference in the propensity for addiction-related behaviors following prolonged cocaine self-administration. It relies on the use of selectively bred high-responder (bHR) and low-responder (bLR) rat lines that differ in several characteristics associated with “temperament,” including novelty-induced locomotion and impulsivity. We show that bHR rats exhibit behaviors reminiscent of human addiction, including persistent cocaine-seeking and increased reinstatement of cocaine seeking. To uncover potential underlying mechanisms of this differential vulnerability, we focused on the core of the nucleus accumbens and examined expression and epigenetic regulation of two transcripts previously implicated in bHR/bLR differences: fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) and the dopamine D2 receptor (D2). Relative to bHRs, bLRs had lower FGF2 mRNA levels and increased association of a repressive mark on histones (H3K9me3) at the FGF2 promoter. These differences were apparent under basal conditions and persisted even following prolonged cocaine self-administration. In contrast, bHRs had lower D2 mRNA under basal conditions, with greater association of H3K9me3 at the D2 promoter and these differences were no longer apparent following prolonged cocaine self-administration. Correlational analyses indicate that the association of H3K9me3 at D2 may be a critical substrate underlying the propensity to relapse. These findings suggest that low D2 mRNA levels in the nucleus accumbens core, likely mediated via epigenetic modifications, may render individuals more susceptible to cocaine addiction. In contrast, low FGF2 levels, which appear immutable even following prolonged cocaine exposure, may serve as a protective factor. PMID:27114539

  20. Lysosomal localization of β-fructofuranosidase-containing liposomes injected into rats. Some implications in the treatment of genetic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gregoriadis, Gregory; Ryman, Brenda E.

    1972-01-01

    Yeast β-fructofuranosidase (invertase) or 131I-labelled albumin were entrapped into liposomes composed of phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and phosphatidic acid. Of the β-fructofuranosidase activity in the liposomal preparations 96–100% was latent. The following observations were made in experiments with rats injected with protein-containing liposomes. 1. After injection of β-fructofuranosidase-containing liposomes (220 units or 1.5mg of β-fructofuranosidase and 17.5mg of lipid), β-fructofuranosidase activity in blood retained its latency but the activity declined to 50% of the injected dose in 1h. Within 6h much of this activity was recovered in the liver and spleen (respectively 45% and 10% of that injected). For up to 21h after injection, the mitochondrial–lysosomal fraction was the principal location of the hepatic β-fructofuranosidase activity. 2. Lysosomal localization of liposomal protein was supported by the observed increase in the trichloroacetic acid-soluble radioactivity during incubation of the lysosome-rich fraction of the liver of rats injected with liposomes containing 131I-labelled albumin. 3. Association of liposomal protein with lysosomes was demonstrated on subfractionation of the mitochondrial–lysosomal fraction of the liver of rats injected with β-fructofuranosidase-containing liposomes in a Ficoll–mannitol gradient. β-Fructofuranosidase, lysosomal and mitochondrial enzyme marker activities were found to exhibit similar distribution patterns along the gradient. However, in similar experiments with rats previously injected with Triton WR-1339 or dextran (known to alter the specific gravity of lysosomes), only β-fructofuranosidase and lysosomal marker moved along the gradient, in strikingly similar patterns. 4. The lysosomal localization of injected liposome-entrapped material can probably be utilized in the treatment of certain disorders in man. PMID:4646772

  1. Chronic effects of soft drink consumption on the health state of Wistar rats: A biochemical, genetic and histopathological study.

    PubMed

    Alkhedaide, Adel; Soliman, Mohamed Mohamed; Salah-Eldin, Alaa-Eldin; Ismail, Tamer Ahmed; Alshehiri, Zafer Saad; Attia, Hossam Fouad

    2016-06-01

    The present study was performed to examine the effects of chronic soft drink consumption (SDC) on oxidative stress, biochemical alterations, gene biomarkers and histopathology of bone, liver and kidney. Free drinking water of adult male Wistar rats was substituted with three different soft drinks: Coca‑Cola, Pepsi and 7‑Up, for three consecutive months. The serum and organs were collected for examining the biochemical parameters associated with bone, liver and kidney functions. Semi‑quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to observe the changes in the expression of genes in the liver and kidney, which are associated with oxidative stress resistance. Histopathological investigations were performed to determine the changes in bone, liver and kidney tissues using hematoxylin and eosin stains. SDC affected liver, kidney and bone function biomarkers. Soft drinks increased oxidative stress, which is represented by an increase in malondialdehyde and a decrease in antioxidant levels. SDC affected serum mineral levels, particularly calcium and phosphorus. Soft drinks downregulated the expression levels of glutathione‑S‑transferase and super oxide dismutase in the liver compared with that of control rats. Rats administered Coca‑Cola exhibited a hepatic decrease in the mRNA expression of α2‑macroglobulin compared with rats administered Pepsi and 7‑Up. On the other hand, SDC increased the mRNA expression of α1‑acid glycoprotein. The present renal studies revealed that Coca‑Cola increased the mRNA expression levels of desmin, angiotensinogen and angiotensinogen receptor compared with the other groups, together with mild congestion in renal histopathology. Deleterious histopathological changes were reported predominantly in the bone and liver of the Coca‑Cola and Pepsi groups. In conclusion, a very strict caution must be considered with SDC due to the increase in oxidative stress biomarkers and disruption in the expression

  2. Chronic effects of soft drink consumption on the health state of Wistar rats: A biochemical, genetic and histopathological study

    PubMed Central

    ALKHEDAIDE, ADEL; SOLIMAN, MOHAMED MOHAMED; SALAH-ELDIN, ALAA-ELDIN; ISMAIL, TAMER AHMED; ALSHEHIRI, ZAFER SAAD; ATTIA, HOSSAM FOUAD

    2016-01-01

    The present study was performed to examine the effects of chronic soft drink consumption (SDC) on oxidative stress, biochemical alterations, gene biomarkers and histopathology of bone, liver and kidney. Free drinking water of adult male Wistar rats was substituted with three different soft drinks: Coca-Cola, Pepsi and 7-Up, for three consecutive months. The serum and organs were collected for examining the biochemical parameters associated with bone, liver and kidney functions. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to observe the changes in the expression of genes in the liver and kidney, which are associated with oxidative stress resistance. Histopathological investigations were performed to determine the changes in bone, liver and kidney tissues using hematoxylin and eosin stains. SDC affected liver, kidney and bone function biomarkers. Soft drinks increased oxidative stress, which is represented by an increase in malondialdehyde and a decrease in antioxidant levels. SDC affected serum mineral levels, particularly calcium and phosphorus. Soft drinks downregulated the expression levels of glutathione-S-transferase and super oxide dismutase in the liver compared with that of control rats. Rats administered Coca-Cola exhibited a hepatic decrease in the mRNA expression of α2-macroglobulin compared with rats administered Pepsi and 7-Up. On the other hand, SDC increased the mRNA expression of α1-acid glycoprotein. The present renal studies revealed that Coca-Cola increased the mRNA expression levels of desmin, angiotensinogen and angiotensinogen receptor compared with the other groups, together with mild congestion in renal histopathology. Deleterious histopathological changes were reported predominantly in the bone and liver of the Coca-Cola and Pepsi groups. In conclusion, a very strict caution must be considered with SDC due to the increase in oxidative stress biomarkers and disruption in the expression of certain genes

  3. The genetic absence epilepsy rat from Strasbourg as a model to decipher the neuronal and network mechanisms of generalized idiopathic epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Depaulis, Antoine; David, Olivier; Charpier, Stéphane

    2016-02-15

    First characterized in 1982, the genetic absence epilepsy rat from Strasbourg (GAERS) has emerged as an animal model highly reminiscent of a specific form of idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Both its electrophysiological (spike-and-wave discharges) and behavioral (behavioral arrest) features fit well with those observed in human patients with typical absence epilepsy and required by clinicians for diagnostic purposes. In addition, its sensitivity to antiepileptic drugs closely matches what has been described in the clinic, making this model one of the most predictive. Here, we report how the GAERS, thanks to its spontaneous, highly recurrent and easily recognizable seizures on electroencephalographic recordings, allows to address several key-questions about the pathophysiology and genetics of absence epilepsy. In particular, it offers the unique possibility to explore simultaneously the neural circuits involved in the generation of seizures at different levels of integration, using multiscale methodologies, from intracellular recording to functional magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, it has recently allowed to perform proofs of concept for innovative therapeutic strategies such as responsive deep brain stimulation or synchrotron-generated irradiation based radiosurgery. PMID:26068173

  4. Ninety-day oral toxicity studies on two genetically modified maize MON810 varieties in Wistar Han RCC rats (EU 7th Framework Programme project GRACE).

    PubMed

    Zeljenková, Dagmar; Ambrušová, Katarína; Bartušová, Mária; Kebis, Anton; Kovrižnych, Jevgenij; Krivošíková, Zora; Kuricová, Miroslava; Líšková, Aurélia; Rollerová, Eva; Spustová, Viera; Szabová, Elena; Tulinská, Jana; Wimmerová, Soňa; Levkut, Mikuláš; Révajová, Viera; Ševčíková, Zuzana; Schmidt, Kerstin; Schmidtke, Jörg; La Paz, Jose Luis; Corujo, Maria; Pla, Maria; Kleter, Gijs A; Kok, Esther J; Sharbati, Jutta; Hanisch, Carlos; Einspanier, Ralf; Adel-Patient, Karine; Wal, Jean-Michel; Spök, Armin; Pöting, Annette; Kohl, Christian; Wilhelm, Ralf; Schiemann, Joachim; Steinberg, Pablo

    2014-12-01

    The GMO Risk Assessment and Communication of Evidence (GRACE; www.grace-fp7.eu ) project is funded by the European Commission within the 7th Framework Programme. A key objective of GRACE is to conduct 90-day animal feeding trials, animal studies with an extended time frame as well as analytical, in vitro and in silico studies on genetically modified (GM) maize in order to comparatively evaluate their use in GM plant risk assessment. In the present study, the results of two 90-day feeding trials with two different GM maize MON810 varieties, their near-isogenic non-GM varieties and four additional conventional maize varieties are presented. The feeding trials were performed by taking into account the guidance for such studies published by the EFSA Scientific Committee in 2011 and the OECD Test Guideline 408. The results obtained show that the MON810 maize at a level of up to 33 % in the diet did not induce adverse effects in male and female Wistar Han RCC rats after subchronic exposure, independently of the two different genetic backgrounds of the event. PMID:25270621

  5. Graft of the gelatin sponge scaffold containing genetically-modified neural stem cells promotes cell differentiation, axon regeneration, and functional recovery in rat with spinal cord transection.

    PubMed

    Du, Bao-Ling; Zeng, Xiang; Ma, Yuan-Huan; Lai, Bi-Qin; Wang, Jun-Mei; Ling, Eng-Ang; Wu, Jin-Lang; Zeng, Yuan-Shan

    2015-04-01

    Biological materials combined with genetically-modified neural stem cells (NSCs) are candidate therapy targeting spinal cord injury (SCI). Based on our previous studies, here we performed gelatin sponge (GS) scaffold seeded with neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and its receptor TrkC gene modifying NSCs for repairing SCI. Eight weeks later, compared with other groups, neurofilament-200 and 5-hydroxytryptamine positive nerve fibers were more in the injury site of the N+T-NSCs group. Immunofluorescence staining showed the grafted NSCs could differentiate into microtubule associated protein (Map2), postsynaptic density (PSD95), and mouse oligodendrocyte special protein (MOSP) positive cells. The percentage of the Map2, PSD95, and MOSP positive cells in the N+T-NSCs group was higher than the other groups. Immuno-electron microscopy showed the grafted NSCs making contact with each other in the injury site. Behavioral analysis indicated the recovery of hindlimbs locomotion was better in the groups receiving cell transplant, the best recovery was found in the N+T-NSCs group. Electrophysiology revealed the amplitude of cortical motor evoked potentials was increased significantly in the N+T-NSCs group, but the latency remained long. These findings suggest the GS scaffold containing genetically-modified NSCs may bridge the injury site, promote axon regeneration and partial functional recovery in SCI rats. PMID:25046856

  6. Integration of genotoxicity and population genetic analyses in kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami) exposed to radionuclide contamination at the Nevada Test Site, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Theodorakis, Christopher W.; Bickham, John W.; Lamb, Trip; Medica, Philip A.; Lyne, T. Barrett

    2001-01-01

    We examined effects of radionuclide exposure at two atomic blast sites on kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami) at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, USA, using genotoxicity and population genetic analyses. We assessed chromosome damage by micronucleus and flow cytometric assays and genetic variation by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analyses. The RAPD analysis showed no population structure, but mtDNA exhibited differentiation among and within populations. Genotoxicity effects were not observed when all individuals were analyzed. However, individuals with mtDNA haplotypes unique to the contaminated sites had greater chromosomal damage than contaminated-site individuals with haplotypes shared with reference sites. When interpopulation comparisons used individuals with unique haplotypes, one contaminated site had greater levels of chromosome damage than one or both of the reference sites. We hypothesize that shared-haplotype individuals are potential migrants and that unique-haplotype individuals are potential long-term residents. A parsimony approach was used to estimate the minimum number of migration events necessary to explain the haplotype distributions on a phylogenetic tree. The observed predominance of migration events into the contaminated sites supported our migration hypothesis. We conclude the atomic blast sites are ecological sinks and that immigration masks the genotoxic effects of radiation on the resident populations.

  7. Effects of environmental and physiological covariates on sex differences in unconditioned and conditioned anxiety and fear in a large sample of genetically heterogeneous (N/Nih-HS) rats.

    PubMed

    López-Aumatell, Regina; Martínez-Membrives, Esther; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Johannesson, Martina; Flint, Jonathan; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Physiological and environmental variables, or covariates, can account for an important portion of the variability observed in behavioural/physiological results from different laboratories even when using the same type of animals and phenotyping procedures. We present the results of a behavioural study with a sample of 1456 genetically heterogeneous N/Nih-HS rats, including males and females, which are part of a larger genome-wide fine-mapping QTL (Quantitative Trait Loci) study. N/Nih-HS rats have been derived from 8 inbred strains and provide very small distance between genetic recombinations, which makes them a unique tool for fine-mapping QTL studies. The behavioural test battery comprised the elevated zero-maze test for anxiety, novel-cage (open-field like) activity, two-way active avoidance acquisition (related to conditioned anxiety) and context-conditioned freezing (i.e. classically conditioned fear). Using factorial analyses of variance (ANOVAs) we aimed to analyse sex differences in anxiety and fear in this N/Nih-HS rat sample, as well as to assess the effects of (and interactions with) other independent factors, such as batch, season, coat colour and experimenter. Body weight was taken as a quantitative covariate and analysed by covariance analysis (ANCOVA). Obliquely-rotated factor analyses were also performed separately for each sex, in order to evaluate associations among the most relevant variables from each behavioural test and the common dimensions (i.e. factors) underlying the different behavioural responses. ANOVA analyses showed a consistent pattern of sex effects, with females showing less signs of anxiety and fear than males across all tests. There were also significant main effects of batch, season, colour and experimenter on almost all behavioural variables, as well as "sex × batch", "sex × season" and "sex × experimenter" interactions. Body weight showed significant effects in the ANCOVAs of most behavioural measures, but sex effects were

  8. 5-HT1A receptor gene silencers Freud-1 and Freud-2 are differently expressed in the brain of rats with genetically determined high level of fear-induced aggression or its absence.

    PubMed

    Kondaurova, Elena M; Ilchibaeva, Tatiana V; Tsybko, Anton S; Kozhemyakina, Rimma V; Popova, Nina K; Naumenko, Vladimir S

    2016-09-01

    Serotonin 5-HT1A receptor is known to play a crucial role in the mechanisms of genetically defined aggression. In its turn, 5-HT1A receptor functional state is under control of multiple factors. Among others, transcriptional factors Freud-1 and Freud-2 are known to be involved in the repression of 5-HT1A receptor gene expression. However, implication of these factors in the regulation of behavior is unclear. Here, we investigated the expression of 5-HT1A receptor and silencers Freud-1 and Freud-2 in the brain of rats selectively bred for 85 generations for either high level of fear-induced aggression or its absence. It was shown that Freud-1 and Freud-2 levels were different in aggressive and nonaggressive animals. Freud-1 protein level was decreased in the hippocampus, whereas Freud-2 protein level was increased in the frontal cortex of highly aggressive rats. There no differences in 5-HT1A receptor gene expression were found in the brains of highly aggressive and nonaggressive rats. However, 5-HT1A receptor protein level was decreased in the midbrain and increased in the hippocampus of highly aggressive rats. These data showed the involvement of Freud-1 and Freud-2 in the regulation of genetically defined fear-induced aggression. However, these silencers do not affect transcription of the 5-HT1A receptor gene in the investigated rats. Our data indicate the implication of posttranscriptional rather than transcriptional regulation of 5-HT1A receptor functional state in the mechanisms of genetically determined aggressive behavior. On the other hand, the implication of other transcriptional regulators for 5-HT1A receptor gene in the mechanisms of genetically defined aggression could be suggested. PMID:27150226

  9. Genetic Enhancement of Visual Learning by Activation of Protein Kinase C Pathways in Small Groups of Rat Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-rong; Wang, Xiaodan; Kong, Lingxin; Lu, Xiu-gui; Lee, Brian; Liu, Meng; Sun, Mei; Franklin, Corinna; Cook, Robert G.; Geller, Alfred I.

    2006-01-01

    Although learning and memory theories hypothesize that memories are encoded by specific circuits, it has proven difficult to localize learning within a cortical area. Neural network theories predict that activation of a small fraction of the neurons in a circuit can activate that circuit. Consequently, altering the physiology of a small group of neurons might potentiate a specific circuit and enhance learning, thereby localizing learning to that circuit. In this study, we activated protein kinase C (PKC) pathways in small groups of neurons in rat postrhinal (POR) cortex. We microinjected helper virus-free herpes simplex virus vectors that expressed a constitutively active PKC into POR cortex. This PKC was expressed predominantly in glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in POR cortex. This intervention increased phosphorylation of five PKC substrates that play critical roles in neurotransmitter release (GAP-43 and dynamin) or glutamatergic neurotransmission (specific subunits of AMPA or NMDA receptors and myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate). Additionally, activation of PKC pathways in cultured cortical neurons supported activation-dependent increases in release of glutamate and GABA. This intervention enhanced the learning rate and accuracy of visual object discriminations. In individual rats, the numbers of transfected neurons positively correlated with this learning. During learning, neuronal activity was increased in neurons proximal to the transfected neurons. These results demonstrate that potentiating small groups of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in POR cortex enhances visual object learning. More generally, these results suggest that learning can be mediated by specific cortical circuits. PMID:16162929

  10. mRNA GPR162 changes are associated with decreased food intake in rat, and its human genetic variants with impairments in glucose homeostasis in two Swedish cohorts.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Vanni; Sreedharan, Smitha; Carlini, Valeria P; Jacobsson, Josefin A; Haitina, Tatjana; Hammer, Joanna; Stephansson, Olga; Crona, Filip; Sommer, Wolfgang H; Risérus, Ulf; Lannfelt, Lars; Marcus, Claude; Heilig, Markus; de Barioglio, Susana R; Fredriksson, Robert; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2016-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a class of integral membrane proteins mediating intercellular interactions of fundamental physiological importance for survival including regulation of food intake, blood pressure, and hormonal sensing signaling, among other roles. Homeostatic alterations in the physiological status of GPCRs are often associated with underlying causes of disease, and to date, several orphan GPCRs are still uncharacterized. Findings from our previous study demonstrate that the Rhodopsin family protein GPR162 is widely expressed in GABAergic as well as other neurons within the mouse hippocampus, whereas extensive expression is observed in hypothalamus, amygdala, and ventral tegmental area, regions strictly interconnected and involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis and hedonic feeding. In this study, we provide a further anatomical characterization of GPR162 in mouse brain via in situ hybridization as well as detailed mRNA expression in a panel of rat tissues complementing a specie-specific mapping of the receptor. We also provide an attempt to demonstrate a functional implication of GPR162 in food intake-related behavior via antisense knockdown studies. Furthermore, we performed human genetic studies in which for the first time, variants of the GPR162 gene were associated with impairments in glucose homeostasis. PMID:26827797

  11. Persistence of 1,25D-induced hypercalciuria in alendronate-treated genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming rats fed a low-calcium diet

    PubMed Central

    Asplin, John R.; Culbertson, Christopher D.; Granja, Ignacio; Krieger, Nancy S.; Bushinsky, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming (GHS) rats demonstrate increased intestinal Ca absorption, increased bone resorption, and reduced renal tubular Ca reabsorption leading to hypercalciuria and all form kidney stones. GHS have increased vitamin D receptors (VDR) at these sites of Ca transport. Injection of 1,25(OH)2D3 (1,25D) leads to a greater increase in urine (u)Ca in GHS than in control Sprague-Dawley (SD), possibly due to the additional VDR. In GHS the increased uCa persists on a low-Ca diet (LCD) suggesting enhanced bone resorption. We tested the hypothesis that LCD, coupled to inhibition of bone resorption by alendronate (alen), would eliminate the enhanced 1,25D-induced hypercalciuria in GHS. SD and GHS were fed LCD and half were injected daily with 1,25D. After 8 days all were also given alen until euthanasia at day 16. At 8 days, 1,25D increased uCa in SD and to a greater extent in GHS. At 16 days, alen eliminated the 1,25D-induced increase in uCa in SD. However, in GHS alen decreased, but did not eliminate, the 1,25D-induced hypercalciuria, suggesting maximal alen cannot completely prevent the 1,25D-induced bone resorption in GHS, perhaps due to increased VDR. There was no consistent effect on mRNA expression of renal transcellular or paracellular Ca transporters. Urine CaP and CaOx supersaturation (SS) increased with 1,25D alone in both SD and GHS. Alen eliminated the increase in CaP SS in SD but not in GHS. If these results are confirmed in humans with IH, the use of bisphosphonates, such as alen, may not prevent the decreased bone density observed in these patients. PMID:24573387

  12. Persistence of 1,25D-induced hypercalciuria in alendronate-treated genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming rats fed a low-calcium diet.

    PubMed

    Frick, Kevin K; Asplin, John R; Culbertson, Christopher D; Granja, Ignacio; Krieger, Nancy S; Bushinsky, David A

    2014-05-01

    Genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming (GHS) rats demonstrate increased intestinal Ca absorption, increased bone resorption, and reduced renal tubular Ca reabsorption leading to hypercalciuria and all form kidney stones. GHS have increased vitamin D receptors (VDR) at these sites of Ca transport. Injection of 1,25(OH)2D3 (1,25D) leads to a greater increase in urine (u)Ca in GHS than in control Sprague-Dawley (SD), possibly due to the additional VDR. In GHS the increased uCa persists on a low-Ca diet (LCD) suggesting enhanced bone resorption. We tested the hypothesis that LCD, coupled to inhibition of bone resorption by alendronate (alen), would eliminate the enhanced 1,25D-induced hypercalciuria in GHS. SD and GHS were fed LCD and half were injected daily with 1,25D. After 8 days all were also given alen until euthanasia at day 16. At 8 days, 1,25D increased uCa in SD and to a greater extent in GHS. At 16 days, alen eliminated the 1,25D-induced increase in uCa in SD. However, in GHS alen decreased, but did not eliminate, the 1,25D-induced hypercalciuria, suggesting maximal alen cannot completely prevent the 1,25D-induced bone resorption in GHS, perhaps due to increased VDR. There was no consistent effect on mRNA expression of renal transcellular or paracellular Ca transporters. Urine CaP and CaOx supersaturation (SS) increased with 1,25D alone in both SD and GHS. Alen eliminated the increase in CaP SS in SD but not in GHS. If these results are confirmed in humans with IH, the use of bisphosphonates, such as alen, may not prevent the decreased bone density observed in these patients. PMID:24573387

  13. The T-type calcium channel antagonist Z944 rescues impairments in crossmodal and visual recognition memory in Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg.

    PubMed

    Marks, Wendie N; Cain, Stuart M; Snutch, Terrance P; Howland, John G

    2016-10-01

    Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) is often comorbid with behavioral and cognitive symptoms, including impaired visual memory. Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg (GAERS) is an animal model closely resembling CAE; however, cognition in GAERS is poorly understood. Crossmodal object recognition (CMOR) is a recently developed memory task that examines not only purely visual and tactile memory, but also requires rodents to integrate sensory information about objects gained from tactile exploration to enable visual recognition. Both the visual and crossmodal variations of the CMOR task rely on the perirhinal cortex, an area with dense expression of T-type calcium channels. GAERS express a gain-in-function missense mutation in the Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel gene. Therefore, we tested whether the T-type calcium channel blocker Z944 dose dependently (1, 3, 10mg/kg; i.p.) altered CMOR memory in GAERS compared to the non-epileptic control (NEC) strain. GAERS demonstrated recognition memory deficits in the visual and crossmodal variations of the CMOR task that were reversed by the highest dose of Z944. Electroencephalogram recordings determined that deficits in CMOR memory in GAERS were not the result of seizures during task performance. In contrast, NEC showed a decrease in CMOR memory following Z944 treatment. These findings suggest that T-type calcium channels mediate CMOR in both the GAERS and NEC strains. Future research into the therapeutic potential of T-type calcium channel regulation may be particularly fruitful for the treatment of CAE and other disorders characterized by visual memory deficits. PMID:27282256

  14. Assessment of Glial Scar, Tissue Sparing, Behavioral Recovery and Axonal Regeneration following Acute Transplantation of Genetically Modified Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells in a Rat Model of Spinal Cord Contusion

    PubMed Central

    Mukhamedshina, Yana O.; Garanina, Ekaterina E.; Masgutova, Galina A.; Galieva, Luisa R.; Sanatova, Elvira R.; Chelyshev, Yurii A.; Rizvanov, Albert A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective and Methods This study investigated the potential for protective effects of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (UCB-MCs) genetically modified with the VEGF and GNDF genes on contusion spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. An adenoviral vector was constructed for targeted delivery of VEGF and GDNF to UCB-MCs. Using a rat contusion SCI model we examined the efficacy of the construct on tissue sparing, glial scar severity, the extent of axonal regeneration, recovery of motor function, and analyzed the expression of the recombinant genes VEGF and GNDF in vitro and in vivo. Results Transplantation of UCB-MCs transduced with adenoviral vectors expressing VEGF and GDNF at the site of SCI induced tissue sparing, behavioral recovery and axonal regeneration comparing to the other constructs tested. The adenovirus encoding VEGF and GDNF for transduction of UCB-MCs was shown to be an effective and stable vehicle for these cells in vivo following the transplantation into the contused spinal cord. Conclusion Our results show that a gene delivery using UCB-MCs-expressing VEGF and GNDF genes improved both structural and functional parameters after SCI. Further histological and behavioral studies, especially at later time points, in animals with SCI after transplantation of genetically modified UCB-MCs (overexpressing VEGF and GDNF genes) will provide additional insight into therapeutic potential of such cells. PMID:27003408

  15. Prevention of increases in blood pressure and left ventricular mass and remodeling of resistance arteries in young New Zealand genetically hypertensive rats: the effects of chronic treatment with valsartan, enalapril and felodipine.

    PubMed

    Ledingham, J M; Phelan, E L; Cross, M A; Laverty, R

    2000-01-01

    The relative efficacy of three antihypertensive drugs in the prevention of further elevation of blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular structural remodeling in 4-week-old genetically hypertensive (GH) rats was studied by means of two complementary methods, stereology and myography. Four to 10-week-old GH rats were treated with valsartan (10 mg/kg/day), enalapril (10 mg/kg/day) or felodipine (30 mg/kg/day). Untreated GH and normotensive control rats of Wistar origin served as controls. Tail-cuff systolic SBP was measured weekly and left ventricular (LV) mass determined at the end of the experiment. Mesenteric resistance arteries (MRA) were either fixed by perfusion, embedded in Technovit and sections stained for stereological analysis, or mounted on a wire myograph for structural and functional measurements. BP and LV mass were significantly reduced by all drugs; decreases in BP and LV mass were smaller after felodipine treatment. Valsartan and enalapril caused a decrease in BP to normotensive control values. Felodipine kept BP at the 4-week level and prevented further rise with age. Valsartan caused hypotrophic outward remodeling of MRA, enalapril eutrophic outward remodeling and felodipine hypotrophic remodeling. Myograph measurements showed remodeling of the same order. While all drugs lowered the media/lumen ratio in GH to normal, the outward remodeling after valsartan and enalapril indicates that valsartan and enalapril might be more effective in reversing the inward remodeling of resistance arteries found in essential hypertension. PMID:10754398

  16. Intratunical Injection of Genetically Modified Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells with Human Interferon α-2b for Treatment of Erectile Dysfunction in a Rat Model of Tunica Albugineal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Ahmet; Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y.; Lasker, George F.; Bouljihad, Mostafa; Braun, Stephen E.; Kim, Hogyoung; Kadowitz, Philip J.; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B.; Sikka, Suresh C.; Hellstrom, Wayne J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Peyronie's disease (PD) has frequently been associated with erectile dysfunction (ED) and may further compromise coitus. Aim To investigate the efficacy of intratunical injection of genetically modified rat adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) expressing human interferon α-2b (ADSCs-IFN) in decreasing fibrosis and restoring erectile function in a rat model of tunica albugineal fibrosis (TAF). Methods A total of 36 Sprague-Dawley rats (12 weeks old; 300–350 g) were randomly divided in six equal groups: (i) sham group (50 μL saline-injected into the tunica albuginea [TA]); (ii) TAF group (transforming growth factor [TGF]-β1 [0.5 μg/50 μL] injected into the TA); (iii) TGF-β1 plus 5 × 105 control ADSCs injected same day; (iv) TGF-β1 plus 5 × 105 ADSCs-IFN injected same day; (v)TGF-β1 plus 5 × 105 control ADSCs injected after 30 days; and (vi) TGF-β1 plus 5 × 105 ADSCs-IFN injected after 30 days. Rat allogeneic ADSCs were harvested from inguinal fat tissue. Main Outcome Measures Forty-five days following the TGF-β1 injection, erectile function was assessed, and penile tissues were harvested for further evaluations. Results In the same-day injection groups, intratunical injection of ADSCs and ADSC-IFN improved erectile response observed upon stimulation of cavernous nerve compared with TAF group. Intratunical ADSC-IFN injection at day 30 improved erectile responses 3.1, 1.8, and 1.3 fold at voltages of 2.5, 5.0, and 7.0, respectively, when compared with TAF group. Furthermore, at voltages of 2.5 and 5.0, treatment on day 30 with ADSCs-IFN improved erectile responses 1.6- and 1.3-fold over treatment with ADSCs alone. Local injection of ADSCs or ADSCs-IFN reduced Peyronie's-like manifestations, and these effects might be associated with a decrease in the expression of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases. Conclusion This study documents that transplantation of genetically modified ADSCs, with or without human IFN α-2b, attenuated

  17. [Effect of NO-synthesis blockade on the free-radical processes in rats of different genetic strains with acute alloxan diabetes].

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    Previously, we have shown that nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of alloxan diabetes (ALD). In this study in August rats, with the congenital increased activity of NO, and in Wistar rats was induced ALD (130 mg/kg, p/c) and 15 days after were examined the effects of the NO-blockade synthesis, induced by administration of Nω-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) cour- se on the activity of lipid peroxidation (LP), HIF-1α level, the degree of NO-system activation. The activation of iNOS, HIF-1a expression and 3-nitrotyrosine accumulation in liver were more pronounced in August-ALD rats than in Wistar-ALD rats. The level of TBA-active products in the heart and liver was increased in both diabetic groups only in the first 3 days ofALD and then this indicator of LP sharply was decreased as compared with the control. This effect was pronounced more in August rats. The inhibition of NO overproduction reduced significantly the severity of ALD and prevented the activation of LP, iNOS and HIF-1a. Thus, these data suggest, that NO plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ALD and in the regulation of oxygen homeostasis. PMID:25507631

  18. [Effect of NO-synthesis blockade on the free-radical processes in rats of different genetic strains with acute alloxan diabetes].

    PubMed

    Belkina, L M; Terekhina, O L; Antipova, T A; Smirnova, E A; Kruglov, S V; Malyshev, I Iu

    2013-11-01

    Previously, we have shown that nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of alloxan diabetes (ALD). In this study in August rats, with the congenital increased activity of NO, and in Wistar rats was induced ALD (130 mg/kg, p/c) and 15 days after were examined the effects of the NO-blockade synthesis, induced by administration of Nω-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) cour- se on the activity of lipid peroxidation (LP), HIF-1α level, the degree of NO-system activation. The activation of iNOS, HIF-1a expression and 3-nitrotyrosine accumulation in liver were more pronounced in August-ALD rats than in Wistar-ALD rats. The level of TBA-active products in the heart and liver was increased in both diabetic groups only in the first 3 days ofALD and then this indicator of LP sharply was decreased as compared with the control. This effect was pronounced more in August rats. The inhibition of NO overproduction reduced significantly the severity of ALD and prevented the activation of LP, iNOS and HIF-1a. Thus, these data suggest, that NO plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ALD and in the regulation of oxygen homeostasis. PMID:25427381

  19. [Genetics and genetic counseling].

    PubMed

    Izzi, Claudia; Liut, Francesca; Dallera, Nadia; Mazza, Cinzia; Magistroni, Riccardo; Savoldi, Gianfranco; Scolari, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent genetic disease, characterized by progressive development of bilateral renal cysts. Two causative genes have been identified: PKD1 and PKD2. ADPKD phenotype is highly variable. Typically, ADPKD is an adult onset disease. However, occasionally, ADPKD manifests as very early onset disease. The phenotypic variability of ADPKD can be explained at three genetic levels: genic, allelic and gene modifier effects. Recent advances in molecular screening for PKD gene mutations and the introduction of the new next generation sequencing (NGS)- based genotyping approach have generated considerable improvement regarding the knowledge of genetic basis of ADPKD. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the genetics of ADPKD, focusing on new insights in genotype-phenotype correlation and exploring novel clinical approach to genetic testing. Evaluation of these new genetic information requires a multidisciplinary approach involving a nephrologist and a clinical geneticist. PMID:27067213

  20. Genetics in Non-Genetic Model Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lois, Carlos; Groves, James O

    2011-01-01

    The past few decades have seen the field of genetic engineering evolve at a rapid pace, with neuroscientists now equipped with a wide range of tools for the manipulation of an animal's genome in order to study brain function. However, the number of species to which these technologies have been applied, namely the fruit fly, C. elegans, zebrafish and mouse, remains relatively few. This review will discuss the variety of approaches to genetic modification that have been developed in such traditional ‘genetic systems’, and highlight the progress that has been made to translate these technologies to alternative species such as rats, monkeys and birds, where certain neurobiological questions may be better studied. PMID:22119141

  1. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Nora, J.J.; Fraser, F.C.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a discussion of medical genetics for the practitioner treating or counseling patients with genetic disease. It includes a discussion of the relationship of heredity and diseases, the chromosomal basis for heredity, gene frequencies, and genetics of development and maldevelopment. The authors also focus on teratology, somatic cell genetics, genetics and cancer, genetics of behavior.

  2. Genetic predisposition and early life experience interact to determine glutamate transporter (GLT1) and solute carrier family 12 member 5 (KCC2) levels in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sterley, Toni-Lee; Howells, Fleur M; Dimatelis, Jacqueline J; Russell, Vivienne A

    2016-02-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common child psychiatric disorders. While it is typically treated with medications that target dopamine and norepinephrine transmission, there is increasing evidence that other neurotransmitter systems, such as glutamate and GABA, may be involved. The aetiology of ADHD is unknown; however, there is evidence that early life stress may contribute to the development of the disorder. In the present study we used proteomic analysis (iTRAQ) followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis to investigate hippocampal protein profiles of three rat strains: an animal model of ADHD, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), their control Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY), and Sprague-Dawley rats (SD). We additionally investigated how these protein profiles are affected by maternal separation, a model of early life stress. Our findings show that solute carrier family 12 member 5 (KCC2) is increased in SHR hippocampus. The glutamate transporter GLT1 splice variant, GLT1b, was increased (proteomic analysis) while total GLT1 (comprised mostly of GLT1a splice variant) was reduced (Western blot analysis) in SHR hippocampus, compared to WKY and SD--a pattern that is consistent with elevated extracellular glutamate levels. Maternal separation increased total GLT1 in hippocampi of SHR, WKY, and SD, and reduced GLT1b in SHR hippocampus. Together these findings provide evidence for disturbed glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission in SHR hippocampus, maternal separation effects on glutamate uptake in hippocampi of all three strains, as well a unique effect of maternal separation on GLT1b levels in SHR hippocampus. These data suggest significant involvement of glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission in the neuropathophysiology of ADHD, and implicates changes in glutamatergic transmission as a result of early life stress. PMID:26464063

  3. A new model of Pde4d deficiency: genetic knock-down of PDE4D enzyme in rats produces an antidepressant phenotype without spatial cognitive effects.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, T L; Braun, A A; Amos-Kroohs, R M; Williams, M T; Ostertag, E; Vorhees, C V

    2012-07-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are a superfamily of intracellular second messenger cyclic nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes composed of 12 families. The Pde4 family has been implicated in depression and cognition, and PDE4 inhibitors have been evaluated as antidepressants and possible cognitive enhancers. Pde4d(-/-) mice show an antidepressant phenotype and learning enhancement on some tests, but not others as do mice treated with PDE4 inhibitors. Here, we report for the first time the behavioral phenotype of a new Pde4d knock-down (KD) rat model of PDE4D deficiency. Consistent with other data on PDE4D deficiency, Pde4d KD rats showed depression resistance in the Porsolt forced swim test and hyperreactivity of the acoustic startle response with no differential response on prepulse inhibition, suggesting no sensorimotor gating defect. Pde4d KD rats also exhibited a small exploratory activity reduction but no difference following habituation, and no enhanced spatial learning or reference memory in the Morris water maze. A selective improvement in route-based learning in the Cincinnati water maze was seen as well as enhanced contextual and cued fear conditioning and a more rapid rate of cued extinction from their higher freezing level that declined to wild-type (WT) levels only after ∼20 extinction trials. The rat model confirms Pde4d's role in depression but not in spatial learning or memory enhancement and shows for the first time higher fear conditioning and altered extinction compared with controls. The new model provides a tool by which to better understand the role of PDE4D in neuropsychiatric disorders and for the development of alternate treatment approaches. PMID:22487514

  4. Time-frequency dynamics during sleep spindles on the EEG in rodents with a genetic predisposition to absence epilepsy (WAG/Rij rats)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hramov, Alexander E.; Sitnikova, Evgenija Y.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Grubov, Vadim V.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Khramova, Marina V.

    2015-03-01

    Sleep spindles are known to appear spontaneously in the thalamocortical neuronal network of the brain during slow-wave sleep; pathological processes in the thalamocortical network may be the reason of the absence epilepsy. The aim of the present work is to study developed changes in the time-frequency structure of sleep spindles during the progressive development of the absence epilepsy in WAG/Rij rats. EEG recordings were made at age 7 and 9 months. Automatic recognition and subsequent analysis of sleep spindles on the EEG were performed using the continuous wavelet transform. The duration of epileptic discharges and the total duration of epileptic activity were found to increase with age, while the duration of sleep spindles, conversely, decreased. In terms of the mean frequency, sleep spindles could be divided into three classes: `slow' (mean frequency 9.3Hz), `medium' (11.4Hz), and `fast' (13.5Hz). Slow and medium (transitional) spindles in five-month-old animals showed increased frequency from the beginning to the end of the spindle. The more intense the epilepsy is, the shorter are the durations of spindles of all types. The mean frequencies of `medium' and `fast' spindles were higher in rats with more intense signs of epilepsy. Overall, high epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats was linked with significant changes in spindles of the transitional type, with less marked changes in the two traditionally identified types of spindle, slow and fast.

  5. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jorde, L.B.; Carey, J.C.; White, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    This book on the subject of medical genetics is a textbook aimed at a very broad audience: principally, medical students, nursing students, graduate, and undergraduate students. The book is actually a primer of general genetics as applied to humans and provides a well-balanced introduction to the scientific and clinical basis of human genetics. The twelve chapters include: Introduction, Basic Cell Biology, Genetic Variation, Autosomal Dominant and Recessive Inheritance, Sex-linked and Mitochondrial Inheritance, Clinical Cytogenetics, Gene Mapping, Immunogenetics, Cancer Genetics, Multifactorial Inheritance and Common Disease, Genetic Screening, Genetic Diagnosis and Gene Therapy, and Clinical Genetics and Genetic Counseling.

  6. Genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical, highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Basic genetic algorithms concepts are introduced, genetic algorithm applications are introduced, and results are presented from a project to develop a software tool that will enable the widespread use of genetic algorithm technology.

  7. Genetic Counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... Articles Genetic Counseling Information For... Media Policy Makers Genetic Counseling Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... informed decisions about testing and treatment. Reasons for Genetic Counseling There are many reasons that people go ...

  8. New Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... human genome, behavioral genetics, pharmacogenetics, drug resistance, biofilms, computer modeling. » more Chapter 5: 21st-Century Genetics Covers systems biology, GFP, genetic testing, privacy concerns, DNA forensics, ...

  9. Immunochemical and genetic analysis of the p53 gene in liver preneoplastic nodules from aflatoxin-induced rats in one year.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y P; Lin, Y; Ng, M L

    1996-01-01

    Mutations of the p53 tumour-suppressor gene in human hepatocellular carcinomas from certain geographic areas appear to be associated with high dietary exposure to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). In this study, the effects of AFB1 on p53 locus at the preneoplastic stage of rat liver oncogenesis were assessed. Male Wistar rats were treated with a single dose of 1.5 mg AFB1/kg body weight by a gastric tube. Liver biopsies over a period of one year were examined for aberrations of the p53 gene together with the expression of placental glutathione-S transferase (GST-P), a marker for preneoplasia. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot, polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and DNA sequencing techniques were used. AFB1 induction resulted in GST-P overexpression, forming GST-P-positive multi-foci and nodules of hepatocytes, but no aberrations in the p53 expression and the microstructure of exons 5-8 of the p53 gene. These results suggested that p53 mutation(s) might not occur at this early stage of AFB1-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:8779543

  10. Diversity of mitochondrial Ca2+ signaling in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes: Evidence from a genetically directed Ca2+ probe, mitycam-E31Q

    PubMed Central

    Haviland, Sarah; Cleemann, Lars; Kettlewell, Sarah; Smith, Godfrey L.; Morad, Martin

    2014-01-01

    ICa-gated Ca2+ release (CICR) from the cardiac SR is the main mechanism mediating the rise of cytosolic Ca2+, but the extent to which mitochondria contribute to the overall Ca2+ signaling remains controversial. To examine the possible role of mitochondria in Ca2+ signaling, we developed a low affinity mitochondrial Ca2+ probe, mitycam-E31Q (300–500 MOI, 48–72h) and used it in conjunction with Fura-2AM to obtain simultaneous TIRF images of mitochondrial and cytosolic Ca2+ in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Mitycam-E31Q staining of adult feline cardiomyocytes showed the typical mitochondrial longitudinal fluorescent bandings similar to that of TMRE staining, while neonatal rat cardiomyocytes had a disorganized tubular or punctuate appearance. Caffeine puffs produced rapid increases in cytosolic Ca2+ while simultaneously measured global mitycam-E31Q signals decreased more slowly (increased mitochondrial Ca2+) before decaying to baseline levels. Similar, but oscillating mitycam-E31Q signals were seen in spontaneously pacing cells. Withdrawal of Na+ increased global cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ signals in one population of mitochondria, but unexpectedly decreased it (release of Ca2+) in another mitochondrial population. Such mitochondrial Ca2+ release signals were seen not only during long lasting Na+ withdrawal, but also when Ca2+ loaded cells were exposed to caffeine-puffs, and during spontaneous rhythmic beating. Thus, mitochondrial Ca2+ transients appear to activate with a delay following the cytosolic rise of Ca2+ and show diversity in subpopulations of mitochondria that could contribute to the plasticity of mitochondrial Ca2+ signaling. PMID:24994483

  11. Electroejaculation of chimeric rats

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Marina R.; Montonye, Daniel; Bryda, Elizabeth C.

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of genetic engineering of rodents came the need to assess fertility and germline competency, especially in chimeric rodents generated using embryonic stem cells. Traditional methods rely on natural mating and progeny testing, which is time- and cost-intensive. Electroejaculation is a faster method of collecting sperm for genetic analysis and offers the additional benefit of using fewer animals. This column describes a refined electroejaculation technique for chimeric rats using light gas anesthesia and a custom-made platform for sperm collection. PMID:23689457

  12. Electroejaculation of chimeric rats.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Marina R; Montonye, Daniel; Bryda, Elizabeth C

    2013-06-01

    With the advent of genetic engineering of rodents came the need to assess fertility and germline competency, especially in chimeric rodents generated using embryonic stem cells. Traditional methods rely on natural mating and progeny testing, which is time- and cost-intensive. Electroejaculation is a faster method of collecting sperm for genetic analysis and offers the additional benefit of using fewer animals. This column describes a refined electroejaculation technique for chimeric rats using light gas anesthesia and a custom-made platform for sperm collection. PMID:23689457

  13. Pharmacokinetics of Dietary Cancer Chemopreventive Compound Dibenzoylmethane in the Rats and Impacts of Nanoemulsion and Genetic knockout of Nrf2 on its Disposition

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wen; Hong, Jin-Liern; Shen, Guoxiang; Wu, Rachel T.; Wu, Yuwen; Huang, Mou-Tuan; Newmark, Harold L.; Huang, Qingrong; Khor, Tin Oo; Heimbach, Tycho; Kong, Ah-Ng

    2012-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic disposition of a dietary cancer chemopreventive compound dibenzoylmethane (DBM) was studied in male Sprague-Dawley rats after intravenous (i.v.) and oral (p.o.) administrations. Following a single i.v. bolus dose, the mean plasma clearance (CL) of DBM was low as compared to the hepatic blood flow. DBM displayed a high volume of distribution (Vss). The elimination terminal t1/2 was long. The mean CL, Vss and AUC0-∞/dose were similar between the i.v. 10 and 10 mg/kg doses. After single oral doses (10, 50, and 250 mg/kg), the absolute oral bioavailability (F*) of DBM was 7.4 to 13.6%. The increase in AUC was not proportional to the oral doses, suggesting non-linearity. In silico prediction of oral absorption also demonstrated low DBM absorption in vivo. An oil-in-water nanoemulsion containing DBM was formulated to potentially overcome low F* due to poor water solubility of DBM, with enhanced oral absorption. Finally, to examine the role of Nrf2 on the pharmacokinetics of DBM since DBM activates the Nrf2-dependent detoxification pathways, the Nrf2 wild-type (+/+) mice and Nrf2 knockout (−/−) mice were utilized. There was an increased systemic plasma exposure of DBM in Nrf2 (−/−) mice, suggesting that Nrf2 genotype could also play a role in the pharmacokinetic disposition of DBM. Taken together, our results show that DBM has low oral bioavailability which could be due in part to poor water-solubility and this could be overcome by nanotechnology-based drug delivery system and furthermore Nrf2 genotype could also play a role in the pharmacokinetics of DBM. PMID:21341276

  14. Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  15. Genetic counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000510.htm Genetic counseling To use the sharing features on this ... cystic fibrosis or Down syndrome. Who May Want Genetic Counseling? It is up to you whether or ...

  16. Genetic Mapping

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetic Education Resources for Teachers Genomic Careers National DNA Day Online Education Kit Online Genetics Education Resources ... prevalent. Using various laboratory techniques, the scientists isolate DNA from these samples and examine it for unique ...

  17. Genetic counseling

    MedlinePlus

    Genetics is the study of heredity, the process of a parent passing certain genes on to their ... certain diseases are also often determined by genes. Genetic counseling is the process where parents can learn ...

  18. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-01-01

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions. PMID:16800884

  19. Imaging Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  20. Genetic barcodes

    DOEpatents

    Weier, Heinz -Ulrich G

    2015-08-04

    Herein are described multicolor FISH probe sets termed "genetic barcodes" targeting several cancer or disease-related loci to assess gene rearrangements and copy number changes in tumor cells. Two, three or more different fluorophores are used to detect the genetic barcode sections thus permitting unique labeling and multilocus analysis in individual cell nuclei. Gene specific barcodes can be generated and combined to provide both numerical and structural genetic information for these and other pertinent disease associated genes.

  1. Genetic Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, John

    1973-01-01

    Presents a review of genetic engineering, in which the genotypes of plants and animals (including human genotypes) may be manipulated for the benefit of the human species. Discusses associated problems and solutions and provides an extensive bibliography of literature relating to genetic engineering. (JR)

  2. Struvite Urolithiasis in Long–Evans Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jassia; Borjeson, Tiffany M; Parry, Nicola MA; Fox, James G

    2015-01-01

    Struvite urinary calculi, which are composed of magnesium, ammonium, and phosphate, can cause complications including sepsis and renal failure. Struvite calculi were identified within the urinary bladder and renal pelvis of 2 Long-Evans rats that died within days after arrival from a commercial vendor. The remaining rats in the shipment were screened by physical examination, radiography, and ultrasonography, revealing an additional 2 animals that were clinically affected. These rats were euthanized, necropsied, and yielded similar findings to those from the first 2 rats. In addition, urine samples had an alkaline pH and contained numerous bacteria (predominantly Proteus mirabilis), leukocytes, and crystals. All calculi were composed completely of struvite. Another 7 rats in the shipment had alkaline urine with the presence of blood cells; 6 of these rats also had abundant struvite crystals, and P. mirabilis was cultured from the urine of 3 rats. Further investigation by the vendor identified 2 of 100 rats with struvite calculi from the same colony. Although no specific cause could be implicated, the fact that all the affected rats came from the same breeding area suggests a genetic or environmental triggering event; a contribution due to diet cannot be ruled out. Our findings suggest that the affected rats had metabolic disturbances coupled with bacterial infection that predisposed them to develop struvite calculi. During sudden increases of struvite urinary calculi cases in rats, urine cultures followed by appropriate surgical intervention and antibiotic therapy is warranted. Additional factors, including diet, merit attention as well. PMID:26678365

  3. Genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Fraser, F C

    1974-09-01

    A workshop was sponsored by the National Genetics Foundation to evaluate and make recommendations about the status of genetic counseling, its goals, nature, achievements, and needs. The process of genetic workup and counseling is divided into 5 stages: validation of the diagnosis; obtaining family history; estimation of the risk of recurrence; helping the family make a decision and take appropriate action; and extending counseling to other members of the family. Counseling can be directed at individuals or at special groups with the potential of carrying such diseases as sickle cell amenia or Tay-Sachs. No consensus exists on an optimal counseling approach. Genetic counseling is regarded as a team effort, requiring, in addition to the counselor, laboratory facilities and a variety of specialists. The source of payment for genetic counseling services is regarded as a problem of increasing concern. Generally, the fee paid rarely covers the cost of the many procedures and it is suggested that the cost, like that of other public health services, should be subsidized by the state. Considerable argument exists over whether a genetic counselor must have a M.D. degree or whether a Ph. D. in medical genetics is suitable enough. The quality of much genetic counseling, which is often done in the office of doctors unskilled in the field, would be increased if better training in genetics were offered to medical students and if physicians were informed of the existence of counseling centers. Further, there is a growing feeling that some sort of accreditation of genetic counselors is desirable. PMID:4609197

  4. RNA genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo, E. ); Holland, J.J. . Dept. of Biology); Ahlquist, P. . Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on RNA genetics: Retroviruses, Viroids, and RNA recombination, Volume 2. Topics covered include: Replication of retrovirus genomes, Hepatitis B virus replication, and Evolution of RNA viruses.

  5. Genetic Discrimination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicine Working Group New Horizons and Research Patient Management Policy and Ethics Issues Quick Links for Patient Care ... genetic discrimination. April 25, 2007, Statement of Administration Policy, Office of Management and Budget Official Statement from the Office of ...

  6. Arthropod Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zumwalde, Sharon

    2000-01-01

    Introduces an activity on arthropod genetics that involves phenotype and genotype identification of the creature and the construction process. Includes a list of required materials and directions to build a model arthropod. (YDS)

  7. Genetic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Wylie; Tarini, Beth; Press, Nancy A.; Evans, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Current approaches to genetic screening include newborn screening to identify infants who would benefit from early treatment, reproductive genetic screening to assist reproductive decision making, and family history assessment to identify individuals who would benefit from additional prevention measures. Although the traditional goal of screening is to identify early disease or risk in order to implement preventive therapy, genetic screening has always included an atypical element—information relevant to reproductive decisions. New technologies offer increasingly comprehensive identification of genetic conditions and susceptibilities. Tests based on these technologies are generating a different approach to screening that seeks to inform individuals about all of their genetic traits and susceptibilities for purposes that incorporate rapid diagnosis, family planning, and expediting of research, as well as the traditional screening goal of improving prevention. Use of these tests in population screening will increase the challenges already encountered in genetic screening programs, including false-positive and ambiguous test results, overdiagnosis, and incidental findings. Whether this approach is desirable requires further empiric research, but it also requires careful deliberation on the part of all concerned, including genomic researchers, clinicians, public health officials, health care payers, and especially those who will be the recipients of this novel screening approach. PMID:21709145

  8. Genetic screening

    PubMed Central

    Andermann, Anne; Blancquaert, Ingeborg

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To provide a primer for primary care professionals who are increasingly called upon to discuss the growing number of genetic screening services available and to help patients make informed decisions about whether to participate in genetic screening, how to interpret results, and which interventions are most appropriate. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE As part of a larger research program, a wide literature relating to genetic screening was reviewed. PubMed and Internet searches were conducted using broad search terms. Effort was also made to identify the gray literature. MAIN MESSAGE Genetic screening is a type of public health program that is systematically offered to a specified population of asymptomatic individuals with the aim of providing those identified as high risk with prevention, early treatment, or reproductive options. Ensuring an added benefit from screening, as compared with standard clinical care, and preventing unintended harms, such as undue anxiety or stigmatization, depends on the design and implementation of screening programs, including the recruitment methods, education and counseling provided, timing of screening, predictive value of tests, interventions available, and presence of oversight mechanisms and safeguards. There is therefore growing apprehension that economic interests might lead to a market-driven approach to introducing and expanding screening before program effectiveness, acceptability, and feasibility have been demonstrated. As with any medical intervention, there is a moral imperative for genetic screening to do more good than harm, not only from the perspective of individuals and families, but also for the target population and society as a whole. CONCLUSION Primary care professionals have an important role to play in helping their patients navigate the rapidly changing terrain of genetic screening services by informing them about the benefits and risks of new genetic and genomic technologies and empowering them to

  9. Analysis of vkorc1 polymorphisms in Norway rats using the roof rat as outgroup

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Certain mutations in the vitamin K epoxide reductase subcomponent 1 gene (vkorc1) mediate rodent resistance to warfarin and other anticoagulants. Testing for resistance often involves analysis of the vkorc1. However, a genetic test for the roof rat (Rattus rattus) has yet to be developed. Moreover, an available roof rat vkorc1 sequence would enable species identification based on vkorc1 sequence and the evaluation of natural selection on particular vkorc1 polymorphisms in the Norway rat (R. norvegicus). Results We report the coding sequence, introns and 5' and 3' termini for the vkorc1 gene of roof rats (R. r. alexandrinus and R. r. frugivorus) from Uganda, Africa. Newly designed PCR primers now enable genetic testing of the roof rat and Norway rat. Only synonymous and noncoding polymorphisms were found in roof rats from Uganda. Both nominal subspecies of roof rats were indistinguishable from each other but were distinct from R. losea and R. flavipectus; however, the roof rat also shares at least three coding sequence polymorphisms with R. losea and R. flavipectus. Many of recently published vkorc1 synonymous and non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Norway rats are likely SNPs from roof rats and/or other Rattus species. Tests applied to presumably genuine Norway rat vkorc1 SNPs are consistent with a role for selection in two populations carrying the derived Phe63Cys and Tyr139Cys mutations. Conclusion Geographic mapping of vkorc1 SNPs in roof rats should be facilitated by our report. Our assay should be applicable to most species of Rattus, which are intermediate in genetic distance from roof and Norway rats. Vkorc1-mediated resistance due to non-synonymous coding SNPs is not segregating in roof rats from Uganda. By using the roof rat sequence as a reference vkorc1, SNPs now can be assigned to the correct rat species with more confidence. Sampling designs and genotyping strategies employed so far have helped detect candidate mutations

  10. Specific Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Genetic Terms Definitions for genetic terms Specific Genetic Disorders Many human diseases have a genetic component. ... Condition in an Adult The Undiagnosed Diseases Program Genetic Disorders Achondroplasia Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Antiphospholipid Syndrome ...

  11. Genetic labeling of both the axons of transduced, glutamatergic neurons in rat postrhinal cortex and their postsynaptic neurons in other neocortical areas by Herpes Simplex Virus vectors that coexpress an axon-targeted ß-galactosidase and wheat germ agglutinin from a vesicular glutamate transporter-1 promoter

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-rong; Cao, Haiyan; Li, Xu; Zhao, Hua; Geller, Alfred I.

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal circuits comprise the foundation for neuronal physiology and synaptic plasticity, and thus for consequent behaviors and learning, but our knowledge of neocortical circuits is incomplete. Mapping neocortical circuits is a challenging problem because these circuits contain large numbers of neurons, a high density of synapses, and numerous classes and subclasses of neurons that form many different types of synapses. Expression of specific genetic tracers in small numbers of specific subclasses of neocortical neurons has potential to map neocortical circuits. Suitable genetic tracers have been established in neurons in subcortical areas, but application to neocortical circuits has been limited. Enabling this approach, Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) plasmid (amplicon) vectors can transduce small numbers of neurons in a specific neocortical area. Further, expression of a particular genetic tracer can be restricted to specific subclasses of neurons; in particular, the vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (VGLUT1) promoter supports expression in VGLUT1-containing glutamatergic neurons in rat postrhinal (POR) cortex. Here, we show that expression of an axon-targeted ß-galactosidase (ß-gal) from such vectors supports mapping specific commissural and associative projections of the transduced neurons in POR cortex. Further, coexpression of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and an axon-targeted ß-gal supports mapping both specific projections of the transduced neurons and identifying specific postsynaptic neurons for the transduced neurons. The neocortical circuit mapping capabilities developed here may support mapping specific neocortical circuits that have critical roles in cognitive learning. PMID:20849834

  12. Genetic Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  13. Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of pregnancy loss. How do I know which tests to have? Your health care provider or a genetic counselor can discuss all of the testing options with you and help you decide based on your individual risk factors. Do I have to have these tests? Whether you want to be tested is a ...

  14. Altered distribution and function of A2A adenosine receptors in the brain of WAG/Rij rats with genetic absence epilepsy, before and after appearance of the disease.

    PubMed

    D'Alimonte, Iolanda; D'Auro, Mariagrazia; Citraro, Rita; Biagioni, Francesca; Jiang, Shucui; Nargi, Eleonora; Buccella, Silvana; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Giuliani, Patricia; Ballerini, Patrizia; Caciagli, Francesco; Russo, Emilio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Ciccarelli, Renata

    2009-09-01

    The involvement of excitatory adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs), which probably contribute to the pathophysiology of convulsive seizures, has never been investigated in absence epilepsy. Here, we examined the distribution and function of A(2A)Rs in the brain of Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rats, a model of human absence epilepsy in which disease onset occurs 2-3 months after birth. In the cerebral areas that are mostly involved in the generation of absence seizures (somatosensory cortex, reticular and ventrobasal thalamic nuclei), A(2A)R density was lower in presymptomatic WAG/Rij rats than in control rats, as evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Accordingly, in cortical/thalamic slices prepared from the brain of these rats, A(2A)R stimulation with the agonist 2-[4-(-2-carboxyethyl)-phenylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamido-adenosine failed to modulate either cAMP formation, mitogen-activated protein kinase system, or K(+)-evoked glutamate release. In contrast, A(2A)R expression, signalling and function were significantly enhanced in brain slices from epileptic WAG/Rij rats as compared with matched control animals. Additionally, the in vivo injection of the A(2A)R agonist CGS21680, or the antagonist 5-amino-7-(2-phenylethyl)-2-(2-fuyl)-pyrazolo-(4,3-c)1,2,4-triazolo(1,5-c)-pyrimidine, in the examined brain areas of epileptic rats, increased and decreased, respectively, the number/duration of recorded spontaneous spike-wave discharges in a dose-dependent manner during a 1-5 h post-treatment period. Our results support the hypothesis that alteration of excitatory A(2A)R is involved in the pathogenesis of absence seizures and might represent a new interesting target for the therapeutic management of this disease. PMID:19723291

  15. Rapid genetic restoration of a keystone species exhibiting delayed demographic response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic founder effects are often expected when animals colonize restored habitat in fragmented landscapes, but empirical data on genetic responses to restoration are limited. We examined the genetic response of banner-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis) to landscape-scale grassland restor...

  16. Cancer Genetics Services Directory

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview–for health professionals Research NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory This directory lists professionals who provide services related to cancer genetics (cancer risk assessment, genetic ...

  17. Morphological deficits in noradrenergic neurons in GEPR-9s stem from abnormalities in both the locus coeruleus and its target tissues.

    PubMed

    Ryu, J R; Jobe, P C; Milbrandt, J C; Mishra, P K; Clough, R W; Browning, R A; Dailey, J W; Seo, D O; Ko, K H

    1999-03-01

    The epileptic condition of the genetically epilepsy-prone rat (GEPR) appears to be caused partially by deficiencies in the locus coeruleus (LC) innervation of the superior colliculus (SC). Previous studies provide quantitative documentation of noradrenergic morphological deficits in the moderately epileptic GEPR-3. The present findings extend these studies by applying cell culture methodology to assessments of the severely epileptic GEPR-9. Our data show that total neurite length, the number of neurite branch points per cell, the cross-sectional area of cell bodies, and the cell perimeter are deficient in noradrenergic neurons in LC + SC cocultures derived exclusively from GEPR-9s compared to analogous cocultures obtained solely from nonepileptic control rats. Partial restoration of LC neuron morphology toward normal occurs when the GEPR-9 SC component of the coculture is replaced with nonepileptic control SC. Finally, when the GEPR-9 SC is cocultured with the control LC, a partial morphological deficit occurs in the otherwise normal noradrenergic neurons. However, the magnitude of this deficit is less than that observed in noradrenergic neurons of the GEPR-9 LC cocultured with the control SC. These data support the hypothesis that the developmental deficiencies of noradrenergic neurons of the GEPR-9 are derived from two sources, the LC and its target tissue, in this case, the SC. Also, intrinsic abnormalities of the LC appear to make a more pronounced contribution to the noradrenergic deficits than do those which reside in the SC. PMID:10192779

  18. Human genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    This text provides full and balanced coverage of the concepts requisite for a thorough understanding of human genetics. Applications to both the individual and society are integrated throughout the lively and personal narrative, and the essential principles of heredity are clearly presented to prepare students for informed participation in public controversies. High-interest, controversial topics, including recombinant DNA technology, oncogenes, embryo transfer, environmental mutagens and carcinogens, IQ testing, and eugenics encourage understanding of important social issues.

  19. Hepatitis E virus genotype 3 in wild rats, United States.

    PubMed

    Lack, Justin B; Volk, Kylie; Van Den Bussche, Ronald A

    2012-08-01

    The role of rodents in the epidemiology of zoonotic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has been a subject of considerable debate. Seroprevalence studies suggest widespread HEV infection in commensal Rattus spp. rats, but experimental transmission has been largely unsuccessful and recovery of zoonotic genotype 3 HEV RNA from wild Rattus spp. rats has never been confirmed. We surveyed R. rattus and R. norvegicus rats from across the United States and several international populations by using a hemi-nested reverse transcription PCR approach. We isolated HEV RNA in liver tissues from 35 of 446 rats examined. All but 1 of these isolates was relegated to the zoonotic HEV genotype 3, and the remaining sequence represented the recently discovered rat genotype from the United States and Germany. HEV-positive rats were detected in urban and remote localities. Genetic analyses suggest all HEV genotype 3 isolates obtained from wild Rattus spp. rats were closely related. PMID:22840202

  20. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in Wild Rats, United States

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Kylie; Van Den Bussche, Ronald A.

    2012-01-01

    The role of rodents in the epidemiology of zoonotic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has been a subject of considerable debate. Seroprevalence studies suggest widespread HEV infection in commensal Rattus spp. rats, but experimental transmission has been largely unsuccessful and recovery of zoonotic genotype 3 HEV RNA from wild Rattus spp. rats has never been confirmed. We surveyed R. rattus and R. norvegicus rats from across the United States and several international populations by using a hemi-nested reverse transcription PCR approach. We isolated HEV RNA in liver tissues from 35 of 446 rats examined. All but 1 of these isolates was relegated to the zoonotic HEV genotype 3, and the remaining sequence represented the recently discovered rat genotype from the United States and Germany. HEV-positive rats were detected in urban and remote localities. Genetic analyses suggest all HEV genotype 3 isolates obtained from wild Rattus spp. rats were closely related. PMID:22840202

  1. Mitochondrial genetics

    PubMed Central

    Chinnery, Patrick Francis; Hudson, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In the last 10 years the field of mitochondrial genetics has widened, shifting the focus from rare sporadic, metabolic disease to the effects of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in a growing spectrum of human disease. The aim of this review is to guide the reader through some key concepts regarding mitochondria before introducing both classic and emerging mitochondrial disorders. Sources of data In this article, a review of the current mitochondrial genetics literature was conducted using PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/). In addition, this review makes use of a growing number of publically available databases including MITOMAP, a human mitochondrial genome database (www.mitomap.org), the Human DNA polymerase Gamma Mutation Database (http://tools.niehs.nih.gov/polg/) and PhyloTree.org (www.phylotree.org), a repository of global mtDNA variation. Areas of agreement The disruption in cellular energy, resulting from defects in mtDNA or defects in the nuclear-encoded genes responsible for mitochondrial maintenance, manifests in a growing number of human diseases. Areas of controversy The exact mechanisms which govern the inheritance of mtDNA are hotly debated. Growing points Although still in the early stages, the development of in vitro genetic manipulation could see an end to the inheritance of the most severe mtDNA disease. PMID:23704099

  2. Genetic Testing (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Genetic Testing KidsHealth > For Parents > Genetic Testing Print A ... blood, skin, bone, or other tissue is needed. Genetic Testing During Pregnancy For genetic testing before birth, ...

  3. Cancer Genetics Services Directory

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Overview–for health professionals Research NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory This directory lists professionals who provide services related to cancer genetics (cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling, genetic susceptibility testing, ...

  4. Genetically engineered foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants or animals) inserted into their genetic codes. Genetic engineering can be done with plants, animals, or bacteria ... have been genetically engineering plants since the 1990s. Genetic engineering allows scientists to speed this process up by ...

  5. Transgenic hepatocarcinogenesis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Hully, J. R.; Su, Y.; Lohse, J. K.; Griep, A. E.; Sattler, C. A.; Haas, M. J.; Dragan, Y.; Peterson, J.; Neveu, M.; Pitot, H. C.

    1994-01-01

    Although transgenic hepatocarcinogenesis has been accomplished in the mouse with a number of genetic constructs targeting the oncogene to expression primarily in the liver, no example of this process has yet been developed in the rat. Because our understanding of the multistage nature of hepatocarcinogenesis is most advanced in the rat, we have developed a strain of transgenic rats carrying the promoter-enhancer sequences of the mouse albumin gene linked 5' to the simian virus-40 T antigen gene. A line of transgenic rats bearing this transgene has been developed from a single founder female. Five to six copies of the transgene, possibly in tandem, occur within the genome of the transgenic animals, which are maintained by heterozygous matings. Livers of transgenic animals are histologically normal after weaning; at 2 months of age, small foci of vacuolated cells appear in this organ. By 4 months of age, all animals exhibit focal lesions and nodules consisting primarily of small basophilic cells, many of which exhibit considerable cytoplasmic vacuolization. Mating of animals each bearing the transgene results in rats with a demyelinating condition that develops acutely in pregnant females and more chronically in males. Ultrastructural studies of these cells indicate that the vacuoles contain substantial amounts of glycogen, with the cells resembling hepatoblasts. Malignant neoplasms with both a glandular and a hepatoblastoma/hepatocellular carcinoma pattern arise from the nodules. Enzyme and immunohistochemical studies of all lesions reveal many similarities in gene expression to comparable lesions in rats subjected to chemically induced hepatocarcinogenesis, with certain exceptions. The placental form of glutathione-S-transferase is absent from all lesions in the transgenic animal, as is the expression of connexin 32. A significant number of lesions express serum albumin, and many, but not all, exhibit the T antigen. Lesions expressing the T antigen also contain

  6. Candidate genes for hypertension: insights from the Dahl S rat.

    PubMed

    Rudemiller, Nathan P; Mattson, David L

    2015-12-15

    Human genetic linkage and association studies have nominated many genes as possible contributors to disease. Mutating or deleting these genes in a relevant disease model can validate their association with disease and potentially uncover novel mechanisms of pathogenesis. Targeted genetic mutagenesis has only recently been developed in the rat, and this technique has been applied in the Dahl salt-sensitive (S) rat to investigate human candidate genes associated with hypertension. This mini-review communicates the findings of these studies and displays how targeted genetic mutagenesis may contribute to the discovery of novel therapies for patients. PMID:25877508

  7. Genetic diversity within and between natural populations of Rattus norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Cramer, D V; Chakravarti, A; Arenas, O; Humprieres, J; Mowery, P A

    1988-01-01

    The levels of gene diversity for 17 polymorphic loci in natural populations of wild rats were examined for three separate locations in North and South America. The level of gene diversity in the total sample for the RT1.A locus, the dominant class I histocompatibility locus in the major histocompatibility (RT1) complex of the rat, was 0.807. The degree of gene diversity for nonalloantigenic loci scattered throughout the rat genome was 0.215, a level comparable to, if not slightly higher than, that for other mammalian species. The large and consistent levels of diversity for individuals within each population suggest that significant deviations from random mating have occurred within each group. Conclusions from analyzing genetic distance and the index of genetic differentiation between the three populations are consistent with these populations' geographic isolation and small effective population size. Assuming that the separation of the North and South American groups has existed for approximately 300 years, the effective size of these populations is estimated to be approximately 1,500 individuals. Apparent differences in the distribution of the number and frequency of alleles in the major histocompatibility complexes of mice and rats and the level of genetic differentiation among separate rat populations may be due to the effects of genetic drift in small populations. PMID:3183358

  8. Genetic risks and genetic model specification.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Gang; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jinfeng; Yuan, Ao; Li, Qizhai; Gastwirth, Joseph L

    2016-08-21

    Genetic risks and genetic models are often used in design and analysis of genetic epidemiology studies. A genetic model is defined in terms of two genetic risk measures: genotype relative risk and odds ratio. The impacts of choosing a risk measure on the resulting genetic models are studied in the power to detect association and deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in cases using genetic relative risk. Extensive simulations demonstrate that the power of a study to detect associations using odds ratio is lower than that using relative risk with the same value when other parameters are fixed. When the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium holds in the general population, the genetic model can be inferred by the deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in only cases. Furthermore, it is more efficient than that based on the deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in all cases and controls. PMID:27181372

  9. Medical genetics and genetic counseling in Chile.

    PubMed

    Margarit, Sonia B; Alvarado, Mónica; Alvarez, Karin; Lay-Son, Guillermo

    2013-12-01

    In the South American Republic of Chile genetic counseling is not currently recognized as an independent clinical discipline, and in general is provided by physicians with training in clinical genetics. At present only one genetic counselor and 28 clinical geneticists practice in this country of over 16 million inhabitants. Pediatric dysmorphology constitutes the primary area of practice in clinical genetics. Although the country has a universal health care system and an adequate level of health care, genetic conditions are not considered a health care priority and there is a lack of clinical and laboratory resources designated for clinical genetics services. Multiple educational, cultural and financial barriers exist to the growth and development of genetic counseling services in Chile. However, during the last 10 years increased awareness of the importance of identifying individuals at risk for inherited cancer syndromes led to growing interest in the practice of cancer genetics. PMID:23744184

  10. Genetic Differences in Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intellect, 1977

    1977-01-01

    The Genetics Society of America has released a statement saying that the possibility of a "genetic difference in intelligence between races" is still an open question and warning against "the misuse of genetics for political purposes". (Editor)

  11. Genetic Testing for ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Involved Donate Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (FALS) and Genetic Testing By Deborah Hartzfeld, MS, CGC, Certified Genetic ... guarantee a person will develop symptoms of ALS. Genetic Counseling If there is more than one person ...

  12. Applying the New Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorenson, James

    1976-01-01

    New developments in the prediction and treatment of genetic diseases are presented. Genetic counseling and the role of the counselor, and rights of individuals to reproduce versus societal impact of genetic disorders, are discussed. (RW)

  13. Rats! Oh No, Not Rats!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Gary E.

    1987-01-01

    Examples of problems encountered in a new library building--including rats and humidity--and a description of the library's collections provide a framework for this presentation of the California State Library's emergency management planning. Current preservation efforts are documented and the library's disaster and security plans are described.…

  14. Obesity-resistant S5B rats showed great cocaine conditioned place preference than the obesity-prone OM rats

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, P.K.; Wang, G.; Thanos, P.K..; Kim, R.; Cho, J.; Michaelides, M.; Anderson, B.J.; Primeaux, S.D.; Bray, G.A.; Wang, G.-J.; Robinson, J.K.; Volkow, N.D.

    2010-12-01

    Dopamine (DA) and the DA D2 receptor (D2R) are involved in the rewarding and conditioned responses to food and drug rewards. Osborne-Mendel (OM) rats are genetically prone and S5B/P rats are genetically resistant to obesity when fed a high-fat diet. We hypothesized that the differential sensitivity of these two rat strains to natural rewards may also be reflected in sensitivity to drugs of abuse. Therefore, we tested whether OM and S5B/P rats showed a differential preference to cocaine using conditioned place preference (CPP). To also evaluate whether there is specific involvement of the D2R in this differential conditioning sensitivity, we then tested whether the D2R agonist bromocriptine (BC) would differentially affect the effects of cocaine in the two strains. OM and S5B/P rats were conditioned with cocaine (5 or 10 mg/kg) in one chamber and saline in another for 8 days. Rats were then tested for cocaine preference. The effects of BC (0.5, 1, 5, 10, 20 mg/kg) on cocaine preference were then assessed in subsequent test sessions. OM rats did not show a significant preference for the cocaine-paired chamber on test day. Only the S5B/P rats showed cocaine CPP. Later treatment with only the highest dose of BC resulted in reduced cocaine CPP in S5B/P rats when treated with 5 mg/kg cocaine and in OM rats treated with 10 mg/kg cocaine. Our results indicated that obesity-resistant S5B rats showed greater cocaine CPP than the obesity-prone OM rats. These findings do not support a theory of common vulnerability for reinforcer preferences (food and cocaine). However, they show that BC reduced cocaine conditioning effects supporting at least a partial regulatory role of D2R in conditioned responses to drugs.

  15. The rat as an animal model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Kloskowska, Ewa; Winblad, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    As a disease model, the laboratory rat has contributed enormously to neuroscience research over the years. It has also been a popular animal model for Alzheimer’s disease but its popularity has diminished during the last decade, as techniques for genetic manipulation in rats have lagged behind that of mice. In recent years, the rat has been making a comeback as an Alzheimer’s disease model and the appearance of increasing numbers of transgenic rats will be a welcome and valuable complement to the existing mouse models. This review summarizes the contributions and current status of the rat as an animal model of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:19432812

  16. EXPRESSION PROFILING OF FIVE RAT STRAINS REVEAL TRANSCRIPTIONAL MODES IN THE ANTIGEN PROCESSING PATHWAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative gene expression profiling of rat strains with genetic predisposition to diverse cardiovascular diseases can help decode the transcriptional program that governs cellular behavior. We hypothesized that co-transcribed, intra-pathway, functionally coherent genes can be r...

  17. Pulmonary Transcriptional Response to Ozone in Healthy and Cardiovascular Compromised Rat Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The genetic cardiovascular disease (CVD) and associated metabolic impairments can influence the lung injury from inhaled pollutants. We hypothesized that comparative assessment of global pulmonary expression profile of healthy and CVD-prone rat models will provide mechanistic ins...

  18. The Genetics of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lazzaro, Brian P.; Schneider, David S.

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, Brian P. Lazzaro and David S. Schneider examine the topic of the Genetics of Immunity as explored in this month's issues of GENETICS and G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics. These inaugural articles are part of a joint Genetics of Immunity collection (ongoing) in the GSA journals. PMID:24939182

  19. Interactive Genetics Tutorial Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    The Interactive Genetics Tutorial (IGT) project and the Intelligent Tutoring System for the IGT project named MENDEL supplement genetics instruction in biology courses by providing students with experience in designing, conducting, and evaluating genetics experiments. The MENDEL software is designed to: (1) simulate genetics experiments that…

  20. GENETIC RELATIONSHIPS AMONG FERTILITY TRAITS OF HOLSTEINS AND JERSEYS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy Herd Improvement data with service dates from 2,195,643 Holstein and 171,981 Jersey sire-identified lactations from 1995 through 2000 were used to assess genetic variation in and relationships among fertility traits: days to first service (D1), days to last reported service (DL), nonreturn rat...

  1. How Are Genetic Conditions Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consultation How are genetic conditions diagnosed? How are genetic conditions diagnosed? A doctor may suspect a diagnosis ... and advocacy resources. For more information about diagnosing genetic conditions: Genetics Home Reference provides information about genetic ...

  2. Update: Biochemistry of Genetic Manipulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    Various topics on the biochemistry of genetic manipulation are discussed. These include genetic transformation and DNA; genetic expression; DNA replication, repair, and mutation; technology of genetic manipulation; and applications of genetic manipulation. Other techniques employed are also considered. (JN)

  3. Differential strain vulnerability to binge eating behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Britny A; Klump, Kelly L; Racine, Sarah E; Sisk, Cheryl L

    2014-03-29

    Binge eating is a significantly heritable phenotype, but efforts to detect specific risk genes have fallen short. Identification of animal strain differences in risk for binge eating could highlight genetic differences across individuals of the same species that can be exploited in future animal and molecular genetic research. The current study aimed to explore strain differences in risk for binge eating in Sprague-Dawley versus Wistar female rats using the Binge Eating Resistant/Binge Eating Prone model. A sample of male Sprague-Dawley rats, a known low-risk group for binge eating, was included as a comparison group. A total of 83 rats (23 Wistar females, 30 Sprague-Dawley females, 30 Sprague-Dawley males) completed a protocol of intermittently administered, palatable food. Binge eating prone (BEP) and binge eating resistant (BER) rats were identified using a tertile approach. Sprague-Dawley female rats consumed the highest amount of palatable food and were more likely to be classified as BEP compared to Wistar female and Sprague-Dawley male rats. Wistar female rats were not significantly different from Sprague-Dawley male rats in their palatable food intake and tendency to be classified as BER rather than BEP. Sprague-Dawley female rats appear to be a particularly vulnerable genotype for binge eating. Comparisons between this group and others could help identify specific genetic/biological factors that differentiate it from lower risk groups. The reward system, linked to binge eating in humans, is a possible candidate to explore. Strain differences in the reward system could help increase understanding of individual differences in risk for binge eating in humans. PMID:24480076

  4. The local effect of octreotide on mechanical pain sensitivity is more sensitive in DA rats than DA.1U rats.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fan-Rong; Wang, Hui-Sheng; Guo, Yuan; Zhao, Yan

    2016-02-01

    A recent study by the authors indicated that major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are associated with the differences in basal pain sensitivity and in formalin model between Dark-Agouti (DA) and novel congenic DA.1U rats, which have the same genetic background as DA rats except for the u alleles of MHC. The objective of the present study is to investigate whether there is a difference in the pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) model and local analgesic effect of octreotide (OCT) between DA and DA.1U rats. The hindpaw mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) and heat withdrawal latency (HWL) were observed. The C unit firings of the tibial nerve evoked by non-noxious and noxious toe movements were recorded by electrophysiological methods in normal and PIA models in DA and DA.1U rats before and after local OCT administration. The expression of somatostatin receptor 2A (SSTR2A) was observed by immunohistochemistry. The results demonstrate that DA rats have a higher mechanical sensitivity than DA.1U rats after PIA. Local OCT administration significantly elevated MWT in DA rats under normal and PIA sate, but not in DA.1U rats. The electrophysiological experiments showed OCT significantly attenuated the firings of C units evoked by non-noxious and noxious stimulation in DA rats more than those in DA.1U rats both in normal and PIA states. In addition, the expression of SSTR2A in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord was significantly higher in DA than in DA.1U rats. All of the findings suggest a higher local analgesic effect of OCT in DA rats than DA.1U rats, which might be associated with the MHC genes. PMID:26606866

  5. Genomes and phenomes of a population of outbred rats and its progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Baud, Amelie; Guryev, Victor; Hummel, Oliver; Johannesson, Martina; Baud, Amelie; Guryev, Victor; Hummel, Oliver; Johannesson, Martina; Hermsen, Roel; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H; Koller, Daniel L; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S; Aitman, Tim J; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan; Flint, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Finding genetic variants that contribute to phenotypic variation is one of the main challenges of modern genetics. We used an outbred population of rats (Heterogeneous Stock, HS) in a combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis to identify sequence variants and genes contributing to complex traits of biomedical relevance. Here we describe the sequences of the eight inbred progenitors of the HS and the variants that segregate between them. We report the genotyping of 1,407 HS rats, and the collection from 2,006 rats of 195 phenotypic measures that are relevant to models of anxiety, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and osteoporosis. We make available haplotype dosages for the 1,407 genotyped rats, since genetic mapping in the HS is best carried out by reconstructing each HS chromosome as a mosaic of the progenitor genomes. Finally, we have deposited an R object that makes it easy to incorporate our sequence data into any genetic study of HS rats. Our genetic data are available for both Rnor3.4 and Rnor5.0 rat assemblies. PMID:25977769

  6. Genomes and phenomes of a population of outbred rats and its progenitors.

    PubMed

    Baud, Amelie; Guryev, Victor; Hummel, Oliver; Johannesson, Martina; Flint, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Finding genetic variants that contribute to phenotypic variation is one of the main challenges of modern genetics. We used an outbred population of rats (Heterogeneous Stock, HS) in a combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis to identify sequence variants and genes contributing to complex traits of biomedical relevance. Here we describe the sequences of the eight inbred progenitors of the HS and the variants that segregate between them. We report the genotyping of 1,407 HS rats, and the collection from 2,006 rats of 195 phenotypic measures that are relevant to models of anxiety, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and osteoporosis. We make available haplotype dosages for the 1,407 genotyped rats, since genetic mapping in the HS is best carried out by reconstructing each HS chromosome as a mosaic of the progenitor genomes. Finally, we have deposited an R object that makes it easy to incorporate our sequence data into any genetic study of HS rats. Our genetic data are available for both Rnor3.4 and Rnor5.0 rat assemblies. PMID:25977769

  7. Promising future for the transgenic rat in transplantation research.

    PubMed

    Doorschodt, B M; Teubner, A; Kobayashi, E; Tolba, R H

    2014-10-01

    The rat is the most widely used animal species in surgical research and offers distinct advantages over the mouse in transplantation models due to its size and close genetic similarity to humans. Sequencing of the rat genome and successful application of transgenic technologies which had only been available for mice have since led to a resurgence of the use of rat models. Transplantation provides the possibility to deliver transgenes through a variety of routes which can potentially offer treatment modalities for post-transplant dysfunction and rejection. Moreover, the use of genetically encoded fluorescent light probes has enabled in vivo visualization of organs and tissue in living animals. In recent years, generation of gene knockout rats via the zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) and transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) technologies has offered alternatives to the sophisticated embryonic stem cell based gene-targeting. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of transplantation studies involving transgenic techniques using rat models and recent advances in methods to modify the rat genome. Through novel gene modification techniques, precise, complete and conditional knockout and knockin rat models have become available which can provide promising new treatment options and opportunities for studying human transplant-related pathophysiology. PMID:24975516

  8. Air puff-induced 22-kHz calls in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Hideaki; Sato, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Air puff-induced ultrasonic vocalizations in adult rats, termed "22-kHz calls," have been applied as a useful animal model to develop psychoneurological and psychopharmacological studies focusing on human aversive affective disorders. To date, all previous studies on air puff-induced 22-kHz calls have used outbred rats. Furthermore, newly developed gene targeting technologies, which are essential for further advancement of biomedical experiments using air puff-induced 22-kHz calls, have enabled the production of genetically modified rats using inbred rat strains. Therefore, we considered it necessary to assess air puff-induced 22-kHz calls in inbred rats. In this study, we assessed differences in air puff-induced 22-kHz calls between inbred F344 rats and outbred Wistar rats. Male F344 rats displayed similar total (summed) duration of air puff-induced 22 kHz vocalizations to that of male Wistar rats, however, Wistar rats emitted fewer calls of longer duration, while F344 rats emitted higher number of vocalizations of shorter duration. Additionally, female F344 rats emitted fewer air puff-induced 22-kHz calls than did males, thus confirming the existence of a sex difference that was previously reported for outbred Wistar rats. The results of this study could confirm the reliability of air puff stimulus for induction of a similar amount of emissions of 22-kHz calls in different rat strains, enabling the use of air puff-induced 22-kHz calls in inbred F344 rats and derived genetically modified animals in future studies concerning human aversive affective disorders. PMID:26723270

  9. Global genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Elahe; Kumm, Jochen; Ronaghi, Mostafa

    2004-01-31

    The introduction of molecular markers in genetic analysis has revolutionized medicine. These molecular markers are genetic variations associated with a predisposition to common diseases and individual variations in drug responses. Identification and genotyping a vast number of genetic polymorphisms in large populations are increasingly important for disease gene identification, pharmacogenetics and population-based studies. Among variations being analyzed, single nucleotide polymorphisms seem to be most useful in large-scale genetic analysis. This review discusses approaches for genetic analysis, use of different markers, and emerging technologies for large-scale genetic analysis where millions of genotyping need to be performed. PMID:14761299

  10. [Advances in genetic modification technologies].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baixue; Sun, Qixin; Li, Haifeng

    2015-08-01

    Genetic modification technology is a new molecular tool for targeted genome modification. It includes zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) technology, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) technology and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated (Cas) (CRISPR-Cas) nucleases technology. All of these nucleases create DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) at chromosomal targeted sites and induce cell endogenous mechanisms that are primarily repaired by the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) pathway, resulting in targeted endogenous gene knock-out or exogenous gene insertion. In recent years, genetic modification technologies have been successfully applied to bacteria, yeast, human cells, fruit fly, zebra fish, mouse, rat, livestock, cynomolgus monkey, Arabidopsis, rice, tobacco, maize, sorghum, wheat, barley and other organisms, showing its enormous advantage in gene editing field. Especially, the newly developed CRISPR-Cas9 system arose more attention because of its low cost, high effectiveness, simplicity and easiness. We reviewed the principles and the latest research progress of these three technologies, as well as prospect of future research and applications. PMID:26762038